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Full text of "History of Brookline, formerly Raby, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire : with tables of family records and genealogies"




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EDWARD E. PARKER 



HISTORY 



OF 



BROOKLINE 



Formerly RABY 



HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY NEW HAMPSHIRE 



WITH 



Tables of Family Records and Genealogies. 



By EDWARD E. PARKER. 



Published by The Town. 



I 






T- 









HISTORY COMMITTEE 

AS FIRST CONSTITUTED IN 1906. 



Clarence R. Russell, 
*Samuel Swett, 
*Eddy S. Whitcomb, 
*Edward C. Tucker, 
*John B. Hardy, 

David S. Fessenden. 



AS RE-ORGANIZED IN 1913. 



Clarence R. Russell, 
Walter E- Corey, 
*David S. Fessenden, 
Frank L. Willoby. 



'Deceased. 




I 



COMMITTEE ON BROOKLINE HISTORY 



To 

The Citizens of Brookline 

In Memory of the Early Fathers of the Town 

And of Their Descendants Wherever Located 

This History 

Is Respectfully Dedicated 

By 

The Author. 



INTRODUCTION 



This history of Brookline is the culmination of long continued desires 
on the part of its inhabitants that the acts and annals of the early settlers 
in the town, as well as those of the generations succeeding them, in order 
that they should inure to the edification and benefit of the generations 
yet to come, should be preserved in some durable and permanent form. 

Its preparation for publication was authorized by a vote of the citi- 
zens at a town meeting holden on the 13th day of March, 1906. At the 
same meeting the selectmen were authorized to appoint a history com- 
mittee consisting of five citizens. The selectmen subsequently appointed 
the committee, and, soon after its appointment, the committee arranged 
with the undersigned to prepare the history for publication. 

In presenting the completed work to his old time fellow citizens 
and to the public in general, for their and its approval, or disapproval, 
as the case may be, the compiler has but little to say by way of intro- 
duction. 

For him the work of preparing it has been a labor of love; and now 
that his task is completed, he can only hope that it will not turn out 
to be a case of love's labor lost. 

In the labor attendant upon its preparation, from beginning to end, 
the compiler has been actuated by a desire to produce a record history 
of the town. A history which, so far as possible, should depict the char- 
acteristic qualities of its people, as those qualities have been exhibited 
in their acts and procedure during the years of the town's existence. 

"With that end in view, the materials used in its compilation have, 
for the main part, been taken from the town's official books of records, 
the unofficial accounts, published and unpublished, of the acts of, and 
incidents happening to, its people; and from such of its traditions as, 
having survived the lapse of years, have come down to the present gen- 
eration stamped with such marks of authenticity as would seem to render 
them worthy of preservation. 

In following out this line of procedure, care has been taken to keep 
as closely as possible to the language of the original text; quoting from 
the same freely, and oftentimes voluminously; especially in instances in 



8 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

which the subject matter relates to events and occurrences of more than 
ordinary interest to the people. 

The result has been to produce a work in the construction of which, 
consideration is given to matters which would ordinarily be regarded as 
of minor importance — mere details — to an extent much greater than is 
generally customary in histories of this description. 

At first thought, this phase in the work, i.e., redundency in the mat- 
ter of details, for obvious reasons, would strike many as being in the 
nature of a fault. But when one takes into consideration the fact that 
the life of a town, like that of an individual, is for the greater part made 
up of details, in the formation of which, at some period of his life every 
citizen is more or less actively engaged, it becomes apparent at once 
that, in the compilation of its history, matters of detail constitute a very 
important element for consideration. For the more voluminously and 
accurately they are spread upon its pages, the more thoroughly will its 
readers be able to comprehend the characteristic qualities of its inhabi- 
tants — the men and women from the details of whose lives it is in a great 
measure constructed. 

In addition to the foregoing mentioned sources of information, re- 
course has also been had to the official records and public documents 
of the State and to the published histories of Towns in this vicinity and 
elsewhere, for such historical material relating to Brookline as could be 
gleaned from their pages; care being exercised in each instance to select 
for use only such materials as, from their actual connection with, and 
bearing upon the town and its people, were necessary to the complete 
elucidation of its history. 

Thanks are also due, and the same are hereby gratefully extended, 
to Charles E. Spaulding and Cyrus F. Burge of Hollis, W. F. Bucknam 
of Woburn, Mass., and many others, for valuable information relative 
to the town and its people by them contributed to the work during the 
progress of its compilation; especially to Mr. Spaulding: to whose cour- 
tesy it is indebted for a considerable portion of its data relative to the 
families of some of the early settlers. 

The incompleteness of the work in the matter of family records and 
genealogies will doubtless be a cause of regret to many of the citizens; 
and apparently justly so. But it must be remembered that in under- 
taking the task of preparing the history, those having the work in charge 
were not called upon to seriously consider that phase in its make-up 
relating to the preparation of family records, no appropriation for that 
purpose having been made by the town. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 9 

But to the end that the history might not be wholly lacking in that 
respect, the town's history committee at the very commencement of the 
work caused to be prepared and sent to all known representatives of the 
families of early settlers, the families of former citizens of the town and 
of those of its residents at the present time, circular letters, in which 
the recipients of the same were requested to prepare the vital records 
of their respective families and forward them to the committee for pub- 
lication. 

To these circulars but a very small minority of the recipients made 
any response whatever. Of those who did respond the tables of statistics 
were, in the majority of instances, brief and incomplete. In but very 
few instances were the returns reasonably full and satisfactory; and the 
instances in which full and complete records or genealogies were returned 
could easily be counted on one's fingers. 

The records and genealogies thus received all appear in the following 
pages. That there is not a larger number of them can, under the circum- 
stances, be justly attributed to no other cause than that of neglect or 
indifference on the part of those who, having had the opportunity of 
furnishing them, failed to comply with the committee's request to that 
effect. 

In conclusion, the writer feels that the citizens of the town have 
a very proper cause for congratulating themselves in the fact that, by 
the publication of this work, upon the list of the names of New Hamp- 
shire towns whose histories have already been published, will hereafter 
appear that of their own town. 

It is a little town, to be sure. Its history during the years of its exist- 
ence has scarcely created a ripple in the current of events by which the 
history of the state has been formulated. As a town it has no claims 
to any special marks of distinction over its sister towns in general. It 
has produced no men or women who have become particularly distin- 
guished in any line of action. But it can justly boast of having been the 
mother of many men and women whose qualities as citizens have been 
fully up to the average standard of New Hampshire crops in that line, 
and of a record for patriotism which is second to no town in this state. 
But above all — a fact which is especially to its credit — it is, and always 
has been a town for which the love and affection of its sons and daughters 
has never failed; and of which it could always be truthfully said — in 
the language once employed by Daniel Webster when speaking of his 
alma mater, Dartmouth College — "There are those who love it." 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



CHAPTER I. 

Topographical and Otherwise. 

Surface and Soil — Forests — Granite Ledges — Clay Banks — Ponds — 
River and Brooks — Natural Curiosities — Stone House and Devil's Den — 
Witch Story — Indians — The Bear's Den — Population of Town at Different 
Periods. 

CHAPTER II. 

Old Dunstable. 

Farm Grants — New Plantation Chartered— Its Extent — Its Disinte- 
gration — Names and Dates of Incorporation of Towns Formed from Its 
Territory in New Hampshire — Copy 'of Proprietors' Deed — Old Canal 
Leading out of Muscatanipus Pond — Rock Raymond Hill. 

CHAPTER III. 

Brookline Before Its Incorporation. 

1673—1769. 

The Mile Slip — Land Derived from Townsend, Mass. — The Old 
North Boundary Line of Townsend — The Groton Gore — Petitions for a 
New Township, 1738-1739— West Parish of Old Dunstable— The Province 
Line, 1741— Brookline as a Part of Hollis, 1746-1769— Early Settlers. 



12 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

CHAPTER IV. 

Incorporation of Raby and Events Connected with the Same. 

1746-1769. 

Dissatisfaction among the Inhabitants in the West Part of Hollis — 
Unsuccessful Attempts to Procure a Division of the Township — Appoint- 
ment of Lieut. Samuel Farley as Agent for the Inhabitants of the West 
Part of Hollis and of the Mile Slip to petition the General Court for the 
Organization of a New Township — First and Second Petitions for a Char- 
ter — Charter of the Town of Raby— Area of Raby as Incorporated — 
Subesquent Changes in Its Area — Loss of Land in Raby's North West 
Corner in 1794 — Origin of the Name of Raby. 

CHAPTER V. 

1769-1775. 

First Town Meeting- — First Board of Town Officers — Second Town 
Meeting — First Public Building — First Appropriation for a Public High- 
way — First, Second and Third Cattle Pounds — First and Last Boards of 
Tithing Men — First Highway Accepted by the Town — First List of Rate 
Payers — First Bridge over the Nissitisset River below its outlet from 
Muscatanipus Pond — Straightening of the Highway in 1804 on the West 
Side of Meeting-house Hill— Second Pond Bridge, 1808— Third Pond 
Bridge, 1812-1814— Fourth Pond Bridge, 1843— First Appropriation for 
Public Schools — Highway from Douglass Brook to the House of Ben- 
jamin Shattuck Accepted by the Town. 

CHAPTER VI. 

War of the Revolution. 

Population of the Town at the Opening and During the Continuance 
of the War — Town's Recorded List of its Soldiers in the War — Its Soldiers 
in the Battle of Bunker Hill — Its Soldiers in the Battle of Bennington — 
Action Taken by the Town During the Progress of the War — The Asso- 
ciation Test— Names and War Records of the Town's Soldiers — Com- 
mittees of Safety — Names of the Town's Commissioned Officers — List of 
Names of Revolutionary Soldiers Buried in Brookline. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 13 

CHAPTER VII. 

Current Events, Incidents and Happenings. 

1775-1786. 

Classification of Raby with Mason in the Matter of Representation 
in the General Court — Raby's First Representative in the General Court 
— Second Representative — Raby Classed with Milford in the Matter of 
Representation, 1796 and 1798-^Raby Classed by Itself for the First 
Time in 1802— Small Pox Scare in 1780— The Dark Day, 1780— The 
Town's Action Relative to Damming the Outlet to Muscatanipus Pond 
— Early and Modern Cemeteries — Disturbances over the Law Regulating 
the Killing of Salmon and Other Fishes — Ancient and Modern Inns. 

CHAPTER VIII. 

Current Events Continued. 

1786-1800. 

Title to the Strip of Land on Raby's Eastern Borders Adjacent to 
Hollis Which Had Long Been a Matter in Dispute between the Two 
Towns Settled by a Decree of the General Court as Being in Raby — 
Bridges Over the Nissitisset River — Highway West of the South Cem- 
etery Accepted by the Town — Gift to the Town of the Land upon 
which the Old Meeting-house Stands by R. Cutts Shannon — First Guide 
Boards set up in Town — Change of Town's Name from Raby to Brook- 
line — Prices Current of Commodities in 1795 — U. S. Census of 1790 . 

CHAPTER IX. 

Early Bridie-Paths and Highways — Framed Dwelling Houses in 
Town in 1800. 

Brief Biographical Sketches of Some of the Petitioners for Raby's 
Incorporation in 1768, Who Subsequently Removed from the Town and 
Have no Known Representatives here at the Present Time, viz. : Thomas 
Astin (Austin) — William Blanchard — Robert Campbell — Isaac Stevens — 
Simeon Blanchard — James Nutting — William Spaulding — Daniel Shed — 



14 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

Jonas Shed — Francis Butterick — Jonathan Powers — Henry Spaulding — 
Abigail Spaulding — Peter Honey. 

CHAPTER X. 

Industries, Early and Late. 

1740-1852. 

The Jasher Wyman Sawmill — The James Conneck Sawmill — The 
Melvin Sawmill — Old Sawmill on Rocky Pond Brook — The Washington 
Wright Grist Mill and Blacksmith Shop— The David Hobart, Sr., Black- 
smith Shop — The Benjamin Brooks Sawmill — The James Campbell Saw- 
mill — The Benjamin Shattuck Sawmill — The Abel Spaulding Sawmill — 
The Sawtelle and Newell Sawmill — The Thomas Bennett Sawmill — The 
John Conant Sawmill — The Ensign Bailey Sawmill, Tannery and Sash 
and Blind Shop — The Samuel Brooks Sawmill — The George Betterly 
Fulling Mill— The Alpheus Shattuck Scabbard Mill— Clay Banks and 
Bricks — The Coopering Business — Charcoal Burning — Granite Business — 
Ephraim L. Hardy Tool Shop — The David Hobart, Jr., Steam Sawmill. 

CHAPTER XI. 

Schools and Other Educational Matters. 

First Appropriation for Public Schools — Depreciation of Currency — 
Second Appropriation for Schools — First Public School Teachers, in 1783 
— First Schools Kept in Dwelling Houses — First School Districts — First 
Schoolhouses and Their Locations — School Teachers in 1806 — First 
Superintending School Committee — New School Districts in 1812 — New 
Schoolhouses in -1812 and Their Locations — Description of the School 
Houses of 1812 — First Printed School Report — Redistricting of the Schools 
in 1848-49 — New Schoolhouses and Location of Same in 1850 — Schools 
Included in One District in 1884 — New Schoolhouses and Location of 
Same in 1886 — Names of Superintending School Committees from 1815 
to 1914 inclusive — Partial List of Names of Teachers from 1850 to 1914 
— Biographical Sketches of Ellen C. Sawtelle, Julia H. Gilson, Louise O. 
Shattuck and Frances D. Parker — College Graduates and Biographical 
Sketches of — Biographical Sketches of Graduates Born in Brookline 
but Graduating from Other Towns. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 15 

CHAPTER XII. 

. Ecclesiastical History. 

1783-1791. 

Early Religious Movements — The Meeting-house War, So Called — 
The Completion in 1791 of The First Meeting-house. 

CHAPTER XIII. 

Ecclesiastical History, Continued. 

1791-1837. 

Rev. John Wythe — Organization of The Congregational Church, Dec. 
20, 1795 — First Deacons — Church Covenant — Call and Settlement of Rev. 
Lemuel Wadsworth — Rev. Mr. Wadsworth's Ordination, His Ministry, 
and Sketch of His Life — Inscription on the Tombstone of Rev. Mr. Wads- 
worth— The "Rev." Doctor William Warren — Movement in Favor of 
Formation of a Church of the Christian Denomination in 1821 — Rev. 
Jesse Parker — Rev. Leonard Jewett— Rev. Samuel H. Holman — The Pas- 
torate of Rev. Jacob Holt — Sketch of Mr. Holt's Life — Opening of the 
Meeting-house to the Occupancy of All Religious Denominations and 
The Formation of a "Christian" Church in 1831— The Pastorate of Rev. 
Henry Eastman and Sketch of His Life — Abandonment of the Old 
Meeting-house as a Place of Worship by the Congregationalists. 

CHAPTER XIV. 

Ecclesiastical History, Continued. 

1837-1914. 

Building of the Congregational Meeting-house in 1837-39 — Rev. 
Daniel Goodwin Called to the Pulpit — Mr. Goodwin's Ordination and 
Dedication of the New Meeting-house — Presentation of Communion 
Service by Deacon Thomas Bennett — A Feud in the Church and Society 
and the Resulting Unhappy Effects — Rev. Mr. Goodwin Severs His Con- 
nection with the Church and Society — Biographical Sketch of Rev. 
Daniel Goodwin — Pastorate of Rev. Theophilus Parsons Sawin — Sketch 
of Rev. Mr. Sawin's Life — Pastorate of Rev. John H. Manning — Sketch 
of Rev. Mr. Manning's Life — Pastorate of Rev. Frank D. Sargent — 
Revised Articles of Faith and Covenant, 1871 — The James H. Hall Be- 



16 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

quest to the Church and Society — Repairing and Remodeling of the 
Meeting-house in 1875— The Mary F. Peabody Bequest— The Gift, of 
the Clock on the Church Tower — The Dedication of the Remodeled 
Meeting-house — The Gift of a New Church Bell by Edward T. Hall — 
The James N. Tucker Bequest to the Church and Society — The Wilkes 
W. Corey Bequest to the Church and Society — Rev. Mr. Sargent's Res- 
ignation as Pastor — Biographical Sketch of Rev. F. D. Sargent's Life — 
Pastorate of Rev. George L. Todd — Biographical Sketch of Rev. Mr. 
Todd's Life— Pastorate of Rev. Fred E- Winn and Sketch of His Life- 
Pastorate of Rev. Alphonse Belanger and Sketch of His Life — Centennial 
Celebration of the Organization of the Church — Address at the Celebra- 
tion by Rev. F. D. Sargent — Presentation of a Silver Communion Service 
to the Church by Its Past and Absent Members — Post-Prandial Exercises 
at the Celebration — Original Centennial Poem by Edward E. Parker — 
The Pastorate of Rev. John Thorpe with Biographical Sketch of His Life 
— Pastorate of Rev. George A. Bennett — Repairing and Re-Dedication of 
the Meeting-house with an Account of Exercises Attendant upon Same 
in 1906 — Biographical Sketch of Life of Rev. George A. Bennett — Pas- 
torate of Rev. Warren L. Noyes with Biographical Sketch of His Life — 
Deacons of the Church from 1797 to 1914, Inclusive — Clerks of the Church 
from 1797 to 1914, Inclusive. 

CHAPTER XV. 

Ecclesiastical History, Concluded. 

The Methodist Episcopal Church and Society. 

Organization of the Church and Society in 1852 — Pastorate of Rev. 
Amos Merrill with Biographical Sketch of His Life — Pastorate of Rev. 
Gustavus Silverstein — Pastorate of Rev. Henry B. Copp — Biographical 
Sketch of Rev. H. B. Copp's Life — Names in the Order of Their Succes- 
sion of Pastors of the Church — Building of the Methodist Meeting-house 
in 1859 — The first Organ Installed in the Church — The Second Organ 
Installed in the Church — The Purchase and Installation of the Church 
Bell— The Gift of the Pulpit in 1907— The Gift of the Communion Serv- 
ice in 1908 — Celebration of the Fiftieth Anniversary of the Building of 
the Meeting-house — Boards of Trustees — The Joseph C. Tucker Gift to 
the Church and Society — The Calvin R. Shedd Devise to the Church and 
Society — The James N. Tucker Bequest to the Church and Society — 
The Wilkes W. Corey Bequest to the Church and Society— The Albert 
W. Corey Memorial Fund — The Mary Corey Legacy. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 17 

CHAPTER XVI. 

Current Events, Incidents and Happenings. 

1800-1830. 

Local Conditions in 1800— Tax List of 1801— Town Classed by 
Itself in the Matter of Representation in 1802— The Killing of the Last 
Panther in Town— Census of 1810— War of 1812— Old Militia Days in 
Raby — A May Day Training in the Forties — The Brookline Independent 
Cadets — A Year Without a Summer, 1816— Laying Out of Highway at 
West End of the Pond — Brookline Social Library — The First Fire Engine 
— First Hearse— First Hearse House — Post Office and Post Masters — 
Engine Men in the Year 1829. 

CHAPTER XVII. 

Current Events, Incidents and Happenings. 

1830—1860. 

Population in 1830 — Laying Out of Three New Highways— Star 
Shower of 1833— The Town's Bass Viol— Stoves Installed for the First 
Time in the Old Meeting-house — Disappearance of the Pulpit Sounding 
Board — Building of the Stone Bridge near the Abel Foster Sawmill — 
Vaccination of the Town's Inhabitants — Building of the Congregational 
Meeting-house — Population in 1840 — Town Poor Farm — Proposed Change 
in the Name of the Town — The Ladies' Benevolent Society — Inventory 
of 1848— Population in 1850— The Steam Sawmill Fire— New Fire En- 
gine—The Old Militia Band — Brookline Brass Band and the Musical 
Festival of 1866 — Brookline Cornet Band — The Prohibitive Liquor Law. 

CHAPTER XVIII. 

Brookline in the War of the Rebellion. 

CHAPTER XIX. 

Current Events, Incidents and Happenings. 

1860-1890. 

Local Conditions in 1860 — The Young Men's Library Association — 
Town's Centennial Celebration — Accident on Meeting-house Hill Spet. 



18 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

9, 1869 — The Democratic Cannon— The Cook, Putnam and Company 
Furniture Manufactory — Hobart, Kendall and Company — Town's Action 
Relative to School District No. 8 in Milford — Renting of Old Meeting- 
house to Cook, Putnam and Co. — Destruction of Pulpit and Pews in 
the Old Meeting-house — Three Days Town Meeting in 1874 — Death by 
Accident of George W. Peabody — vStraightening of Main Street in 1878 — 
Delegates to Constitutional Convention in 1876 — Vote on the Proposed 
Amendments to the Constitution in 1877 — Brookline Public Library — 
Order of the Golden Cross — Accidental Death of Frank Hobart — Burn- 
ing of the Fernando Bailey Dwelling House — Death by Exposure of 
Daniel S. Wetherbee- — Burning of J. A. Hall Cooper Shop — Burning of 
the Miles Foster Dwelling House— Burning of the Samuel Gilson House 
— The "Yellow Day" — Burning of David S. Fessenden Sawmill — Brook- 
line and Hollis Telephone Company — Burning of School House in District 
One — Memorial Day Observances— Discontinuance of Certain Highways 
— J. H. S. Tucker's Store Burglarized— Delegate to Constitutional Con- 
vention in 1888 — Burning of the Charles A. Stickney Sawmill. 

CHAPTER XX. 

Railroads in Brookline and a Narrative of the Events which led up to 

Their Construction. 

Failure of the Citizens' First Attempt to Obtain a Railroad in 1844 
— The East Wilton and Groton Railroad Company in 1846 — The Brook- 
line Railroad, 1871— The Manchester and Fitchburg Railroad, 1877— The 
Brookline Railroad Company, 1891 — Celebration of the Opening to Public 
Traffic of the Brookline Railroad in 1892— The Brookline and Milford 
Railroad Company, 1893. 

CHAPTER XXI. 

Current Events, Incidents and Happenings. 

1890-1914. 

Population in 1890 — First Concrete Sidewalks — The Public Drinking 
Fountain — Burning of Sampson Farnsworth's Dwelling House — Burning 
of the Rufus Woodward House- — The Fresh Pond Ice Company — Sketch 
of the Life of Noah Farley— Bond Street Laid Out — The Caroline Brooks 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 19 

Legacy — The Grange— O. D. Fessenden's Gift to the Town— Brookline 
Improvement Company — Burning of the Alpheus Shattuek House — Burn- 
ing of the John Sanders House — The New England Type Factory — 
Congregational Church Struck by Lightning— New Hearse— Murder of 
Adelbert Parker — Old Home Week Celebrations — The James Carlton 
Parker Legacy — The Freshet of 1900 — The Harriet Gilson Legacy— Burn- 
ing of the Thomas O. Heren House — Burning of the Emma S. Dunbar 
House— State Roads — The Imla M. Williams Legacy — Orville D. Fessen- 
den Company — Burning of the J. A. Hall and the Joseph Hall Houses — 
The Dodge Legacy — Brown Tail Moths — New Valuation of the Town — 
The Emily M. Peterson Legacy — The Eliza J. Parker Legacy — The Martha 
E. Perkins Legacy— The Bertha Hutchinson Legacy — Burning of the"Bee- 
hive," and Deaths of Edward 0. Brien and John Powers — Water Plant — 
The Brookline Public Park — Electric Lights. 

CHAPTER XXII. 

The Daniels Academy Building. 

CHAPTER XXIII. 

Biographical Sketches of Physicians Resident of and Practising in 
Brookline from 1827 to 1914 Inclusive. 

David Harris, 1827-1839— Jonathan C. Shattuek, 1850-1861— David 
P. Stowell, 1862-1867— Darius S. Dearborn, 1875-1879— Alonzo S. 
Wallace, 1879-1888— Charles H. Holcombe, 1888- 

CHAPTER XXIV. 

List of Names of Town Officers from 1769 to 1914. 

CHAPTER XXV. 

Votes for Governor from 1786 to 1913 Inclusive. 

CHAPTER XXVI. 

Marriages from 1743 to 1914 Inclusive. 



20 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

ILLUSTRATIONS. 

Part I. 

Opp. Page 

Brookline Brass Band, -- - 321 

Brookline Public Park, - 399 

Congregational Meeting-house, 1839, - - - - - 231 

Congregational Meeting-house, 1875, - 250 

Daniels Academy Building, - - 402 

First Meeting-house, 1791, - - 205 

First Fire Engine, 1826, ----- 308 

Fresh Pond Ice Company Plant, ------ 377 

Group of History Committee, ------- 4 

Group of Brookline Soldiers in Civil War, ----- 327 

"Inncroft," Residence of Edward E. Parker (Old Nathan Corey 

House), ---------- 194 

Map of Early Raby, --------- 42 

Map of Disputed Territory, - 114 

Methodist Meeting-house, 1859, - - 278 

Muscatanipus Hills, --------- 30 

Muscatanipus Pond, --------- 24 

Pond bridge, 1914, - 73 

Railroad Bridge Over River Below the Pond, - - _ 367 

Railroad Depot at Village, ------- 365 

Residence of Dr. C. H. Holcombe, ------ 415 

Residence of Miss Ellen C. Sawtelle, ------ 189 

Second Fire Engine, --------- 308 

The Old Yellow House, or "Ehnwood," - - - - - 111 

Village School House, 1854, ------- 175 

Village Main Street, 1914, - - - 419 

Part II. 

Capt. Nathan Corey House, 1805, 487 

Capt. Robert Seaver House, 1775, 612 

Jonas French Homestead, - 513 

Lieut. John Cummings House, 1775, 489 

Lieut. Samuel Farley House, 1769, ------ 504 

Residence of Clarence R. Russell, 1914, 601 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 21 
PORTRAITS. 

Parti. 

Page 

Copp, Rev. Henry B., ... 282 

Dodge, Thomas H., - - - 407 

Dodge, Eliza Daniels, ------- 408 

Farley, Hon. Benjamin Mark, ------- 193 

Goodwin, Rev. Daniel, ------- 241 

Holcomb, Dr. Chas. H., - 416 
Parker, Edward E., ----- - Frontispiece 

Parker, Miss Frances D., - - 192 

Sargent, Rev. Frank D., - - - 253 

Sawin, Rev. Theophilus P., - - 244 

Sawtelle, Miss Ellen C, -------- 189 

Shattuck, Dr. Jonathan C, - - 411 

Pari II. 

Fessenden, David S., ------- oil 

Fessenden, Orville D.,- -------- 512 

French, John A., - - - ... . - 515 

French, Charlotte L. (Pierce) ------- 516 

Gilson, Deacon Eleazer -------- 521 

Hall, Joseph A., --------- 533 

Hall, James H., -------- 535 

Hardy, John B., - - - 539 

Hobart, David, Jr., ------ - - 54 1 

Hobart, George W. L., - - - - 542 

Hobart Group, - - - - - - - 542 

Hobart, Maria Sawtelle, -------- 543 

Horton, James A., - - - - - - - - - 546 

Hutchinson, John F.,- - - - - - - - - 550 

McDaniels, Mary, - - ... - 494 

Nye, George H., --------- 572 

Parker, William Harrison -------- 576 

Parker, Walter Lang, -------- 578 

Parker, James Carlton, -------- 579 

Parker, Deverd Corey, - - 581 

Parker, James Clinton, -------- 582 



22 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

Page 

Parkhurst, Lewis, --------- 584 

Rockwood, Cynthia Hobart, ------- 593 

Rockwood, William Brooks, - - 599 

Russell, Rufus Granville, - - - 603 

Russell, Mary A, (French) - 604 

Russell, Clarence R., - 606 

Sawtelle, Isaac, --------- 608 

Sawtelle, Joseph, -__--.-___ 610 

Shattuck, Nathaniel - - - 620 

Smith, William, - - 629 

Smith, Mrs. Eunice Augusta, ------- 631 

Swett, Samuel, - - ----- 637 

Swett, Mrs, Ellen S., -------- 638 

Tucker, Joseph C, - _.-... 642 

Tucker, Edward C, - .__-___ 644 

Wallace, William, - 648 

Whitcomb, Eddy S., -------- 652 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 23 



CHAPTER I. 

Topographical and Otherwise. 

Surface and Soil — Forests — Granite Ledges — Clay Banks — Ponds — Rivers 
and Brooks — Hills — Natural Curiosities, Stone House, Devil's 
Den — Witch Story — The Bear's Den — Indians — Population of the 
Town at Different Periods. 

Brookline is situated in the southern part of New Hampshire on the 
Massachusetts state line. It is bounded on the south by Townsend and 
Pepperell in Massachusetts; on the west by Mason, on the north by 
Milford, and on the east by Hollis. 

The surface of the entire township is hilly; there being but few 
level tracts, and these of small size. The soil is, for the greater part, a 
sandy loam, not especially well adapted to agricultural purposes. There 
is, however, a considerable acreage of good land, strong and productive, 
and some excellent farms. Fifty years ago there were more. But since 
then many of the town's sons and daughters, like those of many another 
New England town, lured by the call of the great world outside, have 
gone forth to seek their fortunes in its midst. In the meantime, the 
deserted farms have never ceased to send forth mute but expressive 
appeals for the return of their absent ones. Within the past few years, 
in some instances, these appeals have been heeded, and as a result, many 
of the old farms are being rejuvenated. 

In the southern part of the town, on the farm of the late Luther 
Rockwood, there is an extensive bed of clay, from which bricks of most 
excellent quality were formerly manufactured; but for the past forty 
years the plant has been idle. 

The town has always been noted for its forests. For many years in 
its history, its magnificent growth of white and pitch pines, chestnuts, 
oaks, hemlocks, maple and other varieties of forest trees were a sure and 
stable source of income and profit to its people. The old growth trees 
and even the second growth had practically disappeared forty years ago. 
But in the meantime their places have been taken by a new growth which, 
in quantity at least, more than compensates for their loss. In the esti- 



24 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

mation of competent and conservative judges, the town's acreage of 
woodlands at the present time is larger than it was forty years ago. 

The town is founded upon a rock; and that rock is granite. It un- 
derlies the entire surface of the township. Except near the river bottoms, 
it is impossible to excavate the soil to any considerable depth without 
striking it solid, firm and sure. On hilltops and hillsides, in forests and 
fields, its ledges are to be continually found, cropping out above the 
surface. Some of the ledges have been opened up and operated for many 
years past. But until within comparatively few years their products 
have, for the greater part, been confined to home consumption. But in 
1892, by the opening of the Brookline and Pepperell railroad to public 
use, they were brought near to the open markets; and as a result, since 
then many new quarries have been opened ; some of which, at the present 
time, are being worked with profit. The granite is generally of excellent 
quality and is easily quarried. 

Ponds. 

MUSCATANIPUS POND, which still retains its Indian name, 
meaning, according to the Massachusetts Historical Society's Records, 
Great Bear Pond, is located about one-half mile north of the village Main 
street in a basin formed by the hills of the same name on its west side 
and by Rock Ramond hill on its east side. Many years ago the towns- 
people, as a matter of convenience in pronouncing its name, cut out the 
first two syllables of the same and always referred to it as "Tanipus" 
pond. In the state, county and other maps which have been published 
from time to time during the last seventy-five years, its name has ap- 
peared with many variations in the manner of spelling; among which 
Potanipo, Potanipa and Potanipus have been more frequently used. But 
Muscatanipus is its original and correct name. This pond is about one 
mile in length by one-half mile in width, and contains about two hundred 
and fifty acres. It is fed by two streams, which flow into it from the 
northwest and north, respectively. Its waters abound in the different 
species of fish indigenous to the waters of the state generally.* From the 
earliest times this pond has been a favorite resort for pleasure seeking 
parties from the surrounding country. At the present time (1914) its 

* Within the sixty years last passed, two attempts to stock this pond with species of fishes natur- 
ally foreign to its waters have been made. Of these two attempts, the first was made about the year 1864 
by the late Joseph C. Tucker; who at the time placed in its waters two pikes, a male and a female. The 
second attempt was made in 1905 by Edward E. Parker in company with Emri W. Clark, of Nashua, 
by whom forty thousand Michigan lake trout fry were planted in this pond. Both of these attempts 
were failures. 



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HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 25 

waters furnish the Fresh Pond Ice Company of Somerville, Mass., with 
its annual supply of ice. 

LAKIN'S POND is located about four miles north of the village 
Main street, on the east side of the highway to Milford. It is a natural 
pond, contains about fifty acres, has no inlet, and discharges its overflow 
into Scabbard-Mill brook. At the present time it is known to some peo- 
ple as Melendy's pond. But in the early maps of the state and county 
the name of Lakin was invariably applied to it: and by that name it 
has been known to the inhabitants of this town from time immemorial. 
The origin of its name is unknown. Neither tradition nor written record 
mention any family of the name of Lakin as ever having lived in the 
vicinity. 

POUT POND is located about one mile south of the village on 
the east side of the highway to Pepperell, Mass. Although dignified by 
the name of pond, it is really little better than a pond-hole. It contains 
about two acres, is fed by springs and rain water, and drains, when it 
does drain, into the Nissitisset river. Its waters, in which there are no 
fish of any description, invariably "dry up" in the summer time. And 
the only matter of interest connected with it that justifies its mention 
here, is to be found in the fact that for many generations past its icy 
surface in the winter time has furnished a safe and excellent skating 
field for the children of the families living in its vicinity. 

GOOSE POND is located about three miles north of the village on 
the west side of the road leading out of the highway to Greenville on 
its north side, at a point near the old district number 6 schoolhouse, 
and passing in a northerly direction to the old Nathaniel Hutchingson 
place. It is a very small pond, having an area of probably less than one- 
eighth of an acre. But it is rarely ever entirely devoid of water, even in 
the dryest summers. Few of the town's people even know of its exist- 
ence; and none know the origin of its name. Possibly it originated in 
the fact that on some occasion in the long ago, a wandering wild goose, 
or even a flock of geese, made an over-night stop in its waters. But if 
it ever harbored a flock, however small, of geese at one time, its waters 
must have slopped over. 



26 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

River and Brooks. 

THE NISSITISSET RIVER rises in the hills of Mason; its prin- 
cipal source being Pratt pond. It retains its original Indian name, of 
which the meaning is unknown. From "Pratt's" for the first five miles 
the stream flows in a south-easterly direction, passing in its course through 
the southwest corner of Milford and the northwest part of Brookline. 
About midway of its course through Brookline its waters unite with those 
of Campbell's brook to form Muscatanipus pond. Leaving Muscatanipus 
by an outlet in its south shore, the stream continues on in a southeasterly 
course and bisecting the southerly part of this town, passes through the 
southwest corner of Hollis and the northwest part of Pepperell, Mass., 
where it flows into the Nashua river from the west at a point located a 
short distance below the bridge over the latter stream known as "Jew- 
etts." Its length from its source to its junction with the Nashua is not 
far from eighteen miles, of which seven miles are in Brookline's territory. 

At the upper part of its course in Mason, this stream is known as 
the vStarch Factory brook. In Milford it is known as the Spaulding 
brook; the name being derived from Abel Spaulding, a settler in the 
Mile Slip as early as 1782, who built his log-cabin upon its banks in that 
part of the Slip which in 1769 was incorporated as a part of Brookline, 
but which in 1794 was taken away from the latter town and incorporated 
as a part of Milford. In Brookline it is also known as the Spaulding 
brook up to the last mile of its course before entering Muscatanipus 
pond, during which it is known as the North Stream. 

The Nissitisset, largely increased in size, makes its exit from Mus- 
catanipus pond by an outlet in its south shore; and descending in a 
series of rapids, in the first quarter of a mile of its course experiences 
a fall of some thirty feet. For more than a century the power generated 
by these falls was in almost constant use for the purpose of operating 
small manufacturing plants located on the river's banks. But at the 
present time all of these plants have ceased to exist, and the river's waters 
are running to waste. 

HUTCHINGSON, or, as it was formerly known, MOSIER BROOK 
is a small stream located in the northwest part of the town, and having 
its source oh the farm of the late John Q. A. Hutchingson. Its course 
from its source is southwesterly. It is tributary to Spaulding's brook, 
which it enters a mile, more or less, north of the site of the sawmill of 
the late Alpheus Shattuck. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 27 

SCABBARD-MILL BROOK rises in the north-east part of the 
town and flowing in a southwesterly direction, empties into the North 
Stream about one mile above Muscatanipus pond. In the early days 
of the town this stream was known as Bennett's brook, and later as Saw- 
telle's brook; these names being derived from Thomas Bennett and Eli 
Sawtelle, respectively; both of whom were early settlers on its banks. 
It derives its present name from a scabbard-mill which was erected upon 
its banks in the early thirties by Lawrence Bailey; and which was sub- 
sequently owned and operated for many years by the late Alpheus Shattuck. 

NEEDHAM'S BROOK is a small stream which has its source near 
the old Nathaniel W. Colburn place in the northeast part of the town. 
Its general course is southwesterly. It is tributary to Scabbard-Mill 
brook, into which it flows about one mile north of the latter brook's junc- 
tion with the North Stream. It received its present name from Jeremiah 
Needham, who for many years owned and occupied the dwelling house 
at the present time standing upon the old Captain Eli Sawtelle place on 
the west side of the highway to Milford, some three miles north of the 
village. This brook was formerly known as the Sawtelle brook, and also 
as the Stickney brook; the latter name being derived from Ebenezer 
Burge, better known by his sobriquet of "Dr. Stickney," who for many 
years lived, and finally died, in a little cottage near its source. 

CAMPBELL'S BROOK rises in the southeast part of Mason, from 
whence it enters Brookline from the west. Its general course is south- 
easterly, its length about three miles. It empties into Muscatanipus pond 
on its west shore, where it is known as the West Stream. This stream 
received its name originally from James Campbell, an early settler in 
the Mile Slip; who, immediately before the opening of the Revolution, 
built the first sawmill to be erected upon its banks. In the years that 
have passed since then, it has been known at different times as Foster's 
brook, from Abel Foster, who for many years owned and operated a 
sawmill standing on its banks on the site of the Campbell mill ; and the 
Hall brook, from J. Alonzo Hall, who owned and operated said mill after 
the Civil War. The upper part of the stream in Mason is known as the 
Bennett brook, from a Mr. Bennett of Groton, Mass., who formerly 
owned and operated a sawmill located upon its banks in that locality. 

About one mile below its source, this stream receives from the west 
a small tributary brook, which is also known as Campbell's brook; its 
name undoubtedly originating from the same source as did that of the 



28 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

larger stream. Like the larger brook, it too has its source in Mason. 
Its general course is easterly, and its length about one mile. 

ROBBINS' BROOK, sometimes called Wetherbee's brook from 
Daniel S. Wetherbee, who for a number of years resided near it, has its 
source in the easterly part of Mason, and flowing in a southwesterly 
direction through this town, becomes tributary to Campbell's brook, 
about one-half mile above its entrance into Muscatanipus pond. 

In the early days of the town this stream was known as Cram's 
brook. There is a tradition to the effect that about the time of the town's 
incorporation one Cram, given name unknown, built a sawmill upon its 
banks below the bridge by which, at the present time, it is crossed in the 
highway at the foot of the Ezra Farnsworth hill. 

THE MILFORD or OLD HOUSE BROOK rises at the west end 
of Bear hill, about two miles north of the village Main street, and, flowing 
in a westerly direction, crosses the highway to Milford a few rods north 
of the point where said highway intersects the highway to Greenville. 
It is tributary to Scabbard-Mill brook. It is a very small stream, but 
it seldom dries up. 

TALBOT BROOK, so named from Ezra Talbot, an early settler in 
town near its source, rises in the valley between the Muscatanipus hills. 
Its general course is easterly. It is about one mile in length. It flows 
into the Nissitisset river from the west a short distance below the river's 
outlet from Muscatanipus pond. 

THE VILLAGE BROOK has its head waters in the northeasterly 
part of the town. It is formed by the junction — about one-half mile north 
of Main street — of two small streams known respectively as the west and 
east branches. Its general course is southwesterly. Its length is about 
one and one-fourth miles. It empties into the Nissitisset river about one 
fourth of a mile southwest of the village Main street. In the early days 
this stream was known as Douglass brook; the name being derived from 
Capt. Samuel Douglass, whose log-cabin as early, at least, as 1786, stood 
on, or near, the site of the dwelling house at the present time occupied 
by the widow of Charles N. Corey, on the west side of Main street opposite 
E. E. Tarbell's store. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 29 

STONE HOUSE BROOK has its source in the woodlands about 
one mile east of the village Main street. It takes its name from a natural 
curiosity near its head waters, which has long been locally known as 
"The Stone House." The stream is small in size, flows in a westerly 
direction and discharges into the Village brook in the meadows west of 
Main street. Its length is about one and one-fourth miles. 

WALLACE BROOK was named from Capt. Matthew Wallace, an 
early settler in the Mile Slip. It rises in the northern part of Townsend, 
Mass., enters this town near its southwest corner, and flowing in an 
easterly direction through the south part of the town, empties into the 
Nissitisset at South Brookline. Its length in Brookline is about two and 
one-half miles. Next to the Nissitisset, it is perhaps the largest stream 
in town. It never runs dry; and in years past has furnished power for 
several sawmills and other small manufacturing plants. 

STICKNEY BROOK rises in the north part of Townsend, Mass., 
and flowing in a northerly direction, enters this town at South Brookline, 
where it empties into the Wallace brook a few rods below the sawmill 
of Deacon Perley Pierce. Its length is not far from one and one-fourth 
miles. In early years, before Brookline was incorporated, this stream 
was known as Wolf brook. In 1740 Jasher Wyman built upon its banks 
the first sawmill to be erected within Brookline's present territory. 

ROCKY POND BROOK rises in Rocky Pond in Hollis. Its general 
course is southerly, and its length is about two miles. For the first mile 
after leaving the pond the stream flows through Hollis territory; it then 
crosses the line between Hollis and Brookline and finishes its course in 
the territory of the latter town, of which it crosses the southeast corner, 
and where it flows into the Nissitisset river about two miles below its out- 
let from Muscatanipus pond. 

This brook at different times within the past ninety years has been 
known as the Hobart brook and the Hardy brook; the former name 
being derived from David Hobart, Sr., who settled on its banks in Brook- 
line about 1818, coming here from Pepperell, Mass., and the latter from 
Ephraim L. Hardy, a settler in this town from Hollis in about 1840. 

On the majority of both the state and county maps which have 
been published within the last seventy-five years this brook has been 
represented as lying wholly within the town of Hollis. But such repre- 
sentations are erroneous; the lower part of its course being in Brookline, 
as stated above. 



30 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

Hills. 

Of the hills in Brookline the most prominent are the two known 
respectively as Little and Big Muscatanipus, and Rock Ramond and Bear 
Hills. 

LITTLE MUSCATANIPUS HILL is located immediately west of 
the village Main street, its eastern side forming the west wall of the val- 
ley in which the village is situated. Its height above the sea level, as 
given by the United States Coast Survey, is six hundred feet. It extends 
in a southerly direction from the southwest shore of Muscatanipus pond 
to South Brookline, a distance of about one and one-fourth miles. The 
hill has been many times denuded of its forest growth. At the present 
time (1914) it is covered with a thrifty growth of young trees. With the 
exception of a tract of cleared land on its northern slope and some cleared 
lands around its base, no portion of its surface has ever been under cul- 
tivation. 

BIG MUSCATANIPUS HILL is situated west of Little Musca- 
tanipus, from which it is separated by a narrow valley. Its height above 
the sea level is seven hundred feet. It is located wholly in that part of 
the twonship formerly known as the Mile Slip; the east boundary line 
of which (the same being identical with the west boundary line of Old 
Dunstable) ran north and south through the valley between it and Little 
Muscatanipus Hill. Like its sister hill, Little Muscatanipus, this hill has 
long been denuded of its original forest growth. At the present time its 
summit, southeasterly, easterly and northwesterly slopes are bare, and, 
to a considerable extent under cultivation; constituting the farm of 
Clarence R. Russell, Esq. (From the latter fact, this elevation is, at the 
present time, occasionally mentioned as Russell's hill.) On its southerly 
slope lies the farm late of Eli Cleveland, deceased; at the present time 
it is owned and occupied by George L. Dodge. Save for these two farms 
this hill is covered with young forest growth. 

The views to be obtained from the summits of each of these hills, 
although that from Little Muscatanipus at the present time (1914) is 
somewhat obstructed by trees, are among the finest in southern New 
Hampshire. 

ROCK RAMOND HILL is located on the east shore of Musca- 
tanipus pond. It derives its name from Daniel Ramond of Concord, 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 31 

Mass., who as early as 1730 owned a large tract of land in which it was 
included, in the west part of old Dunstable, and which he sold to Jona- 
than Melvin in 1738. In the early deeds of lands in this vicinity this hill 
is invariably mentioned as Rock Ramond; a name which in modern years 
has been corrupted into "Rock Rament." 

BEAR HILL lies to the north of and about one mile distant from 
the village Main street. It is of inconsiderable height, but whatever dig- 
nity it loses from that fact is amply compensated for by its length ; which, 
from its easterly to its westerly terminus, is about two miles. From tbe 
earliest times it has been, and now is, covered with forest growth; that 
at the present time, of course, being young. In late years, the correct 
way of spelling this hill's name has been, to some extent, a matter of 
discussion among the town's people; the question being as to whether 
it should be spelled B-e-a-r or B-a-r-e. In early deeds of lands in its 
vicinity both forms of spelling the name are used. But as the name 
dates back to the days of the early settlers, when the virgin forests which 
then covered its sides were the haunts of the wild beasts common to the 
country, the theory that it derived its name from bear, the beast, rather 
than from bare, indicating a state of nakedness, would seem to be more 
probable than otherwise. 

COREY'S HILL is the name applied to the southeasterly part of 
the hill immediately east of the village Main street. The name is derived 
from Capt. Nathan Corey, who came from Groton, Mass., to Brookline 
about 1800; his being the first of the families of the same name now living 
here to settle here. 

HOBART'S HILL is the name applied to the northeasterly part 
of the hill immediately east of the village Main street; its name being 
derived from George W. L. Hobart, a descendant of David Hobart, Sr., 
who settled in Brookline in 1818, coming here from Pepperell, Mass. 

COLBURN HILL is located in the northeast part of the town. 
The east Milford highway crosses its summit about one and one-half 
miles north of the village. This hill was named after Lot Colburn, a 
descendant of one of the families of that name, which in the early part 
of the last century settled in this town, coming here from Hollis. 



32 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

Natural Curiosities. 

There are few New England towns which do not have within their 
limits more or less objects of natural formation which, either in con- 
struction, location, general appearance, or all of these conditions, are so 
far removed from the ordinary as to cause them to be regarded as natural 
curiosities. Brookline has at least two such — the "Stone House" and 
the "Devil's Den." 

THE STONE HOUSE is located about one mile east of the village 
Main street on the side of a ravine in which the brook named from the 
house has its source. The ravine on its east side is hemmed in by a nat- 
ural wall of granite which, rising somewhat abruptly from its base to an 
average height of twenty or thirty feet, extends north and south for a 
distance of one-fourth of a mile, more or less. A large portion of the 
wall's surface is covered with ragged pieces of broken granite, some of 
which are of large size, and it is scarred with seams and crevices, which 
traverse and indent it in all directions. At a point about midway of 
the wall's length, a huge mass of rock projects itself upward from the 
surrounding surface. This mass is in form of an irregularly shaped solid 
square, and is faced on its south and west sides by flat and nearly per- 
pendicular surfaces. At some remote period in its history some immense 
natural power has removed from the base of this mass, at its southwest 
corner, a large square block of its original material. The vacant space 
caused by the removal of the block, together with a large crevice, known 
as "The Chamber," in the face of the rock above it, have been known 
from the days of the early settlers as the "Stone House." 

The main "room" of the house is about eight by eight feet in length 
and breadth and ten feet in height. On the north and east sides, its walls 
are solid, with comparatively smooth surfaces; conditions which also 
apply to its ceiling, which is formed by the under surface of that part of 
the original mass which projects over it. An irregular opening in the wall 
on the west side of the room serves as a window; and another and larger 
opening in its south side serves as a door. Between the door and the 
window, at the southwest corner of the room, a slender column formed 
of broken pieces of granite rises from the floor to the ceiling; serving, 
apparently, as a support for the weight of the enormous mass above it. 
The "chamber" over the main room is of a size and dimension sufficient 
to admit of the occupancy at one and the same time of two or three per- 
sons lying at full length upon its floor. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 33 

For an hundred and forty years last past, this house of stone has 
been a resort for pleasure parties, sight-seers, and searchers after the 
curious in Nature. Generation after generation of the village children 
have used it as a play -ground, and it has been the scene of many a social 
gathering, hilarious and otherwise, on the part of their elders. Beneath 
its roof many a party of belated coon-hunters, disgusted with the un- 
successful results of a night's tramp in search of their favorite game, 
have found a grateful shelter while waiting for the hour when — "In the 
morning by the bright light" — they could wend their weary ways home- 
ward; and within its sheltering walls many a weary tramp has slept and 
dreamed of other and happier days. Upon its walls are inscribed the 
names of many of the town's citizens, both the living and the dead. Of 
the latter class there are, I think, some whose names have never appeared 
on any memorial stone other than this in this town. 

Tradition says that during the Revolutionary War this house was 
used by the Tories in this vicinity as a place in which to meet and delib- 
erate upon their plans for the overthrow of the Rebel Government. Early 
in the last century a cobbler, whose name has long since passed into 
oblivion, is said to have opened up his shop, and for a short time carried 
on his business within its walls. 

At the present time (1914) the ravine in which the house is situated, 
and through which in past years it was more easily reached, is rapidly 
filling up with brush and brambles, making the approach to the house 
much more difficult than it formerly was. But by taking a more cir- 
cuitous route and approaching the house from its rear, it is still easily 
accessible; and year by year parties of the townspeople, accompanied 
by their guests from abroad, make frequent pilgrimages to it. 

The Devil's Den. 

THE DEVIL'S DEN is located at the base of the east side of Little 
Muscatanipus hill, a short distance in a southerly direction from the 
railroad station in the village. The entrance to the den is at the foot of 
an out-cropping ledge, and is so small as to be practically impassable to 
any but persons of small size. At the present time this entrance is par- 
tially concealed by bushes and young pines. The den has been explored 
by very few people; and these who have made the venture have found 
the passage-way so tortuous and narrow as to compel them to "crawl on 
their hands and knees" for the first twelve or fifteen feet, at the end of 
which distance they report the passage as widening out, and increasing 



34 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

in height so as to form a small room in which it is possible to sit erect. 
The passage-way continues on beyond this room; but from this point its 
dimensions are too small to permit further explorations. Among those 
who in their boyhood days, "in fear and trembling," penetrated into its 
mysterious depths are James P. S. Tucker, Bryant A. Wallace, and E- 
E- Parker. 

In connection with this cave and Little Muscatanipus hill, the writer 
many years ago heard the late Samuel Talbot relate the following legend; 
which he claimed to have heard when a boy, many times told by his 
father, Ezra Talbot, who lived oh the west slope of the hill. It is a witch 
story; and one of the few of that kind which have survived here from 
the early days of the town. It dates back to a period in the country's 
history immediately following the close of the Revolution, when New 
England was flooded with witch stories in which the celebrated Moll 
Pitcher was the heroine; her reputation as a witch having been estab- 
lished from the fact that, owing to the insufficient methods then in use 
for the dissemination of news, the brave deeds which, as a soldier in man's 
clothing, she performed in the Patriot army while fighting by the side 
of her husband in its ranks, were, in their transmission throughout the 
country, so changed, and the real facts so altered and distorted, as to 
impress the general public with the idea that she was endowed with 
supernatural powers. 

But to return to the story. Moll Pitcher once made a visit to this 
town, where she was for a brief pericd the guest of one of its citizens. 
One day while walking out with her host and a party of his friends, 
prompted, perhaps, by a desire of pleasing him and them as a slight re- 
turn for their hospitality, she suddenly stopped in a small cleared space 
near the den, and, standing erect with uplifted hands, began to mutter 
what appeared to them to be incantations. As the moments passed, her 
gestures became more and more violent, and her language more wild and 
incoherent. Suddenly, to the great surprise, and, very probably, to the 
consternation of her audience, an old sow with a litter of twelve pigs 
issued from the surrounding woods and began to run around her in a 
circle. Twelve times they circled around her form and then disappeared; 
vanishing as suddenly as they came. With their disappearance the 
witch resumed her normal condition, and proceeded to inform her as- 
tonished hearers that the day would come when silver and gold would 
be dug out of that hill by the cart load. The witch's prophecy is as yet 
unfulfilled; but the citizens of today are still able to point with pride 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 35 

to the cave, and also to the hill, the most important concomitants necessary 
to its fulfilment. 

The Bear's Den. 

THE BEAR'S DEN is located in the west part of the township 
near the foot of Big Muscatanipus hill, on its southeasterly slope. It 
has the appearance of being a natural cave, and is of considerable size. 
Its internal appearance is such as indicates that it has long been a resort 
for wild animals. From time immemorial it has been known to the people 
dwelling in its vicinity as the bear's den. But there is no person at the 
present time living who has personal knowledge of its ever having been 
the abode of an animal of that description. Its name probably originated 
with the Indians long before the advent of the whites in this part of the 
township, and has survived to the present time as a matter of tradition. 
It is not improbable that this cave was the original home of the identical 
bear in whose honor, possibly from its extraordinary size, the Indians 
gave to the hill upon which it is located, as well as to its sister hill on 
its eastern side, and the pond which nestles at its feet on the north, the 
name Muscatanipus, meaning "great bear." 

Indians. 

There are no proofs that this town, either before or after its incor- 
poration, ever suffered from Indian depredations. Indeed, neither by tra- 
dition nor record, are they mentioned as having been at any time even tem- 
porary sojourners within its limits. But that at some period in time past 
they were frequent visitors, and, possibly, so far as their nomadic habits 
permitted, even permanent residents in this town, the implements of 
their manufacture which have been found in various locations, and the 
retention by the pond and the hills adjacent to it and the river of their 
original Indian names of Muscatanipus and Nissitisset furnish abundant 
proof. But perhaps the strongest proof of this, at least quasi, perma- 
nency of their habitation here, is furnished by the fact that within a few 
years last past an Indian burying place has been located on the east shore 
of Muscatanipus pond, between the shore and the ice-houses of the Fresh 
Pond Ice Company. 

In 1902 this burying ground was made a matter of investigation by 
the authorities of Harvard College ; who caused many of the graves to be 
opened and, as a result, obtained many specimens of Indian skulls, and 



36 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



also of various implements of their manufacture, which were added to 
the ethnological department of the college museum. 

In 1891, also, the employees of the Brookline and Pepperell railroad, 
while engaged in building the road-bed for the spur-track on the west 
side of Rock Ramond hill, excavated several skulls, which good authori- 
ties pronounced to be of Indian origin, and of which one was perforated 
by a hole apparently caused by a rifle ball. 

Population of the Town at Different Periods in Its History. 



1769 
1775 
1786 
1790 
1800 
1810 
1820 
1830 
1840 
1850 
1860 
1870 
1880 
1890 
1900 
1910 
1914 



Estimated by the writer, 
Guessed at by the State authorities, 
Selectmen's return to the State, 
United States Census, 



(Estimated), 



135 
320 
262 
338 
454 
538 
592 
641 
652 
708 
756 
741 
698 
546 
600 
501 
550 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 37 



CHAPTER II. 

Old Dunstable. 

Farm Grants — New Plantation Chartered — Its Extent- — Its Disintegration 
— Names and Dates of Incorporation of Towns Formed from Its 
Territory in New Hampshire — Copy of Proprietor's Deed — Old 
Canal Leading Out of Museatanipus Pond — Rock Ramond Hill. 

The township of Brookline as constituted at the present time includes 
within its eastern limits a tract of land two miles in width and extending 
north and south for the entire length of its east boundary line which was 
originally included in the territory of Old Dunstable, of which it formed 
the extreme western limits. 

In 1746 the west part of Old Dunstable, including this tract, was 
incorporated as a new township under the name of Hollis. 

In 1769 this tract was taken away from Hollis and in conjunction 
with the southern part of the Mile Slip, incorporated into a township 
under the name of Raby. Thus it appears that the history of this tract, 
up to the time of the incorporation of Raby in 1769, was identical with 
the histories of Old Dunstable and Hollis during the same period. But 
the social, civil, political and ecclesiastical histories of each of the latter 
towns has already been written and published; and thus, partly because 
those histories are easily accessible to the general public, but more es- 
pecially because of the fact that the early settlers in that part of Dun- 
stable and Hollis which subsequently became a part of Raby were so 
remote from the centres of activity in each as to have few or no interests 
in common with either, a repetition in these pages of the subject matter 
in them contained, except so far as the same may be necessary for the 
purposes of this work, is deemed by the writer to be unnecessary. But 
because of this early territorial connection of Raby with Old Dunstable, 
we deem it proper at this point to narrate as briefly as possible the story 
of the origin, life and disintegration, territorially considered, of the latter 
township. 

Prior to the establishment by the King, in 1741, of the boundary 
line between the Provinces of New Hamsphire and Massachusetts, the 



38 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

latter Province had claimed, and virtually exercised, jurisdiction over all 
that part of southern New Hampshire lying west of the settlements at 
Dover and Portsmouth; and under that claim had issued, at various 
times and to different individuals and companies, grants of lands lying 
in the valley of and on both sides of the Merrimack river in New Hamp- 
shire. 

These tracts of land thus distributed were known as Farm Grants. 
Among the larger of them were the Charlestown School Farm containing 
1000 acres, and located on the south bank of the Souhegan river in the 
present town of Milford ; and of which the southwest corner, now marked 
by a granite monument, was at Dram-Cup hill, and was identical with 
the northwest corner of Old Dunstable; and the Artillery Farm Grant, 
which was made in 1673 to the Honorable Artillery Company of Boston, 
Mass., and which comprised 1000 acres of land lying on the north bank 
of the Nashua river and west bank of the Merrimack river in Nashua. 

In the year 1673 the number of acres that had been disposed of by 
these grants amounted to about fifteen thousand; and the grants were 
scattered over a large territory, few of them being contiguous, some of 
them unsettled, and others sparsely settled. 

Of those which were settled, the inhabitants of each, acting inde- 
pendently of each other, were practically without any local government, 
and so far removed from the home government at Boston as to be prac- 
tically outside of its oversight and control. Recognizing the inconven- 
iences and hardships to which they were subjected from the existence of 
these conditions, in September, 1673, the proprietors of certain of these 
grants petitioned the Great and General Court of Massachusetts to con- 
solidate them into a plantation. After due consideration, the Court, 
on the 26th day of October, of the same year, granted the prayer of the 

The and on the same date issued a charter for the plantation, 
petition, new plantation included not only the original grants of the pro- 
prietors to whom the charter was issued, but also all of the territory lying 
outside of their several grants which was afterwards in the township of 
Old Dunstable. In 1674 the plantation received the name of Dunstable; 
the name being given in honor of Mrs. Mary Tyng, wife of Edward Tyng, 
an immigrant in 1630 from Dunstable, England. 

The plantation of Old Dunstable as it was originally constituted 
contained about two hundred square miles of land lying on both sides of 
the Merrimack river. On the east side it included nearly all of the present 
town of Litchfield, a portion each of Londonderry and Pelham, and all of 
Hudson. Its southeast corner was located at the corner of Methuen and 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 39 

Dracut, Mass. West of the Merrimack river, it was bounded on the 
north by the Souhegan river, on the west by a line running due south 
from Dram-Cup hill to the Groton new line, established in 1730; (this 
west boundary line ran, at its nearest point, about 18 rods west of Mus- 
catanipus pond in Brookline); and on the south by Groton Plantation, 
Chelmsford, and Provinceland, now Townsend, Mass. The following 
named towns in New Hampshire and Massachusetts were included wholly 
or in part within its original limits. In New Hampshire: — Nashua, 
Hollis, and Hudson in full; and, in part, Amherst, Merrimack, Milford, 
Litchfield, Londonderry, Pelham, and Brookline. 

In Massachusetts : — Dunstable and Tyngsboro in full ; in part ; Groton, 
Dracut, Pepperell and Townsend. 

Disintegration. 

The process of the disintegration of Old Dunstable in New Hamp- 
shire began in 1722. In that year a small tract of land was taken from 
its northeast corner and annexed to Londonderry. 

The dates of the incorporation of the several towns which either in 
whole or in part were formed out of its territory in New Hampshire are 
as follows : — 

Hudson: twice incorporated; the first time as Nottingham, by 
Massachusetts, Jan. 4, 1733; the second time as Nottingham West, by 
New Hampshire, July 5, 1746; the name was changed to Hudson in 
June, 1830. 

Litchfield: twice incorporated; the first time by Massachusetts, 
July 4, 1734; the second time by New Hampshire, June 5, 1749. 

Munson, by New Hampshire, April 1, 1746. In 1770 Munson sur- 
rendered its charter to the State, and its territory was divided between 
the towns of Hollis and Amherst; where it remained until 1794, when it 
was taken in conjunction with the northerly part of the Mile Slip and the 
Charlestown and Duxbury School Farms to form the town of Milford. 

Nashua: by New Hampshire as Dunstable, April 1, 1746. The 
name Dunstable was changed to Nashua Dec. 7, 1836. 
• . Merrimack; by New Hampshire, April 2, 1746. 

Hollis; by New Hampshire, April 3, 1746. 

Pelham; by New Hampshire, July 5, 1746. 

Brookline; by New Hampshire, March 30, 1769. 

Milford; by New Hampshire, Jan. 11, 1794. 



40 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

During the years intervening between the issuing of their grant in 
1673 and the year 1794, when by the incorporation of Milford all the 
territory which it originally included had been incorporated into town- 
ships, the proprietors of Old Dunstable continued to exercise the rights 
conferred upon them under the terms of their charter. 

As a matter of fact, for many years after the incorporation of Milford, 
they continued to issue grants, or deeds, of lands located within the original 
bounds of Old Dunstable; and only ceased to do so when, by reason of 
their having revoked, for conditions broken, so many of their grants and 
made so many reconveyances to so many different parties of the same 
tracts of land, the titles to the same became so hopelessly involved as to 
render their acts farcical; and as grantors of land under the Old Dun- 
stable Grant, they finally dropped out of sight. But they left behind 
them, as a legacy to their descendants, a crop of law suits over contested 
titles to lands which for many subsequent years supplied the county courts 
with business; the echoes of which are occasionally heard, even at the 
present time. 

These grants, or proprietors' deeds, were certainly issued as late as 
1803. The following copy of one of them is inserted here as a matter of 
curiosity. It is dated in November, 1791, and is one of many similar 
grants now in the possession of the writer which, taken together, include 
2900 acres of land within the limits of Brookline; and in all of which 
David Wright of Pepperell ,Mass., the great-grandfather of the writer, is 
named as grantee. 

"Laid out to David Wright on the original right of Robert Ox two 
hundred and fifty acres of land lying in that part of Old Dunstable called 
Raby fifty acres on the forty-second Division the remainder on the third 
Bounded as follows Beginning on the east side of the stream or river 
running out of Muscatanipus pond just where the water enters into the 
ditch that leads to Conant's mills thence Down the east side of the road 
to stake and stones thence East to the North West corner of lot of land 
Layd out to Maj'r Hobbart Being about twenty rods thence East by the 
North Bounds of the said lot last mentioned fifty rods to a lot of land 
claimed by Randal McDonols thence North three Degrees West by said 
McDonols land one hundred and thirty-one poles to a small read oak 
tree marked thence north eighty degrees East fifty-eight Poles to a large 
White Pine tree marked on the side of the road west of said McDonols 
House thence North five degrees West by said road one hundred and four 
poles to a Pine tree marked thence North one hundred and twenty Poles 
thence West one hundred and fifty-six Poles to land formerly layd out to 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 41 

Mr. Benjamin Prescott on Rock Raymond thence South thirteen degrees 

West by said Prescott land eighty Poles thence south seventy degrees 

West by said Prescott land fifty-six Poles to a Great Pine tree standing 

on the East Bank of the North Stream thence Down the easterly Bank 

thereof to the place of Beginning. 

Surved by Joseph Blanchard 

The two hundred acres lay out on the third Division to be equal to fifty 

acres of the Best Land 

Toseph Blanchard, ) _ ., A ,, 

xt u t 11 C Committee 

Noah Love well, ) 

The foregoing grant, or laying out, was approved by the proprietors 
at a meeting holden at the house of Jonathan Pollard, innholder in Dun- 
stable, Nov. 1, 1791; as appears by the attestation, signed by Noah 
Lovewell, proprietor's clerk, on the back thereof. 

The grant is interesting, not only because it shows the usual form of 
the proprietor's deeds, but also because it establishes the fact that at the 
time of its date, in 1791, a canal, of which the vestiges are visible at the 
present time, extended from the east shore of Muscatanipus pond down 
the east side of the river for the purpose of carrying water to operate a 
sawmill below the outlet of the pond, and that the mill was known as 
"Conant's." 

It is interesting, further, because of its mention of the hill on the 
northeast shore of the pond by the name of Rock Raymond, instead of 
"Rock Rament"; thus conclusively proving that the latter name, by 
which in mcdern times this hill has been known, is a corruption of the 
former. 



42 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



CHAPTER III. 

Brookline Before Its Incorporation. 

1673-1769. 

The Mile Slip— Land Derived from Townsend, Mass. — The Old North 
Boundary Line of Townsend — The Groton Gore — Petitions for a 
New Township, 1738-1739— West Parish of Old Dunstable— The 
Province Line, 1741— Brookline as a Part of Hollis, 1746-1769 
— Early Settlers. 

At the date of the incorporation of Old Dunstable, Oct. 27, 1673, 
the territory now comprised within the limits of Brookline was divided 
into three parts. Of these parts, the eastern and by far the larger part 
was then included within the limits of the former town; of which, as 
has already been stated, it formed the extreme western limits. The second 
part consisted of the southerly portion of a tract of land located on the 
western borders of old Dunstable, and known as the Mile Slip. The 
third, and smallest part, consisted of a triangular shaped tract of land 
located at Dunstable's southwest corner, which was then Province land, 
but which subsequently became a part of Townsend, Mass. 

The Mile Slip. 

THE MILE SLIP, or, as it was sometimes written in the early 
records, Mile Strip, consisted of a tract of land about one mile in width 
and ten miles in length which extended in a northerly direction from 
the old north boundary line of Townsend, Mass., to the south boundary 
line of Lyndeborough. 

It was bounded on the east by old Dunstable, and by a township 
then known as Narragansett No. 3, (now Amherst ) under a grant of the 
same from the General Court of Massachusetts to certain officers and 
soldiers who served in the Narragansett War in 1675; the grant being 
made in 1728; and on the west by township No. 1, now Mason, and 
township No. 2, now Wilton, in the old Masonian grant of 1749. 



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HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 43 

Originally the Slip was unincorporated land; it having, for some 
unknown reason, failed to be included in either the Dunstable or Ma- 
sonian grants. In 1769 its southern half was incorporated as a part of 
Brookline. In 1776 its northern part, together with the Duxbury School 
Farm, were incorporated into a township under the name of Duxbury. 

Duxbury had but a short existence; and when Milford was incor- 
porated in 1794, it, with the northern part of the Mile Slip, was covered 
into the territory of the latter town. Thus the entire original area of the 
Mile Slip is today included within the boundary lines of Brookline and 
Milford. 

The Triangular Tract of Land Derived from Townsend, Mass., 
and the Old North Boundary Line of Townsend. 

At that date, 1673, all of that portion of the west part of old Dun- 
stable which is now included in Brookline was bounded on the south by 
Groton Plantation, now Pepperell, Mass., and the present town of Towns- 
end, Mass.; which was then an unbroken wilderness. Townsend was 
chartered in 1732; and for many years subsequently, or until the estab- 
lishment of the Province Line in 1741, its northeast corner was located 
at the junction of its east boundary line with the north boundary line 
of Groton Plantation. This location probably never was, and certainly 
is not now, definitely known. But it is supposed to have been about one 
mile south of Townsend's present northeast corner. The old north 
boundary line of Townsend commenced at its said northeast corner and 
ran west, thirty-one and one-half degrees north, until it reached its ter- 
minus somewhere in the present town of Greenville ; crossing in its course 
the southwest part of Brookline's present territory, and the central part 
of township No. 1, now Mason. 

By the establishment of the Province line in 1741, that part of Towns- 
end lying north of that line, and east of the east boundary line of Mason, 
became a part of New Hampshire; and subsequently, at Brookline's in- 
corporation, was included in its charter. This was the Triangular Tract 
in question. It was in the shape of a scalene triangle. As to its bound- 
ary lines, they have been hitherto somewhat difficult to locate, because 
of the lack of sufficiently accurate data from which to establish the point 
at which the old north boundary line of Townsend crossed the south 
boundary line of Brookline. 

But, fortunately, an old deed of the home farm of the late Leonidas 
Pierce in South Brookline describes the farm's east boundary line as 



44 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

being identical with the old north boundary line of Townsend, Mass. 
This farm's east boundary is at the present time not only marked by 
bounds set in the ground, but its course in a southeasterly direction is 
indicated by a trcdden trail which, until within a few years past, was 
well defined; and which, even now, can be traced to the state line. This 
trail, during his residence of many years on the farm, was always known 
and spoken of by Mr. Pierce and his family as the "Old Dunstable Line"; 
and over it, during the forties, they were accustomed to see, nearly every 
morning, Capt. Samuel Brooks come riding down on horseback from his 
home on Townsend hill to the sawmill on Wallace brook which he built 
in the thirties, and which still bears his name. 

It is apparent, therefore, that by beginning at any point in the eastern 
boundary line of the Leonidas Pierce farm, and, reversing the course of 
the old North boundary line of Townsend, running east thirty-one and 
one-half degrees south, the point at which the latter line crossed the 
present south boundary line of Brookline, and consequently its course 
across the town, may be established, at least, approximately. 

Having made the experiment, we find that the old north boundary 
line of Townsend crossed the present south boundary line of Brookline 
at a point in the same located about one and one-fourth miles west of the 
town's southeast corner, and continuing on in its designated course across 
the town, crossed its west boundary line at a point in the same located 
about one mile north of its southwest corner; passing in its course about 
one-fourth of a mile to the south of Little Muscatanipus hill, and skirting 
the base of Big Muscatanipus hill on its southwesterly side; where, on 
the farm of Samuel A. W. Ball, there is standing at the present time a 
stone wall which is mentioned in old deeds of the farm as being located 
on the old north boundary line of Townsend. 

Bearing upon, and corroborative of the fore-going, relative to the 
location in this town of the old north boundary line of Townsend, Mass., 
the writer submits the following statement of admitted facts, and the 
results obtained from computations founded upon them. 

By the survey made by Jonathan Danforth in 1668 of Groton Plan- 
tation, its territory lying west of the Nashua river and south of old Dun- 
stable, was bounded on the north by a line extending west from the river 
and four miles in length. At the west end of this line the northeast 
corner of Townsend was afterwards located; and from it the old north 
boundary line of Townsend commenced to run; its course being west, 
thirty-one and one-half degrees north; a course which would take it 
through the south and southwesterly part of Brookline's present territory. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 45 

When the Province line was established in 1741, its course on the 
west side of the Nashua river began at a point substantially identical 
with that at which the said north boundary of Groton Plantation began, 
and ran north eighty (80) degrees west. 

When Hollis was incorporated in 1746, its charter described its south 
boundary line as running on the Province line — "North Eighty Degrees 
West Six miles and ninety six rods from the Nashua river." Its west 
boundary line, which was identical with the west boundary line of old 
Dunstable, began at the west end of the south boundary line and ran 
due north to the southwest corner of Munson; a length of four miles 
and one hundred and forty rods. 

Again, when Brookline was incorporated in 1769, its south boundary 
line as described in its charter was exactly three miles in length. Of the 
three miles two represented the width of the strip of land taken for the 
new township from the west side of Hollis, and one mile the width of the 
Mile Slip; which was also taken; and which was supposed to be a mile 
wide, more or less. It was probably more; for the present measurement 
of the town's south boundary line is three miles and eighty-five rods. 

By using the foregoing data, and, beginning at its old northeast cor- 
ner, laying out the course of Townsend's old north boundary line, it will 
be found to enter Brookline at practically the same point and to pursue 
practically the same course across its territory as is indicated in the re- 
sults obtained from the first employed of the foregoing two methods. 

The Triangular Tract. 

The triangular tract of land was bounded as follows: On the south 
by a line beginning at a point in the Province (State) line about one 
mile and one hundred and ten rods west of Brookline's southeast corner 
and running west by the Province or State line one mile and two hun- 
dred and ninety -five rods to the southeast corner of Mason; thence 
turning and running north by the east boundary line of Mason about 
one mile. Thence turning and running east thirty-one and one-half 
degrees south by the old north boundary line of Townsend, Mass., to 
the place of beginning. 

The southwest corner of old Dunstable was located in the north 
boundary line of this tract of land at a point where the same was inter- 
sected by Dunstable's west boundary line. 

After the triangular tract of land was set off from Massachusetts 
into New Hampshire by the establishment of the Province line in 1741, 



46 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

it remained as unincorporated land until the incorporation of Hollis in 
1746; when a small part of its east end was included within the charter 
limit of that town. The remaining portion remained as unincorporated 
territory until it was taken to form a part of Brookline at its incorporation 
in 1769. 

The present dwelling house and sawmill of Perley L. Pierce in South 
Brookline, the old Samuel Brooks sawmill, the dwelling houses of the 
late Leonidas Pierce and of the late Henry T. Pierce are all located upon 
territory which was formerly included within the bounds of the triangular 
tract of land. 

The Groton Gore. 

Among the many grants of lands within the limits of the Province 
of New Hampshire which the Province of Massachusetts had issued 
prior to 1741 was one made in 1734; by the terms of which, in response 
to a petition by the inhabitants of Groton, Mass., the latter town became 
the owner of a large tract of land located west of, and adjoining to, Old 
Dunstable. 

This grant was made to Groton as a compensation for the loss by it 
of the "Nashoba land," so called; a tract of four thousand acres located 
on its east and southeast borders to which it had set up a claim of title 
as being a part of its original territory. But which claim, after being 
for many years a subject of dispute between Groton and other claimants, 
was finally settled by the disputed territory's being incorporated with 
certain other lands as Littleton, Mass. The grant received its name of 
Gore from the fact that it was located in the gore of land between the 
west boundary line of Old Dunstable and the old north boundary line 
of Townsend, Mass. 

Groton Gore contained ten thousand and eight hundred acres. The 
House Journal of the General Court of Massachusetts, under date of 
Nov. 28, 1734, on page 94, gives its bounds as follows: 

"Beginning at the North West corner of Dunstable* at Dram-Cup 
hill by Souhegan river and running South in Dunstable line last Peram- 
bulated and run by a committee of the General Court, two thousand 
one hundred and fifty two poles to Townsend line, there making an angle 
and running West 31^ Degrees North on Townsend line and Province 
land Two Thousand and Fifty Six poles to a pillar of Stones then turning 

* This corner is at the present time marked by a stone monument, erected by the Milford Histori- 
cal and Genealogical Society, with appropriate exercises, August 21, 1895. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 47 

and Running by Province Land 31^2 Degrees North two Thousand and 
forty eight poles to corner first mentioned." 

But the Massachusetts Court Records of June 15, 1736, at which 
date the Grant was confirmed, describes each of its boundary lines as 
being considerably shorter than they were described as being in the fore- 
going excerpt from the House Journal. 

But in each of said descriptions, however, the Gore's east boundary 
line is described as "Beginning at Dram-Cup hill and running south in 
Dunstable line as last perambulated to Townsend line"; and as at this 
late day the question as to which of said descriptions gives the correct 
length of the Gore's east boundary line is one of comparatively little 
importance, in the map of early Brookline accompanying this chapter 
the "Gore" is plotted in accordance with the measurements as given in 
the said Massachusetts' Court Records of Nov. 28, 1734. 

From the foregoing it appears that the Groton Gore was in the shape 
of a scalene triangle; the west point of which was located in the west 
part of Mason, now Greenville. That it was bounded on the east by 
the west boundary line of old Dunstable, on the south by the old north 
boundary line of Townsend, Mass., and on the north by a line beginning 
at its said west point in Mason and running by Province land (now Mason 
and Wilton), north 31^ degrees east, to Dram-Cup hill. 

Apart from its being a matter of general historical interest, the Gro- 
ton Gore, because of the fact that it included within its area nearly or 
quite all of that part of the Mile Slip which was subsequently incor- 
porated in and now forms a part of Brookline, is of especial interest to 
Brookline folk. Yet, fifty years ago, the town's oldest inhabitants then 
living had little, save traditional, knowledge of it, or of its location. Nor, 
in the latter respect, were those who had then written histories of the towns 
in this vicinity much better informed. One of them, at least, having 
located the Groton Gore in the northwest part of the present town of 
Pepperell, Mass.* 

By the establishment of the Province line in 1741, the Gore became 
a part of New Hampshire; and Groton people had to surrender their 
rights in it. During the years of its existence, the Gore does not appear 
to have had any permanent settlers. Dr. Samuel Green in his "Boundary 
Lines of Groton, Mass.," says it was used by Groton people for pasturing 
their cattle. So says also John B. Hill in his History of Mason. Mr. 
Hill says, further, that the only settlement was a camp near a place later 
settled and occupied by Joel Annis. It is very probable that for many 

* Butler's History of Groton, Mass., Foot-note, page 59. 



48 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

years after Groton had been dispossessed of the Gore, its people con- 
tinued to pasture their cattle in that part of it which subsequently be- 
came a part of Brookline. For the descendants of Samuel Russell, who 
still own and occupy the farm on the northwest side of Big Muscatanipus 
hill upon which he settled in 1750, have a family tradition that at that 
time the meadows on Campbell's brook to the north of the farm were 
still in us"e for cattle grazing. 

PETITION FOR NEW TOWNSHIPS IN 1738 AND 1739. 

During the years 1738 and 1739, the General Court of Massachusetts 
was called upon to consider three distinct and separate petitions for the 
incorporation of new townships out of lands to be taken from Dunstable 
and Groton, Mass., jointly, or from Dunstable alone. Because of the 
fact that in each of these petitions a part of the land proposed to be taken 
was afterwards included in Brookline' s territory, and more especially be- 
cause of the fact that some of the signers of each of them were, either 
then or shortly afterwards, settlers within the town's present limits, it 
seems proper to give at this point a brief history of each of these petitions. 

The first petition, — the original of which, as well as the originals of 
the other two, is on file in the Secretary of State's office in Boston — was 
dated Nov. 29, 1738. It was addressed "To the Governor, the Council 
and the General Court," and was styled — "Petition of the Inhabitants of 
Dunstable and Groton For a Town Charter." 

After a preamble in which it set forth the disadvantages accruing to 
the subscribers by reason of their living at such distances from their 
respective meeting houses as to prevent their families from attending 
divine worship, generally, for any portion of the year — "By which means 
your Petitioners are deprived of the benefit of preaching the greater part 
of the year" — the petition proceeded as follows: — 

"There is a Tract of good land well situated for a Township of the 
contents of about six miles and a half square, bounded thus, beginning 
at Dunstable Line by Nashaway River, so running by the Westerly side 
of said River, southerly one mile in Groton land; then running Westerly, 
a parallel Line with Groton North Line till it comes to Townsend Line; 
then turning and running north to Groton North- West Corner; and from 
Groton North- West Corner by Townsend Line and by the Line of Groton 
New Grant* till it comes to be five miles and a half to the North Ward of 
Groton North Line ; from thence due east seven miles ; from thence South 

* Grcton Gore. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



49 



to Nashua River and so by Nashua River South-westerly to Groton Line> 
the first mentioned bound. Which described Lands can by no means be 
prejudicial to the Town of Dunstable or Groton; (it not coming within 
six miles or thereabouts of either of their Meeting Houses at the nearest 
place) to be taken off from them and erected into a separate Township." 

"That there is already settled in the bounds of the afore described 
Tract, near Fort)* Families, and many more ready to come on were it 
not for the difficulties and hardships aforesaid of getting to Meeting. 
These with many other Disadvantages we find very troublesome to us, 
our living so remote from the Towns we respectively belong to." 

The petition concluded with the following prayer: "That the Afore- 
said Lands may be erected into a separate and distinct township"; and 
also "That the non-resident proprietors in the said Lands, by reason of 
the great benefit which they would receive from the increased value of 
their lands and the easier settling of the same, should be made to pay 
their proportional part for the building of a meeting house and settling a 
minister," etc. 

The names of those signing this petition were as follows: — 

Settlers on the Aforesaid Lands. 



Obadiah Parker 
Josiah Blood 
Jerahmael Cummings 
Eben'r Pearce 
William Colburn 
vStephen Harris 
Thomas Densmore 



Peter Powers 
Abram Taylor, Jun. 
Benj Farley 
Henry Barton 
Peter Wheeler 
Robert Colburn 
David Nevins 



Philip Woolerich 
Nath'l Blood 
William Adams 
Joseph Taylor, 
Moses Proctor 
Will'm Shattuck 
Thos Nevins. 



Non-Resident Proprietors. 



Samuel Brown 
W. Brown 
Joseph Blanchard 
John Fowle, Jun. 
Nath'l Saltonstall 



Joseph Eaton 
Joseph Lemmon 
Jeremiah Baldwin 
Sam'l Baldwin 
Daniel Ramant 



John Malvin 
Jona'. Malvin 
James Cummings 
Isaac Far well 
Eben'r Proctor 



In Council Jan. 4, 1739, this petition was read and considered; and 
was finally referred for further consideration to the next May session. 
At the same time a committee was appointed to consider the same and 



50 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

report — "What in their opinion might be proper for the Court to do in 
answer thereto." It does not appear that the committee ever reported. 
If the foregoing petition had been granted, the new township would have 
included all that part of Brookline's present territory lying between its 
south boundary line and a line parallel to and about three miles north of 
the same. Yet of the twenty-one "settlers" who signed it, although the 
majority of them were then living in the west part of Old Dunstable, 
not one of them then resided in Brookline's present territory. Of the 
number of non-resident signers, however, Jonathan Melvin and Samuel 
Brown were afterwards residents here; Melvin coming here in 1739, and 
Samuel Brown a few years later. 

The Second Petition for a New Township. 

While the first petition was still pending in the General Court, certain 
inhabitants of the north part of Groton who were dissatisfied because the 
new township for which it asked did not include so large a part of Groton 
as they desired, united with certain of the inhabitants of the west part of 
Dunstable in presenting to the General Court a second petition for the 
formation of a new township. 

This second petition was dated Dec. 12, 1739. Its preamble, except 
for its brevity, was similar to that of the first petition. Its description 
of the proposed new township was as follows : 

"Beginning at the Line between Groton and Dunstable, where it 
crosses Lancaster (Nashua) River, and so up said River until it comes to 
a place called and known by the name of Joseph Blood's Ford Way on 
said River — thence a West Point till it comes to Townsend Line, etc., 
with such a part and so much of the town of Dunstable, as this Honor- 
able Court in their great Wisdom shall think proper, with the inhabitants 
thereof, may be Erected into a separate and distinct Township, that they 
may attend the Public worship of God with more Ease than at present 
they can by reason of the great distance they live from the places thereof 
as aforesaid." 

Signers — Residents in Groton. 

Richard Warner Ebenezer Gilson Josiah Tucker 

Benjamin Swallow Ebenezer Pierce Zachariah Lawrence, Jr 

William Allen Samuel Fisk William Blood 

Isaac Williams John Green Jeremiah Lawrence 

vStephen Eames. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 51 



Residents in Dunstable. 

Enoch Hunt, William Blanchard, Samuel Parker, 

Eleazer Flagg, Gideon Honey, Samuel Farley, 

Samuel Cummings, Josiah Bloed, William Adams, 

Phillip Woolerich. 

Of those whose signatures are attached to the second petition, Samuel 
Farley was the only one then living within the present limits of Brookline. 
Of the Groton signers of the petition, Josiah Tucker was the father of 
Swallow Tucker, who settled here several years prior to the town's incor- 
poration in 1769, and Ebenezer Gilson, who came here from Groton 
before the Revolution. 

The Third Petition for a New Township. 

Notwithstanding the fact that so many of the settlers in the west 
part of old Dunstable signed either one or the other, or both, of the fore- 
going petitions for the formation of a new township, it is apparent that 
the majority were opposed to, or at least, dissatisfied with each and all 
of them. For while the majority favored the formation of the proposed 
new township, they desired that it be formed wholly out of Dunstable 
territory ; and with that end in view, they presented to the General Court 
of Massachusetts a third petition — or, as it is sometimes styled — re- 
monstrance. 

This third petition was dated Dec. 21, 1739; and was in terms as 
follows : 

"We, the Sub'rs Inhab'ts of ye Town of Dunstable and resident in 
that part of it called Nissitissit, Do hereby Authorize and fully Empower 
Abraham Taylor, Jun. and Peter Powers to represent to the General 
Court our unwillingness that any part of Dunstable should be sett to 
Groton to make a Township or Parish and to shew fourth our Earnest 
Desire that a Township be made entirely out of Dunstable Land, Ex- 
tending Six Miles North from Groton Line which will bring them on the 
Line on ye Brake of Land and just include the present settlement; or 
otherwise as ye Honorable Committee Reported, and Agreeable to the 
tenour thereof, as the Honorable Court shall see meet, and as in Duty 
bound, &c, 



52 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



Thomas Dinsmore, 
Jeramael Cummings, 
Joseph Whitcomb, 
Jonathan Melvin, 
William Adams, 
William Wilson, 
Moses Proctor, 



James Whiting, 
James MeDaniels, 
Randal MeDaniels, 
Joseph MeDaniels, 
William Colburn, 
Robert Colburn, 
Stephen Harris, 



Peter Wheeler, 
David Nevins, 
Thomas Nevins, 
Nathaniel Blood, 
William Shattuek, 
Joshua WYight, 
Henry Barton. 



The General Court referred this petition to a committee, which 
subsequently reported as follows: 

Report of the Committee. 

"The committee appointed on the petition of the inhabitants and 
proprietors situated on the westerly side of Dunstable and northerly side 
of Groton, after notifying all parties, having repaired to the lands peti- 
tioned to be erected into a township and carefully viewed the same, find 
a very good tract of land in Dunstable, west of Nashaway river, between 
said river and Souhegan river, extending from Groton New Grant " (Gro- 
ton Gore)" and Townsend line six miles east lying in a very commodious 
form for a township, and on said lands there is now about twenty families 
and many more settling. That none of the inhabitants live nearer to a 
meeting house than seven miles, and if they go to their town have to 
pass over a ferry the greater part of the year. 

We also find in Groton a sufficient quantity of land accommodable 
for settlement, and a considerable number of Inhabitants thereon, that 
in some short time, when they are well agreed, may be erected into a 
Precinct or Parish, and that it will be very inconvenient to erect a town- 
ship in the form prayed for. The committee are of opinion that the 
Petitioners in Dunstable are under such circumstances as necessitates 
them to ask relief which will be fully obtained by their being made a 
township. 

The committee are further of the opinion that it will be greatly for 
the good and interest of the township that the non-resident proprietors 
have liberty of voting with the inhabitants as to the Building and Placing 
a meeting house and that the lands be equally taxed, and that for the 
support of the Gcspel ministry among them the lands of the non-resident 
Proprietors be taxed at two pence per acre for the space of five years. 

All of which is humbly submitted in behalf of the committee." 

(Signed) THOMAS PERRY. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 53 

This report was read in the Council Dee. 27, 1739; and was so far 
accepted that it was ordered — "That the lands mentioned and described 
therein with the inhabitants there be erected into a separate and distinct 
Precinct and the said inhabitants are hereby vested with all such powers 
and privileges as any other Precinct in this Province have or by law ought 
to have or enjoy. And they are also empowered to assess and lay a tax 
of two pence per acre per annum for the space of five years on all the 
unimproved land belonging to the non-resident proprietors to be applied 
to the support of the ministry according to said Report." 

Dec. 28, 1739, the House of Representatives concurred in the fore- 
going order. And thus, as the result of this and the two prior petitions, 
the west part of old Dunstable was- — "Erected into a separate and distinct 
Precinct." 

The West Parish of Dunstable. 

This Precinct of Old Dunstable, which during its existence was known 
as West Dunstable, enjoyed the rights and privileges as set forth under 
the act of its establishment by the General Court on the 28th day of 
December, 1739, until its incorporation as a new township under the name 
of Hollis, April 3, 1746. 

It was bounded on the north, west, and south by the boundary lines 
of old Dunstable, and on the east by the Nashua river and a line extend- 
ing northerly therefrom to the Souhegan river; and included within its 
bounds all of the land which, with the exception of the south part of the 
Mile Slip, at the present time is included within the limits of Brookline 
and Hollis respectively. 

But although the settlers in that part of West Dunstable which now 
constitutes Brookline were citizens of the Precinct, and as such, entitled 
to the enjoyment of all its privileges and immunities, they were few in 
number; and there is little or no evidence that they, or any one of them, 
so far as taking an active part in the management of its affairs was 
concerned, were ever particularly interested in its fortunes. 

The Province Line of 1741. 

The original charters of the Provinces of New Hampshire and Massa- 
chusetts were, of course, granted by the King of England. In the matter 
of boundary lines, their descriptions were very indefinite; for the king's 
counsellors had very indefinite knowledge of the country wherein they 
were granted. 



54 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

When the charter of Massachusetts was granted in 1629, the coun- 
sellors fixed its north boundary line as being three miles north of, and 
parallel to, the Merrimack river; the course of which was then supposed 
to be west and east. Afterwards it was discovered that the river's longer 
course was north and south. This discovery was the beginning of a dis- 
pute between the two Provinces over the question of the location of the 
boundary line between them, which continued for a period of twelve or 
fifteen years. 

The dispute was finally ended by the King; who, in 1739-40, issued 
a decree establishing the boundary line. The line thus established by the 
King was surveyed and located by Richard Hazzen in 1740-41. Hence 
it is known as the Province Line of 1741. By the establishment of the 
Province Line, Townsend, Mass., lost all of the territory which it had 
previously claimed in New Hampshire, a small part of which was the said 
triangular tract now in Brookline. But, at the same time, its loss was in 
some measure compensated for by the fact that it gained new territory 
at its northeast corner by coming into possession of lands which the 
running of the line transferred from New Hampshire into Massachusetts; 
the land thus transferred being that part of old Dunstable which was 
located south of the new line. It was in shape a scalene triangle. Its 
northern boundary line began at the point in Brookline where the Province 
line was intersected by the old north boundary line of Townsend, and 
extended easterly on said Province line about two miles. It was bounded 
on the south by Groton Plantation and Townsend. 

Through this tract the old east boundary line of Townsend was sub- 
sequently extended in a northerly direction for about one mile to its present 
northeast corner at the state line. The land in the tract to the west of 
the line thus extended became a part of Townsend; that to the east of 
the line became a part of Groton Plantation, now Pepperell, Mass. 

Brookline as a Part of Hollis 1746-1769. 

West Dunstable enjoyed its privileges as a precinct of Old Dunstable 
until 1746. But early in the latter year, the Governor and Council ap- 
pointed a board of five commissioners to examine all that part of Old 
Dunstable lying north of the Province line and west of the Merrimack 
river and report as to the feasibility of dividing it into new townships. 
This committee attended to its duties and reported. In accordance with 
its report, soon after it was made, all of that part of Dunstable lying west 
of the Merrimack river was divided into four parts, each of which was 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 55 

incorporated as a new township under the respective names of Dunstable, 
Hollis, Munson, and Merrimack. The township of Hollis was chartered 
April 3, 1746. It included within its limits all that part of the present 
town of Brookline which was originally a part of Old Dunstable. 

From April 3, 1746, until its own incorporation as a township, March 
30, 1769, a period of 23 years, Brookline continued to constitute a part 
of Hollis. But although its inhabitants were in Hollis, they do not appear 
to have been, either socially, politically, or ecclesiastically, to any great 
extent of it. They attended church, to be sure, in Hollis meeting house, 
not having any of their own. But the roads leading from their homes to 
the meeting house were, for the most part, mere bridle paths; and in 
such poor condition as to render a trip to church a task which only the 
most devout of the settlers had the fortitude to undertake with any degree 
of regularity. 

The same cause— poor roads — and also a poverty of possessions, 
which compelled them to stay at home and work their little clearings for 
all they were worth, in order to obtain a sustenance that would make 
their lives worth living, were also undoubtedly answerable for their play- 
ing a somewhat inconsiderable part in the social and civil affairs of the 
town; which in those days centered around the meeting house in Hollis 
village. 

Nevertheless, and notwithstanding the disadvantages under which 
they were placed during this period, some of the settlers in the eastern 
part of Brooklin£'s present territory were at times more or less actively 
engaged in the management of the town affairs of Hollis. Among those 
thus actively participating were James McDaniels, who, at Hollis' first 
town meeting, April 28, 1746, was elected surveyor of highways, an office 
to which he was again elected in 1748; Samuel Douglass, James Joseph 
and Randall McDaniels, John and Jonathan Melvin, Jasher Wyman and 
Isaac Farrar; all of whom on the 5th day of August, 1746, signed a re- 
monstrance directed to the General Court against the proposed location 
of a proposed new meeting house, as being too far away from their homes 
in the west part of the township to properly serve their needs. 

Early Settlers. 

At the date of the establishment of the Province line, in 1741, it is 
very doubtful if the territory which now constitutes the township of 
Brookline contained, all told, more than ten families of bona fide settlers; 
and these were nearly all located in the east part of the town, adjacent 



56 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

to what is now the west part of Hollis; for there is little or no evidence 
that the southern part of the Mile Slip contained settlers prior to 1750. 

Of these ten families, it is impossible to decide which was first to 
come. But so far as the dates of old deeds of lands located here and the 
names of the resident signers to the foregoing three petitions for a new 
township are entitled to be considered as evidence, the honor of having 
been the first settler in Raby might have been claimed with equal pro- 
priety by any one of them. In the following brief statements is embodied 
such information as the writer has been able to obtain relative to these 
early settlers in town. 



Farley. 

CAPT. SAMUEL FARLEY was one of the signers of the second 
of the three foregoing mentioned petitions for a new township, in 1738. 
At that time he was a resident in that part of Old Dunstable which is now 
a part of Brookline, coming there from Bedford. Mass. His log cabin 
was located about one mile south of the village main street en the east 
side of the highway leading from Brookline to Pepperell, Mass. Its site 
at the present time is occupied by a dwelling house which he erected 
prior to the opening of the Revolution, and which is believed to be the 
oldest framed building standing in town. At the date of this writing, 
this house is owned and occupied by Elmer Wallace. For many years 
past it has been known as the "Old Samuel Farley place." It is famed, 
locally, as having been the birthplace of Honorable Benjamin Mark Far- 
ley; for many years a distinguished member of the Hillsborough County 
Bar, and also of George Frederic Farley, a lawyer late of Groton, Mass., 
who were grandchildren of Captain Samuel. 

In 1768, he prepared the petition to the legislature in which the in- 
habitants of the west part of Hollis and the south part of the Mile Slip 
asked to be incorporated into a new and separate township; and, in the 
following year, acting as agent for the petitioners, he was chiefly instru- 
mental in procuring the passage by the legislature of the act in which 
the prayer of the petition was granted by the incorporation of Raby. 
The same year, 1769, he issued the call for, and presided as moderator 
over, the first town meeting to be holden in the new township. (See 
Family Records, post. ) 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 57 

McDaniels.* 

James, Joseph and Randal McDaniels were brothers. Their names 
appear as signers of the third of the foregoing petitions for a new town- 
ship; all three of them being at that time residents in West Dunstable, 
now Brookline; coming there prior to 1739, from Groton, Mass. They 
settled in West Dunstable on land which was conveyed to James Mc- 
Daniels, the eldest of the three, by Maj. Joseph Blanchard by his deed, 
dated July 17, 1739, and recorded in Middlesex, Mass., records, Vol. XL, 
page 11. 

James McDaniels' house, at the time of his settlement here, was 
located about one mile north of the present village main street on the 
west side of the east highway to Milford. It was, of course, a log cabin. 
Its site was subsequently occupied by a framed dwelling house erected by 
McDaniels, which was destroyed by fire in 1850-51; it being at that date 
owned and occupied by the late Col. Artemas Wright. He was the only 
one of the three brothers who left children surviving him; and from him 
are descended not only all the McDaniels, or Daniels, as they now style 
themselves, who since his day and generation have lived, and at the pres- 
ent time are living, in this town, but also many others of the same name 
who in the years gone by have emigrated from Brookline to various local- 
ities in New England and elsewhere. He died April 11, 1801, aged 84 
years, and is buried in the Pond cemetery 7 . His family record is given on 
a subsequent page. 

RANDAL McDANlELS' log cabin in Raby was located about one- 
half mile north of the village Main street on the west side of the north 
highway to Hollis; its exact location being a few rods northeast of the 
V formed by the junction of the latter highway with the east highway 
from Brookline to Milford. According to the family traditions, he was 
unmarried. These traditions say, further, that he died about 1752, and 
was buried in the cemetery in the wocds, about one-fourth of a mile east- 
erly of the eld Dickey place, now owned by Mrs. E. J. Rideout. 

JOSEPH McDANlELS remained in Raby but a short time after its 
incorporation, ere he removed from town. Where he went, or what finally 
became of him are, as yet, unanswered questions. 



* Original spelling of the name as written in said Blanchard deed. On the town records the name 
is spelled in several different ways; among which are McDaniels, McDonald, McDaniel, McDonel, and 
Daniels. 



58 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKL1NE 

SAMUEL DOUGLASS was a settler in West Dunstable, now Brook- 
line, as early as 1735, coming there frcm Townsend, Mass., where he was 
the immigrant settler of his family; coming there from Scotland in 1731; 
his name appearing as grantee in recorded deeds of lands in that town as 
early as Dec. 2, of the latter year. 

In 1735 he purchased of Col. Joseph Blanchard a tract of land located 
in the southwest part of old Dunstable ; of which the deed of conveyance 
to him is recorded in Middlesex records, Vol. 36, page 95. Upon this tract 
of land, soon after its purchase, he built a log cabin, and, with his family, 
took up his residence. 

At this time, old Dunstable included within its bounds a considerable 
portion of territory which now constitutes the northeast part of Towns- 
end, Mass.; and which was transferred from the former to the latter town 
by the establishment of the Province line in 1741. The lands thus 
transferred included the greater part of Nissiquassick Hill, now known as 
Townsend Hill ; upon the northern slope of which in Brookline the Doug- 
lass cabin was located. Its site at the present time is marked by an an- 
cient cellar hole, still in an excellent state of preservation, which is located 
in Brookline about midway of the hill's ascent, on the east side of, and 
about thirty rods distant from, the highway which leads from South 
Brookline to the summit of the same, and a few rods north of the state 
line. The establishment of the Province line left him still an inhabitant 
of Dunstable. In 1742, his name appears as one of forty-three citizens 
of the West Parish of Dunstable who signed the call to the Rev. Daniel 
Emerson, the first minister of the parish. In 1746, by the incorporation 
of the West Parish of Dunstable as a new township, under the name of 
Hollis, he became a citizen of the latter town ; and as such, on the 5th day of 
August of that year, in company with Stephen Ames, William Adams, 
Isaac Farrar, James, Joseph and Randall McDaniels, the majority of 
whom were afterwards citizens of Brookline, he signed a remonstrance 
against the proposed location of the second meeting house in Hollis. In 
1769, when the west part of Hollis and part of the Mile Slip were incor- 
porated as a township under the name of Raby, his farm was included in 
that part of Hollis which was taken for the new township, and he thus 
became a citizen of the latter town. 

He continued to reside in Raby for several years after its incorpora- 
tion. His name appears as a resident of this town in the United States 
census of 1790. About 1792-1793, he removed from Brookline to Little- 
ton, N. H., where his descendants are numerous at the present time, and 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 59 

where tradition says he died and is buried, although his grave is unmarked 
by any tombstone. 

His family record is given in the chapter devoted to family records 
and genealogies, post. 

JASHER WYMAN was born in Woburn, Mass., Jan. 6, 1692. The 
Woburn records give the names of his parents as John and Hannah (Far- 
rar) Wyman. At the time of the establishment of the Province line, in 
1741, he was living in the north-east part of Townsend, Mass. By the 
establishemnt of the line he was transferred from Massachusetts into 
New Hampshire. His house was located in that part of the southwest 
part of old Dunstable w T hich is now a part of Brookline; its site being 
near that now occupied by the dwelling house of Deacon Perley L. Pierce 
in South Brookline. He owned and operated a sawmill which was located 
on Stickney brook, and of which it is claimed that it was the first saw- 
mill to be erected within the limits of Brookline. Mr. Wyman continued 
to reside in West Dunstable for several years after his involuntary intro- 
duction into its territory. He certainly was a resident as late as 1746, as 
in the latter year his name appears on the West Dunstable records as one 
of the signers to a remonstrance against the proposed location of the 
second meeting house of that town. 

Ithimar B. Sawtelle, in his history of Townsend, Mass., says that he 
removed from West Dunstable to Townsend Harbor soon after the es- 
tablishment of the Province line, and that he died there. Other authori- 
ties, however, claim that he eventually removed to and died in Woburn. 
He was related by marriage to the Prescotts of Pepperell, Mass. He has, 
so far as known, no descendants in this town at the present time. 

ISAAC FARRAR in 1741 was living in West Dunstable, now Brook- 
line, coming there from Woburn, Mass., where he was born April 2, 1702. 
He was a son of Isaac and Mary (Wescott) Farrar. His house in Brook- 
line was located just north of the state line and west of the Jasher Wyman 
sawmill. Its site cannot to-day be identified. 

The late Nathan Farrar, of this tow r n, deceased, was probably one of 
his descendants, and he is represented here at the present time by his 
great-great-great-grandson, Frank Farrar, of South Brookline. 

JONATHAN MELVIN was a son of John and Hannah (Lewis) 
Melvin of Concord, Mass. He came from Concord to old Dunstable and 
settled in its west part at some time between the years 1738 and 1741. 



60 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINF. 

In 1738 his name appears on the second of the foregoing three petitions 
as one of the non-resident signers. But at that time he was already a 
land owner here; as appears by a deed of land dated in 1738 and recorded 
in Middlesex County records, Vol. 39, page 421; in which he is named as 
grantee from Daniel Raymond of certain lands in the southwest part of 
Dunstable. His log cabin was located in the northeast part of Raby 
near the west boundary line of Hollis. How long he resided here is un- 
known. But he was certainly here in 1746; for in that year his name 
appears on the Hollis records as one of the signers of the remonstrance 
against the proposed location of the meeting house. He must have 
removed from Raby before its incorporation, as his name does not 
appear on its records. 

JOHN MELVIN, a brother of the aforesaid Jonathan Melvin, set- 
tled in the west part of old Dunstable, now Brookline, at the same time 
as did the latter. His residence, like his brother's, was in the northeast 
part of the town. According to the West Dunstable records, he was 
residing here as late as 1746. It is not known when he left the town nor 
whither he went. 

JOSEPH WHITCOMB in 1739 was living in the northeast part of 
old Dunstable, now Brookline, near the Hollis line. He was probably a 
descendant, possibly a son, of Jonathan Whitcomb of Lancaster, Mass.; 
who, as early as 1730, was the proprietor of a tract of land now located in 
Brookline, which he purchased of one J. Moore. (See Middlesex Records, 
Vol. 32, page 90.) Joseph, or possibly one of his sons of the same name, 
was living in Raby as late as 1790, as his name appears in the list of names 
of its inhabitants as given in the United States Census of that year. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 61 



CHAPTER IV. 

The Town as a Part of Hollis, 1746-1769. 

Dissatisfaction Among the Inhabitants in the West Part of Hollis — 
Unsuccessful Attempts to Procure a Division of the Town — Ap- 
pointment of Samuel Farley as Their Agent to Petition the General 
Court for a Division of the Township — First and Second Petitions 
for a Charter — Charter of the Town of Raby — Area of Raby as 
First Incorporated — Subsequent Changes in Its Area — Loss of 
Land in Its Northwest Corner in 1794 — Origin of the Name of 
Raby. 

For a period of twenty-two years from the date of the incorporation 
of Hollis in 1746, the inhabitants of its western part continued faithful 
in their allegiance to the town. But during that entire period they con- 
tinued to live under the conditions described in a prior chapter. For, 
although they made many attempts to obtain pecuniary aid from their 
more prosperous fellow-citizens in the east part of the township, both by 
causing articles looking to that end to be inserted in the warrants for the 
annual town meetings, and also, by direct appeals to their sympathies, 
the articles were generally defeated. Or, if allowed to be passed, were 
changed, altered and amended, both in matter and form, to the extent 
that the resulting appropriations were so insignificant as to fall far short 
of the amount necessary to the accomplishment of the purposes for which 
they were originally intended to be used; and their sympathetic appeals 
to their neighbors were either unheeded by them or, having been politely 
received and acknowledged, were immediately forgotten. 

Thus matters went on until the year 1764; when, apparently thor- 
oughly disgusted with the condition of their affairs, and just as thoroughly 
convinced that they could expect no change for the better so long as they 
continued to retain their connections with a town in which, although 
nominally citizens, they were in reality in the condition of that class of 
outsiders known as "Non-resident proprietors"; — subject to taxation, but, 
save to a limited extent, exempt from its benefits, — the "west-enders" 
determined, if possible, to sever their connection with the mother town, 



62 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

and to set up housekeeping for themselves in a new township to be formed 
out of that part of its territory,— with as much more as they might be 
able to obtain, — which as citizens they had hitherto occupied. 

Accordingly they caused an article calling for a division of the town 
to be inserted in the warrant for the annual town meeting in March, 1764. 
The majority of the voters were opposed to any division of the township 
which would result in changing the location of the meeting house from its 
position in the exact center of a line drawn through the centre of the 
town from east to west; and, accordingly, when the article came to be 
considered in town meeting, it was disposed of by the following vote : — 

"To measure East from the meeting house to the town line and then 
to measure West from the meeting-house the same length of line — and 
all West by North and South line to be set off to the One Mile Strip so 
called." Such a division as that contemplated by this vote was unsatis- 
factory to the west-enders, and they declined to accept it. But, realizing 
that they were in a hopeless minority, they resolved to defer further action 
at that time, and wait for a more favorable opportunity in which to 
accomplish their purpose. 

In 1768 they appear to have come to the conclusion that the time 
for further action had come. For in the warrant for the annual town- 
meeting of that year there again appeared an article calling for a division 
of the township. But upon the articles being considered the majority 
disposed of it by a vote, or resolution, precisely similar in its terms to 
that by which they disposed of the similar article in the warrant for the 
town meeting in 1764. 

Disappointed, but not disheartened, by this, their second failure to 
obtain the consent of their fellow-citizens to what they considered an 
equitable division of the township, and convinced of the futility of their 
making any further efforts along the lines in which they had been moving, 
the west-enders resolved to appeal to the state authorities for a solution 
of the matter in question; and accordingly, to that end, on the 6th day 
of January, 1768, they united with the inhabitants of the Mile Slip in 
executing the following paper: 

"Appointment of Samuel Farley Agent 

We the Subscribers Inhabitants of the Westwardly part of the Town 
of Hollis and the Inhabitants & the free-holders of the Tract of Land 
call'd the Mile Slip, in the Province of New Hampshire do constitute 
and Appoint Samuel Farley of Hollis Gent to be our Agent Attorney 
and Trustee in our name and Stead to Petition His Excellency the Gov- 
ernor, the Honour'ble His Majesties Counsel & House of Representatives, 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



63 



that we the Inhabitants afores'd may be set off and Incorporated as a 
Distinct Town. 
January 6th, 1768. 



George Russell, 
Archibald Mcintosh, 
James McDonell, 
Thomas Asten, 
Nathaniel Patten, 
Sam'l Brown, 
Isaac Stevens, 
Simeon Blanchard, 
Joshua Smith, 
Abigill Spaulding, 
James Campbell, 



Samuel Russell 
Daniel Shed, 
William Blanchard, 
Benjamin Shattuck, 
James Conek, 
Elexander Mcintosh, 
John Cummings, 
James Nutting, 
Fra's Buttrick, 
Henry Spaulding, 
Clark Brown, 



Mathew Wallace, 
Jonathan Powers, 
Isaac Shattuck, 
Swallow Tucker, 
Robert Seaver, 
Peter Honey, 
Sam'l Farley, 
Rose Dickey, 
William Spaulding, 
Robert Campbell, 
James Nutting, Jun. 



Mr. Farley accepted the foregoing appointment, and on the 19th 
day of May in the same year, drew up and presented to the General Court 
a petition of which the following is a copy: — 



''Petition for the Formation of a New Town. 

"To His Excellency John Wentworth Esq. Captain General, Governor, 
& Commander in chief in and over his Majesty's Province of New Hamp- 
shire And to the Honorable his Majesty's Councel for said Province. 

"Humbly sheweth Samuel Farley of Hollis in said Province, in behalf 
of himself and sundry of the Inhabitants living in the westerly side of 
said Hollis &c in a Tract of Land adjoining to the same, called the Mile 
Slip; that those persons live very Remote from the Meeting House in 
said Hollis, that to attend the Public Worship of God there, is attended 
with much Travil — Whereupon your Petitioner prays in behalf of said 
Inhabitants that the westerly part of said Hollis may be set off & Joined 
to the Tract of Land called the Mile Slip & be made a Town (or a seper- 
ate Parish from Hollis) or otherwise as Your Excellency & Honors shall 
see meet, & your Petitioner, as in duty bound shall ever pray, 
Dated May 19th, 1768." 



SAMUEL FARLEY. 



64 HISTORY 'OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

For some unknown reason, the Governor and Council failed to act 
upon this petition; and the following year Mr. Farley prepared and filed 
with the authorities at Concord a new petition, as follows: — 

"Petition for the Formation of a New Town, 1769. 

"To His Excellency John Wentworth Esq., Captain General, Gov- 
ernor & Commander in chief in & over his Majestys Frovince of New 
Hampshire And to the Honourable his Majestys Councel for said Province 

"The Petition of Samuel Farley, in behalf of himself, & a number of 
the Inhabitants, in the westerly part of Holies, & the Mile Strip so called, 
in said Province humbly sheweth, that your Petitioners, in the said west- 
erly part of Holies, are so remote from the Centre of said Town, by reason 
of the distance, that they cannot attend Town Privileges, without great 
difficulty & expence, & that the Inhabitants of the Mile Slip aforesaid, 
are not incorporated, but are destitute of Town priviledges, wherefore 
your Petitioner Prays as aforesaid, that your Excellency & Honours would 
take of the westerly part of Hollis aforesaid & Incorporate the same to- 
gether with the Mile Strip, into a Seperate or distinct Town, with the 
same Priviledges of other Towns & your Petitioner as in Duty Bound 
shall ever pray. 

SAMUEL FARLEY." 

The petition was accompanied with a plan of the proposed new 
township, and also with a description of its boundary lines, as follows: 

"Boundaries of Raby 1769. 

"Beginning at a Stake & Stones in the South Side Line of the Town 
of Holies which is also the Province Line which Stake stands about two 
miles due East frcm the south-west corner of said Holies, thence running 
north by the Needle cross the said Town to one other Stake & Stones 
standing in the Ncrth Side Line of Said Holies, leaving the meeting House 
in said Holies in the middle between this Line & the East Side Line of 
Holies, then running from the last mentioned Stake Westerly by Holies 
to the North West Corner thereof then continuing that Line cross a 
Tract call'd the Mile Slip to the easterly side Line of Mason — thence 
turning off & running south by the Needle on the easterly side Line of 
Mason- afores'd to the Province Line then due east partly on the Province 
Line & partly on the South Side Line of Hollis afore said to Stake bgan 
at." 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 65 

This petition, although it was strongly opposed by the majority of 
the people of Hollis, was successful; and on the 30th day of March, 1769, 
the Governor and Council incorporated the new town, in accordance with 
the above described boundaries, under the name of Raby. 

It is to be noted at this point that the description of the boundary 
lines of the proposed new town which accompanied the foregoing de- 
scribed petition of 1769, are precisely the same as the boundary lines of 
Raby, as described in its charter. Yet for a period of seventeen years 
immediately following Raby's incorporation, Hollis laid claim to and at- 
tempted to exercise jurisdiction over, a part of the territory which was 
clearly and explicitly included in Raby's limits as described in its charter; 
the same being a tract of land three-fourths of a mile in width, extending 
its entire length north and south, and located in its eastern part, con- 
tiguous to Hollis. 

Hollis' claim of jurisdiction over this strip of land was founded upon 
no other reason than that of a desire upon the part of its inhabitants to 
keep the location of their meeting-house in the exact centre of a line 
running east and west through the township. During this entire period 
of seventeen years the question of jurisdiction was a matter in dispute 
between two towns, and the land itself was known as the "disputed teri- 
ritory." 

The question of jurisdiction was finally settled in favor of Raby by 
an act of legislature in 1786. But that is another story. It will be told 
later on. 

Charter of Raby. 

Province of ^ George the Third by the grace of God of Great Britain 
New Hampshire V France and Ireland King defender of the Faith and so 
J forth. 

[L. S.] To all to whom these Presents shall come, Greeting. 

Whereas our Loyal Subjects in habitants of the westerly part of the 
Town of Holies and the Mile Slip so called in our Province aforesaid 
Have humbly Petitioned and requested us that they may be erected and 
incorporated into a Township and enfranchised with the same Powers and 
Privileges which other Towns within our said Province by Law have and 
Enjoy and it appearing unto us to be conducive to the general good of 
our said Province as well as of said Inhabitants in particular by main- 
taining good order and encouraging the culture of the Land that the 



66 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

same should be done — Know Ye that we of our special grace certain 
knowledge and for the encouragement and promotion of the good pur- 
poses and Ends aforesaid (by and with the advise of our Trusty and 
well-beloved John Wentworth Esq: our Governor and Commander in 
chief, and of our Council for the said Province of New Hampshire) have 
Erected and ordain'd and by these Presents for us our heirs & Successors 
do will and ordain that the Inhabitants of the aforesaid Tract of Land, 
and others who shall improve and inhabit thereon hereafter, the same 
being butted and bounded as follows viz: Beginning at a Stake and 
Stones in the South side line of the Town of Holies, (which is also the 
Province Line) which stake stands about two miles due East from the 
South West corner of said Hollis, thence running North by the Needle, 
cross the said Town to one other stake and Stones standing on the North 
side line of said Holies, leaving the meeting house in the middle between 
this line, and the East side line of Holies then running from the last men- 
tion'd stake Westerly by Holies to the North west corner thereof then 
continuing that line 'cross a tract of land call'd the mile slip to the East- 
erly side line of Mason, then turning off and running South by the needle 
on the Easterly side line of Mason aforesaid to the Province line then 
due east partly on the Province Line and partly on the South side line 
of Holies aforesaid to the stake began at. Be and they are hereby de- 
clared to be a Town Corporate and are hereby erected and Incorporated 
into a Body Politic and corporate to have continuance for ever by the 
name of Raby with all the Powers and Authorities, Priviledges, Im- 
munities and Franchises which any other Towns in said Province by 
Law hold and enjoy — to the said Inhabitants or who shall hereafter in- 
habit there & their Successors for ever — Always reserving to us our heirs 
and Successors all while pine Trees that are or shall be found growing and 
being on said Tract of land, fit for the use of our Royal Navy, reserving 
also to us our heirs and Successors, the Power and right of dividing said 
Town, when it shall appear necessary & convenient for the Inhabitants 
thereof. Provided Nevertheless & tis hereby declar'd that this charter 
and Grant, is not intended and shall not in any maner be construed to 
affect the Private property of the Soil within the limits aforesaid and as 
the several Towns within our said Province, are by the Laws thereof, 
enabled and Authoriz'd to assemble and by the Majority of the Voters 
present to choose all such Officers & transact such affairs as in the said 
Laws are declar'd — We do by these Presents nominate and appoint Sam- 
uel Farley to call the first meeting of said Inhabitants to be held within 
the said Town at any time within Thirty days from the date hereof, 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 67 

giving legal notice of the Time and design of holding such meeting, after 
which the annual meeting in said Town shall be held for the choice of 
said Officers and the Purposes aforesaid on the first Wednesday of March 
annually. 

In testimony whereof we have caused the Seal of our said Province 
to be hereunto affixed Witness John Wentworth Esq our aforesaid Governor 
and Commander in chief the 30th day of March in the 9th year of our 
Reign Anno domini 1769. 

J. WENTWORTH. 
By his Excellency's Comand 
with advice of Council 

T. ATKINSON Jun'r Sec'ry." 

Original Area of Raby, and Loss of Territory in 1794. 

As constituted under its charter, Brookline contained about seven- 
teen square miles. Its dimensions remained without change until 1794. 
In 1794, however, at the incorporation of Milford one square mile of its 
territory was taken out of its northwest corner and transferred into the 
territory of the latter town; of which it has ever since remained a part. 

By the transfer of this square mile of land as above stated, Brook- 
line's area was reduced from seventeen to sixteen square miles; an area 
which at the present time it still retains. A diligent search on the part 
of the writer has failed to disclose any satisfactory reason for the transfer 
of this tract of land from Brookline to Milford. But the process by which 
the transfer was made, which was very simple and so far as known per- 
fectly legitimate, appears to have been as follows : 

By an examination of the charter of Raby it will be seen that the 
town's north boundary line (which was identical with the north boundary 
line of Hollis) ran "Westerly by Hollis' north boundary line to the north- 
westerly corner thereof ; then continuing that line across a tract called 
the mile slip to the easterly side line of Mason; thence turning and run- 
ning due south by the Mason line to the Province line." 

