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Full text of "A history of California and an extended history of its southern coast counties, also containing biographies of well-known citizens of the past and present"

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1359858 



GENEALOGY COLLECTION 



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 

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3 1833 01148 4125 



A HISTORY 



CALIFORNIA 



Extended History of Its Southern Coast Counties 



Containing Biographies of Well-Known Citizens of the Past and Present. 



J. M. GUINN> A. M., 

Secretary and Late President of the Historical Society of Southern California, and 
Member of the American Historical Association of Washington, D. C. 



ILLUSTRATED. 
COMPLETE IN TWO VOLUMES. 

VOLUVIE II. 



HISTORIC RECORD COMPANY 

LOS ANGELES. CAL. 
(907 



Copyright, 1907 



HISTORiC RF.CORD COMPANY. 



1359858 




'■SF' 



'^C.p.JdU^aU^-in^ 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1077 



WILLIAM C. B. RICHARDSON. One of 
the best known and most honored residents of 
Tropico is the venerable William C. B. Richard- 
son, who is distinguished both for his own life 
and work, and for the excellent ancestry from 
which he traces his descent, his family name oc- 
cupying a prominent place in the annals of New 
England, its members being noted for their 
integrity and patriotism. A son of Hon. Elkanah 
Richardson, he was born in Swanzey, Cheshire 
county, N. H., October 28, 181 5, of English an- 
cestry. His paternal grandfather, Wyman 
Richardson, a resident of the Granite state, 
served as a soldier in the Revolutionary war, 
taking an active part in many engagements. 

Born, reared and educated in New Hampshire, 
Ellkanah Richardson subsequently removed to 
Ohio, becoming a pioneer of that state. He was 
a surveyor by profession, and in the pursuit of 
his occupation became familiar with that section 
of the country in the early days of its history. 
A man of much talent, he became influential 
in financial, business and legal affairs, and 
for fourteen years he served as judge of the 
•circuit court. His death occurred while he was 
in the prime of life, at the age of fifty-six years. 
He married Sophia Belding, who was born in 
New Hampshire, of thrifty Scotch ancestr}', a 
sister of William C. Belding, who was killed in 
the war of 1812, and for whom the subject of 
this sketch was named. 

Being taken by his parents to Ohio when a 
boy, William C. B. Richardson was educated 
in the common schools of Cuyahoga Falls, Sum- 
mit county. Subsequently working with his 
father, he became proficient as a surveyor, which 
he followed - for forty years in Cleveland. A 
straightforward, thorough-going business man, 
he met with eminent success in his undertakings, 
acquiring wealth and distinction, and though he 
has disposed of some of the property that he 
formerly held in that place he still owns three 
acres of valuable land, and a number of city lots. 
In municipal affairs he was active and promin- 
ent, and while a resident of Ohio, served for 
two terms as a member of the common council 
of Cleveland. For a few years he was also en- 
gaged in the coal business, being in partnership 
with his son, O. S. Richardson, who is now dis- 
tinguished as the oldest-established coal mer- 
chant in Chicago, 111. In 1868 Mr. Richardson 
came to Los Angeles county, and here pur- 
chased the St. Eulalia rancho of six hundred 
and seventy-one acres. A part of the property 
has been sold in city lots, but adjoining land 
has been purchased, and the estate as it stands 
today contains seven hundred acres, and is worth 
upwards of a quarter of a million dollars. About 
three hundred acres of this is in strawberries 
and the balance in general fruit, walnuts and 



produce. Although over ninety years of age, 
Mr. Richardson retains much of the mental and 
physical vigor of his earlier years, and works 
some every day. He has been prosperous as a 
general farmer and fruit grower, and delights in 
adding to the happiness, comfort and prosperity 
of those around him. When the electric line 
was put through this section he gave the right 
of way, one hundred feet wide, through his 
ranch. 

In Akron, Ohio, in 1838, Mr. Richardson 
married Sarah Abbott, a daughter of John Ab- 
bott, who lived to the ripe old age of ninety- 
two years. Mrs. Richardson died in 1895, aged 
seventy-five years. Of the children born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Richardson, four arrived at years of 
maturity, namely: Omar S., of Chicago; El- 
kanah W., of Tropico, Cal. ; Herbert, also re- 
siding in Chicago, and Mrs. Sophia Bisbee, who 
died in Akron, Ohio. Mr. Richardson is a 
member of the Pioneers Society and the His- 
torical Society of Los Angeles county. He is a 
Master Mason, being made a Mason in Summit 
county, Ohio. 



PROF. W. OLIN LOWE. Prominent among 
the leading educators of San Diego county is 
Prof. W. Olin Lowe, principal of the Ramona 
high school, with which he has been connected 
in this capacity for eight years, outranking in 
length of service any other high school principal 
in the county. A man of broad and progressive 
views, cultured and talented, he is eminently 
qualified for his important work, and is meeting 
with almost phenomenal success. Possessing 
much force of character, and wise and judicious 
in his counsels, he exerts an influence for good 
in the community, and in the mental, social and 
moral development of the children under his 
supervision is an important factor. A son of 
John R. Lowe, he was born June i, i860, in 
Solano county, Cal., where his parents settled as 
pioneers. 

A native of Indiana, John R. Lowe was reared 
to agricultural pursuits, and as a young man 
chose the occupation of his ancestors. In 1852 
he came to California with the courageous pion- 
eers of those days, and in the subsequent years 
became a landholder, and a very successful agri- 
culturist and horticulturist, owning a good ranch 
and a valuable vineyard in Shasta county, where 
he spent the closing years of his life, dying there 
when sixty-four years of age. He was a stanch 
Republican in politics, and an active and con- 
sistent member of the United Brethren Qiurch. 
He married Janet Root, who was born in Indiana, 
and is now living in Kern City, Cal. Of the 
children born of their union, four survive. 

r;oing with his parents to Yolo county when 



1078 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



six years old, W. Olin Lowe there completed 
the course of study in the grammar schools, and 
afterwards attended the San Joaquin Valley Col- 
lege, spending two years in the preparatory de- 
partment and four years in collegiate work, tak- 
ing the regular classical course, which included 
Greek and Latin. He subsequently taught school 
one year in Shasta county, and four and one-half 
years in Selma, Fresno county. Then, giving up 
teaching for awhile. Professor Lowe entered the 
ministry, for three years preaching for the 
United Brethren denomination. Accepting a po- 
sition in Los Angeles in 1895, he taught most 
successfully for four years in the city schools. 
Coming from there to Ramona in 1899, he has 
since had charge of the high school, and in its 
management has won an enviable reputation as 
teacher, friend, counsellor and disciplinarian. 

In 1887 Professor Lowe married Belle Lim- 
baugh, who was born in Missouri, a daughter of 
F. IM. Limbaugh, who came with his family to 
California in 1866, and settled at Rio Vista, 
Solano county. Four children have blessed the 
union of Professor and Mrs. Lowe, namely : 
Minnie Esther, born December 18, 1888; Wil- 
liam Marion Reese, born December 26, 1890; 
Alma Genette, born July 5, 1893, and Frances 
Mae, born March 27, 1896. Politically the pro- 
fessor is a steadfast Republican, and fraternally 
he is a member of the Independent Order of 
Foresters ; of the Fraternal Brotherhood, at Los 
Angeles, and of San Diego Lodge No. 35, F. & 
A. M. He is also a member of the Southern 
California School Masters Club and for two terms 
has been identified with the San Diego county 
board of education. 



JOHN W. GUSHING. One of the enter- 
prising and progressive citizens of Los Angeles 
county was the late John W. Gushing, who en- 
gaged as an agriculturist in Southern California 
for many years prior to his death, which occurred 
February 14, 1903. He was a native of Ireland, 
born in Belfast June 24, 1830, a son of Patrick 
Gushing, a builder in that city, and Mollie 
(Stewart) Gushing, a native of Belfast and a 
member of the same family to which A. T. Stew- 
art of New York belonged. Reared to young 
manhood in Belfast J. W. Gushing received his 
education in the schools of that city, after which 
he made that place his home until 1848. In the 
last-named year he decided to immigrate to the 
western world and accordingly came to New 
York Cit>-, where he was employed for four 
years and during this time applied for his papers 
making him "a citizen of this country. They were 
granted .August 29, 1857. and delivered to him 
in San Francisco. In 1852, he came to Cali- 
fornia via the Nicaragua route, landing in San 



Francisco in April. For several years following 
his arrival in the state he was occupied in the 
mines, after which he returned to San Francisco 
and engaged in general contracting and teaming. 
In 1868 he removed to Humboldt county. Gal., 
and a year later made a trip to Southern Cali- 
fornia, where in the vicinity of Savannah, Los 
Angeles county, he purchased one hundred and 
sixty acres of the Dalton tract. The following 
year he located his family here, erecting a resi- 
dence, barns and all necessary outbuildings, and 
thereafter engaged in grain and cattle raising. 
Later he added to his original purchase one hun- 
dred and eighty acres a half mile north of 
.Savannah and a twenty acre tract adjoining the 
first piece, the entire property becoming known 
as the Primrose farm. He remained on this 
place up to the time of his death February 14, 
1903. His remains were interred in the San 
Gabriel Cemetery, as he was a member of the 
old JNIission Qnurch at San Gabriel. In his poli- 
tical relations he was a Democrat, but was always 
stanch in his support of the Union. 

In San Francisco, in St. Mary's Cathedral. 
October 20, 1861, Mr. Gushing was united in 
marriage by the Rev. Father Croak with Miss 
Mary Carr, a native of County Donegal, Ireland, 
and a daughter of John Carr. He was a general 
contractor who about 1850 located in Philadel- 
phia, Pa., where his death eventually occurred, 
as did that of his wife, formerly Catherine Travis, 
also a native of Ireland. They were the parents 
of nine children, of whom four are now living, 
Mrs. Gushing being the only one in California. 
She came to San Francisco via the Isthmus of 
Panama in 1859 and two years later was mar- 
ried in that city. She is the mother of the follow- 
ing children ; Mary Agnes, wife of Thomas 
Godfrey, of San Pedro ; Elizabeth S. and Alice 
J., both of Los Angeles; Anna L., of Giicago; 
John F., who died at the age of seven years and 
three months : Patrick L., on the home ranch ; 
Cecelia, of Los Angeles : Catherine, wife of Dr. 
C. W. Seeber, of Los Angeles ; Polk L., on the 
home ranch ; James, of Los Angeles ; Joseph 
Emmet, on the ranch ; Ileen, of Los Angeles ; 
and Margaret S. In October, 1904, Mrs. Gush- 
ing removed to Los Angeles, where she now 
makes her home, being a member of the St. 
\'incent's Catholic Giurch, and a devoted worker 
for its interest. 



CLTSHING BROTHERS. Native sons of 
the state of California, Patrick and Emmet J. 
Gushing are engaged in the cultivation and de- 
velopment of property which bids fair to rank 
with the finest ranches of Los Angeles county. 
The eldest was born in this county January 31. 
1876. and the latter .\pril 2^. 1881, both re- 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1079 



ceiving their education through the medium of 
the pubHc schools of El Monte, where they 
grew to manhood. Their father, John W. Gush- 
ing, a pioneer of California, was born in Belfast ; 
Ireland, his education was received in the schools 
of his native city, after which, at the age of 
sixteen years he came to America and in New 
York City was employed for about four years. 
Subsequently he came to California and on the 
property which he owned, known as Primrose 
farm, his death occurred February 14, 1903. 
Progressive and enterprising, the two brothers 
assumed the management of the old Cushing 
homestead, which consisted of one hundred and 
eighty acres located in the vicinity of El Monte, 
and here they are associated in the raising of stock, 
in which business they have been very success- 
ful. In 1904 Patrick Cushing was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Nellie Graney, a native of Port- 
land, Ore., and they are the parents of one son. 
John Gifford. They are devout members of 
the Catholic Church. The brothers are Demo- 
cratic in their national tendencies, although lo- 
cally they can always be counted upon to up- 
hold good government, regardless of party af- 
filitions. Socially they occupy a high position 
among the ranchers of this section of Los An- 
geles, appreciated for their sterling worth as 
men and citizens. 



SYLVESTER H. GARNER. A native Cali- 
fornian. Sylvester H. Garner was born in San 
Bernardino county, August 10, 1869, the 
youngest son of John Garner, a pioneer of the 
st.ate, and one of the prominent men among 
the ranchers of Southern California. The elder 
man was born in Davidson county, N. C, May 
I, 1820, a son of David Garner, who died at the 
remarkable age of one hundred and five years. 
He came to Hancock county. 111., where he mar- 
ried Mary Ann O. Rawson, a native of Wash- 
ington county, Ind. ; they were members of the 
Church of Latter Day Saints and located in 
Nauvoo, 111., where they made their home for 
five years, and upon the exodus of their people 
in 1846 Mr. Garner took his family to Council 
Bluffs, Iowa. Two vears later he started west- 
ward once more and in Salt Lake City he made 
his home until 1851, engaging in farming, etc. 
When learning of the new doctrines which 
Brigham Young had introduced into the church 
since coming to Salt Lake Citv, such as polvg- 
amy and others, he became disgusted with the 
church in that place. Deciding to locate in 
California, he outfitted in 185 1 and on March i 
started to cross the plains to San Bernardino 
with Dave Seelev. Capt. Jefferson Hunt and 
Andrew Lytle. There Mr. Garner purchased 
land and began farming, being the first man to 



plant alfalfa in Southern California and raise 
and thresh the seed, to start his ranch purchas- 
ing fifty pounds of seed at $1 per pound. He 
became prominent in the public life of the com- 
munity, a settlement having been established by 
the men who came through with Mr. Garner, 
and during the years of his residence he was 
elected to many positions of trust and responsi- 
bility. For two terms he served as supervisor 
of San Bernardino county and was chairman of 
the board for several years, and was also school 
trustee for many years. He was a stanch ad- 
herent of Democratic principles. By virtue of 
his early residence in the state he was a member 
of the Pioneer Society of San Bernardino county. 
In 1874 he removed to Newport, where his death 
occurred in 1890, when nearly seventy years old. 
His remains were sent to San Bernardino and 
buried by the side of his wife, who had preceded 
him in 1880. His funeral was one of the largest 
ever held in San Bernardino, the large number 
attending being a silent evidence of the great 
regard and esteem in which he was held. There 
were thirteen children in the parental family, 
of whom six are still surviving. 

Reared in Southern California, Sylvester H. 
Garner received his education in the public 
.'schools of Santa Ana, Orange county, where his 
parents located when he was a child in years. 
After completing his education he began farming 
for himself, at the age of twenty-one years go- 
ing to Fresno, where he followed horticultural 
pursuits. He became the owner of twenty acres 
of land which he sold after five years and came 
to Los Angeles county and in the vicinity of 
Florence engaged in sugar beet culture, leasing 
and cultivating about three hundred and seventy- 
five acres of land belonging to the Nadeau and 
Cudahy estates. Finally giving up ranching he 
located in Los Angeles ancl engaged in the whole- 
sale produce business, and after a time sold out 
and followed a grocery enterprise. Altogether 
he was in commercial enterprises in Los Angeles 
for five years. Finally disposing of his business 
interests he came to El Monte and in 1903 pur- 
chased his present property, which contained 
at that time fifty acres, although he has since 
disposed of a half of it and now has but twenty- 
five acres devoted to walnuts and alfalfa. He 
has made all the improvements himself, install- 
ing a pumping plant, etc., and bids fair to make 
a striking success of his enterprise. 

June 29, 1898, Mr. Garner was united in mar- 
riage with J\liss Cora Van Fleet, who was born 
in Dickinson county, Kans., in 1872 : she was 
but ten years old when brought to California 
by her father, Nelson Van Fleet who for many 
years made his home in Downey, Cal., but is 
now living retired in Los .Angeles. Mrs. Garner 
was one of eleven children, eight of whom are 



1080 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



living in California. Previous to her marriage 
she was a teacher in the Los Nietos public school, 
having held the said position for seven consecu- 
tive years. Mr. and Mrs. Garner have one child, 
.Sylvester H. Jr., who was born in Los Angeles 
City, February ii, 1903. Both himself and 
wife are members of the Reorganized Church 
of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. 



JOHN ROBERT PIERCY. Credit is due 
Mr. Piercy for the efforts he has made toward the 
upbuilding and development of the section 
of California in which he has made his home since 
1895. He is a native of North Carolina, his birth 
having occurred in Murphy. Qierokee county, 
November 22. 1859; his grandfather, Stephen 
Piercy, was born in England and in young man- 
hood immigrated to America and settled in North 
Carolina, his son, Wesley, the father of John R. 
also being a native of that state. The latter was 
a surveyor and was engaged in this work in North 
Carolina until his death. He was a citizen of 
prominence, helpful in the maintenance of law 
and order, and as a Master Mason was influen- 
tial in fraternal circles. He married Martha 
Collins, whose birth and death occurred also in 
North Carolina. 

Of the thirteen children born to his parents, of 
whom nine attained maturity and eight are now 
living, John Robert Piercy was sixth in order of 
birth. He was left an orphan at the age of ten 
years and two years later he went to Indiana 
where, in the vicinity of Terre Haute, he made 
his home with a brother, who was a farmer in 
that section. He remained in that location for 
four years when he decided to go further west- 
ward, and accordingly traveled through Iowa, 
North Dakota and Utah, engaging in farming and 
mining, the latter employment occupying his at- 
tention in Utah for eight years, working with the 
Maxfield Mining Company. It was in 1895 that 
he first came to California and in the vicinity of 
El Monte, Los Angeles county, he found em- 
ployment on the ranch of .George H. Peck. After 
one year he leased the ranch, which consisted of 
four hundred and eighty-three acres, and while 
he engaged in the raising of alfalfa and grain 
he undertook the improvement of the place by 
boring a well one hundred and twenty-seven 
feet deep and installing a steam engine, forty- 
horse power, with a capacity of one hundred and 
fifty inches. He had two hundred acres given 
over entirely to the cultivation of alfalfa. In 
1902 he decided to invest in land and accordingly 
purchased fifty-four acres in the vicinity of El 
Monte, and immediately set it to walnuts, while 
he also engaged in general farming. Later he 
disposed of twenty-nine acres of the jirnperty, re- 
taining twenty-five acres, which he has brought 



to a high state of cultivation and improvement, 
having erected a new residence in 1905. He was 
instrumental in the incorporation of what is 
known as the Peck Ranch Water Company, of 
which he is secretary and manager, and which ir- 
rigates one hundred and fifty-eight acres of land. 
November 22, 1891, in North Carolina, Air. 
Piercy was united in marriage with Miss Rillie 
Tatham, who was born in Cherokee county, that 
state. Her father, Benton Tatham, and grand- 
father, Thomas, were both natives of North Car- 
olina, of English descent, the latter having served 
in the Mexican war, as did his brother, James 
Tatham. Farming- had been the occupation of 
the family for generations and Benton Tatham 
w'as so engaged at the breaking out of the Civil 
war. in which he served faithfully. He married 
Arra \\'right, born in Yancey county, N. C, 
a daughter of James Wright, a farmer of Scotch- 
Irish descent ; she was the fifth in a family of ten 
children and is still living. Mr. and Mrs. Piercy 
are the parents of three children, namely : Rob- 
ert, William and !Murvel. Fraternally he is an 
Odd Fellow, having been made a member of the 
order in Monrovia ; politically he is a Republican 
on national issues, while locally he supports the 
man whom he considers best qualified for public 
duties. 



MARK HUTCHCROFT. One of the suc- 
cessful citizens of the community in and about 
Bassett is ]\Iark Hutchcroft, known and esteemed 
throughout this section as an upbuilder of the best 
interests of the general welfare. He is a native 
of Grant county. Wis., born January 27, 1859, 
the oldest son in a family of eight children, of 
whom three sons and four daughters are now liv- 
ing. His father, John Hutchcroft, was born in 
Yorkshire, England, where the name had flour- 
ished for generations. The grandfather, Ed- 
ward Hutchcroft, brought his family to America 
and located in Grant county. Wis., where he en- 
gaged first as a miner and later as a farmer, 
.^fter spending fifteen years in mining, John 
Hutchcroft followed farming and finally, in 1874, 
brought his family across the continent to Ore- 
gon, where they located in McMinnville. Later 
he purchased a farm in North Yamhill, Yam- 
hill county, and resided there until his death, 
which occurred in 1897. He belonged to the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, and politically was 
a stanch Republican. His \vife. formerly Mar- 
garet Bell, was born in Aberdeen. Scotland, a 
daughter of Robert Bell, a merchant in Scotland, 
where he also died. Thev also were members 
of the Methodist Episcopal Qiurch. 

Mark Hutchcroft received his preliminary ed- 
ucation in the public schools of Wisconsin and 
Oregon, and completed it in the Willamette 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1083 



Universit}'. He was reared on his father's farm, 
where he remained until attaining his majority. 
He then became dependent upon his own re- 
sources and with his brother began logging on 
the North Yamhill river, from the city of Isorth 
Yamhill down to Oregon City and Portland. He 
was occupied thus for five years, when with his 
accumulated earnings he rented a place and be- 
gan raising hops at North Yamhill, still in part- 
nership with his brother. On account of his 
wife's health he sold out in May, 1895, and came 
to California, locating in Santa Monica and en- 
gaging with the Santa Monica Lumber Com- 
pany. In 1897 he accepted a position as fore- 
man of the Bassett ranch, and has held it ever 
since, now being superintendent of three hundred 
acres of this large property, and engaged in set- 
ting it to walnuts. He has purchased thirty acres 
of the ranch, which is devoted to walnuts and 
alfalfa, while his attention is given to general 
farming on the greater part of the place. 

Mr. Hutchcroft was married in Oregon to Miss 
May Roberts, a native of Iowa, and a daughter of 
Henry Roberts, and they have two children, 
Grace and Gladys Belle. Mr. Hutchcroft has 
always take a prominent place in educational 
affairs wherever he has made his home, while in 
Oregon serving on the school board, and was also 
a member of the Bassett school board when their 
building was erected. He is a member of the 
Mountain View Presbyterian Church, in which 
he officiates as an elder, and politically upholds 
the principles of the Republican party. 



HON. WILLIAM H. KELSO. For many 
generations the Kelso family was identified 
with the development of Pennsylvania and 
especially with the agricultural and coal-min- 
ing interests of Allegheny county. The orig- 
inal Scotch immigrant, George Kelso, who 
came to the United States in 1760. from the 
town of Kelso, Scotland, located in Bucks 
county. Pa., from there going- to Cumberland, 
near McClure's Gap, and still later, in 1782, 
removing to Washington county. His son, 
John Kelso, served seven years, seven months 
and ten days in the Revolutionary war, and 
was one of the one hundred and twenty men 
who stormed Stony Point. During his serv- 
ice he was made orderly sergeant. The son 
of the latter and the grandson of the orig- 
inal founder of the name in America, Ben- 
jam,in Kelso, was born in 1790, in Allegheny 
county^ where he became the owner of coal 
lands, bank stock and other profitable hold- 
ings, representing about $30,000, which in 
those days was considered quite a fortune. 
Among the children of Benjamin was John 
P>.. a native of Allegheny county and a life- 



long resident ot that portion of Pentisylvania, 
where he died at sixty-five years. Included 
in his possessions was a tract of coal land, 
which in time became the inheritance of his 
only son, William H., the only daughter hav- 
ing died without heirs. In politics he affiliated 
with the Republican party from the organi- 
zation of the party until his death, and always 
he maintained an active interest in party mat-, 
ters. Through his marriage to Mary Hall, a 
native of Allegheny county, he became con- 
nected with an old-established family of Penn- 
sylvania, of remote Irish extraction. Her 
father, William Hall, was born in Allegheny 
county and after an active life as a farmer he 
died there aged about seventy-six years, his 
wife surviving him until ninety-six years of 
age. During the year 1886 Mrs. Mary Kelso 
came to the Pacific coast and afterward re- 
sided in California until her death in 1905, 
at eighty-two years of age. From childhood 
she had been identified with the United Pres- 
byterian denomination, which was the church 
of her forefathers. 

