(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "History of Buchanan County, Iowa, and its people"

W riii f llll l>^>»'ji | |i | i . 'f " l»"; 



NYPL RESEARCH LIBRARIES 



3 3433 08192032 8 



HISTORY 

OF 



Buchanan County 

IOWA 

And Its People 



ILLUSTRATED 



VOLUME II 



CHICAGO 
THE S. J. CLARKE PUBLISHING COMPANY 

1914 



TEEXSW YORK 
PUBLIC LIBPiAIlY 

997701! 

ASTGH, LENOX AND 

TILDUJ 1 .L'NUATlONS 

B 1»41 L 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



RICHARD CAMPBELL. 

Richard Campbell, deceased, was the founder and first president of the First 
National Bank at Independence and was a citizen who throughout his entire life 
commanded and received the high regard, confidence and good-will of all with 
whom he came in contact. His death, therefore, was deeply regretted when, on 
the 26th of ^larch, 1901, he passed away. He was then in the seventy-fourth 
year of his age, his birth having occurred at Fort Brewerton, New York, on 
the 3d of August, 1827. His parents, John and Sarah (Wilson) Campbell, were 
probably natives of the same state and were of Scotch descent. 

Richard Campbell was one of a family of ten children, but all have now 
passed away. He attended school in New York and when a youth of about 
fifteen years began working for others in the Empire state, residing in Chit- 
tenango. In the year 1856 he came with his brother, John Campbell, to Iowa. 
They made their way westward by rail to Dubuque and thence by wagon to 
Independence. They hauled the lumber from Dubuque to build their home and 
became actively identified with the material development and progress of this 
part of the state. Following his arrival Richard Campbell began loaning money 
and later conducted the First National Bank, of which he became the first 
president, so continuing to the time of his death. He established it upon a safe 
conservative basis and made it one of the strong financial institutions of Iowa. 
Mr. Campbell was also connected with the street railway and at one time owned 
the Gedney Hotel. He was likewise associated with other business enterprises 
and at all times was actuated by a spirit of progress and improvement that 
benefited the city and county as well as advanced his individual interests. 
As he prospered in his undertakings he made judicious investments in real 
estate and became the owner of a number of valuable farms in Buchanan county 
and also considerable business and residence property in Independence, from 
which he derived a substantial annual income. 

Mr. Campbell was twice married and by the first union had a son, Richard 
Mabie, a capitalist of Independence, who is now living retired. On the 11th 
of February, 1874, Mr. Campbell was again married, his second union being 
with Miss Susan Potter Smith, who was born in New London, Connecticut, 
a daughter of Sabin and Susan Childs (Potter) Smith, who were also natives 
of New London, born in 1819 and 1821 respectively. The father followed 
merchandising in Connecticut in early life and afterward removed to New 
York. Subsequently he became a resident of Boston and still later went to 
Chicago, where he lived until a few years prior to his death, which occurred 

5 



6 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

on the 29th of November, 1907. He had long survived his wife, who died 
August 7, 1871. Mrs. Campbell was the third in order of birth in their family 
of five children and by her marriage became the mother of four children. The 
eldest, Alonzo, resides at the old home in Independence. He is the owner of 
several farms and is also proprietor of an implement, wagon and buggy business 
and a creamery. He operates his farms with the aid of tenants. Anna, the 
second of the family, died in 1901, at the age of twenty-three years. Lillian 
died in infancy. Doris Eleanor resides with her mother. For three years 
after her husband's death Mrs. Campbell resided in Dubuque, but returned to 
Independence to take up her permanent abode here, being the owner of one 
of the well appointed homes of the city. — 

In his political views Mr. Campbell was a republican and kept well informed 
on the political situation of the country but never sought nor desired office. 
From the period of his early identification with the west he was closely asso- 
ciated with the material progress and upbuilding of Buchanan county and his 
worth as a man and citizen is widely acknowledged. He possessed many sterling 
traits of character, which won for him high regard and secured for him the 
friendship of those with whom he came in contact. 



HON. MERRITT W. IIAR.MOX. 

Hon. Merritt W. Harmon, lawyer and lawmaker, who has been prominently 
connected with public affairs in Buchanan county not only as a member of the 
bar and as representative of his district in the state senate but also in connection 
with business affairs which have to do with the sulistantial upbuilding and 
progress of the community, was born in Seneca county. Ohio. June 25, 1844, a 
son of Merritt and Minerva (Walker) Harmon. The father's birth occurred in 
Vermont, March 25, 1797, and the mother was born in Warsaw, New York, March 
^0,.1810. In early manhood Merritt Harmon, Sr., went to western New York, 
but afterward returned to Vermont to attend college and when twenty-eight 
or thirty years of age he entered the ministry of the Presbyterian church. Going 
again to the Empire state, he was there married and afterward removed to 
Seneca county, Ohio, where he continued in the work of the ministry. He 
preached until ninety-four years of age. About 1848 he removed to Lansing, 
Michigan, where he resided until February, 1855, when he brought his family 
to Iowa, residing at Cascade, Dubucjue county, until 1856. He was afterward 
located at Ilopkinton, Delaware county, where he spent his remaining days, 
his death occurring in April, 1892, while his wife survived until June, 1895. 
During the latter part of the War of 1812 he was on active military duty with 
the Vermont state troops and his father was a captain in the array, 

INIerritt W. Harmon of this review was the third in order of birth in a 
family of five children. He first attended school in ]\Iichigan and afterward 
continued his education in Dubuque county, Iowa. Still later he attended the 
Hopkinton (la.) College, which was established in the fall of 1859. !Mr. Harmon 
was among its first students, spending two years there, or until the spring 
of 1862, In July of that year he joined the Twenty-first Iowa Infantry as a 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 7 

private and was made sergeant of Company K. He lacked but two days of 
serving three years and although he was often in the thickest of the fight and 
was exposed to all kinds of dangers and hardships he was never wounded nor 
was he confined in the hospital by illness. He participated in the siege of Vieks- 
burg in 1863 and in the siege of Mobile in 1864:-5. He Avas mustered out at 
Baton Rouge, Louisiana, on the 15th of July of the latter year and returned to 
Iowa with a most creditable military record, having proven his valor and loyalty 
on many a southern battlefield. Soon afterward he again went to the south in 
the employ of the Mobile & Ohio Railroad Company, spending one year in 
Mobile, Alabama. 

On the 18th of November. 1866, Mr. Harmon arrived in Buchanan county, 
Iowa, and for two years thereafter engaged in teaching school. He then became 
deputy postmaster of Independence, in 1868, which position he filled for two 
years, and was admitted to the bar in November, 1869. He entered upon the 
practice of law in Independence, forming a partnership with Colonel Jed Lake 
on the 11th of July, 1870. For more than a third of a century this partnership 
was continued and was terminated only in the death of Mr. Lake on the 11th of 
June, 1914. They engaged in the general practice of law and the firm sustained 
a most enviable reputation. In his practice Mr. Harmon prepares his cases with 
great thoroughness and care and seems ever ready for not only attack but also 
for defense. His ability is manifest in his clear and cogent reasoning, in his 
logical deductions and in his correct application of legal principles. It is a well 
recognized fact that the lawyer is more often called to public office than any 
other class of men and the reason for this is obvious, for the preparation which 
qualified him for the bar also prepares him in large measure for other duties, 
enabling him readily to analyze and understand a situation. It was but natural, 
therefore, that Mr. Harmon was called to public office, being elected a member 
of the state senate in 1875, in which connection he did able service in safeguard- 
ing and promoting the best interests of the commonwealth. He was on the ways 
and means committee for eight years. Governor Larrabee being chairman, and 
was chairman of the judiciary and military committees. He was also on the 
committee on penitentiaries and other minor committees. He has filled various 
local offices, including tliat of member of the school board for ten years and has 
been a member of the public librarv board for thirtv vears or more. 

Aside from his practice Mr. Harmon is a director of the First National Bank 
of Independence and at different times has been connected with other business 
affairs, but has severed his connection therewith in order to concentrate his 
efforts upon his law practice. 

On the 24th of December, 1872, ]\Ir. Harmon was married to Miss Maria 
Carter, a native of Ohio, as were her parents, Samuel G. and 'Slary (Houk) 
Carter, who came to Iowa about 1861, settling in Buchanan county, where her 
father followed the occupation of farming and spent his entire life, removing 
to Independence upon retiring from farm life. To Mr. and Mrs. Harmon have 
been born two children: Ray C, an electrical and mechanical engineer residing 
in Des Moines ; and Jessamine, at home. 

In Masonry ]\Ir. Harmon has taken the degrees of the lodge, chapter and 
council. He belongs to E. C. Little Post, No. 54, G. A. R., and thus maintains 
pleasant relations with his old army comrades. He is a member of the Presby- 
terian church and guides his life by its principles. He owns considerable city 



8 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

property in Independence and this is the tangible evidence of a well spent life, 
in which devotion to his profession and careful management of other business 
affairs have brought their merited reward. His record is that of a man who 
has ever been faultless in honor, fearless in conduct and stainless in reputation. 



COLONEL JED LAKE. 



The number of those surviving who were in reality pioneers in the state and 
who, through unremitting toil and the brave endurance of hardships, took posses- 
sion of the wild prairies years ago in the name of civilization, whether as 
farmers, professional men or merchants, is fast decreasing, but the memory of 
their heroic live.s will remain as a stimulus to endeavor as long as the great 
state which they founded endures. Colonel Jed Lake, who passed away at 
Independence on the 7th of June, 1914, was a man who, coming to this country 
in the early days, suffered the discomforts of pioneer life and also knew the 
stern pleasure that comes from persevering in a worthy work and from perform- 
ing faithfully- a duty. He was one of the first attorneys of the county and rose 
to a position of leadership at the local bar, which he retained until the infirmities 
of age compelled him to largely retire from practice. 

His birth occurred in Cortland county. New York, on the 18th of November, 
1830, and his parents were Jedediah and Patience (Church) Lake. The father 
was born in 1798, in Montgomery county. New York, a son of Henry Lake, who 
served under General George Washington in the Revolutionary war, enlisting 
when a boy of seventeen years and serving for four years. In 1822 Jedediah 
Lake settled in Virgil, Cortland county. New York, and there his marriage to 
Miss Church occurred. She was a native of Windsor, Vermont, and by her 
marriage became the mother of four children, of whom the subject of this 
review was the third in order of birtli. The fatlier died when the Colonel was 
but three years of age, leaving the mother with four children, the eldest of whom 
was but seven years old. 

Colonel Lake attended the common schools in the acquirement of an educa- 
tion, and worked at whatever he could find to do in order to partly provide for 
his own sup])ort. At one time he drove a team on the Erie canal for thirteen 
dollars a month and as soon as he had received sufficient education he engaged in 
teaching scliool. He also worked as a farm hand for .some time and as he was 
determined to continue his studies he lived as economically as possible and 
saved his earnings and in this way accunuilated a sufficient sum to enable him 
to attend the New York Central College at McGraw, New York. While a student 
there he worked in his spare time and thus paid part of his expenses. He later 
attended Homer Academy, taking an advanced course in mathematics, but as 
his health had inirtially failed he left school and turned his attention to outdoor 
work. 

In 1855, when a young man of twenty-five. Colonel Lake canu' to Buchanan 
county and for two years woi-ked upon a farm in Buffalo township but at the 
end of that time came to Independence and began the study of law. He was 
admitted to the bar in the spring of 1859 and immediately entered upon practice. 



PUBLIC LI 



u 



_J 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY H 

In 1861 he was elected to the state legislature and served in the session when that 
body pledged the support of Iowa to the preservation of the Union. His service 
to his country in its time of need did not end there, as in the summer of 1862 he 
enlisted in Company H, Twenty-seventh Iowa Infantry, was elected lieutenant 
of his company and soon after appointed by Governor Kirkwood as lieutenant 
colonel of the regiment, which soon after its organization was sent to Minnesota 
to protect the frontier settlements against the Indians. When the danger from 
that quarter had been averted the command was ordered south and took an 
active part in the war until the close of hostilities. During much of the time 
Colonel Lake was in command of his regiment and proved a gallant and faithful 
officer. 

Upon his return from the war he resumed the practice of his profession and 
in July, 1870, formed a partnership with M. W. Harmon, which was continued 
with mutual pleasure and profit until it was severed by death. In 1878 the firm 
of Lake & Harmon was retained to defend a large number of actions brought 
against residents of Iowa by the owners of a patent known as the "driven well" 
patent. These suits were brought in the circuit court of the United States for 
the district of Iowa, the defendants in most cases being farmers, who were sued 
for royalties claimed by the owners of the patent. Colonel Lake took charge of 
the defense in this extensive litigation and the trial in the federal court in Iowa 
resulted in victory for the defendants. The plaintiffs appealed to the supreme 
court of the United States, which confirmed the decision of the lower court. 
This litigation lasted nine years and was of national importance as hundreds 
of people had been sued in similar actions in man^' other states. The Colonel 
was a man of great natural vigor of mind and his thorough training coupled 
with his long and varied experience enabled him to use his mental powers to 
the best advantage. The clarity and incisive qualities of his intellect enabled 
him to seize upon the vital point in any matter and to present his arguments 
with great lucidity, while the force of his personality made his presentation of 
his case impressive and attention compelling. Hiii practice was large and im- 
portant and his colleagues in the profession recognized him as their leader and 
often sought his advice. 

Colonel Lake never held any office of profit but faithfully served the public 
in many official positions. For six years he was city councilman, for seven 
years a member of the board of education, for two years he was on the board of 
supervisors, for eight years he was a trustee for the Iowa Hospital for the Insane, 
at Independence, for fifteen years one of the commissioners of insanity for 
Buchanan county, and he served as a member of the board of commissioners 
appointed by the governor to construct a hospital for the insane at Cherokee. 
Colonel Lake was appointed a commissioner to value a large tract of land in 
Mendocino county, California, an Indian reservation, which required about seven 
montlLs of work. When Perry Munson told Colonel Lake of his intention to erect 
a building for the use of an industrial training school and other purposes and also 
informed him that he was unable to find a suitable location, the Colonel at once 
offered a part of his home property for that purpose and donated the site for 
the school. The location is one of the most convenient that could have been 
found and the public owes much to the Colonel for thus making manual training 
a possibility. He was named as one of the trustees of the property and until 



12 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

his death served in that capacity and was always untiring in his efforts to 
advance the interests of the institution. His last appearance in court was m an 
action to maintain the rights of the public to the school property. In many 
other ways he manifested an unusual public spirit, being willing to make per- 
sonal sacrifices in order to advance the community welfare. As an instance of 
this spirit those who were living in Independence in 1875 may recall that at 
that time when the Burlington, Cedar Rapids & Northern Railroad Company 
proposed to construct its Decorah division through Independence Colonel Lake 
gave the enterprise his earnest support and at a time during a financial stringency 
when failure seemed imminent, he and Dr. Bryant personally guaranteed the 
grading of several miles of the road, thereby securing it for the town. He was 
a director and attorney for the First National Bank of Independence and also 
a director and chairman of the executive committee of the Independence Mill 
Company as well as its local representative. 

Colonel Lake was married January 2, 1861, to Miss Sarah E. ^Meyer, who 
was born in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania. January 2, 1842, a daughter of 
Henry and Isadora (Sullivan) ]\leyer. Ilcr fatli-r was born near Hamburg, 
Germany, and was married in 1835 in London, England, to Miss Sullivan, 
a native of that city, and they soon afterward emigrated to the United States. 
After an ocean voyage of seven weeks they landed in America and made their 
way to Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, where they settled. The father farmed 
there for some time and then removed with his family to Rockford. Illinois, 
where they remained until 1855, in which year Ihey came by wagon to this 
county and the father entered government land in Byron township. He im- 
proved the same and operated it until his death, at .seventy-six years of age. 
His wife died when sixty-five years old. To their union were born twelve 
children, six of whom grew to maturity. -Mrs. Lake was only a child when she 
accompanied her parents to this county and here she grew to womanhood and 
attended school. By her marriage she became the mother of three children. 
Rush C, an attorney in Kan.sas City, Missouri, is quite prominent in city politics 
and a leader in his profession. Jarvis N. died in infancy. Harriet I., the 
only daughter, resides with her mother. She is very active in women's clubs, 
having served as regent for Iowa of the Daughters of the American Revolution, 
and is also well known in the Colonial Dames. 

Mrs. Lake is one of the few pioneer women now living and is known through- 
out the city for her good deeds as she has done much to aid the sick and poor, 
and her sincere sympathy for those in trouble has made her ministrations wel- 
come and acceptable. She is a quiet, unassuming woman but has great strength 
of character and also much practical business ability. She was for sixteen 
years president of the Ladies' Poor Relief Society and has since been made an 
honorary life member of the same. At the time of the Civil war, when her 
husband enlisted for service, their eldest child was an infant and she went 
to the home of her parents and while living there saved the money which the 
Colonel sent her and with it purchased a farm, which proved an excellent invest- 
ment. She has many friends, who liold her in affectionate regard, and her long 
and useful life and womanly ciualities command the respect of the community. 
She proved in all respects a worthy helpmate to Colonel Lake and was always 
in sympathy with his undertakings and aided him in his work in many ways. 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 13 

He was foremost in any movement that promised to advance the interests of 
Independence and the city owes much to him. His great-hearted and broad- 
minded personality commanded the respect of those who at times differed with 
him in their judgment as to the best course to pursue in a given matter and 
those to whom he gave his friendship prized highly his regard and favorable 
opinion. His personal appearance fitted well with his character, as he was a 
man of large frame, well proportioned and of great physical strength. His 
demise, which occurred June 7, 1914, was the occasion of much sincere sorrow 
throughout the county and the influence of his life is potent in making for true 
manhood and unselfish public service. 



JOHN BURNS. 



A farm of three hundred and twenty acres in Washington township pays 
tribute to the care and labor of John Burns, who is giving his personal super- 
vision to the management and cultivation of the place. He was born in County 
Armagh, Ireland, March 16, 1842, and is the eldest in a family of eight children, 
the others being daughters. His parents were James and ]\Iary (Bums) Burns, 
both natives of Ireland. They were married in the Emerald isle and when 
their son John was a youth of sixteen years they sailed for the new world. Land- 
ing at New York, they made their way direct to Buchanan county, traveling 
westward by way of Dubuque. From that point they continued on the journey 
by stage, for there were no railroads in the county at that time. The father 
purchased land near Quasqueton and the early home of the family in this county 
was a log cabin. Both ]\Ir. and Mrs. Bums held membership in the Roman 
Catholic church and died in that faith, the former in 1894 and the latter in 1884. 

John Burns, whose name introduces this record, acquired his early educa- 
tion in the country schools of his native land. As stated, he accompanied his 
parents to the new world when a youth of sixteen and for several years there- 
after aided his father in the cultivation and development of the home place. 
When twenty-one years of age he started out independently, working as a farm 
hand, and was thus employed for eight years. He then began farming on his 
own account, having purchased land near the depot in Independence for seven 
dollars and a half per acre. He took up his abode upon a farm five and a lialf 
miles north of the city and has lived upon this place for over forty years. He 
now owns three hundred and twenty acres, all of which he is cultivating himself, 
and he is today well known as a successful general farmer and stockman, care- 
fully and systematically directing his efforts and winning thereby a well merited 
success. 

On the 3d of April, 1877, ^Ir. Burns was united in marriage to Miss Mary 
Glynn, who was born in Hartford, Connecticut, in 1857, a daughter of Joseph 
and Bridget (Marnhan) Glynn, both of whom were natives of County Clare, 
Ireland. The father died in 1859 and the mother afterward became the wife of 
Pat CuUin, her home being now in Buchanan county, Byron township. Unto 
Mr. and Mrs. Burns have been born ten children : ]\Iary, the deceased wife of 
Pat Brickley, of Hartford, Illinois, by whom she had three children, Mabel. Leo 



14 HISTORY OP BUCHANAN COUNTY 

and John; James, a drayman of Deeorah, Iowa, now thirty-five years of age; 
Sarah, the wife of James McDonald, who resides upon a farm west of Inde- 
pendence and b}^ whom she has six children, Edward, Joseph, Alfred, Lawrence, 
Richard and Mary; John F., thirty years of age, who owns a farm in this 
county and is married and has two children, Mary and Loretta ; Edward, twenty- 
eight years of age, living at home; Margaret, twenty-five years of age, Avho 
attended the Cedar Falls Normal School and was a school teacher prior to her 
marriage to John Ferreton, who follows farming near Independence ; William, 
twenty-three years of age, also at home and now serving as a school director; 
Alice, twenty years of age, who has taught for two years in the country schools ; 
Mabel, eighteen years of age, also a school teacher ; and Leo, a youth of sixteen 
years, who completes the family. 

At the time of the Civil war John Burns enlisted for service as a teamster 
in the Twentv-seventh Iowa Infantrv and was on dutv for about nine months. 
His political allegiance is given to the democratic party, and he has filled some 
local township offices. The religious faith of himself and family is that of the 
Catholic church and they attend St. John's church at Independence. Iowa. From 
the age of sixteen years he has resided continuously in Buchanan county and 
has, therefore, witnessed much of its growth and development through a period 
of more than a half centurv. 



PETER C. THEDENS. 



Peter C. Tliedcns is a sclf-inade man and an analyzation of his life record 
shows that industry and perseverance have been salient features in his career 
in the attainment of the success which has made hira one of the ])rosperous 
farmers of Homer townshi]). where he owns two hundred and eighty-seven acres 
of good land situated on s<H'tion 12 and 14. Ills residence stands on the latter 
section and nearby are good barns and outbuildings for the shelter of grain and 
stock. These in turn are surrounded by well tilled fields and in harvest season 
the farm is indeed a busy place. Mr. Thedens was born in Germany, October 
22, 1864. a son of John and ]\Iaggie (Reimers) Thedens, who were also natives 
of that i-ouutry. The father was a farmer by occupation and followed that pur- 
suit in his native country until 1883, when, attracted by the opportunities of 
the new world, he crossed the Atlantic and made his way to Ford county, Illi- 
nois, where he carried on general farming throughout the remainder of his days. 
He died January 21. 1913. haviug long survived his wife, who passed away on 
the 8th of Max. 1887. 

Peter ( -. Thedens spent his youthful days in the fatherland and acquired his 
education in the public scliools there. When eighteen years of age lie accom- 
panied his parents to the United States and remained with tliem until he had 
attained his majority, at which time he started out in life on his own account. 
He rented land in McLean county and there carried on general farming for 
eleven years, after which he came to Buchanan county, Iowa, and purchased one 
hundred and seventy-five acres on section 14. Homer township. He at once 
began to bring tlie fields to a high state of cultivation and lias since systematically 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 15 

and energetically carried on the farm work. The rich crops which have rewarded 
his labors have enabled him to add to his land from time to time until he is 
now the owner of two hundred and eighty-seven acres constituting a valuable 
property, of which one hundred and twelve acres is in section 12, Homer town- 
ship, and the remainder in section 14. The place is lacking in none of the 
equipments of the model farm. 

On the 27th of February, 1892, Mr. Thedens was united in marriage to Miss 
Annie Schleeter, a daughter of John and Annie (Straw) Schleeter, who were 
natives of Germany and came to the United States in 1867. Making their way 
into the interior of the country, they settled in McLean county, where Mr. 
Schleeter purchased land and carried on farming until his life's labors were 
ended in death on the 25th of March, 1910. The mother passed away June 14, 
1899. To Mr. and Mrs. Thedens have been born ten children, namely: Rose 
and Frank, who are twenty-two and twenty years of age respectively ; Rudolph, 
who died in February, 1896, when but ten months old ; Hulda, who has reached 
the age of sixteen years; Edward, a youth of fourteen; Anna, who is twelve 
years old: and George, Anthony, Ida and Francis, who are nine, seven, five 
and two years of age respectively. 

Politically Mr. Thedens is a republican and is now serving as a township 
trustee, which office he has filled for four years. He belongs to the Masonic 
fraternity and in his life exemplifies its beneficent teachings concerning the 
brotherhood of man. He is also connected with the Eastern Star chapter at 
Rowlev, while his religious faith is that of the Presbyterian church. High and 
honorable principles have guided him in all of his relations and in his daily 
conduct he deviates not from the high standards which are set up as guiding 
posts on life's journey. In the years of his residence in this county he has 
become widely and favorably known and has a large circle of warm friends here. 



WILLIAM H. HERMANN. 

William H. Hermann, the owner of a farm of one hundred and sixty acres 
on section 28, Newton township, was born in Dubuque county, Iowa, in March, 
1869. His parents were Phillip and Anna (Launspach) Hermann, both of 
whom were natives of Germany, the former born in Hesse-Darmstadt on the 
15th of June, 1829. Phillip Hermann emigrated to the United States in an 
early day, locating in Pennsylvania, and in that state worked in the coal mines 
for some time. He afterward removed to Dubuque county, Iowa, where he 
purchased and improved a tract of land which he cultivated. He then came to 
Buchanan county and bought and developed property in Newton township, where 
he carried on agricultural pursuits for many years. After disposing of that 
place he made his way to Louisiana but at the end of two years' residence in that 
state returned to Iowa, taking up his abode in Iowa City, Johnson county, 
where he spent the remainder of his life. His demise occurred on the 16th of 
April, 1902, while his wife was called to her final rest in the year 1889. 

William H. Hermann was reared and educated in Dubuque and Buchanan 
counties and completed his studies at Vinton, in Benton county, Iowa. He 



16 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

remained under the parental roof until twenty-three years of age and then 
started out as an agriculturist on his own account, cultivating rented land for 
five years. On the expiration of that period he purchased one hundred and 
twenty acres of land on section 28, Newton township, improved the place and 
subsequently bought a forty-acre tract adjoining, so that his farm now einliraces 
one hundred and sixty acres. He raises both grain and stock, making a specialty 
of high grade Durham cattle, and in both branches of his business has met with 
gratifying success. He is a stockholder in the Farmers Elevator Company of 
Walker, Iowa, and the Farmers Land Company of Waterloo, this state. 

In March, 1893, ^Ir. Hermann was united in marriage to Miss Anna Reece, a 
daughter of David and Anna (Connor) Reece, who were natives of Ohio and 
New Jersey respectively. In 1851 the father took up his abode in Linn county, 
Iowa, where he secured a tract of government land which he cultivated through- 
out the remainder of his life. He pasvsed away in January, 1914, and his wife 
died the following day, so that the remains of both were interred in the same 
grave. Mr. and Mrs. Hermann have five children, as follows: Carl E., who is 
nineteen years of age; Claude I., a youth of seventeen; Nerval C, who is four- 
teen years old ; and Nellie V. and Elma P., who are twelve and six years of 
age respectively. 

Mr. Hermann gives his political allegiance to the republican party and now 
holds the office of trustee, having served in that capacity for four years. Fra- 
ternally he is identified with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the 
Modern Brotherhood of America at Troy Mills, Iowa, while his religious faith 
is indicated by his membership in the Metliodist church. He is a man of high 
purpose and honorable principles, and during tlie long period of his residence in 
Buchanan county has won a large circle of warm friends who hold him in high 
esteem and regard. 



ROBERT R. PLANE. 



While many years have come and gone since Robert R. Plane was called 
from this life, he is yet well remembered by those who knew him while he was 
still a factor in the world's work and who recognized in him the possession of 
those qualities which characterize honorable manhood and progressive citizenship. 
He was a pioneer hardware merchant of Independence and contributed much to 
the early commercial development of that city. 

His birth occurred in England in June, 1829, and when he was seven years 
of age he came to the United States with his parents, who settled in New York 
state, where they remained for three years. They then journeyed across the 
country by team and took up their abode upon a farm in Illinois. Through the 
period of liis early youth Robert R. Plane was acquiring an education or receiv- 
ing thorough home training in the work of the fields. When he was seventeen 
years of age his father gave him his time and, entering the employ of a merchant 
at a salary of twelve dollars per month, he engaged in hauling the goods from 
Chicago and in assisting in making sales in the store. The following year his 
wage was increased to thirteen dollars per month. He remained in that connec- 




aaor^ 



,■;•-•., I 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 19 

tion for several years, during which time he carefully and economically saved 
his earnings. He then purchased land and about the same time he entered the 
employ of a brother who was engaged in the hardware business at Belvidere, 
Illinois, acting as a clerk there until 1853. In that year he sold his Illinois 
land, purchased a team and a stock of hardware and drove across the country 
to Independence, Iowa. The following year he returned to Illinois and was 
married, after which he brought his bride to his new Iowa home. 

Mr. Plane wedded Emaline Ryder, of Illinois, who died in Independence in 
early womanhood, leaving four children : I. C, who is now conducting the hard- 
ware business established by his father; Elmer and Ida, both deceased; and 
Purling J., who is a traveling salesman in the hardware trade, his territory 
being northwestern Iowa. In 1882 Mr. Plane was again married, his second 
union being with Miss Julia L. Kinney, a native of New York, who arrived in 
Iowa in the spring of 1869 in company with i\Iiss I. S. Tame, with whom she 
engaged in the millinery and fancy goods business. She continued in that con- 
nection for several years and then became the wife of Mr. Plane. She reared 
the younger son of her husband 's first marriage, who was only five years of age 
when Mrs. Plane entered the home. He was a delicate little fellow whom she 
soon learned to love as a mother. She ever called him her boy and the deepest 
affection has always existed between the two. 

Mr. Plane from the time of his early arrival in Independence continued in 
the liardware business until his later life, when he sold his hardware stock to 
his son, thus retiring about a year prior to his death. He left the store building, 
his residence and a good farm of two hundred and forty acres to his widow. 
At the time of the great fire in Independence his store was destroyed and he lost 
everything, but with unfaltering energy and courage he set to work to retrieve 
his possessions and in the course of years became a prosperous merchant. 

Mr. Plane was a republican in his political views but never desired to hold 
office. He devoted his life to his business and his home and was a most loving 
and considerate husband and father. He died in 1895, in the faith of the 
iMethodist Episcopal church, of which he was an active, helpful and consistent 
member. ]\Irs. Plane also belongs to that church and has led an earnest Christian 
life. She is now seventy-five years of age. She has possessed many accomplish- 
ments, including that of painting, and in her younger days she did notably fine 
fancy work. Since the spring of 1869 she has lived in Buchanan county and is 
today one of the best known among the older residents of Independence, enjoying 
the high esteem of all with whom she has been brought in contact. 



STEWART BEATTY. 



Stewart Beatty, residing in Rowley, is a retired farmer and merchant whose 
business enterprise and activity brought him in the course of years a well earned 
and well merited success. He was born in Jones county. Iowa, May 27, 1854, a 
son of James and Grace (Stewart) Beatty, who were natives of Ireland. The 
father came to America in 1834, when sixteen years of age, settling first in Phila- 



20 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

delphia, where he learned the machinist's trade, which he there followed until 
1849. In that year he sought the opportunities of the growing west, making his 
way to Cascade, Iowa, where he purchased forty acres of land from the govern- 
ment at a dollar and a quarter per acre, casting in his lot with the pioneer 
settlers of that region. With characteristic energy he began the development of 
the farm and continued the improvement and cultivation of the place until 
1876, when he came to Buchanan county and invested in seventy-two acres 
of land in Sumner township. Later he purchased one hundred and eighty acres 
and still later an additional tract of eighty acres, making in all three hundred 
and thirty-two acres. He bent his energies to the development of the fields and 
throughout his remaining days gave his attention to his farm, which became one 
of the valuable properties of the district. At the time of the Civil war he 
responded to the country's call for troops, enlisting as a member of Company I, 
Twenty-first Iowa Infantry, with which he served for one year, when he was 
honorably discharged on account of disability. He died on the 19th of ]\Iarch, 
1893, having for but a few months survived his wife, who passed away in No- 
vember, 1892. 

Stewart Beatty was reared and educated in Dubuque county, Iowa, remain- 
ing with his parents until seventeen years of age, when he started out in life 
to earn his living as a farm hand. After being thus employed for two years he 
went to Cascade, where he learned the shoemaker's trade and then came to Inde- 
pendence, where he followed shoemaking for a year. At the end of that time, 
however, he resumed agricultural jnireuits, renting land in Homer township 
which he developed for eight years. He carefully saved his earnings during 
that period, so that at the end of the time he was able to purchase sixty acres 
in Homer township. This he at once began to improve and after selling that 
property five years later he became the owner of another farm of one hundred 
and twenty acres in Homer township, near Rowley. This he also developed and 
improved, continuing its cultivation until September, 1904, when he rented his 
farm and took up his abode in Rowley, where he purchased a general store 
which he conducted for three years. He then retired from active business and 
has since enjoyed a well earned rest. In the meantime he has made extensive 
investments in town property and the supervision of his realty interests keeps 
him pleasantly busy, while his holdings return to him a very gratifying annual 
income. 

On the nth of April, 1883, I\Ir. Beatty was united in marriage to Miss May 
H. Davis, a daughter of Thomas and Abigal (Hayes) Davis, th^ former a 
native of England and the latter of New York. Her father was a farmer in 
England and after coming to America in 1841 learned the stonemason's trade 
in Quebec. Subsequently he removed to Albany, New York, and in 1857 made 
his way westward to Illinois, where he worked at his trade aiul also followed 
farming. Later he returned to New York state and in 1865 came to Iowa, pur- 
chasing land in Homer township. Buchanan county. His time was then given 
to the cultivation of his farm until liis death, which occurred on the 1st of 
November, 1896. His wife survived him for about six years, passing away in 
June, 1902. Mr. and Mrs. Beatty are the parents of a son, LeRoy Henry, now 
a real-estate dealer of Rowley, who was married in December, 1906, to Miss Eva 
Hand, a daughter of M. E. and Sarah Hand. Mr. and ]\Irs. LeRoy H. Beatty 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 21 

have become the parents of a son, Kenneth Clark, who Avas bom in November, 
1909, and is a great favorite with his grandparents. 

Mr. Beatty gives his political allegiance to the republican party and has 
been called to local office, serving for four years as assessor of Homer township. 
He belongs to Holman Lodge, No. 593, A. F. & A. M., of Rowley, and is also 
connected with the Eastern Star. His religious faith is that of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, and he is serving as chairman of its board of trustees and is 
also chairman and treasurer of the cemetery association of Rowley. His interest 
in matters relating to the welfare and upbuilding of the community is deep and 
sincere and has been manifest in many tangible ways. He has been a lifelong 
resident of Iowa, and while he now ranks among the more prosperous citizens 
of Rowley and Buchanan county, his success is attributable entirely to his own 
efforts. He has worked diligently and persistently as the years have gone by 
and has made judicious investments in property, so that he is today one of the 
substantial residents of Buchanan county. Moreover, he has for many years 
lived in this part of the state and is largely familiar with its history, being an 
interested witness of events which have left their impress upon the development, 
growth and material improvement of the county. 



MILTON A. SMITH. 



Among the able members of the Independence bar and one of the native 
sons of the city is Milton A. Smith, who was born on the 19th of January, 1867, 
a son of Alexander and Electa (Young) Smith. The father was born at Lang- 
ford, Berkshire, England, on the 20th of February, 1820, and the mother's birth 
occurred at Fort Ann, Washington county. New York, on the 25th of September, 
1837. In early life the father engaged in business in connection with the over- 
land stage freight and passenger line antedating the period of railroad building. 
He had come to America with his parents in the year 1830, the family home 
being established in New York, and later a removal was made to Michigan, 
where his father died. When sixteen years of age Alexander Smith left home 
and was residing in Chicago at the time he attained his majority. He removed 
from that city to Iowa, settling in Independence, and until the completion of 
the railroad to this point was connected with a stage line. Subsequently he 
turned his attention to farming, alhough he continued to reside in the city, 
where he made his home to the time of his death, which occurred on the 1st of 
January, 1892. His widow resides in Independence in a house which he erected 
in 1857. They were indeed among the pioneer residents of the city, taking up 
their abode here when Independence was a small town and when the county was 
but sparsely settled. With its development and growth i\Ir. Smith was actively 
identified and at all times cooperated heartily in movements for the general 
good. 

Milton A. Smith is the only survivor in a family of four children, the other 
three having died in infancy. He attended the public schools of Independence 
until graduated from the high school and afterward entered the Northwestern 
University as a law student, completing his course in that institution with the 



22- HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

class of 1899. His first step in the business world, however, was not in the path 
of his present profession, for when eighteen years of age he was employed in the 
engineering department of the railroad companies, spending three or four years 
in that way. He was with the Illinois Central for one season in western Iowa 
and for one year was with the Chicago, St. Lonis & Padueah Railroad, now the 
Southern Illinois & Kentucky. He afterward became associate editor of the 
American Trotter, a paper which was owned by Mr. Williams, and after three 
years spent in that connection he went to Chicago, where he attended law school 
for about three years or from 1896 until 1899. Following his graduation he 
returned to Independence and entered upon active practice in October of the 
latter year. On the 1st of June, 1900, he entered into partnership with L. F. 
Springer for the general practice of law. That relationship was maintained 
for about twelve years or until physical disability caused ^Ir. Springer's retire- 
ment from the firm in 1912. Since that time Mr. Smith has practiced alone 
and is accorded a liberal clientage that connects him with much important litiga- 
tion heard in the courts of the district. He is one of the directors of the First 
National Bank of Independence and is also one of the landowners of Buchanan 
county. 

On the 16th of April, 1895, ^Ir. Smith was united in marriage to Miss Ida 
Cooper, who was born near Slippery Rock, Pennsylvania, a daughter of Sylvanus 
Cooper, who was a farmer ow^ling a tract of land in Pennsylvania that has 
been in possession of the family for one hundred and sixteen years, Mrs. Smith's 
grandfather having entered it from the government in 1798. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Smith has been born one child, ^Marion II., whost^ l)irth occurred September 15, 
1900, and who is now attending school. 

In his political views ^Ir. Smith is a stalwart republican and for four years 
filled the office of county attorney. He is now serving for the fifth year as a 
member of the school board and the cause of public education finds in him a 
stalwart champion. He belongs to the blue lodge of Masons, to the Knights of 
Pythias fraternity and to the Golf and Country' Clubs. His has been a well 
spent life and in a profession where advancement depends entirely upon indi- 
vidual merit and ability he has steadily worked his way upward until he now 
occupies an enviable position. 



OREN M. GILLETT. 



Oren M. Gillett, the organizer of the Commercial State Bank of Independence 
and now its president, is a forceful and resourceful business man whose ability 
seems to qualify him to meet any emergency and direct any condition that may 
arise in the course of his active career. "What he undertakes he accomplishes — 
not by reason of the possession of uncommon qualities but because he makes good 
use of his time, his talents and his opportunities. 

He was born at Bergen, Genesee county, New York, ^March 12, 1850, a son 
of John M. and ]\Iabel (Lee) Gillett. The father's birth occurred in Kinder- 
hook, New York, in 1809, and the mother's birth occurred in Bergen in 1815. 
In early life John M. Gillett was a steamboat captain on the Hudson, and for 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 25 

a number of years he was also engaged in merchandising in Troy, New York. 
In the year 1867 he came to the west, making his way direct to Buchanan county, 
Iowa, settling on a farm near Independence, now known as the Shady Grove 
Farm, upon which he lived for two years. In 1870 he took up his abode in 
Independence, where he lived retired from active business to the time of his 
death, which occurred in 1883. His widow long survived him and passed away 
in 1907. Their family numbered four children, of whom "three are living: 
Hannah A., the widow of 0. S. Throop and a resident of Cherokee, Iowa; 
D. L., who resides at Denison, Iowa, where he is engaged in farming; and 
Oren M. The other member of the family was B. F. Gillett, who made his 
home in Buchanan county. He entered railway circles in the employ of the 
New York Central and was employed by the government during the Civil war. 
Later he became a passenger conductor on the Memphis & Charleston Railroad 
and subsequently established his home in Buchanan county, continuing in rail- 
way service as a conductor. His death occurred May 29, 1913. 

Oren M. Gillett was a pupil in the public schools of Batavia, New York, and 
became a student in the academic department of the Union school at Batavia. 
When eighteen years of age he began teaching and thus he earned the money 
with which to pay the expenses of his later education. For four terms he 
followed the profession of teaching. He became a law student in the office 
of his uncle, E. S. Lee, of Independence, who was the first mayor of this city, 
and in 1875 ^Ir. Gillett was admitted to the bar. Several years later he was 
elected clerk of the court, taking the office in 1880. His capability is plainly 
indicated in the fact that he was five times chosen for that position, which he 
continued to fill until January, 1890, when he resigned and assisted in organiz- 
ing the Commercial State Bank, of which he became the first cashier. He filled 
that position for a year and a half and was then elected to the presidency, since 
which time he has been at the head of the bank, which is recognized as one of 
the strong moneyed institutions of thLs part of the state. The policy which he 
has inaugurated is one which commends itself to the support and confidence of 
the public at large and the bank has enjoyed a steady growth from the begin- 
ning, its deposits and its business along other lines constantly increasing. Mr. 
Gillett also owns land in this county and is today numbered among the prosperous 
residents of Independence — a position to which he has attained entirely through 
his individual effort and ability. 

On the 3d of November, 1873, occurred the marriage of Mr. Gillett and Miss 
Emma L. Dyer, a native of Independence, who in early life was brought to 
Iowa by her parents, James A. and Jane (Minton) Dyer. Her father assisted 
in building a mill at Independence and here engaged in the milling business 
for a time. To Mr. and Mrs. Gillett was born a daughter, ]\Iabel, who is now 
the widow of Dr. Carl W. Rummel and resides with her parents. She has one 
child, Marion. 

In his political views ^Ir. Gillett is a stalwart republican and has filled various 

local offices, the duties of which he has discharged with promptness and fidelity, 

making an excellent record in that connection. He has served on the city 

council, is a member of the library board and a trustee of the Munson Industrial 

School, and was a delegate to the national convention that nominated Theodore 

Roosevelt for president. Fraternally he is connected with the blue lodge, chapter 
Vol. n— 2 



26 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

and commandery in Masonry and with the Mystic Shrine. He is also a promi- 
nent member of the Knights of Pythias and for one year was grand chancellor 
of Iowa. His genuine personal worth and his fidelity to the principles of these 
fraternities have gained him the high and enduring regard of his fellow members. 
]Mrs. Gillett is a member of the Pythian Sisters and the Ladies' Literary Club, 
while he belongs to the Country Club. The record which he has made in 
official and business circles establishes him as one of the leading citizens of 
Independence, and through the years of his residence here he has gained a 
circle of friends that is almost coextensive with the circle of his acquaintance. 



GEORGE ELLIOTT. 



George Elliott still resides at his fine farm home on section 7, Fremont 
township, although retired from active life, and still owns one hundred and 
sixty acres of land. At one time he held title to seven hundred acres. He was 
born in Yorkshire, England, about sixteen miles from Slieffield, on the 30th 
of July, 1830, a son of John and Susanna (Dawson) Elliott, who twelve years 
later came with their family to America. They went to Winnebago county, 
Illinois, settling four and a half miles from Rockford on Kent's creek, where 
they spent the remainder of their lives, the father dying when sixty-eight years 
of age and the mother when fifty-five j^ears old. The father was a farmer by 
occupation, and both were members of the Church of England. To them were 
born ten children, of whom six are deceased, one l)i-othei' dying while iu 
service during the Civil war. Those living liesides George are: Mrs. Elizabeth 
Bouck, a resident of Minnesota ; Mrs. Ann Faulkner, living near Rockford, 
Illinois; and Mrs. Hester Faulkner, also living near Rockford. 

George p]lliott received but a meager education, as he never attended school 
in this country and as he was but eleven years old when he came here. He 
remainetl at home until eighteen years of age and then started out in life on 
his own account, since which time he has made his way without material help 
from anyone. He came to Buchanan county in 1853 and entered one hundred 
and sixty acres of land in Jefferson township, which he fenced with rails and 
otherwise improved. He resided there the greater part of the time until the 
spring of 1857, when, with two yoke of cattle he started for Pike's Peak. He 
passed through Des Moines and Council Bluffs, this state, and Nebraska in 
company with a Scotchman named Hugh Robinson. His route then took hiin 
down the Missouri river from Omaha to Nebraska City and along the southern 
edge of that state. He fished and hunted and found that region of the country 
to abound in fish and game. He crossed Iowa with a team four times but never 
got as far west as Pike's Peak. He eventually returned to Buchanan county 
and sold his farm in Jefferson township, ])uying land on section 7, Fremont 
township, just north of his present home farm. Since 1861 he has resided 
continuously on section 7. He became the owner of seven lunidred acres of 
land, which he improved and brought to a high state of cultivation, but he has 
sold all of his land except one hundred and sixty acres where he resides. He is 
now living retired, liut wns for many years a general fai'mer and a stock-raiser. 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 27 

He was especially interested in the problems of the corn grower and experi- 
mented for years with selected seed, new methods of cultivation and the effects 
of different kinds of soil. He was known as a progressive and scientific farmer 
and won marked financial success. In 1896 Mr. Elliott became president of the 
Winthrop State Bank and continued as such until 1912, when he retired. 

In 1861 Mr. Elliott was married in Byron township, Buchanan county, to 
Miss Jeanette Sharp, a daughter of John and Jeanette (Ferguson) Sharp, 
both born in the vicinity of Glasgow, Scotland. She was born near Albany, 
New York, in 1843, and came to this county in 1857 with her parents, a brother 
and sister, the family locating in Byron townsliip. After coming to America 
her father engaged in farming, but as a young man he was a carpenter and 
builder and for some time worked at that trade in Glasgow. He was later in 
the employ of the British government for years and was sent to Ireland. To 
Mr. and ]\[rs. Elliott have been born eight children, namely: John, a resident 
of Lamont ; Alice, the wife of Albert Reed, of Winthrop ; William, cashier of 
the Farmers & Merchants Bank of Aurora, this county ; Florence, the wife of 
Frank Kerr, of Byron township ; Bertha, who died when three years old ; 
Blanche, at home ; Leigh, a farmer residing at home ; and Belle, at home. 

Although not identified with any religious denomination, Mr. Elliott is in 
sympathy with the work of the churches and aids them generously. Politically 
he is independent, preferring to follow the dictates of his own reason and 
conscience in his support of candidates and measures. He has served acceptably 
as township trustee. He is a man of broad minded views and his tolerance and 
keen sense of justice make his judgment clear and his counsel much sought. 
All who know him esteem him highly and his friends prize his good opinion. 



COURTNEY L. BRIGHT. 

The Jesup State Bank, which was organized in 1901, has in the intervening 
years to the present time grown steadily in assets, the volume of business trans- 
acted and the confidence of the public. Much of the credit .for this continued 
prosperity is due to the foresight and wisdom of its efficient cashier, Courtney 
L. Bright. He was born in Perry township, this county, on the 11th of Decem- 
ber, 1873, a son of David S. and Mary (Bantz) Bright. His boyhood was passed 
at home and after completing the course afforded by the public scliools he en- 
tered Herds Business College at Fayette, from which he was graduated in 1894. 
He then remained upon the home farm for a time and in addition to assisting 
with the work of the farm served as secretary of the Jesup Creamery Company. 
By this time he had definitely decided to devote his life to business pursuits 
and wished a more comprehensive and thorough knowledge of the most exact 
and labor-saving methods and also of the larger phases of administration. He 
therefore took commercial courses both at Ames, Iowa, and at Cedar Rapids, this 
state, thus making excellent preparation for efficient service in the business 
world. AVhen the Jesup State Bank was organized in 1901 he was elected cashier 
and has held that important and responsible position ever since. He has detailed 
knowledge of the routine work of the institution and under his administration 



28 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

all of the accounting is accurately and systematically done, and the broader 
phases of banking, the investment of funds, the extension of credit and the rela- 
tions of the bank to its correspondents in the larger cities are all wisely handled. 

Mr. Bright Avas married April 6, 1912, to Miss Minnie Miller, a native of 
Perry township, and a daughter of Edward and Eliza (Diehl) Miller. Her 
father was born in Ohio in 1828 and became a resident of this county about 
1850, teaching school in this locality for many years. He and his wife are 
both deceased. Mrs. Bright has passed her entire life in this county and has 
many warm friends here. By her marriage she has become the mother of 
three children : Rush C, Mildred B. and Keith L., all at home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bright are I)otli members of the IMethodist church and give 
their moral and material support to the forces that make for righteousness. He 
is a democrat in his political views and was for eight years township clerk and 
for one term mayor of Jesup. in both capacities safeguarding as carefully the 
interests of the public as in his private life he looks after his personal interests. 
Before his election to the office of mayor he was for a time treasurer of Jesup 
and two years after his term of office as chief executive expired he was again 
elected treasurer and still holds thai office, his repeated reelection being the 
best proof of the acceptalnlity of his service. He is also a notary public. He 
served as secretary and treasurer of tlie Jesup Creamery Company for ten years 
and for the past eight years has been secretary and treasurer of the Farmers 
Telephone Company. Fraternally he belongs to Kingsley Lodge, No. 416, K. P., 
and to the local camp of the Modern Woodmen of America. He is prominently 
identified with the ])usiness. religious, civic and social affairs of Jesup and is one 
of the most valued and most respected citizens of the town. 



ALBERT WILLL\M NORMAN. 

Although Albei-t William Xcrinan has retired from his labors as an agricul- 
turist, he is actively interested in public affairs in Winthrop and is connected 
with a number of Inisiness enterprises there. He was l)orn on the 31st of August, 
1854, in Oiiio. a son of Nicholas V. and ^lary A. (Taylor) Norman. The former 
was a native of Somersetshire. England, born on the 15th of June, 1819, and 
remained upon a farm in that country until 1848, when he came to the United 
States and followed agricultural pursuits in the east until 1864. He then 
came to this county and purchased one hundred and sixty acres in Fremont town- 
ship, situated about two miles northeast of Winthrop. The land was partly im- 
proved when it came into his po.ssession and he did much to increase its value, 
making it one of the best develoi)ed properties of his locality. He followed mi.xed 
farming, raising cattle and hogs, and his enterprise and good judgment won him 
success, enabling him to add to his land until he became the owner of about 
six hundred acres. This achievement was the more creditable, as he began 
business with no capital. About 1889 he retired from active life and rented his 
land, coming to Winthrop. where he resided until his death, which occurred 
May 7, 1901. He was a republican in his political belief and was steadfast in 
his support of that party. lie held various township offices and for many years 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 29 

was one of the leaders of his party in this county. His religious affiliation was 
with the Church of England. His wife was also a native of Somersetshire, 
England, her birth occurring on the 1st of May, 1830, and she remained in her 
native land until 1848, when she emigrated to the United States, locating in 
Ohio, where she was married to Mr. Norman in August, 1849. She survived her 
husband and passed away in this county, August 23, 1910, at the age of eighty 
years, three months and twenty-two days. She was likewise a member of the 
Church of England and is buried beside her husband in the "Winthrop cemetery. 
To them twelve children Avere born, namely : Freeman W., who died, leaving a 
family ; one who died in infancy unnamed ; Frances A., the wife of Edgar Hur- 
mance, of tliis county, by whom she has several children ; Albert William, of 
this review ; Charles, of Bellingham, Washington ; Ida M., who married Richard 
Braden and passed away leaving one son ; Frederick S., the agent for the Illinois 
Central Railway at Independence, Iowa ; Henry, who died leaving a family ; 
Grant, who died when nine years of age ; Lucy A., the wife of Wilbur Knight, 
of Oelwein, Iowa, by whom she has three sons: Lafayette N., of whom mention 
is made elsewhere in this work; and Homer E., a farmer of Fremont town- 
ship, this county. 

, Albert William Norman was brought to this county by his parents in 1865 
when a lad of eleven years and was reared at home, attending the public schools 
in the acquirement of an education. Upon reaching his majority he rented land 
in this county, which he farmed until 1879, when he removed to Fayette county, 
this state, and operated a rented farm for three years. He then returned to 
Buchanan county and rented land for a year, after which he purchased one 
hundred and sixty acres on section 28, Fremont township. He carried on agri- 
cultural pursuits there with gratifying success until 1913, when he sold the 
farm. However, he still owns considerable land, including one hundred and 
fifty-six acres, fifteen of which are within the limits of Winthrop and eighty 
acres in Fremont township. He rents his land and derives therefrom a good 
income. Although he did not sell his home place until 1913, he retired from 
active farm work in 1911 and came to Winthrop, where he has since resided. 

Mr. Norman was married on the 2d of February, 1882, to Miss Martha J. 
Braden, who was born in this county on the 8th of June, 1859, and died in 
1889, leaving three children as follows: Maude, the wife of Martin Bueher, of 
Winthrop ; Samuel Venn, cashier in the Waverly Savings Bank of Waverly, 
Iowa; and. Albert W., a resident of Dubuque, Iowa. On the 11th of September, 
1906, Mr. Norman was "again married, Mrs. Jennie M. Overbaugh becoming 
his wife. She was born in Griggsville, Pike county, Illinois, on the 28th of 
September, 1874, and when a girl of eight years accompanied her parents to this 
place. She is a daugliter of T. R. and Susan (Lightle) Marshall, natives of 
Ohio and Illinois respectively, a record of whom appears elsewhere in this 
volume. Mr. and Mrs. Norman have a son, Kenneth William, born June 3, 1909. 

Mr. Norman is a republican in his political views and is quite prominent in 
local affairs. He is now serving his second term as mayor of AVinthrop and is 
giving the municipality an efficient administration. He has been a member of 
the school board for six years and for the last two terms has been president 
thereof. He has been constable for a great many years and is fearless in the dis- 
charge of his duties in that connection. He is president of the Winthrop Tele- 



30 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

phone Company, of which he was one of the founders, and is a stockholder in the 
Peoples State Bank of Winthrop, which is one of the flourishing and reliable 
financial institutions of the county. His wife is a member of the i\Iethodist 
church and takes a lively interest in the furtherance of the work of that organ- 
ization. Fraternally he belongs to Winthrop Lodge, No. 550, I. 0. 0. F. He 
is a representative of that fine type of man who, upon retiring from the cares 
of business, devotes his time, energies and his wide experience to the public 
welfare, and the town of Winthrop has gained much from his residence within 
its bounds. 



ROBERT F. CLARKE. 



No history of Buchanan county would be complete without extended refer- 
ence to Robert F. Clarke, so prominently, actively and helpfully has he been 
connected with its ])usiness enterprise and advancement. No man today occupies 
a more enviable position in commercial and financial circles — not by reason alone 
of the success which he has achieved but also owing to the straightforward, 
honorable business policy which he has ever followed, his course being guided 
by the rules which govern strict and unswerving integrity and industry. 

He was born in Lidependence, April 12, 1868, a son of Asa B. and Margaret 
(Hedges) Clarke, both of whom were natives of ^lassachusetts. The father's 
birth occurred in Conway, that state, in 1820, and the mother was born in 1830, 
near Westfield, in wliich town their marriage was celebrated. In the year 1849 
the father made his way over the plains to California, attracted by the discovery 
of gold on the Pacific coast. He was educated in Amherst College and previous 
to his trip to the far west had engaged in teaching. In 1854 he removed to 
Iowa, establishing liis home in Dubuque, where lived four brothers of the family. 
There he studied law and was soon admitted to the bar, becoming one of the 
pioneer lawyers of the state. At that time the railroad extended only as far 
west as Freeport, Illinois, and there were many districts of Iowa which bore all 
the evidences of pioneer life. With his brother Albert, I\Ir. Clarke came to 
Independence, where they engaged in the land business, entering large tracts of 
land with soldiers' warrants which they had purchased. In the sale of that 
property, after the increase in land values, they realized a handsome competence. 
After continuing in the business for a number of years Asa B. Clarke established 
a drug store on the west bank of the river, which he conducted for a considerable 
period. He erected the brick building now occupied by the West End Grocery 
Company and was otherwise identified with the material development and im- 
provement of the city. About 1881 or 1882 he retired from active connection 
with commercial interests. However, many business affairs have profited by his 
cooperation and benefited by his sound judgment. He was interested in the 
flour mill company as treasurer for a number of years when that was one of the 
flourishing concerns of the city. He was one of the organizers of the Presby- 
terian church of Independence and was serving as an elder at the time of his 
death, which occurred December 18, 1882. His ^v^fe survived him for twenty- 
four years, passing away in 1906. While an active business man, Asa B. Clarke 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 33 

was also prominent in connection with public affairs and filled various offices in 
his town. As justice of the peace he performed many marriage ceremonies 
in the early days. 

To him and his wife were born four children: Virginia, now the wife of 
William S. Boggs, who is cashier of the California State Bank at San Bernardino, 
California; Fannie E., residing at the old home in Independence; Archer E., 
who at the time of his death was engaged in the wholesale lumber business at 
Los Angeles, California, where his family still reside; and Robert F., of this 
review. 

The last named supplemented his public-school education, acquired in Inde- 
pendence, by study in Ames College and in Coe College at Cedar Rapids. When 
twenty years of age he engaged in the grocery business in connection with the 
establishment that is now conducted under the name of the West End Grocery 
Company, this being the same store which had formerly been conducted by his 
father and older brother. He gave the business his attention until 1900 and 
then organized a stock company under the name of the West End Grocery 
Company, of which he became and still remains the president. His attention, 
however, is now divided among other business enterprises with which he is 
associated. In 1900 he entered the Peoples National Bank as cashier and in 
1906 was elected president and still remains at the head of the institution. He is 
likewise a stockholder in the Wapsipinicon Mill Company, is president of the 
Brandon State Savings Bank and is identified with various other corporations. 
He is likewise a landowner in Buchanan and other counties of Iowa and in 
South Dakota and Canada. 

On the 17th of June, 1890, Mr. Clarke was married to Miss Lillian Scarcliff, 
who was born in Independence, a daughter of Thomas and Hattie (Crippen) 
Scarcliff. The father's birth occurred in Lincolnshire, England, in 1828, and 
when about eighteen years of age he came to the United States. A short time 
after his arrival on American shores he made his way to Janesville, Wisconsin, 
where he resided until about 1854. He then came to Iowa and purchased forty 
acres of land, borrowing the money to make the investment. He paid one 
hundred dollars for the land but had to pay forty per cent interest on the loan. 
He did not take up his abode upon that tract but settled on a farm which he 
had previously purchased that is now within the city limits. He platted and 
laid out the northeastern and southeastern portions of Independence, known as 
Scarcliff 's additions, while Mr. Clarke's father laid out the southwestern part of 
the city, known as the A. and A. B. Clarke addition. The Clarke brothers were 
also largely instrumental in getting the state hospital located at Independence 
and thus both Mr. and Mrs. Robert Clarke are representatives of families who 
have taken a most helpful part in promoting the upbuilding and progress of the 
city. Her father is still a resident of Independence. He has recently sold a 
tract of land which he divided into lots. In early times he dealt in grain and 
on various occasions shipped as high as thirty thousand bushels. He it was who 
shipped the first carload of grain ever sent from this point. With the business 
development of the city he has been closely associated from pioneer times and 
for many years he has been the vice president of the Peoples National Bank of 
Independence. His wife, a native of New York, passed away in 1911. They 
were the parents of three children, one of whom died in infancy. Mrs. Clarke 



34 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

was the eldest and the other surviving member of the family is Thomas Scar- 
cliff, Jr., who is now engaged in the coal business in Independence. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Clarke have been born three children : Margaret Scarcliff, 
who was graduated from the Lake Forest College at Lake Forest, Illinois, in 
June, 1913 ; Harriet Daisy, who is now a senior in the same school ; and Frances 
Josephine, who is attending high school in Independence. 

Mr. Clarke is an independent republican in his political views but the honors 
and emoluments of office have no attraction for him. He and his wife hold 
membership in the First Presbyterian church, of which he is an elder, and he 
has been a generous contributor to its support. Throughout his entire career 
duty and honor have been his watchwords, and justice has been one of his strong 
characteristics. In business affairs he has long occupied a central place on the 
stage of activity, and he is today one of the most prominent and representative 
citizens of Independence, his labors having found culmination in success — 
that success which is as well a feature in public progress and prosperity. 



LEONARD T. KIMBALL. 

Leonard T. Kimball, president of the State Savings Bank at Quasqueton, is 
one of the more progressive among the younger business men of the county. He 
never fears to venture where favoring opportunity points out the way. More- 
over, he is fortunate in possessing character and ability which inspire confidence 
in others, and it has been the simple weight of his character and ability that has 
carried him into important business relations. 

Mr. Kimball was born in this county in 1886, a son of T. II. and Lilly (Cot- 
trell) Kimball, also natives of this county and representatives of old pioneer 
families. The paternal grandparents came to Iowa at an early period in the 
settlement of this state, and in Quasqueton T. H. Kimball was reared. In early 
life he began farming on his own account and later bought and sold cattle in 
and near Quasqueton. He likewise engaged in buying and selling land and 
became an active factor in business circles. He was also one of the organizers 
of the State Savings Bank, of which he became the first president, and he has 
been interested in several different business concerns and pro.iects but has given 
the greater part of his time to his live-stock, real-estate and banking interests, 
in which he is still engaged, making his home in Quasqueton. His fellow 
townsmen have called him to the office of mayor through popular suffrage and 
his administration was characterized by a prompt and businesslike dispatch of 
duties. He has placed not a little of his money in the safest of all investments 
and is now the owner of considerable land in Buchanan county. 

Leonard T. Kimball, wlio was one of a family of two children, the other 
being a brother, Bernard, who died when two years old, attended the country 
schools of Quasqueton and when eighteen years of age embarked in business on 
his own account as proprietor of a slioe stons wliich he conducted for two years. 
He then turned his attention to the hardware trade at Aurora, Iowa, but 
remained in that line for only a l)rief period, after which he engaged in general 
merchandising for two years. His entrance into the banking business was 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 35 

made while he was conducting his shoe store, at which time he was elected 
assistant cashier of the State Savings Bank of Quasqneton. He proved capable 
and efficient in that connection and three years later was promoted to the 
position of cashier, serving in that capacity for four years. He was then elected 
to the presidency and has since remained at the head of this institution, which is 
conducted along safe, conservative lines, its business affairs being characterized 
at all times by thorough reliability. In addition to his banking interests Mr. 
Kimball owns valuable farm lands and is engaged in the raising of Polled 
Angus cattle, thus adding materially to his income. 

In 1907 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Kimball and Miss Blanche E. 
Specs, a native of Buchanan county and a daughter of W. E. and Roberta 
(Cooper) Spees, both representatives of well known pioneer families of Buchanan 
county. The father was born in 1862 and in early life he followed farming but 
afterward became proprietor of a hotel in Bellingham, ^Minnesota. He also 
engaged in the elevator business and at different times has conducted a barber 
shop. For a period he was also a traveling salesman. His wife, who was born 
in 1864, died in February, 1911. In the family were three children, including 
Mrs. Kimball, who by her marriage has become the mother of two daughters : 
Norma Maxine, born May 24, 1909 ; and Lorraine, born May 10, 1914. Mrs. 
Kimball is active in the social, club and literary circles of Quasqueton, in which 
she moves as a prominent and influential figure. 

Mr. Kimball belongs to the Masonic fraternity and is very active in the 
home lodge, in w^hich he is now serving as senior deacon, while both he and his 
wife are connected with the Order of the Eastern Star. His political indorsement 
is given to the republican party. He has served as treasurer of his city and as 
treasurer of the school board and has been a cooperant factor in many plans 
for the development and upbuilding of the town. His aid can always be counted 
upon to further any measure for the public good and he has scarcely entered 
upon a life which will undoubtedly increase in usefulness and value, both as a 
factor in community interests and in the upbuilding of his own fortunes. 



U. S. GRANT SINGER. 



U. S. Grant Singer, filling the position of township trustee of Middlefield 
township, Avhere he carries on general agricultural pursuits, has been a resident 
of Buchanan county since 1862, or the period of his entire life, for that was 
his natal year. His father, Lewis Singer, was born in Preble county, Ohio, in 
1827, and in early life learned th^ wagon maker's trade, entering upon an 
apprenticeship thereto when but thirteen years of age. He followed tliat pursuit 
until 1855 and then made an overland journey with an emigrant train to Iowa, 
settling in Liberty township, Buchanan county, at which time the nearest rail- 
road point was Dubuque. At that time there were only a few settlers in this 
county and the town of Winthrop had not yet been laid out. He secured a tract 
of land which he purchased for two dollars and a half per acre. The county 
was but sparsely settled and all of the conditions of pioneer life were in evidence. 
As the years went on, however, improvements and conveniences took the place of 



36 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

the discomforts, hardships and privations of the earlier years and Mr. Singer 
prospered in his undertakings, becoming the owner of three hundred and fifty- 
six acres of valuable farm land. He was also a stockholder in the Peoples Bank 
of Winthrop to the time of his death, which occurred in 1903. In early man- 
hood he wedded Phoebe C. Potterf, who was born in Preble comity, Ohio, in 1837, 
and, surviving her husband for seven years, passed away in 1910. 

U. S. Grant Singer, reared upon the old home farm, attended the schools 
of Winthrop and during the periods of vacation assisted his father in the work 
of the fields, so that he had had practical experience when he started out as a 
farm hand at twenty-one years of age. He was thus employed for eight years 
but gradually added to his savings until the amount was sufficient to "enable him 
to purchase land and he secured the nucleus of the farm upon which he now 
makes his home on section 5, Middlefield township. He has since added to the 
property until his landed possessions now aggregate two hundred and sixty-three 
acres, all in one tract, from which he annually gathers good harvests as a reward 
for the care and labor which he bestows upon the fields. The major portion of 
his attention is devoted to the farm with a result that justifies the expenditure 

of time and money. 

On the 20th of :\larch, 1887, Mr. Singer was united in marriage to Miss Ma- 
tilda Dunlap, a native of Winfield, Ohio, and a daughter of William P. and 
Ellen (Grove) Dunlap, both of whom were natives of Virginia., The father 
came to Iowa in 1875, settling in Fremont township, Buchanan county, where 
he secured one hundred and sixty acres of land and carried on general farming 
and stock raising. He has departed this life but his widow survives and makes 
her home near Quasqueton. Mr. and Mrs. Singer have become parents of two 
children : Harold G., a teacher of manual training in the high school of Colfax, 
Washington ; and William L., at home with his father on the farm. 

Mr. Singer exercises his right of franchise in support of the men and meas- 
ures of the republican party and for four years has serv^ed as trustee of INIiddle- 
field township. He belongs to the Congregational church and its teachings guide 
him in all of his life's relations. He takes an active interest in all public affairs 
of the community and is a prominent and influential man of his township. 



JOHN C. STEVENSON. 

John C. Stevenson, an honored pioneer and a retired farmer of Littleton, 
Iowa, has resided in this locality for many years and has witnessed the 
great changes in conditions which have taken place here. There is only one 
other man, Charles Melrose, Jr., living here today who was here when Mr. 
Stevenson arrived. Our subject was born in Tippecanoe county, Indiana, May 11, 
1840, a son of Alexander and Mary Ann (Cameron) Stevenson. The father 
was a native of Pennsylvania, his parents being James and Elizabeth (Mitchell) 
Stevenson, lioth natives of Lower Dublin. Their marriage occurred in the 
Emerald isle on the 9th of April, 1807, and later in the same year they came to 
America, locating at Path Valley, Pennsylvania, whence they subsequently 
removed with their family to Boone county, Indiana, where the parents spent 




MR. AND MRS. ,10HX C. «TEVE.\80X 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 39 

their remaining years. James Stevenson was a weaver by trade. Our subject 
has in his possession the recommendations given his grandfather in Ireland. His 
grandmother died when forty-eight or forty-nine years old. She was the mother 
of four daughters and three sons, but Alaxender, the father of our subject, was 
the only son that grew to maturity and reared a family. 

Alexander Stevenson was reared in Pennsylvania and Ohio and was married 
in Ross county of the latter state, near Fort Defiance. On the 7th of September, 
1850, he came west with his family from Colfax, Indiana, making the trip with 
an ox team and three horses. He took up a claim on school land in Perry town- 
ship, this county, which, however, proved not to be open to settlement at that 
time, and in March, 1851, he filed upon a claim in Fairbank township. At that 
time there were only two houses in Perry township and one in Fairbank town- 
ship, the dwelling of Mr. Stevenson being the second erected in the latter. His 
first residence was a log cabin, two and a half miles north of the village of Little- 
ton, and the erection of even that rude structure was no inconsiderable task. It 
was necessary to float logs to Independence in order to have them sawed so that 
they could be used for flooring, and they hauled them back. The chimney was 
built of stones, sticks and mud. There were no neighbors for miles to the north 
of them and only three buildings in Independence. jNIr. Stevenson broke the 
heavy sod of the prairie and split rails to make the fences for his fields. Although 
the life of those days would seem very hard and uninviting to the present genera- 
tion, the pioneers found many pleasant features in it apart from the stern 
satisfaction of knowing that they were developing fine farms from wild land and 
that they were laying the foundation for a highly prosperous community of the 
future. Mr. and Mrs. Stevenson were among the most respected of those early 
settlers and remained upon their farm in Fairbank toA^Tiship until their deaths. 
The father was a democrat in politics and was one of the leaders in the Presby- 
tesian church, being an elder of his congregation for fifty years and one of the 
organizers of the church of that denomination at Littleton, which was established 
in 1853. He died April 6, 1885, at the age of seventy-six years. His wife, who 
was a native of Ohio, was also one of the charter members of the Presbyterian 
church of Littleton. She died a few months before her husband, passing away 
on the 4th of February, 1885, when seventy-seven years of age. To them were 
born three children, but one son died at the age of five years and the daughter at 
the age of two. 

John C. Stevenson is the only survivor and he shared with his parents the 
life of the pioneer. He was but ten years old when he accompanied them to this 
county and a year later began breaking the prairie sod, driving five yoke of oxen. 
It was a very wet year and breaking ground was unusuall.>^ difficult, but he was 
of the stock that nothing could daunt and not only assisted in getting his father's 
land ready for cultivation, but broke land for the new settlers who arrived in 
the county. His opportunities for acquiring an education were very meager, as 
there were no schools in the county for three years after the arrival of the family 
and his only instruction was that given by his mother. In 1853 the first school- 
house was built in Perry township and during the winter following he attended 
regularly, walking a mile and a half each way. During the summer he assisted 
with the work of the farm and continued to aid his father until his marriage. 
In order to reach the nearest mill it was necessary to make a three days' journey 



40 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

with oxen and there was always danger from the Indians, who were very numer- 
ous and belonged to a number of tribes, including the Sioux, the Winnebagos 
and the Misquakas. There were no bridges over the streams that had to be 
crossed and in the spring floods the fords sometimes became impassable. 

After his marriage ^Ir. Stevenson began his independent business career. He 
became the owner of four hundred and thirty acres of land on sections 34 and 35, 
Fairbank township, and there engaged in cultivating the fields and in feeding 
stock for the market. He was also a well known breeder of pure blooded short- 
horn cattle and for nineteen years shipped stock to Nebraska, Minnesota, the 
Dakotas and Oklahoma, as well as to various parts of this state. He also engaged 
in the dairy business quite extensively for a great many years and found this as 
well as the other phases of his activity very profitable. He managed well his 
diversified interests and manifested sound judgment in the investment of his 
capital. In 1911 he retired and built his present beautiful home in Littleton, 
where he has since resided. 

Mr. Stevenson married Miss Mary Amelia Wilson, on the 4th of September, 
1861, which was the bride's l)irthday. She is a native of Pennsylvania and a 
daughter of Samuel and Sarah (Henry) Wilson, both likewise natives of the 
Keystone state. Her mother passed away in 1850, but her father removed with 
his family to Iowa in 1855, making the trip with a wagon and team of horses. 
He located in Fairbank township, tliis county, where he purchased a farm, and 
devoted his time to agriculture until Iiis death. Mrs. Stevenson M^as only a girl 
when she came to this county and she and her future husband were schoolmates. 
To them have been born ten children, namely: Laura J., at home; p]lmer, who 
owns a part of the homestead ; Eflfie K., who is the wife of Rev, Parley E. Zart- 
man, secretary of the Moody Institute of Chicago; Eber F., M. D., practicing at 
Waterloo, Iowa; Mertie IL, who died in 1900; Ralph J., who is a farmer residing 
near Rowley, this county ; Ray C, living at Littleton ; M. Grace, a stenographer 
employed at the Moody Bible Instituti^ at Chicago; and two who died in child- 
hood. 

Mr, Stevenson is a democrat in politics, but at local elections votes for the 
candidate whom he deems best suited for the office without regard to party affilia- 
tion. He has held a number of township offices, being assessor of Fairbank town- 
ship for four years, school director for thirty years, and for some time served as 
justice of the peace. Ever since the organization of the Littleton Cemetery 
Association he has served as its president and under his care the city of the dead 
is kept in fine condition. In 1859 he united with the Presbyterian church and 
in 1885 was elected an elder, serving in that capacity ever since, and in addition 
has been clerk of the session for twenty-five or thirty years. Since 1885 he has 
been treasurer of the church and has always taken a deep interest in everything 
affecting its welfare. lie has not only given of his tinu^ to its affairs but has 
contributed liberally toward its support and gave generously toward the building 
fund of the new church edifice. Although he is seventy-four years of age and 
has already lived longer than the three score years and ten which the Psalmist 
allotted to man, he is still very active and enjoys excellent physical and mental 
health, ^lany interests in his community have profited l\v his labors and counsel 
and he is still a force in the life of his town. He is especially deserving of honor, 
as he was one of thos(> first settlers who so l)ravelv labored amid hard conditions 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 41 

of life and who persevered in spite of many obstacles, laying well the foundation 
of the prosperity which is now so evident to all. In 1914 he and his wife visited 
his old home in Indiana. On the 4th of September, 1911, they celebrated their 
golden wedding, there being present on that occasion about two hundred relatives 
and friends, and they were the recipients of many beautiful presents and the 
congratulations and well wishes of all. 



C. aUNZENHAUSER. 



Coming to America when a youth of sixteen years, actuated by a desire to 
enjoy better business conditions than he hoped to secure in the old world, 
C. Gunzenhauser is today prominent in a substantial financial concern as cashier 
of the Rowley Savings Bank. His advancement to his present enviable position 
has been continuous and the steps in his orderly progression are easily discern- 
ible. 'He was born in Germany in January, 1866, and is a son of John G. and 
Elizabeth (Snyder) Gunzenhauser, who were also natives of the same country. 
There the father worked as a laborer and continued his residence in Germany 
until death called him in September, 1888. His wife, surviving for a number 
of years, passed away in November, 1895. 

C. Gunzenhauser pursued his early education in the schools of the fatherland 
and there remained to the age of sixteen years, when, actuated by a spirit of 
laudable ambition, he sailed for the United States in February, 1882. Later he 
continued his education by pursuing a course in the Cedar Rapids Busniess 
College. In Germany he had learned the cabinet maker's trade and after 
crossing the Atlantic he settled in Iowa county, Iowa, and later removed to 
Muscatine, where he worked for his brother in a foundry and machine shop for 
one year. He next went to Oxford, Johnson county, Iowa, where he clerked in 
a store until 1893. At that date he rented a tract of land which he cultivated 
for three years. It was after this that he pursued his course in the Cedar 
Rapids Business College, from which he was graduated with the class of 1896. 
He realized fully the value of more thorough and advanced training as a prepara- 
tion for life's practical and responsible duties. Moreover, in the school of 
experience he has learned many valuable lessons and is today a well informed 
business man, displaying sound judgment and keen discrimination. Returning 
to Oxford, he there engaged in general merchandising on his own account for 
three years and at the same time filled the position of assistant^ cashier in the 
Oxford State Bank for a period of four and a half years. In April, 1902, he 
removed to Rowley, where he embarked in the banking business, establishing the 
Rowley Bank, which has recently been incorporated as the Rowley Savings Bank 
with a capital of twenty thousand dollars and with the following otBcers: F. M. 
Williams, president; Theodore Kirsch, vice president; and C. Gunzenhauser, 
cashier. The bank is liberally patronized not only by the people of the town 
but ]iy many throughout the surrounding country as well. The bank is the 
only one in Rowley and previous to its reorganization Mr. Gunzenhauser had 
erected a fine bank building and the deposits amounted to one hundred and 
eight thousand dollars, the loans to eighty-five thousand dollars and the available 



42 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

cash was more than forty thousand dollars. He is thoroughly acquainted with 
the different phases of banking and his wise direction of the interests of the 
institution insures its growth and prosperity. 

On the 20th of October, 1908, Mr. Gunzenhauser was united in marriage to 
Miss Nina Lindsay, a daughter of Robert and Laura Lindsay, the former a 
native of Canada and the latter of Canton, Ohio. Her father was a miller by 
trade, operating flour mills. In 1889 he came to Buchanan county, where he 
purchased land on section 14, Homer township. His attention was then given 
to general farming until 1904, when he retired from active connection with the 
work of the fields and took up his abode in Rowley, where he was at the Head 
of the telephone business for eight years. For the past three years he has 
been assisting his son-in-law in the bank. He has now reached the age of 
sixty-two, while his wife is living at the age of fifty-seven. 

^Ir. and Mrs. Gunzenhauser have but one child, N. Elizabeth, four years of 
age. The parents occupy a pleasant home in which the spirit of hospitality 
reigns supreme. Mr. Gunzenhauser has been prominently connected with many 
elements of public moment, cooperating in all the plans and projects for the 
upbuilding and improvement of town and county. Politically he is a democrat 
and at the present time he is serving as township clerk of Homer township, 
having been continuously the incumbent in that position since January 1. 1907. 
He belongs to Holman Lodge, No. 593, A. F. & A. M., and to the Eastern Star 
chapter at Rowley, and he is a prominent and active worker in the Presbyterian 
church, in which he is now serving as one of the elders. His has been a well 
spent life actuated by high and lionorable principles, and he stands as an 
excellent example of upright manhood and citizenship. 



FRANK .M. WILLIAMS. 



"Williams has it" is the slogan of the business conducted by Frank M. 
Williams, a general merchant of Rowley. He is ever alert and energetic, ready 
for any emergency and always watching for opportunities that will enable him 
to honorably promote his business interests. He knows, too, that the way to 
win trade is to satisfy his customers and he does this by keeping a large and 
well selected stock which he sells at reasonable, prices. His store is today one 
of the leading commercial establishments of the town. 

Mr. Williams is a native of ^lasonville, Delaware county. Iowa, born ]\Iay 
16, 1873, his parents being William ]\I. and Mary E. (Babcock) Williams, the 
former a native of Wales and the latter of Illinois. The father was but four 
years of age when his parents left Wales and came to the new world, settling 
in Indiana, where he was reared and educated. AVhen a young man he accom- 
panied his parents on their removal to Buchanan county, where he remained 
for some time with his father and mother but went to Delaware county before 
the outbreak of the Civil war. He filled the office of sheriff of that county 
when the county .seat was at Delhi. Following the inauguration of hostilities 
between the north and the south, he offered his services to the government and 
enlisted as a member of Company C, Twenty-seventh Iowa Infantry, with whidi 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 48 

he remained until the close of the war or for a period of three years, during 
which he participated in a number of hotly contested engagements that con- 
tributed to the success which finally crowned the Union arms. When the wai; 
was over he took up his abode in Masonville, Delaware county, where he engaged 
in general merchandising, conducting his store there for several years. He after- 
ward rented land in Buchanan county and carried on general farming for ten 
years on that place. He next removed to a farm near Brandon, investing in 
eighty acres in Jefferson township which he developed and improved, continuing 
the cultivation of that farm for many years. At length, however, he retired 
from active business life and removed to Brandon, where he remained until 
his death on the 18th of December. 1900. His widow passed away in 1905. 

Frank M. Williams was reared and educated in Buchanan county, Iowa, and 
remained with his parents until nineteen years of age, when he secured a clerk- 
ship in the employ of John Cline of Brandon, who paid him for the first year 
ten dollars per month and his board. He continued in Brandon until October 
20, 1903, and gradually worked his way upward, so that for five years he was 
there engaged in business on his own account. He left Brandon, however, be- 
cause of the illness of his wife, hoping that a change of climate might prove 
beneficial. Removing to Longmont, Colorado, he there engaged in the grocery 
business for six months and for a similar period made his home in Denver. Re- 
turning to Iowa, he settled in Fort Dodge, where he resided for some time, being 
upon the road as a traveling salesman during that period. 

Mr. Williams was called upon to mourn the loss of his wife on the 21st of 
September, 1905. He had been married on the 21st of November, 1895, to Miss 
:\Iary E. Jamieson, who was born in Brandon, November 21, 1878, a daughter 
of Walter and Martha (Newcomb) Jamieson, who were natives of New York but 
became pioneer settlers of Buchanan county, arriving here at a very early day. 
Her father now makes his home in Brandon but her mother passed away 
July 21, 1911. 

After the death of his first wife Mr. Williams made his headquarters at 
Mason City, Iowa, until 1910. He was again married on the 21st of Decem- 
ber of that year, his second union being with Bertha E. Gaasch, of Linn county, 
Iowa, a daughter of John W. and Mattie (Johnson) Gaasch, the former a native 
of Dubuque county, Iowa, and the latter of Benton county. At an early period 
in the development of Linn county, Mr. and :\Irs. Gaasch became residents of 
that section and there he carried on farming until his death, which occurred in 
1902, he being accidentally killed by a horse. His widow survives and yet makes 
her home in Linn county. 

Following his marriage ]Mr. Williams continued upon the road until January, 
1912, when he came to Rowley and purchased the general mercantile business 
of Van Orsdol & Lotts. He today has a fine store and enjoys an extensive 
patronage. His business methods are such as commend him to public confidence 
and support, and the people have come to know that his slogan, "Williams has 
it," is no idle boast, for he carries a large and well selected line that meets the 
requirements of the general public. 

In his fraternal relations Mr. Williams is a Mason, belonging to Holman 
Lodge, No. 593, and he is also identified with the Eastern Star. He exercises 
his right of franchise in support of the men and measures of the republican 



44 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

party and, while well versed concerning the questions and issues of the day and 
interested in his party's success, he does not seek nor desire office. His religious 
faith is that of the Christian church, which numbers him among its loyal and 
helpful members. 



JASPER NEWTON BARR. 

Jasper Newton Barr, a worthy representative of one of the honored pioneer 
families of Buchanan county, is now living retired in Independence after long 
years of active connection with agricultural interests, but is still the owner of 
four hundred acres of valuable land. For sixty-seven years he has resided in 
Buchanan county and there are no phases of its historj' with which he is not 
familiar from pioneer times down to the present. He can relate many interesting 
incidents of the early days and he rejoices in the later day progress and improve- 
ment of the county. 

His birth occurred in Washington township. September 12, 1847, and he is 
the eldest of the three children of Thomas and Eleanor (Murphy) Barr. The 
father was born in Carroll county, Ohio, July 30, 1823, of Irish ancestry, his 
grandfather, Robert Bai-r. having come to America from the north of Ireland and 
settled in Washington county, Pennsylvania. Tlie mother was also of Irish 
extraction, for her ancestors came to the new world before the Revolutionary 
war and some of the family served under General Washington in the struggle 
for independence. In early life Thomas Barr was employed as a farm hand in 
the Buckeye state. On coming west he was accompanied by his wife and his 
cousin, Reuben Wickham, and his wife, the party traveling by team, each gentle- 
man owning a horse. Reaching Buchanan county on the 18th of November, 
1846, they found the work of improvement here scarcely begun. Most of the 
land was still in possession of the government and upon the broad tracts of 
prairie not a furrow had been turned. ^Ir. Barr entered a claim five miles north 
of Independence, now known as the Barr homestead, and here the family experi- 
enced many of the hardships and difficulties which come to the pioneer. The 
only postoffice in the county at that time was Quastjueton, fifteen miles south of 
where Mr. Barr located. There were still many Indians, but they belonged to 
friendly tribes and most of them were going upon or returning from their trips 
in the north or passing through on their way to reservations farther west. There 
were many species of wild game and it was not difficult to secure venison, for deer 
were plentiful and there were many wild turkeys and other lesser game. After 
building a log cabin upon his place Mr. Barr mauled rails to fence his property 
and carried on the work of general improvement and development for many 
yeare, using ox teams in his work. As time passed on prosperity attended his 
efforts and he ranked with the substantial farmers and stockmen of his township. 
From time to time he added to his holdings until he was the owner of eight hun- 
dred and forty acres of valuable land. In politics he was a democrat, but not 
an office seeker. He continued to remain upon his farm until his death, which 
occurred January 7. 1893. His wife, who was born in Guernsey county, Ohio, 
December 20, 1824, survived him for a decade and passed away March 13, 1903. 




THOMAS BAKR 




MRS. THOMAS BARR 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 49 

Tlieir children were : Jasper Newton ; Mrs. W. A. Rogers, who was formerly a 
resident and landowner of Buchanan county, but now lives in Los Angeles, Cali- 
fornia ; and John Wesley, of Arcadia, Oklahoma. 

The school system of Buchanan county had been developed in only a slight 
degree when Jasper N. Barr was a youth, but he pursued his studies in a log 
schoolhouse for a time and later enjoyed the advantages of a course in the 
Upper Iowa University. His training at farm labor was not meager and he 
early learned valuable lessons concerning the value of industry and persistency. 
He remained upon the home farm and in connection with its cultivation taught 
in the rural schools during the winter months, becoming the teacher of many a 
youth who has since gained prominence. He well remembers those typical 
pioneer schoolhouses, in one of which he began his own education. The building 
was erected of logs with slab seats, the desks were made of boards supported by 
pegs driven into the wall, while the windows were covered with greased paper. 
There were no blackboards or any of the conveniences found in the modem 
schoolroom. 

Yearning to see something of the great west, Mr. Barr went to Colorado 
March 18, 1879, and while there taught school for thirteen consecutive months 
without a vacation, going to one school on Monday after closing another on 
Friday. While in that state he spent some time in the mining camps of Clear 
Creek and Leadville during the height of the excitement there, but he never 
participated in the wild life and revelry that characterized those places, for 
he never used tobacco or intoxicants. At length he returned to the parental 
home and engaged in farming in Washington township, being closely associated 
with general agricultural interests in this county for many years. He is today 
the owner of four hundred acres of valuable land, some of which includes the 
original holdings of his father, and he has the original patents which were 
granted by President Fillmore in 1846. His methods of farm work were practical 
and his labors brought excellent results. He engaged extensively in raising stock, 
becoming one of the leading representatives of that business in Buchanan county. 

On the 12th of September, 1893, Mr. Barr was united in marriage to Miss 
Mary Ellen O'Loughlin, vrho was born in this county, September 7, 1855, a 
daughter of John and Margaret (Maloney) O'Loughlin, both of whom were 
natives of County Clare, Ireland, the former born in 1824 and the latter in 
1830. They came to the United States as young people and first settled in Ohio, 
where Mr. O'Loughlin worked on the canals and in railroad building. In 1852 
he came to Iowa and purchased land, but returned to Ohio, where he again 
remained for a short time. He then took up his permanent abode near Otter- 
ville, Buchanan county, in 1854, and thereafter was engaged in general farming, 
devoting practically his entire time to agricultural pursuits and stock raising 
in Washington township, where his landed possessions aggregated five hundred 
and twenty acres. His political support was given to the democratic party 
and his religious faith was that of the Catholic church. The five surviving mem- 
bers of his family of ten children are yet residents of Buchanan county. Mrs. 
Barr is also a member of the Catholic church. 

Mr. Barr belongs to the Masonic fraternity and has been an active worker 
in that organization. He is also an Odd Fellow and has held all of the offices 
in the lodge. Throughout life he has largely maintained an independent course 

Vol. II— 3 



50 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

in thought and action. He is a great reader and of a literary turn of mind, and 
has contributed many interesting articles to the papers on his travels and pioneer 
times. He has also displayed ability as a poet and is one of the old school 
of gentlemen whom it is a pleasure to meet. In polities he is not allied with any 
party but votes rather for men and measures. In religion he believes that each 
individual should have the opportunity to carry out his views in that regard. 
His own life has been well spent and his business career has been crowned with 
a measure of success that places him today among the substantial residents of 
the county. 



C. E. ILIFF. 



For an extended period C. E. Iliff has been connected with the real-estate 
business in Independence and at diiferent times has also been associated with 
other business affairs which have featured as factors in the steady growth and 
improvement of Independence and Buchanan county. He was born in Fayette 
county, Iowa, on the 8th of April, 1870, his parents being J. N. and Rachel 
(George) Iliff, both of whom were natives of Green county, Wisconsin, the 
former born on the 27th of August, 1846, and the latter in 1850. 

J. N. Iliff came to Iowa in September, 1849, and in the acquirement of his 
education he supplemented a public-school course by study in Western College. 
From pioneer times he was identified with agricultural pursuits until after the 
outbreak of the Civil war. In 1863 he joined the army, becoming a member 
of Company E, Ninth Iowa Cavalry, with which he served for two years and 
eight months. He campaigned in the south especially against General Sterling 
Price. When the w^ar was over he took up his abode in Fayette county, this 
state, and there remained until 1870, when he removed to Spirit Lake. Even 
then the stockades were standing that had been used at the time of the Spirit 
Lake massacre, when the Indians put to death so many of the early settlers of 
that district. Mr. Iliff took up land in Dickinson county and after proving up 
his claim sold out and removed to Buchanan county. He also lived for a time 
in Jesup, where he was engaged in the lumber and grain business and in 
surveying. In 1880 he was appointed county surveyor and for sixteen consecu- 
tive years filled that office in a most capable and commendable manner. Besides 
being surveyor he filled the position of county sheriff from 1888 until 1892, 
having been elected on the republican ticket. Neither fear nor favor swerved 
him in the discharge of his duties and the record which he made in public 
of^ce, as well as his business activity, placed him among the leading and valued 
citizens of his community. He has been a lifelong member of the Methodist 
church, active and earnest in its work. He is now living retired, making his 
home in Independence with his son, C. E. Iliff. 

In the public schools of Jesup, C. E. Iliff largely acquired his education 
and when a youth of but fourteen years began working as a farm hand, being 
thus employed for three years. He then entered the sheriff's office, acting as 
deputy under his father through his term of four years. After a year's absence 
he returned to the sheriff's office as deputy under E. 0. Craig and served in that 




MRS. JASPER N, BARR 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 55 

capacity until 1896, when he was elected sheriff and was continued in the posi- 
tion for six years, or until 1902, making an excellent record by the prompt and 
faithful manner in which he discharged his duties. In 1902 he became asso- 
ciated with J. M. Chappell in the real-estate business, in which he has since been 
engaged, and from that time he has also conducted other business enterprises, 
having become proprietor of these as the result of trades. He is now owner of a 
livery barn in Independence. He has become thoroughly acquainted with 
property values, knows the land that is upon the market and has gained a good 
clientage. He is also a stockholder in the Independence Cement & Tile 
Company. 

]\Ir. Iliff was united in marriage to Miss Ellen McDonald, who was born in 
Buchanan county, a daughter of John and Ellen (Maddigan) McDonald, both 
of whom were natives of Ireland, born in 1842 and 1847 respectively. On 
leaving the Emerald isle John McDonald made liis way direct to Dubuque, 
Iowa, and thence came to Buchanan county. He is now living in Independence 
and is the owner of good land in the county. Mr. and Mrs. Iliff have become 
the parents of three children : Mildred Bernice, Margaret Rachel and Edgar 
Everett. 

Mr. and ^Irs. Iliff hold membership in the Methodist church, and he is a 
prominent Mason, belonging to the lodge, chapter and commandery. He is also 
identified with the Knights of Pythias and has been chancellor commander in 
that organization. He may truly be called a self-made man, for he started out 
in life on his own account when a youth of but fourteen years and has since 
been dependent entirely upon his own resources for the success which he has 
achieved. Activity and energy have been the salient features in his career, 
gaining for him a place among the substantial business men of Independence. 



ALBERT BUEHLER. 



Albert Buehler, well known as a highly respected farmer and stock-raiser 
of Homer township, living on section 35, is busily engaged in the further 
development and improvement of his farm, which comprises two hundred acres. 
He is among the worthy sons of this section of the state that Germany has 
furnished to Iowa, his birth having occurred in the fatherland April 19, 1861. 
His parents, Alexander and Justine (Saal) Buehler, were also natives of 
Germany. The father was a farmer by occupation and alw^ays carried on that 
pur.suit in Germany till death called him in 1873. His widow survives and yet 
makes her home in Germany. 

Through the period of his minority Albert Buehler remained with his parents 
and acquired his education in the public schools. In accordance with the laws 
of the land he served for three years in the German army and in 1884, when 
twenty-three years of age, he bade adieu to friends and native country and 
sailed for the new world, wishing to test the reports which he had heard con- 
cerning the favorable opportunities offered on this side the Atlantic. He set- 
tled in Marion, Linn county, Iowa, where he began work as a farm hand, being 
thus employed for five years. He afterward rented land in Benton county, Iowa, 



56 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

and continued to cultivate leased farms in this state, in Texas and in Minnesota 
for six years. It was his ambition, however, to own property and during that 
period he not onh' carefully saved his earnings but also as carefully watched 
his expenses in order to secure capital that would enable him to purchase land. 
At the end of that time he bought one hundred and sixty acres on section 35, 
Homer township, and since then he has added a forty-acre tract adjoining. 
Today his farm of two hundred acres is a valuable property, carefully and 
systematically managed. He follows modern methods of farming and the results 
are not only sure but desirable. The fields bring forth good crops annually and 
for these he finds a ready sale on the market. He also engages in stock-raising 
and keeps on hand high grades of stock. In addition to his other interests he 
owns stock in the Farmers Elevator Company of AYalker. 

In February, 1889, was celebrated the marriage of Mv. Buehler and j\Iiss 
Ellen Kleitch, a daughter of John and Kate (Nemmers) Kleitch, natives of 
Germany, in which country the birth of ^Irs. Buehler occurred on the loth of 
April, 1858. She was brought to America by her parents when six months old 
and the family home was established in Jackson county, Iowa, where her father 
rented land for some time. He afterward removed to Linn county, where he 
purchased a farm and there carried on general agricultural pursuits throughout 
his remaining days, his death occurring in 1882. His wife survived him for 
nearly two decades, passing away in 1901. Mr. and ]\Irs. Buehler have seven 
children, namely: Kate, Elizabeth, Charles, i\Iary, Nicholas, John and Lena. 

The religious faith of the family is that of the Catholic church and in politics 
Mr. Buehler is a democrat. His is one of the splendidly improved farms of 
the county and the home is a hospitable one, the spirit of good cheer there 
reigning supreme. They have gained many friends during the period of their 
residence in this county and ^Ir. Buehler is numbered among the self-made 
men who owe their prosperity entirely to their own labors. He has never had 
occasion to regret his determination to come to the new world, for in this land, 
where effort is unhampered by caste or class and where the door of opportunity 
is open to all. he has worked his way steadily upward, possessing in generous 
measure those qualities of industry and persistency which are indispensable 
factors in the attainment of prosperity. He has never sought to win a fortune 
through speculation or any underhand business method, but has been thoroughly 
trustworthy in his dealings and solely through close attention to farming and 
stock-raising has gained the creditable place that lie now occupies. 



HARRY C. HAIXES. 



On the pages of Buchanan county's history the name of Haines figures 
prominently in the pioneer chapter, for when this section of the state was a 
frontier region the grandparents of Harry C. Haines .settled here. Since that 
lime representatives of the name have taken an active and helpful part in pro- 
moting the work of public progress and improvement aiul today Harry C. Haines 
is a well known representative of agricultural interests, owning land in Homer 
township, his place of residence being on section 36. He was born ]\Iay 28, 1881. 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 57 

in the township where he still resides, his parents being AVilliam A. and Anna A. 
(Bnell) Haines, the former a native of Zanesville, Ohio, and the latter of Canada. 
William A. Haines was but four years of age when brought to this county by his 
parents. At that time Quasqueton was the county seat and no one dreamed that 
Independence would become the center of county government nor that upon the 
site would spring up a notably thriving, enterprising and progressive town. 
From the time of his early arrival William A. Haines has continuously resided 
in the county with the exception of one year and he has been a very energetic 
and successful farmer. Year by j^ear he carefully tilled the soil in the produc- 
tion of crops which brought to him a substantial income and at length when he 
had acquired a handsome competency he put aside business cares and since the 
spring of 1913 has lived retired, making his home in Rowley. 

Harry C. Ilaines is a western man by birth, training and preference and is 
imbued with the spirit which has been the dominant factor in the upbuilding 
of this section of the state. He began his education in the* district schools and 
afterward spent two terms as a student in the Charles City (Iowa) College. Later 
lie entered the commercial department of the Upper Iowa University at Fayette, 
from which he was graduated on the 13th of April, 1902. He was thus well 
equipped l)y education for life's practical and responsible duties and he has 
since learned many valuable lessons in the school of experience. AVith the com- 
pletion of his commercial course he returned home and began working vrith his 
father on the farm, where he remained until 1903, when he removed to a farm 
of one hundred and twenty acres on sections 35 and 36, Homer township, belong- 
ing to his father. Later he purchased forty acres of this, including the tract on 
which the buildings are located, and has since given his attention to the improve- 
ment of his farm, persistently carrying on his efforts year by year. He cultivates 
the fields in the production of crops best adapted to soil and climatic conditions 
here and he is also engaged in stock raising, making a specialty of handling dairy 
shorthorn cattle and high grade Duroc Jersey hogs. He is an excellent judge 
of stock, so that he is seldom, if ever, at fault in his judgment concerning the 
value of an animal which he purchases. 

As a companion and helpmate for life's journey Mr. Haines chose Miss Clara 
E. Lindsay, their marriage being celebrated February 25, 1903. Her parents, 
Robert and Laura (Leininger) Lindsay, were natives of Canada and of Canton, 
Ohio, respectively. The father was a milh\Tight by occupation and in early 
life crossed the border into the United States, settling in Virginia. It was in 
the Old Dominion that Mrs. Haines was born on the 16th of November, 1882. 
Her father there engaged in the millwright's trade and the flour-mill business 
for nine years, after which he came to Buchanan county, wliere he carried on 
general agricultural pursuits for some time. He is now engaged in banking 
in connection with his son-in-law, C. Gunzenhauser, at Rowley, and is numbered 
among the leading and enterprising business men of that place. Mr. and ^Irs. 
Haines are the parents of five children, as follows: Maude E., a maiden of ten 
summers; Elletha K., who is eight years old; and Lucille L,, Marian B. and 
George William, who are six, four and two years of age respectively. 

Mr. Haines votes with the democratic party but does not seek nor desire 
public office, although he keeps well informed on the questions and issues of 
the day. He and his wife hold membership in the Presbyterian church, and he 



58 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

is a Mason, belonging to both the lodge and the Eastern Star chapter at Rowley. 
He has never desired to change his place of residence, for he has always felt 
that this county offered excellent opportunities for the agriculturist and that 
its advantages in all general directions Mere equal to those to be found anywhere. 
He is a young man working steadily toward success and is now well known as 
a representative of the farming interests of his part of the county. 



FRED F. AGXEW. M. D. 

Dr. Fred F. Agnew, who has been continuously engaged in the practice of 
medicine and surgery in Independence since 1903, was born in this county in 
1874. His father, Isaac B. Agnew, was born in Hebron, Indiana, September 11, 
1831, and in early life became a mail carrier, making his trips on horseback. 
He also drove stock from Ohio and Indiana to Philadelphia for his uncle when 
but a youth, and he was only eleven years of age when he began carrying the 
mail. He was engaged in that sort of work until 1855, when he started for 
Iowa, thinking to find better business opportunities and advantages in this new 
and rapidly developing western country. He drove an o.x team from Indiana 
to Buchanan county, where he settled upon a farm, becoming closely identified 
with the agricultural development of this section. He married Sarah R. Dille, 
who was born near Valparaiso, Indiana, in 1838, and they became the parents 
of seven children, four sons and three daughters, of whom Fred F. Ls the sixth. 
Three of the family are living in Buchanan county, but the parents have both 
passed away. During the later years of his life Mr. Agnew was an active member 
of the IMethodist church. 

After acquiring his early education in the connnon schools, Dr. Agnew became 
a student in the Upper Iowa University at Fayette, where he remained for three 
years. He then became a pupil in the medical department of the Iowa State 
University, in which he spent two years, and later he entered the Jefferson 
Medical College at Philadelphia, in which he won his professional degree. He 
has since taken post-graduate work in 1906, 1908, 1910 and 1914, and throughout 
his professional career he has l)een a close anil earnest student of the science of 
medicine. He did not immediately begin preparation for the practice of medi- 
cine after completing his more specifically literary course, but when twenty- 
three years of age began farming, which he followed for two years. It was then 
that he entered medical college, and after his graduation he spent a year and 
a half as interne in Blockley Hospital. 

On the 1st of October, 1903, Dr. Agnew arrived in Independence and entered 
upon the practice of medicine, becoming associated with Dr. A. G, Shellito. He 
is a fellow of the Amei-ican College of Surgeons and also a memlier of the 
Buchanan County Medical Society, of which he is the president, the Iowa State 
Medical Society and the American Medical Association. Constant reading and 
investigation have kept him in toiuii with modern thought in the field of his 
chosen calling and his work has been highly beneficial to the public. He Ls 
likewise the owner of valuable farm lands in Sumner township ami he operates 
his fatlier's farm, which is devoted to general agricultural pursuits. 




DR. FRED F. AGNEW 



PUBLIC 



A??Tnn IFVnv ,v.> 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 61 

In 1906 Dr. Agnew was united in marriage to ^liss Minnie McBride, who 
was born in this county, a daughter of James McBride, a native of New York. 
They have three children : Frederick Bryant, born September 9, 1908 ; Kathryn 
Alice, born July 30, 1910; and James Ward, born September 16, 1912. 

Dr. A^new is well known in fraternal circles, holding membership in the 
lodge, chapter and commandery of the Masonic fraternity and also with the 
Knights of Pythias. In his life he exemplifies the beneficent spirit of the craft 
which is based upon mutual helpfulness and brotherly kindness, and his practice 
gives him many opportunities to follow the tenets of the order. In a calling 
where advancement depends entirely upon individual merit and ability, he has 
worked his way steadily upward and now enjoys a high and well deserved 
reputation. 



GEORGE F. SLEMMONS. 

George F. Slemmons follows farming in Liber-ty township and was born upon 
the farm upon which he now resides, his natal year being 1875. His father, 
Jesse Slemmons, was bom in Harrison county, Ohio, in 1846, and when nine 
years of age was brought to Iowa by his parents, the family traveling overland 
to Liberty to^aiship, Buchanan county, where they arrived in 1855. This sec- 
tion was then one of the frontier counties of the state and all the evidences of 
pioneer life were here to be found. It was not an unusual thing to see Indians 
and, in fact, the red men were almost as numerous as the white settlers. Wild 
game of many kinds was to be had in abundance and there were also wild ani- 
mals, Mr. Slemmons being chased by a panther during his boyhood days. There 
were no schools or churches when the family first came and the Slemmons family 
bore their part in instituting the improvements which have contributed to the 
intellectual and moral as well as the material progress of the community. In 
fact, Mr. Slemmons, the grandfather, was one of the founders of the Hickory 
Grove Presbyterian church and his daughter taught school in a log house, which 
was a private home, before any public schoolhouses were built. 

After Jesse Slemmons became of age he, too, was very .active in all the 
affairs of the community, contributing largely to upbuilding and public progress 
along various lines. He became the second largest taxpayer in the township, 
owning six hundred and thirty acres of rich and valuable land. Te fed and 
shipped much stock and the different branches of his business were a source of 
gratifying profit. The cause of education found in him a friend and he was an 
earnest Christian man, holding membership in the Presbyterian church. He 
also exercised considerable influence in politics and was one of the most promi- 
nent citizens of the township. He died in 1898, while his wife, who bore the 
maiden name of Elizabeth Work, was born in Harrison county. Ohio, in 1851, 
and is still living. 

George F. Slemmons was the eldest in a family of seven children. He at- 
tended the township schools and further continued his education at Winthrop 
and in Lenox College at Hopkinton, Iowa. He was twenty-two years of age 
when his father died and returned home from school to look after the family 



62 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

affairs. At that time he was elected a member of the school board, although so 
young, and has held the office for about seventeen years, it being a well recog- 
nized fact that he is a stalwart friend of public education and believes in con- 
tinuous progress in the schools and the improvement of their methods. He has 
also held other township offices and in many ways has given evidence of his loy- 
alty to the best interests of the community. Like his father, he stands today 
as one of the leading and prominent business men of his section of the county, 
being extensively engaged in the feeding of cattle and sheep. He is also a di- 
rector and stockholder of the Winthrop State Bank and is the owner of two 
hundred and seventy acres of land. He devotes all of his time to his farm and 
his success is the merited reward of his capable management and persistent 
effort. 

Mr. Slemmons was united in marriage to Miss INIabel L. Thompson, a daugh- 
ter of Walter Thompson, and they have become parents of two children : John 
Walter, born :\lay 20, 1907 ; and Ruth Gertrude, born July 13, 1909. Mr. Slem- 
mons holds membership witli the Odd Fellows and has been an active worker in 
his lodge. He also belongs to the Modern Woodmen camp, and lie is a mem- 
ber of the Presbyterian cliurch, taking deep interest in its work. He serves as 
one of its trustees, contributes generously to its support and does all in his 
power to further the work of the church. The family name has long been in- 
deli})ly impressed upon tlie liistory of this county and the work instituted by the 
grandfather in pioneer times and continued by the father is now being carried 
on by the son, llie name of Slemmons ever being synonymous with business enter- 
prise, reliability and progressiveness in citizenship. 



HENRY MEYER. 



Henry Meyer, who in the course of an active, busy and useful life has con- 
verted raw prairie land into highly cultivated fields and is now the owner of a 
valuable farm pro})erty of two hundred and twenty acres situated on section 11, 
Byron township, was born July 19, 1843, in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, a 
son of Henry and Isadora (Sullivan) Meyer, of whom mention is made on an- 
other page of this work in connection with the sketch of their son-in-law. Colonel 
Jed Lake. 

The boyhood days of Henry Meyer were spent at the old home in Pennsyl- 
vania and at Rockford and Dixon, Illinois, following tiie removal of the family 
to the middle west. In 1855, however, anotlier removal brought the family to 
Buchanan county and their home was established in Byron township. Henry 
^Meyer was then a youth of about twelve years. He continued to assist his 
father in the task of developing and improving a new^ farm and at the same time 
spent the winter seasons in the acquirement of his education. He gave his father 
the benefit of his services up to the time of his marriage, which was celebrated ou 
the 7th of July, 1869, ]\Iiss Sarah L. Spangler becoming his wife. She was 
born in Coshocton county. Ohio, in January, 1844, and is a daughter of (Jeorge 
and Rebecca (Cleggett) Spangler, both of whom were natives of ]\Iaryland. the 
former of frerinan lineage and the lattei- of English exti'actioji. Removing to 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 63 

Ohio, the father there engaged in fanning until his death, which occurred when 
he was in middle life and before the birth of Mrs. Meyer. His widow survived 
until sixty-five years of age. Mrs. Meyer spent her girlhood in the Buckeye 
state and about 1865 came to this county, where her brother, Samuel T. Spangler, 
was living. She made the trip in order to visit her brother and here formed the 
acquaintance of ^Ir. Meyer, who sought her hand in marriage. They have be- 
come the parents of three children : Isadora, the wife of AVilliam Sherren, a 
resident farmer of Byron township ; Hattie Jane, the wife of J. W. Marshall, a 
farmer of the same township ; and Lee L., who is a school teacher and also a 
teacher of music, having taught for nine years in one district near the old home. 

In early manhood Henry Meyer received from his father a gift of eighty 
acres of land which was wild and unimproved, not a furrow having been turned 
upon it. He bought an adjoining tract of eighty acres which was likewise raw 
prairie, and later he purchased one hundred and sixty acres of the old home- 
stead. With characteristic energy he began the development of his farm and 
liis labors were attended with good results, his fields being brought to a high 
state of cultivation, while the large crops annually garnered found a ready 
sale on the market. In late years Mr. ]Meyer sold one hundred acres of the old 
homestead property to his son-in-law, but he still retains the ownership of two 
hundred and twenty acres of excellent farm land, which he personally culti- 
vated until two years ago. He then rented the farm land but keeps the pastur- 
age and is raising full blooded shorthorn cattle, which branch of his business 
is bringing to him gratifying success. 