The northern boundary line of Hollis ran South 80 degrees East. 
A continuation of that line in a westerly direction would have crossed 
and, so far as Raby's charter was concerned, did cross the Mile Slip so 
as to include this transferred piece of land within its bounds. 

When Milford was incorporated in 1794 its south boundary line from 
east to west was identical with the north boundary line of Brookline 
until it reached the east boundary line of the Mile Slip, where, instead 



68 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

of continuing on and crossing the slip as did the Brookline line, it turned 
and ran due south along the west boundary line of Old Dunstable for 
one mile; and then turning again crossed the Mile Slip by a line parallel 
to and one mile south of the point where the same was originally crossed 
by the north boundary line of Brookline. 

Thus it will be seen that by the terms of their respective charters 
this square of land was included in the area of each of these towns at the 
time of their several incorporations. 

But the charter of Brookline ante-dated that of Milford by a period 
of twenty -five years, and therefore as a matter of right it would seem that 
this square of land should now be within the jurisdiction of the former 
town. But as Milford under its charter rights took immediate possession 
of, and has ever since held the same, her right to its possession acquired 
by adverse possession under "color of title," is probably too strong to be 
thrown down, even if Brookline should be disposed to question it. 

RABY was named after a town of the same name in the county of 
Durham in the north part of England from which some of its early settlers 
are said to have come. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE G9 



CHAPTER V. 

Raby. 

1769-1786. 

First Town Meeting — First Board of Town Officers — Second Town- 
Meeting — First Public Building, a Cattle Pound — First Appropri- 
ation for Highways — Second and Third Cattle Pounds — First and 
Last Tithing Men — First Highway Accepted by the Town — First 
List of Rate Payers — First Pond Bridge — Straightening of High- 
way on West Side of Meeting-House Hill — Second Pond Bridge, 
1808— Third Pond Bridge, 1812-1814— Fourth Pond Bridge, 1843 
— First Appropriation for Public Schools — Highway from Douglass 
Brook to Benjamin Shattuck's House Accepted. 

On the 11th day of April. 1769, Samuel Farley, who, as the agent of 
its inhabitants, had been chiefly instrumental in procuring the passage 
by the General Court of the Act by which Raby was incorporated and 
who by the terms of its charter was duly authorized to act in the premises, 
issued the call for the first town meeting of its citizens, as follows : 

"Province of New Hampshire 
Hillsborough, ss. 

By virtue of a charter obtained for incorporating the westerly part of 
Hollis and part of the mile slip into a town by the name of Raby and 
also for the subscriber to caull the first meeting for the choice of Town 
officers and other Affairs necessary to be acted upon Said day I do hereby 
notify the town of Raby that they meet at the house of Samuel Cram 
in sd Raby on Wednesday the twenty sixth Day of April at ten of the 
clock in the forenoon then and there to make choice of Town officers for 
the present year and to act upon any other matters that the town may 
think proper when meet. 

Given under my hand at Raby this 11th Day of April 1769. 

SAMUEL FARLEY." 



70 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

In accord with this call, the inhabitants met at the designated time 
and place. Lieutenant Farley called the meeting to order, and officiated 
as moderator. The only business transacted was a vote to accept the 
charter, and the election of the first board of town officers, as follows: 
Selectmen, James Conneck, William Blanchard and Alexander Mcintosh; 
town clerk, James Conneck; town treasurer, Robert Campbell; constable, 
Samuel Brown. 

Concerning Samuel Cram, at whose house this first town meeting 
was holden, it may be said that the above is the first and last time that 
his name is mentioned in the records. Who he was, from whence he came 
to Raby, and whither he went when he departed from it, are questions 
which are answered neither by record nor tradition. There is, however, 
a tradition to the effect that the stream in the northwest part of the 
township.which at the present time is known as Robbins' brook, was 
known ninety or more years ago as the Cram brook, and that a wood-lot 
then standing in that vicinity was known as the "Cram lot." 

From these circumstances it is not improbable that the Cram house 
was located in this vicinity. Indeed, there are now living in town old 
residents who are strongly impressed with the belief that the original 
dwelling house of Lieut. Samuel Cram and therefore the scene of Raby's 
first town meeting was the rear house of two dwelling houses now in 
ruins, but which stood formerly on the north side of the Robbins' brook, 
a few rods west of the foot of the hill in the highway leading northerly 
from the brook to the dwelling house late of Ezra Farnsworth, deceased; 
formerly the old Sampson Farnsworth place. 

The second town meeting, which occurred in May of the same year, 
was holden in the dwelling house of Alexander Mcintosh. At this meeting 
it was voted: "To raise sixty gold Spanish milled dollars, and to add ten 
dollars to it to pay Samuel Farley for his services in procuring the char- 
ter." It was also voted: "To build a pound near the brook by the high- 
way in Samuel Brown's land, he giving the land"; and George Russell 
and William Blanchard were chosen as a building committee. 

The pound was probably completed within the year. For the fol- 
lowing year Samuel Brown was appointed pound keeper. It was con- 
structed of logs and was located on the south side of the highway from 
Raby to Mason, just west of the Pond Bridge. 

This pound was the first public building to be erected in Raby, and 
its construction is an interesting event in the history of the town; be- 
cause that, with the exception of the sum appropriated for paying Samuel 
Farley for procuring the charter, it marks the matter for which, and the 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 71 

manner in which, it expended its first appropriation of money raised for 
public purposes. 

The second action of the citizens, relative to expenditure of public 
moneys, occurred at a subsequent meeting in the same month, when it 
was voted: "To raise thirteen pounds six shillings and eight and one- 
half pense for the use of highways," and George Russell was selected as 
the town's first highway surveyor. This vote, following so closely as it 
did upon that to raise money to build a pound, would seem to indicate 
that in considering the relative values as public utilities of cattle pounds 
and public highways, the citizens were disposed to estimate the former 
as of more importance than the latter. Nor is it strange that such should 
be the case. For cattle were then among the most valuable of the settlers 
assets. 

These particular assets for obvious reasons were allowed to run at 
large; and from the general lack of fences both around private clearings 
and on public highways there was nothing to prevent them from becom- 
ing lost or stolen assets. In either case the possibilities of their recovery 
by their owners were much enhanced by the probability of their being 
taken up, impounded and held for identification. And the people evi- 
dently considered a cow in the pound worth two in the bush. 

In 1782 this pound was replaced by another built also on practically 
the same site. 

The third and last pound was erected in 1808-09. It was built of 
granite and located in the northeast corner of the Common on meeting- 
house hill where at the present time it is still standing, although it is 
many years since it was used for its original purpose. At the present time 
it contains the wreck of the town's first hearse, the original house for 
which, standing a few rods west of the pound, is being utilized as the 
town "lock up." 

In the spring of 1770, in addition to the usual board of town officers, 
James Campbell and Daniel Shedd were elected tithing men. 

This office, long since obsolete, was considered as an important one 
in the early days of New England. The duties of its happy possessors 
were similar to those of the modern town constable. They were sup- 
posed — "To inspect all licensed houses, to inform of all disorders to the 
Justice of the Peace and of all cussers and swearers." In towns of suffi- 
cient wealth to support it, they were equipped at the town's expense with 
insignia of office in the form of — "Black staffs two feet long, tipped at 
one end for about three inches with brass or pewter." 



72 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

The town continued for about seventy years to elect these officials. 
But during the latter part of this period the performance of their official 
duties was chiefly confined to the inside of the meeting-house ; where, on 
Sundays, they endeavored to prevent the youngsters from disturbing with 
their impish pranks the somnolent condition in which their elders were 
accustomed to complacently listen to the parson's prosy expositions of 
his ideas of Divine love and justice as exemplified in the doctrines of 
pre-destination, fore-ordination and election; doctrines in which the di- 
vines of those days, both in and out of the pulpit, were as open and pos- 
itive in expressing their belief as those of the present day are reticent and 
careful. 

In 1843, Deacon Timothy Wright, Benjamin Shattuck and Asa 
Seaver were elected to this office and they were the last of the tithing 
men. The office became obsolete. 

The wage question for the year 1770 was settled by the citizens in 
town meeting assembled, when they unanimously voted that — "A man 
should have 25 shillings per day till August 15th and oxen 11 shillings 
per day." 

At the March town meeting in 1771 it was voted — "To accept as a 
public highway the road leading out from Campbell's brook and mill to 
Townsend line." This is the road leading out of the highway to Mason 
near to and just south of Campbell's mill-pond, and running in a south- 
erly direction past the present dwelling house of Clarence R. Russell. 
So far as the records show, it was the first road in town to be accepted as 
a public highway. 

In 1771, also, appeared the town's first recorded list of rate, or tax, 
payers. By this list it appears that the whole number of rateable polls 
was forty-five. Of this number there unquestionably are some who were 
non-residents, although there is nothing on the face of the records to 
indicate how many and who they were. 

For instance: Benjamin Brooks and Benjamin Brooks, Jr., whose 
names are on the list, did not become residents here until 1783. But be- 
cause the names as recorded are for the most part the names of those 
who were residents of the town at the time of its incorporation, a copy 
of the list, omitting the assessed taxes, is given as follows : 

List of Taxpayers for the Year 1771. 

Clark Brown, Jonas Shed, Timothy Davis, 

Peter Cummings, Isaac Shattuck, Eason Dix, 




05 



O 

9 



O 

a. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



73 



James Connex, 
Silas Fuller, 
William Hall, 
Archibold Mcintosh, 
Alexander Mcintosh, 
James Mcintosh, 
Josiah Nutting, 
Nathaniel Patten, 
George Russell, 
Samuel Russell, 
Daniel Shed, 
Daniel Shed, Jr. 
William Shed, 



Mathew Wallace, 
James Waugh, 
Thomas Asten, 
William Blanchard, 
Simeon Blanchard, 
Samuel Brown, 
Benjamin Brooks, 
Benjamin Brooks, Jun. 
Joshua Brooks, 
Nathaniel Badger, 
James Badger, 
James Campbell, 
John Cummings, 



Rosany Dickey, 
Isaac Farrow, 
Oliver Hildrth, 
James McDonald, 
Benjamin Shattuck, 
Isaac Stevens, 
Robert Sever, 
Joshua Smith, 
Caleb Stiles, 
Swallow Tucker, 
John Whiting, 
Ezekiel Proctor. 



The Pond Bridge. 

At a town meeting hoi den on the 8th day of January, 1772, the town 
took its first action relative to bridging the river below its outlet from 
Muscatanipus pond at the point where it is crossed by the highway to 
Mason by voting: "To build a bridge over the river at the pond," and 
electing Isaac Shattuck, Alexander Mcintosh and James Campbell to see 
the work effected. It was also voted — "To have the bridge completed by 
the last day of June next"; and — "That any person that doth not work 
out his proportion to the building of said bridge after due notice shall 
pay his deficiency in money." At a subsequent meeting in March of the 
same year, it was voted — "To raise forty pounds for building the bridge 
and repairing highways." As these votes are the only recorded reference 
to the building of this bridge it is reasonable to suppose that the building 
committee attended to its duty and completed the bridge that year, 1772. 

Prior to and at this time the road to Mason, at the brow of the west 
side of meeting-house hill, turned out into the field on the south side of 
the highway as it is now and, describing a semi-circle around the Wads- 
worth house, crossed the present highway just easterly of the "old ditch" 
at the foot of the hill and continued on in a northerly direction through 
the land at the present time owned by the Fresh Pond Ice Company, 
until it reached a point near the pond where the road to Hollis via Randal 
McDaniels' house led out of it. From this point it turned and, passing 
westerly along the shore of the pond, crossed the river by a ford-way 
either at or a few rods below the pond's outlet; from whence it continued 



74 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

on through the field until, at a point near the old Joseph A. Hall place, 
it again became identical with the present highway to Mason. 

This first bridge was erected over said ford- way. It was built on 
wooden piers with log stringers covered with sawn plank, and continued 
to be used for sixteen years from the time of its completion. 

Meanwhile, during this whole period of sixteen years, a sentiment in 
favor of straightening this particular part of the Great Road had been 
gradually developing in the community, and nearly every year the war- 
rants for the annual March town meeting had contained articles looking 
to that end. 

These articles were invariably defeated or passed over until the 
annual town meeting in March in 1799, when the following vote was 
passed: "To straighten the road from the meeting house to adjutant 
Green's the town to be at no cost that is meaning to cross the river below 
where the bridge now stands"—; and ajd't William Green and Lieut. 
Isaac Shattuck were elected as a committee "To straighten the road and 
build the bridge." 

This vote was apparently unsatisfactory to some of the citizens. 
For at a subsequent meeting on the fourth day of the following month 
there was an article in the warrant — "To see if the town will rebuild the 
pond bridge where the old bridge now stands and move the ditch bridge 
down the stream about three or four rods to a good place to build on so 
as to make the road straighter than where the old ditch now stands." 
This article was passed over. 

But at some time between the date of this last mentioned meeting 
and the year 1804 the road was straightened. For it is recorded that at 
a town meeting holden in Feburary of the latter year the selectmen were 
appointed a committee- — "To settle with the Rev. Lemuel Wadsworth 
for his land which is cut off by straigthening the road near his house." 
Soon after this vote work on the new bridge was begun and continued at 
intervals until it was completed in the year 1808. 

This second bridge to be built over the stream at this point stood 
on the site of the present bridge. Like its predecessor, it was constructed 
of hewn logs and planks laid on wooden piers. 

The third bridge over the river at this point was built under the 
supervision of the selectmen by Capt. Nathan Corey between the years 
1812 and 1814. In its construction wooden abutments and wooden piers 
were used. It was erected on the site of the second bridge and, with occa- 
sional repairs, continued to be used until 1843. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 75 

The fourth bridge to stand over the river at this point was constructed 
in 1843-1844 under the supervision of a building committee appointed by 
the town on the 28th day of November of the former year, and consisting 
of Abel Foster, Horace Warner and Benjamin Shattuck. In this bridge, 
stone abutments and stone piers were used for the first time. At the 
present time it is still in use. 

During the three years succeeding the meeting of Jan. 8, 1772, many 
town meetings were holden, but, with the exception of the annual election 
of town officers, little business of importance was transacted. 

At the March meeting in 1773, however, public sentiment in favor of 
public schools was expressed by a vote — "To raise four pounds for school- 
ing the present year." At this same meeting, also, a highway from Doug- 
lass brook to Benjamin Shattuck's house was accepted. As there were at 
this time three roads, or bridle paths, crossing Douglass brook, it is almost 
impossible to determine from which one of the three this accepted high- 
way commenced to run. The probabilities, however, are that it began 
at the upper end of the brook at a ford-way where it was crossed by a 
bridle path which led out of the east highway to Milford a few rods west 
of the old James McDaniels place and passed in a westerly direction, via 
the dwelling house afterward of the Rev. Daniel Goodwin, to the said 
Benjamin Shattuck place, and was identical with the present highway 
between those points. 

That part of said accepted highway which was comprised in the 
bridle path, together with the bridle path itself, was in constant use as 
a public thoroughfare from 1773 until about the year 1815. It was es- 
pecially convenient for the settlers in the northeast part of the town, for 
whom, in going to and from Hollis, it furnished a route considerably 
shorter than that via the Great and Proctor hill roads. It is many years 
since the east end of the bridle path has been closed to public travel; 
but its vestiges still remain, and by them its course from the ruins of 
the old Daniel Goodwin place to its junction with the east Milford high- 
way is easily traceable at the present time. 

The annual town meeting in March, 1774, was the last to be held 
before the outbreak of the Revolution, and it was also the last to be called 
in the name of the Province of New Hampshire. Henceforth, town 
meetings were called in the name of the Colony. 



76 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



CHAPTER VI. 

War of the Revolution. 

1775-1786. 

Population of the Town at the Opening and During the Continuance of 
the War — Town's Recorded List of Its Soldiers in the War— Its 
Soldiers in the Battle of Bunker Hill- — In the Battle of Bennington 
• — Action Taken by the Town During the Progress of the War — 
The Association Test — Names and Records of The Town's Soldiers — 
Committees of Safety — Names of Commissioned Officers — Names 
of Revolutionary Soldiers Buried in Brookline. 

When the War of the Revolution opened in 1775 Raby, or Brookline, 
was in the sixth year of its corporate existence as a town. The years 
which had passed since its incorporation had made no material changes 
either in the number of its inhabitants or in the conditions which sur- 
rounded them in the beginning. In this year the State's Committee of 
Safety, acting under instructions from the Continental Congress, called 
upon the boards of selectmen throughout the state to make and return 
to it a census of the population of their respective towns. Seventeen 
towns, among which was Raby, failed to make returns. Thereupon, the 
Committee of Safety apparently proceeded to guess at the population of 
each of the recalcitrant towns, and to make up its estimates accordingly. 
Its guess relative to Raby was that it had a population of three hundred 
and twenty (320). 

But in the year 1767, only two years before its incorporation with 
the western part of Hollis to form the new town of Raby, the Mile Slip 
had a population of only sixty-seven; and as all the circumstances indi- 
cate that at the time of the incorporation it was the more densely popu- 
lated of the two uniting tracts, it would seem to be not unreasonable to 
estimate Raby's population in 1769 as being twice that of the Mile Slip 
in 1767, or one hundred and thirty-four (134). 

In 1771, two years after its incorporation, the town made up its first 
rate list. By that list the number of the tax payers for that year was 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 77 

forty-five. In 1775 the rate list shows the number of tax payers to have 
been forty-five. In other words, it appears that from the year 1771 up 
to and including the year 1775 there was no change in the number of 
rate payers. From this fact it is inferred that during the above stated 
period there was also no change in the number of inhabitants, and, conse- 
quently, that the town's population in 1775 was substantially the same 
as it was in 1769, or about 134. 

But another fact which tends not only to confirm the probable cor- 
rectness of the foregoing estimate of the town's population in 1775 as 
being one hundred and thirty-four, but also to conclusively disprove the 
reliability of the State Committee of Safety's guess of three hundred and 
twenty as being even an approximation to the correct number, is that in 
1786, eleven years later, the selectmen took a census of the town and 
found its population to be two hundred and sixty-two (262), as appears 
by their report to the General Court, of which the following is a copy: 

"Pursuant to the Requisition of the Genl Court of the 3d of March 
last past we have carefully sought the Number of Souls within the town 
of Raby & find them to be 262 having no Indians no Negro Slaves. 
Raby June— 1786 R. M. McDONALD 1 Selectmen 

ROBERT SEAVKR > of 

JAMES CAMPbl J Brookline 

Honi. E- Thompson Esq. Sec" 

Now in 1786, when the above census was taken, the town's popula- 
tion was found to be 262 ; by the rate list in the same year its tax payers 
numbered eighty-six (86), or about double the number of its tax payers 
in 1775. By the rule of proportion, therefore, it follows that 86, the 
number of rate payers in 1786, bears the same relation to forty-five, the 
number of rate payers in 1775, that 262, the number of its inhabitants 
in 1786, does to the number of inhabitants in 1775; which the solution 
of the problem shows to have been one hundred and thirty-seven (137). 
A result which conforms so closely to the results obtained in each of the 
foregoing estimates as to practically confirm them. Attention is called 
to the fact that each of the above estimates is based upon the assumption 
that each of the rate lists for the years 1771, 1775 and 1786, respectively, 
contains only the names of those who were bona fide residents in Raby 
in the year for which it was made; when, as a matter of fact, each con- 
tains the names of some who were non-resident rate payers. So that in 
each of the above estimates the results obtained are obviously too large. 



78 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

From the foregoing the writer feels warranted to make the statement 
that in the year 1775 the population of Raby was not over, and probably 
considerably under, one hundred and thirty-five (135). The town was 
still in the log cabin pericd of its existence, not more than two framed 
buildings having been erected. Its only public building was a log pound. 
It had neither meeting house nor schoolhouse; the schools, when there 
were any, being kept in private dwellings in which, also, religious gatherings 
assembled and town meetings were holden. 

The public highways, what few there were of them, were at all times 
of the year, in a wretched condition and at certain seasons almost im- 
passable. There was not a horse vehicle in town. Traveling was per- 
formed on horseback, in the saddle and on the pillion, or by the lumbering 
and springless ox carts. The surface of the township was still covered 
with the primeval forests; unbroken, save here and there, at long intervals 
apart, by the small clearings of the settlers; of whom the majority were 
engaged in farming, or at least they imagined they were. For farming 
operations were chiefly confined to pulling stumps and blasting rocks 
from land which when cleared and cultivated was better adapted to the 
production of crops of Canada thistles than of grain. There were no 
grist-mills in town, and no store that deserved the name. Poverty pre- 
vailed, and for many of the people stagnation and starvation walked 
hand in hand. The town itself was solvent because it had no debts; not 
having as yet succeeded in establishing a credit which enabled it to bor- 
row of its neighbors money for public improvements. But at the same 
time it was also bankrupt because; when it needed money, the treasury 
was generally empty. 

Such were the conditions prevalent in Raby at the opening of the 
war. And yet, notwithstanding the paucity in numbers of its people and 
the poverty of their circumstances, few towns in New Hampshire have 
a better record in the War of the Revolution than is that of Raby or 
Brookline. Before the war closed practically all of its entire adult male 
population served as soldiers in the army. 

As has already been stated, when the war opened the rate list shows 
the number of voters in town as forty-five. Well, on a space in the town's 
record book especially reserved for the purpose, are recorded the names 
of Raby's soldiers in the war, with the time, place and length of service 
of each. This record list was evidently made either during the time the 
war was in progress, or soon after its close. The number of individual 
names appearing in the list is forty-two. It was undoubtedly intended 
to include all who served in the war from this town from its beginning in 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 79 

1775 to its close in 1783. All the names upon it appear upon the rate lists 
between those years; and an examination of the rate list for 1783 shows 
the tax payers for that year to have been fifty-six; an increase of only 
eleven over and above the number in 1775. 

Following is a copy of this list, taken from book number 1, page 44, 
Raby's Records: 

Town's Record List of Raby's Soldiers in the Revolution. 

These are the men that went to Cambridge : L. 

Wm. Spaulding and his son. Rates 1. 13.8 8 : 16 - 6 24-0-0 

Archld. Macintosh. Rates 0-18-8 4 : 16 : 12-0-0 

James Conek 12-0-0 
Nathl. Badger for James Badger to Cambridge 

Rates 2 : 19 : 2 12-0-0 

James Mcintosh Rates 3-7-26:3:0 12-0-0 

Nathl. Patten 12-0-0 

Jeremiah Hubert Rate 0-1-4 12-0-0 

Swaller Tucker Rates 3-3-4 5:9:6 12-0-0 

Daniel Shed Jur. Rates 0-18-8 2- 12-6 24-0-0 

These are the men that went to York one year each man. 
Josiah Sewerd. Rate 1 - - : 1 - 16 
Wm. Spalding Jr. for his father 
John Coneck 0-16-0 1-16-0 
Archld. Macintosh, Jr. 

Isaac Shattuck. Rate 2-13-8 t - 11 - 30-0-0 
Benj. Patten. 

Wm. Mcintosh for Nathl. Patten to York. 
Capt. Samuel Douglass. 

These are the men that went to Tygh for five months : 
Benj. Shattuck. Rates 3 - 1-4:7-5-6 6-0-0 
Clark Brown. Rates 2 - 11 1 : 5 - 3 - 9-0-0 

Samel. Russell. Rates 4 - 11 - 8 : 6 - 7 - 6-0-0 
Isaac Shattuck { each man half a turn. 

George Woodward j Rates 2- 13 -8:5-11-0 

I Rates 1 - 19 - 8 : 3 - 15 - 6-0-0 
Isaac Stavens, Jr. j 

Phineas Aston 1 Rates - 16 - : 2 - 2. 



80 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

These are the men that went to Canada one year: 
Hlias Dickey. Rate 2 - 0-8:6-0-6 2-0-0 

Caleb Brown. Rates - 16 - : 16 - - 5-0-0 

These are the men that went to York three months 5-0-0 each : 
Alon r Macintosh. Rates 2 - 14 - : 5 - 18 
Benj. Muzzey. Rates 2-2 - 4 

Andrew Russell for his father 5:1-8. Rates 7-13-0 

These are the men that went to York two months 4-0 each : 
Randel McDonnels. Rates 1 - 17 - 2 : 3-15 
James RolfeR. 1 - - and Moses Lowell's Rates 2-10-1 
2-2-0 

These are the men that went to Bent n ' two months. 7-0 each : 
James Campbell. Rates 2-14-0: 6-19-0 

Thomas Alton. Rates 0-16-0: 1-10-0 

Andrew Russell for his father. 

Jonas Sheed half turn. Rates - 18 - 8 : 1 - • 16 - - 

Sm. Farnsworth half turn. Rates 2-0-9:3- 8-0-0 

These are the men that went to Cambridge six weeks : 
Robert Seaver. Rates 3- 1-4: 7-7 

Clark Brown. Rates 

Randel Mcdonnel. 
Andrew Russell. 

John Conek. Rates 0-16-0 

James Diekay. Rates 2 - 0-6 

Mathew Wallas. Rate 3-10 

The men that went on the alarms. , 0-8 each 

Robert Sever. 

James Dickey. Rates 1 - 2-6 

Swaller Tucker. 
James Campbell. 
James Mcintosh. 
Andrew Russell. 
Wm. Spaulding. 
Clark Brown. 
Benj. Shattuck. 
Daniel Sheed, Jr. 

David Davidson. Rates 1-7-1: 3-14-0 

Waldron Stone. 



- 


-8-0 


- 


-8-0 


- 


-8-0 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 81 

The whole number of names appearing on the list is fifty-six. But 
it will be noticed that many of the names are repeated; some of them 
twice or even more times, owing to re-enlistments on part of their owners. 
Taking out the re-enlistments, the number of the names of those who 
served the town as soldiers is forty-two (42). Adding to this number 
the names of Benjamin Patten, Benjamin Osgood, and John Gardner, 
each of whom enlisted and served as soldiers for Raby, as appears by its 
records, and also by the State Revolutionary Rolls, and Lieut. John 
Cummings, Ebenezer Gilson, Ezekiel Proctor and Joshua Smith, all of 
whom served as soldiers in the Revolution, and all of whom were resi- 
dents within the chartered limits of this town at the time of its outbreak 
during its continuance and after its close, and the resulting aggregate 
shows the number of revolutionary soldiers furnished by Raby to have 
been forty-eight (48). 

Raby, of course, was not large enough to furnish a company con- 
sisting wholly of its own citizens, and thus its soldiers were forced to 
enlist in companies from other towns, or in companies forming parts of 
the State's Continental regiments. 

The town sent three commissioned officers into the war, i.e., Lieut. 
Robert Seaver, Capt. Samuel Douglass and Lieut. John Cummings. Its 
citizens, as privates, were present and fought at Bunker Hill, Bennington, 
White Plains and many other battle fields of the Revolution. There 
were at least nine of its men in the battle of Bunker Hill, as follows: Ar- 
chibald Mcintosh, James Conneck, Nathaniel Badger, William Spaulding, 
William Spaulding, Jr., Nathaniel Patten, Ebenezer Gilson, Ezekiel Proc- 
tor and Lieut. John Cummings. Of these nine men, Archibald Mcintosh 
and John Conneck were mortally wounded in the battle and taken prison- 
ers. They were confined in Boston Jail, where each subsequently died: 
Mcintosh on the 10th day of August, and Conneck on the 24th day of 
July, 1775. They were the first and only men from this town who were 
killed in battle during the Revolution. Their names are inscribed upon a 
memorial tablet in Winthrop Square, Charlestown, Mass., as being among 
the number of those who were killed at Bunker Hill, and they are credited 
to Brookline, N. H. In the same battle, William Spaulding, Jr., of Raby, 
received a wound which rendered him a cripple for the remainder of his 
life. 

The names of Raby's soldiers in the battle of Bennington are as 
follows: Jonas Shed, John Conneck, Archibald Mcintosh, Jr., Ezekiel 
Proctor, Andrew Russell, James Dickey and Daniel Shed. 



82 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

When and by whom the news of the conflicts at Lexington and Con- 
cord were brought to Raby is unknown. But Worcester, in his history 
of Hollis, says that the news of the British's march from Charlestown 
was brought to that town by Capt. John Boynton about noon on the 
19th of April and that it was immediately carried by mounted messen- 
gers to other parts of the town. It is very probable that one of those 
messengers brought the news to this town. But although there is no 
evidence as to how the news came, there is indisputable evidence as to 
how it was received. For when, on the evening of the same day, Capt. 
Reuben Dow's company of ninety-two minute men marched from Hollis 
for Lexington, seven., at least, of Raby's citizens marched in its ranks. 
The names of the seven are as follows: James Mcintosh, James Dickey, 
Randal McDaniels, Robert Seaver, Ezekiel Proctor, Lieut. John Cum- 
mings and Ebenezer Gilson. In addition to those who marched in Cap- 
tain Dow's company four others, at least, of Raby's citizens, i.e., Elias 
Dickey, William Spaulding, Daniel Shedd and Samuel Douglass responded 
to the Lexington alarm. Of the four Dr. Samuel Green, in his "Groton 
in the Revolution," mentions three as having been members of companies 
which marched from that town as follows: Elias Dickey, private in Capt. 
John Nutting's company, William Spaulding, private in Capt. Josiah 
Sawtelle's company, and Daniel Shedd, private in Capt. Asa Lawrence's 
company. The fourth, Samuel Douglass, responded to the alarm as cap- 
tain of a company which marched from Townsend Hill, Mass., near which 
his residence in Raby was at that time situated. 

The first action of the town, as such, relative to the war, so far as its 
records show, occurred at a town meeting held on the second day of Oc- 
tober, 1775; when there was an article in the warrant — "To chose a 
committy for the town concerning arms for the town." This was what 
was known as a "committee of safety"; an institution common in New 
England throughout the war. At this meeting Ebenezer Muzzey, James 
Badger, Robert Seaver, Benjamin Shattuck and Clark Brown were elected, 
and thus constituted, the town's first Committee of Safety. That they 
were men of character and good repute in the estimation of their fellow 
citizens is indicated by their election. That they were patriots is indi- 
cated from the fact that one of them, Captain Seaver, had already been 
in the service at Cambridge, and that all the others became soldiers be- 
fore the war closed. At the same meeting it was also voted — "To act 
according to the advoice of our Congress." This vote probably referred 
to the Continental Congress then in session at Philadelphia. It had not 
yet fully established itself in the confidence of the people and, therefore, 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 83 

this action upon the part of the voters of Raby is significant because it 
shows their disposition to support those in authority — even though that 
authority might be deemed questionable ■ — as long as they exercised it in 
advocating and defending the rights of the people against tyranny and 
oppression. 

The records show no further war action on the part of the town until 
the next year when, at a town meeting held February 17, 1776, George 
Russell, James Badger, Benjamin Shattuck, Swallow Tucker and Ebenezer 
Muzzey were elected a Committee of Safety. 

This last committee, for some reason or other, was apparently unsatis- 
factory ; for, at a subsequent meeting held May 22nd of the same year 
the town voted to choose a new committee and did so. The new com- 
mittee consisted of Alexander Mcintosh, Eson Dise (Dix ?), Clark Brown, 
Mathew Wallace, Benjamin Muzzey, James Campbell and Daniel Shed. 

Of this committee the names of all except Dix appear in the list of 
the names upon the town's record of those who served as soldiers during 
the war. It will be noticed that of those whose names have been men- 
tioned as appearing on the records and holding town offices at this time, 
but comparatively few are represented in town today by their family 
names. The names of Dix and Muzzey and many others, as descendants 
of those whom I have named, have long been unknown here. 

It may be well to say, also, that the surnames of many other fam- 
ilies who have for many years been residents in and prominently iden- 
tified with the town's history do not appear on its Revolutionary War 
records, for the reason that their ancestors were not yet inhabitants of 
the town, but were engaged in making their war records in other towns 
and localities. The names of Corey, Rockwood, Hobart, Bailey, Foster, 
Peterson, Burge, Bohonon, French, Kendall, Baldwin, Colburn, Burgess, 
Pierce, Betterly, Parker, Gould, Cleveland, Stiles, Swett and many others 
who have resided or are now residing or represented in town do not appear 
on the records until after the close of the Revolution. 

At a town meeting held March 5, 1777, the town voted— "to raise 
thirty pounds of powder for the town and lead and flints as the law directs 
and chose Capt. Robert Seaver geat the powder as a committy man." 
At this same meeting, James Campbell, Clark Brown and Capt. Robert 
Seaver were chosen as a Safety Committee for the town. 

In April, 1777, William Spaulding, Swallow Tucker and Isaac Shat- 
tuck were chosen a committee "to settle and see what every man has 
done in the town of Raby since the Concord fite." It does not appear 
that this committee ever reported; and as it was "so quickly done for," 



84 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

one wonders "what it was begun for." At this same meeting it was voted 
"not to dismiss Capt. Robert Seaver and Mathew Wallace from their 
training out for three years or during the war." 

I have been surprised and interested in my researches in the records 
to find so many men with military titles among our townspeople at this 
period in its history. There were more captains and lieutenants — "lef- 
tenants" they called them then — in this town in proportion to its popu- 
lation than there were frogs in Egypt at the time of the plague. But 
on investigation this state of affairs was easily accounted for. For before, 
through and for many years after the close of the war its male citizens 
were enrolled and obliged to drill as soldiers in a sort of home guard, 
known as the train band. In this train band every man of any import- 
ance in town at some period of his life served as an officer. The result 
was an abundance of military titles. The only reason that some of them 
were not brigadier-generals was because the law recognized no such rank 
in "train bands." But as late as the year 1840, Artemas Ward's idea 
of a regiment of brigadier-generals could have been realized in Raby, 
only the regiment would have been a company and its members captains 
and lieutenants instead of brigadiers. 

June 12th of the same year, 1777, the town voted — "To drop the 
powder that was voted to be raised this year." Whether it was dropped 
or not does not appear. But if so there was no explosion for there is no 
report of it recorded subsequently. At this meeting, also, the names of 
William Spaulding and James Rolfe were added to the committee of 
safety. It was also voted — "To raise seventy dollars for Benjamin Pat- 
ten and twenty dollars for Benjamin Osgood if they did serve the town 
of Raby for three years or during the war," and at a later meeting the 
town voted — "to allow Benjamin Osgood as much as they allowed Benj. 
Patten if the said Benjamin Osgood did serve the town of Raby as conti- 
nental man during the war." This is the first mention of a bounty for 
soldiers appearing in the records. 

1778, town meeting April 23, voted — "Not to send a representative 
to the convention at Concord for the Sole purpose of forming and laying 
a permanent system of Government." June 11 "Voted — To give Joseph 
Osgood thirty pounds as a town bounty which was voted to his son Benj. 
Osgood in case he did serve this Town in *** the continental service said 
Osgood an order to the Selectmen on the treasurer of **." 

In 1779 the town voted — "To pay Mr. Daniel Shed, Junior, one 
thousand paper dollars at the end of one year from the date of his note 
that we subs promised him paid." This was undoubtedly bounty money 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 85 

• 

as Shed afterwards served as a soldier. But if he ever received it he cer- 
tainly did not die from the shock occasioned by the sudden acquisition 
of so much wealth as would seem to be indicated by "a thousand paper 
dollars"; for at this time paper currency was greatly depreciated in 
value and shortly after became worthless. A pair of boots at this time 
was worth fifty dollars in this currency. At this same meeting it was 
voted — "To raise men for the war as a town and pay them as a town." 
April 30 of the same year, 1779, the said Shed note was further consid- 
ered by the people in town meeting assembled, as is apparent from the 
following record of that date: "Voted to pay Daniel Shed Juner one 
thousand paper dollars at the end of one year from the date of the note 
that the subrs promis him." At the same meeting it was also voted — 
"To pay Daniel Shed Jr. twenty bushels of Rye Also to allow the said 
Shed as much as the Sbrs have promised him as a town." 

Owing to the scarcity of money and its depreciation in value, the 
town early in the war adopted the practice of abating its soldier's taxes. 
Their wages were also paid in part to their families in grain. At a town 
meeting in November, 1780, an article in the warrant was — "to see if 
the town will clear John Gardner and William Conneck of their rates 
(taxes) for going into the army." At the same meeting it was voted — 
"that the price of grain to pay the soldiers shall be as follows — that endien 
corn shall be three shillings per bushell and rye four shillings per bushell." 

At a town meeting in the spring of 1780 it was voted — "To allow 
Capt. Seaver fifty dollars for a pair of shoes that Jonas Shed had"; also, 
"To allow Alexander Mcintosh twenty dollars for a pair of stockings 
that Shed had." At a meeting in June of the same year, William Spauld- 
ing and Clark Brown were chosen a committee to hire men for the Conti- 
nental Army; and in July it was voted- — "To raise four hundred and 
fifty dollars to pay the soldiers." In August of the same year, Capt. 
Samuel Douglass and James Badger were elected as a committee — "To 
hire a man for the continental army during the war, or three years"; 
and at the same meeting, Waldron Stone and Captain Douglass were 
elected delegates to the meeting of the county committee of safety at 
Temple. April 3, 1781, the selectmen were appointed as a committee to 
purchase beef for the army, and it was also voted — "To allow David 
Davidson 34 pounds and ten shillings for sarvis dun, and 20 pounds for 
sarvice dun in gitting oats." 

In 1781 Swallow Tucker, Samuel Douglass and James Badger were 
elected as a committee — "To hire three men for the continental army 



86 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

during the war, or three years"; and the same year the town voted — 
"To approve the Constitution and not to send a man to convention." 

The constitution which was alluded to in the foregoing vote was 
that which was framed by the convention holden at Exeter in 1781; 
and was the same which, after it had been submitted to and approved 
by the people, was finally accepted and adopted by their delegates in the 
convention held in Concord in October, 1783. It went into effect in 
1784. 

The New Hampshire General Court at its session of this year, act- 
ing under the provisions of an act of Congress calling upon the state to 
furnish the continental army with ten thousand gallons of West India 
rum, passed an act apportioning out to the several towns the amount of 
rum to be furnished by each. Under this act the amount to be furnished 
by Raby was seventeen gallons. 

At the March town meeting of the following year, 1782, there was 
an article in the warrant to the following effect — "To see what the town 
will do in regard to their proportion of Rum as was ordered by the 'Cort'." 
It is evident from what follows that the people fully realized the urgency 
of the "cort's" order for rum. For, when the article was reached, it was 
voted — "To take the money that is now ascst to pay for the rum and 
the cort and assess money immediately in place of it." Doubtless "the 
money now ascst" was used in accordance with the above vote. But if 
the rum was purchased and brought into town, it is extremely doubtful 
if the continental army or, for that matter, the "cort" either, ever had 
an opportunity to even sample it. 

March 29, voted — "To allow Waldron Stone fourteen shillings and 
James Campbell ten and eight pense for sarvis as soldiers." 

May 13, voted — "To raise the soldiers agreeable to act of court"; 
and chose the selectmen — "A committee to hire them." At the same 
meeting, Capt. Roberts Seaver, Lieut. James McDaniels and Lieut. 
Sampson Farns worth were elected a committee — "To settle with those 
who have credit due them for war service in the town." 

Jan. 23, 1783, voted — "To send the committee of safety a return of 
the men that belong to this town who have listed in the bay sarvis and 
claim two of them as our men for the army." The two men especially 
referred to in the foregoing vote were Benjamin Patten and Benjamin 
Osgood, who had enlisted in a Massachusetts regiment. The matter was 
subsequently attended to, as will be noticed in a subsequent page. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 87 

February 15th of the same year it was voted — "That Clark Brown 
have his son's credit for war sarvis as on the town books, — and that 
Capt. Douglass and Waldron Stone be allowed their credit as on the 
town books." 

July 15, 1783, voted — "To pay Elias Dickey the money for his serv- 
ices in the war"; and, also, — "That Clark Brown have his son's credit 
for war service as on the town's books; and that Capt. Douglass and 
Waldron Stone be allowed their credit for service as on the town's books." 

The above is the last record on the book referring to the Revolutionary 
War during its progress. 

The Association Test. 

In the month of April, 1776, the New Hampshire committee of 
safety, acting under the provisions of a resolution passed by the Conti- 
nental Congress, sent to the selectmen of the several towns circulars 
containing a declaration to which the committee requested the boards 
of selectmen to procure the signatures of all the males over twenty-one 
years of age in their respective towns, and to report the names of all who 
refused to sign the same. The "declaration" in said circular contained 
was termed, "An Association Test." The following is a copy of the same, 
together with the names of those in Raby who signed it : 

"We the Subscribers do hereby solemnly engage and promise, that 
we will, to the utmost of our power, at the Risque of our Lives and For- 
tunes, with arms, oppose the Hostile Proceedings of the British Fleets 
and Armies against the United American Colonies." 

George Russell, Nath'l Badger, 

James Badger, James Campbell, 

Benjamin Muzzey, James Rolf, 

Randel McDonald, Swallow Tucker, 

James Dickey, Samuel Russell, 

Nath'ell Patten, George Woodward, 
Sampson Farnsworth, • James Mcintosh, 

Will' Hall, Mathew Walless, 

Denet Shaw, Jr., Robert Seaver, 

Eason Dix, Isaac Shattuck, 

Moses Lowell, W T illiam Spaulding. 
Phinehan Asten, 



88 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

Names and Records of Raby's Soldiers in the War of the Revolution. 

1. CAPT. ROBERT SEAVER enlisted April 19, 1775, as a 
private in Capt. Reuben Dow's company of Hollis which marched from 
Hollis in response to the Lexington alarm and served twelve days at 
Cambridge. During this same year he was second lieutenant in Capt. 
Noah Worcester's company of Hollis, serving this time at Cambridge 
from December to April following. At the time known as the "First 
Ticonderoga Alarm," when, in June, 1777, General Burgoyne was re- 
ported to be marching upon Fort Ticonderoga, he was first lieutenant 
in Capt. Daniel Emerson's company of Hollis which, in response to the 
State's call for troops to repel the invasion, marched as far as Walpole, 
and was then ordered back. 

Mr. Worcester, in his history of Hollis, claims Captain Seaver as a 
Hollis man, saying that in 1775 "his name appears on the Hollis tax lists 
as a resident tax payer." By that process of reasoning nearly every 
man who went to the war from this town might have been claimed as 
a resident of Hollis, for it was not quite six years since Raby had been 
incorporated out of territory that had previously been a part of Hollis, 
and no doubt many of the citizens were still taxed in Hollis, although no 
longer residents there. But in 1769, when Raby was incorporated as an 
independent township, Robert Seaver was living within its limits, — as 
were also Randell McDaniels, John Cummings, Ezekiel Proctor, Ebenezer 
Gilson, Joshua Smith and James Dickey; six other soldiers of Raby, who 
were claimed for Hollis, probably for the same reason as was Captain 
Seaver. The fact of their residence in Raby at that time is established 
conclusively by a plan of Hollis and Raby, which was filed with a peti- 
tion of the people of Raby, addressed to the General Court of New Hamp- 
shire in June, 1785; a copy of which plan appears in this book, and in 
which the sites of the dwelling houses of Cummings, Proctor, Gilson and 
vSmith are designated by marks and names. In this plan and petition, 
Robert Seaver, James Dickey and Randell McDaniels are mentioned and 
described as — "Living in Raby on the side next to Hollis," and, further- 
more, the petition itself is signed by Robert Seaver as one of the select- 
men of Raby. Not only this, but his name appears on the tax list, or 
rates, of Raby for 1771 and every succeeding year up to and including 
1775, and for every year after as long as he lived. Oct. 2, 1775, he was 
chosen one of the town's first committee of safety, as by its records ap- 
pears; and the records show that he was repeatedly a member of that 
committee during the war. As a further proof of his citizenship in Raby, 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 89 

I produce the evidence of himself as embodied in the following certificate, 
copied from the Town Papers of New Hampshire, Vol. XI, Page 241. 
It is entitled — "Certificate of Men enlisted 1776." 

"Raby, July 18, 1776. 
Pursuant to orders from the Hon ble . Nathaniel Fulsom, Esq. Major- 
General to me directed to raise six men in the company under General 
Sullivan. In consequence of said Order I have Raised and caused to 
muster & march in to said service five men Exclusive of one belonging 
to the town of Raby who had enlisted into said service and passed muster." 

(Signed) Robert Seaver, Capt. 
"To the committee of safety for the colony of New Hampshire." 
And finally his name appears as one of the subscribers in 1768 to the in- 
strument by which certain of the inhabitants of the Mile Slip and the 
west part of Hollis appointed Samuel Farley their agent to petition the 
Governor and Council to incorporate them and theirs into a new town- 
ship. His title of "Captain" came from the fact that he was for many 
years captain of the local Militia company. He died at Brookline, Nov. 
3, 1828, aged 85 years, and is buried in the cemetery-on-the-plain, his 
grave being marked by a marble slab. 

2. JAMES McINTOSH was one of Raby's men who marched with 
Captain Dow's company for Lexington and Cambridge on the evening of 
April 19, 1775. When a portion of Captain Goss' company returned to 
Hollis from Cambridge after a few days absence, Mcintosh remained and 
enlisted for eight months in a company which Capt. Reuben Dow or- 
ganized at Cambridge, and which was mustered into the service as a 
part of Col. William Prescott's Massachusetts regiment. He was one of 
the corporals of this company, and in its ranks he fought in the Battle 
of Bunker Hill. He died at Brookline, Oct. 16, 1823, 80 years old, and is 
buried in the pond cemetery. His grave is marked at the present time 
by a head stone. 

3. RANDALL McDANlELS was also in Captain Dow's company 
April 19, 1775. He was probably one of that portion of the company 
which returned to Hollis at the expiration of twelve days. In December, 
1776, he again enlisted in the regiment of Col. David Gilman, which was 
organized to reinforce the army in New York. This time he was in Capt. 
William Walker's company of Dunstable, now Nashua, and served for two 
months, as appears from the company's roll at Concord. He is buried in 
the pond cemetery. 

4. ARCHIBALD McINTOSH, Sr., enlisted as a private in Capt. 
Samuel Gilbert's company, Prescott's regiment, May 10, 1775. He was 



90 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

in the battle of Bunker Hill, where he was wounded and taken prisoner. 
He died of his wounds Aug, 10, 1775, having served eighty-three days. 
His name is inscribed on one of the memorial tablets in Charlestown, 
Mass., as one of Brookline's soldiers who were killed in that battle. Nov. 
30, 1775, Captain Gilbert signed a paper certifying to the fact that he 
was either taken prisoner or killed in the battle; and also that he had 
never received a bounty coat or value thereof. His widow, Rachel Mcin- 
tosh, afterwards received the money value of the coat.* 

5. JAMES CONNECK was also in the battle of Bunker Hill; serv- 
ing in the same company with Archibald Mcintosh. Like Mcintosh, he 
was wounded and taken prisoner. He is reported in the State Rolls as 
having died of his wounds July 24, 1775. His name is inscribed with that 
of Mcintosh on the said tablet in Charlestown. 

6. NATHANIEL BADGER enlisted as a private in Capt. Samuel 
Gilbert's company, Colonel Prescott's regiment, in May, 1775. He fought 
in the battle of Bunker Hill. 

7. WILLIAM SPAULDING, Sr., was a volunteer' from Raby in 
Capt. Josiah Sawtelle's company of minute men, which marched from 
Groton, Mass., for Lexington, on the alarm of April 19, 1775. In May 
of the same year he re-enlisted as a private in Capt. Joseph Moore's 
company, Col. William Prescott's regiment. He was in the battle of 
Bunker Hill, where he was severely wounded in the arm. March 12, 
1777, he petitioned the New Hampshire House of Representatives for an 
allowance, as follows: 

"To the Hon'ble ye General Assembly of ye State of New Hamp- 
shire — The Petition of William Spaulding Humbly Sheweth That he was 
wounded in the battle at Bunker hill by which he hath lost the use of his 
right hand — that he is on ye roll for half pay — that he has lived in Raby 
and in said state upwards of twelve years — that the loss of his hand and 
his poll taxes and a large family to maintain hath much reduced him — 
and that he was chosen by sd Town of Raby constable for ye year 1782 
— and beg'd to be excused but was not released — that his own Taxes 
with some small Debts which he ow'd have brought him into such sur- 
comstances that he is in the arear the sum of £25-7-3-3 to the state 
Treas r and that he hath one state note of £20, and one order of £12 
from ye president both of them herein which is all he has to pay with — 
that he is about to remove to Norrigewalk in on the Kenebec river — 
Therefore he prays your Honors to except of the only means he hath to 
satisfie ye Treas r and Grant that ye Treas r may be Directed to receive so 

* Mass. Soldiers and Sailors. — Vol. X, page 510. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 91 

much of sd note and order as you in your great wisdom & Justice to my 

necessities shall see fit as in duty bound shall pray. 

April 1784. Will" 1 Spalding." 

This petition was considered by the House March 21, 1777, and he 
was granted half pay from the last day of December, 1775, — "On con- 
sideration of his doing Garrison Duty in a corps of invalids, and that in 
case he shall be called upon & refuse to do said duty he will not be enti- 
tled to said half pay." 

On the 7th day of August, 1778, as appears by the State Rolls, Swal- 
low Tucker, James Badger and Benj. Shattuck, as selectmen of Raby, 
certified to the paymaster general that — "William Spaulding of Raby in 
said State Remains lame as he hath since he was wounded in the service 
of the United States at Bunker Hill"; and on the 3rd day of April, 1777, 
he acknowledged the receipt of a certificate for thirty pounds of Ephraim 
Robinson — "In full of his half pay as an Invalid Pensioner to April 1st, 
1778." 

His name appears upon the State pension rolls as late as 1785. 

8. WILLIAM SPAULDING, Jr., was a son of William, above men- 
tioned. He served in the same company with his father and fought by 
his side at Bunker Hill. He afterwards served as a private in Captain 
Goss' company, Colonel Nichols' regiment, Stark's brigade, for two months 
and nine days, and was in the battle of Bennington. 

9. NATHANIEL PATTEN enlisted from Brookline for eight 
months in Capt. Reuben Dow's company, of Prescott's regiment, and 
was in the battle of Bunker Hill. In July, 1776, he served in Capt. Daniel 
Emerson Jr.'s company, Colonel Joshua Wingate's regiment, which was 
raised to reinforce the army in Canada. He was in the service this time 
about six months. In 1777 he again enlisted; this time for Hollis, as a 
private in the First New Hampshire Continental Regiment, then com- 
manded by Col. Moses Nichols. This last enlistment was for three years. 
But in July, 1780, he appears to have re-enlisted for Hollis as a recruit 
for the Continental Army for six months, receiving as a bounty 510 pounds 
and seventy-nine bushels of Rye. He served this last time five months 
and nineteen days. He was at West Point in 1780 in Company 4, of the 
Regt, of N. H. continental troops, then commanded by Col. Joseph Cilley. 

In the New Hampshire War Rolls, under the date of April 23, 1777, 
is the following : 



92 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

"Received of the town of Hollis by the hands of the selectmen the 
sum of twenty pounds as a bounty for engaging in the Continental Army 
to serve the term of three years. Receive for me Jonathan Taylor." 

(Signed) NATHANIEL PATTEN. 

On said rolls under date of May 20, 1779, appears the following 
record: "Received of the selectmen of Hollis by the hands of James 
Mcintosh one Bushel of Rye at nine pound — Eleven pound of Pourk at 
nine pound eighteen shillings — one-half bushel of Beans at three pound 
twelve shillings for my support as my husband is in the Continental 
army for said Hollis." her 

"Byrne (Signed) GRace X PATTEN. 

JAMES McINTOSH." mark. 

10. JAMES MeDANlELS (McDonald). He is claimed in the Hollis 
history as a Hollis man. But his name appears on Raby's recorded list 
of soldiers and also on the town's tax list in 1771 and 1775. He enlisted 
in Capt. John Goss' company, Col. Moses Nichol's regiment, which 
marched from Hollis in July, 1777. He served two months and twenty- 
nine days and was in the battle of Bennington. He died in Brookline, 
April 11, 1801, in the 84th year of his age, and is buried in the pond 
cemetery. His grave is marked by a marble slab. 

11. ELI AS DICKEY enlisted from Raby April 19, 1775, as a 
private in Capt. John Nutting's company of Groton, Mass., Colonel 
Prescott's regiment. But for some unknown reason he was absent from 
his company at the battle of Bunker Hill. His name appears on the roll 
of Captain Nutting's company. It also appears in the New Hampshire 
Revolutionary Rolls as gone to Quebec; and on Raby's record list of its 
soldiers, his name is recorded as one of the — "Men that went to Canada 
for one year." In July, 1776, he enlisted in Capt. Daniel Emerson's 
company, Colonel Wingate's regiment, in the Continental Army. 

12. DANIEL SHED was a volunteer from Raby April 19, 1775, in 
Capt. Asa Lawrence's company of minute men, Groton, Mass. July 7, 
1777, he re-enlisted for Raby for one year in Capt. John Goss' company 
of Hollis, Col. Moses Nichol's regiment. His name appears on Raby's 
record list of its soldiers. In June, or July, 1779, he re-enlisted in the 
third New Hampshire Continental regiment and served until June or 
July, 1780. At his enlistment in 1779 the town voted him a bounty of 
one thousand dollars in cash and eighty dollars for four months supply 
of firewood. He received a state bounty of 60 pounds. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 93 

On the New Hampshire Revolutionary Rolls, Vol. 3, p. 584, appears 
the following statement : 

"Raby now Brookline." 

"The State of New Hampshire to the selectmen of Raby D. To cash 
paid Daniel Shed as a soldier enlisted in the continental service for one 
year being the state bounty 

— Per Rec L 60, Errors excepted in behalf of the selectmen of Raby." 

(Signed) NOAH WORCESTER. 
"In committee of claims f 

Exeter 11th. Feb. 1780 < Daniel Shed was mustered in by 

is lodged in this office." (_ Col. Moses Richards the receipt 

Exc J. GILMAN" 

Feb. 11, 1780. An order on the Treasurer for twenty pounds." 

("Signed) NOAH WORCESTER. 
Copyex d N. PARKER." 

13. ANDREW RUSSELL was a private in Capt. William Read's 
company, Col. Nahum Baldwin's regiment in 1776. He re-enlisted in 
Capt. Daniel Emerson's company at the time of the first "Ticonderoga 
Alarm" in 1777. This alarm was caused by the news of Burgoyne's ad- 
vance upon the fort at Ticonderoga. The company left Hollis June 30, 
and marched as far as Walpole, where the regiment to which it was at- 
tached was ordered back home. At the time of the second alarm in July 
of the same year he was in Capt. John Goss' company of same regiment, 
(Colonel Nichol's), for two months and nine days, and was present at 
and engaged in the battle of Bennington. In July, 1781, he re-enlisted in 
Capt. Moses Nichol's regiment, where he served six months. 

14. JONAS SHED enlisted in Capt. John Goss' company of Hollis, 
July 20, 1777. He was discharged September 28 of the same year, having 
served two months and nine days. He was in the battle of Bennington. 

15. CLARK BROWN enlisted in Capt. Joseph Bennett's company 
of Mason, Col. Moses Nichol's regiment, which marched from Mason for 
Ticonderoga June 29, 1777, on the alarm, to re-enforce General St. Clair, 
and was out five days. 

16. JAMES DICKEY was a volunteer in Capt. Reuben Dow's 
company, which marched from Hollis April 19, 1775, at the time of the 
Lexington alarm. In June, 1777, he was a private in Capt. Daniel Emer- 
son's company, which marched from Hollis at the time of the first Ticon- 
deroga alarm, and was absent five days. In 1781 he was a private in the 
2nd company, 1st New Hampshire continental regiment. 



94 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

17. JOHN CONNECK served as a private in Captain Goss' com- 
pany, which marched from Hollis, July 20, 1777, to re-enforce the northern 
army. He served two months and nine days. He was in the battle of 
Bennington, where he was severely wounded. 

18. WILLIAM CONNECK, at nineteen years of age, enlisted June 
18, 1780, for three years or during the war, as a private in the Fourth New 
Hampshire continental regiment, Capt. John House's company. He was 
mustered in by Major Scott, and discharged December 6, of the same year. 

19. SAMUEL RUSSELL was a private in Captain Stone's com- 
pany, Colonel Hale's regiment, at the time of the first Ticonderoga alarm 
in June, 1777. 

20. JAMES ROLFE in 1777 was a private in Capt. William Walk- 
er's company of Dunstable, Col. David Gilmore's regiment. In 1781 he 
enlisted from Raby for Hollis as private in the fifth company, second N. 
H. continental regiment. He was mustered in at Amherst February 13. 
His term of service was three years. 

21. ISAAC SHATTUCK served in the garrison at Portsmouth; 
and also in the army in New York, in Capt. Timothy Clement's company, 
Colonel Long's regiment. He was in the service twelve months in all. 
He is buried in the Pond cemetery. 

22. JAMES CAMPBELL was a private in Colonel Nichol's regi- 
ment in June, 1777, at the time of the first "Ticonderoga Alarm." He 
was in Capt. Daniel Emerson's company, and served four days. He died 
July 5, 1779, and is buried in the south cemetery. 

23. SWALLOW TUCKER was in the same company and regi- 
ment with James Campbell, and served for the same length of time. 
His name also appears on the town list as one of those "who went to 
Cambridge." He died April 29, 1809, and is buried in the south cemetery. 

24. BENJAMIN SHATTUCK was in Capt. Joseph Barrett's com- 
pany of Mason, Colonel Nichols' regiment, which marched for Ticonderoga 
at the time of the alarm, June 19, 1777. He is buried in the Pond cemetery. 

25. ISAAC STEVENS, Jr., in June, 1776, was a member of Cap- 
tain Emerson's company of Hollis, Col. Joseph Wingate's regiment. 
This regiment was raised to re-enforce the army in Canada. He served 
about six months. 

26. SAMPSON FARNSWORTH served in Capt. Robert Fletcher's 
company, Colonel Hale's regiment; enlisting Aug. 10, 1778. He saw 21 
days service in Rhode Island. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 95 

27. BENJAMIN PATTEN enlisted from Raby Jan. 1, 1777, for 
three years or the war, as a private in Capt. Hugh Maxwell's company, 
Col. John Bayley's regiment, in the Continental Army for the state of 
Massachusetts. He served from Jan. 1, 1777, to Dec. 31, 1779. In 1778 
he was with his company at Valley Forge. A company return under 
date of March 7, 1780, reports him as having deserted. 

28. BENJAMIN OSGOOD enlisted from Raby Feb. 17, 1777, for 
three years or during the war, in Capt. W. H. Ballard's company, Col. 
Ichabod Alden's regiment, in the Continental Army for Massachusetts. 
He is said to have been originally of Chelmsford, Mass. ; from whence he 
came to Raby. 

The enlistment of Patten and Osgood into a Massachusetts regiment 
called the attention of the citizens of Raby to the necessity of some action 
on their part relative to having them counted as a part of the town's 
quota of soldiers called for by their own state. Accordingly, Robert 
Seaver and Alexander Mcintosh, acting in behalf of the selectmen, pre- 
pared and sent to the Massachusetts legislature the following memorial : 

"State of Massachusetts Bay: To the Hon'ble Council & the Hon'ble 
House of Representatives in General Court Assembled The Petition of 
Robert Server & Alex'r Macintosh in behalf of the Selectmen & Town 
officers of Raby in the State of New Hampshire Humbly shews — That 
in the Month of Jany. ye last past Benj. patten of said Raby in the State 
of N. Hampshire aforesaid did iniist himself a soldier & mustered by 
James Barrett Esq muster master for the County of Middlesex as appears 
upon said muster masters Returns now lodged in the Secretarys Office of 
this State, that in the month of February 17th Day Last past that Benj. 
Osgood of said Raby In the State of N. hampshire aforesaid Did iniist 
himself a Soldier & was mustered by James Barrett Esq. — muster master 
For the County of middlesex as appears upon Said Muster masters Re- 
turns Now Lodged in the Secretary office of the State ye Petitioners 
therefore humbly Request this Hon'ble Court Would Direct Some Suit- 
able person to Receive your Petitioners this State Bounty & Likewise the 
Continental Bounty if this Court Shall think of it so that said Patten & 
said Osgood may be Returned as Continental Soldiers for said Raby In 
said State of New Hampshire. — and your Petitioners as in Duty Bound 
will ever pray &c — 
Raby March 3, 1778. 

ROBERT SERVER Capt. 

ALEX'R MACINTOSH." 



96 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

The Massachusetts legislature responded to this memorial by giving 
the petitioners leave to withdraw. The matter was allowed to rest quiet- 
ly until 1783, in which year it was called to the attention of the New 
Hampshire authorities by the following memorial : 

"State of New Hampshire. 

To the Honorable the Senate & House of Representatives of the 
State of New Hampshire. 

The Petition of the Selectmen of the Town of Raby Humbly Shews 
— That Benj'a Osgood & Benj'a Patten two privates belonging to the 
train band in said town of Raby in the year A. D. 1777 inlist into the 
Service of Massachusetts in the Continental Army for three years or 
during the war which men were claimed by the town & were returned by 
the commanding officer of sd Train Band in favour of said Town and 
applied to the General Court of the Massachuettts for an order whereby 
your petitioners might have relief, but upon the principal that by a gen- 
eral resolve they had made Sufficient provision already for relief ordered 
the petition to be withdrawn, as may appear from the certificat accom- 
panying this petition. Whereas the Town of Raby have been fined for 
a delinquency of said two men when the supposed they had fully com- 
plied with the requisisions laid upon them Seems to your petitioners not 
founded in Justice your petitioners therefore humbly pray your honors 
to take their case under your wise consideration and remit the fine layed 
on the Town or grant such relief as you in your wisdom may see fit. And 
your petitioners as in Duty bound will ever pray." 

SWALLOW TUCKER y Selectmen 
ROBERT SEVER [- of Raby 
DANIEL TYLER ) 

The above petition was accompanied with the following certificates: 

"This may certify Benj'a Patten & Benj'a Osgood both of Raby in 

the County of Hillsborough & State of New Hampshire were & are proper 

Inhabitants of said Town of Raby & belonging to my Company as private 

soldiers & belong to the Regiment whereof Moses Nichols Esq is Colonel 

who have lately enlisted into the Continental service 

as privates in the same for the space of three years or during the 
present war (Viz) the said Benja Osgood under Lieut Jonas Parker of 
Acton under the command of Capt. Ballard in Col. Alden's Regt. and 
the s d Benj a Patten in Capt. Maxwell's Company Col Bayleys Regt. 
both in the State of the Massachusetts Bay by means whereof we are orpos- 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 97 

sibly may be deprived of two men which we ought not to be by the re- 
solves of the State with regard to inlistments in this ease made & provided 
Raby May 5th 1777 
To Col Moses Nichols 

A True Copy attest Robert Sever Capt." 
"This may certify that the hire of Benj a Osgood was paid — and the 
hire of Benj a Patten was tendered. 
Raby May 31, 1784. SWALLOW TUCKER 1 Select 



ROBERT SEVER Men. 



29. ARCHIBALD McINTOSH, Jr., was a private in Capt. John 
Goss' company, which marched from Hollis, June 29, 1777, to re-enforce 
the army in the north. He was in the battle of Bennington. 

30. BENJAMIN MUZZEY served as a private in Capt. Philip 
Putnam's company of Wilton, which marched from Wilton for Saratoga, 
Sept. 29, 1777. He afterwards re-enlisted in Capt. William Reed's com- 
pany, Col. Nahum Baldwin's regiment; the company having been raised 
in the 6th regiment of the Militia, and mustered into the service by Abiel 
Abbott, mustering officer. 

31. CALEB BROWN, in 1776, was a private in Capt. Timothy 
Clement's company, Col. Pierce Long's regiment, in the continental serv- 
ice. Time of service nineteen days. In 1778 he was in Capt. Moses Leav- 
ett's company, Col. Moses Nichol's regiment, which marched that year to 
re-enforce the continental army in Rhode Island. Time of service, twenty- 
five days. Dec. 15, 1783, the town allowed him 1 pound and 8 pense — 
"For war service." 

32. THOMAS ALTON (Austin) served as a private in 

company, Col. Thomas Nichol's regiment, which was 



raised in July, 1777, to re-enforce the northern army. 

33. CAPT. SAMUEL DOUGLASS, whose name appears on Raby's 
record list of its soldiers in the Revolution, was captain of a company of 
twenty men which marched from Townsend Hill, Mass., in response to 
the Lexington alarm, April 19, 1775. At that time, he was living in "Pad- 
dledock," now South Brookline, his house being located a few rods north 
of the State line, and on the east side of the highway which leads from 
South Brookline to the summit of Townsend Hill. Its cellar hole is still 
in existence at the present time, and is in a remarkable state of preserva- 
tion, considering the fact that it was built more than one hundred and 
sixty years ago. At a town meeting holden Feb. 15, 1783, it was voted — 



98 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

"That Capt. Douglass and Waldron Stone be allowed credit for war 
sarvis as on the town book"; and under date of Oct. 23, 1784, the town's 
order book contained the following entry — "Capt Douglass order for 3 
pounds-3-4-1 ; it being for his war service." 

34. MOSES LOWELL enlisted as a private in the 5th company 
of the second New Hampshire continental regiment, his term of service 
being for three years or during the war. 

35. JEREMIAH HUBERT (Hobart), whose name is on the 
town's record list of its soldiers, in August, 1775, was a private in Capt. 
Asa Lawrence's company of Groton, Colonel Prescott's regiment. 

36. JOSIAH SUARD (Seward?) enlisted for Raby April 25, 1775, 
in Capt. John Nutting's company of Groton, Colonel Prescott's regi- 
ment, and served three months and eight days. According to Raby's 
records, he was also — "at York 1 year." 

37. WILLIAM McINTOSH, April 12, 1781,* was hired as a re- 
cruit by the town of Stoughton, Mass. His company, regiment and term 
of service are unknown. Opposite to his name on the town's list are the 
words — "For Nathaniel Patten to York." 

38. WALDRON STONE was a volunteer from Raby in Capt. 
Daniel Stone's company of minute men of Ashby, Mass., which marched 
from Ashby for Cambridge, Mass., at the time of the Lexington alarm, 
April 19, 1775. August 1, of the same year, he was a private in Capt. 
Abijah Wyman's company, Col. William Prescott's regiment. His name 
appears on Raby's record list of its soldiers. 

39. LIEUT. JOHN CUMMINGS was second lieutenant of the 
Hollis company of minute men, which, under the command of Capt. Reu- 
ben Dow, in response to the alarm from Lexington, marched from Hollis 
for Cambridge and Lexington on the evening of April 19, 1775. After 
some twelve days service at Cambridge a part of the company returned 
to Hollis. Of the men who remained at Cambridge, fifty-nine were or- 
ganized into a new company under the command of Captain Dow, and the 
company was mustered into the service for eight months as a part of Col. 
William Prescott's Massachusetts regiment. It completed its full term of ser- 
vice, and was in the battle of Bunker Hill. Among the names of the officers 
and men of the organized company were the following citizens of Raby : 
Second Lieut. John Cummings; second corporal, James Mcintosh; pri- 
vates, Nathaniel Patten, Ezekiel Proctor and Ebenezer Gilson. Lieutenant 
Cummings at this time was, and for many years prior thereto had been, a 

* Mass. Soldiers and Sailors. — Vol. X, page 512. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 99 

resident of Raby. His name appears as a resident taxpayer on its first 
rate list in 1771, and also upon its rate list for every subsequent year up 
to about 1790. His dwelling house, a log cabin, was located in the eastern 
part of the township, as its limits were described in its charter in 1769, 
and about three-fourths of a mile northeasterly from the present village 
Main street. Its site at the present time (1914) is occupied by one of the 
oldest framed dwelling houses in town; which, about 1800, was owned and 
occupied as his home by James Parker, 1st, and after him, from about 
1840 to some time in the seventies, by the late James H. Burgess. 

40. EZEKIEL PROCTOR was a member of Capt. Reuben Dow's 
company of Hollis when it marched from Hollis for Cambridge, April 19, 
1775. He continued to be a member of the company after its reorganiza- 
tion at Cambridge, and fought with it in the battle of Bunker Hill. His 
term of service in this enlistment was eight months. In 1776, he re- 
enlisted from Raby with twenty men from Hollis who enlisted during that 
year in the first and third New Hampshire continental regiments, a part 
of whom were in Capt. John House's company of the first regiment, and 
a part in Capt. Isaac Frye's company of Wilton, of the third regiment. 
Both of these regiments served in New York and New Jersey. His term 
of service in this last enlistment was one year. 

Before, at the time of, and for many years after these enlistments, 
Ezekiel Proctor was a resident taxpayer in Raby. His name appears as 
such upon its first rate list in 1771, and for many years afterwards. His 
dwelling house was located about one mile north of the village Main 
street on the west side of the north highway to Hollis. Its site until some 
fifteen or twenty years since, when it was destroyed by fire, was occupied 
by one of the oldest framed buildings in town which, at various times in 
its existence, was known from the names of its different owners as the 
Amos Blodgett place, the Pope place and the Luke Baldwin place. 

41. EBENEZER GILSON was a private in Capt. Reuben Dow's 
company when in response to the Lexington alarm it marched from Hollis 
on the evening of April 19, 1775. He was probably one of those members 
of the company who, after an absence of twelve or thirteen days, re- 
turned to Hollis. For in the fall of the same year, he re-enlisted in the 
Hollis company of forty-five men which, under the command of Capt. 
Noah Worcester, responded to the call of the New Hampshire Committee 
of Safety for troops to re-enforce Gen. John Sullivan, then in command of 
the New Hampshire troops at Winter Hill near Boston. He was in the 
battle of Bunker Hill. His house was located in the disputed territory in 



100 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

the eastern part of Raby on the west side of the east highway from Brook- 
line to Milford, and about one and one-half miles north of the present 
village Main street. At the present time (1914) its exact site is a matter 
of doubt. 

42. JOSHUA SMITH was a private in Capt. William Reed's com- 
pany in Col. Nahum Baldwin's regiment, which was raised in September, 
1777, to re-enforce the continental army at White Plains, New York. He 
served five months. His house in Raby at that time was located in the 
disputed territory in the southeast part of the town on the east side of 
the highway to Oak hill, and about one and one-half miles south of the 
present village Main street. A dwelling house standing on its site at the 
present time was known, sixty years ago, as the Christopher Farley place. 
At present it is known as the Moses Bohonon place. 

43. JOHN GARDNER enlisted from Raby in 1776. He was hired 
by the town to help fill out its quota for that year, and was paid a bounty 
of six pounds. He served first as a private in Capt. Samuel Cornell's com- 
pany, Col. Daniel Moore's regiment. In 1777 he was in Capt. John Lang- 
don's company when it joined the army under General Gates at Saratoga. 
His term of service in this last enlistment was twenty-five days. 

Concerning the war records of the following five soldiers of Raby in 
the Revolution, each of whose names appear on its record list, the writer 
has been unable to obtain any information other than that afforded by 
said list as follows : 

44. GEORGE WOODWARD; "To Tigh for five months." 

45. PHINEAS ASTON (Astin?) ; "Canada 1 year." 

46. ALEXANDER McINTOSH; "Canada 1 year." 

47. MATHEW WALLACE; "To Cambridge 6 weeks." 

48. DAVID DAVIDSON; "Went on the alarms." 



Raby's Committees of Safety. 



* 



1775. Ebenezer Muzzey, James Badger, Robert Seaver, Benjamin 
vShattuck, Clark Brown. 

1776. George Russell, James Badger, Benjamin Shattuck, Swallow 
Tucker, Ebenezer Muzzey. 

1776. (Re-organized Committee.) Alexander Mcintosh, Eason Dix, 
Clark Brown, Mathew Wallace, Benjamin Muzzey, James Campbell, 
Daniel Shedd. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



101 



1777. Alexander Mcintosh, Eson Dix, Clark Brown, Mathew Wal- 
lace, Benjamin Muzzey, James Campbell, Daniel Shedd, William Spauld- 
ing, James Rolfe. 

Raby's Commissioned Officers. 

Captain Samuel Douglass. 
First Lieutenant, Robert Seaver. 
Second Lieutenant, John Cunmmigs. 

Names of Soldiers in the War of the Revolution, Buried in Brook- 
line, Whose Graves are Marked by Memorial Tablets. 



Cemetery on the Plain : 

Capt. Robert Seaver, died Nov. 3, 1828, aged 85. 



Swallow Tucker, 
Benjamin Brooks, 
James Campbell, 
Joshua Smith, 
David Gilson, 

Pond Cemetery: 

Randell McDaniels, 
Adj't. William Green, 
George Russell, 
Samuel Russell, 
Isaac Shattuck, 
James Mcintosh, 
David Davisdon, 
James McDonald, 
Benjamin Shattuck, 
Mathew Wallace, Sr. 
Eleazer Gilson, 
Sampson Farnsworth. 



April 22, 1809, " 67. 

April 2, 1829. 

July 5, 1799, aged 52. 

1838. 

July 10, 1839. 



died Jan. 27, 1825. 

Nov. 29, 1809, aged 82. 



Nov. 


25, 1812, ' 


' 92 


Nov. 


31, 1807, ' 


' 74 


Nov. 


19, 1807, ' 


' 72 


Oct. 


16, 1828, ' 


' 80 


Dec. 


3, 1796, ' 


' 41 


April 


11, 1801, ' 


' 84 


Sept. 


12, 1813, 


' 88 


Dec. 


21, 1851, ' 


' 95 



102 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



CHAPTER VII. 

Raby, Continued. 

1775-1786. 

Classification of Raby with Mason in the Matter of Representation in the 
General Court — First Representative from Raby to the General 
Court — Second Representative to the General Court — Raby 
Classed with Milford in the Matter of Representation — Small Pox 
Scare— The Dark Day of 1780— The Pond Dam— Early and 
Modern Cemeteries — Disturbances over the Law Relative to 
Killing Salmon and Other Fishes — Ancient and Modern Inns. 

From the beginning of the war in 1775 until the close in 1783, the 
records furnish but little information relative to municipal affairs; the 
town apparently having all it could attend to by way of raising money 
and supplies for meeting expenses incurred by, and exigencies arising 
from, the war. 

There are, to be sure, occasional records of votes to raise sums of 
money for preaching, school purposes, and the building and repairing of 
highways and bridges. But in all these cases the sums voted were very 
small; and it not infrequently happened that a sum of money voted for 
some especial purpose at one meeting would, at some subsequent meet- 
ing, by vote, be changed from the use for which it was originally intended 
and applied to the carrying out of some other scheme. There are, also, 
during this period almost every year recorded votes for the appointment 
of committees- — "To git two tiers of lots laid off to Raby from the west 
part of Mason"; or, "To git a portion of the west part of Hollis laid off 
to Raby." The desire on the part of Raby's people for more territory 
and their hopes of acquiring it, as expressed in the foregoing votes, while 
in the case of Mason they were destined never to be realized, were, never- 
theless, in the case of Hollis, afterwards fully realized, as will appear 
further along in these pages. 

Of the highways which were accepted during this period little can 
be said. Many of them were mere bridle paths which have long since 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE ' 103 

ceased to be used as highways and, in the majority of cases, the descrip- 
tions of their laying out are as indefinite and hard to decipher as it is 
today to establish their original locations. 

Representation in the General Court. 

During these years the state laws allowed one representative to the 
General Court for every nine hundred inhabitants. Mason had at this 
time a population of a little over five hundred; while Raby's population, 
owing to the failure of its selectmen to return a census of its inhabitants 
in 1775, was unknown. It was probably this latter fact that caused the 
state authorities to guess at its population as being three hundred and 
twenty, in order that it might be classed with Mason and thus secure the 
number of people necessary for representation. Thus it happened that 
until 1794 Raby and Mason elected a representative together. 

The joint March meetings for the election of a representative appear 
to have generally been held at Mason, the warrants for the same being 
posted in each town. In these meetings Raby does not appear to have 
played any particularly prominent part. Indeed, its books fail to record 
or even mention them. From the year 1775 to 1784 the two towns were 
represented by Deacon Amos Dakin of Mason. But in the latter year, 
either through a special dispensation of Providence or because of political 
paralysis on the part of the politicians of Mason, Capt. Samuel Douglass 
of Raby was elected representative and thus acquired the distinction of 
being the first of its citizens to attain that honor. The second Raby 
man to acquire the distinction was James Campbell, who represented the 
two towns in 1789. 

In 1794 Milford was incorporated and thereafter until the year 1802 
Raby was classed with the latter town in the matter of representation. 
During the period of the town's classification with Milford in 1796 and 
again in 1798, Benjamin Farley of Brookline represented the two towns 
in the legislature. Brookline continued to be classed with Milford until 
1802. But in the latter year the General Court, upon the petition of its 
inhabitants, granted to the town the privilege of being classed by itself 
in the matter of representation in the state legislature. The original peti- 
tion, in response to which the right was conferred, has been lost; but the 
vote of the General Court in considering the same was as follows: 

"State of New Hampshire, In the House of Representatives; June 
16, 1802 



104 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

Upon Reading & Considering the foregoing Petition and the Report 
of a Committee thereon Voted that the prayer thereof be granted and 
that the Inhabitants of the Town of Brookline be entitled to send a Rep- 
resentative to the General Court in future 
Sent up for Concurrence 

John Prentice Speaker 
In Senate June 17, 1802 Read & Concurred 

NATH' PARKER DY Sec're'y" 

March 1, 1780, the citizens voted — "Not to have the small pox in 
town." March 22 of the same year Samuel Douglass was drawn as a 
grand juror — "to serve at the Superior Court at Amherst"; he being the 
first of Raby's citizens to act in that capacity. 

As to the foregoing vote relative to the smallpox ; while at first thought, 
because of its apparent presumption, it appeals strongly to one's sense of 
the ridiculous, at second thought both its presumptuous and its ridicu- 
lous features are eliminated when it is taken into consideration that the 
vote was really nothing more nor less than an expression of the popular 
opinion at that time relative to the employment of vaccination as a pre- 
ventive of that dread disease ; a practice which was then beginning to be 
introduced, and against which there was strenuous opposition upon the 
part of the general public. 

As bearing upon the question of the numbers and distribution of 
horned cattle among the farmers in Raby at that time, it may be stated 
here that in the spring of 1786 the dwelling house of Joshua Smith, lo- 
cated about one mile south of the present village Main street on the east 
side of the highway to Oak hill, was totally destroyed by fire; and that 
at the time of the fire Mr. Smith was the owner of nine milch cows. 

The Dark Day of 1780. 

"May 19, 1780, has long been known in the annals of New England 
as 'The Dark Day.' The darkness commenced to come on about ten 
o'clock in the forenoon, and lasted until the middle of the following night. 
It extended all over New England and far along the Atlantic coast to the 
southward. During the daytime, its density was so great that men at 
work, out of doors, were unable to see and forced to cease from their 
labor. In doors lighted candles for seeing and doing were as necessary 
as in the darkness of ordinary nights. Fowls went to their roosts and 
birds to their nests as at nightfall. The atmosphere appeared to be charged 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 105 

with yellow, brown and blue light intermingled; which imparted a weird 
and immaterial appearance to all objects in nature. The people were ter- 
rified; all labor was suspended or entirely dropped. To many it seemed 
that the judgement day was at hand. After midnight the gloom gradu- 
ally diminished, and long before morning the night had resumed its original 
conditions." 

The Pond Dam. 

At the March meeting of 1781 there was an article in the warrant — 
"To see if the town will give their consent to have a dam built across the 
stream at the mouth of Tanapus pond right in the highway by any per- 
son or persons that shall agree to build two good mills near the dam." 
This article contains the first mention of a dam at the outlet of the pond, 
or mills on the streams below it; and seems to furnish absolute proof of 
the non-existence at this time of either. The article was passed over; but 
the warrant for the March meeting of the following year contained an 
article similar to the foregoing relative to the building of the dam. In 
response to this last article it was voted — "That any person who will up- 
rear and build two good mills that is a saw mill and corn mill as near 
tanapos pond as may be convenient in Raby shall have liberty to build 
a dam across the stream at the mouth of sd pond so high as to raise the 
water one foot above where the ice now is where the bueoy is marked in 
presence of Capt (Isaac) Shattuck, Capt. "(James)" Campbell and Wil- 
liam Hall providing that raising the water to that height shall not tres- 
pass upon any owner of land above." The above vote is particularly 
interesting because of its assumption on the town's part of the right of 
building a dam at the pond's outlet, and also of limiting the height to 
which its waters should be raised. 

Apparently, no one appeared to take advantage of the privilege 
offered in the above vote; for the following year, 1783, the town gave 
Waldron Stone a special privilege of building the dam, as appears by the 
following vote — "Voted, that Waldron Stone be granted of the privilege 
of building a dam across the stream at the mouth of tanapus pond in the 
highway to flow the pond for the mills he proposes to build on said stream 
& the selectmen are hereby directed to give grant of same to him and his 
heirs and assigns in consideration that he is answerable for all damage he 
may do to the owners of land above the highway & gulling &c if said 
Stone do not build sd mills in two years this grant to be void." 



106 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

The foregoing abstracts from the town's record book contain all there- 
in recorded relative to the building of this dam. There is no proof, either 
written or traditional, that Waldron Stone built it; but if he did, he did 
not build it within the specified time of two years from the date of said 
vote ; nor did he then or at any subsequent time build a mill or mills on 
the stream below the pond's outlet. 

Dec. 31, 1781 — "Voted to approve the Constitution lately adopted 
and not to send a man to convention." The above vote refers to the 
State Convention which met at Concord in June of that year and adopted 
a constitution which, upon its being submitted to the people for their 
ratification, was rejected by a majority of the towns of the state. It may 
as well be stated here that at the various conventions of the people held 
at Portsmouth, Exeter and Concord before, during, and for some years 
after the war, Raby was generally represented by Deacon Amos Dakin of 
Mason. Lieut. Sampson Farnsworth did, however, attend a county con- 
vention at Peterborough, in 1785, and received therefor the munificent 
sum of eleven shillings and sixpense. 

In November, 1782, Clark Brown was paid six shillings— "For help- 
ing to find the Senter of the town." Tradition says that Brown was one 
of a committee of several citizens appointed by the selectmen for this 
purpose and that the committee acted, and finally reported the centre of 
the township as being located in the field to the west of the main highway 
to Milfcrd at the point where the same turns to the left near the house, 
(now burned down), formerly occupied as a parsonage by the Rev. Daniel 
Goodwin, one mile north of the village Main street. The purpose of find- 
ing the town's "Senter" probably had to do with the location of the pro- 
posed meeting-house, the building of which was then under discussion; as 
public sentiment at that time demanded that the meeting-house should 
be built as near to the exact centre of the township as it was possible to 
locate it. 

In 1783, Randal McDonald was paid one pound for one year's service 
as selectman; and the same year, Caleb Trowbridge, for teaching school 
five weeks, was paid one pound and ten shillings, or at the rate of about 
one dollar per week. 

Cemeteries. 

THE POND CEMETERY, or west cemetery, as it is sometimes 
called, is located about one mile north of the village Main street on the 
east side of the highway to Mason, and on the west side of Muscatanipus 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 107 

pond. The first mention made of this cemetery in the town's records 
occurs under the date of March 3, 1784, when the town voted— "To give 
Mr. Hall 12 shillings for half an acre of land in square form where the 
burying ground now is in the south west side of the pond and that the 
westerly half of the town fence the burying ground above." The Mr. 
Hall named in the foregoing vote was William Hall, Jr., and an entry in 
an ancient order book of the town shows that March 6, 1787, the town 
paid him 12 shillings for said half acre of land. The language used in the 
foregoing vote would indicate that at the time of its being passed the land 
in question was already in use as a burying ground. 

THE SOUTH CEMETERY, so-called, situated on "the plain" 
south of the village Main street, was in existence at the time of the town's 
incorporation in 1769, as is shown by the dates on some of its tomb- 
stones; one of them at least bearing a date as early as 1766. The original 
and, therefore, the oldest part of the cemetery was located in the south- 
east corner of the present enclosure. Its original bounds, in form of well 
defined ridges of grass covered earth, are at this date easily traceable. 
For many years after Raby's incorporation, its inhabitants continued to 
use this original part of the cemetery as a burial place for their dead; 
although up to the year 1796 it does not appear that the town was pos- 
sessed of even "color of title" in the land. On the 6th day of September 
of the latter year, however, Swallow Tucker, by his deed of that date, 
conveyed the same to the town— "For use as a burying place." Mr. 
Tucker's deed, for some unknown reason, failed to be recorded at the 
time it was given; but in 1840 it was entered in the Hillsborough County 
Registry, Vol. 203, page 602. 

In 1850 this cemetery was enlarged by the addition to it of a tract 
of land purchased by the town from Joseph Jefts. The following de- 
scription of the tract of land so added is taken from the record of the 
town meeting hoi den September 1-6 of that year — "Commencing at the 
north-east corner of the old cemetery thence northerly on the main road 
170 feet to stake and stones — thence westerly 380 feet to a stake and 
stones — thence southerly 320 feet by or near the road leading from the 
dugway (so called) to Townsend — thence easterly by said road 200 feet 
to the old burying yard wall." That part of the cemetery which at the 
present time is fenced in, with possibly some land south of the present 
enclosure, is made up of the said original burying ground and the fore- 
going described addition. In 1904-05 this cemetery was again enlarged 
by the addition to it of a considerable tract of land located on its west 
side. At the present time the entire lengths of the west and east sides of 



108 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

this last addition are bordered by rows of young and thrifty white pine 
trees which were set out in 1909 by Clarence R. Russell, Esq., and it has 
been laid out in avenues and lots. In 1912-13 this addition was enclosed 
by an iron fence erected by the town. 

THE NORTH CEMETERY is located about two and one-fourth 
miles north of the present village Main street on the west side of the 
highway from Brookline to Milford. Compared as to its antiquity with 
the South and Pond cemeteries, it appears to have been of more modern 
origin than either of them. It is very probable that in the beginning this 
cemetery was the property of some family in that part of the town who 
used it for the burial of their own dead. If so, it furnishes, with the ex- 
ception of the "Cemetery in the woods," the only known instance in town 
of what were formerly known as "Family burial lots." 

This cemetery was taken in charge by the town on the 8th day of 
March, 1825, as appears by a vote cast at a town meeting of that date as 
follows — "Voted to recieve the burrying ground laid out in the north part 
of the town as town property." 

The Cemetery-in-the- Woods. 

The oldest and in some respects, at least, by far the most interesting 
cemetery in town, and of the existence of which, even, many of its citi- 
zens are ignorant, is one to which for lack of a better the writer has given 
the foregoing name. It is, as the name implies, situated in the woods, 
and is located on the eastern slope and near the summit of the hill to the 
southeast of, and about one-fourth of a mile distant from, the dwelling 
house on the west side of the north highway to Hollis, formerly known as 
the Dickey place, or Capt, Robert Seaver place; the same being at the 
present time the property of Mrs. Ebenezer J. Rideout. 

This cemetery was in existence certainly as early as 1752. For in 
that year, Randal McDaniels, one of the three original settlers of the 
name in this town, was, according to the family traditions, buried in it. 
Tradition says, also, that it furnished a last resting place for at least some 
members of the Dickey family. It has not been the scene of a burial for 
more than a century past. Sixty years ago it contained some fourteen or 
fifteen graves marked by rough unhewn stones of granite and void of in- 
scription of any character. But in the years intervening since then, time 
and the ruthless hands of men have thrown down and removed many of 
the stones from their original positions. So that at the present time it 
is difficult to locate more than seven of the original graves; and in an- 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 109 

other fifty years, unless measures are taken to prevent it, this ancient 
burial place where sleep the rude forefathers of Raby, its early settlers, 
will have passed beyond the knowledge of men then living. Connected 
with this cemetery there is a tradition to the effect that with one of its 
inmates, a young lady, were buried her personal articles of jewelry. 

Disturbances Over the Law Relative to the Killing of Salmon 

and Other Fishes, 1784. 

In 1784 the Great and General Court passed an act prohibiting — 
"The Killing or destroying any salmon shad or alewives in the Merrimack 
River or any waters falling thereinto in this state, except on Tuesdays, 
Wednesdays and Thursdays, under a penalty of 2 lbs"; and further — 
"That no person shall erect or build annually within the months of May, 
June, September and October, any dams or other obstructions across said 
streams, nor continue said mill-dams or other obstructions under a pen- 
alty of 20 pounds." 

This act, according to tradition, because of its provisions for keeping 
the dams open during certain months of the year, was the cause of no 
little commotion in Raby, where the project of damming the Nissitissett 
River at or below its outlet from the pond was already being seriously 
considered. It divided the people into two factions. It was a question 
of "To dam or not to dam." One faction was opposed to the act, claim- 
ing that to build a dam across the river with the obligation of keeping 
it open during four months of the year, two of which, at least, were spring 
months when mill business was most active, was prohibitive to that ex- 
tent that it reduced to a minimum the chances of making even a living 
profit in the mill business and therefore cut out all inducements for 
capital to invest in building mill-dams. The men who argued as above 
were, of course, the town's capitalists; many of them passing rich with a 
mortgaged farm and an income of five pounds a year. Thus it happened 
that they opposed the damming of the river and instead d — d the General 
Court for passing the law. 

The other faction favored the act because, as they claimed, if the 
dams were not kept open during the spring months, the pond itself, as 
well as all the streams which flowed into it, would no longer furnish the 
inhabitants with their annual spring supply of brain food in form of lam- 
prey eels and alewives; a species of nutrition of which they openly hinted 
the brains of their opponents were sadly in need. This latter faction, 
therefore, was in favor of damming the river and obeying the law. 



110 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

A few years later, and while the foregoing act was still operative, a 
dam was built across the river at its outlet from the pond ; and for many 
years after the seafish continued to make their annual migrations up and 
down the Nissitissett and its tributary streams. Indeed, that ancient 
"chestnut" of alewives crowding into brooks so thickly as to enable one 
to cross upon their backs from shore to shore, continued to be told of 
Douglass brook in the village well into the nineteenth century. 

Inns and Inn Keepers, Ancient and Modern. 

In the year 1785 the General Court of the State passed an act — 
"For the Better Keeping of the Lords Day." By this act, traveling on 
Sunday was prohibited; "Excepting from some adversity or upon a li- 
cense obtained from some Justice of the Peace"; and inn holders were 
forbidden — "To entertain or suffer the inhabitants to be about their 
houses on the Lord's day." 

The last of the foregoing extracts from said act recalls the bromidic 
saying of — "How history repeats itself." For at the time of its enaction 
there was a license liquor law upon the statute books of this state, as 
there is today; and one of the provisions of the present law relative to 
the sale by hotel keepers to their Sunday guests is very similar to the one 
above set forth. 

At this time there were in town three inn keepers : Benjamin Farley, 
Samuel Douglass and Alexander Mcintosh; each of whom had been li- 
censed as such, under the provisions of the law as it then was. Mr Far- 
ley's inn was kept in the old Lieut. Samuel Farley house, now the property 
of Elmer Wallace, and situate on the east side of the highway to Pep- 
perell, Mass., about one mile south of the village Main street. It was 
the first inn to be opened in this town, and it was kept by Mr. Farley 
in connection with a general store, which was also the first store to be 
opened here. 

The inn of Samuel Douglass was located on the west side of what is 
now the village Main street, near the brook named after him. The Mc- 
intosh inn was located in the house now owned and occupied by Henry 
G. Shattuck, and standing on the west side of the highway to Mason, 
about one mile northwest of the village Main street. The annual town 
meetings were held alternately in these two latter inns until the comple- 
tion of the town house in 1791. 

The passing of the above mentioned law did not, to any appreciable 
extent, discommode either of these three inn keepers. For they imme- 




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HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 111 

diately obtained from a justice a license which enabled them to catch, 
corral and entertain all Sunday travelers who chanced to come their way, 
and continued to serve their in town customers, without paying any spe- 
cial attention to the day of the week upon which the service was ren- 
dered, with "cider flip" straight or New England rum at "three cents 
with sug" or "two without," as did, also, their successors in the business 
for many years after them. 

The Old Yellow House. 

In addition to the houses mentioned above there are at the present 
time several other houses in town which at some period of their existence 
have been used as inns. Among the oldest of them is the "Old Yellow 
House," as it was called seventy -five years ago, a name which was es- 
pecially well applicable to it at that time. For even then its weather 
beaten appearance, as well as certain streaks and patches of yellow paint, 
■ — all that was left of its original coating — which were in evidence under 
the eaves and on the sides less exposed to the weather — furnished ample 
and sufficient reasons for the use of the adjectives "old" and "yellow" 
as applied to it. The name of its builder is unknown, although there is 
a tradition to the effect that it was built by Capt. Robert Seaver soon 
after the close of the Revolution. It was occupied and used as a wayside 
inn until well along into the thirties of the nineteenth century. Among 
those who, during that period, occupied it as landlord was Capt. Joshua 
Hall. From 1840 to 1847, the year of his death, it was the property and 
dwelling place of James Parker, Jr., father of the writer who was born 
in it. After Mr. Parker's death, his widow, Deverd Corey Parker, con- 
tinued to live in the house until 1853-54, when she sold it to the late 
Kdwin C. Bailey, then postmaster of Boston and editor of the Boston 
Herald; who at that time owned and was occupying as a summer resi- 
dence the dwelling house adjacent to it on the west, which is at the pres- 
ent time the property and residence of Mrs. Edward C. Tucker. Later 
on, Mr. Bailey conveyed the house to the late Philemon French, who 
made his home in it until his death. At the present time this house is 
owned and occupied by Mrs. Amos A. Peabody, a daughter of the late 
Alpheus vShattuck, Esq., under whose charge it has returned to its original 
use as a hotel, under the name of the Elm House. The house is located 
on the east side of the village Main street opposite to the Nissitisset 
Hotel. At the present time it is easily identified by three very old and 
magnificent elm trees which are grouped around it. 



112 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

The Capt. Nathan Corey house, located on the east side of the vil- 
lage Main street, a short distance south of the Old Yellow House, is also 
another house which in its early days did duty as an inn. It was built 
by Captain Corey about 1805, a few years after he settled in Brookline, 
coming here from Groton, Mass. Captain Corey occupied and kept the 
house as an inn, in connection with his business as a general store keeper, 
until his death in 1836; since when it has been used only as a private 
dwelling house. After Captain Corey's death, the house passed into the 
hands and ownership of his daughter, Susan J. Abbott, wife of the late 
Jonathan Abbott, formerly of Andover, Mass. At Mrs. Abbott's decease 
in 1889, it passed into the possession and ownership of her son, Charles 
H. Abbott. In 1899 it was purchased from Charles H. Abbott by the 
writer, Edward E- Parker, a grandson of Capt. Nathan Corey, by whom 
it is utilized at the present time as a summer home. 

THE NISSITISSET HOTEL is located on the west side of the vil- 
lage Main street and opposite to the "old yellow house," or Elm House, 
as it is known at the present time. Although its use as a hotel is of a more 
modern date than that of either of the foregoing described houses, it has, 
nevertheless, been in use for that purpose for nearly or quite eighty years. 
The ell part of the house is one of the oldest buildings at the present time 
standing on Main street. The date of its erection, like that of the "old 
yellow house," is unknown. The main part of the house was built by 
Capt. Daniel Bills about 1840. But for several years prior to that date 
the ell had been in use as an inn, its upper story being finished off as a 
hall which at that time was used and for many years subsequent to the 
building of the main part of the house in 1840 continued to be used for 
dancing parties and other social gatherings. 

The earliest known landlord of the house was Daniel Bills, who 
acted in that capacity prior to the addition of the main part of the build- 
ing in 1840, and possibly a few years after. Captain Bills was succeeded 
as landlord by Capt. John Smith, who in his turn was succeeded by Jo- 
siah Shattuck of Pepperell, Mass. About 1854 Shattuck sold the house 
and good will to Bigelow of Boston, Mass., and removed to Pepperell, 
Mass., where he subsequently died. In 1855 Capt. Joseph Jefts became 
both proprietor and landlord of the house. During Mr. Jefts' ownership 
the upper part of the ell was lengthened by an addition to its south end. 
Aug. 13, 1867, Captain Jefts conveyed the hotel property to his son, J. 
Frank Jefts, who officiated as its landlord until May 24, 1862, at which 
date he sold the same to Joseph C. Tucker. Soon after disposing of the 
hotel to Mr. Tucker, J. Frank Jefts left town and, from the day of his 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 113 

departure to the present time, (1914), his whereabouts has remained a 
mystery to his former fellow citizens. During Mr. Tucker's proprietor- 
ship the hall in the ell part of the house was divided into sleeping rooms. 
April 6, 1864, Joseph C. Tucker sold the hotel to James W. Fessenden of 
Townsend, Mass., who continued to act as its landlord until April 30, 
1873, at which latter date he conveyed it to Marshall Davis of Amherst. 
Mr. Davis was landlord of this house until March 30, 1875, at which 
date he sold it to Mrs. Martha Shattuck, wife of George J. Shattuck of 
Townsend, Mass. Mr. Shattuck was succeeded as proprietor and land- 
lord of the hotel by James Wise of Leominster, Mass., who, after con- 
ducting the business for a few years, returned to Leominster, where he 
died Feb. 3, 1909. At the present time (1914) his widow, Mrs. James 
Wise, is the owner of the property. 

During the early years of its existence this hotel was managed after 
the manner of conducting inns or taverns in those days. It was never 
without an open bar, where all kinds of distilled liquors could be obtained 
by those who had the wherewith to purchase them; and purchasers were 
never lacking, neither from among the town's people nor from the citizens 
of the neighboring towns. Yet, during all this period, its reputation as a 
hostelry which afforded entertainment for man and beast was second to 
that of no country hotel in the county. Its landlords in those days were, 
on the whole, typical specimens of their class: jolly, courteous and obliging 
to their guests. 

But, like the majority of the old-time taverns, this house has had its 
day. At this time its doors are and for several years past have been closed 
to the public; and the rooms, which have echoed to the laughter, songs 
and stories of nearly four generations of men; and which, if they could 
speak, could furnish more information relative to the good and bad, 
humorous and sad, pathetic and sympathetic sides of the characters of 
some of the town's old-time peculiar citizens than could be obtained from 
any other source of information, are deserted and lone. 



114 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



CHAPTER VIII. 

Brookline. 

1786-1800. 

Recovery from Hollis of the Disputed Strip of Land on Raby's Eastern 
Borders — Current Events, 1786 to 1800 — Bridges over the Nissi- 
tisset River — Highway West of the South Cemetery Accepted by the 
Town — Gift to the Town of the Land upon Which the Old Meet- 
ing-House Stands, by R. Cutts Shannon, Esq. — First Guide Boards 
— Change of Town's Name from Raby to Brookline — Prices Cur- 
rent of Commodities in 1795 — United States Census of 1790. 

From the time when, immediately after Raby's incorporation in 1769, 
the surveyor who ran the boundary line between Raby and Hollis, either 
through ignorance or treachery, had located that line three-fourths of a 
mile west of its right location as set forth in Raby's charter, thus at- 
tempting to deprive the latter town of its title in and to a strip of land 
on its eastern borders three-fourths of a mile in width and extending north 
and south the entire length of the township, until the year 1786, when by 
act of legislature the title to said strip of land was settled as being in 
Raby, the citizens of the latter town had never ceased to claim their 
rights of ownership in the same. 

During the years preceding the Revolution, both Raby and Hollis 
claimed and endeavored to exercise jurisdiction over this tract of land; 
and the question of its ownership was a frequent and fruitful subject for 
discussion between their respective inhabitants; the citizens of Raby ar- 
guing upon the justice of their claim of rights to the same and the possi- 
bility of their establishing those rights; and those of Hollis upon the pos- 
sibilities of their being able to retain possession of it. Moreover, it fre- 
quently happened that when a citizen of one of the towns met a citizen 
of the other, the twain would immediately engage in a war of words which, 
tradition says, sometimes ended in fisticuffs over the disputed territory. 
Thus it happened that in process of time the peaceful relations formerly 
existing between the two towns became somewhat strained. It was dur- 




Mffktn€ Jfe*". 



MAP OF DISPUTED TERRITORY 
(From the Original at the State House at Concord) 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 115 

ing this period that the Rabyans began to speak of their neighbors in 
Hollis as — "Those who dwelt by Hollis sea shore" — thereby intimating 
that they were clams; and by way of retaliation the Hollisites, whenever 
they saw a flock of three crows coming from the direction of Raby towards 
Hollis, would point in a derisive manner their forefingers at them, at the 
same time exclaiming, "There come the selectmen of Raby" ; 

This state of affairs had, so far as Raby was concerned, reached a 
climax, and its inhabitants were about prepared to apply to the Great 
and General Court for a solution of the matter in dispute between the 
two towns, when the advent of the Revolution caused both towns, for 
the time being at least, to suspend their individual hostilities, and to 
unite with their sister towns in a vigorous prosecution of the war against 
the common enemy of the country. 

But although the coming and continuance of the Revolution caused 
the two towns, so far as their personal warfare was concerned, to bury 
the hatchet, the burial was, nevertheless, only a temporary one. The old 
feelings of antagonism were not dead, but sleeping; and the last echoes 
of the Revolution had not ceased to sound ere Raby dug up the buried 
hatchet, and again took the war path which led towards her neighbors on 
the old question cf the disputed territory. Hollis, equally alert, and prob- 
ably far more confident, girded up her loins and calmly awaited the at- 
tack. It was evidently understood in both towns that the conflict between 
them was no longer to consist of a warfare of words, but of deeds. 

At a town meeting of its inhabitants holden on the 5th day of Feb., 
1783, Raby commenced the war by voting — "To petition the town of Hol- 
lis for a part of the west and Nor West part of their town to be laid out to 
Raby"; and chose Capt. Samuel Douglass, Waldron Stone and Lieut. 
James McDonald as a committee — "To consider the matter and report to 
the town from time to time as they have opportunity." 

There is no record of the foregoing committee's having made any 
report of their proceedings up to December 8th of the same year. But 
at a town meeting holden on the latter date their original appointment 
as a committee was re-affirmed. 

Meanwhile, on the 5th day of December of the same year, 1783, cer- 
tain inhabitants of the disputed territory, i. e., the three-fourths of a mile 
strip, petitioned the town of Hollis as follows: 

"Petition of Certain Persons to be set off to Raby. 
To the Town of Hollis 

The Petition of us the Subscribers Inhabitants of the Westerly Part 
of sd Hollis Humbly Sheweth that by Reason of many Inconveniences 



116 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

We Labor under by Living at such a Remote part of Hollis so far from 
meeting and at such a Distance from the other Inhabitants of sd town 
that we are Depriv in a great measure of the privilege of Sehoolling and 
by Reason of the badness of the Rods it is Very Defieult for sum of us 
to git to the Town of Hollis at sum Sesons of the year it is even imprac- 
ticable Except We first goo into the town of Raby and travel Sum Ways 
in the same before We Enter Hollis again — and as we live much more 
Compact with the Inhabitants of Raby and think it mite be more Con- 
venient for us to belong to the Town of Raby to which if we were set of 
it is Lickly the sd Inhabitants of Raby and us your Petitioners mite both 
Injoy the privileges of preaching and Sehoolling — &c — in a ful and ample 
manner than ether they or us can under our present Sitteration we there- 
fore beg you to take our case into your wise consideration & if you in 
your Wisdom can see fit that you would give your Consent to have a 
part of the westerly part of Hollis set off to Raby — (that is that part of 
Raby formerly expected) Beginning at said Sandy bank so cold (called) 
at Nissitisit River and from thence a North pint by the Nedel acrost 
Hollis which we humbly conseve would not be a great Damage to Hollis 
But Verey advantagus to the town of Raby — and to us your Petitioners 
Dec. 5—1783. 

(Signed) James McDonels Simeon Senter James McDaniels Jun. Jesse 
Parkins Phinehas Bennet, Jr. Joshua Smith John Cummings." 

Hollis refused to grant the foregoing petition; and in January, the 
following year, Raby through its selectmen supplemented the efforts of 
the petitioners by forwarding to the Hollis authorities the following paper: 

"Memorial asking for part of Hollis to be annexed to Raby 
To the Town of Hollis 

the Petition of the 
Town of Raby humbly sheweth that we your Petitioners have for a Con- 
siderable Nomber of years Labored under many Disadvantages by Reson 
of the Town being So Small which we belong to and we so fue in Nomber 
that we are not able to Settel a minister nor to hier preaching but a Small 
part of the year. Nor to carre on town affairs without great cost and as 
there is a part of the inhabitants of the westerly part of Hollis that have 
a Desire to be Set of to the town of Raby which we sopose might be very 
advantageous to us your petitioners and those that Desire to be set of 
and not a great Damage to the town of Hollis. We therefore beg you to 
take our Case into your wise consideration and if you can see fit that you 
would give your Consent that a part of the Westerly part of Hollis be set 
of to Raby — (Viz) beginning at the Sandey bank So call'd on Nissitiset 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 117 

River and from themce a North pint acrost Hollis to Amherst line — which 

line we think would Divid the towns of Hollis and Raby much more to the 

advantage of the whol than wheir the Line now is — 

Jan 18—1784 ROBERT SEVER 1 in behalf 

SWALLOW TUCKER }~ of the town 
JAMES CAMPBELL J of Raby" 

Hollis ignored this petition, as it had the one preceding it, and con- 
tinued to hold on to the disputed territory; meanwhile, metaphorically 
speaking, thumbing its municipal nose at both the petition and petitioners. 

At a town meeting holden March 2, 1784, Raby re-elected Capt. 
James Campbell, Swallow Tucker and Capt. Robert Seaver — "As a comit- 
tee to carry on the Petition we sent into Hollis to git a piece of land set 
to Raby." 

If this committee endeavored to — "carry on the Petition." its efforts 
were unsuccessful; and finally Raby's people, having exhausted their 
stock of patience, as well as their committees' knowledge of the system 
of phonetic spelling then in use, on the 29th day of April, 1784, voted to 
carry the question in issue to the General Court; and, at a subsequent 
meeting on the 5th day of October, instructed their committee to act 
accordingly. The committee delayed its action until the following year, 
1785; when, in June, it filed in court the following petition: 

"Petition for Annexation of Part of Hollis State of New Hampshire. 

To Honorable the Senate and house of Representatives of Said State 
in General Court assembled at Portsmouth in said State June 1785 

The petition of Swallow Tucker Robert Seaver and James Campbell 
Committee in behalf of the Town Raby — humbly Shews — 

That the Town of Raby is of Small extent N. & South consisting of 
about four and a half miles in lenth and E- & W. two milds 59 1-2 in 
bredth and much of the land unfit for cultivation and more unfit for 
settlement and consequently thinly inhabited and unable to Settle or Sup- 
port the Gospel or necessary Schools for the instruction of youth (so 
necessary in Society) and other Town charges, and such is the unhappy 
Scituation of ye Town that should we anexed to other Town our difficul- 
ties would not be remided. the inhabitants are So Sensible of the im- 
portance of the education of youth that they can by no means rest easy 
to have their children brought up in Savage ignorance unfit members for 
Society either in Church or State — that the Town of Hollis is a large 
Town both in quantity of land and Number of inhabitants & can well 



IIS HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

spare a part to build up the Town of Raby. the Town of Raby have 
repeatedly applied to the Town of Hollis to vote off to the Town of Raby 
some part of said Town which they refuse to doe, the Town of Raby 
therefore find themselves constrained to apply to your honors to take 
their difficult case under your wise consideration & set off from the Town 
of Hollis and annex to the Town of Raby the following tract of land 
with the inhabitants consisting of nine families (Viz) beginning at the 
great Sand bank (so called ) and running parall with east line of the town 
of Raby untill it comes opposite to Northeasterly corner of the sd Town 
of Raby thence to said Northeasterly corner, in width about three Quar- 
ters of a mile that the inhabitants Settled on said tract of land are de- 
sirous to be Sett of to the Town of Raby (one excepted), we beg leave 
further to represent to your honers that nature seemed to design the 
abovesaid tract of land for the Town of Raby as the proposed line will 
run thro a tract of poor land unfit for cultivation and the Town of Raby 
at their incorporation had reason to expect some further help from the 
town of Hollis — these reasons (with many others which may be given if 
oppertunity therefor) we submit to the wise consideration of this Honor- 
able Court — praying your honors to grant us relief and your petitioners 
as in duty bound shall ever pray 
SWALLOW TUCKER JAMES CAMPBELL ROBERT SEVER." 

With the foregoing petition was filed a plan of Hollis and Raby, 
showing the proposed alterations, and also a plan of Raby alone. These 
plans, of which copies accompany this chapter, are papers Nos. 183 and 
184, Town Papers, Vol. I, collection of 1880, in the office of the secretary 
of state. By an examination of these plans, it will be seen that No. 184 
marks the location upon the disputed land of the dwelling houses of the 
residents; it also gives their names, as follows: "Senter's house, James 
McDaniels, Perkins, Ezekiel Proctor, John Cummings, Mr. Farley, Phin's 
Bennet, Joshua Smith, Joshua Smith, Jr." It also gives the names of 
those living in Raby on the side adjacent to Hollis, as follows: "Jonas 
Shead, R. McDaniels, Capt. Sever, Widdow Dickey, R- Cutts Shannon, 
Esq., James Dickey, Gray, Thos Asten." 

On the loth day of Oct., 1785, while the foregoing petition was still 
pending in the General Court, the inhabitants of the disputed land filed 
in court another petition, framed in language similar to that used in their 
petition under date of Dec. 5, 1783. The names of the signers of this last 
petition were as follows; James McDonell, Jesse parkins, Thomas Law- 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 119 

rence, Simeon Senter, Joshua Smith, Ezekiel Proctor, Ebr's Gilson, Joshua 
Smith, Jun. Phinehas Bennet. 

Benjamin Farley, a son of Samuel Farley, who acted as attorney for 
Raby at the time of its incorporation, was appointed as the town's agent 
for attending to all matters relative to the petition while it was pending 
in the legislature ; and his efforts were ably seconded by Samuel Douglass, 
the town's representative for that year. 

Hollis, of course, opposed the petition. At a meeting of its inhabit- 
ants holden on the 15th day of Sept., 1785, it was voted — "That this 
Town will oppose the Petition preferr'd to the Gen 1 Court, by the Town 
of Raby, That Daniel Emerson Esq. be fully impower'd to oppose said 
Petition, also voted that Noah Worcester Esq. Capt. Dow Ens. Jerem 
Ames William Cumings & Capt. Goss, be a Committee to State the mat- 
ter fairly and give said Emerson Instructions in writing relative to the 
same, taken from the Town Records 

True Copy Attest William Cumings Town Clerk" 

"To Daniel Emerson Esq. Representative for the Town of Hollis — 

Agreable to the above votes of the Town of Hollis, impowering you 
to oppose the Petition of the Town of Raby, & us to give you instructions 
thereon, You are hereby instructed to oppose said Petition — in behalf of 
the Town of Hollis, for the following Reasons (viz) first as the said Peti- 
tioners represent their Weakness and inability to support the Gospel or 
maintain Schools, it cannot be supposed that the addition of nine families 
Settled on such a Tract of Land as they Represent unfit for Cultivation 
if Granted could remove the Difficulties of which they complain — 

2 d as they represent in said Petition, that they at their Incorporation 
had reason to expect some further help from said Town of Hollis, that we 
know of no Reason that they had to expect any such thing unless it was 
by some mistake in their own measure as they themselves measured it 
before the incorporation, that the Town of Hollis never measured nor 
Joined in Measuring until after the Incorporation, That the Votes of the 
Town of Hollis, previous to said incorporation of Raby were design'd to 
fix the meeting house in the Sentre of the Town east and west, which 
Votes of said Town were confirmed by the Charter of the Town of Raby — 
3 d That they in their Petition request to begin at the Grat Sand Bank 
so called, and run a Paralel line with the town of Raby opposite to their 
Northeast corner, then a closing line to their Northeast Corner, which if 
granted will leave a Tract of land with a Number of inhabitants on the 
same about two miles Square belonging to Hollis, at the Northerly end of 



120 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

Raby extending as far west as the west line of Raby excepting the width 
of the Mile Strip— 

4th That the meeting House in Hollis now stands on a plat of Ground 
which it seems nature form'd for that purpose being pleasantly Situated, 
that the Town has been at a Great Expense in laying Out and making 
Roads to accommodate the same, which well convenes the Inhabitants 
from all parts of said Town That if said Petition should be granted, con- 
sequently the meeting house would not be in the sentre of the Town — 
which probably cause an uneasiness in the Easterly part of ye Town, 
which might cause the Town to live in Contention or lay them under the 
disagreeable Necessity of building a New meeting house, and of being at 
a Vast expence to accomodate Roads, to the same, which never can be 
done with that Convenience that it now is — 

NOAH WORCESTER 

REUBEN DOW 
Hollis Sep r 28th JEREMIAH AMES 

1785. WILLIAM CUMINGS Hollis. 

JOHN GOSS J 



Com tee in behalf 
( - of ye Town of 



The contest in the legislature over the petition was of comparatively 
short duration, but was very strenuous while it lasted. But, finally, on 
the 17th day of July, 1786, an act was passed by which the prayer of the 
petition was granted. 

Thus, by act of legislature, the title in and to a strip of land three- 
fourths of a mile in width on the east side of Raby, which was included 
within its original limits as defined in its charter at the date of its incor- 
poration in 1769, but over which, from the date of its incorporation up 
to the date of this act, Hollis had wrongfully claimed and attempted to 
exercise jurisdiction, was settled as being in Raby, where it has ever 
since remained unquestioned. 

Hollis' inhabitants gracefully accepted the dictum of the legislature 
as expressed in the act. For although they had opposed its passage, 
their opposition was not occasioned by any real desire to hold possession 
of the land in question, which was of comparatively little value, but 
rather, as has already been stated herein, by the fact that by its loss their 
meeting-house would no longer stand in the exact center of the township. 
A state of affairs which, in accord with the ideas prevalent in those days, 
would in their estimation be deplorable ; because it would compel those of 
the people who lived on, or near, the limits of that part of the town far- 
thest from the meeting-house, in going to and from the same, to cover 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 121 

more ground than was covered for the same purpose by their fellow towns- 
men who lived near the limits of that part of the town which was nearest 
to the meeting-house. 

There is, however, no record that the change in the location of the 
Hollis meeting-house had any noticeable effect upon the church-going 
proclivities of its people; or, for that matter, upon those of the people of 
Raby; the majority of whom continued to worship in Hollis until the 
completion of their own meeting-house in 1791. 

Municipal and Other Events 1789—1800. 

Notwithstanding the fact that by the passage of the foregoing men- 
tioned act of the legislature, Raby had become confirmed in the possession 
of its original territory, its inhabitants, far from being satisfied with the 
amount of land which they already possessed, were apparently desirous 
of acquiring more. For on the 28th day of Feb., 1786, they passed a 
vote — "To petition the town of Mason for two tiers of lots on its easterly 
part"; and chose Capt. Samuel Russell, Lieut. Isaac Shattuck and Clark 
Browh as a committee to "petition and see if they are willing to be set off 
to Raby." On the 31st day of March of the same year they again "voted 
and chose Capt. Russell, Capt. Samuel Russell and Ebenezer Gilson" as 
a committee — "To git 2 lots from easterly part of Mason set off to Raby." 

At a later meeting in the same year, Benjamin Farley was appointed 
as the town's agent — "To git a piece of the northwest part of Hollis and 
the mile slip laid off to Raby." 

It does not appear that either of the above mentioned committees, 
or the "agent," ever reported. The votes probably originated from an 
indefinite understanding relative to the territory actually embraced within 
the town's limits; and, although for a few years subsequently there are 
recorded, occasionally, similar votes, the matter finally ceased to interest 
the public and was allowed to drop. 

1787. Dec. 5th, Swallow Tucker was elected grand juror, to attend 
court at Amherst at the "General Sessions of the Peace." Mr. Tucker 
was the second from this town to be elected to this position. 

Capt. Robert Seaver was for the second time serving the county as 
coroner; as was also Capt. Samuel Douglass. 

1788. Aug. 5th, Eleazer Gilson was elected as the town's first petit 
juror; and at the same meeting Capt. Robert Seaver was elected as a 
grand juror. 



122 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

In the rate lists of this year the name of John Conant, who subse- 
quently built the first sawmill on the river below the outlet from the 
pond, appears for the first time; as does also the name of Caleb Trow- 
bridge, the town's second schoolmaster. The number of names on the 
tax lists for the year was 83. 

At the convention which met at Exeter, February 13th, and adopted 
the Federal Constitution, Raby, Mason and New Ipswich were repre- 
sented by Deacon Amos Dakin of Mason. 

1790. Minister rates were levied for the first time, and continued to 
be levied until about the year 1843; when the church having become in- 
dependent of the town's control, there was no longer occasion for them. 

Richard Cutts Shannon was for the second time acting as coroner for 
the county and, on December 16, was appointed a justice of the peace and 
quorum. 

Census of 1790. 

This year by order of the legislature a census of the state was taken. 
The population of this town was found to be 338 ; as shown by the return 
of its selectmen, as follows: Males above 16, 86; Males under 16, 89; 
Females, 160; Other persons, 10; Total, 338. 

At the March meeting this year the vote for president was 21; all of 
which were cast for John Pickering. 

1791. At the convention to revise the State Constitution which met 
at Concord on the 7th day of September, Raby, Mason and New Ipswich 
were represented by Charles Barrett, Esq., of New Ipswich. 

Bridges Over the Nissitisset River. 

As has already been stated in a prior chapter, the first bridge built 
by Raby over the river below its outlet from the pond was erected in 1772. 
But at the time of its construction, there was already in existence a bridge 
at the point where the Townsend highway crosses the stream at South 
Brookline. This latter bridge was built by the town of Hollis before the 
incorporation of Raby. One hundred and twenty years ago, it was known 
as the Benjamin Tucker bridge. It is known today as the Fessenden 
Bridge, from David S. Fessenden, who owns the brick house near it. 