On the homestead in Allegheny county. Pa., 
William H. Kelso was born February 24, 
1847, and there he passed the care-free days 
of boyhood. His education was commenced 
in neighboring schools and completed in the 
Dayton (Pa.) Academy, after which he re- 
mained with his father and grandfather. De- 
cember 21, 1870, he was united in marriage 
with Miss Mina C. Craig, a native of Indiana 
county. Pa., and a member of an old eastern 
family. With his young wife he established 
a home on a farm and there he engaged in 
raising grain and feeding cattle. Meanwhile 
the oil industry had assumed gigantic pro- 
portions in Pennsylvania and its activities 
penetrated to the Kelso homestead, which 
proved to possess oil in paying quantities. In 
1887 he rented the old homestead of one hun- 
dred and sixty acres, which he yet owns. 
Eight oil wells on the land produced two hun- 
dred thousand barrels of oil during the first 
year and three of them are still pumping. 
The wells were drilled principally in 1891- 
93, Mr. Kelso's share being one-sixth of the 
output. Upon renting the old home place in 
1887 he came to California and purchased 
sixty acres near Inglewood, and also three 
blocks in the townsite of Inglewood, contain- 
ing fifteen acres, which were iaid out in town 
lots and blocks, including his home place, 
which is one of the most attractive in the 
town. Always interested in movements for 
the development of his home town, he has 
fostered worthy enterprises and was one of 
the founders of the Bank of Inglewood, in 
which he now owns stock. For ten vears he 



1084 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



has officiated as director of Occidental Col- 
lege and in other ways he has proved his keen 
interest in educational progress. In his fam- 
ily there are two daughters, Anna J. and Edith 
A., both of whom were given exceptional ad- 
vantages ; the older is married to Arthur J. 
McFadden, of Santa Ana, member of an hon- 
ored family of this region, and they have one 
daughter, Mary ; the younger daughter, Edith 
A., remains with her parents. 

The religious connections of the family are 
with the Presbj'terian Church, but other de- 
nominations have received from them active 
encouragement and financial aid. In fraternal 
. relations Mr. Kelso holds membership with 
the Independent Order of Foresters. From 
boyhood he was reared to a faith in the Re- 
publican party and later studies of the polit- 
ical situation did not change his belief. 
Though always willing to assist friends who 
were candidates for office, he has never cared 
for such honors for himself, and the only po- 
sition he has held came to him unsought. This 
was in November of 1902, when without an 
active campaign on his part he was elected to 
represent the seventieth district in the state 
assembly. During the session that followed 
he served on various committees of importance 
and represented his constituents with fidelity 
and intelligence, but at the expiration of his 
term he declined further official responsibili- 
ties and honors, and retired to the enjoyment 
of private life and the management of his im- 
portant business and landed interests. 



OLOF LARSON. The years included be- 
tween 1880 and 1898 recall varied experiences 
on the part of Mr. Larson, all valuable in their 
way, but none more so than those brought to 
mind by the dates just mentioned, the former 
being the year of his advent in the New World, 
and "the latter the year in which he located 
upon his present ranch in San Bernardino 
county, not far from the city of that name. A 
son of Lars Hanson and Kestein (Pierceson) 
Larson, he was born in Skone, Sweden, Janu- 
ary 7, 1858. receiving an excellent education in 
the public schools of his native town. Native 
thrift and not necessity was the idea in mind 
when he took up agricultural pursuits upon 
leaving school, for his parents were well-to-do 
and no comfort had been denied him. 

At the age of twenty-two years, in 1880, Mr. 
I^arson carried out a desire which had taken a 
strong hold upon him. and in the spring of that 
year he was among the passengers who landed 
at Castle Garden. Going direct from New 
York to Lasalle county. 111., he remained there 



five years, after which he returned to Sweden 
to visit his parents and friends. Three months 
of rest and inactivity made him anxious to re- 
sume business, and at the end of this time he 
returned to America, this time locating in Ot- 
tawa, 111. In 1886 he sought the milder climate 
of California, locating at Craftonville, where 
he was employed in a hotel for about one and a 
half years. After working in a livery in Red- 
lands for about a year he came to San Bernar- 
dino, but three months later returned to Red- 
lands, where for four months he was in the em- 
ploy of H. H. Sinclair. A desire to see and in- 
form himself in regard to the northern coast 
induced him to go to Seattle, Wash., where he 
found employment with a company engaged in 
laying a cable road, doing construction work 
for about four months, when he went to Puget 
Sound, there acting as yardmaster in a lumber 
3-ard for one year. Still later he became tally 
keeper in loading grain on steamers, following 
this until returning to San Bernardino in 1892, 
from that year until 1898 working in a liverj^ 
stable here. As has been previously intimated, 
it was during the latter year that he purchased 
and settled upon his present ranch of twenty 
acres, which has been his home ever since, and 
which he has transformed from wild land into 
one of the most productive ranches in the coun- 
ty. Realizing that the first essential for a suc- 
cessful ranch depended upon a sufficient water 
supply, he put in flumes for irrigation, having 
in the meantime set out orange trees and plant- 
ed grape vines. The result of his continued ef- 
forts to make his ranch a success has been all 
that could be desired by the most sanguine, and 
much credit is due him for what he has accom- 
plished. 

In San Bernardino, March 2, 1888, Mr. Lar- 
son and Kerstine Swenson were united in mar- 
riage. A native of Sweden, Mrs. Larson was 
born in Skone, July 21, 1865, the daughter of 
Swen Hanson and Ulrika (Rosengrenl Swen- 
son. When twenty-one years of age she came 
to the United States with her brother and lo- 
cated in Ottawa, 111., coming to California the 
following year and settling in San Bernardino. 
Five children have blessed the marriage of Mr. 
and Mrs. Larson, of whom we mention the fol- 
lowing: Ivan LTlrik, born January 9, 1890, and 
Frances Estella, born December 31, 1891, are 
both at home with their parents ; the next child, 
Algene Henrietta, was born April 16, 1894, in 
Sweden, where Mrs. Larson had gone on a 
visit; the daugliter did not long survive the 
journey to the United States, dying two days 
after her arrival, August 6, 1894; the other chil- 
dren arc Algina Kerstina. born June 5, 1899. 
and Norman Stanley, born August 10, 1902. 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1087 



The family attend the Swedish Lutheran 
Church at San Bernardino, of which the par- 
ents are members. PoHtically Mr. Larson is a 
Republican, and fraternally he is a member of 
the Woodmen of the World, having joined the 
order in San Bernardino in 1897. 



CASSIUS C. JOHNSON. Few more con- 
sistent, practical or well-balanced careers 
have contributed to the development of Pomo- 
na and Claremont than that of the late C. C. 
Johnson, whose death, September 3, 1906, was 
mourned by the citizens of both towns as that 
of a personal friend. His remains were in- 
terred in the cemetery at Pomona, in which 
town so many years of his active and useful 
life had been passed. 

Indiana was Mr. Johnson's native state, and 
he was born in Greencastle April i, 1854, one 
of the younger children in a family of ten 
born to his parents, Dickson and Nancy (Se- 
wein Johnson, both of the latter being na- 
tives of Kentucky. Among the early set- 
tlers in Indiana who had crossed over the 
Ohio river from Kentucky was Dickson John- 
son, who settled down as a farmer in that new 
country, but he was evidently not satisfied 
with the country for a permanent location, 
and some time after the birth of his son C. C. 
he removed to Vinton. Iowa, near which city 
he purchased a large farm. It was there that 
his earth life came to a close, leaving to 
mourn his loss a widow and a large family of 
children. The mother passed away some years 
later in Willow Lake, S. Dak. As he was a 
mere child when the family removed from In- 
diana to Iowa C. C. Johnson was reared al- 
most entirel}^ in the latter state, attending 
first the public school of Vinton and later 
Vinton Academy. Although reared on a 
farm he had no taste for farming himself, and 
as soon as his school days were over he se- 
cured a position in a dry-goods store in Vin- 
ton with the idea of learning the business. 
When one has definite ideas of a line of busi- 
ness which he wishes to follow and with per- 
sistency applies himself to its masterv the 
victory is half won, and thus it was with Mr. 
Johnson, for in a short time he was enabled 
to start in the dry-goods business on his own 
account. The failure of his health, however, 
brought about a change in his plans and af- 
ter disposing of his interests in Iowa he came 
to California in r88i. The following year he 
purchased a ranch of thirty acres on the cor- 
ner of San Bernardino and Towne avenues. 
For about four years he raised sheep and grain 
on his property and then siidivided the ranch 



into one and four acre tracts, also opening 
Towne avenue. In the mean time he had been 
employed in the weighing department of the 
Southern Pacific road for about one year. 

In 1895 Mr. Johnson removed to a' foothill 
ranch east of San Antonio, comprising several 
hundred acres. He gave this up, however, in 
the fall of 1900 and removed to Claremont, 
in order that his children could attend Pomo- 
na College. After locating here he engaged 
in the real-estate business, and among other 
transactions with which his name was as- 
sociated was the laying out of a forty-acre 
tract on North Harvard avenue, which he sold 
off as Johnson's addition to Claremont, and 
he also laid out another forty-acre tract ad- 
joining known as College, avenue addition. 
This business is still being carried on under 
the name of C. C. Johnson & Co. In 1902 he 
erected the fine residence now occupied by 
the family, located on North Harvard avenue. 
Far from being self-centered and interested in 
his own private affairs only, Mr. Johnson was 
on the other hand broad minded and gener- 
ous. He was a director in the Citizens' Light 
and Water Company, was the organizer of 
the Co-operative Water Company, which was 
located on his ranch, also assisted in the or- 
ganization of the Claremont Lumber Com- 
pany, the Citizens' State Bank and the Clare- 
mont Inn Company, of which latter he was 
president. For many years he had served ef- 
ficiently as school trustee of Claremont and 
also served as selectman. 

In Vinton, Iowa, May 19, 1880, C. C. John- 
son was married to Miss Louise Moore, who 
was born in Durand. 111., the daughter of 
Hubbard Moore. From Vermont, his native 
state, Mr. Moore set out with the '4gers for 
the gold region, but he did not remain long 
in the west at that time. Later he removed 
to Durand, 111., and established himself in the 
dry-goods business, which he followed until 
removing to Vinton, Iowa, there following the 
builder's trade. Removing from the middle 
west in 1881 he came to California and the 
same year purchased a ranch adjoining Pomo- 
na, upon which he lived the remainder of his 
life, and in addition to its management he also 
carried on contracting to some extent. Mrs. 
Moore, who before her marriage was Kath- 
erine Peck, was born in Massachusetts and 
now resides with her daughter, Mrs. John- 
son. Five children blessed the marriage of 
Air. and Mrs. Johnson: .'\lbert, who is en- 
gaged in the electrical business in Covina ; 
Tames, who is with the Claremont Lumber 
Company; Clarence; Fmma, deceased; and 
Katherine. PoHticalh- Mr. Tohnson was a 



1088 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



strong Republican, and in his church affilia- 
tions was an active member of the Congrega- 
tional Church, of which at one time he was a 
trustee. Thoroughly devoted to the interests 
of this part of California, he was one of those 
citizens whose coming from the east meant 
so much to the development and growth of 
the state. 



JOHN H. BREEDLOVE. Coming to San 
Diego county nearly a quarter of a century 
ago, John H. Breedlove has been an active 
and able assistant in developing and advanc- 
ing its industrial and business prosperity. He 
is pleasantly located near Valley Center, and 
is one of the substantial men of his commun- 
ity, owning a large and well-cultivated ranch, 
and being especially interested in dairying. 
A man of unbounded energy and enterprise, 
he has accumulated his property by hard labor 
and the exercise of the good judgment and 
sound sense with which nature generously en- 
dowed him, and at the same time he has cul- 
tivated to a marked degree those inherent vir- 
tues and habits that make him a valued citi- 
zen and a true man in every relation of life. 
A son of William Breedlove, he was born De- 
cember 26, 1846, in Webster county, Mo., 
where he received a common school educa- 
tion. 

A native of Tennessee, William Breedlove 
remained in his early home until after his mar- 
riage with Susan Haggard. Migrating then 
to the extreme western frontier, he lived for 
many years in Missouri, clearing from the 
wilderness a good farm in Webster county, 
where he became owner of about eight hun- 
dred acres of land. In the later years of his 
life he started with his family for the Pacific 
coast, but while crossing the plains his good 
wife was taken ill and died. He continued the 
journey to California, but after a brief stay 
returned to Missouri, and there spent the re- 
mainder of his life. To him and his wife sev- 
en children were born. 

Brought up on the homestead, and well 
drilled in farming and stock-raising from his 
boyhood. John H. Breedlove became well fit- 
ted for the independent calling which he is 
now following so successfully. As a young man, 
however, he thought to find some more congen- 
ial occupation, and with that end in view went 
in the spring of 1864 to Montana, where he 
worked for awhile in the mines. Not finding 
much profit in his labors he went back to his 
native state, where he resumed ranching for 
a time. Subsequently he went first to Kan- 
sas, then to Texas, where he lived four years, 
working at the carpenter's trade in Wood 



county. Returning home, he assisted his 
father on the farm from 1874 until 1876, when 
he came to California, locating in Butte coun- 
ty, where he followed farming two years. 
Coming from there to San Diego county in 
1878, he took up a homestead claim on which, 
he resided five years. In 1883 he located near 
Valley Center, buying his present ranch of six 
hundred and sixty acres, and in its improve- 
ment has met with unquestioned success, it 
being one of the best and most attractive home 
estates to be found in this section of the state. 
He pays much attention to dairying, for a 
number of years milking from fifty to seven- 
ty cows daily, and carries on general farming 
to a considerable extent, raising all of the hay 
and grain used on the farm. 

In Missouri, in 1875, Mr. Breedlove married 
Edith A. Rogers, a native of that state, and 
into their home four children have been born, 
nam.ely : Roy E., of Los Angeles, a dealer in 
real estate ; Lillian, also dealing in real es- 
tate in Los Angeles ; Grace, at home ; and 
Carl. Although not very active in politics, Mr> 
Breedlove keeps himself well informed upon 
current events, and uniformly supports the 
Republican ticket. Religiously -Mr. and Mrs. 
Breedlove are members of the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church. 



EDWARD H. STAGG, of Los Angeles is a 
man who, although retired from active service on 
account of ill health, still takes a prominent in- 
terest in public affairs, and his thirty years ol 
intimate connection with railroad work while fill- 
ing important positions gives him an insight into 
the live questions of the day, which is of recog- 
nized value. He was born in Jackson county. 
Mo., November 8, 1853, one of a family of seven 
children, five of whom are still living. His 
father, Rev. Isaac M. Stagg, was a native of 
New Jersey and when a young man learned the 
tailor's trade at Hartford, Conn. From there he 
removed to Laporte, Ind., took a theological 
course, was ordained as a minister and accepted 
in the Methodist Conference, after which he re- 
moved to Logansport, Ind., and continued in the 
ministry twenty-four years. His death at East 
St. Louis, 111., removed a man who was greatly 
revered by all who knew him. The mother was 
in maidenhood Marial Thomas, and a native of 
New York. She was a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal Guirch, and an active worker in re- 
ligious circles. Her death occurred in 1891 at 
Albuquerque, N. Mex. 

E. H. Stagg received a common school educa- 
tion and immediately after his school days were 
over he became an apprentice at the cigarmaker's 
trade. In 1872 he beg-an his career as a railroad 




J/. j^£o(cuJii^ <£/^^A 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1091 



man, entering the service of the Ilhnois Central 
as a clerk and was promoted successively to 
baggage master and conductor. Later he be- 
came connected with the Union Pacific Railway 
Company, filling the position of chief bill clerk 
at Kansas City, Mo., and when he left that posi- 
tion it was to become chief clerk to the terminal 
agent of the Denver & Rio Grande in the south- 
western part of Colorado. From there he went 
to Oregon as chief clerk in the auditor's office, 
was soon promoted to the position of traveling 
auditor, and in 1897 became chief claim clerk 
of the Atlantic & Pacific. In 1898 he was made 
auditor of the Randsburg Railway Company, 
which position he filled for about a year, when 
he was appointed to the position of general 
freight and passenger agent of the same com- 
pany, and before he retired from that company 
in 1904 had attained the office of general man- 
ager. Mr. Stagg built the Ludlow Southern 
Railroad and served as general manager and 
treasurer of the company before his retirement 
from active work on account of impaired health. 
He still owns large business interests and is at 
present a stockholder and director of the High- 
land Park Bank. In politics he has always been 
an active member of the Republican party. 

Fraternally Mr. Stagg is a Royal Arch Mason 
and is identified with Signet Chapter No. 57, F, 
& A. M., and is Past Grand Secretary of New 
Mexico jurisdiction of Odd Fellows. He was 
married to Miss Louise Vaughn, a native of 
Windsor, Ontario, and has a family of three 
children, all of whom are living in California. 
Thev are: Mrs. Nellie A. Black, Mrs. Jessie 
Norton, and Mrs. Sarah E. McMillan. Mrs. 
Stagg is a member of and active worker in the 
Methodist Episcopal Church. In everything he 
has undertaken Mr. Stagg has met with great 
success and has amassed a considerable fortune. 



M. ALEXANDER SCHUTZ, A. B., M. D. 
A resident of California since 1891, Dr. Schutz 
has been an eye-witness to the remarkable de- 
velopment of the southern part of the state and 
has himself been an active participant in the 
growth and progress of Long Beach, where he 
has made his home for the greater part of this 
time. He is a native of Russia, having been born 
at Odessa on the Black Sea, March 2, 1864, the 
descendant of a family conspicuous in the af- 
fairs of that country, an uncle now serving as 
physician to the Royal family. After receiving 
a primary education in the private schools in the 
portion of the country where he made his home, 
he entered college and after eight years gradu- 
ated with the degree of A. B. and prepared to 
take up the study of medicine, which he had 
chosen for his life work. He had intended to 



pursue this study with his uncle, but his plans 
were changed by political ideas imbibed through 
a careful and thoughtful review of the situation 
in Russia. He became a Liberalist and before 
his plans were completed was placed under sus- 
picion and practically deprived of his liberty. 
For the sake of the broader freedom to be found 
on this side of the water he decided to come to 
America, and upon his arrival became a student 
in New York, taking up the study of medicine. 
His health becoming impaired he gave up his 
studies and came to California to recuperate, 
completing the course in the Southern California 
Medical College, and receiving the degree of M. 
D. in 1899. In the meantime, in 1894, he had 
located in Long Beach and established a sanita- 
rium for the treatment of chronic and nervous 
diseases, erecting the buildings and fitting them 
out with every modern appliance. Later he en- 
larged the property and the first building which 
was erected is now used for an office. He con- 
ducted the work successfully and at the same time 
took a broad interest in the material upbuilding 
of his adopted city, putting up the first Liberal 
hall in Long Beach, where free speech could be 
made. In 1901 he built the Riviera hotel, the 
largest of its kind in the city, consisting of eighty 
rooms and all modernly ecjuipped for the accom- 
modation of the best class of tourists. Fle was 
also the organizer of the Improvement Society of 
Long Beaoh and established the first batli in the 
place, and along many lines has given his best 
efforts for the beautifying and upbuilding of the 
city. In 1905 he organized the International 
Home for children, his object being to protect 
the homeless and friendless children of all na- 
tionalities and place them in an environment cal- 
culated to enable them to develop the best in their 
lives. They are taught not only the principle of 
universal love and given the best physical and 
intellectual training, but are also instructed in 
useful trades and occupations and taught to be- 
come self-supporting. The home, which is lo- 
cated near Signal Hill, built by the doctor and 
improved each year, is to be dedicated to them in 
perpetuity, to be free from indebtedness and 
thereby insuring them the best opportunity to 
develop the highest type of manhood and woman- 
hood. This is" the plan of Dr. Schutz, to be ful- 
filled at his demise, his possessions to be given 
to the support of the home. 

In Long Beach Dr. Schutz was united in mar- 
riage with Pearl Kelly, a daughter of Rev. Isaac 
Kellv, and a native of Iowa, from which state 
she removed to California in 1895. They are the 
parents of a son and daughter, Ahura and 
Emeth, both natives of this city. Mrs. Schutz 
is identified with her husband in his philan- 
thropic work and gives him licr heartiest support 
and encouragement. In the midst of his other 



1092 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



labors the doctor is the editor of the Southern 
Cahfomia Journal of Health, of which about a 
thousand numbers are published each month, and 
he has also traveled and lectured on Russia ver)^ 
extensively. In his practice in the sanitarium 
he makes a specialty of electricity and X-ray and 
is accomplishing much that is bringing him prom- 
inently before the public. The doctor is not a 
man of one idea, unless it be said — and truly — 
that all his actions are founded upon the rul- 
ing motive of his life, to be a benefit to human- 
ity, for he is broad and philanthropic, a man 
of letters and scholarly attainments ; and a true 
Socialist in all the comprehensiveness of the 
term, freely giving of his time and means in the 
furtherance of his ideas, which mean a broader 
and better future for the coming generation. 



FRANCIS CHERRILL HANNON. A 
native son of the state, Francis Cherrill Han- 
non was born in San Jose, March 6, 1867, the 
son of an honored pioneer. Jeremiah C. Han- 
non was born in London. England, December 
2. 1828, a son of David Hannon, who married 
Martha Cherrill. The grandfather brought his 
family to America and located near Zanes- 
ville,"Ohio. where he died in 1854. Jeremiah 
C. Hannon engaged as a farmer in Ohio until 
i860, when he came by the Isthmus of Pan- 
ama to San Francisco and for a time followed 
mining in California and Nevada. Later, in 
San Francisco, he was married and in 1863 
purchased a ranch near San Jose and farmed 
there for six years, coming at the last-named 
date to Southern California, where he pur- 
chased one hundred and sixty acres one mile 
north of El Monte. This was wild land, which 
he began at once to improve, continuing his 
labors until 1904, when he retired from active 
cares and located at San Gabriel, where he is 
now residing. In addition to his quarter sec- 
tion of land previously mentioned he owns 
seven hundred acres in Beaumont, Cal. He is 
prominent in public affairs, having served for 
many years as county supervisor on the Dem- 
ocratic ticket. His wife, formerly Elizabeth 
Carr, was born in County Donegal, Ireland, 
and she is also living, at the age of sixty-nine 
years. They became the parents of seven 
children, of whom six attained maturity, and 
are now living. 

The eldest in his father's family, Francis 
Cherrill Hannon, was brought to this section 
in infancy, his education being received 
through the medium of the public schools. At 
the age of eighteen years he went to Los An- 
eeles and entered the employ of the Hellman- 
Haas Comoany, wholesale grocers, remaining 
with them for some time, beginning at the 



bottom of the business and working up until 
he was placed in charge of the shipping office. 
At the age of twenty-one years he was 
appointed ganger of the United States rev- 
enue service in the southern district of Califor- 
nia, serving under Asa Ellis for three years. 
.\t the close of his term he was appointed 
deputy sheriff of Los Angeles county^ under 
Sheriff Gibson, and after serving one term 
was made chief deputy in the street depart- 
ment of the city of Los Angeles. His term ex- 
pired two years later, when he engaged in 
general contracting throughout Southern Cal- 
ifornia, taking street and railroad contracts 
for ten years. In 1904 he decided to take up 
agricultural life and accordingly leased the 
ranch which he now occupies, consisting of 
one hundred and thirty-five acres, where he 
has since dug two wells ninety feet deep each, 
and installed a thirty-horse power gasoline 
engine, with a capacity of one hundred inches. 
He gives his time to the raising of vegetables 
and berries for the wholesale markets, ten 
acres devoted to the small fruit, forty acres to 
vineyard and the remainder given over to 
vegetables. 