In his political views Mr. Meyer has long been a stalwart republican, sup- 
porting the party since casting his first presidential vote for Abraham Lincoln. 
For several years he has been roadmaster and he thoroughly recognizes the value 
of good highways in this age when the question of good roads looms large on 
the public horizon. Otherwise he has never sought nor desired public office but 
concentrates his energies upon his business afi'airs, which are capably and profit- 
ably managed. 



FRED FRANCK. 



Fred Franck, numbered among the enterprising, prosperous and representa- 
tive agriculturists of Buchanan county, owns and resides upon a valuable and 
well improved farm of one hundred and sixty acres on section 8, Newton town- 
ship, and also has a forty-acre tract in Cono township. His birth occurred in 
Independence, Buchanan county, Iowa, in November, 1873, his parents being 
Fritz and Fredericka (Geiser) Franck, both of whom were natives of Germany, 
The father, a stonemason by trade, emigrated to the United States in the '50s 
and located at Bufifalo, New York, where he worked at that occupation for several 
years. Subsequently he came to Independence, Iowa, and here worked as a 
stonemason for thirty years. On the expiration of that period he purchased a 
tract of land in Homer township, where he carried on agricultural pursuits for 
five years and then removed to Middlefield township, buying another farm Avhich 
he operated throughout the remainder of his life. In his demise, which occurred 



64 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

in September, 1906, the community lost one of its most substantial and re- 
spected citizens. His widow resides on the home place and is well known and 
highly esteemed here. 

Fred Franck was reared and educated in the town of his nativity and 
remained under the parental roof until twenty-four years of age. He then 
started out as an agriculturist on his own account, operating a rented farm for 
eight years. On the expiration of that period he purchased one hundred and 
sixty acres of land on section 8, Newton township, and subsequently bought 
a tract of forty acres in Cono township. He made a number of substantial 
improvements on the place and now has a valuable and highly developed prop- 
erty which yields him a gratifying annual income. In connection with the 
cultivation of cereals he makes a specialty of the raising of Poland China hogs. 

In February, 1904. "Sir. Franck was united in marriage to Miss Louise 
Walter, a daughter of Christian and Caroline (Wahl) Walter, both of whom 
were natives of Germany. The father emigrated to the United States in 1849. 
locating at Wheaton, Illinois, wliere he remained for four years. In 1853 he 
came to Newton township, Buchanan county, Iowa, and here purchased and 
improved a tract of land which he cultivated until the time of the outbreak of 
the Civil war. He loyally served as a member of the Union army for three 
years and then returned to his farm in this county, here carrying on agri- 
cultural pursuits successfully throughout the remainder of his active business 
career. He subsequently lived retired at Walker for some time and spent his 
last days in tlie home of his son at Quasqueton. where his demise occurred 
in November, 1910. His wife was called to her final rest in January, 1904. 
Mr. and Mrs. Franck have two children, Elta C. and Fred C, who are eight and 
six years of age respectively. 

Mr. Franck gives his political allegiance to the republican party and is 
now serving as a trustee of Newton township, having held that office for two 
years, while at one time he discharged the duties of constable. In Buchanan 
county he has lived 'from his birth to the present time. He is a man loyal in 
citizenship, reliable in business, at all times public-spirited and progressive and 
his life measures up to the full standard of honora])le manhood, his record 
being a credit to a name that has been known and honored in this part of Iowa 
since pioneer times. 



JOHN LAWRENCE McGRATH. D. V. S. 

Dr. John Lawrence McGrath has been engaged in the practice of veterinary 
surgery at Jesup since 1912 and is widely recognized as an able and successful 
young representative of the profession. His birth occurred in Westburg town- 
ship, Buchanan county, Iowa, on the 26th of June, 1881, his parents being 
William and Klizabeth Ann (O'Donnell) ]\IcGrath, both of whom were natives 
of Ireland, tiic latter l)orn in County Clare. 

William McGrath crossed the Atlantic to the United States as a youth of 
sixteen but at the end of a year returned to the Emerald isle. In 1861, when 
a young man of twenty-one, he again came to America and for a perioti of 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 65 

fourteen years was engaged in mining in Michigan and in Duluth, Minnesota. 
The year 1875 witnessed his arrival in Buchanan county, Iowa, and here he 
purchased a tract of land in Westburg township, where he followed farming 
throughout the remainder of his life, passing away in 1904. His demise was 
the occasion of deep and widespread regret, for he had won an extensive circle 
of friends in the community which had been his home for almost three decades. 
He gave his political allegiance to the democracy and was a devout communicant 
of the Catholic church. His widow, who still resides on the home farm in 
Westburg township and has now reached the age of sixty-one years, came to 
this country in young girlhood. To them were born ten children, as follows: 
John Lawrence, Eugene N., Martin Leo, Peter R., William C, Lewis A,, James 
L., Bridget IVIary, Hanora and Johanna. 

John L. McGrath spent the period of liis boyhood and youth on the home 
farm and attended the public schools in the acquirement of an education. When 
twenty-five years of age he left the parental roof and made his way to McKenzie 
county, North Dakota, where he took up a homestead. At the end of eight 
months, however, he gave up his preemption and acquired the property by paying 
a dollar and a half per acre. He entered the Chicago Veterinary College in the 
fall of 1908 and was graduated therefrom with honors in 1912. In that year he 
opened an office at Jesup and has since built up and maintained an extensive 
and profitable practice as a veterinary surgeon. 

On June 19, 1912, Dr. McGrath was united in marriage to Miss Florence 
Anna Collins, a native of Liberty township, this county, and a daughter of 
Patrick and Bridget (Stafford) Collins, who were born in Ireland and survive, 
making their home in Westburg township, Buchanan county. Our subject and 
his wife are the parents of one child. Mrs. McGrath has always lived in Buchanan 
county and is well known and highly esteemed here. In his political views 
the Doctor is a democrat, while his religious faith is that of the Catholic church, 
to which his wife also belongs. 



MERRITT 0. FOUTS. 



Called to the position of cashier of the Commercial State Bank of Inde- 
pendence in January, 1911, Merritt 0. Fonts is still filling that position and is 
proving a capable official, popular with the bank patrons and thoroughly reliable 
in every relation. He was born at Brandon, this county, March 1, 1874, a son 
of William H. and Mary A. (Romig) Fonts. The father's birth occurred in 
Warren county, Indiana, May 30, 1834, and the mother was born in Washington 
county, Wisconsin, April 21, 1844. W. H. Fonts engaged in merchandising 
with his father and in 1851 came to this county, settling at Brandon. His 
father established a sawmill and platted the town, after which he conducted a 
mercantile enterprise. With the business interests of the town W. H. Fonts 
was continuously identified up to the time of his retirement and contributed 
much to the upbuilding and development of that place. He also became the 
owner of large tracts of land and engaged extensively in farming. Apprecia- 
tive of his worth and ability, his fellow townsmen frequently called liim to local 



66 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

ofifices and for a number of years he served as postmaster of Brandon. His wife- 
died in 1892 and he noM^ makes his home with his daughter Clara, the wife of 
J. W. Elliot, a farmer residing near Brandon. 

In the family were hut two children, the younger l^eing Merritt 0. Fonts,, 
who in the pursuit of his education attended successively the schools of Brandon 
and Independence and of Van Wert, Ohio. At the age of eighteen years he began 
teaching school near Brandon and during periods of vacation was employed as 
a clerk in a department store in Independence, where he remained for about two 
years. He afterward engaged in the real-estate business in Independence for 
about three years, at the end of which time he became manager for the Inde- 
pendence Mills Company, but left that firm in less than a year in order to accept 
public office. 

In politics ^Ir. Fonts has always been a stalwart republican and in 1900 was 
elected clerk of the district court, to which office lie was twice reelected. He 
resigned before the expiration of his third term to accept the position of special 
examiner for the United States bureau of pensions, spending most of the period 
of his five years' incumbency in that office at Indianapolis and ^Milwaukee. On 
leaving that position he became (-ashier of the Commercial State Bank in 
January, 1911, and has since been thus identified with financial affairs. 

On the 18th of March, 1896, Mr. Fonts was united in marriage to IMiss ^lae 
Chapman, who was l)orn in Stillman Valley, Illinois, a daughter of AVilliam and 
Ellen (Broad wood) Chapman, both of wliom were natives of Canada, whence 
they removed to Illinois about 1870, settling at Stillman Valley, where the 
father engaged in contracting and building. About 1884 he removed with his 
family to Iowa and took up his abode upor a farm just south of Independence, 
where he is still cariyiiig on general agricultural pursuits. Mrs. Fonts was 
the youngest of four children and by hei- inai'riagc has become the mother of a 
daughter and son, ]\Iildred J. and John Kcinieth. 

Mr. Fouts holds membership with the Knights of Pythias and the ]\Iodern 
Woodmen of America and is secretary of the Odd Fellows lodge. In all these 
different organizations he is held ii\ high esteem, for he is loyal to their pur- 
poses and in his life exemplifies their teachings. Tic is also a member of the 
school board. His record is a creditable one in every relation. lie lias proven 
thoroughly trustworthy in business and reliable in office and has the warm regard 
and confidence of an cxt<Misiv(^ circle of friends. 



CHARLES F. IIERRICK. 

The predominant trait in the Herrick family is perhaps that of patriotism, 
for in the different wars of the country the family has been represented and 
among those who aided in defense of the Union in the darkest hour of our 
country's history was Charles F. Ilerrick of this review. In days of peace, too, 
he was equally loyal to his country and cooperated in movements for local prog- 
ress and improvement. Thus it was that he became recognized as a citizen of 
sterling worth in Buchanan county and his death was the occasion of deep and 




r^ 




CHARLES F. HERRICK 



r- 



I 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 69 

■widespread regret when, in 1905, he was called to his final rest. His birth 
occurred in Lima, New York, in 1835. 

Israel Herrick, his father, was of English parentage, but was bom in Ver- 
mont in 1786. There is a long genealogical record of the family and frequently 
the name of Herrick appears in the annals of America in connection with the war 
history. Israel Herrick, Sr., grandfather of Charles F. Herrick, was one of the 
Minutemen of the Revolution and his son, Israel Herrick, Jr., was a soldier 
of the War of 1812. Then came Charles F. Herrick as a soldier of the Civil 
war and his son, C. G. Herrick, as a soldier of the Spanish- American war. Israel 
Herrick, Jr., was a carpenter and joiner by trade and removed westward from 
New England in 1858, at which time he took up his abode in Buchanan county. 
His son Charles, however, had come to this state in 1856, arriving on the day on 
which James Buchanan was elected president of the United States. After his 
arrival in Iowa Israel Herrick practically lived retired, although there is still 
standing as a monument of his handiwork one of the buildings which he erected 
after coming to Independence, where he remained a substantial and respected 
citizen to the time of his death. 

When thirteen years of age Charles F. Herrick was apprenticed to the 
jeweler's trade, thoroughly mastering the business and becoming an expert work- 
man in that line. In 1856, the year in which he attained his majority, he bade 
adieu to his old home in the east and came to Independence, where he opened 
a jewelry store, becoming one of the pioneer merchants of the city. He con- 
tinued actively in the business until his death, which occurred forty-nine years 
later. At different times he had partners, but never at any time did he sever 
his own connection with the store which he established in pioneer days. In his 
business he kept in touch with the advancement of the times and with the growth 
and progress of the county, carrying a large and well-selected stock and enjoying 
a liberal patronage by reason of his honorable methods and earnest efforts to 
please his customers. For a time he conducted a music store in connection with 
the jewelry business. He possessed natural musical talent and was always active 
in musical circles. 

In 1861 INIr. Herrick enlisted in the Eleventh Illinois Infantry at Rockford, 
becoming a member of the regimental band. Later such bands were discharged 
by general order and in 186-1 he again offered his services to the government 
and was elected captain of Company D, Forty-sixth Iowa Infantry. After 
serving for a short time, however, he was sent home in a precarious condition 
because of camp sickness, being honorably discharged and mustered out before 
the company disbanded. 

Mr. Herrick was united in marriage to Miss Sarah E. Sauerbier, who was 
born in Easton, Pennsylvania, January 27, 1842, a daughter of George and 
Sarah A. (Haberacker) Sauerbier, both of whom were natives of Reading, Penn- 
sylvania. The father, who was born September 21, 1805, died on the 5th of 
August, 1885. The mother, who was born February 26, 1815, passed away INIay 
15, 1877. It was in 1855 that George Sauerbier came to Iowa, settling in Inde- 
pendence. He had engaged in the manufacture of hats when in Pennsylvania, 
but lived retired in Iowa, owing to ill health. The house which he erected in 
1856 is still occupied by his daughter and her family. It was first used as a store 
when most of the city of Independence was on the west side. Mr. Sauerbier was 



4 

70 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

an active and earnest member of the Presbyterian church, both he and his wife 
being widely recognized as people of sterling worth. They had but two children, 
including Mrs. Herrick, who has long been a prominent figure in social and 
religious circles of the city and interested as well in many civic problems. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Herrick were born six children: Ellen A., Alice E., William 
S., Mary P., Sarah E. and Charles G. The eldest is now the wife of S. P. Rider, 
a retired wholesale dry goods merchant of Dubuque, and they have two children : 
Herbert, a dentist practicing in Milwaukee, Wisconsin ; and Marie, the wife of 
Merrill Burch, of Dubuque. The third daughter, Mary P., became the wife 
of A. J. Schaefer, a dry goods merchant of Belvidere, Illinois, and they have 
four children. The fourth daughter, Sarah E., became the wife of Reece Tucker, 
a live-stock dealer of Glenwood Springs, Colorado, and they have three children. 
The younger son of the family is Charles G. Herrick, now a jeweler and watch- 
maker of Independence, his father's successor in business. He learned the trade 
under the direction of his father, and in 1898 gave evidence of possessing the 
same patriotic spirit that has ever been characteristic of the family, for he 
joined Company E of the Forty-ninth Iowa Infantry, of which he became ser- 
geant and was also sergeant-major of his regiment. With that command he 
went to Jacksonville and on to Havana, Cuba, thus defending American interests 
in the war with Spain. Since 1908 he has been continuously engaged in the 
jewelry business in Independence, ranking with the leading and enterprising 
merchants of the city. In 1900 he married Maude A. King, a daughter of 
Prettyman King, who was born in Defiance, Ohio, in 1841, and attended the 
Ohio Wesleyan University. He served as a captain in the Thirteenth Ohio 
Volunteer Cavalry and made a splendid record, participating in twenty-four 
important battles. He was also present at General Lee s surrender. He married 
Miss Mattie Dorset, who died in 1868. Later Mr. King came to Iowa and for 
two years was engaged in the dry goods business in Independence. He then 
returned to Ohio and in 1872 again came to Iowa, being identified with general 
merchandising in Hazleton. He was married again, his second union being with 
Amelia Manz. His political allegiance was given to the republican party. By ■ 
his first marriage he had three children, of whom Mrs. Herrick is the youngest. " 
To Mr. and Mrs. Charles G. Herrick have been born two children, Bernice and 
Lucille. Like his father, Charles G. Herrick has been active in Masonic circles, 
holding membership with the lodge, the chapter, the commandery and El Kahir 
Temple of the Mystic Shrine. He has been junior warden and senior deacon in 
the blue lodge and was its master for two years. In the commandery he has been 
both the junior and senior warden and captain general. He also has membership 
with the Knights of Pythias. 

Charles F. Herrick always took a deep and active interest in civic affairs and 
heartily cooperated in every movement for tlie benefit and upbuilding of town 
and county. He was one of the early mayors of the city of Independence, 
serving in 1868 and 1869. Again in 1896 he was appointed to fill out an unex- 
pired term in that office and in 1905 was again elected the chief executive of 
the city, filling the position at the time of his death. That he was on three 
different occasions called to the office is indicative of the confidence reposed in 
him by liis fellow townsmen. It also indicates that through the intervening 
years he never lapsed in his loyalty to the city and its welfare, but again and 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 71 

again gave evidence of his devotion to the public good. He likewise served as a 
member of the city council and was at all times an earnest advocate of repub- 
lican principles, being one of the active members of the party in Independence. 
He figured prominently in the social as well as the political circles of the city 
and was especially active as a member of St. James Episcopal church, serving 
for many years as a vestryman and as superintendent of the Sunday school. 
He was one of the most prominent Masons of Independence, passing through the 
blue lodge and later taking the degrees of capitular, cryptic and chivalric 
Masonry. He also crossed the sands of the desert witli the Nobles of the ^Mystic 
Shrine. He was a senior warden of his lodge in 1868, its master in 1869, 1870, 
1883 and 1884. He likewise filled one of the principal offices in the chapter and 
in 1882 was elected eminent commander of the Knights Templar Commandery, 
which office he filled for twelve years. He belonged to El Kahir Temple of the 
Mystic Shrine at Cedar Rapids and from the time he became a member of the 
order he was ever a worthy exemplar of the beneficent spirit of the craft, its 
tenets and its teachings. His life was at all times honorable and upright and 
in every relation he commanded the respect, confidence and good will of his 
fellowmen. He contributed much to the material development of the city through 
his business activity and equally to its advancement along political, social and 
moral lines. He left behind him the priceless heritage of a good name and the 
memory of a life that may well serve as a source of inspiration and also as a 
benediction to those with whom he came in contact. 



WILLIAM J. FRANCK. 



William J. Franck is the owner of a well improved farm of one hundred 
and sixty acres on sections 4 and 5, Newton township, and derives a gratify- 
mg annual income in its operation. His birth occurred at Independence, this 
county, on the 30th of September, 1878, his parents being Fritz and Fredericka 
(Geiser) Franck, of whom more extended mention is made on another page of 
this work in connection with the sketch of Fred Franck, brother of our subject. 

William J. Franck acquired his education in his native town and in the 
district schools of Homer and Middlefield townships. He remained under the 
parental roof until he had attained his majority and then worked as a farm 
hand for one year, while subsequently he cultivated a rented tract of land in 
partnership with his brother for three years. On the expiration of that period 
lie returned home and worked for his father for one year. He then again 
rented a tract of land which he cultivated for about seven years and at the 
end of that time purchased a farm of one hundred and sixty acres on sections 
4 and 5, Newton township, his residence being on the former section. This 
he has improved and has operated to the present time, carrying on his agri- 
cultural interests in a inanner that has insured his continued and growing 
success. He cultivates the cereals best adapted to soil and climate and also 
raises thoroughbred Duroc Jersey hogs and high grade cattle, breeding princi- 
pally Herefords. 



72 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

In October, 1906, Mr. Franek was united in marriage to Miss Matilda Fest, 
a daughter of John and Janet Alice (Ironside) Fest, whose record appears else- 
where in this work. John Fest took up his abode among the pioneer settlers of 
this county and is still actively engaged in farming in Newton township. Mr. 
and Mrs. Franek have three children, as follows: William Raymond and 
Hazel ]\I., who are seven and five years of age respectively; and Arthur L,, 
three years old. 

Mr. Franek is a democrat in politics and has fraternal relations with. 
the Modern Brotherhood of America, while his religious faith is that of the 
Congregational church. He has lived in Buchanan county from his birth to 
the present time and has won an extensive circle of warm friends here. 



A. G. BEATTY. 



A. G. Beatty, an honored veteran of the Civil war conducting a real estate, 
collection and insurance agency at Independence, was born in Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania, in 1842, a son of James and Grace (Stewart) Beatty, both of 
whom were natives of Ireland. The mother was born in 1819. The father, 
whose birth occurred in County Tyrone in 1818, was sixteen years of age when 
he came to the United States, making his way to Philadelphia, where he began 
learning the machinist's trade, which he followed for fifteen years. During 
eight years of that period he had a machine shop of his own. In 1849 he removed 
westward to Iowa, making the journey bj^ water, rail and stage coach until he 
reached Jones county. Pleased with the prospects of the country and believing 
that he might earn a good living here, he sent for his wife and three children, 
who joined him in June, 1850. ]\Ir. Beatty had entered land from the govern- 
ment in Jones county and was one of its pioneer settlers. There were no rail- 
roads west of the ^lississippi and the entire country was wild and undeveloped. 
All around were Indians but they were peaceful, belonging to the tribes of 
Sac and Foxes and others who were leaving for reservations farther west. 

James Beattj' continued to engage in farming in Jones county until 1876, 
when he purchased land in Buchanan county, where he owned about four 
hundred acres at the time of his death, which occurred in 1893 when he was 
seventy-five years of age. He was an active and exemplary member of the 
Baptist church and he and his ln*others built a church of that denomination in 
Cascade, Iowa. At the time of the Civil war he responded to the country's call 
for aid and became corporal in Company I, Twenty-first Iowa Infantry. He 
participated in the battle of Helena, Arkansas, and various other important en- 
gagements until he was discharged on account of physical disability in 1864 
due to camp sickness and general breakdown in health from which he never 
recovered. His life was an active, busy and useful one, and his influence was 
always on the side of right and progress. His family numbered five sons, the 
eldest being James Beatty, deceased, who was a resident of Philadelphia and 
who served as commissary sergeant in a Pennsylvania regiment during the Civil 
war. 



I 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^H^^^^^ ^ ^^^^^^^1 


H 


^^K «: 

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^' 


.^^K ^^^^^^^^^^^^1 


^EC 


■ 1 




^^^^^^^^^^^^^^Btofmifc: a > t»M.- *^. fi^^^^^^^^B 



A. G. BEATTY 



1 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 75 

Another of the five sons who did active duty in defense of the Union was 
■ A. (^. Beatty of this review. In his early boyhood he pursued his education in 
one of the old-tnne log schoolhouses of Iowa and for one terra he was a student 
m the Hopkinton Seminary, now Lenox College, at Hopkinton, Iowa. In early 
boyhood he began learning the mason's trade and after reaching the age of 
sixteen years gave his entire attention thereto until the outbreak of the Civil 
war. Responding to the country's call for aid, he joined Company D Ninth 
Iowa Infantry, under the command of Captain David Harper of Anamosa and 
Colonel William Van Devere of Dubuque. He served for one year and was then 
honorably discharged. At the battle of Pea Ridge, Arkansas, he was wounded 
twenty-three times and his right arm is useless. While lying injured upon that 
battlefield he would have given, had he owned it, the entire wealth of the United 
States for a drink of water. He had nothing to drink and no medical attention 
from six o'clock in the afternoon until ten o'clock the next dav. He was passed 
by several times because the^ Red Cross attendants thought 'he was dead but 
eventually he was picked up and his wounds cared for. He was also in the battle 
of Sugar Creek. He still has in his possession a Testament which is stained with 
blood, for he was carrying the little volume in his vest pocket on the battlefield 
when injured. He also has bullets which were extracted from his body. 

For some time after the war and his return to Jones county Mr. Beatty was 
unfit for any work, but eventually he recovered from his many wounds He 
then turned his attention to farming, which he followed in Jones county for 
two years or until 1870, when he came to Buchanan countv. Here he again 
carried on general agricultural pursuits and he is now the owner of farm prop- 
erty in this county which he purchased in 1873. He continued to activelv till the 
soil until 1882, when he removed to Independence and established a real estate, 
iiLsurance and collection agency which he has since conducted with growing 
success. He also became pension attorney in the interior department and at 
different times he has held public offices, serving as justice of the peace of Sumner 
township, as overseer of the poor of Independence and as steward of the 
Buchanan county poor farm for three years. 

Mr. Beatty has long been active in public affairs and is a stalwart advocate 
of the republican party, doing everything in his power to promote its growth and 
secure its success. He is equally active and earnest in his efforts to advance the 
upbuilding of the Baptist church, of which he is a most faithful member. For 
twenty years he served as clerk of the church, has been a member of the board 
of trustees and was moderator of the Dubuque Baptist Association for three 
years. For the past eleven years he has been commander of E. C. Little Post, 
No. o4, G. A. R., and his long continuance in that position indicates how highly 
he IS honored by his fellow members. He likewise served on the staff of the 
national commander, Washington Gardner, of Columbus, Ohio, and is now on the 
staff of David J. Palmer, national commander of the G. A. R. He has been 
a member and chairman of various committees of the state encampment and 
has also been a delegate to the national encampment. 

In 1863 :\Ir. Beatty was united in marriage to :\Iiss Alice Cook Freeman 
who was born in Missouri in 1841, a daughter of Sylvanus and Sophia (Cald- 
well) Freeman, natives of Canada and New York respectively. Her father came 
to the United States when a young man and followed farming in Wisconsin and 

Vol. IT — 4 



76 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

Missouri. After the outbreak of the Civil war he enlisted for service in Company 
I, Twenty-fifth Wisconsin Infantry. His health became greatly impaired during 
the time which he spent at the front, covering more than two years, and rendered 
him unfit for business after he was mustered out. He subsequently removed to 
Dubuque and he became an active member of the Grand Army of the Republic. 
Mrs. Beatty is a prominent member of the Woman's Relief Corps, as are her 
three daughters. To Mr. and Mrs. Beatty were born eight children, but five of 
the number, all sons, died in infancy. Rosella, the eldest daughter, is the wife 
of R. S. Glenn, a general merchant of Oelwein, Iowa, by whom she has five 
children : Charles R., who is a graduate physician of the Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity ; Alice ; Violet ; Martha ; and Hetty. Grace, the second daughter, is the 
wife of K. B. Miller, a general merchant of Independence, and they have two 
children: Irene, the wife of Lloyd Harkness, a carpenter of Independence, by 
whom she has two children ; and Myrtle, at home. Jennie V., the third daughter, 
is acting as stenographer in her father 's office. 

Mr. Beatty has no fraternal or club relationships save his connection with the 
Grand Army of the Republic. He was, however, at one time secretary of the 
Business Commercial Club, which has passed out of existence. He displays 
many sterling traits of character which have won him high regard. His enter- 
prise and energy have established him as a representative business man of Inde- 
pendence, while in many ways he has proven his loyalt}^ and his patriotism in 
citizenship, remaining as faithful to his country in days of peace as he was when 
he followed the stars and stripes upon the battlefields of the south. 



J. W. BIDDING P:R. 



4 



Among the more important and profitable commercial enterprises of Quas- 
queton is the well appointed drug store owned and conducted by J. W. Bid- 
dinger, who has been continuously connected with the trade in this city since 
1903. He is a native son of Quasqueton, born in 1862. His father, Henry 
Biddinger, was born in Tuscarawas county, Ohio. July 9, 1826, and in early 
life learned the harness maker's trade in ^Marion, Iowa, having come to this 
state in 1854, the journey being made across the country in the primitive manner 
of travel in those days. He lived in Marion for several years and then came to 
Buchanan county, settling in Quas^iueton, where he was engaged in business 
as a harness maker and dealer for forty-one years. People came from Dubuque 
to Quasqueton, driving over the prairies to trade with him. Conditions were 
those of pioneer life and on all sides were seen evidences of the fact that this 
was a frontier region. Quasqueton was then the largest town in the county. 
There was plenty of wild game to be had, for the unsettled condition of the 
prairies gave ample feeding ground for all kinds of wild game commonly found 
in this latitude at an early day. 

Mr. Biddinger was united in marriage to I\Iiss ^Telissa ]\IcBee, who was born 
in Tcrre Haute, Indiana. February 27, 1832, and they became the parents of 
five children, of whom J. W. Biddinger is the eldest son and the only one now 
living in this county. The death of the father occurred in 1898, when he had 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 77 

reached the age of seventy-two years, and the mother passed away in 1895. 
They were consistent and active members of the Baptist church, in which 
Mr. Biddinger held various offices, while in the organization of the early church 
he took an active and helpful part. He was a man of high and honorable 
principles and throughout his life was ever loyal to the sterling characteristics 
of upright manhood. 

J. W. Biddinger attended school in Quasqueton until fourteen years of 
age, when he entered a school of medicine at Des Moines, becoming a student 
in Highland Park College of that city. He afterward took up the study of 
pharmacy at Highland Park and was graduated therefrom when twenty-one 
years of age. He then secured a situation in Cedar Rapids, being employed in 
a drug store there for seven years, after wliich he spent three years as clerk 
in a drug store in Omaha, Nebraska. He afterward went to Thurman, Iowa, 
where he had charge of a store until 1898, when he took a trip to Alaska, being 
in the far northwest at the time of his father's death. He remained there for 
a year and a half and with a number of companions with whom he had journeyed 
to the northwest he laid out claims which they worked for gold. On one occa- 
sion a vessel on which he was a passenger was shipwrecked on a glacier. He 
tramped all over Alaska and is familiar with every phase of its pioneer develop- 
ment. In 1900 he returned to Iowa and in 1903 again came to Quasqueton, 
where he opened the drug store of which he is now proprietor and which for 
eleven years he has conducted with growing success. He also owns land in this 
county but devotes the major part of his attention to the drug trade. 

In 1884 Mr. Biddinger was united in marriage to Miss Hermina Cooper and 
they have a daughter, Nellie J., who is the wife of C. Hanson, a music dealer 
of Oelwein. Mr. Biddinger takes no active part in politics nor is he associated 
with any lodges. When leisure permits, he spends his time in fishing and 
hunting and greatly enjoys those sports, but his attention is concentrated upon 
his commercial activities and he is today one of the leading and prosperous 
merchants of his native town. 



JOHN MEYER. 



John ]Meyer is a well known farmer, stock-raiser and feeder of Byron town- 
ship, living on section 3. He is numbered among the pioneer settlers of Bu- 
chanan county, having since 1855 resided within its borders. Pennsylvania 
claims him as a native son, his birth having occurred in Lancaster county on 
the 10th of November, 1848, his parents being Henry and Isadora (SulliVan) 
Meyer, of whom mention is made in connection with the sketch of their son- 
in-law, Colonel Jed Lake, on another page of this volume. 

John Meyer was but seven years of age when the family came to Iowa and 
he shared with the others of the household in the usual experiences and hardships 
of pioneer life, for this was still a frontier region at the time of their arrival. 
At the usual age he entered the public schools, to which he is indebted for 
the educational opportunities which he enjoyed. His training in farm labor 
was not meager and he remained at home until thirty-two years of age, although 



78 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

in the meantime he had become the owner of land which he was cultivating. 
When he attained his majority his father gave him eighty acres and to his 
original holdings he has added from time to time as his financial resources 
have increased until he now has two hundred and eighty acres, while his wife 
is the owner of three hundred and fifteen acres, all in one body. This farm 
Mr. j\Ieyer personally cultivated and developed until about three years ago, 
when he rented all of his fields save about forty acres, in the midst of which 
stands his home. He now raises cattle, horses and hogs and as a live stock 
raiser and feeder is doing a profitable business. 

On the 29th of December, 1880, Mr. Meyer was united in marriage to Miss 
Emma A. Spangler, a daughter of Samuel T. Spangler, a leading citizen and 
honored pioneer settler of the county whose sketch is to be found on another 
page of this work. She was born in Coshocton county, Ohio, October 21, 1855, 
and when quite young was brought l)y her parents to this county, where her 
life has since been spent. In early womanhood she engaged in teaching school. 
Our subject and his wife have one son, Cliff Spangler Meyer. 

In his political views Mr. Meyer has long been an earnest republican, never 
failing to cast his vote in support of the men and measures of the party. For 
fifteen years he has held the office of road supervisor and has done much to 
improve the public highways. For a similar period he served as school director 
and the cause of education finds in him a stalwart champion. He has recently 
erected a handsome residence upon his farm, built in a modern and attractive 
style of architecture. lie and his wife occupy an enviable position in the regard 
of their fellow citizens and the hospitality of their home is greatly enjoyed by 
their manv friends. 



GEORGE CECIL. 

George Cecil, a resident farmer of Liberty township, is a self-made man 
who, starting out in business life at the early age of twelve years, is today a pros- 
perous agriculturist owning and cultivating two hundred and fifteen acres of 
valuable and productive land in tbe township where his entire life has been 
spent. lie was born in Liberty township in 1866, a son of Abraham and Rachel 
(]\IcBane) Cecil, both of whom were natives of Tuscarawas county, Ohio. The 
father, who was born in 1882, passed away in 1871. In early life he engaged 
in farm work in his native .state but heeded the advice of Horace Greeley: "Go 
west, young man, go west," and made his way over the country to Buchanan 
county, where he arrived in 1850. He found here a section of the state in which 
the work of modern civilization and improvement had scarcely been begun. 
In fact there were all the evidences of pioneer life. There were no schools, no 
churches and but few houses and those were mostly built of logs. He took up 
govennnent land and the property which thus came into his possession as a 
claim is now owned by his son George. He had to break the sod and perform 
other arduous tasks incident to the development of new land and as the years 
went on he achieved a measure of success which was most gratifying, coming 
to him as it did as the reward of persistent, earnest and arduous effort. He 



■ HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 79 

was the owner of one hundred and twenty acres and through his labors his 
farm became very productive. He was a man of sterling worth but of retiring 
disposition. 

George Cecil was the youngest in a family of ten children, five of whom are 
yet living in Buchanan county. He attended the district schools but his educa- 
tion opportunities were quite limited owing to the fact that his services were 
early needed upon the home farm. He began to work as a farm hand in the 
neighborhood when twelve years of age and was thus employed until he attained 
his ma.jority, when he began farming on his own account. He now owns the 
old homestead property which his father entered as a claim from the govern- 
ment but to this has added from time to time until he is the possessor of a 
valuable farm of two hundred and fifteen acres in Liberty township, constituting 
one of the good farms of that locality. He cultivates the cereals best adapted 
to soil and climate and is also successfully engaged in raising stock, deriving a. 
substantial income from both branches of his business. 

On the 19th of March, 1889, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Cecil and 
Miss Jennie Roberts, who was born in Ohio, a daughter of John and Esther 
(Bateman) Roberts. Tlie father was born in the north of Ireland in 1813 and 
died in 1882, while the mother, a native of New Brunswick, was born in 1830 
and is still living at the advanced age of eighty-four years. When only a boy 
John Roberts crossed the Atlantic from Ireland to New Brunswick and there 
lived until 1865, when he came to the United States, settling first in Ohio. 
The year 1878 witnessed his arrival in Buchanan county, where he continued 
to engage in general farming and stock-raising, which had hitherto occupied 
his attention. He became a naturalized American citizen and, though never 
a politician, he supported those measures and movements which he deemed of 
benefit to his community. He was an active member of the Methodist church. 

Mr. Cecil holds membership with the IModern Woodmen of America in the 
camp at Independence. He is well known in the county where his entire life 
has been spent and where he has so directed his efforts as to win success. He 
certainly deserves great credit for what he has accomplished. Denied advan- 
tages which other boys enjoy, he nevertheless has cultivated the substantial 
qualities of industry, enterprise and integrity which lead to success and is today 
one of the substantial farmers of Liberty township. 



PHILLIP J. HENDERSON. 

Phillip J. Henderson is the owner of a farm of one hujidred and twenty 
acres on sections 11 and 15, Homer township, and that he thoroughly under- 
stands modern methods of farming is indicated in the excellent and well kept 
appearance of his place. He was born in Brandon, Buchanan county, April 
25, 1865, a son of Phillip and Olive (Howe) Henderson, the former a native of 
Missouri and tlie latter of Canada. Phillip Henderson, Sr., arrived in this 
county in 1856 and was drafted for service as a soldier in the Civil war, becom- 
ing a member of the Fourth Iowa Infantry, with which he Avent to the front, 
being on active duty until the close of hostilities. He then returned to Buchanan 



80 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

county, where he engaged in farming for some time. Eventually, however, he 
removed to the southwestern part of the state, where he purchased land and 
carried on general farming for several years. Finally he returned to Buchanan 
county and bought land in Jefferson township, bending his energies to the 
further development and improvement of that place, upon which he lived for 
an extended period. His life's labors were ended in death on the lltli of 
February, 1897. His widow survives and is now a resident of Cono township. 

Phillip J. Henderson, whose name introduces this review, at an early age 
started to earn his own living by work as a farm hand. His leisure hours were 
few and indolence and idleness have been utterly foreign to his nature through- 
out his entire career. He continued in the service of others until he reached the 
age of twenty-five years and then began farming on his own account, cultivating 
rented land for a long time. However, he carefully saved his earnings until his 
labors had brought him sufficient capital to enable him to purchase a farm in 
1899. He afterward sold that property and invested in one hundred and 
twenty acres on sections 11 and 15, Homer township, whereon he has since 
resided. He at once began to develop and improve the property according to 
modern ideas of farming and has since successfully managed the place, save 
for tv»o years, which he spent in the northwestern part of the state. The farm 
presents a well kept appearance, there are good buildings upon the place and 
these in turn are surrounded by well tilled fields, which give every evidence of 
the careful supervision of the owner. 

On the 10th of April, 1888, ]\Ir. Henderson was united in marriage to Miss 
Minnie E. Patterson, a daughter of Nelson H. and Margaret (Gates) Patterson, 
natives of New York and Pennsylvania respectively. The father was an engi- 
neer and worked in the oil fields of Pennsylvania through the greater part of 
his life. He lived for one year, however, in Buchanan county, Iowa, and then 
went to the Wisconsin pineries to work and was never heard from again. His 
wife passed away January 6, 1883. ]\Ir. and Mrs. Henderson have become the 
parents of one son, George I., who was born December 24, 1892. and is now 
engaged in farming in Sumner township. 

The religious faith of the parents is that of the Methodist church, and the 
political allegiance of Mr. Henderson is given to the republican party, which he 
has supported since age conferred upon him the right of franchise. The greater 
part of his life has been spent in Buchanan county and, while there has been 
nothing spectacular in his entire career, it is that of an entei*prising agriculturist 
and reliable business man and a citizen whose interest in the public welfare has 
been manifested in many tangible ways. 



R. G. SWAN. 



R. G. Swan is a representative of a group of citizens whose lives are con- 
spicuous for ability, force of character, integrity and generous aims. It is 
impossible to be with him half an hour without recognizing his capacity and his 
moral vigoi". He is a financier and man of affairs, whose identification with 
business interests is of distinct value to the community, his efforts being of a 
character that contributes to public prosperity as well as to individual success. 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 83 

He was born at Birkenhead, England, November 4, 1860, a son of Joseph 
and Martha Laura (Owen) Swan, the former a native of Liverpool, England, 
born in 1826, while the latter was born in Wales in 1832. In early life Joseph 
Swan pursued a course of instruction that was intended to fit him for a career 
as an artist, but following his marriage he and his brother became managers of 
the Tranmere ferries, which they conducted for about twenty years. On the 
expiration of that period Joseph Swan was elected overseer of Tranmere, a 
position similar to that of county treasurer in the United States. He held that 
office until his retirement from active life, at which time he had been in the 
government service for about thirty years. He never came to the United States 
and passed away in his native country in 1909. His wife, however, visited 
America before her marriage, coming on a sightseeing trip to the United States 
— something that comparatively few in those days enjoyed — and during the 
trip she visited Niagara Falls. The religious faith of the family was that of 
the Church of England. Mr. Swan held various offices in the church. 

R. G. Swan began his education in private schools and later attended the 
Armstrong Academy at Tranmere, England, while subsequently he became a 
student in the Roslyn Villa Academy at Tranmere. When fifteen years of age 
he accepted the position of clerk in a brewery at Tranmere and in the Queen's 
Brewery was advanced from one position to another until he occupied the head 
clerkship and the cashiership in the office. He resigned his position in connection 
therewith to come to the United States in 1880. He crossed the Atlantic merely 
for the purpose of visiting the country. Having met a man from Independence, 
Iowa, he was induced to come to this city and here remained for ten years. He 
became associated with Thomas Coghlan & Sons in the furniture business and 
has since made his home in Independence, although he has gone back to England 
for brief visits. He became a citizen of the United States and is fully alive to 
its interests. Since 1881 he has occupied the same store in Independence and 
is now senior member of the furniture firm of Swan & Leytze. Theirs is today 
one of the leading furniture establishments of this section of the state. A large 
and carefully selected line of goods is carried and the business methods employed 
by the house win for it the confidence of the public and gain for it a liberal 
patronage. 

The recognition of Mr. Swan's business ability has led to the solicitation of 
his cooperation in connection with various other business enterprises and he is 
now a director of the First National Bank, is a director of the State Savings 
Bank at Quasqueton and president of the Iowa State Bank at Hazleton. He is 
likewise vice president of the Independence Cattle & Horse Company, a corpora- 
tion having over fourteen hundred head of shorthorn cattle and twenty-one 
hundred acres of land. They also engage in raising mules and their business 
is attended with substantial results. Mr. Swan is likewise interested in several 
other business affairs in Independence and is justly accounted one of its foremost 
citizens. He is forceful and resourceful and is ready to meet any emergency 
v.'ith a conscientiousness that comes from a right conception of things and a just 
consideration for what is best in the exercise of human activities. 

In his political views Mr. Swan has long been a stalwart republican and has 
taken an active and helpful interest in promoting party successes. He has 
served as a member of the school board of Independence for nine years and he 



84 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

is now coimty coroner, which position he has filled for fifteen years. For five 
years he held the office of mayor and worked diligently in that connection to 
further public progress and uphold the standards of civic virtue. 

In 1882 Mr. Swan was united in marriage to ]\Iiss Eleanor G. Noble, a 
daughter of J. D. Noble, who served as captain of a volunteer company which 
was raised at Independence for service in the Civil war and became known as 
Company C of the Twenty-seventh Infantry. He married a Miss Gillespie, 
M^ho was a native of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. I\Ir. and Mrs. Swan became 
the parents of five children, one of whom, Charles Richard, died at the age of 
six years. The others are as follows : Joseph N., a resident of Oakland, Cali- 
fornia, is a graduate of the University of California and is now a journalist, 
connected with the Oakland Tribune. He married Beatrice Lyons, a resident 
of Oakland. Herbert G., the second son, is a graduate of the high school of 
Independence and of the Shattuck ^Military School at Faribault, Minnesota. 
He married Grace Cole, who was born in Independence, where they make their 
home, Herbert being now associated with his father in the furniture and under- 
taking business. Richard Mabie, also connected with his father in the furniture 
and undertaking business, married Ethel Stocking, a daughter of L. D. Stocking, 
of Independence. Agnes, a graduate of the Independence high school, is now 
at home. 

The religious faith of the family is that of the Episcopal church and in his 
fraternal relations ]Mr. Swan is a Mason, connected with the lodge, chapter and 
commandery at Independence. He is also identified with the Knights of Pythias. 
His name has figured prominently in connection with public affairs in Buchanan 
county for many years. He is a man of resolute purpose, who carefully formu- 
lates his plans and carries them forward to successful completion, and he has 
been willing to do his public work without any other reward than an occasional 
expression of appreciation. His business enterprise, too, has been a factor in 
advancing public prosperity, and his life counts for good in all of its various 
relations. 



NATHAN NORTON. 



Nathan Norton is now living retired in Rowley but for a long period was 
identified with general agricultural pursuits in this county. He has advanced 
far on life's journey, having reached the seventy-seventh milestone. His birtli 
occurred in Erie county, Pennsylvania, September 1, 1837, a son of Nathan and 
Nabby (]McCray) Norton. The father's birth occurred in Newtown, Con- 
necticut, January 14, 1792, and the mother was born there on the 6th of 
December, 1794. Nathan Norton, Sr., became a farmer and after leaving New 
England carried on agricultural pursuits in both Pennsylvania and Ohio. He 
removed to McHenry county, Illinois, and there purchased and cultivated a 
tract of land upon which he lived for several years. The year 1855 witnessed 
his arrival in Buchanan county, where he bought eighty acres in Homer town- 
ship and at once began to till the soil and add to the improvements upon the 
place. In the later years of his life he left the active work of the farm to 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 85 

others but continued to make his home upon that place until his death, which 
occurred August 19, 1872. For several years he had survived his wife, who died 
in March, 1865. 

Nathan Norton, whose name introduces this review, was but a young lad 
when his parents went to Illinois and there upon the home farm he spent much 
of his youth, the public-school system of the state affording him his educational 
opportunities. He was eighteen years of age when the family came to Iowa and 
continuing upon the home farm, he took charge when his father retired. He 
also purchased eighty acres adjoining, in Sumner township, and developed 
both places, adding thereto many improvements which made the farms among 
the most desirable in that section of the county. Year after year he carefully 
tilled the soil and in the sale of his crops won substantial success. In 1903, 
however, he retired and removed to Rowley. He also made stock-raising an 
important feature of his business, handling shorthorn and thoroughbred Hol- 
stein cattle and Poland China and Duroc Jersey hogs. Upon coming to Rowley 
'he erected a fine residence, which he has since occupied. 

On the 9th of November, 1859, when twenty-two years of age, Nathan Norton 
was married to Miss Lovina Dodson, a daughter of Thomas and Charity (Gear- 
lock) Dodson, the former born September 1, 1790, and the latter in January, 
1794. They were pioneer settlers of Illinois and the father, who was a carpenter 
by trade, was killed by falling from a building on which he was at work. Mr. 
and i\Irs. Norton became the parents of three children: Walter R., now living in 
Independence; Arthur E., a hardware merchant of Rowley; and Jessie, the 
wife of H. Todd, a farmer of Cono township. The wife and mother passed 
away February 5, 1874, and Mr. Norton was married in October of that year 
to j\Iiss Orissa L. Blakeley, a daughter of Ambrose C. and Betsy (Lucky) 
Blakeley, both of whom were natives of the Empire state, the father's birth 
occurring in Windham, Greene county. New York, September 18, 1814, while 
the mother was born in Rensselaerville, Albany county, August 30, 1818. Mr. 
Blakeley was a farmer by occupation and removing to the west, became identi- 
fied with the pioneer development of Buchanan county, taking up his abode 
here before the city of Independence was established. He secured a tract of 
land and was thereafter engaged in general agricultural pursuits until his 
death, which occurred December 5, 1888, while his wife passed away July 2, 
1883. By the second marriage of Mr. Norton three children have been born: 
Herbert A., now engaged in the grain business in North Dakota; Emerson B., 
a farmer of Sumner township ; and Allen C, residing in Cedar Rapids. 

Mr. Norton votes with the republican party and has ever kept well informed 
concerning the questions and issues of the day. He filled the office of trustee 
while living in Homer township, and he has been treasurer of the school board 
for several years. Aside from his business his greatest activity has been along 
the line of church work. He is a devout I\Iethodist and is a trustee of the 
church and one of the class leaders. He united with the church when but 
fourteen years of age and has always been most loyal to its teachings and pre- 
cepts. The Methodist congregation of Rowley was organized in 1870 and the 
house of worship erected in 1871 at a cost of twenty-five hundred dollars, 
previous to which time the meetings had been held in the schoolhouse. That 
building was wrecked in 1874 by a tornado. The members picked up the pieces 



86 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

and rebuilt the church and in 1913 a new building was erected at a cost of 
twenty-five hundred dollars. Today there is a membership of seventy-five and 
the church is in a flourishing condition, the work being well organized and con- 
stituting a force in the moral development and progress of the community. 



ALEXANDER T. McDONALD. 

Many of the business enterprises in Independence and a number of movements 
for the welfare of the community along lines of civic progress owe much of their 
success to the efforts of Alexander T. McDonald, who is one of the most prominent 
men of Buchanan county. He was for many years a merchant of Independence, 
but has now retired from active business, although he is still interested in a 
number of concerns. The marked success which he has achieved has been due 
entirely to his own initiative and business acumen, as he began life without* 
capital or the aid of influential friends. Although he has accomplished much 
and has been an important figure in many lines of activity in his county, he is 
quiet, unassuming, approachable and affable. 

Mr. McDonald was born in Manilla, Ontario, Canada, on the 14th of March, 
1850, a son of Donald and Ann (Edwards) McDonald. His father was born 
in Canada in 1825, his parents being Archibald and Flora ]\IeDonald, natives 
of the highlands of Scotland, where their marriage occurred. They emigrated 
to Canada in 1820 and the father operated a farm near Toronto, Canada, where 
he passed away when about seventy years of age, and his wife died when about 
seventy-five. They were members of the United Presbyterian church in good 
standing. 

Donald McDonald, the father of our subject, was reared upon the home farm 
and educated in the schools of the neighborhood. His marriage occurred in 
Canada and he continued to reside in that country for some time afterward, 
but subsequently removed to the United States, arriving in Buchanan county, 
Iowa, in 1875. He purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land in Byron 
tovvaiship and began the improvement of his farm, which he operated for a num- 
ber of years. He eventually sold the place, however, and removed to Inde- 
pendence, living retired until his death, which occurred in 1898 when he was 
seventy-three years of age. He was a member of the Presbyterian church and 
his political allegiance was given to the republican part}'. His wife was born 
in London, England, but accompanied her parents, Edward and Ann (Ashton) 
Edwards, to Canada when but a child. Both her father and mother were also 
natives of England. The former was a farmer and was also engaged in the 
banking business and accumulated a considerable fortune. He died in 1847 
when but forty-eight years of age and his widow survived for many years, 
dying in 1880 when eighty years of age. They were both members of the 
Church of England. The mother of our subject was reared and educated in 
Canada and is still living at the age of eighty-eight years, making her home in 
Independence. Her church membership is with the Presbyterian denomination. 
By her marriage she became the mother of seven children, namely : Alexander 
T., the subject of this review; Flora, the wife of Walter Thompson, a farmer 




^tM^^ 




HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 89 

living in Byron township; Edward, of Seattle, Washington, government pure 
food and drug commissioner for Washington and Oregon ; John, who previous 
to his death in 1911 was a merchant of Tacoma, Washington; Richard, who is 
engaged in the mercantile business in Tacoma; and Elizabeth and Sarah, both 
living with their mother in Independence. 

Alexander T. McDonald passed his boyhood under the parental roof and 
was educated in the public schools. In 1872, when a young man of twenty-two 
years, he came to Independence and engaged in the mercantile business in 
partnership with his uncle, Thomas Edwards, this association being continued 
for about twenty years. The firm operated a branch store at Brandon which 
^Ir. McDonald managed, and they also had another branch at Oelwein, Iowa, 
^Ir. Edwards eventually sold his interest in the business to James M. Romig 
and Mr. McDonald continued as a partner of Mr. Romig for a number of years, 
but he finally sold his interest in the enterprise to ^Ir. Romig and then engaged 
in the wholesale glove and mitten business. He was associated in that under- 
taking with James A. Wells under the name of the McDonald Glove Company. 
This concern carried on business for about eight years but in 1907 was sold out 
to Wells Keagy & Company. The McDonald Company had about five traveling 
men upon the road and sold their product in Iowa, Minnesota and the Dakotas. 
Mr. McDonald was highly successful both as a merchant and manufacturer, 
as he conducted all of his business dealings upon the principle of fairness and 
justice to all, and his name stood for a high standard of commercial ethics, 
lie also at one time owned an interest in his brother's store in Tacoma. He has 
invested heavily in land and owns about nine hundred and sixty acres of land 
in Dickey county. North Dakota, a part of which is improved and which he 
rents. He also holds title to about three thousand acres in Martin county. North 
Carolina, which he expects to put upon the market in small tracts. Until 1914 
he was the owner of one hundred and sixty acres of land in Buchanan county, 
but a short time ago he sold it, receiving one hundred and fifty dollars per acre. 
He has a half interest in two store buildings in Independence and is one of the 
most substantial citizens of the place. 

Mr. McDonald was united in marriage on the 17th of September, 1882, to 
^liss Clara Romig, a native of Wisconsin, born November 13, 1856, and a 
daughter of Isaac and Elizabeth Romig. Her father was born in 1814. The 
family came to Iowa at an early day in the history of the state and settled in 
Brandon, where Mr. Romig engaged in farming and also in mercantile business 
until his death, which occurred on the 13th of May, 1887. His wife survived 
for eight years, dying June 25, 1895. Mr. and Mrs. McDonald have no children 
of their own but adopted his brother John's daughter, Nellie, when she was 
but a small child and reared her as their own. She is now the wife of Perry 
J. Miller, a real-estate man of Independence. 

Mr. McDonald is a republican but has never been willing to accept local 
office. He was, however, for a number ol years one of the board of trustees of 
the Hospital for the Insane, which is located at Independence, being appointed 
to that office by the state legislature. Fraternally he belongs to Independence 
Lodge, No. 87, A. F. & A. M. ; Aholiab Chapter, No. 21, R. A. M. ; and Kenneth 
Commandery, No. 32, K. T. Both he and his wife are consistent members of 
the Presbyterian church. In addition to his business connections previously 



90 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

mentioned, he is a stockholder and director of the Commercial State Bank of this 
city and was also for a time engaged in the manufacture of lumber here and 
was likewise interested in a number of the early business enterprises of Inde- 
pendence. He has done a great deal toward developing the commercial and 
industrial life of the county and has been associated in business with many 
people. It is much to his credit that his dealings have been invariably straight- 
forward and honorable and all those who have been brought in contact with him 
hold him in the highest esteem and respect. 



CHESTER M. ROBERTS. 

Chester M. Roberts, who since 1905 has been cashier of the Peoples National 
Bank at Independence, was born December 28, 1867, in Fa.yette county, just 
over the border line of Buchanan county. His fatlier, John B. Roberts, was a 
native of southern Indiana and in the early '50s arrived in Iowa, settling upon 
a farm in Fayette county. He wedded Louisa M. Carpenter, who was born in 
the state of New York and with her parents removed to St. Charles, Illinois, 
whence they came to Iowa at an early period in the development of this state. 

For many years Mr. and ]\Irs. John B. Roberts continued to reside upon a 
farm in Fayette county but about 1883 removed to Fairbank, Buchanan county, 
where he established a lumber yard, continuing in the business to the time of 
his death, which occurred in the year 1900. Ilis wife survived him until 
December, 1912, when she, too, passed away. At the time of the Civil war 
]\Ir. Roberts enlisted for service in Company F of tlie First Iowa Cavalry and 
remained at the front as a private for three years. He was always loyal in his 
citizenship, tlisplaying the same spirit of patriotism in days of peace as in times 
of war. To him and his wife were liorn five children, all of whom are yet 
living: John H., a farmer residing at Lanark, Illinois; Guilford W., who is 
engaged in the lumber business at Webster City, Iowa ; Chester ]\I. ; Cora E., 
the wife of W. C. Brant, a resident of Fairbank, Iowa ; and Grififith. who is 
engaged in the lumber business at Ames. 

Chester M. Roberts attended the public schools at Fairl)ank and also the 
district scliools, but liis educational op])ortunities were somewhat limited and 
it has been in the school of experience that he has mastered life's most valuable 
lessons. He early became familial- with all the duties and labors tliat fall to 
the lot of the farmer and remained at lioine, assisting his father until twenty 
years of age, when he began clerking in a store in which he was employed for 
about two years. He was afterward with an elevator company for about two 
years and for a year was connected with his father in the lumber business. He 
then came to Independence, having l)een appointed to public office. His politi- 
cal allegiance has always been given to the democratic party. He filh^d the 
position of deputy clerk under L. F. Springer for two years and was city 
collector for seven years prior to 1901, when he was elected county treasurer, 
succeeding James A. Poor, who had held this office about thirty years prior 
to his death. He was elected on a minority ticket with a nia.jority of over 
two hundred. This office he filled for two vears and was then reelected. He 



HISTORY OP^ BUCHANAN COUNTY 91 

resigned his position, however, to accept the office of cashier in the Peoples 
National Bank in 1905 and has since served in that capacity. He has been 
a popular official of the bank, courteous and obliging to its patrons and ever 
loyal to the interests of its stockholders. He also owns an interest in a larm 
of two hundred and ten acres, in which his partner is Rudolph Ligtze and which 
is operated as a general stock and dairy farm. He is likewise interested in the 
Wapsie Company and owns real estate in Independence. 

On the 5th of September, 1891, Mr. Roberts was married to Miss Myrtle 
M. Higbee, who was born in Fairbank, Iowa, a daughter of R. H. and Rachel 
(Patterson) Higbee. In early life her father engaged in merchandising at 
Fairbank as a partner of Mr. Roberts' father, and after the latter 's death Mr. 
Higbee removed to Lewiston, Idaho, where he is now living retired. He served 
in the Civil war with an Iowa regiment. To Mr. and Mrs. Higbee were born 
four children : ]\Iarvin H., who conducts a cafe and delicatessen store in Lewis- 
ton, Idaho ; Mrs. Roberts ; Elizabeth, the wife of T. J. Gorman, who is conducting 
a millinery and tailoring establishment in Independence, and Maud G., the 
wife of A. R. Luther, who is engaged in the real-estate and insurance business 
in Independence. 

Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Roberts. Eva R., who was 
born August 25, 1892, is a graduate of the Independence high school and is now 
remittance clerk in the Peoples National Bank. Esther L., born July 30, 1894, 
is also a high-school graduate. Albert Chester, born December 21, 1906, com- 
pletes the family. ]\lr. Roberts holds membership with the Masonic fraternity, 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Knights of Pythias. His entire 
life has been passed in this section of the state and he has an extensive circle of 
friends here who entertain for him warm regard because his life has been well 
spent. His salient traits of character may be marked sterling and his worth is 
acknowledged by all with whom he has come in contact. 



WALLACE M. HIGBEE. 

For fifteen years Wallace M. Higbee has been one of the prominent and suc- 
cessful merchants of Fairbank and since February, 1914, has served as post- 
master of the town. He has also served acceptably as sheriff of the county and 
as marshal of the city of Independence. He was born in Chautauqua county. 
New York, on the 17th of August, 1856, a son of Charles and Flora S. (Smith) 
Higbee, the former born in Onandaga county, New York, and the latter in 
Cayuga county, that state. The mother is a direct descendant of the English 
fajnily of Smiths who came to America in the seventeenth century, one branch 
locating in New York and the other in New England. Charles Higbee died 
in Fairbank, Iowa, but his widow survives and resides in Cedar Rapids. Three 
children were born to their union, namely : Wallace M., of this review ; Lawrence 
C, who was born in January, 1866, and resides in Fairbank; and Mrs. Linnie 
Kraft, who is a resident of Cedar Rapids, this state. The two younger children 
were born in Oren township, Fayette county. Iowa, and all were reared there. 



92 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

Wallace M. Higbee accompanied his mother to Iowa in 1857, as his father 
had located in Oren township, Fayette county, the year previous. They 
traveled to Dubuque, Iowa, by rail and thence by team to Oren township, where 
the son grew to manhood. He spent a great deal of his time in assisting his 
father with the farm work but during the winters attended the district school. 
He subsequently completed the course in the Independence high school and was 
for a time a student in the Upper Iowa University at Fayette. After completing 
his education he engaged in the livery business in Fairbank for a number of 
years, but in 1891 gave that up in order to give his entire attention to his duties 
as sheriff of Buchanan county. Although the county is strongly republican, he 
was elected to the office upon the democratic ticket, which was a strong tribute 
to the esteem in which he was held by the electors. He served as sheriff for 
one term and was then appointed city marshal of Independence, holding that 
office for three years. In 1899 he returned to Fairbank and established a store, 
carrying jewelry, wall paper, paints, oils, cigai*s, stationery and drugs. On 
the 14th of February, 1914, he disposed of his drug interests but retains the 
rest of the business. He has a large and representative patronage and his 
customers are assured of fair treatment, as he has an enviable reputation for 
integrity and just dealing. On the 14th of February, 1914, he was appointed 
postmaster of Fairbank and has proved prompt and accurate in his manage- 
ment of the affairs of that office. 

Mr. Higbee was married in Fairbank township, this county, on the 31st of 
December, 1876. to ]\Iiss Harriet L. George, who was born in that township on 
the 4th of October, 1860. She grew to wemanhood there and was there educated. 
Her parents, Sampson and Cynthia (Saylor) George, were natives of England 
and Tompkins county, New York, respectively. Her mother was born on the 
29th of December, 1829. They were among the pioneers of Fairbank township, 
having made the long journey overland from the east wlien it consumed weeks 
instead of days as at the present time. Her father was a farmer in Fairbank 
township during his active life but passed away at Independence. Her mother 
is still living and resides in that city. They had eight children, seven of whom 
survive: William F., a resident of Leadville, Colorado: Mrs. Lela Warburton, 
of Ames, Iowa ; Horace G.. who was born August 7, 1857, and resides in Fair- 
bank; ]\Irs. Higbee; Mrs. C. A. Mills, of Waterloo, Iowa; Ulysses S., deceased; 
Ernest S., living at Palo Alto county, Iowa ; and Clarence, also a resident of that 
county. All were born in Fairbank township and with the exception of the 
eldest, in the same house, and attended the common schools of the community. 
The family was well known and highly esteemed in this county. To 'Sir. and 
Mrs. Higbee have been born four children, three of whom survive. Herbert 
George was born September 13, 1878, and after graduating from the iiigh 
school at Independence completed the four years' course at the Military Acad- 
emy at West Point. He also graduated in pliarmacy at a college in Des Moines. 
At present he is deputy revenue collector of Duliuque, Iowa, and captain of the 
famous Governor's Grays of Dubuque. Mrs. Alice L. Smith, who was born Sep- 
tember 8, 1880, is also a graduate of the Independence high school. She resides 
at Storm Lake, Iowa, where her husband is a very successful physician. Pearl 
died in infancy. Mrs. Amy M. Agncw, who was born November 27, 1886, was 
graduated from the Independence high school and lives in Fairbank. All of 



HISTORY OP BUCHANAN COUNTY 93 

the children were born and reared in this county. Mrs. Higbee is a member of 
the Methodist Episcopal church in Fairbank and is active in the work of the 
various organizations in the church. 

Mr. Higbee is a democrat and has served for a number of years as council- 
man at Fairbank. He has also been for several years a member of the school 
board and takes a keen interest in ever,ything that affects the welfare of the 
public schools, as he realizes that an excellent system of education is a necessity 
in a democracy. Fraternally he belongs to Fairbank Lodge, No. 292, A. F. & 
A. M. ; and to Lodge No. 741, B. P. 0. E., at Oelwein. Besides his business 
in Fairbank he owns a commodious and well furnished home here and is 
recognized as one of the well-to-do citizens of the town. He is a man of com- 
mendable public spirit and has been identified with many movements that have 
resulted in good to the town. 



MICHAEL L. SHINE, M. D. 

Dr. Michael L. Shine, deceased, was for twenty-seven years a leading physi- 
cian and surgeon of Winthrop, Iowa, and was always forgetful of self in his 
care for his patients. This characteristic eventually cost him his life as his 
death was occasioned by blood poisoning contracted while attending a patient. 
He was born in Kentucky on the 29th of September, 1856, a son of Patrick and 
Sarah Shine, both natives of Ireland. Upon coming to the United States they 
resided in Kentucky for several months but in 1857 removed to this county 
and located upon a farm in Westburg township. The mother died when the 
subject of this review was but five years of age and he was only fifteen or sixteen 
years old when his father also passed awa3^ Of the children born to that union 
only one, John Shine, of Texas, survives. 

As Michael L. Shine was the oldest son the care of the family devolved upon 
him following the death of his father, and although he was but a boy he bravely 
shouldered the burden and, engaging in farming, earned enough not only to 
care for himself but to provide for the support of the younger children as well. 
He had completed the course offered in the country schools but was not satisfied 
as he desired to become a physician and when he reached his majority he decided 
to work with that end in view. He was compelled to depend entirely upon his 
own resources but he had a strong physique and a resolute determination to 
succeed. He entered Tilford Academy at Vinton, Iowa, and worked his way 
through, l)eing graduated with the class of 1882. He subsequently entered the 
College of Medicine of the University of Iowa at Iowa City, but owing to lack 
of funds was unable to complete the course. He walked from his home in 
Quasqueton to Winthrop rather than pay money for a conveyance although it 
was bitterly cold and began the practice of medicine in Winthrop. but the state 
legislature soon afterward passed a law requiring a diploma from an accredited 
medical school before one could be licensed to practice. He then returned to 
the State University and completed his medical course, receiving the degree 
of M. D. from that institution in 1887. He again located for practice in 
Winthrop and from that time until his death was accorded the respect and 



94 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

confidence of the community. He soon gained a large and representative prac- 
tice and was very successful in curing or, if that were impossible, checking 
disease. He was more than a physician to his patients as he took a personal 
interest in their recovery and his cheerful personality inspired confidence in an 
ultimate cure. Those to whom he ministered thought of him as a friend and 
felt sincere sorrow when they heard of his untimely demise. He passed away 
on the 2d of March, 1911. 

Dr. Shine was married on the 21:th of September, 1884, to Miss Mary 
Williams, who was born in Quasqueton, a daughter of Cornelius and Susan 
(Kirk) Williams, natives of New York state and Ohio respectively and among 
the pioneers of Buchanan county. By their marriage Dr. and Mrs. Shine 
became the parents of four children : Ben Richard and Dan W., twins, born 
June 17, 1885, the former of whom is a farmer and the latter a graduate of the 
medical department of the University of Iowa with the class of 1914 and now 
located for the practice of his profession at Farley, Iowa; and Byron Lewis 
and Kirk Neal, at home. 

Dr. Shine was a democrat in his political belief. He was a director of the 
Winthrop Telephone Company and his influence was always used to secure a 
normal steady growth for that concern. His fraternal relations were with the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the INlasons. He was a member of the 
Buchanan County IMedical Association, the Iowa State ^ledical Association and 
the National Association of Railway Surgeons and found these professional 
organizations of much value. He was active in local political affairs, serving 
for six years as mayor of tlie town, for a number of years as a member of tlie 
city council, at the time of his death was president of the school board. He had 
a large private practice and was also surgeon for the Illinois Central Railroad 
and his days were busy ones. Nevertheless he could always be counted upon 
to aid in the furtherance of any movement that sought the public welfare 
and his unselfish spirit won him a warm place in the regard of many. 



JAMES HOOD. 



James Hood, deceased, was for many years a prominent farmer and stock- 
raiser of Buchanan county and was well known within its limits. He was born 
in Forfarshire, Scotland, November 19, 1834, and was there reared and educated. 
He learned the blacksmith's trade in his native country and when a young man 
came to the new world and settled in Illinois, where for a few years he worked 
at his trade in the employ of others. When he had accumulated sufficient capital 
he opened a shop of his own in Harvard, Illinois, which he conducted until 1867, 
when he came to this county and bought three hundred and twenty acres of 
land in Byron township. It was prairie land and as yet untouched by a plow, 
and the first residence thereon was but a small rude building. ^Ir. Hood broke 
his hnul, planted his crops as soon as possible and continued to cultivate the 
place, reaping annually abundant harvests. He found Iowa land such a profit- 
able investment that he added to his holdings by degrees until he became the 
owner of over one thousand acres. The familv resided in the first dwelling 



:3i 
> 

D 



?3 
01 

C 
> 

a 

:r 




d 





HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 97 

house for a number of years, but Mr. Hood afterward erected a fine residence 
which was one of the best in the county. He was very successful in his work 
as a farmer and as his sons started out in life for themselves he gave each of 
them a tract of land. He retired from active labor in April, 1908, and removed 
to Independence, where he lived until his death, which occurred on the 24th of 
March, 1914. 

Mr. Hood was married on the 31st of December, 1860, to Miss Jannet Mc- 
Claren, who was born in Perthshire, Scotland, May 25, 1838. She remained 
there until she was sixteen years of age, when she accompanied her mother and 
brother and sister to the United States, the family locating upon a farm near 
Elgin, Illinois. The mother died a few days later. ]\Irs. Hood resided in that 
locality until her marriage and since the removal of the family to this county 
in 1867 she has lived here. She still resides in Independence and has the esteem 
of those who know her. To Mr. and Mrs. Hood were born nine children: 
William H. and John Edward, farmers of Byron township ; Kate, the wife of 
John Hamilton, and May, the wife of A. Burcher, agriculturists of Byron town- 
ship ; Fred D., who follows farming in Byron township ; Martha C, who died 
when sixteen years of age ; Albert J., who resides in Byron township ; George, 
who passed away when a young man of twenty-six years ; and Florence, who 
married Garfield Christianson, a farmer of Byron township. 

^Irs. Hood is a member of the Presbyterian church and active in its work, 
Mr. Hood was a republican in his political belief and much interested in public 
affairs, although he never desired office for himself. He was a man of strict 
integrity and gained an honored name at the same time that he amassed a com- 
fortable fortune. 



GEORGE T. BLAMER, 



George T. Blamer is a well known lumber merchant of Independence, who 
along business lines has steadily worked his way upward until he is now num- 
bered among the men of affluence in this, his native county. His birth occurred 
in Westburg township, September 20, 1869, his parents being Thomas and 
Edna Ann Blamer, the former born in Chester, Ohio, in 1844, while the latter 
was born in Connecticut in 1841. 

Thomas Blamer attended school at Mentor, Ohio, and at Willoughby, Ohio. 
He was married at the age of twenty-four years and soon afterward established 
his home in Independence, Iowa, where he remained for a brief period. He 
then purchased a farm in Westburg township, which he cultivated for six years 
and at the end of that time returned to Independence, where he became man- 
ager of the Grange elevator, being one of the pioneer grain merchants operating 
at Independence, Rowley and Livermore. In the conduct of this business he 
was associated with Mat Stewart for many years, also with the Van Orsdols of 
Rowley and with A. INI, Record of Independence, having elevators in different 
towns in Buchanan county. He continued in the grain business until 1889, 
when he became associated with J. Waekerbarth in the lumber business, organ- 
izing the Waekerbarth & Blamer Company, in which he continued until his 



Vol. IX— ft 



98 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

death in 1912. He was thus prominently identified with business affairs of 
Buchanan county for many years and aided in its material development. He 
was also one of the original stockholders of the Rush Park Seed Company, the 
Commercial State Bank and the Independence Canning Company, of which he 
was the treasurer. . He was like\^ase identified with the Kelly Canning Com- 
pany of Waverly, Iowa, and for a brief period before embarking in the lumber 
business was connected with Henry Stewart in the ownership and conduct of a 
dry-goods store. He was widely recognized as a man of tireless energy and of 
ability to devise and execute the right things at the right time. About thirty 
years ago he served as one of the aldermen of Independence and at all times 
was a stanch republican. To Mr. and j\Irs. Blaraer were born three children, of 
whom George T. is the eldest. The second son, De Witt Blamer, bom in 
Buchanan county in 1871, was graduated from the Naval Academy at Annapolis, 
Maryland, in 1910, and was on the battleship Charleston when it sank on a reef 
near the Philippine Islands. He managed to make his escape, however, and he 
is still connected with the navy, being at the present time captain of the navy 
yard at Bremerton, "Washington. The third member of the family is Mrs. Eliza- 
beth Turney, of Rome, New York. 

George T. Blamer, spending his youthful days under the parental roof, was 
graduated from the high school at Independence and for two years was a student 
in the University of Iowa. When twenty-one yeai's of age he became bookkeeper 
in the Commercial State Bank, with which he was connected until 1893. In that 
year he entered the employ of the Wackerbarth & Blamer Company as book- 
keeper and is now secretary of the company, which was incorporated in 1902 
and of which his father was the treasurer. He is thoroughly familiar with 
every phase of the lumber business and has been active in controlling and develop- 
ing the trade. He is a stockholder in the Commercial Bank and was a director 
of the Buchanan County Fair Association. The exercise of effort and close 
study of commercial conditions have made him a representative business man 
and one whose success is well merited. In addition to his other interests he is 
treasurer of the Independence Canning Corporation and he concentrates his 
energies upon the lumber and the canning business. 

On the 22d of June, 1898, Mr. Blamer was united in marriage to Miss 
Leonora B. Phelps, who was bom in Independence, a daughter of the Rev. W. 
B. Phelps. On the 2d of ^lay, 1864, in Palmer, Massachusetts, Rev. Phelps, of 
Oneida, New York, wedded Hattie Smith, of Palmer, Massachusetts, and a 
half century later they celebrated their golden wedding. At the time of their 
marriage Rev. Phelps had just graduated from Princeton Seminary and they 
went at once to Kill)ourn City, Wisconsin, where they experienced all the hard- 
ships of mission life on the frontier. I^'rom Kilbourn City they came to Inde- 
pendence, where Rev. Phelps was pastor of the Presbyterian church for ten 
years. He afterward had the pastorate of two churches in Illinois — at Aledo 
and Millersburg — and from 1884 until 1895 he was located at ^larengo, Iowa. 
His next pastorate was at Sigourney and there because of throat trouble he was 
compelled to abandon regular pastoral Avork. In 1902 he came to Independence 
and he still does some supply work. At the age of seventy he was placed on 
the list of honorably retired ministers. To Rev. and Mrs. Phelps were born six 
children, of whom four are residents of Independence, I\Irs, W. M. Woodward, 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 99 

Mrs. G. T. Blamer, Willis B. and ^liss Berniee Phelps. To Mr. and Mrs. Blamer 
have been born four children : George Phelps, born June 17, 1899, and now 
attending high school in Independence ; Howard ]M., born April 20, 1901 ; 
Thomas Burton, born December 27, 1904; and Josephine Louise, July 8, 1911. 
Mr. Blamer is prominently known in fraternal circles. He is a past chan- 
cellor commander of the Knights of Pythias lodge of Independence and belongs 
to the IMasonic fraternity. He is also on the advisory board of the boy scouts. 
He gives his political allegiance to the republican party, which has elected him 
to the office of alderman, and he has served as chairman of the republican cen- 
tral committee from the fourth ward and has done effective work in promoting 
the interests of the organization. Both he and his wife hold membership in the 
Presbyterian church and Mrs. Blamer is likewise a member of the Daughters 
of the American Revolution and is active in the organization of Pythian Sisters. 
Mr. Blamer is serving as a trustee and elder in the church and both cooperate 
in all movements and plans for the promotion of its growth and the expansion 
of its influence. His military experience covers service as second lieutenant of 
Company G of the Fifty-sixth Regiment of Iowa National Guard. His interests 
in life are broad and his activities have been of benefit along many lines which 
have promoted the welfare and upbuilding of city and county. 



CHARLES EDWARD PURDY. 

Charles Edward Purdy, formerly well known in banking circles, is now 
devoting his attention to the supervision of his individual interests and invest- 
ments. He stands today among the prosperous citizens of Independence, a posi- 
tion which has been most worthily won, his record at all times measuring up 
to the highest standards of manhood and of business integrity. He was born 
at Galena, Illinois, May 20, 1855, a son of Eliphalet and Catherine (Jaquish) 
Purdy, both of whom were natives of the state of New York, born in 1822 and 
in October, 1827, respectively. 

While in Galena Eliphalet Purdy engaged in the hotel business and in June^ 
1856, he removed from Illinois to Iowa, becoming proprietor of the Montour 
House at Independence, which he conducted successfully for eighteen years, or 
until 1874, when the hotel, which stood at the corner now occupied by the Com- 
mercial Bank, was destroyed by fire. Mr. Purdy thereafter lived practically 
retired until his death, although he was vice president of the Commercial Bank, 
was one of the directors of the Peoples Bank and of the First National Bank 
and was active in founding the Peoples National Bank. He was likewise one 
of the organizers of the Commercial State Bank and owned the building now 
occupied by that corporation. As his financial resources increased he made 
extensive and judicious investments in property and was the owner of a num- 
ber of valuable farms at the time of his death, which occurred in January, 
1893. For twenty years he was a member of the school board and the cause of 
education ever found in him a stalwart champion. He cooperated in many 
other movements of direct benefit to the community and as the years went on 
he became more and more widely recognized as a citizen of sterling worth. His 



100 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

widow survives and makes her home in Independence. There were but two 
children in the family and the younger son passed away in Galena. 

Charles E. Purdy, whose name introduces this review, was only about a 
year old when the family came to Independence and in the public schools of 
this city pursued his early education, while later he spent a number of years 
in Racine College of Wisconsin. When seventeen years of age he entered the 
employ of a Mr. Curtis, a liveryman, and at the age of nineteen secured a posi- 
tion in the Peoples National Bank, acting first as messenger, while later he 
became bookkeeper, filling that position for eleven years. On the expiration of 
that period he turned his attention to the grocery business, which he conducted 
in connection with Mr. Will Scott. Afterward, however, he bought out the 
interest of his partner and continued the business alone for six years. He was 
then offered the cashiership in the Commercial State Bank and, accepting, 
remained with that institution until February, 1912, when he resigned to devote 
his entire attention to his individual interests, which are extensive and im- 
portant. He is a director of the Corn Belt Telephone Company, with head- 
quarters at Waterloo, Iowa, an organization capitalized for five hundred thou- 
sand dollars, is a director of the Commercial State Bank, a stockholder in the 
Quasqueton Savings Bank and the First National Bank, is one of the largest 
stockholders in the Peoples National Bank, of which his father was one of the 
original organizers and stockholders, find is receiver for tbe Keifer Savings 
Bank at Hazleton. 

Mr. Purdy has been administrator for several estates and is the owner of 
tour hundred and eighty acres of valuable land in this county, operated as a 
general stock farm. He also owns two business blocks on i\Iain street and is 
the owner of a number of houses in Independence, which he rents. His invest- 
ments have been judiciously made and his success is the merited reward of 
■capable management, earnest effort, keen discernment and honorable dealing. 
Public service, too, makes demand ui)on his time and energies, for he is the 
present efificient and popular mayor of Independence, to which office he was 
elected in 19l;i. He had previously served as city treasurer for three terms 
.and in 1913 was a candidate for the state legislature, but was defeated by fifty 
votes. He is proving a capable and progressive chief executive of his city and 
has the indorsement of all fair-minded citizens. His political allegiance has 
always been given to the republican party. 

On the 12th of May, 1885, Mr. Purdy was united in marriage to Miss Maud 
Durham, who was born in this city, a daughter of Charles M. and Helen 
(Cameron) Durham, both of whom were natives of New York. The father was 
appointed station agent at the time the Illinois Central Railroad was built 
through Independence and continued in that position throughout his remaining 
days. He, too, was mayor of the city, having been elected in 1881, 1882, 1883 
and 1884. He came to Iowa prior to the Civil war and remained a valued resi- 
dent of Buchanan county until called to his final rest. Mr. and JMrs. Purdy 
have become parents of two children, Arda and Catherine, both at home. 

In Masonry Mr. Purdy has attained high rank, having taken the degrees of 
the lodge, chapter, comniandery and Mystic Shrine. He belongs to the Golf 
and Country Clubs and of the latter is the president. He is also a member of 
.the Episcopal church and his life has ever been in harmony with its teachings. 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 101 

High and honorable principles have ever characterized his career and he is 
honored and respected by all. No man occupies a more enviable position in 
business or financial circles — not alone by reason of the success which he has 
achieved but also owing to the straightforward business policy which he has 
ever followed. 



JOSIAH D. LAIRD. 



Prominent because of his success as a farmer and also because of his long 
residence in Buchanan county, Josiah D. Laird is numbered among the influen- 
tial citizens of Jesup and Perry township. For fifty-four years he has lived in 
this section of Iowa and there are few men who are so well acquainted with the 
early history of this section or who retain a more distinct recollection of its 
pioneer settlers than does Mr. Laird. 

He was born in Mesopotamia, Trumbull county, Ohio, January 14, 1835, 
and has therefore passed the seventy-ninth year of his age. His parents were 
James and Katherine (Cox) Laird, the former a native of Pennsylvania, born 
in 1806. His father, who also bore the name of James, was born in Scotland 
and settled in the Keystone state in an early day. The father of our subject 
was reared in the latter place and was there married, subsequent to which time 
he purchased land in Trumbull county, Ohio, to which he removed. He cleared 
his farm and eventually brought it to a high state of cultivation. In the winter 
months, however, he engaged in teaching school for many years. He died in 
Trumbull county when he had reached the age of sixty-five years. His wife, 
who was born in 1809 and was of German extraction, died at the comparatively 
early age of forty years. 

Reared on the home farm in Trumbull county, Josiah D. Laird attended the 
district schools of the neighborhood until he was fifteen years of age, at which 
time he entered an academy at Orwell, Ohio. At the age of seventeen he taught 
a winter term of school and subsequently taught one season at the academy 
which he had previously attended. His time was alternated by farming and 
teaching until 1860, when he came to Buchanan county, Iowa, to locate on one 
hundred and sixty acres of land which had been given him by his father. Dur- 
ing the succeeding three winters he engaged in teaching at Littleton and then 
disposed of his land. He next engaged in buying grain for a time and in the 
meantime built an elevator at Jesup. He dealt in farm lands and for five or 
six years served as deputy sheriff in Buchanan county. He eventually made a 
trade by which he came into possession of forty acres of land adjoining the 
town of Jesup. He has since added to this until the property now comprises 
two hundred acres, one hundred and forty acres of which lies within the cor- 
porate limits. This land is well improved and is under a high state of cultiva- 
tion. There are also to be found here three substantial sets of buildings. Al- 
though well advanced in years he is still active and appears much younger. He 
has seen this district develop into a prosperous region, having located here in 
pioneer days even before the railroad was built and he has done not a little to 
bring about the transformation that lias here been witnessed along various lines. 



102 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

Mr. Laird was married on the 19th of March, 1863, to Miss Abbie Mosher, 
a daughter of Allen and Phoebe (Wilbur) Mosher, who was born in Columbia 
county, New York, May 5, 1835, and comes of Quaker stock. Her parents were 
both natives of Columbia county and about 1855 they made their way to Clay- 
ton county, Iowa, where the father engaged in farming. They subsequently 
removed to Jesup, where they spent a decade, then made their home among 
their children, spending much of their time with Mr. and Mrs. Laird. They, 
too, were Quakers and both lived to a venerable age, the mother passing away 
at the age of eighty-four, while the father reached the age of ninety years ere 
he was called from this life. 

The marriage of Mr. and ]\Irs. Laird has been blessed with three children : 
Fannie K., the wife of Charles Oliver, of Omaha, Nebraska ; Jay R., who 
operates the home farm; and Abbie May, the wife of E. R. Shoemaker, of 
Waterloo. Iowa. 

]\Ir. Laird has always been a stanch supporter of the republican party and 
in his earlier life was very active in public affairs. For six years he served as 
deput}' sheriff and at one time was a candidate for the office of sheriff* but met 
defeat by fifteen votes. He was township trustee and also served as a member 
of the board of supervisors for one term, while for many years he was a mem- 
ber of the school board. Fraternally he is a Mason and both he and his wife 
have been members of and active workers in the Presbyterian church for more 
than half a century. For fifty years Mr. Laird was clerk of the sessions of the 
Presl)yterian church but then resigned. Their children, too. are all devout 
members of the church. His sterling traits of cliaracter have won for him a 
wide ac(iuainlanc(' and he and his family enjoy the highest esteem of a host 
of warm friends. 



W. P. CRl'MBACKER. M. D. 

Dr. W. P. Crumbacker is superintendent of tiie State Hospital at Inde- 
pendence, having received his appointment to this position on the 1st of July, 
1902. He is well qualified for the onerous and responsible duties which devolve 
upon him in this connection and at all times has proven himself worthy the 
liberal patronage accorded him. 

He was born in Wheeling, Virginia, now West Virginia, in 1857, his parents 
being J. H. and Hannah J. (Pollock) Crumbacker. The father's birth occurred 
in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, in 1823, and the mother was born in 
Belmont county, Ohio, in 1826. J. II. Crumliacker was a student in Bethany 
College of Virginia, which was conducted by Alexander Campbell, the organizer 
of the present Chi-istian church. He was a druggist and carried on business 
witli his fathci' at Wheeling, while later he removed to Washington, Ohio. 
.\t lengtli he took up the study of medicine and in 1865 was graduated from the 
Sterling Medical College at Columbus, Ohio. He then located for practice in 
Antrim, Guernsey county, Ohio, where he remained until his death, which 
occurred in 1894. His wife survived him for about eleven years, passing away 





V 



.^^.^^^ cjr. §: 




THE : 
PUBLIC I. 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 105 

in 1905. He was captain of the Ohio State Militia at Washington, Guernsey 
county, Ohio, a member of the town council, of the board of education, and held 
various minor offices, the duties of which he discharged in a prompt and capable 
manner. He took an active interest in the promotion of the schools and his 
efforts in support of higher education were far-reaching and beneficial. His 
religious faith was that of the United Presbyterian church and he was an earnest 
worker for the upbuilding of the organization. His family numbered six 
children, five daughters and a son, of whom Dr. Crumbacker was the third 
in order of birth. 

In the village schools W. P. Crumbacker pursued his early education and 
afterward attended an academy at Philadelphia, conducted by F. W. Hastings. 
He spent two years, from 1876 until 1878, as a student there, after which he 
entered the Medical College of Ohio, now the medical department of the 
University of Cincinnati. He was graduated in 1882, with the M. D. degree, 
and ten years later he pursued post-graduate work in the New York Polyclinic. 
In 1897 he visited hospitals in Dublin, Ireland, and in Edinburgh, Scotland, 
making special investigations concerning the treatment of nervous and mental 
diseases. He has constantly read and studied along those lines and has attained 
a high degree of proficiency in practice. His education, however, was not con- 
tinuous but was acquired through the improvement of every opportunity which 
came to him. He was only sixteen years of age when he began teaching in the 
country schools of Guernsey county, Ohio. He followed that profession through 
the winter months, while in the summer seasons he continued his studies, thus 
alternating his time until his first year in medical college. Following his course 
he practiced in Ohio with his father for two years and then entered the Athens 
(Ohio) State Asylum, now the State Hospital, in which he became assistant 
physician, remaining there for five years in that capacity. He afterward took 
up private practice in Cambridge, Ohio, where he remained for a year, and on 
the expiration of that period he returned to the Athens Asylum as superintendent, 
filling that position for three years. He next went to the West Virginia State 
Hospital for the Insane at Weston, West Virginia, continuing in charge for five 
years, after which he resumed the private practice of medicine in Athens, Ohio, 
where the succeeding three years were passed. He left that city for Pasadena, 
California, to engage in the private practice of his profession in the Green Hotel, 
the leading hostelry of that city. He remained as house physician, however, 
for only a brief period and was then selected as superintendent of the State 
Hospital at Independence, Iowa, entering upon his duties here on the 1st of 
July, 1902. He has since continued in charge, covering a period of twelve 
years, and during his regime the work has steadily advanced. Several new 
buildings have been added, including a psychopathic hospital, while a new 
nurses' building has just been completed. He has also introduced many radical 
and beneficial changes in treatment. In his care of the patients he uses no 
mechanical restraint and has abolished all of the severe methods which in past 
ages made the care of the insane a blot upon the fair name of many a state. 
He has made another improvement in the way of introducing female attendants, 
having only sixteen male nurses. At the present time there are eleven hundred 
and ninety-seven patients and one hundred and eight nurses. Dr. Crumbacker 
is directly responsible for the entire institution in all of its branches. His 



106 ~ HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

work here has been successful in the extreme. The entire atmosphere is one of 
sympathy and help, and the work accomplished has been most commendable. 

In 1888 Dr. Crumbacker was united in marriage to Miss Emma L. Bower, 
a native of Athens, Ohio, and a daughter of Captain J. C. Bower, who was born 
in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, in 1835. Her mother, Lovisa (Cooley) 
Bower, was a native of Athens county, Ohio. In early life Captain Bower 
took up the occupation of farming, which he followed until he enlisted for 
service in the Civil war, in which he held the rank of captain in a regiment of 
Ohio infantry. Following the close of hostilities he resumed agricultural pur- 
suits and cultivated .six hundred acres of land and also engaged in raising 
horses, mostly driving stock. He also raised Holstein cattle and the various 
branches of his business have proven profitable, owing to his practical and 
progressive methods. At one time he served as coroner of Athens count}', 
continuing in the office for three terms. He was a member of the state board 
of agriculture several years, at one time being president of the board. Mrs. 
Crumbacker is the second in order of birth in a family of five children and by 
her marriage has become the mother of one son, James Bower, who is now a 
student in Harvard University at Cambridge, ^Massachusetts. 

Dr. Crumbacker practically gives his entire time to his professional duties 
and interests and is continually seeking to augment his knowledge by reading 
and study and thereby increase his skill and efficiency. He belongs to the 
American Medico-Psychological Association, of which he has served on the 
council for three years, and he also has membership in the Buchanan County 
Medical Society and the Iowa State Medical Society. His practice represents 
the ideas and ideals of a higher civilization, and the truths which he has gleaned 
from his own broad experience have constituted a valuable contribution to 
medical science. 



DEWITT C. WOODRUM. 

Dewitt C. AVoodrum is a well known and prosperous farmer residing in 
Perry township, his land adjoining the corporation of Jesup on the north. He 
was born in Shasta county, California, September 5, 1854, a son of Henry 
H. and Nancy H. (Brassfield) Woodrum. The former was l)orn in 
Kentucky, where he remained until he was a young man of alwut twenty 
years of age, or until 1848 or 1849, when he removed to Iowa and settled 
upon a farm near Oskaloosa. In 1852 he and his wife went overland to Cali- 
fornia with ox teams and settled in Shasta county, where he farmed to some 
extent. A great deal of his time, however, was given to mining and he was 
often gone for many days at a time prospecting. After four years his wife felt 
that the hardships of the new country and the loneliness were more than she 
could endure and accordingly returned to her home in Iowa, bringing with her 
the subject of this review, who was then but a small cliild. The latter never 
saw his father again and did not hear from him for many years. At the time 
of the Civil war the father joined the Union army and while in the military 
service of the government received an injury which eventually caused his death. 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 107 

although he lived to be seventy-six yeai's of age. The paternal grandfather of 
our subject was a soldier in the War of 1812. 

The mother of Dewitt C. Woodrum was a native of Indiana but was taken 
by her parents when an infant to Peoria, Illinois, where she was reared. She 
was married in Iowa and, as before stated, accompanied her husband across the 
plains in 1852. Upon her return to the middle west she rode a burro and 
carried her son in her arms for a distance of one hundred and fifty miles, or 
until she reached Sacramento, where she took a boat for San Francisco. From 
the latter city she went to the Isthmus of Panama, as she believed that route 
preferable to the long overland trip. She died at the advanced age of seventy- 
five years and six months. 

Dewitt C. AVoodrum spent his boyhood upon the farm near Peoria with his 
mother and step-father, but when sixteen years of age left home. He had care- 
fully saved what little money he had received and had purchased a team, which 
he took with him when he went to the home of an uncle. He had received very 
little education previous to this time and, as he was eager to remedy his 
deficiencies in that respect, he attended district school for three winters while 
assisting his uncle with the farm work during the summers. At the end of that 
lime he went to live with his grandfather, who owned a great deal of land and 
loaned money at interest. The subject of this review assisted his grandfather 
in many ways in the care of his business and in this way received a valuable 
commercial education. Later he rented land in Marshall county, Illinois, which 
he farmed for some time, but afterward became a dealer in horses and the 
owner of a livery stable in the same county. Unfortunately the market for 
horses was poor and money w^as hard to obtain and so he was compelled to sell 
his livery in order to pay his creditors. He next rented a farm belonging to 
liis uncle in Peoria county, Illinois, and devoted his time to agriculture and 
dealing in horses. Upon leaving Peoria county he went to Ford county, Illinois, 
and purchased a farm near Gibson City, which he operated for several years. 
He kept everything upon the place in good repair and by wise management 
conserved the fertility of the soil, and his foresight, coupled wdth the general 
advance in land values, enabled him to sell his place at a large profit. He pur- 
chased one hundred and sixty acres for six thousand dollars and at the end of 
nine years sold his land for one hundred and sixty dollars per acre. He then 
went to Gibson City and for three years engaged in the livery and horse busi- 
ness, after which he bought three hundred and sixty acres of land in Lee- county, 
Illinois, near the town of Dixon, paying forty-five dollars per acre. After cul- 
tivating the same for four years he sold it for seventy-five dollars per acre. 
He subsequently bought and sold four or five different tracts of land in the 
vicinity of Dixon and in 1906 came to this county, purchasing his present farm, 
which comprises one hundred and sixty acres in Perry township. He bought 
it for seventy-five dollars per acre, l?ut it could now be sold for two hundred 
dollars per acre. The land is very fertile and is in a high state of cultivation, 
while the place is provided with the necessary buildings which are kept in fine 
repair. Mr. Woodrum has prospered in his various undertakings and is now 
in the possession of a competence. 

Mr. Woodrum was married when twenty-two years of age to Miss Adeline 
L. Wood, a native of Marshall county, Illinois, and they are the parents of two 



108 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

children : Edna ^l., who has lived in various places in the west and has been 
a mus^c teacher, but is now engaged in the millinery business in Montana ; and 
Marie, at home. 

Mr. Woodrum is a republican and takes a keen interest in everji:hing relat- 
ing to the welfare of the community. Fraternally he belongs to Safety Lodge, 
No. 416, K. P. ; Jesup Lodge, I. O. 0. F. ; to the Encampment ; and to the 
Patriarchs Militant. His energy and business acumen have enabled him to 
prosper materially and he has won also the respect of those who know him. 



REV. THOMAS EDDY TAYLOR, D. D. 

For many years Rev. Thomas Eddy Taylor devoted his life to the active 
work of the ministr\- but has now retired, although there are few Sundaj^s 
in which he does not act as a supply in some pulpit and his interest in the work 
of the church has never abated in the slightest degree. He was born in Lake 
county, Illinois, June 20, 1864, a son of Charles H. and Elizabeth Ann (Rawson) 
Taylor. The father s birth occurred in Devonshire, England, January 24, 1837. 
and he passed away on the 12th of October, 1905. As a boy he began earning 
his own living and the necessity of providing for his own support greatly limited 
his opportunities for acquiring an education. He came to the new world when 
about eighteen years of age and settled in Lake county, Illinois. There he was 
married on the 12th of October, 1861, to Miss Elizabeth Ann Rawson, who was 
born in Michigan in 1841. ]Mr. Taylor afterward engaged in farming and also 
became a local preacher of tlie ]\Iethodist Episcopal church. He resided in 
Illinois luitil the fall of 1864, when he came with his family to Iowa, settling 
on a farm in the northern part of Mitchell county, where he continued to make 
his home until 1871. He was then admitted to the upper Iowa conference and 
from that time until within eighteen months of his death he continued active 
in the work of the ministry, being called to tlie pastorate of various churches in 
northeastern Iowa. Near the close of his ministry he served as a presiding elder 
for a term and a half, but because of failing health he went to California and 
died at Burbank, that state. I\Irs. Taylor survives and is now a resident of 
Manchester, Iowa. 

Rev. Thomas Eddy Taylor is tbe eldest of a family of five children. He 
supplemented his public-school course l)y study in the Upper Iowa University, 
from which he was graduated witih the class of 1887. He al.so attended the 
Moody Bible Institute and when he had finished school he took up the task of 
preaching the go.spel, joining the upper Iowa conference of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. His first (rharge was what was known as the eleventh circuit 
north of Waterloo. He later filled the pastorates of the churches at ^larble 
Rock, Greene, Cresco, Independence, Osage and then again at Independence, 
and in 1911 he retired from the active work of the ministry, although he still 
preaches almost every Sunday, doing supply work. He also frequently preaches 
at the hospital at Independence. In 11)01 his alma mater conferred upon him 
the Doctor of Divinity degree. In the previoiLs year Dr. Taylor began the 
publication of a series of books, his authorsliip having since made him widely 



''5?'^, 





HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 111 

known. His first volume was "Studies in the Life of Christ," which has since 
been followed by "Studies in the Apostolic Church" and "Studies in the Old 
Testament." These volumes were adopted as the official Bible study text-book 
in the Epworth League and also as the official text-book of the United Christian 
Endeavor Society. It has likewise become the official text-book of the Young 
People's Societies of Canada, and in 1901 he was given charge of the Bible study 
department of the Epworth League for three years. In addition to his active 
work along the lines of moral progress and development Dr. Taylor has become 
interested in agricultural pur.suits and is the owner of two hundred and forty 
acres of land in Buchanan county comprised in two farms, to one of which he 
gives his personal attention and supervision. This is known as Idlewild and is 
situated in Wasliington township. He operates this farm of one hundred and 
sixteen acres in a general way but also specializes in the raising of shorthorn 
cattle and Duroc Jersey hogs. The farm adjoins the city limits and is supplied 
with all modern equipments and accessories. 

On the 12th of June, 1889, Dr. Taylor was united in marriage to Miss Nellie" 
i\largaret Huie, who was born at Polo, Ogle county, Illinois, a daughter of Robert 
J. and Julia (Hammond) Huie. The mother was born in New York and about 
1841 was taken to Illinois by her parents, her marriage being celebrated in 
Polo in 1862. ^Ir. Huie's birth occurred in Ogle county, Illinois, in 1840, 
and in early life he followed farming. Later he engaged in the lumber business 
and was also employed as an official weigher at the stock yards at Polo by the 
Illinois Central Railroad Company. In 1862, immediately after his marriage, 
he enlisted for service in the Union army as a private of Company A, Ninety- 
second Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He was afterward promoted to the rank of 
orderly sergeant, subsequently became second lieutenant and still later first 
lieutenant, serving altogether for three years, when he was mustered out. He 
was with Sherman on the celebrated march to the sea and for a short time was 
confined in the hospital with fever. At the close of his military experience he 
returned to Illinois and assisted his father in the further development and im- 
provement of a large farm. In the meantime he purchased a farm in Floyd 
county, Iowa, and later came to this state with his wife and daughter, now Mrs. 
Taylor. For seventeen years he resided upon his Floyd county farm and then 
removed to Charles City, where he engaged in the lumber business until about 
1895, after which he returned to his native county. A few years later he became 
official weigher for the Illinois Central Railroad and is still a resident of Polo 
hut is now living retired. He also engaged at one time in the life insurance 
biLsiness, representing a mutual benefit association of New Jersey, but made that 
simply a side issue to his other interests. While living in Floyd county, Iowa, he 
served as assessor. His wife passed away in May. 1901. Mrs. Taylor was the 
eldest" of their five children. She attended the Upper Iowa University, from 
which she was graduated with the class of 1888, and she is a member of the 
Chautauqua Literary and Scientific Circle and other organizations advancing 
educational and church work. 

Dr. and Mrs. Taylor have three children. Hartness D., who was born July 
16, 1891, and was graduated from the Upper Iowa University in 1918, on the 
completion of a course in the College of Liberal Arts, has been superintendent 
of the public schools at Stanwood, Iowa, and is now studying law at Iowa City. 



112 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

Karl S., born July 20, 1898, is in the second year of high school. Lloyd ]M., 
born September 20, 1901, is attending grammar school. 

In his political views Dr. Taylor is a stalwart republican and at the present 
time is a candidate for the office of representative to the state legislature. His 
life interests have been broad and varied and he is identified with that class 
of men who ever stand for progress and improvement. He is usually to be found 
in those circles where intelligent men are met for the discussion of important 
questions and association with him means expansion and elevation. 



AVILLIS F. VAN ORSDOL. 

It has been said that death loves a shining mark and many times this 
seems to be exemplified when a leading and valued citizen is called from the 
scene of his activities. Willis F. Van Orsdol was one of the valued residents 
of Rowley and throughout his entire life displa.yed qualities and characteristics 
that endeared him to all who knew him, causing his death to be greatly re- 
gretted wherever he was known. He was born in this county in November, 
1863, a son of James and Jessie Van Orsdol, who were pioneer settlers of this 
part of the state. The father was for many years actively and successfully 
engaged in general farming and eventually removed to Rowley, where he con- 
ducted a grain and live-stock business in connection with his two sons, Willis 
F. and Frank J., remaining active in tiiat partnership until his death, which 
occurred July 24, 1912. His widow still resides in Rowley and extended 
mention of them is made on another page of this work. 

Willis F. Van Orsdol spent his youthful days in his parents' home and 
good opportunities and advantages were afforded him. He attended the public 
schools and also continued his education in Vinton, Iowa. After reaching his 
majority he took up his abode in Rowley, where he became connected with the 
live-stock and grain business, carrying on operations along that line until his 
life's labors were ended in death on tlu' 27th of August, 1910, after he had 
been ill for only a brief period. In business he was a resourceful, energetic 
man who readily recognized and utilized opportunities and as the years went 
on his reliable business methods, combined with unfaltering energy and de- 
termination won for him a gratifying measure of prosperity. 

In January, 1890, ^Ir. Van Orsdol was married to l\Iiss Emma Page, a 
daughter of George W. and Lenora (Chandler) Page, the former a native of 
New Hampshire and the latter of ]\Iaine. Her father was one of the firsrt 
settlers of Linn county, Iowa, where he purchased wild land and developed 
and improved a farm, being busily engaged in agricultural pursuits until after 
the outbreak of the Civil war, when he considered his duty to his country his 
foremost interest and enlisted from Linn county as a member of Company II, 
Twentieth Iowa Infantry, with which he served for ten months. He then returned 
to Linn county and throughout his remaining days was actively engaged in 
farming, his death occurring June 5, 1888. His wife survives and took up her 
residence in Rowley in 1904. To Mr. and Mrs. Van Orsdol were born three 
children : Jay W., now engaged in the grain and stock business in Rowley, 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 113 

who was married on the 13th of December, 1913, to Miss Ruby Finch, a native 
of Courtland, New York ; Ivadel, six years of age ; and one who died in infancy. 
They also adopted a little daughter, Genevieve, who came to them when but 
five weeks old. 

Mr. Van Orsdol was a member of Holman Lodge, No. 593, A. F. & A. M., 
and was also identified with the Eastern Star chapter and with the i\Iodern 
Woodmen camp. He voted with the democratic party and never regarded 
lightly his duties of citizenship but met every obligation that devolved upon 
him in that connection through hearty cooperation with movements for the 
general good. He affiliated with the Presbyterian church of which his widow 
is a member and guided his life by its teachings. He left to his family not only 
a comfortable competence, but that good name which is rather to be chosen 
than great riches. He was an honorable and progressive business men, a loyal 
citizen, a faithful friend and a devoted husband and father. Mrs. Van Orsdol 
still makes her home in Rowley, where she owns an attractive residence and 
she also has good farm lands in this part of the county. 



GILBERT E. TITUS. 



Gilbert E. Titus is a well known lumberman and horse dealer of Winthrop, 
whose reputation for ability to correctly judge the good points of a horse has 
extended beyond the limits of this coujity. AVlTolesale houses and ice dealers 
throughout the state often intrust him with the buying of their horses, merely 
telling him what type of horse they wish and the price they are willing to pay 
and leaving the rest to him. He is a man seventy-five years of age but is still 
very active in business and in the various phases of life. 

Mr. Titus was born in Warrensville, Ohio, which is about eight miles from 
the city of Cleveland, August 6, 1839, a son of John H. and Angeline (Miller) 
Titus. His father was born near Rochester, Ohio, a son of Austin Titus. John 
H. Titus was reared in the vicinity of Rochester and there married, after which 
he removed to Warrensville, where he operated a sawmill and gristmill. These 
v/ere destroyed by fire but he subsequently rebuilt the sawmill and continued 
to conduct it for some time, eventually selling it. He then removed to Paines- 
ville, Ohio, where he built a mill which he ran until 1862. In that year he 
traded the mill, which was yielding good profits, for one thousand acres of land 
in Wisconsiii and one thousand acres in this county. He came here and began 
to develop the tract of land which he owned, w^hich was wild prairie as yet un- 
touched by man. He farmed during the summers and in the winters went to 
his holdings in Wisconsin, where he engaged in logging and in shipping the 
lumber which he cut from his land to this place. At the end of three years he 
sold his northern property and in 1865 started a lumber yard in Winthrop, 
•conducting the same for a year, at the end of which time he sold out. In 1867 
he started another yard, which he ran for two years, after which he sold it also. 
From that time until he retired from active life he devoted his energies to 
farming and developing his land, bringing it to a high state of cultivation. As 
his children grew to maturity he gave each of them eighty acres of land and 



114 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

started them out in life for themselves and as they had previously been well 
trained in agriculture they have met with success. He remained in Winthrop 
until about eighty-one years of age and then went to Storm Lake, where he 
passed away a year later. 

John H. Titus supported the republican party by his ballot and for many 
years was a justice of the peace. By his sensible advice he was able to assist 
many people in settling their differences outside of the court and thus saved 
them unnecessary expense. He was reared in the Quaker faith and never de- 
parted therefrom. His wife was born near Scottsville, which is in the vicinity 
of Rochester, Ohio, and was there reared and married. She accompanied her 
husband to Iowa in 1862 and passed away upon a farm near Aurora, October 
14, 1864, when but fortj^-four years of age. She was the mother of twelve 
children, two of whom died in childhood. Like her husband she was a member 
of the Society of Friends. By a former marriage Mr. Titus had a son. Benja- 
min, who is now living retired in Aurora, this county. 

Gilbert E. Titus w^as reared at home and under the instruction of his father 
early became proficient in agricultural w^ork. His schooling was that afforded 
by the public-school system and he was well grounded in the fundamental 
branches of learning. "When a young man of twenty-two or twenty-three years 
he went to Titusville, Pennsylvania, where oil fields had just been discovered. 
The man who first found out their existence was Jonathan Titus, a first cousin 
of the father of our subject, and Titusville was named in his honor. Gilbert E. 
Titus remained in that place for a year and a half and conducted a livery 
stable and drove a stagecoach. At the end of that time he w^ent to Painesville, 
Ohio, where he engaged in the livery business for two years. His father-in-law 
was government inspector of hoi'ses at Cleveland and ]\Ir. Titus was associated 
wdth him until the spring of 1864. He then sold out and in IMarch of that year 
came to this county, locating upon a tract of land near Aurora. He erected a 
number of buildings but after operating the farm for three or four years rented 
it and came to AVinthrop, where he has since engaged in the livery liusiness and 
in tlie buying and selling of horses. His long experience in that line lias made 
him an almost infallible judge of horses and he often sees possibilities of develop- 
ment in an animal that is to all appearances undesirable. Not once but many 
times he has purchased such a horse and by giving it good care and training 
has brought out the good points latent in it. He has prospered in his under- 
takings and is now in possession of a competence which insures him of the 
comforts of life. 

Mr. Titus was married in Ohio to ^liss Caroline Abbott, a native of ^lassa- 
chusetts and a daughter of R. H. Abbott, a railway contractor and government 
inspector of army horses during the Civil war. To Mr. and Mrs. Titus have 
been born two children : Bessie, the wife of Elmer Brintnall, a son of E. P. 
Brintnall, deceased, and a carpenter and builder; and Lila, the wife of B. W. 
Briggs, of Dubuque, Iowa. 

Mr. Titus is an adherent of the republican party and has held a number of 
local offices. In addition to serving as tow'nship trustee and constable he held 
the office of deputy sheriff fourteen years and in that time arrested several 
notorious horse thieves. Both he and his wife are members of the Congrega- 
tional church and are active in the support of all good causes. ^\r. Titus be- 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 115 

longs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Modern Woodmen of 
America and is well known in both of those organizations. He holds the un- 
qualified respect of those who have been associated with him in business or in a 
social way and all who know him wish him many more years of health and 
strength. 



GEORGE A. SNOW. 



George A. Snow, manager at Independence for the Meuser Lumber Com- 
pany of Dubuque, is a self-made man who has been both the architect and 
builder of his own fortunes. He now occupies a creditable position in commer- 
cial circles and his worth is widely acknowledged. He was born in Tieon- 
deroga, Essex county, New York, on the 12th of June, 1848, a son of W^illiam E. 
and Alzina (Sweet) Snow, who were also natives of Ticonderoga. In early 
life the father learned the ship carpenter's and house carpenter's trades and 
in the year 1867 he came to Iowa, settling at Independence, where he engaged 
in carpentering for a number of years. He then purchased a farm southwest 
of the city and devoted his energies to general agricultural pursuits until 
his life's labors were ended in death in January, 1892. For four decades he had 
survived his wife, who passed away in 1852. After her demise the father 
married her cousin, Miss Betsy J. Sweet, his second union occurring before his 
removal to Iowa. There were two children of the first marriage, George A. and 
Charles J., the latter now a resident farmer of South Dakota. There were also 
two children of the second marriage : Emma, deceased ; and Jed, who resides 
on the old homestead. 