The second bridge to be built over the river by Raby is that crossing 
the stream a mile below the Tucker bridge. It is located at the point 
where the river is crossed by the highway leading from Brookline to Oak 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 123 

Hill, in Pepperell. Of late years it has been known as Bohonon's bridge, 
from the fact that it is situated near the late dwelling house of the late 
Moses Bohonon, deceased. At the time it was built, and for many years 
afterwards, it was known as the Joshua Smith bridge. 

The first action of the town relative to building this bridge occurred 
at a town meeting holden May 12 of the above year, when it was voted 
— "To build a bridge across the River that runs across the Road that 
leads from Raby meeting house to Mr. Joshua Smith's house Provided 
Pepperell people did open the road to meet us." Probably Pepperell 
people did — "Open the road to meet us." For at a meeting holden on the 
7th day of March of the following year it was again voted to bridge the 
said stream at this place, and — "To leave the building of the same to the 
selectmen to order it as they should think best." This is the last recorded 
reference to the building of this bridge. It is, therefore, fair to infer that 
the selectmen did as they thought best, and that the bridge was completed 
the same year, 1792. 

1795. The town voted to lay out a road west of the south cemetery. 
The next year, 1796, this vote was repeated in the following language — 
"To lay out a road on the north side of the burying ground near Swallow 
Tucker's if they think best to turn the course of the road now to the 
south side of the burying ground." 

1796. During this year the above mentioned road was built and 
accepted. 

Town Common. 

November 2, R. Cutts Shannon by his deed of that date recorded in 
Hillsborough records Vol. 203, p. 603, conveyed "To the selectmen and 
their successors forever for the use of the town" the land on which the old 
meeting-house now stands. 

1798. This year the first guide boards to be placed in position in 
town were set up. They were constructed of pine boards placed upon 
oak posts. Samuel T. Boynton was licensed for one year as an inn keeper; 
and, as such, in the house situate on the town common now owned and 
occupied by Mrs. Newton W. Colburn, he hung out his sign; a guide 
board which directed both the traveling and non-traveling public to a 
locality not even indirectly suggested by those erected by the town fathers ; 
and which both tradition and the records say was a sample of many others 
of a similar design which for many years previous to its advent had existed 
in town. 



124 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

Change of Name from Raby to Brookline. 

1798. At the time of the town's incorporation under the name of 
Raby, there was a large minority of its inhabitants who were dissatisfied 
with the name. This minority gracefully submitted to the will of the 
majority; and in the progress of events attendant upon the organization 
of the new town and the War of the Revolution the matter for the time 
being, at least, ceased to attract public attention. 

But soon after the close of the war, the old feeling of dissatisfaction, 
intensified no doubt by the fact that the name of Raby recalled associa- 
tions connected with the town's past that were far from agreeable to the 
majority of its citizens, was again revived. Year by year the numbers of 
those who advocated a change in the name of the town increased; and 
year by year public sentiment in favor of the change grew stronger. At 
last, in this year, 1798, matters were brought to a climax by the insertion 
into the warrant for a town meeting on the 30th day of May of an article 
calling for a change of the name of the town from Raby to Brookline. The 
article was passed with little opposition; and Benjamin Farley was sub- 
sequently ordered by the selectmen to draw up and present to the General 
Court a petition calling for a change of the town's name, in accordance 
with the above vote. Mr. Farley obeyed the order and drew up and filed 
in court a petition to the following effect: 

"To the Hon Senate and House of Representatives For Said State 
Convened at Hopkintown. 

Humbly Shews — The Subscribers Select men for the Town of Raby 
that it is the earnest desire of the Inhabitants of said Town that the Name 
thereof may be changed as by their vote in Town meeting may appear — 
We therefore pray your Honors to pass an Act whereby said Town of 
Raby may take and hold the name of Brookline in future — and as in duty 
bound shall pray. 
Hopkintown June 11th 1798. 

RANDEL McDONALD ^| select- 
BENJA. FARLEY, V men 

JAMES McINTOSH J of Raby" 

The prayer of the petitioners was granted by the passage of an act 
to that end which was approved on the fourth day of December of the 
same year. Thus the name of Brookline was substituted for that of Raby 
and the latter became only a memory. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 125 

vSome idea of the cost of living at this time may be obtained from the 
following list of "Boston Prices Current," which is copied from the "Am- 
herst Journal and the New Hampshire Advertiser," under date of Dec. 
12, 1795. 

BOSTON PRICES CURRENT. 



Carefully Corrected. 
Boston, December 10. 



Obferve, T. ftands for ton. — M. for thoufand H. for hundred — Cwt. for 
hundred weight — Hhd. for hogfhead — Bbl. for barrel — lb. for pound 
— gal. for gallon, &c. 

Average Price per Quantity. 

Dls.-Cents 

Ashes Pot. per T. 166 66 

Pearl, per T. 140 

Allum, per cwt. 7 
Beef, 1ft quality, bbl. 11 50 
— 2d, do. bll. 10 



Butter, lb. 15 

Beans, per bufhel, 1 25 

Bees Wax, lb. 33 

Corn, Indian, 95 

Cloth, tow, American, yd. 20 

Cheefe, American, lb. 10 

Flour, Superfine, bbl. 15 

Fine 14 50 

Middlings, 11 

Hides, dried, 2 

Hogs, Lard lb. 14 

Leather, foal, lb. 21 

Lime, per hhd. 4 

Molaffes, gall. 63 

Pork, one hog, bbl. 18 

one and half hog, 16 

middling pieces, 25 

Meal, Rye, per bufhel 1 



126 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

Rum, Jamaica, gall. 1 75 

Winward, do. 1 17 

N. England, do. 70 

Rice, Carolina, cwt. 7 33 

Staves, white oak hhd. M. 30 

red oak, hhd. do. 13 

Staves, barrel white oak, do. 20 

Sugar, brown, cwt. fr. 9 10 14 

Loaf, lb. 26 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



127 



The Population of Brookline at the First Census of the United States in the 

Year 1790. 





Free white males 




Free 




of 16 years 




white females, 


Name of head 


and upward, 


Free white males 


including 


of family. 


including 


under 16 


heads of 




heads of 




families 




families. 






Shannon, R. Cutts 


2 


2 


6 


Shattuck, Benja. 


1 


2 


4 


Farnsworth, Sampson 


3 


- 


3 


Hall, William, Jr. 


1 


- 


1 


McDonold, Randal 


2 


2 


5 


Sever, Robert 


1 


3 


2 


Dickey, James 


1 


3 


2. 


Brown, Clark 


2 


- 


5 


Douglass, Samuel 


1 


2 


2 


Emery, Ebenezer 


3 


1 


2 


Gowing, Ezekiel 


1 


- 


2 


Graham, William 


1 


1 


3 


Gilson, Ebenezer 


3 


1 


4 


Gilson, Eleazer 


1 


3 


3 


Hall, William 


1 


2 


1 


Lesley, Jonas 


1 


3 


4 


McDonald, James 


1 


- 


3 


Proctor, Ezekiel 


2 


— 


2 


Parker, Abijah 


1 


1 


2 


Perkins, Jesse 


1 


2 


1 


Senter, Simeon 


1 


2 


3 


Shattuck, Isaac 


2 


— 


2 


Sartell, Ephraim 


3 


1 


3 


Sawyer, Jonathan 


1 


1 


3 


Wheeler, Abiezer 


1 


2 


1 


Wetherbee, Oliver 


1 


1 


1 


Austin, Phineas 


1 


4 


2 


Austin, Bulah 


1 


— 


6 


Brooks, Benjamin 


1 


1 


4 


Bennet, Phineas 


1 


3 


4 



128 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



The Population of Brookline at the First Census of the United States in the 

Year 1790. — Continued. 





Free white males 








of 16 years 




Free 


Name of head 


and upward, 


Free white males 


including 


of family. 


including 


under 16. 


white females, 




heads of 




heads of 




families. 




families. 


Campbell, James 


5 


1 


3 


Davidson, David 




1 


2 


Emerson, John 




1 


1 


Farley, Benjamin 




8 


5 


Blood, Reuben 




- 


2 


Green, Samuel 




2 


3 


Grace, Benjamin 




2 


2 


Hodgman, Joseph 




1 


1 


Hodgman, Abel 




- 


2 


Hodgman, Abraham 




2 


1 


Lawrence, Ezekiel 




2 


1 


Mcintosh, Alexander 




- 


4 


Mcintosh, James 




— 


3 


Mcintosh, Archibald 




1 


5 


Patten, Nathaniel, Jr. 




3 


2 


Russell, George 




- 


3 


Russell, Samuel 




1 


3 


Russell, Andrew 




2 


3 


Spaulding, Daniel 




1 


4 


Smith, Joshua 




3 


2 


Smith, Joshua, Jr. 




3 


2 


Tucker, Swallow 




1 


2 


Sanders, Isaac 




3 


2 


Kirk, Charles 




3 


2 


Wetherbee, Timothy 




3 


4 


Turrel, William 




2 


2 


Wood, John 




2 


1 


Emery, Ebenezer 


2 


2 


2 


Boston, Philip 






" 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 129 

Recapitulation . 

Heads of families and free white males over 16 86 

Free white males under 16 89 

Free white males, including heads of families 160 

Family of Philip Boston, a free Negro 3 

Total population 338 

Oct. 16, 1790, Samuel Douglas, Jr., was appointed Justice of the 
Peace and Quorum, and was reappointed to the same position on the 
following year. He also held the position of county coroner for the year 
1790. 



130 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



CHAPTER IX. 

Early Highways, Bridle Paths and Dwelling Houses, Together with Brief 
Sketches of Such of the Signers of the Petition for the Incorpora- 
tion of Raby as Left Behind Them No Records of Their Families. 

The Great Road, So Called — The Highway to Hollis via Proctor Hill — 
Bridle Paths: i. e., From Paddledock to Meeting-house Hill — 
From the Daniel Goodwin Place via the James McDaniels Place 
to the Jesse Perkins Place— From the Latter Path to the Senter's 
Place — From the North Highway to Hollis to the Proctor Hill 
Highway — From the Latter Path to the Village — Early Dwelling 
Houses: The Old "Yellow House" — The Capt. Nathan Corey 
House- — The James Campbell House- — The Samuel T. Boynton 
House — The Colburn Green House — Cellar Hole of the Rev. 
Lemuel Wadsworth House — The Sampson Farnsworth House— 
The Lieut. Samuel Farley House — Sketches of the Signers of the 
Petition for Incorporation. 

At the date of the incorporation of Raby there were within its limits 
only two laid out and legally established highways. "The Great Road," 
so called, leading from Pepperell, Mass., entered the town on its east side 
and, continuing on through its territory in a westerly direction, crossed 
the Nissitisset river by a ford way near w T here the stream is spanned by 
the present Pond Bridge, so called, a few rods below its outlet from Mus- 
catanipus pond; from whence it extended to Mason and on through the 
southern border towns of the state, until it terminated at Hinsdale on the 
Connecticut river. 

At this time and for many subsequent years this road was the prin- 
cipal route in New Hampshire for travel and traffic between these border 
towns and Boston. So far as its location in Brookline is concerned, it 
remains today practically the same as in the beginning. 

The second of these laid out highways was that known at the present 
time as the Proctor hill road to Hollis. Its location today is also practi- 
cally the same as in the beginning. From Raby this latter road extended 
on in a southwest direction via Townsend hill to Townsend, Mass. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 131 

The majority of the other roads in town at that time were mere 
bridle paths; suitable only for horseback riders or, in some instances, for 
the passage of the lumbering ox wagons then in use. For, although there 
was no especial scarcity of horses, vehicles drawn by them, except those 
of the rudest description, were unknown here until well along into the 
nineteenth century ; the first "chaise," according to local tradition, having 
been brought into town about 1820 by Deacon Eleazer Gilson. 

These bridle paths, as they were called, although many of them were 
mere foot trails between the log cabins of the settlers, were to be found 
leading in all directions through the dense forest growth which then cov- 
ered the entire surface of the township. In subsequent years some of them 
were laid out and accepted as public highways, and are in use as such at 
the present time. Others continued to be used for public travel for many 
years or until, by the construction of other more direct and therefore 
more convenient routes between the points which they connected, they 
gradually passed into disuse. 

Among the latter class is one which formerly connected Paddledock,* 
now South Brookline, with the western part of the township. It led out 
of the west side of the highway to Townsend, Mass., at a point near the 
location of the present steam sawmill of Orville D. Fessenden in South 
Brookline and, skirting the east base of Little Muscatanipus hill, followed 
up the west bank of the Nissitisset river to a point in the same a few rods 
northwest of the present iron bridge on Bond street, where it crossed the 
stream by a ford way and, continuing on up its east bank, connected with 
the Great Road at the point where the same is crossed by the "old ditch," 
a few rods south of the present pond bridge. 

This bridle path was especially useful for the settlers in the western 
part of the town, for whom it furnished a short cut to Townsend, Mass. 
After the completion of the town's first meeting-house in 1791, it became 
the principal route for the citizens of Paddledock in going to and from 
divine worship. It continued to be used as a public thoroughfare until 
well along into the nineteenth century, but there is no record of its ever 
having been accepted by the town as a public highway. 

When Ensign Bailey built his sawmill and tannery soon after the 
year 1800, this bridle path turned at the ford way (or, rather, another 
path way branched off from it at that point), and passed through the 

* A name which in the early days of the township was given to that part of the town which at the 
present time is known as South Brookline. The origin of the name is obscure. But it is probably a cor- 
ruption of "Puddledock," a name by which a certain locality in Dover was formerly known; and, if so, 
the name was perhaps imported into Brookline by Swallow Tucker; an early settler here, whose family, 
although he came here from Groton, Mass., was originally of Dover. 



132 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

millyard up, and contiguous to, the west bank of the river; which it crossed 
by a stringer bridge erected by Mr. Bailey and located a few rods south 
of the present mill-dam near the village railroad station. The bridge re- 
mained in existence until about the time of the beginning of the Civil 
War; when, having become unsafe from age and want of repairs, it was 
put out of commission, either by the spring floods or the hands of men, 
perhaps both. There are those living today who remember this bridge 
as among the pleasantest of their boyhood memories. For beneath its 
shadow and from its location upward to the dam, they speared many and 
many a pickerel, and, occasionally, a lusty trout with which the river at 
this point then abounded, especially during the period of the subsidence 
of the spring freshets. 

The trail of this bridle path for almost its entire length is easily trace- 
able at the present time, although for a portion of the distance between 
the village and the South Brookline railroad station it is identical with 
the railroad track. 

Upon its east side about one-half way between the two railroad sta- 
tions is an old cellar hole upon which, tradition says, in Revolutionary 
times was located the log cabin of George Davidson, one of Raby's soldiers 
in the war. 

Another bridle path, much used in its day, and which has already 
been mentioned in a prior chapter, led out of the east side of the main 
highway to Milford at or near the residence of the late Rev. Daniel Good- 
win, one mile north of the village Main street and, pursuing an easterly 
direction, came out on the east Milford highway a few rods west of the 
old James McDonald house; from whence it crossed the latter highway 
and, still pursuing its easterly course, terminated at the north highway 
to Hollis; into which it entered at a point near the dwelling house, before 
and after the Revolution, of Ezekiel Proctor, and known to the present 
generation as the Ralph Burns, Amos Blodgett, and Luke Baldwin place. 
The dwelling house of Jesse Perkins, the first of his family to settle in 
Raby, was located on the east side^of this bridle path, a few rods back 
from its junction with the north highway to Hollis. 

Relative to this path, under date of March 1, 1786, the town records 
contain the following entry — "Voted to accept of a road from Capt. 
Seaver's house to Randel McDonalds' so on to the great road by James 
McDonells old field. Said road to be a bridle road." 

Leading out of the foregoing described bridle path upon its north 
side and about midway between the two Milford highways another an- 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 133 

cient bridle path which at the present time is easily traceable ran in a 
northeasterly direction and ended at or near the dwelling house on the 
west side of East Milford highway late of William Gilson, deceased, but 
one hundred and forty years ago of Simeon Senter. On this bridle path 
about one-fourth of a mile west of said Gilson house is a cleared space 
in which is located a cellar hole. This cellar hole is supposed to mark 
the site of the log cabin of Jonathan Whitcomb, one of the earliest set- 
tlers in this town, coming here from Lancaster, Mass., as early as 1730. 
This clearing has long been locally known as "The Boston Place," the 
name originating from the fact that in 1790 a log cabin standing in it 
and located a few rods west of the Whitcomb cabin was occupied by 
Philip Boston, a negro, and, so far as known, the first of his race to settle 
in town. According to the United State's Census of 1790, his family at 
that time consisted of himself, wife and three children. Whatever became 
of them is unknown. Subsequently, the Whitcomb house passed into the 
ownership of the late Abel Gilson, father of said William Gilson, who for 
many years occupied it as his homestead. In the fifties of the last century 
the house was occupied by William Whitcomb for a few years, since when 
it has remained unoccupied. At the present time it is in ruins. 

Another of these old-time bridle paths, and one of the very earliest, 
led out of the north highway from Raby to Hollis at a point on its south- 
erly side about one-fourth of a mile east of the Dickey house, or, as it is 
known at the present time, Ebenezer J. Rideout's place. Its course from 
its starting point was southerly, its length about two miles, and it term- 
inated at a point in the road to Hollis via Proctor hill, a few rods west of 
where the latter road crosses the Rocky Pond brook. Its vestiges, which 
can at the present time be easily traced, furnish the strongest proof of its 
having once been a much traveled road. But no living man can remem- 
ber when it was used as a public thoroughfare. Beside the evidence fur- 
nished by the road itself, another proof of its antiquity is to be found in 
the fact that upon it is located the "Cemetery in the Woods," the oldest 
cemetery in town of the white settlers. This cemetery is located upon 
the west side of and some six or seven rods back from the path, and about 
one-fourth of a mile from its starting point at the north Hollis highway. 

Leading out, on its west side and about midway of its length, of the 
foregoing described path, another bridle path runs in a westerly direction, 
crossing the Stone House brook, and terminating in the village at the 
east Milford highway immediately in the rear of the old Nathan Corey 
house. From this latter bridle path, near where it crosses the Stone 
House brook, another bridle path leads out and passes in a northerly 



134 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

direction through the woods back of the Stone House. Upon this latter 
path, to the east of the Stone House, is an old cellar hole which marks 
the site of a dwelling house in which, in the forties, one Chapman had 
his habitation and home. 

Dwelling Houses in Town in the Year 1800. 

Of the dwelling houses erected in town prior to and for twenty-five 
years following 1768, few are standing today. The locations, even, of the 
majority of them are known only by their cellar holes; and of the cellar 
holes, there are many of which it cannot be claimed with certainty that 
they mark the sites of the location of the dwelling houses of any one of 
the settlers in particular. Nevertheless, the fact that over them once 
stood the rude structures in which dwelt the forefathers of the town, 
and that around them played the children who subsequently became the 
grandparents of the succeeding generations, invest them with a charm 
which, as long as they exist, will always cause them to be objects of peculiar 
interest and veneration. 

Of the dwelling houses at the present time standing on the village 
Main street, the "old yellow house," now known as the "Elmwood," the 
ell of the Nissitisset Hotel, and the Capt. Nathan Corey house, all of 
which have been written up in another chapter of this book, are the old- 
est standing in the compact part of the village; all of them dating back 
to about the year 1800 or a few years prior thereto. Save for these four 
houses, the dwelling houses at the present time standing on said Main 
street, in the compact part of the village, are of comparatively modern 
origin, none of them dating back of the year 1825. 

On the summit of "Meeting-house hill," there are three, possibly 
four, houses which were built prior to the year 1800. The house on the 
west side of the "great road" opposite to the old meeting-house, which 
at the present time is owned and occupied by Lieut. William Ladd Dodge, 
was in existence when the meeting-house was completed in 1791; it having 
been built as early, at least, as 1783. For in the latter year it was occu- 
pied by James Campbell who was then operating with John Colburn the 
"Conant Sawmill" on the river below the outlet to the pond. 

This house was very probably the scene of Raby's first public school, 
which was established in 1783, and of which said Campbell and Isaac 
Shattuck were joint teachers; as the town records mention the school as 
having been kept — "In James Campbell's house near the pond." 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 135 

The dwelling house on the east side of the "great road," some twelve 
or fifteen rods south of the old meeting-house, which at the present time 
is owned and occupied by widow Newton W. Colburn, also dates back of 
1800. In the nineties of the last century it was the home of Samuel T. 
Boynton, who kept an inn and store in it. After Boynton, the house 
was occupied as a store and inn by John H. Cutter, subsequently of "Cut- 
ter's Old Bourbon Whiskey" fame. Still later, in the latter part of the 
forties, this house was the home of Dr. David Harris who occupied it 
until his death, which occurred in 1849. 

The dwelling house on the east side of the great road immediately 
north of the old meeting-house, and known to the present generation as 
the Asher Shattuek place, in the thirties of the last century was the hab- 
itation of Colburn Green, one of the town's most influential citizens at 
that time. He was a son of William and Ruth Green of Pepperell, Mass., 
from whence he came to Brookline. 

On the west side of the great road half way down the hill between 
the old meeting-house and the pond bridge, an ancient cellar hole at the 
present time (1914) marks the site of the dwelling house of the town's 
first minister, Rev. Lemuel Wadsworth. 

The oldest dwelling house standing at the present time in that part 
of the town formerly known as the Mile Slip is undoubtedly the old Samp- 
son Farnsworth house. It is located on the summit of the hill in, and on 
the west side of, the road which leads northerly from the main highway 
to Mason and crosses the Robbin's or Wetherbee brook, the house being 
about one-fourth of a mile north of the bridge over the brook. 

On the east side of the highway from Brookline to Pepperell, Mass., 
about one mile south of the village Main street at the present time stands 
the dwelling house of Lieut. Samuel Farley. This house is the oldest 
framed building now standing in town, it having been built by Mr. Far- 
ley as early, probably, as 1750. On the same side of the same highway 
and some fifteen or twenty rods north of the latter house is an ancient 
cellar hole which is said to mark the site of Lieutenant Farley's original 
log cabin. 

Concerning other ancient dwelling houses in Brookline, as well as of 
the cellar holes which at the present time mark the sites of such of them 
as have disappeared, such information as the writer has been able to 
obtain may be found in this book incorporated in connection with the 
brief sketches of the lives and family records of its early settlers. 



136 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

Habitations and Brief Biographical Sketches of Such of the 

Signers of the Petition for the Incorporation of Raby 

in 1768 as Left Behind Them No Family Records. 

In writing what follows in this chapter concerning the signers of the 
petition for Raby's incorporation, as well as all that is written concerning 
them in subsequent chapters, and in the family records and genealogies 
in this history contained, the author desires to be distinctly understood as 
speaking of and concerning those of the signers aforesaid who at the date 
of their signing the petition were either bona fide settlers, or non-resident 
taxpayers, within the limits of Raby; as those limits were described and 
set forth in its charter at the date of its incorporation in 1769; which in- 
cluded, of course, the three-fourths of a mile wide strip of land on its 
eastern borders to which the town of Hollis set up an unjust claim of 
ownership, but the title to which as being in Raby was finally established 
by act of legislature in 1786; the same being known in the intervening 
years as the "disputed territory." 

For the sake of brevity, as well as of convenience, the names of the 
signers who at the time of their signing were living in the "disputed ter- 
itory" will hereinafter be designated by the letters D. T. immediately 
following their several names ; and in like manner the names of those then 
living in the Mile Slip will be designated by the letters M. S. The names 
of those living outside of these two tracts will be written without marks 
of identification as to their residences. 

WILLIAM BLANCHARD, M. S., was originally of old Dunstable. 
In 1768 he was residing in the Mile Slip. In 1769 he was one of Raby's 
first board of selectmen ; his house at that time being located in the south- 
west part of the town on land bordering on Townsend, Mass., which was 
conveyed to him by Simeon Blanchard. 

He married, Feb. 28, 1733, Deliverance Parker, daughter of Na- 
thaniel and Lydia Parker, of Groton, Mass. He has no descendants — of 
his family name, at least — living here at the present time. 

ROBERT CAMPBELL, M. S., at the date of his signing the peti- 
tion, was probably a resident in the Mile Slip. He was originally of 
Townsend, Mass., and was a brother of James Campbell, an early settler 
in the Slip. He married, March 6, 1738, Elizabeth, daughter of James 
McDaniels, then a resident of Groton, Mass., but afterwards of Raby. 
His residence at the time of his marriage was given as Roxbury, Mass. 
But a deed of land conveyed by him in 1758 describes him as being of 
Townsend, Mass. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 137 

ISAAC STEVENS, at the date of his signing the petition ,was a 
land owner and probably a resident within the present limits of Brookline. 
His name appears on its first list of rate payers in 1771. It also appears 
on its recorded list of its soldiers in the War of the Revolution. His war 
record is given on a prior page. 

He married, Jan. 2, 1771, Elizabeth, daughter of Jonathan and Sarah 
( ) Johnson of Hollis. No descendants here at the present time. 

SIMEON BLANCHARD, M. S., was a resident land owner in the 
Mile Slip. His farm was located in the southwest part of Raby near the 
old Samuel Russell place. At the present time some of his descendants 
are living in New Ipswich. 

JAMES NUTTING, M. S., was probably a son of Ebenezer and 
Ruth (Shattuck) Nutting of Groton, Mass., where he was born April 10, 
1713. He and his son, James Nutting, Jr., each of whom signed the 
petition, were probably then non-resident land owners. Their names do 
not appear on Raby's first rate list in 1771, nor upon any rate lists there- 
after. James Nutting, Sr., married Hepsibah Rolfe of Pepperell, Mass. 

FRANCIS BUTTERICK was originally of Hollis. He was probably 
a non-resident land owner in Raby. His name does not, however, appear 
on its first tax list. 

JONATHAN POWERS, M. S., was a brother of Peter Powers, the 
first settler in Hollis. At the time of his signing the petition, he was the 
proprietor of several tracts of land located in the Mile Slip, now Brook- 
line. His name does not appear in its first rate list in 1771. 

HENRY S PAULDING, M. S., at the date of the petition was a 
non-resident land owner in the Mile Slip. He was probably originally of 
Pepperell, Mass.; and, if so, married Rachel Conant, Nov. 22, 1770. He 
does not appear to have been a resident in Raby after its incorporation. 

ABIGAIL SPAULDING, M. S., one of the signers concerning whom 
the writer has not been able to obtain information. 

PETER HONEY, M. S., at the date of the petition was a resident 
in the Mile Slip, coming there from old Dunstable. His land, which con- 
sisted of two lots, was conveyed to him by William Blanchard by deed 
dated Jan. 28, 1765; and, according to the description in the deed, was 
located west of "Great Massepatanipus hill"; one lot on Campbell's 
brook, and the other on the old north boundary line of Townsend, Mass. 
There is no record of his having lived in Raby after its incorporation. 
In the War of the Revolution he served as a soldier for Dunstable, now 
Nashua, and also for Hollis and Amherst. 



13S HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



CHAPTER X. 

Industries, Early and Late. 

1740-1852. 

The Jasher Wyman Sawmill — The James Conneek Sawmill — The Melvin 
Sawmill — Old Sawmill on Rocky Pond Brook — The Washington 
Wright Gristmill and Blacksmith Shop — The David Hobart, Sr., 
Blacksmith Shop — The Benjamin Brooks, Sr., Sawmill — The James 
Campbell Sawmill — The Benjamin Shattuck Sawmill — The Abel 
Spaulding Sawmill— The Sawtelle-Newell Sawmill — The Thomas 
Bennett Sawmill — The Conant Sawmill — The Ensign Bailey Saw- 
mill — Tannery and Sash and Blind Shop — The Samuel Brooks 
Sawmill— The George Betterly Fulling Mill— The Alpheus Shat- 
tuck Scabbard Mill — Clay Banks and Bricks — The Coopering 
Business — Charcoal Burning — Early Granite Business — The Eph- 
raim L. Hardy Tool Shop— The David Hobart Steam Sawmill. 

Among the earliest and probably the very earliest of the industries, 
outside of that of farming, to be carried on by the original settlers within 
the present limits of Brookline was that of the manufacture of lumber. 

For many years before, as well as after, the town's incorporation, 
and in fact well up to the close of the last century, its magnificent forests 
were the principal source of its prosperity. In the town's early days 
they not only furnished large quantities of lumber for local use, but also 
material for the manufacture of pearl ashes, soft coal, and rift timber for 
hard wood barrels. At a later period when, as early as 1840, the saw- 
mills began to install machinery for the manufacture of sawed barrel 
staves and heads, they were the cause of the establishment here of the 
coopering business which for many years was the principal source of 
income for a large percentage of the town's inhabitants. 

The Jasher Wyman Sawmill. 

The first sawmill to be erected within the present limits of the town 
was built prior to 1741 by Jasher Wyman. It was located on the stream 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 139 

then known as Wolf brook, but at the present time known as Stickney 
brook, in the southwest part of the town; its site being on or near that 
of the present sawmill of Deacon Perley L. Pierce, in South Brookline. 
At the date of its erection the mill was located in Townsend, Mass., from 
whence it was transferred into Brookline by the running of the Province 
line in 1741. 

As appears by the Hollis records, Wyman continued to own and to 
operate the mill until, at least, as late as 1746; after which date we have 
no further definite information concerning him, although there is a tra- 
dition to the effect that he removed from Raby to Townsend Harbor, 
and that he died there. Another tradition says that he died in Woburn, 
Mass. 

After Wyman's ownership ceased, there was a long interval of years 
during which little or nothing is known concerning this mill. But about 
the year 1795, its site was occupied by a sawmill which was owned and 
operated by David Wright, Jr., a son of David Wright and his wife Pru- 
dence (Cummings) Wright, who arrested the tory, Whiting, at Jewett's 
bridge in Pepperell, Mass., in 1775. David Wright, Jr., deceased in 
1825 and is buried in the South Cemetery. After Wright's decease the 
mill was owned and for several years operated by Thomas Tarbell. Sub- 
sequently it passed into the hands of the late Andrew Rockwood. In 
1855 Mr. Rockwood sold the mill to the late William J. Smith. Smith, 
soon after his purchase, entered into partnership with Noah Ball, of 
Townsend, Mass., and the twain under the name of Smith and Ball oper- 
ated the mill until Oct. 22, 1870, when Smith sold it to Deacon Perley 
L. Pierce. 

Dec. 26, 1872, during Deacon Pierce's ownership, the mill was de- 
stroyed by fire. April 25, 1873, Pierce conveyed one undivided half part 
of the mill privilege to David S. Fessenden; and the same year Pierce 
and Fessenden rebuilt the mill. In 1877 Mr. Pierce repurchased Mr. 
Fessenden's interest in the mill and, in 1879, sold the entire plant to 
Charles A. Stickney and William M. Armstrong. Stickney and Arm- 
strong operated the mill until Oct. 17, 1889, when they reconveyed it to 
Deacon Pierce, by whom it has ever since been owned and operated. 
At the present time (1912), of three water power sawmills standing in 
town, this mill is the only one in full operation. Of the other two, the 
old Capt. Sam Brooks mill has been idle for many years, and the Charles 
J. Stickney mill is being operated occasionally and spasmodically. 

The Jasher Wyman mill house was located on the north side of 
Townsend hill, a few rods southeast of the mill. At the time of this writ- 



140 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

ing it is occupied as his dwelling house by Luther Lawrence. In the 
vicinity of this mill, in Wyman's day, were living Samuel Wheeler, John 
Wright, Ensign Farrons (FarrarP)and Capt. Samuel Douglass. Of whom 
Richard Hazzen, who in 1740-41 surveyed the western section of the 
boundary line between the Provinces of New Hampshire and Massa- 
chusetts, in his journal of the survey, speaks as follows. "At three Miles 
and Two hundred poles from the Nashua River we crossed the Nissitissit 
River, and near the End of Our Measure this day by the highway in 
Townsend" — Townsend hill — "Samuel W T heeler's house was north of our 
line about twelve poles and Joshua Wright's House further north. These 
Two houses are all that were inhabited in Townsend on the North of 
Our Line and Ensign Farron's House was South about Ninety Rods, by 
whose fire we lodged this Night." * 

The sites of the houses of Joshua Wright, Samuel Wheeler and En- 
sign Farron, as they were then located, are unknown at the present time. 
But the site of the Captain Douglass log cabin is still marked by its cellar 
hole, which, although it was built more than one hundred and sixty years 
ago, is in an excellent state of preservation. It is located in Brookline in 
an open field lying about midway of the north side of Townsend hill, and 
on the east side of the highway leading from South Brookline to the 
summit of the hill; from which highway it is distant about twenty rods 
in an easterly direction. It is situated a few rods north of the state line. 
At the present time, it may be found by following a stone wall which, 
beginning at said highway, bounds said open field on its north side, for 
about twenty rods, at the end of which distance the cellar hole lies a few 
rods almost directly south. 

The James Conneck (Connex?) Sawmill. 

This mill was built by James Conneck, probably before the town 
was incorporated. Like the Wyman mill, it was originally located in 
Townsend, Mass. Its location in Brookline was in the southwest part 
of the town on the upper part of the Wallace brook; its exact location 
on the brook being at the point where the stream makes its outlet from 
the meadows in front of the old Mathew Wallace place; where the ves- 
tiges of the ancient mill-dam are still to be seen. All traces of the mill 
disappeared many years ago. Seventy-five years ago the oldest inhabit- 
ants then living had no personal knowledge of it and, save for tradition 

* Province Papers of New Hampshire, Vol. XIX, p. 494. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 141 

and the ruins of the dam, the knowledge of its ever having existed would 
long since have passed into oblivion. 

James Conneek, its builder, was one of the town's soldiers in the 
War of the Revolution. He died of wounds received in the battle of 
Bunker Hill. His dwelling house, of which the cellar hole is still in exist- 
ence, was located about one-fourth of a mile south of the Mathew Wal- 
lace place, on the east side of the highway leading from that place to 
South Brookline. Within the past forty years a dwelling house standing 
upon its site has been known as the "Pickerel Nutting Place." 

The Ebenezer Melvin Sawmill. 

The Melvin Sawmill was perhaps the third sawmill, in point of time, 
to be erected in this town. It was built by Capt. Ebenezer Melvin as 
early, at least, as 1747; as the Hollis records for that year contain a 
mention of "Melvin's milldam." The mill was located on the upper part 
of the scabbard mill brook a few rods north of the site, afterwards, of the 
Thomas Bennett sawmill. Its site at the present time is marked by the 
ruins of its old dam; which are still of magnitude and strength sufficient 
to retain within their limits, especially in more than ordinarily wet weather, 
enough water to form a small pond. 

Captain Melvin, whose genealogy is given on another page, in 1770, 
in company with James Gould, Jonas Hobart and Samuel Farley, Jr., all 
early settlers in the east part of the town, removed from Raby to Groton, 
N. H., where they were the first settlers. So far as known, this mill was 
never operated after Captain Melvin abandoned it. 

The Old Sawmill on Rocky Pond Brook. 

When or by whom the first sawmill to be erected on Rocky Pond 
brook within the limits of Brookline was built is unknown. But it is 
reasonably certain that a sawmill was standing upon its banks as early, 
at least, as 1765. For in a deed dated July 24 of that year and recorded 
in Vol. 3, page 5, of Hillsborough County Registry, by which Col. David 
Hobart conveyed to Caleb Farley a tract of land lying upon the brook's 
banks within the present limits of Brookline, mention is made of "Pierce's 
dam and Flint's meadow;" and the records show further, that at that 
time and for many subsequent years, James Flint was the owner of the 
meadows lying on the stream above the point where, about one mile 
south of the village Main street and a few rods north of the point where 



142 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

it crosses the highway to Pepperell, Mass., the stream at the present 
time is blocked by the ruins of an ancient dam. 

That these ruins mark the site of "Pierce's dam," mentioned in the 
foregoing named deed, there can be little or no doubt. For in the entire 
stretch of the meadows above them through which the brook flows, there 
is not a single place suitable for the location of a mill. 

This first, or original sawmill disappeared about 1800. Some ac- 
counts say that it was destroyed by fire. Others say that it was torn 
down by Asa Shattuck of Pepperell, Mass., about 1808-10; and that 
soon after tearing it down, Shattuck built a new mill upon its site. The 
latter statement is probably the true one. At any rate, Asa Shattuck 
operated a sawmill standing upon the site of the old one for a few years 
between the years 1808 and 1822. 

About the year 1828 the mill was again torn down; this time by 
James Hobart, a brother of David Hobart, Sr., who erected a new mill 
upon its site, it being the third sawmill to stand upon the same site. 
James Hobart operated the mill by him erected until about the year 
1835, when he abandoned it; and from that year until 1840 the mill 
remained idle. 

In 1841 the mill was leased by William Wright and Milo J. Rock- 
wood who operated it until 1848, when they abandoned it. Soon after 
the mill's abandonment by Wright and Rockwood its machinery was sold 
to Alfred Spaulding by whom it was removed to and installed in his saw- 
mill on the Spaulding brook in the southwest part of Milford. From the 
time of the removal of its machinery the mill building gradually de- 
cayed, and for many subsequent years it was known to the public only 
as a picturesque ruin. Finally all traces of the original structure dis- 
appeared. At the present time (1912) its site can be located only by its 
crumbling foundations and the ruins of its ancient dam and race way. 

During the period between 1808 and 1812, when it was owned- and 
operated by Asa Shattuck, this mill was the scene of a deplorable acci- 
dent, in which Benjamin Cummings lost his life. 

The Washington Wright Blacksmith Shop and the Gristmill 

Connected Therewith. 

In 1806-07 Washington Wright removed from Pepperell, Mass., to 
this town, where he settled on a farm near the old sawmill on the Rocky 
Pond brook. His dwelling was located on the summit of the hill a few 
rods southwest of the mill and on the west side of the highway. The 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 143 

house was destroyed by fire Jan. 19, 1810, a day known in the annals of 
New England as cold Friday. Its site is marked at the present time by 
its cellar hole, which still survives. 

Soon after he came here Mr. Wright erected upon the brook below 
the sawmill, and between it and the highway, a blacksmith shop, and 
installed therein a gristmill; the latter mill being, so far as is known, 
the only mill of its description to have ever been erected upon this stream. 
Both shop and mill were operated by Mr. Wright until about 1828, when 
he gave up the business and the shop was torn down. 

The Blacksmith Shop of David Hobart Sr. 

In 1828-29, soon after the Washington Wright shop was torn down, 
David Hobart, Sr., a settler near the old mill on Rocky Pond brook, 
coming there from Pepperell, Mass., built a dam across the stream a 
few rods below the point where it crosses the Pepperell highway, and 
erected thereon a building in which for many subsequent years he carried 
on the business of blacksmithing. 

The shop which was afterwards owned and occupied by Ephraim 
L. Hardy is still standing, but has not been used for its original purpose 
for many years. At the present time it is owned by Walter Taylor, who 
utilizes it as a storehouse. 

At the date of his building the shop, Mr. Hobart owned and was 
living in a dwelling house which was located on the east side of the high- 
way, a few rods north of the bridge over the brook, and near the site of 
the original log cabin of Phineas Bennett. This house was destroyed by 
fire June 10, 1877. Its site at the present time (1912) is occupied by the 
dwelling house of Walter Taylor. 

The Benajmin Brooks Sawmill. 

This mill, which was the earliest of at least four which within the 
last one hundred years have stood upon the same site, was located upon 
the south side of the Wallace brook a few rods above the point where, 
at South Brookline, it crosses the highway to Townsend, Mass. Ac- 
cording to tradition, the mill was built about 1791 by Benjamin Brooks, 
Jr., several years after he settled in this town, coming here from Towns- 
end, Mass. But while the tradition in this instance is undoubtedly true, 
there is some reason for doubting the claim that the Brook's mill was the 
first to occupy the site upon which it was erected. For an examination 



144 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

of the Hillsborough County Records shows that the land upon which the 
mill was built was conveyed by Robert Fletcher, of Amherst, to Benja- 
min Brooks, Sr., by deed dated May 7, 1790; and that in the deed the 
land conveyed is mentioned as the — "Sawmill lot." Of course, the use of 
the words "sawmill lot" in the description of the land conveyed may 
have meant nothing more nor less than that at that time the lot was 
considered a good site for a sawmill. But that the words may have had 
reference to the fact that the site had been previously occupied by a 
sawmill is too obvious to be a cause for discussion. 

In the said deed of conveyance, Benjamin Brooks, Sr., is described 
as living in Townsend, Mass. As a matter of fact, his house at that time 
was located on the west side of the highway leading from South Brook- 
line (then Paddledock) to Townsend hill. It stood a few rods south of 
the State line. Its site at the present time is occupied by the dwelling 
house of George Kendall. 

Benjamin Brooks, Jr., at the time of said conveyance, was living in 
Raby; his log cabin being located in Paddledock, now South Brookline, 
on the west side of the highway leading from Brookline to Townsend, 
Mass., and a few rods north of the bridge over the Wallace brook. Its 
site at the present time is occupied by the dwelling house of Frank Farrar. 
He continued to live in the log cabin until 1810. In the latter year he 
built on the east side of said highway and a few rods north of his cabin 
the framed house afterwards known as the Luther Rockwood place, into 
which he removed, and where he continued to reside until his death. 

In this connection it may be of interest to mention some others of 
the dwelling houses which were standing in the vicinity of this mill at 
the date of its being built, or shortly after. Among them was the brick 
house now standing, on the east side of the highway to Townsend a few 
rods south of the bridge over the Nissitisset river; which was built about the 
year 1795 by Benjamin S. Tucker, a son of Swallow Tucker, and father of 
the late James N. and Joseph C. Tucker. At the present time this house 
is owned and occupied as his home by David S. Fessenden. Save for the 
brick, or Tucker house, and the Brook's log cabin already mentioned, 
there were no dwelling houses on this highway between the bridge over 
the Nissitisset and that over the Wallace brook. 

Immediately south of the Wallace brook bridge a lane led out of the 
highway on its east side and ran in an easterly direction for a short dis- 
tance; at the end of which, tradition says, there was a log cabin which 
at one time was occupied by Samuel Douglass, Sr. Tradition says fur- 
ther that sometime in the remote past a tannery for curing sheep skins 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 145 

was located near this house; but the tradition fails to give the name of 
its owner and operator. The house was afterwards for many years the home 
of Nathaniel Shattuck, Esquire. Coming back to the Wallace brook 
bridge, and passing southerly along the Townsend highway, the next 
house to be encountered was that of Samuel Douglass, Jr. It was located 
on the west side of the road a short distance south of the mill. The origi- 
nal house is standing at the present time. In the fifties it was owned and 
occupied as his home by the late Levi Rockwood. About one-fourth of 
a mile south of the Samuel Douglass, Jr., house and on the same side of 
the highway was located the house of Jonas Smith, by whom it is said 
to have been built. In the sixties this house was owned and occupied 
by the late Thomas V. Wright. At the present time it is owned and 
occupied by Stephen Barnaby. — But to return to the Brooks sawmill. 

Jan. 13, 1813, Benjamin Brooks sold the mill to William S. Crosby. 

For a period of thirty-one years from the date of the Brooks deed to 
Crosby, or until 1844, the mill was owned and occupied at different times 
by no less than seven different individuals or firms. Among these differ- 
ent owners was Reuben Baldwin, in whom the title was vested three 
different times; viz., in 1826, in 1829, and from 1834 to 1836. 

During the last term of Mr. Baldwin's ownership the plant was run 
in connection with a gristmill. Whether this gristmill was installed in 
the sawmill building by Mr. Baldwin, or whether it was installed before 
his purchase of the same, the writer has been unable to ascertain. Neither 
has he been able to ascertain definitely how long after 1836 the gristmill 
continued to be operated. 

During the last term of Mr. Baldwin's ownership of the mill, he 
built the dwelling house located on the west side of the highway south 
of and adjacent to the Levi Rockwood millhouse; it being the house of 
which the late Andrew Rockwood was afterward the owner, and in which 
he was living at the date of his decease, March 1, 1889. 

Oct. 1, 1836, Reuben Baldwin sold the plant to Franklin McDonald, 
who operated it until 1844, when he sold out to Levi and Milo J. Rock- 
wood. Up to /this time the mill had been equipped with only the old- 
fashioned "up and down" board saw. But soon after taking possession, 
the Rockwoods added to its facilities for doing business by putting in a 
stave and also a head saw. March 6, 1846, Levi Rockwood sold his inter- 
est in the mill to his partner, Milo J. Rockwood, who thus became the 
sole owner. 

Nov. 15, 1847, while the plant was still in his possession, Milo J. 
Rockwood was killed in the mill by falling onto a circular saw. After 



146 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

Milo J. Rockwood's death the mill passed into the hands of his father, 
Luther Roekwood, who operated it until May 11, 1851, when he sold to 
his son, Levi Roekwood. 

In the month of December, 1852, during Levi Rockwood's owner- 
ship, the mill was totally destroyed by fire. The following year Mr. 
Roekwood erected upon its site a new sawmill and equipped the same 
with new and modern machinery; including, in addition to the stave 
and head saws, a. shingle mill, and continued to operate the plant until 
his death, which occurred in the millhouse, Nov. 7, 1863. 

Levi Rockwood's death, because of the circumstances under which it 
occurred, was one of the saddest events of the history of the town, and 
was the cause of universal regret and sorrow upon the part of its citizens, 
by whom he was held in the highest respect and esteem. He died of 
diphtheria which in that year was epidemic in Townsend, Mass. — where 
its victims numbered over sixty souls — and from whence it was trans- 
mitted to and became epidemic in South Brookline. At the same time 
with Mr. Rockwood's death occurred the deaths of three of his children, 
and also the death of Ann M. Roekwood, a daughter of his brother, 
Andrew Roekwood. 

After Levi Rockwood's death, his wife, Cynthia T. Roekwood, as 
administratrix of his estate, on the 27th day of Aug., 1864, sold and con- 
veyed the mill property to Benjamin Shattuck. Mr. Shattuck operated 
the plant for about one year, and then sold it to David S. Fessenden. 
Mr. Fessenden operated the mill until December, 1874, when he sold it 
to William B. West. In 1876 Mr. West sold the plant to Martha R. 
Patten, and in the same year Mrs. Patten sold and conveyed the same 
to Susan H. Pratt. 

In 1883, Walter Fessenden of Townsend, Mass., as the result of the 
foreclosure of a mortgage which he held on the premises, became the 
owner of the mill. Prior to this, however, on the 18th day of Feb., 1881, 
the mill was again destroyed by fire, and was rebuilt the same year by 
David S. Fessenden. 

Feb. 20, 1883, Walter Fessenden sold the mill property to Charles 
A. Stiekney, then of Milford, by whom it has ever since been, and now is, 
owned. 

June 23, 1884, the mill was again destroyed by fire. It was imme- 
diately rebuilt by Mr. Stiekney. Oct. 6, 1888, the mill was again, and 
for the fourth time within a period of thirty-six years, burned down. 
It was rebuilt the same year by Mr. Stiekney. In 1898 Mr. Stiekney 
equipped the mill with a steam plant, in addition to its water power. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 147 

At the same time he substituted a steel penstock for the ancient channels 
through which the water had hitherto passed from the reservoir to the 
mill. 

At the present time (1914) this mill is standing and is in good con- 
dition. 

The James Campbell Sawmill. 

This mill was built at least as early as 1768. At that time its site 
was within the limits of the Mile Slip where Campbell was an early settler. 
It was located about three miles northwest of the present village Main 
street on the north side of the highway to Mason, and on the north side of 
Campbell's brook, at the point where the brook crosses the highway. 
The mill is one of the earliest to be mentioned in the town's official records 
where, in 1783, there is recorded a vote — "To give Capt. Campbell twelve 
days work of men and four days work of oxen to build a bridge at his 
mill dam." 

Captain Campbell owned and operated the mill until the year 1796, 
possibly longer. To whom he finally sold it is unknown. But the next 
owner, of record, after him was Abel Foster, who operated it during the 
forties. Mr. Foster was succeeded in the ownership of the mill by Wil- 
liam Gilson ; who, in his turn, was succeeded both as owner and operator, 
by Amos A. Gould. Oct. 5, 1870, Mr. Gould sold and conveyed the mill 
to J. Alonzo Hall, by whom it was owned and operated from the date of 
his purchase until his death, which occurred in November, 1899. 

Nov. 15, 1899, the heirs of J. Alonzo Hall sold the mill and the ad- 
jacent land at public auction to Franklin Worcester of Hollis. Mr. 
Worcester operated the plant until Dec. 17, 1903, at which date he sold 
it to the Fresh Pond Ice Company, in whose name the title to the plant 
at the present time stands. The mill building was torn down, under the 
direction of the Ice Company, by James Segee, in 1903-04. Its mate- 
rials were used by Mr. Segee in the construction of his dwelling house on 
the highway west of Clarence R. Russell's house. At the present time 
(1914) the old mill-dam is still standing, but in a very dilapidated condition. 

Of the cabins of the early settlers who, at the time, or soon after, 
this mill was built, were living in its vicinity, that of Capt. SamuelRussell 
was located about one-fourth of a mile southwest of the mill on the east 
side of the road leading out of the west side of the Mason highway at a 
point just south of the mill pond and passing to Townsend, Mass. Its 
site at the present time is occupied by the dwelling house of his great 



14S HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

grandson, Clarence R. Russell. On the east side of the same road, and 
immediately south of the Samuel Russell cabin, was located the cabin 
of his brother, George Russell; south of which and on the same side of 
the road was the cabin of George Woodward; who settled here in 1772, 
coming from Mason, and whose name appears on Brookline's recorded 
list of the names of its soldiers in the War of the Revolution. Still fur- 
ther south, and adjoining the Woodward farm, stood the cabin of Simeon 
Blanchard, originally of Hollis, who settled here about the same time as 
did Woodward. With the exception of the cabin of Captain Russell, the 
sites of all these cabins are unknown at the present time. But the prob- 
abilities are very strongly in favor of the presumption that their sites are 
now occupied by the dwelling houses located on this road which in 1855 
and later were owned and occupied by Elnathan Russell, Jonas Kendall 
and James French, respectively; all of which are located within the 
original limits of the Mile Slip. 

The Benjamin Shattuck, Sr., Sawmill . 

The first sawmill to be erected on the North Stream was built by 
Benjamin Shattuck, Sr., soon after his settling in this town, in the latter 
part of the sixties of 1700, coming here from Groton, Mass. The mill 
was located about three miles north of the present village Main street on 
the west bank of the stream at the point where it crosses the highway 
leading from this town to Greenville. Its site, however, was consider- 
ably higher up the stream than was the site upon which at least two of 
the sawmills which succeeded it were built. 

The mill is said to have been a very crude affair; a mei«e shanty 
formed of upright poles supporting cross pieces, upon which were laid 
coverings of rough plank, which afforded but little protection to the mill 
machinery and still less to the men who operated it. In a very few years 
after the mill was built it was destroyed by fire, and a new mill was built 
upon its site. This second mill was also probably built by Benjamin 
Shattuck, Sr., although it is possible that it was built by his son, Ben- 
jamin, Jr. The date of its construction was not far from 1775. In ad- 
dition to the up and down board saw used in the first mill, the new mill 
was equipped with machinery for sawing shingles; it being, probably, the 
first mill of that description to be set up in this town. The mill remained 
in use until about 1780; when, having become out of repair to the extent 
that it was practically useless, it was torn down. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 149 

The third sawmill to be erected on the stream at this point was 
built in 1783 by Benjamin Shattuek, Jr., who at the same time constructed 
a new dam. The sites of the mill and dam were located further down the 
stream than had been those of the two prior mills and dam; their loca- 
tion having been just south of the highway to Greenville, at the point 
at which it then crossed the stream; which was considerably higher up 
the stream than is the point at which, at the present time, it is crossed 
by the same highway. As a matter of fact, this third mill and dam were 
built just above the point where the stream at the present time crosses 
the Greenville highway; which, at this point, was relocated and recon- 
structed that same year by Mr. Shattuek. 

In this third sawmill was gotten out the lumber used in the con- 
struction of the dwelling house of Benjamin Shattuek, Jr.; or, as it was 
known in latter years, the Alpheus Shattuek house; which was built in 
1783. The mill lasted until well into the nineteenth century, but was 
finally torn down. 

The fourth mill to be erected on the north stream at this point was 
built by Alpheus Shattuek, a son of Benjamin Shattuek, Jr., about 1825. 
It was located on the site of the third mill. Like its predecessors, it was 
fitted up as a sawmill and a shingle mill. In the latter part of the fifties, 
or forepart of the sixties, this mill's machinery was increased by the addi- 
tion of a saw for cutting out barrel staves and heads and, also, a planing 
machine. 

Alpheus Shattuek continued to own and operate this mill until 1862. 
December 5th of the latter year he sold the mill plant, together with the 
entire area of four hundred acres comprised in the original farm of Ben- 
jamin Shattuek, Sr., to James H. Hall; and, shortly after the sale, re- 
moved with his family into the "Old Yellow House" in the village, where 
he resided until his decease in 1886. 

The Alpheus Shattuek Shingle Mill. 

At some period during the existence of the fourth of the Shattuek 
sawmills, Alpheus Shattuek increased the efficiency of the plant by the 
addition thereto of a new shingle mill; the machinery for which was 
installed in a building erected for the purpose by Mr. Shattuek, and lo- 
cated just south of the highway bridge and on the east bank of the stream, 
and but a few rods distant from the sawmill; from which it derived its 
motive power by means of an endless rope connecting the machinery 
of the two mills. This mill was unique in that it performed its work by 



150 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

the use of knives, instead of saws; the shingles being cut from blocks of 
wood which had been prepared for the purpose by being steamed. Tra- 
dition says that the knives proved to be a poor substitute for saws, and 
that their use was soon discontinued. 

The building remained in position until as late as 1869; when, in the 
great freshet which occurred in the fall of that year, it was swept from its 
foundations, and its timbers were torn apart and carried down stream 
to the meadows below, where some of them are to be seen at the present 
time. 

As has been previously stated, on the 5th day of December, 1862, 
Alpheus Shattuck sold his farm, including the sawmill and privileges con- 
nected with it, to James Harvey Hall. Mr. Hall took immediate pos- 
session of the premises, and continued to operate the sawmill until his 
death, which occurred Aug. 11, 1874. During this period, on the 18th 
day of Dec, 1873, George W. Peabody, a son-in-law of Mr. Hall, and a 
young man of the highest character, was accidentally killed in the mill, 
of which, at the time of his decease, he was in charge as foreman. Jan. 
31, 1881, Charles Burgess, an employee in the mill, was also accidentally 
killed within its walls. 

For a few years succeeding Mr. Hall's death the mill was operated 
by his heirs. Feb. 13, 1890, the Hall heirs sold the mill to William H. 
Hall, a nephew of James H. Hall. This sale included the mill property 
only. William H. Hall operated the mill until May 10, 1897; at which 
date he conveyed it back to the James H. Hall heirs, by whom, on the 
18th day of Jan., 1897, its site was sold and conveyed to Walter F. Rock- 
wood; by whom it was subsequently sold to the Fresh Pond Ice Co., in 
whose name it stands at the present time (1914). Prior to Mr. Rock- 
wood's purchase of the site, however, the mill building was destroyed by 
fire. It has never been rebuilt. 

The mill property of Benjamin Shattuck, Sr., as well as his farm of 
more than four hundred acres, remained in the ownership and possession 
of his descendants from 1766-67 to 1862; a period of nearly one hun- 
dred years. During this time the Shattuck sawmills were always the 
centres of the social, as well as of the business activities in the northern 
part of the township. The Shattuck dwelling house, or "mill-house," as 
it was locally known, both in the days of its builder, Benjamin Shattuck, 
Jr., and later, when it was the home of his son, Alpheus, was famed for 
the hospitality of its proprietors. Its doors were open at all times to 
welcome the coming or speed the parting guest; and whoever entered 
them as a friend of the host or hostess never passed out of them without 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 151 

feeling that the cordial invitation to — "come again" — was as sincere as 
it was hearty. There are yet living in this town — and for that matter, in 
all of the towns of this vicinity — citizens who recall with pleasure the years 
between 1840 and 1860, when the Alpheus Shattuck place was one of the 
principal centres of the town's social attractions. To be present at any 
social function transpiring there, whether it was a husking-bee, a barn 
dance, or a turkey dinner, was the nearest approach to perfect earthly 
happiness of which the townspeople had any conception. The house was 
destroyed by fire April 30, 1896. 

In this connection it may be interesting to mention some others of the 
dwelling houses which during the years of the existence of the Shattuck 
sawmills were located in their vicinity. 

About one-half mile northwest of the old Shattuck house, on the 
west side of the highway to Greenville, in the days of Benjamin Shattuck, 
Sr., was located the log cabin of Moses Shattuck, a nephew of Benjamin, 
Sr. The log cabin was torn down early in the nineteenth century; and 
in 1808 Mr. Shattuck erected, a little to the east of its site, and nearer to 
the highway, the framed dwelling house in which he resided until his 
decease, in the latter part of the sixties. It was in this latter house, in 
the latter part of the sixties, that the six children of his son, Asa Shat- 
tuck — each of whom died of consumption after reaching maturity — were 
born. In this house, also, after Moses Shattuck's death, Henry K. Kemp 
resided for many years, or until 1872; in which year he purchased the 
Alonzo Bailey house in the village, into which soon after his purchase 
he moved and where he resided until his decease. For several years 
after the death of Moses Shattuck, the house was occupied by Mrs. A. 
A. Bucknam and her son, Wilton Bucknam, who came here from Stone- 
ham, Mass. In 1874 the house became the property of Jeremiah Bald- 
win who tore it down and used its timbers in building a new house for 
himself in the village. The dwelling house which at the present time 
(1914) is standing on the site of the Moses Shattuck house was formerly 
the schoolhouse of school district number 8, in Milford. It was pur- 
chased from the town of Milford and removed into its present position 
by Fred Farnsworth. 

A few rods north of the Moses Shattuck place on a lane leading 
out of the highway, on its west side, at the present time is located a cel- 
lar hole upon which once stood a dwelling house which in the early six- 
ties was the home of Jeremiah Harwood, a descendant of a family of 
that name which settled in this town at an early date, coming here from 



.152 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

old Dunstable, where the Harwoods were among its early and most re- 
spectable settlers. 

Still further north, on the east side of the highway and at or near 
the point where it unites with the highway leading from Brookline, via 
the Ezra Farnsworth place, to Mason, is a cellar hole which marks the 
site of the dwelling house formerly of Samuel Farnsworth, Jr. The house 
was destroyed by fire many years ago. To the northeast of the Shattuck 
millsite and but a short distance from it, on the old highway leading 
from Brookline to Milford, via the Nathaniel Hutchinson place, are to 
be found at the present time several cellar holes, each of which marks the 
site of ancient dwelling houses. 

Of these cellar holes, one, located on the east side of the highway 
just north of the site of the old district number 6 schoolhouse, marks 
the site of a dwelling house which in the fore part of the last century was 
occupied by Thomas Tarbell, originally of Pepperell, Mass. He was the 
same Tarbell who, at a later date, operated the old Wyman, now Pierce's 
mill in South Brookline, and lived in the old Wyman, now Luther J. 
Lawrence place on Townsend hill. Passing along this highway north 
from the Tarbell cellar hole, the next cellar hole on the east side of the 
road is that of a dwelling house formerly occupied by Withee, originally 
of Mason, and an early settler in this town. Still further north on the 
west side of the road is located the cellar hole of a dwelling house once 
occupied by Jeremiah Harwood, northwest of and distant but a few rods 
from which is the cellar hole of the dwelling house of his son, Jeremiah 
Harwood, Jr. 

At the end of a lane which leads out of the east side of the highway 
at a point just south of the Jeremiah Harwood, Jr., house cellar hole is 
located the cellar hole of the dwelling house formerly of Amariah Ames, 
who came here in the fore part of the last century from Wilmington, 
Mass. This house was at one time occupied by Kimball Shattuck, a son 
of Abel Shattuck. 

Coming back from the Ames' cellar hole to the highway and passing 
on still northerly, the next cellar hole to be encountered is located on the 
west side of the road. It marks the site of the dwelling house formerly 
of David Stickney, who settled here about 1825, coming here from Town- 
send, Mass. On the west side of the highway north of the Stickney house 
cellar hole, there is located the cellar hole of a house of which the former 
occupant is unknown; nearly opposite to which on the east side of the 

highway is the cellar hole of the dwelling house formerly of — 

Peacock; north of which on the same side of the road is the cellar hole 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 153 

of the dwelling house formerly of Wilkins. On the west 

side of this highway, not far from the Milford boundary line, and at the 
end of its limits in Brookline, is still standing the old Nathaniel Huteh- 
ingson house, which was built by Mr. Hutehingson not far from the year 
1808 and which, although it is one of the oldest houses in town, is at the 
present time in an excellent state of preservation. 

The Abel Spaulding Sawmill. 

This mill was originally located in that part of the Mile Slip which 
now constitutes the southwest corner of Milford, but which, until the 
incorporation of Milford in 1794, constituted the northwest part of Brook - 
line; its site being about four miles north of Brookline village on the 
north bank of the brook formerly known as Swallow's stream, but which 
at the present time, for obvious reasons, is known as Spaulding's brook; 
its exact location being at the point where the brook crosses the highway 
leading from Brookline, via the old Sampson Farnsworth place, to Milford. 

The mill's site is located upon land which was conveyed by William 
Spaulding, Sr., to his sons Thomas and Abel Spaulding by his deed April 
9, 1784. It is probable that at the time of this conveyance there was or 
previously had been a sawmill on the brook at or near the site of the 
present mill, for the deed of conveyance mentioned the brook as the 
"Mill Stream." Tradition says that the original Spaulding sawmill was 
built by Abel Spaulding, Sr., in 1784, soon after he purchased its site 
from his father. At the decease of Abel Spaulding, Sr., the mill passed 
into the hands of his son, Abel Spaulding, Jr. Abel Spaulding, Jr., died 
in 1849, and was succeeded in the ownership of the mill by his son, Alfred 
Spaulding. 

For a period of about eighty years from the date of its erection the 
mill did a profitable business, its products finding a ready sale in this 
and also in the neighboring towns. But during all of this period, the 
forests in the vicinity of the mill, upon which it depended for the supply 
of lumber with which to carry on its operations, were being gradually 
depleted of their growths. In the latter part of the fifties the diminu- 
tion in the amount of standing timber in the vicinity of the mill had 
increased to the extent that the advent of the day when the mill would 
be compelled to go out of buisness, on account of lack of the supply of 
lumber with which to operate it, became only a question of time. 

About 1860, Alfred Spaulding, who then owned and was operating 
the mill, equipped it with additional machinery in the form of saws for 



154 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

manufacturing barrel staves and heads. This increase in machinery, while 
it added to the mill's capacity for production, had also the effect of in- 
creasing its demand for lumber with which to operate. For a few years 
the supply of lumber continued to partially meet the mill's demands for 
it. But by the middle of the sixties the greater part of available forest 
growth in the vicinity of the mill had been practically denuded of its 
marketable timber and, as a result, the supply of timber necessary to 
the mill's existence ceased longer to be forthcoming; and in 1870, Alfred 
Spaulding closed out the plant for good. At the present time (1914) 
the mill is in ruins. 

Abel Spaulding, Sr., by whom the sawmill was built, was a son of 
William and Hepzibah (Blood) Spaulding of Pepperell, Mass., where he 
was born June 12, 1749. He married Lucy Wethee Wetherell, by whom 
he had several children, among whom was his son, Abel Spaulding, Jr., 
who was born in Pepperell, Mass., March 2, 1782. 

Abel Spaulding, Jr., married at Pepperell, Feb. 19, 1815, Anna Shat- 
tuck. He died in Milford, April 17, 1849, at the old homestead. His 
wife, Anna, died April 8, 1883. His children, all born on the old home- 
stead, after it was set off from Brookline into Milford, according to the 
records, were as follows: 

1. Elizabeth Ann born in Milford Feb. 9, 1816, m. Justus Peabody 
Dec. 3, 1840, res. Millerton, N. Y. 

2. Josephine Augusta, born in Milford Feb. 10, 1818, m. Ezra 
Farnsworth in 1842, res. Brookline, N. H. 

3. Alfred, born in Milford Dec. 9, 1819, res. in Brookline, died un- 
married at Samuel Bancroft's in North Pepperell about 1905. 

4. William, born in Milford Dec. 10, 1821, m. Abby R. Stearns 
March 27, 1855, res., Ayer Junction, Mass. 

5. Edward, born in Milford Sept. 3, 1824, m. 1st, Olive C. Atherton, 
m. 2d, Jennie Ambrose, res., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

6. John, born in Milford March 2, 1827, m. 1st, Maria J. Smith 
Sept. 25, 1851, m. 2d, Mrs. Emma L. Hart, Oct. 30, 1885, res., San 
Francisco. 

7. Alonzo Jasper, born in Milford April 5, 1830, m. Rosanna 
Harris, res., Arkansas City, Kan. 

8. Erastus, born in Milford Aug. 14, 1832, m. Lizzie Kent, May 
8, 1860, res., Dayton, Org. 

9. Andrew, born in Milford May 21, 1834, m. Susan Shockley, 
April 5, 1865, res., San Francisco. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 155 

The log cabin of Abel Spaulding, St., at the time of his settling in 
Brookline in 1784, was located a few rods north of the sawmill. Its cellar 
hole is still in existence. 

North of the cellar hole of the Abel Spaulding cabin and but a short 
distance from it is a cellar hole which tradition says marks the site of the 
location of the cabin of Daniel Shed, after the close of the Revolution. 
Still further north on the east side of the highway are two additional 
cellar holes, of which one marks the site of the cabin of William Green, 
and the other that of Phineas Holden. On the west side of the highway 
north of the mill, from which it is distant about one-fourth of a mile, is 
located the cellar hole of the cabin of James Badger, a resident of and 
one of the leading citizens in the Mile Slip before the Slip became a part 
of Brookline. He is said to have been born in Ireland in 1749, and to 
have come from Ireland to America with his parents when he was a child. 

His wife's name was Martha — ■ ; she was born in 1742, and 

died May 27, 1812. 

On Raby's book of records of its soldiers in the Revolution appears 
the following entry: "Nathaniel Badger for James Badger to Cambridge 
Rates 2; 19; 2." 

During the years of his residing in Raby he was one of its leading 
citizens. He was moderator in 1774, town clerk in 1774 and 1775, town 
treasurer in 1775, and selectman in 1773 and 1774. He was the father 
of eight children, all born in this town. His family record is given in a 
subsequent page. He died at Milford, Jan. 28, 1841, aged 97 years. 

North of the site of the James Badger cabin on the west side of the 
highway and just north of the north boundary line of the town is to be 
seen the vestiges of the site of the old number 8 district sehoolhouse, in 
Milford. The school building itself, at the present time, is located on 
the old Moses Shattuck place in Brookline, where it is utilized as a 
dwelling house. 

In the field to the northeast of the sawmill and but a few rods dis- 
tant from the same, one may still gaze upon the cellar hole of the cabin 
of Jonas Shed, another of the town's Revolutionary soldiers; of whom 
and his brother, Daniel Shed, another chapter in this book speaks more 
definitely. In 1840 this cellar hole was occupied by the dwelling house 
of Otis Horton, which, one winter's evening during the forties Samuel 
Gilson, Jr., moved "cross lots" over the snow to a new location on the 
poor farm road, and in which he resided for many subsequent years 



156 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

The Sawtelle -Newell Sawmill 

This mill was built about 1785 by Major Eli Sawtelle, a son of Capt. 
Ephraim vSawtelle. It was located about two and one-half miles north 
of the present village Main street, upon the stream then known as Ben- 
nett's brook; but which at the present time is known as the Scabbard 
Mill brook. The mill was never used for any other purpose than that of 
sawing out boards and planks. In the thirties of the last century it was 
operated by Samuel Newell, who is supposed to have owned it with Saw- 
telle. The mill ceased to be operated about 1840. It finally rotted down. 
All traces of the mill disappeared many years since. Its site, however 
at the present time may be located by the vestiges of its dam, some of 
the stones used in the construction of which are still in evidence at a 
point on the stream almost directly west of the old Eldad Sawtelle place 
on the west side of the Milford highway, three miles north of the village 
Main street. The cellar hole of Samuel Newell's dwelling house is located 
in the open field west of the Eldad Sawtelle place 

The Sawmill of Dea. Thomas Bennett. 

This mill was built by Dea. Thomas Bennett about 1800, soon after 
he settled in town, coming here from Groton, Mass. It was located about 
three miles north of the present village Main street on the stream then 
known as Bennett's brook, but known at the present time as the Scabbard 
Mill brook. 

Deacon Bennett owned and operated the mill for more than forty 
successive years. In 1840 he sold the mill plant to Thomas Melendy, 
Jr., and Alpheus Melendy. The following year Alpehus Melendy con- 
veyed his interest in the mill to his partner, Thomas Melendy, Jr., who 
thus became the sole owner of the plant. 

In 1841 Thomas Melendy tore down the old mill and built a new 
mill upon its site in which, in addition to the old-fashioned "up and down" 
board saw, he installed a saw for getting out barrel staves and heads. 

In 1853 Mr. Melendy sold the mill to John Q. A. Hutchingson, who 
operated it until 1855, when he sold the plant to Beri Bennett, a son of 
Dea. Thomas Bennett, by whom the mill was owned and operated for 
the following thirty years. 

During Beri Bennett's ownership the mill building was thoroughly 
repaired, and the machinery was subjected to such changes and alterations 
as were necessary to enable it to meet and comply with such changes in 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 157 

the nature of manufcatured lumber as the public's demand for the same 
then required of mills of its description. The old up and down board 
saw was taken out and a circular saw installed in its place ; the old stave 
saw was also replaced by a new one; and such changes made as were 
necessary for increasing the mill's facilities for production. 

For many years following these changes, Mr. Bennett operated the 
mill successfully. But the cares and incidents attendant upon his increas- 
ing years finally compelled him to retire from business. In 1885 he sold 
his farm, including the mill plant, to Joseph H. Russell of Cambridgeport, 
Mass. Prior to his sale to Russell, however, he had already disposed of 
the mill's machinery. This machinery was subsequently installed in the 
Rockwood sawmill in South Brookline. For several years after its sale 
to Russell the mill building remained standing. But in the meantime its 
timbers were gradually decaying. They finally fell apart, and such por- 
tion of them as was not used for firewood was swept down the stream by 
floods. At the present time only the old foundations and some remnants 
of its dam are left to mark the former site of the mill. 

Following are the names of the several owners, and the dates of their 
respective ownerships, of the Bennett sawmill, as recorded in the Hills- 
borough Registry: 

Deacon Thomas Bennett, 1800, to April 2, 1840; Thomas Melendy, 
Jr., and Alpheus Melendy, April 2, 1840, to April 2, 1841; Thomas Me- 
lendy, Jr., April 2, 1841, to Sept. 22, 1853; John O. A. Hutchingson, 
Sept. 22, 1853, to Oct. 11, 1855; Beri Bennett, Oct. 11, 1855, to Feb. 
4, 1885. At which latter date Bennett conveyed the farm and mill to 
Joseph H. Russell, whose heirs at the present time are still in possession 
of the premises. 

The John Conant Sawmill. 

The first sawmill to be erected on the Nissitisset river within the 
limits of this town was built between the years 1785 and 1790 by John 
Conant, of Townsend, Mass. It was located on the east bank of the 
stream, about two hundred rods below its outlet from Muscatanipus 
pond, its site being the same as that afterwards occupied by the "Upper 
saw-mill," so called, of Ensign Bailey. 

At the time the mill was built, Conant, probably to avoid the expense 
of building a dam, conceived the idea of bringing the water from the pond 
to the mill by means of an artificial channel or ditch. He carried out 
his idea and caused the ditch to be constructed. Tradition says that so 



158 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

far as the conveyance of water by means of this ditch was concerned, 
the experiment was a success, but that the water conveyed by it failed 
to develop power sufficient to turn the mill wheel and that, as a result 
of this failure, Conant subsequently spent more time in d — g the ditch 
than it would have taken him in the first instance to dam the river. 

The ditch left the pond at a point on the south shore just west of 
the big granite boulder near the Orman F. Shattuck boat landing and, 
passing in a southwesterly direction, crossed the highway a few rods south 
of the present pond bridge, from whence it continued to the mill. North 
of the highway all traces of the ditch have long since disappeared. But 
south of the highway its course is still distinctly defined. 

Several years after the mill was built, James Campbell, of Brookline, 
having bought one-half of the mill, entered into a partnership with Conant 
for carrying on its business. Feb. 8, 1796, Conant and Campbell sold 
the plant to Joseph Stickney and Benjamin Campbell, both of Brookline. 
The consideration for the sale was twelve hundred dollars. The descrip- 
tion of the premises conveyed, as set forth in the deed, contained the 
following proviso — "Allowance had through the same for a road with a 
dwelling house and a sawmill and cornmill standing on the same and the 
damb that raises the pond for the use of said mills." From this "pro- 
viso" it would seem that the sawmill at this time was operated in connec- 
tion with a gristmill. If so, the gristmill was, so far as the writer has 
been able to ascertain, the first mill of that description to be located on 
the river in this town. 

From Stickney and Campbell the mill passed into the ownership of 
John Colburn. Colburn operated the mill until July 5, 1808, at which 
date he conveyed it to Ensign Bailey, who continued to own it until his 
death in August, 1863. Aug. 11, 1864, the heirs of Ensign Bailey sold 
and conveyed the mill together with the sawmill known as the Bailey 
"lower mill" and located on the stream below it to Charles A. Priest and 
J. Alonzo Hall. Sept. 2, 1869, Hall and Priest sold the mills to James 
W. Cook of Reading, Mass., and S. Abbott Putnam of Lyman, Mass., 
and the same date Cook and Putnam sold and conveyed both plants to 
J. Alonzo Hall and Joseph Peterson, both of this town. July 21, 1874, 
Hall and Peterson sold the upper or Conant mill to James W. Cook and 
William H. Hall. Sept. 14, 1877, James W. Cook sold and conveyed to 
William H. Hall his undivided half in the mill; and on the 5th day of Oc- 
tober, 1877, William H. Hall sold the plant to John S. Daniels and Na- 
thaniel Hobart. Feb. 7, 1885, John S. Daniels disposed of his interest in 
the mill to David H. Kendall, Henry S. Manning, Charles W. Hughes 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 159 

and Horace Richmond; who, in company with Nathaniel Hobart, under 
the firm name of Hobart, Kendall & Company, operated the plant until 
June 15, 1886, at which date the company sold the entire plant to Albert 
L. Fessenden, of Townsend, and John Buffum, of Boston, to be held in 
trust by them for the benefit of its creditors. Aug. 28, 1888, the trustees 
sold the mill privileges and site to William G. Shattuck; and on the 19th 
day of December of the same year, Shattuck sold the plant to George 
W. Bent, of Boston, Mass. At the present time the mill premises and 
privileges are owned by the Fresh Pond Ice Company, of Somerville, 
Mass. 

Nov. 27, 1889, the mill buildings were destroyed by fire. At the 
present time they have not been rebuilt. 

The Ensign Bailey Sawmill, Tannery and Sash and Blind Shop. 

The second sawmill to be erected on the Nissitisset river below its 
outlet from the pond was erected by Ensign Bailey in 1805 on land which 
was conveved to himself and his brothers, Kendall and Laomi, by Swallow 
Tucker by his deed dated December 21, 1804. 

At the date of this deed there was already a dam across the river 
below the Conant sawmill. This dam was mentioned in the deed as 
"Shannon's dam." Its site was identical with that of the dam now stand- 
ing on the stream a few rods north of the railroad passenger station in 
the village ; which was erected by the late Ensign Bailey, and in the con- 
struction of which it is probable that some of the materials used were 
obtained from the Shannon dam. 

The Bailey sawmill was located about one hundred rods south of this 
dam on the north side of the river at a point in the same nearly opposite 
the iron bridge which at the present time spans the stream at Bond street. 

In addition to the machinery necessary for its use as a sawmill, the 
mill was also equipped with a gristmill, the latter being the second mill 
of its description to be located on the river in this town. At the same 
time at which he built the sawmill, Mr. Bailey also erected another and 
much larger building to be used for the purpose of carrying on the tan- 
ning business, in which he was an expert. This latter building was lo- 
cated to the east of and but a short distance from the sawmill. The 
water necessary for operating both sawmill and tannery was obtained by 
means of an artificial canal which connected the plants with the mill 
pond above the dam. At the present time (1914) the vestiges of the canal 
are still in evidence. 



160 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

For many years after their erection, Mr. Bailey occupied these build- 
ings in carrying on his business as a miller and tanner; in the manage- 
ment of which he was highly successful, accumulating a comfortable for- 
tune, and also acquiring a far more than local reputation as a citizen and 
man of affairs whose word was "as good as his bond." 

About the year 1830 Mr. Bailey erected on the premises a building 
in which he installed a plant for the manufacture of window sashes and 
blinds. The building was located on the east side of the river adjacent to 
the mill-dam. This manufactory was the first and, for that matter, the 
last plant of its description to be established in this town. For many 
years the plant did a large and successful business, its products being in 
constant demand in this and the neighboring towns. In or about 1860 the 
plant went out of commission. In the latter part of the nineties, the 
building in which it was located — the old "Sash and Blind Shop" — was 
removed from its original site near the mill-dam to a new site on the east 
bank of the river west of the old sawmill, where it was fitted up as a kit 
mill. It was subsequently occupied by Charles W. Smith, a son of William 
J. Smith, as a wheelwright shop. 

In 1863 Ensign Bailey died, having retired from business several 
years prior to his death. On the 16th day of Aug., 1863, his heirs sold 
the mill plant, which included the "upper" and "lower" sawmills, to 
Charles A. Priest and Joseph A. Hall, who immediatley formed a part- 
nership under the firm name of Priest and Hall, and established them- 
selves in the milling business in the old Ensign Bailey, or "lower," saw- 
mill. 

Priest and Hall carried on business in the old Bailey mill for five 
years. By the end of this period their business had increased to the ex- 
tent that the firm was compelled to look for larger and more commodious 
quarters. They found them in the old tannery building, into which, in 
1868, the company moved its business, leaving in the abandoned sawmill 
only the stave and head saws. In the tannery building, in addition to 
the machinery brought from the old sawmill, the firm also installed a 
circular board saw, a kit machine and a planing mill. 

After doing a prosperous business in the new plant for five years, 
Priest and Hall, on the 2nd day of Sept., 1869, sold the entire mill property, 
including the upper and lower sawmills, to James W. Cook and S. Abbott 
Putnam. The same date Cook and Putnam sold and conveyed the entire 
mill property to Joseph A. Hall and Joseph W. Peterson, who formed a 
partnership in the mill and lumber business and located their business in 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 161 

the Ensign Bailey sawmill. July 21, 1874, Hall and Peterson sold the 
upper sawmill, or old Conant mill, to William H. Hall. 

Hall and Peterson continued to operate the Ensign Bailey sawmill 
plant until the year 1877. In the latter year poor health compelled Mr. 
Peterson to withdraw from the firm; and Jan. 11, 1877, he sold and con- 
veyed his undivided one-half part of the old Ensign Bailey sawmill plant 
to William J. Smith. Mr. Peterson died Aug. 31, 1884. 

Soon after his purchase of the Joseph W. Peterson interest in the 
Ensign Bailey sawmill plant, William J. Smith entered into a partner- 
ship with Joseph A. Hall for the purpose of operating the sawmill and 
the lumbering business connected with it. This partnership lasted until 
1895. In the latter year, Mr. Smith became financially embarassed and 
assigned his property, including his interest in the mill, to Enoch J. Col- 
burn, as trustee for the benefit of his creditors. Sept. 5, 1895, the as- 
signee sold the Smith interest in the mill, subject to the value of a mort- 
gage held by the Congregational Church and Society upon the same, to 
Perley L. Pierce. December 14 of the same year, Perley L. Pierce sold 
and conveyed his interest in the mill to Thomas S. Hittinger of Townsend, 
Mass., and April 21, 1898, acting in his capacity as trustee of the gift of 
James H. Hall to the Congregational Church, Mr. Pierce sold one un- 
divided half part of the plant to the said Thomas S. Hittinger, thus com- 
pleting Mr. Hittinger's title to that part of the plant which had been 
formerly owned by William J. Smith. April 19, 1898, Alpha A. Hall, as 
administrator of the estate of his father, Joseph A. Hall, sold and con- 
veyed the other half of the plant to William S. Hittinger, who thus be- 
came the sole owner of the original Ensign Bailey sawmill plant. April 
23, 1898, Mr. Hittinger sold the plant to the Fresh Pond Ice Company, 
by which it is owned at the present time (1914) . 

vSoon after its purchase of the property, the ice company tore down 
and removed all the buildings standing upon the premises. These build- 
ings have never been replaced; and there are at the present time no 
indications that they ever will be. Thus the old Ensign Bailey sawmill 
became a memory only. Today the valuable water power by which it 
was for so many years operated is unutilized. 

The Capt. Samuel Brooks Sawmill. 

This mill was located on the Wallace brook in the southwest part of 
the town. It stood on the south side of the highway which leads in an 
easterly direction from the old Mathew Wallace place to the main high- 



162 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

way from this town to Townsend, Mass., with which it connects at a 
point near the sawmill of Deacon Perley L. Pierce in South Brookline, 
from which the Brook's mill was distant about one-half mile in a westerly 
direction. 

The mill was built at some time in the thirties by Capt. Samuel 
Brooks, of Townsend hill. So far as known, it is the first and only mill 
to be located upon this site. Captain Brooks operated the mill for many 
years. After his decease it passed into the hands of his son, George 
Brooks. George Brooks operated the mill until the fall of 1863; when, 
on the 30th day of December, he sold the plant to Anson D. Fessenden, 
of Townsend, Mass., and Levi F. Lowell, of this town, and, shortly after 
the sale, removed with his family to Detroit, Mich.; where for many 
years he carried on a large wholesale lumbering and coopering business, 
and where he subsequently died. 

Messrs. Fessenden and Lowell took immediate possession of the pur- 
chased premises and operated the mill until 1870. In 1870 the firm sold 
the mill to Mrs. Diantha Peaslee, of Somerville, Mass., and removed its 
business to Merrimack, where the firm is located at the present time 
(1914). 

Mrs. Peaslee, through her husband, Harrison Peaslee, operated the 
mill until the 10th day of July, 1875; at which date she sold and, by 
her deed of that date, conveyed the plant to Jennie F. Averill, wife of 
Hartley Averill, of Boston, Mass. Feb. 7, 1908, Mrs. Averill sold the 
plant to Orville D. Fessenden, of this town, in whose name it stands at 
the present time. 

In the spring of the year 1900 the mill's dam was swept away by a 
freshet. The dam was never rebuilt and after its destruction the mill 
remained unoccupied until 1912, when it was burned down. 

Of the dwelling houses which at the present time are standing in the 
vicinity of this mill, the house located in the mill yard a short distance 
west of the plant was probably built by Capt. Samuel Brooks when he 
erected the mill. The dwelling house located on the north side of the 
highway nearly opposite to the mill was erected in the first part of the 
last century. Its builder is unknown. But about 1810-1812, the house 
was occupied by a certain "Doctor" Howe. Of whom tradition says that 
upon one occasion he took in, and entertained, a peddler as his guest for 
the night; and that the peddler, after entering the house, was never seen 
again alive, or for that matter, dead either. 

After the "doctor" removed from the house — going perhaps in search 
of the peddler— it was occupied for several years by Solomon Sanders, 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 163 

father of the late John Sanders. Sanders' name may still be seen inscribed 
many times on the mantle of the old fireplace in the sitting room. 

In 1843 Leonidas Pierce, then of Hollis, purchased the house of Ben- 
jamin M. Farley, Esq., and the same year took up his residence therein. 
Mr. Pierce continued to own and to occupy the house until his death. 
Of his children who were all born in this house, one son, Deacon Perley 
L. Pierce, at the present time owns and operates the sawmill standing on 
the site of the old Wyman sawmill in South Brookline. Another son, 
George W. Pierce, is a resident of Pepperell, Mass., where he is a wholesale 
dealer in grain. The house at the present time is unoccupied. 

On the east side of the highway, a half mile, more or less, west of the 
Leonidas Pierce house, is still standing a dwelling house, at the present 
time unoccupied, which for many years was owned and occupied as his 
home by Henry T. Pierce, a brother of Leonidas. His son, Albert T. 
Pierce, at the present time is residing in the village. Tradition says that 
this house stands on the site of the dwelling house of one of the Connecks 
before and during the Revolution. 

The George Betterley Fulling Mill. 

About 1825-30, George Betterley, who came from Woodstock, Vt., 
to Brookline in 1815, erected a fulling mill on Campbell brook in the 
westerly part of the town. The mill's situation on the brook was a few rods 
southwest of the point at which at the present time the stream is spanned 
by the bridge in the "poor farm road." 

At the time of the mill's construction, wool growing as an industry 
was quite generally followed in town. Nearly every farmer owned at 
least a small flock of sheep; and in nearly every farmhouse the noise of 
hand looms engaged in weaving the "Home made" woolen cloth which then 
constituted the principal wearing apparel of the inhabitants was a fa- 
miliar and almost constant sound. The fulling mill was used for "dress- 
ing" the cloth before it was manufactured into garments. 

The mill continued to be operated for many years or until the gen- 
eral introduction into use of the power loom, and the consequent diminu- 
tion in the cost of manufacturing woolen cloth, rendered the use of the 
hand loom no longer profitable. 

About the middle of the forties the mill ceased to be operated. Sev- 
eral years after it was shut down, the mill was torn down. Some of its 
timbers were used in constructing the cottage house directly west of and 
but a short distance from its site, which was owned and for many years 



164 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

occupied as her home by the late Miss Isabella Lancey. The cottage 
house, formerly of Ferdinand Lancey, located on the east side of the 
poor farm road a few rods north of the mill's site, was also constructed 
in part, at least, of its timbers; and it is an interesting fact to know that 
the site of this latter house is identical with that upon which stood the 
dwelling house first occupied by George Betterley after his advent in this 
town. 

The Scabbard Mill. 

About the year 1830, Lawrence Bailey, a half brother of Ensign 
Bailey, began the business of manufacturing wooden bandboxes in this 
town. For that purpose he erected on the stream then known as Ben- 
nett's brook, but since then for obvious reasons known as the Scabbard 
Mill brook, a mill for sawing out the scabbards, or thin strips of wood, 
of which the boxes were constructed. The mill was located about two 
and one-half miles north of the village on the north side of the brook, 
and immediately southwest of the point where it crosses the Greenville 
highway. Mr. Bailey had carried on the business but a few years when 
he became financially embarrassed, and was obliged to dispose of his 
property and leave town. He was succeeded in the ownership of the mill 
and of the business by Alpheus Shattuck, by whom for many succeeding 
years it was carried on. 

From the mill the scabbards were carried to the old Shattuck saw- 
mill where, in a room fitted up for the purpose they were manufactured 
into bandboxes, for which at that time Boston furnished a ready market. 
For many years the business furnished employment for many of the 
townspeople, both men and women. But, in the course of years, the 
time came when the merits of wood as a material for the construction 
of bandboxes had to yield to the superior claims of paper for that pur- 
pose; and about 1848 Mr. Shattuck retired from the business as being 
no longer profitable. The mill wheels ceased to turn and the mill itself 
was allowed to go to decay. Its ruins were in evidence as late as 1860. 
At the present time they have entirely disappeared. 

Clay Banks and Bricks. 

The manufacture of bricks in this town began as early, at least, as 
1780. The first to engage in the business was Swallow Tucker, who ob- 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 165 

tained the materials necessary for the conducting the same from clay 
banks located upon his farm in South Brookline. 

Mr. Tucker's operations, which covered but a comparatively short 
space of time, were on a small scale, and his manufactured products were 
chiefly confined to home use. Among the buildings which were con- 
structed with bricks of his manufacture were a schoolhouse which in 
1783 the town erected on the east side of the highway to Pepperell, Mass., 
at a point nearly opposite the southeast corner of the south cemetery; 
and the brick dwelling house located in South Brookline on the east side 
of the highway to Townsend, Mass., a few rods south of the bridge over 
the Xissitisset river; which is said to have been built about 1795 by his 
son, Benjamin S. Tucker. 

The Tucker clay banks were located in the open field southwest of 
the site at the present time (1914) occupied by the steam sawmill of 
Orville D. Fessenden, from which they were distant some twenty -five or 
thirty rods; where at the present time the site of the kilns is indicated 
by a small mound of sand. 

The second party to engage in the manufacture of bricks here was 
Capt. Benjamin Brooks, who commenced the business about 1790. Like 
his predecessor in the business, Swallow Tucker, he obtained his mate- 
rials from clay banks located upon his own farm in South Brookline. 
His kilns were located on the west side of the highway to Townsend, 
Mass., and west of his dwelling house (afterwards known as the Luther 
Rockwood place), from which they were distant one hundred rods, more 
or less. 

Captain Brooks continued to own and operate the plant until 1812 
In that year he associated with himself his son-in-law, Luther Rockwood 
as a limited partner in the business; and from that time until his death 
in 1829, the plant was operated by himself and Mr. Rockwood. 

Upon the death of Captain Brooks, Luther Rockwood succeeded to 
the ownership of the plant; which he continued to operate for many 
succeeding years. During this period the plant's field of operations was 
largely extended, and its business correspondingly increased. Consider- 
able quantities of bricks were sold in the adjacent towns, and in the cities 
of Nashua and Lowell, Mass., where they were delivered by means of 
ox teams, which more frequently than otherwise were driven by Mr. 
Rockwood himself. This state of affairs continued until the middle part 
of the fifties; when advanced age and the competition in the business, 
resulting from the increased facilities for transportation afforded by the 
newly constructed railroads, compelled Mr. Rockwood to abandon the 



166 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

business. The last stack of bricks to be manufactured by the plant was 
burned about 1855. Since when both the Brooks and the Tucker clay 
beds have remained dormant. 

The Coopering Business. 

Among the early industries of New England, coopering was one of 
the most important. At first the business was confined to the manufac- 
ture of barrels for home use. But after the close of the Revolution, as the 
country increased in population and wealth, the increase in the amount 
of importation of such luxuries as "West India goods" and molasses cre- 
ated a demand for additional barrels, and the business of manufacturing 
them was correspondingly benefited. 

Brookline's people were not slow in responding to the demands of 
the new conditions of affairs. They immediately began to manufacture 
barrels for export and sale. The barrels were all made from hard wood, 
chiefly oak. For the manufacture of which the materials used were got- 
ten out by hand labor. Hard wood hand-made barrels were the only 
kind to be manufactured here until the last of the thirties. During this 
period, a large percentage of the citizens were coopers by trade. But, in 
addition to this class, there was scarcely a farmer who did not at favor- 
able seasons of the year, especially in the winter time, engage in the busi- 
ness of making barrels; and thus from its profits increase the meager 
income from his farm. For the greater part each cooper worked by and 
carried on his business for himself. 

Whenever a cooper had accumulated a stock of barrels sufficient to 
warrant the undertaking, he loaded them onto wagons and sent them by 
ox teams into Boston. Sometimes two or more coopers or farmers would 
unite their stocks in trade and send them in together. In Boston the bar- 
rels were sold for cash or, more frequently, exchanged for such commodi- 
ties as salt fish, rum and molasses; and, occasionally, for wearing apparel; 
laden with which the teams returned home. The round trip usually 
occupied about a week's time. 

About 1846 the introduction into the sawmills of machinery for man- 
ufacturing barrel staves and heads effected an immediate and radical 
change in the coopering business. Up to that time the business had been 
confined to the manufacture of hard wood barrels only. But barrels of 
that description were expensive to make and clumsy to handle. And, 
besides, their use was principally confined to the holding of liquids, for 
which purpose they were especially adapted. In the meantime there had 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 167 

been developing a demand for a less expensive and lighter class of casks 
adapted to the storing and easy transportation of dry commodities. The 
change in the nature of mill machinery made it possible to meet this 
demand by substituting in place of the hard woods hitherto used in the 
manufacture of barrels such soft woods as pine and chestnut. In fact, it 
instituted a new epoch in the coopering business. 

With the change in the nature of the barrels or casks, came also a 
change in the methods of making and putting them onto the market. 
The business was no longer confined to single individuals, each working 
for himself, but passing into the hands of men of capital and enterprise, 
became wholesale in its nature. For the following forty years it consti- 
tuted the town's chief industry. 

Levi Rockwood was among the first to engage in the wholesale coop- 
ering business here. He carried on the business in connection with his 
sawmill at South Brookline, and continued to do a successful business 
until his death in the latter part of the fifties. In the village the business 
was carried on by James Parker, Jr., and by James N. Tucker. 

In 1846-1847, Joseph C. Tucker and Henry B. Stiles formed a co- 
partnership under the firm name of Tucker and Stiles, for the purpose of 
engaging in the sale of West India goods and groceries. The firm's place 
of business was located in a room in the east end and on the ground floor 
of the ell of the Nissitisset hotel. Soon after its organization, the firm, in 
addition to its regular business, took on that of manufacturing and selling 
barrels at wholesale. Its operations in both lines of business were suc- 
cessful from the first. 

In 1850 the company's business had increased to the extent that it 
was forced to seek for larger and more commodious quarters; and it 
moved into the "red store" building located on the east side of Main street 
adjacent to the village brook, its site being the same as that now occupied 
by the store building of Everett S. Tarbell. The company occupied the 
"red store" until 1857. During this period it carried on a highly suc- 
cessful and prosperous business, especially in the line of wholesale coop- 
ering ; in which branch it had the reputation of doing the largest and most 
lucrative business of any firm in southern New Hampshire. 

During this period, also, in addition to fish and dry casks, the firm 
engaged in the manufacture of syrup casks and barrels; and for many 
years furnished the East Boston Sugar Company with the entire supply 
of syrup casks used in its business. 

In the first part of the fifties, Thomas Melendy, Jr., entered the firm 
as a partner in that part of its business which had to do with the buying 



168 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



and selling of lumber. Mr. Melendy was connected with the firm for 
several years, but finally withdrew from his membership and removed to 
Milford. Subsequently he removed from Milford to Nashua where, after 
engaging for several years in the wholesale lumber business, he died. 

In 1857 business had increased to such a magnitude that the neces- 
sity for larger quarters in which to transact it was, for the second time, 
apparent; and in the fall of that year the firm removed the "red store" 
from its foundations and built a new store upon its site. The new store 
was dedicated on the evening of Thursday, Dec. 17, 1857, by a grand 
ball, which was given by Messrs. Tucker and Stiles in the hall in the second 
story of the building. The ball was an elegant affair. It was attended by 
more than one hundred couples. The music was furnished by Hall's cele- 
brated band of Boston. The following is a copy of the card of invitation: 

GRAND DEDICATION BALL 

AT 

TUCKER & STILES' HALL, 
BROOKLINE, N. H., 

ON THURSDAY EVE'G, DEC. 17, 57 



Committee of Arrangements. 



Alpheus Shattuck, 

J. C. Tucker, 

W. W. Corey, 

Benjamin Shattuck, 

Geo. W. L. Hobart, 

Chas. Gilson, 

John B. Hall, 

James C. Parker, 
P. H. Clark, New Ipswich. 
L. Chamberlin, Mason Vil. 
Chas. McGowan, Milford. 
John H. Poole, Hollis. 
N. W. Cowdrey, Pepperell. 
L. W. Cummings, Towns. Har. 

Albert Howe, 



Benjamin Gould, 
Alonzo Bailey, 
Wm. Wallace, 
John A. Wright, 
W. B. Rockwood, 
Frank Rockwood, 
Wm. Wright, 
Eli Brooks. 

R. Peabody, Mason Cen. 
Albert Powers, Milford. 
John H. Cutter, Hollis. 
Henry Blake, Pepperell. 
U. S. Clark, Groton. 
W. E. Shattuck, T. Cen. 
Townsend West Village. 



Floor Managers. 



Albert Shattuck. 
Chas. Willoughby. 



Luke Baldwin. 
J. C. Tucker. 



MUSIC BY HALLS CELEBRATED BAND, BOSTON. 

Tickets, (including Turkey Supper, ) Three Dollars. 
Dancing to commence at 6 o'clock. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 169 

It may be said here that at the time of the building the new store, 
the old "red store" was taken from the foundations and removed to the 
west side of the street leading from the store to the north highway to 
Milford; where it was used to form the ell of the Jeremiah Baldwin dwell- 
ing house, which was built that year. 

In 1860, while at the height of its prosperity, the firm of Tucker and 
Stiles was induced to invest largely in the kerosene oil business, which 
was then beginning to be recognized as a promising field for the invest- 
ment of capital. The investment proved to be a disastrous one. The 
company in which it was made failed and, by its failure, the firm of Tucker 
and Stiles was financially ruined. It never recovered from the blow, and 
shortly afterwards the partnership was dissolved by mutual consent of 
its members. 

In the early fifties William Gilson engaged in the wholesale coopering 
business here. He carried it on in connection with his transactions in 
wood lands and in lumber, in each of which he was a heavy dealer. Mr. 
Gilson removed from this town to Milford in 1866. At the time of his 
removal, his coopering business was second in importance only to that of 
Tucker and Stiles. In Milford he established himself in the same business, 
which he carried on until his death. He died at Milford, July 19, 1887, 
aged 84 years. 

Soon after the dissolution of the firm of Tucker and Stiles, James 
Clinton Parker and J. Alonzo Hall, each acting independently of the 
other, engaged in the wholesale coopering business. 

Mr. Parker carried on the business until 1876. In that year he sold 
his plant to the Proctor Brothers of Hollis, by whom it was removed to 
the latter place. The same year of his sale to the Proctors, Mr. Parker 
removed to Nashua where, for the six years following, he was in charge 
of the City Farm, as superintendent. He was afterwards superintendent 
for four years of the Wilmington, Mass., town farm, and for fifteen years 
superintendent of the Billerica, Mass., town farm. He died at Lowell, 
Mass., Jan. 1, 1909. He is buried in the family lot in the south cemetery 
in this town. 

Joseph A. Hall was the last to engage on a large scale in the whole- 
sale coopering business in this town. But, if last, he was by no means least 
in the amount and importance of business transacted. Starting in with 
a small financial capital and little or no experience in the business, but 
with a large stock of energy and "push," he so managed that in a very 
few years from the beginning he was the owner and operator of a whole- 
sale coopering plant which in the amount of its products and in the extent 



170 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

of its dealings was fully equal, if not superior, to that of any of his prede- 
cessors in the business here. 

Mr. Hall's prosperity increased that of the town. Business in other 
lines boomed. The fortuitous conditions which prevailed here in the days 
when the business of the firm of Tucker and Stiles was at its best seemed 
to have returned and the prospects for the future were of the most en- 
couraging nature. 

This state of affairs continued for some eight or ten years; but, in the 
meantime, the profitable nature of the coopering business had attracted 
the attention of the general public; and, as a result, the number of those 
engaged in the business in New England had grown to large proportions. 
The competition arising from this state of affairs had the effect of in- 
creasing the price of labor employed and the cost of the materials used in 
conducting the business; and, consequently, of diminishing the profits. 
In Mr. Hall's case these profits were still further diminished by the fact 
that in order to reach the markets, his prodcuts had to be transported to 
the railway stations in Pepperell, Mass., or Townsend, Mass., by means 
of horse teams which were maintained at great expense. Notwithstand- 
ing these drawbacks, Mr. Hall continued for several years to do a large 
and prosperous business. 

Early in the seventies, however, the centre of activity in the cooper- 
ing business was suddenly shifted from Massachusett ands southern New 
Hampshire into Maine, where, by reason of an abundant supply of cheap 
materials, lower prices of labor, and the reduced cost of freightage ob- 
tained by transporting their wares to Boston by water rather than by 
rail the manufacturers were enabled to put them on the market at much lower 
prices than had hitherto prevailed. The result obtaining from this change 
in conditions were disastrous to the barrel manufacturers in New Hamp- 
shire and Massachusetts, especially to the smaller and weaker firms, of 
whom many immediately closed out business. 

Mr. Hall at this time was somewhat heavily involved in debt, the 
debt having been contracted in the course of his business, not only as a 
barrel manufacturer, but also as an extensive dealer in lumber. The 
change in the condition of affairs embarrassed, but did not dismay him. 
He continued to do business, but on a reduced scale. In the meantime, he 
devoted his leisure time to straightening out his financial affairs, an un- 
dertaking in which in the end he was wholly successful, paying his in- 
debtedness to the last dollar. 

Mr. Hall continued for the remainder of his life to carry on the 
coopering and the lumbering business. In the lumbering business he was 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 171 

very successful; accumulating a very considerable fortune. But in spite 
of his efforts he was never able to restore the coopering business to even 
a resemblance of its former prosperous conditions. He died at Brook- 
line, Aug. 3, 1897. With his death the wholesale coopering business in 
this town became practically a matter of history. At the present time 
the business is being carried on to a limited extent by Orville D. Fes- 
senden at South Brookline. 

Charcoal Burning. 

Prior to 1840 the manufacture and sale of charcoal, as compared with 
other industries already established here, was of very little importance 
because of the difficulties in the way of transporting it to market, the 
only available means for transportation being ox teams. 

Nevertheless, prior to that date, there were a few citizens who en- 
gaged in the business on a small scale ; among whom were Otis and James 
Horton, Amariah Ames, and Daniel Shedd, all of whom found the principal 
market for their product in Lowell, Mass. 

The completion and opening to public traffic of the Worcester and 
Nashua railroad in 1847, because of the additional facilities which it af- 
forded for freightage was the cause of an increase in the number of those 
who were engaged in the manufacture of charcoal here and, consequently, 
of a corresponding increase in the amount produced. Among those who 
at this time engaged in and for several subsequent years carried on the 
business somewhat extensively were Deacon Thomas Bennett, Alpheus 
Melendy, Jr., and James Parker, Jr. About this time, also, James H. 
Hall began the business which, as a wholesale manufacturer and dealer in 
charcoal, he carried on until his death, a period of thirty odd years; dur- 
ing which by his careful management and untiring industry he became 
the largest operator in that line in Hillsborough County. 

In addition to his coalpits, which were in constant operation all over 
the township, Mr. Hall also built and operated five brick coal kilns. Three 
of these brick kilns, of which the vestiges are still visible, were located 
just west of the present railroad crossing in North Brookline, on the 
south side of the highway to Greenville. Another was located on the 
north side of the highway to Townsend, Mass., via the old Mathew Wal- 
lace place; from which it was distant a few rods in a northwesterly direc- 
tion. And still another stood near the John Hempell place, in the west 
part of the town. 



172 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

At the time of Mr. Hall's death in 1773, in addition to his other 
extensive dealings in this line, he was, and for many years had been, 
furnishing, under a special contract, four of Boston's largest hotels with 
their annual supply of charcoal. 

In the early sixties, Lot Colburn and Ebenezer J. Rideout, each 
acting independently of the other, began to manufacture and to deal in 
charcoal; finding a ready market for the same in Nashua, to which city 
they hauled it by horse teams; and where for many subsequent years 
their heavily laden coal wagons were familiar and welcome sights to its 
citizens. Mr. Rideout continued in the business for some fifteen or more 
years, when ill health compelled him to abandon it. Mr. Colburn carried 
on the business until his death in the last of the eighties. With Mr. Col- 
burn's death, charcoal burning, as one of the town's industries, became 
relatively of little importance; and so remains at the present time. 

The Granite Business. 

Although the town abounds in ledges of granite of most excellent 
quality, prior to the opening of the Brookline and Pepperell railroad in 
1892, but few of them had been worked; and for obvious reasons the use 
of the quarried materials had been restricted to home enterprises. 

The Corey ledge, so called, was one of the first to be opened up. It 
was worked for the first time about 1804 by Capt. Nathan Corey, who 
obtained from it the underpinning for his dwelling house on the east side 
of Main street in the village, which he was then engaged in building. 

During the past one hundred years this quarry which has always 
remained in the possession of Captain Corey's descendants has been 
operated under lease by many different individuals and firms ; and in that 
time has produced many thousands of tons of granite of the highest grade 
of quality. At the present time this ledge is owned by Walter E. Corey, 
a great grandson of Capt. Nathan Corey. The ledge is located on the west 
side of Corey Hill, some one hundred rods almost directly east of the old 
Capt. Nathan Corey dwelling house. 

As early, probably, as 1825, Samuel Gilson, Sr., began, and for many 
years subsequently continued, to carry on business here as a worker and 
dealer in granite in the rough and also in the finished state. His quarry 
was located about one mile north of the village on the east side of the 
main highway from this town to Milford. After Mr. Gilson's death, he 
was succeeded in the business by his son, Samuel Gilson, Jr., who carried 
on the business until 1892, when he sold the ledge to the firm of Badger 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 173 

Brothers, of Ouincy, Mass. At the present time (1914) the ledge is 
owned by Mrs. Samuel Swett of this town, and is lying idle. During 
the years when it was operated by the Gilsons, father and son, this ledge 
produced more rough and finished granite than was gotten out in the 
same period by all the other ledges in town combined. 

The ledge known as the Wright ledge, located about one mile north 
of the village on the west side of the east highway to Milford, was opened 
up by Col. Artemas Wright about 1840. Colonel Wright continued to 
operate the ledge until about 1860, when he abandoned it and removed 
with his family to Ayer, Mass. The ledge remained unworked from 1860 
to 1892, since when it has been operated occasionally and in rather a 
spasmodic way. 

The Ephraim L. Hardy Edge Tool Manufactory. 

Ephraim L. Hardy came from Hollis to this town in 1841. He set- 
tled in the south part of the town on the old David Hobart, Sr., place, 
which he purchased of Benjamin M. Farley on the 13th day of November 
of that year. Soon after coming here he began to manufacture hand- 
made ploughs and edge tools in the blacksmith shop on the premises. 
At that time the coopering business was beginning to exhibit signs of the 
activity which subsequently made it for many years one of the town's 
leading industries. 

Mr. Hardy, who was a skilled mechanic, immediately took advant- 
age of the situation, and made a specialty of the manufacture of edged 
tools for coopers' use. In a short time the name of Hardy when stamped 
on an edge tool of his make became synonymous with the word excellent. 
His reputation as a maker of edge tools of the highest quality increased 
with his years, and throughout his life was the cause of a steady and con- 
stant demand on the part of the public for implements of his manufacture. 
He died Nov. 28, 1870, and with his death the business ceased to exist. 

The Hobart Steam Sawmill. 

In 1846 David Hobart built the first steam sawmill to be erected in 
town. The mill was located on the west side of the street which, begin- 
ning at a point near the general store of E. E- Tarbell, connects Main 
street with the east highway to Milford. Its site at the present time is 
occupied by the dwelling house formerly of Jeremiah Baldwin, but now 
belonging to the Albert W. Corey heirs. 



174 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

In 1847, the year following its erection, Mr. Hobart sold, at different 
dates, and to different parties, his interest in the plant, as follows: March 
10, to Wilkes W. Corey, one undivided half part; March 27, to Lemuel 
Brooks, one undivided fourth part; April 27, to James N. Tucker, one 
undivided fourth part. 

After doing a successful business for several years, the mill was 
destroyed by fire in the summer of 1852. It was never rebuilt. 




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HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 175 



CHAPTER XI. 

Schools and Other Educational Matters. 

First Appropriations for Public Schools — Depreciation of Currency — 
Second Appropriation for Schools — First Public School-Teachers — 
Wages Paid School-Teachers in 1783 — Schools Kept in Dwelling 
Houses — First School Districts — First Schoolhouses and Their 
Locations — School-Teachers in 1806 — First Superintending School 
Committee — New School Districts in 1812 — New Schoolhouses in 
1812 and Their Locations — Descriptions of the New Houses — 
First Printed School Report — Redistricting of the Schools in 1848- 
49 — New Schoolhouses and Locations of Same in 1850 — Schools 
Included in One District in 1884 — New Schoolhouses and Loca- 
tions of Same in 1886 — Superintending School Committees from 
1815 to 1914 Inclusive— Partial List of Names of Teachers from 
1850 to 1912— Biographical Sketches of Ellen C. Sawtelle, Juliette 
H. Gilson, Louise O. Shattuck, and Frances D. Parker — College 
Graduates and Biographical Sketches of Same — Biographical 
Sketches of College Graduates Born in Brookline, but Graduating 
from Other Towns. 

The first recorded action of the town relative to appropriating money 
for school purposes occurred at the annual March town meeting in 1781, 
when a vote "To raise three hundred pounds for schooling" was passed. 
There is no record that this vote was subsequently carried into effect. 
And if it had been, the sum realized compared with that indicated by the 
vote would have been insignificant. For at that time the continental 
paper money had depreciated in value to the extent that one hundred 
pounds in the latter currency was equal in value to one pound only in 
silver. 

The actual value of the Continental paper money, as compared with 
that of silver, is shown by a scale of values which was that year prepared 
and adopted by the Great and General Court of New Hampshire, as 
follows : 



176 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

"Authorized Scale of Depreciation of Continental Paper Money. 

June, 1777, £100 in silver equal to £120 in Continental Paper Money. 
" 177(>, £100 " " £425 

" 1779, £100 " " £1342 

" 1780, £100 " " £5700 

" 1781, £100 " " £12000 

By that scale it is evident that the three hundred pounds authorized 
by the vote, if raised in silver, would have been equivalent to thirty-six 
thousand dollars in continental currency; a tidy little sum of money, the 
raising of one-sixth part of which, at that time, would have rendered the 
town insolvent. It is probable that the vote was passed on the assump- 
tion on the part of the voters that its absurdity would have the effect 
of destroying its validity. 

No further action relative to schools was taken by the town until 
the March town meeting of 1783, when the following vote was passed; 
"To raise four pounds for schooling the present year; said schools to be 
kept by Isaac Shattuck and James Campbell at James Campbell's house 
at the pond and each party to draw their own money." 

There is no reason for doubting but that these schools were kept at 
the house designated in the vote and by the designated parties ; and thus 
it happened that Isaac Shattuck and James Campbell became the town's 
first public school-teachers of record. And as at the time the vote was 
passed Campbell was living in the dwelling house — or a house then stand- 
ing on its site — at the present time located on the west side of the Mason 
highway opposite the old meeting-house, and owned and occupied as his 
home by Lieut. William L. Dodge, there can be but little doubt but 
that in that house was kept Brookline's first public school. 

The schools at this time, and for many subsequent years were kept 
in private dwelling houses. The second school-teacher of record was 
Caleb Trowbridge, supposed to be a son of Rev. Caleb Trowbridge, of 
Groton, Mass., who, in 1783, officiated in that capacity, and received for 
his services one pound and four pence. 

In the same year James Campbell received — "One pound and seven 
shillings and one half bushel of rye for keeping school in the Lieut. Shed 
house"; probably Jonas Shed's house in the northwest part of the town. 
In that same year, also, Caleb Trowbridge for teaching school five weeks 
received one pound and ten shillings, or about one dollar per week, and 
he provided his. own board and lodging at that. In these modern days 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 177 

of high prices, one wonders where he lodged and of what his fare con- 
sisted. But Caleb evidently was not discouraged nor cast down; for 
after retiring from the business for several years during which he was, 
perhaps, engaged in spending his five dollar wage in riotous living, he 
again appears on the scene in his old role of schoolmaster; as did also, 
for the first time, Eleazer Gilson; each receiving pay at the rate of one 
pound and eight shillings for the term, or forty-two cents per week. This 
last experience as a teacher probably finished Trowbridge, for, thereafter, 
his name does not appear again in the list of teachers mentioned in the 
records of the town. 

The first action taken by the town relative to the building of school- 
houses occurred Nov. 6, 1786, when there was an article in the warrant — 
"To see if the town will build a house for the benefit of the schools." 
The article was passed over. 

Up to this time all matters appertaining to public schools had been 
conducted in an irregular and unsystematic manner. Some years the 
town failed to make any appropriation for them and, in the years when 
appropriations were made, it frequently happened that the appropriation 
was used for other purposes. There were no prudential or superintending 
school committees, their functions being performed by the selectmen; who 
hired and paid the teachers, and regulated the terms at which and the 
places in which the schools should be kept; and as there were no school 
districts established, they apparently located them for any time of the 
year and at any part of the town which best suited their fancies or whims. 

First School Districts. 

At a town meeting in March, 1787, the selectmen were empowered — 
"To divide the town into squadrons"; and it was voted — "That such 
squadrons have the benefit of their own money for schooling but in case 
any squadron neglects to school out their money within the year that 
those squadrons which have schooled out their own money shall have the 
benefit of the same." 

The word squadron as used in the foregoing vote was equivalent to 
the word district as it is used in connection with the public schools at the 
present time. The above vote was not carried into effect. But, the 
following year, the town again voted to divide its territory into school 
districts, and also designated the number of districts to be formed as 
five, and selected a committee to make the division as follows: Benjamin 



178 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

Farley, Lieut. Isaac Shattuek, Lieut. Ephraim Sawtelle, Lieut. James 
Mcintosh, and Ezekiel Proctor. 

April 11 of the same year this committee reported as follows — "To 
have the town stand as it is classed now that is four classes." At the 
same meeting it was voted — "To build a house for each class and to do it 
as a town; and to raise one hundred and ten pounds to build said houses; 
and to build them twenty feet long and eighteen feet wide, and to have 
said houses completed by January next." 

The First Schoolhouses. 

The foregoing vote was carried into effect and before the end of the 
year in which it was passed, the four schoolhouses for which it called 
were either completed or well under way; and in the following year, 
1788, all of them were completed and occupied. 

At this late day it is almost impossible to locate the sites of these 
houses. But tradition says that the house erected in the northwest class, 
or district, was located on the west side of the highway to Greenville 
(then Mason) near the dwelling house then of Moses Shattuek, but after- 
wards of the late Henry K. Kemp. The house in the northeast class was 
located on the west side of the highway to Milford near Lakin's pond; 
that in the center class was located a few rods north of the old meeting- 
house on the east side of the highway to Mason ; and that of the southeast 
class on the east side of the highway to Pepperell, Mass., and opposite 
to the southeast corner of the South cemetery. 

Of these first schoolhouses, that in the centre class located near the 
old meeting-house is mentioned by the Rev. T. P. Sawin in his "Chroni- 
cles," read at the town's centennial in 1869. There is also a reference to 
it in an ancient "order book" of the town as follows: "Ezekiel Proctor — 
one pound two shillings six pence and three farthings, it being his rate 
towards Building the schoolhouse by the meeting-house"; and again in 
1796 it is mentioned in the order book, in connection with an order on 
Asher Spaulding, as the "Central schoolhouse near the meeting-house." 

In the southeast class schoolhouse in 1798, the year after he was or- 
dained, the Rev. Lemuel Wadsworth taught for seven weeks at a wage 
of four dollars per week. In the same year Louis Jewett taught in this 
class, Samuel Brown in the northeast class, Polly McDonald in the central 
class and John Daniels in the northwest class. 

The town maintained this system of four school classes for a period 
of sixteen years, or until 1808. During this period the records furnish but 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 179 

little information concerning the schools. But on the said order book 
there is a record to the effect that in the winter of 1801, Benjamin Mark 
Farley taught school in the southeast class, receiving as pay for his services 
thirteen dollars and thirty-two cents for the term. 

In 1806 the school-teachers were Lucy Wadsworth, Joseph F. Ben- 
nett and Polly Daniels. Polly taught the summer term in the northwest 
class at a wage of nine dollars and twenty-six cents for the term. 

In the year 1807 the sum of one hundred and thirty dollars was 
raised for the support of the schools. 

In 1806 the word district as a substitute for class appears on the 
records for the first time when, at a town meeting holden on the twenty- 
ninth day of August, it was voted to accept the report of a committee in 
favor of a new division of the town into school districts. The report was 
in favor of three instead of four districts. No action was taken on the 
vote, and the old system of four districts prevailed until 1810. 

First Superintending School Committee. 

In 1808 the town elected its first superintending school committee 
as follows : 

James Parker, Sr., Capt. Eli Sawtelle, Deacon Joseph Emerson, Lieut. 
Benjamin Shattuck, George Daniels, James Mcintosh, and Capt. Robert 
Seaver. It was styled — "A committee to regulate the school classes." 

The following year, 1809, John Daniels, Lieut. George Daniels and 
Rev. Lemuel Wadsworth were elected "Inspectors of Schools." Among 
the names of the school-teachers for that year appear the names of Amos 
Ames and Sally Daniels. 

In 1810 the question of redistricting the town again came up for con- 
sideration and, at a town meeting holden on the 5th day of August, the 
town voted to divide its territory into three school districts. 

No immediate action relative to carrying this vote into effect appears 
to have been taken. But in reading between the lines of the records it 
becomes apparent that between the years 1812 and 1815 the said division 
into three districts was made, and that the old schoolhouses were aban- 
doned and new ones erected. 

The three new districts were known, respectively, as the north, north- 
west, and southeast districts. The three new schoolhouses were located 
as follows: that in the north district was located about two miles north 
of the village Main street on the west side of the Milford highway and 
a few rods north of the north cemetery; that in the northwest district 



180 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

was located about one mile north of the village Main street on the west 
side of the highway to Mason in the V formed by the junction of the 
latter highwa) with the highway leading out of it to the Mathew Wallace 
place. Of these two schoolhouses, that in the northwest, or Pond district, 
was destroyed by fire many years ago. But the house in the north dis- 
trict is in existence at the present time. A few years after its abandon- 
ment by the town, it was removed to a site near the dwelling house on 
said Milford highway, formerly of Calvin Shedd, but at the present time 
of Ichabod Lund, where for many years it was used as a cooper's shop, 
and where at the present time (1914) it is still standing. 

