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Full text of "History of Boone County, Iowa"

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HISTORY OF 

BOONE COUNTY 

IOWA 

ILLUSTRATED 



VOLUME 



CHICAGO 

PIONEER PUBLISHING COMPANY 

1914 



■fHE NEW YORK 
LIBRARY 

#u4505 

ASTOR, LENOX AND 

TILDtN FOUNDATIONS 

R 1915 L 



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.5^°': 






BIOGRAPHICAL 



HON. CHARLES JOHN ALFRED ERICSON. 

America is often spoken of as the land of opportunity. That it is so is a 
fact which finds proof in the history of such men as the Hon. Charles John 
Alfred Ericson, men whose privileges in early life were limited, but who found 
in the conditions of the new world the chance to work upward. While success 
came to Mr. Ericson in large measure, the attainment of wealth was never the 
ultimate aim of his life and as he prospered he gave freely of his means for 
the benefit of his fellowmen, for the upbuilding of schools and the dissemination 
of knowledge in various other ways. Few have recognized more fully the duties 
and obligations of the individual toward his fellows, and the news of his demise 
carried with it a sense of personal bereavement to the great majority of his 
fellow citizens in Boone county and among his colleagues in the state senate. 

Mr. Ericson was born March 8, 1840, in Sodra \T parish, near Vimmerbi, 
province of Calmar, Sweden. His father, Erik Nilson, was born August 2, 1804, 
and his wife, Catherine Clemetson Nilson, was born October 9, 1803. They 
had three children: Nils P. Peterson, who was born in 1825 and who, learning 
the paper manufacturer's trade, adopted the name of his employer as was the 
custom of that time: Gustaf Adolf, born in 1829; and Charles John Alfred, born 
March 8, 1840. The father was a farmer and freeholder in his native province, 
where he remained until 1852, when he came with his family to the new world, 
settling near Moline, Illinois, where he engaged in farming and fishing, as he had 
done in Sweden. Subsequently he removed to Webster county, Iowa. 

Charles John Alfred Ericson was a youth of twelve years when the family 
came to the United States and his education, begim in Sweden, was continued 
in the public schools of Rock Island county, Illinois. It was in 1845 that the 
first Swedish immigrants left Calmar for the new world, and in 1849 S. P. Sven- 
son, an uncle of Mr. Ericson, became a resident of New Sweden, Jefiferson 
county, Iowa. The following year another uncle, O. Clemetson, took up his 
abode at Andover, Henry county, Illinois, and both wrote glowing accounts of 
the opportunities on this side of the Atlantic. The father, Erik Nilson, was further 
induced to come to America by the reports sent back by his two sons, Gustaf A. 
and N. P., who had settled near Moline. As stated heretofore, the father with 
his family made the long voyage, bidding adieu to home and friends on the 4th 
of April, 1852. They crossed the Atlantic in one of the oldtime ships, on which 
were one hundred and fifty immigrants. They were to pay twenty dollars 



6 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

passage for each member of the party and furnish their own food. The fresh 
water was carried in huge wooden casks and every morning about a iiuart was 
measured out to each person. They came in sight of New York on the 19th of 
July. One of the first experiences of Mr. Ericson was getting lost in New York. 
He and his father, with others from the ship, started out to see the city. At 
length, attracted by the music of a brass band, they followed on and on. thinking 
to remember the turning points in their course by certain signs, such as a lion 
and gilded clock, but they found that they could not make their way back to the 
ship and wandered around for hours. At length a kind-hearted man, understand- 
ing something of their dilemma, led them to one who could speak their language 
and within fifteen minutes they had been escorted back to their ship — tired and 
weary, for they had walked miles in linsey-woolsey clothing on a hot July day 
without anything to eat. The next morning the family proceeded up the Hudson 
river to Albany and thence went by rail to Bufl:'alo, where they boarded a 
steamer bound for Dunkirk. From that point they continued by rail on to 
Chicago and by a canal-boat went to Peru, Illinois, where they hired teams to 
take them to Andover, twenty miles from Rock Island, where they found the 
first Swedish settlement. The trip, especially across the country, was a very hard 
one and it was not until the ist of August. 1852, that they reached their destina- 
tion near Moline, joining there the two elder brothers of Charles J. A. Ericson. 

For a few years thereafter the last named worked for his brothers and relates 
that his first lesson in English was to repeat, when sent on an errand to a neigh- 
bor, "Mr. Ericson sent me here to get your spade." He was afterward taught to 
drive three yoke of oxen to a breaking-plow and for two seasons he operated a 
ferry-boat across Rock river and also worked on a farm. He was afterward 
employed to run a stationary engine in a sawmill and flour mill and still later 
clerked in a store in Altona, Illinois. A brother, who had previously removed to 
this state, advised him to come to Iowa, which advice he followed. He was at 
that time in possession of about four hundred dollars saved from his earnings, 
and this he invested in a stock of general merchandise, which he opened at 
Mineral Ridge, Boone county. The wholesale merchants with whom he first 
dealt, unasked by him, offered him credit, recognizing in his face the stamp of 
honesty, which was current coin with him throughout life. In time his busi- 
ness at Mineral Ridge grew and further activities were manifest in service as post- 
master at that town. In 1870 he removed to Boone and for some time continued 
merchandising, building up the largest business at that time in the county. In 
1872 he assisted in organizing the First National Bank of Boone, of which he was 
elected vice president, and upon closing out his store in 1875, he became cashier 
of the bank, which surrendered its charter and was reorganized as the City Bank 
of Roone in 1878. Later he succeeded to the presidency of the institution and 
so continued until his death. He deserved great credit for what he accomplished 
in a business way. On one occasion he said, "What little success I have attained 
I attribute to three things ; first, honest and fair dealings with every man ; second, 
refraining from speculations and investments in outside enterprises, but attend- 
ing strictly to my own business : and, third, making my word as good as my bond." 
These rules which he laid down for himself were strictly adhered to and no one 
ever questioned the integrity of his motives and on no occasion did he ever attempt 
to over-reach another in a business transaction. His prosperity was the direct 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 7 

and merited reward of liis labors, and his entire business career proved the fact 
that success and an honored name may be won simuUaneously. 

Aside from his lousiness, there were many interesting features in the life 
■ record of ^Mr. Ericson. He was married twice. In 1858 he wedded Miss 
Matilda Nelson, and they became parents of two daughters, Alice and Lorena. 
In 1873 he \tas united in marriage to Miss Nellie Linderblood, who died in 1899. 
He had pleasant fraternal relations with his brother Masons, holding member- 
ship in Mount Olive Lodge, No. 79, A. F. & A. M. ; Tuscan Chapter, R. A. M.; 
and Excalibur Commandery, No. 13, K. T. ; in all of which he held prominent 
offices, serving as treasurer of the Commandery from the early period of his 
residence in lioone until his death. 

It was his i)olitical career that perhaps won Mr. Ericson widest fame, yet who 
can say upon what line his life reached out in greatest helpfulness, for he assisted 
many philanthropic and public projects, was a friend to the poor and needy and 
gave hearty cooperation to many plans and projects for the public good. 

The first office which ^Ir. Ericson held was that of i^ostmaster of Mineral 
Ridge, and he also served in other local jjositions, including that of road super- 
visor, school director, school treasurer and township clerk. After his removal 
to Boone he was elected to represent his ward in the city council, was elected for 
several terms to the office of city treasurer and was president and treasurer of 
the school board. 

In 1871 higher political honors came to him in his election on the republican 
ticket to the fourteenth general assemblw in which he served during the regular 
session and through one extra session, which was called in 1873 to revise the code. 
Twentv-four vears later, while a member of the senate, he also rendered aid in 
code revision. In 1895 he was elected senator, serving through six regular sessions 
and one extra session. He did important committee work as a member of the 
ways and means committee and as chairman of the committee on claims in the 
twentv-sixth and twent)-seventh general assemblies. He was later made chair- 
man of the committee on public libraries and in the thirty-second general assembly 
he was chairman of constitutional amendments and suffrage. During the last 
three sessions he served on the committee on banks. Many tangible evidences 
of his public spirit may be cited. It was he who introduced and secured the 
passage of the bill, whereby corporations are taxed twenty-five dollars for the 
first thousand of capital stock and an additional dollar for each one thousand 
thereafter; not, however, to exceed three hundred and fifty dollars for any one 
corporation. In the twenty-seventh general assembly he introduced a bill reduc- 
ing the interest on state warrants from six to five per cent. His efforts, however, 
concentrated largely upon the development and support of the historical depart- 
ment, public libraries and the Agricultural College through legislative enactment. 
He introduced the bill for the establishment of good roads, becoming a pioneer 
in inaugurating that movement. Twice he introduced bills for the protection of 
birds, their nests and eggs. W. C. Hayward, secretary of state, said : "During 
three of the five sessions that I served in the state senate, Hon. C. J. A. Ericson 
was a member of that body. We were both members of the ways and means com- 
mittee, and both lived, during the session, at the Savery Hotel and I then had an 
opportunity of becoming quite well acquainted with him. He was a large man 
in every way, physically and intellectually. He was of fine appearance and of 



8 HIST(3RY OF BOONE COUNTY 

the most kindly disposition. He took a special interest in educational affairs 
and was a firm and steadfast friend of our educational institutions. He was a 
careful and considerate man, one of whom it could be said that he was 'safe and 
sane'; at the same time he was in every sense of the word 'progressive' and an " 
advocate and supporter of all progressive measures along reasonable lines. He 
was mild and pleasant in manner, but, at the same time, firm and unyielding in 
support of what he deemed to be right. A splendid, big strong man. It was a 
distinct loss to the state he loved so well when he passed away." Warren Garst 
wrote of Mr. Ericson: "My people moved to Boone in June of 1866. Almost 
from the first the name of Mr. Ericson became a household word on account of 
the prominent position he held in that community. It was not strange, therefore, 
when I became associated with him in a legislative way I should remember the 
earlier impressions I had received in the community in which we then lived. I 
found Senator Ericson to be a powerful force in all remedial legislation ; always 
throwing his influence and vote to any cause he thought to be for the betterment 
of society. He was especially active and exceedingly fortunate in formulating 
plans to increase the revenues of the state from sources that would not be burden- 
some and at the same time would be greatly remunerative. As I remember it, 
under the old law any incorporation organizing in Iowa was required to pay a mere 
nominal fee into the coffers of the state. Senator Ericson introduced a bill that 
changed this and we now have had instances where very large corporations have 
paid many thousands of dollars in single fees. 

"He also introduced and secured its passage through the senate, a bill to ta.x 
corporations through an annual fee. Senator Ericson figured that if his bill 
became a law it would add to the revenues of the state from one hundred and 
fifty thousand dollars to two hundred and fifty thousand dollars annually. It is 
not my purpose to go into the discussion of this proposition as to its justice or 
fairness, but I was then and am now in thorough smypathy and accord with 
Senator Ericson's position. 

''While Senator Ericson was seeking every way to secure additional revenues 
for the state, through any of the then established means, he was liberal with sug- 
gestions as to distribution. He was anxious to see the great agricultural school 
at Ames become one of the leading institutions of this character, not only in this 
country, but in the world. His success along this line is best attested by what 
this great institution is doing and is. He always had a great interest in the history 
of the state, and perhaps it is more due to him and his untiring energy than to 
that of any other man that we have the magnificent Historical building, which 
is an asset of state-wide importance, for it seems to me that no man, woman or 
child can visit this elegant structure without having a greater pride and a greater 
love for this great state. I have no disposition to go into detail as to Senator 
Ericson's legislative experience. I am indeed glad to have the opportunity to 
say to the people of Iowa that, while there have been men who have perhaps been 
more conspicuous, there has been no man who has done more along material and 
ethical lines than the Senator from Boone." Again we c|uote, this time from the 
Iowa Library Quarterly : "He was deeply interested in the work of the Iowa 
Library .Association, having served as vice president of that body, and repeatedly 
on legislative committees, attending the annual meetings regularly. His pres- 
ence will be greatly missed, as well as his advice and counsel. Senator Ericson 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 9 

was a man of gentle character, with strong friendships and deep convictions. 
His place is not likely to be filled again in the library circles of the state or in 
the hearts of those whose friendship he had gained." 

One of Mr. Ericson's most generous gifts to Boone was what is known as 
the Ericson Library, erected and equipped at a cost of ten thousand seven 
hundred dollars. On the occasion of its dedication Judge Horace E. Deemer 
said : "It is a proud day for Boone, and a pleasant one, I know, for the generous 
donor who has built a monument to himself which will outlive any mere creation 
of the builder's art, chiseled simply to perpetuate the memory of a name. Within 
the past few years at least three generous and loyal men within the boundaries 
of this state have made large contributions for the building and founding of 
public libraries; and it is my deliberate judgment that they have made the best 
possible use of their money. That the communities to which they have been 
given fully appreciate the generosity, I have no shadow of doubt ; and that the 
people of this little city of Boone are filled with gratitude to their honored fellow 
citizen, Senator Ericson, is so plainly evident that it scarcely needs mention. I 
am not so sure, however, that any of these men fully appreciate the value and 
the full significance of his generosity. In this building rich and poor alike may 
meet the best and greatest thinkers of the age. \\'ealth gives no advantage, and 
social position counts for nothing. No matter how poor the boy or girl, no 
matter how thinly clad, no matter though the prosperous of their own town or 
time will not recog<iize them on the street, no matter though they are excluded 
from the so-called best society, here they shall not pine for companionship or 
society. Here Milton will tell of Paradise, Shakespeare open all the flood gates 
of the imagination, Franklin give forth his practical advice, Bryant sing of 
nature's beauties, Darwin and Huxley elucidate their theories, Proctor search 
the skies and Thackeray forget his snobbery. Here one may select his own 
associates from among the greatest thinkers and actors and writers the world 
has ever known. He may meet the most eminent statesmen and scientists, poets, 
and philosophers of all time. As said by another, 'He that loveth a book will 
never want a faithful friend, a wholesome counsellor, a cheerful companion, and 
an effectual comforter.' But better than all, here, perhaps, may some spark set 
fire the smouldering fumes of genius, and a flame go forth that will illuminate 
for all time the pages of our western literature." 

Mr. Ericson always displayed the highest sense of honor in politics as well 
as in business and other relations of life and would never deviate from any 
course which he believed to be right. In July, 1903, he was appointed chairman 
of the Scandinavian Relief Committee to assist the famine stricken districts of 
northern Scandinavia, and his success in raising funds for this purpose is indi- 
cated in an excerpts from a letter written by Governor A. B. Cummins : "The 
success of the plan must be credited, in a large measure, to your patriotic and 
intelligent labors. For this work, and in behalf of sufi^ering humanity, I 
thank you.'' 

In IQ04 Senator Ericson was appointed a member of the Iowa Commission 
for the Louisiana Purchase Centennial Exposition and as such had charge of the 
dairy and apiary department, which was splendidly managed, not only as regards 
its exhibition, but also its finances. He came to be one of Iowa's most honored, 
representative and distinguished men. Where he was best known, however, he 



10 HISTORY OF ROONE COUNTY 

was most loved and the regard entertained for him in his home town is indicated 
in a speech delivered on the fiftieth anniversary of his settlement in Boone 
county, when a bancjuet was tendered him by his friends, on which occasion 
C. S. Mason said : "Men often criticise : sometimes they flatter. Avoiding both, 
'tis my desire to speak the truth, for he who even roughly paints a i^icture, using 
brush, or pen, or lips, should first of all paint true. In such a spirit I approach 
the pleasing task I have undertaken, and. happily, in this case there is little 
incentive to over-state the facts or over-paint the picture, for in the life and 
character and record of our friend, the truth is an all-sufficient eulogy. Should 
I say he is a king of finance, you would not believe me ; should I report him 
possessing, far above his fellows, the qualities of great statesmanship. 1 wunld 
not believe myself ; or, should 1 picture him possessed of genius, he would i^er- 
haps laugh me to scorn : but when I say that in finance he is w-ise and just and 
withal merciful, I am saying that which I suppose you now believe: and when 
I say that he has brought to the performance of his public duties the same test 
of high manhood and good intentions that has guided him in business affairs. I 
am saying that which I believe will meet the approval of his conscience and win 
for me the smile of approbation. 

"Is this man wise? I know of no better test than to apply the record. Born 
in a humble home across the sea, he left when young the confines of the old world 
that he might stand upon the shores of the new, where, looking out upon a 
splendid age, in a splendid republic, he might search for a place where he could 
struggle and perhaps achieve. Fate or some subtle influence that we cannot 
explain, led him to locate near this vicinity, and for fifty years he has gone in 
and out among, and been one of the people of this community. I think it fair 
to estimate that in all those years he has averaged ten business transactions daily : 
one hundred and fifty thousand business transactions with his neighbors and 
the people among whom he lives, and if about a single one there is a taint, or 
even a suspicion of dishonesty, then has my information been at fault. Surely 
such a business record as this is one of which he or any man may well be pniud. 
Not only has he gained high reputation for business honesty, but in a larger way 
he has achieved success in that he has succeeded first in winning the kind regards, 
and in more recent years, the loving esteem of a great majority of the better class 
of people among whom he lives. To such an extent is this true, that the people 
have delighted to place upon him political honors and have asked of him the 
performance of important political duties. Not only has he gained a high reputa- 
tion for business honesty, and gained the respect of the people in all the other 
matters of which I speak, but during these years he has been gathering together 
in an enterprising way and without in the least injuring others, that which we 
believe to be a sufficient competency which has enabled him not only to meet 
generously the many, many re(juirements made upon men of reasonable wealth, 
but has enabled him in more recent years to do those things which he hopes, and 
which we believe, will redound to the benefit of this and other communities for 
many years to come. Surely such a record as I have briefly, and I trust, truth- 
fully described, needs little comment. 

"Is our friend kind beyond the average man? Upon this point I have testi- 
mony, and first I will place upon the stand yourselves, and ask if. in the few or 
many years you have known him, there has not been some one. perhaps many. 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 11 

occasions, when, by kind words or some kindly act, he has won the atTection of 
your heart and gained the confidence of your understanding. There are many 
witnesses I should like to call whom I cannot secure, for many of them are 
resting under the infirmities of old age and living quietly in their declining years 
in the homes and upon the farms that the kindness of our friend has helped to 
secure, while many more have finished their work and made their records and have 
gone home to their reward and rest within their graves in different portions of 
this country ; and, as I cannot present to you their testimony, permit me briefly 
to call attention to it second hand. First and last and at different times, and not 
by design, but accidentally or in a casual way, I have heard from the lips of at 
least twenty dififerent men, the story of the help they have received from our 
kind friend. Some have spoken of these obligations without any show of senti- 
ment, while others have shown upon their faces that there was within them the 
spirit of gratitude. If, in a casvial way and without design. I have heard from 
the lips of twenty men of the assistance they have received from our kind friend, 
is it not fair to presume that there are in this vicinity, living and dead, hundreds 
who, could they speak to us, would add to the volume of our testimony? Permit 
me to take the stand myself. Some years ago our country was swept by a 
financial tornado, the worst financial panic I have e\ er known : great business 
houses tottered and some fell ; and, while the general business interests of the 
country were to some extent palsied, the fierceness of the storm centered upon 
those engaged in banking business, for everywhere men seemed to have lost con- 
fidence in banks and in each other : hundreds of millions of dollars of deposits 
were drawn from banks and hid away in stockings and in safety deposit vaults, 
and everywhere the depositors in banks were watching for the least sign of 
danger, that they might ijuickly pounce upon the banks that held their deposits and 
bring to them temporary disaster, if not destruction. At such a time as this, the 
business firm of which I am a member needed funds. I spoke to a banker of this 
town about it, and quickly, almost fiercely, got his refusal. A little later I saw 
our friend and spoke briefly of our needs and said, T guess I will have to ask you 
for some money.' He said, 'How much?' I replied that temporarily two or three 
thousand dollars would answer. Drawing a long breath that was mighty near 
a sigh, and speaking in a tone of almost pleading, he said, 'Keep it as near two 
thousand as you can.' Any man can assist another when it is in his regular line 
of business and for his profit to do so. There are here and there some, perhaps 
in the aggregate many, who, upon some occasion, will assist their fellowmen even 
though the element of profit does not attach to the transaction ; but there are 
mighty few men in all the world, nor have there ever been, nor will there be in 
all the years to come those who, in time of storm and stress and danger, will 
weaken their own position that they may extend a helping hand to a business 
acquaintance. I presume the transaction I speak of was forgotten by our friend 
within an hour, for he had other important matters on his mind ; but I did not 
so soon forget, nor have I yet forgotten, nor will I forget during all the years 
that are spared me, for I thought then, and it seems to me now, it was a bright 
spot in the midst of surrounding gloom, and an oasis in the desert of human 
selfishness. 

"I have a grandson who bears my name. I hope through him the name 
may be continued ; yes, in a broader sense, I hope through him the family name 



12 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

I bear, and which is now held by so few living representatives, may be carried 
into future generations where possibly it may become an honored name among 
the people ; so I feel for that boy great interest, and I would make for him great 
sacrifices, if thereby I could surround him with the influence and furnish him 
that training which would secure for him in future years the qualities of good 
citizenship, and I have often thought, and think today, that if, among all the 
men I know or have ever known, east or west, I was obliged to select the one 
man of all others whose traits of character, of mind and heart and brain, and 
whose every quality, good and bad, the boy must emulate and at last attain to, 
my choice would fall on our kind friend. Surely no higher words of praise 
than that can I bestow. 

"A pebble tossed upon the placid surface of a lake creates a ripple that 
broadens, widens, extends until it is said there is a ripple on the other shore. 
A man's good deeds live after him, broadening, widening, extending, losing 
perhaps their identity, but working in harmony with other good influences — 
working on and on and on, and who shall say that these good influences will 
not continue to do their office in the world until the end of time? 

"Our friend has led a clean and manly and useful life, worthy the emulation 
of young men ; and, in more recent years, he has been able to set in motion 
good influences which he hopes, and we believe will work for the civilization 
and the improvement of mankind when he shall have passed away : and who 
shall say that the good influences he hath thus set in motion will not continue 
in some way, working on and on until the records of time shall cease?" 

Many were the words of praise written of him when death called him, for 
all felt that a good man had passed on, lea\ing behind a memory that is 
enshrined in the hearts of all who were his associates. He was broad minded 
and liberal, loved his adopted country and yet never lost his interest in those 
who came from his native land and to many of Scandinavian birth he proved a 
most helpful friend. In his later years he greatly enjoyed traveling, and his 
success gave him opportunity to indulge his taste along that line. He had but 
recently returned from a trip abroad when he was stricken with the illness that 
terminated in death in 1910. He was an active member of the Presbyterian 
church, in which he served as treasurer and trustee for three decades. There 
was no occasion on which he seemed to fall short of the highest standards. 
Notwithstanding the fact that his school privileges were very limited, he was a 
well informed man, for he learned life's lessons in the school of experience, 
read broadly, thought deeply" and listened attentively. He early made it his 
habit to associate with those from whom he could learn. In business he was 
guided by the old adage that, honesty is the best policy, but there were still 
higher principles manifest in his character and these sprang from an understand- 
ing of the obligations of man toward his fellowmen and toward his Creator. 
One of his biographers spoke of his career as that "of one whose Christian 
character has made the world better: one who enjoyed the esteem and love of 
all who knew him." One of his pastors wrote : "I have always honored him 
as a lover of our Savior and a friend of man, and have always rejoiced when 
word came of some new benefaction which his generosity had provided in the 
way of school and library endowment ; and his memory will always be one of 
my precious possessions. He was a great help and inspiration to me in my 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 13 

work — never obtrusive with counsel or critical in his judgments, but quietly 
helpful in every undertaking for the advancement of the work of our church." 
Still another wrote of him : "Loyal to his friends and to his city, he never 
had a thought that his large and growing competence made any chasm between 
him and his poorest acquaintance. He was a man to all men, honorable, con- 
siderate and cordial." 



SAM M. STERRETT. 



Among the retired citizens of Boone who well merit the rest which has come 
to them is Sam M. Sterrett, who for many years was actively engaged in farm- 
ing and is still the owner of valuable farm property in the county. He resides, 
however, at 1328 Harrison street in Boone and there, surrounded by many of 
the comforts and luxuries of life, he is spending the evening of his days in 
quiet and well earned rest. He arrived here in October. 1865, having driven 
across the country from Tippecanoe county, Indiana, where his birth occurred 
October 14, 1835. His parents were Robert and Margaret (Montgomery) Ster- 
rett. The former was bom in the north of Ireland, of Scotch parentage. His 
mother came to America with her youngest son and youngest daughter, both of 
whom are now deceased, and made her way to Indiana, her death occurring 
in Tippecanoe county, that state. Robert Sterrett, crossing the Atlantic to the 
new world, passed away in Tippecanoe county, Indiana, at a comparatively early 
age, dying in 1837, while his wife survived him only until 1841 or 1842. She was 
born in Wayne county, Indiana, and at her death left four children, while one 
had passed away previously. 

Sam .M. Sterrett is the only one now living of the two sons and two daugh- 
ters who reached adult age and is the only one who ever came to Iowa. His 
brother Rev. Alexander Sterrett was a Presbyterian minister at Evansville, 
Indiana, also in Kentucky and for many years at Terre Haute, Indiana. Finally 
he went to Kansas, where he engaged in missionary work, organizing churches 
at Wyandotte and several other places. He finally passed away at Wyandotte, 
now Kansas City, Kansas, in 1888. He had become the owner of considerable 
land in that state, comprising two sections in Clay county. Elizabeth Sterrett, 
sister of S. M. Sterrett, was twice married and by her first marriage left a son, 
William Shurtz, who is now a property owner of Boone. The children of her 
second marriage are deceased. One of the sons, George R. Simpson, was a 
prominent educator of Minnesota and died at the age of thirty-five years. Jane 
Sterrett became the wife of Matthew Stranahan but died a few months later. 

Sam M. Sterrett was educated in the public schools. Being left an orphan 
at an early age, he resided with an uncle and with others through the period 
of his boyhood and youth, but early in life started out to make his own living. 
At length he rented a farm, which he cultivated until 1865. 

While on a visit in Boone county in 1858 Mr. Sterrett was married to Miss 
Mary Jane Dawkins, a native of Kentucky, who later went to Indiana and finally 
came to Iowa. She died in January, 1869, upon the home farm in Dodge town- 
ship, at the age of twenty-nine years, leaving three children : Jennie, now the 



14 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

wife of John Hannum, of Boone; Celestia Anna, the wife of the Rev. A. T. 
Carpenter, a Methodist P2piscopal minister, who is now preaching near Winni- 
peg, in Manitoba, Canada ; and Margaret, who is the wife of John Boucher, a 
farmer residing near Hastings, Colorado. In 1870 Mr. Sterrett was again mar- 
ried, his second vmion being with Miss Winnie Baker, who was bom in Clay 
county, Indiana, in July, 185 1, a daughter of Joel and Ollie Baker, who came 
from Indiana in the fall of 1851 and settled in Boone county, where they have 
since resided. To the second marriage of Mr. Sterrett there have been born 
ten children: Docia, the wife of Herman Stotts, of Minnesota; Mav. the wife 
of Arthur Stotts, residing on her father's farm in Dodge township ; Robert 
Leroy, w^ho died at the age of eight years ; Eva, the wife of Harry Wiley, living 
in Boone; Mabel, the wife of Frank Anderson, a resident of Boone; Clara, the 
wife of Alvin Bowman, a farmer living near Boone ; Iowa Belle, the wife of 
Arthur Doran, who follows farming near Boone; Alexander, who married 
Miss Nellie Nyberg and formerly engaged in railroading but is now engaged in 
truck farming; Lillian, who is attending Simpson College; and Irene, also a 
student in that school. All of these children have taught school. 

Mr. Sterrett has been very successful in his business affairs, ranking for 
many years as a leading and prosperous agriculturist of his county. His home- 
stead, which he still owns, is a farm of two hundred and forty acres of rich 
and productive land, five miles north of the corporation limits of Boone. He 
was also the owner of another tract of two hundred acres, which he sold recently. 
It was in the winter following his arrival in October, 1865, that he purchased 
the home place and from that time until his retirement he was an active factor in 
the agricultural development of the community. Having now put aside the work 
of the fields, he is enjoying a well earned rest, having purchased and remodeled 
his present comfortable home at No. 1328 Harrison street in Boone. 

Politically Mr. Sterrett was a democrat, but a change in his views led him to 
support the republican party and he now votes the prohibition ticket, for he has 
always been a stanch advocate of its doctrines and believes the liquor question 
to be one of the paramount issues before the people today. He belongs to the 
Methodist Episcopal church of Boone, as do the others of his family, and his life 
has been guided by its teachings, thus making him one of the men of the county 
most worthy of respect, confidence and good-will. 



GEORGE W. CROOKS. 

George W. Crooks was for many years actively connected with the pro- 
fession that has important bearing upon the stability, prosperity and welfare 
of every community. A mind naturally analytical and logical in its trend has 
given him force in the trial of -litigated interests intrusted to his care, and his 
name figures prominently in connection w'ith the court records. He was born 
in Clay county, Indiana, on the 22d of July, 1836, and is a son of Jacob and 
Hannah (Croy) Crooks, both of whom were of German lineage. His ancestors 
in the paternal line established homes in Ohio and Kentucky. Jacob Crooks 
served his country as a soldier in the War of 1812, and in days of peace devoted 




GEORGE W. CROOKS 



IPUh 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 17 

his attention largely to the cultivation of the fields. In 1845 he left Indiana 
for Iowa, establishing his home in this state when it was still under territorial 
rule. He tirst made settlement near I'"airfield. in Jefferson county, but in the 
spring of 1847 came to Boone county, where he entered land from the govern- 
ment, securing a claim a few miles south of Boone. With characteristic energy 
he began the development of the place, turning the first furrows and making 
the first improvements upon this land. There he made his home until his 
death, which occurred in 1853, while his wife surxived until 1882. 

George W. Crooks was a lad of but nine summers when the family arrived 
in Iowa, and his youth was spent in Hhe usual manner of lads who are reared 
upon the frontier. He early became familiar with the best methods of breaking 
the sod, cultivating the fields and caring for the crops, and to the farm work 
he gave his attention until 1855, when he removed to Boonesboro, since which 
time he has made his home either in that town or in the city of Boone, save for 
a period of two years, which he spent in Madrid, Iowa. In 1856 he began 
working in a flour and sawmill and was thus employed until he joined the 
army. 

Mr. Crooks made preparations for haxing a home of his own in his marriage 
in i860 to Miss Rebecca Nutt. The following year the Civil war was begun 
and, his patriotic spirit being thoroughly aroused, he offered his services to the 
government and was commissioned first lieutenant, with power to enlist a com- 
I^any. He assisted in raising Company D. Tenth Iowa Regiment, and left 
Boone county for the rendezvous in August, iS6r, but on account of ill health 
he was disqualified to be regularly mustered in the United States service. His 
brother, W. C. Crooks, who also joined the army, was killed in the battle of 
Shiloh and the Grand Army post in Boone was named in his honor. It was a 
sore disappointment to George W. Crooks that he could not go to the front; 
but in every possible way he rendered aid to the Union cause at home and never 
wavered in his loyalty to the federal government in the slightest degree. In 
June, 1863, he was appointed sheriff of Boone county, and filled that position 
until January, 1874, when, at the end of about eleven years, he retired from 
the office with the confidence and good-will of all, having made an excellent 
record by his fidelity, loyalty and fearlessness in that position. 

Mr. Crooks had previously taken up the study of law and after careful prepa- 
ration for the bar was admitted at the December term of the district court, in 
1873, >-ipon examination before the Hon. D. D. Chase, who was then judge of 
the district court. In the following January he formed a partnership with 
I. N. Kidder, with whom he was associated until 1882. The following year he 
entered into partnership relations with R. F. Jordan, with whom he practiced 
continuously until i8gi. Through the two succeeding years he did not engage 
in active practice, but in 1893 formed a partnership with the Hon. J. J. Snell 
that was maintained for a number of years. He was the second attorney in 
Boone county, and continued in active practice until 1908, when he retired. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Crooks were born two sons : John S., now mayor of 
Boone; and W. H., who is engaged in the abstract business. The wife and 
mother passed away November 27, 1909, and her death was deeply regretted 
by many friends who esteemed her highly for her many excellent traits of heart 
and mind. In his political views Mr. Crooks has always been a stalwart demo- 



18 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

crat, and for one term lie represented his district in the state legislature. Fra- 
ternally he is a Mason and has been most loyal to the teachings of the craft, 
exemplifying in his life its beneficent spirit. His religious faith is that of the 
Methodist church. Ere he retired from active practice a biographer wrote of 
him: 

"He has long occupied a foremost position in the foremost rank of the 
legal practitioners of Boone county. His life has been one of untiring activity 
and has been crowned with a big degree of success, yet he is not less esteemed 
as a citizen than as a lawyer, and his kindly impulses and charming cordiality 
of manner have rendered him exceedingly popular among all classes. The 
favorable judgment which the world passed upon him in his early years has 
never been set aside nor in any degree modified. It has, on the contrary, been 
emphasized by his careful conduct of important litigation, his candor and 
fairness in the presentation of cases, his zeal and earnestness as an advocate 
and the generous conunendation he has received from his contemporaries, who 
unite in bearing testimony to his superior mind and high character." 

Mr. Crooks is now in the seventy-eighth year of his age, but well preserved 
for one of his years, and though the snow of winter is upon his head, the flow- 
ers of spring are in his heart. He keeps in touch with the trend of modern 
thought and progress and no history of Boone county would be complete with- 
out extended reference to him, because of his long residence here and the impor- 
tant part which he has played in the public life of the community. 



EDGAR R. WILLIAMS. 

Edgar R. Williams, one of the former owners and editors of the Ogden 
Reporter, published at Ogden, Boone county, was born south of this city on 
the isth of June, 1873, his parents being John T. S. and Jane (Thomas) Wil- 
liams, the former a native of Canada and the latter of Wisconsin. They became 
pioneer residents of Boone county as is indicated in the sketch of John T. S. 
Williams on another page of this volume. 

Edgar R. Williams was reared and educated in this county and is indebted 
to the public-school system for the opportunities which he received for intel- 
lectual progress. During the periods of vacation he worked in the fields and 
early became familiar with all the duties of farm life, continuing to assist his 
father in the various branches of farm work until he reached the age of twenty 
years. Thinking to find other pursuits more congenial than the farm work, 
he began learning the printer's trade in the office which he later owned. He was 
there employed for about eight years and mastered the business in principle 
and detail. He was afterward employed in various other places and in 1904 
purchased the Ogden Reporter, while later he admitted Mr. Carl Lund to a 
partnership. They operated the plant continuously for a number of years and 
made the Reporter an interesting paper, with a good patronage in both the cir- 
culation and advertising departments. They followed the methods of modern 
journalism, and the success of the paper was a natural result of their close 
application and unfaltering energy. 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 19 

Mr. Williams was married in September, 1902, to Miss Elizabeth Thompson, 
a daugliter of William and Tillie (Latimer) Thompson, residents of Greene 
county, Iowa. Mr. and Mrs. Williams had one child, Thelma, who died in 1903 
in infancy. The family residence is a comfortable home at the corner of First 
and Walnut streets in Ogden. Mr. Williams belongs to the Knights of Pythias 
lodge in Boone, and his wife is a member of the Methodist church. His politi- 
cal support is given to the republican party, and he made his paper one of the 
organs in its support, but he does not seek nor desire office, preferring to con- 
centrate his energies upon other interests and duties. He has become widely 
known through his activity in the newspaper field and enjoys the confidence 
and good will of the general public. 



L. D. HENRY. 



Great credit is due L. D. Henry for what he has achieved in life. He began 
his career in a comparatively humble capacity and today is one of the leading 
financiers of Boone county, conducting a private bank at Beaver and also being 
interested in a number of other enterprises of a similar nature. Moreover, Mr. 
Henry is ever ready to indorse and support valuable measures which make for 
material expansion, moral improvement and intellectual attainment. He was 
born in Trumbull county, Ohio, April 13, 1864, and is a son of Zimri and 
Emeline (Brown) Henry, the former a native of Trumbull county, Ohio, and 
the latter of Pennsylvania, of German descent. The father followed farming 
throughout life in Trumbull county, Ohio, with the exception of the last few 
years of his life, during which he conducted a hotel at Kinsman. He died in 
1908, his widow surviving him until October, 191 1. 

L. D. Henry was reared and educated in Kinsman and attended the academy 
there. He has always been proud of the fact that he was a schoolmate of 
Garence S. Darrow, the noted Chicago attorney, and he had as his teacher 
Mary Darrow, who was noted as an educator and connected with the Chicago 
schools, but is now deceased. After completing his education Mr. Henry turned 
his attention to railroading, becoming a brakeman for the Lake Shore & Michigan 
Southern Railroad. In two and one-half years he was promoted to the position 
of conductor and remained with that system until 1889, when he made his way 
to Savanna, Illinois, becoming conductor for the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul 
Railroad, with his headquarters in that city. In 1893 he was transferred to 
Perry, Iowa, and for twelve years, or until 1905, ran a train out of there. Meet- 
ing with an accident which cost him his right leg, his company then made him 
live stock agent of his district, in which capacity he was charged with settling 
claims for the traffic department. He held that position for two years and, 
being an observant man, able to judge of conditions and opportunities, per- 
ceived that a bank in Beaver would be a most profitable investment. He, there- 
fore, came to that city and with E. D. Carter organized the Beaver Savings 
Bank. The original capital was ten thousand dollars and the institution was a 
success from the beginning. Its prosperous condition is largely due to the initia- 
tive of Mr. Henry, who has proved himself a financier of no mean ability. The 



20 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

bank was under state charter until April i, 191 2, when it was reorganized, Mr. 
Henry acquiring the interests of the other stockholders and transforming the 
corporation into a pri\ate bank. It is now known as the Beaver Bank and its 
capital and surplus exceed fifteen thousand dollars. Mr. Henry is sole owner and 
his daughter Mabel is assistant cashier. " They have over sixty-six thousand 
dollars in deposits and well merit the confidence placed in them. /Mthough Mr. 
Henry is progressive and ever ready to lend a helping hand in promoting the 
industrial enterprises and in assisting agricultural ventures, his foremost con- 
sideration is the safety of his depositors. He has always displayed marked energy 
and determination in his business affairs and has made good use of opportunities 
as they [iresented themselves and has even created them where none existed. 
He has overcome difficulties by persistent, energetic and honorable effort. He is 
a man of unerring accuracy in judgment and of a caution in business transac- 
tions which, though it protects the bank from loss, does not hinder its develop- 
ment. In short, he knows whom and what to trust. He owns the two-story 
block in w hicli the bank is located, it being erected by him in 1907. 

On Aiay 31. 1886, Mr. Henry married Miss Bertha L. Fellows, a daughter 
of Har\e}- and Reuhama ( Johnson ) Fellows, natives of the Keystone state, 
where they always made their home. Her mother was the first white child born 
in Warren county, Pennsylvania. Her father died in 1887 and her mother in 
June, 1905. Mr. and Mrs. Henry had three children: Mabel A., born February 
21, 1888, assistant cashier of the Beaver Bank; Carl H., who was born February 
20, 1895, and died in December, 1897; and Margaret Lucille, born January 3, 
1900, who is attending school in Grand Junction. 

Mr. Henry has other important interests, being a stockholder and treasurer 
of the Farmers Cooperative Company of Beaver, and he also owns a block of 
shares in the Peoples National Bank at Perry. Since 1888 he has been a mem- 
ber of the Order of Railway Conductors and was secretary of the general board 
of adjustment for the Milwaukee system for ten years. He is a charter mem- 
ber uf the American Nobles of Perry. Politically he is a republican and was a 
member of the city council in Perry. Since coming to Beaver this town has been 
incorporated and he has since served as councilman, giving the city the benefit 
of his business ability besides supporting a number of measures which have 
Ijeen of great benefit to the community. He and his family are ATethodists and 
de\-out in their religious professions. While he has attained success, he is a 
man who is considerate of the interests of others and always ready to make 
sacrifices in order to promote the public welfare. He has proved himself a use- 
ful and valuable citizen and enjoys in full measure the respect, esteem and con- 
fidence of all who ha\'e come in contact with him. 



J. B. McHOSE. 

J. B. McHose is one of the citizens of Boone county whom she may well 
honor, for his life in all of its dilTerent phases has been such as measures up to 
the highest standards of manhood and citizenship. In business he has been 
industrious, energetic and rclialile, in ]iublic office loyal, patriotic and capable. 




J. B. McHOSE 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 23 

anil those who have met him in social relations count his friendship as some- 
thing worth while. A native of Iowa, Mr. McHose was born in the city of 
Davenport — then a town of little importance — August 25, 1849, his parents 
being Samuel and Mary ( Dillin ) McHose. He is descended from Scotch. 
German and English ancestry of pre-Revolutionary times, and from the mingled 
l)lood of the three races have come some of his strong and sturdy characteristics. 
His father and grandfather were brick makers. In pioneer times the parents 
became residents of Iowa, but the mother passed away March 22, 1863, in 
(jcneseo, Illinois. In the family were eight children: J. B., of this review; 
William E., now deceased ; Isabelle, the wife of F. Smock of San Diego, Cali- 
fornia ; Samuel M., living in Nevada, Iowa; Mrs. Dora Neil, whose home is in 
Seattle, Washington; Mrs. Mary Stuart, a resident of Lewiston, Montana,* 
Joseph, deceased ; and George, deceased. Losing his first wife, the father, who 
has just passed away at the age of ninety-one at Grinnell, Iowa, married again, 
his second union being with Fannie Nye. Unto them were born three children : 
Arthur, of Boone; Charles, a resident of Maxwell, Iowa; and Harry, of 
Montana. 

J. B. McHose spent the days of his boyhood and youth in his parents' home 
and early began work in his father's brickyard. His educational opportunities 
were those accorded by the public schools. At twenty years of age he left the 
partntal roof and started out in the business world independently, becoming 
connected with the manufacture of bri9k;^nd:^tso; during the winters taking up 
the profession of teaching, for which, he was yvelliiualified through a high-school 
education. At length he began the study of law and graduated from the Wash- 
ington University of St. Louis, Missouri, with.the class of 1874. He then located 
for practice in Story county. Iowa, where he f€tnaiJied for four years, but at the 
end of that time abandoned his profession and again turnetl his attention to 
the manufacture of clay products. In 1889 he came to Boone and established the 
Boone Clay Works, manufacturing brick, drain tile and other clay wares, 
which he conducted for about twenty-two years with splendid success, enjoying 
a growing and gratifying business, from which he retired in 1910. He has also 
for twenty-eight years been the owner of a large farm in Iowa and is deeply 
interested in agricultural and horticultural affairs. In connection with his large 
clay manufacturing interests he also did business as a paving contractor, and in 
the city of IJoone as well as other places are numerous evidences of his activity 
in the construction of substantial buildings and business blocks. He likewise 
won success as a beekeeper, devoting considerable attention to the raising and 
care of these insects. 

Mr. McHose has an excellent public record. Since attaining his majority 
he has given stalwart support to the republican party, keeping well-informed on 
the questions of the day and taking active part in promoting the principles in 
which he believes, as a campaign speaker and also as chairman of the republican 
county central committee. For several years he served as a member of the city 
coimcil of Boone, exercising his official prerogatives in support of all measures 
which he deemed of value and worth in promoting the city's best interests. He 
took a leading part in inaugurating a number of modern civic improvements. It 
was during his term as councilman that the first paving was done and that twenty- 
four miles of sewer were laid. The latter project was the cause of one of the 



24 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

greatest controversies in the city's history, but time has proven its wisdom. In 
November, uji2, Mr. McHose was elected to represent his district in the state 
legislature and took active part in its councils. He was placed upon its most 
important committees, such as judiciary, ways and means, mines and mining, 
insurance, and some half dozen others. He at all times sought the welfare of 
the public rather than party interests or personal aggrandizement, and he was 
the father of a bill designed to put private banks in Iowa under state supervision. 
He studied closely the legislative problems and lived up to the platform upon 
w^hich he was elected — "belief in the strictest fidelity and accountability of public 
officers, rigid economy and honesty in public atYairs, laws for the protection of 
the weak against the strong and the education of the young for the industries 
and business interests of the state." He believes thoroughly in progressive 
republicanism. 

On the i6th of March, 1876, Mr. McHose was united in marriage to Miss 
Ella Hamor, a native of Pennsylvania, and they own and occupy a fine brick 
residence in Boone, built of brick which he manufactured. ]\Ir. McHose also 
has other valuable property and at the present time is living retired, giving his 
attention to the supervision of his farming and other interests. He is identified 
with various societies and organizations, which indicate him to be a broad- 
minded, progressive man. He has membership in the National Geographical 
Society, the State Historical Society and the State Horticultural Society. In 
Masonry he has attained the thirty-second degree, belongs to the Mystic Shrine. 
the Eastern Star and to the Knights of Pythias. For several years he served 
as president of the State Brick and Tile Makers" Association. He deserves 
much credit for what he has accomplished in that he started out in life empty 
handed and has worked his way steadily upward. He began in brick manufac- 
turing before he attained his majority with a capital of less than fifty dollars. 
His knowledge of legal principles was the foundation of much of his success in 
business and his valuable public service in office. 



JUDGE DAVID R. HINDMAN. 

A history of the bench and bar of the eleventh judicial district of Iowa would 
be incomplete and unsatisfactory were there failure to make prominent reference 
to Judge David R. Hindman, of Boone, who for eleven years sat upon the bench 
and for an extended period was regarded as one of the most able and eminent 
lawyers practicing in his section of the state. It is not the province of biography 
to give voice to a man's modest estimate of himself and his accomplishments, 
but rather to judge the record establishing his position by the consensus of public 
opinion on the part of his fellowmen. Judged by that standard, too much can- 
not be said in praise of David R. Hindman, for all who knew him were glad and 
proud to call him friend, recognizing his honorable manhood, his lofty pur- 
poses and his well spent life. In a profession where advancement depends entirely 
upon individual effort and merit he made steady progress and his course ever 
reflected credit and honor upon his chosen calling. 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 25 

Judge Hindman was a native of Otsego county, New York, born on the 
loth of May, 1834, and was, therefore, almost seventy-four years of age when 
he passed away at his home in Boone on the 17th of April, 1908. The greater 
part of his youth was spent in Oneida county. New York, and he supplemented 
public-school instruction by study in the Whitestown (N. Y.) Seminary. He 
afterward entered for professional training the Clinton Law School and, 
having completed his preparation for the bar, he removed to Portage City, 
Wisconsin, in i860, and for some time engaged in active practice there. How- 
ever, following the outbreak of the Civil war he joined the army, enlisting first 
in response to the call for three months' troops and afterward reenlisting as a 
private of the Nineteenth Wisconsin Infantry. He rose from the ranks through 
successive promotions to the captaincy of the company and was beloved by those 
who served under him. He never asked the troops to go where he would not 
lead. 

With the close of the war Judge Hindman returned to Wisconsin and the fol- 
lowing year came to Boonesboro and to Boone in 1875, where he opened an office 
and entered upon the active practice of his profession. His ability won almost 
immediate recognition. He displayed comprehensive knowledge of the law and 
notable skill in applying legal princi]jles to the points at issue. His ability gained 
for him ajipointment to fill out the unexpired term of Judge Mericle of the 
eleventh judicial district in 1 888. He was then elected and afterward reelected, 
retiring from the bench in 1899. He could have remained for a longer term of 
years in that judicial position, had he so desired, for he had "won golden opin- 
ions from all sorts of people" by the fairness, equity and impartiality of his 
decisions. Of him it has been written: 

"Judge Hindman was without a peer among the district judges in the state 
of Iowa and he established a record with the state supreme court — his decisions 
were scarcely ever reversed by that body — which indicated that Air. Hindman 
was well read in the profession. Of late years he maintained an office in Boone 
and enjoyed a very good practice. 

"From the start of his professional life D. R. Flindman made friends of all. 
Eminently successful in a financial way. he leaves a far greater legacy, the good- 
will of the community. Throughout his long life crowned with deeds of use- 
fulness his upright character and noble manhood stood out prominently. As 
a judge of the district court, as a practicing attorney, in any of his business 
dealing or in his social life he was the same — afifable, with a kind word for all, 
never saying anything but good of his fellowmen. His disposition was most 
genial and his views of life were of the most optimistic. He often expressed 
the desire to depart this life suddenly — without suffering — and his wish was 
gratified by an all-wise Creator. One of the interesting traits of his life was his 
fondness for young people and when in their company he seemed contented 
and happy. He always held a charitable estimate of everybody's character and 
his death is, indeed, a sad blow to Boone and this community where he was so 
well and favorably known. Everywhere among his friends of the legal profes- 
sion nothing but words of praise are heard for him. All unite in paying a 
tribute to this well spent life." 

It was in 1866 that Judge Hindman was united in marriage to Miss Jennie 
E. Ritchey, who was born near Lafayette, Tippecanoe county, Indiana. Her 



26 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

father, a farmer by occupation, died in the early '70s, and her mother and sister 
afterward came to make their home with Judge and Mrs. Hindman, Mrs. Ritchey 
here passing away in 1897, in the eighty-sixth year of her age. Her daughter, 
Miss Mary A. Ritchey, still resides with .Mrs. Hindman. Judge and Mrs. Hind- 
man had no children, but he is still survived by four sisters, all of whom are 
living at Syracuse, New York. Judge Hindman was a prominent Mason and 
attained the Knight Templar degree of the York Rite, exemplifying at all times 
in his life the beneficent spirit of the craft. He wore with pride the little bronze 
button, which showed him to be a member of the Grand Army of the Republic, 
and he always maintained the deepest interest in those with whom he had served 
when wearing the nation's blue uniform. He was interested in the armory and 
in the hospital and in other public affairs of his city and cooperated in all move- 
ments for the general good. At the same time he was devoted to his profession 
and, while his allegiance to his clients' interests was proverbial, he never forgot 
that he owed a still greater fidelity to the majesty of the law. Death came to 
him suddenly and after an illness of but six hours he passed away. A fitting 
tribute was paid to his memory by Hon. R. F. Dale, who said : 

"It seems meet and proper that the members of this bar should pause for 
a time this afternoon and cast anchor to the rushing turmoils of life and give 
our thoughts in contemplation of the virtuous dead — to stand at the tomb and 
allow our eyes to take glimpses of eternity and enjoy in anticipation the rest which 
awaits us at the close of this life. Surely, we must be much benefited thereby, 
become better men, gather more potency to clasp virtue and entrench ourselves 
more strongly against vice. 

"On occasions like this does not the query arise, is the grave the end? We 
know the body submits to decay but we are also told that there will come a time 
when a voice shall command the seas and the graves to give up their dead and 
meet the spirit somewhere which shall descend there to be reunited. The stroke 
of death only expands life. 

"Of the life of our departed brother, in this. world of discontent and rest- 
lessness, no one need speak, it is an open book upon each page of which is ex- 
pressed a noble mind, kind heart, generous spirit and heroic dealings. D. R. 
Hindman lived his allotted time and from our acquaintance and observations 
with and of him we could see him meeting his duties courageously and manfully 
and at all times with kindness and due thought of the rights of others: he 
always met the combinations of former ages intelligently and- strove to apply 
them to the demands as they now exist. While our brother is not visible to the 
natural eye, yet those who read history aright say he is not dead. 

"These ceremonies combined with the influence of the life lived by the tenant 
of the grave enrich our minds, assist in forming our judgments ; our hearts are 
softened and if rightfully studied our lives are directed and controlled thereby. 
Honor, ability and dignity were attributes possessed by our departed brother. 
"He was a student of human nature, thus gaining knowledge of the world in 
its noblest sense : always taking a broad and liberal view of human conduct : never 
seeking for matter for condemnation but rather for matter of approval ; always 
excuses for the erring and charity for weakness. He understood weakness as 
well as strength : vice as well as virtue. His power and qualifications for a law- 
yer, jurist, neighbor and friend were based upon his knowledge gained from 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 27 

such study. His colossal kindness and hospitality made him one whom we were 
always glad to meet. Those who knew him longest respected and loved him 
most. No better recommendations can man desire or possess. His life here 
gives the lie to that old and unwarranted idea, entertained by many and ex- 
pressed by some, 'No lawyer can be honest.' His word was his bond, his bond 
a verity. We cannot change his condition but his life and influence are our 
heritage. , 

"What more can be said. Let us emulate his kindness and good-will exhibited 
toward the members of his chosen profession and thereby lessen the bitter feel- 
ings and animosities that are prone to enter into our dealings together. Judge 
Hindman asked only for his client that to which he believed him entitled, let 
us follow his example." 



GEORGE W. NELSON. 

George W. Nelson is to be numbered among the enterprising younger busi- 
ness men of Boone, where he now is the owner of the Boone Bottling Works, 
a prosperous establishment the ownership of which he acquired only about a 
year ago. Mr. Nelson was born in Boone, September 7, 1877, and is a son of 
Andrew and Ellen Nelson, natives of Sweden. They came to America soon 
after their marriage, settling in Rockford, Illinois. In that city they remained 
for a time, the father following the trade of tailor. In 1868 they came to Boone, 
Andrew Nelson becoming one of the earlier settlers of that city. He was the 
first tailor of Boone, working for his brother, John T., who came to that city 
about the same time. He continued in that association for a number of years 
and then retired, passing away June 17, 191 2. His widow survived him until 
May 27, 1913. The father was one of the organizers and a trustee of the 
Swedish Mission church, of which both he and his wife were members. He was 
a republican and stanchly upheld the principles of that party. To him and his 
wife were born the following children : Oscar A., of Boone ; Theodore E., who is 
a business man of that city ; Charles, who passed away at the age of fifteen ; 
George W., of this review ; and three who died in infancy. 

George W. Nelson attended the public schools of Boone until fifl,:en years 
of age, receiving his first instruction under a Mrs. Joseph Whittaker. After 
laying aside his text-books he became a clerk in the shoe store of C. A. McCune, 
*so remaining until Mr. McCune sold out his interest to Oscar A. Nelson and 
George W. Nelson. Mr. Nelson of this review a few years later sold out to 
his brother and bought the Westerberg Bottling Works, changing the name 
to the Boone Bottling Works. Although Mr. Nelson has conducted this business 
only a short time, he has already laid the foundations of a decided success. There 
is great credit due him for what he has achieved, as his success has come to 
him entirely through his own efforts. 

On May 3. 191 1, Mr. Nelson married Miss Theresa A. Anderson, of Min- 
neapolis, Minnesota, a daughter of Gustave A. .Anderson. Mr, and Mrs. Nel- 
son reside in a handsome home at No. 427 South Boone street, where they often 
entertain their manv friends. They are members of the Swedish Lutheran church 



28 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

and interested in its work. Politically Mr. Nelson preserves independence, giving 
his vote to the candidates whom he considers best fitted for the office irrespective 
of party affiliation. Fraternally he is a member of the Benevolent Pro- 
tective Order of Elks and popular in that organization. He is a public-spirited 
citizen who promotes enterprise wherever and whenever possible and who in a 
quiet way has done his share for the development of his city. 



BERNHART PAUL HOLST. 

When we contemplate the career of those who turn the tide of adversity in 
early life to successful ends, we are induced to regard with more than ordinary 
admiration their character and perseverance. Probably there is in the central 
part of the United States no one who has greater claim to a biographical sketch 
in this work than Bernhart Paul Hoist, both from the interest shown in the 
general upbuilding of educational institutions and for his long contact with the 
development of Boone county and the state of Iowa. His life offers so much 
encouragement to those who are at the commencement of their business and 
professional career, all of which is so laudable and exemplary, that the writer 
is inspired by many incidents of importance associated with him and his educa- 
tional and professional work and business enterprises. 

He is descended from German parentage, his forefathers having resided 
for many generations in the regions made famous by the imperial contests of 
Napoleon and the wars for Polish independence. Though these eventful times 
■were witnessed in different sections of Germany, the former refers to Lauen- 
turg, the home of his paternal ancestors, and the latter to Posen, the seat of his 
maternal progenitors. In both provinces were formidable parties that joined in 
the revolution of thought and action against the continuance of ancient imperial 
regimes, and with these were associated the families of whom the subject of this 
sketch is a scion. 

The earliest history of the paternal ancestors may be traced to the village of 
Kulpin, in Lauenburg, northern Germany, which was a famous stronghold of 
a warlike clan of Teutons in the eleventh century. This village was long a 
fortified point of strategy, but became a local center of trade and quiet home life 
under the civilizing influences of the reformation, which made this portion of 
Europe a stronghold of Protestantism and the modern educational arts. 

At Kulpin, in 1800, we find Christian Ludvvig Hoist, grandfather of the 
subject of this sketch, the manager of the large estate of Kul]Mn, which was 
highly developed in fertility and jjroductiveness under his management for a 
quarter of a century. This estate, though now greatly decreased in area by 
reason of transfers and subdivisions, was still a valuable and extensive posses- 
sion in 1913, when it was visited by the subject of this sketch, but its ownership 
and management had passed into the possession of others. 

Heinrich Ludwig Hoist, the father of the subject of this sketch, was born 
in the beautiful lake-village of Ratzeburg, about three miles from Kulpin, on 
April 17, 1817, and died at Pilot Mound, Iowa, September if>, 1885. He was 
the son of Christian Ludwig Hoist, who died while the son was still in infancy, 




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THE NEW YORK 
[PUBLIC LIBRARY 



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HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 31 

and his mother subsequently married a school teacher at Ratzeburg. Under the 
careful and sympathetic instruction of his stepfather he obtained the benefits of 
a practical education and afterward learned the trade of a cooper. He was 
an able thinker on theological and economical questions, a lover of good books, 
and took considerable interest in traveling. After visiting many cities of the 
German Confederation, he traveled in Switzerland, Austria, France and Russia, 
and in 1842 settled in Samotschyn, Germany, where he founded and developed 
a successfid business as a cooper. 

On June 15, 1843, H. L. Hoist, the father of Bernhart Paul Hoist, married 
Eniilie Leopoldina Buchholz at Samotschyn. She was born at Obersitzko, a 
picturesque town on the Warthe river, in Posen, April 20, 1820. Her father. 
Wilhelm Gotthold Buchholz, was a prominent citizen and successful druggist 
at her native town, and her mother was Dorothea Caroline Hirsekorn. It was 
the ambition of her parents to give her and her only sister, Amelia Wilhelmina, 
a good education, which hope was realized in the kindergarten and public 
schools of Obersitzko, and subsequently both were taught music and fine handi- 
work in a real-schule, or manual school. Her only brother, Edward, was lib- 
erally educated and became a successful pliarmacist. 

The family resided in Germany about three years after their marriage, 
embarking from Bremen, October 12, 1846, with the view of founding a home 
in Australia, and landing at Port Adelaide, March 18, 1847. ^t "''^ ''^ noticed 
that the tri]) on the ocean re(|uire(l over five months, a fact due to the tardy 
progress tuade by sail ships, and while on the Atlantic ocean, off Cape Blanco, 
Africa, October 29, 1846, their first born son, Wilhelm Hoist, died. For seven 
months the familv resided in Adelaide, one of the finest cities in Australia, after 
which they resided at different times at Lobethal, Hoft'nungsthal, Hoclikirch, 
and on a farm near Lindock \'alley. In the meantime H. L. Hoist was either 
occupied in farming or interested in gold mining, and after a residence of twenty 
years in Australia, about equal portions of the time in the colonies of Victoria 
and South Australia, they decided to emigrate to the United States. On AprU 
3, 1867, they set sail from Melbourne for London, England, which place they 
reached in July, and after spending some time in that city and Liverpool they took 
a steamboat for New York, reaching Castle Garden on August 3, 1867. Five 
davs later they came to Boone, Iowa, and soon after purchased a farm of one 
hundred and sixty acres located twelve miles northwest of the court house, in 
Pilot Mound township, and a half mile west of Pilot Mound, the highest eleva- 
tion in Boone county. 

This farm was the home of Bernhart Paul Hoist, the subject of this sketch, 
during his boyhood years. He is the youngest of the family, which consisted of 
four boys and three girls. They are named in order of age as follows : Wilhelm 
(1845-46) ; Ludwig Heinrich (1847) ; Philip Hermann (1850-57) ; Mary Louise 
(1853-1914); Augusta Johanna (1856); Emilie Caroline (1858-72); and Bern- 
hart Paul (1861). Wilhelm died oft' Cape Blanco, Africa. October 29, 1846; 
Philip Hermann died at Lobethal, South Australia, March 20, 1857; and Emilie 
Caroline died at Pilot Mound, Iowa, January i, 1872. Ludwig Heinrich chose 
to remain in Australia, where he acquired success as a teacher and supervisor in 
the public schools. Mary Louise married Julius Amme in 1882, and Augusta 
Johanna married Joseph Adamson in 1883 ; the latter resides in Boone county. 



32 ■ HISTORY OF ROONE COUNTY 

Bernhart Paul Hoist was born September i8. 1861, in Hochkirch, in the 
Australian colony of Victoria, now the state of Victoria, and since 1867 has 
resided in Boone county, Iowa, which state is yet his home and for which he 
has ever had strong love. He was reared amid refining influences, the best 
that were possible under pioneer conditions, and early developed the traits of 
character which led to a strong manhood. In the home and public schools he 
secured his early education, after which he had the benefits of academic and 
collegiate work. From early infancy he enjoyed the benefits that come from 
learning to use several modern languages, and in his educational research at- 
tained more than mediocre proficiency in German history and literature. He was 
granted his first teacher's certificate by J- H. Chambers, county superintendent 
of Boone county schools, in 1883, when he began teaching in the public schools. 
Being popular among his associates and indefatigable as an organizer, he gave 
hearty and efficient support in the maintenance of debating societies, institutes, 
Sunday schools and other organizations intended to benefit and improve moral 
and social conditions. In the spring of 1884 he, in company with two other 
young men, Samuel and Andrew Adamson, drove a team to Logan county, 
Nebraska, where he served in surveying government lands and in the meantime 
completed title under the exemption law to a quarter section of public land. 
Subsequently he drove on the California trail across the plains to the foothills 
of the Rocky mountains, and in the autumn of that year returned to Boone 
county to resume teaching in the public schools. 

On September 15, 1887, Mr. Hoist married Ella Roose, Rev. Abram Miller 
of the Lutheran church of Georgetown solemnizing the marriage at the home of 
the bride's parents, near Moultrie, Ohio. Mrs. Hoist was bom in Columbiana 
county, Ohio, January 26, 1867, and was the youngest of four children, having one 
sister and two brothers. Her parents, Michael Roose, born February 14, 1826, 
and Rachael Myers Roose, born February 16, 1832, are of German parentage 
and descended from early settlers of Pennsylvania. They resided in the natural 
gas and oil belt near Alliance, Ohio, where they owned a productive fruit and 
dairy farm. Three children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Hoist, two sons and 
a daughter. The elder son, Bertram Paul, was born February 22, 1889. He 
graduated from the Boone high school in 1908, from Drake University in 1913, 
and from the University of Chicago in 1914, obtaining the A. M. degree at the 
latter institution. The daughter, Blanche Alcott, was born in Boone, Iowa, 
January 2, 1894: she graduated from the Boone high school in 191 1 and from 
St. Katharine's Academy at Davenport, Iowa, in 1914. She has also studied 
at Drake University and other institutions. The younger son, Emil Roose. 
was born January 21, 1904, and since his sixth year has attended the public 
schools of Pilot Mound and Boone, 

Ella Roose Hoist, wife of the subject of this sketch, died January 31, 1904, 
at Boone. This loss and the death of his mother on March 5, 1908, are the most 
impressive of the sad events which we record in this sketch. 

No compendium such as the province of this work defines in its essential 
limitations will serve to offer fit memorial to the life and accomplishments of 
Bernhart Paul Hoist, the honored subject of this sketch — a man remarkable in 
the breadth of his wisdom, in his indomitable perseverance, his strong indi- 
viduality, and \et one whose whole esoteric phase, being an open scroll, invites 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 3a 

the closest scrutiny. True, his have been "massive deeds and great" in one 
sense, and yet his entire life accomplishments but represent the result of the fit 
utilization of the innate talent which is his, and the directing of his efforts in 
those lines where mature judgment and rare discrimination lead the way. There 
is in him a weight of character, a native sagacity, a far-seeing judgment and 
a fidelity of purpose that commands the respect of all. A man of indefatigable 
enterprise and fertility of resource, he has carved his name deejjly on the record 
of the educational, political, commercial and professional history of the state, 
which, owes much of its advancement to his efforts, especially along educational 
lines. Being one of the most capable and successful educators of the state, 
he caused the schools of Boone county to make rapid progress and induced a 
higher sentiment for professional enterprise in teachers' institutes and public 
school courses. 

It may be said that throughout his entire life he has been connected with 
educational work, and that he turned to good account much of the time that 
too many men fail to utilize. In his professional work he has been as persevering 
to enlarge his own usefulness and that of his learners as he has ever been dili- 
gent in his -business enterprises, and it may be said that he has been equally 
successful in both lines. In 1889, at the age of twenty-eight years, he was. 
elected county superintendent of schools of Beone county in which capacity he 
remained for ten years. No one in the county ever filled the same position 
for as long a period, and it is doubtful if anyone else in the state has been more 
highly complimented through popular suftVage than he. It is suggestive of more 
than ordinary popularity and ability when we note that he was nominated on. 
the Democratic ticket while Boone county is strongly Republican, and yet he 
was elected, receiving a vote about five hundred more than the strength of his 
partv. In 1891, when reelected, he received a vote of one thousand more than 
his party, and in 1893, his vote was about eleven hundred more than that cast 
for his ticket. In 1895, when the opposition party had an average majority of 
thirteen hundred votes for its candidates he was given a safe indorsement for 
a fourth term and afterward was elected for the fifth time, each term being 
for two vears. In 1899, while conducting an institute at Boone where about 
three hundred and thirty teachers were in attendance, he was notified that 
the Democratic state convention had nominated him for superintendent of public 
instruction by acclamation, and shortly after he was tendered a general public 
ovation by the teachers and citizens of Boone. Though defeated in the state 
election, he turned the compliment of the nomination to good account by deliv- 
ering addresses in many of the cities of the state and extending his acquaintance 
among [niblic men. 

Professor Hoist is known as an institute instructor and lecturer, having been 
appointed on the corps of teachers for more than twenty-five Iowa institutes 
held in different counties. Among his most popular addresses are those entitled 
Educational Foundations, Fundamentals, Three Great Evils of the Age, and 
I am Fearfully and Wonderfully Made. His popularity as a conductor of 
institutes is evidenced by the following memorial presented to him in 1895 by 
the teachers of Boone county : 

"Whereas: The sixth session of the Boone County Normal Institute under 
voiir direction is now drawing to a close, and in view of the fact that these 



34 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

sessions have been the most earnest and enthusiastic ever held in the county, the 
courses of study being the most systematic and complete ever issued, the 
instruction in them able and conscientious and the manner of conducting them 
competent and energetic ; 

"In grateful recognition whereof : We, the teachers of Boone county, tender 
you our sincere thanks for the watchful interest with which you have ever 
guarded our educational affairs, and the firm and yet courteous manner in 
which you have ever dealt with both teachers and patrons of our schools; and 
we do hereby recommend you to the school public, not only as an educator of 
profound ability, but as a gentleman of thoroughly Christian character. 

''Furthermore : We, the undersigned members of the Boone County Normal 
Institute of 1895, as a testimonial of our high personal regard, and as an evi- 
dence of our appreciation of the able manner in which you have discharged the 
important duties of your office, present you with this gold watch and chain, and 
hope that you may long enjoy positions of usefulness among your fellowmen." 

The subject of this sketch has been not only influential in the higher councils 
of educational meetings, but has held a number of official positions and served on 
important legislative committees. In 1892 at Cedar Rapids, Iowa, he was chosen 
the first vice-president of the Iowa State Teachers' Association. He was quite 
a young man when thus honored,* but he capably filled the position and in 1893 
was elected president of the County Superintendents' and Normal Department 
while in session at Des Moines. His indefatigable efforts in promoting organiza- 
tion had the desired effect and gave Iowa the largest meeting ever held up to that 
time by county superintendents. The Iowa Normal Monthly, published at 
Dubuque, Iowa, said of him : 

"He is master in effecting organization and system. He brings harmony and 
a gladdening spirit into the work. Under his efficient management ever}' line of 
school work has been awakened and broadened. He has organized a teachers' 
library and a hundred for the public schools with over two thousand five hundred 
volumes. His systematic plans for conducting teachers' meetings and county 
institutes make them at once profitable and popular. In his office are kept the 
most accurate and systematic records of supervision and gradation. 

"He is an able writer and natural speaker. The past year he delivered about 
forty lectures before institutes and conventions. While he takes delight in this 
line of work, he is constantly guarding the schools in his charge. Their upbuild- 
ing and successful advancement have been his constant desire. One of Iowa's 
greatest educators, Dr. W. H. Beardshear, fittingly says of him : T can speak 
■of him and his work in the most commendable terms.' " 

In speaking of his public life and work it may be fitting to mention briefly 
the confidence in which he is held by those that know him best. This applies 
not only to his public service, but is true also of his business and social life. 
When but twenty-one years of age he was nominated for justice of the peace 
in Pilot Mound township by a class of citizens who wanted to bring a young man 
and efficiency to that office at a time when the town of Pilot Mound was in its 
infancy. It is needless to say that he was elected and that he served his con- 
stituents with ability. After retiring from the county superintendency in 1901 
he was chosen a member of the city council of Boone by the citizens of the fifth 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 35 

ward who favor public improvements, and was elected for consecutive terms 
aggregating a total of thirteen years, the longest in the history of the city. 

He is closely identified v/ith many local enterprises and for many years was on 
the board of directors of the Boone Commercial Association, serving as the presi- 
dent of this organization for the year of 191 1-1912. It was during this period that 
the Fairview Addition to Boone, the new two hundred thousand dollar high 
school, the Swedish Old Folks Home, the larger city waterworks and other enter- 
prises were promoted by the business interests of Boone, and of which he was 
an advocate. 

He is indebted largely to himself for what he is and for what he has achieved, 
but above all he attributes his success to the watchful care and constant encour- 
agement of his parents. From his father, a man strongly devoted to the religious 
teachings and moral practices of the Lutheran church, he obtained a fine collec- 
tion of works in the German, and to him also is he indebted for support in 
attending for two years a school where he studied modern languages and the 
sciences. From this work as a' nucleus, he broadened his mind by constant study 
and practical application, taking, while engaged in school supervision, advantage 
of university extension courses of study and in 1899 was awarded on an exam- 
ination the degree of Master of Arts by the Western University, in Illinois. 

While at the farm home during his youth he began to take interest in read- 
ing the works of great authors, such as Schiller, Bryant, Holmes, Whittier, 
Goethe, Bancroft, Shakespeare and Dickens, and from each he drew inspira- 
tion characteristic of the writer. He was particularly fond of sketches drawn 
from Eulenspiegel and the Nibelungenlied. Being interested in literary work, 
he began to find pleasure in writing as a local correspondent for county news- 
papers, and prepared numerous essays on literary topics to be read before 
schools and lyceums. In 1890 he began publishing the Boone County Teacher, 
a monthly educational journal, which he issued for ten years and made it a 
helpful means of furthering pedagogical work. In 1893 he read an able paper 
on Demands of the County Superintendency before the County Superintend- 
ents' and Normal Department at Des Moines, and subsequently delivered many 
addresses relating to educational topics before institutes and teachers' meet- 
ings. While county superintendent of I'oone county he also published annu- 
ally the Graded Four Years' Institute Course of Study, which was issued 
regularly for ten years. 

The finest literary work of Professor Hoist, however, is "The Teachers' and 
Pupils' Cyclopaedia." He began work on it in 1898, when he was in the county 
superintendency, writing biographical sketches and articles on scientific subjects, 
such as would not lose interest and value by the lapse of time. In the early 
part of 1900 he employed typewriters and shorthand reporters with the view 
of completing the work on the manuscript and making it ready for the com- 
positors, working from early morning until nine o'clock at night about two 
years in collating and revising it. The work was finally published in its com- 
plete fomi in February, 1902, when it was issued in three large volumes con- 
taining two thousand two hundred and six pages and about one thousand five 
hundred illustrations. 



36 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

Ten editions of "The Teachers' and Pupils' Cyclopaedia" were issued with 
various revisions from the first set of plates. However, the publication was 
thoroughly revised and enlarged to seven volumes in 1912, when it embraced 
about four thousand double-column pages and was called "The New Teachers' 
and Pupils' Cyclopaedia." About two hundred and fifty thousand sets of this 
reference work have been sold in the United States, Canada, Alaska and Hawaii, 
placing it in the highest rank of useful American literary products. 

"The New Teachers' and Pupils' Cyclopaedia" is written in a beautiful, 
narrative style, and is a valuable treatise and dictionary of geography, his- 
tory, mytholog}', discoveries, inventions and educational progress. It treats 
the literature of all countries and peoples ; reviews the resources and political 
conditions of all lands : presents the biographies of all noted persons both living 
and dead ; and discusses the arts and sciences in their working and application. 
It has already found its way into hundreds of homes and school libraries, and 
is justly regarded one of the finest and most utilitarian American products 
now on the book market. 

The writings of Bernhart Paul Hoist, besides outlines, addresses, essays and 
books of reference, include a large number of verses and poetical compositions. 
These products, including a number of translations, were written at times of 
rest, or as change in occupation permitted, being influenced, of course, by the 
inspirations which then impress the writer, such as the native fancy or the 
scenes and experiences while traveling in America or abroad. In 1913 these 
writings were collected and published in a volume under the title "Poems of 
Friendship and Other Poems." By permission of the author we publish the 
following, verses which are classed among the Poems of Power: 

SUCCESS 

It means a cross for faithful hands to carry. 

In contest fierce, and with tireless brain : 
It means that weary limbs must never tarry. 

When right demands that we should try again. 

Al morn may beauty roses bloom in glory, 

.\t noon may shrink and wither stem and leaf, 

At night may all the world seem cold and hoary. 
And should this the spirit vex and grieve? 

You cringe because your hands are bleeding. 

And seek a new and untried field for luck. 
And soon release your grip, when yon shouUl be heeding 

The fact that true success depends on ])luck. 

If you despair when days are clear and cloudless. 

And dream that dreadful storms are raging overhead. 

An awful ghost will rise before you shroudless, 
.And all your early hopes will soon be dead. 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 37 

Success will surely come with time and labor, 

If we our aims will carry far and high, 
For we can win the plaudits of our neighbor. 

And reach the goal by perseverance bye and bye. 

Nature, life, love and friendship are favorite themes for verses by this author. 
He is at his best when writing on these and kindred topics. The writer is 
pleased to quote the following selection which is classed with his Poems of 
Friendship : 

FRIENDS 

Should some one speak unkindly of your friend. 
With earnest mien, you must his worth defend ; 
Though all the world should at your true friend chide. 
Hold to his hand and stand close by his side — 
For this we know : a true and trusty heart 
Of happy life is an essential part. 

Heaven will in its gentle kindness give 
True friends to those who truly act and live, 
But those that fail trustworthy friends to prize 
At length are severed from these holy ties — 
And finally, o'erwhelmed by doubt and fear, 
Are borne by strangers on their rustic bier. 

Should storms betide and all your fortune rend, 
You still are rich if you possess a friend. 
But if you win vast fortune and renown. 
Or even wear a sceptered, kingly crown. 
And have no friends, no trusty friends in need. 
You still are poor, ah ! very poor, indeed ! 

Though born in the antipodes, we think few Americans have touched more 
closely the spirit of democracy or treated with greater fervor the liberty and 
independence which is ours. Of this we have an admirable example in the 
following lines classed with his Poems of Sentiment : 

LIBERTY 

Written after visiting New York Harbor 

Hail to the woman with the torch of fire. 

Standing on Bedloe's Isle the world to guide! 

Beacon to pilgrims of worthy sire. 
Guide to the homeless! Far and wide 

Has thy mighty welcome blazed its way 



38 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

To all earth's tired as well as me, 
And now I see the break of better day, 
The dawn of freedom and of liberty ! 

Unlike the brazen Rhodes of Grecian lore, 

With mighty limbs from land to land ; 
She stands upon the eastern sea-washed shore. 

The emblem of the free in heart and hand ! 
Her face is glad with Music of the Spheres, 

Her eyes as stars in glowing beauty shine, 
She lights the path to peace in future years. 

She progress gives to me and all of mine! 

Long centuries had pressed upon the poor, 

Had made them dead to joy and faith and fear ; 
They could not hope to see an open door, 

So pressed with pain, could scarcely shed a tear : 
The Tragedy of Time caused head to bow. 

The Wheel of Labor made the back to bend ; 
Profaned and robbed, what could they do, and how ? 

What shores to them would friendly welcome send? 

The masters and the lords of royal blood 

With monstrous mandates crushed the living soul. 

And ground man down with burdens and tlie flood 
Of wars. And, as the years and ages roll, 

Refused to right the base perfidious wrongs 

That dwarf and stun the much-bewildered brain — 

But, hark ! I hear the welcome, new-born song 
And see the torch of liberty again ! 

Glides now the ship to anchor in the bay — 

Soon will I tread the shore of my adopted land 
And breathe a purer spirit, blessed day. 

As I step on the far-enchanted strand ! 
This heritage is nature's noblest gift 

To man, and to the multitudes that come, 
As well as all who long have been adrift. 

And rest at last to make this land their home. 

Hail to the 'cvoman zvitli the torch of fire. 

Statiding on Bedloe's Isle the zvorld to guide! 
Beacon to pilgrims of zvorthy sire, 

Guide to the homeless! Far and zvide 
Has th\ iniyhtv welcome biased the tvay 

To all earth's tired as tvell as me. 
And nozv I see the break of better day. 

The daivn of freedom and of liberty! 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 39 

From 1867 until February, 1900, the subject of this sketch resided on the 
family homestead immediately south of the town of Pilot Mound, a tract of 
one hundred and seventy acres that is now a part of the town, and in the 
latter year removed to the city of Boone, where he is still a resident. He is the 
owner of several large tracts of land, has a fine home in the city, and holds 
material interests in The Hoist Publishing Company, a concern devoted to the 
publication of his books. In irjio he completed building the Hotel Hoist, Boone's 
popular hostelry, and equipped it with all the modern improvements. He is a 
stockholder and official in the Boone .State Bank, in the Boone National Bank 
and in other large banking and commercial enterprises. 

The subject of this sketch is a reader and has a fine library of more than 
five thousand volumes, including books printed in the English, German, Swed- 
ish and other languages. In his work he has exemplified the spirit of education 
ajjproved by Sidney Smith, who said: "The real object of education is to give 
children resources that will endure as long as life endures; habits that will 
ameliorate, not destroy ; occupation that will render sickness tolerable, solitude 
pleasant, age venerable, life more dignified and useful, and death less terrible." 
He is a man of distinct and forceful individuality, his influence has ever been on 
the side of progress and public improvement and Boone county has reason to be 
proud that she can number him among her citizens. 



ISAAC GAGE OSGOOD. 

Isaac Gage Osgood, who is one of the proprietors of the O. & D. Motor 
Company, has in a short time become one of the prosperous business men of 
Boone. His firm are agents for the Yale, DeLuxe, M. & M. and Eagle motor- 
cycles and they also deal in bicycles and cycle accessories besides doing various 
kinds of repairing. The business is located at No. 809 Allen street and the firm 
enjoys a most profitable trade. 

'Mr. Osgood was born in Alarseilles, La Salle county, Illinois, June 10, 1875, 
and is a son of Simon T. and Louise L. (Gage) Osgood. The paternal grand- 
parents are Luther P. and Catherine (Toll) Osgood, natives of Oneida county, 
New York. The grandfather, who is a farmer by occupation, removed to the 
middle west about sixty-two years ago, locating in La Salle county, and there 
he yet resides. 

Isaac G. Osgood was educated in the public schools of La Salle county and 
the Des Moines College of Des Moines, Iowa. He attended school until about 
twenty years of age but as a boy worked in a lumberyard and grain elevator 
for his father. He subsequently started farming on his grandfather's property, 
which comprised four hundred and twenty acres, and there remained for five 
years, when the land was sold and our subject engaged with his father and 
brother, Beman F., in the manufacturing and lumber business, the firm being 
known as S. T. Osgood & Son. They were also at the head of the Marseilles 
Harrow Company. At the end of four years Isaac G. Osgood acquired title 
to a farm east of La Salle, Illinois, which he improved and cultivated until 1912, 
when he sold out and came to Boone, Iowa. Here he has since become the 



40 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

head of the O. & D. Motor Company and in this short time has demonstrated 
his ability as a business man. 

On December 15, 1897, Mr. Osgood married Miss Lottie E. Drackley. of 
La Salle county, Illinois, and they have five children : Lenore, Herbert M., Ade- 
laide L., Simon T. and Charlotte L. Mr. Osgood is a republican but has never 
sought public office, although he is well informed upon all public questions 
and stanchly supports his party. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church and interested in its work. Although he has resided in Boone but two 
years, he already has established a reputation which ranks him with the suc- 
cessful men of that city, and it may be safely prophesied that his business afi^airs 
will grow in scope and importance as the years pass by. 



JUDSON REYNOLDS CRARY. 

ludson Reynolds Crary was a man whom to know was to respect and honor. 
Life was ever to him purposeful. Each day brought its opportunities that were 
well improved and, while his opportunities were not exceptional, he, through 
his own efforts, reached a position of broad intelligence as well as of business 
enterprise, resulting in a well rounded success. As the years went on he became 
more and more strongly endeared to the people of Boone and the surroimding 
country and since he has passed away his memory is cherished and revered by all 
who knew him and remains to them as a blessed benediction. 

Mr. Crary was born on the 27th of August, 1837, at Pierrepont, St. Lawrence 
county, New York, and lived there until nineteen years of age. After teaching 
one term in a country school in Potsdam township, St. Lawrence county, he, 
with not over ten dollars in his pocket and a letter of recommendation from a 
judge, for whom he had written while working his way through the academy, 
arrived in Chicago and from 1856 to 1867 was employed as an accountant 
except for a number of months, when he served with the Chicago Board of 
Trade Battery at Cairo, Illinois. This battery was the first volunteer regiment 
to leave Chicago. He was honorably discharged from the same, for fever had 
rendered further service fatal. In 1865 he was joined by his brother M. S. 
Crary, who remained with him for two years. On the expiration of that period 
they came to Boone, arriving in 1867. In a partnership relation, which was, 
formed on the 29th of April, 1S67, they embarked in the general hardware and 
implement business and their trade constantly grew and developed until it became 
one of the largest of the kind in the state. The brothers continued together under 
the firm style of Crary Brothers until December 16, 1909, when they disposed 
of their interests. There were still many features of their business to close up, 
however, and they were yet engaged in that work when J. R. Crary became ill — 
an illness from which he never recovered. 

On the 27th of October, 1867, Mr. Crary was married, in Livonia, New York, 
to Miss Jessie West, and brought his bride to their new home in Boone They 
had one of the finest homes in the community, and it was ever the abode of a warm 
hearted and generous hospitality. Mr. and Mrs. Crary became the parents of 




J. K. CRAKV 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 43 

three children: Bessie; Dr. A. W. ; and Mrs. Ruth Stevenson, who has a little son, 
Dean Stevenson. 

Mr. Crary was a member of the Universalist church, and his life was ever 
upright and honorable in all its relations. He constantly endeavored to do 
what he believed to be right, and his integrity and honor were never called into 
question. After attending the district schools in his early youth and select schools 
for a brief period he was graduated from the St. Lawrence Academy at Potsdam, 
which completed his school training, yet, throughout his life he remained a 
student, not only of books but of the signs of the times. He became a well 
educated, scholarly man. He possessed a notably retentive memory, read broadly 
and thought deeply. His reading covered a wide range, and he became the 
possessor of a very extensive and well selected library. He was especially 
fond of poetry and improved many a moment by picking up a volume and re- 
reading one of his favorite poems. It was an easy matter for him to express 
himself in light verse and sometimes he gave himself to the task of writing 
poetry of a more serious or classical nature. He enjoyed the study of genealogy, 
and he also spent many a pleasant hour in the cultivation of roses and in the 
pursuit of photography. Whatever he undertook was done with thoroughness. 
He enjoyed art, drama and music and read so broadly and studied so thoroughly 
along these lines that he was well qualified for advanced criticism. He loved 
nature in every phase, especially trees and flowers, and took great interest in 
working among them. He enjoyed travel and brought to new scenes the interest 
and enthusiasm of youth. His interest centered in his family and those who 
came to know him saw that beneath the calm, slightly stern exterior there was an 
unceasing fund of geniality. He was in sympathy with the young in their pleas- 
ures, and he had an unusually wide range of information concerning games and 
athletic spQrts. He was equally well versed upon the current topics of the day, 
and he could converse as readily with young people as with old, holding at all 
times their interest and attention. In the family circle, reaching out to brothers, 
sisters, nephews and nieces, he was always a favorite. They came to him for 
advice and assistance, which at all times were freely given. He held friendship 
inviolable. There were in him those qualities which drew him strongly to those 
with whom he came in contact and his associates constantly found unexplored 
depths in his nature, resulting from a comprehensive fund of information and a 
broad, keen sympathy with life in all of its higher purposes, activities and atti- 
tudes, which rendered association with him a constant pleasure and intellectual 
and moral uplift. 



ARCHIE WEST CRARY, M. D. 

The tendency of the age is towards specialization and those who attain the 
highest degree of proficiency are the men who, after familiarizing themselves 
with the broad general principles of a calling or profession, concentrate their 
energies upon a particular line and thus gain notable skill in one field. This 
practice Dr. Archie West Crary has followed and is today well known by reason 
of his special work in ophthalmology, otolog\' and laryngology at Boone. He 



44 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

was bom April i8, 1876. in the city in which he still makes his home, his parents 
being J. R. and Jessie (West) Crary. The family comes of Scotch-Irish ancestrj' 
and was founded in America about one hundred years prior to the Revolutionary 
war. In the struggle for independence was Colonel Archibald Crary, after whom 
Dr. Crary is named. 

After mastering the branches of learning taught in the public schools Dr. 
A. W. Crary entered Cornell College and won the Bachelor of Science degree 
upon graduation with the class of 1897. The following year he enlisted for 
service in the Spanish-American war, becoming a private of Company I, of the 
Fifty-second Iowa Infantry X'olunteers. He continued in connection with the mili- 
tary organization of the state and in 19 10 was elected to the rank of first lieutenant 
of the Fifty-sixth Regiment of the Iowa National Guard. In the meantime he 
continued his studies in preparation for a professional career and upon the 
completion of a medical course in the State University of Iowa won his M. D. 
degree in 1906. During the last two years of his medical course he acted as 
clinical assistant in the State University Hospital for twenty hours a week and 
after graduation was appointed to a position upon the facultv of the State 
University, with the title of clinical assistant in ophthalmology, rhinolog}- and 
laryngology and occupied this position for one year, meanwhile assisting 
Dr. L. W. Dean, ex-president of the state medical association, in his work 
at the_ \'inton School of the Blind and in all his operative work. In 1907 he 
received the degree of Master of Science and in 1908 a special degree in 
ophthalmology, otology and laryngology. Since his graduation in 1906 he has 
continued in the practice of medicine and in his special field has shown marked 
efficiency. 

On the 22d of June, 1910, Dr. Crary was united in marriage in Emmetsburg, 
Iowa, to Miss Ida May Johnson, who was republican candidate for county 
superintendent of schools of Palo Alto county in 1909. Their home and grounds 
at the corner of Fourth and Linn streets are a monument to the artistic tastes 
of Dr. Crary's father, and there they gladly entertain all true friends and 
neighbors. The Doctor is well known in fraternal circles, belonging to the 
Knights of Pythias, the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the Masons. 



JOSIAH B. PATTERSON. 

Josiah B. Patterson, proprietor of a well appointed and well stocked grocery 
store in Boone, conducted under the name of the Patterson Grocery Company, 
has for more than a half century been identified with business and public inter- 
ests in this section of the state. He arrived in the county in 1856, locating at 
Belle Point, in the northeastern corner of Douglas township, upon a farm which 
his father had purchased in 1854. Since that time the family name has figured 
in connection with events of public importance and with the material develop- 
ment of the community. 

Josiah B. Patterson was born in Morgan county, Ohio, August 28, 1842, 
a son of William and Sarah (Cadwallader) Patterson. The father's birth oc- 
curred in Harrison cotinty, Ohio, November 20. 1819. He was a son of Jeremiah 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 45 

Patterson, of North Carolina, and a grandson of Captain William Patterson, 
who was a Scotchman by parentage, although born in the north of Ireland. He 
became a sea captain, devoting his entire life to that calling. Jeremiah Patter- 
son made farming his life work. He removed from North Carolina to Ohio 
and his death occurred in the latter state. His son, William Patterson, born 
and reared in Harrison county, Ohio, brought his family to Iowa in 1856 and 
settled upon a farm which he had previously purchased in 1854. With character- 
istic energy he began the development and cultivation of his land, which he 
converted into richly tilled fields, making his home thereon until his death. He 
was reared in the faith of the Society of Friends but afterward joined the 
Methodist Episcopal church. His wife was a native of Belmont county, Ohio, 
born February 27, 1821, and her death occurred in Boone county, July 12, 1906. 
She was a daughter of David Cadwallader, a native of North Carolina, although 
his father was a native of W'ales and the founder of the family in the new 
world. It was in r^Iorgan county, Ohio, in October, 1841, that William Patter- 
son and Sarah Cadwallader were united in marriage. They became the parents 
of four children, of whom Josiah B. and two sisters are yet living, these being: 
Mrs. Rachel Reichenbach, the wife of Frederick Reichenbach, a resident of 
Colfax township; and Mrs. Edith Johnson, a widow, also residing in Colfax 
township. The other sister was Mrs. Sarah \'outrees, who was the wife of 
George V'outrees and who died in December. 1910. 

Josiah Ij. Patterson spent the first fourteen years of his life in his native 
state and then accompanied his parents to Iowa. His educational opportunities 
were somewhat limited, but his training at farm labor was not meager. At the 
Lime of the Civil war, however, he put aside all business interests and personal 
considerations in order to respond to the country's call for aid, enlisting on the 
nth of August, 1862, as a member of Company D, Thirty-second Iowa Infan- 
trv, w ith which he remained until mustered out on the 24th of August, 1865. He 
participated in a number of hotly contested engagements, but was never wounded, 
although he was often in the thickest of the fight. 

When the war was over Mr. Patterson returned to Boone county and re- 
sumed farming, in which he engaged until 1888. He was then appointed deputy 
sheriff under Samuel Zenor, and the following year was elected to the oiifice 
of sheriff, in which position he served for two terms, or four years, retiring from 
that position on the ist of January, 1894. He was again called to public office in 
1897 when appointed postmaster of Boonesboro, in which position he continued 
until 1902, In January of the latter year he was again made deputy sheritif and 
continued in that position for five years. Since September, 1908, he has been 
interested in the grocerv trade and has divided his attention between his com- 
mercial and agricultural interests, for he still supervises his farm. He has an 
attractive store in which he carries a large and well selected line of staple and 
fancy groceries, and his success has placed him with the leading merchants of 
the city. 

In March, 1862, Mr. Patterson was united in marriage, when but nineteen 
and a half years of age, to Miss Mary Hull, who was born in Licking county, 
Ohio, and when eight years of age came to Boone county with her father's fam- 
ily. This was in the year 1852. She was a daughter of Uriah and Rachel 
(Sigler) Hull, residents of Licking county, where they resided until coming 



46 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

west to Iowa. The mother died in 1875 and the father passed away in li 
when nearly ninety years of age. Their daughter, Mrs. Patterson, was called 
to her final rest November 27, 1907, and her death was deeply regretted by 
many friends as well as by her immediate family. By her marriage she had be- 
come the mother of seven children, all of whom survive. Charles H., is operat- 
ing the home farm near Luther, Boone county. Mrs. Elizabeth Jenkins is living 
in Denver, Colorado. Emma is at home. Wilkie C. is a jeweler of Aurora, Illi- 
nois. Webb is engaged in the grocery business in Boonesboro. Sarah and 
Gertrude are at home, and the latter is employed in the Boone postoffice. 

Politically Mr. Patterson has always been a stalwart republican. He has 
filled nearly all of the township and other local offices, and the record which he 
has made as a public officer is a creditable one, being characterized at all times 
by promptness, fidelity and loyalty. Socially he is connected with the Benevol- 
ent Protective Order of Elks and the Knights of Pythias. He is also a member 
of J. G. Miller Post, No. 69, G. A. R., and is as true and loyal to his country 
today as when he followed the old flag upon the battlefields of the south. The 
success which had come to him in a business way is the direct and merited 
reward of his own labors. Starting out in life with little capital, he has worked 
his way upward, and his energy and enterprise place him among the substantial 
citizens of his adopted county. 



LLOYD A. TILLSON. 



Lloyd A. Tillson, of Boone, is a member of the well known plumbing and 
heating firm of T. E. Nelson & Company. He is the outside representative for 
this business and has done much toward establishing it upon a profitable basis. 
He was born in Boone, November 4, 1880, and is a son of Josiah P. Tillson, 
who was born in Otsego, New York. 

Lloyd A. Tillson was educated in the public schools of Boone, graduating 
with the class of 1898. He received his first lessons under Miss Adelaide Skliba 
and graduated from high school under Professor Miller. He then for two years 
pursued a course of mechanical engineering in the Iowa State College at Ames. 
At the end of that time he entered the employ of Sutherin & Company, working 
for four years in their plumbing shop, and there he laid the foundation for the 
valuable knowledge which he now uses in promoting his own interests. In 1905 
he became connected with C. B. Sherman in the plumbing business, the head- 
quarters of the firm being at No. 618 Story street, and he continued in that 
partnership until 1908, selling his interest to Mr. Sherman in that year and 
establishing business alone at No. 1009 Story street. He there remained for two 
years, disposing of his interests at the end of that time and acquiring a half share 
in the firm of T. E. Nelson & Company. Mr. Tillson has since given his sole 
attention toward the upbuilding of the business, and the firm enjoys the highest 
reputation, being engaged in sanitary plumbing and the installation of steam 
and hot water heating. Not only is he an expert in his particular trade but an 
excellent business man, the success of the firm being founded upon efficiency, 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 47 

thoroughness and honesty. The honorable principles which influence all his 
actions have become the policy of the tirm. 

On June 7, 1905, Mr. Tillson was united in marriage to Miss Florence Stokes, 
of Boone, her parents being Isaac and Margaret (Kennedy) Stokes. They have 
three children : Robert Lloyd and Howard Dow, twins ; and Jack Edwin. Mr. 
Tillson stands high in his community as a business man and citizen, being ever 
ready to promote enterprises which will prove of value to the city. Although 
he is not jxilitically active, he is public-spirited and is conceded to be a factor in 
the development of his community and county. 



JOHN JENSEN. 



John Jensen, engaged in the cultivation of the ^^'illiam Bakley farm in 
Amaqua township, comprising a tract of one hundred and sixty acres on sec- 
tion 35, was born in Denmark, October 7, 1865, and is a son of Andres and 
Sina Jensen, who were also natives of that country. The father made farming 
his life work and has always continued a resident of Denmark, where he is now 
living retired, making his home with a daughter. His wife passed away in 
1898. 

John Jensen spent his youthful days in his native country and pursued his 
education in its public schools. His opportunities in that direction were some- 
what meager, however, for when thirteen years of age he left home to earn 
his own living as a farm hand. He was thus employed until 1889, or until he 
was twenty-four years of age, when he bade adieu to friends and native land 
and sought a home in the new world. Landing on American shores, he pushed 
his way into the interior of the country, settling at Ogden, Boone county, where 
he began work as a farm hand, being thus employed for four years. Desiring 
that his labors should more directly benefit himself, he then rented the Earl farm 
in Beaver township, which he operated for a year. He next rented the William 
Bakley farm in Amaqua township and has since operated it, covering a period 
of nineteen years. He is now cultivating only one hundred and sixty acres, 
which tract is situated on section 35. At a former date, however, he engaged 
more largely in this work. He has extended the scope of his activities in other 
directions, for in October, 1913, he joined William Bakley in the conduct of a 
grain and coal business in Ogden under the firm style of Jensen & Company, 
in which connection he has already built up a big trade. 

On the 30th of November, 1889, Mr. Jensen was united in marriage to Miss 
Mary Christensen, a daughter of Mels and Catherina (Jensen) Christensen, who 
were natives of Denmark. The father followed farming in his native country, 
where he is still living. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Jensen have been born four children : 
Clarence, thirteen years of age ; Roy and Floyd, twins, aged eleven ; and Free- 
man, aged seven. The religious faith of the family is that of the Lutheran 
church, to which they are most loyal, and the political belief of Mr. Jensen is 
that of the republican party, for he feels that its platform contains the best ele- 
ments of good government. He is today a loyal and patriotic American citizen, 
having the same attachment for the land of his adoption as those who have been 



48 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

born under the stars and stripes. He has never regretted his determination to 
come to the new world, for here he has found good opportunities, which he 
has improved, and is today one of the substantial citizens of Ogden and Amaqua 
township. 



J. R. WHITAKER. 



J. R. Whitaker, a prominent representative of the Boone county bar, holding 
at all times to high ideals in his profession, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania, June 3, 1852, his parents being Charles and Catherine (Ripka) Whitaker, 
who were also natives of the Keystone state. The father was born in the year 
1820 and following the outbreak of the Civil war offered his services to the 
government, becoming colonel of the Twenty-eighth Regiment of Wisconsin 
\'olunteers, with which he served throughout the period of hostilities. When he 
left Philadelphia to establish his home in the middle west, he settled in Waukesha 
county, Wisconsin, and there resided until 1866, when he brought his family to 
Iowa, settling first in Boonesboro. Subsequently he removed to Boone, where 
he engaged in the hardware business, and in 1868 he removed to a farm in 
Hamilton county, which remained his place of residence until 1881. He then 
established his home in Ames, Iowa, where he continued to reside until called 
to his final rest in December, 1892. He was twice married, his first wife being 
Catherine Ripka, by whom he had eight children: Catherine, J. R., J. M., Sarah, 
Amelia and Agnes, all of whom are yet living; and Lavinia and Ellen, deceased. 
The wife and mother passed away in 1862, and Mr. Whitaker afterward married 
Margaret Hill, whose death occurred in Hamilton county, Iowa, in December, 
1894. There were several children by that marriage. 

Judge Whitaker was a youth of fourteen years when the family came to Iowa, 
where for forty-eight years he has now made his home. His youth was largely 
passed upon his father's farm, and he supplemented his public school education 
by study in the Iowa State College, from which he graduated in 1874. In 1871, 
he was admitted to the bar, for he had determined upon the practice of law as 
a life work and had thoroughly qualified himself for the profession by preliminary 
reading. In 187S he opened a law office in Boone in partnership with John A. 
Hull, Sr., the association continuing for five years, during which time Judge 
WHiitaker made substantial progress in a profession where advancement is pro- 
verbially slow. At the end of that time, or in 1883, he was elected city attorney 
and the following year was again called to public office, being elected mayor of 
Boone. He discharged the duties of that position with promptness and capa- 
bility for two years and in 1885 was elected to the office of county attorney, in 
which he continued through reelection for three terms. Judicial honors were 
conferred upon him in 1898, when he was elected district judge. He took his 
seat upon the bench, and his decisions, strictly fair and impartial, brought to 
him high commendation from his professional associates and the general public. 
At the close of his first term he was again his party's nominee and was reelected. 
On his retirement from the bench he resumed the private practice of law, and 
his clientage is now large and distinctively representative. His name is asso- 




J. K. WIIITAKKK 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 51 

ciated with the most important litigated interests that have been tried in the 
courts of the district for more than thirty-five years, and his pronounced ability 
has won for him his judicial honors and his gratifying success as a lawyer. 

On the 5th of July, 1884, Mr. Whitaker was united in marriage to Miss 
Elizabeth Tallman, a native of New York, and they have become the parents of 
three children : Benjamin T., who is now a physician of Boone ; Genevieve, who 
died in 1887; and James R., at home. The family attend the Presbyterian church, 
and Mr. Whitaker holds membership with the Knights of Pythias. His political 
allegiance is always given to the republican party, and in oiifice he has given 
indisputable proof of his public-spirited devotion to the general good. 



BENJAMIN B. WILEY. 

Few business men of Boone are better or more favorably known than Ben- 
jamin B. Wiley, the manager of the Arie Opera House. Not only is Mr. Wiley 
achieving individual success in that position, but he is rendering a service to 
the general public of his city by pro\iding amusement and entertainment to its 
people. 

He was born in Waterloo, Iowa, on January 15, 1864, and is a son of Tobias 
Wile, a native of Stuttgart, Wurtemberg, Germany. The father was an officer 
in the German army and participated in the great war against France. His 
birth occurred about 1824 and he received an excellent education, entering upon 
military life before he was married. He held commissioned rank for six years. 
At the end of that time he crossed the Atlantic to New York, whence he made 
his way to Cincinnati. Not too proud to earn an honest dollar by any means 
that were honorable and taking advantage of opportunities as they presented 
themselves, he peddled goods in that city in order to procure a living. He mar- 
ried Miss Julia Rosenstock, a native of Alsace-Lorraine, who emigrated to the 
United States at the age of eighteen, leaving behind her her parents, who both 
died in Alsace. From Cincinnati the father went after his marriage to Waterloo, 
Iowa, where he bought and sold stock. He often drove overland to Chicago in 
the pursuit of this business. Later he turned his attention to the clothing trade 
in Waterloo and conducted a store with great success for a number of years. The 
last years of his life he lived in retirement and died in i88g, in Waterloo, his 
widow surviving him but three months. His burial took place in Dubuque. 
The parents of our subject had the following children: Moses, a capitalist of 
Warrensburg, who married a Miss Roberts ; Sarah, who is now Mrs. Edward 
Hopkins of Duluth ; Louis, of Minneapolis, who is engaged in business in that 
city ; Max R., of Chicago ; Benjamin B., of this review ; Fanny, who is Mrs. I. B. 
Myers of Memphis, Tennessee ; Mayme ; Sophia ; and Hattie. The last three 
make their home in Chicago. 

Benjamin B. Wiley attendeii the public schools of Waterloo till he was 
fourteen years of age. At that early age he took upon himself the responsibilities 
of life, becoming an employe of M. Hellman, a clothing merchant of Omaha, for 
whom he clerked for ten years. He spent two years at Yankton, South Dakota, 
for the same company and for three years was located at Grand Island. At the 



52 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

end of that time, in August, 1901, Mr. Wiley with three of his sisters came to 
Boone and opened a racquet store. Subsequently Mr. Wiley assumed the man- 
agement of the old Phipps Opera House of Boone, and it may be mentioned 
in this connection that while in Omaha he acted as treasurer of Boyd's Opera 
House there, fulfilling the duties of this office during the evenings. In Boone 
he subsequently became a partner of James J. Kirby in the management of 
the opera house and the bill-posting business and successfully continued so for 
seven or eight years. The partnership was then dissolved and during this time 
the old opera house was remodeled and the name changed to the Arie Opera 
House, the building having been bought by B. Arie. Upon Mr. Kirby leaving 
the firm Mr. Wiley assumed entire charge and management, and he has since 
successfully conducted the establishment. He is well versed in all the details 
connected with the business and has proven himself an efficient manager and a 
farsighted business man. 

In November, 1899, Mr. Wiley married Miss Edith Foster, who was born in 
Boone in 1881 and is a daughter of William and Matilda Foster. To this union 
the following children were born : Max, thirteen years of age ; Harold, who is 
eleven; Julia, nine; Benjamin B., Jr., six; and Marjorie, aged four. The family 
reside at 1324 Green street and occupy one of the largest and most handsome 
homes in Boone. Mr. Wiley has always been an ardent democrat and cast his 
first vote for Grover Cleveland. Locally, however, he is independent in his 
support of candidates and even in national politics he rather prefers to follow 
his own judgment nowadays. Mr. Wiley is a public-spirited citizen and has 
contributed much toward the growth and development of his city, being ever 
ready to give financial and moral support to all those measures which promise 
to be of value to the city and its inhabitants. 



WILLIAM D. KRUSE. 



William D. Kruse, a prosperous and enterprising young citizen of Boone 
county, is a factor in financial circles as assistant cashier of the Ogden State Bank, 
which position he has held for the past five years. He is a worthy native son of 
this county, his birth having occurred in Ogden on the 28th of August, 1887. 
His parents, Hans and Catherine (Retus) Kruse, were both born in Schleswig, 
Germany. The father took up his abode among the pioneer settlers of Boone 
county, Iowa, in the early '60s, and here devoted his attention to general agri- 
cultural pursuits throughout his active business career, winning gratifying suc- 
cess in his undertakings and becoming the owner of considerable property. He 
passed away on the 25th of April, 191 1, and the community mourned the loss of 
one of its substantial and esteemed citizens. His widow survives and is also 
widely and favorably known. 

William D. Kruse, reared and educated in the county of his nativity, was a 
youth of twelve years when in 1899 his parents established their home in Ogden, 
where he attended school for four years. Subsequently he spent six years as 
clerk in a grocery store and on the expiration of that period was made assistant 
cashier in the Ogden State Bank, in which capacity he has served for the past 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 53 

five years. He is a stockholder in the institution and as an able and courteous 
official has contributed materially to its continued growth and success. Mr. 
Kruse likewise handles fire and life insurance and deals in real estate to some 
extent. He owns one hundred and sixty acres of valuable land in Amaqua town- 
ship, this county. 

On the 15th of February, 191 1, Mr. Kruse was united in marriage to Miss 
Grace Gustlin, a daughter of John Gustlin, a resident of Callender, Webster 
county, Iowa. Our subject and his wife have one child. Vivian, who is about two 
years of age. 

Mr. Kruse gives his political allegiance to the democracy and now acts as 
treasurer of Ogden, proving an efficient incumbent in that important position. 
He also serves as treasurer of the Boone County Fair Association and is widely 
recognized as a loyal and public-spirited citizen who has the best interests of 
his community at heart. His religious views are in accord with those of the 
Lutheran and Methodist churches. He is a young man of strong and estimable 
character and highly respected by all who know him. 



JAMES JOHNSTONE. 



There is much credit due James Johnstone for what he has achieved because 
he began his career in a comparatively humble position and today owns a pros- 
perous bakery in Boone, being numbered among the substantial business men of 
the city. He was born in Inverness, Scotland, December 26, 1868, and is a son 
of James and Margaret (Ross) Johnstone. The grandfather, James Johnstone, 
was a butcher and drover and a successful man in that line of business in his 
day. He died in the little town of Petty, near Inverness, Scotland. The father, 
who was born about 1843, after attending the public schools, worked as a drover 
and butcher. He drove cattle through all that section of Scotland and located in 
Inverness, where he was married and carried on business for several years. He 
then moved to the little town of Ballintore. where he now resides, the town being 
located on the Scotch coast, north of Inverness. He ships live stock to the 
London markets by the boat route and is a substantial business man of his little 
city. His wife died in 1898. She was a strict Presbyterian, to which faith her 
husband also gives his allegiance. They were the parents of the following children : 
Margaret, who is married and resides on a farm near Aberdeen; William, of 
Perth, Scotland, who is also married and is employed as an engineer on the High- 
land Railroad: Janet, of Tain, Scotland, who married James Sangster, a con- 
tractor; James, our subject: Christina, who is married, her husband following 
carpentering in Aberdeen, Scotland : Alexander, a drover of Ballintore ; John, a 
carpenter of Boone, Iowa ; George, a hotel-keeper of Johannesburg, South 
Africa, who is married and served with the scouts in the British army during the 
Boer war; and David, of Ballintore, Scotland. 

James Johnstone of this review passed his boyhood in Inverness and Ballintore, 
both romantic and historic old towns of Scotland. There he attended the public 
schools, receiving thorough instruction until fourteen years of age, when he 
was apprenticed to the baker's trade in Inverness, serving for four years. After 



54 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

having completed his indenture he set sail from Glasgow for New York, where 
he arrived in May, iSSC). After a short stay he removed to Boston, where he 
was employed at his trade for three years, and then went to Chicago after having 
visited various states. He spent the years 1892, 1893 and 1894 in Chicago and then 
proceeded to Des Aloines, Iowa, where he had charge of the S. B. Carton bakery 
for a time. This was the largest establishment of its kind there in those days. 
Mr. Johnstone next came to Boone, finding employment with the Perrine bakery 
for about three years. At the end of that period he started in the same business 
mdependently in the old Crary building, on the site of the present garage and 
removed from there one and one-half years ago to his present place, his estab- 
lishment turning out a grade of goods which is eagerly demanded by a large list 
of customers. Mr. Johnstone is a thoroughly up-to-date business man, having 
equipped his plant with modern machinery and using the most sanitary methods 
in the manufacture of his goods. He enjoys a high reputation for fairness— 
a reputation which is merited. 

In May. 1895, James Johnstone married Miss Alice Reed, of Rose Hill. Iowa, 
a daughter of William Reed. They have three sons, Horatio, William and George. 
The parents are members of the Presbyterian church and politically Mr. John- 
stone is a stanch republican, ever upholding the issues and candidates of his 
party. He is thoroughly well informed upon all public ciuestions and particularly 
interested in those affecting his city and county. He has been a prime mover ii* 
promoting a number of valuable measures which have turned out beneficially 
for the city and stands in the front ranks with those men who have at heart the 
progress of the community. He is esteemed and respected by all who know him 
m a business or social way and is well entitled to the confidence and trust with 
which he is met on all sides. 