George A. Snow pursued his education in the schools of New York and for 
one year in the schools of Independence. At the time of his mother's death, 
which occurred when he was but four years of age, he went to live with his 
maternal grandparents, with whom he remained until he was eighteen years of 
age. He came to Iowa in 1869, joining his father, with whom he remained 
through the winter. He then worked in Independence for others, being em- 
ployed for one summer in the building of the big mill at this place. He after- 
ward secured a clerkship in a store, remaining there and in other stores for 
about eight years. He next turned his attention to the hotel business, which he 
conducted for two years at Cedar Falls, Iowa, after which he became a land- 
owner, also following farming for about eight years. On the expiration of 
that period he again took up his abode in Independence and for nine years Avas 
employed in the Leach lumber yard, at the end of which time Mr. Leach sold 
the business to the Meuser Lumber Company of Dubuque. Mr. Snow remained 
with them as manager of the business at Independence and is now in control 
of the yard at this place. He has carefully directed the business, which has 
become a profitable venture, and he has the entire confidence of the corporation 
which he represents. He owns farm lands in Nebraska and in Minnesota, having 
made judicious investment in real estate. 

Mr. Snow has been married twice. In 1876 he wedded Miss Emma Fleming, 
who was born north of Winthrop in Buchanan county, a daughter of James 



116 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

Fleming, who was an early settler of the county, in which he followed farming. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Snow was born one daughter, Lillian, who died in 1885. The 
wife and mother passed away in 1879 and in October, 1882, Mr. Snow wedded 
Mrs. Phoebe M. (Blair) Knapp, who was born in Pennsylvania, a daughter of 
Joseph and Phoebe (Whitford) Blair, both of whom were natives of Essex 
county. New York. They emigrated from that state to Pennsylvania and 
thence came to Iowa about 1870, settling on a farm near Brandon, where they 
continued until about three years prior to the death of Mr. Blair. At that 
time he took up his abode in Brandon, where he lived retired for two years 
but spent his last year in the home of his daughter, Mrs. Snow. He was nearly 
ninety-five years of age at the time of his death, while his wife passed away 
when eighty-five years of age. They had lived together in happy wedlock for 
sixty-five years. IVIrs. Snow is the youngest of their four children. Mr. and 
Mrs. Snow have an adopted child, Marie Knapp, who is a granddaughter 
and who is now attending school. 

In his political views Mr. Snow has always been a democrat but has never 
been an office seeker. He has membership with the IModern Brotherhood of 
America and with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He has worked 
earnestly and persistently as the years have gone on and has made for himself 
a creditable position in the business circles of Independence, while in social 
life, too, he has won a desirable place. 



ALFRED P. BURRHUS. 

Alfred P. Burrhus has been closely associated with the material development, 
political activity and moral progress of Quasqueton and is therefore accounted 
one of its prominent and valued citizens. He is now engaged in the implement 
business there, having been connected therewitli for a quarter of a century. 
He is also a factor in banking circles and is the owner of extensive farm property 
in the county. His birth occurred in Patterson, Putnam county, New York, 
March 22, 1839, his parents being Luther and Mary (Penny) Burrhus, who 
were also natives of that county. The father, who was born in 1806, devoted 
his early life to farming, owning a tract of land in that state. He continued his 
residence in the east until 1859 and then came to Iowa. Here he enlisted at 
Independence as a member of the Graybeard Regiment and was with the array 
until the close of the war, his command being largely engaged in guarding pris- 
oners at Columbus, Ohio. When hostilities were over he returned to Buchanan 
county and lived with his son Alfred until his death, which occurred in 1871, 
when he was sixty-five years of age. He had long survived his wife, who died 
in 1845 at the age of thirty-nine years. Mr. Burrhus gave his political support 
in early life to the whig party, of which he was an active champion, and later 
upon the dissolution of that party he joined the ranks of the newly formed 
republican party. He always manifested a deep interest in the political questions 
and situation of the country, both when in New York and in Iowa. 

Alfred P. Burrhus was a pupil in the country schools of his native state and 
afterward attended the high school at Poughkeepsie, New York. When sixteen 




j^rfrd. 




HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 119 

years of age he began teaching in the rural schools and the following year came 
to Iowa, where he was employed as a teacher in the district schools of Delaware 
county for a time. He afterward traveled in a photograph ear, making daguerreo- 
types throughout northeastern Iowa for two years, and he visited Waterloo when 
it was only a village. He afterward became interested in a hack line carrying 
passengers between Waterloo and Dyersville, Iowa, and later he turned his 
attention to farming, having saved from his earnings a sum sufficient to enable 
him to purchase a tract of land in Liberty township, Buchanan count}'. He was 
also appointed mail agent over the route between Winthrop, Rowley and IMarion, 
carrying the mail for about a quarter of a century. While thus engaged he 
established an implement business in Quasqueton, which he has conducted for 
the pa.st twenty-five years and within that period has built up an extensive trade. 
He now has one of the leading establishments of this character not onl}' in 
Quasqueton but in the county, and he has also established branch implement 
houses at Robinson and at Rowley, Iowa, devoting the greater part of his atten- 
tion to that line. However, he is a stockholder in the State Savings Bank 
of Quasqueton and in the State Bank of ]\Ionti, and for many years he has been 
closely and extensively associated with agricultural interests, being the owner 
of three hundred and ninety-five acres of valuable land in Buchanan county, some 
of which is in Cono and some in Liberty township. He handles Durham cattle 
for commercial purposes only and also full blooded Percheron horses. 

In 1858 Mr. Burrhus was married to Miss Elizabeth Crooks, who died in 1872, 
and the following year he wedded her sister, ]\Iartha A. Crooks, who was born 
in Leesville, Ohio, and in 1856 was brought to Iowa by her parents, Alexander 
and Hannah (Johnson) Crooks, natives of Ireland and of Leesville, Ohio, respect- 
ively. In early life the father learned the tailor's trade in New York city 
following his emigration from Ireland to the United States. He afterward 
removed westward to Leesville and in 1856 came to Quasqueton, where he filled 
the office of justice of the peace. Later he was elected sheriff of this county and 
following his return to Quasqueton was again elected justice of the peace, 
occupying that position to the time of his death, his decisions being strictly fair 
and impartial. In Ohio, too, he was very active in politics. His religious faith 
was a dominant feature in his life. He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, in which he served as trustee and was also superintendent of the Sunday 
school. He was honorable in every relation and his life constituted an example 
well worthy of emulation. 

]\Ir. Burrhus has a family of four children, three of whom were born of the 
first marriage and one by the second. F. C, the eldest, now a druggist of Denver, 
Colorado, has lost his wife but has two .sons, Leo and Harold. Lois N. is the wife 
of George Rozelle, representative of a pioneer family of Buchanan county and 
a conductor on the Denver & Salt Lake Railroad. She is the mother of two 
sons, Alfred and Harry McDonald, born of a previous marriage to George 
McDonald. Artie E. is the wife of 0. D. Stapleton, a civil engineer living at 
La Grange, Illinois, and they have four children : Doris, ]\Iabel, 0. D. and Billy 
B. The fourth of the family is A. P. Burrhus, Jr., who is associated with his 
father in the implement business. He married Ida Overly and they liave seven 
children, namely : Walter B., Wilma, IMarjorie, Genevieve, Miriam, Pauline and 
Kenneth. 

Vol. II— c 



120 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

Mr. Burrhus has long figured actively in political circles as a stalwart repub- 
lican. He has been a member of the county central committee and a delegate to 
state conventions and has done not a little to shape the party's policy in this 
section of the state. At the present writing he is filling the position of township 
clerk and is the efficient and popular mayor of Quasqueton. Fraternally a 
Mason, he has filled all the offices in the local lodge, including that of master. 
He is equally prominent in the Odd Fellows lodge, in which he has passed through 
all the chairs, including that of noble grand, and he has been a delegate to the 
grand lodge. Stronger still is his belief in and sympathy with the principles 
and teachings of the ^Methodist Episcopal church, of which he is an active and 
zealous member. He is serving as one of the stewards, is chairman of the board 
of trustees and is superintendent of the Sunday school. He is constantly seeking 
out new methods to interest the young people in the work of the church and to 
instill into their minds those principles which work for the upbuilding of noble 
character. He has ever been interested in all movements for the betterment of 
existing conditions, whether for the mental, material, political or moral welfare 
of his community. His life has indeed been a potent force for good and the 
consensus of public opinion names him as one of the foremost citizens of Quas- 
queton and his part of the county. 



THOMAS SCARCLIFF. 



Thomas Scarcliff is one of the most venerable citizens of Independence, 
having passed the eighty-sixth milestone on life's journey. He first visited 
the city in 1851 and later he took up his permanent abode here, since which 
time he has been actively identified with its growth and development. At the 
present time he is vice president of the Peoples National Bank. The success 
which came to him in former years now enables him to live retired with an in- 
come sufficient to supply all of his needs and his wishes. England numbers 
him among her native sons, his birth having occurred in Dunston parish, near 
Lincoln, in Lincolnshire. February 11, 1828. His parents were Henry and 
Eleanor (Hurt on) Searclift', also natives of the same locality, the former born 
in 1793 and the latter in 1791. Henry Scarcliff always made farming his life 
work. He brought his family to America about 1865 and settled first in Rock 
county, Wisconsin. He afterward purchased a farm nine miles from Janes- 
ville and thereon continued for a number of years, after which he took up his 
abode in the city of Janesville, where he lived retired to the time of his demise. 
His wife died some years before, when about sixty-.seven years of age. 

Thomas Scarcliff was the fifth in order of birth in a family of six children. 
He attended school in his native country and at the age of nineteen years crossed 
the Atlantic to the new world, making his way to Batavia, New York, where 
he worked in a hotel. He was afterward employed as a clerk in Janesville, 
Wisconsin, entering the service of Smith & Clarke, dealers in dry goods, with 
whom he continued for about two years, receiving a hundred dollars for one 
years' service. In 1851 he first came to Independence, making the trip with 
horse and buggy across the country, but remained for only two nights at Inde- 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 121 

pendenee. He then went to Janesville, Wisconsin, where he remained until the 
following spring. At that time he went to Warren, Illinois, by rail, thence 
by stage to Galena and on by boat to Dubuque. During that trip, while at 
Warren, he was compelled to sleep on the floor of the depot, as no other quarters 
could be secured. From Dubuque he traveled to Independence by farm wagon. 
He had previously entered two hundred and forty acres of land adjoining the 
town of Independence and upon his return he purchased forty acres on the 
south side of Main street, for which he paid four hundred and fifty dollars. 
This he afterward laid out in town lots. This forty-acre tract constitutes the 
southeastern part of the city and he has sold out the entire tract. The former 
purchase he also improved and has sold practically all of it for good prices. 
A part of this has been laid off in town lots and constitutes the eastern section 
of the city. In addition to dealing in real estate he engaged in the grain busi- 
ness and at two times had corn cribs a quarter of a mile in length and sixteen 
feet in width along the track. He sold his corn at Dubuque and on two dif- 
ferent occasions he shelled and shipped over ninety thousand bushels. He 
shipped the second car load of grain ever sent over the Illinois Central Railroad 
from this point. Before the building of the railroad he at one time purchased 
eighteen hundred bushels of wheat at forty-two and a half cents per bushel, 
which he cleaned and screened and then sold at seventy cents per bushel, realiz- 
ing a handsome profit on the investment. As the years went by Mr. ScarclifT 
became identified with other business enterprLses. He is a stockholder in the 
First National Bank and is now the vice president of the Peoples National 
Bank. He was also one of the early stockholders in the Wapsipinieon ^Milling 
Company but afterward disposed of his interest in that industry. Other busi- 
ness concerns have profited by his cooperation and financial support and he has 
thus contributed much to the business development and consequent prosperity 
of the city. 

On the 30th of September, 1862, the marriage of ]\Ir. Scarcliff and Miss 
Harriet Crippen was celebrated in St. James Episcopal church, and thej^ were 
the first couple married therein. The bride was born at Fort Covington, New 
York, September 17, 1841, a daughter of Ransom B. and Marian (Stiles) 
Crippen, both of whom were natives of Franklin count}', New York. They 
came to Iowa at an early period in the development of this state and the father 
was the first station agent at Winthrop, occupying that position for a number 
of years. Later he removed to Independence, where he remained for a number 
of years and then returned to New York, where both he and his wife passed 
away. The death of Mrs. Scarcliff occurred April 2, 1911, and was deeply 
regretted by many friends as well as by her immediate family. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Scarcliff were born two children. Thomas E. married Lolah Ozias. whose 
parents were also pioneers in this county, and they have one child, Helene 
Anna. Thomas E. Scarcliff is engaged in the grain, coal and lumber business 
in Independence. The other member of the family is Mrs. R. F. Clarke, the 
wife of the president of the Peoples National Bank. They have three children, 
ilargaret, Daisy and Frances. 

Mr. Scarcliff belongs to the Masonic fraternity, with which lie has been iden- 
tified for more than a half century. He is now a member of the lodge, the 
chapter, the commandery and the Mystic Shrine. His political allegiance is 



122 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

given to the democratic party and he served as a member of the city council 
for a number of years, exercising his official prerogatives in support of many 
public improvements. He is an exemplary member of the Episcopal church 
and his entire life has been guided b}' its teachings, so that his career has at 
all points been honorable and upright, winning for him the high respect and 
warm regard of all with whom he has been brought in contact. 



NATHANIEL G. PARKER. 

Nathaniel G. Parker is" a veteran of the Civil war who has spent practically 
his entire life in this county, remaining for sixty-eight years in the vicinity 
of Quasqueton. He is now living retired in the town which in the early period 
of the county's existence was the county seat. He was born in Linn county, 
Iowa, in 1843. His father, Nathaniel G. Parker, Sr., was born in Pennsylvania, 
near the Ohio state line, in 1806, and in early life learned and followed the 
ship carpenter's trade near Sandusky. Ohio. There he resided until 1838, 
when he went to Illinois, where he remained for a year. He then came to Iowa, 
traveling overland to Linn county, where he settled in 1839. He worked as a 
millwright near Cedar Rapids, being employed in a mill on Otter creek. He 
afterward came to Buchanan county and helped i)ut in order the mill at 
Quasqueton. 

In 1846 Mr. Parker removed his family to that town and for four years 
operated the mill. At tiiat period Quasqueton was the only village in the 
county and pioneer conditions everywhere existed, the work of development 
and civilization having scarcely been begun. ]\Iost of the liouses were built 
of logs and they stood in the midst of a country of wild prairie and uncut 
forests. Tlie Indians still visited the neighborhood and there was plenty of 
wild game. Deer were frequently killed, while it was no uncommon thing to 
secure wild turkeys, prairie chickens, quails, etc. Mr. Parker was one of the 
first six taxpayers and he became closely and actively identified with the prog- 
ress of the county. He helped to lay out the roads and erected the first church 
and schoolhouses built in the county. Investigation into the early history shows 
how closely and helpfully he was as.sociated with the pioneer development. He 
acquired lands from time to time until his holdings were quite extensive, and 
he broke the sod on the wild prairie with ox teams. In 1857, however, he sold 
the farm which he had cleared for thirty dollars per acre and removed to Texas, 
where he remained until 1860. He then returned northward to Kansas and 
traded a yoke of oxen for a claim, but there was a scourge of grasshoppers, 
totally destroying all crops, and feeling that he could not earn a living for 
himself and family in that state, he traded his claim for a pony and returned 
to Iowa, where he remained until his death, which occurred in 1877 when he 
was seventy-one years of age. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Maria 
Walker and was born in Connecticut in 1812. passed away in 1855. 

Nathaniel G. Parker, who was largely reared in this county, pursued his 
early education in tlx' little brick schoolhouse at Quasqueton which is still 
standing, and he ivent through the usual experiences, trials, hardships and priva- 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 123 

tions incident to pioneer life and at the same time enjoyed those pleasures 
which come through the close companionship that is usually a feature of fron- 
tier communities. Time passed on uneventfully for him until after the out- 
break of the Civil war, when on the 5th of September, 1862, at the age of 
nineteen years, he enlisted as a member of Company G, Sixth Iowa Cavalry, 
being enrolled as a private at Quasqueton. He was mustered out as sergeant. 
The regiment was organized at Davenport and he became the company's 
saddler, having previously learned the trade under the direction of his father. 
He participated in the battle of White Stone Hill from the 3d to the 5th of 
September, 1863, was in the battle at Manovatse on the 30th of July of the same 
year, and at Takaokuty on the 28th of July, 1864, being on duty much of the 
time in the territory of Dakota. 

When the war was over Mr. Parker returned to Quasqueton, where for a 
short time he was engaged in the harness business. He afterward carried on 
general farming but is now living retired and for sixty-eight years has made 
his home in the vicinity of Quasqueton. 

In 1878 Mr. Parker was united in marriage to Miss Sarah Biddinger, a 
native of Ohio and a daughter of AVilliam and Katherine (Kitch) Biddinger. 
Her father was born in Pennsylvania, in 1810, and his life record covered the 
intervening years to 187-1. The mother was bom in Ohio, in 1824, and passed 
away in 1901. ]Mr. Biddinger was a farmer in Ohio in early life and on 
coming to the west in 1849 settled in Liberty township, Buchanan county, 
when this was a frontier region. He traded Ohio property for Iowa lands 
and made his way westward by boat to Dubuque and thence across the country 
to his destination. He became a factor in the early development of this section 
of the state and his wife was active in church work. In their family were eight 
children, including ]\Irs. Parker, who has spent much of her life in Iowa. 

Mr. and Mrs. Parker have had no children of their own but have reared two. 
Fraternally he is connected with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and he 
also wears the little bronze button that indicates his membership in the Grand 
Army of the Eepublic. He is interested in that organization, which affords 
him opportunity for association with the "boys in blue" who defended the 
Union during the darkest days in the country's history. 



MRS. MARY (COAVIE) McCARTY. 

The life record of Airs. Alary (Cowie) AlcCarty is one which has gained for 
her the esteem and admiration of all who know her, for she has accomplished much 
that others would have failed to do. AVhen left a widow with four small children, 
she not only kept them together but came to a new country and through busi- 
ness ability and close application has succeeded in accumulating a comfortable 
competence. She was born in County Limerick, Ireland, where she was reared, 
and in young womanhood she crossed the Atlantic to the United States, settling 
first in Detroit, Alichigan, where she formed the acquaintance of Alichael 
AlcCarty, who sought her hand in marriage. He, too, was a native of County 
Limerick, Ireland, and as a young man had come to the new world, making his 



124 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

way to Detroit, where he was employed to the time of his death, which occurred 
when he had advanced but a little way beyond the milestone that marks arrival 
at adult age. At the time of his death they were the owners of a little home 
in Detroit. 

In 1869 or 1870, not long after the demise of her husband, Mrs. McCarty 
with her four children, the eldest then six years of age, came to Iowa, living 
with and working for a sister of her deceased husband on a farm in Byron 
township. She saved her money until her industry and economical expenditure 
had brought her a sum sufficient to enable her to purchase eighty acres of land, 
and as her sons grew in years and strength they worked in the fields, more 
and more largely relieving their mother. Mrs. McCarty, however, did not 
scorn the out-of-door work and on more than one occasion drove the team which 
hauled the harvester or did other work in the fields. She displayed splendid 
business management and ability in the control of her business affairs and added 
to her land from time to time until she is now the owner of two hundred acres, 
constituting a very valuable property improved with splendid farm buildings. 
The home place is especially well improved. There is a comfortable and at- 
tractive residence, a large barn, the latest improved machinery and all the 
other accessories of modern farm life. The family have always worked to- 
gether, keeping but one pocket book and sharing with each other in all the 
adversity as well as in the prosperity which has come to them. They now have 
a herd of pure blooded Hereford cattle equal to any to be found in the state. 

To ^Ir. and ^Irs. McCarty were bom two daughters and two sons : Mary, at 
home; Lizzie, the wife of ]\Iichael Greeley, a resident farmer of Byron town- 
ship ; John, at home ; and Daniel, who married Clara Lorang, a native of New 
York state, and resides on the old homestead. ]\Irs. ]\IcCarty is now about 
eighty years of age but is still active, hale and hearty. She and her family are 
members of the Catholic church. She certainly deserves great credit for what 
she has accomplished, showing that she possesses excellent business ability, 
initiative and executive force, as well as those womanly qualities which have 
made her a devoted mother. 



MYROX L. EDDY. 



Myron L. Eddy is a representative farmer of Washington township, owning 
three hundred and thirty acres of rich and valuable land, and in addition to the 
tilling of the soil he is engaged in buying and selling cattle. He was born in 
Byron township, Buchanan county, on the 18th of October, 1859, his parents 
being Levi H. and Maria (Smith) Eddy. The mother was born in 1841 and 
died in 1884, at the comparatively early age of forty-three years. The fatlier's 
birth occurred in Cherry Valley, Illinois, in 1839 and he passed away in Norfolk. 
Nebraska, in 1902, but was buried, however, in this county. In early life he was 
a stage driver in Illinois and on leaving that state he made his way to Independ- 
ence, Iowa, arriving here when the town contained a single log house. He pur- 
chased land for six doUars per acre and broke not only his o\\ti land but also his 
neighbor's farm with the use of ox teams. It was in the early '50s that he 




:\m. AND :mrs. :\iyPkOX l. eddy 



THr "^ 



PUBLIC 



J 



AfrroR i.n\nT a- 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 127 

arrived in Iowa and following the outbreak of the Civil war, a decade later, he 
joined Company E of the Twenty-seventh Iowa Infantry-, with which he served 
for four years. He was wounded in the battle of Pea Ridge, Arkansas, but 
during the greater part of the time was on active duty with his command and 
made a most creditable military record. When the war was over he returned 
to this county, where he remained until the latter part of his life, when he 
removed to Norfolk, Nebraska, where he conducted a hotel and was also in the 
land business. He owned considerable land and also bought and sold stock. 
At one time he- was the owner of about three hundred and fifty acres in Iowa 
but sold nearly all of that property before his removal to Nebraska. He was an 
active, earnest and loyal supporter of the republican party but never sought 
nor desired office as a reward for party fealty. His death occurred in 1902, 
when he was sixty-three years of age. In the family were eight children, seven 
sons and one daughter, Myron L. being the eldest, and three of the number are 
now residents of Buchanan county. 

During his youthful days Myron L. Eddy attended the district schools and 
when seventeen years of age he went to Colorado, spending two and a half years 
in Denver. During a part of that time he was employed as foreman of con- 
struction work on the Denver & Rio Grande Railroad. Returning to Iowa, he 
was married when twenty-one years of age and began farming on his own 
account, since which time he has devoted his time and attention to general 
agricultural pursuits save for two years which he spent in "Waterloo, Iowa. He 
now owns three hundred and thirty acres of valuable land in Washington 
township, also buys and sells cattle and is an extensive feeder and shipper. 
His farm presents a most neat and thrifty appearance. He has about one 
hundred acres in corn, thirty acres in oats and the remainder in hay and pasture 
land. He gives his undivided attention to his farming and live-stock interests, 
and his capability in business is evidenced in his growing success. 

On August 28, 1881, Mr. Eddy was united in marriage to Miss Lucy Henegar. 
who was born near Quasqueton, a daughter of Daniel Henegar, who was born 
in Canada in 1819 and when a young man came to the United States. He made 
his way first to Illinois and afterward to Iowa, spending some years as a farmer 
in Buchanan county. Later he removed to Kansas, settling near Winfield, where 
he followed farming for six years. He then returned to Iowa, where his remain- 
ing days were passed, his death occurring in 1885, when he was sixty-six years 
of age. He married Melissa Brown, who was born in Canada in 1820 and who, 
surviving for many years, passed away in 1913, at the notable age of ninety- 
three years. They were the parents of two children, of whom ^Irs. Eddy is the 
older. To Mr. and Mrs. Eddy have been born nine children, six of whom are 
living, while two sons and a daughter have passed away. The family record 
is as follows: Arthur M., a resident of Arkansas; Nellie, the wife of Ralph 
Shoemaker, now upon the home farm with her father; Myrtle, the wife of 
Elmer Bennett, who is also assisting his father-in-law upon the old homestead 
farm and has two children, Leta and Dora Elaine; Delbert, who died in infancy; 
Lula, who died at the age of sixteen years; Guy M., who died at the age of 
seventeen years ; Oscar, at home ; Grace, the wife of Roy Castile, by whom she 
has a son, Raymond Arthur; and Helen, who completes the family and is now 
attending school. 



128 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

Mr. Eddy holds membership with the Modern Woodmen of America and is 
well known throughout Buchanan county, where the greater part of his life 
has been passed. He is a self-made man, who has been both the architect and 
builder of his own fortunes. As the years have gone by he has gradually worked 
his way upward, proving the worth of industry and determination as factors in 
the attainment of prosperity. 



MICHAEL R. CONSIDINE. 

Michael R. Considine, a prominent factor in financial circles of Buchanan 
county, being vice president of the Jesup State Bank, is equally well known 
as a farmer and stockman of this section. He is a native son of the county, 
born on a farm in Perry township, September 8, 1867, his parents being Patrick 
and Ann (Crane) Considine, both of whom were natives of Ireland. In 
1852 the father emigrated to Canada in company with two brothers, a sister and 
his parents, Patrick and Susan (Keane) Considine, natives of County Clare, 
Ireland. There Patrick Considine, Sr., and his three sons worked on a railroad 
for about five years, during which time they carefully saved their money, and 
in 1856 the son Patrick, father of our subject, was sent to Iowa to buy a home 
for the family. Looking about for a suitable location, he decided upon Perry 
township, Buchanan county, as a desirable place in which to invest his money. 
He purchased a tract of one hundred and sixty acres near Littleton, and the 
following year he was joined by the other members of the household. Father 
and sons then bent their energies toward the improvement and development 
of the farm. In the course of time the sons married and established homes of 
their own, all becoming well-to-do farmers of Perry township. Patrick Consi- 
dine, Sr., spent his remaining years on his farm in Perry township and there 
passed away. The mother of our subject, who bore the maiden name of Ann 
Crane, emigrated from Ireland to the United States in her girlhood, her arrival 
here being in the same year as that of ]\Ir. Considine. They were married in 
this country and became the parents of four children. Through the death of 
her husband Mrs. Considine was left with the care of her family but she 
managed to keep them together on the farm, carefully rearing them and giving 
them the advantages of an education such as were enjoyed in those early days. 
She is still living at the age of ninety years and now makes her home with her 
son Michael. She is a communicant of the Catholic church. The children 
are : Ellen, the wife of John Keane, a farmer of Black Hawk county, Iowa ; 
Mary, who is single and makes her home with her brother Michael ; Thomas, 
who died at the age of seventeen years; and ^Michael R., of this review. 

Michael R. Considine was deprived of a father's care at the age of two 
years but he was carefully reared by his mother, who is now in turn cared for 
by him. His elder brother died when a youth of seventeen years, so that as 
soon as he was old enough the care of the farm devolved upon ^lichael. The 
place comprised one hundred and sixty acres, which he cultivated until 1912, 
when he rented the farm and with his mother and sister Mary removed to Jesup, 
where they occupy a beautiful and substantial home. Prior to leaving the 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 129 

farm, in 1901, Mr. Considine formed a partnership with Z. A. Comfort in 
buying and shipping stock, and he is still dealing in live stock, disposing of 
several carloads of cattle and hogs in the city markets each year. His business 
interests are varied, however, for in addition to his stock business he is acting 
as vice president of the Jesup State Bank, of which he' was one of the organizers 
and is now serving on the board of directors. He likewise owns stock in the 
telephone and creamery companies of the city. 

It was on the 28th of October, 1895, that Mr. Considine was married to Miss 
Bridget Meaney, who was born on the Emerald isle but in 1891 in company 
with a brother emigrated to the United States. Like the other members of 
the family, Mr. Considine is a communicant of the Catholic church, while 
politically he supports the democratic party. For several years he has served 
as township trustee. He is an alert and enterprising business man, possessing 
all the requisite qualities of a sturdy Irish ancestry, and fully merits the high 
esteem in which he is held alike by business and social friends. 



MARTIN D. OZIAS. 



Martin D. Ozias, a well known, highly respected and influential citizen of 
Independence, is spending the evening of life in honorable retirement and justly 
merits the ease and comfort which he now enjoys. He was throughout a long 
period closely and actively identified with the agricultural interests of Buchanan 
county. 

He W'as born in Preble county, Ohio, November 22, 1832, a son of Jesse and 
Temperance (Rice) Ozias. The father, also a native of Ohio, was descended 
from Pennsylvania Dutch ancestry and his parents were pioneers of the Buck- 
eye state. Jesse Ozias was reared in the state of his nativity and was there 
married. He was a farmer by occupation and in 1851 removed with his family 
to Buchanan county, Iowa, where he platted a town, named Chatham, which 
was located near Littleton in Perry township. There he built a store, which he 
operated for some little time, and then sold his interests here, returning to his 
former home in Ohio. He spent but one year there, however, when he returned 
to Buchanan county and he and his sons entered seventeen hundred acres of 
land. He purchased the warrants and permitted his sons to locate the land. 
This land they improved ,and the father was active in its cultivation throughout 
a long period. He passed away at his home when he had reached the age of 
eighty-six years and six months. In early years he was a whig but when the 
republican party was formed he joined its ranks. His religious belief was that 
of the Baptist church. His wife, who was likewise a native of Ohio, survived 
him for two or three years and departed this life at the age of eighty-six. 
Their family numbered seven children as follows: ^Martin D., of this review; 
Julia, the widow of J. F. Wolf and a resident of St. Louis, Missouri; Eli R., of 
Chicago, Illinois; Elizabeth, the wife of James AVhait, a resident of Washing- 
ton ; Tilman, who makes his home in Phoenix, Arizona ; and two who died in 
infancy. 



130 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

Martin D. Ozias, the eldest of the children, was reared in the state of his 
nativity to the age of nineteen years. He then accompanied the family on their 
removal to Iowa, the year of their arrival in this state being 1851. He bought 
four hundred acres in Fairbank township with land warrants that cost eighty- 
seven cents per acre. He broke the sod, developed a farm, erected a house 
thereon and eventually sold his land for nine and ten dollars per acre. In 
1852 he purchased a half section of school land in Perry township, which he 
also improved and to which he added until he now owns fifteen hundred acres 
in Buchanan county, and he likewise owns four hundred acres in Minnesota. 
He also owns a business building in Independence which is known as the Ozias 
block and which is worth ten thousand dollars. Mr. Ozias sold his farm in 
Perry township in 1869 and invested the money in four hundred acres in Wash- 
ington township, two miles from Independence. On this he erected good build- 
ings and made of it a valuable property. He was active in the management and 
operation of his extensive landed possessions until 1908, when he rented all his 
land and retired to Independence, where he occupies one of the beautiful resi- 
dences of the city. 

It was on the 3d of July, 1854, that Mr. Ozias was united in marriage to 
Miss Clarinda J. Bright, who was born August 20, 1832, claiming Ohio as the 
state of her nativity. She was a daughter of David and Lucinda Bright, who 
were natives of Indiana but came to Buchanan county, Iowa, in 1850, where 
her father became a prominent pioneer farmer of Washington and Perry town- 
ships. The union of Mr. and Mrs. Ozias was blessed with seven children ; Mary 
E., the wife of Simon Walker, of Perrj' township ; John L., a prominent farmer 
of Perry township ; Martha, the wife of Andrew Dunlap, of Independence ; 
Charles E., a farmer of Perry to^^^lship ; Anna E., the wife of Marcus Lauritsen, 
a banker of Minnesota; Edward H., who operates his father's farm in Minne- 
sota; and Lola, the wife of Tliomas E. Scarcliff, a dealer in lumber and coal in 
Independence. 

Mr. Ozias is a democrat where national issues are involved but at local elec- 
tions he votes independently. He would never consent to accept official honors 
but for a time in an early day he filled the office of justice of the peace. He 
is the oldest Odd Fellow in Independence and holds membership in Independence 
Lodge, No. 142. He is now in his eighty-second year but is still as active as a 
man many years his junior. The wealth which he today enjoys has been earned 
by intelligentl}^ directed labors, while his personal characteristics have estab- 
lished him high in the regard of his many friends and acquaintances. 



A. N. TODD. 



A. N. Todd, lawyer, was born in St. Clair county, IMichigan, on the 19th of 
April, 1854. His father, Morris Todd, was born in New York in 1830 and in early 
life learned and followed the shipwright's trade. While in the east he wedded 
Clara F. Finlayson, who was born in« the Empire state in 1836. Removing to 
Michigan, he settled in St. Clair county, where he engaged in general mer- 
chandising. In 1854 he came to Iowa, taking up his abode at Quasqueton. Having 




A. N. TODD 



Tn- 



PUBLIC LI 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 133 

acquired lands, he began- farming and carried on general agricultural pursuits 
and stock-raising for many years. In fact, he was a well known and prominent 
representative of that line of activity in Buchanan county to the time of his 
death, which occurred in 1900. He held the office of county supervisor for one 
term, having been elected on the republican ticket, and was the first assessor of 
Liberty township. His family numbered seven children. 

A. N. Todd, who was the eldest, attended the public schools of Buchanan 
county and was graduated from the State University in 1876 with the degree of 
Bachelor of Law. On attaining his majority he entered upon the practice of 
law at Stockton, Kansas, but did not continue active in that field, turning his 
attention to the real-estate business, in which he continued for four years. He 
then went to Hiawatha, Kansas, where he practiced law and also engaged in the 
real-estate business for six years. He next removed to Kansas City, Missouri, 
where he followed his profession for five years, and in 1896 he came to Inde- 
pendence, Iowa, where he is now engaged in law practice with H. C. Chappell. 
He is likewise president of the fair association, but he devotes the greater part 
of his time to his professional duties and is regarded as one of the able members 
of the Buchanan county bar, owing to his comprehensive knowledge of legal 
principles and his careful preparation of cases. 

In 1876 Mr. Todd was united in marriage to Miss Julia E. Hovey, who was 
born in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, in 1853, a daughter of James 0. Hovey, who was 
born in Vermont in 1825, while his wife was also a native of that state, born 
in 1829. Mr. Hovey came to Iowa from the Green IMountain state, settling in 
Cedar Rapids, after which he removed to Quasqueton, Buchanan county, where 
lie conducted a mill for three years. He next removed to Fairbanks, where he 
operated a gristmill and conducted a store for several years. He then went to 
Waverly, where he continued in the same line of business until his death. To 
Mr. and Mrs. Todd has been born one child, Christie A., who was born in Rooks 
county, Kansas, and is a graduate of the State Normal College at Cedar Falls. 

Mr. Todd holds membership with the Odd Fellows. He has filled several 
offices, having been city attorney of Rosedale, Kansas, city attorney of Inde- 
pendence for eight years and mayor of the city for two years. He is thus active 
in the public life of the community and has done much to further progress and 
improvement. 



OTTO TIELEBEIN. 



Otto Tielebein is the owner of a well developed farm of one hundred and 
twenty acres on section 3, Newton township, and is also manager of the imple- 
ment business of Buckley Brothers at Kiene. He was born in Dubuque county, 
this state, March 3, 1863, a son of Frederick C. and Catherine E. (Fisher) 
Tielebein, both of whom were natives of Germany. In 1853 the father came 
to America and, making his way into the interior of the country, settled in 
Dubuque county, where he purchased land and carried on general farming 
until 1865. He then came to Buchanan county, where he purchased one 
hundred and sixty acres in Newton township, and again his persistency of 



134 HISTOEY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

purpose and careful management were soon manifest in the improved appear- 
ance of his place, which he cultivated throughout his remaining days. He 
passed away in March, 1901, and his wife died in November, 1908. 

Otto Tielebein was but two years of age when his parents came to Buchanan 
county and he has since remained here, a witness of its growth and development 
and an active factor in its business affairs. He is indebted to the public-school 
system for the educational opportunities which he enjoyed, and he remained 
upon the home farm with his parents until they were called to their final rest. 
The father's land was then divided and Otto Tielebein purchased the interests 
of some of the other heirs in the property, so that he now owns one hundred 
and twenty acres of arable and productive land on section 3, Newton township, 
adjoining the town of Kiene. In fact, he gave the land for the town site and 
the right of way for the railroad. He is engaged in farming upon his place 
and his labors are attended with good results. He practices the rotation of crops 
and modern scientific methods of farming and annually gathers good harvests. 
At the same time he capably manages the implement business of Buckley 
Brothers at Kiene, where he was formerly engaged in the hardware business 
but sold out. He is also a stockholder in a general store at Kiene. 

Mr. Tielebein exercises his right of franchise in support of the men and 
measures of the democratic party and he is identified with several fraternal 
organizations, including the Masons, the Modern Woodmen of America and 
the Modern Brotherhood of America. He has filled several local offices, serving 
for four years as township clerk, as a member of the election board for fifteen 
years and for twenty years as a member of the school board, of which he is now 
the secretary. He was also township tnistee for three years and he has ever 
been loyal to the office, discharging his duties with promptness and fidelity 
and thus furthering the best interests of the public. 



^VJ1J.1A.M SHERREN. 



William Sherren is the o^^^ler of a valuable farm in Byron township. The 
place is beautiful in the lay of the land and in the improvements which have 
been made upon the farm. There is a large residence standing in the midst of 
highly cultivated fields and the extensive barns indicate that stock-breeding and 
feeding must be one of the important features of the place. Mr. Sherren was 
born in Du])uque. Iowa, IMay 12. 1858, and is a son of Joseph and Jane (Lin- 
coln) Sherren. The father, a native of England, was a gardener and when 
about thirty years of age came to the United States. He fir.st settled in Ohio, 
where he probably worked at his trade, and later became a resident of Dubuque, 
Iowa, where he engaged in draying for three 3'^ears. In 1864 he went to Fayette 
county, where he rented land for a year and then removed to Buffalo township. 
Buchanan county, where he again cultivated rented land for two years. Death 
then terminated his labors when he was but forty-four years of age. 

The widow of Joseph Sherren, Mrs. Jane Sherren, had come to the United 
States in her young womanhood on the same vessel which bore her future hus- 
band. It was on shiphoai'd that they became acquainted and started Ihe friend- 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 135 

slii]) which later terminated in their marriage. They had five children, one of 
whom died in infancy and another at the age of two and a half years. After 
the death of her first husband Mrs. Sherren became the wife of David Slater, 
who has also passed away, and she now lives with a daughter, Mrs. Fred 
Sampson, in Winthrop, Iowa. 

William Sherren spent his boyhood upon the home farm and at the age of 
fourteen began earning his own living by working as a farm hand in the employ 
of neighbors, being thus busily engaged in the fields through the summer months. 
In the winter seasons he attended the district schools. That he was faithful in 
his work is indicated by the fact that he remained in the employ of one man 
through seven summers. He afterward worked for three years by the day in 
this county and subsequently drove a peddler's wagon for five and one-half 
months. At the end of that time he rented his mother's farm, which he con- 
tinued to cultivate for four j-ears and during that period he carefully and sys- 
tematically saved his earnings. He next purchased one hundred and seventy- 
nine acres of land in Buffalo township but was only able to make a partial 
payment upon the property. He rented his place to his brother and continued 
to cultivate his mother's farm for three or four years longer. He then sold his 
land in Buffalo township and purcha.sed his present home place of one hundred 
and sixty acres, which he has since improved with good buildings and on which 
he has carefully carried on general agricultural pursuits with the result that 
liis efforts are manifest in large crops which find a ready sale on the market. 

Mr. Sherren was united in marriage to Miss Dora ^lyer, a daughter of Henry 
Myer, and they have become the parents of five children, of whom three died in 
early life, those still living being Verna and Maurice. In his political views 
Mr. Sherren is a republican but has never consented to accept office, desiring 
to concentrate his undivided attention upon his business affairs. He has worked 
persistently and energetically as the years have gone on and that his labors 
have been intelligently directed finds evidence in his fine farm, now one of the 
best unproved in the township. He has closely studied the best methods of tilling 
the soil and caring for the crops with the result that his place is most pro- 
ductive, his farm work bringing him a substantial financial return annually. 



WILLIAM 0. HAINES. 



William 0. Haines was born upon the farm on section 14. Homer township, 
which he is now operating, his natal day being June 29, 1888. His parents 
were William A. and Anna (Buell) Haines, of whom mention is made elsewhere 
in this volume in connection wdth the sketch of H. C. Haines. His boyhood 
days were passed in the usual manner of farm lads. He attended the district 
schools and worked in the fields through the summer months, early lieeoming 
acquainted with the best and most practical methods of planting the crops and 
caring for the harvests. He remained with his parents until he reached the 
age of twenty-three years and then started out in life independently by renting 
land near Independence for a year. He then removed to his father's farm on 
section 14, Homer township, and has since continued its cultivation and further 



136 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

development. The fields are now well tilled and good crops are gathered 
annually. The place is divided by well kept fences and the latest improved 
farm machinery is used to facilitate the work. 

On the lOtli of February, 1912, Mr. Haines was united in marriage to Miss 
Ethel Jayne, a daughter of Frank and Rosetta (Squires) Jayne, who were 
natives of Illinois. The parents came to Buchanan county at an early period 
in its development and the father secured a tract of land, upon which he en- 
gaged in farming for many years, operating the place until 1911, when he put 
aside active farm work, and is now emplo.yed at the Insane Hospital at Inde- 
pendence. His wife passed away on the 25th of March, 1901. 

In his political views Mr. Haines is a democrat and keeps well informed con- 
cerning the vital questions before the country, yet does not seek nor desire 
office. His religious belief is that of the Presbyterian church and to its teach- 
ings he is most loyal. He has been a lifelong resident of this county and that 
his record is an honorable and upright one is indicated in the fact that many 
of his stanchest friends are numbered among those who have known him from 
his boyhood to the present. 



clarencp: b. everett. 

Clarence B. Everett, president of the Fairbank State Bank, is a native of 
Fair])ank township, this county, liorn September 5, 1855. His parents were 
poineers of this county and he was the first white child born in Fairbank town- 
ship. His father, F. J. Everett, was born in New York, on the 28th of ^larch, 
1829, and began providing for his own sujiport when quite young. AVhen 
twelve years of age he entered the employ of a bank in New York city and con- 
tinued in that line of work until lie was twenty-five, when his health failed and 
he came west, being at the time a bookkeeper in the Chemical Bank in New York 
city. When he decided to emigrate lie went to Dubucpie. Iowa, on the advice 
of friends, but did not remain there, liowevcr, and, keeping his course due west- 
ward, he arrived at what is now Fairbank. walking the entire distance from 
Peoria, Illinois, to Fairbank. He arrived here in 1858 and at that time very 
little land had been taken up. He secured about twelve hundred acres and, 
having faith in its value, he held it until he was able to sell at a great advance 
over the price paid. Some of the land entered then is still in po.ssession of the 
family. He thoroughly identified liiiiiself with the county and took an active 
part in the upbuilding of tlie town of Fair])ank, operating the first sawmill in 
the locality and was proprietor of a general store in Fairbank for many years. 
He continued to make this community his home until his death, with the excep- 
tion of a short time when he returned to the east. His wife was born in New 
York state, May 28, 1829. and came to this county in 1853. Their marriage, 
which occurred in 1854, was one of the first events of the kind to be celebrated 
in Buchanan county. After the birth of the eldest children she returned to the 
east and resided there for a time but came again to this county and continued 
to live here until her death, which occurred December 11, 1899. F. J, Everett 
died in Fairbank on the 25tb of October, 1898. To their union were born ten 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 137 

children, of whom four are still living. The record is as follows : Clarence B., 
of this sketch ; F. G., who was born on the 1st of May, 1857, and died in Fair- 
bank, Iowa, on the 12th of November, 1907 ; Newton B., a resident of Los 
Angeles, California ; Hattie, deceased ; John, also deceased ; Mrs. Mary Davis, 
living in Fayette, Iowa ; C. L., who died May 20, 1903 ; Eva and Emma, twins, 
who died in childhood; and Mrs. Sarah Ross, a resident of Waterloo, Iowa. 
All of the children were reared in this county. 

Clarence B. Everett grew to manhood in Fairbank township and after at- 
tending the common schools of tliat locality was for a time a student at Lenox 
(College in Hopkinton, Iowa. He was for a time associated with his father in 
the conduct of the latter 's general store, but in 1900 he entered the banking 
business. His first position was that of bookkeeper of the Fairbank State Bank 
and he later served as cashier. Since 1910 he has been president of the 
institution. 

Mr. Everett was married on the 8th of April, 1880, to Miss Achsah French, 
who was born in Black Hawk county, Iowa, a daughter of Ezra and Melissa 
(Siple) French, natives of England and Canada respectively. They were the 
parents of the following children : Mrs. Everett ; Mrs. Rebecca Gates, of Oel- 
wein ; Mrs. Mary Noss, who died in Waterloo, Iowa ; and Charles, a resident of 
Wisconsin. All were born in Black Hawk county and were there reared, the 
parents being among the early settlers of that section of the state. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Everett have been born five children : Ed E., who attended the Iowa 
Teachers' College at Cedar Falls and Drake Universit}^ at Des Moines, Iowa, 
and who is now the auditor of Buchanan county and a resident of Independence ; 
Mrs. Bessie Kautz, living in Oren township, Fayette county, this state ; C. Her- 
bert, who is telegraph operator for the Denver & Rio Grande Railroad at 
Thistle, Utah ; Harry, in the employ of the Canadian Pacific Railway in the 
northwestern territory; and Mrs. Mildred Gorman, a resident of Independence. 
All of the children were born and reared in Fairbank, Mr. Everett is a demo- 
crat in his political belief. 



AUGUST P. TIELEBEIN. 

August P. Tielebein of Newton township, is the o\\Tier of one of the best 
improved farms of Buchanan county, supplied with all modern accessories, con- 
veniences and equipments. He has always lived in this county and has not only 
been an interested witness of its growth and development, but has aided in 
various projects for the public good. He was born in Newton township, Sep- 
tember 4, 1866, a son of Frederick C. and Catherine E. (Fisher) Tielebein, of 
whom mention is made in connection with the record of Otto Tielebein, on an- 
other page of this work. 

Mr. Tielebein of this review spent his youthful days upon the home farm 
and he knew the joys and pleasures as Avell as the duties that fall to the lot of 
the farm lad. His education was such as the public schools afforded, supple- 
mented by a course in the Highland Park College at Des Moines, from which 
he was graduated with the class in pharmacy in 1909. At the age of twenty-six 



138 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

years he left the old homestead and purchased one hundred and twenty acres 
of land on section 5, Newton township, which he at once began to develop and 
improve. At a later date he added to his original holdings and now owns one 
hundred and seventy acres in that farm, which he lias brought to a high state 
of cultivation. He has since operated the land with the exception of four years, 
during which he was engaged in the drug business at Ryan, Iowa, and five years 
spent upon a ranch in South Dakota, where he took up a homestead and to it 
added until he became the owner of thirty-three hundred acres in one piece. 
That place is well stocked with forty-two head of horses and three hundred and 
eighteen head of cattle. He employs a man to conduct and cultivate that ranch 
and on the 2d of March. 1914, he returned to his old home in Newton township, 
having one of the best improved farms in the county. 

On the 19th of July, 1893, Mr. Tielebein was united in marriage to ^liss Mary 
A. Daubenberger, a daughter of Frank and Catherine Daubenberger, the former 
a native of Germany and the latter of Pennsylvania. Her fatlier was a youth 
of fourteen years when he accompanied his parents on their removal to America. 
He took up the occupation of farming, which he afterward followed, and after 
cultivating a farm in Clayton county, Iowa, for a number of years removed to 
Buchanan county, securing a tract of land in Middlefield township, whereon his 
remaining days were spent. He died in 1900 and is survived by his widow. Mr. 
and Mrs. Tielebein have become the parents of one child, Hazel C, born July 8, 
1894. They are members of the ^Methodist Episcopal church. 

In politics Mr. Tielebein is a progressive republican, and he belongs to the 
Masonic fraternity, with the purposes of which he is in hearty sympathy. He 
has served as school director and as assessor of his township and his influence 
is always on the side of advancement and improvement. His life has indeed 
been a busy and useful one, in which there has been much hard labor, but his 
industry has been crowned with success and lie is today one of the substantial 
agriculturists of Newton township. 



ALEXANDER HOUCK. 



Since 1900 Alexander Houck has rented his valuable farm in Westburg 
township to his son and has lived in lionorable retirement from the responsibili- 
ties of active life in Independence. He was born in Walton, Delaware county, 
New York, on the 14th of June, 1844, a son of William and Lydia (Hoage) 
Houck. The father was born in Schoharie county. New York, his parents being 
Ruloff and Rachel Houck. Ruloff Houck was a native of Holland and was sent 
to the United States with a colony before the war for independence. During 
that struggle he was a tory, remaining loyal to King George. He lived to the 
remarkable old age of one liundred years and his wife also survived to an ad- 
vanced age. Both the father and mother of our subject were born in Decatur, 
New York, and the former was a farmer by occupation. During his lifetime 
much of the Empire state was a wilderness, and he cleared three farms, which 
he improved and cultivated. He passed away in that state at the age of 
seventy-one years and his wife died when fifty-six years of age. The father was 




ALEXANDER HOUCK 




MRS. ALEXANDER IIOUC K 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 143 

a democrat in his political belief, and she belonged to the Methodist Episcopal 
church. To their union were born seven children. The father had eight chil- 
dren by a previous marriage, Miss Sarah Case, a native of New York, being hia 
first wife. 

Alexander Houck remained at home until he was twelve years of age, or 
until the death of his mother. His father died two years later and he was 
thrown upon his own resources. He worked upon farms by the moiith until 
1862, when, on the 27th of August, he enlisted in Company C, One Hundred 
and Forty-fourth New York Volunteer Infantry, serving with his command 
until the close of the war and participating in a number of battles and skir- 
mishes. He took part in the engagements before Charleston and in many battles 
upon the Atlantic coast. He was honorably discharged on the 15th of June, 
1865, in South Carolina and returned to Delaware county. New York. 

In the fall of that year Mr. Houck removed to Jones county, Iowa, where 
he remained for one year, working upon farms by the month. He then came 
to Buchanan county and was employed by others for two years. At the end of 
that time he was married and, as his wife owned eighty acres of land in West- 
burg township, the couple settled upon the place and Mr. Houck devoted his 
time to its cultivation and improvement. . He purchased adjoining land until 
the farm comprised nearly four hundred acres, but eventually disposed of all 
but two hundred acres. He operated it successfully until 1900, when he rented 
it to his son and removed to Independence, where he now lives retired. The 
land is naturally very productive and its fertility has been carefully conserved 
by modern methods of agriculture. Mr. Houck was a very progressive and 
energetic farmer and his place yielded him annually a substantial return. 

On the 15th of April, 1869, Mr. Houck was united in marriage to Miss 
Elizabeth Stewart, a native of County Derry, Ireland, born on the 26th of 
December, 1847. When quite young she was brought to the United States and 
lived for three years in Philadelphia and for nine years in Bolton, New Jersey. 
Her parents, Robert and Margaret (Gourley) Stewart, were likewise natives of 
the north of Ireland and came to the United States about 1850. Her father was 
a farmer in his native land, but for several years after emigrating to this country 
was employed in a nail factory in New Jersey. In April, 1860, he came west 
and located in Westburg township, this county, settling upon a tract of one 
hundred and sixty acres of land, which he had purchased in 1856. He was 
an indefatigable worker and soon had his land in a fine condition. As his capital 
increased he invested in additional land until he became the owner of twelve 
or thirteen hundred acres of fine land, besides owning a great many residences 
in Independence. He eventually rented his farms and removed to Independence, 
where he built a home and lived retired, with the exception of a couple of years, 
when he again farmed, until his death, which occurred when he was eighty-nine 
years of age. His wife also lived to a good age, dying when eighty-five years 
old. They were both members of the Presbyterian church and Mr. Stewart was 
a republican in politics. Mrs. Houck has lived the greater part of her life in 
this county and is widely known and highly respected here. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Houck were born seven children. Elsie is the wife of Erk- 
son Houck, who is engaged in the real-estate business in Houston, Texas, and 
they have two children, Alexander and Harriet. Robert W., a mail carrier on a 

Vol. II— 7 



144 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

rural route from Jesup, Iowa, is married and has three children, Frances, 
Harold and Bernice. Harry, who is farming near Jesup, is married and has 
two children, Herbert and Theodore. Stewart, who is operating his father's 
homestead, is married and has four children, Donald, Kenneth, Marcia and 
Wayne. Margaret is the wife of George E. Knapp, a lawyer of Vinton, Iowa. 
Lulu married Roy G. Crowder and died when twenty-eight years of age, leaving 
a son, John Alexander. ^Mabel is the wife of Harold Tabor, of Independence, 
and they have two children, Elizabeth Janet and Charles Byron. 

Mr. Houck is a member of the Masonic fraternity and his wife has been 
connected with the Eastern Star for over twenty years. She attends the Pres- 
byterian church. ]\Ir. Houck by his ballot supports the men and measures of 
the republican party. He has taken quite an active and prominent part in 
public affairs, serving on the school board, as township trustee and as assessor. 
He enjoys the unqualified respect of those who have been brought in contact 
with him, as his life has always been guided by high standards of conduct. 



CHARLES W. FIESTER. 

Charles W. Fiester, secretary and general manager of the West End Gro- 
cery Company, in which connection he is directing an important business enter- 
prise of Independence, was bom June 23, 1875, in the city which is still his 
home, his parents being Roland B. and ^larietta (Lowmiller) Fiester, both of 
whom were natives of Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, born near Williamsport. 
In early life the father learned the carriage painter's trade and about 1864 
removed to Iowa, where he continued in the painting business for a number of 
years. In fact he still follows it to some extent, although he is now practicalh' 
living retired from industrial life. He is city assessor of Independence, which 
position he has filled for several terms. To him and his wife have been born 
seven children : Janet, the wife of Austin Hatch, cashier of the Harlem National 
Bank at Harlem, Montana ; Charles W. ; Sidney, who is engaged in the restau- 
rant business in Chicago and wlio married Gertrude Nelson, a native of Michi- 
gan ; William A., who is associated with his brother Charles in the grocery busi- 
ness; Archie, a resident of Pittsfield, ^Massachusetts, who is in the employ of the 
General Electric Company between Pittsfield and Schenectady, New York; 
Lena, at home ; and Clarence, who is with his brothers in the grocery store. 

Reared in his native city, Charles W. Fiester attended the public schools 
and at the age of eighteen started out in life on his own account, being em- 
ployed as clerk in a grocery store in Independence, where he worked for others 
for about seven years. Since that time he has been carrying on business on his 
own account as a stockholder in the West End Grocery Company, of which he 
is the secretary and general manager. This is one of the important commercial 
concerns of the city, having a liberal patronage. Mr. Fiester is also a land- 
owner in Buchanan county but devotes his entire attention to the management 
of the store, in which is carried a large and carefully selected line of staple and 
fancy groceries. The business methods of the house are such as will bear the 
closest investigation and scrutiny and their trade is constantly growing. 




ALEXANDER HOUCK 
As a Union Soldier 




MR. AND MRS. ROBERT STEWART 



r 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 147 

On the 10th of November, 1908, Mr. Fiester was united in marriage to Miss 
Mary Belle Uonnan, a native of Independence and a daughter of James B. and 
Martha (Ross) Donnan. In early life her parents came to Iowa, where the 
father practiced law and also engaged in the abstract business. Mr. and Mrs. 
Fiester have one son, Charles Donnan, who was born April 26, 1911. 

Fraternally Mr. Fiester is connected with the Odd Fellows and his religious 
faith is that of the Presbyterian church. In polities he is a republican but the 
honors and emoluments of office have no attraction for him. He has preferred 
always to concentrate his energies upon his business affairs and throughout his 
entire life has been connected with the grocery trade, which he knows thoroughly 
and in which he is now meeting with substantial success. 



WILLIAM E. GRISWOLD. 

William E. Gri.swold was born on the 7th of October, 1866, upon the farm 
of one hundred and sixty acres on section 30, Fremont township, which he now 
owns and operates. His parents were Harvey and Mary E. (Dilenbeck) Gris- 
wold. The father was born in Saratoga county, New York, a son of Josiah 
and Elizabeth (Van Buren) Griswold, who spent their entire lives in the Em- 
pire state. The latter was a relative of President Van Buren. Josiah Griswold 
kept a tavern in New York .state for many years. In his family were six chil- 
dren, of whom one son went to California. Harvey Griswold was the only one 
of the family to come to this county, arriving here in 1855, and he entered land 
from the government, the patents signed by President Pierce being still in the 
hands of his son, William E. He entered three hundred and twenty acres at 
that time and later entered one hundred and twenty acres more, but eventually 
sold a part of his land. In 1862 he brought his family here from Janesville, 
Wisconsin, and he continued to reside upon his land, which he farmed until his 
death in 1883, when he was sixty odd years of age. He was a republican and 
served upon the board of supervisors and also held a number of township 
offices. Fraternally he belonged to the Masonic order. His wife was born 
in Montgomery county. New York, and went to Wisconsin with her people, 
where her marriage occurred. Three children were born there and two were 
born after the removal of the family to this county. They are as follows : Hon. 
Henry J., engaged in the real-estate business in Des Moines, was formerly state 
representative and state senator. In early life he was a merchant of Winthrop. 
Arthur M. is a farmer of Fremont township. Ida E. is the wife of Harry Hig- 
man, ex-postmaster of Winthrop. Lizzie is the wife of W. B. Miller, a merchant 
of Winthrop. William E. is the youngest of the family. The mother died in 
1905 at the age of about seventy-two years. Her mother, who in her maidenhood 
was Miss Catherine Moyer, died at the home of our subject when ninety years 
old. Her birth occurred just three days before that of Abraham Lincoln. In 
her religious belief she was a Congregationalist. 

William E. Griswold was educated and grew to manhood in Fremont town- 
ship and after reaching years of maturity was a carpenter, painter and paper 
hanger. He followed these occupations for nineteen years, or until his marriage. 



148 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

after which he removed to the farm where he now resides. It comprises one 
hundred and sixty acres on section 30, Fremont township, and as its owner he 
ranks with the substantial citizens of the county. His initiative and well 
directed energy insure him good crops and as he studies carefully market condi- 
tions he sells to good advantage. 

Mr. Griswold was married in Winthrop on the 24th of February, 1903, to 
Miss Anna Christensen, a native of Denmark. When a child of four years she 
was brought to America by her parents, Hans and Christina Christensen who 
now live retired in Independence. Her father was during his active life a 
farmer and accumulated a competence. To Mr. and Mrs. Griswold have been 
born two children, AVilda Marie, a child of eight years, and Gerald William, 
four years old. 

Mr. and Mrs. Griswold are members of the Congregational church and are 
numbered among those whose lives are forces for good in the community. Mr. 
Griswold is a republican, but has never accepted office. He belongs to the 
Masonic order and to the ]\Iodern Woodmen of America and has many friends 
in those organizations. He is respected by the community at large and has not 
only achieved financial success but has also aided in the development of the 
county. 



BRUNO W. TIELEBEIN. 

Bruno W. Tielebein, who has spent his entire life in Buchanan county and 
enjoj's an enviable reputation as one of its representative agriculturists and 
prosperous citizens, is the owner of an excellent farm embracing one hundred 
and sixty acres on section 4, Newton township. Ilis birth occurred in that town, 
ship on the 16th of May, 1868, his parents being Frederick C. and Catherine E. 
(Fisher) Tielebein, more extended mention of whom is made on another page 
of this work in connection with the sketch of Otto Tielebein, a brother of our 
subject. 

Bruno W. Tielebein attended the district schools in the acquirement of an 
education and remained under the parental roof until twenty-seven years of 
age. Subsequently he cultivated rented land until 1902. when he fell heir to 
a farm of thirty-five acres on section 4, Newton township, the boundaries of 
which he extended by purchase to include one hundred and two acres. He 
improved the property and later bought more land until his place now comprises 
one hundred and .sixty acres. He likewise owns a fifteen-acre tract of timber 
land on section 31, Newton township, and in his undertakings as an agricnltnrist 
has won a well deserved and most gratifying measure of success. In addition 
to the cultivation of cereals he raises higli grade Poland China hogs and thor- 
oughbred shorthorn cattle, this brancli of liis business adding nuUerially to his 
annual income. He is also a stockhohler in the general store at Kiene and 
enjoys an enviable reputation as one of the enterprising and substantial citi- 
zens of his native county. 

On the 27th of March, 1895, Mr. Tielel)ein was united in marriage to Miss 
Elizabeth C. Schuman, a daughter of William and Susan (Harmon) Schuman, 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 149 

both of whom were natives of Dubuque county, Iowa. The father came to Bu- 
chanan county in an early day and purchased four hundred acres of land in 
Newton township, here carrying on agricultural pursuits throughout the re- 
mainder of his life. His demise occurred in October, 1911, but the mother 
survives and resides on the old home place. 

Mr. Tielebein gives his political allegiance to the republican party and is 
identitied fraternally with the Modern Brotherhood of America, while his 
religious faith is that of the Congregational church. He is esteemed by all who 
know him and enjoys the respect and confidence of his friends and the general 
public. 



A. B. CROOKS. 



A. B. Crooks, who in 1912 became manager of the implement business of 
A. P. Burrhus & Sons at Rowley, was born in Ohio, June 11, 1852, a son of 
Alexander and Hannah (Johnson) Crooks. The father was a native of Ireland 
and when thirteen years of age ran away from home and came to America. 
He landed at New York city, having worked his way across the water, and for 
six years he was employed in different capacities in the eastern metropolis. He 
spent much of three years in a store and afterward served an apprenticeship 
of about three years to the tailor's trade. On the expiration of that period he 
removed to Leesville, Ohio, where he engaged in the tailoring business on his own 
account, conducting his establishment successfully at that point until 1856, 
when he came to Buchanan county, settling in Quasqueton. 

This was a new but rapidly developing region and Alexander Crooks be- 
lieved that better business opportunities could be secured in the growing west. 
He opened a tailoring establishment in Quasqueton which he conducted for ten 
years and then turned his attention to the real-estate and insurance business. 
In the meantime he was called to public office, having in 1862 been elected sheriff 
of the county, in which position he served for four years. After his retirement 
from office he returned to Quasqueton, where he continued in the real-estate 
and insurance business until his death, which occurred in 1899. His wife, who 
was born in Ohio, pa.ssed away in 1898. 

A. B. Crooks was a little lad of but four summers when the family came 
to Iowa, so that he was largely reared in Quasqueton and Independence, pur- 
suing his education in the schools of the two cities. When his text-books were 
put aside he engaged in farming upon a tract of rented land in Liberty town- 
ship. This he continued to cultivate until 1872, when he removed to Grundy 
county, where he worked on the farm of Governor Boise until the fall of 1878. 
At that date he went to Nebraska, where he purchased one hundred and sixty 
acres of wild land which he at once began to develop, living thereon for seven 
years. At the end of that time he sold the property and returned to Buchanan 
county, where he again cultivated a rented farm for two years. He then aban- 
doned general agricultural pursuits and secured a clerkship in a store in 
Quasqueton, where he remained for six years. He next went to Lisbon, Iowa, 
where he resided for a year, his wife condvicting a millinery store there during 



150 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

that period. At the end of that time they came to Rowley and Mr. Crooks 
purchased a hotel and livery business. He later sold the livery barn and con- 
ducted the hotel for three and one-half years, after which he engaged in truck 
and fruit farming until 1912, when he accepted his present position as manager 
of the implement store of A. P. Burrhus & Sons at Rowley. 

On the 18th of August, 1877, Mr. Crooks was united in marriage to Miss 
Hattie A. Odren, a daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth (Twitchell) Odren, 
the former a native of Michigan and the latter of Ohio. They became pioneer 
residents of Buchanan county and in 1854 removed to Howard county, where 
Mr. Odren entered a claim from the government, on which he began to break 
the sod. In the course of time he had transformed the place into productive 
fields, which he continued to cultivate until 1870. He then came to Buchanan 
county and rented land until 1878. In that year he removed to Nebraska, 
where he secured a homestead claim but after a few years he returned to Bu- 
chanan county and lived in Quasquetoii until the death of his wife, which 
occurred in 1906. He is now residing in Cedar Rapids at the advancied age 
of eighty-three years. He is one of the veterans of the Civil war. having served 
for more than four years at tlic fi-ont as a member of the Fourth ^lichigan 
Cavalry, during which he participated in a number of hotly contested engage- 
ments and lielped to capture Jefferson Davis. 

Mr. and Mrs. Crooks have become the parents of a daughter, Iva May, 
now the wife of B. E. Davis, a truck farmer of Independence. Mrs. Crooks is 
the proprietor of a millinery store in Rowley, having conducted the business 
for twenty-two years. Her productions arc tasteful aiul stylish and her store 
is liberally patronized. 

The religious faith of J\Ir. and Mrs. Crooks is that of the Methodist church. 
His political indorsement is given to the republican party, and he has served 
as justice of the peace here for four years. He belongs to Franklin Lodge, 
No. 59, I. O. O. F., of Quasqueton, and is interested in the growth and upbuild- 
ing of the institution. 



ALBERT :\1ERR1LL. 



The Merrill family have been represented in this county. since pioneer times 
and have been leaders in all that makes for the public welfare and the name is 
highly honored in this locality. Albert Merrill is a worthy representative of the 
family and has the unqualified respect of those who have been associated with 
him. He is a retired farmer, living in Winthrop, enjoying a leisure won by 
former years of wisely directed labor. 

He was born in Tuscarawas county, Ohio, February 17, 1848, a son of John 
and ^largaret ((Juthrie) .Merrill. The former was born in Pennsylvania and 
was a son of Jesse IVFerrill. The ancestry is traced back to two brothers, who. 
at an early day, emigrated from Holland to the United States. Je.sse Merrill 
married Miss Nancy Hemphill, a native of the Keystone state, although her 
parents were l)orn in Ireland. She accompanied her husband to this comity 
and they remained residents thereof nntil called to their final rest. She died 




ALBERT MERRILL 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 153 

when about eighty-five years of age and he lived to the venerable age of ninety- 
three years. After he came to this county, about 1855, he lived with his son 
John and other members of his family. As a young man he ran a distillery 
in Pennsylvania but in 1832 removed to Belmont county, Ohio, where he followed 
farming. 

John Merrill, father of our subject, was born in Washington county, Pennsyl- 
vania, in 1812, and remained there until he was a young man of twenty years. 
He then removed to Belmont count}', Ohio, where he married and where he 
carried on farming for a time. However, in June, 1849, he came to this county 
and settled four miles south of the present site of Winthrop. The land is now 
in Liberty township but at that time the county was unorganized. He pur- 
chased forty acres from a squatter and the family resided for some time in a 
log house upon that place. He also took up a claim from the government and 
began the improvement of his land. By degrees he added to his property until 
at the time of his death, which occurred when he was eighty-two years of age, 
he owned about one thousand acres of land in the county. He was not only 
one of the leading agriculturists of his locality but was prominent in public 
affairs. He was county supervisor at the time that the poor farm was pur- 
chased and held various township offices. He and his wife were among the 
charter members and organizers of what is now known as the Pine Creek 
Presbyterian church, the history of which organization is given elsewhere in 
this work. He was also an elder therein for many years. He died July 19, 
1894, at the age of eighty-two years. His wife, who was in her maidenhood 
Miss Margaret Guthrie, was born in Harrison county, Ohio, January 28, 1814, 
a daughter of Robert and Jane (Cunighan) Guthrie, natives of Scotland and the 
parents of a large family. Mrs. Merrill was reared in Ohio and there her mar- 
riage occurred. Upon the .journey to Iowa it was necessary to go to Wisconsin 
by canal and thence by ox team to this country. She was one of the honored 
pioneer women of Buchanan county and did her full share in redeeming the 
land from the wilderness. She survived her husband for several years and 
passed away October 25, 1902, at the advanced age of eighty-eight years. In 
their family were eleven children, namely: Jesse, who died when about thirty 
years old ; Jane, a resident of Winthrop : Nancy, also living here ; Mary, the 
wife of Charles Boon of Linn county, Iowa ; IMargaret, now Mrs. David Milne 
and a resident of Creighton, Nebraska ; Robert, who met death by accident when 
in his thirteenth year; Albert, the subject of this review; James, who was a 
farmer by occupation and died in 1901 ; John, living retired in Ames, Iowa ; 
Alice, the widow of Samuel Slemmons of Independence ; and Sarah, who married 
Samuel Wilson and passed away in 1886. 

Albert Merrill spent his boyhood under the parental roof and when his time 
was not taken up by attendance at the public schools he assisted his father in 
the work of the fann. When twenty-four years of age he located on one hundred 
and sixty acres of wild land in Middlefield township that belonged to his father 
and began operating the same. He subsequently bought the place and still later 
purchased eighty acres adjoining. He built a good residence upon his land and 
in many other ways improved his property and from time to time added to his 
holdings until he was the owner of four hundred and forty acres of fertile land, 
aU under cultivation. He successfully carried on agricultural operations until 



154 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

1907, when he sold two hundred and eighty acres, retaining one hundred and 
sixty acres, which he now rents to his sons. He purchased his residence in 
Winthrop and has since resided here, enjoying a well earned ease. He has 
extensive landed interests in other states, owning eight hundred acres in New 
Mexico; twenty-eight acres of valuable irrigated land near Brownsville, Texas; 
one hundred and sixty acres in the Panhandle of that state ; and three hundred 
and twenty acres of wild land in Stanton county, Texas. 

Mr, Merrill was married on the 23d of January, 1879, to ^Miss Fannie L. 
Kershner, who was born in Ncm' York state, February 12, 1855, a daughter of 
Jonathan and Jane (Vance) Kershner, natives of Pennsylvania and the Empire 
state respectively. Her paternal grandfather, Jonathan Kershner, was born in 
Germany. The parents of ]\Irs. ]\Ierrill came to this county in 1868 and located 
in Liberty township, where they lived for a time, after which they removed to 
Middlefield township, where her father died at the age of tifty-tive years. Her 
mother made her home with the subject of this review until her death, which 
occurred in 1913, when she had reached the advanced age of eighty-nine years. 
Both were members of the Methodist church. To them were born seven children, 
namely : John, a resident of Independence ; Florence, the wife of A. P. Miller, 
of Boulder, Colorado; Mrs. Merrill: Fred, a resident of Winthrop; Mary, who 
died in New York state when three years of age ; Edwin, who was accidentally 
killed when a lad of fifteen ; and Anna, the widow of William Auten and a 
resident of Winthrop. ^Frs. Merrill was fourteen years of age when she accom- 
panied her parents to this county. By her marriage she became the mother of 
eight children: Fred, who died at the age of seven months; Willis Hodge, who 
is conducting a general .store in Winthrop ; Clyde R., at home ; Charles R., who 
resides upon the home farm ; Jessie Jane, a nurse by profession ; Bessie, who is 
engaged in teaching in this county and resides at home; Susie, who conducts a 
millinery store in Winthrop ; and Hazel, likewise a teacher, 

Mr, and ]\Irs, Merrill are members of the Presbyterian church and take a 
keen interest in its welfai-e. The father and grandfather of Mr. Merrill were 
the prime movers in establishing the first Presbyterian organization in Liberty 
township and in building the first church edifice of that denomination in the 
township, and he has been very active in erecting the three buildings of that 
church. In early life he voted the republican ticket but of late years has given 
his support to the prohibition party. He has served as trustee of his township 
and as road commissioner and for fifteen yeai*s was a school director. He is 
upright in all of his dealings, and his sincerity and straiglitforwardness have 
won for him the esteem of bis fellow citizens. 



JOSEPH II, RISELEY, 



Since assuming off\vo in 1913, Joseph H. Riseley has demonstrated his 
ability to liandlc the affairs of the postoffice at Winthrop with system and dis- 
patch, and has also proved a courteous and ol)liging j)Ostmaster. Tie was 
born in Ulster county. New York, on llic 13th of April. 1848, a .son of 
Albert and Margaret (Bradstreet) Riseley. both natives of the FiUipire state. 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 155 

The former engaged in moving houses and in various other lines of work 
and so provided for the support of his family. He was married in August, 
1844, to Margaret Bradstreet, a native of Delaware county, New York, who was 
born March 11, 1820. In the fall of 1854 they came west and after two years 
spent in Ogle county, Illinois, settled in this county and he took up forty acres 
of land in Middlefield township upon a land warrant. As that was before the 
days of ramifying railroad connections he drove through from Ogle county, 
Illinois, to Buchanan county, Iowa, with oxen. In addition to cultivating the 
land which he owned he rented a farm and began its operation. He also broke 
tlie prairie sod for others, preparing many hundreds of acres in the county for 
cultivation, and built a number of bridges for the county authorities. As he 
was able he bought more land until he became the owner of six hundred and 
forty acres all situated in Middlefield township. However, he lost part of this 
through signing his name as security on notes. He subsequently removed to 
Calhoun county, Iowa, where he lived retired for ten or twelve years. His wife 
passed away in Rockwell City, February 15, 1899, when seventy-eight years 
and eleven months of age. He later returned to New York and remarried, but 
after remaining in his native state for a time he returned to Iowa, locating at 
Rockwell City and there passed his remaining days, his death occurring October 
27, 1910. He was liberal in his political views and, although he usually sup- 
ported the republican party, upon occasion he voted for the man irrespective 
of his party affiliation. He held a number of township offices and served as 
county supervisor for three terms. 

Joseph H. Riseley was a lad of eight years when brought to this county and 
the greater part of his boyhood was passed in Middlefield township. As his 
strength increased he aided more and more in the work of the homestead and 
aside from breaking much of their o\\n land he broke many acres of prairie for 
others. He remained at home until he was a young man of twenty-eight or 
thirty years, but after his marriage he removed upon a quarter section of land 
which his father gave him with the condition that he was to assume and pay off 
the indebtedness upon it. After farming for some time he sold his place and 
started a creamery near Fort Dodge, Iowa, operating the concern for a year, 
when he sold his interest to his partner and removed to Calhoun county, Iowa, 
where he engaged in the general mercantile business for two years. At the 
expiration of that time lie sold his store and returned to this county and went 
into the livery and horse business in partnership with G. E. Titus, continuing 
in that relation for about three years. He was then elected county supervisor 
and for six years devoted his entire attention to the work of that office. He 
then purchased a small farm of thirty acres in this county, which he cultivated 
intensively and greatly improved for two years, but, as he was appointed post- 
master upon the 1st of September, 1913, he then located in Winthrop. He 
quickly mastered the details of the work of the office and his services are giving 
satisfaction to the people of the town. 

Mr. Riseley was married on the 22d of February, 1876, to Miss Elma E. 
Hulett, a native of Wisconsin and a daughter of Marshall and Margaret (Clark) 
Hulett, natives of Vermont and New York respectively. Her father was a 
farmer by occupation and emigrated with his family to Wisconsin, where the 
family home was maintained until 1868, when they removed to this county and 



156 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

he purchased two hundred acres of land lying in Liberty, Byron and Fremont 
townships. He operated his land until his death, which occurred in June, 1903. 
His widow survived him for ten years, passing away in 1913. 

Mr. Riseley is a democrat and has served on the city council for a number 
of years. Fraternally he belongs to Byron Lodge, No. 546, A. F. & A. M., and 
conforms his life to the high standards of ethics inculcated by that order. His 
life has been one of useful activity, and he has not only made many friends, 
but has also retained their steadfast regard and esteem. 



ALEXANDER M. DONNAN. 

Alexander M. Donnan, the faithful custodian of public funds in Buchanan 
county, liaving been called to the office of county treasurer in 1906, was born 
in Independence, Iowa, on the 6th of October, 1871, a son of Jame.s B. and 
Martha (Ross) Donnan. The father's birth occurred in West Charlton, Sara- 
toga county, New York, December 17, 1840, while the mother was born in Lower 
Waterford, Vermont, and was a sister of E. Ross, formerly president of the 
Peoples National Bank of Independence, and a sister of Senator Ross of Ver- 
mont, who was chief justice of the G-reen ^lountain state for many years and 
succeeded Senator ]\Iorrell in the office of United States senator. 

When twenty-one years of age James B. Donnan removed to the west and, 
entering the office of his brother, W. G. Donnan, began reading law. He was 
admitted to the bar soon after the close of the war and then entered upon 
the active practice of his profession, in which he continued with his brother 
for a number of years, or until his hearing failed and forced his retirement 
from that field of professional activity. He then turned his attention to the 
abstract business, in which he continued until 1911. At different times he 
has held local offices, but has never been an aspirant for political preferment. 
His wife died in August, 1906. In their family were five children : Lillian, the 
wife of C. A. Rosemond, a resident of Bloomington, Illinois ; Alexander M. ; 
Abbie, at home with her father; Mary B., the wife of C. W. Fiester: and Ruth 
U., who died in 1909. 

Alexander ^I. Donnan, reared in his native city, attended the public schools 
of Independence and afterward spent two years as a student in Cornell College 
at IMount Vernon, Iowa, and three years in the University of Illinois, trom 
which lie was graduated with the class of 1895. During vacation periods he 
worked in a store for a few years. He was graduated from the College of 
Engineering of the University of Illinois and afterward turned his attention 
to the profession of architecture, which he followed in Independence until 
called to his present position, liaving been made county treasurer on the 1st 
of February, 1906. He has since been the incumbent in the office, covering a 
period of more than eight years, and has made a most creditable record by 
the prompt, capable and thoroughly reliable manner in which he has discharged 
his public duties. 

In September, 1903, Mr. Donnan was united in marriage to Miss Helen 
Maude Rosemond, who was born in Taylorville. Illinois, a daugiiter of (^aptain 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 157 

W. E. and Caroline (Baumgartner; Roseinond, both of whom were natives of 
Ohio. Removing westward, they settled in Taylorville, Illinois, and in the 
spring of 1882 arrived in Iowa. At different times the father engaged in busi- 
ness as a stockman and merchant. Settling in Independence, he devoted some 
time to dealing in live stock, but later became connected with commercial inter- 
ests, although at the present time he is living retired, both he and his wife being 
still residents of Independence. He served in the Civil war with the rank of 
captain, having enlisted in an Ohio regiment. On several occasions he was 
wounded, being at one time injured at the battle of Lookout Mountain. His 
famih' numbered six children, of whom Mrs. Donnan is the youngest. 

In his political views Mr. Donnan has always been a stalwart republican 
and does everything in his power to promote the growth and insure the success 
of his party. He belongs to the ]\Iasonic lodge and to the Knights of Pythias 
fraternity and the rules which further govern his conduct and guide him in all 
his relations with his fellowmen are found in the Presbyterian church, of which 
he is a faithful member. That his life has been well spent is indicated in the 
fact that many of his stanchest friends are those who have known him from 
his boyhood to the present time. 



LOUIE L. KASSAR. 



The farm of Louie L. Kassar is situated on sections 15 and 16, Homer town- 
ship, and comprises one hundred and twenty acres of rich land. Thereon he 
is engaged not only in the cultivation of cereals best adapted to soil and 
climate but also in the raising of high grade stock and is meeting with success 
in that undertaking. He was born in Illinois, August 26, 1878, a son of Louis 
and Emma (Hudson) Kassar, both of whom were natives of Germany. In early 
life they crossed the Atlantic to the new world and settled in Du Page county, 
Illinois, where the father purchased and improved land, continuing its cultiva- 
tion throughout his remaining days, his death occurring in 1880. His widow 
survives and is now living in Buchanan county at the age of seventy-two years. 

Louie L. Kassar was reared and educated in Illinois and in Buchanan county, 
for with his mother he came to this county, settling on land which the father 
had previou.sly purchased in Homer township. The usual experiences of the 
farm boy fell to his lot, for from an early age he worked in the fields, assisting 
in the task of plowing, planting and harvesting. Eventually he purchased the 
old home place, comprising one hundred and twenty acres of sections 15 and 
16, Homer township, his residence being situated on the former section. He 
has greatly improved the property and- has continuously carried on farm work 
here with the exception of two years which he spent in farming near Elkton, 
South Dakota. Today upon his place are seen substantial buildings that furnish 
ample shelter to grain and stock. He is making a specialty of high grade 
shorthorn cattle and Poland China hogs and his annual sales of stock bring 
to him a gratifying return. 

In August, 1901, I\Ir. Kassar was united in marriage to Miss Edna Robson, 
a daughter of Robert J. and Bessie (Councilman) Robson, the latter a native 



158 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

of Illinois, while the former was born in Canada. The father made farmiug 
his life occupation and after removing westward to Iowa in an early day settled, 
in Clinton county, where he carried on general agricultural pursuits for some 
time. He afterward came to Buchanan county and invested in land in Homer 
township which he farmed for about twenty years. He is now living retired, 
making his home in Nebraska, but his wife died in January, 1910. Mr. and 
Mrs. Kassar have become parents of two children : Wayne F., ten years of age ; 
and Donald L., aged three. 

Mr. Kassar votes with the republican party and his ballot is intelligently 
cast because he alwaj's keeps in touch with the modern, significant issues and 
problems of the day. He and his wife hold membership in the Methodist 
church, are loyal to its teachings and generous in its support. He has made a 
creditable record as a farmer and, as the greater part of his life has been passed 
in Buchanan county, he is widely known here. 



WILLIAM E. POWLES. 



William E. Powles, who passed away at Rowley on the 30th of May, 1907, 
was long and actively identified with agricultural pursuits as a farmer of Sum- 
ner township and spent the last seven years of his life in honorable retirement. 
His birth otf-urred in Steuben county, Indiana, on the 28th of November, 1847, 
his parents being John and Elmira (Perkins) Powles, the former a native of 
England and the latter of Ohio. John Powles, a shoemaker by trade, located 
in Illinois on coming to America and followed farming in that state for some 
years. Subsequently he came to Buchanan county, Iowa, purchasing a tract of 
land in Cono township which he cultivated throughout the remainder of his 
life. He passed away when but forty years of age, and his wife is also deceased. 

William E. Powles was reared and educated in Illinois and when a youth of 
eighteen came with his parents to Buchanan county, this state. He purchased 
and improved eighty acres of land in Sumner township and throughout the 
remainder of his active business career devoted his attention to the operation of 
that farm, annually gathering good crops which found a ready sale on the 
market. In 1900 he put aside the work of the fields and took up his abode at 
Rowley, where he lived in honorable retirement until called to his final rest, 
passing away ]\Iay 30, 1907, after a short illness. For one year he served as 
deputy postmaster at Rowley and made a creditable record in that connection. 
His widow is still in possession of the lioine farm and also owns a handsome 
residence at Rowley. 

On the 18th of October, 1871. Mr. -Powles was united in marriage to Miss 
Effie Spencer, her parents being Carlonas and Chnrity (Goodman) Spencer, 
the former a native of Pennsylvania and the latter of Delaware county. New 
York. Mr. Spencer, who was an agri('ulturi.st by occupation, came to Buchanan 
county, Iowa, from Wisconsin in 1864, purchasing and improving a tract of 
land in Sumner township which he cultivated for a number of years or until the 
time of his retirement. He died while on a visit to Pennsylvania, in December. 
1895, having survived his wife, who passed away in April. 1893. Mr. and Mrs. 



( 


-^ 


.** 


^tW 


V 




^^^^WK^^t^^^HiVP^r^ 


^S^MJ^^k ^^^^T^^TfS^^^^^^^^ 




MR. AXD MRS. ^YILLIA]\I E. POWLES 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 161 

Powles had no children of their own but reared eleven whom they fitted for an 
honorable place in life. 

Mr. Powles gave his political allegiance to the prohibition party, believing 
that the liquor traffic is one of the worst evils with which this country has to 
contend. He belonged to the Grange and to the Good Templars and in religious 
faith was a Baptist, while his widow is a devoted member of the Methodist 
church. His demise was the occasion of deep and widespread regret, for he had 
resided in the community for more than four decades and had gained an extensive 
circle of warm friends here. 



EDMOND GALLERY. 



Edmond Gallery, a well known and representative agriculturist of Buchanan 
county, is the owner of a farm of one hundred and twenty-seven acres on 
section 34, Fremont township, and also has another tract embracing one hun- 
dred and forty acres on section 27 of the same township, cultivating all except 
twenty-six acres, which he rents. His birth occurred in Springfield, ]\Iassa- 
chusetts, on the 23d of August, 1868, his parents being Patrick and Johanna 
(McGrath) Gallery, the former born in County Clare, Ireland, March 17, 1822, 
and the latter in Tipperary, Ireland, in 1828. Their marriage was celebrated 
in Springfield, Massachusetts, Patrick Gallery having emigrated to the United 
States as a young man of twenty-one years. All of their children were born in 
the Bay state. In 1869 the family came to Iowa, locating on a farm in Buchanan 
county which the father operated until within six years of his demise, which 
occurred on the 7th of June, 1900. He had lived here for more than three 
decades and his death was the occasion of deep and widespread regret. His 
wife was called to her final rest on the 8th of September, 1908. In their family 
were five children, as follows : James, a resident of AVinthrop ; Ellen, the wife 
of Michael Hogan, of Paoli, Kansas; Daniel, a farmer living near Paoli, Kansas; 
Frank, a resident farmer of Fremont to^vnship ; and Edmond, the subject of 
this review. 

Edmond Gallery was but little more than a year old when his parents estab- 
lished their home in this county and here he acquired his education. He 
remained on the home place until the time of his marriage and then started out 
as an agriculturist on his own account, having since operated the farm on which 
he resides at present. He cultivates the cereals best adapted to soil and climate 
and also raises and feeds stock, both branches of his business returning to him 
a gratifying annual income. All of the improvements on the property stand 
as monuments to his enterprise and energy, and in its neat and thrifty appear- 
ance the place bespeaks the supervision of a practical and progressive owner. 

At IMasonville, Delaware county, Iowa, Mr. Gallery was united in marriage 
to Miss Alice Larkins, who was born in Chicago in 1874, her parents being 
Edward and Delia (Ryan) Larkins. The father, a native of New York and a 
carpenter by trade, passed away at Flint, Michigan. March 3, 1875. In Sep- 
tember, 1853, in Chicago, Illinois, he wedded Miss Delia Ryan, a native of 
Louth county, Ireland, by whom he had one child, Alice. The daughter was 



162 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

educated in Iowa, coming to this state with her mother following the death of 
the father. She was a teacher in the country schools for five years preceding 
her marriage. She has become the mother of nine children, as follows: Eleanor, 
who was graduated from the Notre Dame Convent, at Independence, Iowa, in 
1913 and is now a teacher in the Middlefield No. 2 school; Anna, who finished 
her studies in the Winthrop schools in 1914; Josie; Alice; Edmond; Francis; 
Elmer ; Walter ; and James. All of the children are still under the parental roof. 
Mr. Gallery gives his political allegiance to the democracy, exercising his 
right of franchise in support of its men and measures. He is a devout com- 
municant of the Catholic church and is identified fraternally with the Foresters. 
In the community where practically his entire life has been spent he is widely 
and favorably known, having in the course of his upright and honorable career 
gained recognition as a substantial and progressive farmer and a public-spirited 
and loyal citizen. 



CHRIS GLEERl'P. 



Chris Gleerup, a resident farmer of Liberty township, his home being on 
section 20, was born at Jylland, Denmark, in 1848, his parents being Jens 
Jensen and ]Mary (Matson) Gleerup, who were also natives of Denmark, both 
born in 1814. In early life the father took up the occupation of farming, but 
afterward learned and followed the potter's trade, owning and conducting quite 
an extensive establishment for the manufacture of pottery. He also owned a 
fair-sized farm in Denmark. He served in the Danish-German war of 1848 
and he was a very active man in connection with public affairs in his com- 
munity, holding various offices of responsibility in his town. He led a busy, 
active and useful life and never came to the United States, devoting his life 
to the management of his individual interests in his native country. 

Chris Gleerup, who was one of a family of twelve children attended school 
in Denmark and in early life learned the baker's trade, which he followed for 
six years, beginning his apprenticeship when a youth of sixteen and continuing 
until he reached the age of twenty-two. He afterward served for sixteen months 
in the Danish army in accordance M'ith the laws of the country and then made 
preparations for coming to the United States. Having crossed the Atlantic, he 
journeyed to the middle west, reaching Buchanan county, Iowa, in 1874. Imme- 
diately afterward he began farming in Liberty township, but after a brief 
period devoted to agricultural pursuits there he removed to Independence and 
for two years was connected with a confectionery store. He next went to Cedar 
Falls, where he was engaged in the furniture business. He then sold out and 
returned to Buchanan county, where he purchased land and was again engaged 
in farming, but after a brief period was appointed steward of the county home, 
which position he occupied for five years. He is today the owner of one hundred 
and forty acres of land on section 20, Liberty township, and largely concentrates 
his energies upon the development and improvement of his farm, which indi- 
cates his careful, practical and progressive management in its excellent ap- 
pearance. 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 163 

Mr. Gleerup was united in marriage to Miss Anna Maria Nelson, a niece of 
Charles Nelson, who was the pioneer of the Danish settlement in Liberty town- 
ship. Her parent, Nels and Margaret (Rasmussen) Nelson, were natives of 
Denmark. In early life the father followed farming in that country and he, 
too, served in the war of 1848. He came to the United States in 1875, settling in 
Buchanan county, where he owned a small tract of land but never became active 
in affairs here. In religious faith he was a Seventh Day Adventist. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Gleerup has been born a daughter, Ella, now the wife of Chris John- 
son, a resident farmer of Liberty township, and they have three children, Evan, 
Leta M. and Paul Weyler. 

Mr. Gleerup votes with the republican party, but has never been ambitious 
to hold office. He has been officially connected with the schools, however, serv- 
ing as one of the directors for more than twenty years. He has been particularly 
active as a factor in the Danish settlement and has freely given helpful advice 
and counsel to all who have come to him, his opinions being much sought. For 
the past thirty-six years he has been identified with the Danish Baptist church 
and has held all of its offices, including those of Sunday school superintendent, 
steward, trustee, etc. He is never too busy to find time to devote to church work 
and has done much to further the moral development of the people of his com- 
munity. He is very popular and well liked by all who know him, for it is 
recognized that he is an honorable, upright man and he has social qualities which 
find expression in friendliness, sympathy and kindness. 



ARTHUR L. McCLERNON. 

Arthur L. McClernon, filling the office of county recorder of Buchanan 
county, was born in Independence on the 6th of March, 1878, a son of Hugh 
and Bridget (Maroney) McClernon, The father was born in Belfast, Ireland, 
and the mother in County Clare, Ireland. He was a saddler by trade, having 
learned the business in Scotland, and he became a harness dealer ere leaving 
his native country. In 1864 he sailed for the United States and for some years 
remained in New York city, after which he came to Independence about 1868 
or 1869. Here he engaged in the saddlery business in connection with his 
uncle, the partnership existing until his uncle's death about two years later. 
Mr. McClernon afterward remained in the business until his demise, which 
occurred on the 31st of March, 1903. For several years he had survived his 
wife, who died in 1896. In public affairs Mr. McClernon took a deep interest 
and for many years filled the office of alderman, exercising his official preroga- 
tives in support of many measures for the general good. 

Arthur L. McClernon was the second in order of birth in a family of five 
children. He attended the public schools of Independence and when seventeen 
years of age took up the saddlery business in connection with his father, with 
whom he was associated for about ten years or until the latter 's death. He 
then took over the business, which he continued alone for about six years. At 
the end of that time he disposed of his stock and went upon the road as a travel- 
ing salesman for a large wholesale saddlery company, whom he thus represented 



164 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

for about three years. He was then elected to his present office. In his political 
views he has always been a stalwart democrat and in the fall of 1912 he was 
elected county recorder of Buchanan county, assuming the duties of the office 
on the 1st of January, 1913. He had previously served as alderman for a num- 
ber of years. He now devotes his entire time and attention to his official duties 
and is making a creditable record in that connection. His religious faith is 
that of the Roman Catholic church. He is widely and favorably known in 
[ndependence, where he has spent his entire life, and many of his stanchest 
friends are those who have known him from his boyhood to the present time. 



HON. T. F. HALSTEAD. 

The position of Hon. T. Frank Halstead in public regard is indicated in the 
fact that hLs fellow townsmen have chosen him to represent them in the general 
assembly. He is well known in Buchanan county, where his entire life has 
been passed, and his record stands in contradistinction to the old adage that 
"a prophet is never without honor save in his own country." 

He was born in 1862 and is a son of J. R. and Lovina (Everett) Halstead. 
The father was born in New York in 1832 and is now living in Oklahoma. In 
early life he followed agricultural pursuits in the Empire state and in 1850 
traveled across the continent with an emigrant train to California. It was a 
long and wearisome journey, for as he proceeded westward settlements were 
less frequent until he got upon the broad plains, where one could travel hundreds 
of miles without coming to a habitation. He continued, however, over the hot 
stretches of sand and through the mountain passes until he reached the Pacific 
coast, spending five or six yeai-s in California, where he purchased land and 
engaged in the live-stock business. In 1856 he retraced his steps as far as 
Illinois, but only remained in that state for a brief period and in the late '50s 
arrived in Iowa, settling in Cono township, Buchanan county. He afterward 
took up his abode in Liberty township and through the period of his early resi- 
dence here shared in all of the hardships and privations wliich constitute the 
leading features of pioneer life. He converted the wild prairie land into a well 
improved farm, but at the time of his wife's death retired from active farm life 
and removed to Oklahoma, where he now has financial interests that claim his 
attention. Mrs. Halstead was a native of Ohio and during the period of her 
residence in Iowa won many warm friends, who deeply regretted her demise. 
Mr. Halstead was also a prominent and influential citizen of the county. He was 
an active democrat and was called to a number of local offices. His business life 
was devoted to general farming and stock-raising, and he was the owner of 
one hundred and sixty acres of rich land. His religious faith was that of the 
]\Iethodist church, and he frequently served as an official in the church. He 
has many good substantial qualities and was well liked in Buchanan county. 

T. Frank Halstead acquired his education in the country schools and, being 
an only son, assisted his father and lived at home until his marriage. He then 
began farming on his own account and has carried on general agricultural pur- 
i?aits until a recent date, when he practically retired, leaving his sons to do the 




HON. T. F. HALSTEAD 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 167 

active work of the fields. He is still the owner of two hundred and five acrei 
of rich and productive land and derives therefrom a substantial annual income, 
which supplies him with all of the comforts and some of the luxuries of life. 
He is also a stockholder in the Quasqueton State Savings Bank. 

Mr. Halstead was married to Miss Clara M. Plank, who was born in Al- 
lamakee county, Iowa, a sister of Dr. F. T. Plank, a practicing dentist of Inde- 
pendence. They now have three children : Lewis R., who is on the farm with his 
father ; Nellie, the wife of Clinton A. Kress, a farmer of Liberty township, by 
whom she has one child, Vonda ; and Everett R., at home. 

]Mr. Halstead holds membership with the Odd Fellows lodge at Quasqueton, 
in which he has been very active, filling all the offices in that organization and 
also acting as deputy grand master of Buchanan county. He is likewise identi- 
fied with other fraternal organizations, to the teachings of which he is ever loyal. 
His political allegiance is given the democratic party and he is recognized as 
one of its most influential members in Liberty township and Buchanan county. 
He has filled various township offices and in 1912 was elected to represent his 
county in the thirty-fifth general assembly of Iowa. His election came as proof 
of his popularity and the confidence reposed in him by his fellow townsmen, for 
this is a republican county. He is equally active in support of measures which 
are not influenced by political considerations, and his aid is always on the side 
of progress and improvement and in behalf of those things which are a matter 
of civic virtue and civic pride. 



CHARLES FRUSH. 

Charles Frush is conducting a profitable business in Jesup. where he is the 
owner of a general mercantile store. Before engaging in this line of business 
he carried on farming and his mse direction of his business interests combined 
with indefatigable industry has won him a substantial measure of success. 

The birth of Mr. Frush occurred in Jefl^erson countj^ Iowa, July 4, 1871, 
his parents being G. H, and America L. (Harrison) Frush. The father was 
born upon his father's farm in Ohio and when six years of age the grandparents 
brought their family to Iowa, settling in .Jefferson county, where a farm was 
purchased, upon which Q. H. Frush spent his boyhood and youth. He lived 
upon that place for fifteen years and then wedded America L. Harrison. They 
removed to Osborne county, Kansas, in 1872 and Mr. Frush homesteaded one 
hundred and sixty acres of land, upon which he took up his abode, carefully 
cultivating the fields for twenty-one years. He then sold that property and 
returned to Iowa, settling in Westburg township, Buchanan county, in 1893. 
Here he invested in a farm of one hundred and sixty acres, upon which he lived 
for eight years, and then turned his attention to the coal business at Waterloo, 
where he remained for four years. On the expiration of that period he sold his 
interests in the town and liought a farm of four hundred and thirty acres in 
Black Hawk county, to which he afterward added a tract of forty acres. Six 
years were spent in that county, after which he again disposed of his farm and 
removed to AVaterloo, where he and his wife still make their home. Mrs. Frush 

Vol. II- 8 



168 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

was born in Dubuque, Iowa, in 1829, and when a young lady accompanied her 
parents on their removal to Jefferson county, where her marriage occurred. 

Charles P'rush spent his youthful days upon the homestead farm in Kansas, 
the family removing to the Sunflower state when he was only about a year old. 
He acquired his education in the public schools and on the 16th of October, 
1894, he returned to Iowa. For a year thereafter he worked as a farm hand in 
Buchanan county and afterward joined his brother in renting and cultivating 
a tract of land in Westburg township. They remained thereon for a year but 
in the spring of 1897 Charles Frush rented a farm independently. 

It was about that time that he was united in marriage to Miss Ina Jones, a 
daughter of Henry and Mary (Hulderman) Jones, both of whom were natives 
of Indiana, in which state they were educated and married. In 1883 they 
removed to Kansas and purchased a farm near the Frush place. There the 
daughter remained until her marriage to Charles Frush, when she accompanied 
her husband to Iowa. The young couple began their domestic life upon a farm 
which they occupied for two years and later they lived upon a rented farm near 
Jesup for five years. 

At the end of that time Mr. Frush turned his attention to commercial pur- 
suits, purchasing in 1903 the general store of R. E. Taylor at Jesup. He has 
since carried on merchandising and now has a good stock, covering various 
lines that are usually in demand. His store is well arranged, his prices are 
reasonable and his business methods thorouglily reliable. Accordingly he is 
meeting with success and is now one of the substantial merchants of his part of 
the county. 



M. K. BRIERLY, D. U. S. 

Dentistry is uni(|ue among the professions. The (lualities demanded for suc- 
cess are of a threefold nature. One must possess mechanical skill and ingenuity 
added to a knowledge of the scientific principles of the profession and, more- 
over, must have business capacity akin to that which is demanded in commercial 
relations. Di'. Brierly is well equipped along these different lines and as a 
practitioner of Independence has made for himself a creditable position among 
the practicing dentists of his section of the state. He was born in Spring Prairie, 
Walworth county, Wisconsin, in 1864, a son of James and Mary (Hargreaves) 
Brierly, both of whom were natives of England, the former born in Lancashire 
in 1824 and the latter in 1840. The father learned the weaver's trade in Eng- 
land and when eighteen years of age came to the I'nited States, making his way 
to Spring Prairie, Walworth county, Wisconsin, where he engaged in farming, 
purchasing land in that locality. There he remained up to the time of his death, 
and he was an active supporter of the democratic party and frequently the 
incumbent in public offices. He was also active in the work of the Congrega- 
tional church and his well-spent life won for him deserved regard. In addition 
to his farming interests he engaged successfully in the breeding of Shorthorn 
cattle. 

Dr. Brierly. who was the fifth in order of birth in a family of six children, 
attended tho district schools and the public schools of East Troy, Wisconsin, 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 169 

ill the ac(|nireinent of that general education which must constitute the founda- 
tion for all specialized knowledge. At length he determined upon dental 
practice as a lifework and with that end in view entered the Chicago College 
of Dental Surgery, from which he was graduated with the class of 1892. His 
dental course, however, did not immediately follow his public-school training. 
When twenty years of age he began teaching in his home county and followed 
that profession for three years. He afterward spent two years in the employ 
of the Santa Fe Railroad in northern Illinois, doing sum-ey work, and it was 
subsequent to that time that he took up the study of dentistry. Following 
his graduation he returned to East Troy, Wisconsin, where he practiced for 
three years and then came to Independence in 1895. Here he has since actively 
followed his chosen calling, covering a period of alxiut twenty years, during 
which time professional services have made heavy demands upon his attention 
and his energies. He soon gave demonstration of his ability to do the delicate 
mechanical work of the profession and at all times has kept abreast with the 
latest scientific discoveries. He has no other business interests save that he is 
the owner of two hundred and eighty-five acres of rich and valuable land in 
Buchanan county. 

In 1897 Dr. Brierly was united in marriage to Miss Emma Limbert, a 
daughter of Frank Limbert, who was born in Auerbach, Bavaria, Germany, 
in 1818, and is now living retired in Independence at the remarkable old age 
of ninety-six years. His wife, who bore the maiden name of ^largaret Shep- 
pard, was born in Germany in 1830. In early life Mr. Limbert was an iron 
molder, following that business in Dayton, Ohio, for some time and afterward 
removing to Waterloo, Iowa, where he worked at the same trade. In 1879 he 
came to Independence and for a time engaged in farming in Buchanan county 
as well as working at the iron molder 's trade. He had eight children, of whom 
Mrs. Brierly is the seventh in order of birth. To Dr. and ^Irs. Brierly have 
been born three children : Herbert, who was born in 1898 ; Marian, in 189D ; 
and Lawrence, in 1903. All are now in school, the first two being high-school 
pupils. 

The religious faith of the family is that of the Baptist church, except that 
Mrs. Brierly is a Presbyterian. Dr. Brierly 's political indorsement is given to 
the republican party and his fraternal relations are with the Modern Woodmen 
of America and the Knights of Pythias. Along strictly professional lines he 
is connected with the State Dental Association and thus keeps in touch with 
modern advancement in his chosen field. 



GEORGE SAFER. 



George Sauer, a prosperous and progressive agriculturist of Newton town- 
ship, residing upon a valuable farm of one hundred and sixty acres on section 
17, also owns another tract of eighty acres across the road on section 20. His 
birth occurred in Dubuque county, Iowa, on the 19th of January, 1855, his 
parents being Henry and ]\Iary Sauer, both of whom were natives of Germany. 
They emigrated to the United States and first located in New York, while sub- 



170 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

sequently they removed to Illinois and still later took up their abode in Dubuque 
county, Iowa, where the father carried on agricultural pursuits for some time. 
Eventually he came to Buchanan county, purchasing and improving a tract of 
land in Newton township which he cultivated throughout the remainder of 
his life. He won a gratifying measure of success in his undertakings as an 
agriculturist and had become an extensive landowner when he passed away in 
1904. 

George Sauer attended the district schools in the acquirement of an educa- 
tion and remained on the home farm until he had attained his majority. He 
then secured employment as a farm hand and when twenty-six years of age 
rented a tract of land which he cultivated until 1900. In that year he fell heir 
to a farm of one hundred and sixty acres on section 17, Newton township, on 
which he has resided continuously since, and he has since purchased a tract of 
eighty acres across the road on .section 20. He is progressive in his methods 
and brings to his work a ready understanding of the principles involved in 
modern agriculture. His fields are highly cultivated and his buildings kept 
well in repair, giving evidence of the practical spirit of the owner. 

On the 17th of November, 1884. Mr. Sauer was united in marriage to Miss 
Louise Klotz. a daughter of Charles F. and Rachel (Hekel) Klotz, both of 
whom were natives of Germany. They cmigi-ated to the Tnited States and took 
up their abode among the pioneer settler.s of Buchanan county, Iowa, the father 
here carrying on general agricultural piu'suits for many years. He is now 
living retired at Quasqueton, but the mother has passed away. ^Ir. and Mrs. 
Sauer have one son. Fred William, who is twenty-five years of age and operates 
one of his father's farms. Mr. Sauer gives his political allegiance to the repub- 
lican party and his wife is a member of the Congregational church. They have 
a wide acquaintance and their hospitable home is enjoyed by many friends. 



RICHARD I. BUCKLEY. 

Richard I. Buckley is a partnei- in the firm of Buckley Brothers, dealers 
in agricultural implements at Rowley, and is classed with the enterprising and 
successful young business men of Buchanan county, within the borders of which 
he was born on the 12th of July. 1880. his birthplace being the old home farm 
in Homer township. His father, Benjamin F. Buckley, was born ii» Barnstable, 
Massaehusetts. April 'SO, 1838, and during his infancy his parents, ]\Ir. and 
I\Irs. William Buckley, removed to Summer Hill, New York. William Buckley, 
followed the sea for twenty-five years and by reason of industry and merit 
worked his way upward from cabin boy to master of a vessel. Many times he 
sailed around Cape Horn and visited various important ports. He was engaged 
in whale fishing in the northern Pacific and experienced many narrow escapes 
as a sailor. 

Benjamin F. Buckley, father of Richard I. Buckley, remained at home with 
his parents in Summer Hill, New York, until eighteen years of age, after which 
he began earning his living, and while working out also attended school. He 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 171 

engaged in teaching until he was twenty-three years of age, but with the out- 
break of the Civil war he put aside all business and personal considerations and 
in August, 1861, enlisted as a private in the Forty-fourth New York (Ells- 
worth's) Regiment. After several months spent with that command he was 
taken ill and was sent to a hospital at Philadelphia, where he suffered an attack 
of typhoid fever. Following his partial recovery he was honorably discharged, 
but after resting for thirty days he again enlisted, joining the One Hundred 
and Thirty-eighth New York Infantry, which subsequently became the Ninth 
Heavy Artillery. He continued with that command for fifteen months and in 
recognition of gallant and meritorious conduct on the field of battle was com- 
missioned a lieutenant in the Third United States Colored Regiment, and with 
that command assisted in the recapture of Fort Sumter. About a year later 
he was honorably discharged because of physical disability. Mr. Buckley then 
came to Iowa and settled in Homer township, Buchanan county, where he pur- 
chased one hundred and sixty acres of land. The tract was entirely destitute 
of improvements and he at once began to develop and cultivate it, his labors 
resulting in a quick and marked transformation of the place. The wild territory 
was converted into productive fields and year by year he carefully tended his 
crops until subsequent harvests were gathered. He thus operated his farm until 
190], when he retired from agricultural life and moved to Rowley. He then 
accepted the position of rural mail carrier and acted in that capacity for ten 
year.s. He died January 14, 1913, and in his passing Buchanan count}' mourned 
the loss of one of its honored pioneers and highly esteemed citizens. In early 
manhood he had wedded Miss Addie J. Fleming, who was born at Sumner Hill, 
New York, and who survives, residing in Rowley. They were the parents of 
four children : Susie E., who was born November 20, 1867 ; William R., June 
11, 1873; Edwin P., who was born Januarj^ 23, 1876. and is mentioned else- 
where in this volume ; and Richard I., of this review, whose birth occurred on 
the 12tli of July, 1880; William died in infancy. Mr. Buckley was long a 
valued citizen of his community and served as assessor, clerk and trustee in 
Homer township. 

Born on the old homestead farm, Richard I. Buckley entered the district 
schools at the usual age and therein continued his studies to the age of seven- 
teen years, when he entered the Upper Iowa University at Fayette, remaining 
as a student there for two years. He then returned home and thereafter gave 
his father the benefit of his services in the cultivation of the farm until 1902, 
when he took up his abode in Rowley and embarked in merchandising in part- 
nership with G. J. Sherman, under the firm style of Buckley & Sherman. That 
relation was maintained for a year and a half, at the end of which time ]\Ir. 
Buckley .sold out and began work at the carpenter's trade, being thus identified 
with industrial activity until December, 1913, with the exception of two years 
which he spent in the service of "Uncle Sam" on a rural mail route. At the 
date mentioned he formed a partnership with his brother, E. P. Buckley, and 
engaged in the agricultural implement business, in Avhich the.y have since con- 
tinued. They handle a large assortment of the leading makes of farm machinery 
and their business in now extensive and profitable. In addition to their estab- 
lishment at Rowley the Buckley Brothers have a branch hoiLse at Kiene, this 
county. 