The third in number of these three schoolhouses, or that one erected 
in the southeast district, was located at what is now the south end of the 
village Main street, and on the west side of the highway to Pepperell, 
Mass. It was built in 1812 by Capt. Nathan Corey with bricks burned in 
the Luther Rockwood kiln in South Brookline. Its cost was two hundred 
and fifty-two dollars. This house is still standing. At the present time 
it is owned and occupied as her home by widow Ira Daniels. 

As to their outside dimensions, these houses were identical. Inside, 
they were patterned after the style then prevailing in schoolhouse inte- 
riors. The central ground space, for a breadth of from eight to ten feet 
and extending in length from end to end of the room, was covered with 
rough plank flooring which, on either side, rose on inclined planes to the 
side walls of the house. Upon these inclined planes were located the 
desks and seats of the pupils. Both desks and seats were of primitive 
shapes, rudely constructed, and as uncomfortable as it was possible for 
human ingenuity to conceive and construct them. The girls sat together 
on one side of the house and the boys on the other. At the back part of 
the room, opposite the entrance door to the house, was a large chimney 
with a fireplace of dimensions sufficient to take in cord wood sticks; on 
one side of which, generally on the side next to the girls, the teacher's 
desk was placed. 

Pupils attended school to a much more advanced period in their lives 
than at the present time. Especially was this the case in the winter time, 
when a large percentage of the scholars was made up of young men and 
women of from 21 to 25 and even older years of age. 

In the winter terms of school, males were generally employed as 
teachers, and their success in the business depended more upon their 
physical than their mental qualifications. 

The big boys generally devoted the first few days to "trying out" the 
master; and woe to him if he failed to exhibit the tact, nerve and strength 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 181 

necessary to govern and control them; for, in that case, his reign was 
generally brief, and its ending an ignominious one. 

In some districts it was no unusual event for the school to experience 
a change of teachers several times in the same term ere one could be pro- 
cured whose staying powers were sufficiently developed to enable him to 
hold out to the end. 

The textbooks in use at this time, as they continued to be until well 
into the forties, were Emerson's Mental, Colburn's Mental and Adams' 
Practical Arithmetics, and Olney's Geographies. 

From 1815 to 1836 the annual appropriations for schools averaged 
from $150 to $200. 

In 1827 Dr. David Harris' name appears upon the records for the 
first time as a member of the school committee, a position which he con- 
tinued to hold for several years in succession thereafter. In 1828 the 
Rev. Jacob Holt served on the committee. In 1836 the committee con- 
sisted of Dr. Harris and Rev. Henry E. Eastman. 

School Report Printed in Pamphlet Form for the First Time. 

In 1832 the superintending school committee, as the school board 
was then termed, consisting of Dr. David Harris, John Sawtelle and Capt. 
John Smith, submitted to the town the first formal and detailed report 
of the condition of its public schools. 

By the report it appeared that the number of pupils attending the 
schools during that year was 148, divided among the three districts as 
follows: District number one, 44; district number two, 44; district num- 
ber three, 60. Among the textbooks reported as being in use at that 
time were The National Reader, Scott's lessons, Analytical Reader, Easy 
Lessons, and Kelley's Spelling Book. 

In 1842 the school report shows the number of pupils in the public 
schools to have been 180; and gives a list of the textbooks then in use 
as follows: "Rhetorical Reader, Monitorial Reader, National Reader, 
Young's Reader, New Testament, Emerson's First and Second Spelling 
Books, Smith's, Olney's and Peter Parley's Geographies, Adam's and 
Colburn's Arithmetic's and Smith's Grammar." 

Redistricting of the Schools. 1848-49. 

Almost every year from 1836 to 1849 the warrants for the annual 
town meetings contained articles calling for a re-division of the town into 



182 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

school districts. These articles were generally voted down or passed over; 
but, finally, at the March meeting in 1849, Nathaniel Shattuck, I. Bard 
Sawtelle, Artemus Wright, Abel Foster and Eldad Sawtelle were elected 
as a committee — "To redistrict their territory into school districts and 
define their bounds." March 30th of the same year this committee re- 
ported in favor of dividing the town into seven school districts. The 
report was accepted and, although at a subsequent meeting an attempt 
to reconsider it was made, stood. 

The report defined the boundary lines of each of the contemplated 
new districts and, soon after its acceptance by the town, the inhabitants 
in each district met, organized and commenced the building of new school- 
houses. Before the close of the following year, 1850, the houses were all 
completed and in use. 

The Locations of the Schoolhouses Built in 1850. 

The schoolhouse in district number one, known as the "Paddledock 
district," was located on the east side of the road leading out of the south 
side of the highway to Townsend, Mass., at a point just south of the 
bridge over the Wallace brook in South Brookline and passing in an east- 
erly direction to the Oak Hill road, so called, with which it united near 
the bridge over the river known as Bohanon's. It was located about one 
hundred rods west of the latter bridge. The house in district number 
two, in the southwest part of the town, was located on the east side of 
the north highway to Townsend and a few rods west, of the old Mathew 
Wallace place; that in district number three, known as the Pond dis- 
trict, was located about two and one-half miles north of the village Main 
street on the east side of the highway to Mason, and nearly opposite a 
lane which leads out of said Mason highway on its westerly side and 
terminates at the dwelling houses formerly of John S. Daniels and Davis 
Green. The house in district number four, the village district, was lo- 
cated on the east side of the highway to Milford a few rods north of the 
Congregational church; that in district number five was located on the 
west side of the east highway to Milford about one mile north of the vil- 
lage Main street, and a short distance north of the old James McDaniels 
place (more recently the Artemas Wright place). The house in district 
number six, known as the Alpheus Shattuck district, was located about 
three miles north of the village Main street, on the east side of the high- 
way to Greenville, near the point where the highway to the old Nathaniel 
Hutchingson place leads out of the same. The schoolhouse in district 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 183 

number seven, which comprised the northeast part of the town, was lo- 
cated about three miles north of the village on the west side of the high- 
way to Milford, and near the dwelling house and sawmill of the late 
Beri Bennett. 

Of these seven schoolhouses there are remaining at the present time 
(1914) only two; i. e., that in the Pond district, which has been trans- 
formed into a dwelling house; and the schoolhouse in the village, which 
at the present time is in use for the Grammar schools. The bell which 
hangs in the tower of this house was a gift from the late Ensign Bailey 
to the district in the fifties, soon after the house was built. 

At the date of the building of the seven schoolhouses the number of 
the town's school children was two hundred and fifty (250), divided 
among the districts as follows: number one, 49; number two, 16; num- 
ber three, 33; number four, 61; number five, 34 ; number six, 30; number 
seven, 27. 

The division of the town into seven school districts continued for a 
period of thirty-five years or until 1884. In the meantime, however, 
several attempts to abolish the system were made. 

The first of these attempts occurred in 1880, when there was an 
article in the warrant for the annual March meeting — "To see if the town 
will divide into five districts"; and a committee of seven, one from each 
school district, was appointed to consider the matter. 

At a subsequent meeting, in the same year, this committee, which 
consisted of Jedidiah L- Wilbur, dist. 1, Eli S. Cleveland, dist. 2, Joseph 
Sawtelle, dist. 4, Franklin Gilman, dist. 5, William H. Hall, dist. 6, and 
Ichabod Lund, dist. 7, reported in favor of the division into five districts. 
The report was accepted, and the selectmen and superintending school 
committee were instructed to make the division. But at a subsequent 
meeting in April of the same year this vote was rescinded. 

For the following three years the question was allowed to rest with- 
out any action on part of the town. But in the meantime, to those of its 
citizens who had its educational interests at heart, it was becoming more 
and more apparent that its antiquated school system as well as its old- 
fashioned schoolhouses had passed their days of usefulness; and that a 
change, both in methods of teaching and in the style of the schoolhouses, 
was absolutely necessary to the future welfare of its public schools. 

These advocates of a change in the public school system kept the 
matter in constant agitation. Among them no one worked more strenu- 
ously or more ably for the cause than did the Rev. Frank D. Sargent, 



184 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

superintendent of the schools for the years 1882 and 1884; as is shown 
by his reports for those years. 

Gradually the public developed a preponderating sentiment in favor 
of the change and when, at the March town meeting, in 1884, there ap- 
peared an article looking to the abolishment of the system of seven school 
districts, and the establishment in place thereof of a new system in which 
the entire township should be included in one district, the article was 
passed almost unanimously. 

The Public Schools under the One District System. 

New Schoolhouses. 

At the same meeting at which the town voted to include all its schools 
in one school district, i. e., April 8, 1884, a vote to build three new school- 
houses was also passed; and Joseph A. Hall, David H. Kendall and the 
board of education, which that year consisted of Rev. Frank D. Sargent, 
were elected as a committee to superintend the building of the same. 
At the same time the selectmen were instructed to appraise the school 
property owned by the town. This appraisal was made the same year; 
and its valuation, as reported by the board of selectmen, was found to 
be eleven hundred and twenty -three and tVo dollars ($1123.50). 

Notwithstanding the foregoing action by the town relative to the 
building of new schoolhouses, some, at least, of the old houses continued 
to be used for school purposes for several years after it was taken; the 
house in district number two remaining in the service until 1886. In 
the meantime, however, the schoolhouses in districts numbers three and 
six became so dilapidated as to be unfit for further occupancy and they 
were abandoned. 

Finally, however, in 1886, the building committee reported the three 
schoolhouses as completed and ready for use, and they were that year 
turned over to the school authorities. Of these three houses, however, 
only one was newly built, the other two having been supplied by repairing 
and remodeling two of those in use under the old system. The new house 
of the three was located on "The Plain" on the east side of the highway 
to Pepperell, Mass., and about one-half mile south of the Congregational 
meeting-house. At the present time it is in use for a primary school. 
The second of these three "new" schoolhouses was, and is, located in the 
Pond district on the west side of the highway to Mason, and about one 
hundred rods north of the junction of the latter highway with the high- 
way leading out of it to the old Mathew Wallace place. It is the same 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 185 

schoolhouse which under the seven district system was in use in district 
five; its location under that system having been on the west side of the 
east highway to Milford, a few rods north of the old James McDaniels 
place. 

The third in number of these houses is that which at the present time 
is standing in the fork formed by the junction of the highways to Milford 
and Greenville, two miles north of the village Main street. It is the 
schoolhouse formerly of the old school district number seven; where its 
location was on the west side of the highway to Milford near the Beri 
Bennett sawmill. 

The building of the new house, with the removal and continued use 
of two of the old ones, and the retention and continued use of the old 
schoolhouse in the village, reduced the town's schoolhouses to four in 
number, a number which up to the present time (1914) has remained 
unchanged. 

With the establishment of the one district system, the name district 
as applied to the classification of the schools, became obsolete ; and in its 
place were substituted the words primary and grammar, representing, re- 
spectively, the two grades into which the schools were that year divided. 
Under this system the school located on Milford street in the village was 
classed as a grammar school, and the remaining three as primary schools 
— a classification which at the present time (1914) still exists.* 

At the time it was made the number of the town's school children 
was ninety-four (94), divided between the sexes as follows: Boys, 42; 
girls, 52. At the present time (1913) the whole number of pupils in the 
schools is 86, of which number 43 are boys and 43 are girls. The text- 
books in use at the present time are as follows: Arnold and Kittredge's 
Grammar, Charles E. Merrill's Readers, — "Graded Literature" — Went- 
worth's Arithmetics, Montgomery's History, Redding and Hirman's 
Geography, Albert F. Blaisdel's Physiology. 

Superintending School Committees, 1815-1914. 

1815; Rev. Samuel Wadsworth, James Parker, Sr., Thomas Bennett. 
1816; Rev. Samuel Wadsworth, James Parker, Sr., Thomas Bennett. 
1817; James Parker, Sr., Samuel T. Boynton, Thomas Bennett. 
1818; James Parker, Sr., Samuel T. Boynton, Thomas Bennett. 
1819; James Parker, Sr., Thomas Bennett, Nathaniel Shattuck. 

* In the summer of 1914 the grammar school was removed from the school-house in District No. 4 
into the school-room in Daniels Academy building. 



186 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

1820; Samuel T. Boynton, James Parker, Sr., John Daniels. 

1821 ; Thomas Bennett, Gecrge Daniels, James Parker, Sr. 

1822; Nathaniel Shattuek, Isaac Sawtelle. 

1823; Nathaniel Shattuek, James Parker, Sr., Randal McDonald. 

1824; John Sawtelle, George Daniels, James Parker, Sr. 

1825; No record. 

1826; No record. 

1827; Nathan Corey, David Harris, Nathaniel Shattuek. 

1828; Rev. Jacob Holt, Dr. David Harris. 

1829; Rev. Jacob Holt, Dr. David Harris. 

1830; Rev. Jacob Holt, Dr. David Harris. 

1831; Rev. Jacob Holt, Dr. David Harris. 

1832; Rev. Jacob Holt, Dr. David Harris. 

1833 ; John Smith, John Sawtelle. 

1834; John Smith, Alpheus Shattuek, Dr. David Harris. 

1835; John Smith, EH Sawtelle. 

1836; No record. 

1837; Rev. Henry C. Eastman, Dr. David Harris. 

1838; No record. 

1839; No record. 

1840; Rev. Daniel Goodwin, Dr. David Harris. 

1841; Rev. Daniel Goodwin, Dr. David Harris, George A. Daniels. 

1842; Isaac Sawtelle, Nathaniel Shattuek, Ransom Fisk. 

1843; Isaac Sawtelle, Ransom Fisk, Fernando Bailey. 

1844; Rev. Daniel Goodwin, Ransom Fisk, Fernando Bailey. 

1845; Rev. Daniel Goodwin, Nathaniel Shattuek, Jr., William Gilson. 

1846; Nathaniel Shattuek, Jr., Ithimar B. Sawtelle, Fernando Bailey. 

1847; Nathaniel Shattuek, Jr., Eldad Sawtelle, Dr. David Harris. 

1848; Nathaniel Shattuek, Jr., Ithimar B. Sawtelle, N. Herman Shattuek. 

1849; Francis A. Peterson. 

1850; N. Herman Shattuek, Dr. Jonathan C. Shattuek, Fernando Bailey. 

1851 ; Dr. Johathan C. Shattuek, Isaac Sawtelle, Francis A. Peterson. 

1852; Dr. Jonathan C. Shattuek. 

1853; Dr. Jonathan C. Shattuek. 

1854; N. Herman Shattuek. 

1855; Nathaniel H. Lund. 

1856; N. Herman Shattuek. 

1857; Benjamin Gould. 

1858; Dr. Jonathan G. Shattuek. 

1859; Joseph F. Jefts. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 187 

1860; Dr. Jonathan C. Shattuek. 

1861; Dr. Jonathan C. Shattuek. 

1862; Rev. George C. Thomas. 

1863; Fernando Bailey. 

1864; Rev. Theophilus P. Sawin. 

1865; Rev. George F. Eaton. 

1866; Dr. David P. Stowell. 

1867; Henry K. Kemp. 

1868; Rev. Charles H. Chase. 

1869; Edward E. Parker. 

1870; Benjamin Gould. 

1871; No record. 

1872; No record. 

1873; Edward E. Parker. 

1874; Mrs. Mary E. Shattuek. 

1875; Rev. William E. Bennett. 

1876; Henry K. Kemp. 

1877; Henry K. Kemp. 

1878; Charles A. Stickney. 

1879; Benjamin Gould. 

1880; Benjamin Gould. 

1881 ; Benjamin Gould. 

1882; Rev. Frank D. Sargent. 

1883; Rev. Frank D. Sargent. 

1884; Rev. Frank D. Sargent. 

Board of Education. 

1885; No record. 

1886; Rev. F. D. Sargent, Dr. Alonzo S. Wallace, George W. Bridges. 

1887; Dr. Alonzo S. Wallace, George W. Bridges. 

•1888; Dr. Alonzo S. Wallace, Charles A. Stickney, Charles Shattuek. 

1889; George H. Nye, George E. Stiles. 

1890; Caroline E. Hardy, Orville D. Fessenden, Mrs. Ella W. Tucker. 

1891 ; Mrs. Ella W. Tucker, Caroline E- Hardy, George W. Bridges. 

1892; George W. Bridges, Rev. George L. Todd. 

1893; George W. Bridges, Mrs. Ella W. Tucker. 

1894; Ella W. Tucker, Orville D. Fessenden, George E. Stiles. 

1895; Ella W. Tucker, Orville D. Fessenden, George E- Stiles. 

1896; Orville D. Fessenden, Ella W. Tucker, George H. Nye. 



188 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 
1906 
1907 
1908 
1909 
1910 
1911 
1912 
1913 
1914 



Ella W. Tucker, Orville D. Fessenden, George H. Nye. 

George H. Nye, George W. Bridges. 

George H. Nye, George W. Bridges, Miss Myrtie L. Shattuek. 

George W. Bridges, Myrtie L- Shattuek. 

Rev. John Thorp, George W. Bridges. 

Rev. John Thorp, George W. Bridges. 

George W. Bridges, Eddie S. Whiteomb, Alpha A. Hall. 

Eddie S. Whiteomb, Harry H. Marshall. 

Harry H. Marshall, Ella W. Tucker. 

Harry H. Marshall, Ella W. Tucker. 

George Nye, Eddie S. Whiteomb, Mrs. Nancy J. Daniels. 

Mrs. Nancy J. Daniels, Eddie S. Whiteomb, Mrs. Abbie B. Bennett. 

George L. Dodge, Nancy J. Daniels, George H. Nye. 

George L. Dodge, George H. Nye, Mrs. Nancy J. Daniels. 

George L. Dodge, Nancy J. Daniels, George H. Nye. 

George H. Nye, Nancy J. Daniels, Arthur A. Goss. 

George H. Nye, Nancy J. Daniels, Arthur A. Goss. 

Dr. Charles H. Holcombe, Ella W. Tucker, George H. Nye. 



A Partial List of the Names of the Town's Native Born Teachers, 

1850-1910. 

Frances D. Parker, Martha Bailey, Amanda Sawtelle, Caroline Shat- 
tuek, N. Herman Shattuek, Edward E. Parker, Ellen C. Sawtelle, Theresa 
Seaver, Celia A. Hobart, Myrtie L. Shattuek, Josie Seaver, Carrie Rus- 
sell, Lizzie H. Hutchingson, Loella V. Shattuek, Jennie M. Russell, Bertha 
A. Swett, Florence N. Hobart, Mrs. Emma Kline, Minnie A. Colburn, 
Cora F. Cleveland, Fannie M. Cox, Mabel L. Edson, Mabel S. Tucker, 
Bertha E. Bohonon, Edith M. Bohonon, Jennie A. Shattuek, Mary L. 
Brown, Mabel L. Hodgman, Mae E- Kline, Frank W. Kendall, Bertha 
Kline, Grace Whiteomb, Marion Stiles, Helen Hobart, Juliette H. Gilson. 

Of those whose names appear on the above list, four at least adopted 
teaching as an avocation and made it their life work. The names of the 
four are as follows: Ellen C. Sawtelle, Juliette H. Gilson, Louisa O. Shat- 
tuek, and Frances D. Parker. 




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HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



189 




MISS ELLEN C. SAWTELLE 



ELLEN CATH- 
ERINE SAW- 
TELLE was born 
in Brookline March 
16,1843. She is the 
daughter of Joseph 
and Catherine 
(Parker) Sawtelle, 
and a lineal de- 
scendant of Richard 
Sawtelle, an early 
settler in Groton, 
Mass., coming there 
from Watertown, 
Mass. On her 
mother's side of the 
house she is a de- 
scendant in the fifth 
generation of Deacon Thomas Parker, an early settler in Reading, Mass. 
She was educated in the public schools of her native town, Appleton 
Academy of Mont Vernon, and the State Normal School at Salem, Mass., 
graduating at the latter institution in 1864. Soon after her graduation 
at the Normal School and during the same year, she received an appoint- 
ment as teacher in the public schools of Boston, Mass., and was immedi- 
ately assigned to a position in the Hancock Grammar School, where from 
the date of her appointment to the present time, a period of forty-eight 
years, she has taught continuously. 

During this period she has filled every position open to the school's 
corps of teachers, holding for a large portion of the time that of first 
assistant. In 1904 she was appointed master of the school ; a position which 
she continues to hold at the present time, and in the occupancy of which 
she is one of eight only of the city's female teachers who have attained to 
the honor of that position. 

The Hancock School is one of the largest and, from its location and 
the number and character of its pupils, one of the most important of Bos- 
ton's public schools. As its master, Miss Sawtelle has exercised a most 
powerful influence in the work of Americanizing the children of the foreign 
born population of the city. Her labors in this line and the results ac- 
cruing from them are justly regarded as being entitled to rank with the 
city's largest and most important missionary enterprises. In retiring from 



190 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

her work as a teacher, which she contemplates doing at the end of the 
present school year (1912), Miss Sawtelle will leave behind her the repu- 
tation of having been for many years one of the city's most conscientious 
and efficient public school-teachers. 

Miss Sawtelle's success as a teacher has been fully equalled by her 
success socially. There is probably not a better known woman in Boston. 
She numbers her friends by the legion not only in the city, but also in the 
towns in the vicinity. She is an active and honored member of many of 
the city's social and literary societies, including the Twentieth Century 
Club. 

During all the years of her sojourn in Boston, she has retained her 
love and affection for, and continued to hold her residence in, her native 
town where, with the exception of several seasons spent in traveling in 
Europe and in her own country, she has passed her vacations in the old 
homestead, receiving and entertaining her friends and acquaintances with 
a hearty and generous hospitality which is one of her marked characteris- 
tics, and where she enjoys the respect and esteem of her fellow townsmen. 

In the early part of June, in accord with her often expressed deter- 
mination to retire from teaching during the year 1912, Miss Sawtelle 
announced her resignation as Master of the Hancock School. The news 
of her resignation was received with sincere expressions of regret by her 
friends; and especially so by the two thousand girls who had graduated 
from the school during the years of her connection with it ; who, in recog- 
nition of their esteem for her, on the evening of June 7th, tendered her a 
reception in the Hancock School building, at which more than five hundred 
of their number were present. 

At the close of the reception, her former pupils organized themselves 
into a permanent association under the name of "Miss Sawtelle's Girls." 

JULIETTE HANNAH GILSON was born in Brookline, Jan. 11, 
1845. She is a daughter of William and Hannah W. (Wheeler) Gilson, 
each late of Milford, deceased. Miss Gilson graduated at Mount Holyoke 
Seminary. 1868; she was a missionary in Southern Illinois, 1868-70; 
professor in Bluenhof Seminary, Stellenbosch, Cape Colony, 1876-1883; 
mission work among Kaffirs and Zulus, South Africa, 1883-1886. Regular 
and post-graduate course at Hartford Theological Seminary, 1890-94, 
receiving degree of S. T. B.; missionary of A. B. C, Zulu Mission, Rho- 
desia, Africa, 1896 to present time. 

Miss Gilson's life was passed in this town until 1865, when she re- 
moved with her father to Milford. Since then, as appears from the fore- 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 191 

going, she has passed many years in Africa, devoting herself to mission- 
ary work, an avocation for which by natural abilities, training and edu- 
cation, she is thoroughly fitted, and in which she has acquired a most 
excellent reputation, and one far more than local in its extent. Miss 
Gilson is a good public speaker, and as such is well known in this vicinity . 

LOUISA O. SHATTUCK, a daughter of Gardner and Silence 
(Warren) Shattuck, was born in Brookline, Nov. 11, 1827. She was 
educated in the public schools of her native town and in the Female 
Seminary at West Townsend, Mass. In 1849 she removed from Brook- 
line to Framingham, Mass., where she made her home with her brother, 
Gardner I v . Shattuck. She taught for several terms in the public schools 
of Framingham, Mass., and subsequently in the Hopkinton, Mass., High 
School. About 1854 she returned to Brookline, where for several years 
following she engaged in teaching, both in public and private schools. 

Miss Shattuck was apparently born with a predilection for teaching 
as a profession. It constituted a predominating element in her character 
throughout her entire life; always enthusiastic, she was uniformly suc- 
cessful. She excelled especially in Latin and drawing. 

In 1858 she left her old New England home for California, sailing 
from New York July 5th. After what was then considered a quick pas- 
sage, she arrived in San Francisco July 28. In San Francisco she met 
and married Pillsbury Hodgkins, who was then employed as an agent by 
the Wells-Fargo Express Company, running on the company's boat be- 
tween San Francisco and Stockholm. In the latter place, soon after their 
marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Hodgkins settled and established their home; 
and in that place were born their children, three sons and one daughter. 

Mrs. Hodgkins' children received their education largely, if not 
wholly, from their mother. 

In 1892 her husband died, and soon after his death she removed 
from vStockholm to San Francisco, where she made her home with one of 
her sons. 

In San Francisco, true to her natural predilections, she resumed her 
old calling of teaching, confining her work, however, to the instruction 
of private pupils, among whom were many Chinese, in whom she was 
especially interested. She never taught in the public schools of San 
Francisco. 

Mrs. Hodgkins took a lively interest in the early, as well as the mod- 
ern, history of San Francisco; was closely identified with many of its 



192 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



leading clubs and societies, and keenly alive to and deeply interested in 
all matters appertaining to the welfare of its citizens. 

She died in San Francisco Jan. 28, 1911, her death occurring on the 
anniversary of her arrival in California fifty- three years before. She is 
buried in San Francisco. 



FRANCES D. PARKER 
the only daughter of James 
and Deverd (Corey) Parker, 
was born in Brookline, Dec. 
26, 1833. She was educated 
in the public schools of her 
native town and in Appleton 
Academy, New Ipswich. At 
sixteen years of age she 
commenced teaching in the 
public schools of Brookline 
and, with the exception of 
brief intervals taken for 
i est, continued to follow her 
chosen calling until her 
death. During her career, 
Miss Parker taught in nearly 
all the towns bordering on 
Brookline, acquiring the rep- 
utation of being a thorough, 
conscientious and compe- 
tent instructor. Up to the 
year 1870 her work was confined to the common schools; but in the 
latter year she accepted a position as assistant in the Warrensburg 
Academy, Warrensburg, N. Y., where she remained two terms. 

In 1876-77 she was elected as a teacher in the public schools of Nashua, 
where she taught in the Grammar grade until failing health compelled 
her to resign her position. She was a Christian woman. Throughout her 
life she enjoyed the respect of and was held in the highest esteem by her 
friends and acquaintances. She died at her home in Brookline Feb. 16, 
1889, and is buried in the family lot in the "cemetery-on-the-plain." 




MISS FRANCES D. PARKER 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



193 



College Graduates from Brookline with Short Biographical 

Sketches of Their Lives. 



Harvard, 


1804 


Harvard, 


1815 


Dartmouth, 


1857 


Dartmouth, 


1869 


Wesleyan, 


1874 


Univ. of Vermont (Med. ) 


1891 


Williams, 


1892. 


Yale, 


1898 


Providence University, 


1899 


Mount Holvoke, 


1900 


Albany Med., 


1903 


Dartmouth, 


1908 


Simmons, 


1909 


N. H. State, 


1913. 



1. Benjamin Mark Farley, 

2. George F. Farley, 

3. Ephraim J. Hardy, 

4. Edward E. Parker, 

5. George H. Hardy, 

6. Alvin H. Wright, 

7. James E. Peabody, 

8. George H. Abbott, 

9. Elmo D. Lancey, 

10. Florence D. Sargent, 

11. Joseph B. Swett, 

12. Harold S. Hobart, 

13. Ethel Rockwood, 

14. Charles R. Hardy, 



BENAJMIN MARK 
FARLEY was a native of 
Brookline, where, within its 
original charter limits, he 
was born April 8, 1783. He 
was a grandson of Lieut. 
Samuel Farley, and a son 
of Benjamin and Lucy 
(Fletcher) Farley. His 
father was a prominent 
citizen of this town until 
as late as 1810, and was 
the representative in the 
legislature in 1798. Benja- 
min Mark prepared for col- 
lege in the public schools 
of his native town and 
in New Ipswich Appleton 
Academy. He graduated 
from Harvard College in 
1804, and was the first college graduate from this town (then known 
as Raby ) . He was admitted to the Hillsborough County Bar in 1808 and 




HON. BENJAMIN MARK FARLEY 



194 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

in the same year began the practice of his profession in Hollis. In 1855 
he retired from practice and removed from Hollis to Boston; from 
whence, after a brief residence, he removed to Lunenburg, Mass. He died 
at Lunenburg Sept. 16, 1865. 

In his day and generation Mr. Farley ranked not only with the most 
eminent members of his profession in Hillsborough County, where he was 
a confrere of Franklin Pierce, afterwards President, Hon. Charles G. 
Atherton, Hon. Charles W. Morrison, and others scarcely less eminent 
in the profession, but also with the most eminent lawyers in the state. 
As a citizen he was highly honored and respected. During his residence 
of forty-seven years in Hollis, in addition to holding many positions of 
public trust, he represented the town for fifteen years in the legislature 
where, for several terms, he was chairman of the Judiciary Committee. 

GEORGE F. FARLEY, a brother of Benjamin Mark Farley, was 
born in Brookline April 5, 1793. He graduated from Harvard College in 
1816. He read law in the office of his brother Benjamin, in Hollis, and 
in the office of Luther Lawrence, of Groton, Mass. In 1821, he was ad- 
mitted to the bar of Hillsborough County and the same year began to 
practice his profession in New Ipswich. In 1831 he represented New 
Ipswich in the legislature, and the same year he removed to Groton, 
Mass., where for twenty -four years following he was a successful practi- 
tioner. He died at Groton, Nov. 8, 1855. 

EPHRAIM JEWETT HARDY was born in Hollis May 26, 1830. 
He was a son of Ephraim L- and Susan Jewett Hardy. His father re- 
moved from Hollis to Brookline about 1840. He attended the public 
schools in Brookline, and fitted for college at Phillips Andover Academy, 
and at Kimball Union Academy, Meriden. He entered Dartmouth Col- 
lege in 1853, but did not live to graduate, dying in his senior year in 1857. 
He was a young man of great promise; a sincere Christian, of manly 
and decided character, and an excellent scholar. His death was deeply 
deplored by his classmates, and by the college generally. He is buried in 
the South Cemetery. 

Edward Everett Parker. 

Hon. Edward E. Parker was born in Brookline Jan. 7, 1842. He is 
a son of James and Deverd (Corey) Parker, and a lineal descendant in 
the sixth generation of Deacon Thomas Parker who came from England 
to America in the ship Susan and Ellen, and settled at Reading, Mass., 
in 1633. 





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HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 195 

His paternal grandmother, wife of James Parker, 1st, was a daughter 
of Abijah and Sarah (Chamberlain) Boynton of Pepperell, Mass.; and 
a descendant of John Boynton and William Boynton, who came to America 
from Yorkshire, England, and settled in Rowley, Mass., in 1638. His 
maternal great-grandmother, wife of David Wright of Pepperell, Mass., 
was the leader of the band of patriotic women who captured the noto- 
rious tory, Leonard Whiting, at Jewett's bridge in Pepperell, in 1775. 

His paternal great-grandfathers, Edmund Parker and Abijah Boynton, 
and his maternal great-grandfathers, Nathan Corey and David Wright, 
were soldiers in the War of the Revolution. 

He prepared for college at Phillips Exeter Academy and at Mont 
Vernon Appleton Academy, graduating at the latter institution in 1863. 
He served for Brookline in the War of the Rebellion, enlisting in the 
United States Navy Aug. 20, 1863. His service was performed on the 
United States Ship Perry, of which he was yeoman. He was honorably 
discharged from the service at Philadelphia in October, 1864, by reason 
of the expiration of his term of enlistment. In the spring of 1865, with 
a determination to complete his education, he entered Colby Academy 
at New London, graduated there in the summer and entered Dartmouth 
College in the autumn, where he graduated in the class of 1869. For 
the three years immediately following his graduation he was engaged in 
teaching school. He was principal of Warrensburg Academy, Warrens- 
burg, N. Y., in 1869-70; principal of Wareham, Mass., High School in 
the fall of 1870. Meantime he decided to make the law his profession, 
and so resigned his position at the end of the first term and entered the 
law office of Thomas Cunningham at Warrensburg, N. Y., where he re- 
mained six months. Returning to New England and feeling the neces- 
sity of saving money with which to pursue his studies, he accepted the 
position of principal of the high school at Middleboro, Mass., and taught 
one year. 

In August, 1872, Judge Parker became a resident of Nashua. He 
entered the office of Gen. Aaron P. Stevens, and while studying law was 
principal of a Nashua evening school and engaged from time to time in 
reporting for the newspapers. He was admitted to the Hillsborough 
County bar at the March term of the court held at Amherst in 1873. 
Immediately after he formed a co-partnership with General Stevens 
under the firm name of Stevens and Parker, which continued until July, 
1879; when, on the resignation of Judge Henry E. Burnham of Man- 
chester, he was appointed judge of probate by Governor Cheney. He 
held the position of Judge of Probate of Hillsborough County until Jan. 



196 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

7, 1912, a period of thirty-two and one-half years, when his term of office 
expired by reason of his having reached the age of seventy years; an 
age to which, under the state's constitution, the terms of office of all 
the state's judges are limited. 

Among the complimentary articles concerning Judge Parker which 
were published in the various newspapers of the County at the expira- 
tion of his term of office, the following, written by Col. Elbridge J. Copp 
who, as register of probate, was associated with him during the entire 
term, appeared in the editorial columns of the Nashua Daily Telegraph 
under date of Jan. 6, 1912: 

"In the retirement of Judge Edward E- Parker from the office of 
Judge of Probate the people of Hillsborough County meet with a loss 
that cannot at once be filled; the unfortunate provision of the Constitu- 
tion of New Hampshire fixing an age limit to the judges of our courts has 
proven detrimental in more cases than otherwise. 

"It is recognized by all who have business with the Probate Court, 
and have been associated with Judge Parker that his mental powers and 
administrative abilities are at their best, his thirty years experience and 
his mature judgment in the application of the laws of probate in the 
settlement of estates is a valuable asset to the people of the County of 
Hillsborough that is lost in his retirement. To sit in judgment in the 
unsnarling of complicated conditions that are incident to the probating 
of estates is not the work for ordinary minds. In the practice of the 
Probate Court hardly any two estates are settled in identically the same 
way, new conditions are continually rising, and frequently where no prece- 
dent is found, that must be settled in the discretion of the Judge of Probate 
by the application of principles. 

"The importance of the office is perhaps not fully appreciated by the 
public, practically the entire property of the County passes through the 
Probate Court once in about thirty years, involving of course large in- 
terests, calling for administrative ability, sound judgment and broad dis- 
cretion of power, even more than that of Judges of the Superior Court. 

"In Judge Parker we have found these qualities to a rare degree. 
In education, in his experience, in his natural intuitive judgment, and 
with a mind characterized by strong common sense and a love of justice, 
he has been eminently equipped fcr the position he has so honorably 
filled. 

"The writer is in position to perhaps better know Judge Parker's 
official life than most people; for thirty years I have been in most inti- 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 197 

mate official relations with him, I have known every official act, the 
history of every case, leading to his every decree. 

"In all the thousands of cases in all these years that have passed 
through Judge Parker's hands, he has been true to his convictions of 
justice, uninfluenced by personal friendship or selfish interest, giving to 
every one in interest so far as was in his power, all of his or her inherited 
rights. 

"Never was the custody of a minor child upon petition for guardi- 
anship granted without the consent of, or an opportunity given to be heard 
to the parent, whatever representation may have been made as to the 
unfitness of the natural parent; never was the widow's rights more jeal- 
ously guarded than by Judge Parker; in short, never was the seat of 
justice graced by a more upright judge, and without ambition further 
than to do his whole duty in the position he was filling, from day to day. 

"Judge Parker's native ability would undoubtedly have brought to 
him wealth and honor in the practice of his profession, or if he had so 
chosen, he would have gained high honors in the political field, but what 
to him has been a loss has been a personal gain to those whom he has 
served, and is it not the highest honor, after all, to have gained and re- 
tained the love and respect of your fellowmen? 

"I think I express the sentiment of all the people of Hillsborough 
County, and more than of Hillsborough County, regardless of political 
creed, that it is with profound regret that we bid him good-bye, as Judge 
of Probate, and in his retirement to private life, sincerely hope that he 
may enjoy many years of health and happiness, so richly earned." 

During his residence of forty years in Nashua, Judge Parker has held 
many positions of honor and trust. He was a member of the committee 
appointed by the Governor in 1902 for the revision and unification of the 
forms used in the probate courts of the state. He was city solicitor in 
1876 and 1877, has served twelve years on the board of education, of 
which he was president in 1902, and in 1901 was elected as a member of 
the board of trustees of the public library; a position which he is holding 
at the present time. He has served several terms as moderator of Ward 
4, and represented the ward as its delegate in the constitutional conven- 
tions holden at Concord in 1902 and 1910. 

Judge Parker was made a Mason in Benevolent Lodge A. F. and 
A. M. of Milford in 1868. At the present time he is a member of Rising 
Sun Lodge A. F. and A. M. of Nashua. He is a member of John G. Fos 
ter Post, G. A. R., of Nashua, of which he is a past commander. He 
has held appointments on the staff of the Commander-in-chief, and served 



198 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

twice as Judge Advocate General of the department of New Hampshire, 
G. A. R., the last time in 1893. He was delegate-at-large to the Na- 
tional Encampment, G. A. R., at Louisville, Ky., in Spetember, 1895. 
He is past-commander of the Department of New Hampshire, G. A. R., 
having holden that position in 1903-1904; and was in command of the 
department at the National Encampment, G. A. R., holden at San 
Francisco, Cal., in 1903. 

As a lawyer, Judge Parker stands high in his profession. He is a 
pleasing public speaker and has delivered many addresses on Memorial 
Days and other public occasions. He was the orator-of-the-day at the 
celebration of the opening of the Brookline and Pepperell railroad at 
Brookline in 1892. He is a writer of ability both in poetry and prose. 
He was centennial poet at the celebration of the centennial year of Dart- 
mouth College in 1869; and the same year officiated as poet at the cen- 
tennial celebration of Brookline. In the past forty years he has written 
many poems of acknowledged merit which have been published in leading 
newspapers and magazines. Among his published prose works are the 
following : 

"John Lovewell, Sr.," published in Granite State Magazine of Man- 
chester, June 8, 1908. He was one of the authors, and was editor-in- 
chief, of the History of Nashua, published in 1897. At the present time 
he is engaged in writing this work, of which he is the compiler. He is a 
member of the Congregational Church in Brookline. 

Judge Parker was united in marriage Dec. 20, 1877, with Alice Prince 
Hammond, youngest daughter of Dr. Evan B. and Sarah Ann (Adams) 
Hammond, whose lineage appears in a sketch of the life of the former, 
given in the History of Nashua. 

The children of their marriage are Rena Deverd, born Nov. 23, 1878; 
graduated at Wellesley College in 1901. At present time (1912) teacher 
of art in the High School of Practical Arts, Boston, Mass.; Edna Alice, 
born Dec. 13, 1880; graduated at Mt. Holyoke College in 1903; at pres- 
ent time teacher of sciences in the High School at Manchester, Mass. 

REV. GEORGE HENRY HARDY, a son of Ephraim Lund and 
Delana (Lapham) Hardy, was born in Brookline, Nov. 15, 1849. He 
prepared for college in the public schools of his native town, the Mount 
Pleasant Grammar School, Nashua, and Phillips Exeter Academy. He 
graduated at Wesley an University in 1874, and at Drew Theological 
Seminary, Madison, N. J., in 1876. 

He was licensed to preach by the Methodist Quarterly Conference 
at Middletown, Conn., Feb. 16, 1874. In 1874-75 he was principal of 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 199 

Spring Valley Academy, Madison, N. J.; from 1875 to 1876 he taught 
Latin and mathematics in Madison Institute, N. J. In 1876 he was ad- 
mitted on trial to the New Hampshire Conference. April 4, 1878, he was 
ordained as deacon by Bishop Merril at Lancaster, and April 11, 1880, 
as elder, by Bishop Andrews at Great Falls. 

Appointments — Henniker, 1876-77; Groveton, 1878; Mouton- 
ville, 1879-80, with Chickville and North Wakefield in 1880; Moulton- 
borough, 1881; Gilford Village, 1882; Grantham and North Grantham, 
1883-85; Peterborough, 1886-89; North Charlestown and West Unity, 
1889-93; West Rindge, 1894-95; Conference Historian, Ashburnham, 
Mass., 1896-1913. 

May 24, 1876, he married Emma, daughter of George Washington 
and Nancy Smith (Brainard) Guy, of Middletown, Conn. 

ALVIN H. WRIGHT, M. D., a son of Moses and Henrietta (Gard- 
ner) Wright, was born in Brookline, March 23, 1857. He attended the 
public schools of Brookline and Hollis, graduating from the Hollis High 
School in 1885. Shortly after his graduation from the high school, he 
entered a technical school in Nashua, working half of each school day as 
a machinist apprentice, and pursuing his studies the other half. In 1886, 
his health being in poor condition, he returned to Hollis and studied 
medicine for one year in the office of Dr. L. R. Qua. He then entered 
the medical school of the University of Vermont; from which he gradu- 
ated with honors in 1891, being one of five men in his class to attain to 
thftt distinction. 

Soon after his graduation from the medical school, he accepted a posi- 
tion in the employ of the Santa Fe Railroad Company, by which he was 
commissioned as its resident surgeon in the territory of New Mexico. 
In 1892 the company transferred him from New Mexico to Ottawa, Kans., 
where he was placed in charge of its hospital in that town. In 1900, he 
resigned from the company's employment and established in Ottawa a 
private hospital of his own, which he continued to conduct in connection 
with his surgical practice until 1903; when, his health giving out, he 
disposed of his business in Ottawa and removed to San Francisco, Cal., 
where he has ever since been located. 

At the present time (1911) Dr. Wright is professor of Clinical surgery, 
and demonstrator of anatomy in the College of Physicians and Surgeons 
of San Francisco. His prospects for a life of usefulness and prosperity 
are of the most flattering nature. 

In 1890 he was united in the bonds of matrimony to Olive Bartlett 
Sanborn of Burlington, Vt., by whom he has had two children, Olive F. 



200 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

Wright and Alvin H. Wright, Jr.; both of whom are living at the present 
time. 

JAMES E. PEABODY, a son of George W. and Frances (Hall) 
Peabody, was born in Brookline, Aug. 21, 1869. He was educated in the 
public schools of his native town and in Cushing Academy, Ashburnham, 
Mass.; graduating from the latter institution in 1889 as valedictorian of 
his class. He graduated from Williams College in 1892. From 1892 to 
1895 he was principal of the Williamstown, Mass., High School. He was 
employed for five years in the United States Fish Commission and Marine 
Biographical Laboratories at Woods Hole; during which time he pub- 
lished an original paper on the structure and functions of certain sense 
organs of the shark. In 1896-97, he graduated at Harvard University 
with the degree of A. M. During his course at Harvard he taught in 
Radcliffe College. In 1896-97, he taught in the English High School and 
also in the evening High Schools of Boston. Since 1897 he has been at 
the head of the department of biology in the Morris High School, New 
York City; has published a book on "Laboratory Exercises in Physiology" 
a book on "Studies in Physiology," and, at the time of this writing, has 
nearly ready for the press a book on High School "Biology"; he has been 
secretary of the New York Association of Science Teachers, twice presi- 
dent of the New York Association of Teachers of Biology, and twice 
chairman of both the state and the New York City Committees for the 
preparation of geology syllabus outlines and for the nature study syllabus. 
At the present time (1911) he is clerk of the Westchester, N. Y., Congre- 
gational Church, and resides in Scarsdale, N. Y. 

July 13, 1898, Mr. Peabody married Sarah Emma Barrett of Barre, 
Mass. Two children have been born of this marriage: Elizabeth Barrett, 
born Aug. 30, 1900; George Wellington, born Aug. 17, 1907. 

GEORGE HAVEN ABBOTT was born at Charleston, S. C, Oct. 
7, 1876. He is a son and the only child of Rev. Thomas Jefferson and 
Theresa Maria (Seaver) Abbott. His father was a member of an old and 
excellent Vermont family. On the maternal side of his family, he is a 
lineal descendant in the fifth generation of Lieut. Robert Seaver, and also 
of Capt. Samuel Douglass, each of whom served for Brookline as Com- 
missioned officers in the War of the Revolution. 

Shortly after his birth, his father resigned his position as pastor over 
a church of the Methodist Episcopal denomination located in Charleston, S. 
C, and with his family returned north, where he died soon after his return. 
Upon the death of his father, his mother with her infant son returned to 
Brookline, where she resided with her father, Asa Seaver, until her death. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 201 

Mr. Abbott prepared for college in the public schools of this town 
and at Tilton Seminary, Tilton, N. H., where he graduated with honors 
in 1894. He graduated from Yale University in 1898, with honors, receiv- 
ing the degree of B. A., and being elected a member of the Phi Beta Kappa 
Society. For the two years immediately succeeding his graduation, he 
was a member of the Harvard Law School. July 1, 1899, he entered the 
law office of Weeks, Battles and Marshall in New York City. He was 
admitted to the New York State Bar in February, 1902, and immediately 
associated himself in the law business with Barton S. Weeks, in New 
York City. At the end of two years he severed his connection with Mr. 
Weeks, and opened a law office for himself at No. 58 Nassau Street, where 
he is located at the present time. 

Oct. 31, 1906, he was united in marriage with Katharine Faith Har- 
grave, daughter of William Gillard and Katherine Hargrave, of New 
York City. He is a member of the New York Athletic Club, Republican 
Club, Yale Club, Lawyer's Club, and New York Bar Association. No 
children. 

ELMO DUSTIN LANCEY, a son of Ferdinand and Katherine 
(Robins) Lancey, was born in Brookline Oct. 5, 1871. He was prepared 
for college in the schools of his native town and at Cushing Academy. 
He graduated at Brown University with the degree of Bachelor of Arts 
in the class of 1899. "After graduation from college, he engaged in the 
insurance business at Providence until his health began to fail. In 1898 
he removed to the West, hoping to arrest his disease, which was con- 
sumption. He lived at Salt Lake City, Utah, at Denver, Col., and at 
Albuquerque, N. M. At last he gave up all hope of recovery and returned 
to the east to die." He died at Providence, R. I., Dec. 21, 1901, aged 
thirty years, two months and nineteen days. 

Mr. Lancey was a member, originally, of the Congregational Church 
of this town, but later, at the time of his death, of the Episcopal Church 
of the Redeemer in Providence. He was a man of noble character and of 
hopeful promise for usefulness in life. 

He married Alice Louise Brown, daughter of Mr. Herbert Brown, 
of Providence, who survived him. He left no children. 

FLORENCE GERTRUDE SARGENT was born in Brookline, 
July 8, 1878. She is a daughter of Rev. Frank D. and Emma S. (Taylor) 
Sargent. She prepared for college in the public schools of her native 
town and in the Putnam, Conn., High School. She graduated from Hol- 
yoke College in 1900. For the six years immediately following her grad- 
uation she was engaged in teaching school. Two years of this period, 



202 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

1900 and 1901, were passed in the High School in Plainville, Mass., and 
four years, 1902-06, in the Putnam High School. In 1906 and 1907 she 
took the post graduate course in Radcliffe College. Subsequently, she 
was for three years a member of Mrs. Von Mack's Private School for 
girls, Boston, Mass., and for two years a member of the Misses Shipley's 
School, Bryn Mawr, Pa. At the present time (1912) she is teaching in the 
Putnam High School. Miss Sargent enjoys the distinction of being the 
first of Brookline's native born female college graduates. 

JOSEPH BENJAMIN SWETT, Jr., M. D., son of Joseph and 
Emily (Gilson) Swett, was born in Brookline, March 5, 1865. He was a 
descendant of John Swett, who came to this country from Oxton, England, 
in 1742, and settled in Newbury, Mass. Dr. Swett was educated in the 
public schools of his native town and at Cushing Academy, Ashburnham, 
Mass.; graduating from the latter institution in 1890. From the Academy 
he entered the Albany, N. Y., Medical College, from which he graduated 
with honors in 1893, receiving the degree of M. D. After his graduation, 
he was for several years an instructor in the college; until he finally re- 
signed his position and commenced the practice of his profession in Albany, 
where he died Oct. 3, 1897. He was never married. At the time of his 
decease, Dr. Swett was a member of the Albany County Medical Society; 
a member of Lodge No. 5, F. A. M., of Albany, and a member of Company 
B, 10th Battalion N. Y. S. M. 

HAROLD SAWTELLE HOBART, a son of Willie and Harriet 
(Rideout) Hobart, was born in Brookline, Sept. 29, 1884. He prepared 
for college in the public schools of his native town and the Nashua High 
School, and graduated from Dartmouth College in 1908. Soon after 
leaving college, he entered the employment of the Proctor Marble Com- 
pany, of Proctor, Vt., where he is located at the present time. 

ETHEL MAY ROCKWOOD, daughter of Walter Francis and Clara 
(Whitcomb) Rockwood, was born in Brookline, March 4, 1887. She pre- 
pared for college in the public schools of her native town and in the Mil- 
ford High School. She graduated from Simmon's College in 1909 with 
the degree of D. S. After leaving Simmon's, Miss Rockwood studied 
medicine and graduated from John Hopkins' Medical School, Baltimore, 
Md., with the degree of M. D., in 1914. 

CHARLES RICHARDSON HARDY, son of John Baldwin and 
Carrie (Richardson) Hardy, was born in Brookline, April 10, 1893. He 
attended the public schools of his native town, and was prepared for col- 
lege in the Milford High School. He entered the New Hampshire State 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 203 

College and, taking the two-years course, graduated from the college in 
1913. At the present time (1913) he is residing in Hollis and is engaged 
in practical farming. 

Biographical Sketches of College Graduates Born in Brookline, 
hut Graduated from Other Towns. 

REV. EDWARD HAMMOND BROOKS,* Baptist, son of George 
and Mary A. Brooks, was born in Brookline, May 9, 1849. Prepared for 
college at Groton, Mass., Academy, Appleton Academy, New Ipswich, 
and Amenia Seminary, New York. Graduated at Kalamazoo College, 
1874. Studied for the ministry at Morgan Park, 111., 1874-75, and at 
Newton, Mass., 1875-76, and 1882-83, Theological Seminaries. Ordained, 
Boston, Mass., June 11, 1876. Pastor, Cassopolis, Mich., July, 1876-78; 
Lapeer, Mich., September, 1878-79; Crown Point, Ind., October, 1879- 
82; Second Church, Grand Rapids, Mich., 1883-90; Aurora, 111., 1891- 
96; Los Angeles, Cal., 1897-98; East Los Angeles, 1899. 

Married Mary E. Bennett at Kalamazoo, Mich., Sept. 27, 1876. 

REV. CHARLES PELT FESSENDEN,* Baptist, son of Joseph 
and Rachael (Crosby) Fessenden, was born in Brookline, Jan. 15, 1813. 
Graduated at Lay College, Brooklyn, N. Y., and Hamilton (New York) 
Theological Seminary, 1878. Ordained, West Union, N. Y., March, 1867. 
In itinerant and missionary work for twenty-five years. Went to Michi- 
gan in 1869. Missionary in Newaygo and Musekgon counties. At Rives, 
Mich., 1872. Pastor, Medina, North Adams, and Litchfield. Residence, 
Hesperia, Mich., 1882, Eaton Rapids, Mich., 1885-91. Died there 
Nov. 27, 1891. 

Married Elizabeth R. Hakes at Columbia, Pa., Jan. 1, 1837. 

REV. CLIFTON FLETCHER, Baptist,* son of Jesse and Patience 
(Hobart) Fletcher, was born in Brookline, March 5, 1823. Student, Wes- 
leyan University, 1864-68. Ordained, North Tewksbury, Mass., June 4, 
1856. Pastor there, 1856-69; Billerica, Mass., 1869-76; Canton, Mass., 
July 1, 1875-77. Without charge, Melrose, Mass., Nov. 1, 1876-92, 
meanwhile serving as acting pastor, Brookline, Mass., 1878-84. Member 
of the School Board, Melrose, 1878-86, and chairman, 1880-86. Was also 
an active member of the Y. M. C. A. Died at Melrose, Mass., Aug. 19, 
1902. 

GEORGE E. WRIGHT was born in Brookline, Jan. 20, 1867. He 
is a son of William and Eliza A. (Elliott) Keyes Wright. In his childhood 

* Native Ministry of New Hampshire, 84. 



204 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

his father removed from Brookline to Townsend, Mass. He fitted for 
College in Phillips Exeter Academy, and graduated from Harvard College 
in 1889, and from the Harvard Law School in 1892. He has received from 
Harvard the following degrees: A. B., 1889; L. L. B., 1892; A. M., 1892. 
At the present time (1914) he is, and since 1893 has been, engaged in the 
practice of law in Seattle, Wash. In 1906 he delivered an address before 
the Washington State Bar Association; and in 1907 was appointed a 
trustee of the Seattle Public Library. He married, July 16, 1895, Mary 
Estelle Wyckoff at Delhi, 111. His family record is given in another page 
of this book. 

WILLIAM HARMON WRIGHT, a son of William and Eliza A. 
(Elliott) Wright, of this town, was born, Dec. 2, 1869, in Townsend, 
Mass., to which place his parents removed from Brookline a short time 
before his birth. He fitted for college in the public schools of Townsend 
and at Phillips Exeter Academy, and graduated at Harvard University in 
the class of 1892. At both of those institutions he distinguished himself 
in athletics. In 1893 he removed from Townsend to Seattle, Wash., where 
he was employed for eight years as teller in the Bank of Commerce. At 
the end of that time he retired from his position in the bank, and devoted 
his time to the buying and selling of real estate and to beautifying the 
grounds around his residence, in which he took great pride. 

He married, Oct. 11, 1899, Frances Rumsey of Seattle; by whom he 
is survived. He died at Seattle, May 26, 1911. 

Children: Hammond, born Oct. 27, 1900; Margaret, born June 23, 
1902; William Francis, born Feb. 5, 1904. 

MORTON BOWLER FRENCH was born in this town Dec. 7, 
1879. He is a son of John E. and Caroline M. (Kendall) French. In his 
childhood his parents removed from Brookline to Athol, Mass. He pre- 
pared for college in the Athol High School. He graduated from Dart- 
mouth College in 1903. At the present time (1912) he is located in New 
York City, where he is connected with the American Telephone and 
Telegraph Company as Telephone Engineer. 

DAVID ALLEN ANDERSON, a son of Levi and 

Anderson, was born in Brookline, April 19, 1840. He graduated from 
Dartmouth College in 1868. Soon after his graduation he settled in 
North Adams, Mass., where he engaged in business. He died at North 
Adams, Jan. 1, 1907. 







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HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 205 



CHAPTER XII. 

Ecclesiastical History. 

Early Religious Movements — The Meeting-house War, So Called — The 
Completion in 1791 of the First Meeting-house. 

During the first six years succeeding its incorporation, Raby's records 
contain no mention of any appropriation of money for religious purposes. 
But from this fact it must not be inferred that its people were indifferent 
to their religious or moral obligations. For tradition says that during 
this period religious meetings at which ministers from neighboring towns 
officiated were held at various places in town. Among those who thus 
officiated was the Rev. Jacob Burnap of Merrimack, who on one occasion 
preached in the barn of Capt. Samuel Douglass. This barn was located 
near Captain Douglass' dwelling house on the village Main street, its site 
being not far from that now occupied by the house late of the widow 
John Spaulding, deceased. Tradition says, further, that during this period, 
and for many years subsequently, the town was visited by itinerant 
preachers, who held services in the open, preaching to congregations who 
heard them gladly. 

But the real reason for the town's laxity in the matter of raising money 
for the preaching of the Gospel, during this period, is undoubtedly to be 
found in the fact that its inhabitants continued to practice their long 
established custom of attending divine worship in Hollis and other neigh- 
boring towns. Coupled with this fact also are those of their paucity of 
numbers and poverty in possessions; powerful arguments against the 
expenditure of money for any purpose other than that of actual existence. 

The first recorded action relative to public worship occurred at a 
town meeting holden March 6, 1775; when it was voted — "To raise the 
sum of eight dollars to pay the priest"; and James Campbell and James 
Badger were chosen as a "Committee to agree with the priest." 

The foregoing vote would seem to indicate that there was already a 
minister in town. But there is no record of his name or origin. Whoever 
he was, during the time he was employed in preaching out that eight dol- 
lars appropriation, he must have often longed for the flesh pots of Egypt ; 



206 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

for three years passed before the town raised any additional sum for 
preaching; the second appropriation for that purpose occurring in March, 
1778, when it was voted to raise ten pounds. 

The number of the town's rateable polls at the date of the second ap- 
propriation was sixty, and its population not far from one hundred and 
fifty. It is possible that at this time the "priest" was still living in town, 
and that he continued to do so for the succeeding three years, or until the 
time of the next appropriation. But, if he did so, it is to be hoped that 
his was a case where Providence tempered the wind to the shorn lamb. 
For, owing to the depreciation in value of the Continental paper money 
which at this time was the only money in circulation, the ten pounds 
appropriated was really equivalent to only five pounds in silver, or one- 
half its face value; and, as this depreciation in the value of the currency 
was attended with a corresponding appreciation in the value of commodi- 
ties, it is evident that his position was no sinecure. 

Under such circumstances as the foregoing, it is no wonder that so 
many of the early ministers in New England became experts as horse 
traders. 

Speaking of the depreciation in the currency, both that issued by the 
state and also by Congress, it increased so rapidly as to cause general 
alarm; and early in the spring of 1777, the New Hampshire legislature, 
for the purpose of relieving the tensity of the situation, passed a law by 
which the price at which the common necessities of life could be sold 
were regulated. Among the commodities upon which prices were fixed 
by this law are the following : 





s d 




s 


d 


Oats per bushel 


2 


Beef, per lb. 





3 


Indian Corn per bushel 


3 6 


Pork per lb. 





43^ 


Rye per bushel 


4 6 


Linen Cloth per yd. 


4 





Beans per bushel, 


6 


Flannel cloth per yd. 


3 


6 


Salt per bushel, 


10 


Molasses per gal., 


4 





Butter per lb., 


6 


N. E- Rum per gal., 


3 


10 


Cotton per lb., 


3 


W. I. Rum per gal., 


7 


8 


Wool per lb., 


2 2 









The passage of this law, however, was of little effect. For the cur- 
rency still continued to depreciate in value, and the necessities of life to 
appreciate in price; the latter being governed by the actual value, as a 
medium of exchange, of the former. 

In the month of March, 1781, at the annual town meeting, it was 
voted to raise three hundred pounds for preaching. At the time this vote 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 207 

was taken, both the State and the Continental currency had depre- 
ciated in value to the extent, that, in exchange, seventy-five pounds of 
paper money was equivalent to one pound in silver. So that the three 
hundred pounds voted, when reduced to its value in silver coin, was 
equal to four pounds, or about twenty dollars. March 30, of the same 
year, it was voted — "To hire the Rev. Mr. Houston to preach out the 
whole of the money raised for preaching." 

Who the Rev. Mr. Houston was, from whence he came to Raby, and 
whither he went when he departed, are questions which are answered 
neither by the records nor by tradition. But it is fair to presume that he 
accepted the offer and — "preached out the whole of the money"; and 
thus he became, so far as the records show, the town's first minister of the 
Gospel. 

From the date of the vote, in 1781, to raise three hundred pounds, 
up to and including the year 1791, the town records contain no mention 
of any sums of money as having been appropriated for religious purposes. 
But in the latter year, a Reverend gentleman by the name of Wythe was 
hired — "To preach out the whole of the money." Mr. Wythe's ante- 
cedents, like those of his predecessor, Mr. Houston, are unknown. Tra- 
dition says, however, that previous to his coming to Raby, he had been 
preaching in Mason. 

Up to this time (1781) religious meetings had been holden in private 
dwelling houses, a practice which was continued until the year 1783-84, 
when the town built its first schoolhouses ; in which, after the latter date 
until 1791, when the meeting-house was ready for occupancy, public 
gatherings of all descriptions convened. 

The town's first definite action relative to building a meeting-house 
occurred at a meeting of the citizens holden March 1, 1780; when it was 
voted to build a house 30 feet wide and 40 feet long ; and Samuel Douglass, 
Alexander Mcintosh, Clark Brown, James Campbell, and William Spauld- 
ing were elected as a — "Committee to find the place to set the same." 
At a subsequent meeting holden the same year, this committee reported 
in favor of a site located about midway of the south side of meeting-house 
hill, and on the east side of the highway leading up the same.* The 
people refused to accept the report, and immediately divided into factions 
upon the question of the location of the house. One faction favored the 
site selected by the committee. Another, and apparently the larger one, 
was in favor of the location on the summit of meeting-house hill, where 

* This site was afterwards occupied by the dwelling house of the late Horace Warner. The Warner 
house which is standing at the present time is that which was owned and occupied by the late Wlliiam 
Gardner Shattuck at the time of his death, 1892. 



208 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

the house now stands. In addition to these two principal factions, there 
were others, minor ones, composed of two or three persons, and even of 
single individuals, each of whom had opinions of their own as to the best 
site for locating the house. 

From these differences of opinion there resulted a factional contest 
over the question of what particular spot or locality was most suitable 
for the location of the house, which was known locally as 

The Meeting-house War. 

This war between the several factions was carried on with more or 
less intensity and bitterness of spirit for a period of nearly eleven years 
in duration, during which neither side would yield; nor did either gain 
any permanent advantage. For if, by chance, at any of the numerous 
town meetings called in reference to the meeting-house, either faction 
succeeded in carrying a vote by which the location was fixed, the defeated 
faction would immediately cause the calling of another meeting ; at which, 
aided by the smaller factions, and individuals who, because they couldn't 
rule, were bound to ruin, they generally succeeded in revoking the vote 
of the preceding meeting and passing another one by which the site of the 
house was fixed in a location more in accord with their own wishes. 

After the first outbreak, there seems to have been a lull in the war 
of a year or so in duration during which the citizens were engaged in 
another and, for the time being, more engrossing controversy over the 
building and locating of a cattle pound. 

But when in 1783 the latter question was finally settled, the meeting- 
house war again broke out, and with renewed intensity. At the March 
meeting of the latter year, after a lengthy and heated discussion, it was 
finally voted to set the house "On a hight of land north of the road and 
east of the burying ground, if the committee can agree with the owners 
of the land." The burying ground referred to in this vote was evidently 
that located on the west shore of the pond, and the "hight of land" the 
summit of the hill upon which the meeting-house now stands. 

At a subsequent meeting in March of the same year, Capt. Samuel 
Douglass, Waldron Stone, Swallow Tucker, Lieut, Randal McDonald and 
Lieut. Sampson Farnsworth were elected as a committee "to oversee the 
business and conduct the matter of building the house." It was also 
voted that the house should be- — "Forty feet long, thirty feet wide and 
eighteen foot posts"; and that "every man in town have an equal chance 
as may be in gitting stuff and laboring at the house." 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 209 

The foregoing vote would seem to indicate that there was at last a 
prospect of making some progress in the matter of locating and building 
the house. But, alas! the next entry in the records shows that the ap- 
parently peaceable prospect was only an illusionary one. For at a meeting 
of the townspeople in June of the same year, the old question of the house's 
location again came to the front, and it was voted that— "The setting up 
of the meeting-house be put off till next April, and that the comittee git 
Mr. Brown." 

Who "Mr. Brown" was, or what they wanted to get him for, does not 
appear in the records. Nor does it appear that the committee presented 
any petition to the Great and General Court. But the vote itself was a 
fine piece of strategy on the part of the partisans of the location on the 
hill. For it opened up the minds of the opponents to that site to a knowl- 
edge of the possibility that outside of the citizens of Raby there were 
others who, if called upon, had the authority as well as the power to 
settle the question at issue; and that their opponents had the will as 
well as the numerical strength necessary to call in that arbitrator. 

For the four years succeeding the foregoing vote there was another 
lull in the proceedings relative to the meeting-house ; occasioned, no doubt, 
by the town's being busily engaged in an effort to obtain additional terri- 
tory by adding to that which it already possessed the strip of land on the 
west side of Hollis to which under the terms of its charter it was legally 
entitled. But when in 1786 that important matter had been settled in 
favor of Raby, its inhabitants, with renewed zeal, returned to the prose- 
cution of the Meeting-house War. 

At the March meeting in 1787 the town again voted, and for the 
third time, to build a meeting-house ; and at the same time elected Samuel 
Douglass, James Campbell, Randal McDonald, Isaac Shattuck and 
Thomas Bennett as a committee — "To see the timbers got to build the 
same." Again the dimensions of the house were fixed; this time "38 feet 
long, 28 feet wide and two stories high." The committee was even in- 
structed as to the time — "within which the frame must be set up." 

But again the discordant elements warred. The spirit of contention 
got in its work, and at a town meeting in April following, it was voted — 
"To Chose a committee to say where the meeting-house shall stand and 
their judgment to be final and end all dispute in regard to that matter." 

In the month of October following, in accordance with that vote, 
Capt. Samuel Douglass and Capt. James Campbell were chosen as the 
committee; and, at the same meeting they reported as follows: "That 
the meeting-house shall stand at or near where the fence comes to the 



210 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

road from Foster's hovel and on the south side of the road and east of the 
grate bridge." The report was accepted by the meeting, and thus the 
problem of the location of the house, which had vexed and worried the 
people since when in 1780 they first voted to build it, at last seemed to 
have been satisfactorily solved. 

The friends of the location as fixed by this vote were jubilant and, 
like David of old, exalted their horns. They rejoiced with exceeding great 
joy. In fact they evidently overdid the rejoicing act by indiscreetly 
boasting of their victory over their opponents. So that, at last, the eyes 
of the latter were opened ; and it dawned upon them that both the prompt- 
ness of the committee in making its report, as well as the nature of the 
same, indicated that its members were, and had from the beginning been, 
in favor of the location which they had recommended, and were there- 
fore governed by their prejudices in selecting it. In fact, the opponents 
of the hill site soon realized that they had been the subjects of trickery, 
in that the said committee was, in its makeup, wholly one-sided, and that 
they were the victims of non-representation. Accordingly they hustled 
around and procured the calling on the 14th day of April, 1788, of an- 
other town meeting, at which, after much skirmishing and debating, they 
finally succeeded in carrying a vote — "To have a Court's committee to 
prefix a place to set our meeting-house." 

In accord with the foregoing vote, on the 29th day of May, the se- 
lectmen framed and forwarded to the Great and General Court a petition, 
of which the following is a copy : 

"To the Hon 11 the Senate and House of Representatives for the 
State of New Hampshire : 

The petition of the Subscribers the Selectmen of the town of Raby 
in the county of Hillsborough in said State Humbly shews That the In- 
habitants of said Town have voted to build a meeting-house in said Town 
but cannot Exactly agree on any particular spot of Ground to set it upon, 
and have agreed to petition your honors to send a committee to find out 
a suitable place for that purpose. 

Your petitioners therefore humbly pray your honours to Interpose 
and grant us such a Committee as your Honours in your great wisdom 
shall think fit and they as in duty bound will ever pray: 
Raby May 29, 1788 JAMES CAMPBELL ] Selectmen 

SAMPSON FARNSWORTH \ of 

RANDELL McDONALD Raby." 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 211 

On the 7th day of June following, the Court granted the prayer of 
the petition, and Timothy Farrer, of New Ipswich, Abiel Abbott, of Wil- 
ton, and John Goss, of Hollis, were appointed a committee — "to locate 
the meeting-house, the town to pay the expense." It is probable that 
this committee acted, selected the "spot" for the house's location, and 
reported accordingly. But a diligent search in the town records and State 
papers fails to reveal any record of such a report. Nor does it appear 
that the committee's decision, if they came to any, had any immediate 
effect by way of settling the question at issue. For, from the date of its 
appointment up to and including April 9, 1789, there occurred four addi- 
tional town meetings, at each of which the location of the meeting-house 
furnished the principal subject for discussion. At two of these meetings 
it was voted to delay the building of the house; and at one of them, that 
of March 4, 1789, a building committee was again elected. At this latter 
meeting occurred the first action relative to appropriating money to build 
the house; it being voted to raise thirty pounds for that purpose. 

By this time, the fact that they were engaged in a foolish and profit- 
less warfare, seems to have dawned upon the minds of all the interested 
parties. Since the town first voted to build a meeting-house a period of 
nine years had elapsed, during which the entire population had been em- 
broiled in a bitter controversy, no substantial progress made, and the end 
as yet was apparently afar off. Meanwhile many of those who were alive 
and interested in the matter at the beginning, had succumbed to the in- 
evitable, and passed on to that mystical land, where, in all probability, 
both cattle pounds and meeting-houses are unknown. Others had passed 
into their dotage, and were unable to have distinguished the meeting- 
house, if it had been built, from the pound, which was built. The young 
men and women had reached maturity, married, had children of their 
own and, having divided up between the factions, were now asissting 
their elders in carrying on the war. 

Such was the condition of affairs when, at a meeting of the inhab- 
itants in the month of April, 1789, the town took what appears to have 
been its final action relative to either the building or location of the house. 
For from this time the records contain no further references to the matter. 
At this meeting, after again voting to build a meeting-house, it was finally 
voted — "To send another petition to the court's committee praying them 
to come and view the town again and see if they can find a spot of ground 
for us to set our meeting-house on that is satisfactory to the town." And 
at the same meeting, Lieut. Ephraim Sartell, Lieut. James Mcintosh, 
Benjamin Shattuck and Joshua Smith were elected as — "A committee to 



212 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

wait on the court's committee." The records contain no evidence that 
the "court's committee" were ever called upon to act under the provisions 
of the foregoing vote. Tradition says, however, that it did act, and that 
it reported in favor of the site upon which the house now stands. 

Soon after the passing of the vote of April, 1789, work on the house 
was begun, and continued with considerable regularity until it was ready 
for occupation in 1791. 

The land upon which the meeting-house stands was a gift to the 
town from Richard Cutts, Shannon Esq. His deed of conveyance of the 
same to the town, recorded in Hillsborough Registry, Vol. 203, page 603, 
is dated Nov. 21, 1796. 

The men who constituted the building committee were Benjamin 
Farley, Joshua Smith, Eleazer Gilson, and Daniel Spaulding. This com- 
mittee had the general supervision of the work. The house was built by 
the people ; each one contributing to its construction in labor or materials, 
or both, according to their several means and circumstances. From time 
to time appropriations to defray necessary expenses were made. Besides 
these appropriations, money was raised by selling pew grounds. 

The inconveniences and troubles to which the people were subjected 
in the matter of raising funds, and the straits to which they were reduced 
by reason of their poverty, are well illustrated by an article inserted in 
the warrant for a town meeting on the 15th day of April, 1790; which, 
referring to a prior vote of the town to sell pew grounds, reads as follows — 
"That it is thought by a considerable number of the inhabitants to be 
attended with great difficulties and inconveniences as well as a vast deal 
more expense and to hinder the building of the house as soon as the same 
might be done." The article concludes with these words — "And to act 
thereon as the town may think proper as well as for the interest as the 
Peace and quietness of the town." At this same meeting it was — "voted 
that Daniel Spaulding," who was one of the building committee, and 
also a carpenter, "should build the porches"; which, the vote specified, 
were to be ten feet square and ten feet high. 

These porches were subsequently built by Mr. Spaulding, he furnish- 
ing all the materials and performing all the labor, for which he was to 
receive — "One pew in each corner of the South side of the meeting-house 
and what room he shall make above by building the porches." 

In May, 1790, ninety pounds were voted for furnishing the house, 
of which amount it was stipulated that nine pounds should be paid in 
hard money. In this same year Minister's rates were levied for the first 
time. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 213 

On the 12th day of March, 1791, eleven years and two months after 
the town's first vote to build it, the meeting-house was so far completed 
that it was used for the first time, the occasion being that of holding a 
town meeting. 

Thus, after a war of words extending over a period of more than ten 
years, the meeting-house was so far completed as to be ready for occu- 
pancy and use. There is no record that it was ever formally dedicated, 
and tradition also is silent on that point. 

Although it was erected as a house of God, the first meeting holden 
within the walls was a secular one. For many years, or at least as long as 
the town continued to look after the religious as well as the worldly inter- 
ests of its people, the house was used both as a place of worship and a 
town house. It still is and always has been used for holding the annual 
and special meetings of the town (with the exception of a few years in the 
latter part of the last century, when the town meetings were held in 
Tarbell's hall in the village) . 

But its use as a place of public worship ceased many years ago. Dur- 
ing its use for the latter purpose, it was occupied at various times by the 
Congregationalists, Methodists, Christians, and Universalists in turn. 
The house has received some severe usage in its day. Forty years or 
more ago, after it ceased to be used for religious purposes, the town au- 
thorities, influenced doubtless by a desire of obtaining from it some rev- 
enue for the town, were induced to lease it to a local company for the 
storage of furniture and lumber and, in order to make room for storage, 
authorized the removal of its furnishings, or the greater part of them. 
Under this authority the lofty, ornate and beautiful pulpit was ruthlessly 
torn down and carried away, disappearing from sight as completely as if 
it had never existed; the box-pews, the "sheep-pens" of our childhood, 
were removed from the main floor of the house, and only the gallery pews 
are now left, as samples of the architectural skill of the early fathers of the 
town, and proofs of their painful and loving endeavors to beautify and 
adorn the house with the work of their hands. It stands today as a most 
worthy monument to their memories. 

It is perhaps the only representative of the type of meeting-houses 
common in New England a century and more ago now standing in Hills- 
borough County. The memories associated with it are holy. Partially 
despoiled though it is, it still retains sufficient marks of its original inside 
architectural beauty to attract the antiquarian and the lovers of the past, 
and it is to be hoped that no sacrilegious hand, moved by the spirit of 
despoilation, will ever again be lifted against it. 



214 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



CHAPTER XIII. 

Ecclesiastical History, Continued. 
1791-1837. 

Rev. John Wythe — Organization of the Congregational Church, Dec. 20, 
1795 — First Deacons — Church Covenant — Call and Settlement of 
Rev. Lemuel Wadsworth — His Ordination, His Ministry, and 
Sketch of His Life — Inscription on the Tombstone of Rev. Lemuel 
Wadsworth — The "Rev." "Doctor" William Warren — Movements 
in Favor of the Formation of a Church of the "Christian" De- 
nomination in 1821 — Rev. Jesse Parker — Rev. Leonard Jewett — 
Rev. Samuel H. Holman — The Pastorate of Rev. Jacob Holt — 
Sketch of Mr. Holt's Life — Opening of the Meeting-house to the 
Occupancy of all Religious Denominations and the Formation of a 
"Christian" Church in 1831— The Pastorate of Rev. Henry E. 
Eastman, and Sketch of His Life — Abandonment of the Old Meet- 
ing-house as a Place of Worship by the Congregationalists. 

As has already been stated in a prior chapter, the old meeting-house 
was occupied for the first time on the 12th day of March, 1791, the occa- 
sion being that of holding a town meeting. For the consecutive five 
years following its opening the house continued to be used for both civic 
and religious meetings. During this period, as had from the beginning 
been the custom, all secular matters connected with divine worship con- 
tinued to be controlled by the town authorities; who attended to the 
expenditure of appropriations raised for that purpose, hired the minis- 
ters, and did such other acts as in their judgment were essential for the 
general religious welfare of the citizens. 

The only minister of record who preached here during this period was 
the Rev. John Wythe. 

Meanwhile, the building of the meeting-house was substantially com- 
pleted, the last appropriation for that purpose — sixty pounds — having 
been made in May, 1792. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 215 

There was, as yet, no regularly organized church in town ; but there 
were a considerable number of professing Christians, some of whom, at 
least, were actively engaged in doing the Master's work. 

Organization of the Congregational Church. 

Dec. 10, 1795, fifteen of the town's citizens united to form the Con- 
gregational church existing here at the present time. The names of these 
original members of the church are as follows : 
Benjamin Farley, Samuel Farley, 

Ezekiel Proctor, Lucy Farley, 

Joshua Smith, Rebekah Campbell, 

Clark Brown, Hannah Shattuck, 

Ephraim Sawtell, Abigail Sawtell, 

Eleazer Gilson, Hannah Gilson, 

Joshua Emerson, Lydia Emerson. 

Joshua Smith, Jr. 

On the day of the church's organization, Eleazer Gilson and Joshua 
Emerson were elected as its first deacons ; and on the same day it entered 
up its first record as follows : 

"Dec. 10, 1795; This day was the church of our Lord Jesus Christ in 
Raby embodied after the Congregational order." 

Covenant of the Church. 

The members subscribed to the following covenant: 

"We, whose names are hereunto enjoined, do covenant with the Lord 
and with one another, solemnly binding ourselves in the presence of God 
and His people, that we will, by divine assistance, walk after the Lord 
in all his ways, as he hath revealed them in his holy word. 

1st. We avouch the Lord Jehovah, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, to 
be one God, and give up ourselves and children to be His people. 

2ndly. We give up ourselves to the Lord Jesus Christ, as our Prophet, 
Priest and King ; relying on his word for instruction, his merits for justi- 
fication, and his power and grace for assistance, protection and salvation. 

3dly. We engage by divine assistance to walk together in the spirit 
of love, watching over one another with humility and fear, avoiding every 
occasion of offence, and reasonably admonishing, and in weakness restoring 
such as may be overtaken in a fault. 



216 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

4thly. We engage to watch and pray that we so cause our light to 
shine before men that they, seeing our good works, may glorify our Father 
who is in heaven, and the peace and prosperity of Jerusalem, and to sub- 
mit to the Gospel discipline of the church. 

5thly. We engage to submit ourselves to the Congregational order 
and discipline of Christ's house, and to the lawful ordinance of man for 
the Lord's sake. 

6thly. We engage to give up our infant offspring to God in baptism, 
and to bring up those committed to our care, in the nurture and admoni- 
tion of the Lord ; setting an example of piety before them, both in public 
and in private. 

All these things we engage in the sincerity of our hearts, this tenth 
day of December, one thousand seven hundred and ninety-five." 

For more than a year after the organization of the church both it 
and the town continued to be without a settled pastor; although there is 
reason to believe that during the latter part of that period the Rev. Lemuel 
Wadsworth was, so far at least as the church was concerned, officiating in 
that capacity. 

On the 21st day of November, 1796, the church voted unanimously 
to give Rev. Lemuel Wadsworth a call to become its pastor, and at the 
same time instructed its moderator to invite the town to join with the 
church in the call. This "call" by the church could, under the circum- 
stances, be construed in no other way than as an expression of its mem- 
bers' confidence in the reverend gentleman's qualifications for the position; 
a recommendation on their part which might serve to guide their fellow- 
citizens in their selection of a minister, for the support of whom each would 
have to bear his proportionate share of taxation, and in whose ministra- 
trations each and all were entitled to participate equally. 

The Town's Call and Settlement of the Rev. Lemuel Wadsworth. 

On the 7th day of December, 1796, a little over a year after the 
organization of the church, the citizens in town meeting assembled, voted 
— "To give the Rev. Lemuel Wadsworth a call to settle as a gospel minis- 
ter"; and chose William Green, Clark Brown, Ephraim Sawtell, Joseph 
Emerson and Eleazer Gilson as a committee — "To consult with Mr. Wads- 
worth and see if he is disposed to settle in the ministry." This committee 
attended to its duties and, at the same meeting, reported a favorable 
answer from Mr. Wadsworth. Upon receiving the committee's report, 
the meeting proceeded to elect the following named citizens as a commit- 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 217 

tee — "To arrange upon the terms of his settlement and salary, i. e., Wil- 
liam Green, Ephraim Sawtell, Joseph Emerson, Isaac Shattuck, Swallow 
Tucker, James Campbell, James Mcintosh, Randel McDonald and Eleazer 
Gilson." At an adjourned meeting, on the following day, the committee 
reported, and its report was accepted, as follows: 
Rev. Mr. Wadsworth's Settlement: 

Voted — "To give the Rev. Lemuel Wads worth for a Settlement as a 
gospel minister in this town the sum of one hundred and fifty pounds one- 
third thereof at or before the first day of Nov. 1797, one third thereof at 
or before the first day of Nov. 1798, and the other third thereof at or 
before the first day of Nov. 1799." It was also unanimously voted — 
"That said Wadsworth's salary take place at the time of his ordination 
and that the town pay him sixty pounds yearly as a salary until the first 
of Nov. 1799 and after the last mentioned date seventy pounds yearly 
during his being a gospel minister in this town"; also voted — "That Mr. 
Wadsworth return about the first day of April next to give his answer." 

Mr. Wadsworth undoubtedly did "return" and agree to the foregoing 
offer of settlement. For May 22, following, the town appointed Isaac 
Shattuck, Ephraim Sawtell and William Green as a committee — "To con- 
sult with him concerning his ordination" ; which, as it was finally arranged, 
occurred Oct. 11, 1797. 

Ordination of Rev. Lemuel Wadsworth. 

A full account of the services attendant upon the ordination of Mr. 
Wadsworth would doubtless be very interesting reading. But, alas, such 
an account is impossible. Relative to it tradition, even, is silent; and 
the records of the town furnish little or no information. The only entries 
on the records of the church relative to it are recorded under the dates of 
September 7th and 8th, respectively. By these records it appears that an 
invitation to join in the ordination exercises was extended by the Brook- 
line church to the churches in Hollis, Pepperell, Mass., Townsend, Mass., 
Mason, New Ipswich, Wilton, Milford, Canton, Mass., Stoughton, Mass., 
Groton, Mass., and Amherst. 

As to the part taken by the town in that important event in its his- 
tory, the following excerpts from its records furnish the only attainable 
information : 

"Aug. 28, 1897, voted: That Mr. Asher Spaulding provide for the 
Council at the ordination in the following manner — that for the supper 
sixteen cents each on said ordination day and for all other meals seventeen 



218 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

cents each and for horses eleven cents each and for all the liquors lemons 
and shugar at the common retail prices." It was also voted: "That the 
selectmen and Esquire (Benjamin) Farley adjust Mr. Spaulding's account 
respecting the above entertainment"; also — "That R. M. McDonald, 
Joseph Tucker, Eli Sawtell and Daniel Spaulding be a committee to take 
care of the meeting-house on said ordination day." 

In addition to the foregoing, the following entries copied from the 
pages of an ancient order book of the town, undoubtedly refer to the 
ordination exercises: 

"Feb. 17, 1798, Paid Asher Spaulding in full for nales and brandy 
delivered to the committee for building the stage for ordination seventy 
two cents." 

"March 5; Asher Spaulding in full for providing for the council -133." 

As to the duties of the foregoing named committees, according to the 
traditions prevailing among the old people of fifty years ago, they were 
well performed. The committee on building the stage, by the — it is to 
be hoped — judicious use of the "nales" and "brandy," succeeded in erect- 
ing a platform which sufficed for the occasion; and the committee on 
entertainment provided a sumptuous ordination dinner; which, according 
to one tradition, was served at the dwelling house of Swallow Tucker, on 
"the plain" and was lacking in neither — "liquors, lemons or shugar," — 
and under the influence of which, some, at least, of the partakers became 
spiritously elevated to the degree that their spirituality, for the time 
being, passed under a cloud. 

Mr. Wadsworth at the time of his ordination was in the 29th year of 
his age, and just out of college. 

Immediately after his ordination, he moved into the house which to 
the day of his death he continued to occupy as a parsonage. This house 
was located on the southerly side of the highway leading westerly from 
the old meeting-house to the "Pond bridge," and at a point about half 
way between the meeting-house and the bridge. The house disappeared 
many years ago; but its cellar hole is still in evidence, and may be iden- 
tified by a large elm tree which grows out of its depths; and, also, by a 
clump of lilacs, which, having survived the flights of years, still flourish 
on its borders and with each returning spring pay fragrant tribute to the 
memory of its former occupant. 

Mr. Wadsworth's pastorate covered a period of about twenty years; 
during which the town's population increased from about 400 in 1797, to 
about 550 in 1817, and the church is said to have been strengthened by 
the addition of nineteen new members. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 219 

As to Mr. Wadsworth's personal appearance, the writer in his boy- 
hood days often heard his mother, who during the latter part of his min- 
istry was a girl in her teens, describe him as a man of short stature and 
large body; light complexioned, and full face with pleasant features; 
polite and courteous in his manner and very social in his habits. 

She well remembered seeing him on many occasions at her father's 
house, when engaged in making his pastoral calls; during which, as was 
then the custom, the decanter of spirits was invariably produced and its 
contents sampled by him before his departure. She said, too, that it was 
no unusual event for him to drop in on the young people at their social 
gatherings, and even at their dancing parties; where, in the pauses of 
the music, during which the young men bearing waiters loaded with liquid 
refreshments circulated among the dancers, he would help himself to a 
glass of brandy and, having drank the same, depart with a courteous 
bow and a hearty "good night." 

Mr. Wadsworth died at Brookline on the 25th day of November, 
1818; leaving a widow surviving him, but no children. His funeral, which 
was largely attended, occurred in the old meeting-house on the 27th day 
of that month. The funeral sermon was preached by the Rev. Ebenezer 
Hill of Mason. The sermon was afterwards printed; and, from a copy 
of the same which, fortunately has been preserved through the passing 
years, the following excerpt, containing a brief sketch of Mr. Wadsworth's 
life, and a brother clergyman's estimation of his character and abilities, 
has been taken. Mr. Hill said: 

"The REV. LEMUEL WADSWORTH was born of respectable 
parents at Stoughton, Massachusetts, March 9th, 1769. In the early 
part of his life he had no more advantages of education than were common, 
at that time, to all classes of people. His circumstances did not allow 
him to follow his strong inclination to obtain a collegiate education, 
until his time was his own. Then under many forbidding circumstances 
and embarrassments, he applied himself to study with resolution. With 
little charitable aid, principally by his own exertions, he maintained him- 
self when fitting for college, and through the course of his studies. While 
a member of college he conducted himself with such regularity, sobriety, 
meekness, unassuming manners, and close application, as to gain the es- 
teem of the officers and of his fellow students. At the age of twenty-four 
years he graduated at Brown College in Providence, in the year 1793 and, 
without delay, applied himself to the study of divinity. He soon became 
a candidate for the gospel ministry, the object for which he labored to 



220 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

qualify himself. Divine Providence directed him to this place and, after 
preaching a suitable time for the people to be acquainted with his gifts, 
a church being formed, he received the almost unanimous call of the 
church and town to settle with them as their minister. Their call he 
accepted, and was ordained Oct. 11, 1797. From that time he continued 
to labor among them and to enjoy, in a degree very remarkable at this 
day, the high esteem of his people until suddenly removed by death on 
the 25th instant. 

It was in the milder virtues, humility, gentleness, condescension, 
filial piety, brotherly love and Christian kindness, Mr. Wadsworth shone 
with distinguished brightness. He was exemplary in his life, and a pat- 
tern of Christian forbearance and forgiveness. He always appeared con- 
tented with the allotments of Divine Providence, for he did not seek great 
things for himself here. Philanthropy and kindness were congenial to his 
heart. He was at all times ready with whatever he possessed, to admin- 
ister relief to the distressed, and comfort to his friends, and all men were 
his friends. Not only was the law of kindness on his lips, but all who 
had occasion for it experienced his kindness. His liberality to the poor 
was extended to the utmost of, if not beyond, his ability. And even the 
vicious he sought to reclaim rather by kindness than by severity. His filial 
piety and brotherly affection shone brightly in his tender care and liberal 
support of an aged mother and a helpless sister, to the close of their lives. 
His brethren in the ministry he loved, and, diffident of himself, and mod- 
est in his manners, he in honor preferred others to himself. On every 
occasion they experienced the kindness of his heart. 

For several of the last years of his life he was exercised with many 
bodily infirmities, but not so as often, or for a long time, to take him off 
from his stated labors. His increasing infirmities and disorders he viewed 
with calmness as harbingers of early death. His pains he bore with firm- 
ness of mind and with patience and resignation, as coming from the hand 
of God. As the time of his departure evidently approached, his hopes 
were strong and full of immortality. * * * While he manifested a 
readiness to depart, his only hope was in a crucified Savior. He said: 
'I have coveted no man's silver or gold, I have labored with my hands to 
supply my necessities, and I have had a little to give to the poor, and I 
gave it cheerfully. But I have no merit. I have endeavored to convince 
others that there is salvation for sinners only in Christ. I have no other 
hope and I desire no other way.' * * * Blessed are the dead who die 
in the Lord from henceforth; yea, saith the Spirit, they may rest from 
their labors, and their works do follow them.' " 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 221 

Mr. Wadsworth was buried in the Pond cemetery. On the 10th day 
of March, 1818, the town voted to erect a tombstone over his grave, and 
chose as a committee for that purpose, EH Sawtell, Deacon Eleazer Gilson 
and Benjamin Shattuck. Under the supervision of this committee, the 
tombstone was subsequently prepared and placed in position by Luther 
Hubbard, at a cost of forty-five pounds and sixteen shillings. It is located 
in the front part of the cemetery near the entrance gate, and consists of 
an oblong block of hewn granite with a slab of slate stone lying flat upon 
its upper surface. The slate stone slab bears the following inscription : 

"This Monument is Erected to the Memory of Rev. Lemuel Wads- 
worth, the first Minister of the Gospel in Brookline." 

He was born in Stoughton, Mass., March 9, 1769, and ordained pastor 
of the church in this place Oct. 11, 1797. He performed the work of a 
gospel minister twenty years. Living in harmony with the people of his 
charge, being highly esteemed for his ministerial labors, for meekness, 
humility, gentleness and brotherly kindness. He departed this life Nov. 
23, 1817, in full hope of a glorious immortality, through Jesus the Lamb 
of God, in whom he trusted and in whom he labored to persuade others to 
trust, as the only Saviour of Sinners. "Mark the perfect man and behold 
the upright. For the end of that man is peace. Blessed are the dead who 
die in the Lord, and their memory is blessed." 

Several years after Mr. Wadsworth's death, his widow, Abigail Wads- 
worth, was united in marriage with Lieut. Ephraim Sawtell. During her 
married life with Mr. Sawtell they resided in the old Capt. Robert Seaver 
house on the north highway to Milford, the same being at the present 
time owned and occupied as his home by George F. Shattuck. Mrs. 
Sawtell survived her husband for many years, dying at an advanced age 
in the fifties. 

For twenty successive Sundays after the death of Mr. Wadsworth, 
the pulpit was occupied by ministers hired by Mrs. Wadsworth Among 
those thus hired were the Rev. Jesse Parker, Rev. John Barrett, and 
Rev. Samuel Dix of Townsend, Mass. 

At the March town meeting of the year 1818 there was an article in 
the warrant relative to giving Mr. Barrett a call, but it was passed over. 
However, it was voted to raise one hundred and fifty dollars for preaching, 
and Ensign Bailey and Randel McDonald were elected a committee — 
"To lav out the same." 



222 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

The "Reverend" Doctor (?) William Warren. 

Soon after the date of the foregoing vote the townspeople were agree- 
ably surprised by the advent in their midst of a stranger who answered to 
the name of William Warren, announced himself as a physician by profes- 
sion, and signified his intention of opening an office in town, which he did. 
Where he originated and from whence he came to Brookline are questions 
which to this day have remained unanswered. Indeed, for what little 
information we have relative to his career in town, until toward the very 
last of it, we are indebted solely to tradition. But, whoever he was, he 
came here as a pilgrim and a stranger and the citizens took him in. Af- 
terwards, he took them in. 

Being a man of good address, courteous and polite in his manners, 
and possessed of a knowledge of medicine which, however superficial it 
may have been, he had the tact or good fortune to use discreetly, he soon 
acquired a local reputation as an excellent physician. Nor was he less 
successful in establishing the reputation of being a consistent Christian, 
which he professed to be. He was a regular attendant at religious meet- 
ings, where his pious demeanor, ready command of language, and fluency 
of speech soon won the approval of the elders, and undoubtedly suggested 
to them the idea of engaging him to fill the then vacant pulpit. This idea 
was carried into effect; and thus it happened that in but a very short 
time after his arrival he was serving his fellow citizens in the dual ca- 
pacity of medical adviser and spiritual shepherd; a state of affairs which 
appears to have been satisfactory to all parties concerned. For a while 
this arrangement worked well, and everything moved on harmoniously. 
The "doctor" labored assiduously, exhibiting equal skill in cutting, slash- 
ing, plastering, purging and bleeding his patient's mortal parts, and sooth- 
ing, comforting, and instructing their immortal parts; and his patients, 
of both parts, in turn tumbled over each other in their zeal to employ and 
pay him for his services. 

But, as after events proved, Mr. Warren, notwithstanding his pious 
pretensions, was really a wolf in sheep's clothing, a bold, bad man. Like 
many another successful rogue before him, however, he couldn't stand 
prosperity. After a while, feeling secure in the strength of his hold upon 
the respect and confidence of the citizens, he began to exhibit his true 
colors. Gradually it leaked out that he was a gay Lothario — a typical 
Don Juan, and most scandalous stories concerning him began to be cir- 
culated. These stories increased in magnitude and number until they 
involved in their meshes half the families in town, and threatened to be 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 223 

the causes of a series of divorce cases which would have swamped the 
county courts. Matters at last came to such a pitch that the citizens 
were forced to take action. 

At a town meeting holden Sept. 18, 1820, the warrant contained the 
following article — "To see if the town will discharge Dr. William Warren 
from any further ministerial services and pay him for what service he has 
done to this time, or act anything on said article that the town may think 
proper." After a heated discussion and after the taking of several ballots, 
which showed considerable dissimilarity of opinion among the voters, the 
article was finally carried, and the selectmen were authorized — "To notify 
Dr. Warren that he is dismissed from any further ministerial services after 
this time." The selectmen dismissed him and, subsequently, he was paid 
the amount due him for services rendered — not by the town, however, as 
appears by the following record : 

"Jan. 30th, 1821"; article in the warrant: "To see if the town will 
unite in forming a society in said town for the support of the ministry 
providing that those that brought in certificates not to pay Dr. Warren 
for his services as a preacher will pay their proportional part with those 
who have paid to Dr. Warren, which sum is to be annexed and laid out 
in having a gospel minister." 

In response to the foregoing article, the citizens voted to join such 
a society as was suggested by it. 

The foregoing is the last record which mentions the name of Dr. 
William Warren. He probably shook from his feet the dust of Brookline 
and departed for more congenial surroundings. But the evil effects of 
his "ministry" upon the community and church were not effaced for many 
a year. The little church was greatly demoralized; and although imme- 
diately after his departure the old meeting-house became the scene of a 
series of religious gatherings at which both the laymen and pastors the 
neighboring churches volunteered their services and, with the members 
of the home church, labored earnestly and zealously to inspire them and 
the citizens with renewed zeal and enthusiasm in religious affairs, their 
efforts were comparatively fruitless of results. 

For the four following years the town was without the services of a 
pastor. 

In the meantime, in 1821, certain of the citizens who were in their 
religious beliefs of the "Christian" persuasion, made a movement towards 
the establishment in town of a church of that denomination. To that 
end they endeavored to obtain the use of the meeting-house for holding 
their meetings. After some opposition, they succeeded, on the 30th day 



224 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

of January, 1821, in obtaining from the citizens the following vote — "To 
let the Christian Society have the privilege of the meeting-house if they 
bring a minister of good credit." The words "minister of good credit" 
in this vote are especially noticeable. The people did not want any more 
Doctor Warrens. To what extent the "Christians" at this time availed 
themselves of the said "privilege" is now unknown; as are, also, the 
names of those who were active in the movement. But it was the first 
religious society other than the Congregationalists to obtain the privilege 
of occupying the meeting-house. 

In 1822 and 1823 the Rev. Jesse Parker, the Rev. Leonard Jewett 
and the Rev. Samuel H. Tolman each occasionally preached in town. 
Of the three foregoing mentioned clergymen, the writer has been unsuc- 
cessful in his search for information relative to the Rev. Jesse Parker. 

Rev. Leonard Jewett was a native of Hollis where, at that time, he 
was residing and, being in poor health, occasionally supplying pulpits in 
the neighboring towns. In 1833 he accepted a call to the Congregational 
Church in Temple, where he was ordained March 6 of that year. July 
25, 1844, he resigned his charge in Temple and returned to Hollis, where 
he died Feb. 16, 1862. 

Rev. Samuel H. Tolman was born in Dorchester, Mass., April 30, 
1781. He graduated at Dartmouth College in 1806; studied for the min- 
istry, and was ordained at Shirley, Mass. At the time of his supplying 
the pulpit in Brookline, he was preaching, probably, either in Dunstable, 
Mass., or in South Merrimack. He died at Atkinson, N. H., April 2, 1856. 

The Pastorate of Rev. Jacob Holt. 

By the year 1825 the community had so far recovered from the dis- 
astrous effects of the "ministry" of "Dr." Warren that it began to give 
serious consideration to the question of settling another minister. At a 
meeting of the citizens holden on the 20th day of April, the selectmen 
were instructed to confer with the Rev. Jacob Holt — "Respecting preach- 
ing or act anything respecting the same as they may think best." 

No further action relative to preaching appears to have been taken 
until the 14th day of March following, when it was voted — "To ordain 
Rev. Jacob Holt on condition a sufficient subscription should be obtained, 
and that William S. Crosby, Moses Shattuck, George Daniels, Esq., and 
William Hall be a committee to draft off the old bond get subscribers 
and sign a new one with such enlargements as will be thought proper." 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



225 



The committee commenced its labors, but evidently was not very 
successful in procuring signatures to the bond. For on the second day of 
October of the same year, Nathaniel Shattuck, Deacon Eleazer Gilson 
and Capt. Mathew Wallace were elected as a new committee — "To obtain 
an additional minister bond." 

Dec. 6, 1825, the church, as appears by its records, joined in the call 
to Mr. Holt. 

Dec. 27, 1825, although, as appears by a subsequent town record, the 
minister's bond had not been completed, the town voted — "To ordain Mr. 
Jacob Holt to take pastoral care of our church." At the same time with 
this vote, Thomas Bennett, Ensign Bailey, George Daniels, Esq., William 
Hall, and Deacon Eleazer Gilson were elected as a committee — "To wait 
on Mr. Holt and appoint the council and find a place where they can be 
entertained and appoint a day for his ordination and make provisions for 
the same." 

This committee attended to its duties, and on the 31st day of De- 
cember, 1826, the Rev. Jacob Holt was ordained as a gospel minister and 
installed as pastor of the local church. 

The Ecclesiastical Council called for the purpose of Mr. Holt's ordi- 
nation convened at the house of James Parker, 2nd. The council was 
constituted of pastors and delegates from the churches in the following 
named towns : 

Rev. Ebenezer Hill, 

Rev. EH Smith, 

Rev. David Palmer, 

Rev. Humphrey Moore, 

Rev. James Howe, 

Rev. Thomas Bede, 

Rev. Charles Robinson, 
The council was organized by choosing the Rev. Ebenezer Hill as 
moderator, and Rev. James Howe as clerk. 



Mason, 
Hollis, 

Townsend, Mass. 
Milford, 

Pepperell, Mass., 
Wilton, 
Groton, Mass., 



William B. Flagg. 
Ephraim Burge. 
Eliot Gowen. 
Daniel Burns. 
Deacon Jonas Parker. 
Deacon Ezra Abbott. 
Calvin Boynton. 



Order of Exercises. 



Introductory Prayer, 

Sermon, 

Charge, 

Ordaining Prayer, 

Right hand of fellowship, 

Concluding prayer, 



Rev. David Palmer. 
Rev. Humphrey Moore, 
Rev. Ebenezer Hill. 
Rev. Eli Smith. 
Rev. James Howe. 
Rev. Charles Robinson. 



226 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

An interesting part of the proceedings of this council was its action 
on the following resolution relative to the church in Groton, Mass. : 

"Resolved that this council do not consider the transactions of this 
day as acknowledging the regular standing of the church in Groton, over 
which the Rev. Charles Robinson is Pastor." 

The vote on the resolution was taken by yeas and nays and resulted 
as follows: Yeas: Smith, Burge, Moore, Burns, Palmer, Gowan, Hill, 
Flagg, Howe, and Parker; Nays: Bede, Abbott, Robinson, and Boynton. 

As to the day's doings outside of the ordination exercises proper, there 
is little doubt that they were, to say the least, pleasant if not exhilarating. 
For by a license obtained from the selectmen, John H. Cutter who was 
then keeping store in this town, on that day "mixed and sold liquors at 
the dwelling house of Asher Shattuck and Coburn Green's house and 
shop"; and Lieut. John Smith was licensed — "To mix and sell on the 
Common." 

There were also present "music" from Pepperell; and a "band of 
singers" from Hollis, concerning which and whom the following items 
copied from an ancient order book of the town form interesting reading: 

"Feb. 26, Luke George Order $6.00 It being in full for the music 
from Pepperell on ordination day." 

"Feb. 7, James Parker, Jr. order for $7.00 it being in full for his find- 
ing supper and spirit for the Hollis singers on ordination day." 

"Capt. Joseph Hall, order $6.91 It being in full for providing the 
singers on ordination day." 

By this order book it also appears that James Parker, Jr., also pro- 
vided the entertainment for the members of the council at a cost of thirty- 
one dollars. 

Mr. Holt's pastorate, which extended over a period of about four 
years, appears to have been quiet and uneventful. Tradition has pre- 
served no information concerning it and, after his ordination, the only 
entry relative to him to be found in the town records is under date of 
March 13, 1829; when it was voted — "To appoint a committee to assist 
Mr. Holt to collect money of those who signed his bond." 

But this entry is a significant one for, from it, it is fair to draw the 
inference that the failure of his parishioners to comply with their obliga- 
tions under the terms of their bond securing the payment of his salary 
was the cause which finally led him to sever the bonds by which he was 
bound to them; which, in 1831, he did. He went from Brookline to 
Ipswich, Mass. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 227 

The following sketch of Mr. Holt's life is taken from a historical 
discourse delivered before the Hollis Association of Ministers, May 6, 
1862, at Hollis, by Rev. A. W. Burnham, D. D., of Rindge. : 

REV. JACOB HOLT. "Very little is on record respecting Mr. 
Holt. He was born in Andover, Mass., in 1780, — graduated at Dartmouth 
College in 1803,— became the second pastor of the church in Brookline, 
N. H., in 1827, — resigned in 1831, — passing the remainder of his life in 
Ipswich, Mass., where he died, probably about 1851 *-52. Quiet and 
retiring in his habits, a sincere Christian, he was evangelical in his re- 
ligious faith, and cordially devoted to his work as a minister of the gospel." 

It may be well at this point to mention the fact that, after the ex- 
piration of Mr. Wadsworth's pastorate, the word "settlement," referring 
to the town's contract with its ministers, does not again appear on its 
records. In the case of Mr. Holt, Mr. Wadsworth's successor, although 
he was engaged by the town, the payment of his salary appears to have 
been guaranteed by a bond signed by individual citizens; and it is prob- 
able that the same arrangement prevailed in the case of Rev. Mr. East- 
man, the town's third minister. Nevertheless, the town doubtless con- 
tinued to contribute to the support of preaching during the years covered 
by the pastorates of the first three of its ministers. For the "minister 
tax," which was assessed for the first time in 1790, continued to be as- 
sessed and collected, as the records show, year by year, until as late as 
1843, when it appears on the book for the last time. 

For the four years next succeeding that of Mr. Holt's resignation the 
town and church were without a settled pastor. During this period the 
sentiment in favor of a more liberal interpretation of the Scriptures and 
a broader expansion and freer expression of religious thought, which had 
manifested itself in the attempt, in 1821, to establish in town a "Chris- 
tian Society," again came to the surface. 

This sentiment, although vigorously opposed by the Congregation- 
alists, gained in strength so that in 1831, at a town meeting holden on the 
8th day of March, its advocates were sufficiently strong in numbers to 
carry a vote — "That the Meeting-house may be occupied by different 
denominations." 

By that vote, religious tolerance, so far as the use of the Meeting- 
house was concerned, was established in Brookline ; and from that day to 
the present time the house has been open to the use of any and all relig- 
ious denominations whose adherents profess to worship God in spirit and 
in truth, and according to the dictates of their own consciences. 

* Mr. Holt died in 1847, aged 66 years. — [Ed.] 



228 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

That vote was really the beginning of the end of the support by the 
town, as such, of what the records term "gospel preaching." 

The Pastorate of Rev. Henry E. Eastman. 

Mr. Eastman was called to the pastorate of the Congregational 
Church on the 15th day of September, 1835. He was called by the Church 
and Society. There is no record of the town's joining in the call. Indeed, 
as a matter of fact, the town's records make no mention of him whatever, 
except in connection with his holding, in 1837, the position of superin- 
tending school committee. But from the fact that during his pastorate 
the minister's tax continued to be assessed, it is probable that the town 
contributed toward his support. 

Mr. Eastman was ordained Dec. 9, 1835. His ordination council was 
constituted of pastor and delegates from the Congregational churches in 
Mason, Milford, Pepperell, Mass., Hollis, Amherst, and Townsend, Mass. 

Order of Exercises. 

Introductory Prayer Rev. David Palmer. 

Sermon, Rev. James Howe. 

Consecration Prayer, Rev. Ebenezer Hill. 

Charge, Rev. Silas Aiken. 
Right Hand of Fellowship, Rev. David Perry. 

Address to the people, Rev. Humphrey Moore. 

Concluding Prayer, Rev. David Perry. 

In the meantime, from the date of the town's vote in 1831 to open 
the meeting-house to all denominations, the "Christians" had been en- 
joying its use in conjunction with the Congregationalists. But just 
prior to, or soon after, Mr. Eastman's ordination, this joint occupancy 
ceased. The Congregationalists, who viewed with apprehension and 
alarm the growth in town of the spirit of liberalism, and who were dis- 
satisfied in being compelled to share with a society whose creed was, in 
their judgment, fraught with so much danger to the welfare, both here 
and hereafter, of the citizens of the town, in the use of a house of worship 
of which for so many years they had held undisputed possession, resolved 
to abandon the old meeting-house as a place of worship, and did so. For 
a few years succeeding their abandonment of the old meeting-house they 
held their meetings in the schoolhouses. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 229 

It has been claimed by some people in the past, that the Congrega- 
tionalists were compelled to leave the old meeting-house by action on part 
of the town, and that the town formed, or authorized the formation, of 
a "Christian" church, with the understanding that its ministers should 
exchange puplits with the Universalists and Unitarians. But so far as the 
records of the town are concerned they do not contain a particle of evi- 
dence of any such action on its part; except it be found in the vote of 
1831, which opened the house to the use of all religious denominations. 
For from that date onward, the records contain no mention of any vote, 
or action of any description, on the part of the town relative to hiring or 
engaging the services of a minister of any denomination whatever, not 
even of Mr. Eastman. Nor that the citizens in any way changed their 
dictum, as expressed in the vote of 1831, relative to the occupancy of the 
meeting-house. 

That the Congregationalists abandoned the house is true; and that 
they abandoned it voluntarily, and for the reasons herein before stated, 
and not because they were compelled to do so by any action upon the 
part of the town, is probably equally true. 

Mr. Eastman held his pastorate until the fall of 1837 when he was 
released at his own request and by the society, as appears by the following 
entries in its records : 

"Oct. 28, 1837; voted, to grant the request of Rev. Henry E. East- 
man in dissolving his pastoral relations now existing between him and the 
Society. Voted to grant his request so that he may leave immediately." 

The following sketch of Mr. Eastman's life was written by the Rev. 
Daniel Goodwin, late of Mason, deceased. 

"REV. HENRY E. EASTMAN was for a short time a member of 
the Hollis Association. He was born in Granby, Mass.; was graduated 
at Amherst College in 1832, and at Andover in 1835; was married to 
Miss Minerva Nash, of Conway, Mass., 1836; was ordained in Brookline, 
Dec. 9, 1835. He remained there two years. Afterwards preaching in 
Tolland, Mass., for a time, when he went to the West under the direction 
of the Home Missionary Society, and had been located four years in 
Somerset, Hinsdale County, Michigan, when his master called him home. 

He died of typhoid fever in September, 1852. In his last sickness, it 
is said, he was remarkably peaceful, though strongly desirous of recover- 
ing for the good of others. For himself, he felt it would be sweet to rest 
in the bosom of Jesus. He left a widow and two sons, to whom he spoke 
words of hope and counsel, saying: 'Do not be troubled; the Lord will 



230 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

provide.' When asked, in his last moments, how he was, he replied, 
'Happy in the Saviour.' 

Mr. Eastman is represented as a conscientious man, a faithful min- 
ister, distinguished for his amiable and inoffensive traits of character. 
In a resolution passed by the Presbytery of Marshall, he is spoken of — 
'As a brother beloved in the Lord; intelligent, earnest, and faithful, and 
as an example of single hearted devotedness to the cause of Christ.' " 




CONGREGATIONAL MEETING-HOUSE— 1 839 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 231 



CHAPTER XIV. 

Ecclesiastical History, Continued. 

1837-1912. 

Building of the Congregational Meeting-house, 1837-1839 — Rev. Daniel 
Goodwin Called to the Pulpit — Mr. Goodwin's Ordination and 
Dedication of the New Meeting-house — Presentation of Commun- 
ion Service by Deacon Thomas Bennett — A Feud in the Church 
and the Society, and the Resulting Unhappy Effects — Mr. Good- 
win Severs His Connection with the Church and Society — Bio- 
graphical Sketch of Rev. Daniel Goodwin — The Pastorate of Rev. 
Theophilus Parsons Sawin— Services at His Installation — Sketch 
of His Life — Pastorate of Rev. John H. Manning — Pastorate of 
Rev. Francis D. Sargent — Revised Articles of Faith and Covenant, 
1871 — The James H. Hall Bequest to the Church and Society — 
Repairing and Remodeling of the Meeting-house in 1875 — The 
Mary F. Peabody Bequest — The Gift of the Clock on the Church 
Tower — Dedication of the Remodeled Meeting-house — The Gift of 
a New Church Bell by Edward T. Hall — The James N. Tucker 
Bequest to the Church and Society — The Wilkes W. Corey Bequest 
to the Church and Society — Rev. Mr. Sargent's Resignation as 
Pastor, Biographical Sketch of Rev. F. D. Sargent's Life — Pas- 
torate of Rev. George L. Todd— Sketch of Rev. Mr. Todd's Life- 
Pastorate of Rev. Fred E- Winn and Sketch of His Life — The Pas- 
torate of Rev. J. Alphonse Belanger, and Sketch of His Life — 
Centennial Year of the Organization of the Congregational Church 
and the Church's Celebration of the Same in 1895 — Address at 
the Celebration by Rev. Frank D. Sargent — Original Centennial 
Poem by Edward E. Parker — The Pastorate of Rev. John Thorpe 
— Sketch of Mr. Thorpe's Life — Pastorate of Rev. George A. Ben- 
nett, and Sketch of His Life — Meeting-house Repaired and Re- 
dedicated in 1906 — Pastorate of Rev. Warren L. Noyes, and Sketch 
of His Life — List of Deacons of the Congregational Church from 
1795 to 1912 Inclusive — Clerks of the Congregational Church from 
1795 to 1912 Inclusive. 



232 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

In the preceding chapter Rev. Mr. Eastman's resignation is recorded 
as having been accepted Oct. 28, 1837. On the 23rd day of December 
following, the members of the Congregational Society met at the dwelling 
house of Asher Shattuck and, having elected Thomas Bennett as moder- 
ator and James Parker, Jr., as clerk of the meeting, after a lengthy dis- 
cussion, resolved that "it was expedient to build a new meeting-house"; 
and voted that the said new house should be located — "On the east side 
of the Milford road on the hill near to Mr. Benjamin Wheeler's shoe- 
maker's shop on land owned by Mr. Albert George, provided the land 
could be purchased of Mr. George for that purpose." 

At an adjourned meeting on the 27th day of the same month, Horace 
Warner, James Parker, Jr., and Asa Betterly were elected as a building 
committee. Jan. 15, 1838, William Gilson was appointed as a committee 
of one — "To take a deed of a piece of land Suitable to set said meeting- 
house on." On the 16th day of February, 1838, Albert George of Boston, 
Mass., by his deed of that date, in consideration of sixty dollars to him 
paid, conveyed to the Congregational Society of Brookline the land on 
which its meeting-house now stands. 

At a meeting of the society on the 25th day of February, it was 
voted — "To build the meeting-house agreeably to a plan drawn by Horace 
Warner, * * * the dimensions of which on the ground is fifty feet by 
forty." At a subsequent meeting in the same month, the society voted 
— "To build a vestry in the roof of the house." 

At a meeting of the "stockholders" on the 18th day of March, 1839, 
James Parker, Jr., and Asa Betterly were elected a committee — "To sell 
pews, and to let such pews as remain unsold until there is an opporutnity 
of selling the same." 

The foregoing meeting was holden in the "new meeting-house"; and 
as the last recorded meeting prior to it was holden at the dwelling house 
of Capt. Nathan Dunphee on the 5th day of June, 1838, it is evident 
that at some time between these two last mentioned dates the house was 
so far completed as to be ready for occupancy. 

As to the methods employed in building the new meeting-house, the 
records show that they were similar to those employed in building the old. 
Every member of the society contributed to its construction, according to 
his means or disposition, either by donations of money or building mate- 
rials, or both; and the deficits in the amount necessary to defray the ex- 
penses was made up from the sum realized by the sale of the pews. 

On the 3rd day of January, 1838, the pews were sold at public auction. 
The conditions of the sale appear to have been to sell to the highest bidder 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



233 



the privilege of selecting by number the pew which he desired, and for 
which, when so selected, he paid its price as already fixed by the committee 
on the sale of the pews. 

The following record of the sale is given here not only because it gives 
the names of those who purchased the pews and the price paid by each, 
but also because it establishes the identity of some, at least, of those who 
were then members of the society. 

"Pews Sold at Auction 



No. 8 
1 
13 
11 
9 
7 
29 
15 
27 
5 

10 
17 
31 
33 
20 
23 
19 
36 
34 
18 
6 
2 
32 
16 
40 
39 
12 
25 
14 
30 



to Timothy Wright; 

" Asa Betterly; 

" Nathaniel W. Colburn; 

" C. Farley; 

" James H. Hall; 

" E. Sawtell; 

" Horace Warner; 

" W. W. Corey; 

" Nathan Dunphee; 

" William Gilson; 

" John Burge; 

" Robert Seaver; 

" James Parker; 

Thomas Bennett; 
" David Harris; 
" Stephen Perkins; 
" Leonard French; 
" John Hutchinson; 
" Timothy Wright, Jr. ; 
" Waldo Wallace; 
" Francis A. Peterson; 
" William Gilson; 

Thomas Bennett; 
" Abel Foster; 
" Eli Sawtell; 

Thomas Bennett; 
' Artemas Wright; 
' Franklin McDonald; 
" Asher Shattuck ; 

Jonas Hobart; 



choice money, $9 . price 



7. 

7. 
10. 
12. 

8. 

8. 

8. 

8. 

7. 

3. 

2. 

5. 

2. 

3. 

1. 

1. 

2. 

3. 

1. 

1. 

1. 



1. 



$64.00 
57.00 
67.00 
75.00 
77.00 
73.00 
73.00 
63.00 
68.00 
67.00 
58.00 
47.00 
70.00 
67.00 
38.00 
46.00 
36.00 
47.00 
58.00 
51.00 
46.00 
51.00 
55.00 
50.00 
50.00 
50.00 
50.00 
55.00 
46.00 
50.00 



234 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

Price 60.00 
60.00 
35.00 
45.00 
50.00 
130.00 
The Amount of Pews Sold 1825.00 



No 


3 ' 


' John S. Daniels; 


i t 


35 ' 


William Gilson; 


t i 


22 ' 


' Isaac and Joseph Sawtell; 


a 


24 ' 


i a 1 1 tt a 


it 


28 ' 


t a a a a 



$1955.00" 



The average price per year, at this date, for pew rental was three 
dollars. 

In the summer of 1849 the new meeting-house was remodeled, and 
underwent some changes, the nature of which are not definitely known. 
Prior to making these alterations, however, the authorities took the pre- 
caution to secure from the owners of the pews the following receipt : 

"Brookline, August 9th, 1849. 

We the undersigned, Pew holders in the Congregational Meeting 
house in Brookline before the Altering and Remodeling of Said house Do 
Hereby Acknowledge that wee have Received Payments in full of the 
Congregational Society for all Pews by us owned Before the Alteration of 
Said House. 

William Gilson, James H. Hall, Robert Seaver, Horace Warner, 
Eldad Sawtell, John S. Daniels, Thomas Bennett, John Burge, Calvin R. 
Shed, Louisa Spaulding, Deverd C. Parker, Joseph Hall, David Hobart, 
Asa Betterly, Nathan Dunphee, Franklin McDonald, Isaac Sawtelle, 
Joseph Sawtell, N. W. Colburn, F. A. Peterson, Asher Shattuck, Wilkes 
W. Corey, Artemas Wright." 

The interior arrangements of the new meeting-house as it was origin- 
ally constructed, were very similar to those in it at the present time. 
The pulpit was located at the back part of the house, and in very nearly 
the same position as that occupied by the present pulpit. Behind the 
pulpit, built out from the church walls, was an alcove, in which were lo- 
cated the chairs, and, at a later period, the sofa, designed for the use of 
the minister and his visiting clerical friends. The seats for the congrega- 
tion faced the pulpit, and were constructed so as to be at right angles 
with the side walls of the house. The gallery over the vestibule at the 
front of the building was for many years used as a choir loft; so that, 
whenever, during that part of the devotional exercises devoted to singing, 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 235 

the congregation arose and remained standing, in order to face the music 
it had to right about face. 