NATHAN E. GOLDTHWAIT. 

Nathan E. Goldthwait was born in Mendon, Worcester county, Massachusetts, 
December 29, 1827. At the age of eight years he moved with his parents to 
Uxbridge, Massachusetts, where he attended the common public schools until 
the age of seventeen. At that time his ambition led him to seek a college educa- 
tion, depending on his own resources to win his way. For two years he attended 
in succession the Worcester and Uxbridge Academies of his native state. He en- 
tered Brown University in .September, 1848, and graduated in June, 1852. He 
was at once appointed a teacher in the Worcester (Mass.) Academy, where he 
remained two years. In the years 1854 and 1855 he was principal (the last 
principal) of the Uxbridge Academy and also the first principal of the Uxbridge 
high school. 

Early in 1856 the western fever took him to Wisconsin, where he became 
president of the Wisconsin Female College at Fox Lake, now transferred to 
Milwaukee and one of the best ladies' colleges of our country. Before coming 
west he was appointed president of Wayland University, of Beaver Dam. Wis- 
consin. This he declined and took the position at Fox Lake subsequently. In 
November, 1868, he came to Boone, Iowa, as first superintendent and organizer 




9f . <^. ^^2C7a<^ 



THE NEW YO:.:- 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



;vSTOR. LE.NOX 
TILDE N FOUNDATlONt 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 57 

of the graded schools of the city. Previous to this time only a common district 
school kept by Mr. Ford had been maintained in the city. Soon after arriving in 
Boone he bought fifteen hundred acres of prairie land at from three to five dollars 
per acre. While engaged in his profession he improved a part and sold a part 
of the land. Although retaining his residence in Boone, he was elected professor 
of mathematics in Des Moines College, but in the year 1886, on January i, he 
Vkfith Clinton Tcmlinson, as partner and business manager, bought of Means & 
Downing the Boone Republican, then a weekly paper of good reputation in the 
county and state. Since that time he has been engaged in the newspaper business 
and in managing his real estate. About the year 1906 he sold the Daily News 
to his son Stephen and assisted him in establishing the Boone News-Republican 
after buying out a rival daily. The News-Republican now has a new office build- 
ing and press as fine as any in a town of fifteen thousand people in this state. 

On the 25th of April, 1845, ^^^- Goldthwait united with the Baptist Church 
of North Uxbridge, Massachusetts, and has been a loyal member of the denomi- 
nation since. On August 25, 1852, he was united in marriage with Mary A. 
Thayer, also of Uxbridge, Massachusetts. On January 12, 1914, the wife of 
more than sixty-one years departed this life. The burial occurred on Wednesday, 
January 14, 1914. The casket adorned with her favorite flowers and containing 
the sacred relics, rests in beautiful Linwood Park. 



NELSON M. WHITEHILL, M. D. 

Dr. Nelson M. Whitehill, a successful physician and surgeon of Boone, has 
here followed his profession continuously for the past decade and is accorded an 
extensive practice. His birth occurred in Green Mountain, Marshall county, 
Iowa, on the 13th of October. 1870. his parents being William H. and Margaret 
J. (Gibson) Whitehill, natives of \'irginia. The father, who devoted his atten- 
tion to agricultural pursuits throughout his active business career, passed away 
on the 3d of March, 1908. The mother survives, however, making her home at 
State Center, Iowa. They were the parents of four children, as follows : 
Nelson M., of this review ; William J., who acts as cashier of the Dobbin & 
Whitson Bank of State Center, Iowa ; Benjamin C, residing in Saskatchewan, 
Canada ; and Anna Belle, the wife of L. J. Rice, a druggist of Hubbard, Iowa. 

Nelson M. Whitehill pursued a high-school course, subsequently followed 
the profession of teaching for two years and then for three years attended Grin- 
nell College of Grinnell, Iowa. Having determined upon the practice of medicine 
as a life work, he entered Rush Medical College of Chicago for professional 
training and in 1897 was graduated from that institution with the degree of 
M. D. During the next seven years he practiced at Garwin, Tama county, this 
state, and in 1904 came to Boone, which city has since remained the scene of his 
professional labors. He is careful in the diagnosis of a case and has been very 
successful in the administration of remedial agencies, bringing back health and 
happiness to many of his patients. 

On the 25th of December, 1897, Dr. Whitehill was joined in wedlock to Miss 
Mary L. Brown, a native of Iowa, by whom he has two children, Marguerite 



58 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

and Charlotte. He is a republican in politics and now holds the office of county 
coroner. He has been a member of the school board for three years, thus 
evincing his interest in educational matters. His religious faith is that of the 
Presbyterian church, and he serves as president of the board of directors of the 
Young Men's Christian Association. Fraternally he is identified with the Masons 
and the Knights of Pythias. He has those personal qualities which make for 
popularity and has gained many friends outside of professional circles. 



F. H. GRAVES. 



F. H. Graves of Madrid is to be numbered among the successful bankers of 
Iowa, having been a valuable factor in the upbuilding of the Farmers Savings 
Bank of Madrid, of which he now serves as cashier. The high reputation for 
solidity which this institution enjoys is largely due to the circumspect efforts 
of its able manager, Mr. Graves. He was born in Belle Point, Douglas town- 
ship, Boone county, July 2, 1867. His parents were Henry M. and Caroline 
(Hull) Graves, the former born in Clay county, Indiana, April i, 1840, and the 
latter a native of Missouri. The Graves family were among the pioneers of 
Boone county, and the father is yet residing in Madrid. The mother, however, 
died in that town in 1904. She came with her parents to this county by the 
overland route when but six months of age, in 1846, the family settling at Belle 
Point. There were no railroads at that time and the stage station was at their 
place. Aroimd them still stretched unbroken prairie in all directions. The 
marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Graves took place in this county, and they became the 
parents of four children, of whom two are living: F. H., of this review: and 
H. C, also residing in Madrid. 

F. H. Graves was reared in Boone county and in the acquirement of his 
fundamental education attended the common schools. He subsequently im- 
proved his opportunities by attending the Iowa State College at Ames, from which 
he was graduated in 1887. His business activities have been confined to Boone 
county with the exception of one year, during which he was engaged in com- 
mercial pursuits in Des Moines. For eleven years Mr. Graves conducted a drug 
store in Madrid and earned during that time the reputation of being an up-to- 
date, successful, aggressive and honest business man. In 1901 he was chosen 
assistant cashier of the Madrid State Bank and in 1908, upon the reorganization 
of the Farmers Savings Bank of Madrid, he became its cashier. He occupies 
that position at present and has proven himself a shrewd, able and progressive 
banker. He thoroughly understands the world's mart of finance and readily 
makes use of those legitimate opportunities which present themselves in order 
to further the interests of his institution. He is a man of rare executive ability, 
yet he has the capacity of handling a lot of detail and is ever ready to embrace 
suggestions which might prove of value to the growth of the bank. However, 
Mr. Graves is very conservative in regard to the investment of the funds of the 
bank and is exceedingly careful of his depositor's interests. On the other hand, 
he is ever ready to extend credit to new industry and enterprise if he can be 
convinced of the solid foundation of such new ventures. In that manner he has 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 59 

contributed to the growth of his city by means of his bank. His gift of keen 
observation and his understanding of human nature are also valuable factors in 
his success. The bank of which he is now at the head was organized in 1904 
as a private firm by Schooler & Son of Des Moines. The capital and surplus 
amounts to thirty thousand dollars at present, and their field extends to all 
departments of general banking. 

In 1888 Mr. Graves married Miss Frederica Schaal, who was born in Polk 
county, Iowa, July 19, 1868. There she attended the common schools and grew 
to womanhood. She taught school in Polk county and afterward attended the 
Iowa State College. Her parents, Adam and Miriam (Leighty) Schaal, were 
honored pioneers of Polk county, where they settled in 185 1. The father was 
born in Wurttemberg, Germany, and passed away in the county which had been 
so long his home in December, 1912. The mother, a native of Pennsylvania, 
died while visiting in the state of Colorado. Mr. and Mrs. Schaal had eleven 
children : W. J., of Polk county ; Mrs. Mary Rogers, of Grand Junction, Colo- 
rado; F. A., of .Seattle, Washington; Mrs. Frederica Graves; Mrs. W. C. Arie, 
of San Francisco, California; Mrs. R. M. Harvey, of Perry, Iowa; D. P., of 
Sheldahl, Iowa ; C. D.. of Beach, North Dakota ; E. A., of Polk county ; R. B., 
of Des Moines, Iowa* and Mrs. Roy Johnson, of Alleman, Iowa. All were born 
in Polk county. 

F. H. Graves gives his allegiance to the progressive party. He believes in the 
ideals and ideas of this organization and eagerly advocates their adoption. He 
has been a member of the town council of Madrid, serving with distinction, and 
for one term has held the office of town clerk. Both he and his wife are mem- 
bers of the Methodist Episcopal church of Madrid. Fraternally Mr. Graves is 
a member of Star Lodge, No. 115, A. F. & A. M., and has held all the offices in 
the same. He also belongs to Tuscan Chapter, R. A. M., of Boone ; El Kader 
Commandery of Boone; and Za-ga-zig Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S., of Des Moines. 
He is a member of Madrid Lodge, No. 433, I. O. O. F., of Madrid and Camp 
No. 2426, M. W. A., of that city. Mr. Graves owns a handsome home where 
both he and his wife extend warm-hearted hospitality to their many friends. He 
is considered one of the most substantial citizens of his community, and it 
redounds to his credit that he has won a prominent place among his fellowmen 
through his own efforts. Interested in all measures and movements of public 
welfare, he has been a great factor for good, and his life's actions have not 
only brought him individual prosperity but have influenced the growth of his 
community and county. 



JOHN M. KNAPP. D. D. S. 

Dentistry may be said to be almost unique among occupations, as it is at once 
a profession, a trade and a business. Such being the case, it follows that in order 
to attain the highest success in it one must be thoroughly conversant with the 
theory of the art, must be expert with the many tools and appliances incidental 
to the practice of modern dentistry and must possess business qualifications ade- 
quate to dealing with the financial side of the profession. In all of these par- 



60 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

ticulars, Dr. John M. Knapp is well qualified and therefore has attained prestige 
among the able representatives of dentistry in Boone county. He has followed 
the profession in Boone for the past six years and is a young practitioner of 
undoubted skill and ability. His birth occurred in Vinton, Benton county, Iowa, 
on the 1 6th of April, 1885, his parents being George Redmond and Dora (Den- 
man) Knapp, the former a native of Pennsylvania and the latter of Iowa. To 
Mr. and Mrs. G. R." Knapp were born six children, as follows: Grace, who gave 
her hand in marriage to E. M. Gunther, of Boone, Iowa ; George E., a resident of 
Washington, D. C. : Elsie, deceased ; Anna, who is the wife of Russell Shreeves, 
of Keystone, Iowa ; John M., of this review ; and Esther, at home. 

John M. Knapp was graduated from the \'inton high school in 1904 and 
subsequently worked for a short time in his father's office. He also spent a brief 
period as deputy recorder and later entered the dental department of the State 
University of Iowa at Iowa City, being graduated therefrom in 1908. It was 
his intention to locate for practice in the West, but he first visited his sister in 
Boone and was so attracted by the town and its opportunities that he bought out 
Dr. T. B. Hollenbeck and has remained there continuously since. The wisdom 
of his choice of a location is indicated in the large and lucrative practice which 
is accorded him, for his skill is widely recognized and' constantly called in 
requisition. 

On the 7th of June, 191 1, Dr. Knapp was united in marriage to Miss Belle 
Ray, a native of Benton, Iowa. He is a republican in politics and supports the 
Presbyterian church, while fraternally he is identified with the Masons and the 
Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. In both professional and social circles 
of his community he is popular and highly respected. 



HENRY D. H.A.GGE. 



Henry D. Hagge represents important commercial interests in Beaver as 
manager of the grain business owned by the Quaker Oats Company. He was 
born in Amaqua township, Boone county, June 5, 1877, and is a son of Claus 
and Margaret (Hensen) Hagge, the former a native of Germany and the latter 
of Jackson county, Iowa. The father emigrated to America in his young man- 
hood and after residing elsewhere for a short time came to Boone county, 
where he at first rented land but shortly afterward bought a farm in Amaqua 
township. This he improved and operated until 1893, when he retired to Ogden. 
His energy, however, would not let him rest and later he engaged in the lumber 
and grain business until 1903. Both he and his wife are still residents of 
Ogden and are enjoying a comfortable competence. 

Henry D. Hagge was reared and educated in the district and public schools 
of Ogden. For si.x summers he worked as a farm hand and attended school 
during the winter season. In the spring of 1899 he came to Beaver and had 
charge of the lumber and grain business of his father until 1902. 
From July of that year until January I, 1906, Mr. Hagge was con- 
nected with Nylander Brothers & Williams, at Ogden, who were implement and 
grain dealers. On the latter date he embarked in the grain and live-stock busi- 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 61 

ness independently in Ogden, associating with him Claus Tarns, the firm becom- 
ing Tams & Hagge. This association continued until 1910. On March i of that 
year Mr. Hagge came to Beaver, accepting the position of manager of the Wells 
Hord Grain Company, in which capacity he has since remained although the 
ownership of the concern has passed to the Quaker Oats Company of Chicago. 
Mr. Hagge has proven himself an able business man and enjoys the full con- 
fidence of the officers at headquarters. His business ability is readily recognized 
in Beaver and he is considered one of the most shrewd grain dealers. Mr. 
Hagge has succeeded because he combined with business ability a policy which 
stamps him as a man of the highest character. His methods have always been 
fair and square and his word is as good as his bond. 

On October 15, 1902, Mr. Hagge married Miss Emma Reimers, a daughter 
of John and Botilda (Thompson) Reimers, who were Boone county pioneers. 
Her father throughout life followed agricultural pursuits and on one property 
resided for thirty-two years. He passed away December 18, 1907. His widow 
now lives in Ogden. ]\Ir. and Mrs. Hagge have two children: Carl W., who is 
nine years of age; and Irene L., aged six. 

Mr. Hagge has always taken a deep interest in the progress and growth of 
Beaver and stands high in the regard of his fellow citizens. He is the present 
mayor and has served in that capacity for three years, giving his community 
a busmesslike and satisfactory administration. He is a democrat and his religious 
faith is that of the Lutheran church. Mr. Hagge must be considered a vital 
force in the growth and upbuilding of Beaver, upon. the development of which 
city he has had a most beneficial influence. 



JOHN A. PETERSON. 



John A. Peterson has since 1903 been an equal partner with Charles Rosen 
in the firm of Charles Rosen & Company of Ogden, with which establishment he 
first became identified as an employe a quarter of a century ago. They carry an 
enormous stock of harness and horse goods and a full line of shoes. Mr. Peter- 
son was born in Sweden on the nth of October, 1867, his parents being Peter 
A. and Christine Johnson, who are also natives of that country. The father, 
a farmer by occupation, is now engaged in agricultural pursuits in the interests 
of the government. He has reached the age of seventy-six years, while his 
wife is seventy-four years old. 

John A. Peterson was reared and educated in the land of his nativity and 
there followed farming in association with his father until 1887. When a young 
man of twenty years he crossed the Atlantic to the United States and came direct 
to Boone county, Iowa, entering the service of the Chicago & Northwestern Rail- 
way at Ogden and being thus employed for two years. In December 1889 
he secured a position with the harness firm of Goetzman & Company and learned 
the trade, finding the business so much to his liking that he has remained con- 
tmuously identified therewith to the present time. The establishment later came 
mto possession of Charles Rosen, and on the 2d of January, 1903, Mr. Peterson 
became an equal partner in the concern, which has since been known as Charles 



62 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

Rosen & Company. They carry a very extensive stock of harness and horse 
goods as well as a complete line of shoes and enjoy a liberal and lucrative patron- 
age that has made the enterprise most profitable. Mr. Peterson owns a handsome 
residence in the eastern part of Ogden and also has a fine orchard of two acres. 
On the 17th of April, 1893, Mr. Peterson was united in marriage to Miss 
Anna Anderson, a daughter of E. M. and Emma Jonson, natives of Sweden, 
where the father is engaged in business as a butcher. Mr. and Mrs. Peterson 
have four children, namely: Ruth, who is nineteen years of age; Paul, eighteen 
years old; and Werner Linne and David C. A., who are fourteen and twelve 
years of age respectively. Mr. Peterson gives his political allegiance to the pro- 
gressive party, while his religious faith is indicated by his membership in the 
Swedish Mission. The hope that led him to leave his native land and seek a 
home in America has been more than realized. He found the opportunities he 
sought, — which, by the way, are always open to the ambitious, energetic man, — 
and making the best of these he has steadily worked his way upward. He pos- 
sesses the resolution, perseverance and reliability so characteristic of his nation, 
and his name is now enrolled among the best citizens of Boone county. 



JOHN T. S. WILLIAMS. 

John T. S. Williams, -one of the leading and respected citizens of Boone 
county, where he has resided continuously for the past forty-five years, has 
since 1907 lived retired in Ogden. He has reached the ripe old age of seventy- 
nine years, his birth having occurred in Canada on the 31st of August, 1835. 
His parents were the Rev. Ebenezer and Margaret (Sheriff) Williams, the 
former a native of Wales and the latter of Scotland. 

In 1869, when a young man of thirty-four years, John T. S. Williams came 
to Boone county, Iowa, from Wisconsin, purchasing land in Beaver township 
which he improved and cultivated until 1879. He was then elected county 
treasurer and filled the office with credit for two years, on the expiration of 
which period he embarked in the general mercantile business at Ogden, conduct- 
ing an enterprise of that character for six years. Subsequently he again 
devoted his attention to farming for a year but at the end of that time returned 
to Ogden, where he was successfully engaged in the implement business until 
1893. In that year he was appointed postmaster under President Cleveland and 
for four years ably discharged the duties devolving upon him in that connec- 
tion. Afterward he embarked in the real-estate business and was thus success- 
fully engaged until 1907, since which time he has lived retired. He owns a 
handsome residence in Ogden and also has considerable farm property. 

On the 20th of October, 1858, Mr. Williams was united in marriage to Miss 
Jane Thomas, a daughter of William and Mary (Bowden) Thomas, who were 
natives of England. Unto our subject and his wife were born seven children, 
as follows: G. K., who operates his father's farm in Boone county; Charles H., 
' also an agriculturist of this county ; Charlotte J., the wife of J. A. Nylander, 
who is living retired; Lilly S., who passed away on the 20th of October, 1909; 
Laura M., the wife of C. L. Thomas; Edgar R., who is the editor of the Ogden 




MR. AM) MRS. ,I()11X T. S. WILLIAMS 



!| 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 65 

Reporter ; and Amy F., the wife of J. C. Davis, who is dean of Marquette Uni- 
versity in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

Mr. Williams is a democrat in his political views and for a number of years 
abl_\ served as clerk of Beaver township, which he organized. The cause of 
education has ever found in him a stalwart champion and has benefited by his 
labors on the school board, of which he long served as secretary. His religious 
faith is that of the Methodist church. He is an honored pioneer of his com- 
munity and has not only witnessed its growth but has earnestly aided in the 
work of development and upbuilding. The circle of his friends is almost coex- 
tensive with the circle of his acquaintances, for his life has ever been such as 
to win for him the esteem and regard of all with whom he has come in contact. 



JOHN B. MATHERS. 



Although John B. Mathers is one of the youngest business men of Boone he 
must be numbered among the most successful in the industrial circles of the 
city. He is the senior member of the contracting and building firm of Mathers 
& Addison, who conduct a most profitable and growing business in Ijoone, where 
Mr. Mathers has now resided for about eight years. He was born in the town 
of Linlithgow, Scotland. December 2^], 1882, and is a son of James and Ann 
(Baxter) Mathers. The grandfather, Robert Mathers, was a native of Inverness- 
shire, Scotland. He was a brewer and distiller and did an extensive Ijusiness 
in his native district. His death occurred in 1904, at the age of eighty-one years. 
Me was twice married and was the father of the following children : David ; Nell, 
of Edinburgh. Scotland; Elizabeth, of Glasgow: Mary, of Boness : James, the 
father of our subject; and Alexander, of Glasgow. 

James Mather was born in Fettercairn, Inverness-shire, Scotland, about the 
year 1856. His education was a meager one and he early began work in his 
father's brewery and distillery. Later he succeeded him in business, carrying on 
the same in his native district for a number of years. About 1878 he went to 
Middleton, County Cork, Ireland, and has since been employed as a brewer and 
distiller by the Cork Distillery Company. His wife is also living and both are 
members of the Episcopal church of Ireland. In their family were the follow- 
ing children ; Robert, who died in infancy ; Robert, second of the name, who 
also died when young; Margaret, Who died in infancy; John B., of this review; 
David, of Middleton, Ireland ; Agnes, who married James Hendry, of Lynn, 
Massachusetts ; Nell, of Newport, Rhode Island ; Annite, of Palmetto Bluiif. South 
Carolina ; and Mary, of Lynn. Massachusetts. 

John B. Mathers attended the parochial schools of Middleton, Ireland, for 
five years and then studied under the Christian Brothers of the same place until 
seventeen. After completing his education he entered the employ of the Cork 
Distillery Company, remaining with that concern for one year. He then crossed 
to Polmont, Scotland, where he learned the carpenter's trade, at which he worked 
for six years. His next move brought him to the new world, when he sailed 
from Glasgow on the steamer Caledonia and landed in New York in March, 
1906. His present partner. Thomas Addison, accompanied him to the eastern 



66 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

metropolis and they worked in New York for five months and subsequently in 
Newark, New Jersey, for five months. Mr. Mathers then came to Boone, accept- 
ing a position with Frank Henry, a contractor, with whom he remained for three 
years, Mr. Addison being in the same employ. At the end of that time both 
returned to Scotland but after five months came back to Boone and founded the 
firm of Mathers & Addison. They have since been very successful as contractors 
and have been entrusted with the building of numerous homes in the city and 
vicinity. Mr. Mathers is a reliable workman of no mean business ability and 
enjoys in his commimity a reputation which places him among the substantial 
business men of Boone. 

He was married here Jtme 21, 1912, to Miss Mary Chalmers, a native of 
Boone and a daughter of Joseph and Margaret (Gillespie) Chalmers, and to this 
union was born a son, James. They reside at No. 1015 West Fourth street, in a 
comfortable home, where they often entertain their friends. 

Fraternally Mr. Mathers is a member of the Masons and the C)dd Fellows, 
having joined the former by becoming affiliated with the St. John Lodge of 
Polmont, Scotland. His membership with the Odd Fellows is in Boone Lodge, 
No. 79. Politically he is a republican, believing in the policies of that party and 
supporting its measures and candidates at the polls. He is a progressive man of 
new ideas and can always be found in the front ranks of those who inaugurate 
new movements in order to develop the city and contribute to its bettennent and 
growth. 



S. PARKER CLARK. 



S. Parker Clark, a popular and esteemed young citizen of Ogden. has for 
the past six years been identified with the Ogden State Bank in the capacity of 
cashier. He is numbered among the worthy native sons of Boone cotinty, his 
birth having occurred in Ogden in November, 1881. His parents. Dr. Orson 
and Lucy Emma ( Sylvester ) Clark, took up their abode among the pioneer 
residents of Boone county in 1869. A sketch of the father appears on another 
page of this work. 

S. Parker Clark was reared and educated in the place of his nativity and 
following his graduation from the public schools entered Drake L^niversity at 
Des Moines, where he completed the pharmaceutical course in 1902. Return- 
ing to Ogden, he there worked in a drug store for six years, on the expiration 
of which period he purchased the business and continued its conduct until 1908. 
In that year he disposed of the store and accepted the position of cashier in the 
Ogden State Bank, in which capacity he has remained continuously since, mak- 
ing a highly creditable and commendable record and enjoying an enviable repu- 
tation in financial circles. He is likewise a stockholder in the institution. 

In March, 1904, Mr. Clark was united in marriage to Miss Grace Upton, 
a daughter of Harley and Ruth (Bamun) Upton, who were pioneer settlers of 
Boone county and have passed away. Mr. and Mrs. Clark have one daughter, 
Ruth Louise, who is six years of age. 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 67 

Politically Mr. Clark is a republican, while his religious faith is that of the 
Congregational church. He is a worthy exemplar of the Masonic fraternity and 
also belongs to the Knights of Pythias. In the community where practically his 
entire life has been spent he has a circle of friends which is almost coextensive 
with the circle of his acquaintances. 



THOMAS ADDISON. 



Thomas Addison is a worthy representative of that sturdy race of Scotch 
people who have contributed so much toward the development and prosperity 
of this country. He is a member of the firm of Mathers & Addison, carpenters 
and contractors of Boone, Iowa, and is widely recognized as a shrewd and able 
business man and an expert in his line of work. He was born in the town of 
Linlithgow, Linlithgowshire, Scotland, September 22, 1882, and is a son of 
Abram and Margaret (Bryce) Addison, while his paternal grandparents were 
William and Margaret Addison. The grandfather, who was a farmer by occu- 
pation, respected and esteemed in his neighborhood, died in Linlithgow about 
1890, at the age of eighty-four years. His wife passed away a year later, being 
then eighty-two. Both were members of the Presbyterian church and devout 
in their religious professions. Their children were: Abram, the father of our 
subject ; John, a resident of Scotland, who follows farming and auctioneering 
and who has been twice married ; William, who is married and follows agricul- 
tural pursuits in his native land ; George, a banker of Dalmellington. Scotland, 
who is married ; Annie, deceased, and Thomas, who is engaged in the insurance 
business in Edinburgh. 

Abram Addison attended the public schools in Scotland and after completing 
his education assisted his father with the work on the home farm. He remained 
there until married, when he took up agricultural pursuits on his own account. 
Both he and his wife still live in Linlithgow and the fomier is active in the 
affairs of his native city. They are devoted members of the Presbyterian church 
and stanch supporters of that denomination. Their children were: William, a 
farmer of Linlithgow, Scotland; John, who follows the same occupation in his 
native country ; Abram, a butcher of Linlithgow ; James, who is engaged in farm- 
ing in his native country ; Thomas, of this review : George, who follows farm- 
ing in Scotland ; Margaret, Agnes and Sarah, all at home : Manuel, who is now 
studying draughtsmanship in Nobel's Explosive Works in Scotland ; Minnie and 
Stevenson Heather, both at home : Tina, who died at the age of seventeen ; and 
twins who died in infancy. 

Thomas Addison passed his boyhood and youth on the home farm, attending 
public school until seventeen years of age. He then apprenticed himself to 
the carpenter's trade in Polmont, Scotland, serving for five years with William 
Walker, for whom he afterward worked as journeyman for four years. He then 
joined John B. Mathers, his present partner, in coming to America and they 
landed in New York from the ship Caledonia. Mr. .A.ddison found employment 
in that city and in Newark. New Jersey, remaining there for ten months, but 
in 1907 came to Boone, Iowa, and accepted a position with Frank Henry, a con- 



68 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

tractor, with whom he remained for three years. At the end of that time he paid 
a five months' visit to his home in Scotland and upon his return to Boone entered 
into partnership with Mr. Mathers, estabHshing the firm of Mathers & Addison, 
which has flourished ever since. Not only is Mr. Addison an expert workman 
but he is a thoroughly up-to-date business man. He is careful in executing con- 
tracts entrusted to him and has been given a number of important contracts on 
account of the high reputation which he enjoys. His honorable principles have 
become the foundation of the business policy which he pursues and he enjoys 
in full measure the confidence of the public. 

On August 17, 1912, Mr. Addison was married in Boston, Massachusetts, to 
Miss Jean C. Brown, who was born in Linlithgow, Scotland, a daughter of 
James and Jean (Craig) Brown. Mr. and Mrs. Addison have one child, Jean 
C. They are members of the Presbyterian church and fraternally Mr. Addison 
belongs to Boone Lodge, No. 79, L O. O. F. He is also a member of the Masonic 
order, having joined one of the oldest lodges in Scotland, the Ancient Brazen 
Lodge, No. 17, F. & A. M. Politically he is a republican, fully conversant with 
the issues of the day and thoroughly in accord with the aims of his party. How- 
ever, he is not an active politician although he is ever ready to give his support 
to public enterprises which have for their purpose the material, moral and intel- 
lectual growth of the city. He has become a useful and valuable American 
citizen and by his activities has contributed toward the prosperity of Boone and 
Boone countv. 



ORSON CLARK, M. D. 



Dr. Orson Clark, the period of whose residence in Ogden covers forty-five 
years, was long an active and successful representative of the medical fraternity 
here but is now spending the evening of life in well earned retirement. His birth 
occurred in Wyoming county, New York, on the 21st of April, 1844, his parents 
being Samuel and Anna (Bryant) Clark, both of whom were natives of Ver- 
mont. The father, an agriculturist by occupation, devoted his attention to the 
operation of a farm in New York during his active business career and passed 
away in the spring of 1870. 

Orson Clark was reared and educated in the Empire state and on completing 
his public-school work entered a medical university of Buffalo, winning the 
degree of M. D. in 1866. He located for practice in Wisconsin and followed his 
profession in that state for three years, on the expiration of which period he came 
to Ogden, Boone County, Iowa, where he has remained continuously to the pres- 
ent time. The house in which he now resides was erected by him in 1870. As a 
physician and surgeon he enjoyed a large and lucrative practice that was 
accorded him in recognition of his professional skill and ability. He has retired 
from active practice, however, and is now enjoying a well merited rest. In 
financial circles he still remains a prominent factor as vice president of the 
Ogden State Bank. 

In 1868 Dr. Clark was united in marriage to Miss Lucy Emma Sylvester, a 
daughter of Caleb and Johanna (Whitney) Sylvester, both of whom were born 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 69 

in Maine. Unto Dr. and Mrs. Clark were born six children, as follows : Herbert 
S., an agriculturist of Boone county ; Dr. C. B. Clark, who serves as postmaster 
at Ogden ; Dr. O. W. Clark, a banker of Ogden ; Louise, whose demise occurred 
in February, 1902 ; Anna B., the wife of W. D. Miller, of Ogden ; and S. 
Parker, who acts as cashier of the Ogden State Bank. 

In his political views Dr. Clark is independent, always considering the capa- 
bility and fitness of a candidate rather than his party affiliation. He has served 
as county coroner and was a member of the first council of Ogden. His religious 
faith is that of the Congregational church. He enjoys a wide and favorable 
acquaintance in both professional and social circles of Boone county and is 
highly esteemed as one of its representative citizens. 



H. D. LUCAS. 



H. D. Lucas, a native son of Boone county who has spent his entire life within 
its borders, is activelv and successfully identified with business interests of 
Madrid as the junior member of the firm of Hutton & Lucas, dealers in shelf 
and heavy hardware and also proprietors of a plumbing and heating establish- 
ment. His birth occurred at Belle Point, Douglas township, Boone county, Iowa, 
on the 15th of October, 1872, his parents being Corydon L. and Nancy (Sturdi- 
vant) Lucas. An extended sketch of the father appears on another page of 
this work. 

In the acquirement of an education H. D. Lucas attended the common schools, 
completing his studies in the public schools of Madrid. The family home had 
been established in that town in 1883. Our subject there conducted a meat 
market for a period of four years, from 1902 until 1906, and in the latter year 
embarked in the hardware business, being now a member of the firm of Hutton 
& Lucas, who are dealers in shelf and heavy hardware and also conduct a plumb- 
ing and heating establishment. In this connection he has won a gratifying meas- 
ure of success, being accorded a liberal patronage and enjoying an enviable repu- 
tation as a business man of ability, enterprise and sound judgment. He owns a 
half interest in the firm and has an attractive and well appointed home in Madrid, 
while his wife is the owner of a tract of fifty-four acres of land in Douglas town- 
ship, comprising a portion of the old Luther homestead. 

On the 17th of May, 1899, in Madrid, Iowa, Mr. Lucas was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Carrie Luther, who was born in Douglas township, Boone county, 
Iowa, on the 23d of May, 1878, her parents being Milden and Mary (Hull) 
Luther. The father's birth occurred in Clay county. Indiana, on the 22d of 
March, 1840, while the mother was born in Putnam county, Indiana, on the 25th 
of December, 1841. The maternal grandparents of Mrs. Lucas took up their 
abode among the pioneer settlers of Iowa, locating in Jefiferson county in 1842. 
Her parents came overland to Boone county in 1849 and were among the early 
residents here. They remained on a farm until 1908 but during the past six 
years have lived retired at Madrid in a commodious and comfortable home. 
They became the parents of seven children, four of whom still survive, as fol- 
lows: Mrs. Lillie L. Williams, who was born on the loth of December, 1862, 



70 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

and is now a resident of Madrid; Mrs. Ella Farr, born January 28, 1866, and 
living in Madrid; Mrs. Zylpha A. Hutton, also of Madrid, who was born on 
the 15th of March, 1868; and Mrs. Carrie Lucas. All the above named were born 
and reared in Douglas township, this county. Mrs. Lucas, who has spent her 
entire life within the borders of Boone county, acquired her education in the 
common schools and completed her studies in the public schools of Madrid. By 
her marriage she has become the mother of two children, namely: Dott, who was 
born in Madrid on the 8th of April, 1900, and is now attending school there; 
and Vaughn, whose birth occurred in Madrid on the 29th of October, 1908. 

!Mr. Lucas gives his political allegiance to the democracy, while his religious 
faith is indicated by his membership in the Christian church of NLadrid. Fra- 
ternally he is identified with the Masons, belonging to Star Lodge, No. 115, 
of Madrid, and he is likewise connected with the Modern Woodmen of America, 
being at present venerable consul of Mizpah Camp in Madrid. Both Mr. and 
Mrs. Lucas enjoy an extensive and favorable acquaintance throughout the com- 
munity and the hospitality of the best homes is freely accorded them. 



SWAYNE A. BENGTSON. 

Swayne A. Bengtson. who now lives in well earned retirement in Madrid after 
a successful career as a farmer and an implement dealer and also in connection 
with the milling business, still owns important interests in this city and is vice 
president of the Farmers Savings Bank. Many public honors have come to 
Mr. Bengtson from his city and county ; for five years he served as the county 
treasurer, w-hile for seven terms he was city clerk of Madrid, for three terms an 
alderman and for two terms the mayor. Swayne A. Bengtson was born in 
Sweden, Alay i, 1861, and when about nine years of age came with his parents to 
America in 1870, the family locating in Madrid on August ist of that year. He 
has ever since been a resident of this community. Mr. Bengtson is a son of S. G. 
and Carolina Bengtson, natives of Sweden, both of whom died in Madrid, the for- 
mer on November 8, 1904, and the latter October i, 1897. They had the. fol- 
lowing children: Mrs. Christina C. Swanson, of Madrid; J. G., who died in this 
city; Swayne A., of this review; Mrs. Hulda Larson, who also passed away in 
Madrid; Anna Lovisa, who passed away in Oakland, Nebraska, the wife of Rev. 
J. M. Olson : and Mrs. Linda Otto, an adopted daughter who died in Garden 
township. The four elder children were born in Sweden and the two younger 
ones in Boone county. 

Swayne A. Bengtson began his education in his native country and com- 
pleted his school work in Madrid. He located with his parents on a farm two 
miles northwest of Madrid in 1870, but in 1873 they moved into the town. The 
father was a tailor by trade and was successful in this occupation. Swayne A. 
Bengtson, his brother and a sister, for thirteen years operated a farm, being so 
engaged until 1887, their efforts being rewarded with most gratifying results. 
In that year he and his brother turned their attention to the implement business 
when the firm of Johnson, Bengtson & Company came into being. Air. Johnson 
continued as senior member for about two years, at the end of which time the 




SWAYXK A. BKXUT.SOX AND FAMILY 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 73 

brothers purchased his interest in the business. The business was continued under 
the name of Bengtson Brothers, but in the fall of 1892 Mr. Bengtson's brother 
died. S. A. Bengtson continued the business under the name of S. A. Bengtson 
& Company, his father being the company, until the fall of 1899, when he sold 
out, interesting himself in the iMadrid Alilling Company, of which he served 
as secretary, treasurer and general manager until November 1, 1901. In his 
business transactions Mr. Bengtson showed rare executive ability, and by reason 
of this quality and his fair methods he attained prosperity. He still owns a fourth 
interest in the Madrid Milling Company. In 1901 he was elected treasurer of 
Boone county and on January i, 1902, assumed the duties of the office. He 
continued in this position for live years, serving an extra year on account of the 
biennial election law going into force during his term. Air. Bengtson made an 
excellent record as treasurer of Boone county. He administrated the affairs of 
his office with the greatest care and gave the best that was in him to the public's 
affairs. He earned the highest commendation for his efficient work and well 
merited all ihe praise given him, for Boone county's financial affairs prospered 
under his administration. 

On July 2, 1896, Mr. Bengtson married, in Madrid, Miss Ida F. Carlson, 
who was born in Sweden on April 8, 1863. She came to ^America in 1887 after 
having received a thorough education in her native land. Her first home was in 
Omaha, Nebraska. Her parents, Carl Johann and Sarah Maria (Vikstronij 
Nilsson, were born in Sweden, the former March 14, 1824, and the latter Decem- 
ber 8, 1S21. They died in their native land, the father March 8, 1891, and the 
mother November 8, 1905. In their family were four daughters and two sons : 
Rev. Carl Vilhelm, born June 11, 1850, who resides at Taraboda, Sweden; Augusta 
Carolina, born January 14, 1853, who also remained in her native land; Hannah 
Sofia, born April 13, 1855, of Seattle, Washington; Lars Gustav, born March 
9, 1857, one of the earlier merchants of Madrid; Mrs. Sarah Ulrika Sundberg, 
born July 2."/, 1859, and residing in Sweden; and Mrs. Bengtson, the youngest of 
the family and the wife of our subject. All the children were reared and edu- 
cated in Sweden. Mr. and Mrs. Bengtson had the following children : Vladimir 
Gustav Gideon, born in Madrid, August 17, 1897, who is attending high school 
in this city; Olga Vendela Maria, born at Madrid, March 6, 1901, who died in 
Boone, Iowa, May 14, 1902; and Linnia Hortense, born in Boone, December 7, 
1904, who is attending public school in Madrid. 

Mr. Bengtson is a most public-spirited man, thoroughly conversant with 
political and public issues of the day and particularly interested in local govern- 
mental affairs. He is ever ready to give support to valuable enterprises of a 
public nature, and his commimity and county have benefited by his activity. He 
served for seven terms as city clerk of Madrid and for three temis as alderman 
of the city and in these offices made such excellent records that the people chose 
him as mayor of the city. For two terms Mr. Bengtson served as the executive 
and under his stimulating influence many important improvements were made — 
improvements which have been of the greatest benefit to Madrid Mr. Bengtson 
is still interested in the Madrid Milling Company and also stands high in the 
financial world of Boone county, having been a director and vice president of 
the Farmers Savings Bank of Madrid for a number of years. He has other 
property interests and is considered one of the most substantial citizens of his 



74 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

conmuinity. IJoth Mr. and Mrs. Bengtson are members of the Swedish Free Mis- 
sion church and in this connection it may be mentioned that his father was one 
of the founders of this organization. Mr. Bengston has held all the offices in his 
church and has always been sincerely devoted to its work. He has many friends 
in Madrid who hold him in the highest regard not only for what he has achieved 
in life but for those qualities of mind and character which have made it possible 
for him to reach the position which he now^ holds in the community. 



ARTHUR FINNEGAN. 



Arthur Finnegan, who now li\es retired in Boone, is one of the city's most 
venerated residents, having been for many years connected with the railroad serv- 
ice. He now lives retired at No. 1310 Seventh street, passing his declining 
years in comfortable surroundings and in the enjoyment of a competency to which 
he is entitled by reason of long years of arduous, faithful and trustworthy labor. 
He selected Boone as his residence forty-eight years ago, coming here in 1866, 
and is therefore to be considered one of the pioneers of the city, for there were 
but the beginnings of a village when he arrived. Not only has he watched the 
onward march of civilization in his district, but he has been a factor in its 
growth and has made many valuable contributions toward its development in the 
many years in which he has made his home here. 

Mr. Finnegan is a native son of the Emerald isle, his birth having occurred 
in County Monaghan, August 15, i!~i38. his parents being James and Rose 
(Halligan) Finnegan. The father was a miller by trade and also a millwright. 
He died in Ireland when his son Arthur was about five years of age. After her 
husband's death the widow brought her seven children to America, her mother 
later joining her and passing away in Fairfield, New York, at the most extraor- 
dinarv age of one hundred and fourteen years. Mother and children landed in 
Toronto in 1843, '^"'^ there the former remained for the rest of her life, passing 
away in that city from the effects of a fall at the age of ninety-six. She bore 
her husband the following children : Margaret, the wife of John Ellward ; Mrs. 
Mary Baxter, deceased ; Phillip, deceased : Catherine and Arthur, twins, the 
former living in Rochester, New York : Alice, of Rochester ; and Bridget, who is 
also a resident of that city. 

Arthur Finnegan was about tive years of age when his father died and early 
was indentured to the latter's trade. In Toronto he learned carriage painting 
and subsequently was connected with the Toronto Iron Works for four years. 
This was in his early boyhood, and when but seventeen he went to Bufifalo, New 
York, where he worked a*; machinist for nine months. He then made his way 
to .New Orleans, where he continued along the same line, his sojourn in that 
citv being shortly before the Civil war broke out. Leaving there, lie returned to 
Toronto, where he accepted work on the Crand Trunk Railway as a machinist 
foreman at Port Sarnia on the St. Clair river. However, illness overtook him 
and after recovering he became a fireman on the Grand Trunk Railway, con- 
tinuing in that occupation for eighteen months. He then received a run as an 
engineer on the same line. Relinquishing this position, he made his way to 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 75 

Chicago, Illinois, where he arrived in 18O4, finding employment in the Northwest- 
ern railway shops for one year. During that time he was setting up engines for 
the Iowa division. On April i6th, 1866. he was given charge of an engine and 
located in Boone, which place was the beginning of his run for forty-five years. 
Tried and true and trustworthy in the discharge of his duties, he stood high in 
the estimation of the officials of the road and was often commissioned to under- 
take confidential trusts. Prominent men of the world would particularly request 
that he should be put in charge of shipments of large sums of money, as it 
was generally known that he was most cautious and would willingly sacrifice 
life in order to protect the interests of those who had confidence in him. During 
his long period as an engineer he never had an accident — a record which is most 
remarkable and earned him the highest commendation. When he came to Boone 
it was a village of a few straggling houses, but he recognized its opportunities 
and foresaw its future and as his means permitted bought lots, gradually acquir- 
ing much property and building on many of them. He also owns valuable farm 
land in Iowa. 

On April 24, 1865, at Mount Clemens, Michigan, Mr. Finnegan married Miss 
Mary McCafifery, of Mount Clemens, a daughter of Dennis McCaflfery. To this 
union six children have been born: Edward D., Arthur J. and Robert L., of 
Boone; Mary E., deceased; George Marion, deceased: and Phillip Adelbert, 
of Peoria, Illinois. 

On account of his long and faithful service .Mr. Finnegan was placed on the 
pension roll of the Northwestern Railway, April 1, 191 1, and now lives in the 
enjoyment of a most comfortable income, being one of the most highly esteemed 
and respected citizens of Hoone, where he has many friends. Indeed there are 
few who know him, if any, who are not his friends. He and his family are 
devout members of the Roman Catholic church, and fraternally Mr. Finnegan 
is a member of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers. Politically he is a 
democrat, stanchly supporting that party and thoroughly in sympathy with its 
principles. He is a useful, patriotic, public-spirited citizen who has always placed 
public interests above his own and w ho has been more loyal to outside obligation? 
than even to his own welfare. He is a kindly, courteous, afifable gentleman whom 
it is an honor to know and who has brought sunshine into many lives bv his pleas- 
ing, kindly, oliliging ways and his sympathetic personality. 



CARL H. ANDER.SON. 



Carl H. Anderson is associated with his brother, Clarence R. Anderson, in the 
conduct of a general mercantile establishment at Ogden and has won gratifying 
and merited success in this connection. His birth occurred in Marcx' township, 
Boone county, Iowa, on the ist of January, 1874, his parents being Charles and 
Sarah (Carlson) Anderson, who are mentioned at greater length on another page 
of this work in connection with the sketch of Clarence R. Anderson. 

Carl H. Anderson was reared and educated in this county, pursuing his 
studies in the district schools. He remained on the home farm with his parents 
until twenty-five years of age and then came to Ogden, where he was employed 



76 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

as clerk for three years. On the expiration of that period he went to JBoone and 
there clerked for a year in the service of H. T. Cook, a clothing merchant. Sub- 
sequently he returned to Ogden and embarked in the mercantile business on his 
own account, having thus remained a factor in commercial circles of the town 
to the present time. In August, 1913, he was joined by his brother, Clarence R. 
Anderson, and the firm has since been known as Anderson Brothers. They 
erected a modern two-story brick building on the main street and occupy nearly 
all of the structure, carrying an extensive stock of merchandise. A liberal patron- 
age is accorded them, for they have won an enviable reputation as reliable, up- 
to-date merchants and enjoy the confidence of the public in unusual degree. 

In October, 1901, Mr. Anderson was united in marriage to Miss Hannah 
Bergstrom, a daughter of John and Hannah Bergstrom, natives of Sweden, who 
emigrated to America and located in Boone county, Iowa, in 1868. The father 
operated a farm here until about 191 1 and has since lived retired in Ogden. Mr. 
and Mrs. Anderson have six children, as follows: Luella, eleven years old; 
Bessemer and Donald, who are nine and seven years of age respectively ; Melvin, 
five years old ; Helen, who is four years old : and Russell, two years of age. Mr. 
Anderson is a republican in his political views, while his religious faith is indi- 
cated by his membership in the Swedish Mission. He has always remained within 
the borders of Boone county and that his life has ever been upright and honor- 
able is indicated in the fact that the associates of his boyhood and youth are 
still numbered among his stanch friends and admirers. 



WILLIAM H. GALLUP. 

William H. Gallup was for nearly fifty years connected with newspapers in 
Boone and other counties of the state as owner, editor and publisher, and in every 
instance the papers while under his control increased in their volume of business, 
in their influence and in their general tone of reliability. Keeping in touch with 
progressive methods, he has never catered to the sensationalism or in any way 
adopted the ideas of the "yellow" sheet. His influence has always been on the 
side of advancement and improvement and, he gained for his papers the same 
high regard which is entertained for him as a man. 

A native of New York, Mr. Gallup was born at Summit, Schoharie county, 
May 17, 1840. a son of Nathan and Pamelia (Baird) Gallup, who were natives 
of Connecticut and of New Jersey respectively. The father, who made farming 
his life work, died in Summit, and the mother has also passed away. In their 
family were eight children, Nathan, Silas, Abigail, Samuel, Margaret, Bedent B., 
John B. and William H., all having passed away but William, the subject of this 
sketch. 

William H. Gallup was fourteen years of age when his father sold the old 
home farm in Schoharie county. In his youthful days he attended the district 
schools and afterward pursued a course in a seminary. He also taught school 
during the winter months and at nineteen years of age he took up the study of 
law, being graduated from the New York State and National Law School, located 
at Poughkeepsie, New York, on the ist of August, i860. He was admitted to 




WILLIA.M H. (iALLUP 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 79 

the bar at Newburgh, New York, in the following September and spent the suc- 
ceeding winter in the law office of Hon. S. L. Mayham at North Blenheim. 
On the 1st of April, 1861, he came to the middle west, settling first at Marshall- 
town, Iowa, on the nth of May, 1861, six days before he was twenty-one, where 
he practiced his profession for a short time. He then purchased a newspaper, 
the Marshall County Times, and has since been identified the greater part of 
his life with journalistic interests. He continued as editor and proprietor of that 
paper from October, 1861, until April, 1862. In May of the succeeding year 
he again became editor and sole proprietor of the Marshall County Times and 
so remained until September, 1864. A few weeks in 1862, after the capture of 
Fort Donelson by General Grant, which was one of the first substantial Union 
victories in our great Civil war, he published the Daily Marshal Times, a four 
column folio, in order to give the news of Grant's maneu\ers, which culminated 
in the battle of Shiloh. While in Marshalltown he- took an active part in the 
aiTairs of the county and city, and was one of the two or three who kept at work 
securing subscribers to make the place an incorporated town, thus laying the 
foundations for the beautiful city that it is today. At the first republican caucus 
for the nomination of officers for the newly incorporated town, he found him- 
self to his total surprise the nominee for mayor when the ballots were counted out. 
Removing to Boonesboro in December, 1864. he estabUslied the Boonesboro 
Index, the first number appearing on February i, 1865, and which for six months 
was the only paper published in Boone county. In the latter part of 1865, Mr. 
Gallup removed the Index office from Bonesboro to the new town of Boone 
and continued its publication until September, 1867, when he sold the plant to 
L. M. Holt, who changed the name to The Montana Standard. Boone had pre- 
viously adopted the name of IMontana for the purpose of getting a postoffice, 
there already being one postoffice in the state by the name of Boone and this 
making a different name necessary. 

Mr. Gallup's last official appearance as a lawyer was his election to the office 
of city attorney of Montana in March, 1868, but which office he deemed it advis- 
able to resign in a few weeks, because it became to his financial interest to resvime 
the publication of the Standard, which he continued until September, 1869. 
In May, 1870, he purchased the Nevada Aegis, renamed it Nevada Representa- 
tive and continued as its sole editor and proprietor until September, 1882, or 
for over twelve years. In 1875 he was elected state senator from the thirty-first 
senatorial district, composed of the counties of Boone and Story, and served 
in the sixteenth and seventeenth general assemblies, his term covering the years 
of 1876, 1877, 1878 and 1879. While in the senate, he took an active part in 
the daily routine of business, was always present at the opening of the daily ses- 
sions, avoided set speeches made for political effect and never dodged a roll 
call on any question. He had the rare distinction of introducing one bill which 
was read twice and then upon his motion the rules were suspended, the bill read 
a third time and put upon its final passage and passed, without a dissenting vote 
upon any of the roll calls, his word being accepted by all parties as to its truth- 
fulness and accuracy. At the first inauguration of Governor Gear he was chair- 
man of the joint legislative committee which arranged the inaugural ceremonies. 
He was also author of senate file 67, in the sixteenth general assembly, which 
became a law and allowed counties, townships and municipalities to vote a tax 



so HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

of five percent, payable half in one year and half in the succeeding year, to aid 
in the building of railroads, which the state so much needed for its development 
in those days. After disposing of the Nevada Representative by redistricting in 
18S2, he was engaged for about two years in the book, news and stationery busi- 
ness in Nevada, and also for about two years owned and conducted a banking 
business at Cambridge, Story county. But in 1887 the newspaper fever again 
got control of him, and he purchased the Perry Chief in December of that year, 
which he published as editor and proprietor until May, 1892, when he became part 
owner of the Boone Republican, remaining so until November, 1896, and as sole 
owner until October, 1897. He was also editor and part proprietor of the Daily 
Boone Republican from April, 1896, until November, 1896. He was editor and 
proprietor of the Monthly Boone Review and Advertiser from February, 1899, 
until March, 1900, and in January. 1902, he became editor and sole owner of 
the Weekly Boone Standard for the third time, which paper he continued to pub- 
lish until June, 1908. Few men of the state can boast of so long and continued 
a newspaper career. He has had much to do with shaping the journalistic policy 
of the state. He made his papers both the mirror and molder of public opinion 
and his editorials were always fair and liberal to all. 

Mr. Gallup was united in marriage on the 26th of August, 1862, in Sununit, 
New York, to Miss Albina Dyer, a native of Schoharie county, who lost her father 
in her early girlhood, while her mother now lives in California at the advanced 
age of eighty-eight years. The wedding of Mr. and Mrs. Gallup was celebrated 
at six o'clock in the morning, on which occasion there were present three invited 
couples beside the immediate families. After the morning breakfast, the four 
couples drove to Howe's cave, about ten miles distant, where, in charge of an 
experienced guide, they made a four mile trip on foot into the interior of the 
cave. After a few weeks spent in New York, Mr. and Mrs. Gallup came to 
their home in the west. As the years went by six children were added to the 
household: Chester, who died in childhood; Frankie, the wife of James Hamil- 
ton, of Sioux City, Iowa ; William, who passed away in boyhood ; Lucy, who died 
in infancy; Fred H., who is captain of Company F, of the Third Field Artillery, 
now located at Fort iMyer, Virginia ; and James, owner of a prosperous job 
printing establishment in Boone. 

Mr. Gallup is a republican and has held a number of local offices. His fra- 
ternal relations connect him with the Masons and his religious faith with the 
Methodist church. His life has been honorable, his actions manly and sincere, 
and there is no citizen in Boone county more worthy of high regard. 



CARL CLAUSSEN. 



Carl Claussen, a well known young business man of Ogden, is a member 
of the firm of Hagge & Claussen, automobile dealers and also proprietors of a gen- 
eral repair shop. He is a native son of Boone county, having been born in 
.-\mac|ua township on the 5th of May, 1883. His parents. Thomas and Margaret 
(Jones) Claussen. were born in Germany. The father, who followed farming 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 81 

in that country, emigrated to the United States when twenty years of age and 
made his way direct to this county but a short time later removed to Wyoming, 
where he resided for a year and a half. On the expiration of that period he 
returned to Boone county, Iowa, purchasing and improving a farm in Amaqua 
township which he operated successfully until 1900. He has lived retired in 
Ogden during the past fourteen years and is widely recognized as a substantial, 
representative and esteemed citizen of the community. 

Carl Claussen was reared and educated in this county, pursuing his studies 
in the district schools. He remained on the farm with his parents until sixteen 
years of age, when the family home was established in Ogden. Subsequently he 
entered Highland Park College of Des Moines and later pursued a special course 
in mechanical engineering in the Iowa State College of Agriculture and Mechan- 
ical Arts at Ames. He then went to Minneapolis, Minnesota, and for eight 
months was engaged in railroad work, while during the next year and a half 
he followed farming near Spokane, Washington. After returning to Ogden he 
operated the municipal electric light plant for three years. On the ist of Febru- 
ary, 191 3, he embarked in business in partnership with H. J. Hagge as a dealer 
in automobiles, the firm name being Hagge & Claussen. They handle Buick cars 
exclusively and also carry on a general repair business. Success has attended 
the venture, for the partners are young men of splendid business ability, enter- 
prise and enthusiasm. Their garage is a one-story brick structure of double width. 

In his political views Mr. Claussen is a democrat while his religious faith is 
that of the German Lutheran church. He has cooperated in many movements 
for the general good, has ever cast his influence on the side of improvement and 
has advocated high ideals of manhood and citizenship. 



J. AUGUST CARLSON. 

J. August Carlson is one of those sturdy Swedish-Americans who have found 
in this country the opportunities which lead to success. He is the owner of the 
Belmont stock farm in Marcy township, which enjoys a reputation that extends 
far and wide over the state. He also owns two hundred and forty acres on sec- 
tion 22, Amaqua township. He was born in Sweden, May 10, 1858, and is a son 
of J. P. and Christina Carlson, natives of Sweden. There the mother died in 
1868. The father subsequently came to America, locating in De Kalb, Illinois, in 
1870. In the fall of the same year he came to Moingona, Boone county. He 
was a carpenter by trade and for two years continued in that line of occupation, 
after which he retired, making his home with S. .M. Kollin, until his death in 1878. 

J. August Carlson attended the schools of his native country and as a boy 
of twelve years came with his father to America. He again took up his lessons 
here, completing his education in the English schools. He began his career as a 
farm hand and it is interesting to note that he has worked and lived on section 4 
in Marcy township for thirty-nine years. He continued in the employ of others 
until 1883, removing in that year onto the farm which he had acquired in 1881 
and which comprises one hundred and three acres on section 4, Marcy township. 



82 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

He immediately gave his sole attention to the improvement of his property and 
has ever since continued on the same place. His farm is known as the Belmont 
stock farm, and Mr. Carlson has become recognized as one of the most pro- 
ficient stockraisers and dealers in his section of the state. He has taken more 
premiums and prizes on stock than any other man in Boone county. Close 
application, thrift, industry and judicious management have been the factors in 
his success. He also owns two hundred and forty acres on section 22, Amaqua 
township, which are highly improved and net him a considerable income. He 
gives particular attention to Duroc Jersey hogs, and Percheron horses and short- 
horn cattle and has taken a number of prizes on this stock. 

In February, 1883, Mr. Carlson was united in marriage to Miss Ida C. Wie- 
big, a daughter of Jonas and Maria (Danielson) Wiebig, natives of Sweden, 
where the mother died in 1872. The father came to America in 1889 and located 
in Clinton. Iowa, but after a short time came to Boone county, where he gave his 
attention to farming for awhile. He then removed to Nebraska, taking up a 
claim in that state, and there he died in 1901. Mr. and Mrs. Carlson became 
parents of eight children as follows: Henry W., Albert J., Arthur W., Elmer A., 
Raymond F., Alice C, Clarence E. and Carl J. Mr. Carlson served as trustee 
of Marcy township for twelve years and is now treasurer of the school board, 
manifesting thereby his deep interest in the cause of education. Politically he is 
a republican, and his religious faith is that of the Swedish Mission church. Most 
of his attention is given to his important stock-raising and farming interests, yet 
he is always ready to concern himself about public questions and to give ma- 
terial and moral support to movements which promote growth and advancement. 
Fraternally he is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America and very popu- 
lar in this lodge. Great credit is due him for what he has achieved, for he 
came to this country empty-handed and has attained a substantial position among 
the residents of Boone county. 



JOHN A. MENTON. 

Since 1902 John A. Menton has been connected with the publication of the 
Boone County Democrat in partnership with John R. Herron. He makes his 
home in the city of Boone, where he is both widely and favorably known. His 
birth occurred in North Easton, Massachusetts, February 25, 1867, his parents 
being John and Johannah (Leary) Menton, both of whom were natives of Ire- 
land. The mother crossed the Atlantic to Canada in her girlhood days. The 
father went from Ireland to Birmingham, England, here he remained for about 
twelve years and then came to the United States, settling in Massachusetts. It 
was there that they were married, and in the spring of 1867 they removed west- 
ward to Boone county, where for many years the father followed the occupa- 
tion of farming. He afterward lived retired until his death, which occurred in 
the year 1905. His wife survived him for about eight years, passing away in 
1913. In their family were nine children as follows: Julia, the wife of T. J. 
O'Conncll, a resident of Boone; Dennis, deceased; Daniel, also living in Boone; 
John A. ; Kate, the wife of D. P. Ivis, of this county ; Nellie, at home ; T. P., 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 8$ 

a resident of Boone ; W. F., living in Santa Ana, California ; and Edward J.^ 
of Boone. 

John A. Mentqn left the farm in his youthful days and supplemented the 
education which he had previously acquired in the public schools by study in the 
Western Normal College. He then went to the west for his health, spending twO' 
years in Colorado, and upon his return to Iowa, he engaged in teaching school, 
successfully following that profession for ten years. During that period he took 
up the study of law and was admitted to the bar in 1899. He afterward practiced 
in Boone and in lola, Kansas, and when he again returned to Boone once more 
became an instructor in the public schools. He also acted as a salesman and 
afterward resumed the practice of law. In 1902 he* entered the newspaper field 
in partnership with John R. Herron, and the connection has since been main- 
tained. They are owners and publishers of the Boone County Democrat, which 
has a good circulation, and is, therefore, an excellent advertising medium. 

On the 28th of April, 1909, Mr. Menton was united in marriage to Miss Ida 
V. Engel, who passed away eleven months later. His political allegiance is- 
given to the democratic party, and for twelve years he was chairman of the 
democratic central committee of Boone county. His religious faith is that of the 
Catholic church. Much of his life has been spent in this section of the state, 
where he is now widely known, and he has won many friends during the long 
period of his residence here. 



WILBUR H. KEIGLEY. 

Wilbur H. Keigley, the president and general manager of the W. H. Keigley 
Land Company of Madrid, is at the head of a well established real-estate and loaa 
business in the city and also buys and sells land in northern Iowa and southern 
Minnesota. Boone county is proud to number him among her native sons. 
His birth occurred in Douglas township on the 4th of July. 1868, his parents 
being William Jacob and Elizabeth ( Throckmorton ) Keigley, the former born 
in Pennsylvania in 1824 and the latter in Green county, that state, in the same 
year. William Jacob Keigley was one of the pioneer settlers of Boone county, 
making the o\trland journey to this state. He located on a farm in Douglas 
township and devoted his attention to the work of the fields throughout his 
active career. His demise occurred in Madrid, Iowa, on the 31st of December, 
1905, while his wife passed away in that city on the 27th of April, 1904, the com- 
munity thus losing two of its respected early residents. 

They were the parents of eight children, as follows : William, a native of 
Pennsylvania, who passed away in that state : John Warren, who died in Boone, 
Iowa, in December, 1913; Wilbur H., of this review: Clayton C, a resident of 
Crowley, Louisiana : Theo H., who makes his home in Colfax township, Boone 
county, Iowa; Lionel F., living in Ames, Iowa; Robert M., who passed away in 
Madrid, this state : and Mrs. Emmerah E. Sutherland, who is a resident of 
Garden township. The two eldest children were born in Pennsylvania and the 
younger ones in Douglas township, this county. All the surviving members of 
the family were reared in Boone county. 



84 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

Wilbur H. Keigley, whose entire life has been spent within the borders of his 
native county, attended the common schools in the acquirement of an education 
and is a graduate of the Madrid high school. He gave his attention to general 
agricultural pursuits until 1885 and subsequently engaged in various kinds of 
business in Madrid, eventually becoming identified with real-estate interests. He 
is now the president and general manager of the W. H. Keigley Land Company 
of Madrid, conducting a general real-estate business locally and also buying and 
selling land in northern Iowa and southern Minnesota. Success has attended his 
undertakings in gratifying degree and he is now numbered among the prosperous 
and representative business men of the county. He owns a commodious and 
attractive residence in Madfid and also has property in Minnesota. 

In 1890 Mr. Keigley was united in marriage to Miss Arab Belle Holcomb, a 
native of Illinois and a daughter of Milo and Caroline Holcomb, who established 
their home in Boone county, Iowa, in 1878. The father passed away in Wood- 
ward, this state, while the mother's demise occurred at Aladrid. Their six sur- 
viving children are as follows: Mrs. Mattie Moore, of Manitou, Oklahoma; 
Mrs. Carrie L. Woods, who is a resident of Fort Madison, Iowa ; Charles, living 
in Madrid, Iowa; Mrs. Wilbur H. Keigley; Frank, of Pocahontas coimty, Iowa; 
and Mrs. Blanche Rhodes, of Woodward, Iowa. ]\Ir. and Mrs. Keigley have two 
children, namely: Alilo W., who was bom January 13, 1897; and Marvel E., 
whose birth occurred December 27, 1902. Both are natives of Madrid and attend 
the public schools of that city. ■ 

In politics Mr. Keigley is a stanch democrat and his fellow townsmen, recog- 
nizing his worth and ability, have chosen him for various positions of public 
trust. He has held numerous local offices in Madrid, has acted as city marshal 
and as constable in Douglas township. He served as deputy sheriff of Boone 
county under the administration of George Garner and was the democratic pre- 
cinct chairman for a number of years. Mr. Keigley attends the services of the 
Methodist Episcopal church in Madrid and is fraternally identified with the 
Masons, belonging to Star Lodge, No. 115, of Madrid, and Tuscan Chapter, No. 
31, R. A. M., of Boone. He is likewise connected with the Modern Woodmen 
of America at Madrid. He has always lived in Boone county and the fact that 
many of his stanchest friends are numbered among those who have known him 
from his boyhood to the present time is an indication of an upright and well 
spent life. He manifests sterling qualities not only in his business activities but 
also in his social and citizenship relations and is justly accounted one of the 
valued residents of the community. 



MRS. NETTIE McINTOSH WAHL. 

One of the beautiful homes of Boone is that owned and occupied by Mrs. 
Nettie Mcintosh Wahl at the corner of Sixth and Wood streets. She is most 
widely and favorably known in this city and throughout the county, where she 
tias many friends. She was born in Indiana in 1851, a daughter of William and 
Fmily W. (Parker) Mcintosh, the former a native of Indiana and the latter of 
Kentuckv. Mrs. Wahl was but six weeks old when her parents removed with 






WILLIAM Mc;L\TUs;lI 




MRS. WILLIAM McINTOSH 



jPu. 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 89 

the family to Iowa. She is a sister of James Whitcomb Mcintosh, mention of 
whom appears elsewhere in this volume. Spending her girlhood days under 
the parental roof, she was reared and educated in Boonesboro and also attended 
a Sisters' school at Ottumwa, Iowa, when seventeen years of age. 

Later she engaged in teaching school in Boone county for twelve or more 
terms and proved very capable in that direction, imparting clearly and readily 
to others the knowledge that she had acquired. She taught at Glenwood, Iowa, 
in the School for Feeble-minded for ten years and was very successful in her 
work with that unfortunate class, her patience and ready sympathy enabling 
her to accomplish results that few others could have accomplished. She then 
returned to Boonesboro to care for her mother and sister until the death of the 
former. The sister. Miss Mary Frances Mcintosh, now makes her home with 
Mrs. Wahl. The latter is a member of the Daughters of the American Revolu- 
tion, holding membership in Deshon Chapter of Boone, and her name is also on 
the membership roll of the Order of the Eastern Star of Boone. Most of her 
life has been devoted to charitable work and she has done great good in the 
world. She is liberal in her religious views, attending various churches, con- 
tributing to their support and giving generously to many worthy objects whereby 
the interests of the individual and the community are promoted. 



PEDER T. SAVERAID. 



Peder J. Saveraid is one of those sturdy Norwegian-Americans who have 
found in this country the opportunities which they sought, .\lthough yet f|uite a 
young man, he is at the head of the Boone Creamery Company, an important 
concern in the commercial life of the city and of particular significance in regard 
to agricultural development. Mr. Saveraid has largely established the high repu- 
tation which the products of his creamery company enjoy, their principal out- 
put being Saveraid's special pure creamery butter. They are located at No. 1003 
Eighth st-eet in Boone and there can be found an up-to-date, sanitary plant 
which might serve as a model to other establishments of a similar nature. Its 
success is 'argely attributable to Mr. Saveraid. who is a man of great experience 
in his line of business. 

He was born in Norway, September 15, 1876, and is a son of John and .Anna 
( Holland) Saveraid and a grandson of Peder Saveraid, who served in the Nor- 
wegian army. .After having attended the common schools the grandfather 
learned shipbuilding, later owning his own yard. Business conditions in his par- 
ticular line, however, turned from bad to worse and he was therefore forced to 
relinquish this enteqirise and went to sea. Success came to him in this connec- 
tion and he eventually became the owner of six vessels and was captain of one 
of them. He died in Norway. In his family were ten children. Late in life 
he owned a farm and his son John, the father of our subject, passed his boy- 
hood there, early becoming acquainted with agricultural pursuits. He enjoyed 
a common-school education and remained in his native land until 1881, when he 
brought his family to the United States, being impressed with the opportunities 
of which he had heard in regard to this country. He sailed from Bergen to 

Vol. n— 5 



90 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

New York and from that city made his way directly to Story City, Iowa, where he 
now lives retired. He is a member of the synod and has always taken an active 
part in the religious affairs of his community. His wife died in Story City in 
1885, and subsequently he married Miss Bertha Stoll. By his first marriage he 
had the following children: Peder, deceased; Anna, the widow of H. H. 
Falland ; Samuel, of Story City: Mrs. Lena Olson, of Minnesota; Sebert, of 
Boone; Margaret, who died at the age of sixteen; Mrs. Hannah Ritland, of 
Huxley, Iowa; John, deceased; Peder, the second of the name and the subject 
of this review ; and Ross, of Lake Mills, Iowa. 

Peder J. Saveraid was but five years old when his parents brought him to the 
United States. He attended the public schools in Story City until fifteen, and 
until twenty-one worked as a farm hand, receiving about eighty cents per day. At 
the early age of eleven years, however, he had become self-supporting, perform- 
ing such duties as were commensurate with his age until leaving school, when he 
gave his entire attention to farming. On attaining his majority he became con- 
nected with the creamery business in Huxley, where for fourteen years was 
engaged in that line. At the end of that time, in 1912, he invested his savings in 
his present plant, which he has since so successfully conducted. Great credit is 
due Mr. Saveraid for what he has achieved, as he has gained his success entirely 
through his own efforts. He is today considered one of the most successful 
business men of Boone and contributes toward the reputation of the city by 
turning out a creamery product which is an honor to the state. Naturally his en- 
terprise has had a beneficial influence ui)on dairy conditions and he therefore must 
be considered a factor in the dairy development of Iowa. 

On June 11, 1902, Mr. Saveraid married Miss Josie Saveraid, a daughter of 
John and Elizabeth Saveraid, who were natives of Norway, their daughter, 
however, being bom here. Mr. and Mrs. Saveraid of this review- have five 
children: .Arthur J., attending school; and J. O., Elizabeth, Walter P. and 
Palmer J. 

The parents are members of the Norwegian Lutheran churcli and deeply 
devoted to its service. Politically Mr. Saveraid is a republican, thoroughly in 
sympathy with the aims of his party, whose candidates he stanchly supports. He 
is an aggressive young man of the modern school of American business and has 
made a record for himself which well entitles him to be ranked with the useful 
citizens of Boone. While he has achieved individual success, he has always 
been considerate of the interests of others and never loses sight of the com- 
munity welfare, to the betterment of which he willingly and readily contributes 
liis share and more than his share. 



JOHN WALTER JORDAN. 

Although one of the younger representatives of the Boone county bar, the 
comparative youth of John Walter Jordan seems to be no detriment, as he has 
already gained a position as a representative of the legal profession that many 
an older lawyer might well envy. He has his B. L. degree from the State Univer- 
sity and has practiced continuously since 190". He was born in Boone, Mav 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 91 

24, 1883, and is still a resident of the county seat. His parents were Richard 
and Martha (Lynch) Jordan, both natives of New York. His grandparents 
on the paternal side were John and Anna (Connolly) Jordan, natives of Ireland, 
and on coming to the new world in the autumn of 1856, they settled at Dixon; 
Lee county, Illinois, where they remained for ten years. The year 1866 wit- 
nessed their arrival in Boone county, Iowa, at which time they took up their 
abode upon a farm and there spent their remaining days. Their son, Richard 
F. Jordan, father of John Walter Jordan, was born in Glens Falls, New York, 
on the 19th of March, 1856, and in the fall of the same year was taken by his 
parents to Illinois. He was one of five children, the others being, Mary, Maurice, 
Alice and Edward C. Richard F. Jordan was educated in the country schools 
and at the age of seventeen years entered the Iowa State College at Ames, from 
which he was graduated with valedictorian honors in the class of 1877. He then 
entered a law school at Des Moines and on the 7th of June. 1879, was admitted to 
the bar. Returning to Boone, he here entered upon the practice of his chosen 
profession and was associated with various partners, the firm style being suc- 
cessively, Ramsey & Jordan, Crooks & Jordan, Jordan & Brockett, and Jordan & 
Goodykoontz. He also practiced alone for a time and throughout the entire 
period of his connection with the Boone county bar ranked high as one of the 
leading lawyers of his section of the state. 

While a law student in Des Moines, Richard F. Jordan formed the acquaint- 
ance of Miss Martha L. Lynch and their friendship ripening into love, they were 
married on the 23d of May, 1882. Four children were born to them: John 
Walter, of this review; Richard Frank, of Chicago; and Helen and flara. at 
home. Mr. Jordan lost his life as a result of injuries sustained in a fire Sep- 
temljer 3, 1901. A stable on his premises burned and in an endeavor to rescue 
a favorite driving horse from the flames, he received injuries from which he 
died two days later. He was beloved by all who knew him, and thus it was that 
his death was the occasion of deep and widespread regret. He took an active 
part in civic affairs at all times, doing everything in his power to promote public 
progress, and his efforts resulted for good along many lines. He served as a 
member of the school board, was city solicitor, and president of the board of 
trustees of the public library. He was also president of the Business Men's Asso- 
ciation and was active in formulating its policy for the promotion of the best 
interests of the city. Frequently he was called upon to deliver public addresses 
and on such occasions he was always given the closest attention. While in national 
affairs he was a democrat, he cast a non-partisan vote at local elections. His 
fraternal relations were with the Elks, and his religious faith was that of the 
Catholic church. His widow survives him and makes her home in Boone, where 
she has an extensive circle of friends. 

Reared in his native city, John Walter Jordan attended the public schools and 
in 1900 entered the Iowa State College, from which he was graduated with the 
class of 1904, completing the course which gave him the Bachelor of Science 
degree. He next entered the Iowa State University at Iowa City, where he pur- 
sued his law course and won his Bachelor of Laws degree in IQ07. In the fall 
of the same year he opened an office in Boone for the practice of his chosen 
profession. On the ist of September, 1913, he formed a partnership with S. R. 
Dyer and Walter R. Dyer, under the firm style of Dyer, Jordan & Dyer. His 



92 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

name figures in connection with many important litigated interests, and his abil- 
ity is growing through the exercise of his powers and through his continued 
reading, study and investigation. Jrle analyzes his cases most carefully and is 
seldom if ever at fault in the application of a legal principle. 

Mr. Jordan was reared to the Catholic faith, to which he still adheres, and he 
belongs to the Knights of Columbus and the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. 
His political support is given the democratic party. 



A. R. WESTERBERG. 



A. R. Westerberg, who in 1899 established the Madrid Electric Lighting & 
Power Company in association with his father, is still the manager of the elec- 
tric plant in Madrid, which is conceded to be one of the best lighted towns of 
its size in the state. He has spent his entire life within the borders of Boone 
county, his birth having occurred in Garden township on the 6th of July, 1876. 

The parents, A. P. Westerberg and Mrs. Emma Lundahl Anderson Wester- 
berg, were both natives of Sweden, the former born in Skaraborg, Westergot- 
land, on the 17th of July, 1840, and confirmed in the Lutheran church in 1856. 
When a young man of twenty-six years he emigrated to the United States, 
locating in Boone, Iowa, on the 9th of October, 1866. He entered the bridge- 
building department of the Chicago & Northwestern Railway and continued with 
the corporation for nine years. Having carefully saved his earnings, he then 
bought a tract of one hundred and twenty acres in Garden township, where he 
successfully carried on general agricultural pursuits, extending the boundaries 
of his farm by additional purchase until it embraced two hundred acres of valu- 
able land. His last years were spent in Madrid, Iowa, where he passed away on 
the 22d of September, 1909. The period of his residence in Boone county cov- 
ered more than four decades, and he was widely recognized as one of its substan- 
tial and esteemed citizens. The demise of his wife occurred on tlie old home 
farm in Garden township, and subsequently he was again married, his second 
union being with Mrs. Christina Westland, by whom he had one child, Lester 
Roosevelt Westerberg, who is a resident of Madrid. Unto him and his first wife 
were born eight children, as follows: Mrs. Maude Anderson Westerberg 
Sundberg, living in Garden township ; A. R., of this review ; Mrs. Ethel Wester- 
strom, of Madrid, Iowa ; Frank, who is a resident of Boone, Iowa ; Mrs. Esther 
Krantz of Madrid; Edwin, living in Longmont, Colorado; Mrs. Blanche 
Peterson, who makes her home in Garden township ; and Zylph, deceased. The 
above named were all born and reared in Garden township. 

A. R. Westerberg grew to manhood on the home farm and attended the 
common schools in the acquirement of an education. Being mechanically inclined, 
he was given an opportunity to develop this talent in successfully controlling a 
threshing outfit in the neighborhood Subsequently he applied himself to the 
study of electricity and mastered the science through his own efforts. In 1899 
in association with his father he established the Madrid Electric Lighting & 
Power Company of Madrid, in the conduct of which A. P. Westerberg took a 
deep and active interest during the remainder of his life, living to see the plant 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 93 

one of the best equipped in central Iowa. In 191 2 the local plant was abandoned, 
and our subject has since secured the power from Boone, where it is furnished 
by the Iowa Railway & Light Company. This has given universal satisfaction 
and Mr. Westerberg has realized his ambition in making Madrid one of the 
best lighted towns of its size in the state. He acts as manager of the plant and 
is one of its heaviest stockholders. He owns an attractive and commodious * 
residence in Madrid and has long been numbered among the prosperous, enter- 
prising and representative citizens of the community. 

On the 5th of April, 1900, Mr. Westerberg was united in marriage to Miss 
Emma Grace Krantz, who was born in Garden township, this county, on the 28th 
of .April, 1875, her parents being John and Mary Krantz, the former a native 
of Sweden. They were among the earlier settlers of Boone county, and here 
Mrs. Westerberg grew to womanhood and acquired her education in the common 
schools. John Krantz passed away in Garden township, but his widow survives, 
making her home in Madrid. They had three children, namely : C. L., who was 
born on the 29th of June, 1873, and resides in Madrid; Mrs. A. R. Westerberg; 
and G. A. J. Krantz, of Madrid. All were born and reared in Garden township. 
Mr. and Mrs. Westerberg have one son, Edgar Richard Quinton Westerberg, who 
was born on the 23d of November, 1903, and is now a public-school student at 
Madrid. 

In his political views Mr. Westerberg is a stanch republican. His religious 
faith is indicated by his membership in the Swedish Lutheran church of Madrid, 
to which his wife also belongs. He is a man of good business ability, of exem- 
plary habits and upright character, is worthy the trust of his fellowmen and 
fully merits the good-will which is uniformly extended him. 



T. T. MAHONEY. 



T. T- Mahoney, a well known representative of the legal fraternity in Boone 
county, has been engaged in active practice at Boone since 1901 and is now a 
partner of William W. Goodykoontz. He is numbered among the worthy native 
sons of this county, his birth having here occurred on the i6th of October, 1876. 
His parents, Timothy and Mary (Hickey) Mahoney. were both born in Ireland. 
When still but a child the father was brought to the United States and taken to 
Wisconsin. In 1867 he came to Boone county, Iowa, and has here remained 
throughout the intervening forty-seven years. He devoted his attention to gen- 
eral agricultural pursuits during his active business career but is now living 
retired in the enjoyment of well earned ease. Mr. Mahoney has held some 
minor township offices and also served as alderman in Boone, ever proving an 
efficient and faithful public servant. He is well known and highly esteemed 
throughout the community, having won the friendship and regard of all with 
whom he has been associated during the long years of his residence here. Unto 
him and his wife were born the following children: two who died in infancy; 
William, who is a resident of Casper, Wyoming; Frank and George, both of 
whom are deceased; Edwin, a resident of Boone, Iowa; Joseph H., living in 



94 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

Des Moines ; Dora, who is the wife of P. M. Reilly, of Boone ; Mary, who gave 
her hand in marriage to A. E. Murphy, of Boone ; and T. J., of this review. 

The last named acquired his early education in the district schools and subse- 
quently continued his studies in the Iowa State College at Ames, being graduated 
from that institution in 1896. He next took up the study of law at Des Moines, 
winning the degree of LL. B. in igoi. In that year he came to Boone and for 
twelve months practiced his profession in partnership with M. K. Ramsey. He is 
now associated with William W. Goodykoontz and is recognized as an attor- 
ney of power and ability, being accorded an extensive and gratifying clientage. 
The zeal with which he has devoted his energies to his profession, the careful 
regard evinced for the interests of his clients and an assiduous and unrelaxing 
attention to all the details of his cases, have brought him a large business and 
made him very successful in its conduct. In April, 1898, he enlisted for service 
in the Spanish-American war as a member of Company I, Fifty-second Iowa 
Volunteer Infantry, and on October 30th of the same year was mustered out as 
corporal. He is now judge advocate of the First Iowa Brigade of the National 
Guard. 

On the 30th of June, 1913, Mr. Mahoney was united in marriage to Miss 
Josephine Patton, a native of Emmetsburg, Iowa. He gives his political allegiance 
to the democracy and is a devout communicant of the Catholic church, while 
fraternally he is identified with the Knights of Columbus and the Benevolent 
Protective Order of Elks. His genial qualities, his social disposition and his 
sterling worth have gained him many friends in this community, and the high 
regard in which he is held merits his classification with the representative and 
esteemed citizens of his native county. 



JOHN LUNDAHL. 



John Lundahl, who now lives practically retired in Madrid, was for many 
years a most successful agriculturist of Boone county. He was bom in Swe- 
den, March 11, 1852, and in 1865 came to America, with his parents. Andrew 
and Johanna Lundahl, the family selecting Swede Point (now Madrid) for their 
first habitat. The first winter they spent in Douglas township, returning to 
Madrid in the spring. There they lived one year and then removed to the farm 
of John Anderson, where they spent a number of years in the cultivation of the 
soil. At the end of that time they were able to purchase a farm in Douglas 
township, which yielded them rich returns and which they managed for some 
time. Mr. Lundhal of this review resided there until the death of the father. 
His parents were natives of Sweden. The mother was born January 7, 1829, 
and died in Madrid at the age of seventy-seven years. May 10, 1906. After the 
death of her husband in Douglas township, Mrs. Lundahl kept the family to- 
gether and with the aid of the older sons successfully continued in the culti- 
vation of the home farm. She had six children, as follows : Airs. Westerberg, 
now deceased; John, of this review; Frederick, born in 1854, deceased; 
Frank, a resident of Canada : Victor, of Garden township, this county : and Mrs. 
Amanda C. Johnson, born February 10, 1868, who is residing in Madrid. Mrs. 



■y, 

r 







HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 97 

Johnson is a native of Boone county, but the other members of the family were 
all born in Sweden. 

John Lundahl continued agricultural pursuits until April i, 1911, when he 
and his wife removed to Madrid to occupy their handsome dwelling in that 
city. The first business block of the town stood on the site where their home 
is now located, and in it a store was conducted by a man named Hornbeck. Mr. 
Lundahl still owns two hundred acres of highly improved and choice land in 
Garden township, eighty of which are located on section 29, forty on section 30 
and eighty on section 20. To the cultivation of this farm, purchased by him 
in 1876, he gave his attention for many years and it is today recog^nized as one 
of the most desirable in its region. Mr. Lundahl always followed the most 
modern methods and cultivated his fields with a view toward soil preservation. 
He succeeded because he was careful and untiring and because he always applied 
great intelligence to his work. 

On May i, 1878, John Lundahl was married, in Douglas township, to 
Josephine Johnson, who was born August 2, 1855, in Sweden. Her parents 
came to America in 1868 and located in De Soto, Dallas county, Iowa. Her 
father, A. P. Johnson, a native of Sweden, was for a time connected with rail- 
road work in De Soto. In 1873 he and his family located on a fami in Gar- 
den township, which he had purchased three years before. He died in that 
township in 1907, highly respected by all who knew him. His wife, Mrs. 
Sophia (Johnson) Johnson, also a native of Sweden, now resides in Madrid. 
She bore her husband eight children : Mrs. Josephine Lundahl ; John, of Des 
Moines ; Aaron, deceased ; Swante, deceased ; August, of Garden township ; 
Matilda, of Madrid; Jennie, deceased; and Oscar, residing in Madrid. Some 
of the children were born in Sweden and the remainder in Boone county, where 
all were reared. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lundahl had five children, all born in Garden township: 
Esther, whose birth occurred March 19, 1879, and who died in Garden township; 
Harry Edwin, born November 9, 1881, who resides on the home farm in Gar- 
den township; Mrs. Mabel M. Benson, born August 11, 1884, who lives at Still- 
water, Minnesota, her husband being chaplain at the state penitentiary of that 
place; Maude Matilda, who was born March 10, 1888, and died at the age of 
sixteen months; and Carl, whose birth occurred August 30, 1890, now a member 
of the firm of Johnson & Lundahl of Madrid, who are engaged in the buying 
and selling of grain and coal. .-Ml the children attended the common schools, 
the youngest son being a graduate of the Madrid high school. Harry attended 
Augustana College of Rock Island, Illinois, for two years. Mrs. Mabel Ben- 
son is highly proficient in music and took one year's instruction in that art at 
Jewell Junction and one year in the Conservatory of Music of Drake University 
at Des Moines. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lundahl are members of St. John's Lutheran church of Madrid, 
of which he was trustee and has been a deacon for a number of years. They 
are deeply interested in church work and carry out their Christian ideas in 
their everyday life. Both are enterprising citizens, desirous and willing to 
assume their share in any worthy public enterprise. Politically Mr. Lundahl is 
a republican and for a number of years was trustee of Garden township. For 
twelve vears he has been a school director, having always taken an interest in 



98 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

the cause of education. He has traveled extensively, having visited Mexico and 
other countries. Both Mr. and Mrs. Lundahl are highly esteemed and 
respected in Madrid, where they have many friends and are ranked among the 
foremost citizens of Boone county. Mr. Lundahl is entitled to the honor of 
being called a self-made man, having built up his fortune without any outside 
help. The respect which is paid him is well merited and the prosperity which 
has come to him is due him in recognition of his unfaltering efforts. 



HORACE THOMAS COOK. 

Horace Thomas Cook is the oldest representative of mercantile interests in 
Boone in years of continuous connection with business. The spirit of enter- 
prise and progress has ever dominated him in all that he has undertaken, and 
he has built up a business of large and gratifying proportions. He was born in 
Boonesboro, Iowa, May 21, 1868, a son of Lorenzo Dow and Belle (Thomas) 
Cook, the former a native of Illinois and the latter of Indiana. In the year 
1854 the father arrived' in Boone county and began clerking for his father-in-law, 
Shallum Thomas, who settled in Boonesboro in 1852. After a few years he 
became a partner in the store and later took over the business, subsequent to 
which time he admitted two partners. The firm name was then L. D. Cook & 
Company. Mr. Cook afterward purchased a business in Boone in 1878 and con- 
ducted the two stores. About 1880 he purchased the interest of his two part- 
ners and in 1883 he retired from business. His interests had been carefully 
managed, and his energy and determination enabled him to overcome all difficul- 
ties and obstacles and work his way steadily upward to success. Mr. Cook 
departed this life in December, 1886, having for ten years survived his wife, who 
died in June, 1876. Unto them were born three children: Nora and Grace, both 
of whom died in infancy ; and Horace Thomas. Following the death of his first 
wife the father was married, in 1878, to Qara Benjamin, and unto them was 
born a daughter, Clara Belle, now the wife of Dr. Heinenan, of Colorado. Mrs. 
Lorenzo D. Cook-Leonard is a resident of California. 

Horace T. Cook, reared in his native county, attended school until sixteen 
years of age and then entered business life in connection with the trade of book- 
binding. At a later date he entered into active connection with the clothing busi- 
ness as an employe of the firm of Wallace & Johnson. This was in 1888 and he 
continued in that house for seven and a half years. In 1897 he established a busi- 
ness on his own account in connection with James T. Regan, the partnership con- 
tinuing for nine months under the firm style of Cook & Regan. At the end of 
that time Mr. Cook purchased the business, which has since been carried on 
under the name of H. T. Cook. He carries a large and well selected line of men's 
clothing and furnishings and is today the oldest representative in the mercantile 
line in Boone. His store is well appointed, his stock large and attractive, and 
his progressive methods have placed him among the leading and successful 
merchants of his part of the state. The location of the store would ordinarily 
insure good business, but the personality of the owner and his methods accord- 
ing to the general opinion have been the salient features in his growing success. 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 99 

He has made it his purpose to serve each customer in such a way as to secure 
his continued patronage and friendship and the same treatment is carried out 
by those in his employ in the conduct of all business transactions. Mr. Cook is 
outspoken and always to the point, qualities which are admired by those who 
have regard for truth and abhor anything that even approaches hypocrisy or 
dissimulation in the slightest degree. 

C)n the 23d of September, 1890, Mr. Cook was united in marriage to Miss 
Harriet M. Shulters, a native of Boone, and they became parents of four chil- 
dren : Margaret, deceased ; Lucille, twin to Margaret, who has also passed away ; 
Caryl Clare, born in July, 1894; and Horace Dow, whose birth occurred in May, 
1899. In his political views Mr. Cook is a stalwart republican and keeps well 
informed on the questions and issues of the day. He belongs to the Masonic 
order and to the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, and his religious faith is 
that of the Presbyterian church. These associations indicate much of the prin- 
ciples that govern his conduct and have made him a man whom to know is to 
respect and honor. He has a wide and favorable acquaintance in his native 
county, and the fact that many of his stanchest friends are those who have known 
him from his boyhood indicates that his life has been an honorable and upright 



HENRY MAAS. 



Henry Maas was one of the very successful German American agriculturists 
of Boone county, Iowa. For many years he cultivated a profitable farm near 
Ogden which is now in possession of his widow. Mr. Maas combined German 
patience and thoroughness with American aggressiveness and by following mod- 
ern and up-to-date methods and giving close attention to all tasks at hand gained 
success. He was born in Germany and early in life crossed the Atlantic to 
America. In 1871 he came to Boone county, Iowa, and purchased land which he 
operated until his death. He transformed the wild prairie into richly bearing 
fields, and the appearance of his farm buildings betrayed his careful attention to 
the smallest detail of operation. He was ever ready to embrace the latest ideas 
and the most modern machinery could be found upon his place. He was rewarded 
by rich annual harvests and as time passed he became one of the substantial 
farmers of his neighborhood. 

In 1871 Mr. Maas was united in marriage to Miss Margaret Ehlers, a daugh- 
ter of Mr. and Mrs. John Ehlers, also natives of Germany. The father con- 
cluded his days in the fatherland, and after his death his widow came to America 
and made her home with her daughter until she passed to her reward in 1901. 
Mr. and Mrs. Maas had twelve children, Catherina, Johanna, Henry, Charles, 
Herman, Margaret, Lena, Marie, Edward and William. Two daughters Emma 
and Annie, died in infancy. For the past nine years Mrs. Maas has made her 
home in Ogden, although she still owns the homestead. She resides in a fine 
modern brick residence in Ogden and is highly esteemed and respected in that 
city, where she has many friends. 



7()4.^u.:> 



100 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

Mr. Maas was a member of the German Lutheran church. He was interested 
in all worthy public projects and took a deep pride in the civic advancement of 
his section. He not only gained individual success but by his labors contributed 
toward raising agricultural standards and was a factor in raising Iowa to the 
position of the most prosperous agricultural state in the Union. Mr. Maas died 
in 1894, his demise causing sincere mourning to his many friends. He left his 
family in most comfortable circumstances, but their greatest heritage is the 
memory of his untarnished and honorable life. 



GEORGE WALKER. 



George Walker is now living retired in a pleasant home at No. 714 Fifth 
street in Boone but in former years was closely and prominently connected 
with agricultural activity in Boone coimty. He has passed the seventy-seventh 
milestone on life's journey, his birth having occurred near Edinburgh, Scotland, 
on the loth of February, 1837. His forefathers had there resided for genera- 
tions and were salt makers, many representatives of the name residing at Mus- 
selburgh and Inverness. The paternal grandparents, George and Isabelle (Juere) 
Walker, and the parents, James and Margaret (Gregg) Walker, all died in 
Scotland. The mother of George Walker came of a family noted for longevity 
and she reached the remarkable old age of ninety-seven years. Her children 
were: Isabelle, who becaine the wife of Robert Grundy and died in Scotland; 
Jane, who married Angus McMillan and died in Scotland ; George, of this 
review: Janet, who became the wife of David Howie and died in Scotland; 
Tames, who passed away in the same country ; Alison, who married Cornelius 
Yourston, who for thirty-nine years was sealer of weights and measures in 
Edinburgh ; Helen, now living in Scotland : and Margaret, who became the wife 
of John Blythe and died in Boone county. 

George Walker attended the home schools of Cockenzie, pursuing his studies 
there until he reached the age of twelve years, when he began work in the 
salt and coal mines. The village was located on the coast and vessels would 
stop there to coal. Mr. Walker and others boys would haul coal and salt to 
the ships. At seventeen years of age he left home and went to Lanarkshire, 
near Glasgow, where he was employed in the coal mines for four years. He 
then returned home and worked in that locality for a time. He ne.xt went to 
Midlothian, the region made famous by Sir Walter Scott's romantic and pathetic 
story of The Heart of Midlothian. In 1868 he sailed for the United States as a 
passenger on the steamship Hibernia and landed at New York on the 4th of 
lulv- He made the voyage alone, leaving his wife and three children in Scot- 
land until he could prepare a home for them in the new world. 

Mr. Walker made his way to Sharon, Pennsylvania, where he began work in 
the mines. He there continued until 1874 and in the meantime was joined by 
his wife and children. In the year mentioned he traveled westward to Rock 
Springs, Wyoming, where he spent a part of three years. On the expiration of 
that period he settled in Marcy township, Boone county, Iowa, where he pur- 
chased eighty acres of land and followed farming until about 1910. He added 




CiKOlillK WALKKR 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 103 

to his property, becoming owner of one hundred and fifty acres which he still 
owns and upon which he erected a new house and also built a substantial barn 
and other outbuildings for the shelter of grain and stock. Year by year he care- 
fully tilled his fields and his labors brought good harvests. At lengfth, with a 
comfortable competence acquired from his well directed efforts, he retired from 
business life and established his home in Boone, where he now resides. 

It was in Scotland on the i6th of January, 1864, that Mr. Walker was united 
in marriage to Miss Margaret Grundy, of that land, a daughter of Robert and 
Agnes (VVishart) Grundy, in whose family were eleven children. Unto Mr. and 
Mrs. Walker have been born twelve children : Agnes, now the wife of Francis 
Muck, of Alinnesota : Margaret, who was graduated at Independence, Iowa, and 
is now a trained nurse: Euphemia, who died in infancy: James C., who married 
Minnie Linerod and is a practicing physician of Boone; Robert and George, 
who have jjassed away ; Walter, who married Carrie Counter and is living in 
Sioux City, Iowa; Robina, the wife of John Peacock, o.f Boone: Isabelle, the 
wife of John Wright, of Boone: John, living in Minnesota; Allie, who married 
John B. Donaldson, of Minnesota : and William, who married Clara Stewart and 
resides upon the home farm. 

The parents are members of the Baptist church, in the work of which they 
have taken active and helpful interest, Mr. Walker, serving as one of the dea- 
cons for many years. His political allegiance is given to the republican party 
and he is a stalwart advocate of its principles. He has never had 'occasion to 
regret his determination to come to the new world. His youth was a period of 
earnest and unremitting toil in his native land and, believing that he might have 
better opportunities on this side the Atlantic, he came to the United States. 
Nor has he been disappointed in his hopes. Gradually he has worked his way 
upward here, finding that in America "labor is king." His business enterprise, 
his unfaltering diligence and his honorable dealing have been the salient fea- 
tures in his growing success, making him at length one of the substantial resi- 
dents of Boone county. 



SIXTEN T. ANDERSON. 

Sixten T. Anderson is a member of the mercantile firm of Hagge (^- Ander- 
son of Beaver and also serves as postmaster of the town, having held that posi- 
tion for the past decade. His birth occurred in Norrkoping, Sweden, on the 
23d of January, 1875, his parents being Gus and Christina Anderson, who are 
likewise natives of that country. They emigrated to the United States in i88t. 
locating in Ogden. this county, where Gus Anderson worked in the emi:)loy of the 
Chicago (Jt Northwestern Railway for some time. Subsequently he cultivated 
rented land for a time and later purchased a farm in Union township, which he 
operated during the remainder of his active business career. He now lives 
retired in Bouton, Dallas county, this state, enjoying the fruits of his former 
toil in well earned ease. 

Sixten T. Anderson, who was a little lad of six years when he accompanied 
his parents on their emigration to the new world, acquired his education in 



104 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

Boone county. After leaving the Ogden liigh school he was employed as a clerk 
by D. Nebbe of Ogden for a period of eight years and in 1902 came to Beaver. 
Here he embarked in the mercantile business in partnership with his father-in- 
law, Claus Hagge, and has remained a member of the firm of Hagge & Ander- 
son to the present time. The concern carries an extensive and well selected 
stock of goods at reasonable prices and is accorded a gratifying patronage, 
both the members being widely recognized as enterprising, progressive and reli- 
able merchants and capable business men. Mr. Anderson owns a third interest in 
a quarter section of land in Beaver township and is a stockholder in the Farmers 
Cooperative Company and the Grocers Wholesale Company of Des Moines, 
Iowa. 

In Jime, igo2, Mr. Anderson was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Hagge, 
her parents being Claus and Margaret (Hensen) Hagge, of whom more extended 
mention is made in connection with the sketch of Henry D. Hagge, brother 
of Mrs. Anderson. Mr. Anderson is a republican in politics and is now making 
a creditable record as a member of the town council. He has likewise served 
as secretary of the school board and for two years held the office of mayor, 
his administration being characterized by valuable measures of reform and 
improvement. For the past ten years he has acted as postmaster of Beaver, 
satisfactorily discharging the duties devolving upon him in that capacity. The 
period of his residence in Boone county covers a third of a century and he has 
long been 'numbered among its respected, representative and public-spirited 
citizens. 



EVAN H. JENKINS. 



Evan H. Jenkins, who has been a leading resident of Ogden for the past 
twenty-two years, is a prominent factor in financial circles as president of the 
Farmers State Bank, which was organized in June, 1910. His birth occurred 
in Lee county, Iowa, on the 2d of January, 1852, his parents being W. H. C. 
and Mary A. (Cassel) Jenkins, both of whom were natives of Ohio. They came 
to Boone county, Iowa, in 1854, purchasing land in Marcy township which the 
father improved and cultivated during the remainder of his life. I'.oth Mr. and 
Mrs. W. H. C. Jenkins are deceased. 

Evan H. Jenkins was reared and educated in this county, pursuing his studies 
in a log schoolhouse. He remained under the parental roof until he had attained 
his majority and subsequently purchased and improved a farm of one hundred 
and sixty acres in Beaver township, devoting his attention to its operation until 
1892. As his financial resources increased, owing to his untiring industry and 
capable management, he augmented his property holdings by additional purchase 
and now owns six hundred and seventy acres of rich and productive land, one 
hundred and ninety acres thereof lying in Greene county. In 1892 he put aside 
the active work of the fields and took up his abode in Ogden, where he has 
remained continuously since and where he owbs a magnificent home. In June, 
1910, the Farmers State Bank was organized and he became a stockholder, direc- 
tor and president of the institution, the afifairs of which he has since guided most 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 105 

ably and well. He is likewise a stockholder in the City State Bank of Ogden 
and well deserves a place among the leading and representative citizens of the 
county. 

In March, 1878, Mr. Jenkins was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth 
McCarthy, a daughter of John and Catherine (Hoffman) McCarthy, who were 
natives of Canada and Indiana respectively. The parents became pioneer resi- 
dents of this county, taking up their abode in Boonesboro, where Mr. McCar- 
thy devoted his attention to mercantile pursuits. Both he and his wife have 
passed away. Mr. and Mrs. Jenkins are the parents of four children, as follows : 
Lura, who is the wife of C. E. Swain and resides in Malvern, Iowa; Laura B., 
the wife of D. E. Peck, of Berlin, Germany ; Roy E., who operates his father's 
farm in Beaver township; and Eva E., who is a high-school teacher at Denison, 
Iowa. 

In politics Mr. Jenkins is a stanch republican and he has done able service as 
a member of the town council and also on the school board. He is a charter mem- 
ber of the local lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, joining the 
organization in 1873. His religious faith is that of the Congregational church. 
His life has ever measured up to a high standard of manhood and honorable 
purpose and the years have brought him a circle of friends almost coextensive 
with the circle of his acquaintances. 



WILLIAM WARD GOODYKOONTZ. 

Boone county numbers William Ward Goodykoontz among its native sons, his 
birth having occurred within its borders on the 18th of August, 1872, his par- 
ents being Daniel F. and Mary Elizabeth (Moore) Goodykoontz, the former 
a native of Indiana and the latter of Pennsylvania. The father came to Iowa 
about the year 1855, settling in Allamakee county when it was largely an unde- 
veloped district. In 1886 he removed to Boone and became one of the pioneer 
merchants of the city, opening a drug store. He built the first brick block in 
Boone and has contributed to the improvement and progress of this section in 
many ways. At the time of the Civil war he responded to the country's call 
for aid, enlisting as a member of Company B, Twelfth Iowa Infantry, with 
which he was on active duty throughout the period of hostilities, participating in 
many engagements which led up to the final victory that crowned the Union 
arms. In igo6 he was called upon to mourn the loss of his wife, who died on the 
6th of January, of that year. In their family were two children, but they lost 
their second child in infancy. 

William Ward Goodykoontz attended the public schools and passed through 
consecutive grades until graduated from the high school on the 28th of May, 
1890. He afterward went to Ann Arbor, Michigan, where he entered the State 
University, there pursuing a collegiate course, where, in 1895, he was graduated 
on the completion of the law course. He afterward returned to Boone, where he 
opened an office and has since practiced. 

On the 31st of December, 1900, Mr. Goodykoontz was united in marriage to 
Miss Florence S. Streeter, a native of Blackhawk county, Iowa, who formerly 



106 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

engaged in teaching in the schools of Boone. In their family are three children : 
Elizabeth G., who was born October 4, iyo2 ; Mary \\ ., October 25, 1904; and 
Uaniel Edward, October 31, 1907. 1 he lannly attend the Presbyterian church. 
The parents are well known socially, and the hospitality of their home is greatly 
enjoyed by their many friends. Air. Goodykoontz is a member of the Knights of 
Pythias, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Benevolent Protective 
Order of Elks. His political allegiance has been given to the republican party 
since age conferred upon him the right of franchise, and his fellow townsmen 
have several times called him to public office, and his record as mayor of the 
city, as city attorney and as legislator is a most commendable one. He served as 
a member of the city council before being made chief executive of Boone and 
his understanding of the needs of the city made him a splendid municipal officer. 
In 1908 he was called to represent his district in the state legislature, of which 
he was a member for four years. He proved an able working member on the 
floor of the house, connected with much important constructive legislation and 
serving on a number of the leading committees. He is a member of the Com- 
mercial Association and in this connection works effectively and earnestly for 
the advancement of the interests of Boone. 



G. H. GETTY. 



In connection with public affairs of his community G. H. Getty has been very 
active and at the present time he is serving for the second term as county audi- 
tor, in which connection he has made a splendid record as a painstaking and 
trustworthy official. He was born in Washington county. New York, November 
25, 1870, and is a son of James H. and Sarah E. (Williamson) Getty, both of 
whom were natives of New York and in 1877 came to Iowa. They settled on a 
farm in Beaver township, Boone county, and in connection with de\eloping the 
fields and cultivating the crops best adapted to soil and climate Mr. Getty engaged 
in the raising of blooded Holstein cattle, winning substantial success in the con- 
duct of his business interests. Unto him and his wife were born five children : 
G. H., of this review; Estella. the wife of James Boomer, of Greene county, 
Iowa ; James A. and Nettie E., both of whom are now deceased : and Guy W., 
living in Meade county, South Dakota. 

G. H. Getty was a lad of but six years when the family came to Iowa and 
upon the home farm in Beaver township he was reared, early becoming familiar 
with all the duties and labors that fall to the lot of the agriculturist. He attended 
the ])ublic schools and when eighteen years of age took up the profession of 
teaching. He was not satisfied, however, with the education that he had thus 
far acquired and he grasped eagerly every opportunity that would enable him 
to broaden his knowledge and thus prepare for the higher responsibilities of life. 
He at length entered the Greene County Normal School, from which he was 
graduated, afterward taking a special course in bookkeeping, commercial 
branches and in law. He followed the profession of teaching for twenty years 
and at the same time managed a farm and engaged in raising thoroughbred stock 
in Beaver township. It is a widely recognized fact that he is a man of undaunted 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 107 

energy and that diligence and determination are among his chief characteristics. 
Even important agricultural and professional duties did not seem to fully mo- 
nopolize his time, for he was able also to faithfully perform the duties of various 
township offices. He served as road supervisor and township clerk and was twice 
a candidate for superintendent of schools — in 1899 and again in 1908. Failing 
of the nomination at the primaries, however, he showed nothing of a disgruntled 
spirit, but actively set to work to elect the man who was nominated. This is 
certainly an indication of his broad mind and public spirit. In 1908 he was offered 
and accepted the position of deputy county auditor and during his two years 
incumbency in that position he thoroughly acquainted himself with all of the 
intricate details of the work involved. He displayed thoroughness, patience and 
accuracy, and his ability was recognized by all who knew aught of the workings 
and management of the office. In 19 10 his party sought him to become a candi- 
date for the position of county auditor and he was elected. Indorsement of his 
first term service came in 1912, when he was reelected by an overwhelming major- 
ity, a deserved honor conferred upon him by the citizens of Boone county, irre- 
spective of party ties. He is now the present incumbent and his record is most 
satisfactory to the people of the community. 

On the isth of March, 1893, Mr. Getty was united in marriage to Miss Emma 
M. Hayer, a native of Boone county, and unto them have been born six children: 
Sarah Nettie and Lillian Elizabeth, who are attending high school ; a son who died 
in infancy; Donald Hiram; Mildred Frances; and Everett Benjamin. 

The family attend the Baptist church, in which Mr. and Mrs. Getty hold mem- 
bership. He is also identitied with various fraternal organizations and exem- 
plifies in his life the beneficient spirit upon which these have been founded. 
In politics he is a republican, always well versed concerning the important issues 
and questions of the day, and he has become a recognized leader in party ranks 
in Boone county. Almost his entire life has been passed in this county and his 
worth and ability are recognized and attested by his fellow townsmen, his circle 
of friends being an extensive one. 



LINCOLN McCASKEY. 

Lincoln McCaskey, owning and operating a well improved farm of eighty 
acres on section 20, Yell township, has been a resident of Boone county through- 
out practically his entire life or for more than a half century. His birth occurred 
in Indiana on the ist of April. 1861, his parents being Harrison and Elsie (Ritter) 
.McCaskey, the former a native of Ohio and the latter of Pennsylvania. They 
came to this county in 1863, the father purchasing and improving a farm in Yell 
township which he operated throughout the remainder of his active business 
career. The last few years of his life were spent in honorable retirement at 
Ogden, where he passed away in September, 1900. His demise was the occa- 
sion of deep and widespread regret in the community which had been his home 
for thirty-seven years. His widow, who is seventy-six years of age, still makes 
lier home in Ogden, where she is well known and highly esteemed. 



108 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

Lincoln McCaskey, who was but two years old when brought to Boone county 
by his parents, attended the district schools in the acquirement of an education 
and remained at home until he had attained his majority. When twenty-one 
years of age he began the cultivation of a rented tract of land but at the end of 
two years bought property of his own, purchasing eighty acres on section 20, 
■^'ell township, which he improved and which he has operated continuously to the 
present time. His undertakings as an agriculturist have been attended with 
gratifying success, the well tilled fields annually paying tribute to his care and 
labor in bounteous harvests. 

On the 25th of March, 1884, Mr. McCaskey was joined in wedlock to Miss 
Mary J. Pugsley, a daughter of Wyman and Margaret (Reading) Pugsley, the 
former a native of New York and the latter of Germany. Mr. Pugsley removed 
to Minnesota in an early day and in 1865 enlisted for service in the Civil war as 
a member of the First Minnesota Regiment, remaining with that command for 
six months or until the cessation of hostilities between the North and the South. 
After returning to Minnesota he followed farming in that state for a short time 
and then came to Boone county. Iowa, purchasing the property which is now in 
possession of our subject. Subsequently he bought another tract of land and con- 
tinued its cultivation throughout the remainder of his life with the exception of 
a year spent in Kansas and another year or two in New York. His demise oc- 
curred in this county on the 20th of August, 1902, when he had attained the age 
of sixty-seven years. Mrs. Pugsley, who survives her husband, is seventy-seven 
years of age and still resides on the old home place. Mr. and Mrs. McCaskey 
have live children, namely : _ Bessie, Devillo, Maude, Wilma and Gertrude. All 
are still under the parental roof. 

Mr. McCaskev gives his political allegiance to the republican party and is now- 
holding the office of assessor in Yell township. He has, moreover, promoted 
the interests of the cause of education as a school director. Having spent prac- 
tically his entire life within Boone county's borders, he has become widely 
acquainted here, while his genial disposition has made for him a circle of warm 
friends which is almost coextensive with the circle of his acquaintances. He 
possesses, moreover, those sterling traits of character which in every land and 
clime win coniidence, respect and good-will, and by the consensus of public 
opinion he is accorded a prominent place among the valued citizens of his 
communitv. 



FREEMAN L. PAINE. 



Freeman L. Paine, who now lives retired in Boone in the enjoyment of a 
well earned rest, was for many years a conductor of the Northwestern Rail- 
road Company and has made his residence in Boone since 1880. He owns a 
handsome home at 1219 Story street, where he is surrounded with all of the 
comforts of life. He was born September 20, 1842, near Erie, Pennsylvania, and 
is a son of Eddy Brown and Sally (Holmes) Paine, the father born in Provi- 
dence, Rhode Island, in 1796, and the mother in Albany, New York. When a 
young man the father went to Albion, New York, where he was married to Sally 



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HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 111 

Holmes, and there he engaged in farming and dairying for a time. About 1848 
he removed to Belvidere, Illinois, where he continued along that line of business. 
He was prominent in Belvidere and for niany years was connected with the Baptist 
church, of which he was a deacon for four decades. He died there in 1868, but 
his wife passed away in Waverly, Iowa, while on a visit to her daughter Mrs. 
James Moss, her death occurring in 1858, when she was quite a young woman. 
In their family were the following children : Frank, Harry F. and Ezra H., all of 
whom died in Belvidere; Albert E., who died in San Francisco; Freeman L., the 
only member of the family of eight now surviving; Anna M., who died when 
quite young ; Marietta, deceased ; and Adelia, who married James Moss and 
passed away in Waverly, Iowa. 