172 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

On the 18th of December, 1900, Mr. Buckley was married to Miss L. Blanche 
Ketterman, a daughter of James S. and Lucy (Storts) Ketterman, who were 
natives of Indiana and Pennsylvania, respectively. At an early period in the 
development of Iowa they settled in Benton county, where the father engaged 
in general agricultural pursuits, operating his farm for many years, or until 
1909, when he retired from active life. He is now residing in Urbana. Mr. 
and Mrs. Buckley have became the parents of four children: Harold F., who 
died in 1902; Richard Lowell, born April 27, 1904; Benjamin F., September 5, 
1906 ; and Lillian R., February 18, 1912. 

Mr. Buckley is well known as a representative of Masonic interests, being a 
charter member of Holman Lodge No. 593, A. F. & A. M. He has held various 
offices in the lodge and was master for two years. He also belongs to the Order 
of the Eastern Star and was worthy patron for a year. In his life he exem- 
plifies the beneficent spirit of this organization, which is based upon a recog- 
nition of the brotherhood of mankind. He also has membership with the 
Modern Woodmen of America. Politically he is a republican and his religious 
faith is evidenced in his membership in the Methodist church. There have been 
no unusual chapters in his life history, nothing particularly spectacular, yet 
there is in his record that which is worthy of commendation and of emulation, 
for he has displayed in business persistency of purpose coupled with integrity ; 
in citizenship has shown fidelity to the public welfare ; and in his social relations 
has ever been true to high standards of manhood which are manifest in con- 
sideration for others, geniality, cordiality and sincerity. 



P. G. FREEIMAN. 



P. G. Freeman, now living practically retired in Independence, has been iden- 
tified with many pioneer experiences of Buchanan county and has not only been 
an interested witness of the growth and development of this section of the state, 
but has taken a helpful part in promoting the changes which have brought 
the county to its present state of progress and prosperity. 

He was born in Allegany, New York, in 1839, a son of Isaac G. and Elizabeth 
(Armstrong) Freeman, the latter also a native of Allegany. The father was 
bom at Boundbrook, New Jersey, and in early life became a farmer of Allegany, 
New York. In addition to tilling the soil he engaged in raising sheep. He took 
an active part in the public life of the community, serving as sheriff for several 
years in the early '30s and also commanding a regiment of the New York State 
]Militia as colonel. On removing to the west he settled at Belvidere, Illinois, 
where he carried on general agricultural pursuits, remaining there for eight 
years. In the spring of 1854 he came to Buchanan county and took up land from 
the government. Not a furrow had been turned or an improvement made upon 
the place, but with characteristic energy he began to develop the fields and soon 
brought his farm to a high state of cultivation. To his original holdings he 
added until he was the owner of considerable land in Buchanan county. He 
was likewise active in shaping the public policy and molding the destiny of the 




p. G. FREEMAN 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 175 

county along other lines. He filled the offices of county supervisor and justice 
of the peace and was a recognized leader in the ranks of the whig party until 
its dissolution and afterward in the ranks of the republican party. He was 
also a very helpful and earnest member of the Baptist church and his life was 
ever guided by its principles. In his family were twelve children, of whom 
P. G. was the fourth in order of birth. One of his sons, Reuben, who was the 
sixth child, served in the Civil war, going to the front as a member of Company 
D, Twenty-seventh Iowa Volunteer Infantry, and died of measles, which he con- 
tracted at Pea Ridge, Arkansas. 

P. G. Freeman was but a little lad at the time of the removal to the Missis- 
sippi valley. He pursued his education in the schools of Illinois and of Iowa, 
and when eighteen years of age secured a clerkship in Van Winkle's store at 
Lowell, Michigan. There he remained for two years, spending the last year 
as manager of the Van Winkle sawmills at Greenville on the Grand river. 
Because of sickness he then went to Beloit, Wisconsin, and for a year was 
employed in the general store of W. P. Adams. On the expiration of that period 
he returned to Buchanan county and entered the store of P. C. Wilcox of Inde- 
pendence as clerk. The following year, 1861, he opened a store of his own, but 
sold out in the fall of 1862 and became connected with Beardsley Brothers, a 
wholesale house of Chicago, which he represented as salesman for five years. 
His next connection was with the Edward Lafercade Erwin Company of Phila- 
delphia, wholesale dealers in dry goods, with whom he continued for twelve years, 
representing the house upon the road as a traveling salesman. When his em- 
ployers sold out he became connected with John Mott & Company of New York. 
Eventually he retired from the dry-goods business and afterward engaged in 
buying and selling butter and eggs. He is the owner of a farm in Buchanan 
county comprising two hundred and forty-six acres, which includes a part of the 
original land taken up by his father, who had come to the west with an ox cart, 
bringing with him sheep, horses, cattle and oxen. Before leaving the farm in 
his boyhood Mr. Freeman had driven a six-yoke team of oxen in breaking up the 
sod for his father and neighbors. He knows much concerning the early pioneer 
experiences of this part of the state and can relate many an interesting incident 
of the early days. In addition to his farming property he has other interests, 
being now a stockholder, director and the treasurer of the Sherman Smith Manu- 
facturing Company. 

In 1865 Mr. Freeman was united in marriage to Miss Adelaide J. Smith, who 
was born in New London, Connecticut, a daughter of Sabin Smith, a merchant 
of that place. To that marriage was born a son, Ledyard M., who is a traveling 
salesman, selling Ball brand products of Mishawaka, Indiana. He is married 
and has one child, Kenneth G. Mrs. Freeman died in March, 1901, and in June, 
1902, Mr. Freeman was again married, his second union being with Mrs. Jose- 
phine (Smith) Jones, a native of Ohio and a daughter of Wilbur R. and Mina 
C. Smith. Her father was a farmer of Ohio. Mrs. Freeman takes an active part 
in the religious, social and club life of Independence, having been president 
of the Ladies Musical Club, the Literary Club, the Missionary Society and was 
the organizer of the Civic Improvement Club. She is deservedly recognized as 
one of the most prominent women of Independence and her efforts along the 
lines of progress are far-reaching and beneficial. 



176 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

Fraternally Mr. Freeman is connected with the Masons and his political 
allegiance is given to the republican party, while his religious faith is that of the 
Presbyterian church. His has been an active and well spent life, in which effort 
has brought to him success. Wherever he is known — and his business has brought 
him a wide acquaintance — he is held in high esteem and most of all where he is 
best known. 



WILLIAM H. BLANK, JR. 

William H. Blank, Jr., is a resident farmer of Liberty township, his home 
being on section 10, where he now owns one hundred and sixty acres of land 
devoted to general farming and stock raising. His life record had its beginning 
in Du Page county, Illinois, his natal year being 1866. His father, William 
H. Blank, was born in Niagara county. New York, in 1840, and is still living, 
making his home on a farm in Liberty township with his son and namesake. 
The mother, who bore the maiden name of ^lartha Ann Plank, was born in 
Memphis, Scotland county, Missouri, in 1846, and departed this life in 1903. 

In early manhood William H. Blank, Sr., engaged in farming in Illinois 
and at the outbreak of the Civil war responded to the country's call for troops 
to aid in crushing out the rebellion in the south. Prompted by a spirit of 
patriotism, he accordingly enlisted in Company K, Thirty-sixth Illinois Infan- 
try, with which he served for more than four years. He took part in a number 
of hotly contested battles and became disabled. The most important engage- 
ments in which he participated were those of Stone River, IMission Ridge and 
Chickamauga, and at the time of his discharge he was holding the rank of 
corporal. He stayed at the front as long as able and returned home with a 
most creditable military record. He has long been an active and prominent 
worker in the Methodist Episcopal church, in which he has held all of the 
offices, doing all in his power to further the work of the church and extend 
its influence. He is living practically retired from business, but is yet an 
active man for one of his years. He came to Iowa in 1870, settling first in 
Middlefield township, after which he removed to Quasqueton, but remained 
there for only a l)rief period. He bought land north of the town and engaged 
in general farming and stock raising for a long period, but at length put aside 
the active work of tlic fields and now lives with his son William in Liberty 
township. 

William H. Blank, Jr., was but a young lad when brought bj'' his parents 
to Iowa, and after mastering the branches of learning taught in the district 
schools of Buchanan county, continued his education in the Upper Iowa Uni- 
versity at Fayette. He always lived at home and in early manhood learned 
the creamery business and for a time was connected with the creamery at 
(Quasqueton. INIost of his life, however, has been devoted to general farming 
and stock raising in Liberty township, where he owns one hundred and sixty 
acres of good land. The fields respond readily to the care and labor which he 
bestows upon them, and thus he annually harvests good crops. Practically 
his entire time and attention are devoted to the farm, which is a valuable 
property. 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 177 

In 1894 Mr. Blank was united in marriage to Miss Mabel L. Crinklaw, a 
native of Rockwell, Iowa, and a daughter of George B. and Alice (Simms) 
Crinklaw. The father was born in London, Canada, in 1845, and the mother 
in Byron, Illinois, in 1850, and both are now residents of Cedar Falls, Iowa. 
When a youth of fifteen years George B. Crinklaw removed to Mount Carroll, 
Illinois, and when he attained his majority he was ordained a minister of the 
Methodist church. His first pastorate was at Sabula, Iowa, and while living 
there he was married. He afterward became a resident of Buchanan county 
and was the Methodist minister of Quasqueton. To him and his wife were 
born seven chiklren, all of whom yet live with their parents save Mrs. Blank. 
Rev. Crinklaw has always been an ardent temperance man and active worker 
for the prohibition cause. His life has, indeed, been one of usefulness and 
distinction, constituting an important force in the moral progress of the com- 
munity. He is still connected with the Methodist conference, but is now on 
the retired list, having devoted more than forty years to preaching the gospel 
and much of this time has been given to Iowa pastorates. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Blank have been born four children : Arlee, who is attend- 
ing the high school at Independence ; Berdina, who is a pupil in the Winthrop 
schools; and Verna and Dorothy, who are attending the district school. Both 
Mr. and Mrs. Blank hold membership in the Methodist church, in which they 
are actively interested, taking a helpful part in the work which means so much 
toward molding character and shaping the ideals of the community. Their 
lives have ever conformed to high standards, integrity, justice, charity and 
sympathy featuring as factors in their careers. 



P. F. HARRINGTON. 



A highly improved farm is that owned by P. F. Harrington in Washington 
township. It comprises one hundred and twenty acres and upon the place Mr. 
Harrington has resided since August, 1900. He is one of the native sons of 
the county, born in 1871, his parents being. John and Mary (Duffy) Harrington, 
both of whom were natives of Ireland. The parents came to America when 
young people, and during the period of the Civil w^ar John Harrington was 
with the government in the bridge building department. Following the cessa- 
tion of hostilities he removed westward to Iowa, settling at Independence, where 
he began digging wells. Later he turned his attention to farming and also 
engaged in breeding and raising Norman horses. At the time of his death he 
was the owner of four hundred and ninety acres of rich and valuable land 
near Hazleton, his possessions being the visible evidence of a life of well directed 
energy and thrift. He passed away in 1908, at the age of sixty-eight years, 
while his wife died in 1888 at the age of fifty-one years. When Mr. Harrington 
retired from active farm life he removed to Oelwein and there his remaining 
days were passed. Both he and his wife were Catholics in religious belief, and 
he was a stalwai't advocate of the democratic party, active in its support, yei 
he neither held nor desired public office. Three sons of the family still reside 
in this county, one brother, T. E. Harrington, now living retired in Waterloo. 



178 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

P. F. Harrington, whose name introduces this record, pursued his education 
in the schools of Hazleton township and when seventeen years of age began 
farming with his brother, J. M. Harrington, on the old family homestead, to 
the further development and improvement of which he directed his energies for 
five years. He then began farming independently and in August, 1900, pur- 
chased land in Washington township, where he now owns and cultivates one 
hundred and twenty acres, constituting one of the excellent farms in his part 
of the county. His is one of the two homes of the township supplied with 
electric lights. In all things he follows progressive methods and modern ideas, 
and in large barns and good sheds he has provided ample shelter for both grain 
and stock. He raises considerable stock, making a specialty of thoroughbred 
Belgian horses, Duroc-Jersey hogs and Shorthorn cattle. 

On June 4, 1900, Mr. Harrington was married to ]\Iiss Matilda Reide, who 
was born on the farm which is still her home, her parents being Conrad and 
Maria (Weber) Reide, both natives of Germany. The father, who died in 1912 
at the ripe old age of ninety-two years, was a young man of twenty-eight years 
when he crossed the Atlantic to America, settling near Erie, Pennsylvania, 
where he engaged in farming. In 1860 he made his way westward to Iowa and 
purchased land in Washington township, Buchanan county, becoming the owner 
of two hundred acres, constituting one of the valuable farms in the district in 
which he lived. Before leaving liis native land he served in the German army. 
He was a member of the German Presbyterian church and his life was ever 
honorable and upright. To Mr. and ^Irs. Harrington have been born two chil- 
dren, Roland and Leo, born in 1902 and 1904, respectively, and now attending 
school in Washington towaiship. 

The religious belief of the family is that of the Catholic church, and they 
attend St. John's church at Independence. Mr. Harrington is a democrat in 
politics and has held a number of local offices, but has always preferred to con- 
centrate his energies upon his business affairs, in which he is now meeting with 
gratify- "^g success. 



OLIVER KENNETH CREW. 

Forest Lawn, one of the excellent farms of Washington township, is the 
property of Oliver Kenneth Crew, who devotes much of his time and attention 
to the development and improvement of his place, yet also has other business 
connections establishing him as one of the enterprising citizens of his com- 
munity. He was born in Belmont county, Ohio, February 10, 1852, a son of 
Aquilla and Rachel (Farmer) Crew. Both were representatives of old American 
families. The father was born in Virginia in 1816 and died in 1888, at the age 
of seventy-two years. The mother was born in South Carolina in 1820 and 
passed away in 1893, at the age of seventy-three years. In early manhood 
Aquilla Crew, who was a farmer by occupation, removed from Virginia to Ohio, 
where he became the owner of a tract of land and carried on general farming, 
specializing in the production of tobacco and also in the raising of sheep. Both 
he and his wife were of the Quaker faith and, unlike most peopl? of that religious 




MR. AND AIRS. OLIVER K. CREW 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 181 

persuasion, he took considerable interest in polities and filled the office of justice 
of the peace. He also had two sons who were members of the Ohio State Militia 
and thus showed their independence in regard to the teachings of their church 
concerning militarj- service. In the year 1862 ]\Ir. Crew left Ohio and made his 
way direct to Linn county, Iowa, where he was the owner of two hundred and 
twenty acres of good farm land. Throughout his entire life he engaged in 
sheep raising, ever making that an important feature of his farm work. • 

Oliver K. Crew was the seventh in order of birth in a family of eleven 
children and is the only one who came to Buchanan county. He acquired his 
early education in the public schools of Ohio and was a youth of ten j^ears at 
the time of the removal of the family to Iowa, where he continued his studies in 
Linn county. He remained with his father upon the home farm until he had 
attained his majority and afterward worked as a farm hand for four years. 
He was then married and began farming on his own account in Linn county, 
where he invested in land. In 1902 he removed to Buchanan county, where he 
is also a landowner. He had previously lived in Keokuk county for eight years 
after leaving Linn county. 

His place, known as Forest Lawn, comprises one hundred and fifteen acres 
of rich and arable land and is one of the splendidly kept farms of Washington 
township. Since starting out in life on his own account Mr. Crew has engaged 
quite extensively in the raising of Chester White hogs. He has also handled 
standard bred horses and is today the owner of some high grade stock. He 
won two prizes with a driving team at the Cedar Rapids State Fair, also carried 
off the blue ribbon at the Linn County Fair and the Keokuk Fair, where he 
displayed five horses and captured five first prizes. He has won prizes on both 
his horses and hogs in every county fair where he has exhibited. No higher 
indication of the value of his stock could be cited. He has ever believed in 
holding to the highest standards in stock-raising and he has done much to improve 
the grade of stock produced in this section of the state. He has also handled 
Shropshire sheep, and while he never exhibited them but once, on that occasion 
he took a second prize. He devotes the greater part of his time and attention 
to his farming and stock-raising interests, but is also a stockholder in the Bu- 
chanan County Fair Association and in the Western Iowa Land Company of 
Waterloo. 

On November 25, 1877, Mr. Crew was united in marriage to ^Miss Harriett 
Ilodgin, who was born in Morgan county, Ohio, in 1856, a daughter of Robert 
and Martha (Rhodes) Hodgin. The father's birth occurred in Morgan county, 
Ohio, in 1828, and in early life he learned the tanner 's trade. He also conducted 
a hotel when in the east, and on coming to Iowa in 1862 he began farming in 
Linn county, where he purchased a farm and in connection with its cultivation 
engaged in the raising of Berkshire hogs. In the later years of his life he retired 
from active business and lived in Springville, Iowa, until his death, which 
occurred in 1878 when he was fifty years of age. His widow resided at Belle 
Plaine, Iowa, where she pas.sed away in August, 191-4, at the advanced age of 
eighty-six years. ^Ir. Hodgin filled the office of justice of the peace and served 
in other minor positions, being thus active in public life for many years. 

Mrs. Crew was the second in order of birth in a family of three children 
and is the onlv one who has ever become a resident of Buchanan county. By 



182 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

her marriage she became the mother of eight children, but Claude, the third 
in order of birth, died in 1903 at the age of twenty-four years. She was the wife 
of C. E. Waklen, of Council Bluffs, an engineer on the Rock Island Railroad. 
The children still living are as follows. Ora is the wife of S. S. Barkley, a 
farmer owning one hundred and sixty acres of land in Holyoke, Phillips county, 
Colorado, and they have three children : Bernard, born in 1902 ; Oliver Kenneth, 
In 1907 ; and Cecil, in 1913. Bertha is the wife of John Heald, a machinist of 
Mora, Minnesota, and they have three sons: Virgil, born in 1898; Merle, in 1904; 
and Donald, in 1907. Lulu is the wife of Milton Whitcher, a farmer living near 
West Union, Iowa. Olive is the wife of Hobart Pierce, a carpenter of Sac City, 
Iowa, and they have one child, Quentin, born in 1913. Roy and Ray, twins, born 
in 1890, are now upon the farm with their father. Cecil, born in 1894, is a 
graduate of the Waterloo Business College and is now bookkeeper in the First 
National Bank of Independence. The twin sons attended the high school of 
Independence and they are members of the Mystic Workers. 

Mr. Crew holds membership with the Royal Highlanders in Keokuk county." 
In politics he is a republican but not an active party worker. He belongs to the 
INIethodist church and his life has been ever upright and honorable, winning 
for him the high respect of those with whom he has been brought in contact. His 
has been an active and useful life and through his persistency- of purpose, capable 
management and recognition of opportunities he has worked his way steadily 
upward until he has become one of the prosperous farmers of Buchanan county. 



EDWARD W. RAYMOND. 

Edward W. Raymond is conducting a well equipped job printing estab- 
lishment at Independence and is accorded a liberal and well deserved patronage. 
He is likewise a well-known figure in the musical circles of the city as leader 
and in.structor of Raymond's Concert Band. He has a wide acquaintance and 
many friends attest their high regard for him. His birth occurred at Man- 
chester, Iowa, June 28, 1867, his parents being Charles A. and Emma (Fleisch) 
Raymond, the former a native of Vermont and the latter of New York city. 
In early life the father learned the trades of a carpenter and mason. He was 
quite young when he accompanied his parents to Iowa, and at the last call for 
troops to serve for one hundred days during the Civil war, he joined an Iowa 
regiment and went to tlie front. After the cessation of hostilities he followed 
various vocations, continuing his residence in Manchester, however, until his 
death. His widow afterward married Stephen S. Potter and is again a widow, 
now residing in Independence. 

Edward W. Raymond was the eldest of five children liorn of his mother's 
first marriag(\ I lis education was acquired in the jniblic schools of Manchester 
and when l)ut thirteen years of age he began learning the printer's trade at that 
place, being connected with the Manchester Press for five years. He afterward 
entered the office of the Manchester Democrat, with which he was associated 
for eight years. He then came to Independence and rented the job department 
of the American Trotter, a few years later purchasing that part of the plant 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 183 

and thus establishing the present E. W. Raymond job printing house. He 
has since continued in the business and his place is equipped with all of the 
latest and most improved kinds of presses and other printing machinery for 
doing the most up-to-date and attractive work. He has a stitcher, perforator, 
cylinder press, punching machine and, in fact, everything to be found in a 
first-class job printing office. He does contract work in addition to the usual 
run of business which comes to the job printing office and he is accorded a liberal 
patronage. He is likewise interested in other local enterprises and is accounted 
one of the progressive, enterprising business men of the city. 

On the 10th of April, 1887, occurred the marriage of Mr. Raymond and 
Miss P]mma Elizabeth Alcock, who was born near Manchester, Iowa, a daughter 
of Ralph and Almina (Krapti) Alcock, the former a native of New York and 
the latter of Holland. The father was a farmer in early life but eventually 
took up his abode in Manchester, where he was employed by others. There 
he passed away in 1912, but his wife is still living in Manchester. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Raymond have been born three children : Earl Edward, who was 
born in October, 1889; jMinona Mildred, born August 5, 1892; and Clarence 
Lionel, born December 12, 1906. The elder son wedded Miss Mary Fern Jean- 
nette Farris, a native of Independence, and they have two children : Jeannette 
Farris, born May 26, 1913; and Earline Elizabeth, born ]\Iay 5, 1914. Earl 
E. Raymond is assisting his father in the printing business. 

In fraternal circles Mr. Raymond is well known. He has attained the 
Knight Templar degree in the York Rite, the thirty-second degree in the Con- 
sistory and is now sword bearer in the Commandery. He also belongs to the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias and the Owls. His 
political allegiance is given the republican party and he served for one term 
as alderman. He is the present chief of the volunteer fire department and on 
the 11th of August, 1913, was given a certificate recognizing his twenty years 
of service in the company. He is also well known as the leader and instructor 
of Raymond's Concert Band, numbering twenty-six pieces, and his musical 
talent has been one of the notable attractions of many public and private 
gatherings in this section of the state. He has an inherent love of music which 
he has developed through study, and he has ^lade the band of which he is the 
head one of the leading musical organizations of the state. 



EDWIN P. BUCKLEY. 



One of the more recently established but reliable and enterprising business 
concerns of Rowley is that conducted by the firm of Buckley Brothers, of which 
Edwin P. Buckley is a partner. The business was started only in 1913, but 
the partners were already well known in their section of the county as reliable 
and energetic men and thej' have secured a liberal patronage which is steadily 
growing. 

Edwin P. Buckley was born in Homer township, January 23, 1876, on the 
old family homestead, a son of Benjamin F. and Addie J. (Fleming) Buckley, 
who are mentioned elsewhere in this volume in connection with the sketch of 



184 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

their son, Richard I. Buckley. The experiences of the youth of Edwin P. 
Buckley were those which usually come to the farm lad. He worked in the 
fields through the summer months and in the winter seasons pursued his studies 
in the district schools, thus gaining along both lines in knowledge which has been 
the foundation of his later success. He continued with his parents until twenty- 
three years of age and then rented land in Homer township, carrying on general 
farming for five years. .At the end of that time he had saved a sufficient sum 
to enable him to purchase one hundred and sixty acres on sections 22 and 23, 
Homer township. The ability which he displayed in carrying on farm work 
was manifest in the fact that he was later able to add forty acres to his original 
holdings. AVith characteristic energy he began to till the soil and added to his 
farm the modern improvements which a progressive spirit demands. He con- 
tinued actively in farm work until ]\Iarch 1, 1913, when he rented his place 
and came to Rowley, where for six months he engaged in clerking in a store. 
He then formed a partnership wdth his brother, Richard I. Buckley, under the 
firm style of Buckley Brothers, and opened a general implement establishment, 
of which they are the proprietors. Suceess^ has attended their efforts, it being 
the legitimate outcome of their energy, capable management and trustworthy 
business methods. 

On the 10th of February, 1897, ^Nlr. Buckley was joined in wedlock with 
Miss Nellie M. Lotts, a daughter of William G. and Ella (Creighton) Lotts, 
the former a native of Wisconsin and the latter of Tennessee. In an early day 
they arrived in Buchanan county and purchased land in Homer township, which 
for many years Mr. Lotts continuously cultivated. At the present writing he 
is living retired in Oelwein. In 1897 Mr. Buckley was called upon to mourn 
the loss of his wife, who passed away on the 24th of April of that year, and 
on the 9th of September, 1898, he was again married, his second union being 
with Delia C. Wright, a daughter of Richmond and Alaria E. (Pease) Wright. 
Her mother was born in Massachusetts, while her father's birth occurred in 
Paris, Monroe county, Missouri, October 8, 1837. He was a son of Rev. Alfred 
Wright, who in ]84fi brought his family to Iowa, settling in Anamosa, whence 
he removed in 1853 to Quasqueton, Buchanan county, where he organized a 
church. Richmond Wright was educated in the district schools and in Cornell 
College of Iowa. In 1855 he took his initial step in the business world in 
connection with his uncle, Ransom Wright, in burning brick, which business 
he followed for several years. He afterward cultivated his father's farm until 
1858, and during that period carefully saved his earnings until the sum was 
sufficient to enable him to i)urchase eighty acres of land in Liberty township. 
This was but the begiiniing of a successful career as an agriculturist, for he 
bought more land from time to time until he owned three hundred and ten 
acres. This he improved, adding all the modern accessories and equipments 
of a model farm. The i-cnuiinder of his life was carefully and systematically 
devoted to general agricultural pursuits with the result that he has won a place 
among the prosperous farmers of the county. In 1875 he built a cheese factory 
and a creamery upon his place and also conducted business along those lines. 
In 1863 he was united in marriage to Miss Maria E. Pease and they became 
the parents of four children: William, Louise B., Delia C. and Charles A. 
The father, who was born October 8, 1837, passed away February 10, 1907, 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY ]85 

when in the seventieth year of his age, and his wife, who was born January 16, 
1834, died March 18, 1908. 

Mr. and Mrs. Buckley are widely and favorably known in Rowley, having 
a large circle of warm friends. For two years he served as assessor of Homer 
township and is now filling the office of justice of the peace, his decisions being 
strictly fair and impartial. He votes with the republican party, and he has 
membership relations with the Modern Woodmen of America and the Methodist 
church — associations which indicate the rules that govern his conduct, making 
liim a man whom to know is to respect and honor. 



ANDREW IIIGGINS. 



Although now eighty-one years of age, Andrew Higgins still supervises the 
operation of his farm, whi«h is situated in Washington township, not far from 
Independence. Old age need not suggest, as a matter of course, helplessness 
nor want of occupation. There is an old age which grows stronger mentally 
and physically as the years go on and gives out of its rich stores of wisdom and 
experience for the benefit of others. Such is the record of Andrew Higgins, 
who is now one of the most venerable among the active farmers of Buchanan 
county. He was born in County Derry, Ireland, in 1833. There also occurred 
the birth of his parents, John and Margaret (Downey) Higgins. The father 
died in Ireland in 1888, when over seventy years of age. He engaged in business 
as a buyer and seller of fiax and had several teams which he used in hauling 
flax to Belfast. He was also the owner of farm property and made his home 
upon a farm, there rearing his family of seven children, who cultivated the 
fields while he devoted his attention to other business pursuits. 

Andrew Higgins is the eldest living member of that family, six of whom 
came to the United States. His older brother died in Independence. Andrew 
Higgins attended school in Ireland and when a youth of fifteen crossed the 
Atlantic to the new world. For two years he resided in Pennsylvania, where 
he worked as a laborer, and then continued on his westward way until he 
reached Independence, where he was employed on the building of the court- 
house. He afterward took up the occupation of farming, being employed by 
the month until he saved from his earnings a sum sufficient to enable him to 
purchase property. At length he invested in farm land in Washington town- 
.ship at a time when its value was very low, paying but twelve dollars and 
a half per acre. He is now the owner of a valuable farm of three hundred and 
twenty acres, of which he has forty acres planted to corn and twenty acres to 
oats, while the remainder is in hay or in pasture. He raises considerable stock 
and is still active in the management and operation of his farm, although he 
has long since passed the time when most men would put aside business cares. 

Mr. Higgins was married July 18, 1864, to Miss Mary Ann Downs, who 
was born in Holmes county, Ohio, in 1846, a daughter of Robert and Hannah 
(Nevell) Downs, who were also natives of Holmes county. The father, born in 
1823, died in 1860, at the early age of thirty-seven years, and the mother 
passed away at the age of seventy-one. In early life ]\Ir. Downs engaged in 



186 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

teaching school, but after he removed westward to Buchanan county followed 
farming in Liberty township. While in Ohio he served as assessor, yet he was 
not active in politics as a seeker for office. His life was characterized by high 
and honorable principles and he belonged to the Bethel church in Liberty 
township. In his family were four tlaughters, of whom Mrs. Higgins is the 
eldest. By her marriage she has become the mother of eleven children, ten of 
whom are living, while one died in infancy. The others are as follows: W. J., 
a resident farmer of this county, is married and has six children ; Ethel, Eva, 
Grace, Frank, Charles and Ralph. Mary is the wife of Thomas Welch, living 
in South Dakota, and they have ten children. Ellen is the wife of H. Bray, 
a resident of Salem, Wisconsin, and they have five children : Celeste, Glenn, 
Lillian, Henry and Ella. James is upon the home farm. Daniel, also living 
upon the home farm, is married and has three children : -Lawrence, Howard 
and Andrew. Andrew, residing upon his father's land in Washington town- 
ship, is married and has .six children : Rose, ]\Iabel, Alice, Ella, Bernard and 
Leo. Edward, connected with the gas plant at Independence, is married and 
has three children. Adolphus is home with his parents. Lewis married Blanche 
Stone, of Buchanan county, and has two children : Dorothy and Lewis. Emma 
is the wife of Clint Christianson, of Milbank, South Dakota. There are now 
forty-one grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. 

At the time of the Civil war Mr. Higgins attempted to join the army and 
enlisted for active service, but was rejected on account of defective eyesight. 
He holds membership in the Catholic church, and he votes with the democratic 
party. He has held some local offices, yet has never been a politician in the 
sense of office seeking, preferring always to give his undivided time and attention 
to his business affairs. Whatever success he has achieved is the reward of his 
own labors, and his life record shows wliat may be accomplished when energy 
and deteniiination point out the way. 



WILLARD B. COLTMAX. 

Wilhird B. Coltman, one of tlie owners of tlic Bulletin Journal of Inde- 
pendence, was born in Lafayette county, Wisconsin. February 15, 1876. His 
parents, John H. and Iluldah (Lindsay) Coltman, were also natives of the same 
county and in early life the father took up zinc and lead mining. He con- 
tinued actively in that business until about 1898, when he removed to California, 
locating first at Angels. He engaged in prospecting in that section of the state 
and afterwards removed to Sonora, where he now resides. He is still engaged 
in mining, having practically devoted his entire life to that occupation. While 
a resident of Wisconsin lu* held various local offices and was an influential man 
in the community in which he made his home. lu his family were three chil- 
dren : Willard B. ; Lemoine, deceased; and one who died in infancy. 

At the usual age Willard I>. Coltman became a pupil in the schools of 
Lafayette county, Wisconsin, and pursued his studies through the granunar and 
high schools. Later he pursued a private course in stenography, and all through 
his life he has been a close and discriminating student in the school of expe- 




WILLARD B. COLTMAX 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 189 

rience. When about twenty years of age he went to Manchester, Iowa, where 
he was employed in a printing office, remaining there until January, 1909. He 
then came to Independence and was employed on the Bulletin Journal for one 
year, at the end of which time he was admitted to a partnership, becoming a 
member of the present firm of Willey, Farwell & Coltman. This paper was 
established in the year 1864 and is the second oldest in Buchanan county. Mr. 
Coltman devotes his entire attention to the office and its duties, practical expe- 
rience as a printer well qualifying him to carry on the work. 

On the 28th of June, 1904, occurred the marriage of Mr. Coltman and Miss 
Gertrude M. Lawman, who was born at Manchester, Iowa, a daughter of Baltz 
J. and Louise (Denzel) Lawman, both of whom were natives of New York. The 
father engaged in the harness and saddlery business in Manchester for a number 
of years, and both he and his wife passed away in that town. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Coltman have been born two children : Frances Lenore, born July 24, 1905 ; 
and Paul Denzel, born December 2, 1909. 

Mr. Coltman exercises his right of franchise in support of the men and 
measures of the republican party, but has never aspired to public office. He is 
identified with several fraternal organizations, including the ]\Iasons, the Modern 
Woodmen of America and the Knights of the Maccabees. He is also a member 
of the Interstate Business Men's Association, and he stands for progress along 
all lines, believing that the opportunity for advancement is ever before us and 
should be utilized for the benefit of the individual and the community. He has 
made close application and indefatigable energy the basis of his growing success, 
which has brought him to a creditable position in newspaper circles of Iowa. 



JOEL F. OSSMAN. 



A good farm of one hundred acres on sections 10 and 11, Homer township, 
pays tribute to the care and labor bestowed upon it by Joel F. Ossman, its 
present owner. He was but a little lad of three years when brought to Buchanan 
county in 1858, his birth having occurred in Pennsylvania, July 7, 1855. He 
is a son of Israel and Catherine (Gharus) Ossman, who were natives of the Key- 
stone state. The father followed agricultural pursuits and for some years 
operated a farm in Pennsylvania. He also worked in coal mines there for three 
or four years and in 1858 came to Buchanan county, Iowa, where he rented 
land for sixteen years. He was ambitious, however, to own a farm and carefully 
saved his earnings until he was able to purchase eighty acres in Fayette county, 
Iowa. His time and attention were then given to the task of tilling the fields 
upon that place, and subsequently he retired, taking up his abode in Rowley, 
where his remaining days were passed. He died in August, 1897, and it was 
ten years later that his wife passed away, on the 27th of August, 1907. 

Joel F. Ossman, coming to Buchanan county at the early age of three years, 
was here reared and educated and to his father gave the benefit of his service 
in the work of the fields until twenty-seven years of age, when he rented land 
and began farming on his own account. For seven years he cultivated that 
place and then purchased one hundred acres on sections 10 and 11, Homer 



Vol. n— 9 



190 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

township, the buildings being upon the former section. He has since carried 
on general farming and substantial results have accrued, for he is now one 
of the well-to-do agriculturists of his community. 

On the 7th of December, 1882, Mr. Ossman was united in marriage to Miss 
Anna Ginther, a daughter of John T. and Betsy (Wheeler) Ginther, natives 
of Ohio. The father was a farmer and at an early period in the development 
of Buchanan county settled within its borders. He engaged in farming from 
the early '50s until his death in 1884, his home place being situated in Sumner 
township. His wife had passed away in 1870. To Mr. and Mrs. Ossman have 
been born four children, as follows : Jessie, who is the wife of Raymond Hand, 
an agriculturist of Cono township ; and Roy, Guy and Alva, all at home. 

Mr. Ossman votes with the republican partj^ and has served as trustee of 
his township for three years, but prefers to give his attention to his farm work 
rather than to office holding. He belongs to the Modern Woodmen camp and 
his religious faith is that of the Church of God, his membership being in 
Bethel church near Independence. For more than a half century he has oeen 
an interested witness of the county's development. At the time of his arrival 
there were large tracts of land upon which not a furrow had been turned nor 
an improvement made, and as the years have gone on the events which have 
figured largely in the history of the county have left their impress upon his 
mind and he can relate many interesting incidents of the early days and the 
manner of living at that period. He has never been content to stand still, 
but has always furthered that progress which is perhaps most manifest in the 
methods of farming at the present time. 



G. E. SHEFFIELD, M. D. 

Dr. G. E. Sheffield, engaged in the practice of medicine at Quasqueton, 
started out in life on his own account at the age of thirteen years and has 
steadily worked his way upward, dependent entirely upon his own resources 
since that time. He was born in New York in 1847, his parents being Edward 
R. and Jane (Radcliffe) Sheffield. The father, a native of New Haven, Con- 
necticut, was born in 1825 and in early life was associated with his father 
in a tanning business. When about eighteen years of age he became foreman 
of a paper mill and while thus employed was killed when but twenty-two years 
of age. His wife, who was born in New York in 1827, long survived him, 
passing avfay at the age of seventy-eight. 

Their son, Dr. Sheffield, pursued his education in the schools of Ashland, 
New York, and his professional training in Drapers College of that state. Long 
before he entered upon preparation for the practice of medicine, however, he 
was earning his living, for at the age of thirteen he started out to make his 
own way in the world and he earned the money to continue his studies by 
working in a dairy, milking cows for five years. When he had completed a 
course of medicine in Drapers College, he made his way westAvard to Illinois in 
1868, and there began practice, remaining in that state until 1877, which year 
witnessed his arrival in Keokuk, Iowa. He followed his profession in that city 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 191 

until 1890 and afterward went to Waterloo, Iowa, and later to California, where 
he remained for eight 3'ears. In 1902 he returned to this state, settling in 
Quasqueton, where he has since practiced, and he is now accorded a liberal 
patronage. 

In 1870 Dr. Sheffield was united in marriage to Miss Julia Sheff, a native 
of Sangamon county, Illinois, and a daughter of Elijah and Julia (Wright) 
Sheff, the former a native of Virginia and the latter of Onondaga county. New 
York. In early life her father followed farming, but at the age of twenty-six 
lost his eyesight and became a broom-maker. He removed to Illinois when 
pioneer conditions existed in that state. Indians still roamed over the prairies 
or through the forests and there was much wild game of all kinds. Chicago 
was then a small village and the most far-sighted could not have dreamed that 
it would ever reach its present metropolitan status. Mr. Sheff lived to witness 
many changes in the country. He was a very intimate friend of Abraham 
Lincoln, whom he entertained in his own home. 

To Dr. and Mrs. Sheffield have been born six children: Edward, who is 
engaged in farming; Jennie B., who is the wife of R. A. Brown, a hotel pro- 
prietor at Quasqueton, by whom she has two children, Helen and Fern ; George, 
an engineer on the Illinois Central Railroad at Waterloo; Cora, the wife of 
F. D. ]\Ioore, who owns a fruit ranch near Spokane, Washington, and by whom 
she has three children, Myrtle, Nellie and Hazel ; Herbert A., who is janitor of 
the First National Bank building at Waterloo; and Lillian Ethelyn, at home. 

Dr. Sheffield is a Mason and has been very active in the organization. He 
has held all the offices of the local lodge and several times has been a delegate 
to the grand lodge. He also belongs to the Eastern Star and, -in fact, organized 
the chapter at Quasqueton. He has reason to be proud of his record in Masonic 
circles, for his life has always been an exemplification of the teachings of the 
craft, which is based upon a recognition of the brotherhood of man and which 
at all times urges the acceptance of the .spirit of mutual helpfulness. He iS 
continually holding out a hand of assistance to fellow travelers on life's journey 
and his personal worth has insured him the high respect and warm regard of 
those who know him. 



EDWIN E. EVERETT. 



On the roster of county officials of Buchanan county appears the name of' 
Edwin E. Everett, who is now serving for the fourth year as county auditor, 
in which position he has made an excellent record by the prompt, faithful and 
able manner in which he has ever discharged his duties. He was born in Black 
Hawk county, Iowa, June 3, 1881, a son of Clarence B. and Achsah (French) 
Everett, also natives of this state. The father was the first white child born 
in Fairbank, Iowa, his natal day being September 4, 1855, while the mother was 
born in Black Hawk county, August 5, 1859. In early life Clarence B. Everett 
engaged in merchandising in partnership with his father in Fairbank, but subse- 
quently turned his attention to railroad work, in which he engaged for five j'ears. 
He afterward established a hardware store in Fairbank and still later opened 



192 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

a general store, which he conducted for a number of years. He withdrew from 
commercial connections, however, in 1907 and entered the Fairbank State Bank 
as cashier. He has since been elected to the presidency of that institution, and 
now devotes his entire time to its management and upbuilding. Thus gradually 
he has worked his way upward to a prominent position in business circles and 
his life has been one of continually increasing usefulness and value to the com- 
munity in which he lives. To him and his wife were born five children : Edwin 
E. ; Bessie, the wife of F. W. Kautz, a farmer residing in Fairbank; C. Herbert, 
a telegraph operator of Utah, connected with the Denver & Rio Grande Railroad 
Company ; Harry L., a railroad man living at Le Pas, Canada ; and Mildred, 
the wife of J. L. Gorman, who is engaged in the drug business in Fairbank. 

At the usual age Edwin E. Everett entered the public schools of Fairbank, 
in which he continued his education as a high school pupil until 1898. He 
afterward spent a little more than a year as a student in Drake University at 
Des ]\Ioines. After completing his studies he was employed in the Fairbank 
State Bank as bookkeeper for about a year and then went to San Francisco, 
California, on a prospecting trip. He afterward returned to Fairbank, and a 
little later located in San Francisco, where he was employed as clerk in the 
Russ Hotel for about three years. He next returned to Fairbank as cashier 
of the State Bank, which position ho acceptably filled for about eighteen months 
and then came to Independence as teller in the People's National Bank, con- 
tinuing to occupy the latter position until elected to his present office. 

In his political views Mr. P^verett has ever been a stalwart democrat and 
keeps well informed on the questions and issues of the day. He has never been 
a politician in the sense of office-seeking, hut four years ago was chosen county 
auditor and is now the capable incumbent in that position, having made an 
■excellent record through the prompt and faithful discharge of Ids duties. Fra 
ternally he is connected with both the ^lasons and the Ivnights of Pythias and 
is loyal to the teachings and purposes of those organizations. Much of his life 
has been spent in Iowa, and he is well known as a representative young man, 
alert and enterprising and embodying in lii.s life the progressive spirit which 
has been the dominant factor in tlie upbuikling of this section of the country. 



GEORGE LOWRY. 



George Lowry, one of the venerable and respected citizens of Jesup, where 
he is now living retired after a period of connection with agricultural interests 
of Buchanan county, dating from 1869, was born in Underbill county, Vermont, 
March 16, 1825. He is a son of James and Rebecca (Pratt) Lowry. The father 
-was likewise a native of the Green Mountain state and was a soldier in the War 
of 1812. In early life he followed the carpenter's trade, but in later life engaged 
in agricultural pursuits. About 1835 he removed to Cass county, ^Michigan, 
making a location in the village of Adamsville, where he continued to work 
at his trade until 1856 or 1857, when he came to Iowa and secured a soldier's 
grant of land of one hundred and sixty acres in Jackson county, which he 
improved and to which he later added a tract of one hundred and twenty 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY • 193 

acres. He cultivated this land until the time of his demise, which occurred 
when he had reached the advanced age of seventy-seven years. His wife sur- 
vived and subsequent to his death made her home in California with a daughter, 
and there her death occurred. In their family were nine children, but only 
two are living. The record is as follows : Ann, deceased ; George, of this review ; 
Oliver, Jane, Myron, Elia and Emily, all of whom have departed this life; 
Harriet, now making her home in California; and Frank, who has also passed 
away. 

George Lowrj' w^as reared under the parental roof and accompanied his 
parents on their various removals during the period of his boyhood and youth. 
He later learned and worked at the carpenter 's trade, being thus engaged until 
1850. He was married about this time, but his wife died in 1853 and he subse- 
quently went to California by the overland route, making the journey as far 
as Salt Lake City with horses, but at that point he traded his horse team for a 
yoke of oxen and continued his journey to Bidwell's Bar, Oroville and Spanish 
Town. He then hired a man to drive his team and haul freight, while he spent 
three years at Bidwell's Bar, California, working at his trade. He was also 
interested in a mine, but eventually sold his interest therein for five hundred 
dollars. He spent five years there working at his trade and then, disposing of 
his team and other interests, returned to Michigan, where he purchased a farm, 
operating the same some seven or eight years. In 1867 he came to Iowa, operat- 
ing his father's farm in Jackson county two years, on the expiration of which 
period he made a permanent location in Buchanan county, purchasing land in 
Westburg township, his place comprising one hundred and sixty acres, on 
which had been erected a small house. He made many improvements on the 
farm and added sixty acres to his original holdings, operating the same until 
1911, in which year he took up his abode in Jesup, where he has since lived 
in honorable retirement. His undertakings both as a farmer and carpenter 
were attended wdth a gratifying measure of success, and he has long been 
numbered among the prosperous and esteemed citizens of his community. 

Mr. Lowry has been twice married. He was first married about 1850 to 
Miss Sarah E. Mattox, of ]\lichigan, who died three years later, leaving one son, 
Charles Wallace, a resident farmer of Buchanan county. His second union was 
with Sarah E. Plass, who was born October 14, 1843, in Elkhart county, Indiana, 
a daughter of John and Eliza E. (Curtis) Plass. Her father was a native of 
New York and was a blacksmith by trade, following this line of work in Kansas, 
where he died at the age of seventy-eight years. His father, William Plass, 
was a native of Holland, while his mother was born in Germany. Mrs. Lowry 's 
materal grandfather was a Scotchman and was a soldier in the Revolutionary 
war. Her mother, Mrs. Eliza E. Plass, departed this life at the age of seventy- 
seven years. Mrs. Lowry spent her early life on the state line between Indiana 
and Michigan and by her marriage has become the mother of one son. James R., 
who makes his home in Jesup. 

]\Ir. Lowry has alw^ays supported the men and measures of the democratic 
party, but has never consented to hold public office. His wife is a member of 
the Methodist Episcopal church. Although he has reached the advanced age 
of eighty-nine years, he still retains his mental faculties unimpaired and takes 
a keen interest in the happenings of the times. He has always been a steady, 



194 • HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

hard-working man and the course he has followed has commended him to the con- 
fidence and good-will of all and he has an extensive circle of friends throughout 
Buchanan county. 



WHEELER B. HALLECK. 

Wheeler B. Halleck, president of the Winthrop State Bank, and also an 
extensive landowner, is a man of excellent financial ability whose resources are 
constantly increasing. He was born in Erie county, New York, on the 16th of 
March, 1*846, a son of Peter M. and :Mary B. (Buffum) Halleck. The father 
was born in Steuben county. New York, on the 25th of June, 1820, and accom- 
panied his parents, Caleb and Dorcas (JMarcelle) Halleck, to Colden, Erie county, 
New York, when a child, receiving his education there. He was one of a family 
of nine children and early began to provide for his own support, working upon 
nearby farms and living at home. After reaching mature years he engaged in 
farming and also ran a sawmill. In 1845, when a young man of twenty-five 
years, he married Miss Mary Buffum at Colden. She was born June 15, 1822, 
in Erie county, near Colden, and was one of thirteen children, whose parents 
were Wheeler and Electa (Curtis) Buffum. Her father was born in November, 
1800, and died in 1887, while her mother, born in IMay, 1803, passed away in 
1883. ^Ir. and Mi-s. Peter M. Halleck remained for ten years at Colden after 
their marriage, but then came west, settling at Buffalo Grove, Buffalo township, 
this county. They left New York on the 8th of May, 1855, and visited six 
months in Illinois before continuing their westward journey. Upon arriving at 
their destination Mr. Halleck purchased one hundred and sixty acres and farmed 
the same for twenty-five years. His health then failed and he removed to what 
is now Buffalo Grove, ])ut in 1887 he left that place and settled at Aurora, where 
he resided until his death in 1897. He was a republican in politics, but never 
accepted office. His religious faith was attested by his membership in the Free- 
will Baptist churcli. He was the father of eleven children, namely: Wheeler 
B., the .sul).ject of this review; Richard B., a resident of Lamont, Iowa; Sylvester 
0., who died in 1909 ; Mary A., now Mrs. James Weston, of Aurora, Iowa; Ennna, 
living in Sioux City, Iowa ; Hannah E., a resident of Winthrop ; Dorcas Electa, 
now Mrs. Adelbert HaM^kins, of Aurora ; Ruby and David C, both deceased ; 
Henry H., of Oelwein ; and Sarah Anna, deceased. The mother, who is still 
living at the venerable age of ninety-two years, resides with her daughter, Mrs. 
James Weston. 

Wheeler B. Halleck was a child of nine years when the family removed to 
this county and located in Buffalo town.ship. His boyhood was spent upon the 
home farm and his education was. acquired in the public schools of the neighbor- 
hood. When the family first came there was no schoolhouse and the children 
of the locality were taught in his father's home. When he became of age he 
located in Winthrop and engaged in the livery business and in the buying of 
horses for a time, but in 1875 he was married and turned liis attention to farming , 
for eight years. He then again located in AYinthrop and from 1884 to 1892 he 
engaged in l)uying and selling horses and cattle. In 1892, in association with 




WHEELER B. HALLECK 



PI 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 197 

Elmer Brintnall, he owned and managed a lumberyard, but in 1897 sold his 
interest in that enterprise. In 1884 he was one of the leaders in the organization 
of the Winthrop State Bank and sold a great deal of the stock in that institution^ 
He was from the start a director therein, and in 1911 was elected its president, 
which office he still holds. In this capacity, as in all others, he manifests financial 
acumen and detailed knowledge of the business situation. He has invested 
heavily in land and owns eighteen hundred acres, all fenced and in pasture 
land, in Meade county. South Dakota; two hundred and forty acres in Macon 
county, Missouri, all of which is improved ; and one hundred and twenty acres 
in Littlefield township, this county, which is in a high state of cultivation. 

In 1875 Mr. Halleck married Mrs. Frances J. (Miles) Smiley, a native of 
Illinois, whose death occurred in January, 1906. Mr. Halleck is a republican in 
his political belief, has served as township trustee, and upon coming to Win- 
throp was elected alderman, holding that office at the time that the town was 
incorporated. He belongs to the Congregational church and is a trustee therein. 
Fraternally he belongs to Winthrop Lodge No. 550, I. 0. 0. F. He has proved 
very successful and is respected in his eommunitj^ for his ability and his integrity 
and honesty. 



HARRY HIGMAN. 



Harry Higman has resided in Winthrop since 1877, save for five years which 
he spent in South Dakota. He is now engaged in the real estate and insurance 
business here and is meeting with well deserved success. He was born in 
Plymouth, England, July 1, 1854, a son of William and Harriet (Bray) Hig- 
man, also natives of that place, born in 1814 and 1821, respectively. They 
brought their family to America in 1858, and remained for eighteen years at 
Galena, Illinois, where they first located, but in 1876 removed to ^lanehester, 
Delaware county, Iowa. The following j^ear they came to this county and 
located at Winthrop, where the parents resided until called to their final reward. 
The father was during his active life an agriculturist, but for a number of 
years prior to his death lived retired. He died in 1904 when about ninety years 
of age. He was a member of the Episcopal church. His widow survived for 
three years and died when eighty-six years old. To them were born seven 
children, three of whom survive, those besides Harry being: J. B., a retired 
farmer of Manchester, Iowa ; and Mrs. Annie Noble, of Graettinger, Iowa. 

Harry Higman was but a child of four .years when he accompanied his 
parents to this country and his education was received in Galena. Illinois. 
After graduating from the high school he remained upon the home farm for 
a time, but subsequently engaged in the manufacture of butter and cheese near 
Winthrop, Iowa, for four years, during which time he resided at Winthrop. 
His marriage then, occurred and he removed to Plankington, Aurora county, 
South Dakota, when that state was still a territory. There he took up a home- 
stead claim and also a tree claim, three hundred and twenty acres in all, and 
improved the homestead, residing there for five years. At the end of that time 
he returned to Winthrop and was employed at a creamery as butter-maker for 



198 HISTORY OF RUCHANAN COUNTY 

two years. He was subsequently in the retail harness business for seven or 
eight years, and in 1897 was appointed postmaster by President McKinley, 
serving in that capacity for sixteen and a half years. During his incumbency 
in that position the rural free delivery system was established throughout the 
country and the four routes which radiate from Winthrop were then instituted, 
being among the first started in this part of the state. Since retiring from the 
office of postmaster he has engaged in the insurance and real estate business 
and is also interested with L. X. Xorman in a moving picture theater. His 
long residence in this part of the county has thoroughly familiarized him with 
property values and this knowledge, cpupled with his business experience and 
sound judgment, makes him unusually efficient as a real estate agent. He 
represents several of the better known insurance companies and is doing con- 
siderable business in that line. He is prouder, however, of his long service as 
postmaster than of his success as a private business man, and his record is 
indeed one that reflects much credit upon him. 

Mr. Higman married Miss Ida E. Griswold, a daughter of the late Harvey 
Griswold, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this work. She was reared 
and educated here and by her marriage has become the mother of three children, 
the eldest of whom was born in South Dakota, the others being natives of Win- 
throp. Arley B. is at home and is assistant postmaster: Gladys N. and Marian 
J. are also at home. 

Mr. and ^Irs. Higman are members of the Congregational church and assist 
in its work. ]\Ir. Higman is a republican and for many years has taken an 
active part in politics as county committeeman. He belongs to the ^lodern Wood- 
men of America, No. 434, at Winthrop, of which he is clerk, and also to the 
local lodge of the IMasons. He is one of the most widely known men in Winthrop 
and the number of his friends is proportionately large, as his splendid qualities 
of character command the respect and regard of those who are brought in contact 
with him. 



WILLIAM BOYACK. 



William Boyack is practically living retired in Independence, although he 
still has valuable farming and stock-raising interests in Buchanan county. He 
was born in Dundee, Scotland, on the 24th of December, 1851, his parents being 
William and Jane (Doig) Boyack, who were likewise natives of the land of hills 
and heather. Both have now passed away, the father's death having occurred 
when he was eighty-two years of age. When in Scotland he worked as a weaver 
in Dundee and there lived until after his marriage, subsequent to which time 
he came to the United States, Avhere he followed general farming and stock- 
raising. He arrived in Iowa in 1855 and was thereafter a resident of this state 
to the time of his demise. He was very active in politics as a supporter of the 
republican party, although he had no political aspirations. 

William Boyack attended school in Sumner, Buchanan county, Iowa, and 
when about twenty-one years of age began farming in Buchanan county, and 
subsequently carried on general agricultural pui-suits to the time that he estab- 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 199 

lished his home in Independence. He still owns valuable farm property in this 
county and is engaged in raising red Duroc Jersey hogs and Durham cattle. 
He owns one hundred and forty-five acres of rich and productive land and the 
careful cultivation of his fields has brought to him a very substantial measure 
of success. 

On April 12, 1883, Mr. Boyack was united in marriage to Miss Ida Safford, 
a native of Michigan and a daughter of M. 0. and Eliza (Hoard) Safford, 
who removed from ^Michigan to Iowa, settling in Buchanan county, where the 
father carried on farming. His family numbered twelve children. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Boyack have been born five children: Frank, living on the home 
farm in Sumner township ; Mercan William ; Nellie, a graduate of the high 
school and of the Cedar Rapids Business College, since which time she has 
been teaching in the schools of this county; Bessie, who is a graduate of the 
Independence high school and is now the wife of Earl E. Penrose, living on a 
farm at Bonner Springs, Kansas ; and Donald, at home. 

Mr. Boyack is an Odd Fellow and is the present noble grand of the lodge 
at Independence. He also belongs to the Modern Brotherhood of America. His 
political allegiance is given to the republican party and he was especially active 
in political affairs when living in Sumner township. From the age of four 
years he has been a resident of Iowa and throughout almost the entire period 
of his connection with the state he has been identified with its agricultural 
development, his success being attributable to the capable, persistent manner 
in which he has cultivated his fields and raised his stock. 



DANIEL KAUTZ. 



Daniel Kautz has lived retired at Rowley since the spring of 1914, but still 
owns two hundred and forty acres of rich and productive land on section 20, 
Cono township, where he successfully followed farming throughout his active 
business career. His birth occurred in Germany on the 25th of April, 1849, 
his parents being Daniel and Katherina (Stauffer) Kautz, who were likewise 
natives of that country. They emigrated to the United States in 1855, locating 
first in New York and six months later making their way to West Chicago, Illinois, 
where the father was employed as a section hand. In 1866 he came to Buchanan 
county, Iowa, and purchased and improved a tract of land in Cono township, 
which he cultivated throughout the remainder of his life. His demise occurred 
on the 17th of February, 1888, when he had attained the age of seventy-two 
years, while his wife died July 12, 1887, at the age of sixty-nine. 

Daniel Kautz, whose name introduces this review, -was a lad of six years 
when he accompanied his parents on their emigration to the new world and 
acquired his education at West Chicago. He was a youth of seventeen when 
the family home was established in Buchanan county, this state, and remained 
on the home farm until his marriage. Subsequently he took up his abode on 
his wife's farm of forty acres in Cono township and turned his attention to 
the further cultivation and improvement of the property. Later he purchased 
eighty acres more and afterward bought a quarter section of land, devoting his 



200 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

attention to general agricultural pursuits with excellent success until the spring 
of 1914, when he put aside the active work of the fields and purchased an 
attractive residence in Rowley, where he has since lived retired. His holdings 
embrace two hundred and forty acres of valuable land on section 20, Cono 
township, and he is also a stockholder in the Farmers' Land Company of 
Waterloo, Iowa. 

On the 20th of December, 1879, ]\Ir. Kautz was united in marriage to Mrs. 
IMagdalena (Pfaadt) Kaesser, a daughter of Jacob and Magdalena (Kautz) 
Pfaadt, both of whom were natives of Germany. The father was a wool spinner 
in that country and there spent his entire life, passing away in 1872, while the 
demise of the mother occurred in Buchanan county, Iowa, in 1874. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Kautz have been born five children, as follows: Fred, who operates 
his father's farm in Cono township; Minnie, the wife of Elmer Height, of 
Walker, Iowa ; Ann, who gave her hand in marriage to Eli Housholder, a car- 
penter residing at Rowley; and William and Frank L., who operate their father's 
farm. By her first husband Mrs. Kautz had four children, namely: Lena, 
who is the wife of ^Martin Kress, a farmer of Cono township ; Henry, an agri- 
culturist by occupation and a resident of Arlington ; Edward, who makes his 
home in Oregon ; and Charles, who follows farming in this county. 

Mr. Kautz gives his political allegiance to the democracy and has served 
as school director of Cono township for a period of seventeen years, the cause 
of education ever finding in him a stanch champion. His religious faith is 
that of the Presbyterian church, the teachings of which he exemplifies in his 
daily life. The period of his residence in Buchanan county covers nearly a half 
century and his record is that of one of its most esteemed, substantial and 
representative citizens. 



ELIAS PARKER. 



Elias Parker is perhaps the oldest business man in Jesup or in that section of 
Buchanan county, and although he is now eighty-five years of age he is to be 
found daily at his store, which is one of the important concerns of the city. 
He was born in the state of New York. August 20, 1829, a son of Oliver Parker, 
and was left an orphan at the early age of three and a half years, after which 
he made his home with relatives, by whom he was reared and educated. At the 
age of eighteen years he started out to make his own way in the world, and 
to this end served a three years' apprenticeship to the blacksmith's trade. 

^Ir. Parker remained in the east until April, 1857, which date marks his 
arrival in Buchanan county. On locating in Littleton, he had but twenty-five 
dollars in his pocket but he was determined to establish himself in business. He 
purchased a slab shanty on credit and went to work at the blacksmith's trade, 
going in debt for his material. In August following he was joined by his wife, 
whom he had wedded in the east, and to provide a home for her he had to 
borrow money, paying for the same four per cent interest per month. He was 
also obliged to ])orrow a stove, bed and other necessities but he went to work 
in earnest and for six vears conducted a blacksmith shop in Littleton. He then 









X 




-J 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 203 

purchased a farm in Perry township, paying for the same eight hundred dollars, 
this money having been furnished him by his wife's people. He broke the wild 
land, cleared and improved the same and thereon made his home four years. On 
the expiration of that period he took up his abode in Jesup and opened a wagon 
and blacksmith shop, which he conducted with success until 1884, when he dis- 
posed of his interest in this line and engaged in the hardware and implement 
business. In February, 1912, he once more sold out and embarked in the furni- 
ture and undertaking business, to which he has since added a line of implements 
and also deals in coal. He is associated in business with his son, Oliver, and 
they enjoy an extensive and gratifying patronage, being classed among the repre- 
sentative business men of this section of the county. Mr. Parker does not feel 
the weight of his years, being still hale and hearty, and is found daily at his 
place of business, discharging his duties in the same capable manner that has 
ever characterized his career. 

Mr. Parker was married on the 8th of October, 1856, to Miss Amelia C. Brown, 
a native of New York, and they reared five children to years of maturity : Ida 
A., the wife of James McSparran, who lives in Jesup ; Oliver, who was born 
October 3, 1860, and is now associated with his father in business; Isabelle, the 
wife of V. W. Davis, cashier of a bank in Fairbank, Iowa ; Fred E., who died 
when a young man ; and Leora, the wife of C. A. Emerson, of Jesup. Two chil- 
dren died in infanc.y. 

Mr. Parker gave his earl}^ political allegiance to the whig party but when the 
republican party was formed he joined its ranks. He never aspired to public 
office though he has served as a school director. Looking back over his past 
record, one cannot help rejoicing in the success he has achieved and feel that it 
is justly merited, for. deprived of parental care at a tender age, he early had to 
depend upon his own resources and though at times the outlook seemed dis- 
couraging, he worked on with tireless energy and today stands among the 
successful and representative men of Buchanan county. 



MARTIN SCHNEIDER. 



Martin Schneider, a representative agriculturist and well-known citizen of 
Buchanan county, who has here resided for a period covering thirty-six years, 
owns and operates an excellent farm embracing one hundred and sixty acres 
on section 21, Newton township, and also owns other land in that township. 
His birth occurred in Dubuque county, Iowa, in July, 1861, his parents being 
Christian and Catherine (Buck) Schneider, both of whom were natives of Ger- 
many. The father emigrated to the United States in an early day, locating in 
Dubuque county, Iowa, where he purchased and improved a farm which he 
operated until 1878. In that year he came to Buchanan county and bought a 
tract of land in Newton township, which he improved and in the cultivation of 
which he was actively engaged throughout the remainder of his life. His demise 
occurred in 1892, while his wife was called to her final rest in 1894. 

Martin Schneider accompanied his parents on their removal to this county, 
and remained at home until he had attained his majority. Subsequently he 



204 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

devoted his attention to the cultivation of rented land for three years, and on 
the expiration of that period purchased a farm of two hundred acres in Newton 
township in association with his brother. He cultivated the property for five 
years and then sold his interest, purchasing a farm of one hundred and sixty 
acres on section 21, Newton township, which he improved and which he has 
operated continuously and successfully since. In 1909 he bought another farm 
of one hundred and twenty acres on sections 16 and 17, Newton township, which 
is being operated bj^ his sons. In connection with the cultivation of cereals he 
also devotes consideration attention to live-stock interests, buying hogs, sheep 
and cattle at the town of Kiene. He is likewise a factor in financial circles as 
vice president and a stockholder of the Walker Exchange Bank of Walker, Iowa. 

On December 12, 1882, Mr. Schneider was united in marriage to Miss IMartha 
]\I. Hoover, a daughter of Samuel and Hulda (Cummings) Hoover, both of 
whom were natives of Ohio. The father came to Buchanan county. Iowa, in an 
early day with his parents, the family taking up their abode among the first 
settlers here. Samuel Hoover operated a farm in Newton township throughout 
his active business career. Both he and his wife are deceased. To Mr. and ^Irs. 
Schneider have been born foiu* children, as follows : Nettie passed away in 
]\Iay, 1911, and was the wife of Victor Hocken, an agriculturist of Newton town- 
ship. They had a daughter named Elva, who makes her home with Mr. and 
Mrs. Schneider. George AV. and Nelson ]\r. operate their father's farm, and 
Ida L. is at home. 

In his political views Air. Sclmcider is a stanch republican. He acted as 
trustee of Newton township for a period of seven years and has also served as 
school director for a number of years, ever proving a most capable and trust- 
worthy public official. Fraternally he i.s identified with the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, belonging to the lodge at Troy Alills. while his religious faith 
is tluit of the Congregational church. He possesses many qualities that have 
commended liim to the friendship and kindly regard of all with whom he has 
come in contact and he has long been numbered among the valued and repre- 
sentative residents of his communitv. 



JAMES ORR. 



The home farm of James Orr on .sections 2 and 11, Homer township, con- 
stitutes one of the attractive features in the landscape and is the tangible evi- 
dence of a well-spent, active and useful life, for largely through his efforts this 
farm has been brought to its present high state of cultivation. Air. Orr was 
born in Ireland in October, 1847, and of that country his parents, John and 
Mary ^Kirkpatrick) Orr, were also natives. The father devoted his life to 
farming and both he and his wife remained residents of the Emerald isle until 
their life's labors were ended, Air. Orr passing away in 1906 and his wife 
in 1910. 

The youthful days of James Orr were devoted to the acquirement of a 
public-school education and to farm work in Ireland, for he remained with his 
parents until twenty-four years of age. Ambitious to enjoy the privileges and 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 205 

opportunities of the new world, he came to America at that time and crossed 
the continent as far as Buchanan county. In Homer township he was employed 
as a farm hand for about seven years, but it was his desire to engage in farming 
on his own account and he accordingly rented land which he cultivated for five 
years. On the expiration of that period he bought one hundred and twenty 
acres in the southern part of Homer township, which he afterwards traded as 
partial payment upon his present place, comprising two hundred acres on sec- 
tions 2 and 11, Homer township. His residence is situated on the former section 
and near his pleasant and commodious home stand substantial barns and sheds, 
so that there is ample shelter for grain and stock. The fields produce golden 
harvests and the work is carried on so methodically and systematically that 
there is little doubt as to what the result will be. Aside from his other interests, 
Mr. Orr is a stockholder in the Rowley Bank. 

On the 24th of March, 1885, was celebrated the marriage of James Orr and 
Miss Sarah Agnew, a daughter of John and Eliza (Orr) Agnew, who were 
natives of Ireland. Her father was likewise a farmer and carried on that occu- 
pation throughout his remaining days in the old country, where his death 
occurred in 1886, while his wife survived until 1893. Mr. and Mrs. Orr have 
two children : John, at home ; and Elizabeth, who is teaching school at Ackley, 
Iowa. 

For four years Mr. Orr has filled the office of justice of the peace and his 
decisions embody both the law and the equity in the case. Politically he is a 
republican and in religious belief is a Presbyterian, serving as an elder in the 
church in which he has his membership. His fellow townsmen among whom 
he has lived for four decades have learned to know that he is a man of his 
word, that what he promises he will perform, and that he is thoroughly trust- 
worthy in all of his business dealings. 



EDWARD L. PLANK. 



Edward L. Plank, a well known and successful agriculturist residing on 
section 1, Cono township, is the owner of an excellent farm embracing one 
hundred and forty-seven acres of rich and productive land. His birth occurred 
in Allamakee county, Iowa, on the 1st of April, 1867, his parents being John 
and Eva C. (Barnhart) Plank, the former a native of Detroit, Michigan, and 
the latter of Germany. 

The paternal grandfather of our subject was a Methodist preacher who 
emigrated to the United States in a very early day, locating at Detroit, where 
he spent the greater part of his life as a minister of the gospel. When seventy- 
five years of age he abandoned the pulpit and went to South Dakota, taking 
up a homestead on which he spent the remainder of his life. John Plank, 
the father of Edward L. Plank, made his way to Allamakee county, Iowa, 
many years ago and there carried on agricultural pursuits for a period of about 
twenty-two years. In 1876 he came to Buchanan county, purchasing a tract 
of land in Middlefield township which he cultivated until 1881. In that year 
he took up his abode in Cono township and bought the farm which is now in 



206 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

possession of our subject and which comprises one hundred and forty-seven 
acres on section 1, improving the property and operating the same success- 
fully until 1892, when he put aside the active work of the fields. His remaining 
years were spent in honorable retirement at Quasqueton, where his demise 
occurred in December, 1908, the community thus losing one of its most esteemed 
and substantial citizens. His widow, who survives and makes her home at 
Quasqueton, enjoys an extensive and favorable acquaintance throughout the 
county in which she has now resided for nearly four decades. 

Edward L. Plank, who was a lad of nine years when the family home was 
here established, acquired his education in the district schools of the county 
and also attended the public schools of Quasqueton. After attaining his 
majority he rented the home farm on shares for three years and during the 
next five years rented the place for cash. He then purchased the property 
and in its further development and improvement has been actively engaged to 
the present time. He cultivates the cereals best adapted to soil and climate 
and for the past fifteen years has also raised thoroughbred Poland China hogs, 
finding both branches of his business gratifyingly remunerative. The Quasque- 
ton State Savings Bank numbers him among its stockholders. 

On the 31st of December, 1891, ^Ir. Plank was united in marriage to ^liss 
Nellie Perkins, a daughter of Joshua and Fannie (Leatherman) Perkins, who 
were natives of Maine and Illinois respectively. They came to Buchanan county, 
Iowa, in a very early day and the father operated a farm near Quasqueton 
throughout the remainder of his life, passing away in October, 1911. The 
mother was called to her final rest in October, 1908. Mr. and Mrs. Plank have 
seven children, as follows: Neta ]\I., twenty-one years of age; Flossie I., who 
is eighteen years old; Lewis H., a youth of sixteen; and Eva F., Ethel M., 
Raymond E. and lona G., who are fourteen, ten, eight and five years of age 
respectively. 

Mr. Plank gives his political allegiance to the democracy and is now serving 
in the capacity of trustee, having held that ofifice for the past six years. He 
is also candidate for the position of county supervisor, being nominated at the 
convention in June, 1914. His religious faith is that of the Methodist church, 
the teachings of which he exemplifies in liis daily life. His unbending integrity 
of character, his fearlessness in the discharge of duty in every relation in which 
he has been found, and his appreciation of the responsibilities which rest 
upon him make him a citizen whose worth is widely acknowledged. 



F. W. NICHOLS. 



F. W. Nichols has resided in Fairbank for almost fifty years and in that 
time has seen Fairbank grow from a tiny settlement to the present thriving 
town. He has contributed to its development and his long and useful life here 
entitles him to the regard of his fellow citizens. He has also another claim 
upon the respect and honor of this generation, as he is a veteran of the Civil 
war, having served in that memorable conflict for almost three years. He was 
bom in Lower Canada, June 16, 1833, a son of Truman and Abigail (Minkler) 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 207 

Nichols, natives of Canada and New York, respectively. The father died in 
Iowa and the mother in Sycamore, Illinois. To their union were born four 
sons : Henry, deceased ; Elum, who resides in Sandwich, Illinois ; F. W., of 
this review ; and John, deceased. 

In 1838 F. W. Nichols was taken by his parents to Illinois, the family 
locating in St. Charles, where they remained the first winter. The following 
spring, however, they settled upon a farm in Du Page county, and there Mr. 
Nichols of this review grew to manhood and became a farmer. On the 2d of 
September, 1862, he enlisted in the Union army, being enrolled in Company F, 
One Hundred and Fifth Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He was with his command 
for nearly three years and participated in many hotly contested engagements, 
but on the 7th of June, 1865, was honorably discharged. His regiment was at 
different times attached to the command of General 0. 0. Howard and to that 
of General "Williams. At the close of the war Mr. Nichols returned to Illinois, 
but in the fall of 1866 came to Fairbank. He engaged in the mercantile business 
in partnership with Jacob I. Minkler, the association being maintained for a 
number of years. After the partnership was dissolved he became a stock buyer, 
and has since been identified with a number of business interests of the town. 
He has excellent judgment and his wisely directed activities have brought him 
a competence which enables him to live retired. He owns his success solely to 
his own industry, good management and thrift and these qualities have also 
won him the respect of those who know him. 

Mr. Nichols was married in Illinois on the 1st of September, 1865, to Ellen 
M. Green, who was born in Hardwick, New York, on the 10th of August, 1841, 
a daughter of George A. and Hannah Moore (Hughes) Stittman. Her father 
was born in Connecticut on the 15th of June, 1812, and died in Battle Creek, 
Michigan. Her mother was a native of Pennsylvania, born August 21, 1818, 
and also passed away in Battle Creek. There were seven children born to their 
union: George A., deceased; Mrs. Maria White, of Mu.skegon, Michigan; Mrs. 
Nichols ; Phoebe, Richard and William, all deceased ; and Mary A. George and 
Richard were both in the Seventh Michigan Battery during the Civil war and 
are buried at New Orleans, Louisiana. The former died in July, 1866, and the 
latter July 5, 1865. All of the children were born in the state of New York, 
except the youngest, whose birth occurred at Coldwater, Michigan. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Nichols were born the following children : Laura A., whose 
birth occurred August 7. 1866, and who died August 31, 1868; Mrs. Abigail 
Dewey, whose birth occurred August 3, 1868, and who is now residing in Moville, 
Iowa; Mr.s. Hattie Poison, born July 11, 1870, who died September 13, 1900; 
Mrs. Kate Knight, born April 30, 1872, now residing in Salem, Missouri; Wil- 
liam A., born on the 7th of April, 1875, who is living near Middle River, Minne- 
sota ; and Mrs. Ellen S. Corrigeux, born September 25, 1880, now a resident of 
Spokane, Washington. All of the children were born and raised in Fairbank. 

Mr. Nichols has been superintendent of the Sunday school of the Methodist 
Episcopal church at Fairbank for twenty-five years and since 1868 has been a 
trustee of the church. In the many years that he has gladly given his time 
and service to the church his influence has affected many lives and he has been 
a potent force in the maintaining of a high moral standard in the community. 
His wife is also an active member of the Methodist Episcopal church. Politically 



208 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

Mr. Nichols is a republican and fraternally belongs to the Knights of Pythias 
of Fairbank and also to the Grand Army of the Republic. Mrs. Nichols holds 
membership in the Pythian Sisters and in the Woman's Relief Corps. For 
forty years Mr. Nichols has been identified with the Cemetery Association of 
Fairbank, which has the task of keeping the local City of the Dead in good 
condition. Mr. Nichols owns his residence in Fairbank and has accumulated 
sufficient property to enable him to live in leisure. He and his wife are held 
in warm regard by their fellow citizens and there is no couple in the county 
more highly respected than they. 



JOHN H. WILLEY. 



John H. Willey, one of the owners and editors of the Bulletin Journal, has 
devoted his entire life to newspaper publication and is well known among the 
representative.s of that field of business in the state. His birth occurred in 
Zanesville, Ohio, April 1, 1853, his parents being ]\Ioses H. and Charlotte Belle 
(]\Ioore) Willey. The father's birth occurred in West Virginia in 1820 and the 
mother was born in Pennsylvania in 1831. In early life Closes H. Willey fol- 
lowed the occupation of farming but afterward learned the carpenter's trade 
and became a contractor and builder. When a young man he removed to Ohio, 
residing in that state until 1856, when he brought his family to Iowa, settling 
in Oskaloosa, but later removing to Atlantic in 1868. He continued in business 
as a contractor to the time of his death, which occurred in 1887. He was an 
expert mechanic and, therefore, found little difficulty in securing a liberal 
patronage. His widow still survives and now makes her home in Independence. 
In their family were ten children, of whom six are j^et living. 

John H. Willey, the second in order of birth, was but three years of age 
when the family arrived in Iowa and in the schools of Oskaloosa he pursued his 
education, but from an early age he has been dependent upon his own resources, 
working for others since a mere boy. He had learned the printer's trade before 
he reached the age of twenty years, at which time he purchased a half interest in 
a newspaper at Atlantic, Iowa, with which he was connected from 1874 until 
1880. He then became sole owner of the paper, which he published for eleven 
years. On the expiration of that period ho sold out and a year later came to Inde- 
pendence. Here he purcha.sed the Bulletin Journal and for two years was in 
partnership with AVilliam Toman. This is the second oldest newspaper in the 
county. Mr. Willey is still connected therewith as editor and in the ownership 
of the paper has as his partners A. H. Farwell and Willard B. Coltman. He 
devotes his entire time to the interests of the paper and has gained a good sub- 
scription list and advertising patronage. The paper is carefully managed and 
attractively edited, and IMr. Willey keeps in touch with the trend of general ad- 
vancement, which is as marked in the field of journalism as in any other walk 
of life. 

On the 28th of September, 1876, Mr. Willey was united in marriage to Miss 
Jennie Boyer, who was born in Zanesville, Ohio, a daughter of Oliver J. and 
Emily Boyer, who were natives of Maryland. Soon after the Civil war they 



r 




JOHN II. W ILLEV 




A. H. FARWELL 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 213 

came to Iowa, settling at Clinton and subsequently removing to Boone, where the 
father did railroad work until a short time prior to his death, which occurred in 
1907. He served for four years as a private in the Civil war. His wife died 
when Mrs. Willey was a mere child. She was the eldest of tive children. To I\Ir. 
and Mrs. Willey have been born four children: Nellie E., now the wife of R. 
B. Hovey, who is living retired in Chicago ; one who died in infancy ; Harry R., 
who is a regular in the United States cavalry and is now on the Mexican border ; 
and Horace B., who is assisting his father in the newspaper office. 

Mr. Willey belongs to the Knights of Pythias and to the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, and he attend.s the Methodist church, of which his wife is a member. 
His political allegiance is given to the republican party, the principles of which 
he upholds through the columns of his paper. He stands at all times for progress 
and improvement and gives his aid to any movement or measure which he deems 
of benefit to the community. Practically his entire life has been passed in this 
state and for fifty-eight years he has been an interested witness of its progress. 
Personal effort and newspaper publication have both been made to serve public 
ends, and he deserves mention as one of the representative and valued residents 
of Buchanan countv. 



HENRY F. BALL. 



Henry F. Ball is a resident farmer and a township trustee of Liberty town- 
ship. Success has come to him as the reward of persistent effort, wisely and 
intelligently directed, for he started out in life for himself as a farm hand with 
no capital and has achieved success by dint of determined purpose, indefatigable 
energy and business integrity. He was born in Linn county, Iowa, in 1866, a 
son of Marcus Lysander Ball, who was born near Syracuse, New York, in 1838, 
and had attained the age of sixty-eight years when, in 1906, he was called to 
his final rest. In early life the father worked on canal boats in the east and 
also learned the shoemaker's trade, but the reports which reached him con- 
cerning the opportunities, the growth and the advantages of the middle west 
drew him to Iowa and he made the overland trip to Jones county. He settled 
upon a tract of land which his father had entered from the government, and 
there began the development of a farm. 

The grandfather died soon after his arrival in Iowa and Marcus L. Ball then 
removed to Linn county, where he carried on general farming until 1866. In 
that year he arrived in Buchanan county, where evidences of pioneer life and 
conditions still existed. He had to haul his produce to Manchester and at times 
the roads were almost impassable, l)ut with persistent energy he continued his 
farm work. In 1882 he removed to Liberty township, where he also owned 
land, and there he carried on general farming until he retired from active life 
and took up his abode in Winthrop where, in 1906, he met death by accident, 
being killed by a train. He had been somewhat active in public affairs, having 
served as road supervisor for twenty years. He was a zealous advocate of the 
republican party and did all in his power to further its growth and win for 



"Tol. 11—10 



214 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

it success. He was a charter member of the Presbyterian church and assisted 
in organizing the Unity Presbyterian church. He also aided in organizing 
the Farmers' Mutual Insurance Company of Independence, and in all things he 
was actuated by a progressive spirit, which was never content to rest with 
present conditions, but was always seeking something better and something in 
advance. In early manhood he wedded Ellen Keller, who was born in Ohio in 
1845. They traveled life's journey happily together for many years and were 
then separated by the death of the father in 1906, while the mother passed 
away in 1912. 

Henry F. Ball had only such educational advantages as the district schools 
of that day afforded, and M^hen but a boy he began work as a farm hand, and 
from that time forward lias been dependent upon his own resources. When 
twenty-one years of age he purchased eighty acres and since that time has been 
busily engaged in general farming. To his original holdings he has added 
until he now owns one hundred and eighty-five acres, in the midst of which 
stands a comfortable and commodious residence. The barns and outbuildings, 
too, are such as one would expect to find upon the land of a progressive farmer 
and the fields present a neat and thrifty appearance. In a word, Mr. Ball 
has led an active, useful and well spent life and has won the merited rewards 
of labor. 

It was in 1889 that Mr. Ball was united in marriage to Miss Flora Swartzel, 
a native of Buchanan county and a daughter of Frank and Lucy (Sherretts) 
Swartzel, who are natives of Ohio and are now seventy and sixty-seven years 
of age respectively. The father has made farming his life work. In the early 
'50s he came to Iowa, locating near Quasqueton, and he is well known in this 
part of the county. Mr. and ^Nlrs. Ball have become the parents of four 
children : Lila, the wife of Charles Switzer, by whom she has one child, 
Mervene ; Eulalie, the wife of Carl Gates, a farmer and representative of a 
pioneer family, by whom she has a son, Elmo ; Neva, who is a graduate of the 
Iowa State Teachers' College and has taught in the schools of this county; and 
Frank, who is associated with his father in the farm work. 

Mr. Ball is a charter member of Winthrop Lodge, No. 550, I. 0. 0. F., and 
has taken an active interest in its work and filled all of its chairs. His political 
indorsement is given to the republican party, and he has served as township 
trustee for the past twelve years. He Ls also the township director of the 
Farmers Insurance Company. His interest in the public welfare is manifest 
in many tangible ways, and lie is a well known and popular man of his 
township. 



CALVIN HUBERT GILBERT. 

Calvin Hubert Gilbert, of Independence, is one of the leading photographers 
of Iowa, a fact which is attested by the many medals and honor awards which 
he has received in exhibition contests. Moreover, he is today the president 
of the Iowa State Photographers' Assoeiation — a position which indicates his 
high stvinding among the representatives of the art. 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 215 

Mr. Gilbert was born near Beloit, Wisconsin, June 24, 1874, and is a son of 
William H. and Lucy M. (Truesdell) Gilbert, the latter a sister of Gaylord 
Sankston Truesdell, the noted American artist, who won the gold medal at the 
Paris (France) Salon, for a study of cattle in oil. Mrs. Gilbert was born at 
Waukegan, Illinois, on the 8th of May, 1848. The birth of William H. Gilbert 
occurred at Pulaski, New York, on the 9th of September, 1840, and in early 
life he learned the carpenter's trade. He was still but a young lad when he 
accompanied his parents to Afton, Wisconsin, where he was reared to manhood 
and later he went to Chicago. It was there that he learned the trades of 
carpentering and cabinetmaking and he continued in active business in Chicago 
until after the outbreak of the Civil war, when he put aside all personal con- 
siderations and enlisted for active duty at the front, becoming drummer boy 
of Company A, Nineteenth Illinois Infantry, the Zouaves. He enlisted for 
the entire war, and with his company fought at the battle of Chickamauga. 
He was captured while attending the wounded on the battlefield and confined 
in six rebel prisons, including Andersonville and Libl)y, his incarceration cover- 
ing seventeen months, at the end of which time he finally succeeded in making 
his escape. Our subject has in his possession a number of interesting relics 
which his father made while in prison. After his escape he was taken to the 
Charleston hospital, where he was treated for eight months, for his health had 
become greatly impaired through the ravages of prison life. When the war 
was over he was mustered out and returned to his father's farm near Beloit, 
Wisconsin, where he recuperated. He then took up his abode in that city and 
worked at the carpenter's trade for several years. In later years being unable to 
work at his trade, he assisted his son in the studio until his death, which 
occurred November 14, 1906. He was an earnest Christian man, holding mem- 
bership in the Baptist church, in which he served as deacon. His life was 
indeed honorable and upright in all of its purposes and in all of his actions, 
and he left to his family the priceless heritage of an untarnished name. His 
widow .survives and now resides in Independence. 

Calvin H. Gilbert is an only child. He attended school in both Beloit and 
Afton, Wisconsin, and afterward took special work in a training school at 
Chicago which fitted him for the duties of secretary in the Young Men's 
Christian Association. He was eighteen years of age when he began studying 
photography in Janesville, Wisconsin, devoting two years to a mastery of the 
principles of the art. He then took charge of a studio at Antioch, Illinois, 
where he remained for a year. He was afterward in Clinton, Wisconsin, where 
he conducted a studio for eighteen months, and later spent one year as operator 
in a photographic gallery in Elkhorn. He was afterward with Norman B. 
Lawson of Chicago for six months and in the Gibson .studio for a short time. 
It was during that period that he attended school, pursuing his special course, 
after which he became assistant secretary of the Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation at Janesville, where he remained for about a year. In the year 1898 
he came to Independence and for a year was employed in the photographic 
studio of Mr. Fairbanks. He was then elected secretary of the Young Men's 
Christian Association but after serving a year as such purchased the Fair- 
banks studio in 1901 and has since conducted it. It is most thoroughly 
equipped and he does most artistic and expert work at reasonable prices. 



216 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

Mr. Gilbert has never deviated from the highest artistic standards. He 
has kept in touch with the most advanced processes of photography and under- 
stands fully the scientific principles underlying his work as well as the artistic 
worth and value of light, shade and posing. In 1902 he won the gold medal 
in the miniature class and gained the same medal through three successive 
years and also one silver medal. He won the prize in Class B for portrait 
work and two diplomas in Indiana on the same exhibit in 1907. The silver 
medal which he gained was awarded in 1908 on Class A. In 1910 he secured 
the gold medal in that class in Iowa. In 1912 he was elected the second vice 
president of the Iowa State Photographers' Association and the following 
year he was appointed the first vice president, while in 1914 he was elected 
president of the association — a fact indicative of his high standing among his 
brother artists. He devotes his entire time to the studio. He also displays 
marked artistic talent as a painter in oils. He was gifted by nature with 
ability which he has developed through study and experience until he stands 
as one of the eminent representatives of photographic art in Iowa. He has 
attended all the state and a number of national photographers' conventions and 
thus has kept abreast with the most advanced ideas and methods. 

On the 20th of December, 1899, Mr. Gilbert was married to ^liss Oma 
Kiefer, who was born in Ilazelton. Iowa, a daughter of William H. and Ella 
(Bates) Kiefer. The father's birth occurred at ^lishawaka, Indiana, September 
26, 1856, and the mother was born at Janesville, Wisconsin, Septemljer 19, 1857, 
Mr. Kiefer engaged in merchandising in early life at Ilazelton, Iowa, for exactly 
twenty years and then removed to Independence, where lie organized the Iowa 
Grocery Company, conducting business under that name for four or five years. 
He then retired and became a salesman for the ilishawaka Woolen Company, 
which he represented for three or four years. He is now engaged in selling 
specialties for the National Clock & Manufacturing Company, being the Iowa 
representative of that iiouse, and he makes his home in Independence. He was 
at one time alderman from the fourth ward. To him and his wife have been 
born three children, of whom Mrs. Gilbert is the eldest. The others are: Donna, 
who became the wife of W. B. Piielps, a traveling salesman, and died April 17, 
1911. leaving a child, Pauline, who is living with her paternal grandparents; 
and Beulah, the wife of (Jeorge Scully, of Waverly, Iowa, who is county 
treasurer of Bremer county. Mr. and Mrs. Kiefer also reared a child, Robert 
Bates, a nephew, whose mother died when he was but eight months old and who 
has ever been given the place of a son in the household, although not legally 
adoj^ted. He is a graduate of the Upper Iowa I'niversity of the class of 1913 
and is at present studying law. To Mr. and ^Ir.s. Gillx'i-t liave been born three 
children: Anita Grace, born January 29, 1901; Helen May, February 24, 
UnVA- and Donna Elizabeth, May 28, 1913. 

Ml-. Gilbert holds membership with the Modern Woodmen of America, with 
the Modern Brotherhood of America, with the Methodist Episcopal church and 
witli the Brotherhood of the Methodist Episcopal church. His political allegiance 
is given the republican party, although he displays independent tendencies, 
voting according to the dictates of his judgment regardless of party ties. His 
entire life has been guided by upright principles and purposes. He has never 
deviated from a course which his judgment has sanctioned as right between 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 217 

himself and his fellowmen, nor are his standards the superficial ones of the 
world, but have their root in those principles which are the basic element of the 
Christian religion, and it is this which has made him thoroughly reliable in all 
of his business dealings and progressive in all of life's relations. 



HORACE W. HOVEY. 



Horace AV. Hovey is now living retired at Independence but for forty-two 
years was engaged in the drug business in this city and won the success which 
now enables him to put aside further business cares. His birth occurred at 
Worcester, Vermont, September 26, 1841, his parents being Horace and Alpha 
(Hammond) Hovey, who were also natives of New England, the former having 
been born at Hanover, New Hampshire, August 2, 1805, and the latter at 
Thetford, Vermont, July 29, 1803. The ancestry of the family in America is 
traced back to 1635, Horace W. Hovey having in his possession the genealogy 
from that period to the present in a work that was largely prepared by his 
cousin, Horace, who recently passed away. The coat of arms is a hand holding a 
pen, with a scroll beneath and the words "Hinc Orior, " by this we rise. A brother 
of Horace Hovey, Sr., was one of the founders of Wabash College in Indiana. The 
paternal grandfather of our subject served in the Revolutionary war and patriot- 
ism has always been one of the salient characteristics of the family. In early life 
Horace Hovey, Sr., carried on general agricultural pursuits. He continued his 
residence at Worcester, Vermont, to the time of his death and held the office of 
justice of the peace there, but political honors and emoluments had no attraction 
for him. 

Horace W. Hovey was the third born in a family of five children, three of 
whom are yet living. He acquired his preliminary education in the district 
schools of Vermont and afterward attended Wabash College of Indiana. His 
youthful days were spent upon the home farm with the usual experiences that 
fall to the lot of the farm lad. He assisted in the work of plowing, planting 
and harvesting and after the close of the Civil war, when in his twenty-fifth 
year, he made his way westward to Iowa, arriving at Independence in 1868. 
There he began learning the drug business and was in the employ of A. B. 
Clarke until 1882. He then purcha.sed the store, which he successfully con- 
ducted for thirty years or until 1912, when he sold out and is living retired, 
enjoying a rest which he has truly earned and richly deserves. He is spending 
his leisure time in travel, gaining thereby the knowledge and culture which 
only travel can bring. 

On the 20th of June, 1872, ]Mr. Hovey was united in marriage to Miss Marial 
Barnhart, who was born at ]\Iayville, Chautauqua county. New York, a daughter 
of Peter and Sarah (Herrick) Barnhart. the former born in Somerset county, 
Pennsylvania, in 1789. and the latter in Essex county, Vermont, in 1801. 
]\Ir. Barnhart became an early settler of New York, where he followed various 
business pursuits, being connected with the management of a hotel, with the 
tanning business and with farming. About 1857 he brought his family to 
Iowa, settling in Independence, where he lived retired. His sons engaged in the 



218 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

newspaper business, establishing what is now known as the Conservative. Later 
four of the brothers engaged in the type foundry business in Chicago, fortaing 
the firm of Barnhart Brothers & Spindler, which has become one of the 
largest type foundries in the world. Mr. Barnhart died in the year 1876, 
while his wife survived until 1878. Their daughter, Mrs. Hovey, was the 
fifth bom in a family of nine children and she is entitled to belong to the 
Daughters of the American Revolution, for her paternal grandfather was a 
soldier in the war for independence. Her father was twice married and had 
six children by his first union. To Mr. and Mrs. Hovey has been born a son, 
Royal Barnhart, who was born March 20, 1874, and resides in Winnetka, Illinois, 
his business interests being in connection with the Barnhart Brothers type foundry 
of Chicago, of which he is a director. He was married October 31, 1905, to 
Miss Nellie E. Willey, and they have three children: Ruth Marial, born Janu- 
ary 21, 1907 ; Sarah Elizabeth, June 23, 1908 ; and Eugenia, August 23, 1912. 

In 1877 Mr. Hovey erected his present residence in Independence and here 
expects to spend his remaining days. His has been a well spent, useful and 
active life, crowned with a measure of success that is the direct reward of his 
efforts. His record should serve to inspire and encourage others, showing what 
may be accomplished when energy and ambition point out the way. He belongs 
to the Presbyterian church and his entire career has commanded for him the 
confidence and good-will of those with whom he has been associated, for he has 
ever been honorable, straightforward and reliable in every relation of life. 



MONSIGNOR J. J. GARLAND. 

Monsignor J. J. Garland, who passed away September 15, 1914, after thirty- 
seven years in the priesthood, came to Independence on the 24th of June, 1912. 
He was born at Dover Plains, New York, on the 5th of March, 1854, a son of 
Thomas and Rosanna (O'Dowd) Garland, who were natives of Ireland. The 
father, who was born in 1820, died in 1892. The mother, who was born in 1822, 
passed away October 5, 1877. It was in the year 1846 that Thomas Garland 
came to the United States, settling in Dutchess county, New York, where he 
resided until 1855. He then removed to Kewanee, Illinois, where he owned 
land and became a successful farmer. He had but two children, the daughter 
being Mrs. John Hunt, of Sheldon, Iowa. 

The son, Monsignor J. J. Garland, was only about a year old when his parents 
settled in Kewanee, Illinois, in April, 1855. In 1867 he was sent back to New 
York, where he entered the Seminary of Our Lady of Angels at Suspension 
Bridge, there pursuing his classical course. He remained there for four years, 
but completed his course in St. Ignatius College at Chicago, Illinois, in 1871. 
In September of the same year he entered the Seminary of St. Bonaventure in 
Allegany, New York, where he completed his philosophical and theological 
studies. Being adopted by the late Archbishop Hennessy in 1876, he was called 
to Dubuque but, being too young for ordination, he was sent by the Arch- 
bishop to St. Joseph's College at Dubuque to become a member of the faculty 




M0X81GX0R J. J. GARLAND 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 221 

as master of discipline. On the 24th of February, 1877, he was ordained to the 
priesthood and was immediately appointed assistant to the late Rt. Rev. E. C. 
Lenihan, then of Sioux City, where he experienced real pioneer missionary life, 
for the parish contained nine counties of northwestern Iowa. In order to visit 
the Catholic families scattered over that vast territory, the priests were com- 
pelled to ride horseback or in himber wagons over the prairies, finding shelter 
at night with the frontier settlers. 

On the 11th of December, 1877, Father Garland was sent to take charge 
of a portion of Cresco parish in Howard county, known as the Crane Creek 
settlement. There, sixteen miles from a railroad, he labored for several years, 
organizing the mission into a parish, building a parochial residence and securing 
from the government a mail route. In 1880 he was assigned to Center Grove, 
Clinton county, as the successor of Rev. J. B. Gaffney, and there he undertook 
the task of erecting a new church. He had lime hauled from ]\Iaquoketa and 
lumber from Clinton, while other necessary building materials could be secured 
at that place. After eight years there spent he arrived at Eagle Grove, Wright 
county, on the 26th of January, 1889. This was a new railroad town and a 
division point on the Northwestern, and he also served the churches at Dun- 
eombe, Lehigh and Coalville in Webster county. He built the first church in 
Lehigh, but was relieved of the mission work in 1890. At the time of his arrival 
in Eagle Grove he found practically no church or school and only twenty-eight 
families, but the following year he secured the building of a substantial church 
which was dedicated by Bishop Cotter. On the 20th of June, 1894, however, 
the building was totally destroyed by a cyclone. He at once undertook the work 
of rebuilding, and this time the edifice was constructed of brick. He also estab- 
lished a parochial school, erecting the Dominican convent and high school of 
the Sacred Heart. In 1902 he celebrated the twenty-fifth anniversary of his 
ordination to the priesthood, and two years later Eagle Grove was made a 
deanery, with Father Garland as its first dean. 

On the death of the Very Rev. P. J. McGrath, August 14, 1904, he was 
appointed to succeed him as rector and dean of the Charles City deanery. On 
the 24th of June, 1912, he came to Independence and on the 18th of May, 1913, 
he was made a monsignor by Pope Pius X. He labored untiringly to further 
the interests of Catholicism and had the satisfaction of seeing the work of the 
church grow in each city in which he was stationed. 



JOHN W. LEAVEN. 



John W. Leaven, a representative and enterprising young agriculturist re- 
.siding in Newton township, is the owner of a well improved farm comprising 
one hundred and twenty acres on section 20. His birth occurred in Benton 
county, Iowa, on the 5th of May, 1885, his parents being Nicholas and Anna 
(Lanser) Leaven, both of whom are natives of Holland. The father came to 
the United States with his parents when ten years of age, the family home 
being established in Dubuque county, Iowa. Subsequently he removed to 
Benton county, this state, and there successfully carried on agricultural pur- 



222 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

suits for a number of years. In time he disposed of his property and came to 
Newton township, Buchanan county, here purchasing and improving a farm 
of three hundred and sixty acres which he operated for seven years. On the 
expiration of that period he put aside the active work of the fields and took 
up his abode in Walker, where he has since lived in honorable retirement. His 
wife also survives and they enjoy an extensive and favorable acquaintance 
throughout the community. 

John W. Leaven was reared and educated in the county of his nativity 
and remained under the parental roof until twenty-four years of age. He then 
started out as an agi'iculturist on his own account, cultivating rented land for 
two years, at the end of which time he bought from his father a tract of one 
hundred and twenty acres on section 20, Newton township, this county. He has 
made a number of excellent improvements on the property and has been actively 
and successfully engaged in its operation to the present time, carrying on the 
work of the fields in a most practical, progressive and resultant manner. 

On the 25th of November, 1909, Mr. Leaven was united in marriage to Miss 
Mamie Burke, a daughter of Thomas and Catherine (Tarpy) Burke. Her 
father came to Buchanan county in an early day and has since followed farm- 
ing in Newton township. Our subject and his wife have three children, namely : 
Anna Catherine and Bernice, who are four and two years of age respectively ; 
and Thomas Francis, who is in his first year. 

Mr. Leaven gives his political allegiance to the democracy and is a Catholic 
in religious faith. His life is actuated by high principles and characterized by 
manly conduct, and in his home community he enjoys that warm personal 
friendship and kindly esteem which are always given in recognition of genuine 
worth in the individual. 



GUY I. GROVER. 



Guy I. Grover is a native son of Homer township, born on the 4th of March, 
1876, and he still resides in that township, owning a tract of land on sections 
2 and 3. His parents. Azotus and Olive E. (Buell) Grover, are mentioned on 
another page of this volume. When Guy I. Grover had attained to sufficient 
age he entered the public schools and when he had mastered the branches of 
learning there taught he became a student in the Upper Iowa Universit.y at 
Fayette. He then remained with his parents until he reached the age of twenty- 
two years, after which he began farming and rented land of his father for 
eight years. At that time the father died and the son came into possession of 
a place of one hundred and twenty acres on sections 2 and 3, Homer township, 
and later he purchased sixty acres adjoining, so that he now has" a fine farm 
of one hundred and eighty acres. A glance at the place indicates something 
concerning the owner. Neatness and order characterize* the entire farm and 
his earnest work finds its reward in the abundant harvests which he gathers. 
He also buys, sells and raises stock in large numbers. His judgment couceniing 
the value of an animal is seldom, if ever, at fault and he is thus able to make 
judicious purchases and profitable sales. 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 223 

On the 23d of December, 1897, Mr. Grover was united in marriage to Miss 
Eunice Grain, who was born March 26, 1876, a daughter of Charles E. and 
Elizabeth (Haines) Grain, the former a native of New Jersey and the latter 
of Ohio. Mr. Grain followed farming as a life work and in 1853 arrived in 
Iowa, settling in Cedar county, where he purchased land and began farming. 
He afterward removed to Linn county, where he again carried on farming and 
later he removed from that place to Buchanan county, living in Rowley for 
five years or until the time of his death, which occurred in June, 1910. His 
widow survives and now makes her home with her children. Mr. and Mrs. 
Grover have four children, namely : John Devere, a youth of sixteen ; Walter 
Lloyd, fourteen years old ; and Charles Azotus and Elizabeth Buell, who are 
eight and five years of age respectively. 

Taking up the study of political questions in his early manhood, Guy I. 
Grover became convinced that the republican party could best solve the govern- 
mental problems vexing the country and he has never seen occasion to change 
his opinion. He belongs to the IMethodist church at Rowley and is superin- 
tendent of its Sunday school. In its teachings are found the source of his moral 
strength and his devotion to the highest standards. He ever attempts to live 
peaceably among his fellowmen, works persistently to further the best interests 
of the community and at all times his influence is on the side of righteousness 
and truth. 



GEORGE SHERRER. 



George Sherrer, deceased, was during his lifetime one of the representative 
farmers of Buchanan county. He was bom in Bavaria, Germany, on the 23d 
of September, 1854, a son of Valentine and Magdalena (King) Sherrer* The 
former, who was born in Bavaria in 1829, emigrated to America and settled 
in Iowa in 1871. He passed away in March, 1909. His wife was born in the 
same kingdom and in the same year and also died in 1909. Thej^ had seven 
children, of whom George Avas the eldest. 

George Sherrer was educated in Germany and had liberal advantages along 
that line. During his youth he was in the employ of others and after coming 
to this country continued to work as a farai hand until he had saved money 
enough to purchase land. In 1878 he bought an eighty acre tract in this county 
and gave his attention to its cultivation, carrying on general farming. His 
widow still lives upon that place. He subsequently bought two hundred and 
seventeen acres in Delaware county, Iowa, which he also cultivated, and as the 
owner of two hundred and ninety-seven acres of rich Iowa land he was finan- 
cially independent and enjoyed the comforts of life. He was a man of marked 
industry and enterprise and was also characterized by sound judgment, which 
enabled him to manage his business affairs so as to avoid waste and secure the 
maximum profit. He died July 31, 1908, and his many friends mourned his loss. 

Mr. Sherrer was married in P'ebruar}^, 1876, to Miss Frances Halamrach, 
who was })orn in Bavaria, Germany, in 1857, a daughter of George and Mar- 
garet (Marshall) Halamrach. Her father, who was a decorator by profession, 



224 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

was born in Bavaria in 1835 and came to America in 1866. He died in 1868, 
His wife was also a native of Bavaria and was born in 1835. She passed away 
in January, 1908, surviving her husband for forty years. To their union were 
born four children, of whom Mrs. Sherrer is the eldest. The latter became the 
mother of eight children : Mrs. Barbara Faber ; Mrs. Jenny Shaufhauser ; 
Mrs. Mary Reed ; Charles M. ; Arthur, at Monti ; Frank S., living in Fremont 
township, this county ; Albert, at home ; and Mrs. Eveline CrLsull. Mrs. Sherrer 
owns and her son Albert operates one hundred and sixty-seven acres of land 
in Delaware county and eighty acres in Buchanan county, following general 
farming, and stock raising. The family is of the Catholic faith. 

Mr. Sherrer was a democrat in his political belief and served upon the 
school board. Fraternally he belonged to the Modern Woodmen of America 
and his widow is a member of the Royal Neighbors. He possessed in large 
measure those sturdy and admirable qualities of character which have made 
the Teutonic race such a power in the world, and he not only won success for 
himself but also contributed to the prosperity of Buchanan county. 



HORACE L. BOIES. 



Horace L. Boies, an extensive landowner and farmer living at Quasqueton, 
where he is also connected with banking interests, belongs to that class of men 
who have won success through the ready recognition and utilization of oppor- 
tunity. He was born in Boone county, Illinois, November 1, 1850, a son of 
W. D. and Sarah (Bugby) Boies. The life record of the father covered a span 
of eighty-six years, his birth having occurred near Buffalo, New York, in 1820, 
while in 1906 he passed away. His wife was a native of New England, bom 
in Putney, Vermont, in 1822. In early manhood W. D. Boies followed the occu- 
pation of farming in the Empire state and afterward removed westward to 
Illinois, settling about sixty-five miles from Chicago, the journe.y being made 
before any railroad lines had been built into that city. For many years he was 
identified with agricultural interests in Illinois and in 1873 arrived in Buchanan 
county, Iowa, establishing his home in Liberty township, where he owned con- 
siderable land. In addition to general farming he engaged in the manufacture 
of cheese. 

Horace L. Boies was a pupil in the district schools of Illinois and continued 
his education in the public schools of this state after coming to Iowa in 1869. 
It was subsequent to the time when h'^ attained his nineteenth year that he 
became a student in the high school in Waterloo, studying under Professor 
Van Colin, afterward state superintendent of education. He began business 
life as a farm hand, working for an uncle in Grundy county after a year spent 
in Quasqueton. In 1873 his father brought the family to Buchanan county, 
and Horace L. Boies returned to Quasqueton, where he has since lived. That 
his life has been one of unremitting diligence and determination, that his invest- 
ments have been judiciously made and his business affairs carefully conducted 
is indicated in the fact that he is now the owner of six hundred acres of valuable 
land in Buchanan county, and he devotes most of his time to assisting his sons 




HORACE L. BOIES 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 227 

in looking after the farms. He is also the vice-president of the Quasqueton 
State Savings Bank and in business affairs his judgment is sound, his sagacity 
keen and liis enterprise unfaltering. 

On August 29, 1880, Mr. Boies was united in marriage to Miss Jennie Tower, 
who was born in Canada, July 2, 1850, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas 
Tower, both of whom were natives of England. The father came from that 
country when a young man and for several years followed farming in Canada. 
In November, 1865, he arrived in Buchanan county, Iowa, settling near Win- 
throp, where he made purchase of farm property . until he was the owner of 
more than six hundred acres. He became a naturalized citizen of the United 
States, but he did not seek to figure prominently as an office holder, preferring 
always to give his time and attention to his general farming and stock-raising 
interests. His business was so capably conducted that success in large measure 
attended him. He and his wife are buried at Fort Dodge, Iowa. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Boies have been born four children : Hawley, who attended 
the Upper Iowa College at Fayette and the Cedar Falls Normal School, is now 
living on one of his father's farms. He married Lulu Slater and has three chil- 
dren, Willis, Wilma and Leonard. Lucretia, who attended Upper Iowa Univer- 
sity at Fayette, died at the age of twenty-three years. Ruth is the wife of 
Dr. E. W. Shine, a graduate of the State University of Iowa City. Glenn also 
occupies one of his father's farms. He wedded Leta Gaylord, whose grandfather 
was one of the pioneer settlers of Byron township, and they now have two chil- 
dren, Marion and June. 

Mr. Boies gives his political allegiance to the republican party and keeps 
thoroughly informed concerning all of the vital questions and problems of the 
day. His fellow townsmen, appreciative of his worth and ability, have fre- 
quently called him to township and town offices, and he has served both as 
councilman and mayor of Quasqueton and as township trustee, exercising his 
official prerogatives in support of many valuable and progressive public meas- 
ures. His religious faith is that of the Methodist church and the underljdng 
principles concerning man's duty to his fellowmen find expression in his every- 
day life, as seen in his honorable business dealings, in his devotion to the public 
good and in his helpful attitude toward his fellow townsmen. 



WILLIAM B. MILLER. 



William B. Miller is a native son of the county and has gained and held the 
respect of those who have come in contact with him. He is now manager of a 
hardware and implement store in Winthrop for the W. D. Hoyt Company, 
which concern also owns stores in Manchester, Earlville and Robinson. He 
was born in Quasqueton, Liberty township, on the 12th of March, 1862, a son 
of William and Lavonia (Fleming) Miller. The former was born in Prussia, 
January 11, 1829, and removed to Canada with his parents when but a child 
of two years. He was married on the 2d of November, 1856, in this county, 
where he had settled in 1855. He was a blacksmith by trade and followed 
that occupation until late in life, when he became a partner of his son William 



228 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

B. in the conduct of a hardware business. This association was formed in 
October, 1890, and was continued until the death of the father on the 3d of 
August, 1898. In 1862 he enlisted in the First Iowa Cavalry and served 
throughout the Civil war until its close, being honorably discharged in 1865. 
His wife was born in New York state, November 27, 1836, and died Novem- 
ber 8, 1887. She an-ived in this county in 1853. They had three children, 
namely : Delia, now the wife of William Baitey, who lives in Sebastopol. Cali- 
fornia ; William B., of this review ; and Minnie, the wife of C. W. Bucher. of 
Winthrop. 