For a number of years after moving into the new meeting-house, 01 
until the house was remodeled in 1875, the choir continued the practice, 
which had been established during the latter part of its sojourn in the 
old, of using violins, violoncellos and, occasionally, a cornet, as accom- 
paniments and aids to its singing. But in the latter part of the fifties a 
seraphine, an instrument then just coming into general use, was installed 
in the choir loft; and with its installation, the fiddles and cornets were 
gradually relegated back to the dance-halls and military bands, where, in 
the opinion of many of the congregation, they properly belonged. 

Pastorate of Rev. Daniel Goodwin. 

In 1839, the new meeting-house having been practically completed, 
the church and society decided to call a pastor to fill the pulpit which had 
been vacant ever since the resignation of the Rev. Mr. Eastman in 1837. 

After due deliberation, on the 10th day of January, 1839, a call was 
extended to Rev. Daniel Goodwin. The call was signed on the part of 
the church by Deacon Thomas Bennett, Eldad Sawtell and Timothy 
Wright; on the part of the society by Nathaniel W. Colburn, John Burge 
and Robert Seaver. By its terms Mr. Goodwin's salary was fixed at four 
hundred dollars per annum, to be paid semi-annually, and he was to be 
allowed — "Four Sabbaths in a year for himself." 

Mr. Goodwin accepted the call and, on the 27th day of February, 
1839, he was ordained in the new meeting-house; and at the same time 
the house was dedicated with appropriate ceremonies to the service of 
the Lord. 

Exercises Attendant upon the Dedication of the New Meeting- 
house and the Ordination of Rev. Daniel Goodwin, 

Feb. 17. 1849. 

The council was composed of the following pastors and delegates: 
Mason; Rev. Ebenezer Hill and Rev. A. H. Reed, Moses 

Merriam, Del. 
Merrimack; Rev. H. Moore, EH Sawtell, Del. 

Townsend, Mass. ; Rev. David Stowell and Rev. David Palmer. 
Pepperell, Mass. ; Rev. James Howe and Deacon Jonas Parker. 
Milford; Rev. Abner Warren, Richard Williams, Del. 



236 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

Hollis; Rev. David Perry, Thomas Cummings, Del. 

Derry; Rev. E. L. Parker. 

Rev. Ebenezer Hill was elected moderator and Rev. David Perry 
scribe of the Council. 

The dedicatory exercises occurred first, and were conducted as fol- 
lows: 

Invocation and reading of the Scriptures, Rev. Abner Warren. 

Prayer, Rev. H. Moore. 

Sermon, Rev. Ebenezer Hill. 

Concluding Prayer, Rev. David Stowell. 

Ordination Exercises. 

Introductory prayer, Rev. Abner Warren. 

Sermon, Rev. E. L. Parker. 

Charge to the pastor, Rev. H. Moore. 

Ordination Prayer, Rev. David Stowell. 

Right hand of fellowship, Rev. David Perry. 

Address to the people, Rev. A. H. Reed. 

Concluding prayer, Rev. James Howe. 

Mr. Goodwin was the fourth in order of succession of the pastors of 
the church. At the time of his taking charge as pastor of its people, the 
church was still suffering from the demoralizing conditions occasioned by 
its abandonment of its original place of worship. But it was still the 
church of the fathers, and was recognized as such by the townspeople, 
the majority of whom continued to worship within its walls. 

Mr. Goodwin, who was a young man, a recent graduate of Andover, 
and well equipped for the work in which he was about to engage, came into 
his charge with a full knowledge of the situation in which the church was 
then placed; and doubtless entered into the performance of his pastoral 
duties with a firm determination to work for its upbuilding ; to be zealous 
in season and out of season in doing all things necessary and proper for 
the promotion of peace and harmony between it and the citizens and for 
the advancement of the cause of Christ. 

He was from the beginning successful in his efforts. A thorough be- 
liever in the principles of Christianity, his emphatic and unreserved ad- 
vocacy of those principles, as well as his consistent Christian life, soon 
imbued the minds of his fellow citizens with a belief in the sincerity of his 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 237 

professions; and his affability, courteousness, and ability to readily adapt 
himself to his environments won their respect and esteem. Under his 
ministrations the church partially regained its weakened prestige, and for 
many years he was a tower of strength in the church and a power for 
good in the town. 

May 2, 1848, Deacon Thomas Bennett presented the church with a 
communion service consisting of a tankard and four cups of Brittania 
ware ; for which the church tendered him a vote of thanks. 

In 1850, the harmonious relations which had hitherto existed be- 
tween the pastor and his people were disturbed by the happening of an 
event which, though insignificant in itself, had the immediate effect of 
dividing the society and church into two warring factions, and in the end 
resulted in Mr. Goodwin's withdrawing from his pastoral connections with 
them. 

The trouble originated in an attempt on the part of Dr. Jonathan C. 
Shattuck to procure the construction of the southerly part of the highway 
which connects the village Main street with Milford street via the brow 
of the hill back of the Congregational meeting-house. In 1849-50, Dr. 
Shattuck purchased of the Congregational society a lot of land on the 
summit of said hill and erected thereon the dwelling house in which he 
afterwards made his home, the house being the same which, at the present 
time is owned and occupied by Albert T. Pierce. At the same time 
he constructed that part of the road in question which leads in a westerly 
direction from the house down the hill to Milford street. 

Soon after the completion of his dwelling house, Dr. Shattuck be- 
came desirous of lengthening the road which he had already constructed 
by extending the same down the southerly side of the hill to Main street. 
To that end, he applied to the Congregational society which owned the 
land over which the contemplated extension would necessarily pass for a 
right of way by purchase of the same. Upon receipt of the Doctor's re- 
quest or proposition, both the society and church immediately divided 
into two factions, the members of one faction favoring, and those of the 
other opposing the same. The objections raised by those opposed to the 
project were that the construction of the contemplated road would injure 
the symmetry and beauty of the grove in the rear of the church and, by 
diminishing its size, diminish its utility as a place for holding out-door 
meetings, such as festivals and picnics, for which purpose it had long been 
in customary use. 

Thus the trouble began. In the contention which followed, Mr. 
Goodwin took an active part, siding with those who favored the granting 



238 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

of Dr. Shattuck's petition. Gradually, the entire body of the townspeople 
was drawn into the fray upon one side or the other. For several years 
matters went on in this way; the church meanwhile worshipping to- 
gether beneath the same roof, and both pastor and people in the perform- 
ance of their ordinary duties as Christians, conducting themselves toward 
each other with, at least, an appearance of harmony. But year after year 
the contention over the roadway grew fiercer and more bitter. 

At last, from being a contention in which each party was at first 
disposed to discuss fairly and in a Christian-like spirit the matter in dis- 
pute, the discussion reached the point where passion and prejudice took 
the place of reason and Christian fellowship, and merged into a wordy 
war of personalities, in which the members of each faction exerted them- 
selves to vilify and abuse those of the other. 

While matters were in this condition, the town authorities, acting 
upon a petition of some of the citizens, laid out and built the entire length 
of the road in question, in 1853, and the same was accepted as a public 
highway. It would seem as if this action on the part of the town relative 
to the roadway should have caused the ending of the dispute between the 
factions of the society and church. But it did not. On the contrary, it 
added to its intensity. The road, of course, was no longer a matter of con- 
tention. But there remained the fact that in the contention over it, Mr. 
Goodwin had taken sides with those who were in favor of its being built 
and, by his influence and counsel, aided them in bringing the affair to a 
result by which the opponents of the road felt that they had been grievously 
wronged. 

This latter faction also argued that Mr. Goodwin, by acting as a 
partisan, had destroyed his usefulness as pastor of the church. Accord- 
ingly, they requested him to resign his pastorate. 

Mr. Goodwin, who doubtless felt that he had acted in the matter 
conscientiously and for the best, declined to accede to the request of the 
majority and, in so doing, was supported by his friends. 

Failing in their attempts to obtain Mr. Goodwin's resignation, the 
majority faction, at a meeting of the church on the 12th day of January, 
1855, approached him with a proposition to call a council, ex parte or 
mutual, and refer the church difficulties to it for a settlement. Mr. Good- 
win declined to accept the proposition and, with his friends, withdrew 
from the meeting. After his departure the majority voted to call an ex 
parte council, and appointed Eldad Sawtell, James H. Hall and Levi 
Anderson as a committee of arrangements for the same. The committee 
attended to its duties, and in response to the call, Jan. 12, 1855, an ex 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



239 



parte council consisting of pastors and delegates from the following named 
churches, Kirk Street Congregational Church, Lowell, Mass.; Congrega- 
tional Church, Amherst; Congregational Church, Francistown, and the 
Congregational Church at Lyndeboro, met in the new meeting-house — 
"For the purpose of hearing the grievances of said majority of the church 
with their pastor and advising them what to do in relation to their diffi- 
culties." Mr. Goodwin was present by invitation. 

After deliberating over the matter at issue, the council united in 
advising the calling of a mutual council — "To investigate existing diffi- 
culties in the church and to advise respecting them, with authority to 
recommend the dissolution of the pastoral relations if in the judgment 
of the council it be deemed expedient." This recommendation was adopted 
by both factions of the church; which at the same time united in issuing 
a call for a mutual council. 

May 2, 1855, the mutual council assembled in the new meeting- 
house. It was constituted as follows: 



Congregational Church, 



Rindge, 



Olive Street Church, 


Nashua, 


Congregational Church, 


Milford, 


Congregational Church, 


Francestown, 


Congregational Church, 


Mason, 


Congregational Church, 


Mason Village, 


Congregational Church, 


Amherst, 


First Congregational Church, 


New Ipswich, 


Second Congregational Church 


, New Ipswich, 


Congregational Church, 


Hollis, 


First Congregational Church, 


Lowell, 


Kirk Street Church, 


Lowell, 



Congregational Church, 



Pepperell, 



Rev. A. W. Burnham, 
Deacon L. Goddard. 
Rev. Austin Richards. 
Rev. E. N. Hidden. 
Rev. L. Taylor, 
Deacon Seville Taylor. 
Rev. J. L. Arms, 
Thomas Wilson. 
Rev. E. M. Kellogg, 
Deacon Simeon Cragin. 
Rev. J. G. Davis, D.D. 
Deacon B. B. David. 
Rev. Samuel Lee, 
Deacon James Davis. 
Rev. J. Ballard, 
Deacon Henry Adams. 
Deacon Oliver Scripture. 
Rev. Linus Child. 
Rev. Amos Blanchard, 
Deacon Sewell G. Mack. 
Rev. Thomas Morey, 
N. Cutter. 



240 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

Rev. Linus Child was elected moderator and Rev. Amos Blanchard, 
scribe. 

Rev. B. F. Clark appeared as counsel for the aggrieved members of 
the church, and Rev. S. C. Bartlett appeared in behalf of the pastor and 
minority members. Both parties agreed to abide by the decision of the 
council, with the understanding that letters of dismission and recommen- 
dation to other churches should be granted to any who might desire them. 

After hearing and considering the evidence submitted by each fac- 
tion in support of the charges and complaints by each made, the council 
unanimously reported, in substance, that the charges were unsustained; 
and, further — "That nothing has transpired prejudicial to the moral or 
ministerial character of Rev. Mr. Goodwin. That no complaint has been 
made of any want of ability or fidelity in preaching the gospel or in dis- 
charging his parochial duties — that nevertheless through a variety of 
causes a portion of the church have been so far alienated towards him as 
to render his withdrawal and removal to another sphere of labor probably 
conducive, in the judgment of the council, to his enjoyment and useful- 
ness." 

"The council therefore bear testimony to his abundant self-denying 
and successful labors for the good of the people and, without advising 
him to ask for a dismission, they assure him, in the event of his deeming 
such a step to be expedient, of their cordial sympathy and esteem, and 
recommend him as an able and faithful minister of Christ." 

The pastor and church then concurred in requesting the council to 
dissolve; which, with renewed expressions of respect and esteem for the 
pastor and people, and commending the latter to the care of the Great 
Shepherd, it proceeded to do. 

From the date of the dissolution of the council, Mr. Goodwin's pas- 
toral connections with the church ceased. 

Mr. Goodwin's withdrawal from his connection with the church was 
followed by the withdrawal from its membership of a majority of those 
who had been his friends and supporters; some of whom united with the 
church of the same denomination at Hollis, others with the church at 
Mason, and a few with the church at Dunstable, Mass. Others united 
with the Methodist Episcopal Church in this place, twelve being received 
into its membership in 1858. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



241 




REV. DANIEL GOOD- 
WIN was born at London- 
derry, Jan. 25, 1809. He 
was a son of Joshua and 
Elizabeth (Jones) Goodwin. 
He prepared for college at 
Pinkerton Academy, gradu- 
ating in 1831. He was a 
graduate of Dartmouth Col- 
lege in the class of 1835, 
and of Andover Theologi- 
cal Seminary in 1838. In 
April, 1838, he was licensed 
to preach by the Andover 
Association. Feb. 25, 1839, 
he was ordained as pastor of 
the Congregational Church 
in Brookline, a position 
which he occupied for over 
sixteen consecutive years, 
he having resigned May 3, 
1855. In 1855 he officiated as acting pastor over the church at Hills- 
borough Bridge, and in 1856 officiated in the same capacity over the 
churches in Londonderry and Derry. In 1857 he received a call from the 
Congregational Church in Mason and was installed there April 18, 1860, 
serving until April 23, 1878, when he was dismissed at his request. 
After his dismissal he continued to reside in Mason as a private citizen 
until the date of his death, which occurred Dec. 30, 1893. 

Mr. Goodwin was scribe of the Hollis Association seventeen years. 
Many of his sermons and sketches were published, among which were the 
following: Sketch of the Church, Brookline, 1845 — True Piety and its 
Reward— Funeral Sermon of David Harris, M. D., Brookline, Jan. 29, 
1849— Funeral Sermon of Mrs. Abigail Hill, Mason, April 29, 1849— 
Sketches of Deceased Members of the Hollis Association, 1862 — Sketches 
of Towns and Cities of Hillsborough County, in the History of New 
England, 1880. 

Mr. Goodwin was thrice married. His first wife was Julia Ann, 
daughter of Eben and Lucy (Cross) Shute of Derry, to whom he was 
united in marriage, Feb. 12, 1839. She died at Brookline, Sept. 10, 1845. 
Aug. 24, 1846, he married Martha, daughter of Eli and Mary (McDonald) 



REV. DANIEL GOODWIN 



242 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

Boynton of Pepperell, Mass. She died in Mason, April 14, 1875. His 
third marriage was with Mrs. Lucy Jane Boynton, daughter of John and 
Susan (Jewett) Blood of Pepperell, Mass., Oct. 3, 1876. His last wife 
survived him, and at this date is residing in Pepperell, Mass. 

During his residence in Brookline he was a member of the school 
board in 1840-41, 1844-45. In Mason he was town clerk, 1870-75; su- 
perintendent of schools, 1858, 1873-75 and 1884-85; member of the 
school board, 1889-90; justice of the peace, 1876-93; notary public, 
1872-93; postmaster, 1869-78 and 1884-86. He represented Mason in 
the Legislature in 1885-86. He died at Mason, Dec. 30, 1893, aged 84 
years, 11 months, and is buried in the village cemetery in that town. 

The Pastorate of Rev. Theophilus Parsons Sawin. 

Oct. 11, 1856, the church and society united in extending a call to 
the Rev. Theophilus P. Sawin, then in charge of the City Missionary 
Society of Manchester, to become their pastor. By the terms of the call 
Mr. Sawin was to receive a salary of six hundred dollars per annum and 
to be provided with a home suitable for himself and his family. 

Mr. Sawin accepted the call, and was installed as pastor of the church 
and society Dec. 11, 1856. 

The installing council comprised the following named pastors and 
delegates : 

Amherst, S. B. Melendy, del. 

Pearl Street Church, Nashua, Rev. E. E- Adams. 

Mark W. Merrill, del. 

Church in Hollis, Rev. Pliny B. Day. 

Noah Farley, del. 

Church in Pepperell, Mass., Rev. Edward P. Smith, 

Deacon A. J. Ames, del. 

Church in Francestown, Rev. L. Taylor. 

Deacon Serville Starrett, del. 

Franklin Street Church, Manchester, S. Benton, del. 

Rev. E. N. Hidden. 

Church in Milford, Rev. Humphrey Moore, D.D. 

Daniel Burns, Jr., del. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 243 

Order of Exercises. 

Reading of Scriptures and prayer, Rev. Edward P. Smith. 

Sermon, Rev. E- E. Adams. 

Installing Prayer, Rev. h- Taylor. 

Charge to the Pastor, Rev. E. N. Hidden. 

Right Hand of Fellowship, Rev. h. Taylor. 

Address to the People, Rev. Pliny B. Day. 

Closing Prayer, Rev. Humphrey Moore. 

Benediction, Pastor. 

Mr. Sawin entered upon the performance of his ministerial duties 
under more than ordinary discouraging circumstances. The church was 
weakened by the loss of nearly one-half of its members, who withdrew 
from its communion in 1855, and also by a corresponding diminution in 
the number of those who constituted its society membership. In addition 
to its loss in membership it was also considerably involved in debt. But 
the new pastor set himself energetically to work to remedy the situation. 
In his efforts to that end, he had the full and cordial support of the church 
and society. Under the combined efforts of pastor and people the church 
soon regained a great measure of its former prosperity; and, gradually, 
confidence in its future, which had been weakened by the recent unhappy 
episode in its history, was restored to its members, and at the close of Mr. 
Sawin's pastorship it had practically resumed its normal condition before 
the war. 

After serving as the church's pastor for a period of nine years, four 
months and twenty-six days, on the 7th day of May, 1866, Mr. Sawin 
tendered his resignation; and at a council called to consider the same, on 
the 18th day of May, following, it was voted that it be accepted. He 
went from here to Manchester to engage in Home Mission work. 

During Mr. Sawin's pastorate in Brookline the total increase in his 
church's membership was 48; of which number, eight were admitted by 
letter and 38 by profession of faith. 

As a preacher and exponent of the gospel, Mr. Sawin never hesitated 
to tell the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, as he under- 
stood it. No one ever questioned the soundness of his theology. Yet, 
while earnest and explicit in expressing his own religious convictions, he 
was always mindful and respectful of the religious sentiments of those 
who differed from him. To this spirit of tolerance, combined with the 
evident sincerity of his belief in his own religious convictions, is, doubt- 



244 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



less, to be ascribed, under Providence, his success as a laborer in the 
Lord's vineyard in this place. 

As a citizen, Mr. Sawin was popular and respected. He was frank and 
social in his nature, democratic in his ways, witty, and possessed of a large 
fund of humor which he used readily and aptly, as occasion demanded. 
For example: on one occasion, a citizen, an easy-going man about town, 
presented him with a fine string of brook trout which Mr. Sawin received 
with thanks. A day or two after the donor, meeting him on the street, 
asked him if he enjoyed the trout. "Very much indeed, they were excel- 
lent," replied Mr. Sawin. "Well, parson," said the citizen, "I forgot to 
tell you that they were caught on Sunday." "Very likely," came the 
quick response, "but that wasn't their fault." 

REV. THEOPHIIvUS 
PARSONS SAWIN, son of 
Bela and Becca (Barber) 
Sawin, was born in Natick, 
Mass., Feb. 4, 1817. After 
passing through the public 
schools of Natick and Lynn, 
he succeeded in obtaining 
an academic education. 
Subsequently he taught in 
the public schools of Lynn; 
at the same time studying 
theology with Rev. Parsons 
Cooke, D. D. of that city. 
He was a graduate of An- 
dover Theological Seminary 
and was ordained to the 
ministry at Saugus, Mass., 
April 14, 1843. Soon after 
his ordination, Mr. Sawin 
was settled as pastor over 
the Congregational Church at Harwich, Mass., where he remained until 
1851. In the latter year he severed his connection with the church in 
Harwich and removed to Manchester, N. H., where he officiated as city 
missionary until he was called to the church in Brookline, in 1856. 

May 7, 1866, he resigned his pastorate here and returned to Man- 
chester, where, for the three years following his return, he occupied his 
former position as city missionary. Subsequently, and for various lengths 




REV. THEOPHILUS P. SAWIN 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



245 



of time, he was pastor over the churches in Revere, Mass., Middleboro, 
Mass., and Lyndeborough, N. H., the latter church being his last charge. 
He died at Medford, Mass., Jan. 19, 1886, aged 68 years and 11 months. 

His children: Theophilus Parsons Sawin, Jr., born Jan. 14, 1841; 
James Milton, born Jan. 27, 1842; Henry Chapin, born Aug. 22, 1843; 
Martha Anna, born 1845; Lura Sabrina, born Dec. 25, 1846; William 
Mason, born Aug. 10, 1849; Martha Ellen, born 1851. 

Rev. Theophilus Parsons Sawin, Jr., died in Troy, N. Y., Nov. 13> 
1906, after a pastorate of eighteen years in the First Presbyterian Church 
of that city; Henry Chapin Sawin died in Newton, Mass., April 28, 1905, 
after serving as principal of the Bigelow School in that city for thirty-one 
years, continuous service; James Milton Sawin resides in Providence, 
R. I., where he has been princiapl of the Elm-Point Street Grammar 
School since May 18, 1868, a period of forty years continuous service; 
Lura Sabrina now resides in Lynn, Mass., as a companion to a lady; 
William Mason resides in Bedford, Mass., and is a manufacturer of brushes, 
and a merchant in Boston, Mass. The other two girls died in infancy. 

Pastorate of Rev. John H. Manning. 

The Rev. Mr. Sawin's pastorate was followed by that of Rev. John 
H. Manning. Mr. Manning was called by the church and society through 
their committee, James H. Hall, John Burge and Francis A. Peterson. 
The call fixed his salary at seven hundred and fifty dollars per annum 
and the free use of the pasonage. He accepted the call, and was ordained 
in the Congregational meeting-house March 6, 1867. 

In the council of ordination the following churches were represented 
by their pastors and delegates : 



Amherst, 
First Church, 



South Church, 



Nashua, 

Pepperell, Mass. 
Andover, Mass., 
Milford, 



Rev. J. G. Davis, D.D. 
Francis Peabody. 
Rev. E. C. Hooker. 
Virgil C. Gilman. 
Rev. S. L. Blake. 
Asher Blood. 
Rev. Charles Smith. 
Nathan P. Abbott. 
Rev. F. D. Ayre, 
A. C. Crosby. 



246 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

Hollis, Rev. Pliny B. Day, 

John Perkins. 
Mount Vernon, Rev. B. M. Frink, 
William H. Conant. 
Mission Church, Manchester, Rev. T. P. Sawin. 

Order of Exercises. 

Reading of Scriptures. 

Anthem by the Choir. 

Invocation and Reading of Scriptures. Rev. B. M. Frink. 

Prayer, Rev. E. C. Hooker. 

Hymn. 

Sermon, Rev. Charles Smith. 

Ordaining Prayer, Rev. J. G. Davis. 

Charge to Pastor, Rev. P. B. Day, D.D. 

Fellowship of Churches, Rev. F. D. Ayre. 

Charge to the People, Rev. T. P. Sawin. 

Prayer, Rev. S. h. Blake. 

Anthem. 

Benediction, Pastor. 

Mr. Manning came to this church from Andover, Mass., his native 
place. He was educated in its public schools and Theological Seminary, 
of which latter institution he was a graduate. His ministry over the 
church in Brookline was very brief, extending over a period of only one 
and one-half years in duration. It was ended by his death after a brief 
hlness, Aug. 19, 1868. His sudden demise was sincerely mourned by the 
citizens, who had learned to respect and esteem him as an honorable 
citizen and a faithful pastor. 

On the records of the church, under the date of Aug. 19, 1868, is the 
following entry : 

"Rev. John H. Manning died after an illness of about ten days of 
brain fever, aged about 44 years. His funeral was attended at the church 
on Friday, Aug. 21st, by a sad and sorrowing people. 

The exercises were conducted by Rev. J. G. Davis, D. D., of Amherst, 
Rev. P. B. Day, D. D., of Hollis, and Rev. S. L. Blake, of Pepperell, 
Mass. His remains were on Saturday attended by his family and a dele- 
gation of his people to Andover, Mass.; where, after further appropriate 
exercises, they were interred to await a blessed resurrection." 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



247 



The Pastorate of Rev. Francis D. Sargent. 

For about one year succeeding the death of the Rev. Mr. Manning 
the church remained without a pastor. Aug. 10, 1869, its members 
united in extending a call to Rev. Francis D. Sargent. By the terms of 
the call the salary was fixed at eight hundred dollars per annum, the free 
use of the parsonage and four or five Sunday vacations yearly. The 
committee of arrangements consisted of James H. Hall, John Burge and 
Amos Gould on part of the church, and William J. Smith, and J. Alonzo 
Hall in behalf of the society. 

Mr. Sargent accepted the call and was ordained as pastor of the 
church, Oct. 20, 1869. 

Council of Ordination. 



Amherst Congregational Church, 

East Wilton Congregational Church, 

Milford Congregational Church 

Hollis Congregational Church, 

Townsend Congregational Church, 

Mason Village Congregational Church, 

Chelsea, Mass., "Winnese," 

Nashua First Congregational Church, 
Mount Vernon Congregational Church, 



Rev. J. G. Davis, D.D. 
Eli Sawtelle, Del. 
Rev. D. E. Adams, 
Zebediah Abbott, Del. 
Rev. George E. Freeman, 
R. D. Bennett, Del. 
Rev. David Perry. 
A. H. Wood, Del. 
Rev. G. H. Morse. 
Noah Ball, Del. 
Rev. George F. Merriam. 
Elisha B. Barrett, Del. 
Rev. A. H. Plumb. 
Samuel D. Green, Del. 
John D. Proctor, Del. 
Rev. Seth H. Keeley, 
Deacon William Conant, Del. 



The council was organized by the election of Rev. J. G. Davis as 
moderator and Rev. George E. Freeman as scribe. The order of exercises 
of ordination was as follows : 



Reading results of Council, 
Reading of Scriptures, 
Sermon, 



Rev. George F. Merriam. 
Rev. G. H. Morse. 
Rev. A. H. Plumb. 



248 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

Ordaining Prayer, Rev. J. G. Davis, D.D. 

Charge to Pastor, Rev. David Perry. 

Right Hand of Fellowship, Rev. D. E- Adams. 

Address to the People, Rev. George E. Freeman. 
Concluding Prayer by the Pastor of local 

M. E. Church, Rev. Alonzo Draper. 

Benediction, Pastor. 

Mr. Sargent was a graduate in the class of 1866 of Amherst College, 
and also of Andover Theological Seminary ; having graduated at the latter 
institution the same year in which he was ordained as pastor of the church 
in Brookline. 

He entered upon his duties as pastor with the zeal and enthusiasm 
of one who had thoughtfully and prayerfully devoted himself to a life of 
labor in and love for the work to which he felt he had been called of God. 
He was welcomed by his church with a respect which soon ripened into 
esteem, and eventually quickened into love which never failed, but grew 
stronger and more abiding during the entire course of his ministry here. 

Under his ministrations, the church and society enjoyed, perhaps, the 
highest degree of prosperity in its history. Peace and harmony prevailed 
in its councils, and year by year it grew in grace and in the knowledge of 
God. 

During his pastorate the total increase in the membership of the 
church was ninety-six (96); of this number, seventy-three (73) joined on 
profession of faith, and twenty-three (23 ) were received by letter. 

Jan. 5, 1871, the church voted to revise its articles of faith and cove- 
nant, and appointed as a committee or revision, Rev. Frank D. Sargent, 
Deacon John Peabody and Francis A. Peterson. The committee attended 
to its duties and the same year made a report, which was accepted by the 
church, in which it recommended the acceptance and adoption of revised 
articles of faith and covenant, which were adopted by the church, as 
follows : 

Articles of Faith and Covenant, 1871. 

"Art. I. We believe that there is one God, the Creator, and Pre- 
server of the universe, infinite in all natural and moral perfection. 

'Art. II. We believe that the Scripture of the Old and New Testa- 
ments were given by the inspiration of God, and are the only sufficient 
rule of religious faith and practice. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 249 

"Art. III. We believe that God is revealed in the Scriptures as the 
Father, the Son and the Holy Ghost, and that these three are one, and 
in all the attributes of God-head equal. 

"Art. IV. We believe that God governs all things according to his 
sovereign and eternal purpose yet in such manner as not to impair the 
freedom of men or his accountability for all his actions. 

"Art. V. We believe our first parents fell from the state of holiness 
in which they were created by transgressing the divine commandment and 
that in consequence all their descendants are by nature alienated from 
God and while left to themselves do invariably choose a life of sin. 

"Art. VI. We believe that the Lord Jesus Christ, who is God and 
man, has by his obedience, suffering and death, made an atonement for 
sin which is adequate to the salvation of all men, but is effectual in the 
salvation of only those who accept of its provisions by repentance and 
faith in Christ. 

"Art. VII. We believe that justification is an act of God's free 
grace whereby he pardons the penitent sinner, and receives him into 
divine favor, not on account of any works of righteousness done by him, 
but only for Christ's sake, through faith in His blood. 

"Art. VIII. We believe that Christ has a visible church in the 
world, that its ordinances are baptism, and the Lord's Supper; that it is 
the duty of Christians to unite with the visible church and observe its 
sacred ordinances, and that it is the privilege of believeing parents to 
devote their children to God in baptism. 

"Art. IX. We believe that there will be a general resurrection of 
the just and of the unjust and a day of judgment in which all shall give 
account to Christ for all the deeds done in the body, and that then the 
righteous will be received into a state of blessedness and the unrepentant 
into a state of punishment; both of which will be without end." 

The Covenant. 

"You do now avouch the Lord Jehovah to be your God and portion 
forever. 

"You acknowledge the Lord Jesus Christ to be your Savior, and the 
Holy Spirit to be your Sanctifier, Comforter and Guide. 

"You humbly and cheerfully consecrate to his service all your powers 
and possessions, and promise that you will seek, above all things, the 
honor and interests of his kingdom. 



250 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

"You cordially join yourselves with his church in a direct and special 
union, engaging to love and watch over its members, as your brethren, 
and to receive from them all needful care and admonition; to give dili- 
gent attendance with them to all parts of instituted worship ; to avoid all 
those worldly amusements which are inconsistent with the spirit of the 
Gospel and to live a sober, righteous and Godly life. 

"All this you do relying upon the merits of the Savior for the pardon 
of your sins, and beseeching God to prepare and strengthen you for every 
good work, to do His will, working in you that which is well pleasing in 
His sight, through Jesus Christ our Lord." 

The James H. Hall Bequest to the Church and Society. 

Aug. 15, 1874, James Harvey Hall, an active member of the church 
and one of the town's leading citizens, died testate. Under the provisions 
of his will, which was admitted to probate in August in that year, the 
church and society became beneficiaries in his estate in the sum of two 
thousand dollars, which they subsequently received. The bequest was 
set forth in the will as follows: 

"To the Orthodox Congregational Church and Society the sum of 
two thousand dollars to be used as a fund, the interest of which shall be 
expended for the support of the Gospel in said Church. Provided never- 
theless that if said Congregational Church and Society shall cease to 
exist, the said sum shall revert to my beloved wife and my children, 
Mary Frances Peabody and Edward T. Hall and their heirs." 

Meeting-house Repaired and Remodeled. 1875. 

During Mr. Sargent's pastorate the meeting-house was remodeled. 
The work of remodelling was begun April 20, 1875. It was completed in 
about seven months time. In the course of the work, the original struc- 
ture was raised from its foundations and the basement, as it exists today, 
constructed beneath it. The size of the house was also enlarged by the 
addition to its north end of an extension fifteen feet in length. At the 
same time the old-fashioned windows were replaced by modern win- 
dows of stained glass, and the auditorium improved and renovated. The 
cost of renovation was largely met by a generous donation of one thou- 
sand dollars, given for that purpose by Mrs. Mary J. Hall, widow of 
James H. Hall. 



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HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 251 

At this time also Mrs. Mary Frances Peabody, widow of George W. 
Peabody, as a tribute to her husband's memory, presented the church 
and society with the beautiful and excellent pipe organ which at the 
present time occupies its appropriate position in the choir loft; and 
coincident with the reconstruction of the meeting-house, the "Town 
Clock" was installed in its present position on the church tower. 

At the time of its being placed in position on the tower, this clock 
was said to be a gift to the church, but the name of the donor was with- 
held from the public; and, although since then a generation of men have 
come and gone, the name of the donor still remains unknown. 

In this year, also, Edward T. Hall, in honor of the memory of his 
father, James H. Hall, presented the church and society with the bell, 
which hangs in the church tower at the present time. 

Early in the month of October, 1875, the work of reconstruction was 
practically completed; and on the 13th day of that month, the recon- 
structed meeting-house was with appropriate ceremonies rededicated. 

Dedicatory Exercises. 

Hymn, Choir. 

Sermon, Rev. Charles Wetherbee, Nashua. 

Dedicatory Prayer, Rev. J. G. Davis, D.D., Amherst. 

Anthem, Choir. 

Address by the Pastor, Rev. F. D. Sargent. 

Addresses by Rev. D. E. Adams, Wilton; Rev. Hiram L. Kelsey, Hollis; 

Rev. William E. Bennett of M. E. Church, Brookline; and Rev. Mr. 

Lincoln of Wilton. 
Singing of Doxology. 
Benediction. 

In 1876, Charles H. Russell and Jefferson Whitcomb were elected 
deacons of the church; and in 1882 Perley L. Pierce was elected to the 
same office. 



* The bell which originally hung in this tower was purchased by the church and society, soon after 
the completion of its meeting-house in 1849, from the First Cong. Church and Society of Nashua. When 
in Nashua it hung in the tower of the old "North Church" in the "Harbor." Originally, it is said to have 
done service for a Spanish convent in the West Indies; from whence it was brought north by a sailing 
vessel. In 1875, from some unknown cause, it became cracked, and was removed from the tower. Its 
materials, so far as available, were used in the construction of the bell presented by Mr. Hall. 



252 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

The James N. Tucker Bequest. 

In 1882, the Congregational church and society and the Methodist 
Episcopal Church and society received from the estate of James N. Tucker, 
of Townsend, Mass., bequests in the sum of one thousand dollars each 
($1000). 

The Wilkes W. Corey Bequest. 

In the same year, 1882, each of said churches and societies received 
from the estate of Wilkes W. Corey, of Brookline, bequests in the sum of 
one hundred dollars ($100.) . 

The conditions attendant upon the bestowal of each of these bequests 
are set forth in the chapter devoted to the history of the local Methodist 
Episcopal Church in subsequent pages of this book. 

Aug. 25, 1883, Mr. Sargent, after fourteen years of faithful service, 
tendered to the church and society his resignation, giving as his reasons 
for so doing impaired health and the possible supposition that a change 
of pastors would be agreeable as well as beneficial to his parishioners. 
His resignation was met by the church and society by a prompt and 
unanimous request that it be withdrawn. But as he still insisted on its 
being accepted, his parishioners reluctantly consented to call a council to 
consider it; and, to that end, summoned several of the Congregational 
churches and societies of the neighboring towns to send delegates to a 
council to be convened in the Congregational Church Meeting-house in 
Brookline, Dec. 19, 1883. 

The council met at the time and place mentioned in the call. It was 
constituted of pastors and delegates from the churches in Hollis, Nashua 
(First and Pilgrim churches), Wilton, Mason, Milford and Mount Vernon. 

After due deliberation, during which the church and society joined 
in protesting against, and presented strong reasons for not accepting, the 
resignation, it was voted — "that the pastoral duties be not dissolved," 
and the council was dissolved. 

In 1887-88, by an arrangement between himself and his parishioners, 
Mr. Sargent, for a portion of the time, filled the vacant pulpit of the Con- 
gregational Church in Townsend, Mass., preaching there in the forenoon 
and in his home church in the afternoon of each Sunday. 

In vSeptember, 1888, he again tendered his resignation which, at a 
meeting of the church and society, November 1, was by his consent laid 
on the table; but only for a short time. Mr. Sargent was insistent in his 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



253 



demands for its consideration; and December 27, it was taken from the 
table, and a committee for calling a council to consider it appointed. 
The committee consisted of Rev. F. D. Sargent, Dr. Charles H. Holcombe, 
Deacon Perley L. Pierce, William J. Smith, J. Alonzo Hall, William H. 
Hall and George E. Stiles. It attended to its duties and, in response to 
its summons, on the 15th day of January, A. D., 1890, the members of 
the council met in the Congregational Church. It was made up of pas- 
tors and delegates from the churches in Greenville, Hollis, and the First 
Congregational Church in Nashua. 

Rev. George F. Merriam of Greenville was elected moderator, and 
Rev. Samuel L. Gerould, of Hollis, scribe. The council approved of the 
resignation, expressed its sympathy with the church, and recommended 
Mr. Sargent to the churches of Christ. 

After severing his connection with the church in Brookline, Mr. 
Sargent continued for several years to preach in Townsend, but finally 
accepted a call to the Second Presbyterian Church in Putnam, Conn., a 
position which at the present time (1914) he still continues to occupy. 

REV. FRANK DANA 
SARGENT was born in 
Boston, Mass., Nov. 10, 
1844. He is a son of John 
and Louisa (Hunt) Sargent. 

He prepared for college in 
the public schools of Boston 
and of Newton, Mass., and 
graduated from Amherst 
College in 1866. He studied 
theology in Newton and 
Andover Theological semi- 
naries, graduating from the 
latter institution in 1869. 

Soon after his graduation 
from Andover and the same 
year, the Congregational 
church of this town extended 
to him a call to fill its vacant 
pulpit as its pastor. Mr. 
Sargent accepted the call, 
and at an ecclesiastical council holden in the meeting-house of the church 




REV. FRANK D. SARGENT 



254 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

and society in Brookline on the 20th day of October, 1869, was ordained 
to the ministry and installed as pastor of the church. 

Mr. Sargent's pastorate in Brookline covered a period of twenty-one 
years in length, extending from 1869 to 1890, during the last four years of 
which, in connection with his home church, he was in charge of the Con- 
gregational Church in Townsend,. Mass. 

During his stay here he was the frequent recipient of flattering invi- 
tations to accept pastorates in other and wealthier and more influential 
churches; all of which for many years he invariably declined to accept; 
conceiving it to be his duty to remain with the church which had been 
the scene of his public entry into the service of the Master, and which was 
endeared to him by ties of love and affection formed by many years of 
most cordial and friendly associations with its members; and being loth 
to sever his connections with a community in whose midst he had first 
set up his family altars, and established a home; and of whose people he 
enjoyed in the highest degree the respect and confidence. 

In the latter years of his pastorate, however, while his love and 
affection for his church and people experienced no change, influenced, 
doubtless, to some extent by a growing conviction that his opportunities 
for future usefulness in his work would be largely increased if enjoyed in 
a larger field of action; and also by a desire to provide his children with 
better facilities for their education than his position here would enable 
him to afford them, he decided to sever his connections here; and to that 
end, in 1890, tendered to the church and society his resignation. After 
some delay on the part of the church and society, during which both the 
church and the community made strenuous endeavors to influence him to 
reconsider his decision, his resignation was accepted. Soon after its ac- 
ceptance, he removed from Brookline to Putnam, Conn., to take charge 
of the Congregational Church in that place, over which he was installed 
as pastor, Sept. 1, 1890; a position which at the present time (1914) he 
is still occupying. 

Mr. Sargent's pastorate in Brookline was a most successful one. 
The cause of its success is to be found in the fact that he practiced what 
he preached. His was not a religion of all things to all men, but of the 
right thing to every man. He thoroughly believed in the truth of the 
religion which he professed, and, having the courage of his convictions, 
did not hesitate to proclaim them, if need be, from the housetops. 

A preacher of more than ordinary abilities and eloquence, in his 
pulpit and elsewhere, he avoided display and ostentation, and used his 
abilities and eloquence to convince and convert his hearers by presenting 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 255 

to them the truths of the gospel in plain, simple and direct language 
which they could understand and comprehend. 

Firm and steadfast in the advocacy of his religious convictions, he 
nevertheless treated with respect the sentiments of those who differed 
with him in their religious beliefs; even when those beliefs were in direct 
contradistinction to his own; and, avoiding contention and strife, in a 
spirit of conciliation, strove to lead them to search the Scriptures, as 
being the fountain head of all religious truth, rather than by antagoniz- 
ing their views, to arouse in their souls that spirit of combativeness which 
would tend to strengthen, rather than to weaken, them in their beliefs. 

As a citizen, Mr. Sargent was held in no less esteem than he was 
held as a pastor. He was public spirited, and always ready to lend his 
aid and assistance to the advancement of the town and its citizens. Dig- 
nified and courteous in his deportment and manners, he treated all men 
as his equals in the Lord, and responded promptly to all calls upon his 
humanity for aid and assistance upon the part of those who were in dis- 
tress of mind, body or estate. 

He was an earnest and zealous advocate of the cause of education 
and a warm friend and supporter of the town's public schools; of which, 
during his residence here, he was many times elected superintendent, and 
of which their present efficiency and utility is owing in a large measure 
to his labors in their behalf. 

Mr. Sargent was united in marriage to Emma S. Taylor, daughter 
of Samuel Stevens and Rachel (Hills) Taylor, of Dunstable, Mass., Oct. 
21, 1869. Three children, all born in Brookline, have been the result 
of this mani ge: Bertha Louise, born March 19, 1872; Florence Ger- 
trude, born July 8, 1878, and Harold Taylor, born Oct. 15, 1885. 

The Pastorate of Rev. George L. Todd. 

Rev. George L. Todd was called to the pastorate of this church 
Feb. 18, 1890. He was acting pastor from March to May 8, 1890, when 
he was ordained to the ministry, 

Council of Ordination. 

The Council of ordination met in the Congregational Church, and 
consisted of pastors and delegates from the following churches. 
Congregational Church, Greenville, Rev. George F. Merriam 

Elisha B. Bennett. 



256 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



Congregational Church, 
Congregational Church, 
Congregational Church, 
Congregational Church, 
First Congregational Church, 
Pilgrim Church, 
Congregational Church, 
Congregational Church, 



Hollis, 


Rev. S. Iv. Gerould, 




Franklin P. Colburn. 


Mason, 


Rev. F. T. Smith. 




Geo. Whittaker. 


Milford, 


Rev. W. A. Thomas. 




Frederic W. Sawyer. 


New Boston, 


Deaon Moses A. Dane. 




J. P. Todd. 


Nashua, 


Rev. Cyrus Richardson 




A. N. Shepard. 


Nashua, 


Rev. Geo. W. Grover. 




Dea. Kimball Emerson 


Pepperell, Mass., 


Rev. C. S. Tomblin. 




Rev. Eli Harrington. 


Townsend, Mass., 


Rev. F. D. Sargent, 




Waldo Spaulding. 



Order of Exercises. 



Reading of Minutes, 

Invocation, 

Reading of Scripture, 

Prayer, 

Sermon, 

Prayer of Installation, 

Right Hand of Fellowship, 

Charge to Pastor, 

Charge to People, 

Prayer, 

Benediction, 



Rev. George F. Merriam. 
Rev. Cyrus Richardson. 
Rev. Geo. W. Grover. 
Rev. C. S. Tomblin. 
Rev. W. R. Cochran. 
Rev. Geo. F. Merriam. 
Rev. W. A. Thomas. 
Rev. S. L. Gerould. 
Rev. F. D. Sargent. 
Rev. G. N. Bryant. 
Pastor. 



Mr. Todd's term of service here was brief. But, brief as it was, it 
was of length sufficient to enable his parishioners to fully realize the fact 
that in him they had acquired a most worthy successor to Mr. Sargent, 
and they congratulated themselves accordingly. He labored assiduously 
and discreetly, both as pastor and citizen, in the performance of his du- 
ties. He was eloquent and persuasive in the pulpit, and out of it his 
deeds and words were thoroughly consistent with the religion in which 
he professed to believe. He had acquired the confidence, respect and 
esteem of his church and the citizens, and the prospect of a successful 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 257 

and profitable pastorate among a harmonious and most friendly people 
was before him when, on Oct. 5, 1892, he tendered his resignation. 

His resignation was reluctantly and sorrowfully accepted by the 
church and greatly regretted by the citizens. He went from Brookline 
to the church in Merrimack, Mass., where he was installed as pastor, 
Oct. 9, 1892. 

The following sketch of his life is taken from Rev. F. N. Carter's 
"Native Ministry of New Hampshire." 

GEORGE LORING TODD, D.D., Presbyterian, son of Deacon 
James Page and Desire (Loring) Todd, was born, June 19, 1859. Pre- 
paratory studies at Francistown Academy. Graduated at Amherst Col- 
lege, 1884, and at Auburn Theological Seminary, 1887. Licensed to 
preach and ordained by the Boston Presbytery, at Lowell, Mass., April 
13, 1887. Labored in Northern Michigan, summers of 1885 and 1886. 
Went to La Paz., Bolivia, South America, to establish a collegiate insti- 
tute, December, 1887. Succeeded, but was soon turned from his charge 
by the Jesuits. While waiting for opportunity to return home, engaged 
in mining works. Vice-consul of the United States there. Left Oct. 29, 
1889, reaching New York, Nov. 23, 1889. Acting pastor, Brookline, 
March to May, 1890; ordained pastor May 8, 1890; dismissed Oct. 5, 
1892. Installed Merrimack, Mass., Oct. 9, 1892; dismissed Sept. 9, 
1900. First church, Havana, Cuba, October, 1900-01. Superintendent 
of Reform and Industrial School at Guanajay, Cuba, April, 1901. En- 
tered again the employ of the Home Missionary Society and pastor, 
Havana, Cuba, Jan. 1, 1902-04. D. D. from Wheaton College, 1904. 

Married Alice, daughter of Elijah Fuller and Elizabeth Jacobs 
(Dunklee) Gould, at Antrim, Dec. 20, 1886. 

At the present time Mr. Todd is still in Cuba, where he is employed 
in educational work by the United States government. 

The Pastorate of Rev. Fred E. Winn. 

For nine months immediately following Mr. Todd's resignation, the 
church was without a settled minister; the pulpit in the meantime being 
supplied by pastors from the churches in the neighboring towns, and by 
others who preached as candidates, especially the latter. Listening to 
candidates for the vacant position finally became monotonous, and be- 
sides it was felt that it was conducive neither to harmony nor progress in 
spiritual affairs. Realizing the truth of these facts, June 20, 1893, the 
church and society united in extending a call to Rev. Fred E- Winn of 



258 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

Hudson. Mr. Winn's settlement was fixed at a salary of seven hundred 
and fifty dollars per annum and the use of the parsonage. Mr. Winn 
accepted the call, and was ordained Aug. 31, 1893. 

Council of Ordination. 

The churches represented in the council were as follows: Congrega- 
tional Church in Andover Theological Seminary; Congregational Church, 
Hudson; First Congregational Church, Nashua; Congregational Church, 
Greenville; First Congregational Church, Merrimack; Congregational 
Church, Hollis; Congregational Church, Merrimack, Mass.; Congrega- 
tional Church, Milford; Congregational Church, Amherst; Rev. F. D. 
Sargent, Putnam, Conn. ; Rev. Daniel Goodwin, Mason. 

Order of Exercises. 

Anthem, Choir. 

Invocation, Rev. Daniel Goodwin. 

Reading of Scripture, Rev. C. H. Dutton, 

Sermon, Rev. E. J. Hinch. 

Ordaining Prayer, Rev. S. L. Gerould. 

Charge to Pastor, Rev. F. D. Sargent. 
Right Hand of Fellowship, Rev. F. P. Chapin. 

Charge to the People, Rev. G. L. Todd. 

Closing Prayer, Rev. A. J. McGown. 

Benediction, Pastor. 

Mr. Winn came here soon after his graduation from Andover The- 
ological Seminary. The church at the time of his advent had already 
passed the high water mark of its day of prosperity. Many of those who 
had been prominent in its councils and generous contributors to its sup- 
port had passed on. The society was also weakened in numbers, and 
the congregation diminished in size. 

The new pastor entered upon his work with the courage born of faith 
and the zeal of an enthusiast. Indeed, his zeal in doing his work often- 
times seemed to race with and outstrip his discretion, especially so in his 
efforts to advance the cause of temperance, of which he was a most en- 
thusiastic advocate. In that cause, Mr, Winn evidently felt it to be his 
duty to "Cry aloud and spare not"; and there appears to be no question 
but that he did his duty faithfully. He spared no one, whether in or out 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 259 

of the church, whom he deemed guilty of directly or indirectly using, or 
dealing in, intoxicants. His work for the cause of temperance was un- 
questionably conscientiously performed. But Providence only knows 
what of good for the cause he really accomplished. So far as apparent 
results were concerned, when at the close of a pastorate of less than two 
years duration, he resigned his charge here, the temperance question was 
still in statu quo; and the church had barely held its own, having gained 
ten new members (seven by profession of faith and three by letter), and 
dismissed eleven. 

Mr. Winn resigned his pastorate, May 17, 1895. His resignation was 
accepted by the church, May 23 of the same year. At a council held here 
July 2, 1895, which was constituted of pastors and delegates from the 
churches in Amherst, Greenville, Hollis and Mason, the acceptance of his 
resignation by the Brookline church was approved. Mr. Winn's de- 
parture was regretted by the church, in which he had labored assiduously 
and faithfully. He left behind him the reputation of being a sincere 
Christian with the courage of his convictions. 

REV. FRED E. WINN, son of William F. and Lucy M. (Richard- 
son) Winn, was born in Hudson, Dec. 14, 1863. He prepared for college 
in the public schools of Hudson and at McGaw's Institute, Reeds Ferry; 
graduated from Dartmouth College in 1887, and from Andover Theological 
Seminary in 1892. From July, 1892, to April, 1893, he supplied the pulpit 
of the Congregational Church in Hudson. June 20, 1893, he was called 
to the pulpit of the Congregational Church of Brookline, where he was 
ordained Aug. 31, 1893. He was dismissed, at his request, from the Brook- 
line church May 23, 1895. He went from Brookline to Bennington, where 
he was installed as pastor of the Congregational Church. From Benning- 
ton he removed to Bridgeton, Mass., where at the present time (1910) 
he is pastor of the Congregational Church. 

July 25, 1888, Mr. Winn was united in marriage with Sarah C. Moul- 
ton, daughter of George W. and Hannah H. (Spofford) Moulton of 
Merrimack. 

The Pastorate of Rev. J. Alphonse Belanger. 

Nov. 6, 1895, the Congregational Church and society extended a 
call to the Rev. J. Alphonse Belanger to become their pastor at a salary 
of seven hundred dollars per annum, the free use of the parsonage and an 
annual vacation of two weeks duration. Mr. Belanger accepted the call, 
and was "recognized" Dec. 17, 1895. 



260 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

The "Council of Recognition" consisted of pastors and delegates 
from the churches in Mason, Hollis, Amherst, Greenville, Milford, and 
Townsend, Mass., Rev. F. D. Sargent, Rev. George L. Todd and Rev. 
Fred E. Winn. The council, upon examination, found that Mr. Belanger 
was a congregational minister in good and regular standing, but declined 
to give him the position of an installed pastor, suggesting that, as a con- 
sequence of its action, he could be dismissed without the necessity of 
calling a council. In accord with the council's finding, Mr. Belanger was 
"inducted" into the pulpit Dec. 17, 1895. 

Service of Recognition. 

Voluntary, Choir. 
Reading of Scripture and Invocation, Rev. D. W. Morgan. 

Welcome to the Pastor, Rev. H. P. Peck. 

Recognition Prayer, Rev. George F. Merriam. 

Right Hand of Fellowship, Rev. S. L. Gerould. 

Charge to Pastor, Rev. George E- Todd. 

Charge to the People, Rev. F. E- Winn. 

Benediction, Pastor. 

Mr. Belanger's term of service lasted two years, eleven months and 
twenty-three days. He was a faithful shepherd over the little flock com- 
mitted to his charge, laboring early and late to advance in its midst the 
cause of the Master. During his ministry, sixteen new members were 
added to the church, of whom nine were received on profession of faith 
and seven by letter. 

Mr. Belanger, like his immediate predecessor in the pulpit, was a 
radical temperance advocate and, like his predecessor, in advocating the 
temperance cause, he worked on radical lines, sparing in his advocacy 
neither friend nor foe. 

Mr. Belanger resigned from his pastorate Dec. 29, 1898. On the day 
of his resignation the church, after voting to accept the same, passed a 
resolution in which it bore testimony— "To his more than common abil- 
ity as a preacher, his faithfulness as a pastor, and his manly Christian 
courage, doing with his might what his hands found to do." He went 
from Brookline to the church in Wallingford, Vt. 

REV. JOSEPH ALPHONSE BELANGER was born in Quebec, 
P. Q., Oct. 9, 1857. He graduated at Boston University in 1895, and was 
ordained May 22, 1895. He was "recognized" and "inducted" into the 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 261 

pulpit of the Congregational Church of Brookline, Dec. 17, 1895; and 
dismissed at his request March 1, 1899. From Brookline he went to the 
Congregational Church in Wallingford, Vt. 

Centennial Year of the Congregational Church and the Exercises 
Attendant upon the Celebration of the Same. 

During Mr. Belanger's pastorate, on the 10th day of December, 
1895, the church completed the one hundredth year of its existence. In 
anticipation of and with a view of properly observing this event, at a 
meeting holden January 3 of that year, the church appointed Rev. Fred 
K. Winn, Deacon Perley L- Pierce, J. Alonzo Hall, Miss Emily M. Peter- 
son, and Mrs. Nancy J. Daniels as a committee of arrangements for a 
centennial celebration. This committee was subsequently somewhat 
changed by substituting the name of Rev. J. A. Belanger for that of Rev. 
Mr. Winn, who in the meantime had resigned and left town, and also by 
the addition to it of Dr. Charles H. Holcombe. Under the supervision of 
the foregoing committee, the necessary arrangements for the celebration 
were made and subsequently successfully carried out. 

This anniversary, an event in its history second in importance only 
to that of its organization, was most enthusiastically observed by the 
church and its friends, large numbers of whom, especially of its absent 
members, and of those who having formerly been included in its member- 
ship, were at this time residents and members of churches in other towns, 
returned to the home church; and by their presence and active partici- 
pation helped to contribute to the success of the celebration. 

The exercises which occupied three days were conducted under the 
following 

PROGRAMME. 

Sunday, December 15th, 
10.45 A. M. 

Centennial Sermon by the Pastor, with Special Music. 

5.45 P. M. 

Reunion of the Sunday-school. 

Singing by the children. 

History of the School, Mrs. Nancy J. Daniels. 



262 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

The Sunday-school Superintendent, J. Alonzo Hall. 
Primary Work, Mrs. Wm. J. Smith. 

Intermediate Work, Mrs. Wm. H. Hall. 

7.00 P. M. 

Young People's Work. Addresses: 

Miss Emily M. Peterson, Miss Jennie M. Litchfield. 

Miss M. L. Shattuck, Miss Mary E. Rockwood. 

Monday, December 16th. 
7.30 P. M. 

Devoted to Woman's Work in the Church. 

Scripture Reading, Mrs. J. A. Belanger. 

Prayer, Mrs. N. J. Daniels. 

Address, Miss H. Juliette Gilson. 

Social Work of Woman, Mrs. Frank D. Sargent. 

Address, Mrs. Anna Kemp. 

Rising Womanhood, Miss Mary L. Brown. 

Tuesday, December 17th. 
10.30 A. M. 

Doxology, Congregation. 

vScripture and Prayer, Rev. F. E. Winn. 
Hymn by the Choir of Long Ago. 

Addresses of Welcome, Dr. C. H. Holcombe. 

Historical Address, Rev. J. Alphonse Belanger. 
Brookline Church 

Twenty-six Years Ago, Rev. F. D. Sargent. 
Brookline Church 

of the Future, Rev. Geo. L. Todd. 

1.30 P. M. 

Banquet, Rev. F. D. Sargent, Toast-master. 

4.30 P. M. 

Convening of Ecclesiastical Council to examine the new Pastor. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 263 

7.30 P. M. 

Brookline Church among its Neighbors, Rev. A. J. McGown. 

Centennial Poem, Hon. B. E. Parker. 

8.15 P. M. 

Recognition Services. 

The exercises on this occasion were all of the most interesting char- 
acter. The entire proceedings were subsequently published in pamphlet 
form. Their reproduction in these pages would form one of the book's 
most interesting chapters, but want of space forbids it. It has, however, 
been thought best to insert the address of Rev. F. D. Sargent, and the 
Centennial Poem delivered by Hon. E. E. Parker. The address, because 
of its historical nature, in that it dealt with the lives and characteristics 
of some of the men and women connected with, and the events transpiring 
in, and happening to, the church and society during the twenty and more 
years immediately preceding the celebration; and the poem because of 
its significance in connection with the Old Meeting-house, the Church and 
society's first place of worship. 

THE BROOKLINE CHURCH TWENTY-SIX YEARS AGO. 

By Rev. Frank D. Sargent. 

Your church! Our church! My church! Twenty-six years ago last 
January a young man from the seminary at Andover stood for the first 
time in the pulpit of your church. He came and, so far as he knew, went 
away as other students had come and gone. Eight months later the same 
young man stood before the same people, but he had changed the phrase 
"your" church to "our" church. Twenty-six years go by, and that same 
man, no longer young, nor yet old, changes again the pronoun, and now, 
as for many years past, he speaks of this as "my" church. Say what we 
will, there are experiences in life that stand out like headlands on the 
coast, promontories that rise above the surrounding country. Life is not 
a monotonous level, neither is it so devoid of the unusual as to be un- 
eventful. Especially is this true of pastoral life. While Dr. Smith Baker 
of Boston may be right when he says, "Every new people with me has 
been better, richer, more desirable than the preceding," yet to the average 



264 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

pastor one church, one pastorate, one period of ministerial life will be, 
Saul like, head and shoulders above all others in point of interest and 
affection, and this will not necessarily be the last one. It matters not 
how commodious and beautiful the other churches may be, how cultured 
and wealthy their congregations, how influential their membership, the 
relation with the one church which we denominate with the personal pro- 
noun "my" will be intimate more than all the others. 

Associations and conditions play a large part in the make up of every 
life. As some of you have heard me say, there is a little schoolhouse in 
northern Vermont, with desks old-fashioned, and showing the marks of 
many a schoolboy's knife, floors worn through in spots, walls disfigured, 
woodwork unpainted, yet that little room is more beautiful to me than 
any palace that art ever contrived, or fancy fashioned, because in that 
building the dear old Mother heard the first and only sermon which she 
was ever permitted to listen to from the lips of her boy, whom she loved 
as she loved her life. When a year after her death, I went again to that 
country hamlet and visited the schoolhouse on the hill, not even the 
Holy of Holies of the ancient tabernacle could have been more sacred to 
the Israelites than was that place to me as I knelt beside the seat where 
Mother sat. Nothing but association could develop such sentiments as 
these and, yet because of associations, this and like experiences become 
marked and influential. 

I esteem it a privilege to speak of this as my church, not to the det- 
riment of others with which I may have been connected, but because of 
the peculiar interest that twenty years of ministerial life and labor has 
engendered. This church is not altogether unnoted in her past. I would 
not be pessimistic in regard to the present, nor unmindful of the fact that 
the last quarter of a century has been throbbing with that which goes to 
make men better, and the world more Christlike. I do not believe that 
this period of time that has witnessed, so far as this community is con- 
cerned, the introduction of the telegraph and telephone, the iron horse, 
improved educational advantages and wider business influences, have 
been so many triumphs for Satan, and consequently so many steps back- 
ward, yet is it not true that temporal prosperity may not always be able 
to be utilized by spiritual forces. Bright as may be the membership of 
this church today, full of life and vigor as may be her determination, yet 
she is not now in membership and influence what she was a quarter of a 
century ago. 

Allow me to picture the church and people as I first knew them. 
In those days the building in which we worshipped was far from pleasing 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 265 

architecturally. A neighboring pastor in a fit of possible jealousy de- 
nominated it a "spiritual butterbox." It was sixteen feet shorter than 
now, and the auditorium was twelve feet nearer the ground. The front 
steps were so close to the street that very little detour was needed to 
bring the churchgoers to the very doors. It had broad, plain windows, 
blinded on the outside; plain straight-backed pews, grained in colors so 
gloomy and style so unutterable that it was not necessary to shade the 
windows in order to get the "dim religious light" that is supposed to be 
so helpful to religious meditation; the pulpit of mahogany, flanked on 
either side by pillars or ornamental bases of a like material; the long 
lines of stovepipes through which the heat was flashed from roaring fires 
in the box stoves in the front corridor that made that place somewhat 
like the furnace of Nebuchadnezzar, "seven times hotter" than such places 
are wont to be; and last, the choir gallery, with its ancient melodeon and 
bassoon, with now and then a bass viol as an accompaniment, and the 
singers so separated by the arched roof and high balustrade from the rest 
of the congregation that much of their praise reached neither the heavens 
above them, nor the earth below. Such was the church as I remember it 
twenty-five years ago, and yet we loved that old building and, when in 
1875, after serious and careful consideration, we voted to remodel and 
beautify the same, not a few regrets were expressed, and on the last Sab- 
bath that we worshipped in the old edifice the whole day was given up to 
reminiscence, and grateful recognition of the goodness of God in connection 
with church life. 

Primitive as the. church building may have been, the people who 
worshipped within its walls were neither lacking in culture nor ambition. 
As I write I picture tham as they appeared Sunday after Sunday, each in 
their accustomed places. On my right hand, in the old wing pews, sat 
Asher and Beri Bennett, the latter, with elbow on the back of the seat 
in front of him, eagerly taking in the thoughts of the young minister who 
was, to him at least, a veritable messenger from God. I remember the 
loyalty of these two men to their pastor, and their pride in him which 
they did not try to conceal. Do you wonder that they are not forgotten 
by us, when I tell you that upon the very first Sabbath of the new pas- 
torate, just as we were entering the church a trifle late, Brother Beri, 
his face all aglow with satisfaction, turned to Asher and in a stage whisper, 
audible in nearly every part of the room, said, "Here comes our dear 
pastor and his cunning little wife." Honest as the day was long, almost 
childish in their likes and dislikes, old-fashioned in their notions, they 



266 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

were more dear to us than many whose ideas and station were more 
modern. 

Right in front of the pulpit sat another man with his family, always 
there, and always in season. I should as soon have thought of the heavens 
falling as to even dream that John Burge would not be in his place in 
church at least fifteen minutes before the bell tolled. More than once 
have I passed the church door on my way to exchange with a minister 
in a neighboring town, and met Brother Burge driving into the churcl^ard. 
Blunt, decided, humorous, almost rough in his expressions, he was ever 
ready to stay up the hands of the pastor, and do his part in the labor and 
contributions of the church. 

Intimately associated with Brother Burge was James H. Hall, a 
man who used his wealth for the good of the church and the glory of 
God. I should do violence to my own conscience if I did not place a 
personal tribute above the memory of this man, who had so much to do 
with the shaping of my early ministry. A man with faults like humanity 
everywhere, yet his faults seemed to make his virtues even more pro- 
nounced than they otherwise would have been. For years it was his 
custom each quarter to bring to the pastor $50 as his share of the salary. 
To this he also added the rent of one-quarter or one-half of the parsonage. 
Not infrequently, in fact generally in winter this long sleigh drawn by 
two horses would be filled with his family and neighbors, thereby adding 
materially to the number of the congregation. The prosperity of this 
church was due in no small measure to the faithful and assiduous labors of 
this man of God. Well did the pastor say at his death, "A prince has 
fallen in Israel." 

Another man, younger than the others, in fact the youngest of the 
active men of the church, was George Peabody. Wonderfully gifted in 
prayer and testimony, quick to think, apt in remark, versatile in ability, 
his sudden and terrible death made a deep and lasting impression upon 
the community. At the time of his decease, he was superintendent of the 
Sunday school, leader of the choir, deacon in the church, an officer in the 
society, and the pastor's right-hand man. I doubt if his place in this 
church has ever been made good, even though worthy men have followed 
him. 

It was not many years after his death that God called to himself his 
brother, Deacon John Peabody. He was not a man of great talent or re- 
markable genius. I do not recall a thing that he did that would warrant 
unusual mention, and yet I do not know of any life I ever touched that 
was so heartily and fully given to God as was his. He was a veritable 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 267 

Abraham, yea, in many respects the peer of the old prophet, for if God 
had asked his life, I believe he would have given it. If ever this church 
had an illustration of a perfect man, that man was Deacon John Peabody. 
I do not think that he ever, in his later life at least, did anything that his 
conscience did not approve, and many a sad heart and burdened soul, 
and toiling laborer here and elsewhere, have reason to praise the self- 
sacrifice of this man of God. 

Another man who, on account of his years, was only occasionally 
seen in church, was Deacon Timothy Wright. Ignorant of books, some- 
what unfortunate in business, poor in earthly goods, yet upon him God 
had seemed to breathe the gift of prayer that was truly delightful. 

One of the staunch supporters of the church, whose name was upon 
the church roll twenty-six years ago, but who was then a resident of 
Milford, was William Gilson. For many years he was thoroughly identi- 
fied with this church, and while afterwards connected with another fellow- 
ship, he still kept his interest in the old church home. He was a frequent 
visitor both at the church service and other gatherings, and there were 
few improvements which required the outlay of money that did not bear 
his name. It was through his generosity, in part, that the church is in 
possession of its parsonage. 

Another man upon whom the church depended for counsel and help 
in spiritual and social life was Deacon Jefferson Whitcomb. A busy man, 
hard working, almost intemperate in his industry, he yet gave a large 
part of his vitality to the church. It was his voice that led the choir for 
years, while his help in the Sunday school as superintendent and teacher, 
and his efforts in the prayer meetings and social gatherings were decided 
and beneficial. 

Never shall I forget another whom I saw at times in the congrega- 
tion, and who was familiarly known as "Uncle Jimmie." I hardly believe 
he would have known to whom you referred if you had addressed him 
as Mr. Pierce. I never met him only as I found him fairly bubbling over 
with good nature, expressing itself with a face wreathed in smiles and 
words accompanied with a chuckle that was simply indescribable. He 
was one of the few men that the minister loved to meet on "blue Monday." 

Twenty-six years ago last July after a Sabbath of candidating, I 
met a company of fourteen or fifteen men who gathered in the home of 
Francis Peterson. Men they were who represented the life and talent, 
property and influence of the town of that day. Their object was to show 
me that the call of God and the need of the hour, so far as I was con- 
cerned, was the acceptance of the invitation to become their pastor. As 



268 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

I now regard it, I think that that little company of men, by their pres- 
ence, manhood, and evident sincerity, did more to shape the first twenty 
years of my ministerial life than all other forces put together. A part of 
those men are living today; many of them God has called to himself. 
The most modest and retiring of them, the truest and most loyal was 
Francis Peterson. He it was who with an eye to economy, with a heart 
that always beat in sympathy with the progress of the church, whose 
word in season and out of season was a stimulus to pastor and people 
who, not rich in the world's estimation practiced economy that he might 
be rich toward God, put his life into the spiritual and temporal fabric of 
this church and society. While by no means eloquent in remark or prayer, 
yet rarely a prayer meeting in the early days passed without his presence 
and participation. 

I wish I had the time to speak of "Grandpa" Pettee, venerable with 
the multiplicity of years; of Joseph Hall, aged and feeble, yet rarely 
absent from the church service, and loving the prosperity of Zion; of 
Joseph Peterson, a man whose physical sufferings were almost indescrib- 
able, and yet who contributed to the upbuilding of the society; of Amos 
Gould who loved to be a little different from others, showing itself, for 
example, in his subscriptions when, instead of making a round number, 
he would place upon the paper the figures $49.99 instead of $50; of 
James French, crippled years ago with disease, battling with physical and 
other difficulties, yet trying in his way to live for God and truth; of 
John S. Daniels, keen and critical, kind of heart, informed upon many 
questions beyond his associates, living a life that touched us more than 
we knew; of Joseph Shattuck, a living witness of what camp exposure 
and the deprivations of war could do; of Willie Hodgman, modest and 
Christlike; these and others stand out in my memory today. Add to 
these the names of men who, while not members of the church, were con- 
tributors to its social and financial success: Gardner Shattuck, Andrew 
Rockwood, Joseph Tucker, Reuben Baldwin, Mr. Joseph Smith and son, 
Frank Hobart, whose early death was a sad blow to both family and 
community, Henry Pierce, Wm. Wallace, Joseph Sawtelle, and F. Shattuck. 

All these are dead, and yet their forms and faces were familiar in the 
early life of the parish. I do not need to speak of the living members, 
since most of them are with you today. True to their convictions at that 
time, they have been staunch supporters of the church. The future may 
bring enthusiastic supporters, but this church will never find more worthy 
contributors to its demands than the men and women now living who, 
twenty-six years ago and less, stood with their young pastor and pledged 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 269 

him their sympathy. I do not need to speak of the women of the church 
since they have been referred to in another paper, only to add this testi- 
mony that this anniversary could never have occurred, or, if celebrated, 
would have been lacking in enthusiasm only for the quiet, patient, self- 
sacrificing labors of its women. 

We speak of the congregations that gather in this auditorium Sun- 
day after Sunday. Do you know that they do not compare numerically 
with those of a quarter of a century ago? Let me read a few figures from 
my record of those days. I take them from the month of August, 1870, 
as they come, morning and afternoon: 126, 136; 156, 128; 112, 122; 
120, 305; 105, 114; 120, 122; 122, 112; 133, 122; 127, 143; 141, 145; 
149, 148; and so on. These give you an idea of how people came to church 
in those days. They believed in church-going. It was not church in the 
morning and a ride or visit in the afternoon, but a service in the morning 
at 10.45, Sunday school at 12.00, preaching again at 1.15, outside meeting 
in one of the schoolhouses at 3.00 or 4.00, and a prayer meeting in the 
evening at 6.00 or 7.00 o'clock, according to the season of the year, and 
these services were largely attended by the same class of hearers. 

Twenty-six years ago the church depended for the support of its 
pastor on Home Missionary aid. It did not require very many words 
from me to convince them that they were too strong to hold out the 
hand like a beggar, and, when once they became self-supporting, not 
even financial depression and almost bitter self-denial could tempt them 
to apply for aid. I do not know of an ecclesiastical society in this vicinity 
where the church held so large a place in the lives of its members as it 
did here in Brookline. Take the subscription list, and read the pledges 
of the few names that made up its roll, $200, $100, $80, $50, $30, $20, 
$15, $10, $5, $1, and this, too, from men who with one or two exceptions 
would be regarded as comparatively poor. I recall as though it were 
yesterday the feeling of shame that came over me when I thought of 
what was being done, and the feeling that prompted me to relinquish 
one hundred dollars of my salary was not altogether to my credit, but 
was a response to the greater sacrifice that they were making. 

I wish that I might be permitted to speak all that is in my heart in 
recognition of what was done by the people who made up this congrega- 
tion twenty or twenty-five years ago. Think you that I can recall the 
past, and remember that first evening after I became their pastor, when 
the people gathered in the parsonage and in leaving placed in the young 
minister's hand a note with thirty or more names attached, and inside 
the package bank bills amounting to $400? Think you that I am un- 



270 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

mindful of the kindness of this people, or hesitate to declare them large- 
hearted and generous, when I look over my personal record and see items 
that in the aggregate make individual gifts to the amount of more than a 
thousand dollars? Think you that I can lightly regard the spirit of gen- 
erosity that influenced this church, when I take up another paper and 
read the following : 

Brookline, N. H., Jan. 13, 1875. 

We, the undersigned, agree to pay the sums attached to our names 
for the purpose of moving and remodelling the church. 

To this are attached twenty names, aggregating pledges to the 
amount of between $4000 and $5000. 

Think you that I altogether regret the little sacrifice I might have 
made when, instead of ignoring the kindness and devotion of this people, 
I turned my back upon flattering calls from larger fields? All honor I 
say to this old church whose centennial we celebrate today. I would 
that I had the ability to speak fittingly of the men who have been leaders 
in spiritual things, but who have now entered into their rest! Much of 
the prosperity of this people is due to Brother Daniel Goodwin, more if 
possible to Brother Sawin, while Brother Manning, whose early death 
was a sad grief to all, left his impress upon this church which will never 
be effaced. God bless these memories, and help those who remain to 
continue the work, relying upon Him who in every change of time and 
condition is a helper and advocate. 

At the close of Rev. F. D. Sargent's address, C. H. Russell, a former 
member, came out of the pastor's room, bearing on a large tray a beautiful 
and costly silver communion service, the centennial gift of past and 
absent members. Mr. Sargent in a few well-chosen words, on behalf of 
the donors, presented to the church this beautiful gift and, turning to 
the present pastor, said, "We commit this, my brother, to your charge." 
Mr. Belanger was taken by surprise and, with emotion, accepted in be- 
half of the church the beautiful token of love in a few words to the effect 
"that whenever the church gathered around the Lord's Table our prayers 
would go up for our benefactors." 

At 1.30 P. M. two hundred sat around well-laden tables in the ves- 
tries below. When the appetites seemed to have been satisfied, Rev. J. 
A. Belanger introduced Rev. F. D. Sargent as toastnaster of the occa- 
sion. Dr. A. Wallace, of Nashua, responded to the toast, "The Relation 
of the Physician to the Minister." Mr. James Peabody, of Harvard 
University, to that of "The Young Men." Rev. C. F. Crathern to that 
of "Opportunities of the Young." Rev. F. E. Winn, "The Sphere of the 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 271 

Country Church." Rev. J. A. Belanger, "The Brookline Ministry of the 
Future." 

The "Old Meeting-house." 

By HON. EDWARD E. PARKER 

Upon the hill-top's rounded crest, naked, and brown, and bare, 

Firm and securely founded on its solid granite base, 
The father's ancient meeting-house uplifts, in crystal air, 

Its crude and homely outline; void of beauty and of grace. 
Yet there are those who love it, and the memories it recalls, 

And traditions which surround it, from the days of long ago ; 
Which, like a flame of glory, deck its time-defaced walls, 

With a drapery of beauty human skill could ne'er bestow. 

To them the rough-hewn timbers which enter in its frame, 

From the massive superstructure to the porches quaint and odd, 
Are witnesses forever of the fathers' zeal and fame, 

And their fixed and firm reliance on the promises of God; 
And the croonings of the night winds, through each crevice rare and slim, 

Are but the ghosts of melodies, — the solemn, sad refrains, — 

Of spirit choirs invisible, who, in its shadows dim, 

Still chant their adoration in the old-time minor strains. 

Around its sacred precincts, as a centre fixed and firm, 

Are grouped the township's records through a century of years; 
All of ill the fathers suffered, all of glory they could earn. 

As Providence dealt with them, in its history appears. 
There they worshipped, there they married, and there, when time was o'er, 

Their tributes of affection to departed friends were paid; 
E'er the living, through its portals, in sad procession bore 

Their dead to rest forever in the churchyard's quiet shade. 

And there the sounding viol, and the cornet's silver tones, 

First broke the Sabbath stillness with melodies profane; 
Which the elders heard with horror, and trembled, in their bones, 

At the sound of other music than the pitch-pipe, wind and rain. 
Alas, for its departed days! Deserted now and still, 

The summer winds around it whisper dirges soft and low, 
And the demon winds of winter, sweeping down from Ramond hill, 

In scorn of its long vanished fame, their blatant trumpets blow. 

The Pastorate of Rev. John Thorpe. 

The Rev. John Thorpe was called to this church May 11, 1899. He 
accepted the call and on the first day of June of the same year, without 
any formalities, entered upon the performance of his pastoral duties. 
His term of service was somewhat brief, lasting only a few days over two 



272 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

years. But, brief as it was, it was sufficiently long to enable him to es- 
tablish the reputation of being an able minister and a faithful servant of 
his Master. 

During his pastorate the church and society experienced little or no 
change. He resigned his pastorate May 5, 1902, to take charge of the 
Congregational Church in Centre Harbor. 

REV. JOHN THORPE, son of Joel and Sarah Brown Thorpe, was 
born in Manchester, England, May 4, 1845. He was educated in the 
schools of Manchester, and studied theology with a pastor of that city. 
At the age of sixteen he began preaching in Manchester as a local Meth- 
odist preacher. He came to the United States in 1871, and settled in 
Lawrence, Mass., as an employee in the mills. While in Lawrence he also 
engaged in local preaching. June 1, 1885, he was called to supply the 
pulpit of the Congregational Church in South Weare; where he was or- 
dained Dec. 20, 1885. From June 17, 1888, to Sept. 1, 1894, he was 
pastor of the church in Mount Vernon. Sept. 1, 1894, he took charge as 
pastor of the Congregational churches in Andover and East Andover. 
June 1, 1899, he commenced his duties as pastor of the Congregational 
Church in this town. From June 1, 1902, to January, 1908, he was pastor 
of the Congregational Church at Centre Harbor. From Centre Harbor 
he removed to Dolgeville, Los Angeles County, Cal., where, Jan. 12, 
1908, he entered upon his duties as pastor of the Bethlehem Congrega- 
tional Church, a position which at this date (1908) he still holds. In 
addition to his abilities as a preacher, Mr. Thorpe is also a poet, he having 
been the author of over fourteen hundred religious hymns, many of which 
have been published. 

Feb. 22, 1870, Mr. Thorpe married Emily A. C. Bennett, daughter 
of Alfred and .Sarah Ann (Clowes) Bennett of Newton Heath, England. 
No children were born of the marriage. 

In 1902, after Rev. Mr. Thorpe had resigned his charge, representa- 
tives of the local Congregational and Methodist Episcopal churches joined 
in an attempt to bring about a union of the two churches. After several 
weeks of conference and discussion, however, the project was found to 
be impracticable and, for the time being, at least, it was abandoned. 

The Pastorate of Rev. George A. Bennett. 

The Rev. George A. Bennett was called to the pastorate by the 
church and society, June 5, 1903. His salary was fixed at five hundred 
dollars per annum, to be paid in monthly installments, and an annual 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 273 

vacation of two weeks in duration. He began his duties as pastor, June 
24, 1903. There is no record of any installation services. 

Meeting-house Repaired and Rededicated — 1906. 

During Mr. Bennett's pastorate in the months of June and July, 
1906, the meeting-house was repaired and improved at an expense of 
nine hundred and forty-five dollars, raised by subscription, by putting in 
new ceilings and new coverings upon the walls of the auditorium. The 
auditorium was also provided with a new carpet, and other needed repairs 
and improvements made at a total cost of sixteen hundred dollars. Upon 
the completion of the work, the church was rededicated Thursday, Aug. 
23, 1903. The dedicatory services were as follows: 

Sermon, Rev. Frank D. Sargent. 

Dedicatory Prayer, Rev. John Thorpe. 

Remarks, Rev. Mr. Corson, Mason; Rev. Mr. Harmon, 

Townsend, Mass. ; Rev. W. F. Bennett, of the 
local Methodist Church, and the Pastor. 

Nov. 4, 1908, Mr. Bennett tendered his resignation. But the church 
declined to accept it and, upon the receipt of a petition signed by seventy- 
five of his parishioners requesting him to reconsider it, he withdrew the 
same. October 1 of the same year he again tendered his resignation. 
It was accepted, and November 1st he severed his connection with the 
church. 

REV. GEORGE ALFRED BENNETT, son of Alfred Lorenzo and 
Ann (Nutting) Bennett, was born in Groton, Mass., Oct. 11, 1853. He 
was educated in the public schools of Groton and Pepperell, Pepperell and 
Ashby high schools, and Wesleyan Academy, Wilbraham, Mass. After 
leaving school, although desirous of fitting himself for the ministry, Mr. 
Bennett was compelled to devote several years of his young manhood to 
mercantile pursuits. In 1874 he commenced doing evangelistic work 
from which in 1895 he was called to the pastorship of the Congregational 
Church in Ripton, Vt. During his pastorate in Ripton he studied the- 
ology with Rev. Robert J. Barton, pastor of the Congregational Church 
at Salisbury, Vt., and, in the meantime, received a license to preach from 
the Addison County Minister's Association. 

In December, 1898, he was called to the Congregational Church in 
Acworth, N. H., where he was ordained July 3, 1900. June 3, 1903, he 



274 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

accepted a call to the church in Brookline, a position which he resigned 
Oct. 1, 1908. 

Mr. Bennett has been twice married. Sept. 25, 1879, he married Ella 
S. Robbins, of Pepperell, Mass., who died Oct. 14, 1882. He married 
Abbie V. Hartford, of Brockton, Mass., Sept. 20, 1884. His children are 
— by his first wife— Etta L., born July 19, 1880. By his second wife: 
Gladys Hartford, born at Watertown, Mass., Jan. 17, 1890; Charles 
Alfred, born at Ripton, Vt., June 1, 1896. 

The Pastorate of Rev. Warren L. Noyes. 

From the date of Rev. Mr. Bennett's severing his connection with 
the church, Nov. 1, 1908, to April 1, 1909, the church was without a 
pastor. During this period the pulpit was filled by stated supplies. In 
the meantime, however, the church and society were in communication 
with various parties with a view to filling the vacancy. Finally, the 
church succeeded in entering into an agreement with Rev. Warren L. 
Noyes, then pastor of the West Church in Peabody, Mass., whereby he 
was engaged to fill its then vacant pulpit. Rev. Mr. Noyes assumed his 
pastoral duties April 1, 1909. No formal exercises were attendant upon 
the occasion. He continued to act as pastor of the church until Novem- 
ber , 1913, at which date he resigned his position and removed to 
Nashua, where he is residing at the present time (1914). Mr. Noyes 
proved himself to be a faithful pastor of his flock. He was well liked by 
his people and by the citizens generally, whose respect and esteem he ac- 
quired by his uniformly gentlemanly and courteous deportment, and by 
whom he was regarded as a power for good in the community. 

During Mr. Noyes pastorate, among the events which transpired in 
connection with the church are the following: The month of January, 
1909, was distinguished by a series of revival services. In January, 1910, 
a new order for morning worship was instituted. In February, 1910, a 
new communion service was purchased. In December, 1911, the Apostle's 
Creed was adopted as the creed of the church. 

In 1909, under Mr.- Noyes influence and governed by his counsels, 
the church effected the organization of an association to be known as the 
Congregational Brotherhood. 

This Association was constituted of members of the church and 
society and of non-church members resident in the town. It had for its 
object the general uplift of the community along the lines of morality 
and religion. It was organized Dec. 15, 1909, with the following board of 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 275 

officers: President, Chester B. Valedge; Vice-President, Arthur A. Goss; 
secretary, Stephen T. Marshall; treasurer, Perley L. Pierce; teacher, the 
Rev. Warren L. Noyes; membership and invitation committee: Frank 
E. Gilman, chairman; Henry S. Bailey and Charles R. Hardy; com- 
mittee on religious work, H. Arthur Brown, chairman, Carl Clifford and 
Luther J. Lawrence; committee on public meetings, C. H. Holcombe, 
chairman, Stephen T. Marshall; committees on benevolence, and finance, 
Chester B. Valedge, chairman, Perley L. Pierce and the Rev. Warren L. 
Noyes; citizenship committee, A. A. Goss, chairman, Albert T. Pierce. 
The Brotherhood met on the first Friday evening of each month. The 
association is still in existence at this time (1913). 

During Mr. Noyes pastorship thirty new names were added to the 
church's roll of membership. At the present time it has a membership of 
eighty souls, of whom a considerable number are out of town residents. 
Its Sunday school library contains 300 volumes. 

REV. WARREN L. NOYES was born in Chelsea, Vt., Dec. 25, 1841. 
He is a son of Abiel and Louisa (Corwin) Noyes. His father was a farmer, 
poor in worldly possessions, but rich in the possession of a large family 
of children. Until he was thirteen years of age, he remained at home, 
working on his father's farm and attending the public schools of his na- 
tive town. From his thirteenth to his twentieth year, he worked out 
much of the time for the neighboring farmers, his wages contributing to 
the support of his father's family. During this period he attended the 
public schools in the winter terms, often working for his board and lodg- 
ings. In his twentieth 3^ear, realizing that the time had arrived for him 
to begin the carrying out of his long cherished plan of obtaining a liberal 
education, he abandoned farming forever, and entered his name as a stu- 
dent in New Hampton, N. H., Academy. His capital at this time amounted 
to twenty-five dollars. With that amount and such additional sums of 
money as he was able to earn by working as janitor of the academy, 
teaching school, and working out during vacations, he was able to com- 
plete his academic course, graduating in severely broken health in 1865. 

Soon after his graduation from New Hampton, he entered Dartmouth 
College, where, however, he remained but a short time, ill health and lack 
of funds compelling him to abandon his college course. After leaving 
Dartmouth, he entered Bates Theological Seminary, from which he 
graduated in 1868. He was ordained to the ministry as a Free Baptist at 
Sutton, Vt., in 1868. Subsequently he left the Baptist denomination and 
united with the Congregationalists. His pastorates under the Baptist 



276 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

denomination were at Sutton, St. Johnsbury, and Lyndon, Vt. ; and he 
supplied pulpits, for one year each, in Chicago, 111., and Jackson, Mich. 

After uniting with the Congregationalists, he was pastor of the 
churches located at Chester and Castelton, Vt., and the West Church at 
Peabody, Mass. For a period of nearly three years in duration, begin- 
ning in 1901, he was located at Harriman, Ten., where he was in the em- 
ploy of the American Missionary Association. In 1898 his wife died at 
Castelton, Vt., and at the same time he had a severe and protracted 
attack of illness. Soon after his wife's death, influenced thereto by a hope 
of regaining his health, he went to California, where he remained for a 
considerable time. For five consecutive years from the time of his going 
to California, including his stay in that state, he was without a settled 
pastorate, the condition of his health being such as to prevent his ac- 
cepting a permanent position. During the greater part of that time he 
preached in response to calls for stated supplies. In 1903, having in 
some measure recovered his health, he accepted a call to the pastorate of 
the Congregational church in Francestown, a position which he occupied 
until 1905. In the latter year he severed his connections with the church 
at Francestown, and took charge as pastor of the West Church in Peabody, 
Mass., where he remained until 1909. From Peabody he removed to 
Brookline, where he accepted a call to the pulpit of the local Congrega- 
tional Church, of which he became pastor April 1, 1909, a position which 
he resigned in November, 1913, when he removed to Nashua, where, at 
the present time (1914), he is residing. 

Mr. Noyes has been twice married. He married first, July 15, 1868, 
Miss Susan S. Johnson, of Springfield, N. H. She died in 1898. One 
child, Clarence E., was born Sept. 2, 1874, the result of this marriage. 
Married, second, in May, 1902, Miss Mary Olivia Northrop of Castelton, 
Vt. 

Deacons of the Brookline Congregational Church. 

Joseph Emerson, 1795-1812. Removed to Wendell, Mass., 1812 

Eleazer Gilson, 1795 Died, Dec. 21, 1851, aged, 95. 

Thomas Bennett, 1812-1855. Dismissed June 12, 1855. 

Christopher Farley, 1833-1839. Died March 21, 1859, aged 48. 

Timothy Wright, 1833-1849. Died Nov. 10, 1871, aged 80. 

Eldad Sawtelle, 1855-1857. Died Sept. 12, 1857, aged 51. 

J. Henry Hall, 1859-1870. Dis. to Cong. Ch., Pepperell Mass 

John Peabody, 1859-1876. Died Jan. 13, 1878, aged 48. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 277 

George W. Peabody, 1871-1873. Died Dec. 18, 1873, aged 35. 

Charles H. Russell, 1876-1882. 

Jefferson Whitcomb, 1876-1882. Died March 16, 1882, aged 53. 

Perley L. Pierce, 1882- 

Edward T. Hall, 1886-1888. 

Charles H. Holcombe, 1888- 

Charles H. Russell, elected honorary deacon, Jan. 1, 1908. 

Clerks of the Church. 

Joseph Emerson, 1797-1812. Dismissed to Wendell, Mass. 1812 

Thomas Bennett, 1812-1855. Dismissed June 12, 1812. 

James H. Hall, 1855-1859. Died Aug. 15, 1874, aged 64. 

Rev. Theophilus P. Sawin, 1859-1866. Died at Medford, Mass., Jan. 19, 

1886, aged 68. 

Francis A. Peterson, 1866-1884. Died Jan. 14, 1884, aged 70. 

Henry C. Hall, 1884-1886. 

Emily C. Peterson, 1886-1907. Died Nov. 6, 1907, aged 68. 

Marion Stiles, 1907- 



278 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



CHAPTER XV. 

Ecclesiastical History, Continued. 

The Methodist Episcopal Church and Society. 

Organization of the Church and Society — Pastorship of Rev. Amos Mer- 
rill — Sketch of Rev. Mr. Merrill's Life — Pastorate of Rev. Gusta- 
vus Silverstein — Pastorate of Rev. Henry B. Copp — Sketch of 
Rev. Mr. Copp's Life — Names in the Order of Their Succession of 
the Ministers Succeeding Rev. Henry B. Copp — Building of the 
Methodist Meeting-house — The First Organ Installed in the 
Church— The Second Organ— The Church Bell— The Gift of the 
Pulpit, 1907— The Gift of the Communion Service, 1908— Cele- 
bration of the Fiftieth Anniversary of the Building of the Meeting- 
house — Boards of Trustees — The Joseph Tucker Gift to the Church 
and Society — The Calvin R. Shedd Devise — The James N. Tucker 
Bequest— The Wilkes W. Corey Bequest— The Albert W. Corey 
Memorial Fund — The Mary Corey Legacy. 

The Methodists commenced holding services here as early as 1848. 
Tradition says that the first clergyman of that denomination to preach in 
town was Rev. Horace Moulton'of Townsend, Mass., who conducted a 
series of meetings in the old meeting-house in the fall of 1850. Mr. Moul- 
ton was followed by Rev. Samuel Tupper of Townsend, and by Rev. Mr. 
Parmenter of Lunenburg, Mass. 

Organization of the Church and Society. 

On the 12th day of March, 1852, the present local Methodist Church 
and society were formally established by the organization of an official 
board, or quarterly conference. The record of its organization is as 
follows : 

"The male members of the Methodist Episcopal Society of Brookline, 
N. H., met in the old meeting-house for the purpose of organizing an Offi- 
cial Board or Quarterly Conference of the M. E. Church of this place. 




METHODIST MEETING-HOUSE— 1859 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 279 

"The meeting was opened by prayer by Rev. C. N. Smith, the pre- 
siding elder for this district. 

The following named members of the society were elected as officers 
of the Board : 

Secretary, pro tern, O. P. Pitcher. 
Stewards, Gardner Shattuck, Randal Daniels, Samuel Gilson and Henry 

Spaulding, 
Recording Steward, Ralph Burns., 
Estimating Committee, Ehab B. Shattuck, Henry Spaulding." 

For the first few years of its existence the society worshipped in the 
old meeting-house. But about 1858 it began to hold its meetings in 
Tucker and Stiles' hall, where it continued to worship until the comple- 
tion of its new meeting-house in 1859. 

The first settled pastor of the church was the Rev. Amos Merrill, 
who commenced his pastoral duties a short time prior to its organization, 
coming here from New Ipswich, where up to the date of his advent 
in Brookline he had been pastor of the local Methodist church. 

As it was organized at first, the society was, of course, small in num- 
bers. But what it lacked in that respect was amply compensated for by 
the zeal and enthusiasm of its members, who were instant in season and 
out of season in rendering service to the Master; doing in His name what- 
ever their hands found to do, and with an eye single to His glory. As a 
result of their devotedness, in a very few years after its organization, the 
society was firmly and securely established in the community. 

Mr. Merrill's pastorate ended in 1855. He went from Brookline to 
the state of Vermont, leaving behind him the reputation of being an able, 
earnest and sincere preacher of the Word. As a pastor he was courteous 
and gentlemanly in his intercourse with his fellow-citizens 'and, at the same 
time, fearless in the expression of his religious views. Although not a man 
of liberal education, he was endowed with a natural eloquence which ena- 
bled him to present the truths of Christianity in a way and manner which 
carried conviction to the souls of his hearers. 

The local church was most fortunate in having secured his services 
as its pastor in the days of its infancy. He found it weak in numbers, 
poor in wealth, and with but a dubious outlook for the future. He left 
it, still weak in numbers, to be sure, and poor in worldly possessions, 
but strong in a spirit of self reliance, and rich in the possession of an 
abundant faith in the promises of God, which eventually established it 
upon a sure and firm foundation. 



280 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

Biographical Sketch of Rev. Amos Merrill. 

REV. AMOS. MERRILL, a son of Benjamin and Polly (Kyle) Merrill, 
was born at Corinth, Vt., Oct. 26, 1809. He was educated in the common 
schools of his native town. In his early manhood he was employed as a 
local preacher in the Methodist Episcopal Church, officiating in Vermont 
and New Hampshire. About 1842-43, he removed from Corinth to New 
Ipswich, N. H. In 1852 he was called to the ministry in the Methodist 
Episcopal Church in Brookline, he being its first pastor. In 1855 Mr. 
Merrill resigned his pastorship in Brookline and, after preaching for 
several years in different towns in Vermont and New Hampshire, finally 
took charge of the Methodist Church in East Haverhill, N. H., where 
he died June 29, 1865. 

Mr. Merrill was twice married. His first wife was Phoebe Reynolds, 
of Wilton, Canada. She died at Corinth, Vt., June 31, 1871. His second 
wife was Amelia C. Martin, a sister of his first wife, of Wilton, Canada. 
She died at Somerville, Mass., June 18, 1893. 

Mr. Merrill was the father of three children, all by his first wife, 
viz: Charles N. Merrill, born at Corinth, Vt., Oct. 22, 1831; died at 
Nashua, Dec. 25, 1874. Melvina, born at Corinth, Aug. 13, 1833; died 
at West Corinth, Aug. 30, 1858. James A., born at Corinth, Vt., Sept. 
12, 1835; died at Nashua in 1913. 

Charles N. for several years prior to and at the time of his decease 
was instructor in music in the public schools of Nashua. James A. was 
secretary of the New Hampshire State Temperance Union from 1882 to 
1894. 

For the three years immediately following Mr. Merrill's pastorate, 
the pulpit was filled by the following named clergymen : 1854, Rev. Henry 
Chandler; 1855, Rev. Joseph C. Emerson and Rev. A. McLean; 1856, 
Rev. Linvill J. Hall. 

The Pastorate of Rev. Gustavus Silverstein. 

REV. GUSTAVUS SILVERSTEIN was installed as pastor in 1857. 
Mr. Silverstein was a foreigner, a Swede, and, when he came here, but a 
short time in this country. He was possessed of a considerable natural 
ability, educated, and devoted to his work and, notwithstanding his im- 
perfect knowledge of English, an eloquent and effective pulpit orator and 
exhorter. 

During his ministry here the country was swept by the great relig- 
ious revival of 1857, the effects of which were largely felt in this town. 
In the revival Mr. Silverstein labored earnestly and zealously and, through 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 281 

his untiring efforts, was instrumental in bringing many souls to repent- 
ance and, by newly acquired membership, strengthening his charge in 
numbers and spirituality. 

Mr. Silverstein's broken speech and lack of command of language in 
which to express his ideas were oftentimes productive of ludicrous results 
and, not infrequently, the cause of his hearers, even in their soberest 
moments, being convulsed with merriment. Such was the case when on 
one occasion at the close of an evening service he made the following 
announcement: "Brederen and sisters, dere vill be a evenin' meetin' here 
nex Vendnesday night if it don't rain; und dere vill be a meetin' here if 
it does rain; und if you can't come yourselves, blease bring your lankerns." 
At that time whale oil lanthorns and lamps were in ordinary use for 
illuminating purposes; and in such an interior as that comprised in the 
old meeting-house, where the feeble glimmer of a few such lights only 
served to make the darkness more apparent, the more of them displayed 
the better. 

Mr. Silverstein's term of service expired in 1858. He was succeeded 
as pastor by Rev. Levi Smith. Mr. Smith occupied the pulpit from April, 
1858, to April, 1859; when he was succeeded as pastor by Rev. Henry 
B. Copp. 

The Pastorate of Rev. Henry B. Copp. 
Rev. Henry B. Copp officiated as pastor of the church from the 18th 
day of April, 1859, to April, 1862. Mr. Copp came into his pastorate here 
at an interesting period in the history of his church. As the result of the 
revival of 1857, its membership at that time was largely increased in 
numbers. This increase had also been augmented by the addition to its 
membership in 1858 of twelve citizens who, having formerly been members 
of the local Congregational Church, had withdrawn from its communion 
at the time of Rev. Daniel Goodwin's resignation as its pastor in 1855. 
As one of the results of the withdrawal of the twelve from the Congrega- 
tional Church and their subsequent uniting with the Methodist Church, 
the relations existing between the two churches were not, to say the least, 
of the most cordial nature. 

It was the period, also, in which were transpiring the momentous 
events which subsequently culminated in the War of the Rebellion; and 
which, because of their importance as bearing upon the future of the 
Republic, engrossed the attention of the public to the extent that all 
other matters of general interest, even those of a religious nature, were, 
for the time being, in danger of being relegated to a secondary position as 
subjects for its consideration. 



282 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

In Brookline, as everywhere else in New England, the people were 
divided in their opinions as to the righteousness of the impending conflict. 
This division of sentiment was shared in by the members of the local 
churches, whose members naturally shared in the views of the political 
party to which each happened to belong. 

To this division in political sentiments was owing the existence of a 
strong faction of citizens who were opposed to the preaching in the pulpit 
of what they termed political sermons. That is to say, sermons which ad- 
vocated the crushing out of the Rebellion as a matter of patriotism. Such 
a state of affairs made it unpleasant for clergymen whose sense of duty 
prompted them to speak openly and frankly against what they conceived 
to be evil, under whatever guise it existed, 

But Mr. Copp proved himself to be a Christian and a patriot with 
the courage of his convictions. As a pastor he was a faithful and fearless 
preacher of the truths of Christianity, as he understood them. As a 
shepherd, he admonished, encouraged and guided his little flock in their 
intercourse with their fellow Christians so that during his pastorate the 
relations existing between the two churches were peaceful and, on the 
whole, harmonious; and as a patriot, he was equally frank and fearless 
in his advocacy not only of the right but also of the duty on the part of 
the Government to punish traitors to its laws. 

During his pastorate, the church erected its present house of worship 
on the east side of Main street in the village. 

Biographical Sketch of Rev. Henry B. Copp. 

REV. HENRY B. COPP was born in 
Piermont, Dec. 25, 1833. He is a son of 
Joseph M. Copp, born in Warren in 1801, and 
Harriet H. Brown, born in Cavendish, Vt., 
in 1810. His parents were farmers and excellent 
Christian people. When he was about twelve 
years of age, his father moved from Piermont 
to Warren, where, for a short time, he resid- 
ed in a log cabin. In 1846, his father, tired of 
trying to support his family on the precarious 
income derived from a farm in the back- 
woods, removed from Warren to Nashua, 
then a place of some six thousand inhabitants. In Nashua he worked to 
help support the family, selling newspapers and doing such other work 
as came to hand. During this period his labors occupied his time to the 




HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 283 

extent that he found but little opportunity to attend the public schools. 
Nevertheless, being of a studious disposition, he devoted his leisure hours 
to study at home ; and so diligently did he apply himself that when the 
Nashua High School was opened to the public he was able to enter it as 
a student most excellently well prepared for his work. After leaving the 
high school, he attended for a short time Crosby's Academy in Nashua. 
From his boyhood days Mr. Copp had been actuated by a desire of some 
day becoming a minister of the gospel ; and it was with that end in view 
that he had attended both the high school and the academy, hoping that 
eventually he might be able to complete his education by a college course 
and thus fit himself for the responsible position to which he aspired. 
But like many another aspiring lad, his dreams of a college education 
were destined never to be realized. While he was yet a student in the 
high schools, circumstances were such that he was compelled to engage 
in teaching, not only between terms, but also during some terms, in order 
to procure pecuniary means to support himself. One winter while teaching 
in Hudson he was stricken with a severe attack of bleeding from the throat 
and lungs, which gave symptoms of being permanent in its nature. This 
incident caused him to give up his idea of entering college; and eventu- 
ally he entered as a student the Methodist Theological School which was 
then located in Concord, but which at the present time constitutes a part 
of Boston University. He had been a member of the school but a short 
time when a return of his old complaint compelled him to leave the insti- 
tution and to abandon, temporarily at least, his studies. He returned to 
his home in Nashua. This was in the fall of 1858. In the early winter of 
that year he received from the Methodist Episcopal Church in Brookline 
an invitation to occupy for a few Sundays its pulpit which was then vacant. 
He accepted the invitation and filled the position to the entire satisfaction 
of the people until the following spring; when he was engaged by the 
church as its regular pastor ; a position which he held until the expiration 
of his term of sendee, under the rules then governing the Methodist 
Church. 

Mr. Copp went from Brookline to the Methodist Episcopal Church 
in Rindge. During the last half century, in addition to Brookline and 
Rindge, he has been a pastor in the following places: Auburn, Chester, 
Seabrook, Newmarket, Exeter, Amesbury, Salisbury, and Merrimackport 
in Massachusetts; also Laconia, Lisbon, Londonderry, Milford, Kingston, 
Hampton, Epping, West Rindge, Peterborough and Deny Village. 

Mr. Copp is well known in many parts of the state, where his reputa- 
tion as an able, faithful and eloquent preacher of the gospel and a patriotic 



284 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

and conscientious citizen is firmly and securely established. He is a 
brother of Col. E- J. Copp of Nashua, now, and for many years past, reg- 
ister of probate for Hillsborough County, and author of "The History of 
The Third New Hampshire Volunteer Regiment" in the War of the Re- 
bellion, and Capt. C. D. Copp, late of Clinton, Mass., deceased; both war 
veterans. At the present time (1913) Mr. Copp is residing in Derry 
where, although he is in his eighty-first year, he is still engaged in his 
regular work of the ministry, preaching regularly in Derry Village. 

Mr. Copp married for his first wife Miss Almira E. Plumer of Lon- 
donderry. She died in 1896. In 1901 he married for his second wife Mrs. 
Laura Luella Pond of Manchester, who is still living. No children by 
either marriage. 

Names, Order of Succession of Instalment, and Duration of Term 
of Service of the Clergymen Succeeding Rev. Henry 
B. Copp as Pastors of the Church. 

Rev. George C. Thomas, April, 1862, to April, 1863. 

Rev. George F. Eaton, April, 1863, to April, 1866. 

Rev. Charles H. Chase, April, 1866, to April, 1869. 

Rev. Lorenzo Draper, April, 1869, to April, 1871. 

Rev. Albert F. Baxter, April, 1871, to April, 1873. 

Rev. William E. Bennett, April, 1873, to April, 1876. 

Rev. William H. Stuart, April, 1876, to April, 1878. 

Rev. Irad Taggart, April, 1878, to April 25, 1881. 

Rev. Joseph W. Presby, April 25, 1881, to April 23, 1883. 

Rev. John H. Hillman, April 23, 1883, to April 26, 1886. 

Rev. Amos B. Russell, April 2, 1886, to May 5, 1887. 
Rev. Eugene N. Thrasher and Rev. F. 

A. Zimmerman, May 5, 1887, to 1888. 

Rev. George N. Bryant, May 5, 1888, to April 13, 1891. 

Rev. Herbert F. Quimby, May 3, 1891, to 1892. 

Rev. J. C. C. Evans and A. B. Russell, 1892, to 1893. 

Rev. William T. Boultonhouse, April 20, 1893, to 1895. 

Rev. Irad Taggart, April, 1895, to 1896. 

Rev. Arthur M. Shattuck, April 12, 1896, to April 10, 1898. 

Rev. Walter Woodyard, April 24, 1898, to 1899. 

Rev. Herbert J. Foote, April 1899, to April, 1902. 

Rev. W. E. Covell, April, 1902, to April 19, 1903. 

Rev. William G. Babcock, April 26, 1903, to April 4, 1904. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



285 



Rev. Charles W. Dockrill, 
John Bard, student, 
Henry B. Mansell, student, 
Walter F. Whitney, student, 
T. Ross Hieks, student, 
D. Howard Hickey, student, 
James N. Seaver, student, 
John Beard, student, 
Rev. Charles W. Dockrill, 



April 17, 1904, to April 4, 1905. 

1905, to Sept., 1905. 

1905, to Sept. 8, 1906. 
April 22, 1906, to April 10, 1907. 
April 28, 1907, to April, 1908. 
April 10, 1908, to April, 1909. 

1910, to April, 1912. 
April, 1912, to 1913. 

1914, 



The Building of the Methodist Episcopal Meeting-house. 

Almost from the date of its organization in 1852, the members of the 
church began to lay plans for building a new meeting-house. The first 
five years, however, passed away with little or no encouragement for the 
immediate realization of their plans, and the prospect of their fulfillment 
appeared to be as far off as in the beginning. 

But in 1858, during the pastorship of Rev. Henry B. Copp, the church 
was materially strengthened in numbers and in wealth by the addition 
to its membership of twelve of the number of those who had withdrawn 
from their connection with the local Congregational Church in 1855, at 
the time, or soon after, the Rev. Daniel Goodwin severed his connection 
with the same. Under the stimulus of this addition to its strength, the 
plans of the church for building a new meeting-house received a fresh 
Impetus. Preparations for building the house were immediately begun 
and, as rapidly as possible, carried forward towards completion. In this 
preliminary work Rev. Mr. Copp, the pastor, labored tirelessly and 
zealously. 

The money necessary for building the house was raised by subscrip- 
tions from the members of the church and the citizens generally. The 
land upon which the house stands was conveyed to the society and church 
by Joseph C. Tucker by his deed dated April 27, 1859. The considera- 
tion for the deed was two hundred and fifty dollars ($250). By the 
terms of the deed the land conveyed was to be used — "To build thereon 
a house of worship" * * * "to be used for that purpose and no other." 
And it was conditioned further: 

"That whenever said premises ceases to be used and occupied for the 
above specified purpose for the term of three years said land shall revert 
back to said Tucker or his heirs free and clear of all encumbrances." 



286 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

The house was completed and occupied for the first time in the 
summer of 1859. The dedicatory sermon was preached by the Rev. Sulli- 
van Holman, of Nashua. Rev. A. F. Bailey, of Townsend, offered the 
dedicatory prayer. 

Its interior arrangements, which were modeled after those of the 
Congregational meeting-house, have remained practically unchanged up 
to the present time (1914). 

Soon after the house was completed, Asa Seaver, Mrs. Louisa Spauld- 
ing, Orman F. Shattuck, Asher Shattuck, John S. Daniels, Henry B. 
Stiles and Jonas Kendall presented the church and society with a reed 
organ, which was installed in the choir loft. This organ remained in use 
until 1869, when it was superseded by a five octave double reed Esty in- 
strument, the cost of which was paid by popular subscription. The pipe 
organ which is in use at the present time was installed in position Sept. 
21, 1886. It was purchased of Isaac W. Butler, by whom it was made. 
Its cost was four hundred and forty-five dollars, which was met by money 
raised for the purpose by popular subscription. 

The bell which hangs in the tower of the house was installed in its 
position in 1873. Its weight is 1260 pounds. Its original cost was six 
hundred and twenty-eight dollars. It was paid for with money raised by 
popular subscription. It was rung for the first time, July 4, 1873. 

For the first five years from the date of its organization in 1852, the 
growth of the church in membership and in material prosperity was slow 
but steady. 

In 1858, six years after its organization, its membership had in- 
creased to thirty-four in number, and it had accumulated a Sunday-school 
library of two hundred and forty-two volumes. At the quarterly confer- 
ence of that year Levi Smith received a license as a local preacher. 

For the twenty years immediately following the completion of its 
meeting-house, in 1859, the church continued to increase in numbers and 
in strength. During this period, under the pastorate of Rev. Charles H. 
Chase, in 1866-68, it became entirely free from the burden of indebted- 
ness to which it had been subjected, to a greater or less extent, since its 
organization. 

In 1872, under the pastorate of Rev. William Bennett, the church 
reached the height of its prosperity. It had a membership of fifty-two in 
number, and fifteen probationists. Its Sunday-school contained ninety 
scholars. Its library consisted of 500 volumes, and its real estate was 
valued at four thousand dollars. From 1876 to the latter part of the 
eighties, the church and society continued to remain in a prosperous 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 287 

condition. Although during that entire period the membership of both 
was, on the whole, gradually decreasing ; the decrease being caused by the 
deaths of some of the oldest and most influential members, and by the 
removal from town of others, the vacancies caused by the deaths and 
removals of whom failed to be filled as rapidly as they were made. 

Another cause for this decrease in membership is, also, undoubtedly, 
to be found in the fact that during that period the population of the town 
was slowly decreasing, and by this decrease in population the opportuni- 
ties for an increase in church membership were correspondingly diminished. 

In 1907, during the pastorate of Rev. Walter F. Whitney, the exte- 
rior and interior of the church underwent extensive repairs; and in the 
same year Orville D. Fessenden presented the church and society with 
the beautiful pulpit which at the present time adorns the interior of its 
house of worship. 

In 1908, the church was the recipient of a handsome silver com- 
munion service; the gift of George Haven Abbott, who presented the same 
in memory of his mother, Theresa Seaver Abbott. 

Fiftieth Anniversary of the Church. 

On the 11th day of November, 1909, this church observed the fiftieth 
anniversary of the building of its house of worship. The following account 
of the exercises attendant upon the celebration is taken from a news- 
paper in which it was printed at the time. 

"The church was beautifully decorated with laurel wreaths. An arch 
of evergreen and laurel was suspended above the platform, upon which in 
figures and letters of gold was inscribed '1859 — Welcome — 1909'. 

"The platform and pulpit were adorned with laurel, ferns and large 
yellow chrysanthemums. The afternoon exercises consisted of an organ 
voluntary, Mrs. Emma Valedge; hymn, 'Our Lord, Our Faith, Our Bap- 
tism,' choir; Apostle's Creed, congregation; reading, ninety-fifth Psalm, 
the Rev. T. Rose Hicks, of Nashua; prayer, the Rev. Herbert J. Foote, of 
Sunapee; solo, 'The Celestial City,' Mrs. Jennie Boutelle; welcome, the 
Rev. D. H. Hickey; anthem, 'How Excellent is Thy Name,' Mrs. Phoebe 
Jenness Randall and choir ; reminiscences of the church, the Rev. Henry 
B. Copp, of West Derry; church history, the Rev. George H. Hardy, of 
Ashburnham. 

"Communion was administered very impressively by the district 
superintendent, the Rev. R. T. Wolcott; hymn, 'The Solid Rock'; bene- 
diction. 



288 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

"At 5.30 o'clock a banquet was served at the Congregational vestry, 
under the supervision of Mrs. Ellen S, Swett, assisted by Mrs. Clinton D. 
Gilson and Mrs. Stanley, nearly one hundred partaking. 

The evening serivce which began at 7.30 o'clock was as follows: 
Organ voluntary, Mrs. Emma Valedge; hymn, 'How Firm a Foundation'; 
Scripture reading, the Rev. Warren L. Noyes; prayer, the Rev. Walter 
F. Whitney of Hillsborough; anthem, 'How Lovely is Zion,' choir; ad- 
dress, 'Mission and Evangelism,' by the Rev. R. T. Wolcott, which was 
strong, thoughtful and inspiring, the speaker earnestly advocating personal 
evangelism, urging the preachers of the gospel to be men among men, to 
come in personal contact with them; solo, 'The Holy City,' Delbert Porter. 

"Remarks replete with happiness and good cheer were given by the 
Revs. H. J. Foote, Walter F. Whitney, T. Ross Hicks and Albert F. 
Baxter and James A. Merrill of Nashua. The benediction was pronounced 
by Rev. R. T. Wolcott. 

"The entire services were of unusual interest and enjoyed by all in 
attendance. 

"Among those from out of town were the Rev. and Mrs. R. T. Wolcott, 
the Rev. Henry B. Copp, West Deny; the Rev. and Mrs. Herbert J. 
Foote, the Rev. and Mrs. Walter F. Whitney, Hillsborough; the Rev. 
George H. Hardy, Ashburnham; the Rev. Albert Baxter, the Rev. and Mrs. 
T. Ross Hicks, Nashua; Rev. and Mrs. D. H. Hickey, Mr. and Mrs. 
Augustus Lovejoy, Ayer, Mass.; Mr. and Mrs. Charles P. Hall, Nashua; 
Mr. and Airs. Charles Dunbar, Sandown; Mrs. May Kline Pingree, John 
Kline, Fitchburg, Mass.; James A. Merrill, Nashua." 

At the present time, 1914, the church has a membership of about 
twenty souls. It is free from debt and has a fund, derived from gifts and 
legacies, of twenty -five hundred dollars. Its members are zealous, earnest 
and hopeful; and are looking forward to a future of usefulness resulting 
from the upbuilding of God's work in their midst. 

Boards of Trustees of the Church and Society, 1859-1912. 

April 4, 1859, the church appointed its first board of trustees, as follows: 
Calvin R. Shedd, Jonas Kendall, Asher Shattuck, Dr. Jonathan C. Shat- 
tuck, Samuel Gilson, Sr., Asa Betterly, and Benjamin Kendall. 

This board remained practically unchanged until 1864-65, when 
several of its members dropped out and Luther McDonald, John Shedd, 
Nathaniel B. Hutchingson and Nathaniel Vickery were appointed in 
their places. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 289 

From 1865 to 1877 new members were appointed and, at various times, 
installed in the board as follows: 1871, Ichabod F. Lund; 1872, Orman F. 
Shattuck; 1874, Albert W. Corey, Charles P. Hall and David S. Fessen- 
den; 1875, J. Ransom Bean, Jackson Rideout and George S. Hull. 

In 1877 the board was reorganized; all of its old members were 
dropped, and a new board appointed, consisting of the following named 
members: Henry G. Shattuck, Lorenzo Draper, Jr., George H.Nye, George 
Peacock, Mrs. Margaret Vickery, and Mrs. Eliza J. Kendall. This board 
remained unchanged until 1884, when the name of Jeremiah B. Needham 
was added to the list of members. 

From 1884 to 1890 new members were added to the board from time 
to time as follows: 1887, George E. Stiles; 1889, Daniel McKensie; 
1890, William Jenness. 

Following are the boards of trustees as constituted from 1891 to 1912, 
inclusive, so far as the same are obtainable. 

1891. 
Henry G. Shattuck, Orman F. Shattuck, David S. Fessenden, Jere- 
miah Needham, Asa Seaver, George H. Nye, George A. Peacock. 

1892. 

Henry G. Shattuck, Orman F. Shattuck, David S. Fessenden, Jere- 
miah Needham, Asa Seaver, George H. Nye, Geo. A. Peacock. 

1893. 
George H. Nye, Orman F. Shattuck, David S. Fessenden, Henry G. 
Shattuck, Jeremiah Needham, Asa Seaver. 

Records from 1894 to 1907, inclusive, are missing. 

1908. 

Henry G. Shattuck, David S. Fessenden, Orville D. Fessenden, 
Morton Campbell, Mrs. Imogene Dunbar, Mrs. Ellen S. Swett, George H. 

Nye. 

1909. 

Henry G. Shattuck, David S. Fessenden, Orville D. Fessenden, 
Morton Campbell, Mrs. Imogene Dunbar, Mrs. Ellen S. Swett, George 
H. Nye. 



290 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

1910. 

Henry G. Shattuck, David S. Fessenden, Orville D. Fessenden, 
Morton Campbell, Mrs. Imogene Dunbar, Mrs. Ellen S. Swett, George 
H. Nye. 

1911. 

Henry G. Shattuck, David S. Fessenden, Orville D. Fessenden, 
Morton Campbell, Mrs. Imogene Dunbar, Mrs. Ellen S. Swett, George 
H. Nye, Herbert S. Corey. 

1912. 

Henry G. Shattuck, David S. Fessenden, Orville D. Fessenden, 
Morton Campbell, Mrs. Imogene Dunbar, Mrs. Ellen S. Swett, George 
H. Nye, Herbert S. Corey. 

Gifts, Devises and Bequests to the Church and Society. 

The Joseph C. Tucker Gift. 

The gift, in 1859, by Joseph C. Tucker to the church and society of 
the lot of land upon which the meeting-house is located has already been 
mentioned in a prior page in this chapter. 

The Calvin R. Shedd Devise. 

In 1874, under the terms of the will of Calvin R. Shedd, of this town, 
the church and society came into possession and conditional ownership 
of a parsonage. The clause in the will by which this devise was estab- 
lished reads as follows — "To the trustees of the Methodist Episcopal Church 
and Society in said Brookline in trust the lot of land with the dwelling 
house and buildings thereon situate in said Brookline conveyed to me by 
widow Sawtelle and now occupied as a parsonage in connection with said 
church and society as such parsonage forever. If however after the pay- 
ment of my debts and expenses of administration my estate shall not be 
sufficient in the judgement of my Executors to secure to my said wife 
her comfortable support and maintenance, as aforesaid without taking 
the rent and income that may be derived from said parsonage premises 
towards her support and maintenance, then the said devise and bequest to 
said Trustees is not to take effect until the death or marriage of my said 
wife ; but whenever this devise or bequest may take effect whether at my 
decease or at the decease or marriage of my said wife it is upon the condi- 
tion that the premises so devised shall be used as a parsonage in connec- 
tion with said church and society; but with power to said Trustees to sell 
and convey said premises whenever in their opinion it may be for the 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 291 

interest of said Church and Society to exchange their parsonage for one 
in a different place and to invest the proceeds in the purchase of other 
premises to be so used for a parsonage and whenever the said Methodist 
Episcopal Church shall cease to maintain its organization in connection 
with a church having occasion to make use of such parsonage then the 
said devise shall be void and the said estate shall be disposed of as a part 
of the rest and residue of my Estate, as next hereinafter provided." 

The James N. Tucker Bequest. 

In 1881, the Methodist Episcopal Church and society, and the Con- 
gregational Church and society became beneficiaries under the will of 
James Noble Tucker, of Townsend, Mass., a native of this town, in the 
sum of one thousand dollars each. 