Freeman L. Paine passed his boyhood and young manhood in Belvidere, at- 
tending the public schools of that city. At the age of twenty-one he removed to 
Chicago, Illinois, finding employment with the Illinois Central Railroad on a pas- 
senger train. He soon demonstrated his ability and was promoted to the position 
of passenger conductor. About 1880 he was conductor of a freight for a few 
months, but subsequently became a passenger conductor on the Northwestern, a 
position which he held until about five years ago, when he retired on a pension. 
Many were the celebrated personages whom he carried on his train, among them 
being President Arthur, President Cleveland and his young bride and also Presi- 
dent McKinley. With him have traveled many noted men of all walks of life, 
including MacKay, the millionaire, and Senator Clark, of Montana fame. Mr. 
Paine has made his home in Boone since 1880 and is numbered among the city's 
most respected residents. 

On January 29, 1873, our subject was married, at Paxton, Ford county. Illi- 
nois, to Miss Augusta Dudley Carlisle, of that city. She was born in Yonkers, 
New York. January 29, 1853, and when less than a year old removed with her 
parents to lUoominglon. Illinois. When she was eight years of age the family 
located in Toledo, Ohio, where she attended the Ursuline Convent until the age 
of seventeen. Pier father, Thomas Carlisle, died when she was only twelve years 
of age, at which time he was superintendent of military roads in Kentucky, where 
his tleath occurred. Afterward his widow and children located in Paxton, Illi- 
nois, and there Mrs. Paine began teaching school at the age of seventeen. She 
is one of the organizers and the first regent of De Shon Chapter of the Daugh- 
ters of the .\merican Revolution at Boone, having five Revolutionary ancestors. 
Her father was torn in Salem, Massachusetts, in 1819, and was a son of Rev. 
Thomas Carlisle, rector of .St. Peter's church of that place. The latter's wife was 
Eleanor Forrester, a daughter of Simon and Rachel (Hawthorne) Forrester. 
Mrs. Paine is also a member of the Connecticut Society of Mayflower Descend- 
ants, her direct ancestor being Elder William Brewster. Her five Revolutionary 
ancestors were Captain Danjel De Shon, General Gurdon Saltonstall and his son 
Major Saltonstall, Captain Simon Forrester and Captain Daniel Hawthorne. 
The mother of .Mrs. Paine before her marriage was Miss Augusta Coit De Shon, 
who was born in New London, Connecticut, and comes of an old and distin- 
guished French family. The first American ancestor, Daniel De Shon, came from 
France shortly after the revocation of the Edict of Nantes, settling in Rhode 
Island. His children became pioneers of Connecticut. Mr. Paine is also of 

Revolutionary stock on his mother's side, being descended from Captain Ezra 
Vol n— fi 



112 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

Holmes. He is a relative of Thomas Paine and is descended from Roger Wil- 
liams through the latter's daughter Mercy. 

Mr. Paine was reared in the Baptist church and his wife adheres to the Protes- 
tant Episcopal denomination. She has always deeply interested herself in religious 
work and gives much of her time and thought to that object. Mr. Paine partici- 
pates in many movements which are undertaken for the betterment of the city 
and is interested in measures which have for their purpose general development. 
He has always been a republican and is thoroughly in sympathy with the aims 
and purposes of that organization. 



CARL A. ALSIN. 



Carl A. Alsin, who is a native of Boone county, his birth having occurred in 
Garden township on February 26, 1872, is very successful in the conduct of a 
profitable livery business. His barn, only recently built, is modern in every 
respect and his equipment conforms to the same standard. Carl A. Alsin is a 
son of John and Margaret (Olson) Alsin. both natives of Sweden, who passed 
away in Madrid. They came to America in 1864 and settled at Swede Point, 
now Madrid. They resided for a short time in the town but then purchased a 
farm in Garden township, to the cultivation of which the father gave his sole 
attention. He was an energetic and industrious man who always followed the 
latest methods, and it is therefore natural that he succeeded in accumulating a 
competence. Both he and his wife subsequently retired to Madrid, where they 
spent the remainder of their lives. They had seven children : Mrs. Coleman, of 
Omaha, Nebraska ; John, a resident of Boone : Peter, who also resides there ; 
Mrs. Clara Peterson, deceased ; Mrs. Hulda Newman, of Garden township ; 
Mrs. Anna Orth, of Denver, Colorado : and Carl A., of this review. The five 
elder children were born in Sweden and the younger are natives of Garden 
township. 

Carl A. Alsin has always been a resident of Boone covmty. In the acquire- 
ment of his education he attended the common schools and subsequently assisted 
his father in the work on the homestead. He then learned the trade of harness 
making in Madrid and followed this occupation for three years. The next 
year he resided in Omaha, Nebraska, being connected with the painter's trade. 
On the 4th of May, 1910. he turned his attention to the livery business in Madrid 
and so successful were his efTorts that in May, 1912, he decided to build his pres- 
ent up-to-date barn, which is one of the best to be found in this part of the state. 
Mr. Alsin not only maintains a sales stable but also boards horses and has one 
of the roomiest and most substantially built feed sheds in Boone county. He 
also maintains an automobile service and derives a gratifying income from this 
business departure. 

On February 21, 1894, Mr. .Alsin married Miss Helma Hultman, who was 
born in Sweden, July 4, 1872. She came to America with her parents in 1885, 
the familv selecting Madrid as their home. Both her father and mother were 
natives of the northern kingdom and died in Madrid. Mr. and Mrs. Alsin had 
two sons: Martin, born February 18, 1895, who attended the common schools 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 113 

and is at present holding the position of clerk in the Kinsey general mercantile 
store in Madrid; and Floyd N., born April 15, 1898, attending the Madrid high 
school. Mrs. Alsin passed away in Colfax township on July 9, 1909. On Feb- 
ruary 8, 191 1, Mr. Alsin was again married, his second union being with Miss 
Nellie Westerstrom. a native of Rockford. Illinois, where she was born June 5, 
1876. Her parents were natives of Sweden, and her father is now residing in 
Madrid, while the mother has passed away. Mr. and Mrs. Westerstrom were 
the parents of si.x children. 

Mr. Alsin is a republican. His business interests demand his whole attention, 
and he has found no time to actively enter the political arena, although he is 
ever ready to give his support to worthy public enterprises. He owns his home 
and also has other realty interests in Madrid, including two vacant lots and a 
fourth of a Ijlock in the business part of the city, whereon his business is con- 
ducted. He is an able business man, attentive to his customers and untiring in 
his efforts to please them. He has succeeded because he centers his whole being 
upon his business affairs. Socially he is well liked, and he has many friends in 
Madrid and Boone county. 



ALBERT T. WOLF. 



Albert J. Wolf is one of the substantial agriculturists of Pilot Mound town- 
ship, Boone county, having also followed teaching for some time and having 
rendered services to his country in the Spanish-American war. He was born 
in Pilot Mound township in August, 187 1, and is a son of Henry and Minnie 
(Frey) Wolf, natives of Germany, the father being one of the first settlers of 
Boone county, acquiring land in Pilot Mound township which he improved and 
cultivated until 1909, when he retired, taking up his residence in Boone. There 
he and his wife now spend the evening of life among the comforts and con- 
veniences which are theirs by right of many years of arduous labor. 

Albert J. Wolf was reared and educated in Pilot Mound township, com- 
pleting his schooling at Highland Park College of Des Moines. He then taught 
for four years and subse(|uently enlisted in Company I for service in the Spanish- 
American war, wearing the military uniform of his nation for four months. 
After being discharged he came to Pilot Mound township, buying the Pilot 
Mound Moniter, a weekly newspaper, which he successfully edited and pub- 
lished for five years. He then removed to his father's farm on section 31, Pilot 
township, and has operated the same ever since, receiving large annual harvests 
in remuneration for his well directed labors. He follows the most progressive 
and up-to-date methods and has made many improvements since taking charge. 

In June, 1900, Mr. Wolf married Miss E. Louise Stark, a daughter of Williain 
and Olive Stark, natives of Boone county, who are living at Pilot Mound, the 
father being an old-time resident of that locality. Mr. and Mrs. Wolf have 
three children, Theodore F., Archidean and Winston. 

Mr. Wolf is a trustee and secretary of the board of the Farmers Cooperative 
Company of Pilot Mound and at present serves as clerk of his township, having 
recently been reelected. Fraternally he is a member of the Modern Woodmen 



114 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY ; 

of America, the Masonic lodge and the Spanish-American War Veterans Asso- 
ciation, while politically he affiliates with the republican party. His religious 
faith is that of the Baptist church, and he takes an interest in church work as 
well as in all other movements initiated for the betterment of humanity along 
material, moral and intellectual lines. 



CHARLES OTIS. 



Charles Otis is one of the active .business men of Boone, conducting an 
extensive lumberyard, of which he has been sole proprietor since 1906. He is 
also the owner of excellent farming property and in all of his business dealings 
displays an energy that enables him to overcome obstacles and difficulties and 
work his way steadily upward. He was born in Michigan, July 17, 1874, and is 
a son of Henry H. and Mary L. (Bascom) Otis. The father, who passed away 
May 17, 191 3, was for a long period an honored resident of Iowa. He was born 
June 21, 1838, in Ashtabula county, Ohio, and was a son of Robert Otis, a native 
of New York, and a grandson of John Otis, who became an early resident of the 
Empire state and removed thence to Ohio, but afterward became a resident of 
northwestern Pennsylvania, where his death occurred in 1846. He served as a 
soldier of the Revolutionary war. The family is of Scotch-Irish lineage. Robert 
Otis, grandfather of our subject, removed from New York to Ashtabula county, 
Ohio, in 1830, and in 1876 went with his son Henry to Iowa, where he died in 
October, 1894, when in his eighty-fifth year. His wife, Mrs. Lucy Otis, was a 
native of Connecticut and a daughter of Charles Richards, who was of English 
descent, and for many years resided in central New York, where he cultivated 
a farm and operated a distillery. He died in 1858, while his wife, Abigail Manly, 
passed away at the age of seventy-six years. Their daughter, Mrs. Robert Otisi 
died in Trumbull county, Ohio, in 1884 at the age of seventy-two years. 

Henry H. Otis supplemented a public school training by study in the Western 
Reserve Seminary at West Farmington, Ohio, and following the outbreak of the 
Civil war joined the Union army, May 29, 1862, as a member of Company B, 
Eighty-seventh Regiment of Ohio Volunteers. Six months later he was trans- 
ferred to the Thirteenth Ohio Infantry and at Harpers Ferry, September 12, 
1862, was promoted to the rank of captain. Five months later, by special per- 
mission of Governor Tod, he was transferred to the western army as a member 
of the Thirteenth Ohio Regiment. He fought in the battles of Harpers Ferry, 
Antietam, Stone River and others, and was honorably discharged January i, 1864. 

After the close of the war Henry H. Otis engaged in the insurance business 
and later became a commercial traveler, and subsequently began farming in 
Trumbull county, Ohio, where he remained fnom the spring of 1866 until 1872. 
He next conducted a hotel and livery barn in Kent county, Michigan, and in 
1876 established his home in Harrison township, Boone county, Iowa. Three 
years later he removed to a farm in Des Moines township. In later years he 
concentrated his energies largely upon the dairy business, in which he met with 
substantial success. He was a member of the Knights of Pythias lodge at Boone, 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 115 

and belonged also to Jerusalem Lodge No. 13, F. & A. M., of Hartford, Ohio, 
to the Druids and to the Grand Army of the Republic. He was married 
November 16, 1867, to Mary L. Bascom, a daughter of Horatio and Caroline 
( Newell) Bascom, natives of Kentucky. Henry Otis passed away May 17, 
1913, and his widow now resides in Davenport, Iowa. They were parents of 
four children: Caroline N., living in Davenport; Lucy R., the wife of George 
M. Chapin, of Miles City, Montana ; Charles ; and Frank, of Boone. 

Charles Otis spent his youthful days under the parental roof with the usual 
experiences that come to the farm lad reared in moderate financial circum- 
stances. He attended the public schools and worked upon the home farm until 
twenty-four years of age. He then turned his attention to commercial pursuits, 
becoming connected with the lumber trade. In the meantime, however, he had 
volunteered for service in the Spanish-American war as a member of Company 
I, Fifty-second Infantry, and as first sergeant remained with his command until 
it was mustered out in October, 1898. 

After his return home, Mr. Otis engaged in the lumber business and was 
associated with a partner from 1899 until 1906. He then purchased the interest 
of his partner and has since been alone, having a substantial business which 
brings to him an excellent financial return. His methods are such as will bear 
close investigation and scrutiny, and as the years have gone by his honorable 
dealing, his enterprising policy and his determination have been the sources of 
his splendid success. In addition to his lumber business, which is growing in 
volume and importance year by year, he has important farming interests, includ- 
ing a three hundred acre tract of land, together with one hundred acres in other 
tracts. He carries on general farming and stock-raising and both branches of his 
business are gratifying sources of income. 

. Mr. Otis was married on the 4th of May, 1899, to Miss Mary C. Zimbelman, 
a native of Boone county, and unto them have been bom two children : Louise, 
born on the 6th of April, 1901 ; and Warren F., born August 30, igo2. The 
religious faith of the family is that of the Presbyterian church, while fraternally 
Mr. Otis is connected with the Masons. His political belief is that of the republi- 
can party, but he does not seek nor desire office, although never remiss in the 
duties of citizenship. He is interested in all that pertains to public progress 
and delights in what is being accomplished to make Boone a more progressive, 
more enterprising and better city, being especially helpful in his relations to all 
those things which are a matter of civic virtue and civic pride. 



SCOTT E. TUCKER. 



Scott E. Tucker has been actively identified with business interests of Boone 
for the past two decades as a successful grocery merchant. His entire life has 
been spent in Boone and Boone county, his birth having here occurred September 
2, 1874. His parents, Charles and Emma (Norton) Tucker, both natives of 
New York, came to Boone, Iowa, in 1865. The father was identified with 
educational interests for many years, teaching in the district and city schools 
and winning an enviable reputation in this connection. He is now living prac- 



116 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

tically retired and enjoys a wide and favorable acquaintance througliout the 
community which has remained his home for almost a half century. The mother 
was called to her final rest on the 28th of September, 1908. Our subject has 
one sister, Gracia E., who is now serving as county superintendent of schools 
for the second term. 

Scott E. Tucker attended the district schools in the acquirement of an edu- 
cation and when a young man of about twenty years, in August, 1894, embarked 
in the grocery business at Boone, where he has been thus identihed with mer- 
cantile interests to the present time. For about three years he was associated 
with Dr. Fred Webb, now of Macon, Georgia, and subsequently conducted busi- 
ness in partnership with his brother for about seven years. Since 1906, however 
he has been alone and has been accorded an extensive and gratifying patronage, 
for he carries a large and well selected line of staple and fancy groceries and 
has won an unassailable reputation for reliability and straightforward dealing. 
In May, 191 1, he opened another store at No. 1639 Fifth street, which is also 
popular and well patronized. 

On the 7th of August, 1906, Mr. Tucker was united in marriage to Miss 
Edna Hathaway, a native of Ohio, by whom he has two children : Elizabeth 
Ann, whose natal day was September 20, 1907; and Scott E. Tucker, Jr., born 
March 12, 1914. Mr. Tucker gives his political allegiance to the republican 
party. He is known to all his friends and acquaintances as a man of generous 
impulses, of kindly spirit and genial disposition, while in business circles he is 
recognized as an enterprising and prosperous merchant. 



CARL C. OLSON. 



Carl C. Olson, who takes his place among the progressive business men of 
Boone, has also participated in the public life of his county, having served as 
recorder for two terms. He is now half owner in The Hawkeye Laundry Com- 
pany, and efficiently conducts the business along up-to-date and sanitary lines. 
He was born in Sweden, October 30, 1863, and is a son of Carl O. and Carrie 
(Mattson) Johnson, and grandson of John Person. The grandfather and father 
both served in the Swedish army and followed farming in their native land. The 
latter was educated there in the common schools but in 1868 emigrated to the 
United States with his family, consisting of wife and four children, in order 
to profit by the opportunities awaiting in this country. They made their way 
direct to Denison, Iowa, where they remained for a few months, and then came 
to Boone county, locating upon eighty acres of land four miles southeast of 
Ogden. The father developed this farm but in the fall of 1895 removed to Col- 
orado, disposing of his Boone county interests. He purchased one hundred and 
twenty acres in Bent county, that state, residing there until his death January 9, 
1914. He was born March 6, 1833, and his first wife, who died in 1886, was born 
in 1834. Both were devout adherents of the Lutheran church, taking much 
interest in its work. For his second wife the father married Miss Lizzie Lybeck, 
who was born in Boone county. By his first marriage he had the following chil- 
dren: John, who died in 1868; Carl C, of this review; Eric and Matilda, both 






VAUL C. OLSON 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 119 

of whom died when young ; August and Emric, residents of Bent county, Colorado ; 
Julia, who died in infancy; Amanda, of Trinidad, Colorado; and Aurora, who 
died in Colorado, in 1896, at the age of seventeen years. There were no children 
born to the father's second union. 

Carl C. Olson was about live years of age when he came with his parents 
to the United States. He attended the schools of Boone county, and among his 
teachers were James Swayne and Isabelle Jenkins, who is now Mrs. Bricker, of 
Boone. Leaving school at the age of sixteen, he made his way to Omaha, where 
he worked in a barbwire factory. There an unfortunate accident befell him, 
for he lost his right hand in a machine. However, he did not lose courage and 
decided to choose another road to fortune. For live years or for nine terms 
he attended the Augustana College at Rock Island, Illinois, and in 1891 began 
teaching in Marcy township, where he remained for several years. He was 
connected with parochial and public schools, teaching in all thirteeen terms in 
Boone county. After giving up his work as an instructor of the young he was in 
1898 elected as recorder of Boone county and served for two terms, having also 
served as deputy recorder under J. S. Halliday. After he retired from office he 
took up the fire and life insurance business in Boone, successfully continuing 
along that line for two years. He then bought a half interest in The Hawkeye 
Laundry Company, his partner at that time being Ralph Duckwood. In 1909 he 
formed a partnership with G. W. Griest, an association which has since been most 
profitably maintained. Not only has Mr. Olson proven himself an efficient teacher 
and a faithful official but he has become one of the successful business men of 
his city, ever taking an active part in all such enterprises which will increase the 
prestige of the community or promote its growth. 

On October 10, lyio, Carl C. Olson married Theresa Brannberg, a native of 
Boone county. They have one son, Carl Arnold, who was born on July 4, 191 1. 
They are devout members of the Swedish Lutheran church, Mr. Olson having 
been a deacon for several years. He formerly was Sunday school superintend- 
ent and is still the leader of the choir, but owing to pressing business he had to 
give up the former position. Mr. Olson is thoroughly conversant with the 
political issues of the day and was formerly quite active in the republican 
party. He and his wife have many friends in Boone and stand high in the esti- 
mation of their fellow citizens. There is great credit due Mr. Olson for what he 
has achieved in spite of the severe handicap which befell him when he was 
but a bov. Howe\ er, determination conquered and by sheer force of character, 
industry and honesty he has won for himself an enviable place in his com- 
munity. 



C. J. CEDERQUIST. 



C. D. Cederquist is one of the successful lawyers of Boone county, prac- 
ticing in Madrid. Mr. Cederquist was born in Titusville, Pennsylvania, Sep- 
tember 28, 1874, a son of L. J. and Tekla G. Cederquist, natives of Sweden, 
who now reside in Titusville, Pennsylvania. They had nine children, as fol- 
lows: Mrs. C. T. Carlson, Mrs. J. A. Holmberg, C. J.. L. A., O. W., Mrs. Ed. 



120 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

Johnson, A. E., M. O. and E. R. All these children were born and reared in 
Titusville and received their public-school education in that city. 

C. J. Cederquist remained there until eighteen years of age, rounding out 
his earlier education by a high-school course which he completed with gradua- 
tion. He then pursued a scientific course at Augustana College at Rock Island, 
Illinois, graduating in 1895, and in 1900 received his law degree from Drake 
University of Des Moines. For one year he was engaged in the practice of 
his profession in that city but then removed to Boone, where he continued until 
January, 1910. At that time he located in Madrid and is now associated with 
Mr. Harpel of Boone, the firm name being Harpel & Cederquist. They main- 
tain offices both in Boone and Madrid and are admitted for practice in all the 
courts. 

In 1907 Mr. Cederquist married in Boone, Iowa, Miss Clara Bork, who was 
born in Peoples township, Boone county. There her father, Gustav Bork, died, 
the family subsequently removing to Boone, where the children attended school. 
Mrs. Carolina Bork, who was born in Sweden, still resides there. Her four 
children were born in Peoples township. They are: Mary, of Boone; E. G., 
of Peoples township; Levi M., of Boone; and Mrs. Clara Cederquist. The last 
named bore her husband two children : Esther, born in Boone : and Dena, a na- 
tive of Madrid. 

Mr. Cederquist is a republican and deeply interested in the welfare of his 
party. He is thoroughly conversant with the leading issues and questions of 
the day and is an influential factor in local public afifairs. For two terms, from 
1906 to 1910, he was county attorney for Boone county and in 1912 was elected 
mayor of Madrid. As a lawyer Mr. Cederquist stands high in the estimation 
of his professional brethren and the general public. Both he and his wife are 
members of the .Swedish Lutheran church of Boone, the work of which they 
helpfully sustain. 



LOUIS F. FEHLEISEN. 

Louis F. Fehleisen has important lumber interests at three places in Iowa, 
making his headquarters, however, at Boone, where he is well established in 
business. He is notably prompt, energetic and reliable, and he possesses in large 
measure the substantial quality of common sense, the lack of which is often the 
element that brings disaster or failure in business afl:'airs. From a compara- 
tively humble position in the business world, he has worked his way steadily 
upward, making his efforts count for the utmost and using his time and talents 
to the best advantage. He was born in Jasper county, Iowa, May 12. 1859, and 
is a son of William T. and Catherine (Ludwick) Fehleisen, the former a native 
of Germany and the latter of Indiana. The father came to America when 
about ten years of age and conducted business first as a carpenter and after- 
ward as a contractor. For many years he resided in Newton, Iowa, and he 
passed away in September, 1910, having for three years survived his wife, who 
died in 1907. They were the parents of five children: George W.. living in 
Madrid, this state; Bertha, whose home is in Newton, Iowa; Louis F. ; Hester, 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 121 

the wife of J. A. McCalment, of Tarkio, Missouri ; and Esther, who died in 
infancy. 

Louis F. Fehleisen has been an active factor in business circles since reach- 
ing the age of sixteen years. He entered the employ of his father at that time 
and remained with him until he attained his majority. Thinking that he needed 
further educational training, particularly along lines that would better equip 
him for the conduct of business, he went to Quincy, Illinois, where he entered 
the Gem City Commercial College, there pursuing the full commercial course, 
after which he was graduated with the class of 1881. Later he followed the 
carpenter's trade for a year and on the expiration of that period entered a bank 
in Marshalltown, Iowa, where he remained for three months. He next went to. 
Des Moines, where he engaged in the lumber business, and afterward was con- 
nected with the lumber trade in the northwestern part of the state. In the spring 
of 1888 he came to Boone and with his brother established the Boone Lumber 
Company. In 1897, he opened a yard on Tenth and Marshall streets. The 
business has prospered from the beginning and as a result of his capable man- 
agement, his enterprise and determination, Mr. Fehleisen is now at the head 
of an extensive and profitable business, which also includes yards at Ogden and 
at Berkley, Iowa. Today the business is conducted under the firm style of 
Fehleisen-Rosacker Lumber Company. He has never heedlessly passed by the 
opportunities which surround all, but has worked persistently and energetically 
in order to win the advancement that is the goal of all who enter business circles. 

On the 1st of October, 1884, Mr. Fehleisen was married to Miss Sophie 
Achtemeier, a native of Wisconsin, and to them have been born six children : 
Bertha Carrie, the wife of R. L. Martin, of Boone ; Minnie Catherine, at home ; 
Vera Elizabeth ; Bessie Lulie ; Elmer E., who is associated with his father in 
business; and Ruth Edna. Mr. Fehleisen votes with the republican party and is 
■well informed concerning the vital questions and issues of the day, but has 
never been an aspirant for public office. The religious faith of the family is 
that of the Presbyterian church, to which they loyally adhere, taking active 
interest in its work and contributing liberally to its support. In social circles 
the family is widely and favorably known, and the hospitality of the best homes 
of the city is cordially extended to them. 



C. OSCAR HANSON. 



C. Oscar Hanson, a successful and representative merchant of Beaver, 
handles a complete line of hardware, harness and farm implements and also 
deals in automobiles. His birth occurred in Bureau county, Illinois, in July, 
1865, his parents being John and Matilda Hanson, natives of Sweden, who 
emigrated to the United States in an early day, locating in California. In that 
state the father prospected for gold for some time and subsequently removed to 
Illinois, where he purchased land and carried on farming for several years. On 
the expiration of that period he returned to Sweden but at the end of a year 
came back to this country and took up his abode in Boone county, Iowa, here 
purchasing a tract of land which he cultivated until 1894. He is now eighty- 



122 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

three years of age and has Hved retired in Boone during the past two decades. 
His wife has attained the age of seventy-six years. They are well known and 
highly esteemed throughout the community and have many friends here. 

C. Oscar Hanson was reared and educated in Boone county and when four- 
teen years of age began learning the blacksmith's trade, working at that occupa- 
tion at intervals through a period of twenty-eight years. He spent two years 
on the road as a representative of the International Harvester Company and for 
si-x years was engaged in the hardware and implement business at Boone in 
association with his brother, while for a year and a half he conducted an enter- 
prise of that character alone. In October, 1913, he came to Beaver and pur- 
chased the hardware establishment which he is now conducting. He handles 
a complete line of hardware, harness and farm implements and is also a dealer 
in Detroit and Jackson automobiles. Mr. Hanson bought the two-story steel 
structure in which his business is carried on and has erected an addition thereto, 
occupying the building in its entirety. An extensive patronage is accorded 
him, and he enjoys an unassailable reputation for reliability and integrity that 
is indeed well merited. 

In June, 1S93, Air. Hanson was united in marriage to Miss Edith Kaatz, a 
daughter of August and Minnie Kaatz, who were natives of Germany and emi- 
grated to the United States in an early day. The father followed farming in 
Alinnesota until the time of his demise in November, 1912. The mother now 
makes her home with our subject. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Hanson have been born 
six children, as follows: Alarjorie, who is fifteen years of age; Opal, who is 
thirteen years old ; Leona and Francis, who are nine and seven years of age 
respectively; Aniford, who died in November, 1896; and Dorothy, who passed 
away in September, 1903. 

Since age conferred upon him the right of franchise Mr. Hanson has given 
his political allegiance to the republican party. His religious faith is that of the 
Lutheran church, while fraternally he is identified with the Modern Woodmen 
of America, the Homesteaders, the Knights of Pythias and the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows. He is a man of marked enterprise, positive character 
and strict integrity, and he has ever been greatly interested in the growth and 
]3rosperity of his community. His life is exemplary in many respects and he 
has the esteem of all his friends and the confidence of those who have had busi- 
ness relations with him. 



JOHN W. MORGAN. 



John W. Morgan, who passed away in Ogden on the 20th of October, 1913, 
had been a resident of Boone county for more than four decades and was long 
numbered among its active and successful agriculturists. His birth occurred in 
England on the 20th of August, 1851, his parents being William and Rebecca 
Morgan, who were likewise natives of that country. The father, a carpenter by 
trade, emigrated to the United States in an early day and located in Illinois, where 
he purchased land and turned his attention to agricultural pursuits. The remainder 
of his life was spent in the Prairie state. 



o 




HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 125 

John W. Morgan was reared and educated in Illinois and after putting aside 
his text-books took up farming. When twenty-one years of age he came to Boone 
county, Iowa, purchasing and improving a tract of land in Peoples township, where 
he carried on general agricultural pursuits with gratifying success during the 
remainder of his active business career. In 1903 he took up his abode in Ogden, 
there living in honorable retirement until called to his final rest. He died on the 
20th of October, 1913, after an illness of five weeks, and the community thus lost 
one of its prosperous, representative and respected citizens. 

In December, 1874, Air. Morgan was joined in wedlock to Miss Margaret Mil- 
ler, a daughter of John and Sarah (Miller) Miller, both of whom were natives of 
York county, Pennsylvania. The father, a shoemaker by trade, came to Boone 
county, Iowa, in 1866, here purchasing land and engaging in farming during the 
remainder of his life. His demise occurred on the 2d of December, 1897, while 
his wife passed away on the 27th of August, 1896. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Morgan 
were born twelve children, as follows: Charles, who is identified with the tele- 
phone company in Ogden ; Albert, a resident of Ogden ; Frank, who follows farm- 
ing in Boone county ; Harry, who makes his home in O^den ; John, who conducts 
a moving picture theatre in Ogden ; Myrtle, who is the wife of George Heaps, 
Jr., of Boone, Iowa; Ray, a barber of Ogden; Arthur, who is at home; Josephine, 
the wife of V. E. Soderquist, who is a member of the firm of Bass & Soderquist, 
clothing merchants of Ogden; Wilbur, a high-school student; Edith, who is also 
attending the high school; and Elmer, who was accidentally killed by a train on 
the 27th of March, 1905. 

Mr. Morgan exercised his right of franchise in support of the men and 
measures of the democracy, believing firmly in the principles of that party. Fra- 
ternally he was identified with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, while his 
religious faith was that of the Methodist .church. His life was upright and hon- 
orable in all relations, and he enjoyed the friendship and esteem of those who 
knew him. Mrs. Morgan, who has now lived in Boone county for a period of 
forty-eight years, also has an extensive and favorable acquaintance within its 
borders. 



ELIAS J. CARTWRIGHT. 

Elias J. Cartwright is now occupying a beautiful and attractive home at 
No. 503 Clinton street. He was formerly closely identified with agricultural 
interests in Boone county and is still the owner of valuable farm property, 
from which he derives a substantial annual income. He was born in Coles 
county, Illinois, November 10, 1852, and is a son of Robert N. and Sarah (Dyer) 
Cartwright, the former a native of Indiana and the latter of Illinois. The 
father made farming his life work and in 1853 came to Boone county, settling 
on a farm in Worth township. There he devoted his energy to general agricul- 
tural pursuits for many years with growing success, but in 191 1 sold that prop- 
erty and removed to Boone, where he is now living retired in the enjoyment of 
the fruits of his former toil. In 1913 he was called upon to mourn the loss 
of his wife, who died on the 17th of June of that year. They were the parents of 



126 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

twelve children: Sarah, who died in infancy; Elias J.; Susan, the wife of Virgil 
Boone, of Worth township; Katherine, the wife of F. O. Lockard of Boone; 
John W., living in Payette, Idaho; Albert N., of Rockford, Washington; Andrew 
J., whose home is in Spokane, Washington; Clarence A., also living in Rock- 
ford; Charles W., of California; Grant R. and Harvey G., both deceased; and 
Daniel J., who is located at Seneca, South Dakota. 

In the spring after attaining his majority, Elias J. Cartwright left home. He 
had been reared as a farm lad, working in the fields through the sunnner months 
and attending the public schools in the winter seasons. Desiring to start out 
independently, he went to California, where he engaged in ranching for about 
three years. On the expiration of that period, however, he returned to Boone 
county, where he made investment in eighty acres of land, which he at once 
began to cultivate and improve. As the years passed on he added to this tract 
from time to time until his holdings embraced three hundred acres or more in 
Colfax township. He carefully tilled the fields, bringing the farm to a high, 
state of cultivation, and annually he gathered rich harvests which made his 
work very profitable. He had secured a handsome competence, when, in 1910, 
he retired from active business life and removed to Boone, purchasing his pres- 
ent attractive home at No. 503 Clinton street. 

On the 6th of June, 1876, Mr. Cartwright was united in marriage to Miss 
Sarah Morgan, a native of Illinois, who came to Boone county in her child- 
hood. Four children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Cartwright: Robert A., 
who is upon the home farm; Walter W., also living in Colfax township; Lulen 
Cleo, deceased ; and Linn Dorwin, a resident of Fowler, Colorado. 

Mr. Cartwright votes with the republican party and has supported its prin- 
ciples since age conferred upon him the right of franchise. In 1910 he was 
elected to the office of supervisor and in 19 12 was reelected. For twenty years 
he has been a trustee of Colfax township and no higher testimonial to his ability 
could be given than the fact that he has so long been retained in this office. 
He belongs to the Ancient Order of United Workmen and to the Christian 
church — associations which indicate much of the nature of the rules which 
govern his actions and control him in all of his relations with his fellowmen. 
He deserves much credit for what he has accomplished, for he started out in 
life empty-handed and has worked his way upward through the force of his 
character and his native and acquired ability. His life record indicates what 
may be accomplished when energy and determination point the way. 



DAVID J. CONN. 



David J. Conn, conducting a growing business as a railroad grading con- 
tractor, his home being in Boone, his native city, was born on the 17th of Sep- 
tember, 1877, his parents being Hugh and Sarah J. (McMechan) Conn, Ijoth of 
whom were natives of Ireland and were of Scotch-Irish descent. The father 
crossed the Atlantic to the new world in 1865 and the following year made his 
way to Boone, where he entered the employ of the Northwestern Railroad Com- 
pany. Tt was on the ist of January, 1868, that the mother started for the new 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 127 

world. Hugh Conn is today engaged in the coal and feed business in Boone 
under the firm style of Conn & Son, and theirs is one of the well known busi- 
ness interests of the city. The family numbered four children, three daugh- 
ters and a son: Grace, now the wife of Ernest Leatham and a resident of 
Memphis, Tennessee; Margaret, the wife of Dr. C. A. Rhoades of Boone; David 
J., of this review ; and Elsie, who has departed this life. 

At the usual age David J. Conn began his education, which he continued in 
the public schools of Boone, passing through consecutive grades until graduated 
from the high school with the class of 1896. At the time of the Spanish- Ameri- 
can war he volunteered for active duty as a member of Company I, Fifty-second 
Iowa Infantry. After being discharged from the army he entered into business 
with his father as a dealer in ice, but has since changed his occupation, being now 
engaged in taking and executing contracts for railroad grading. In this connec- 
tion he has built up a business of good proportions and is leading a busy, active 
and useful life. He does not seek to figure prominently in any public connec- 
tions, but he belongs to that class of substantial citizens whose very industry 
and devotion to daily duty constitute them worthy and valued residents of their 
community. 

On the 18th of October, 1906, Mr. Conn was united in marriage to Miss Pearl 
L. Patterson, a native of Boone, and to them has been born a son, Richard J. H., 
whose birth occurred September 16, IQ08. Mr. Conn votes with the republican 
party and is interested in all matters relating to the general welfare. The 
religious faith of Mr. and Mrs. Conn is that of the Presbyterian church, to the 
work of which they contribute both of time and means. They have been life- 
long residents of Boone and have an extensive circle of warm friends here — 
many who have known them from childhood as well as those whose acquaintance 
they have formed in later years. Mr. Conn has been a witness of all the changes 
which have occurred in Boone and this section of the state for thirty-seven years, 
has rejoiced in what has been accomplished and in various ways has aided the 
work of further progress and development. 



J. C. PETERSEN. 



J. C. Petersen is a well known clothing merchant of Boone, where he is con- 
ducting business under the name of the J. C. Petersen Company. Under his 
guidance the business has grown to gratifying proportions and is regarded as one 
of the leading commercial enterprises of the city. Mr. Petersen is a native of 
Germany, born April 9, 1868, and is a son of Marcus and Anna (Hub) Petersen, 
who were also natives of the same country. The father still lives in Germany, 
but the mother is deceased. In their family were four children: J. C, of this 
review ; Anna ; Mathena ; and Marcus. 

J. C. Petersen spent the first sixteen years of his life in his native land 
and during that period attended its public schools. At length, bidding adieu to 
friends and native country, he sailed from Hamburg to New York in October, 
1884, and after a brief stay in the eastern metropolis made his way westward to 
Iowa. In this state he turned his attention to farming and while thus employed 



128 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

attended school in the winter seasons for three months, thus supplementing the 
knowledge that he had gained in the fatherland and acquiring a greater freedom 
in the use of the English language. On the expiration of that period he came 
to Boone and has since been identified with its commercial interests. He first 
accepted a clerkship in a clothing store, in which he remained until 1893. During 
that period he carefully saved his earnings until his industry and economy had 
brought him a sufficient sum to enable him to engage in business on his own 
account. He then organized the firm of Petersen iS: Samson and the business was 
continued in that connection until the nth of July, 1897, when the junior part- 
ner died. The senior member of the firm then carried on the business under his 
own name until 1902, when he formed a stock company known as the ]. C. 
Petersen Company, admitting three employes, F. O. Schmidt, Emanuel Cuther 
and Andrew Anderson, to a partnership and thus rewarding them for their 
faithful and loyal service. They have a large and well appointed store, carry 
an attractive line of clothing and men"s furnishings and as the years have gone 
by they have increased their business as the result of their honorable methods 
their enterprising spirit and their close application. The brick building occupied 
by the J. C. Petersen Company is the property of the senior member of the firm, 
who owns other real estate in the city, which constitutes the tangible evidence of 
his life of well directed energy and thrift. He also conducts a similar store 
in Fort Dodge. 

On the 5th of May, 1889, Mr. Petersen was united in marriage to Miss Anna 
Ick, a native of Germany, and they have become parents of six children, Marv, 
Anna, Marcus, Albert, Harry and Christ. In his political views Mr. Petersen is 
a democrat, but has never sought nor desired political ofiice. He has served, 
however, as a member of the school board, and the cause of education finds in 
him a stalwart friend. He belongs to the Masonic fraternity, holds membership 
with the Improved Order of Red Men and his religious faith is evidenced in 
his membership in the German Lutheran church. To all these organizations he 
is most loyal, and it is a well known fact that Mr. Petersen is ever faithful to a 
trust reposed in him whether of a public or a private nature. He deserves much 
credit for what he has accomplished, for he came to America empty-handed 
when a youth of sixteen and has worked his way steadily upward to his present 
position of affluence. His business methods are such as neither seek nor require 
disguise, and in every relation of life he has commanded the good-will and con- 
fidence of his fellow men. 



JACOB M. CARLSON. 



Since 1908, Jacob M. Carlson has been the county supervisor for Douglas 
township. He rendered such distinguished service in his first term that he was 
reelected and is now closing his second term to the entire satisfaction of his 
constituency. Mr. Carlson was connected with various business interests in 
Madrid, particularly the grain and mercantile business. He now, however, gives 
most of his attention to his official position. His parents were Carl J. and Bertha 
(Nelson) Johnson-Carlson, natives of Sweden, who both died in that country, 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 129 

« 
the former reaching the venerable age of ninety-three years. They had seven 
children : Adolph, Nels, Mrs. Anna Schenader, Peter and Charles, of Hamilton 
county, Iowa ; Gustav, of South Dakota ; and Jacob M., of this review. All were 
born and educated in Sweden. 

Jacob M. Carlson was born in Ostergotland, Sweden, November 9, 1858. 
He came to America when about twenty years of age, in 1878, and located at 
Swede Point, Boone county, Iowa. For six months he worked as a farm hand 
in Garden township and then accepted a position as clerk in the general mer- 
chandise business of William Johnson, of Madrid, with whom he continued for 
two years. At the end of that time he was employed for a year by M. J. Sellen. 
Having gained in experience and having mastered the language, he then engaged 
in the grocery business in partnership with George W. Briggs, under the firm 
name of Briggs & Carlson, but sold out to Mr. Briggs in 1885. In that year he 
entered the service of Crary Brothers of Boone, for whom he conducted a hard- 
ware store in Madrid. In 1887 Mr. Carlson purchased what is now known as the 
Watt Webb farm in Douglas township and operated this farm. He bought and 
sold grain at the same time, making his business headquarters at Wheeler's 
switch. He secured from the railroad a flag station at this place, which greatly 
facilitated the shipping end of the business, and also bought grain for the McFar- 
land Elevator Company, thus continuing for three years. He then sold his farm 
to Fred Johnson and removed to Madrid, where in 1892, with John A. Johnson, 
he entered the mercantile business. They built in conjunction the brick block 
where Johnson & Johnson have their present general merchandise business. 
Upon the dissolution of the partnership Mr. Johnson retained the store building 
and Mr. Carlson received the stock of goods. Buying the Crary Brothers" brick 
building, he removed his goods there and successfully conducted his store until 
1908, when he sold his stock to E. O. Kinsey, who at present is at the head of 
that business. In all his undertakings Mr. Carlson proved himself an able and 
honest merchant. He was successful because he had executive ability, a capacity 
for detail and because the underlying qualities of his character are above 
reproach. In November, 1908, Mr. Carlson was elected to the county board of 
supervisors and now his second term of office is drawing to its close. He has 
always championed the people's interests and has secured many advantages for 
his constituency. 

On December 19, 1880, Jacob M. Carlson was married at Swede Point 
(Madrid) to Miss Tilda Sell, who was born in Sweden, August 2, 1862. She 
came with her parents to America in 1870, the family locating in Rockford, Illi- 
nois. Her father, C. G. Sell, was also a native of Sweden and was a carpenter 
by trade. He came to Boone county in 1871 and located on a farm west of 
Madrid, passing away in that city. February 9, 1899. Mrs. Carlson's mother, 
Johanna (Johnson) Sell, was born in Sweden and died in Madrid in July, 1913. 
They had seven children, of whom three are living, namely : Mrs. Tilda Carlson ; 
Mrs. Hulda Hoover, of Madrid ; and Mrs. Nellie Erickson, also of that city. 
The four eldest, Sophia, Carolina, Louise and Charles, are deceased. All were 
born in Sweden with the exception of Mrs. Erickson. who is a native of Boone 
county. Mr. and Mrs. Carlson have five children, who were born in Madrid 
and reared there. They all graduated from the Madrid high school. They are: 
E. C, now a traveling salesman for the Washburn-Crosby Milling Company of 



130 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

* 

Minneapolis, residing in Madrid; Harry Robert, born February 8, 18.4, who is 
engaged in the general merchandise business in Madrid ; Clarence, born October 
2, 18.S6, assistant cashier in the Farmers Savings Bank of Madrid; William 
Arthur, liorn May 5, i88g, a clerk in E. Hancock's clothing store in Madrid; and 
Anna Sell Dora, born December 19, 1891, who resides with her parents. 

Jacob M. Carlson is a republican and loyal to the standards of that party. 
He has been a member of the town council of Madrid, rendering valuable^ serv- 
ice, and as county supervisor continues his record as an efficient official. Mrs. 
Carlson is a member of the Swedish Mission church of Madrid, while Mr. Carl- 
son belongs to Star Lodge, No. 115, A. F. & A. M., and the local lodges of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias and the Modern 
Woodmen of America. He has held various fraternal oflices. Mr. Carlson 
owns several tracts of real estate in Douglass township and has personal and 
business property in Madrid. He has acquired a competency because he is indus- 
trious, energetic and thrifty. His well furnished home is the meeting place 
of his many friends, who often enjoy the hospitality of Mr. and Mrs. Carlson. 



JAMES H. NOYES, M. D. 

The life record of Dr. James H. Noyes spans seventy-nine years and it 
is hoped by his many friends that it will continue for many years to come, for 
he is one of Boone county's most valued and respected citizens. For a half 
century he engaged in the practice of medicine, from which at the present time 
he has practically retired. However, he is president of the Ogden State Bank 
and is a stockholder in other business enterprises. There is an old age which 
grows stronger and brighter mentally and morally as the years go by and gives 
out of its rich store of wisdom and experience for the benefit of others. Such is 
the record of Dr. Noyes of Ogden. A native of Massachusetts, he was born in 
Gardner, July 20, 1835, and is a son of Henry J. and Jane L. (Gates) Noyes, 
also natives of Massachusetts. The father was a chair manufacturer in that 
state and there passed away in 1872, his wife surviving him until 1879. 

Dr. Noyes pursued his early education in the public schools of his native 
city and afterward entered Appleton Academy at New Ipswich, New Hamp- 
shire, where he remained three and one-half years. He next became a student 
in Burr Seminary in Vermont, where he pursued a short course. Later he 
took up the study of medicine, to which he devoted four years, completing his 
medical course at Columbia College, New York, where he was graduated with 
the class of i860. He then began practice at Nashua, New Hampshire, where 
he remained until the outbreak of the Civil war, when, on the Gth of May, 1861, 
he joined the Sixth New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry, of which he was com- 
missioned assistant surgeon. He went to Washington and was attached to the 
Army of the Potomac, serving under Generals Burnside, McClellan and Grant. 
He was advanced to the position of surgeon of the Sixth New Hampshire, with 
which he was on active duty until after the close of hostilities, or for about five 
years. He was in practically all of the engagements in which his command par- 





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# 




DK. JAMKS H. NOYES 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 135 

ticipated, including the first and second battles of Bull Run; Roanoke Island; 
Camden, North Carolina; Vicksburg, Mississippi; the siege of Petersburg and 
others, being present at the time of the surrender of General Lee at Appomattox. 

It was in December, 1865, that Dr. Noyes came to Iowa settling first in Cedar 
county, where he engaged in practice until 1867. He then came to Ogden, Boone 
county, where he practiced for many years, devoting a half century of his life 
to his chosen calling before he retired from professional activity. He was the 
first physician to arrive in Ogden and is the oldest living practitioner in his part 
of the state. On the establishment of the Eleanor Moore Hospital at Boone 
he became one of the trustees and has so continued to the present time. While 
in active practice he always kept in touch with the advanced thought of the day, 
reading broadly, thinking deeply and utilizing his knowledge in a splendid effort 
to alleviate human suffering and restore health. That his efforts were attended 
with a gratifying measure of success is indicated in the large practice which was 
always accorded him up to the time of his retirement. He is a member of the 
Boone County Medical Society, of which he has served as president, has also 
been president of the Boone District Medical Society, comprising several coun- 
ties, and is a member of the Iowa State Medical Society and the American Medi- 
cal Association. 

In addition to his practice Dr. Noyes became interested in business affairs 
of Ogden and is now president of the Ogden State Bank, which was reorganized 
from a private bank into a state institution in 1899, since which time Dr. Noyes 
has been connected with it. The other officers are : Orson Clark, vice president ; 
S. P. Clark, cashier; and W. D. Kruse, assistant cashier. The bank is capitalized 
for twenty-five thousand dollars. The company owns the building which it occu- 
pies, which is of the very latest type of bank construction, splendidly equipped 
with furnishings, vaults, safety deposit boxes, etc. This is the oldest state bank 
in the county and its patronage is well merited. Dr. Noyes is also a stockholder 
of the Boone Brick & Tile Company, is interested in business property in Ogden 
and owns several farms in the northern part of the state, all of which he has 
improved. He has a country home in Hancock county, Iowa, which is one of 
the best developed in the county and well stocked with horses and cattle of high 
grade. 

On the 31st of May, 1S66, Dr. Noyes was united in marriage to Miss Sarah 
F. Stone, a daughter of Naham and Caroline M. (Graves) Stone, natives of New 
Hampshire. Three children were born unto Dr. and Mrs. Noyes: Mary S., now 
the wife of William R. Shurtz, of Boone; Josiah G., who died in 1870; and 
Helen, who died in infancy. The wife and mother passed away February 27, 
1913, after an illness of but two days. 

Dr. Noyes has taken a very active, prominent and helpful part in public 
affairs. He served as mayor of Ogden for nearly twenty years. After a three 
months' incumbency of another in that position he was called to the office, and 
no higher testimonial of his capability, fidelity and trustworthiness can be given 
than the fact that he was again and again reelected to the position. For nearly 
twenty years he has been pension examiner, holding the office at the present time. 
He gave to the city a beautiful clock, which is placed on the Ogden State Bank 
building. .Many tangible evidences of his public spirit may be cited, indicating 
his deep interest in the general welfare. He is the only living charter member 



136 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

now connected with Rhodes Lodge, No. 303, A. F. & A. M., which at the present 
writing has a membership of eighty. He is also connected with the Eastern Star 
and with the Grand Army of the Repubhc. None has been more active in 
support of j\Iasonry in Boone county than Dr. Noyes, who was master and sec- 
retary of his lodge for nearly twenty years, a record of which he has every reason 
to be proud, for it indicates his exemplification of the high principles of the fra- 
ternity, a fraternity which is based upon mutual helpfulness and brotherly kind- 
ness. He believes firmly in the principles of the order and has done everything 
in his power to secure their adoption. He is frequently called upon to deliver 
addresses on the occasion of Memorial Day celebrations and upon other public 
occasions. His political allegiance has always been given to the republican 
party since its organization. He attained the right of franchise about the time 
the party sprang into existence and he has been an interested witness of its prog- 
ress and the manner in which vital political situations have been handled. 

His religious faith is that of the Methodist church. He was a member of the 
first board of trustees and was thus active in the building of the church. Mrs. 
Noyes was, too, a faithful and active member of the Methodist church and was 
long a teacher in the Sunday school. Before her marriage she was a teacher in 
the public schools, for which vocation she was fitted in Washington, D. C. Like 
her husband, her interests were broad and her activities helpful. She manifested 
special interest in connection with the welfare of children and furthered many 
progressive movements along that line. At the time of her death she was presi- 
dent of the Glenwood Cemetery Association, which position she had occupied 
fifteen or more years. At all times she was a most womanly woman, beloved 
and respected by all who knew her, so that her death was the occasion of deep 
and widespread regret. Dr. Noyes shared in her interests in the various move- 
ments for the benefit of mankind. A review of his life displays many char- 
acteristics worthy of emulation, not the least of which has been his unfaltering 
loyalty to the best interests of his community, his close conformity to a high stand- 
ard of professional ethics and his personal integrity and honor. No man enjoys 
more fully or merits more sincerely the regard and good-will of all with whom 
he has come in contact. 



JAMES WHITCOMB McINTOSH. 

An active, busy and useful life has brought James W'hitcomb Mcintosh to 
a point where he can put aside active business cares and live retired in the 
enjoyment of the fruits of his former toil. Gradually he has advanced step by 
step, connected at dift'erent times with commercial and industrial interests and 
also with official duties in behalf of the county. He was born in Putnam county. 
Indiana, December 30, 1844, and is a son of William and Emily (Parker) Mcin- 
tosh. The mother was a native of Oldham county, Kentucky, while the father 
was born in Harrison county, Indiana. He made farming his life work and 
in pioneer days came to Iowa, settling just west of Boone in October, iS^i. 
He found here a little village with but limited business activity, and he lived to 
see notable changes as the years went on. He was at all times deeply interested 



I 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 137 

in the welfare and upbuilding of the community and to the extent of his oppor- 
tunities cooperated in the work of public progress. He had for forty-four 
years been a resident of Boone when he passed away in 1895. His wife, sur- 
viving him for a decade, died in 1905. In their family were five children: 
Alma, who is now the widow of Wright Harris and makes her home in Auburn, 
Nebraska ; James Whitcomb, of this review : Mary Francis, who is living in 
Boone; Clinton DeWitt, who died in early manhood; and Nancy E., a resident 
of Boone county. 

James W. Mcintosh was but seven years of age when brought by his parents 
to Iowa and has since lived in Boone county, with the interests of which he 
has been thoroughly identified as time has passed on. In his youth he was sur- 
rounded by the conditions and environments of pioneer life. He pursued his 
early education in the district schools and afterward spent a year and a half 
as a student in Oskaloosa College at Oskaloosa. Iowa. He next entered Bryant 
& Stratton's Business College at Chicago, there pursuing a commercial course, 
after which he returned to Boone and for some time was connected with mer- 
cantile interests. For three years he engaged in the grocery business and sub- 
sequently became associated with the lumber trade, remaining as manager of 
the Farmer Lumber Company for about three years. He was then called to 
public office in his appointment to the position of deputy auditor, in which 
capacity he served for six years. He next engaged in the grain business, buying 
and shipping with the McFarlin Grain Company of Des Moines for sixteen 
years, and during that time he also spent three years as agent for the Des 
Moines & Northern Railroad Company. He ever displayed close applica- 
tion, unfaltering energy and determination, and those qualities constituted the 
salient features in the attainment of the success which now enables him to live 
retired and enjoy the comforts of life without further recourse to labor. 

On the 9th of May, 1867, Air. Mcintosh was united in marriage to Miss 
Josephine Ketchum, a daughter 'of Daniel C. and Cordelia (Cummings) Ket- 
chum. who were natives of Massachusetts and in 1864 arrived in Boone. The 
father was a watchmaker and jeweler by trade and conducted business along 
those lines in this city. His life's labors were ended in death on the 24th of 
December, 1909, and his wife jiassed away in April, 1906. Their daughter, 
Mrs. Mcintosh, was their only child, and by her marriage she has become the 
mother of four children ; Emily Cordelia, who died in childhood ; Maud, the 
wife of S. A. Boone, living in the city of Boone; Sibyl, wdio also passed away 
in childhood ; and James Lawrence, a resident of Oklahoma City. 

.Mr. Mcintosh has long given his unfaltering poHtical support to the demo- 
cratic party, and has served as a member of the city council, exercising his 
official prerogatives in support of many measures for the general good. He 
belongs to the Masonic fraternity and has filled all of the offices in the local 
lodge, while in his life he exemplifies the beneficient spirit of the craft. An 
interesting point in the life record of Mr. Mcintosh is the fact that in 1854 he 
was called upon to read the Declaration of Independence at the 4th of July 
celebration and again, a half century later, he was called upon for the same 
service in connection with the pioneer celebration. He is today one of the oldest 
residents of Boone county in years of continuous connection therewith, hav- 
ing for sixty-three years made his home in this county. His life, ever honor- 



138 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

able and upright in its purposes and manly and sincere in action, has won for 
him the high regard of young and old, rich and poor. He is an authority upon 
many matters connected with the early history of the county, and events of 
which others know only by hearsay he has witnessed. He has lived to see 
remarkable changes, as the district has become thickly settled by a prosperous 
and contented people, who have converted wild land into productive farms or 
established enterprising commercial and industrial interests, that have resulted 
in the upbuilding of growing and progressive towns and cities. 



WILLIAM PAULSON. 



An e.xcellent farm of one hundred acres on section i6, Amaqua township, is 
the property of William Paulson and the improvements found thereon are evi- 
dences of his life of well directed energy and thrift. Today his is one of the 
finest improved farms in the county. He has always lived in this section of the 
state, his birth having occurred in Boone, January 20, 1875. His p^irents, Georo-e 
and Anna (Cook) Paulson, were natives of Germany and on coming to America 
established their home in Boone about the year 1871. The father engaged in 
teaming and also worked in the brewery for some time, but afterward turned 
his attention to general agricultural pursuits, renting a tract of land whereon 
he engaged in farming. He operated his first place until 1887 and then pur- 
chased one hundred and fifty acres in Amaqua township. Prosperity attended 
him in this venture and as his financial resources increased he added to his 
property from time to time until he now owns two hundred and ninety acres on 
sections 9 and 16. He improved this place in notable manner, erecting two sets 
of buildings, adding all modern equipments and securing the latest improved 
machinery to facilitate the work of the fields. He continued to operate the farm 
until 1904, when he lost his wife in death, and then retired. He is still residing 
on the old home place with his son at the age of si.xty-nine years. His wife was 
sixty-three years of age when she passed away. 

William Paulson was reared and educated in Amaqua township, the public 
schools affording him his educational privileges. His training at farm work 
was thorough and brought to him a knowledge of the value of industry, economy 
and determination. He remained with his parents until he reached the age of 
twenty-three years and then purchased his present farm, becoming owner of 
one hundred acres on section 16, Amaqua township. With characteristic energy 
he took up the task of developing the place and today has one of the finest 
improved farms in the county. His home is an attractive residence, commodious 
and of modern style of architecture. There are good buildings for the shelter 
of grain and stock, and everything about the place indicates his careful super- 
vision and progressive methods. Stock-raising is a leading feature of his place, 
and he makes a specialty of handling thoroughbred Hereford cattle, Belgian 
horses and Chester White hogs. 

In September, 18(97, Mr. Paulson was united in marriage to Miss Anna Biel- 
feldt, a daughter of Henning and Catherine (Peters) Bielfeldt, who were natives 
of Germany and on coming to America in 1866 settled in Clinton, Iowa. The 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 139 

following year they removed to Boone county, where Mr. Bielfeldt purchased land 
in Amaqua township, which he improved and cultivated until 1898. He then 
retired from active farm life and established his home in Ogden, where he resided 
until his death, which occurred March 27, 1908, when he was sixty-eight years 
of age. His widow survives and now makes her home with Mr. and Mrs. Paulson 
at the age of seventy-two years. Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Paulson: Edward, sixteen years of age; and Wesley and Leslie, twins, aged 
fourteen. 

The religious faith of the family is that of the German Lutheran church and 
they are interested in all that tends to promote the moral as well as the material 
progress of the community. In his political views Mr. Paulson is an earnest repub- 
lican, well versed on the questions and issues of the day, and he is now serving for 
his fourth term, or eight years, as assessor of Amaqua township, the duties of 
which he has ever discharged with promptness and fidelity, his official career 
reflecting credit upon himself and proving entirely satisfactory to his constituents. 
As one of the native sons of Boone county he is well known, having spent his 
entire life, covering thirty-nine years, within its borders. 



JOHN HENRY EADE. 



John Henry Eade, secretary and treasurer of the Boone Blank Book Com- 
pany, is thus closely associated with one of the important business enterprises 
of Boone. Moreover, he is a recognized leader in the ranks of the republican 
party and has been called to several local offices, the duties of which he has dis- 
charged with promptness and fidelity. He was born in Linden, Iowa county, 
Wisconsin, October 29, 1865, and is a son of Nicholas and Josephine (Heath- 
cock) Eade, both of whom were natives of England. The father came to 
America as a young man of eighteen years, devoting his life to the occupation 
of mining gold. He traveled all over the United States, British Columbia and 
South America in that connection. In 1875 he came to Boone county, and his 
last days were spent in Ogden, Iowa, where he passed away on the ist of June, 
1886. His widow survives and now makes her home in Des Moines. They were 
the parents of five children, two daughters and three sons: Ida M., who is 
with her mother in Des Moines ; John Henry, of this review ; Mary A., the 
wife of C. |. Engleen, also of Des Moines; Joseph W., deceased; and William 
J., whose home is in Newark, Ohio. 

John Henry Eade completed his education in the high school at Ogden, 
Iowa, when eighteen years of age. He was a lad of nine years when brought 
by his parents to Iowa and has since made his home in this state. He was en- 
gaged in mercantile lines for about nine years after putting aside his text-books 
and then entered the field of real estate and insurance, in which he spent about 
three years. He next became deputy clerk of the district court, which office he 
filled for three years, and on the expiration of that period he was elected in 1900 
clerk of the court for a term of four years. He proved prompt, capable and 
efficient in the position and retired from the office as he had entered it — with 
the confidence and good-will of all concerned. He was afterward connected 



140 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

with the Boone Blank Book Company for five years and then opened a book store, 
in which he spent a year and a half. He then merged his interests into the 
business of the Boone Blank Book Company and has since then been identified 
with that corporation, acting as manager, secretary and treasurer. In these con- 
nections he is largely controlling the interests of the business and is giving proof 
of his capability to meet and manage complex conditions and coordinate forces 
into a unified and resultant whole. 

Air. Eade has been married twice. On the 13th of August, 1S90, he wedded 
Harriett R. Burnside, and after a happy married life 'of about eight years she 
passed away July 13, 1898, leaving a daughter, Lilah, who is now the wife of 
E. T. Beiser, of Boone. On the 29th of July, 1904, Mr. Eade was united in 
marriage to Miss Lulu B. ^^'agner, a native of Crawford county, Iowa. Mr. and 
Mrs. Eade hold membership in the Methodist church, and he belongs also to the 
Knights of Pythias lodge. He has voted with the republican party since age con- 
ferred upon him the right of franchise and is thoroughly conversant with the prin- 
cipal features which divide the great political organizations. He is never remiss 
in the duties of citizenship, whether of a local or national character, and during 
his residence in Boone has contributed to various movements and measures which 
have been of notable worth and value as factors in the upbuilding of the city. 



P. D. GRAY. 



P. D. Gray, a leading and prosperous citizen of Boone countv. has here 
resided for more than four decades and is now living retired in Beaver. His 
birth occurred in Maryland on the 27th of June, 1843, 'lis parents being Peter 
and Elizabeth (Chester) Gray, who were likewise natives of that state. The 
father, who devoted his attention to general agricultural pursuits in ^Maryland 
throughout his active business career, passed away in that state in 1881. The 
mother was called to her final rest in the year 1852. 

P. D. Gray was reared and educated in the state of his nativity and was a 
young man of nineteen when on the 22d of August, 1862, he enlisted for service 
in the Civil war as a member of Company F, Third Maryland Infantrv, con- 
tinuing with that command until the cessation of hostilities between the north 
and the south. For a period of seven and a half months he was held a prisoner 
at Danville, Virginia. 

After returning to Maryland Mr. Gray there worked as a blacksmith for 
two years and on the expiration of that period removed to Ogle county, Illinois, 
where he worked at his trade for a short time. Subsequently he w-as there 
employed as a farm hand for three years and then followed farming on his 
own account for one year. At the end of that time he made his way to Iowa, 
locating in Story county, where he was engaged in agricultural pursuits for one 
year and then came to Boone county. Here he continued in the service of the 
Chicago & Northwestern Railway for about seven years and afterward again 
turned his attention to agricultural pursuits, purchasing land at six dollars per 
acre. He followed farming successfully for about eleven years and was then 
obliged to abandon the work of the fields because of impaired health, taking up 




MK. AND MRS. P. D. GRAY 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 143 

his abode in Beaver, where he has resided continuously since and where he 
owns considerable property. He is now spending the evening of life in honor- 
able retirement, having accumulated a comfortable competence during former 
years of toil. 

On the 1st of January, 1868, Mr. Gray was joined in wedlock to Miss Mary 
E. Bowers, a daughter of David and Nancy A. (Reynold) Bowers, who were 
natives of Maryland. The father, who spent his entire life in that state, passed 
away in 1868, while the mother was called to her final rest in July, 1902, when 
ninety-two years of age. Mr. and Mrs. Gray became the parents of twelve 
children, as follows: Orphia J., who is the wife of C. S. Powers, of Moulton, 
Iowa; Edward E., a resident of Bruno. Minnesota; John H., living in Ohio; 
N. Anna, who is the wife of John Sifrit. of Beaver, this county ; Charles, who 
makes his home in California; Frank L., whose demise occurred in 1878; Daniel 
A., a resident of Des Moines, Iowa; Cynthia A., twin sister of Daniel, who is 
the wife of Calvin Shadle, a farmer of Boone county; Mary E., who gave her 
hand in marriage to George Stubbs, of Ogden, Iowa ; Blaine E. ; Arthur W., 
at home; and Elsie M., the wife of Fred Harten, a farmer of Boone county. 

Mr. Gray is a republican in politics and his fellow townsmen, recognizing 
his worth and ability, have chosen him for ])ositions of public trust. He has 
held the offices of notary public, justice of the peace, trustee, assessor and road 
supervisor of Amaqua township and in these various connections has discharged 
his duties capably and commendably. lie likewise served as postmaster for two 
terms, proving an efficient and po])ular incumbent in the position. Mr. Gray 
is identified fraternally with the Ancient Order of United Workmen and still 
maintains pleasant relations with his old army comrades through his membership 
in the Grand Army of the Republic. His religious faith is that of the Meth- 
odist church. He has always been interested in the development of the com- 
munity and has supported all movements calculated to advance the welfare of 
its citizens. His practical ideas and progressive methods, as manifested in the 
discharge of his duties in both public and private life, no less than his sterling 
qualities of character, have won him the esteem and high regard of many. 



CHARLES H. WILLIAMS. 

Charles H. Williams is not only a successful agriculturist of Marcy town- 
ship, but for a number of years was connected with business affairs, dealing 
in grain, live stock and implements in Ogden. He was born in Wisconsin on 
July 13, 1861, and is a son of John T. S. and Jane Williams, who are mentioned 
elsewhere in this work. 

Mr. Williams of this review attended school in Wisconsin, completing his 
education in Boone county. He remained on his father's farm until the latter 
engaged in the mercantile business, when Charles Williams became a clerk for 
him. continuing so for about eight months. At the end of that time he went to 
Mitchell, South Dakota, where he remained a year, after which he returned, 
farming the old home place in association with his brother. He then moved 
onto eighty acres which his father gave him and which are situated on section 



144 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

i8, Marcy township. He gave his sole attention to improving this place and has 
operated the same ever since, having transformed it into one of the most lucra- 
tive agricultural properties of the neighborhood. In 1904 he engaged in the 
implement, grain and live-stock business in Ogden in partnership with Nylander 
Brothers, the firm being known as Nylander Brothers & Williams. They con- 
tinued for about eight years, when they liquidated their business. Mr. Wil- 
liams has since given his sole time to his farm, which stands as evidence of 
his incessant industry and his enterprise. He today not only enjoys the dis- 
tinction of owning one of the most profitable farms of Marcy township, but 
he must be numbered among those men who are forces in the development of 
their district. 

On September 9, 1S85, Charles H. Williams married Miss Delia Bennett, 
a daughter of John and Nanny (Crase) Bennett, natives of England. The 
parents came to America many years ago and in the '40s located in Wisconsin. 
During the gold excitement Mr. Bennett made for the Golden state and during 
the wild years of the gold fever was killed there. His widow survived him 
many years, passing away August i. 1907. Mr. and Mrs. Williams have three 
children: Olive M., the wife of Al Berglund, residents of Boone; Lillian 
Fern, aged fifteen ; and Margaret L., who is thirteen. Mr. Williams has always 
taken a laudable interest in educational matters and at present is president of 
the school board. His political allegiance is given to the democratic party, and 
his religious faith is that of the Methodist church. Along agricultural lines he 
specializes in cattle-raising and markets about a carload of cattle yearly. He 
is a valuable and useful citizen and has contributed his full share toward that 
development which has brought prosperity to Iowa. 



OTTO HILE. 



Boone has been signally favored in the class of men who have occupied her 
ofiices, for on the whole they have been public-spirited citizens, loyal to the inter- 
ests intrusted to their care and faithful in the discharge of their duties. To this 
class belongs Otto Hile, who is now serving for the ninth year as city clerk. 
having made a splendid record in the position. He was born at Cedar Rapids, 
Iowa, August 23, 1864, and is a son of Henry and Barbara (Otterbein) Hile. 
The father became one of the pioneer grocers of Boone, to which city he removed 
in the fall of 1865. For a considerable period he was connected with commercial 
activity here and was regarded as one of the progressive and representative 
business men. Both he and his wife are now deceased. In their family were 
but two children, the daughter being Miss Kate Hile, of Boone. 

The son. Otto Hile, was a pupil in the public schools of Boone, where he has 
made his home from infancy. He also pursued a business course at Burlington, 
Iowa, and upon his return joined his father in the grocery business, remaining 
with him until the father's death. Otto Hile afterward continued the business 
alone until April, 1898. Subsequently he was connected with other mercantile 
lines as salesman until 1905, when he was appointed city clerk by the city council 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 145 

and has since continued in that position, making a most creditable record in 
the office. 

In July, 1896, Mr. Hile was united in marriage to Miss Emma Coleman, a 
native of Omaha, Nebraska, and to them have been born two children, Ruth and 
Frances. Mr. Hile is independent in his political views, supporting men and 
measures rather than party and voting as his judgment dictates without regard 
to partv ties. There is an interesting military chapter in his life record, for in 
1886 he joined the Iowa National Guard, with which he was connected until 
after the Spanish-American war. OfTering his services to his countr>' for active 
duty in the war with Spain, he was mustered in on the 26th of April, 1898, as 
major of the Fifty-second Iowa \'olunteer Infantry, and remained with that 
command until mustered out in the following October. Mr. Hile's life has at all 
time been honorable and upright, commanding for him the confidence and good- 
will of all with whom he has been brought in contact. No higher testimonial 
of his capability in office could be given than the fact that he has been so long 
retained in this position. He is systematic and methodical in the work of the 
office, prompt and painstaking, and his loyalty to the best interests of the com- 
munity both as an office-holder and as a private citizen is widely recognized. 



H. RAY AKERS. 



H. Ray Akers is one of the younger generation of shrewd and able business 
men of Ogden, Iowa, where he represents the W. F. Priebe Company, who are 
engaged in the poultry, butter, egg and cream business, the firm maintaining 
headquarters in Chicago. Mr. Akers is the Ogden manager and as such is 
widely and favorably known in business and agricultural circles. He is a native 
of Ogden, born August i, 1883, and a son of E. E. and Emma (Enfield) Akers. 
The father was born in Fulton county, Pennsylvania, April 11, 1858, and was a 
son of Charles and Margaret (Hill) Akers, also natives of the Keystone state. 
Charles Akers followed agricultural pursuits in Pennsylvania and upon coming 
to Boone county, Iowa, in 1868 bought land which he cultivated throughout 
the remainder of his life. His wife had passed away before he left their native 
state. 

Their son E. E. Akers was but ten years of age when his parents removed to 
Boone county and was therefore principally educated in Iowa. Upon leaving 
school he turned his attention to the painting and paper-hanging trade, which he 
followed during practically all of his life, with the exception of two years in 
which he was engaged in farming in Hancock county, where he owned property. 
Mr. Akers died November 27, 1905, when but forty-seven years of age, his demise 
causing sincere sorrow to his many friends. On April 11, 1882, he was married 
to Miss Emma Enfield, a daughter of Samuel and Harriett (Vanarsdale) Enfield, 
who were born in Indiana and came to Boone county, Iowa, in 1861. There 
Mr. Enfield acquired title to land which he operated until his death. His wife 
has also passed away. Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Akers had seven children: H. Ray; 
Mabel, deceased; Ethel, who married Frank Taggart, of Spokane, Washington; 
and Bessie, Edith, Carl and Merle, all at home. The father gave his political 



146 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

allegiance to the republican party and in his religious faith was a Methodist. 
He gave his hearty support to public enterj^rises and always took an interest in 
the upbuilding of his community. 

H. Ray Akers was reared under the parental roof and in the acquirement 
of his education attended the public schools, graduating from the Ogden high 
school with the class of 1902. He then learned the trade of a painter and 
paper-hanger with his father and successfully continued in that line of business 
until igi2, when he accepted the position of manager for the W. F. Priebe Com- 
pany of Chicago. This firm is extensively engaged in the poultry, butter, egg 
and cream business and Mr. Akers occupies an important position in business 
circles of Ogden, where he has entire charge of the affairs of his firm. Their 
business is entirely wholesale. 

On April 23, 1906, Mr. Al;.ers was united in marriage to Miss Esther Daniel- 
son, a daughter of Charles and Hulda Danielson, who were born in Sweden 
and upon coming to America located in Boone county, Iowa. In an early day 
her father was engaged in farming in Cass township, operating land until his 
recent retirement from active labor, when he removed to Aladrid. Mr. and 
Mrs. Akers have two children: Maxine, aged six years; and Kenneth, aged 
four. 

Mr. Akers gives his political support to the same party as did his father, 
being a stanch republican. However, he is not an office seeker but gives his 
undivided attention to his business affairs, although he takes a lively interest 
in public enterprises and is ever ready to materially support measures which 
will prove of benefit to his community. By his business activities he has" stimu- 
lated trade and he has made himself a valuable factor in commercial life of 
Ogden. His religious adherence is given to the Methodist church and he is 
interested in its work and in its various branches of activity. Yet a young man, 
Mr. Akers has already made for himself a substantial position in life and con- 
tinued success may be safely prophesied for him. 



BENJAMIN M. DAWKINS. 

Benjamin M. Dawkins, now in his eightieth year, is living retired in Boone, 
residing in the home of L. \\'. Johnson on Twenty-second street. Always a resi- 
dent of the middle west, he has lived to witness remarkable changes, for in the 
period of his boyhood Indians were not far from his home and there were great 
stretches of uncut forests and unbroken prairies throughout the middle Missis- 
sippi valley. 

Mr. Dawkins was born in Oldham county, Kentucky, January 26. 1835. a 
son of Johnson and Mary (Ransdell) Dawkins. The grandfather, William 
Dawkins, was from Virginia and removed to Henry county, Kentucky, where 
Johnson Dawkins spent the period of his youth. In 1854 he removed to Tippe- 
canoe county, Indiana, and in the fall of 1856 arrived in Boonesboro, Iowa. At 
that time there was only one building in what is now the city of Boone. He 
had purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land near Ridgeport in Dodge town- 
ship and upon that place established his family in 1856. His wife had died in 




BENJAMIN M. DAWKINS 



J 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 149 

Kentucky, but he brought with him his two sons and two daughters, these being 
Mrs. Felicia Dorcas Pollard, Mary J., Thomas and Benjamin M. The last 
named is the only one now living. Other sons and daughters of the family 
were : John R., who died in early manhood ; Lucy ; and Elizabeth. The father 
afterward spent some time in Madison county, Iowa, and died in Boone county 
in August, 1879, his funeral services being held on the 6th of that month. He 
was a farmer and stockman who successfully conducted business. He also 
improved land in Madison county and was a well known and highly respected 
citizen. 

Benjamin M. Dawkins was reared in Kentucky and in Indiana, to which 
state the family removed during his early boyhood. He attended school in both 
Indiana and in Iowa. Reared upon the frontier, he also had the experiences of 
pioneer life in this state. He assisted in the arduous task of developing a new 
farm and continued to engage in general agricultural pursuits until about 1S75. 
He then established a drug store at Ridgeport, which he conducted with gnnv- 
ing success for twenty-eight years, or until 1903, when he sold out and has since 
lived practically retired. His was a well apijointed store and his honorable deal- 
ing won for him a liberal patronage that made his income a gratifying one. He 
now has some coal interests in Colorado and at different times has owned small 
farms in this section of the state. 

In his political views Mr. Dawkins is a democrat, giving stalwart support 
to that ])arty since age conferred upon him the right of franchise. He served for 
four years, from 1868 until 1872, as sujiervisor of Boone and has also been 
township trustee. He belongs to the Methodist Episcopal church of Ridgeport 
and is well known in the county where he has so long made his home. There 
have been no spectacular events in bis life history, but faithful perfomiance of 
duty and diligence in business have gained him a comfortable competency and 
he is now able to live retired, enjoying the fruits of his former toil. 



THOMAS J. BURDICK. 

Thomas J. Burdick, a representative of industrial interests in Beaver, is 
engaged in business as a wagon maker and has long been numbered among the 
substantial and esteemed citizens of the community. His birth occurred in New 
York on the isth of January, 1838, his parents being Thomas E. and Susan 
(Dibble) Burdick, who were likewise natives of the Empire state. The father 
who devoted his attention to general agricultural pursuits throughout his active 
business career, passed away in New York, in 1842, at the age of forty-seven 
years. The mother was called to her final rest in 1898. 

In the acquirement of an education Thomas J. Burdick attended the schools 
of New York, Pennsylvania and Illinois. He left the state of his nativity when 
twelve years of age and as soon as he became old enough turned his attention to 
agricultural pursuits, operating a farm in Illinois for a number of years. In 
that state he likewise worked at the wagon maker's trade. He came to Boone 
county, Iowa, in 1875, purchasing a farm in Amaqua township which he operated 
successfully until 1892. In that year he removed to Glidden, Carroll county. 



150 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

and was there engaged in business as a wagon maker until 1909, when he re- 
turned to Boone county and purchased property at Beaver. Here he has con- 
tinued as a wagon maker to the present time, enjoying an extensive patronage 
in that connection which is accorded him in recognition of his splendid work- 
manship and reliable business methods. He still owns an eighty-acre tract in 
Amacjua township. 

Mr. Burdick has been married twice. In 1863 he wedded Miss Helen Hin- 
man, who was a daughter of Stephen Hinman and passed away after two weeks' 
illness, in 1865. Two years later he was again married, his second union being 
with Mrs. Elizabeth (C'happel) Hinman, a daughter of John and Mar>' Chappel. 
Unto them was born one child, Mary H., who is the wife of George Tuttle, an 
agriculturist of Boone county. 

In his political views Mr. Burdick is a republican, loyally supporting the men 
and measures of that party. His religious faith is that of the Presbyterian 
church. He has now passed the seventy-sixth milestone on life's journey and 
enjoys the respect and veneration which .should ever be accorded one who has 
traveled thus far on this earthly pilgrimage and whose career has been at all 
times upright and honorable. 



G. A. SANDBERG. 



G. A. Sandberg is successfully engaged in the conduct of a blacksmith shop 
and the manufacture of wagons in Madrid. Although his early educational 
opportunities were limited, he is a well informed man, as he has been a lifelong 
student, and today he is conversant with all issues and questions that affect the 
welfare of the nation. Mr. Sandberg is a close observer and has derived much 
of his knowledge from travel. He also studies all public questions intelligently 
and cannot be confused on any of the political and moral controversies that arise. 
Moreover, Mr. Sandberg is a most successful business man who combines the 
sturdy qualities of his native race with the aggressiveness of the American 
business man. 

G. A. Sandberg was born in Sweden, October 13, 1853, and received his 
schooling in that country. His parents were Carl F. and Louisa Catharina 
Sandberg, natives of Sweden, who are now deceased. They had the following 
children, all born in Sweden : G. A., of this review ; Mrs. Sophia Anderson ; 
Bernard, a resident of Des Moines, Iowa : Mrs. Matilda Lock, also of that city ; 
Mrs. Emily Reiberg and Andrew, both of Sweden ; John, deceased ; Mrs. Bertha 
Falk, who also resides in her native land ; and Werner, a blacksmith of Des 
Moines. 

Perceiving the opportunities which were awaiting young men on this side of 
the Atlantic, Mr. Sandberg crossed the ocean, landing in Canada, January i, 
1873. Thence he crossed the border into the United States at Port Huron and 
from there went to Marquette, Michigan, where he worked for one year. He 
then removed to Dubuque, Iowa, where he was employed by the Thomas Con- 
nolly Company and the Illinois Central Railroad. He next made his way to 
Fayette county, Iowa, where he engaged in farm work, but subsequently went 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 151 

to Webster City, where he was employed on the Hamilton county courthouse. He 
then did some work on the Crooked Creek Railway running out of Lehigh and 
subsequently was engaged in coal mining at that place. Coming to Boone county 
he worked for a time in a brickyard at Boone but in 1879 returned to Hamilton 
county, where he continued work along the same line. He was employed in 
Webster and Boone counties up to September 26, 1882, when he began to devote 
himself entirely to his trade of blacksmithing and woodworking in Madrid, of 
which city he has been a resident since. He left his native land on account of 
the unsatisfactory labor conditions, receiving many times but twenty-five cents 
a day for his work. By industry, economy and perseverance he has built up one 
of the most successful blacksmithing and wagon manufacturing establishments 
in Boone county. In 1883 he formed a partnership with Rudolph Schoonover 
and they have since been most successful in their business transactions. The shop 
is one of the best equipped in the county, and in order to give an idea as to the 
extent of their business it may be stated here that in the thirty-one years since- 
the firm has been established, on an average of seven hundred plows have been 
sharpened annually in their shop. A ton of horseshoes is used annually and quite 
a number of top buggies and spring wagons are manufactured. The honorable 
methods which Mr. Sandberg follows in all his transactions have been the founda- 
tion of his success and he enjoys today the utmost confidence of his patrons and 
the people of Madrid. Prosperity has come to him because he has been untiring 
in his efforts and because he has managed his business affairs circumspectly, tak- 
ing advantage of opportunities as they offered themselves. 

In 1901, after an absence of over a quarter of a century, Mr. Sandberg 
returned to his native land for a visit. He has used these opportunities of travel 
for observation and education and is today considered one of the best informed 
men upon all public questions in Madrid. He was first attracted to that city 
and became aware of its possibilities as a favorable location while on a visit to 
his uncle. Mason Anderson, in 1882. Not only does Mr. Sandberg speak 
Swedish but he also is proficient in French and German, which was of decided 
advantage to him as the first person he met in Madrid was one with whom he 
could make himself understood only in the French tongue. Mr. Sandberg is 
equally well versed in English and he has therefore the advantage of drawing 
his information from four nationalities, being able to acquaint himself with their 
views and progress by reading in their own languages. Mr. Sandberg is an 
expert at his trade and this has been one of the causes of his success. When he 
arrived in Madrid this was his greatest asset, for his cash capital was but small. 
He experienced sickness and other drawbacks and obstacles, hindrances which 
would have discouraged many a stout heart, but he never lost sight of the goal 
and moved onward, and the years have brought him the reward for his indomitable 
energy and incessant labor. 

On October 28, 1885. G. A. Sandberg married Miss Abigail Fread, who was 
born in La Salle county, Illinois, April 27, 1856. Both her parents died in Illi- 
nois and Mrs. Sandberg came to Boone county in 1881. She was one of ten 
children, as follows : Albert, Absalom, Philip, James and Mrs. Louis Luther, 
all of Illinois; Mrs. Ellen Bagwell, of California; Mrs. Abigail Sandberg; Mrs. 
Eva Story, also of the Golden state; Mary and Angle, both of Illinois. The 
only child of Mr. and Mrs. Sandberg died in infancy. 



152 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

Politically G. A. Sandberg is independent, preferring to follow his own 
judgment in the support of measures and candidates. He has taken a deep 
interest in all public questions and in private capacity does everything in his 
power to further the general welfare. The progress and growth of Madrid has 
been stimulated by his business activities and by his personal participation in 
many measures that have proven of the greatest benefit to the community. 
Fraternally he is a member of Star Lodge, No. 115, A. F. & A. M., of Madrid, 
and Mrs. Sandberg belongs to the Eastern Star, Yeomen and Rebekah lodges. 
They own a handsome modern home in that city where they entertain their many 
friends. ]\Ir. Sandberg is very popular and stands high in the community not 
only because of his financial success but because he embodies those qualities of 
character which typify honorable manhood and loyalty to all tasks and obliga- 
tions imposed upon him. 



ALBERT B. DEERING, M. D. 

Dr. Albert B. Deering is one of the successful physicians of Boone, interested 
in all that pertains to his profession and which renders his. service of greater 
usefulness and value to his fellowmen. His reading has been wide and his broad 
study has enabled him to cope with many of the intricate and complex problems 
that continually confront the physician. He was born in Moingona, Boone 
county, July 2'/, 1874, a son of Alpheus A. and Martha (Clift ) Deering, natives 
of Maine and of Veniiont respectively. The former died December 3, 1910, but 
the mother survives and now makes her home in San Diego, California. On 
leaving New England, they became residents of the middle west, settling in 
Boone county in 1868. The father engaged in the practice of medicine at JNIoin- 
gona for several years and then came to Boone, where he followed his profession 
until his demise. He ranked high as a physician and surgeon and something of 
his standing among his professional brethren is indicated in the fact that he was 
made secretary of the State Medical Society. He was also district surgeon for 
the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad. Interested in affairs pertaining to public 
progress, he did everything in his power to promote advancement along material, 
intellectual, social and moral lines. He served as a member of the school board 
and at one time was also postmaster of Boone. To him and his wife were born 
four children : Charles C, who is now living in Des Moines, Iowa ; Albert B. ; 
Judson W., who is a civil engineer, residing at San Diego, California ; and Elsie, 
the wife of Percy McDowell of Palo Alto, California. 

Liberal educational opportunities were accorded Dr. Albert B. Deering, who 
was a student in the Iowa State College at Ames and afterward attended the 
Iowa State University at Iowa City, spending one year as a student in its medical 
school. He then entered the medical department of the Northwestern Uni- 
versity at Chicago and was graduated therefrom with the class of 1898. He 
almost immediately afterward volunteered for service in the medical department 
of the Forty-ninth Iowa Infantry, with which he was connected for a year and 
then returned to Boone, where he has since practiced. He is district surgeon for 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 153 

the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad and local surgeon for the Iowa Railway 
Light Company. 

On the i8th of December, 1901, Dr. Deering was united in marriage to Miss 
jean Miller, a native of Wyoming, and their children were diree in number: 
Albert B., who was born April 7, 1905 ; David Miller, born January 29, 1907 ; 
and Jean, who was born October 18, 1909, and passed away on the 29th of July, 
191 1. Dr. Deering is independent in politics. Fraternally he is an Elk and in 
religious faith a Presbyterian. He possesses a broad humanitarian spirit, and 
the calls of his fellowmen make strong demand upon his sympathy. He is inter- 
ested in everything that tends to a broader and more accurate knowledge of the 
laws concerning the preservation and restoration of health, and by broad reading 
he is constantly adding to the information which he has already accjuired and 
which enables him to successfully cope with many professional problems. 



JOHN W". THOMPSON. 

John W. Thompson is a business veteran of Ogden, Iowa, where he was for 
many years connected with the publishing business as editor and owner of the 
Boone County Messenger. Since 191 1 he has lived retired in the enjoyment of 
a well earned competency. He was born in Pennsylvania, September 9, 1833, 
and is a son of James and Jane (Park) Thompson, the father a native of Mary- 
land and the mother of Pennsylvania. James Thompson followed agricultural 
pursuits and also was active in mercantile life. At an early day in the history 
of Iowa he came to Greene county, where he bought land, but he passed away 
shortly after his arrival there. The mother died in Cedar Rapids, whence the 
family subsequently came to Boone county. 

John W. Thompson was reared and educated in Pennsylvania, finishing his 
course at a private school in that state. In 1852 he went with the family to 
Cedar Rapids, Iowa, the trip being made by boat from Pittsburgh to Muscatine. 
They then drove to Cedar Rapids, where the father made entry for land, and 
our subject well remembers when he plowed corn on the tract where West Cedar 
Rapids now stands. Mr. Thompson of this review fanned there for about 
two years but in 1866 came to Boone county, Iowa, where he purchased land 
to the extent of eighty-nine acres. This tract he improved and operated until 
1881, acting during the winter months as principal of the schools of Moingona 
for some time. As a school teacher as well as a farmer he was successful and 
earned the respect and esteem of his friends and neighbors. Upon coming to 
Ogden Mr. Thompson engaged in the newspaper business, organizing the Boone 
County Messenger. This paper he conducted for about twenty years. Its edi- 
torial policy was always clean-cut, while particular attention was given to the 
setting forth of local happenings. Mr. Thompson not only proved himself an 
able editor but he was a successful business manager. His circulation list in- 
creased year by year, and his advertising patronage gained in volume and quality. 
When he retired from the newspaper business in 191I he had built up a valuable 
organ in the country press of the state. Mr. Thompson has now passed his 
eightieth year, yet he is very active and interested in the growth and development 



154 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

of his city and section, to which he contributed so much in his newspaper 
■career. 

On September 12, 1854, John W. Thompson was united in marriage to Miss 
Mary Rogers, a daughter of Henry and Frances (Bixby) Rogers, natives of Penn- 
sylvania, who went to Linn county, Iowa, during pioneer days. There the father 
engaged in farming, operating land in that section for the remainder of his life. 
Mr. and Mrs. Thompson became the parents of seven children : Mattie E., who 
jnarried S. J. Elliott and they reside in Beaver, Boone county ; Clara, who is 
teaching school in St. Paul, Minnesota, and for fourteen years was principal of 
the Ogden schools ; May, the wife of Edward Freeman, a passenger conductor 
•on the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad; Anna, who married Dr. Bradshaw, 
a dentist of Ogden ; Etta, the wife of C. F. Weaver, a newspaper man of Ames, 
iy whom she has nine children; Wiley J., who passed away in 1865, at the age 
of two years ; and one who died in infancy. Mrs. Thompson's death occurred 
in 1872 and on January 20, 1906, Mr. Thompson married Mrs. Euretta S. 
Brooks, daughter of Joel and Betsy (Hill) Clark and the widow of Harvey 
Brooks. The latter was a veteran of the Civil war and a pioneer of Boone county, 
where he passed away July 27, 1902. 

Mr. Thompson has always given his support to the democratic party and 
stanchly believes in the principles and platform of that organization. He has 
ever interested himself in public affairs and for a number of years served as 
township clerk. His religion is that of the Methodist church. Much credit is 
due Mr. Thompson not only for his accomplishments in his own behalf, but for 
the service which he rendered his community in his semi-public position as editor 
and owner of the Boone County Messenger. He has ever given his influence 
toward promoting improvements and has taken his part in bringing to Ogden 
.and Boone county the conveniences and comforts of modern civilization. 



ANDREW G. ANDERSON. 

Andrew G. Anderson is engaged in the plumbing business in Boone, where for 
twelve years he has conducted his present establishment, enjoying growing suc- 
cess as time has passed on. He was born in Sweden, July 26, 1867, and is a 
■son of John and Sarah Anderson, both of whom were natives of that country, 
where the mother still resides, while the father has passed away. He was a 
sailor, devoting his life to that calling. 

Andrew G. Anderson was one of a family of six children. The days of his 
boyhood and youth were spent in his native land, and his education was acquired 
in its schools. Hearing favorable reports concerning the new world and its 
opportunities, he determined to try his fortune on this side the Atlantic and, 
bidding adieu to friends and relatives, he left Sweden on the 4th of September, 
1887. H did not tarry upon the eastern coast, but with Boone county as his 
destination made his way at once into the interior of the country, reaching Moin- 
gona in October. His financial condition rendered it imperative that he seek 
immediate employment and for one month he worked for the Northwestern 
T^ailroad Company, while later he spent thirty days in the coal mines. He then 




AM)Ki;\\ <i. ANDKRSON 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 159 

went to Omaha, Nebraska, where he secured a position in connection with the 
city waterworks in September, 1888. After a few months spent in that connec- 
tion he made his way to Chicago and afterward returned to Boone, where he 
entered the employ of Mr. Crary in the plumbing and hardware business. He 
remained in that connection from 1889 until May 16, 1902, when he established 
a plumbing shop of his own. In 1907 he purchased a fine brick building and 
has today the leading establishment in his line in this city. He thoroughly under- 
stands the trade, does expert work and by reasonable prices, honorable dealing 
and enterprising methods has gained a most liberal and gratifying patronage. 

In 1893 Mr. Anderson was united in marriage to Miss Mary W. Berglund, 
a native of Boone county, and to them have been born eight children, as follows : 
Walter Leroy, born December 24, 1893; Freddie Raymond, born July 29, 1895; 
Erive Paul, whose birth occurred on the 25th of December, 1898; Pearl Chris- 
tine and Earl Robert, twins, born June 7, 1900; Sara Josephine, whose natal 
day was May 26, 1903; Ruth Marion, born May 23, 1906; and William Clyde, 
born September 16, 1909. 

In his political views Mr. Anderson is independent, voting for the candidate 
whom he thinks most capable rather than for party. He belongs to the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows and the Loyal Order of Moose, and in those 
societies has many friends He has recently returned from a trip to his old 
home, having spent ten weeks in his native land. He has never had occasion 
to regret his determination to come to America, for on this side the Atlantic he 
found the opportunities which he sought and in their improvement has worked 
his way steadily upward. His has been a busy and useful life, and his record 
shows what may be accomplished when industry is one of the salient traits of 
character. 



\MLLIAM A. WEST. 



William A. West, chief of the fire department, was born Ji.ily 6, 1868, in 
Boone, where he still makes his home. He was the fifth in order of birth in a 
family of six children, whose parents were David A. and Margaret (Conley) 
West, the former a native of Canada and the latter of St. John, New Brunswick. 
It was about the year 1865 that David West brought his family to Boone, where 
he engaged in ditching, working oxen in that connection. He afterward engaged 
in the laundry business in Boone until 1890, when his life's labors were ended 
in death. His widow survives and yet makes her home in Boone. Among their 
children were four who died in infancy, while those who survive are Willianr 
and Clayton, the latter a resident of Perry, Iowa. 

The public schools of his native city afforded William A. West his educa- 
tional opportunities and in his initial step in business circles, he joined his father, 
vho was then engaged in the laundry business, and with whom he continued 
until the father's death. He then carried on the business alone until his estab- 
lishment was destroyed by fire in the year 1900. It was in 1903 that the fire de- 
partment of Boone was organized and six months later Mr. West was made 
captain of the hose department. In 1908 he was made chief of the fire depart- 



160 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

ment and has since acted in that capacity. He has raised the department to a 
high standard of efficiency and has the loyal service and indorsement of the men 
who are under him. , 

On the 7th of November, 1892, Mr. West was united in marriage to Miss 
Jessie McAllister, a native of Des Moines, and they became the parents of two 
children, James and Gladys, but both are now deceased. The parents are mem- 
bers of the Christian church and in its work are interested and active. Mr. West 
has always resided in Boone, and his cordial relations with many of his fellow 
townsmen indicate an upright, honorable life, worthy the regard of those with 
whom business or social relations have brought him in contact. 



BURT U. HUNTLEY. 



Burt M. Huntley, who is engaged in buying and shipping grain at Boone, was 
born in De Kalb, Illinois, on the i6th of December, 1869. His parents were 
Fernando C. and Louisa K. (Wright) Huntley, the former a native of Illinois 
and the latter of Ohio. The father engaged in the grain, lumber and live stock 
business and in 1870 came to Boone county, settling in Ogden, where he con- 
tinued to reside until his death, which occurred in January, 1901. His wife 
survived him for thirteen years and was called to her final rest on the ifith of 
February, 1914. Her last days were spent in the home of her son, B. M. 
Huntley. Her remains, however, were interred at Ogden, the Rev. S. Muneke 
of the Presbyterian church having charge of the services. She was born in 
Tallmadge, Summit county, Ohio, and came of good old Puritan stock. In her 
girlhood days the family removed to Cleveland, Ohio, and when she was still 
quite young a further removal was made to De Kalb. Illinois. Both parents 
died w'ithin five days after their removal to the west, the father's death occurring 
in the south while he was serving as a soldier of the Civil war. The daughter 
afterward returned to Ohio and attended school at Tallmadge and at Oberlin. 
She subsequently engaged in teaching for a time near the latter city, after which 
she returned to De Kalb, Illinois, where she taught for one year in the graded 
schools. It was on the 21st of November, 1865, that she gave her hand in 
marriage to Fernando C. Huntley, and they continued to reside in De Kalb until 
July 27, 1870, when they went with their little family to Ogden, Iowa. They 
were among the early residents of the locality and ever shared in the work of 
development and improvement. The Huntleys united with the Congregational 
church and were active in every line of church work, while Mrs. Huntley's rare 
musical gifts were of much value to the choir. She was also very active in 
church, Sunday-school and missionary work and, indeed, was well known along 
every line of Christian service. She possessed a charitable disposition, a brave 
and courageous spirit and notable nobility of character. She was ever a most 
gracious, cordial and kindly hostess, and her friends were indeed many. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Huntley were born five children : Mabel, now the wife of George H. 
Rogers, living in Ames, Iowa ; Burt M. ; Frances Elva, now in Portland. Oregon ; 
Ralph \y.. now at Cheyenne Wells, Colorado; and Lillian, who passed awav at 
the age of three years. 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 161 

In taking up the personal history of Burt M. Huntley, we present to our 
readers the life record of one who is widely and favorably known in Boone and 
throughout the surrounding country, for since attaining manhood he has been 
closely associated with business alTairs along various lines. He was cashier 
of the Bank of Ogden for seven years and was then elected to the office of 
county treasurer, in which he served for two terms, or four years, as his efficiency 
won him reelection, and also for six months by appointment. He was a most 
careful custodian of the public funds and discharged his duties with a prompt- 
ness and fidelity that left nothing to be desired. After retiring from the office 
he became one of the organizers of the Boone-Brick-Tile Company, of which he 
remained as manager for seven years, wisely directing the interests of that 
constantly growing business. He then built an elevator at Boone and has since 
been engaged in buying and shipping grain. Soon after embarking in that busi- 
ness he admitted C. Williams to a partnership. Their interests have developed 
steadily along substantial and gratifying lines, and their business is an important 
one to the community, inasmuch as it furnishes a market for local grain pro- 
ducers, while at the same time their annual sales to the city grain markets bring 
to them a substantial annual income. 

On the 20th of September, 1893, Air. Huntley was united in marriage to Miss 
Bessie G. Phillips, a native of Jones county, and unto them have been born three 
children: Marjorie Louise, born July 19, 1895; Helen Elizabeth. April 7, 1902; 
and liurt Phillips, August 10, 1910. The parents hold membership in the Con- 
gregational church and are interested and active in its work, doing all in their 
power to promote its growth and extend its influence. 

Mr. Huntley votes with the republican party and is a loyal and public- 
spirited citizen, cooperating heartily in many movements contributing to the 
general good. In Masonry he has attained high rank, holding membership with 
the lodge, chapter, commandery and the Mystic Shrine, and at all times he is 
faithful to the teachings of the craft, which has at its basic principle the truth 
of mutual kindness and brotherhood. Mr. Huntley was less than a year old when 
the family came to Boone county and has since resided within its borders, his 
record at all times commending him to the confidence, good-will and high regard 
of those with whom he has been brought in contact. 



OSCAR J. LINDGREN. 

Oscar J. Lindgren is a representative and enterprising agriculturist of Yell 
township, residing on section 20, where he owns seventy-nine acres of rich and 
productive land. His birth occurred in Sweden on the 30th of April, 1870, his 
parents being Storm and Johanna Lindgren, likewise natives of that country. 
The father, a shoemaker by trade, still works at that occupation in Sweden, but 
the mother passed away in 1873. 

Oscar J. Lindgren was reared and educated in his native land and also learned 
the shoemaker's trade, working at that occupation until he had attained his 
majority. When twenty-one years of age, desiring to take advantage of the 
opportunities aft'orded by the new world, he crossed the Atlantic to the L^nited 



162 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

States and came direct to Boone county, Iowa, beiug here employed as a farm 
hand for some time. Subsequently he cultivated a tract of rented land in Peoples 
township for six years and for three years operated a rented place in Beaver 
township. Having accumulated sufficient capital to enable him to purchase 
property of his own, he came into possession of seventy-nine acres of land on 
section 20, Yell township, on the ist of Alarch, 1909, and has since devoted his 
time and energies to its operation. He has made substantial improvements on 
the property and annually gathers rich crops which find a ready sale on the 
market. 

On the 7th of September, 1904, Mr. Lindgren was united in marriage to Miss 
Hulda Nelson, a daughter of Nels and Anna Nelson, both of whom were natives 
of Sweden. The father, a blacksmith by trade, died in that country in 1884, while 
the mother was called to her final rest in August, 1901. IMr. and Mrs. Lindgren 
are the parents of five children, namely : Wallace, Walter, Edna, Earl and Pearl. 

Mr. Lindgren exercises his right of franchise in sitpport of the men and 
measures of the republican party and is now ably serving in the capacity of 
school director. His religious faith is that of the Lutheran church. The hope 
that led him to leave his native land and seek a home in the new world has been 
more than realized, for here he found the opportunities which he sought and in 
their wise utilization has won a place among the substantial and esteemed citizens 
of his community. 



C. O. ERICKSON. 



C. O. Erickson is one of the prominent members of the Swedish colony in 
Madrid. Combined in him are the sturdy qualities of his native race with the 
business ability and aggressive tendencies of the American character. He is at 
present a member of the firm of Erickson Brothers, who are engaged in stone 
and cement work and who are very prosperous in their commercial affairs. In 
their plant at Madrid are manufactured work blocks, posts, columns and many 
other stone and cement ornaments and building materials. 

Mr. Erickson was born in Sweden in 1874 and is a son of Eric and Louise 
(Nelson) Anderson, natives of Sweden and still residents of that country. Of 
their children, two died in infancy and the remaining are : C. O.. of this review ; 
Franz, who is connected with his older brother in the management of the firm 
of Erickson Brothers; Axel, of Minneapolis; Mrs. Hilda Olson, of Washington; 
Mrs. Hannah Peterson, of Sweden ; Mrs. Hilma Carlson, of Washington ; and 
Mary, Ida and Alice, of Sweden. 

C. O. Erickson spent his boyhood under the care of his parents, who early 
instilled into him a proper valuation of the qualities of thrift, industry and 
energ)'. In the acquirement of his education he attended country school. When 
a young man of nineteen he became more and more convinced that the oppor- 
tunities which his native country held out to him did not permit him to gain 
that independence which he desired. He therefore turned his eyes to the 
western hemisphere and in 1893 came to America. He settled in Madrid, Iowa, 
and there he has since been engaged in mason and cement work. He is very 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY • 163 

successful as a contractor and has handled some important deals. He is a mem- 
ber of the firm of Erickson Brothers, his partner being his brother Franz, and they 
execute stone and cement work. Mr. Erickson enjoys a high reputation in 
business circles and has reached financial independence through his own etforts, 
so that he may truly be styled a self-made man. He is highly esteemed by 
all who know him and in financial and commercial circles enjoys the greatest 
confidence. 

In 1898, C. O. Erickson married Miss Nellie Sell, who was born in Douglas 
township in August, 1873. Her parents were C. G. and Johanna (Johnson) 
Sell, natives of Sweden, who in 1871 came to Douglas township and settled 
on a farm west of Madrid. The father was a prosperous, up-to-date agricul- 
turist and after a long and successful career passed away in Madrid, February 
9, 1898. His widow survived him until July, 1913. Of their seven children the 
six older were born in Sweden and the youngest in Boone county. Four — 
Sophia, Carolina, Louise and Charles — are deceased. The living are : Tilda, 
who married Jacob M. Carlson, supervisor of Boone county, residing in Madrid; 
Mrs. Hulda Hoover, also of that city ; and Mrs. Nellie Erickson. Mr. and Mrs. 
Erickson have two children: Roy, born in 1900, who is attending public school; 
and Harold, whose birth occurred in 1909. 

Mr. and Mrs. Erickson are members of the Swedish Mission church. Politi- 
cally he is a republican but he has never been connected with public affairs, 
preferring to fulfill his citizen's duties privately. He is interested in the growth 
and progress of his city and gives valuable support to enterprises which are 
undertaken in the interests of the general welfare. Mr. and Mrs. Erickson 
reside in a handsome home which they make a hospitable meeting place for their 
many friends. Success has come to him in answer to his ambition and initiative, 
and the prosperity which he enjoys is merited by years of close application and 
incessant industry. 



FRANK E. HANNUM. 



Frank E. Hannum, manager of the Farmers Elevator at Boone, is well known 
throughout the county in which practically his entire life has been spent. His 
birth occurred in Zanesville, Ohio, on the 23d of February, 1864, his parents 
being William P. and Elizabeth A. (Gibbons) Hannvmi, the former a native of 
Pennsylvania and the latter of Ohio. In the spring of 1865 the family home was 
established in Boone county, Iowa, and here the father followed farming through- 
out his active business career. His demise occurred on the 31st of October, 
1891, while his wife was called to her final rest on the nth of January, 1914, 
the community thus losing two of its substantial and esteemed residents They 
were the parents of seven children, as follows: George, serving as deputy sheriff 
of Boone county; Margaret, at home; Mary, who is the wife of H. J. Pollard, 
of Boone ; John, residing in Boone, who is employed as conductor on the Chicago 
& Northwestern Railway ; Alva, a carpenter living in Boone ; Frank ; and Effie, 
who is the wife of John D. Goode, of Dodge township. 



164 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

Frank E. Haiinum attended the public schools of Boone in the acciuirement 
of an education and after putting aside his text-books devoted his attention to 
agricultural pursuits. Subsequently he embarked in business as a contractor 
and builder and later took charge of the Farmers Elevator at Boone, which 
he has managed in a capable, efficient and commendable manner to the present 
time. 

In January, 1899, Mr. Hannum was united in marriage to Miss Eva L. 
Mosgrove, a native of Boone county, by whom he has four children, as fol- 
lows, Bessie, Rollin M., Raymond R. and Ruth E. All are with their parents in 
Boone. In his political views Mr. Hannum is a republican, while his religious 
faith is that of the Methodist church, of which he is a liberal supporter. 
Fraternally he is identified with the Woodmen of the World, the Ancient Order 
of United Workmen, the Improved Order of Redmen and the subordinate lodge 
and encampment of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Both Mr. and 
Mrs. Hannum have an e.xtensive acc)uaintance in this county and enjoy the 
regard and esteem of a large circle of warm friends. 



JOHN McCREA BRAINARD. 

.SIo history of Boone county would be complete without extended reference 
to lohn McCrea Brainard, now one of the venerable residents of the city of 
Boone, having passed the seventy-eighth milestone on life's journey. Through 
much of this period he has been a resident of Iowa, where for more than a 
half century he was connected with the profession of teaching and with journal- 
ism, becoming widely known in the field of newspaper publication. 

.Mr. J]rainard was born in Blairsville, Indiana county, Pennsylvania, on the 
30th of March, 1836, and comes of English ancestry, tracing the line back to 
Daniel Brainard, who, when but eight years of age, crossed the Atlantic from 
England and found a home in Hartford, Connecticut, in 1640. Two years 
later he became a citizen of and large landholder in Haddam, Connecticut, and 
he aided in the substantial development of the section of the colony in which he 
lived. He passed away in Haddam, April i, 171 5. His family numbered seven 
sons and a daughter. The paternal grandparents of John McCrea Brainard 
were Isaac and Alice (Brainard) Brainard, who though of the same name wer€ 
not relatives. Their son, Martin Brainard, was born at Randolph, Vermont, 
June 20, 1796, and completed a course of study in Dartmouth College by gradu- 
ation with the class of 181 7. He then entered upon the study of law, was admitted 
to the bar at Utica, New York, and afterward practiced his profession in 
Rochester and Buffalo, New York, in Pennsylvania and in Wisconsin. In the 
autumn of 1875 he removed with his family to St. Augustine, Florida, and was 
laid to rest in the old Huguenot cemetery there. His wife bore the maiden 
name of Agnes Moorhead, but was usually known by her pet name of Nancy. 
She was born near Blairsville, Pennsylvania, March 13, 1813, a daughter of 
Samuel and Martha (Bell) Moorhead, and on the 6th of November, 1830, 
she gave her hand in marriage to Martin Brainard, whom she survived for a 
decade, passing away in St. Augustine, Florida, December 14, 1893. The 




JOHN M. BRAIXARD 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 167 

ancestral record in the maternal line speaks of Mrs. Brainard as a woman of 
more than usual education for those days, who was possessed of a tenacious mem- 
ory and a capacity for ready and pertinent quotation, generally recognized among 
her acquaintances. Her ancestry was Scotch-Irish, immigrating in the early 
part of the eighteenth or latter part of the seventeenth centur)-, via Baltimore, and 
settling in the rich Cumberland valley, Franklin county, Pennsylvania, near 
Chambersburg. Her grandfather, Samuel Moorhead, of Westmoreland county, 
Pennsylvania, married Agnes, daughter of Samuel Craig, also of Scotch-Irish 
stock, who was a soldier of the Revolutionary war and lost his life in the line 
of duty, being killed by the Indian allies of the British while crossing Ches- 
nut Ridge on his way to Fort Ligonier, in the same county. The intermarriages 
of the Moorhead families were almost without exceptions with persons of 
Scotch-Irish descent; and this was also true to a considerable extent on the 
Brainard side of the house, the first — Daniel— having married a Scotch las- 
sie, Hannah Spencer, and Scotch names appear frequently in the list of brides 
in later generations. 

John McCrea Brainard was the fourth in order of birth in a family of 
thirteen children. The three older sons died in early childhood, while the remain- 
ing ten children reached adult age. The subject of this sketch began his edu- 
cation under the teaching of his parents, who instructed him to some extent 
in the Latin language, in addition to those branches which today constitute the 
public school curriculum. He was afterward sent to th,e public schools and 
in the autumn of 1851 enrolled in the preparatory academy at Eldersridge, 
Pennsylvania, being at that time fifteen years of age. In that school he pre- 
pared for the junior year at Jefferson College, teaching school in the winter 
and attending the five months' terms at the academy. In the spring of 1853 the 
family removed from Pennsylvania to Beloit, Wisconsin, where John McCrea 
Brainard continued his education as a student at the college at that place, but 
only remained until fall, when he returned to Pennsylvania, where he alter- 
nately studied in the academy and taught school until the spring of 1856. With 
the completion of his academic course he decided to establish his home in the 
West. Before taking up his abode in the Mississippi valley, however, Mr. 
Brainard was married to Miss Martha Vale Wilson, a daughter of Sanford and 
Letitia (Clark) Wilson, of Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania. The wedding 
was celebrated March 18, 1856, in Callensburg, Clarion county, Pennsylvania. 
The bride's mother was a cousin of Governor James Clark, the third and last 
territorial governor of Iowa, who shortly after the close of his official term 
died of cholera and was laid to rest in Burlington. Mr. and Mrs. Brainard 
became the parents of seven children: Justin, born May 9, 1858, at Charles 
City, Iowa, married Gladys J. Calonkey, September 4, 1884, and is now liv- 
ing in Florida; Walter L., born March 12, 1S60, at Clear Lake, Iowa, was 
married June 20, 1886, to Lizzie A. Shackleton, and died September 23, 1887; 
Frank S., born February 18, 1862, at Clear Lake, Iowa, is a resident of Boone, 
Iowa; Elmer E., born January 31, 1864, at Nevada, Iowa, was married at Elka- 
der, Iowa, January 2, 1889, to Fannie E. Woodward and makes his home in 
Williston, North Dakota; Mabel Alice, born December 24, 1865, in Nevada, Iowa, 
is the widow of Dr. J. T. Coveny and they resided in Oscaloosa, Iowa, until 
the Doctor's death; Emma Vale, born May 23, 1871, in Boone, Iowa, was 



168 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

married February 17, 1896, to Stillman Pearson, and resides in Aurora, Illi- 
nois. She had a twin brother who died a few days after their birth. 