In Los Angeles Mr. Hannon was united in 
marriage with Ixliss Frankie Crowley, a na- 
tive of Nevada county. Cal., and born of this 
union are two children, Ynez and Margaret. 
Politically ^Mr. Hannon is a stanch Demo- 
crjit and at one time was a member of the 
Democratic city^ central committee of Los 
Angeles. He is a man of many- splendid qual- 
ities of character, which he has displayed 
throughout his residence in Southern Califor- 
nia, and as a man and citizen has won the re- 
spect and esteem of all who know him. 



JA:MES B. CARROLL. Among the exten- 
sive, practical and progressive agriculturists of 
San Diego county, James B. Carroll, of Escon- 
dido, owner of a large and valuable ranch, holds 
a position of importance and influence. An 
active, capable business man. possessing a clear 
judgment and amply endowed with those qual- 
ities which constitute an honorable citizen, he is 
highly esteemed throughout the community, and 
takes genuine interest in. the advancement of its 
prosperity and in the improvement of its moral, 
educational and social status. He is the son of 
the late Cornelius Carroll. The latter and his 
wife, whose maiden name was Mary Egan. were 
both born in Ireland, and there spent their earlier 
lives. After their marriage they moved to the 
United States and were among the pioneer set- 
tlers of Wisconsin, and also lived for several 
vears in Minnesota. From there they removed 
to Oregon, where Mr. Carroll followed the oc- 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1093 



cup'ation of engineer and merchant. Later he 
came with his family to San Diego county, Cal, 
and for a time farmed land in Mission Valley. 
Subsequently he located near Escondido, pur- 
chasing the place now farmed and occupied by 
his son, James B., and here successfully carried 
on his independent occupation until his death in 
1885. His good wife survived him, passing 
away on the home ranch in 1898. Eight chil- 
dren were born of their union, four of whom 
are living, while four have passed to the world 
beyond. 

James B. Carroll was born in Salem, Ore., but 
most of his life has been spent in San Diego 
county. After finishing his education in the San 
Diego public school he turned his attention to 
the pursuit of agriculture and assisted his father 
in the management of the ranch, which the latter 
had purchased about four miles from Escondido. 
He now has about eight hundred acres of fine 
valley land, and is extensively engaged in rais- 
ing stock and grain, being one of the largest and 
most successful ranchers in this section of the 
county. 

Living with Mr. Carroll on the parental home- 
stead are his three sisters, namely : Mrs. Hollan, 
Honora J., and Theresa Carroll. Honora J. 
Carroll has been a teacher, and was principal 
of the North Salem and North San Diego public 
schools, and has also taught music. Mr. Carroll 
is greatly interested in the welfare of town and 
county, voting irrespective of party in local is- 
sues, but in national politics supporting the 
straight Democratic ticket. Fraternally he is a 
member of San Diego Lodge, Ancient (.)rder of 
Hibernians. 



BENJAMIN SOULARD \-IRDEN. The 
identification of the A'irden family with Amer- 
ican development dates from the year 1620, when 
one of that name immigrated to this country from 
Holland and settled in the vicinity of Dover, Del. 
The original house occupied and owned by the 
family is still standing, a veritable landmark of 
the far distant past. Later generations remained 
in Delaware and wielded considerable influence 
in their localities. The lineage descends from 
Samuel Virden, a man of wealth and high stand- 
ing, to his son, Peter, a native of Delaware, but 
during early manhood a planter near Jackson, 
Miss., and a staff officer in the Civil war. At 
the close of that struggle he established his fam- 
ily in Philadelphia. Pa., and engaged in busi- 
ness in that city, but ultimately returned to Dela- 
ware, where in 1900 he passed away at his 
Dover home. His wife, who bore the maiden 
name of Emma Clocey. was born in Pennsyl- 
vania of French descent and was connected with 
the Soulard family of St. Louis. 



Seven children, all but one of whom are living, 
comprised the family of Peter and Emma Vir- 
den. One of the sons, Edwin, carries on a drug 
business at Santa Paula, Cal., and is a leading 
citizen of that town. Another son, Benjamin 
Soulard, was born at Jackson, Miss., March 7, 
1866, and as a boy lived in Philadelphia and 
Dover, and attended the Wilmington Academy 
in Dover. From youth he has been familiar with 
the drug business, his first experience being 
gained with W. C. A. Loder, on Sixteenth and 
Chestnut streets, Philadelphia. After one year 
as a student in the Philadelphia College of 
Pharmacy he went to Savannah and to other 
points in the south, where for several years he 
was employed as a drug clerk. On his return 
to Philadelphia he opened a drug store on 
Twenty-third and Pine streets, but disposed of 
the busfness after one year. 

On coming to California in 1888 Mr. Virden 
engaged as a clerk for his brother at Santa 
Paula, but soon went to Ventura, where he re- 
mained for two years in a drug store. During 
1892 he embarked in the drug business for him- 
self at Saticoy and for some years he continued 
in that town. At the time of the founding of 
Oxnard he came to the new town and rented a 
lot containing a cabin of most primitive appear- 
ance. In that building he started the first drug 
store in the place. Subsequently he replaced the 
original building with one of brick, 25x60 feet 
in dimensions, and conveniently arranged for the 
conduct of his drug business. His attractive 
residence in Oxnard is presided over by his wife 
(a native of Ventura county, and formerly 
Josephine Kelley) and its pleasures are en- 
hanced by the presence of their children. Hazel 
C. Ruth M., and Benjamin S., Jr. 

The movement which resulted in the incor- 
poration of Oxnard had in Mr. Virden a stanch 
supporter and one appreciative of the benefits 
accruing therefrom. At all times he has favored 
measures for the development of the city's re- 
sources and the introduction of modern improve- 
ments conducive to the comfort and health of 
the citizens. Since 1902 he has officiated as 
clerk of the board of school trustees and mean- 
while has been a stanch friend of all plans for 
educational development and for the elevation of 
the system of public schools. The Citizens Gnb, 
an organization highly beneficial to the town, 
numbers him among its directors. Strongly 
Democratic in his sympathies, he has aided his 
partv by working as a member of the county cen- 
tral committee and by acting as a deletrate to 
the state convention. .'Xfter coming to the coast 
he was made a Mason in Hucneme Lodee and 
later identified himself with Oxnard Lodo-e No. 
^41, F. & A. M. Beginning as a Rova] Arch 
Mason in the Ventura" Chapter, he later became 



1094 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



a charter member of Oxnard Chapter Xo. 86, 
of which he acts as high priest. In addition he 
has become associated with Ventura Command- 
ery, K. T., and Al Malaikah Temple, A. A. O. 
N. M. S., of Los Angeles, and also belongs to 
the Uniform Rank, Knights of Pythias. 



CLAUS A. JOHNSON. Many generations 
of the Johnson family followed agricultural 
pursuits in Sweden, where, on a farm near Boras, 
Elsborslaen, occurred the birth of the gentleman 
whose name introduces this article and who for 
some years or until his death, followed the oc- 
cupation of a contracting mason at San Diego. 
His parents, John and Sophia (Anderson) John- 
son, left their native land when somewhat ad- 
vanced in years and came to the United States, 
settling at San Diego, where tire father died in 
April, 1905 ; the mother still makes her home in 
this city. Their only child, Claus A., was born 
April 25, 1861, received a public-school education 
in Sweden, and at the age of fourteen years en- 
tered upon an apprenticeship to the general mer- 
cantile business in his home town. April 25, 
1881, on the twentieth anniversary of his birth, 
he landed in New York City after an unevent- 
ful voyage across the ocean. From New York 
he proceeded west as far as Illinois, where for 
more than a year he was employed in the factory 
of the Illinois Steel Coinpany at Joliet, Will 
county. On leaving that place he was apprenticed 
to the mason's trade in Joliet, but within a few 
months removed to Chicago, where he completed 
the trade. In 1886 he began to take contracts 
for mason work and in time became extensively 
interested in the erection of large structures. 

Overwork in the interests of his occupation 
undermined Mr. Johnson's health and for that 
reason he relinquished his work in Chicago, 
after which he removed to California and trav- 
eled throughout the southern part of the state 
until he was able to take up active work once 
more. Securing land ten miles east of San Diego 
in Spring valley he planted citrus and deciduous 
fruit trees and improved a valuable orchard 
of nineteen acres. The house on the place was 
erected by him, and other improvements are also 
the result of his handiwork. In order to secure 
water for domestic purposes and for irrigation 
he piped a conduit from the mountains, this giv- 
ing him the very finest qualitv of water and 
greatly enhancing the value of his orchard. In 
i8gg he commenced to take contracts for stone 
and mason work in San Diego, and thereafter 
made San Diego his home and business head- 
quarters. Among his important contracts was 
that for all of the brick work at Fort Rosecrans, 
and he also had the contracts for the Pickwick 



theatre, the American National Bank building; 
and the Fox-Heller block. 

While living in Joliet Mr. Johnson married 
Miss Clara Johnson, a native of Sweden. They 
became the parents of seven children, namely : 
Frank, who was associated with his father, in 
contracting ; Clara and Ellen, who are now study- 
ing nursing in the Battle Creek Sanitarium ; 
Fannie, Richard, Ida and Adelena, who are at 
home. For several years Mr. Johnson served as 
a school trustee in the Spring valley district 
while he was making his home on his fruit farm. 
His political views were somewhat diflferent from 
those expressed by the bulk of the American 
voters and brought him into sympathy with the 
Socialists. After coming to San Diego he identi- 
fied himself with the Chamber of Commerce, 
while fraternally he belonged to the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows and the 
Knights of Pythias. Upon the organization, 
June 30, 1904, of the Scandinavian Society 
of San Diego (in the founding of which he was 
actively interested) he was chosen the first secre- 
tar)' of the body and at the expiration of the term 
was honored with the office of president, which 
he filled acceptably up to the time of his death. ■ 



MRS. SARAH BLAIR SCOTT. For many 
years a resident of Oceanside, Mrs. Sarah Blair 
Scott is well known throughout the community 
in which she resides, and has the sincere respect 
and esteem of her neighbors and friends, who 
have ever found her a kind, genial, helpful com- 
panion, always ready to aid the needy and cheer 
the afflicted. A daughter of William Blair, she 
was born in Ireland, of honored Scotch ancestry. 

William Blair was born and brought up in 
Scotland, being reared to farming pursuits. He 
removed to Ireland when a young man, and from 
there immigrated with his family to the United 
States, settling in Maryland, on the banks of 
the Qiesapeake Bay, near Baltimore, where he 
resided imtil his death. His wife, whose maiden 
name was Hester Moore, spent her entire life 
in Ireland, dying in early womanhood. Of their 
six children, three are living, Sarah, the special 
subject of this sketch, being the fifth child in 
order of birth Three of the sons served in the 
Civil war, William B., of San Jacinto, Cal., serv- 
ing in an Illinois regiment ; Tliomas, living in 
Chapin, 111., also serving in an Illinois regiment ; 
while John, who enlisted in an Illinois regiment, 
was killed while in service. 

But three years of age when she came with her 
father and the family to Maryland, Sarah Blair 
lived there a few years, and then went to Spring- 
field, 111., where she completed her education in 
the public schixils. In December, 1877, she mar- 




^^^^=^ <v^t^.^^-- 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1097 



Tied Frederick Woodruff, a native of Louisville, 
Ky., and they began life together in Tracy, 
Minn., where Mr. Woodruff was first engaged 
in farming, and afterwards in business pursuits. 
Coming to California in 1890, he was engaged 
in the butcher business at Oceanside until his 
death, in 1892. In 1894 Mrs. Woodruff married 
for her second husband Levi L. Scott, who was 
•a soldier in the Civil war. In 1891 Mr. Scott 
removed from Iowa to San Diego county, locat- 
ing in Oceanside, where he opened a barber shop, 
which he conducted successfully until his death, 
in 1901. He was an industrious, enterprising 
man, well liked and highly esteemed, and be- 
longed to the Masonic order. Mrs. Scott has 
lived retired since the death of Mr. Scott, having 
a cozy home on Second street. She is a woman 
■of strong personality, and is a firm believer in 
1:he tenets of the Christian Church. 



WILLIAAI H. FREER. No more pro- 
minent family than that established in Califor- 
nia by William H. Freer holds rank among 
•the representative citizens of Los Angeles 
■county, the name l^eing especially well known 
and esteemed in El Monte and vicinity. The 
pioneer. William H. Freer, was a native of the 
middle west states, his birth having occurred 
on the little Miami river in Ohio, February 
5, 1814. He was a son of Jonathan Freer, 
who was born in North Carolina and became 
a pioneer settler of Ohio, where with his wife, 
formerly Hannah Swords, of Virginia, he en- 
gaged in farming. He finally removed to 
Randolph county, Ind., and thence to Missouri, 
locating in Atchison county, where his death 
eventually occurred. His wife survived him 
for manj^ years, her death occurring in Cali- 
fornia. William H. Freer engaged as a farmer 
in Atchinson county. Mo., in which state he 
was married and in 1849 came across the 
plains to California with his family, consist- 
ing of his wife, three children, his mother, two 
sisters and two brothers, one of the brothers 
dying en route. They traveled by ox-teams 
via the Tmckee route and were five months 
making the journey, traveling continuously 
from May to October. Their first winter was 
spent on the Stanislaus river in San Joaquin 
county, where INfr. Freer engaged in making 
saddle trees. In the spring of 1850 he lo- 
cated in Santa Clara county at Berryessa, and 
on Penetentia creek, three miles from San 
Jose, purchased a small farm and began work 
as a farmer and horticulturist. In 1851 he 
tried mining for a time, but not caring for the 
life ho soon returned to his ranch and as time 
passed continued to add to his first purchase 
tmtil he owned one liundred and seventy-five 



acres. In the meantime, in 1869, he had made 
a trip to Southern California and purchased 
three hundred and twenty acres of the old 
Dalton tract. In 1875 he decided to locate 
here permanently and accordingly brought his 
family to the property, one and a half miles 
north of El 'Monte, the land lying on the 
banks of the San Gabriel river and being ex- 
ceedingly fertile. He improved the ranch by 
the erection of a fine residence, barns and out- 
buildings, good fences, and the setting out of 
fruit, walnuts, etc. Later he purchased three 
hundred and seventeen acres of the old Tibbett 
place, paying $5,000 and selling it during the 
boom of 1887 for $72,000. He was a very 
successful business man, combining good judg- 
ment with decision of character, which en- 
abled him to see and take advantage of the 
many golden opportunities presented in the 
early days of the state. His death occurred 
February 16. 1902, removing from the com- 
munity a citizen highly esteemed and one 
whose place could never be filled. 

In Grundy county. Mo., November 25, 1840. 
^Ir. PVeer was united in marriage with Zerelda 
Stucker, who was born in Indiana, March 15, 
1824, a daughter of John and Susanna Stucker, 
natives of ^^^oodford county, Ky. Mr. and 
Mrs. Freer became the parents of the follow- 
ing children : Alexander, who died in Los An- 
geles county in 1870: James B.. a resident of 
El Monte : Ellen, who died in infancy in 
Missouri: Matilda: Jonathan Perry, who died 
in 1861 ; John H., residing at Arcadia; Martin, 
located on the old home place : Hannah, who 
became Mrs. Dobbins and died in Tehachapi ; 
Thom'as, a resident of El Monte; Delilah, Mrs. 
Lowrv. who died in the home in 1887: Mary 
L., wife of Thomas Stucker, of Los Angeles ; 
Julia, who died in .Santa Clara county when 
one year old; and Jackson, and Lee both of 
El Monte. 



JOHN WESLEY SMITH. Distinguished 
for his braverv, courage and coolness on the 
field of battle, John W. Smith, of Fernando, won 
for himself an honorable record as a soldier dur- 
ing the Civil war. and is now just as faithfully 
performing all the duties devolving upon him as 
a public-spirited, enterprisins: citizen. A native 
of Maryland, he was born February 5, 1839, in 
Baltimore, where he lived until fourteen years 
old, obtaining his education in the city schools. 

Removing then to Illinois, he followed farming 
until T862, when he enlisted, at Peoria, in Com- 
pany B, Eighty-sixth Illinois Volunteer Infantry. 
Sharpshooters, which was assigned to the Third 
Brigade, Second Division, Fourteenth Army 
Corps. Subsequently he took part in thirty-six 



1098 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



battles and in numerous skirmishes, being at first 
with the Army of the Cumberland, and later 
marching- with Sherman to the Sea. The last 
battle in which he participated was that of Ben- 
tonville, N. C. He took part in the Grand Re- 
view at Washington, D. C, where his division 
was awarded the first premium. He was fortun- 
ate in war, receiving no wounds of consequence, 
although while crossing Shepard"s Run, after the 
battle at Missionary Ridge, he was injured in the 
right hip and for a time was confined to the hos- 
pital. He was also under the care of a physician 
for some days on account of being sunstruck. 

Having been mustered out of service at the 
close of the war, Mr. Smith returned to Illinois, 
where he continued in his agricultural work un- 
til 1888, being quite successful. Coming then to 
Fernando, Cal, he purchased a lot in the village 
and erected a dwelling house, which he occupied 
until the erection of his present residence, when 
he sold it at an advantage. Mr. Smith delights in 
an active life, and is now kept busily employed in 
setting out and pruning fruit trees, an occupation 
in which he is an adept. 

While a resident of Illinois Mr. Smith married 
Delia Sitzer, and they are the parents of five 
children. Sheridan M., of Fernando, married 
Bertha Hoyt, and they have four children, Lyle, 
Cliflford and Clinton (twins) and Floyd; Grace 
E., Mrs. Niblock. of Los Angeles, has one child, 
Nina; and Frank M.. Ida C. and Ernest T.. are all 
deceased. 



JEAN TILLAT. Born in the Pyrenees 
mountains, in France, December 25, ,1869, 
Jean Tillat was the son of Joseph and j\larie 
(Hauquet) Tillat, both natives of the same 
place, where they passed their entire lives. 
They had one son and one daughter, Jean be- 
ing the younger child. He was reared on his 
father's farm and alternated his home duties 
with attending the common schools. He re- 
mained at home until he was twenty years 
old, when, in 1889, he came to America, 
crossed the continent and located in Los An- 
geles. He was qualified only for farming at 
that time and shortly after his arrival secured 
employment on a farm in the vicinity of Santa 
Monica, beginning at the bottom and patient- 
ly working his way round by round to a bet- 
ter position. He engaged in general farming 
and the sheep business for some time, when 
he went to Arizona and there accepted a po- 
sition as commissary on a large sheep ranch 
in the northern part of the territory. After 
five years he returned to California and was 
located for a time in Los Angeles. With his 
acchmulated means he decided to engage in- 
dependently in sheep raising and accordingly 



purchased a band of sheep in Arizona and 
brought them to California and herded them 
in Los Angeles county. For four years he 
continued at this work in partnership with 
Anton Earth, of Los Angeles, after which 
they sold out and dissolved partnership. 

In 1906 Mr. Tillat bought his present ranch 
of twenty acres near Arcadia, known as a part 
of the Sierra Vista tract, and began its im- 
provement and cultivation, erecting a com- 
fortable home, barns and outbuildings. He 
was married in Los Angeles to Miss Cather- 
ine Martinez, who was also born in the Py- 
renees and they have one daughter, Mary 
Louise. Mr. Tillat belongs to the French Be- 
nevolent Society of Los Angeles. Politically 
he is a stanch adherent of Republican princi- 
ples. He is liberal and enterprising and held 
in higfh esteem bv all Avho know him. 



CLEASON AMBLER. For a radius of 
many miles surrounding the village of Mesa 
Grande the name given above is well known, 
for not only is Mr. Ambler postmaster of the 
village and clerk of the county, but as propri- 
etor of a general store in Mesa Grande he has 
won many friends and well-wishers by his 
courteous treatment and straightforward busi- 
ness dealings. He is a son of E. P. and Mary 
A. (Willingmeyer) Atnbler, both natives of 
Pennsylvania, their home now being in St. 
Louis, Mo., where the father is engaged in in- 
stalling steam and hot-water heating plants. 

Among the six children that were born to his 
parents Cleason Ambler was the eldest, and 
was born in Belleville, St. Clair county, 111., 
July 21, 1873. Scholastic privileges were not 
lacking in his boyhood years, and be it said to 
his credit that he made the most of his oppor- 
tunities. He first attended the public schools 
of St. Louis, was later graduated from the high 
school, and still later took a three-year course 
in the manual training school of that city. For 
a short time after leaving school he held a 
clerkship in the same city, but subsequently for 
two years assisted his father in his business. 
After attaining his majority he determined to 
strike out in the world on his own account and 
the year 1895 witnessed his arrival in Califor- 
nia. Mining and prospecting claimed his at- 
tion for the first two or three years, after which 
lie was interested in the cattle business in 
Yuma. .\riz., for a time. Going from there to 
Granite, Mont., he secured employment with 
the Granite Bi-Z\letallic Company, and during 
the three years of his association wath the com- 
pany gave excellent satisfaction as foreman of 
the works. 

In the meantime Mr. Ambler has established 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD.. 



1U99 



domestic ties by Ins marriage with Carrie B. 
Stone ill iSgg. Locating with his family in 
San Diego in 1901, ATr. Ambler purchased the 
stock and good-will from one of the merchants 
of the town, and three months later added to 
his first purchase by buying- out another store. 
Upon selling out his interests in San Diego 
two years later he came to Mesa Grande and in 
May, 1903, purchased the general merchandise 
store of which he is now the proprietor. Con- 
trary to his father's political belief Mr. Ambler 
is a Democrat, and takes considerable interest 
in all matters that afifect the public welfare. 
While a resident of St. Louis Mr. Ambler be- 
came a member of the Baptist Church, and he 
still adheres to the faith of that body of be- 
lievers. His wife, however, is a member of the 
Christian Church, holding membership in the 
church of that denomination in San Diego. Sev- 
eral fraternal associations claim Mr. Ambler's 
membership, prominent among being the Elks 
and Ma.-^ons. 



ANTHONY CLARENCE RECHE, JR. 
There are many fine ranches in San Diego 
county that as regards productions and im- 
provements will compare favorably with any 
other in this part of the state. A large num- 
ber of these places are owned by men com- 
paratively young in years, who started in the 
world with but little more capital than an un- 
limited amount of energy and perseverance, 
and who are succeeding to an eminent degree 
in their agricultural labors. Prominent among 
this number is Anthony C. Reche, Jr., whose 
father, Anthony C. Reche, Sr., was a pioneer 
of this place, and gave to Fallbrook its ])resent 
name. He is a native and to the manner born, 
his birth having occurred June 24, 1873, on a 
farm not far distant from the one that he now 
occupies. 

Born January 31. 1833, in Montreal, Canada, 
Anthony C. Reche, Sr., was taken by his par- 
ents, in 1835, to Rochester, N. Y., where he 
was reared and educated. He there learned 
the trades of carpenter and millwright, and 
in February, 1854, started by the way of the 
Isthmus for the Pacific coast. Locating at 
Santa Clara, he followed his trade in that vi- 
cinity for two years, and was afterwards em- 
ployed in mining in Calaveras and Mariposa 
counties, in the latter place also putting up 
quartz mills. Going to Visalia, Tulare coun- 
ty, in 1858, he there followed' his trade about 
three years, erecting sawmills and flour mills. 
The following year he was similarly engaged 
in San Jose, from there going, in 1862, to San 
Bernardino, where he operated a general 
store for twelve months. Removing thence to 



Temecula, he ranched for a year, and then re- 
moved to El Monte, Los Angeles county, 
where he worked at his trade for a few years, 
in the mean time going back to Temecula to 
build a large mill, finally settling there in 
1868, and living there a year. Returning to 
this country in 1869, he opened a general store, 
keeping miner's supplies, at Pala, where he re- 
mained a year. Locating in the old town of 
Fallbrook in 1870, he took up land, and for 
six years was employed in farming. Migrat- 
ing then to San Bernardino, he was for fifteen 
years a resident of that place, but in 1891 he 
returned to Fallbrook, and here resided until 
his death. May 27, 1808. He was a Democrat 
in politics, a man of many fine qualities of 
heart and mind, and a member of the Catholic 
Church. 