William B. Miller received his education in the district schools and in the 
schools of Quasqueton. After reaching manhood he farmed for tAvo years and 
subsequently, in connection with his fatlier, bought the hardware stock of Wil- 
liam Wynette, of AVintbrop, on the 1st of October, 1890. After the death of 
his father he continued alone in business until 1912, or for twenty-two years. 
During that time he became thoroughly familiar with the various makes of 
hardware and implements and acquired the ability to judge accurately the value 
and lasting qualities of any article in those lines. He also came to understand 
the problems of the buyer and salesman and was recognized as one of the most 
able men in the hardware trade in this county. In 1912 he sold his store and 
accepted the position of manager for the AVinthrop branch store of the W. D. 
Hoy.t Company, Avhich is one of tlie largest concerns in the county, incorporated 
under the state laws of Iowa. Their name is a synonym for integrity, initiative 
and high quality of goods. The fact that Mr. Miller is their representative in 
Winthrop is added proof of his capability and enterprise. 

Mr. Miller married Miss Lizzie A. Griswold, who was born on the 10th of 
December, 1863, and is mentioned elsewhere in this work. To their union have 
been born three children : Glen H.. born 1890, is a graduate of Cornell College 
at Blount Vernon. Iowa, receiving the degree of Bachelor of Science in 1913; 
Donna, born 1894, is a graduate of the Winthrop high school and is bookkeeper 
in the store of Mhich Mr. Miller is manager; and Alarjorie, born 1900, is attend- 
ing school. 

Mr. Miller is a republican and since attaining his majority has taken an active 
part in politics. Fraternally he is a member of the ]\Ia.sonic order, of the 
Eastern Star and of the Woodmen. His wife is likewise a member of the Eastern 
Star and the Congregational church. Mr. Aliller owns his comfortable home 
in Winthrop and is one of the substantial citizens of the town. 



AV ALTER GEORGE STEA^ENSON. 

AValter George Stevenson, ca.shier of the First National Bank at Inde- 
pendence, was born in Muscatine, Iowa, April 4, 1860. His father, George D. 
Stevenson, was born in the state of New York in 1796 and removed from the 
Empire state to Pennsylvania, becoming one of the pioneers in the section in 
which he settled. lie aided in clearing a tract of land and engaged in farming, 
carrying on agricultui'al i)ursuits there until his removal to Iowa in the '50s, 
at which time he took up his abode in Muscatine, where he engaged in farming, 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 229 

owning a large tract of land near that city. He carefully cultivated and tilled 
the fields and while so engaged made his residence in Muscatine. About 1864, 
however, he removed to Independence, where he engaged in the furniture busi- 
ness in partnership with William Sampson. This relation was continued for 
several years, at the end of which time Mr. Stevenson retired from the business. 
In the meantime he had aided largely in promoting various improvements in 
Independence and his worth as a man and citizen was widely acknowledged. 
He owned a number of residence properties vvhich he rented to others and 
which he left for the support of his family. He was also actively interested 
in the sash and door factory at one time and was widely recognized as a man of 
determined purpose who in his business career brooked no obstacles that could 
be overcome by persistent and honorable effort. 

]Mr. Stevenson never aspired to public office, but his patriotic spirit was 
manifest in his service in the War of 1812, in which he carried an old flintlock 
pistol and also a sword which are now in possession of his son, Walter G., and 
are most highl.y prized. George D. Stevenson was married twice and by his 
first union had a large family. After losing his first wife he married again, his 
second union being with Sarah A. Carpenter, who was born in England in 
1841. They had four children, of whom Walter G. is the eldest. The father 
died in August, 1870, and the mother passed away on the 24th of ^lay, 1875. 
He was a most earnest worker in the Methodist Episcopal church, served on 
its board of trustees and did everything in his power to promote the church 
work. 

Walter G. Stevenson, spending his youthful days in his parents' home, 
acquired his education in the public schools until graduated from the high 
school with the class of 1878. He afterward entered the Upper Iowa Uni- 
versity and was graduated with the class of 1883. He then took up the profes- 
sion of teaching, which he followed at Fairbank and later in the high school 
of Independence, devoting about five years to the work of the schoolroom. In 
the meantime he had served as deputy county clerk and it was subsequent to 
that period that he became a teacher in the high school at Independence. He 
was afterward teller in the Commercial State Bank, to which position he was 
called in 1892, serving in that capacity for about ten years. He next entered 
the First National Bank as assistant cashier in January, 1902, and thus served 
until about 1911, when he was elected to his present position — that of cashier. 
He is a popular official, prompt and faithful in the discharge of his duties, 
courteous in his treatment of the bank 's patrons and at all times carefully safe- 
guarding the interests of the stockholders. He is likewise a stockholder in the 
Iowa State Bank at Hazleton and in the State Savings Bank at Quasqueton, 
but he devotes the major part of his attention to his duties as cashier of the 
First National Bank. 

]Mr. Stevenson is well known in the Knights of Pythias lodge, in which he 
is serving as master of the exchequer. His religious faith is evidenced in his 
active and helpful membership in the Methodist Episcopal church. In politics 
he is a republican with independent tendencies. He served as deputy county 
clerk for eighteen months under 0. M. Gillett and W. E. Bain but otherwise 
has not sought nor desired office. He is pleasantly situated in his home life. 
He was married December 20, 1894, to Miss Mattie E. Miller, a native of this 



230 . HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

county and a daughter of Samuel and Sarah Miller. Theirs is a hospitable 
home whose good cheer is greatly enjoyed by their many friends, and both 
Mr. and Mrs. Stevenson are widely and favorably known in Independence and 
throughout Buchanan county. 



LEON C. SIMMONS. 



Leon C. Simmons is proprietor of the largest hardware store in Buchanan 
county and is .justly accounted one of the most enterprising and progressive 
business men of Independence. He conducts his interests according to the most 
modern commercial methods and his earnest endeavor to please his patrons has 
acquired for him the large trade that he now enjoys. This county numbers 
him among her native sons, his birth having occurred at Winthrop on the 8th 
of September, 1879, his parents being Adam C. and Eva E. (Pulis) Simmons. 
The father was l)orn in Ohio and in early life took up the occupations of a 
farmer and of a mechanic. He came to Iowa prior to the Civil war and follow- 
ing the outbreak of hostilities put aside all business and personal considerations, 
enlisting in 1862 as a member of Company B, Twenty-fifth Iowa Regiment. 
He was commissioned on the 28th of September, 1864, as a corporal and was 
honorably discharged June 6, 186.5, at Washington, D. C. He participated in 
a number of the most hotly contested engagements, but was never wounded 
nor confined in a hospital through ilhiess. 

After being mustered out ^Ir. Simmons again returned to Iowa and located 
once more in Blount Pleasant, but afterward went to Winthrop, where he wns 
united in marriage to IMiss Eva E. Pulis, who was born at Geneva, Wisconsin, 
on the 15th of July, 1854. He then engaged in the business of driving wells, 
Imt afterward removed to Independence and filled the office of deputy under 
Sheriff Ed Curier for two terms. He continued his residence at the county 
seat until his detlth, which occurred in February, 1898, and his widow is still a 
resident of Independence. In fiddition to his service as deputy sheriff Mr. Sim- 
mons likewise filled the office of constable for a number of years and made an 
excellent record as a public official. He was twice married and by the first 
union had one child, Katherine, now the wife of Frank Aborn, a druggist i^esid- 
ing at Sheffield, Iowa. By the second marriage there were three children: 
Leon C. ; Vera, the wife of George K. Perrin, who is engaged in the general 
insurance business at Hutchinson, Kansas; and Don, a window trimmer living 
at Los Angeles, California. 

Leon C. Simmons atteiuled the public schools of Independence and made 
his initial step in the business world when eighteen years of age as a clerk in a 
grocery store. He was afterward employed as a .salesman in the retail clothing 
store owned by his father-in-law for ten years, at the end of which time he pur- 
chased a half interest in a hardware store. The partnership existed until 1910, 
when Mr. Simmons became sole proprietor, and he is totlay conducting the 
largest store of the kind in the county. The building has been remodeled and 
completely restocked by Mr. Simmons since 1910. He has a modern, up-to-date 
store, handling all kinds of heavy, shelf and builder's hardware, stoves and 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 231 

plumbing and heating apparatus. His trade is now extensive and he has ever 
recognized the fact that satisfied patrons are the best advertisement. The 
foundation upon which he has builded his success has been made of energy, 
industry and straightforward dealing and he is now one of the prosperous 
merchants of the city. He also has other local interests. 

On the 12th of November, 1905, Mr. Simmons was united in marriage to 
Miss Caroline Littell, who was born at Prairie du Sac, Wisconsin, a daughter 
of AV. H. and Helen Josephine (Tabor) Littell, natives of New Jersey and of 
New York respectively. They were married, however, in Wisconsin and in 
1879 came to Independence, where Mr. Littell embarked in merchandising, 
in which he engaged until 1895, when he retired from active business. He 
still retains his residence in Independence, where he has vested interests. After 
coming to the county he became a landowner. He was a soldier of the Civil 
war, enlisting for three years in a Wisconsin regiment. He was forunate in 
that he escaped wounds and illness, although he was often in the thickest of 
the fight and took part in the long marches and arduous campaigns that 
marked the progress of the Civil war. 

Mr. Simmons gives his political allegiance to the republican party, but has 
never sought nor desired political preferment. He is a Mason and a Knight 
of Pythias. Both he and his wife are well known socially and have an extensive 
circle of warm friends in this county. He deserves much credit for what 
he accomplished, for he started out in life empty-handed. The steps in his 
orderly progression, however, are easily discernible and mark the wise use of his 
time, talents and opportunities. 



CLINTON WILSON WOLGAMOT. 

Clinton Wilson Wolgamot recently sold his draying business in Fairbank, 
in which line he had been engaged since 1913, although previous to that time he 
was a stock buyer. He was born in Fairbank township, this county, October 
18, 1859, a son of Joseph and Atha T. (Buckmaster) Wolgamot. The former 
was born in Maryland in February, 1829, and while still an infant of less than a 
year was taken by his parents to Holmes county, Ohio. He enlisted as a private 
from that county for service in the Mexican war and was in the army for about 
three years. His wnfe was born in Holmes county, Ohio, ^lareh 3, 1822, and 
passed away in Fairbank, Iowa, September 16, 1898. He died in Fairbank on 
the 27th of August, 1911. To their union were born eight children, six of whom 
survive: Dr. A. R., whose birth occurred on the 10th of January, 1852, and who 
passed away in Stockville, Nebraska, in 1909 ; Andrew, who was born June 23, 
1853 ; Mrs. Nancy McGranahan, of Ocheyedan, Iowa, who was born May 8, 1855 ; 
Jasper, who was born August 16, 1857, and is now a resident of Portland, 
Oregon; Clinton W., of this review; John W., who was born April 30, 1862, 
and now resides in Fairbank ; D. Sheridan, who was born January 10, 1 865, and 
is a resident of Fairbank township ; and Mrs. Eva Higbee, who was born Feb- 
ruary 23, 1868, and resides at Vermidji, Minnesota. The two eldest children 
were born in Holmes county, Ohio, and the six younger in Buchanan county. 



232 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

All were reared here and received their education here, all but two being gradu- 
ated from the local high school. 

After Clinton W. AVolgamot had completed his schooling he gave his atten- 
tion to farming in his home community for many years. For eight years, 
however, he cultivated land in 'Brien county, Iowa. He was engaged in buying 
stock at Fairbank for twelve years and as he is an excellent judge of cattle and 
hogs he found that business profitable. In 1913, however, he abandoned that 
and bought the dray line in Fairbank which he has recently sold, after running 
it for about a year. He was well equipped for the transfer business and was 
not only careful, thus avoiding damage to the goods intrusted to him, but was 
also rea.sonable in his charges. 

Mr. Wolgamot was married at Littleton, Iowa, October 29, 1883, to Miss 
Martha Hitchens, who was born in the state of New York on the 3d of August, 
1858, a daughter of John and Gertrude Hitchens. Her father passed away 
at Hazleton, Iowa, and her mother at Fairbank. There were four children in 
their family, two of whom survive : Mrs. Nettie Thomas, of Linn county, this 
state ; and Mrs. Wolgamot. By her marriage the latter has become the mother 
of four children, a.s follows: ]\Irs. Flossie Smalley, who was born in O'Brien 
county, Iowa, and is now residing in ^Minneapolis, ]\Iinnesota; Earl, who is a 
professional baseball player and is at present employed by West Union as 
catcher; and Atha and Wesley, both residing with their parents. The three 
younger children were all born in Fairbank and all were reared here and 
acquired their education in the local schools. 

Mrs. Wolgamot is a member of the ^lethodist Episcopal church of Fairbank, 
and Mrs. Wolgamot belongs to the local camp of the Modern Woodmen of 
America. He is a democrat in his political belief and is stalwart in his support 
of that party at the polls. He owns a comfortable home in Fairbank, and his 
many admirable qualities of character have won him the esteem of many friends. 



JOHN A. WEBER. 



A bus3' life is that led by John A. Weber, who is extensively and successfully 
engaged in farming, owning and cultivating a valuable property of three hun- 
dred and sixty acres in Wasliington township. He was born in Luxemburg, 
Germany, in 1854, and of that place his parents, Theodore and Mary (Kiefer) 
Weber, were also natives, both born in 1818. They continued residents of Ger- 
many until their son John was a lad of thirteen years and then sailed for the 
new world, attracted by the broader business opportunities offered on this side 
the Atlantic. The father had just previously been engaged in merchandising 
in Ronsdorf, Germany, and had followed farming in that country, owning land 
there. On reaching the new world he made his way at once to Buchanan county, 
Iowa. It was in 1867 that he became identified with farming interests in this 
county, where he continued the work of tilling the soil to the time of his death. 
His study of the political situation of the country led him to give active support 
to the democratic party after he had become a citizen of the United States, but 




Mil. AND .MRS. JOHN A. W KUKK 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 235 

the honors and emoluments of office had no attraction for him, as he always 
preferred to give his attention to his business affairs. As the years passed by 
he prospered and became the owner of two hundred acres of land. Both he 
and his wife were of the Catholic faith. The former died in 1891, at the age 
of seventy-three years, and the mother passed away in 1890, at the age of seventy- 
two years. In the family were fifteen children, but not all lived to adult age, 
John A. Weber being the youngest now living. He has one sister, Emma Weber, 
who is a resident of Independence. 

John A. Weber began his education in the schools of Germanj' and continued 
his studies in the schools of Buchanan count3^ His training at farm labor was 
not meager, for from an early age he assisted his father in the development of 
the fields upon the old homestead. He was twenty-four years of age when he 
began farming on his own account and has since followed that pursuit, winning 
success as the years have gone by. From time to time he has added to his 
holdings until he is now the owner of three hundred and sixty acres of arable and 
productive land in Washington township, all of which he farms himself. He 
has a splendidly developed property, of which one hundred acres is planted to 
corn, with sixty acres in oats and the remainder in hay and pasture land, save 
twenty acres of timber. He makes stock-raising an important feature of his 
place, specializing in Durham cattle and Poland-China hogs. Ever\i:hing about 
his farm indicates his careful supervision and progressive methods, and at all 
times he utilizes the latest improved machinery to facilitate the work of the fields. 

In 1878 ]\Ir. AYeber was united in marriage to ]\Iiss Anna Gerslenberger, who 
was born in Dubuque, a daughter of Frank and Theresa (Ernest) Gerslenberger, 
both of whom were natives of Schleswig, Germany. The father, who was bom 
in 1826, passed away in 1908, and the mother, who was born in 1831, is now 
living in Dubuque at the advanced age of eighty-three years. ]\Ir. Gerslenberger 
was a young man of about twenty-five years when he bade adieu to friends and 
native country and sailed for the United States. He began farming near Dubuque 
and afterward came to Buchanan county in 1874. Here, too, he became inter- 
ested in agricultural pursuits as the owner of about two hundred acres of land. 
He and his wife held membership in the Catholic church, in the faith of which 
they reared their family of six children. 

To i\Ir. and Mrs. Weber have been born twelve children : Rosa, now thirty- 
five years of age, is the wife of Leonard Pint, a resident farmer of Perry town- 
ship, and they have eight children : Elizabeth, Joseph, Hilda, Herman, Verona, 
Gertrude, Alatilda and ^Margaret ; George, thirty-four years of age and now 
engaged in farming in Washington township, wedded ilary Pint, a sister of 
Leonard Pint, and they have three children : Lewis, Herbert and Lillian ; 
Mathias, thirty-two years of age, also owns and cultivates a farm in Washington 
township, and he wedded Anna Pint, by whom he has two children, Oscar and 
Ervin : William, aged thirty, is a farmer of Fulton, Kansas, who married Nellie 
Shields: Frank, twenty-nine years of age, follows farming in Washington town- 
ship : Elizabeth, twenty-six years of age, is at home with her parents ; Charles, 
twenty-three years of age, and John, twenty years of age, are assisting their 
father upon the home farm ; Matilda, aged eighteen, is a teacher in Washington 
township ; Leonard, fourteen, Theresa, thirteen, and Edward, eight, are all at 

home with their parents and are attending the public schools. 
Vol. n— n 



236 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

The family are communicants of St. Joseph's church. Mr. Weber has been 
a resident of the county for forty-seven yesirs, and has therefore witnessed much 
of its growth and development. He has seen the wonderful changes which 
have occurred, transforming the wild lands into fine farms, while towns have 
been converted into cities. He rejoices in what has been accomplished and stands 
ready to further any movement for the general good. In politics he is a democrat. 



CHARLES E. BOYACK. 

Charles E. Boyack is now living practically retired in Independence, in 
which city he took up his abode in 1908. Indolence and idleness, however, are 
utterly foreign to his nature and to some extent he continues active in the field 
of surveying and engineering work. He was born in this county in 1862, a sou 
of William and Jane (Doig) Boyack, both of whom were natives of Dundee, 
Scotland, born in 1822 and 1824 respectively. They were reared and married 
in that country and there the father learned and followed the trade of linen 
weaving. On crossing the Atlantic to America they took up their abode in 
Rockford, Illinois, in 1851, and there spent two years, during which period he 
was foreman of a lumber yard. In 1853 they arrived in Buchanan county, 
settling in Sumner township, where Mv. Boyack purchased land and began 
farming. In addition to tilling the soil he engaged in raising thoroughbred, 
.shorthorn cattle and Poland China hogs and took several prizes at the county 
fairs. He was, however, not much of an exhibitor, being more of a breeder. 
He had no political aspiration for himself, yet was active in politics in Sumner 
township and labored earnestly to uphold those principles in which he believed. 
Many sterling traits of character won for him the confidence and high regard 
of those with whom he came in contact, and he remained one of the valued 
residents of Buchanan county until his death, which occurred in 1901. 

Charles E. Boyack, who was the youngest in a family of six children, 
acquired his early education in the common schools of Buchanan county. When 
about twenty-five years of age he formed a partnership with his father to carry 
on general farming and stock-raising, making a specialty of pure blooded cattle 
and hogs. Year after year he continued to live upon the farm until he removed 
to Independence. At different times he has been called to public office. In 
1894 he was elected county supervisor on the republican ticket, and he has also 
been county surveyor for six years and county engineer for three years. He 
had acquired his knowledge of engineering when working in that way as a boy 
upon the farm and he still engages in engineering to some extent. He yet 
owns farm lands in Buchanan county, but is not actively engaged in their 
cultivation at the present time. 

In August, 1892, :Mr. Boyack was united in marriage to Miss Helena Clue, 
who was born in Buchanan county and in early life was left an orphan. Her 
father came to Iowa direct from Germany. He was a stonecutter by trade and 
worked in connection with dressing the stone used in the building of the state 
hospital but lived upon a farm. He had only two children. Mrs. Boyack 
being the younger. By her marriage she has become the mother of two daughters. 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 237 

Ruth Agnes, who was born in this county and is a graduate of the high school 
of Independence, is now engaged in teaching in the country schools. Elsie 
Virginia, born in Buchanan county, is a high-school graduate and also a teacher 
in the country schools. 

Mr. Boyack belongs to the Odd Fellows' society and the >Modern Woodmen 
of America. He has always been very active in support of the republican party, 
for he believes its principles contain the best elements of good government. 
He stands loyally for everything which he thinks has a bearing upon the welfare 
and upbuilding of his city and county. Here he has always lived and his many 
excellent traits of character are recognized by his large circle of friends. 



JOHN WEIHER. 



John Weiher, who has lived retired at Rowley since 1910, was for a number 
of years actively and successfully identified with agricultural pursuits in this 
eounty, owning and operating an excellent farm of two hundred acres in Cono 
township. His birth occurred in Germany on the 3d of April, 1837, his parents 
being John and Marj^ (Deikmann) "Weiher, who were likewise natives of that 
country. The father, a farmer by occupation, passed away in Germany in 
1847, but the mother died in the United States. 

John Weiher acquired his education in the schools of his native land and there 
lived for a number of years after attaining his majority, following farming as 
a means of livelihood. In 1864 he crossed the Atlantic to the United States 
and made his way to Wisconsin, where he was engaged in agricultural pursuits 
for six years, being employed as a farm hand for four years and cultivating 
the soil on his own account for two years. Subsequently he came to Buchanan 
county, Iowa, and purchased and improved a tract of two hundred acres in 
Cono township, devoting his attention to its operation throughout the remainder 
of his active business career. In 1910, having won a comfortable competency, 
he left the farm and took up his abode in Rowley, where he is now spending 
the evening of life in well earned ease. 

Mr. Weiher has been married twice. In October, 1860, he w^edded Miss 
Carlonia Ludemann, by whom he had four children, as follows : John, who is a 
resident of Chicago; Augusta, who gave her hand in marriage to Charles 
Heiland, of Rowley ; Emma, who passed away in 1902 ; and Frank, a resident of 
Rowley. The wife and mother was called to her final rest September 10, 1900, 
and on the 10th of June, 1904, Mr. Weiher was again married, his second union 
being with Miss Catherine Ossman, who was born in Pennsylvania in 1850. 
Her parents, Israel and Katie (Garis) Ossman, were pioneer settlers of Buchanan 
county, Iowa, and here resided until they passed away, the former in 1899 and 
the latter in 1906. Israel Ossman gave his time and energies to general agri- 
cultural pursuits throughout his entire business career. 

In his political views Mr. Weiher is a democrat, while his religious faith is 
that of the Presbyterian church. The hope that led him to leave his native 
land and seek a home in the new world has been more than realized, for here he 
has found the opportunities which he sought and in their wise utilization has won 



238 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

a gratifying measure of prosperity. He has now passed the seventy-seventh 
milestone on life's journey and enjoys the respect and veneration which should 
ever be accorded one who has traveled thus far on this earthly pilgrimage and 
whose career has been at all times upright and honorable. 



MANLY I. PERRY 



Manly I. Perry, engaged in general merchandising at Quasqueton, is actuated 
in all of his business activities by high standards and follows the most modern 
commercial methods. He was born in Jones county, Iowa, in 1868, a son of 
Malachi and Lucretia (Cutler) Perry. The father was born in De Kalb county, 
Illinois, in 1844, and the mother's birth occurred in Linn county, Iowa, in 1850. 
In early life the father followed farming and on coming to Iowa settled in 
Jones county, but afterward removed to Linn county. At the period of the 
Civil war he put aside all business and personal co)isiderations, feeling that his 
first duty was to his countr^^ and enlisted in Company K, First. Iowa Cavalry, 
with which he served for three years, and, although he participated in a number 
of hotly contested engagements, he was never wounded nor taken prisoner. In 
1886 he removed to Buchanan county and engaged in farming in Cono township 
up to the time of his retirement from agricultural life. He then removed to 
Quasqueton, about two years prior to his death, and engaged in the butcher 
business with his son. 

Manly I. Perry was largely reared in Linn county and acquired his educa- 
tion as a public-school student. He began working in the fields when but seven 
years of age and assisted his father until he reached the age of fourteen, after 
which he began working for others, spending the succeeding seven years as a 
farm hand in the employ of different people in the neighborhood. He afterward 
engaged in farming on his own account for three years and tlien opened a meat 
market in Quasqueton, continuing in the butcher business for nine years. Suc- 
cess attended his efforts in that direction and led him to branch out along other 
commercial lines. He opened his general mercantile store, which he has now 
conducted for about thirteen years, winning a substantial measure of prosperity. 
He carries a good line in all the different departments and his reliable business 
methods, earnest endeavor to please his patrons and fair prices have won for 
him a continually growing trade. 

In 1890 Mr. Perry was united in marriage to ]Miss Stella C. Williams, who 
was born in Quasqueton, Iowa, a daughter of George and Emily A. (Wilkins) 
Williams. Her father, who was born in Pennsylvania, learned the carpenter's 
trade in early life and after living for some time in Wisconsin came to Iowa, 
arriving in this state after tlie Civil war, in which he had served as a member 
of a Wisconsin regiment. He found pioneer conditions in this state and shared 
in the arduous task of early development and improvement. Owning land, he 
followed farming in Buchanan county for some time, but was living retired 
when death called him. He was an active member of the IMethodist church 
and was recognized throughout the community as an exemplary Christian man. 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 239 

To Mr. and ^Mrs. Perry have been born two children : Floyd, who is in the 
store with his father; and Bernice, who is attending school. 

In his political views Mr. Perry is a republican, but does not seek nor 
desire office. He belongs to the ^Masonic fraternity and to the Eastern Star. 
He has held all of the offices in the Odd Fellows' society and is connected with 
the Eebekahs. He also has membership with the Modern Brotherhood of 
America and the Modern Woodmen of America and in both of those organiza- 
tions has held office. The varied interests of his life are given a proportionate 
measure of time and attention, but are never allowed to interfere with the 
capable conduct of his business affairs. He has won success and in addition 
to his store is the owner of farm lands in Buchanan county. His has been an 
active, useful and well spent life, placing him among the representative mer- 
chants of his town. 



EVINGTON F. MUIMFORD. 

Every state in the Union perhaps has contributed to the citizenship of Iowa, 
and among the many who have come from New York is numbered Evington F. 
Mumford, who was born in Lewis county, that state, on .the 1st of September, 
1847, a son of W. C. and Mary (Walsworth) Mumford, natives of New York. 
The father owned land and improved a farm in the Empire state, there spending 
the greater part of his life. He died in 1886 and for two years was survived by 
his wife, who passed away in 1888. 

The usual experiences of a farm lad came to Evington F. Mumford in his 
boyhood, which was spent in New York. He remained with his parents until 
he attained his majority and then made his way westward to Illinois, where 
he rented land and carried on farming for six years. At the end of that time 
he purchased eighty acres which he cultivated for about six years and on selling 
out he bought a swamp at ten dollars per acre. When the state ran a big ditch 
through this he also further tiled the land and converted one hundred and 
sixty acres of untillable swamp land into a fine farm upon which he reared his 
family. After cultivating that place for sixteen years he traded it at a rate 
of one hundred and forty dollars per acre for his present place in Buchanan 
county, which comprises three hundred and twenty acres on sections 3 and 4, 
Homer township, and which was known as the S. S. Allen farm. In addition 
to his previous farm he gave four thousand dollars for his present property, the 
transfer being made on the 1st of March, 1910. 

Mr. ]\Iumford at once began the further development and improvement of 
his farm, which is now one of the attractive properties of the county. The 
evidences of thrift and untiring industry are there seen and all of the modern 
buildings and improved machinerj^ upon the place indicate the fact that the 
owner has kept in touch with the trend of advancement along agricultural lines. 
He also engages quite extensively in stock-raising, making a specialty of handling 
thoroughbred Hereford cattle and Poland China hogs. 

On the 1st of September, 1870, Mr. IMumford was united in marriage to 
Miss Hannah ]\Ioon, a daughter of Thomas and Ann (Haxby) Moon, who were 



240 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

natives of England and in an early day came to the United States, the mother 
being then a little child, but the father was practically grown when he made 
the voyage to the new world. He located in Illinois and purchased land near 
Kewanee, where he carried on farming throughout his remaining days, passing 
away in 1878. His wife survived for more than two decades, dying on the 
7th of September, 1899. To Mr. and Mrs. Mumford have been born six children, 
as follows : John T., at home ; Ella, who passed away in 1873 ; Elizabeth A., 
who is the wife of Bert Fifield, of Illinois, and the mother of a daughter, Irene, 
thirteen years old ; Alice, who gave her hand in marriage to Elisha Myer and 
resides near Trenton, Missouri; Leonard B.. at home; and Manville, who follows 
farming near Vista, Iowa. 

A republican in politics, a Baptist in religious faith — these are the associa- 
tions of Mr. ^lumford outside of business. He is neglectful of none of the 
duties which devolve upon him in a public relation but has made farming his 
chief interest and his labors have resulted in the attainment of a high measure 
of success which is the merited reward of his industry and close application. 



HON. BEX.IA.MIX F. STODDARD. 

Hon. Benjamin F. Stoddard for many years has been prominent in public 
affairs of Buchanan county and his intiuence has been felt throughout the state 
of Iowa, as he was for two terms a member of the general assembly. He is the 
present mayor of Jesup and brings his wide knowledge of civic and governmental 
matters to the administration of the affairs of the town, proving an unusually 
able and progressive executive. 

He was born at Gales Ferry, near New London. Connecticut, on the 9th of 
July, 1848, a son of Isaac A. and Celia M. (Cortes) Stoddard. The father was 
a native of the same place and the subject of this review is a representative of 
the sixth generation of the family born at Gales Ferry, the Stoddards having 
resided in this country since about IGoO, when William and Anthony Stoddard 
came here from England. The mother was also of English descent and was 
born at Windham, Connecticut. 

In early life Isaac A. Stoddard was a whaler and had many interesting expe- 
riences in the Arctic seas. In 1855 he came with his family to Iowa and settled 
in Clayton county, near the town of McGregor, where he resided for four years. 
At the end of that time he removed to Grand Meadow township, where he 
purchased one hundred and sixty acres of wild land. He cleared the farm and 
cultivated it for a number of years, or until 1867, when he sold the place and 
came to Buciuuian county, buying one hinidred and sixty acres east of Jesup. 
He operated that farm until his death, whieh oecurred when he was eighty-nine 
years of' age. He was a man of iron constitution and was vigorous and active 
until a very short time before his death. He was a republican in politics and 
held all of the township offices. He was also very active in church work. Innng 
a local minister of the Methodist Episcopal church and prominent in the Sunday 
school. His wife died when the subject of this review was fourteen years of 
age and when she was hut forty years old. Her religious affiliation was with 




HON. BENJAMIN F. STODDARD 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 243 

the Congregational church and she could always be depended upon to aid in 
the work of that organization. By her marriage she was the mother of three 
children, namely: Benjamin F. ; Mary M., the wife of N. R. Reynolds, of 
Luverne, Minnesota; and Isaac C, who died when thirty-five years of age. 

Benjamin F. Stoddard was about six years of age when the family removed 
to Iowa and remained at home until he was a youth of eighteen years. He then 
began the study of telegraphy at Jesup and for about two years followed that 
occupation, being stationed at various points on the Illinois Central Railroad. 
At the end of that time he abandoned telegraphy and learned the miller 's trade, 
which he followed for six years at Independence, Iowa. He then began farming 
and still oversees the cultivation of a valuable tract of land which he owns in 
Perry township, this county. About thirty-eight years ago he built his present 
home in Jesup and has since been a resident of the town. A great deal of his 
time has been devoted to public service, as he has held all of the town offices 
and, as before stated, is the present mayor. He represented his district in the 
state legislature in the thirty-third and thirty-fourth general assemblies and 
proved an efficient member of that body. He served on the following committees : 
Railroads and transportation, roads and highways, food and dairy, agriculture, 
telegraph and express, schools and text-books, senatorial districts, federal rela- 
tions, and was chairman of the committee on horticulture. He readily learned 
the intricacies of legislative procedure and manifested excellent judgment in 
deciding upon the merit of the bills that came up for consideration, and was an 
important factor in securing the passage of a number of measures which proved 
beneficial to the state at large. 

On the 12th of February, 1875, the marriage of I\Ir. Stoddard and Miss 
Electa A. Labour was solemnized. Mrs. Stoddard was born May 21, 1849, in 
the state of New York and came to this locality in 1867. They have two children : 
Gertrude E., the wife of R. W. Houck, of Jesup; and Margaret M., assistant 
superintendent of the Northwestern Hospital at Moorhead, jMinnesota. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stoddard are active and consistent members of the ]Methodist 
Episcopal church. He is a republican in politics and his advice is much sought 
in local councils of his party. Fraternally he belongs to Siolem Lodge No. 222, 
A. F. & A. M., of Jesup, and both he and his wife are members of the Eastern 
Star. He is one of the prominent citizens of Jesup and his endorsement of any 
project does much toward insuring its success. 



GEORGE W. FRANCK. 



A farm of one hundred and sixty acres situated on section 8, Newton town- 
ship, pays tribute to the care and labor bestowed upon it by George W. Franck, 
and he holds title to one hundred and forty acres of land in that township. 
He was born in Independence, Buchanan county, February 22, 1882, a son of 
Fritz and Fredericka (Geiser) Franck, who are mentioned in connection with 
the sketch of Fred Franck, on other pages in this work. 

At the usual age George W. Franck became a public-school pupil, pursuing 
his studies in the schools of Homer and Middlefield townships. When not busy 



244 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

with his text-books lie worked in the fields and received thorough training in the 
best methods of plowing, planting and harvesting. To his father he gave the 
benefit of his services until twenty-four years of age and then started out in life 
on his own account, choosing as an occupation the pursuit to which he had been 
reared. During the greater part of the time he has lived in Newton township and 
he is now operating what is known as the Hekel place of one hundred and sixty 
acres on section 8. He has recently purchased from George Hekel one hundred 
and forty acres on sections 16, 17 and 24, Newton township, and in the spring 
of 1915 expects to build a residence on section 16, when he will then remove to 
that place. 

On the 8th of September, 1909, Mr. Franck was married to Miss Julia May 
Fest, a daughter of John and Janet Alice (Ironside) Fest. Mr. and Mrs. 
Franck have become the parents of three children, Benjamin G., Gilbert W. 
and Leon L., aged respectively four, two and one years. 

The religious faith of the parents is that of the Congregational church and 
they are well known in the community where they reside. They have many 
sterling traits of character which have gained for them the friendship and high 
regard of those with whom they have been brought in contact. ]Mr. Franck 
votes with the republican party but does not seek office as a reward for party 
fealty, preferring always to give his attention to his business affairs, which are 
now bringing to him the substantial rewards of labor. 



FRANK E. SHIMER, M D. 

Dr. Frank E. Shimer, who has been actively engaged in the practice of 
medicine at Jesup for the past nine years, is widely recognized as an able and 
successful representative of the profession in Buchanan county. His birth 
occurred in Benton county, Iowa, on the 9th of October, 1880, hLs parents being 
John A. and Ellen (Clarke Shimer, the former a native of Black Hawk 
countv, this state, and the latter of Buchanan countv. Jesse Shimer, the 
paternal grandfather of our subject, came to Iowa from Pennsylvania in 1854, 
settling in Black Hawk county. The maternal grandparents of Dr. Shimer 
came to Buchanan county, Iowa, from Indiana, and here their daughter Ellen 
was reared. She passed away at the age of forty-eight years but is survived 
by her husband, who makes his home at Laporte City, Black Hawk county, Iowa. 

Frank E. Shimer spent the days of his boyhood and youth on the home 
farm and supplemented his early educational training by a course of study in 
the high school at Laporte City. Having determined upon the practice of 
medicine as a life work, he entered the medical dejiartment of the University 
of Illinois in 1901 and at the end of four years was graduated from that insti- 
tution, receiving the degree of M. D. on the 6th of June, 1905. He passed the 
required examination before the state board of Illinois and a month later 
opened an office at Jesup, Iowa, where he has remained continuously to the 
present time, his practice having steadily grown as he has demonstrated his 
skill and ability in coping with the intricate problems which continually con- 
front tli(> ]>hysician in his efforts to restore health and jirolong life. With the 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 245 

advanced tlioiight of the profession he keeps in close touch through his mem- 
bership in the Buchanan County Medical Society, the Iowa State Medical So- 
ciety and the American Medical Association. 

On the 30th of September, 1905, Dr. Shinier was united in marriage to Miss 
Tina Ashley, a native of Black Hawk county, Iowa, by whom he has a daugh- 
ter, Dorothy A. He gives his political allegiance to the republican party and 
is identified fraternally with the Knights of Pythias, belonging to Safety 
liodge. No. 416, at Jesup. A man of genial, cordial nature, he has gained the 
good will and friendship of all with whom he has been associated in profes- 
sional, fraternal and social relations. 



FRANK E. KERR. 



Frank E. Kerr is a resident farmer of Byron township, living on section 
15. The farm that he now owns is also the place of his birth and his natal day 
was October 11, 1870. His parents were William and Amanda Morehouse 
(Hearn) Kerr. The father was a native of Scotland, born in 1830, and after 
spending the period of his minority in the land of hills and heather he came 
to the new world in 1852, settling first in New York state, where he was 
employed until 1859. He then came to Buchanan county and in 1860 made 
his way westward to the Black Hills, where he engaged in teaming for five years. 
He then returned and bought land in Byron township in 1865. This district was 
then largely undeveloped and the land which came into his possession was wild 
and unimproved, but with characteristic energy he began its cultivation and 
converted it into productive fields. He also added to his holdings until at one 
time he owned three hundred and twenty acres, of which he later sold forty 
acres, retaining possession of a tract of two hundred and eighty acres until 
his death, which occurred on the 9th of May, 1906. 

The political- views of Mr. Kerr accorded with the principles of the repub- 
lican party and his religious belief was that of the Presbyterian church. He 
was a self-made and succe.ssful man to whom difficulties and obstacles seemed 
but to serve as an impetus for renewed effort. Gradually he worked his way 
upward and no one could grudge him his prosperity, so honorably was it attained. 
Mrs. Kerr was a native of Ohio. In early womanhood she married a Mr. 
Hearn, who died while serving the country as a soldier in the Union army during 
the Civil war. In 1868 she became the wife of William Kerr and twenty 
years later passed away leaving two sons, Frank E. and William, who own the 
old homestead. 

Frank E. Kerr spent his boyhood days upon the home farm and pursued his 
education in the public schools. At the time of his marriage he rented the 
farm from his father and thus continued its cultivation until the father 's death, 
when he and his brother inherited the place. 

It was in February, 1898, that Frank E. Kerr was united in marriage to 
Miss Florence Elliott, who was born in Fremont township, this county, a daughter 
of George and Jannette (Sharp) Elliott. The father was born in England in 
1830 and when ten years of age went to Illinois with his parents. In 1856 he 



246 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

came to this county and operated a threshing machine in Jefferson township 
for three years. He then removed to Byron township, where he lived for three 
years and on the expiration of that period took up his abode in Fremont town- 
ship, where he purchased land which he brought to a high state of cultivation. 
From time to time he added to his holdings until he became the owner of four 
hundred and eighty acres upon which he is still living at the ripe old age of 
eighty-four years. He has held various township offices and has been a promi- 
nent leading citizen of the community. His wife was born in New York, in 
1843, and in her girlhood came to Iowa, where she engaged in teaching school 
prior to marriage, which was celebrated in 1861. To Mr. and Mrs. Elliott 
were born eight children, of whom seven are yet living. Mrs. Kerr was edu- 
cated in the public .schools of this county. 

In his political views Mr. Kerr is a stalwart republican and several times 
has served as school director but has never sought nor desired political office, 
preferring to concentrate his energies upon general farm work, in which he is 
busily and successfully engaged. His farm is well improved, giving evidence 
of the care and supervision of the owner, who in all of his methods is most 
practical and progressive. 



A. F. TUNKS. 



A. F. Tunks, living retired in Jesup, was engaged for many years in business 
as a contractor and builder, and various substantial structures in Buchanan 
county stand as monuments to his thrift and enterprise. A native of Ohio, he 
was born in 1842, a son of Levi and Sarah (Alexander) Tunks. In 1854 the 
father took his family to Illinois, settling in Winnebago county, where he pur- 
chased sitxy acres of land, upon which he resided for a decade. In 1864 he 
removed with his family to Tama county, Iowa, but the following year became 
a resident of Black Hawk county, where he invested in eighty acres on which 
he lived to the time of his death, when he was seventy-four years of age. His 
wife, a native of New Jersey, went to Ohio with her parents, who purchased 
land in that state and there carried on farming throughout their remaining days. 
It was in Ohio that she became the wife of Levi Tunks, and thereafter she accom- 
panied her husband on his various removals, which brought her ultimately to 
Iowa. Following his death she went to Center Point, Linn county, to live with 
her son Allen and there passed away. 

A. F. Tunks was largely reared upon his father's farm in Winnebago county, 
Illinois, and is indebted to the public-school system for the educational oppor- 
tunities which he tliere enjoyed. When his text-books were put aside he began 
learning the carpenter and joiner's trade, which he followed until he enlisted 
for service in the Civil war, joining Company I, Seventy-fourtli Regiment of 
Illinois Volunteers, in 1862. He spent a year at the front and then, because of 
illness which rendered him unfit for further duty, was honoral)ly discharged. 
He immediately returned home and afterward assisted his fatlier in the cultiva- 
tion of the farm until 1866, when he came to Buchanan countv. 



5^ 







i- 



1 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 249 

In March, 1862, in Illinois, ^Ir. Tunks was united in marriage to Miss Lucinda 
Elliott, a daughter of Samuel and Lydia (Hulse) Elliott. Her father was born 
in Ohio in 1832 and attended the public schools of that state. When twenty-five 
years of age he married and afterward removed to Winnebago county, Illinois, 
where he purchased land and improved a farm, upon which he lived for thirty- 
five years. He then sold out and went to Tama county, Iowa, where he invested 
in farm land which he cultivated for fifteen years, when he sold. His wife died 
in Jesup at the age of sixty-six years, and Mr. EUiott, surviving her for a con- 
siderable period, lived upon his son's farm in Tama county until his death, 
which occurred when he had reached the age of eighty-two years. Their daugh- 
ter, ]\Irs. Tunks, was born in Winnebago county, where her girlhood was passed 
and where the public schools afforded her the educational privileges which she 
enjoyed. By the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Tunks have been born eleven children : 
Mrs. Harriet Hohl, now living in Waterloo ; Archie B., who died in Jesup ; Mrs. 
Laura Horn, living in Jesup ; Harry E., whose home is in Brandon ; Will A., 
of Jesup; Fred C, of Waterloo; Mrs. Nellie Brown of Jesup ; Frank; Mrs. 
Bessie Barrett, Henry and Ruby, all living in Jesup. 

Removing to Iowa, Mr. Tunks settled in Brooklyn, Pow^eshiek county, in 
1864 and there worked at his trade for two years, after which he went to Tama 
county, where he again followed his trade for a decade and also did some con- 
tract work. On the expiration of that period he came to Buchanan county, 
settling in Perry township, where he worked at his trade and later took up 
contracting and building, continuing actively in the business until he retired 
and removed to Jesup, where he and his wife now reside. He is the owner of 
three good residence properties in Jesup and a farm in WLsconsin and from his 
realty holdings derives a gratifying annual income. Mr. Tunks is now seventy- 
two years of age, while his wife has reached the age of sixty-seven. He belongs 
to the Odd Fellows lodge of Jesup, with which he has been affiliated for fifteen 
years, and he exercises his right of franchise in support of the men and measures 
of the republican party. His worth as a citizen is well known. He has lived a 
busy and useful life, and his industry and integrity have been the salient features 
in his career. He now well deserves the rest which has come to him, for in 
former years he so carefully conducted his business affairs that he became the 
owner of valuable property holdings that now return him a gratifying annual 
income. 



E. W. COMFORT. 



E. W. Comfort, successfully carrying on general farming on section 33, 
Perry township, was born in Cook county, Illinois, in 1859, a son of W. M. and 
Matilda (Blackman) Comfort. The family lived upon a farm in Illinois until 
1863 and then removed to Buchanan county, the father purchasing two hundred 
and sixteen acres of land in Perry township, known now as the old Comfort 
farm. 

E. W. Comfort was at that time four years of age and upon that place the 
days of his boyhood and youth were passed, his time being divided between vsork 



250 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

in the fields as age and strength increased and the duties of the schoolroom. The 
practical experience of his youth well qualified him to carry on farm work when 
he started out in life on his own account in early manhood. 

On September 1, 1889, Mr. Comfort was united in marriage to Miss Anna 
Vaneman, a daughter of U. B. and Martha (Smith) Vaneman. Her father w^as 
born near New Castle, Pennsylvania, and was a son of David and Anna (Cunning- 
ham) Vaneman. His boyhood was spent in the Keystone state and his education 
was there acquired. Later he accompanied his parents to Buchanan county, Iowa, 
where his father in 1857 purchased a farm in Fairbank to\^^lship. There the son 
remained until after the outbreak of the Civil war in 1861, when he enlisted for 
service in the Twenty-seventh Iowa Infantry. He was on continuous duty for 
two years, at the end of Avhich time he became ill and was honorably discharged 
at Cairo, Illinois. He then returned to Littleton, Iowa, and remained upon his 
father's farm until his marriage to Miss Martha Smith, a daughter of JMartin 
and Minerva (Spalding) Smith. The marriage was celebrated October 6, 1864. 
They then went to Flint, Michigan, where Mr. Vaneman worked on his farm of 
eight}^ acres for seventeen years. He then returned to Westburg township, 
Buchanan county, where he resided for some time, after which he sold his farm 
property there and took up his abode in Hazleton, living retired until his death, 
which occurred January 17, 1913. His widow survives him at the age of 
seventy-three years and is living with her son in Buchanan county. Mrs. Vane- 
man was born in Jefferson county, New York, in 1841, and with her parents came 
to Buchanan county, living in Fairbank township up to the time of her marriage. 
Their daughter, Mrs. Comfort, spent lier girlhood days in Buchanan county and 
pursued a public-school education. To ^Ir. and ^Irs. Comfort have been born 
ten children: Frank Harrison, living upon his father's farm; Mrs. Nellie Martha 
Sampson, now of Jesup ; ^Nlrs. Hazel ^Matilda McVenes, also of Jesup ; Ray Wy- 
man; Jennie Sarah; Arthur David: Ilattie May; Willie McKinley; Charlie 
Wesley ; and Mabel Grace. The last seven named are all yet at home. The parents 
are members of the Methodist church and are loyal to its teachings. 

Mr. Comfort votes witli the republican party and is interested in its success 
and growth but does not seek nor desire office as a reward for party fealty. 
He stands for progress and improvement in public affairs, however, as well as 
along agricultural lines, but he concentrates his energies upon the operation of 
his farm of two hundred and forty acres, willi the result that determination 
and energy have brouglit him to a creditable position among tlie well-to-do agri- 
culturists of Perry townsliip. 



JOSEPH LIMBERT. 



Joseph Limbert is one of the partners in a wholesale cigar and pipe business 
at Independence and concentrates his efforts upon the upbuilding of the trade, 
which has already assumed extensive and gratifying proportions. He was born 
in Auglaize county, Ohio, on the 30th of September, 1861, a son of Francis 
Limbert, who was born in Germany, January 1, 1828. The father was brought 
to the United States when but six years of age by his parents and in early life 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 251 

he learned aud followed the molder's trade in Dayton, Ohio. He made the 
first car wheel manufactured by the Barney-Packard Manufacturing Company 
of Dayton and for several years followed his trade there, but after an accident 
which caused him the loss of the sight of one eye he turned his attention to 
farming. 

In 1864 Francis Limbert came to Iowa, settling at Waterloo, where he 
resumed the molder's trade and was thus engaged until the sight of the other 
eye became impaired. He then took up his abode upon a farm in Westburg 
township, Buchanan county, in 1868, and was identified with general agricul- 
tural pursuits in the ownership and cultivation of one hundred and sixty acres 
of land until 1881, when he retired and established his home in Independence, 
M'here he still resides. He was married in Ohio in early manhood to Miss 
Margaret Sheppard, who was born in Germany in October, 1829, and came to 
the United States with her parents when four years of age. She died in 1910. 
In their family were seven children, of whom Joseph is the fifth. The father 
led a busy and useful life, always concentrating his energies upon his industrial 
or agricultural interests and taking no active part in political affairs. 

Joseph Limbert was but three years of age when the family came to Iowa 
and through much of his life has been a resident of Buchanan county. He 
pursued his education in the public schools of Westburg township and when 
twenty years of age engaged in merchandising in connection with N. E. Becker, 
liis brother-in-law, at Allison, this state, there remaining for a year and a half. 
He afterward clerked for Steven Tabor in a grocery store in Independence for 
two years and then went upon the road as a traveling salesman for Chamberlin, 
Dewstoe & Company, wholesale tobacconists, whom he represented for fifteen 
years, or from the 1st of January, 1885, until 1900. He then severed his con- 
nection with that house and formed a partnership with his brother, Albert F. 
Limbert, for the conduct of a wholesale bu.siness in cigars and pipes, and bought 
his brother's interest in 1901. He employs four men to represent him upon 
the road, while he also acts as a traveling salesman. He is a jobber of the well 
known cigar Wapsipinicon, which name is derived from an old Indian legend. 
A band of Sac warriors, led by Pinnekon, were accompanied by a band of Fox, 
led by Fleet Foot, on the warpath against the Sioux, to avenge the death of 
members of Pinnekon 's tribe. On their return from a victorious battle Pinnekon. 
with some of Ms braves, visited the village of the Fox and there wooed and won 
Wapsie, the daughter of Good Heart, chief of the Fox tribe. The evening before 
they were to be married and leave for the Sac village, Wapsie and Pinnekon 
floated down the river to Cedar Rock. There he was shot from ambush by Fleet 
Foot, mad from jealousy, and sank in the river with Wapsie. 

On the 8th of October, 1885, Mr. Limbert was united in marriage to Miss 
Stella A. Kent, a native of Independence and a daughter of Silas and Roxie 
Ann (Welsh) Kent, both of whom were natives of New York and are noAV 
deceased. Her father was killed at the Ith of July celebration at Ashville, 
New York. He went to California in 1849 during the gold rush, but after a 
brief period there spent returned to New York, making the journey l>oth ways 
by wagon train. His wife was an active member of the Methodist church. In 
their family were three daughters, of whom Mrs. Limbert is the youngest. She 
has three children: Fred K., born in 1887, who was graduated from the Inde- 



252 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

pendence high school and is now a traveling salesman for his father; Cora 
]\Iargaret, at home ; and Ralph R., who was born in 1894 and is now traveling 
for his father. Mrs. Limbert is an active member of the Presbyterian church 
and is also prominent in the social and club life of the city. 

Mr. Limbert belongs to the Odd Fellows society, the Modern Woodmen of 
America and is a charter member of Wapsie Council, No. 413, United Commer- 
cial Travelers. He has never sought nor desired political office, preferring to 
concentrate his energies upon his business affairs, yet he is deeply interested in 
the welfare and progress of the city and is especially known for his activity in 
efforts for beautifying Independence through floral adornment. 



FRED C. NORMAN. 



Fred C. Norman, agent for the Illinois Central Railroad at Independence, was 
born in Ohio in 1860, a son of Nicholas and Mary (Taylor) Norman, both natives 
of England. The father was born in Somersetshire, in 1820, and the mother in 
1823. Coming to the United States, he settled first in Ohio, where he began 
farming when about twenty-one years of age. He lived in that state for two 
years and then removed to Illinois, establishing his home near Chicago, whicli 
was then a small place. A year later he came to Buchanan county, Iowa, settling 
in Winthrop. Here he purchased land and carried on farming throughout the 
greater part of his life. There were still many evidences of pioneer conditions 
in Buchanan county at the time of his arrival and he lived to see the progres.s 
and improvement wrought by man. After taking out naturalization papei*s he 
became a stalwart republican but did not seek nor desire office, preferring to 
concentrate his efforts upon his business, for in addition to tilling the soil he 
engaged extensively in raising cattle, making a specialty of Durhains. He died 
in 1904. His wife, who had come to the new world when about twenty-one year.s 
of age, passed away in 1911. 

Fred C. Norman was the seventh in order of birth in a family of twelve 
children and he supplemented his district-school education by study in Winthrop. 
When twenty-one years of age he became a telegraph operator and agent on the 
Illinois Central at Winthrop, which position he filled for eighteen years, and was 
afterward traveling agent and operator for three years. He was division agent 
for four years, and in the variou.s capacities in which he served proved able and 
conscientious. In 1908 he was transferred to Independence, where he has since 
been agent. On one occasion he retired from railroad work and went upon the 
road as a traveling salesman for an implement house but afterward returned and 
is now the efficient and popular agent at Independence. 

In 1886 Mr. Norman was married to Miss Gelia Adams, a native of Liberty 
township, this county, and a daughter of ]\I. R. and Nancy (Logan) Adams, both 
of whom were natives of Ohio. Her father, born in Keene in 1840, came to 
Iowa with his l)roth('r when sixteen years of age and settled near Quasqueton 
in 1856, casting in his lot with the early settlers. He drove across the country, 
for there were no railroads from Earlville to his desination. He became the 
owner of two hundred acres of land in Liberty township and thereon engaged 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 253 

in farming until 1883, when he put aside the work of the fields and embarked 
in the grocery business in Independence, where he still conducts his store. He 
has been identified with the interests of the county from pioneer times. The 
first school built in Liberty was erected upon his land and he has ever been a 
friend of intellectual and moral progress. In early life he was active in the 
Presbyterian church but afterward joined the Congregational church and has 
done much to further its interests and promote its success, serving as one of its 
deacons and trustees. His daughter, ]\Irs. Norman, is very active in the social, 
church and club life of Independence. To Mr. and Mrs. Norman have been 
born two children : Milton, who is with the Illinois Central Railroad at Waterloo 
as telegraph operator ; and Winifred B., at home. 

Mr. Norman is well known in Masonic circles as a member of the lodge, 
chapter and commander}^ In politics he has always been active as a supporter 
of the republican party and has held various offices, including that of council- 
man and mayor of Winthrop. 



DAVID SHERIDAN WOLGAMOT. 

David Sheridan Wolgamot, who is a farmer residing in Fairbank township, 
is a native of that township, born January 10, 1865. His parents were Joseph 
and Atha T. (Buckmaster) Wolgamot, natives of Maryland and Holmes county, 
Ohio, respectively. The father served for three years in the Mexican war arid 
in the early fifties came with his family to this county, ca.sting in his lot with 
the pioneer settlers. He died in 1911, having survived his wife since 1898. A 
more detailed account of their lives is given in the sketch of Clinton W. Wol- 
gamot, found on another page of this work. 

David S. Wolgamot was one of the eight children born to his parents and 
was reared in his native township. His elementary and secondary education 
was acquired in the public schools of Fairbank, and he later attended the pharma- 
ceutical department of the Iowa State University at Iowa City. He subse- 
quently engaged in the live-stock business at Fairbank for fifteen years and 
during part of that time conducted a dry goods store there. In 1911 he 
purchased eighty acres of fine land in Fairbank township, and has since devoted 
the greater part of his time to the cultivation of the same. As the soil is 
naturally productive and as he uses practical methods in his farming he harvests 
annually crops which average a large yield to the acre and he shares in the 
prosperity which is the usual lot of the Iowa farmer. For the last few years 
he has also engaged in the buying and selling of land. 

David S. AVolgamot was married at Fairbank on the 24th of August, 1899, to 
Miss Sarah E. Davis-Sanborn, who was born in Monona, Clayton county, on the 
1st of February, 1872. She came to Buchanan county in 1881, when a child of 
nine years, and as her parents were both deceased she was adopted by Merrill 
and Mary E. Sanborn. Her foster father is deceased, but IMrs. Sanborn resides 
in Fairbank. There were four children in the Davis family : Frank, who lives 
in Black Hawk county, this state ; Mrs. Wolgamot ; Warren, of Huron, South 
Dakota ; and Mrs. Minnie Belle Reisner, of Brock, Alberta, Canada. All of these 



254 ' HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

children were born in Clayton county, Iowa. Mrs, Wolgamot is a member of the 
Baptist church of Fairbank. 

Mr. Wolgamot is a man of broad views in polities and has never allied himself 
with any party, preferring to vote independently. Although he has been elected 
to several offices in the township he has always refused to qualify. Fraternally 
he belongs to Fairbank Lodge, No. 148, A. F. & A. M., and to the Elks at Oelwein. 
His perseverance and industry have secured him a comfortable living, and he 
enjoys the confidence of those who know him. 



GEORGE W. RAMSEY, M. D. 

For many years Dr. George W. Ramsey was engaged in the active practice of 
medicine but in 1908 retired from the profession and took up his abode upon a 
farm a mile from Independence, in Washington township, where he owns forty- 
five acres of good land. He was born in Tuscarawas county, Ohio, in 1848, a 
son of William and Elizabeth (Palmer) Ramsey, both of whom were natives of 
Pennsylvania, born in 1815 and 1816 respectively. In early life the father was 
apprenticed to the carpenter's trade in Ohio, the family having previously 
removed to Harrison county, that state. He continued his residence in the 
Buckeye state until 1853, when he came to Iowa, settling on Pine creek, in 
Liberty township, this county. The journey was made by steamboat from 
Wheeling, West Virginia, to Dubuque and thence by team to Buchanan county. 
This was then a wild and largely unsettled region. He entered land from 
the government and began building a log house before he received the patent 
to his land. There were then no railroads in the county and Independence was 
but a tiny village. With characteristic energy ^Ir. Ramsey continued the work 
of breaking the sod and transforming the wild prairie into cultivable fields. 
Year after year he carried on his farm work and became one of the prosperous 
agriculturists of Buchanan county, owning at the time of his death two hundred 
and eighty acres of valuable land. He was ever a loyal member of the Baptist 
church and died in that faith in 1878, at the age of sixty-three years. His wife 
long survived him and passed away at the advanced age of eighty-one years. 
Three of their children are yet living. 

Dr. Ramsey, the eldest of the family, was a lad of but five years when the 
parents came to Iowa. He pursued his early education in one of the old-time 
log schoolhouses of Liberty township and he was a member of the first class 
that was graduated from the State Agricultural College at Ames, the year being 
1872. Determining upon a professional career, he next entered Rash INIedical 
College of Chicago, from which he was graduated with the M. D. degree in 
1876. He did not at once, however, prepare for the practice of medicine. 
Through the period of his boyhood and youth he remained upon the home farm 
and after his graduation from the agricultural college he taught school to some 
extent in this county and also in Illinois. It was afterward that he entered 
Rush Medical College and following his graduation therefrom he located for 
practice at Magnolia, Putnam count}-, Illinois, where he remained for six years. 
He then removed to Hennepin, the county seat of that county, and for four years 




DR. GEORGE \V. KAMSKV 




MRS. GEORGE W. RAMSEY 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 259 

he filled the office of coroner there, being the only democrat elected in that 
county at the time. He practiced there for ten years and then removed to 
Masonville, Iowa, where he continued in practice until 1908. For a time 
he w^as in partnership with Dr. E. Gay lord, a graduate of the Michigan 
State University and also of a college in Nashville, Tennessee. He served as a 
surgeon in the United States army during the Civil war and had charge of the 
officers' hospital at Nashville. In 1908 Dr. Ramsey retired from active practice 
and took up his abode upon a farm about a mile from Independence, where he 
has forty-five acres of good land, to the cultivation and improvement of which 
he now devotes his energies. 

On the 28th of February, 1888, Dr. Ramsey was united in marriage to Miss 
Fannie Aurora Davis, a native of Morgan countj', Ohio, and a daughter of Dr. 
E. W. and Ann (Balderson) Davis. Her father, who was a first cousin of 
Jefferson Davis, president of the southern Confederacy, was born in Virginia 
and died in 1872, at the age of fifty-seven years. The mother, who was 
born in Ohio in 1818, was sixty-five years of age when she passed away in 
1883. The parents of Dr. Davis died when he was quite young, and in early 
life he was employed on boats and afterward worked his wa}' through a medical 
school of Philadelphia. He then began practicing in Marietta, Ohio, and because 
of his own ill health he traveled around in a wagon. Eventually he reached 
Cedar Rapids, Iowa, but was compelled to seek a change of climate, his last days 
being spent in Fulton, Illinois. In the Davis family were nine children, of whom 
Mrs. Ramsey is the fifth. She has a twin brother, Warren, who was a member 
of Company H, One Hundred and Third Illinois Infantry, entering the army 
from Lewistown, Illinois. He was injured while at the front but recovered and 
is now living in Canton, Illinois. Another brother, Joseph Davis, served with 
the southern army under General Robert E. Lee. Dr. and Mrs. Ramsey have 
one child, Evangeline Enola. 

In political affairs Dr. Ramsey has taken an active part as a supporter of 
the democracy and served as a member of the county central committee and of 
the judicial committee in Illinois. While living at Masonville he filled the office 
of mayor, resigning that position when he removed to this county. He was 
especially successful in his practice and won an enviable reputation as an able 
and leading physician and surgeon. As the years went by his efforts brought 
him substantial success and ultimately enabled him to put aside his business cares 
and enjoy freedom from arduous professional duties. He is eligible to member- 
ship in the Sons of the American Revolution, his grandfather Palmer was killed 
at the battle of Brandywine. 



ARTHUR E. NORTON. 



Arthur E. Norton, of Rowley, is a representative of one of the pioneer 
families of Buchanan county and was born in Homer township on the 18th of 
May, 1867, his parents being Nathan and Lovina (Dodson) Norton, of whom 
mention is made elsewhere in this volume. 

Vol. 11—12 



260 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

The usual experiences of the farm lad came to Arthur E. Norton during 
his boyhood and youth, his time being divided between the work of the fields 
and the acquirement of a public-school education. After attending the district 
schools he continued his studies at New Hampton, Iowa, and then returned to 
the farm, remaining with his father until twenty-five years of age. He then 
started out in business life independently, continuing the cultivation of a farm 
until 1893, w^hen he came to Rowley, where in partnership with James Clayton he 
purchased a hardware stock and embarked in business as a merchant. They 
continued together with mutual pleasure and profit for nineteen years, at the 
end of which time ^Ir. Clayton sold his interest to Mr. Rosencrans, who is still 
a partner of Mr. Norton, They have a good store filled with an attractive line 
of shelf and heavy hardware and their trade is increasing annuall}' because their 
business methods are such as will bear the closest investigation and scrutiny. 
They erected a business block and now have a patronage which is most extensive 
and gratifying, their annual sales reaching a large figure. While thus connected 
with commercial interests of Rowley Mr. Norton has also served as postmaster 
for seventeen years and was deputy postmaster for four years. 

On the 31st of October, 1894, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Norton 
and >Iiss Mary J. Clayton, a daughter of Robert and Hannah (Winn) Clayton, 
who were natives of Wisconsin. The father was a farmer bj' occupation and 
owned a tract of land in Wisconsin until his removal to Iowa, when he purchased 
a farm in Homer township, Buchanan county, upon which he has since lived. 
He is now seventy-seven years of age. His wife also survives and they are 
among the most liighly esteemed of the worthy couples of the township. Mr. 
and Mrs. Norton have become the parents of one son, Robert A., now eleven 
years of age. The family residence is an attractive home standing in the midst 
of beautiful grounds covering ten acres. Mr. and ^Irs. Norton are most hos- 
pitable people and they have a circle of friends in Rowley and this section of 
the county that is ahuost coextensive with the circle of their acquaintance. 

For eight years Mr. Norton filled the otfiee of township clerk, to which position 
he was chosen as a candidate of the republican party. He belongs to Holman 
Lodge, No. 593, A. F. & A. M., to the Eastern Star chapter and to the Modern 
Woodmen camp. He is also a member of the Methodist church and his religious 
belief has been a strong element in shaping his life and guiding him in all of his 
relations with liis fellowmen. He has always lived in this county and his many 
sterling traits of character have gained for him the confidence and good-will 
of all with whom he has been })rought in contact. 



EDWARD O. CRAIG. 



Edward O. Craig is living retired and the rest which has come to him is 
well merited and richly deserved. A native of Pennsylvania, lie was born at 
Reading on the 26th of September, 1852, bis father being Andrew V. Craig, 
whose birth occurred in Virginia in 1814. In early life he liecame a marble 
noiker and after removing from the Old Dominion to Pennsylvania continued 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 261 

in that line of business. He married Caroline 0. ^liller, who was born in 
Virginia in 1816, and after living for a few years in the Keystone state they 
came to Iowa in 1855, settling in Quasqueton, where Mr. Craig engaged in 
farming. He became the owner of a place east of Quasqueton and there passed 
away seven years later. He was a prominent and influential resident of the com- 
munity, served as school director and as justice of the peace and was ever 
actively and helpfully interested in matters relating to the general welfare. He 
died in 1862, while his wife also passed away on the home farm, her demise 
occurring in 1879. 

In a family of eight children Edward 0. Craig was the sixth in order of 
birth. His youthful days were spent upon the home farm, with the usual 
experiences of the farm lad who early begin.s work in the fields. At the age of 
sixteen years he assumed the management of the place. He was but ten years 
of age at the time of his father 's death. For three years he attended the schools 
of Quasqueton and then went to country school. When he was still but a youth 
he assumed the heavy respon-sibilities incident to the care and development of 
the homestead farm, on which he continued for a number of years, busily en- 
gaged in its further development and improvement. AVhile there residing he 
was elected a member of the board of supervisors and remained in that position 
until elected sheriff of the county, at which time he removed to Independence, 
where he has since made his home. He served as .supervisor for three terms, or 
for nine years, and it was in 1884 that he assumed the duties of sheriff, making 
a most creditable record by the prompt and capable manner in which he met 
every task that devolved upon him. He continued in the position for four years 
and after leaving the sheriff's office turned his attention to the real-estate 
business, in which he engaged for five years. Since that time he has lived 
practically retired save for five years which he devoted to the hotel business in 
Independence. He owns land in Buchanan county and from his farm properties 
derives a substantial rental, that provides him with all of the necessities and 
comforts and many of the luxuries of life. 

^Ir. Craig owns and occupies a modern and attractive residence in Inde- 
pendence. He was married on Christmas day of 1878 to Miss Mary L. Brown, 
a native of Pennsylvania and a daughter of Samuel and Sarah Brown, who 
were also born in the Keystone state. The father, who was a l^lacksmith by trade, 
brought his family to Iowa about the same time the Craig family arrived in this 
state. He settled in Linn county and followed lilack.smithing until after 
hostilities broke out between the north and the south, wlien he enlisted for 
service in the Thirty-first Iowa Infantry Regiment. He laid down his life on 
the altar of his country, dying in the hospital at St. Louis while wearing the 
blue uniform of the Union troops, his death occurring in June, 1863. His wife 
passed away in Linn county, Iowa, near Springfield, April 13, 1860. Mr. Brown 
had served as justice of the peace after coming to this state and was ever de- 
voted to the welfare and upbuilding of the community in which he made his 
home. Mrs. Craig was the youngest of seven children and by her marriage has 
become the mother of five children: Orville B., who was born August 22, 1880, 
and is now a shoe merchant of Independence; Ola E., who was born October 1, 
1886, and is the wife of Roy p]bersoll. a farmer residing in Fremont township ; 
Walter W., who was born February 17, 1890, and is a mail clerk on the Illinois 



262 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

Central Railroad ; one who died in infancy ; and Edith L., who was born Febru- 
ary 15, 1895, and passed away on the 15th of January, 1903. 

Mr. Craig is an exemplary representative of the teachings of Masonry, in 
which order he holds membership in the lodge, chapter and commandery. He 
is also identified with the Modern AYoodmen of America and the Modern Brother- 
hood. His political allegiance has always been given to the republican party and 
his religious faith is that of the Methodist Episcopal church. His life has been 
well spent and his many sterling traits of character are recognized b}' all who 
know him. In his business career he owes his success to close application, un- 
faltering energy and judicious investment and he is now enjoying the merited 
and deserved rewards of his labor. 



THOMAS R. MARSHALL. 

Thomas R. Marsliall is a highly esteemed retired farmer residing in Win- 
throp. He is a native of Ohio, born in Franklin, Harrison county, June 2, 1844, 
a son of Joseph and Jane (.McFadden) Marshall, the former a native of New 
England »nd a cooper by trade. The father passed away on the 19th of January, 
1845, when but thirty-four years of age. He had gone to Illinois in the fall 
of 1844 and expected to remove there in the following spring, but died before 
he could carry out his plans. He was a captain in the old state militia of Ohio 
and his swoi'd is still in the possession of the family. The mother of ^Ir. 
]\Iarshall of this review was born in Ohio, l)ut her parents were natives of the 
north of Ireland, whence they emigrated to the United States and settled in the 
Buckeye state in the early days of the history of that commonwealth. She was 
the mother of five children by her marriage to ^Ir. Marshall, the youngest, 
the subject of this i-eview, being but .seven months old at the time of the death 
of the father. The mother subsequently remarried, becoming the wife of John 
Stoneman, by whom she had two daughters, Elizabeth and Susan Edith. They 
accompanied their father to this county in 1855, the wife and mother having died 
in August, 1854, and he built the first sawmill within the confines of the county 
and also one of the first lime kilns. His death occurred in December, 1866. 

Thomas R. Marshall was but ten years of age when his mother died and he 
subsequently lived with an inicle for a year, after which he went to Pike county, 
Illinois, where he made his home with his mother's sister. He worked upon his 
aunt's farm until he was fourteen aiul during the winters attended the district 
school. He subsequently worked as a farm hand and was so engaged for ten 
years, seven of which he spent in the employ of one umn. In March, 1864, he 
enlisted in Company V. One Hundred and Thirty-seventh Illinois Yolunteer 
Infantry for om- hundred days and fell sick at ^lemphis. Tennessee, where he 
was on guard duty. He was taken prisoner by Forrest and, as he was not able 
to march or ride, he was left near Memphis and later placed in the hospital, where 
he was taken care of until he recovered sufficiently to go to Springfield, Illinois, 
where, on the 29th of November, 1865, he was honorably discharged from the 
military service. He then returned to his home and continued as a farm hand 
until after his marriage, after which he rented a farm, which he cultivated for 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 263 

fourteen years, but in the spring of 1882 he came to Iowa and bought a place 
in Byron township, comprising one hundred and sixty acres. The purchase 
price was twenty-five dollars per acre and he was compelled to borrow the money 
to pay for his land, but he subsequently liquidated this debt. After farming 
this property for fourteen years he sold it and purchased ninety acres of land 
located just north of Winthrop and operated this place until 1910, when he dis- 
posed of it, receiving one hundred and twenty dollars per acre. He then came 
to Winthrop and has since lived here in the enjoyment of a richly deserved leis- 
ure. He w^as alert and enterprising in the management of his farm work and 
his industr}^ coupled with his sound judgment, enabled him to add to his re- 
sources year by year and to gain a competence. 

In 1867 Mr. Marshall was united in marriage with Miss Susan Lighter, a 
native of Pike county, Illinois, who passed away in Iowa on the 21st of March, 
1899, leaving four children. William J. is a farmer of Byron township. Jennie 
M. became the wife of Solomon Overbaugh, who died in April, 1902, and after 
his death married A. W. Xorman, of whom mention is made elsewhere in this 
work. Arthur Thomas is engaged in building bridges in Buchanan county, 
and Cora May is the wife of C. J. Mulford, of Winthrop. On the 30th of Oc- 
tober, 1907, ^Ir. ]\Iar.shall married Mrs. Hannah (Beith) White, born in Largs, 
Scotland, on the 19th of March, 1843, whence she was brought to the United 
States by her parents, Thomas and Gene Beith, when but fifteen months old. 
The family settled at St. Charles, Kane county, Illinois. Her father was a 
mason by trade and followed that occupation for ten years, after which, in 
1854, he came with his family to Iowa and .settled in Byron township, this 
county, where he entered government land which he improved. In 1873 he sold 
his property and removed to Dixon county, Nebraska, where he took up land. 
However, the family remained in that state only a few years, after which they 
returned to this county, where Mr. Beith died in April, 1882. He was a school 
director and was prominent in local affairs. After his death his widow made her 
home with her daughter ]\Irs. Marshall until her demise, which occurred March 
29, 1913, when she had reached the venerable age of ninety-three years. Both 
she and her husband were members of the Presbyterian church. Mrs. Marshall 
was about eleven years of age when she accompanied her parents to this county 
and continued her education in the public schools, which were held in the homes 
of the settlers, as there were no schoolhouses built at that time. On the 4th of 
]\Iay, 1861, she was married to Robert White, a native of Canada, who passed 
away in 1888. They had no children of their own, but adopted two : Munsey, 
who resides in ]\lanson, Iowa ; and Herbert H., a dentist practicing in Chicago. 

Mrs. ^larshall is a member of the Congregational church, but Mr. ^Marshall 
belongs to the ]\Iethodist church and has been very prominent in the work of that 
organization. He has held church office for forty years, being steward and 
trustee for twenty-eight years, and was the first Sunday school superintendent, 
being elected to that position when the church was organized. Before coming 
to this state he was a Sunday school superintendent in Illinois when quite a 
young man. He has been a member of the Methodist church since he was a boy 
of twelve years and in the intervening years has striven constantly to guide liis 
life by the teachings of Christianity and to apply the golden rule to his dealings 
with his fellowmen. His political allegiance was for many years given to the 



264 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

republican party, but he is now a stanch supporter of the prohibitionist party. 
For several years he has been school director and he has been treasurer for 
twelve years, discharging the duties of his office with ability and conscientious- 
ness. While actively engaged in farming he was known as one of the progressive 
agriculturists of the county and did much to aid in the development of its 
resources besides securing a competence for himself. His salient traits of 
character are industry, integrity and kindness, qualities which invariably com- 
mand respect and win regard. 



WHEELER D. HEARN. 



Wheeler D. Hearn, who owns and operates a farm of one hundred and fifty- 
seven and a half acres on section 31, Fremont township, was born in Liberty 
township, this county, on the 24th of September, 1861, a son of Jacob and 
Amanda (Morehouse) Hearn. The former was born in Tuscarawas county, Ohio, 
in 1838 and came with liis parents, ^Ir. and Mrs. Isaiah Hearn, to this county 
at an early day in its history. Isaiah Hearn conducted the first tavern on the 
state road on Pine creek in Liberty township and also owned a small farm, where 
he resided at the time of his death in 1864. lie had several children, two of 
whom survive: Mrs. Matilda Anders, of Oelwein, Iowa; and Isaac, a resident 
of Wamego, Kansas. 

Jacob Hearn was married in this county and resided upon a farm in Liberty 
township. At the time of the Civil war he enlisted in the Sixteenth Iowa Volun- 
teer Infantry, but after serving with his command for nine months he was 
killed in 1864 on Sherman's famous march to the sea. His wife was born in 
Cumberland county. Ohio, and came west with her parents in girlhood. She 
was married on Pine creek and became the motlier of two sons: Wheeler D., 
the subject of this review; and Palmer I., who is a farmer in Fremont township. 
The latter was born in Byron township, this county, on the 5th of August, 1864, 
and resided there until three years after his marriage to Miss Josephine Harper, 
a native of Tuscarawas county, Ohio, who came to this county with her parents 
when sixteen years of age. Her father, IMichael Harper, was a veteran of the 
Civil war. To Mr. and Mrs. Elmer I. Hearn were born eight children, seven 
of whom survive, namely : Alta, the wife of C. L. Decker, a farmer of Fremont 
township ; Mae, a teacher in the schools of this county ; and Daniel E., Maud 
Amanda, Laura, John and Frank, all at home. Elmer I. Hearn is a republican 
in his political belief and is a memlier of the Modern Woodmen at Mason ville. 
After the death of Jacob Hearn, his widow married William Kerr and they 
removed to Byron township, where she died in 1888. To this union were born 
two sons, Frank and William, both farmers of Byron township. 

Wheeler D. Hearn was reared in Byron township and remained with his 
mother until he was twenty-three years of age. He was then married to ]\Iiss 
Laura Yaw, who was born in Byron township, this county, in August, 1865, a 
daughter of Calvin and Mary (Howard) Yaw, both natives of Cattaraugus 
county. New York, where they were married and whence they emigrated west 
about 1854. They located in Byron township, this county, where the mother 




CALVIN YAW 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 267 

died in Jime, 1888, when sixty-one years of age. Mr. Yaw survived until March, 
1894, dying at the age of eighty-two years upon a farm in Fremont township, 
which he had purchased in the '80s from John Campbell and which he had 
improved and developed. He was prominent in public affairs and supported 
the candidates of the republican party by his ballot. His wife was a Baptist 
in her religious faith. Mrs. Hearn is the third in order of birth in a family of 
four children, of whom two are deceased: Flora, who died in infancy; and 
Hattie, who died when fifteen years old. Her brother Frank is living at Win- 
throp, Iowa. To Mr. and Mrs. Hearn have been born five children, three of 
whom are natives of Byron township and two of Fremont township. Frank 
resides in Winthrop and owns and operates a threshing outfit. He married 
Miss Kate Parker, of Independence. Mamie, Idella and Margaret are all at 
home, as is also Donald, who has a barber shop at Winthrop. 

Mr. Hearn now owns the farm on section 31, Fremont township, which was 
formerly the property of his father-in-law, ]\Ir. Yaw, and has continued the 
work of developing the place, which is now one of the valuable farm properties 
of the county and which is in a high state of cultivation. In addition to the 
raising of grain he devotes considerable attention to stock-raising and is as 
successful as a stockman as he is as an agriculturist. He is recognized as one 
of the progressive and substantial residents of the county and holds the full 
confidence of all who know him. His political allegiance is given to the repub- 
lican part}^ and he has served as township trustee since 1908 and as a member 
of the school board. Fraternally he belongs to the INIodern Woodmen of America 
and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at Winthrop, and his daughters are 
members of the Rebekahs. The family attend the IMethodist Episcopal church 
and contribute to its support. Mr. Hearn, in addition to his farming and stock- 
raising interests, is connected with the public utilities of the county, being presi- 
dent of the local telephone company, which gives excellent service to its patrons. 
He gives much personal attention to the affairs of the company and its credit- 
able record is due in large measure to his business sagacity and personal oversight. 



NICHOLAS N. COMBS. 

Nicholas N, Combs, living on a farm on sections 21 and 22, Homer township, 
was bom in Lawrence, Van Buren county, ^Michigan, August 5, 1S69, his parents 
being Charles and Susan (Grover) Combs, of whom mention is made elsewhere 
in this volume in connection with the sketch of J. D. Combs. He was a little 
lad of but seven summers when the parents arrived in Buchanan county, Iowa, 
so that he was practically reared here. The public schools afforded him his 
early educational privileges and he afterward attended the State Normal School 
at Cedar Falls. When his text-books were put aside he returned home and gave 
his father the benefit of his services until the father's death in 1893. He then 
inherited the home farm, comprising one hundred and twenty acres on sections 
21 and 22, Homer township, and since that time he has made quite a change in 
the appearance of the place by adding many modern improvements. He is en- 
gaged in the raising of thoroughbred Hereford cattle and also Poland China hogs 



268 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

of a high grade, and annually sells considerable stock, thereby substantially in- 
creasing his income. 

Mr. Combs has never married, his sister, Maria A., acting as his housekeeper. 
She was bom in Lawrence, Van Buren county, Michigan, August 23, 1865, was 
also reared and educated in Buchanan county, and has spent the greater part 
of her life in Homer township. They are both adherents of the Methodist faith 
and Mr. Combs votes with the democratic party. He is likewise a charter mem- 
ber of the Modern Woodmen lodge at Rowley. It is not difficult to find those 
who speak of him in high terms, for he has long lived in this section of the state 
and has guided his life by the standards of upright manhood and honorable 
citizenship. 



ROBERT FULTON CARSEY. 

Robert Fulton Carsey, filling the office of justice of the peace and accounted 
one of the representative residents of Independence, was born at Arrow Rock, 
Missouri, in 1856. His father, ]\Iilton Perry Carsey, was born in Ohio in 1824 
and now, at the age of ninety years, is living with a .son at Sherman, Texas. 
The mother, who bore the maiden name of Mary A. Jones, was born in London 
in 1834 and died in the year 1912. Just prior to his marriage Milton P. Carsey 
removed westward to St. Louis and became a shoe merchant of that city. He 
afterward took up his abode at Boonville, Missouri, and still later at Arrow 
Rock, from which point he came to Iowa, settling first in Keokuk. In all these 
different places he continued to engage in the shoe business, while still later 
he was a shoe merchant in Carthage, in AVebster and in Fountain Green, Illinois. 
He removed from Illinois to Texas, taking up his abode in Sherman, where he 
lived retired from active life. 

The fourth in order of birth in a family of ten children, Robert F. Carsey 
spent his youth as a pupil in the country schools of Illinois to the age of sixteen 
years, when he began working on a farm. He then entered a shoe shop, learning 
the trade, spending four years in that way, during which time he received only 
his board and clothing in compensation for his services. He continued with one 
employer for six years and then bought out the business at Carthage, Illinois, 
where he conducted business on his own account for five or six months. He 
then went to Keokuk, where he spent a year and a half. In early life he was 
the champion foot racer in and around Keokuk and in a try-out he made a 
record of one hundred yards in ten seconds on the track at Keokuk, with two 
timekeepers holding watches. He was very active in athletic circles and greatly 
enjoyed contests of skill. 

On leaving Keokuk I\Ir. Carsey went to Quincy, Illinois, and in the vicinity 
of that city began farming, eventually becoming the owner of land. He lived 
there for only three years, at the end of which time he bought one hundred and 
six acres of land in Hancock county. Iowa, where he engaged in farming until 
1891. He then became a reporter for the American Trotter of Independence, 
with which he was connected until its editor Mr. AVilliams moved away and the 
l)ul)licatioii was suspended. Dui'ing that time IMr. Carsey was also engaged in 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 269 

training race horses and was the owner of Sally Toler, a grand circuit racer 
that lost only one race in the entire season. i\Ir. Carsey also owned and trained 
many other horses and was trainer of a public stable. He owned a farm and 
his business was successfully conducted. 

Mr. Carsey has been married twice. He first wedded Jenny McClintock, 
who was born in Adams county, Illinois, a daughter of John and Barbara 
(Wolfe) McClintock. Her father was a farmer of Adams county, Illinois, 
where he owned considerable land and was a preacher of the Dunkard faith. 
The Wolfe and McClintock families were very prominent in Adams county 
and the representatives of the former are still active in both political and 
church circles there. To Mr. Carsey 's first marriage there were born two chil- 
dren : Alice Viola, a commercial artist with the D. C. Bowling Company of 
Chicago; and Edmund Arthur, who is teaching in Normal, Illinois. On the 
28th of December, 1913, Mr. Carsey was united in marriage to ]\Irs. Mary E. 
Mison, who was born in England, a daughter of Robert Bland, also a native of 
that country, and a sister of John Bland, the florist at the State Hospital in 
Independence. 

]\Ir. Carsey holds membership with the Knights of Pythias. His political 
allegiance is given to the democratic party and for six j-ears he has filled 
the office of justice of the peace in Washington township. He belongs to the 
Christian church and is a citizen widely and favorably known in Independence. 



CHARLES HEILAND. 



Charles Heiland, who was long and actively identified with agricultural pur- 
suits in Buchanan county, still owns two hundred and ninety acres of valuable 
land on sections 18 and 19, Cono township, but since March, 1911, has lived 
retired at Rowley. His birth occurred in Germany on the 1st of December, 
1855, his parents being Carl and Carrie (Heiland) Heiland, who were likewise 
natives of that country. The father, who there followed merchandising through- 
out his entire business career, was killed in a runaway accident in 1860. The 
mother, long surviving him, passed away in the year 1906. 

Charles Heiland was reared and educated in the land of his nativity, and 
after putting aside his text-books secured employment as a farm hand. In 1873, 
when a youth of seventeen, he crossed the Atlantic to the United States and 
made his way direct to Buchanan county, Iowa, here working as a farm hand 
for a period of five years. Subsequently he cultivated rented land for a year 
and then purchased a tract of eighty acres on Section 19, Cono township, Avhich 
he improved. As the years passed and his financial resources increased, owing 
to his untiring industry and capable management, he extended the boundaries of 
his farm by additional purchase until it now embraces two hundred and ninety 
acres of valuable land, eighty acres of which lie on section 18. In the operation 
of that place he was actively and successfully engaged until March, 1911, when 
he abandoned agricultural labors and removed to Rowley, where he has since 
lived in honorable retirement. 



270 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

On the 1st of November, 1880, Mr. Heiland was united in marriage to Miss 
Augusta Weiher, a daughter of John and Carlonia (Ludemann) Weiher, of 
whom more extended mention is made on another page of this work. Our sub- 
ject and his wife have four children, as follows: Carl, who operates his father's 
farm; Katie, who gave her hand in marriage to Rozell Butterfield, an agricul- 
turist of Benton county, Iowa; William J., who operates one of his father's 
farms: and Carrie N., who is the wife of Joseph Boelder and resides in 
Nebraska. 

]\Ir. Heiland gives his political allegiance to the democracy and has served 
as school director of Cono township for a period of fifteen years, making a cred- 
itable record in that connection. His religious faith is that of the Presbyterian 
church. Coming to the new world in early manhood, he eagerly availed himself 
of the opportunities here afforded and worked his way steadily upward to a posi- 
tion among the prosperous and substantial citizens of his community. The 
period of his residence in Buchanan county covers more than four decades, and 
he enjoys an extensive and favorable accpiaintance within its borders. 



LEWIS SHOENUT. 



Lewis Shoenut, deceased, was one of the most prominent residents of Fair- 
bank, having extensive business interests in the town. He was born in Chicago, 
Illinois, on the 17th of August, 1853, a son of Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Shoenut, 
both natives of Germany. They emigrated to this country and settled in 
Chicago when it was a mere village and gave little promise of ever becoming 
the great city that it is today. They subsequently removed to Independence, 
Iowa, and kept the first tavern there. The father also owed a farm in the 
locality. Both died in Independence. 

Lewis Shoenut was the only child born to his parents and accompanied them 
on their journey westward from Illinois, arriving in Dubuque, Iowa, in 1854. 
They almost immediately removed to Independence, where he attended the 
public and subscription schools. In 1888 he removed to Fairbank and for more 
than twenty years he engaged in mercantile business here, retiring from the 
same in August, 1913. He was a progressive and successful merchant, being 
always anxious to improve his stock and satisfy his customers. He was inter- 
ested in many other business projects and helped to incorporate the Farmers 
State Savings Bank of Fairbank, of which he served as president for a time. 
He was still a stockholder and director in that institution at the time of his 
death. He likewise owned an interest in the elevator at Fairbank and had 
invested heavily in local real estate, owning a number of business blocks and 
dwelling houses in Fairbank, besides his own commodious residence. He was 
also the proprietor and manager of the opera house and was one of the most 
important men in the financial world of Fairbank. He had retired from active 
work and devoted his time to looking after his extensive business interests, 
but death claimed him on the 3d of October, 1914. and the community thus 
lost a valued and useful citizen. 




LEWIS SHOENUT 



J 

1 




HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 273 

Mr. Shoenut was married at West Union, Iowa, in 1883, to Miss Ella Leonard, 
who was born in Fairbank, where she was educated and grew to womanhood. 
Her father, Matthew Leonard, died in 1893, but her mother, who was in her 
maidenhood Miss Catharine Kehoe, survives and resides with her daughter, 
Mrs. Shoenut. There were six sons born to ^Ir. and Mrs. Leonard, namely: 
Thomas, now a resident of Herman, Nebraska: and Patrick, ]\Iat, John, James 
and Henry, all five deceased. 

Mr. and ^Irs. Shoenut became parents of two daughters. Mrs. Catharine 
Leehey, who was born at Independence, Iowa, was educated in the parochial 
schools at Fairbank. She married Hugh Leehey and passed away at Fairbank 
in 1909. Helen, who was born in Fairbank, Iowa, attended the parochial school 
of her native town and died in August, 1911. 

Mr. Shoenut was a communicant of the Catholic church of Fairbank, to 
which his wife also belongs, and they contributed generously to the furtherance 
of its work. He was a democrat in politics and served as mayor of Fairbank 
for one term. He was councilman for twelve years and did a great deal both 
in an official capacity and as a private citizen to secure the progress and advance- 
ment of his community. He resided in Buchanan county continuoush' from 
1854, with the exception of one year, and, as he was but an infant when brought 
here by his parents, he spent practically his entire life here. His was a nature 
that could not endure inactivity and his initiative and enterprise not only won 
him prosperity but benefited the county as well, and he was held in high esteem 
by his fellow citizens. 



THOMAS ROBINSON. 



Thomas Robinson is a retired farmer, but still makes his home on his farm 
on section 20, Liberty township, where for many years he was busily engaged 
in tiUing the soil. He was born in Lincolnshire, England, May 28, 1830, and is 
therefore one of the venerable citizens of Buchanan county, having passed the 
eighty-fourth milestone on life's journey. His parents, John and Sarah Robin- 
son, were also natives of England and the family is noted for longevity. Both 
the father and mother lived to a ripe old age, and the former died in California 
when a nonagenarian. He devoted his early life to farming but afterward 
worked as a railroad contractor in England. The hope of bettering his financial 
condition led him to seek a home in the United States, and after crossing the 
Atlantic he made his way to Wisconsin, where he carried on farming for many 
years, and upon his retirement from active business life he went to California, 
where he lived retired until called to the home beyond. 

Thomas Robinson had practically no school advantages. His early life was 
largely devoted to farming and after coming to the United States he made his 
home in Iowa. At the time of the outbreak of the Civil war he enlisted as a 
member of Company E, Fifth Iowa Infantry, under Captain Lee, and served 
for three years, when he reenlisted and served one month and one day. He 
acted as wagonmaster and was driver of a six-mule team. He was on active 



274 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

duty in the battles of Corinth and luka and carries the sears of wounds sus- 
tained. 

After the war Mr. Robinson returned to Buchanan county and was employed 
on a railroad which was then being built between Dubuque and Sioux City. 
Later he removed to Liberty township, where he owns one hundred and fifteen 
acres of land on section 20. He then turned his attention to general farming, 
which he followed for many years, carefully tilling his fields and cultivating his 
crops, which brought to him good financial returns as time passed. He now 
has a comfortable home and a good competence with which to meet the demands 
of life throughout his remaining days. 

Mr. Robinson has been twice married. His first wife died in 1882. and in 
1885 he wedded Margaret Wilson, a native of Ohio. He has one son, Thomas, 
who married ^larie Dougherty, of Independence. Mrs. Robinson is a representa- 
tive of one of the oldest families of Buchanan county, closely connected with 
its history from pioneer days. 

Mr. Robinson has held some local offices, and when his health permitted he 
was an active member of the Grand Army of the Republic and of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows. He is today one of the oldest and best known 
men of his township and a well spent life has won liim the regard and respect 
of those with whom he has been l)rought in contact. He has never had occa- 
sion to regret his determination to come to the new world, for here he found the 
business opportunities which he sought and by a life of earnest and persistent 
labor gained a substantial measure of success that now enables him to live 
retired. 



A. H. GROVER. 



A. H. Grover, who passed away on tlic 12th of May, 1906, liad been long 
and actively identified with agricultural jnirsuits in Buchanan county, and at 
the time of his demise owned more than ciglit hundred acres of valuable land. 
His birth occurred in Jackson county, Iowa, on the 15th of December, 181:4, his 
parents being Harvey and Lucinda (Griffen) Grover, the former a native of 
Chautauqua county. New York, and the latter of Ohio. Harvey Grover. an agri- 
culturist by occupation, took up his abode among the first settlers of Jackson 
county, Iowa, and there purchased a tract of land which he cultivated during 
the remainder of his life, passing away in 1847. His wife, who survived him 
for more than a half century, was called to her final rest in 1903. 

A. II. Grover was reared and educated in the county of his nativity. In 
1861 he enlisted for service in the Union army as a member of Company I, Thirty- 
first Iowa Infantry, remaining with that command until honora])ly discharged on 
the 22d of ^lay, 1864, and participating in several ])attles. He fought under 
General (Jrant and made a splendid military record, never faltering in the per- 
formance of any task assigned him and at all times proving a brave and loyal 
soldier. For one year following the cessation of hostilities he devoted his atten- 
tion to agricultural pursuits in Jackson (-(mnty. Iowa, and in 1867 removed to 
Jones county, this state, where he continued to reside until 1870. In that year 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 275 

he came to Buchanan county and purchased a tract of land in Homer township, 
which he improved. As the years passed and his financial resources increased, 
owing to his untiring industry and capable management, he augmented his hold- 
ings by additional purchase until at the time of his death he owned more than 
eight hundred acres of rich and productive land. He passed away on the r2th of 
May, 1906, at the end of thirty-six years' residence in this county, and the com- 
munity mourned the loss of one of its most prosperous agriculturists and highly 
esteemed citizens. 

On the 4th of March, 1864, ^Ir. Grover was united in marriage to Miss Olive 
E. Buell, a daughter of Samuel and Elizabeth (Bouck) Buell, both of whom 
were natives of Canada. The father, a farmer by occupation, took up his abode 
in Jackson county, Iowa, in 1862, but at the end of two years returned to his 
native country, where he passed away in 1879. His wife was called to her final 
rest in the year 1889. To Mr. and ^Irs. Grover were born eleven children, as fol- 
lows : Harvey Y., who is a resident of Rowley, Iowa ; Agetta, who died in De- 
cember, 1869 ; William A., who follows farming in Homer township ; Nellie, who 
gave her hand in marriage to Stewart Sloans, an agriculturist of Cono township ; 
Byron E., a resident of West Branch, Iowa; Guy I., who is engaged in farming 
in Homer township ; John A., living at Rowley, Iowa ; Ethel, who is the wife 
of W. H. Junkins, of Hartland, Minnesota ; Mary, the wife of Edgar Crane, 
who follows farming in Homer township ; Laura, who is the wife of Harvey 
Sprague, an agriculturist of Hazleton township ; and Mabel, who passed away on 
the 1st of February, 1892. Leora B. Grover, daughter of Harvej' Y. Grover, 
and a little maiden of seven years, has been in the home of Mrs. Olive E. Grover 
since babyhood. John A. Grover, who lives with his widowed mother in Rowley, 
has operated the home farm since his father's demise and is widely recognized 
as an enterprising and successful agriculturist of the community. 

In his political views, ^Ir. Grover was a stanch Republican, and for one 
term ably served as county supervisor of Buchanan county, while for a number 
of years he also acted as a trustee. He was a valued member of Francis Post 
of the Grand Army of the Republic at Walker, and also a worthy exemplar of 
the Masonic fraternity, while his religious faith was that of the JNIethodist church. 
His life record is an example of what may be attained when industry and energy 
lead the way, and the high esteem and confidence that was conceded him on 
every hand was but justly bestowed upon him. 



DARIUS GATES. 



Among those who, while active factors in the world's work, contributetl to 
the development and substantial improvement of Buchanan county, was Darius 
< rates. He was born in Pennsylvania, October 27, 1854, a son of Ira and Mari- 
etta (Bowman) Gates, who w^ere likewise natives of the Keystone state. They 
there resided until 1868, when they removed westward, arriving in Buchanan 
county, Iowa. The father purchased land in Homer township and cultivated it 
through his remaining days. His wife died in the year 1890. 



276 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

Darius Gates was a youth of fourteen when he reached Buchanan count}-, 
having previously been a public-school student in his native state. He then 
started out in life on his own account, and, dependent upon his own resources 
from that early age, could surely be called a self-made man. He was employed 
as a farm hand for some time, but the ambition to engage in farming on his 
own account was strong within him and prompted him to save his earnings and 
live most economically until the sum he possessed was sufficient to enable him to 
start out in life independently. He then rented land which he cultivated until 
1881, and during that period he again practiced close economy, as well as in- 
dustry, so that he was at length able to purchase a farm in Homer township. 
From that time on his progress was continuous, and after several years he sold 
his original property and bought two hundred acres on sections 25 and 35, 
Homer township. He then had the added incentive of developing a larger farm, 
to the cultivation and improvement of which he devoted his remaining days. 
About four years' illness preceded his death, which occurred April 26, 1895, 
when' he was at the comparatively early age of forty years. 

It was on the 25th of April, 1880, that Mr. Gates was united in marriage to 
Miss Alma Combs, a daughter of Charles and Susan (Grover) Combs. To Mr. 
and ^Irs. Gates were born three chiUlren. as follows: Ralph E., now thirty-three 
years old; and Charles R. and Harry I., who are thirty and twenty-three years of 
age, respectively. All are still at home with their widowed mother. In 1906 
Mrs. Gates purchased the place where she now lives — a fine farm of two hundred 
and forty acres on sections 27 and 28, Homer township, and has since directed 
the operation of tliis farm. 

Mr. Gates served as a trustee of his township and was holding that office at 
the time of his death, having l)een elected on the republican ticket. He was 
ever a most earnest supporter of the republican party, believing firmly that its 
principles contained the best elements of good government. He was e(|ually loyal 
in his belief as a .Methodist, and Christian teachings guided him in every relation 
of life, making him a man whom to know was to respect and honor. His death 
was deeply deplored not onl>- l)y his immediate family but liy many friends. 
Success had attended his labors, bringing him a comfortable competence, and 
in addition to leaving to his family a good farm he also left to them the still 
more priceless heritage of that good name which is rather to he chosen than 
great riches. 



HARRY L. COBB. 



As a dealer in shorthorns, Harry L. Cobb is known throughout not only 
Buchanan county and Iowa, but throughout the United States, for some of his 
herd hold the world's record among stock of that class. He deserves much 
credit for what he has accomplished, for his .success is the legitimate outcome of 
carefully directed labor and wisely planned investment. He was born Novem- 
ber 20, 1869, in the house which he now occupies at Independence, his parents 
being Edwin and Phinanda (Butterfield) Cobb, who were both natives of the 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 277 

Empire state. The father was bora at Windham, Greene county, in the midst 
of the Catskill mountains, June 7, 1823, and the mother's birth occurred at 
Johnson Creek, Niagara county, July 17, 1825. 

In early life Edwin Cobb became a farmer and dealer in live stock. Emigrat- 
ing westward, he first settled in Illinois, and in 1853 came to Iowa, establishing 
his home in Independence, on the spot where his son Harry L. now resides. At 
that time this section of the state was but sparsely settled and the work of im- 
provement and development seemed scarcely begun. Mr. Cobb became the owner 
of a fine farm adjoining the city. At first he engaged in selling wagons, which 
he hauled from Dubuque. He also bought hides, furs, etc., and along these 
different lines of commercial activity laid the basis of his success. A few years 
later he built his residence, known as the Cobb place, and conducted a hotel 

• 

there in early times, but later he devoted his entire attention to farming and 
as soon as the county became sufficiently settled to make such a business a 
paying one. he engaged in buying and shipping stock, which he sent to Chicago 
and other markets, continuing actively and successfully in that business until his 
retirement, which occurred a few years prior to his death. The Cobb place covers 
four acres, situated directly across the street from the Hawthorne school in In- 
dependence. In addition to his other business affairs, Mr. Cobb was a director 
of the First National Bank for many years. Throughout his life he carried on 
farming and stock-raising and became the owner of two valuable farm properties. 
To him and his wife were born five children : Franklin Butterfield, who was 
born November 13, 1855, and died February 27, 1910 ; Edwin Simon, who was 
born October 19, 1858, and is now state agent for a large flour mill of Kansas, 
his home being in Cedar Rapids; Albert Sidney, who was born August 30, 1862, 
and is engaged in merchandising in Independence; George Woodworth, who was 
born September 25, 1865, and is now connected with a large cattle company 
operating in southern California, his home being in Pomona ; and Harry L., of 
this review. All the children were born in the Cobb home in Independence. 

In early times Edwin Cobb served as treasurer of the school board and was 
connected with the fair association, but he steadily refused to fill political posi- 
tions. With the growth and development of the county he was closely associated 
and his name is found on the roll of honored pioneer settlers who laid the foun- 
dation for the present prosperity and progress of the county. He died June 3, 
1914, lacking but four days of being ninety-one years of age. He had long sur- 
vived his wife, who passed away February 20, 1872. 

Harry L. Cobb acquired his education in the public schools of Independence 
and in the Upper Iowa University at Fayette. He worked with his father until 
he attained his majority and then began to acquire interests with the latter in 
the live-stock business. He has always resided in Independence and was contin- 
ually connected with his father in live-stock dealing until the latter 's death. 
About 1908 Harry L. Cobb l)egan buying and breeding pure bred dairy short- 
horn cattle, starting with a pair. He now has a valuable herd, includuifu the 
cow which holds the world's shorthorn record for milk and l)utter. This cow 
is Ruth III, and the register number is 20440. Mr. Cobb likewise owns the cow 
which stands in the second place, Charlotte B. He keeps on hand a number of 
pure blooded cows, shipping all over the United States. Recently he shipped to 
California a number of choice cattle, which he sold at fancy prices, and .he devotes 



278 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

his entire time to the live-stock business and to farming, his activities in those 
directions bringing him a substantial annual income. 

On the 30th of May, 1890, Mr. Cobb was united in marriage to Miss Pearl 
Kays, a native of Independence and a daughter of James and Palona (Spencer) 
Kays, the former born in Pennsylvania in 1835, and the latter in Ohio in 1841. 
In early life Mr. Kays followed blacksmithing. He emigrated westward to Wis- 
consin and thence to Independence, where he arrived about 1864. Here he also 
engaged in the blacksmithing business for a number of years. He then removed 
to a farm in the vicinity of Hazleton, whereon he lived for fifteen years, and at 
the same time conducted a blacksmith shop on his farm. He next took up his 
abode in the town of Hazleton, where he again conducted a smithy. Later he 
returned to Independence, where he remained for a number of years, and then 
went to Waterloo, Iowa, where he now lives retired, making his home with his 
daughter. To Mr. and Mrs. Kays were born seven children : Emma, the wife 
of John Coonrad, a lumber dealer of Waterloo; Irene, the deceased wife of 
Lester Lawrence, who is residing in Cedar Rapids ; Laura, who died in childhood ; 
Nettie, the wife of Myron Yining, a carpet maker of Waterloo ; Ora, who married 
Lillian Peterson, and is a traveling salesman, living at Waterloo; Mrs. Cobb; 
and Nellie N., the wife of Charles Baker, a traveling salesman, living in 
Kansas City. 

]\Ir. and Mrs. Cob)) have become parents of five children: Grace, who was 
born May 15, 1891. and died in infancy; CJlen Albert, who was born Noveml^er 
2, 1892. and who is associated with his father in the stock business; Veda, who 
was born September 21, 1899; Harriet Lucile, born December 3, 1903; and 
Harold George, born December 2. 1910. Glen A. Cobb married Verona Sensor, 
who was born in Ilawkeye, Iowa, and tliey have a daughter, Marion Leona, born 
August 27. 1914. 

^Ir. Cobb belongs to the Masonic lodge and is a loyal advocate of its teach- 
ings. The greater part of his attention, however, is devoted to liis business 
affairs and his wise management of his interests has led to the attainment of 
substantial success. ]\Ioreover. he has done mucli to improve the grade of stock 
raised, not only in this section of the state but in other parts of the country, and 
has done much to win for Iowa its well earned reputation as a leading live-stock 
center of the country. 



JACOB ARNOLD. 



On the 15th of August, 1905, occurred the demise, of Jacob Arnold, who, 
although born in Germany, was for many years a resident of Buchanan county, 
Iowa, gaining in that time many warm friends. His natal day was the 14th of 
January, 1834, and he remained in the fatlierland until he was a young man of 
twenty, when he crossed the Atlantic to America and continued his way west- 
ward to Du Page county. Illinois, where he located. He was married in 1862, 
and in 1865 he and his wife with their two oldest children came to Buchanan 
county, making the journey in a wagon. Tliey settled upon an eighty acre tract 
of wild prairie land in Cono township and ^Ir. Arnold immediately began its 






.<4P-«& ■ 


■kv 


fl 


^^B 


^1 


^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 


J ^^^ 


^ 


Jn 



ME.. AND MRS. JACOB ARNOLD 



THE NSW YORK 
?T'BL1C LUUIARY 



J 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 281 

cultivation. He was compelled to go in debt in order to make his first purchase, 
but as both he and his wife were hard workers and economical the indebtedness 
upon the property was eventually paid off and Mr. Arnold bought more land 
from time to time until he became the owner of about nine hundred acres, from 
which he derived a handsome income. He was industrious and alert and his 
success was but the merited reward of his enterprise and good management. 

In 1862 Mr. Arnold married Miss Katherina Kautz, a native of Germany, 
born on the 3d of November, 1846. Her parents, Daniel and Katheriue (Stoffer) 
Kautz, who were likewise natives of the fatherland, came to the United States 
when she was a child of nine years. The family settled in Du Page county, 
Illinois, but both Mr. and Mrs. Kautz died in Cono township, this county, where 
they had resided for some time before called to their final rest. All of the children 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Arnold are married and have homes of their own. At the 
death of the father the property was divided and each received a good farm. 

Mr. Arnold was a member of the Presbyterian church, to which his wife also 
belongs. In political matters he supported the democratic party and held various 
township offices. His widow still resides upon the eighty acres which they first 
purchased and which has remained the homestead throughout the many years 
since their arrival in this county. Mr. Arnold conformed his life to high stand- 
ards of conduct and in addition to winning material success, gained the sincere 
respect and esteem of those who knew him, and his death in 1905 deprived the 
county of a valued resident. 



JOHN W. WOLGAMOT. 

John W. Wolgamot, of Fairbank, is one of the leading auctioneers of this 
part of the state and cries many sales annually. He was born in Fairbank 
township, Buchanan county, April 30, 1862, a son of Joseph and Athae T. (Buck- 
master) Wolgamot, natives of Maryland and Holmes county, Ohio, respectively. 
The father was taken by his parents to Holmes county, Ohio, when but an infant. 
He was a soldier in the Mexican war, serving for three years, and at the close 
of the war returned to Oliio. In the early fifties he brought his family to Bu- 
chanan county, where he lived until his death, which occurred at Fairbank 
in 1911. His wife died in 1898. They were the parents of eight children, of 
whom the subject of this review is the sixth in order of birth. A fuller account 
of the lives of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Wolgamot will be found in the sketch of 
Clinton W. Wolgamot, which appears elsewhere in this work. 

John W. Wolgamot grew to manhood in this county and received his educa- 
tion in the common .schools. He followed agricultural pursuits until 1882, when 
he engaged in the butchering business and in the buying and selling of live 
stock in Fairbank. He continued in those occupations for some time but is now 
an auctioneer and his services are often required in other counties, as he has a 
a reputation for efficient work that extends throughout this section of Iowa. 
He understands his business thoroughly and is almost always al)le to secure a good 
price for the articles offered at auction. He is not only largely in demand for the 
sales of household goods, but cries most of the sales of live stock and farm iraple- 

Vol. 11—13 



282 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

ments held in this county and many held in adjoining counties. He understands 
a crowd thoroughly and this knowledge enables him to present the merits of the 
article which is for sale in such a way as to get a good price for it. 

Mr. Wolgamot was married, in Waterloo, Iowa, on New Year's day, 1896, 
to Miss Ida Hoffman, who was born in Dixon, Illinois, January 3, 1866. In 
1872 she accompanied her parents to Iowa, the family locating near Dunkerton 
on a farm. Her father, William Henry Harrison Hoffman, was born in Penn- 
sylvania and died in Fairbank, Iowa, 1897. Her mother, who was in her 
maidenhood Miss Rebecca Hersel, was also a native of the Keystone state and 
likewise died at Fairbank. To their union were born seven children, of whom 
four are living. The brothers and sisters of ]\Irs. Wolgamot were : Mary 
Luetta, who died in Pennsylvania when a child of two years; Reuben, residing 
in Bondurant, Iowa ; John Aaron, whose home is near Butterfield, Minnesota ; 
Charles Luther, of Staples, Minnesota ; Alice May, who died when nine years 
of age ; and Mrs. Rosetta jMatilda Busby, \vho died in Fayette county, Iowa. The 
eldest child was a native of the Keystone state, the four next in order of birth 
were born in Illinois and the two youngest in Black Hawk county, Iowa. Mrs. 
Wolgamot is a member of the Episcopal church and aids in the work of its 
various organizations. 