Almost immediately after their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Brainard started for 
the middle west, and on the 21st of July, 1856, they arrived in Floyd county, 
Iowa, becoming residents of Charles City. In the autumn of that year Mr. 
Brainard accepted the position of teacher in the public schools of Charles City, 
with which he was connected for a year. He was afterward in the employ 
of the bank of Ferguson & Eastman, was in the store of Ferguson & Stanley 
and was connected with the county offices. In 1858 he removed from Charles 
City to Mason City, where he engaged in teaching through the succeeding year 
and in the autumn of 1859 accepted a school at Clear Lake, where he taught 
through the ensuing winter. During his residence there he began newspaper 
publication, entering into partnership with Silan Noyes in the establishment of 
the first newspaper at that place, known as the Clear Lake Independent. Since 
then Mr. Brainard has been almost continuously connected with journalism. 
He was at that time twenty-three years of age. The following year the Inde- 
pendent suspended, and the office was removed to New Amsterdam, Hancock 
county, where Mr, Brainard published the paper during a portion of the year 
i86t. Times became very hard with the outbreak of the Civil war, however, 
and again he discontinued his paper and turned his attention to merchandising 
m Clear Lake, still in partnership with Mr. Noyes, but misfortune attended 
this venture, owing to the fact that many to whom they had extended credit 
went to the war and lost their lives on the field of battle, so that the accounts 
could not be collected. 

In the summer of 1863 Mr. Brainard removed to Nevada, Story county, 
where he purchased the Reveille from George Schoonover, which he rechris- 
tened The Story County Aegis. After five years spent in Nevada he purchased 
the interest of John Chapman in the Council Bluffs Nonpareil, which he edited 
during a part of 1868 and 1869. He next purchased the Boone Standard, and 
from that time forward was connected with journalistic, business and public 
interests in Boone, where three years before he had attended the first sale of 
lots. The Standard was published without missing an issue for nearly a third 
of a century, or until January i, 1902, when, because of advancing years and 
of changed conditions in the field of newspaper publication, Mr. Brainard 
retired. A contemporary biographer has said in this connection: "While 
Brainard's modest little 'Standard' was always readable from the first line to 
the last, the propitious days for a weekly in Boone county, Iowa, had 'faded 
into the azure of the past.' Some men of his years, when compelled by the 
logic of their environments to give up a line of business and retire to a life 
wholly private, become soured and misanthropic, imagining that they have been 
ill-used, that 'republics are ungrateful' and all that sort of thing. Not so was 
it with John M. Brainard. He saw that the days of the country weekly had 
passed away never to return, and he accepted the situation cheerfully without 
a word of complaint, turning his attention to other fields of usefulness. 

"The writer has known Mr. Brainard intimately and well for nearly forty 
years, and it is a pleasure to bear testimony to his many excellent qualities of 
head and heart. As a writer for the press he was one of the first among those 
who came as pioneers into northwestern Iowa prior to i860. His paper was 



I 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 169 

a clean piece of writing and printing. No parent ever felt any hesitancy in 
having it come into the home. It always contained much aside from the news 
of the day that was in the highest degree instructive. Even now old settlers 
speak in most cordial terms of what John Brainard's paper was a quarter of a 
century ago. A complete file of that most excellent journal is in tlie State 
Historical Library at Des Moines." 

Mr. Brainard has several times been called to public office, although never 
a politician in the sense of office seeking. In 1862 he was elected to fill a vacancy 
from the sixth district of Iowa in the state board of education, but on the 24th 
of March, 1864, this board was abolished by act of the general assembly. On 
the 14th of February, 1873, he received from President Grant the commission 
that made him postmaster of Boone and in 1877-80 he was a member of the 
Boone school board. In 1886 he was elected to the city council and there lab- 
ored earnestly and effectively to advance the welfare of the city. In 1893, 
when it was decided to build a general sewer system, he was largely instru- 
mental in securing as its advisory engineer in this work, the distinguished 
Colonel George E. Waring, whose plans were substantially adopted. In 1881-82 
Mr. Brainard was active in promoting the St. Louis, Des Moines & Northern 
Railway, from Boone to Des Moines, now a part of the Chicago, Milwaukee 
& St. Paul system. He was also one of the foremost factors in establishing 
and promoting the public library, which is a monument to his interest in 
the general welfare. He remains today one of the valued and honored residents 
of Boone, the growth and development of which he has witnessed for forty- 
five years, taking most active and helpful part in all the work of progress 
and improvement. There are few more thoroughly informed concerning the 
history of this section of the state, and his labors have been effective and far- 
reaching, not only for the material advancement, but also in behalf of the intel- 
lectual and moral progress of the district. 



ISAAC E. ROBINSON. 

Isaac E. Robinson was not only a successful agriculturist of Greene county 
but there is also honor due him for his long and faithful service in the Civil 
war. In his farming he always followed progressive and up-to-date methods 
and established valuable agricultural standards in this state. 

Mr. Robinson was born near Utica, New York, October 11, 1836, a son of 
E. and Catherine (Bushman) Robinson, natives of New York. The father, 
who was also a farmer, decided upon a settlement in the middle west, where 
he expected to find better opportunities for advancement. He therefore made 
his way to Illinois, going to that state in the early days of its history and enter- 
ing land in Carroll county, to the cultivation of which he devoted the remainder 
of his days. He was successful in his chosen occupation and esteemed and 
respected by all who knew him. He died in 1884 and was survived by his 
widow for two years, the mother passing away in 1886. 

Isaac E. Robinson was reared on the home farm and received his education 
in the schools of Illinois. In September, 1861, his patriotism prompted him 



170 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

to enlist in Company B, Seventh Illinois Cavalry, and for three years he served on 
the battlefields of the south during the greatest civil war of our history. He 
performed his duties faithfully and gallantly defended the Union. After his 
term of enlistment had expired he was honorably discharged and returned to 
Illinois, in which state he farmed until 18S4, when he removed to Greene county, 
Iowa, acquiring land which he operated until his death. His demise occurred 
May 30, 1904, when he was nearing his sixty-eighth birthday. He always fol- 
lowed the most approved methods of farming and was industrious and tireless 
in his efforts to transform the wild prairie land into rich, bearing fields. His 
buildings were in the best of repair and modern machinery was installed upon 
his farm to increase the yield of his acres. 

On September 3, 1874, Mr. Robinson was united in marriage to Miss Flora 
Davis, a daughter of Isaac and Catherine (Hallet) Davis, natives of Wayne 
countv, New York. Her father was a stonemason by trade and in 1835 took 
up his residence in Illinois, where he continued in this occupation until his 
death, January 5, 1881. His widow survived him until February 27, 1897. Mr. 
and Mrs. Robinson had eight children : Ella, who married William Tilley, of 
Incline, this state; Pearl, the wife of T. C. McWhinney, of Odell, Iowa; 
Leonard, a farmer in South Dakota; Marion, who conducts a blacksmith shop 
at Boone; Lillian, whose husband, W. H. Fister, farms in South Dakota: Myra, 
the wife of Guy Hoover, of Boone, Iowa; Isaac L., a coal miner residing in 
Boone; and Leroy G., who passed away September 15, 1881. 

After Mr. Robinson's death his widow made her home with her children 
for some time but two years ago she came to Ogden, where she bought a hand- 
some home about a block from the main street. She has won many friends in 
this city, who esteem her for her kindness of heart and high qualities of char- 
acter. She is a member of the Christian church. 



NOAH HARDING. 



Noah Harding, now living retired in Boone at the age of nearly eighty- 
eight years, is the oldest pensioner of the Iowa division of the Northwestern 
Railway. He was a faithful and trustworthy employe of that company, stand- 
ing high in the esteem of his superior officers, and he is highly respected by all 
with whom he has come in contact. He now makes his home with a daughter, 
Mrs. D. C. Crandell, at No. 515 Green street, Boone, and receives that respect 
which is due to one of his age who has done well life's work. 

;\Ir. Harding was born September 11, 1826, on a farm in Rush county, 
Indiana, his parents being Jesse and Hannah (Burkett) Harding, the former 
a native of Ohio and the latter of South Carolina, of German ancestry. His 
paternal grandfather was Fade Harding, who served for seven years under 
Washington in the war for independence. When our subject was only three 
or four years old the family, then consisting of the father, mother and three 
children, removed to Boone county, Indiana, the trip being made with two 
horses and a wagon. There the father took up a claim of one hundred and 
sixty acres twelve miles from Indianapolis and made his home thereon until 
his son Noah was eighteen years of age, when he removed to St. Joseph county, 





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NOAH lIAKDlNti AMI (ih'KAT-UKANDSON 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 173 

that state, there acquiring title to a farm of similar size, which he cultivated 
for two years. At the end of that time he sold out antl returned to Boone 
county, but subsequently went to Hamilton county, Indiana, and took up a 
claim of one hundred and sixty acres on the Miami Reserve, where he and 
his son Noah hewed the logs and erected a house. The Indians were still liv- 
ing in that locality. The father spent his last days at the home of our sub- 
ject in Boone county, where he passed away at the age of ninety-two years. 
His wife also died here, at the age of seventy. In their family were the 
following children : Noah, of this review ; Lavina, who married Joseph Emler 
and is now deceased; Elizabeth, the wife of John Doty, of Boone county; Nancy, 
who married James Larkins and died in Oklahoma; and Susan, who wedded 
John Larkins and died in the same state. 

In early life Noah Harding .learned the carpenter's trade and worked at 
this occupation successfully, building mills, houses, barns and other structures. 
In 1853 he removed to Story county, Iowa, and on his way there remained one 
night with the soldiers at Fort Dodge. He then took the trail to Boonesboro, 
looking over the land in order to select'a homestead. He settled on one hun- 
dred and sixty-four acres where Story City now stands and subsequently served 
as its second postmaster and was the first county supervisor from Lafayette 
and Howard townships. He built the first schoolhouse and the first church 
there, and also erected the first railroad bridge in hjs township. During the 
war he operated a mill between Collegetown and Ontario, and also drilled a 
company which was sent to the front. He assisted in the erection of a mill at 
Marshalltown in the spring of 1S63 and September 15, 1863, began to fell and 
prepare timber for Walker & Blair, contractors, who were building the North- 
western Railway from that point. Air. Harding and a Mr. Dye, now deceased, 
had the contract for building the bridge between Nevada and Harding creek, 
which was named in honor of our subject. Mr. Harding assisted in build- 
ing the first railroad bridge across the Des Moines river at Moingona, having 
taken over the sub-contract from Walker & Blair, and is the only survivor of 
the first i^arty which crossed that river on a locomotive, the others being W. W. 
Walker and John I. Blair. In February, 1873, he was appointed foreman of 
the Northwest'ern shops at Boone, which position he filled for twenty-nine 
years, retiring on a pension in February, 1902. He was the second man in the 
city to be retired by his company under the pension system. As a railroad man 
Mr. Harding enjoyed the full confidence of all who came in contact with him 
and proved himself trustworthy and faithful. He was just and exacting, but he 
also was kind, sympathetic and ever ready to help those who were in need 
of his services. For over twenty years he was assistant fire chief in Boone, 
and even when an old man it was a question whether there were many on the 
force who could outrun him. He was always first on duty, day or night, summer 
or winter. He saw the town developed from a small settlement of three 
houses until it is today one of the flourishing cities of the state, and not only 
did he watch the onward march of civilization, but he contributed to develop- 
ment and in many ways was instrumental in making possible the prosperous 
conditions which now prevail here. 

On March i, 1847, Mr. Harding married Miss Elizabeth Anderson, who 
died in Indiana in 1852, having borne her husband three children: Mary Ellen, 



174 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

who married D. C. Crandell, of Boone; Robert, who died in young man- 
hood, in Texas; and Ann EHza, who died in infancy. In 1853 Mr. Harding 
married Miss Nancy Anderson, a sister of his first wife and a daughter of Robert 
and Catherine (Crum) Anderson. By this union were born the following chil- 
dren: Alinerva, who married Edward Fisk, now of Boone; Christina, the wife 
of Walter Shropshire, of Omaha, Nebraska ; Daniel, who died in Oklahoma ; 
and Frances, who married Frank Saunders, of Olympia, Washington. Mrs. 
Nancy Harding died in Ontario, Iowa, and Mr. Harding now makes his home 
with his daughter at No. 515 Green street. He is revered by all who know 
him, and the city of Boone honors in him a pioneer who came to this state 
when primitive conditions yet prevailed. He is stll active in mind and body 
and takes a lively interest in all issues and questions of the day. 

Mr. Harding is a lifelong democrat and was appointed postmaster of Story 
City by President Buchanan, serving in that position for eight years. He is a 
true Christian, yet does not belong to any particular denomination, although 
he always has attended church and has given his support to various religious 
institutions. For years he was a member of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, but after the Civil war only seven members of the lodge returned and 
the local organization was given up. 



GEORGE E. SLAUGHTER. 

George E. Slaughter is engaged in the feed and cereal business at Boone, 
where, in 1912, he entered into partnership with E. B. Cordell, which partner- 
ship is still maintained. There are no spectacular phases in his life history ; 
it is -a record of a man who early recognized the value of industry and who, 
through the years of his manhood, has diligently and persistently labored for 
success. He was born in Ogle county, Illinois, July 31, 1874, and is a son of 
Joseph H. and Susan (Cooley) Slaughter, the former a native of Illinois and the 
latter of Iowa. The father made farming his life work and in the year 1877 
removed with his family to Iowa, but afterward went to Nebraska, where he 
spent two years. He then returned to this state, settling in Ames, where he 
lived for about six years, after which he returned to Illinois, where he still 
makes his home. In 1897 he was called upon to mourn the loss of his wife, who 
passed away on the loth of January of that year. In their family were six 
children: George; Mazy, the wife of James Elder, living in Coeur d'Alene, 
Idaho ; Guy, who is located at White Salmon, Washington ; Floss ; Leah, the wife 
of Roy Musselman of Ogle county, Illinois; and Harvey L., also a resident of 
Ogle county. 

When thirteen years of age, George E. Slaughter started out to make his own 
way in the world and for several years was employed at farm labor in Boone 
county. His education was such as the public schools afforded. He continued to 
engage in farming until after his mother's death, when he turned his attention to 
railroad work, becoming a fireman. Later he entered the machine shop of the 
railway company and was identified with industrial activity as a representative 
of the railroad for a number of years. On the expiration of that period he 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 175 

resumed farming, to which he devoted about six years in Boone county, bringing 
his land to a high state of cultivation. At length, however, he established his 
home in Boone and entered the feed and cereal business as a partner of E. B. 
Cordell under the firm style of Cordell & Slaughter, which relation has been 
maintained since 1912. They are accorded a liberal patronage, and public opinion 
places them among those whose business methods are above everything that 
savors of deception or underhanded dealing. 

On the 2d of March, 1898, Mr. Slaughter was united in marriage to Miss 
Hilda May Carlson, a native of Sweden, and unto them have been born two 
children: Ethel May, whose birth occurred January 6, 1899; and Lawrence 
Edward, who was born on the 22d of April, 1901. The religious faith of the 
family is that of the Baptist church. Mr. and Mrs. Slaughter are loyal to its 
teachings and are much interested in its growth and development. Fraternally 
he is connected with the Ancient Order of United Workmen and also with the 
Degree of Honor, while his political allegiance is given to the republican party, 
which he has supported since reaching adult years. His life has been a busy 
one, and gradually he has advanced step by step, his industry, close application 
and determination winning for him the success that now crowns his efforts. 



WILLIAM H. BERGER. 

William H. Berger, who carries on general agricultural pursuits, now owns 
and oi^erates a farm of one hundred and sixty acres on section 29, Amaqua 
township. The appearance of the place indicates his practical and progressive 
spirit. The fields give promise of good harvests, buildings are kept in repair 
and all work is done on time, there being no needless delay or waste of energy. 
Mr. Berger is a native of Kankakee county, Illinois. He was born December 
16, 1880, of the marriage of Gustav and Louise (Appel) Berger, who were 
natives of Germany. In early life the father and mother came to the United 
States with their respective parents, and Gustav Berger worked upon the home 
farm for his father until he had attained his majority, when he started out in 
life on his own account. He took up the occupation to which he had been 
reared and for a time cultivated rented land, but eventually saved enough money 
to enable him to purchase property. He then bought a farm in Kankakee 
county, Illinois, and has since owned and operated it. He also owns one hun- 
dred and sixty acres on section 20, Amaqua township, Boone county. 

His son, William H. Berger, whose name introduces this review, was reared 
and educated in Kankakee and La Salle counties, Illinois, and remained with 
his parents until twenty-three years of age, when he started an independent busi- 
ness career by renting land in Kankakee county. He operated that farm for two 
years and then came to Boone county, where he cultivated his father's farm 
in Amaqua township for seven years. He next purchased one hundred and 
sixty acres, constituting his present farm on section 29, Amaqua township, lying 
just across the road from his father's place. This is splendidly improved and 
was formerly the property of C. H. Last, of Beaver. Since making the pur- 
chase Mr. Berger has concentrated his energies upon its further development 



176 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

with good results. Timely spring planting and careful cultivation result in the 
production of good harvests, and for his crops he finds a ready sale on the 
market. He is also a stockholder in the Beaver Cooperative Company of Beaver. 

Mr. Berger was married in February, 1906, to Miss Rose Guhl, a daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Michael Guhl, who were natives of Germany and became pioneer 
settlers of Kankakee county, Illinois. Mr. Guhl is a mason and still follows that 
trade at Bonfield, Illinois. Mr. and Mrs. Berger became parents of two children : 
Luella F., now six years of age; and Bonita, who died September 5, 1913, at 
the age of three years. The religious faith of the parents is that of the German 
Lutheran church, while the political belief of Mr. Berger is that of the republican 
party. He is now serving his third year as trustee of his township and cooperates 
in many movements relative to the welfare and upbuilding of the community. 
He is yet a young man and in the careful conduct of his business affairs has 
already achieved a success which many an older man might well envy. 



THOMAS L. JONES. 



Since 1892 Thomas L. Jones has been identified with business interests in 
Boone and since 1896 has concentrated his efforts upon real-estate dealing. He 
has been agent for many property interests here and has negotiated many im- 
portant realty transfers. In all that he does he is actuated by a spirit of enter- 
prise that enables him to overcome difficulties and obstacles and work his way 
steadily upward to success. 

Iowa claims Mr. Jones as a native son, his birth having occurred in Story 
county, November 18, 1866, his parents being Richard and Henrietta (Ross) 
Jones, who were married on the 20th of May, i860. The father is a native of 
Wayne county, Indiana, while the mother's birth occurred in Porter county, that 
state. Richard Jones came to Iowa in 1855, settling in Johnson county, where' 
he lived for a year, and then removed to Story county, where he carried on 
general farming, bringing his fields to a high state of cultivation and developing 
a splendid property. Year after year he raised good crops and in due time had 
acquired a handsome competence, which enabled him to put aside further busi- 
ness cares, so that he is now living retired. He has made his home in Boone 
county since 1892. He was a soldier of the Civil war, responding to the 
country's call for troops on the 29th of July, 1862, when he joined Company A 
of the Twenty-third Iowa Infantry, of which he was made second corporal. 
On the 17th of May, 1863, he was wounded in the battle of Black River Bridge, 
Mississippi. In June, 18(14, 'le was made first sergeant and with that rank 
served until the close of the war, when he was mustered out July 26, 1865, at 
Harrisburg, Texas. His was a creditable military record, covering three years 
of active service, in which he participated in a number of hotly contested engage- 
ments. He was honoralily discharged at Davenport, Iowa, August 11, 1865, but 
he still maintains pleasant relations with his old army comrades through his 
membership in the Grand .\rmy of the Republic. To him and his wife were born 
four children: Thomas L. ; Edward W., whose home is in Crookston, Minne- 
sota ; James F., who studied medicine and engaged in practice in Arizona to 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 177 

the time of his death on the 12th of March, 1909: and \\'ilbur G., who is travel- 
ing auditor for the Rothschilds of Chicago. 

Thomas L. Jones was reared in the usual manner of farm lads who spend 
their time and youth in the middle west. From the time of early spring planting 
he would assist in the work of the fields and was thus engaged until after crops 
were harvested in the autumn. The winter seasons were devoted to the acquire- 
ment of an education and in 1890 he took up the profession of school teaching, 
being then a young man of twenty-four years. He proved capable in imparting 
readily and clearly to others the knowledge that he had acquired, and the schools 
under his control made substantial progress. The summer seasons were devoted 
to farm work. In 1892 he removed to Boone and in 1893 he established a music 
store, which he conducted successfully until 1896. He then turned his attention 
to the real-estate and loan business, handling property both for himself and 
others and making loans on farm lands. He has become widely and favorably 
known in this connection and he is thoroughly informed concerning realty values 
and knows exactly the property that is upon the market. 

On the 27th of April, i8go, Mr. Jones was united in marriage to Miss Bertha 
A. Jones, a native of Indiana, and to them have been born three children ; 
Bernice R., whose natal day was March 11, 1891 ; Ethel L., born May 29, 1892: 
and Edith L., born on the 30th of March, 1894. The family occupies an enviable 
position in the social circles of the city, the hospitality of the best homes being 
freely accorded all of the representatives of the Jones household. The religious 
faith of the family is that of the Christian church, and Mr. Jones also holds 
membership in the Royal Arcanum and the Woodmen of the World. His political 
support is given the democratic party and upon its ticket he has been elected to 
several offices. He served for four years as city assessor, has also been city 
clerk and for three years was a member of the city council, during which period 
he exercised his official prerogatives in support of many progressive public move- 
ments and needed reforms and improvements. He has at all times been loyal to 
the best interests of the community, and his worth both as a man and citizen is 
widely recognized. 



MRS. SARAH ADELLA KOUHNS. 

The highest esteem and greatest respect is given on all sides to Mrs. Sarah 
Adella Kouhns, who for many years has been an honored resident of Ogden. 
Iowa. Mrs. Kouhns was born in Ohio in September, 1852, a daughter of William 
and Lucinda (Robinson) Hassenpflug, natives of Pennsylvania. The father was 
a carriage maker by trade and at an early day went to Ohio, where he engaged in 
farming, operating land for the remainder of his life in that state. He died 
in i860, being survived by his widow until 1904. 

Sarah A. Hassenpflug was reared and educated in Ohio, where she subse- 
quently turned her knowledge to good account by teaching school for some time. 
In 1868 she married A. Kouhns, now deceased, and since 1871 she has lived in 
Boone county. For the past fifteen years she has been a resident of Ogden. 
Mrs. Kouhns had five children : Laura, who married A. E. Yarges, who farms 



178 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

in Nebraska ; Lucy, the wife of Al. Treloar, a farmer in Boone county ; Ruben, 
who follows the same line of occupation in this county ; Margaret, who died in 
1904 ; and Alontie, who died in infancy. 

Mr. Kouhns was engaged in agricultural pursuits but his widow has sold the 
farm and has her money invested in other profitable ventures. She owns a 
handsome home in Ogden, where she has many friends. Mrs. Kouhns gives her 
adherence to the Baptist church, in the work of which she takes a deep and help- 
ful interest. 



OSCAR OAKLEAF. 



Oscar Oakleaf, whose record furnishes an excellent illustration of the power 
of industry and perseverance in the attainment of success, came to America 
in early inanhood and has worked his way steadily upward to a position of influ- 
ence and affluence in his community, being now the president of the Madrid 
State Bank, one of the solid financial institutions of Iowa. H'is birth occurred 
in Sweden in 1858, his parents being J. P. and Annie (Peterson) Oakleaf, 
who spent their entire lives in that country. Their children were nine in num- 
ber, as follows : three who died in infancy ; Oscar, of this review ; Carl, still 
residing in Sweden; Gust, who makes his home in Minnesota; Mrs. Emma 
Swanson, of Madrid; Mrs. Hannah Peterson, also living in Madrid; and Mrs. 
Martha Hallblad, who resides in Minnesota. All were born in Sweden. 

Oscar Oakleaf spent the first twenty-one years of his life in the land of his 
nativity and in 1879 crossed the Atlantic to the United States, locating at Mar- 
shalltown, Marshall county, Iowa, where he secured employment as a farm 
laborer. In 1881 he came to what is now Madrid and entered the service of 
William Johnson as a clerk, remaining in his employ for nine years and nine 
months. On the expiration of that period, in 1891, he secured a position with 
the A. T. Davis Milling Company of Madrid and continued with the concern 
for about a year, later becoming financially interested in the same. He also 
became interested in the Citizens State Bank of Madrid, which was located on 
the present site of the Madrid State Bank. In that institution he rose steadily 
from one position to the next highest, serving successively as bookkeeper, assis- 
tant cashier, cashier, and president, and proving his ability and worth in each 
capacity. The Madrid State Bank conducts a general banking business and 
enjoys a reputation as one of the safe and conservative financial institutions of 
Iowa. It has a capital of twenty-five thousand dollars and a surplus of twenty- 
five thousand dollars — a fact which bespeaks the able management and care- 
ful direction of its chief executive officer. The bank is modernly equipped, 
has safety deposit boxes and is the depository for the United States postal sav- 
ings funds. Mr. Oakleaf is one of the heaviest stockholders of the Madrid 
State Bank, owns an attractive home in Madrid, and also has a valuable and 
modernly improved farm of one hundred and thirty-seven acres in Douglas 
township. 

In 1895 Mr. Oakleaf was united in marriage to Miss Clara Anderson, who 
was born in Madrid in 1864, her parents being Peter and Melinda Anderson, 



I 




OSCAR OAKLEAP 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 181 

both of whom are deceased. They were among the early settlers of Boone 
county and it was here that Mrs. Oakleaf grew to womanhood and attended 
the public schools. By her marriage she has become the mother of two chil- 
dren: A. Ruben, who was born July 19, 1897, and is now a high school stu- 
dent in Madrid; and Gladys H., who was born March 26, 1899, and also attends 
school in Madrid. Both are natives of that city. 

In his political views Mr. Oakleaf is a stanch republican and for the past 
fifteen years has ably served as school treasurer of Madrid. Both he and his 
wife are devoted and consistent members of the Swedish Lutheran church in 
Madrid. The period of his residence in this county covers a third of a century, 
and he enjoys an extensive acquaintance within its borders. Coming to the 
new world in the hope of bettering his financial condition, he found the oppor- 
tunities which he sought and in their wise utilization has won both prosperity 
and friendly respect. 



AXEL E. SKORTMAN. 

Axel E. Skortman has been a resident of Madrid for nearly a half century 
and throughout practically his entire life. He is successfully engaged in busi- 
ness as a merchant, owning a half interest in a stock of implements. His birth 
occurred in Sweden on the 5th of November, 1864, his parents being August 
and Carolina (Anderson) Skortman, who were likewise natives of that country, 
the former born in 1838 and the latter ^n 1842. In the summer of 1865 the 
family crossed the Atlantic to the United States and settled at Madrid, Boone 
county, Iowa, where August Skortman worked at the tailor's trade for three 
years. On the expiration of that period he turned his attention to general agri- 
cultural pursuits in Douglas township and in 1874 took up his abode on a farm 
in section 24, Garden township, where he spent the remainder of his life, passing 
away in 1902. He paid but four dollars per acre for his first farm and the 
land has since steadily increased in value until it is now worth two hundred 
dollars an acre. In his demise the community lost one of its substantial, esteemed 
and representative citizens. His widow, who still survives, now makes her home 
in Slater, Story county, this state. 

They were the parents of ten children, including the following named : 
Axel E., of this review; Mrs. Anna Cross, who is a resident of Sac City, Iowa; 
Charles, living in Slater, Iowa ; Emil, who makes his home in Minnesota ; Mrs. 
Nellie Swanson, of Story county, Iowa ; Minnie, who is married and resides in 
Garden township, this county; Mrs. Selma Peterson, also of Garden township; 
and Edward, who passed away at the age of twenty-one years. All were born 
in Boone county, Iowa, with the exception of our subject, and all were reared 
and educated here, attending the early schools of the county. 

Axel E. Skortman grew to manhood in Madrid and, as above stated, has 
always remained a resident of the town. Success has attended his undertakings 
in the business world until he is now numbered among the prosperous and repre- 
sentative citizens of his community, owning a valuable and well improved farm 
of one hundred and sixty acres in Madison township, Polk county, and also a 



182 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

half interest in a stock of implements in Madrid. He likewise owns an attractive 
and well appointed home in Madrid and is one of the best liked and most 
enterprising residents of the town. 

On the 7th of March, 1888, Mr. Skortman was united in marriage to Miss 
Dora Cross, who was born in Madison township, Polk county, Iowa, on the 
5th of May, 1868, her parents being Homer and Samantha (Scheidler) Cross, 
natives of Ohio and Indiana respectively. The took up their abode in Garden 
township on coming to this county and are now residents of Madrid. Their 
two daughters are as follows : Mrs. Dora Skortman, who grew to womanhood 
in this country and has always remained a resident here; and Mrs. Ina Ed- 
wards, a native of Garden township, this county, who now resides in Des 
Moines, Iowa. Our subject and his wife have one daughter, Mrs. Violet 
Kinsey, who was born in Madison township, Boone county, Iowa, on the i5lh 
of March, 1892, and grew to womanhood in Polk county. She pursued a high- 
school course in Madrid and was married in that town. 

Mr. Skortman is a republican in politics and has done valuable service as a 
member of the town council of Madrid. His religious faith is indicated by his 
membership in the Christian church of Madrid, to which his wife also belongs. 
and fraternally he is identified with the Masons, belonging to Star Lodge, No. 
115, A. F. & A. M., of Madrid. He is likewise connected with the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows and the Knights of Pythias of Madrid and the Yeomen. 
By nature he is social and genial and he has many attractive qualities which 
have won him a circle of warm friends. 



VIRGIL O. HOLCOMB. 

Virgil O. Holcomb is actively engaged in the real-estate and insurance busi- 
ness in Boone and has won a gratifying measure of success in this connection. 
His birth occurred in Trumbull county, Ohio, on the 8th of March, 1866, his par- 
ents being Charles and Louisa (Wilbur) Holcomb, both of whom were natives 
of Connecticut. In 1869 the family home was established in Boone county, 
Iowa, the father here devoting his attention to general agricultural pursuits 
throughout his active business career. He now resides in the town of Boone and 
is well known and esteemed throughout the community which has been his 
home for a period of forty-five years. The demise of his wife occurred in 
.-\ugust, 1909. They had two children: Virgil O.. of this review; and Frank 
who is deceased. 

Virgil O. Holcomb supplemented his preliminary education by a high-school 
course and also attended Highland Park College of Des Moines. Returning 
to the home farm, he was busily engaged in agricultural pursuits during the 
summer seasons, while in the winter months he followed the profession of 
teaching. He was chosen a member of the board of supervisors and ably served 
in that capacity for six years, on the expiration of which period he embarked 
in the real-estate and insurance business at Boone, with which he has been con- 
tinuously identified to the present time. He has kept well informed concern- 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 183 

ing property values and has therefore been enabled to negotiate important realty 
transfers beneficial alike to his clients and to himself. 

On the 2d of August, 1892, Mr. Holcomb was joined in wedlock to Miss 
Mary Wylie, a native of Boone county, by whom he has three children, namely, 
Caroline J., Curtis F. and Richard Franklin. In politics Mr. Holcomb is inde- 
pendent, supporting men and measures rather than party. Fraternally he is 
identified with the Ancient Order of United Workmen, and his religious faith 
is that of the Methodist church. In civic as well as business affairs Mr. Holcomb 
is enterprising and progressive and is always ready to accord his support and 
cooperation to every movement the adoption of which he feels will redound to 
the benefit of the majority. He has resided within the borders of Boone county 
since three years of age and enjoys a very extensive and favorable acquaintance 
here. 



WILLARD FOSTER. 



Willard Foster may truly be called a self-made man, for the success which 
has come to him has been won entirely through his own efforts. He started out 
to make his way in the world when a lad of but thirteen years and since that 
time has led a busy life, his growing effectiveness and usefulness in business 
circles finding tangible evidence in his property holdings, consisting of an attract- 
ive home and a large feed and coal yard. He was born in Story county, Novem- 
ber 4, 1856, and is a son of John R. and Elizabeth (Jackson) Foster, both of 
whom were natives of Indiana. They came to Iowa in 1852, taking up their 
abode in Story county, where the father followed farming until i860. Follow- 
ing the outbreak of the Civil war he immediately responded to the country's 
call for troops, feeling this to be his paramount duty. With his command he 
went to the front and was among those who laid down their lives on the altar 
of their country, his death occurring while he was serving as a soldier. His wife 
had previously passed away and thus their three children were orphaned. The 
daughter, Suzanna, is now the wife C. P. Meredith, a resident of Clark Fork, 
Idaho. The elder son is Willard, and the youngest of the family was Thomas, 
who died in childhood. 

When his father went to the army Willard Foster went to live with his 
grandparents, with whom he remained through much of the period of his youth. 
He continued with them through winter seasons, while in the summer months he 
earned his own living by working at farm labor from the age of thirteen years. 
When crops were harvested in the late autumn he would return to the home 
of his grandfather and spend the winter season in attending school. It will 
thus be seen that he had no special advantages or opportunities at the outset 
of his career, being forced to enter so early upon the task of earning a livelihood. 
When twenty-one years of age he was married and located upon a farm in 
Boone county. After renting land for about three years, during which time 
he lived most economically, he invested his earnings in an eighty acre tract. 
After cultivating that property for a time he sold out and bought one hundred 
acres. Later he rented his farm and removed to Boone, where he became an 



184 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

employe in the shops of the Northwestern Railroad Company, there spending 
three years. He was afterward in the street car service for ten years and later 
was elected township constable, to which position he was reelected at the close 
of his first term. Ere he retired from that position he was elected sheriff of the 
county and filled the office most acceptably for five years, discharging his duties 
without fear or favor. He next purchased a feed and coal business on Tenth 
street and has thus been identified with commercial interests in the city to the 
present time. Evidence of his success is seen in his fine home, which is one 
of the modern residences of Boone, situated at the corner of Sixth and Harri- 
son streets. It is attractively furnished and, moreover, is the abode of a warm- 
hearted hospitality, which makes it the center of a cultured society circle. 

On the 15th of July, 1877, Mr. Foster was united in marriage to Miss Mary 
A. Moyer, and unto them has been born a daughter, Bertha, who is now the 
wife of W. H. McLain, of Emmetsburg, Iowa. The religious faith of Mr. 
and Mrs. Foster is that of the Methodist Episcopal church, and his fraternal 
i-elations are with the Ancient Order of United Workmen. He votes with the 
republican party, and it was upon this ticket that he was elected to office. He 
has never been remiss in the duties of citizenship, while in business he has never 
failed to show that enterprising spirit and unfaltering determination which 
overcome obstacles and advance steadily toward success. He certainly deserves 
much credit for what he has accomplished, inasmuch as he started out for him- 
self at a very early age and has been dependent entirely upon his own resources 
from that time to the present. 



L. D. NORRIS. 



The late L. D. Norris was one of the best known and most beloved citizens 
of Madrid and Boone counties. He was born in Brown township. \'inton 
county, Ohio, on February 7, 1847, and died in South Dakota, February 27, 
1909, at the age of sixty-two years. His parents were Daniel Johnson and 
Martha (Coe) Norris, the former born in New Hampshire, March 6, 1816, and 
the latter in Connecticut in 1818. The father died in Arkansas in 1896 and the 
mother in Nebraska in 1881. They were among the pioneers of Iowa, having 
come overland in 1854. They first located at Salem in Henry county. The 
father was a school teacher in that place and for a number of years followed 
the profession in Iowa. From Henry county the family removed to Nevada, 
Iowa, when this territory was as yet all prairie and there were but a few log 
cabins in Nevada. Thence Mr. and Mrs. Norris and family went to Monroe, 
Jasper county, where they remained for two winters during the war, in 1862 
and 1863, and from there they made their way to Dallas county, coming in 
1864 to Boone county. Members of the family have made their home in this 
county since. Mr. and Mrs. Norris, Sr., had four sons and one daughter. The 
latter was Mrs. C. H. Hayes, who died in Arkansas. The sons were: L. D., 
of this review; Jacob Chester, born February i, 1851, who resides in Madrid; 
H. R., who lives in Oakwood, Oklahoma; and Johnson, who died in infancy. 
The three eldest children were born in Vinton county, Ohio, H. R. Norris in 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 185 

Salem, Iowa, and the youngest in Nevada, this state. All were reared and 
educated in Iowa. 

L. D. Norris of this review married in Boone county, March 13, 1870, Miss 
Elizabeth Hubby, who was born m Cass township, Jones county, Iowa, May 
24, 1852. Her parents settled there in 1851, entering land. In 1867 the Hubby 
family came to Boone county, and here her father resided until his death. Her 
parents were John and Hannah (Jones) Hubby, natives of Canada, the former 
having been born in the Dominion in 1800. He died near Madrid in 1879, hav- 
ing survived his wife but a short time, the latter passing away September 4, 
1878. To Mr. and Mrs. Hubby were born thirteen children, of whom seven are 
living: Mrs. Lois Kelley-McCapes, residing in California; John, of Lynch, 
Nebraska; Mrs. Helen Wagner, of Des Moines; Mrs. Elizabeth Norris; Mrs. 
Harriett Williams, of Boone county ; Mrs. Clara Huffman, of Douglas town- 
ship ; and George, a resident of Boone county. 

Mr. and Mrs. Norris became the parents of eight children, all of whom are 
living. They are: Mrs. Lillian Mills, born January 7. 1871, of Madrid; Mrs. 
Hannah Johnson, born December i, 1872, of Des Moines; Edward C, born 
February 18, 1875, of Minnesota; George H., whose birth occurred March 12, 
1877, and who is a resident of South Dakota; Mrs. Dollie Stinehouse, born July 
31, 1879, and residing in Madrid, Iowa; Edith, born in 1881, who is teaching 
school in Madrid; Mrs. Bessie Harleen, born May 22, 1884, residing near 
Madrid ; and Duroc, born February 5, 1888, who makes his home with his 
mother. All these children were reared in Madrid and received their education 
in the public schools of that city. The daughters have all followed the pro- 
fession of teaching and the second son was also engaged along that line. 

Mr. Morris was a republican but he never entered public life, although 
he was deeply interested in the welfare of his nation and the progress of his 
locality. He was a member of the Christian church of Madrid, to which the widow 
yet belongs. All members of the family with the exception of one brother 
own claims in South Dakota and secured the same by locating on them and im- 
proving them. Mr. Norris stood high in the estimation of his fellowmen, who 
appreciated in him a man of character and one who was always ready to extend 
a helping hand to those in need. His memory is venerated by all who knew him. 
Not only did he leave his family a competence but an honored name — a name 
which stood for truthfulness in friendship, loyalty in citizenship and the faithful 
discharge of all obligations of life. 



WILLIAM H. AIRHART. 

William H. Airhart is well known in Boone as proprietor of The Regal, 
which is recognized to be the best equipped billiard parlor in the state of Iowa. 
His birth occurred in Ogle county, Illinois, on the i6th of August, 1859, his 
parents being David and Jane (Taylor) Airhart, both of whom were natives 
of Pennsylvania. They came to Iowa in 1865, locating in Story county, where 
the father devoted his attention to general agricultural pursuits. In 1896 he 
came to Boone and here both Mr. and Mrs. David .'\irhart spent the remainder 



186 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

of tncir lives in honorable retirement. Their children were as follows: Rose: 
Clara and Andrew, both of whom are deceased: William H., of this review; 
George, a resident of Whittemore, Iowa ; Fred, living in Des Moines ; Vione, 
the wife of R. Ballard, of Story county, this state ; Julia, who is the wife of 
William Bell of Boone county; Edward, residing in Boone; and Cora. 

When twenty years of age William H. Airhart began farming in Story 
county, being thus actively engaged until March, 1887, when he came to Boone. 
Here he entered the train service of the Chicago & Northwestern Railway, con- 
tinuing with that corporation for a period of about fifteen years. In 1901 he 
embarked in the feed and coal business but at the end of about three years again 
turned his attention to agricultural pursuits, following farming for five years. 
Subsequently he conducted a coal and feed store in Boone for another period 
of three years and then spent a year in California. Returning to Boone, he 
opened a select billiard parlor known as The Regal, which has been pronounced 
by experts to be the best equipped parlor of its kind in the state. 

Mr. Airhart has been twice married. On the 8th of August, 1880, he wedded 
Miss Olive Corey, by whom he had three children, namely : Edward, who is 
a resident of Boone county ; and Harry and Maude, both deceased. The wife 
and mother was called to her final rest in 1896 and in September, 1898, Mr. 
Airhart was again married, his second union being with Miss Carrie Low, a 
native of Pennsylvania. 

Mr. Airhart is a socialist in his political views and has served as a member 
of the city council. His religious faith is that of the Christian church, while 
fraternally he is identified with the Improved Order of Redmen. He is widely 
recognized as a substantial and representative citizen of Boone county and is 
popular by reason of his genial and social qualities which, combined with his 
genuine personal worth, have won him the high regard of all with whom he has 
come in contact. 



WILHELM DOERDER. 

For over four years Wilhelm Doerder has lived retired in Boone after a suc- 
cessful agricultural career in Jackson township. He resides in a handsome home 
at No. 1818 Boone street, which is his property and where he is surrounded by 
the comforts of life, to which he is entitled because of his many years of arduous 
and successful labor. He was born in the province of Silesia, Germany, April 
2, 1849, a'lfl is a son of Karl and Ernestina (Sanger) Doerder, natives of that 
province. The father was a cloth weaver and died in his native land about 1900, 
at the age of sixty-seven years. His wife attained the age of sixty-four. In 
their family were ten children, eight of whom died during their youth, the only 
living sister of our subject being Mrs. Hannah Bittner, who resides in Germany. 

Wilhelm Doerder received his education in Silesia, laying aside his text- 
books when about fourteen years of age. He then worked for farmers living 
in his neighborhood and also found employment in the coal mines. Being im- 
pressed with the opportunities awaiting a young man in the new world, he came 
to the United States in 1876, sailing from Rotterdam to London and thence 



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MR. AND MRS. WILHELM DOEEDER 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 189 

traveling to Liverpool, where he took the steamship Abyssinia to New York. 
On a later trip this boat went to the bottom of the ocean. When Mr. Doerder 
began his voyage to America he had little more than the necessary traveling 
expenses. After arriving in New York he made his way to Nebraska, settling 
in Lancaster coimty. where there was a friend living from the old country. The 
first summer he engaged in farm work, remaining with the friend during the 
winter, and in the spring joined a party of gold seekers who were bound for 
the Black Hills of South Dakota. He with five other men walked all the way 
from Nebraska to the Black Hills, and many times they awoke in the morning 
to find themselves covered with snow. Mr. Doerder had no blankets and traded 
a knife to an Indian for a buffalo robe. There he remained only one month, 
at the end of which time he returned east, walking the whole distance to Boone 
county, where he worked in the Canfield coal mine in Logan. He then was 
employed for a, few months in the Herman Brewery and subsequently became 
a section hand on the Northwestern Railroad. Toward the end of the summer 
he traveled over the country with one Henry Bowman, selling goods. He then 
worked in Jackson township on the farm of Mrs. John Adix, a widow, whom he 
married in 1879. Mr. Doerder successfully cultivated this farm until he retired 
four years ago, moving to Boone on November 10, 1909. He always followed 
the most modern methods and became prosperous in his farming pursuits. 

On April 26, 1879, Mr. Doerder married Mrs. John Adix, who before her 
marriage was Miss Hannah Goetsch. She was born in Pomerania, Germany, 
and died Aiiril fi, 1914, at the age of seventy-six years. She Jjore her husband 
the following children : Albert, who is in charge of the hom'e farm in Jack- 
son township and who married Rosie Linniger, by whom he has one son, Law- 
rence ; and Paulina, who married Lee Koepenhaver, residing near Jordon. By 
her first marriage Mrs. Doerder had five children : Charles, of Jackson town- 
ship ; William, also a resident of that township ; John, who makes his home in 
Harrison township ; Kate, who married John Murken, of Harrison township ; 
and Ida, the wife of Joseph F. Gutt of lioone. Mr. Doerder enjoys the full con- 
fidence of all those who know him and is well entitled to the respect and esteem 
which he receives on all sides because of his manly qualities of character and 
the success which he has achieved in life. 



CHARLES E. ROGERS. 

Charles E. Rogers, senior member of the firm of Rogers & Dodge of Boone, 
is profitably engaged in the auto repair and general machinery business and 
enjoys a reputation as one of the most substantial business men of the city. He 
was born January 6, 1875, at Fort Dodge, Cooper township, Webster county, 
Iowa, his parents being George W. and Emma R. (Wood) Rogers. The paternal 
grandfather, Daniel Rogers, was born in England, near the Wales line, and was 
a farmer by occupation. He came to the United States with his wife and three 
children, the family landing in New York, whence they went to Baltimore, making 
their home near that city for about ten years. They subsequently located on a 
farm near Wheeling, West Virginia, where the grandfather remained until his 



190 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

death in 1896, at the age of ninety-three years. His wife, Elizabeth Rogers, 
attained the remarkable age of one hundred and three years, passing away at the 
home of her son John in Minneapolis, Minnesota. In their family were the fol- 
lowing children: Mary, who married John Hirschberger and resides at Elk 
Garden, West \'irginia, at the age of eighty-three ; George W., the father of 
our subject; Sarah, who married John Glidden and lives at Cherokee, Iowa, 
at the age of seventy-one ; Elizabeth, who died at the age of eighteen years ; 
James, of Portland, Oregon, who married Lucy Johnson ; John, of Minneapolis, 
Minnesota; Benjamin, of Pipeston, Mfnnesota; David, of Minneapolis; and 
Lucy, who married John Bailey, their residence being Elk Gardens, West 
Virginia. 

George W. Rogers, who was born in England in 1839, came with his parents 
to the United States when ten years old. He attended the common schools of 
his native country and America, but his educational advantages were limited by 
circumstances and the conditions of the time. He earned his first wages as a 
driver of a supply team in Wheeling, West X'irginia, delivering goods to points 
within a radius of one hundred and fifty to two hundred miles from that city. 
In April, 1861, he enlisted as a private in Company H. Eleventh West \'irginia 
Volunteer Heavy Artillery, and served until the close of the war, being veteran- 
ized after eighteen months. He held the rank of chief gunner at the time of his 
discharge and after the war was over became a bridge builder for the Pennsyl- 
vania Railroad Company. In 1866 he removed to Fort Dodge, Iowa, home- 
steading one hundred and sixty acres in Cooper township and proving up his 
claim. However, he never developed the land but for two years engaged in 
the cigar business at Fort Dodge. He then turned his attention to the coal busi- 
ness there until 1907, but now lives retired at Marshalltown, Iowa. The father 
has been a lifelong republican, stanchly upholding the principles of that party. 
Although prominent in his community, he has never sought office, preferring 
to work for the good of his fellowmen as a private citizen. Both he and his 
wife attend the Methodist Episcopal church. They had the following children: 
Qiarles E., of this review ; Gertrude, who died at the age of nine years ; Nettie,. 
■ who was three years old when she passed away ; Henry, who died in infancy ; 
William G., a resident of Superior. Wisconsin, who married Mary Dyson ; 
Ellen C, who married Charles Wolcott and resides in New Hampshire : and 
Edith I., the wife of Melvin Wooley, of Ceylon, Minnesota. 

Charles E. Rogers was educated in the schools of Fort Dodge, which he 
attended until sixteen years of age. He entered upon his business career in 
the employ of the Northwestern Railway, remaining with that company for some 
time. He was then for six months a seaman on the Great Lakes, being subse- 
quently promoted to the position of mate on the sailing vessel Driver, a schooner 
going out of Sheboygan, Wisconsin. After this he was connected with a machine 
shop in Sheboygan and subsequently held similar positions in Des Moines, various 
places in Minnesota and in other parts of the country. In September. 1912, he 
became independent by opening his present repair shop as a member of the 
firm of Rogers & Dodge. He shortly after bought out his partner but again be- 
came associated with Mr. Dodge in February. 1914. They do a general repair 
business and enjoy a high reputation for excellent workmanship. Moreover, 
both are business men of no mean qualifications and enjoy the confidence and 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 191 

respect of all those who have transactions with them. Good work at fair prices 
has been their motto and they have gained a large patronage by adhering to this 
policy. 

On June 21, 1905, Mr. Rogers married Miss Ellen Taylor of Des Moines, 
a daughter of William and Elizabeth (Kavanaugh) Taylor. Mr. and Mrs. Rogers 
have two sons : Gilbert T., born October 26, 1907 ; and William Charles, July 
16, 1910. The parents are members of the Presbyterian church and Mr. 
Rogers gives his adherence to the republican party. He is interested in all 
movements undertaken to promote the growth of the city and readily gives 
his support toward material and moral advancement. Although he has not lived 
in Boone many years, he has already made many friends who esteem him as 
an earnest, conscientious and progressive business man and citizen. 



MATHIAS I. REILLY. 



One of the important business enterprises of Boone is that which is incor- 
porated and conducted under the name of the Leader Grocery & Market Com- 
pany, in which Mathias J. Reilly is the senior partner. His name has long been 
a familiar one in the trade circles of the city and stands as a synonym for pro- 
gressive methods, his establishment largely setting the standard for activity in 
other business houses of Boone. 

Mr. Reilly was born in Utica, New York, April 5, 1859, and is a son of 
Lawrence and Bridget Reilly, both of whom were natives of Ireland. It was in 
the year 1848 that the father bade adieu to friends and native land and sailed 
for the new world. He established his home in Utica, New York, where he 
was well known as a railroad man for a number of years. In 1869 he arrived 
in Iowa and for a year thereafter engaged in railroading. Subsequently he 
turned his attention to farming, which he followed for several years, being thus 
engaged to the time of his death, which occurred in 1887. His wife survived 
him for many years and passed away on the 19th of March, 1905. 

Mathias J. Reilly was reared on the old home farm and at the age of twenty- 
one was still upon his father's place in Harrison township. Upon the solicita- 
tion of Mr. Schroeder, however, he left the farm and entered the Schroeder 
meat market at Boone. This was about 1880. He remained in that employ for 
three years and in 1883 embarked in business on his own account as proprietor 
of a meat market, in which he had L. D. Sparks as a partner, their interests 
being conducted under the firm name of Sparks & Reilly. At length Mr. Reilly 
sold out to Mr. Sparks and entered the T. P. Rogers grocery, with which he con- 
tinued for about a year. He next sold out and later entered into partnership 
with A. S. Tarrow. In 1891. however, he purchased the business of his partner 
and for about twenty-one years was alone, but in January, 1912, he incorporated 
the business under the name of the Leader Grocery & Market Company. In 
this undertaking he is associated with .Severt Teasdahl, Charles Rafferty, Cleo 
Elliott, Ed Ray and his daughter Marie. The business is now an extensive one 
and is growing year by year. A large and well selected line of staple and fancy 



192 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

groceries is carried, and equal excellence is maintained in the market. This 
insures a liberal patronage, and the success of the house is very gratifying. 

In January, 1S84, Mr. Reilly was united in marriage to Miss Mary Hamilton, 
a native of Clinton county, Iowa, and unto them have been bom five children ; 
Grace; Leo, who died in childhood; Marie; Leonard; and John. The relig- 
ious faith of the family is that of the Catholic church, to which Mr. Reilly loyally 
adheres. He belongs to the Knights of Columbus and also holds membership 
with the Yeomen, the Workmen and the Woodmen. His political support is 
given the republican party and for four years he served as a member of the city 
council. Diligence and determination have been among his salient characteristics 
and have been manifest with equal result in behalf of the general welfare and in 
advancing his individual success. 



L. W. ADIX. 



For many years L. W. Adix successfully followed farming in Yell town- 
ship, Boone county, but he now lives retired in the city of Boone in the enjoy- 
ment of a competency which he has well earned. He was born in Mecklenburg- 
Schwerin, Germany, March 4, 1833, and is now in the eighty-second year of 
his age. He is a son of John Jacob and Friedericka Elizabeth (Schmidt) Adix, 
both natives of Mecklenburg. The father was a wagonmaker by trade and 
established himself independently in that line of business. He died in 1842, at 
the age of forty-five years, his widow surviving him until her death, which 
occurred when she was seventy-two years of age. Of their children two died 
in infancy, the others being: Sophia, who married in Germany and subse- 
quently came to the United States, locating in Austin county, Texas, where 
she passed away; Mary, who married Gottlieb Days, residing in Dane county, 
Wisconsin ; Dora, who married Daniel Fitzgerald, of Boone, both having passed 
away ; L. W., of this review ; and Frank, who resided in Boone county for many 
years and died here. 

L. W. Adix was but nine years of age when his father died. He attended 
school until fourteen and then learned the trade of marble worker in Mecklen- 
burg. At the father's death the mother was left with six children and 
our subject greatly assisted her in rearing the family. In 1854 they decided to 
emigrate to America and sailed from Hamburg, Germany, to New York on a 
sailing vessel, the voyage taking nine weeks. They at first lived in Milwaukee, 
Wisconsin, for a short time and then removed to Madison, that state, Mr. Adix 
turning his hand to any honest labor which he could find to do. In October, 
1865, the family arrived in Boone. Iowa, where he established himself as a 
builder and contractor of houses, engaging in that business for about three years. 
He then married and in 1869 bought a farm in Yell township, comprising eighty 
acres. He set himself immediately to the work of placing this land under cul- 
tivation and so prospered in his afi'airs that he subsequently added one tract of 
forty and another of eighty acres to his holdings. There he farmed for thirty 
years, bringing his fields to a high state of productivity and erecting substan- 
tial and modern buildings. He was a leader in agricultural pursuits there and 



V. 




HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 195 

largely contributed toward the development of his section. In 1900 he retired 
from active life and removed to Boone to enjoy a well earned competency. 

In Madison, Wisconsin, Mr. Adix married Miss Fredericka Krogman, who 
was born in Mecklenburg-Schwerin, Germany, November 13, 1841. She was 
thirteen years of age when she came with her parents to the United States and 
grew to womanhood in Madison. Her father, Louis Krogman, was a shepherd 
in Germany, where he married Louisa Schmidt. He was a man well along in 
years when he emigrated to America and his death occurred in Madison, Wis- 
consin. He and his wife had the following children: Minnie, who married 
Levi Carp and died in Madison; Christian, who was also married and died 
near that city; and Mrs. Adix. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Adix are: 
Bertha, the widow of William Wolf, of Yell township; Louis, who married 
Rosetta Phipps and resides near Ogden ; Lizzie, the wife of Marion McCoskey, 
of Marietta, Minnesota; Minnie, the wife of Joseph Wagner, of Marietta; Frank, 
of Boone, who married Lizzie Reinhart ; and Albert, who married Katrina 
Kampf and resides in Boone. 

Mr. and Mrs. Adix are both devout members of the Lutheran church. 
Politically the former has always supi)orted the democratic party but has never 
aspired to public office. He and his wife reside in a handsome home at No. 151 1 
Boone street, Boone, and there they often entertain their many friends. Both 
are highly esteemed by all who know them and are venerated. asi early pioneers 
who came to Iowa when civilization was yet in its infancy and both contributed 
largely toward that development by which the present prosperous conditions 
have become a realitv. 



WILLIAM S. GRAY. 



William S. Gray enjoys an extensive patronage as a hardware merchant of 
Ogden and has won an enviable reputation as a straightforwawl and reliable 
business man. His birth occurred in Tipton, Cedar county, Iowa, on the 21st 
of September, 1875, his parents being Alex and Ann (Shearer) Gray, both of 
whom were natives of Scotland. They emigrated to the United States in the 
'40s. Alex Gray, who was a miller by trade, followed that occupation for some 
time or until he removed to Johnson county, Iowa, where he devoted his attention 
to agricultural pursuits for nine years. In 1893 ^^ came to Boone county, this 
state, and purchased a tract of land which he cultivated during the remainder of 
his life. In his demise, which occurred on the i6th of December, 1904, the 
community lost one of its substantial and esteemed citizens. His widow sur- 
vives. 

William S. Gray was reared and educated in Johnson and Boone counties 
of Iowa, remaining under the parental roof until he had attained his majority. 
He then pursued a course of study in a commercial college of Omaha and was 
subsequently employed as a traveling salesman for five years. On the expira- 
tion of that period he went to Oklahoma and for three years carried on business 
as a plumber of Enid. The next two years were spent as a traveling salesman 
and then he came to Ogden, Iowa, here embarking in the hardware business in 



196 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

partnership with A. G. Howe. Subsequently he purchased his partner's interest 
and has since continued in business alone. He carries a large stock of shelf 
and heavy hardware and is accorded a liberal and well merited patronage. He 
owns the double-store building of two stories in which the business is con- 
ducted and is widely recognized as one of tlie prosperous, enterprising and repre- 
sentative merchants of the county. 

On the 1st of June, 1912, Mr. Gray was united in marriage to Miss Ailene 
Famham, a daughter of N. H. and Eleanor (Gardner) Farnham, who were 
pioneer settlers of Wisconsin. The father now makes his home in Idaho, but the 
mother passed away in 1906. Mr. and Mrs. Gray have one child. Elaine F., who 
is a year old. 



GEORGE H. LAWTON. 

George H. Lawton has lived in Boone county for fifty-eight years and is the 
owner of a well improved farm of eighty acres on section 20, Yell township. 
His birth occurred in Elizabethtown, Ohio, on the loth of September, 1852, 
his parents being Alfred and Jane ( Stewart) Lawton, who were natives of 
New York and Ohio respectively. The father, a blacksmith by trade, con- 
ducted a shop in Ohio until 1856 and then, because of impaired health, came 
west to Boone county, Iowa, purchasing a farm in Marcy township. He im- 
proved the property and began its operation, also conducting a blacksmith shop 
on the farm for six years. On the expiration of that period he disposed of the 
place and bought one hundred and tw^enty acres of land in Yell township, part 
of which is now In possession of our subject. He likewise improved the latter 
tract and was busily engaged in its operation for many years or until he put 
aside the active work of the fields and took up his abode in Ogden, where he 
lived retired until his death in October, 1896. The period of his residence in 
this county covered four decades and he had gained enviable recognition as one 
of its substantial agriculturists and esteemed citizens. The demise of his wife 
occurred in October, 1890. 

George H. Lawton, who was but four years of age when he came to this 
county with his parents, attended the district schools in the acquirement of an 
education. When twenty-four years of age he purchased eighty acres of the 
home farm, on section 20, Yell township, and has since devoted his time and 
energies to its further cultivation and improvement with the exception of a 
period of five years spent as the proprietor of a meat market in Boone. As 
progressive ideas have guided him in his work, and industry has been the force 
which has put them into constant practice, it is but in the natural course of 
events that Mr. Lawton should be accounted one of the prosperous farmers of 
the community. 

On the 5th of April, 1881. Mr. Lawton was united in marriage to Miss Rosa 
Wilkins, her parents being George and Sarah A. (Osmer) Wilkins, both of whom 
were natives of England. They emigrated to the United States in 1867, locating 
in Sterling, Illinois, where Mr. Wilkins followed farming until 1880, when he 
came to Boone county, Iowa. Here he operated a farm for two years and on 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 197 

tne expiration of that period returned to Illinois, purchasing a tract of land near 
Sterling which he cultivated during the remainder of his life. His demise occurred 
on the 7th of March, 1909, while his wife was called to her final rest in November, 
1912. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Lawton were born eight children, as follows: Oscar, 
who passed away in 1882; Henry Owen, whose demise occurred in 1884; Pearl, 
who died in the year 1892; Anna Mabel, who passed away in 1894; one who died 
in infancy, in January, 1897; George A., a Methodist minister of Evanston, Illi- 
nois ; Edgar, at home ; and Olive, who is attending school at Ogden. 

In politics Mr. Lawton has always been a stanch republican. The cause of 
education has ever found in him a stalwart champion and for five years he served 
as secretary of the school board. His religious faith is that of the Methodist 
church. His entire career has been characterized by high ideals and noble prin- 
ciples and in every relation of life his record has ever measured up to a high 
standard of honorable manhood. 



REV. CARL E. JIPP. 



For many years the late Rev. Carl E. Jipp was in charge of the German Luth- 
eran church at Ogden and his Christian activities were of untold value to the 
many who came under his teachings and instructions. He was born in Ger- 
many, August 15, 1864, a son of Christian and Sophia (Hammerich) Jipp, both 
natives of the fatherland. Christian Jipp passed away in his native land, and 
his wife subsequently came to America, making her home at Wilton, Iowa, where 
she resided with her son until her death. 

Carl E. Jipp was reared and educated in Germany, leaving his native land 
at the age of fourteen and crossing the ocean to America. He located at Wil- 
ton, Iowa, where he had relatives, and there he remained until twenty-one years 
of age. He then entered Concordia College at Springfield, Illinois, and studied 
for the ministry. He graduated from that institution with the class of 1893 ^"d 
then received a call to Coon Rapids, Iowa, where he remained for a year. At 
the end of that period a pulpit at Ogden was offered him, and he accepted the 
charge of the German Lutheran church at this city. He continued in this charge 
for about seventeen years, or until his death. His influence upon the community 
was a decided factor in the upbuilding of religion and morality in his city. Rev. 
Jipp not only preached Christianity but all his actions were permeated by Chris- 
tian principles. He entertained deep love for his fellowmen and he was ever 
ready to hold out a helpful hand to those who struggled on life's pathway. Many 
were the ones who received encouragement from him and who under his stimu- 
lating guidance took on new hope and succeeded in overcoming life's serious 
struggles. His friends in Ogden — friends not only of his faith but adhering to 
other religions — were many and all entertained for him the highest regard and 
veneration. When he died July 15, 191 1, sorrow entered into many homes of his 
city, for all who knew him realized that they had lost a true friend. 

On May 23, 1894, Rev. Jipp was united in marriage to Lena A. Nanke, a 
daughter of Gustaf and Ernestina (Neuman) Nanke, natives of Germany, who 
at an early day settled in Keokuk county. Iowa, where the father successfully 



198 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

followed agricultural pursuits during the remainder of his life. He died in 
lyoo, having survived his wife for twenty-one years, the latter passing away in 
1879. Rev. and Mrs. Jipp had nine children : Frieda ; Marie ; Carl ; Lena ; Walter ; 
Alma; Luella; Louise; and Ernest, who died in 1896. 

Rev. Jipp was not only interested in the spiritual welfare of his charges but 
always concerned himself in the material development of Ogden and would 
readily give liis support to measures which had for their purpose the advance- 
ment of the city. His political allegiance was given the democratic party. Mrs. 
Jipp, who survives him, owns a handsome residence in Ogden and a valuable 
farm in Osceola county, Iowa. She has many friends in her city, who esteem 
in her a lady of the highest womanly qualities of character. 



HENRY SCHROEDER. 



Henry Schroeder is proprietor of a large grocery store and meat market in 
Boone. Watchful of all indications pointing to success, he has so conducted his 
affairs that substantial returns have accrued and he is now one of the prosperous 
merchants of the city. His birth occurred in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, 
September 17, 1847, 'I's parents being Henry and Katrina (Lentz) Schroe- 
der, who were also natives of that country. When nineteen years of age Henry 
Schroeder of this review left Germany in company with his brother Andrew 
Schroeder, then seventeen years of age, and sailed for the new world in 1867. 
Later the parents of our subject also crossed the Atlantic and came to Iowa, 
settling at Wheatland, Qinton county, where their two sons had preceded them. 
The father was a farmer by occupation, devoting his entire life to the work of 
tilling the fields. Unto him and his wife were born six children: John, de- 
ceased; Hans, who died in Britt, Iowa, February 8, 1914; Adolph, who was a 
fireman on the Northwestern Railroad and was killed in an accident in 1882, 
leaving a widow and five children, residents of Boone ; Victoria Elizabeth, the 
wife of Peter Umland, of Fort Dodge, Iowa ; Henry, of this review : and Andrew, 
who is living at Rushmore, Minnesota. 

When Henry and Andrew Schroeder reached the new world their combined 
cash capital consisted of but eleven cents. It had taken them seven weeks and 
five days to cross the ocean, so slow was the sailing vessel on which they were 
passengers. Their financial condition rendered immediate employment a neces- 
sity and they hired out to a dairy farmer of New Jersey, working for ten dollars 
per month. ( )n leaving the east Henry Schroeder made his way to Wheat- 
land. Iowa, covering the distance on foot from Davenport, thirty miles away. 
An uncle, .Andrew Lentz, lived in W^heatland, where he was proprietor of a 
brick and tile works. Mr. Schroeder joined his uncle and afterward telegraphed 
for his brother in New York, who finally arrived upon the scene. Mr. Schroeder 
was somewhat handicapped after coming to this state, for his health gave way 
and he was ill for five weeks. As soon as possible, however, he began work as a 
farm hand. It was in the following spring that the father arrived and a year 
later sent for the others of the family. In the fall of 1869 Henry Schroeder 
came to Roone county, where he located upon a farm, where he lived until 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 199 

1871. He rented eighty acres of land for a year, his brother Adolph and his 
wife taking up their abode with him, the lady managing the affairs of the house- 
hold. 

On the 14th of August, 1871, Mr. Schroeder was united in marriage to Miss 
VVilhelmina Brugerman, who was a native of Germany and came to the United 
States in 1869. In the year of his marriage Mr. Schroeder left the farm and 
removed to Boone, where he spent one year in the brewery of J. E. Herman. 
He then embarked in the butchering business on his own account and after- 
ward added a stock of groceries. He now has one of the leading establish- 
ments in this city, conducting a large and growing trade. Many of his patrons, 
have been with him through all the intervening years, a fact which indicates 
his honorable business dealing and his enterprising methods. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Schroeder have been born six children : Andrew, who is. 
now engaged in business with his father ; Henry, who is conducting a wholesale 
liquor house in Boone; Laura, the wife of J. P. Dougherty, of Colorado; Mary, 
at home; John, who died in September, 1901 ; and Katrina, at home. The family 
is well known in Boone, where they have an extensive circle of warm friends. 
Their religious faith is that of the German Lutheran church and aside from his 
membership therein Mr. Schroeder is also connected with the Woodmen of the 
World and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Politically he is a democrat 
and has served on the city council. He stands for all that tends to promote the 
progress and upbuilding of the city and has given active support and financial 
aid to many movements that have greatly furthered the interests of Boone. He 
is today one of the older merchants of Boone and is justly accounted one of the 
self-made men. His life history proves that enterprise and determination are 
a sure foundation upon which to build prosperity, for those are the qualities, 
which he has employed in advancing toward his present enviable position as a 
business man. 



C. H. LAST. 



C. H. Last, who was actively engaged in agricultural pursuits in Boone 
county for a number of years, has lived retired in Beaver since the spring of 
1913. His birth occurred in England on the i6th of August, 1872, his parents 
being Richard J. and Rebecca (Garnham) Last, who were likewise natives of 
that country. The father, who followed farming in England throughout his 
entire business career, passed away in that country in 1884. The demise of the 
mother occurred in the year 1913. 

C. H. Last was reared and educated in his native land and when twelve 
years of age left the parental roof to live with an uncle. He worked in a store 
in England for one year. In 1890, when a young man of seventeen, he crossed 
the .Atlantic to the United States, locating in Champaign county, Illinois, where 
for two years he was employed as farm hand. On the expiration of that period 
he came to Boone county, Iowa, and here continued as a farm hand for one- 
vear. He then rented a tract of land in Amaqua township and cultivated the same 
for eight years, at the end of which time he purchased one hundred and' 



200 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

sixty acres in the same township and began the improvement of the property. 
The operation of that tract claimed his attention for a number of years, and 
he annually gathered rich harvests which found a ready sale on the market. In 
the spring of 1913, having accumulated a comfortable competence, he put aside 
the active work of the fields, disposed of his farm and took up his abode in 
Beaver, where he purchased an attractive residence and has since lived in hon- 
orable retirement. 

In November, 1895, Mr. Last was joined in wedlock to Miss Mary Bakely, 
a daughter of Paul and Catherine (Agnew) Bakely, both of whom were natives 
of Germany. They emigrated to the United States and located in Ohio, where 
Mr. Bakely was engaged in agricultural pursuits until 1872. In that year he 
came to this county and purchased and improved a tract of land which he cul- 
tivated until his death in November, 1901. His widow has attained the age 
of eighty-one years and resides in Beaver, this county. Mr. Last is a republi- 
can in politics and a Methodist in religious faith. Both he and his wife enjoy 
an extensive and favorable acquaintance in the community and well merit the 
regard and esteem which are uniformly accorded them. 



THOMAS SPARKS. 



Thomas Sparks was one of Boone county's pioneers, settling permanently in 
Boonesboro in 1852. From that year until his death he continuously resided in 
this neighborhood, passing away in August, 1909, in his ninety-fourth year. 
He had taken up his residence in the city of Boone several years before his 
death, his widow now making her home at No. 116 Benton street. 

Mr. Sparks was born in Pennsylvania, near Brownsville, December 2^, 181 5, 
and as a boy of ten years removed with his parents to Tuscarawas county, 
where his father was engaged in the cultivation of a farm. When about 
twenty years of age Mr. Sparks of this review returned to his mother's 
people in Pennsylvania, where he completed his education and also taught school. 
Later he took up the same profession in Iowa, in Pottawattamie county. He 
made his first trip to Boone county in 1847 or 184B and entered eighty acres of 
land but did not remain at that time. In 1852 he married in Pennsylvania 
and subsequently located six miles south of Boone in Worth township, this farm 
remaining his home until the fall of 1903. The original homestead comprised 
eighty acres, and he also owned one hundred and twenty acres of timber, and 
later bought another eighty acres, his total holdings consisting of two hundred 
and eighty acres. When Mr. Sparks arrived here his land was raw prairie, but 
he set himself to its cultivation and as the years passed developed one of the 
most valuable farms in his neighborhood. He had given considerable attention 
to surveying and was elected the first county surveyor of Boone county, laying 
out Boonesboro. From 1903 until his death he resided at No. 621 Tenth street, 
Boone, and there passed away. 

On March 15. 1852, Thomas Sparks married, in Fayette county, Pennsyl- 
vania, Miss Esther Ann Dunn, a native of that state, who was born November 
9, 1828. She accompanied her husi^and on the trip to Iowa, the journey being 




THOMAS SI'AUKS 




MRS. THOMAS SPARKS 



'HE NE' 



it 

t 
I 

ft 

V 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 205 

made by way of the Ohio and Mississippi rivers and by ox teams from Keokuk. 
Their first home in Worth township was a log cabin, and later Mr. Sparks 
there built one of the first frame houses, the entire building being constructed 
of native walnut. In their family were the following children. L. D., of Boone; 
F. C, a widower and also a resident of this city, his daughter Gladys making her 
home at Ames ; Asenath D., who is the widow of Lewis Fisher, Jr., and has two 
children; John C, an engineer of the Northwestern Railroad for years and a 
resident of Boone, who has one son ; Mrs. Nettie J. Hitsman, who lives near 
Luther, Boone county, and has two children; Robert, a railroad employe who 
makes his headquarters in Kansas City ; Playford, of Boone, who has been twice 
married and has two children by his first union; Frank, who died as a soldier 
in Manila during the Spanish-American war and left a widow and a child, 
the former now also deceased : Eugene V., who was a ranchman of Colorado, 
where he passed away, leaving a widow ; and two who died in infancy. 

Mr. Sparks was a stanch whig but later voted the democratic and subse- 
quently the republican ticket. He lived to the ripe old age of ninety-three years 
and in him the city of Boone mourned one of the veteran pioneers of this 
district. 

His widow sold one of the farms after his death and bought a home at No. 
ii6 Benton street, where she now resides. There her son, F. C. Sparks, also 
lives. He was born February ii, 1854, and married Miss Anna Likely, who 
died in 1900, leaving one daughter. Mrs. F. C. Sparks' parents were among the 
early settlers near Fort Madison, Iowa. Mrs. Thomas Sparks and her son 
are members of the Methodist Episcopal church, the former having been con- 
nected with that organization since she was fifteen years of age. She first 
attended services at the Brown schoolhouse and later at the Boone schoolhouse 
near their home. She also was a member of a class at the Gildey school, then 
attending services at the College Chapel church and later at the Methodist 
Episcopal church at Luther but now is a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church of Boone. She is now nearing her eighty-sixth birthday, yet she is 
energetic and agile and still participates in many of the activities of life. 



LEWIS BOONE. 



Lewis Boone, a representative of the family in whose honor the c'ounty of 
Boone was named, was born in Worth township, this county, on the nth of 
October, 1861. His parents, Tyler and Mary (Nutt) Boone, were both natives 
of. Putnam county, Indiana, and took up their abode among the earliest settlers 
of Boone county, Iowa. The family came overland to this county from Indiana, 
its representatives settling in Worth township and also in Des Moines town- 
ship. Tyler Boone, the father of our subject, still resides in Worth township, 
but the mother there passed away in 1903. Their children are five in number, 
as follows : Lewis, of this review : Philip, who is a resident of Athberton, 
Montana: Mrs. Julia Luther, living in Sioux City, Iowa; Mrs. Eva Burlingame, 
who makes her home in Madrid. Iowa ; Mrs. Minnie Hull, of Worth township. 
All were born and reared in Worth township, this county. 



206 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

Lewis Boone grew to manhood in his native county and attended the com- 
mon schools in the acquirement of an education. He was actively engaged 
in general agricultural pursuits until 1902, when he came to Madrid and for the 
past twelve years has there been employed as a laborer. 

In Worth township Mr. Boone was united in marriage to Miss Eliza- 
beth Dyer, a native of Coles county. Illinois, and a daughter of Joseph and Nancy 
Dyer, who took up their abode among the earliest settlers of Boone county, 
Iowa, locating in Worth township, where they spent the remainder of their 
lives. They had twelve children, five of whom survive, namely : Mrs. Anna 
Hurley, of Greene county, Iowa; Mrs. Elizabeth Boone; Mrs. Vina Huffman, a 
resident of Worth township : Lawrence, living in Colfax township ; and Matthew, 
of Worth township. All were reared in this county. Mr. and Mrs. Boone have 
two sons: William, who was born June 17, 1885, and resides with his parents 
in Madrid; and Roe, born December 14, i8go. who is a resident of Dnbuque 
county, Iowa. Both were born, reared and educated in Worth township. 

Mr. Boone gives his political allegiance to the republican party and has ably 
served as a member of the school board in Worth township. He is identified 
fraternally with the Modern Woodmen of America at Madrid, and both he 
and his wife are devoted members of the Christian church of Worth township. 
Mr. Boone has spent his entire life within the borders of this county and 
enjoys an extensive acquaintance here. His family is directly descended from 
Daniel Boone and was represented among the pioneer settlers of both Indiana 
and Iowa. 



HORACE C. PAYNE. 



Horace C. Payne is a partner in a large and profitable livery business of 
Boone, conducted under the name of Payne Brothers. He was born in tHis 
city in July, 1876, a son of Samuel Payne, of whom mention is made on another 
page of this work. The public schools afforded him his early educational jiriv- 
ileges, and he afterward attended a business college. He then embarked in 
merchandising and subsequently learned the jeweler's trade, which he followed 
for six years. Then, on account of ill health, he turned his attention to the 
buying and selling of horses, handling only those of high grade. A mare which 
he sold for two hundred and fifty dollars was three years later sold to the 
Vanderbilts, together with three others as a four-in-hand team, for fiftv thou- 
sand dollars. In 1903 Horace C. Payne purchased a third interest in a livery 
business iii connection with his father and brother. He is now in line for the 
position of government buyer of horses and mules for the army. The livery 
stable conducted by Payne Brothers is a large and well equipped one and they 
own a number of excellent horses and a fine line of carriages. They make it 
their purpose to please their patrons, and their business has now reached large 
and gratifying proportions. 

On the 22d of April, 1901, Mr. Payne was united in marriage to Miss Rose 
M. Parkin, a native of Indiana, and unto them have been born two children : 
William P., born April 5, 1902; and Josephine, born in November, 1908. Mr. 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 207 

Payne votes with the democratic party and keeps well informed on the ques- 
tions and issues of the day, but does not seek nor desire office. Fraternally 
he is an Elk, and he also belongs to the Yeomen, while his religious belief is 
that of the Episcopal church. He has many friends in this city, where his 
entire life has been passed and where the genuine worth of his character has 
won recognition in the loyal regard of many with whom he has been brought 
in contact. 



OSCAR WILLIAM WESTERSTROM. 

Oscar William Westerstrom is a successful stone, brick and cement contractor 
of Madrid. He is a native of Boone county, his birth having occurred in Elk 
Rapids, May 21, 1876. His parents were Gustav William and Johanna Sophia 
(Sell) Westerstrom, the former born in Sweden, July 5. 1839, and the latter in 
the same country June 22, 1849. The father is living in Madrid, but his wife 
passed away in that city on March 30, 1896. Their marriage took place in Rock- 
ford, Illinois, in 1869 and six children were born to them: Anna Olivia, who was 
born February 12, 1870, and died in Madrid, January 6, 1891 ; Mrs. Emma Sophia 
Hultman, born March 18, 1872, of Madrid: Mrs. Nellie Ottilia Alsin, born April 
5, 1874, the wife of Carl A. Alsin; Oscar William, of this review; Henry Martin, 
born August 26, 1879, who died in 1880; and Henry lilmer, born on May 8, 1882, 
residing in Madrid. The three eldest children were born in Rockford, Illinois, 
and the younger ones in Boone county, where all were reared and educated. 

Oscar William Westerstrom attended the public schools of Madrid. His 
father was a mason, and he applied himself to the same trade, learning the busi- 
ness under the direction of the father. Mr. Westerstrom is at present a most 
successful stone, brick and cement contractor of Madrid, his services being in 
great demand. He is an able business man and highly efficient in his line of work. 
He enjoys the confidence of all who have business transactions with him because 
of his fair and honest methods. 

On August 23, 1899, Mr. Westerstrom married Miss Ethel Westerberg, who 
was born in Garden township, Boone county, March i, 1878. She is a daughter 
of A. P. and Emma Lundahl Anderson Westerberg, who were natives of Sweden, 
the former born in Westergotland on the 17th of July, 1840. When sixteen years 
old he was confirmed in the Lutheran church, and when a young man of twenty- 
six he emigrated to the United States, locating in Boone, Iowa, in 1866. He first 
was connected with the bridge-building department of the Chicago & North- 
western Railway, continuing with that corporation for nine years. He then 
bought a tract of one hundred and twenty acres in Garden township, where he 
successfully followed agricultural pursuits, gradually extending his farm until it 
embraced two hundred acres. He passed away in. Madrid on the 22d of Sep- 
tember, i90(;, highly esteemed and respected by his fellow citizens. His wife died 
on the old home farm in Garden township and he subsequently married Mrs. 
Christina Westland, who bore him a son, Lester Roosevelt Westerberg, a resi- 
dent of Madrid. By his first union he had eight children: Mrs. Maude Sund- 
berg, who resides in Garden township; A. R. Westerberg, a prominent resident 



208 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

of Madrid; Mrs. Ethel Westerstrom; Frank, a resident of Boone; Mrs. Esther 
Krantz, of Madrid; Edwin, of Longmont, Colorado; Mrs. Blanche Peterson, 
who makes her home in Garden township ; and Zylph, deceased. All these chil- 
dren were born and reared in Garden township. 

Air. and Mrs. Westerstrom have two children: Edna Gertrude, born August 
14, 1900; and Russell William Theodore, born February 16, 1906. Both are at- 
tending the public schools of Madrid. Mr. and Mrs. Westerstrom are members 
of St. John's Lutheran church, to which they give their moral and material sup- 
port. They live in a handsomely furnished home in Madrid, besides which Mr. 
Westerstrom owns valuable personal property. Politically he is a republican, well 
conversant with the public issues of the day, although he has never cared to enter 
the political arena. He has many friends in Madrid, enjoys the highest reputation 
in business circles and socially is very popular. 



I 



PETER T. NELSON. 



Peter T. Nelson, a resident of Boone for the past forty-five years, has been 
actively engaged in the lumber business here for three decades and is now at 
the head of the well known firm of P. T. Nelson & Sons. His birth occurred 
in Sweden on the 28th of March, 1845, his parents being Thorkel and Ellen 
(Peterson) Nelson, who were likewise natives of that country and have passed 
away. To them were born six children, as follows : Nelse, Andrew T. and Olaf . 
all of whom are deceased; Peter T., of this review; John T., a resident of Los 
Angeles, California ; and Hans T., living in Boone, Iowa. 

Peter T. Nelson became identified with the milling business when a youth 
of sixteen and was thus engaged until he had attained the age of twenty-three. 
In 1869 he emigrated to the United States and took up his abode in Boone, Iowa, 
being here employed at railroad work for three years. Subsequently he spent 
twelve years at the tailor's trade and on the expiration of that period embarked 
in the lumber business, in which he has been engaged continuously and success- 
fully since. He purchased an interest in the Farrow Lumber Company and in 
1905 bought out his associates and admitted his two sons, Emil L. and Alfred 
E., to a partnership. The firm has since conducted business under the style of 
P. T. Nelson & Sons and is a successful enterprise, its members being widely 
recognized as men of excellent executive ability, sound judgment and unas- 
sailable integrity. 

On the 26th of November. 1872, Mr. Nelson was united in marriage to Miss 
Lizzie Norlin, who passed away in 1893 and who bore him six children, namely: 
Charles and Edward, both of whom are deceased ; Emil L. and Alfred E., who 
are associated with their father in business; Nellie, the wife of A. F. Nelson, 
of Boone; and Arthur, who has passed away. On the 6th of January, 1897, Mr. 
Nelson was again married, his second union being with Miss Augusta Gustafson. 

In his political views Mr. Nelson is independent, supporting men and measures 
rather than party. He has never sought nor desired the honors and emoluments 
of ofl[ice, preferring to devote his entire attention to his business interests, which 
have brought him well merited prosperity. He is now the only surviving or- 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 209 

ganizer of the Swedish Mission church and still resides on the same lot where 
he was first married more than four decades ago. Coming to the new world 
in early manhood, he eagerly availed himself of the opportunities here afforded 
and worked his way steadily upward to a foremost place among the substantial 
and respected citizens of Boone county. 



RICHARD F. SMALLEY. 

Richard F. Smalley, who has lived retired in Boone for the past seven years, 
was busily engaged in the pursuits of farming and stock-raising in this county 
throughout his active business career and still owns a quarter section of land in 
Jackson township. His birth occurred in Illinois on the i6th of December, 1841, 
his parents being Edward and Susan (Wiley) Smalley, natives of Ohio. They 
came to Iowa in 1854 but a short time later removed to Minnesota. In 1867, 
liowever, they returned to Boone county and the following year Mr. Smalley 
here purchased a farm of one hundred and twenty acres. To him and his wife 
were born eight children, as follows : Sarah Ann, who is the widow of Duane 
Bentley and resides in Boone ; Thomas J., a resident of Des Moines township, 
Boone county; Richard F., of this review; Mary E., who is deceased, as is also 
her husband, Hosea Bullard of Winneshiek county ; Malinda, the wife of Charles 
W. Mix, of Sumner, Iowa ; Catherine, who gave her hand in marriage to T. J. 
Murphy, of Norman, Oklahoma; Harriet E., who is the widow of Harvey 
Casteel and resides in Dodge township, this county ; and William, of Jackson 
township, this county. 

Richard F. Smalley devoted his attention to agriculture throughout his active 
business career, following the pursuits of farming and stock-raising with excel- 
lent success. In 1907 he removed to Boone, purchasing a residence at No. 2129 
Story street, where he has since lived retired in well earned ease. He still 
owns one hundred and sixty acres of valuable and productive land in Jackson 
township and has long been numbered among the prosperous and representative 
citizens of the community. 

On the 23d of March, 1868, Mr. Smalley was united in marriage to Miss 
Ellen E. Bentley, her parents being Thomas and Paulina (Churchill) Bentley. 
the former a native of New York and the latter of Vermont. In their family 
were thirteen children, namely: Allison D. and Levina P., both of whom are 
deceased; Marcus L., a resident of Boone; Layton B., also living in Boone; 
Adelia M., who is the widow of H. J. Ehrhart and resides in Boone ; Edward J., 
of Marshalltown ; Mrs. Ellen Smalley ; George W., who is deceased ; Charles A., 
residing in Boone; Gardner A., who makes his home in Webster City, Iowa; 
Elmer, residing in Fraser, Iowa; Frank, of Webster City, this state; and Mary, 
the wife of William Smalley, of Jackson township, Boone coimty. 

iMr. and Mrs. Smalley have six children : Albert R., who is a resident of 
Jackson township, this county; Emma L., the wife of L. O. Hutson of Jackson 
township; Nellie M., who gave her hand in marriage to Arthur Carlson, of San- 
born county. South Dakota ; Alfred F., who is a carpenter by trade ; Tibbie E., 
the wife of James McDonald of Sanborn county, South Dakota; and Katie V., at 



210 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

home. In politics Mr. Smalley is a prohibitionist, stanchly advocating the prin- 
ciples set forth by this party. His religious faith is that of the Free Methodist 
church. Earnest effort and intelligently directed labor constituted the salient 
features of his business career, while his life has been governed by high prin- 
ciples that have gained for him the respect and good-will of his fellowmen. 



ROBERT REYNOLDSON. 

Robert Reynoldson has lived retired in Boone for the past eight years after 
a successful career as a farmer and stock-raiser in Des Moines township. He 
was bom in Cambridgeshire, England, November ii, 1845, ^"d is a son of Robert 
and Mary (West) Reynoldson, who crossed the Atlantic in 1857, locating in 
Canada. They came to Boone county in November, 1865, but in 1872-3 removed 
to Boone county, Nebraska, where the father homesteaded land and where the 
parents resided until their deaths. He passed away in the '80s, aged eighty- 
five years, and his wife died when she was about sixty years old. They were 
members of the Church of England and devout adherents of that faith. Of 
their twelve children eleven were born in England and the youngest in Canada. 
All those who lived to maturity attained substantial positions in life, four sons 
now making their home in Nebraska. Four daughters are also living, and they 
quite frequently visit their oldest brother, the subject of this review. 

Robert Reynoldson enjoyed but limited educational advantages in England 
but nevertheless has been successful in life and there can be counted no failure 
against him. He has always been honest, determined and industrious and has 
never undertaken anything that he has not brought to a successful conclusion. 
He came to Boone county in November, 1865, and for about four years was 
employed in the McFadden mill at Boonesboro. He then operated a ditching 
machine and in that way laid the foundation for a small fortune which enabled 
him in 1876 to buy one hundred and sixty acres of land three miles south of 
Boone. This property was known as the Jones farm, Mr. Jones having entered 
it from the government, and Mr. Reynoldson still has the patent. He later 
added to his land and now owns about four hundred acres which are worth at 
least two hundred dollars per acre. A quarter section of this land he bought 
at prices ranging between thirty-five and seventy dollars. He followed farming 
and stock-raising for many years, giving particular attention to fine horses and 
mules, and later also fed cattle and hogs for the market. He was always pro- 
gressive in his farming and success came to him in remuneration for his unceas- 
ing efforts. 

On January I, 1872, Mr. Reynoldson married Miss Olive Jones, who was 
born in Hardin county, Ohio, in July, 1842, and is a daughter of Jesse Jones, 
who with his family came to Boone county in 1853, settling in Des Moines town- 
ship. There Mrs. Jones passed away, her husband dying in Story county, hav- 
ing reached an age of more than eighty years. There were six children in the 
Jones family and Mrs. Reynoldson still has two brothers and one sister living 
in Story county. Mr. and Mrs. Reynoldson are the parents of five sons and 
one daughter, as follows : Fred, who cultivates a farm four miles north of 



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HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 213 

Boone and who married Clara Hoffman, by whom he has one son, Harold ; 
Jesse, who left the parental roof at the age of seventeen and is now engaged in 
the real-estate business in Montana, owning a considerable amount of land and 
also engaging in the cattle business : Mary, who married Joseph Kemmer, a 
farmer of Jackson township, residing near Erickson, by whom she has four 
daughters and one son, Leone, Irene, Minnie, Lulu and Loren L. ; and Edward 
an agriculturist of Dodge township, who married Miss Hattie Good, a daughter 
of George Good, by whom he has four sons, Cleo, Howard, Robert and Glenn ; 
JameSj who operates one of his father's farms two miles from Boone, and who 
married Miss Lulu Parker; and Charles, who married Elizabeth Radcliffe and 
resides on the home farm. 

Robert Reynoldson is a democrat and has always taken an active part in the 
progress and advancement of his county. His wife attends the Christian church, 
and both have derived much pleasure from traveling, having crossed the conti- 
nent and spent some time in California. Mr. and Mrs. Reynolds and family 
are highly respected by all who know them and are nxunbered among the sub- 
stantial citizens of Boone who have made valuable contributions to the material, 
moral and intellectual development of this part of the state. 



HENRY EHLERS. "i 

: fi 

Henry Ehlers has continuously conducted business as a general merchant of 
Ogden for the past twenty-three years and is w^ell known as a prosperous, enter- 
prising and representative citizen of Boone county. His birth occurred in Yell 
township, this county, in June, 1870, his parents being Jacob and Margaret 
(Thomson) Ehlers, the former a native of Hamburg and the latter of Holstein, 
Germany. They emigrated to the United States in a very early day and took 
up their abode in Clinton county, Iowa. In 1863 Jacob Ehlers enlisted for serv- 
ice in the Civil war and after the cessation of hostilities between the north and 
the south returned to Clinton county, where he operated a farm until 1869. In 
that year he came to Boone county and here purchased and improved a tract of 
land which he cultivated throughout the remainder of his life. He was acci- 
dentally killed by a falling tree in 1878. His wife survived him for a number 
Of years, passing away in 1892. 

Henry Ehlers was reared in the county of his nativity and attended the dis- 
trict schools in the acquirement of an education. When eighteen years of age 
he left the home farm and came to Ogden, where he was employed as a clerk 
until 1891. In that year he embarked in business as a general merchant in asso- 
ciation with Charles Remiers, the firm of Ehlers & Remiers being continued until 
April, 1910, when our subject purchased his partner's interest and has since been 
alone. He carries a large stock of general merchandise, occupying two floors and 
basement. A liberal patronage is accorded him, for he displays an attractive and 
excellent line of goods at reasonable prices and enjoys an unassailable reputation 
for integrity and fair dealing. 

In November, 1897, M^. Ehlers was united in marriage to Miss Margaret 
Lorenzen, a daughter of Fedder and Phoebe (Clausen) Lorenzen, both of whom 



214 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

were natives of Germany. They became pioneer settlers of Boone county, and 
the mother is still living here, but the father has passed away. Mr. and Mrs. 
Ehlers have four children, as follows: Otto, fifteen years of age; Alma, who 
is twelve years old ; and Carl and Dorothy, who are eleven and six years of age 
respectively. 

Mr. Ehlers is a republican in politics and now serves as a member of the city 
council, while for six years he has done valuable work on the school board. His 
religious faith is indicated by his membership in the German Lutheran church. 
His entire life has been spent within the borders of Boone county, and he is 
well known as a successful merchant and esteemed citizen. 



LEROY D. SPARKS. 



Leroy U. Sparks long occupied a creditable position in the business circles of 
J.oone, where for a quarter of a century he conducted a meat market. He is now 
occupying an attractive home, which stands in the midst of a farm of thirty-five 
acres within the corporation limits of the city. A native of Boone county, he was 
born February 9, 1853, a son of Thomas and Esther (Dunn) Sparks, both of whom 
were natives of Pennsylvania, but were reared upon Ohio farms. The father 
came to Iowa in 1846 when many evidences of pioneer life were still to be seen 
here. He then returned to the east and was married in Pennsylvania, he and his 
wife coming to Boone in 1852. They settled upon a farm, the father devoting his 
entire life to general agricultural pursuits. He was very active in public con- 
nections and was the first county surveyor of Boone county. He also held a num- 
ber of township offices and labored effectively and earnestly for the welfare and 
upbuilding of the community. He died August 20, 1910, after a residence of 
more than a half century in this state, during which period he had won the high 
respect and good-will of those with whom he had been associated. His widow 
still lives in Boone at the ripe old age of eighty-five years. In their family were 
twelve children : Leroy D. ; Fremont, living in Boone ; E. \'.. who is now deceased ; 
Asenith, who is the widow of Lewis Fisher and makes her home in San Francisco, 
California; James G., a resident of Los Angeles, California; John C, of Boone; 
Nettie, the wife of Joseph Hitsman of Luther, Iowa; a son who died in infancy; 
Belle, who also died in infancy ; Frank, deceased ; Robert, living in Kansas City,' 
Missouri ;■ and Playford, of Boone. 

Leroy D. Sparks has spent his entire life in the county of his nativity and 
at seventeen years of age took up the profession of teaching, which he followed 
for three terms. He afterward carried on farming for twelve years and then 
established his home in Boone, where he opened a meat market, which he con- 
ducted for a quarter of a century. He always carried a good line of meats, made 
every possible effort to please his patrons and for many years enjoyed an excel- 
lent trade that brought him a substantial, gratifying and well earned profit. He 
has now retired from the meat business and lives upon his farm, which is splen- 
didly improved, his being one of the attractive homes in the city. 

On the 30th of September, 1874, Mr. Sparks was united in marriage to Miss 
Luella Stevens, a native of Iowa and a daughter of Jacob and I.ucretia (Brown) 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 215 

Stevens, natives of Pennsylvania and of Vermont respectively. In 1865 they 
came to Boone and the father, a butcher by trade, was connected with the meat 
business in this city. He died December 21, 1902, while his wife passed away 
January 8, 1894. In their family were six children: Mrs. Sparks; Ida, the 
wife of John Kail ; George, of Boone ; Mary and Jacob, who have passed away ; 
and Daisy, the wife of William Stange, of Chicago. To Mr. and Mrs. Sparks 
have been born six children : George B. and James G., both of Boone ; Ralph 
Leroy and Gertrude L., at home; Mary Alma, the wife of Chester Gonse, of 
\'alley Junction ; and Harry Stevens, at home. 

In his political views Mr. Sparks is independent, voting for men and meas- 
ures rather than for party. He has filled township offices, including those of 
assessor and township clerk. Fraternally he is a Mason and also holds member- 
ship with the Woodmen of the World. For more than sixty years he has been 
an interested witness of the changes which have occurred in Boone county, 
has seen its growth and development and has aided in its progress. That his has 
been a well spent life is indicated in the fact that many of his stanchest friends 
are those who have known him from his boyhood to the present time. 



WILLIAM B. SCHOOLER. 

William B. Schooler has since April, 1913, conducted a furniture and under- 
taking establishment in Ogden, in partnership with A. G. Howe, and in this 
connection has won an enviable reputation and a well merited measure of suc- 
cess. His birth occurred in Dallas county, Iowa, in November, 1879, his parents 
being Wesley Taylor and Alice (Stevens) Schooler, the former a native of 
Alissouri and the latter of Indiana. Wesley T. Schooler came to Boone county, 
Iowa, in 1859 and here carried on general agricultural pursuits until 1880. 
In that year he took up his abode in Madrid and embarked in the hotel busi- 
ness, while subsequently he became engaged in the implement business, con- 
ducting an enterprise of that character for about twelve years. He was also a 
blacksmith by trade. iS.t the time of his retirement he removed to Marshall 
county, Iowa, but at the end of four years returned to Madrid, where he made 
his home until 1909. For the past five years he and his wife have lived in 
Oregon. 

William B. Schooler obtained his education at Madrid and after putting 
aside his text-books secured a clerkship in a furniture store. He likewise famil- 
iarized himself with the undertaking business and was identified therewith 
as an employe for a period of nine years. In April, 1913, he came to Ogden. 
Boone county, and embarked in the furniture and undertaking business in part- 
nership with A. G. Howe, who has remained his associate to the present time. 
Their stock is extensive and their patronage liberal, for they are widely recog- 
nized as merchants and business men of ability and integrity who are well 
worthy of support. 

On the 15th of June. 1907, Mr. Schooler was united in marriage to Miss 
■'Xnna Caylor, a daughter of Daniel and Ellen (Rowley) Caylor, who were born 
in Ohio and Wisconsin respectively. Mr. Schooler gives his political allegiance 



216 HISTORY OF I'.OONE COUxN'TY 

to the republican party, while his religious faith is that of the Baptist church. 
Fraternally he is identified with the Masons, the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, the Yeomen and the Maccabees. His salient characteristics are such 
as have gained for him the friendly regard and good-will of all with whom he 
has been associated through either business or social relations, and he is well 
entitled to a foremost place among the representative and respected residents 
of (3gden and Boone county. 



N. T. A. CALSON. 



N. T. A. Calson has been actively engaged in business as a general merchant 
of Pilot Mound for the past three decades and is now the senior member of the 
firm of Calson & Son. His birth occurred in Sweden in October, 1855, his parents 
being C. J. and Annalena (Nelson) Calson, who were likewise natives of that 
country. They crossed theAtlantic to the United States in 1864 and first located 
in New "^'ork, there remaining for four months, while subsequently they resided 
in Illinois for a year and a half. On the expiration of that period they came to 
Iowa and for one year made their home in Webster county, then taking up their 
abode in Boone county in 1866. C. J. Calson purchased eighty acres of land in 
Pilot Mound township, improxed the property and devoted his attention to its 
operation throughout the remainder of his active business career. His demise 
occurred at Pilot Mound in March, 191 1, after a residence of forty-five years in 
P.oone county, and the community mourned the loss of one of its substantial and 
esteemed citizens. For almost four decades he had survived his wife, who was 
called to her final rest in August, 1871. 

N. I. A. Calson began his education in the schools of his native land and 
continued his studies in Boone county, being nine years of age when he accom- 
panied his parents on their emigration to the new world. He remained at home 
until a youth of fourteen and then secured employment as a farm hand, being 
thus engaged for a number of years. In 1879 lie rented a tract of land in Pilot 
Mound township and after cultivating the same for five years came to the town 
of Pilot Mound, where he embarked in the mercantile business, in which he has 
been continuously engaged to the present time. In 191 1 he erected a new and 
modern store building, fifty by eighty feet, on the main street. Mr. Calson 
occupies lx)th the one story and basement and carries a very extensive and well 
selected stock of goods, enjoying a most gratifying patronage by reason of his 
straightforward business methods, reasonable prices and earnest desire to please 
his customers. He is now associated in business with his son under the firm style 
of Calson & Son. He owns farming property in Douglas township and also a 
commodious residence in Pilot Mound and is widely recognized as one of the 
prosperous and representative citizens of the county. 

In the fall of 1886 Mr. Calson was united in marriage to Miss Amelia F. 
Zunkel, a daughter of Ferdinand and Margaret (Eppinger) Zunkel, both of 
whom were natives of Germany. They took up their abode among the pioneer 
settlers of Boone county, Iowa, and here Mr. Zunkel carried on agricultural 
pursuits for many years. His demise occurred on the 20th of March, 1876, 




N. J. A. CALSOX AND FA.MILY 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 219 

while his wife passed away on the 19th of January, 1896. Mr. and Mrs. Calson 
have one son, Leonard C, who was born October 3, 1888, and is now engaged in 
the mercantile business with his father. He wedded Miss Belva Adams and has 
one child, Russell A., who is in his first year. 

In his political views Mr. Calson is a stanch republican. He served in the 
capacity of township clerk for about twelve years and has also done resultant 
work as a member of the town council. He has been a resident of this county 
for nearly a half century and has gained the esteem of all with whom he has come 
in contact because of his upright and honorable principles and also by reason of 
the straightforward methods he ever follows. 



HENRY LEWIS DAVIS. 

Henry Lewis Davis, a respected citizen and representative agriculturist of 
Boone county, was born in Harrison county, Ohio, on the 9th of October, 1850, 
a son of Lewis and Mary Ann (Ames) Davis, both of whom were natives of 
Pennsylvania. They took up their abode in Muscatine county, Iowa, on the 
6th of October, 1854, and in June, 1855, came to Boone county, the father 
entering three hundred and twenty acres of land in Colfax township. Later 
disposing of this property, he bought a tract of eighty acres in Worth town- 
ship and subsequently extended the boundaries of his faxm by additional pur- 
chase until it embraced more than three hundred acres:' He continued to reside 
thereon throughout the remainder of his life, passing away on the 25th of May, 
1892, while his wife was called to her final rest on the.' 26th of February, 1900. 
Mr. Davis held the office of county coroner for two terrris and also served in 
minor township positions, making a creditable and commendable record as a 
public official. The period of his residence in this county covered thirty-seven 
years, and he gained an extensive and favorable acquaintance within its bor- 
ders. To him and his wife were born thirteen children, as follows : Margaret 
Ann. who is deceased ; James A., who was killed at the battle of Pleasant Hill, 
Louisiana, in 1864; Sarah Ellen, deceased; Cyrus M., an old soldier who makes 
his home in Luther, Iowa; Jesse, living in Boone; Elizabeth J., who is the 
wife of Charles Fleming of Arkansas ; iMary Maria, who is the widow of John 
Nutt and resides in Boone; Henry Lewis, of this review; Catherine A., the 
wife of S. T. Steelsmith, of Troy, Idaho; George A., of Worth township; 
Keziah M., who is the widow of Nimrod Rule and lives in Boone ; Abraham 
L., of Fort Dodge; and Abbie Amanda, who is the wife of Albert Nutt, of 
Boone. 

Henry Lewis Davis, who was a little lad of five years when his parents set- 
tled in this county, remained on the home farm until twenty-five years of age 
and then made his way to California, following farming in San Luis Obispo. 
At the end of a year he returned to Boone county and purchased a tract of 
ninety-nine acres adjoining the old homestead. He eventually disposed of the 
property which he had acquired and at the present time owns one hundred and 
thirty-nine acres comprising a part of the home place. During the last few 
years he has devoted his time and energies to both farming and stock-raising. 



220 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

making a specialty of shorthorn cattle. His undertakings as an agriculturist 
have been attended with gratifying and well deserved measure of success, and 
he enjoys an enviable reputation as one of the prosperous and esteemed citizens 
of his community. 

On the 23d of August, 1876, Mr. Davis was united in marriage to Miss Ara- 
bell C. Cross, a native of Boone county and a daughter of Isaac and Maria 
(Keigley) Cross, both of whom were born in Greene county, Pennsylvania. 
They came to this county about 1855, and here the father turned his attention 
to agricultural pursuits. He passed away in May, 1907, while the mother was 
called to her final rest in April, 1900. They had two children : Mrs. Henry 
L. Davis; and Sarah E., who is the wife of Robert McMillen, of Indianola, 
Iowa. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Davis have been born four children, as follows: 
Alta E., who is the wife of E. C. Payne, of Worth township ; Clara Belle, who 
who is the widow of Saul Dyer and resides in Boone ; James Leroy, of Beaver 
township, Boone county ; and a daughter who died in infancy. 

Mr. Davis gives his political allegiance to the republican party, has served 
in the capacity of supervisor for two terms and has also acted as township 
assessor and trustee, ever discharging his public duties in a most satisfactory 
manner. Fraternally he is identified with the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, the Knights of Pythias and the Ancient Order of United Workmen, while 
his religious faith is that of the Presbyterian church, which receives his sup- 
port. As a citizen he is public-spirited and whatever tends to promote the best 
interests of the community receives his indorsement and hearty cooperation. He 
has spent most of his life in this county and is therefore widely and favorably 
known, commanding the high regard of all with whom he has been associated. 



TAMES B. McELROY. 



James B. McElroy is engaged in the cultivation of a farm of three hundred 
and twenty acres on sections 11 and 15, Beaver township, and the attractive 
appearance of the place indicates his careful supervision. His birth occurred in 
that township, June 6, 1875, his parents being John and Alargaret (McCoy) 
McEIroy, both of whom were natives of New York. The father came to Iowa 
in 1868 and engaged in railroading for some time. Later he purchased land in 
Beaver township and began the development and improvement of a farm, which 
he continued to operate throughout his remaining days, his death occurring in 
1907. His widow survives and resides upon the old homestead. 

James B. McElroy was reared in Beaver township and pursued his educa- 
tion in the district schools and in the ]niblic schools of Ogden. He early became 
familiar with the best methods of tilling the soil and caring for the crops and 
remained at home with his parents until 1911, when he rented his father-in- 
law's place, situated on sections 11 and 15. Beaver township, and comprising 
three hundred and twenty acres of land. Thereon he is now engaged in general 
farming and good results attend his labors, for his methods are practical and 
progressive. He owns an interest in the home place on section 29 and also 
owns land in Canada. He is meeting with prosperity in his undertakings, and 



I 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 221 

the analyzation of his Hfe record shows that his progress is the result of close 
application, persistent energy and soi^nd judgment. 

On the 27th of February, 191 1, Mr. McElroy was united in marriage to 
Miss Margaret Vaughn a daughter of Dennis and Mary (Mahoney) Vaughn, 
who at an early period in the development of this section of the state came to 
Iowa. The father was a veteran of the Civil war, and following its close he 
engaged in farming in Beaver township throughout the remainder of his days. 

The religious faith of Mr. and Mrs. McElroy is that of the Catholic church. 
For eight years he has served as one of the trustees in his township and is 
interested in all affairs of public moment. He gives his political allegiance to the 
Democratic party and keeps well informed on the questions and issues of the 
day. He has served as school director, but he prefers to concentrate his energies 
upon his business affairs. He is now a stockholder in the Farmers Cooperative 
Company of Berkley, Iowa. In addition to developing his tields he feeds several 
carloads of cattle per year, and this branch of his business is proving to him a 
profitable source of income. He has a wide acquaintance in Boone county, 
where he has always made his home and where he has ever stood for all that is 
progressive in the agricultural life of the community. 



ALBERT G. HOWE. 



Albert G. Howe is engaged in business at Ogden as a member of the firm of 
Schooler & Howe, conducting a well appointed and liberally patronized furniture 
and undertaking establishment. His birth occurred at Independence, Kansas, 
on the 1 ith of January, 1880, his parents being James M. and Ellen M. (Carlisle) 
Howe. The father came to Boone county, Iowa, in an early day and here de- 
voted his attention to agricultural pursuits for some time, subsequently removing 
to Kansas, where he operated a farm until 1881. In that year he returned to 
Ogden, this county, and was here engaged in the draying business for some time, 
while later he embarked in the mercantile business, conducting an establishment 
of that character successfully until 1899. Since disposing of his interests he has 
lived retired in Ogden, enjoying the fruits of his former activity in well earned 
ease. He has attained the age of seventy-three years and is a highly esteemed 
and respected citizen of his community. During the period of the Civil war he 
served for four years as a member of Company B, Eighth Illinois Cavalry, mak- 
ing a creditable record as a brave and loyal defender of the Union. The demise 
of his wife occurred on the 12th of October, 1912. 

Albert G. Howe was reared and educated in this county, attending the public 
schools of Ogden. He afterward worked in his father's store for some time and 
subsequently went to Berkley, Boone county, where he was engaged in the mer- 
cantile business for one year. On the expiration of that period he returned to 
Ogden and embarked in the hardware business in association with W. S. Gray, 
to whom he sold out at the end of three years. He was next engaged in the 
mercantile business in Ogden until September, 19 12, and then gave his attention 
to real-estate interests until April, 1913. In that month he entered into partner- 
ship with William B. Schooler for the conduct of the furniture and undertaking 



222 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

establishment which they have since continued under the firm style of Schooler 
& Howe. They carry an extensive stock and are accorded a large patronage 
which attests the satisfaction of those with whom they have dealings. 

On the 1st of January, 1902, Mr. Howe was united in marriage to Miss 
Bertha Webb, a daughter of Q. O. and Erispa (Mace) Webb, pioneer settlers 
of Boone county, who now reside in Ogden. The father here devoted his atten- 
tion to general agricultural pursuits for a number of years but has lived retired 
since 1907. Mr. and Mrs. Howe have two children, Lucile F. and Yera R., who 
are eight and five years of age respectively. 

Mr. Howe is a republican in politics and has ably served as a member of 
the city council for five years. He is identified fraternally with the Masons 
and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and his religious faith is that of the 
Methodist church. He is widely recognized as a young man of enterprise, ability 
and worth and enjoys an extensive and favorable acquaintance throughout the 
county in which practically his entire life has been spent. 