February 22, 1861, at Visalia, Cal., Anthony 
C. Reche, Sr., married Menora C. Cayton, who 
was born in Iowa, a daughter of Alexander S. 
and Elizabeth (Droullard) Cayton. Mr. Cay- 
ton died in November, 1849, '" California, and 
his widow subsequently married for her sec- 
ond husband Dr. R. Matthews. In 1854 Dr. 
Matthews and family came by ox-teams to 
California, and was the first white man to 
settle in Visalia. Mrs. Matthews, now a bright 
and active woman of eighty-three years, is still 
living. Ten children were born of the union 
of Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Reche, Sr., namely: 
Vital C, of Ocean Park ; Anthony B., born in 
1864, and living only one month; Angenora 
L., wife of J. H. Maag, of Los Angeles: 
Helene H., wife of C. S. Wilson, of Big Pine, 
Inyo county; Charles L., of Banning; An- 
thony C, Jr., the subject of this sketch ; Flora 
L.. the first white girl born in Fallbrook, and 
who became the wife of W. H. Buchanan, of 
Redondo ; Bernie E., born in San Bernardino, 
and now living with his brother Anthony, 
with whom he is in partnership : Eugenia M., 
wife of F. W. Roberti, of Seattle, Wash. ; and 
Alma B., wife of L. Fields, of Redondo. Mrs. 
Reche and her mother. Mrs. Matthews, are 
living near -Fallbrook, where they are held in 
high esteem and respect. 

But three years old when the family re- 
moved to San Bernardino, .\nthony C. Reche, 
Ir., obtained a practical education in the com- 
mon schools of that town, and subsequently 
was for two years track walker for the South- 
ern Pacific Railroad Company. Removing 
Ihen to Fallbrook, where he has the distinction 
of being the first child born of white parents 
in the place, he worked by the montli until 
1901. Starting then as a rancher on his own 
account, he is now, in partnership with his 
brother, carrying on general farming with ex- 
ceptionally satisfactory results, having seven 



1100 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



hundred acres of land on the St. Margaret 
ranch. Progressive and enterprising, he has 
proved himself a thorough master of his call- 
ing, and as a young man of integrity and hon- 
or is fully entitled to the high position which 
he holds in the estimation of the community. 

In 1903 Mr. Reche married Mamie Free- 
man, a daughter of Jonas Freeman, of whom 
a brief biographical sketch ma}' be found else- 
where in this volume, and thev have one child, 
a daughter named Julia Catherine. Fraternal- 
Iv Mr. Reche is a member of Fallbrook Lodge 
No. 339, I. O. O. F. 



DAVID CRISE, M. D. The initial period 
of the agricultural development of America 
found the Greise family immigrating from 
Germany to cast in their fortunes with those 
of other pioneers, and several successive gen- 
erations lived and labored upon Pennsylvania 
farms. Among the children of George Greise, 
a farmer of Fayette county, Pa., was a son, 
George W., who was born and reared upon the 
farm in that county, and he it was who 
changed the spelling of the family name from 
its original form to the mode in present use. 
During the '70s he removed to Ohio, but after 
the death of his wife, Rachel, he returned to 
Pennsylvania and there spent his last years in 
retirement. His wife was a daughter of Daniel 
Stough, a pioneer farmer of Westmoreland 
county. Pa., and of German ancestrj'. Both 
families were identified with the Lutheran 
Church, their ancestors in the old country hav- 
ing been among those who followed Luther in 
the Reformation. 

Upon the old homestead in Westmoreland 
county, Pa., David Crise was born May 23. 
1846, being a son of George W. and Rachel 
Crise. At an early age he proved himself an 
apt and diligent pupil in local schools, where 
he advanced so rapidly in his studies that it 
was decided to educate him for a profession. 
In accordance with his preferences he was sent 
to the Jefferson Medical College of Philadel- 
phia, from which he was graduated in March, 
1872, with the degree of M. D. Opening an 
office at Mendon. Pa., he gained his first pro- 
fessional experience in that town, whence a 
year later he removed to Washington county, 
in the same state, and after four years became 
a practitioner of Beach City, Stark county, 
Ohio, where he built up a growing practice 
during the ten years of his residence in the 
town. In July, 1S88, he came to California and 
opened an office at Escondido, where now he 
has the distinction of being, in point of years 
of nracticc. the oldest physician in the town, 
and one of the oldest in the county of San 



Diego. Through membership in the County, 
State and American Medical Associations, and 
through the careful perusal of medical jour- 
nals, he keeps in touch with every advance 
made in the profession, and is a constant stu- 
dent of therapeutics. In addition to possessing 
the advantages derived from years of practi- 
cal experience in the profession, he possesses 
undoubted ability in the diagnosis of intricate 
diseases and in the treatment of the same, 
which qualities, coupled with his humanitarian 
principles and genial sympathy, eminently 
adapt him to fill a high place in the local med- 
ical field. While he has made a specialty of 
the diseases of women and has been unusually 
successful in that line, his knowledge of medi- 
cine is broad and varied, and is not limited to 
any one department of materia medica. 

The marriage of Dr. Crise took place in 
Pennsylvania June 27, 1872. and united him 
with Lucetta Null, who was born and reared 
in that state. Five children were born of their 
union. The eldest, Vivi Anna, is the widow 
of Henry Haliday and resides in Escondido. 
The second-born, Lola E., married H. W. 
Cleave of Los Angeles. The eldest son, Bruce 
L., was graduated from the Escondido high 
school in 1898 and from the medical depart- 
ment of the University of Southern California 
in 1903, after which lie spent one year as an 
interne in the Sacramento city hospital, and 
then became associated with his father in the 
practice of medicine and surgery, with a 
specialty of the latter branch of the profession ; 
his wife was a Miss Davies of Sacramento. The 
two remaining sons of the family are David R., 
a well driller in Escondido. and Harry N., a 
graduate of the Redlands school. The family 
are identified with tlie Congregational Church 
and are contributors to all movements for the 
religious, moral and educational advancement 
of their comnmnity. 



FRANCIS P. BROOKS. A host of friends 
have witnessed the efforts of Francis P. Brooks 
in his development and cultivation of a ranch 
in the vicinity of Norwalk and have appre- 
ciated his industry, energy' and perseverance, 
which have contributed no little toward his suc- 
cess. Mr. Brooks is a native of Nebraska, his 
birth having occurred in Butler county, Sep- 
tember 6, 1877. His parents, Noah and Esther 
(Shuggart) Brooks, the former a native of 
New Jersey and the latter of Illinois, located as 
pioneers in Nebraska, where they made their 
hom.e for some years In the fall of 1901 they 
came to California and Mr. Brooks now owns 
a ranch of thirty acres in the vicinity of his 
son's ranch. He is a Republican in politics and 




^f^^^^^tiC^ 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1103 



o.ctive in the advancement of the principles he 
endorses, although he has never cared for offi- 
cial recognition. He is a member of the Sev- 
enth Day Adventist Church. Of their three 
children all are living in California. 

Francis P. Brooks Avas educated in the com- 
mon schools of Nebraska and also spent one 
year in the Lincoln State Normal, after which 
he returned home and engaged in farming with 
his father. At twenty years of age he became 
dependent upon his own resources and after 
farming in the middle west for two years came 
to California in 1901. Subsequently he traveled 
all over the state, locating for a time in Mendo- 
cino, Humboldt county, and for one year car- 
ried on a ranch in Dinuba, Tulare county. 
About four years ago he came to Norwalk and 
;he first year purchased his present property, 
which consists of ten acres located one and one- 
half miles southeast of town, which he has 
since improved and cultivated. He also leases 
about eighty acres, devoted to the raising of 
grain. He is likewise interested in team con- 
tracting, holding a contract at the present writ- 
ing for the hauling of pipe for the Murphy Oil 
Company. 

Mr. Brooks' marriage occurred in 1898 and 
united him with Miss Edna Curtis, a native of 
Nebraska, and a daughter of Charles Curtis, 
whose death occurred in Santa Ana, Cal. They 
have two children, Oris and Hazel. Mr. Brooks 
is a Republican in politics and in religion be- 
longs to the Seventh Day Ad\'entist Church. 



MAJOR THOMAS Y. ENGLAND. Al- 
though never a permanent resident of Red- 
lands, no man was more interested in its de- 
velopment and upbuilding than the late Major 
Thomas Y. England, who since he first be- 
came interested in California gave his time and 
attention to the beautifying of his winter 
home, known as Prospect Park and open to the 
public as one of the show places of the city. 
Mr. England was born in Wilmington, Del, 
May 28, 1837, a son of James England, of 
Quaker ancestry and English origin. The 
father engaged as a leather merchant and 
manufacturer of Philadelphia. During the 
Civil war Thomas Y. England served in the 
First Regiment Delaware Infantry, first as 
quartermaster, later as first lieutenant, and 
was then made commissary of subsistence on 
the staffs of Generals Hancock, Meade and 
Wilson, with the rank of captain, but when he 
resigned was given the rank of major. After 
leaving high school he became associated with 
hfs father "and they succeeded in building up a 
lar^e and lucrative bu^'ness. in fact, one of the 



largest concerns in the world of its character, 
it being incorporated under the name of Eng- 
land, Walton & Co., and he served as its pres- 
ident until his death. Since that time the busi- 
ness has continued with Mr. Walton as presi- 
dent. Mr. England became an habitual visitor 
to Southern California and finally began the 
improvement of what is known as Prospect 
Park, a magnificent orange grove and park of 
sixty acres, which is one of the sightly places 
in a city of beauty and magnificent improve- 
ments. Major England and his son J. W. 
were interested in bringing water into Red- 
lands and were unusually active in this line 
during the dry years, when it was thought im- 
possible to save the orchards. For many years 
he served as president of the South Mountain 
Water Company, and was also president of the 
Orange Growers' Association. Fraternally he 
was a Mason, and in his home in Philadelphia 
Vv^as associated with the Grand Army of the 
Republic and Loyal Legion. He refused a 
commission in the Regular army after the 
close of the war in order to devote his entire 
time and attention to his business. In politics 
he was a stanch advocate of the principles ad- 
vocated in the platform of the Republican par- 
ty ; in religion he was a member of the Bap- 
tist Church. 

The death of Major England occurred Jan- 
uary 2, 1906; he left a widow formerly^ Miss 
E. Clarissa Combs, a native of New Jersey, 
born near Woodbury, and v/hom he married 
October 17, 1862. Her father, Thomas Combs, 
was also born in New Jersey of English de- 
scent, and there engaged as a farmer until his 
retirement, since which time he made his home 
in Philadelphia. He was a member of the So- 
ciety of Friends, and a much esteemed and re- 
spected citizen. His wife was formerly Anna 
Haines, a native of Philadelphia, and a daugh- 
ter of Joseph Haines, a builder by occupation. 
Mrs. England became the mother of the fol- 
lowing children : James William, a prominent 
horticulturist who makes his home in Red- 
lands ; Martha E., wife of Charles S. Walton^ 
president of the England, Walton & Co. manu- 
facturing interests ; and Clarissa E., wife of 
Edwin A. Landell Jr., a leather merchant of 
Philadelphia. Mrs. England is a member of 
the Baptist Church and a generous contributor 
to all its charities. To her much of the credit 
is due for the development of Prospect Park, 
for she was able to give even more time than 
her husband because of his business interests 
which demanded his attention. She has been 
very liberal in all movements tending toward 
the general welfare of the community and is 
always counted upon to further the best in- 



1104 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



tere'sts of the city. She spends her summers in 
her home in Philadelphia and her winters in 
the sweet sunny land of Southern California. 



GEORGE W. GRIFEITHS. Since 1850 
George W. Griffiths has been a resident of Cal- 
ifornia and no citizen has been more interested 
in the development of the country and its ad- 
vancement among the sister states of the nation. 
He was a lad of ten years when he came west, 
his birth having occurred in Detroit, Mich., 
August 18, 1840. His father, Charles Griffiths 
was born in Wales, and in young manhood went 
to London, thence to America and after locating 
in the middle west engaged in steamboating on 
the lakes between Buiifalo and Detroit. He was 
also similarly employed on the Mississippi river 
between St. Louis and New Orleans, becoming 
captain of a steamer and later part owner, con- 
tinuing in this occupation about twenty years. 
In 1849 he crossed the plains to California, with 
two comrades, Caleb Gosling, of Napa county, 
Cal., and George Hughes, of San Francisco, 
making the journey in ninety days with an ex- 
press wagon and six mules. Their plan was to 
have a dinner at four o'clock in the afternoon 
and then continue the journey to a good camp- 
ing place for the night, and thus lie down to 
sleep without the necessity of drawing attention 
to their camp by a fire. This undoubtedly saved 
them much trouble from the Indians. After his 
arrival in San Francisco Mr. Griffiths with Gov- 
ernor Burnett built the first stern wheel steamer 
that crossed the bay. Later he went to Sacra- 
mento and engaged in the hotel business, there 
meeting with a success which brought him large 
returns, prices at that day being one dollar per 
meal. Later he farmed and then followed min- 
ing in Nevada. Returning to San Francisco he 
made that place his home until his death. Fra- 
ternally he was a Mason and an Odd Fellow and 
prominent in both organizations. Politically he 
was a stanch Republican. His wife was formerly 
Mary Ann Whitfield, a native of England, born 
in the vicinity of London ; her father, Walter 
Whitfield, settled in Michigan, near Detroit, 
where he purchased land and farmed until his 
death. Mrs. Griffiths followed her husband to 
California in 1850, via the Isthmus of Panama, 
with her son, George W., of this review, and 
daughter, Mary E., now Mrs. Marshall, of Santa 
Rosa. A son, William L., born later is now a 
merchant in Suisun, Cal. Mrs. Griffiths died in 
San Francisco. 

The trip to California remains a vivid recol- 
lection in the memory of George W. Griffiths, 
the steamer trip to the east side of the isthmus, 
the mule-back ride across, and thence to San 
Francisco bv the old sidewheeler. His education 



was received principally in the public schools 
of Sacramento, he being later sent east via Nica- 
ragua to Burlington College, New Jersey, enter- 
ing as junior and graduating therefrom at a later 
date. He then took up the study of medicine 
under the instruction of his uncle in Detroit, 
Mich., Dr. Bradie, with whom he remained a 
year, then returning to California via the Isth- 
mus of Panama. Upon his return to the state 
he engaged in farming in Solano county, Cal., 
later in Southern California and then in Hum- 
boldt county. About 1886 he returned to South- 
ern California and located in Orange county 
where he farmed several thousand acres of land 
at one time, he and his sons together farming 
more acres than any other individual in South- 
ern California. Dr. Griffiths was always pro- 
gressive in his ideas and the latest methods and 
improvements found him an ardent advocate, and 
their farming apparatus was always of the latest 
make and most modern that could be obtained. 

About 1904 Dr. Griffiths retired from active 
cares and made his home in San Francisco un- 
til the great earthquake of 1906, when in the 
fall of that year he came to Los Angeles and is 
now associated with the real estate and oil land 
firm of Griffiths, Fackenthall & Griffiths, located 
at No. 131 East Fifth street, in the King Edward 
building. He was married in Marin county, Cal., 
to Miss Elizabeth Moore, who was bom in Mich- 
igan and died in Orange county, Cal., leaving 
five children, namely : Mary Catherine, Mrs. 
Dowler, of San Francisco; Charles Ed- 
win, of Bakersfield; George W. Jr., a con- 
tractor in Covina ; William L.. a partner with 
his father and also a large farmer near Covina; 
and Walter B., a farmer near Napa, Cal. Dr. 
Griffiths has been a member of the Episcopal 
Church for forty years, his wife having also been 
a member of that denomination. Politically he 
is a stanch Republican and gives his support to 
the advancement of the principles he endorses. 



PATRICIO ONTIVEROS. The oldest of 
the thirteen children of that noble Spanish pio- 
neer, Juan Pacifico Ontiveros, Patricio Onti- 
veros, over whose head has passed eighty 
years, is physically strong, mentally alert and 
temperamentally happy. While no two people 
attain longevity from an observance of the 
same rules of life, there is reason to believe 
that calm and temperate people have the first 
claim on borrowed time, and are the greatest 
strategists in outwitting the biblical injunction 
of the threescore years and ten. This is em- 
phasized in the life of Mr. Ontiveros, whose 
principal activities have centered around the 
ranch upon which he has lived for half a cen- 
tury, and of which he at present owns two hun- 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHIC.\L RECORD. 



1105 



dred and twenty acres. This ranch has as its 
principal resources grain and beans. Its en- 
vironment has taken on the character of the 
owner, is substantial in equipment, conserva- 
tive in tendency, and vmeventful in its routine. 
It is one of the landmarks of the community, 
and seems to have always taught its lessons of 
thrift, industry and wise conservatism. 

Notwithstanding the fact that Mr. Ontiveros 
comes from a wealthy and distinguished family 
of California, he was unable to attend school 
during his childhood on account of their scarc- 
ity. He was born March 17, 1826, in Los An- 
geles county, where his father was sole propri- 
etor of nine thousand acres of land. In 1856, 
the year of the famih^ removal from Los An- 
geles to Santa Barbara" county, Mr. Ontiveros 
married a native daughter of the former coun- 
ty, Serrano Leonor, a representative also of an 
old and prominent Spanish family. Mrs. Onti- 
veros died in 1898, at the age of fifty-eight, hav- 
ing become the mother of fourteen children, of 
whom four died in infancy. Those who reached 
maturity are as follows : Delphina, who became 
the wife of Geronimo Carranza ; Rosa, de- 
ceased, formerly the wife of Feliz Carranza ; 
Sarah, the wife of Miguel Carranza ; Natalia, 
single ; Charles, who married Virginia Gon- 
zales and has six children ; Thomas, who mar- 
ried Paulina Gonzales ; and Pablo, Zoilo, Na- 
poleon and Leandro, the four last mentioned 
unmarried. The wives of Charles and Thomas 
Ontiveros, who were in maidenhood Virginia 
and Paulina Gonzales, are members of a very 
prominent pioneer Spanish family of Santa 
Barbara county. 

Though never active in politics, Mr. Onti- 
veros has faithfully adhered to the principles 
and issues of the Republican party. In religion 
he is a Catholic and liberally supports the 
church of that denomination at Sisquoc. The 
breeding and culture of generations of Span- 
iards are reflected in the manners of Mr. Onti- 
veros, and he bears an enviable reputation in 
the business, social and religious departments 
of his home communitv. 



JOHN N. TURPENTINE. In tracing the 
genealogy of this i^rominent citizen of Escon- 
dido we find that his ance.stors were identified 
with the colonial history of our country and 
bore an active part in the early wars. The ma- 
ternal grandfather, Capt. James Harris, who 
was an "officer in the war of 1812, descended in 
direct line from John Harris, the founder of 
the citv of Harrisburg. the capital of Pennsyl- 
vania. ' The paternal grandfather, Major Sam- 
uel Turrentinc. who was also an oificcr in the 



war of 1812, gained his first experience in mil- 
itary tactics while serving in the first struggle 
with England, and his faithful service in that 
campaign led to his selection as an officer 
when war was again declared with the same 
country about thirty-five years later. About 
the time of the second war he removed to Ten- 
nessee and there remained until his death some 
years later. The Harris and Turrentine fam- 
ilies were both stanch allies of the Whig party 
during its existence and both proved their loy- 
alty to. the stars and stripes in times of peace 
and war. 

Among the children of Major Turrentine 
was Rev. Wilson Turrentine, a native of North 
Carolina, who married Elvira Harris, and re- 
mained for m.any years a resident of Tennes- 
see. When deatli came to terminate his activ- 
ities, December 17, 1899, he was then ninety- 
four years of age ; his wife had passed away at 
seventv-six years, and her father lived to be 
within four years of a full century. John N., 
the subject of this review, was born Novem- 
ber 2, 1845, '^^'^' 5" boyhood the advantages of 
a private school and a course in Lookout Col- 
lege were given the lad, who early showed 
signs of a fine mind and aptitude for study. 
These qualities, combined with religious fer- 
vor, led him to enter the ministry of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal denomination, attached to the 
Central Tennessee conference, under which he 
labored in assignments in that region. 

Coming to Califorina in 1885, Mr. Turren- 
tine first settled in Tulare county and in the 
fall of 1886 was chosen pastor of the Visalia 
Methodist Episcopal Church. After two years 
he removed to Escondido and during the fol- 
lowing year he officiated as pastor of the 
church of his denomination at this point, to 
which he yet remains a generous contributor. 
For three terms he held the office of city clerk, 
and during the first administration of Presi- 
dent McKinley he was appointed postmaster, 
which position he now fills with efficiency and 
fidelity. The bond agitation, which for some 
years demanded considerable attention from 
the taxpayers of Escondido, received due at- 
tention on his part, and on the occasion of the 
burning of the bonds, September 9, 1905, he 
was chosen orator of the day. Ever since cast- 
ing his first presidential vote for Genera! 
Grant he has been a firm adherent of the Re- 
publican party and always supports its prin- 
ciples with his ballot. While living in Ten- 
nessee he became a member of the Shelbyville 
Lodge of Chosen Friends in 1866, and his in- 
terest in that organization remains unabated. 
In addition he has been a leading Mason in 
Consuelo Lodge No. 325, E. & A. M., of which 
he has officiated as secretary since the organ- 



1106 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ization, with the exception of one term, during 
which he held the office of master. 

The marriage of ]\'tr. Turrentine was sol- 
emnized January 2, 1873, and united him with 
Mary E. Robinson, daughter of W. T. Robin- 
son, of Tennessee. Captain Robinson was a 
man of large talents, exceptional attainments 
and attractive personality and was beloved 
wherever known. Descended from a family 
that sent soldiers to the war of 1812, it was 
natural that he and three of his brothers 
should be loyal to the government, and he not 
only enlisted in the Federal army at the open- 
ing of the Civil war, but also he raised a com- 
pany of volunteers and was chosen their cap- 
tain. The talents which made him successful 
in war contributed to his prominence in times 
of peace. As a member of the state legislature 
and the state senate he represented his con- 
stituents with honor and dignity, and as judge 
of Dekalb county he proved himself learned 
in the law and impartial in its administration. 
The family of Mr. and Mrs. Turrentine con- 
sists of four children, namely: Edgar E., 
cashier of the Escondido Savings Bank; Lucy 
Harris, at home; Howard B., a clerk in the 
postoffice ; and Lawrence, a student in the Es- 
condido high school. 



HENRY E. McNEALY. The purchase of the 
quarter section of land on which he now engages 
in farming was consummated by Mr. McNealy in 
1892, but it was not until ten years later that he 
removed to the tract and commenced to improve 
the land. Since coming to the ranch, which is 
advantageously situated in the San Marcos valley, 
he has fenced the land and made other needed 
improvements. Though no longer under the 
necessity of constant labor, he is happiest when 
busy and so continues at the head of his ranch 
in spite of being the possessor of means that 
would permit of his retirement. Since thirteen 
years of age he has earned his livelihood and 
ever since then he has been an indefatigable 
worker, yet he bears well the burden of his sev- 
enty-three years, and a stranger would judge 
him to be on the sunny side of sixty-five years. 