Mr. AVolgamot is a democrat in his political allegiance and has always taken 
an active part in public affairs. He served one term as deputy sheriff of Bu- 
chanan county and has been a member of the council at Fairbank as well 
as city marshal and constable. Fraternally he belongs to the Elks at Oelwein. 
His time has not been entirely taken up by his auctioneering business and he has 
bought, improved and sold a number of farms in this community. He owns 
two substantial business houses in Fairbank and also one hundred and sixty acres 
of good land near Otoka, South Dakota. His wife owns and manages the leading 
millinery store in Fairl)ank. They both have marked business ability, which 
they have developed, and both are successful and prosperous. All of their rela- 
tions with their fellowmen are guided by liigh standards of conduct and their 
friends are many. 



AMOS G. SIIELLITO, M. D. 

Dr. Amos G. Shellito, engaged in the general practice of medicine at Inde- 
pendence, was born in Crawford county, Pennsylvania, August 20, 1860, a son 
of George and Amanda (Slocum) Shellito. The fatlier was born in Crawford 
county, Pennsylvania, in 1821, and the mother's birth occurred in Vermont in 
1830. George Shellito always followed the occupation of farming and spent 
his entire life in his native county, where he died in the year 1892. His wife 
survived him for about thirteen years, passing away in 1905. 

Dr. Shellito was the third in a family of six children and after attending 
the public schools of his native county continued his education in the preparatory 
department of Allegheny College. He also attended medical school in Cleveland 
for one year and then entered a medical college at Baltimore, Maryland, from 
which ho was graduated in 1882. The same year he came to Iowa, settling at In- 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 283 

dependence, where he entered upon the practice of his profession. He has since 
continued in the general practice of medicine and has been accorded a liberal 
patronage. 

In December, 1884, Dr. Shellito was married to Miss Nellie F. Campbell, 
who was born in Independence, Iowa, a daughter of John H. and Ruth R. 
(Judd) Campbell, both of whom were natives of New York. They came to Iowa 
about 1856 and Mr. Campbell engaged in the banking business, he and his 
brother organizing the First National Bank of Independence, with which insti- 
tution he was connected until his death, which occurred in 1886. His wife 
passed away January 20, 1910. Dr. and Mrs. Shellito have a son, Judd Campbell, 
who was born May 25, 1889, and is now attending the Johns Hopkins University 
at Baltimore, Maryland, as a student in the medical department. 

Dr. Shellito is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church and gives liis 
political allegiance to the republican party but is without aspiration for office. 
He belongs to the ^Masonic fraternity, holding membership in the lodge, chapter, 
commandery and Mystic Shrine. Along strictly professional lines his connection 
is with the Buchanan County Medical Society, the Iowa State Medical Society 
and the American Medical Association. Thus he keeps in touch with the advance- 
ment made in his chosen field of labor. 



GEORGE W. KLOTZ. 



A farm of one hundred and twenty acres on section 4, Newton township, 
pays tribute to the care and labor bestowed upon it by its owner and occupant, 
George W. Klotz, who was born January 8, 1867, in the township which is still 
his home. He is a son of Charles F. and Rachel (Hekel) Klotz, who were natives 
of Germany. In early life the father came to the new world, making his way to 
Dubuque county, Iowa, whence he afterward came to Buchanan county. All 
through his life he followed the occupation of farming and in Newton township 
he purchased a tract of land which he continued to develop and cultivate until 
1907, when he retired from active business and took up his abode in Quasqueton, 
where he still remains. In 1907 he was called upon to mourn the loss of his wife, 
who died in February of that year. 

George W. Klotz has always been a resident of this county, spending his 
youthful days in the usual manner of farm lads, early becoming familiar with 
the best methods of plowing, planting and harvesting. He remained with his 
parents to the age of twTuty-five years and then rented land and began farming 
on his own account. He was given one hundred and twenty acres of land on 
section 4, Newton township, by his father and has since devoted his energies to 
the further development and improvement of the property. Iowa's soil is 
naturally rich and productive and pays good return for the care and labor be- 
stowed upon it. The farm of Mr. Klotz is now well improved with modern 
accessories and conveniences, and he uses the latest machinery to facilitate the 
work of the fields. He also engages in stock-raising, handling high grade cattle, 
sheep and hogs, and he is a stockholder in the Kiene Store Building Company in 
the village of Kiene. Earnest, persistent labor has been the source of his success. 



284 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

Year by year he has worked on persistently and energetically and in his business 
management has displayed sound judgment. 

In June, 1892, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Klotz and Miss Nellie 
Perry, a daughter of Malachi and Lucretia (Cutler) Perry. Four children have 
been born of this union, namely : Arlene, who is the wife of John Buchanan, of 
Jackson, Iowa ; Florence, a maiden of fifteen summers ; and ^Marion and Nellie, 
who are ten and eight years of age respectively. ^ 

Mr. Klotz is a believer in the principles of the republican party, and for 
four years he served as trustee of his township, while he has also been justice 
of the peace. Otherwise, however, he has not held nor desired public office, 
preferring to give undivided attention to his business affairs. He has member- 
ship with the ]\Iodern Brotherhood of America and the family attend the Con- 
gregational church. In those associations are found the motive springs of his 
conduct, making him a man of genuine worth enjoying the unqualified regard of 
neighbors and friends. 



THEODORE B. HOUSHOLDER. 

The j^ear 1886 witnessed the arrival of Theodore B. Housholder in Buchanan 
county, at which time he purchased land and became identified with agricul- 
tural pursuits. For many years he carried on general farming but since 1910 
has lived retired in Rowley, enjoying a well earned rest. His birth occurred 
in Barrington, Cook county, Illinois, on the 7th of December, 1858, his parents 
being Charles and ^laria (Casteline) Housholder, botli of whom were natives 
of New York. Removing westward, they settled in Cook count}', Illinois, at an 
early period in the development of tliat section of the state and there the 
father embarked in farming, continuing to engage in that occupation throughout 
his remaining days. Both he and his wife have passed away. 

Theodore B. Housholder was reared and educated in his native county and 
received ample training in farm work through the assistance which he rendered 
his father in cultivating tlie fiekls of the old home farm. On attaining his 
majority his desire to engage in l)usiness on his own account caused him to rent 
land which he cultivated until 1S86. He then removed westward with Buchanan 
county as his destination and purchased forty acres of land in Homer township. 
This he at once began to cultivate l)ut after three years sold out and purchased 
eighty-five acres, upon which he made his home throughout the remainder of 
the period that he tlevoted to active business. His labors were soon evidenced 
in the good crops which he gathered and in the excellent appearance of his 
place, characterized at all points by neatness and thrift. His careful manage- 
ment of liis ])usiness aft'airs and his well directed industry brought liim a 
competence sufficient to enable him to put aside further cares in 1910 and retire 
from active life. 

On the 20th of February, 1880, Mr. Honsholder was married to Miss Amanda 
Shouler, a daughter of Eli and Mahala (Hankins) Shouler, who were Illinois 
pioneers, removing to that state from Wisconsin and there spending their re- 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 285 

maining days. Mr. and Mrs. Housholder have become the parents of three sons, 
Eli, Jay and Wayne, all residents of Rowley. 

Mr. Housholder is a republican in his political views and keeps in touch 
with the leading questions and issues of the day. He has served as a trustee 
of Homer township. He and his wife are highly esteemed in the community 
in which they make their home. More than a quarter of a century has passed 
since their arrival in this county and throughout the entire period their lives 
have been such as to win for them the confidence and good-will of all with 
whom they have come in contact. 



WILLIAM G. BROWN. 



William G. Brown is one of the foremost business men of Independence, a 
position to which he has attained through indefatigable energy and intelligently 
directed effort. He started out in life practically empty-handed and is today 
one of the partners in an enterprise employing two hundred and eighty people. 
He was born in Independence, July 25, 1869. His father, Ellis P. Brown, whose 
birth occurred in New London, Chester countj^ Pennsylvania, in 1836, came 
to Iowa from Pennsylvania in 1864 and engaged in the grain business in Inde- 
pendence. He wedded Mary E. Norris, who was born in New Philadelphia, 
Ohio, in 1842. Following their removal to Iowa she engaged in the millinery 
business, her store being located in the building in which originated the great 
fire that practically destroyed Independence on the 3d of ^lay, 1874. It was 
with difficulty that they managed to escape from the tire, which completely 
destroyed the business. Ellis P. Brown was a .soldier of the Civil war, serving 
for ninety days with the Pennsylvania Artillery, his command being called out 
at the battle of Gettysburg. He was of the Quaker faith. He had no political 
aspirations and held no public ofifice, but his life was upright and honorable 
and won for him warm regard. 

William G. Brown, the elder of two children, attended the schools of Inde- 
pendence and at the age of eighteen years accepted the position of baggageman 
in his native city in the employ of the Illinois Central Railroad. When he had 
thoroughly acquainted himself with the duties of that position and proven his 
worth, he was advanced to the position of ticket agent at Dubuque in the service 
of the Chicago & Great Western. In 1897, however, he returned to Independence, 
where he opened a cafe which he conducted until 1911. He next entered 
into partnership with E. 0. Parker and Joseph Limbert for the manufacture 
of novelty cards and jobbing of other fancy novelties. The business was started 
in one room and something of its rapid and .substantial growth is indicated in 
the fact that they now occupy five store buildings. They conduct their own 
printery and employ two hundred and eighty people. The cigar and candy 
boards and other novelties which they make are sold all over the United States, 
Mexico and Canada and their output along all lines is shipped to every part 
of this country, their business being now one of mammoth proportions. Mr. 
Brown keeps in close touch with the trade, studies its indications and the de- 
mands of the public and is ever ready to meet any emergency that may arise. 



286 HISTORY OP^ BUCHANAN COUNTY 

In 1906 Mr. Brown was united in marriage to Miss Bonita Walker, of Inde 
pendence, a daughter of John W. and Maria Agnes (Nay lor) Walker, the former 
born in Indiana in 1847 and the latter in Pennsylvania in 1848. The father 
died in 1905, at the age of fifty-eight years, and the mother now makes her home 
at Weyerhauser, Wisconsin, at the age of sixty-six years. In early life the 
father was a resident of Orangeville, Illinois, and was there located at the 
time of the Civil war. Responding to the country's call for troops, he went 
to the front and while in the army sustained a sunstroke from which he never 
fully recovered. He was a carpenter and builder and in the '70s removed to 
Iowa, where he made his home for a considerable time. At length he left Inde- 
pendence and went to Yates Center, Kansas, and later removed to Wisconsin, 
where he passed away. 

"Slv. Brown holds membership with the United Commercial Travelers. He is 
a man of marked initiative spirit who at all times is forceful and resourceful. 
His plans are carefully formed and promptly executed and, moreover, he has 
the abilit.y to recognize and utilize opportunities which others pass heedlessly 
by. Gradually he has worked his way upward and today he is at the head 
of an extensive and prosperous business which is not only a source of gratifying 
individual income but also an element in the prosperity of Buchanan county. 



GEORGE W. BARE. 



Homer township is divided up into many excellent farms which indicate the 
progressive spirit of their owners in their well tilled fields, good crops and sub- 
stantial buildings. George W. Bare has a fine tract of land on sections 27 and 
28, Homer township, comprising two hundred acres. His life record began 
in Fairfield county, Ohio, on the 4th of July, 1861, his parents being John and 
Elizabetli (Haas) Bare. Tlie father was born in Pennsylvania, but the mother 
was a native of Switzerland. In early life John Bare learned and followed the 
carpenter's trade and after leaving Pennsylvania lived for some time in Ohio be- 
fore going to Indiana. Following his arrival in the last named state he settled 
in Whitley county, where his remaining days were passed. He died in 1863, 
while his wife's death occurred in 1879. 

George W. Bare, spending his youtiiful days in Indiana, attended the public 
schools there and received thorough training in farm work, early taking his 
place in the fields in connection wifii the tasks of plowing, planting and harvest- 
ing. He remained at home until 1880. when at the age of nineteen years he 
came to Buchanan county, where for four years he cultivated a rented farm. 
He then put aside that task and was employed as a farm hand for four years. At 
the end of that time he again began farming on rented land, spending two 
years in Benton county, Iowa, after which he purchased eighty acres on section 
27, Homer townshij). He then bent every energy to the development of that 
place and from time to time he has extended the boundaries of his farm until 
it now comprises forty acres adjoining the original homestead, and in 1912 he 
bought eighty acres on section 28, IIonuM* township, making in all two hundred 
acres wbicli lie is carefulh- tillinir. The high tas.seled corn and the golden heads 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 287 

of the wheat indicate that his methods of cultivating the soil are practical and 
insure substantial results. In his pasture lands are found high grade stock, 
including thoroughbred shorthorn cattle and Poland China hogs. 

On the 30th of April, 1890, Mr. Bare was united in marriage to Miss Eva 
L. Robison, a daughter of L. E. and Fannie (Mosier) Robison, who were natives 
of New York. The father followed farming until after the outl)reak of the Civil 
war, when he enlisted for service at the front with the boys in blue, joining the 
Sixteenth New York Heavy Artillery in January, 1864, and being subsequently 
transferred to the First New York Mounted Rifles, with which command he served 
until the close of the war. Ifa 1869 he arrived in Buchanan county and two years 
later purchased land in Homer township upon which he continued to reside until 
1908. During that period he carefully carried on general farming but ulti- 
mately retired and removed to Walker, Iowa, where he now resides at the age of 
seventy years. His wife is sixty-two years of age. Mr. and Mrs. Bare are the 
parents of eight children, namely : Elmer D., who is twenty-three years of age 
and is an electrician at Walker ; Lida J., twenty-one years of age, who is a milliner 
of Dumont, Iowa ; Charles Leslie, a young man of nineteen years ; John, a youth 
of fourteen ; and Harold, Hattie, Carrie and Fannie, who are twelve, ten, six 
and four years of age respectively. The last six named are still under the 
parental roof. 

Mr. Bare exercises his right of franchise in support of the men and measures 
of the democratic party and has filled the office of justice of the peace, in which 
connection he carefully w^eighs the evidence of the case and bases his decisions 
upon the equity and the law. He belongs to the Modern Brotherhood of Amer- 
ica and to the Methodist church and in these associations are found the motive 
springs of his conduct, making hiin a man worthy the high respect of those 
with whom he has dealings or with whom he is brought in contact in social rela- 
tions. 



DON W. ANDERSON. 



Don W. Anderson has for a number of years been identified with business 
activity in Rowley and is now a salesman in the F. j\I. Williams general store. 
He was born in Otterville, this county, November 7, 1885, his parents being 
William and Flora (Pratt) Anderson. The father, a native of Indiana, arrived 
in Buchanan county in early life in company with his parents. He afterward 
followed farming for some time and finally turned his attention to commercial 
pursuits, engaging in the grocery business in Otterville, where he conducted a 
store for about eight years. He still makes his home in that place, but his wife 
passed away in 1885. 

Don W. Anderson was but two weeks old when his mother died, and he after- 
ward lived with his uncle, L. R. Miller, at Independence, until nine years of age. 
He pursued his early education in the schools of that city and subsequently 
attended Highland Park College at Des Moines, Iowa, from which he was grad- 
uated with the class in pharmacy in December, 1904. After completing that 
course he worked in a drug store for others and afterwards engaged in busi- 



288 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

ness on his own account. For two years he was proprietor of a drug store at 
Aurora, this county. Later he spent a year in Independence, and then came to 
Rowley, where he conducted a drug store for two years. On the expiration of 
that period he turned his attention to the real estate business, with which he was 
connected until January, 1914, when he accepted his present position as clerk 
in the general store of F. M. "Williams. He is well known to the trading public, 
is ever courteous in his treatment of patrons and thoroughly reliable in his busi- 
ness methods. 

On the 28th of October, 1905, Mr. Anderson was united in marriage to Miss 
Lena Hutton, a daughter of Ira and Louise (Culbertson) Hutton, the former a 
native of Kansas, and the latter of Greele}-, Iowa. Her father was at one time 
engaged in the creamery business in Otterville and also in Independence, and 
is now conducting a similar enterprise at Earlville. Mr. and Mrs. Anderson 
have three children, namely : Gladys and Merle, who are five and four years 
of age, respectively; and Roth, who is in the second year. 

The religious faith of the famil.y is that of the Presbyterian church, to 
which both Mr. and Mrs. Anderson belong. Politically he is a democrat and is 
a candidate for the office of clerk of the court on that party ticket. At the 
present writing he is filling the office of assessor of Homer township, which posi- 
tion he has occupied for two years. He holds membership with the Masonic 
lodge at Rowley, with the Eastern Star Chapter, and with the Modern Wood- 
men Camp at Otterville, and to the teachings of those organizations is always 
loyal. He and his family occupy a pleasant residence in Rowley, which he owns, 
and their home is the abode of a warm-hearted hospitality which is greatly en- 
joyed by their many friends. ^Ir. Anderson is a young man of genuine personal 
worth and justly merits the high esteem which is uniformly accorded him. 



ZEXAS A. CO.MFORT. 



Zenas A. Comfort, a prominent factor in financial circles of Buchanan county, 
is the president of the Jesup State Bank at Jesup and is also a successful stock- 
man and owner of extensive farm lands. His birth occurred in Cook county, 
Illinois, August 19, 1850, his parents being William and .Matilda (Blackman) 
Comfort. The parents were both natives of Canada but took up their abode in 
Illinois early in life, being married near Elgin, that state. Tiie father, who was 
a farmer by occupation, took up his abode in Buchanan county. Iowa, in 1868, 
purchasing four hundred and eighty acres of land a mile and a half east of 
Jesup. This he improved and cultivated throughout his remaining days, p'assing 
away on the home farm at the age of seventy-two years. He was a republican 
in his political affiliations and was an active member of the ]\K'thodist Episcopal 
church. He was well known throughout the county and his death brought to 
the community a distinct loss. His wife survived for a few years and passed 
away July 17, 1910. in the faith of the ]\Iethodist church, in which she was like- 
wise a devoted and active worker. In their family were seven children: Zenas 
A., of this review ; W. J., who makes his home in Sioux City. Iowa ; George M., 
who has i)assed away : E. W., who operates the old homestead farm in Perry 




ZENAS A. COMFORT 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 291 

township ; Levi L., who has also departed this life ; Elmer E., a farmer of Perry 
township; and Matilda, the deceased wife of John Cruikshank, of Cedar Rapids. 

Zenas A. Comfort was educated in the schools of Illinois and was a youth of 
eighteen years when the family home was established in Buchanan county. He 
assisted his father in the cultivation of his new land and remained under the 
parental roof to the age of twenty-five years, when he was married and estab- 
lished a home of his own on eighty acres of land in Perrj^ township. To this 
tract he added eighty acres four years later and actively engaged in its cultivation 
for many years. During the winter months he gave his attention largely to 
shipping stock, but in 1901 he disposed of all his stock, rented his farm to his 
son and took up his abode in Jesup. He here formed a partnership with ]\I. R. 
Considine and from that time to the present they have engaged quite ex- 
tensively in buying and shipping stock. In 1901 ]Mr. Comfort and J. H. Carey 
solicited stock and organized the bank which has since conducted business under 
the style of the Jesup State Bank. Upon the inception of this institution Mr. 
Carey was elected president and Mr. Comfort w^as made vice president. Five 
years later the death of Mr. Carey occurred and ^Ir. Comfort then succeeded 
to the presidency, in which capacity he has since served, contributing in no 
small degree to the growth and success of the institution. In addition to his 
banking interests ^Ir. Comfort has accumulated farm lands in North and South 
Dakota, Minnesota and Texas, his possessions now aggregating nine hundred 
acres. He also owns city property in Jesup and holds stock in the telephone 
company and the creamery of this place and in the Rath Packing Company at 
Waterloo, Iowa. 

Mr. Comfort was married, September 6, 1875, to ]\Iiss Mary Jane Wills, a 
native of England, and their union has been blessed with seven children : Fred', 
Clifford and Jesse, all of whom follow farming in Perry township ; Jasper, who 
resides in Texas ; Birdie, the wife of W. J. Campbell, a merchant of Jesup ; Lora 
A., at home ; and one who died in infancy. 

In politics Mr. Comfort is a stanch republican and both he and his wife are 
devoted members of the Methodist Episcopal church, in which for many years 
he has served as a trustee. His life has been characterized by principles that 
command respect, and in all his dealings he has shown a probity that reflects 
upon him the highest credit. 



REMINGTON FRED FRENCH. 

Remington Fred French is well known as an active and successful live- 
stock dealer, which business he has conducted along extensive lines. His birth- 
place was in Buchanan county, a mile and a half north of his present place of 
residence, his natal day being August 29, 1870. He is one of a family of eight 
children born unto Philander and Mary Ann (Van Netten) French. The father's 
birth occurred in Cayuga county. New York, November 12, 1812, and the mother 
was born in New Jersey, March 20, 1832. Mr. French always followed farming 
and for a number of years in early life engaged in surveying. He came to Iowa 
about 1848, settling in Buchanan county, about a half mile .south of the county 



292 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

farm. He became a land owner and continued upon his farm throughout the 
remainder of his days, devoting his entire life to the cultivation of his fields, 
covering three hundred and sixty acres, his efforts resulting in greatly enhanc- 
ing the value of his property. He died July 30, 1892, and his wife passed away 
March 28, 1913. 

Remington F. French was a pupil in the old stone school house in the home 
district and afterward pursued a business course in Des Moines. Later he was 
graduated from the Iowa State University, having completed the law course 
with the class of 1899. He remained at home until twenty-one years of age, and 
after preparing for the bar he formed a partnership in 1899 with Captain 
Holman, who was then county attorney. The relationship between them existed 
for three years, at the end of which time Mr. French removed to his present 
home, which he had previously owned. He has made all of the improvements 
upon the farm, which is today one of the finest places in the county. He has 
two hundred and thirty-five acres of excellent farm land, which he cultivates in 
a general way, and in 1907 he began the breeding of full-blooded Belgian horses. 
In 1911 he began importing direct from Belgium, making the first trip in that 
year. He made his own selections and did his own l)uying and today owns a 
number of full-blooded imported horses. He sells in a numl)er of surrounding 
states and in Canada, handling more stock of this kind than all other stock dealers 
of the county together. He is a most careful buyer, seldom if ever at error 
in estimating the value of a horse, and his success is well deserved. He devotes 
his entire time to his farm and his livestock interests and is today one of the. 
representative men in this line in Buchanan county. For some years he was 
extensively engaged in feeding cattle upon a farm north of the poor farm, 
but sold that property. He afterward disposed of his farm a mile and a half 
east of his present place, which is situated in Washington township and is one 
of the valuable properties of the county. He is now concentrating his energies 
upon the breeding, raising and sale of horses. His stable contains the mare 
which won the first prize in the three-year-old class at the Iowa State Fair in 
1913, and also the colt which won the first weanling's prize in tiie same year. 
He likewise has the sire of this colt in his stable. He is also the owner of a 
pair of four-year-old mares which won second prize at the State Fair in 1911 
and again in 1912, and he is the owner of the stallion which won second prize 
in the three-year-old class in 1913. He is likewise the owner of a grandson of 
the stallion which won five championships in Belgium and Paris exhibits in 
consecutive years. He now has on hand thirty head of full-blooded Belgian 
horses. He has no desire to be the largest importer, but has ambition to handle 
horses of the highest grade. His stable for mares is one hundred and twelve by 
thirty-tM^o feet, with a shed in the rear sixty-four by twenty-four feet. The 
stallion barn is equipped witli box stalls and its dimensions are thirty-two by 
eio-htv feet. He has everv facilitv needed in connection with his Inisiness and 
his name is familiar to horsemen throughout the country. He is an expert .ludge 
of horses and his business has been so conducted as to win substantial .success. 

On the 30th day of May, 1900, :Mr. French was united in marriage to Miss 
Kate Wilson, whose birth occurred upon a farm a half mile east of her present 
home, her parents being Elzie and ^laria (Kaufman^ Wilson, both of whom 
were natives of Wayne eounty, Ohio, the former born August 8, 1844. and the 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 293 

latter on the 20th of August, 1853. They came to Iowa on the 4th of May, 1864, 
and Mr. Wilson followed farming and stock raising, living for many years on a 
farm a half mile east of the French farm, save for a short time upon a farm in 
Buffalo township, later returning to the old homestead. Eventually, however, 
he left the farm, although he is still a resident of the county. For a number 
of years he was one of the stockholders and directors of the Commercial National 
Bank and was a holder of key No. 2 to the vaults. He never sought nor desired 
political office, yet filled the position of supervisor. To him and his wife were 
born two children, Mrs. French being the younger and the only daughter. She 
attended the city schools of Independence and pursued a course in music in 
Oberlin College at Oberlin, Ohio, and also studied in Chicago, thus developing 
her native talent. To Mr. and Mrs. French have been bom two children : Mar- 
garet Wilson, born August 12, 1903 ; and Ruth Virinda, born February 2, 1906. 
In his political views Mr. French is a Republican and is now serving as a 
member of the board of county supervisors. He belongs to the Masonic fra- 
ternity, in which he has taken the degrees of lodge and chapter. 



ROBERT EPHRATM LEACH. 

The news of the sudden death of Robert Ephraim Leaeli, which was occa- 
sioned by an accident, on the 30th of August, 1914, came as a shock to Inde- 
pendence, as he was a man in the prime of life and possessed of great physical 
vigor. He was one of the leaders in civic affairs, prominent in fraternal circles 
and a business man of no mean ability. He was often referred to as the best 
educated man in Independence, and was proficient in many languages and also 
in higher mathematics. He did not admit all to intimate relationship, but those 
who were privileged in being his close friends held him in the highest honor, as 
they found him in all circumstances a man true to his word, even at the greatest 
material cost to himself, and unflinchingly loyal to any cause in which he be- 
lieved. For a number of years he was one of the leaders of the bar of Buchanan 
county, but for some time previous to his death he concentrated his energies 
upon the management of his estate and that of his aged father, Ephraim Leach, 
'one of the pioneers of the county. 

Mr. Leach, of this review, was born in this city on the 13th of February, 
1869, a son of Ephraim and Mary E. (Traeey) Leach. A sketch of the father 
appears elsewhere in this work. The subject of this review was the only child 
born to his parents and was reared in Independence, attending the public schools 
of the city. However, his secondary education was acquired in Waterloo, and 
after being graduated from the high school there in 1886 he entered the State 
University of Iowa at Iowa City, and completed his course there with the class 
of 1889. After spending two years in post-graduate work in Harvard Univer- 
sity he entered the law department of the University of Iowa, from which he was 
graduated with his legal degree in 1894. His college career was one of unusual 
success, both in scholastic attainments and in the field of student activities. His 
scholarship was of a high order and won him election to Phi Beta Kappa, an hon- 
orary college fraternity founded at William and Mary in 1776 for the purpose of 



294 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

recognizing marked ability shown in college work and also with the aim of 
fostering the love of learning. That he held the respect and esteem of his college 
mates is apparent from the fact that he was elected a member of Beta Theta 
Pi, a leading college fraternity, and was president of Phi Delta Phi, a law 
fraternity. 

After leaving law school he pursued his legal studies in the office of Wood- 
ward & Cook, and was in due time admitted to the bar. He subsequently prac- 
ticed his profession alone for a year, but upon the death of J. S. Woodward, 
formed a partnership with the latter 's partner, J. E. Cook, and this law firm 
continued until about 1905. ^Ir. Leach then again practiced by himself for a 
time, but subsequently became associated with R. J. O'Brien in the formation 
of a law firm, which continued until January, 1909. At that time Mr. Leach 
withdrew from the firm and devoted his time and energy to the management 
of his other interests and those of his father. He was successful in everything 
that he undertook, bending the powers of his fine intellect, trained in the best 
schools of the country, to the accomplishment of whatever task he had in hand, 
and the association of his name with any project insured its validity. As a 
lawyer he was aggressive in the conduct of any case intrusted to him, his wide 
learning and his keen, vigorous mind making him an opponent much to be 
feared, and he won an unusually liigh percentage of the cases in which he ap- 
peared as counsel. 

Mr. Leach was married on the 28th of June, 1S94, to ]\Iiss Kate E. Wood- 
ward, a daughter of ]\Ir. and ]\Irs. J. S. Woodward, a sketch of whom appears 
elsewhere in this work. To ^Ir. and ^Irs. Leach were born four children : 
Robert Woodward ; Jerome Southwick, who is deceased ; Epliraim ; and Catliarine, 
also deceased, 

Mr. Leach was a member of the Presbyterian church and practiced in his 
daily life the teachings of Christianity. Fraternally he was prominent, belong- 
ing to Tndepeiulence Lodge, A. F. & A. M. ; Aholiab Chapter, R. A. M. ; Kenneth 
Commandery, K. T. ; Crescent Lodge, K. P.; Wapsie Camp, M. W. A.; Indepen- 
dence Lodge, I. 0. 0. F.; and Anchor Homestead. B. A. V.: and he was also 
affiliated with a number of other organizations, including the Harvard Club of 
Chicago, the Buchanan County Bar Association, and the Iowa State Bar Asso- 
ciation. He was an accomplished linguist, being master of the English, German, 
Greek. Latin, French, Spanish and Italian languages, and able to translate 
to some extent two other foreign tongues. Not only was he gifted as a language 
student, but lie was also a mathematician of exceptional ability. He realized 
the importance to a community of a good school syst^^n and he recognized also 
the fact that the best work can only lie done when there is adequate eciuipment, 
and was the one man who did the mo.st towards securing the fine new high 
school building, which is the pride of the city. A gi-eat many, disliking the idea 
of the expense of erecting a modern high school building, were in favor of 
patching up the old one, but Mr. Leach circulatA'd a petition and secured a 
sufficient numlier of signatures to insure the success of the plan to erect a new 
building. 

l*olitically Mr. Leach belonged to the republican party, and was active in 
its ranks until 1912, at which time he joined the progressive party, and from 
that year until his death was one of the leaders of the new organization in this 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 295 

state. He was delegate from Iowa to notify Colonel Roosevelt of his nomination 
for president. He was candidate for Congress in this district upon the pro- 
gressive ticket and his energetic and telling campaign resulted in his polling 
many more votes than the politicians of the older parties believed possible. He 
was a man who, while quietly insisting upon his rights, was also scrupulous in 
the discharge of his duties and just to ail men. In his family relations he was 
_all that a man should be, and his friends found that his loyalty was unchanging 
and steadfast. His sense of obligation included the community in which he 
lived his entire life, and no citizen of Independence ever labored more unselfishly 
or sincerely for her welfare. He was a man of magnificent physique and his 
great strength and reserve force, coupled with his fine mind, enabled him to 
achieve much in diverse lines of endeavor. 



A. ROY LUTHER. 



A. Roy Luther, a real estate agent of Independence, and one of the native 
sons of the county, was born in 1880, a son of W. S. Luther, whose birth oc- 
curred in Castile, New York, April 1, 1833. In early life he was connected 
with a cousin in the foundry business, but at the outbreak of the Civil war all 
business and personal considerations were put aside and he joined the array as 
a member of Company A, One Hundred Forty-ninth Regiment, New York Vol- 
•unteer Infantry. In the Dismal Swamp he contracted sickness which forced 
him to obtain a leave of absence. His trip home led to no improvement, and he 
was later obliged to resign. He went to the front as sergeant, and when he left 
the army he was holding the rank of second lieutenant. After the war he went 
to southern Ohio, where he remained for five years, engaged in the oil business, 
but he still maintained his home in Castile, New York. 

In 1869 W. S. Luther arrived in Iowa, settling at Independence, where he 
engaged in the agricultural implement business, establishing the firm of Bartle, 
Luther & Brownell, which relation was maintained for fifteen years. Later he 
was at Ossian, Iowa, and at Austin, Minnesota, in the creamery business with 
C. "W. Williams, and subsequently he returned to Independence. During the 
period of his early residence here he was also interested in a sash and door 
factory. It was in Castile, New York, in 1871, that he was united in marriage 
to Miss Anna Shea, who was born in St. John, New Brunswick, August 11, 1850. 
They became the parents of five children, who are yet living, all being residents 
of Independence, namely: W. S. and A. R., who are engaged in the real estate 
business; J. S., who is bookkeeper for the People's National Bank; W. P., who 
is associated with his brothers, A. R. and J. S., in the cigar l)usiness ii,i Tnde 
pendence ; and Mrs. J. B. Steinmetz, of Independence. The father died in 
March, 1914, in the faith of the Methodist church, in which he held membership. 
The mother survives. 

A. Roy Luther attended school in Independence and when seventeen years 
of age enlisted as a member of Company E, Forty-ninth Iowa Volunteer In- 
fantry, for service in the Spanish-American War. He served for one year in 
Jacksonville, Florida, in Savannah, Georgia, and in Cuba, and while at Jack- 



296 HISTOKY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

sonville suffered from typhoid fever. After his return he went into the post- 
ofifice as junior clerk, remaining there under several different postmasters, or 
for a period of fourteen years. In November, 1912, he entered the real estate 
and insurance business, and now confines his attention to real estate dealing, 
being an active representative of that line of business. 

Mr. Luther was united in marriage to Miss Maude Higby, a native of Fair- 
bank, Iowa, and they have one child, Elizabeth May, who was born September 2,' 
1910. Mrs. Luther was for six years on the concert stage, in which connection 
she traveled all over the United States and through its colonial possessions. 

Mr. Luther belongs to the Masonic fraternity, and is a chancellor commander 
of the Knights of Pythias. He also has membership with the Spanisli War 
Veterans, and in politics he is an active republican, doing all in his power to 
promote the growth and further the success of the party. He has made a com- 
mendable record in business circles and possesses the enterprise and energy 
which overcome difficulties and obstacles and advances steadily toward the goal 
of prosperity. 



LOUIS F. KLOTZ. 



A student of history cannot carry his investigations far into the records of 
Buchanan county without learning that the name of Klotz figures prominently 
on its pages from pioneer times to the present, especially in connection with 
the agricultural development of this region — and agriculture is the principal 
source of the prosperity and advanced condition of the county today. Among 
those actively engaged in farming in Newton township is Louis F. Klotz, who 
resides on section 9. It was in that township that he was born on the 12th of 
February, 1873, his parents being Charles F. and Rachel (Ilekel) Klotz, of whom 
mention is made in connection with the sketch of George AV. Klotz, on another 
page of this volume. 

As the years of boyhood and youth passed, Louis F. Klotz divided his time 
between the acquirement of a public school education and the work of the fields. 
He early received practical training in the Ix'st methods of plowing, planting 
and harvesting, and through the period of his minority remained with his par- 
ents. He then started out in life on his own account by renting land from his 
father, and eventually inherited one hundred and twenty acres of land on sec- 
tion P. Newton townsliip, and upon that farm has since resided. His life of ac- 
tivity, enterprise and ])rogressiveness is evidenced in the excellent appearance of 
his place, which is lacking in none of the equipments of the model farm. Every- 
thing is well kept, the place is divided into fields of convenient size by substan- 
tial fences, and good barns and outbuildings furnish ample shelter for grain 
and stock. 

On the 6th of March. 1894, 'Mr. Klotz was united in marriage to ^liss Edith 
M. Ironside, a daughter of James and Matilda (Fike) Ironside. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Klotz have been born three children, namely: Gertrude M., nineteen years 
old; and Franklin L. and Donald D., who are sixteen and eight years of age, 
respectively. 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 297 

In addition to his farming interests Mr. Klotz is a stockholder in the Kiene 
Store Building Company. He has always been actuated by a spirit of progress 
in business affairs, and he believes just as thoroughly in advancement in public 
connections. He is a stanch advocate of the temperance cause and expresses 
his opinions in this particular at the ballot box by casting his vote for the pro- 
hibition party. He has filled the office of justice of the peace for one term and 
at the present writing is serving as road supervisor— a position of growing 
importance in this age when public opinion is concentrated upon the subject 
of good highways. Fraternally he is connected with the Modern Brotherhood of 
America, and with the Union Federation lodge. He belongs to the Congrega- 
tional church of Kiene, and is one of its trustees and superintendent of the 
Sunday school, doing all in his power to further the growth of the church and 
extend its influence. His has been a well spent life, as is attested by the high 
regard in which he is uniformly held, while many of his stanchest friends are 
those who have known him from his boyhood to the present. 



WILLIAM C. FALCK. 



William C. Falck is one of the leaders in commercial and financial circles 
of Laiiiont, being president of the Farmers Savings Bank and also a well known 
merchant, dealing in coal, grain, feed and farm and power machinery. He was 
born in Allegheny, Pennsylvania, on the 27th of May, 1871, a son of Lorenz 
and Amelia (Zilliot) Falck. The father was born near Strasburg, Germany, 
and was brought to America by his parents when a child of seven years. The 
family resided for a time at Allegheny, Pennsylvania, and then removed to 
Cincinnati, Ohio, whence, in 1848 or 1849, they Avent to Fort Atkinson, Iowa. 
The grandparents of our subject passed away in this state, the grandfather 
being more than eighty years of age at the time of his demise. Lorenz Falck 
grew to manhood in Iowa and then returned to Allegheny. Pennsylvania, where 
he was married. He lived there for some time but in 1874 removed to Win- 
neshiek county, Iowa, where he made his home until 1890, when he located 
upon a farm in Fayette county which he had purchased. He devoted his time 
to its cultivation until April, 1914, when he retired, and he has since resided at 
Strawberry Point. He owns about four hundred acres of land, which is oper- 
ated by his sons, and also holds title to other property. In the days before the 
railroads McGregor was the market to which they hauled their grain and stock. 
The mother of our subject was born in Bucks county, Pennsylvania, of German 
ancestry. Her parents were brought as children to America from Alsace-Lorain 
and were married in the Keystone state. She passed away in the fall of 1878, 
leaving five children, one son and four daughters, the latter being: Mrs. Carrie 
Haines, a resident of Davenport, Iowa ; Mrs. Emma Haines, who passed away 
in Davenport; Ida, the wife of J. B. Wiesender, of Fayette county, this state; 
and Elizabeth, who resides with her sister, Mrs. AViesender. The father was 
married twice, Miss Anna Falck becoming his second wife. She is still living. 
To their union were born nine children, eight of whom survive ; Sophia, at 
home ; Fred, a farmer residing near Ridgeway, Iowa ; Theodore, who is mar- 



298 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

ried and lives upon a farm near the homestead iu Fayette county ; Charles W., 
Walter and Leon, all living upon the home farm; and Saloma and Freda, both 
at home. 

William C. Falck was reared in Winneshiek count}^ Iowa, and there attended 
the public schools in the acquirement of his elementary education. He subse- 
quently was a student in the Breckenridge school at Decorah, Iowa. After 
reaching maturity he came to this county and purchased land in Madison town- 
ship, which he cultivated assiduously until 1913. He still owns two farms in 
that township. In November, 1913, he removed to Lamont and purchased the 
coal, feed and machinery business formerly owned by James Carr. In the com- 
paratively short time that has since elapsed the patronage has grown rapidly 
and the business is steadily increasing in volume. He handles the best grades 
of anthracite and eastern bituminous coal, feed of all kinds, grass seeds and 
also the best makes of farm and power machinery. His practical knowledge 
of agricultural implements and of the best seed has been of great value to him 
in his mercantile enterprise, as it enables him to buy to advantage. His busi- 
ness methods are above reproach and he has won immediate recognition as a 
progressive and efficient business man. Aside from his store he is connected as 
president with the Farmers Savings Bank, which was organized in 1910. He 
was one of those wlio established the bank and was a member of its first board 
of directors. He has l)een president foi- tlu- i)ast three years and for a year 
previous to his election to that position was vice president. He has been con- 
nected with the institution since its organization and not a little of the credit 
for its continued prosperity is due to him. 

On the 13th of October, 1897, ]\lr. Falck was united in marriage in Fayette 
county, Iowa, to IMiss Anna Wolfe, of Scott township, that county, and they 
have become parents of nine children. Two were born in Clayton county, six 
in Fayette county and one in Buchanan county. They are as follows: Elsie, 
Ida, Dorothy, Lydia, Louis, Helen, Otto, Irma and Myra, all at home. 

Mr. Falck is a republican and has served in various local offices. The family 
belong to the Lutheran church and the parents are active in its work. Mr. 
Falck owns his residence in the northwestern part of town and also, as previ- 
ously mentioned, two fine farms in this county. He is a man of financial acumen 
and this, coupled with his industry and enterprise, insures him success in his 
business undertakings. His strict adherence to high standards of conduct and 
his agreeable personality have gained him a place in the warm regard and high 
esteem of many. 



sa:\iuel t. spangler. 

Samuel T. Spangler, deceased, was one of the prominent pioneer farmers and 
stock dealers of Buffalo township, representing that class of men who have 
laid broad and deep the foundation upon which has been built the present prog- 
ress and prosperity of the county. He was born in Maryland on the 11th of 
June, 1829, a son of George V. and Rebecca (Cleggett) Spangler. The father 
was a farmer and the owner of a number of slaves. He removed from Maryland 



r 







MRS. SAMUEL T. 8PANGLER 




SAMUEL T. SPANGLER 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 303 

to Ohio when his son Samuel was nine years of age and in the Buckeye state the 
boy was reared, having the usual experiences which fall to the lot of the farm 
lad who divides his time between the work of the fields and the acquirement of 
a common-school education. 

When twenty-one years of age Mr. Spangler bought a farm in Ohio and 
cultivated it until 1856, when, attracted by the business opportunities of the 
growing west, he came to Iowa, making the journey by rail to Dubuque and 
thence by wagon to Buchanan county, settling in Buffalo township, where he 
purchased one hundred and sixty acres of prairie land. With characteristic 
energy he began its development and improvement, turning the sod and bringing 
the fields under a high state of cultivation as the years went on. He traded 
horses for this land without seeing the property ahead of time, but there was no 
disappointment awaiting him in the rich and arable soil of this county. He 
successfully developed and improved his farm, which is still in possession of 
the family, and he added to his holdings from time to time until he became the 
owner of about fifteen hundred acres, which he still retained at his death and 
left as a valuable estate to his widow. He was also among the pioneer stock- 
raisers of the county, making a specialty of handling thoroughbred Durham 
cattle, which had excellent opportunity to graze upon his broad pastures. For 
his stock he always received good prices and thus his different business affairs 
brought him substantial success. He was one of the organizers and stockholders 
of the Aurora Savings Bank of Aurora, this county, was elected its first president 
and so continued until his demise. 

On the 31st of July, 1851, Mr. Spangler was united in marriage to Miss 
Sarah M. Adams, who was born in Keene, Ohio, December 29, 1833, a daughter 
of John Q. and Lavina (Walker) Adams, who were natives of Massachusetts 
and of Maine, respectively, the father being a second cousin of John Adams, 
president of the United States. Mr. Adams was a mechanic and farmer and 
in an early day removed westward to Ohio, where he owned a large tract of 
land. He was born in 1800 and died at the age of seventy-two years, while his 
wife, who was born in 1807, passed away at the age of eighty-three years. 
Their daughter, Mrs. Spangler, remained under the parental roof until the 
time of her marriage and in"^ 1856 accompanied her husband to Iowa, since 
which time she has lived upon the old homestead farm, where they took up 
their abode fifty-eight years ago. She spends, however, much time in travel 
and in visiting relatives. She became the mother of three children : Ella L., 
the wife of A. T. Flickinger, a practicing attorney of Council Bluffs, Iowa; 
Emma, the wife of John Meyer, of Byron township; and George F., mentioned 
elsewhere in this volume. 

JMr. Spangler voted with the democratic party and was called by popular 
suffrage to represent his district in the state legislature for one term. He was 
also justice of the peace in pioneer times and his decisions were strictly fair 
and impartial, "winning golden opinions from all sorts of people." He pre- 
ferred, however, to concentrate his energies upon his business affairs, which were 
of growing importance, and thus was he occupied until his death, which occurred 
April 29, 1907. He left behind him the record of a well-spent life, characterized 
by enterprise and honor in business and fidelity to duty in every relation. He 
lived to witness many changes from pioneer conditions to later day prosperity 

Vol. 11—14 



304 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

and progress, his memory forming a connecting link between the primitive past 
and the progressive present. Wherever he was known he was held in high 
esteem and most of all where he was best known — a fact indicative of a life of 
upright manhood. 



JACOB WACKERBARTH. 

Jacob Wackerbarth, president of the Wackerbarth & Blamer Lumber Com- 
pany of Independence, is a business man of marked energy, identified with vari- 
ous corporations which feature largely in the development, upbuilding and 
material progress of Independence. Tireless energy, keen perception and ability 
to plan and perform are salient factors in his life record and he possesses in 
large measure the quality of common sense, which is too often lacking in the 
business world, its absence being the cause of the great majority of failures. 
A native of Germany, he was born in Hesse-Cassel on the 30th of May, 1855. 
His father, Heinrich Wackerbarth, and mother, Anna E. Kaiser Wackerbarth, 
were both natives of Hesse-Cassel. His mother died when her son Jacol) was 
only eighteen months old. In his native country Heinrich Wackerbarth fol- 
lowed farming, owning extensive lands, and he was also mayor of the village in 
which he lived. He was a prominent and infiuential citizen of the connnunity 
in which he made his liome. He never neglected the higher, liolier duties of 
life in meeting the demands of a inorc material character which were made 
upon him, but Avas ever an active and faithful member of the Reformed church. 

Jacob Wackerbarth was the fiftli in order of hii-th in a family of six chil- 
dren. He attended school in Germany and when sixteen years of age came to 
the United States, arriving in Indepeiulence on the 3d of May, 1872. He made 
his way direct to this city from New York and liere engaged in the trade of 
cari'iage making, wliicli he had previously learned in Germany. This pursuit 
he followed a])Out one year, at the expiration of which time he went to Chicago 
and worked in a sash and door factory nearly one year, when he returned to 
Independence and again engaged in the manufacture of carriages, which he 
followed about two years. In the month of July. 1876, he returned to tlie old 
country, where he remained about four months, settling up his father's estate. 
Immediately after his return he went into the retail boot and shoe business in 
Independence. With him in this business, G. A. Steinmetz was engaged, which 
connection finally led to the formation of the firm of Steinmetz & Wackerbarth. 
In 1881 Mr. Wackerbarth engaged in the lumber business under the firm style 
of Zinn & Wackerbarth. That connection was maintained for seven years, at 
the end of which time Mr. Zinn sold out to Mr. Thomas Blamer, leading to the 
organization of the present firm, known as the Wackerbarth & Blamer Com- 
pany. Of this corporation Mr. Wackerbarth is the president and is active in 
the control of an extensive and growing enterprise. This by no means indicates 
the limit of his ))usiness activity, however, for he is the president and was one 
of the organizers of the Independence Canning Corporation, is president of the 
Independent Ice Company and president of the Gedney Company, which owns 
and manages the liotel and opera house at Independence and also controls a 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 305 

similar business at Sioux Falls, South Dakota, and at Atkinson, Nebraska, as a 
company ranch and business property. The ranch comprises thirteen hundred 
and twenty acres of land and on it the company is extensively engaged in rais- 
ing cattle and horses. In addition Mr. Wackerbarth is a stockholder in the 
Commercial State Bank, is president of the Kelley Canning Company of Wav- 
erly, Iowa, and is a stockholder of the Sherman Smith Manufacturing Com- 
pany. He is preeminently a business man and one who has wielded a wide 
influence in commercial, industrial and agricultural circles. 

On Christmas Eve, 1879, occurred the marriage of Mr. Wackerbarth and 
Miss Pauline Zinn, a native of this county and a daughter of Eckhardt and 
Mary Zinn, both of whom were natives of Hesse-Cassel, Germany. Mr. Zinn 
came to Iowa in 1850, being one of the pioneers of this county and carried on 
business as architect and contractor for some 3'ears. Later he turned his atten- 
tion to the lumber trade, taking into partnership with him his son-in-law, Jacob 
Wackerbarth. Mrs. Wackerbarth, who was the third in a family of seven chil- 
dren, died on the first of February, 1893, leaving four children. The eldest, 
Fred J., was born October 8, 1881, graduated from the Independence High 
School in 1900, and is now vice president of the Wackerbarth & Blamer Lum- 
ber Company and is assistant treasurer of the Independence Canning Corpora- 
tion. In July, 1913, he married Maud Stephens Volk of Rock Island, Illinois. 
The three daughters, Minnie P., born July 6, 1883, Carrie E., born November 
9, 1885, Neva R., born February 16, 1891, are all residing in Independence. 
They are all graduates of the Independence High School, Carrie E. also grad- 
uating from the American Conservatory of Music in Chicago, and Neva R. 
from Northwestern University at Evanston, Illinois. 

In 1897 occurred the second marriage of Mr. Wackerbarth, this union being 
with Miss Minnie Wolters, a native of Wisconsin. Her father was born in Ger- 
many and became an early settler of Allamakee County, Iowa, where he had 
large land holdings. To ]\Ir. and Mrs. Wackerbarth have been born two chil- 
dren : Carl A., who was born December 25, 1898, and Erwin II., born Decem- 
ber 13, 1900. The parents are active members of the German Presbyterian 
church. Having ever concentrated his energies upon his business affairs, Mr. 
Wackerbarth has a wide circle of friends in the business world. He has never • 
had occasion to regret his determination to come to the new world, for here he 
has found the opportunities which he sought and in their improvement has made 
steady advancement, ranking today as one of the representative business, men 
of the county, .strong, forceful and resourceful, ready to meet any emergency 
and controlling his interests with the clear judgment and sagacity that ulti- 
matelv win success. 



AA^LLIS G. KTEFER. 



Willis G. Kiefer, cashier of the Hazleton State Bank and also interested in 
real-estate dealing, belongs to that class of business men whose entei-prising 
efforts are an element in public progress and prosperity as well as in individual 
success. A native of St. Joseph county, Indiana, he was born October 24, 1868. 



306 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

His father, Jacob Kiefer, was born in Portage county, Ohio, in 1842 and was 
of German descent, his father, George Kiefer, having been born near the Rhine, 
in German}', in 1812, while the mother, Mary Ann (Schale) Kiefer, also a 
native of that country, was born in 1815. They came to the United States in 
early life, the father arriving in 1832. He settled in New York and afterward 
removed from that state to Ohio, where he purchased land. By trade he was 
a weaver and he continued in that business in addition to clearing and cultivat- 
ing his land. In 1847 he removed to Indiana and again he cleared a tract of 
land and converted it into cultivalile fields, maintaining his home thereon until 
1872, when he removed westward to Iowa, settling in Independence, where he 
worked with his brother in the coopering business. 

Jacob Kiefer was reared in Indiana and in 1861 responded to the country's 
call for troops, enlisting at Mishawaka, that state, as a member of Company F, 
Forty-eighth Indiana Volunteer Infantry. He held the rank of sergeant at the 
time of his discharge. He participated in many important engagements, includ- 
ing the battles of Jackson, Corinth, luka, Vicksluirg, and Champion's Hill. He 
was on duty under General Sherman until 1865 and went with him on the 
famous march from Atlanta to the sea. He was never wounded and was the 
only one of those who enlisted from his home town to return alive. He became 
a resident of Iowa in 1869 and has taken a very active part in public affairs in 
Buchanan county, his influence always being on the side of progress, upbuild- 
ing and improvement. He served for nine years as a member of the ])oard of 
supervisors and for the past seventeen years has been postmaster of Hazleton. 
His political allegiance is given to the repul)lican party, and his religious faith 
is that of the IMethodist churcli. of which he is a loyal representative. He 
belongs to the Knights of Pythias lodge and is an active and valued member of 
the Grand Army post at Hazleton. in wliieh he has filled the office of com- 
mander. 

Willis G. Kiefer is the eldest son in a family of three sons and four daugh- 
ters. Four of the number yet reside in Iowa and three in Buchanan county. 
Brought to this county in infancy, Willis G. Kiefer attended the country schools 
of Hazleton township and afterward became a student in the Upper Iowa Uni- 
k versify at Fayette, being graduated on the completion of the commercial course 
and also pursuing to some extent tiie normal course. He remained under the 
parental roof until he had attained his majority but at the age of sixteen years 
began teaching in the district schools and also followed the same profession in 
the primary department of the town schools for one term. Later he was ad- 
vanced to higher grades and when he was twenty years of age was a teacher at 
Gurnee, Illinois. When twenty-one years of age he was married and retired 
from the profession of teaching to become a factor in financial circles of Hazle- 
ton. He joined the Kiefer Brothers Banking Company, with which he remained 
as bookkeeper and teller until IVIay, 1893. He then organized the Hazleton 
State Bank, of which he became cashier, his father-in-law. T. E. McCurdy, 
becoming its president. Mr. Kiefer is the heaviest stockholder in the bank, 
which has been established upon a paying basis, its safe conservative policy 
recommending it to the general support of the public. He is also interested in 
the real estate business and has negotiated many important property transfers. 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 307 

In 1889 occurred the marriage of Mr. Kiefer and Miss Inez L. :\IcCurdy, a 
native of Buffalo township and the only child of Timothy E. and Kathryn 
(Nelson) MeCurdy, the former born in New Comerstown, Ohio, in 1843, and 
the latter in Buchanan county, Iowa, in 1859. Mr. McCurdy came to this state 
immediately after the Civil war, in which he saw active service for one year as 
a member of an Illinois regiment. He was wounded in battle and returned 
home. After coming to Iowa he began farming in Buffalo township and was 
closely identified with agricultural interests there for about two decades, retir- 
ing from active farm life in 1885. He is now president of the Hazleton State 
Bank and has interests in other financial institutions of Iowa. He has filled 
the office of county supervisor, is now the capital extension representative and 
has been representative from his district in the general assembly. His political 
allegiance is given to the republican party and his opinions carry weight in its 
local councils. He has labored untiringly to secure success for the party and 
in all matters of citizenship maintains a progressive and helpful attitude. To 
Mr. and Mrs. Kiefer has been born a daughter, Laura Ruth, whose birth oc- 
curred in Hazleton on the 2d of April, 1901. 

]Mr. Kiefer has membership with the Knights of Pythias and with the Mod- 
ern Woodmen of America. He takes no active part in politics but is an earnest 
worker in the ^Methodist rhurch, serving at present as one of the trustees, while 
formerly he was superintendent of the Sunday school. He givers generously to 
the support of the church and does not hesitate to give his time to further the 
various lines of church work. His interest in the welfare and upbuilding of 
the community is deep and sincere and is manifest in many tangible efforts for 
public progress. His work of a public nature has been as resultant as have his 
efforts in business life and he is today accounted one of the foremost citizens of 
Hazleton and Buchanan countv in connection with financial affairs. 



W. C. KENNEY. 



W. C. Kenney has been identified with general agricultural pursuits in this 
county for nearly a half century, owning and operating an excellent farm of 
two hundred and twenty-five acres in Westburg township, and for the past 
twenty-eight years has also conducted a general store at Shady Grove, in Jef- 
ferson township. His birth occurred in Concord. New Hampshire, in 1847, his 
parents being Joseph M. and Helen (Osbourn) Kenney, who were likewise na- 
tives of that state. In 1854 the family home was established in Dodge county, 
Minnesota, where the father bought a tract of government land. 

W. C. Kenney, who was a little lad of seven when he accompanied his par- 
ents on their removal to Minnesota, attended the public schools in the acquire- 
ment of an education. In 1867, when twenty years of age, he came to Buchanan 
county. Iowa, and purchased a farm of two hundred and twenty-five acres in 
Westburg township, in the operation of which he has been actively engaged to 
the present time, the well tilled fields annually yielding golden harvests as a 
reward for the care and labor which be bestows upon Them. In 1886 he em- 
barked in the mercantile business at Shady Grove and has remained the pro- 



308 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

prietor of a general store at that place throughout the intervening twenty-eight 
years, being accorded a gratifying and well merited patronage a,nd being widely 
recognized as an enterprising and reliable merchant. 

In 1867 Mr. Kenney was united in marriage to Miss Comantha Boyles, by 
whom he has three children, namely: Fred C, G. W. and Frank E. He gives 
his political allegiance to the republican party and for a period of twelve years 
acted as postmaster of Shady Grove, making a most creditable record in that 
connection. Fraternally he is identified with the Masons, belonging to Siloam 
Lodge, No. 222, at Jesup, Iowa. Mr. Kenney is a man of exemplary character, 
reliable in business, progressive in citizenship and faithful to all ties and obli- 
gations, and he commands and holds the confidence and regard of all who are 
associated with him. 



HAROLD A. HOUSHOLDER, M. D. 

Dr. Harold A. Housholder, of Winthrop, is still a young man but has already 

achieved a position of leadership in medical circles of his locality. He was born 

in Fremont township, this county, October 23, 1881, a son of Alva C. and Ella 

T. (Parson) Housholder, the former a native of IMcHenry county, Illinois, 

born in 1850. His father, Henry Housholder, was a native of Pennsylvania 

and upon coming west first settled in Indiana, where he farmed for a number 

of years, later removing to Illinois. He died, however, in Buchanan county, 

Iowa, in 1880. His ancestors were Holland Dutch but the family was established 

in this country many years ago. The name originally was Haus-Halter. Henry 

Housholder married Miss Elizabeth Casterline, a native of Indiana and of 

English extraction. Alva C. Housliolder was reared and educated in Illinois 

and removed with his parents to this county in 1876, his father buying a farm 

upon which stood a tavern on tlie old road connecting Dubuque and Sioux City. 

Alva C. HoushohU'r bought a farm north of Winthrop, which he operated until 

his father's death wlien he returned to his father's farm and conducted the same 

until 1884, when he returned to his own property and followed agricultural 

pursuits until 1889, when he purchased a general store in Winthrop, which he 

conducted successfully until 1894, when he sold out and again bought land 

in this county. After farming his place for two years he sold it and in 1899 

removed to Van Buren county, wiiere he bought land which, however, he soon 

disposed of. He then went to Clark county, ^Missouri, where he rented land 

for two years, but in 1905 went to Bentonsport, Iowa, where he lived for some 

time, after which he located at Quasqueton, living there for three years. At 

the expiration of that time the family removed to Center, Oliver county, 

North Dakota, where the father took up a homestead, which he improved. Since 

receiving a deed to the same he has rented it and is now living at Fort Clark, 

North Dakota. His wife was born in Ogle county, Illinois, and they had three 

children: Francis L., who is engaged in the practice of dentistry at Minot, 

North Dakota; Harold A., of this review; and Netta Elizabeth, the wife of H. H. 

Kenyon, a banker of Zap. North Dakota. 




DE. HAROLD A. HOUSHOLDER 






i 




HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 311 

Dr. Housholder was reared in this county and was graduated from the 
public schools of Winthrop. In the fall of 1900, when a young man of nine- 
teen, he entered the Iowa State Academy, a private institution of high grade, 
from which he was graduated in 1901. He then entered the medical department 
of the State University of Iowa, which on the 15th of June, 1905, conferred 
upon him the degree of M. D. He immediately began the practice of his 
profession at Quasqueton, this county, where he remained until 1909. In that 
year he went to Center, North Dakota, but on the 1st of October, that year, located 
at Minot, that state. After three years spent there he returned to Winthrop, 
low^a, and in the two years that he has been in practice here he has gained 
a reputation as a practitioner of excellent training and scrupulous conscien- 
tiousness. He is an accurate observer and his years of practice have given him a 
definite knowledge and a certainty of decision that cannot be acquired in any 
other way. He is a member of the county and state medical societies and of 
the American Medical Association and in this way keeps informed as to the 
methods used by progressive physicians and surgeons elsewhere and also as 
to the newest discoveries and theories in the more abstract fields of medical 
science. His practice is representative and is steadily growing and his col- 
leagues in the profession entertain for him a sincere respect. 

On the 27th of December, 1905, Dr. Housholder was united in marriage 
to Miss Lelia M. Bloom, of Winthrop, and to their union two children have 
been born, IMaurice Leonard and Shirley Claire. The Doctor votes the democratic 
ticket in national affairs but at local elections is nonpartisan. His wife belongs 
to the Methodist Episcopal church, in the work of which she takes a keen interest, 
and he is a member of the Masonic order. They are popular socially and hold 
the full confidence and respect of all who have been brought into contact with 
them. 



JOHN L. WALKER. 



John L. Walker, a prominent and prosperous agriculturist residing in West- 
burg township, has devoted his attention to farming throughout his entire busi- 
ness career and has met with excellent results in his operations. His birth 
occurred in Black Hawk county, Iowa, in 1859, his parents being William and 
Elizabeth (Hall) Walker, both of whom were natives of Scotland, the former 
born in 1827. Emigrating to the United States, William Walker took up his 
abode on a farm near St. Charles, Illinois, and subsequently removed to Black 
Hawk county, Iowa, where he bought land at a dollar and a quarter per acre. 
Later he augmented his holdings by additional purchase and at the time of his 
; death owned five hundred acres of valuable land. His demise occurred on the 
1st of January, 1895. He was a Presbyterian in religious faith and a worthy 
exemplar of the Masonic fraternity. His wife had come to the United States 
with her parents in 1844 and the family home was established in Illinois, in 
which state she was married. The young couple then took up their abode in 
Black Hawk county, Iowa. To them were born nine children, as follows: 
Eliza, Agnes, Frank, J. L., William, Mary, F. C, Nettie and George. 



312 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

John L. Walker was reared under the parental roof and obtained his edu- 
cation in the public schools. After putting aside his text-books he assisted in 
the operation of the home farm for two years and subsequently purchased a 
tract of land adjoining the homestead, cultivating the same for twelve years. 
On the expiration of that period he purchased his present farm of three hundred 
and twenty acres in AVestburg township, Buchanan county, which he has operated 
continuously and successfully since, annually' harvesting bounteous crops which 
find a ready sale on the market. 

In 1884 Mr. Walker was united in marriage to ^liss Eleanor Hallmon, a 
daughter of Samuel Hallmon, who is a native of Pennsylvania and settled in 
Black Hawk county, Iowa, in 1867. He is now living retired at Jesup. Mr. 
and Mrs. Walker have nine children, namely : F. F., Robert W., Blanche E., 
Ruth A., Karl E., Quincy S., Dewey E., John P. and William K. 

The religious faith of the family is that of the Presbyterian church. Mr. 
Walker enjoys the confidence and esteem of all who know him, and while he 
has attained to individual prosperity, has done much toward raising agricul- 
tural standards and has contributed by his labor toward making this one of 
the most prosperous farming sections of the state. 



OSCAR J. METCALF. 



Oscar J. Metcalf, who throughout the entire period of his life bore a most 
enviable reputation as an upright business man, a progressive citizen and a 
friend and neighbor of sterling worth, figured for many years as an active 
factor in the commercial circles of Buchanan county. ]\Ir. Metcalf was born in 
Hampshire county, Massachusetts, on the 3d of August, 1830, a son of Eli S. 
and Laura (Barker) Metcalf. His paternal grandparents were natives of Scot- 
land, but emigrated to the United States, settling in ^Massachusetts, where his 
father, Eli S. Metcalf, was born. The latter was a farmer by occupation and in 
the fall of 1830 removed to Ohio by wagons and settled in Huron county, whicli 
was a part of the Western Reserve. He cleared the land of the timber and 
undergrowth that covered it, but only lived seven years after removing to that 
state. Pie is buried in the New Haven, Ohio, cemetery. The mother of the 
subject of this review was also a native of the Bay state, although her parents 
were born in England. She died when her son Oscar J. was but five years of 
age and, as his father died two years later, he was thi-own upon his own re- 
sources when a mere child. He was one of three children, the elder being Eli 
F., a farmer residing at Dell Rapids, South Dakota, while the younger is Ange- 
line, the wife of Daniel Bruner, a farmer of Sonoma county, California. 

Left an orphan when but seven years of age, Oscar J. Metcalf afterward 
lived with Ames Ogden. a Virginian, who was then residing in Huron county, 
Ohio, to whom he gave the l)enefit of his labors until he reached the age of 
eighteen years. His opportunities and advantages were extremely meager dur- 
ing that period. He attended only parts of three terms of the district scliool 
in the woods of Ohio. At the age of eiglitccn, however, he went to Oberlin, 
where he worked at odd jolts to pay his way through Oberlin College. He also 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 313 

learned and followed the carpenter's trade while there and in the fall of 1854 
he came to Iowa, settling at Dubuque, where he engaged in teaching school 
through the winter months and working at his trade through the remainder of 
the year until about 1860. The spring following his arrival in this sl^te he 
purchased one hundred acres of land in Hancock county, for which he paid one 
hundred and twenty-five dollars, or the usual government price of a dollar and 
a quarter per acre. However, he continued to follow carpentering and teach- 
ing until 1860, when he purchased a store at Epworth. Dubuque county, which 
he conducted until 1872, and at the same time dealt in grain and live stock at 
that place. He met with substantial success in the business, but eventually sold 
out and removed to Winthrop, where he established a lumber, grain and coal 
business. He first dealt only in grain, but afterward purchased a lumberyard. 
He handled almost all of the grain that was shipped from Winthrop and also 
sold practically all of the coal that was used in the town for many years. He 
made good improvements in the way of building an elevator and coal and lum- 
ber sheds. Because of failing health he sold his elevator, warehouse and lum- 
beryard in 1899 and retired, but when his health improved he again purchased 
an interest in a lumberyard and personally looked after his business affairs up 
to the time of his demise, which occurred when he was eighty-four years of age. 
He also engaged in dealing in real estate and was a notary public, holding a 
license as such for many years and witnessing the signing of many important 
documents. 

Mr. Metcalf was united in marriage in Dubuque county, Iowa, on the 1st of 
November, 1855, to ]Miss Abigail, Freeman, a native of Lorain county, Ohio, who 
died at Epworth, this state, on the 7th of June, 1869, leaving three children, 
namely: Laura Hattie, the wife of Edgar Brintnall, of whom mention is made 
elsewhere in this work; Sherman A., who died when fifty-two years of age and 
left two children ; and Oscar Eli, who died when thirty-two years of age. Mr. 
^Metcalf was married the second time. Miss Isabella Frater becoming his wife on 
the 21st of February, 1871. She was born in Durham, England, on the 14th 
of March, 1851, a daughter of Ralph and Mary (Stott) Frater, both likewise 
natives of that country. Her father was a landowner and stock dealer and in 
1856 went to Australia, where his death occurred. In 1867 his widow came 
with her three daughters to Iowa, joining a son and uncle who resided in Far- 
ley, this state. She remained at that place until her death, which occurred 
when she was eighty-three years of age. She was a member of the Church of 
England and a woman of estimable character. Mrs. Metcalf was about sixteen 
years of age when brought to this county and was but nineteen years of age 
when married. She gave her husband's three motherless children the same 
loving care which she bestowed upon her own children, who were three in num- 
ber, namely: Belle, now the wife of Dr. B. H. McKeeby, a dentist of Cedar 
Rapids, by whom she has two sons; MoUie A., the wife of Dr. H. H. White, a 
dentist of Chicago; and :Mildred, at home. Mrs. ^Metcalf is the fortunate pos- 
sessor of a lovable, cheerful disposition which binds her friends to her in strong 
ties of affection. She and her daughters are members of the Congregational 
church. 

]\Ir. Metcalf was a republican in his political lielief and cast his first ballot 
for Fremont as president. However, in local affairs he often voted independ- 



314 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

ently, as he felt that party affiliations counted for less in county and township 
elections than the fitness of the candidates. While living in Dubuque county 
he was county supervisor, but was never an office seeker. He was prominent in 
local Masonic circles, being one of the charter members of the local lodge. He 
was initiated into the order in 1866 at Epworth, Dubuque county. He also 
belonged to the Eastern Star. He belonged to the state militia until 1864, when 
the call came for one hundred day men and he enlisted in Company C, Forty- 
fourth Iowa Volunteer Infantry, and served with his command until the close 
of the war. The regiment was a part of the Army of Tennessee and most of its 
service was in the state of Tennessee, where it was largely used on guard duty 
and in skirmishes. Before enlisting Mr. ^letcalf gave practical evidence of his 
patriotism by helping support some of the families whose breadwinners were in 
the service of the Union. 

Mr. Metcalf was a member of the Presbyterian church. His life was at all 
times actuated by high and honorable principles and he bore an enviable reputa- 
tion throughout the period of his residence in Buchanan county. The integrity 
of his business methods was never called into question and to his family he left 
not only a comfortable competence but also the priceless heritage of an untar- 
nished name. None speak of him save in praise, and the high esteem in which 
he was held in Winthrop was but the merited reward of a long and upright life. 
He passed away on the 14th of October, 1914. His life was as the day with its 
morning of hope and promise, its noontide of activity, its evening of completed 
and successful effort ending in the grateful rest and quiet of the night. 



W. N. LOY. 



W. N. Lo}^ was born in JNIorrow county, Ohio, July 10, 1843, and became a 
pioneer settler of Buchanan county, Iowa, in 1856. In the years which have 
since come and gone he has not only been an interested witness of the develop- 
ment and upbuilding of the county, but has also borne an active and helpful 
part in the work which has brought about present day conditions. 

He was a youth of thirteen when he came to Iowa with his parents, F. S. 
and Clarassy (Purvis) Loy. The father was born in Pennsylvania in 1823 and 
the mother in New York in 1822. When a young man F. S. Loy went to Ohio, 
and when old enough began farming in that state, being there connected with 
agricultural interests until 1854, when he made the trip overland with teams to 
Grant county, Wisconsin. He there purchased land when the district in which 
he settled bore the evidences of frontier life. In 1856 he journeyed by wagon 
from that state to Buchanan county and lived in Independence until 1858, de- 
voting his time to teaming between that place and Dubuque. Independence was 
then a mere village and gave little promise of its later rapid and substantial 
development. All around was the wild prairie, dotted in summer with a million 
wild flowers and in winter covered by a dazzling and unbroken sheet of snow. 
There were all kinds of wild game to be had and deer were seen on the town 
site. In 1858 Mr. Loy began breaking the sod upon the farm land which he 
had secured, clearing and cultivating his fields and erecting the necessary build- 




MR. AND MRS. W. N. LOY 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 317 

ings upon his place. He took possession of the property in 1860 and for many 
years thereafter actively engaged in tilling the soil and raising stock. He made 
a specialty of raising shorthorns and he was also the owner of a large number 
of driving horses which won prizes at fairs. His shorthorns were also prize 
winners at the Buchanan county fairs. Mr. Loy was engaged on the construction 
of the first hotel, The Empire, in Independence in 1856, and in many ways 
was closely associated with the initial steps in the county's development and 
progress. He was an active republican in the local councils of his party and 
did much to aid in winning success for its candidates. He was also a zealous 
member of the Presbyterian church and contributed to the support of various 
churches in Independence in the early days. He died in this city at the ripe old 
age of eighty-five years, while his wife passed away in Sumner township at the 
age of fifty-eight. 

W. N. Loy, a youth of thirteen when the family came to Iowa, continued 
his education in • the schools of Independence, being a pupil in one of the 
pioneer schoolhouses which was built about 1858. He remained at home until 
twenty-five years of age and then began farming, which he followed until 
the outbreak of the Civil war, when all business and personal considerations 
were put aside and he joined the "Boys in blue" of Company H, Twenty- 
seventh Iowa Volunteer Infantry. He served for eighteen months, going north 
on scout duty in the vicinity of St. Paul and afterward south to Tennessee, 
where he was largely engaged on provost duty. After the war he returned to 
this county, settling upon a farm in Sumner township. He acquired eighty 
acres, which he still owns and which he cultivated for many years with good 
success, although he is now living retired in Independence, where he has made 
his home for the past two years. 

On the 15th of September, 1871, Mr. Loy was united in marriage to Miss Mary 
E. North, who was born in Washington county, Wisconsin, a daughter of Nelson 
and Isabelle (Wiley) North. Her father was born in Shoreham, Vermont, in 
1824 and died in 1891. Her mother, whose birth occurred in Trumbull county, 
Ohio, in 1830, is still living at the age of eighty-four years, in Sumner town- 
ship. IMr. North went from New England to Wisconsin when a young man, 
settling there before the state was admitted to the Union. He purchased 
land and resided thereon until 1865, in which year he came to Iowa, making the 
trip overland. He purchased a farm in Sumner township and in both Wis- 
consin and Iowa engaged in the raising of shorthorn cattle in addition to 
general agricultural pursuits. He also held local township offices in both states 
and for seven years he was county assessor in Wisconsin. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Loy were born four children : Elsie B., now the wife of 
John Firth, a farmer living near Independence, by whom she has one child, 
Susan; Frederick, who was a farmer of Sumner township and died in 1912, 
leaving a wife and daughter, Elsie; Elma C, now the wife of Charles 0. 
Jones, who is connected with the State Hospital at Independence and by whom 
she has three children, Nellie, Sarah and Howard ; and Lucy E., who married 
Walter M. Jones, a brother of Charles 0. Jones, and they now have three 
children, William B., Kenneth N. and Donald F. 

Mr. Loy is active in the Grand Army of the Republic and his wife in the 
Woman's Relief Corps. They are well known as pioneer residents of the 



318 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

county, Mr. Loy having resided here for fifty-six years, during which notable 
changes have occurred, for when he came this entire district was then largely 
undeveloped and unimproved. There was still considerable wild game to be 
had in the forests, the timber w^as uncut and the prairies uncultivated, while 
the now thriving towns and villages of the county had not yet sprung into 
existence. Mr. Loy has borne his part in the work of general improvement 
as the years have gone by and can tell many an interesting tale of the early 
days and of the events which have marked the progress of this section of 
the state. 



LEX T. SWARTZELL. 



Len T. Swartzell, who since 1902 has been sole owner of the largest store in 
Hazleton and who has other important business interests and connections estab- 
lisliing him as one of the leading and energetic business men of his section of 
the state, was born in Quasqueton in 1869, his parents being David S. and Mary 
E. (Moore) Swartzell. The father was born in Pennsylvania in 1837 and was 
a son of Solomon Swartzell, who became one of the pioneer residents of this 
county and one of the first to engage in the raising of fancy stock in this part of 
the state. He was active in politics and several times was called to public office. 
He served as deputy sheriff in an early day and was also town constable. The 
family arrived in Iowa in 1855 and settled upon the fai'm where Len T. Swart- 
zell was born. There David S. Swartzell remained until the time of his marriage 
to Miss Mary E. Moore, the wedding being cele])rated in Quas(|ueton. She was 
born in Ohio in 1842 and following their marriage they began their domestic life 
in Quas(iueton, where the father engaged in the implement business. During 
the later years of his life he conducted a poult i-y business and was also the owner 
of good farm property in this county. During the period of the Civil war he 
served for three years in an Iowa regiment. He died in 1912 at the age of 
seventy-five years, while his widow now makes her home in Quas(|ueton at the 
age of seventy-two years. 

Len T. Swartzell was the fourth in order of birth in a family of ten children 
and in his youthful days attended school in (Quasqueton, but when fourteen years 
of age began earning his own liveliiiood, entering the employ of A. P. Burrhus, 
a liveryman, for whom he worked for three years. He was afterward for seven 
years in the employ of J. M. Benthall. proprietor of a general store at Quasque- 
ton, and later he went to Maxwell, where he was with the Kimball & Swartzell 
Clothing Company, l)ecoming connected therewith in 18f)3. He severed his 
connection with that firm two years later and in the meantime he was also part 
owner in a store at Washington, Iowa. In 1896 he removed to Independence, but 
remained there for only a brief period and in October of that year came to 
Hazleton, where he embarked in general merchandising in connection with \V. E. 
Curtis, the partnership continuing for five years. In 1902 he became sole owner 
of what is now the largest store in Hazleton. He carries a large and carefully 
selected line of goods and his sales increase annually, for his business methods 
commend him to the confidence and patronage of the public He is also interested 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 819 

iu the general mercantile business of Swartzell Brothers at Stanley, Iowa, and 
is a stockholder and director in the Iowa State Bank and in the Farmers Tele- 
phone Company of Hazleton. 

In 1892 INlr. Swartzell was united in marriage to Miss Gertrude Everett, who 
Avas liorn near Tama City in 1873, a daughter of Jackson and Sarah (Addy) 
Everett. Her father came to this state with his family in 1851 and they cast in 
their lot with the pioneer settlers of Tama county, which was then a wild and 
almost unpopulated district. There were no railroads and no roadhouses for 
stage travelers. Jackson Everett was a farmer by occupation and owned consid- 
erable land. His brother Thomas was a soldier of the Civil war, going to the 
front from Iowa. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Swartzell have been born two children, who are yet living. 
Clifford E., born in Maxwell, Iowa, in 1894, is a graduate of the Hazleton schools 
and of the Oelwein high school and for the past three years has been pursuing 
the collegiate course in the ITniversity of Minnesota as a member of the class 
of 1915. Marion was born in Hazleton in October, 1909. 

Mr. Swartzell is a member of Hazleton Lodge, No. 678, I. 0. 0. F., in which he 
has held all of the offices. His wife is active in club and social circles of the city, 
and both are widely and favorably known. They have many friends and the 
hospitality of their home is greatly enjoyed by those who know them. 



JOSEPH SMITH. 



Joseph Smith owns and occupies a farm of one hundred and sixt,v acres in 
Homer township, which he has converted from a tract of wild prairie into richly 
productive fields. A native of New York, he was born September 21, 1857, his 
parents l)eing Ferdinand and Magdelina (Graff) Smith, both of whom were na- 
tives of Germany, the former born in Prussia, and the latter in Bavaria. Coming 
to America in 1852, the father settled in New York and after residing for a 
number of years in the Empire state, made his way westward to Benton county, 
Iowa, where he worked in a sawmill for some time. Finally he purchased land 
there which he cultivated and improved until 1897. He then retired and took 
up his abode in Norway, Iowa, where he made his home until his death, which 
occurred on the 29th of December, 1908. It was almost five years later before 
his wife was called to her final rest, her death occurring on the 22d of Sep- 
tember, 1913. 

While born in the east, Joseph Smith has spent the greater part of his life 
in Iowa, having been reared in Benton county, where he acquired his education 
in the pul)lic schools. He remained with his parents until he reached the age 
of twenty-four years and worked for his father in the fields upon the old home 
place. He then purchased one hundred and twenty acres of land on section 
27, Homer township, and afterward added thereto forty acres adjoining on sec- 
tion 34, Homer township. The tract was nothing but wild land when it came 
into his possession. He broke the sod, tilled the fields and cultivated his crops 
and today the land is rich and mellow, responding readily to the care he be- 
stows upon it. 



320 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

On the 13th of June, 1882, Mr. Smith was married to Miss Theresa Nolte, a 
daughter of George and Mary (Death) Nolte, natives of Prussia. The parents 
came to America and settled in New York in 1852, the father there securing 
employment at the blacksmith's trade. After three years, however, he removed 
westward to Indiana, and a year later came to Iowa, settling in Fayette county, 
where he purchased two hundred and twenty acres. This he developed and im- 
proved, and upon the farm spent his remaining days, dying on the 1st of June, 
1891, while his wife's death occurred ten years later, on the 15th of May, 1901. 
Mr. and Mrs. Smith are the parents of an only child, Mary M. They are Cath- 
olics in religious faith, and Mr. Smith is a democrat in his political views. 



CHARLES E. BOIES. 



Charles E. Boies is one of the extensive landowners of Buchanan county, his 
possessions aggregating eight hundred acres. Of this he is personally cultivating 
a farm of one hundred and sixty acres and in addition buys and ships cattle and 
horses, the extent and importance of his business connections making him widely 
known. He was born in Boone county, Illinois. January 15, 1859, and was a 
nephew of Governor Boies of Iowa. His father. William D. Boies, was a native 
of Aurora, Erie county, New York, l)orn August 24, 1819. and his life span cov- 
ered eighty-six years, his death occurring in September, 1905. He always 
followed farming and upon liis removal from New York made his way to Boone 
county, Illinois, where he took up his abode ui)on a farm in 1847. In early life 
he engaged in teaching .school for twelve dollars per month and walked four miles 
to the schoolhouse. His wife was also a schoolteacher. In pioneer times in Boone 
county he had to market his wheat and other farm products in Chicago, hauling 
his grain witli ox teams to that city. In Boone county he remained until 1873, 
when he came to Bucliaiiaii county and i)ui'chased a tract of land known as the 
Hatch farm, near Quas(|iU'ton. With cliaracteristic energy he began its further 
development and resided thereon until 1895, when he took up his abode in the 
village, spending his remaining days in tlic enjoyment of a rest which he had 
truly earned and richly deserved. His l)usiness affairs were most carefully con- 
ducted and his investments .judiciously made. At one time he was the owner of 
twelve hundred acres of land near Quasqueton and in connection with general 
farming conducted an extensive dairy business, having a large herd of cattle. 
He engaged successfully in tiie manufacture of cheese and all of the products of 
his dairy found a ready sale upon tlie market. 

AVilliam D. Boies was also active as a factor in the public life of the com- 
munity. While in Illinois he served as county supervisor for twelve or fifteen 
years and after coming to Buchanan county filled the office of justice of the peace 
in Liberty townsliip for several years, his decisions being strictly fair and 
impartial. In early manhood he wedded Sarah C. Bugbv, who was born in 
Vermont in 1821. and they became the parents of six children, of whom C. E. 
Boies is the fifth in order of birth. Three of the nuinber have passed away, while 
three yet survive. One brother. II. L., is a resident of Quasc|ueton, while W. D. 
Boies, of Sheldon, Iowa, is now upon the bench as district judge. 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 321 

Charles E. Boies completed his education in the high school at Sycamore, 
Illinois, and when twenty-one years of age began farming on his own account, 
renting land from his father, under whose direction he had become thoroughly 
familiar with the best methods of tilling the soil and caring for the crops while 
he assisted in the work of the home farm. He was identified with general agri- 
cultural pursuits continuously until 1873 and came with the family to Iowa. In 
1890 he removed to Rowley, where he embarked in the hotel, livery and live- 
stock business, which he conducted for six years. In 1896 he went to Quasqueton, 
Avhere he engaged in buying cattle and horses until 1902. He then removed to 
Independence, where he continued in the same business, and in 1908 he settled 
upon his farm south of the city, in Sumner township. Here he owns and culti- 
vates one hundred and sixty acres of rich and productive land and still buys 
and ships cattle and horses. As the years have gone on he has added to his hold- 
ings until he is now the owner of eight hundred acres of valuable farm land in 
Buchanan count3\ The soil is naturally rich and productive and he derives a 
gratifying annual income from his property. 

In 1880 Mr. Boies was united in marriage to Miss Clara ]\Iiller, who was born 
in McHenry county, Illinois, a daughter of William J. and Elmira (Benson) 
Miller. The father was born in Illinois in 1826 and the mother's birth occurred 
in Chautauqua county. New York, in 1833. Mr. Miller became a farmer of 
McHenry county, Illinois, and in connection with the tilling of the soil engaged 
in stock-raising. He served for one year as a private of Company I, Ninety-fifth 
Illinois Volunteer Infantry, during the Civil war, and at the close of his military 
experience returned to his native state. Later, however, he removed to Iowa, 
settling in Liberty township, Buchanan county, in October, 1865, so that the 
residence of the family here covers almost a half century. Mr. Miller was county 
recorder for two terms, being elected on the greenback ticket. In addition to his 
agricultural interests he engaged in teaching in the country schools and in Row- 
ley. He passed away in 1895 and Mrs. Miller now makes her home with her 
daughter in Buchanan county. Mrs. Boies is worthy matron of the Eastern 
Star and for four years has been superintendent of the household department of 
the County Fair Association. She takes an active part in church, social and 
club life in the town and her work and influence along those lines is most valuable 
and beneficial. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Boies have been born three children. Ethel, born in this 
county, is now the wife of E. M. Wilcox, a farmer of Liberty township. Both are 
graduates of the Cedar Falls Normal School and at the time of the Spanish- 
American war ]\Ir. Wilcox went from Montour, Iowa, to the front with the Forty- 
ninth Iowa Infantry. For four years he engaged in teaching school in the 
Philippines. Unto him and his wife have been born two children, Marion and 
Charles. The second member of the Boies family is Inez M., who is a graduate 
of the Independence high school and of the Cedar Falls Normal School, and is 
now a teacher in the primary department in Independence. Burr B.. born in 
1890, is upon the home farm with his parents. 

Fraternally ]\Ir. Boies is a Mason and is connected with the Eastern Star. 
He also belongs to the ]\Iodern Woodmen camp, and his religious faith is evidenced 
in his membership in the Methodist church. He takes an active interest in public 
affairs and cooperates in many movements for the benefit and upbuilding of this 



322 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

section of the state. He is now a stockholder in the Fair Association. In politics 
he is a republican and his party has elected him to the office of county supervisor 
for a term of three years. His efforts in behalf of the public welfare have been 
far-reaching and beneficial and his life work makes him one of the valued citizens 
of the county. 



ROBERT H. COPELAND. 

Robert H. Copeland is a retired farmer living in Independence but for many 
years was actively and successfully connected with general agricultural pur- 
suits in Buchanan county. He is also one of the veterans of the Civil war and 
there are in his life history many chapters worthy of commendation and approval. 
He is now in the seventy-ninth year of his age, his birth having occurred in 
Albany county, New York, in 1835, his parents being Robert and Mary (De Long) 
Copeland, the former born in Scotland in 1781 and the latter in New York in 
1787. Robert Copeland came to the United States when a small boy and resided 
in the Empire state until 1837. He then removed with his family to Ohio, 
settling near New Philadelphia, wliere he worked at the carpenter's trade and 
also engaged in farming two hundred acres of land about four miles from the 
town. He thus led a busy, active and useful life and after his retirement from 
business affairs he took up his abode in town, where he held the office of justice 
of the peace for many years, his decisions being strictly fair and impartial. He 
served as an officer under General Butts in a New York company of militia 
in the War of 1812. His wife died in 1839 and he passed away in 1866, 

Robert H. Copeland was one of the two children born of his father's second 
marriage. He attended school in New Philadeljihia and when seventeen years 
of age he learned the blacksmith's trade under his brother, who crossed the plains 
to California in 1849. Our subject worked at his trade in New Philadelphia 
until 1855, when he heard the call of the west and in company with another 
young man left home and friends in Ohio, journeying westward by train to 
Freeport, Illinois. From that point lie walked to Quasqueton. Iowa, where 
he arrived on the 24th of April, 1855. He found conditions similar to those 
which are always characteristic of pioneer life. There were plenty of Indians, 
but they were friendly, and there was all kinds of wild game, including deer. 
Mr. Copeland secured employment as a farm hand but worked in that way for 
only a few months, after which he located in Independence and secured employ- 
ment in a brickyard, aiding in the manufacture of the brick used in the con- 
struction of the first l)rick l)uildings in Independence. In 1856, however, he 
returned to Liberty township and broke the sod upon a tract of prairie land 
preparatory to farming. He then carried on general agricultural pursuits until 
1864, when he answered the call of President Lincoln for volunteers and enlisted 
as a member of Company D. F'ifteenth Iowa Infantry, with which he served 
until the close of the war. He was with Sherman on the march to the sea and 
participated in the sharp fighting at Atlanta and at Savannah, Georgia. When 
the war was over he returned to his farm and in connection with tilling the soil 
he worked at liis trade until his retirement from active business in 1911. He is 




ROBERT H. COPELANU 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 325 

now enjoying a well earned and well merited rest and is accounted one of the 
worthy and highly respected citizens of his community. 

Mr. Copeland has been married twice. He first wedded Miss Louisa Mc- 
Gonigle, who was born in Buchanan county, a representative of one of the early 
families who settled in this county in 1849. She passed away in 1888, leaving 
behind her many warm friends. By her marriage she had become the mother 
of five children: Eudora, the wife of W. J. King, a blacksmith of Waterloo, 
by whom she has two children, Gladys and Golda; Lilah, the wife of Helmer 
Nibeck, a farmer of Fremont township, by whom she had four children, Lena, 
Odessa and Leora and R. H., who died in 1913 ; Elsie, the widow of Roscoe 
Singer, of Oelwein, Iowa, and the mother of two sons, John and Robert; J. 
Dewey, who owns land and follows farming in Liberty township and who is 
married and has six children, Plummer, Gertrude, Catherine, Phoebe, Robert 
and Dewey; and Gertrude, the wife of P. M. Freeman, a prominent farmer of 
Hazleton township, by whom she has two sons, P. M. and Kermit. In 1890 Mr. 
Copeland was again married, his second union being with Miss Amy Perkins, 
a native of Vermont and a daughter of John D. and Tryphene (Shurtliff) 
Perkins, w^ho removed to Wisconsin in 1855, the father there carrying on farming 
throughout his remaining days. 

Mr. Copeland belongs to the Church of God. He has always given his 
political allegiance to the democratic party and has filled some local offices. He 
is an active member of the Grand Army of the Republic and thus maintains 
pleasant relations with the "Boys in Blue," with whom he did active service 
on southern battlefields. He has always been as true and loyal to his countrj^ 
in daj^s of peace as when he followed the nation's starry banner through the 
south. 



PETER SCHROLL. 



Peter Schroll, a well known and enterprising agriculturist of Westburg town- 
ship, is the owner of an excellent farm comprising one hundred and sixty acres 
on section 15, which he has operated continuously and successfully for the past 
twenty-two years. His birth occurred in York county, Pennsylvania, in 1850, 
his father being Daniel Schroll, likewise a native of the Keystone state. In 1850 
he removed to Illinois and subsequently took up his abode in Coffeyville, Kansas, 
where he entered a tract of land. A short time afterward, however, he disposed 
of the property and made his way to Montana, spending the remainder of his 
life in that state. 

Peter Schroll was still but an infant when the family home was established 
in Illinois. The year 1892 witnessed his arrival in Buchanan county, Iowa, and 
here he has since devoted his attention to general agricultural pursuits, purchas- 
ing a farm of one hundred and sixty acres in Westburg township, in the operation 
of which he has won a most gratifying and well merited measure of prosperity. 
He conducts his interests in a most practical and progressive manner and enjoys 
an enviable reputation as one of the representative and respected citizens of his 
community. 



Vol. n.— 17 

Vol. 11—15 



326 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

In 1870 Mr. Sehroll was united in marriage to Miss Belle Wheeler, by whom 
he has had nine children, as follows : Catherine, who passed away September 22, 
1876, in Illinois; Charles D.; Phoebe E.; Grace Belle; Elizabeth Helen; James 
Alvin, who died in 1908 ; Chester Peter ; Ira Orville ; and John Burton. 



JOHN N. SMITH. 



John N. Smith, cashier of the Iowa State Bank at Hazleton, has in his busi- 
ness career made steady advancement through the utilization of opportunity, 
through fidelity to duty and through the employment of the qualities of enter- 
prise, diligence and deteruiination. He was born in Guthrie county, Iowa, No- 
vember 1, 1880. His father, Frank Smith, was a native of Luxemburg, Ger- 
many, born in 1834, and was only ten years of age when he accompanied his 
parents on the voyage across the Atlantic to the new world, the family home 
being established near Sheboygan, Wisconsin, where the father carried on agri- 
cultural pursuits until 1870. In that year Frank Smith removed to Guthrie 
county, Iowa, settling on a farm, on whick he continued to reside until called 
to his final rest. He was the owner of one hundred and sixty acres of land and 
successfully carried on general farming and stock-raising. 

In early manhood Frank Smith wedded ^Margaret IMeyer, whose birth oc- 
curred near Luxemburg, Germany, in 1838. They became the parents of five 
children, of whom John N. is the youngest. The father has now passed away, 
dying in 1898, at tlie age of sixty-four years, but the mother is living in Guthrie 
county with a daughter at the age of seventy-six years. In politics he was a 
democrat but never aspired to hold office. One of his brothers, who came to the 
United States at the same time he crossed the Atlantic, was killed in the battle 
of Gettysburg, while serving as a member of a Wisconsin regiment during the 
Civil war. 

John N. Smith was reared under the parental roof and pursued his educa- 
tion in the schools of Yale, Iowa, and in a ])usiness college at Des Moines. 
Througli his youthful days he renuiined upon the home farm and early became 
familiar with the l)est methods of tilling the soil and caring for the crops. He 
was twenty years of age when he entered upon his business course at Des Moines 
and after his graduation went to California, where he spent a year and a half 
for the benefit of his health. He then returned to Iowa, making his way to 
Independence, where in 1902 he became associated with the Palmer Hubbard 
Produce Company in the capacity of bookkeeper. He thus served for three 
years, after which he was appointed deputy county clerk under J. T. Steven- 
son. Later he was with the First National Bank of Independence as bookkeeper 
and in 1910 he was elected by the republican party to the office of county clerk, 
in wliich he made so excellent a record during his term that he was reelected in 
1912. However, he was solicited to become cashier of the Iowa State Bank at 
Hazleton, in which he is also a stockholder and director, and accei)ted the posi- 
tion. He likewise owns farm lands in this county and is conducting a growing 
and profitable insurance business. 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 327 

In 1904 Mr. Smith was united in marriage to Miss Bertha A. Triiax, a native 
of Guthrie county, Iowa, and a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John W. Truax, who 
are still living in that county, representatives of early families there. John W. 
Truax has land which his father, James Truax, entered from the government. 
The grandfather was one of the first to become identified with the work of 
general improvement and development in that section of the state and for many 
years carried on general farming and stock-raising. He died at the very vener- 
ble age of ninety-eight years. In the family of Mr. and Mrs. John W. Truax 
were five children, of whom Bertha A. is the eldest. She has spent her entire 
life in this state and was a teacher of music and also a school teacher in the 
Yale schools. By her marriage she has become the mother of five children, 
Alton L., J. Vernon, Wilma Pauline, Frances Alella and Kathryn. 

Mr. Smith is an exemplary representative of the ]\Iasonic fraternity and a 
past master of Independence Lodge. He regards it as the duty as well as the 
privilege of every American citizen to exercise his right of franchise in support 
of the measures which he believes to be factors in good government. Accordingly 
he has been an active worker in the republican party and has done much to 
further its interests, nor is he neglectful of the higher duties of life. He belongs 
to the ]Methodist church and is interested in its welfare and generous in its 
support. He has made a creditable record in every relation and at all times has 
been actuated by principles of truth and honor. 



EVERETT C. WARD, M. D. 

Dr. Everett C. "Ward, successfully engaged in the practice of medicine and 
surgery at Brandon, is widely recognized as a prominent and able representative 
of the profession in Buchanan county. His birth occurred in Humboldt county, 
Iowa, in 1876, his parents being C. E. and Harriet (French) Ward. The father 
was born in New York city in 1826 and when a youth of fifteen went to Vermont, 
where he lived with relatives and learned the tailor's trade, working at that 
occupation for a time. Subsequently he removed to Brooklyn, Wisconsin, and 
there married Miss Cynthia Eddie. At the age of twenty-six j-ears he located on 
the farm of his father-in-law. clearing and improving the property and carrying 
on general agricultural pursuits with excellent success. His wife died when they 
had been married five years, and five years later he wedded Miss Harriet L. 
French, a daughter of Samuel and Phoebe French. 

In 1874 Mr. and ]Mrs. Ward took up their abode in Humboldt county, Iowa, 
where he purchased and improved a farm of one hundred and sixty acres which 
he operated for seven years. On the expiration of that period he disposed of the 
property and bought another quarter section in the same vicinity which he 
cultivated continuously for thirty-one years. He then took up his abode in Ren- 
wick, Humboldt county, where his wife passed away in 1913, at the age of 
seventy-three years, and subsequently he came to Brandon, Buchanan county. 
Here he makes his home at the present time, having now reached the venerable 
age of eighty-eight years. He served as an enlistment officer for the Federal 
army during the period of the Civil war and has ever given his political allegiance 



328 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

to the republican party, which was the stanch support of the Union during the 
dark days of the Civil war. His religious faith is indicated by his membership 
in the Baptist church. 

Everett C. Ward spent his boyhood on the home farm in Humboldt county 
and after leaving the Renwick high school entered college at Des Moines, where 
he continued his studies for three yeai*s or until obliged to abandon them tem- 
porarily on account of illness. Subsequently he spent two years in the study of 
osteopathy at Des ]\Ioines and then entered the medical department of the State 
University of Iowa at Iowa City, from which institution he was graduated with 
high honors four years later. He located for practice at Mount Auburn, Benton 
county, Iowa, there remaining for three and a half years, and on November 12, 
1910, opened an office at Brandon, Buchanan county, where he has remained con- 
tinuously to the present time, being accorded a liberal and lucrative patronage. 
His ability and skill have been constantly manifest in the excellent results which 
have attended his efforts for the alleviation of human suffering and the restora- 
tion of health. 

On the 5th of August, 1909, Dr. Ward was united in marriage to Miss Laura 
B, Furry, a daughter of John and Elizabetli (Jones) Furry. They have one 
child, Everett Lynn Ward. Dr. Ward is a repu})lican in politics and is identified 
fraternally with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Rebekahs and the 
Modern Woodmen of America. On account of his unsullied character and his 
usefulness in his profession he justly ranks high in the respect of the entire 
community. 



GEORGE D. BLACK. 



George D. Black justly deserves to be called a self-made man, for he started 
out to earn his own living when a lad of but twelve years. Today he is exten- 
sively engaged in the cultivation and production of gladioli and in this connec- 
tion is known not only throughout the United States but also to growers of this 
plant in foreign lands as well. He has built up an extensive and profitable 
business and a view of his place in the blooming season is indeed a rare treat. 

Mr. Black was born in Butler county. Ohio, June 18, 1858, a son of Henry 
and Sophia (Deem) Black. The father, a native of Pennsylvania, came of 
German parentage. In early life he learned the cooper's trade and emigrated 
from Pemisylvania to Ohio, removing to the latter state at a period whicli ante- 
dated railroad building. There he engaged extensively in the cooperage busi- 
ness, continuing his residence in Ohio until 1859. when he came to Iowa, settling 
about three miles from Brandon, in Buchanan county. There he purchased a 
small tract of land and built a log cabin. He had brought some nursery stock 
with him and began the development of a nursery, but lost this through climatic 
conditions. Soon afterward he was taken ill with typhoid fever and never 
regained robust health. He died in 1892 in the ninety-first year of his age. 
His wife, a native of Butler county, Ohio, still remains upon the old home farm, 
the boundaries of which have been extended by additional purchase, ^h: Black 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 329 

had been previously married twice and George D. Black is the eldest of nine 
children born of his father's third marriage. 

The educational opportunities of George D. Black were limited. His labors 
were needed upon the home farm but in the winter months he attended the dis- 
trict school near by and when twelve years of age began to earn his own living 
and also assist in the support of the family by working for others. When 
eighteen years of age he secured a position as a farm hand and in that way 
earned a sum sufficient to enable him to continue his education as a student in 
the Tilford Collegiate Academy at Vinton, Iowa, where he remained the major 
part of three years. During the most of that time he. did janitor work in pay- 
ment of his tuition. He taught school for two winters and after completing his 
course in the Tilford Collegiate Academy he again took up the profession of 
teaching. He also conducted an apiary near Brandon, on the old home farm, 
and at one time owned one hundred and eighty stands of bees, which in one year 
produced thirteen thousand pounds of honey. After a few years he gradually 
worked into the nursery and seed business and as he did so withdrew from 
bee culture and the production of honey. As his nursery business developed he 
began dealing in seeds at Brandon and later put his seeds in all the stores of 
the county. He continued upon the old home place up to the time of his marriage 
and then removed to Independence. 

Mr. Black has now practically discontinued the seed business and does not 
issue a catalogue, as was formerly his custom, but concentrates his eflforts upon 
the propagation and production of gladioli. He has a tract of twenty acres of 
land all platted within the limits of Independence. He devotes his attention 
to the nursery business, specializing in the production of gladioli, and now has six 
acres in bulbs. He has a large yellow seedling of his own and received a reward 
of merit in England from the National Gladioli Society and is assured of a first- 
class certificate, these certificates never being issued the first year. He frequently 
imports bulbs from Holland and other foreign countries and has some of the 
rarest and finest specimens of the flower to be found on the American continent. 
Independence is noted as a center of gladiolus production. Mr. Black is a con- 
tributor to the ^Modern Gladiolus Grower, a magazine issued in 1913 and pub- 
lished at Calcium, New York. 

On the 15th of April, 1890, Mr. Black wedded Miss Martha E. McLaughlin, 
a native of Canada and a daughter of Robert and Laura (Baxter) McLaughlin, 
both of whom were natives of that country. The father became a woodworker 
and operated a factory at Oshawa, Canada, his principal output being wooden 
clocks, although he manufactured many other things in wood. About 1871 he 
came to Iowa, settling at Brandon, where he engaged in the building of wagons, 
cutters and buggies, continuing active along that line until competition became 
too strenuous. He then turned his attention to the house-moving business, in 
which he continued until he retired from active life about 190-4. He is now 
eighty-eight years of age, and he and his wife reside with Mr. and Mrs. Black. 
Mr. McLaughlin served in the war with Mexico and is perhaps the only Mexican 
war veteran now living in Buchanan county. His famih' numbered five chil- 
dren, of whom Mrs. Black is the second. Three children have been born to ]Mr. 
and Mrs. Black. Robert Henry, born June 18, 1892, is a graduate of the In- 
dependence high school and also of the Upper Iowa University of Fayette of 



330 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

the class of 1913. Immediately after his graduation he went to Philadelphia, 
where he became connected with the Burpee seed house, and he is now located 
at Albert Lea, Minnesota, where he is engaged in the seed business. Oscar W., 
born in 1894, and Harry N., born March 12, 1897, are both at home and are 
assisting their father. 

Mr. Black is a charter member of the Odd Fellows lodge at Brandon, and 
both he and his wife are connected with the Fraternal Bankers Association. 
They also belong to the Methodist Episcopal church and he is serving as class 
leader at Independence. In politics he has been a stalwart republican since age 
conferred upon him the right of franchise and while at Brandon he served as 
justice of the peace and held other township offices. He has ever been actively 
interested in the welfare and development of the section in which he makes his 
home and cooperates heartily in every movement for the public good. He has 
become widely and favorably known and in his chosen field of business has made 
for himself an enviable name and place. His is a creditable record inasmuch as 
he started out in life on his own account when -a youth of but twelve years, since 
which time he has been dependent entirely upon his own resources. 



CLESSOX A. K ION YON. 

Clesson A. Kenyon is a retired business man living in Lamont and is among 
the most highly respected citizens of the town. lie was born in tlic neighl)oring 
county of Delaware on the 2r)th of September, 1861. a son of Amos and Caroline 
(WycofP) Kenyon. The father was born in Hutbiiid. Vermont, June 3, 1819, 
and there grew to manliood. He was married in his native state and subse- 
(juently came to Iowa, locating in Delaware county, in the early '40s. He bought 
one hundred and sixty acres of land in that county and eighty acres in Buchanan 
county and farmed it until his death on the oth of May, 1891, when seventy- 
two years of age. His wife was born in the l^rovince of Quelle, Canada, on 
the 17th of May, 1825, l)iit was educated in Vermont, where their marriage 
occurred. She passed away on the 23d of July. 1889. 

Clesson A. Kenyon was the ninth in order of birth in a family of ten chil- 
dren and received his early education in the common schools of the county. He 
subsequently attended Manchester Academy at Manchester, Delaware county, 
and T'pper Iowa University at Fayette. He took a normal course and after leav- 
ing school taught for live winters. Uj^on abaiuloniug that profession he farmed 
the home place for three years and then purchased eighty acres of land near 
Lamont. He operated that tract of land for six years and on selling it embarked 
in general mercantile business in Lamont with his brother. In 1899, under 
President McKinley, he was appointed postmaster and held that office for four- 
teen and a half years, handling the incoming and outgoing mails with dispatch 
and accuracy. He was the candidate on the republican ticket for county recorder 
in the election of November, 1914, and received a splendid majority. His term 
of two years begins Jamuiry 1, 1915. 

Mr. Kenyon married INIiss Eva M. Sheldon, a daughter of William P. and 
Julia (Smith) Sheldon. The father was l)orn in Allegany county, New York. 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 331 

July 29, 1827, and in May, 1858, came to Iowa. He taught school and farmed 
in connection with his brother for some time. He then bought land in Dela- 
ware county and operated his farm until 1888, when he retired and moved to 
Strawberry Point, Iowa. He resided there for five years but now makes his 
home with the subject of this review. His marriage to Miss Julia Smith oc- 
curred on Christmas day, 1862. She was born in Michigan on the 18th of 
September, 1837, and came to Iowa with her parents when sixteen years of 
age. She died on the 4th of October, 1910. In the Sheldon family were two 
children, Mrs. Kenyon, and Frank, who is a commission agent living in Chicago, 
Illinois. Mrs. Kenyon spent two years in the Manchester Academy after com- 
pleting the public-school course and subsequently attended Upper Iowa Uni- 
versity at Fayette for a term. She taught school for six terms previous to her 
marriage. Mr. and Mrs. Kenyon have three children : Mildred E., born Decem- 
ber 27, 1886, is the wife of David Curtis, a resident of Lament; Claire C, born 
June 1; 1888, is a registered pharmacist in the Miller drug store at Waterloo, 
where he makes his home. He married Miss Anna Pieper, by whom he has a son, 
Paul, born February 3, 1914. Gladys Julia, born January 6, 1892, is still at 
home. All of the children are graduates of the public schools. 

The family attend the Methodist church and are always willing to cooperate 
in any movement seeking the moral welfare of the communit}'. Mr. Kenyon 
belongs to Mohawk Lodge, No. 310, K. P. ; to Bush Camp, No. 2605, M. W. A. ; 
and Lamont Camp, No. 214, W. 0. W. Mrs. Kenyon is a member of the Pythian 
Sisters, and is a member and the recorder of the Royal Neighbors since 1903. 
They have many friends in Lamont and in the surrounding country and all 
who know them hold them in high esteem. 



MRS. JOSEPH BUNNELL. 

Mrs. Joseph Bunnell, who makes her home on a farm in Jefferson township, 
has continuously resided in this county during the past thirty-six years and is 
well known and highly esteemed throughout the community. She was born in 
New York on the 1st of July, 1839, and on the 3d of October, 1860, gave her 
hand in marriage to Joseph Bunnell, whose natal day was April 15, 1835. The 
young couple established their home in Indiana immediately following their 
marriage, and in that state Mr. Bunnell engaged in the milling business, operat- 
ing a flour and sawmill with the turning lathe attachment. Mrs. Bunnell still 
has two chairs that were made by him at that time. In 1864, dviring the gold 
excitement then raging in Idaho, he and others started for the west, going by 
rail to the end of the road, which was at Grinnell, Iowa, and then across the 
plains by ox teams and covered wagons. He remained in the west for two years 
and at the end of that time returned to Indiana, where he was engaged in the 
hardware business until 1873. 

That year witnessed the arrival of Mr. Bunnell and his family in Iowa and 
for about five years they made their home upon a farm in Black Hawk county, 
hut in 1878 became residents of Buchanan county, purchasing a tract of land 
in Jefferson township. Mr. Bunnell won prosperity in the conduct of his farm- 



332 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

ing interests and became widely recognized as a substantial farmer and a 
respected citizen. He passed away on the 30th of July, 1911, at the age of 
seventy-six years. 

For over a half century he and his wife had traveled life's journey together 
and on the 3d of October, 1910, celebrated their golden wedding, at which time 
their children and grandchildren were all present. Their children are : ]\Irs. 
O. M. Kinney, H. S. and B. B. Since the father's death the last named has 
operated the home farm and is meeting with good success in its cultivation. He 
was married on the 25th of December, 1895, to Miss Grace Standish, and they 
have four children. Miles Standish, Floyd B., Clarence J. and Sarah B. The 
family is one of prominence in the community where they reside and are held 
in high esteem by all who know them. Although not a member of any religious 
denomination, Mrs. Bunnell is a firm believer in the Bible and her life has ever 
been in harmony with its teachings. 



RANFORD E. COOK. 



Ranford E. Cook owns and operates five hundred and eight acres of land, 
most of which is situated on section 19, Fremont township. This land has been 
in his possession for thirty-three years and he has long been numbered among 
the substantial and progressive farmers of the county. In addition to culti- 
vating the soil, he raises high grade stock, breeding Belgian draft horses and 
Black Polled Angus cattle. For many seasons he has owned a threshing 
machine and has threshed most of the grain in his neighborhood. 