A. P. LUNDVALL. 



For over fifteen years A. P. Lundvall has been engaged in the general mer- 
chandise business in Boxholm. carrying a most complete and up-to-date stock 
and following business policies which rank him as one of the progressive mer- 
chants of the county. Mr. Lundvall has secured an extensive and profitable 
patronage for his business, his customers coming to him from a large adjoin- 
ing territory. He has succeeded because his business is built upon fair and ' 
honest methods, because he contents himself with a reasonable profit and because 
he is ever ready to oblige a customer if possible. Mr. Lundvall was born in 
Sweden on March 9, i860, and is a son of J. P. and Christina Lundvall, natives 
of that country. During his active life the father was the superintendent of a 
large woolen mill in Sweden, which country has always remained his home and 
where he is still living at the age of ninety-two years, his wife dying in 1907. 

A. P. Lundvall was reared and educated in his native land and after com- 
pleting his studies accepted a position in the office of the woolen mills with which 
his father was connected. In 1881, at the age of twenty-one, he came to America, 
locating at first in New Britain, Connecticut, where for three years he worked 
for the American Hosiery Company. Being impressed by the stories which 
he had heard of the opportunities that were awaiting an aggressive young man 
in the middle west, he then made his way to Dayton, Webster county, Iowa, 
where he arrived in the spring of 1884, accepting a position in the general 
store of Burnquist Brothers. There he continued as an employe until 1889, in 
which year he became a partner in the firm, with which he remained as manager 
until 1895, when his partner died. .-Kt that time the business was sold, but Mr. 
Lundvall again entered mercantile life, allying himself with new partners and 
founding the firm of Lundvall, Swanson & Johnson. He continued in this 
establishment until 1899, when he sold his interest and went to Fort Dodge, 
Iowa, where he worked for the Larson Dry Goods Company for one year. 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 223 

He then returned to Dayton and for three months was connected with the firm 
of C. V. Peterson. In April, 1900, he came to Boxholm, Boone county, where 
he bought the first town lot and built the first business building, engaging in 
merchandising. He has ever since been at the head of this business and now 
carries a most complete stock adequate to the most exacting demands of his 
customers. His trade is extensive and covers a large territory. The success 
of the business must be entirely attributed to Mr. Lundvall, who is able, shrewd, 
honest and thoroughly up-to-date as regards merchandising methods. 

In June, 1892, A. P. Lundvall married Miss Emily Erickson, a daughter 
of Eric and Betsy Erickson, natives of Sweden, who located in Webster county 
in the early days of its history. There the father cultivated land until his death, 
his widow now making her home with Mr. and Mrs. Lundvall, who have six 
children, as follows : June, who is employed in her father's store ; and Eve- 
lyn, Lloyd, Reynold, Mildred and Ralph. 

Mr. Lundvall has other important interests, being a stockholder in the 
Farmers Savings Bank of Boxholm, and the Farmers Elevator Company. 
He is always interested in the cause of education and at present 
serves as school director of his district. Politically he is a republican, loyal 
to his party, and for seven years served as postmaster of Boxholm. resign- 
ing in favor of John Hocke, who at that time was conducting a harness shop 
in this city. Fraternally Mr. Lundvall belongs to the Modern Woodmen of 
America, and his religious faith is that of the Swedish Lutheran church. By 
his activities he has largely contributed toward making possible the prosperous 
conditions that now prevail in Boone county and in particular has been one of 
the factors in the upbuilding of Boxholm, of which town he is now one of the 
foremost representatives of commercial interests. 



JACOB SCHIERHOLZ. 



Jacob Schierholz, a representative agriculturist of Boone county who has 
resided here for a period of forty-five years, is the owner of one hundred and 
sixty acres of valuable land on sections 8 and 6, Yell township. His birth occurred 
in Germany on the 27th of February, 1851, his parents being Peter and Catherine 
(Frahm) Schierholz, who were likewise natives of that country. The father, 
who devoted his attention to farming in Germany throughout his entire business 
career, there passed away in 1854, while the mother was called to her final rest on 
the 9th of June, 1894. 

Jacob Schierholz spent the first eighteen years of his life in the fatherland 
and there pursued his education but continued his studies in the United States 
after the age of twenty. On the 27th of February, 1869, he set sail for the new 
world and on reaching American shores made his way to Clinton county, Iowa, 
where he worked for others until December of that year. He then came to Boone 
county and was here employed as a farm hand for seven years, while subsequently 
he cultivated rented land for one year. In 1872 he purchased forty acres of his 
present farm in Yell township and began the improvement of the property. As 
his financial resources increased, owing to his untiring industry and capable man- 



224 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

agement, he extended the boundaries of his place by additional purchase until 
it now embraces one hundred and sixty acres of valuable land, eighty acres thereof 
lying in section 8 and the remaining eighty in section 6. Alert, energetic and 
industrious, he has met with success in his undertakings, practicing the rotation 
of crops and cultivating his farm after the most approved methods of modern 
agriculture. 

On the 20th of September, i88o, Mr. Schierholz was united in marriage to 
Miss Frances McKune, a daughter of Edward and Minerva B. (Hastings) 
McKune, the former a native of Great Bend, Pennsylvania, and the latter of New 
York. Edward McKune removed to Illinois at an early day and in August, 1862, 
enlisted for service in the Civil war from Dixon, that state, joining Company E, 
Seventy-fifth Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He was killed in October of the same 
year, in the first battle at Perryville, Kentucky, thus laying down his life on the 
altar of his country. The demise of his wife occurred in December, 1890. Mr. 
and Mrs. Schierholz are the parents of eleven children, as follows: Emily, who 
gave her hand in marriage to Charles N. Frost, of Lee Center. Illinois ; Catherine 
E., the wife of William Kruse; Peter, at home; Jacob E., who is a resident of 
Beaver, Boone county; Frances M., the wife of Fred Drew, of Perry, Iowa; Har- 
riett A., who is the wife of Everett Hull, of Ogden, Iowa; Albert H., also living 
in Ogden, this state; Lurena E., who is the wife of Mason Pugh, a miner of Yell 
township ; and Mabel, Wilhelm and Loue, all of whom are still under the parental 
roof. 

In his political views Mr. Schierholz is a stanch republican, loyally supporting 
the men and measures of that party at the polls. His religious faith is that of the 
United Brethren church. His many excellent traits of character have won him 
an extensive circle of friends and he is well known and highly esteemed throughout 
the community in which the greater part of his life has been spent. 



JOHN RUNDBERG. 



John Rundberg, of Ogden, Iowa, was a typical representative of that sturdy 
race of northern Europe which has furnished so many valuable citizens to the 
United States. He was born in Sweden and found in this country opportuni- 
ties which he turned by his energy and industry into material success. Mr. 
Rundberg was born August 19, 1834, a son of Andrew Rundberg. The father, 
also of Swedish birth and a wagonmaker by trade, was likewise engaged in 
blacksmithing. He stood high in the estimation of his community and served 
for some time in the responsible position of overseer of the poor, having charge 
of the poor farm of his district. The parents never came to America, the 
father dying in his native land in 1846 and the mother surviving him for about 
thirty years. 

John Rundberg had to earn his own livelihood upon the death of his father, 
at which time he was only twelve years of age. He found employment at the 
munificent sum of eight cents a day and afterward learned the carpenter's 
trade and also that of cabinet-maker, completing his apprenticeship when he 




JOHN nrxUBERG 



r" 



F u ij i 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 227 

was eighteen years of age, a fact which speaks well for his deep and serious 
purpose. 

Mr. Rundberg continued in the pursuit of his trade until 1868 in his native 
country, coming in that year to America and locating in New York. In Septem- 
ber he invented a threshing machine separator, giving thereby evidence of the 
fertility of his mind and the close attention which he paid to mechanical details, 
for which he had a particular talent. Later Mr. Rundberg decided upon a 
removal to the West and went to Stockholm, Wisconsin, where for a short time 
he continued to pursue his trade. Hie then came to Boone, Iowa, the year of 
his arrival being 1869. He followed his trade in a furniture factory in Boone 
county for one and one-half years, at the end of which time he decided upon 
a change of residence, selecting Moingona, where he established himself in the 
furniture business in partnership with Samuel Morgan. They remained in this 
connection for about nine months and in the fall of 1874 Mr. Rundberg came 
to Ogden and founded a furniture and undertaking business, of which he was 
the head until 1904, when the store was destroyed by fire. He rebuilt but retired 
from the business, his son, however, carrying a stock of furniture and continu- 
ing the activities of his father. Mr. Rundberg was successful because he had 
a thorough knowledge of the furniture business and because he possessed good 
business ability. Fair methods always prevailed in his establishment, and his 
reputation for the honest treatment of his customers gained for him an exten- 
sive trade. 

Mr. Rundberg was twice married. His first union was, with Miss Johanna 
Rundberg, a native of Sweden, who passed away December 10, 1877. On Jan- 
uary 5, 1879, he married Hannah Rustan, a daughter of Gustav and Caro- 
line Rustan, natives of Sweden. The father was a carpenter by trade but 
also followed agricultural pursuits. He crossed the Atlantic to America and 
located in Webster county, Iowa, at an early day. There he was for many years 
successful as an agriculturist, gaining a competency which permitted him to 
retire in the later years of his life, when he moved to Des Moines. That city 
remained his residence until his death, which occurred in September, 1910. His 
wife had preceded him to the Great Beyond in 1900. To the first union of 
Mr. Rundberg were born five children: Augusta, the wife of Charles Rosen, 
a harness dealer of Ogden, Iowa; David; John H. ; Emma; and Philip E., who 
is now conducting the furniture and undertaking business established by his 
father. To the second marriage also five children were born, Jennie, Charles, 
Martin, Bessie and Anna H. 

Mr. Rundberg gave his political allegiance to the republican party and 
although he shunned publicity and never sought public office, was always inter- 
ested in the development and advancement of his city and county. He gave 
material and moral support to worthy public enterprises and as a successful 
business man stood in the front ranks with those men who considered no eiTort 
too great in order to promote the welfare of their city. In later years Mr. 
Rundberg did not enjoy the best of health and after an illness of two years he 
passed away on December 14, 1913, in his eightieth year. He was venerated 
by all the citizens of Ogden as a pioneer and one of the early business men of 
the city. He was esteemed not so much for what he had accomplished as for 
the high qualities of his character. Mrs. Rundberg, who survives him, owns 

Vol. II— 1 1 



228 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

the building in which the furniture and undertaking business is now conducted, 
and resides in a handsome home which stands in grounds that comprise four 
acres of land. She is well and favorably known in Ogden, where she has many 
friends who esteem her highly on account of her womanly qualities of character. 



FRANCIS MARION BOLLE. 

Francis ]\Iarion Bolle, who was born in Douglas township, Boone county. 
May i8, 1866, has always been a resident of the county. After completing 
his common-school education he turned his attention to farming and has been 
quite successful in this occupation. His parents, Louis and Elizabeth (Jenkins) 
Bolle, were among the pioneers of Boone county, making the overland trip 
to Swede Point in 1851. The father became the owner of what now is known 
as the Samuel Bryant farm and which is adjacent to Madrid and was success- 
ful as a farmer. He was born in Germany, June 23, 1831, and died in Madrid, 
February 18, 1909. His wife, a native of Indiana, is residing in that city. 
In their family were six children, all of whom were born and reared in Douglas 
township. They are: Josiah, of North Dakota; William, of Perry, Iowa; Mrs. 
Mary Jane Eversole of Kansas ; Francis Marion of this review ; Henry Scott 
of North Dakota; and Mrs. Hattie Edith Biggs, of Irvington, Kossuth county, 
Iowa. 

Francis Marion Bolle owns a farm comprising one hundred and twenty acres 
of choice land on sections 27 and 28, Garden township. He has always followed 
the most up-to-date methods and by his labors has substantially contributed 
toward the agricultural development of Boone county. His land is planted to the 
most suitable cereals and by incessant labor and judicious management he has 
secured a competency. He resides in a pleasant and handsome home which is 
the hospitable meeting place of the many friends he and his wife have made in 
Boone county. 

On January 29, 1895, Mr. Bolle married Miss ^Martha Ann Hamnian, who 
was born in Polk county, July 8, 1870. She came to Douglas township with her 
parents in 1875. Her father, Amos Hamman, was bom in Vermilion county, 
Indiana, March 16, 1839. He enlisted for service with the Union army in the 
Civil war and after a gallant record was honorably discharged. Subsequently 
he came to Iowa and located in Polk county, south of Maxwell, where he operated 
a farm for a number of years. He is now residing in a comfortable home in 
Madrid. He comes of an old American family and several of his direct ancestors 
were soldiers in the Revolutionary war. The mother of Mrs. Bolle, Susaima 
Jane (Butler) Hamman, was born in Illinois, October 2, 1843, ^"d died in 
Garden township, July 10, 191 1. She bore her husband five children, all of 
whom are living: Mrs. Martha Ann Bolle, born July 8, 1870; George Franklin, 
born September 6, 1872, of Madrid: Milo Gideon, born January 29, 1874, of 
Nebraska; Zoe May, who was born August 15, 1879, and is cashier of the 
Madrid State Bank; and John Jacob, whose birth occurred October 4, 1881, and 
who resides in South Dakota. The three eldest children are natives of Polk 
county and the two younger were born in Boone county, where all were reared. 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 229 

The Hammans are accounted among the most successful and prominent families 
of their neighborhood. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bolle have one daughter, Laura ]\Iay. born June 15, igoo, who 
is attending school. They stand high in the esteem of their community and 
enjoy the respect of all who know them. Mr. Bolle has many friends in Douglas 
township who have known him from his early youth and are appreciative of his 
high qualities of character. Mr. Bolle is public-spirited, although he has never 
actively entered politics. He is a republican and in full accord with the principles 
of that party. He supports all community enterprises of value and has done 
more than liis share in promoting the general welfare. 



ERNEST C. E. CARLSON. 

The name of Ernest C. E. Carlson figures prominently in connection with 
commercial activity in Boone, where he is now conducting business as a partner 
in the firm of S. A. Nelson & Company. He is a self-made man and his life record 
should serve as a source of inspiration and encouragement to others, showing 
what may be accomplished when ambition points out the way and when energy 
and determination lead to the goal of success. He was born in Sweden, March 
28, 1864, and is a son of Charles J. and Anna Sophia (Carlson) Carlson, who 
were also natives of that country. In the year 1885 they crossed the Atlantic 
to the new world, and the father continued farming in America until called to his 
final rest on the 22d of April, 1912. His widow survived until the 20th of May, 
1913. In their family were two children: Ernest C. E. ; and Caroline, now the 
wife of Charles Olson, of Boone. 

Ernest C. E. Carlson pursued his early education in the public and high schools 
of Sweden. He was a young man of about twenty-one years when the family 
came to the United States, and after arriving on this side the Atlantic he devoted 
some time to general agricultural pursuits. In 1889 he accepted a clerkship in the 
grocery store of A. T. Davis and later purchased the business, which he con- 
ducted alone until i8go, when he consolidated his interests with those of C. V. 
Nelson and Alfred Zandell, the business being then conducted under the firm 
style of Nelson, Zandell, Carlson & Company. Two years later Mr. Carlson dis- 
posed of his interest to his partners and devoted the succeeding year to the 
improvement of his education. Lie then purchased another store, which he con- 
ducted under the firm name of Carlson & Company until 1894. He then joined 
forces with Alfred Recksen and S. A. Nelson. In 1897 he was appointed deputy 
treasurer of the county and served for four years. Within that period Alfred 
Recksen retired from the company and the business has since been conducted 
under the firm name of S. A. Nelson & Company, Mr. Carlson remaining as one 
of the partners. They carry a large and well selected stock of general mer- 
chandise, and the neat and attractive arrangement of their store and their reason- 
able prices have secured for them a liberal and well merited patronage, which is 
increasing year by year. 

On the 28th of May, 1890, Mr. Carlson was united in marriage to Miss Hannah 
Peterson, a native of Sweden, and unto them have been born eig-ht children : 



230 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

Harold E., born August 13, 1891 ; Walter A., born February 2^, 1893; Dora E., 
July 24, 1S97; Gerhard M., February 15, 1900; Eldon L., February i, 1903; Eve- 
line J., April 4, 1906; and Bernadine I.. January 23, 191 1. A daughter, Ruth E., 
passed away June 29, 1906. 

In his political views Mr. Carlson is an earnest republican but does not 
seek nor desire office, preferring to concentrate his energies and efforts along 
other lines. He is the president of the Swedish Mutual Insurance Company and 
secretary of the Swedish Old People's Home. He belongs to the Swedish' Mis- 
sion and is an elder of his church. He takes an active and helpful interest in 
the moral progress of the community and his influence is always on the side of 
right, reform, truth and justice. In his business career he has gone upon the 
principle that a good name is rather to be chosen than great riches, and he has 
never sacrificed honorable dealing to a desire for gain. 



IRA D. JOHNSON. 



In the death of Ira D. Johnson on the 20th of September, 1898, Boone 
mourned the loss of one of her valued and representative citizens, for his life 
exemplified the many sterling traits of manhood which in every land and clime 
awaken confidence and regard. He was born in Lawrence county, ^Missouri, 
August 12, 1870, and completed a high-school course at Henrietta, Texas. He 
also attended a business college at Jacksonville, Illinois, and thus qualified for 
onerous and responsible duties in later life. In the fall of 1890 he came to 
Boone and entered into partnership with his father, the late W. D. Johnson, 
in the coal business under the firm name of W. D. Johnson & Company. He 
devoted practically his entire attention to the coal trade and in that connection 
a big business was built up. He was also a stockholder in the Security Sav- 
ings Bank, and his contemporaries and colleagues in business circles knew him 
to be a" thoroughly reliable and enterprising man. 

On the 29th of October, 1890, in Illinois, Mr. Johnson was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Mary E. Johnson, a daughter of James and Martha (Adkins) 
Johnson, who were natives of Mason county, Illinois. James Johnson was a 
member of Company .M, Second Illinois Cavalry at the time of the Civil war, 
enlisting in 1862 and serving for three years. He became a commissioned officer, 
holding the rank of second lieutenant when nuislered out of the service. By 
occupation he was a farmer, devoting his entire life to general agricultural pur- 
suits. The cause of temperance found in him a stalwart advocate and earnest 
worker, and his life was actuated by many high and manly principles. His 
family numbered nine children, all of whom are yet living. Two of the sons 
are residents of Boone county — F. H., making his home in the city of Boone, 
while Edgar resides near Ogden. To Air. and Mrs. Ira D. Johnson were born 
three children: William D., who remains at home and is an automobile sales- 
man ; Lucile, who is attending Northwestern University at Evanston, Illinois, 
and Ethel Lorraine, who died when a baby. 

Politically Mr. Johnson was a republican, although reared in the faith of 
the democratic party, to which his father gave his support. Fraternally he 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 231 

was connected with Boonesboro Lodge, No. 324, K. P., and his widow is a 
member of the Pythian Sisters. He died at the very early age of twenty-eight 
years, and the news of his demise was a shock to the entire community. He 
left behind him many friends, and his heritage to his family was not only a good 
property, but also that good name which is rather to be chosen than great riches. 
In action he was manly and sincere, in spirit kindly, and one of his more pro- 
nounced characteristics was his devotion to his family. 



HENRY C. SPURRIER. 

Henry C. Spurrier is the owner of one of the most highly improved farms 
in Boone county, comprising two hundred acres on sections 5 and 4, Yell town- 
ship. His birth occurred in Illinois in September, 1850, his parents being 
Francis M. and Rebecca (Argo) Spurrier, the former a native of Kentucky and 
the latter of Ohio. Francis M. Spurrier removed to Illinois with his parents 
in 1830 and carired on farming in that state until 1856, when he drove across 
the country to Boone county, Iowa, and here began the cultivation of rented 
land. In September, 1862, he enlisted for service in the Civil war as a mem- 
ber of Company D, Thirty-second Iowa \'olunteer Infantry, continuing with 
that command until February, 1865, when he was wounded and received his 
discharge. He returned to this county and carried on general agricultural pur- 
suits here throughout the remainder of his active business career, while the last 
years of his life were spent in honorable retirement at Ogden, where he passed 
away in November, 191 2. The period of his residence in Boone county cov- 
ered fifty-six years and in his demise the community lost one of its esteemed 
and representative citizens. He had long survived his wife, who died in Illi- 
nois in February, 1856. 

Henry C. Spurrier, who was a little lad of si.\ years when he came to this 
county with his father, acquired his education in Yell township and remained 
on the home farm until twenty-six years of age. He then started out as an 
agriculturist on his own account, purchasing seventy acres of land which he 
improved and subsequently sold. Later he bought a tract of two hundred 
acres on sections 5 and 4. Yell township, which has since remained in his pos- 
session and which he has improved to such an extent that it is now one of the 
best equipped farms in the entire county, and in its operation he has won a 
measure of success that has gained him recognition among the substantial and 
leading agriculturists of his community. In connection with the cultivation of 
cereals he also keeps thoroughbred stock, feeding a carload of cattle annually. 
He likewise owns property in Canada. 

In August, 1881, Mr. Spurrier was united in marriage to Miss Alice Hainey, 
her parents being Jackson and Nancy (Russell) Hainey, who were natives of 
Kentucky and Tennessee respectively. The father removed to Kansas in an 
early day and successfully carried on farming in that state for many years. 
His demise occurred in 1900, in the Sunflower state, where his widow still makes 
her home. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Spurrier have been born six children, as fol- 
lows : Eva, who is at home; Blanche, the wife of Charles Tonsfeldt, an ^gricul- 



232 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

turist of Yell township; Ethel, at home; Howard, who makes his home in 
Canada ; .jMaude, whose demise occurred in 1901 ; and Orson, at home. 

Air. Spurrier is a republican in politics and has served as trustee of Yell 
township for twelve years, making a creditable record in that connection. His 
religious faith is that of the Baptist church. He has resided in this county for 
fifty-eight years and has become widely and favorably known within its bor- 
ders. His life is exemplary in all respects and he has ever supported those inter- 
ests which are calculated to uplift and benefit humanity, while his own high 
moral principles are deserving of warm commendation. 



JOHN W. \'AN ZANDT. 

John \\'. \'an Zandt, a well known and respected citizen of Madrid, is a prom- 
inent factor in financial circles as president of the Farmers Savings Bank. His 
birth occurred in Highland county, Ohio, on the nth of July, 1843. h's parents 
being Joshua and Alary Ann (Thayer) \'an Zandt, the former born in \'irginia 
on the 2d of February, 1818, and the latter in \'ermont in 1822. In 1850 the 
family home was established in Kendall county, Illinois, and Joshua Van Zandt 
there resided until called to his final rest in May, 1899. His wife passed away in 
1891. They were the parents of the following children: Mrs. Martha Smith, 
who is deceased ; Mrs. Jane Andrews, who has also passed awa}' ; John W.. of 
this review ; George W., who resides on the old home farm in Kendall county, 
Illinois ; Mrs. Mary Falkenberg, living at Minooka, Illinois : Frank, who makes 
his home in Eureka, California; and Mrs. Hulda Falkenberg, of Joliet. Illinois. 
The three eldest children were born in Ohio and the younger members of the 
family in Illinois. 

John W. Van Zandt, who was a little lad of five years when taken by his 
parents to Kendall county, Illinois, there attended the common schools and early 
in life turned his attention to agricultural pursuits. In May, 1864, he enlisted 
for one hunrired days' service as a member of Company H, One Hundred and 
Thirty-eighth Illinois \'olunteer Infantry, but remained with the Union troops 
about six months, being detailed to guard railroad property in Missouri and 
adjoining states. He participated in several skirmishes and was honorably dis- 
charged at Springfield in November, 1864. 

In 1879 Mr. Van Zandt brought his family to Garden township, Boone 
county, Iowa, and for a number of years 'Successfully cultivated one of the valu- 
able and productive farms of the district, winning a gratifying measure of pros- 
perity in his undertakings. At the present time he serves as president of the 
Farmers Savings Bank of Madrid, of which institution he is one of the heaviest 
stockholders and the continued growth and success of which is largely attributa- 
ble to his able management and direction. He owns a handsome and well 
appointed residence in Madrid and is widely recognized as one of the prosperous 
and leading citizens of the community. 

On the I2th of May, 1866, Mr. \'an Zandt was united in marriage to Miss 
Addie Kennison, who was born in \'ermont on the 19th of November, 1848, her 
parents being Henry and Arvilla (Smith) Kennison, likewise natives of that 



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HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 235 

state. The father passed away in Wihnington, IlHnois, in 1857, while the mother's 
demise also occurred in Will county, that state. Their children were as follows : 
Delos, who is deceased ; Mrs. Sarah Mason, who is a resident of Madrid, Iowa ; 
Mrs. Evaline Frise, also of Madrid, Iowa ; Frank, who passed away in Kossuth 
county, Iowa; J. S., who was born on the 4th of September, 1845, ^"d resides in 
Madrid, Iowa ; Mrs. Susan Copp, deceased ; and Mrs. Addie Van Zandt. The 
above named were born in \'ermont and reared in Illinois. Unto Mr. and Mrs. 
Van Zandt have been born five children, four of whom still survive. William H., 
whose birth occurred on the nth of October, 1867. was a graduate of the Iowa 
Agricultural College and was employed as postal clerk on the Milwaukee road 
from ]\Iarion to Council Bluffs. He passed away on the 7th of July, 1908. Mrs. 
Nettie M. Stor)-, who was born on the 20th of June, i86g, is a resident of Ames, 
Iowa. E. G., whose natal day was December 19, 1872, has been a postal carrier 
in Des Moines for the past fourteen years. Mrs. Cora Valline, who was born 
September 9, 1876, resides in Boone, Iowa, her husband being a locomotive en- 
gineer in the employ of the Chicago & Northwestern Railway. Joshua, bom 
April 24, 1890, is a graduate of the Madrid high school and the Capital City 
Commercial College of Des Moines, Iowa, and is now in the employ of Davidson 
Brothers of Des Moines. All except the last named, who is a native of Garden 
township, this county, were born in Illinois. 

Mr. Van Zandt is a republican in politics and has: always been interested and 
active in the work of the party in his home commuoity,'i He has held all of the 
township offices and ably served as assessor of Garden township for many years, 
while at the present time he acts as assessor of the city of Madrid. He serves 
on the school board of Garden township and for the past eighteen years has been 
a valued member of the Madrid board of education. His cooperation and sup- 
port can ever be counted upon to further any movement or measure instituted 
to promote the general welfare and he is widely recognized as a most loyal, public- 
spirited and progressive citizen. He is identified with the Grand Army of the 
Republic as a member of John Filmer Post, No. 347, of Madrid, of which he 
has long been quartermaster, and for one year served as its commander. His 
wife is a devoted and consistent member of the Madrid Christian church. Both 
Mr. and Mrs. Van Zandt are widely and favorably known throughout the 
county, having gained many friends during the long period of their residence 
here. 



LEWIS SAVITS. 



In giving an account of the more prominent agriculturists of Boone county 
and particularly Beaver township, Lewis Savits cannot be overlooked. Mr. 
Savits, a native of Boone county, owns eighty acres on section 15 and eighty 
acres on section 21. besides eighty ,^cres on section 10, which he bought in igoo 
and which was the first land that he cultivated as an independent farmer. He 
was born in Amaqua township, December 5, 1872, and is a son of George and 
Elizabeth (Gunder) Savits, the former a native of Pennsylvania and the latter 
of Illinois. They came to Boone county about 1862, the father acquiring title 



236 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

to forty acres of land in Yell township. He farmed successfully until 1882. 
Jn 1886 he removed to Ogden, which remained his home until his death in 1902. 
His widow resides in Ogden. 

Lewis Savits was reared and educated in Boone county, attending the dis- 
trict schools. Early he began his career as a farmer and remained in the employ 
of others until 1892, in which year he rented land in Beaver township, in the 
cultivation of which he was so successful that in 1900 he was enabled to acquire 
eighty acres on section 10. He immediately took the task in hand of improv- 
ing the land and has since devoted himself to this occupation with the excep- 
tion of fourteen months spent in Colorado. Air. Savits is an up-to-date and 
modern farmer and follows most progressive methods in the operation of his 
farm. There can be found a complete and well repaired set of buildings, which 
in conjunction with his well tilled fields, indicate his careful management and 
his incessant industry. As his means increased Mr. Savits acquired title to 
eighty acres of land on section 15 and eighty acres on section 21. He not only 
follows general agricultural pursuits but excels as a stock-raiser and annually 
markets three or four carloads of stock. Moreover, Mr. Savits is a stockholder 
in the Farmers' Cooperative Company of Beaver. 

On December 8, 1896, he married Sadie Vaughn, a daughter of Patrick and 
Lena (Horton) Vaughn, the former born in Ireland and the latter in New 
\ork. The parents came to Boone county during pioneer days, and here the 
father successfully devoted himself to agricultural labors. For a short time he 
was also connected with railroad construction work. He bought eighty acres 
on section 15, Beaver township, and this is the same land which our subject 
now owns and operates. Mr. Vaughn had it under cultivation for forty-three 
years and there remained until his death in August. igo8. His wife died in 
February, 1910. Mr. and Mrs. Savits have two children: George Patrick Leo, 
fifteen years of age: and Lina Eloise, who is two years old. 

Mr. Savits has not only attained individual success but has been a force in 
the agricultural development of his section. He has always interested himself 
in public questions and is at present one of the township trustees, having served 
in that position for six years to the benefit of the township, whose interests he 
promotes in every way. Politically he is a republican and thoroughly conversant 
with the aspirations of his party, its ideals and its principles. He gives his 
adherence to the Catholic faith and is interested in religious life as well as in 
all other efforts tending to improve the moral life of man. Both he and his 
wife are favorably and well known in Beaver township, where they have many 
friends. 



H. EDMOND FRY. 



H. Edmond Fry, a practitioner at the Boone county bar since 1902, con- 
nected in his professional work with Judge John L. Stevens until 19 14, but since 
that time alone, has his offices in the Boone National Bank building and is 
accorded a large and distinctly representative clientage. He was born Septem- 
ber 13, 1870, in the county which is still his place of residence and is a son of 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 237 

Henry Fry, who is mentioned elsewhere in this volume. His entire life thus 
far has been passed in Boone county and from the Boone high school he was 
graduated with the class of 1889. He afterward attended Cornell College for 
about one year and subsequently entered the State University, pursuing a par- 
tial course in the law school of that institution. He then continued the study of 
law in the office and under the direction of J. J. Snell, a prominent attorney, 
until qualified for admission to practice. He passed the required examination 
in 1901 and entered upon the active work of the profession in 1902. However, 
this was by no means his initial step in business life, nor was his educational 
course a continuous one. Reared upon the home farm, he had early become 
familiar with the duties and labors incident to the development of the fields and 
was active in their cultivation until twenty years of age, when he became a 
teacher in the schools of Boone county. He afterward became a stenographer 
and typist and later was made accountant for the Building & Savings Associa- 
tion and subsequently occupied the position of bookkeeper and teller in the First 
National Bank of Boone for about two years. He next entered the State Uni- 
versity at Iowa City and as mentioned above, returned to Boone for the further 
study of law, in which he continued until his admission to the bar. He began 
practice in 1902 with Judge John L. Stevens, and this association was main- 
tained until 1914, since which time Mr. Fry has been alone in the general prac- 
tice of law. He has won for himself a creditable position in a calling where 
advancement depends entirely upon broad knowledge and individual merit. 

In January, 1913, Mr. Fry was united in marriage to Miss Elsa C. Odel, 
of Red Oak, Iowa, a daughter of H. F. Odel, a pioneer of the state and a promi- 
nent retired farmer and real-estate man. Mr. and Mrs. Fry hold membership 
in the Methodist church, and in fraternal circles his connection is with the 
Masons and the Knights of Pythias. He has been somewhat active in public 
affairs, serving as city solicitor for two terms, or from 1905 until 1909. He is 
now a candidate for district judge of the eleventh judicial district on the non- 
partisan ticket, and should he be elected there is no doubt that he will make 
an excellent presiding officer over the courts. He has been well informed con- 
cerning the principles of jurisprudence, and an analytical mind enables him to 
readily recognize the relation between the fact, the evidence and the law applicable 
thereto. 



CHARLES R. MORGAN. 

Charles R. Morgan, a well known and representative citizen of Ogden, is a 
lineman in the service of the Marcy Mutual Telephone Company and has also 
been engaged in auctioneering for the past seven years. His birth occurred 
in Peoples township, Boone county, Iowa, on the 13th of December, 1875, his 
parents being John W. and Margaret (Miller) Morgan. A sketch of the father, 
who passed away in Ogden on the 20th of October, 19 13, appears on another 
page of this work. 

Charles R. Morgan acquired his early education in the district schools of his 
native county and also attended public school in Ogden. He remained under 



238 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

the parental roof until eighteen years of age and then went to Ames, where 
he attended the Iowa State College of Agriculture until graduated from that 
institution with the class of 1898. Subsequently he made his way to Jefferson, 
Green county, this state, and there worked in a creamery for a year and a half. 
On the expiration of that period he rented a tract of land and after cultivating 
the property for two years entered the service of the Bell Telephone Company, 
with which he continued for five years. He next spent two years as lineman 
with the Boone County Telephone Company and five years later became con- 
nected with the Marcy Mutual Telephone Company, by which he has been 
retained to the present time. For the past seven years he has also devoted con- 
siderable attention to auctioneering and in that connection has won an enviable 
reputation that has caused his services to be frequently sought. 

On the 14th of January, 1903, Mr. Morgan was united in marriage to Miss 
JVIinnie Linderman, a daughter of John and Phoebe (Cook) Linderman, who 
were natives of Germany and emigrated to the United States in an early day. 
They settled first in Harrison county, Iowa, and subsequently came to Boone 
county, Mr. Linderman here following farming for a period of fourteen years. 
He now makes his home with our subject, his wife having passed away in 
1903. Mr. and Mrs. Morgan are the parents of four children, as follows : 
Carroll, eight years of age ; Gerald, who is seven years old ; and Earl and Helen, 
who are six and four years of age respectively. Mr. Morgan gives his political 
allegiance to the democracy and in religious faith is a Methodist. He is also a 
worthy exemplar of the Masonic fraternity. Both Mr. and Mrs. Morgan enjoy 
a wide and favorable acquaintance in the community where they reside, and the 
hospitality of the best homes is cordially extended to them. 



ALLEN T. SILVER. 



Allen T. Silver, who for the past twenty-eight years has resided at Boone, 
is a retired farmer, now residing at the home of George W. McBride at 1606 
Carroll street. He is widely known and highly respected, for his life has been 
a busy and useful one in every relation. He proved himself a loyal soldier 
during the Civil war, has made a capable public officer and is known as a reliable 
business man. At the present time, however, he is enjoying a rest which he 
has truly earned and richly deserves. He was born at Franklin, Warren county, 
Ohio, April 25, 1827, and has, therefore, passed the eighty-seventh milestone on 
life's journey. He is a son of James and Mercy (Mullin) Silver. The grand- 
father removed with his family to Warren county, Ohio, in 1805 and there fol- 
lowed the occupation of farming, spending his remaining days in that locality. 
He was twice married and by his first wife had two children and by the second 
ten. The father, a native of New Jersey, was but five years of age when he 
went with his parents to Warren county, Ohio, and in 183 1 he removed with 
his family to Henry county, Indiana. He engaged in merchandising at West 
Liberty and when the new National road was built removed to Knightstown. 
where he engaged in business for a number of years. Subsequently he took up 
his abode upon a farm in Rush county, Indiana, but his later years were spent at 




ALLKN T. SILVER AM) GKKAT-UHANDSON 



I -. 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 241 

Knightstown, where he died in 1864. He was active in politics and at one time 
was a candidate for the state legislature. His religious faith was that of the 
Society of Friends, or Quakers. He married Mercy Mullin, who was born in 
New Jersey, December 31, 1799, a daughter of Isaac Mullin, who removed to 
Warren county, Ohio, about the same time the Silver family established their 
home there. He became an extensive farmer of that district. His father also 
went to Ohio and died near Springboro, Warren county. He was a native of 
Ireland. Mrs. Mercy (Mullin) Silver passed away in 1855. 

Allen T. Silver has reached a more advanced age than any other member of 
his family. He is the eldest of six children and only one other is now living, 
Isaac, who resides near Indianapolis and is seventy-eight years of age. For a 
quarter of a century Allen T. Silver was a resident of Indiana, the family home 
being established there when he was Vnit four years of age. It was a frontier 
region in which they settled, and he experienced the usual privations and hard- 
ships of pioneer life. His education was acquired in the old-time subscription 
schools, for the public-school system had not then been organized in his locality. 
There he engaged in farming until 1853, when he removed to F>oonesboro, Roone 
county, Iowa. However, he had previously attended lot sales here in 185 1. For 
some time after taking up his abode in the county he engaged in clerking and 
in 1856 he went to Ridgeport, where he conducted merchandising on his own 
account for two years. Later he was again in the same line of business for short 
periods. At length he purchased a farm just north' ef- ffee city and operated it 
until his removal to Boone, where he engaged in stock-buying, conducting 
business very successfully. 

On the 15th of April, 1855, in Dodge township, Mr.' Silver was united in 
marriage to Miss Sophia Friedley, a native of Indiana and a daughter of Daniel 
Friedley. She came to Boone with her brother Henry Friedley, a pioneer of 
this county, who arrived in 1850. He spent his later years near Tacoma, Wash- 
ington, and there passed away in December, 1913, at the age of almost eighty 
years. Mr. and Mrs. Silver had no children of their own but adopted George 
W. McBride when he was but thirteen months old. He had lost his mother, 
and they took him into their family as a son, rearing and educating him. He is 
a machinist by trade and is in the employ of the Chicago & Northwestern Rail- 
road Company. He married Miss Lena Pohl, and to them have been born three 
children, Leone and Ella and Alice, twins. Ella was married and has one son, 
Richard Lamonte Noland. The death of Mrs. Silver occurred in September, 
1902, and Mr. Silver now makes his home with his fosterson, Mr. McBride. 
His wife was a consistent member of the United Brethren church and had a 
large circle of warm friends in this county. 

In public affairs Mr. Silver has always taken a keen interest. He acted as 
enrolling officer during the Civil war in Dodge and Harrison townships, Boone 
county, being appointed to that position in 1863. In the following year he en- 
listed as a member of Company K, Thirteen Iowa Infantry, with which he 
served until the close of the war. He is now a member of the Grand Army 
post at Boone and thus maintains pleasant relations with those who were his 
comrades in arms. Politically he was originally a whig, but on the organiza- 
tion of the republican party he joined its ranks and has since been one of its 
stalwart advocates. He served as supervisor of his township, as township trus- 



242 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

tee, as justice of the peace and postmaster. He acted as deputy postmaster at 
Boonesboro for a year and later was postmaster at Ridgeport. He has likewise 
been school director and at all times he has been a helpful factor in promoting 
public progress. In former years he served as a trustee of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church and assisted in building the house of worship for that denomina- 
tion at Ridgeport. His life has been well and worthily spent, and he is today 
one of the most venerable of Boone's citizens, receiving the honor and respect 
which should ever be accorded those of advanced years, whose lives have been 
guided by manly principles. Six decades have come and gone since he arrived 
in this county, so that he has been a witness of much of the growth and develop- 
ment of this part of the state. He has seen many remarkable changes and can 
tell many interesting stories of the early days. 



BENJAMIN F. ROBERTS. 

Boone county lost one of its valued and representative citizens when Benja- 
min F. Roberts passed away on the 22c\ of May, 1899, for he had been a resi- 
dent of Harrison townshi]) from 1837. He came to Iowa from New York, 
having been born in Jefferson county, the Empire state, in 1830. His parents 
were Dr. Hugh and Betsy ( Burdick ) Roberts, who were also natives of New 
York, where they spent their entire lives. They were of Quaker faith and the 
father was a practicing physician, who also owned and supervised a farm. 

Benjamin F. Roberts was reared in his native county, where he learned the 
wagon-maker's trade, following that pursuit in the east until 1857, when he 
removed westward to Boone county and began farming in what was then Jack- 
son, but is now Harrison township. In his work he met with a large meas- 
ure of success. He kept in touch with the advanced methods of farming, 
brought his land to a high state of cultivation, and as improved machinery was 
placed upon the market, he became a purchaser thereof and thus facilitated 
his farm work. His place ever presented a neat and attractive appearance, 
and the result of his labors was the attainment of a gratifying competence. 

In Jefferson county. New York, on the 24th of August, 1854, Mr. Roberts 
was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Houghton, who was born in Jefferson 
county, New York, September 6, 1835, a daughter of Elijah and Harriet (Dop- 
king)' Houghton, who were natives of Massachusetts and New York respectively 
and were farming people. Mr. and Mrs. Roberts became the parents of two 
daughters. Harriet Estella is the wife of J. R. .McNaughton, a farmer living 
at Cedar Rapids, Linn county, Iowa, and they have four children: Mrs. Ollie 
Delany ; Mrs. Lillian Privett ; Earl, of Des Moines : and Benjamin F., a student 
in the Art Institute of Chicago. Emma was married July 31, 1884 to William 
F. Boggs, who was for many years a hardware merchant of Streator, Illinois, 
and for five years conducted business at Story, Iowa. He has followed farm- 
ing in Boone county, operating the Roberts farm in Harrison township. He 
was born July 10, 1854, in Clarion county, Pennsylvania, and in 1857 was taken 
to Illinois by his parents, Robert M. and Isabella May (Baumgardner) Boggs. 
They remained in Illinois until 1873, when they removed to Plainview, Nebraska, 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 243 

where they resided until they passed away. William F. Boggs attended the high 
school. He afterward entered the hardware business and in 1889 formed a 
partnership at Streator, Illinois, becoming a member of the firm of McFeely, 
Boggs & Company. In 1905 Mr. Boggs withdrew from that firm and removed 
from Streator to Story, Iowa, where he engaged in the hardware business for 
five years. On the 5th of May, 1910, he arrived in Boone, where he has since 
made his home, and is today one of the valued and respected residents of this 
city. Mr. and Mrs. Boggs have one son, Sidney R., who is a graduate of the 
Boone high school of the class of 1914. Mr. Boggs served for five years as 
a member of the state militia of Illinois. His political allegiance is given to 
the republican party, and while in Streator he served as a member of the board 
of education for nine years. He belongs to the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, the Modern Woodmen of America and the Knights of the Globe. Since 
1884 he has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal church and he is inter- 
ested in the Young Men's Christian Association. 

In his political views Benjamin F. Roberts was a stalwart republican, sup- 
porting the party from its organization, until his demise. He was a man of 
progressive views and ideas. He helped to build the first agricultural college, 
at Ames, donating liberally to the institution and attending in 1859 the first 
])icnic on the campus, together with Mrs. Roberts, who also attended the last 
one, held in 1909. While fifteen years have come and gone since Mr. Roberts 
passed away, he is yet remembered by many citizens of Harrison township and 
other sections of the county, who esteemed him highly because of his many 
excellent traits of character, his public-spirited devotion to the general good and 
his loyalty in friendship. 



ANTON L. CHALLBERG. 

Anton L. Challberg is a member of one of the best known families of 
Beaver township. There he owns one hundred and twenty acres on section 36, 
all of which is highly improved, annually bringing him rich harvests. Mr. 
Challberg is a native of Boone county, his birth having occurred in Marcy town- 
ship in February, 1873. His parents, Nels P. and Lena (Olson) Challberg, 
were natives of Sweden. On his arrival in America the father located in Dixon, 
Illinois, in 1853. He was a mason and worked at that trade for some time, 
remaining in Dixon until his removal to Minnesota, where he bought land, oper- 
ating the same for about thirteen years or until 1868. That year marks his 
arrival in Boone county. He became the owner of one hundred and sixty 
acres of land in Swede Lane, Marcy township, which he improved and cultivated 
for the remainder of his life, being so successful that he was enabled to grad- 
ually acquire six hundred and twenty acres in Marcy and Beaver townships. 
The father died in September, 1878, and the mother in January, 1909. During 
the later years of her life she made her home with her son Anton. In the fam- 
ily were ten children, five of whom are now deceased. Those living are : John, 
a resident of Fort Dodge; Emma, the wife of N. M. Peterson, an agriculturist 



244 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

of .Marcy township; Charles, a successful contractor residing in California; 
Minton L., who farms on the old homestead in Alarcy township ; and Anton L. 

The last named was reared and educated in Marcy township, attending the 
Marcy Center school. It may be of interest to note here that this school was 
destroyed by the cyclone of 1882. Mr. Challberg early devoted himself to 
agricultural pursuits, thoroughly acquainting himself with the details of the 
work and acquiring the knowledge necessary for the successful conduct of a farm. 
He remained with his widowed mother on the home farm until igoi, when the 
land was divided and he came into possession of one hundred and twenty acres 
situated on section 36, Beaver township. He has since improved his place 
wonderfully, and there his mother lived with him until her death, having the 
love and tender care of her son. Mr. Challberg has remained on this place 
continuously with the exception of two years, during which time he was engaged 
in the coal and feed business in Fort Dodge. 

He is at present assessor of Beaver township and has served in that office 
to the entire satisfaction of all concerned for five years. He is a stockholder 
and director in the Farmers Savings Bank of Berkley. Boone county, and has 
proved himself a valuable member of the board in giving suggestions in regard 
to the business management of the bank. Politically he is a republican, inter- 
ested in the welfare of his party, yet not an active politician. He is ever ready 
to give his support to worthy public enterprises and aids in all movements under- 
taken to improve his township. He belongs to the Swedish Alission church and 
carries his Christian principles into his everyday life. Mr. Challberg has many 
friends in Marcy and Beaver townships and all who know him speak highly of 
him. 



ERASTUS R. IRVING. 



Forty-seven years have come and gone since Erastus R. Irving took up his 
abode in Boone county and since 1857 he has been a resident of Iowa. Through 
the past seven years he has lived in the city of Boone, having retired from active 
business life. For many years, however, he was extensively and successfully 
engaged in general agricultural pursuits and is still the owner of valuable farm 
property in Colfax and Jackson townships. His birth occurred in Washington 
county. New York, November i, 1830, his parents being Adam and Roby 
(English) Irving, the latter a lineal descendant of Stephen English, a May- 
flower passenger. The father of Mrs. Irving was Luke English, a soldier of 
the Revolutionar)' war, who participated in a number of the hotly contested 
engagements which brought independence to the colonies and was present at the 
surrender of General Burgoyne. His daughter Roby was born in Connecticut 
and in early womanhood gave her hand in marriage to Adam Irving, who 
became the founder of the Irving family of which Erastus R. Irving is a repre- 
sentative. Adam Irving was born in northern England, at Carlisle, and he had 
a brother who fought under the Duke of Wellington in the battle of Water- 
loo, in which he was slightly wounded. Adam Irving was a tailor by trade 
and came to America as an English soldier at the time of the War of 1812. 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 245 

Liking the country, he decided to remain and settled in New York state, where 
he was married and resided for some time. In later life he removed to the west 
and spent his last days in Boone county, Iowa, where he passed away about 
thirty years ago at the age of eighty-three. He had long survived his wife, 
who passed away at the comparatively early age of thirty-nine years. They 
were the parents of six children. 

Erastus R. Irving is the only one now living, the last of the others having 
died in 1913, at the age of eighty-seven. All reached a good old age. One was 
a twin brother of Erastus R. Irving and died in 1901. The youngest brother, 
George, came to Boone county in 1866 in company with Erastus and here fol- 
lowed farming for many years. At his death he left a family of five children, 
four daughters and one son. 

In taking up the personal history of Erastus R. Irving we present to our 
readers the life record of one who has long been widely and favorably known 
in Boone county. He spent the period of his boyhood and youth in the east, 
pursuing his education in the public schools of New York and in 1854 he removed 
westward to Illinois, settling in Boone county, where he conducted a store. In 
1857 he went to Mankato, Minnesota, where he entered a quarter section of 
land and proved up his claim. This he sold some years later and invested the 
proceeds in Boone county property. He now owns three hundred and twenty 
acres of land lying largely in Colfax township, with eighty acres in Jackson 
township. The farm is worth at least two hundred dollars per acre. Upon 
it are fine improvements and all modern accessories and conveniences of the 
model farm of the twentieth century. Farming, however, has not always occu- 
pied the time and attention of Mr. Irving. In early manhood he engaged in 
teaching school in Benton county, Iowa. Following his marriage, which was 
celebrated in November, 1858, he and his wife located upon a rented farm in 
Boone county, Illinois, where they remained for two years. Upon coming to 
Iowa they settled in Benton county, and through the succeeding winter Mr. 
Irving engaged in teaching school. Later he again went to Minnesota, where 
he carried on farming through the summer months, but in the autumn again 
went to Boone county. Illinois. There he carried on farming until 1865, when 
he again sought a home in Iowa. In the spring of 1866 he purchased ninety 
acres of land on section i, Worth township, Boone county, and began the 
development of a farm. The land was in its primitive condition and destitute 
of all improvements, but with characteristic energy he began its development. 
After two years he sold that property and invested in one hundred and sixty 
acres on section 7, Colfax township. This, too, was unbroken prairie when it 
came into his possession, but his labors soon wrought a marked transforma- 
tion in the appearance of the place. In atldition to tilling his fields he set out 
a large orchard and planted a walnut grove. Later he purchased another farm 
and again began its development with the same characteristic energy that has 
always marked his life work. He built good barns and outbuildings upon the 
place and continued to till the soil until he retired from active business life. 
His labors were crowned with a substantial measure of success, for his work 
was intelligently directed and he acquired, therefore, a handsome income. 

It was in November, 1838, in Boone county, Illinois, that Mr. Irving wedded 
Miss Nancy M. Burton, who was born in Dutchess county, New York, March 



246 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

27, 1835, a daughter, of John and Elizabeth ( Stuart) Burton, who in the fall 
of 1838 went west to Boone county, Illinois, where they spent their remaining 
days. iMr. Burton passed away when more than eighty years of age, and his 
wife died when about seventy-one years of age. Mrs. Irving had three sisters 
and four brothers, of whom three brothers and one sister are living. Two of 
the brothers are now in Iowa and one in New York, while the sister is a resi- 
dent of Wisconsin. Mrs. Irving spent her girlhood days in Illinois, remaining 
there until her marriage, which occurred when she was about twenty-four 
jears of age. To Mr. and Mrs. Irving were born two daughters, who have 
passed away, the daughter Myra dying in early childhood, while Edna E. became 
the wife of Dr. O. F. Beckett, of Boone, and died in May, 1913, at the age of 
forty-three years. They were at that time residents of Hiawatha, Kansas, and 
.at her death Mrs. Beckett left a son and daughter. George B. Irving, the 
only son of Mr. and Mrs. Erastus Irving, resides at home and is the owner 
of an excellent farm of one hundred and sixty acres in Colfax township. He 
wedded Mary Brown, and they have one daughter. 

In public affairs Mr. Irving has taken a deep and active interest. He served 
his 'township as justice of the peace and as town clerk, and his duties have 
■ever been promptly and faithfully discharged. He cast his first presidential 
ballot for Franklin Pierce and in 1856 supported John C. Fremont, since which 
time he has always voted for the presidential can-didates of the republicarr 
party save on one occasion when he supported Cleveland. He has frequently 
been a delegate to party conventions. Both he and his wife are members of 
the Methodist Episcopal church and have contributed 'generously to its support 
and taken an active interest in its wprk. A contemporary biographer has said 
of him: "Mr. Irving is a citizen of worth, who has cooperated in many move- 
ments for the general good. His life record is a creditable and honorable one, 
and the success he has achieved has come to him as the direct result of his 
energy and capable management. When he started out in life he had no influ- 
ential friends to assist him and no inheritance upon which to depend, but with 
strong purpose and laudable ambition he has worked his way steadily upward 
to the plane of affluence.'' He is now living retired at the age of eighty-three 
years, and the rest which has come to him is well earned. 



MOSES H. DONELSON. 

Moses H. Donelson, one of the prosperous citizens of Ogden and Boone 
county, justly ranks with the leading business men of his part of the state and 
"has done much to win for Iowa its splendid and enviable reputation as one of the 
chief agricultural centers of the entire country. He has been closely connected 
with farming and stock-raising and is now the owner of five hundred and twenty 
acres of rich and valuable land. A native of New Jersey, he was born in Salem 
county, on the 14th of November, 1844, and is a son of Henry and Ann Eliza- 
beth (Atkinson) Donelson, the former a native of the north of Ireland and the 
latter of New Jersey. In 1830 the father came to America, settling in Phila- 
delphia, where he remained for twelve years in the employ of one man. During 



IpUBL: 

L 



v; 



I 




MKS. MOSES H. DONELSOX 




MOSES H. nONELSON 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 251 

that time he managed to save seven hundred dollars of his earnings, but was 
cheated out of this. He then went to New Jersey, where he remained until 
December, 1863, when he removed to Illinois. In the latter state he purchased a 
farm and with characteristic energy began its cultivation and development. In 
course of time his fields were bringing forth splendid crops and many improve- 
ments were added to his place. Upon that farm he spent his remaining days, 
his death occurring February 11, 1874, when he was sixty-two years of age. His 
wife passed away at the age of eighty-two. 

Moses H. Donelson was reared and educated in New Jersey, but his oppor- 
tunities for acquiring an education were exceedingly limited, as he never went 
to school after reaching the age of ten years. However, experience has taught 
him many valuable lessons and he is today a well informed man with a good 
business education and possesses the ability which many a college-bred man lacks. 
When a little lad of but ten years he began working as a farm hand and was thus 
employed until 1868, when he determined to engage in farming independently 
and rented a tract of land in Illinois. He operated that place for a year. In 
September, 1869, he removed to Boone county, driving across the country from 
Illinois. He purcliased eighty acres of land, now in Peoples township, going in 
debt for the amount. This land he improved, adding many modern equipments 
and also extending the boundaries of the farm from time to time until it now 
comprises five hundred and twenty acres of rich and productive land. The 
work of development has been carried forward year by year, and his place 
is now one of the best improved farms of the county. Upon it he has raised 
thousands of bushels of com, but has never sold an entire load during his farm- 
ing experience, feeding it all to his stock. He has been a most successful feeder 
and stock dealer, feeding on an average two carloads of steers each year and 
from one hundred to three hundred head of hogs. He operated this place until 
December, 1913, when he retired and removed to Ogden, 'purchasing a com- 
fortable home that he now occupies. In all of his business affairs he has dis- 
played sound judgment and keen discrimination, and thus his success has been 
honorably and worthily won. For twenty-five years he was statistical corre-' 
spondent for the agricultural department at Washington and had three assistants 
under him in the county. 

On the 1st of October, 1868, Mr. Donelson was united in marriage to Miss 
Tollitha C. Cameron, a daughter of James and Elizabeth (Harrell) Cameron, 
both of whom were natives of Kentucky. The father was a farmer and went 
to Illinois at an early day, there securing a tract of land upon which he carried 
on general agricultural pursuits until the evening of his life. He passed away at 
the advanced age of eighty-nine years, having long survived his wife, who died 
in August, 1874. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Donelson were born three children: James 
II., a farmer of Beaver township; Welcome B., who is operating the home farm; 
and William C, who is manufacturing spring bolsters for all makes of wagons 
at Chariton, Iowa. 

Mr. Donelson served as one of the trustees of Peoples township and was also 
school director for nine years. Politically he is a republican and ever keeps 
well informed on the questions and issues of the day, so that he is able to sup- 
port his position by intelligent argument. He attends various churches and his 
influence is on the side of reform, progress and improvement. Energy has been 

Vol. 11—12 



252 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

the guiding spirit of his Hfe, and his industry has never faUered. From a com- 
paratively humble position in the business world he worked his way steadily up- 
ward, and in the course of years he became the owner of one of the large and 
valuable farms of the county. His business judgment is sound and his sagacitv 
keen, and his careful management of his affairs has been the salient element in 
his success which now ranks him with the men of affluence in Ogden. 



EMANUEL LAWBAUGH. 

Emanuel Lawbaugh is one of the most highly respected and esteemed citi- 
zens of Madrid. He has been an active factor in the growth of the city, having 
platted and laid out an addition to the town of Madrid known as Lawbaugh's 
Addition. He still owns much valuable realty in Madrid and also has interests 
in Des Moines. Mr. Lawbaugh, moreover, has been mayor of Madrid for six 
terms — terms which have been replete with growth and accomplishment. He 
has recently been reelected to the office. Mr. Lawbaugh was born at Mount 
Eaton, Wayne county, Ohio, June 14, 1837. His parents w^ere John and Mar- 
garet (Shoup) Lawbaugh, the former born in 1799 and the latter April 4, 1804, 
in Pennsylvania. They died in Geneseo, Illinois, the father July 22, 1872, and 
the mother November 11, 1886. Their marriage took place in Tuscarawas 
county, Ohio, January 6, 1823. In their family were the following children: 
William, born October 10, 1823, who died February 17, 1896; John J., whose 
birth occurred April 25, 1825, and who died May 7, 1888; Lucy A., who was 
born January 12, 1827, and died September 4, 1902; Jacob, born October 10, 
1828, who passed away on the 3d of July, ic>io; Eliza, who was born May 6, 
1831, and died December 12, 1886; George, born March 4, 1833, who is a resi- 
dent of Salem, Oregon; Henry, born February 26, 1835, who died February 
21, 1904; Emanuel, of this review; Elizabeth, born May 9, 1839, of Geneseo, 
•Illinois; Peter, born February 18, 1841, who died May 18, 1842; and Josiah R., 
born June 10, 1843, who died January 13, 1912. The seven oldest members 
of this family were born in Tuscarawas covmty and the four younger in Wayne 
county. 

Emanuel Lawbaugh removed with his parents to Henry countv, Illinois, in 
1854, the family settling on a farm. Two brothers had preceded the other mem- 
bers of the family and there they all gave their attention to agricultural pursuits 
for some time. Emanuel Lawbaugh then learned the trade of stone mason, 
which he followed during the summer months. In the meantime he qualified 
for teaching school and subsequently followed that profession for nine winters in 
Illinois. He still has the first certificate permitting him to teach school in his 
possession — a manuscript of which but few are extant in these days. His first 
teacher's certificate, a first grade one, was issued in 1857 and later he obtained 
others of like grade. After having married in 1865 he engaged in the lum- 
ber business with his brothers, their headquarters being in Geneseo, Illinois, and 
there he was very successful in business for a number of vears. Since com- 
ing to Madrid in 1889 he has platted and allotted an addition to the town which 
is known as tlie Lawbaugh Addition. He still retains a number of lots in this 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 253 

tract. Mr. Lawbaugh also has interests in Des Moines and is numbered among 
the substantial residents of Madrid. For six terms he has been mayor of 
Madrid and while occupying the executive chair has given the city a business- 
like and most beneficial administration. He is the present mayor of Madrid, 
having been elected in 1914 for the seventh time. He acceptably filled the office 
of justice of the peace and school director nine years before coming to Iowa. 

On April 6, 1865, Mr. Lawbaugh married Miss Elizabeth Lord, who was 
born in Toronto, Canada, April 11, 1841. In 1843 the family removed to Cleve- 
land. Ohio, and there remained until 1856, when they went to Davenport, 
Iowa. Her father died in that city in 1862. He was James Lord, a native of 
London, England, a highly educated man who for a number of years held a 
position with the British government. Her mother, Belinda (Hurd) Lord, a 
native of Canada, died in Geneseo, Illinois, in 1864. Mr. and Mrs. Lord had 
four children, of whom Mrs. Lawbaugh, who is the youngest in the family, is 
the only one surviving. The others were : Emma, who died in Oregon ; Fannie, who 
passed away in Newton, Iowa; and Esli, who entered the Union army and 
has never since been heard of. Mrs. Lawbaugh in the acquirement of her 
education attended the common schools in Cleveland, Ohio, and Davenport, 
Iowa. She bore her husband four children: Charles Sumner, born August 
13, 1866, who received a business education and is now residing in Cedar Rapids; 
Horace Benton, born March 12, 1869, who died in Atkinson, Illinois, August 18, 
1881 ; Mary .Margaret, born August 14 1871, who passed away August 15, 1881 ; 
Morris Hale, born June 30. 1874, who resides in Manning, Iowa. Mr. and 
Mrs. Lawbaugh have four grandchildren, a daughter born to their son Charles 
and a son and two daughters born to Morris H. Lawbaugh. 

Mr. Lawbaugh gives his allegiance to the progressive wing of the republican 
party. Lie has always taken a deep interest in public affairs and is well informed 
upon all questions that affect his community, his county, his state and the nation. 
It is interesting to note in this connection that he voted for Lincoln both times 
and that his father and live of his brothers attended the same polling place at Lin- 
coln's second election — a father and six sons voting for Lincoln. The two sons 
of Mr. Lawbaugh are members of Star Lodge, No. 115, A. F. & A. M., of Madrid, 
and Mr. Lawbaugh and his wife are members of the Baptist church of ( leneseo, 
111. He owns a handsome, modernly equipped home in Madrid and is the 
proud owner of one of the choicest libraries in the community. Mr. and Mrs. 
Lawbaugh stand high in the esteem of the community and enjoy a respect which 
is well merited by their high qualities of character. 



WESLEY B. SHERMAN. 

Wesley B. Sherman, manufacturer and dealer in confectionery at No. 1005 
West Third street in Boone, is a wideawake and alert business man, who has ad- 
vanced to his present position through his intelligently directed effort. He was 
born near Peoria, Illinois, in 1845, a son of D. H. and Sarah (Gifford) Sher- 
man, both of whom were natives of New Jersey, in which state they were reared 
and married. In the early '30s they removed westward to Illinois, casting in 



254 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

their lot with the pioneer settlers of that state. The father followed farming 
for many years and spent his last days in Boone, Iowa, where he departed this 
life in the early '90s, when in his ninetieth year, having long survived his wife, 
who died in Illinois at about the age of forty-five years. They were members 
of the Methodist Episcopal church and were people of the highest respectability. 

Wesley B. Sherman was reared in his native state, where he made his home 
until eighteen years of age. The Civi.l war was then in progress, and his spirit 
of patriotism was aroused by the continued attempt of the south to overthrow 
the Union. He, therefore, enlisted at Chicago in 1864 as a member of Com- 
panv F, Ninth Illinois Cavalry, with which he served until October, 1865. He 
spent twenty months in the south, attached to the Sixteenth Army Corps, and 
saw some active, arduous duty, but he never faltered whether in the thickest 
of the fight or stationed on the lonely picket line. 

Following his return from the army Mr. Sherman went to Kossuth county, 
Iowa, intending to secure a homestead there. Later, however, he removed to 
Boonesboro and has since resided much of the time in Boone county, although 
at difl:'erent periods he has gone elsewhere. He engaged in brick manufacture 
and made brick for the west wing of the Iowa State Agricultural College at 
Ames. Several years were devoted to that business, in which he won sub- 
stantial success, but his health failed and he was obliged to give up manual labor. 
He then opened a barber shop in Boonesboro about 1875 and conducted it for 
several years. On selling out he turned his attention to the restaurant business, 
which he conducted for a few years, at the end of which time he sold out and 
opened a grocery store, in which he continued for an extended period, being 
the head of the firm of W. B. Sherman & Company. On selling his interest in 
that business about four years ago he purchased the Candy Kitchen of Mr. 
Eggenberger and now continues in this line of business, manufacturing candy 
and ice cream, which he sells both wholesale and retail. He employs four or 
five people and sells and delivers locally to many customers. His business has now 
reached large and gratifying proportions and is bringing to him a substantial 
annual income. 

Mr. Sherman was married, in Hamilton county in 1882 to ^liss Emma 
Swanson, who for years made her home in Boone. Her parents were residents 
of Hamilton county. The death of Mrs. Sherman occurred in 1903. and she 
was survived by four daughters : Edith, who is now the wife of W. D. Craw- 
ford of Boone, by whom she has a daughter, Bernadine; and Carry, Emma 
and Marie, all at home. The family residence is at West Boone, and Mr. Sher- 
man and his daughters are widely and favorably known. Politically he is a 
democrat and has filled various local offices, to which he has been called by 
the vote of his fellow townsmen, who have recognized his ability and wish 
to profit by the benefit of his service in office. He has twice been a member of 
the city council of Boonesboro and served in that capacity in Boone for one 
term. Three times has he resigned from that position, once because of ill 
health, once because of removal to another city and the third time that he 
might accept the position of postmaster, to which he was called during President 
Cleveland's second term. He acted in that position for three and a half years 
and then resigned in favor of J. B. Patterson. Fraternally Mr. Sherman is an 
Odd Fellow and a Knight of Pythias. He also belongs to J. G. Miller Post, 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 255 

G. A. R., of Boonesboro, and in these organizations he has gained many friends 
by reason of his personal worth and his loyaUy to the objects for which the 
societies stand- 



EDWARD W. HARRISON. 

In the death of Edward W. Harrison, Boone county lost a citizen worthy of 
the high regard in which he was uniformly held. His life conformed to the 
high standards of Masonry and of citizenship in every regard, and the fact 
that he was for thirty years in the employ of one corporation is indicative 
of his fidelity and capability in business. He was called to his final rest Septem- 
ber II, 191 3, at the age of seventy-five years, his birth having occurred in Liver- 
pool, England, February 14, 1838. His parents were William R. and Lizzie 
(Simcock) Harrison. The father was engaged in shipbuilding, devoting his 
life to industrial activity. The mother died in England, but about 1848 the 
father sailed for the new world, accompanied by his son Edward. At length 
they reached New York harbor and for a period remained in the eastern 
metropolis, but later made their way to Chicago, where Edward W. Harrison was 
reared and learned the carpenter's trade. He led a busy, active and useful 
life, devoting his time and energies to work at his trade save for the period 
when patriotism o'ertopped every other interest in his life and he offered his 
services to the government in defense of the Union cause. It was in 1861 that 
he enlisted as a member of Company G, Eighteenth United States Infantry, with 
which he sened for three years, doing active duty on many a hotly contested 
battlefield. So strenuous was his service that it undermined his health and 
to his army experience could be traced his invalid condition during the last 
twenty years of his life. 

When the war was over Mr. Harrison returned to his home with a most 
creditable military record. Soon afterward he left Illinois and came to Iowa, 
from which time forward he was in the employ of the Chicago & Northwestern 
Railroad Company, remaining with that corporation for thirty years or more. 
He was a foreman in the carpenter shop and discharged his duties in a most 
capable and satisfactory manner. He seemed to know just how to direct the 
labors of men so as to produce the best results, yet he was never a machine 
taskmaster. 

On the 13th of July, 1878, at Boone, Mr. Harrison was united in marriage to 
Miss Eliza J. West, who was born at Farmington, Van Buren county, Iowa, a 
daughter of James and Lucetta West. They were pioneers of this state, and 
Mr. West made merchandising his life work. Both are now deceased. Mrs. 
Harrison was reared in Iowa and in early womanhood began learning the 
millinery trade, being employed in a wholesale house in Des Moines for a 
number of years prior to her marriage. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Harrison was born 
a son, Ridgby William, who is employed as a bookkeeper. 

Mr. Harrison gave his political indorsement to the republican party and kept 
well informed concerning the questions and issues of the day. He wore with 
considerable pride the little bronze button that indicated him a member of the 



256 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

Grand Army of the Republic, his affiliation being with W. C. Crooks Post of 
Boone. He was also a Mason and exemplified in his life the beneficent spirit 
of the craft. He attended and supported the Baptist church, to which Mrs. 
Harrison belongs. When death called him on the iith of September, 1913, 
he was laid to rest with Masonic rites, his funeral being very largely attended by 
his brethren of that order. He never sought to figure prominently in any 
public connection, but he did seek to do his duty day by day and his example 
in that respect is well worthy of emulation, his straightforward and upright 
course winning for him the respect of all with whom he came in contact. 



PETER CASSEL. 



Although Peter Cassel now lives practically retired, he still holds a foremost 
place in the banking world of Madrid as vice president of the Madrid State Bank. 
For twenty years he was successfully engaged in the drug business in that town 
and by his honorable methods and high ([ualities of character he won many friends 
in his community. 

Mr. Cassel is a native of Madrid, born July 9, 1859. There he grew to man- 
hood and he has since remained a resident of is native city. He is a son of 
Qiarles John and Ulricka (Dalander) Cassel, both of whom passed away in 
Madrid, the former in 1902 and the latter in 1894. The father was born in 
1821. The mother arrived in Douglas township in iS^fi and was here one of the 
earliest families in Boone county. The paternal grandfather of our subject, 
Peter Cassel, after coming to this country settled near Fairfield, Jeflr'erson 
county, Iowa, and was one of the sturdy frontiersmen of this state. Mr. and 
Mrs. Charles J. Cassel had nine children, of whom eight are living. The one 
deceased is Mrs. Matilda Oakleaf . The living ones are : jMrs. Olive Anderson, 
residing in Nebraska ; Clara, also of that state ; Mrs. Johanna Johnson, of 
Garden township ; Mrs. Mary Peterson, of Geneseo, Illinois ; Manda, of Madrid ; 
John, also of Madrid ; C. W., of the same city ; and Peter, of this review, who 
is the second son in the family. All were born and reared in Madrid and attended 
its common schools. 

Peter Cassel was reared on his father's farm and attended the more primitive 
schools of early days in the neighborhood. Upon leaving the homestead he began 
his independent career as a clerk in a general store in Madrid, changing his 
position subsequently to one in a drug store, in which connection he remained for 
several years, becoming thoroughly actiuainted with the business. At the end 
of that time he established himself in the drug business and for twenty years 
conducted one of the most successful establisliments in the city. His store was 
modern and up-to-date and he always saw that particular attention was given to 
the prescription department. He carried the usual sundries and derived a grati- 
fying income from the various departments of the establishment. His success 
was entirely due to his business ability, his fair methods and the particular atten- 
tion which he paid to his customers. In 1908 Mr. Cassel retired from active com- 
mercial pursuits in the enjoyment of a competence more than sufficient to meet 
his expenditures. He now gives almost his entire attention to finance, being 




MR. AM> MUS. I'KTKK ('ASSEL 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 259 

one of the largest stockholders of the Madrid State Bank, of which he is vice 
president. He was one of the incorporators of this institution and has been an 
official of the same since its organization. Mr. Cassel is also vice president of 
the Peoples' Telephone Company. 

On the 3d of September, 1890, Mr. Cassel married Anna Elizabeth Hopkins, 
who was born in Douglas township, June 17, 1862. She has always been a resi- 
dent of her native township, where she attended school and grew to womanhood. 
Her parents, John F. and Lydia (Bates) Hopkins, came to Boone county in 1854 
and both resided here until their death. The father was born in Marion county, 
Ohio, October 4, 1821, and passed away on his homestead near Madrid, April 
19, 1909. He enjoyed a wide reputation as one of the most successful breeders 
of pure blooded stock in Boone county. Mrs. Hopkins was born in the same 
county as her husband, January 10, 1835, and died on the home farm near 
Madrid, August 10, 1901. Their marriage occurred in Marion county, Ohio, 
April 22, 1852, and of their five children four are living: Mrs. Eva J. Aldrich, 
born in Marion county, Ohio, December 23, 1853, who is now residing in Bison, 
South Dakota; Mrs. Elsie Nance, born January i, 1859, a resident of Madrid; 
Mrs. Anna Elizabeth Cassel; and Mrs. N. H. Yearnshaw, born April 22, 1865, 
residing in Madrid. Robert John Hopkins, the only son, who was born April 
26, 1856, died December 6, 1893. Except the eldest daughter, all these children 
were born in Madrid and were reared and married here. Robert John Hopkins 
was a graduate of the Iowa Agricultural School at Ames with the class of 1881. 
He was elected clerk of the courts of Boone county for two terms. On Novem- 
ber 28,* 1886, he married Miss Abbie M. P>ater, of Clarence, Iowa, who died in 
Madrid on the old Hopkins farm. July 11, 1892. By her he had two children: 
Helen Lydia, born November 12, 1889, a teacher of science in Sigourney, Iowa; 
and Robert Frater, who died at the age of two weeks and three days. 

Mr. Cassel is a stanch republican. For a number of years he was a member 
of the city council of ^Madrid, and aided in furthering a number of valuable 
measures. He and his wife attend the services of the iNIethodist Episcopal 
church and are devoted to its work. He is a member of Star Lodge, No. 115, 
A. F. & A. M., of Madrid, and Tuscan Chapter and the Commandery at Boone, 
as well as Za-Ga-Zig Temple of the Mystic Shrine at Des Moines. He also belongs 
to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Besides a handsome home, ]Mr. 
Cassel owns other personal property. Success has come to him in answer to 
ambition and his career is proof of the fact that industry and energy will win 
recognition. Madrid is the better for his activities and he has borne his share 
in the growth and upbuilding of that city. 



G. K. WILLIAMS. 



G. K. Williams is to be accounted one of the most substantial farmers of 
Boone county, owning one hundred and fifteen acres on section 13, Beaver 
township. He has achieved local fame as stock-raiser, giving particular atten- 
tion to Shropshire sheep and Duroc Jersey hogs. The magnitude of his farm 
operations is indicated in the fact that he always keeps about fifteen head of 



260 HISTORY OF BOOXE COUNTY 

horses. G. K. Williams was born in Wisconsin in January, 1861, and is a 
son of John T. S. and Jane Williams, more extensive mention of whom is made 
in another part of this work. 

G. K. Williams was reared and educated in Wisconsin and Boone county, 
Iowa. He grew up under the care of his parents, and when they left the farm 
he remained to take full charge. He has operated the same ever since. Mr. 
Williams has one hundred and fifteen acres in his home place, which lies entirely 
on section 13, Beaver township. His buildings are substantial and kept well in 
repair, and he has installed the most modern farm equipment and machinery in 
order to facilitate labor. He gives particular attention to stock-raising and has 
attained a wide reputation as a breeder of Shropshire sheep and Duroc Jersey 
hogs. He also farms in connection with the homestead two hundred acres 
adjoining his farm on the south. "* 

On February 3, 1897, G. K. Williams married Miss Margaret Rockwell, a 
daughter of James L. and ]\Iary E. (Tattersall) Rockwell, natives of Xew York. 
The father was a blacksmith by trade and early in life went to Minnesota, where 
he remained until the war broke out. He enlisted and ser\-ed for one year in 
a ^linnesota regiment, being sent home at the end of that period on account 
of disability. He now makes his home with his children, his wife having died in 
June, 1880. Mr. and Mrs. Williams are the parents of Helen J., John L. and 
James T. S. Williams, who are respectively fifteen, fourteen and six years of 
age. 

For several terms ^Ir. Williams has served as township trustee of Beaver 
township and has proven himself in that office and along many other* lines a 
progressive and loyal citizen. He is interested in moral and intellectual develop- 
ment as much as in material achievement, and, while he has earned a competency, 
he has been an important factor in the development of his section, particularly 
along agricultural lines. His political belief is that of the democratic part}', 
and he is loyal in his support of its measures and candidates. He is a 
man who practices Christianity. Mr. Williams has many friends in Beaver town- 
ship and well merits the esteem and confidence which he enjoys. 



ANDREW JOHN MUNN. " 

About the year 1867 Andrew John Munn became a resident of Boone, 
where he continued to make his home until called to his final rest on the 20th of 
January, 1900. He was a native of Oneida county. New York, born in the vil- 
lage of Whitesboro, February 25, 1840, his parents being James and Abigail 
(Patterson) Munn, who were married in that county. The father was of Eng- 
lish lineage, while the mother came of Irish parentage. In their family were 
three children, all of whom are now deceased. 

Andrew John ^lunn, who was the eldest, was reared at the place of his nativ- 
ity and attended its public schools. \Mien a young man he resolved to try his 
fortune in the middle west. Thinking to find better business opportunities 
in the Mississippi valley, he made his way to Boone county, Illinois, in company 
with his parents and two brothers. They were farming people and the father 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 261 

carried on general agricultural pursuits there until his death, which occurred 
May i6, 1862, when he was forty-four years of age. The mother afterward 
journeyed farther west and after spending a number of years in Boone passed 
away at the home of her son Andrew on the 17th of December, 1888, when 
she was seventy years of age. The brothers of Andrew J. Munn were Wesley 
J. and Aaron W. The latter was a railroad man, connected with the Chicago 
& Northwestern for many years, and he passed away in Boone, August 18, 1913. 
Wesley J. Munn was born at Waterloo, New York, in 1846, and while acting as 
conductor on a train which was wrecked, he met his death at Crescent, Iowa, Sep- 
tember I, 1883. 

Andrew J. Munn spent his boyhood and youth in the Empire state and there 
on the 18th of September, 1861, was married to .Miss Sarah Carr, who was born 
in Oneida county. New York, December 5, 1844. Her parents were Ralph 
and Mary (Lawrence) Carr, the former a native of England and the latter 
of the state of New York, where they were married. The mother died there 
when a comparatively young woman and the father passed away in Creston, 
Iowa, at the age of seventy-five years. He had married again. For a long 
period he was in the employ of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad. 
His people were of the Episcopalian faith, while his wife's people were of the 
Baptist faith. Mrs. Munn was one of six children, of whom two sisters are 
living: Mrs. F"annie Able, of Boone; and Mrs. James Walbran, of Osceola 
county, Iowa. The others of the family have passed away. Mr. and Mrs. Munn 
became the parents of four children: James W. ; Mary, the wife of J. H. 
Richenberg, of Boone; Fanny, at home; and Arthur, a member of the firm of 
J. H. Richenberg & Company. 

After removing to Boone .Mr. Munn acted as check clerk in the freight 
house of the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad Company for many years and 
was regarded as a most reliable business man, always true and loyal to the 
interests which he represented. He served as alderman of Boone and was always 
interested in projects for the benefit of the public. He became one of the char- 
ter members of the Modern Woodmen camp at Boone and was most loyal 
to the teachings of that organization. Many sterling traits of character gained 
him warm friendship and high regard, and wherever known he enjoyed the 
respect and good-will of those with whom he was brought in contact. 



JAMES WELLS MUNN. 

James Wells Munn, the eldest son of Andrew John Munn, was born October 
27, 1862, near Belvidere, Illinois, and was therefore a little lad of five years 
when, in 1867, he accompanied his parents to Boone, Iowa. Here at the usual 
age he became a pupil in the public schools and passed through consecutive 
grades until he reached the age of seventeen years, when he started out in the 
business world, beginning work in the freight department of the Chicago & 
Northwestern Railroad Company at Boone. When nineteen years of age he 
went to Council Bluffs and later to Omaha, Nebraska, where he was employed 
on the Elkhorn branch of the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad. He spent 



262 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

several years there and in 1904 removed to Chicago, where he was appointed 
to a position in the office of the general passenger agent of the Chicago & 
Northwestern. He acted as chief clerk until 1912, when he was made assis- _ 

tant general passenger agent, which office was created at that time. No higher I 

testimonial of his capability and fidelity can be given than the fact that through- f 

out his entire business life he was retained in the service of a single corporation. 

in 1883 James Munn was united in marriage to Miss Nettie Strong of 
Boone, who died in 1906. There were four children born of that union, two 
of whom, Maurice Andrew and James Wells, Jr., survive. The former is an 
art student in Chicago, while the latter is attending high school. Two of the 
children died at the ages of five and three years respectively. 

The death of Mr. .Munn occurred on the 13th of March, 1914. and he was 
laid to rest at Omaha, Nebraska. In Masonry he attained high rank, becom- 
ing a Knight Templar, and he was also a member of the Eastern Star at Chi- 
cago. He likewise belonged to the Royal Arcanum of Omaha, and he always 
attended and supported the Methodist Episcopal church. In the death of her 
husband and son Mrs. Andrew J. Munn has suffered a great bereavement, 
for both were men of high principles and noble purposes, greatly esteemed by 
all who knew them and at all times worthy of the highest regard. 



ALBERT W. ADIX. 



Albert W. Adix is successfully established as carpenter and contractor in 
Boone, also owning valuable real estate and deriving a gratifying income from 
his activities as a builder. He was born September 29, 1877, on the home 
farm in Yell township, Boone county, and is a son of Lewis W. and Fredericka 
(Krogman) Adix, natives of Mecklenburg-Schwerin. Germany, the former born 
March 4, 1833, and the latter November 13, 1841. Extended mention of them 
is made in another part of this work. 

Albert W. Adix attended the public schools of his neighborhood, including 
the Hickory Grove school, laying aside his text-books at the age of eighteen. 
Before that time he had already busied himself on the homestead, but now 
devoted his entire attention to agricultural work, assisting his father with the 
operation of the farm. He subsequently bought this property and continued 
to work it until Septeinber, 1912, when he removed to Boone, becoming man- 
ager of the Adix Hotel and continuing in that capacity for about two years. 
He then rented the hotel and gave his attention to the carpentering and con- 
tracting business, having been very successful along that line since. In partner- 
ship with his brother, Frank D., he owns eighteen lots in the city and both are 
now engaged in a number of important transactions which will contribute to the 
growth and development of their city. 

On July 10, 1907, in Chicago, Illinois, -Mr. Adix married Miss Katy Kumpf, 
-who was born in Boone, March 31, 1886, and attended the schools here from 
six until thirteen years of age. She is a daughter of George and Jennie (Henie) 
Kumpf, both living, the former a fanner of Minnesota. Mrs. Adix is a German 
Lutheran, having been confirmed in that church, and attends the local services 






> 




HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 265 

of that organization. In their family are three children: Harold Albert, born 
August 31, 1908; Rosetta Katy, born February 22, 1910; and Laverne, born 
May 3, 191 2. Mr. Adix is a democrat and is thoroughly conversant with the 
issues and questions of the day. He is ever interested in anything that per- 
tains to the general advancement and is a useful citizen, who in a large measure 
enjoys the respect and esteem of all those who know him. 



OSCAR JOHNSON. 



Oscar Johnson, a well known merchant of Ogden, is successfully engaged 
in business as a member of the firm of Johnson Brothers & Bailey, who conduct 
the only exclusive grocery store in the town. His birth occurred in Moingona, 
Boone county, Iowa, in October, 1873, his parents being Charles E. and Bessie 
Johnson, both of whom are natives of Sweden. The father emigrated to the 
United States in 1866 and made his way direct to this county, locating at Min- 
eral Ridge, where he was employed on the railroad until 1873. In that year 
he bought a tract of eighty acres on Alarcy township and began improving the 
property, while subsequently he extended the boundaries of his farm by addi- 
tional purchase until it embraced one hundred and twenty acres of valuable 
and productive land. He devoted his attention to general agricultural pursuits 
with gratifying success until 1909, when he put aside the active work of the 
fields and erected a handsome residence in Ogden, where he has since lived 
in honorable retirement. The period of his residence in this county covers 
nearly a half century and he is widely recognized as one of its substantial and 
esteemed citizens. To him and his wife were born eleven children, five of whom 
still survive, namely : Robert, David E., Oscar, Harry and Ellen. 

Oscar Johnson acquired his early education in his native town and subse- 
quently pursued a commercial course in the Highland Park College of Des 
Moines. He then came to Ogden and here clerked in diiTerent stores for some 
time. In 1904 he embarked in business as a general merchant on his own account 
and at the end of six years opened a bakery and grocery establishment in part- 
nership with his brother Harry. In 1912 they admitted H. L. Bailey to the 
firm, which has since been known as Johnson Brothers & Bailey, proprietors 
of the only exclusive grocery store in Ogden. They carry a large and well 
selected stock of staple and fancy groceries and are accorded an extensive 
patronage, enjoying an enviable reputation as reliable, enterprising and up-to- 
date merchants. 

In March, 1901, Mr. Johnson was united in marriage to Miss Nellie Ogren, 
a daughter of A. G. and Anna Ogren, who were natives of Sweden. They 
emigrated to America in an early day and took up their abode in Geneseo, Illi- 
nois. The father, a tailor by trade, subsequently came to Boone, Iowa, 
and was here engaged in business as a tailor for. a few years. The last years of 
his life were spent in Ogden, where he passed away in 1898, while his wife was 
•called to her final rest in 1884. .Mr. and Mrs. Johnson have one child, Beulah 
A., who is ten years of age. 



266 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

In politics Air. Johnson is a progressive, advocating the principles set forth 
by Theodore Roosevelt at the time of the birth of the party. He now serves as 
secretary of the local school board and the cause of education has ever found 
in him a stalwart champion. In religious faith he is a Methodist. He enjoys an 
extensive and favorable acquaintance in the county in which his entire life has 
been spent and has long been numbered among its prosperous and representative 
citizens. 



HUGO E. SANDEN. 



Hugo E. Sanden, formerly a partner in the Schwene Hardware Com])any 
of Ogden, belongs to that class of men known as self-made, for he had no special 
advantages at the outset of his career and no capital to aid him when he started 
out in business on his own account. He has worked persistently and energetically 
and at all times has kept in mind the old adage that honesty is the best policy. 

Mr. Sanden was born in Marshall county, Kansas, September 25, 1879, and 
is a son of the Rev. P. J- and Amelia (Aurell) Sanden, who were natives of 
Sweden. Crossing the Atlantic to the new world in 1865, the father made his 
way to Chicago, where he was employed in a furniture factory. Later he 
removed to Minnesota, where he took up a homestead claim, and while in that state 
he also taught school for some time. He afterward went to Paxton, Illinois, 
where he entered the Theological Seminary and was graduated therefrom. 
Having thus qualified for the work of the ministry, he received and accepted 
a call from the Swedish Lutheran church at Chariton, Iowa, where he con- 
tinued as pastor for four or five years. On the expiration of that period he went 
to Kansas, where he purchased land which he cultivated for ten years. During 
that time he also engaged in preaching, his salary being but fifty dollars per 
year. While there he was ordained and was elected a missionary, after which 
he organized churches in Missouri, working there for moral development and 
progress at the time that Jesse James was carrying on his reign of lawlessness 
and violence. At a subsequent date Mr. Sanden went to Marshall county, Kan- 
sas, where he purchased a farm, which he operated for nine years, and at the same 
time continued to preach on Sundays. In the fall of 1887 he went to Porter, 
Indiana, where he engaged in the work of the ministry until April 8, 1891. 
At that date he came to Ogden, Boone county, and for six and a half years 
engaged in preaching in Swede valley in Marcy township. On the expiration 
of that period he retired from the active work of the ministry and also to some 
extent from business afl'airs, removing to Texas, where he purchased fifteen 
acres of land. He only remained in the southwest for two years, however, 
after which he returned to this state, settling at Spencer, Iowa, where he 
engaged in preaching for four years. He then retired permanently and removed 
to Moingona, Iowa, where he resided until his death, which occurred on the 
9th of May, 191 1. His life was well worthy of emulation, for his influence 
was ever on the side of right, progress, justice and truth, and his teaching bore 
good fruits among those with whom he was associated. His widow survives 
him and yet makes her home in Ogden. 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 267 

Hugo E. Sanden acquired his education in various places according to the 
removals of his parents. He afterward went to .Moline, Illinois, where he was 
employed in a furniture factory for some time and on the 17th of March, 1902, 
he came to Ogden, where he has since made his home. Here he sought and 
obtained employment in the hardware store of William Schwene, his salary 
being five dollars per month at first. He remained with William Schwene for 
three and a half years and then went upon the road as a traveling salesman 
for the Majestic Manufacturing Company of St. Louis, continuing in that con- 
nection for a year. He afterward returned to Ogden and purchased an interest 
in the Schwene Hardware Company, the partners thereof at that time being Mr. 
Sanden, Charles Lindholm and William Schwene. Some time later the last 
named was killed and was succeeded by his brother, John P., who took his inter- 
est in the store. Mr. Sanden was manager of the business until they sold out 
recently. 

On the 24th of October, 1909, IMr. Sanden was united in marriage to Miss 
Dora Clark of Perry, Iowa, a daughter of Elmer T. and Mattie (Miller) Clark, 
the former a native of Ohio, whence he came to Iowa, settling in Jones county 
at an early day in the period of its development. Later he removed to Ogden 
and subsequently began farming in Union township, Boone county, owning and 
operating his place until 191 1, when he retired and removed to Perry. His wife 
also survives. 

Mr. and Mrs. Sanden are well known in Ogden and have an extensive circle 
of warm friends which insures to them the hospitality of the best homes of the 
city. Mr. Sanden belongs to the Knights of Pythias lodge, gives his political 
allegiance to the republican party and attends the Congregational church. He 
is always found with those movements and measures which are indorsed by 
public opinion as worthy of support. In manner he is genial, courteous and 
social, and those qualities have won for him personal popularity. 



JOHN HERRON. 



In a history of the early settlers, whose efforts have been factors in the sub- 
stantial development of Boone county, it is well that mention be made of John 
Herron, who arrived in the spring of 1860 and for many years was identified 
with the agricultural interests of this section of the state. Later he promoted and 
developed the Farmers Mutual Insurance Company, and his activities were ever 
of a character that contributed to public progress and prosperity as well as to indi- 
vidual success, making him a citizen of worth to the community. He was born 
in Carroll county, Ohio, March 24, 1825, a son of Thomas and Ruth (Davy) 
Herron. The father, who was a farmer, represented an old Ohio family of 
Irish lineage. His father came from Ireland and settled in Pennsylvania, whence 
he afterward removed to Ohio, becoming one of the pioneer settlers of that state. 
Thomas Herron was born in Pennsylvania, where he remained until about twenty 
years of age. Later he took up the profession of teaching in Ohio and while in 
that state was united in marriage to Miss Ruth Davy, who was also a repre- 
sentative of an old family there. He afterward followed farming in the Buck- 



268 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

eye state until 1845, when death claimed him. His widow survived and passed 
away during the period of the Civil war. In their family were eight children, 
but only one is now living, a daughter, who resides at Magnolia, Carroll county, 
Ohio, at the advanced age of eighty-six years years. 

)ohn Herron was reared to the occupation of farming and during much of 
his life followed the work of the fields in Ohio and in Iowa. He was married 
in Tuscarawas county, Ohio, on the ist of January, 1850, to Miss Miranda A. 
KoUar, who was born in Tuscarawas county in 1831, a daughter of Michael and 
Catherine (McCrary) Kollar, both of whom were natives of Pennsylvania, but 
were married in Ohio. Her maternal grandfather was from Ireland and mar- 
ried a lady of Pennsylvania-Dutch stock. Michael Kollar was a blacksmith by 
trade and followed that pursuit until his death, which occurred when his daugh- 
ter, Mrs. Herron, was an infant of but a few months. 

Mr. and Mrs. Herron began their domestic life in Ohio, but after about ten 
years removed to Iowa, arriving in the spring of i860. They settled on a farm 
a mile east of Boone, in Des Moines township, Boone county, having traded 
their Ohio property for unimproved land in this state. They resided for a time 
in Boone while improving the farm by erecting buildings, but in the spring of 
1861 took up their abode upon that place and there remained until Mr. Herron 
retired from active farm life and returned to Boone in 1882. Soon afterward 
he began formulating plans that resulted in the organization of the Farmers 
Mutual Insurance Company of Boone and for sixteen years devoted his time 
and energies to the establishment and upbuilding of the business, securing many 
subscribers and making the company one of strength and financial solidity. At 
length he retired from active business life and spent his remaining days in the 
enjoyment of a comfortable competence, which had come to him as a result of 
his carefully directed business affairs in former years. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Herron were born six children, four being born in Ohio 
and two in Boone county. Five of the number reached adult age. Thomas S., the 
eldest, was one of the oldest engineers on the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad 
when he left that service. He died December 22, 1909, at the age of fifty- 
nine years, having for only about six months survived his wife, who in her maid- 
enhood was Sarah Gillette and who passed away on the 13th of May, 1909. 
Isaac A., was employed as an engineer on the Chicago & Northwestern before 
he went west in 1881. He assisted in building the Oregon Short Line and was 
an engineer on that road for a long period, but now resides on a ranch near Glens 
Ferry, Idaho, and is recognized as a prominent and influential business man 
there. He operated the water system at that place and has otherwise been con- 
nected with public interests. He was married in Idaho and has four children: 
John, who is now a member of the United States navy; Thomas, a fireman on 
the Oregon Short Fine, residing at Pocatello, Idaho ; Leota, a teacher ; and Isaac 
Elmore, a fireman now residing at Lincoln, Nebraska. Salina Isabelle was mar- 
ried in 1875 to Marion Boyd, a harness maker and farmer who died in 1880. They 
had a daughter, Edith Ethel, who is now the wife of Edgar Houser, a policeman 
of Boone. They have one daughter, Mary Isabelle Houser. Mrs. Houser's first 
husband was Robert Lithcow and they had one son, Marion B. Lithcow, who was 
twelve years of age on the 9th of February, 1914. Mr. and Mrs. Marion Boyd 
had two sons, Warren M. and Thomas Marion, who died in infancy. IMargaret, 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUXTY 269 

the fourth member of the Herron family, is the wife of Marcellus Smith, a resi- 
dent of Royal, Clay county, Iowa, where he is engaged in the real-estate business. 
They have three children: Mrs. Lottie Chessley, of Spencer, Iowa; John, living at 
Royal, Iowa ; and Xora, of Boone. James A., is a farmer near Ogden, Boone 
county, and married Mrs. Hannah Cook. Ruth died at the age of four years. 

Politically Mr. Herron was a stalwart republican, giving unfaltering sup- 
port to that party and its principles. He served for many years as county assessor, 
and the record which he made in office was highly creditable. He was entitled to 
wear the Grand Army button by reason of his service as a member of Company D, 
Thirty-second Iowa Volunteer Infantry, with W'hich he remained for nineteen 
months. He was afterward a hospital nurse until the close of the war. In later 
years he joined the Grand Army Post, while his wife became a member of the 
Women's Relief Corps. His religious faith was that of the Presbyterian church, 
and its principles were the actuating spirit in his life, making him a man whom to 
know was to respect and honor. He remained a resident of this part of the state 
from the spring of i860 until he passed away, on the 30th of September, 1899, and 
throughout that period his many good traits of character gained for him an ex- 
tended circle of warm friends. 



JOHN F. SCHWENE. 



John F. Schwene was successfully engaged in business at Ogden as a member 
of the Schwene Hardware Company, for six years, or until April, 1914, his 
partners in the enterprise w-ere Hugo E. Sanden and Charles G. Lindholm. 
Mr. Schwene has now retired from business, having sold out to C. E. Cook and 
Charles G. Lindholm, the firm being known as Cook & Lindholm. The birth of 
Mr. Schwene occurred in Clinton county, Iowa, on the nth of September, 
1872, his parents being Chris and Phoebe (Heldt) Schwene, both of whom are 
natives of Germany. They emigrated to the United States in an early day and 
took up their abode in Clinton county, this state. The father, a carpenter by 
trade, there worked at that occupation for some time and afterward came to 
Boone county, here cultivating a rented tract of land for a time. Subsequently 
he purchased and improved a farm which he operated continuously and success- 
fully until 1912, when he put aside the active work of the fields and removed 
to Ogden, where he has since lived in honorable retirement. Both he and his 
wife enjoy an extensive and favorable acquaintance throughout the community, 
being widely recognized as people of genuine personal worth. 

John F. Schw-ene was reared and educated in Clinton and Boone counties, 
being nine years of age when the family home was established in the latter 
county. He lived with his parents on the home place until the time of his 
marriage, when his father and mother removed to Ogden, but he continued on 
the farm for four years longer. On the expiration of that period he also took 
up his abode in Ogden and for one year was engaged in the wagon business. It 
was at the end of that time that he became identified with the Schwene Hard- 
ware Company, purchasing the interest of his brother, who had been accidentally 
killed. His associates in the enterprise were Hugo E. Sanden and Charles G. 



270 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

Lindholm. They were accorded a libera! and well merited patronage and always 
carried an extensive stock of shelf and heavy hardware, occupying two floors 
and basement. Cook & Lindhohn are now the owners of the business. In 
the conduct of his business interests Mr. Schwene displayed unusual executive 
ability and keen discernment, and prosperity came to him in gratifying measure. 

Mr. Schwene has been married twice. On the 27th of February, 1902, he 
wedded Miss Theresa W'rede, by whom he had a son, Carl, who is now nine 
years of age. The wife and mother passed away on the 9th of December, 1906, 
after a short illness. On the 27th of February, 1912, Mr. Schwene was again 
married, his second union being with Miss Lizzie Boderius, who died on the 
loth of June, 1913, after a four days' illness. 

Mr. Schwene gives his political allegiance to the republican party, while 
his religious faith is that of the German Lutheran church. He is well known and 
has many friends throughout the community and, being greatly interested in its 
general welfare, he takes an active part in all measures of reform and progress. 



EBER N. GARVIX. 



Many substantial evidences of the enterprise, laudable ambition and the 
handiwork of Eber X. Garvin are seen in good buildings of Ogden and the sur- 
rounding country, for during an extended period he was connected with building 
operations and did important work as a contractor. At length, with the gratify- 
ing success which was the merited reward of his labors, he retired and is not 
connected with business enterprises to any active extent at the present. He was 
born in Caledonia county, \^ermont. May 25, 1845, and is a son of Allen and Elsie 
(Powers) Garvin. His father was a native of New Hampshire, while the 
mother's birth occurred in \'ermont. She represents one of the oldest New 
England families, it being possible to trace the ancestrv' back to the !\Iayflower. 
Allen Garvin followed farming in \'ermont for many years, but before entering 
into active connection with agricultural interests he engaged in freighting by 
team across the country from Boston. In 1S74 he came to Boone county, where 
he resided for five years, or until 1879, when he removed to Guthrie county, 
Iowa. There he made his home with his son until 1886, when he returned to 
Boone county to live with his son Eber, with whom he continued until his death, 
which occurred May 17, 1888, when he was eighty-six years of age. For a few 
years he had survived his wife, who died on the 23d of August, 1885. 

Eber N. Garvin was a resident of the Green Mountain state to the age of ten 
years and during that period began his education in the public schools. He then 
went to Wisconsin, where he continued his studies and in which state he re- 
mained until 1873. In the meantime his patriotic spirit was aroused by tlie 
continued attempt of the south to overthrow the Union and on the 29th of 
August, 1864, when but nineteen years of age, he enlisted for service at the front 
as a member of Company C, Forty-third Wisconsin Infantrj', with which he 
was on duty for one year, or until after the close of the war. 

When mustered out Mr. Garvin returned to Wisconsin, where he engaged in 
farming until 1873. He then came to Iowa, settling in Osceola county, where he 




KBKR N. GARVIN 



,^.RY 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 273 

secured a homestead, upon which he resided for a year and a half before coming 
to Ogden, Boone county. Following his removal he engaged in teaming for a 
few years' or until 1881 and then began working at his trade, that of carpenter 
and builder. In Ogden he erected for his residence one of the model homes in 
the northeastern part of the town, and he has built many good dwellings in his 
part of the county. Thoroughness has ever characterized his workmanship, 
and he has paid due heed to both utility and beauty in construction. 

On the I2th of November, 1868, Mr. Garvin was united in marriage to Miss 
Orphia A. Potts, a daughter of Samuel A. and Lydia (Tillotson) Potts, the 
former a minister of the Gospel, devoting much of his life to the preaching of 
Christian doctrines. He died in 1880 and for almost a quarter of a century was 
survived by his wife, who passed away in the spring of 191 3, at the age of 
ninety-three years. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Garvin have been born five children: Mary, the wife of 
Samuel Dana, residing in Boone; Orland D., who died in November, 1904; 
Myrtle, the wife of George Anderson, a resident of South Dakota; Roscoe, 
residing at home; and John, who is in Boone. The wife and mother passed 
away in September, 1903, after a brief illness, and her death was deeply regretted 
by all who knew her. 

Mr. Garvin votes with the republican party, which he has supported since 
age conferred upon him the right of franchise, but he has never sought office 
as a reward for party fealty. He belongs to Buford Post, G. A. R., of Ogden, 
and he thus maintains a close and pleasant relation with those who wore the blue 
while he, too, was a soldier upon the tented fields of the south. He has always 
been as loyal to his country in times of peace as in times of war and has the 
deepest attachment for the nation's starry banner. 



CHARLES FRANKLIN METCALF. 

Charles Franklin Metcalf, who owns a substantial home in Madrid, of which 
city he has been a resident for many years, is at present street commissioner. 
He is respected and esteemed by all who know him and stands high in the 
community. Born in Jefferson county, Indiana, March 20, 1857, he is a son 
of Charles and Sophia ( Hardenbrook) Metcalf, the former a native of Kentucky 
and the latter of Madison, Indiana. The father died in the Hoosier state in 
1S75. the .Metcalf family having removed from Kentucky to Indiana. Mrs. Met- 
calf 'who was born in ^841, now resides in Marshalltown, Iowa. They had two 
children, of whom Charles Franklin of this review is the elder. His sister, 
Mrs. Flora Vancleave, who was born in Jefferson county, Indiana, died in Salina, 

Kansas. . o^ , 1 1 j 

Charles F. Metcalf came with his parents to Iowa in 1867 by the overland 
route the family locating on a farm near Minburn in Dallas county. While 
he gave some attention to farming, he also devoted a number of years to the 
livery business, in which he was successful, and also undertook threshing for 
other farmers. The father had purchased a farm near Minburn, but in 1872 
the son returned to Indiana, where he was engaged in logging for about three 



ml 11—13 



274 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

years. In 1875 he again came to Iowa and has since continuously resided in this 
state. He and his wife own a well furnished home in Madrid, provided with 
every convenience. Mrs. Metcalf enjoys a statewide reputation for her excellent 
cooking and the large number of people who are entertained at the Metcalf home 
and partake of her table attest to her popularity and ability. Both Mr. and 
Mrs. Metcalf are industrious people and have acquired a position of financial 
independence by quietly persevering in their pursuits. They have secured a 
competency through their own efforts by following the long established motto 
of doing well everything they undertake to do. They have acquired a host of 
friends, all of whom appreciate them for their high qualities of character. 

On March 15, 1882, Mr. Metcalf was married in Minburn, Iowa, to Miss 
Mahala Minerva Harmon, who was born in Canada, November 7, 1863, but 
removed to Illinois with her mother when a child of two years, in 1865, settle- 
ment being made at Somonauk. Her parents were Elias and Anna Maria (Lamb- 
kin) Harmon, the former born near Montreal, Canada, May 6, 1830, and the 
latter December 28, 1834. The father died June 26, 1869, his widow surviving 
him for many years. Her death occurred in North Dakota, October 10, 1912. 
In their family were the following children : Matilda Jane, who was born 
January 7, 1856, and died March 7, i860; Mrs. Mary Hannah .Shaffer, born 
August 17, 1837, now a resident of Joliet, Illinois; John Sylvester, born August 
4, 1859, who makes his home in Boston, Massachusetts; Mrs. Delilah Jane 
States, born June 15, 1861, who resides in Crosby, North Dakota; Mrs. Charles 
Franklin Metcalf; Josiah Brien, born September 10, 1865, who resides at 
Pocahontas, Iowa ; and Mrs. Ida Lilly Stodbraker, who was born November 
20, 1867, and lives in Chicago, Illinois. 

Of the five children born to Mr. and Mrs. Metcalf the two oldest are natives 
of Dallas county and the three younger of Boone county. They are : Mrs. Mabel 
Holliday, born February 6, 1884, residing in Polk county; Harry S., whose birth 
occurred November 10, 1886, and who resides in Madrid; Mrs. Grace Slade, born 
December 28, 1888, of Omaha, Nebraska ; Maude, born October 5, 1889, a school 
teacher of Polk county; and Cyrus, who was born February 18, 1894, and is em- 
ployed as a bridge worker in Iowa by the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Rail- 
way. These children were reared in Boone county, all receiving a common-school 
education, while Maude Metcalf graduated from the Madrid high school. Politic- 
ally Mr. Metcalf is a republican. He has always taken a lively interest in the 
progress of his city and is at present efficiently serving as street commissioner of 
Madrid. 



JOSEPH SAUNDERS. 



With the death of Joseph Saunders on ( )ctober 16, 1907, there passed from 
Boone county history a veteran pioneer who for almost fifty-four years had been 
a resident of that county and who had made valuable contribution to its growth 
and advancement. At the time of his demise he resided in Worth township, 
where he was widely and favorably known and highly esteemed by young and 
old. He was a veteran of the Mexican war and is therefore entitled to great 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 275 

honor, for he was one of those who took up the cause of the flag in those 
critical days and who helped to secure to the United States a vast territory 
where now reside millions of its contented citizens. 

Mr. Saunders was born in Tennessee, July i, 1827, and after the death of 
his father accompanied his mother to Putnam county, Indiana, being then but 
five years of age. There he grew to young manhood. He was reared mostly in 
the home of his grandmother, Mrs. Summers, who resided in Putnam county, but 
later made his home for several years with a Mr. Simpson, with whom he 
remained until the time of his enlistment. He spent one year in rafting logs 
down the Mississippi river and then enlisted at the age of nineteen, serving 
with honor and distinction in the Mexican war. Returning to Indiana he attended 
school for a year and in 1850 crossed the plains to California, where he was 
engaged for four years in mining. 

In 1854 Mr. Saunders was united in marriage to Miss Susan Mcintosh, 
an aunt of James Whitcomb ]\IcIntosh, in connection with whom extended 
mention is made of the Mcintosh family on other pages of this work. Mrs. 
Saunders, who now makes her home in Boone with a daughter, Mrs. Irving 
M. L'Hommedieu, was born in Putnam county. Indiana, September 17, 1833, 
and is a daughter of George and Elizabeth (Boone) Mcintosh. She visited a 
brother and other relatives in Boone county in 1853 and upon her return to 
Indiana married Mr. Saunders. Her ancestors Ixith in the paternal and maternal 
lines were Revolutionary patriots, and their descendants are all eligible to mem- 
bership in the Sons and Daughters of the American Revolution. 

Mr. and Mrs. Saunders came to Boone in 1854, settling on a farm in Worth 
township which for more than fifty-three years remained their home. Settlers 
in those early days were few and far between, and they were among the sturdy 
pioneers who braved the dangers of the wild and underwent the hardships 
of frontier life. Mr. Saunders closely applied himself to breaking his land 
and bringing it under cultivation and as the years passed his labors were 
crowned with success. Buildings sprang up on his farm, and it became one of 
the most valuable in the neighborhood. Upon it he erected a comfortable home 
ivhich was renowned throughout the vicinity for its hospitality. Mr. Saunders 
was a man of unswerving integrity and fidelity to duty, which characteristics he 
displayed as a soldier, as a citizen, as a husband and as a father. He was 
aways a kind and considerate friend and neighbor. He led a strenuous life 
which brought him prosperity and which was useful in the advancement of his 
section. 

Mr. and Mrs. Saunders became the parents of ten children : George D., of 
Rockford, Washington : W. A., of Los Angeles, California : Grant, of Douglas 
township, Boone county; Ivan, of Luther; Lucy A., the wife of Alvin Graves of 
Des Moines; Bessie Viola, who married French Luther; Permelia, the wife 
of W. H. Crooks, who is mentioned elsewhere in this work : Melinda L., the wife 
of Irving M. L'Hommedieu of Boone ; Emmett, who died in infancy ; and 
Commodore Perry, who passed away at the age of eighteen. 

Mr. Saunders died October 16, 1907, after having passed his eightieth birth- 
day. A large concourse of sorrowing relatives and friends attended his funeral, 
and many beautiful floral tributes were laid upon his casket. The services were 
conducted by Rev. Longbrake, of the LTniversalist church, of which Mr. Saunders 



276 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

was a member and to which his widow still belongs. The memory of Mr. 
Saunders still lives with all who knew him and who respected him for what he 
achieved in life and the qualities of his character which made possible his 
success. 



S. C. BARRETT. 



For about a quarter of a century S. C. Barrett has lived retired in Boone 
after a successful agricultural career. He still owns one hundred and sixty acres 
of land on sections 9 and 16, Colfax township, deriving a gratifying income from 
this source. 

Mr. Barrett was born in Jefferson county, New York, January 8, 1853, '^ son of 
Enos and Louisa (Bellinger) Barrett, who came to Boone county in 1855, set- 
tling on a farm in Worth township three miles south of Boone, this property beiog 
now owned by F. W. Fitch. Mr. and Mrs. Enos Barrett after years of success- 
ful farm labor retired to Boone about twenty years ago and there they resided 
until their deaths, the father passing away October 11, 1896, at the age of eighty- 
four, and the mother December 22, 1891, aged seventy-three. Enos Barrett was 
born in Vermont, and his marriage occurred in New York. He was a millwright 
by trade and built mills in the east and also the first grist mill at Boone, the order 
being given by a Mr. Hoover. He afterward gave his attention to farming and 
was successful along that line. After taking up his residence in Boone he served as 
councilman. Both he and his wife were members of the Methodist church, and 
fraternally the former was a Mason. In their family were the following chil- 
dren : George W., who served for four years in the Civil war; Isaac L., of Boone; 
Mrs. Malinda E. Rogers, a widow, who also resides in this city ; John R., of Ida 
Grove; a son who died in infancy; Mrs. Carr, who passed away in South Dakota; 
Ellen A., who died in Boone in April, 1909; Enos, who died when (|uite young; 
and S. C, whose name heads this sketch. 

S. C. Barrett was reared and educated in Boone county, graduating from 
the lioone high school under Principal N. E. Goldthwaite. He was married in 
1877 and subsequently located on a farm in Worth township but four years later 
purchased land in Colfax township, near Luther, where he remained for some 
time. In 1902 he acquired title to a farm which he still owns and which is easily 
worth two hundred to two hundred and twenty-five dollars an acre. He brought 
his fields to a high state of productivity and erected a number of substantial 
buildings, improving his property in many ways, so that it is now one of the 
most valuable in that neighborhood. Land prices now being about two hundred 
dollars per acre, it is interesting to note that Mr. Barrett acquired his first acreage 
at the rate of about fourteen dollars per acre. 