A native of Licking county, Ohio, born Oc- 
tober 13, 1832, Henry E. McNealy was only 
eleven months old when death deprived him of a 
mother's afifectionate oversight. His father, 
Jeremiah, was born in Virginia, but removed to 
Ohio at an early age and eventually settled in 
Indiana, where he died. All through his life he 
was a tiller of the soil, but a series of misfortunes 
befell him, which obliged his son, Henry E., to 
take up the burden of self-support at an age when 
otherwise he would have been in school. For a 
time he worked as a farm hand and later he 



learned the carpenter's trade, which he followed 
as a journeyman in Indiana, Illinois and Mis- 
souri. During the spring of 1859 he joined a 
party of emigrants bound for California and after 
a journey of six months with ox-teams and 
wagons he landed in Butte valley, where he en- 
gaged in mining, but met with no special success. 
Later he had charge of a pack-train from Oro- 
ville and Chico, Butte county, to Susanville, 
Lassen county. Removing to Marysville in 1865 
he engaged in the trucking business for two 
years, and then went into the mountain country, 
opened a meat market at Susanville, and for four 
years carried on a butcher's business. The next 
place to which he removed was Santa Barbara 
county, where he engaged in the grocery busi- 
ness at Lompoc for seven years. Afterward he 
was placed in charge of the wharf at Gaviota, 
and remained there until 1902, when he removed 
to his ranch in San Diego county. 

The first marriage of Mr. McNealy took place 
at Oroville, Cal., in September, 1865, and united 
him with Mirah Emmons, who was born in New 
York and died at Gaviota, Cal., in 1887, leaving 
five children, viz. : Edward, Amy, Howard, Ralph 
and Mark. In 1891 in Santa Barbara county 
occurred the marriage of Mr. McNealy to Miss 
Rachel Valenzuela, who was born in that county, 
being a member of a pioneer Spanish family of 
that locality. Seven children were born of this 
union, namely: Owen, Helen, George, Kenneth, 
Eva, Carl and Ethel. Mrs. McNealy .is a sin- 
cere member of the Catholic Church and is rear- 
ing her family in that faith. Ever since attain- 
ing his majority Mr. McNealy has voted the Re- 
publican ticket, but he has never been active in 
public affairs, nor has he desired to participate 
in the responsibilities of official positions, yet in 
a quiet, unostentatious way he discharges the 
duties incumbent upon him as a citizen and a 
public-spirited man. 



JAMES CHARLES WALLACE. Very 
early in the colonial history of America repre- 
sentatives of the Wallace family immigrated 
from Scotland and settled along the Atlantic 
coast, where, in the development of a new 
country, they displayed the fortitude and con- 
stancy characteristic of their ancestors amid 
the trials besetting them in their home land. 
The genealogical records show that some of 
the family lived in Pennsylvania and other 
branches in TMaryland, whence removal was 
made to Ohio in the early settlement of the 
latter state. James C. Wallace, Sr. who was 
a native of Ohio, became a pioneer farmer of 
Perrv county in the vicinity of Somerset, and 
remained there until an attack of typhoid fever 
terminated his career at fiftv-two vears of 




^£^^"9^ 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1109 



age. When a young man he had married 
Sarah Plummer, who was born in Ohio of a 
Quaker family, but did not affiliate with the 
Society of Friends, having identification with 
the Baptist Church. Surviving her husband 
for many years, she attained the great age of 
one hundred and two j^ears. 

In the family of James C. Wallace, Sr., 
there was a son who bore the father's name 
and who was born in Perry county, Ohio, 
September 29, 1835. At the age of four j^ears 
he was orphaned by his father's death while 
yet too young to realize the nature of his be- 
reavement and the extent of his loss. It there- 
fore became necessary for him to begin to 
earn his own livelihood at an age when most 
children are in school and free from responsi- 
bilities. When he was thirteen years of age 
he left his mother's home and went to Zanes- 
ville and from there proceeded by steamboat 
to New Orleans, thence traveling east as far 
as Florida, where for two years he was em- 
ployed at Jacksonville m the grafting of 
orange trees. The failure of his health caused 
him to return to Ohio and after a short so- 
journ at Delaware, that state, he returned to 
Jacksonville with health restored. A few 
months later he removed to Crab Orchard 
Springs, Ky., and subsequently learned the 
jeweler's trade at Lancaster, Garrard county, 
following the same for three years in Ken- 
tucky. During the winters he engaged in 
hunting and fishing through the south. Even- 
tually settling at Oxford, Miss., he carried 
on mercantile pursuits for fourteen years and 
met with a gratifying degree of success until 
the outbreak of the Civil war caused the loss 
of his plantation and other properties. Later 
he was employed for a year as proctor of the 
Mississippi State University and held other 
positions in the south, but in 1870 returned to 
Ohio to visit his mother, whom he had not 
seen for twenty-one years. 

The war having crippled his chances for 
success in the south, Mr. Wallace came to 
California, landing from the steamer at San 
Pedro, whence he proceeded eastward a few 
miles and became connected with B. D. Wil- 
son as foreman of a large ranch. After a year 
there he went to Los Angeles and worked at 
the jeweler's trade for a year. Meanwhile he 
purchased five acres of his present home- 
stead, paying $500 for the same. At that time 
the only building between Los Angeles and 
his property was an adobe stage station and 
he is now "the oldest settler of this locality. 
After putting up a small house he turned his 
attention to the nursery business and mean- 
time continued at his trade. The second year 
he added five acres to his ranch and in 1892 



purchased twenty-three acres adjoining, all 
of which he still owns, and in addition he has 
leased other lands in order to secure the 
needed acreage for the management of his ex- 
tensive citrus fruit nursery. His first naval 
trees he ordered from Australia and he bud- 
ded the first orange trees in California. At 
this writing he has fifteen acres of oranges in 
bearing. The balance of the property is util- 
ized for nursery purposes. 

After settling in the south Mr. Wallace met 
I\Iiss ^Martha \Vilson, who was born and 
reared at Oxford, Miss., and they were united 
in marriage May 22, 1861. Seven children 
were born of their union, namely : Glencoe ; J. 
Wiley, who has sixteen acres of coffee and 
rubber land in Mexico and also owns mining 
interests in that country ; George A., who as- 
sists his father in the nursery business and 
relieves him of its many responsibilities ; Ben- 
jamin, who practices dentistry in Mexico; 
Martha, Mrs. Kennedy, whose husband is 
connected with the Los Angeles Lighting and 
Power Company; Stella, Mrs. Reynolds, 
whose husband is a dentist residing in Pasa- 
dena ; and Walter, who resides with his pa- 
rents, and is a practicing dentist in Los An- 
geles. In political faith Mr. Wallace is a 
Democrat. 



ARTHUR P. FERL. A prominent citizen 
in the material upbuilding of San Pedro, Los 
Angeles county, is Arthur P. Ferl, who has 
been a resident of this city since December, 
1904. He was born in Detroit, Mich., Septem- 
ber 7, 1865, the fifth in a family of six chil- 
dren. His father, Peter Henry Ferl, was a 
native of England, who located in Detroit, 
Mich., and was engaged in mercantile business 
until his death. He married Margaret Mc- 
Donnell, a native of the north of Ireland. 

An orphan at seven, Arthur P. Ferl was 
reared in the home of his older brothers and 
sister, receiving his education in the public 
schools until he was thirteen, when he was ap- 
prenticed to learn the trade of printer. AVhen 
nineteen years of age he left home and located 
in Denver, Colo., where he formed a partner- 
ship with O. L. Smith the same year, the firm 
being known as Smith & Ferl, printers and 
publishers, which, in the course of a few years, 
became one of the largest institutions in the 
western country. In 1890 A^lr. Ferl sold all his 
interests in Denver and located in Salt Lake 
City, where he engaged in the real estate and 
mining business until 1896, when, having re- 
ceiveci an appointment in the government 
service, he went to Washington, D. C, where 
he began the study of law at the National Law 



1110 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



School, after which he took a course in art at 
the Corcoran Art Gallery. In February, 1902, 
he was sent to the Philippines on detached 
service, staying- in the islands two years. In 
November, 1904, he resigned from the govern- 
ment service and came to Southern California 
and in December located in San Pedro, en- 
gaging in the real estate business. Mr. Ferl 
has three children, Ronald J., Emily M. and 
Arthur Bayly. 

Fraternally Mr. Ferl is a Mason, being a 
member of Harmony Lodge No. 17, F. & A. 
M., of Washington. D. C. Politically he is a 
Republican, and is active in his efforts to ad- 
vance the principles he endorses. In the pub- 
lic affairs of the city he has taken a place of 
prominence, being one of the organizers of the 
Chamber of Commerce and its president in 
1906. He is president of the Pacific Manu- 
facturing & Supply Association, chairman of 
the board of directors of the Harbor City Sav- 
ings Bank and is identified with many other 
enterprises in the rapidlv srowing citv of San 
Pedro. 



CHARLES MASON. The identification of 
Charles Mason with the business interests of 
San Pedro has brought to him a personal success 
as well as winning for him a place of importance 
among the representative citizens of his home 
town. He is now acting as superintendent of 
the San Pedro Water Company, with which he 
has been connected since its organization, and is 
bringing to the discharge of his duties the ability 
and energy which have distinguished his career 
thus far, and which bid fair to place him among 
the successful men of this section. Although not 
a native son of California Mr. Mason is a west- 
erner by birth, having been bom in Florence, 
Pinal county, Ariz., January 31, 1881. His fa- 
ther, A. Mason, was a native of Bethel, Me., and 
with a brother, Charles, crossed the plains in an 
early day and from California went later to Ari- 
zona, and in the vicinity of Florence Charles 
Mason was one of the discoverers of the Silver 
King mine, of which A. IMason served as super- 
intendent for eight years. Later he engaged in 
prospecting and mining with headquarters in 
Los Angeles, and remaining so occupied until 
his death, which occurred August 10, i8q2. He 
was a man of energy and ability and the descend- 
ant of patriotic ancestry, his grandfather having 
served valiantly in the Revolutionarv war. Fra- 
ternally he was a Knight Templar Mason. He 
is survived by his wife, formerly Mercedes 
Robles, who was born in Sonera, Mexico, and 
she now makes her home in Los Angeles. She is 
the mother of four children, namely: Mercedes, 
wife of AT. Borquez, of Los Angeles : Charles. 



the personal subject of this review : Guadaloupe, 
wife of Bruce Cass, of Ramona, Indian Territory; 
and Moses, associated with the firm of Cass & 
Smurr, of Los Angeles. 

Charles Mason was reared to young manhood 
in Los Angeles, receiving his preliminary edu- 
cation in the public schools of that place, after 
which he entered St. Vincent's College. Upon 
the completion of the course in that institution 
he was graduated with honors, when he became 
a student in the Southern California Business 
College. L'pon leaving school he became as- 
sociated with Hulse, Bradford & Co., as sales- 
man, and continued with them for some time, 
when he became connected with the Sunset 
Telephone and Telegraph Company. LTpon 
the organization of the Home Telephone Com- 
pany he accepted a position on switch-board 
work and remained with them until 1903, 
when he resigned, and coming to San Pedro 
engaged as bookkeeper for the Seaside Water 
Company. He remained with them until their 
disorganization, when he became superinten- 
dent of the new company, that of the San 
Pedro Water Company. This company supplies 
water to both San Pedro and Wilmington, its 
source of supply being from the pumps at the 
latter place, while at San Pedro they have a 
reservoir with a capacity of two million, five hun- 
dred thousand gallons, located on a knoll one 
hundred and fifty feet above the city and with 
a sixty-five pound pressure. They have six miles 
of water mains, from which they supply thirteen 
hundred consumers, and are constantly extend- 
ing the lines to meet the needs of the rapidly 
growing city. 

Mr. Mason was married in Los Angeles to 
Nellie Marie Sessler. a native of Ohio. In his 
fraternal relations Mr. Mason is a member of 
the Elks lodge at San Pedro, in which he is 
chaplain. He is a member of the Giamber of 
Commerce and takes an active and helpful in- 
terest in all that pertains to the gro\\"th and 
progress of the place. 



WILLIAM L. RAMEY. One of the flourish- 
ing industries of San Diego county is the Es- 
condido Lumber, Hay and Grain Company, 
proprietors of the Escondido roller and feed mills, 
wholesale dealers in grain, hay, rolled barley, 
etc., retail dealers in lumber, brick and cement, 
and owners of warehouses at Escondido, San 
Marcos and Buena. The president of the com- 
Dany, William L. Ramey, was also its organizer. 
Under the orginial form of organization the com- 
pany engaged exclusively in the lumber busi- 
ness, but later articles of incorporation were se- 
cured and the business was enlarged by the in- 
troduction of milling, hay, grain, etc., since which 



1359858 




tbAftAuf M«^niU|| 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1113 



time there has been a steady and gratifying 
growth. In addition to the management of the 
office and yards. Mr. Ramey is vice-president 
of the Escondido Savings Bank and the Bank 
of Escondido, and is also the owner of a ranch 
of one hundred and eighty-five acres near town, 
on which grain is raised, and shipments are made 
from the lemon and orange groves to eastern 
markets. 

A native of Champaign county, Ohio. Mr. 
Ramey was born December lo, 1845, being a 
son of William and Frances (Neff) Ramey, "the 
former born in A'irginia of French lineage, the 
latter born in Pennsylvania. The maternal 
grandfather, Daniel Nei¥, was a soldier in the 
Revolution and the w?r of 181 2, and the great- 
grandfather, Jacob Neff. served in the first strug- 
gle with Enghnd. Lieutenant-Governor Jacob 
NefF is a cousin of Mrs. Frances Ramey. About 
1829 William and Frances Ramev went to Ohio 
on their wedding journey and became pioneers 
of that state. After a number of years they 
moved to Hancock county, 111., where Mr. Ramev 
became the owner of farm lands and stock and 
acquired what was in those davs considered a 
com.petency. At his death in 1892 he was eighty- 
two years of age : his wife passed away in 1887, 
when sevent^^-eight years old. 

Bv embarking in the grocery business William 
L. Ramey became a business man at twenty- 
two years of age, and later he carried on genera! 
merchandising in Clayton, 111., but after three 
years he removed to Ferris, a village on the 
Ouincy branch of the Chfcago, Burlington & 
Quincy Railroad, in Hancock county, and there 
he carried on a mercantile store for four years. 
On account of poor health he came to Califor- 
nia in 1874 and settled in San Francisco, wdiere 
he was with the Southern Pacific Railroad Com- 
pany for six years as their city collector and 
manager of their city wharf. On fully regaining 
his health he returned to the east on a vacation, 
but decided to remain, so forwarded his resig- 
nation to the railroad officials. For a time he 
carried on a grain business at Clarinda, Iowa, be- 
sides which he had charee of the grain elevators 
at other stations on the Humeston & Shenandoah 
Railroad. After a vear the railroad company 
ofifered him special inducements to take charge 
of various stations, including Andover, Blvthe- 
dale, Ridg-ewav, Bethany. New Hampton, Albany 
and Darlington, and he bought grain at all of 
these places. Owing to a shortage in the crops, 
his work was unusually difficult and trving. 
About 1884 he disposed^ of his interests in Iowa 
and removed to Madison, Neb., where he en- 
gaged in the hardware business and became a 
■stockholder in the First National Bank of Madi- 
son unon its organization. 

Owing to the failure of his wife's health Mr. 



Ramey decided to remove to California, and in 
1 89 1 he came to this state in company with A. 
W. Wohlford, now the president of the Bank 
of Escondido and a stockholder in the Escondido 
Lumber, Ha}' & Grain Company, he and Mr. 
Ramey owning the majority of the stock in both 
enterprises. Their settlement in Escondido has 
proved most helpful to the business interests of 
the town, for they are men of high honor, ex- 
ceptional character, irreproachable integrity, liv- 
ing up to their obligations and expecting others 
to do the same. Not a little of the recent de- 
velopment of the town may be attributed to 
their foresight, intelligence and enterprise, and 
they have been promoters of every measure for 
the upbuilding of local interests. 

The first marriage of Mr. Ramey took place at 
Cartage. Ill, October 10, 1872, and united him 
with Miss Helena Freas, who was born in that 
state and died in California in September, 1892. 
In the fall of 1894 he married Mrs. Florence 
Stevenson, by whom he has a daughter, Florence, 
now a student in the Escondido schools. By 
her former marriage Mrs. Ramey has two sons, 
namely : Lloyd Stevenson, cashier of the Bank 
of Escondido; and Frank Stevenson, manager 
of the supply department of the Sunset Telephone 
Company at Los Angeles. While living in Han- 
cock county. III, Mr. Ramey was made a Mason 
in 1872 in the Carthage lodge, and afterward 
was raised to the chapter and commandery de- 
grees ; both'in Illinois and at Madison, Neb., he 
was an officer in the lodge and active in its work. 
Politically he votes the Republican ticket and is 
intelligently conversant with public affairs. With 
his family he holds membership in the Escondido 
Congregational Church. 



WESLEY HASKELL. The family repre- 
sented by this enterprising busiiiess man came to 
the United States in an early period and set- 
tled in New England, where his father, Rev. C. L. 
Haskell, a man of fine mental attainment and 
extended influence, long served as pastor in 
Methodist Episcopal churches in the state of 
Maine and rose to a position of eminence in his 
denomination. 

The son. Wesley, was born at East Boothbay, 
Me. He is known to be a self-made man of cul- 
ture and refinement, having educated himself in 
the eastern schools and at Boston University, 
where he acquired a broad and liberal education. 
He was ordained to the ministry of the Congrega- 
tional denomination and has held pastorates in 
Providence, R. I., and in Peoria and Rockford, 
III., in each of which places he ministered to 
large and influential congregations. Upon leaving 
the central states in 1Q02 he came to California 
where for a brief period he preached in San 



1114 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Francisco and Oakland, and afterward acted as 
pastor of the First Unitarian Church of Los 
Angeles. On ^account of failing health, and by 
the advice of his physician he gave up the min- 
istry and entered upon business 'affairs. It is 
a matter of remark among his acquaintances 
that he is possessed of unusual ability as a bus- 
iness man and the result of his shrewd man- 
agement and keen foresight is evidenced in the 
present growing condition of his enterprises. 

The Ocean Park IMilling and Manufacturing 
Company, a consolidation of Groesbeck & Ritchie 
and the Ocean Park Planing Mill Company, of 
which Mr. Haskell is the president, is located 
at Ocean Park. This establishment is one of 
the largest manufacturing concerns of its kind 
on the coast. The plant is equipped with ma- 
chinery of the most modern and approved pat- 
terns ; its equipment, indeed, being surpassed by 
perhaps no mill in all of Southern California. 
This concern makes a specialty of fine furniture 
of every description and mill work in all its 
branches. 

Mr. Haskell is also interested in insurance. 
He is the supreme treasurer of the Commoners 
of America, a fraternal beneficial order with 
headquarters at Los Angeles, chartered under 
the laws of the state of Cahfornia for the mu- 
tual benefit of its members and their beneficiaries. 
This order has surpassed in growth since its 
organization anything known in the history of 
fraternal insurance in the L'nited States. 

No citizen of Southern California possesses a 
firmer faith in its future than does Mr. Haskell, 
and he proves his faith by his continued connec- 
tion with its business interests. No section of 
the country has interested him to such a degree 
as this, and on the other hand no business man 
has had its interests more at heart. In every com- 
munity citizens of intelligence, broad culture, 
liberal views, keen sagacity and wise forethought 
are valued acquisitions, and he has proved to be 
such in his social and business relations. In na- 
tional politics he votes with the Republicans, 
but in local matters he considers national prob- 
lems to be of less importance than the selection 
of men of high honor and accented standing for 
such positions as are in the gift of the citizens. 
The Masonic fraternity numbers him among its 
warm supporters, and in addition he is affiliated 
with the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. 



GEORGE ELLO CROSS. In 1885 George 
EUo Cross came to California with his parents 
and since that time has been a resident of this 
section of the state, now being located in the 
vicinity of Puente and engaged in general farm- 
ing and the wholesale hay and grain business. 
He was born in Cape Vincent, Jefferson county. 



N. Y., August 6, 1874; his father, George Cross, 
was born in Chaumont, N. Y., and engaged as a 
farmer. His death occurred in 1877. His pater- 
nal grandfather was born in New England, of 
Scotch descent. His mother was in maidenhood 
Harriet Canfield McPherson, also a native of 
Jefferson county, and the daughter of William 
McPherson, who was born in New Hampshire 
of Scotch descent, and became a farmer in New 
York. She still survives and makes her home in 
Puente. She has four children, namely: John, 
of Los Angeles; Jennie D., wife of Thomas R. 
Greene, deputy postmaster of Puente ; William 
M., the Southern Pacific agent at Lemon, and 
George Ello. 

When eleven years old the family removed to 
Orange county, Cal., where two brothers of the 
mother resided, Robert and Steven McPherson, 
and in that place Mr. Cross attended the public 
schools and later completed his education in Los 
Angeles. At fifteen years he took up the study 
of telegraphy and after completing it accepted 
a position as operator for the Southern Pacific 
Railroad, and in 1892 was transferred to Puente 
in a like capacity, remaining there for four years. 
For a time thereafter he was located at Tracy, 
Wesley and Oakville, spending two years at the 
three places. Later he became agent at Duarte 
for two years, was then located at Bassett for a 
like period, when, in 1902, he resigned to en- 
gage in the hay and grain business in Puente. 
He has since become interested in the Puente 
Warehouse Company, and is serving at the pres- 
ent writing as secretary and manager of the en- 
terprise. For storage of grain they have the 
Buck warehouse, a building 200x50 in dimen- 
sions with a capacity of forty-five thousand sacks, 
and located on the Southern Pacific Railroad. He 
has also interested himself successfully in the 
raising of grain and alfalfa, having sixty acres 
of alfalfa and about two hundred and thirty- 
five acres devoted to grain, besides which he 
also raises some stock. He owns a residence in 
Puente which is presided over by his wife, form- 
erly Miss Josephine Rowland, a native of Puente, 
and the daughter of Albert Rowland, a well- 
known pioneer of California, who died in 1891. 
They have two children, Cecelia and Albert. 

In 1904 Mr. Cross was appointed postmaster 
of Puente and at that time he purchased and 
remodeled the building which is now utilized for 
the postoffice. He is a Republican politically 
and takes an active interest in advancing the 
principles he endorses. He is prominent fra- 
ternally, having been made a Mason in Lexing- 
ton Lodge No. 104, of El ]Monte, and both him- 
self and wife are members of the Order of East- 
ern Star, No. 172. also of El Monte. Mr. Cross 
also belongs to the Modern \\'oodmen of Amer- 
ica of Lemon, and the Fraternal Brotherhood 




^^^....t^ 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1117 



of Puente. He has always taken a keen interest 
in all educational affairs and is now a member 
of tlie board of trustees of the Hudson district, 
and is serving at the present writing as clerk. 



JOSEPH H. BURKE. Intimately asso- 
ciated with the pioneer days of the state of 
California, Joseph H. Burke survived the per- 
ils and privations of that historic time and 
lives to witness and participate in the develop- 
ment of resources which has made it one of 
the first states not only of the west, but of the 
entire Union. He is now a useful citizen of 
Rivera, Los Angeles county, in which section 
of the state he has spent the greater part of 
his time since coming west in 1853, although 
at different times being located at other points 
for brief sojourns. Mr. Burke is a native of 
Tennessee, his birth having occurred in Roane 
county, April 14, 1831 ; his father, Milton 
Burke, in manhood a minister of the Method- 
ist Episcopal Church and also a physician, was 
a native of Virginia, as was also his mother, 
in maidenhood Phoebe Hartley. His paternal 
grandfather, John Burke, also of Virginia, 
married a daughter of Nathaniel Osborn, who 
was a soldier in the Revolutionary war and in 
the war of 1812, taking part in the battle of 
New Orleans at the close of that conflict. He 
had thirteen wounds and received a pension 
for each wound. He lived to the unusual age 
of one hundred and thirteen years and six 
months, witnessing the days of colonial devel- 
opment, the statehood growth and progress, 
and the shadow that preceded the struggle that 
almost rent our fair land asunder. 