The terms of this bequest, which constituted the 16th clause of the 
will, were as follows: 

"I give and bequeath to both of the Religious Societies, namely the 
Congregational Society and the Methodist Episcopal Society in Brook- 
line, New Hampshire, One thousand dollars each; that is to say, the 
income on said Bequests shall be paid yearly to said Societies equally for 
the support of preaching, as long as both Societies keep up preaching, 
provided should either of said Societies fail to support preaching then 
and in that case the whole of the income on both bequests shall be paid 
to the Society supporting preaching, and the said income shall not be used 
for any other purpose. And I order my trustees to invest in some safe 
securities all the above Bequests named to Religious Societies that the 
income may be paid to said Societies as above provided." 

Nov. 7, 1882, Orman F. Shattuck was appointed as the first trustee 
of the James N. Tucker Fund; a position which he held until his death. 
He was succeeded as trustee by George H. Nye, who continues to hold 
the office at the present time (1914). 

The Wilkes W. Corey Bequest. 

At the decease of Wilkes W. Corey in 1882, under the terms of his 
will, the church and society became beneficiaries in the sum of one hundred 
dollars from his estate. 

» 

The Albert W. Corey Memorial Fund. 

In 1907, the widow and heirs-at-law of Albert W. Corey, a native of 
and life-long resident in this town, and throughout his life a firm friend of 



292 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

this church, in honor of his memory, presented the church and society 
with one thousand dollars in trust, the same to be known as the Albert 
W. Corey Memorial Fund. The deed of trust ran to Henry G. Shattuck, 
George H. Nye, Morton Campbell, Orville D. Fessenden, David S. Fes- 
senden, and Charles S. Dunbar, trustees of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church of Brookline. The conditions under which the trust was created, 
and upon the performance of which its perpetuity depends, are set forth 
in the instrument creating the trust as follows : 

' 'To be invested in proper and safe securities or other interest bearing 
investments in the name of and for the benefit of said church. 

"To use and apply the income from said investment of said sum for 
the preaching of the gospel annually. 

"The trust herein created shall continue indefinitely as above set 
forth as regards the use of said income, and the principal shall remain 
forever intact unless the present edifice used for church purposes shall 
be destroyed by fire, in which event the said principal may then be used 
if necessary to aid in the reconstruction of said church edifice. 

"If the said trustees or their successors shall decide not to re- 
construct said church or for any reason the said church shall be discon- 
tinued or services therein abandoned definitely, then the said sum of 
$1000. shall revert to the party of the first part to be divided in the pro- 
portions of one-half to the said widow and one-half to the other members 
of said party of the first part, their respective heirs or assigns. 

"In case of suspension of regular services in said church for six con- 
tinuous months, then this trust shall be terminated and the said sum of 
one thousand dollars shall revert and be divided as above set forth." 
Dated Jan. 28, 1908. 

Signed: Mary Corey, Herbert S. Corey, Jessie M. Corey, Walter E. 
Corey, Henry G. Shattuck, George H. Nye, David S. Fessenden, Orville 
D. Fessenden, Morton A. Campbell, Charles S. Dunbar. 

The Mary Corey Legacy. 

In 1912, Mrs. Mary Corey, by her will, admitted to probate June 
25, of that year, bequeathed five hundred dollars to the church. The 
conditions under which the bequest was given are as follows — "The in- 
come to be used for the support of the Gospel as long as the church exists 
as a preaching place. Should it cease to exist, then the amount above 
mentioned is to be equally divided between John H. Kline and Morton 
Kline." 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 293 



CHAPTER XVI. 
Current Events, Incidents and Happenings. 

1800-1830. 

Local Conditions in 1800 — Tax List of 1801 — Town Classed by Itself in 
the Matter of Representation — The Killing of the Last Panther in 
Town— Census of 1810— War of 1812— Old Militia Days in Raby 
A May Day Training in the Forties — The Brookline Independent 
Cadets — 1816, A Year Without a Summer — Laying Out of High- 
way at West End of the Pond — Brookline Social Library — The 
First Fire Engine — First Hearse — First Hearse House — Post 
Office and Post Masters — Fire Engine Men in the Year 1829. 

In 1800, according to the United States Census of that year, the num- 
ber of Brookline's inhabitants was 454; an increase of 116 over the num- 
ber given in the census of 1790. The town was still in the log cabin period 
of its existence, not more than ten or twelve framed dwelling houses- hav- 
ing been erected within its limits, one of which was the old meeting-house, 
built in 1791. 

The dwelling houses of the inhabitants were scattered all over the 
township. The "village" of the present time was not in existence. It 
was not even thought of. Commencing on the great road at the point 
where it is crossed by the town's east boundary line, and passing along its 
course westerly to the summit of meeting-house hill, of all the framed 
dwelling houses at the present time located upon it only five were then 
standing, viz : the old Samuel Farley house, located on the east side of the 
road one mile south of the village; the old "yellow house" so called in the 
village, the same being known at the present time as the Elm wood; 
the L part of the village hotel; the Samuel T. Boynton house, located on 
the summit of meeting-house hill, afterwards known as the Doctor Harris 
house, and at the present time owned and occupied as her home by 
widow Newton W. Colburn ; the dwelling house on the west side of the 
road opposite the old meeting-house, now the residence of Lieut. William 
L. Dodge; and the old meeting-house itself. 



294 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

Save for these five dwelling houses, and the old Douglass log cabin, 
located on the west side of the road near where the dwelling house of 
widow of Charles N. Corey now stands, there were, so far as is known, no 
other human habitations on the road between the points above indicated; 
and the road, including the present village Main street, for the entire 
distance named, was for the greater part of the distance bordered by 
dense forest growth. 

The great majority of the inhabitants were engaged in farming, 
although the avocations of coal burning, coopering and lumbering were 
carried on to a considerable extent. Save for the sawmills, of which there 
were at this time seven in operation, there was not a manufacturing plant 
of any description located in town. There was but one church, the Con- 
gregationalist, which occupied, as its place of worship, the old meeting- 
house on the hill; and three schoolhouses, located in different parts of the 
township, sufficed to furnish the young and rising generation with mental 
pabulum sufficient, as it was then believed, to ensure its usefulness as 
future citizens. The public highways were for the greater part in wretched 
condition. For the ancient practice of citizens assembling at stated times 
in each recurring spring upon the highways located in each of their re- 
spective "Highway Districts," and working out their respective highway 
taxes upon the same by leaning for the greater part of the day upon their 
respective spades and hoes and discussing politics or retailing scandal, 
was still in vogue. 

But, nevertheless, the town's outlook for the future was, on the whole, 
most encouraging; and its people, far from being discouraged, were, each 
and all, actively engaged in minding their own business, as well as, to some 
considerable extent, attending to that of their neighbors, and looking 
hopefully forward to the coming of better times. Nor in the end were 
their hopes disappointed. But that is another story. 

The Tax List for the Year 1801. 

The names of the citizens who in the spring of 1801 "worked out" 
their highway taxes by retiring from labor to repose were as follows : 

Jonathan Ames, Jacob Austin, Benjamin Brooks, 

Clarke Brown, Ebenezer Brown, Abnah Bills, 

Samuel T. Boynton, John Colburn, James Campbell, 

Benja. Campbell, Ebenezer Emery, Joseph Emerson, 

John Emerson, Benjamin Farley, Samuel Farnsworth, 

Philip Farnsworth, Adjt. William Green, Colburn Green, 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



295 



Calvin Green, 
Lieut. Eleazer Gilson, 
Nathan Gilson, 
Abraham Hodgman, 
vStephen Hall, 
Jonas Leslie, 
Alexander Mcintosh, 
Major McDonald, 
Richard Melendy, 
Abijah Proctor, 
Joseph Pike, 
Samuel Russell, Jr., 
Benjamin Shattuck, Jr., 
Joshua Smith, 
Capt. Simeon Senter, 
Lieut. Eli Sartell, 
Ezra Talbot, 
Mathew Wallace, 
Moses Shattuck, 
Abraham Withington, 
Gardner Conant, 
Elisha Towns, 
Daniel Wright, 



Abel Green, 
Ebenezer Gilson, 
David Gilson, 
Abraham Hodgman, 
Uriah Hall, 
Thomas Lancey, 
Lieut. Jas Mcintosh., 
George McDonald, 
Thomas Melendy, 
Jesse Parker, 
Capt. Geo. Russell, 
John Russell, 
Benjamin Shattuck, 
Joshua Smith, Jr., 
Lieut. Daniel Spaulding, 
Swallow Tucker, 
Lieut. Luther Wright, 
Joseph Wyman, 
Ebenezer Wheeler, 
Thomas Bennett, 
David Lawrence, 
Nathaniel Patten, 
Oliver Wetherbee, 



Ezekiel Green, 
Abel Gilson, 
Abel Hodgman, 
William Hall, 
Phinehas Holden, 
Lieut. Alex. Mcintosh, 
James Mcintosh, 
John McDonald, Jr. 
Ezekiel Proctor, 
Abijah Parker, 
Samuel Russell, 
Stephen Robbins, 
Lieut. Isaac Shattuck. 
Capt. Robert Seaver. 
Lieut. Ephraim Sartel, 
Josiah Tucker, 
David Wright, 
Benj. Lock, 
Joshua Woodbridge, 
Joshua Seaver, 
Jonas Lawrence, 
Wid. Polly Tucker, 
Joseph Jepson. 



The Town Classed by Itself in the Matter of Representation. 

1802. As has been previously stated, up to the year 1802, Brookline, 
in the matter of its being represented in the state legislature had been, 
classed with other towns; it being classed with Mason from 1769 to 1794, 
and with Milford from 1794 to 1802. This state of affairs had long been 
a source of great dissatisfaction to its inhabitants; and in 1802 they de- 
termined to make an effort to be classed in the future by themselves. 
To that end the town petitioned the General Court. In response to this 
petition the house of representatives, after considering the same, passed 
the following act : 

"State of New Hampshire 

In the House of Representatives 

June 16, 1802. 

Upon reading and Considering the foregoing Petition and the Report 

of a Committee thereon Voted that the prayer thereof be granted and that 



296 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

the Inhabitants of the town of Brookline be entitled to send a Representa- 
tive to the General Court in future 
Sent up for concurrence 

John Prentice Speaker. 
In Senate June 17, 1802. Rec'd and concurred 

Nath Parker D. J. Secry. 
A True copy of a vote of the General Court on the Petition of the 
Legal Voters of the town of Brookline 

Attest Nath'l Parker D. J. Secy." 

Soon after the passage of the foregoing act, and during the same 
year, James Parker, Sr., was elected to represent the town in the General 
Court; and thus Mr. Parker was the first one of its citizens to fill that 
office under the new classification. Mr. Parker also represented the town 
in the legislature of the years 1803 and 1804 following. 

At this time the pond in Hollis known at the present time as Rocky 
Pond was known as Pout pond; and in this year, 1802, a road across 
"Pout pond brook" was accepted by the town; as was also a bridge 
which David Wright built over the "sluice way" to his mill; and for the 
building of which he was exempted from taxes for the term of two years. 
Mr. Wright was a son of David and Prudence Wright of Pepperell and a 
brother of Mrs. Nathan Corey. His mill was located on or near the site 
now occupied by the sawmill of Deacon Perley L. Pierce, in South Brook- 
line. 

It would seem that predatory wild animals and birds had not yet 
ceased to terrify and annoy the townspeople. For this very year the town 
voted a bounty of two dollars per head for wild cats, and seventeen cents 
per head for crows. 

The Killing of the Last Panther in Town. 

It was about this time that the "last panther in town" v/as killed. 
The story of its killing, which for many years subsequently was one of the 
town's traditions, was substantially as follows: 

One Sunday late in the fall of the year, the Rev. Lemuel Wadsworth, 
perched up in his two-storied pulpit, like an owl in a hollow tree, was en- 
gaged in administering to his congregation their usual Sunday morning 
sleeping draught ; said draught being in form of a sermon divided into two 
parts, and subdivided into sixteen heads. He had reached the "fif- 
teenthly," and been so far successful in his efforts that the majority of 
his patients were already engaged in nodding vigorous assents to the 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 297 

theological dogmas which constituted the principal ingredients of the 
said sleeping draughts; — althouth as to the real nature and efficacy of 
said ingredients, they knew as little as did the minister himself — which 
was absolutely nothing. Suddenly the meeting-house was filled with the 
clamor of baying hounds, coming, apparently, from the direction of Rock 
Ramond hill. At the familiar sound, the parson pricked up his ears, and 
his congregation opened their eyes. Moment by moment the baying be- 
came louder and more vociferous, and the congregation more restless. 
Then there came to their ears the sound of hurrying feet crunching through 
the snow-crust in the direction of the house; a moment later the doors 
swung in on their hinges and upon the threshold appeared the form of a 
man who, in stentorian tones, shouted: "Ther dogs have got a wild crit- 
ter treed on Rock Rament"! A moment after this announcement every 
man and boy in the audience had got outside the meeting-house and, 
leaving behind them the dogmas which they did not understand, were 
pressing on in the direction of the dogs, whose voices they could and did 
understand. On arriving at the hill, the pack was found to be baying at 
the foot of a tall hemlock tree which stood a short distance from the base 
of the granite cliff on its western side, and in the branches of which, near 
its top, the wild beast was indistinctly visible. The crowd at once entered 
into a discussion as to what species of animal it was. There was a great 
diversity of opinions; but the majority seemed to be inclined to the belief 
that it was a panther. In the meantime, a citizen, who, more thoughtful 
than his fellows, had been home and returned with a rifle, commenced 
firing at the animal ; and, at the third shot, brought it snapping and snarl- 
ing to the ground, where the dogs immediately set upon and soon worried 
the life out of it. A post mortem examination showed that the "pan- 
ther" was a wild-cat and, as one of the participants in the affair after- 
wards said, "A danged measly one at that." 

1806. The names of Ensign and Abraham Bailey appeared on the 
tax list for the first time. At its March meeting the town voted — "To 
accept the road from Jesse Perkins to Abijah Proctor's where it is trod." 
The road thus accepted was really the lane which connected the old Per- 
kin's homestead place with the north highway to Hollis, which it entered 
on the north side about one mile north of the village. It was discontinued 
by vote of the town many years since. 

1809. Robert Seaver, Jr., was appointed county coroner, a position 
which he continued to hold for the following fourteen consecutive years, 
or until 1823; serving the last two years of this term in conjunction with 
Colburn Green, who continued to hold the office until the vear 1826. 



298 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

1810. The United States Census of this year gave the town a popula- 
tion of 538; an increase over the number of its inhabitants as found by 
the census of 1800 of eighty-four souls. 

Cold Friday, 1810. 

Friday, Jan. 19, 1810, was known throughout New England as "The 
cold Friday." The cold was of the intensest description. It was accom- 
panied by a fierce gale, the wind, which came out of the northwest, blow- 
ing throughout the day and the night following with hurricane violence, 
and causing an immense amount of damage to property, not only in New 
England, but also throughout the entire country. At the height of the 
gale, the dwelling house of Washington Wright, located about one mile 
south of the village Main street on the west side of the highway to Pep- 
perell, Mass., caught fire and was burned to the ground. An infant child 
of Mr. Wright perished in the flames. 

1811. Benjamin Shattuck, Jr., was this year appointed deputy sheriff 
for the county. He continued to hold this office for every year following 
until 1820. when he was succeeded in the position by William S. Crosby, 
who held the office until the year 1828. 

The War of 1812-1815. 

Immediately after the close of the Revolution, the British Govern- 
ment inaugurated and, for many years in succession, carried out a policy 
of aggression against the United States and its people. 

In pursuance of this policy, among others of its unwarranted insults 
and outrages, it impressed into its naval service citizen sailors of this 
country, and seized and confiscated its ships. 

In the meantime, the United States Government made many and 
strenuous protests against the commission of these outrages, but without 
avail. Finally, its stock of patience became exhausted and, on the 18th 
day of June, 1812, Congress passed a resolution declaring war against 
Great Britain and its dependencies. 

In this war the State of New Hampshire furnished its full quota of 
soldiers for the regular army. But as the records of the war are on file at 
Washington and inaccessible to the general public, it has hitherto been 
impossible to give definite information concerning them. So far as known, 
however, no citizens of Brookline served as soldiers in the regular army 
during this war; those who did serve doing so as members of the force of 
the state's militia which was called out for the defence of Portsmouth. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 299 

At this time the militia company in this town formed a part of the 
fifth regiment of the State militia. In September, 1814, Portsmouth was 
threatened with an attack from the British fleet, and on two separate 
occasions in that month, men for its defense were drafted from the militia. 
The first draft, which was taken from twenty-three regiments, marched 
for Portsmouth on the 9th day of September, and was mustered in at Ports- 
mouth on the 16th day of that month. The soldiers comprising this draft 
served three months. The second contingent of drafted men was mus- 
tered in at Portsmouth September 27, and served sixty days. 

The only action taken by Brookline relative to this war, so far as its 
records show, is indicated by the following extracts from the same; than 
which said records contain not another allusion to the war. 

At a meeting of the town's inhabitants in July, 1812, it was voted — 
"To make the detached soldiers up to $12 per month from the time they 
were called on until they were discharged!" Prior to the foregoing vote, 
however, at a meeting holden March 9, 1809, the citizens, evidently an- 
ticipating trouble to come, had voted — "To pay the soldiers seven dollars 
that stand as minute men." 

But while the town's book of records furnishes no information rela- 
tive to its action in this war, other than which has already been given 
in the above two extracts, fortunately for this history, the writer has 
come into possession of an ancient and well preserved "Town order book," 
from the entries in which he has been able to establish the fact that eight, 
at least, of Brookline's citizens served as soldiers in the war. The names 
of the eight are given in the following copies of 

Entries in the Said Order Book. 

"1815 

Robert Seaver, Jr., $10.00 

It being in full for his services at Portsmouth which the town voted to 

make up to the soldiers in addition to Government pay. 

Benjamin Smith, $10 . 00 

John Hutchinson $10.00 

Jonas Smith, $10.00 

John Sawtell, $10.00 

1816, Feb. 5th, 

Henry Hutchinson's order. It being in full for his services at 

Portsmouth $7 .00 

Moses Shattuck, $7 .00 

Solomon Sanders, $7 . 00" 



300 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

Old Militia Days in Raby and Brookline. 

At the time of the outbreak of the Revolution, and for many years 
prior thereto, the colonies had an organized militia, established under the 
laws of the mother country. Under this system every New England town 
of a sufficient number of inhabitants maintained a company of militia men. 
In the early days these companies were called "Training bands." Raby 
had its training band which it kept up during the continuance of the Rev- 
olution, and of which Robert Seaver, during that period, when not absent 
on war service, was captain. 

After the country had established its independence, the State of New 
Hampshire proceeded to the organization of a militia system of its own; 
which was of course based upon the laws of the United States for organ- 
izing the militia in the country at large. 

In 1817, this system, after undergoing many changes and modifica- 
tions at the hands of successive legislatures had reached a condition which, 
though far from being perfect, was so satisfactory that, except for occa- 
sional changes in regimental and other minor formations, it remained sub- 
stantially the same until the advent of the war of the rebellion. 

Under this system, the State's militia in 1819 was constituted of 
thirty-eight regiments divided into three divisions of six brigades each. 
Brookline's company at that time was in the fifth regiment, in which 
regiment also were the companies in the towns of Amherst, Merrimack, 
Litchfield, Mount Vernon, Milford, Dunstable, Hollis and Nottingham 
West (Hudson). In the regimental organization of the fifth, Brookline's 
company was known as the eleventh. Locally, throughout its existence of 
more than fifty years, it was known as "the Slam Bang's." 

In its ranks during the years of its existence, every able-bodied male 
resident in town, of the age of eighteen and under the age of forty-five 
years, at some period in his life marched as a private; and from it origi- 
nated a crop of captains, lieutenants, ensigns, sergeants, corporals, and 
other military titles, which, appearing as they do upon the town's records 
during this period, as prefixes to the names of so many of its citizens, have 
a tendency to create in the minds of its readers today the impression that 
the number of the town's citizens who at that time were possessed of 
military titles, preponderated to the extent that the number of those who 
served as private soldiers was an exception to the rule. 

By the state laws at that time, an infantry company with full ranks 
consisted of sixty-four men, rank and file. Its officers were a captain, 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



301 



one lieutenant, one ensign, four sergeants and four corporals, the corporals 
to be included in the rank and file. 

The writer has lying before him at the time of this writing the Journal 
— commencing in June, 1817 — of the Brookline Militia company. From 
its pages it appears that at the company's annual May training in June, 
1817, it mustered sixty-nine men in its rank and file; and as a matter of 
interest today, because the company was supposed to contain within its 
ranks all the able-bodied men between the ages of eighteen and forty -five 
in town at that date, and also because many of those whose names appear 
upon its rolls were then, and for many years afterwards, prominent men in 
town affairs, and are represented in town at the present time by their de- 
scendants, I give herewith the roll's list of names, as follows: 

"Officers of the eleventh Company year one thousand eight hundred 
and seventeen. 

Captain, Samuel Smith; Lieutenant, Eli Parker; Ensign, Joseph 
Boynton; sergeants, James Parker, 1st, Nathaniel Shattuck, Jr., 2nd., 
John Smith, 3rd, Jonathan Foster, 4th. 



Rank and File. 



Sargents : 



James Parker, Jr. 
Nathaniel Shattuck, Jr. 
John Smith, 



Johnathan Foster, 
Abel Gran, Jr., 
Samuel Gilson. 



David Daniels, 
Jonas Smith, 
Luther Rockwood, 
William Bacon, 
John Cleveland, 
Calvin Clemens, 
Philip Farnsworth, Jr., 
Jesse Fletcher, 
Lemuel Hall, 
David Hobart, 
Caleb G. Jewett, 
Eleazer Kemp, 
Joseph Law, 
Samuel Lawrence, 
John Sanders, 
Samuel Perkins, 



Eri Daniels, 
Randal Daniels, 
Asher Bennett, 
Asa Betterly, 
James Campbell, 
John Colburn, Jr., 
Sampson Farnsworth, 
John Hutchinson, 
James Hutchinson, 
Uriah Hall, 
Joseph C. Jackson, 
Timothy Kemp, 
Ebenezer Lund, 
Sampson Mcintosh, 
Thomas Tarbell, 
Stephen Perkins, Jr., 



Davis Bills, 
Robert Seaver, Jr., 
Benjamin Brooks, Jr., 
William S. Crosby, 
Simeon Clement, 
Samuel Dix, 
Samuel Farnsworth, 
Joseph Hall, 
Samuel Hodgman, 
William Hall, Jr., 
David G. Kemp, 
Horace Knap, 
James Lancey, 
Sidney Osgood, 
Stephen Perkins, 
John Shattuck, 



302 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

Moses Shattuck, Luther Shattuck, Wm. Sanders, 

Benj n Smith, Solomon Sanders, George H. Verder, 

Timothy Wright, Isaac Woodard, Benj'n Wetherbee, 

Prescott Wright, David Withe, William Wright, 

Asher Shattuck." 

In addition to the commissioned and non-commissioned officers and 
the rank and file, each company was entitled to two musicians, a fifer and 
a drummer. 

Judging from the aforesaid Journal, life in the militia in those days 
was no sinecure. Twice a year, in the spring, and again in the fall, the 
company was compelled to turn out at home for training and inspection. 
In the months of September or October of each year it attended, at Am- 
herst meeting-house generally, but occasionally at Milford, Hollis or Dun- 
stable, — the regimental inspection and drill; and, at longer intervals, the 
brigade musters at "Cork Plains," in Windsor. Besides these gatherings, 
it was called out by its officers several additional times in each year for 
home drill. 

In view of all these meetings, musterings, marchings and drillings, 
it is no wonder that the pages of the "Journal" abound in copies of written 
excuses from members of the "rank and file" for not appearing, "armed and 
equipped as the law directs," at certain company meetings. These excuses 
were generally of a trivial nature. But, in the majority of cases, they 
seem to have been acceptable to the commanding officer of the company, 
or to the surgeon's mate of the regiment ; and there are recorded instances 
where a stone bruise on the applicant's heel, or a sore finger were con- 
sidered as excuses of importance sufficient to gain for their fortunate pos- 
sessors exemption from military duty for periods varying anywhere from 
two months to two years in length. 

In the early days, the members of the company were usually warned 
to appear for training, or inspection, as the case might be, on the town 
common. But at a later period, during the last of the forties, it became 
customary for them to rendezvous at the village tavern, then kept by 
Capt. John Smith, and known as the Nissitisset hotel. 

As a matter of curiosity, the results of the last recorded inspection of 
this company, which occurred in May, 1847, is given below: 
" 1 Captain, 36 cartridges, 

1 Lieutenant, 36 priming wires and brushes, 

1 Ensign, 36 cartridge boxes and belts, 

1 Clerk and Orderly, 72 spare flints, 

52 Privates. 36 knapsacks and canteens, 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 303 

17 Absent, 1 drum," 

35 Present, 1 fife, 

39 present including officers, 1 Infantry Regulations, 

36 muskets, 1 Militia Law, 
36 bayonets, 1 Roll Book, 
36 iron and steel ramrods, 1 Order book." 

A May Training Day in the Forties. 

On the morning of the day the townspeople were astir at a very 
early hour. By sunrise, in every household, breakfast had been eaten, 
the chores done, and the inmates, dressed in their best attires, were ready 
for the day's festivities. The soldiers were already in evidence on the 
village streets, the first arrivals coming in on foot, singly or in groups of 
two or three each. A little later, they were followed by their comrades- 
in-arms, who came in all sorts and descriptions of vehicles, each of which 
was filled to overflowing with men, women and children who, quickly 
disembarking, joined the throng of those who had already arrived. Each 
moment brought fresh arrivals. Until, long before the hour set for the 
commencement of the exercises, it would seem as if the town's entire 
population had been assembled in the village, Gradually the tavern and 
its immediate vicinity became the centre of attraction for the crowd, 
which was constantly being increased in size by the arrival from the 
neighboring towns of strangers, who were attracted either by a desire to 
witness the thrilling and wonderful military evolutions of the company, 
or to sample the tavern keepers liquid refreshments ; perhaps both. 

Intermingled with the crowd were peddlers and hucksters of all sorts 
and descriptions, from the irrepressible small boy who sold sheets of home- 
made gingerbread and knurly, worm eaten apples of natural fruit, to the 
grownup vendors of corn extractors, one application of which was guar- 
anteed to effect a cure by eating out the corn from its surface to its roots 
without pain or damage to the surrounding flesh, and dealers in that class 
of "gold" jewelry which was then beginning to be in vogue and which was 
afterwards known as "Attleboro." At the appointed hour the company 
fell into line, broke into columns of fours and at the word of command 
from the captain to the music of the fife and drum, marched away through 
the dusty streets and emerald lanes. Behind them, armed with hoop- 
poles and sticks and imitating with military precision every movement 
of their elders, followed the urchins who but a few years later were carrying 
real muskets and doing real military service on the battlefields of the 
Civil War. 



304 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

At the noon hour there was generally an intermission of an hour or so, 
during which the soldiers partook of refreshments. These refreshments 
were paid for by the town which let out the contract for furnishing them to 
the lowest bidder. They consisted, generally, of crackers and cheese and 
codfish and rum, especially rum. The effect of this bill of fare upon those 
partaking in it was, to say the least, exhilerating, as was manifest in the 
company's after-dinner evolutions which, if they were lacking in a strict 
compliance with military rules, were at least characterized by vim, vigor 
and vigilance, three very essential qualifications for a soldier's life. 

Nor were the elements of pugnacity and esprit de corps wanting in 
the company's members either collectively or individually. As witness 
the following incident which occurred at one of the May trainings towards 
the last of the forties and of which the writer then a small boy was a 
witness. 

On the morning of the day in question the members of the company 
were, as usual, assembled in the "office" of the village tavern, outside of 
which the usual crowd of sightseers were waiting for the exercises to begin. 
Suddenly, Capt. Artemas Wright, the then commanding officer, ordered 
the drummer boy to beat the call to fall in. The drummer obeyed orders 
and, as the rattling thunder of his drum reverberated through the square, 
the soldiers began to fall out of the tavern and to fall into line, which was 
formed opposite to the piazza on the ell part of the house. But such a 
line! It wavered back and forth in undulations as unsteady and unstable 
as a loose rope swayed by the wind. After repeated efforts, in obedience 
to the captain's commands, the men had managed to "right face," "size 
up," and "front face," and were making vigorous efforts to "right dress" 
when, most unexpectedly, a soldier whose diminutive height brought him 
near the foot of the line, stepped forth from the ranks and, throwing his 
musket down into the sand, walked up to a stranger (who, with a grin on 
his face, was leaning against a piazza post and watching the show, ) and 
deliberately struck him in the face. The stranger, although taken by 
surprise, was not slow in responding to the soldier's attack, and in a 
moment the twain were clinched and down in the sand, where they rolled 
over and over, swearing strenuously, and scratching and pummelling each 
other until they were at last separated by the spectators. The soldier 
immediately sprung to his feet, picked up his musket and, shaking the 
sand from his garments, resumed his position in the company ranks. 
"Wetherbee," said the captain, addressing the offending militia man, 
"you are fined twenty-five cents"! "Don't give a d — n, sir," came the 
quick response, "I'll pay it, sir! But I want you to distinctly understand f 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 305 

sir, that there can't no d — n Massachusetts man come over here and grin 
at this company when it's on parade, sir"! 

In 1846-47, Capt. Artemas Wright of Brookline was commissioned as 
colonel of the fifth regiment; and in the same year Ithimar B. Sawtelle, 
also of Brookline, was appointed as the regiment's adjutant. In 1850, 
Henry B. Stiles of Brookline was one of the regiment's majors. During 
Mr. Wright's colonelcy in 1846 the regiment mustered at Nashua. The 
muster field was located on the west side of Main street and opposite to 
the grounds on the east side of the street afterwards occupied by the 
buildings of the Waltham Watch Factory. The Brookline company was 
present at this muster and it was the last muster it ever attended. The 
company, however, kept up its organization in a feeble way until about 
1849, when it was quietly disbanded. 

During its existence, a period of more than half a century, the. com- 
pany was commanded at various times by the following named citizens : 

Capt. Robert Seaver. during the Revolution. 

Capt. George Russell, during the Revolution. 

Capt. Samuel Smith, from 1817 to 1820. 

Capt. Eli Parker, from 1820 to 1821. 
Capt. Nathaniel Shattuck, Jr., from 1821 to 1827. 

Capt. John Smith, from 1827 to 1831. 

Capt. Joseph Hall, from 1831 to 1832. 

Capt. Eli Sawtell, Jr., from 1832 to 1833. 

Capt. Reuben Baldwin, from 1833 to 1834. 

Capt. Abiel Shattuck, from 1834 to 1837. 

Capt. Nathan Dunphee, from 1837 to 1838. 

Capt. Franklin McDonald, from 1838 to 1840. 

Capt. William R. Green, from 1840 to 1841. 

Capt. Wilkes W. Corey, from 1841 to 1842. 

Capt. Artemas Wright, from 1842 to 1847. 

Capt. Joseph F. Jefts, from 1847 to 1848. 

The Brookline Independent Cadets. 

In 1845 several of the town's citizens who were liable to do military 
duty refused to respond to the summons of their superiors to appear at 
the annual May training. As a result of their disobedience they were 
subjected to fines which they refused to pay. Capt. Artemas Wright, 
who was then in command of the company and who was a strict discipli- 
narian, immediately commenced legal proceedings against the rebellious 



306 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

members of the company and had them brought before the proper author- 
ities by whom the recalcitrants were found to be guilty and were sen- 
tenced to pay not only their fines but also the costs of the trial. An- 
gered by their defeat the disobedient militia men resolved to form a new 
and independent military company which they at once proceeded to do. 
The new company was organized under the name of The Brookline Inde- 
pendent Cadets. It was constituted of the seceding members of the old 
company and of other citizens who, having reached the age at which they 
were by law exempt from the further performance of military duties, 
volunteered to serve in its ranks. James N. Tucker was the new com- 
pany's first and, so far as the writer has been able to ascertain, its only 
commander during its brief existence. It was the first and only uniformed 
military company which the town ever possessed. The uniforms of its 
members were home made. They consisted of frock coats of blue and 
black inch-square checked cloth with caps of the same material, and 
white pants. The caps of the privates were ornamented with turkey 
feathers; while those of the officers sported more ornate adornments in 
the form of ostrich plumes. 

During its existence the company trained annually and attended 
musters. And once, possibly twice, in its history, it was present at and 
took part in certain military events, or sham fights, known as "Corn- 
wallis' Surrender," which occurred at Pepperell, Mass., and in which, 
besides the cadets, a Pepperell infantry company, a company of artillery 
from Groton, Mass., and possibly other companies participated. Con- 
nected with the cadets was a band of music, the first to be organized in 
town, of which more will be said in a subsequent page of this history. 
The company disbanded about 1850. 

A Year Without a Summer. 

1816. This year was known as a year without a summer. Old people 
then living had known no year like it, nor has it since been duplicated. 
Heavy frosts and snow storms prevailed throughout the spring. The 
summer was cold and stormy. The people of this town were at their 
wit's ends to provide food for their cattle. Hay sold for one dollar per 
hundred pounds. Corn was two dollars per bushel, and hard to obtain 
even at that price. To such extremities were the farmers driven that 
they cut down forest trees in order that the cattle might browse on the 
branches. 

1820. Town's population, 592. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 307 

1821. This year James Parker, Jr., and Isaac Sawtelle were en- 
gaged in keeping store in their dwelling house on Main street, the house 
being the same which, with store attached, is at the present time owned 
and cocupied by Walter E. Corey, the present store building having been 
built several years subsequent to the above date by James N. Tucker. 
So far as known, the said store of Parker and Sawtelle was the first store 
to be opened on Main street in the village. At this date, also, Samuel T. 
Boynton was keeping store in his house on Meeting-house hill. At a 
town meeting holden October 30, the town voted — "To accept the road 
laid out near Sawtell and Parker's house." The road thus accepted is 
that which leads out of the east side of Main street at a point opposite 
the ell of the tavern, and runs easterly to the east Milford highway. The 
number of taxpayers this year was 192, of which number 124 were resi- 
dents and 68 non-residents. 

1822. March 12, the town voted to accept of a. road "running from 
Alexander Mcintosh's house to the road that leads from George Betterly's 
to the meeting-house." At that time Alexander Mcintosh was living in 
the present house of Henry G. Shattuck, and George Betterly was living 
on the east side of the "Poor farm Road" on the west shore of Muscatani- 
pus pond. 

At the same meeting — March 12 — it was voted — "That the selectmen 
be a committee to superintend the building of a road around the ledge 
near or west of the pond, and that they should provide so much powder 
and rum as may be necessary while making sd road." The selectmen that 
year were George Daniels, James Parker, Jr., and Thomas Bennett. 
Tradition says that the road was built the following summer, and that 
during its construction there was lack of neither powder nor rum. The 
ledge referred to in the foregoing vote was that located on the west side of 
the Mason highway at a point nearly opposite to the present dwelling 
house of Fred Farns worth at the head of the pond. Prior to the building 
of this new road, the traveled path ran in a westerly direction from the 
ledge to the dwelling house then of Alexander Mcintosh, but at the pres- 
ent time of Henry G. Shattuck. The "new road" being that part of the 
present highway leading from the said Farnsworth house to that of said 
Henry G. Shattuck. 

1823. Brookline Social Library. 

The first public library to be established in this town was organized 
in 1823 under the name of The Social Library of Brookline. It was a 



308 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

voluntary association, comprising within its membership many of the 
town's leading citizens. Soon after its organization, the association was 
incorporated by the legislature. Its first board of directors were Ensign 
Bailey, George Daniels and EH Sawtelle. The Association had an active 
existence of twenty-five or thirty years. During that period it accumu- 
lated a library of nearly, or quite, one hundred volumes. Since the latter 
part of the fifties the Association has been practically defunct; and dur- 
ing that period the remnant of the library has been stored in the dwelling 
house of the late Wilkes W. Corey. Several years since, Mrs. W. W. 
Corey placed this remnant, consisting of some forty odd volumes, in the 
custody of E. E. Parker, with the understanding that they should eventu- 
ally become a part of the present town library. In 1914 Mr. Parker car- 
ried out Mrs. Corey's wishes, and the books now constitute a part of the 
latter library. 

The Town's First Fire Engine. 

1826. This year the town purchased its first fire engine. It was, of 
course,a hand machine, its supply of water being furnished by buckets 
made of leather. Soon after its purchase a company of firemen was 
organized and, soon after its organization, incorporated by the legislature. 
This engine was in active service from 1826 to 1852; after which latter 
date the disastrous steam sawmill fire having caused the town to pur- 
chase a more modern machine, it gradually passed into disuse. At the 
present time it is stored in a building in South Brookline. 

First Hearse. 

As early as the year 1819 the town voted to purchase a hearse. But 
the vote was subsequently rescinded and no further action relative to the 
matter was taken until this year. When, by vote of the citizens, the town 
purchased its first hearse of Capt. Nathaniel Shattuck, by whom it was 
built. It was in use for man}' subsequent years. At the present time 
(1914) its ruins are lying in the old cattle pound on meeting-house hill; 
where for the past twenty years or more it has gradually been going to 
decay. 

First Hearse House. 

1827. At the March town meeting of this year it was voted to 
build a hearse house and the sum of thirty dollars was appropriated for 
that purpose. Nathaniel Shattuck, Mathew Wallace, Jr., and Horace 




FIRST FIRE ENGINE— 1826 




SECOND FIRE ENGINE- 1852 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 309 

Warner were elected as a committee to locate and build the same. The 
committee attended to its duties and the same year the house was erected. 
The house is standing at the present time (1913), although many years 
have passed since it was used for its original purpose. It is located on the 
town common on the east side of the highway to Mason and just west 
of the old town pound. For twenty years or more last past it has been 
used as the "town lockup." 

As bearing on the question of the town's authority over the cemeteries, 
it may be noted here that it this year granted "Leave to any person to 
build tombs in the west cemetery." 

Post Office and Postmasters. 

From the date of Brookline's incorporation under the name of Raby 
in 1769 until the year 1828 its mail was received at the post office in 
Amherst, where it was held until called for by the owners, or from whence, 
at infrequent and irregular intervals, it was brought into this town by its 
citizens on their return from business or pleasure trips to Amherst, and 
by them distributed to its respective owners, or else left for distribution 
at dwelling houses designated for that purpose, and located in different 
parts of the township. The house of Capt. EH Sawtell in the northeast 
part of the town, the inn of Alexander Mcintosh in the west part, and the 
inn of Capt. Samuel Douglass in the central part of the town, were all 
used as places for such distribution. 

In 1828 the Government designated Brookline as a post town and, 
January 2 of that year, appointed Dr. David Harris as its first post- 
master. The first post office was located in the dwelling house at the 
present time owned and occupied by Walter E. Corey in connection with 
his store on the east side of Main street in which Dr. Harris was then 
residing. In 1832 Dr. Harris built the dwelling house on the west side of 
Main street which was afterwards owned and occupied until his death by 
the late Wilkes W. Corey, and the same year moved into the house and 
established the post office therein. 

Dr. Harris was succeeded as postmaster by William S. Crosby, who 
was appointed June 4, 1832. Mr. Crosby held the position from 1832 to 
1834. During this period, tradition says, the post office was located in the 
ell part of the village hotel. 

In 1834 Mr. Crosby was succeeded as postmaster by Dr. Harris who 
received this, his second appointment as such, September 11 of that year. 
Soon after his appointment, Dr. Harris sold his house in the village to 



310 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

Wilkes W. Corey and purchased the Samuel T. Boynton house on meeting- 
house hill, in which he immediately installed himself and family, and the 
post office as well. 

The office remained in the Boynton house until about 1840-42, after 
which year its location for many years alternated between the two stores 
on the village Main street, the same being governed by the politics of the 
quondam postmaster. 

In 1861 at the date of the appointment of Henry B. Stiles as post- 
master the post office was located in the Tucker and Stiles Store on the 
west end of Main street, in the village, where it remained until the death 
of Mr. Stiles in 1892. In the latter year George E. Stiles, a son of Henry 
B. Stiles, was appointed postmaster and, soon after his appointment, he 
installed the office in the location which it occupies at the present time ; 
(1913) in the little building on the east side of Main street, a few rods 
west of the E- E. Tarbell store; which had previously been in use for 
storing the town's fire engine. 

In 1795 the Amherst Journal and New Hampshire Advertizer, estab- 
lished at Amherst by Nathaniel Coverly January 16 of that year, and the 
first newspaper to be printed in Hillsborough County, was the only news- 
paper to be taken in this town. It had an existence of only one year, and 
was followed by the Farmer's Cabinet, which was established at Amherst 
by Joseph Cushing in 1802. 

From 1802 to 1845 the Farmer's Cabinet was the only newspaper 
having any considerable circulation in Brookline. 

During this period envelopes and postage stamps were unknown; 
stamps not coming into use until 1847. The rates of postage were written 
on the outside of each letter, paper and package sent through the mail, 
and were governed by the weight of each package and the distance of the 
place to which it was to be carried. These rates were changed from time 
to time by the government. Following are the postal rates as they were 
established in 1843 : 

"Single letters, thirty miles and under, 6 cents; exceeding thirty and 
less than 80 miles, 10 cents; exceeding 80 and less than 150 miles, 12J^ 
cents; exceeding 150 and not over 400 miles, 25 cents. For double, 
treble and quadruple letters the postage increased accordingly. All 
packages weighing one ounce and a quarter were considered equal to five 
single letters, each; and thus onward in the same ratio. Newspapers were 
transported throughout the state in which they were printed for one cent 
each; exceeding 100 miles and without the limits of the state, one and 
one-half cents each. All moneys sent by mail at risk of owner." 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 311 

For the first five years after the establishment here of the post office, 
Brookline's mail continued to be received through the Amherst post 
office. But subsequently Nashua was substituted for Amherst as a dis- 
tributing office. During this period the mails were brought into town by 
mounted postmen. 

About 1838, possibly a little earlier, a stage route from Nashua via 
Hollis, Brookline and Mason to New Ipswich was established. At Nashua 
the line connected with the Nashua and Lowell Railroad, which was 
opened to public travel in the month of October, 1838, and made three 
round trips per week, leaving Nashua on Mondays, Wednesdays and 
Fridays at 9 o'clock A. M., and returning on Tuesdays, Thursdays and 
Saturdays. The stagecoach horses both on the outward and inward 
trips were changed in Brookline, the shifting being done at the barn in 
the village connected with "the old yellow house," then the property and 
residence of James Parker, Jr. The line was equipped with Concord 
coaches during the last part of its existence. From its beginning to its 
ending it carried the United States mails to and from the towns located 
on its route. It was discontinued in 1848 when by reason of the comple- 
tion of the Worcester and Nashua railroad it ceased to be profitable. 

The Worcester and Nashua railroad was opened to public travel 
Dec. 18, 1848. Soon after the opening of the road the government es- 
tablished a mail route between Pepperell, Mass., and Brookline. The 
establishment of this new route was the cause of the opening of a new 
stage line for the transportation of the mail between these towns; an 
arrangement which was in the highest degree satisfactory to Brookline 
people because of the fact that they thus enjoyed the privilege of receiving 
their mail daily, instead of tri-weekly, as, up to this time, they had been 
accustomed to receive it. And also because it brought them into closer 
contact with the outside business world. 

The mail continued to be carried over this route until about 1869, 
when the route was discontinued and a new one established between 
Townsend, Mass., and Brookline. Over this latter route during its exist- 
ence the town received and sent out two mails daily. This route was 
abolished by the opening of the Brookline and Pepperell railroad in 1892; 
since when the mails arrive and depart twice daily. 

Postmasters and Their Terms of Office. 

David Harris, appointed Jan. 2, 1828; William S. Crosby, appointed 
June 4, 1832; David Harris, appointed Sept. 11, 1834; James N. Tucker, 



312 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

appointed July 30, 1842; Ithimar B. Sawtell, appointed Dec. 4, 1844; 
Reuben Baldwin, appointed April 6, 1846; James N. Tucker, appointed 
July 25, 1849; Joseph C. Tucker, appointed April 26, 1850; Sumner S. 
Kendall, appointed April 14, 1853; Henry B. Stiles, appointed June 5, 
1861; George E. Stiles, appointed Dec. , 1892; Geo. W. Bridges, ap- 
pointed March 28, 1895; Fred A. Hall, appointed April 18, 1913. 

At the present time (1914) the post office is located in the store of 
A. A. Hall on Main street. 

1829. The town was for the first time divided into fire wards. The 
engine company consisted of eighteen men as appears from the following 
copy of an entry on one of the town's old order books: 

"Engine Men 

April 18th; This certifies that Rufus Center, Alonzo Bailey, Alpheus 
Shattuck, Lawrence Bailey, Europe Shattuck, William Whitcomb, Asia 
Shattuck, James Parker, Moody Lancy, Samuel Gilson, Asher Mcintosh, 
John Conic, Benjamin C. Jaques, James Wallis, Louisiana Lancy, Joseph 
Smith, Silas D. Tanner, and America Shattuck are legally appointed to 
be engine men in Brookline 

Attest, Eldad Sawtell, Clerk." 

The original certificate, of which the foregoing is a copy, was prob- 
ably returned to the state authorities at Concord. It was made in ac- 
cordance with a state .law passed in 1815, and which was still in force, a 
clause from one of the provisions of which was as follows: "18 men in 
all towns where there are fire engines exempt or excused from military 
duty, except in annual June trainings." 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 313 



CHAPTER XVII. 

Current Events, Incidents and Happenings. 

1830-1860. 

Population in 1830 — Laying Out of Three New Highways — Star Shower 
of 1833— The Town's Bass Viol— Stoves Installed for the First 
Time in the Old Meeting-house — Disappearance of the Meeting- 
house Sounding Board — Building of the Stone Bridge near Abel 
Foster's Sawmill — Vaccination of the Town's Inhabitants — Build- 
ing of the Congregational Meeting-house — Population in 1840 — 
Town Poor Farm — Proposed Change in Name of Town — The 
Ladies' Benevolent Society — Inventory of 1848 — Population in 
1850 — Delegate to Constitutional Convention in 1852 — The Steam 
Sawmill Fire— New Fire Engine— The Old Militia Band— Brook- 
line Brass Band and Its Musical Festival in 1866 — Brookline Cornet 
Band — The Prohibitory Liquor Law — Date of the Building and 
Dedication of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

1830. Population, 627. 

1831. April 1, the town voted — "To lay out a road from Calvin 
Clemans (Clement?) to Philip Farnsworth's." At the date of this vote 
Clement was living in the house on the east side of the highway to Mason, 
about two miles north of the village, which afterwards became the prop- 
erty and for many years the home of the late Jonas French, Sr. ; and the 
road referred to in the vote was the highway which at the present time 
leads out of the highway to Mason, on its east side, a few rods west of 
the site of the old Clement house, and passes in a northeasterly direction, 
crossing the Robbins' brook — to the old Sampson Farnsworth place. 

May 26 the selectmen laid out a road from Thomas Tarbell's to 
John Hutchingson's house. At that date Tarbell was living in a house 
which stood just west of the site at a later period of the schoolhouse in 
District No. 6; and the road in question was identical with the road at 
the present time leading from the old site of the schoolhouse to the old 
Nathaniel Hutchingson farm. 



314 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

In September of that year the town voted — "To pay forty dollars for 
stone to be furnished on the ground for the purpose of building a wall 
around the pond cemetery." The wall was subsequently built by Samuel 
Gilson, Jr. 

1832. November 22 the town voted to accept — "A road Beginning 
near the bridge near Baldwin's mills thence easterly across Jonas Smith's 
land to land of Eli Parker thence easterly across sd Parker's land to the 
road to Christopher Farley's near the bridge across the river." At the 
date of the foregoing vote Reuben Baldwin was operating the sawmill in 
South Brookline which at the present time is owned by Charles J. Stickney; 
and the said road was identical with the road at the present time leading 
out of the south side of the highway to Townsend at a point just south of 
the bridge over the Wallace brook, and running southerly to Bohonon's 
bridge, so called. 

1833. The prices to be paid for labor this year were fixed by the town 
as follows: for men ten cents per hour; for oxen, eight cents per hour. 

The "Star Shower" of 1833. 

Those of Brookline's inhabitants who happened to be awake and out 
of doors before daylight on the morning of Jan. 19, 1833, were witnesses to 
a most remarkable display of heavenly fireworks. The entire expanse of 
the upper atmosphere was filled with "shooting stars" which coming, 
apparently, from every direction, crossed and recrossed each other's paths 
in bewildering confusion. Many years after the event, one of the town's 
then oldest inhabitants, who had witnessed the display, in speaking of it, 
said that it appeared to her — "as if all the stars in heaven were falling 
from their places, and that the sight, although a most beautiful one, was in 
its effects most awe-inspiring." The display was witnessed throughout 
the country. 

Brookline's Bass Viol. 

1835. At this time Brookline was and for several years has been 
the owner of a bass viol. How, when or from where the instrument came 
into the town's possession is unknown. Several years prior to 1835 an 
attempt has been made to procure a vote to sell it. The attempt failed 
and, for the time being, the matter was dropped. 

In 1835, however, at a town meeting holden on the 28th day of No- 
vember the viol was again brought into public notice by an article in the 
warrant which called for its being sold or otherwise disposed of. After a 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 315 

heated discussion the article was disposed of by the following vote: 
"That the bass viol shall still be owned by said town and that the select- 
men put it into the hands of some person who will keep it well strung at 
his own expense and bring it to the meeting-house when religious meetings 
are holden in the same and use the same according to his best skill to 
promote religious harmony." 

At this time the Congregational Church and society and in fact the 
town's entire population divided into two factions were engaged in dis- 
cussing the question of the propriety of using stringed, wind, or other 
musical instruments in the Sunday services of the choir. Those who 
were opposed to the practice, representing the more conservative part of 
the community, argued that for men to worship the Supreme Being by 
the use of any kind of musical instrument other than that with which he 
was naturally endowed, viz, his voice, was sacrilegious. This faction was 
especially opposed to the use of the viol in question. Probably because 
its use even in church music was suggestive of worldly pleasures, and 
therefore calculated to draw the minds of the congregation away from 
the contemplation of subjects fitting for the day and send them wandering 
off into by and forbidden ways. 

On the other hand the radicals, those who favored the use of the 
viol, laughed their opponents to scorn and called them old fogies and 
their arguments antiquated ; claiming that the use of musical instruments 
as an aid to the voice in singing divine praises was no more sacrilegious 
then, than it was in the days when King David played on a harp of a 
thousand strings, or when Miriam sang her song of triumph and accom- 
panied it with the timbrel. In the end the matter in dispute was carried 
into town meeting and settled as is recorded in the foregoing vote. The 
viol was in use in the choir for many subsequent years. But whoever 
became its final custodian or whatever finally became of it are today 
matters of conjecture only. 

At the said November town meeting it was voted — "To purchase a 
stove or stoves and pipes sufficient to warm the meeting-house," and 
Moses Shattuck, Reuben Baldwin and James Parker, Jr., were elected a 
a committee to carry the vote into effect. The stoves were installed in the 
house the same year. 

Prior to that year the old meeting-house had been without heating 
facilities. For although at the time of its being built' it was provided with 
chimneys, the chimneys had never been provided with fireplaces. Conse- 
quently, during all the winters of the seventy which had come and 
gone since the house was completed in 1791, the worshipers within its 



316 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

walls whose means enabled them to do so, in order to be able to endure 
the cold with any sense of comfort whatever, had been compelled to pro- 
vide themselves with little tin or zinc stoves heated by "tallow dips," 
and called "foot- warmers." From which the fortunate possessors derived 
sufficient warmth to enable them to listen with some degree of compla- 
cency to the sermon, while their stoveless neighbors were shivering out- 
wardly and, doubtless, in many instances, swearing inwardly. 

Disappearance of the Sounding Board. 

At that same meeting, also, it was voted — "To take down the sound- 
ing board and sell it to the highest bidder." Subsequently, and, according 
to the records, during the same year, the sounding board was taken down 
and sold to David Willoughby. And thus the mystery connected with its 
disappearance is at last cleared away. 

1837. The wooden bridge over the stream near the sawmill of Abel 
Foster, on the highway to Mason, was replaced by one built of stone. 
Dr. Harris, by a vote of the town — "Vaccinated all its inhabitants with 
kine pox who have not had it." and received for his services sixty -seven 
and sixty-five one hundredth dollars. 

1839. The Congregational meeting-house was built and dedicated. 
Colburn Green was still holding the position of county coroner, and Capt. 
John Smith that of deputy sheriff. The price of labor was eighty-three 
and one-half cents per day. The selectmen received for their services each 
twenty dollars per year and found themselves. Asa Betterly received 
twenty dollars per thousand for planks furnished the town for repairing 
the pond bridge. 

1840. Population, 652. 

Two soldiers of the Revolution, Eleazer Gilson and Abel Hodgman, 
were still living in town. The main part of the village tavern, Nissitisset 
house, was built this year by Daniel Bills. Highway from Jeremiah 
Hood's house, in the Milford line, to the main road from Brookline to Mil- 
ford was laid out and accepted. 

Town Poor Farm. 

1841. Prior to this year the keeping of the town's poor had been put 
up at public auction, each individual case being farmed out to the lowest 
bidder. This practice, although a very convenient and, perhaps under 
the circumstances, even a necessary one, had been far from satisfactory to 
the majority of the townspeople ; and year by year there had been devel- 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 317 

oping in the community a strong sentiment against its continuance. 
This sentiment found expression at a town meeting holden March 9th of 
this year, when it was voted to purchase a poor farm, and Samuel Farns- 
worth, Jr., George Daniels, Nathaniel Shattuck, Jr., and Luther Rock- 
wood were elected as a purchasing committee. 

On the 19th day of April following, the committee purchased of Asa 
Burgess the land and buildings on the same located on the east side of what 
was afterwards known as the Poor Farm road in the northerly part of the 
town which was subsequently for many years used as a town farm, paying 
therefore the sum of fourteen hundred dollars. 

September 20th of the same year the town voted to make the poor- 
house a workhouse, and elected John Hemphill as its manager; thus es- 
tablishing for the first time in town the office of overseer of the poor. The 
farm thus purchased continued to be used as a home for the town's poor 
until the year 1864. 

In the meantime, on the very year of its establishment, the legislature 
passed an act by which all settlements gained in towns prior to 1796 were 
declared to be void. By the passage of this act, the number of paupers to 
be supported by the county was largely increased. In 1839, the county 
judges, Hon. Jacob Whittemore of Antrim, and Jesse Carr of Goffstown, 
who at that time were in charge of all matters appertaining to the county 
paupers, with a view of diminishing the county expenses, purchased a 
farm located in Goffstown to be used as a county farm. In 1850 this 
farm was opened to the admission of paupers. In 1861, the legislature 
passed a law voiding all settlements gained in towns prior to 1840. By 
this act the county became responsible for the support of nearly all pau- 
pers; and the result was that nearly all of the towns sold their poor farms. 

At a town meeting holden Nov. 8, 1864, Brookline voted to sell its 
poor farm, and elected Wilkes W. Corey, Abel Foster and James Clinton 
Parker as a committee to effect the sale. The committee immediately 
proceeded to divide it into suitable lots and, during this and the following 
year, sold the same at public auction. Lot number 13, which included the 
farm buildings, was sold to William Gilson, James H. Hall, and John 
Burge, on the 24th day of February, 1865. 

1846. At the March town meeting of this year there was an article 
in the warrant — "To see if the town will vote to alter the name of this 
town from the name of Brookline to Oregon." The article was passed over. 
The year was noted for the settlement by compromise of a long-continued 
controversy between the United States and Great Britain over the question 
of title in and to the northwest territory, which each claimed, and in the 



318 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

dispute concerning which matters had reached the point where war be- 
tween the two countries was imminent. By the compromise, which was 
suggested by Great Britain, the 49th parallel was fixed upon as the bound- 
ary line between the United States and Canada. It was probably in con- 
nection with this event that some patriotic citizen was inspired with the 
idea of a change in the town's name. 

The steam sawmill which stood on the west side of the street leading 
easterly from Main street, at a point near the store of Tucker and Stiles 
to the north highway to Hollis, was built this year. 

Milo Rockwood, a son of Luther and Kesiah Rockwood, was killed 
by coming in contact with a saw in the sawmill of Levi Rockwood in South 
Brookline. He was a young man, and was held in high esteem in the com- 
munity. He was buried with military honors by the local militia company, 
of which he was a member. 

The Ladies' Benevolent Society. 

1847. This society was organized January 20th of this year. Its 
object, as set forth by its constitution, was — "To assist any among us who 
may need and desire assistance; and to aid such other objects of benevo- 
lence as may present themselves from time to time, according to our 
means"; and at the same time — "To improve our minds by profitable 
conversation, reading, &c." 

The society as originally constituted, although it originated with the 
ladies of the Congregational Church and society — then the only church in 
town— was intended to be unsectarian in its nature; a policy which, so 
far as possible, it maintained throughout its existence; a period of twenty- 
five years. It was exclusively a woman's organization. It commenced 
its existence with a membership of thirty-three in number. Its first board 
of officers were as follows : 

President, Mrs. Thomas Bennett, 

Vice-President, Mrs. Rhoda Betterly, 

Directors, Mrs. David Harris, Mrs. James Parker, 

Secretary, Mrs. Daniel Goodwin, 

Treasurer, Mrs. Mary A. Hall. 

In 1856 the society was re-organized under the same name, but with 
a new constitution and new by-laws which, however, were practically 
identical with the original. Under its re-organized conditions, the society's 
first board of officers were as follows : 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 319 

President, Mrs. Linville J. Hall, > 

Vice-President, Mrs. Amos Merrill, 

Secretary, Mrs. Daniel Goodwin, 

Treasurer, Mrs. Lucy Pierce. 

Directors, Mrs. Mary Wright, Mrs. Calvin R. Shedd. 

In 1861 the society was again re-organized, this time under the aus- 
pices of the Brookline Methodist Episcopal Church. Under this last or- 
ganization the complexion of the society was so far changed that gentle- 
men were admitted to membership. At this time its membership was 
thirty-four; and its board of officers was made up as follows: 

President, Mrs. Orman F. Shattuck, 

Vice-president, Mrs. Benjamin F. Kendall, 

Secretary, Miss Marietta Dustin, 

Treasurer, Mrs. Nathaniel B. Hutchingson, 

Directors, Mrs. Lucy Blodgett, Mrs. Henry B. Stiles, Mrs. Amos 

Merrill. 

The society had an existence of over twenty-five years, its records 
showing its last regular meeting to have been holden Sept. 29, 1872. 

At the present time (1914) organizations similar to the foregoing are 
maintained by the ladies of both churches. 

Inventory of Brookline for the Year 1848.* 

"No. and value of Polls— 87 $ 4,296.00 

No. and value of cows, oxen and other neat stock — 391 .... $ 9,944.00 

No. and value of sheep— 108 $ 147.00 

No. of buildings not specially designated — 250 

Value of improved and unimproved lands — $153,289 . 00 

Value of carriages $ 300 . 00 

Value of shares in bank and other corporations $ 160.00 

Amount of money on hand, at interest and on deposit $ 187.54 

Value of stock in trade $ 80 . 60 

Value of mills $ 87.00 

Amount of Inventory $256,100 00" 

1850. Population, 718. 

At a special town meeting holden February 6 the citizens were called 
upon to act on the following article in the warrant — "To see if the town 

* See Inventory of Hillsborough County, 1848. 



320 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

will vote to build a new townhouse, or to remove the old house at or near 
the centre of the town, and fit up the lower part of the same as a school- 
room for school district number four, and the upper part for a hall to be 
used for town meetings, and also as a suitable place for religious and scien- 
tific instruction; and for all social gatherings the purposes of which are 
sanctioned by the good taste of the present age." 

The citizens voted not to build a new house, but did elect a commit- 
tee to see about repairing the old one. The committee never reported. 

1852. March 12 Isaac Sawtelle was elected as a delegate to the Con- 
stitutional Convention which was holden at Concord on the first Wednes- 
day in November. 

The Steam Sawmill Fire. 

This year was marked in local history by the destruction by fire of 
the steam sawmill at the north end of the compact part of the village. 
The fire occurred in the forenoon of a day in June. A stiff breeze from 
the northwest was blowing at the time. The wind carried the sparks and 
burning cinders over and set fire to many of the buildings at the south end 
of the village Main street. At one time during the fire's progress eleven 
dwelling houses were simultaneously reported to be in flames. The only 
fire engine in town was the old hand tub; and so inadequate to meet the 
exigencies of the case was it deemed, that messengers asking for assistance 
were dispatched to Hollis and other neighboring towns. Hollis responded 
to the call and sent its engine. But before it arrived the local firemen, 
aided by the citizens, who turned out en masse, had succeeded in checking 
the progress of the flames, and in the end, although considerable damage 
was done, the sawmill was the only building to be destroyed. 

The New Fire Engine. 

As a result of the claimed inefficiency of the old "hand tub" at the time 
of the steam mill fire, soon after the fire occurred, certain citizens began 
to agitate and discuss the question of the town's purchasing a new fire 
engine. As usual in discussions of questions of this nature, the towns- 
people divided into two factions, one faction favoring and the other 
opposing the purchase. In the end, those in favor of the purchase carried 
the day, and on the second day of September the town voted to purchase 
a new engine, and at the same time elected S. Warren Shattuck, James N. 
Tucker and Ensign Bailey as a purchasing committee. Soon after its 
appointment and during the same year, the said committee purchased 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 321 

the Hunniman fire engine which ever since has been and at the present 
time is in service. 

The new machine's advent in town was greeted by those who had 
opposed its purchase with contemptuous smiles and derisive words. 
And when, one afternoon soon after its arrival, it was brought out for the 
purpose of testing its capabilities, they appeared in force with the old tub 
prepared to dispute the claimed superiority. Both companies prepared 
their respective mahcines for the test which, by agreement between them, 
was to consist of each engine's playing a stream against the somewhat 
decayed shingles on the roof of Tucker and Stiles' -store, (the old store), 
the company whose machine did the most damage by way of tearing up 
and ripping off the shingles to have the honor of having won the victory. 
The new engine played first. But, although it threw a great volume of 
water, the stream lacked force and had little or no effect upon the sta- 
bility of the roof covering. Then the "old tub" took its turn and the 
stream tore up and scattered the rotten shingles like, as one spectator 
expressed it, — "They were a pile of dead autumn leaves." Its company 
members immediately claimed the victory and made the welkin ring with 
their triumphant cheers. In the midst of the excitement that followed, 
Orman F. Shattuck, the leading hoseman of the new machine company, 
accidentally, probably, held his hose pipe in such a position that the 
spray from its nozzle fell upon the members of the other company, by 
whom it was received as a challenge to battle, which they immediately 
accepted. Capt. Artemas Wright, who for the nonce was acting as their 
foreman ordered his men to man the brakes, and at the same time directed 
his leading hoseman to turn the stream full upon the members of the new 
company. His commands and directions were obeyed to the letter. The 
stream from the pipe struck squarely in the face of Shattuck who, blinded 
and nearly strangled by the force and volume, endeavored, for a mo- 
ment, to retaliate by an answering stream; but was finally forced to drop 
his pipe and make an ignominious retreat; as did also all the members of 
his company ; not, however, until they were thoroughly wet down. 

Military Bands of Music. 

Since the town was incorporated it has, at different times in its his- 
tory, been the home of three separate and distinct military bands of 
music. The first of these was the old militia band, so called, which was 
associated with and furnished music for the old militia company. Origi- 
nally, the company marched to the music furnished by a fifer and a drum- 



322 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

mer who were paid by the State. But, as years passed by, the fifer and 
drummer were joined by musicians who played upon musical instruments 
of other and different descriptions. In 1847, by reason of these additions 
to its ranks, the company's corps of musicians had increased to eight in 
number, and attained to the dignity of being called "The Band." The 
following is the list of the names of its members at that time and the 
kind of instrument played by each: George W. L. Hobart, E-flat bugle; 
William Wallace, clarionet; Lemuel Brooks, ophiclide; Moses Bohonon, 
trombone; Abner H. Bills, trombone; Kendall Shattuck, snare drum; 
Eliab Shattuck, bass drum. This band went out of existence with the 
militia Company in 1848. 

The Brook line Brass Band. 

The Brookline Brass Band was organized in the summer and fall of 
1851. As originally constituted, its membership consisted of sixteen men, 
as follows : Wilkes W. Corey, John S. Daniels, Joshua J. Hobart, Fernando 
Shattuck, Luke Baldwin, N. Herman Shattuck, Orman F. Shattuck, 
William B. Rockwood, John Hall, William Wallace, Eliab Shattuck, Ira 
Daniels, George W. L. Hobart, Harvey M. Hall, David D. Rockwood, 
Benjamin Shattuck. 

During the thirty or more years of its existence, in addition to its 
original members, there were enrolled in its ranks at various times eleven 
others of the town's citizens, as follows: Bela G. Cochran, Charles S. Wil- 
loughby, Albert W. Corey, Charles Coggin, Frank L. Willoughby, John 
E. French, Clinton Coggin, Leroy A. Wallace, J. Edgar Hobson, Charles 
E. Shattuck, Clinton Bohonon. 

The band's first leader was George W. L. Hobart, who held the posi- 
tion for twenty-five consecutive years. For the first ten years of its exist- 
ence it was under the instruction of Peter A. Clark of New Ipswich, who 
at this time enjoyed throughout this part of New England the reputation 
of being an excellent musician, both vocally and also as a performer on 
wind instruments; his favorite instrument being the E-flat bugle, in the 
playing of which, his admirers claimed, he was second to none, the cele- 
brated Ned Kendall alone excepted. About 1865, Mr. Clark retired from 
his position as the band's instructor. He was succeeded by Alonzo Bond 
of Boston, Mass. 

Musical Festival, 1866. 

In 1866, while under Mr. Bond's instruction, and at his suggestion, 
the "Old Brass" as it had then begun to be called, issued invitations to 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 323 

several of the military bands located in the towns and cities in this vi- 
cinity to attend a musical festival to be holden in Brookline on the 6th 
day of September of that year. The invitation was accepted by the 
bands in Nashua, Milford, Wilton, Hollis, Dunstable, Mass., Townsend, 
Mass., Pepperell, Mass., and Groton Junction, Mass., each of which was 
present on the occasion. 

The scene of the gathering was in the grove on the north shore of 
Muscatanipus pond. Besides the citizens of Brookline, who turned out 
en masse, there were present large delegations from neighboring towns. 
At ten o'clock the procession, having already been formed, marched from 
Main street to the grove in the following order: each band being followed 
by their respective delegations — Brookline Brass Band, G. W. L. Hobart, 
leader, including Prof. Alonzo Bond, leader of Bond's Band of Boston; 
Pepperell Cornet Band, Augustus Shattuck, leader, sixteen pieces; 
Townsend, Mass., Cornet Band, Stephen A. Tyler, leader, fourteen pieces; 
Hollis Cornet Band, W. A. Trow, leader, nineteen pieces; Milford Cornet 
Band, A. A. Nickles, leader, W. C. Kidder, director, including Walter Dig- 
nam, leader of Manchester Band, nineteen pieces; Wilton Cornet Band, 
Carl Krebs, leader, eighteen pieces; Nashua Cornet Band, B. F. Sargent, 
leader, E. T. Baldwin, director, fifteen pieces; Dunstable, Mass., Cornet 
Band, H. Spalding, leader, eighteen pieces; Groton Junction, Mass., 
Band, fourteen pieces. 

On arriving at the grove the following citizens were elected as officers 
of the day: Rev. C. H. Chase, President; Charles A. Priest, Secretary; 
J. Alonzo Hall, Chief Marshal; David Hobart, James Clinton Parker, 
Charles A. Priest, Henry B. Stiles, Dr. David P. Stowell, William Wright, 
and Nathaniel Hobart, Assistant Marshals. 

The estimated number of people present was three thousand. At 
eleven o'clock the meeting was called to order by Rev. Mr. Chase. The 
order of exercises was as follows: Music by the Brookline Brass Band; 
prayer by President Chase; addresses by President Chase and Henry K. 
Kemp. Esq., of Brookline, after which each of the bands present played 
select pieces of music. 

At the close of the exercises more than eight hundred people, includ- 
ing the bands, partook of a most bountiful banquet, which had been pro- 
vided for the occasion by the citizens of Brookline.. 

At the close of the banquet, the consolidated bands, consisting of one 
hundred and fifty pieces, played patriotic airs. The procession was then 
re-formed and marched back to the square in front of Tucker and Stiles 
store, where the consolidated bands, under the leadership of Professor 



324 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

Bond, by way of a finale, played several popular airs. The several bands 
then adjourned to and met in convention in the hall of Tucker and Stiles. 

Musical Association. 

During the post prandial exercises at the grove, Professor Bond, in an 
eloquent speech, had suggested the idea of forming a musical association, 
to consist of the bands then present and of such other bands in the vicinity 
as could be induced to join with them in the enterprise. 

The idea was enthusiastically received by the members of the bands; 
and at a meeting in the hall a motion to form such an association was 
carried unanimously. A committee of one from each band was appointed 
to nominate a board of officers. And upon the reception and adoption of 
the committee's report, the following gentlemen were elected as the asso- 
ciation's first board of officers : 

Wilkes W. Corey, Brookline, President; E. T. Baldwin, Nashua, W. 
C. Kidder, Milford, vice-presidents; E. A. Blood, Pepperell, Mass., sec- 
retary. The band leaders and the said board of officers were appointed as 
an executive committee. 

In 1868, this Association held its second annual meeting, under the 
name of "Band Convention," at Nashua, on the 15th day of September; 
on which occasion, in addition to eight of the bands of which it was orig- 
inally composed, there were also present bands from Hooksett, Franklin, 
North Chelmsford, Mass., and Leominster, Mass. The third and last 
convention of this Association was held at Leominster, Mass., in Sep- 
tember, 1869. 

This convention of military bands was the first of its kind to be formed 
in New England. To Alonzo Bond belonged the honor of originating the 
idea of forming it. To Brookline belongs the honor of being the place of 
the Association's birth and the scene of its first convention. An honor 
which is more highly appreciated because of the fact, as was claimed at 
the time and never since disputed, that from this musical festival in 
Brookline, Patrick Gilmore derived the idea which inspired him to under- 
take the work of holding the first "Peace Jubilee," which was holden in 
Boston in the fall of 1869. 

In 1877-78, the "Old Brass," by the deaths of some of its members 
and removal from town of others, had become so diminished in numbers 
that it became apparent that its continued existence was dependent upon 
additional membership. Accordingly new members were taken in, and a 
re-organization of the band was effected. Under its re-organized condi- 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 325 

tion the names of its members were as follows: Eldorus C. Shattuck, 
John B. Hardy, Henry A. Hall, Alpha A. Hall, Horace Richmond, Frank 
Cook, Francis Coil, Willie A. Hobart, Frederic G. Hobart, George Man- 
ning, Henry Bohonon, Clinton Bohonon, Charles L. Willoughby, Bela 
G. Cochran, Onslow Daniels, David D. Rockwood. 

David D. Rockwood was elected leader. During the remainder of 
its existence it had, at various times, as instructors, James Lovejoy, of 
Hollis, and Augustus Cummings of Nashua. It continued to play until 
1882; when it quietly disbanded. At the time of its disbandment, it 
enjoyed the distinction of being the oldest military band in the State, it 
having had a continuous existence of thirty-one years. 

Brookline Cornet Band. 

This band, the third to be formed in town, was organized in the fall of 
1859. It was started in opposition to the "Old Brass"; but as a rival to 
the latter band it failed completely. It had an existence of about one 
year and then disbanded. Its original membership was as follows : Charles 
E. Shattuck, David H. Cochran, Albert Foster, Charles Bohonon, John 
E. French, Edward E. Parker, William Wright, Clinton Bohonon, J. 
Edgar Hobson, J. Miron Stickney, George H. Jefts, Charles H. Stiles 
Perley A. Smith, Daniel W. Smith, Willie M. Wright, Edward C. Tucker, 
Henry Stickney. Of its original members, ten served in the Civil War. 

1855. Population, 718; number of polls, 186; amount of inventory, 
$266,333.00; number of sheep, 78; neat stock, 457 ; horses, 113. 

The Prohibitory Law. 

This year was famed for the passage by the legislature of a law pro- 
hibiting the sale of intoxicating liquors throughout the state, except by 
licenses granted to certain persons for certain purposes, and under certain 
conditions therein named, specified and set forth. 

It strictly prohibited inn holders, saloon keepers and all other persons 
from selling intoxicating liquors to be drank on the premises, or to be 
carried away in bulk. The law remained in force for a period of forty-eight 
years, or until 1903; in which year the present license law went into 
effect. 

During said period of forty-eight years there was not a year when 
intoxicating liquors were not sold openly and publicly in this town. All 
attempts to enforce the law were ineffectual. Occasionally parties were 
arrested and fined for selling or keeping for sale. They either paid their 



326 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

fines and kept on in the business, or else escaped punishment by promis- 
ing to go out of business and left town, having in the meantime sold out 
to other parties who, no less unscrupulous than themselves, came in and 
carried on the business at the old stand. And so the farce, for farce it 
was, went on from year to year. 

The conditions prevailing in Brookline under this law were practi- 
cally identical with those existing in a large proportion of the towns, and 
in nearly all of the cities, in the State. 

Among the law's provisions was one which provided for the sale of 
liquors for medicinal and mechanical purposes by an agent appointed for 
that purpose by the town's boards of selectmen. On the first day of 
April of this year, Asher Shattuck was appointed as the town's first 
liquor agent. His fees for services were fixed by law at five dollars per 
annum, and he was authorized to sell— on a doctor's prescription only — 
all liquors at a profit of only twenty-five per cent over the original cost of 
the same. Mr. Shattuck was a strictly temperate and conscientious man, 
and during his agency complied strictly with the provisions of the law. 
But, so far as making money for himself or materially aiding the tem- 
perance cause, his business was profitless ; and the same statement would 
be true of all those in this town who in after years succeeded him in the 
agency. 

Under the present license liquor law the town is and for several years 
past has been a no-license town. There are at the present time no places 
within its limits where intoxicating liquors are openly sold. Under local 
option its inhabitants have succeeded in bringing about, in the short space 
of five years, a state of affairs under which the town is freer from the 
traffic in, and the evil effects resulting from the use of intoxicating liquors 
than it ever was before during its entire corporate existence. 

1858. March 9, the town voted "the use of old meeting-house to 
the Methodists week days when they want it and it is not in use by the 
town." At the same time, "the use of the house for one-half of the time 
Sundays" was granted to the Universalists. 

1859. The Methodist Episcopal meeting-house on Main street was 
erected this year, and was dedicated with appropriate exercises to the 
service of Almighty God. 




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HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 327 



CHAPTER XVIII. 
Brookline in the War of the Rebellion. 

At the outbreak of the Rebellion in 1861, Brookline was near the 
height of its prosperity. It had a population of 756 souls, and a valuation 
of about three hundred thousand dollars. Thousands of its acres were still 
covered with old growth forests, and nine sawmills were in active opera- 
tion. Its cleared lands were all under cultivation; there were no deserted 
farm houses. Among its industries were a tannery, a wheelwright's 
shop, a sash and blind manufactory, and more than one hundred of its 
citizens found steady and remunerative employment in the coopering 
business, which was then the town's leading industry. Three religious so- 
cieties, — Congregational, Methodist and Universalist, — were flourishing; 
and its public schools were filled with puplis. 

In politics the Republican voters were in the majority as shown by 
the gubernatorial vote at the annual March meeting, when the whole 
number of votes cast was 179, divided as follows: Nathaniel S. Berry, 
Republican, 105; George Stark, Democrat, 74. Party feeling ran high in 
those days, and the political battles at the polls were bitterly fought. 

The Democrats in town in common with their brethren throughout 
the North professed to believe in Jeffersonian principles, and swore by 
Andrew Jackson. But while they believed in the Jeffersonian principles 
of the equality of men, they were nevertheless inclined to tolerate and 
wink at the slavery of the negro. For although they admitted that its ex- 
istence in this country was not exactly in accordance with the Jefferson- 
ian idea, they were content to justify it on Scriptural grounds, and claimed 
that even if it was of itself evil, its existence was necessary to the con- 
tinuance in power of the Democratic party; a state of affairs upon which 
in their belief was based the hopes of the future stability of the Union. 

At the presidential election they cast their votes in common with the 
northern wing of the party for Stephen A. Douglass; thus putting them- 
selves on record as being in favor of the doctrine of Squatter Sovereignty. 

The Republicans in town also believed in Jeffersonian principles and 
some of them swore ; but not by Andrew Jackson. They were in full accord 
with their party's policy of confining the institution of slavery to the 



328 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

States where it then existed, and prohibiting its extension into new terri- 
tory. There were but two out and out Abolitionists in town. 

The store of Tucker and Stiles at the west end of the village street 
was generally regarded as the headquarters of the Republicans, and that 
of Kendall and Wright at the east end of the street as the headquarters of 
the Democrats. 

At this time the only daily newspapers circulating in town were the 
Boston Journal and the Boston Post, each of which was represented by 
one copy; the Journal being taken by Tucker and Stiles, and the Post by 
Kendall and Wright. Nightly, during the winter of 1860-61, the contents 
of each of these papers were read aloud at the headquarters of the party 
which it represented to the partisans therein assembled, who, after listen- 
ing to the reading, having resolved themselves into a committee of the 
whole, commented on its news, and discussed the general condition of 
affairs in the country. 

These discussions, although invariably partisan in their nature, were 
generally harmonious because they were generally carried on by those 
who represented only one side of the question under consideration. But 
it occasionally happened that members of one party would stray into the 
other party's headquarters and butt into the debates there going on. In 
such cases all sense of harmony instantly disappeared, discord took its 
place, and soon pandemonium reigned. The disputants, eager to uphold 
their party's principle and throw down those of their opponents, were all 
engaged in talking at one and the same time, each one intent on expressing 
his ow T n opinions and, for the greater part, entirely oblivious to those of 
his adversary; the majority, by way of emphasis, occasionally punctuating 
their arguments with words bordering, at least, on the profane, and ges- 
tures which were more forcible than graceful. 

In these debates, the Democrats, true to their traditions, derived 
from years of political association with the Southern wing of the party, 
unconsciously followed the trend of their old affiliations. They argued in 
a general way in favor of the doctrine of Secession, and questioned the 
Government's right to coerce States which, by withdrawing from the 
Union, might attempt to enforce that doctrine. They claimed, moreover, 
that even if the Government possessed that right and should attempt to 
enforce it, the attempt would be futile and disastrous, because of the 
strong opposition to such a course existing in the North ; by reason of 
which, in case of war, a majority of its citizens would, in their opinion, 
either take up arms in favor of the cause of the South or, by refusing to 
obey the Government's summons to defend the Union, render its efforts 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 329 

to that end abortive; and among the disputants there were not wanting 
those who openly and frankly stated that in case of war they would be 
found among that majoirty. 

To these and similar arguments the Republicans, as a matter of 
course, replied in kind; controverting every statement of their opponents. 

These meetings oftentimes lasted until a late hour of the night; and 
frequently when they broke up, the partisans separated in such frames of 
mind as caused them to hurl at each other such opprobious epithets as 
"black republicans" and "copper-head"; epithets which, in the light of 
subsequent events had as little relevancy and meaning as do the nick- 
names which school children, in their angry moments, apply to each 
other. For, when the war really came, many of those who in these de- 
bates were most strenuously opposed to it, were among the first to enlist 
on the side of the Union; while others who in their words were brave 
fighters for the Union, still continued to fight its battles in their minds 
and at a distance. 

In the meantime, as the winter wore on, several of the southern 
States formally withdrew from the Union and, Feb. 4, 1860, seven of them 
met in convention at Montgomery, Ala., and instituted a new government 
under the name of the Confederate States of America. On the 14th day 
of April, 1861, Fort Sumpter, in the harbor of Charleston, S. C, after a 
bombardment lasting for thirty-six hours, surrendered to Confederate 
forces under the command of General Beauregard. 

The next day President Lincoln issued a proclamation calling for 
seventy -five thousand volunteers to put down the rebellion. 

Extracts from Brookline's Records Relative to the War. 

On the 23rd day of April, eight days after the date of the President's 
proclamation, the town authorities of Brookline issued a warrant calling 
for a town meeting on the 9th day of May following. This warrant con- 
tained the following article : 

"To see if the town will vote to raise and appropriate one thousand 
dollars, or any sum of money to arm and equip a military company to aid 
the General Government in capturing and hanging upon the most con- 
venient tree Jeff Davis and his associate traitors." 

In response to this call the citizens met and, after some discussion 
relative to raising a company, the impracticability of which was finally 
admitted, passed resolutions as follows : 



330 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

"That the town raise a sum of money not exceeding one thousand 
dollars for the following purposes. 

1st. To aid such persons as may enlist and actually serve in the 
present war in such manner as may be decided on as hereinafter provided. 

2nd. To aid the families of such person or persons as may enlist and 
actually serve in the war when in actual need of aid. 

3rd. That any man having a family shall receive, in addition to 
Government pay, a sum not exceeding ten dollars per month, and a man 
without family shall receive a sum not exceeding seven dollars per month. 

4th. That a select committee of three be appointed to examine each 
case that shall be presented and make appropriations according to their 
judgment and the selectmen shall upon their decision draw an order in 
favor of the person for the same. 

5th. That the treasurer of the town be authorized to borrow such 
sums of money as may be necessary to meet said drafts. 

6th. That all persons who hereafter enlist must enlist within the 
limits of this state in order to entitle them to the benefits of the foregoing 
appropriation — that this is not to be considered to affect the rights of those 
persons who have already enlisted out of the state." 

Ensign Bailey, Calvin R. Shedd and Sumner S. Kendall were elected 
as the select committee mentioned in the fourth of the said resolutions. 

Between the date of the foregoing meeting and the month of October 
following, fifteen of the town's citizens enlisted into the service; the 
majority of them in Massachusetts regiments. 

October 23 the town voted — "To raise a sum not exceeding two thou- 
sand dollars for the support of those who have enlisted or may hereafter 
enlist in the service of the United States, in accordance with Pamphlet 
Laws, Chap. 218"; and authorized the town treasurer to borrow the same. 
Benjamin Gould, Wilkes W. Corey and Henry B. Stiles were elected as a 
committee to apply and expend said two thousand dollars. 

1862. April 1 the town voted three hundred dollars to pay unmarried 
men for services in the army. 

July 26, 1862, by a census taken by the selectmen, the number of 
citizens liable to do military duty was found to be one hundred, with 
twenty-two men already in the service. 

September 1 — "Voted to pay each person, he being a citizen of the 
United States, who has enlisted for this town since July 15 into the service 
of the United States, for three years or the war, the sum of 150 dollars"; 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 331 

and also — "To each citizen of Brookline who should enlist between the 
date of this meeting and the fifteenth day of September, next, for nine 
months in the service." 

1863. July 15 voted — "to pay the sum of three hundred dollars to 
citizens of Brookline who may be drafted into the service." 

September 19 voted — "To pay all men drafted under this draft, or 
their substitutes, three hundred dollars, each within ten days after they 
are mustered into the service." 

November 30 voted — "That the selectmen be instructed to borrow 
money sufficient to pay all men that enlist from this town to fill out the 
last call of the President amounting to 9 men in all, and that they draw 
town orders for the same not exceeding four thousand dollars ($4000.)." 
Also voted — "To furnish two more men than they have furnished on the 
last call and let it remain for the present." 

1864. June 7 — "Voted to pay all men who were drafted on the 17th 
of May last and are liable and all who may be until March meeting 1865." 

June 11 voted — "That the town shall pay all men that are drafted 
and liable to the militia State Service, if the State does not pay the same." 

June 30 voted — "That the town should furnish men to fill the quota 
of the town until March next, and pay for the same except what they 
may draw from the State or the United States ; and that the town choose 
two agents to furnish substitutes for the present war to fill the quota of 
the town." 

July 9, Joseph C. Tucker and Wilkes W. Corey were elected agents 
to furnish substitutes to fill the quota of the town for the present year, 
and to pay drafted men two hundred dollars. 

July 23. The appointment of the foregoing agents was rescinded, 
and the town voted — "To put in ten men as substitutes at an expense 
of not over three hundred dollars each; and that any man liable to the 
draft who may furnish a substitute for himself shall receive three hundred 
dollars." 

August 4. Voted — "To draw up a paper for the purpose of seeing 
how much money may be raised to clear the draft for three years, and the 
largest sum paid by any one man liable to the draft shall have the first 
substitute"; and Joseph A. Hall and William J. Smith were chosen as a 
committee to draw the said paper. 

August 13, voted — "That 16 men volunteer to pay $150 each and 
their names to be stricken from the enrolment for three years, the town to 
pay the balance of the expense." 



332 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

1865. March 14, voted— "That the selectmen should fill all calls for 
soldiers from the president for the ensuing year and borrow money for the 
same." At the same meeting it was also voted — "To pay Fletcher Spauld- 
ing, George P. Brown, David H. Burge and Ward Messer the sum of $150 
who have re-enlisted in the army the past year and count on the quota of 
the town of Brookline"; also voted "To pay J. E. Hobson and Lewis L. 
Emery $150 each." 

1866. March 13, voted— "To pay Thomas Bennett and Albert French 
$150, each, as bounty." 

The foregoing is the last entry in the record book relative to the Civil 
War, during its progress. 

The war records have been given here in full ; not only because they 
are records and, therefore, history, but also because, to one reading be- 
tween the lines, they tell, far more accurately and truthfully than any 
historian, writing at this late date, could hope to do, the story of the 
conditions prevailing in town during the period covered by the war. 

The town's obligations, as recorded in its records, to the men who 
represented it in the war, were subsequently faithfully performed. It 
paid out in bounties and aid to soldiers' families sums amounting in all to 
over twenty thousand dollars. 

The following figures compiled by the Rev. Theophilus P. Sawin 
were taken from a sermon by him delivered on the 7th day of December, 
1865, and are undoubtedly close approximations to the truth: 

"Paid out by the town to its own citizens 

Paid during the war $ 7,750.00 

Paid out by individual citizens 400 . 00 

Paid out by the State as aid to soldiers' families 3,460.01 



$11,610.01 
Paid out to substitutes by the town and individual citizens. . 25,055.00 



Total received by men enlisting from this town as principals 

and substitutes (including aid to families) $36,665.01 

Subtracting from the above total the amount that has been 
paid, or which may be paid by the State and General 
Government, and also what has been paid by individuals, 
i. e $16,220.00 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



333 



and it leaves the amount actually paid out by the town as 
twenty thousand four hundred and forty-five and 1-100 
dollars $20,445 . 01" 

The whole number of men furnished by Brookline in the war was one 
hundred and four (104). Of this number, seventy were either residents 
in town, or natives residing in other towns at the time of their enlistments, 
and thirty-four were substitutes furnished by the town and its citizens 
individually. 

The following list compiled by the Rev. T. P. Sawin gives the names 
of those who furnished Substitutes, and also the names of the substitutes 
furnished by each. 



Table, 

showing a list of substitutes employed by Brookline to put down the 
Rebellion of 1861. Also the time of enlistment of each. 



Names of 'Principals. 


Names of 


Time of 


Remarks. 




Substitutes. 


Enlistment. 




Cleveland, Eli 


Felix Montacine 


Aug. 16, 1864 




Coggin, Charles H. 


William Longfield 


Sept. 1,1863 


Died of wounds re- 
ceived May 14,64 


Colburn, Frank P. 


John McCabb 


Sept. 1,1863 




Colburn, Newton W. 


William Rowman 


Aug. 18, 1864 




Daniels, Onslow 


James Elwin 


June 9, 1864 


Mis'g at Pop. Gr. Ch 
Va., Sept. 20, '64. 


French, John E. 


James Dorr 


Sept. 1,1863 


Mis'g at Olustee, 
Fla., Feb. 20, '64. 


Gilson, Henry S. 


Louis Duble 


Oct. 11,1864 


Deserted Oct. 17, '64 


Hall, Edward T. 


George Jackman 


Aug. 16, 1864 




Hall, Joseph A. 


Henry Robson 


Aug. 15,1864 




Hall, James Henry 


Louis Wilson 


Aug. 20, 1864 




Hobart, Joshua J. 


William K. King 


Aug. 20, 1864 




Lawrence, Silas 


Daniel Glaughlin 


Oct. 10,1863 




Lawrence, Simon 


George Boyemat 


Oct. 10,1863 




McDonald, Luther 


Daniel W. Smith 






Parker, James Clinton 


John Kelly 


Aug. 20, 1864 




Peabody, John 


George Thomson 


Aug. 19, 1864 


Deserted Oct. 12, '64 


Rockwood, William Brooks 


Dennis Burke 


Dec. 16,1864 




Russell, Rufus G. 


Robert McDonald 


June 20, 1864 


Deserted en route to 
regiment. 


Smith, William J. 


John Mcguire 


Aug. 17,1864 





334 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



Table Showing a List of Substitutes employed by Brookline to put down the 
Rebellion of 1861. Also the Time of Enlistment of each. — Continued. 



Names of Principals. 


Names of 
Substitutes. 


Time of 

Enlistment. 


Remarks. 


Shattuck, George J. 


George Roda 


Aug. 15, 1864 




Shedd, John C. 


Martin Muldoon 


Aug. 20, 1864 




Stiles, Charles H. 


John McDernett 


Sept. 1,1863 




Towns, Darwin 


William Johnson 


Aug. 20, 1864 




Wallace, Laroy A. 


John Fenis 


Oct. 10,1863 




Willoby, Charles L. 


Thomas Redmand 


Oct. 5, 1863 




Wright, Frederick 


James Murphy 


Aug. 20, 1864 




Wright, William 


Dennis Barry 


Aug. 18, 1864 




Town of Brookline 


James Sweeny 


Nov. 18, 1863 


Deserted March 19, 
1864 


Town of Brookline 


William Driscoll 


Nov. 24, 1863 




Town of Brookline 


Alulford Noodal 


Dec. 24, 1864 




Town of Brookline 


Hugh Robertson 


Nov. 18, 1863 


Died of dis.at Hamp- 
ton, Va., Nov.13, '64 


Town of Brookline 


Allen Dean 


Oct. 11,1864 


Deserted Oct. 16, '64 


Town of Brookline 


Isaac Wetherbee 


Dec. 24,1864 




Town of Brookline 


John Noonan 


Dec. 24,1864 





An Unique War Document. 



In the fall of 1864 the President issued a call for more troops. At that 
time the conditions in this town were such that in order to enable it to 
furnish its quota of men required under the call, it became necessary to 
resort to the hiring of substitutes; the cost of which was extremely high, 
the prices ranging from five hundred to one thousand, and often more, 
dollars for each man hired. These prices, the board of selectmen, to 
which the town had already delegated the authority to act in such emer- 
gencies, hesitated to pay, fearing that by so doing it might exceed the 
limits of its authority. But the demand for men was urgent and the 
time for action limited. To avoid the calling of a town meeting, and at 
the same time to protect the board, individually and collectively, from 
any liability to which, by reason of its acts in the emergency, it might be 
subjected in the future, certain patriotic citizens caused to be drawn up, 
executed and delivered to the board a bond of indemnity. The signers of 
the bond were all citizens of, and taxpayers in, the town. To the signature 
of each was affixed his individual seal; and the borders of the instrument 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 335 

bore the United States revenue stamps then necessary to the legality of 
such documents. Following is a copy of the bond : 

"Know all men by these presents that we subscribers citizens of 
Brookline in the County of Hillsborough and State of New Hampshire, 
are held and firmly bound to the Selectmen of said Brookline in the sum of 
Five Thousand Dollars, to be paid to said selectmen, to the payment 
whereof we respectively bind ourselves and our heirs firmly by these 
presents, sealed with our seals, and dated the 24th day of August, 1864. 

The condition of this obligation is that if we the said Subscribers shall 
indemnify said selectmen against all cost and damages to which they may 
be subjected by reason of their paying more than Three Hundred Dollars 
respectively out of the town's funds for the purchase or hire of substi- 
tutes to fill the quota of said town of Brookline under the call of the Gen- 
eral Government issued in the month of July, 1864 — Then this obligation 
shall be void. 

Subscribers' Names. Subscribers' Names 

Alpheus Shattuck, Leroy A. Wallace, 

Andrew Rockwood, Geo. J. Shattuck, 

Abel Foster, George V. Hodgman, 

S. S. Kendall, Joseph Sawtelle, 

Benj. Shattuck, Franklin Rockwood, 

Joshua J. Hobart, Brooks Rockwood, 

David Hobart, Frederick Wright, 

Nathan Farrar, Andrew J. Shattuck, 

Benjamin Gould, Eli Brooks, 

N. B. Hutchinson, Nathaniel Hobart, 

Abel Shattuck, Saml. D. Gilson, 

Ira Daniels, Silas Lawrence. 

We subscribe to and are hoi den and firmly bound by the within 
bond — 

George H. Jefts, W. G. Shattuck, 

Nathaniel Vickery, J. B. Swett, 

James M. Stickney, G. W. L. Hobart, 

John Sanders, James H. Hall, 

J. H. Bennett, Wm. Wright, 

T. J. Stickney, Luther McDonald, 



336 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



John A. Kendall, 
Clinton Bohanon, 
Joseph Baxter, 
Eli S. Cleveland, 
George Hall, 
Abel R. Ball, 
Frank D. Colburn, 
Samuel Talbott, 
A. S. Betterly, 
Joseph Hall, 
C. F. vShattuek, 
Albert Foster, 
David P. Stowell, 
Jerry Harward, Jr., 
George W. Peabody, 
Edward T. Hall, 
Henry F. Carlton, 
Amos Farnsworth, 
Francis A. Law, 
William M. Foster, 
E. F. Lancey, 
John Hemphill, 
Amos A. Gould, 



Randall Daniels, 
Thomas V. Wright, 
J. W. Fessenden, 
D. D. Rock wood, 
Stephen S. Mixer, 
Fernando Bailey, 
Henry B. Fish, 
B. G. Cochran, 
Albert W. Corey, 
Job Shattuck, 
Lot Colburn, 
Asher Bennett, 
James Henry Hall, 
William J. Smith, 
John Peabody, 
John Hall, 
Henry Swett, 
Newton W. Colburn, 
Charles L. Willoby, 
Erastus D. Towne, 
Elhanen W. Russell, 
Wm. Gilson, 
W. J. French." 



Brookline's Soldiers in the Civil War. 

Third Regiment New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry (Three Years). 

Burgess, Benjamin D., Co. G; b., Brookline; age 21; res., Brookline; 
enl. March 27, '62; must, in March 27, '62, as Priv.; wd., Aug. 
27, '64, Petersburg, Va.; disch. April 26, '65, Wilmington, N. C. 
Awarded "Gilmore Medal" by Maj. Gen. 0. A. Gilmore, for gal- 
lant and meritorious conduct during operations before Charleston, 
S. C. 



Fourth Regiment New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry (Three Years). 

Bennett, Thomas D., Co. C; b. Brookline; age 30; res. Brookline; enl. 

Aug. 24, '61; must, in Sept. 27, '64. P. O. ad. Brookline. 
Burge, David H., Co. C; b. Brookline; age 21; res. Brookline; enl. 

Aug. 24, '61; must, in Sept. 18, '61, as Priv.; re-enl. Feb. 28, '64; 

must, out Aug. 23, '65. P. O. ad. Vineland, N. J. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 337 

Brown, George P., Co. C; b. Temple; age 22; ered. Brookline; enl. 
Aug. 29, '61; must, in Sept. 18, '61, as Priv. ; re-enl. and must, 
in Feb. 28, '64; app. Wagoner; must, out Aug. 23, '65. Dead. 

Bohonon, Moses, Co. C; b. Danbury; age 44; res. Brookline; enl. Aug. 

23, '64; cred. Cornish; must, in Aug. 23, '64, as Priv.; disch. 
disab. June 22, '65, Concord; Died Nov. 7, '84, Pepperell, Mass. 

Cochran, David H., Co. C; b. Brookline; age 32; res. Brookline; enl. 
Nov. 25, '63; must, in Nov. 25, '63, as muse; disch. Oct. 10, '65 
to date Aug. 23, '65, Raleigh, N. C; died at Brookline. 

Colburn, Irvin, Co. C; b. Brookline; age 37; res. Brookline; enl. Aug. 

24, '61; must, in Sept. 18, '61, as Corp.; captd. May 16, '64, 
Drewry's Bluff, Va.; died, dis. Feb. 7, '65, Florence, S. C. as 
prisoner. 

French, Albert M., Co. C; b. Dunstable, Mass., age 27; res. Brookline; 
enl. Aug. 28, '61; must, in Sept. 18, '61 as Priv; disch. Sept. 26, 
'64; time ex. 

French, Jonas C, Co. C; b. Dunstable, Mass.; age 19; res. Brookline; 
enl. Aug. 28, '61; must, in Sept. 18, '61, as Priv.; app. Sergt.; 
re-enl. Feb. 17, '64; must, in Feb. 28, '64; captd. Aug. 22, '64; 
d. Dec. 5, '64, Salisbury, N. C. 

King, Asa J., Co. C; b. Chelmsford, Mass.; age 43; res. Brookline; 

enl. Aug. 31, '61; must, in Sept. 18, '61 as Priv.; disch. disab. 

Jan. 12, '62, Hilton Head, S. C. 
Green, Lorenzo, Co. B.; b. Brookline; age 35; res. Brookline; enl. Aug. 

27, '61; must, in Sept. 18, '61, as Priv.; disch. disab. Oct. 19, '61, 

Annapolis, Md. 
Lancey, George F., Co. C; b. Brookline; age 19; cred. Greenfield; enl. 

Sept. 3, '61; must, in Sept. 18, '65, as Priv.; d. dis. Sept. 24, '63, 

Morris Isl., S. C. 
Messer, Ward, Co. C; b. Lunenburg, Mass.; age 30; res. Brookline; 

enl. Aug. 27, '61; must, in Sept. 18, '61, as Priv.; app. Corp.; 

re-enl. and must, in Feb. 28, '64; wd. May 20, '64, Drewry's Bluff, 

Va.; disch. disab. May 29, '65, Manchester; d. July 24, '85, Bow. 
Ricker, Oliver P., Co. A; b. Bartlett; age 18; res. Brookline; cred. 

Dover; enl. Aug. 16, '62; must, in Aug. 18, '62, as Priv.; app. 

Corp. March 1, '65; Sergt. May 1, '65; disch. June 15, '65, Ra- 
leigh, N. C. 
Smith, Perley A., Co. C; b. Brookline; age 18; res. Brookline; enl. 

Aug. 14, '62; must, in Aug. 18, '62, as Priv.; mis. May 16, '64, 



338 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

Drewry's Bluff, Va.; gd. from mis.; disch. May 30, '65; d. Oct. 

26, '81, Brookline. 
Spaulding, Stephen A., Co. C; b. Townsend, Mass., age 20; cred. Brook- 
line; enl. Aug. 18, '62; must, in Aug. 18, '62 as Priv.; disch. 

disab. Oct. 26, '63, Morris Isl., S. C; died Nov. 12, '63, Hilton 

Head, S. C. 
Spaulding, Albert, Co. C; b. Townsend, Mass.; age 23; cred. Brookline; 

enl. Aug. 18, '62; must, in Aug. 18, '62 as Priv.; disch. disab. 

Oct. 5, '63, Morris Isl., S. C. 

Spaulding, Amos F., Co. C; b. Townsend, Mass.; age 19; res. Brookline; 

enl. Sept. 9, '61; must, in Sept. 18, '61, as Priv.; re-enl. Feb. 25, 

'64; must, in Feb. 28, '64; must, out Aug. 23, '65. 
Stiles, Charles H., Co. C: b. Brookline; age 18; res. Brookline; enl. 

Aug. 24, '61; must, in Sept. 18, '61, as Priv.; disch. disab. May 3, 

'62, St. Augustine, Fla. P. O. ad. Keene. 

Stiles, John A., Co. C; b. Brookline; age 18; res. Brookline; enl. Aug. 
14, '62; must, in Aug. 20, '62, as Priv.; wd. Sept. 29, '64, with 
ball; disch. June 15, '65; Raleigh, N. C. P. O. ad. Townsend, 
Mass. 

Wright, William M., Co. C; b. Pepperell, Mass.; age 21; res. Brookline; 
enl. Dec. 15, '63; must, in Dec. 15, '63 as Muse; reported on 
m. o. roll dated Aug. 23, '65, as absent sick since April 25, '64, 
N. & V. A. G. O. Prior enl'mts; 14th Mass., Aug. 7, 1861, as 
muse; disch. Sept. 25, '62; re-enl. 47th Mass., Nov. 18, 1862 as 
muse. ; disch. Sept. 2, 1863. 

Seventh Regiment New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry (Three Years). 

Shattuck, Warren, Co. D; b. Groton, Mass.; age 44; res. Brookline; 

enl. Oct. 18, '61; must, in Nov. 6, '61, as Priv.; disch. disab. 

Jan. 4, '63, St. Augustine, Fla. 
Wright, Ezra S., Co. H; b. Hollis; age 33; res. Brookline; enl. Oct. 26, 

'61; must, in Nov. 12, '61, as Priv.; must, out Dec. 27, '64; died 

at Brookline. 

Eighth Regiment New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry (Three Years). 

Griffin, Cyrus N., Co. A; b. Pelham; age 19; res. Brookline; enl. Sept. 
16, '61; must, in Oct. 25, '61 as Priv.; must, out Jan. 18, '65; 
died Oct. 6, '67. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 339 

Stowell, David P., Co. F; b. Massachusetts; age 25; res. Brookline; 
cred. Brookline; enl. Nov. 25, '63; must, in Nov. 25, '63, as Priv. 
app. 2 Asst. Surg. Nov. 25, '63; disch. June 24, '64; dead. 

Ninth Regiment New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry {Three Years). 

Bennett, John C, Co. B; b. Brookline; age 25; cred. Nashua; enl. 
July 31, '62; must, in Aug. 9, '62, as muse; must, out June 10, 
'65. P. O. ad. Spokane Falls, Wash. 

Bohonon, Charles, Co. A; b. Brookline; age 24; cred. Brookline; enl. 
Dec. 15, '63; must, in Dec. 15, '63 as Priv.; tr. to Co. A, 6 N. H. V. 
June 1, '65; disch. to date July 17, '65, Concord. P. O. ad. 
Townsend, Mass. 

Hall, Harvey M., Co. C; b. Brookline; age 27; cred. Hollis; enl. Nov. 
4, '63; must, in Nov. 4, '63, as Muse; died dis. Sept. 1, '64, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

Hobson, Edgar J., Co. B ; drafted; b. Pennsylvania; age 29; res. Brook- 
line; cred. Brookline; drafted Sept. 1, '63; must, in Sept. 1, '63; 
Priv.; tr. to Co. B, 6 N. H. V. June 1, '65; disch. Sept. 11, '65, 
to date July 17, '65, Concord; prior enl. Band, 14 Mass.; enl. 
July 5, '61; must, in July 5, '61, as muse; disch. Aug. 14, '62. 
P. O. ad. Concord, N. H. 

Thirteenth Regiment New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry (Three Years). 

Emery, Lewis L., Co. B; b. Hillsborough; age 27; res. Brookline; cred. 
Brookline; enl. Aug. 28, '62; must, in Sept. 18, '62, as Priv.; 
disch. disab. Feb. 5, '63; drafted and must, in Sept. 1, '63; as- 
signed to Co. G, 13 N. H. V.; wd. sev. Sept. 29, '64, Ft. Harrison, 
Va.; disch. May 30, '65; died in Brookline. 

Hill, David A., Co. A; b. Mason; age 29; res. Brookline; cred. Brookline; 
enl. Sept. 1, '62; must, in Sept. 18, '62, as Priv.; must, out June 
21, '65. P. O. ad. Mason. 

Russell, Charles H, Co. G; b. Brighton, Me.; age 29; res. Mason; cred. 
Brookline; enl. Aug. 14, '62; must, in Sept. 19, '62, as Priv.; 
app. Corp. Oct. 1, '64; must, out June 21, '65. P. O. ad. Brookline. 

Wetherbee, John F., Co. I; b. Wilton; age 37; res. Brookline; cred. 
Brookline; enl. Aug. 22, '62; must, in Sept. 20, '62, as Priv.; 
disch. disab. Feb. 26, '63, Philadelphia, Pa. 



340 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

Sixteenth Regiment New Hampshire Volunteer Infantry ( Nine Months ) . 

Bohonon, Clinton, Co. C; b. Brookline; age 20; res. Brookline; cred. 

Brookline; enl. Sept. 4, '62; must, in Oct. 18, '62, as Corp.; must. 

out Aug. 20, '63, as Corp.; volunteered for storming party at 

Port Hudson, La., under G. O. No. 49, Headquarters Dept. of the 

Gulf, June 15, '63; dead. 
Bohonon, John, Co. C; b. Brookline; age 18; res. Brookline; ered. 

Brookline; enl. Sept. 4, '62; must, in Oct. 18, '62, as Priv.; must. 

out Aug. 20, '63; re-enl. 6 Regt. Mass., July 7, '64 for 100 days; 

must, in July 17, '64, as Priv.; must, out Oct. 27, '64, tm. ex. 

P. O. ad. Pepperell, Mass. 
Burgess, Asa S., Co. C; b. Brookline; age 19; res. Brookline; cred. 

Brookline; enl. Sept. 4, '62; must, in Oct. 18, '62, as Priv.; must. 

out Aug. 20, '63; volunteered for storming party at Port Hudson, 

La., under G. O. No. 49, Headquarters Dept. of the Gulf, June 

15, '63. 
Boutwell, William C, Co. C; b. Lyndeborough ; age 20; res. Brookline; 

cred. Brookline; enl. Sept, .22, '62; must, in Oct. 18, '62, as Priv.; 

died dis. June 21, '63, New Orleans, La. 
Kendall, Daniel, Co. C; b. Mason; age 35; res. Brookline; cred. Brook- 
line; enl. Sept. 15, '62; must, in Oct. 18, '62, as Priv.; must, out 

Aug. 20, '63; died in Brookline. 
Merrill, James A., Co. C; b. Corinth, Vt.; age 26; res. Brookline; cred. 

Brookline; enl. Sept. 3, '62; must, in Oct. 18, '62, as Priv.; must. 

out Aug. 20, '63; d. in 1913. 
Sawtelle, Augustus I., Co. C; b. Brookline; age 41; res. Brookline; 

cred. Brookline; enl. Sept. 15, '62; must, in Oct. 18, '62, as Sergt. ; 

died dis. July 6, '63, Algiers, La. 
Smith, Daniel W. ; Co. C; b. Brookline; age 22; res. Brookline; cred. 

Brookline; enl. Nov. 18, '62; must, in Nov. 18, '62, as Priv.; 

disch. disab. May 5, '63, New Orleans, La.; died at sea May 11, '63. 

Massachusetts Regiments Volunteer Infantry. 

Burgess, Charles H., Co. K; 56 Regt.; b. Brookline; age 29; must, in 

Nov. 23, '63, as Priv. ; must, out July 22, 1865. 
Burgess, James L., Co. B; 56 Regt.; b. Brookline; age 25; res. Harvard, 

Mass.; cred. Harvard; enl. Nov. 25, 1863; must, in Feb., '64, as 

Priv.; wd. May 18, '64 at Spotsylvania Court House, Va.; must. 

out at Washington, D. C, May 18, '65; time ex. ; P. O. ad. Nashua. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 341 

Burgess, John C, Co. D, 21st Regt.; b. Brookline; age 21; enl. Sept. 2, 
'62, as Priv. diseh. Sept. 2, '63. P. O. ad. Pepperell, Mass. 

Dunphee, Eli S., Co. B, 26th Regt.; b. Brookline; age 21; enl. Nov. 6, 
'62; diseh. June 5, '63, as Orderly Sergt. Butlers body gd.; wd. 
mor. by ball June 5, near Port Hudson, La.; died in Hospital. 

Foster, George W., Co. A, 36th Regt.; b. Brookline; age 19; enl. July 23, 
'62 as Priv. diseh. June 24, '65. 

French, John A, Co. A, 36th Regt.; b. Dunstable, Mass.; age 21; res. 
Brookline; ered. Fitehburg; must, in July 26, '62; must, out 
June 8, '65; tm. ex. absent wd. 

French, Orrin A., Co. C, 15th Mass.; b. Nashua; age 18; res. Brookline; 

cred. Dartmouth, Mass.; enl. March 15, '64; must, in March 

15, '64, as Priv.; tr. to Co. E., 20 Mass. Inf. July 27, '64; captd.; 

died Jan. 1, '65, at Salisbury, N. C. 
Gardner, Charles H., Co. C; 16 Mass.; b. ; age 32; 

res. Brookline; cred. Brookline; must, in July 2, '61, as Priv.; 

must, out July 11, '63; wd. near Fair Oaks, Va., and lost a leg. 
Gilson, Charles, Co. B, 26th Mass.; b. Brookline; age 17; res. Brookline; 

cred. Brookline; enl. ; must, in March 13, '63, 

as Priv. ; must. out. 
Gillis, James, Co. A, 36th Mass.; age 44; res. Brookline; enl. July 23, 

'62; must, in July 23, '62; must, out July 22, '65. 

Gould, Peter W., Co. C, 16th Regt.; age 27; b. Brookline; res. Brookline; 
must, in July 2, '61 ; must, out Sept. 18, '63, as Sergt. disability. 

Hardy, Warren C, Co. C, 25th Regt.; age 22; b. Brookline; res. Brook- 
line; cred. Worcester; must, in Oct. 15, '61, as Priv.; must, out 
to re-enlist Dec. 17, '63, as corp.; died of dis. at Newburn, S. C. 

Jefts, Albert N., Co. C, 15th Regt.; age 21; b. Brookline; res. Brookline; 
cred. Clinton, Mass.; must, in July 12, '61, as Priv.; must, out 
Nov. 12, '62, to enlist in U. S. A. 

Jefts, Ed. Farwell, Co. B, 46th Mass.; b. Brookline; age 44; res. Brook- 
line; cred. ; enl. July 19, '61; must, out 
July 26, '62. 

Jefts, George H, Co. F, 77 Pa.; b. Brookline; age 23; res. Brookline; 
enl. Nov. 18, '64, as Priv.; diseh. Aug. 28, '65, at Waldon, N. C; 
res. Fitehburg, Mass. 

Mann, Oliver J., Co. E. B. S. 2 L- C; ; age 20; res 

Brookline; enl. Nov. 7, '62; Tr. to Co. C, Mass. 31 Cav. 



342 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

Shattuck, Joseph C, Co. C, 15th Mass.; b. Brookline; age 17; res. 

Brookline; cred. Dartmouth, Mass.; must, in March 14, '63, as 

Priv.; tr. July 27, 1864, to 20th Inf. 
Nelson, Eugene L., Co. F, 3 H. A.; b. Brookline; age 21; res. Brookline; 

ered. Boston, Mass.; must, in Sept. 16, '63, as Priv., must, out 

Sept. 18, '65, tm. ex. 

Woodward, Andrew L, Co. E, 33rd Regt.; b. Brookline; age ; res. 

Brookline; cred. Townsend, Mass.; enl. July 22, 1862, as Priv.; 

must, in July 26, '62; d. of dis. Nov. 8, 1864; buried at Chattanooga. 
Laws, Francis A., Co. D, 53rd Regt.; b. Brookline; age ; res. Brookline; 

cred. Brookline; enl. ; must, in Oct. 17, 1862; as 

Priv.; dis. Jan. 15, 1863. Surgeon's certificate. 

Laws, Lewis O., Co. D, 53rd Mass. Regt.; b. Brookline; age 21; res. 
Brookline; cred. Brookline; must, in Oct. 17, 1862; died at Marine 
Hospital, New Orleans, Aug. 5, 1863. 

Wetherbee, Charles W., Co. E, 33rd Regt.; b. Brookline; age 22; res. 
Brookline; cred. Brookline; enl. July 26, '62; must, in July 26, 
'62, as Priv.; d. of dis. at Fredericksburg, Va., Dec. 28, '62. 

Wright, William H., Co. E, 33rd Regt.; b. Brookline; age 21; res. Brook- 
line; cred. Townsend, Mass.; must, in Aug. 5, '62, as Priv. dis. 
July 3, '65, order of War Dept. 

Wright, Lewis T., Co. E, 33rd Regt.; b. Brookline; age 24; res. Brookline; 
cred. Townsend, Mass.; must, in Aug. 5, '62, as Priv.; died Oct. 

14, '64, Charleston, S. C. 

First Regiment New Hampshire Heavy Artillery. 

Pierce, Geo. W., Co. F; b. Brookline; age 19; cred. Nashua; enl. Sept. 
'64, for one year; must, in Sept. 6, '64, as Corp.; must, out June 

15, '65. 

United States Navy. 

Wallace, Bryant, W. ; b. Brookline; age 21; res. Brookline; cred. Brook- 
line; enl. Aug. 12, '62, for one year as a landsman; served on 
U. S. S. Ohio, North Carolina, Daylight and Morse; disch. Aug. 14, 
'63, from the Morse, tm. ex. P. O. ad. Nashua. 

Parker, Edward E.; b. Brookline; age 21; res. Brookline; cred. Brook- 
line; enl. Aug. 20, '63, for one year as landsman; served on U. S. S. 
Ohio and Perry; app. yeoman; disch. Oct. 10, '64, from receiving 
ship Princeton at Philadelphia, Pa., tim. ex. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 343 

Currier, Charles; b. Wilton,; age 23; res. Brookline; enl. May 17, '64, 
as ordinary seaman, for one year; served on U. S. S. Ohio and Mas- 
sachusetts; disch. Aug. 17, '65; tm. ex.; died at Brookline. 

Little, George S. ; b. Salisbury; age 19; res. Brookline; enl. Oct., '63; 

as coal heaver; served on U. S. S. Nipsic; disch. Dec. 20, '64, 
from U. S. S. Savannah, New York City; tim. ex. 



344 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



CHAPTER XIX. 

Current Events, Incidents and Happenings, Continued. 

1860-1890. 

Local Conditions in 1860 — The Young Men's Library Association — Town's 
Centennial Celebration — Accident on Meeting-house Hill, Sept. 
9, 1869 — The Democratic Cannon — The Cook, Putnam & Com- 
pany Furniture Manufactory — Hobart, Kendall & Company — 
Town's Action Relative to School District No. 8 in Milford — 
Rentnig of Old Meeting-house to Cook, Putnam & Co. — De- 
struction of Pulpit and Pews in Old Meeting-house — Three Days 
Town Meeting in 1874 — Death by Accident of George W. Peabody 
— Straightening of Main Street in 1878 — delegates to Constitu- 
tional Convention in 1876 — Vote on the Proposed Amendments to 
the Constitution in 1877 — Brookline Public Library — Order of the 
Golden Cross — Accidental Death of Frank Hobart — Burning of 
the Fernando Bailey Dwelling House — Death of Daniel S. Wether- 
bee — Burning of J. A. Hall Cooper Shop — Burning of the Miles 
Foster House — Burning of Samuel Gilson's House — The Yellow 
Day — Burning of David S. Fessenden's Sawmill — Brookline and 
Hollis Telephone Company — Burning of Schoolhouse in District 
One — Memorial Day, Observances of — Discontinuance of Certain 
Highways — J. H. S. Tucker Store Burglarized — Delegate to Con- 
stitutional Convention in 1888 — Burning of the Charles A. Stickney 
Sawmill. 

From the year 1860 up to and including the year 1865, the only im- 
portant or interesting events occurring in town were such as were con- 
nected with the citizens' action relative to the Civil War, which have 
already been narrated in a prior chapter. The same statement is applic- 
able to the period intervening between the years 1865 and 1869, during 
which period the townspeople were endeavoring to work out satisfactory 
solutions of the problems of debt and a general disarrangement in affairs 
which had been left them as legacies by the War. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 345 

The Young Men's Library Association. 

1861. This association was organized Feb. 12, 1861. It was a citi- 
zen's organization and formed, as its name indicates, for the purpose of 
founding a library. It was a stock company, but was unincorporated. 
Residents of either sex in town were eligible to membership in the company. 

The association maintained its organization for a period of about nine 
years. During the entire term of its existence its headquarters were in the 
hall over the store of Kendall and Wright at the south end of the village 
Main street, where, also, its library was located. 

In 1863 the association's library consisted of two hundred and nine 
volumes of well selected books. This collection was gradually increased 
in number, by the addition of new instalments of books purchased by the 
association and books donated to it by its friends until, in 1869, its library 
numbered between three hundred and four hundred volumes. 

From 1869 to 1877 the association appears to have passed through a 
period of inactivity, its last meeting of record occurring Jan. 17, 1869. 

In 1877, the association transferred its library to the town. The 
condition upon which the transfer was made was that the books should 
be used for the purpose of founding a public library. The town agreed to 
the condition, accepted the books, and used them as the nucleus of the 
Brookline Public Library, which was organized that year. With the 
transfer of its library to the town the association ceased to exist. 

1867. This year a lodge of the order of Good Templars was estab- 
lished in town. It had an existence of several years in duration, during 
which it was a very flourishing institution, having, at the height of its 
prosperity, a membership of over one hundred souls. 

Brookline's Centennial Celebration, Sept. 8, 1869. 

By the year 1868 the work of readjustment of the town's affairs, 
while it was by no manner of means to be regarded as even near comple- 
tion, had, nevertheless, progressed so satisfactorily that the citizens had 
regained confidence in themselves and in their resources, and were ready 
to engage in the work of preparing for the celebration of the one hundredth 
anniversary of the incorporation of the town, which was due to occur on 
the 30th day of March the following year, 1869. 