In 1877 S. C. Barrett married Miss Mary E. Boyd, who was born April 24, 
1857, in Clinton county, Iowa, near Lyons, and is a daughter of James and Mary 
(Sloan) Boyd, who removed to Boone county in 1869, locating in Colfax town- 
ship, where the father purchased one thousand acres of land, paying between 
seven and ten dollars per acre. This is now worth two hundred and fifty dollars 
per acre, the extraordinary advance in price being evidence of the progress which 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 277 

has been made in this part of the state. Byron Boyd, a brother of Mrs. Barrett, 
now lives in the old Boyd home, and two other brothers, George and John, also 
reside in Colfax township. Marion Boyd, another member of the family, died 
on the home farm, leaving a widow. 

S. C. Barrett is a republican and has always been loyal to the principles of 
his party. He served as constable in Colfax township in 1892 and 1893 and for 
about ten years was a justice of the peace in Boone county, part of the time in 
Colfax township and part in Boone. Fraternally he is a charter member of Boone 
Lodge, No. 492, I. O. O. F., Mrs. Barrett belonging to the Rebekah degree. Both 
have contributed to the advancement of the city and county, being ranked among 
the most esteemed and respected residents of Boone, where they have many 
friends. 



CHRIS E. CHRISTENSEN. 

Chris E. Christensen, who owns a valuable farm of ninety-four acres on sec- 
tion 12, Beaver township, is a native of Denmark, that little kingdom of north- 
ern Europe which is so justly famous for its farm achievements, and it seems 
that he has brought with him a goodly amount of that agricultural talent which 
is conceded to be a gift of his race. He was born in March, 1878, and is a son of 
Enevold and Carrie (Jensen) Christensen, Danish people. The father followed 
agriculture in his native land and there farmed until he passed away m 1885. The 

mother died in 1890. • > • u- 

Chris E. Christensen enjoyed the educational advantages provided in his 
native land and there for a time worked as bookkeeper for a creamery company. 
He held this position in Denmark for three years, learning valuable business 
methods and becoming acquainted with the industry which is the greatest of that 
country In 1904 Mr. Christensen emigrated to America and located m Wiscon- 
sin there remaining for three months. He then went to Winnebago county, 
Iowa for a short time and subsequently to Missouri, where for five months he 
hired out as a farm hand. At the end of that time he made his entrance into 
Boone county, continuing in the same occupation for six months. Being m- 
dustrious and thrifty, he had bv that time acquired the means which enabled him 
to rent a farm in Marcy township which he operated for six years. He then 
bought ninety-four acres on section 12, Beaver township, and he has improved 
this tract to such an extent that it is now considered one of the most valuable 
properties of his district. Mr. Christensen is thoroughly imbued with modem 
ideas regarding farming and is ever ready to adopt new methods in order to 
increase the yield of his acres and to raise the standard of his output. 

On March i, 191 1. Chris E. Christensen married Ellen G. Rockwell, daughter 
of James L. and Marv E. (Tattersall) Rockwell, natives of New York. The 
father followed the blacksmith's trade and worked in Minnesota until the Civil 
war broke out, when he enlisted for one year's service with a Minnesota regi- 
ment He was sent home at the end of that time with an honorable discharge 
which was given him on account of disability. He now makes his home with his 
children. His wife died in June, 1880. 



278 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

Mr. and Mrs. Christensen have a son, Paul R., two years of age. Mr. 
Christensen is a stockholder in the Independent Harvester Company of Piano, 
Illinois, and always a leader in modern agricultural thought. He has done 
much toward stimulating interest in his section and has introduced standards 
which have been adopted by others. He is a stock-raiser, giving particular atten- 
tion to cattle, and feeds about one car load a year. He gives his allegiance to 
the Methodist church and enjoys the high esteem of the community. Mr. Christ- 
ensen is a patriotic and public-spirited man, although he is not politically active. 
He has thoroughly conformed himself to American ideas and combines the 
thorough knowledge which he acquired in his native country with the aggressive 
spirit of the successful American business man. 



BENJAMIN WILLIAMS. 

One of the earliest pioneers of Douglas township and one to whose memory 
high honor is still paid by all who knew him was Benjamin Williams, who 
located at Elk Rapids in the spring of 1S47. He was a frontiersman of the 
sturdy type who unflinchingly took upon his shoulders the hardest work and who 
carried to success all undertakings which he began. He was one of the trail 
blazers for the civilization that came in his wake and that made Iowa the 
prosperous state which it is today — the civilization that brought comfort, educa- 
tion and untold opportunities to those who came after the pioneer era. As 
regards the early history of Boone county, a niche of honor has to be con- 
ceded to Benjamin Williams. 

Mr. Williams was born in Preble county, Ohio, in 1817 and while yet a 
small boy moved overland with his parents to Putnam county, Indiana, which 
remained his home until his early manhood. There he married Elsa Ann Strong, 
the young couple afterward removing to Illinois. In the fall of 1846 he came 
by the overland route to Iowa and in the spring of 1847 located at Elk Rapids, 
Douglas township. His wife died not long afterward, having borne him six 
children: Mrs. Sarah Risler, deceased; John, deceased: Spencer, a Union sol- 
dier who died during the great conflict between the North and the South ; Mar- 
garet, of Colorado; Henry, deceased; and Isaac, also residing in Colorado. 
Subsequently Mr. Williams returned to Indiana, where he married America 
Mcintosh, who died after four years of wedded life, at Elk Rapids, Iowa, leav- 
ing three children : Mrs. Mary Westbrook, of Terre Haute, Indiana : Joseph, 
deceased; and George, of Colorado. On September 13, 1857, Mr. Williams con- 
tracted another union, marrying in Worth township. Boone county, Mrs. Eliza- 
bel:h Goodrich, who was born in Putnam county, Indiana, August 10, 1832. 
There she grew to womanhood. Her first husband was Perry Goodrich, who was 
bom in Vigo county, Indiana, and died near Bowling Green, that state, at the 
early age of thirty-three years. Mr. and Mrs. Goodrich had three children. 
Daniel B. resides in Terre Haute, Indiana. Mrs. Julia Harvey, born in Putnam 
county, Indiana, March 20, 1853, died in Boone, Iowa, August 22, 1912. In 
1868 she married William M. Harvey, by whom she had four children: Nellie 
E. Harvey, of Boone, one of the most successful teachers of this county ; Wil- 




an. AM) MKS. BKXJAMIN WILLIAMS 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 281 

Ham H. Harvey, of Des Moines; Ernest Harvey, who died Marcii 8, 1897; and 
Mrs. Pearl McNeil, of Boone, Iowa. Mary, the youngest child of Mr. and Mrs. 
Goodrich, died in infancy. Mr. and Mrs. Williams had ten children, of whom 
five died quite young. The other five were : Hannah, who passed away at the 
age of fourteen ; .Sc|uire B., born May 13, i860, who died at Madrid, April 14, 
1912; W. H., who was born March 7, 1863, and is a successful live-stock buyer 
in Madrid; Perry O., of Des Moines; and Mrs. Alice A. Wells, who was bom 
December i, 1866, and died in Madrid, July 19, 1897. She married Charles E. 
Wells, October 17, 1884. Mr. and Mrs. Wells had three sons: Emory, born 
in February, 1886, who was educated in the Madrid public schools and then 
served four years in the United States navy, now residing at Woodward, Iowa; 
Vaughn H., born March 4, 1889, of Woodward: and Gail, born June 25, 1895, 
who is attending school at Washington, D. C. For many years these children 
received the loving care of their grandmother, Mrs. Benjamin Williams, and 
being particularly near her heart, it is but fitting and proper that their names 
should be embodied in this review. 

When Mr. Williams came to Iowa no railroads traversed the prairies. Des 
Moines was a hamlet of log huts, and Boone county was a wilderness. No 
mill, no store, no shop, no church, no .schoolhouse could be found within a hun- 
dred miles. The nearest trading points were Iowa City and Keokuk. From 
these facts it is not difficult to deduce what obstacles confronted the young 
pioneer from Indiana. That he conquered and that he won a livelihood and 
competence is to be ascribed to his perseverance, his industry and his sturdiness 
of character. As the years rolled by his material resources increased, and his 
thriftiness bore fruit. Moreover, he established himself in the esteem and 
respect of his fellow citizens, who looked up to him in admiration and turned to 
him for advice and counsel, .\lthough he was a forceful man, he was tender- 
hearted and ever ready to extend a helping hand to those who were struggling 
with adverse circumstances or who had fallen by the wayside. Mr. Williams 
was a democrat and loyal to his political profession. He was a member of the 
Baptist church, to which Mrs. Williams also gives her adherence. He stood 
high in his church and his community and by his honorable conduct refiected 
honor upon his section. The betterment of individual and community was 
nearest his heart, and every act he undertdok he considered conscientiously, 
judging it from the standpoint in which it would be seen by his contemporaries. 
He was successful and secured a competency because he put his heart in his 
work and because he followed honorable methods. His death was a severe blow 
not only to his immediate family but to all who knew him, and his memory is 
kept alive because of the influence which his strong personality exerted upon 
the growth of his part of the state. Gathered to his fathers in the flesh, his 
spirit lives in the progressive works of the present generation, the accomplish- 
ment of which was made possible by his pioneer labors. 

Mrs. Williams is passing her declining years in a handsome home in Madrid. 
"Aunt Betty," as she is familiarly called, is a favorite with all and a welcome 
visitor to all the homes of the community. She has the brave spirit of her 
famous ancestor, Daniel Boone, her maiden name being Boone and she being a 
direct descendant of the great pioneer, and this courage has enabled her to 
worthily perform the duties that have fallen to her lot in a long life filled with 



282 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

helpful activity. The respect and tenderness shown her by friends and relatives 
are hers by right, and it can be truthfully said that by her sunny disposition 
she has dispelled more gathering clouds than any other individual in the 
community. 



EMMET R. GONDER. 



Emmet R. Gonder, engaged in general farming on section 19, Beaver town- 
ship, has charge of the old homestead of the Gonder family and also cultivates 
an adjoining forty acres which he owns. He is yet a young man and has already 
achieved success that many might well envy. He is busily employed in operating 
two hundred and ten acres of rich and productive land, and the results obtained 
are gratifying. 

In May, 1881, in Illinois, occurred the i)irth of Emmet R. Gonder, his parents 
being William and Ellen Jane ( Shaw ) Gonder, who were natives of Ohio. The 
father came to Illinois at an early day and in connection with farming engaged 
in teaching school. His time was thus spent until 1884. when he removed to 
Boone county and purchased a tract of land in Beaver township, which he 
developed and improved, making his home thereon until 1912. He then retired 
from active farm life and removed to Grand Junction, where he and his wife 
now reside. He long occupied a creditable place in agricultural circles of this 
county and is today classed among the worthy and representative citizens of 
Grand Junction. 

Emmet R. Gonder was about two years of age when his parents came to 
Iowa, and in consequence he attended the public schools of Boone county. 
Advanced educational opportunities were accorded him, however, and he spent 
some time as a student in the State College at Ames, Iowa, in the Des Moines 
College. Des Moines, and in the Capital City Commercial College of Des Moines. 
He then took up the profession of teaching, which he followed for three years, 
having charge of the commercial department of the Iowa Business College at 
Des Moines. He afterward accepted a position with the Goldman-Cobacker 
Company, clothing merchants, being in charge of the credit department for three 
years. Because of failing health he returned to the farm, of which he took 
charge, and he has since conducted and operated it in addition to forty acres 
of his own, which adjoins this place, on section 19, Beaver township. He is 
energetic, industrious, alert and enterprising and carries forward to successful 
completion whatever he undertakes. The farm is well improved, and in addi- 
tion to cultivating the fields he makes a specialty of the raising of pure-blooded 
Duroc Jersey hogs. He is also a stockholder in the Beaver Cooperative Com- 
pany of Beaver, Iowa, and is interested in a threshing outfit. The farm which 
he controls comprises two hundred and ten acres, and he is leading a busy, useful 
and active life. 

On the 30th of December, 191 1, Mr. Gonder was married to Miss Josephine 
A. Treloar, a daughter of Joseph and Margaret (Kendall) Treloar, the former 
a native of Wisconsin and the latter of Des Moines. The father was a Baptist 
minister and at an early day in the development of Boone county took up his 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 283 

abode within its borders and here engaged in preaching for three years. He 
is now living in Houston, Texas, and is still actively engaged in the work 
of the ministry. Mr. and Mrs. Gonder have one child, Mildred Alice, who is 
a year old. The parents hold membership in the Baptist church, and Mr. Gonder 
gives his political allegiance to the progressive party. He is serving for the 
second year as township clerk, but has never been ambitious in the line of office 
holding, preferring to concentrate his energies upon his business affairs, which, 
capably managed, have brought to him a substantial measure of success. 



GEORGE BRUNTON. 



The name of Brunton has long been a synonym for business activity and for 
individual honor in Boone. George Brunton was born in this city, August 7, 
1882, a son of Robert D. and Mary (Marshall) Brunton, of whom mention is 
made on another page of this volume. Spending his youthful days under the 
parental roof, the son attended the public and high schools and in 1899 made his 
initial step in the business world in connection with journalism. He secured a 
position as reporter on the Daily New's, which paper afterward purchased the 
Evening Republican. The two were consolidated under the name of the News 
Republican, which has been most liberally patronized. Entering the office in a 
humble capacity, George Brunton has steadily worked his way upward until he 
is now manager of the paper and handles practically all of the business connected 
with its management and publication as well as its advertising. In fact, he looks 
after the many divisions and details of the work and in its control displays sound 
judgment and enterprise. When first he entered the newspaper business he was 
the one especially recommended by the superintendent of schools as ready to 
occupy a business position, and he has proven worthy of the good words which 
were then spoken of him. He keeps in touch with the advancement that char- 
acterizes modern journalism, and during the state Grand Army encampment he 
alone reported the entire affair, his account thereof being creditable to himself 
as a journalist and highly pleasing to the blue clad veterans. 

Mr. Brunton is well known socially and fraternally. He is a life member 
of the Eks lodge, a member of the Knights of Pythias, No. 324, and of the Poca- 
hontas Lodge, I. O. R. M. His name is also on the membership roll of the Coun- 
try Club, and he is serving as one of its directors. He is likewise a member of 
the board of directors of the Boone Commercial Association and is chairman 
of its publicity committee. Mr. Brunton is also a director of the Boone Chau- 
tauqua Association. His political allegiance is given to the republican party, and 
his religious faith is that of the F'resbyterian church. He is also a member of the 
Methodist Brotherhood. His interest in moral progress is deep and his labors 
along that line effective. He has always been fond of clean sport and is inter- 
ested in the Young Men's Christian Association. He is known throughout Boone 
as the school boy's friend, always standing up for the unfortunate erring boys 
and assisting them to obtain an education and gain a start in the world. He 
believes that many youthful misdemeanors are due to environment or thoughtless- 
ness and that every boy should be given his chance to prove the character that is 



284 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

within him and that may be developed. The general opinion of Mr. Brunton 
can best be expressed in the words of a prominent business man of Boone, who 
said : "Whatever George says he will do he does and does exceedingly well." He 
is an expert with the kodak and has a most attractive collection of pictures 
taken on his travels. Not to know George Brunton in Boone is to argue oneself 
unknown. He is entirely free from ostentation or display, but it is not the 
distinctive and specific office of biography to give voice to a man's modest esti- 
mate of himself and his accomplishments, but rather to leave the perpetual record 
establishing his position by the consensus of public opinion and, judged in this 
way, George' Brunton may well be termed one of the foremost men of Boone and 
there are, indeed, few if any who are better liked by colleagues and contemporaries. 



WILLIAM R. DYER. 



William R. Dyer, who was identified with agricultural pursuits in Boone 
county throughout his active business career, has lived retired in Boone since 
1901 and is widely recognized as an esteemed and representative citizen of the 
community. His birth occurred in Coles county, Illinois, on the 5th of December, 
1844, his parents being William and Elizabeth (Cartwright) Dyer, both of 
whom were natives of Indiana. They came to Boone county, this state, in 
November, 1853, locating in Worth township, where the father devoted his 
attention to farming. He died in Boone on the 18th of December, 1890, and 
the community thus lost one of its substantial and respected citizens. His wife 
was called to her final rest in the year 1897. They became the parents of seven 
children, as follows: Andrew J., who is deceased; William R., of this review; 
Sarah, who is the widow of J. H. Hoffman and resides in Boone; Reddick J., 
who has passed away ; Zimri P., living in Paskenta, California ; John, of Worth 
township, Boone county ; and Clara E., who is the wife of John Jennings, of 
Oklahoma. 

William R. Dyer was in his eighteenth year when he enlisted for service in 
the Civil war on the nth of August, 1862, as a member of Company D, Thirty- 
second Iowa Volunteer Infantry, with which command he remained for three 
years and twenty-four days. He was mustered out at St. Louis, Missouri, and 
honorably discharged on the 4th of September, 1865, returning home with a 
most creditable military record. General agricultural pursuits claimed his atten- 
tion throughout his entire business career and he still owns a valuable tract of 
land comprising one hundred and sixty acres in this county. In 1901 he put 
aside the active work of the fields and purchased a residence in Boone, where he 
has since lived in honorable retirement, spending the evening of life in comfort 
and ease. 

On the i8th of February, i86g. Mr. Dyer was united in marriage to Miss 
Almina Doran, a native of Ohio and a daughter of George and Lydia (Steel- 
smith) Doran, who were born in Pennsylvania and came to Boone coimty, 
Iowa, in the '50s, locating on a farm in Des Moines township. Both have 
passed away. Their children were six in number, as follows: Sarah, who is 
deceased ; Mrs. Almina Dyer ; George, who has also passed away ; Angeline, 




MR. AND MRS. WILLIA.M R. DYER 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 287 

who is the wife of George Bennett and resides in Oregon; James, deceased; 
and Julia, the wife of George Millard of Des Moines township, this county. 
George Doran was twice married, his first union being with Maria Cobb, by 
whom he had two children : Thomas B. ; and Andrew J., a resident of Prescott, 
Arizona. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Dyer were born thirteen children, as follows: 
Arthur G., who is a resident of San Diego, California; Doran, who died in 
infancy : Zimri, who has passed away ; Adelbert, living in Prescott, Arizona ; 
Alta, at home ; Ruth, a high-school principal in Scranton, Iowa ; Daisy, who is 
engaged in the profession of teaching ; Paul, living in Colfax township, this 
county ; Arizona, the wife of Elmer Smalley, of Jackson township, Boone 
county; George M., deceased; John, living in Colfax township, this county; and 
Morton and Lydia, both of whom are deceased. 

Mr. Dyer gives his political allegiance to the republican party and has been 
chosen to serve in all the township offices, his worth and ability being uniformly 
recognized. From i8So until 1885 he did able service as a member of the board 
of supervisors. He belongs to the Grand Army of the Republic and was a 
member of the Soldiers Relief Commission. He is also a devoted member of the 
Methodist church. Mr. Dyer has many friends in the community where he has 
resided for more than six decades, and his excellent traits of character have 
gained for him the respect and regard of his fellowmen. 



CHARLES G. LINDHOLM. 

Charles G. Lindholni, gradually working his way upward in the business world, 
was for a time partner in the Schwene Hardware Company of Ogden, which he 
and C. E. Cook bought out April i, 1914, the firm now being Cook & Lindholm. 
Theirs is a large establishment, occupying two floors and basement of one of the 
leading business blocks of the city. Boone county is indebted in considerable 
measure for its upbuilding and prosperity to its Swedish American citizens, to 
which class belongs Charles G. Lindholm, who was born in Sweden, June 28, 
1868. He is a son of Louis and Sophia (Erickson) Lindholm, both of whom were 
natives of Sweden. The father was a cabinet-maker by trade and in early life 
came to America. He did not tarry on the eastern coast, but made his way at 
once into the interior of the country, settling at Boone in the spring of 1869. 
There he worked at his trade for about a year, on the expiration of which period 
he removed to Ogden, where he resumed work as a cabinet-maker, being thus 
engaged throughout the remainder of his days. He passed away in 1878. His 
widow survives and yet makes her home in Ogden. 

It was in the city where he is now located that Charles G. Lindholm was 
reared and educated, being indebted to its public-school system for the educa- 
tional opportunities which he enjoyed. When the period of his youth had passed 
he entered a hardware store and there learned the tinner's and plumber's trades. 
He worked in that way for about fifteen years and then purchased a third interest 
in the Schwene Hardware Company, his partners being H. E. Sanden and John 
F. Schwene. He and C. E. Cook now own the company. They have one of the 
large stores of this kind in the county, carrying an extensive stock which is dis- 



288 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

played on two floors and in the basement of a good business block built in Ogden. 
Here can be found everything in the line of tinware and shelf and heavy hardware 
and their sales reach a gratifying figure annually. 

In June, 1898, Mr. Lindholm was united in marriage to Miss Susie Lindblom, 
a daughter of Louis and Martha (Seestromj Lindblom, who were natives of 
Sweden and pioneer settlers of Boone county. The father was a hoisting engi- 
neer during most of his life in the coal mines and death called him in 1910, his 
widow surviving him until 191 1. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Lindholm have been born 
the following children : Lester, Fern, Wendel, Carl, Thora, Rosalie and Ethel. 

Mr. Lindholm has served on the school board, and the cause of education finds 
in him a stalwart friend. His political indorsement is given to the republican 
party and wide reading keeps him in touch with the advanced political thought 
of the day. He is a member of the Masonic lodge and of the Swedish Lutheran 
church, associations which indicate much of the nature of the interests which gov- 
ern his life and control him in his relations with his fellowmen. 



JUDGE SAMUEL McBIRNIE. 

Judge Samuel McBirnie, justice of the peace at Boone, has occupied his 
present official position for fifteen years and throughout the entire period his 
opinions have been characterized by a fairness and impartiality that are seldom 
questioned. A native of Belfast, Ireland, he was born on the 5th of April, 1834, 
but when five years of age was taken to Scotland by his parents, David and Sarah 
McBirnie. The father was employed on the docks in connection with outgoing 
vessels. His position did not bring him any great income and when but eight 
years of age Samuel McBirnie went to work in the coal mines with his sister. He 
continued in active connection with that business until 1894. About 1864 he 
crossed the Atlantic to America and subsequently worked in the mines in Penn- 
sylvania, Ohio and in Boone. After coming to Iowa he finally leased coal lands, 
which he operated on his own account for a number of years. He then turned 
his attention to the insurance business and about the same time was elected justice 
of the peace, which office he has held for fifteen consecutive years. Never have 
any of his decisions been reversed, and his impartial judgments have been the 
secret of his long continuance in the office. 

Judge McBirnie was united in marriage to Miss Marguerite Miller, a native of 
Scotland, who came to the new world about a year after his arrival. They were 
married near Dunfermline. Scotland, and to them were born eleven children, of 
whom only two are living. William, who is engaged in mining; and Robert, who 
is a conductor on the Northwestern Railroad. 

In his political views Judge McBirnie is a stalwart republican and keeps well 
informed on the questions and issues of the day. He served as a memlier of the 
city council from the fifth ward for four years. He was also townshiii trustee 
for six years and was road supervisor for a similar period. In the discharge of 
his official duties he has ever been found prompt and faithful and the highest testi- 
monial of his ability and loyalty is found in his reelections. More than sixty 
years ago he joined the Masons in Scotland and he now holds membership in 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 289 

Mount Olive Lodge, No. 79, A. F. & A. M. He also joined the Latter Day Saints 
church in Scotland, an organization which has as its motto "Mind your own 
business," and to this rule Judge McBirnie has strictly adhered. A business man 
of Uoone who has known him for more than thirty years says of him : "He is 
the soul of honor and the most truthful man in Boone." He has now reached 
the advanced age of eighty years and he receives the veneration and respect which 
should ever be accorded those who have come into the evening of life and whose 
past record is one of personal and public honor. 



EDGAR FRIEDLEY. 



For a number of years Edgar Friedley was successfully engaged in agricul- 
tural labor but since 1908 has been located in Boone, where he raises berries and 
small nursery plants on a seven-acre tract, also acting as rural mail carrier. 

Mr. Friedley was born in Dodge township, Boone county. May 4, 1869, and 
is a son of Henry and Mary D. (Coe) Friedley, the former born February 18, 
1834, in Clark county, Indiana. When yet an infant he accompanied his parents 
to Clay county, that state, and at the age of twelve was left an orphan. When 
si.xteen years of age he came to Boone county with W. L. Defore. He turned 
his attention to farm work and augmented his earnings by rail splitting. Being 
industrious and thrifty, he accumulated the means to purchase land and subse- 
quently engaged in farming independently. Later he was engaged in the nursery 
business and so continued until 1903, «hen he retired and went to Puyallup, 
Washington, where he made his home with his son John S. During the early 
days he served as a frontier guard in the Indian troubles. He gave his allegiance 
to the republican party, and his religious faith was that of the Methodist church. 
He died December 4, 1913. His wife, Mary D. Coe, whom he married on August 
26, 1858, was born August 20, 1840, on a farm near Columbus, Ohio. She came 
to Boone county with her parents in 1856 and lived on the home farm until her 
marriage. She died on her husband's farm on April 11, 1898. Mr. and Mrs. 
Henry Friedley were the parents of five children : John S., who graduated from 
Ames and Valparaiso Colleges and is now living in Puyallup, Washington, being 
successful as a fruit farmer ; Florence S., the wife of John B. Condon, a retired 
agriculturist of Boone count\' : Clara, who died in 1893 ■ I^a, the wife of C. T. 
Burke, a real-estate dealer of Tacoma ; and Edgar. 

The last named was reared on his father's farm in Dodge township and 
assisted in the labors on the homestead until May 15, 1889, when he married. He 
then farmed independently and successfully followed agricultural pursuits uniil 
the fall of 1908, when he sold his farm and removed to Denver, which he made 
his home for nine months. At the end of that period he returned to Boone, which 
is now his home. From 1889 until 1902 he farmed as renter, taking over in the 
latter year his father's farm, which he successfully cultivated until he disposed 
of the same in 1908. Upon his return to Boone from the western state he pur- 
chased a tract of seven acres adjoining the northern part of the city, and there 
he raises berries and small nursery plants. He is also acting as rural mail carrier. 
He is well known in Boone vicinity and highly respected by all who know him. 



290 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

On May 15, 1889, Edgar Friedley married Miss Irene Pollard, who was born 
in Boone county on November 3, 1868. Her parents, David and Felicia 
(Dawkins) Pollard, have both passed away. To them were born eleven children, 
five sons and six daughters, of whom one daughter is deceased. Nearly all the 
members of the family now reside in Boone. Mr. and Mrs. Friedley have three 
children: Minnie, born April 8, 1890, who married in 1908 S. E. Bass, a farmer 
of Boone county; Henry A., born June 2^, 1896, attending the high school at 
Boone; and Sadiebelle, born October 10, 1903, attending Lowell school in Boone. 
Both Mr. and Mrs. Friedley take a laudable interest in the progress of their com- 
munity and are valued and much respected residents of their township and 
county. 



JOHN K. HAWBAKER. 

General agricultural interests of Beaver township find a worthy representa- 
tive in John K. Hawbaker, who is living on section 19. He started out in life as 
a farm hand and is today the owner of an attractive and valuable place of one 
hundred and twenty-five acres, on which are seen all modern impro\ements and 
equipments. Pennsylvania claims him as a native son, his birth having occurred 
in that state, April 19, 1869. His parents were David and Sarah (Kokanour) 
Hawbaker, who were natives of Pennsylvania and in the year 1875 removed 
westward to Dallas county, Iowa, where the father purchased forty acres of 
land. Later he sold that property anci bought one hundred and twenty acres. 
To this he added from time to time as his financial resources increased until he 
was the owner of two hundred and forty acres, which he improved and upon 
which he made his home until his death in May, 1892. He was then but forty- 
four years of age. His wife, however, had passed away previously, dying in the 
year 1883, at the age of thirty-three years. 

John K. Hawbaker was a little lad of about six years when the family arrived 
in Iowa, and in Dallas county he was reared and educated. Wl.ile he continued 
to make his home under the parental roof until he could purchase a farm of his 
own he was employed at farm labor between the ages of fourteen and twenty 
years, and it was his industry, close application and determination in that con- 
nection that brought to him the capital that eventually enaijled him to purchase 
property. He became the owner of eighty acres in Dallas county, developed and 
improved it and continued thereon for eleven years. He then sold that prop- 
erty and removed to Webster county, where in \goo he purchased eighty acres. 
This he developed for three years and then came to Boone county, Iowa, where 
he ])urchased one hundred and twenty-five acres on section 19, Beaver township. 
He set about improving the property and has since given his time and energies 
to its further cultivation, transfomiing it into one of the best imi)ro\ed places in 
the countv. His farm forms a most attractive feature in the landscape. It is 
divided into fields of convenient size by well kept fences, the buildings are always 
in excellent re])air and the early spring planting gives promise of abundant har- 
vests — a promise that is realized because of the practical and progressive methods 
which are followed. 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 291 

On the 14th of February, 1892, Mr. Hawbaker was united in marriage to 
Miss Carrie B. Merical, a daughter of Henry S. and Mary (Becker) Merical, 
who were natives of Indiana and Illinois respectively. In early life the father 
came with his parents to Iowa, being but seven years of age when they settled in 
Dallas county. Following the outbreak of the Civil war he attempted to enlist 
for service in the Union army, but was rejected on account of his youth. His 
hope for military service being thus frustrated, he turned his attention to farm- 
ing in Dallas county and has since cultivated and improved his land, which is 
now very valuable and productive. He has reached the age of sixty-nine years, 
while his wife is sixty-si.x years of age. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Hawbaker have been born four children : Lenora and 
Leona, twins, twenty-one years of age, the former now the wife of Melvin Blan- 
shan, a farmer of Greene county, Iowa, while the latter is the wife of George 
Hoefle, a farmer of Beaver township ; Vern Ray, nineteen years of age, who is at 
home; and John Benjamin, three years of age. 

Mr. Hawbaker is serving the second year of a first term as trustee of Beaver 
township, and he gives his political support to the democratic party. He belongs 
to the Baptist church and to the Modern Woodmen camp. He neglects none of 
his duties in any of these particulars and at the same time remains an active^ 
energetic and successful business man. He now feeds a load of cattle every 
year, and his live-stock interests are an important feature of his business. In 
addition to his farm in Boone county he .owns seventy acres just across the road 
in Greene county and is a stockholder and director in the Beaver Cooperative 
Company of Beaver and a stockholder in the Farmers Savings Bank of Berkley. 
What he undertakes he carries forward to successful completion, finding that 
there are no difficulties and obstacles which cannot be overcome by persistent, 
earnest effort. 



FRED M. PAYNE. 



Fred M. Payne is engaged in the livery business at Boone, a member of the 
firm of Payne P)rotliers. He was born in this county December 17, 1S70, and is 
a son of Samuel and Elizabeth ( Hoyt ) Payne, the former a native of Indiana 
and the latter of Ohio. They came to Boone in 1850, casting in their lot with 
pioneer residents of this part of the state. In 1900 the father built the finest 
livery barn of Boone and his sons became associated with him in the ownership 
and conduct of the business. He died in October, 191 3, and in his death the 
community lost a representative and valued citizen. To him and his wife were 
born six children : Delia, now deceased : Fred M. ; Frank, a stockman living in 
South Dakota; Horace C, who is in partnership with his brother Fred; Grace; 
and Howard, who is associated in l:)usiness with his brother Frank. 

Fred M. Payne has spent his entire life in this county and is widely known. 
In the pursuit of his education he passed through consecutive grades in the 
public schools until he became a high-school student. He was afterward engaged 
in mercantile lines with his father and eventually became a partner of his father 
and brother in the livery business, with which he is now connected. They have a 



292 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

splendidly equipped barn, own a number of horses of good stock and a full line 
of modern vehicles. Their patronage is extensive because their business methods 
are honorable and because they ever earnestly desire to please their patrons. 

Mr. Payne was united in marriage to Miss Lytha Hauser, a native of Boone, 
on the loth of May. 1895. Theirs is a hospitable home, whose good cheer is 
enjoyed by their many friends. "Sir. Payne gives his political allegiance to the 
democratic party, but does not seek nor desire office, preferring alwavs to con- 
centrate his energies upon his business aiifairs, which are capably directed. He 
is energetic and enterprising and as the years go by he is becoming more and 
more firmly established as a substantial and representative citizen of Boone. 



ARTHUR T. JOHNSON. 

Arthur T. Johnson, of Madrid, has been connected with the general mer- 
chandise and restaurant business but is now mostly engaged in looking after his 
extensive personal and business properties. Although quite a young man, he has 
already achieved reniarkable success. He was born in Madrid, June 29, 1880, 
and has always been a resident of that city.. 

His parents were William and Anna ( Johnson ) Johnson, natives of Sweden, 
the former born June I, 1839, and the latter December 12, 1853. In August, 
1852, the father came to America and made his home in New York and Pennsyl- 
vania for some time. From the latter state he made his way westward to Illi- 
nois and when the gold fever was at its height made the overland journey to 
California in 1859 with three other young men. Arriving in the Golden state, 
he at first rented land which he later bought. In 1870 lie retraced his steps and 
located in Polk county, Iowa. In 1874 he sold out there and removed to Madrid, 
where he successfully engaged in general merchandising for twentv-nine years. 
Not only was he one of the most substantial citizens of the community but also 
one of the most public-spirited business men always giving his support to such 
measures as promised of Ijenefit to the city. He died in Madrid, April 29, 1902. 
His wife came to America when about twelve years old, in 1865, her family locat- 
ing at Swede Point. Her parents were the first passengers to arrive in Boone 
by the way of the Northwestern Railway. She was married to William Johnson 
in Boone county, July 7. 1871, and is now residing with her son, Arthur T. The 
old family home, where the parents first located, is still standing near Elk Rapids. 
Mr. and Mrs. Johnson had nine children, of whom Arthur T. of this review is 
the only one now surviving. 

Arthur T. Johnson received excellent educational advantages, graduating 
from the Madrid high school with the class of 1898 and subsequently attending 
the Capital City Commercial College of Des Moines. He then engaged in gen- 
eral merchandising in Madrid, which city has been his home continuously with 
the exception of three years, during which he homesteaded in South Dakota. 
After giving up his general store he conducted a restaurant in Madrid until 
January 10, 1914. when he disposed of the establishment. He is now devoting 
his time to his many personal and business properties. He is a thoroughly up-to- 
date American business man, shrewd and capable, yet always considerate of the 




WILLIA.M .JOHXSOX 




.MKS. WILLIAM .lOllXSON 



f — 






HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 297 

interests of others. He is in sympathy with all movements undertaken for trade 
extension and the upbuilding of industries and can always be found in the 
front ranks of those men who have at heart the welfare of the community. 

On August 12, 191 3, Mr. Johnson married Miss Hattie C. Johnson, who was 
born in Sweden, January 30, 1882, and in that year she was brought by her par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. John Johnson, to America, the family settling in Des Moines, 
Iowa. She attended the graded schools of that city and subsequently the East 
high school. Her mother died in Des Moines, but her father is now residing 
in Madrid. Of their five children three are living: Mrs. Jerda Davidson, of 
Canada; INIrs. Artliur T. Johnson; and Hulda, a stenographer, who is a resi- 
dent of Des Moines. 

Politically Mr. Johnson is a republican, devoted to the interests of his party. 
He has never cared to enter the political arena but is a loyal and patriotic citizen 
and in a private way furthers many public interests. He stands high in the 
Masonic order, being a member of Star Lodge, No. 115, A. F. & A. M., of 
Madrid, the chapter and commandery of Boone and Za-Ga-Zig Temple of the 
Mystic Shrine of Des Moines. He also belongs to the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows at Madrid. Mr. Johnson owns various business properties and is 
one of Madrid's substantial citizens. By furthering his private interests he has 
become a factor in the general growth of the city. He has many friends in 
Madrid and is esteemed and respected by all who know him and most respected 
by those who know him most intimately and are appreciative of his high qualities 
of mind and character. 



M. M. SHAW, M. D. 



Dr. M. M. Shaw has been located in Madrid since 1904 and is one of the 
successful ]ihysicians of the city. His practice is extensive and the confidence 
reposed in him is well merited because of his thorough knowledge and the par- 
ticular attention which he gives each individual case. In a minor way Dr. Shaw 
also acts as a surgeon. He was born in Monroe, Jasper county, Iowa, June 17, 
1875, and his grandfather, Thomas Lowrey Shaw, was one of the pioneers of 
that county. His father, William Hamilton Shaw, was born in Pennsylvania, 
August 16, 1836, and came with his parents to Jasper county in 1867, the family 
locating near Monroe. His wife, Sarah E. McKnight, was a native of Marysville, 
Pennsylvania, boni September 26, 1841. She is still residing in Monroe. She 
bore her husband five children: Mrs. Laura E. Gloyd, of Monroe; Thomas G., 
of Hamburg, Iowa : Lillian, an employe in the pension department at Washing- 
ton, D. C. ; Dr. M. M., of this review; and Arthur, a resident of Des Moines. 
Mrs. Gloyd was born in Pennsylvania, but the four younger members of the 
family are natives of Jasper county, Iowa. 

In 1881 Dr. Shaw moved with his parents to Calhoun county, Iowa, locating 
on a farm near Rockwell City. He received his common-school education in 
Jasper and Calhoun counties, subsequently attending high school. He completed 
two years' collegiate work at Tarkio College of Tarkio, Missouri, and studied 
medicine for four years at Drake L^niversity in Des Moines, graduating in 1904. 

Tol. 11—14 



298 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

Locating in Madrid, he lias since been very successful, having a large town 
and country practice. He has remained a student and keeps well informed in 
regard to the latest discoveries and methods which constantly come to the fore in 
this country and Europe. He is most careful in diagnosis, but after mapping out 
the treatment applicable to each case is exacting and decisive, instilling conti- 
dence in those who come under his care. In fact, his personality is an important 
part of his success, for he combines strength with kindness. 

On the 22d of February, 1910, Dr. Shaw married Miss Lois E. Stover, who 
was bom in Cass township, Boone county, February 14, 1882, and was gradu- 
ated from the Madrid high school, growing to womanhood in that city. She is 
a daughter of Isaac and Mary M. (Messmore) Stover, of whom extended men- 
tion is made elsewhere in this work. Dr. and Mrs. Shaw have two children: 
Eldon, born March 26, 191 1 ; and Margaret, born October 14, 1912. 

Politically the Doctor is a republican and has always been interested in the 
success of his party. He has been health officer of Madrid and during his term 
greatly improved the efficiency of his department. Mrs. Shaw is a member of 
the Christian church and he belongs to the United Presbyterian organization. He 
is a member of Star Lodge, No. 115, A. F. & A. M., and also holds membership 
in the Knights of Pythias. He owns some property in Madrid, but gives prac- 
tically his entire attention to his professional interests. He is ever ready to hold 
out a helping hand to those afflicted and in the execution of his medical work is 
swayed by his kindly and humane nature. 



W. D. JOHNSON. 



The history of the development of this section of the state would be incom- 
plete and unsatisfactory were there failure to make reference to W. D. Johnson, 
for many years a prominent business man and highly respected citizen of Boone. 
It has been said of him that he lived a good life and was ever a friend to those in 
need or distress. He had reached the age of seventy-seven years when called to 
his final rest on the 31st of October, 1910, for his birth occurred in Tennessee, 
March 15, 1833. The period of his boyhood and youth was largely passed near 
Chandlerville, Illinois, he being about a year old when his parents established 
their home in that locality. In his boyhood he attended the public schools, which, 
however, were of rather a rudimentary character. His parents, John and Rosa 
(Adkins) Johnson, were botli natives of Tennessee, where the father followed 
fanning until 1833, when he took his family to Illinois. The district in which he 
settled was a frontier region and in his young manhood he was noted as a hunter 
and trapper, his adventurous and tireless spirit finding vent in pursuit of the 
abundant game then found in all the states bordering the Mississippi. The usual 
experiences of frontier life fell to him and to his family, w^hich numbered four- 
teen children, seven sons and seven daughters. 

W. D. Johnson was the eldest son and third child and much of the farm 
work devolved upon him up to the time when he reached the age of seventeen 
years. He then left home to make his own way in the world. It was in 1854 that 
he started from St. Joseph, Missouri, to Salt Lake City to assist in driving a 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 299 

flock of sheep and was away from home on that trip until the spring of 1856. 
There were many hardships and difficulties to be encountered, for on the entire 
trip there was no one to be seen, save as they occasionally met a government 
wagon train or gold seeker's outfit. In 1859 Mr. Johnson again started for the 
west, this time with a train of wagons drawn by oxen, their destination being the 
mining regions of Pike's Peak. Again Mr. Johnson penetrated into the western 
wilderness, when, in i860, he had charge of a train of five hundred wagons with 
fifteen hundred people in the party. With that caravan the long and tiresome 
journey to Oregon was accomplished and en route they had several encounters 
with the Indians. In crossing the Wind River mountains a party of Sioux In- 
dians attacked the train and an engagement followed which continued for twenty- 
four hours. A great deal of stock belonging to the wagon train was run off by 
the Indians, who drove the cattle to a flat-topped mountain nearby, and as there 
was an urgent need of recovering the property, Mr. Johnson called for volunteers 
to aid him in making the attempt. Only thirty-six men responded to the call and 
when, at length, the mountain was reached and they saw the Indians, all but one 
of the men deserted Mr. Johnson and fled. Of course, under the circumstances, 
there was nothing to do but to join in the retreat. Two other Indian attacks oc- 
curred before the five months' journey was completed, but at length they reached 
their destination with the loss of only four men. 

Mr. Johnson passed the winter of i860 in Oregon and the following spring 
made his way to the mining regions around Placerville, Washington, where he 
worked with varying success for about six years. In 1866 he again went to 
Illinois and not long after began buying cattle in southwestern Missouri, which 
he drove to the Illinois markets. The business proved profitable, and he continued 
therein for a number of years. In 1871 he went to Texas, where he engaged 
in buying and selling cattle in partnership with W. B. Warsham of Hen- 
rietta, Texas, making his home in Cooke county. In the years following 
he extended his operations through a number of counties until 1881, when he 
removed to Hale county and there, in partnership with J. M. Morrison, pur- 
chased a ranch of eighty-seven thousand acres, stocked with a herd of three 
thousand cattle. In 1883 they exchanged half of the land with C. C. Slaughter 
in return for ten thousand head of cattle, and in 1890 they sold the remainder 
of their land to Mr. Slaughter. Mr. Johnson then took his share of cattle 
and drove them to Swisher and Castro counties, where he had about five thous- 
and head upon the range until the year 1900. He then disposed of both his 
land and cattle in Texas and came to Boone county to live with his daughter- 
in-law, Mrs. Mary E. Johnson. In the meantime, or in 1882, he had become 
financially interested in the Logan & Canfield coal mining business and from that 
time until his death he was president of the W. D. Johnson & Company Coal 
Company. He was also connected with other important business enterprises of 
Boone, including the Boone Brick Tile & Paving Company, the Boone National 
Bank and the Security Savings Bank. He was a man of sound judgment and 
unfaltering energj', carrying forward to successful completion whatever he 
undertook. 

Mr. Johnson was united in marriage to Miss Eliza A. Warsham, a native of 
Missouri, who died in 1875, leaving a son, Ira D. Johnson, who married and 



300 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

removed to Boone. There he passed away in 1898, leaving two children, William 
D. and Lucile. 

The death of W. D. Johnson occurred, as previously stated, in 1910 and was 
a matter of deep regret to all who knew him. One of the local papers said: 
"In disposition Mr. Johnson was firm but kind. With relatives and members 
of his home he was generous, amiable, never speaking a word to wound the 
feelings of his intimates. To every relative and personal friend he was generous 
to a fault. To the idle and vagrant he gave no sympathy. He was a man of wise 
public spirit, bestowing his time and wealth upon only the most worthy enter- 
prises. The unfortunate and needy had no better friend." No better estimate 
of a man's character can be given than the opinion of his fellow townsmen 
who have had excellent opportunity to judge him. Mr. Johnson received and 
merited the high regard of those with whom he came in contact, and his many 
good qualities were widely recognized and warmly commended. 



ROBERT DOUGLAS BRUNTON. 

Robert Douglas Brunton, who passed away on the 26th of March, 1906, was 
a citizen who had many warm personal friends in Boone and, therefore, his 
death was the occasion of deep and widespread regret. His history is that 
of a man who worked his way upward by persistent purpose and honorable 
efifort until he became recognized as one of the leading representatives of the 
coal industry in his section of the state. He was born in Fordle, Scotland, on 
the 9th of October, 1842, a son of William and Janet (Douglas) Brunton, who 
spent their entire lives in the land of hills and heather. In their family were 
four sons, two of whom died in infancy, while two came to the new world, 
one of them being still living. 

Robert D. Brunton spent the period of his minority in his native land and 
in 1864 crossed the Atlantic to America, making his way to Hubbard, Ohio. 
He afterward went to Pennsylvania and was employed in the coal mines of the 
two states. He later came to Boone, arriving in July, 1875, from which time 
until his death he was connected with the coal industry, largely as superintendent 
of mines. During the last six years of his life he was less active. He was, 
however, one of the best known practical coal men in this section of the state, 
becoming recognized as an expert in operating coal lands and thereby winning 
most gratifying success. In business he was honest, faithful and efficient, and 
he left a comfortable competence and home to his family. 

On the 2d of January, 1865, Mr. Brunton was united in marriage to Miss 
Mary Marshall, of Bedford, Pennsylvania, a daughter of Robert and .Agnes 
(Gardner) Marshall. Her father was also engaged as superintendent of mines. 
Following his demise his widow married again. There were seven children of the 
first marriage and four by the second, of whom six are yet living. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Brunton were born ten children : William, who is engaged in the insurance 
business in West Boone; Agnes, the wife of Reid Duckworth, assistant cashier 
of the City Trust Savings Bank of Boone ; Robert, living in California ; Joseph, 
of Boone ; John, who has departed this life ; George, who is mentioned else- 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 301 

where in this volume ; EHzabeth, a teacher, now living at home ; Alexander, 
of Colorado ; James, of Boone ; and Ruth, deceased. 

In his religious faith Mr. Brunton was a Presbyterian and in his life exem- 
plified his Christian belief. He also belonged to the Masonic fraternity, the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Knights of Pythias, and the last 
named attended his funeral in a body. Many words of deep appreciation of his 
character and of his worth were spoken by those who knew him. He enjoyed 
the high regard of all with whom he came in contact, and his well spent life not 
only proved what may be accomplished in a business way but also gave indi- 
cation of the fact that success and an honored name may be won simultaneously. 



E. B. CORDELL. 



Modern business enterprise finds a capable exponent in E. B. Cordell, who 
is engaged in the sale and manufacture of feed and cereals in Boone, where he 
established his present business in 1910. This he has since successfully con- 
ducted, and his enterprising methods have resulted in making it a successful 
undertaking. Mr. Cordell was born in Crawford county, Ohio, April 8, 1870, a 
son of J. L. and Agnes Ellen (Grubb) Cordell, the former a native of Virginia 
and the latter of Pennsylvania. The father made farming his life occupation and 
in the year 1881, after residing for a number of years in Ohio, he journeyed 
westward to Boone county, Iowa, where he secured a farm, cultivating and 
improving it until his death, which occurred on the 31st of October, 1913. He 
was not only an enterprising agriculturist but was also a citizen whose progressive 
spirit found expression in hearty aid of many movements for the general good. 
He filled the office of supervisor and in other ways was connected with the 
public welfare. He died October 31, 1913, having for a little more than a year 
survived his wife, who passed away on the 26th of September, 1912. In their 
family were three children ; J. Lavergne, now deceased ; Bertha D., living in 
Boone ; and E. B. 

The last named was reared to farm life and had the usual experiences that 
fall to the lot of the boy who works in the fields through the summer months and 
attends the public schools in the winter seasons. He remained upon the farm 
with his father until the time of his marriage and then started out independently, 
purchasing eighty acres of land, which he cultivated and improved for eight 
years, bringing his fields under a high state of cultivation. He then sold out and 
for eight years thereafter was a mail carrier in this county. In 1910 he entered 
commercial circles by establishing the cereal business in which he is now engaged. 
He is now senior partner of the firm of Cordell & Slaughter and their business 
is a growing one. 

On the 2ist of February, 1894, Mr. Cordell was united in marriage to Miss 
Eleanore Rogers, a native of Ohio, and unto them have been born four children : 
Watha E., who was born September 19, 1895, and is now attending business col- 
lege in Cedar Rapids ; George Roger, who was born June 24, 1900, and is at 
home ; Ivaloo May, who was born October 28, 1902 ; and Agnes Eleanore. on 
the 28th of October, 1912. 



302 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

Mr. Cordell has a military chapter in his life record, for through eight years 
he was a member of the Iowa National Guard and at the time of the Spanish- 
American war he volunteered for active service with Company I, Fifty-second 
Iowa Infantry, with which he served as quarter master sergeant. He votes with 
the republican party and is conversant with the vital political questions of the 
day. His religious faith is that of the Methodist church, to the teachings of 
which he is loyal. His has been a busy and useful life and energy and close 
application have been the salient features in winning for him the measure of 
success which he now enjoys, making him one of the substantial residents of 
Boone. 



GEORGE W. CRANK. 



Since 1870 George W. Crank has been engaged in the jewelry business in 
Madrid and is the oldest living jeweler in Boone county. He also is an impor- 
tant manufacturer in this line and moreover is a maker of high grade violins. 
He is the patentee and sole manufacturer of Lens Eye Pins, a violin device 
which enables the maker to see the placing of the sound post in the instrument. 
There is a great demand for this valuable invention in all parts of the world 
and Mr. Crank makes consignments thereof to the most distant places where 
violin manufacture flourishes. He also manufactures tool supplies of various 
kinds. In his plant all kinds of metals are engraved and repair work of the 
most diversified character is efliciently done. 

George W. Crank was born in Maysville, Dekalb county, Missouri, May 5, 
1853. His parents were Alfred and Margaret (Henson) Crank, the former a 
native of Kentucky and the latter of Ohio. The former died in Polk City, 
aged seventy-three, and the latter also passed away at that place. Alfred Crank 
and his son Joseph, a brother of our subject, were both Union soldiers during 
the Rebellion. The paternal grandfather of George W. Crank was an Indian 
fighter of some repute who was with Boone in Kentucky. Mr. Crank is yet in 
possession of a bullet ladle v\'hich was used by his grandfather, Joseph Crank, 
while he was fighting with Boone. The grandparents were Kentucky pioneers. 
The Historical Society of Madrid is indebted to Mr. Crank for many interesting 
relics. In 1910 he divided pieces of the old Lincoln flag pole among the 
people, which are treasured by them as valuable souvenirs. This old flag pole, 
one hundred feet high, was erected in i860 and known as the Lincoln flag pole. 
Fifty years afterwards, or in 1910. Mr. Crank excavated the base of it, which 
was eight feet in length, and cutting it into small pieces, carefully labeled each 
one. Many portions were divided among Madrid people and a large piece of the 
historic wood can be seen at the Madrid Historical Society's museum at Madrid. 

Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Crank had the following children : Mrs. Catharine 
Thompson, deceased, who was born in Ohio ; Joseph, above mentioned as a 
Civil war veteran, born in Missouri, who died in Arkansas ; Mrs. Maria Thomp- 
son, deceased : John William, who died at the age of five months ; George W., of 
this review ; and Floyd M., of Muskogee, Oklahoma. The male members of 




MR. AND :\1RS. GEORGE W. CRANK 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 305 

the family were for generations cabinet-makers by profession, and they made 
the spinning wheels for the pioneers of this section. 

George W. Crank came to Boone county with his parents in 1862, when about 
nine years of age, and they located near the High Bridge postoffice at Swede 
Point. They made their home on a farm, but afterward the father sold this 
property and removed to Polk City. George W. Crank learned his trade in Des 
Moines, Iowa, and in 1870 engaged independently in the jewelry business in 
Madrid, being today the oldest jeweler in Boone county. His education was 
acquired in the common and district schools, and he was graduated from the 
Polk City schools. Today Mr. Crank owns one of the most important jewelry 
manufacturing establishments in central Iowa, which comprises the making of 
high grade violins. He is particularly interested in the latter branch of his 
business and turns out an instrument which has earned the highest praise of 
most competent judges. He receives an additional income as the patentee and 
sole manufacturer of the Lens Eye Pins above mentioned. Mr. Crank is at 
the head of a business institution which has been of great value to the growth 
and development of Madrid and lioone county, and while he has acquired a 
private fortune, he has been a great factor in paving the way for the progress 
and the prosperous conditions which now prevail in his part of the state. 

In March, 1873, Mr. Crank married at Des Moines, Iowa, Miss Catherine 
Kirsher, who was born near Polk City, in Polk county, March 2-j, 1855. She 
was a resident of that county until her marriage and there attended the public 
schools. Her parents, Peter and Caroline (Harmon) Kirsher, were pioneers of 
Polk county, having made their way overland from the east. Both father and 
mother were born in Germany and died in Polk county. In the Kirsher family 
were eleven children: Joseph, residing near Helena, Montana; Caroline, de- 
ceased ; Peter, who also makes his home near Helena : Anthony, a resident of 
Des Moines ; Jacob, occupying the old home farm near Polk City ; Frank, who 
resides near Van Meter, Iowa ; Mrs. Mary Pontius, of Des Moines ; Adam, 
deceased ; Mrs. Crank ; and Elizabeth and Thomas, residing on the home farm. 
The three eldest of these children were born in Pennsylvania and the remainder 
in Polk county, where all were reared. Of the eight children born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Crank seven are living: Charles M., born September 10, 1874, a resident 
of Woodward, Iowa ; Mrs. S. Elizabeth Adams, of Madrid, born March 23, 
1877; Mary A., born April 18. 1879. residing with her parents; Mrs. Idaletta 
Grimm, born May 20, 1881, and residing at Woodward; Ira D., of Woodward, 
who was born March 18, 1886; Carrie A., whose birth occurred February 9, 
i8go, and who is teaching school in Madrid: and George F., born November 12, 
i8<;5, a graduate of the Madrid high school with the class of 1914. Fay C, 
who was born October 4. 1898, died at the age of three months. The older 
children were born at Polk City and the two younger ones in Madrid. All com- 
pleted the course of study in the Madrid high school. 

Mr. Crank formerly gave his allegiance to the republican party but for the 
last seven years has been in accord with the socialist organizatian. He sin- 
cerely believes in a fairer disvision of labor and capital and is in favor of a great 
many measures which will bring about a faster development of the human race 
to an ideal state. He served for one term as mayor of Madrid, giving the city 
a businesslike administration replete with valuable improvements, and for one 



306 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

term was a member of the city council. Both he and his wife are members of the 
Christian church. Since June 17, 1883, he has been a member of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows lodge of Madrid, and the high esteem in which he is 
held in that organization is evident in the fact that he has occupied all of the 
chairs. Mr. Crank is a man who is most sincerely interested in the uplift of 
his fellow citizens and who is ever ready to assist the distressed and needy. 
Progressive enterprises of a public nature find in him a warm champion, and he 
leaves no stone unturned in his efforts to bring about better living conditions 
and a greater happiness to mankind. While he has attained individual success, 
he has been consiclerate of his neighbors, friends and fellowmen, and his career 
is not strewn with the wreck of other fortunes. He is highly respected for what 
he is and for the achievements of his mind and industry. 



JOHN WILLIAM ISAACSON. 

The attractiveness of Boone county as a place of residence is indicated in the 
fact that many of her native sons have remained within her borders, recognizing 
the fact that the opportunities she offers them are equal to those found else- 
where in the country. In fact, Iowa leads in various regards. It is one of the 
best agricultural states of this great Union and it is in the lead as to its public 
schools. 

Mr. Isaacson was born in Boone county, March 4, 1868. His parents, Alex- 
ander and Margaret E. (Bergquist) Isaacson, had made an overland trip from 
Andover, Illinois, to this state in 1866, settling in Garden township, Boone 
county, on the 17th of May of that year. Both parents were nati\es of Sweden. 
The father, who was born July 7, 1831, crossed the Atlantic in 1859. He was 
married in Illinois on the 8th of April, 1862, to Margaret E. Bergquist, who was 
born in Sweden, July 25, 1840, and came to the United States in 1857. Alex- 
ander Isaacson was naturalized in 1864 and remained a loyal citizen of his 
adopted land to the time of his demise. On coming to the new world he settled 
in Illinois and for some time resided at Andover, Henry county, that state. In 
1866 he drove across the country to Garden Prairie, in Garden township this 
county, and there made his home on the north one half of northwest quarter of 
section 15, township 82, range 25, until 186S. when he went with his fainily to a 
farm near Sheldahl, the west one half of the southwest quarter of section 25, 
township 82, range 25, where they remained until 1889. In that year they took 
up their abode upon a farm in Colfax township, the northeast t|uarter of section 
34, township 83, range 25, where the succeeding decade was passed, and in 1899 
the parents went to Madrid, where their remaining days were spent, the father's 
death occurring October 16, 191 1. For about three years he had survived his 
wife, who died on the 17th of November, i(;o8. They were early settlers of 
Illinois and likewise of Boone county and were numbered among the substantial 
and highly respected people of their community. In their family were five chil- 
dren, three daughters and two sons, namely : Mrs. Amelia Kinland, who was born 
April 14, 1863, and died at Newkirk, Oklahoma, in 1902; Francis A., born 
November 15, 1865, and now living in Madrid: John William, of this review: 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 30T 

Anna L., who died in infancy; and Airs. Ida O. Johnson, who was born Septem- 
ber 20, 1875, and was married in Boone county in 1897, her death occurring in 
July of the following year. The two eldest children were born in Illinois and 
the younger members of the family in Boone county. All, however, were reared 
in this county and attended the country schools of the community in which they 
made their home. 

John William Isaacson has always been a resident of Boone county and was 
reared in the usual manner of farm lads, early becoming familiar with the duties 
and labors that fall to the lot of the agriculturist. After attaining his majority he 
continued to engage in farming, but in 1899 left the farm and removed to Madrid, 
where for some time he was engaged in the hardware business. He owns good 
business property in the city, including the brick blocks in which the hardware: 
business of A. Yocum is conducted. He is also the owner of a well improved one 
hundred and twenty acre farm in Colfax township and good residence property 
in Madrid. 

Mr. Isaacson is pleasantly situated in his home life. He was married in this^ 
county in 1906 to Miss Anna Matilda Alsin, who was born in Fairfield, Jefferson 
county, Iowa, and came to Boone county in childhood. Here she was reared to 
womanhood and has since made her home. Her father, P. A. Alsin, was one of 
the pioneer settlers of Garden township. 

In his political views Mr. Isaacson is a republican and is thoroughly informed 
concerning party questions and issues, but does not seek nor desire office, pre- 
ferring to concentrate his energies upon his business affairs. He is today sur- 
rounded by most of the comforts of life as the result of his careful management 
and intelligently directed business activity. He forms his plans carefully, is 
determined in their execution, and as the years have gone by he has won that 
success which is the legitimate reward of earnest, persistent effort. 



W. D. MILLER. 



W. D. Miller is actively identified with journalistic interests in Boone county 
as editor and publisher of the Ogden Reporter, which he purchased in February, 
1914. His birth occurred in New Market, Shenandoah county, Virginia, on the 
4th of September, 1878, his ])arents being John and Elizabeth (Louderback) 
Miller, who were likewise natives of that state. The father, a harness maker 
by trade, followed tliat occupation in \irginia throughout his active business- 
career. His demise occurred in January, 1901, and his widow now resides in 
Washington, D. C. 

W. D. Miller was reared and educated in the place of his nativity and when 
nineteen years of age made his way westward to Illinois, remaining in that state 
for two years. In 1901 he came to Iowa, locating in Eldora, Hardin county, 
where he learned telegraphy in the service of the Chicago & Northwestern Rail- 
way Company. In 1903 he came to Ogden, Boone county, and here remained 
in the employ of the Minneapolis & St. Louis Railway as agent for three years. 
On the expiration of that period he removed to California and later to Okla- 
homa, where he resided until 1907, when he returned to Ogden, having here re- 



308 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

mained continuously since. On February i, 1914, he purchased the Ogden 
Reporter and is now devoting his attention to his duties as editor and publisher. 
The sheet has a large subscription and advertising patronage and its columns 
are devoted to the dissemination of local and general news, while its editorial 
policy is such as has won for it enthusiastic support. 

On the 25th of December, 1907, Air. Miller was united in marriage to Miss 
Anna Belle Clark, a daughter of Dr. Orson and Emma (Sylvester) Clark and a 
sister of S. Parker Clark, a sketch of whom appears on another page of this 
work. Her father also receives extended mention in another part of this volume. 
Mr. and Mrs. Miller have one child, Virginia, who is three years of age. 

In his political views Mr. Miller is a progressive, stanchly advocating the 
principles set forth by Theodore Roosevelt at the time of the birth of the party. 
His religious faith is that of the Congregational church, while fraternally he is 
identified with the Masons. He is a man well liked and highly esteemed, and his 
efforts contribute substantially to the upbuilding and promotion of the interests 
of his community. 



JAMES M. WHITE. 



James M. White, who died in Ogden in July. 1901. was long and actively 
identified with industrial interests as a carpenter of that place, and enjoyed an 
enviable reputation as a substantial and respected citizen. His birth occurred 
in Pennsylvania on the 29th of December, 1849, his parents being Lewis and 
Elva White, who were likewise natives of the Keystone state. The father, 
an agriculturalist by occupation, removed to Illinois in an early day and there 
followed farming during the remainder of his life. 

James M. White was reared and educated in Illinois and in early life learned 
the carpenter's trade, working at that occupation in the Prairie state for some 
time. After coming to Boone county, Iowa, he engaged in farming for four 
vears, but on the expiration of that period took up his abode in Ogden and 
again began work at his trade. During the remainder of his life he engaged 
in carpentering and in that connection won a gratifying measure of success. 
for he was a skilled and reliable workman. He died in July, 1901, when in 
the fifty-second year of his age, and his demise came as a great blow not only 
to his immediate family, but also to an extensive circle of friends. 

In December. 1870, Mr. White was joined in wedlock to Miss Mary More- 
head a daughter of Samuel and Mary A. (Hollis) Morehead, both of whom 
were natives of Pennsylvania. The father removed to Illinois in an early 
day and carried on agricultural pursuits in that state until called to his final 
rest on the 24th of September. 1894. The demise of the mother occurred 
September 22. 1874. Unto j\Ir. and Mrs. White were born ten children, as 
follows: Lewis E., who is a resident of Perry, Iowa; Charles J., living in 
Ogden ; May, who is the wife of Isaac Dixon, of Ames, Iowa ; Eva. who gave 
her hand in marriage to Henry Jones, an agriculturist of Boone county ; Belle, 
the wife of Frank Morgan, who follows farming in Boone county; Arthur, 
a barber of Ogden; Sylva, who died in 1903; John W., living in Ogden; Ray- 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 311 

mond, a resident of Boone, Iowa ; and Albert, who died when but one year 
old. 

Mr. White was a democrat in politics and cast his ballot in support of the 
men and measures of that party. He served as a member of the school board 
for four years. His religious faith was that of the Methodist church, while 
fraternally he was identified with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Mrs. 
White, who yet survives her husband, is well known and highly esteemed in 
Ogden, where she still makes her home. 



J. HENRY GONDER. 



An excellent farm of one hundred and si.xty acres on sections 17 and 18, 
Beaver township, pays tribute to the care and cultivation of J. Henry Gonder, a 
wide-awake, alert and energetic business man, who belongs to that class which- 
have won for Iowa her well earned and well merited reputation of being one of 
the leading agricultural states of the Union. He was born in McLean county, 
Illinois, February 18, 1857, and is a son of Daniel and Mary Ann (Leeding) 
Gonder, the former a native of Ohio and the latter of England. In the year 
1856 the father went to Illinois, purchasing land in McLean county, upon which 
he settled and which he continued to cultivate until 1884. He then went to 
Greene county, Iowa, where he purchased a farm and also bought across the line 
in Boone county, operating his land until 1900, when he retired and took up his 
abode in Rippey, Greene county, where he resided until the death of his wife, 
which occurred in May, 191 2. He is now making his home with his son William 
in Grand Junction, at the advanced age of eighty-eight years. He is a veteran 
of the Mexican war and has ever been as true and loyal to his country as when 
he followed the stars and stripes into the land of the Montezumas. 

J. Henry Gonder was reared in McLean county, Illinois, where he pursued a 
public-school education. Practical experience in farm work prepared him for 
the duties which he afterward undertook in managing a farm of his own. He 
remained at home until he was married and then came to Boone county, purchas- 
ing one hundred and twenty-five acres of land on section 19, Beaver township. 
This he improved and operated for seventeen years, but, thinking his home too 
far distant from a school, he disposed of that place and purchased his present fine 
farm 6f one hundred and sixty acres on sections 17 and 18, Beaver township. 
To the further development and cultivation of this property he has since given 
his attention. His work is persistently and energetically done, and his labors are 
guided by intelligent direction. In addition to his farming interests Mr. Gonder 
is a stockholder in the Beaver Cooperative Company at Beaver, Iowa, and is also 
interested in a threshing outfit. Thus he is broadening his business connections 
and adding to his success. 

On the 17th of January, 1884, Mr. Gonder was united in marriage to Miss 
Etta Carter, a daughter of Joseph and Sarah (McNaught) Carter, who were 
natives of Illinois, the father following farming in McLean county all of his 
life. He passed away in June, 1876, at the age of thirty-five years and is sur- 
vived bv his wife, who is living in Lexington, Illinois, at the age of sixty- 



312" HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

seven. Mrs. Gonder was born in McLean county, Illinois, in December, 1865, 
and by her marriage she has become the mother of seven children : Mabel, the 
wife of O. B. Lofstedt, a resident of Grand Junction; Myrtle, the wife of M. J. 
Rinker, a farmer of Beaver township ; Lertnie, the wife of Harry Clark, a resi- 
dent farmer of Amaqua township ; and Mary, Henrietta, Daniel R. and Velda, 
all at home. 

Mr. Gonder gives his political allegiance to the republican party and for two 
terms served as trustee of Beaver township. He has also been constable of the 
township for twenty years, and he discharges his official duties with promptness 
and fidelity. Fraternally he is connected with the Odd Fellows and the Yeomen. 
His long residence in this section of the state has made him widely known, and 
his substantial qualities have gained him high and enduring regard. 



WILLIAM E. VAN METER. 

William E. Van Meter, who is successfully engaged in the real-estate business 
in Ogden, where he opened his office in 191 3, was born in Illinois on the 31st 
of August, 1879, a son of John and Eliza ( Saunders) Van Meter, the fonner a 
native of New Jersey and the latter of Illinois. In early life John Van Meter 
removed westward to Illinois, where he resided until 1881, when he brought his 
family to Boone county, where he secured a tract of land and carried on farming 
for six years. On the expiration of that period he established his home in Ogden 
and was engaged in teaming until the year 1894 when he went into the ice busi- 
ness so continuing for eight years, his son William E. being his partner during 
the last four years of that period or from 1898 to 1902. He still makes his home 
in Ogden but is now retired from active business, enjoying a well earned rest 
and the fruits of his former toil. 

William E. Van Meter was a little lad of but two years when brought by his 
parents to Boone county, where he has since made his home. His education was 
acquired in the schools of Ogden and he engaged in teaming until he joined 
his father in the ice business. He was admitted to a partnership and the relation 
between them was maintained until 1902. In that year William E. \'an Meter 
removed to Eraser, where he engaged in the dray and sand business, shipping 
sand extensively. There he made his home until 1908, when he purchased a farm 
near Pilot Mound, which he operated for two years. On selling out he pur- 
chased a merry-go-round and operated it upon the road until September, 1913, 
when he returned to Ogden and purchased a nice home. Here he has since 
engaged in the real-estate business in partnership with E. L. Merriam. They , 
now have a large clientage and are handling much important property. Mr. Van 
Meter has acquainted himself with property upon the market and is also thor- 
oughly informed concerning realty values. He is thus able to select for the 
purchaser what he desires and negotiate sales for those who wish to dispose of 
property. His business is growing along substantial lines. 

On the 29th of May, 1901, Mr. Van Meter was united in marriage to Miss 
Ethel Baker, a daughter of Andrew and Maria J. (Brown) Baker, who were 
natives of Indiana. The father was a farmer and came to Boone county about 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 313 

1880. He had served his country as a soldier in the Civil war for four years, 
being a member of an Indiana regiment. After coming to Iowa he purchased a 
farm, which he cultivated until 1902. He then put aside the more active work 
of the fields and removed to Ogden, where he resided until 1906. He then went 
to Guymon, Oklahoma, where he passed away on the ist of April, 1907, at the 
age of sixty-four years. His wife survived him until March 20, 191 1, and was 
also sixty-four years of age at the time of her demise. To Mr. and Mrs. Van 
Meter have been born two children, Earl and Geneva, aged eleven and nine 
years respectively. 

Mr. Van Meter was a member of the city council while at Pilot Mound. He 
has always given his political allegiance to the republican party and keeps well 
informed on the questions and issues of the day. Fraternally he is connected 
with the Masons and with the Odd Fellows, and his religious faith is that of the 
Methodist church. In his church and fraternal relations are indicated the rules 
which govern his conduct and guide him in all of his connections with his fellow- 
men. His life has been well spent and whatever success he has achieved is the 
result of his intelligently directed effort and energy, bringing him to a place 
among the representative men of Ogden. 



JOHN R. HERRON. 



The present populous city of Boone contained only two houses at the time 
of the arrival of the Herron family in Iowa. They became pioneer residents of 
Boone county, and it was upon the old family homestead in Des Moines town- 
ship that John R. Herron was born on the 19th of March, 1874. He is a son of 
Richard and Sabina (Payton) Herron, the former a native of Ireland and the 
latter of Canada. The paternal grandfather, Richard Herron, Sr., was likewise 
born on the Emerald isle and after crossing the briny deep to the new world he 
settled in Canada, where he devoted his life to general agricultural pursuits. He 
wedded Mary Henneberry and they became the parents of four children, three 
sons and a daughter: Richard; Mary, who became the wife of T. McDermott, 
of Eagle Grove, Iowa ; William, of Missouri Valley, Iowa : and John, who has 
departed this life. 

It was in 1847 that Richard Herron, Jr., became a resident of Stratford, 
Ontario, where he resided for eighteen years, or until 1865. He then married 
Sabina, a daughter of Patrick Payton, who was born in Ireland, but in the '30s 
established his home in Canada, where his remaining days were passed. White 
residing in Canada Mr. Herron followed farming, but in 1865 left that country 
for Iowa. After spending two months in Cedar Rapids, he removed to Boone, 
at which time the railroad extended only to Nevada. The family remained in the 
little hamlet until 1869 and then took up their abode upon a farm in Des Moines 
township, three and a half miles southeast of the city. There they remained until 
the spring of 1886, when they left the farm and returned to Boone, where Mr. 
Herron is now. living retired. His wife passed away in January, 1907. They 
had but two children and the elder, Mary, died in infancy. 



314 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

The son, John R. Herron, whose name introduces this record, was a pupil in 
the country and city schools until sixteen years of age, when he began learning 
the printing business in the office of The Boone County Democrat. He has been 
continuously connected with this paper since the ist of January, 1899, when he 
purchased a half interest in the business, his partner being M. Miller, who sold out 
a year and a half later. For a year Mr. Herron was associated in the ownership 
and publication of the Democrat with J. B. Barnett, who disposed of his interest 
to W. F. Menton, and in 1903 the latter sold out to his brother, John F. Menton, 
who is now Mr. Herron's partner. The paper is published under the incorpora- 
tion of the Democrat Publishing Company, and a progressive policy marks the 
Democrat, making it a very readable, entertaining and instructive paper. 

On the 20th of October. 1903, Mr. Herron was united in marriage to Miss 
Mary Jordan, a native of Boone county, and they have become parents of five 
children : Emmet, Edward, Mncent. Margaret and Francis. In politics Mr. 
Herron is a democrat and has filled the office of chairman of the country central 
committee. He is well known in fraternal circles, holding membership with the 
Knights of Columbus, the Yeomen and the Mystic Workers, and he is also a 
communicant of the Catholic church. He is both widely and favorably known 
in this county, where his entire life has been passed and where he has ever been 
an interested witness of the events that shape its progress and promote its wel- 
fare. 



HARVEY H. RINKER. 



Harvey H. Rinker has iinproved two excellent farms in Boone county and is 
now the owner of two hundred acres of rich, arable and productive land on sec- 
tions 16 and 19, Beaver township. This is the visible evidence of a life of well 
directed energy and thrift. He had no assistance from his parents and whatever 
success he has achieved is attributable entirely to his own labors. The measure 
of his industry has been the measure of his prosperity, and the former is indi- 
cated in the fact that he is accounted one of the substantial agriculturists of his 
community. He was born in Virginia, August i. 1866, a son of John and Sarah 
(Hoover) Rinker, who were also natives of the Old Dominion. The father, who 
was a farmer by occupation, removed to Illinois with his family and there 
engaged in farming, being identified with agricultural interests in that state until 
1895, when he came to Iowa, settling in Boone county. In connection with his 
son he purchased two hundred and forty acres of land on section 16, Beaver 
township, and to its further development and improvement devoted his remain- 
ing days. He enlisted for service with the Confederates and was at the front 
throughout the Civil war. Honest in his opinions and firm in his convictions, he 
did not deviate from a course which he believed to be right. He died February 3, 
1910, at the age of sixty-nine years and is survived by his widow, who is living 
upon the old home place at the age of seventy-two years. 

Harvey H. Rinker spent his youthful days under the parental roof, with the 
usual advantages of a public-school education and good home training. On 
attaining his majority he began farming on his own account, and his practical 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 315 

experience in assisting his father now proved of much value to him. He rented 
land in McLean county, Illinois, which he cultivated for three years, and then 
came to Boone county, arriving three years before his parents. He purchased 
, what became known as the Rinker farm, owned jointly by himself and father, 
and operated this land on section i6, Beaver township, for eighteen years. He 
then rented the place to his brother and purchased the farm upon which he now 
resides, comprising eighty acres of land on section 19, Beaver township. He has im- 
proved this place wonderfully as well as his other farm and now owns two hundred 
acres of splendidly improved land. He had no financial assistance from his 
parents but started out in the business world on his own account empty- 
handed and gradually worked his way upward. He has ever been watchful of 
the details pointing to success, has worked earnestly and persistently, and his 
methods have been of a most practical character. He has studied the question 
of crop rotation and understands the best time for planting and the best methods 
of enriching the soil. He has thus been able to gather good harvests and is now 
one of the substantial farmers of the community. In addition to tilling his fields 
he is engaged extensively in stock-raising, feeding two carloads of cattle, one car- 
load of sheep and one carload of hogs each year. He is also a stockholder in 
the Beaver Cooperative Company of Beaver. 

On the nth of February, 1892, Mr. Rinker was united in marriage to Miss 
Anna L. Rogers, a daughter of Lucius and Eunice (Freeman) Rogers, the former 
a native of Michigan and the latter of Illinois. Her father was a veteran of the 
Civil war, having enlisted from Illinois with the boys in blue, with whom he 
served until the close of hostilities. After the war he began farming and con- 
tinued the cultivation of a tract of land in Illinois until 1892, when he came to 
Iowa, settling in Guthrie county. There he carried on general agricultural pur- 
suits throughout the remainder of his days, owning four hundred and sixty acres 
of land. He died in September, 1913, while his wife is now living in Jefferson, 
Iowa. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Rinker have been born four children, Emmet, Perry, Eunice 
and Catherine. The family attend the Baptist church, of which both Mr. and 
Mrs. Rinker are members. In his political views Mr. Rinker is independent, 
supporting men and measures rather than party. He is never remiss in the duties 
of cuizenship and aids in advancing many public interests that have proven of 
worth to township and county. 



CLARENCE R. ANDERSON. 

Clarence R. Anderson is a member of the mercantile firm of Anderson Broth- 
ers at Ogden. They follow progressive methods, are energetic and in their close 
application, keen business sagacity and unfaltering industry is found the secret 
of their growing success. Clarence R. Anderson was born in Ogden on the 5th of 
August, 1891, and is, therefore, yet a young man. but the position to which 
he has attained is one which would be creditable to a man of twice his years. 
His parents, Charles and Sarah (Carlson) Anderson, were natives of Sweden. 
Crossing the Atlantic to the new world, Charles Anderson established his home 



316 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

in Illinois in the '60s, but after remaining there for a brief period came to Boone 
county, where he purchased a tract of land and improved a good farm in Marcy 
township. He continued its cultivation year after year with gratifying success in 
the production of the cereals best adapted to soil and climate. His methods were 
at once practical and progressive and resulted in good crops, for which he found 
a ready sale. He was thus engaged until 1904, when he retired and removed to 
Ogden, where he spent his remaining days in the enjoyment of a well earned and 
well merited rest. His death occurred September 17, 1912, while his wife sur- 
vived him only until the 26th of February, 1913. 

Clarence R. Anderson, reared in Ogden, pursued his education in its public 
schools and when his text-books were put aside he secured a clerkship in a gen- 
eral store, owned by his brother. In the summer of 1913, they erected a modern 
two-story business block and are now engaged successfully in general merchandis- 
ing under the firm style of ^Anderson Brothers. They carry a large and carefully 
selected line of goods, and their stock is attractive both in quality and price. 
They make earnest effort to please their patrons, are prompt, faithful and at all 
times thoroughly reliable and honorable in their dealing. Clarence R. Anderson 
is also a stockholder in the Ogden State Bank and is recognized as one of the 
rising young business men of the city. His political views accord with the prin- 
ciples of the progressive party, and he is not afraid to announce his opinions, yet 
is never bitterly aggressive. His religious faith is indicated by his membership 
in the Swedish Mission. Well known in Boone, he has many sterling traits of 
character, that have gained for him high personal regard. 



B. ARIE. 

B. Arie, agent at Boone for the Anheuser-Busch Brewing Association of 
St. Louis, and prominently associated with the building industry in this city, 
was born in Brody, Austria-Hungary, in 1847. His educational opportunities 
were those afforded by the common schools of his native land, and in 1876 he 
entered the Roumanian army, his country being allied with the Russians at that 
period. He participated in the Russian and Roumanian wars of 1877-8, and dur- 
ing that period he lost the sight of his left eye. 

Hoping to find better business opportunities in the new world than he believed 
he could secure in the old, Mr. Arie came to the United States in 1881, land- 
ing at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where he remained for a short time. He 
then went to Omaha, Nebraska, where he engaged in the bottling business, but 
he did not meet with the profit that he had anticipated in that connection, and 
he left Omaha in 1882, removing to Boone, where he established bottling works. 
He continued in the business here until 1894, and from that time to the pres- 
ent he has been connected with the Anheuser-Busch Brewing Association of 
St. Louis as its agent and representative in Boone. This does not cover the 
extent of his business activity, however, for he has been largely associated with 
the building industry at Boone, where he has erected many fine structures that 
are a monument to his spirit of enterprise and are a credit to the city. These 
include the Opera House block and the Arie building. He was the builder of the 




B. ARIE 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 319 

Arie Hotel at Madrid, Iowa, and he has also been the builder of three build- 
ings which he has given to his three grandchildren — Ruth, Janette and Ethel — 
and these three buildings are named the Virginia, the Ethel and the Helen. 

Mr. Arie was united in marriage to Miss Eva Abrams, and they became the 
parents of three children, but two have passed away, the other being O. B.. who 
is now engaged in the real-estate business in Boone. Mr. Arie has never had 
occasion to regret his determination to come to the new world, for here he 
fomid the opportunities which he sought and, working his way steadily upward, 
has reached a position among the most substantial business men of Boone. Not 
all days in his career have been equally bright. At times he has seen the clouds 
of business disaster gathering, but even then he has not lost heart and courage. 
He has ever recognized the fact that industry wins, and his intelligently directed 
effort has at length won reward in the attainment of a handsome competence. 



HON. JOHN S. CROOKS. 

Hon. John S. Crooks is serving for the second term as mayor of Boone. His 
life record stands in contradistinction to the old adage that a prophet is never 
without honor save in his own country, for in the city of his birth John S. Crooks 
has attained a position as a foremost citizen and has wielded a wide influence in 
public affairs. He was born May 29, 1865, and is a son of George \\\ and 
Rebecca (Nutt) Crooks, of whom mention is made on another page of this 
volume. Reared under the parental roof, he passed through consecutive grades 
in the public schools and became a high-school inipil. His initial step in the 
business world was made in connection with railroad work, to which he devoted 
a year. He afterward spent ten years in the abstract business and for fifteen 
years was secretary of a loan company, at the end of which time he closed out 
his interests in that connection. Later he engaged in the real-estate and insur- 
ance business, and at the present writing he is concentrating his efforts largely 
upon his official duties, for his fellow townsmen, appreciative of his worth and 
ability, elected him to the office of mayor in March, 191 1, and he served so credit- 
ably during his first term of two years that he was reelected in March, 1913, 
and is now the incumbent in the position. He has made an excellent record, 
characterized by many needed reforms and improvements, and his course has 
been thoroughly public-spirited at all times. 

Mr. Crooks was united in marriage to Miss Luella M-. Parks, a native of 
Boone county, and unto them have been born a son and daughter: George \V., now 
a resident farmer of Boone county : and Mildred, who is attending the State Col- 
lege. Mr. Crooks votes with the democratic party and has indorsed its prin- 
ciples since age conferred upon him the right of franchise. He is popular in 
several fraternal organizations, having membership with the Masons, the Elks 
and the Royal Arcanum. His religious belief is that of the Methodist church, 
and these connections indicate the rules which govern his conduct and guide him 
in all of his relations with his fellowmen. The name of Crooks has been an 
honored one in Boone county since his uncle John M. Crooks became one of the 
early settlers of the county in 1846. In all the intervening years to the present 



320 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

representatives of the name have sought the improvement and upbuilding of this 
section, and the work begun by his grandfather and carried on by his father is 
now being continued by John S. Crooks, whose record as mayor is, indeed, 
creditable. 



ISAAC STOVER. 



Isaac Stover, who now lives retired in Madrid after a long and successful 
business career which not only brought him prosperity but had its effect upon 
the development of his county, belongs to one of the oldest families of his locality. 
Moreover, there is great credit due him for the gallant service which he rendered 
his country in the Civil war. He was born near Alamo, Montgomery county, 
Indiana, September 19, 1842, and is a son of Joseph and Lydia (Rinker) Stover, 
natives of Tennessee. The father was born in 1806 and died in Madrid, Iowa, 
August 14, 1884, while the mother's death occurred in Dallas county, Iowa, in 
February, 1880. The family removed to Dallas county, locating on a farm, where 
they remained until 1856, when they came to Madrid. Joseph Stover was one of 
the pioneer sawmill men of Boone county establishing an enterprise of that kind 
in 1856. He and his wife had eleven children, of whom six are living. The 
family comprised in all : William, deceased ; Mrs. Melinda Wheeler, who also 
has passed away ; Samuel, deceased ; Mrs. Lucinda Rutherford, deceased ; Mrs. 
Mary Wood, a resident of Nebraska ; Elizabeth, who died in infancv ; Isaac ; 
George W., residing in Idaho ; Henderson, who makes his home in Washington ; 
Joseph M., residing in Dallas county, Iowa ; and Mrs. Sarah Hoop, a resident of 
Douglas township. All were born in Indiana. 

Isaac Stover enlisted for service in the Union army from Swede's Point when 
about nineteen years of age, on the ist of August, 1861, joining Company D, 
Tenth Iowa Volunteer Infantry. His first term of enlistment ended January i, 
1864, but he reenlisted and served until August 15, 1865, when he returned to 
his private affairs in Madrid, engaging in the sawmill business. Mr. Stover has 
to his credit a most honorable military record which entitles him to distinction. 
He participated in numerous engagements, including that at Island No. 10, New 
Madrid, Pittsburg Landing and the two sieges of Corinth. He was with Grant 
in the Western Army and at Jackson, Champion's Hill and the siege of Vicksburg. 
He was one of the heroes of Sherman's celebrated march to the sea, being a 
participant thereof during the entire trip. At the close of the war he was among 
that proud throng which constituted the Grand Review. 

Besides his milling interests, Mr. Stover was active in agricultural operations 
in Cass township, where he still owns one hundred and twenty acres on section 
27, which is highly improved and bear rich harvests. He has always followed 
the most modern methods and deserves credit as a leader in the farm develop- 
ment of Iowa. Because of his incessant labors, his business ability and his thrift, 
he has become one of the substantial men of his locality. He now lives retired 
in Madrid, passing the evening of life amid comfortable surroundings. 

On the 8th of October, 1865, the marriage of Isaac Stover and Mary M. Mess- 
more was celebrated. She was born in Washington county, Iowa, August 17, 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 321 

1847, and in 1848 was brought by her parents, Adam and Sarah J. (Wilhams) 
Messmore, to Boone county, of which the family has ever since been residents. 
The father and mother were among the pioneers here and the former operated 
one of the first flour mills along the Boone river. He was born in Pennsylvania, 
August 17, 1820, and died in Moingona, Iowa, January 24, 1881. For three 
months he served in the Union army. His wife was born in Indiana, March 9, 
1820, and died in Boone, June 11, 1901. In their family were the following chil- 
dren: Mrs. Stover; Mrs. Kate Capron, of Des Moines; Henry, deceased; Hiram, 
a resident of Geneva, Nebraska; ]\Irs. Elizabeth Grosvenor, deceased; Frank, of 
Council Bluffs, Iowa ; Mrs. Ada Steward, of South Dakota ; Edward ; Mrs. May 
Boswell, of South Dakota ; Mrs. Susie Kairns ; Ellsworth ; and John. These chil- 
dren were born in Hamilton, Webster and Boone counties and all reared in this 
county. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stover became the parents of the following: Clarence J., born 
October 24, 1866, who died September 20, 1868; Edward A., born ]\Iarch 9, 1869, 
now a resident of Tingley, Iowa; Albert R., whose birth occurred August 13, 
1872, and who resides in Manzanola, Colorado; Lillian, who was born February 
15, 1874, and died February 3, 1881 ; Rev. John A., born October 16, 1876; and 
Mrs. Lois E. Shaw, born February 14, 1882, a resident of Madrid. All the chil- 
dren were born in Boone county. Rev. John A. Stover was the first graduate of 
the Madrid high school and at present is a minister of the Christian church at 
Frankfort, Indiana. 

Isaac Stover is a democrat and has always taken a vital interest in local affairs. 
He served as township clerk and assessor in Cass township and also held various 
school offices, recognizing fully the value of improved methods of education. 
Both he and his wife are members of the Christian church of Madrid. He is a 
member of Star Lodge, No. 115, A. F. & A. M., of Madrid, and has held all the 
offices in the local organization. He is deeply interested in Masonic work and 
practices the principles of the brotherhood in his everyday life. He is acknowl- 
edged to be one of the best posted Masons in the community. He is also a mem- 
ber of J. Filmer Post, No. 347, G. A. R., where he meets his comrades of old and 
keeps awake in him the spirit which prompted him once to stand up in defense 
of the flag against the aggression of the South. Mr. Stover would make an ideal 
citizen of any community, for he always places the public welfare above private 
gain. He is admired and respected for what he has achieved and for what he is. 
His patriotism and his noble and manly qualities of character have been the key 
to that position which he now holds in the affection of all who know him. 



ALEX FYFE. 



Alex Fyfe, known to his many friends as "Sandy," is a prosperous merchant 
of Ogden, where he has conducted a flour and feed store for the past ten years. 
His birth occurred in Scotland on the 30th of January, 1848, his parents being 
William and Jane (Henderson) Fyfe, likewise natives of that country. The 
father, a coal miner in Scotland, emigrated to the United States in the fall of 
1865 and took up his abode in Pennsylvania, where he continued as a coal miner 



322 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

for two years. In 1868 he came to Boone county, Iowa, and here purchased and 
improved a farm near Moingona, being actively engaged in its operation and also 
continuing work as a coal miner throughout the remainder of his life. He passed 
away on the 14th of January, 1889, when seventy-seven years of age, the com- 
munity thus losing one of its substantial and respected citizens. His wife was 
called to her final rest on the 23d of August, 1897. 

Alex Fyfe acquired his education in the schools of his native land and was a 
youth of seventeen when he accompanied his parents on their emigration to the 
new world. For a period of twenty years he worked as a coal miner at Moingona 
in the winter seasons, while during the summer months he farmed the home 
place. In November, 1904, he took up his abode in Ogden and embarked in the 
flour and feed business, having conducted an establishment of that character 
throughout the intervening decade. An extensive patronage is accorded him, and 
he enjoys an enviable reputation as an enterprising and reliable merchant. He 
owns his place of business and also six lots in the main business section of Ogden. 

In 1881 Mr. Fyfe was united in marriage to Miss Anna Hightshoe, by whom 
he has four children, as follows : Samuel, a brakeman in the service of the Chi- 
cago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway, who resides at Perry, Iowa ; Alex, who is 
engaged in business as a butcher of Perry ; Ernest, of Perry, who is an engineer 
in the employ of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway ; and William, who 
is a butcher residing in Perry. 

Mr. Fyfe gives his political allegiance to the republican party and was reared 
in the faith of the United Presbyterian church. He is a worthy exemplar of the 
Masonic fraternity, belonging to the blue lodge, the chapter, the commandery, 
the Mystic shrine and the Eastern Star, He is likewise identified with the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows and the Rebekahs. The period of his residence in 
Boone county covers about a half century, and he is widely and favorably known 
within its borders, having won many friends who esteem him for his good qual- 
ities and upright, honorable life. 



JOHN A. HALEEN. 



Among the business concerns of Boone the firm of Anderson & Haleen, who 
are engaged in blacksmithing and carriage manufacturing, take a prominent place. 
The firm has built up a reputation for punctuality, reliability and high class work 
which reflects honor upon those who conduct the business. Mr. Haleen is the 
junior partner in the concern and not only is he efficient as a workman, but he is a 
shrewd and able business man who combines the sturdy qualities of his native 
race with American aggressiveness in promoting his interests. A large number of 
satisfied customers is proof of the success of this firm. 

Mr. Haleen was born in Sweden, June 29, 1866, and is a son of Gustav Ander- 
son and Catherine (Johnson) Haleen, the former a farmer throughout life. The 
father is now seventy-eight years of age, while the mother died when seventy 
years old. In their family were the following children ; John A., of this review ; 
Anna, of Sweden; Victor, of Boone, Iowa ; Sanna, of Webster City. Iowa ; Gustav, 
a farmer of Boone ; Marie, of Boone ; and Tachlay, also of Boone. 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 323 

The educational advantages of John A. Haleen were meager. He entered 
school at the age of seven but at that time had only one term of instruction and 
although he later was permitted to attend for two more terms most of his time 
during his boyhood and youth was taken up by work on the home farm. Being 
impressed with the opportmiities which were awaiting willing young hands in 
this country he decided when twenty-one years of age to emigrate to the United 
States and sailed from Guttenberg to New York, whence he made his way to 
Pocahontas, Iowa. There he engaged at his trade, doing blacksmith work, which 
he had learned in his native country. In the spring of 1893 he left Pocahontas 
for Roc'kford, Illinois, to work as a blacksmith in the Scandia Plow factory. 
However, he remained there but a few months, going in August, 1893, to Web- 
ster City, where he worked for four years. At the end of that time, in 1897, he 
came to Boone and was for over seven years in the employ of Thompson & Peter- 
son. The desire to see the place of his birth influenced him to pay a visit to 
Sweden and he spent five months in his native land. He and Mr. Anderson 
formed their present partnership, February i, 1913. bringing into life the firm of 
Anderson & Haleen. They are engaged in blacksmith work and carriage manu- 
facturing and do an extensive and profitable business. They are obliging to their 
customers, their workmanship is superior, and they can be relied upon in every 
detail of the work. As business men they enjoy a high reputation, and while 
they own a prosperous business, they have contributed I)y this means toward the 
general prosperity of the city in which they reside. 

In December, 1896, Mr. Haleen married Miss Larvida Benson, vi-hose father 
and mother are both dead. Mr. and Mrs. Haleen have the following children, 
Allan, Helmer, Esther, Ruth and Arthur. The parents are members of the Swed- 
ish Lutheran church and are loyal and devoted to its creed. They take part in 
the various phases of church life and give their moral and material support to its 
work. Mr. Haleen is a republican, supporting the candidates and measures of 
that party. Personally he is averse to accepting public office but in a private way 
has done much toward promoting trade and industrial prosperity in Boone. 
Fraternally he is a Modern Woodman and popular in this order. He is well 
liked by all who know him because of the genuine qualities of his character, and 
he has manv friends in Boone. 



F. G. LIERMAN. 



F. G. Lierman, an enterprising and successful young business man of Ogden, 
there conducts a first-class meat market in association with his father. He 
is numbered among the worthy native sons of Boone county, his birth having 
occurred at Moingona on the 17th of November, 1882. His parents were Fred 
and Mary (Hamilton) Lierman, the former a native of St. Louis, Missouri, and 
the latter of West Virginia. Fred Lierman, who came to this county in 1874, 
was a butcher by trade and also worked in the coal mines for two years. He 
removed to Ames, Story county, where he worked in a butcher shop for several 
years, subsequently returning to Moingona and there engaging in business as a 
butcher from 1879 until 1882. In the latter year he met with an accident which 



324 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

occasioned the loss of his left leg and therefore went to Boone, where he worked 
in a butcher shop until 1885. In that year he again embarked in business on 
his own account and some time later removed to Lehigh, Webster county, Iowa, 
where he carried on a coal and butcher business for eighteen years. In Sep- 
tember, 1913, he came to Ogden and has here since conducted a first-class meat 
market in association with our subject, having built up an extensive and gratify- 
ing patronage. During the period of the Civil war he served for a short time as 
a member of Company G, Se\enth Missouri \'olunteer Infantry. For nearly a 
quarter of a century he has survived his wife, who was called to her final rest on 
the 5th of March, 1891. 

F. G. Liernian acquired his education in Boone and since putting aside 
his text-books has been associated with his father during the greater part of the 
time. At Lehigh he worked in the coal mines. In September, 1913, he and his 
father opened a meat market in Ogden, where they have conducted a success- 
ful establishment of this character to the present time. Mr. Lierman is recognized 
as a young man of good business ability and sound judgment and is numbered 
among the representative and progressive citizens of the community. 

On the I2th of April, 191 1, Mr. Lierman was united in marriage to ]\Iiss 
Dorothy Rosacker, her father being M. Rosacker, a pioneer lumber merchant of 
Ogden. In religious faith Mr. Lierman is a Catholic. He also belongs to the 
United Mine Workers. Both he and his wife are well known in this county 
and the circle of their friends is almost coextensive with the circle of their 
acquaintances. 



ERNEST C. BROWN, M. D. 

Dr. Ernest C. Brown has successfully followed the profession of medicine 
and surgery in Madrid for more than two decades and has built up a practice 
which is one of the most extensive in central Iowa. His birth occurred at 
A'erona, Oneida county, New York, on the 24th of August, 1867, his parents 
being Calvin and Mary Jane ( Morton ) Brown. The father was one of those 
highly respectable farmers who, while their holdings are not large, take a very 
high rank in community life by reason of thrift, probity and general sterling 
qualities. He owned a small fann near A'erona, New ^'ork, on which he lived 
for nearly a half century, rearing and educating his large family. At the time 
of his death, in September, 1896, he was one of Oneida county's oldest residents, 
and his portrait and sketch of life appear in the Oneida county history, published 
that year. From the standpoint of ability, he was prepared by nature for a 
broader field of action. He gave considerable attention to fruit-growing, gaining 
a state-wide reputation for the excellent varieties of pears, apples and grapes 
which he produced. He figured prominently in the agricultural and horticul- 
tural societies of both county and state. Subsequently he became identified with 
the dairy business and won gratifying success in that connection, at one time 
owning what was called the Banner Dairy, 

His wife, the mother of the Doctor, was a daughter of Samuel Morton, of 
Rome, New York, a descendant of the Mortons who figured so prominently in 




DK. ERNKST C. BliUWN AM) FAMILY 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 327 

the history of New England and in the line of descent from Sir George Morton, 
who fitted out the Mayflower for its famous voyage but who, through the intrigue 
of the British, was arrested and not allowed to sail with the expedition he had 
formed. The Mortons, however, came to Massachusetts in the following year 
in the "Speedwell." The Browns were also from the best old New England 
stock, coming from Connecticut to New York in 1796 and locating on a farm 
near Rome, N. Y., which has ever since remained in the family. The ancestry 
of Dr. Brown in the maternal line and on the side of his grandmother Brovi'n, 
who was a Talcott, can be traced well back into the early English history — the 
Mortons to William the Conqueror and the Talcotts to the Earl of Warwick. 
The paternal grandfather of our subject held the rank of captain in the War of 
1812, while his greatgrandfather in the maternal line was with Ethan Allen in 
his Revolutionary exploits. 

Ernest C. Brown acquired his earlier education in the common school of his 
native county and subsequently attended the Rome Free Academy for two 
winters, working on his father's farm during the summer months. When twenty- 
one years of age he left the old homestead and entered the Fort Edward Col- 
legiate Institute at T'ort Edward, New York, pursuing a classical course in that 
institution. In the fall of i8go he took up the study of medicine in the University 
of Michigan Homeopathic Medical College at Ann Arbor, being graduated with 
the degree of M. D. in June, 1893. In the following August he came to Iowa 
and at once began the practice of his profession, being J associated for a few 
months with Dr. Martin, the leading homeopathist of Boone. In October, 1893, 
he opened an office in Madrid, where he has remained continuously since and has 
met with exceptional success, now enjoying a practice whiich is one of the most 
extensive in central Iowa. In the spring of 1898 he pursued post-graduate work 
in a special line of his profession. He is a member of the American Institute 
of Homeopathy and the Hahnemann Medical Association of Iowa, and acts as 
examining physician for several ilfe insurance companies. Prosperity has come 
to him in merited and gratifying degree and he owns an attractive and well 
appointed home in Madrid. 

On the 20th of June, 1900, at IMadrid, Iowa, Dr. Brown was united in marriage 
to Miss Florence Mason, who was born in Kendall county, Illinois, on the 12th 
of F'ebruary, 1S79, her parents being George and Sarah Ann ( Kennison) Mason, 
the former born in LaSalle county. Illinois, February 19, 1839, and the latter in 
Vermont, July 17, 1843. In 1884 the parents established their home in Wash- 
ington county, Iowa, whence they came to Madrid, Boone county, in 1895. Mrs. 
Brown attended the common and high schools in Washington, Iowa, and also 
had special training in elocution and oratory at Drake University of Des Moines. 
Her parents still survive, residing in a commodious and attractive home at Madrid. 
Unto them were born the following children : Mrs. J. H. Mayer, who is a 
resident of Garden township ; E. G. Mason, of Washington, Iowa ; L. E. Mason 
of Slater; Delbert, who is deceased; and Mrs. Florence Brown. All were born 
in Illinois, in which state the Mason family resided for about twenty-eight years. 
Dr. and Mrs. Brown have four children, namely : \'ictoria Grace, who was born 
on the I2th of April, 1901 ; Gertrude Bernice, whose birth occurred June i, 
1903 ; Albert Mason, whose natal day was January 27, 1905 ; and Kenneth Ross, 



328 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

born October 6, 1907. All are natives of Madrid and are now attending the 
public schools of that city. 

Dr. Brown tirst exercised his right of franchise in support of Grover Cleve- 
land and David B. Hill in the memorable New York contest of 1888, traveling 
over one hundred and fifty miles to cast his ballot. He has always remained a 
loyal adherent of the democracy and on two different occasions was the candi- 
date of his party for the ofiice of county coroner. His religious faith is indi- 
cated by his membership in the Methodist Episcopal church of Aladrid, to which 
his wife also belongs, she being active aijd prominent in the musical and auxiliary 
societies of that church. Loyal in friendship, devoted to the ties of home and 
family and maintaining a high standard of conduct in all the relations of life, 
Dr. Brown is well worthy the esteem in which he is unifomily held. He is 
generous in his support of every noble and good cause. 



JAMES F. RICHEY. 

James F. Richey, who after a long and successful career as an agriculturist 
in Dayton township, Webster county, now lives retired in Boone, is one of the 
city's most substantial citizens. He was born in Wayne county, near Wooster, 
Ohio, November 7, 1845, and is a son of Gasper T. and Martha (Richard) 
Richey. The paternal grandfather removed from Pennsylvania to Ohio, becom- 
ing one of the pioneers of that state. He died in Webster county, Iowa. In his 
family were the following sons : James, who located in Webster county, where 
he died ; John, who passed away in \^'ayne county, Ohio ; Gasper T., father of 
our subject: and Samuel, whose death occurred in Sheldon county, Indiana. 
There were also nine daughters in this family. 

Caspar T. Richey was educated in the schools of \\'estnioreland county, 
Pennsylvania, and there he married, removing subsequently to Wayne county, 
Ohio. He was a miller by trade and owned and ran grist mills, sawmils and oil 
mills, pressing oil from pumpkin seeds. Being impressed with the opportunities 
of the middle west he moved to Webster county, Iowa, locating in Dayton town- 
ship, November 9, 1854. He had come to Iowa the previous year and entered 
twenty-three hundred acres of land in Webster and Polk counties upon which 
he and his family located in 1854. They drove from Ohio by team and arrived at 
their new home after a long and arduous journey. The father soon became one 
of the foremost men of Webster county and was i)rominent in political affairs. 
Conditions were still of the most primitive nature when the family located there 
and many were the dangers which Caspar T. Richey underwent, his life being 
threatened several times. The mail service was very unsatisfactory and in his 
connnunity only one paper was read, the copy circulating among various families. 
He served for ten years as justice of the peace and also was a member of the 
board of county supervisors. During the first year he succeeded in improving 
half a section of his land, erecting fences thereon and transforming the wild 
prairie into bearing fields. When he died he left large holdings which he had 
accumulated with the idea of giving the land to his cliildren. His home was built 
of round, unhewn logs and was fourteen by eighteen feet in size and one story in 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 329' 

height. At that time droves of elk, deer and wild hogs were still plentiful. The 
father died April 9, 1882, at the age of seventy-nine years, and found his last 
resting place in Linn cemetery, Boone county. He was a stanch democrat and 
his religious faith was that of the Methodist Episcopal church, to which his wife 
also belonged. She died about ten years later, in 1892, at the age of eighty-four 
years. In their family were the following children ; Alargaret, who is now Mrs. 
Cyrus Burnett, of Dayton, Iowa ; Mary J., who married J. R. Lyon and died in 
Fort Dodge; Priscilla, the deceased wife of Levi Emerson, of Stratford, Iowa; 
Henrietta, who married A. R. Daughenbaugh of Des Moines; Gasper, who mar- 
ried Hattie Lyon and died in \\'ebster county ; James F., of this review ; and 
Sylvester, who married Angeline ]\Iahon and died in Dayton. 

James F. Richey attended school conducted in the old log schoolhouses of his 
native township whenever time and cirrumstances permitted, his educational 
advantages being very limited, though he continued to attend school for a short 
time each year until he was eighteen. He remembers that in the early days there 
was not a house within ten miles of his father's homestead and church was held 
in a schoolhouse at Des Moines at a time when there were but few houses in Fort 
Dodge. Indians were still plentiful and our subject's brothers in 1856 partic- 
ipated in a campaign against the hostile savages. Mr. Richey helped his fathef 
in the development of the farm and they built the largest barn in Webster county 
at that time. They raised large quantities of grain and even supplied their neigh- 
bors with seed. Mr. Richey remained on the homestead until after his marriage 
and subsequently located on a farm of three hundred and eighty-five acres which 
was given him by his father. The house and barns were kept in the best of 
condition and he received a handsome income from his agricultural interests. He 
bought three hundred and seventy-four and one-half acres in partnership with 
M. J. Carlson, of Pilot Mound, this land being underlaid with coal. It is situated 
in Douglas township, Boone county. After many years of successful labor Mr. 
Richey left his farm in 1888 and removed to Pilot Mound, Boone county, where 
he engaged in buying and selling live stock, but in 1893 he came to Boone, where 
he now lives retired in the enjoyment of a gratifying competency. 

On October 11, 1868, James F. Richey married Miss Louisa Baker, who was 
born near Terre Haute, in Clay county, Indiana, November 9, 1846, and received 
her education in the common schools of Dodge township, Boone county, Iowa. 
She is a daughter of Joel and Olive (Mitchell) Baker. Her father was born in 
Kentucky and after his marriage there removed to Clay county, Indiana, but in 
185 1 he came to Iowa, locating on wild prairie land in Dodge township, Boone 
county, his holdings comprising one hundred and sixty acres. He later sold out 
and acquired three hundred acres of land east of Ridgeport, Dodge township, 
Webster county. He died there in 1889, at the age of sixty-eight years, his wife 
passing away April 11, 1914. Both were buried in the Mineral Ridge cemetery. 
They were devoted members of the Baptist church. When Mrs. Baker died she 
had forty-eight grandchildren and one hundred and forty-two great-grandchil- 
dren. Her children were : Julia, who married Giles Strode, of Butler county, 
Kansas; Louisa, the wife of our subject; Sarah, who married E. J. Ray, of 
Boone ; Mary, the wife of J. W. Cole, of Dodge township, Webster county ; 
Winnie, who is now Mrs. Samuel Sterrett of Boone; Annie, the wife of J. B. 
Price, of Ridgeport ; Martha, who married David Cole and resides near Ridge- 



330 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

port ; John, who died at the age of fourteen years ; Priscilla, the wife of Charles 
Ray, of Armour, South Dakota ; EHzabeth, the wife of Herman Lindmark, resid- 
ing near Ridgeport ; George, of Fort Cobb, Oklahoma : and Elias, who married 
Luella Stotts and resides near Stanhope, Iowa. 

Mr. Richey is a stanch democrat and thoroughly in accord with the aims of 
his party. He gave his first vote for president to General AlcClellan. Both he 
and his wife are members of the Baptist church of Boone and Mr. Richey taught 
ni the Sunday school while residing in Pilot Mound. He has ever been inter- 
ested in the intellectual and moral upbuilding of the people and has contributed 
toward that end. He is respected and esteemed by his fellowmen because of his 
high qualities of character and because he is a useful, loyal and patriotic citizen. 



J. G. LUC.\S. 



J. G. Lucas enjoys a high reputation among the newspaper men of Iowa as 
owner and editor of the Register-Xews of ^ladrid, a paper which through 
his incessant labors has become one of the foremost country publications of the 
state. Mr. Lucas is a son of Cory don L. and Xancy ( Sturdivant) Lucas, 
the former the well known real-estate man and historical authority of !\Iadrid, 
also the first mayor of the town. 

J. G. Lucas was born at Belle Point, Boone county, Iowa, January 8, 1879. 
There he passed his boyhood and attended the common schools. He has always 
been a resident of this county. While yet young he became interested in the pub- 
lishing business in Madrid, and he has followed this occupation all his life. In 
December, 1904, he acquired the Register-News and he has since equipped his 
plant so completely and modernly that it stands second to none in the state. Mr. 
Lucas is an enthusiastic newspaper man. In his editorials, which are clear cut 
and forceful, he sets forth views which have had a decidedly beneficial influ- 
ence upon the growth of his city, and his paper has been of the greatest educa- 
tional value in the community. His news columns comprise extensive accounts 
of local happenings and include a record of the nation's and world's events. It 
is but natural that a paper of this character has increased in circulation from 
year to year and that its advertising patronage has likewise grown. The Regis- 
ter-Xews is today considered one of the most valuable publications to those who 
desire to reach an extensive and representative public. In connection with his 
newspaper Mr. Lucas also maintains a high-class printing plant, turning out 
artistic and up-to-date work punctually and at a most reasonable price. 

In 1904, J'. G. Lucas married in Madrid Miss Maude Halsy, a native of 
Boone county, where she attended the common schools, completing her educa- 
tion in the Madrid high school. She grew to womanhood here and has ever since 
remained a resident of this county. Her parents are C. W. and Catharine 
(Purkhiser) Halsy and they have five children: Clyde, of Des Moines; Mrs. 
Maude Lucas ; Mrs. D. E. Crawford, of Des Moines ; Lee, of Madrid ; and Mrs. 
William Valline, who also resides at the capital. All these children were born 
and reached maturity in P.oone county. Mr. and Mrs. Lucas are the parents of 




MR, AND MRS. J. G. LUCAS 



PUB' 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 333 

Max, Catharine, Lillian and Robert L. Lucas, who were born in Madrid, where 
they pursue their education. 

Mr. Lucas is a republican and has always taken a deep interest in the wel- 
fare of his party. Both he and his wife are members of the Christian church. 
He is well known in fraternal circles, being a member of Star Lodge, No. 115, 
A. F. & A. M., and the Odd Fellows lodge of Madrid. Yet a young man, he has 
already achieved a decided success, a success which not only means individual 
prosperity but which stands for patriotic and public-spirited citizenship. As a 
man and through the influence of his paper he has largely contributed toward the 
growth and progress of Madrid and Boone county, and his efforts in this respect 
have proven a factor in the increasing prosperity of his section and the moral 
and intellectual upbuilding of his town. 