When he was nine years old Joseph H. 
Burke was taken to Pulaski county. Mo., by 
his parents, and there they spent the ensuing 
four years, after the death of the mother re- 
turning to Tennessee, and later to Camden 
county. Mo., where the father passed the re- 
mainder of his life, dying at the advanced age 
of eighty-eight years. At the age of fifteen 
years Joseph H. Burke set out in life for him- 
self, becoming dependent upon his own re- 
sources ; he went first to Huntsville, Ala., 
where he worked on a cotton plantation, and 
later in Arkansas learned the trade of wagon- 
maker and blacksmith. Subsequently for a 
year and a half he worked at his trade in Lit- 
tle Rock, Ark., after which he went to Fort 
Smith, same state, and there purchased an in- 
terest in a wagon and blacksrnith shop, and 
with his partner conducted the same success- 
fully for a year and a half. Stricken with ty- 
phoid fever about this time, he found on re- 
covery that his partner had taken advantage 
of him and he therefore decided to withdraw 



his interests from the concern. Attracted to 
the Pacific coast, in the fall of 1852 he went 
to New Orleans and there boarded a steamer 
for Galveston and Matagorda Bay, and from 
the latter point traveled by stage to San An- 
tonio, Te.x., where, the following year, he 
joined the George Wentworth party, com- 
posed of seventy-seven men, and one of the 
most completely equipped trains that crossed 
the plains in that year. Every man was well 
armed, carrying a rifle and six-shooter and a 
large supply of ammunition ; they had ten big 
wagons, two hundred and eighty mules, and 
sixteen hundred Texas steers, and George 
Wentworth brought with him a span of horses 
which he later sold in San Francisco for 
$2,000. 

The compan}^ disbanded in Los Angeles, 
where Air. Burke found employment in David 
Anderson's shop, receiving $32 a day. After 
five months he joined a party of six to mine 
gold at Santa Anita, on what is now a part of 
"Lucky" Baldwin's ranch, but this proving a 
failure he entered into partnership with a Mr. 
Hulett, one of General Walker's comrades, of 
Sonora raid fame, and with him started by 
boat from Wilmington to San Francisco. Be- 
ing detained at Santa Barbara they fell in with 
a party of travelers, a member of whom was 
Professor Trask, the state geologist, and Mr. 
Hulett, being an educated man, joined the 
company as assistant geologist at a salary of 
$150 per month. Left without a partner Mr. 
Burke joined a party of three government wag- 
ons on their way to Fort Tejon, where he be- 
came their wheelwright, and later conducted a 
mercantile establishment in that location. Not 
meeting with the desired success in this line, 
he returned to Los Angeles and located a 
wheelwright business on Main street, where 
the German-American Savings Bank now 
stands, purchasing a lot with one hundred and 
fifty feet on Main and thirty feet on First 
street, for the sum of $95. Later he sold this 
for $500. About this time (1862) he was of- 
fered the site of the Nadeau hotel for $420, but 
did not buy. He carried on his shop success- 
fully for a few years, in the meantime becom- 
ing the owner of one hundred and thirty-five 
feet on the west side of Main street, in the cen- 
ter of the block, between Third and Fourth 
streets : in 1864 he traded this to ex-governor 
John D. Downey for two hundred and fifty 
acres of land at Downey. He established his 
home there and for the ensuing twentA'-one 
years engaged in the cultivation and improve- 
ment of his property, carrying on general 
farming and also planting a walnut orchard, 
which has brought him large financial returns 
with the passing years. His money accumu- 



1118 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



lated rapidly and he soon loaned it out at as 
high a rate of interest as two per cent a month. 
Through his marriage with Miss JMary Hun- 
ter, in 1855, he had five children, and desiring 
to give them landed property, he decided to 
purchase more land, and accordingly bought 
the old Barton place at Rivera, consisting of 
one hundred and ninety acres. Five acres of 
this ranch was devoted to a vineyard, and the 
first year he owned it each acre of the vine- 
yard netted him $200. This induced him to 
set out one hundred and seventy-five acres on 
"his two ranches to vineyard, and the immense 
operations called for the building of a winery 
on the property. For some years he engaged 
extensively in the manufacture of wine, but 
after his vines were destroyed he planted wal- 
nuts and oranges. The greater part of his land 
he has now divided among his children, who 
are, named in order of birth : Frank, of Down- 
ey ; Henry, who died leaving two children, a 
daughter, now deceased, and Pascal, who 
lives with his mother at Garvanza ; Osburn, 
who lives a half mile south of Rivera ; Kizzy, 
wife of Arthur \\'hite, of Rivera; and Ulila, 
wife of John Shade, near Rivera. 

ATr. Burke's wife was born in Greene coun- 
ty. 111., a daughter of Jesse and Keziah 
(Brown) Hunter, the former of whom was 
captain of a volunteer company in the Mex- 
ican war, and accompanied Generals Steven- 
son and Cook overland to acquire possession 
of California, and with the united forces of 
Commodore Stockton succeeded in taking Los 
■\ngeles. Captain Hunter was later appointed 
Indian agent but resigned, and driving a herd 
of cattle to northern California, engaged in 
the stock business. His family, consisting of 
wife and five children, came west in 1849 and 
settled in Sacramento, Cal., where their home 
remained for three years, when, in 1852, they 
riemoved to Los Angeles. In this city occurred 
the death of Captain Himter in 1877, after hav- 
ing acquired possession of a large amount of 
land, owning a part of the Verdugo ranch, 
and having altogether thirty-seven hundred 
acres. His wife also died on the home ranch. 
They were the parents of the following named 
children : William, deceased ; Asa, Mary, 
Jesse, Samuel, Martha and Elizabeth. 

Throughout his entire life Mr. Burke has 
maintained a strong interest in all public 
questions, and although Democratic in his po- 
litical allegiance he is above all else a patriot- 
ic and loyal citizen, and can always be counted 
upon to further any plan for the advancement 
of the general welfare. A man of unusual 
ability, he has steadily risen to a position of 
financial independence, acquiring large prop- 
erties and at the same time building up for 



himself an honored place in the citizenship of 
whatever community he has made his home. 
Early in his youth he showed signs of mechan- 
ical and inventive ability, engaging at the age 
of seventeen years with a partner in the turn- 
ing and calking of flat boats, and through an 
invention of a new process for this work Mr. 
Burke was paid the large sum of $10 per day. 
His personal characteristics, in youth and in 
manhood, have been such as to win for him a 
wide and lasting friendship throughout not 
only his home section, but the entire state, and 
give him a place among the representative cit- 
izens of the pioneer days of California. 



CHARLES C. BROWN. As city engineer 
of Redlands Charles C. Brown has acquired a 
popularity and prominence which place him 
among the representative citizens of this sec- 
tion of Southern California. He was bom in 
New Brunswick, near AVoodstock, December 
16, 1859, a son of Charles Brown, a native of 
the same locality and a pilot on the St. John's 
river until his death, at the age of forty-seven 
years. He was the descendant of English an- 
cestry, and married into an old Alassachusetts 
family, his wife being Lizzie Hovey; she sur- 
vived her husband and is now living in Nor- 
walk. Cal., at the age of seventy-four years, re- 
taining her health and faculties. They had two 
children, Sanford, residing in Norwalk, and 
Charles C, of this review. 

When five years old Charles C. Brown was 
taken by his parents to Hodgdon, Me., attended 
its public schools and later became a student in 
Holton Academy, at Holton, Afe., from which 
institution he was graduated in 1882. Enter- 
ing Colby' University he took a four years' 
course and graduated therefrom with the de- 
gree of A. B. in 1886. He then came to Cali- 
fornia and in Los Angeles count}' entered the 
employ of the Santa Fe Railroad in the sur- 
vey corps and on the San Jacinto line worked 
on the coast line to San Diego. In 1887 he was 
engaged in surveying in AAHiittier and vicinity, 
laying out the town of Studebaker and several 
additions to Whittier. He also worked as a 
general surveyor and civil engineer on 
irrigating canals, and spent one year at Rands- 
burg as assayer and surveyor. During this time 
he made his home at Norwalk, Los Angeles 
county. Returning to Whittier he installed the 
Whittier water works, planning and building 
their present water system. In 1900 he came to 
Redlands in the interests of the Yucaipe Land 
& Water Company, planning and building their 
system to Crafton and East Redlands, which 
adds to their water supply an increase of two 
hundred and fifty inches. In 1902 he located in 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1119 



Redlands, having; purchased two years previous 
a ranch where he had set out an orange grove 
and installed an irrigation system. He is now 
the owner of a ranch of two hundred acres of 
land with seventy acres under the pipe line, 
and forty acres are in oranges and some in al- 
falfa. He was appointed city engineer of Red- 
lands in February, 1905. 

In Los Angeles Mr. Brown was united in 
marriage with Miss Amelia E. Shrake, a native 
of Indianapolis, Ind. The}- are members of the 
First Baptist Church of Redlands, and politi- 
cally Mr. Brown is a stanch advocate of Re- 
publican principles. Fraternally he was made 
a Mason in Whitticr and is now a member of 
Redlands Lodge No. 300, F. & A. M., and is 
also identified with the Foresters. He is a 
member of the Board of Trade of Redlands and 
interested in the development and advance- 
ment of the cit3''s welfare. 



ALMER HUNT. The tract of land which 
has been under the supervision of Mr. Hunt 
for some years and which he is operating with a 
gratifying degree of success comprises two hun- 
dred and fifteen acres lying near Downey. When 
he came to California at the age of about twen- 
ty-eight years he secured employment for some 
months with a hay press at Hynes and then be- 
came a laborer on a ranch. After a month in 
that capacity he was made foreman and now 
rents the same place, of which he has one hun- 
dred acres in alfalfa and makes a specialty of the 
milk industry. On the ranch there are sixty 
milch cows with twenty-two head of young cat- 
tle, and the milk from the dairy is handled bv the 
Alpine Farm & Dairy Company. An abundance 
of water is provided by four wells operated by 
two pumping plants. In addition to the dairy 
industry, he is also interested in the breeding 
of fine horses, owning some of the finest breeds 
to be found in the state. On Maplewood stock 
ranch, as his place is known, mav be seen the 
following: Leland Rex 34546, a handsome bay 
of eleven hundred and eighty ])ounds : Ventura, 
a dapple gray Percheron, of nineteen hundred 
and seventy-five pounds : Black Louie, a black 
Bel-jian stallion of fourteen hundred pounds ; 
Richwood, a black Silkwood pacer, weight twelve 
hundred pounds ; and Grover, the latter a large 
Spanish jack, weight nine hundred and seventy- 
five pounds. 

In the southern Dart of Insrham county, Mich., 
Aimer Hunt was born October ig, T87S. being 
a son of T. H. and Marv J. (Barnum) Hunt, 
natives respectively of Michigan and New York, 
and botli now deceased. Throughout all of his 
active life the father followed the trade of a 
millwrisht. There were in the faniilv a son and 



two daughters, the latter both living in Mich- 
igan. The former, whose name introduces this 
sketch, was given such advantages as the com- 
mon schools of Ingham county afforded and at 
an early age became self-supporting through his 
work in the lumber woods. Not only did he 
have charge of a lumber camp in Clare county, 
Mich., but in addition for three years he owned 
a camp of his own. On disposing of his inter- 
ests in Michigan he came to California in 1902 
and has since been busily engaged in farm 
activities in Los x^ngeles county. 

The marriage of Mr. Hunt took place in Mich- 
igan February 25, 1900, and united him with 
Emma A. Lent, a native of Pennsylvania, and 
a daughter of C. A. and Sarah A. (Gore) Lent, 
natives of Pennsylvania and for many years 
farmers of Michigan. Eventually Mr. Lent 
brought his family to California and settled in 
the southern part of the state. At this writing 
he is employed as foreman of a borax company 
in Death valley. In his family there were five 
children, Mrs. Hunt being the oldest. To the 
information gleaned from text-books during her 
school years she has added the culture derived 
from careful reading of the best literature, and 
has further broadened and deepened her life by 
the element of religion, being a faithful member 
of the ]\Iethodist Episcopal Church. To her only 
child, Albert J., both she and Mr. Hunt are giv- 
ing all the opportunities within their power in 
order that he may be trained for a useful man- 
hood. While Mr. Hunt has never been active in 
politics he is none the less pronounced in his 
views and favors the Republican platform in 
national questions. During Ijis residence in 
Michigan he was an active member of the Tent 
of the Maccabees and also holds connection with 
the Modern Woodmen of America. 



AUGUST ALBERT GOETTING. A lib- 
eral, enterprising citizen, August Albert Goett- 
ing is prominent among the upbuilders of River- 
side and San Bernardino counties, having been 
engaged as an agriculturist in this section since 
1 89 1. He was born in Gallipolis. Gallia county, 
Ohio. March 2, 1862, the third in a family of 
six sons and three daughters born to his parents, 
August and Frederika (Hess) Goetting. They 
were both natives of Germany, where they were 
married, immigrating to America when Mr. 
Goetting was but twenty-four years old. Locat- 
ing in Ohio, he cleared and improved a hundred 
and sixty-acre farm, on which he and his wife 
are now living, he being seventy-five and she 
seventy-three years old. In religion they are 
members of the Lutheran Church. 

August .\lbert Goetting was the eldest son 
in the family and was reared on the paternal 



1120 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



farm in Ohio, receiving his education in the 
pubUc schools. He remained at home until at- 
taining his majority, when he went to Frank- 
lin county and secured employment on a farm, 
as that was the work in which he had early been 
trained. In 1889 he came to California and in 
Los Angeles entered the employ of the Southern 
Pacific Railroad Company, as a carpenter in the 
bridge and building department. He was located 
between Fresno and Reno, Nev., for two years, 
when he returned to Southern California and in 
San Timoteo cafion, near El Casco, established 
an apiary. This enterprise he continued suc- 
cessfully until 1895, when he rented the old C. 
W. Gower place and continued the management 
of an apiary and general farming. In October. 
1906, he purchased his present farm, which con- 
sists of one hundred and sixty acres, well im- 
proved and highly cultivated, general farming 
and an apiary of two hundred stands occupying 
his attention. He has been very successful in 
his work and is esteemed among the farmers 
of this section both for his ability as an agricult- 
urist, as well as personal qualities of character, 
his liberality and enterprise placing him high 
in the citizenship of El Casco. 

August 14, 1898, Mr. Goetting was married 
to Miss Annie J. Singleton, a native of this 
section and a daughter of William Singleton. In 
his fraternal relations Mr. Goetting is a member 
of the Odd Fellows lodge of Redlands and polit- 
ically he is a stanch adherent of Democratic 
principles. He is a member of the California 
Bee Keepers' Association, in which he takes an 
active and helpful interest. 



LOUIS SENTOUS. One of the upbuilders 
of Los Angeles and a man of energy and enter- 
prise, is Louis Sentous, who is also a member of 
a family whose name is prominent in various 
avenues of business activity. As the name would 
indicate he is of French parentage, his birth 
having occurred in Haute-Garonne, France, 
July 28, 1839. His parents were Francisco and 
Marie (Rouillon) Sentous, whose entire lives 
were spent in their native country, where the 
father engaged as a prosperous farmer and 
stockman. Louis Sentous was reared on the 
paternal farm to the age of si.xteen years, when 
he decided to follow the example of his elder 
brother, John, who in i8.t;2 had emigrated to 
America and located in California. Accordingly 
December 29, 1855, he took passage at Havre 
on the sailer Gutre, which made the passage to 
San Francisco via Cape Horn. They encountered 
the most severe storms at the Horn and made 
only sixty miles in sixty-two days, everyone even 
to the ship's officers having given up hope of the 
boat weathering the storm. The added length 



of the voyage caused them to run out of provi- 
sions and they were compelled to sacrifice all 
the livestock on board, even to the dogs, which 
were killed and eaten. However, they passed 
safely through these trying times and on July 
16, 1856, they reached San Francisco, after a 
voyage of seven months and nineteen dayi. 
. Mr. Sentous at once made his way to the 
mines of Calaveras county, where he engaged in 
placer mining and after making several hundred 
dollars he came to Los Angeles, which city he 
reached October 29, 1859. The rains had come 
early that fall and he found the hills and valleys 
green and the verdure of the mountains pre- 
sented a beautiful sight, on the trip from San 
Pedro to Los Angeles, noting grass eighteen 
inches high. Some of the party in their rapture 
declared they would never leave such a beautiful 
country. The first year in Southern California 
was spent by Mr. Sentous in working for B. 
Revierra, who had a dain' in the Pueblo de los 
Angeles, which then numbered about twenty-five 
hundred people, the most southerly business 
place of any kind being an old brewery and a 
small store at Third and Main streets. About 
a year after coming to this section Mr. Sentous 
was thrown from a horse and seriously sprained 
his leg. He was sent to the French hospital at 
San Francisco, where the surgeon said he would 
have to amputate the limb. Mr. Sentous re- 
fused to undergo the operation and declared he 
would take his chances of recovering as he was. 
Two months later he was able to leave the hos- 
pital and from San Francisco he went to the 
mines in Calaveras county, from there to Co- 
lumbia and then to Sonoratown, Tuolumne 
county, where he purchased a farm, cleared and 
improved it and engaged in the dairy business. 
Disposing of this interest in 1866 he returned 
to Los Angeles and in the vicinity of the citj' 
engaged in the stock business, ranging: his cattle 
in the San Fernando valley. In 1868 he drove 
his herd of cattle to San Francisco and sold 
them and the following year bought a band of 
cattle, six hundred and eighty in number, from 
a man who had just brought them from Texas, 
and after disposing of them in the San Fran- 
cisco markets he concluded to make a visit to 
his home in France. He accordingly made the 
journey over the railroad which had just been 
completed, thence taking passage on a steamer 
from New York City and arriving safely in his 
old home in France. He remained there for a 
little more than a year, and while there married 
Miss Bernadotte Laserra, and with his bride re- 
turned to Los Angeles in 1870. 

He again began the cattle business, purchasing 
a ranch on the Tehachapi, and three rears later, 
in addition to this enterprise, he became in- 
terested with two of his brothers, P. Marie and 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1123 



Alphonse Sentous, in the establishment and 
maintenance of a meat market in Los Angeles, 
but the two brothers sold to their other brothers, 
Vincente and Exupere. They were first located 
on Aliso and Los Angeles streets, and remained 
so engaged until 1896, when they sold out and 
dissolved partnership, and Louis Sentous having 
previously established a wholesale butcher busi- 
ness and meat market at No. 6 North Main street, 
purchased the site and later put up the Sentous 
block, which extends from Main to San Fernando 
streets. Later he incorporated the Sentous Pack- 
ing Company with Ed C. Conet, his son-in-law, 
of which enterprise Mr. Sentous was president 
and manager for some years. Their business 
was conducted in the Sentous block, where they 
had three stores 55x110 feet in dimensions. Dur- 
ing this time he was also largely interested in 
the raising of stock on his Puente ranch, which 
consists of eighteen hundred acres of land well 
watered and susceptible of irrigation because of 
this. The purchase before the property was di- 
vided among the brothers amounted to fifty- 
three hundred and twenty acres. In 1905 he sold 
his interest in the Sentous Packing Company 
and since that period has given his time entirely 
to the raising of cattle and horses on his well- 
improved ranch. Besides the interests named 
Mr. Sentous was identified with other enter- 
prises in the city of Los Angeles, having erected 
a business house at the corner of Buena Vista 
and Bellevue, which he later sold to the Pacific 
Electric Railway, and built a business house on 
Castelar street, which he owns in connection with 
the Sentous block. 

Mr. Sentous built a fine residence at No. 1802 
Toberman street, which is now the home of the 
family. To himself and wife have been born 
three children, namely: Jules, who is a prom- 
inent Mason ; Mary Louise, Mrs. Conet, of Ven- 
tura; and Narcisse, j\Irs. Garner of Los Angeles. 
Mr. Sentous is a stanch Republican in his polit- 
ical affiliations, and although never desirous of 
official recognition personally gives his best ef- 
forts to advance the principles he endorses. He 
is an honored member of the French Benevolent 
Society of Los Angeles. Liberal and progressive 
in spirit he has won for himself a place of prom- 
inence among the representative citizens who 
hold him in high esteem for his splendid qual- 
ities of mind and heart. 



LOUIS BRENNEIS. Numbered among the 
pioneer business men of Oxnard is Louis 
Brenneis, proprietor of the blacksmith, car- 
riage and implement works that since its es- 
tablishment in 1809 has been operated under 
his name. The building which he occupies 
and which was erected under his supervision 



stands on the plaza, covering a floor space of 
100x140 feet, and is equipped with all the 
modern and scientific improvements, including 
a gas engine of eight-horse power, an electric 
dynamo of ten-horse power, three fires with 
power blowers and a Killifer power hammer. 
In addition to blacksmithing and machine 
work for several years he engaged in the hard- 
ware and agricultural implement business, but 
eventually sold the stock, and since then has 
given his attention to practical and scientific 
horse-shoeing, and the manufacture and re- 
pair of wagons, carriages and farming imple- 
ments. 

Bv birth and ancestry Mr. Brenneis is of the 
German race, and his parents, Louis and Eliz- 
abeth (Bilz) Brenneis, were natives and life- 
long residents of Heidelberg, Baden. For 
manv years the father filled the office of aud- 
itor,' but eventually he retired from office and 
a few years later he passed away, since which 
time the mother has continued at the old home- 
stead. All of their eight children are stillliv- 
ing, Louis being the second in order of birth, 
and he was born at Heidelberg August 31, 
t868. As a bov he attended a gjannasium in 
Heidelberg, but left school at the age of four- 
teen. In 1S83 he came to the United States 
and secured employment in New York City. 
After eighteen months in the metropolis he 
proceeded west as far as Kansas, where he re- 
mained during one winter at Manhattan. In 
the spring of "1887 he went to Pleasanton, Ala- 
meda county, Cal, where he became an ap- 
prentice to the trade of blacksmith and horse- 
shoer under his uncle, J. A. Bilz. On the com- 
pletion of his apprenticeship three years later 
he began to work in the employ of J. H. 
Dutcher at Livermore, Alameda county, where 
he remained for five years. 

After having followed his trade at Fresno 
for two vears Mr. Brenneis removed to New- 
hall, and in February, 1898, came to Oxnard as 
an employe on the construction of the Ameri- 
can Beet 'Sugar factory. A year later he em- 
barked in the business' which he now conducts 
and which through his energ>' and industry 
has taken rank among the leading enterprises 
of its kind in the county. After coming to Ox- 
nard he was united in marriage with Miss So- 
phia Reiman, who was born in Germany and 
at the age of five years came to California with 
her father, Morit'z, and other members of the 
family. Born of their union are six children, 
Annie, INIary, Joseph, Charles, Sophia and 
Moritz. The religious connections of the fam- 
ilv are with the Santa Clara Catholic Church, 
while fraternally Air. Brenneis affiliates with 
the Knights of Columbus. Ever since becom- 



1124 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ing a citizen of the United States he has been 
stanch in his allegiance to the Democratic par- 
ty, has kept posted concerning political aftairs 
and at one time served as a member of the 
■county central committee of his party. 
Through the building up of a successful busi- 
ness he has promoted his own prosperity and 
at the same time has been a factor in the ma- 
terial dev-elopment and commercial growth of 
Oxnard, where he holds a place among the en- 
terprising and progressive citizens. 



LOUIS MAX SCHALLERT. The ances- 
tral lineage of the Schallert family is lost amid 
the traditions of Austria, where many gener- 
ations lived and labored and died. The found- 
er of the race in America was Lawrence M. 
Schallert, a man of broad education and many 
talents, who left his native Tyrol for the 
greater opportunities of the new world, and 
resided first in New York City and later in 
St. Louis, being engaged in editorial work 
with prominent newspapers. His wife, who 
bore the maiden name of Creocentia Neyer, 
was like himself a descendant of an old Tyro- 
lese family, and Avas born in the little village 
of Feldkirch nestling in a valley beneath the 
shadow of rugged mountains, near the bor- 
ders of Germany and Switzerland. Since the 
death of her husband, which occurred in East 
St. Louis, she has made her home in the Mis- 
souri city across the Mississippi. 