The first action of the town relative to the celebration was taken at 
a town meeting holden Nov. 3, 1868, when Alonzo Bailey, James H. Hall, 
Henry K. Kemp, Henry B. Stiles, Wilkes W. Corey, and Joseph A. Hall 



346 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

were elected as a committee — "To consider the advisability of the town's 
celebrating the one hundredth anniversary of its incorporation." 

At a subsequent meeting in the same year, this committee reported 
in favor of a celebration, but on account of the inclemency of the weather 
usual in the season in which the event properly fell, suggested the ad- 
visability of deferring it to some date in the fall of the year. After some 
discussion, the report was accepted; and, under the designation of "Com- 
mittee of Arrangements," the same committee was re-elected with full 
power to make all necessary preparations for the celebration, and to select 
the day for the same, which it subsequently set for the 8th day of Sep- 
tember, 1869. 

No appropriation for defraying the expenses was made by the town. 
Nor, after that recorded in the last of the two foregoing mentioned town 
meetings, was any further action relative to the same taken by the town 
as such; except that at a meeting of the citizens Nov. 9, 1869, a com- 
mittee consisting of James Clinton Parker, Wilkes W. Corey, William 
G. Shattuck, Henry K. Kemp, and Joseph A. Hall was appointed "To 
publish the Centennial Proceedings." For some unknown reason this 
committee failed to act; and thus no official report of the celebration was 
ever published. 

The funds necessary for paying the expenses of the celebration were 
raised by subscriptions from the citizens. Over one thousand dollars were 
raised and expended by the committee of arrangements; and, as the re- 
sult of its efforts, the advent of the day found the old town fully and amply 
prepared not only to welcome its absent sons and daughters, but also to 
welcome and suitably entertain the strangers who gathered within its 
gates. 

Hundreds of its living absent sons and daughters and of the de- 
scendants of its early settlers took the opportunity to return and revisit 
the scenes amidst which they or their parents had passed the happy days 
of childhood; and, by their presence, assist in doing appropriate honors to 
a town whose simple history and homely traditions have always endeared 
it to the hearts of its children. 

The morning of the day of the celebration broke with signs of rain. 
But by seven o'clock the skies had partially cleared off, and through the 
rifts in the clouds the sunlight shone on the gray mists climbing the sides 
of Little Muscatanipus hill ; a condition of affairs which from time imme- 
morial has been regarded by the townspeople as an almost unfailing sign 
of fair weather. Nor did the sign fail in this instance. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 347 

At nine o'clock a procession was formed in the square in front of the 
store, then of J. A. Hall and Brother, at the west end of the village Main 
street, as follows: 

Chief Marshal and Aids, 

Brookline Brass Band, 

Committee of Arrangements, 

The President of the Day, Orator, Poet, and Chaplain, 

Vice-presidents, 

The Rev. Clergy, Invited Guests, Representatives of the Press and 
Others, 

The Choir, 

Citizens of Brookline, 

Citizens at Large. 

From the square the procession, headed by the band and escorted by 
the town's soldiers in the War of the Rebellion, marched to the summit of 
the hill back of the Congregational Church where, in the natural amphi- 
theatre formed by a hollow or depression in the surrounding land, and 
known locally as the "Devil's punch bowl," the literary exercises of the 
day were observed. Three sides of the amphi-theatre had been fitted up 
with seats for the accommodation of the audience; which, when the exer- 
cises opened, was estimated to consist of more than three thousand people. 
The other side was occupied by a large and commodious platform profusely 
decorated with flags and flowers, upon which were seated the aged people 
of the town, the Brookline Brass Band, a large choir organized from the 
native talent and under the leadership of Charles N. Merrill of Nashua, 
the invited guests and the following named officers of the day : 
President, Alonzo Bailey. 

Vice-presidents: Captain Franklin McDonald, Capt. Joseph Hall, 
Joseph Smith, Henry K. Kemp, Major Wilkes W. Corey, Alpheus Shat- 
tuck, Newton W. Colburn, William J. Smith, Andrew Rockwood, James 
H. Hall, Joseph Sawtelle, W. G. Shattuck. 
Chief Marshal, J. Alonzo Hall. 

Aids : Joseph W. Peterson, Nathaniel Hobart, William Wright, 

Edward T. Hall. 

Committee of Reception: Benjamin Gould, Henry B. Stiles, Reuben 
Baldwin. 

Toastmaster, James Clinton Parker. 
Secretary, Charles A. Priest. 

Town Committee: Alonzo Bailey, James H. Hall, W. W. Corey, 
Henry K. Kemp, J. Alonzo Hall. 



348 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

The assemblage was called to order by the Chief Marshal, who, in a 
few introductory remarks, introduced Alonzo Bailey, Esq., as president 
of the day. 

Mr. Bailey on taking the chair spoke substantially as follows : 

"We have met to celebrate the one hundredth anniversary of the 
good old town of Brookline. As children and friends assemble under the 
paternal roof to commemorate the paternal birthday, so we meet today to 
celebrate with joy and festivities the one hundredth birthday of our com- 
mon parent. It affords great pleasure to us who have continued to abide 
in the old homesteads and linger around the old haunts to welcome back 
to them the friends and associates of our childhood days; and our pleas- 
urable feelings are enhanced by the consciousness that our desires for your 
return are no less strong than are yours to come. You are welcome. 
Since you wandered away from the old homes, time has wrought many 
changes in the old town. But the old homes are still here, and the old 
associations, in memory at least still linger around them. The hills and 
valleys, the forests, ponds, and streams, substantially unchanged by the 
flight of years, still invite you. And more than all else, that home love 
which has ever characterized Brookline people, still glowing in their 
hearts, welcomes you back as children of a common family. 

For the stranger we have no striking natural attractions. But we 
can show him homes founded in love, and supported by honest toil; 
worthv fathers and mothers, and sturdy and intelligent sons and daughters. 

We have no great manufacturing plants or educational institutions. 
But we can show many cooper institutes which, in industry, at. least, can 
vie with their New York namesake. 

Our farmers are poor; but our farmers are industrious and honest. 
Our sources of material wealth are few and meager; consequently, we 
have accumulated but little of this world's goods. But we are rich in our 
inheritance of the patriotic spirit which sent so many of our fathers into 
the War of the Revolution, and of their sons into the War of the Rebel- 
lion; and we cling to our traditions, revere the memory of our ancestors, 
and honor God; gratefully acknowledging His many mercies and bles- 
sings upon the town through the hundred years of its exsitence. 

Once more, in the name of my townsmen, I extend a welcome to all 
the sons of Brookline, whether native or adopted, and to all who have come 
to join their hearts with ours on this occasion." 

At the close of Mr. Bailey's address, the Rev. Theophilus P. Sawin, 
of Manchester, a former pastor of the Congregational Church in this town 
offered prayer. During the prayer, which was very touching and im- 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 349 

pressive, the entire audience rose and remained standing. At its close the 
choir sang the following ode, written for the occasion by Miss Frances 
Deverd Parker, a native of this town, and a daughter of James Parker, Esq. 

Ode. 

By Miss Fannie D. Parker. 
(Tune, America. ) 

Hail! Brookline, home to thee, 
Thy sons with joy we see 
Return today. 
From far and near they throng, 
Friends who've been parted long, 
Chanting thy praise with song 
And joyful lay. 

One hundred years have fled 
Since first our fathers sped 

Their prayers to heaven, — 
Asking that light sublime 
O'er their dark paths might shine; 
God heard: — the gift divine 

To them was given. 

Let us, their children, now, 
In adoration bow 

To God above. 
Praising His mighty power, 
Whose goodness deigned to shower 
O'er them in danger's hour, 

Protecting love. 

And when an hundred years 
Again — with hopes and fears, 

Have passed away. 
May our descendants here 
Our memories revere, 
Who greet with joy sincere 

This festal day. 

Following the singing of the ode, the principal address of the day was 
delivered by Ithemar B. Sawtelle, Esq., a native of the town, but, at that 
time, a resident of Townsend, Mass,; of which town he was afterwards 
the historian. His address on this occasion was historical in its character, 
dealing chiefly with the early history of the town, and was an able, scholarly 



350 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

and eloquent production. From its beginning to its ending it held the 
closest attention of the audience, by which, at its close, it was enthusi- 
astically applauded. It was subsequently published and copyrighted by 
Mr. Sawtelle. 

At the conclusion of the oration, the choir sang the following ode by 
Mrs. Sarah D. Tarbell, of Mason; a native of Brookline, and a daughter 
of the Rev. Daniel Goodwin. 

Ode. 

By Mrs. Sarah D. Tarbell. 
(Tune, Autumn.) 

Welcome! all— in gladness meeting, 

Hail we our centennial day! 
Friends, long absent, joyful greeting 

Join in our exulting lay. 
While our voices sweetly blending, 

Swell the chorus loud and long, 
May our hearts to heaven ascending 
Raise our centenary song. 

"Hoary heads, with honors laden, 

Manhood in the flush of pride 
Aged matron, blooming maiden, 

Meet together, side by side." 
Cheerfully our footsteps gathering, 

On the soil our fathers trod, 
Peaceful blessings now imploring, 

From our God — our father's God. 

Though today we meet in gladness, 

Back o'er distant years to roam, 
Many hearts are filled with sadness, 

Lingering near the early home. 
But, though death full oft hath taken 

Well-known faces we have loved, 
Sweet the memories they awaken, 

Sweet the thought — they rest above. 

The ode was followed by an original poem written for the occasion 
by Edward E. Parker, a native of Brookline and a graduate that year of 
Dartmouth College, which was read by the author. But a few weeks 
prior to this occasion, Mr. Parker had enjoyed the honor, at the class day 
exercises during Commencement week, of delivering an original poem 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 351 

written by him for the celebration of Darthmouth's centennial anniver- 
sary, which occurred that year. 

After the poem came the reading of the Chronicles; which had been 
prepared for the occasion by the Rev. T. P. Sawin, by whom they were 
read. Written in Scriptural style, and dealing with current events in the 
past and present history of the town, their pathos, wit and humor made 
them especially attractive and satisfactory to the audience. But the 
reader was not allowed to finish his task. For in the midway of his reading, 
rain, which had for a long time been threatening, commenced to fall, and 
with its coming the audience, scattering in all directions for shelter, van- 
ished. 

The exercises at the grove, thus abruptly broken up, were not resumed. 
But the only feature lacking for the complete carrying out of the original 
programme, was the rendition of an original hymn, prepared for the 
occasion by Mrs. Sarah B. Lawrence, of Pepperell, Mass.; a native of 
Brookline. The hymn follows : 

Hymn. 

By Mrs. Sarah B. Lawrence. 

(Tune, Antioch.) 

A hundred years ago today, 

Where wild beasts roamed at will, 
The brave man's bold and fearless stroke, 

As towering forests fell, 

Silenced the savage yell, 
And on the deep, grand stillness broke. 

Rude homes arose, and wilderness fled — 

The fields with plenty smiled — 
Blessings of peace distilled like dew, 

While every man and child 

With busy hand beguiled 
A life so simple, free and true. 

So year by year new merices crowned 

Those quiet homes are blest, 
So one by one in silence passed, 

To find a sweeter rest, 

Where toil nor care molest, 
And noble life is crowned at last. 



352 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

Our fathers' memory honored be! 

While here from far and wide 
The sons and daughters willing come 

To laud with honest pride, 

And view on every side 
Glad scenes that cheer our natal home. 

We boast a river flowing free, 

In busy service found, 
Of "Tanapus" so smooth and bright, 

Where festive scenes abound, 

And echoing sports resound, 
Waking the hills to life and light! 

At the conclusion of the exercises at the grove, a banquet was served 
in a large tent which had been hired for the occasion, and pitched on the 
lot of land (at the present time the site of the Daniels Academy Building) 
located nearly opposite to the Congregational church, and on the west 
side of the highway. The banquet was prepared and served by James W. 
Fessenden. The tables were decorated with flowers and bountifully 
loaded with food. Seven hundred plates were laid and they were all 
taken. But before the conclusion of the banquet, the rain, which had con- 
tinued to fall intermittently, began to descend in torrents. It soon came 
pouring through the tent roof in streams which reduced the food to un- 
palatable and uneatable masses of pulp. The guests were deluged in 
cataracts of water. Umbrellas and parasols were spread by those who 
were so fortunate as to have them, but with little effect. The toastmaster, 
James Clinton Parker, made an effort to continue the post-prandial exer- 
cises, in the form of responses to toasts and the reading of letters from 
absent citizens and former residents. But his efforts were only partially 
successful, for the rain, which continued to fall, dampened the spirits of 
the audience, and checked all attempts at enthusiasm. To prolong the 
exercises under such circumstances was impossible. The audience finally 
stampeded from the tent en masse; and thus this part of the day's exer- 
cises closed prematurely. 

An hour or so after the close of the banquet the rain ceased to fall, 
the clouds cleared away, and for the remainder of the day fair weather 
prevailed. In the glow of the sunlight, the discomforts of the rain were 
soon forgotten. The streets once more filled up with happy people. Old 
scenes were revisited, old friendships renewed, and new ones formed. 
Family ties were strengthened and new plans for the future developed. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 353 

The day's festivities were brought to a close in the evening by a dis- 
play of fireworks, and by a grand reunion and reception tendered by the 
citizens to their guests, the "Home Comers", in the hall of J. A. Hall 
and Brother. 

It would afford the writer great pleasure to be able to reproduce in 
these pages the letters received from old residents and others in response 
to invitations for them to be present at the celebration. But diligent 
search has failed to produce them; and we are forced to the conclusion 
that they are lost beyond recovery. 

Sad Accident on Meeting-house Hill, Sept. 9th. 

The programme for the Centennial day exercises included, among 
other features, the firing of salutes at sunrise and sunset from the summit 
of meeting-house hill. At the close of the day it was found that a portion 
of the powder provided for that purpose had been left over. The day 
following, Sept. 9, a party of the citizens were engaged on the hill's summit 
in firing salutes with this unexpended powder, when, at about four o'clock 
in the afternoon, by a premature explosion of a charge in the gun, two of 
the firing party, Samuel Gilson and Charles A. Gilson, father and son, re- 
ceived injuries which disabled them for life. 

The Cannon — What Became of It.? 

As to the cannon used in firing the foregoing salute, it may be record- 
ed that it disappeared soon after the celebration. Originally, it was the 
property of the members of the Democratic party in town, by whom it 
was purchased in 1856 and used in firing salutes during the Presidential 
campaign of that year. At the time of its disappearance, rumor had it 
that it had been taken by a self appointed committee of citizens, consist- 
ing of members of both political parties, and sunk in the depths of Mus- 
catanipus lake. But up to the present time the rumor has never been 
verified, and the cannon's whereabouts is still a mystery. 

The Cook, Putnam and Company Furniture Factory. 

In the fall of 1869, James W. Cook of Reading, Mass., and S. Abbott 
Putnam of Lynn, Mass., rented of Joseph A. Hall and Joseph W. Peterson, 
who were then its owners, the sawmill known as "Bailey's upper mill" 
and located on the east bank of the river a few rods below its outlet from 



354 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

the pond; and, having installed the necessary machinery, commenced 
therein the manufacturing of pine chamber sets and walnut lounge frames, 
under the firm name of Cook, Putnam and Company. The firm continued 
to carry on the business until 1874, when it was dissolved by the with- 
drawal from it of Mr. Putnam. July 21, of the same year, Messrs, Hall 
and Peterson sold the mill and appurtenances to James W. Cook and 
William H. Hall; who at once entered into partnership and, under the firm 
name of Cook, Hall and Company, resumed and continued to carry on 
the business of the old firm until Sept. 14, 1877; at which date Mr. Cook 
disposed of his entire interest in the plant to his partner, Mr. Hall, who 
thus became sole owner of the same. William H. Hall continued to oper- 
ate the plant until Oct. 5, 1877; at which date he sold the same to Nathaniel 
Hobart and John S. Daniels. Under the firm name of Hobart and Daniels, 
the new owners of the plant carried on the business until the 7th day of 
February, 1885; at which date Daniels withdrew from the firm, and sold 
out his interest in the mill and its appurtenances to David H. Kendall, 
Henry S. Manning, Charles W. Hughes, and Horace S. Richmond. The 
new owners of Mr. Daniel's one half part of the plant immediately entered 
into co-partnership with Nathaniel Ho.bart, who still continued to own the 
other half, and, under the firm name of Hobart, Kendall and Company, 
continued the business. 

Hobart, Kendall and Company. 

The new firm installed new and improved machinery in the mill, and 
endeavored by every legitimate means to improve its business. It was so 
far successful in its efforts that in 1889, four years after its formation, its 
affairs were in a most prosperous condition, and its outlook for the future 
excellent. 

Up to the year 1879, the company had manufactured pine and walnut 
furniture only; which was shipped in "the rough" to purchasers. But, in 
the meantime, the public had been developing a taste for chestnut chamber 
furniture in place of pine. By the year 1879 this sentiment had grown to 
the extent that the demand for furniture of the latter description had al- 
most entirely ceased. Under these circumstances, the firm gave up the use 
of pine as a factor in its business, and commenced the manufacture of 
finished chestnut chamber sets only. It met with immediate success in 
its new enterprise; and its business increased to the extent that it was 
forced to enlarge its plant by building a finishing and packing shop thirty 
by seventy-eight feet in its dimensions, and two stories in height; and equip 
the same with a new engine and new machinery. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 355 

At that time the firm was employing from forty to fifty men; nearly 
all of whom were skilled mechanics from out of town who brought their 
families here with them. The churches had good congregations every 
Sunday and the merchants were prosperous. It was a happy state of affairs 
for the town and its people. Too good to last. 

In a few years the supply of chestnut lumber, at least such as was 
located within reasonable hauling distance of the mill, had become practi- 
cally exhausted. Oak, ash and sycamore were substituted in its place. 
But the additional cost of procuring these woods, together with the ex- 
pense incurred by the company by hauling its manufactured products 
to and from Pepperell or Townsend for railroad shipment, and the sharp 
competition of western furniture manufacturers, finally compelled the 
firm to go out of business; and, in 1886, it assigned its plant and business 
to Albert L. Fessenden and John Buffum, to be held by them in trust for 
the benefit of its creditors. 

At the time of the failure, Nathaniel Hobart was the only monied 
member of the firm. Consequently nearly the whole burden of the firm's 
indebtedness fell upon his shoulders, and he lost heavily. 

The failure of the firm was a severe blow to the town, and one from 
which it has not recovered even to the present time. 

1870.— Population,— 741. 

At the March town meeting of this year there was an article in the 
warrant — "to see if the town would receive the territory included in school 
district number 8, in the town of Milford." 

The territory alluded to in the article was the square mile of land at 
the northwest corner of Brookline which, having originally been included 
within its charter limits, was taken from Brookline and included in the 
territory of Milford at the time of its incorporation in 1794. The above is 
the first and only record appearing on the town's books of any action on 
the town's part looking to the restoration to it of said territory, or any 
part thereof. 

1871. March meeting. The town voted — "To let the lower part of 
the town-house to Cook, Putnam and Co. for a term of four years at a 
rental of fifty dollars per annum;" and William Wright, Joseph Sawtelle 
and Wilkes W. Corey were elected as a committee to carry out the terms 
of the vote; which they did at once. The same year Cook, Putnam and 
Co,, took possession of the lower part of the house, and having torn down 
and removed the ancient and ornate pulpit, and also the pews in the 



356 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

center of the house, the "Sheep-pens" of the early settlers childhood days, 
used the same as a store room for the firm's manufactured products in 
the furniture line. A sacrilege sanctioned by the town which must have 
caused those same early settlers, figuratively speaking, to, at least, sit up 
in their graves and take notice. 

1872. May 17, the old fire engine house located on the west side and 
about midway of the village Main street was torn down in the night time 
by an unknown party of citizens and the engine removed to South Brook- 
line. 

Dec. 26, the sawmill of Deacon Perley L. Pierce in South Brookline 
was destroyed by fire. 

Sept. 8, the Asher Bennett dwelling house on the highway to Mil- 
ford was burned down. 

1873. January 4, the dwelling house of Frederick Wright on the 
east highway to Milford was destroyed by fire. 

September 6, the Pope house, — old Ezekiel Proctor house, — on the 
north road to Hollis burned down. 

Dec. 18, George W. Peabody was accidently killed while at work in 
the sawmill of his father-in-law, James H. Hall, in the north part of the 
town. 

1874. January 23, the Congregational Church and Society installed 
a new bell weighing 1819 pounds in its church tower. 

1875. For the first time in the town's history, by a vote of its citizens, 
curfew bells were rung throughout the year; and the practice was continued 
throughout the following year. 

Straightening of Main Street. 

1876. The town voted — "To straighten Main street from Bela 
Cochran's house to Joseph Smiths house" ; and instructed the selectmen to 
attend to the same. The project was opposed by some of the citizens, 
who finally carried the matter into the court; where, after some little de- 
lay, a decision was rendered in favor of the town ; and in 1877-78 the street 
was straightened in accordance with the original vote. 

Joseph A. Hall represented the town in the Constitutional Conven- 
tion which convened at Concord this year. 

1877. In the matter of the proposed amendments to the State's 
Constitution which had been agreed upon by the members of the Consti- 
tutional Convention of 1876, and which were this year submitted to the 
voters of the state for their approval, or otherwise, Brookline voted to 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 357 

strike out the word "Protestant" from the Bill of Rights; in favor of 
biennial elections of the Governor, counsellors, members of the senate and 
house of Representatives ; in favor of a house of Representatives whose 
number should be based upon the state's population; and in favor of 
abolishing the religious test. 

March 23, Frank Hobart, a son of David Hobart, while working in 
the woods, was killed by a falling tree. 

June 17, the Ephraim L. Hardy house on the east side of the highway 
to Pepperell, Mass., one mile south of the village, was burned to the ground. 

July 6, the dwelling house of Fernando Bailey on the summit of the 
hill back of the Congregational church was destroyed by fire. 

August 7, Daniel S. Wetherbee died of exhaustion resulting from an 
exposure of 26 days without food or shelter in the woods in the notherly 
part of the town. 

August 17, an infant daughter of William H. French was scalded to 
death. 

September , the cooper shop of J. Alonzo Hall on the east side 
of the highway to Milford, a few rods north of the Congregational church, 
was totally destroyed by fire. 

Brookline Public Library. 

The town's first action relative to the establishment of a public 
library occurred at the annual March town meeting of this year; when 
the following vote was passed: — "To appropriate one hundred dollars to 
establish a town library providing the stock holders of the old library 
will release all their claims on the old library in favor of the new library." 
At a subsequent town meeting holden the same year, a vote re-affirming 
the foregoing vote was passed, and the Rev. Frank D. Sargent, Henry W. 
Kemp and George W. Bridges were "accepted" as a board of library 
trustees with authority to draw the money appropriated for the same. 

The "old library" alluded to in the foregoing votes was not the Social 
Library of 1823, but another and later library which, several years prior 
to this, had been formed by an association of citizens; and which at this 
time was located in the hall over the store of Kendall and Wright at the 
south end of the village Main street. The town subsequently purchased 
its books. 

The necessary arrangements for establishing the library were com- 
pleted within the year following the aforesaid votes; and at the annual 
March meeting of the following year, the sum of two hundred and fifty 



358 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

dollars was appropriated for its use. At the same meeting, George W. 
Bridges, Luke Baldwin and Charles N. Corey were elected as its first 
board of trustees. 

For a few years after it was established, the library was located in 
the room on the ground floor in the back part of the store at the present 
time owned by Everett E. Tarbell, at the west end of the village Main 
street. But subsequently it was removed from the store into the back 
part of the village schoolhouse, where it remained until the spring of 1914, 
when it was removed from the schoolhouse into the Daniels Academy 
Building; where it is located at the present time. 

At the date of its establishment the library contained about two 
hundred volumes; of which the majority came to it from the Young Men's 
Library Association. Since then the original number of volumes has been 
largely increased from time to time by the addition of books purchased 
by appropriations of money from the town for that purpose, and by gifts 
of books from citizens and others. At the present time, (1914) it contains 
2341 volumes, besides many valuable pamphlets. 

Librarians Since Organization. 

1877—1878 George W. Bridges, Rev. Frank A. Sargent. 

1879 Charles N. Corey. 

1889 Mrs. Ella W. Tucker. 

1890-1896 Mabel S. Tucker. 

1897-1910 Mrs. Ella W. Tucker. 

1911-1914 Blanche W. Hall. 

Boards of Trustees, 1878 to 1910. 



1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 



George W. Bridges, Luke Baldwin, Charles N. Corey. 
Charles N. Corey, David H. Kendall, Edward C. Tucker. 
George E. Stiles, Horace S. Richmond, Henry E. Putnam. 
George E. Stiles, Charles F. Pressey, James H. S. Tucker. 
George E. Stiles, James H. S. Tucker, Edward T. Hall. 
George E. Stiles, James H. S. Tucker, Edward T. Hall. 
George E. Stiles, James H. S. Tucker, Edward T. Hall. 
George E Stiles, James H. S. Tucker, Edward T. Hall. 
James H. S. Tucker, George E. Stiles, Edward T. Hall. 
James H. S. Tucker, George E. Stiles, Edward T. Hall. 
James H. S. Tucker, George E. Stiles, Edward T. Hall. 



1889 
1890 
1891 
1892 
1893 
1894 
1895 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 359 

George E. Stiles, Edward T. Hall, James H. S. Tucker. 
Charles W. Smith, Ella W. Tucker, Orville D. Fessenden. 
Charles W. Smith, Ella W. Tucker, Orville D. Fessenden. 
Charles W. Smith, Ella W. Tucker, Orville D. Fessenden. 
L. S. Powers, Ella W. Tucker, Orville D. Fessenden. 
Dr. Charles H. Holcombe, Ella W. Tucker, Orville D. Fessenden. 
Dr. Charles H. Holcombe, Ella W. Tucker, Orville D. Fessenden. 
Dr. Charles H. Holcombe, Ella W. Tucker, Orville D. Fessenden. 
Ella W. Tucker, Dr. Charles H. Holcombe, O. D. Fessenden. 
Ella W. Tucker, Dr. Charles H. Holcombe, O. D. Fessenden. 
Ella W. Tucker, Dr. Charles H. Holcombe, O. D. Fessenden. 



1900-1911; Ella W. Tucker, Dr. Charles H. Holcombe, O. D. Fessenden. 



1912 
1913 
1914 



Dr. Charles H. Holcombe, Ella W. Tucker. 

Dr. Charles H. Holcombe, Warren L. Noyes, Fred A. Hall 

Dr. Charles H. Holcombe, Mrs. Ella W. Tucker. 



Samaritan Commandery No. 96, United Order of the Golden Cross. 

1880. 
This Commandery was organized in Brookline February 23, 1880. 
Its charter members were Dr. Alonzo S. Wallace, Mrs. Mary F. Wallace, 
Rev. Frank D. Sargent, Edward T. Hall, Emily M. Hall, David H. Kendall, 
Sophia R. Kendall, Emma S. Sargent, William J. Smith, and Mrs. Mary E. 
Smith. 

First Board of Officers. 

Past Noble Commander, Alonzo S. Wallace. 

Noble Commander, David H. Kendall. 

Vice-Noble Commander, Mary E. Smith. 

Prelate, Rev. F. D. Sargent. 

Worthy Herald, Edward T. Hall. 

Noble Keeper of Records, C. T. Pressey. 

Financial Keeper of Records, Emma S. Sargent. 

Treasurer, William J. Smith. 

Warder of the Inner Gates, Sophia R. Kendall. 

Warder of the Outer Gates, Perley L. Pierce. 

From the date of its organization to the present time (1914)the com- 
mandery has held its meetings in the vestry of the Congregational Church. 

During the years of its existence it has enjoyed continuous prosperity, 
and its rolls have borne the names of many of the town's most influential 



360 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



citizens— its membership at one time reaching ninety-two members. Of 
those who, since its organization, have been among the number of its 
members ten have died; as follows: Jefferson Whitcomb, George E. Stiles, 
Emily M. Hall, Lenora M. Nye, Joseph A. Hall, Julia F. Dunbar, David 
H. Kendall, Helen I. Hoitt, Georgia A. Shattuck, and Samuel Swett; and 
many others have removed from town. At the present time (1914) the 
organization has a membership of twenty-seven of whom sixteen are non- 
residents. 

Names of Members, March 18, 1914. 



Edward T. Hall, 
Clara A. Fessenden, 
Dr. Charles H. Holcombe, 
Ella H. Nye, 
John D. Hobart, 
Herbert J. Hall, 
Clara G. Kennedy, 
John E. Silvernail, 
James C. Douglass, 



Perley L. Pierce, 
Albert T. Pierce, 
Clintina A. Holcombe, 
Annie M. Gilson, 
Edwin A. Shattuck, 
Ada M. Hall, 
Albert B. Eaton, 
Byron D. Pease, 



David S. Fessenden, 
Hattie F. Pierce, 
George H. Nye, 
Fred E. French, 
Grace E. Pierce, 
Frank P. Kennedy, 
Flora J. Eaton, 
George Sargent. 



1880— Population,— 698. 

Nov. 25, the dwelling house of Miles Foster in the north part of the 
town was burned down. 

1881. Jan. 31, Charles Burgess was accidently killed while working 
in the sawmill of James H. Hall in the north part of the town. 

Feb. 16, Ebenezer T. Burge was burned to death. 

Feb. 16, the dwelling house of Samuel Gilson, Jr. located on the poor- 
farm road was totally destroyed by fire. 

The Yellow Day, Sept. 6, 1881. 



Tuesday, Sept. 6, 1881, was known throughout New England as the 
"Yellow Day." It was an uncomfortable, although not particularly hot, 
day. At daybreak the atmosphere appeared to be filled with a yellowish 
light, which, while it had not the appearacne of haze, or fog, had 
nevertheless, the effect of completely obscuring the sun. Under its 
influence foliage and vegetation of all descriptions were changed 
from green to a spectral violet blue. The sky took on a brassy 
aspect. The wild birds ceased to fly and to sing. Barnyard 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 361 

fowls retired to their roosts, as if the night had come; and do- 
mestic animals had the appearance of being cowed by the unusual 
conditions surrounding them. All objects, animate and inaminate, ap- 
peared strange and unatural. As the day advanced, the darkness increased 
in density. By one o'clock it had increased to the extent that it became 
necessary to use artificial lights in the interiors of buildings, the same as 
in the darkness of night. Hour by hour the gloom deepened and the brassy 
appearance of the sky increased in density. This state of affairs continued 
until about three o'clock in the afternoon; after which daylight gradually 
returned. By 5 o'clock the darkness had almost disappeared; and from 
that time until nightfall, the remainder of the day was passed under, 
approximately, the usual atmospheric conditions; the daylight, however, 
being of apparently diminished intensity. 

The night following was a very dark one. The singular and un- 
natural phenomena attendant upon the day were a cause of anxiety to 
timorous folk; and especially so to those who were of superstitious natures; 
to whom this ominous aspect appeared as signs of the coming of the day 
of doom. To the scientists these phenomena were, like those attendant 
upon the famous "Dark Day" of 1780, enigmas for which they then were, 
and ever since have been, unable to give any satisfactory solution. 

1882. Feb. 18; the sawmill of David S. Fessenden in South Brook- 
line was destroyed by fire. 

Nov. 7. The town voted to accept the bequest of five hundred 
dollars left to it under the will of James N. Tucker; the income to be used 
for the pepetural care of the South Cemetery. 

The Brookline and Hollis Telephone Company. 

1884. This company was organized by citizens of Brookline. in the 
summer and fall of 1884. Its object was to construct a telephone line 
from this town via Hollis to Nashua. It was not an incorporated company. 
The funds for building the line were raised by subscription. Bight citizens 
of this town contributed fifty dollars each, and the remainder of the neces- 
sary amount was raised in Hollis. The following citizens, all of this town, 
were elected as the company's first board of officers: Rev. Frank D. Sar- 
gent, president; Walter F. Rockwood, treasurer; George W. Bridges, clerk. 

Oct. 21, the company petitioned the town authorities for a license to 
erect poles and stretch wires from the store of James H. S. Tucker at the 
west end of Main street to the town line of Hollis, via the highway toPep- 
perell, Mass. The license was immediatley granted; and the line was com- 



362 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

pleted that same year. The first public telephone station was established 
in the store of J. H. S. Tucker. The first citizens to install telephones 
in their dwelling houses were the Rev. Frank D. Sargent and Dr. A. S. 
Wallace. 

The following year, 1885, the citizens of Townsend, Mass., became 
desirous of extending the line into that town. To that end they raised 
and expended a sum of money sufficient to carry the project into exe- 
cution. With the completion of the line to Townsend the company's 
original name was changed to "Brookline, Townsend and Hollis Telephone 
Co."; the original board of officers, however, were continued in office. A 
few years later, the line was extended to Fitchburg, Mass. 

The company continued to do a profitable business until 1898; when 
it sold its entire plant to the New England Telephone and Telegraph 
Company; by which company it is owned and managed at the present 
time. (1914). 

1886. In June of this year, the schoolhouse in District 1, South 
Brookline, was burned down. 

Memorial Day — Observances of — 

For many years prior to 1886 the town made annual appropriations 
of money to be expended in decorating the graves of its deceased veteran 
soldiers in the War of the Rebellion. But during this period the exercises 
attendant upon the performance of this duty were informal, and unat- 
tended with martial pomp or display. 

In 1886, however, as the result of a citizen's movement in that di- 
rection, the town for the first time observed Memorial Day in a formal 
manner. 

The exercises were under the management of Post 30, Grand Army 
of the Republic, of Hollis; an organization to which many of Brookline's 
Veterans at that time belonged. The ceremonies were very simple. A 
procession, consisting of one hundred and fifty citizens on foot, and as 
many more in carriages was formed on Main street; from whence, headed 
by the West Townsend, Mass., Cornet Band, it marched to the south 
cemetery. On arriving at the cemetery, the exercises consisted of singing 
by a local choir, and brief remarks by the reverends Frank D. Sargent 
and A. B. Russell, and members of the Post. At the conclusion of the 
exercises the living comrades decorated the graves of the dead, and the 
assemblage quietly dispersed. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 363 

The following year, 1887, the exercises attendant upon the day's ob- 
servance were more formal in their character. The anniversary of the 
day that year fell on Sunday, and for that reason its obesrvance was placed 
for Saturday, May 29. 

The exercises for the day were in charge of the following officers and 
committee of arrangements: President of the day, George E. Stiles; Vice- 
President, James H. S. Tucker; Chief Marshal, George W. Bridges; Aids, 
Samuel Swett, Alpha A. Hall. 

Committee of Arrangements. 

Rev. Frank D. Sargent, James H. S. Tucker, George W. Bridges, 
Samuel Swett, Daniel Kendall, George E. Stiles, Albert W. Corey, 
Walter F. Rockwood, Edward C. Tucker, Ira Daniels, Frank L. Willoby, 
Mrs. Frank 1. Willoby, H. W. Seaver, Mrs. H. W. Seaver, Imla M. 
Williams, Mrs. Imla M. Williams, Charles N. Corey, Mrs. Nathaniel 
Hobart. 

The exercises were conducted in accordance with a programme pre- 
pared for the occasion as follows : 

PROGRAM. 



"The procession will form in the Square at the store of J. H. S.Tucker, 
at 9.30 A. M. and in the following order proceed to the West Cemetery, 
then countermarching to the South Cemetery, then returning to the 
Square aboved mentioned. 

Chief Marshal 
2nd. REGIMENT BAND, W. A. Cummings, Leader; 
John H. Worcester Post and Brookline Veterans; 

Aid 
President of Day, Speakers and Disabled Soldiers in carriages ; 

Marshal 
Schools of Brookline 
Citizens. 

12 o'clock, Collation for Band, Soldiers and invited guests, at the Hall 
of J. H. S. Tucker. 

2 o'clock, at Tucker's Hall, Music; Prayer; Address; Music; Address; 
Music; Address; Music. 



364 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

The Hall has been engaged for a Camp Fire and Reunion at 7 1-2 
o'clock in the evening, and all Brookline Soldiers are requested to remain 
and form a permanent organization. 

All are invited to contribute flowers and food for this first grand Me- 
morial Day Brookline has witnessed, and those who accept the invitation, 
are requested to bring in their contributions by 9 A. M., Saturday." 

For may years subsequent to these first two observances, Memorial 
Day, or "Decoration Day," as it was then called, continued to be formally 
observed here; and year by year the town voted appropriations for that 
purpose. But as the years passed, and the veterans became few in numbers 
and enfeebled by age, the more pretentious formalities incident to the 
day were gradually dispensed with. 

For the last few years, Memorial Day exercises have been conducted 
by the children of the public schools; who assemble under the charge of 
their teachers in some public hall, from whence, after carrying out a pro- 
gramme consisting of patriotic songs and recitations, they march in 
procession , headed by the surviving veterans and the citizens, to the 
"cemetery-on-the-plain" ; bearing in their arms an abundance of fragrant 
flowers and wreaths of evergreen ; with which upon arrival at the cemetery 
they deck the graves of the veterans; after which ceremony, the exercises 
are closed with prayer by the attendant clergyman. 

1888. At the annual March town meeting, the citizens voted to dis- 
continue the following named highways: "The highway from Abraham 
Betterly's to the Senter Place; the highway from the Pope Place," (old 
Ezekiel Proctor house) "to the Jesse Perkin's Place," and "the highway 
from the Eddie Whitcomb Place," (old William Gilson place) , "to the 
Boston Place." 

March 13, the store of James H. S. Tucker at the west end of the 
village Main street was entered by burglars and the safe blown open and 
robbed of its valuable contents. 

Brookline was represented in the Constitutional Convention this year 
holden at Concord, by David S. Fessenden. 

1889. September 17, the sawmill of Charles J. Stickney in South 
Brookline was destroyed by fire. 




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HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 365 



CHAPTER XX. 

Railroads in Brook line and a Narrative of the Events Which Led Up to Their 

Construction. 

Failure of the Citizen's First Attempt to Obtain a Railroad in 1844 — The 
East Wilton and Groton Railroad Company, 1846 — The Brookline 
Railroad, 1871— The Manchester and Fitchburg Railroad, 1877— 
The Brookline Railroad Company, 1891 — Celebration of the Open- 
ing of the Brookline Railroad Company to Public Travel in 1892 — 
The Brookline and Milford Railroad Company, 1893 

The Nashua and Lowell railroad was incorporated by act of legis- 
lature on the 23rd day of June, 1835. It was the first railroad to enter 
New Hampshire. It was opened for business in 1838, and went into full 
operation in 1840. Up to this time the Middlesex Canal, in Massachusetts, 
and the canal system in connection with the Merrimack river in New 
Hampshire, had served as modes of conveyance of freight, and to some 
extent of passengers, between Boston and the towns on the Merrimack, 
and the adjacent country. There was naturally much opposition to the 
building of the road, especially among the stock-holders in the canal 
companies. 

The establishment and successful operation of this railroad naturally 
excited not only curiosity, but finally created a feeling of intense interest 
among the inhabitants of the neighboring towns. A railroad fever struck 
the surrounding country. Brookline was one of the first of the towns in 
this vicinity to feel its effects; and, soon after the road's completion, the 
desirability of a railroad from some point in Massachusetts into its own 
borders, and perhaps beyond, began to be vigorously discussed. Among 
the projects for the new railroad which were favorably considered, was one 
which contemplated the continuation of the Boston and Lowell railroad 
from its terminus in Lowell, Mass., via Brookline to East Wilton; and a 
somewhat active effort was made to put this project into execution. But 
meanwhile another project, carried on by those who were interested in 
building the present Wilton railroad, was under way ; and after some con- 
siderable sparring between the rival factions, those opposed to the Brookline 



366 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

route carried the day, and the Nashua and Wilton railroad was incor- 
porated Dec. 28, 1844. 

The East Wilton and Groton Railroad Company. 

Far from being discouraged by the failure of their attempt, in 1844, 
to obtain a railroad charter, the citizens of Brookline continued to agi- 
tate and discuss the question of building the contemplated road. In this 
agitation and discussion they were aided by certain of the citizens of East 
Wilton, and also by citizens of Groton and Pepperell, in Massachusetts. 
In 1846, they again petitioned the legislature for a railroad charter; and 
finally, on the 10th day of July of that year succeeded in obtaining the 
passage of an act whereby the road was incorporated under the name of 
the East Wilton and Groton Railroad Company. The original grantees 
under this act were Samuel W. Blake and Asa F. Lawrence of Groton, 
Mass., Benjamin Gould and Alpheus Shattuck of Brookline, and William 
H. Burns of East Wilton. By the terms of the charter the road was to 
begin in East Wilton; thence to Milford, thence to Brookline, thence 
through the southwest corner of Hollis to the state line; there to intersect 
and unite with the East Wilton and Groton railroad as it had been chartered 
by the Massachusetts legislature in March, 1845. By its act of incorpor- 
ation, the capital stock of the company was to consist of 2000 shares. The 
par value of the shares, however, was not stated. But as the president 
and board of directors were restricted from laying an assessment on over 
one hundred dollars for each share, it is presumable that the par value 
was at least SI 00 per share. By section 15 of the act it was provided that 
— "If the Wilton railroad should proceed according to their charter granted 
in December, 1844, then this act is to become null and void." It is a matter 
of record that the Wilton railroad did so proceed. In 1848 the charter of 
the East Wilton and Groton railroad was amended; and there the legis- 
lative record relative to the road ends. 

It is probable that by the completion of the Wilton railroad, the 
charter of the East Wilton and Groton railroad became "null and void." 
Tradition says that the only action taken by the grantees under this charter 
was to cause a survey of the route of the road from Brookline to Pepperell 
to be made. That such a survey was made is an unquestioned fact. 

Among the petitioners for the charter from Brookline were Alpheus 
Shattuck, Benjamin Gould, James Clinton Parker, Andrew Rockwood and 
many others. In the work before the legislature, preliminary to obtaining 
the charter, the petitioners were opposed by the Lowell and Nashua rail- 



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HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 367 

road; which employed as its counsel James U. Parker of Merrimack, and 
Franklin Pierce; afterwards President. The petitioners were represented 
before the legislature by Asa F. Lawrenc an able and efficient lawyer of 
Groton, Mass. 

The Brookline Railroad. 

For a period of twenty-three years dating from the time of the loss of 
its charter by the East Wilton and Groton railroad, no active efforts for 
procuring a charter for a railroad into Brookline were made. But during 
all that period the matter was constantly under consideration on the part 
of the citizens; the majority of whom were not only hopeful, but confident 
that the road would come some time, even if they did not live to see it. 
In 1871 their hopes were realized; for on the 13th day of July of that year, 
in response to a petition to that end, the legislature passed an act for the 
incorporation of a railroad into Brookline, under the name of the Brook- 
line Railroad. The charter issued under the provisions of the act was the 
second, in order of number, to be issued for a railroad in Brookline. The 
names of the grantees under the act were as follows : Joseph A. Hall, James 
W. Fessenden, Joseph Sawtelle, James W. Cook, Wilkes W. Corey, Alpheus 
Shattuck, Joseph C. Tucker, William J. Smith, James Clinton Parker, 
Rufus G. Russell, David G. Russell, David S. Fessenden, and Nathaniel 
Hcbart of Brookline; John N. Worcester, Timothy E- Flagg, Charles A. 
Reed, William A. Trow, Henry N. Smith, Samuel A. Worcester, George L. 
Pierce, Ambrose H. Woods, Calvin M. Smith, and Abel Colburn of Hollis. 

By the terms of this charter the grantees were empowered to locate 
the road from any point between the States of Massachusetts and New 
Hampshire, and between the towns of Hollis and Pepperell to any point 
at or near the village in the town of Brookline, and to connect with the 
Middlesex Central railroad, or the Brookline and Tyngsboro railroad in 
Massachusetts; the capital stock to be not more than $150,000; and the 
corporation was to organize and lay out $15,000 in construction before 
Jan. 1, 1876, or the charter was to be void. This the grantees failed to do 
and the charter was allowed to expire. 

The Manchester and Fitchburg Railroad. 

On July 14, 1877, the third charter for a railroad into Brookline was 
granted by the legislature, under the name of the Manchester and Fitch- 
burg railroad. The names of the grantees under this charter residing in 



368 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

Brookline were as follows. Joseph A. Hall, Joseph Sawtelle. Associated 
with them were sixteen others, residents of Manchester, Bedford, Amherst, 
New Ipswich and Fitchburg, Mass. By the charter's provisions they had 
power to locate and construct the road from some point in Manchester 
through Bedford, Merrimack, Amherst and Milford, to some point on 
the line between New Hampshire and Massachusetts in Brookline, Mason, 
New Ipswich or Rindge, with a right to enter upon and use the Concord 
railroad, the Manchester and North Weare railroad, the Concord and Ports- 
mouth railroad, the Nashua and Wilton, and the Peterboro and Shirley 
railroad; paying such tolls as fixed upon by agreement or by the legislature. 
The capital stock was fixed at not more than 10,000 shares of $100 each, 
the road to be constructed within five years from the passage of the bill, 
or the same would be void. Meetings were held at various places and con- 
siderable enthusiasm aroused; but enthusiasm was about all that was 
aroused. Capital was not forthcoming, and the time limited in the charter 
was about to expire, when in 1881 events transpired that instilled new life 
into the enterprise, and on Aug. 17, 1881, the legislature passed an act to 
revive and continue the charter to July 1, 1890. In this revival of the 
charter it was provided that the route of said road should be within 100 
rods of the townhouse at Amherst plain. When by means of this revival 
of the charter the nearly defunct road had been galvanized into a seeming 
appearance of new life, the hopes of the citizens of Brookline were raised 
to the highest point. Never since the inception of a railroad into the town 
in 1844 had all appearances, signs, omens, reports and manifestations 
been so favorable for a railroad as now; and it was currently reported that 
if the road should be built from Manchester to the State line, certain 
capitalists in Fitchburg would build the remaining portion of the road to 
Fitchburg. In fact, these capitalists, it was understood, guaranteed it. 
Meanwhile certain of the manufacturing corporations in Manchester were 
apparently interested in the matter. They were at that time, and had 
previously been, having trouble with the railroads leading south out of the 
city of Manchester in regard to the cost of freightage, and they appeared 
very desirous of obtaining means of egress that would render them inde- 
pendent of the Concord railroad. 

Eminent counsel were employed, frequent meetings were held at Man- 
chester and Fitchburg, and at intermediate points along the route; where 
affairs relating to the projected road were discussed, and viewed in all 
lights. The several towns along the route either voted the 5 per cent on 
their several valuations which the law allowed, or expressed their will- 
ingness to do so. Two or more different surveys were made; one sub- 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 369 

stantially over the route as set forth in the charter, and one down the west 
bank of the Merrimack river, passing through the easterly portion of 
Hollis. This latter survey was made I think before the alteration of the 
charter in 1881, which required the road to run within 100 rods of the 
Amherst townhouse. In fact the elements of capital and labor seemed to 
be working harmoniously in conjunction with the wishes of the people, 
and "all went merry as a marriage bell," when, "hush, hark, a sound 
broke in like a rising knell." In fact something dropped. An investi- 
gation showed that the Concord railroad had dropped on the price of 
freightage, and with that drop the project of the Manchester and Fitch- 
burg railroad dropped also, and passed away like "the baseless fabric of 
a dream." A few years later, as the time approached for the expiration 
of the term of the charter, viz., July, 1890, some talk was made as to hav- 
ing the term extended; but upon search being made it was found that 
that valuable instrument, the charter, had dropped also — completely out 
of sight. And from that day to this no citizen of Brookline has ever seen 
it. It is supposed to be resting, with other equally valuable papers, in the 
archives of the first railroad to enter New Hampshire. How it got there 
the Lord only knows. We can only say of it, in the language of tombstone 
epitaphs, "Requiescat in pace." 

The Brookline Railroad Company. 

The fourth and last charter for a railroad in this town was granted 
by the New Hampshire legislature, March 31, 1891, under the name of the 
Brookline Railroad Company — the road that is in sucessful operation 
today (1914). The grantees under this charter were William G. Shattuck, 
Thomas S. Hittinger, George W. Bridges, Walter F. Rockwood, James H. 
S. Tucker, Gilman P. Huff, David Hobart, Ira Daniels, James H. Hall, 
Willie A. Hobart, Samuel Swett, Albert W. Corey, Charles E. Shattuck, 
and Charles A. Stickney, all residents of Brookline except Thomas S. 
Hittinger, who, at that time, was a resident of Townsend Harbor, Mass. 

This charter authorized the construction of a railroad not exceeding 
6 rods in width from some point on lake Potanapo to some point on the 
State line of Massachusetts, in Brookline or Hollis, over such a line as 
would be passed over in the construction of a railroad in the most feasible 
route to a point at or near the station on the Worcester, Nashua and Port- 
land railroad in Pepperell, Mass., with a right to connect with the Wor- 
cester, Nashua and Portland railroad, and to lease to any railroad corpo- 
ration in manner and form consistent with the laws of this State. The 



370 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

capital stock was limited to 1000 shares of $100 each and the act was to 
be void unless the road was completed within ten years from the passage 
of the bill. 

The charter was obtained by the personal and persistent efforts of the 
citizens of Brookline, aided and assisted by Thomas S. Hittinger, super- 
intendent of the Fresh Pond Ice Company of Cambridge, Mass. To Mr. 
Hittinger, in a very large measure, belongs the credit of the road's exis- 
tence. Hon Franklin Worcester of Hollis was also a zealous advocate of 
the road from its inception ; giving freely of his time and money in further- 
ance of the enterprise; and under his skilful guidance the bill was sucess- 
fully engineered through the legislature, in spite of the strenuous oppo- 
sition of one or two powerful railroad corporations in this State. Shortly 
after the road obtained its charter, the railroad commissioners of Massa- 
chusetts granted a charter for a new railroad in that State, extending from 
some point in Groton to the State line in Pepperell. This road was subse- 
quently built and connected with the Brookline road; and at the present 
time (1914) the entire line of the two roads is being operated under the 
name of the Brookline and Pepperell railroad. 

The road is fourteen miles in length; of which three miles are located 
in New Hampshire. It connects with the Peterborough and Shirley rail- 
road, a branch of the Fitchburg railroad, at West Groton, Mass. From 
West Groton it follows down the west side of the Nashua river to Pepperell, 
Mass. ; thence, turning at nearly a right angle, it follows up the west bank 
of the beautiful Nissitisset river to its terminus in Brookline, on the shores 
of Muscatanipus pond. From the date of its being opened for traffic to 
the present time, the road has done a profitable business. 

Originally this road was under the management of the Fitchburg 
railroad, by which corporation it was built. Subsequently, when the 
Boston and Maine railroad company leased the Fitchburg system, it 
passed into the control of the former company. At the present time 
(1914) it is controlled by the N.Y. N. H. & H. under its lease of the B. & M. 
system of roads. 

Celebration of the Opening of the Brookline Railroad Company to 

Public Traffic, Sept. 8, 1892. 

The Brookline railroad was formally opened to public traffic on the 
8th day of September, 1892. The opening day was made the subject of a 
public celebration — for which elaborate preparations had been going on 
for weeks before the event — bv the citizens of Brookline and their friends 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 371 

in its vicinity. The following account of the celebration, and the events 
attendant upon it, is compiled from an article written and published at 
the time in a New Hampshire newspaper. 

At about ten o'clock, A. M., the first train, consisting of seven coaches 
loaded down with humanity, with Henry A. Hall and Herbert W. Bout- 
well, both natives of Brookline, at the throttles of the engines, and con- 
ductor Frank W. Barns in charge of the train, came in from the south. 
Immediately the train came to a stop in the village depot, Capt. Frank 
Eaton let loose the Lyndeboro Lafayette artillery, and thirty times the 
cannon boomed above the valley town. Ere the train upon the track had 
departed, forty-eight school girls, under direction of George H. Bridges, 
chairman of the school board, decked the already flagged engine with 
beautiful flowers. Then the train drew out, and another of nine coaches, 
Conductor Sexton's, came thundering in. On this train was the East 
Pepperell brass band, Gilman Robbins leader. Half an hour later the 
procession proceeded down Main street in the following order : Chief mar- 
shal, D. D. Rockwood; aids, A. A. Hall, G. P. Huff, O. D. Fessenden; 
platoon of Nashua and Brookline police; Second Regiment Band, W. A. 
Cummings leader; Brookline firemen in line; barge containing school 
children; other barges; carriages with some of the State's distinguished 
citizens. In a carriage with James H. S. Tucker were his excellency Gov. 
Hiram A. Tuttle and Senator Jacob H. Gallinger. Gen. Henry M. Baker, 
Gen. Charles Williams and the orator of the occasion, a native of Brookline, 
Judge E. E- Parker, followed in carriages. Behind these came visitors and 
citizens in their carriages. The line proceeded through the principal 
streets, with the accompanying music of the bands. Under the most 
beautiful old flag that ever floated over this old earth, the procession 
marched. The names of Harrison and Reid greeted them on "the old 
flag" as they passed Tucker's store. In front of the hotel, Cleveland and 
Stevenson's names were attached to the stars and stripes. The column 
halted in front of E. C. Tucker's residence and Governor Tuttle, Senator 
Gallinger and the other prominent guests entered Mr. Tucker's hospitable 
home. Many entered to greet the governor and his friends. 

At 11 A. M., as the governor ascended the rostrum, which was on the 
east side of Main street in front of the M. E. church, the second Regiment 
band, which was near by upon a raised platform, rendered the stirring 
strains of "Hail to the Chief." Rev. G. L. Todd, pastor of the Brookline 
Congregational church and president of the day, then called the assembly 
to order. A most touching prayer was made by Rev. Daniel Goodwin, 
an aged and retired clergyman of Mason, who years ago was a pastor of 



372 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

the Congregational church of Brookline. President Todd then gave a 
brief and happy welcoming address. The Second Regiment band after- 
wards played the "American Hymn." The president then introduced the 
orator of the day, Judge E. E. Parker, of Nashua, a native of the town, 
who gave a scholarly and eloquent address. 

Following Judge Parker's grand and appreciated effort, the Second 
Regiment band again did itself proud. It was now 1 o'clock — the dining 
hour — and so President Todd at this point, announced a pause in the 
proceedings, during which time he invited the guests and as many as 
could be accomodated to repair to Tucker's hall, and there partake of one 
of P. & J. Besse's best and most celebrated Boston repasts. Assembled 
at the festive board, a brief silence was maintained while Rev. C. F. Cra- 
thern of Mason invoked the Divine blessing in a few well chosen words. 
Then the cheerful company dined to their hearts' and stomachs' content. 
R. B. Pope, the colored head waiter, gave a dinner to 444 people at the 
first sitting. He had a score or more of able and gentlemenly colored 
waiters at his command. The banquet hall was tastefully decorated with 
bright colored paper fans and with evergreen strung overhead, and wreaths 
hung here and there. Dinner ended, the company re-assembled at the 
grand stand. The president invited the press representatives upon the 
platform. He then called for three rousing cheers for the governor, and 
got them in good shape. Then he introduced his excellency to the sea of 
upturned faces. 

Governor Tuttle in substance, said that he was pleased to be present 
and take part in the day's proceedings. He referred to the time when 
the first train of cars came plunging into his old home, Pittsfield. He had 
visited Brookline for the first time only recently, and was so well pleased 
then that they found him here again on this gala day. He referred to the 
fine pure water of their shining lake, spoke of the people of these little 
country hamlets furnishing the sinews of the country. They could bring 
muscle as well as brains to the front. In closing he pronounced himself 
proud to have had the privilege of signing their railroad bill, thanked 
them for their cordial reception and polite attention, and then gracefully 
withdrew. 

Gov. Tuttle's address was followed by brief speeches by U. S. Senator 
Jacob Gallinger, Gen. H. M. Baker of Bow, Hon. Robert M. Wallace of 
Milford, Hon. John MeLane of Milford, Hon. Franklin Worcester of 
Hollis, Albert L. Fessenden, Esq., of Townsend, Mass., Hon. George 
A. Wason of New Boston, Rev. A. Woods of Pepperell, Mass., Rev. 
Daniel Goodwin of Mason, Edward Wason of Nashua and many 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 373 

others. As night came on apace the gathering lessened, but many tarried 
for the fireworks and the music of the later hours. 

Among the names of the many out of town people present were Col. 
Dana W. King, James H. Hunt, E. W. Eaton, C. J. Hamblett, John A. 
Spaulding, and J. W. Howard of Nashua, Henry S. Gilson, James A. 
Mixer, Col. F. E. Kaley, F. E. Bartlett, Dr. H. S. Hutchinson, Dr. D. S. 
Dearborn and lady, O. H. Foster and lady, Mrs. John McLane and a party 
of ladies from Milford. The press representatives present were Edward 
M. Stanyan and W. S. Towner, New Hampshire Republican; Frank J. 
Maloney, Associated Press; W. B. Rotch, Farmer's Cabinet; J. G. Faxon, 
Boston Herald; Col. F. E. Pecker, Boston Journal; and A. E. DeWolfe, 
Nashua Telegraph. 

Three thousand people were on the street at noon. The evening was 
enlivened by the music of the band and a brilliant display of fireworks; 
which closed the festivities of one of the most notable days in the town's 
history. 

The Brookline and Milford Railroad Company. 

The Brookline and Milford Railroad was incorporated by act of legis- 
lature February 22, 1893. The grantees under the act were John McLane, 
R. M. Wallace, H. H. Barber, F. E- Kaley, O. H. Foster, Clarence J. 
Gutterson, of Milford; Franklin J. Worcester, L. B. Dow, of Hollis, and 
James H. S. Tucker and Thomas L. Hittinger of Brookline. 

By the terms of the. act the road was to be built from some conven- 
ient point on the Brookline railroad in Brookline to some convenient point 
in the town of Milford; with the right to connect with the Brookline rail- 
road in Brookline and with the Wilton road in said town of Milford. The 
road was built and said connections made in little less than one year and 
nine months from the date of its incorporation. It was opened to public 
traffic Thursday, November 15, 1894; and the event was made the oc- 
casion of a grand celebration at Milford. 

Like the Brookline railroad, this road was built by the Fitchburg 
railroad corporation. At the present time (1914) it forms a part of the 
Boston and Maine railroad system in New Hampshire under lease to the 
N. Y., N. H., & H. railroad; by which company the entire line of railroads 
from Milford to Ayer, Mass., is controlled and operated. 



374 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



CHAPTER XXI. 

Current Events, Incidents and Happenings, Continued. 

1890—1914. 

Population — Concrete Sidewalks — The Public Drinking Fountain — 
Burning of Sampson Farnsworth House — Burning of the Rufus 
Woodward House — The Fresh Pond Ice Company — Sketch of 
Life of Noah Farley— Bond Street Laid Out — The Caroline Brooks 
Legacy — The Grange — O. D. Fessenden's Gift to the Town— 
Brookline Improvement Company — Burning of the Alpheus Shat- 
tuck House — Burning of the John Sanders House — The New Eng- 
land Type Factory — Congregational Church Struck by Lightening 
— New Hearse — Murder of Adelbert Parker — Old Home Week 
Celebrations — The James Carlton Parker Legacy — The Freshet of 
1900 — The Harriet Gilson Legacy — Burning of the Thomas O. 
Heren House— Burning of the Emma S Dunbar House — State 
Roads— The Imla M. Williams Legacy — Orville D. Fessenden 
Steam Sawmill — Burning of the J. A. Hall and Joseph Hall 
Houses — The Dodge Legacy — Brown Tail Moths — New Valuation 
of the Town — The Emily M. Peterson Legacy — The Eliza J. 
Parker Legacy — The Martha E. Perkins Legacy — The Bertha 
Hutchinson Legacy— Burning of the "Beehive" and Deaths of 
Edward O'Brien and John Powers — Water Plant — The Brookline 
Public Park — Electric Lights. 

1890— Population— 501 

At the annual March town meeting of this year, for the first time in 
its history, the town voted an appropriation of money to be used exclusively 
in improving the conditions of its sidewalks. The amount of the appropri- 
ation was over one hundred dollars. It was expended the following summer 
in the construction of a concrete sidewalk on the east side of the village 
Main street between the stores of Walter E. Corey and Everett E. Tarbell. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 375 

From time to time during the years immediately succeeding 1890, 
appropriations similar to that of the latter year and for the same purpose, 
but frequently of much larger amounts, were raised and expended on the 
sidewalks; principally on those in the village. As a result of those ex- 
penditures, at the present time (1914) concrete sidewalks have been con- 
structed and are in use on portions of the following named streets : Main 
street on its east side from a point opposite the residence of K. E. Parker 
continuously to the summit of meeting-house hill; on its west side from 
the same point at its east end to a point opposite the dwelling house of 
widow Charles N. Corey; Bond street, on its west side from its junction 
with Main street to the railroad depot; Milford street, on its east side 
from the Congregational meeting-house northerly to the residence of Widow 
Eddy Whitcomb; the street running easterly from Main street near Tar- 
bell's store, on its west side for the entire length. In addition to the fore- 
going, concrete sidewalks have been put in on the highway to Townsend 
opposite the residences of David S. Fessenden and William B. Rockwood 
in South Brookline. 

The Public Drinking Fountain. 

At the same meeting, March 11, Charles W. Smith, David Hobart 
and Charles N. Corey were elected as a committee to enquire into the cost 
of erecting a public drinking fountain in the square at the west end of Main 
Street near the store of James H. S. Tucker. At the March meeting of 
the following year this committee reported; and, upon considering the 
report, the meeting passed the following vote; — "To establish as a common 
such part of the triangle near J. H. S. Tucker's store as is necessary for 
the purpose, and to improve the same by placing thereon a public drink- 
ing fountain. Also to appropriate a sum not exceeding one hundred and 
seventy-five dollars to make such improvements and to furnish the water 
for the same." At the same time the committee of the previous year was 
re-elected, under the title of "Trustees of the drinking fountain," with 
power to carry the vote into effect. 

In the summer of 1892 the board of trustees erected the bronze drink- 
ing fountain at the present time standing upon the square at the west end 
of the village Main street, and at the same time constructed the reservoir 
which supplies it with water, at an expense to the town, including the cost 
of the fountain, of four hundred and odd dollars. 

1890. April 30, the old David J. Stickney house in North Brookline 
was destroyed by fire. 



376 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

July 24, the Rufus Woodward house on the plain south of the village 
was destroyed by fire. 

The Fresh Pond Ice Company. 

The Fresh Pond Ice Company of Somerville, Mass., removed its 
plant from Somerville to this town in the fall or spring of this year, 1890, 
and established its business in its present location on the south shore of 
Muscatanipus lake. 

Prior to its location here, the company had purchased from its owners 
all of the land surrounding and contiguous to the lake ; with the exception 
of a small tract, on its west shore, which at the present time( 1914)is owned 
by Frederick Farns worth. 

Soon after locating here, and during the same year, the company 
through its agent, Thomas S. Hittinger, who was also one of its members, 
commenced the erection of its ice houses. They were all completed in the 
following year. The houses, which were nine in number, were all covered 
by one and the same roof. At the time of their completion, their storage 
capacity was sixty thousand tons. The dimensions of the building as 
first erected were 245 feet in length by 180 feet in breadth. 

Since its erection, the original building has, at various times, been en- 
larged by the addition of new houses, until at the present time it encloses 
within its walls thirteen houses, with a capacity for holding eighty thous- 
and tons of ice ; and is said to be the largest ice plant under one roof in the 
State 

Practically, the company's entire product is sold in Cambridge and 
Somerville, Mass., to which cities it is shipped via the Fitchburg division 
of the B. & M. railroad. Its daily shipments during the summer months 
average from twenty to forty loaded cars. In addition to its plant at the 
lake, the company also owns the sites, and controls the water power con- 
nected with the same, of the two saw and grist mills formerly owned and 
operated by the late Ensign Bailey, and located on the river below its 
outlet from the lake. 

Thomas S. Hittinger, the company's superintendent from the time of 
its establishment in this town, died at his home in Cambridge, Mass., Oct. 
26, 1904. His death was a severe blow to the company, in whose interests 
he was an indefatigable worker, and a cause of sincere regret to the citizens 
of Brookline ; by whom he was highly respected. It was owing to his efforts, 
as much perhaps as to the efforts of any other one man, that this town 



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HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 377 

finally obtained its railroad; and it was through his influence that the ice 
business was established here. 

Mr. Hittinger was succeeded as the company's superintendent by E. 
A. Davenport; who in his turn was succeeded by Edward L. Hadley, the 
present occupant of the position. 

The Brookline Granite Company. 

1891. During the construction of the Brookline and Pepperell rail- 
road in 1891, Fayette Cutler and William Burnham of Barre, Vermont, 
purchased of Vernal Barber and Joseph A. Hall two separate lots of land 
located on the west side of Ramond hill and, under the firm name of The 
Brookline Granite Company, commenced to quarry granite from the ledges 
located on the purchased premises. 

Subsequently, on the 24th day of October, 1892, the company through 
its agent, Jacob McClure, purchased of Samuel Gilson, Jr., a tract of land 
containing granite ledges, and consisting of sixteen acres located on the 
easterly side of said hill. 

The company, under the management of Col. McClure, began its 
first operations upon the ledge located on the northwest side of the hill, 
near the terminus of a spur-track of the Brookline and Pepperell railroad 
which led up the hill on its westerly side, and which had been built for its 
accomodation. It employed a large number of quarrymen; and, under the 
active and constant oversight of the manager, the work of developing the 
ledge progressed rapidly and satisfactorily; and the prospects for the 
future success of the enterprise appeared to be most auspicious. 

Such was the state of affairs when on the evening of September 7, 
1893, Col. McClure was suddenly stricken down by heart failure; from the 
effects of which he died on the third day of October following. 

Soon after Col. McClure's death the company suspended its oper- 
ations on the ledge and apparently abandoned the enterprise. The work 
was never resumed and from the day of its abandonment to the present 
time the plant has remained idle. 

Noah W. Farley. 

December 28 Noah W. Farley died of heart failure at his residence 
in Auburndale, Mass., aged seventy years. Mr. Farley was an adopted 
son of Christopher and Ruth Jewett Farley, and a native of this town. 



378 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

At the age of twenty-one years he removed from Brookline to Boston, 
Mass., where he started a retail business on Hanover street. From that 
time until his decease he was one of Boston's most successful business 
men. During that period he was connected as a partner with several of 
the city's largest and most successful business firms. At the time of his 
death he was senior member of the firm of Farley, Harvey & Company on 
the corner of Chauncy and Bedford streets. He was a member, and for 
many years treasurer of the Park Street Congregational Church. As a 
business man he was honest, upright and conservative. As a friend he 
was constant and sincere. 

In 1849 he married Pamelia Thayer of New Ipswich. He was sur- 
vived by his wife, three sons and a daughter. 

Badger Brothers. 

During this year, Charles L., William, George I,., Charles F., and 
Fred L. Badger, all of Quincy, Mass., where under the name and style of 
Badger Brothers they were extensive manufacturers of and dealers in 
granite products, located a branch of their business in Brookline. 

The scene of the company's operations here was the ledge located on 
the east side of the highway to Milford about one half mile north of the 
village Main street, and known as the Samuel Gilson, Jr. Ledge; which 
was purchased for it of Henry A. Willey. 

For several years following its purchase, the company worked the 
ledge at intervals; expending considerable sums of money in an effort to 
quarry the granite in blocks of dimensions suitable for its requirements. 
To that end the ledge was excavated to a very considerable depth. But 
with but indifferent results. For the granite, although excellent in quality 
and abundant in quantity, continued to develop in layers too thin to be 
available for the use for which the company intended it. Discouraged 
with the results, the company finally abandoned the enterprise, and sold 
its plant to Samuel Swett. 

1892. March 8, the town voted to convey a narrow strip of land 
from the east side of the west cemetery bordering on Muscatanipus Pond 
to the Fresh Pond Ice Company. The conveyance was subsequently 
made. 

March 8, Bond Street was laid out. 

February 14, The Timothy J. Wright dwelling house near the rail- 
road crossing in North Brookline was destroyed by fire. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 379 

July 20, the old Samuel Farnsworth house in North Brookline was 
burned down. 

Brookline was represented in the Constitutional Convention of this 
year by Orville D. Fessenden. 

1893. May 24, the old Mathew Wallace place in the southwest part 
of the town was totally destroyed by fire. 

The town voted to accept a legacy of one hundred and eighty-eight 
and 36-100 dollars from Caroline W. Brooks, the income of the same to 
be used for the perpetual care of her family burial lot in the south cemetery. 

Brookline Grange No. 211. 

1894. "Brookline Grange No. 211 P. of H. was organized March 14, 
1894. The Hillsboro Co. Pomona Grange records give the following events 
which preceded its organization : 

'At a Pomona Grange meeting held at Goffstown Feb. 7, 1891, Brook- 
line was presented as a favorable field for the organization of a subordinate 
Grange. George Tarbell of Milford, Andrew H. Spalding of Hollis and 
George A. Wason of Nashua were appointed a committee to go to Brook- 
line and investigate and report, and Pomona Grange voted to hold a public 
meeting there providing the citizens were willing to have them do so. 

This committee reported at the next Pomona meeting held at Mason, 
Feb. 27, that the citizens of Brookline would gladly receive them at an 
early date. They voted to hold said meeting March 7. On that date a 
load of enthusiastic patrons came over from Milford and in all there were 
one hundred and ten present. And all arrangements were made to organize 
a Grange in Brookline. David D. and Martha A. Rockwood at this time 
became interested, and they kindled the fire of enthusiasm for the organiz- 
ation of a Grange among the citizens of Brookline, and they ever remained 
true and loyal to the end of life. 

The record of the first meeting, on the night of the organization of 
Brookline Grange is as follows : 

Brookline, N. H., March 14, 1894. 

Agreeable to a previous notice a meeting was held in the small vestry 
of the Congregational church, on the evening of March 14, 1894, for the 
purpose of considering the question of organizing a Grange , there being 
present several of the citizens of the town, and E. C. Hutchinson of Mil- 
ford, Sec. and Special Deputy of the N. H. State Grange, H. O. Hadley of 
Temple, District Deputy of the N. H. State Grange for district No. 10, 
A. H. Spalding, Master of Hollis Grange, and a few other patrons of neigh- 



380 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

boring Granges. A petition was presented containing the following names, 
who were the charter members of the Grange: Joseph A. Hall, Mrs. Eliza 
A. Hobart, Charles A. Stickney, Mrs. Clara A. Stickney, Mrs. Susie E. 
French, Miss Abbie F. Barrett, Clarence R. Russell, Mrs. Clara E. Russell, 
Hattie S. Williams, David S. Fessenden, David D. Rockwood, Mrs. Ella 
F. Rockwood, William B. Rockwood, Mrs. Etta E. Rockwood, George H. 
Kendall, Mrs. Alice Kendall, Mrs. Mary F. Barber, Martin A. Rockwood, 
Mrs. Mary E. Rockwood, David Hobart and William J. Bailey; and the 
requisite fee having been paid by each, they were presented at the Altar 
and obligated as Patrons of Husbandry by State deputy E. C. Hutchinson. 
Proceeded to the election of officers resulting in the choice of the 
following: Master, David D. Rockwood; Overseer, Clarence R. Russell; 
Lecturer, Mrs. Susie E. French; Steward, David Hobart; Ass't. Steward, 
William J. Bailey; Chaplain, Joseph A. Hall; Treasurer, Martin A. Rock- 
wood; Secretary, David S. Fessenden; Gate Keeper, George H. Kendall; 
Ceres, Mrs. Ella F. Rockwood; Pomona, Mrs. Eliza A. Hobart; Flora, 
Mrs. Mary A. Rockwood; Lady Ass't. Steward, Mrs. Clara E. Russell. 
And the aboved named officers were duly installed by Deputies E. C. Hut- 
chinson and H. O. Hadley, who then proceeded to instruct them in the 
work of the order. 

Voted that the Grange be called Brookline Grange No. 211. 
The following were appointed a committee on Constitution and By- 
Laws: C. A. Stickney, D. S. Fessenden, M. A. Rockwood. Voted that 
the next meeting be held at this place on Saturday evening, March 
24, 1894, at 7:30 P. M. The following committee was chosen to fix the 
time and provide a place for the meetings of the Grange: Joseph A. Hall, 
Eliza A. Hobart, Susie E. French. 

After remarks by the Deputies and some others, the Grange was 
closed in due form by Deputy H. O. Hadley as Master and Deputy E. C. 
Hutchinson as Overseer." 

A true record attest H. O. Hadley, Secretary. 

The first three meetings of the Brookline Grange were held on Satur- 
day evenings in the small vestry of the Congregational Church. The 
fourth meeting, on April 11, 1894, was held in Tarbell's Hall, which place 
has ever since been the Grange's home. The evenings of its regular meet- 
ings are the second and fourth Wednesdays of each month, except July 
and August, when meetings are held on the fourth only. 

A good literary program is assured at each meeting and, at the close, 
marching, games and other pastimes are enjoyed. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 381 

During its existence here the Grange has exerted its influence for 
good among the citizens of the town. It has thrown open its doors to the 
public on many occasions to enable the citizens to recieve the benefit of 
lectures, meetings of the State Board of Agriculture, Pomona meetings, 
and children's nights. It has held several very successful fairs, and to it 
the Old Home Week Association in Brookline owes its existence. 

Eight of the charter members of the Brookline Grange have died 
since its organization, viz; Mrs. Eliza Hobart, Joseph Hall, Martin Rock- 
wood, Mrs. Mary Rockwood, David Hobart, David Rockwood, William 
Rockwood, Mrs. Clara Stickney; and two;,, viz Charles Stickney and Mrs. 
Abbie Barrett Prescott, have withdrawn from the order. Another member, 
Mrs. Hattie Williams Carruth, at the present time (1914) is living in 
Houston, Texas. The remaining ten were present at its twentieth anni- 
versary. 

Besides the charter members who have died, the Grange has lost ten 
others by death: Miss Grace N. Nye, Charles W. Currier, Mrs. Harriet 
A. Baldwin, Mrs. Fannie E- French, Mrs. Nettie M. Rideout, Mrs. Mary 
LeClaire, John H. B. Pierce, Edward W. Smith, Mrs. Emily C. Swett, 
Mrs. Augusta J. Smith. 

The membership at the present time (1914) is one hundred and eight, 
of whom forty-four are men and sixty -four women. Since its organiaztion 
the Grange has had ten Masters, as follows: David Rockwood, one year; 
Clarence Russell, four years; William Bailey, three years; Martin Rock- 
wood, two years; Albert Pierce, one year; Clara Russell, one year; Orville 
Fessenden, one year; George Tarbell, one year; Fred Hall, three years; 
and Edward Pierce, the present worthy master, who is serving his fourth 
year. 

Twentieth Anniversary. 

The Grange observed its twentieth anniversary March 11, 1914, by a 
day meeting under the direction of the Charter Members. The morning 
session at 11:15 was the regular meeting; literary program, accordion solo 
by Arthur Goss, short addresses by Frank P. Fisk and Clarence L. Trow 
of Milford, Master and Lecturer, respectively, of Hillsboro Co. Pomona 
Grange, Fred C. Willoby and Andrew H. Spalding, Master and P. M., re- 
spectively, of Hollis Grange, Mrs. Emma F. Seaver, Master of Townsend 
Grange, Joseph D. Batchelder and John Smith, Master and P. M., re- 
spectively, of Fruitdale Grange, Mason; piano solo, Miss May Pierce. 
Dinner was served at the banquet hall above at 12:30. 



382 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

The afternoon session, which occurred at 1 :30, was public, and a 

good sized audience listened to the following program : 

Anniversary Song, Grange Choir. 

Welcome and Poem, Mrs. Mary A. Barber. 

Music, piano and cornet, Mrs. Louise Bailey, Bernard Slocomb. 

Grange History, Mrs. Clara E. Russell. 

Song, Mrs. Maude Greeley and Miss Ethel Taylor. 

Address, H. O. Hadley of Peterboro, P. M. of N. H. State Grange. 

Piano Duet, Misses May Pierce and Alice Whitcomb. 

Addresses, by Wesley Adams and Mrs. M. N. Adams of Derry, Master 
and Ceres of the N. H. State Grange, and George B. Drake 
of Manchester, Secretary State Grange. 

Farce, — Scarlet Bonnet — Characters, Mrs. Hattie Pierce, Mrs. Catherine 
Cady, Mrs. Delia Hall, Miss Blanche Hall, Miss Lila Barnaby 
and Miss May Pierce. 

In Memoriam, Mrs. Alice Kendall. 

Letter of Andrew D. Rockwood of Chico, Cal., read by Miss Blanche Hall. 

Dutch Selection, William J. Bailey. 

Supper was served in the banquet hall from 6:30 to 7:30 

At 8 o'clock the following program was presented: 

Piano Duet, Misses May Pierce and Alice Whitcomb. 

Song, Mrs. Maud Greeley and Miss Ethel Taylor. 

Piano Solo, Miss May Pierce. 

Song, Velma Taylor. 

Recitation, Miss Mattie Kent. 

Piano Solo, Miss Alice Whitcomb. 

Piano duet, Misses May Pierce and Alice Whitcomb. 

Coon song. Edward Taylor and Wallace Jenness. 

Original sketch, written by A. Starr Barnaby. A. Starr Barnaby and Wal- 
lace Jenness. 

Marching and dancing followed, which closed the exercises of the twentieth 
Grange Anniversary." 

1894. At the November town meeting, Orville D. Fessenden pre- 
sented the town with an ebony gavel suitably inscribed, to be used by the 

moderator at town and school meetings. 

The Brookline Improvement Company. 

1896. This company was incorporated March 2, of this year. The 
company owed its existence to the Brookline Board of Trade, which had 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 383 

been organized the previous year; but which, by the organization of the 
Improvement Company, ceased to exist as an independent organization, 
and became merged into the latter company. 

The company, as set forth in its articles of association, was formed 
— "To promote the growth and prosperity of the town." 

The names of its original members were as follows : Walter F. Rock- 
wood, Frank L. Willoby, Charles W. Smith, Orville D. Fessenden, Samuel 
Swett, Imla M. Williams, Charles W. Currier, Charles L. Willoby, Henry 
G. Shattuck, George H. Nye, Edward C. Tucker, Herbert S. Corey. 

By the terms of its charter, its capital stock was fixed at three thous- 
and dollars, divided into 120 shares, at a par value of twenty-five dollars 
each. 

On the twenty-second day of January of this year the company held 
its first meeting for the organization under its charter, and elected its first 
board of officers, consisting of a president, vice-president, treasurer, 
secretary and three directors. 

The board of directors was constituted as follows: Albert W. Corey, 
Charles S. Dunbar and Frank L Willoby. 

May 1, 1897, the company made its first annual return to the Secre- 
tary of State as follows : 

"Capital stock authorized, $3000 00 

No. of shares issued, 62 

Par value of shares, 25 00 

Paid in, 1550 00 

Debts due company, 37 50 

Debts due from company 550 00 

Amount of property, including real and 

personal estate, 2350 00" 

Soon after its organization, the company purchased a tract of land 
located on the south side of Bond street and adjacent to the railroad track 
upon which it erected a commodious one story wooden building and in- 
stalled therein an engine. This building when completed was rented to 
John Ridge of Nashua. Mr. Ridge took immediate possession of the 
premises and commenced the business of manufacturing horse shoe files, 
under a patent which he claimed to own, or to have the right to use. 

For several years following the business was carried on with indiffer- 
ent success. Then trouble came. Certain parties in Boston, Mass., set 
up a claim of priority of rights of ownership in Mr. Ridge's patent, and 



384 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

instituted proceedings to deprive him both of the patent and the right to 
use the same. Mr. Ridge opposed the suit, but in the end was compelled 
to surrender his claim both to the patent and its use; soon after which he 
closed out his business and left town. 

With Mr. Ridge's departure the company's plant was closed down 
never to be re-opened. Its building remained unoccupied until Nov. 15, 
1903; at which date it was sold to the New England Type Company. With 
this sale the company closed out its affairs and ceased to exist. 

The New England Type Factory. 

1897. This company established its plant in Brookline during this 
year, coming here from Boston, Mass., where it was originated by Harry 
and Henry Marshall, brothers, soon after the close of the Civil War. Its 
business was the manufacture of wooden printing type. At the time of 
its location in this town, it was said to be, with one exception the only 
company of its kind in the United States. 

For several years after coming to Brookline the company conducted 
its operations in a small building located on the east side of the highway 
to Milford about one mile north of the village. In the month of April, 
1899, Henry Marshall sold his interests in the plant to his brother Harry, 
who from that time forward until the company ceased to exist, carried on 
the business alone ; Henry Marshall having in the meantime acted as the 
company's agent until his death, which occurred in 1907. 

Nov. 13, 1903, the company purchased the factory building of the 
Brookline Improvement Company located on Bond street in the village, 
and soon after its purchase moved into and established its plant in the 
same. 

During the last few years of its existence, the company, in addition to 
its regular business, engaged somewhat extensively in the manufacture of 
children's toys, and also of various kinds of wooden implements. 

From the date of the establishment of the plant in Brookline, the 
company's business prospered; and it was constantly and steadily improv- 
ing when, at noon time on the 19th day of November, 1909, its factory 
with its contents, was destroyed by fire caused by a spark from a loco- 
motive of the Boston and Maine railroad company. 

At the present time, (1914) the factory has not been rebuilt, and the 
business, like many another of the town's enterprises in the past, has van- 
ished in the smoke of the flames by which it was destroyed, apparently 
never to return. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 385 

July 17, the Congregational Church was struck by lightning. The 
Bolt tore off one of the faces of the clock on its tower, and then passed 
into the interior of the house; where it raised havoc with the steel ceilings, 
walls and furniture; causing damages to the extent of several hundreds of 
dollars. 

1898. March 8, the town voted to remove the public library into the 
Grammar schoolhouse on Milford street. 

June 5, the John Sanders house and the barber's shop connected with 
the same were destroyed by fire. 

1899. March 14, the town voted to buy a new hearse at an expense 
not exceeding five hundred dollars; and elected Charles S. Dunbar, Walter 
F. Rockwood and Charles E. Shattuck as a committee to purchase the 
same. 

The Murder of Adelbert Parker. 

On the night of Sunday, September 28, of this year, near the midnight 
hour, occurred the first and so far as is known the only murder ever com- 
mitted in this town. The scene of the murder was in the old dwelling 
house known as the Lemuel Hall place, located on the east side of the high- 
way to Oak Hill in Pepperell, Mass., and about two miles south of Brook- 
line Village. 

The murderer's name was Frank Worby. His victim was Adelbert 
Parker; a native of, and at the time of his death a resident in, Pepperell, 
Mass. ; a young man of excellent family and up to the time of this event of 
good reputation. 

Worby, who was a mulatto, was a comparative stranger in this town; 
he having resided here but a short time when the murder was committed. 
His reputation was bad. He was reputed to be a horse thief, and known 
to be an ex-state prison convict. For about two months preceding his 
brutal act, he had occupied the premises in question for the purpose of 
carrying on a road-house; which under his management had acquired an 
evil reputation. 

On the night of the murder the house was visited by a party of young 
men from Oak Hill, among whom was the murdered man. In addition to 
the party from Oak Hill, there were present also other young men; the 
loafers and idlers usually found about such places. As the evening wore 
on the entire party indulged in intoxicating drinks; and with the usual 
results. About midnight Parker and Worby became embroiled in an angry 
dispute over a female inmate of the house, and finally came to blows and 



386 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

clinched. They were separated by the bystanders, and Worby passed out 
of the room into an adjoining bed-room ; from which, however, he immedi- 
ately returned with a loaded revolver with which he shot and killed Parker 
in his tracks. 

Immediately after committing the murder, Worby disappeared. For 
several days subsequently the county and town authorities made diligent 
but unsuccessful search for him. He was finally located in Lee; where, 
having in the meantime added the crime of bigamy to his list, he completed 
his criminal record before he could be arrested, by committing suicide. 

Old Home Week — Celebrations of. 

Old Home Week was first observed in New Hampshire; where it was 
instituted in 1899 by Governor Edward W. Rollins. Gov. Rollins' idea 
was to make it a carnival week. A week when every native born son and 
daughter of the State should return to the place of his or her nativity and 
— "See what he or she could do to assist in improving and beautifying the 
place and its general uplifting and upbuilding." 

The idea* met with immediate success. The week's first celebration in 
1899 was formally observed by about fifty of the cities and towns of the 
State, among which number was Brookline. 

For the three first years, 1899, 1900 and 1901, the celebration in 
Brookline was confined to the holding of basket picnics at the grove on 
the shore of Muscatanipus lake. These picnics were attended by the citi- 
zens generally, and to some extent by its sons and daughters from abroad. 

But the town's first general and elaborate celebration of the events 
occurred in 1902; when an entire week, commencing Saturday, August 16 
and ending August 23, was devoted to its observance. 

The week was ushered in and closed by special religious services. On 
the evening before the opening day of the festival, bon-fires were lighted 
on the hill-tops — Big Muscatanipus hill being especially noticeable for its 
huge cap of flame, — and by the ringing of the church bells. During the 
week, the streets, public buildings, and many of the dwelling houses were 
decorated with the national colors. Hundreds of the towns' absent sons 
and daughters returned to their old homes, and many of them remained 
throughout the week. 

The exercises for the week were planned and carried out under the 
supervision of an association of citizens known as "The Brookline Old 
Home Week Association" ; of which the officers were as follows : President, 
Clarence R. Russell; vice-presidents, OrvilleD. Fessenden and Rev. H. E. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 387 

Coville; secretary, Mrs. Ella W. Tucker; treasurer, Albert W. Corey; ex- 
ecutive committee, Dr. Charles H. Holcomb, Frank L. Willoby, Samuel 
Swett. 

Friday, August 22, was observed as Old Home Day. Music for the 
occasion was furnished by the Ashby, Mass., Band. 

The reception committee consisted of David S. Fessenden, Charles E. 
vShattuck, Mr. and Mrs. Walter F. Rockwood, Mr. and Mrs. Edward E- 
Parker, Mr. and Mrs. Edward C. Tucker, Mr. and Mrs. Charles S. Dun- 
bar, Miss Myrtie L. Shattuck, Mr. and Mrs. Alpha A. Hall, Mr. and Mrs. 
Samuel Swett and Mr. and Mrs. Clarence R. Russell. 

The literary part of the day's programme occurred at eleven o'clock 
A. M. in the auditorium of the Congregational church. The meeting was 
called to order by Clarence R. Russell, president of the day. The order of 
exercises was as follows: 

Prayer, Rev. H. E- Covell. 

Selection, Band. 

Selection, Choir. 

Address of welcome, Clarence R. Russell. 

Song, Choir. 
Oration, Judge Edward E. Parker 

Song, Choir. 

At the close of the exercises in the church, the audience formed in 
procession and, led by the band, marched to Tarbell's hall, where dinner 
was served to over four hundred guests. The dinner was followed by post 
prandial exercises ; during which brief addresses were delivered by citizens, 
invited guests, and old residents of the town. 

The afternoon was devoted to family and other reunions, and to ath- 
letic games for the young folks. The day closed with fire-works, and a 
grand reunion and ball in Tarbell's hall in the. evening. 

During each of the years succeeding 1902, up to and including the 
year 1909, the town continued its annual observance of the week. In 
1910, its observance was omitted. Its omission, however, was not the 
result of any dimunition of interest and enthusiasm either on the part 
of the citizens or that of the outside public. For as to the former, they 
were fully sensible of the benefits which had accrued to the town from its 
observance in the past, and equally desirous of its continuance in the fu- 
ture ; and as to the latter, its interest was exemplified from the fact that 
the attendance of strangers at the Old Home Day exercises of the previous 
year had been fully equal to that of any similar occasion in the past. 



388 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

The omission was owing, rather, to the fact that the care and labor 
of preparing for the celebration, which, (as is apt to be the case in such 
affairs), had devolved upon the few rather than the many, began to wear 
upon those upon whom the burden fell ; and, also, of the apparent danger 
that the week, from its continued annual observance, would eventually 
lapse into something in the nature of a — "Continuous Performance," and 
thereby lose its significance and attractiveness. It was therefore decided 
by the Association and the majority of the citizens that celebrations of 
Old Home Week in the future should occur biennially rather than annually. 

The following are the names of the officers of The Old Home Week 
Association and the programmes of the Old Home Day exercises for each 
year from 1903 to 1909 inclusive. 

1903. President, Clarence R. Russell vice-presidents, Orville D. Fes- 
senden, Rev. George A. Bennett; secretary, Mrs. Ella W.Tucker; treasurer, 
Samuel Swett; executive committee, Albert W. Corey, Frank L. Willoby, 
Frank P. Kennedy, John F. Hutchingson. 

Old Home Day Exercises, Friday August 21. 

Invocation, Rev. George A. Bennett. 

Song, Choir. 

Address of Welcome, Clarence R. Russell. 

Oration, Hon. John F. Hutchingson, Lexington, Mass. 

Dinner, Tarbell's Hall. 

Reunion and Ball in the evening. 

1904. 
President, Clarence R. Russell, Esq. ; vice-presidents, Alpha A. Hall, 
Rev. George A. Bennett; secretary, Mrs. Ella W. Tucker; treasurer, Sam- 
uel Swett; executive committee, Frank P. Willoby, Frank P. Kennedy, 
Walter F. Rockwood. 

Old Home Day Exercises, August 26. 

9:30 A. M. Concert by the Ashby, Mass., Band. 
11 :00 A. M. At the Congregational Church; 
Selection, Band. 

Invocation, Rev. George A. Bennett. 

Address of Welcome, Clarence R. Russell, Esq. 

Response, Morton A. Klein. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 389 

Song, Choir. 

Oration, Rev. George L. Perin, D. D. of Boston, Mass. 

Song, Choir. 

Poem, Hon. Edward E. Parker. 
Song, 

12:30 P. M. Dinner, Tarbell's Hall, followed by remarks. 

3:00 P.M. Ball Game. 

5:00 P.M. Band Concert. 

8:00 P. M. Reunion and Ball in Tarbell's Hall. 

POEM. 

Brookline's Welcome Home. 

By HON. EDWARD E. PARKER 

Once more old Brookline welcomes home her erstwhile sons and daughters 

Who left her pleasant home-farms in the happy long ago: 
And joys to hear their voices, like the sound of many waters, 

Resounding o'er her hillsides as with faces all aglow 
They tread once more their native soil, and breathe the crystal air 

Which sweeps above its wooded heights and o'er its verdant meadows, 
Just as they did in childhood days, when, free from doubt and care, 

Life's pathway wound its sunny course through scenes undimmed by shadows. 

The times have changed since we went forth; the old familiar faces 

Of those we knew in other days have passed away forever; 
And strangers now perform the task, and fill the vacant places 
Where we and ours in days of yore were wonted to foregather. 
Full many a vacant cellar-hole, by clambering vines concealed, 

Now serves to mark the spot where once a modest farm-house stood, 
Whose inmates, in their simple lives and daily walks, revealed 
The sacredness of family ties and human brotherhood. 

And yet, in spite of time or change, our minds, in freedom ranging 

Above this sordid present life, its cares, its hopes, its charms, 
To where on memory's wall engraved, unchanged and aye unchanging, 

Are limned the pristine glories of those now deserted farms, 
While gazing on its varied scenes, unite in true thanksgiving 

That in our hearts we feel once more the glow of home-love fires, 
And ken that earth affords no spot where life is worth the living, 

To be compared with that where first we learned to lisp our prayers. 

The homestead roof, the homestead walls, 'neath Time's rude touch decaying, 

May fall in ruins, and the winds in wild derision sweep 
O'er its deserted barren greens, where, in our childhood's playing, 

We woke on Rament's rocky sides the echoes long and deep; 
The rains may beat, the snows may fall upon it, and, untrammelled 



390 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

By sentiments of love or fear, the strangers feet may tread 
Its sacred soil, but still, like scenes on ancient walls impanelled, 
Our hearts will bear its impress 'till we're numbered with the dead. 

Now, as of old, on rainy days, the mist-clouds, lightly dancing 

Before the east wind's humid breath, sail o'er the river's tide; 
Or, at the twilight's peaceful hour, in ghostly ranks advancing. 

Move upwards from the meads which skirt Potanapo's steep side; 
Until, beneath their envious folds, the village, disappearing, 

Is lost to sight, and in its place a sea of snowy foam. 
Through which gigantic forms move on like ships at sea, each steering 

Its course to where in radiance glow the beacon-lights of home. 

Still on the maple's topmost bough, in sweet abandon swinging, 

The robin trills his welcome to the coming of the dawn; 
E'er yet the night in tardy flight its westward course is winging, 

Or morning's whispering winds have kissed the tassels of the corn; 
And at the midnight's solemn hour, like cloistered monks intoning 

Their liturgies, among the pines resound the wind-harps' strains; 
The same as when in childhood days, their magic influence owning, 

Unconsciously we passed into the dream-god's weird domains. 

At sunset hour, departing day, its flaunting banners streaming 

High o'er the western mountain-tops, lights up with radiant glow 
The upland fields, the lakes and streams, whose light, reflected, gleaming 

In softened radiance, illumes the village far below; 
And, as the daylight softly fades into the shadowy gloaming, 

In plaintive notes the whippoorwill his song insistent sings, 
And through the gloom the swallows make their evening flights of homing, 

'Till softly o'er the sleepy town Night spreads her drowsy wings. 

Still o'er the surface of the pond the west-wind, blithely sweeping, 

Impels the rippling waves to break in music on the shore; 
And o'er its moonlit surface rings, in song or joyous greeting, 

The merry voices of the crews who ply the flashing oar. 
And still the boisterous winter winds, on angry pinions rushing, 

Sweep round the corners of the house with weird and mournful wails, 
The summer showers dance on the roofs, and summer roses, blushing, 

Bloom in the wayside hedge, and shed their fragrance on the gales. 

These are the scenes which Memory shows, responsive to our gazing 

Upon her pictured walls; and which, in rolling years to come, 
As in the past, whate'er of Fortune's gifts our future lives is phazing, 

Will draw as magnets draw the steel, our wandering foot-steps home. 
The vacant chairs, the darkened hearths, the vanished friends now sleeping. 

Beneath the flowers which bud and bloom on hillside and on plain, 
Though silent, in their silences continually are speaking, 

In tones which thrill our hearts, the words — "Come home, come home again!" 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 391 

1905. 

President, Dr. Charles H. Holcombe; vice-presidents, Alpha A. Hall, 
Esq., Rev. George A. Bennett; secretary, Mrs. Ella W. Tucker; treasurer; 
Samuel Swett; executive committee, Frank P. Kennedy, Walter F. Rock- 
wood, George H. Nye. 

Old Home Day Exercises, August 24. 

11 :00 A. M. At the Congregational Church; 

Invocation, Rev. George A. Bennett. 

vSelection, Band. 

Song, Choir. 

Address of Welcome, Dr. Charles H. Holcombe. 

Address, John H. Klein. 

Song, Choir. 

Oration, Hon. Edward E. Parker. 

12:30 P. M. Dinner at Tarbell's Hall. 
5:00 P.M. Concert New Ipswich Band. 
8:00 P. M. Reunion and Ball at Tarbell's Hall. 

1906. 

President, David S. Fessenden; vice-presidents, Rev. George A. Ben- 
net, Frank H. Jenness; secretary, Mrs. Ella W. Tucker; treasurer Samuel 
Swett; executive committee, John B. Hardy, Walter E- Corey, Albert T. 
Pierce. 

Old Home Day Exercises, August 24. 

9 :30 A. M. Concert by the Laurel Band of Milford. 
11:00 A. M. At the Congregational Church: 

Selection, Band. 

Invocation, Rev. George A. Bennett. 

Address of Welcome, Mrs. Clara E. Russell. 

Response, James A. Horton. 

Song, Quartette. 

Oration. Dr. Charles H. Holcombe. 

Song, Quartette. 

Selection, . Band. 



392 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

12:30 P. M. Dinner in Tarbell's Hall. 

3:00 P. M. Ball Game, Pepperell vs. Milford. 

5:00 P.M. Band Concert. 

8:00 P. M. Reunion and Ball, Tarbell's Hall. 

1907. 

President, Frank H. Jenness; vice-presidents, Rev. George A. Bennett, 
George H. Nye; secretary, Mrs. Ella W. Tucker; treasurer, »Samuel Swett; 
executive committee, Walter E. Corey, Albert T. Pierce, Francis H. 
Lawrence. 

Old Home Day Exercises, August 23. 

9:30 A. M. Concert by the Ashby Band of Ashby, Mass. 
11:00 A. M. At the Congregational Church: 
Selection, Band. 

Invocation, Rev. George A. Bennett. 

Greeting, Frank H. Jenness. 

Address of Welcome, D. Wallace Jenness. 

Response, Mrs. Mabel Tucker Badger. 

Vocal Solo, Mrs. Phoebe Jenness Randall. 

Oration, Rev. Frank D. Sargent. 

Vocal Solo, R. Cassius Nye. 

Selection, Band. 

12:30 P. M. Dinner at Tarbell's Hall, followed by toasts and re- 
marks by former residents. 

3:00 P. M. Base Ball Game, Townsend vs. Pepperell. 

5:00 P. M. Band Concert. 

8:00 P. M. Reunion and Ball, Tarbell's Hall. 

1908. 

President, Frank H. Jenness; vice-presidents, George H. Nye, Frank 
P. Kennedy; secretary, Mrs. Ella W. Tucker; treasurer, Samuel Swett; 
executive committee, Edward C. Tucker, Fred E. Rockwood, H. Arthur 
Brown. 

Old Home Day Exercises, August 21. 

9 :30 A. M. Concert by the Ashby Band, Ashby, Mass. 
11 :00 A. M. At the Congregational Church. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



393 



Selection, 

Invocation, 

Selection, 

Welcome, 

Response, 

Selection. 

Oration, 

Selection, 

Selection, 

12:30 P. M. 
remarks. 

2:00 P. M. 

3:00 P. M. 

5:00 P. M. 

8:00 P. M. 



Band. 

Rev. George A. Bennett. 

Appleton Quartet, Boston, Mass. 

Frank H. Jenness. 

Alfred J. Cox. 

Appleton Quartet. 

Rev. Charles W. Dockrill. 

Appleton Quartet. 

Band. 

Dinner at Tarbell's Hall, followed by brief toasts and 



Athletic Sports. 

Base Ball Game, Brookline 1898 vs. Brookline 1908. 
Band Concert. 

Reunion and Ball at Tarbell's Hall. 
Sunday, August 16, Union Services in the Methodist Church; sermon 
by Rev. Arthur M. Shattuck, East Rochester. 

Sunday, August 23, Union Service in the Congregational Church; 
sermon by the Rev. George L. Perin, D. D., of Brookline, Mass. 



1909. 



President, George H. Nye; vice-presidents, Fred A. Hall, William J. 
Bailey; secretary, Blanche W. Hall; treasurer, Harry Marshall; executive 
committee, Mrs. Jennie Boutelle, Frank E- Gilman. 



Old Home Day Exercises, August 27. 



9:30 A. 


M. 


Concert by the Lunenburg Military Band of Lunenburg 


Mass. 






10:30 A. 


M. 


Ball Game, Local Teams. 


11:00 A. 


M. 


At the Congregational Church: 


Selection, 




Band. 


Invocation, 




Rev. Warren L. Noyes. 


Selection, 




Mrs. Phoebe Jenness Randall. 


Welcome, 




George H. Nye. 


Response, 




Miss Ellen C. Sawtelle. 


Selection, 




Mrs. Mabel Brackett and Mrs. W. S. Bickford. 


Oration, 




Rev. Herbert J. Foote. 


Selection, 




Band. 



394 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

12:30 P. M. Dinner, Tarbell's Hall. 
2:00 P.M. Base Ball Game. 
4:30 P. M. Band Concert. 
7 :30 P. M. Fire works. 
8:00 P. M. Reunion at Tarbell's Hall. 
Sunday, Aug. 22, Union Service at Congregational Church ; sermon by 
Rev. Warren L. Noyes. 

Sunday, Aug. 29, Union Service at Methodist Church ; sermon by Rev. 
Elwin Hitchcock of Keene. 

1913. 

President, George H. Nye; vice-president, Homer A. Brown; treasurer, 
Walter E. Corey; secretary, Alfred S. Barnaby; executive committee, Ed- 
win H. Taylor, Delbert W. Porter, Edward O'Hern. 

Old Home Day Exercises, August 29. 

Forenoon. 

9:00 Concert by the Townsend Brass Band of Townsend Mass. 

9 :30 Ball Game by Local Teams. 
At Daniels Academy Building : 
Selection, Band. 

Invocation, Rev. Warren U. Noyes. 

Song, Roswell C. Nye. 

Greeting, President George H. Nye. 

Response, Precival Betterly. 

Music, Welcome Song, Quartette. 

Oration, Fred Fessenden. Newton, Mass. 

Address, Rev. George H. Hardy. 

Selection, Band. 

Reading, Mrs. Mabel Perkins. 

Dedication Speech, Hon. Herbert F. Parker of Worcester, Mass. 

Selection, Band. 

Afternoon. 

12:15 Dinner in Banquet Hall. 

2 :00 Ball Game, Milford Camera Club vs. Townsend A. A. 
4:00 Sports. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 395 

4:45 Automobile Parade. 
5 :00 Concert by the Band. 
Evening. Concert and Ball. 

Sunday, August 24, Union Service at Methodist church; sermon by 
Rev. C. W. Dockrill. 

Sunday, August 31, Union Service at Congregational church; sermon 
by Rev. F. D. Sargent. 

1900. The Orville D. Fessenden Steam Sawmill. 

This mill is owned by Orville D. Fessenden, by whom it was erected 
in 1900. It is located in South Brookline on the west side of the highway 
leading from Brookline, to Townsend, Mass., a few rods south of the 
bridge in said highway over the Nissitisset river, and is operated by Mr. 
Fessenden in connection with his business as a wholesale manufacturer and 
dealer in lumber and barrels. As its name indicates, the mill is, and from 
the beginning has been, operated by steam power. 

In the fall of 1913 its old engine was replaced by a new Rollins engine 
of one hundred and twenty-five horse power, and at the same time a new 
engine house was constructed and the mill building reconstructed and re- 
modelled. In addition to the mill proper, the establishment has connected 
with it a blacksmith and repair shop, a large and commodious office build- 
ing, a water plant, which furnishes it with an abundant supply of running 
water, and an electric lighting plant. To the water and electric plants con- 
nected with this mill the village in Brookline is indebted for the systems by 
which, through the characteristic enterprise of Mr. Fessenden, its streets, 
public buildings and many of its dwelling houses are supplied with running 
water and electric lights; the water system having been established by Mr. 
Fessenden as a private enterprise on his part in 1913; and the electric light- 
ing having been introduced under a contract between him and the town 
authorities in 1914. 

In connection with Mr. Fessenden's plant in Brookline he also owns 
and operates a plant for the manufacture of barrels in North Acton, Mass. 
and in Harvard, Mass. 

At the present time, (1914), Mr. Fessenden's business in each of its 
branches is in a prosperous condition, and its operations, which cover a 
large territory, are constantly being enlarged and extended. 

1900. March 17, the town accepted a legacy of three hundred dollars 
from the estate of James Carlton Parker; the income to be used for the 
perpetual care of his family lot in the south cemetery. 



396 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

The Great Freshet in the Spring of 1900. 

In the spring of this year, the Nissitisset river experienced one of the 
heaviest freshets known in its history within the memory of living men. 
It waters, swollen by heavy rains and melting snows, overflowed its banks 
and inundated the adjacent fields and meadows, inflicting considerable 
damage. The iron bridge over the river at Bond street and its abutments 
were damaged to the extent that it required the expenditure of several 
hundred dollars to restore them to their condition before the flood. 

November 6, the town voted to accept a legacy of one hundred dollars 
from the estate of Mrs. Harriet Gilson; the income to be used for the per- 
petual care of the family lot in the south cemetery. 

1901. June 25, the dwelling house of Thomas O. Heren, (formerly 
known as the Rev. Daniel Goodwin house), located on the east side of the 
main highway to Milford, about one mile north of the village, was totally 
destroyed by fire. 

At the March town meeting the town voted to purchase the Albert 
T. Pierce lot on the east side of Main street west of and adjacent to the 
Post Office, for the sum of five hundred dollars. The purchase was effected 
in the summer following. 

1903. February 18, the dwelling house of Mrs. Emma S. Dunbar, 
located one mile west of the village on the west side of the highway to 
Mason was burned down. 

1905. March 14, the town voted to accept a legacy of one hundred 
dollars from the estate of Imla M. Williams; the income from the same to 
be used for the perpetual care of the family lot in the south cemetery. 

State Roads. 

This year, at its March town meeting, the town made its first appro- 
priation under the law providing for the building of State roads; which 
was passed at the January session of the legislature of the same year. The 
amount appropriated was four hundred and twenty-four and 50-100 
dollars. To this amount the State added two hundred and fifty-four and 
40-100 dollars, as provided for under the provisions of the law; making 
the whole amount in the town's hands for use in building the contemplated 
highway six hundred and seventy-four and 90-100 dollars ($674.90). For 
some reason to the writer unknown, no portion of this sum was expended 
that vear. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 397 

The following year, 1906, the town made an additional appropriation 
in the sum of four hundred and thirty-six and 50-100 dollars; to which 
amount the State added the sum of two hundred and sixty-one and 60-100 
dollars; making the entire amount raised for the State road in that year 
six hundred and ninety-eight and 10-100 dollars. 

This sum added to the amount of the appropriation of the previous 
year, placed the town in possession of thirteen hundred and seventy-seven 
dollars ($1377.00) for use in building the contemplated road; 
to which amount should be added ten and 40-100 dollars, making 
the entire amount of the State road fund thirteen hundred and eighty- 
seven and 40-100 dollars ($1387.40). 

With this amount available for use, the town, in the summer of 1906, 
constructed its first section of State road. The road commenced at a point 
in the Milford highway nearly opposite the Congregational church, and, 
following the highway in a northerly direction, ended a short distance 
north of the dwelling house of Dr. Charles H. Holcombe. Its length from 
end to end was 3000 feet. The total cost of its construction was fourteen 
hundred and twenty-three and 39-100 dollars ($1423.39). An average 
cost of four and 74-100 dollars per lineal foot. For each of the three years 
immediately succeeding 1906, the town made appropriations for and con- 
structed sections of State road as follows : 

1907. Road from the brow of the hill in the Townsend highway west 
of the south cemetery down to and across the bridge over the river near 
the dwelling house of David S. Fessenden in South Brookline. The con- 
struction of this section of road included the raising of said bridge several 
feet above its former level. 

1908. Road in the highway to Pepperell, Mass., beginning on the 
brow of the hill in the same a few rods west of the point where it is crossed 
by the Rocky Pond brook, and extending to the brow of the hill in the same 
a few rods east of said bridge. 

1909. Road in the highway to Mason beginning on the brow of 
Meeting-house hill on its south side, and, passing southerly, ending at its 
base, at its intersection by Bond street. The combined length of these 
four sections was 7000 running feet; the total cost of their construction 
three thousand nine hundred dollars and eighty-nine cents. ($3900.89). 

1906. March 13, the town voted to print a history of the town, pro- 
viding the printing of the same should not cost over five hundred dollars; 
and subsequently the selectmen appointed Clarence R. Russell, Samuel 
Swett, Eddie S. Whitcomb, Edward C. Tucker, John B. Hardy and David 
S. Fessenden as a committee to superintend the work of its publication. 



398 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

September 2, the dwelling houses of J. Alonzo Hall and Joseph Hall, 
located respectively on the west and east sides of the highway to Mason 
about one mile west of the Congregational church, were destroyed by fire. 

1907. March 12, at the annual March town meeting, the following 
votes were passed: 

"To accept a legacy of one hundred dollars from the estate of Mrs. 
Eliza D. Dodge, late of Worcester, Mass.,; the income of the same to be 
used for the perpetual care of the grave of her father, John Daniels, in the 
Pond Cemetery." 

"To accept a legacy of one hundred dollars from James A. Horton of 
Greenfield, Mass.; the income of the same to be used for the perpetual 
care of his family lot in the South Cemetery." 

"To raise twenty-five dollars for the destruction of Brown Tail Moths." 

"To buy a new hearse and raise six hundred dollars to pay for the 
same, and that the selectmen be a committee of three to purchase it." 

"To take a new valuation of the personal and real estate, and that the 
selectmen with Willie A. Hobart and Elmer W. Wallace take the same." 

Brown Tail Moths. 

These pests appeared for the first time in Brookline in the summer of 
1905. The foregoing recorded vote of March 13, 1906, was the first action 
on the part of the town relative to their extermination. In the following 
year, 1907, the State passed an act to provide for the suppression of the 
Gipsy and Brown Tail Moths. From the time of the passage of the act, 
this town, acting under its provisions, continued to make annual appro- 
priations for the moth's extermination; but expended them in conjunction 
with the sums of money appropriated by the State for the same purpose in 
paying the State's agents for doing the work. At the present time (1914) 
the work of extermination is still going on; but with apparently little de- 
crease in the amount of damage done by the pests. 

1908. During this year the town purchased the hearse in use at the 
present time (1914) at a cost of five hundred and fifty-five dollars and 
fifty-six cents. ($555,56) . 

During this year also, the committee elected for the purpose at the 
annual March meeting of the previous year proceeded to take a valuation 
of the town's real and personal estate; which was found to be three hun- 
dred and forty-four thousand five hundred and fifty-two dollars ($344,552). 

March 10, at its annual town meeting, the town passed the following 
votes : 




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HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 399 

"To accept a legacy of three hundred dollars from the estate of Emily 
M. Peterson; the income to be used for the perpetual care of the family 
lot in the South Cemetery." 

"To accept a legacy of one hundred dollars from Miss Eliza Jane 
Parker; the income of the same to be expended for the perpetual care of 
the family lot of Joseph A. Putnam in the South Cemetery." 

"To accept a legacy of one hundred dollars from Miss Martha E. 
Perkins; the income of the same to be used for the perpetual care of her 
family lot in the South Cemetery." 

The Brookline Public Park. 

1909. This tract of land was conveyed to the town by Clarence R. 
Russell, Orville D. Fessenden, Samuel Swett and Walter E. Corey, by 
their deed of gift dated March 4th of this year. It was accepted by the 
town by a vote of its citizens at its annual town meeting in March of the 
same year; at which meeting, also, the said donors were elected as the first 
board of Park Trustees, their term of office to be five years from the date 
of their election. 

The idea of establishing the Park originated with Clarence R. Russell, 
and it was largely due to his efforts that the idea was carried into effect. 

The Park consists of a tract of about eight acres of land located on 
the east side of the highway to Milford about one eighth of a mile north of 
the Congregational church. By the terms of the deed of gift the control 
and management of the Park is wholly in the hands of the legal voters of 
the town. 

1910. March 8, the town voted to accept a legacy of one hundred 
dollars from Bertha Hutchinson; the income of the same to be expended 
for the perpetual care of her family lot in the South Cemetery. 

The Burning of the "Beehive." 

On the morning of January 29, the dwelling house known as the "Bee- 
hive," located on the west side of the highway to Mason about midway of 
the east side of Meeting-house Hill was partially destroyed by fire. While 
the fire was in progress it was ascertained that Edward O. Brien and John 
Powers, both of Milford, employees of the Fresh Pond Ice Company and 
roomers in the house, were within the house. Upon the discovery of this 
fact Oscar Elliott and Edward O. Heren, members of the local fire engine 
company, voluntarily entered the burning building and at the risk of their 



400 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

lives rescued the imperilled men; an act of heroism unparalleled in the 
history of this town. The rescued men, however, were so badly injured by 
the smoke and flames that they survived their injuries but a short time, 
each dying within a few weeks after their rescue. 

This year Orville D. Fessenden installed the plant by which the village 
was for the first time in the town's history supplied with running water. 
At the present time (1914) the plant continues to be owned and managed 
by Mr. Fessenden. 

The Charles A. Blodgett Legacies. 

At the annual March meeting the town voted to accept a legacy of 
$100.00, from the estate of Charles A. Blodgett, the income to be used for 
the perpetual care of the family lot in the South Cemetery. 

1911. The town came into possession of $587.10 from the estate of 
Charles A. Blodgett; the same to be used towards building a town house. 

1912. Brookline was represented in the State Constitutional Con- 
vention of this year by Orville D. Fessenden. 

Electric Lights. 

1913. During this year Orville D. Fessenden installed in his mill in 
South Brookline an electric plant. Soon after the plant was completed 
Mr. Fessenden entered into a contract with the town authorities under the 
terms of which he agreed for a stipulated price to supply 
the Daniels Academy Building and such of the streets and highways as 
should be designated by the town with electric lights for a term of years. 
At the present time (1914) said contract is still in existence, and under 
its provisions, in addition to the Daniels Academy Building, the village 
streets and many of the highways of the town are nightly illuminated by 
electricity. 

Federation of the Congregational and Methodist Churches. 

1914. In the month of April the Congregational and Methodist 
churches entereed into a federation under the terms of which the two 
churches agreed for the future to unite in holding services for public wor- 
ship ; the meetings to be holden alternately in the respective houses of wor- 
ship of each church. The first meeting was holden in the Congregational 
meeting-house, Sunday, April 12, and was under the charge of the Rev. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 401 

Charles W. Dockrell, who was unanimously elected pastor of the confeder 
ated churches. 

April 15, David Fessenden died. 



402 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



CHAPTER XXII. 
The Daniels Academy Building. 

In 1908, Thomas H. Dodge of Worcester, Mass., by the terms of his 
will, which was admitted to probate in the fall of that year, made provisions 
for the establishment in Brookline of an academy for boys and girls; the 
same to be known as Daniels Academy, in honor of his wife, Eliza Daniels 
Dodge, who was a native of this town. 

The terms of the will under which the fund for establishing said 
Academy was provided were as follows: 
Extracts from the Will of Thomas H. Dodge 

"64th — I give and bequeath to the Worcester Trust Co. the sum of 
$15,000, in strict trust and confidence, however, as follows — 

"The said Trust company shall hold said sum of $15,000 and invest 
and reinvest the principal and income thereof for the term of 75 years from 
the date of my decease. 

"At the expiration of 75 years from the date of my decease, said trust 
company shall procure the formation of a corporation in the State of New 
Hampshire, for the purpose of establishing and maintaining an academy 
for both boys and girls, said academy to be located in the town of Brook- 
line, N. H., the birthplace of my beloved wife, Eliza D. Dodge, now de- 
ceased, which academy shall be known as Daniels Academy, with suitable 
provisions as to officers, their powers and duties for control, direction, 
conduct and administration of the corporation, and the care and manage- 
ment of the funds in its charge; and upon the legal formation and organi- 
zation of said corporation, my said trustee shall transfer to it all the 
property and estate then in its hands under this provision of trust, the 
same to be thereafter used and employed for the establishing and main- 
taining of such academy. 

"In the formation of said corporation, I hereby direct and request 
that provision shall be made for the selection of eight trustees as follows : 

"One by the selectmen of said Brookline, one by the Congregational 
church of said Brookline, one by the Methodist church of said Brookline, 
one by the selectmen of the town of Pepperell, one by the Congregational 
church of said Pepperell, one by the Congregational church of the town of 



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HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 403 

Hollis, N. H., one by the selectmen of said town of Hollis-, and one by the 
selectmen of Townsend, and that the mayor of the city of Nashua, N.H 
the city solicitor of said Nashua, the district attorney for Hillsboro county, 
New Hampshire, and the chairman of the selectmen of said Brookline, 
shall be ex-officio trustees of said academy, making twelve trustees in all. 

"I desire and direct that, if practicable, each of these trustees appoint- 
ed as above provided shall serve for a period of five years, and that the 
same officials having authority to appoint such trustees shall also have 
authority to fill any vacancies, meaning and intending that eight of the 
trustees of this corporation shall hold their positions by appointment, from 
time to time, by the officials above mentioned, and that such mayor, city 
solicitor, district attorney and chairman of selectmen shall act as trustees 
for the time being as they shall hold the respective offices. 

"In case I should not, by codicil to this my last will and testament, 
give some directions about the location of said academy building, I direct 
that said trustees shall select such location in the town of Brookline, as 
they shall deem best and proper for such academy." 

"67th — All the rest, residue and remainder of all my property and 
estate, real and personal, whatever the same may be, and wherever the 
same may be situated, I give devise and bequeath, as follows: 

"The same shall be divided into two equal parts, one of which parts 
is to be added to the $30,000 fund mentioned in the second clause of this 
will, and the other part thereof to be added to the $15,000 fund mentioned 
in the 64th clause of this will. 

"68th — I hereby constitute and appoint Rufus B. Dodge of said 
Worcester, to be the executor of this, my last will and testament." 

The citizens of Brookline were profoundly grateful to the founder of 
the academy for the honor conferred upon the town by its proposed lo- 
cation in their midst; an honor which they highly appreciated. 

But mingled with their feelings of gratitude, there was also a feeling 
of disappointment; arising from the fact that by the terms of the will it 
was stipulated that the fund devoted to the establishment of the Academy 
should be invested for a term of seventy-five years before it became avail- 
able for that purpose. 

To be sure, at the end of that period, the fund with its accumulated 
interest would have amounted to one and one-half million dollars, more 
or less. But, in the meantime, they, and the majority of their descend- 
ants in the second generation, would have gone to a land in which, so far 
as they knew, academies were unknown institutions, without having en- 
joyed in any degree the benefits which would have accrued to them and 



404 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

theirs by the immediate carrying out of the said provision of the will. And 
realizing the truth of the adage that — "A bird in the hand is worth two in 
the bush," they were disposed, if possible, to unite with others of the bene- 
ficiaries under the will who were reported as being dissatisfied with its pro- 
visions relating to their several interests in effecting a compromise in its 
terms which should be mutually satisfactory; an arrangement to which it 
was generally understood that all the interested parties were agreeable. 