JOHN M. ANDERSON. 

John M. Anderson is a representative business man of Boone, being the senior 
partner in the firm of Anderson & Haleen, who are engaged in general blacksmith- 
ing, repair work and the manufacture of wagons and carriages. Mr. Anderson 
was born November 30, 1866, in Sweden. He is a son o-f Anders and Johanna 
Anderson and a grandson of Peter Anderson. The latter followed farming 
throughout life in his native country, where he passed awayi In earlier years he 
served in the Swedish army. He had the following children: John; Swan; 
Christine ; Annie ; Mattie ; and Anders, the father of our subject. The last named 
also followed farming throughout life and died in Sweden in September, 1869. 
His widow subsequently married John Johnson, who died two years later. In 
1887 she and two of her sons, Andrew and Emit, sailed from Gottenborg, Sweden, 
to New York and thence made their way to Boone county, where her two daugh- 
ters, Josephine and Annie, had preceded them. In Boone, Mrs. Johnson married 
John Aim, who is also deceased. To Mr. and Mrs. Anders Anderson the fol- 
lowing children were born : Matilda, who married John Anderson and died in 
Sweden in 1909; Josephine, who married in Princeton, Illinois, and is now a 
widow residing in Boone : Annie, who married Augus Alt, of Boone ; John M. 
of" this review ; Andrew, of Chicago, who married Matilda Wenstrom ; and Emil, 
who died in Fort Dodge, Iowa. By the subseijuent marriages of the rriother no 
children were born. 

John M. Anderson attended the public sch(x>ls in Sweden until fourteen years 
of age and then spent three years in a military institution. He came to the United 
States in 1888, one year after his mother's arrival here. He located in Boone 
and worked for the Northwestern Railway as bridge foreman. Then he learned 
blacksmithing and wagon making in the employ of Thompson & Peterson, with 
whom he remained for eighteen years, gaining valuable experience of a practical 
kind and also thoroughly acquainting himself with the business end in connection 
with such an enterprise. In February, 1913, he formed a partnership with Mr. 
Haleen in the establishment of the firm of Anderson & Haleen, who are now 
doing an extensive and most profitable business. They are known as reliable, 



334 HISTORY OF BOONE COUXTY 

punctual and trustworthy, and it may be said that no piece of work ever leaves 
their shops unless it is of the very best workmanship. 

In October, 1893, Mr. Anderson married, in Boone, Miss Annie Edling, of 
Dayton, Iowa, a daughter of John and Christina Edling. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Anderson the following children were born : Clarence, who is an electrician in 
the emplov of a coal mine in Ogden ; Fred, a lineman on the interurban road, 
residing at home; Esther, at home: Harold, now six years old; Mary, deceased; 
and Oscar. The parents are members of the Christian church and helpfully 
interested in its work, while politically Air. Anderson is independent, giving his 
support to the candidates whom he considers best fitted for the office to which 
they aspire, irrespective of party affiliation. Fraternally he is a Modern Wood- 
man, a Domestic Worker of the World and a member of the Loyal Order of 
Moose. He is a distinct factor in the development of Boone and has contributed 
to its growth by pursuing his private affairs. He is ever ready to give his sup- 
port to public enterprise and can be found in the front ranks of those men who 
have at heart the welfare and betterment of the citv. 



JOSEPH A. SIFRIT. 



Joseph A. Sifrit. who for twenty-nine years has made his home on his present 
farm on section 7. Beaver township, was born in Woodford county, Illinois, in 
May, 1855, a son of Alichael and Susanna (Xewland) Sifrit, both of whom were 
natives of Ohio. On leaving that state they came to Boone county, Iowa, in 185 1, 
but only remained for about a year, removing at the end of that time to Woodford 
county, Illinois, where the father purchased land and operated his farm until 
1869. He then sold out and went to Coles county, Illinois, and afterward became 
a resident of Cumberland county, that state, where he carried on general agri- 
cultural pursuits until 1874. He then returned to Boone county, where he/ car- 
ried on farming for some time. Later he retired and made his home with his 
children throughout his remaining days, death calling him on the 28th of May, 
1906. He had long survived his wife, who passed away on the 21st of April, 1882. 

Joseph A. Sifrit was reared and educated in Illinois and remained with his 
parents, or made his home with them, until twenty-four years of age. In the 
meantime he earned his living by working as a farm hand in the employ of others, 
but he was ambitious to improve his own financial condition and began renting 
land in Dallas county. This he operated for a number of years, or until 1885, 
when he purchased his present farm of eighty acres on section 7, Beaver town- 
ship. This he also set about improving and has operated the place continuously 
since. It is not difficult to conjecture what manner of man Mr. Sifrit is when we 
notice his place and see its well kept appearance. The fields give promise of 
abundant harvests, and everything about the farm is kept in good condition. He 
also owns forty acres of land on section 19, Beaver township, and his wife is 
the owner of eighty acres in Dallas county. 

On the 28th of February, 1881, Mr. Sifrit was united in marriage to Miss 
]\Iary E. Halley, a daughter of George W. and Christina (Staley) Halley, who 
were natives of Ohio and on coming to Iowa cast in their lot with the pioneer 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 335 

settlers of Jackson county in 1853. There the father engaged in the practice of 
veterinary surgery until 1871, when he renio\ed to Dallas county, where he con- 
tinued to practice until his death. He was accidentally killed by being thrown 
from a cart while breaking a colt, his neck being broken. This was in September, 
1907. For more than ten years he had survived his wife, who passed away 
December 28, 1896. To Air. and Mrs. Sifrit was born a child, who died in 
infancy in 1882. 

In his political views Mr. Sifrit is a prohibitionist, for he believes that the 
question of the sale and manufacture of alcoholic liquors is one of the most 
important before the country today. His religious faith is that of the Baptist 
church, and his life exemplifies many high and honorable principles. He is 
esteemed wherever known and most of all where he is best known. 



CHARLES ROSEN. 



In the business world Charles Rosen has worked his way upward step by step, 
his ability increasing through the exercise of effort, and although he started out 
empty-handed, he is now at the head of a profitable and growing harness business 
conducted under the firm name of Charles Rosen & Company. He was born in 
Sweden on the 17th of November, 1851, a son of Mr. and Mrs. Carl Carlson, who 
were also natives of that country and never came to America. The father was a 
farmer by occupation. In 1870 Charles Rosen and his two brothers came to the 
United States, Charles making his way to Des Moines, Iowa, where he remained 
for a brief period. He then went to Lost Grove, this state, where he was em- 
ployed as a farm hand for six months. On the expiration of that period he 
removed to Boone, Iowa, and entered the employ of Oscar Nelson in the harness 
business, remaining with him for six months. His employer then went into bank- 
ruptcy, leaving Mr. Rosen stranded. He then entered another harness shop, 
where he was to receive a salary of six dollars per month. However, he was 
raised one dollar for the first month and another dollar for the second month, his 
salary then remaining eight dollars per month for some time. Eventually, how- 
ever, he was paid fifty dollars after he had learned his trade. On leaving Boone 
he came to Ogden, where he had charge of a harness business from 1875 until 
1897, when his employer died. He then purchased the stock and has since con- 
ducted the store, making it one of the important commercial enterprises of the 
state. On the 2d of Januarv-, 1903, he admitted John A. Peterson to a partner- 
ship under the firm name of Charles Rosen & Company. They carry an extensive 
line of harness and horse goods and a complete line of shoes. Theirs is the only 
business of the kind in Ogden, and their trade is growing month by month. They 
draw their patronage from a wide surrounding territory, and their sales now 
reach a gratifying annual figure. 

In 1878 Mr. Rosen was united in marriage to Miss Augusta Rundberg, a 
daughter of John Rundberg, a native of Sweden and a pioneer of Boone county, 
who is now deceased. Unto Air. and Mrs. Rosen have been born four children: 
Lillian E., who has passed away; Walter M., cashier of the City State Bank of 
Ogden; and Edna and Clarence, at home. Mr. Rosen owns a fine residence in 



336 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

the eastern part of the town, and the spirit of hospitality there reigns supreme. 
He votes with the repubhcan party, and upon its ticket has been elected to some 
local offices. For nine years he served as a member of the city council and exer- 
cised his official prerogatives in support of many measures for the general good, 
seeking to promote matters of reform, progress and improvement in his city. 
For an extended period he has been a member of the school board, and the cause 
of education has found in him a stalwart champion. His religious faith is that 
of the Swedish Mission, and high and honorable principles actuate him in all of 
his relations with his fellowmen. Upon the sure and safe foundation of integrity 
in business he has builded his success, and those who have known him and 
watched his career speak of him in terms of high regard. 



HARRY LUCAS TILLSON. 

Harry Lucas Tillson, who for a number of years has been engaged in the 
electrical supply business in Boone and who is an electrical contractor, is a native 
son of this city, where he was born February 22, 1883. He is a son of Josiah P. 
and Olive ( Lucas ) Tillson, the former born in Otsego, New York. Their son, 
Harry L., attended the schools of Boone until 1899, spending the last three years 
in high school under the direction of Professor George L Miller. He subse- 
quently entered the Iowa State College at Ames, where he took a course in elec- 
trical engineering, graduating with the class of 1903. He then returned to Boone, 
where he remained until bis remo\al to the Kansas oil fields, where he was pro- 
fessionally employed for a year and a half. He next became a member of the 
stafif of the Boone Electric Company, continuing with this concern for one and a 
half years. At the end of that time he established himself independently as an 
electrical contractor and also as a dealer in electrical supplies. 

On July 10, 1905'; Mr. Tillson married Miss Alice Nelson of Boone, a daugh- 
ter of George C. and Adelia (Hibbard) Nelson. Politically Mr. Tillson is a 
republican but is not active in public affairs, although he is ever ready to support 
valuable enterprises which promise to improve conditions in his community. He 
is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and also belongs to the 
encampment of that organization. 



H. T. HAGGE. 



H. J. Hagge is a member of the firm of Hagge & Claussen, of Ogden, dealers 
in automobiles, who also conduct a general repair business and are accorded a 
liberal patronage in both connections. His birth occurred in Yell township. 
Boone county, Iowa, on the 3d of November, 1888, his parents being Hans and 
Catherina (Keuhl) Hagge, both of whom are natives of Germany. The father 
emigrated to the United States in an early day, first spending a short time in Wis- 
consin and later coming to this county. He purchased and improved a farm in 
Yell township, carrying on general agricultural pursuits successfully until 191 1, 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 337 

when he put aside the active work of the fields and took up his abode in Ogden, 
where he has since lived retired. Both he and his wife are well known and highly 
esteemed throughout the community, and the hospitality of the best homes is 
cordially extended them. 

H. J. Hagge acquired his early education in the district schools of this county 
and continued his studies in the public schools of Ogden, while subsequently he 
pursued a course in the Capital City Commercial College of Des Moines. After 
putting aside his text-books he cultivated rented land for three years and then 
took up his abode in Ogden, where he worked for a short time. On the ist of 
February, 1913, in partnership with Carl Claussen, he embarked in the automo- 
bile business, having since handled Buick cars exclusively and also conducting a 
general repair business under the firm style of Hagge & Claussen. They own 
their garage, which is a single-story brick building of double width. Mr. Hagge 
has won gratifying success in this connection and also owns a farm of eighty 
acres in Yell township which owes its excellent improvements to his personal 
efl'orts. 

Since age conferred upon him the right of franchise Mr. Hagge has supported 
the men and measures of the republican party. His religious faith is that of the 
German Lutheran church. He has spent his entire life within the borders of his 
native county and is a popular young man who has won and retained an extensive 
circle of friends. 



SIDNEY R. DYER. 



Sidney R. Dyer, a leading and successful representative of the legal fraternity 
in Boone county, has now practiced his profession in the town of Boone contin- 
uously fot more than four decades and has been accorded an extensive and grati- 
fying clientage. His birth occurred in Lockport, New York, on the 28th of 
December, 1845, h's parents being John and Sarah A. (Webb) Dyer. 

Sidney R. Dyer acquired his education in the public schools of Fulton, 
Illinois, and also attended a military academy there. In July, 1862, when in his 
seventeenth year, he enlisted for service in the Civil war, becoming a member 
of Company F, Ninety-third Illinois Infantry, and remaining with that command 
until mustered out in 1865. Subsequently he pursued the course of study in the 
Northern Soldiers' College and in 1870 took up the study of law in the office 
of W. E. Leffingwell, of Lyons, Iowa. He was admitted to the Clinton county 
bar in 1872 and engaged in practice for a short time at Fulton, Illinois, but in 
November of that year he opened an office in Boone, where he has remained 
continuously since. A liberal and lucrative clientage has been accorded him. 
He is remarkable among lawyers for the wide research and provident care with 
which he prepares his cases. At no time has his reading ever been confined to 
the limitation of the questions at issue. It has gone beyond and compassed every 
contingency and provided not alone for the expected, but for the unexpected, 
which happens in the courts quite as frequently as out of them. 

As a companion and helpmate on the journey of life Mr. Dyer chose Miss 
Jennie L. Mofif'att, a daughter of Charles A. and Charlotte (Bascom) MofTatt, both 



338 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

of whom were born in New York. Our subject and his wife had two sons, Dr. 
John S., deceased, and Walter R. 

Mr. Dyer gives his political allegiance to the republican party and for two 
terms held the office of mayor in Boone, his administration being characterized 
by many measures of reform and progress. He is a stanch champion of the 
cause of education and has done valuable service as a member of the school 
board. He belongs to the Grand Army of the Republic and is identified fra- 
ternally with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. During the many years 
in which Mr. Dyer has practiced his profession in Boone his success has been 
uniformly pronounced, while his long residence in the community, together with 
his sterling integrity and personality, has won for him a large number of 
friends. 



SQUIRE B. WILLIAMS. 

There was no more beloved citizen in Aladrid, Iowa, than Squire B. Wil- 
liams, who was highly respected and esteemed as a friend, as a citizen, as a 
merchant, banker and official. For a number of years Mr. Williams was most 
.successfully engaged in the grain business and from 1909 until his demise also 
served as cashier of the Madrid State Bank. Under Cleveland he was post- 
master of Madrid and discharged his duties in a highly creditable way. Mr. 
Williams was one of the best informed men of his community, conversant 
with the leading issues and questions of the day and always ready to give his 
support to valuable public enterprises. He was a man of energy and deter- 
mination and by persistent and honorable efforts mounted the ladder to success. 

Squire B. W^illiams was born in Boone county, Iowa, May 13, 1S60, on what 
is now known as the John Dalander farm, near Elk Rapids, and was a son of 
Benjamin and Elizabeth Williams, pioneer residents of this county, who are 
mentioned at length in another part of this work. Benjamin Williams was 
a native of Ohio who had moved to Indiana, where he was educated and grew 
to manhood. In 1847 he came to Iowa, settling in Boone county, and here he 
resided until his death in February, 1884, at the age of sixty-six years. Eliza- 
beth Williams, who sur\ives him, also came to Boone county at an early day 
in its history. 

Squire B. \\'illiams was reared under the parental roof, receiving a common 
.school education in the neighborhood of the father's farm and early assisting his 
parents in their agricultural labors. He remained with them until twenty 
years of age, when he came to Madrid and engaged in the livery business, in 
-which he was successful for about four years. Disposing of his interests in 
that line, he then formed a partnership with the late G. A. Young and they 
■conducted a meat business for about a year. At that time he was appointed 
postmaster of Madrid by President Cleveland, and filled the position for one 
term, giving great satisfaction to the patrons of the office. He subsequently 
.became local manager of the .McFarland Grain Company, and in that position 
came in touch with the most important agricultural interests of the section, 
.earning the high regard of his employers. He remained with this firm for 




SQUIKE B. WILLIAM.- 




,<»■ • 



JIKS. SC^riKE I!. WILLIAMS 



\ -ri m: V ■ " ■ ■■'O^v 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 343 

twelve years. In August, 1900, he purchased from C. S. Lavvbaugh an established 
grain business, which he successfully conducted until his demise. Mr. Wil- 
liams was a shrewd and able business man, thoroughly honest in all his methods, 
and in great measure he enjoyed the confidence of those who had business 
transactions with him. His ability was recognized and by it he built up a 
commercial institution which brought him a large competence. He made a 
number of profitable and judicious investments, including stock purchases in 
the Madrid State Bank. In 1909, when a vacancy occurred in the cashiership, 
Mr. Williams was elected to that position, and ably managed the affairs of this 
bank until his death, supervising at the same time his grain interests. As a 
banker Mr. Williams proved himself most able. While he was connected offi- 
cially with the institution the bank increased in stability, and its resources grew 
rapidly. His advice was frequently sought by investors, and the depositors of 
the institution found in him a valuable friend. He was careful in the invest- 
ments of the bank, and his foremost consideration was always the interest of 
the depositors. 

On September 29, 1883, Mr. Williams was united in marriage to Miss Blanche 
Bilsland, of Madrid, who ably assisted him in his many enterprises and was his 
worthy helpmate. During his last illness she cared for him with all the love 
conceivable and provided him with every imaginable comfort. Mrs. Williams 
was born in Douglas township, Boone county, on September 2, 1861. Here she 
grew to womanhood, attending the common schools and the Boone high school 
for one year. Her parents, John and Eliza (Wagner) Bilsland, were natives 
of Indiana and Illinois respectively, the former born in Fountain county, April 
7, 1 83 1, and the latter in Iroquois county, March 27, 1837. The mother died in 
Madrid, January 25, 1896. Mr. Bilsland still resides in a handsome home in 
•Madrid, Mrs. Williams, his daughter, making her home with him. The father 
came overland to Iowa in 1853, and settled at Swede Point, now Madrid. Soon 
after his arrival he acquired a large tract of land in northern Douglas town- 
ship. This was in the year 1856. He then returned to Indiana, bringing his 
bride to the newly established home in Iowa. They were pioneers indeed, as 
at that time nearly all the vast expanse surrounding Madrid was unbroken 
land and settlements were sparse. Markets were at a great distance and fron- 
tier conditions pre\ailed generally. By perseverance and close application Mr. 
Bilsland, however, overcame these difficulties and rose to a position of sub- 
stance among his fellow citizens. The father of Mr. Bilsland was born on the 
Atlantic ocean when the grandparents were emigrating to America. The family 
first located in Pennsylvania and several members participated in the War of 1812. 
Mr. and Mrs. Bilsland retired to Madrid in 1873, yet the former continued to 
direct his farm operations until 1897. Mrs. Williams was their only child. 

Mr. and Mrs. Williams had two daughters, both born in Madrid: Mrs. Edna< 

Boone Parsons, born March 6, 1886, who attended the Madrid high school, but 

left before graduating and who graduated from the oratory department of 

Drake University in 1905 ; and Dorothy B., born September 14, 1898, who is 

attending school in Madrid. Mrs. Parsons is a very effective orator and recited 

at the Boone County Pioneers' Semi-Centennial. held at Ames in 1904, the 

Declaration of Independence, earning high praise because of the effective recital 

of the famous document. She married in 191 1 Benjamin F. Parsons, a gradu- 
voi. n— 10 



344 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

ate electrical engineer of Iowa State College, and they now reside in Portland, 
Oregon. They have one son, Carter Franklin Parsons, born January 5, 1914. 

Squire B. Williams was an ardent democrat. His first vote was cast for 
Cleveland in 1884, while the first vote of Mr. Bilsland was given Franklin 
Pierce. Mr. Williams was honored with election to public office and for two 
years served as city treastirer. He was always ready to lend valuable aid in the 
way of enabling his community to realize some aspects of its higher self. His 
material aid was ever forthcoming. He was a courteous, afifable, approachable 
gentleman, a man of sympathies who was ever ready to do a kindness to those 
in need of his services. Both he and Mr. Bilsland were members of Star Lodge, 
No. 115, A. F. & A. M., of Madrid. He belonged to the Christian church, of 
which Mrs. Williams is a member, and always took a deep interest in its work. 
He was particularly effective as a member of the choir, possessing an excellent 
voice, and Mrs. Williams still sings with that organization. She now looks 
after the extensive interests left by her husband, and has proven herself a most 
able manager of important afifairs. She is a charter member of Occidental 
Chapter, O. E. S., of Madrid, and at present is grand warder of the state of 
Iowa in the organization. Both Mr. and Mrs. \\"illiams were always among 
the most progressive citizens, and it might be of interest to note here that they 
introduced the first telephone to their community and that the first gasoline 
stove found a place in their home. 

Mr. Williams was one of the very best types of Iowa's native sons and he 
reflected honor upon his state and county by his honorable activities. Squire 
B. Williams died on April 14, 1912, at the age of fifty-one years, eleven months 
and one day. His demise caused sincere sorrow throughout the communitv. 
and in many homes his loss was felt as a personal one. As a friend he was 
faithful and true, as a citizen loyal to his community and countv and as a 
father and husband he proved his noble manhood. His memory will live for 
many years, and his record is such that it should spur on the young men of today 
to gain an honorable position and financial independence by following his worthy 
precepts. 



ALBERT T. SUNDELL. 

Albert T. Sundell, who has remained a resident of Grant township from his 
birth to the present time, devotes his attention to the operation of the home farm 
of one hundred and sixty acres on section 20 and also makes a specialty of stock- 
raising. He was born on the 8th of June, 1877, ^ son of Gust and Emily (Berg- 
man) Sundell, both of whom are natives of Sweden. The father crossed the 
Atlantic to the United States in the '60s and located in Keokuk, Iowa, where he 
helped to build the canal, assisting in its construction for six years. On the 
expiration of that period he came to Boone county and purchased a tract of 
land in Grant township which he improved and operated continuously and suc- 
cessfully until 1900, when he put aside the active work of the fields and removed 
to Pilot Mound, where he has since lived retired. He has now reached the age 





MR. AND MRS. JOHN BILSLAND 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 347 

of seventy years and is well known and highly esteemed throughout the com- 
munity. 

Albert T. Sundell was reared in Grant township, where he acquired his edu- 
cation, also attending the short course at Iowa State College at Ames for three 
years. After attaining his majority he took charge of the home farm, compris- 
ing one hundred and sixty acres on section 20, Grant township, and has since 
operated the same with excellent results. The property wall eventually come 
into his possession, for he is the only child of his parents. In connection with 
the tilling of the soil he makes a specialty of the raising of Duroc Jersey hogs 
and Hereford cattle and also of buying stock. He is also a stockholder in the 
Farmers Elevator Company of Boxholm and is widely recognized as a progres- 
sive and enterprising citizen of his native county. 

In May, 1900, Mr. Svmdell was united in marriage to Miss Julia Lundblad, a 
daughter of Alfred and Sophia Lundblad, who are natives of Sweden and emi- 
grated to America at an early day. The father, one of the earliest pioneers of 
Boone county, still lives on his farm in Pilot Alound township, and the mother also 
yet survives. Unto Mr. and Airs. Sundell have been born six children, as follows: 
Clarence ; Cloyd ; \iola ; Herman, who died in 1908 ; .Mildred ; and Laura. 

In politics Mr. Sundell is a republican, loyally supporting the principles and 
candidates of that party. He has served as trustee of Grant township and has 
been a member of the school board since reaching his majority or for a period 
of sixteen years, ever discharging his official duties in a capable and commend- 
able manner. He is identified fraternally with the Modern Woo<l©1en of America, 
and his religious faith is that of the Lutheran church. Both Mr. and Mrs. Sun- 
dell are held in high esteem throughout the community and have an extensive 
circle of warm friends, while the hospitality of the best homes is freely accorded 
them. 



JOHN S. GASTON. 



With Boone as a railway center, naturally a considerable proportion of its 
citizens are connected with the railway service, among whom are those whose 
efficiency has been acknowledged in promotion by the railway corporation which 
they serve. One of these is John S. Gaston, a passenger conductor on the North- 
western between Boone and Omaha. He has been a conductor since 1890, while 
his connection with railroad work dates from 1883, more than three decades ago. 
His first position was that of brakeman, while later he became freight conduc- 
tor, and in 1904 was made passenger conductor. He was born upon a farm 
near Traer, Tama county, Iowa, on the 3d of January, 1859 a son of Hugh Ford 
Gaston, a native of Muskingum county, Ohio, born in August, 1810. While 
still a resident of the Buckeye state he married Elizabeth Stokes, of Wells- 
ville, Ohio, a daughter of John and Martha (Van Tilberg) Stokes. On leaving 
his native state Hugh Ford Gaston removed to Iowa with his wife and child, 
settling in Tama county. The journey was made by wagon and they crossed 
the Mississippi river at Muscatine. Pioneer conditions existed in the state, where 
the work of progress and improvement had scarcely been begun. They settled 



348 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

among the Indians in Tama county and the father purchased one hundred and 
sixty acres of government land at a dollar and a quarter per acre. His farm was 
situated in Perry township and was mostly prairie land. He later acquired an ad- 
joining tract of one hundred and sixty acres of land for which he gave a team of 
oxen. This was virgin soil, and with characteristic energy he began to turn the sod 
and prepare the place for cultivation. He built a house of logs and it was in 
that pioneer cabin that John S. Gaston was born. Later the primitive home was 
replaced by a frame dwelling and this in turn gave way before a thoroughly 
modern two-story frame residence containing ten rooms — one of the attractive 
modern homes of the twentieth century. About fifteen years ago Mr. Gaston 
retired from active life and removed to Traer, where he is still living — active, hale 
and hearty and possessing a most retentive memory. He is one of the honored 
pioneer settlers of his part of the state and has ever been acknowledged a citi- 
zen of worth. He was one of the builders of the Congregational church, and 
he has always given stalwart support to the republican party. His wife also 
survives and is now eighty- four years of age. Theirs is the remarkable record 
of having been married sixty-six years and having never been separated for a 
single day. In their family were the following children : Etta, at home ; James, 
who died at the age of forty-one years; John S. ; Ella, now the wife of Professor 
O. P. Berber of Cornell, Iowa ; Alattie, who died at the age of twenty-one years ; 
Willis, living at Reinbeck, Iowa ; Wallace, who makes his home at Traer ; Den- 
ver Dayton, at home : and Zay, the wife of George Franzenberg of Tacoma, 
\\'nshington. 

Born and reared on the old home farm. John S. Gaston was a pupil in the 
public schools of Traer between the ages of five and fifteen years. With the 
family he shared in the usual experiences, hardships and privations of pioneer 
life, at a time when Waterloo was the nearest town to the Gaston homestead. 
The entire country was new and the land unbroken, and there was no railroad 
until the Burlington, Cedar Rapids & Northern was built through Traer. Even 
in his boyhood days Mr. Gaston was deeply interested in the development and 
progress of the district. After leaving the public schools he continued his edu- 
cation at the Tilford Academy in ^^inton, Iowa, and also spent a year at Cor- 
nell College in Mount Vernon. When about eighteen years of age he finished 
his studies and later remained upon the home farm until he attained his major- 
ity. About 1882 or 1883 he came to Boone and soon afterward entered the employ 
of the Chicago & Northwestern Railway Company in the capacity of brakeman. 
After serving in that way for two years he was called home to take charge of 
the farm, for his father had been elected county treasurer of Tama county and 
needed the assistance of his son in the work of the fields that he might be thus 
relieved to take charge of the duties of his official position. In 1887 John S. 
Gaston returned to Boone and once more entered the employ of the Northwestern 
as brakeman, continuing as such until the ist of June, 1890, when he was pro- 
moted to freight conductor, his run being between Boone and Council Bluffs. 
He acted in that capacity until 1904. when, on the 24th of December, he was pro- 
moted to the position of passenger conductor, still running between Boone and 
Council Bluffs. He has since served as passenger conductor and is a popular 
official of the road because of his unfailing courtesy and obliging manner and 
his ready and willing assistance to the many patrons of the road. 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 349 

On the 22d of November, 1888, in Traer, Iowa, the Rev. Bingham pronounced 
the words that made John S. Gaston and Miss Helena Schroeder husband and 
wife. Mrs. Gaston was born in Marne, Holstein, Germany, June 19, 1865, and 
was brought to the United States when ja. year old by her parents, who located 
in Davenport, Iowa. When she was five years of age they went to Toledo, 
Tama county, and when she became a maiden of twelve summers a removal 
was made to Traer, Iowa, where she continued her education in the public 
school. Her father, Peter Schroeder, was educated in Germany and served for 
three years in the German army. He afterward learned and followed the mason's 
trade in his native country, but, thinking that he might have better opportunities 
in the new world, he crossed the Atlantic to the United States, as previously 
stated, accompanied by his wife and two children. He was the only one of that 
branch of the Schroeder family to come to America. He followed the mason's 
trade for a time after reaching the new world, but ultimately turned his attention 
to other pursuits and is now a retired farmer living in Davenport. Unto him 
and his wife were born the following children: Mrs. Gaston; Charles, who 
makes his home in Spencer, Iowa; William, deceased; Henry, a practicing physi- 
cian of Braymer, Missouri; Peter, a physician of Davenport, Iowa; and Emma, 
the wife of Charles Anderson, of Peoria, Illinois. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Gaston have been born three children. Mildred, born 
November 18, 1889, in Boone, attended the public schools until graduated with 
the class of 1908. She then pursued a four years' course in Ames College, tak- 
ing domestic science, and for a year and a half she was a teacher at Ida Grove. 
On the iith of February, 1914, she became the wife of John .M. Gould and 
resides in Cleburne, Texas. Mary Elizabeth, born November 13, 1894, was 
graduated from the Boone high school with the class of 1913 and is now a 
teacher in the Ericson school of Boone county. Donald S., born April 17, 1899, 
is a high-school pupil in Boone. The record of the children indicates the inter- 
est of the parents in education and their efforts to give their daughters and son 
excellent advantages along that line. In politics Mr. Gaston is a stalwart repub- 
lican, believing firmly in the principles of the party. He belongs to the Brother- 
hood of Railway Trainmen and to Boone Lodge, No. 79, F. & A. M. He and 
his family are consistent and faithful members of the Presbyterian church, and 
they occupy a pleasant home at No. 204 Tama street, which Mr. Gaston purchased 
eight years ago. Fidelity to duty is one of his strong characteristics ; his ability 
has developed through efifort and his energy and industry have made him one 
of the trustworthy representatives of railway activity in Boone. 



JOHN REED BOYD. 



John Reed Boyd is a prosperous farmer residing on section 17, Colfax town- 
ship, where he successfully cultivates one hundred and sixty acres of land, which 
he owns. His birth occurred in Elk River township, Clinton county, Iowa, on 
the 2d day of December, 1853. His father, James Boyd, was a native of Pitts- 
burgh, Pennsylvania, and there grew to manhood. His marriage occurred in 
Clinton county, Iowa, his wife being in her maidenhood Miss Mary Sloane. 



350 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

They later came to Boone count}-. The father passed away in Colfax township 
after he had reached the Psalmist's allotted age of man, his death occurring when 
he was seventy-two years old. His political support was given to the democratic 
party, and he was a man of splendicj. qualities of character and enjoyed the 
esteem of his community. His wife passed away on the homestead, and both 
are buried in Clarke cemetery. To them were born the following children: 
George J.; Thomas S. ; Martha W., now deceased, who married Norman Hurd; 
Marion and David, who have passed away : John Reed, of this review ; Mary 
E., now Mrs. Smith Barret, of Boone; Ethel A., deceased, who married Harry 
Myers ; and James B., of Colfax. 

John Reed Boyd remained in Clinton county, Iowa, until he was sixteen 
years of age, and his energies were devoted to the acquiring of an education in 
the public schools and the assisting in the work of cultivating the home farm. 
In 1869 he accompanied his father to Boone county, locating on a tract of land 
in Colfax township. The father was at one time the owner of nine hundred 
acres, which he later divided among his children. Our subject continued his 
education in Colfax township, putting aside his text-books at the age of nineteen. 
For a few years thereafter he remained at home, aiding his father in the tilling 
of the soil. In 1875 his marriage occurred, and for thirteen years subsequently 
he made his home upon his father's land. In the fall of 1892 he built his present 
residence. He has proven himself an efficient agriculturist and reaps bountiful 
harvests as the reward of his labor. 

In 1875 Mr. Boyd married Miss Ella Hull, a daughter of Samuel A. and 
Rachel (Prother) Hull. The following children were born to our subject and 
his wife: Minnie May, the wife of Charles Cromwell of Madrid; Samuel R., 
at home; Ernest W., also at home; Byron J., of Colfax township; Alpha C, who 
married Tillie Legvold, of Colfax; Harry E., who passed away at sixteen; and 
Lee J. and Leah Irene, twins. 

Mrs. Boyd is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. Boyd gives 
his political allegiance to the democratic party and has served for some time as 
a school director, always manifesting a praiseworthy interest in the welfare of the 
public schools of his district. He has carried the same spirit into all the relations 
of life and in consequence holds the respect of his fellowmen. 



FRANK D. ADIX. 



Frank D. Adix, who is engaged in the carpentering and contracting business 
in Boone in partnership with his brother A. W., is numbered among that city's 
shrewd and able business men. He is a son of Lewis W. and Fredericka (Krog- 
man) Adix. natives of Germany, who are mentioned in another part of this work 
and who are numbered among the pioneer residents of Boone county. 

Frank D. Adix was born on the home farm in Yell township, March- 12, 1875, 
and when old enough entered the district schools of the neighborhood, continuing 
his lessons in the Hickory Grove school during the winter months until he was 
twenty-one years of age. During this time, how-ever, he gave much attention 
to agricultural pursuits, acr|uainting himself thoroughly with the best methods 




MR. AND MRS. PRANK D. ADIX 



THE NEW YORK 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 353 

under the able direction of his father. He so continued until twenty-two years 
of age and then, in partnership with his brother Albert W., acquired the title 
to the homestead, which they operated as partners until the spring of 1913, when 
Mr. Adix of this review removed to Boone in order to give the best of care to 
his aged parents. He is now engaged in the contracting business in Boone and in 
partnership with his brother has executed a number of important contracts. He 
is shrewd and able, up-to-date and thoroughly honest in all his methods, having 
gained a high reputation among the builders of Boone county. In partnership 
with his brother he owns eighteen lots in Barnett's addition in the fifth ward of 
the city of Boone. 

On March 20, 1907, Mr. Adix was imited in marriage, in Ogden, Iowa, to 
Miss Elizabeth Rinehart, a daughter of William P. and Phoebe (Bressler) 
Rinehart. Mr. Adix takes a lasting interest in the social and material progress 
of his coinmunity. He gives readily to charitable causes and, although not a 
member of any church, often attends religious services. He is a democrat, loy- 
ally supporting that party at the polls, although he is not an office-seeker. 



WILLIAM H. CHANCE. 

William H. Chance, of Boone, Iowa, is a partner in the firm of T. H. Chance 
& Son, who conduct a large and profitable machine shop.m that city. He is one 
of the younger business men of Boone county, his birth having occurred in Angus, 
this county, March 14, 1884. He is a son of Tillman and Jennie (Davis) Chance, 
the latter a native of Boone county. The father was born in Adel,'' Dallas county, 
Iowa, about sixty years ago. He spent his boyhood and youth in Dallas county, 
there attending the public schools. In his earlier life he assisted in farm labor 
but subsequently became an engineer in the gold mines of Colorado and upon his 
return from the western state established himself as a stationary engineer in 
Angus in 1880. He now deals in farm lands, besides being interested in the firm 
with wdiich son is connected. Both Mr. and Mrs. Chance are members of the 
Christian church and the former is fraternally a Knight of Pythias and a Mason. 
He votes independently, preferring to follow his own judgment in giving sup- 
port to the various candidates. Previous to his marriage to Jennie Davis, Mr. 
Chance was wedded to a Miss Garoutte, who bore him two children : Zilla ; and 
Clifford A., of Ralston, Iowa, who married Jessie Le Compte, by whom he has 
one child, Eloise. To his second marriage the following children were born : 
William H., of this review; Myrtle, who now resides with her parents and who 
is the widow of James McCart, by whom she has one child, Grace; Josephine, 
the wife of R. A. Timmins and the mother of Audrey Timmins : Emma, who is 
Mrs. Frank Burris of Des Moines ; Lena, who married Richard Harrison and 
resides in Des Moines : and Linnie, at home. 

William IT. Chance was but a year old when his parents removed from Angus 
to Fishville, Iowa. There they remained about a year and then proceeded to Van 
Meter, which was the family home for about four years. The next two years 
were spent in Victoria, British Columbia, whence the family returned for one 
year to Van IMeter, thence going to Eraser, Iowa, where they domiciled for thir- 



354 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

teen years. William H. Chance was educated in the public schools of Fraser and 
Ogden. He completed his lessons in the latter place at the age of sixteen and 
then became a fireman for the Boone Coal & Mining Company at Fraser, holding 
that position for two years. At the end of that time he was promoted engineer 
and for six years acted in that capacity. He then was given charge of an engine 
in the Ogden mines for one year and for the next two years was employed as 
master merchanic. On the expiration of that period he came to Boone, becoming 
part owner of the machine shop which is operated under the firm name of T. H. 
Chance & Son. Mr. Chance is not only an expert machinist but an able business 
man and has done much toward establishing the reputation of his firm. They 
now do an extensive business and are numbered among the prosperous concerns 
of his city. 

In June, 1905, in Fraser, William H. Chance married Miss Bessie Grylls, who 
was born in Angus in September, 1883, and is a daughter of Samuel and Mar- 
garet (Williams) Grylls of Fraser. Mr. and Mrs. Chance have two children: 
Clifford Howard, who was born February 27, 1907 ; and Raymond Samuel, born 
March 25, 1909. Mr. Chance votes independently, not submitting to any party 
dictation. Fraternally he belongs to the Loyal Order of Moose, the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows and the National Association of Steam Engineers. Mr. 
Chance has not only built up an individual success but has been a factor in the 
growth and development of his community. He is every ready to give his sup- 
port to measures which are undertaken to extend the trade interests of his city 
and also takes a lively interest in the moral and intellectual upbuilding of the 
people. He receives the confidence and esteem of all who know him and is 
worthy of the trust which is placed in him. 



PETER A. STARK. 



Peter A. Stark, who was born in Sweden, January 16, 1863, is a representa- 
tive of that race which has contributed so much toward the general development 
of this country in various sections of the United States. He combines in his 
character the sturdy qualities of his nation with the aggressiveness and the 
shrew^dness of the American merchant. He is engaged in the hardware and im- 
plement business in Boxholm, Boone county, and has been very successful 
in the conduct of his affairs. His parents were Peter and Matilda (Larson) 
Stark, natives of Sweden, the former a carpenter by trade. He was engaged in 
that occupation in his native land until 1868, when he and his family came to 
America, locating in Hardin township, Webster county, Iowa, where the father 
found employment in a sawmill, remaining there until 1879, when he removed to 
Grant township, Boone county, where he had previously bought land which he 
transformed into richly bearing fields, operating this property for many years. 
He had bought this farm while yet a resident of Hardin township, Webster 
county, in 1872, but took up its cultivation about seven years later, when he 
moved thereon. This farm consisted of eighty acres and was located on section 
16. Mr. Stark finally retired from active labor with a fair competency and 
moved to Boxholm, where he lived until his death, which occurred in the spring 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 355 

of 1909, at the age of seventy-six years. His widow is a resident of Boxholm 
and is now in her seventy-fifth year. 

Peter A. Stark was five years of age when his parents came to America and 
received his education in Webster county, Iowa. He remained on the home farm 
until he had reached his majority and then bought land on section 16, Grant 
township, which he improved and cultivated for nine years. Upon selling out 
he came to Boxholm, engaging in the hardware and farm implement business, 
and has ever since given his attention to this line of work. He carries a large 
stock and enjoys a profitable trade, his store being the only one of its kind in 
the neighborhood. He owns his own business building and also holds title to his 
residence. 

In June, 1888, Mr. Stark married Miss Rose Johnson, a daughter of Swan 
and Margaret (Englund) Johnson, natives of Sweden, who upon coming to 
America located in Grant township, where the father followed farming and 
also acted as engineer. His property was located on section 3, Grant township, 
and there he continued until iSgo, when he retired and moved to Dayton, where 
he gave some attention to auctioneering and the real-estate business. He died 
in that city in February, 1912, and his widow is still residing there. Mr. and 
■Mrs. Stark are the parents of four children: Swan A., twenty-four years of 
age, who is engaged in farming in Missouri ; Alice, who is twenty-one years of 
age and who married Oscar T. Wilen, who is employed in his father-in-law's 
store; Ernest Bryan, sixteen years of age; and Virgil J., aged ten. 

Mr. Stark also owns a hardware and implement business in Harcourt, Web- 
ster county, which is in a most prosperous condition. He is a stockholder in 
the Farmers State Bank of Boxholm and at present is a member of the town 
council. For twelve years he served as trustee of Grant township and also 
held the office of assessor. In his various 'public connections he has always proven 
himself a man of trustworthiness and faithfulness, placing the general welfare 
above his private interests. His political allegiance is given to the democratic 
party, and his religious faith is that of the Methodist church. Fraternally he is a 
meml:)er of the Masonic lodge, the Knights of Pythias and the Modern Woodmen 
of America. .Mr. Stark has many friends in Boxholm and stands high in the esti- 
mation of all who know him. 



JAMES W. LAMB. 



Tames W. Lamb, a retired hotel proprietor, has been a resident of Boone for 
thirty years and of the county for forty-four years. He has an extensive acquaint- 
ance in this part of the state, and he has had considerable influence in shaping pub- 
lic affairs. He was born near Terre Haute, Indiana, on the 1st of April, 1836. 
His paternal grandfather was a pioneer of Kentucky and died in that state. His 
father, William Lamb, was born in North Carolina in 1804 but when four years of 
age was taken by his parents to Kentucky, where he was reared. He there mar- 
ried Rachel Ashcroft and afterward removed to Indiana, where he lived until his 
removal to Illinois, his death occurring in Jo Daviess county of the latter state 



356 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

wlicn he was in his seventy-sixth year. His wife passed away when sixty-five 
years of age. They had a family of nine children, all of whom have now passed 
away with the exception of James W. and John R., the latter a resident of Hanover, 
Illinois. 

lames W. Lamb was but four years of age when the family removed from 
Indiana to Schuyler county, Illinois, where they lived for four years and then took 
.up their abode near Freeport, that state, where he was reared to manhood. The 
country was new and pioneer conditions existed on all sides. He remembers see- 
ing herds of deer and elk where now stands the flourishing city of Freeport. 
He was educated in one of the old-time log schoolhouses with its hewed log 
benches and big fireplace occupying one end of the room. Methods of instruc- 
.tion were as primitive as the building and it was at a time when every school 
teacher heeded the injunction concerning "Spare the rod and spoil the child." In 
his youth Mr. Lamb worked upon the home farm and as he advanced in years and 
strength assisted more and more largely in the labor of the fields. After a time 
the father purchased a farm in Jo Daviess county, just across the line from their 
•old home. 

In 1856 James W. Lamb was married in ]\IcDonough county, Illinois, to 
Miss Deborah Ann De Camp, of that county, a daughter of Joel and Matilda 
(Bridge) De Camp. The young couple began their domestic life upon an Illinois 
farm and in May, 1870, they removed to Iowa, settling at Ogden, where Mr. 
Lamb conducted a meat market which was the first in the town. At the end of 
three years he purchased a farm in Yell township and thereon made his home for 
.seven years, upon the expiration of which period he went to Rolfe, Iowa, where 
he was engaged in the live-stock and banking business for five years. He then 
came to Boone and embarked in the hotel business, conducting the City Hotel 
for twenty-seven years, since which time he has lived retired. His business atifairs 
have at all times been carefully and wisely directed and his energy and careful 
iuanagement have brought to him a success which now enables him to live retired. 

\\ bile living in Yell township Mr. Lamb was called upon to mourn the loss 
of his first wife, who passed away there in 1877. He afterward wedded Susie 
Fogel, in Phillipsburg, Kansas. She died in Boone in 1896 and on the 24th of 
April, 1901, Air. Lamb wedded Mrs. ]\Iargaret Totten, who was born in Park- 
■ersburg. West Virginia, October 21, 1849, a daughter of William and Lucy 
(Maddox) Davis, who were natives of West Virginia and were descended from 
New England ancestry. The latter was a daughter of one of the soldiers of the 
Revolutionary war. .Vllen Davis, the paternal grandfather, was a large slave 
holder in Virginia. During the early period in the history of that state he owned 
and operated a ferry at Harpers Ferry. .Margaret Davis, daughter of William 
•and Lucy (Maddox) Davis, was but five years of age when she accompanied her 
parents to Jasper county, Iowa, where she was reared to womanhood. In 
that county she first married Phillip Totten, a native of Ohio and a butcher by 
trade. He died in Hot Springs, Arkansas. They became the parents of three 
children : Alvin, a merchant of Turtle Lake, North Dakota ; Anna, the wife of 
Asby Perry, of Atkinson, Nebraska; and William, of Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. 
By his first marriage Mr. Lamb had two children, who are yet living, Alzina and 
Julia. The former is the widow of David Reading and has three children. Lew-is, 
Nellie and Ethel. Julia is the wife of George Rittgers, of Paton, Iowa, and their 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 357 

children are Glenn, Bessie, Gertrude, Lloyd and Floyd, twins, iMarvel and 
Homer. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lamb are members of the First Methodist Episcopal church. 
In politics he was a republican for a number of years after casting his first presi- 
dential ballot for Fremont. For some years past, however, he has been active in 
the prohibition party and for a long period has been county chairman. In the 
early days of his residence here he served as deputy sheriff and has also been 
constable, supervisor and school director. Fraternally, he is connected with 
the Odd Fellows, being a charter member of Rolfe Lodge, No. 94. Energy and 
industry constitute the basis of the success which he has achieved. He early 
realized that these qualities are indispensable in winning business advancement and 
his close application and diligence have placed him in a position among the men 
of affluence in his adopted county, where he is also widely and favorably known 
by reason of many attractive social qualities. 



GUST BROD. 



For an extended period Gust Brod was connected with general agricultural 
pursuits in Boone county, but on the ist of March, 1914, retired, taking up his 
abode at Bo.xholm, where he is now living. He is serving as one of the trustees 
of Grant township and is financially interested in business enterprises, the active 
management of which, however, he leaves to others, while he is enjoying a well 
earned and well merited rest. He was born in Germany, August 17, 1859, and 
is a son of August and Mary Brod, who were also natives of that country. The 
father learned and followed the weaver's trade in Germany, and in 1872 crossed 
the Atlantic to America, making his way at once to Boone county, where he 
took up his abode in Grant township, purchasing sixty acres of land which was 
largely wild and undeveloped. This he improved, carrying on the farm work 
to the time of his death, which occurred in February, 1893. His wife passed 
away December 25, 1901. They had long been numbered among the worthy 
residents of Boone county, enjoying the warm regard of all with whom they had 
been brought in contact. 

Gust Brod was reared in the fatherland to the age of thirteen years and pur- 
sued his education in the schools of that country until the emigration to the new 
world, after which he continued his studies in public schools of Iowa. He 
remained with his parents until twenty-four years of age and then started out 
in life on his own account, purchasing eighty acres of land in Grant township, 
which he improved. Subsequently he purchased his father's original tract of 
sixty acres, so that his farm then comprised one hundred and forty acres, lying 
on sections 26 and 27, Grant township. Year by year he carefully cultivated 
the place, bringing the fields under a high state of development, and year by 
year he gathered good crops as the reward of his care and labor. The wise 
management of his business affairs and the practical progressive methods 
which he followed in developing and cultivating his farm brought him a 
most gratifying and substantial measure of success, enabling him to put 
aside further business cares, so that on the ist of March, 1914, he retired from 



358 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

farm life and removed to Boxholm, where he now resides. He is a stockholder 
in the Farmers State Bank of Boxholm and also a stockholder and director of the 
Farmers Elevator Company. 

On Christmas day of 1884, Mr. Brod was married to Miss Cora D. Muench, 
a daughter of Jacob and Catherine (Bubb) Muench, who were natives of Pennsyl- 
vania. The father was a mason by trade and at an early day made his way to 
Illinois, where he remained until 1881, when he removed with his family to 
Boone county, Iowa, purchasing land in Grant township which he carefully tilled 
and developed for many years, winning success in his undertaking. He then 
retired from active business life and removed to Pilot Mound, where he made 
his home until his death, which occurred on the 23d of December, 1907. His 
widow survives and is yet living at Pilot Mound. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Brod 
have been born six children : Alvin E., Lillian, Nellie, Ruby, Gladys and Myrtle. 
Mrs. Brod was born in Mount Morris township. Ogle county, Illinois, December 
5, 1866. 

In his political views Mr. Brod is a republican and is serving as one of the 
trustees of Grant township, a position which he has ably filled through the past 
ten years. His religious faith is that of the Evangelical Association. He belongs 
to that class of self-made men whose success is the logical outcome of their un- 
faltering energy and close application. 



CAPTAIN WILLIAM DAVIS TEMPLIN. 

Captain William Davis Templin, an honored veteran of the Civil war, resid- 
ing at No. 904 Marion street, was born October 22, 1832, in Delaware county, 
Indiana, a son of Dr. Isaiah and Elizabeth (Clevenger) Templin. The father 
was a medical practitioner in Indiana and in 1851 removed westward to Oska- 
loosa, Iowa, where he practiced until his death in 1866. He was born in Hills- 
boro, Ohio, and his wife was a native of Clinton county, that state. Her people, 
however, came from Virginia, while the Templin family were from Kentucky, 
the grandfather. Robert Templin. there making his home prior to going to Indiana. 
The religious faith of the family is that of the Presbyterian church. Unto Dr. 
and Mrs. Isaiah Templin there were born six sons and two daughters, of whom 
three sons and one daughter are yet living: William Davis; Cyril, a resident of 
Hoskins, Nebraska; James, of lola, Kansas; and Mrs Serena J. Cline, of 
Oklahoma. 

\Mien twelve years of age Captain William D. Templin, who was the second 
in order of liirth in his father's family, went to Piatt county, Illinois, where he 
remained until 1855. He then came to Boone county, Iowa, establishing his home 
here prior to the Civil war. He at first engaged in farming and also conducted 
business as a stationary engineer. After the war and until a recent date, when 
he retired, he was in the pension claim service and was also justice of the peace 
for fourteen years. 

Captain Templin proved his loyalty to his country by enlisting in 1861 as a 
member of Company D, Tenth Iowa Volunteer Infantry, with which he served 
for six months as a private. He was then elected second lieutenant, in 1862 




CAPTAIN WILLIAM D. TEMPLIN 



n^ 



h-- 



P-'^.^LIC Li^h^HY 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 361 

returned home and in one day raised Company D, of the Thirty-second Iowa 
Infantry, numbering one hundred and ten men, seventeen of whom are still 
living. A reunion is annually held on the nth of August, the date of their 
enlistment. Mr. Templin went to the front as first lieutenant of that company 
and during most of the time commanded the company. He served from the 12th 
of August, 1861, until the 30th of March, 1865, and participated in many hotly 
contested engagements. He was wounded at Yellow Bayou, Louisiana, in the 
famous Red River campaign, which caused the loss of his left limb, the other leg 
being broken by a shot. He never suffered from illness, however, throughout the 
long period of his connection with the army. It was meet that he should be given 
a government position, so ably and faithfully had he served his country and so 
great was the sacrifice which he made for the Union cause in losing his leg. 

On the I2th of December, 1858, at Boone, Captain Templin was married to 
Miss Catherine Olson, whose people came to this county about 1856. Two of her 
brothers are still living: William, a resident of Des Moines; and John, who is in 
Oklahoma. Mrs. Templin died October 6, 1891, at the age of fifty-six years, and 
of her seven children four daughters and one son survive. In order of birth the 
children were as follows: Ida M., now the wife of W. R. Vernon, of Julesburg, 
Colorado; Mellie, the wife of Jacob Odendeahl, of Des Moines; Edward E., of 
Redfield, South Dakota, who is a farmer and married Mabel Jays ; Annie, the 
wife of J. A. Benson, of Sheldon, Iowa ; Jessie M., at home ; Emma, who was 
the wife of G. William Rinehart and died February' 2^, 1889; and Willie, who 
died in infancy. ■ 'V-'Mcjt 

Captain Templin is a member of J. G. Miller Post, No. 67, G. A. R., of 
which he was the first commander, and since that time he has held various other 
offices in the organization, tor the past ten years he has acted as quartermaster. 
At one time he belonged to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. His religious 
faith is that of the Alethodist Episcopal church. Captain Templin is widely 
known in this county, where he has now made his home for fifty-nine years. 
He has not only been an interested witness of the great changes which have 
occurred but has taken an active and helpful part in promoting them, and his 
influence and aid have ever been on the side of progress and improvement. He 
has now passed the eighty-first milestone on life's journey and his is a creditable 
record, not the least important feature of which has been his life-long fidelity to 
his country and her best interests, his spirit of patriotism being one of his 
predominant characteristics. 



CLINTON STAPLES MASON. 

A merchant may do much to promote the growth of his community and may 
serve it in many ways if he be energetic enough to make use of the opportunities 
that present themselves. Such a merchant was Clinton Staples Mason, who 
with his brother, Charles T. Mason, for many years conducted a general dry- 
goods store at Boone under the name of Mason Brothers. No firm in this 
section of the state enjoyed a higher reputation than Mason Brothers, as their 
stock of goods was always up-to-date and varied. It was also, first of all, of 



362 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

excellent quality, for the brothers made it the basic principle of business that 
full value should be given for value received. Our subject was born in Tamvvorth, 
New Hampshire, on the 28th of October, 1843, ^ son of Larkin D. and Catherine 
(Staples) Mason. The father was prominent in public affairs in his section of the 
state, being active in politics, a merchant and a judge. He was also a landowner 
and gave his personal attention to the operation of his farm. He was twice 
married, two children being born to the first union and ten to the second. Of 
the children born to the last marriage, two, our subject and his brother Charles 
T., came to Boone county. 

Clinton S. Mason received the advantages of a high-school education in his 
native state and there secured his first business experience. He was for two 
years a clerk for William H. Bailey, a merchant of Littleton, New Hampshire, 
and he was subsequently employed for a similar length of time by C. H. Dearborn 
at Center Harbor, New Hampshire. He had heard much concerning the advan- 
tages of the \\'est and made his w^ay to Chicago, where he started a grocery store, 
conducting the same for one year. He then disposed of this property and with 
his brother, Charles T. Mason, went to Moingona, Iowa, then a thriving mining 
town. The brothers engaged in a mercantile enterprise at that place for five 
years. They kept a general stock of merchandise, meeting the varied needs of 
the community. At the end of that time, as the mines were being abandoned, our 
subject and his brother saw that Moingona no longer oft'ered the same oppor- 
tunities for commercial success. They recognized that Boone was a town with 
a future and opened a retail dry-goods store in this city. With their usual fore- 
sight they secured the best location in the city at the beginning and for thirty-five 
years carried on a flourishing retail business at that point. Their name was known 
throughout this section of the state, and their trade came from a wide extent of 
territory. It was not alone the excellence of their goods that attracted custom 
but also the willingness to serve that was the actuating spirit of the house. They 
builded upon the principle of absolute honesty in all their dealings, and the wisdom 
of their policy was shown by the fact that for thirty-five years they held a place 
of supremacy in their line. Both Mr. Mason and his brother, Charles T., invested 
in land, thus becoming still further identified with the interests of Boone county. 
Both are now living practically retired, enjoying a rest which is well deser\ed. 
as for many years they contributed much to the prosperity of their city and 
county. 

Mr. Mason married Mrs. Annette Curry Noyes, widow of Captain Samuel B. 
Noyes, and they became the parents of four children. Arthur Larkin was born 
in 1873 ''^"d died in 1874. Howard Curry Mason was born on the 3d of Septem- 
ber, 1875, and passed away on the 7th of September, 1912. He left a widow, 
Mrs. Lilian T. Mason, and three children, all of whom reside in Winchester, 
Massachusetts. The children are : Annette E. ; Clinton Staples, Jr. ; and Frances 
Bell, II. I'"rances Bell Mason, whose birth occurred on the 26th of June, 1877, 
is an alumna of Wellesley College and of the Pratt Institute of Brooklyn. She 
is now a teacher of art in St. Louis. Catherine Staples was born on the 6th of 
November, 1879, and has been twice married, her first husband being Harold 
J. Copeland, who met death in an accident. His widow later marrie4_Professor 
Robert H. Fernald, of the mechanical engineering department of the University 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 363 

of Pennsylvania. Two children have been born to this marriage, Merritt Cald- 
well and Frances Mason. 

Mr. Alason of this review is a repnblican in politics, believing that the policies 
of that party are for the good of the country. He is one of the most gifted orators 
of this section of the state and has delivered some memorable addresses both on 
political issues and on other topics. He attends the Presbyterian church and 
contributes to its support. His life has been one of imusual openness and candor 
and none has ever questioned his integrity. He is today enjoying the ease which 
his former years of strenuous activity made possible and is secure in the esteem 
and good-will of his fellow citizens. 



JOSEPH E. REUTTER. 



Joseph E. Rentier has long been actively and successfully identified with 
agricultural interests of Boone county, owning and operating a well improved 
farm comprising one hundred and sixty acres on section 27, Grant township. He 
is likewise a factor in. financial circles as president of the Farmers State Bank 
of Boxholm. His birth occurred in Henry county, Illinois, in February, 1870, 
his parents being Jacob and Hannah (Metzger) Reutter, natives of Wurtemberg, 
(iermany. In 1866 they crossed the Atlantic to the United States and took up 
their aljode in Henry county, Illinois, where the father followed farming for 
five years. On the expiration of that jieriod he came to Boone county, Iowa, 
purchasing and improving a tract of land in Grant township and continuing 
its cultivation for a number of years. Eventually he put aside the active work 
of the fields, having acquired a comfortable competence that obviated the neces- 
sity of further toil. He made several trips to Germany and spent the winter 
seasons in California. His demise occurred in September, 1910, while his wife 
was called to her final rest in .\pril, 1905. 

Joseph E. Reutter was reared and educated in Grant township, this county, 
continuing under the parental roof until he had attained his majority. Subse- 
quently he cultivated rented land for about six years and at the end of that time 
bought a tract of one hundred and sixty acres on section 27, Grant township, 
which he at once began improving and which he has operated continuously since 
with the exception of three years spent as cashier of the Farmers Bank. His 
property is now under a high state of cultivation, returning bounteous harvests as 
a result of the care and labor bestowed upon it. Mr. Reutter also occupies a 
prominent position in financial circles as president of the Farmers State Bank 
of I'.oxholm and is likewise a stockholder and director of the Farmers Elevator 
Company of that town. 

In November, 1898, Mr. Reutter was united in marriage to Miss Minerva 
Muench. a daughter of Jacob and Catherine (Bubb) .Muench, who were natives 
of Peimsylvania. The father was a mason by trade and at an early day made 
his way to Illinois, where he remained until 1881, when he removed with his 
family to Boone county, Iowa, purchasing land in Grant township which he care- 
fully tilled and developed for many years, winning success in his undertaking. 
He then retired from active business life and removed to Pilot Mound, where 



364 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

he made his home until his death, whicli occurred on the 23d of December, 1907. 
His widow still survives and is yet living at Pilot Mound. Unto Mr. and Mrs. 
Rentier have been born four children, namely : Ralph, Clarence, Elliott and Mabel. 
In his political views Mr. Reutter is a progressive, stanchly advocating the 
principles set forth by Theodore Roosevelt at the time of the birth of the new 
party. He is at present serving in the capacity of township clerk and has ably 
discharged the duties devolving upon him in that connection for sixteen years. His 
religious faith is that of the Evangelical Association. Having resided in Boone 
county throughout practically his entire life, he is well and favorably known here 
and his record is such as commends him to the respect and good-will of all with 
whom he is associated. 



JOHN NELSON ROSS. 

John Nelson Ross, who follows farming on section 13, Des Moines township, 
was born in Champaign county, Ohio, November 15, 1848. His paternal grand- 
father, John William Ross, was a native of Scotland but decided to establish his 
home in the new world and spent his last days either in Pennsylvania or Ohio. 
His son, John Williamson Ross, father of John Nelson Ross, was born in Ohio, 
near Cincinnati, following the removal of his parents from Pennsylvania. The 
grandparents of our subject were among the early settlers of Ohio and members 
of the family fought in the Indian wars, while one Captain John Ross was a 
soldier in the Revolutionary war. John W. Ross developed a farm in the north- 
ern part of Champaign county, Ohio, where he had one hundred and twenty acres 
of land. All around him were Indians and wild animals haunted the forests, 
while wild game of all kinds was plentiful. With a comrade, Sol. Remley, he 
left Cincinnati and on horseback made his way northward to Champaign county, 
where they purchased and and built log houses upon their farms, which adjoined. 
Mr. Ross then returned to Cincinnati, where he was married, after which he took 
his bride to the home which he had prepared. Remley also did the same, and they 
reared their families in Champaign county. Unto Mr. and .Mrs. Ross were born 
twelve children, of whom our subject was the sixth in order in birth. Eight of 
the children are still living, the youngest being fifty-six years of age. The oldest, 
Marcellus D., was a member of the First Ohio Volunteer Infantry from 1861 
until 1865 and was wounded in the leg at the battle of Chickamauga, while serv- 
ing under General Rosecrans. The mother of our subject bore the maiden name 
of Christina Wambaugh and was a native of Pennsylvania. 

On the old family homestead in Champaign county, Ohio, John N. Ross was 
reared and in the pursuit of his education he attended the public schools and also 
a normal school in St. Paris, Ohio. He continued his education after arriving 
in Iowa and was graduated from the Boone County Normal School with the 
class of 1889 under Superintendent Ashton. When twenty years of age he began 
teaching in the rural schools of the Buckeye state. In 1870 he remo\-ed to lioone, 
Iowa, where he began teaching under Superintendent L. W. Fisk and was actively 
identified with the educational interests of the city until 1894. Within that period, 
about the year 1890, he was a candidate for the position of county superintend- 




.\IK. AMI .Ml;s. .KilIX X. KOSS 



u.. 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 367 

ent of schools. For the past twenty-five years he has written for the local papers, 
thus further identifying himself with the life of the community. 

In 1872, in Boone county, Mr. Ross was united in marriage to Miss Esther 
Ann Smith, a daughter of Charles H. and Margaret Rebecca (Paxton) Smith, 
who were early settlers of Coshocton county, Ohio. The Paxtons came from 
Ireland. In 1854 Mr. Smith removed with his family by wagon to the west, set- 
tling in Boone county. Following his marriage Mr. Ross settled upon a farm 
but continued to engage in school teaching. Through the summer months he 
would cultivate his farm until his boys were old enough to work, after which he 
taught through both the summer and winter months. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Ross 
were born seven children: Euphemia, now the wife of J. W. Cutler of Boone 
county; Charles H., who married Laura Bass and is living on the home farm; 
John W., who married Maggie Otterbein and is residing in Boone; Walter C, 
who married Grace Bass and is living in Estherville, Iowa ; Francis Mahlon, who 
married Ada Wilson and lives in Des .Moines township, Boone county ; Mabel E., 
the wife of R. J. Stark of Grant township, Boone county; and Otto Glenn, who 
married Bessie May Pardee and lives in Des Moines township, Boone county. 

John N. Ross and family are members of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
identified with Bethel Chapel. Mr. Ross has been very active in church work for 
a long period, having been class leader and a teacher of the Bible class. He 
has been lifelong republican since casting his first presidential vote for U. S. 
Grant, and for sixteen years he has filled the office of assessor. Fraternally he 
is a Woodman of the World, having been connected with the camp for sixteen 
years. His interests are broad and varied, and his is a well rounded character 
because of the nature of his activities, which have recognized not only his oppor- 
tunities for attaining success but also his obligations in citizenship and his duties 
to his fellowmen. 



LOUIS GOEPPINGER. 



For many years Louis Goeppinger has in various ways participated in the 
development of Boone, of which city he is a pioneer. Here he founded what is 
now the oldest saddlery firm in the state and also participated in other enterprises 
which contributed to the upbuilding of the city. Mr. Goeppinger was born in 
Reutlingen. Wurtemberg, Germany, on the 9th of June, 1829, and was the second 
child of Johannes and Katharine (Ammer) Goeppinger. During the period of 
his boyhood he acquired a good education in the schools of Germany and then 
took up the tanner's trade, an occupation that had been followed by his ancestors 
for more than three centuries. 

The reports which he heard concerning the opportunities of the new world, 
however, attracted him to America and in the spring of 1849, accompanied by 
his brother Frederick, he sailed for the United States, landing at New York 
on the 19th of April, after forty-nine days spent as a passenger upon the sailing 
vessel Luconia. This length of time for the crossing was in marked contrast to 
the voyage which he made in 1896, when he returned on a visit to his old home 

in Germany, taking passage on the Columbia, of the Hamburg-American line, 

Vol. n.— 1 7 



368 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

which made the trip in six days. On first coming to America Louis Goeppinger 
made his way to Dauphin, Pennsylvania, where he remained for six months, and 
then went to Allegheny City, that state, where he followed his trade for some 
time. He carefully saved his earnings until economy and industry had brought 
him sufficient capital to enable him to embark in business on his own account. He 
then went to Malvern, Ohio, where he opened a tannery, which he conducted suc- 
cessfully until 1866. He then disposed of his plant at that place and removed to 
Boone, Iowa, where he opened a leather store in a modest frame building with 
a small stock of goods, conducting the business under the style of L. & H. 
Goeppinger, which name has ever since been used. This is the oldest saddlery 
firm in the state and its business has been one of growing importance, bringing 
to the owners a most gratifying return. Mr. Goeppinger is one of the pioneer 
residents of Boone and when he arrived here he could buy land at his own price. 
The town was very small and for hundred of miles around and to the west there 
stretched a vast sea of billowy green — the waving prairie grasses. He saw lots 
sold on Story street, now the principal business thoroughfare of Boone, at two 
hundred and twenty-five dollars each, while today some of the same lots would 
bring ten thousand dollars. From the time of his arrival he took active and 
helpful part in the development and upbuilding of the city and for many years 
figured as one of its most prominent business men. He was one of the first 
stockholders in the City Bank and for many years was its vice president and 
later president. His firm built the first three-front, substantial business block 
on Story street, and he was otherwise connected with the improvement of real 
estate. He also aided in building the German Lutheran church and for many 
years has been one of its consistent and helpful members. On April i, 1912, he 
was elected city trustee. 

It was on the 19th of July, 1857, at Malvern, Ohio, that Louis Goeppinger 
was united in marriage to Miss Catharine LeBeau, who was born at that place 
February 10, 1840, a daughter of Charles LeBeau, a native of Landau, Germany, 
who, emigrating to Ohio, there carried on the cooper's trade until his death at the 
age of seventy-five years. Mr. Goeppinger was for many years a member of the 
school board of Boone, and the cause of education always found in him a friend. 
To his children he gave good opportunities in that direction. 

John L. Goeppinger, their son, is today at the head of the saddlery business 
in Boone. He is a man of strong purpose, alert and energetic, and his success 
has come to him as the merited reward of intelligently directed efifort. He was 
born in Malvern, Ohio, June 5, 1862, and removed with his parents to Boone, 
being graduated from the Boone high school at the age of nineteen years. He 
was the only male member of the first class to complete the course. He after- 
ward became a student in Duflf's College at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and was 
graduated therefrom in 188 1. He next entered into active connection with the 
wholesale leather and saddlery business which was established by his father and 
uncle and with which he has since been coimected. This is today one of the most 
important business enterprises of the city and under the guidance of John L. 
Goeppinger it has grown and developed to its present extensive and profitable 
proportions. It is true that he entered upon a business already established, but 
in conducting this he has met the changing conditions of the times and proven 
his ability to cope with the problems that a different age has brought. He, too, 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 369 

has become an active factor in financial circles. He was one of the organizers 
of the Security Savings Bank, of which he remains a director, and he was one of 
the organizers of the City Trust & Savings Bank, of which he is also a director. 
He owns large real-estate interests, including both farm land and city prop- 
erty, and in all of his business affairs he displays sound judgment, unfaltering 
energy and marked persistency of purpose. His life has ever been one of 
usefulness and well directed activity. In company with his father and others, 
constituting a party of six, he went to Wurtemberg, Germany, and other parts 
of Europe. This proved a most delightful experience in his life. 

On the 24th of June, 1896, John L. Goeppinger was united in marriage to 
Miss Ella Groetzinger, a daughter of Julius and Elizabeth (Shauwecker) Groetz- 
inger, the wedding being celebrated at Allegheny City, Pennsylvania. Her father 
was a native of Reutlingen, Germany, born February 6, 183 1, and is still living. 
Her mother, born July 31, 1837, at Columbiana, Ohio, died March 29, 1890, at the 
age of about fifty-three. John L. Goeppinger's marriage has been blessed 
with the birth of five children: Julius Louis, born May 9, 1898; Alfred Henry, 
born December 25, 1899; Katharine Louise, born January 2, 1902; Helen Eliza- 
beth, born March 8. 1908; and Walter William, born September 11, 191 1. Mr. 
and Mrs. Goeppinger are members of the Evangelical Lutheran church. They 
take a very active and prominent part in the church work. Mr. Goeppinger gives 
his political allegiance to the republican party but has found little time to fill 
public office and, in fact, has always preferred to leave that duty to others. In 
matters of citizenship, however, he is never remiss and has cooperated largely 
in many measures relating to the public good. He has served as one of the trus- 
tees of the Public Library, for ten years has been a member of the school board 
and for two terms was its president. Few men have done as much to advance 
the interests of education in Boone. His life has, indeed, been fruitful of good 
along many lines and all who know him entertain for him the highest regard by 
reason of what he has accomplished and the honorable methods which he has 
pursued in every relation of life. 



GEORGE DANIEL THROCKMORTON. 

George Daniel Throckmorton, owning and operating a good farm of eighty 
acres on section 19, Jackson township, was born on the 22d of May, 1862, in 
the town of Waynesburg, Greene county, Pennsylvania, which county was the 
home of the family for many years. There his father, Daniel Throckmorton, 
was born in 181 7 and on reaching manhood engaged in farming in that county 
until 1869, when he brought his family to Iowa, locating upon a farm of one 
hundred and twenty acres in Douglas township, Boone county. He was not long 
permitted to enjoy his new home, however, for he passed away in 1872. He 
was a faithful member of the .Methodist Episcopal church and a democrat in poli- 
tics. While a resident of the Keystone state he held several county offices. 
In early life he married Nancy Ely, a native of Washington county, Pennsylvania, 
who is still living at the advanced age of ninety-four years and now makes her 
home in Luther. They had seven children, namely: Jonas E., who married 



370" HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

Emeline Sellers and who is a resident of Sumner county, Kansas ; Joseph, who 
married Lizzie Myers and died in Boone county; Caroline, the wife of Oliver 
Patterson of Colfax township, this county; James, who died in infancy; Lizzie, 
who first married Hartford Moss and after his death wedded John Elliott and 
lives in Luther; Charles H., who married Lois Worbas and makes his home in 
Guthrie ; and George Daniel, whose name introduces this sketch. 

George Daniel Throckmorton was only about six years of age when the family 
removed to Boone county, and in Douglas township he grew to manhood. He 
attended the public schools near his home, but at the age of seventeen laid aside 
his text-books in order to give his entire attention to the cultivation of the home 
farm, as his father had <Jied when he was only ten years old. He was married 
January ii, 1887, to Miss Viola May Roderick, by whom he has two children: 
Eva M., now the wife of George L. Adix, of Jackson township; and Forest Cecil, 
who was born September 20, 1893, and is at home. For two years after his 
marriage Mr. Throckmorton resided upon the old family homestead, but at the 
end of that time removed to his present place on section 19, Jackson township, 
where he is successfully operating eighty acres. The republican party finds in 
Mr. Throckmorton a stanch supporter of its principles, and his wife is a member 
of the Christian church. 



JOHN A. BURNSIDE. 



The late John A. Burnside, father of Arthur M. Burnside of Boone, was for 
a number of years a resident of this state, although he spent his youth and earlier 
life in Ohio and also closed his career in that state. He was born in Muskingum 
county, Ohio, in December, 1845, and was a son of Christopher and Ann J. 
(Miller) Burnside, both of Scotch extraction, although they were natives of 
the north of Ireland, whence they came as young people to America. Their mar- 
riage took place in Zanesville, Ohio. Christopher Burnside followed agricultural 
pursuits and both parents resided there until their demise. 

John A. Burnside was the eldest of three sons and one daughter, all of whom 
are deceased. He was reared and educated in Muskingum county and after 
marrying there went, in 1869, to Ames, Iowa. Two years later he removed to 
Mills county, which was his home for four years. He then returned to Ohio, 
which state remained his residence until he passed away on September 14, 1883, 
near Adamsville, Muskingum county. In 1885 Mrs. Burnside returned to Iowa, 
locating on a farm near Ogden. which was her home until 1898. When her son, 
A. M. Burnside, was elected auditor of Boone county she removed to Boone and 
has since made her home with him. 

In March, 1869, John A. Burnside married Aliss Alargaret P. Smyth, who 
was born near Zanesville. Ohio, a daughter of George and Mary (Lee) Smyth, 
the former of Scotch-Irish extraction, born in the north of Ireland. Mrs. Smyth 
was of the same stock, but a native of Pennsylvania. Both parents died in Ohio. 
In their family were eleven children, of whom two daughters besides Mrs. Burn- 
side are now living. Mr. and Mrs. Burnside were the parents of one son and 
three daughters : Arthur M.. who is mentioned elsewhere in this work ; Mrs. J. 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 371 

J. McGregor, of South Dakota, who has two children, John Lowell and Margaret 
M. ; Mrs. E. E. Beatty, who resides near Grand Junction, Iowa, and has one son, 
Homer Burnside ; and Mrs. Webb Patterson, of West Boone, who is the mother 
of one daughter, Mary Priscilla. 

John A. Burnside always gave his allegiance to the republican party. He 
served as a member of the Home Guards and held various offices in the localities 
in which he resided. His religious faith was that of the Presbyterian church, 
and he always attended its services. Mrs. Burnside is a member of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal church of Boone and interested in its work. She belongs to the 
Hawthorne Club and the Women's Christian Temperance Union. She is one of 
the best beloved women of Boone, in the moral, intellectual and religious progress 
of which city she has taken a helpful interest. 



SAMUEL S. POWERS. 

Agricultural interests find a worthy representative in Samuel S. Powers, who 
owns three valuable farms, one comprising one hundred and sixty-four acres on 
section i8, Beaver township, while the second of one hundred and sixty acres 
is a part of the old home place on section 28, Amaqua township. His third prop- 
erty, upon which he now resides, is an excellent farm of two hundred and eighty 
acres, lying on sections 28 and 33, Amaqua township. This is one of the best 
improved places of the county and forms a most attractive feature in the land- 
scape. Mr. Powers well deserves the reputation which he has earned of being a 
leading farmer of this section of the state. He was born June 11, 1855, in Illi- 
nois, his parents being William and .Susan (Cline) Powers, the former a native 
of Pennsylvania and the latter of Washington county, Maryland. The father 
was reared in Maryland and there learned the miller's trade, which he followed 
through the period of his boyhood and early manhood. In 1854 he went to 
Illinois and purchased land in Carroll county, that state, and also in Ogle county. 
He improved his property and resided thereon until 1875, when he came to Boone 
county and made investment in five hundred and sixty acres in Amaqua township. 
This he also developed, bringing his fields to a high state of cultivation, and he 
continued to operate his land for a long period. Finally, however, content with 
the success that he had already achieved, he retired from active life and removed 
to Beaver, where he resided until the death of his wife in 1900. He afterward 
made his home among his children until hi^ own demise, which occurred in 1903. 
Mr. and Mrs. Powers were people of the highest respectability and enjoyed the 
warm regard and enduring friendship of many with whom they came in contact. 

Samuel S. Powers was reared and educated in Illinois and remained with 
his parents upon the home farm until he reached the age of twenty-six years. 
His boyhood was devoted to the acquirement of a public-school education and 
to the work of the fields, for at an early age he began assisting his father in farm 
work. His training was of a practical kind, that brought him the experience 
that has constituted the broad and substantial foundation upon which he has 
built his later success. Leaving home at the age of twenty-six years, he purchased 
two hundred and eighty acres of land on sections 28 and 33, Amaqua township. 



372 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

and began the further development of the farm which is now his home. The 
result of his labors is seen in the excellent appearance of the place, for he has 
today one of the finest improved farms in the county. Laudable ambition has ever 
actuated him in his business career, and from time to time he has added to 
his holdings, which now include one hundred and sixty-four acres on section 
i8, Beaver township, and a quarter section in Amaqua township, which is a part 
of the old homestead. He raises full-blooded Chester White hogs and red polled 
Durham cattle, and his live stock interests are an important and profitable branch 
of his business. 

In January. 1882, Mr. Powers was united in marriage to Miss Susan K. Gil- 
bert, a daughter of Daniel and Elizabeth (Hardnock) Gilbert, who were natives 
of Washington county, Maryland. The father went to Ogle county, Illinois, 
at an early day and there engaged in farming, securing land which he cultivated 
throughout the remainder of his life. He passed away Alarch 25, 1905. and his 
wife died on the 24th of December, 1907. Mr. and Mrs. Powers had a family 
of six children : Albert L., who died on the 7th of December. 1884 ; Samuel .\., 
who is operating his father's farm in Beaver township ; Elmer G.. who is culti- 
vating one of his father's farms in Amaqua township ; and Walter W., Lizzie 
and Daniel I., all at home. In his political views Mr. Powers is an earnest 
republican. He has never sought nor desired office, however, but has preferred to 
concentrate his energies upon business affairs. He has acted as school director 
in his township, and the cause of education and of religion find in him a stalwart 
champion. He belongs to the Brethren church, of which he is treasurer, and 
he is president of the Cemetery Association. He is regarded as a public-spirited 
citizen, and his influence is always on the side of progress, reform and improve- 
ment. 



AMAZIAH M. SHAEFFER. 

Among the veterans of the Civil war residing in Boone county is Amaziah M. 
Shaeffer, who is also numbered among the early settlers of this section of the 
state. He has been active along many lines of life which have contributed to 
the public welfare as well as to individual success. For many years he held 
political office, and he has been equally active in church work so that his labors 
have been far-reaching and beneficial. He has been a resident of Iowa since 1855, 
at which time he settled in Boonesboro, and he was born in White county, In- 
diana, near Delphi, January 26, 1843. His paternal grandfather, John Shaeft'er, 
was a native of Germany, it is believed. However, in early life he lived in Penn- 
sylvania and thence removed to Ohio. He served as a soldier in the Mexican 
war and died in White county, Indiana. His son, Peter Shaeffer, was born in 
Pennsylvania and when quite young was taken by his parents to Muskingum 
county, Ohio, where he lived to the age of eighteen years, and then removed to 
White county, Indiana. He wedded Nancy .Merriman and in 1855 they left the 
Hoosier state for Iowa, settling in Boone county, where the father died at the age 
of fifty-seven years. He had long survived his wife, who passed away in this 




MK. AMI .MKS. AMAZIAH M. .SHAEFKKR 



TH'- 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 375 

county at the age of thirty-three years. He married again, his second wife being 
Martha Price, who passed away in West, Iowa. Seven children were born to 
Peter Shaeffer, as follows : John R., who enlisted for service in the Civil war 
with the Forty-sixth Indiana Volunteer Infantry and was killed at the battle of 
Champion's Hill ; Tillmann H., a resident of Hotchkiss, Colorado ; Amaziah M. ; 
Jasper, living in Oklahoma ; Newton, whose home is in Marshalltown, Iowa ; Wil- 
liam, deceased ; and George W., who makes his home in Fraser, this county. 

Amaziah AI. Shaeffer was reared to the age of twelve years in the place of 
his nativity and then became a resident of Iowa. He is indebted to the public- 
school systems of Indiana and of this state for the educational privileges he 
enjoyed. On the 28th of February, 1862, he enlisted in Boonesboro as a Union 
soldier, becoming a private of Company K, Sixteenth Iowa Volunteer Infantry, 
for three years, or during the war. On the i8th of March, 1864, he veteranized 
and was honorably discharged at Goldsboro, North Carolina, on the 28th of 
March, 1865. His first captain, Michael Zetter, was killed at Shiloh. His next 
captain was Jesse Lucas, Alexander Weingardner being first lieutenant, while 
Colonel Alexander Chambers commanded the regiment. Mr. Shaeffer partici- 
pated in many of the most important battles of the war, including the engagement 
at Shiloh, the siege of Corinth, the battle of luka, the siege of Vicksburg, the 
Meridian raid, the battles of Kenesaw Mountain, Nicajack Creek, Chattahooche 
river, Atlanta, and the celebrated march to the sea under Sherman. Later he was 
on detached duty for a time in a hospital at Atlanta and afterward participated 
in the battles of Savannah, Pocataligp, Cambechee river, Orangeburg, North 
Edisto river, Fayetteville and Bentoriyille. He then proceeded to Goldsboro with 
his command and was there honorably discharged. 

Following his return home Mr. Shaeffer recuperated and then took up active 
farm work, purchasing eighty acres of land in Hamilton county, Iowa, where 
he lived for two years. He then came to Boone county, settling in Dodge town- 
ship, where he purchased two hundred and forty acres. There he carried on 
farming for sixteen years, after which he sold that property and invested in one 
hundred and sixty acres, upon which he lived for seven years. Later he disposed 
of that farm and bought eighty acres a mile east of Boone, which he improved. 
In igo6 he once more sold out and, retiring from active farm life, took up his 
residence in Boone, where he now makes his home. He has greatly improved 
all of these different properties and has thus added to the agricultural progress 
of the county. He now owns one hundred and sixty acres of land in Potter 
county. South Dakota. His life has been a busy, useful and active one, and his 
labors have brought to him a measure of success which now numbers him among 
the men of affluence in his section of the state. 

Mr. Shaeffer was married in Boone county, December 31, 1865, to Miss 
Dorothy Getzman, of this county, a daughter of Barnhart and Mary Getzman. 
Six children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Shaeffer as follows: Leora M., who 
died in September, 1878, when twelve years of age: Lafayette M., who passed 
away in July, 1878, at the age of ten; Samuel R., whose death occurred in 1898 
when he was twenty years of age; Maggie L., who married George Shafer and 
who departed this life in 1910; Elsie who became the wife of William Phipps of 
Idaho ; and Russell G., who married Juanita Sifford and lives at New Hartford, 
Iowa. 



376 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

Mr. Shaeffer belongs to C. \V. Crooks Post, No. 329, G. A. R., of which he is 
the present commander, and through his association therewith he keeps in close 
touch with many of his old army comrades. He is also a member of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church. High and honorable principles have guided him in all 
life's relations, molding his character and making him a man worthy the high 
regard and confidence of all with whom he has come in contact. While living in 
Dodge township he held office almost continuously, serving as road supervisor, 
as constable, justice of the peace and school director, and in all these positions 
he discharged his duties with prouiptness and fidelity. He has also been town- 
ship trustee and as such managed well the interests committed to his care. He 
has been equally active in the church, serving as steward and as chairman of the 
building committee during the erection of the Bethel church, to which he was a 
generous contributor. He possesses an even disposition and kindly spirit and 
has been very popular among his fellow townsmen. He was considered one 
of the best farmers and stock-raisers in this section of the state and did much to 
promote agricultural activity and to raise the standards of farming. His life 
has indeed been one of far-reaching influence and benefit and has won for him 
a good name, which is rather to be chosen than great riches. Nevertheless he 
has gained a substantial measure of this world's goods, and his record proves 
that success and an honored name may be won simultaneously. 



LLEWELLYN V. HARPEL. 

Llewellyn V. Harpel is one of the most successful lawyers of Boone, being 
a member of the firm of Harpel & Cederquist. who do a very legal business. 
Mr. Harpel was born near East Liberty, Logan county. Ohio, and is a son of 
George and Minerva (Vernon) Harpel, the latter a lineal descendant of a Mr. 
\'ernon who was one of the eleven Friends who came over to this country with 
William Penn. The paternal grandfather. George C. Harpel. was born in 
northern Germany and was brought by his parents to America when but one 
year old, the family locating in Pennsylvania. They later removed to Carroll 
county, Ohio, where the late George Harpel, father of our subject, was born. 
The latter served three years and eight months in the Civil war in an Ohio regi- 
ment. He married in 1866, locating first in Logan county. Ohio, and in 1870 
removed to Polk county. Iowa, where he operated a farm until about four years 
before his death in 1908, having removed to Boone in 1004. He was loyal to the 
democratic party and was quite influential in its local councils in Polk county. 

Llewellyn \'. Harpel spent his early boyhood on a farm in Polk county, near 
Sheldahl. He subsequently pursued a scientific course at the Iowa State Col- 
lege, graduating as a Bachelor of Science in 1887. He studied law at Drake 
University of Des Moines and in 1890 was admitted to the bar. He at first 
entered the law offices of Kauffman & Guernsey, attorneys in Des Moines, and 
did office work for them as clerk and stenographer until January i, 1891, gaining 
valuable experience while so engaged. He then entered the office of John 
Shortley of Perry, Iowa, working on a salary basis for eighteen months, and 
formed at the end of that period a partnership with Mr. Shortley, under the firm 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 377 

name of Shortley & Harpel. On June i, 1903, Mr. Harpel moved to Boone, 
succeeding Charles Whitaker in the firm of Whitaker & Cederquist. Later M. C. 
Creighton of Madrid was taken into the firm, the latter having charge of the 
branch ofiice at that city. Upon his decease Mr. Cederquist took charge of the 
Madrid office, the firm now being Harpel & Cederquist. Mr. Harpel has all 
the qualities of which a lawyer may be proud. He has a clear, logical mind and 
an excellent memory, using both to advantage in presenting his arguments be- 
fore court and jury. He has handled a number of important cases and has 
concluded most of them to the satisfaction of his clients. He moreover enjoys 
a high reputation as a counselor and is frequently called in consultation in regard 
to difficult legal problems. 

On July 20, 1892, Llewellyn V. Harpel married Miss Kate Stevens, extended 
mention of whom follows. They have one son. Gates Harpel. who is 
a senior in the Iowa State College. Mr. Harpel of this review is a Master 
Mason and was the first master of the lodge at Boone to serve in the Champlain 
Memorial Alasonic Temple. He is a Chapter Mason and a Knight Templar and 
also is a member of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, the Knights of 
Pythias, the Modern Woodmen of America and the Woodmen of the World, 
being very popular in all of these organizations. For about twelve years he was 
a democrat and within that period served as city solicitor of Perry. He then 
gav£ his allegiance to republicanism for about ten years and is now affiliated 
with the progressive party, being thoroughly in accord with the aims of that 
organization. He is a valuable, useful citizen who participates in all the move- 
ments which are undertaken in order to advance the interests of Boone city and 
Boone county. 



KATE STEVENS HARPEL, M. D. 

Mrs. Kate Stevens Harpel, the wife of Llewellyn V. Harpel, who is mentioned 
in the preceding sketch, is successfully engaged in medical practice in Boone. 
She was born near Springfield, in McHenry county, Illinois, on October 22, 1867, 
and is a daughter of Asher M. and Johanna (Chesley) Stevens. Her paternal 
grandmother, who in her maidenhood was Miss Julia Kellogg, was a granddaughter 
of an officer of the American Revolution and a member of the Kellogg family 
whose history in both this country and Great Britain has been so well written. 

■Mrs. Harpel of this review was but six months of age when her family 
removed to Cerro Gordo county, Iowa, later settling on a farm in Owen township, 
which is still owned by members of the family. Her mother died in 1878, leaving 
seven children, the youngest of whom was three years old. Kate, with an older 
sister, did the housework for the family, attending at the same time the district 
school. At the age of fifteen she went to Mason City for the purpose of attending 
high school, by permission of her family, but without means or assistance except 
that she had a place where she could work for her board and expenses. Despite 
this outside work she covered a double course in two years, graduating within 
that period from a four years' course and at the head of her class. She was 
immediately offered a position in the Mason City public schools and taught fifth 



378 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

grade pupils until 1887, when she entered the Iowa State College, having saved 
the means to defray one year's expenses from her teaching. The other three 
years of her college course were cared for by what she was able to earn while 
teaching during the winters and by service as assistant college librarian. In 1890 
she received the degree of Bachelor of Letters, ranking second in a class of forty- 
four. The college commencement being held in November, she taught the balance 
of the school year in the Marshalltown public schools and the next year acted as 
principal of the Webster City high school. 

In Ti-dy, 1892, Miss Stevens was united in marriage to Llewellyn V. Harpel, 
an attorney at law, and they lived in Perry for eleven years, then removing to 
Boone, their present home. Her only son. Gates, was born in 1893. During 
her residence in Perry she filled for six months a vacancy as high-school teacher 
and served for three years by popular election on the board of education, assisting 
in organizing the Wednesday Study Club, which is still in existence. Having 
received a doctor's degree from the medical department of Drake University, 
where she was matriculated, she began the regular practice of medicine in 1903 
and has ever since been very successful as a physician. She is careful in diagnosis 
and has made few mistakes, if any. Many are those who have come to her and 
who have found relief by reason of her treatments. To her professional and home 
duties she has also added church work in the Universalist church and Sunday 
school and club work, being an organizer of the Outlook Club and serving for two 
years as its president. She is moreover active in the Political Equality Club, the 
Civic League and the Iowa Women's Medical Association and is a past com- 
mander of the Ladies of the Maccabees and a past worthy matron of the Eastern 
Star. Mrs. Harpel has been of utmost value to her community, being a leader 
in all movements which are undertaken for the betterment of mankind. She 
is a noble representative of American womanhood, and although she is active 
in so many public and semi-public capacities, she has not lost a particle of that 
sweet womanhood of which we all are so proud. 



E. PETER DALANDER. 

E. Peter Dalander is a native of Madrid and comes of an old pioneer family 
of Boone county which settled here in 1846 on land where Madrid now stands. 
Mr. Dalander has worthily carried forward the family traditions and stands 
high in the estimation of his fellow citizens. Since 1903 he has served as post- 
master, discharging his duties to the greatest satisfaction of the patrons of the 
office. 

Mr. Dalander was born July 10, 1864, and has always been a resident of 
Madrid. His grandmother, Anna Dalander, secured the first deed to land in 
Boone county and the instrument is now preserved in the archives of the Madrid 
Historical Society. His parents were Eric and Eva E. (Swanson) Dalander, 
both natives of Sweden, the former born in 1814 and the latter in 1836. The 
father died in Madrid, January 29, 1893. He emigrated to America in 1846 
and immediately located upon a farm which is now the site of Madrid. The 




E. PETER DALAXDER 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 381 

mother came with her foster parents to America in 1846 and the family also 
located in Boone county. 

In the Dalander family were the following children, all born and reared in 
Douglas township: John, a son of the father's first marriage, residing in 
Kansas; Mrs. Anna M. Nelson, of Madrid; Mrs. Clara Jacobson, deceased; 
Mrs. A. M. Sundberg, oi. Madrid ; S. A., also of that city ; Dr. C. A. Dalander, 
who was born July 11, 1869, and died in Des Moines, April 12, 1906; Z. W., 
born January 20, 1872, residing in Madrid ; Minnie M., born January 19, 1876, 
residing with her mother; Clara, who died in infancy; and E. Peter, of this 
review. 

The father entered land and at first followed farming, but later engaged in 
the milling business in Madrid, operating the first steam mill in that part of the 
country. Subsequently the family returned to the farm and the subject of this 
review there remained with his parents until he was twenty-one years of age. 
He received his earlier education in the public schools, rounding out his funda- 
mental knowledge with a two years' academic course. After leaving the home- 
stead he clerked in a drug store for some time and then conducted a similar 
establishment of his own for ten years, being very successful along that line. In 
1903 he was appointed postmaster of Madrid and he has since held that position. 
He makes an excellent public servant and is popular with all who have transac- 
tions with his office. 

Mr. Dalander, in 1892, married Miss Alma L', Anderson, who was born in 
Douglas township, June 4, 1866. There she wasreafecl and she has remained 
a resident of Douglas township ever since. Her father, John Anderson, came 
to the township in the same party in which Mr. Dalander's parents arrived. He 
at first worked in Des Moines in order to secure sufficient capital to purchase 
a farm. For his second wife he married Carolina Nelson. Both were born in 
Sweden and died in Madrid. The father was a very successful farmer and stood 
high among his fellow citizens. He was supervisor of Boone county for a num- 
ber of years and for twenty years served as assessor of Douglas township. By 
a former marriage he had five children and by the second union there were 
eight. All the thirteen children of Mr. Anderson were reared in Douglas town- 
ship. 

Mrs. Dalander received, in addition to a common-school education, musical 
training in Kansas, continuing her studies along that line in Shenandoah, Iowa. 
She is a proficient artist and well accjuainted with musical lore. Mr. and Mrs. 
Dalander have four children, three daughters and a son : Martin S., who was 
born May 15, 1894, and after graduating from the Madrid high school took one 
year's work in the Midwestern Academy of Music, being at present in attendance 
at the Capital City Commercial College of Des Moines ; Edna E., born in April, 
1898, who is attending high school in Madrid ; Helen, born in August, 1903 ; 
and Ruth, born August 27, 1908. 

Mr. Dalander is an adherent of the republican party and has ever been 
loyal to the standards and principles of that organization. He is deeply inter- 
ested in the cause of education and for fifteen years has done valuable service 
as member of the local school board. Both he and his wife belong to the Swedish 
Lutheran church of Madrid, to which they give their material and moral support. 
Mr. Dalander is a well informed man who forms valuable opinions on all matters 



382 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

of public importance. His support is eagerly sought and he is ever ready to 
promote worthy enterprises of any kind. As a citizen he is of great value to 
Madrid and Boone county, considering no exertion on his part too great in order 
to promote progress. As an official he is courteous, affable, approachable and 
obliging. 



NATHANIEL NOLAND. 

Nathaniel Noland, deceased, was for a considerable period a well known 
farmer of Boone county. He was born in Highland county, Ohio, seventy-five 
years ago, a son of Benjamin and Elizabeth (Staley) Noland, who reared a large 
family. The father was a fanner by occupation and spent his last days in Iowa, 
whither he removed with his family during the childhood of his son Nathaniel. 

The family home was established in Dallas county and later a removal was 
made to Boone county. In this state Nathaniel Noland was reared to manhood, 
sharing with the family in the usual experiences, hardships and privations of 
pioneer life. His education was obtained in one of the oldtime log schoolhouses 
when the methods of instruction were very primitive as compared with the ad- 
vanced educational standards of the present day. School was held for only about 
three months in a year and throughout the remainder of the time Nathaniel 
Noland worked upon the home farm, early becoming famiilar with all the duties 
and labors incident to the cultivation of the soil and the development of the crops. 

As a young man Nathaniel Noland heard and answered the country's call 
for men, enlisting in Company D, Tenth Iowa Volunteer Infantry at Boone in 
1861. He served throughout the war, participating in many battles and going 
with Sherman on the march to the sea. At the close of the war in 1865 he 
received his honorable discharge and returned to the life of a civilian. 

On the 15th of March, 1866, in Peoples township, Mr. Noland was united 
in marriage to Miss Angeline Peoples. Her ancestor, John Peoples, was brought 
to the United States in childhood by his parents, the family home being estab- 
lished in Pennsylvania near Brownsville, where the grandfather of Mrs. Noland 
engaged in farming. John Peoples was quite old, being nearly eighty years 
of age, when he sought a new home in Coshocton county, Ohio, where he lived 
with his son William until the time of his death. He married Henrietta Jones, 
a native of Pennsylvania, in which state she died, leaving a large family. Their 
son, David Peoples, born in Pennsylvania, was educated in the district schools 
and married Lavina Peart, of New Jersey, a daughter of Thomas and Mary 
(Fisher) Peart. Lavina (Peart) Peoples died in September, 1886, at the age 
of seventy-eight years. The children of that family were ; Melvina, who became 
the wife of Jesse Vernon and is deceased ; Mary, who became the wife of Levi 
Colvin and has passed away ; Amanda, who married William Tarr and is de- 
ceased ; William, who was killed at the battle of Pleasant Hill, Louisiana, during 
the Civil war; Henrietta, who became the wife of Enos Rhodes and has passed 
away: Angeline, who married Nathaniel Noland; Sarah E., the wife of John W. 
Kirby of Boone; Ann Eliza, the wife of Luke Becket of Spencer, Iowa; and 
Rachel C, who married Miles Becket and is also deceased. 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 383 

Following their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Nathaniel Noland settled on a prairie 
farm in Peoples township. He became the owner of a tract of eighty acres, 
which he brought to a high state of cultivation, carefully tilling the soil as the 
years passed on. He died May 9, 1886, and was laid to rest in a cemetery in 
Peoples township. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Noland were born six children : Hallie L., now the wife 
of C. A. Steelsmith; William, who died in childhood; Levi C. ; Fred P., who has 
departed this life; Clyde, a practicing physician in Ogden, Iowa; and Retta, at 
home. The death of the husband and father occurred May 9, 1886, and he was 
laid to rest in a cemetery in Peoples township. His political support was given 
to the republican party, but, while interested in the welfare of the community, 
he never desired public office. He sought the moral progress of the community 
as a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. His many sterling traits of 
character endeared him to all who knew him, and his upright life left to his family 
a memory that is cherished and which serves as an inspiration and a benediction 
to those who knew him. 



AXEL WESTEEN. 



Among the prosperous financial institutions of Boone county is the Farmers 
Savings Bank of Boxholm, of which Axel Westeen is the cashier. Much of the 
success of this enterprise is due to his initiative and able management, and 
he is conceded to be one of the best informed men in the county on financial 
matters, particularly as regards local conditions. Mr. Westeen was born in 
Webster county, Iowa, in March, 1870, and is a son of Olaf and Carrie (Olson) 
Westeen, natives of Sweden, who came to America in 18R8 and located in Webster 
county, where the father was engaged in farming until 1882. He then came 
to Boone county and bought land in Grant township which he successfully oper- 
ated until 1904, when he retired in the enjoyment of a competence and moved 
to Pilot Mound, where he now resides at the age of eighty-three years, his wife 
having passed away in April, 1913. 

Axel Westeen was reared and educated in Webster and Boone counties and 
after completing his lessons worked on his father's farm and then learned the 
blacksmith's trade, conducting a shop and hardware store. For ten years he 
conducted an establishment of this kind on the farm and for fifteen years acted 
as postmaster, this being before the town of Boxholm had come into existence. 
Subsequently he entered the hardware business exclusively, conducting a store 
of that kind for eight years, and then went to Boone, where for two years he was 
employed by the Wheelock Hardware Company. In 1910 Mr. Westeen returned 
to Boxholm, acquiring an interest in the Farmers Bank, which was then a private 
concern owned by J. H. Roberts. In 1910 the bank was reorganized as the 
Farmers Savings Bank, the capital stock being ten thousand dollars. The present 
officers are: J. H. Roberts, president; O. L. Lidvall, vice president; and Axel 
Westeen, cashier. The directors include: .M. J. Lundvall, J. H. Roberts, Alf. 
Sundberg, Axel Westeen and O. L. Lidvall. Mr. Westeen is proving himself an 
able financier and in the last few years has done much toward increasing the 



384 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

business of the bank. He is careful and cautious as regards investments, and 
yet he is always ready to extend credit when suitable security is forthcoming. 
Hi? advice is frequently sought upon matters relating to financial transactions, 
and he is ever ready and willing to accommodate those who seek his opinion. 

On June 6, 1894, Mr. Westeen married Miss Nettie Sundberg, a daughter of 
Olaf and Anna Sundberg, natives of Sweden, who located in Boone county 
in 1866, Mr. Sundberg engaging in farming and coal mining. He died in 1884, 
but his widow yet resides on the Sundberg home farm in Grant township. Mr. 
and Mrs. Westeen have five children, Florence Edith, LeRoy J., Earl, Gladys 
and Dorothy, who are respectively eighteen, sixteen, thirteen, eight and three 
years of age. 

Mr. Westeen has always taken a helpful part in all movements tending toward 
the improvement of his town and county. He is a democrat and loyal to the 
principles of his party. He has served as justice of the peace and at present 
fills the position of town clerk of Boxholm. His religious faith is that of the 
Swedish Alission church, and fraternally he is connected with the local lodges of 
the Masonic order and the Modern Woodmen of America. Mr. Westeen is one 
of the popular business men of Boxholm and in the social and business life of 
that town has many warm friends. 



DESKIN W. CROUCH. 

For a number of years Deskin W. Crouch has been engaged in farming in 
Pilot Mound township, owning a valuable property of one hundred and sixty acres. 
He was born in Missouri, October 12, 1873, and is a son of Samuel and Catherine 
(Gulick) Crouch, natives of Ohio. The parents went with their respective fam- 
ilies to Illinois when children, and the father was reared and educated in that 
state, where he subsequently married. In 1867 he and his wife went to Missouri, 
where he bought land which he improved and operated until 1894. In that year 
he sold out and returned to Illinois, farming until he retired to Champaign, where 
he resided until his death, March 13, 1909. His widow is now living in Indiana. 

Deskin W. Crouch was reared and educated in Missouri, remaining upon his 
father's farm until he reached his majority. His parents then removed to Illinois, 
where he and his father farmed together for two years, at the end of which time 
Mr. Crouch, of this review, followed agricultural pursuits in that state inde- 
pendently for one year. He then came to Boone county, where he rented land for 
a similar period, and subsequently acquired title to two hundred acres on section 
31, Pilot Mound township. He has since, however, sold forty acres of this tract. 
His farm is in a good state of cultivation and its buildings are kept in excellent 
repair, the appearance of the property betraying the prosperity of the owner. 

On September 27, 1900, Mr. Crouch married Miss Minnie M. Campbell, a 
daughter of James and Sarah (Cook) Campbell, who were born in Ohio. The 
father was a fanner by occupation and early in life went to Illinois, where 
he purchased land near Champaign, in the operation of which he passed the 
remainder of his life. He die'd in 1901, his wife having preceded him to the 
Great Beyond in 1884. Mr. and Mrs. Crouch were the parents of four children, 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 385 

of whom one died in infancy. The others are James Robert, Roy C. and Marvin 
M., who are twelve, eight and six years of age respectively. 

Air. Crouch is interested in commercial as well as agricultural affairs, being a 
stockholder and director of the Pilot Alound Savings Bank and also holding stock 
in the Farmers Cooperative Company of Pilot Mound. His religion is that of 
the Presbyterian faith, and politically he is a republican. He has served for ten 
years as township trustee and still occupies that office, having done valuable work 
in promoting the development and advancement of his immediate locality and 
Boone county. 



GEORGE LEWIS ADIX. 

George Lewis Adix, proprietor of the Alfalfadale Farm of eighty acres on 
section 22, Jackson township, has spent practically his entire life in that township, 
where he was born and reared. His father, Franz Adix, was a native of Germany 
and was only three years old when his father died. At the age of fourteen Franz 
Adix came to the United States with his brother, L. W. Adix, and for many 
years was one of the leading farmers of Boone county. Here he was married 
to Miss Hannah Bauman of Boone, a daughter of Henry Bauman, and they be- 
came the parents of ten children, namely : Henry, who was born November 17, 
1875, and was accidentally killed in a runaway April 21, 1908; William of Novato, 
California, who was born June 12, 1877, and married Ethel Hoffman; Mary, who 
was born November 24, 1878, and is now the wife of Allen Purdie of Boone; 
Francis, who was born February 25, 1880; George Lewis, of this review, who was 
born September 7, 1882; John, born February 24, 1884; Hannah, December 28, 
1886; Elmer, February i, 1889; Dora, October 12, 1892; and Hazel, July 3, 
1894. The father, who was an earnest and consistent member of the German 
Lutheran church, died on his farm in Jackson township, March 8, 1908, highly 
esteemed by all who knew him, while the mother passed away May 13, 1903. 
They were laid to rest side by side in the Lynwood cemetery. 

George L. Adix spent his boyhood and youth on the home farm in Jackson 
township and remained with his parents until his marriage. He attended the 
public schools, and it was the intention of his parents to send him to college and 
to fit him for the dental profession. At the age of nineteen, however, he gave 
up that idea and has since devoted his attention principally to agricultural pur- 
suits. At the age of twenty-one he spent one year in California, visiting relatives 
the greater part of the time, and then went to Minnesota, where he had charge 
of land belonging to his father, who gave him power of attorney to administer 
his property. After the death of the father he was appointed administrator of 
the estate, which he ably managed. It was after his marriage that he located upon 
his present farm, which he purchased from Frank Nygren in 191 1. This place 
is beautifully located six and one-half miles east of Boone and three miles from 
Jordan. Since it came into his possession he has made improvements thereon, 
and it is today in a high state of cultivation. Mr. Adix is a pioneer in the raising 
of alfalfa in this locality and has become quite an extensive stock-raiser, making 
a specialty of thoroughbred Chester White hogs. He now has upon his place 



386 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

over one hundred and sixty head of hogs, which he feeds largely on alfalfa. He 
also has given considerable attention to the raising of Rhode Island Red poultry. 
He is one of the most progressive and up-to-date young farmers of Boone county 
and undoubtedly will meet with excellent success in his undertakings. 

On the 2ist of February, 191 1, Mr. Adix was united in marriage to Miss Eva 
Myrtle Throckmorton of Jackson township, a daughter of George and Viola 
(Roderick) Throckmorton. She was born near Madrid, Boone county, and 
received her literary education in the public schools. She has given considerable 
attention to the study of music, pursuing that art at Simpson College for some 
time. After leaving school she taught the piano for two years. She is now 
organist in the Prairie Center church, and has taught a class in the Prairie Center 
Sunday school for ten years. However, she holds membership in the Christian 
church at Boone. Through her etTorts and those of the class enough money 
was raised to i)uy a piano for the Sunday school. Since attaining his majority 
Mr. .^dix has affiliated with the republican party and on that ticket was elected 
township clerk in 1912 for a term of two years, being now a candidate for re- 
election in 1914. He is a member of the Yeomen and is regarded as one of tlie 
leading citizens of the communitv. 



JONATHAN BUECHLER. 

Jonathan Buechler is living practically retired, his home being at Ridgeport, 
in fJodge township, where he has remained since 1858, in which year he built 
the house that he now occupies. He arrived in Boone county two years before 
and has lived at or near the village continuously since, covering almost sixty 
years. In the early days he engaged in merchandising for about a year and 
then traded his store for his farm, .^.t one time between the years 1870 and 
1875 h'^ was the owner of about one thousand acres of land, but lost heavily 
through going security for friends and being forced to pay security debts. 
However, he has never lost the respect of his fellow townsmen, and the high 
regard in which he is uniformly held is a testimonial of the integrity and honor 
of his life. He was born in Pine Grove township, Schuylkill county, Pennsyl- 
vania, in 1831. a son of Henry and Abigail (Dollinger) Buechler. The maternal 
grandfather, John Dollinger, was a Revolutionary soldier, serving for seven 
years in that long conflict which brought independence to the American people. 
Henry Buechler was but three days the senior of his wife. The latter was born 
on shipboard and the former in Schuylkill county, Pennsylvania, June 10, 1791. 
Mr. Buechler spent his last days in Wayne county, Iowa, where he departed this 
life March 14, 1872, at the age of almost eighty-one years. His wife, whose 
natal day vvas June 13, 1791, passed away at the age of sixty-five years. He was 
a Lutheran in religious faith, while Mrs. Buechler was a believer in the Presby- 
terian doctrines. 

In their family were ten children, of whom Jonathan Buechler was the ninth 
in order of birth and is the only one now living. In 1844 the family removed 
to Tippecanoe county. Indiana, and the father purchased a farm on Sugar creek, 
two miles from Americus. He was a man of considerable wealth for those davs 




.MK. AND MRS. JONATHAN BUECHLKIi 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 389 

and Jonathan Buechler had some opportunities, therefore, which were denied 
other lads of the period. He attended school in Germantown after beginning 
his education and the schools of Preble county, Ohio. Subsequently he engaged 
in teaching in Indiana, having charge of a subscription school, his remuneration 
being sixty dollars per quarter, and he boarded himself. He taught for two terms 
and for two years he engaged in farming in Indiana along the Wabash river, 
raising one hundred and ten bushels of corn to the acre. The soil was compara- 
tively new to cultivation and responded readily to the care and labor bestowed 
upon it. 

In September, 1853, Mr. Buechler was united in marriage to Miss Martha 
Ann Miller, a daughter of Rew David Miller, who in 1854 came to Boone county 
and purchased five hundred acres of land, largely covered with timber, at two and 
a half to three and a half dollars per acre. 'Mrs. Buechler departed this life 
August II, 1889, when fifty-five years of age, and was survived by ten children. 
Those still living are: Mary, now the wife of James Martin, a lawyer of Fort 
Dodge, Iowa; Emma, the wife of Henry Ferguson of Boone; Eva, the wife of 
Clell Jennings of Dodge township; Lizzie, the wife of Frank Peterson, a farmer 
of Dodge township ; George, a prominent and successful farmer living near Ridge- 
port : and Charles, who for forty-eight terms engaged in teaching school and is 
now a painter and paper hanger of Boone. He is married and has two living 
children. .'Vfter having lost his first wife Mr. Buechler wedded Mrs. Nancy 
Stotts, nee Vernon, on Thanksgiving day, the 26th of November, 1891. She 
was born in Muskingum county, Ohio, a daughter of Allen and Elizabeth (Hague) 
Vernon, the latter of Quaker parentage, while the former was of English birth. 
Both died when Mrs. Buechler was a young child. She was married in Ohio to 
Chistal Stotts, and they removed to Boone county about 1856, since which time 
she has made her home within its borders. Mr. Stotts was a farmer and owned 
a good tract of land in Dodge township, where he made his home until his 
death in 1884. Unto him and his wife were born six children, of whom four sons 
and one daughter are yet living, namely: Frank. Eddie, Oscar, Mrs. Anetta 
Garrett and John. 