Mr. Cook was born in Oswego county, New York, on the 29tli of February, 
1856, a son of Emery and Mary Jane (Benson) Cook. The former was born 
in Chautauqua county. New York, on the 17th of February, 1829, and lived 
there until 1869, when he removed with liis family to iManchester, Delaware 
county, Iowa. He rented a farm for some time but subsequently purchased 
one hundred and forty acres three miles west of Manchester, which he farmed 
for about thirty years. At the end of that time, or in 1905, he sold his land 
and retired. He is still living, making his home with a daughter in Coffins 
Grove township, Delaware county. His wife was born in Oswego county, 
New York, on the 16th of June, 1833, and they were there married. She 
passed away in this state in 1903. To Mr. and Mrs. Emery Cook were born 
five children: Malcolm, whose birth occurred on the 2d of April, 1854, and 
who is a farmer of Liberty township, this county: Ranford, of this review; 
Edward W., who was born December 14, 1858, and lives in Coffins Grove town- 
ship, Delaware county; Helen M., who was born August 17, 1863, and died in 
1891; and Susie L., who was born August 17, 1870, and resides in Coffins Grove 
township, Delaware county. 

Ranford E. Cook was educated in New York until he was a lad of thirteen 
years and then he accompanied his parents on their removal to Delaware county, 
this state, remaining at hom^' until twenty-two years of age. He then rented 
a farm for five years and subsequently came into possession of the land which 
he now operates. It comprises five hundred and eight acres and all but a 




RANFORD E. COOK 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY ^ 335 

quarter section is situated on section 19, Fremont township. The one hundred 
and sixty acre tract is located three miles from the other. Mr. Cook raises 
a great deal of grain but is chiefly interested in stock. For twenty-five or 
thirty years he has been a well known breeder of Belgian draft horses and 
his stallions have always been registered animals. He also raises high grade 
Black Polled Angus cattle. For thirty seasons he has owned a threshing 
outfit and has been given the patronage of the farmers of his neighborhood. 

Mr. Cook was first married when twenty-eight years of age and, as his first 
wife died, in 1891 he married Miss Neva B. Coates, who was born in Delaware 
county, Iowa, on the 14th of September, 1863, a daughter of Ezra and Eliza- 
beth (Hetherington) Coates. Her father was born in New York in 1835 and 
is still living in Delaware county. Her mother, who was born in Ohio in 
1837, died in 1867 while still a young woman. They were married in Iowa 
City, this state, and had four children, namely : Sadie, the wife of Louis Coon 
of Delaware county ; Clarence, deceased ; Neva, the deceased wife of our subject ; 
and Charles, a resident of INIinnesota. Mrs. Cook passed away January 19, 
1910. She was the mother of six children: James Blaine, who was born Feb- 
ruary 8, 1893, and is operating a farm in this county; Helen Margaret, who 
was born May 8, 1895 ; Donald Dean, whose birth occurred March 9, 1897 ; 
Clarence Coates, whose birth occurred on the 23d of February, 1899 ; Clyde 
R., born May 25, 1905 ; and Mary Elizabeth, who was born December 29, 1909, 
All of the younger children are at home. 

Mr. Cook was reared in the faith of the ^Methodist Episcopal church and 
still gives his allegiance to that denomination. He is a republican in his politi- 
cal belief and is serving as school director. Although he takes a citizen 's interest 
in matters of public concern, he has devoted the greater part of his energy to 
his private affairs and in attaining his individual success he has also contributed 
to the advancement of the agricultural and stock-breeding interests of Buchanan 
county. 



THOMAS CONSIDINE. 



Thomas Considine is well known as a pioneer of Buchanan county and Perry 
township, for he has been identified with the agricultural interests of this section 
since 1857, covering a period of fifty-seven years. He was born in County 
Clare, Ireland, September 14, 1842, a son of Patrick and Susan (Keane) Con- 
sidine, who were likewise natives of County Clare. Patrick Considine followed 
farming in his native county and in 1852, in company with his wife, three sons 
and one daughter, left the Emerald isle for Canada, the family home being estab- 
lished in Hamilton. There father and sons worked on the railroad for a few 
years. Their greatest ambition was to get to the United States and make for 
themselves a good home. To this end they worked diligently and saved their 
earnings, and in September, 1856, the son, Patrick, Jr., was sent out to invest 
in farm land. He decided upon Buchanan county, Towa, as a desirable place 
in which to live and purchased a farm of one hundred and sixty acres near 
Littleton, in Perry township. He then joined the other members of the family 



336 - HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

in Canada, but the following year they came to this state, though for several 
months they worked on the railroad, in the meantime making their home in 
Dyersville. In December of 1857 they took up their abode upon the uewl}^ 
acquired farm and at once undertook the task of breaking and developing laud 
in this then new and largely unsettled region. The father remained on this 
place throughout the remainder of his life and passed away at the advanced 
age of ninety-two years. The mother died in 1878 at the age of seventy. He was 
a democrat in his political views and both he and his wife were devout members 
of the Catholic church. Their four children were as follows : Patrick, who 
engaged in farming in Bachanan county and died at the age of thirty-eight 
years; Michael, who was also engaged in farming in this section and died at 
the age of seventy-three ; Thomas, of this review ; and ^largaret, the widow of 
]Michael Cunningham and a resident of Waterloo, Iowa. 

Thomas Considine was in his tenth year when the family left the land of 
their nativity for Canada, so that his early education was acquired in the latter 
place. He worked as water boy for the railroad company and was a youth of 
fifteen years when the family home was established in Buchanan county, sub- 
sequent to which time he continued his studies in the schools of Littleton. He 
remained on the home farm until he had reached the age of twenty-seven years, 
when he establislied a home of his own by his marriage. He purchased a part 
of his present farm property in Perry township and he has added to it until 
the place now embraces two hundred and seventy-three acres. He has improved 
his property witli substantial buildings and now owns one of the most valuable 
and up-to-date farms in tliat section of Buchanan county. 

Mr. Considine has ))een married twice. His first union was with IMiss 
Bridget ]\Ieany, the marriage ceremony ])eing performed January 31, 1870. 
She was a native of County Clare, Ireland, and in 1866, during her girlhood, 
emigrated to the United States. She passed away January 6, 187J), leaving two 
children : Charles James, wlio is associated with his father in the operation of 
the farm ; and Mary, who died at the age of fifteen years, on the 12th of Novem- 
ber, 1885. For his second wife ^Ir. Considine chose ]\Irs. Annie (Nolan) Brown, 
whom he wedded April 30, 1880. She was l)orn in County Wexford, Ireland, 
and was there reared and married, after which she came with her husband to 
the United States and located in Freeport, Illinois. Later their home was 
established in Winthrop, Iowm. and it was in that city that Mr. Brown's death 
occurred. The widow then made her home in Independence, Iowa, until her 
marriage to Mr. Considine. By tliis union there is a son and daughter: Thomas 
Joseph, who is still with his parents; and Frances Margaret, the wife of James 
Meany, a resident farmer of Perry township. 

In politics an ardent democrat, Mr. Considine has always manifested a deep 
concern in public affairs, although he has persistently refused to accept public 
position at the hands of his fellow citizens. He and his family are comnninicants 
of the Catholic church. It was the pioneers who through their patience and 
energy and their wise foresight organized and built up a community here which 
in its general prosi)erity. its orderly society, the pleasantness of its honu-s and 
the intelligence and moral tone of its people is all that goes to make up a desir- 
able civilization, and in this work Thomas Considine took a large part. In the 
fifty-seven years that have passed since he took up his abode in Buchanan county. 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 337 

he has witnessed many changes and now in the evening of life he can enjoy many 
comforts, as the result of a life spent in usefulness and activity. At the age 
of seventy-two years he is still hale and hearty and is surrounded by a host 
of warm friends who entertain for him the highest respect and esteem. 



N. M. MIGUET. 



N. M. Miguet is now living retired in Hazleton, but for many years was 
actively identified with farming interests in Buchanan county, where he still 
owns four hundred and ninetj^-four acres of land which returns to him a gratify- 
ing annual income. He was born in France in 1842. His father, John Peter 
Miguet, was a farmer of that country, born near Paris, in which section he 
eventuallj' became the owner of a farm. In 1847 he crossed the Atlantic to the 
new world, making his way to Dubuque, Iowa. He sailed for New Orleans 
and was fifty-six days upon the water. He then proceeded up the Mississippi 
river and from Davenport continued his journey to Dubuque. He remained for 
several years in Dubuque county, where he secured land which he cleared and 
developed. There were no railroads in that district at that time, as Dubuque 
was but a village. It seemed that the work of progress and development had 
been scarcely begun and Mr. Miguet bore his part in the work of pioneer improve- 
ment there. In 1856 he removed to Buchanan county, which was also a frontier 
district. He took up his abode in what was then Superior, but is now Hazleton 
township, and purchased land three miles west of Hazleton, the original home- 
stead comprising eighty acres now in possession of his son N. ]\I. ]\Iiguet. The 
father carried on general farming and stock-raising and his careful management 
of his business affairs brought to him a substantial measure of prosperity as 
the years went on. Before leaving his native country he wedded Frances Bar- 
donett, who was also born near Paris. They became the parents of ten children, 
two of whom are residents of Hazleton. Both the father and mother have now 
passed away, the former dying at the age of eighty-one years, March 10, 1880, 
and the latter when eighty-seven years of age, February 19, 1888. 

N. ]\I. Miguet Avas a little lad of five years when the family emigrated to 
the new world and was a youth of but fourteen when they came to Buchanan 
county. Here he continued his education in the district schools, walking four 
miles to attend a school, Avhich was held in the basement of a house, for at that 
period there were no regular schoolhouses or church buildings in the township 
and he conned his lessons while sitting on a slab bench. His educational oppor- 
tunities were meager, but he employed his time to good advantage and in the 
school of experience he has since learned many valuable lessons. AVhen only a 
small boy he began to look after the affairs on the farm, because his father 
could not speak English and therefore the son, who had readily picked up tlie 
language, managed his business interests. The occupation to which he was 
reared he made his life work and he continued upon the homestead farm, to 
which he added four hundred and fourteen acres, until liis retirement from 
active business in 1895, when he removed to Hazleton. He still gives general 
supervision to the place, which is operated by his son, and he is today one of 



338 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

the prosperous citizens of Buchanan county, as is any man who can claim the 
ownership of four hundred and ninety-four acres of the rich and valuable farm 
land of this section of the state. Year after year he carefully tilled his fields, 
conducting the farm work along ])rogi*essive lines, and year after year he 
harvested good crops which brought to him a gratifying income. 

On the ITtli of September, 1863. Mr. INIiguet was united in marriage to Miss 
Caroline A. Long, who was born in Pennsylvania in 1847 and. whose life record 
covered the intervening years to the 3d of January, 1908. Her parents were 
John jM. and Margaret (Gross) Long, both of whom were natives of Germany. 
Her father died when fifty-five years old and her mother at the venerable age of 
ninety years. They came to the United States when twenty-four years of age 
and settled in Pennsylvania. ]Mr. Long followed farming there, but afterward 
removed westward to Illinois and in 1855 came to Iowa, taking up his abode in 
ITazleton township, then known as Superior township. There he secured land 
and began farming, carefully tilling his fields and also successfully raising stock. 
He owned two hundred acres of rich laud, which responded readily to the care 
and cultivation he bestowed upon his fields. To him and his wife were born 
five daughters and a son, of whom ]\Irs. Miguet was the fourth in order of 
birth. Living as they did upon the frontier, the Long home was placed at the 
disposal of the public for school purposes and for preaching. The parents 
were Presbyterians in religious faith and were very active workers in church 
circles, their influence counting as a strong element for good in the community 
in which they made their home. 

Mr. and Mrs. Miguet became parents of six children: John L., a landowner 
of Buchanan countv who married Ennna AYise and has five daughters, Mvra. 
Caroline, Modesta, Lucille and Ella ; Edward T., who is residing upon his father's 
farm and married Susie Ewing. by whom he has a son, Hugh ; Carrie, the wife 
of Charles Shaefer, who for eighteen years was agent of the Burlington Rail- 
road at Hazleton and is now a real-estate man of San Diego, California, by 
whom she has two children, Zella and Zora ; Ella, the wife of F. W. Clark, a 
farmer of Buffalo township: pjinma. the wife of J. T. Simek, a carpenter and 
liuilder of Hazleton, by whom she has two cliildren, Len T. and Ijera ; and Dest, 
a traveling salesman representing the Mulford ^Medicine Company of Des 
Moines. 

For fifty-eight years Mr. Miguet has been a resident of this county and is 
therefore familiar with its history in all tlie phases of its groAN-th and develop- 
ment, lie lias not only been an interested witness of the changes which have 
occurred but has been a cooperant factor in many measures for the public good. 
Twenty-eight.years ago he was chosen count.v supervisor for a term of three years 
and sixteen years afterward was again elected to that office, in which he served 
for six yeai*s. He was township treasurer for five years and has also been town- 
ship trustee. He is president of the board of education and when his present 
term expires will have served for twenty-eight years as school director. The 
cause of education has ever found in him a stalwart champion and at all times 
he stands for progress and improvement. He was first elected county super- 
visor on the democratic ticket, but later study of political conditions led him to 
change his opinions and he is now active in the republican party. Fraternally 
he is connected with the i\Iasonic lodge at Hazleton and his religious faith is that 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 339 

of the Presbyterian church. He is a man who has always believed in making 
present conditions better than those with which he was surrounded in his youth 
and his influence therefore has ever been cast on the side of advancement and 
improvement. 



JOSEPH J. SMITH. 



Joseph J. Smith, a highly respected and representative farmer of Washington 
township, owns three hundred and twenty-six acres of land and since 1874 has 
been identified with agricultural pursuits in Buchanan county. He was born 
in County Derry, Ireland, in 1844, a son of J. D. and Sarah (White) Smith, 
who were also natives of County Derry. Coming to the United States in early 
life, they were married in New York and there the father, who was a black- 
smith, followed his trade for seven years, after which he returned to Ireland, 
where he reared his family. He engaged in business as a grain merchant there 
until 1861, when he returned to the new world, settling at Chatham, Canada. 
After a year, however, he crossed the border into the United Staves and settled 
in Michigan, near Lake Superior, where he engaged in mining, remaining in that 
locality for six years. 

J. D. Smith afterward came to Buchanan county and purchased land in 
Byron township, giving his attention here to general agricultural pursuits. At 
the time of his retirement he was one of the prosperous farmers of his locality, 
owning two hundred and forty acres of rich and productive land. He also 
engaged successfully in the raising of Durham cattle. To him and his wife 
were born ten children, seven sons and three daughters, all of whom were born 
in Ireland. One son, Isaiah Smith, now occupies the old homestead farm in 
Byron township. Upon that place the father lived to the time of his death, 
which occurred in 1893 when he had reached the very advanced age of ninety- 
six years. His wife passed away ten years before, at the age of seventy. In 
religious faith they were Presbyterians and in political belief Mr. Smith was 
a republican, active and loyal in the support of the party. He was interested 
in all that pertained to public progress and cooperated in many movements which 
were directly beneficial to the community. 

Joseph J. Smith attended school in Ireland until the time when the parents 
returned to the new world. He came with them to Iowa and when about thirty 
years of age began farming on his ovm account in Washington township. Pre- 
vious to that time he had been employed in the copper mines near Lake Superior 
but since 1874 he has continuously engaged in general agricultural pur.suits 
in this county, covering a period of forty years. His holdings today emlirace 
three hundred and twenty-six acres of arable land and in addition to cultivating 
the crops best adapted to soil and climate he raises considerable stock, making 
a specialty of Poland China hogs. His farm presents a neat and thrifty appear- 
ance and everything about the place indicates his careful supervision and 
progressive methods. 

In 1880 Mr. Smith was united in marriage to Miss Margaret Herrigan, wlio 
was born in New York in 1849 and passed away in this county in 1909 at the 



340 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

age of sixty years. Her parents were Jeremiah and Catharine (Devert) Her- 
rigan, both natives of Ireland. Crossing the Atlantic, they landed at New York 
and afterward made their way to Buchanan county, where the father purchased 
a farm. He continued to make his home in this county to the time of his death. 
In politics he was an active democrat and his religious belief was that of the 
Catholic church. To Mr. and Mrs. Smith were born four children: J. J., 
thirty-three years of age, who is now with a dredge company in ^Missouri and 
is the owner of land in this county; J. D., thirty-two years of age, and Leo, 
thirty-one years of age, both at home ; and Maude, the wife of William Fenner, 
a farmer of Washington township, by whom she has three children — Leo, who 
was born May 11, 1911; Harold, February 17, 1912; and Evelyn ^largaret. June 
18, 1914. The religious faith of the family is that of the Presbyterian church, 
father and children all being members thereof. 

Mr. Smith has no political aspirations but votes with the republican party and 
is a firm believer in its principles. He stands for progress and improvement in 
public affairs, just as he does in business life, and his cooperation can always 
be counted upon to further movements for the general good. The greater part 
of his attention, however, is given to his farming interests and he is today 
accounted one of the leading farmers of Wasliington township, where by careful 
management and practical methods he has won well deserved success. 



W. L. POOLER. 

W. L. Pooler, actively engaged in farming in Westburg township, was born 
in Clayton, Iowa, in 1859, a son of G. AV. and Mary A. (Benedict) Pooler. The 
father's birth occurred at Swanton, Vermont, in 1822, and, leaving New Eng- 
land, he became a resident of Allamakee county, Iowa, in 1852. There he pur- 
chased one hundred and twenty acres of government land, upon which not a 
furrow had been turned or an improvement made, but with characteristic energy 
he began to break the sod and till the soil. Later he sold the property at a 
profit of twelve hundred dollars in gold and returned to Vermont for a short 
visit. He then again came to Iowa, arriving in Jesup, Buchanan county, in 
1867. There he purchased a home, which he occupied for three years, after 
which he took up his aliode in Westl)urg township, where he again became owner 
of a tract of land of one hundred and twenty acres. Later he invested in one 
luindred and sixty acres and to that added from time to time until he was the 
owner of four hundred and forty acres of rich and productive land in this 
county. Year after year he carried on general farming, making his home upon 
his place until 1888, when he returned to Jesup and occupied the property which 
he had purchased when he first came to this county. There he continued to 
reside until his death, which occurred on the 16th of October, 1895. 

It was on the 20th of September, 1855, that Mr. Pooler was united in mar- 
riage to ]\Iiss ^lary A. Benedict, who was born in New York in 1834 and came 
to this state a])out 1852 with her parents, the family home being established 
in Clayton county, where her father took up land and carried on general farm- 
ing for about fifteen years. In 1867 he removed witli his family to Jesup and 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 341 

the same year purchased land in Westburg township, residing upon his farm for 
twelve years. He then again took up his abode in Jesup, where Mrs. Benedict 
still makes her home. Mr. Benedict, however, spent his last days in Nebraska, 
where he died April 19, 1908. 

On the old home farm in Westburg township W. L. Pooler spent the days of 
his boyhood and youth and in the public schools he acquired his education. 
The occupation to which he Avas reared he decided to make his life work and in 
1895 he purchased the old home property, upon which he still resides. In the 
intervening period, covering nineteen years, he has given undivided attention 
to the work of further developing and improving the place and now has an 
excellent farm equipped with all modern accessories and conveniences. 

Cn the -Ith of February, 1880, Mr. Pooler was united in marriage to Miss 
Emma McKibben, of Westburg township. Her father was born in Pennsylvania, 
March 10, 1831, and her mother was born in Ohio, March 22, 1834. The latter 
died in Nebraska, February 10, 1904. To Mr. and ]\Irs. Pooler have been born 
seven children : Etta M., now Mrs. Mastelles ; Mrs. Elva B. Stevens ; Mrs. Irene 
E. Burrell; Lula AY., who died July 4, 1914; George D., Leon E. and Mary W. 

Mr. Pooler is an Odd Fellow and he attends the Methodist church — as.socia- 
tions which indicate much of the nature of his interests and the rules which 
govern his conduct. He has lived continuously in this county since 1867, or 
from the age of eight years, and thus for forty-seven years has been a witness 
of the continued growth and development of this section of the state. He has 
borne his part in the work of general advancement and rejoices in what has 
been accomplished. He has never sought to figure prominently in any public 
connection, prefering always to concentrate his energies upon his business affairt^, 
and through his close application, energy and determination he has won a credit- 
able measure of success. 



JERRY W. WOOFF. 



Buchanan county lost a worthy citizen when Jerry W. Wooff was called to his 
final rest on the 6th of January, 1913. He was a representative farmer of 
Westburg township and in business affairs had become firmly established as an 
energetic, progressive man, while in matters of citizenship he was at all times 
reliable. His birth occurred in Lancashire, England, November 4, 1841, his 
parents being Thomas and Jane (Thompson) Wooff. The latter was a daughter 
of Anthony and Elizabeth Thompson. Mr. and IMrs. Thomas Wooff w^ere mar- 
ried in 1840 in England and in 1847 came with their family to the United States, 
settling at St. Louis, Missouri. For five years Mr. Wooff engaged in mining 
near St. Louis, where he passed away on the 20th of June, 1852, his wife sur- 
viving him for some time. 

Jerry W. Wooff was reared on a farm near St. Charles. IMissouri, and through 
the period of his boyhood and youth gave much of his attention to the work of 
the fields. When twenty-five years of age he went to Green county, Wisconsin, 
where he was married, and in 1869 he arrived in Buchanan county, Iowa, settling 
in Westburg township, where he purchased one hundred and twenty acres of 



342 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

land. He afterward sold that property and invested in one hundred and sixty- 
acres, which he continued to cultivate and improve to the time of his death, 
which occurred on the 6th of January, 1913. In all of his farm work he fol- 
lowed modern methods, keeping in touch with the advancement of the times, and 
he used the latest improved machinery to facilitate the work of the fields. 

Mr. Wooff was united in marriage to Miss Katherine MaddreU, who was born 
in Wisconsin in 1847, a daughter of John T. and Elizabeth (Hover) Maddrell. 
Her father was born on the Isle of Man, off the coast of England, January 20, 
1814, and came to the United States in 1840, settling in Brooklyn, New York, 
where he established a tailoring shop, which he conducted for two years. He 
then removed westward to Benton, Wisconsin, where he continued in the same 
line of business for three years. He subsequently removed to Shullsburg and 
in 1852 made an overland trip to California, remaining a year and a half on 
the Pacific coast. He then returned by way of the water route and again became 
identified with the interests of the middle west, with which he was connected 
until his death on the 5th of April, 1888. His wife was born upon a farm in 
Mercer county, Pennsylvania, and when eighteen years of age removed westward 
with her parents to Nauvoo, Illinois. After a short time, however, they went to 
Benton, Wisconsin, and it was there that Mr. and Mrs. ^laddrell were married 
on the 27th of April, 1845. 

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Wooff were born seven children : Mrs. Nellie Schroll, of 
Westburg township ; John T. ; Sadie E., now Mrs. Martin, whose husband is a 
farmer of Westburg township ; Will H., living upon the home farm with his 
mother; Mary, who died April 1st, 1882; J. W. also upon the home farm; and 
Lee R., who completes the family. Mrs. Wooff still occupies the old homestead, 
which is being operated with the aid of her sons. 

Mr. Wooff was a soldier during the Civil war, being enrolled in Company B, 
Tenth Regular Volunteers of INIissouri, and serving for about three years. He 
was a devoted husband and father, finding his greatest happiness in promoting 
the welfare of his wife and children. He deserved much credit for what he 
accomplished, as he started out in life empty-handed and gradually worked his 
way upward through determination and energ>' that brought him at length to a 
position among the substantial farmers and stock-raisers of his section of the 
state. 



HENRY TEMPUS. 



Henry Tei^pus is one of the prominent farmers and dairymen of Buchanan 
county. In fact, his dairy is one of the finest in this part of the state. His 
home is pleasantly situated about two miles from Independence and is frequently 
visited by those who are interested in modern, progressive methods of farming 
and dairying. 

Mr. Tempus was born in Independence on the 2d of February, 1859, a son 
of Peter and Elizabeth (Book) Tempus, both of whom were natives of Ger- 
many. The father was born in Hessen-Nassau on the 20th of July 1820, and 
learned the tailor's trade in his native country. Before emigrating to the new 




■J. 







MR. AND MUS. PETER TEMPI'S 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 347 

world he served for three years as a tailor in the German army. In the early 
'50s he bade adieu to his fatherland and sailed for the new world, making his 
way to Cincinnati, Ohio, where he worked at his trade. He afterward went to 
Pittsburgh, still later to Dubuque, Iowa, and ultimately arrived in Independence. 
His objective point was New Ulm, Minnesota, but the news of the massacre there 
prevented him from continuing on his way to that place. The journey from 
Dubuque was made by stage, for there were no railroads west of the city at 
that time. He was the first tailor in Dubuque and was also one of the pioneers 
in that line of business in Independence, where he remained continuously to the 
time of his death, which occurred on the 12th of October, 1900. In early man- 
hood he had wedded Elizabeth Book, who was born in Germany, January 6, 1836. 
Not far from the present home of Henry Tempus there still stands a log house 
in which his mother worked for ]\Irs. John Boone when she was but fourteen 
years of age. She had come from Germany with her parents, the family settling 
in Fairbank township, Buchanan county. After coming to the new world, 
Peter Tempus was drafted at Independence for service in the Civil war, but 
was not called into action, as it w^as found that the quota was full. More than 
fifty-five years ago he aided in organizing the German Presbyterian church of 
Independence and was ever active in its work and upbuilding, thus leaving the 
impress of his individuality for good upon the progress and development of 
this section of the country. 

Henry Tempus attended school in Independence before the high school had 
been established. In earl}- life he took up the carpenter's trade, which he 
followed for several years, and in 1903 began farming, to which he has since 
devoted his energies. His place is situated about two miles from Independence 
and upon his farm he has a herd of forty head of pure-blooded Jersey cattle. 
His dairy is considered the finest in his part of the county and is frequently 
visited by those who are interested in modern dairy management. He supplies 
butter to many of the leading families of Independence, and his business along 
that line has reached extensive proportions. He also engages in raising Duroe- 
Jersey hogs and in the management of his interests is meeting with excellent 
success, for his judgment is sound, his industry indefatigable and his methods 
practical and progressive. 

On the 17th of November, 1885, Mr. Tempus was united in marriage to Miss 
Nellie J. Sherman, who was born near Jesup, Iowa, a daughter of Jacob and 
Katherine (Breithaupt) Sherman, both of whom were natives of Germany, the 
former born in 1832 and the latter in 1836. Her father came to the new world 
Avhen about twenty-two years of age and in 1857 became the owner of a farm 
of two hundred and forty acres near Jesup, which has since been in possession 
of the family. He died June 12, 1893, but his widow still survives and is now 
living in Jesup, at the age of seventy-six years. To Mr. and Blrs. Tempus have 
been born five children : Peter F., born November 2, 1887 ; Ida Bertha, October 
5, 1889 ; Earl Albert, September 22, 1891 ; Henry Charles, May 21, 1893 ; and 
Carl Harold, December 12, 1898. All are yet at home with their parents, and 
the family is widely and favorably known in Independence and throughout this 
part of the county. 

Mr. Tempus holds membership with the Mystic Toilers of Independence, but 
is not active along fraternal or political lines, preferring to give his undivided 

Vol. 11—18 

Vol. n— 16 



348 ^ HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

attention to his business affairs, which, capably and intelligently directed, are 
bringing to him substantial success, so that he ranks with the leading farmers 
and dairymen of this part of the state. 



ROBERT H. JAMIESON. 

In connection with the story of business enterprise in Brandon and that sec- 
tion of the county, the name of Robert H. Jamieson should be prominently men- 
tioned, for he has figured largely in promoting real-estate dealing, banking and 
live-stock interests. Thus various lines of business still claim his attention and 
make him one of the representative and valued residents of Buchanan county. 

Mr. Jamieson was born in Jefferson township, May 6, 1875, a son of Walter 
and Martha (Newcomb) Jamieson. The father's birth occurred at Amboy Cen- 
ter, Oswego county. New York, January 22, 1843, his parents being Robert and 
Euphimia (McCollum) Jamieson, who owned and occupied a farm in that local- 
ity. In 1852 they removed with their family to iMayville, New York, where the 
father engaged in the tanning of leather. Robert Jamieson was a native of 
Dumfriesshire, Scotland, and spent his youthful days upon a farm in that 
country. Coming to the United States, he settled first at Amboy Center, New 
York, whence he removed to ]\Iayville, as previously stated. There he was busily 
engaged in the conduct of his tannery until the 3d of August, 1861, when he 
enlisted for service as a member of the Seventy-second New York Infantry, re- 
maining at the front for almost a year. He was shot and instantly killed in 
the battle of AVilliamsburg on the 5th of May, 1862. 

Walter Jamieson accompanied his parents on their removal to Mayville and 
when a youth of eighteen years he enlisted for service in the Civil war, enrolling 
as a member of Company G, Seventy-second New York Volunteer Infantry, on 
the 17th of Jul3% 1861. He remained at the front for three years and later 
reenlisted. On the 2d of July, 1863, he was wounded at the battle of Gettysburg 
and was honorably discharged March 4, 1864. On the 9th of September follow- 
ing he again offered his services to the government, joining Company B, Nine- 
teenth Regiment of the Veteran Reserve Corps, with which he continued until 
November 15, 1865, and was then honorably discharged. On the 12th of March, 
1866, he returned to Mayville, New York, but after a short time left his old home 
in the Empire state and started westward to Iowa with Buchanan county as his 
destination. He bought a farm a mile east of Brandon, in Jefferson township, 
and to the original tract of ninety-five acres kept adding from time to time until 
he is now the owner of two hundred and twenty-five acres constituting one of 
the, excellent farms of Jefferson township. He is now seventy-one years of age, 
with a clear mind and his physical faculties as well in splendid condition. In a 
word, he is a very active, energetic man and his worth in the community is 
widely recognized. He has filled a number of local offices, serving for two terms 
as county supervisor and also filling the position of township assessor for twenty 
years. 

On the 4th of July, 1868, Walter Jamieson was united in marriage to Miss 
Martha Newcomb, a daughter of George and Eliza (Hob'son) Newcomb. She 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^H ^'Ti^l-. 


^ 


^^^^^^m^^^^^^'" '^ttj^^F* ^^^^^^1 


k 




} 




ii 


H 






MR. AND MRS. JACOB SHERMAN 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 351 

was born on a farm in Chautauqua county, New York. July 13, 1850, and with 
her parents came to Buchanan county, her father purchasing a farm of forty 
acres in Jefferson township. Later he bought an eighty-acre tract and then sold 
the original place. Upon his farm he continued to reside until his death, while 
his wife survived him and died upon the same farm in 1884. Their daughter 
Martha became the wife of Walter Jamieson in AVaterloo, Iowa, and they be- 
gan their domestic life on the old home farm a mile east of Brandon. There 
they continued to reside until the death of Mrs. Jamieson, July 2, 1911, and 
the father now makes his home with his son Robert in Brandon. 

Rol)ert H. Jamieson spent his boyhood upon the old homestead farm a mile 
east of Brandon with the usual experiences that fall to the lot of the farm lad. 
He pursued his education in the public schools and on the 5th of June, 1895, 
when twenty years of age, was united in marriage to Miss Anna Williams, a 
daughter of John and Lucinda (Couts) Williams and a granddaughter of 
Steven D. and Mary Ann Williams. John Williams was born on his father's 
farm in Indiana and when a young man made his way to Benton county, Iowa, 
purchasing a tract of land north of Vinton. His farm comprised two hundred 
and sixty acres, upon which he resided, carefully cultivating the fields, to the 
time of his death, which occurred March 1, 1913. His parents also went to 
Benton county, where their last days were passed. Mrs. John Williams, the 
mother of Mrs. Jamieson, was born in Pennsylvania and in her girlhood accom- 
panied her parents to Newhall, Benton county, Iowa, where her father entered 
a claim, securing one hundred and twenty acres. This he eventually sold and 
took up his abode in Vinton, where he remained until the death of his wife in 
1845. He survived her until 1889 and passed away in Newhall. Iowa. It was 
their daughter Lucinda who became the wife of Mr. Williams, and among 
their children was a daughter Anna, who became the wife of Mr. Jamieson. 
By the last marriage there have been born five children : Ruth L., Mary E. and 
Walter J., all at home ; George H., who died in 1913 ; and Marlin G. 

Following his marriage Mr. Jamieson began cultivating his father's farm, 
giving much of his attention to stock-raising and shipping. His business affairs 
were carefully, systematically and successfully conducted and he remained upon 
the farm until 1911, when he removed to Brandon. He still manages the farm, 
however, and is extensively engaged in the handling of stock and in the con- 
duct of a real-estate business. In the year 1910 he sold to farmers and other 
citizens living within a radius of fifteen miles of Brandon cattle to the value of 
one hundred thousand dollars, and he is today one of the leading stock dealers 
of the county. For the past eight years he has been a director of the Brandon 
State & Savings Bank, and he is also manager of the Brandon Cooperative Ex- 
change, which deals in grain, lumber, coal and live stock. His real-estate affairs 
are managed with the same thoroughness and progressiveness that characterizes 
his activities in other fields of business. He is thoroughly conversant with prop- 
erty values and now has under course of construction six modern dwellings 
which are a credit to the city of Brandon. He was one of the leaders in the 
movement which made possible the building of the new electric railroad through 
Brandon and he subscribed a very liberal amount of stock, also giving the right 
of way through forty acres of valuable land. He readily recognizes the oppor- 
tunities for growth and development in his section of the county and cooperates 



352 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

in all movements for the benefit and upbuilding of his city and surrounding 
country. He possesses initiative spirit and has a genius for devising and execut- 
ing the right thing at the right time, joined to everyday common sense. His 
activity and ability have marked him for leadershij) and his fellow townsmen 
have great faith in his judgment. 



GEORGE W. WURTZ. 



General agricultural pursuits claim the time and energies of George W. 
Wurtz, the owner of an excellent and well improved farm in Westburg township. 
His birth occurred near West Chicago, Illinois, in 1861, his parents being Chris- 
tian and Elizabeth (Boughman) Wurtz. The father, a native of Germany, emi- 
grated to the United States in 1848, and after two years he removed to West Chi- 
cago, Illinois, and has there resided continuously throughout the intervening 
sixty-four years. There he wedded Miss Elizabeth Boughman. who passed away 
in 189-1. 

George W. Wurtz wa.s a man of forty years when in 1901 he came to Bu- 
chanan county, Iowa, and purchased the farm in Westburg township which he 
has since operated. Success has attended his undertakings as an agriculturist 
and he is justly entitled to representation among the substantial and enterprising 
citizens of the community. 

In 1890 Mr. Wurtz was united in marriage to Miss Emma Arnold, her father 
being Jacob Arnold, a native of Germany. lie emigrated to the United States 
as a young man, settling first at West Chicago. Illinois, and in 1866 purchased 
a tract of land in Cono township. Buchanan county. Iowa, taking up his abode 
among the early settlers here. His demise occurred when he had attained the age 
of seventy-one years. Our subject and his wife have five children, namely: 
Christopher J., Rose Nellie. George W.. Emory Earl and Pearl Emma. Mr. 
Wurtz belongs to the Methodist Episcopal church and in his home community is 
well known and highly esteemed as an upright and honorable citizen. 



EDSOX A. LEWIS. 



Iowa offers splendid opportunities to the agriculturist, as lands are naturally 
rich and arable and respond readily to the care and cultivation bestowed upon 
them. The man, therefore, who wisely and systematically directs his labors in 
the tilling of the soil can i-eadily win success and this Edson A. Lewis has done. 
For a long period he was closely connected with farming interests in Buchanan 
county, but is now living retired in Hazleton. He was born in Essex county. New 
York, April 19, 1850, a son of Allen A. Lewis, whose birth occurred June 22, 
1823, and who is now living in Hazleton at the unusual age of ninety-one years. 
He is a son of James and Daphne (Allen) Lewis, both of whom were natives 
of New Hampshire. The father passed away in 1854 at the age of sixty-nine 
years, while the mother died in the year 1879. James Lewis followed the occu- 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 353 

pation of farming, as had his father, Abel Lewis, who was one of the patriots of 
the Revolutionary war and served for eight years, from 1775 to 1783, as aii 
aid on the staff of one of the generals in the Revolutionary war. 

Allen A. Lewis continued in the same occupation which had been followed 
by his father and grandfather. In early manhood he married Levisa McKenzie, 
who was born in the state of New York, August 28, 1825, and is now living at 
the advanced age of eighty-nine years. They are perhaps the most venerable 
couple in this county. Mrs. Lewis is a daughter of Robert McKenzie, who was 
born in Essex county, New York, October 20, 1792. and died at the age of sixty- 
seven years. His w-ife, ^Irs. Jemimah (Strong) McKenzie, was born June 8, 
1792. Robert McKenzie was private secretary to and lieutenant on the staff of 
a general who commanded the American troops near Lake Champlain in the War 
of 1812. It was in early life that Allen A. Lewis removed from New Hampshire 
to New- York and after remaining for an extended period in that state he came 
to Iowa in 1864. In New York he served as captain of a rifle corps of the State 
Guards, but could not enter the army at the time of the Civil war because of 
his health. Following his removal to the west he settled in Hazleton township, 
this county, and began farming. He brought his fields to a high state of cultiva- 
tion and also engaged extensivelj' in stock-raising, making a specialty of handling 
sheep. He had one of the best improved farms of the county, his home being an 
attractive and substantial residence, and upon the place were also good barns 
and outbuildings and the latest improved machinery of the day. He was always 
active in republican affairs in his township and held several local offices, although 
he was never an aspirant for political preferment. Mrs. Lewis has always been 
very active in the ]\Iethodist church and today, at the age of eighty-nine, does 
more real church work than many of the younger women of the congregation. 

Edson A. Lewis acquired the rudiments of an education in the district 
schools, which were taught in the farmers' homes, as there were no schoolhouses 
at that period. Being an only son, he remained with his parents, assisting his 
father in the farm work, and together they acquired three hundred and five 
acres of land. As the years went on the son more and more largely relieved his 
father of the work of the farm and he has always featured stock-raising as an 
important branch of his business. He handles high grade stock and in this, as 
in other branches of his farm work, displays progressive methods, keeping in 
touch with all the modern ideas which mark progress along that line. He has 
seen Buchanan county grow in many ways, but there is no more noticeable evi- 
dence of advancement than is to be seen in the means of conveyance, for when 
the family first came here even buggies were very uncommon and today it is no 
unusual thing to find the farmer, as well as the townsman, using his motor car. 
Edson A. Lewds became an active worker upon the home farm when but sixteen 
years of age and worked persistently and energetically for a long period until, 
having become the possessor of a handsome competence, he put aside business 
cares and is now living retired. 

On the 25th of December, 1878. occurred the marriage of Mr. Lewis and 
Miss Abbie C. Beers, who was born in New^ York, December 23, 1852, a daughter 
of Benjamin Beers, who at an early age became a cabin boy on a sloop used 
as a provision ship in the War of 1812. He was born in Vermont in 1799 and 
passed away at the age of sixty-seven years. His wife, who bore the maiden 



354 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

name of Susanna Barton, was an own cousin of Phoebe and Alice Gary and 
was born at Sandy Hill, Argyde county, New York, in 1810. Her life record 
covered a span of eighty-two years, being ended in 1892. Both removed in 
their youth to Essex county, New York, and there Benjamin Beers followed the 
cooper's trade. He afterward began farming in that state, owning a tract of 
land. In early manhood he was an active whig and upon the dissolution of that 
party he joined the ranks of the new republican party. His fellow townsmen, 
appreciative of his worth and ability, frequently called him to public office. 
Both he and his wife remained residents of the Empire state until called to their 
final rest. Mrs. Lewis had a brother, George \Y. Beers, who was a non-commis- 
sioned officer in the Civil war and died from wounds received at the battle of 
Antietam. There were twelve children in the family, of whom ]\Irs. Lewis was 
the eleventh in order of birth. Both of her parents held membership in the 
Baptist church and took a most active and helpful part in its work, doing all 
in their power to advance moral progress. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Lewis have been born three sons. Ralph Clifton, bom in 
1879 and living upon a farm in this county, married Clara FoUmer and has 
two children, Ross and Mabel. Both the parents have attended the Upper Iowa 
University at Fayette. Harry C. died at the age of seventeen months. Allen 
Barton, born in 1886, is a graduate of the Oelwein Business College at Oelwein, 
Iowa, and married Miss Bernice Few. He is engaged in the hardware business 
at Whitehall, Illinois, and is a verj^ active church worker. The eldest son is 
serving as a school director. 

About thirty years ago Mr. Lewis, acknowledging the power of the Supreme 
Being, became an active worker in the ^Methodist church and has done much to 
increase the influence of the Prairie Grove church and also of the ^Methodist 
church of Hazleton. He has reared his family in that faith and has lived to 
see his sons also become active in church work. Mr. Lewis has served as a 
teacher and aS superintendent in the Sunday school, as a trustee and steward 
in the church, and has filled other of its offices, being now the church librarian. 
He is an ardent temperance worker and was a most earnest supporter of the 
Good Templars during its existence. He now has membership with the Modern 
Woodmen of America. It will be easily seen that his life is actuated by high 
and honorable principles and that he has labored effectively for the uplift and 
benefit of tnankind, never deviating from a course which he believes to be right 
nor faltering in his allegiance to a cause which he has espoused. 



HENRY F. SUIIR. 



Henry F. Suhr was for an extended period actively engaged in general 
farming in Buchanan county but has retired from agricultural life and makes 
his home in Hazleton. where he has business connections as vice president of 
the Iowa State Bank of Hazleton and as president of the Hazleton Farmers 
Telephone Company. 

He was born in Hessen, Germany, May 10, 1857, and was the second in a 
family of five children whose parents were William Henry and Wilhelniina 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 355 

(Prasuhn) Suhr. The father's birth occurred in Hessen, in 1826, while the 
mother was born in 1828. William H. Suhr carried on farming to a limited 
extent in that country, where he owned a small tract of land, but thmking that 
better business opportunities might be secured on this side the Atlantic, he 
sailed for the United States in 1868 and made his way across the country to 
Iowa, settling at Dyersville. There he worked on the railroad until 1870, when 
he removed to Buchanan county, settling in Washington township, where he 
owTied one hundred and sixty acres of laud, there devoting his attention to 
general farming and stock-raising until his death. He took out his naturaliza- 
tion papers, becoming a citizen of the United States, and his study of the 
political situation and questions of the day led him to give his allegiance to the 
republican party. He held several local offices but was not very active in politics. 
He was, however, a devoted member of the German Presbyterian church, acted 
as one of its early elders and took a most helpful interest in the various lines of 
church work. He died in 1898 at the age of seventy-two years, and his wife 
passed away in 1906 at the age of seventy-nine years. All of their children 
were born in Germany, save one, and three of the family are yet residents of 
Buchanan county. 

Henry F. Suhr was a lad of thirteen years when he arrived with his parents in 
this county, within the borders of which he has since made his home. He 
attended the Robinson school in Washington township and when not busy with 
his text-books worked in the fields, continuing to assist his father in the develop- 
ment of the home farm until twenty years of age, when he started out in life 
on his own account and worked for nearby farmers for about three years. He 
then began farming on his own account and after cultivating rented land for 
a year invested in one hundred and twenty acres in Hazleton township. Upon 
that tract he made his home for about twenty-one years and annually gathered 
good harvests and also successfully raised stock, his business affairs lieing wdseh' 
and intelligently directed so that he gained gratifying success. At length he 
left the farm and took up his abode in Hazleton, where he is connected with 
the Iowa State Bank as vice president and with the Hazleton Farmers Telephone 
Company as the president. At this writing he looks after the latter 's interests 
in road work. 

On the 30th of November, 1882, w^as celebrated the marriage of Mr. Suhr and 
Miss Alice McFarland, a native of Linn county, Iowa, and a daughter of Thomas 
and Almanda (Lee) McFarland, both of whom were born in Virginia. The 
latter w^as a daughter of Daniel R. Lee, who was a brother of General Robert 
E. Lee. Strongly related in blood, they held opposing views at the time of the 
Civil war, for Daniel R. Lee enlisted with his son at Indianapolis, Indiana, for 
service in the Union army. Thomas McFarland was reared upon a farm in 
Virginia and about the year 1853 arrived in Iowa after having resided for a time 
in Indiana. He w^as married in this state to Almanda Lee and returned to 
Indiana when his daughter, Mrs. Suhr, was three years of age. He had made 
the trip from Indiana to Iowa with ox teams and used oxen in his farm work. 
On returning to the Hoosier state he lived near Crawfordsville and was employed 
as a sawyer in the lumber mills of that locality. In 1874 he again came to 
Iowa, settling in Linn county, where he carried on farming. He spent the last 
part of his life, however, in Pendleton, Oregon. In his family were nine children, 



356 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

of whom jMrs. Suhr is the eldest. Mr. and Mrs. Suhr have adopted two chil- 
dren : Ida May James, now the wife of E. F. Latham, of the Hazleton Telephone 
Company, by whom she has two children, Thelma A. and Opal Lucille; and 
Arthur H., a farmer of this county, who is married and has two children, Norma 
and Loraine W. 

Mr. Suhr is identified with the Modern Woodmen of America and the Knights 
of Pythias. He votes with the republican party and keeps well informed on 
the questions and issues of the day but does not seek nor desire political pref- 
erment. Practically his entire life has been passed in Buchanan county and his 
memory forms a connecting link between the primitive past and the progres- 
sive present, for he can relate many interesting incidents of the early days as 
well as of later progress and improvement. He has manifested in his life many 
substantial qualities and thus it is that he enjoys the confidence and high regard 
of all with whom he has been associated. His religious faith is that of the 
Presbyterian church, in which he is serving as a trustee. He is one of its 
earnest members, his belief finding exemplification in his daily conduct. 



GEORGE GERSTENBERGER. 

George Gerstenberger has extensive property holdings in this county, his 
landed possessions aggregating five hundred acres, and in all of his farm work 
he follows the most progressive methods. He is a native of Dubuque county, 
Iowa, born November 27, 1864. His father, Franz Gerstenberger, was born in 
Germany in 1828 and there learned and followed the miller's trade until 1860, 
when he bade adieu to friends and fatherland and sailed for the new world. 
Making his way across the country, he settled first in Dubuque, where he resided 
until 1865. That year witnessed his arrival in Buchanan county, where he turned 
his attention to farming, purchasing both prairie and timber land. He had 
about two hundred and sixty acres and he brought his farm to a high state of 
cultivation. He planted shade trees, set out an orchard and made his place most 
attractive in appearance, as well as most productive through the employment of 
modern methods. For aliout six years he lived retired prior to his death, which 
occurred in 1882. He was a democrat in politics, but without aspiration for 
office. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Teresa Ernst, was born in Germany 
in 1830 and is now living at the advanced age of eighty-four years. They were 
the parents of six children, of whom (ieorge was the fourth in order of birth, and 
three of the number are now living in this county. 

George Gerstenl)erger, reared in Iowa, enjoyed such educational advantages 
as the common-school system of the state afforded and during his youthful days 
early became familiar with the best methods of carrying on farm work. He 
started out independently when twenty-five years of age, purchasing land, since 
which time he has carried on fanning on his own account. He is today the 
owner of the old family homestead of two hundred and sixty acres and an addi- 
tional tract of two hundred and forty acres, making in all about five hundred 
acres. He has seventy-five acres planted to corn, fifty acres in oats and jnuch of 
the remainder in hay. and not a little of liis crops is used for his stock-raising. 




^m. AND MP^xS. (iKOKGE (;f-:rsti:ni5i:i;(;kr 



r 



J 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 359 

He makes the latter an important feature of his business and derives therefrom 
a, substantial annual income. He has two good houses upon his place and the 
farm is well improved in other directions. In fact, it is lacking in none of the 
equipments and accessories of a model farm. 

On January 14, 1890, Mr. Gerstenberger was united in marriage to Miss Mary 
Heid, a native of Johnson county, this state, and a daughter of John and 
Mary (Schnoeblen) Heid, the former a native of Florida and the latter of 
Johnson county, Iowa. They are now residents of Oklahoma. The father has 
made farming his life work. He was one of the pioneer settlers of Johnson 
county, Iowa, where he lived until 1888, when he came to Buchanan county. 
Here he won a place among the prosperous agriculturists of the district, owning 
about four hundred acres of rich and arable land. In 1909 he removed to Okla- 
homa, where he is still busily engaged in farming and stock-raising, having in 
that state about five hundred acres. His political allegiance is given to the 
democratic party and his religious belief is manifest in his membership in the 
Catholic church. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Gerstenberger have been born ten children: Frank, John, 
Fred, Joseph, Teresa, Leo, George, Anthony, Anne and Alice. The family circle 
yet remains unbroken by the hand of death and all are still under the parental 
roof. They have been reared in the faith of the Catholic church, attending 
St. Mary's church at Hazelton, to which the parents belong, and Mr. Gersten- 
berger is a democrat in his political opinions. He is willing to aid in movements 
for the public good and has held some local offices, but he prefers to concentrate 
his energies upon his business affairs, which are carefully guided by sound judg- 
ment and have become important elements of prosperity. 



J. BARNEY LUX. 



J. Barney Lux owns and occupies an excellent farm of one hundred and 
eighty acres in Sumner township and in addition is the owner of a quarter sec- 
tion of land in Westburg township. Whatever success he has achieved is the 
direct result of his own labors, and he early came to a recognition of the eternal 
truth that "industry wins." He was born near Joliet, Illinois, in 1864, a son 
of Henry and Elizabeth (Gravenish) Lux. The father was a native of Luxem- 
burg, Germany, born in 1835, and he died at the age of sixty-eight years. His 
wife,' who was born in Germany about 1828, passed away in 1906. Henry Lux 
spent the period of his minority in his native country and then when twenty-one 
years of age came to the United States, settling first in Chicago. He afterward 
took up his abode upon a farm near Joliet, Illinois, where he remained until the 
early '70s, when he came to Iowa, locating near Fairbank in Hazleton township. 
There he became the owner of land which he cultivated and improved for about 
seven years. He next removed to a farm north of Independence, in Washing- 
ton township, and subsequently took up his abode in Homer township, where 
he remained for seven years. He afterward removed to Laurens, Iowa, there 
remaining until his death, at which time he was the owner of farm property in 



360 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

Pocahontas county. He was a member of the Catholic church and was a demo- 
crat in his political belief. 

J. Barney Lux is the second in order of birth and the only one of the six 
children in the father's family who is now living in Buchanan county. Here 
he attended the country schools and when not busy with his text-books his time 
was given to the task of cultivating and improving the fields. He started out in- 
dependently when twenty-one years of age and was employed by neighboring 
farmers until he reached the age of twenty-six. He then began farming upon 
the place of his father-in-law, which he cultivated for several years. He care- 
fully saved his earnings until his industry and economical expenditure had 
brought him a sum sufficient to enable him to purchase property, and that he 
has succeeded in his undertakings is indicated in the fact that he is now the 
owner of one hundred and eighty acres of land in Sumner township and one 
hundred and sixty acres in Westburg township. Thereon he is engaged in the 
raising of Poland China hogs and Durham cattle and both branches of his busi- 
ness are bringing to him substantial success, his entire time being given to his 
farm interests. 

Mr. Lux was joined in wedlock to ]\liss Alvina Stewart, a native of this 
county. They have had no children of their own, but the kindness of their hearts 
has prompted them to rear four, two girls and two boys, to whom they have 
given every advantage of home and school life, caring for them until they have 
been able to care for themselves. Two of the number are married and all four 
are a credit to the careful rearing of their foster parents. 

Mr. Lux is an Odd Fellow and in politics is a republican. He has served 
as township trustee and in other local offices but has little aspiration along that 
line, preferring to concentrate his energies upon his business affairs. He has 
been a resident of Buchanan county for four decades and has therefore wit- 
nessed much of its growth and development. He has taken an active interest in 
the work of progress as the years have gone by and his aid can be counted upon 
to further beneficial public measures. ]\Ioreover, his life record shows what can be 
accomplished in business when energy and determination point out the path 
to success. 



THOMAS KELSH. 



Although Thomas Kelsh has only held the office of postmaster of Lamont 
since May 20, 1914, he has already demonstrated his fitness for the place and 
his capacity for systematic and accurate handling of routine work. He is 
efficient, courteous and obliging, and his appointment to the office meets the 
ai)])roval of his fellow citizens. 

He was born in Platteville, Grant county, Wisconsin, in November, 1863, a 
son of Thomas and Ann (Virden) Kelsh. The father was born in County 
Meath, Ireland, and in 1843, as a young man, emigrated to America. He first 
located in Pennsylvania, where he was engaged in mining for nine years, and 
then removed to Grant county, Wisconsin, where he mined and farmed. In 1872 
he went to Dubuque county, Iowa, and followed agricultural pursuits there for 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 361 

ten years, but in 1882 removed to this county, locating in Madison township, 
where he farmed until his death, which occurred in 1894 when he was seventy- 
four years of age. He was a communicant of the Catholic church and a demo- 
crat in politics. His wife was also a native of County Meath, Ireland, and died 
in this county in 1900 at the age of seventy-nine years. She also belonged to 
the Catholic church. The subject of this review is the youngest of the seven 
children born to them, three of whom survive. The others are: J. M., of 
Erametsburg, Iowa, where he is engaged in farming; and John, a railroad man 
of Cedar Rapids. 

Thomas Kelsh, Jr., was reared in Dubuque and Buchanan counties and was 
given the advantages of a good education, graduating from the Dyersville 
high school with the class of 1881. Upon starting out in life for himself he 
became an agriculturist and operated his farm near Lamont until the spring of 
1914, when he accepted the office of postmaster of that place. He was successful 
as a farmer and his services in his present capacity are highly acceptable to his 
constituents. 

In 1897 Mr. Kelsh was united in marriage to Miss Frank M. Quick, a 
daughter of William and Mary Quick, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in 
this work. With the exception of four years, Mr. Kelsh has resided in Lamont 
since 1897. From 1904 until 1910 he was mayor of the town and was for three 
years previous to that a member of the city council. He vinderstands well the 
problems of municipal government as applied to the small town, and as mayor 
and councilman did much to secure efficiency in the administration of public 
affairs and to advance the welfare of the community along lines of civic progress. 
For the past eight years he has been a member of the township board and 
for three years has served upon the school board. From 1894 until 1897 he was 
secretary and general manager of the Farmers Creamery and proved an able 
business executive. He is a democrat and has been county committeeman from 
Madison township for twenty years and his counsel is often sought in regard 
to the best policy to pursue in local political affairs. His religious faith is 
indicated in his membership in St. Mary's Catholic church of Lamont and he 
belongs to the Knights of Columbus. He is also a member of the Modern Wood- 
men of America and the Woodmen of the World, belonging to the camps of 
those organizations at Lamont. Whether as a private citizen or as a public official 
he has measured up to high standards of citizenship, which demand that, if 
need be, private interests be subordinated to the general welfare, and in all rela- 
tions of life he has conducted himself as a man of honor and integrity. 



CHARLES E. MEYTHALER. 

Charles E. Mey thaler, a prominent representative of agricultural interests, 
owns a farm of one hundred and sixty acres of rich and valuable land in Sumner 
township, where he is engaged extensively in the cultivation of corn and also 
in the raising of full blooded Holstein cattle. He was born in this county in 
1876, a son of Christian and Margaret Haman :\Ieythaler, the former born in 
Germany in 1836 and the latter in Pennsylvania in 1840. 



362 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

When nineteen years of age Christian Mey thaler crossed the Atlantic to tlie 
new world and settled in Green county, Wisconsin, where he became the owner 
of land, upon which he lived for about ten years. He then removed to Black 
Hawk county, Iowa, where he also owned and cultivated a farm, but after a 
brief period there passed took up his abode in Independence, where he followed 
the stonemason's trade, which he had previously learned in Wisconsin. He lived 
in Independence at the time of the memorable fire and afterward was employed 
in connection with the building of the hospital and on the erection of many of 
the new structures of the cit}'. He afterward took up his abode upon a farm 
north of Independence, where he lived for several years, and it was upon tliat 
place that his son Charles E. was born. After about five years there spent 
he removed to a farm three miles south of Independence, upon which he con- 
tinued to reside until 1902, when he sold that property. He is now a resident 
of Spokane, Washington, where he makes his home with his daughter. In the 
family were twelve children, of whom Charles E. was the eighth in order of 
birth. Six of the number are yet residents of Buchanan county, where all own 
land. In addition to tilling the soil the father was well known as a successful 
breeder of shorthorn cattle, which he raised more for connnercial purposes than 
for the prize ring. His political allegiance is given to the republican party and 
his religious faith is that of the Methodist church. 

Charles E. Meythaler attended the common schools of this county and at the 
age of twenty-one years began farming, spending two years in the employ of 
others. When a young man of twenty-three years he rented a tract of land 
and started out independently. He has since been thus engaged and is today 
the owner of a valuable property of one hundred and si.xty acres, of which he 
has fifty-five acn^ i)lanted to corn, twenty acres to oats, while the remainder 
is meadow and pasture land. He raises full blooded Holstein cattle, having 
about sixty head of tlioroughbreds on his place. He maintains a dairy in con- 
nection therewith, but sells his milk to otliei- i)arties to deliver. He has a bam 
fifty-six by sixty-two feet and his farnj is thoroughly ecpiipped for the conduct 
of the business to which lie devotes his energies. He is an active, energetic 
business man. progressive and enterprising, and ticcomplishes what h(^ under- 
takes. 

in 1899 Mr. Meythaler was united in marriage to Miss Alice Warlmrton, 
a daughter of William II. and Ellen C. (Irvine) Warburton, both of whom were 
natives of Ogle county, Illinois. Her father was born in Galena in 1845. His 
father had removed to Illinois before Chicago sprang into existence, the little 
village there being known as Fort Dearborn. He was an exhorter of the jNIetho- 
dist church and in 1850 went to California, attracted by the discovery of gold 
on the Pacific slope. His son William H. Warburton attended the Rock River 
Methodist Seminary of Illinois and retained his residence in Ogle county until 
1869. when he came to Buchanan connty, Iowa, settling in Sumner township, 
where he has since harvested forty-six crops. He has one hundred and sixty 
acres of rich ami productive land, known as the Pleasant View farm, and aside 
from his business affairs he has been prominent in other connections. He has 
held all the township offices, gives his political allegiance to the republican party 
and has been a member of the county central committee. For five years he has 
been president of the Farmei-s County Institute and is known as the father 



1 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 363 

of the institute. He is especially active as a member of the Presbyterian church, 
in which he has served as deacon and superintendent of the Sunday school. 
The scope of his activities is broad and his efforts have been of the greatest 
possible value to his fellow townsmen. He it was who made and used the 
first King road drag in this county and at all times he has stood for advance- 
ment and progress. He married Ellen C. Irvine, a representative of one of the 
pioneer families of Ogle county, Illinois. To ^Ir. and Mrs. Warburton have 
been born three children : Carrie, who is very active in Sunday school work 
and has attended the international and world's conventions as a delegate; Alice, 
now Mrs. Meythaler; and Clyde W., who is in the United States service as a 
small grain expert. 

JNIr. and Mrs. Meythaler have become the parents of three children : Irvine, 
born in 1901 ; Marion, in 1909 ; and William Charles, in July, 1912. Mr. Mey- 
thaler belongs to the Buchanan County Fair Association and also to the Iowa 
Holstein Breeders Association. His political allegiance is given to the repub- 
lican party, but he has no desire for office. In the Presbyterian church he has 
taken an active and helpful interest and is now serving as* one of the deacons. 
His life has been well spent and his many sterling traits of character have won 
for him the confidence, good-will and high regard of all with whom he has been 
associated. He has always resided in Buchanan county and among his stanchest 
friends are many who have kno^^Ti him from his boyhood to the present time. 



JOHN D. THOMPSON. 



John D. Thompson has been engaged in business in Lamont for many years 
and is now the owner of a general store. Also for a time he served as post- 
master of the town. He was born in Kane county, Illinois, May 19, 1860, and 
received his education in the country schools near Lamont, his parents remov- 
ing to this countv while he was still a child. He remained at home until he was 
twenty-eight years of age and then for four years operated a farm of two 
hundred and forty acres on section 36, Madison township. At the end of that 
time he removed to Lamont and purchased a half interest in a furniture and 
undertaking business. He was appointed postmaster of the town under Cleve- 
land's administration and held that office for four years or from 1892 to 1896. 
He still retained his interest in the furniture and undertaking establishment 
while serving as postmaster and in the meantime became connected with the 
coal, feed, grain and stock business. He eventually sold his interests in all of 
these undertakings save the stock business, which he has continued to engage 
in to some extent ever since. In 1900 he invested in a meat market, which he 
conducted until 1912, and still owns the building and fixtures. While he was 
engaged in the butcher business he was elected secretary of the Cooperative 
Creamery, which is located in Lamont, and held that responsible position Tor 
seven years. For the last three years he has been again engaged in mercantile 
business, conducting a general store in Lamont. He knows what lines of goods 
are demanded by his customers and spares neither time nor pains in securing 



364 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

a stock that best supplies the local demands. His business methods are above 
reproach and his patronage is growing steadily. 

Mr. Thompson was married January 1, 1891, to Miss Sadie Colomey, a 
daughter of Levi and Mary (Hutchinson) Colomey. The father was born in 
Farmington, New Hampshire, February 26, 1832, and in 1867 came to Delaware 
county, Iowa, and settled upon a farm. However, he continued to follow his 
trade, which was that of a shoemaker, and resided in Delaware county until 
1889, when he came to Buchanan county. His ^^^fe was born at Litchfield, 
Kennebec county, Elaine, February 12, 1834, and lived there until sixteen years 
of age, when she accompanied her parents to Massachusetts, her marriage 
occurring in Natick, that state. They had five children. Herbert Erwin, who 
resides in Kansas, has been twice married. Childs B. died when sixteen years 
of age. Anna May died when a child of three years. Sadie is now Mrs. Thomp- 
son. Mrs. Etta M. Sherwin is residing in Kansas and is the mother of five 
children. Mr. and Mrs. Thompson are the parents of two children. George 
Levi, whose birth occurred November 1, 1891. is now taking the animal hus- 
bandry course in the Ames Agricultural College. Mary Cynthia, born August 
27, 1893, completed one term of study at the Iowa State College for Teachers at 
Cedar Falls after completing the course offered by the high school at Lament. 

^Ir. Thompson is a democrat and has taken an active part in public affairs. 
He was the second mayor of Lamont and held that office for four years, giving 
the municipality a thoroughly efficient atlministration. Fraternally he is a 
charter member of Mohawk Lodge, No. 310, K. P., and is also a member of Bush 
Camp, No. 2605, M. W. A. His wife belongs to the Pythian Sisters, the Rebekahs, 
the Royal Neiglibors and the Woman's Relief Corps of Lamont. Both are widely 
known and higlily esfcciiicd in Lamoiif. wbcre they have resided for many 
years. 



CORNP:Lirs TOOMEY. 



Cornelius Toomey is a prosperous farmer living on section 25, Westl)urg town- 
ship, where he owns a good farm, within the borders of which are comprised 
one hundred and sixty acres. Illinois numbers him among her native sons, his 
birth having occurred in ]\IcHenry county in 1843, his parents being Cornelius 
and Catherine (Riley) Toomey. The former was a native of Ireland, born in 
County Cork,^and on coming to the United States settled in McHenry county, 
Illinois, where he purchased a tract of land of eighty acres. He bent every 
energy to the further development and improvement of the place and remained 
thereon for twenty years. He then sold it and came to Iowa with Sumner town- 
ship, Buchanan county, as his destination. There he purchased eighty acres of 
land and continued to live thereon until his life's labors were ended in death in 
1889. 

The religious faith of Cornelius Toomey. Sr., was that of the Catholic church, 
and his political belief was that of the democratic party. His wife was also a 
native of County Cork, Ireland, and it was when she was a young lady that she 
accojiipanied her parents to the new world, becoming a resident of McHenry 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 365 

county, Illinois, where her father purchased farm land and continued to carry 
on general agricultural pursuits until his death. It was in that county that 
Catherine Riley became the wife of Cornelius Toomey. She accompanied him 
to Iowa, and they continued to live upon the old homestead in Sumner township 
throughout their remaining days and were witnesses of much of the growth and 
development of this section of the state. 

Cornelius Toomey, whose name introduces this review, spent his boyhood 
largely upon the old home farm and is indebted to the public school system of 
the county for the educational opportunities which he enjoyed. His time was 
divided between his studies, the pleasures of the playground and the work of 
the fields, for at an early age he began assisting his father in the cultivation of 
the crops. He remained at home until 1894 and then purchased a farm in 
Westburg township comprising one hundred and sixty acres on section 25. In 
the intervening period, covering twenty years, he has wrought many changes 
in the appearance of his place through the improvements he has made upon it 
and the careful, systematic manner in which he has developed his fields. 

Mr. Toomey was united in marriage to Miss Amy Tole, and they have a 
daughter, Alice, who is in her nineteenth year. The family are well known in 
the part of the county in which they live and have many warm friends. Mr. 
Toomey votes with the democratic party, but neither seeks nor desires office, 
preferring to concentrate his energies upon his business affairs. His religious 
faith is that of the Catholic church. From his boyhood days he has continu- 
ously resided in Buchanan county and is interested in everything that pertains 
to its upbuilding and progress. 



GEORGE W. HARDWICK. 

George W. Hardwick, successfully engaged in general farming and stock- 
raising, his position, by reason of his ability, being one of leadership in his 
chosen calling, was born in Westburg township in 1871, a son of Thomas and 
Margaret (Schutte) Hardwick. The family is of English descent. The father 
was born in England in 1818 and, coming to America, was employed as a farm 
hand in the state of New York for two years. He then made his way westward 
to Illinois, where he worked upon a farm for a similar period, and in 1855 he 
came to Iowa, entering a tract of government land four miles north of Winthrop. 
He then returned to Illinois, where he remained for one year, and in the spring 
of 1856 he again went to Winthrop, making the journey across the country with 
ox teams. With characteristic energy he began to break the sod, till the fields 
and otherwise improve the property. He lived there for ten years, keeping 
bachelor's hall, but in 1866 sold his farm and removed to Westburg township, 
where he purchased eighty acres of land, upon which he lived until July 20, 
1912, on which date he passed to the home beyond. For several years past 
the half century mark he had been identified with agricultural pursuits and at 
all times had stood for progress and improvement. He displayed sound judg- 
ment in business affairs, unfaltering energy and most commendable persistency 
of purpose. 



366 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

In addition to being a successful farmer Thomas Hardvvick was one of the 
organizers and stockholders of the Jesup State Bank. His political allegiance 
was given to the republican party, and his religious faith was that of the 
Episcopal church. His wife was a native of Wisconsin but in her girlhood days 
went to Jefferson township, this county, where, in 1868, she became the wife 
of Thomas Hardwick, and unto them were born two children, the elder being 
John T. Hardwick, now a prominent resident farmer of Westburg township. 

At the usual age George W. Hardwick became a pupil in the public schools 
and through the period of his boyhood and youth he worked in the fields, 
gaining practical knowledge of the best methods of cultivating the soil and caring 
for the crops. After his text-books were put aside he began farming on his own 
account, cultivating a part of the old homestead until his father's death, when 
he inherited his present place of three hundred and twenty acres situated in 
Westburg township. Thereon he built a beautiful residence and has added 
many other modern equipments indicative of his progressive spirit. His farm 
constitutes one of the attractive features in the landscape by reason of its 
excellent buildings, its fine shade trees, its well tilled fields and high grades of 
stock, for in addition to general farming Mr. Hardwick engages in raising and 
feeding stock, handling both cattle and hogs. 

On the 81st of March, 1909, Mr. Hardwick was united in marriage to Miss 
Frances Ellen Ross, who was born in England in 1886, a daughter of William 
Ross. She came to the United States with iier parents when three years of age, 
the family home being established in St. Louis, Missouri, while later a removal 
was made to Chicago, wliere her parents are still living. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Hardwick has been born a daughter, Frances Ross. 

Mr. Hardwick votes with the republican party, but has never wanted office. 
This does not mean that he is neglectful of the duties of citizenship ; on the 
contrary he willingly and helpfully supports many measures for the general good, 
and his cooperation can always l)e counted upon to further the public welfare. 
He is a man of unfaltering energy who allows no obstacles or difficulties to bar 
his path to success, and as the years have gone by he has gained for himself a 
very creditable position among the leading farmers and stock-raisers of the 
countv. 



AUSTIN W. I'ERKINS. 



Austin W. Perkins is a veteran of the Civil war and a retired farmer of 
Middlefield township. He has almost reached the eightieth milestone on life's 
journey and certainly deserves the rest which has come to him after a life of 
activity and usefulness crowned with sulistantial success and the high respect 
of his fellowmen. He was born in Woodstock, Maine, August 8, 1885, his parents 
being Luther and Sallie (Dural) Perkins. The father was a native of England, 
but was only six months old when brought to the United States, the family home 
being established in Maine. He attended one of the old-time backwoods schools 
of Maine and wIkmi a young man began preaching for the Baptist church, devot- 
ing his life to that calling, but deatli claimed him when he was still in early 



r 




AUSTIN W. PERKINS 




MRS. AUSTIN W. PERKINS 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 371 

manhood. The mother of our subject was probably born in Maine and was of 
French extraction. 

Austin W. Perkins started out in life on his own account after his father's 
death when he was a young man of twenty years. Previous to this time, however, 
he had worked as a farm hand for Stillman Berry, who afterward became his 
father-in-law. He was employed for a time in a sawmill at Bangor, Maine, and 
later worked in a store wath his brother at Chelsea, Massachusetts. In 1856 he 
came to Buchanan county, Iowa, and located upon a tract of land which he and 
his wife had inherited from her father. This place has since been his home and 
year after year he tilled the soil and cultivated his fields, but in 1898 retired from 
farming and has since left the operation of his land to others. 

Mr. Perkins also took a most helpful interest in public work. He aided in 
organizing schools and churches and in furthering many projects intended for 
the benefit and upl)uildiug of the community. He is today the only survivor 
among the voters at the first township election of Middlefield township, this being 
in the fall of 1857. The spirit of patriotism has ever been strong within him 
and following the outbreak of the Civil war he enlisted in 1862, becoming a 
member of Company H, Twenty-seventh Iowa Infantry, with which he served 
for three years, participating in eleven important engagements under Colonel 
J, S. Gilbert and Captain J. ^lilkr. The regiment was attached to the Second 
Brigade, Third Division of the Sixteenth Corps of the Army of the Tennessee. 
He took part in the battles of Pleasant Hill, Yellow Bayou, Tupelo, Nashville, 
Fort Blakely and others. He was never wounded but his health became impaired. 
He rendered valua))le and valiant service to his country and returned home with 
a most creditable military record. 

On Januaiy 27, 1857, Mr. Perkins was united in marriage to Miss Olive Berry, 
who was born in Paris, Maine, March 23, 1838, a daughter of Stillman and Persis 
(Cushman) Berry and a representative of one of the prominent early families of 
the Pine Tree state. Her father farmed in Maine for a number of years and then 
made the journey across the country to Quasqueton, which was then the only 
town in that vicinity, arriving in 1855, when all of the conditions of pioneer life 
were here to be met. He worked to some extent at the carpenter's trade in the 
early days and erected some of the first buildings of the township. He was a 
true pioneer, active, helpful, energetic and willing at all times to assist a neighbor 
or friend or to promote public progress. He held membership in the Baptist 
church, guided his life by its teachings and served as one of its deacons. 

Mr. and Mrs. Perkins became the parents of five children, all born here. The 
eldest, Julia A., is the wife of A. S. Leach, a former Protestant Methodist 
preacher, who is now engaged in business at Coggon, Iowa. They have four 
children. Luther Stillman, the second member of the family, was born May 5, 
1859, and now occupies the old home farm in Middlefield township, which he is 
carefully and systematically condvicting. He married Miss Cora A. King, a 
daughter of Ezra B. King, one of the active and prominent pioneer settlers of 
Byron township. Mr. and Mrs. L. S. Perkins had two children, Addie 0. and 
Bertha E. The former is the wife of Marshall Ball, who is engaged in the auto- 
mobile business in Jesup, Iowa, and they have one child, Harold. The younger 
daughter, Bertha E., became the wife of Albert.P. De Greif, a prominent farmer 
of Middlefield township, but she died September 19, 1910, leaving two children, 

Vol 11— 17 



372 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

Cora May and Arthur L. Cynthia A. Perkins is now the ^^^do\v of Charles M. 
Hunt, who was a prominent citizen and political leader of Pocahontas, Iowa, and 
they had four children, Gilbert, Melville, Hazel and Wilbur. Gilbert A. Perkins, 
the fourth member of the family, is with the Warfield-Pratt-Howell Grocery Com- 
pany of Cedar Rapids. He is married and has a daughter. Evangel, aged eighteen 
years. Addie 0., the youngest member of the family, died in 1879. Mr. Perkins 
now has fourteen grandchildren and one deceased and also fourteen great-grand- 
children and one deceased. His wife died on the 9th of March, 1898, mourned 
by all who knew her. 

Mr. Perkins was one of the organizers of the Baptist church at Winthrop, 
served as a deacon in the same during its existence and was superintendent of 
the Sunday school for seven years. He has always been a progressive citizen, 
helpful in his attitude toward public affairs, and filled the office of constable of 
his township for one year and as school director for one term. He is a very 
prominent and influential member of the Grand Army of the Republic and for six 
3^ears has been chaplain of the post at AVinthrop. He has attended both the state 
and national encampments for seventeen consecutive years. His life has been 
exemplary in many respects and he has never taken a drink of liquor or used 
tobacco in any form. He has traveled to considerable extent, making four trips 
to the Pacific coast, a like number to the Atlantic coast and has also visited 
Canada and Mexico. His son, L, S. Perkins, with whom he now resides, has like- 
wise been prominent in Middlefield to\niship. He, too, was a deacon in the Bap- 
tist church and now attends the Methodist Episcopal church of Winthrop. His 
life is an exemplification of Christian teaching and his religious faith finds mani- 
festation in his honorable business dealing and in his straightforward conduct 
in every relation of life. 



DORIC C. CARVEY. 



Doric C. Carvey, who resides on section 26, Hazleton township, started out 
to earn his own living when a little lad of but thirteen years. That he has 
come off victor in the battle of life is evidenced in the fact that he is today 
the owner of a valual)le farm property of two hundred and five acres and he 
enjoys a well earned reputation as a careful man of business, enterprising and 
progressive. 

Mr. Carvey was born in this county April 26, 1870, his parents being D. C. P. 
and Euphrasia (Tucker) Carvey, who were natives of the Empire state, born 
in 1834 and 1844 respectively. The year 1867 witnessed their arrival in Iowa 
as they removed to this state from Walworth county, Wisconsin, driving across 
the eomitry with three horse teams, crossing the ice at Dubuque. The ladies 
of the family, however, came by train. ]\Ir. Carvey settled in Hazleton town- 
ship Avhen there were only a few homes within its boundaries. There was 
one log sclioolhouse but no churches and it seemed that the work of settlement, 
development and civilization had scarcely been begun. The father was not 
long permitted to enjoy his new home, for his death occurred through an acci- 
dent in a threshing machine three years later. He filled the offices of county 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 373 

treasurer and collector when in Walworth county and his political allegiance 
was always given to the republican party. In his family were seven children, 
two sons and five daughters, of whom one daughter is now living in Hazleton 
township. Upon his arrival in this county the father secured one hundred and 
sixty acres of raw prairie land, on which not a furrow had been turned nor 
an improvement made. He broke the sod and began the development of the 
fields and continued actively in his farm work until his death. It was Mr. 
Carvey and J. E. Tryer, who were instrumental in securing the building of a 
schoolhouse near the former's farm. 

It was in that school that Doric C. Carvey began his education and later 
he had opportunity to attend the Upper Iowa University at Fayette. Owing 
to his father's early death, which left the family in somewhat straitened cir- 
cumstances, it was necessary that he begin to earn his own living when but 
thirteen years of age and out of his wages he also contributed to the support 
of the family. AVhen twenty-one years of age he started out as a farmer 
on his own account by renting land and carefully saved his earnings until 
his industry and economic expenditures had brought him sufficient capital to 
enable him to purchase property. To his original holdings he has added until 
he now owns two hundred and five acres in Hazleton township, all well improved 
and highly cultivated. He paid his own way while at the Upper Iowa Uni- 
versity and after attaining his majority engaged in teaching in the country 
schools for six terms, but now he devotes his undivided attention to his farm 
and its further development. He also engages in raising good stock, the annual 
sale of which brings him a substantial return. Upon his farm are found all 
modern equipments and accessories and his work is conducted along the most 
progressive lines of agriculture. 

Mr. Carvey was united in marriage February 26, 1896, to Miss Elizabeth 
Menzel, who was born in Buchanan county, a daughter of John H. and Marie 
(Schneider) Menzel. natives of Germany. Her father was born in Prussia in 
1832, and her mother was born in that kingdom in 1835. They came to the 
United States when twenty-three and twenty-two years of age respectively. 
John H. Menzel did not have to serve in the German army, but his father 
fought under Blucher in the Franco-Prussian war and was wounded in the 
battle of Waterloo in 1815. In his native country John H. Menzel followed 
farming and in 1856 he became a resident of Dubuque, then a small town, 
remaining there for about eleven years. In 1867 he came to Buchanan county, 
where he worked as a farm hand until he had acquired a sufficient sum to 
enable him to purchase land in this county. In addition to tilling the soil he 
engaged quite extensively in raising stock and also bought and sold stock. He 
has been a resident of Iowa since pioneer times. There was still plenty of 
game to be had in the state at the time he took up his abode in Dubuque. He 
has held some local offices and has been an active and earnest worker in the 
Lutheran church. In 1901 he was called upon to moum the loss of his wife. 

To Mr. and :^Irs. Carvey have been born six children : Esther and Eva, who 
are attending high school in Hazleton ; and Lois, John, Dorothy and Donna, 
who are pupils in the district schools. Mr. Carvey is a republican in his politi- 
cal views and has served as trustee of Hazleton township and as justice of the 
peace. He is not a politician, however, in the sense of office seeking, but takes. 



374 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

an active part in furthering all movements which he believes will better politi- 
cal conditions or advance the civic standards of town or county. He and his 
wife hold membersliip in the Methodist Episcopal church, in which they take 
a deep and helpful interest. For five years Mr. Carvey was superintendent of 
the Prairie Center Sunday school and he is one of the trustees of the church. 
Aside from his church work he has allowed himself little leisure for outside 
interests, preferring to concentrate his energies upon his business affairs, and 
it has been his close application and unremitting industry that have won for 
him the measure of success that he now enjoj^s. 



JOHN A. BUCK. 



John A. Buck, who is now practically retired but who until 1914 followed 
farming in Liberty township, is well known as a capable and successful agricul- 
turist, but there are other interests in his life which are equally worthy of men- 
tion, for his efforts have been an element in promoting moral progress and in 
advancing the public welfare along various lines. He was born in Tuscarawas 
county, Oliio, in 1852, a son of John and Margaret (Slemmons) Buck, the former 
a native of Washington, Pennsylvania, born June 28, 1812, and the latter of 
Harrison county, Ohio, born June 22, 1816. The father died in Tuscarawas 
county, Ohio, January 4, 1890, and the mother passed away there July 28, 1898. 
In early life the father followed farming. When a young man he removed from 
the Keystone state to Ohio, and was thereafter a resident of Tuscarawas county 
until death called him. He was active in public affairs as a supporter of the 
democratic part.v. his opinions carrying wciijlit in its local councils. He served 
in all the township offices and was likewise county supervisor. The Presbyterian 
church numbered him among its most earnest, zealous and faithful members and 
for fifty-two years he was one of the elders. In the family were nine children, 
of whom John A. Buck is the fiftli in order of l)irth. One of the sons, Thomas, 
now a resident of Texas, sei-A^ed in tlie Civil war with the one-hundred-day men. 

John A, Buck entered the country school near his father's home in Tuscara- 
was county and after mastering the branches of learning therein taught at- 
tended New Comerstown College. In early life he worketl with his father 
upon the farm and afterward divided his time between farm work in the summer 
months and teaching in the country schools until 1879, when he arrived in 
Buchanan county, Iowa. Settling in Liberty township, he was employed for 
several years as a farm hand by Jesse Slemmons. Later he bought land which 
he now owns in Liberty township, comprising one hundred and sixty acres, and 
the greater part of his life has been devoted to general agricultural pursuits. He 
was, however, for three years engaged in the grocery business in Rowley but 
returned to the farm which he still occupies. In 1914, however, he put aside 
the active work of the fields and is now practically living retired. 

On the 10th of November, 188G, Mr. Buck was united in marriage to Miss 
Margaret R. Work, a daughter of George L. and Sarah (Crouch) Work, natives 
of Washington county, Pennsylvania, and Harrison county, Ohio, respectively. 
Mr. Work was born December 5, 1809, and his wife's natal day was June 19. 1816. 



PIISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 375 

In early life he became a physician, having attended a medical school in Athens, 
Ohio, and until 1854 he practiced in the Buckeye state. He then removed west- 
ward to Davenport, Iowa, and became one of the early physicians of that city, 
where he was well liked and won substantial success, practicing there until his 
death, which occurred in that city, on the 8d of March, 1854. His widow died 
in this county, July 21, 1889. They had six children, of whom two sons, John 
and Alexander, enlisted at Hopedale, Ohio, for service in the Civil war as 
members of the Forty-third Ohio Infantry and were killed in battle. Dr. 
Work was always very active in public affairs, especially helpful toward school 
and church. For many years he was an elder in the Presbyterian church and 
at all times guided his life by its teachings, so that his career was a most honor- 
able and useful one and his memory remains as a blessed benediction to those 
who knew him. 

Mr. and Mrs. Buck have two children : Margaret Ellen, who was formerly 
with Chappell & Todd as stenographer and is now an employe of the Donnon 
Abstract Company ; and Mary Belle, at home. Mr. Buck and his family are ever 
interested in matters pertaining to the welfare and progress of their section 
of the state. They hold membership in the Presbyterian church of Pine Creek 
and in its work have been most helpful, Mr. Buck serving as an elder of the 
church for twenty-seven years and also filling other offices such as trustee and 
steward. For the past quarter of a century he has been a school director and 
his inliuence is always on the side of progress and improvement, right, justice 
and truth. 



ERNEST M. WHITNEY. 

Ernest M. Whitney is a farmer and stockman, owning and operating a finely 
improved farm of two hundred acres on sections 23 and 27, Madison township. 
He was born upon a farm near the place where he now resides on the 18th of 
September, 1869, a son of the late David M. Whitney, a sketch of whom appears 
elsewhere in this work. The father was married twice and the subject of this 
review has a brother living and a half sister, namely: Clarence ]\I., also a 
farmer of Madison township; and Jennie, now Mrs. Leslie P. Clubine, of 
Lamont. He had four other brothers, but they have passed away. They were 
Woodford and Willard, twins, who died when six months old; Herbert, who 
died when nine years of age ; and Claude, who died when a boy of fourteen years. 

Ernest M. Whitney was reared upon the homestead in Madison township 
near his present farm, and attended the common schools of the neighborhood, 
acquiring a thorough knowledge of the fundamental branches of learning. 
From boyhood he was accustomed to the work of the farm and upon reacliing 
maturity continued to devote his time and energy to agriculture. He has 
resided at his present place for the past twenty-seven years and has made most 
of the improvements thereon. It comprises two hundred acres of land on sections 
23 and 27, Madison township, and is one of the best developed fanning proper- 
ties of the locality. Mr. Whitney not only keeps everything about his farm in 
excellent condition and gives his growing crops the care necessary to insure 



376 HISTORY OP BUCHANAN COUNTY 

a large yield, but also studies the markets carefully and is enabled to sell his 
grain at a good advantage. He also raises stock to some extent and finds this 
likewise a profitable undertaking. 

On the 19th of September, 1887, Mr. Whitney was united in marriage at In- 
dependence, Iowa, to Miss Minnie Van Vors, who was born in this county on 
the 9th of April, 1868. Her parents were David and Mary (Foote) Van Vors, 
the former of whom was born in New York state and came west in young 
manhood, being married in Illinois. He continued to reside there for some 
time thereafter but brought liis family to Iowa while it was still a pioneer region. 
Pie passed away May 30, 1900, when sixty years of age. His widow, who has 
now reached the age of seventy-two years, resides at Independence. Mrs. Whit- 
ney is one of a family of six children, four of whom survive. The others are : 
Mrs. Ida Flauher, a widow residing at Ames, who has two children living and 
one deceased ; Jason, the manager of the Iowa Telephone Company at Dubuque, 
Iowa, who married Lottie Baird and has a son ; and Edith, now Mrs. Austin 
Sill, of Independence. AValter, who died in 1901. married Miss Mary Vanek 
and to their union was l)orn a son, Edgar. The widow resides at Dubuque. 
AVillie, who completes the family, died in infancy. To ]\Ir. and Mrs. AVhitney 
have been ])orn seven children. Harry died in infancy. Ina is the wife of 
Herman Sliarff. a resident of Ijamont and a dealer in pumps and a well driller 
by occupation. They liave three children, Edith, Hugo and Gladys. Myrtle, 
a graduate of the Lamont High school, class of 1910, Orville, Jason, Ruth and 
Jennie are all at home. 

Mv. Wliitney is a republican and is a member of the school board of the 
independent district of Lamont. Fraternally he belongs to the subordinate 
lodge and encampment of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and has 
passed through all of the chairs in botli. His wife and daughters belong to the 
Rebekahs, and Mrs. Whitney and Miss Myrtle have ))oth filled all of the chairs in 
that organization. Tho.se who have known Mr. Whitney most intimately hold 
him in the highest esteem, which is an indication of his sterling integrity and 
the loyalty of his friendship. 



JEFFERSON DAVIS COMBS. 

JeflPerson Davis Combs, living on .section 10, Homer township, was born 
July 31, 1861. in Mina, New York, a son of Charles and Susan M. (Grover) 
Combs, who were likewise natives of the Empire state. The father was a 
farmer by occupation and following his removal westward to Michigan secured 
a tract of land which he cultivated for fourteen years. In 1876 he arrived in 
Buchanan county and purchased two hundred and forty acres on sections 21 
and 22, Homer township. He at once began the task of developing and improv- 
ing the place and in the course of years brought his farm to a iiigh state of 
cultivation, his labors being rewarded by golden harvests. He died October 
2, 1893, while his wife, who survived for more than ten years, passed away 
in :\Iarcli, 1904. 



O 



> 






< ^ 




r 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 379 

Jefferson D. Combs grew to manhood in Homer township and remained 
with his parents upon the farm to the age of thirty-six years, when he pur- 
chased one hundred and sixty acres of land on section 10, Homer township. 
He at once began to develop this along still more progressive lines and today 
has one of the best improved farms of the county. He is engaged in the raising 
of thoroughbred Hereford cattle and Poland-China hogs, and he is a stock- 
holder in the Rowley Bank, 

On the 10th of August, 1897, Mr. Combs was united in marriage to Miss 
Lillian Ferry, a daughter of Hobert G. and Susanna (Smiley) Ferry, the 
former a native of Massachusetts and the latter of Wisconsin. The father 
was a carpenter by trade and in an early day came to Buchanan county, where 
he took up farming, which he followed in Homer and Sumner townships. 
Later, however, he removed to Independence, where he resumed work at his 
trade and engaged in carpentering throughout his remaining days, passing 
away April 6, 1895. His wife died January 9, 1906. Mr. and Mvs. Coml)s 
are the parents of six children, as follows: Ruth A., who is sixteen years of 
age; Charles IL, a j^outh of fourteen; Newell, twelve years old; and Wilma B., 
Helen B. and Lois Gunilda, who are ten, seven and four years of age re- 
spectively. 

The religious faith of the family is that of the Presbyterian church, and 
the political belief of Mr. Combs is that of the democratic party. He has 
never sought nor desired political office but for fourteen years has served as 
school director and is still acting in that capacity. He belongs to the Modern 
Woodmen of America, and, while there is nothing in his life record that 
differentiates it greatly from the lives of others who have followed farming 
in this part of the state, there are nevertheless qualities worthy of high com- 
mendation and of emulation. He has always closely applied himself to the 
duties in hand, has been honorable in his dealings with his fellowmen and 
through laudable ambition and unremitting diligence has gained a creditable 
place among the substantial farmers of Homer township. 



JOHN F. CARR. 



John F. Carr is a furniture dealer and undertaker of Lamont and is ranked 
as one of the successful business men of the town. He was born in Madison 
township, this county, on the 1st of October, 1861, a son of John and Anna 
(Kane) Carr, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this work. He was educated 
in the country schools near his home and subsequently took a business course 
in the academy at Manchester, Delaware county, this state. He completed his 
work there in 1886 and afterward operated his father's farm for six years. 
In 1892 he became associated with his brother, James Carr, and J. D. Thompson 
in the general produce and cattle business. Upon the dissolution of the 
firm Mr. Carr of this review took over the furniture business and has since 
conducted it. He is also a licensed embalmer, having passed the required 
examination before the state board of examiners at Des Moines, Iowa. His 
services in that line are expert and his charges are reasonable. His furniture 



380 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

store is one of the best in his part of the county and his patronage is large 
and steadily increasing. 

Mr. Carr is a democrat in his political belief and has been a delegate to both 
state and county conventions of his party. In 1909 he was alderman from the 
second ward and the credit for the installation of the present water system is 
due to him more than to any other member of the council. Fraternally he is a 
charter member of Mohawk Lodge, No. 310, K. P. His life has been one of 
industry and upright living, and his sterling qualities of character insure him 
the respect of those who know him. 



JOHN F. HEKEL 



John F. Hekel, devoting his energies to farming and stock-raising in Lib- 
erty township, his home being on section 24, was born in Newton township, 
this county, in 1867, his parents being Julius and ^lary (Cottenburg) Hekel. 
The father's birth occurred near Brussels, Germany, in 1831, while the mother 
was a native of Dubufjue county, Iowa, in 1839. 

"When but a boy Julius Hekel came to the United States in company with his 
parents, who traveled across the country to Iowa, settling in Dubuque county. 
There Julius Hekel worked as a laborer and farm hand until 1851, when he 
came to Buchanan county, settling in Newton township. Here he found the 
conditions usually met with in pioneer districts — raw prairies, uncut timber and 
streams unbridged. He met with all of the hardships and privations incident 
to frontier life, but he was actuated by a strong desire to become the owner 
of a good farm and the difficulties which lie encountered did not deter him. 
In fact, his efforts were an element in the early development and progress of 
this section of the state and he is numbered among those to whom the county 
owes a debt of gratitude for what they accomplished in pioneer times. He was 
also active in early affairs aside from farming, for he assisted in building 
churches and schools and otherwise advancing early improvements. He also 
aided in organizing the township. At the time of his arrival Indians were still 
numerous in this section of the state and they passed to and fro from their 
hunting trips in the north. Deer and lesser game were to be had in abundance. 
Mr. Hekel belonged to the German Methodist church and was active in its 
work, thus contributing to the early moral progress of the community. He 
prospered in a material way, becoming the owner of three hundred and sixty 
acres of rich and valuable land, which he continued to successfully cultivate until 
his death, which occurred in 1886. 

John F. Hekel was one of a family of eight children. He attended the 
rural schools of Newton township and when eighteen years of age began farm- 
ing on his own account on lands given him by his father, and when the father's 
health became such that he was no longer able to carr\^ on the work John F. 
Hekel lived for a time on the old homestead in Newton township and managed 
its cultivation and development. In 1895 he removed to Liberty township, where 
he is now the owner of three hundred and sixty acres of valuable farm land, 
giving his attention to its general supervision and furthf-r improvement. He 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 381 

carefully tills the fields and golden harvests reward his labors. In addition to 
raising cereals he also buys, sells and ships stock and feeds a large number of 
cattle annually. His business interests are carefully managed, for he is wide- 
awake, alert, sagacious and persevering. In addition to his other interests he is 
a stockholder in the State Savings Bank of Quas(iueton. 

On September 3, 1890, Mr. Hekel married Miss Lillian M. Daubenberger, a 
native of Clayton county, Iowa, and a daughter of Frank and Catherine (Rupp) 
Daubenberger. The father was born in Germany in 1839 and died in the year 
1901, while the mother, who was born in Indiana in 1848, still resides in 
Buchanan county. In his boyhood days ]\Ir. Daubenberger came to the United 
States with his parents, who established their home amid the pineries of Wis- 
consin, living there until 1855, when they removed westward to Clayton county, 
Iowa. Frank Daubenberger there remained until 1889, when he came to 
Buchanan county, settling in Middlefield township, owning there one hundred 
and sixty acres of good farm land. In 1907 he retired and took up his abode 
in Newton township, where he was living at the time of his death. In religious 
faith he was a Catholic. 

To Mr. and ^Irs. Hekel have been born three children : Lester C, who 
is at home with his father on the farm, assisting in its cultivation ; and Artie 
M. and Gilbert L., who are attending school. The family is well known and 
the parents have the warm regard of those with whom they have come in 

contact. 

Mr. Hekel is a Mason and is an active member of the Odd Fellows lodge, 
in which he has filled all of the offices. He votes with the republican party, 
has been active in township affairs and has filled several local offices. He belongs 
to the Unity Presbyterian church of Liberty township arid is zealous and helpful 
in its work. His life interests are many and indicate his breadth of thought and 
purpose. He neglects no duties, never fails to meet his obligations and A\asely 
uses his time, talents and opportunities not only for his own benefit but also 
for the public welfare. 



J. D. SWEENEY. 



The history of business development and material growth in Brandon would 
be incomplete were there failure to make prominent reference to J. D. Sweeney, 
who was largely instrumental in organizing the new Farmers State Savings 
Bank of Brandon, of which he is the president. He has also become well kno\ni 
through his active identification with farming interests. He was born in Belle- 
ville. Canada, in 1865, his parents being Michael and Mary (Kilty) Sweeney. 
The father was a native of County Tipperary, Ireland, and upon his emigra- 
tion to the new world settled at Belleville, Canada. He made the trip across 
the Atlantic when a youth of twelve years, in company with his parents, who 
purchased a tract of wild land from the government, securing one hundred 
acres which was covered with timber. The grandfather at once began to cut 
away the trees and clear the fields and there he continued to carry on general 
agricultural pursuits up to the time of his death. 



382 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

Michael Sweeney went from Canada to New York, where he worked at his 
trade for some time, but later removed to Charleston, South Carolina, where 
he spent a few years. He then returned to Canada and was united in inarriage 
to Miss Mary Kilty. Afterward he sold the old home farm in the Dominion 
and removed to Hancock county, Michigan, where he rented a tract of land and 
carried on general agricultural pursuits for four years. In 1870 he arrived in 
Buchanan county and invested in property in Jefferson township, becoming 
the owner of one hundred and sixty acres which is now the home of his son, 
J. D. Sweeney, and upon which he lived to the time of his death. His labors 
wrought a marked transformation in the appearance of the place, for his work 
brought the fields to a high state of cultivation and he added to the farm many 
modern ecpiipments. His political views were in accord with the principles of 
the democratic party and his religious faith was that of the Catholic church. ' 
His wife was a native of Canada, where she was educated and married. She, 
too, spent her last days in Jefferson township. 

J. D. Sweeney was reared under the parental roof and in his boyhood learned 
lessons concerning the value of industry, perseverance and determination. His 
mental discipline was received in the public schools, and after his text-books 
were put aside he learned the carpenter's trade but devoted his time prin- 
cipally to his farm, having a good tract of land on section 15, Jefferson town- 
ship. The soil is naturally rich and productive and the care and labor which 
he bestows upon the place results in good harvests. In addition to tilling the 
soil Mr. Sweeney has become actively interested in financial affairs as president 
of the Farmers State Savings Bank, which he aided in organizing, and also as 
secretary of the Farmers Cooperative Exchange, which deals in grain and live 
stock. He is also interested in timber lands near Morton, Washington, and in 
coal-bearing properties in the same vicinity. 

Mr. Sweeney is unmarrietl and his sister .Martha lives witli him upon the 
farm. His political indorsement is given to the democratic party and he is now 
chairman of the democratic central township committee. He has been secretary 
of the school district for nineteen years and is interested in much that pertains 
to general progress and improvement. He has adhered to the religious faith of 
the family and is a Catholic. 



SAMUEL MILLER. 



Samuel Miller is numbered among the pioneer settlers of this county, he and 
his wife arriving here from the east in 1857. hi the nearly fifty-eight years 
succeeding they have resided here continuously, and they have done their full 
share in the upbuilding and development of this section of their adopted state. 

Mr. ]\Iiller was born in Preble county, Ohio, in May, 1883, a time when the 
Buckeye state itself was on the frontier. In early life he learned the carpenter's 
trade, which he followed till 1856, wlien he embarked in the grocery business at 
Lexington, conducting a store there for a year, when he concluded to try his 
fortune in the new and growing west. His father had been here the previous 
year and had l)ought a small farm near Littleton, wiiich they were to divide. 




SAMUEL MILLER 



HISTORY OF BLX'HAXAX COUNTY 385 

Samuel Miller had only recently been married, and his small savings were barely 
enough to bring himself and wife west and make the first payment on their land. 
Without teams or farming tools, he turned his attention to his old trade, working 
in connection with his brother, David. There are still houses and barns standing 
in the vicinity of Littleton which they constructed in the '50s and '60s, cutting 
and hewing lumber from the native timber for framework that has defied time. 
Those truly were times that tried men's souls. The 3'ear following their arrival 
came an almost total crop failure, along with the hard times consequent upon 
the money panic. Wildcat money received one day was apt to be no good the 
next, and there was almost no specie in circulation. For his carpenter work 
Mr. Miller was largely paid in barter, corn, provisions, etc. Many a grist of corn 
and wheat he carried a mile and a half to the old Littleton mill, then carried 
home his flour or meal. Although their little house had real lumber siding, the 
shingles were sawed and dressed down from native oak, and the beds, tables and 
other furniture were almost wholly his own handiwork from native trees. They 
were homesick almost to death, but were without the money to go back to Ohio, 
and had to remain here. Little by little, by means of hard labor and the closest 
economy, they began to gain. Mr. [Miller of this review finally got an ox team, 
later a horse, then a team, and with these enough machinery to work his little 
farm, gradually giving up his trade for agriculture. Forty-nine years ago he 
bought the farm he still owns, moving on to it the next year. Occasionally he 
added to his land holdings and began to work into stock-raising. He was one of 
the early cattle feeders of his locality, and almost the first farmer there to ship 
stock of his own feeding to the Chicago market. 

In 1884, their three sons and one daughter having grown to mature years 
and prepared to start in life for themselves, Mr. and Mrs. ^liller rented the old 
home place and moved into the home in Independence, where they have since 
lived. Shortly afterward he engaged in ])uying live stock, in which he has been 
interested almost continuously since, for fifteen years past as senior member of 
the firm of Miller & Son, his partner being his eldest son, A. P. Miller. When 
the latter was elected to the board of supervisors they sold their Independence 
stock business, but a year or two later bought the Doris elevator, with the 
accompanying grain, live stock, coal, flour and feed business, which they still 
continue to carry on, although both live in Independence. 

Fifty-nine years ago at West Alexander, Ohio, Mr. Miller was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Sarah A. Wikle, who was born in that state in 1834 and survives, 
after almost sixty years of faithful companionship. At eighty-one and eighty 
years of age respectively they enjoy better health than is usual at their age. 
Mr. Miller is particularly well preserved. His mind is keen and active, and he 
takes a live interest in public matters as well as in business. They became the 
parents of four children, all of whom survive: Alonzo P., a stock and grain 
buyer, who has served the county two terms on the board of supervisors ; Mattie E.. 
the wife of AY. G. Stevenson, cashier of the First National Bank; William C, a 
practicing physician in Independence, and Warren F., editor of the Independence 
Conservative. 

It is seldom that one of :Mr. [Miller's years remains active in business, and 
his record should put to shame any man of much fewer years who, grown weary 
of the struggles and burdens that he should bear, would relegate his duties to 



386 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

others. While living in the county he has served as a member of the board of 
supervisors and filled a number of township offices, discharging his duties with 
promptness and fidelity. The religious faith of his wife and himself is that of 
the Presbyterian church, in the work of which they have been active and helpful, 
guiding their lives by its teachings. 



J. D. NABHOLZ. 



J. D. Nabhok, carefully, systematically and successfully carrying on general 
farming in Jefferson township, his home being on section 36, was born in 
Homer township, this county, in 1865, his parents being David and Susan 
(Kronmiller) Nabholz. The father's birth occurred in Germany in 1836, his 
parents being Paul and ^larj- Nabholz. His youthful days were spent in Wit- 
tenberg, Germany, where his education was acquired, and in 1854, when eighteen 
years of age, attracted by the opportunities of the new world, he came to the 
United States. He settled first near Rochester, New York, and there worked 
as a farm hand for six years, after which he made his way westward to Iowa, 
traveling l)y wagon across the country to Jefferson township, Buchanan county, 
where he purchased forty acres of land which he at once began to cultivate and 
improve. His place was situated near Independence. Subsequently he rented 
a farm five miles to the north. 

In 1863 ]\Ir. Nabholz married .Miss Susan Kronmiller, a daughter of Jacob 
and Margaret Kronmiller. Following their marriage they settled upon a farm 
ill the southwestern part of Homer township, where later Mr. Nabholz pur- 
chased one hundred and twenty acres of land at ten dollars per acre. Upon 
that farm lie remained until 1869, when he sold the property and removed 
to Linn county, Iowa, purchasing one hundred and twenty acres upon which 
he resided for seven years. He then traded that property for a farm in Jeffer- 
son township, Buchanan county, of three hundred and sixteen acres, which he 
continued to cultivate and develop until 181)!). He then removed to Brandon and 
bought a small farm of twenty-seven acres upon which he spent his i-emaining 
days, his death occurring January 23, 1906. His interest in the political situa- 
tion of the country led him to give earnest support to the republican party and 
he guided his life by the teachings of the German Evangelical church, of which 
he was a member. His wife was a native of Montgomery county, Ohio, born 
January 21, 1843, and with her parents she went to Linn county, Iowa, in 
her ehildhood days, the family driving across the country with a team. The 
father purcliased land and improved his property, thereon making his home 
until 1880, when he sold out and went to independence, where he purchased 
a residence and lived retired until the death of his wife iu 1889. He afterward 
made his lioiiie with his daughter, ^Irs. Hemphill, at Lafayette, Iowa, until 
his demise November 6, 1894. 

J. D. Nabholz spent his boyhood in Linn and Buchanan eounties, attending 
school in both counties. He lived upon his father's farm until he reached 
the age of twenty-six years and then took up his abode in Jefferson township, 
this county, where he l)egan farming on his own account. He was married in 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 387 

1890 to Miss Jennie Briggs, a daughter of Jonathan and Rachel (Roszell) 
Briggs. Her father was born in Belvidere, Illinois, in 1842, and with his par- 
ents went to Missouri, where he lived for some time. He made the journey to 
Benton county, Iowa, in a covered wagon and there on the 23d of March, 1866, 
he wedded Miss Rachel Roszell, a daughter of Hiram and Mary (Doles) Roszell,' 
after which he rented a farm which he occupied for some time. Later he came 
to Buchanan county and purchased a farm upon which he and his wife continued 
to reside until their deaths. Mrs. Briggs passed away November 1, 1912, when 
about sixty-six years old, and the death of Mr. Briggs occurred on the 4th of 
March, 1913, when he was seventy-one years of age. 

Following their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Nabholz took up their abode upon a 
farm of eighty acres which he purchased and to which he added until he had 
one hundred and sixty acres. In 1899 he traded this property with his father 
and returned to the old homestead, upon which he now resides, having one of 
the most thoroughly up-to-date, progressive and well developed farms of Jeffer- 
son township, lacking in none of the accessories and conveniences of a model 
farm of the twentieth century. As the years have gone on, Mr. Nabholz has 
prospered and his success is evidenced in the fact that he is now the owner of 
three hundred and thirty-six acres of rich and valuable land. 

To him and his wife have been born two children, Edith and Millard, both 
yet at home. In his political views Mr. Nabholz is a republican. Fraternally 
he is connected with the Masons at Vinton, Iowa, and his religious faith is that 
of the Methodist Episcopal church. High and honorable principles have invari- 
ably guided him and have been manifest in his straightforward business dealings 
and in all of his relations with his fellowmen. 



W. F. STUMMA. 



W. F. Stumma is a prosperous farmer of Westburg township living on sec- 
tion 34. He dates his residence in Iowa from 1867, arriving here when a lad 
of but eleven years, his birth having occurred in Wisconsin in 1856. His parents 
were Frederick W. and Ernestina Stumma. The father, who was born in 
Hanover, Germany, in 1820, spent the period of his minority in that country 
and in 1844 crossed the Atlantic to the United States, making his way to Wis- 
consin. In 1846 he enlisted for service as a private in the Mexican war, becom- 
ing a member of Company K of the Wisconsin Infantry. When the city of 
Mexico was captured he climbed the wall and was one of the first men to get 
inside the city. He served under General Winfield Scott. When the war was 
over he returned to Wisconsin and the government in recognition of his serv- 
ices gave him a land warrant for one hundred and sixty acres, whicli he located 
in Sheboygan. He at once began to improve the tract and lived thereon until 
1867, when he sold that property and came to Buchanan county, settling in Jef- 
ferson township, where he purchased ninety acres of land. He was thereafter 
engaged in the further development of that place until his death, which occurred 
when he was sixty-six years of age. The community found in him a worthy 
and representative citizen and reliable business man. His political faith was 



388 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

that of the republican party and his religious belief that of the German Lutheran 
church. 

Mrs. F. W. Stumma was born in Berlin, Germany, in 1832, and in 1840 was 
brought to America by her parents, who settled in Sheboygan county, Wis- 
consin, Avhere they purchased land. She there resided up to the time of her 
marriage and afterward accompanied her husband to this state. She survives 
and is now living in Jefferson township. Her parents both passed away in 
Sheboygan county, Wisconsin, her father in 1860 and her mother in 1892 at the 
advanced age of ninety-two years. 

W, F. Stumma was largely reared on the old homestead farm on which his 
parents took up their abode on coming to Iowa. His education, begun in the 
public schools of Wisconsin, was continued in the public schools of this st&te, 
and when not busy with his text-books his attention was mainly given to the 
farm work, so that broad practical experience cpialified him for carrjdng on 
farming on his own account when he started out in life independently. 

It was in 1886 that Mr. Stumma was united in marriage to Miss ^laggie 
Schulte, a daughter of Arndt and Augusta (Gosse) Schulte, of Jefferson town- 
ship. Following his marriage Mr. Stumma purchased a tract of land of eighty 
acres in Westburg to^\^lship whereon he has since made his home. He has 
brought his fields to a high state of cultivation and has added many modern 
equipments to his farm. He has good l)uildings upon the place, his barns 
furnishing ample shelter for grain and stock, and his land is divided into fields 
of convenient size by well kept fences. As the years went by a daughter came 
to bless their home, Eva May, now Mrs. Nevin Shane, of Jesup. 

In his political views Mr. Stumma is an earnest republican, doing all in his 
power to promote the growth and insure the success of the party, which has 
called him to various local offices. He was township trustee for four years, 
was road supervisor for four years and for fourteen years has served as school 
director, the cause of education finding in him a stalwart champion. He belongs 
to the German Lutheran church and his aid and influence are always given on 
the side of progress, reform, justice and truth. The spirit of advancement has 
ever actuated him and he was the first farmer to own an automobile in Buchanan 
county and also among the first to secure certain kinds of improved machinery. 
As the years have gone by his business affairs have been conducted so carefully 
and wisely that he now not only owns a good farm property in Westburg 
township but also attractive residence property in Independence and in Jesup. 