The eldest in a family of whom two now 
survive, Louis Max Schallert was born Feb- 
ruary 25, 1861, during the residence of his par- 
ents in New York City. As a boy he attend- 
ed private schools in St. Louis. When only 
twelve 3^ears of age he began to learn the 
lumber business and gradually acquired a thor- 
ough practical knowledge of the occupation. 
In early life he was successively employed as 
foreman in the yellow pine departments of 
the John J. Ganahl Co.. and Knapp, Stout & 
Co., also as superintendent of the St. Charles 
I'ATo.) Car Company. Coming to California in 
1888 he sectired a position as clerk with the 
Pacific Pine Lumber Company at San Fran- 
cisco, and in 1890 removed to Los Angeles, 
where he entered the emplo}^ of the Citizens' 
Ice Company and was soon promoted to be 
their assistant superintendent. When the 
ownership of the business passed into diflferent 
hands, he entered into other activities. For 
eighteen months he conducted a grocery on 
the corner of Glov/ner and Twenty-third 
streets, and afterward for eight years carried 
on a coffee and tea store at No. 207 East Pico 
street. 

About this time IMr. Schallert bought prop- 



erty in Hollywood where he now resides. His 
first purchase in this beautiful suburb consist- 
ed of real estate on Prospect and Cohing aven- 
ues, where he built three stores in a block and 
two stores comprising the Schallert block, 
55x100 feet in dimensions. Since then he has 
erected his family residence in Hollywood and 
improved other vacant property in the same 
place. Shortly after the organization of the 
Lumber Surveyors' Association of Southern 
California in 1902 he became connected with 
the new enterprise, in which now he is an ac- 
tive member, and for the same period he has 
been engaged as a lumber surveyor in Re- 
dondc. In addition to property investments 
lie has bought stock in the Hollywood Nation- 
al Bank and also in the Citizens' Savings 
Bank of Hollywood. The Hollywood Board 
of Trade also numbers him among its mem- 
bers and promoters. 

The marriage of Mr. Schallert took place in 
St. Louis and united him with Miss Louisa 
Phiel, a native of Missouri. They are the par- 
ents of two children, Eugene Joseph and Isa- 
bella Marie. The family are identified with 
the Church of the Blessed Sacrament at Hol- 
lywood and contribute to its maintenance, as 
well as to other worthy movements. In poli- 
tics Mr. Schallert votes for the men best quali- 
fied for public ofifice and exercises considera- 
ble freedom in his ballot, supporting men rath- 
er than party, and measures rather than plat- 
forms. Various fraternities include him among 
their members, among these being the Knights 
of Columbus at Los Angeles, the German St. 
Joseph Society of Los Angeles, the Fraternal 
Brotherhood and the Knights of the Macca- 
bees. 



HARRY W. GRISWOLD. Many of the 
older residents and business men of Fernando 
remember with pleasure the late Harry W. Gris- 
wold, who for a number of years was intimately 
identified with the highest and best interests of 
this section of Los Angeles county, and a brief 
sketch of his life will be gladly welcomed by the 
readers of this volume. A man of sterling char- 
acter and worth, energetic and progressive, he 
was active in promoting the industrial and mate- 
rial prosperity of the community in which he 
resided, and in business, political and social cir- 
cles was prominent and popular. 

The earlier years of Mr. Griswold were spent 
in Niagara county, N. Y., where as a young man 
he was engaged in the railroad business. Com- 
ing to the Pacific coast in 1877, he entered the 
employ of the Southern Pacific Railroad Com- 
pany, first in Los Angeles, and then in Fernando, 
being station agent here for a short time. Decid- 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGR.\PHICAL RECORD. 



1125 



ing to change his occupation, he entered upon a 
mercantile career, at the death of his brother-in- 
law, the late Hon. A. B. Moffitt, buying his in- 
terest in the store with which he was connected. 
As a general merchant Mr. Grisvvold was very 
successful, his fair and upright dealings with all, 
and his systematic and honorable business meth- 
ods, winning him a large and lucrative trade. He 
became widely and favorably known, and carried 
on a substantial business until his death, which 
occurred December i8, 1887, when he was but 
thirty-three years of age. He was very active, 
and in addition to attending to his store was at 
the time of his death serving as postmaster, agent 
for the WeUs-Fargo Express Company, and as 
justice of the peace, keeping at all times busily 
employed, and besides these public positions was 
financial trustee of the Alaclay Theological Col- 
lege. 

In 1879 ^'Ii'- Griswold married Mary Maclay, 
daughter of the late Hon. Charles Maclay, and 
their only child died in infancy. Mrs. Griswold 
still resides in Fernando, where she has a beau- 
tiful home, over which she presides with a 
gracious hospitality. Public-spirited and gener- 
ous, Mrs. Griswold is a woman of strong per- 
sonality, highly esteemed throughout the com- 
munity, and is a member of the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church, in which she is an active worker. 



ELKANAH W. RICHARDSON. Prominent 
among the solid business men of Los Angeles 
county is Elkanah W. Richardson, a wide-awake 
representative of the agricultural and horticul- 
tural interests of Tropico. He is widely and 
favorably known as a cultured and genial man, 
an able, skillful and progressive farmer, and is 
highly esteemed throughout the community in 
which he resides. A son of William C. B. 
Richardson, of whom a sketch may be found on 
another page of this volume, he was born, No- 
vember 6, 1849, in Cleveland, Ohio, where he 
acquired his early education, attending the schools 
and a business college. 

After leaving school, Elkanah W. Richardson 
went to Chicago, where for several years he was. 
book-keeper for his brother, O. S. Richardson, 
an extensive coal dealer, who is still in business 
in that city. Coming by way of Cape Horn as 
a sailor to California in 1871, he arrived in 
San Francisco on September 11, and immediately 
came to Los Angeles to look after property that 
his father had previously purchased. A month 
later he returned to Illinois, and at Salt Lake 
City met refugees fleeing from the big fire that 
nearly devastated Qiicago, rendering so many 
homeless, and destroyed millions of dollars worth 
of property. Two months later, he went back 
to Cleveland, and for a year assisted his father 



in surveying in that city and its suburbs. Im 
June, 1873, he again visited Los Angeles, and 
on December i of that year he assumed 
charge of his father's ranch, becoming superin- 
tendent, a position that he filled most creditably 
for many years. In 1881 he embarked in the 
dairy business, and built up an extensive and 
lucrative trade, in which he was successfully 
employed for a score of years. Since 1901 Mr. 
Richardson has devoted his time and energies 
to carrying on his father's varied interests prin- 
cipally, although he occasionally does some sur- 
veying in the town and county. 

In Los x\ngeles, Cal., in 1887, Mr. Richardson 
married Ella Weekley, and into their household 
five children have been born, namely : Eulalia,. 
a graduate of the Glendale high school and now 
a student in Stanford ; William: McKinley ; 
Omar Burt; Paul Eddy; and John Everett. 
Fraternallv Mr. Richardson is a prominent mem- 
ber of Glendale Lodge No. 388, I. O. O. F., in 
which he has passed all the chairs and is a mem- 
ber of the Encampment and the Rebekahs. He 
is a man of unquestioned business ability and 
judgment, as is shown by his management of his 
father's estate, the Santa Eulalia rancho, which 
at that time of its purchase, in 1868, contained 
six hundred and seventy-one acres of land. 
William C. B. Richardson paid $2500 for the 
tract, which lies between the Dreyfus and 
Glassell tracts and the Los Angeles river. For 
the first few years after taking charge of the 
ranch or until 1880, Mr. Richardson raised sheep 
on it and then converted it into a diary farm, 
subsequently devoting it to deciduous fruits and 
strawberries, each change being for his pecuniary 
advantage. When the Pacific Electric Railroad 
was put through he subdivided forty acres into 
lots 50x100 feet, and worth from $400 to $700 
each. A part of these lots have already been 
sold. With the one hundred acres more re- 
cently purchased it makes a valuable estate of 
seven hundred acres. Ever since its organization 
Mr. Richardson has been a trustee of the Glen- 
dale union high school. He is a member of the 
Glendale Valley Club and the Pioneers Society 
of Los .A.ngeles county. 



GEORGE JACOB EUEHN. Ranching has 
occupied the attention of ]\Ir. Buehn since he 
came to the vicinity of Norwalk, Los Angeles 
county, about 1878, and with this enterprise he 
has more recently combined that of wine man- 
ufacture, having a vineyard of forty acres and 
turning out twenty-five thousand gallons of 
wine each year from his own grapes. He was 
born in Baden, Germany, July 21, 1848, a son 
of Christian and Eva (Sebastian) Buehn, both 
natives of the Fatherland, where thev are now 



1126 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



living at an advanced age. Of their family two 
sons and two daughters are in California. 

G. T. Buehn was educated in the public 
schools of his native land and later learned 
wine making and became thoroughly familiar 
with market gardening. He came to America 
at the age of nineteen years and located in Cal- 
ifornia, from San Francisco going to Oregon, 
where he engaged in the dairy business for 
eleven years. For three years of this time he 
lived in East Portland and eight years in Mor- 
row county, owning in the latter section a fine 
ranch of eighty acres and engaging in the stock 
business. He caire to Los .A.ngeles county to 
visit two sisters and they prevailed upon him 
to locate here permanently. Accordingly, in 
1879, he purchased his present property, which 
consists of sixty acres, of which forty acres are 
in wine grapes ; the entire property was wild 
and uncultivated land at that time and to Mr. 
Buehn is due the credit for having developed 
one of the fine ranches of this section. He set 
out trees, built house, barn, winery and all 
necessarj' outbuildings, fences, etc., and has 
added not only to the value of his own proper- 
tv, but enhanced that of the ranches about him. 
" May 8, 1880, Mr. Buehn married ]\Iiss Mary 
Feldman, a native of Germany, and they are 
the parents of five children, namely: Minnie, 
Louisa, George, Louis and Elsie. Both himself 
and wife are members of the German Lutheran 
Church. Politically he is a Republican, and in 
fraternal matters belongs to the Fraternal Aid, 
was an Odd Fellow in Oregon, and also carries 
old-line insurance. He is progressive and en- 
terprising and esteemed in the citizenship of 
Los Angeles county. 



PETER L. LOPEZ. Among the best known 
and most active residents of Fernando is Peter 
L. Lopez, an energetic, capable business man. 
possessing keen judgment and marked executive 
ability. He was born June 28, 1867, in Los 
Angeles valley, which was likewise the birthplace 
of his. father, Valentine Lopez, whose birth oc- 
curred sixty years ago, and of his grandfather, 
whose name was Peter Lopez. The Lopez fam- 
ily was one of the first to settle in this section of 
Los Angeles county, taking up grants of land 
from the Spanish government, and many of the 
descendants of the original emigrants are still 
living here, honored and respected citizens. 

After leaving the public schools of Fernando, 
Peter L. Lopez was for a year a student in the 
college then located here. The ensuing five years 
he assisted his father on the home ranch, and 
then for two years had the contract for carrying 
the mails from Fernando to Simi, Ventura 
cotmtv. ^^'llen but twenty-three years of age he 



was elected constable of Fernando township, an 
office in which he served most acceptably for three 
terms of four years each. Resigning then, he 
spent a year of leisure, enjoying a well-earned 
vacation free from business cares. In 1905 he 
resumed his public duties, accepting the appoint- 
ment of road superintendent or overseer, an of- 
fice which keeps him busily employed, it being 
the hardest road district in the entire county. 
Under his personal supervision he has one hun- 
dred and fifty-seven miles of road and two moun- 
tain ranges to cross, and the question of keeping 
these public thoroughfares in a satisfactory con- 
dition for travel is often a difficult one to solve. 
He is a man of good business capacity, and by 
dint of industry and wise judgment has acquired 
considerable property, owning several village lots 
in Fernando and one of the best residences in 
the community, having erected it in 1900. 

April 8, 1894, Mr. Lopez married Lottie Will- 
iams, and they have one child, a daughter named 
Bertha. Fraternally Mr. Lopez is a member of 
the Independent Order of Foresters, belonging to 
the Los Angeles Lodge. 



LEGENE SAGE BARNES. One of the suc- 
cessful real-estate dealers of Long Beach is L. S. 
Barnes, who, although a resident of this city only 
since IQ04, has built up for himself a secure posi- 
tion among her business men. Locating in the 
city in the year mentioned above, he engaged in 
handling real estate, being at that time associated 
with W. W. Bryan, later purchasing the latter's 
interest and continuing alone until January, 1906, 
when, with two others, he established the busi- 
ness now known as L. S. Barnes & Co., located at 
No. 121 West Ocean avenue, where they con- 
duct a real-estate enterprise of considerable mag- 
nitude. 

Legene Sage Barnes was born in Wilber, Sa- 
line county, Neb., August 7, 1875, the second in 
a family of seven children, four of whom are liv- 
ing, he being the only one in California. His 
father, Thomas H. Barnes, was a native of Ohio, 
his birth having occurred in the vicinity of Co- 
lumbus, where the family fortunes had been lo- 
cated by Samuel, the paternal grandfather. The 
latter ran a steamer on the Ohio river for many 
years, eventually removing to Nebraska and be- 
coming a pioneer of Wilber, where his death oc- 
cured at an advanced age. He was a man of 
strong character and patriotism, and at the call of 
the Union in '61 he enlisted in an Ohio regiment 
and gave faithful service to the cause. Thomas 
H. Barnes was also a pioneer of Nebraska, 
through his connection with the Burlington & 
Missouri River Railroad Company ( for which he 
secured right of way through the state from 
Omaha to Denver) being a potent factor in the 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1129 



upbuilding of this section of the countr_\-. He 
located the greater number of towns in western 
Nebraska and eastern Colorado, and at the pres- 
ent writing owns valuable properties in the first- 
named state. At one time he located in Oregon 
and in Salem built the electric railroad, which 
covers a distance of twenty-five miles in the city 
and its vicinity, and also platted Englewood, an 
addition to Salem, and was otherwise instru- 
mental in the advancement of that city. Later he 
returned to Nebraska, and has since made his 
home in Alliance, where he engages in the han- 
dling of landed properties. Inheriting the sterling 
characteristics of his forefathers, he takes a keen 
interest in all matters pertaining to the general 
welfare and gives his efforts freely to the pro- 
motion of public enterprises. A Democrat in pol- 
itics, he is prominent in the councils of his party, 
and fraternally he is a Mason. His wife, for- 
merly Rose Harris, a native of Youngstown, 
Ohio, is also living. 

The early education of L. S. Barnes was re- 
ceived through an attendance of the public and 
high schools of Salem, Ore., his graduation tak- 
ing place in 1892. Returning to Nebraska with 
his parents he attended a commercial college at 
Hastings. Previous to this he had studied teleg- 
raphy, and about this time accepted the position 
of operator for the Burlington & Missouri River 
Railroad Company at Hastings ; later he acted in 
the same capacity at David City, Neb. In 1895 
he went to Salt Lake City, Utah, for the Rio 
Grande & Western Railroad and as conductor 
ran between Salt Lake City and Park City that 
state. Later he was conductor on a passenger 
train out of Milford, Utah, which position he 
resigned to engage in mining in Utah and later 
in ^Montana. He was successful in this enter- 
prise, discovering and opening several mines that 
brought large financial returns, among which was 
the Coobartal which was the last disposed of. 
Mr. Barnes' first trip to California was made in 
December, 1895, his decision to locate here per- 
manently being made in 1904, when he came to 
Long Beach, as previously stated. He has met 
with unusual success in his business enterprises, 
acquiring financial returns, and has gained a high 
position among the business men of the city. In 
addition to the business enterprise already men- 
tioned he is interested in the Long Beach Realty 
Investment Company, and the Moore Foster In- 
vestment Company, serving as treasurer in the 
last-named organization. 

In Raton. N. Mex., Mr. Barnes was united in 
marriage with Miss Grace Dinsmore, a native of 
Kansas, who had resided for some years in Salem, 
Ore. Thev are the parents of two children, 
Willa and Legene S., Jr. Mr. Barnes takes a 
lively interest in social and fraternal affairs of 
Long Beach, being a member of the Cosmopoli- 



tan Club and Chamber of Commerce, and is iden- 
tified with the Benevolent Protective Order of 
Elks and Knights of Pythias. He is a man of 
broad information, in touch with current events, 
and a citizen upon whom the public honor may 
safely rest. 



CHARLES H. HOGE. Through his asso- 
ciation with the real-estate interests of Long 
Beach, Charles H. Hoge is making himself a 
factor in the material upbuilding and growth 
of the city. He is a native of Hunt county, 
Tex., and was born October 31, 1866, a son of 
John C. Hoge. The latter was a native of 
Missouri, whence he removed to Texas at the 
close of the Civil war, and became a farmer 
in Hunt county and later in the vicinity of 
Blanco, where he is now residing. His wife, 
whom he married in Texas, was formerly 
Mattie King, a native of Illinois, and born of 
this union were six sons and four daughters, 
of whom Charles H. Hoge is the eldest. He 
was reared to young manhood in Texas, where 
he attended the common schools in pursuit of 
an education and engaged with his father in 
farming. In Alarch, 1891, he left his native 
state and located in the northern part of Ari- 
zona, remaining in Ihat location until fall, 
when he came to California. In Redlands, his 
first location, he engaged in the real estate 
business with a partner, the firm being known 
as Dike & Hoge. Together they subdivided 
the Oliver Grove addition of twenty-nine acres, 
and also subdivided other tracts during the 
eight years in which they continued business. 
Disposing of his interests in that section 
Mr. Hoge located in the city of Los Angeles 
and as a member of the real-estate firm of 
Hoge & Gaylord laid out the Echo Park 
tract. In the spring of 1904 he came to Long 
Beach and here became a partner in the firm 
of Todd, Windham & Hoge, who laid out 
the Pacific Home tract of twenty-eight acres, 
and also handled the one hundred acres com- 
prised in the Long Beach Park tract, along 
the Ocean front, which tract was opened to 
the public in 1905. In the fall of 1905 the 
firm of Todd, Windham & Hoge raised the 
money for the first payment on the eight 
hundred acres now being improved as Long 
Beach Harbor, and assisted in the organization 
of the Dock & Terminal Company, and the 
firms of Todd & Windham and C. H. Hoge 
& Co. have the exclusive holding of all of that 
property. This has been the means of more 
than doubling the values of real-estate in 
Long Beach. With others Mr. Hoge organized 
the Dominguez Investment Company to sub- 
divide the Dominguez Harbor Tract of two 



1130 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



hundred acres on the north side of Anaheim 
Road, running from Long Beach to Wihning- 
ton. ]\[r. Hoge is now doing a general real- 
estate business independently, under the firm 
name of C. H. Hoge & Co. 

j\Tr. Hoge is identified fraternally with the 
Order of Pendo, and in his political convic- 
tions is a Democrat on national issues, while 
locally he reserves the right to cast his ballot 
for the man whom he considers best qualified 
for public office. 



CAPT. ELAIER O. LUTZ. The excellent 
harbor at San Diego and the large number of 
tourists visiting the city every year render yacht- 
ing one of the most satisfactory sources of recrea- 
tion and pleasure. Recognizing this fact, Cap- 
tain Lutz has devoted his attention to the devel- 
opment of a business catering to the wants of 
strangers as well as town people. As the pro- 
prietor of the Star boathouse, at the foot of H 
street, he has built up a business unique in 
character and interesting in details. His pleasure 
wharf is commodious and at the end he has his 
row boats, sail boats and launches, including the 
Dolphin, fortj'-seven and one-half feet; the 
Urania, forty-five feet, and the Dolly, twenty- 
six feet. A special feature of the business is his 
Tuesday and Thursday excursions of the Dol- 
phin, which carries the guests past Roseville, 
La Playa, the quarantine station, the fortifica- 
tions at Fort Rosecrans and the government 
jetty. 

The Lutz family comes from Pennsylvania, 
whence the captain's grandfather removed to Cir- 
cleville, Ohio, and settled among the pioneer 
farmers on the Scioto river. After the family 
removed to the fann near Circleville, Louis Lutz 
was born there and after he had attained man's 
estate he devoted himself to agricultural pursuits 
in the same locality. In 1871 he removed to 
Kansas and settled in Emporia, where he open- 
ed a hardware and agricultural implement store, 
conducting the business for a period of twelve 
years. At the expiration of that time he closed 
out his interests in Emporia and removed to New 
Mexico, where he acquired large tracts of land 
in San Miguel county near Las Vegas, and there 
he remained until his death at sixty-eight years 
of age. His wife, who was born at Circleville, 
Ohio, and died in New Mexico, bore the maiden 
name of Susan Hittler, her father, Jacob, having 
been a farmer in the vicinity of Circleville. 

Six children formed the family of Louis Lutz 
and three are still living. Elmer O., who was 
second in order of birth, was born on the home 
farm near Circleville, Ohio, February 19, 1866, 
and was a boy of five years when the family set- 
tled in Emporia, Kans., where he secured a 



public school education. During 1882 he accom- 
panied the family to New Mexico, where his 
father had purchased the Osage Sutton grant of 
sixty-nine thousand six hundred and forty acres 
of land situated one hundred and ten miles south- 
east of Las Vegas. The ranch had forty-two 
miles of fence, all of which was of four wires. 
Assisted by other members of the family, the 
father conducted a cattle business which was in- 
corporated under the title of the L. L. Cattle Com- 
pany, with the father as president and Elmer O., 
manager and treasurer. A specialty was made 
of full-blooded Hereford cattle, of which they 
had a large number of fine specimens. At times 
they had as man)' as four thousand head of cat- 
tle on the ranch, all of which bore their brand of 
L LL. 

Owing to considerable trouble with rheuma- 
tism, which only a change o"f occupation and cli- 
mate could benefit, Elmer O. Lutz left New Mex- 
ico in 1897 and removed to San Diego, where 
he has since made his home. However, it was 
not until three years later that he disposed of his 
interests in New JNIexico, all of the land and 
cattle being then sold. In 1898 he established a 
boathouse at the foot of D street and opened 
the business which he has since conducted with 
energv', judgment and originality. However, 
since beginning in the business he has disposed 
of his first property to the Corinthian Yacht Club 
and has purchased the property at the foot of H 
street. He is identified with the San Diego 
Chamber of Commerce, also the San Diego Yacht 
Club. His home is a comfortable residence in 
the cit)', presided over by his wife, formerly 
Miss E. May Addington, a native of Iowa. In 
politics he gives his influence and ballot toward 
the principles of the Republican party, of which 
he is a pronounced supporter. 



C. O. ANDERSON is making extensive im- 
provements at Glenoak ranch, erecting thereon 
a beautiful mission style house which is being 
fitted with all modern •improvements, including 
an acetylene gas plant, and a telephone, his am- 
bition being to make it one of the most com- 
fortable and attractive homes in that section of 
the state. The land is devoted to tlie growing 
of fruit and grain, the conduct of these opera- 
tions being in the hands of a manager. The 
ranch has an independent irrigation plant with 
gasoline engine to furnish power for the centrif- 
ugal pump, which has a capacity of seventy- 
five gallons per minute. 

Mr. Anderson was born September 26, 1857, 
in Sweden, in which country he received his 
early education. When fourteen years of age he 
came to the United States, going directly to 
Qiicasro. Later he removed to Rock Island 



HISTORICAL- AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1131 



and engaged in the manufacture of shoes, re- 
maining there some time. After disposing of 
his interests there he entered mercantile enter- 
prises in Des Moines and Davenport, Iowa. In 
1887 he came to San Diego, Gal., and secured 
employment in a retail shoe house, remaining 
eight and one-half 3-ears with F. T. Wright & 
Co., after which he became manager of the shoe 
department in Marston's department store. 
Severing his connection with this firm after three 
and a half years of valuable service to his em- 
ployer he next accepted a position as traveling- 
salesman for the firm of Utz & Dunn of Roches- 
ter, N. Y., the field given him being Galifornm, 
Nevada and the Hawaiian Islands, a position 
which he has filled for the past seven years. 