It was in 1853 that Jonathan Buechler came to Iowa. He settled at Ben- 
nington, on the Iowa river, and there engaged in selling goods for a year or two. 
In 1854 he came to Boone county, where he entered government land, which he 
improved, making his home thereon for a few years. He afterward traded for 
another tract and a farm in Indiana and ultimately traded that property for a 
store at Ridgeport, where he carried on commercial pursuits for several years 
At different times he has made many deals for various properties and in placing 
his investments has displayed sound judgment. He has dealt quite extensively 
in farm, town and city property and has also given supervision to the cultivation 
and improvement of his land. He is by trade a fine stone and brick mason and has 
assisted in the erection of many business blocks and other buildings at Boone 
and elsewhere in the county. He has aided in the erection of eighteen different 
churches and also the county farm buildings. His life has been one of intense 
and well directed activity, and the years have brought him a success which is 
very gratifying. 

Politically Mr. Buechler was reared in the democratic faith, but has voted 

the republican ticket since the Civil war. He was in hearty sympathy with the 
Vol. n.-i8 



390 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

Union cause and the governmental policy and three times he volunteered his 
services, but did not get to enlist, twice on account of the company being filled 
and once because of an injury which he had sustained in his foot in his youth. 
Socially Mr. Buechler is a Mason, belonging to Boone Lodge No. 79, A. F. 
& A. M., which he joined in 1867. He and his wife are members of the Free- 
will Baptist church at Ridgeport. He has served as notary public and as justice 
of the peace, and he was deputy postmaster under Allen T. Silver and others 
for several years at Ridgeport, but the postoffice there was discontinued July 
I, 1913. He has also been deputy sherifif. Mr. Buechler recalls the Indian days 
and many thrilling adventures during his travels over many parts of Iowa and 
other states. While returning from Indiana to Iowa with a large amount of gold, 
he and a companion were held up near Marengo, Iowa, by four robbers. The 
two men were put to bed on the floor, each between two of the robbers, but at a 
preconcerted signal they fought their way out, mounted their horses and made 
their escape. They had managed to retain their arms, his companion having 
a revolver, while Mr. Buechler had a bowie knife. Other incidents almost as 
exciting featured in his life in the early days, but he has lived to see many changes, 
as law and order have been established and as the work of civilization and develop- 
ment has been carried forward, and as one of the pioneer settlers of the county 
he well deserves mention in this volume. 



ELMER CROUTHAMEL. 

• 

Elmer Crouthamel. who owns and successfully operates a fine farm of three 
hundred and twenty acres in Dodge township, has spent his entire life in Boone 
county, with the exception of one year de\oted to farming in Plymouth county, 
this state. He was born on the 27th of June, 1872, on the old family homestead 
on section 32, Dodge township, and is a son of Jonas and Elizabeth (Yost) 
Crouthamel, both of whom were natives of Bucks county, Pennsylvania, the 
father born in Bedminster township in 1833 and the mother in Hilltown township. 
The parents were married in 1S57 and to them were born three sons and one 
daughter: Isaiah and Remantus, both residents of Boone; Elmer, of this review; 
and Elniina, the wife of Polas Hoeke, a farmer of Palo Alto county, Iowa. Dur- 
ing his boyhood the father learned the stonemason's trade, which he followed 
continuously until coming to this county in 1866, when he turned his attention 
to farming. He has lived here continuously since, with the exception of one 
year spent in Illinois. He survives his wife, who died on the 4th of April. 1914. 

Upon the home farm Elmer Crouthamel early became familiar with all the 
labors which fall to the lot of the agriculturist and pursued his studies in 
the schools of the neighborhood. Since old enough to be of any assistance in the 
operation of the farm he has engaged in agricultural pursuits and is today 
the owner of an excellent and well improved farm of three hundred and twenty 
acres. He was married on the 6th of August, 1900, to Miss Stazy Lestine, a 
daughter of John and Josie (Warak) Lestine, farming people of Dodge township. 
Five children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Crouthamel. namely : Lee, now thirteen 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 391 

years of age ; Walter, eleven ; Mae, five ; and Harry, two. These are all living, 
while Howard, twin brother of Harry, died in infancy. 

Mr. Crouthamel is a member of the Yeomen lodge of Boone and by his 
ballot supports the men and measures of the democratic party, taking a very 
active and commendable interest in public affairs. For two terms he has served 
as school director, and he never withholds his support from any enterprise which 
he believes will advance the welfare of his community. 



WILLIAM H.\RVEY FOSTER. 

William Harvey Foster, deceased, was a soldier of the Civil war and a 
respected citizen of Boone. For many years he was a trustworthy engineer on 
the Northwestern Railway, having practically spent all his life in connection with 
railway service. He was born in Zanesville, Muskingum county, Ohio, July 17, 
1836, and was a son of Jonathan and Elizabeth Foster. Jonathan Foster, 
who was born in Maryland, was a well-to-do farmer, also dealing extensively in 
stock. He moved his family to Ohio and later to Indiana, where they settled on 
a farm north of Millersburg, and there he spent the remainder of his life, dying 
at the age of seventy-five years in the faith of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
The mother died before the family removed to Indiana, in Ohio, and the father 
subsequently married a widow, Mrs. Johnson, whose maiden name was Self. The 
second Mrs. Foster died in Indiana. Sherman, a stepson of Jonathan Foster, 
served four years in the Civil war and died in the soldiers' home in Indiana. By 
his first marriage the father had the following children : Sarah, who married John 
Matthews and died in Indiana, near Leesburg; William Harvey, of this review; 
Martha, the widow of John Harriman ; Phoebe, who became Mrs. Fisher Fry 
and died in Ligonier. Indiana; Thompson, who died at the age of twenty-four; 
and Willis, who married and died in Indiana. 

William Harvey Foster was educated in the country schools and subsequently 
followed farming. In February, 1865, he enlisted in the One Hundred and Fifty- 
second Indiana Volunteer Infantry, joining Company D, of which Captain Smith 
was at the head, as a private. He served until the close of the war. On Novem- 
ber 2, 1865, he married Miss Matilda Jane Tomlinson, and they came to Boone in 
January, 1866. This community then had but si-x houses, and the Northwestern 
Railway was completed west only as far as Woodbine. Mr. Foster bought a farm 
close by and lived thereon for one year. He then entered the shops of the North- 
western Railway as engine cleaner and subsequently became fireman and engineer. 
He had the run between Boone and Moingona and also ran a pusher engine which 
helped the trains over the hills. He died on October 18, 1897, and was buried 
in Linwood cemetery. 

He was an active member of the Methodist Episcopal church and one of the 
founders and lifelong friends of the Young Men's Christian Association. Fra- 
ternally he belonged to the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers and was a 
member of the Independent Order of C)dd Fellows. His political adherence was 
given to the republican party. 



392 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

To Mr. and Mrs. Foster were born the following children. Ida, who is Mrs. 
Herbert Cronk, of Chicago, was born in Boone county and educated in the city 
of Boone. She taught school there and subsequently celebrated her wedding in 
that city. Later she removed to Clinton, Iowa, where her husband was a passenger 
conductor on the Chicago & Northwestern Railway, having the run between 
Clinton and Chicago. She now conducts Foster's Restaurant at No. 221 South 
Wabash avenue, Chicago, and is manager of the Woman's Athletic Club, which has 
its building at No. 606 South Michigan avenue in Chicago. She is prominently 
engaged in uplift work and interested in all vital social questions. She has no 
children. Melvin, who was a fireman with the Northwestern Railway, died at the 
age of twenty-two. Lulu married Charles Pendarvis of Boone. Edith married 
Benjamin B. Wiley, who is extensively mentioned in another part of this work. 
Harvey Norman died in infancy. Olive resides in Watertown, Illinois. 'Mrs. 
Foster, the mother of these children, was born on a farm in Noble county, Indiana, 
May 13, 1844. She attended the country schools and was reared among strangers, 
as her mother had died when she was quite young. Her father, Andrew Tom- 
linson, was a native of Maryland, and her mother before her marriage was Miss 
Julia Banner, also a native of the Old Line state. The father was a carpenter 
and he subsequently followed that trade in Indiana, whither the family had 
removed. He later went to Missouri, where he died at the age of seventy-five, 
his wife having passed away in Indiana when seventy years of age. In their 
family were the following children : William, of Topeka, Indiana ; Silas, who was 
drowned in the Mississippi river when on his way from New Orleans on a trans- 
port which was sunk during the war ; Henry, who lost his life in the battle of 
Baton Rouge on the day when he was twenty years old ; and Mrs. Foster. 

Mr. Foster's memory is still with his many friends in Boone, all of whom ■ 
regarded him affectionately because of the genuine qualities of his character. 
He was a kindly, courteous gentleman of the old school who readily made friends 
and who eagerly participated in all matters pertaining to the public welfare, and * 
he was ever ready in peace and war to make sacrifices in order to render service 
to his country or raise humanity to a higher plane. 



FRED WAHL GOETZMAN. 

One of the well-to-do farmers of Dodge township is Fred Wahl Goetzman, 
living in section 35, where he owns and cultivates eighty acres of good land. 
Boone county numbers him among her native sons, his birth having occurred here 
on the 5th of September, 1866. His parents were Henry and Harriet (Lamb) 
Cioetzman. The father came with his parents from Germany to Ohio in 1853, 
and the family made their way at once to Iowa, establishing their home in Des 
Moines township, Boone county, where Henry Goetzman, after attaining his 
majority, made arrangements for having a home of his own through his marriage 
to Miss Harriet Lamb, a native of Ohio. He secured a farm, on which they 
began their domestic life, and for many years he was closely associated with 
agricultural interests, devoting his attention to the work of the farm until 1904, 
when death ended his labors. His widow survives and is now living in Boone. 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 393 

Fred W. Goetzman acquired a common school education, and his youthful 
experiences were those which usually fall to the lot of the farm lad. He worked 
in the fields through the summer months and when he started out in life on his 
own account he continued in the same pursuit. He is today the owner of a good 
farm of eighty acres situated on section 35, Dodge township. The soil is arable 
and has been brought by him to a high state of cultivation. In addition to pro- 
ducing the crops best adapted to climatic conditions he makes a specialty of raising 
shorthorn cattle and thus adds materially to his income. A glance at his place 
shows that he is a progressive, practical farmer and that he keeps up with the 
times is indicated by the fact that he is the owner of an automobile. 

On the 20th of September, 1893, Mr. Goetzman was married to Miss Luella 
Merkel, a daughter of Conrad and Margaret Merkel, who came from Ohio to 
Iowa and cast in their lot with the settlers of Des Moines township, where the 
father followed farming throughout his remaining days. Unto Mr. and Mrs. 
Goetzman have been born two children, Frederick Earl and Harriet Margaret. 
Mr. Goetzman gives his political support to the democratic party and has served 
for two terms as school director. He is not a member of any church but attempts 
to follow the Golden Rule and his friends attest the fact that he is the possessor 
of many sterling traits of character. 



ISIDOR WEIGEL. 



Isidor Weigel, deceased, was for a number of years one of the most prosper- 
ous farmers and highly esteemed citizens of Harrison township, his home being 
on section 27. He was born in Schlesien, Germany, November 25, 1843, ^"d" 
there passed the days of his boyhood and youth, coming alone to the United 
States in 1869. Locating first in Illinois, he was there employed as a laborer for 
three years and at the end of that time purchased one hundred and twenty acres 
in Livingston county, that state, to the cultivation and improvement of which 
he devoted his energies for some time. 

In 1872 Mr. Weigel married Miss Theresa Mueller, who died in 1881, and 
of .the six children born to them two are also deceased. The others are: Theresa, 
the wife of Fred Reinsch, a farmer of Harrison township ; Max, who married 
Callie Knight and follows farming in Harrison township ; Helena, the wife of 
Joseph McCoy, also a farmer of Harrison township; and Alfred, who is engaged 
in farming in Story county, Iowa. Mr. Weigel was again married November 8, 
1881, his second union being with Christina Eisner, a daughter of Frank Eisner. 
The children born of this union were: Isidor, who was drowned in 1885, at the 
age of two and a half years; Rudolph, who is homesteading in Alberta, Canada; 
Christina, the wife of William Smith, who is an engineer on the Illinois Central 
Railroad, residing in Council Blufi^s, Iowa ; Philomina, Ernest, Rheinhart and 
Isidor, all at home ; and Adelaide, who is attending school in Cedar Rapids. 

It was in 1883 that Mr. Weigel brought his family to Boone county, Iowa, 
and located on the farm now owned by his widow. This place comprises four 
hundred and eighty acres on section 27, Harrison township, and is in a high state 
of cultivation and well improved with excellent buildings. Mr. Weigel was a 



394 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

most progressive farmer, and, being also an able business man, he met with 
remarkable success in his undertakings. Eighty acres of the home farm Fred 
Reinsch now rents and Alfred Weigel rents fifty-eight and a half acres and owns 
one hundred acres in Story county. Mr. Weigel was independent in politics, 
voting for the man he deemed best qualified for office regardless of party ties. 
He held membership in the Catholic church, 'to which his family also belong, and 
they stand high in the community where they reside. 



E. S. THORNGREN. 



E. S. Thorngren is one of the most active and substantial men of Boxholm, 
Boone county, conducting not only a large and profitable lumber business, but 
also holding title to extensive farm property and being connected with banking 
interests. Moreover, Mr. Thorngren has always participated in movements for 
the upbuilding and betterment of the county and is today connected with a num- 
ber of public and semi-public institutions which contribute greatly toward the 
advancement of the county. He was born in Grant township, Boone county, 
March 24, 1882, and is a son of J. O. and Josephine (Chingren) Thorngren, 
natives of Sweden. The father came to America with his parents and subse- 
quently engaged in farming in Grant township, where he followed this occupa- 
tion for many years. Upon his removal to Pilot Mound he turned his attention 
to the lumber, live-stock and grain business, continuing so for about twenty 
years with ever increasing success. At the end of that time he removed to 
Minneapolis but subsequently returned to one of his farms near Boone, where he 
lived until his death, which occurred on March 29, 1912. His widow is now 
living in Boxholm. 

E. S. Thorngren was reared and educated in Grant township and Pilot Mound, 
completing his lessons by attending Humboldt College and the Simpson Business 
College at Indianola. In 1903 he came to Boxholm and engaged in the lumber 
business and has ever since continued therein. He also handles building material 
and his business transactions are important and extend over a considerable 
territory. Moreover, Mr. Thorngren actively manages a two hundred and thir- 
teen acre farm in Grant township, from which he derives a gratifying income. 
He is also a stockholder and director in the Farmers State Bank of Boxholm 
and the proprietor of the Willow Grove Stock Farm. He was instrumental 
in organizing the Farmers Elevator Company of Boxholm and is a stockholder 
therein. Besides all of these interests he owns two farms, one of eighty acres 
and another of one hundred and sixty acres in Oklahoma. Mr. Thorngren is a 
typical representative of the successful young American business man and has 
attained to prosperity because of his far-sightedness, his determination, his 
industry, his honesty and his close application. He has made use of opportun- 
ities as they presented themselves and it may be even said of him that he created 
opportunities where there were none before. While building his own fortune he 
has been an important factor in the growth and development of his section of 
the state, to the advancement of which he has made valuable contributions. 




E. S. THOKNGKEN 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 397 

On June lO, 1904, Mr. Thorngren married Miss Lillian Carlson, a daughter 
of J. P. and Jennie (Loving) Carlson, natives of Sweden, who settled in Boone 
county in 1883. The father turned his attention to farming in Pilot Mound 
township and there he is still operating a farm. Mr. and Mrs. Thorngren were 
the parents of three children: Francis M., aged eight; J. Loran, who is six 
years of age ; and Ruth C, who died April 20, 1914, at the age of three and one- 
half years. 

Mr Thorngren has always taken a deep interest in the welfare of the com- 
munity, warmly championing the cause of education. He is president of the 
Boxholm school board and in that connection has been instrumental in greatly 
improving the educational system prevailing in his city. He also serves as 
president of the Commercial Association of Boxholm, allying himself with those 
men who are ever willing to make sacrifices in order to promote industrial and 
commercial growth. He is secretary of the Grant Township Mutual Telephone 
Company and has been for some time the republican committeeman for Grant 
township and a member of the town council. In 1912 Mr. Thorngren was the 
republican nominee for representative from the nfty-third district but was de- 
feated by J. B. McHose, of Boone, by less than one hundred votes. He has 
always been loyal to the republican party, upholding its principles and candi- 
dates. His religious faith is that of the IMethodist church, and he gives material 
and moral support to its growth. Mr. Thorngren is a public-spirited citizen, a 
successful business man and a leader in all movements for moral and intellectual 
advancement. He reflects honor and credit upon the community and stands high 
in the estimation of all who know him. 



FREDERICK GEORGE WESTRIP. 

Frederick George Westrip is the oldest yardmaster in years of continuous 
service in connection with the Northwestern Railway system. He has for thir- 
teen years occupied his present position and has been connected with various 
departments of the company's service for forty years. He acted as yardmaster 
at Council Bluffs for twehe years and investigation into his history shows him 
to be one of the most faithful and reliable men in the company's employ. He 
enjoys to the fullest extent the confidence of those under whom he serves 
and his record might well serve as an example to others. He was born November 
24, 1858, in the pineries about one hundred and fifty miles north of Detroit, 
Michigan, a son of George Frederick and Hannah (Cook) Westrip, both of 
whom were natives of England, born near London. The mother was a daughter 
of Henry Cook and for many years was a resident of Iowa, where she ultimately 
passed away. The marriage of the parents was celebrated in England, and one 
child was born to them ere they crossed the -Atlantic to the new world and 
settled in Michigan, where the father followed farming, having eighty acres of 
land. Following the outbreak of the Civil war he enlisted for service in a 
Michigan regiment and lost his life in the blowing up of a transport on the 
Mississippi river. His widow afterward became the wife of John Baker. By 



398 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

her first marriage she had three children: John, of Council Bluffs; Frederick 
George, of this review ; and William, also of Council Bluffs. 

Following the removal of the family to this state Frederick George Westrip 
became a student in the schools of Council Bluffs, but was entirely thrown upon 
his own resources and since his youthful days has depended altogether upon his 
labors for his success and his opportunities. He could only attend school at 
intervals and his educational advantages were therefore limited. He went to 
live with an uncle, Henry Cook, with whom he remained for three years and 
then started out in life on his own account. No matter what success he has 
achieved, it is attributable entirely to his own efforts, and his example shows 
what may be accomplished when determination and energy point out the way. 

On the i6th of April, 1878, Mr. Westrip was united in marriage to Miss 
Mary E. Kalert, who was born in Burlington, Iowa, and attended the public 
schools. She is a daughter of Andrew and Selina ( Pattison ) Kalert and a 
granddaughter of Robert Pattison, who named the city of Burlington. 

Mr. Westrip's railroad career began when he was fourteen years of age. 
He acted as a brakeman and switchman in Council Bluffs and at Dunlap, Iowa, 
and afterward became connected with yard work at Council Bluffs. He rose 
to the position of conductor on a freight train running between Council Bluffs 
and Dunlap and subsequently was promoted to the position of locomotive fire- 
man. A year later he was made yardmaster and has since continued to act 
in that capacity, spending twelve years as yardmaster at Council Bluffs and then 
coming to Boone in the same capacity for the Northwestern Railroad Company. 
He has here remained for thirteen years, and his work has given the utmost 
satisfaction to those interested. He is the oldest yardmaster on the Northwestern 
system, is most faithful and reliable and thoroughly understands every feature 
of the work intrusted to him. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Westrip were born six children: Gertrude, who died in 
infancy; George, who has also passed away; Mabel, a trained nurse making her 
home with her parents ; William, of Chicago ; Gladys and Frederick, both at 
home. Mr. Westrip holds membership with the .\ncient Order of United 
Workmen and with the Maccabees and his political allegiance is given to the 
republican party, but the honors and emoluments of office have had no attraction 
for him, as he has always preferred to concentrate his energies upon the duties 
which have devolved upon him in business. His record is indeed commendable, 
and all who know aught of his service speak of him in terms of high regard. 



WALTER JAMES OLIVER. 

Walter James Oliver owns and occupies an attractive home at No. 307 West 
Fourth street, where he has resided for the past seven years. He is now living 
retired, enjoying a well earned rest, the fruits of his former toil supplying him 
with all of the comforts and some of the luxuries of life. He first came to Iowa 
in 1876 and has since lived in this state, save for a period of five years. 

Mr. Oliver was born in Sussex, England, in 1851 and in 1854 was brought 
to America by his grandparents, having been left an orphan in his infancy by 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 399 

the death of his parents, Thomas and Rachel (Butcher) Oliver. His grandfather, 
Joel Oliver, was a brick maker in England and after coming to the new world 
followed the same pursuit in Griggsville, Pike county, Illinois, where he was 
closely identified with industrial activity for many years. He died there at the 
very advanced age of ninety-six years, and his wife survived to the age of ninety- 
eight. It will thus be seen that Walter James Oliver comes from a family noted 
for longevity. He is an only child and was reared by his grandparents. Passing 
through consecutive grades in the public schools, he eventually reached the high, 
school and afterward attended the Gem City Business College at Quincy, Illinois. 
From early youth he was more or less familiar with the trade of brick making,, 
in which his grandfather engaged, and eventually he became foreman in a brick- 
making plant, continuing in that line of business until he came to Iowa in 1876. 
In that year he settled upon a farm in Taylor county, where he carried on gen- 
eral agricultural pursuits for twenty-two years. In 1898, however, he removed 
to Nodaway county, Missouri, where he purchased land and followed farming 
and stock-breeding near Guilford for five years. On the expiration of that 
period he came to Boone, where he has now lived for the past decade. Here 
he is engaged in the raising of fancy chickens and rabbits and thus his time is 
occupied, for indolence and idleness are utterly foreign to his nature and he 
could not content himself without some interests and activities. He also gives 
supervision to three farms in Dodge township, Boone county, and also to a farm 
property in Greene county. 

Mr. Oliver was married in Pana, Christan county, Illinois, to Miss Mary A. 
Powell, a native of Sussex, England, who died in Iowa in 1893, leaving three 
sons and two daughters, all of whom are yet living, are married and are connected 
with agricultural interests. One daughter is now in Taylor county, near Len- 
nox and the three sons are in Nodaway county, Missouri. For his second wife 
Mr. Oliver chose Mrs. Charlotte Swigert, nee Bibler, and their marriage was 
celebrated in Boone. Mrs. Oliver was born in Crawford county, Ohio, in Octo- 
ber, 1852. and was one of a family of nine children. Two of her brothers are 
now residents of Hamilton county, Iowa. Her parents, David and Rachel (Eich- 
elberger) Bibler. were natives of Ohio and spent four years in Illinois, near 
Peoria. Tiiey afterward went to Hamilton county. Iowa, in 1858, settling near 
Webster City, where they made their home until late in life. The father always 
followed farming and was quite successful, capably managing his business affairs 
so that substantial results were achieved. He died in Don Palos, California, at 
the age of seventy-nine years, his birth having occurred in 1818, and his wife, 
afterward returning to Ohio, passed away in that state in 1900, also at the age 
of seventy-nine. They were Methodists in religious faith and were earnest Chris- 
tian people. 

Their daughter Charlotte was married in 1880 to Anderson Swigert, who was 
horn in Ohio and came to Boone county in 1858. He resided in Dodge township, 
where he engaged in blacksmithing. and he also was a cattle buyer at Ridgeport. 
He first married Miss Mary Magdalene Winklepleck, also of Ohio, in which 
state the wedding was celebrated, and she passed away in Ridgeport, leaving five 
children, of whom four are yet living. The death of Anderson Swigert occurred 
in 1896 when he had reached the age of seventy-three years. By his marriage to- 
Charlotte Bibler there were born five children, of whom four yet survive, the 



400 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

eldest daughter being now a resident of Kenosha, Wisconsin, while three of the 
family are in Boone county. Mrs. Oliver gave to each of her children a farm, 
and all are now successful. Mrs. Oliver has eight grandchildren, while Mr. Oliver 
has twelve grandchildren. 

In his political views Mr. Oliver is a stalwart republican and regards it the 
duty, as well as the privilege, of every true American citizen to support his views 
upon public questions in the exercise of his right of franchise. Both he and his 
wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. In 1906 he erected an 
attractive residence at No. 307 West Fourth street, where they are now most 
pleasantly located. They have many friends in this county and sterling traits of 
character have gained them warm regard among all with whom they have been 
brought in contact. 



ANDERSON SWIGERT. 

Long residence in Boone county makes it imperative that the life record of 
Anderson Swigert find a place upon the pages of the county's history, for he was 
closely associated with business activity and with the upbuilding of this section 
for many years, coming here in pioneer times. He was born in Tuscarawas 
county, Ohio, September 22, 1823, a son of Elisha Swigert, who was a cattle 
drover. The four sons and two daughters of the family were left orphans when 
Anderson Swigert was but nine years of age, and he was thus forced to start 
out in life on his own account. His educational privileges were indeed meager, 
and save for a few months spent in a private school as a child he had no educa- 
tional training save that which was self-acquired in the school of experience. 
He mastered the rudimentary branches of learning and as the years went on 
added to his knowledge through life's lessons. He served seven years as an 
apprentice to a blacksmith and in 1848 started in business on his own account 
in the town of Chili, Ohio, where he won a fair measure of success. He added 
to his blacksmithing a foundry business and also conducted a hotel until 1856. 

He then brought his family to Iowa, settling at Ridgeport, Boone county, where 
he continued in the business of blacksmithing and hotel keeping. He likewise 
invested in farm property and gave personal supervision to the operation of his 
farm and to his stock-raising and feeding interests. His time was devoted to 
these various lines until 1873, when he gave up other business and for a time 
devoted his undivided attention to his farm and live stock, continuing along that 
line until 18S3. when he retired. A substantial measure of success has rewarded 
his efforts. In all of his business career he displayed unfaltering energ>\ industry 
and determination and carried forward to successful completion whatever he 
undertook. In all of his dealings he was thoroughly reliable and won an unas- 
sailable reputation for his business integrity. 

On the 15th of November, 1848, .Mr. Swigert was united in marriage to Miss 
Magdalene Winklepleck, and they became the parents of eight children, of whom 
four are still living: Madill, a resident of Nebraska: George A., who makes his 
home in Kansas : Frank : and Mrs. Cordelia Sturtz, of Boone, Iowa. The wife 
and mother passed away in 1875 ''^"d on the 22d of May, 1880, Mr. Swigert was 



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HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 403 

again married, his second union being with Charlotte Bibler, of Hamilton county, 
Iowa. Unto this marriage were born five children, of whom Blacksen died at 
the age of fifteen years, the others being: Mrs. Effie A. Davis, of Kenosha, Wis- 
consin ; C. J., a resident of Boxholm, Iowa ; Mrs. Cassie A. Davis, living in 
Boone ; and Mrs. Belle L. Wells, whose home is near Paton, Iowa. 

In his political views Mr. Swigert was always an earnest republican from 
the organization of the party but never sought nor desired office of any kind, pre- 
ferring to concentrate his undivided attention and energy upon his business, which' 
he conducted so capably that substantial success resulted. He was one of the 
promoters and builders of Boone county, taking an active interest in many pro- 
jects for its upbuilding and development. Throughout the pioneer days he proved 
himself a friend of the early settlers and was ever ready to assist the poor and 
needy. He was widely known not only in Boone but throughout adjoining coun- 
ties and was highly respected by all. He passed away in 1896 and in his death 
the community lost one of its worthy and honored pioneers — a man whose life 
was not spectacular in the slightest degree and who did 'not seek to figure promi- 
nently in any public connection, but who through the sterling worth of his char- 
acter won and enjoyed the friendship and regard of those with whom he was 
brought in contact. 



FRANK A. SNYDER. 



Frank A. Snyder, a progressive and representative agriculturist of Boone 
county, residing on section 27, Grant township, is the owner of one hundred and 
twenty acres of rich and productive land. His birth occurred in Chicago, Illi- 
nois, on the 8th of September, 1857, his parents being Andrew and Magdelina 
(Hagge) Snyder, the former a native of France and the latter of Pennsylvania. 
Andrew Snyder was brought to the United States by his parents when but three 
years of age, the family home being established near Buffalo, New York, and 
subsequently near Chicago, Illinois. He learned the blacksmith's trade in the 
western metropolis and for a number of years was there engaged as a black- 
smith and expert horseshoer. Later he removed to North" Northfield, Illinois, 
and afterward took up his abode in Deerfield, that state. For a period of ten 
years he followed farming near Des Plaines, Illinois. His demise occurred in 
1909, but his widow still survives at the age of eighty years, making her home 
in Deerfield, Illinois. 

Frank A. Snyder was reared and educated in the state of his nativity and 
after putting aside his text-books worked as a farm hand in Illinois for some 
time. In the spring of 1890 he came to Boone county, Iowa, and began the 
cultivation of rented land. Two years later, however, he purchased one hundred 
and twenty acres on section 27, Grant township, and undertook the improvement 
of the property, which he has operated continuously and successfully to the present 
time. His wife raises, thoroughbred White Leghorn Rose Comb chickens and 
ships eggs to Minnesota, Dakota, Missouri, Nebraska, Iowa and Illinois. She 
also raises White Holland turkeys, Pekin ducks and Emden geese, and all of 



404 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

her poultry is white. Mr. Snyder, in connection with the cultivation of cereals, 
raises shorthorn cattle and Chester White hogs. He is a stockholder in the 
Fanners Elevator Company of Boxholm and the Mutual Telephone Company 
and has long enjoyed an enviable reputation as one of the enterprising and pro- 
gressive citizens of his community. 

On the 1 8th of December, 1889, Mr. Snyder was united in marriage to Miss 
Annie Bleimehl, a daughter of Peter and Maria Bleimehl, natives of Germany, 
who emigrated to the United States in the '40s and took up their abode in Chicago, 
Illinois. The father, who was a blacksmith by trade, later removed to Wheeling, 
Illinois, where he conducted a shop for six years and then went to Deerfield, that 
state, there spending the remainder of his life. He passed away in 1879, while 
his wife, surviving him for three decades, was called to her final rest in 1909. 
Unto Mr. and Mrs. Snyder have been born eight children, namely: Raymond; 
Laura; Harvey; Alda ; Alvin ; Elmer; Irving, who died in 1895; and Lucille, 
whose demise occurred in 191 2. 

Mr. Snyder gives his political allegiance to the republican party and serves 
as justice of Grant township, having discharged the duties of that office in a 
highly satisfactory and commendable manner for a period of ten years. He has 
likewise acted as secretary of the school board for a number of years, and the 
cause of education has ever found in him a stalwart champion. His religious 
faith is that of the Evangelical Association, in the work of which he takes an 
active and helpful interest. Both Mr. and Mrs. Snyder are well and favorably 
known in Boone county and have a circle of friends which is almost coextensive 
with the circle of their acquaintances. 



ISAAC D. MUENCH. 



Isaac D. Muench, who now lives retired in Pilot Mound, Iowa, has not only 
been a factor in the agricultural development of his state, but has to his credit 
a war record of which he well may be proud. He was born in Dauphin county, 
Pennsylvania, May 28, 1846, and is a son of Jacob D. and Solma (Myers) 
Muench, both natives of that county. The father was a shoemaker by trade, but 
throughout the greater part of his life followed farming. He died in Pennsyl- 
vania in 1845. His wife survived him until 1884. 

Isaac D. Muench was reared and educated in Dauphin and Snyder counties, 
Pennsylvania, attending the academy in the latter county. He then completed 
a business college course at Harrisburg. At the early age of eighteen years he 
enlisted in Company A. Two Hundred and Eighth Pennsylvania Volunteer In- 
fantry and served for ten months, or until the close of the war. He subsequently 
taught school in Pennsylvania for several terms and also clerked in various 
stores and mercantile concerns. The next six years and eight months were spent 
in railroad service. In 1880 Mr. Muench came to Boone county, and here he 
bought land in Pilot Mound township. He gave his undivided attention to the 
cultivation of the same, and his became one of the most profitable farms of the 
neighborhood. He continued its operation until 1901, when he removed to Pilot 
Mound, where he now lives. 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 405 

In 1877 Mr. Muench married Kate Martin, a daughter of Edward and Bar- 
bara (Remery) Martin, natives of Maryland. Mr. and Mrs. Muench became 
parents of seven children : Daniel, who died in 1895 ; George C, who is in the 
United States mail service in Los Angeles ; Virgil O., a physician who practices 
in Nichols, Iowa ; Sallie, who died in infancy ; Robert S., a traveling salesman of 
Cedar Rapids; Grace, who died in infancy; and Harvey, a farmer of Boone 
county. Mr. Muench has always interested himself in public questions and has 
helpfully cooperated in promoting the growth and development of his district. 
He is now assessor of Pilot Mound and has also been secretary of the school 
board for ten years. 

He is a member of the Evangelical church and thoroughly devoted to its work. 
Politically he is a stanch advocate of the prohibition party. He takes deep inter- 
est in the moral and intellectual upbuilding of humanity and is ever ready to 
support movements which will make for better manhood and sweeter woman- 
hood. ' 



FREDERICK E. WELSH, M. D. 

A well known and prominent representative of the medical profession in 
Boone is Dr. Frederick E. Welsh, and his life stands in contradistinction to the 
old adage that a prophet is never without honor save in his own country, for he 
is a native son of Boone and in the city where the greater part of his life has 
been passed he is accorded a liberal practice, and by the consensus of public 
opinion is named as one of the leading physicians of his part of the state. His 
natal day was December 11, 1874. 

His father, George H. Welsh, was one of the pioneer settlers of this county 
and established one of the early drug stores of Boone. He was born in Norfolk 
county, Canada West, in 1842, and in 1851, when a lad of about nine years, ac- 
companied his parents on their removal across the border and into Ogle county, 
Illinois. After some time he became a resident of Hamilton county, Iowa. In 
his youth he learned the printer's trade, which he followed for a number of years, 
hut when the differences between the north and the south involved the country 
in civil war, he put aside all business and personal considerations and offered his 
aid to the government, enlisting in the Thirty-second Iowa Infantry, with which 
he served for three years. Following his return home he again resumed active 
connection with the printing business and for some time was one of the proprie- 
tors of the Marshall County Times. He applied himself so closely and arduously 
to the management of his business that his health became impaired, necessitating 
a change of occupation, and in 1867 he removed to Boone, where he established 
a drug store, of which he was proprietor throughout his remaining days. On 
the 7th of October, i86g, he wedded Miss Helen Francis Hartwell, a native of 
Rockford, Illinois. His death occurred on the nth of September, 191 1, and his 
widow, still surviving, now makes her home in Boone. In their family were five 
children, George H., who was born November 27, 1872, and was American agent 
for the Singer Sewing Machine Company in the City of Mexico, obtained a con- 
cession permitting the building of a railroad, which he and his partner built to 



406 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY' 

a distance of one hundred and eighty miles. His death occurred in the City of 
-Mexico July 15, 1909. Frederick E. is the next of the family. Charles Aldrich, 
born February 25, 1881, was a graduate engineer of the Iowa State College and 
became a prominent building and contracting engineer. He was identified with the 
Louisiana Purchase Exposition at St. Louis, having taken a contract in connection 
with the building of the Cascades and other important structures on the exposition 
grounds. He was also identified with the extension of the Northwestern Elevated 
Railroad in Chicago through the north shore suburbs. He died March 14, 1907. 
Marguerite, the next of the family, is at home. Helen is the wife of Albert 
Wieland, manager of the Bettendorf Car & Axle Company, of Davenport. 

Reared in his native city, Dr. Welsh passed through consecutive grades in 
the public schools until graduated from the Boone high school with the class of 
1892. He afterward entered Drake University at Des Moines, there spending a 
year, and subsequently became a student in the Northwestern University at Evan- 
ston, which he attended for four years and was then graduated. He next en- 
tered the State University at Iowa City, in which he pursued the medical course, 
and later he entered the medical department of the Northwestern University in 
Chicago, from which he was graduated with the class of 1903. In the meantime 
he had had some practical experience in medical and surgical work. On the 26th 
of April, 1898, Dr. Welsh enlisted as a private in Company I, Fifty-second Iowa 
Infantry at Boone and spent one month in Des Moines. The regiment immediately 
entered the United States service and Dr. Welsh was made a corporal. He was 
then transferred to the hospital staff as hospital private and later was advanced 
through the successive grades to lance acting hospital steward, lance hospital stew- 
ard, acting hospital steward and finally became hospital steward, in charge of the 
Second Division. Third Corps and the Ambulance Division, which made him an 
ofticer on the colonel's staff. As he had not then graduated in medicine, he could 
not be advanced farther. Owing to illness, he was the last man of his regiment 
to be mustered out, leaving the army thirty days after the other members of the 
regiment. 

Following his graduation from the Northwestern University Medical School, 
where he had completed his preparation for medical practice, Dr. Welsh went to 
Rutland, where he practiced for eight years, and in 191 1 he returned to Boone, 
where he opened an office and has since engaged in practice. He is well versed 
not only in the major, but also in the minor points of his profession. He makes 
a specialty of children's diseases and has become recognized as an authority on 
the same. He is a coming leader among the physicians of this section of the state 
because of the thorough study which he gives each individual case. His diagnosis 
is most careful, and he is seldom if ever at fault in anticipating the outcome of 
disease. He employs the most modern methods in his practice and at all times 
keeps in touch with the advanced thought and progress of the profession. His 
practice is large and gratifying and in addition, he has various other busmess 
interests. He is now proprietor of the Welsh drug store, the pioneer establish- 
ment of the kind in Boone, has been a director of the Rutland State Savings Bank 
for the la.st nine years, is ex-president of the Rutland Rolling Mills Corporation, 
resigning when he removed to Boone, and is a director of the Rutland Cooperative 
Creamery Association. He manifests keen sagacity and enterprise in relation 
to business affairs as well as professional interests, and because of the extent 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 407 

and importance of his activities has come to be recognized as one of the leading 
citizens of this section of the state. 

On the 22d of December, igo2. Dr. Welsh was united in marriage to Miss 
Cleve Edna Squires, a native of Marshalltown, Iowa, and a daughter of Henry 
W. and Emma (Andrews) Squires. Her father, who is now living retired in 
Ames, Iowa, was formerly a contractor and builder and erected some of the 
largest churches, business houses and private residences of his day throughout 
central Iowa. Unto Dr. and Mrs. Welsh have been born a daughter, Cleve 
Squires, born June 6, 1904, and a son, Frederick Edwin, Jr., born on the 14th 
of October, 1910. 

Dr. Welsh gives his political indorsement to the republican party by his sup- 
port at the polls of all of its candidates and its measures, but he does not desire 
public ofifice for himself. He is a Master Mason, and also belongs to the Eastern 
Star chapter. He also belongs to the Woodmen of the World and the Wood- 
man Circle, while since his college days he has been a member of the Delta Tau 
Delta fraternity, having joined the chapter at Northwestern University. His 
religious belief is that of the Episcopalian church and to its teachings he is faith- 
ful. In all the relations of life Dr. Welsh has been found progressive and loyal. 
He stands for all that is best in community affairs and in the national life as well, 
and can justly be termed a typical American citizen, alert and enterprising, ready 
to meet any emergency of life with the confidence and courage that come from 
a right conception of things and an habitual regard for what is best in the exer- 
cise of human activities. 



THOMAS PAGE. 



Since the fall of 1910 Thomas Page has made his home in Luther, where he 
is now living retired. ha\ing, previous to this time, devoted his attention largely 
to agricultural pursuits. His early home was in Ohio, for he was born in Clin- 
ton county, that state, June 30, 1837, his parents being Wesley and Matilda (Cris- 
pen) Page. His father, who was also a farmer by occupation, died when a young 
man and was long survived by his widow, who was about seventy years old at 
the time of her death, which occurred in Clinton county, Ohio. They were mar- 
ried in that state, though he was a native of \'irginia and she of Pennsylvania. 
After her husband's death she spent some two or three years in Illinois, but 
finally returned to Ohio. In their family were six children, five sons and one 
daughter, our subject being the next to the oldest. The others were: Mason, 
who is still a resident of Ohio; Silas, twin of Thomas, the former now deceased; 
William and Lucinda, also twins, both of whom are deceased; and Wesley, a 
retired farmer living in Luther, Iowa. 

Thomas Page spent his early life in Ohio and received a good practical educa- 
tion in the common schools of that state. At an early age, however, he began 
earning his own livelihood and started out in life for himself empty handed. In 
the fall of 1861 he left his native state and removed to Sangamon county, Illi- 
nois, where he had a brother and sister residing, but on the ist of March, 1864, 
he became a resident of Boone county, Iowa. At that time the city of Boone 



408 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

was the terminus of the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad. His brother Wesley 
had located here the year previous. Thomas Page located on the Peterson place 
in Worth township, being then in the employ of J. H. Norton for about one 
year. The following two years he worked for John Jennings, at the end of which 
time he was married and rented a farm, which he operated for the same length 
of time. He then purchased forty acres of land one mile north of the present 
site of Luther from L. and H. Goeppinger. There was a house standing upon 
the land, iiut otherwise it was unimproved, and to its cultivation and develop- 
ment he at once turned his attention. Subsequently he traded that property to 
Philip Hull for one hundred and twenty acres three miles east of Worth, in what 
is now Colfax township. He also improved that farm, which he finally traded 
for a place of one hundred and eleven acres in Des Moines township. It is 
today one of the best improved and most productive tracts in the locality and to 
its cultivation Mr. Page devoted his attention until 1910, when he retired from 
active labor and removed to Luther. Here he has built a good comfortable resi- 
dence and also has twenty acres of land which he rents. At one time he owned 
considerable property, but has disposed of much of this, feeling that he is entitled 
to a well earned rest. He followed general farming, and the success which at- 
tended his efforts was due entirely to his own careful management and industrious 
habits. 

In the fall of 1866 Mr. Page was married in this county to Miss Alice Boone, 
a daughter of William Myrtle Boone, a prominent pioneer of this county whose 
sketch appears elsewhere in this work. Both Mr. and Mrs. Page are now well 
advanced in life, she having reached the age of seventy-two years, while he is 
seventy-seven. Of their three children, William, who is a farmer by occupation, 
resides near the Des Moines river in Worth township. He married Miss May 
Thompson and has a large family, including two daughters who are married 
and three sons and two daughters who are single. Bertha, the second child of our 
subject, is at home. V. A. is a farmer by occupation. 

In early life Mr. Page was a member of the Home Guards in Ohio and since 
attaining his majority has always affiliated with the republican party, but has 
never accepted office. At one time he was a member of the New Light or Chris- 
tian church and still favors that denomination. He is a man of upright char- 
acter, whose life has been such as to gain him the confidence and high regard of 
those with whom he has been brought in contact. 



CORYDON L. LUCAS. 



Corydon L. Lucas, of Madrid, Iowa, is very successfully engaged in the 
real-estate and insurance business ; but he is of greater importance to his com- 
munity than a merely well-to-do man, for he has been connected with many 
public-spirited enterprises. He was instrumental in organizing the Madrid His- 
torical Society and has always taken the deepest and most helpful interest in pre- 
serving valuable records to posterity. Mr. Lucas moreover served as the first 
mayor of Madrid, was the postmaster of the community under Cleveland and 
has now been for twelve years a justice of the peace. He also acts as notary. 



•^. 



/^ 




fORYDOX L. LUCAS 




MKS. COKYDOX L. LUCAS 



THE NEW 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 413 

Corydon L. Lucas was born in Putnam county, Indiana, November 19, 1838, 
a son of Hiram and Susan ( Payne) Lucas. The father was born in Estill county, 
Kentucky, April 9, 1815, and in 1834 made his way over land to Indiana, whence 
he came with the family to Boone county, arriving here October 8, 1853, where 
the town of Madrid now stands. At this early period there were but two houses 
in Madrid, surrounded by unbroken prairie, and but one set of farm buildings 
could be found between Madrid and Belle Point. This farm was located along 
the Des Moines road. The town of Boonesboro had been laid out but two years 
previously and settlements were sparse and far between. The father won an 
honorable place in his community and acquired a competence. He died at 
Grayson Station, October 4, 1906. His wife, Susan (Payne) Lucas, was born 
in Spencer county, Kentucky, February 6, 1819. Her parents made their way to 
Indiana in 1834, and in that state Hiram Lucas and Susan Payne were married 
in 1835. She came with her husband to Boone county in 1853. The Payne 
family were originally Virginians and were among the pioneer settlers of Ken- 
tucky. Mr. and Mrs. Lucas were the parents of eleven children: William H., 
who died in North Dakota ; Corydon L., of this review ; H. M., residing at Woon- 
socket. South Dakota ; Mrs. Nancy Mace, of Oklahoma City ; P. J., of Boone 
county, Iowa; Mary A., of Ames, Iowa; Mrs. Ellen Zenor, who died in 191 1 ; 
Anna, deceased ; Mrs. Matilda Williams, of Worth township ; Zylpha J., resid- 
ing at Ames; and Florence, who died in December, 1913. The seven older chil- 
dren were born in Putnam county, Indiana, and the younger ones in Boone 
county. 

Corydon L. Lucas remained in Indiana until 1853, coming with the family to 
Boone county and arriving on the site of Madrid in October of that year. There 
they remained over night, continuing the next day northward and locating where 
Grayson now stands. The township is now called W^orth. The Lucas family 
were among the pioneers of Boone county and experienced all the hardships of 
primitive frontier life. Mr. Lucas attended the early common schools and sub- 
sequently taught for some time in the county. He always has taken a deep interest 
in historical records of his community, which he has carefully preserved, and his 
collections and the deductions made therefrom are so important that the publishers 
of this work have intrusted him with the compilation of two important chapters. 
His wide acquaintance and extensive reading well qualify him for this under- 
taking. 

In 1862 Mr. Lucas moved from Grayson to Belle Point, where he located on 
a farm which he improved and developed until he retired from agricultural labors 
in 1883 and took up his abode in Madrid. He embarked in the real-estate business 
and has since given his attention to this line of work, also acting as notary and 
doing a considerable business in insurance and collections. He is considered one 
of the best judges as regards local realty and his straightforward, honest methods 
have won him a large clientele. Mr. Lucas purchased the Anderson Addition to 
Madrid, consisting of thirty-five lots, all of which he has sold but one lot. He 
was the prime mover in organizing the Madrid Historical Society, which has the 
honor of being the pioneer society of its kind in this part of the state. Mr. Lucas 
has one of the finest and largest collections of relics, documents, mound curios, 
elk horns and other interesting objects that are to be found in any county. It con- 
tains the first land deed in Boone county. There are also stone hatchets, peace 
Vol. n— I'j 



414 HISTORY OF DOONE COUNTY 

pipes, early firearms and swords, and he preserves a broad-hatchet which blazed 
the first road into Boone county. He also preserves an inscribed tablet referring 
to Lieutenant R. S. Granger and bearing the date of December lo, 1845. 

On February 9. 1862, Mr. Lucas married in Douglas township, Boone county, 
Iowa, Aliss Nancy Sturdivant, who was born in Clay county, Indiana, March 17, 
1839. She came by the overland route to Boone county in 185 1, the family settling 
on a farm in what is now Douglas township. Her father, John Sturdivant, was 
born in North Carolina in 1790 and died in Douglas township, Boone county, Iowa, 
July 6, 1866. He was among Boone county's pioneers. Her mother, Mary 
(Green) Sturdivant, born in North Carolina, died in Douglas township in 1889, 
aged ninety-four years. The parents were married in their native state and in 
1830 made removal to Indiana. In their family were eight children : Rainey, 
deceased ; Mrs. Dora Cagle, deceased ; Mrs. Elizabeth Jenkins, deceased ; Mrs. 
Melinda Payne, deceased; Mrs. Diana Cunningham, who died in Worth township; 
H. C. who passed away in Boone county; John, who died in Madrid; and Mrs. 
Nancy Lucas, who is the only member of the family to survive. The three eldest 
in this family were born in North Carolina and the younger members in Clay 
county, Indiana. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lucas have had four children: Pandora, who was born Novem- 
ber 12, 1862, and died January 29, 1869; John, who was born September 2, 1869, 
a successful real-estate dealer, rice farmer and lumberman of Arkansas county, 
Arkansas; H. D., born October 15, 1872; and J. G., born January 8, 1879, of 
whom further mention is made in another part of this work. These children 
were born, reared and educated in Douglas township, Boone county. John Lucas 
was for three years editor of the Madrid Register and then spent a year with the 
Platte County Argus of Missouri. Returning to Iowa, he remained in this state 
until March 17, 1903, and then removed to Arkansas county, Arkansas, where 
he is at present successfully engaged as realty dealer and also follows rice farm- 
ing and is engaged in the lumber business. H. D. Lucas attended the common 
and public schools of Madrid and is engaged in the hardware business here. J. G., 
who is further mentioned elsewhere, is the editor of the Register-News of Madrid. 

Corydon L. Lucas gives his allegiance to the democratic party and has always 
supported this organization and taken a deep interest in its progress. His counsel 
in local afifairs is highly valued, and he has been an influential leader in many 
movements that have proven of value to his community. He was the first mayor 
of Madrid and during his administration laid the plans for the continued 
prosperitv that has prevailed in his community. Under the second Cleveland 
administration he was postmaster of his city and earned during that time the high 
encomiums of all who had to transact business with the postoffice. For twelve 
years he has served as justice of the peace and his fairness and impartiality is 
readily recognized. Mr. Lucas is a man of high ideals, always actively interested 
in all things that affect the material, intellectual, moral and religious improvement 
of Madrid and Boone county. He is a member of the Christian church and de- 
voted to its work. His handsomely furnished home in Madrid is a hospitable 
meeting place for his many friends. Besides his many other interests he owns 
two citv lots and also holds title to three hundred acres of land in Missouri. H'e 
has secured a place of trust among his fellows on account of his faithfulness to 
all tasks imposed upon him, and he is beloved by all because of his genial and 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 415 

pleasant disposition, which expresses itself in the helpfulness which he is ever 
ready to extend to all those who find themselves in situations where a lifting hand 
is welcome or needed. 



GEORGE H. ZIMBELMAN. 

Among those who have been active in promoting the business development 
and material upbuilding of Boone is numbered George H. Zimbelman, whose 
efforts have largely been of a character that has contributed to public prosperity 
as well as to individual success. What he has undertaken he has carried forward 
to completion, and as the years have gone on he has demonstrated his ability to 
cope with perplexing business problems and legitimately turn them to his own 
advantage. 

Mr. Zimbelman is numbered among the pioneer residents of Boone, the family 
home being established here in 1856. He was then a little child of scarcely three 
years, his birth having occurred in Zanesville, Ohio, August 8, 1853. He is a 
son of John and Magdalene (Stanger) Zimbelman, both of whom were born in 
the year 1817, the former in Switzerland and the latter in Alsace. John Zimbel- 
man crossed the broad Atlantic to the new world in 1832 and five years later was 
married in Ohio. He first visited Iowa in 1855, entering a tract of government 
land in Fort Dodge, and in the spring of 1856 brought his family to this state. 
They journeyed by boat to Keokuk and thence by teams (their own veliicles 
which they had brought with them on the boat) to Boonesboro, then a village of 
two hundred and fifty inhabitants. The date of their arrival was April 24, 1856. 
Subsequently Mr. Zimbelman erected a house on the present site of the Gospel 
Tabernacle, being obliged to haul the lime from Webster City, Iowa, by wagon. 
He eventually acquired two hundred and nine acres of land just west of Boone. 
He was a shoemaker by trade but after coming to this state took possession of a 
brewery in Boonesboro, which he conducted for some time. In 1878 two of his 
sons, Lafe and Alfred, took over the brewing business and the father then re- 
tired, spending his remaining days in the enjoyment of rest from further labor. 
He, passed away December 16, 1890, and for fifteen years was survived by his 
wife, who died on the 3d of January, igo6. In their family were ten children : 
Catherine, who died in infancy; Jacob L., deceased; Lafayette, long a prominent 
lumber dealer of Boone, but now of Los Angeles; William, deceased; Louise, of 
Boone; Albert, deceased; Rovena, the wife of John R. Patterson of Boone; 
George H.; Charles, deceased; and Alfred, living in Los Angeles, California. 

George H. Zimbelman spent his youthful days in Boone and attended the 
public schools until he entered upon business activity. For two years he was 
associated with his father, but in 1875, when twenty-two years of age, went to 
Ogden, Iowa, where for two years he was engaged in the grocery business with 
O. J. Halliday. He then sold out to his partner and embarked in the grocery 
business in connection with his brother-in-law, Mr. Patterson. They conducted 
their store for about two years, and in 1880 Mr. Zimbelman started for Colorado, 
driving a mule team from Boone to Leadville. He then began freighting between 
Como and Leadville and in the fall of the same year drove the same team back 



416 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

to Boone. In the party with which he traveled were Samuel Johnson, now de- 
ceased, O. J. Halliday and James Paxton. Following his return Mr. Zimbelman 
again engaged in the grocery business as a member of the firm of Halliday, Ellis 
& Company and was thus connected until 1892, when he sold out. At that time, 
associated with others of the family, he began operating in the coal fields, sinking 
a shaft on his own property. For fifteen years he continued to engage in the 
mining of coal and then leased his land, so that he is now living retired. 

Mr. Zimbelman has always given his political support to the democratic party 
but does not seek nor desire office, having always preferred to give his undivided 
attention to his business affairs. He has a wide acquaintance in this county, 
where practically his entire life has been spent, and he has been an interested wit- 
ness of the changes which have occurred, bringing about its present condition of 
modern development and progress. 



JOHN B. STROUSE. 



John B. Strouse, who throughout life has always made the best use of his 
advantages and is now able to lay aside all business cares and live retired in 
Luther, was born in Terre Haute, Indiana, June 3, 1837. His father was John 
Strouse, who was born in Pennsylvania of German parentage and was left an 
orphan at an early age. When young he removed to Ohio and was there mar- 
ried to Miss Mary Reed, by whom he had six children, but four of these died in 
early life. The others are: Alpheus. who is living in Dakota; and John B., of 
this review. The mother was born and reared in Ohio. Soon after their mar- 
riage the parents removed to Terre Haute, Indiana, and subsequently made their 
home at another place in that state. Later they became residents of Milford, Illi- 
nois, but spent their last days in Iowa, the father dying in Pocahontas county at 
the age of eighty-three years, and the mother passing away at the home of our 
subject at the age of eighty-six. 

John B. Strouse was five years old when the family left his native town, but 
they remained residents of Indiana until he was seven, at which time they re- 
moved to Milford, Illinois. There he pursued his studies in a schoolhouse built 
of hewed logs with slab seats for benches. His educational advantages were 
meager, owing to the pioneer conditions of the county at that time, but he pur- 
sued his studies until about twenty years of age and at the same time assisted in 
the work of the home farm. He then started out to make his own way in the 
world by working for neighboring farmers. He was married in Milford, Illinois, 
March i. 1863, to Miss Cynthia Jane Peed, of Salty Mound, Indiana, and they 
became parents of eight children. Lee, the eldest, has been twice married, his 
first wife being Annie Ramsay. He is a graduate of the Cincinnati Eclectic Medi- 
cal College and is now engaged in the practice of his chosen profession at Cov- 
ington, Kentucky. Mary is the wife of Benjamin Jennings of Gove, Kansas. John 
married Emma Likely and lives in Thornton. Iowa. .Montgomery is a resident 
of Los Angeles, California. Frank died in infancy. Noah married Emma Barker 
and lives in Boone county. Ann is a resident of Des Moines. Wilbur died in 
infancy. 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 417 

In 1865 Mr. Strouse came to Iowa and located on his father's farm near 
Drakeville in Davis county, where he spent a year and a half. He then removed 
to Macon county, Missouri, but after residing there for a short time returned to 
Drakeville and one year later became a resident of Warren county, Iowa, where 
the following year was passed. Eight years were then spent in Pocahontas 
county and in 1877 he became a resident of Boone county. In his farming opera- 
tions here he met with most excellent success and became the owner of a well 
improved place of three hundred and twenty acres in Garden township, which 
he sold four years ago. He continued to carry on farming until April, 1900, 
when he removed to Luther and has since lived retired. Here his wife died 
April, lyii, and was laid to rest in the Clarke cemetery. She was a devout 
Christian lady and was loved and revered by all who knew her. Mr. Strouse 
has ever been devoted to his family and has given his children an excellent start 
in life, not only dividing his farm of three hundred and twenty acres among 
them, but also giving them many thousands of dollars. On starting out in life 
for himself he was in limited circumstances, but he steadily worked his way up- 
ward and by industry, enterprise and good management became one of the pros- 
perous citizens of his community. 



FRANK PEPPER. 



Farming interests have claimed the attention of Frank Pepper since he started 
out in life for himself, and he today owns an excellent farm of three hundred and 
sixty acres on section 34, Harrison township, and also one hundred and seventy 
acres in Jackson township, all of which property he has acquired through his 
own unaided efforts. A native of Iowa, he was born in Marshall county, on the 
i6th of October, 1857, and is a son of S. M. and Mary ( Stalling) Pepper. His 
mother is now deceased, but his father is still living and resides on the old home- 
stead in Jackson township. He is a native of Connecticut, but was reared in 
Pennsylvania and from that state came to Iowa in 1852, settling in Marshall 
county. He removed, however, to Boone county when the railroad was first 
built in this locality, in 1865. Having learned the carpenter's trade, he followed 
that occupation here for five years, but, as times were hard and there was not 
much to do along that line, he turned his attention to farming in 1870 and is 
still engaged in the cultivation of land in Jackson township. In his family are 
four children, namely: Frank, of this review; William, who is engaged in farm- 
ing in Story county, Iowa ; Arlie, the wife of George Brooks, a farmer of Clay 
county ; and Edward, who makes his home in Des Moines. 

During his boyhood and youth Frank Pepper had the advantages of a com- 
mon-school education and under his father's direction gained his knowledge of 
farming. For six years after his marriage he operated rented land, but in 1892 
purchased one hundred and sixty acres on section 34, Harrison township, for 
twenty-six dollars per acre. He subsequently bought a forty acre tract at the 
same price and later added one hundred and sixty acres to his farm, paying for 
the last sixty-five dollars per acre. This is also in Harrison township, but at 



418 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

the present time he also owns one hundred and seventy acres in Jackson town- 
ship, for which he paid one hundred and fifty dollars per acre. 

On the 20th of January, 1885, Mr. Pepper was united in marriage to Miss 
Mary Diggins, a daughter of Patrick and Mary (Reagan) Diggins, who were 
farming people, living near Ontario, Story county, Iowa, but are both now de- 
ceased. In the Diggins family were the following children : William, who is still 
engaged in farming in Story county; Mary, the wife of our subject; Julia, the 
wife of Charles McKenna, a farmer of Jackson township, Boone county; James, 
a farmer of Harrison township; and Kate, the wife of William Keller, a farmer 
of Harrison township. Mr. and Mrs. Pepper have seven sons, as follows : Fred, 
who assists in the operation of his father's farm in Jackson township ; William 
and Raymond, both at home ; Frank, who married Hazel York and with his 
brother Fred operates the farm in Jackson township ; and James, Dewey and 
Edward, all at home. The mother and children attend the Catholic church, 
but Mr. Pepper is not identified with any religious organization. Although he 
was reared a democrat, he has affiliated with the republican party since the McKin- 
ley administration and has taken quite an active interest in public affairs. He 
served as school director for several terms and has always given his support 
to those enterprises which he deems calculated to promote the moral or material 
welfare of his community. In his farming operations he has met with most 
excellent success, and this has all been due to his enterprise, progressive methods 
and untiring industry. 



WALLACE G. LAIDLEY, M. D. 

Dr. Wallace G. Laidley has been a medical practitioner of Pilot Mound for 
the past eight years and enjoys a reputation as an able and successful repre- 
sentative of the profession in this county. His birth occurred in Kingston, 
Canada, on the 23d of January, 1876, his parents being William H. and Mary D. 
(Gilmour) I,aidley, who were likewise natives of that country. The father, 
who followed general agricultural pursuits in Canada throughout his active 
business career, passed away on the 9th of November, 1901. The mother sur- 
vives, however, and yet makes her home in Canada. Their children are seven 
in number, namely : Oswald, Maude, Florence, Addie, Wallace G.. Douglas and 
Kenneth. 

Wallace G. Laidley was reared to manhood in his native country and attended 
the public schools in the acquirement of an education. Desiring to prepare for 
a professional career, he entered the medical department of Queens University 
at Kingston, Canada, and was graduated from that institution with the class 
of April, 1906. He then came direct to Pilot Mound, Boone county, Iowa, and 
has here followed his profession continuously to the present time, being ac- 
corded an extensive and gratifying practice. He has demonstrated his skill and 
ability in the successful treatment of many difficult cases and ever keeps abreast 
with the most advanced methods of his profession through membership in the 
Boone County Medical Society, the Iowa State Medical Society and the Ameri- 
can Medical Association. 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 421 

On the 30th of June, 1909, Dr. Laidley was united in marriage to Miss Mae 
Mather, a daughter of Irving C. and Lillie (Caldwell) Mather, who were na- 
tives of Iowa and Indiana respectively. Irving C. Mather came to Boone county 
in an early day and embarked in the real-estate and insurance business, being 
successfully identified therewith until he passed away on the 20th of December, 
1900. To him and his wife, who survives and resides in Boone, were born two 
children : Mrs. Mae Laidley ; and Guy C, who is a resident of Sheldahl, Iowa. 
Dr. Laidley gives his political allegiance to the republican party and is a Metho- 
dist in religious faith. Fraternally he is identified with the Masons, the East- 
ern Star, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Modern Woodmen of 
America and the Royal Neighbors. He is most conscientious in the performance 
of his professional duties and in every relation of life is actuated by high and 
lionorable principles. 



WALTER H. CANIER. 



From early boyhood Walter H. Canier has been connected with the shoe 
trade, and since 1886 has conducted a store in Boone. His success in this con- 
nection is enviable and has come entirely through his persistency of purpose, his 
close application and his wide-awake, alert business methods. Iowa numbers him 
among her native sons, his birth having occurred in Washington county on the 
26th of April, 1863, his parents being David and Sarah E. (Clark) Canier, both 
of whom were natives of Ohio. In the early '50s they arrived in Iowa, becoming 
pioneer residents of this state. They settled on a farm in Washington county, 
comprising two hundred acres of wild and unimproved land. It had been taken 
up as a claim from the government by another and was purchased by David 
Canier, who inmiediately began its cultivation and improvement, converting it 
into a fine farm, which is still in possession of the family. He continued to 
reside upon that place until his death, and his wife also passed away there. They 
were the parents of a daughter and two sons: Eugenia M., the wife of Ezra H. 
Smith of Washington county ; Orlando S., who is living in Long Beach, Cali- 
fornia ; and Walter H. 

The last named, at the age of twelve years, left the farm as a result of an 
injury sustained in a cyclone, in which he was carried a quarter of a mile by the 
storm. This rendered him unqualified for the arduous work of the fields, and he 
sought employment in other directions. After five years spent in a shoe store 
at Washington, Iowa, he came to Boone and has been constantly in the shoe busi- 
ness from that time to the present. In 1886 he embarked in business on his own 
account and is now a partner in the firm of Canier Brothers & Herman, Mr. Her- 
man having been admitted to the firm in 1889. The business has been in con- 
tinuous existence for a quarter of a century and is today one of the old established 
houses of the city. They carry a large and well selected line of boots and 
shoes, both high grade and medium priced, and their stock is always adequate 
to the demands of the public, while their straightforward and honorable busi- 
ness policy commends them to the further support of old patrons and brings them 
manv new ones. 



422 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

On the 14th of August, 1892, Mr. Canier was united in marriage to Delia 
M. Broughton, a native of Indiana, who was reared, however, in Bremer 
county, Iowa. Mr. and Mrs. Canier have had no children of their own, but have 
reared seven children, of whom one, Ivadelle, the wife of Richard H. Sturges of 
Los Angeles, California, was born of Mrs. Canier"s first marriage, when she was 
Mrs. Rogers. 

When age conferred upon Mr. Canier the right of franchise he indorsed the 
principles of the republican party and has never seen reason to change his views. 
He always votes for its men and measures, for he belie\es that the party platform 
contains the best elements of good government, yet he never seeks office as a 
reward for party fealty. He is in hearty sympathy with the teachings and tenets 
of the Masonic lodge, to which he belongs, and his religious faith is that of the 
Presbyterian church. He stands stanchly in support of all that pertains to the 
social, moral and intellectual welfare of his community and is justly accoimted 
one of its most worthy citizens. 



GEORGE H. STANGER, M. D. 

Dr. George H. Stanger is a well known and successfid physician and surgeon 
of Boone, where he has practiced his profession continuously for the past twenty- 
two years. His birth occurred in Louisa county, Iowa, on the i8th of February, 
1866, his parents being George and Margaret ( Suitte) Stanger, the former a 
native of Germany and the latter of Cambridge, Ohio. The father, who in 
1856 took up his abode in Louisa county, Iowa, was engaged in the business of 
carpentering and contracting throughout his active career. He passed away in 
Valley, Nebraska, on the ist of January, 1913, while the demise of his wife 
there occurred on the 31st of December, 1912. L'nto them were born seven 
children, as follows: Sarah Belle, who was born on the sth of June, 1857. and 
died in 1902; Mary Virginia, who is the wife of C. V. Crooks, of Omaha, 
Nebraska: Carrie E., who gave her hand in marriage to J. W. Johnston, of 
Ayrshire, Iowa; Georgiana, deceased; George H., of this review: John S., an 
agriculturist residing in Webster City, Iowa ; Ima (irace, the wife of J. S. Ken- 
nedy, of Valley. Nebraska. 

George H. Stanger acquired his early education in the district schools at 
Boone and when twenty-three years of age entered the State University of Iowa 
at Iowa City. Having determined upon the practice of medicine as a life work, 
he took up the study of that profession in the College of Physicians and Surgeons 
at Chicago, which institution conferred upon him the degree of M. D. on the 
31st of March, 1892. He at once opened an office in Boone, Iowa, and that city 
has remained the scene of his professional labors throughout the intervening 
twenty-two years. An extensive and lucrative practice has been accorded him, 
and he has won a merited reputation as an able physician. 

On the 27th of June, 1900, Dr. Stanger was united in marriage to Miss 
Katharine Champlin, a daughter of Frank and Lavinia (York) Champlin, who 
took up their abode among the early settlers of Boone, this state. The Doctor 
gives his political allegiance to the democracy and is identified fraternally with 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 423 

the Masons, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Knights of Pythias. 
Both he and his wife are freely accorded the hospitality of many homes and their 
genuine personal worth has gained for them the warm and enduring regard and 
friendship of all. 



PAUL R. DYER. 



Paul R. Dyer, a farmer of Colfax township, was born January i8, 1882, 
on a farm in that township, now the property of J. J. McKone. He is a 
son of William R. Dyer, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this work. He 
received his education in the common schools, his first teacher being Miss Amelia 
Walker and his last John Menton. His schooling was completed at the age of 
eighteen years and he remained upon the home farm, assisting in its cultivation, 
until after his marriage, which occurred in lyoi. He then operated the home- 
stead, consisting of one hundred and sixty acres on section 9, Colfax township, 
until three years ago, when he Ijought his present property, a valuable eighty 
acre farm located on section 15, Colfax township. He has made many improve- 
ments upon the place since it came into his possession and his knowledge of 
soils and proper methods of carrying on the work of the farm enables him to 
raise abundant crops, which bring him gratifying financial returns. 

On the i6th of October, 1901, ]\Ir. Dyer was married to Miss Minnie J. 
Derks, a daughter of Peter Derks. To this union three children were born, 
two of whom died unnamed and Robert J. died in infancy. The parents are 
members of the Christian Alliance church of Boone and are actively interested 
in its work. Mr. Dyer gives his political allegiance to the republican party, 
feeling that he can thus best promote the interests of good government. He has 
served for three years as secretary of the local school board, doing all in his 
power to advance the welfare of the public schools. 



WILLIAM MYRTLE BOONE. 

William Myrtle Boone, deceased, was a representative of a very old and 
prominent family of this county. He was born in Kentucky and was a great- 
grandson of Squire Boone, a brother of the noted hunter, Daniel Boone, of 
Kentucky fame. During his boyhood William M. Boone accompanied his parents 
on their removal to Indiana, the family locating in Putnam county, but in May, 
1852, they came to Boone county, Iowa, where the father. Squire Boone, spent 
the remainder of his life in Worth township. He donated the land for the Squire 
Boone cemetery on section 14, that township, and took a very active and promi- 
nent part in public affairs. He was a stanch abolitionist and later never wavered 
in his support of the republican party. He died in 1878 at the ripe old age of 
eighty-five years, honored and respected by all who knew him. 

William M. Boone grew to inanhood in Indiana and there married, in 1841, 
Miss Nancy Parker, also a native of Kentucky, who had accompanied her father 



424 HISTORY OF ROONE COUNTY 

on his removal to Indiana during her girlhood. She died in Boone county, Iowa, 
January i, 1896, at the age of seventy-two years, ten months and sixteen days. 
At one time she was a member of the Christian church. To Mr. and Mrs. Boone 
were born nine children: Mrs. Alice Page, a resident of Luther, Iowa; Edward, 
deceased; Jesse P., of Luther; Squire, who died in infancy; Virgil, a farmer of 
Worth township; Mrs. Matilda Page, of Luther; Laura, deceased; Oliver Perry; 
and one who died in infancy. 

Throughout his active life Mr. Boone followed farming, and he became 
prominently identified with public affairs, serving in several local offices. His 
political support was given the republican party and in religious affairs he fav- 
ored the Universalist church. He died on the loth of July, 191 1, when over 
eighty-nine years of age. He was one of a large family of children, but only 
two are- now living, these being: Tyler Boone, who resides with his daughter, 
Mrs. Hull of Douglas township ; and Betty, a resident of Madrid, Iowa. 



PHILLIP GARTLAND. 

Phillip Gartland now lives retired at No. 728 Burton street, Boone, after a 
life of arduous labor, which brought him a competency. He was born in Ireland, 
in what is called the "Gap of the North," in the town of Carrickmacross, where 
the five counties of Louth, Meath, Cavan, Armagh and Monaghan meet. His 
date of birth was January 6, 1835, and his birthplace was just over the line in 
Monaghan county. He is a son of Peter and Ann (Corrigan) Gartland, natives 
of County Monaghan. and a grandson of Patrick Gartland, who was born and 
lived all his life in County Monaghan. Peter Gartland followed farming all 
his life. He removed from Monaghan to County Clare and died there about 1850 
at the age of sixty-seven years. His wife, Ann, was a daughter of John and 
Nancy (Murphy) Corrigan. farming people. Mr. and Mrs. Peter Gartland 
were the parents of the following children: John, who died in Ireland when 
young; Mary, who died in infancy; Phillip, of this review; Daniel, who emi- 
grated to America at the age of twenty ; and George and Peter, who died in 
infancy. 

Daniel Ciartland, the aforementioned, was joined in this country by his 
brother Phillip after the latter had reached American shores. Both went through 
the Irish famine in the years 1847 and 1848, when the United States sent the first 
ship of corn to the suffering Erin, and it is a curious incident that this ship while 
making for Ireland met two vessels going to Liverpool, which were loaded with 
the best the island could produce, the goods being consigned to the absent land- 
lords. On June i, 1861, Daniel Gartland enlisted in Jonesboro as a private in 
Company D, Third Vermont \'olunteer Infantry, and served until November 24, 
1862, when he was discharged on account of disability. He was captured in 
the seven days' battle of the Wilderness and was placed in the famous Ander- 
sonville ])rison. being paroled at the end of three months. He then went to 
Connecticut, where he worked in a hoe factory and later moved to Wilkesbarre, 
Pennsvlvania, where he again enlisted on August i, 1864, as a private in Com- 



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HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 427 

pany F, I-^ifth Pennsylvania Cavalry, and was killed October 7, 1864, in front 
of Petersburg. 

Phillip Gartland attended the schools of his native land until seventeen years 
of age, engaging at odd times in farm labor. In 1854, when nineteen years of 
age, he went to England, working in a blast furnace at Durham. Having heard 
of the advantageous conditions existing in America he on June 30, 1863, left 
Liverpool for New York, sailing on a steamship of the Cunard line. After 
arriving on American shores he made his way to Connecticut, where he found 
work in hoe factories at Naugatuck and Seymour, making bayonets for the sol- 
diers at the front. He removed to Wilkesbarre, Pennsylvania, where he worked 
in the anthracite coal mines for a time but later returned to Connecticut. There 
on October 9, 1864, he was married to Miss Ann Hughes, of Seymour, Con- 
necticut, the ceremony taking place at Derby, that state. They subsequently re- 
moved to Hubbard, Trumbull county, Ohio, where he was engaged in coal 
mining until 1867. In May of that year he with his wife and one child came to 
Moingona, Boone county. He continued to mine coal there until 1893 and also 
took an active part in the public life of the municipality, serving for one term as 
township clerk. For eight years he was secretary of the school board and from 
1877 until 1891 held the position of justice of the peace, discharging his duties 
fairly and impartially. He also served as treasurer and recorder several times. 
In 1892 Mr. Gartland went to Seymour, Wayne; coimty, Iowa, continuing in 
coal mining and then removed to Marceline, Missouri, wjiere he mined until 1896. 
In that year he came to Boone, where he also followed mining but later was 
employed by the Northwestern Railroad Company in the round house. After 
many years' labor Mr. Gartland retired in 1909, having acquired a comfortable 
competency by thrift and industry. 

At Derby, Connecticut, Mr. Gartland married on October 9, 1864, Miss .\nn 
Hughes, of Seymour, Connecticut, a daughter of Edward and Ann (Murphy) 
Hughes. Mr. and Mrs. Gartland were the parents of the following children : 
Ann, who was born in Hubbard, Ohio, married William Hughes, and they now 
live in Grinnell, Iowa. Daniel, who was born in Moingona, Iowa, died while 
young. Edward was born in Moingona, Boone county, March 13, 1870. He at- 
tended ])ublic school until eight and a half years of age, then went to work with 
his father in the mines, so continuing until twenty years of age. Part of the time 
he drove the mules but as the years passed became a full fledged miner. He 
spent much of his time in mining in Wyoming. Missouri and Illinois and took up 
his permanent residence in Boone in 1894, where he established himself as a 
wholesale and retail liquor dealer. He was at first located in the Wells house 
but afterward removed to 715 Allen street, where he remained fourteen years. 
He then changed his location to 281 Island street, buying the property and build- 
ing the structure which now stands there. His present place of business is loi | j 
Story street and is known as the Bain block. Politically he is a democrat, taking 
an active part in the progress of his city, and fraternally is a member of the 
Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. Mary Catherine was born in Moingona, 
Iowa, and married P. J. Moffett, and they now reside in Denver. Sarah, a native 
of Moingona, remains at home. Susie, who was also born in that city, mar- 
ried William Gartland and they make their home with our subject. Elizabeth 
Jane, who was born in Moingona, graduated with the class of 1901 and is now 



428 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

teaching in the public schools of Chicago, after having taught in Boone county for 
four years. Agnes Frances, the next in order of birth, was born in Moingona 
and is a graduate of the Boone parochial school. Phillip B., born in Moingona, 
also graduated from the Boone parochial school and then joined a surveying 
party of the Northwestern railroad, being now engaged in that work in the west. 
Mrs. Gartland died in Boone, April i, 191 1, and is buried in this ctty. She was 
a devout member of the Sacred Heart church and generous in her contributions 
to that institution. 

Mr. Gartland is a stanch democrat and thoroughly devoted to the interests of 
his party. He is a member of the Sacred Heart church, the services of which 
he regularly attends. He enjoys in large measure the esteem and respect of 
his fellowmen and can look back upon his life record with pride, for all that he 
has achieved he has secured through his own efforts. He is now in his eightieth 
year and yet takes an active interest in life's affairs. 



JOHN A. HULL. 



The name of Hull has figured conspicuously in connection with the history 
of the bar of Boone county for many years, and the record of him whose name 
introduces this review adds new luster thereto. He began practice in 1894 and 
has advanced gradually as he has given proof of his ability to cope with the 
intricate and complex problems of law. 

His birth occurred in Boonesboro, Iowa, on the 26th of March, 1871. and 
he is descended from Scotch, Welsh and German ancestry. The first of the 
family, of whom there is accurate record, was Uriah, and his wife's name was 
Isabelle. He was a soldier in the Revolutionary war from Virginia, and his 
state afterward gave him a land warrant in payment for his services and he 
located in Rockingham county, \irginia, on a high plateau. He owned the 
largest of three small prairies there, which the mountaineers called respectively, 
bull pasture, cow pasture and calf pasture, but about 1808 or 1809 he found 
settlers crowding him and sold his farm and moved further west, settling on 
the present site of Newark, Ohio, where his sons cut. the first trees. The journey 
to Ohio from Virginia, was made without wagon or cart and without either 
path or guide. The grandfather of our subject, the Rev. Samuel Hull, was a 
son of this pioneer settler in the mountains of Virginia and of Licking county. 
Ohio. Two brothers of Rev. Samuel Hull, Dr. James and George Hull, the 
latter born in 1779, came to Boone county, Iowa, in 1849, and another brother, 
Uriah, born in 1800, came in 1851. Numerous descendants of these brothers are 
still residents of this section. John A. Hull, father of John A. Hull, Jr., was 
born in Terre Haute, Vigo county, Indiana, in the year 1831 and pursued his 
education in the public schools and in Asbury University at Greencastle, Indiana. 
Taking up the study of law, he was admitted to the bar and engaged in the 
practice of his profession at Madison, Tennessee. He had read law for 
four months at Terre Haute with Colonel R. N. Thompson. His uncles, above 
mentioned, having ventured into Boone county a few years before, John A. 
Hull, Sr., joined them in 1854 and established a law office in Boonesboro. He 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 429 

rose to prominence as a representative of the bar and for many years ranked 
with the distinguished lawyers of his section of the state. His death occurred 
June 12, 1888. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Margaret Emeline 
Wear, was born in Madisonville, Tennessee, and died on the 15th of August, 
1907, surviving her husband for ahiiost twenty years. They were the parents 
of eight children: Alice, now the widow of Henry H. Leib of Boone; Mary E., 
the widow of R. M. Hughes, also of Boone;. Mrs. Lillian C. Hostetter, deceased; 
Nannie M., the wife of Charles W. Barnes of Boone; Thirza, who became the 
wife of C. H. Bowen and has passed away; John A., of this review; and Samuel 
and Frank, who died in infancy. 

John A. Hull has spent his entire life in Boone county, save for the period 
when he was pursuing his education elsewhere. At seventeen years of age he 
entered Simpson College at Indianola, Iowa, and his literary training served 
as an excellent foundation upon which to build the superstructure of his pro- 
fessional knowledge. After four years devoted to classical work he entered 
the law department of the University of Iowa and was graduated with the class 
of 1894. He then began practice in Boone, where he has now remained for 
twenty years, and throughout this period he has been accorded a liberal practice 
which has grown both in volume and importance as time has passed on. It is 
well known that he prepares his cases with thoroughness and care and that he 
manifests the most conscientious zeal in protecting the interests of his clients, 
yet he never forgets that he owes a still higher allegiance to the majesty of 
the law. 

On the 7th of September, 1904, Mr. Hull was united in marriage to Miss 
(iladys Sigworth, a daughter of Dr. H. W. Sigworth, of Anamosa, Iowa. They 
have become parents of three children : Thirza, born October 9, 1905 ; John A., 
born April 18, 1907; and Dwight Sigworth, born August 15, 1912. In his 
political views Mr. Hull is a democrat, always stanchly supporting the principles 
of the party, yet never active in seeking office for himself. Fraternally he is 
connected with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. He is well known in 
Boone county, and the fact that many of his warmest friends are those who 
have known him from his boyhood to the present time is an indication that 
his life has been well spent. He has made good use of his talents and oppor- 
tunities and is today one of the prominent lawyers and highly respected citizens 
of his native county.- 



JOHN CHARLES POHL. 

John Charles Pohl is the owner of a farm of one hundred and sixty acres 
in Dodge township but leases most of his land. He is well known throughout 
Boone county, where he has made his home continuously since 1872. He was 
not yet four years of age when brought to this county by his parents, his birth 
having occurred in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, on the 6th of November, 1868. His 
parents were Fred and Wilhelmina (Motts) Pohl, the former a native of Berlin, 
Germany, and the latter of Steifelbaden, of the same country. In their family 
were nine children, four sons and five daughters. Leaving their native land the 



430 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

parents sailed for America with their family and established their home in 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where they remained for a brief period and then came 
to Iowa, settling in Boone county in 1872, the father securing an eighty-acre 
tract of land in Jackson township. 

Upon the homestead farm in this county John C. Pohl was reared with the 
usual experiences that fall to the farm lad, his time being divided between the 
work of the school-room, the pleasures of the playground and the duties assigned 
him in connection with the cultivation of the fields. 

On the 25th of July, 1900, Mr. Pohl was united in marriage to Miss Julia 
Tatman, a native of Pocahontas county, Iowa, and they have five children : 
Grant, Frances, Fern, Marion and Ethel. 

The family home is situated on section 34, Dodge township, where Mr. Pohl 
owns one hundred and sixty acres of land, but he does not farm at all owing to 
ill health and rents most of the place. However, he raises both shorthorn cattle 
and Belgian horses, and his live-stock interests are an important source of 
revenue to him. He drives an automobile and has many substantial improve- 
ments upon his place, which indicates his prosperity and the success which he 
has made in managing his business affairs. His religious faith is that of the 
Methodist church, and his political allegiance is given to the republican party. 
His long residence in the county has made him widely known, for he has lived 
in this section of the state for forty-two years and has therefore been a witness 
of many of the changes which have occurred and of the growth and develop- 
ment which have brought the county to its present advanced state of progress. 



HON. JUSTIN R. DORAN. 

Hon. Justin R. Doran is not only one of the foremost, if not the foremost, 
representative of agricultural interests in Beaver townsliija, but was also for 
many years in the state legislature and in that connection did valual^le work in 
promoting constructive measures which were of great benefit to the slate in 
general and his constituency in ]iarticular. There is great credit due Mr. Doran 
for what he has achieved, as he has attained the substantial position which he 
now occupies entirely through" his own efforts. 

He was born in Niagara county. New York, August 8, 1850, and is a son of 
Patrick and Catherine ( Keeley ) Doran, both natives of County Carlow, Ireland. 
The father in early life operated a flour mill in the Emerald isle. He and his 
wife came to America on lioard the slii]) Richard Cobden. and they experienced 
the most perilous passage, the boat almost being wrecked. They landed in 
New York, February i, i84<). and thence went by packet boat by way of the 
Plrie canal to Reynolds Basin, in Niagara county. New York, where they made 
their home for four years. Being attracted by the promising west, they then 
removed to Ottawa. Illinois, where the father worked as a farm hand for a few 
vears. Their next change of residence brought them to Livingston county, in 
the same state, and there Mr. Doran bought a farm, to the cultivation of which 
he devoted himself until his death, which occurred on November 25, 1863. His 
wife passed awav in La Salle county, Illinois, about ten \'ears previously, .Vugust 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 431 

-5' 1^55- They were the parents of eight children : Edward, a well-to-do farmer 
of Polk county, Iowa; Ellen, the widow of C. Harvey, residing in Grand Junc- 
tion, Iowa; Miss Mary, also of that city; Thomas H., a lumber dealer and stock- 
raiser of Burwell, Nebraska ; Justin R. ; John, who farms near Bradshaw, 
Nebraska; and two who died in infancy. 

Justin R. Doran was left an orphan when fifteen years of age and at that 
period embarked upon an independent career, earning his living by doing chores 
while attending school in Livingston county. Having completed his education, 
he hired out as a farm hand for some time and after having gained \aluable 
experience operated the old homestead in partnership with his brothers until 
1874. In 1872, however, he and a brother purchased a corn threshing outfit, 
and they operated the same in Benton county, Iowa, until July of the same year, 
when they returned to Illinois. At the end of that time Mr. Doran sold the 
home place and then removed to Boone county, Iowa, where he acquired three 
hundred and seventy acres of his present farm, situated on section 5, Beaver 
township. He was the first settler on the four sections which formed the school 
district No. 3 and has added to his holdings from time to time until he now holds 
title to three thousand acres of the best improved land to be found in the neigh- 
borhood. Nearly all of the farm is located in Beaver township. Judicious 
management, incessant labor and modern and up-to-date methods have been the 
means by which Mr. Doran has attained prosperity. His place is in a most 
excellent condition, and his buildings are substantial and modernly equipped. 
Mr. Doran has always been a leader in agricultural afi'airs and has greatly con- 
tributed toward raising the farming standards of his section. He has l^ieen one 
of those men who have been successfully copied by others and who have been 
the backbone of the agricultural prosperity of the state. 

Mr. Doran married Miss Olive F. Blanshan, a daughter of Jacob and Maria 
Blanshan, natives of Auburn, New York. The parents removed to Wisconsin 
in 1848 and resided in that state until 1874, when they came to Iowa. In 
Wisconsin and this state the father followed agricultural labors throughout his 
life. He was prominent politically, serving in the Wisconsin state legislature, 
and was also a member of the board of county supervisors for a number of 
years. He died in 1890, and his wife passed away in February, 1902. To 
-Mr. and Mrs. Doran thirteen children were horn: Lester G. ; Alfred T., who 
died at the age of one year; Alexander R. ; Eugene B. ; Benjamin B. ; Oliver E. ; 
Lucia S.; Maud H. ; Laut H. ; Mamie C.; Milo T. : Daisy E. : and John Keeley, 
who died at the age of two and one-half years. 

Mr. Doran has always given his allegiance to the republican party and has 
been a most prominent factor in its affairs in the state. He is not onlv a leader 
in agricultural matters, but deeply interested in cither fields of progress. He 
was a state legislator for four long sessions and two short ones and during this 
time was one of the foremost men in the assembly in committee rooms as well 
as upon the floor. His views of life are those of a broad-minded man, who has 
delved deeji into the questions of vital importance and who has proven himself 
a master of those afl:'airs which make up life's experiences. For many years lie 
has served as trustee of Beaver township and in this capacity has exerted an 
influence as important to his township as his services were to the state. He is 
a member of the Masonic lodge at Grand Junction and belongs to the lodge of 



432 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at Ogden. He has been adjuster of 
the Boone County Farmers 2^Iutual Insurance Company for six years, acting 
in that capacity for all the territory west of the Des Moines river in Boone 
and adjoining counties. Mr. Doran is a courteous, affable and approachable 
gentleman, ever ready to do a kindness to those who need his services. He has 
many friends in Boone county in business, social and political circles. He is con- 
versant with the leading issues and questions of the day and all affairs which 
particularly affect his locality. As a citizen he stands high, as an agriculturist 
he is a leader and as a man he is respected highly for what he has achieved and 
the principles which have guided his conduct. 



W. BRITTAIN. 



Beautiful "Fairview" is the home of J. W. Brittain. The place is situated in 
Dodge township, and the home stands upon a knoll, commanding a splendid view 
of the surrounding country. In fact, one can look for miles over the district 
and take in the details of the farm of two hundred and sixty acres, which, devoted 
to the raising of crops and stock, is one of the best improved properties of Boone 
county. Here Mr. Brittain resides, carefully controlling his business interests, 
and his success is the result of close application, sound judgment and unfalter- 
ing enterprise. 

A native of Pennsylvania, J. W. Brittain was born in Lucerne county. De- 
cember 29, 184S, a son of Jacob and Cassandra (Myers) Brittain. The father 
was of English descent and was a son of Joseph Brittain, who was reared upon 
Long Island, where his father had settled on coming from England to the new 
W'Orld. Jacob Brittain. who was born December 27, 1813, passed away on the 
3d of Januar\-. 1871. His wife, who was born in 1818, survived him for over 
twenty-two years, dying in ^larch, 1893. 

J. W. Brittain was reared in the Keystone state and when a young man of 
twenty-five years came, in 1873, to Boone county upon a visit to his uncle. He 
did not remain at that time but after two years returned and for ten years was 
a member of his uncle's family. Upon the death of his uncle he purchased the 
farm and has since made his home thereon- He is now the owner of two hun- 
dred and sixty acres of rich and^valuable land that responds readily to the care 
and labor he bestows upon it. He is regarded as a successful agriculturist and 
stock-raiser. His methods of tilling the soil -and caring for the crops are pro- 
gressive, and he keeps on hand high grades of stock, for which he finds a ready 
sale upon the market. His farm is one of the most pleasing and attractive feat- 
ures in the landscape, and his home is one of the most beautiful in his section 
of the county. It is large and commodious, built in modem style of architecture, 
is tastefully furnished and, moreover, is a most hospitable one, so that it is a 
favorite resort with the many friends of the family. 

In 1882 Mr. Brittain was united in marriage to Miss Elnora A. Gibbons, who 
was bom in Boone county in 1859. Her parents were John H. and Sarah A. 
r Moore) Gibbons, the former a native of Ohio and the latter of Pennsylvania. 
They removed westward to Boone county in 1855, and four years later their 



I 



> 
o 







> 




HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 435 

daughter Elnora was born. Two children were born unto Mr. and Mrs^ Brit- 
Jin but bo h died in early childhood during an epidemic of diphtheria. Mr. and 
Mrs' B ittan are widely 'and favorably known and have a large arcle of warm 
Wends For fifteen years Mr. Brittain filled the office o township trustee h: 
onrcontinuance m that position indicating his capabilty and fidehty. For 
alo' t"orty-one years he has lived in this county and has a w,de acquaintance. 
He is accounted'a worthy representati^.e of the best class of cit.ens and ,s a 
recognized leader in agricultural progress. 



WALLACE FARLEY. 

With the business interests of Boone county Wallace Farley of Ogden has 
bee 1 sely associated. He is now one of the stockholders and vice p^eside^t 
of the City State Bank, and he has made extensive ^^^^'^T ZsfjTl 
and in commercial paper. He was born m Canada, March 4, 1848, and is a 
son o Pe"r V and Elizabeth (CannifE) Farley, both of whom were natives of 
t^e same country. The father arrived in this county in 1870 and engaged ,n 
fa mTng winning substantial success through his well directed labors. He had 
corTe to Iowa a number of years before, removing from Illinois to this stat 
111866 He took an active part in public affairs and was a member of the 
board of supervisors. His death occurred in 1892. while his wife passed away 

°" Waltce^Vfri:;' wl?Lred and educated m the public schools of Illinois 
and If Iowa, com leting his studies at Mount Vernon, this ^'a- He then c:am 
to Boone county, where he engaged in farming for six year . and m the fdl of 
1875 he established his home in Ogden, where he opened a l^niberyard. a ha d 
ware and implement store and also engaged in the gram ^V--- J -^ ^ 'J 
along those lines for five years and for two years he handled -tie and da t 
in real estate He is a man of determined purpose, carrying forward to success 
ulTompe U^n whatever he undertakes, and in business affairs he has brooked 
no b'a'cles that could be overcome by determined Pers;.;ent and honora 
effort In 1884 he erected a building and organized the Crty Bank, which he 
conducted for ttenty-three years as a private banking "-t'tution^ He hen o d 
most of his stock, the bank was reorganized as a state bank and Mr. Farle> wa 
Zsen vice president. The institution is today called the City State Bank o 
Ogden It is in a flourishing condition and its success is due in large measure 
to ttrenterprising and substantial measures established by Mr. Farley m con- 
necln with its conduct. As the years have passed on he has embraced his 
oppor un ty for investment in real estate and has extensive property holdings^ 
He has also conducted a bond brokerage business and is himself the owner of 

much valuable paper. • . a/t- t .iio A Rridp-e- 

In Tune 1869, Mr. Farley was united m marriage to Miss Julia A^ Bridge 
man. a daughte; of Benjamin and Lucy A. Bridgeman, natives of Ohio and 
Ton er settlers of Boone county, Iowa, where they followed farming. The 
?lth r passed away in 1906. having for a number of years survived his wife, 



Vol. 71—2 



436 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

who died in California about 1880. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Farley were born two 
children: Elizabeth C, at home; and Edith M., who died in January, 191 3. 

Mr. Farley, interested in the public welfare, has served as a member of the 
city council and also on the school board. Fraternally he is connected with the 
Masons, and he also wears the little bronze button of the Grand Army of the 
Republic, for he enlisted in 1864 as a member of Company B, One Hundred and 
Forty-second Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and served until the close of the war. 
His political faith has always been that of the republican party, and his religious 
belief that of the Methodist church. Sterling traits of manhood and citizenship 
have long been exemplified in his life, and he is well known in Boone county, 
where he has now made his home for more than four decades. 



PATRICK H. JUDGE. 



Patrick H. Judge is the owner of a farm of one hundred and sixty acres, 
on which he resides, situated on section 14, Des Moines township. He is 
numbered among the extensive landowaiers of this part of the state, his posses- 
sions aggregating four farms, three of which are situated in Des Moines town- 
ship, this county, and one in Story county, Iowa. His investments have always 
been judiciously made, and his sound judgment finds expression in his purchase 
of valuable property. 

Mr. Judge was born in Troy, New York. March 14. 1853, and comes of 
Irish ancestry, his paternal grandparents being James and Ann (Hill) Judge, 
natives of the green isle of Erin. James Judge, father of our subject, was born 
in County Roscommon, Ireland, in 1829, acquired his education there and when 
eighteen years of age came to the United States. He was employed at difTereiU 
places in the state of New York, working as a farm hand at three and four 
dollars per month, but his industry and worth became recognized and won him 
advancement. He was married in Troy, New York, to Miss Bridget Kelly 
who was bom in County Galway, Ireland, a daughter of Patrick and Bridget 
(Mooney) Kelly. James Judge's people were well-to-do, owning one hundred 
acres of land, which is a large estate for Ireland. The brothers of Mrs. Judge, 
finely educated men, taught school in Ireland and ranked high in educational 
circles. Two of her brothers, James and John, came to the United States, and 
their sister Bridget followed their example, giving her hand in marriage in 
Troy, New York, to James Judge. They conducted a grocery store in Troy 
for a time but the family removed to Janesville, Wisconsin, where a house and 
lot was purchased. There, however, Mr. Judge became ill with fever and ague, 
a disease very common at that time, and left Janesville for Monroe, Wisconsin. 
In 1872 he removed to Iowa, settling in Colfax township, Boone county, where 
he passed away on the i6th of December, 1907, his remains being interred m 
Boone. His political indorsement was given to the democratic party. His wife 
passed away August 11, 1901. She was a member of Sacred Heart church. 

Patrick H. Judge was but two years of age when the removal was made 
from New York to Janesville, Wisconsin, where the family remained for four 
years and then went to Green county, that state, settling near Monroe. There 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 437 

Patrick H. Judge was sent to the public schools, and later he completed his 
education in Dane county, Wisconsin. He worked upon his father's farm from 
boyhood until he attained his majority. In 1872 the family came to Iowa, reach- 
ing Boone county on the loth of May. All the members of the family made the 
journey with three teams and wagons, and three of them drove three cows from 
their Wisconsin home to this state. The family residence was established upon 
a farm in Colfax township, the father purchasing eighty acres of land, to which 
he added by subsequent purchase. In the work of tilling the soil Patrick H. 
Judge bore his part but left home at the age of twenty-one years and went to 
work for a dairyman, Thomas Barrett, of Franklin township, Story county, with 
whom he remained nine months as an employe in ]\Ir. Barrett's cheese factory. 
He afterward spent some time at home, building fences, etc., thus allowing his 
younger brothers to attend school by relieving them of the necessity of aiding in 
the fann work. Later he was emplowed at Ames College in 1876, working under 
Professor Morrow, who was engaged in experimental agricultural work. Mr. 
Judge's father then gave him a team and in 1877, boarding at home, he began 
the cultivation of a forty-acre tract of land which he leased from Dan Clark, of 
Story county. Mr. Judge farmed that place until the following fall and sold his 
corn at twelve cents per bushel after giving Mr. Clark one-half of the yield as 
rental for the place. He spent a suinmer in Grundy county, where he was 
employed by a German named Franken, receiving a dollar and a half per day. 
From his earnings he saved nearly one hundred dollars. He had previously 
invested in a forty-acre tract of railroad land in Colfax township, Boone county, 
and purchasing stock, he put them on that tract. He invested his money in 
hogs at a dollar and a quarter per hundred pounds, fattened them and sold 
them for five dollars per hundred. The money which he thus earned he invested 
in another forty-acre tract near his original purchase and in 1879 he added still 
another forty acres. Thus gradually he increased his holdings, for as he gained 
sufiicient capital he made other purchases, his investments being most judicious. 

In 1890 Mr. Judge was married to Miss Catherine Coleman, a native of 
Wayne township, Monroe county, Iowa, born September y. 1867. Her parents 
were Joseph and Bridget ( Finnell ) Coleman, both of whom were natives of 
Ireland, the former born in County Tipperary and the latter in County Clare. 
They came to the United States in early life, landing in New York, and were 
married in Wisconsin. They afterward settled in Dubuque and thence went 
to St. Louis, where they lived for nine years. On the expiration of that period 
they returned to Iowa, settling in Monroe county upon a farm of four hundred 
acres which the father purchased. He died January i, 1900, at the age of 
seventy-five years, and his wife passed away in 1901, at the age of seventy- 
six years. 

Following their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Judge had begun their domestic life 
upon a farm in Colfax township, where he owned a half section, but since then 
he has disposed of that property. In March, 1902, he removed to his present 
farm. He had built a fine home upon the place in Colfax township, and he has 
his present property well improved. The home place comprises one hundred 
and sixty acres on section 14, Des Moines township, and his holdings include two 
other farms in the same township and one in Story county, from which he derives 
a gratifying annual income. 



438 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Judge have been born four children: Joseph, who was 
born August 9, 1891 ; James Francis, born December 3, 1892; John W., Sep- 
tember I, 1896; and Henry A., October 7, 1898. The family is well known, and 
Mr. Judge ranks with the representative agriculturists of the county. He has 
been the architect of his own fortunes and has builded wisely and well. Industry 
has been the keynote of his success. He has labored long and diligently, his 
efforts intelligently directed, and as a result of his perseverance and determina- 
tion he ranks now with the representative and prosperous fanners of the county. 



OSMAN L. CLAPP. 



Osman L. Clapp, an engineer on the Chicago & Northwestern, connected 
with the passenger service between Boone and Omaha for the past sixteen years, 
has been continuously in the employ of the corporation which he now represents 
since the 8th of August, 1876, at which time he became a switchman under 
S. L. Moore, then yardmaster. Gradually he has worked his way upward, 
and his fidelity to duty is recognized by the company, as is plainly indicated 
in his long retention in the service. He was born at Fitchburg, Dane county, 
Wisconsin, March 31, 1857, and was the fourth in order of birth in a family of 
nine children, six of whom are yet living. He was reared upon a farm, with the 
usual experiences of the farm lad. His parents were George W. and Sally 
(Black) Clapp, both of whom were natives of Onondaga county. New York. 
They were born, reared and married near Geneva, that state, their wedding 
being celebrated in 1850. Soon afterward they removed westward to Wisconsin 
and began their domestic life upon the farm which Mr. Clapp had entered from 
the government in 1848. With characteristic energy he began to develop his 
fields and there resided until called to the home beyond. The father died 
December 31. igoo. at the age of seventy-seven years, and the mother was seventy- 
six years of age when she passed away in 1907. Both were of English descent. 
At the time of the Civil war George W. Clapp enlisted for service in the Union 
army, but illness prevented him from going to the front. 

It was upon the old homestead farm in Wisconsin that Osman L. Clapp was 
reared. He early became familiar with the duties and labors that fall to the lot 
of the agriculturist and, while working in the fields through the summer months, 
he devoted the winter seasons to the acquirement of a public-school education. 
He favored mechanical rather than agricultural pursuits, however, and when a 
youth of nineteen years entered railway service as a switchman in the employ of 
the Chicago & Northwestern at Boone. Later he became connected with the 
yard service and afterward entered the locomotive engineering department and 
for the past thirty-one years has been an engineer, acting in that capacity on 
freight trains for some time, while for the past sixteen years he has been an 
engineer in the passenger service. There has never been an accident to his train 
when the fault was his. He is most careful and painstaking, recognizing how 
important is the duty that devolves upon him, and his worth and fidelity are 
recognized by the company which he represents. 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 439 

■Mr. Clapp has been married twice. He first wedded Miss Mary Warner, 
who was born in Warren county, Pennsylvania, and during her infancy was 
brought to Boone by her parents. Three children were born of that union. 
Arthur L., who is a graduate of the State College at Ames, is now roadmaster 
of the Southern Illinois division of the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad, with 
headquarters at Pekin, Illinois. He married Emma Skinner and has a daughter, 
Lajene. Mary Ruth, the second member of the family, is a noted violinist and 
pianist of Urbana, Illinois, where she has charge of the music in the public 
schools. She had previously traveled for a year in connection with the Lyceum 
Bureau. She is a graduate of the American Conservatory of Music, in which 
she won a gold medal and made the highest record. Charlotte is head saleslady 
in the millinery department of a large store in Des Moines. The wife and mother 
passed away October i, 1910, when almost fifty years of age. She was a member 
of the Presbyterian church, in which faith the children were reared. For his 
second wife Mr. Clapp chose Mrs. Rachel J. Williams, nee Ballou. She was 
born in Missouri and prior to her present marriage had lived in Pottawattamie 
county, Iowa, where she still owns a farm. 

Politically Mr. Clapp was reared a democrat, but now votes independently, 
supporting men and measures rather than party ties. He is connected with the 
Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers, and his wife is a member of its ladies' 
auxiliary. They reside at No. 526 Benton street, in an attractive home which he 
has remodeled and improved, and in Boone, where he has long resided, they have 
an extensive circle of warm friends. 



ORVILLE M. THATCHER. 

Orville M. Thatcher, the well known cashier of the Luther Savings Bank 
and one of the most progressive young business men of the town, was born in 
Grant township, Dallas county, Iowa, and spent his early life upon a farm. His 
father, M. H. Thatcher, was born in Clinton county, C)hio, and came to Iowa 
in 1867, settling on a farm in Dallas county, where he is now living retired. 
In connection with general farming he was at one time extensively interested in 
stock-raising and in business affairs prospered until he is now regarded as one 
of the well-to-do men of his community. He was one of the defender.s of the 
Union during the Civil war. His wife is also a native of Clinton county, Ohio, 
and is still living. They had seven children, namely: Frances, now the wife of 
J. T. Thatcher, a resident of Kansas; Silas J., of Altoona, Iowa; Harriet, the 
wife of O. M. Coate of Orange, California; Virginia, the wife of A. B. Coate 
of Des Moines, Iowa; Martha, at home; Catherine, the wife of O. B. Price, 
of Dallas county; and Orville M., of this review. 

(!)rville M. Thatcher received good educational advantages, first attending 
the public schools and later the schools of Des Moines and Dixon, Illinois, where 
he pursued a college course and was graduated in 1903. He then entered the 
private banking house of W. J. Stewart of Grimes, Iowa, as assistant cashier, 
remaining there one year. In July, 1904, he came to Luther as cashier of the 
Luther Savings Bank, which he and his father, M. H. Thatcher, organized at 



440 HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY 

that time. His father is now president of the institution, while Oscar Oakleaf 
of Madrid, is the vice president, with our subject as cashier and Charles Goodrich 
assistant cashier. This is one of the safe, conservative financial institutions of 
the county, and those at its head are reliable and enterprising business men. 

Orville AI. Thatcher was married on the 26th of June, kjoj, to Miss Lillid 
Eckersley, who was born in Iroquois county, Illinois, a daughter of Henry H. 
and Harriet (Hunt) Eckersley. Her father was born, reared and educated in 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and in early life learned the machinist's trade. 
During the Civil war he entered the service and for four years was connected 
with the marines. During a terrible storm he was saved from a watery grave 
by the ship Sabine. On leaving the east he removed to Chicago and later to a 
farm in Grundy county, Illinois, and from there to Iroquois county, the same 
state, but now makes his home in Wright county, Iowa. His wife died in Illinois. 
In their family were eight children, namely: Sadie, who is now a school teacher 
in Iroquois county, Illinois; .Anna, the wife of John Lovelace of that county; 
Cornelia ; Harry, a resident of Iroquois county ; William and Thomas, both of 
Wright county, Iowa; John, of Iroquois county, Illinois: and Lillie, the wife of 
our subject. Mr. and Mrs. Thatcher have two children, Wilbur Clayton and 
Orville Donald. The parents hold membership in the Methodist Episcopal 
church, in the work of which they take a very active interest, Mr. Thatcher 
serving at the present time as superintendent of the Sunday school. He is 
republican in politics, and takes a commendable interest in public afTairs, never 
withholding his support from any enterprise which he believes calculated to pro- 
mote the moral or material welfare of his community. 



C. H. RECKSEEN. 



C. H. Reckseen is well known in business circles of Madrid as manager of 
the Rex Lumber Company, owning one of the best equipped lumber yards in 
central Iowa. His birth occurred in Sweden in 1876, his parents being Swan and 
Christina Peterson, likewise natives of that country. In 1888 the family emigrated 
to the United States, coming directly to Boone county, Iowa, and taking up their 
abode on a farm in Colfax township. The parents now reside in a new and 
modern home at Madrid and are among the well known and highly esteemed 
people of the community. Unto them were born eleven children, as follows: 
Alfred, who is a resident of High Bridge, Iowa ; Mrs. Anna Clay, living in Des 
Moines. Iowa ; Lina, who is deceased ; Maria, who has also passed away ; John 
Albert, who makes his home with his parents in Madrid ; Edwin, a resident of 
Colfax township ; Matilda, who is living in Des Moines, Iowa ; C. H., of this re- 
view ; Mrs. Maria Young, of Colorado Springs. Colorado ; Mrs. Hulda Olson, of 
Chicago, Illinois ; Mrs. Oscar Anderson, living in Colfax township. All the above 
named were natives of Sweden. 

C. H. Reckseen, who was a youth of twelve years when he accompanied his 
parents on their emigration to the new world, acquired his education in the com- 
mon schools and also pursued a course of study in the Capital City Commercial 
College at Des Moines. Iowa. He was subsequently employed as a bookkeeper 




C. H. KEI'KSEEN 



HISTORY OF BOONE COUNTY " 443 

for one year and in 1900 became identified with the lumber business, in which 
he has remained continuously since. He spent six years at Des Moines and two 
years in Denver, Colorado, and for the past six years has acted as manager of 
the Rex Lumber Company of Madrid, Iowa, conducting one of the finest equipped 
lumber yards to be found in the central part of the state. Mr. Reckseen is widely 
recognized as a man of excellent business ability, sound judgment and scrupulous 
integrity, and his efforts have contributed in no uncertain degree to the con- 
tinued prosperity of the concern with which he is connected. He is a heavy 
stockholder in the Rex Lumber Company, owns an attractively appointed home in 
Madrid and is numbered among the substantial and representative citizens of the 
county. 

In 1906 Mr. Reckseen was united in marriage to Miss Emelia Timan, who was 
born in Sweden in 1880, her parents being Mr. and Mrs. C. J. Timan, likewise 
natives of that country. They emigrated to the United States and established their 
home at Laurens, Pocahontas county, Iowa, where the father turned his atten- 
tion to agricultural pursuits. He is now a resident of Madrid, this state, but the 
mother passed away in Laurens. LTnto Mr. and Mrs. C. J- Timan were born five\ 
children, namely: Adolph, who is a resident of Laurens, Iowa; Mrs. Anna Berg- 
ling, of St. James, Minnesota ; Hulda, living in Denver, Colorado ; Mrs. Emelia 
Reckseen ; and Carl, who is a resident of Hayfield, Iowa. Mr. and Mrs. Reckseen 
have one son, Harold Timan, who was born in Denver, Colorado, on the 6th of 
October, 1907, and is now a public-school student of Madrid. 

Mr. Reckseen is a republican in politics and a prominent factor in the local 
ranks of the party, being now a republican committeeman of Douglas township. 
He is likewise the president of the board of education of Madrid and in this 
connection has made a highly commendable and creditable record. He is a man of 
strongly marked character who has come to be recognized as a forceful element 
in the community and his sterling personal traits of character have won him the 
high regard and confidence of all with whom he has been associated. 



EDWARD H. WANE. 



Edward H. Wane, a well known farmer and stock-raiser, ownhig and 
operating a good farm of one hundred and thirty-two acres on the state road 
in Worth township, was born on the old Wane homestead in Des Moines town- 
ship, this county, February 18, 1862. He is a brother of J. W. Wane, in whose 
sketch extended mention is made of the family. Reared in Des Moines town- 
ship, he is indebted to its public schools for the educational privileges he enjoyed 
during his boyhood and youth. On leaving the home farm he was connected for 
two years with the conduct of a grocery store at B