E. D. CORN^VELL. 



E. D. Cornwell has been a lifelong resident of Sumner township and is now 
the owner of one hundred and thirteen acres of the original Cornwell homestead, 
which has been in possession of the family for about forty-nine years. He was 
born in Independence on the 11th of April 1868, his parents being Charles 
E. and Sarah J. (Carpenter) Cornwell, both of wliom Avere natives of New 
York. The father was born at IMiddlebery, April 30, 1841, and the mother's 
birth occurred in Warsaw, Wyoming county, August 17, 1844. ^Ir. Cornwell 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 389 

was the owner of one himdred acres of land in New York, but, thinking to 
find still better opportunities in the growing west, he came to Iowa in Sep- 
tember, 1865, and resided in Independence until he could erect buildings and 
otherwise prepare his farm for occupancy. He went to ^Michigan, where he was 
married, and then brought his bride to his new home. He and his brother had 
first come to Buchanan county, making the trip by wagon, but when the family 
removed to the west the railroads were being built. On the first trip, however, 
there was no railroad bridge at Dubuque and they crossed the ice on sleighs. 
On leaving Independence Mr. Corn well took up his abode upon a farm three 
miles south of the city, in Sumner township. There were eight children in his 
father's family and practically all of them removed to the west in the early 
days, becoming actively identified with the pioneer development of different 
sections. 

Following his removal to the farm Charles E. Corn well continuously and 
successfully cultivated his laud until his life's labors were ended in death on 
the 15th of October, 1891, when he was fifty years of age. He had held local 
township offices, but he always preferred to concentrate his energies upon his 
business affairs and lived a quiet, unassuming but useful life. His widow sur- 
vives and is living with her son in Sumner township at the age of seventy 
years. There were but two children in the family and the daughter, Gertrude, 
also resides with her mother and brother in Buchanan county. 

E. D. Cornwell largely acquired his education in public school Xo. 6 in 
Sumner township, but for a short period while visiting an aunt he attended 
school in Cleveland, Ohio. Practically his entire life has been spent on the 
old home place, where he now resides, and through the period of his youth his 
time was divided between the acquirement of an education and the Avork of the 
fields. When his father's health became impaired E. D. Cornwell assumed the 
management of the farm and has since carried on general agricultural pursuits 
and stock-raising. He now has one hundred and thirteen acres of the original 
homestead and his place is a valuable farm property, splendidly improved with 
all modern improvements and accessories. His home is one of the finest in the 
township and there are also large and substantial barns and outbuildings for 
the shelter of grain and stock. In fact, this is one of the best improved farms 
in the county, thoroughly modern and up-to-date in every particular. His resi- 
dence is built in attractive style of architecture and supplied with every con- 
venience. 

In 1902 Mr. Cornwell was united in marriage to Miss Cora McGrew, who 
was born in Legrand, Iowa, a daughter of A. H. and Lydia J. (Hiatt) McGrew. 
Her father was born in Ohio in 1848 and his life record covered the inter- 
vening years to the 5th of October, 1903. The mother, who was born in 1846. 
is now living in Whittier, California. At an early day A. H. McGrew came to 
this state and lived for a time in Marshalltown and also in Oskaloosa. He after- 
wards established his home in Sumner township, Buchanan county, and still 
later lived in Independence. At the time of his death he was a resident of 
Manchester, Iowa, where he had been a news dealer. He and his wife were 
members of the Society of Friends, or Quakers, and were married according to 
the ceremony of that sect. Later, however, they united with the Methodist 
church, in the work of which they took an active part. Unto Mr. and IMrs. 



390 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

Cornwell have been born three children : Charles Edward and Helen Marian, 
who are attending school in Sumner township ; and Ruth Elizabeth. 

Mr. Cornwell holds membership with the Odd Fellows and the Woodmen 
of the World and in both has filled the various offices in the local lodges. His 
entire life has been passed in Buchanan county and the work instituted by his 
father has been carried on by him. He has ever been dominated by the spirit of 
enterprise and progress and is today one of the progressive farmers and valued 
citizens of Sumner township. 



SAMPSON C. HITTLE. 



Sampson C. Hittle, deceased, carried on general farming in Washington 
township for many years. He was born in Nachusa township, Lee county, 
Illinois, December 27, 1847, and is the seventh in order of birth in a family of 
eight children whose parents were Jacob and Nancy (Culp) Hittle, both of 
whom were natives of Somerset county, Pennsylvania. The former was born 
in 1804 and the latter in 1808. In Pennsylvania the father engaged in business 
as a teamster until 1840, when he moved westward to Lee county, Illinois. 
There he turned his attention to farming and became the owner of two hundred 
acres of good land. In addition to cultivating the fields in the production of 
crops best adapted to soil and climate, he engaged in the raising of fine Morgan 
horses. His political belief was that of the republican party and he took an 
active and helpful interest in its work. His religious faith was that of the 
German Baptist church, and his life ever measured up to high standards of 
honor and manhood. He died in the year 1877, survived by his wife for five 
years, her death occurring in 1882, in Illinois, as had his. They had one son, 
Alexander P., who came to Iowa in 1863 and enlisted in the Ninth Iowa Cavalry, 
of which he became a sergeant. He had his second finger shot off in the battle 
of Shiloh, but he recovered from his injuries and lived until 1883. George W. 
Hittle, another son, was wounded and died in battle at Perryville, Kentucky. 

In taking up the personal history of Sampson C. Hittle, we present to our 
readers the life record of one who was widely and favorably known in this 
county by reason of his active connection with public affairs as well as agri- 
cultural interests. He was educated in the conunon schools and through the 
summer months aided his father in the work of the fields, thus gaining practical 
experience in the best methods of tilling the soil. He remained upon the home 
farm until twenty- two years of age and then began cultivating his father's land 
on his own account. In addition to general farming he raised shorthorn cattle 
and made a specialty of Poland-China hogs. He remained a resident of Illinois 
until February, 1884, and then removed to Buchanan county, Iowa, where he 
so lived as to win the high regard and good will of all of his fellow citizens. In 
the year of his arrival he purchased land and was the owner of one hundred 
and sixteen acres in Washington township, which ho cultivated with the aid 
of his son. 

On the 5th of February, 1874, Mr. Hittle was united in marriage to Miss 
Caroline Albright, who was born in Somerset county, Pennsylvania, a daughter 





MR. AND JNIRS. 8AMP80X C. HITTLE 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 393 

of Frederick A. and Caroline (Specht) Albright, both of whom were natives 
of Germany and came to America in childhood. They were married in Penn- 
sylvania, where Mr. Albright followed the carpenter's trade, but after their 
removal to Illinois he turned his attention to farming. His political allegiance 
was given to the democratic party and he held membership in the Lutheran 
church. His family numbered thirteen children, of whom Mrs. Hittle was the 
fourth in order of birth. The father died in 1900, at the age of eighty-two 
years, and the mother passed away in 1902, at the age of seventj^-five years. To 
Mr. and Mrs. Hittle were born seven children : Anna, the wife of W. A. Robin- 
son, a farmer and horseman of Buchanan county, by whom she has four children, 
Myrtle, Lucius, Wilmer and Palmer ; Elva, the wife of Palmer Ramsey, a retired 
farmer of Independence, by whom she has one child, Ruth Atta ; May, who is a 
professional nurse; Harry L., a farmer of Leo, Alberta, Canada; iNIinnie, at 
home ; Edna, the wife of Park AValker, a farmer of Hewitt, Minnesota, by whom 
she has one child, Delbart; and Arthur, who operates the home farm, which 
presents a neat and thrifty appearance, indicating his careful supervision and 
practical methods. 

Mr. Hittle was a stanch republican in his political views, active in the work 
of the party, and he held some minor township offices. The religious faith 
of himself and family is that of the Presbyterian church and they are people 
of sterling worth who display many admirable traits of character and rank 
high in the community in which they reside. They are living lives of usefulness 
and Avorth, and their many splendid qualities have gained for them high regard. 



FRED RETZ. 



Fred Retz, a successful stockman and prominent citizen of Lamont, is 
entitled to honor as a self-made man, his prosperity being due to his well directed 
labor. He was born near Berne, Switzerland, on the 20th of January, 1861, a 
son of Jacob and Mary (Heddicker) Retz, who in 1872 brought their family to 
the United States. They located first at Elkader. Iowa, where they lived for 
a short time and then removed to Elgin, Fayette county, Iowa, where they resided 
for many years. While there the father engaged in the sawmill business. In 
1884 the family located on a farm near Manchester in Delaware county. In 
1904 the father retired and the family removed to Lamont. He died there in 
1908 at the age of seventy-three years and was survived three years by his 
wife, who died in 1911 when about the same age. They were Lutherans in 
religious belief. To their union were born eight children, of whom five are 
living. The youngest died in childhood at Manchester. Mrs. Ada Ryan lives 
in Lamont. Mrs. Hedwick Ryan is the wife of a farmer of Delaware county. 
Amiel and Albert are both farmers of that county. Mrs. IVIary Stone resides 
in Buchanan county. Jacob, who died in 1910, was a farmer of Fayette county. 
Fred completes the family. 

Fred Retz attended school in his native country and after emigrating to 
the United States was a student in night school for a time but his educational 
advantages were somewhat limited. Although his scholastic training was rather 



Vol 11—18 



394 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

> 

meager, he received thorough instruction in the best methods of farming and 
through actual experience became familiar with all of the varied work to be 
done upon a farm. After reaching mature years he continued to cultivate the 
fields and was very successful in that occupation. He still owns three hundred 
and thirty acres of fine land, two hundred and fifty acres on section 2, Fremont 
township, and eighty acres in Madison township, adjoining Lamont. He now 
leases this property. In 1900 he moved to Lamont in order to give his family 
the advantages of the schools of the town, as he realizes the necessity of a 
good education if one is to win success in the present day. He owns a garage 
in Lamont and is vice presicTent of the Farmers Savings Bank, which he aided 
in organizing. He is a man of marked business ability and succeeds in what- 
ever he undertakes. 

Mr. Retz was united in marriage in 1886 in Buchanan county to Miss ^lary 
Stone, a native of Delaware county and a daughter of the late E. D. Stone, 
a pioneer of this part of Iowa, who died in 1911 at the advanced age of eighty- 
five years. He was very active and the owner of a fine farm of three hundred 
and twenty acres. His widow, who is eighty-five years old. resides upon the 
homestead. To Mr. and Mrs. Retz have been born five children, all natives of 
Buchanan county, namely: ]\Iabel. the wife of Alonzo Jenks of Lamont; Elsie, 
the wife of Roy Halleck, of Waterloo, l)y whom she has two sons; Earl, who 
manages his father's garage at Lamont; Hazel, assistant cashier in the Farmers 
Savings Bank of Lamont ; and Howard, at home. 

Mr. Retz is independent in i)olitics and lias been so ])usy with his individual 
affairs that he has never accepted office except that of school director. Socially 
he belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Knights of Pythias 
and his wife and daughters are members of the Rebekahs and the Pythian 
Sisters. He is one of the substantial and well-to-do residents of Lamont and has 
the satisfaction of knowing tliat all that he has accom})lished.is due to his 9wn 
sound judgment and persevering labor. In achieving success he has followed 
methods that are above suspicion, and he holds the untjualified respect of all who 
know him. 



JOHN JOSEPH NEV. 



John Joseph Ney, a member of the Iowa bar enjoying a state-wide reputa- 
tion and since June, 1912. senior partner in the law firm of Ney & Bradley of 
Iowa City, was born in Sandusky, Ohio, June 8, 1852, a son of Patrick and 
Ann (Corcoran) Ney, who were natives of Ireland. After coming to America 
the father was employed largely at farm labor for a time. In New York city 
he was married and afterward removed with his wife to Ohio, where he entered 
upon the business of contracting. He graded several miles of the Pittsburgh, 
Fort Wayne & Chicago Railroad and later purchased a farm at Areola, a station 
on the road eight miles west of Fort Wayne, Indiana. Upon that farm were 
born the following children : Edward. Mary A., Sara C, Patrick K.. Michael J. 
and C. W., all of whom are yet living. 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 395 

In 1872 the family removed to the Ney farm in Newton township, Buchanan 
county, Iowa, and Patrick Ney, the father, continued as a successful farmer 
and contractor up to the time of his death. He came to this state from 
Indiana with a complete railroading outfit and graded the heavy work on what 
is now the Illinois Central west of Winthrop. When the company became 
financially embarrassed and was unable to pay off the men Mr. Ney, although 
not personally responsible, was liable for this debt, paid off his men and moved 
the railroading outfit to Austin, Minnesota. He afterward sold out his interest 
in a contract there and returned to his home in Indiana. Later he enlisted for 
service as a private in the Fifth Indiana Battery of Light Artillery and follow- 
ing his return from the war engaged as a contractor on the Fort Wayne, Jackson 
& Saginaw, the Fort AVayne & Grand Rapids and the Fort Wayne, Muncie & 
Cincinnati Railroads. He also built the Baker street and Clinton street sewers 
in Fort Wayne and completed a contract on the Grand Trunk Railroad in 
Michigan and another contract on the Paducah & Elizabethtown Railroad in 
Kentucky. He constructed the abutments of a bridge at Fairbank and Quas- 
({ueton in Buchanan county in 1871 and was a pioneer in the use of the prairie 
boulder for bridge work. He completed an important contract for the state of 
California on the Sacramento river, known as the debris work, and returned 
to his Iowa home again, subsequent to which time he made a visit to the scenes 
of his childhood in Ireland. Later he again came to Iowa and died at Dubu(iue 
in 1892, his remains being interred in the Catholic cemetery at Independence. 
Mrs. Ney was a sterling wife and mother and a most valuable helpmate. Both 
were enterprising, industrious, energetic people and they reared and educated 
a large family who are now^ a credit to their name. 

John J. Ney, spending his youthful days under the parental roof, devoted 
his attention to the acquirement of an education, supplementing his study in 
the schools by a law course and thus winning admission to the bar on the 9t.h 
of September, 1875. He became a member of the firm of Lake, Harmon & Ney 
and later formed the firm of Burchart & Ney. In 1884 he was elected circuit 
judge to fill out the unexpired term of B. W. Lacy and in 1886 was elected 
district judge and again chosen to that office in 1890. He resigned to accept 
the position of resident professor of law in the Iowa State University in 1894 
and upon removing to Iowa City formed a law partnership with Milton Remley, 
the then recently elected attorney general of the state. IMr. Ney continued 
in law practice as a member of that firm and also filled the position of resident 
professor through the four succeeding years. His partnerehip witli ^Ir. Remley 
was dissolved in 1904, after which Judge Ney continued alone in practice until 
June, 1912, when the present law firm of Ney & Bradley was formed at Iowa 
City. He is an eminent member of the l)ar of this state and his record on the 
bench is in harmony with his record as a man and lawyer, being characterized 
by the utmost fidelity to duty and a masterful grasp of every pro])lem presented 
for solution. His knowledge of the law is comprehensive and exact and his 
growing ability has brought him to a place of distinction among the leading 
attorneys of Iowa. He served as city attorney of Independence in 1877 and as 
mayor in 1878, and save for the last named position his official service has always 
been along the strict path of his profession. His political aHegiance has ever 
been given to the democratic party. 



396 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

At Chicago, on the 3d of October, 1878, Judge Ney was united in marriage 
to Miss Emily Frances Colby, a daughter of Abram Maher and Mary A. Colby. 
To this marriage there were born the following named : Marian, Francis J., 
Philip R., Genevieve F. and John J., all born in Buchanan county before the 
removal to Iowa City. The eldest son was married to Miss Ora Hewitt, of 
Sidney, New York, in 1913, and they now reside in Minneapolis, Minnesota. 
Mrs. Emily Ney passed away in 1893 and was laid to rest in Independence. 
On the 20th of February, 1904, at Iowa City, Judge Ney wedded Anastasia 
Mullin, a daughter of William and Ellen Mullin, of Iowa City. 

The religious faith of Judge Ney and his family is that of the Catholic 
church. He has membership in the Commercial Club and in the Elks Club of 
Iowa City. He is widely known throughout the state as an able and learned 
lawyer, and in a profession where advancement depends entirely upon individual 
merit he has worked his way upward until he occupies today a commanding 
position among the leading lawyers of the Iowa bar. 



JOHN BERKIDUE. 



John Berridge is a retired farmer living in Lamont l)ut still owns a farm 
of two hundred and forty acres on sections 20 and 21, Madison township, which 
is operated by his son, and one hundred and sixty acres in Fayette county, Iowa. 
He was born near Union Mills. Indiana, January 17, 1849, a son of William and 
Sarah (Miller) Berridge. The former was born in Cranfield, England, in 1830,' 
and in the early '40s came to America, settling in Ohio. He subsequently 
removed to Michigan, making his iiome in Sturgis, that state. In 1861 he 
located in Illinois and in 1907 he passed away in Pecatonica, that state. He 
was nuirried in Ohio to Miss Sarah Miller, who was also born in Cranfield, 
England, in 1832, and who passed away in l^ecatonica, Illinois, in 1912. To 
their union were ])orn four children: Susie, deceased; George, who is living 
at Bangor, JMichigan ; Joseph, deceased; and John of this review. 

When still a child the last named accompanied his parents to Michigan and 
later moved with them to Illinois. He remained at home until twenty years 
of age, when he came to Lamont. Iowa. He was pleased with conditions here 
and for five or six years rented land in the vicinity of Lamont. At the end 
of that time he purchased the farm of two hundred and forty acres which he 
still owns and devoted his time and energy to its cultivation until 1903. In 
that year he retired and moved to Lamont, where he now resides. During his 
active life he was a thoroughly alert and progres.sive farmer and realized a 
gratifying profit annually from the sale of his grain and stock. 

In 1873 Mr. Berridge was united in nuirriage with Miss Eliza Rowse, a daugh- 
ter of Joseph and Mary (Wood) Rowse. The father was liorn in England in 
1832 and passed away in Manchester, Delaware county, Iowa, in 1899. His 
wife was born in New York state, of German descent, in 1834, and died at Man- 
chester, Iowa. To their union were born six children : Eliza, now ]\Irs. Berridge ; 
George, a resident of Aurora ; William, whose home is in Canada ; Mary Ann, 
deceased; Hattie. living in Sioux City. Iowa; and Lottie, a resident of Oelwein. 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 397 

To Mr. and Mrs. Berridge were born five childi-en : LeRoy Earl, the oldest, 
was born April 7, 1874, and died on the 13th of the following October. Graced 
born November 3, 1875, is married and lives in Glidden, Iowa. Albert, born 
November 4, 1878, is married and resides on the home place. Laura, born 
September 12, 1881, engaged in teaching in western Iowa for a time but is 
now the wife of C. G. Curtis, a resident of De Smet, South Dakota. Robert, 
born November 1, 1887, died in Des Moines when twenty-one years of age. 

Mr. and Mrs. Berridge belong to the Methodist Episcopal church, are active 
workers in the cause of religion, and he is president of the board of church 
trustees. He is a republican in politics and fraternally belongs to Lamont Lodge, 
No. 656, I. 0. 0. F. Mrs. Berridge is a member of the Royal Neighbors and is 
also a member of the Woman's Relief Corps of Lamont. He is connected with 
a number of the business interests of the town, being a director of the Lamont 
Savings Bank and president of the local creamery. He has not only won 
financial success but has also gained the respect of his fellow citizens, who 
esteem him as a man of incorruptible integrity and of marked public spirit. 



SAM KANOUSE. 



Sam Kanouse. numbered among the prosperous, representative and progres- 
sive agriculturists of Jefferson township, owns and operates a valuable farm of 
one hundred and sixty acres on section 33. His birth there occurred on the 
15th of February, 1866, his parents being Benjamin and Elizabeth (Monbeck) 
Kanouse. The father was born on a farm in Ohio on the 27th of June, 1827, and 
acquired his education in the public schools of that state. On the 23d of 
October, 1851, he wedded Miss Elizabeth Monbeck and during the next two 
years operated a rented farm. Subsequently he came to Buchanan county, Iowa, 
entering a forty-acre tract of government land in Jefferson township Avhich he 
improved and on w^iich he made his home for two years. On the expiration 
of that period he returned to the Buckeye state, where he operated a rented 
farm for two years and then again came to Jefferson township, this county, 
taking up his abode on the farm of forty acres which he had entered from the 
government and residing thereon for a number of years. Subsequently he dis- 
posed of the property and for a short time cultivated a rented tract in the 
vicinity, while later he purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land south 
of Brandon, in Jefferson township, whereon he spent the remainder of his life. 
His demise occurred on the 20th of February, 1893, and the community thus 
lost one of its representative agriculturists and respected citizens. His wife 
passed away soon afterward. She was also a native of Ohio and was reared and 
educated in that state. 

Sam Kanouse spent the days of his boyhood and youth on the old home farm 
near Brandon and attended the public schools in the acquirement of an educa- 
tion. General agricultural pursuits have claimed his time and energies through- 
out his entire business career and he has always remained on the old homestead, 
operating the same in accordance with the most practical and modern methods. 
He is likewise interested in a threshing outfit operated from Brandon and has. 



398 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

long been numbered among the enterprising and progressive citizens of his 
native county. 

In his political views ]\Ir. Kanouse is a democrat and is widely recognized as 
a loyal and public-spirited citizen who does everything in his power to promote 
the general welfare. He owns stock in the new electric railroad running between 
Waterloo and Cedar Rapids, Iowa. His entire life has been spent in Buchanan 
county, and he enjoys an extensive and favorable acquaintance ^\'ithin its bor- 
ders, so that this record cannot fail to prove of interest to many of our readers. 



JOHN FEST. 



The life record of John Fest indicates what may be accomplished when energj' 
and industry lead the way. Although he started out as a farm hand working at 
a small salary, he is today the owner of six hundred acres of rich land situated 
in Newton township, his home place being on section 9, where he has lived for 
more than three decades. 

He was born in Dubuque county, January 15, 1857, and comes of German 
ancestry, his parents, Charles and Louisa (Klotz) Fest, both being natives of 
Germany. The father crossed the Atlantic when thirty-three years of age and 
settled in Galena, Illinois. He was a mason by trade and became a master 
mechanic. After emigi^ating to the new world he worked at his trade until 1867. 
After living for some time in Dubuque county, Iowa, he went to Wisconsin, where 
he owned forty acres of land. He employed a man to cultivate his fields, while 
he continued to work at his trade, and in 1867 he came to Buchanan county, 
where he purchased eight}^ acres of wild land covered with brush, the tract being 
situated in Newton township and constituting a part of the present possessions 
of his son John. With characteristic energy the father began the development 
of this place and continued to break the sod, till the fields and cultivate his crops 
until 1880, when he retired and returned to German}-, where he spent his remain- 
ing days, his death occurring in 1889. His wife was but two years of age when 
brought to the United States and her last days were spent in Decatur county, 
Iowa, where she passed away in 1900. 

John Fest was reared and educated in Cassville, Wisconsin, and with his 
parents came to Iowa upon their return to this state. He remained with them 
until 1879, when he began working as a farm hand, being employed in that way 
for five and a half years. He next rented the old home place, which he cultivated 
for two years, after Avhich he purchased one hundred and sixt.v acres of the farm, 
which is located on section 9, Newton township. With characteristic energy he 
began its further development, and improvement and today has one of the best 
improved properties in the county. He has cultivated this farm continuously 
since September, 1883, and understands thoroughly the best methods of tilling 
the soil and producing his crops. This is evidenced in the fact that success in 
substantial measure has attended his efforts, eiia])ling him to add from time to 
time to his holdings until his possessions now aggregate six hundred acres of rich 
land, most of which is in Newton township. He is engaged in the raising of 
thoroughbred Aberdeen Angus cattle, Belgian horses and Duroc Jersey hogs 




JOHN FEST 



I 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY > 401 

and his live-stock interests are an important feature of his business, adding 
materially to his annual income. He is also a stockholder in the Robinson 
Lumber Company at Robinson, Iowa. 

On the 12th of September, 1883, Mr. Fest was united in marriage to ]\Iiss 
Janet A. Ironsides, a daughter of James and Matilda A. (Fike) Ironsides. The 
father, a native of Scotland, crossed the Atlantic to Canada in early life and in 
1852 came to Iowa, settling in Newton township, Buchanan county, where he 
purchased land and devoted his remaining days to general agi'icultural pursuits. 
He died June 19, 1908, at the advanced age of eighty-six years, and his wife, a 
native of Canada, passed away January 19, 1909, at the age of seventy-five years. 
Mr. and Mrs. Fest became the parents of six children, as follows : Alva James, 
who resides at home and operates one of his father's farms; Matilda A., who 
gave her hand in marriage to AVilliam J. Frank, an agriculturist of Newton town- 
ship; Julia M., who is the wife of George W. Franck, also a farmer of Newton 
township ; Mary E., a maiden of thirteen summers ; Ralph E., who is eleven years 
of age ; and Grace, who passed away in June, 1899. 

;Mr. Fest is the oldest member of the Odd Fellows society living in this section 
of the county, his membership being in the lodge at Troy Mills. He also has 
membership in the Modem Woodmen of America and in the Protestant Methodist 
church, while politically he is a republican. His has been an active, busy and 
useful life. He has never allowed obstacles nor difficulties to bar his path, 
regarding them rather as an impetus for renewed effort. He has worked with 
unfaltering purpose and indefatigable euergj^ to achieve success and his life 
record should serv'e as a source of inspiration and encouragement to others, show- 
ing what may be accomplished when there is a will to dare and to do and when 
laudable ambition finds expression in intelligently directed effort. 



LOUIS H. DESTIVAL. 



Louis H. Destival was born in Buchanan county in 1871 and is a repre- 
sentative of one of the old pioneer families, established here in 1859. At the 
present time he is carrying on general farming and stock-raising and makes 
his home in Hazleton township. His father, Charles E. Destival, was born in 
Switzerland in 1833 and his grandparents were Isaac and Susan Destival, also 
natives of the land of the Alps. 

When fifteen years of age Charles E. Destival came to the United States 
and was employed iji the east in a brickyard. In 1853 he arrived in Iowa, 
journeying westward with an emigrant train of ox teams and wagons. He 
began work on the railroad which Avas then being l)uilt from Dubuque to 
Manchester, and in 1859 he came to Independence, where he was employed 
in a brewery until 1861. The following year he was married and in 1863 he 
left his young wife for active service at the front, having enlisted in Company 
K of the Ninth Iowa Cavalry, under Captain Shawhan of Sigourney. He 
served for two years, lacking five weeks, and was largely engaged in scout 
duty and in fighting bushwhackers. On one occasion he had his horse shot from 



402 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

under him but personally sustained no injuries. He became a second cor- 
poral and color bearer and made a most creditable military record through 
his loyalty and bravery. He now maintains pleasant relations with his old 
army comrades through his membership in the Grand Army of the Republic. 
After the close of the war he returned to Buchanan county, where he engaged 
in farming and also in clearing land for his neighbors, ridding it of brush and 
timber. He still owns farm property in this county and for many years was 
actively engaged in tilling the soil, but for the past decade has lived retired 
in Hazleton. Prior to the Civil war he gave his political allegiance to the demo- 
cratic party, but in 1860 he voted for Abraham Lincoln and has since supported 
the republican party. 

In 1862 Charles E. Destival was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth 
Eldridge, who was born in Syracuse county, New York, in 1846. Her father, 
also a native of the Empire state, bom in 1813, died in 1867. His wife, Mrs. 
Saliua Eldridge, was likewise a native of New York. ]\Ir. Eldridge followed 
farming in the east until 1854, when he came to Iowa, settling on the present 
site of Oelwein, although the town was not established at that time. His wife 
taught the first school in Oelwein. He afterward removed to Independence 
and later lived in Hazleton township to the time of his death. He Avas a demo- 
crat in politics and filled a number of public offices, his neighbors having great 
confidence in his ability and trustworthiness. To Mr. and ]\Irs. Destival were 
bom six children, who are yet living: Edward, of Hazleton township, who is 
married and has six children ; Carrie, the wife of L. Walker, by whom she has 
five children; Lena, the wife of Mat Hitchin, of Hazleton, and the mother of 
one child; Mrs. Effie Nelson, of Oakland. California, who has three children; 
Louis H.. of this review; and Edith, the wife of T. Lahner, of Hazleton township. 

Louis II. Destival attended the district schools and remained upon the home 
farm until he had attained his majority, dividing his time between the duties 
of the schoolroom, the pleasures of the playground and the work of the fields. 
He then began farming on his own account and now resides in Hazleton town- 
ship upon a tract of land of seventy-five acres, which he has purchased. The 
soil is rich and productive, and he successfully engages in the production of 
crops adapted to climatic conditions. He also raises stock, making a specialty 
of mules, and for five years dealt in live stock in Hazleton in connection with 

farming. 

In 18!)") :\li'. Destival wedded Miss Emma Lahner, a daughter of Antone and 
Clara Lahner. Her father, a native of Germany, remained there until about 
thirty years of age. He had a brother who served in the army under Napoleon. 
On coming to the new world Antone Lahner settled in Illinois and became an ex- 
tensive landowner of that state, winning success as the years went by through 
his judicious investments and carefully managed business affairs. About 1884 
he removed to Iowa and settled on the farm now occupied by Mr. and Mrs. 
Destival. He was an active democrat, a well read man and pronounced in his 
views. He passed away in 1890, at the age of seventy-two years, and his wife, 
who was born in Canada, is now living in Hazleton township at the age of sixty- 
two years. In the family of Mr. and ^Irs. Louis H. Destival are five children : 
Victor L., Doris E., Louis D., Fern and Vivian, and the circle yet remains 
unbroken by the hand of death. 



HISTORY OP BUCHANAN COUNTY 403 

Mr. Destival has membership with the Modern Woodmen of America and 
the Orients. He has been a lifelong resident of this county and is a worthy 
representative of an honored pioneer family that has been represented in the 
county for several years exceeding a half century. 



A. D. MOUNT. 



Iowa well deserves its reputation as one of the leading agricultural states 
of the Union. Its undulating prairie land offers excellent opportunities to the 
farmer and the state has become thickly settled with a class of enterprising 
farmers whose work is attended with excellent results. Among those who have 
busily and successfully tilled the soil in Buchanan county is A. D. Mount, now 
living on section 8, Jefferson township. He is also president of the Farmers Co- 
operative Exchange of Brandon. His birth occurred in this county October 
28, 1865, his parents being Robert and Mary Jane (Rohn) Mount. The father 
was a native of County Donegal, Ireland, and when twenty years of age came to 
the United States, establishing his home in eastern Pennsylvania. He became 
timekeeper and foreman at the rock quarries at Glendon and also engaged in 
teaching school there at night. He was thus busily engaged for a number of 
years, having scarcely an idle moment in all the twenty-four hours. He then 
married and removed to the middle w^est. settling in Jefferson township, Bu- 
chanan county, where he purchased a farm of one hundred and sixty acres. This 
he carefully improved and developed, remaining thereon to the time of his 
death. He held membership in the Catholic church and gave his political alle- 
giance to the democratic party. It was in Easton, Pennsylvania, that he wedded 
Mary Jane Rohn, who was born in Bethlehem, that state, in which place both 
her father and mother passed away. 

A. D. Mount spent his boyhood upon the home farm at Easton, Pennsylvania, 
and in 1874, when a youth of nine years, accompanied his parents on their 
westward removal to Buchanan county, Iowa, the father purchasing a farm 
in Jefferson township. He remained there with his parents until he reached 
the age of fourteen, at which time he accepted the position of foreman on con- 
struction work for the Burlington Railroad. He was also employed in a similar 
capacity on the Illinois Central but later he abandoned railroad work and went 
to Dakota, where he was employed as a harvest hand through one summer. In 
the following spring he made his way to Valentine. Nebraska, and on by wagon 
to the Pine Ridge agency, in South Dakota, where he was employed by the 
United States government in building schoolhouses in which to educate the 
Indians. In the fall of that year he drove overland from Pine Ridge to Run- 
ning Water, North Dakota, where he w^as in charge of a bunch of horses on a 
range. A short time afterward, however, he left that district and returned to 
Buchanan county, settling in Independence, where he remained through the 
winter. In the spring he accepted a position with the Illinois Central Railroad 
as construction foreman at Cherokee, Iowa, where he remained until February. 
He then returned to Independence and in the spring of that year rented the 



404 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

farm that had belonged to his father. Since then he has been closel}' associated 
with agricultural interests in this part of the state. 

In the fall of that year Mr. Mount married Miss Sarah Burns, a daughter 
of James and Catherine Bums. Her father died August 6, 1912. Her mother 
was born in Ireland, came to the United States when a young lady and settled 
in New York, where she became the wife of James Burns. They removed west- 
ward to Independence, Iowa, where Mr. Burns purchased a house and worked 
by the day to the time of his death. His wife passed away in 1910, while he 
survived her about two years. 

Following their marriage IMr. and Mrs. Blount began their domestic life upon 
a farm, which they occupied until 1902. Later, however, that property was sold 
and Mr. Mount purchased one hundred and sixty acres on section 8, Jefferson 
township, where he now resides. He has long been an active and progressive 
agriculturist and is prompted in all of his business affairs by laudable ambition. 
He sees the opportunities for advancement and has cooperated in many move- 
ments which have resulted beneficially to the community. He is now president 
of the Farmers Cooperative Exchange of Brandon, is a director of the Farmers 
Mutual Telephone Company of Jesup and is a director of the Farmers Savings 
Bank of Brandon. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Mount have been ])oni seven children : ]Mrs. Mary Agnes 
Messingham, now living in Independence ; and Raymond L., Robert V., Frank 
A., Gertrude L., Genevieve E. and Elmer J., all at home. Tlie family have 
been reared in the faith of the Catholic church, of which ISIr. and Mrs. Mount 
are members. His political indorsement is given to the democratic party. For 
four terms he was assessor of Jefferson township, and in 1910 was census 
enumerator for that township. He is affiliated with the Modern Woodmen of 
America and has been consul and clerk of the local camp. His activities have 
touched various lines and all beneficially, and his work has been a factor in 
general progress and improvement as well as in his individual success. 



EDGAR E. BRINTNALL. 

The State Bank of Winthrop has for many years enjoyed the full confidence 
of the community and its resources have constantly grown. Much of this con- 
tinued prosperity is due to the watchfulness and financial ability of its cashier, 
Edgar E. Brintnall, who for twenty-nine years has held that position and has 
virtually determined the policies of the institution. 

He was born in AYindham county, Vermont. April 17, 1852, a son of Ervin P. 
and Wealthy J. (Willey) Brintnall. The father Avas likewise a native of the 
Green Mountain state as were also his parents. Prosper and Amy (Johnson) 
Brintnall. Prosper Brintnall enlisted with a Vermont regiment for service in 
the War of 1812 and was a carpenter by trade. Both he and his wife lived to an 
advanced age. His parents Avere Jonathan and ]\Iary (Williams) Brintnall, the 
former of Avhom came to the United States from England and located in Massa- 
chusetts, later becoming a soldier of the Revolutionary Avar. His Avife was bom 
June 21, 1750, in Massachusetts. 




EDGAR E. BRINTNALL 



I 




/> 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 407 

Ervin P. Brintnall, the father of our subject, was reared iu Vermont and 
there married, but in 1854 he removed to Illinois, locating at Elgin, where he 
followed the carpenter's trade until the summer of that year. He then came to 
Iowa for the purpose of looking over the country with the intention of settling 
here and as he did not wish to spend any more money than necessary upon the 
trip he walked from Delhi to AVaterloo, a distance of fifty miles. He returned 
to Illinois and continued to reside in that state for a number of years but in 1864 
removed to Iowa with his family and settled upon a farm in Byron township, one 
mile and a half north of AVinthrop. The place comprised one hundred and sixty 
acres, which he secured by trading his house and lot in Elgin for it. He devoted 
his energies to its cultivation for a number of years but eventually turned it 
over to his sons, making his home with the subject of this review in Winthrop 
until his death, which occurred on the 31st of January, 1911, when he was in his 
eighty-fourth year. He was an active republican and quite prominent in local 
affairs. For several years he held the office of county supervisor and also served 
in a number of township offices. He was a member of the Congregational church 
and a deacon therein for many years, always manifesting the greatest interest in 
anything pertaining to its welfare. He followed his trade to some extent after 
removing to this county and the first Congregational church at Winthrop was 
one of the structures erected by him. His wife, who was in her maidenhood 
Bliss Wealthy J. Willey, was born in Keene, New Hampshire, in 1828, and was 
the daughter of Benjamin and Abigail (Burgess) Willey, likewise natives of the 
Granite state. Both families were of old New England stock. Her parents 
removed to Illinois with their family but her mother died when but forty-six 
years of age. Her father then lived with his children and from 1868 until his 
death, which occurred when he was about eighty years of age, made his home 
with his daughter, Mrs. Brintnall. She died in 1878, when about fifty years old. 
She was also an active and consistent member of the Congregational church and 
jjy her marriage had five children, namely: Edgar E., of this review; Florence, 
the deceased wife of C. A. Frederick; Elmer; Herbert, a merchant of Marshall- 
town, Iowa; and Angle, an employee of the state at Clarinda, Iowa. 

Edgar E. Brintnall was but an infant when the family removed to Elgin, 
Illinois, and his boyhood was spent in that city and upon a f ami near Shaumberg 
until the removal of the family to this county. After completing the course 
offered by the public schools he entered Lenox College at Hopkinton, Iowa, and 
studied there for a time. He subsequently took a commercial course at Daven- 
port, Iowa, and then for a number of years taught school during the winter and 
assisted his father upon the farm in summer. In the fall of 1885 he accepted the 
position of cashier of the Winthrop State Bank and has held the same ever since. 
The directors and the -ther officers of the bank have the utmost confidence in his 
ability and integrity and le^^'^e its management almost entirely to him, and during 
the many years that he has u^en cashier he has completely justified their trust 
in him. He is sanely progres/^e and under his direction the institution has 
paid good dividends to the stockholders and has at the same time amply safe- 
guarded the funds of its depositors and extended credit in such a way as to 
foster the legitimate business interests oi the community. 

Mr. Brintnall was married on New Year's day, 1877, to Miss Laura H. Metealf, 
a native of Epworth, Dubuque county, Iowa, and a daughter of 0. J. and Abbie 



408 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

(Freeman) Metcalf. A sketch of her father appears elsewhere in this work. 
She was reared and educated in Dubuque county and taught school before her 
marriage. Mr. and Mrs. Brintnall have a son, Harold E., who resides upon a 
part of his grandfather's homestead and engages in general farming and the 
breeding of registered Holstein cattle. He married Miss Mable Potter and they 
have two sons: Douglas Harold, a lad of seven years; and Edgar Samuel, an 
infant. 

Mr. Brintnall was in his early life a stanch republican but of late years has 
supported the prohibition party, as he believes that the liquor problem is one of 
the great issues before the American people at the present time. He has ]3een 
nominated by his party for a number of offices, including that of auditor of the 
state, congressman and county treasurer. Both he and his wife are members of 
the Congregational church and he has been the leader of the choir for the past 
forty-eight years, a record that is seldom equalled. He owns part of the old 
Brintnall homestead in this county l)ut the management of the bank demands 
practically all of his time and energ}\ He is recognized as an astute business man, 
as a public-spirited citizen and as a man of incorruptible integrity and is held 
in high esteem by his fellow townsmen. 



MARWOOD LEVI SHORT. 

Marwood Levi Short was born iii Ontario, Canada, August 26, 1861, but 
from the age of ten years has lived in Buchanan county and is now actively 
identified with the farming interests of Hazleton township. His fatlier, James 
W. Short, was boi-n in Devonsliire, England, in 1834, and in 1856 made the 
voyage across the briny deep to Canada, where he engaged in farming for a 
number of years. He wedded Mary Front, who was born in 1840, and in the 
year 1869 they left Canada for the United States, settling in Tama county, 
Iowa. They removed to Buchanan county, in 1871, and ^Ir. Short purchased 
land in Buffalo township, where he lived until 1880. He then took up his abode 
in Hazleton to\\iiship, where the family has since resided. He carried on gen- 
eral farming and stock-raising, and his business affairs were capably and suc- 
cessfully managed. In the later years of his life he removed to Hazleton, retir- 
ing from active, business, and at the time of his death he was a resident of ]\Iin- 
ncsota. His widow survives and now lives with her children in Iowa. Late in 
life he became a meml)er of the .Methodist Episcopal chun-li. 

]\Iarwood L. Short, who is one of a family of thirteen children, was but 
eight years of age when the family crossed the border into the United States, 
so that he was largely reared in Tama and Buchanan counties. His youthful 
days were spent upon his father's farm, which lie heli)ed to im])rove. early be- 
coming familiar with the best methods of tilling the soil and caring for the 
crops. When he married he began his domestic life upon a rented farm, there 
living for three years, at the end of which time he found that he had saved a 
sufficient capital to enable him to become a property owner. He then purchased 
his father's farm of one hundred and sixty acres, on which he has since lived. 
The place gives evidence of his careful supervision and indicates that his 



^ HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 409 

methods are at onee practical and progressive. Annually his fields bring forth 
good harvests and in his barns and pastures is found high grade stock. Beside 
his other interests he is a stockholder in the Iowa State Bank of Hazleton. 

On the 24th of September, 1891, Mr. Short was married to Miss IMalx-l 
Miller, a native of this county and a daughter of William and Florence (Irvin) 
Miller, both of whom were natives of Scotland, born near Aberdeen. The father, 
who was born in 1835, passed away in 1900. and the mother's death occurred 
in 1880. On coming to the new woyld William Miller first settled in Canada, 
but afterward came to the United States, taking up his abode in Hazleton 
township, Buchanan county, in 1856. He drove across the country and cast in 
his lot with the pioneer settlers. The township was then unimproved prairie 
land, only a few settlements having been made within its borders, and there 
was much game to be had in this part of the state. There were no railroads at 
the time of his arrival and the work of progress and development seemed 
scarcely begun. He took an active interest in the work of general improvement 
and his labors resulted beneficially for the community as well as himself. 

To ]\Ir. and Mrs. Short have been born six children : Myrtle, who is the 
wife of Guy Allen, living on a farm in Hazleton tpwnship ; Carl, upon the home 
farm ; Wendel, who is now attending business college in Oelwein ; Harold ; 
Grace ; and Florence. Mr. Short holds membership with the Guardians of 
Liberty, and he and his family occupy an enviable position in social circles, the 
hospitality of the best homes of this section of the county being freely accorded 
them. His life has been in a measure quietly and uneventfully passed, but he 
has displayed the sterling qualities of perseverance, energy and reliability in 
business and has made for himself a creditable place among the wide-awake and 
progressive farmers of Hazleton township. 



B. F. NABHOLZ. 



General farming finds a worthy representative in B. F. Nabholz, who is the 
owner of an excellent tract of land of two hundred and eighty acres on sections 
25 and 36, Jefferson township, where he now resides. The place presents a 
neat and attractive appearance that is indicative of the careful management 
and practical methods of the owner. Mr. Nabholz is a native son of Iowa, his 
birth having occurred in Linn county in 1870, his parents being David and 
Susan (Kronmiller) Nabholz, more detailed mention of whom is given in the 
sketch of J. D. Nabholz in this work. The educational opportunities which he 
enjoyed were those afforded by the public schools and upon the home farm he 
was trained in the work of the fields, early gaining wide knowledge of the best 
methods of tilling the soil and harvesting the crops. 

When twenty-two years of age Mr. Nabholz was united in marriage t<» Miss 
Abbie De Nio, a daughter of Philip and Loretta (Ilouck) De Nio, of Brandon. 
Her father was born in New York in 1827, was reared and educated in that 
state and afterward married Miss Ilouck. In 1855 he removed westward to 
Jones county, Iowa, where he rented land, continuing its cultivation for two 
years. In 1857 he came to Buchanan county, casting in Ins lot with its pioneer 



410 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

settlers. He took up his abode in Jefferson township, where he purchased a 
farm about four miles north of Brandon, comprising one hundred and twenty 
acres of rich and cultivable land. Year by year he carefully tilled the soil, 
bringing his fields to a high state of improvement. In 1894, however, he put 
aside the active work of the farm and removed to Jesup, where he remained for 
two years and then went to Brandon, where he resided until called to his final 
rest in 1902. His wife survives him and is now living with a daughter in Jef- 
ferson township at the age of seventy-seven years. To Mr. and Mrs. Nabholz 
have been born three children : ]Mabel, F. W. and Ethel, all yet at home. 

Following their marriage ^Ir. and ^Irs. Nabholz began their domestic life 
in Jefferson township, where he purchased two hundred and eighty acres of 
land that now constitutes one of the valuable and highly improved farms of 
the county. It is equipped with all modern accessories and conveniences and 
in its operation Mr. Nabholz has ever displayed a progressive spirit. He has 
kept in touch with the advanced methods of farming, as is indicated in the fact 
that he built the first silo in Jefferson township. He uses the latest improved 
machinery to facilitate the work of the fields and every phase of practical and 
progressive modern farm life finds expression on his place. His large crops are 
carefully and systematically harvested and handled and he also has good grades 
of stock. 

Mr. Nabholz gives his political allegiance to the republican party, which he 
has supported since age conferred upon liim tlie right of franchise. He keeps 
well informed on the (|uestions and issues of the day. but while he votes for 
republican candidates, he lias never sought nor desired office for himself. He 
belongs to the Metliodist Ei)iscopal churcli and the ruling spirit of his life is 
found in his religious ])elief. making him a man upright and reliable in every 
connection and honored wherever he is known. 



CLARENCE M. WHITNEY. 

The farmers of Buchanan county are progressive and up-to-date and are 
prosperous as a whole, as this is one of the best agricultural sections of the state. 
Clarence ^I. AVhitney, who owns one hundred and sixty acres of fine land on 
section 26, Madison township, is enei-getic and alert, always seeking for improved 
methods or machinery, and liis wisely directed labor yields him a comfortable 
annual income. 

He was born in .Madison tow nship, December 29. 1865. a son of the late David 
M. Whitney, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this work. He was reared 
upon the home farm in :\Iadison township and at the usual age entered the public 
schools, completing the course offered. He subsequently attended the University 
of Upper Iowa at Fayette and then taught for one term at Fremont Center, this 
county. However, the greater part of his life has been occupied in farming and 
he has found it a congenial and profitiible calling. He ownis and operates a well 
improved farm of one hundred and sixty acres which constitutes the northeast 
quarter of section 26. JMadison township, and follows diversified farming, giving 
considerable attention to the raising of graded stock. 



HISTORY OP BUCHANAN COUNTY 411 

In 1.892 Mr. Whitney was united in marriage to Miss Hattie Wilkins, who 
was born in Jesup in 1867, a daughter of William and Elizabeth (Goodrich) 
Wilkins, who came to this county in 1863 and located at Jesup. Her father was a 
wagonmaker and followed that trade until his death, which occurred in 1890 
when he was sixty-one years of age. He was born in Cattaraugus county, New- 
York, and as a young man went to Winnebago comity, Illinois, being married in 
1861 at Rockford, that state. His wife was a school teacher for a number of years 
previous to her marriage. Mr. Wilkins worked in a carriage factory in Rockford 
for some time but subsequently removed to this county, as before stated. He was 
a Presbyterian in religious belief and his wife was a Methodist. The latter died 
in 1898 at the age of fifty-four years. Mrs. Whitney is the only one of their 
children now living. A sister died in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, about four years ago, 
and a brother died at Lamont and a sister died at Mount Auburn, Iowa, a number 
of years ago. jMts. AVhitney was reared at Jesup and remained at home until 
her marriage. She has become the mother of four children : Winfred, usually 
known as Fred, Glenn, Eva and Angie, all at home. 

Mrs. Whitney is a member of the Baptist church and takes a lively interest 
in everything affecting its welfare. Mr. Whitney is a republican in politics and 
fraternally belongs to the Knights of Pythias. Both he and his wife are natives 
of this county and have spent their entire lives here, always manifesting the 
spirit of true citizenship which places the public good above private interests and 
individual gain. 



C. F. STUMMA. 



C. F. Stumma, proprietor of a garage and dealer in automobiles in Brandon, 
was born in Jefferson township, Buchanan county, in 1869, a son of Frederick W. 
and Ernestina (Hartzberg) Stumma, of whom mention is made elsewhere in this 
volume in connection with the sketch of their son AV. F. Stumma. The boyhood 
days of C. F. Stumma were spent upon the home farm with the usual experiences 
of the lad who divides his time between the duties of the school room, the pleasures 
of the playground and the work of the fields. 

Our subject continued at home until twenty-four years of age and then made 
arrangements for having a home of his own in his marriage to ]\Iiss Emma Luloff, 
a daughter of August and Fredericka (Harp) Luloff. The father, a native of 
Germany, came to the United States in his boyhood days in company with his 
parents, who settled in Sheboygan, Wisconsin. They purchased government land, 
securing one hundred and sixty acres, a part of which was covered with timber. 
At that place August Luloff was reared and in 1861 he responded to the country's 
call for aid, enlisting in the Union army, in which he served for three years, when 
he was honorably discharged. He then returned to his home in Sheboygan, 
Wisconsin, and there married ^liss Fredericka Harp, a daughter of Alexander 
and Minnie Harp. For five years he engaged in farming on his father's land 
and then removed westward to Iowa, settling in Jefferson township, this county, 
where he purchased a valuable tract of one hundred and sixty acres. Upon this 
farm he remained until death called him on the 23d of August, 1896. His widow 



\. 



412 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

survives and is now living with a son at Cedar Rapids at the age of sixty-six 
years. She, too, is a native of Germany and was brought by her parents to the newl 
Avorld, the Harp home being also established in Sheboygan, Wisconsin, where her 
father purchased a farm of one hundred and sixty acres. This he at once began 
to develop and improve and lived thereon for nineteen years, after which he and 
his family also became residents of Jefferson township, Buchanan county, where 
Mr. Harp bought one hundred and twenty acres of land. He employed the same 
practical methods in tilling the soil here and became recognized as an enterprising 
agriculturist of his community. His wife died in 1884 when sixty-three years of 
age. Mr. Harp survived for some time and was living with his daughter, Mrs. 
Weiser, of Black Hawk county, when he passed away in 1894. He was a republi- 
can in his political views and was a member of the German Lutheran church. 

Following his marriage IMr. Stumma purchased a farm of eighty acres in 
Jefferson township, north of Brandon, whereon he resided for twenty years, 
during which period he carefully cultivated his fields and added many improve- 
ments to the property. Annually, as the result of his practical and progressive 
methods, he gathered good crops and all departments of his farm work w^ere 
carefully directed and brought to him a substantial measure of success. -After 
tw^o decades spent upon the farm he sold that property and removed to Brandon, 
where he deals in automobiles and also conducts a garage. He is agent at this 
place for the Ford car and has sold many of those machines throughout this part 
of the county. His garage business is also profitable and his energy and deter- 
mination are the salient features in his growing success. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stumma are parents of a son. Earl, who is still at home. In his 
political views Mr. Stumma is an earnest repul)lican and keeps well informed on 
the questions and issues of the day. but does not seek nor desire office as a reward 
for party fealty. His entire life has been spent in this county, covering a period 
of forty-five years, and he is a representative of one of the old and valued pioneer 
families of this section of the state. 



JAMES CARR. 



James Carr has been engaged in the grain and produce business in Lamont 
for twenty years and is widely known as a reliable and enterprising man. He 
was born on section 86, Madison township, this county, December 26, 1863, a 
son of John and Anna (Kane) Carr. The former was born in County Cavan, 
Ireland, November 25, 1825, and when a child of four or five years was taken to 
Canada. The family subsequently removed to New York city, where he received 
the greater part of his education. From the age of fourteen to that of twenty-six 
he served upon a num-of-war and upon his return to the life of a civilian he pur- 
chased a farm in Cattai-augus county. New York. He remained upon his land 
for about ten years and then removed to Madison township, this county, and 
bought land on section 36. His first purchase was an eighty acre tract but by 
degrees he added to his possessions until at the time of his death he owned six 
hundred and seventy acres of land. He gave each of his sons a farm and thus 
gave them a splendid start in their business careers. He was married in New 




JAMES CAER 




MRS. JAMES CARR 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY ■ 417 

York city to Miss Anna Kane, who was bom near Dublin, Ireland, a daughter 
of Joseph Kane. Her sister's husband was a professor in a college there and she 
came to America with some of her sister's children, settling in New York city. 
She w} s a private tutor there until her marriage, which occurred about 1848. 
She beov^rae the mother of ten children, namely : Monica Rhoda, who was born 
June r 3, 1849, ana died in infancy ; Michael, who was born June 28, 1850, and is 
now a attorney of Manchester, Iowa ; Peter, born May 25, 1852 ; Margaret, whose 
birth )ccurred October 29, 1853 ; Sylvester, who was born November 17, 1855, 
and passed away when a young man of twenty-five years; Mary, who was born 
July 21, 1857, and died when a girl of thirteen ; Joseph, who was born September 
26, 1859, and is residing upon the home farm ; John, born October 1, 1861, who 
is th'^ proprietor of a furniture store in Lamont; James, of this review; and 
Ellen, born July 31, 1866. 

James Carr attended the country schools until he was twelve years of age 
and then the public schools of Manchester for three years. Subsequently he was 
a student in the Manchester Academy for two years and in the University of 
Upper Iowa at Fayette for two years. He later taught school for about a term 
and then farmed for a year, after which he was employed in the postofifice of 
Majichester for four years. After his marriage he again turned his attention to 
agi culture, being so engaged for seven years. At the end of that time he 
rep oved to Lamont and in ^March, 1896, became a partner in a general produce 
business. He subsequently bought out the interests of the others and has since 
conducted the business alone. It has grown steadily in volume and he has made 
a reputation for fair dealing which is one of his most valuable assets. 

Mr. Carr was married May 2, 1886, to Miss Jessie M. Wing, a daughter of 

Israel and Lydia (Jones) AVing. Her father was a native of Cherry Valley, New 

York, born January 17, 1833, and when a boy accompanied his parents to 

Indiana, remaining there for a number of years. His father was a farmer and 

shoemaker. Israel Wing was married at Laporte, Indiana, to Miss Lydia Jones, 

who was there born ]\Iarch 27, 1836, and was educated in her native city. They 

became the parents of six children : Elliott Alfred, who was born August 17, 

1857, and is now a resident of Lamont ; Frances T., who was born January 13, 

1859, and died September 30, 1862 ; Alice Ann, who was born November 24, 1861, 

and died on the 15th of October of the following year ; La Dora, who was born 

November 21, 1865, and resides at Lamont ; Jessie M., the wife of Mr. Carr; and 

Mary Eliza, who was born August 24, 1870, and resides at "Wadena, Minnesota. 

The father died July 16, 1899, and the mother November 19, 1896. Mrs. Carr 

vvas educated in the country schools of Madison township, this county, and 

remained at home until her marriage. She has become the mother of twelve 

children : James Lowell, born February 17, 1887, who is married and resides 

upon a farm in this county ; Reuben Israel, born October 19, 1888, who is a 

farmer by occupation and who married Miss Ethel Tuttle, by whom he has two 

children, Ronald H. and Harold James ; Mary Frances, who was bom August 24. 

1890, and died January 16, 1895 ; Nellie La Dora, who was born March 23, 1892, 

and is teaching school in this county ; Phoebe Grace, who was born February 23, 

1894, and is now a clerk in the postoffice ; Jessie IMildred, who was born January 

25, 1896, and is keeping house for her brother ; Marion, who was born April 3, 

1898, and is attending school ; Elsie Almira, born April 12, 1900 ; Claude Eaton, 
Vol. n— 19 



418 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

June 7, 1902; Eva Margaret, April 25, 1906; Marjorie Esther, September 19, 
1907 ; and Stella Goldie, March 13, 1910. 

The family are communicants of the Catholic church and do all in their power 
to promote the growth of its work. Mr. Carr is a democrat in politics and takes a 
commendable interest in all matters affecting the welfare of the community. 
He is quite prominent in the local councils of his party and has been a delegate 
to numerous county and state conventions. Fraternally he belongs to Mohawk 
Lodge, No. 310, K. P., Lamont Lodge, No. 656, I. 0. 0. F., and Solomon Lodge, 
No. 594, A. F. & A. M. His wife is a member of the Order of the Eastern Star. 
He has other business interests aside from the buying and selling of produce as 
he is a director in the Lamont Savings Bank. During the years that he has 
resided in Lamont he has cooperated in many movements that have resulted in 
the advancement of the material and civic interests of the town and has won 
many friends, who are enthusiastic in his praise. 



E. F. W. LULOFF. 



E. F. W. Luloff is a self-made man in the highest and best sense of the term. 
He started out in business life emptyhanded, having no inherited wealth or 
influential friends to aid him, but through his integrity and industry he has 
worked his way upward and is today the owner of a valuable farm property of 
one hundred and sixty acres on section 28, Westburg township, worth one hun- 
dred and seventy-five dollars per acre. 

Wisconsin numbers i\Ir. Luloff among her native sons, his birth having there 
occurred in 1866. His parents were Louis and Henrietta (Gosse) Luloff. The 
father was born, reared and educated in Germany and eventually married Miss 
Henrietta Gosse. Coming to the United States, they made their way into the 
interior of the country, settling in Sheboygan county, Wisconsin, where the 
father purchased a farm of forty acres. After developing it for a time he sold 
that property and in 1867 came to Buchanan county, Iowa, settling in West- 
burg township, where he made investment in one hundred and eighty acres. 
He improved this by erecting substantial buildings and bringing the fields under 
a high state of cultivation. In fact, he added all of the accessories and con- 
veniences of a model farm and carefully tilled his fields until 1879, when death 
terminated his labors. He was a veteran of the Civil war, having served for four 
years with the boys in blue of the Union army. He participated in the battle 
of Gettysburg and a number of other important engagements, which proved the 
strength of the Union troops and led up to the victory that finally crowned the 
northern arms. Politically he was a democrat and was a member of the Ger- 
man Lutheran church. His widow survived him for thirty-two years and passed 
away on the 13th of March, 1911, upon the old home place where her son, F. A. 
Luloff, now resides. She spent her girlhood days in Germany and was educated 
there. Her religious faith was also that of the German Lutheran church. 

No event of special importance occurred to vary the routine of farm life for 
E. F. W. Luloff in his boyhood and youth, which was spent upon the home 
place now owned by his brother-in-law. He is indebted to the public-school 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 419 

system for the educatioual advantages which he enjoyed and later he took up 
farming, purchasing the William Polk farm. At a subsequent date he sold that 
property and invested in the Robert Stewart .farm. He holds title to three 
hundred and forty acres of fine land and is a substantial agriculturist of the 
county. 

On the 3d of February, 1892, Mr. Luloff was united in marriage to Miss 
Ida Ehrke, a daughter of Carl and Amelia (Ebert) Ehrke. Mrs. Luloff was 
born in Brandenburg, Germany, in 1873. Both Mr. and Mrs. Ehrke were na- 
tives of Brandenburg, Germany. They began their domestic life in that country 
following their marriage in 1866. On coming to the United States, Mr. Ehrke 
went first to Baltimore, ^Maryland, and on leaving the east made his way to 
Independence, Iowa, where he lived for two years. He then purchased a farm 
of eighty acres three miles east of Jesup and occupied that place for nine years. 
He then sold out and bought a farm five miles south of Aurora, in Buchanan 
count}', becoming owner of one hundred and twenty-seven acres, on w^hieh he 
lived for ten years and then rented the property, taking up his abode in La- 
mont, Buchanan county, where he and his wife now reside, the former at the 
age of seventy-four years and the latter at the age of seventy years. Mrs. Luloff 
was educated in Brandenburg, Germany, and came with her parents to the new 
world. She is a member of the German Lutheran church and displays many 
excellent traits of heart and mind. To Mr. and Mrs. Luloff have been born two 
children: Arthur L., who was married October 23, 1913, to Miss Adelia Hart- 
ing, of Spring Creek township. Black Hawk county; and Clarence C. Both 
sous are upon the home farm. 

The family is widely and favorably known in the county, the hospitality of 
many of the best homes being freely accorded them. Mr. Luloff' early learned 
the lesson that industry is the foundation upon which all true and honorable 
success is built and therefore cultivated that quality with the result that is now 
seen, he being today the owner of two of the valuable and highly cultivated 
farms of Westburg township. 



G. B. CLOSE. 



G. B. Close is a resident farmer of Sumner township, where he ovms one 
hundred and eighty-eight acres of land. His has been an eventful life with many 
varied experiences. He was born in this county in 1850. His father, Thomas. 
Close, was a native of Lincolnshire, England, bom in 1803, and his father was a 
carpenter of Dublin, Avhere he met his death in a faU. John Close, a brother of 
Thomas, became a tailor of Connecticut, and Thomas Close was for fourteen years 
a master tailor in the British army, on duty in both the East and the West Indies. 
He crossed the Atlantic to the United States when twenty-seven years of age and 
kept drifting w-estward until eventually he became a resident of Janesville, 
Wisconsin, where he was living at the time of his marriage to Miss Mary Hull, 
a native of Ohio. The Hull family came from England but was of German 
lineage. 



420 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

On leaving Wisconsin, Thomas Close removed to Iowa, coming with. Rufus 
Clarke, the brewer, and several others in 1846. He carried the first mail between 
Cedar Falls and Dubuque and on the first trip rode a black pony and carried 
three letters. He afterward took up land from the government, securing eighty 
acres now included within the city limits of Independence, for which he paid a 
dollar and a quarter per acre. He afterward purchased land in the neighboring 
township and in the early days he was also engaged in the grocery and hotel 
business. At the time of his death, which occurred in 1869, he was living retired 
but had purchased and sold many acres of land in Buchanan county and con- 
tributed much to its material development and improvement. He built the first 
two-story brick house in Independence, at which time there was a brick kiln at 
Gatesville, now extinct. His political allegiance was given to the democratic 
party and he was once a candidate for sheriff. His religious belief was that of 
the Episcopal church. He was very helpful and considerate in his relations to 
his fellowmen and displayed many sterling traits of character which won him high 
regard. Throughout his life he exemplified the beneficent spirit of the Masonic 
fraternit}', in which he held membership. 

G. B. Close, who was one of five children, attended school in Independence 
and also became a student in the seminary at that city. When only nine years of 
age he began riding running horses and followed the race track for twelve years, 
riding in the summer months, while in the winter seasons he was employed as a 
farm hand at a salary of but eight dollars per month. He afterward served an 
apprenticeship at the cigar maker's and butchering trades and he also punched 
cattle and conducted other business interests of that character. He herded 
cattle and horses and also raised hogs in Wisconsin and Nebraska, and in 1892 
built upon his farm in Sumner township, just south of Independence, a packing 
plant thirty by ninety-six feet and an ice liouse thirty-two by one hundred feet. 
There he employed eighteen men in the conduct of his business, which, however, 
he closed out in 1896. In 1898 he went to Nebraska, shipping a bunch of cattle to 
that state, where he ranged cattle for five years. However, he continued to make 
his liome in Independence, where he conducted a butchering business. He is 
still the owner of an excellent farm of one hundred and eighty-eight acres which 
he keeps in a high state of cultivation and from wliich he derives a gratifying 
annual income. 

In 1886 Mr. Close was united in marriage to ^liss ]\Iargaret Costello, a native 
of Philadelphia and a daughter of Patrick and ]\Iary (Lawless) Costello, both of 
whom were natives of Ireland. Her father was fifty years of age when he came to 
the United States. He established his home in Newton township upon a farm 
near the village of Newtonville, Iowa, and after carrying on agricultural pursuits 
there for a number of years lived retired in Walker, where his death occurred 
in 1905, when he was about eighty-six years of age. His wife afterward removed 
to Independence, where she passed away in 1910 at the very advanced age of 
ninetj^-two years. One of their daughters is a Catholic mm of Philadelphia. In 
the family were five children, of whom two died in Ireland, while one is yet living 
in Oklahoma. To Mr. and Mrs. Close have been born seven children, of whom 
six survive : May, a graduate nurse now connected with the Mercy Hospital of 
Chicago ; George, who is engaged in the cattle business in Oregon ; Julia, a nurse 
who was graduated from Mercy Hospital in Des ]\Ioines : Charles, who is engaged 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY J:21 

in the cattle business at Boone, Colorado, representing the Thatcher Brothers 
of Pueblo, that state; Ella, a stenographer of Independence; and Marguerite, 
who is teaching in the country schools. 

Mr. Close has served as a member of the city council but felt that one term 
was sufficient. He has always concentrated his energies upon his farming opera- 
tions, in which he is now actively engaged, and in addition to tilling the soil he is 
raising Duroc Jersey hogs. He also owned some horses during the Williams 
regime. He was in races all over the country when riding running horses. He 
belongs to the Episcopal church, although his family are of the Catholic faith, 
and he is also a member of the Legion of Honor. His life activities have taken 
him into many districts and brought him many and varied experiences, all of 
which he has used to good advantage, learning therefrom valuable life lessons. 
He early recognized the fact that industry, diligence and persistency of purpose 
are the salient features of success and these he has utilized in the attainment of 
the prosperity which is now his. , 



JAMES F. LAMB. 



James F. Lamb, one of the prominent and leading agriculturists of Jefferson 
township, is the owner of an excellent farm comprising one hundred and seventy 
acres on section 16. He is numbered among the worthy native sons of Buchanan 
county, his birth having occurred in Jefferson township in 1872. His parents, 
Bernard and Ellen Martin Lamb, were both natives of County Cavan, Ireland. 
The father emigrated to the United States with his parents as a young man and 
located in Boston, Massachusetts, where he was successfully engaged in the shoe 
business for seven years. On the expiration of that period he sold out and came 
to Jefferson township, Buchanan county, Iowa, purchasing the farm of one hun- 
dred and seventy acres which is now in possession of our subject. The operation 
of that place claimed his atteaition throughout the remainder of his active business 
career and his last years were spent in honorable retirement at Independence, 
this county, where he had purchased a nice home and where his demise occurred 
at the age of seventy-nine. He gave his political allegiance to the democracy and 
was a devout communicant of the Catholic church. Mrs. Lamb, who passed away 
in Independence six years prior to the death of her husband, had come to this 
country in company with her parents, who took up their abode in Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, and there died. She belonged to the Ancient Order of Hibernians and 
in religious faith was a Catholic. 

James F. Lamb attended the public schools in the acquirement of an educa- 
tion and has always remained on the old home farm where he was born and which 
he now owns and operates. The place comprises one hundred and seventy acres 
of rich and productive land on section 16, Jefferson township, and in its cultiva- 
tion he has met with gratifying success, raising the cereals best adapted to soil 
and climate and also devoting considerable attention to live stock. 

When a young man of thirty-three years Mr. Lamb was united in marriage to 
Miss May Duddy, her parents being P. C. and Catherine Duddy, both of whom 
are natives of Ireland. They emigrated to the United States, were married at 



422 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

Philadelphia and are now residing on a farm at Clear Water, Minnesota. Mr. 
and Mrs. Lamb have two children, Ita K. and Gerald D. 

In politics Mr, Lamb is a democrat and his influence is ever on the side of 
public progress and improvement. He was instrumental in having the new elec- 
tric railroad built through Brandon and his cooperation may ever be counted upon 
to further any movement or measure instituted to promote the general welfare. 
His religious faith is that of the Catholic church, and in the community where 
his entire life has been spent he is well known and highly esteemed as an upright, 
honorable and valued citizen. 



CHARLES G. TRASK. 



The attractiveness of Buchanan county as a place of residence is indicated 
in the fact that many of her native sons have remained within her borders, not 
caring to change the place of their abode, but recognizing the fact that they can 
have as excellent opportunities and advantages here as could be secured elsewhere 
in the country. Such a one is Charles G. Trask, of Sumner township, who was 
born in this county in 1864, his parents being Ami H. and Austa N. (Fry) 
Trask, the former a native of Chautauqua county. New York. ])orn November 3, 
1826. while the latter was a native of Wisconsin. Ami II. Trask came from the 
sturdy, thrifty, intelligent and patriotic stock of New England on whom fell the 
brunt of the battles for American independence. When thirteen years of age 
he left the east and removed to Rock county, Wisconsin. He learned the brick- 
maker's trade in early life, but the tasks around the brickyard soon became 
irksome and he turned to the cabinetmaker's trade. His education in books was 
limited, but he early learned lessons of industry, economy and perseverance. 
When twenty-one years of age. or on the 8d of June, 1847, he started for Iowa, 
and took up his residence at Quascpieton. where he remained about two years. 
The tovm contained only one log house and it was no unusual thing to see 
buffaloes, deer and other wild animals. The forests were uncut, the prairies 
uncultivated and much of the county was still in just the condition in which it 
came from the hand of nature. 

One of Mr. Trask "s first tasks after reaching this state was in helping to put 
down the first dam across the Wapsipinicon river, where the mill now stands, 
and for his labors he received seventy-five cents per day. In 1847 he took a 
contract with Eli Phelps to carry the mail from Quas(|ueton to Duliuque and was 
thus engaged for two years. In 1849 he went to St. Paul, Minnesota, but 
.remained only until the following year, when he returned to Independence. He 
was then attacked with the gold fever and in May of that year started across the 
plains as one of a company of emigrants. The trip was full of incidents and 
thrilling experiences. On one occasion they had thirty horses in a string and 
saw an Indian sneaking upon them attired in a bearskin with the intention of 
stealing the entire number. The red man, however, forfeited his life. At length 
the long .iourney across the hot stretches of sand and over the mountain 
passes was completed and Mr. Trask arrived in California, where he 
remained for three years, visiting all the important mining camps, including 



> 
Pi 

Q 
> 







^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^H^* •^■r 




^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^F^' 


^.'^ .'--''" ' "'J^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^B 




^^^H||||^^Rr^^M|^^''<^^^^| 








^^^^^^^^^K^^^l 




' ' ^^wTai^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^H 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 425 

Sacramento, Shasta, Eureka and Trinidad. On the 31st of December, 1853, he 
sailed on the ship Brother Jonathan for the Isthmus and was transferred at 
San Juan Del to the vessel Northern Light, which bore him as a passenger to 
New York. He then returned to Independence and afterward engaged in freight- 
ing between this point and Dubuque. In 1855 he established a livery stable and 
throughout the remainder of his life he dealt more or less in horses. He was the 
owner of four hundred acres of valuable land and was also one of the directors 
of the Peoples National Bank, which he assisted in organizing. His political 
allegiance was originally given to the whig party and when that organization 
passed out of existence he joined the ranks of the new republican party . and 
afterward became a stanch prohibitionist. He was one of the oldest settlers and 
also one of the most substantial and representative men of the county. He was 
opposed to anything that indicated evil or detrimental tendencies and supported 
all measures which worked for the uplift of the individual and the benefit of 
the community. 

Charles G. Trask, an only son, attended the public schools of Independence 
and also spent two years as a student in a convent of this city. He early received 
business training and experience under the direction of his father, and when 
about sixteen years of age he began buying and driving young stock for his 
father. Afterward he left liome, traveling around the country, and at Water- 
loo, Iowa, he entered the employ of the Illinois Central Railroad as a brakeman. 
AA^hile thus engaged he lost a leg when but nineteen years of age. He then 
returned to Independence, where he engaged in the livery business with his 
father, taking charge of the barn in 1891, his father having died on the 24th of 
June of that year. He has always engaged in buying stock and in carrying on 
general agricultural pursuits and in 1891 became manager of his father's estate. 
AYhile he has long owned land in the county, he did not remove to his farm until 
about eight years ago, or in 1907. He today has one of the finest country 
homes in Buchanan county and one of the best improved farms in Sumner town- 
ship. The place presents a most neat and attractive appearance, the fields are pro- 
ductive, and large crops are annually harvested, while stock-raising remains an 
important feature of the business. He handles much stock, although specializing 
in no particular breed. In addition to his other interests, he is one of the 
directors and stockholders of the Peoples National Bank of Independence. 

Mr. Trask was united in marriage to Miss Ida May Krebs, who was born in 
Black Hawk county. Iowa, a daughter of ^lartin and Katherine (Reichert) 
Krebs, both of whom are living in La Porte City at the age of seventy-six years. 
The paternal grandfather was a physician of Milwaukee and practiced there 
successfully for a number of years. In the '50s he came to Iowa and purchased 
farms for his son and practiced medicine in this state, and such was his person- 
ality that he was generally l)eloved. His wife was in her maidenhood Miss 
Barbara Fry. Martin Krebs came to this state in 1859 from Milwaukee by M^ay 
of the lake and was married at Waterloo at the old Central Hotel. He and his 
wife removed immediately to their farm in Black Hawk county, where their 
children were all born. For thirty years they resided upon that place and were 
known as prominent residents of their locality. They are now living retired in 
La Porte City. The father has taken a most helpful interest in church, civic 
and social affairs and has long been a devoted member of the German Lutheran 



426 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

church. Mrs. Trask, who was the fourth in order of birth iu a family of ten 
children, has become the mother of four sons : two who died in infancy ; Archi- 
bald Hugh, who is employed in the hardware establishment of L. C. Simons of 
Independence ; and Judd Marvin, who is attending school in Independence. Mr. 
Trask is an Odd Fellow and has held all of the offices in the lodge. He is broad- 
minded in his views concerning political and civic conditions. He votes with 
the republican party and stands for progress and improvement at all times, seek- 
ing ever the welfare and upbuilding of the district in which he lives. 



JOHN G. BUSCHKE. 



Although John G. Huschke, a resident of Westburg township, started out to 
earn his own living as a farm hand working for a meager wage, he is today one 
of the successful agriculturists of Buchanan county, owning three hundred and 
eighty acres of rich and arable land valued at one hundred and seventy-five 
doUars per acre. All this represents his own earnings and his place is well 
improved with all the equipments and accessories of a model farm of the twen- 
tieth century. His land is situated on section 4, Westburg township, and the neat 
and thrifty appearance of the place is indicative of his careful supervision, 
practical methods and sound judgment. 

Mr. Huschke was born in Scott county, Iowa, December 28, 1861, and is a 
son of Bernard and Barbara (Wachter) Huschke. The father was a native of 
Prussia, born in 1830, and when twenty-two years of age made the voyage across 
the Atlantic to the new world and into the interior of the country. In 1852 or 
1853 he took up his abode in Scott county, Iowa, where he was employed as a 
farm hand until 1858, during which period he carefully saved his earnings until 
he felt justified in purchasing property. He then invested in eighty acres in 
Scott county and lived upon that farm for nine years. He next removed to 
Pleasant Valley township, in the same county, purcliasing one hundred and sixty 
acres which he owned and cultivated for thirty-five years. His last days were 
spent in well earned and honorable retirement in Davenport, where he passed 
away in 1912. His wife was a native of Switzerland and was but four years of 
age when brought to America by her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Wachter, who 
were also natives of the land of the Alps. They, too, settled in Scott county, 
Iowa, where her father purchased eighty acres. There she lived at home until 
her marriage, becoming to her husband a faithful companion and helpmate on 
life's journey. 

John G. Huschke was comparatively young when he started out to earn his 
living as a farm hand, working by the month. He also followed threshing until 
twenty-nine years of age and then purchased a farm of one hundred and four 
acres situated in Poweshiek county, near Brooklyn. That farm soon gave evi- 
dence of the care and labor he bestowed upon the fields and after operating the 
place for thirteen years he sold out for ninety dollars per acre. He then came to 
Buchanan county and purchased two hundred and twenty acres in Westburg 
township for sixty-five dollars per acre. Upon this place, which is situated on 
section 4, he has since made his home and liis farm is now a valuable and pro- 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 427 

ductive property, constituting one of the attractive features of the landscape. 
He has prospered as the years have gone by and the farm has advanced in value 
through the work he has put upon the fields. He practices the rotation of crops 
and other modern methods of farming and he also conducts a dairy business and 
raises stock. In 1912 he added to his property holdings by purchasing one hun- 
dred and sixty acres of land in Perry township for ninety-two and a half dollars 
per acre. 

Mr. Husehke was married in 1895 to Miss Mary M. Schmidt, a daughter of 
Charles Schmidt, who was born in Germany in 1827. After coming to the United 
States he remained in New York for a short time and then continued on his 
westward way until he reached Davenport, Iowa. He was a carpenter by trade 
and followed that pursuit in Davenport until he reached the age of sixty-two 
years, when, having acquired a handsome competence, he retired from active life, 
although he is still living in that city at the age of eighty-seven years. His wife 
was born in German}^ in 1825, was there reared and in that country became the 
wife of John Beck. After crossing the Atlantic and settling in New York, Mr. 
Beck died and there his widow married Charles Schmidt. Mrs. Husehke was 
reared in Davenport, acquired her education in the schools of that city and was 
married there, and she has become the mother of six children : Ann, the wife of 
Theodore Schmidt ; Theresa, who married Philip Schmidt ; Bernard ; Marie ; 
Mildred; and Clara. 

The parents are members of the Catholic church, and politically Mr. Husehke 
is a democrat. His interest in community affairs is that of a public-spirited citi- 
zen and not of an office seeker. He is a self-made man who as the architect of his 
fortunes has builded wisely and well. An analyzation of his life work shows that 
diligence, determination aud fair dealing have been the salient points in his 
business career. 



FARMERS SAVINGS BANK. 

The Farmers Savings Bank at Lamont, Iowa, in the four years of its 
existence, has gained the confidence of the business houses and also of the 
private individuals of the town and its deposits have steadily increased. Its 
policy has been one of progression, tempered, however, with enough conservatism 
to adequately safeguard the interests of stockholders and depositors. It was 
chartered on the 3d of March, 1910, under Iowa laws with authority to transact 
general banking business. The first officers were : D. J. Kenna, president ; 
W. C. Falck, vice president ; and M. J. Nolan, cashier. The board of directors 
included Messrs. D. J. Kenna, W. C. Falck, Fred Retz, J. H. Brown, Thomas 
Vanek, A. K. Anderson and A. L. Seeber. At the present time the administra- 
tive officers are AV. C. Falck, president; Fred Retz, vice president; and O. C. 
Gladwin, cashier. Mr. Gladwin has held the office of cashier since April 1, 
1911, and the active management of the institution is left largely to him. The 
directorate comprises, in addition to the above mentioned officers, J. H. Brown, 
Thomas Vanek, Frank Dozark and A. K. Anderson. The institution is capitalized 
at fifteen thousand dollars, the present surplus is one thousand and the deposits 



428 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

average about ninety-eight thousand dollars. The bank owns the building in 
which it is situated and which was erected in the fall of 1910, and is one of the 
best business blocks in Laniont. It is twenty-two by fifty-six feet in dimen- 
sions, is of pleasing design and of excellent material, and the upper floor is 
given over to office rooms. The affairs of the bank are in good condition and, 
although its first consideration is the safety of the funds intrusted to it upon 
deposit, it is so judiciously managed that it earns a good dividend for its stock- 
holders. 



WARREN F. MILLER. 



Warren F. Miller, editor of the Independence Conservative, is a native of 
Buchanan county and has passed most of his life here. He is the youngest son 
of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Miller, pioneer settlers, and was born on a farm in 
Perry township, November 13, 1866. He was fortunate in parents who indulged 
his wish for a better education than the county schools afforded, and he entered 
Lenox College at the age of thirteen, graduating from there with the degree of 
Bachelor of Sciences in 1884, when a little past seventeen years of age. That fall 
he began his first term as a teacher in a Delaware county rural school, having to 
get a special permit from the state superintendent because of being under the 
required age. lie followed teaching for several years succeeding, in the mean- 
time taking a course in the Cedar Rapids Business College during a summer 
vacation. 

In 1891 Mr. Miller resigned the principalship of the F'airbank schools to 
accept the position of deputy to L. F. Springer in the office of clerk of the district 
court. After two years he resigned this to enter the law school of the University 
of Iowa, from which he graduated in 1894. A few weeks later he and a class- 
mate, the late C.Tj. Everett, opened a law office in Independence, but this part- 
nership was dissolved with the beginning of the succeeding year, when Mr. 
Everett entered a partnership with Judge Ransier. and ]\Ir. Miller with his 
former chief, L. F. Springer, under the firm name of Springer & Miller. He was 
elected city attorney of Independence the succeeding spring, serving two years, 
during which time it fell to him to prepare the ordinances, contracts, etc., for 
the new municipal lighting plant. In the fall of 1896 he gave up the practice 
of law to enter country newspaper work, he and his fath(»r purchasing an interest 
in the Conservative. He was associated with L. W. Goen for a little over six 
years in publishing the Conservative, the ^Millers then selling their interest back 
to Mr. Goen. It was during this time that Warren F. Miller was elected mayor 
of Independence, serving two terms and declining to be a candidate for a third. 
He then moved to Kansas, where he' owned and published the Courier-Democrat 
for upward of six years. His next newspaper veiiture was at Le Mars, where he 
purchased the Le Mars semi-weekly Glo])e-Post, which he conducted till he sold it 
in December, 1913, and returned to Independence. 

In March, 3914. Mr. Miller of this review, associated with S. Miller and 
Mattie E. Stevenson, purchased the Independence Conservative from the Goen 
estate and he became its editor and business manager. This brought him back to 




WARREN F. MILLER 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 431 

his old field of labor. New equipment was added and new life put into the paper, 
now in its sixtieth year, and the effect was at once apparent in the tone of the 
paper and its steady increase in business. He feels that he is probably located 
for as many years of business life as may be spared him, with his one ambition 
to make the Independence Conservative one of the best of its class. 

Mr. ^liller is a member of the Masonic order and of the Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks. He was reared in a Presbyterian family and united with 
that church in Independence under the pastorate of Rev. D. W. Fahs, in 1898. 
He was married in Independence, May 25, 1898, to Miss Nella E. Smale, one 
of the talented musicians of the city and the youngest daughter of George Smale, 
a pioneer druggist. They have a family of three children: Paul, aged fifteen, 
a student in the high school ; Leo. aged ten. and Marian, aged eight, both in the 
citv grade schools. 

As would be expected of the editor of a democratic paper, Mr. Miller is a 
consistent and persistent democrat. He has been a member of the county central 
committee, wherever located, every year but one since he was twenty-two, county 
chairman once in Iowa and twice in Kansas, and was a member of the state com- 
mittee in Kansas when he removed from that state. At forty-eight he is satisfied 
if the long hours and multifarious grind of country newspaper work affords him 
an occasional day to go fishing. 



EZRA Mackenzie. 



Ezra MacKenzie is the owner of Brunswick Park, a fine farm of two hundred 
and eighty acres in Hazleton township, which is so called in honor of his birth- 
place — New Brunswick, Canada. His natal day was March 21, 1853, and his 
parents were Daniel and Phoebe (Brundage) MacKenzie, who were also natives of 
New Brunswick, the former of Scotch and the latter of English descent. As far 
back as is known the MacKenzies have followed agricultural pursuits. In the 
year 1800 the family was established in New Brunswick, and Daniel MacKenzie 
became one of the extensive landowners there, his possessions aggregating seven 
hundred acres. He was regarded as one of the substantial and valued citizens of 
the community in which he made his home and his life was ever in harmony with 
his professions as a member of the Freewill Baptist church. He died in 1890, 
at the age of seventy-six years. 

Ezra MacKenzie pursued his education in the schools of New Brunswick and 
when twenty-four years of age came to the United States, since which time he has 
made his home in Buchanan county. He had previously owned a shingle mill 
and worked in the timber in the winter months, owning a big timber tract. After 
coming to this country he was employed as a farm hand for a time but as soon 
as possible made investment in land, to which he has since added until he now 
owns two hundred and eighty acres in Buchanan county which he calls Brunswick 
Park. His farm has been carefully developed and improved according to modern 
methods and all of the equipments and accessories of the model farm of the 
twentieth century are found upon his place. He is prominently known as a 
stock-raiser, handling Polled Durham cattle and Percheron horses, \v'liich he 



432 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

raises for sale and for exhibition purposes. Pie has Avon many prizes at the 
county fair on his horses and his stock is one of the attractive features of his 
farm. In business affairs his judgment is sound, his discrimination keen and his 
enterprise unfaltering. Aside from his interests as the owner of Brunswick 
Park he is a stockholder, director and the president of the creamery company, is 
president of the Corn Growers' Association, is president of the Cooper Valley 
Telephone Company, president of the Hazleton Fair Association and a stock- 
holder in the Buchanan County Fair Association. 

Mr. ]\IacKenzie was united in marriage to ]\Iiss Alice J. Miller, a native of 
Hazleton township and a daughter of George M. Miller. Her father was born in 
New York, in 1837, and was a son of Adam and Baehabee (Pettis) Miller, the 
former born in Connecticut in 1794 and the latter in Rhode Island in 1800. Adam 
Miller became a carpenter and builder in New York and in 1849 removed west- 
ward to the vicinity of Rockford, Illinois, where he worked at his trade and also 
became actively identified with the sheep industry, driving sheep overland, as 
there were then no railroads in that part of the country. On the 13th of Septem- 
ber, 1852, he came to Buchanan county and purchased land in Hazleton township, 
which his sons cultivated. They were pioneers in raising shorthorn cattle and 
Chester White hogs and were extensively engaged in shipping hogs which were 
used for breeding purposes. Adam ^liller was a resident of Buchanan county 
at the time of his death. He served as a drum major in the War of 1812, going 
to the front from AVasliington county. New York. 

George M. Miller attended the district schools near his home and when twelve 
years of age started out in life on his own account. He went witli a brother to 
Illinois and there worked on a farm and in a tavern, drove stage and also attended 
to various duties in the store of Benjamin Hoyt, of Boone county, Illinois, in 
the town of Newburg, which is now extinct. He came with his father to I^uehanan 
county when a youth of about fifteen years and here worked as a rail splitter and 
also engaged in hauling merchandise into this county l)efore the advent of rail- 
roads. In fact he worked at anything and everything that is necessary in con- 
nection with the early settlement and development of a frontier district. In 1853 
he purchased land from the government, entering his claim, and soon afterward 
became actively engaged in farming; in which occupation he continued year 
after year with excellent success. As his financial resources increased he added 
to his holdings and when he removed to Hazleton was the owner of seven hundred 
and sixty acres of valuable farm land in Buchanan county, now in possession of 
his son and daughter. He was not only a leading farmer but also a representative 
citizen. He served as supervisor of his county for eight years and was a trustee 
of the College for the Blind at Vinton. He was active in the republican party 
and at all times cooperated in the movements for the benefit and upbuilding of 
this section of the state. He made the first shingles that covered the first church 
in Independence and helped cut the logs foi* the first bridge over the Wapsipini- 
con river. In Masonry he was well known as a member of the lodge, chapter and 
Eastern Star at Independence. The first meeting of the Baptists in this county 
was held in the home of his father, Adam Miller, while the first Presbyterian 
gathering Avas in the home of John Long in Hazleton township. 

It was in 1857 that George M. Miller was united in marriage to Miss Margaret 
Spragg," who was born in New Brunswick, Canada, in 1835, a daughter of John 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 433 

and Amelia (Taylor) Spragg, who were also natives of Canada, born in 1805 
and 1812 respectively. Becoming residents of the United States, they made their 
way to Iowa in 1855 and their last days were spent in Hazleton township, where 
they were identified with agricultural pursuits. Mr. Spragg became one of the 
substantial farmers and reliable citizens of the community and lived to the 
advanced age of ninety-four years. To Mr. and Mrs. Miller were born three 
children : Edgar F., who owns and occupies a farm west of Hazleton, where he is 
engaged in the raising of Galloway cattle; Alice J., now Mrs. MacKenzie; and 
Letta A., the wife of W. E. Curtis, a real-estate dealer of Cedar Rapids, by whom 
she has two children. By the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. MacKenzie there have 
been born five children : Ethel is the wife of W. H. Hatch, a representative of a 
pioneer family of this county living near Oelwein, and they have three children, 
MacKenzie, Willis Ezra and Robert ; Inez became the wife of Simon G. Corcoran 
but has passed away. Donald M. is at home with his parents. Ross Daniel, a 
farmer of Buchanan county, married Grace Duke and has one son, Hugh. 
E. Bruce married Berdina Scott and lives upon the farm of his father-in-law in 
Fayette county. 

]\Ir. MacKenzie took out his naturalization papers soon after coming to the 
United States and has been a student of the political questions and issues of the 
day. A zealous republican, he has served his party with the sincere desire to see 
its principles triumph — principles in which his faith is bound. He is a member 
of the Baptist church and served as superintendent of the Union Sunday school 
of the Presbyterian and Baptist churches for twenty years. His influence has 
always been against evil and on the side of right, justice and truth. He belongs 
to the Knights of Pythias and has taken an active interest in the work of the local 
lodge and in the state organization as well, filling all the chairs in both the sub- 
ordinate and grand lodges. He has held every office in the Modern Woodmen 
camp and his wife is active in the Pythian Sisters and in the Eastern Star. Of 
the Eastern Star she has been worthy matron for two years and for seven consecu- 
tive years has represented the Pythian Sisters in the Grand Temple of Jowa. She 
is also president of the county organization of the Woman's Christian Temper- 
ance Union and also of the local Woman's Christian Temperance Union. Both 
Mr. and Mrs. MacKenzie rank high in the social circles of the city and their 
influence is widely felt for good. Mr. MacKenzie has always been foremost in 
support of and promotion of the most progressive ideas relating to the material 
development and civic progress of his community and is recognized as the leader 
in his township. His life is one of general worth and usefulness and on the 
pages of his history appears a clean record. 



DAVID H. REVEL. 



David H. Revel, dealer in agricultural implements at Brandon and also 
identified with financial interests as one of the organizers and stockholders of 
the Farmers Savings Bank, was born in Harrison township, Benton county, 
Iowa, on the 2d of July, 1865, his parents being William and Amy (Davis;. 
Revel. The father's birth occurred in Southampton county, Virginia, in 1818. 



434 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

He was a son of Hamilton Revel, Avho was born on a farm in the Old Dominion, 
the family having been established in Virginia at an early epoch in the history 

of that state. 

William Revel was reared on the old home farm and at the age of seventeen 
years removed westward to Greensburg, Indiana, where he was employed as a 
farm hand until he reached the age of twenty-four years. He then married and 
rented land from the man by whom he had previously been employed by the 
month. For seven years he lived upon that place and then came to Iowa, set- 
tling in Benton county in 1849 about four miles south of Brandon. He was one 
of the pioneers of that district, for the work of progress and improvement 
seemed scarcely begun in that section of the state. Much of the land was still 
in the possession of the government and Mr. Revel entered a claim of one hun- 
dred and sixty acres. There were no railroads in the county and he had made 
the journey overland with a team of horses and a wagon. He experienced many 
of the hardships and privations of pioneer life, but as the years went on frontier 
conditions were replaced by those of modern civilization. He broke the soil, 
tilled the fields and in time brought his farm to a high state of cultivation. 
Moreover, he extended the boundaries of his property by additional purchases 
at various intervals until he was the owner of five hundred and twenty acres 
of rich and valuable land, upon which he lived to the time of his death in 1891. 
His widow survives and is now living with her daughter, ]\Irs. Lizzie AVallace, 
on a farm in Harrison township, Benton county, at the age of eighty-eight 
years. 

Mr. Revel was a republican in his political vieAvs and was a consistent and 
earnest member of the Christian church. Mrs. Revel was born on a farm near 
Greensburg, Indiana, in 1826, and much of her life was spent amid pioneer sur- 
roundings before time and man wrought the changes which made this section 
of the state one of its prosperous and populous districts. She was a represen- 
tative of one of the old New England families. Her father was born in Vermont 
and when a young man learned the cabinetmaker's trade in the east. He after- 
ward removed to Kingston, Indiana, where he married, and there worked at his 
trade for a time. He afterward purchased a farm of eighty acres, on which he 
took up his abode, and he supported his father and mother in their old age. 
His life was a busy, useful and honorable one and he continued his residence in 
Indiana until called to his final rest. 

David H. Revel, whose name introduces this review, spent his youth upon 
the old homestead farm in Harrison township, Benton county, and after master- 
ing the branches of learning taught in the district schools became a student in 
Tilford Academy at Vinton, Iowa, in which he completed his course in 1889. 
He then returned to the old home place and devoted two years to its further 
cultivation. He then made arrangements for having a home of his own through 
his marriage to Miss Emma Yount. a daughter of Fred and ^lary Yount. Pur- 
chasing a farm east of Brandon, Iowa, he resided thereon for about five years 
and then sold that property and took up his abode in the town, where he pur- 
chased a store building and opened a stock of farm machinery and agricultural 
implements. From the beginning he has enjoyed a liberal patronage, which 
has steadily increased as his enterprise and thorough reliability have become 
recognized. He is a man of energy and of keen discrimination and carries for- 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 435 

ward to successful completion whatever he undertakes. He does everything pos- 
sible for the upbuilding and improvement of Brandon and was one of the organ- 
izers of the new Farmers Savings Bank, of which he became a large stockholder. 
He was one of those who championed the movement for the building of the 
electric railroad through Brandon, doing everything in his power to secure the 
execution of the project. 

In 1913 ^Ir. Revel was called upon to mourn the loss of his wife, who was 
born in Jefferson township, this county, in 1864 and spent her entire life here. 
She was for a quarter of a century a devoted and faithful member of the Chris- 
tian church and was the organizer of the Cemetery Association, of which she 
was president at the time of her death. Her many excellent traits of heart and 
mind endeared her to all who knew her and she left behind an extensive circle 
of friends. Mr. Revel has one son, Howard G., who is twenty-one years old and 
a partner of his father's in business. He attended the public schools and the 
Tilford Academy at Vinton. Iowa, and was graduated from the Commercial 
College of Cedar Falls, Iowa, in June, 1914. Mr. Revel is \ndely and favorably 
known in Brandon and throughout the surrounding district and enjoys the high 
regard and confidence of all with whom business or social relations have brought 
him in contact. • 



ALBERT A. SMITH. 



Albert A. Smith operates four hundred acres of fine land located on sections 
28, 29, 32 and 33, Madison township. He carries on general farming but pays 
special attention to the raising of cattle. He breeds high grade black Polled 
Angus, the heads of the herd being all registered animals. He w^as born in 
^ladison township on the 12th of April, 1859, a son of Lemuel Holly and Mary 
(Colby) Smith. The former was born in Rutledge, Vermont. July 29, 1823, 
and in 1839, when a youth of sixteen years, went to ]\IcHenry county, Illinois. 
He subsequently purchased land there and farmed in that state for a number 
of years. During this period, or in 1849, he took an overland trip to the gold 
fields of California, where he remained for less than one year. Returning to 
McHenry county, Illinois, he resumed his farming operations. His marriage 
occurred there, but in 1854 he brought his family to ]\Iadison township, Buch- 
anan county, Iowa. He entered some land from the government and bought 
other tracts until he was the owner of one thousand four hundred acres, part 
of which was in Buffalo township. He supervised the operation of his land 
until his death, which occurred in September, 1902. His wife was also a native 
of Rutledge, A^ermont, born May 22, 1826, and her death occurred in March, 
1904. Eight children were born to them, namely: Montraville, who makes his 
home in Kansas ; Nellie, now the wife of William Andrews, of North Dakota ; 
Olive, who married R. M. Jenks and is now deceased; Herbert, who resides in 
tile state of AVashington ; Carrie E.. who is the widow of C. E. Todd and resides 
in Minneapolis, Minnesota ; Albert A. ; Mary, who died in childhood ; and Mary, 
the second of the name, who lives in Minneapolis. The four oldest children 
were born in Illinois and the younger ones in this state. 



436 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

Albert A. Smith received his elementary education in the country schools 
and supplemented the knowledge thus acquired by two terms of study in Fay- 
ette College. He remained at home until he attained his majority. Early in 
life he began assisting his father with the work of the farm and when it became 
necessary for him to decide upon a life occupation he determined to devote his 
time and energy to agriculture. He now owns four hundred acres of land and 
is successfully carrying on mixed farming. He takes a great interest in the 
raising of high grade cattle and ships many head annually to Chicago. He 
breeds black Polled Angus cattle and, as the animals at the head of his herd 
are all registered, his stock is of high grade. He is considered one of the well- 
to-do and progressive agriculturists and stockmen of the county and his assets 
are steadily increasing. 

On the 9th of September, 1883, Mr. Smith was united in marriage with 
Miss Amy A. Garland, a daughter of William and Elsie (Dykeman) Garland. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Smith have been born two sons. Carroll G., whose birth 
occurred on the 3d of August, 1888, operates part of his father's f-arm. He is 
a graduate of the Lamont high school and married Miss Edith Hauser. Albert 
Putnam, who was born November 19, 1889, lives at home. The family are con- 
sistent members of the ^Metliodist Episcopal church. 

Mr. Smith is a democrat and is one of the leaders in political circles of this 
county. He has often been a delegate to the county conventions of his party 
and is serving his fifth year as one of the board of trustees of ]\Iadison town- 
ship. In his early manhood he held that office for twelve consecutive years. 
He has been vice president of the Lamont Savings Bank for the last four years 
and in that connection has manifested the same sound judgment that has char- 
acterized his management of his private affairs. He is a man of strict integrity 
in his dealings with his fellowmen. 



WALTER THOMPSON. 

Although he began his business career without resources other than his 
strength, intelligence and determination to succeed, and although he had to go 
into debt in order to buy his first land, Walter Thompson is now one of the sub- 
stantial citizens of Byron township and the owner of a fine farm on section 27, 
and considerable other real estate as well. He was born in Ontario county, 
Ontario, Canada, May 13, 1850, a son of George and Catherine (Metcalf) 
Thompson, both natives of Ireland, the former born in Tipperary and the latter 
in Belfast. The father emigrated to Canada with his parents when a boy of ten 
years and lived there until his death, which occurred when he was eighty-six 
years of age. He was a farmer by occupation and was highly respected in his 
community. The mother was but an infant when brought by her parents to 
New York city, where she was reared and educated. She died in Ontario at the 
age of eighty years. Both parents were members of the Eposcipal church, to the 
support of which they contributed. Twelve children were born to them, of whom 
the subject of this review was the fifth in order of birth. 




MRS. WALTER THOMPSON 




WALTER THOMPSON 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 441 

Walter Thompson was reared at home and aided his father in the operation 
of the homestead. He was educated in an old log schoolhouse, studying there 
during the winters until he was twenty-two years of age. He was then married 
and engaged in farming in Canada until 1876, when he came to this county and 
purchased his present farm of one hundred and sixty acres, paying thirty dollars 
per acre. He also owns two other farms in Washington township, one compris- 
ing one hundred acres and the other forty-five acres, both of which he rents. 
He likewise holds title to ten acres of land in Independence which he leases to 
others, and has a lot in Tacoma, AVashington. He never allowed himself to 
become discouraged by temporary hardships or obstacles in his way, as he was 
convinced that persevering labor and good management would enable him to 
attain success eventually, and his faith has been justified, as he is now one of 
the well-to-do farmers of his locality. He understands agriculture thoroughly 
and is enterprising, planting his crops in good season and giving them the 
necessary cultivation during the summer months. As a result he harvests 
annually large crops which he sells at a good price. 

In the county of Ontario, Canada, Mr. Thompson was united in marriage to 
Miss Flora Jane McDonald, who was born in Ontario on the 10th of April, 1852, 
and was reared and educated in her native country. They have four children : 
Florence, the wife of Edward Hood, a farmer of Byron township ; Lewis Walter, 
at home ; Mable, the wife of George Slemmons, of Libert.y township ; and Verna, 
at home. 

Mr. Thompson is a republican in his political belief and has been quite active 
in local affairs. For nine years he has served on the county board of commission- 
ers and was reelected in the fall of 1914, his term to begin January 1, 1915. For 
twenty or twenty-five years he has served as township trustee, which office he 
holds at present, and for several years he has been a member of the school board. 
Both he and his wife belong to the Presbyterian church, in which he has served 
as elder for thirty years. Fraternally he belongs to Winthrop Lodge, No. 546, 
A. F. & A. M. ; the Modern Woodmen of America ; Crescent Lodge, K. P., of 
Independence ; and both he and his w^fe hold membership in the Royal Neighbors. 
The life record of Mr. Thompson is an example of what a man of initiative, indus- 
try and sound judgment may accomplish if he but persists in his endeavor to 
achieve success. Not only has he won material prosperity, but he is also one of 
the most respected citizens of his township. 



JOHN LEARY. 



Early in life John Leary realized that the chief factor in the attainment of 
success is industry, and in cultivating and utilizing that quality he has become 
one of the well-to-do farmers of Westburg township, where he now makes his 
home, owning and cultivating two hundred and forty acres on section 3. He 
was born in Rochester, New York, in 1852, his parents being Dan and INIargaret 
(McMullen) Leary. The father, a native of Ireland, came to the United States 
when thirteen years of age, settling in Rochester, New York, and removing to 
Kendall. Orleans county, that state, in 1856. For ten years he was a stage 

Vol. 11—20 



442 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

driver and later rented a farm which he cultivated for a short time. He sub- 
sequently returned to Rochester, where he worked as a boiler maker until his 
health failed him and he went to live with his daughter at Carlton, Orleans 
county, where he passed away in 1903. In politics he was a democrat and his 
religious faith was that of the Catholic church. His wife was born in Dublin, 
Ireland, and when a young lady came to the United States, making her way to 
Rochester, New York, where she became the bride of Dan Leary. 

Their son, John Lear}', remained under the parental roof until nineteen 
years of age and then started to earn his living b,y working as a farm hand. 
He was employed in that manner for seven years, after which he removed to 
La Rose, Marshall county, Illinois, where he followed farm work for five years 
and also operated a farm on shares for two years. About that time he wedded 
Miss Mary Ellen Wills, of Lacon, Illinois, and they began their domestic life 
upon a rented farm of one hundred and sixty acres. In the cultivation of that 
property he met with success and afterward rented another tract of one hun- 
dred and forty acres, thus making three hundred acres which he farmed for 
ten years. He afterward left that place and rented another tract of two hun- 
dred and twenty acres on which he remained for three years. On leaving Illinois 
he took up his abode in Barclay township, Black Hawk county, Iowa, and after 
living upon a rented farm there for two years he removed to Perry township, 
where he rented two hundred and seventy-five acres, continuing the cultivation of 
that place for three years. He next came to Buchanan county and in Westburg 
township purchased two hundred and forty acres constituting his present home. 
This is today a valuable farm property. He paid sixty-five dollars per acre for 
the first quarter section and seventy-four dollars per acre for the remaining 
eighty acres. He has added many modern e<|uipineiits and improvements to his 
place and has good farm buildings which furnish ample shelter for grain and 
stock, while in his sheds is found the latest improved farm machinery. 

In all these years Mr. Leary has had the able assistance and encouragement 
of his "wife, who was born in Lacon, Illinois, in 1863. a daughter of David and 
Mary (Martin) Wills. Her father was born in Ripley, Oliio, in 1830, a son of 
Samuel and Belinda (^Martin) Wills, and left home at the age of fifteen years, 
going to Peoria, Illinois, where he learned steaml)oat engineering. He after- 
ward accepted a position as engineer on one of the ^Mississippi river boats and 
was on the Jennie Lind during the Civil war. He was also an engineer on Mis- 
souri river boats and on boats on the Illinois river at different times, and in 
the winter seasons when navigation was impossible he worked at his old trade 
of coopering, which he had learned and followed in Ohio and in Peoria, Illinois. 
At length he retired to Henry, Marshall county, Illinois, where he passed away 
in 1906 at the age of seventy-six years. His wife was born in County Cavan, 
Ireland, in 1836, and was a little maiden of but eleven summers when brought 
to the United States. Her father died near Pittsfield, Massachusetts, almost 
immediately after their arrival, but the mother and daughter continued on their 
way to Lacon, Illinois, and lived upon a rented farm. Mrs. Wills now makes 
her home with Mrs. Leary. To Mr. and Mrs. Leary have been born five chil- 
dren : Charles E., George E., Ora J., Owen D. and Harry W. 

The political belief of Mr. Leary is that of the democratic party. Tbe visible 
evidence of his life of thrift, industry and determination is liis W(>1I kept farm, 



HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 443 

Avhich he has gained entirely through his own efforts. His business career has 
at all times been creditable and his path has never been strewn with the wreck 
of other men's fortunes. On the contrary he has ever been reliable and trust- 
worthy in his dealings and his prosperity has its root in indefatigable labor. 



WILLIAM H. GARLAND. 

William H. Garland is a native son of Buchanan county and throughout his 
life his interests have been identified with those of the community in which he 
lives. He owns and operates two hundred and sixteen acres of land on sections 
19 and 20, Madison township, and raises black Poland China hogs and high 
grade cattle and horses. 

He was born upon the farm where he now resides, on the 11th of July, 1865, 
a son of W^illiam and Elsie (Dykeman) Garland. The father passed away at 
that place on the 4th of March, 1906, at the age of seventy years. He Avas born 
in Cambridgeshire, England, and came to America when sixteen years of age, 
locating first at Palmyra, Wisconsin, where he worked for some time. He was 
married in Janesville, that state, on the 1st of March, 1863, and in 1865 re- 
moved to this county. The family home was established upon land which is 
a part of the farm in ^ladison township now in possession of the son William 
H. The place was partially improved when it came into his possession but he 
further developed it and erected better Iniildings. He bought at first eighty 
acres which he operated for a while, and then conducted a mill at Manchester, 
Iowa, for some years but in 1877 returned to his farm in this county and resided 
there until he removed to Lamont in October, 1898. He was a democrat in pol- 
itics and fraternally belonged to the Masonic order. His wife was born in Wal- 
worth county, Wisconsin, November 1, 1844, a daughter of Henry and Anna 
(W^hittaker) Dykeman. both natives of Schoharie county. New York. She is a 
member of the Order of the Eastern Star at ^Manchester. She is still living at 
the age of seventy years and resides at Lamont. Besides her son she has a 
daughter, ]\Irs. A. A. Smith, of Madison township. 

William H. Garland was reared in this county and has made his home here 
during his entire life save for a few years spent in Manchester. He attended 
school in that city and also pursued his studies in the Richardson schoolhouse 
at Buffalo Grove, Madison township. More than two decades ago he took charge 
of the home farm and has since cultivated it. The place now comprises two 
hundred and sixteen acres of fine land and as he is a man of industry and 
sound judgment his success has been assured and his resources have steadily 
increased. He follows diversified farming and gives considerable attention to 
the raising of black Poland China hogs and cattle and horses. 

Mr. Garland was married in this county to Miss Kate Jenks, a half-sister of 
C. E. Jenks, of Madison township. She was born and reared in that township 
and by her marriage has become the mother of two children : Elmer, a young 
man of twenty-two years; and Edith, aged fifteen. Both are at home. 

Mr. Garland is a democrat in his political belief and fraternally belongs to 
the Yeomen of Aurora. Buchanan county is proud to claim him as a native 



444 HISTORY OF BUCHANAN COUNTY 

son and is the gainer because he has continued to reside here, devoting his life 
to the cultivation of some of the rich land which is the source of the wealth of 
the countv. 



JAMES VAN ORSDOL. 



When death called James Van Orsdol a feeling of deep, genuine and wide- 
spread regret was felt throughout Rowley and the surrounding territory, for 
through an extended period he was actively connected with business interests in 
the town and county as a farmer, as a hotel proprietor and as a dealer in grain 
and stock. His life record spanned seventy-seven years, his birth having occurred 
in Cook county, Illinois, on the 7th of July, 1835, and his death in RoM'ley on 
the 24th of July, 1912. His parents were William and Mercy (Miller) Van 
Orsdol, natives of New York. Through much of his life the father followed 
farming near Crystal Lake, Illinois, but died in 1844 when a comparatively 
young man. ^Irs. Van Orsdol long survived him and passed away in Rowley 
in 1889. 

James Van Orsdol was reared and educated in Illinois and was also married 
in that state. In 1861 he arrived in Buchanan county, driving across the country 
and here investing in eighty acres of land in Liberty township. With char- 
acteristic energy he ])egan to develop this place and afterward added to it from 
time to time by additional purchase until he was the owner of more tlian four 
hundred acres. For twenty years he lived upon the farm, carefully and sys- 
tematically tilling the soil and winning thereby a substantial competence. At 
length he rented his farm and removed to Rowley, where he opened a hotel 
which he successfully