Under these circumstances, the executor finally filed in the probate 
court of Worcester county, Mass., a petition in which the matters in 
question between the devisees and legatees under the will were submitted 
to its decision. 

After a period of two years, more or less, had elapsed, during which 
the interested parties were trying to arrive at an agreement, a compromise 
was finally effected ; and soon after its accomplishment, the same was filed 
in court. The court accepted and approved of its provisions and, soon 
after its approval, handed down a decree, the substance of which, so far 
as it related to the Daniels Academy fund, was as follows: 

Final Decree of the Court Relative to Daniels Academy Fund. 

'Fourth. The sixty-fourth paragraph in said instrument shall be 
modified and amended so that as so modified and amended, construed and 
executed, the same shall be of the tenor, form and effect as follows : 

"SIXTY-FOURTH: I give and bequeath to the Board of Select- 
men and the School Committee of the Town of Brookline in the State 
of New Hampshire, and their successors in office, the sum of FIFTEEN 
THOUSAND DOLLARS ($15,000.), in trust however, and not otherwise, 
for the following trusts and uses: 

"First. To expend an amount not exceeding said fifteen thousand 
dollars ($15,000.) for the purchase or acquisition, by gift or otherwise, of 
a proper site in said Town of Brookline, and for the erection thereon of a 
suitable building, to be designated and named The Daniels Academy 
Building, In Memory of Eliza D. Dodge, which said building shall pro- 
vide a room or rooms adequately furnished and equipped for the uses of 
the public schools of said Town of Brookline, and shall further contain a 
public hall, designed, constructed, furnished and equipped for the use of 
the citizens of said Town of Brookline, for educational, social and public 
purposes and meetings, together with a room or rooms in said building for 
the use of the public library of said Town, and for offices for the Town 
officials thereof. The said building, when so constructed, shall be con- 






HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 405 

veyed by the said trustees to, and shall become the property of the said 
Town of Brookline, to be by the said Town maintained for the purposes 
above set forth. 

"Second. Any excess or surplus remaining in the hands of the said 
trustees, after the disbursements above provided for the acquisition and 
construction and equipment of said site and building shall be held by the 
said trustees and their successors in said trust, and shall be maintained 
perpetually by them as a distinct and separate trust fund, to be known 
and designated as The Eliza D. Dodge School Fund and the said 
trustees shall annually present to the citizens of said Town of Brookline, 
in writing, an accurate statement and account of said fund, and the said 
trustees shall annually pay over to the School Committee of said Town, 
the annual net income of said fund for the use and benefit of the public 
schools of said Town. 

"SIXTH. The sixty-seventh section of said instrument shall be 
modified and amended so that as so modified, amended, construed and 
executed, the said section shall be of the tenor, form and effect as follows : 

"All the rest, residue and remainder of my property and estate, real 
and personal, whatever the same may be, and wherever the same may be 
situated, I give, devise and bequeath as follows : 

"The same shall be divided into two equal parts, one of which parts 
shall be paid over to the trustees mentioned in the second section of this 
instrument, as hereby modified and amended, for the purposes, uses, and 
upon the trusts therein set forth and specified; and the other part thereof 
shall be paid over to the trustees mentioned in the sixty-fourth section of 
this instrument, as hereby modified and amended, for the purposes, uses, 
and upon the trusts therein set forth and specified." 

The decree provided further, that RufusB. Dodge, as executor thereof , 
should "pay on account of costs, expenses of professional services, aris- 
ing from and on account of the controversy as to the probate of said will, 
and the settlement and adjustment thereof, and the agreement for com- 
promise thereof, all counsel fees." 

Herbert Parker, Esquire, of Boston, Mass., appeared in the case as 
counsel for the town of Brookline. 

The foregoing decree was dated Jan. 22, 1912. At the date of its be- 
ing rendered, the Board of Trustees of the Dodge fund consisted of George 
L. Dodge, David S. Fessenden and Lewellyn S. Powers, constituting the 
board of selectmen, and George H. Nye, Mrs. Nancy J. Daniels and Arthur 
A. Goss, constituting the board of education. Shortly after the date of the 



406 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

decree, the executor of the will paid over to the board of trustees the fif- 
teen thousand dollars building fund; and the board began to make prepa- 
rations for erecting the building. 

August 17, 1912, Mrs. Samuel Swett, by her deed of gift of that date, 
conveyed to the board of trustees the lot of land upon which the building 
was subsequently erected, in honor of the memory of her husband, Samuel 
Swett. Among other conditions mentioned in the deed was the following: 
"That the trustees shall prepare and install or cause to be prepared and 
installed, permanently in said building ,when the same is erected and com- 
pleted, a suitably inscribed tablet in honor of the memory of said Samuel 
Swett." The deed also provided, further, that in case the town should 
ever cease to use the land for the purpose for which it was conveyed, the 
same should revert to the donor and her heirs. 

The work of constructing the building was begun in the fall of 1912, 
soon after the date of Mrs. Swett's deed of the land to the trustees. The 
work was performed and the materials furnished by contract, under the 
supervision of the board of trustees; and was completed in the summer of 
1913. 

The cost of the plant, all told, amounted to the sum of about seven- 
teen thousand and five hundred dollars ; an excess of two thousand and five 
hundred dollars over and above the sum originally devoted to its establish- 
ment under the terms of the will. This excess resulted, principally, from the 
extra expense incurred by the trustees in grading the building lot; an opera- 
tion which the peculiar location of the lot made absolutely necessary. It 
was paid for by an appropriation raised by the town for that purpose. 

Soon after the completion of the building, Walter L. Parker, Esq., of 
Lowell, Mass., in honor of the memory of his father, William Harrison 
Parker, a native of Brookline, presented the town with the flag-staff, 
which at the present time is standing on its grounds, and, also, with 
a beautiful United States flag, to be used in connection with the staff. 

The beautiful and ornate clock which adorns the wall of the build- 
ing's auditorium, was presented to the town in the summer of 1914, by 
Miss Ellen C. Sawtelle, a native of Brookline. 

Dedication of the Daniels Academy Building. 

On Friday, the 29th day of August, 1913, the Daniels Academy Build- 
ing was dedicated with appropriate ceremonies to the public use. The dedi- 
catory ceremonies, which were in charge of officers of the Old Home Week 
Association for that year, were conducted in the hall of the Academy Build- 




HON. THOMAS H. DODGE 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 407 

ings, and were largely attended by citizens of the town and visitors from 
abroad. The programme of the exercises was as follows : 

Programme. 

Selection, Townsend, Mass., Brass Band. 

Invocation, Rev. Warren L. Noyes. 

Song, Mr. Roswell C. Nye. 

Greeting, George H. Nye, Pres. of the Day. 

Response, Mr. Percival Betterly, of Fitchburg, Mass. 

Music, Welcome Song, Quartette. 

Address, Rev. George H. Hardy, of Ashburnham, Mass. 

Selection, . Townsend, Mass., Brass Band. 

Reading, Mrs. Mabel Perkins. 

Dedication Address, Hon. Herbert L. Parker, Worcester, Mass. 

Selection, The Band. 



March 7, 1914, the board of trustees, in accordance with the terms of 
the will, conveyed the building fully completed and equipped, together 
with the land upon which it is located, to the town. At the date of said 
conveyance of the building, no part of the fund set apart under the terms 
of the will for its support and maintenance has as yet been received by 
the board of trustees; nor was the amount of said fund definitely known 
by them, the same remaining to be established by the decree of the pro- 
bate court for the county of Worcester, Mass., in which court the settle- 
ment of the Thomas H. Dodge estate was still pending. It is expected 
that the fund will amount to a sum of not less than forty-five thousand 
dollars. 

THOMAS H. and ELIZA DANIELS DODGE. 

Mrs. Eliza Daniels Dodge, in honor of whose memory, her husband, 
Thomas H. Dodge, late of Worcester, Mass., deceased, by his last will and 
testament, left to the town of Brookline a generous legacy for the purpose of 
erecting, supporting and maintaining the edifice at the present time stand- 
ing, and known as "Daniels Academy Building," was born at Brookline, 
February 6, 1822. 

She was the daughter of John and Bridget (Cummings) Daniels, and 
a grandchild of James McDaniels, one of the earliest settlers in this town; 
coming here from Groton, Mass., in 1743. Her grandfather, James Mc- 
Daniels, served as a soldier for Brookline in the War of the Revolution ; and, 



408 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

before and after the war, was classed among its prominent and influential 
citizens. On the maternal side of the house, she was a descendant in the 
eighth generation of Isaac Cummings of Ispwich, Mass., and a grand-child 
of Lieut. Benjamin Cummings of Hollis; who marched from Hollis as a 
private in the company of Capt. Reuben Dow at the Lexington Alarm, 
April 19, 1775, and was afterwards in the battle of Bunker Hill; and a 
grand-niece of Samuel and Prudence (Lawrence) Cummings of Hollis, 
whose daughter Prudence married David Wright and settled in Pepperell; 
Mass.,; where at the time of the Lexington alarm in 1775, she was the 
leader of a patriotic band of women who captured the notorious tory, 
Leonard Whiting, near Jewett's Bridge in that town. 

Her childhood and young womanhood were passed in Brookline, in 
whose district schools she was educated, and for which throughout her en- 
tire life she continued to manifest a firm and abiding love and affection. 

The name of "Daniels Academy Building" which is applied to the edi- 
fice in her memory standing here at the present time, probably had its 
origin in the fact of her original purpose of founding an academy in its 
place. 

She married, June 29, 1843, Thomas H. Dodge, a son of Malaichi and 
Jane (Hutchins) Dodge, and a native of Eden, Vermont; where he was 
born September 27, 1823. 

At the date of their marriage, Mr. Dodge was, and for many years 
had been, a resident in Nashua; his parents having removed to that city 
when he was fourteen years old. He was educated in the district schools of 
Eden, the public schools of Nashua, Crosby's Literary Institute of Nashua, 
and the Gymnasium Institute at Pembroke. 

He read law in the offices of the Hon. G. Y. Sawyer and Gen. Aaron 
F. Stevens of Nashua; and was admitted to the Hillsborough County Bar, 
upon examination, at Manchester, Dec. 5, 1854. Soon after his admittance 
to the bar, he opened an office in Nashua, and began the practice of his 
profession. 

During his residence in Nashua, in his minority, he became interested 
in the subject of manufactures; especially in the manufacture of cotton 
cloths; in which, by assiduous study, he acquired a knowledge so thorough 
and practical that in 1850, he wrote and published a pamphlet entitled, 
"Review of the Rise and Progress and Present Importance of Cotton 
Manufactures of the United States;" which attracted immediate at- 
tention and was widely read, both in this country and in England. 

During this period, also, he manifested, or rather developed, a natur- 
al genuis for invention; which he put to practical use in the production of 




MRS. ELIZA (DANIELS) DODGE 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 409 

many labor saving devices; among which the most important, perhaps, 
was a press for printing upon paper or cloth from the roll; which was 
patented November 18, 1851. 

In 1855, Mr. Dodge's skill as an inventor, together with his reputa- 
tion as an able lawyer and his knowledge of manufactures, had become so 
widely known as to attract the attention of Hon. Charles Mason; who was 
then United States Commissioner of Patents; by whom he was that year 
appointed a member of the board of examiners at the patent office, Wash- 
ington, D. C. He accepted the appointment, and removed from Nashua 
to Washington, where in many years of valuable service as a member of 
the board of patent examiners, he acquired a fame which was national in 
its scope. 

In 1858, Mr. Dodge resigned from his position on the board of patent 
examiners, and opened a law office in Washington ; where, for several years 
he conducted a highly successful business in that line, and from whence he 
finally removed to Worcester, Mass.; where he passed the remainder of 
his life. He died at Worcester in 1908; leaving a large estate, which, under 
the terms of his last will, was distributed among his friends and relatives 
and public institutions, in generous bequests; not the least of which, in 
the estimation of its citizens, was that which he left to Brookline in honor 
of the memory of his wife. 

Mrs. Dodge was a generous hearted and public spirited woman, 
thoroughly democratic in her ideas, dignified and courteous in her manners 
and in her disposition charitable to a degree. In her lifetime, from her 
abundance she gave freely and generously to the worthy poor, and to 
charitable and other public institutions. At her decease, under the terms 
of her will, her large estate was distributed widely and wisely. Among the 
beneficiaries therein named, were twenty-nine public institutions and near- 
ly fifty of her relatives and friends. She died at Worcester, March 27, 1908 ; 
and is buried in that citv with her husband. 



410 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



CHAPTER XXIII. 

Biographical Sketches of Physicians Residents of and Practicing in 
Brookline from 1827 to 1914, Inclusive. 

David Harris, 1827-1849— Jonathan C. Shattuck, 1850-1861— David P. 
Stowell, 1862-1867— Darius S. Dearborn, 1875-1879— Alonzo S. 
Wallace, 1879-1888— Charles H. Holcombe, 1888—. 

DAVID HARRIS, M. D., was born in Dunstable, now Nashua, July 
20, 1798. He was a son of Jonathan and Rachel (Johnson) Harris. He 
graduated from Dartmouth College in 1826, and from Pittsfield Medical 
School In 1827 he came to this town and began to practice his profession, 
being the first regularly educated physician to settle here. He continued 
to live and to practice in Brookline until his death, which occurred January 
26, 1849. He is buried in his family lot in the South cemetery. 

Concerning Dr. Harris' reputation, both professionally and as a citi- 
zen, the following excerpts from his funeral sermon, preached by Rev. 
Daniel Goodwin, who was a fellow citizen with him, speak eloquently and 
convincingly. 

"It is now twenty- two years since Dr. David Harris came among you, 
and commenced the labors of his profession. By his valuable and self-deny- 
ing services, his wise and judicious deportment, he secured and retained to 
the last the entire confidence and high esteem, not only of this community, 
but of that of the neighboring towns, as a physician and a man. Few men 
in the profession, similarly situated, it is believed, ever had warmer or more 
numerous friends or fewer enemies than he. Indeed, it is not known that 
he had an enemy on earth. Everybody esteemed him and spoke well of 
him; and the reason was that he was a friend of every one, and was always 
willing, at whatever sacrifice, to do all he could for the good of others. He 
made no invidious distinctions between the rich and the poor. His practice 
has been very great, extending over a large territory. He enjoyed, in an 
unusual degree, the confidence of the medical profession in this vicinity, as 
a safe and skilful physician." 

"As a citizen he was no less esteemed and beloved. He was honest, 
upright, open-hearted, could be believed and trusted everywhere, and in 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



411 



everything. *******As a counsellor he was wise and discreet. He was a 
lover of good order and a firm and stedfast supporter of the institutions 
of religion. His crowning excellence, however, was his piety, which was 
humble and unobstrusive, but deep and real." 

Dr. Harris was the first postmaster of Brookline, having been appoint- 
ed in 1828. He was re-appointed in 1834. He was many times a member 
of the superintending school committee, and represented the town in the 
legislatures of 1831, 1832 and 1834. He married Louisa, daughter of 
Williard and Olivia (Bowers) Marshall of Nashua. 

JONATHAN CHAM- 
BERLAIN SHATTUCK, 
M. D., son of Way ling and 
Luanda (Parker) Shattuck, 
was born in Pepperell, 
Mass., Sept. 10, 1813. He 
prepared for college in the 
public schools of his native 
town and in Pepperell Acad- 
emy, and graduated at Dart- 
mouth College in 1842. For 
the four years immediately 
following h i s graduation 
from Dartmouth he was 
engaged in teaching school. 
He then studied medicine, 
and graduated from the 
College of Physicians and 
Surgeons in New York City 
in 1848. Soon after his 
graduation he settled in 
Brookline, where he began his professional life. 

From the beginning, Dr. Shattuck's success as a physician was as- 
sured. Possessed of more than ordinary natural abilities, and by his edu- 
cation thoroughly equipped for his work, he entered into the performance 
of his professional duties with a zeal and enthusiasm that soon acquired 
for him the reputation of being a careful and skilful physician ; and as such 
he was known, not only in Brookline, but also in the surrounding towns ; 
all of which were included within the scope of his practice. 

As a citizen Dr. Shattuck was held in the highest respect and esteem 
by his fellow citizens; in his intercourse with whom he was genial and 




DR. JONATHAN C. SHATTUCK 



412 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

affable and gentlemanly, and by whom he was honored by being many 
times elected as superintendent of schools. He was moderator in 1853, 
selectman in 1860 and 1861, and town clerk in 1861. 

He was a man of strong will power, and of equally strong convictions ; 
a firm believer in the Christian religion, and an equally firm advocate of 
the strict observance of the moralities of life; and as such, in any and all 
causes in which the welfare of the public was a matter in issue, his work 
and influence were invariably exerted on the side which he believed to be 
right and just. 

Soon after coming here, Dr. Shattuck and his wife united with the 
local Congregational church. In 1850, he erected on the summit of the 
hill in the rear of the church the dwelling house which at the present time, 
(1914) is owned and occupied as his home by Albert T. Pierce. After the 
house was completed, he conceived the idea of connecting it with Main 
street by building a roadway down the south side of the hill. With that 
end in view, he approached the Congregational church and society, which 
owned the land over which the proposed new road would have to pass, 
with a proposition to buy or lease the same. Upon considering his propo- 
sition, a majority of the church and society voted not to accept it, and re- 
fused to either sell or lease the land. As the result of this vote, the church 
and society, which had already divided into factions, became embroiled 
in a bitter church war; which lasted for many years, and in which the only 
matter at issue was the advisability of selling or leasing, or otherwise dis- 
posing of, the land in question; the intrinsic value of which was not over 
ten dollars. In the end the war divided the church in twain. In 1858, 
Dr. Shattuck and several of his friends severed their connection with the 
Congregational church, and subsequently united with the local Methodist 
Episcopal church. 

Dr. Shattuck continued to reside and to practice in Brookline until 
1861. In the latter year he removed from Brookline to Pepperell, Mass., 
where for several years he conducted a private hospital. While residing 
in Pepperell, during the winter when Gen. Grant's army was in camp 
along the banks of the Mississippi river north of Vicks.burg, Dr. Shattuck, 
although he was at the time in poor health, responded to a call for volunteer 
surgeons, and served for four months as a surgeon in the army hospital in 
St. Louis. In 1866, failing health, and the certainty that he could not 
long survive the rigors of the New England climate, induced him to seek a 
new home in Minnesota. The change in climate was apparently bene- 
ficial to him. His health improved, and for awhile he engaged in the 
practice of his profession. But not for a long time. His health again gave 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 413 

out, and for the last four months of his life his decline was marked and 
rapid. He died in Minnesota of consumption, May 17, 1878. 

December 4, 1850, Dr. Shattuck was united in marriage to Phebe 
Ann Cummings, daughter of Samuel and Joanna (Wyman) Cummings of 
Antrim. One child was born of this marriage, Nellie Vrybena, born in 
Brookline, August 6, 1855. She married Jan. 29, 1876, at Zumbrota, 
Minn., Dudley Snow Brainard, M. D., son of Oliver and Mary Snow 
Brainard of Williamsburg, N. Y.; children, Mary Phebe Brainard, b. Oct. 
29, 1876; Dudley Shattuck Brainard, b. Oct. 15, 1884. 

DAVID PORTER STOWELL, M. D., a son of Rev. David and 
Emily (Starrett) Stowell, was born in Townsend, Mass., Sept. 22, 1838. 
He graduated from Phillips Andover Academy in 1857. In 1860 he enter- 
ed Amherst college, but did not graduate. In 1862, he graduated from the 
University of New York, and the same year commenced to practice his 
profession in this town; having, however, read medicine in the office of 
Samuel Dearborn, M. D., in Milford. In 1863 he served for a short time 
in the War of the Rebellion, as assistant surgeon in the eighth New Hamp- 
shire Volunteers. In the latter part of the sixties he removed from Brook- 
line to Greenville. In 1877 he removed from Greenville to Mercer, Me. 
In 1898 he removed from Mercer to Waterville, Me., where he practiced 
his profession until his death which occurred Feb. 12, 1903. During his 
residence at Waterville, he was for eight years city physician, and served 
on the board of education ten years. He was a Mason and a member of 
the Grand Army of the Republic. 

Dr. Stowell married Sarah Elizabeth Batchelder, of Mount Vernon, 
May 21, 1863. He was survived by his wife, but left no children. 

DARIUS STEARNS DEARBORN, M. D., was born in Northfield, 
January 4, 1834. He is a son of David and Nancy Clay Dearborn. He 
passed through the public schools of his native town, and graduated from 
the New Hampshire Conference Seminary in 1855. For a number of years 
after his graduation from the Conference Seminary he was located in the 
west, journeying there over the plains at the time of the excitement over 
the discovery of gold in Nevada. During this period he engaged to some 
extent in teaching school. On his return to the east, he read medicine 
with Dr. Luther Knight of Franklin, and attended lectures in the medical 
schools of Dartmouth College and the University of New York; graduat- 
ing from the latter institution in 1875. Immediately after his graduation 
from the University, and the same year, he settled in this town and began 
the practice of his profession. He remained in Brookline for a period of 
four years; during which he enjoyed a lucrative practice, and was highly 



414 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

esteemed, both as a citizen and as a physician, by his fellow citizens. In 
1879 ill health compelled him to give up work; and in that year he sold 
out his business in Brookline to Dr. A. S. Wallace. After regaining his 
health, he settled in Milford, and resumed in that town the practice of 
his profession. His practice in Milford covered a period of thirty years 
in length, and in that time his reputation as being a most excellent and 
trustworthy physician extended throughout the country. 

As a citizen, Dr. Dearborn was kind, courteous and gentlemanly in 
his bearing towards all with whom he came in contact. He was a warm 
and steadfast friend, and a sturdy, but not bitter, opponent. He was 
sympathetic by nature, and responded willingly to all calls upon him for aid 
and assistance, professional or otherwise, on the part of those who were 
worthily poor; rendering his services without money and without price. 
Simple in his manner of living, and inclined to be reticent and retiring in 
his intercourse with his fellow men, he neither sought, nor cared for official 
honors nor political preferments ; preferring rather to live a simple life, and 
enjoy the rewards consequent upon a faithful and conscientious perform- 
ance of his duties as a physician and a citizen. He retired from practice 
in 1907, and the same year removed from Milford to Northfield; where at 
the present time he is living on — "His old home farm." He married Sept. 
8, 1875, M. J. Adams. 

ALONZO S. WALLACE, M D., was born in Bristol, Me., Feb. 17, 
1847. He is the only son of David and Margaret F. Wallace. His grand- 
father, David Wallace, was one of the early settlers of New Hampshire. 

Dr. Wallace fitted for college in the public schools of his native town, 
Lincoln Academy, New Castle, Me., and the Eastport Conference Semi- 
nary, Bucksport, Me. He attended the medical schools of Bowdoin College 
and of Portland, and graduated from the medical school of Dartmouth 
College in 1874. 

During the years in which he was preparing for college, he was en- 
gaged to some considerable extent in teaching and also held the position of 
superintendent of schools in his native town. At an early age he was prin- 
cipal of Bucksport, Me., High School. After graduating from Dartmouth 
Medical School, he accepted the position of assistant teacher in the Re- 
formatory School of the city of Boston, and in a short time was promoted 
to the principalship of the school. After holding this position for several 
years, during which he acquired an enviable reputation for his excellent 
management, he resigned to accept the position of first assistant port phy- 
sician of the city of Boston, and was soon promoted to port physician. 




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HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 415 

In 1879 he resigned his position as port physician and removed from 
Boston to this town; where in that same year he established himself as a 
physician in the general practice of his profession. During his residence 
in Brookline, Dr. Wallace enjoyed a large, lucrative and constantly in- 
creasing practice, embracing not only this town, but also all of the towns 
in its vicinity ; his reputation as a physician learned and skilled in his pro- 
fession being second to none in Hillsborough county. 

By 1888 his business had increased to the extent that it occupied 
nearly all of his time both by night and by day. His professional calls 
were urgent and frequent, and they kept him constantly on the move. 
The exposure to all sorts and conditions of weather incident upon his long 
professional rides, and the constant strain to which his practice subjected 
both his mental and physical faculties began to have a perceptible effect 
upon his health, and after careful deliberation, he decided that a change 
from Brookline to some location where he could practice his profession 
under more favorable environments would under the circumstances be 
both prudent and reasonable. Having decided upon his course of action, 
he governed himself accordingly, and in 1888 removed from Brookline 
to Rochester. 

Dr. Wallace's removal from this town was sincerely and universally 
regretted by its citizens, by whom he was held in the highest respect and 
esteem; both as a physician and a citizen. 

He remained in Rochester but a comparatively short time, and finally 
removed to and settled in Nashua, where he is located at the present time, 
and where his practice is very extensive, covering the towns and cities in a 
large area of the surrounding country. His reputation as a physician has 
grown with the years, and he ranks with the leading physicians of the 
State. 

He is a member of the Congregational church. He is a member of the 
Order of Odd Fellows, the United Order of the Golden Cross, and of the 
New Hampshire Medical Society. 

He married Mary F. Maynard, daughter of Charles and Harriet May- 
nard of Lowell, Mass., by whom he has four children. 

CHARLES HENRY HOLCOMB, M. D., was born in Southwick, 
Mass., Nov. 12, 1859. He is a son of Franklin and Sarah J. (Robinson) 
Holcomb; and a lineal decendant of Thomas Holcomb, the immigrant 
settler at Dorchester, Mass., who came there in 1630 from the county of 
Devonshire, England; where the family traces its descent back to the fif- 
teenth century. The descendants of Thomas Holcomb in the United 
States are not only very numerous but they are also classed with the best 



416 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 




and most representative of 
its citizens. Many of them 
have become distinguished 
in various walks in life. 
Among the latter class was 
Dr. William F. Holcomb; 
who for many years was a 
professor in the college of 
New York; where he lec- 
tured on diseases of the eye 
and ear; he being the first of 
the physicians of the United 
States to make a specialty 
of the diseases of the former 
organ. He was also for sev- 
eral years president of the 
New York Genealogical So- 
ciety; and was the author 
of a History of the Hol- 
combs in America, in which 
he records the names of 
ninety physicians of that name. 

Another worthy representative of the family was the Rev. Amasa Hol- 
comb of South wick, Mass., who, with only the advantages of a common 
school education, after leaving school continued his pursuit of knowledge 
unaided and alone; and finally attained to such proficiency in his studies 
that he was voluntarily honored by Williams College by the bestowal up- 
on him of the degree of A. M. ; and was also the recipient of various medals 
and diplomas from scientific societies in New York and Philadelphia. He 
is said to have been the first to manufacture telescopes in America, in 
which business he was without a rival until 1842. In 1839, with one of his 
reflecting telescopic mirrors, he succeeded in taking portraits from life; 
thus becoming a contemporary of Daguerre in the discovery of that 
wonderful art. 

In 1872, Dr. Holcomb, the subject of this sketch, having lost his 
father in the Civil War, removed with his mother from South wick to 
Wilton; where they settled on the old homestead farm; and where for the 
following two years he worked on a farm during the summers and attend- 
ed the public schools in the winters. In 1875, realizing that he had ex- 
hausted all the advantages to be obtained from the Wilton schools, and 



DR. CHARLES H. HOLCOMB 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 417 

being desirous of obtaining a liberal education, he entered McCullom 
Institute, at Mont Vernon, where he remained one year. The following 
year he passed as a student in the Milford High School. From Milford 
he went to Westfield, Mass., where he attended school for four years. 
From Westfield he entered Harvard Medical College; from whence he 
graduated in the class of 1886, having in the meantime taken one term in 
the Mass. General Hospital, graduating from the latter institution in 1886. 
Immediately after his graduation, he settled in Milford, where he com- 
menced to practice his profession. 

In 1888, by the removal of Dr. Alonzo S. Wallace to Rochester, 
Brookline was left without the services of a physician. Dr. Holcomb, al- 
though he had succeeded in establishing a good practice in Milford, took 
advantage of the vacancy caused by Dr. Wallace's removal, and soon after 
it occurred and during the same year, removed from Milford to Brookline. 

In taking this step, Dr. Holcomb was doubtless influenced by his 
hopes that in Brookline he could at once enter into the enjoyment of a 
larger field of action, and, consequently, of larger opportunities for ad- 
vancement in his profession than he could expect to attain by years of 
practice in Milford; where physicians were many and competition sharp. 
Nor were his hopes disappointed. His reception in Brookline was a cordial 
one, and he soon acquired the confidence of its people. Year by year, his 
reputation as a careful, conscientious and skillful physician has grown in 
strength; and with its growth his field of action has expanded. At the 
present time his practice covers a large territory, extending into many of 
the neighboring towns, both in this State and in Massachusetts; and his 
professional reputation is excellent throughout the County. Since resid- 
ing here, he has taken post-graduate courses in Harvard Medical College. 
He is a member of the Nashua Medical Association, the New Hampshire 
State Surgical Club, the State Medical Society, and the Hillsborough 
County Medical Association, of which he is the president this year (1912). 
Dr. Holcomb is an ardent lover of Nature, and is enthusiastically interest- 
ed in the science of botany; to the study of which he devotes many of his 
leisure hours. 

As a citizen Dr. Holcomb is highly esteemed and respected by his 
fellow citizens; by whom he has been honored with many positions of trust 
during the twenty-five years of his residence here. He was president of 
the day at the town's celebration of "Old Home Week" in 1905, and orator 
of the day at its celebration in 1906. 

At the present time he is, and for twenty-five years has been, secretary 
and treasurer of the board of health, and is a member and treasurer of the 



418 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

board of trustees of the Public Library. He is a member in the seventh de- 
gree of the Patrons of Husbandry, and a member of and deacon in the 
local Congregational Church. 

Dr. Holcomb married, June 23, 1888, Clintina, daughter of James E. 
and Olive A. (Robinson) Burton, of Temple; by whom he has had one 
daughter, Marion Candace; b., May 8. 1892, in Brookline. 







f- 

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HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



419 



CHAPTER XXIV. 







Town Officers. 








1769-1914. 








Moderators. 




1769. 


Samuel Farley, 


1797. 


William Green 


1770. 


No record. 


1798. 


Benjamin Farley 


1771. 


No record. 


1799. 


William Green 


1772. 


James Conneck 


1800. 


Benjamin Farley 


1773. 


Samuel Brown 


1801. 


Benjamin Farley 


1774. 


James Badger 


1802. 


Benjamin Farley 


1775. 


James Conneck 


1803. 


Benjamin Farley 


1776. 


Clark Brown 


1804. 


Benjamin Farley 


1777. 


William Spaulding 


1805. 


James Parker, Sr. 


1778. 


Clark Brown 


1806. 


Benjamin Farley 


1779. 


Saumel Douglass 


1807. 


Benjamin Farley 


1780. 


Samuel Douglass 


1808. 


Randell McDonal 


1781. 


Robert Seaver 


1809. 


John Daniels 


1782. 


Clark Brown 


1810. 


John Daniels 


1783. 


Clark Brown 


1811. 


James Parker, Sr. 


1784. 


Robert Seaver 


1812. 


James Parker, Sr. 


1785. 


Samuel Douglass 


1813. 


James Parker, Sr. 


1786. 


Samuel Douglass 


1814. 


James Parker, Sr. 


1787. 


R. Cutts Shannon 


1815. 


James Parker, Sr. 


1788. 


R. Cutts Shannon 


1816. 


James Parker, Sr. 


1789. 


Robert Seaver 


1817. 


George Daniels 


1790. 


R. Cutts Shannon 


1818. 


Ensign Bailey 


1791. 


R. Cutts Shannon 


1819. 


Ensign Bailey 


1792. 


R. Cutts Shannon 


1820. 


Ensign Bailey 


1793. 


Robert Seaver 


1821. 


Ensign Bailey 


1794. 


Robert Seaver 


1822. 


James Parker, Sr. 


1795. 


Robert Seaver 


1823. 


James Parker, Sr. 


1796. 


Randall McDonald 


1824. 


George Daniels 



420 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



1825. Thomas Bennett 

1826. John Daniels 

1827. John Daniels 

1828. Ensign Bailey 

1829. Ensign Bailey 

1830. James Parker, Jr. 

1831. William S. Crosby 

1832. William S. Crosby 

1833. Reuben Baldwin 

1834. Ensign Bailey 

1835. James Parker, Jr. 

1836. James Parker, Jr. 

1839. John Smith 

1840. John Smith 

1841. John Smith 

1842. John Smith 

1843. John Daniels 

1844. George W. Daniels 

1845. Ithimar B. Sawtelle 

1846. Ithimar B. Sawtelle 

1847. Ithimar B. Sawtelle 

1848. Ithimar B. Sawtelle 

1849. N. Herman Shattuck 

1850. Joseph C. Tucker 

1851. Joseph C. Tucker 

1851. Joseph C. Tucker 

1852. Joseph C. Tucker 

1853. Jonathan C. Shattuck 

1854. Joseph C. Tucker 

1855. Isaac Sawtelle 

1856. Thomas Melendy 

1857. Joseph C. Tucker 

1858. Joseph C. Tucker 

1859. Albert Shattuck 

1860. William G. Shattuck 

1861. William G. Shattuck 

1862. Joseph C. Tucker 

1863. Joseph C. Tucker 

1864. William G. Shattuck 

1865. William G. Shattuck 



1866. Joseph C. Tucker 

1867. Joseph C. Tucker 

1868. Joseph C. Tucker 

1869. William G. Shattuck 

1870. William G. Shattuck 

1871. James Clinton Parker 

1872. Joseph A. Hall 

1873. James Clinton Parker 

1874. James Clinton Parker 

1875. David A. Fessenden 

1876. David A. Fessenden 

1877. David A. Fessenden 

1878. Joseph A. Hall 

1879. Joseph A. Hall 

1880. David S. Fessenden 

1881. David S. Fessenden 

1882. Joseph A. Hall 

1883. Joseph A. Hall 

1884. David D. Rockwood 

1885. Charles A. Stickney 

1886. Charles E. Shattuck 

1887. Charles E. Shattuck 

1888. Edward C. Tucker 

1889. George W. Bridges 

1890. George W. Bridges 

1891. David S. Fessenden 

1892. James W. S. Tucker 

1893. Orville D. Fessenden 

1894. Orville D. Fessenden 

1895. Frank L. Willoby 

1896. Frank L. Willoby 

1897. Frank L. Willoby 

1898. Frank L. Willoby 

1899. Frank L. Willoby 

1900. Frank L. Willoby 

1901. Frank I, .Willoby 

1902. Frank L. Willoby 

1903. Orville D. Fessenden 

1904. Orville D. Fessenden 

1905. Orville D. Fessenden 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



421 



1906. Orville D. Fessenden 

1907. Orville D. Fessenden 

1908. Orville D. Fessenden 

1909. Orville D. Fessenden 

1910. Orville D. Fessenden 



1911. Orville D. Fessenden 

1912. Orville D. Fessenden 

1913. Orville D. Fessenden 

1914. Orville D. Fessenden 







Town Clerks. 




1769. 


James Conneck 


1801. 


Benjamin Farley 


1770. 


No record. 


1802. 


Benjamin Farley 


1771. 


No record. 


1803. 


Randall McDonald 


1772. 


No record. 


1804. 


Randall McDonald 


1773. 


Samuel Brown 


1805. 


James Parker, Sr. 


1774. 


James Badger 


1806. 


James Parker, Sr. 


1775. 


James Badger 


1807. 


James Parker, Sr. 


1776. 


Alexander Mcintosh 


1808. 


James Parker, Sr. 


1777. 


Alexander Mcintosh 


1809. 


James Parker, Sr. 


1778. 


Swallow Tucker 


1810. 


George Daniels 


1779. 


Alexander Mcintosh 


1811. 


George Daniels 


1780. 


Elias Dickey 


1812. 


George Daniels 


1781. 


Waldron Stone 


1813. 


George Daniels 


1782. 


Waldron Stone 


1814. 


George Daniels 


1783. 


Waldron Stone 


1815. 


John Daniels 


1784. 


Swallow Tucker 


1816. 


John Daniels 


1785. 


Randall McDonald 


1817. 


John Daniels 


1786. 


Randall McDonald 


1818. 


John Daniels 


1787. 


Swallow Tucker 


1819. 


John Daniels 


1788. 


Randall McDonald 


1820. 


John Daniels 


1789. 


Randall McDonald 


1821. 


Thomas Bennett 


1790. 


Ezekiel Proctor 


1826. 


Thomas Bennett 


1791. 


Ezekiel Proctor 


1827. 


William S. Crosby 


1792. 


Randall McDoneld 


1828. 


William S. Crosby 


1793. 


Randell McDonald 


1829. 


Thomas Bennett 


1794. 


Randell McDonald 


1830. 


James Parker, Jr. 


1795. 


Benjamin Farley 


1831. 


James Parker, Jr. 


1796. 


Benjamin Farley 


1832. 


William S. Crosby 


1797. 


Randall McDonald 


1833. 


Reuben Baldwin 


1798. 


Randall McDonald 


1834. 


George Daniels 


1799. 


Randall McDonald 


1835. 


Isaac Sawtelle 


1800. 


John McDonald 


1836. 


James Parker, Jr. 



422 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



1837. Isaac Sawtelle 

1838. Isaac Sawtelle 

1839. Isaac Sawtelle 

1840. George Daniels 

1841. George Daniels 

1842. Nathaniel Shattuck, Jr. 

1843. Nathaniel Shattuck, Jr. 

1844. Alonzo Bailey 

1845. Nathaniel Shattuck, Jr. 

1846. Nathaniel Shattuck, Jr. 

1847. Nathaniel Shattuck, Jr. 

1848. Nathaniel Shattuck, Jr. 

1849. Alonzo Bailey 

1850. Henry B. Stiles 

1851. Henry B. Stiles 

1852. Isaac Sawtelle 

1853. Henry B. Stiles 

1854. Joseph C. Tucker 

1855. Joseph C. Tucker 

1856. Henry B. Stiles 

1857. Henry B. Stiles 

1858. Henry B. Stiles 

1859. Nathaniel W. Lund 

1860. Benjamin Gould 

1861. Jonathan C. Shattuck 

1862. Benjamin Gould 

1863. Franklin McDonald 

1864. Henry B. Stiles 

1865. Henry B. Stiles 

1866. Henry B. Stiles 

1867. Henry B. Stiles 

1868. Henry B. Stiles 

1869. Henry B. Stiles 

1870. Henry B. Stiles 

1871. Henry B. Stiles 

1872. Henry B. Stiles 

1873. Henry B. Stiles 

1874. Henry B. Stiles 

1875. Henry B. Stiles 

1876. Henry B. Stiles 



1877. Edward C. Tucker 

1878. Henry B. Stiles 

1879. Henry B. Stiles 

1880. Henry B. Stiles 

1881. Walter F. Rockwood 

1882. Walter F. Rockwood 

1883. Alpha A. Hall 

1884. Alpha A. Hall 

1885. Alpha A. Hall 

1886. George E. Stiles 

1887. George E. Stiles 

1888. George E. Stiles 

1889. Edward C. Tucker 

1890. George E. Stiles 

1891. Edward C. Tucker 

1892. Edward C. Tucker 

1893. George E. Stiles 

1894. George E. Stiles 

1895. George E. Stiles 

1896. Alpha A. Hall 

1897. Alpha A. Hall 

1898. Alpha A. Hall 

1899. Alpha A. Hall 

1900. Alpha A. Hall 

1901. Alpha A. Hall 

1902. Alpha A. Hall 

1903. Edward C. Tucker 

1904. Edward C. Tucker 

1905. Edward C. Tucker 

1906. Edward C. Tucker 

1907. Edward C. Tucker 

1908. Edward C. Tucker 

1909. Edward C. Tucker 

1910. Edward C. Tucker 

1911. Edward C. Tucker 

1912. Alpha A. Hall 

1913. Alpha A. Hall 

1914. Alpha A. Hall 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



423 



Town Treasurers. 



1769. Robert Campbell 

1770. No record. 

1771. No record 

1772. Swallow Tucker 

1773. Isaac Shattuck 

1774. Benjamin Shattuck 

1775. James Badger 

1776. Isaac Shattuck 

1777. Robert Seaver 

1778. Clark Brown 

1779. Clark Brown 

1780. Clark Brown 

1781. Robert Seaver 

1782. Robert Seaver 

1783. Samuel Douglass 

1784. Isaac Shattuck 

1785. Samuel Douglass 

1786. Samuel Douglass 

1787. James Campbell 

1788. Isaac Shattuck 

1789. Robert Seaver 

1790. Robert Seaver 

1791. Samuel Douglass 

1792. Samuel Douglass 

1793. Benjamin Farley 

1794. Benjamin Farley 

1795. Isaac Shattuck 

1796. Isaac Shattuck 

1797. Asher Spaulding 

1798. Samuel T. Boynton 

1799. Samuel T. Boynton 

1800. Samuel T. Boynton 

1801. Randal McDonald 

1802. Benjamin Farley 

1803. John Colburn 

1804. John Colburn 

1805. John Colburn 

1806. John Colburn 



1807. David Wright 

1808. John Daniels 

1809. John Daniels 

1810. James Parker, Sr. 

1811. James Parker, Sr. 

1812. James Parker, Sr. 

1813. James Parker, Sr. 

1814. James Parker, Sr. 

1815. James Parker, Sr. 

1816. James Parker, Sr. 

1817. James Parker, Sr. 

1818. James Parker, Sr. 

1819. James Parker, Sr. 

1820. Ensign Bailey 

1821. Ensign Bailey 

1822. Randall McDonald 

1823. Randall McDonald 

1824. Eli Sawtelle 

1825. Benjamin Shattuck 

1826. Benjamin Shattuck 

1827. Benjamin Shattuck 

1828. Joshua Hall 

1829. John Daniels 

1830. John Daniels 

1831. John Daniels 

1832. Horace Warner 

1833. Ensign Bailey 

1834. Ensign Bailey 

1835. Ensign Bailey 

1836. George Daniels 

1837. George Daniels 

1838. Horace Warner 

1839. Horace Warner 

1840. Horace Warner 

1841. Horace Warner 

1842. Horace Warner 

1843. Horace Warner 

1844. Horace Warner 



424 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



1845. 


Horace Warner 


1880. 


1846. 


Wilkes W. Corey 


1881. 


1847. 


Wilkes W. Corey 


1882. 


1848. 


Wilkes W. Corey 


1883. 


1849. 


Horace Warner 


1884. 


1850. 


Horace Warner 


1885. 


1851. 


Horace Warner 


1886. 


1852. 


Horace Warner 


1887. 


1853. 


Wilkes W. Corey 


1888. 


1854. 


Francis A. Peterson 


1889. 


1855. 


Francis A. Peterson 


1890. 


1856. 


Nathaniel W. Lund 


1891. 


1857. 


Philemon French 


1892. 


1858. 


Sumner S. Kendall 


1893. 


1859. 


Sumner S. Kendall 


1894. 


1860. 


Joseph Smith 


1895. 


1861. 


Joseph Smith 


1896. 


1862. 


Sumner S. Kendall 


1897. 


1863. 


Sumner S. Kendall 


1898. 


1864. 


Orman F. Shattuck 


1899. 


1865. 


Sumner S. Kendall 


1900. 


1866. 


Sumner S. Kendall 


1901. 


1867. 


Joseph Sawtelle 


1902. 


1868. 


Joseph Smith 


1903. 


1869. 


Joseph Smith 


1904. 


1870. 


Joseph Smith 


1905. 


1871. 


Joseph Smith 


1906. 


1872. 


Joseph Smith 


1907. 


1873. 


William J. Smith 


1908. 


1874. 


William J. Smith 


1909. 


1875. 


William J. Smith 


1910. 


1876. 


William J. Smith 


1911. 


1877. 


William J. Smith 


1912. 


1878. 


William J. Smith 


1913. 


1879. 


William J. Smith 


1914. 



William J. Smith 
William J. Smith 
William J. Smith 
William J. Smith 
William J. Smith 
William J. Smith 
James N. S. Tucker 
James N. S. Tucker 
James N. S. Tucker 
James N. S. Tucker 
William J. Smith 
George B. Stiles 
William J. Smith 
William J. Smith 
William J. Smith 
William J. Smith 
Albert T. Pierce 
Herbert S. Corey 
Herbert S. Corey 
Herbert S. Corey 
Herbert S. Corey 
Herbert S. Corey 
Albert T. Pierce 
Albert T. Pierce 
Albert T. Pierce 
Albert T. Pierce 
Herbert S. Corey 
Herbert S. Corey 
Herbert S. Corey 
Herbert S. Corey 
Herbert S. Corey 
Herbert S. Corey 
Herbert S. Corey 
Fred A. Hall 
Fred A. Hall 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



425 



Selectmen. 



1769. James Conneck 
William Blanchard 
Alexander Mcintosh 

1770. No record. 



1771. Samuel Brown 
George Russell 
Isaac Shattuck 

1772. James Conneck 
Alexander Mcintosh 
James Campbell 

1773. George Russell 
Samuel Brown 
James Badger 

1774. James Badger 
Robert Seaver 
Thomas Asten 

1775. George Russell 
Alexander Mcintosh 
James Campbell 

1776. Alexander Mcintosh 
Benjamin Shattuck 
Clark Brown 

1777. Alexander Mcintosh 
Benjamin Shattuck 
Isaac Shattuck 

1778. Swallow Tucker 
Benjamin Shattuck 
James Badger 

1779. Alexander Mcintosh 
James Mcintosh 
Sampson Farnsworth 

1780. Elias Dickey 
Randall McDonald 
David Davidson 



1781. Waldron Stone 
Swallow Tucker 
James Campbell 

1782. Waldron Stone 
David Davidson 
Randall McDonald 

1783. Waldron Stone 
Randall McDonald 
Clark Brown 

1784. Swallow Tucker 
Robert Seaver 
Daniel Tyler 

1785. R. McDonald 
Robert Seaver 
James Campbell 

1786. Randall McDonald 
Robert Seaver 
James Campbell 

1787. Swallow Tucker 
Benjamin Farley 
James Mcintosh 

1788. R. McDonald 
James Campbell 
Sampson Farnsworth 

1790. Ezekiel Proctor 
Eleazer Gilson 
Daniel Spaulding 

1791. Ezekiel Proctor 
Eleazer Gilson 
Daniel Spaulding 

1792. Randall McDonald 

Joshua Smith 
Joseph Tucker 

1793. Randall McDonald 
James Campbell 
James Mcintosh 



426 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



1794. Randall McDonald 
James Campbell 
James Mcintosh 

1795. Benjamin Farley 
Eleazer Gilson 
Isaac Shattuck 

1796. Benjamin Farley- 
Randall McDonald 
Joseph Emerson 

1797. Randall McDonald 
William Green 
James Mcintosh 

1798. Randall McDonald 
Benjamin Farley 
James Mcintosh 

1799. Randall McDonald 
Joseph Emerson 
Eli Sawtelle 

1800. John McDonald 
George McDonald 
Colburn Green 

1801. Benjamin Farley 
Joseph Emerson 
EH Sawtelle 

1802. Benjamin Farley 
Joseph Emerson 
EH Sawtelle 

1803. Randall McDonald 
James Mcintosh 
Samuel T. Boynton 

1804. Randall McDonald 
James Mcintosh 
Samuel T. Boynton 

1805. James Parker, Sr. 
Benjamin Shattuck, Sr. 
George Daniels 

1806. James Parker, Sr. 
Benjamin Shattuck, Sr. 
George Daniels 



1807. James Parker, Sr. 
George Daniels 
Colburn Green 

1808. James Parker, Sr. 
George Daniels 
Colburn Green 

1809. James Parker, Sr. 
George Daniels 
Colburn Green 

1810. George Daniels 
John Daniels 
Thomas Bennett 

1811. George Daniels 
John Daniels 
Thomas Bennett 

1812. George Daniels 
Thomas Bennett 
John Daniels 

1813. George Daniels 
Thomas Bennett 
John Daniels 

1814. George Daniels 
Ensign Bailey 
Mathew Wallace 

1815. John Daniels 
Benjamin Shattuck 
Colburn Green 

1816. John Daniels 
Benjamin Shattuck 
Colburn Green 

1817. John Daniels 
Benjamin Shattuck 
Colburn Green 

1818. John Daniels 
Benjamin Shattuck 
Thomas Bennett 

1819. John Daniels 
Thomas Bennett 
Colburn Green 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



427 



1820. John Daniels 
Thomas Bennett 
Mathew Wallace 

1821. Thomas Bennett 
George Daniels 
James Parker, Sr. 

1822. George Daniels 
James Parker, Sr. 
Thomas Bennett 

1823. James Parker, Sr. 
Samuel T. Boynton 
William S. Crosby 

1824. James Parker, Sr. 
George Daniels 
Ensign Bailey 

1825. Thomas Bennett 
Samuel T. Boyntou 
Ensign Bailey 

1826. Thomas Bennett 
Ensign Bailey 
George Daniels 

1827. William S. Crosby 
Samuel T. Boynton 
James Parker, Sr. 

1828. William S. Crosby 
Thomas Bennett 
David Daniels 

1829. Thomas Bennett 
William S. Crosby 
James Parker, Jr. 

1830. James Parker, Jr. 
David Daniels 
William S. Crosby 

1831. James Parker, Jr. 
David Daniels 
William S. Crosby 

1832. William S. Crosby 
Eli Parker 
Reuben Baldwin 



1833. Reuben Baldwin 
Horace Warner 
George Daniels 

1834. George Daniels 
Horace Warner 
Isaac Sawtelle 

1835. Isaac Sawtelle 
John Smith 
James Parker, Jr. 

1836. James Parker, Jr. 
John Smith 
Isaac Sawtelle 

1837. Isaac Sawtelle 
Horace Warner 
Nathaniel Shattuck 

1838. Isaac Sawtelle 
John Smith 
Samuel Farnsworth 

1839. Isaac Sawtelle 
John Smith 
Samuel Farnsworth 

1840. George Daniels 
Samuel Farnsworth 
Nathaniel Shattuck 

1841. George Daniels 
Samuel Farnsworth 
Nathaniel Shattuck, Jr. 

1842. Nathaniel Shattuck, Jr. 
Alonzo Bailey 

Abel Foster 

1843. Nathaniel Shattuck, Jr. 
Abel Foster 

Alonzo Bailey 

1844. Alonzo Bailey 
Abel Foster 
Isaac Sawtelle 

1845. Nathaniel Shattuck, Jr. 
Wilkes W. Corey 
Andrew Rockwood 



428 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



1846. Nathaniel Shattuck, Jr. 
Wilkes W. Corey 
Henry B. Stiles 

1847. Nathaniel Shattuck, Jr. 
Wilkes W. Corey 
Reuben Baldwin 

1848. Nathaniel Shattuck, Jr. 
Reuben Baldwin 
Alpheus Shattuck 

1849. Alonzo Bailey 
Henry B. Stiles 
David Hobart 

1850. Henry B. Stiles 
David Hobart 
Nathaniel W. Lund 

1851. Henry B. Stiles 
Isaac Sawtelle 
Joseph Smith 

1852. Isaac Sawtelle 
Philemon French 
Abel Foster 

1853. Henry B. Stiles 
Franklin McDonald 
John Q. A. Hutchingson 

1854. Joseph C. Tucker 
Joseph Sawtelle 
Philemon French 

1855. Joseph C. Tucker 
Joseph Sawtelle 
Philemon French 

1856. Alonzo Bailey 
George Brooks 
James Clinton Parker 

1857. Alonzo Bailey 
James Clinton Parker 
Abel Foster 

1858. Henry B. Stiles 
Nathaniel W. Lund 
William J. Smith 



1859. Alpheus Shattuck 
David Hobart 
Wilkes W. Corey 

1860. Benjamin Gould 
Joseph A. Hall 
Jonathan C. Shattuck 

1861. Benjamin Gould 
Jonathan C. Shattuck 
Joseph A. Hall 

1862. Wilkes W. Corey 
Calvin Shedd 
David Hobart 

1863. Wilkes W. Corey 
David Hobart 
George Brooks 

1864. Joseph A. Hall 
John S. Daniels 
James Clinton Parker 

1865. Joseph A. Hall 
Joseph W. Peterson 
Stephen S. Mixer 

1866. Wilkes W. Corey 
Fernando Bailey 
Henry K. Kemp 

1867. Henry B. Stiles 
James Clinton Parker 
Joseph C. Tucker 

1868. James Clinton Parker 
Philemon French 
Rufus G. Russell 

1869. James Clinton Parker 
Philemon French 
Rufus G. Russell 

1870. David S. Fessenden 
Orman F. Shattuck 
Amos A. Gould 

1871. Henry B. Stiles 
Benjamin Kendall 
Amos A. Gould 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



429 



1872. Henry B. Stiles 
David S. Fessenden 
Ira Daniels 

1873. Henry B. Stiles 
Ira Daniels 
Edward T. Hall 

1874. David S. Fessenden 
Perley A. Smith 
Martin A. Rockwood 

1875. David S. Fessenden 
Henry B. Stiles 
Martin A. Rockwood 

1876. Martin A. Rockwood 
Joseph A. Hall 
Samuel Swett 

1877. David S. Fessenden 
Samuel Swett 
William Wallace 

1878. Henry B. Stiles 
Nathaniel B. Hutchingson 
Charles B. Powers 

1879. Henry B. Stiles 
Nathaniel B. Hutchingson 
Jefferson Whitcomb 

1880. Jefferson Whitcomb 
Charles N. Corey 
Charles W. Currier 

1881. Charles N. Corey 
Rufus G. Russell 
Charles S. Dunbar 

1882. Rufus G. Russell 
Charles S. Dunbar 
David D. Rockwood 

1883. Charles S. Dunbar 
David D. Rockwood 
Albert W. Corey 

1884. David D. Rockwood 
Albert W. Corey 
Ichabod F. Lund 



1885. Albert W. Corey 
Ichabod F. Lund 
George H. Nye 

1886. Charles N. Corey 
Onslow Daniels 
Walter F. Rockwood 

1887. Charles N. Corey 
Onslow Daniels 
Walter F. Rockwood 

1888. Onslow Daniels 
Walter F. Rockwood 
Joseph B. Swett 

1889. Walter F. Rockwood 
Joseph B. Swett 
Albert W. Corey 

1890. Ira Daniels 
Alpha A. Hall 
Clarence R. Russell 

1891. Charles N. Corey 
James H. S. Tucker 
Samuel Swett 

1892. Charles N. Corey 
George H. Nye 
John B. Hardy 

1893. David S. Fessenden 
Alpha A. Hall 
Martin A. Rockwood 

1894. Alpha A. Hall 
David D. Rockwood 
Linville M. Shattuck 

1895. Albert W. Corey 
Linville M. Shattuck 
Ira Daniels 

1896. Albert W. Corey 
Linville M. Shattuck 
Ira Daniels 

1897. Albert W. Corey 
Ira Daniels 
Eddy S. Whitcomb 



430 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



1898. Albert W. Corey 
Eddy S. Whitcomb 
Ozro W. Hodgman 

1899. Albert W. Corey 
Eddy S. Whitcomb 
Ozro W. Hodgman 

1900. David S. Fessenden 
Elbert L. Baldwin 
Charles W. Currier 

1901. Alpha A. Hall 
Charles W. Currier 
Albert W. Corey 

1902. Alpha A. Hall 
Edward C. Tucker 
Albert W. Corey 

1903. Alpha A. Hall 
Edward C. Tucker 
Payson Burge 

1905. Alpha A. Hall 
Clarence R. Russell 
Samuel Swett 

1906. Clarence R. Russell 
Samuel Swett 
Eddv S. Whitcomb 



1907. Samuel Swett 
Eddy S. Whitcomb 
Harry Marshall 

1908. Samuel Swett 
Harry Marshall 
Fred E Rockwood 

1909. Harry Marshall 
George L. Dodge 
David S. Fessenden 

1910. George L. Dodge 
David S. Fessenden 
Harry Marshall 

1911. Harry Marshall 
David S. Fessenden 
George L. Dodge 

1912. George L. Dodge 
David S. Fessenden 
Llewellyn S. Powers 

1913. David S. Fessenden 
Harry Marshall 
Payson Burge 

1914. Harry Marshall 
Payson Burge 
George H. Nye 



Representatives. 



1775-1914. 



1775. 
1776. 
1777. 

1778. 
1779. 
1780. 
1781. 
1782. 
1783. 
1784. 
1785. 



Raby and 
Raby and 
Raby and 
Raby and 
Raby and 
Raby and 
Raby and 
Raby and 
Raby and 
Raby and 
Raby and 



Mason 
Mason 
Mason 
Mason 
Mason 
Mason 
Mason 
Mason 
Mason 
Mason 
Mason 



Dea. Amos Dakin of Mason 
Dea. Amos Dakin of Mason 
Dea. Amos. Dakin of Mason 
Dea. Amos Dakin of Mason 
Dea. Amos Dakin of Mason 
Joseph Barrett of Mason 
Benjamin Mann of Mason 
Benjamin Mann of Mason 
Benjamin Mann of Mason 
Samuel Douglass of Raby 
Samuel Douglas of Raby 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



431 



1786. 
1787. 
1788. 
1789. 
1790. 
1791. 
1792. 
1793. 
1794. 
1795. 
1796. 
1797. 
1798. 
1799. 
1800. 
1801. 



Raby and 
Raby and 
Raby and 
Raby and 
Raby and 
Raby and 
Raby and 
Raby and 
Raby and 
Raby and 
Raby and 
Raby and 
Brookline 
Brookline 
Brookline 
Brookline 



Mason 

Mason 

Mason 

Mason 

Mason 

Mason 

Mason 

Mason 

Milford 

Milford 

Milford 

Milford 

and Milford 

and Milford 

and Milford 

and Milford 



Benjamin Mann of Mason 
Dea. Amos Dakin of Mason 
Obadiah Parker of Mason 
James Campbell of Raby 
Obadiah Parker of Mason 
Charles Barrett of Mason 
Obadiah Parker of Mason 
Joseph Merriam of Mason 

No. record 
William Peabody of Milford 
Benjamin Farley of Raby 
Augustus Blanchard of Milford 
Benjamin Farley of Brookline 
Augustus Blanchard of Milford 
William Peabody of Milford 
William Peabody of Milford 



In 1902, By Act of the Legislature, Brookline, in the matter of repre- 
sentation, was for the first time classed by itself. 



1802. James Parker, Sr. 

1803. James Parker, Sr. 

1804. Randall McDonald 

1805. Samuel T. Boynton 

1806. Samuel T. Boynton 

1807. Samuel T. Boynton 

1808. Samuel T. Boynton 

1809. Samuel T. Boynton 

1810. James Parker, Sr. 

1811. James Parker, Sr. 

1812. James Parker, Sr. 

1813. James Parker, Sr. 

1814. James Parker, Sr. 

1815. Samuel T. Boynton 

1816. Benjamin Sbattuck, Sr. 

1817. Benjamin Shattuck, Sr. 

1818. Benjamin Shattuck, Sr. 

1819. George Daniels 

1820. George Daniels 

1821. Thomas Bennett 



1822. Thomas Bennett 

1823. George Daniels 

1824. George Daniels 

1825. George Daniels 

1826. Voted not to send. 

1827. Voted not to send. 

1828. Thomas Bennett 

1829. William S. Crosby 

1830. William S. Crosby 

1831. David Harris 

1832. David Harris 

1833. David Harris 

1834. Reuben Baldwin 

1835. Horace Warner 

1836. Ensign Bailey 

1837. James Parker, Jr. 

1838. James Parker, Jr. 

1839. James Parker, Jr. 

1840. Ensign Bailey 

1841. Ensign Bailey 



432 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



1842. James Parker, Jr. 

1843. Alpheus Shattuck 

1844. Alpheus Shattuck 

1845. Alpheus Shattuck 

1846. Ithimar B. Sawtelle 

1847. Ithimar B. Sawtelle 

1848. Ithimar B. Sawtelle 

1849. Alpheus Shattuck 

1850. James N. Tucker 

1851. James N. Tucker 

1852. Benjamin Gould 

1853. Nathaniel Shattuck 

1854. Henry B. Stiles 

1855. Henry B. Stiles 

1856. Voted not to send. 

1857. Joseph C. Tucker 

1858. Joseph C. Tucker 

1859. Nathaniel W. Lund 

1860. Francis A. Peterson 

1861. Francis A. Peterson 

1862. Joseph C. Tucker 

1863. Joseph C. Tucker 

1864. William J. Smith 

1865. William J. Smith 

1866. Alpheus Shattuck 

1867. Joseph A. Hall 

1868. Joseph A. Hall 

1869. James W. Hall 

1870. James W. Hall 

1871. James Clinton Parker 

1872. James Clinton Parker 

1873. Joseph Sawtelle 

1874. David S. Fessenden 

1875. David S. Fessenden 

1876. Franklin McDonald 

1877. Franklin McDonald 

1878. Rufus G. Russell 



1879. Rufus G. Russell 

1880. Rufus G. Russell 

1881. Edward T. Hall 

1882. Edward T. Hall 

1883. Charles E. Shattuck 

1884. Charles E. Shattuck 

1885. Samuel Swett 

1886. Samuel Swett 

1887. James H. S. Tucker 

1888. James H. S. Tucker 

1889. Charles N. Corey 

1890. Charles N. Corey 

1891. Walter F. Rockwood 

1892. Walter F. Rockwood 

1893. Willie A. Hobart 

1894. Willie A. Hobart 

1895. Alpha A. Hall 

1896. Alpha A. Hall 

1897. Orville D. Fessenden 

1898. Orville D. Fessenden 

1899. Frank L. Willoby 

1900. Frank L. Willoby 

1901. Charles W. Smith 

1902. Charles W. Smith 

1903. Linville M. Shattuck 

1904. Orville D. Fessenden 

1905. Orville D. Fessenden 

1906. Elmer W. Wallace 

1907. Elmer W. Wallace 

1908. Herbert S. Corey 

1909. Herbert S. Corey 

1910. Edward C. Tucker 

1911. Edward C. Tucker 

1912. Willie C. Hobart 

1913. Willie C. Hobart 
1914. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 433 

Delegates to Constitutional Conventions. 

1852. Isaac Sawtelle 1902. Orville D. Fessenden 

1876. Joseph A. Hall 1912. Orville D. Fessenden 

1888. David S. Fessenden 



434 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



CHAPTER XXV. 



Votes for Governor, 1786 to 1912, Inclusive. 

The chief magistrate of the State held the title of President and was elected 
by the people, as the Governor now is, up to the date of the adop- 
tion of the present Constitution, September 5, 1792; when the name 
of the title was changed from "PRESIDENT" to Governor. 



Votes for State President from 1786 to 1792, Inclusive. 



1786. 
1787. 
1788. 
1789. 



1793. 
1794. 
1795. 
1796. 
1797. 
1798. 
1799. 
1800. 
1801. 
1802. 
1803. 
1804. 
1805. 

1806. 
1807. 
1808. 
1809. 



John Langdon 

John Langdon, 25 ; all cast. 1790. 

John Langdon, 30; all cast 1791, 

John Pickering, 22; all cast. 1792, 



John Pickering, 21; all cast. 
Josiah Bartlett, 26; all cast. 
Josiah Bartlett, ; all cast. 



Votes for Governor from 1793 to 1912, Inclusive. 



John Langdon, 38; all cast. 
John T. Gilman, 38; all cast. 
John T. Gilman, 47 ; all cast. 
John T. Gilman, 47 ; all cast. 
John T. Gilman, 38; all cast. 
John T. Gilman, 38; all cast. 
John T. Gilman, 32; all cast. 
John T. Gilman, 32; all cast. 
John T. Gilman, 40; all cast. 

No record. 
John T. Gilman, 47; all cast. 
John T. Gilman, 51 ; all cast. 
John Langdon, 51 ; 
John T. Gilman, 4; 
John Langdon, 48 ; 
John Langdon, 43; 

No record. 
John Langdon, 
Jeremiah Smith, 



all cast, 
all cast. 

51. 
11. 



1810. John Langdon, 
Jeremiah Smith, 

1811. John Langdon, 
Jeremiah Smith 

1812. William Plumer, 
John T. Gilman, 

1813. William Plumer, 
John T. Gilman, 

1814. John T. Gilman, 
William Plumer, 

1815. William Plumer, 
John T. Gilman, 

1816. William Plumer, 
James Sheafe, 

1817. William Plumer, 
James Sheafe, 

1818. William Plumer, 
William Hale, 



56. 

6. 

57. 

10. 

56. 
6. 

82. 
11. 

16. 
81. 

82. 
16. 

55. 
18. 
52. 
18. 
59. 
17. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



435 



1819. 


Samuel Bell, 


75. 




William Hale, 


16. 


1820. 


Samuel Bell, 


67. 




Richard H. Ayer, 


34. 


1821. 


Samuel Bell, 


55. 


1822. 


Samuel Bell, 


57. 




Joseph Hall, 


1. 


1823. 


Samuel Dinsmore, 


26. 




Levi Woodbury, 


58. 


1824. 


David L. Morrill, 


62. 




Levi Woodbury, 


20. 


1825. 


David L. Morrill, 


74. 




William S. Crosby, 


3. 




Ebenezer Lund, 


1. 


1826. 


David L. Morrill, 


60. 




Benjamin Pierce, 


20. 


1827. 


Benjamin Pierce, 


42. 




David L. Morrill, 


23. 


1828. 


John Bell, 


100. 




Benjamin Pierce, 


21. 


1829. 


John Bell, 


92. 




Benjamin Pierce, 


26. 


1830. 


Timothy Upham, 


79. 




Matthew Harvey, 


24. 




William Hall, Jr. 


1. 


1831. 


Ichabod Bartlett, 


60. 




Samuel Dinsmore, 


29. 




William Hall, Jr. 


1. 


1832. 


Samuel Dinsmore, 


47. 




Ichabod Bartlett, 


34. 


1833. 


Samuel Dinsmore, 


50. 


1834. 


William Badger, 


67. 




Nathaniel W. Colburn, 


1. 


1835. 


William Badger, 


50. 




Joseph Healey, 


39. 


1836. 


Isaac Hill, 


49. 




Abel Shattuck, 


1. 


1837. 


Isaac Hill, 


54. 


1838. 


Isaac Hill, 


49. 




James Wilson, Jr. 


83. 



1839. James Wilson, Jr. 67. 
John Page, 53. 

1840. John Page, 62. 
Enos Stevens, 59. 

1841. John Page, 76. 
Enos Stevens, 74. 

1842. Henry Hubbard, 73. 
Enos Stevens, 52. 

1843. Henry Hubbard, 72. 
Daniel Hoit, 31. 
Anthony Colby, 25. 
John H. White, 12. 

1844. John H. Steele, 79. 
Anthony Colby, 38. 

1845. John H. Steele, 74. 
Anthony Colby, 43. 

1846. Nathaniel S. Berry, 13. 
Anthony Colby 59. 

1847. Jared W. Williams, 79. 
Anthony Colby, 32. 
Nathaniel S. Berry, 9. 

1848. Jared W. Williams, 93. 
Nathaniel S. Berry, 74. 
George Y. Sawyer, 1. 

1849. Samuel Dinsmore, 89. 
Levi Chamberlain, 67. 
Nathaniel S. Berry, 4. 

1850. Samuel Dinsmore, 86. 
Levi Chamberlain, 73. 
Nathaniel S. Berry, 5. 

1851. Samuel Dinsmore, 87. 
Thomas E. Sawyer, 81. 
John Atwood, 5. 

1852. Thomas E. Sawyer, 93. 
Noah Martin, 81. 
John Atwood, 5. 

1853. James Bell, 74. 
Noah Martin, 88. 
John H. White, 9. 



436 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



1854. James Bell, 
Nathaniel S. Baker, 
Jared Perkins, 

1855. Ralph Metcalf, 
Nathaniel S. Baker, 
James Bell, 

1856. Ralph Metealf, 
John S. Wells, 
Ichabod Goodwin, 

1857. William Haile, 
John S. Wells, 
Charles B. Hadlock, 

1858. William Haile, 
Asa P. Cate, 

1859. Ichabod Goodwin, 
Asa P. Cate, 

1860. Ichabod Goodwin, 
Asa P. Cate, 

1861. Nathaniel S. Berry. 
George Stark, 

1862. George Stark, 
Nathaniel S. Berry, 
Paul J. Wheeler, 

1863. Ira A. Eastman, 
Joseph A. Gilmore, 
Walter A. Harriman, 

1864. Joseph A. Gilmore, 
Edward W. Harrington, 80. 

1865. Frederick Smyth, 105. 
Edward W. Harrington, 80. 

1866. Frederick Smyth, 101. 
John G. Sinclair, 102. 

1867. Walter Harriman, 108. 
John G. Sinclair, 109. 

1868. Walter Harriman, 115. 
John G. vSinclair, 106. 

1869. Onslow Stearns, 115. 
John Bedel, 87. 



82. 


1870. 


86. 




5. 




81. 


1871. 


79. 




9. 


1872. 


82. 




80. 


1873. 


7. 




94. 


1874. 


81. 




1. 


1875. 


91. 




83, 


1876. 


85. 




108. 


1877. 


100. 
95. 


1878. 


105, 
74. 


1879. 


84. 




79. 
6. 


1880. 


92. 

87. 


1882. 


10. 
101. 


1884. 



1886. 



1888. 



1890. 



Onslow Stearns, 100. 

John Bedel, 71. 

Lorenzo Burrows, 3. 

James Pike, 108. 

James A. Weston, 81. 

Ezekiel Straw, 113. 

James A. Weston, 85. 

Ezekiel Straw, 102. 

James A. Weston, 81. 

James A. Weston, 91. 

Luther McCutchings 89. 

Person C. Cheney, 107. 

Hiram A. Roberts, 105. 

Person C. Cheney, 110. 

Daniel Marcey, 117. 

Daniel Marcey, 118. 

Benjamin F. Prescott, 107. 

Benjamin F. Prescott, 115. 

Frank A. McKean, 104. 

Natt Head, 118. 

Frank A. McKean, 85. 

Warren G. Brown, 15. 

Charles H. Bell, 113. 

Frank Jones 105. 

Samuel W. Hale, 89. 

Martin V. B. Edgerly, 98. 

John M. Hill, 86. 

Moody Currier, 76. 

Larkin D. Mason, 4. 

George Carpenter, 2. 

Thomas Cogswell, 79. 

Charles H. Sawyer, 64. 

Joseph Wentworth, 21. 

Charles H. Amsden, 84. 

David H. Goodale, 68. 

Edgar L. Carr, 3. 

Charles H. Amsden, 80. 

Hiram A. Tuttle, 56. 

Josiah M. Fletcher, 1. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



437 



1892. William O. Noyes, 1. 

Luther McKinney, 86. 

John B. Smith, 68. 

1894. Daniel C. Knowles, 3. 

Henry O. Kent, 72. 

Charles A. Busiel, 108. 

1896. George A. Ramsdell, 79. 

Henry O. Kent, 55. 

George W. Barnard, 1. 

1898. Frank W. Rollins, 78. 

Charles F. Stone, 71. 

Augustus F. Stevens, 1. 

1900. Chester B. Jordan, 85. 

Frederick E. Potter, 72. 

Harris Towle, 1. 

1902. Henry F. Hollis, 73. 

John McLane, 69. 

David Heald, 1. 



1904. Daniel Heald, 1. 

John McLane, 69. 

Henry F. Hollis 73. 

1906. Nathan C. Jameson, 82. 

Charles M. Floyd, 43. 

Edward B. Tetley, 2. 

1908. Edward B. Tetley, 1. 

Walter L. Lewis, 2. 

Clarence E. Carr, 59. 

Henry B. Quimby, 63. 

1910. Asa W. Drew, 1. 

Clarence E. Carr, 48. 

Robert P. Bass, 56. 

1912. Alvah H. Morrill, 1. 

William H. Wilkins, 1. 

Winston Churchill, 6. 

Franklin Worcester, 56. 

Samuel D. Felker, 48. 



438 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 



CHAPTER XXVI. 

Marriages. 

1743—1914. 

Marriages by Rev. Mr. Emerson in Groton, and Pepperell, Mass., of 
Heads of Families which were Among the Early Settlers in Brook- 
line. 

In Groton. 

1731. Jan. 6, William Spaulding, Hepsibah Blood. 

1733. Jan. 23, Ebenezer Gilson, Anna Searl. 

1733. Feb. 28, William Blanchard, Dunstable, Deliverence Parker. 

1735. Jan. 6, John Cummings, Sarah Lawrence, Littleton, Mass. 

1738. Mar. 6, Robert Campbell, Roxbury, Mass., Elizabeth McDaniels. 

1741. Oct. 6, Daniel Shed, Mary Tarbell. 

1741. Jan. 19, Thomas Tarbell, Jr., Esther Smith 

1750. Date lost, Samuel Gilson, Elizabeth Shed. 

1752. Jan. 22, Benjamin Brooks, Jr.,Townsend, Mass., Elizabeth Green. 

1754. Jan. 15, David Gilson, Annis Gilson, of Pepperell. 

1755. Mar. 26, Capt. Ephraim Sartell, Wid. Hannah Stone, Pepperell. 
1757. Dec. 22, Ephraim Sartell, Abigail Stone. 

1762. Sept. 30, Capt. Ephraim Sawtelle, Mrs. Hannah Parker. 

1763. Dec. 8, Benjamin Shattuck, Abigail Farnsworth. 
1765. April 16, William Green, Pepperell, Hannah Woods. 
1765. Sept. 25, Sampson Farnsworth, Rachel Shattuck. 
1765. Sept. 26, William Shed, Lydia Farnsworth. 

1768. Dec. 1, Thomas Gregg, Eunice Lakin. 
1770. Dec. 27, Nathan Corey, Molly Green. 

In Pepperell. 

1747. May 14, Nathaniel Shattuck, Hannah Simonds. 
1752. Feb. 20, Samuel Gilson, Elizabeth Shed. 
1757. April 28, Nathaniel Shattuck, Ruth Shattuck. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 439 

1757. Nov. 23, Daniel Shed, Hannah Lakin. 
1761. Jan. 15, Isaac Shattuck, Hannah Hall. 

1770. Feb. 15, Joseph Leslie, of Hollis, Mary Gilson. 

1772. Jan. 21, Abijah Parker, Sarah Lawrence. 

Marriages in Dunstable (Nashua) of Parties Afterwards Residing in 

Brookline. 

1743. Feb. 7, Elias Dickey, Rose McDaniels. 

1744. Oct. 9, Samuel Farley, Hannah Brown. 

Marriages of Residents of Brookline from 1743 to 1785, as Found in Hollis 

Town Records. 

1755. May 6, Mathew Wallace, Jean Leslie. 

1757. July 11, Joshua Smith, Hannah Baldwin, of Townsend, Mass. 

1761. Dec. 24, David Wright, of Pepperell, Prudence Cummings of Hollis. 

1766. Nov. 27, Swallow Tucker, Lucretia Carter, of Hollis. 

1767. Feb. 26, Isaac Stearns, Rebekah Jewett. 

1768. Nov. 15, Benjamin Shattuck, Jr., Mary Proctor, Hollis. 

1771. Jan. 2, Isaac Stevens, Elizabeth Johnson. 

1773. Dec. 30, Christopher Farley, Ruth Jewett. 

1774. Jan. 13, Jonas Leslie, Elizabeth Dow. 

1777. Feb. 20, Ebenezer Melvin, Cockemouth, Janna Bayley. 

1779. Mar. 17, Jonathan Dix, Miriam Kneeland of Harvard. 

1782. Feb. 13, John Connie, Abigail Hartshorn, Dunstable. 

1783. May 7, Lt. Samuel Farley, Elizabeth Powers of Mason. 

1784. May 20, Nathaniel Patten, Mehitabel Blood. 

In the Hollis Marriage Records. 

1785. June 30, Capt. Samuel Douglass, Wid. Tabitha Fletcher of Hollis. 
1788. Dec. 2, Thomas Kemp, Hollis, Wid. Hannah Shattuck, Raby. 
1791. April 28, Nathaniel Shattuck, Jr., Hannah Keyes. 

1794. Feb. 27, William Merrill, Hollis, Dolly Smith, Raby. 

1796. Feb. 10, David Burge, Betsey Mcintosh. 

1806. Dec. 18, Isaac Senter, Brookline, Sally Ball, Hollis. 

1809. Sept. 28, Jonas French, Jr. Dunstable, Martha Jewett, Hollis. 

1814. Dec. 27, Samuel Smith, Brookline, Sally Dow, Hollis. 

1838. Mar. 19, Eri McDaniels, Brookline, Ann Farley, Hollis. 



440 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

1847. Dec. 31, Simeon A. Spaulding, Hollis, Catharine P. Sawtelle, 

Brookline. 

1858. April 8, James T. Willoby, Hollis, Cornelia T. Pierce, Brookline. 

1877. Nov. 14, George A. Newton, Hollis, Mary L. Swett, Brookline. 

Marriages of Brookline People in Mason. 
By Rev. Jonathan Searle. 

1772. Dec. 9, Randall McDaniels, Martha Russell. 

By Rev. William Eliott. 

1820. Nov. 20, Moody Lancey, Charlotte Kemp. 

By Rev. Ebenezer Hill. 

1790. Nov. 4, John Seaver, Esther Russell. 

1790. Nov. 17, Josiah Elliott, Mason, Polly Wetherbee. 

1790. Dec. 21, John Russell, Leafee Lawrence. 

1790. Dec. 29, Samuel Farnsworth, Azubah Badger. 

1792. Jan. 23, Samuel Russell, Susannah Campbell. 

1792. Jan. 23, Jonas Campbell, Elizabeth Russell. 

1792. Jan. 26, Samuel Douglass, Jr., Mile Slip, Sarah Seaver. 

1793. May 2, Stephen Hall, Submit Shattuck. 
1793. May 22, Amos Crotch, Boxboro, Lydia Brown. 
1795. April 16, Ebenezer Emery, Jr., Abigail Shattuck. 

1795. Oct. 17, Moody Shattuck, Elizabeth Tarbell, Pepperell, Mass. 

1796. Aug. 24, Jacob Austin, Isabell Mcintosh. 

1796. Nov. 24, Clark Brown, Mrs. Sarah Withee, Mason. 

1805. March 5, Benjamin Cummings, Lucy Whitaker, Mason. 

1817. Nov. 28, David Hobart, Eunice Wright. 

1821. May 8, Loami Chamberlain, Mason, Eliza Tucker. 
1824. April 30, Sampson Mcintosh, Eliza Amsden, Mason. 
1826. Jan. 26, James Parker, Deverd Corey. 

1826. March 30, George Betterly, Hannah Lee. 

1826. Sept. 25, Luke George .Harriet H. Howet. 

1831. Nov. 6, Davis Green, Brewer, Me., Sophia Daniels. 

1832. March 11, Hutchingson Rogers, Billerica, Mass., Keziah Colburn. 
1832. March 22, Nelson Marsh, Ashby, Mass., Thirza Mcintosh. 
1834. March 5, Mcintosh, Betsey Wright. 

1837. Oct. , David Wallace, Sarah Ann Smith. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 441 

Marriages of Brookline People in Townsend, Mass. 
By Rev. Samuel Dix. 

1763. Jan. 8, Alexander Mcintosh, Mile Slip, Mary Walker, Pepperell. 

Mass. 

1764. May 29, Samuel Douglass, Slip Town, Mary Conant, Townsend, 

Mass. 

1777. June 24, Phineas Astin, Elizabeth Spaulding. 

1778. May 7, Daniel Spaulding, Townsend, Rebeekah Osgood. 

1781. Feb. 22, Josiah Seward, Sarah Osgood. 

1782. March 7, George Woodward, Jane Wallace. 

1782. Aug. 12, Jacob Wetherbee, Mason, Grace Patten. 

1783. May 1, John Wright, Mason, Hannah Russell. 
1790. May 21, James Searle, Townsend, Sally Patten. 

, Abel Green, Hannah Farrer, Townsend. 
1792. Sept. 11, Samuel Hodgman, Phene Lawrence, Townsend. 
1792. Oct. 10, David Lawrence, Townsend, Kesia Williams. 
1794. Jan. 30, John Colburn, Townsend, Kesia Campbell. 

From Church Records, Townsend, Mass. 

1801. March 15, John Williams, Lucy Foster, Townsend. 

1803. Sept. 12, Isaac Sanders, Hannah Sanders. 

1813. April 22, Jeptha Wright, Polly Hosley. 

1814. June, 9 Phinehas Austin, Ruth Baldwin, Townsend. 
1819. Dec. 19, Joseph Simonds, Brookline, Betsey Tarbell. 
1821. Feb. 15, James Lancey, Azubah Shattuck. 

1826. Sept. 3, Colburn Green, Sarah Colson. 

1826. Oct. 26, Phillip Farnsworth, Jr., Abigail Dix. 

1827. May 29, Lancey, Going, Lunenburg, Mass. 
1830. March 4, Asa Mars, Sally Foster. 

From Brookline Town Records. 

1778. May 6, Swallow Tucker and Anna Sanders. 

1778. March 19, Archibald Mcintosh and Susanna Russell. 

1779. Oct. 28, Elias Dickey and Jenny Ferson. 

1780. Feb. 10, Eleazer Gilson, and Hannah Shattuck.. 

1781. Feb. 22, Josiah Seward and Sarah Osgood. 



442 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

1781. June 12, Samuel Nutting and Molly Russell. 

1782. Feb. 12, Andrew Russell and Rebecca Nutting. 
1782. Feb. 13, John Connick and Abigail Hartshorn. 
1786. Nov. 16, John Wallace and Sarah Pett. 

1788. Mar. 11, Ebenezer Astin and Mary Tucker. 

1782. Mar. 27, Thomas Asten and Ruth Russell. 

1788. Sept. 4, Isaac Sanders and Mrs. Hannah Woodward. 

1789. Jan. 6, William Hall and Mary Mcintosh. 
1789 March 24, Abijah Parker and Eleanor Seaver. 

1790. Nov. 25, Joseph Douglass and Amy Smith. 

1790. Dec. 21, John Russell and Lefe Lawrence, of Mason. 

1791. Dec. 29, Samuel Farnsworth and Azubah Badger, M. S. 

1792. Jan. 23, Samuel Russell and Susanna Campbell of Mason. 
1792. Jan. 23 ; Jonas Campbell and Elizabeth Russell. 

1792. Jan. 26, Samuel Douglass, Jr., and Sarah Seaver. 

1793. May 2, Stephen Hall and Mrs. Submit Shattuck. 
1793. May 22, Amos Crouch of Boxboro, Mass., Lydia Brown. 
1796. Oct. 4, Asher Spaulding and Nabby Green. 

1796. Nov. 20, Benjamin Tucker and Elizabeth Shannon. 

1797. Nov. 16, Aaron Simons and Hannah Proctor. 

1798. Mar. 11, Abijah Shattuck and Nancy Sanderson. 
1798. Mar. 22, Abijah Proctor and Sally Bills. 

1798. April 5, Uriah Hall and Hannah Shattuck. 

1798. Nov. 15, Caleb Blood and Mary Williams. 

1798. Dec. 13, Samuel Brooks and Hannah Bennett. 

1799. Jan. 15, Mathew Wallace and Betsey Mcintosh. 
1799. Oct. 3, Ezra Shattuck and Polly Sever. 

1799. Feb. 17, John Cummings and Betsey Hall. 

1799. Dec. 3, Jonathan Clark of Washington and Betsey Davidson. 

1800. Nov. 11, Oliver Hall and Rebecca Spaulding. 

1800. June 22, Ebenezer Wheeler and Betsey Leslie. 

1801. June 25, Gardner Conant and Sally Straw. 
1801. Sept. 17, William Ayers and Hannah Foster 

1801. Nov. 26, Nathan Gilson and Abigail Hobart. 

1802. Sept. 7, Josiah Wheeler and Mary Tucker. 
1802. Sept. 19, Thomas Lancey and Molly Wetherbee. 
1802. Oct. 10, Moses Shattuck and Sally Wetherby. 

1802. Oct. 19, Samuel Peabody and Hannah Pike. 

1803. June 26, Joshua Smith and Mary Austin 
1803. June 29, Samuel Tucker and Lydia Lowell. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 443 

1803. July 6, John Peabody and Ede Sartell. 

1803. Sept. 11, Richard Davis and Polly Stearns. 

1803. Sept. 17, William Lovejoy and Esther Burns. 

1805. Oct. 27, Benjamin Brooks and Hannah Lash. 

1805. Nov. 28, Sewell Wetherby and Sally Spaulding. 

1805. Dec. 21, John Emerson Wheeler and Lydia Flagg. 

1806. Mar. 9, Samuel Stearns and Anna Lash. 

1807. Jan. 22, Ensign Bailey and Martha Daniels. 

1807. Mar. 3, Ephraim Whitcomb, Jr. and Nancy Gilbert. 

1807. Mar. 24, Eleazer Gilson and Mary Senter. 

1807. June 30, Edward Hazen and Esther Cass. 

1807. July 5, Abraham Bailey, and Olive Dailey. 

1807. Nov. 3, James White and Mary Green. 

1807. Nov. 26, Prescott Wright and Hannah Gilson. 

1807. Dec. 8, Boag Brown Draper and Sally Lowell. 

1808. Feb. 11, John Daniels and Bridget Cummings. 
1808. May 29, Daniel Gassett and Betsey Spaulding. 

1808. Aug. 31, John Brown and Lucy Brown. 

1809. Feb. 9, William Hall and Betsey Gilson. 

1810. Oct. 14, John Orr and Mary Wright. 

1810. Nov. 18, Jonathan Jefts, Mason, and Betsey Wright, Mason. 

1810. Nov. 22, Randall McDonald and Rebeccah Campbell. 

1811. Jan. 31, Nathaniel Sawtelle, Jr., and Sybil Shattuck, both of Pep- 

perell, Mass. 

1811. June 3, Jonas Woods, Jr., and Patty Hobart, Dunstable, Mass. 

1811. June 25, Daniel Lawrence and Rebeccah Lawrence. 

1811. Dec. 29, Jesse Fletcher and Patience Hobart, Townsend. 

1812. Jan. 14, Luther Rockwood and Kesiah Brooks. 
1812. Jan. 19, John Hutchinson and Rebeccah Shattuck. 

1812. April 7, Samuel Richardson, Shirley, Mass and Betsey Hodgman. 

1812. May 5, Timothy Wright and Lucy Mellendy. 

1812. July 22, Thomas Cummings and Sarah Proctor, both of Hollis. 

1812. Sept. 27, Jonathan Brooks and Lydia Austin. » 

1812. Oct. 1, Aretus Swallow, of Dunstable, and Susannah Kendall. 

1812. Oct. 8, William S. Crosby and Lydia Mira Whitcomb. 

1812. Oct. 11, Eri Daniels and Fannie Wright. 

1812. Nov. 30, John Sanders and Cyrena Daniels. 

1812. Dec. 24, Benjamin Smith and Sally Daniels. 

1812. Dec. 27, David Daniels and Mary Fletcher. 

1813. Mar. 9, Samuel Gilson and Rebeccah Wright. 



444 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

1813. Mar. 14. Ebenezer J. Flagg of Mason and Ellis Woods of Hollis. 

1813. Mar. 16, Robert Sever and Hepzibah Gilson. 

1813. Sept. 3, Joshua Smith and Sally Cummings. 

1813. Dec. 2, Simon Pierce and Sally Hodgman. 

1813. Dec. 5, David Dutton, Mont Vernon and Delinda Sanders. 

1813. Dec. 26, William Adams, Townsend, Mass., Martha Lawrence 
Hollis. 

1813. Dec. 30, Solomon Sanders and Sally Adams. 

1814. Nov. 14, Areal Goin, of Jaffrey, Betsy Hazen, Dunstable. 

1815. Mar. 7, Reuben Tarbell, Mason, Susanna Brown. 
1815. July 16, Joel Tarbell, Mason, Betsy Shattuck. 

1815. Aug. 23, Henry Hutchinson, Milford, Sarah Osgood, Milford. 

1815. Aug. 23, Benjamin Osgood, Rachel Hutchinson, both of Milford. 

1815. Aug. 31, vSamuel Perkins and Mary Shattuck. 

1816. Jan. 7, Ebenezer Mills, Lyndboro, Malvina Holden. 
1816. July 4, Jacob Nutting, and Hannah Ames. 

1816. Nov. 7, Eleazer Kemp, Pepperell, Mass., Nancy Smith. 

1816. Nov. 10, George H. Verder and Deverd Wright. 

1816. Nov. 13, Prince Burnham, Rhoda Gilbert, both of Boston. 

1816. Dec. 3, Asa Betterly, Rhoda Swallow, Dunstable. Mass. 

1817. Jan. 28, David Green Kemp and Orphy Hodgman, Ashby, Mass. 
1817. Feb. 23, Vernal Barber, Sherburne, Mass., Mary Waugh. 

1817. June 17, Davis Bills and Hannah Lawrence. 

1817. May 20. Daniel Burns, Milford, and Lydia Sawtelle. 

1818. Dec. 24, John Sawtell and Elizabeth Parker. 

1819. Dec. 30, Samuel Tucker and Clarinda Ames. 
1821. May 6, Stephen Perkins and Sally Gilson. 
1821. Nov. 8, David Gilson and Polly Lovejoy. 
1821. Mar. 15, Noah Shattuck and Clarissa Sanders. 
1821. Oct. 9, Loammi Parker and Mary Mcintosh. 
1824. July 4, Horace Warner and Abigail Sawtelle. 

1824. July 6, David Wright and Mary Pedrick. 

1825. Aug. 15, James Campbell and Betsy Farnsworth. 

1825. Nov. 24, John Hemphill and Polly Gilson. 

1826. Dec. 10, Samuel T. Boynton and Martha Daniels. 

1827. Apr. 24, David Harris, Louisa Marshall of Dunstable, Mass. 
1827. Feb. 20, Samuel Green and Polly Campbell, both of Townsend. 
1827. Mar. 15, Abel Shattuck and Deverd Verder. 

1827. Mar. 15, William Gilson and Eliza Ames. 

1827. May 3, Luther Burge and Almira Reed, of Hollis. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 445 

1827. July 5, Thomas V. Wright and Mary Bowers, both of Hollis. 

1827. Sept. 29, Phineas Holden and Sukey Green. 
1826. Mar. 26, James Parker and Deverd Corey. 

1828. Mar. 2, Benjamin Wheeler and Roxanna Woods. 

1828. May 25, Abner W. Marble, Wilton, and Mary Melendy. 

1828. June 12, Beri Bennett and Margaret Russell of Milford. 

1828. July 23, John Burns, Milford., and Susan Daniels 

1828. July 20, Asia Shattuck and Jane Wallace. 

1828. July 31, James Pierce and Lucy Wheeler. 

1828. July 13, Rufus Senter and Mary Shattuck 

1828. Aug. 19, John Colburn and Eliza Wallace. 

1828. Sept. 2, Horace Warner and Augusta Hall. 

1829. May 31, Walter Blood, Townsend, and Lucy Wadsworth. 
1829. May 6, Jonas Wheeler, Lyndeboro, and Mary Hall. 
1829. July 8, Joseph Robbins and Mary Ann Reed. 

1829. Oct. 25, Hezekiah Beard of Townsend, and Eliza Wadsworth. 

1829. Nov. 29, Louisana Lancey and Martha Farnsworth. 

1831. Mar. 9, Peter Green Robbins and Roxanna Robins. 

1831. May 31, Nathan Blood, Pepperell, and Mary Brooks. 

1831. June 19, Jonas Lawrence and Sally Wright. 

1833. Feb. , Benjamin C. Jaquith, Barnard, Vt., Grace Wallace. 

1833. Mar. 24, Joseph Smith and Abigail Talbot. 

1834. Oct. 4, Waldo Wallace and Catherine Hall. 

1834. Dec. 4, Artemas Wright, Groton, Mass., Mary McDonald. 

1836. Feb. 27, Capt. John Smith and Lucy Lund. 

1836. July 7, Franklin McDonald and Lucy Rockwood. 

1836. Oct. 4, John G. Jones and Abigail Law. 

1837. Mar. 20, Heman Sever and Eliza Boynton of Weare. 
1837. Dec. 6, William R. Green and Betsy Wallace. 

1839. Apr. 4, Moses Bohonnon, Danbury, and Hannah Wright. 

1839. May 1, Ira Proctor, Hollis, and Mary Hutchinson. 

1839. May 1, Asa Seaver and Rebecca Hutchinson. 

1840. Jan. 28, Daniel A. Alexander, Medford, Mass., Susan Seaver. 
1840. June 26, Capt. Jonathan Abbott, Andover, Mass., Susan Corey. 
1840. Oct. 1, Porter Hartwell, Boston, Mass., Mary Jane Corey. 

1840. Oct. 13, Jotham Grimes and Jane Wright. 

1841. Oct. 7, Henry B. Stiles and Betsy A. Smith. 

1841. Oct. 14, Wilkes W. Corey and Sophia R. Shattuck. 

1842. Nov. 29, Levi Rockwood and Cynthia Hobart. 

1842. Nov. 24, Alfred A. Woodward, Amherst, Clorinda Hutchinson. 



446 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

1843. Apr. 6, Jeremiah Baldwin and Mary Bennett. 

1843. July 6, John Knowles, Nashville, Hannah A. Hall. 

1844. Oct. 10, Fernando Bailey Lucretia Stevens, Pepperell, Mass. 

1844. Dec. 31, Joseph F. Jefts and Roxanna Shattuck. 

1845. Sept. 17, N. Herman Shattuck and Charlotte A. Croiser. 
1845. Sept. 25, Henry K. Kemp, Groton, Mass., Paulina J. Hall. 

1847. May 6, William Kendall, Pepperell, Mass., Augusta Warner. 

1847. Nov. 25, Joseph W. Peterson and Martha Hall. 

1847. Nov. 25, Oliver O. Davis, Elmira Davis, both of Mason. 

1847. June 27, George A. Johnson, Nashua, Mary A. Betterly. 

1847. Oct. 10, Zachariah Whitman, Westminster, Mass., and Ellen F. 

Johnson, Leominster, Mass. 

1848. Mar. 31, Sylvester Jones, Manchester, Albina Betterly. 
1848. Nov. 6, George Russell, Mason, Hannah Cram, Lyndeboro. 

1848. Nov. 7, Augustus May, Ashburnham, Mass., Sarah E. Reed, Groton 

Mass. 

1849. Apr. 21, Jeremiah Baldwin and Elizabeth Hall. 

1849. May 6, John Spaulding, Millbury, Mass., Mrs. Louisa Hobart. 

1849. Aug. 4, James A. Williams, Hannah Robbins, both of Boston. 

1850. Jan. 1, Stanford Cram and Hannah L. Cram. 

1850. Jan. 24, Charles Gilson, Rutland, Vt., Sophia Pierce, of Chelmsford, 

Mass. 

1850. Jan. 31, Henry B. Farwell, New Gloucester, Mass., Emily Harris. 

1850. Jan. 10, John Waugh and Abigail Hartwell. 

1850. Mar. 7, Joseph F. Johnson, Caroline Bills, both of Townsend. 

1850. Mar. 3, George Bumon, Ellen Hyrus, both of Townsend. 

1850. Mar. 19, Nathaniel Hobart and Eliza Ann Shattuck. 

1850. Aug. 18. Joseph R. Foss, Merideth Village, Maria A. Woodward. 

1850. Nov. 26, Benjamin F. Worcester, Rebecca Worcester, both of 

Groton, Mass, 

1850. Dec, 3. Irving Colburn, Melissa Reed, Mont Vernon. 

1851. Jan. 1, Edward P. Cummings, Francestown, Harriet Bailey. 
1851. Jan. 16, John A. Gutterson and Catherine E. Hall. 

1851. June 4, Bradley Stone, Milford, Asenath Colburn. 

1851. June 4, Frederick F. Wright and Mary A. Colburn. 

1851. July 1, Joseph A. Hall and Mary M. Foster. 

1851. Oct. 23, Samuel Brooks and Alexena S. Lawrence. 

1852. Feb. 26, Isaac W. Vickery and Harriet E. Spaulding, Lempster, 

Mass. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 447 

1850. Aug. 24, Thomas Hartwell, Charlestown, Mass., and Ann Larkin, 

of Gloucester, Mass. 

1852. Apr. 12, John H. Worcester, Elmira Gilson, both of Groton, Mass. 

1852. Apr. 27, Newton W. Colburn and Sarah E. Leslie. 

1852. Apr. 29, Charles L. Willoby and Augusta B. Wheeler. 

1852. Aug. 18, Jefferson Whitcomb, Townsend, Eliza Ann Gilson. 

1852. Sept. 16, Joseph Smith and Mrs. William Whitcomb. 

1852. Dec. 16, Rufus G. Russell and Augusta French. 

1853. Apr. 7, George A. McLure, Meridan, N. Y., Malvina A. Merrill. 
1853. Apr. 7, Edward P. Crosby, Milford, Clara F. Haddon, Nashua. 
1853. July 24. Benjamin A. Davis, Lovina Hemphill, both of Nashua. 
1853. Aug. 7, Aaron Blood, Amy Houston, Ashby, Mass. 

1853. Sept. 4, Charles N. Merrill, Susan E. Morrill, New Ipswich. 

1853. Nov. 24, Charles B. Powers, Worcester, Mass., Sarah Hemphill. 

1853. Apr. 7, Kendall Shattuck, Mary C. Nutting, Pepperell, Mass. 

1853. May 4, William Wright and K. Jane Rockwood. 

1853. Oct. 25. Edwin W. Smith, Milford, E. Augusta Hobart. 

1853. Nov. 3, Henry Spaulding and Sarah A. Perkins. 

1854. Jan. 20, John Ritchie, Nashua, Lucinda Bailey. 

1854. Apr. 15, George F. Chamberlain, Barre, Mass., and Martha Flagg 

of Hubbardston, Mass. 

1855. Apr. 5, John Campbell, Mason, and lydia Campbell. 

1856. Oct. 10, William McCall, San Francisco, Cal., Louisa Gould. 

1856. June 15, Morgan Burdick, Mary Jane Howe, both of Milford. 

1857. Jan. 29, Samuel Gilson, Sarah Reed, Gardner, Mass. 
1857. Feb. 22, Luther Burge and Eliza Ann Seaver. 

1857. Feb. 26, Charles H. Porter and Rhoda R. Fredericks. 

1857. April 1, Charles H. Russell and Amanda Gilson. 

1857. Sept. 10, Nathaniel W. Lund, Mrs. Caroline B. Gerry, Townsend. 

1857. Oct. 13, Daniel B. Willoby and Mrs. Mary Lakeman. 

1857. Dec. 7, Benjamin Boutwell and Frances W. Russell. 

1858. April 8, James R. Pierce and Catharine Burge. 

1859. Jan. 14, Nathaniel Gilson, Nellie C. Harris, Petersham, Mass. 

1859. April 7, William C. Boutwell and Lucy Converse. 

1860. Sept,. 8 John S. Howard and Sophia White. 

1860. Sept. 11, Timothy Hodgman and Mrs. Sarah Love joy. 

1860. Sept. 18, Otis Clemens and Abbie Ranger. 

1861. Jan. 1, Rodney P. Peabody and Mary Flaws. 
1861. April 26, Augustus Lovejoy and Hattie A. Wright. 
1861. Aug. 11, David W. Miller and Thirza Bennett. 



448 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

1861. Aug. 24, Francis A. Grimes and Helen Barnes. 

1861. Sept. 1, John C. Bennett and Lizzie G. Rood. 

1861. Nov. 22, David A. Hill and Caroline Wetherbee. 

1861. Sept. 24, Phelps Brooks and Betsy J. Adams. 

1861. Oct. 23, George Farnsworth and Hattie A. Waters. 

1861. Nov. 14, Charles C. Hodgman and Mrs. Nancy Sylvester. 

1862. Feb. 7, Lewis Cleveland and Sarah D. Ward. 

1862. May 19, James Woodward and Melona L. Shattuck. 

1862. Sept. 3, Lewis Law and Ellen Lancey 

1862. Sept. 13, Ferdinand E. Lancey and Catherine H. Robbins. 

1862. Nov. 5, Nathaniel B. Hutchinson and Emily T. Shedd. 

1862. Nov. 12, Onslow Daniels and Maggie Cathcart. 

1862. Nov. 22, William D. Phelps, Josephine Wilcox, Wilmington, Mass. 

1862. Nov. 6, Calvin R. Shedd and Mrs. Mary Sawtelle. 

1862. Nov. 27, James Page and Emily Warren. 

1862. Dec. 4, George Plummer and Hannah M. Martindale. 

1863. Jan. 8, Charles G. Hutchinson and Annette S. Jefts. 
1863. Feb. 7, Amos Blodgett and Lucy A. Betterly. 
1863. Oct. 15, Albert F. Wright and Lydia M. Burgess. 

1863. Dec. 23, William Wright and Mrs. Eliza A. E. Keyes, Mason. 

1863. Dec. 31, P. Warren Gould and Augusta Fessenden. 

1864. Joseph B. Swett and Emily C. Gilson. 

1864. May 3, Luther McDonald and Marietta Dustin. 

1865. July 1, Charles P. Hall and Annie S. Green. 

1865. March 12, Clinton Bohonon and Hattie A. Hobart. 

1865. April 8, Charles N. Corey and Sarah J. Sawtelle. 

1865. May 18, Norris C. Wetherbee and Abbie M. Smith. 

1865. July 18, Bryant W. Wallace and Jane N. Pierce. 

1865. July 23, Nathaniel B. Hutchinson and Lizzie H. Hunter. 

1865. Sept. 17, James C. Rounds and Jennie Flagg. 

1866. March 21, Moses B. Wright and Seriphina H. Gardner. 
1866. Aug. 24, Frederick A. Nightingale and Fannie D. Chase. 
1866. Nov. 26, John Holland and Ellen Sullivan, Milford. 
1866. Nov. 29, John Bohonon and Phema Page, Pepperell, Mass. 
1866. Dec. 12, Asa S. Burgess and Mary L. Forbes. 

1866. Dec. 13, Isaiah E. Scripture and Mary Foster. 

1867. Feb. 13, John C. Burgess and Nellie A. Henderson, Nashua. 
1867. March 28, Eugene L. Nelson and Emma L. Colburn. 

1867. April 17, Beri Bennett and Mrs. Nancy Lynch. 

1867. April 27, Charles F. Carlton and Caroline F. Peabody. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 449 

1867. Oct. 3, E. Henry Gurney and Mary W. Orcutt. 

1867. Nov. 25, Joseph C. Shattuck and Eliza J. Gould. 

1867. Dee. 11, Joshua Hobart and Mary Baker, Westminster, Mass. 

1868. Jan. 1, Edward T. Hall and Marilla E. Edson. 
1868. June 9, Henry Bradford and Martha Gould. 
1868. July 6, Jonathan Powers and Emerline Ranson. 
1868. Sept. 8, George M. Peabody and Mary Frances Hall. 
1868. Oct. 5, George H. Needham and Abby Farnum. 
1868. Oct. 14, Asa S. Burgess and Sarah A. Smith. 

1868. Sept. , Daniel Parker and Sarah A. Wright. 

1868. Nov. , John Wright and Alvira Robbins. 

1868. Sept. , Charles W. Hunter and Alma Holt of Peterboro. 

1868. Sept. , Solomon O. Robbins and Marion Woods, Milford. 

1869. Jan. 20, Nathaniel M. Vickery and Margaret Valentyne. 
1869. Feb. 6, Fernando Bailey and Mrs. Evaline B. Ball. 
1869. March 11, James M. Nutting and Lizzie Coudrey. 
1869. May 29, Timothy Wright and Lucinda Willoby, Milford. 
1869. Nov. 8, Lewis G. Hunter and Nellie S. Needham. 

1869. Nov. 18, 

1869. ,Ai W. Stickney and Hattie M. Shattuck. 

1869. Dec. 25, William Hodgman and M. Louisa Edson. 

1870. Jan. 1, Albert B. Brooks and Louisa Harwood. 
1870. Feb. 3, Oren J. Bailey and Ellen F. Baldwin. 
1870. Feb. 23, Edward H. Russell and Adelaide Colburn. 

1870. Nov. 23, Nathan Buttrick and Roxanna Wheeler. 

1871. Jan. 4, Leroy A. Wallace and Ellen L. French. 
1871. Jan. 8, Martin A. Rockwood and Mary E. Livermore. 
1871. , Franklin T. Lane and Mary McGauley. 
1871. May 10, Edward C. Tucker and Ella Wade of Boston. 

1871. Dec. 2, William H. French and Susie E- Willoughby, Milford. 

1872. , Amos Farnsworth and Sarah A. Foss of Nashua. 
1872. Jan. 9, Simon Lawrence. and Sarah A. Burgess. 

1872. July 3, Charles A. Wright, Townsend, Luoisa J. Burgess. 

1872. July 25, Joseph R. Smith and Lizzie M. Taylor, Townsend. 

1872. Aug. 23, Albert Wilson and Ella M. Whitaker, both of Milford. 

1872. Sept. 21, Robert Ellis and Mary E. F. Bond, both of Milford. 

1872. Dec. 5, Perley A. Smith and Maria M. Proctor of Hollis. 

1872. Dec. 25, Augustus Flagg and Mary J. Coggswell, Concord, Mass. 

1873. Sept. 17, Luther A. Gilson and Lizzie S. Smith, Hollis. 
1873. Nov. 25, John O. A. Wiley, Amherst, and Sarah P. Clark. 



450 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

1873. Dec. 21, Thomas J. Abbott and Theresa M. Seaver. 

1874. April 21, Samuel D. Gilson and Elizabeth L. Ross, Bennington, Vt. 
1874. May 17, Ai W. Stickney and Emma E. Fletcher, Mt. Holly, Vt. 
1874. May 27, John D. Hobart and Mary A. Wallace. 

1874. vSept. 10, William F. Harwood and Georgia A. Wilkins. 

1874. Oct. 6, Franklin McDonald and Louisa J. Fales, Harvard, Mass. 

1874. Nov. 4, Walter F. Cook and Lizzie A. Burrill, Reading, Mass. 

1875. April 28, Albert T. Pierce and Minnie J. Thomas. 
1875. April 8, George H. Blood and Harriet A. Hills. 
1875. May 10, Charles H. Burnham and Cora A. Lund. 

1875. May 27, Moses B. Wright and Addie S. Pierce, Chelsea, Mass. 

1875. June 3, Gorham Storer and Achsah N. Bohonon. 

1875. July 3, Eli S. Cleveland and Mrs. Addie Kline. 

1875. Aug. 17, James C. Parker and Mrs. Cynthia Carr of E. Washington. 

1875. Sept. 8, Dr. D. S. Dearborn and M. J. Adams. 

1875. Oct. 19, Samuel Swett and Lucy C. Pierce. 

1875. Nov. 4, George H. Nye and Lenora M. Wright. 

1876. Jan. 18, George A. Kendall and Adna E. Fretts, Milford. 
1876. March 5, Albert W. Corey and Mary Kline. 

1876. March 30, David D. Rockwood and Ella F. Herrick. 

1876. May 3, Daniel R. Bean and Louisa Shattuck of Concord. 

1876. May 21, Charles W. Smith and Emma A. Gates of Townsend. 

1876. June 3, William H. Crossman and Sarah A. Betterly. 

1876. Sept. 5, Andrew Rockwood and Rebecca Pierce, Townsend, Mass. 

1877. April 16, George W. Foster and Areine Worcester. 
1877. April 10, Hermon O. Bean and Sarah E. Storer. 

1877. Dec. 23, E. A. Bruce and Abbie A. Goin of Townsend. 

1876. Dec. 30, Daniel Sullivan, Townsend, Mass., Delpha Sanders. 

1876. March 26, George L. Whitcomb and Emma Weyth both of Town- 
send. 

1876. Dec. 25, William A. Bennett, Milford, and Sarah H. Hardy. 

1877. Nov. 13, Moses Bohonon and Mrs. Elizabeth Lawrence of Pepperell. 

1877. Nov. 12, Charles A. Robbins of Hollis and Clara L. Hayes. 

1878. Jan. 1, Parker Jewett, Gridley, 111., Rachel Steele. 
1878. April 3, Icabod F. Lund and Alexina S. Brooks. 
1878. June 2, Samuel Swett and Mrs. Ellen Hunter. 

1878. Nov. 24, Elmer W. Wallace and Jennie E. Rockwood. 

1878. Dec. 25, Jacob Aspenwall and Lizzie M. Hill of New Ipswich. 

1879. Jan. 5, Charles G. Dunbar and Flora J. Pinkham. 
1879. Mar. 1, George O. Hutchins and Laura A. Ludwig. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 451 

1879. May 14, Amos A. Gould and Arabella A. Green. 

1879. Oct. 11, Harry S. Richmond and Mattie A. Bailey. 

1879. Sept. 18, Orman F. Shattuck and Hattie A. Parker, Townsend 

Mass. 

1879. Oct. 2, Orange H. Cook of Townsend, Mass. and Etta Kendall. 

1879. Oct. 29, Frank A. Cook, Reading, Mass., Helen M. Hobart. 

1879. Dec. 31, Albro H. Putnam and Ellen J. Russell, Townsend. 

1880. Jan. 18, Charles N. Corey and Sarah J. Corey. 
1880. April 6, Freeman E. Wright and Etna E. Baldwin. 
1880. Oct. 10, Alpha A. Hall and Nellie J. Fletcher, Hollis. 
1880. Oct. 31, George E. Stiles and Mary J. Sawtelle. 

1880. Oct. 28, Joseph Sawtelle and Mrs. Cynthia J. Roockwod. 

1880. Nov. 24, Zenas M. Gilman, Boston, Mass., Lula S. Ball. 

1881. Feb. 27, Charles W. Smith and Elnora L. Taylor, Townsend. 
1881. April 29, Willie A. Hobart and Hattie Rideout. 

1881. Nov. 25, Arthur E. Lawrence, Shirley, Mass., Nellie E. Chase, 
Hampton. 

1881. Jan. 8, William O. Buxton, Fitchburg,Mass., Lulu Johnson, Lunen- 
burg, Mass. 

1881. May 9, William N. Alexander and Alice E. Johnson, Mont Vernon. 

1881. June 15, George W. Fish and Lellie Chapman, Hanover, Mass. 

1881. July 17, Walter F. Rockwood and Clara W. Whitcomb. 

1881. Aug. 3, Charles A. Bills and Lizzie E. Peacock. 

1881. Dec. 22, Nathaniel Hardy, Hattie M. Willoby, both of Milford. 

1881. Nov. 12, Frederick Hildreth, Townsend, Martha J. Baxter. 

1882. March 8, John F. Hutchinson, Lexington, Mass., Mary W. Lund. 
1882. Feb. 23, Fred Farnsworth and Ella M. Foster. 

1882. Aug. 8, Michael Keefe and Mary Grady both of Fitchburg, Mass. 

1882. June 1, Arthur E. Chase, Lelia L. Barrett, both of Mason. 

1883. June 13, George H. Willoby, Emily L. Gardner, Machias, Me. 
1883. July 9, Hartly R. Lampson and Laura E- Pierce. 

1883. Nov. 6, Alpha A. Hall and Delia R. Peacock. 

1883. Nov. 15, Willie E. Betterly and Mary L. Hall. 

1883. Nov. 22, Albert T. Pierce and Ella M. Baldwin 

1883. Dec. 30, Fred G. Hobart and Francenia Hofsess. 

1884. Jan. 8, Elza A. Tibbetts, New Castle, Me., Mary A. Kendall. 
1884. Jan. 25, Augustus E. Wright, Hollis, Martha Burgess. 

1884. April 23, Delbert W. Robbins, Mary E. Alexander, Mont Vernon. 

1884. Aug. 20, James E. Corbin, Glocester, R. I., Mary E. Pratt. 
1884. Oct. 16, James H. S. Tucker and Ida L. Hodgman, Mason. 



452 HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 

1885. April 2, Eddy S. Whitcomb and Adella Baldwin. 

1885. April 9, Perley A. Gould and Grace D. Hobart. 

1885. April 9, Llewylln S. Powers and Celia A. Hobart. 

1885. June 10, George E. Betterly and Eliza Day, Townsend, Mass. 

1885. Aug. 2, Carl W. Cochran and Minnett Reed. Townsend, Mass. 

1885. Nov. 2, Elmer J. Rideout and Arrie M. Manson, York, Me. 

1885. Nov. 25, Frederick A. Sawyer, Sterling, Mass., Alice R. Rockwood. 

1886. Sept. 30, Addison L. Cleveland and Laura Colwell, Nashua. 

1887. Jan. 8, Frank I,. Weston and Jennie F. Gilson. 
1887. June 15, Amos W. Pierce and Louisa Barnaby. 
1887. Oct. 15, Horace H. Nye, Keene, Winnie H. Hall. 
1887. Oct. 29, Herbert M. Smith, Minta J. Paul of Hollis. 

1887. Nov. 29, Orville D. Fessenden and Isabella McKenzie. 

1888. April 12, Edgar M. Smith, Westboro, Mass , Lovilla J. Wright. 
1888. April , John Dobson, Townsend, Mass., Nellie Colburn. 
1888. May 31, Barnard McGovern and Hannah Donavan. 

1888. June 23, Charles H. Holcombe and Clintie A. Burton, Temple. 

1888. May 16, John B. Hardy and Caroline E. Richardson, Hollis. 

1888. Oct. 9, Henry C. Hall and Effa A. Pierce. 

1888. Dec. 1, Franklin W. Slocomb, Pepperell., Mass, Hattie M. Wright. 

1889. Feb. 6, Charles W. Reed, Hollis, Kittie J. Hannon, Northfield, Vt. 
1889. April 21, Charles P. Lawrence, Pepperell, Bessie M. Taylor. 
1889. May 1, John Colon and Emma J. Elliott. 

1889. June 12, Frank G. Williams and Hattie J. Shattuck. 

1889. Aug. 19, Wellington Peterson and Ella Norcross. 

1889. Oct. 17, George E. Rockwood, Lillian M. Colson, Townsend. 

1890. Feb. 5, George H. Kendall and Alice Pierce. 

1890. March 11, Charles N. Corey, Ella N. Jones, Chelsea, Vt. 

1890. May 8, Daniel McKenzie and Rebecca Dean of Scotland 

1890. June 4, Albert T. Pierce and Hattie F. Goodwin, Nashua. 

1890. June 8, George F. Colburn, Lowell, Isabella M. Wright. 

1890. June 7, Albert H. Whitcomb, W r ilton, Hannah Johnson. 

1890. June 11, Elmer J. Rideout and Nettie Sargent, Milford. 

1890. July 2, John G. Abbott, Mrs. Mankin Lake, Pepperell, Mass. 

1890. Nov. 2, Charles H. Buraham and Ellen A. Brooks. 

1891. June 30, Benjamin H. Pierce, Cambridge ,Mass., Grace E. Hall. 
1891. Nov. 14, Charles A. Gilson and Elmira F. Peacock. 

1891. Feb. 27, Stephen Swicker and Lena M. Corkham. 

1892. March 2, Charles C. Wheeler, Berlin, Mass., Rose Halstead. 
1892. Nov. 23, Patrick O. Kennan and Annie T. O'Neill. 



HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF BROOKLINE 453 

1893. Jan. 14, Frank D. Taylor and Luna A. Mosher. 

1893. Jan. 14, Lemuel Jones and Amy L. Mosher, Hollis. 

1893. Jan. 8, James M. Lund and Grace F. Wheeler, Hollis. 

1893. April 5, William Haselton, Townsend, Mass., Clara B. Rockwood. 

1893. July 12, John C. Evans, Ballard Vale, Mass., Frances M. Cox. 

1893. Dec. 9, Urbane F. Rowell, Townsend, Minnie R. Webb, Fitchburg. 

1893. Dec. 25, William A. Hughes, Townsend, Mass., Estelle L. Currier. 

1894. Jan. 1, Herbert S. Corey and Elva I. Shattuck. 

1894. April 12, Charles M. Wilkins; and Mary E. Melendy, Milford. 

1894. June 14, Elmer E. Daniels and Lavilla M. Kemp. 

1894. Oct. 15, George L. Wilkins and Mary E. Brooks. 

1894. Nov. 28, Alexander Whitford and Rebecca Corckham. 

1894. Dec. 31, Linville M. Shattuck and Minnie M. Daniels. 

1895. March 19, William H. Thorpe and Bertha Z. Lawrence. 
1895. March 20, Arthur A. Goss and Jennie A. Shattuck. 
1895. April 24, Ermon E. Bout well and Jennie M. Frye, Wilton. 

1895. June 26, William T. Boultonhouse, Fitzwilliam, N. H. and Cora 

F. Cleveland. 

1895. Aug. 12, Blanchard D. Sewell and Lucy B. Segree. 

1895. Sept. 3, George L. Badger, Quincy, Mass., Mabel S. Tucker. 

1896. June 2, George W. Bridges, Elizabeth C. Todd, New Boston. 
1896. June 16, Onslow Daniels and Lavina R. Eddy. 

1896. Sept. 26, Arthur E. Chase and Delia E. Peacock. 

1896. Oct. 10, Patrick Regan and Mary Shea of Belmont, Mass. 

1897. May 30, Elmer J. Wyeth, Townsend, Mass., Jennie E. Coruth. 
1897. June 9, Ernest W. Nye and Addie H. P. Segee. 

1897. Sept. 29, Allie Jameson, Katie McGannis of Milford. 

1897. Oct. 23, Edwin C. Robbins and Clara Robbins. 

1898. Feb. 5, Frederic G. Hall and Lucy J. Burton. 
1898. April 14, Samuel E. Thayer and Mabel A. Slatt