Mrs. Anderson is a native of Illinois and was 
for many years a school teacher in the public 
schools of California. Fraternally Mr. Ander- 
son is a member of the Woodman lodge, the 
Knights of Pythias, and holds membership in 
the Traveling Men's Protective Association of 
L^tica, N. Y. PoHtically he is an advocate of 
the principles embraced in the platform of the 
Republican party. Fie is one of the best posted 
shoe men in tlie country and is personally popular 
with all who enjoy his acquaintance. He is 
well-read, well-traveled, and takes an interest 
in all matters of importance to the public welfare. 



CAPT. SAMUEL WYLIE McNAB. A man 
of keen insight and a good judge of human 
nature, Capt. Samuel Wylie ]\'IcNab is an ef- 
ficient executive officer under appointment by the 
sheriff of San Bernardino county. He is of 
Scotch descent, and the sturdy elements of char- 
acter found in tlie men of that nationality are 
a part of his inheritance from his early ancestors. 
His grandfather, Henrj' McNab, was a weaver 
in Philadelphia, later removed to Pittsburg, and 
finally became a pioneer of the state of Iowa. 
His son, James, was born in Philadelphia, be- 
came a farmer near Pittsburg, and moved in suc- 
cession to Galena, 111., where he was engaged in 
lead mining, Dubuque, Iowa, and later settled 
in Jackson county of that state, near Maquoketa, 
where he operated a farm until his retirement 
from active business and now resides with his 
son in San Bernardino, having reached the ad- 
vanced age of eighty years. He is a Republi- 
can in political faith, which party also receives 
the support of Captain McNab. The mother, 
who was Mary Hogg before her marriage, was 
a native of Pennsylvania and died when her son 
was but four years of age. 

The birth of Mr. McNab occurred December 
18, 1868, at Canes Ford, near Maquoketa, Iowa, 
and the first twelve years of his life were spent 
on the farm. He then went to Maquoketa and 



attended the' public school for a short time. A 
year later he began to learn the printer's trade 
in Sharon, Pa., and after working in the Eagle 
office for some time returned to his native state 
and again attended school at Maquoketa. His 
education being completed he journeyed through 
various parts of the United States, in 1887 coming 
to San Francisco, where he was engaged on the 
city papers there for a season, then came to Los 
Angeles and worked on the old Tribune-Herald. 
In 1890 he returned to Iowa and farmed for 
three years, after which he again took up his 
trade in the Maquoketa Record office. But one 
who has once lived in California is never quite 
satisfied away from her alluring attractions and 
1895 found Captain McNab again a resident of 
San Bernardino county. In a short time he 
was engaged as foreman of the Riverside Enter- 
prise, and a year later accepted a similar position 
on the San Bernardino Sun. Retaining this posi- 
tion until Januar}', 1903, he resigned at that time 
to accept the appointment as a deputy under the 
county sheriff and has since given his entire time 
to his official duties. In fraternal circles Captain 
McNab affiliates with the Modern Woodmen of 
America, is a member of Kaaba Temple, A. A. 
O. N. M. S., at Davenport, Iowa; was made a 
Mason at Maquoketa in Helion Lodge No. 36, 
A. F. & A. M., and now belongs to San Ber- 
nardino Lodge No. 348 ; was a member of Bath- 
kol Chapter No. 94. R. A. M., at Maquoketa, of 
which he is past high priest, and now belongs to 
Keystone Chapter "No. 56, at San Bernardino ; 
was formerly a member of Tancred Commandery 
No. 40 at Maquoketa, of which he is past re- 
corder, and is now a member of San Bernardino 
Commanderv No. 23 and San Bernardino Lodge 
No. 856, B. P. O. E. He has been a member of 
Company K, Seventh Regiment of National 
Guard of California since 1898, in 1902 was 
elected lieutenant of the company and in 1905 
was elected and commissioned captain. He is 
also a member of the Board of Trade at San 
Bernardino and takes an active interest in all 
matters tending toward the development of that 
section of the state. 



WILLIAM PAPSON. As a pioneer Will- 
iam Papson is remembered among the early set- 
tlers of California and his name held in the high- 
est esteem by all who ever knew him. He was 
born in Hillsdale, N. Y., in 1831, his father hav- 
ing emigrated from his home in England and 
located in New York. Reared to young man- 
hood in his native state and educated in the 
public schools, he was well equipped for the bat- 
tle of life, and in 1852, at the age of twenty-one 
years, he outfitted with ox-teams and crossed the 
plains to California. He came safely through 



1132 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



the hardships and dangers of the trip, and upon 
his arrival in the state he followed the example 
of the great majority of the settlers of the west 
and engaged in mining. He was first located in 
Plumas county, where he continued for a time, 
but having been trained to an agricultural life 
he soon became interested in this pursuit and 
decided to purchase a farm. He settled near 
San Jose and engaged in general farming and 
fruit raising and there, [March 8, 1865, he mar- 
ried Miss jMatilda Freer. She was born in 
Atchison county, Mo., a daughter of William 
H. Freer, who brought his family across the 
plains in 1849. After marriage Mr. and Mrs. 
Papson continued to farm in that section for 
the period of three years, when they removed to 
San Felipe and followed ranching for seven 
years. Returning to Santa Clara county they 
again engaged in farming in the vicinity of Ber- 
ryessa and after three years removed to Los 
Gatos and made that place their home for seven 
years. They were principally occupied during 
this time in horticulture, in whicli they were 
very successful. Removing to Lake county in 
1888 Mr. Papson purchased a ranch near Upper 
Lake and engaged extensively in the raising of 
stock, grain and hay. He also owned one hun- 
dred and thirty-four acres on the banks of Lula 
lake, where his death occurred July 12, 1897. 
He was a citizen of worth and works, interested 
in the movements of the day, and always ready 
to lend his aid in matters of public import. He 
was a Republican in politics but never cared for 
official recognition. Fraternally he was made a 
Mason in San Jose Lodge No. 10, F. & A. M. 

Mr. and Mrs. Papson were the parents of one 
son, George W., who has charge of the home 
place in Lake county. After the death of her 
husband Mrs. Papson remained in Lake county 
until January, 1900, when she located on the 
old home place near Savannah, and is now re- 
siding with her mother on the old Freer home- 
stead" in the vicinity of El Monte, Los Angeles 
county. 



VICENTE LUGO. A man of modest, un- 
assuming character, honest and upright in 
his dealings, Vicente Lugo, living near Santa 
Monica, is a fine representative of the early 
Spanish families who were so prominent in 
the settlement of Southern California. A na- 
tive Californian, he was born, January 19, 1865, 
in Los Angeles, which was also the birthplace 
of his father, the late Francisco Lugo. His 
grandfather, Antonio Lugo, was born and 
reared in Spain. When a young man he im- 
migrated to California, and during his day was 
one of the leading business men of Los Angeles, 
owning large herds of cattle and horses, and 



accumulating much wealth. He married An- 
tonio Rondon in California. 

A life-long resident of Los Angeles, Fran- 
cisco Lugo became owner of several thousand 
acres of land that his father bought from the 
Mexican government, it being a part of the 
San Bernardino grant. He was not actively 
engaged in agricultural pursuits himself, but 
hired men to run his ranch, a large portion of 
which he lost prior to his death, which occurred 
at his home in Los Angeles, at the age of sixty- 
five years. He married Vicente Machado, who 
was born in Santa Barbara, and died at the 
age of sixty-five years, in Los Angeles. Both 
she and her husband were members of the 
Catholic Church. 

Vicente Lugo, with his sister, Francisca 
Lugo, inherited from his mother's estate thir- 
teen acres of valuable land, part of the grant 
known as La Ballona rancho, lying one mile 
north of Venice, where they are now living, 
their home being pleasantly located, on a corner 
lot, on the Short Line Electric Railway. Mr. 
and Miss Lugo have recenth^ sold twelve acres 
of their ranch, receiving $1,000 per acre for 
it, retaining for themselves the home lot, on 
which their residence is located. Politically 
Mr. Lugo is a stanch supporter of the prin- 
ciples of the Republican party, and fraternally 
is a member of the Foresters of America. 



EDWARD C. D. A'AN ORNAM. The first 
representative of the Van Urnam family in the 
United States was Great-grandfather \"an Or- 
nam, who, as may be surmised from the surname, 
was a native of Holland. Bringing with him 
all the sturdy qualities for which the Dutch as a 
nation are noted, he settled in New York state 
and reared his family amid the trying conditions 
which alwa}'s pre^•ail in a new country. A grand- 
son of this immigrant and the father of our sub- 
ject, Daniel D. A'an Ornam, was born in \\"ills- 
boro, N. Y., where in his early manhood years 
he followed his trade of mason and builder. From 
there he later went to Buffalo, that state, and still 
later to Massachusetts, in both of which places he 
continued to work at his trade. Some time before 
his death he removed to the middle west, settling 
in Davenport, Iowa, and later in Cedar county, 
that state, where he died when in his fifty-seventh 
year. As his wife he had chosen Harriet F. Ross, 
who was born in Massachusetts, the daughter of 
Peter Ross, the latter born in New York state of 
English descent. In the latter's family was an- 
other daughter, Olive, who became the wife of 
^Ir. Burbank, by whom she has one son, Luther 
Burbank, who is known the world over as the 
Wizard of Horticulture. INIrs. Harriet F. Van 




-^ 



^^^ 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1135 



Ornam survived her husband many years, and 
passed away at the home of her son Edward in 
Long Beacli September 4, 1906, when she was in 
her ninety-fifth year. For many years she had 
been a member of the Methodist Church, and 
throughout her Hfe she exempHfied the teachings 
of the Christian religion. 

Of the ten children born to Daniel D. and Har- 
riet F. (Ross) Van Ornam only two are now liv- 
ing, Edward C. D. and Ferris B., both of I-ong 
Beach. Edward C. D. was born in Champlain, 
N. Y., August 8, 1836, and was reared in Buffalo 
until six years old, when the family removed to 
Massachusetts, settling in Worcester. He at- 
tended the public schools of that city for a time, 
but later returned to Buffalo, where he was a 
pupil in the public schools. By the time he had 
reached his sixteenth year he had settled upon 
definite plans for his future career in the business 
world. From his father he learned the brick- 
mason's and builder's trade, and in 1854, when 
the family renioved to Davenport, Iowa, he 
worked side by side with his father in the execu- 
tion of the many and important contracts which 
came to them. Among them may be mentioned 
the Cook & Sargent's marble block, the Episcopal 
Church of Davenport, besides numerous fine resi- 
dences. After he followed his trade continuously 
for about twenty years he made a change in both 
occupation and location, in 1870 removing to Cass 
county, Iowa, where he purchased wild land and 
started out as a farmer and stock-raiser. His 
specialty, however, was the raising of fine stock, 
consisting principally of high-grade Short-horn 
Durham cattle. During the eleven years which 
he carried on stock-raising in Cass county he was 
fairly successful, but a desire to resume his trade 
caused him to dispose of his interests there and 
remiove to Lewis, that county. In that city and 
Omaha, Neb., whither he later removed, he car- 
ried on contracting until 1887, during the winter 
of that year coming to California and visiting 
many cities in various parts of the state. Long 
Beach being among the number. He returned to 
Iowa in the following spring and again took up 
his trade, but the middle states seemed less at- 
tractive than formerly and he determined to 
transfer his interests to the west. Coming to 
Long Beach in 1893 he at once began to take con- 
tracts for building and during the twelve years 
following erected many of the finest buildings in 
this city. He has erected a number of residences 
on his own account and later sold them. Since 
1905 he has not been in active business and is 
now living retired in the enjoyment of the com- 
petency accumulated through many years of con- 
tinued activitv. 

In Durant,' Cedar county, Iowa. Mr. Van Or- 
nam married Ann M. Dool'ittle, born in Walling- 
ford, Conn,, her father being Chester Dnolittle, 



well known in that state, where his death oc- 
curred. Mrs. Van Ornam died in 1890, in Lewis, 
Iowa. Seven children were born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Van Ornam, as follows : Hattie ^L, the wife of 
Fred W. Snell, of Buena Park, Cal. ; Luther L., 
who died in early childhood; Bertha F., Mrs. 
John B. Steen, of Long Beach; William W., also 
of this city ; Edward E., who died when in his 
twenty- fourth year; Chester D., manager of the 
San Pedro Lumber Company at Huntington 
Beach; and Ralph R., who is in the employ of the 
Nofzinger Lumber Company, Los Angeles. In 
his church affiliations Mr. Van Ornam is a Pres- 
byterian, and politically he is a Republican. 



JOHN J. HOUGH. The supervision of the 
roads of Long Beach district have been in the 
charge of Mr. Hough for a considerable period 
and under his direct personal oversight as fore- 
man and superintendent the work has been 
maintained at a high standard of excellence, 
his success in the department being proved 
by his retention in the office at the solicitation 
of the people of the district. Mr. Hough is 
a representative of an eastern family, his par- 
ents, George and Hester Anna (Tiffany) 
Hough, having been born, reared and married 
in New York state, but becoming early settlers 
of Illinois, where the mother died in 1865. At 
that time John J. was scarcely four years of 
age, he having been born in Kane county. 111., 
November 7, 1861. For a long period the 
father continued to make his home in Illinois. 
Twenty years after the death of his wife he 
came to California and settled at Garden Grove, 
Orange county, where he remained in retire- 
ment from active cares until his death in 1893, 
at seventy-five years of age. 

Little of special importance occurred to 
mark the years of Mr. Hough's youth. Edu- 
cated in common schools, he was fitted for 
active participation in life's duties and respon- 
sibilities and was qualified to discharge his 
obligations as a citizen. In young manhood 
he chose agriculture as his vocation and for 
some years tilled the soil of an Illinois farm. 
When he came to California in 1878 he bought 
land near Santa Ana and for some years con- 
ducted general ranch pursuits, but finally- 
disposed of his holdings and removed to Long 
Beach in 1893. On the corner of Orange and 
Seventh streets he established his home, sur- 
rounding which he owned five acres which he 
utilized for a market garden. For a short 
time he engaged in truck farming, but soon 
the rise in property values made his place too 
high-priced to retain for such purposes, and 
he afterward sold three acres at a gratifying 



1136 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



advance on the original cost. In 1896 he was 
appointed road superintendent of Long Beach 
district, which position he has since satis- 
factoril}' filled. 

While living in Orange county. Air. Hough 
was married at Garden Grove, June 30, 1886, 
being united with JMiss Alice Sturgess, a native 
of England, and, like himself, a member of 
the Alethodist Episcopal Church, in which 
faith the}- are training their three children, 
Sadie, A^anoni and Clinton. Though not a 
partisan in political ideas and not narrow in 
his views. Air. Hough is firm in his adherence 
to the Republican part)- and gives its principles 
his constant support. The only fraternal or- 
ganization to v/hich thus far he has given 
allegiance is the ^Masonic order, in which he 
holds membership with Long Beach Lodge 
No. 327, F. & A. M., and maintains a warm 
interest in its work, upholding its lofty prin- 
ciples of the brotherhood of man and aiding 
in its frequent charities. 



HARRY M. WILLARD. By means of ex- 
tended travels through much of the region west 
of the ]\Iississippi river TMr. Willard has gained 
a comprehensive idea of this portion of the United 
States, and his experience, based upon habits of 
close observation as he followed his occupation 
in different towns, convinced him that few cities 
surpass San Diego in scenic beauty and equable 
climate. During 1897 he traveled south from 
Utah as far as the City of ^lexico, where he had 
planned to settle and engage in the building busi- 
ness, but he was not satisfied with the surround- 
ings, so returned to the States and visited San 
Diego on a tour of inspection, the result being 
that he removed hither and established himself as 
a contractor and builder. 

On a farm near Burlington, Iowa, Harry M. 
AVillard was born Alay 19, 1858, being third in 
order of birth among five children and the only 
one to settle in California. His parents, Samuel 
G. and Eliza J. (Lansdale) Willard, were natives 
of Ohio and the latter died in Iowa. The former 
crossed the plains to California in 1849 and tried 
his luck in the northern mines for three years, 
after which he returned to the east, purchased 
raw land in Iowa, improved a valuable farm, and 
now, at the age of eighty-five years, continues 
to reside at the old homestead in retirement from 
agricultural labors. On the home farm the early 
years in the life of Harry M. Willard were un- 
eventfully passed. In addition to common school 
advantages he had the privilege of studying in 
Denmark academy, and thus acquired a better 
education than many farm boys of that day. 

On starting out for himself to earn his own 
livelihood in the world, Harrv M. Willard went to 



Kansas about 1880 and became interested in the 
insurance business at Topeka. His first visit 
to the Pacific coast was made in 1886, when he 
bought a team and wagon and traveled overland 
to Oregon, thence to California. It was thus 
possible for him to inspect the country much more 
closely than if the trip had been made via rail- 
road. When he reached Santa Barbara he began 
to work at the carpenter's trade, remaining in 
that town for a year. Afterward he made brief 
sojourns in Pasadena and Los Angeles, where he 
followed carpentering. On his return to Iowa 
in 1889 he gave his attention entirely to the build- 
ing business, but in 1890 again followed the tide 
of immigration westward, this time settling at 
Salt Lake City and engaging in contracting and 
building with considerable success. Perhaps his 
most important work there was the superintend- 
ing of the erection of the building utilized as 
a courthouse and city hall, which cost $4,000,000 
and represented a substantial and unique style 
of architecture. Since coming to San Diego 
in 1897 he and his brother-in-law, under the firm 
name of Willard & Neely, have had the contracts 
for numerous residences and flats, and St. 
Joseph's sanitarium, also many buildings at 
Homestead, Point Loma and Pacific Beach. His 
residence, at No. 1701 Second street, was erected 
by himself and he has also built other houses to be 
sold as opportunity oft'ers. On the organization 
of the Alaster Builders' Association he became a 
charter member and at this writing holds the 
office of treasurer. 

The marriage of Air. Willard took place at 
Burlington, Iowa, and united him with Miss Eva 
Neely. a sister of William T. Neely, and an active 
member of the Alethodist Episcopal Church. 
Mention of her family appears in the sketch of her 
brother elsewhere in this volume. The Demo- 
cratic party receives the ballot of Air. Willard at 
both local and general elections. In fraternal 
relations he is identified with Silver Gate Lodge 
No. 296, F. & A. M., in which he was made a 
Alason, and is also associated with the Wood- 
men of the World and the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows. 



AIORITZ TREPTE. A skilled mechanic, en- 
ergetic and progressive, Aloritz Trepte is actively 
identified with the industrial prosperity of San 
Diego, and as a carpenter and contractor has 
been an important factor in the upbuilding of the 
city. He is widely known as a man of sterling 
integrity, his business dealings being character- 
ized by fairness and honesty, and he is every- 
where esteemed and respected. He was bom 
December 5, 1864, in the kingdom of Saxony, 
Germany, and in tliat land of industry and thrift 
was well trained in those habits and virtues that 




/^^y'.^!^^^!^ 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1139 



should make him a desirable citizen of any coun- 
try. His parents, Carl and Christine (Gurgen) 
Trepte, were life-long residents of Germany, the 
father, who was a miller by trade, dying in 1871. 

The youngest of a family of nine children, 
]\Ioritz Trepte is the only member of the parental 
household in America. Brought up in Saxony, 
he received a common school education, and in 
early life, under the instruction of his grand- 
father, Gottlieb Gurgen, learned the miller's 
trade, which he followed until becoming of age. 
Eager to try his fortunes in the United States, 
the mecca of every boy of ambition, he immi- 
grated to this country in 1886, going directly to 
Milwaukee, Wis., where for two years he worked 
at the carpenter's trade. Coming to California 
in 1888, he followed his trade in San Francisco 
until 1895, when he made a trip to Southern 
California. Being very much impressed and 
pleased with San Diego and its surroundings, he 
decided to settle here permanently. Forming a 
partnership with Herman Strode, he engaged in 
contracting and building under the firm name 
of Strode & Trepte, continuing thus until 1900, 
when he bought his partner out. Since that 
time Mr. Trepte has carried on the business alone 
and in the filling of his many contracts has erect- 
ed some fine business houses and many hand- 
some residences. In 1905 he built his own at- 
tractive residence at No. 155 Twentieth street. 

In San Francisco, Cal., ]\Ir. Trepte married 
Christine Treusch, a native of Hesse-Darmstadt, 
Germany, and they are the parents of three chil- 
dren, Walter, Alvin and Carl. Mr. Trepte is a 
member of the Master Carpenters' Association 
of San Diego, and an active worker in the or- 
ganization. Politically he is a Socialist. Fra- 
ternally he belongs to the Woodmen of the 
World ; Turn Verein, of which he is ex-presi- 
dent ; to the Sons of Herman, and to the Knights 
and Ladies of Security. Religiously he is true 
to the faith in which he was reared, being a 
Lutheran. 



MARTIN JULIUS LAURENT. For 
more than one-quarter of a century Mr. Lau- 
rent was intimately identified with the devel- 
opment of Ventura county. Measured by the 
history of the far-distant ages of the past, 
twenty-five years represent but a brief epoch, 
but it is a long time gauged by the present 
standards of progress and activitv. Not until 
years after he had settled on a farm in the 
Santa Clara valley of the south did the near- 
by town of Oxnard spring into existence. At 
that time transportation facilities were few 
and unsatisfactory. Modern farming tools had 
not been brought to their present state of de- 
velopment : indeed, the larger part of those 



now used \yere but a nebula in the inventor's 
brain. School and church advantages were 
meagre. Men had before them the arduous 
task of subduing an unknown soil and ascer- 
taining to what products it was best adapted; 
hence there was little leisure for recreation, 
yet it was in those days that the charm of 
gracious hospitality shone at its brightest and 
the kindly deeds in another's interests were of 
common occurrence. 

In the settlement and development of Cali- 
fornia almost every nationality was represent- 
ed. Mr. Laurent represented the French race, 
being a descendant of a long line of ancestry 
identified with the history of France. His 
father, Nicholas, who was a native of that 
countr}-, became a merchant tailor in Louis- 
ville, Ky., but later took up farming pursuits 
among the pioneers of Leavenworth county, 
Kans., and eventually moved to Douglas coun- 
ty, where he died at Lawrence. Loyal in de- 
votion to his adopted countr}-, he offered his 
services to the Union during the Civil war 
and served as a member of a Kansas regiment. 
His wife, Ursul, also died in Lawrence. The 
eldest child and only son among their three 
children was jNIartin Julius, who was born in 
Louisville, Ky., March 14. 1842, and in early 
bo3^hood accompanied the family to Kansas, 
there attending the public schools. Practical- 
ly the first employment which he secured was 
that of clerk for an uncle at Cape Girardeau, 
IMo.. and later he engaged in the mercantile 
business for him'^df in Missouri for two years. 

The marriage of Mr. Laurent was solem- 
nized at Lawrence, Kans., February 23, 1871, 
and united him with Miss Annette Petit, who 
was born in the department of Haute-Saone 
in the eastern part of France near the German 
border and also in close proximity to the 
mountains separating France from Switzer- 
land. Her father. Jean Baptiste Petit, for 
vears was a farmer in that region, but in 1853 
he brought the familv to the United States 
and settled in Clearfield county. Pa., there 
engaging in farm pursuits and also in lumber- 
ing. The year that marked the close of the 
Civil war saw him a pioneer of Douglas coun- 
ty. Kans.. where he engaged in farming near 
a hamlet then known as Blackjack. During 
1875 he came to California and settled in the 
Santa Claia valley of tlie south, where he died 
in t8q4. at the age of eighty-four years. A 
number of years before leaving France he 
married Miss Elizabeth Catherine Carame. 
daughter of Louis Carame, a manufacturer of 
agricultural implements in France. Her death 
occurred in Kansas in 1870, when she was six- 
tv-one years of age. Five children comprised 
their familv. namelv: Mrs. Harriet Roussev, 



1140 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



a resident of Oxnard, Gal. ; Margaret, who 
died in Pennsylvania in early girlhood ; An- 
nette, Mrs. Laurent, of Oxnard; Frank and 
Justin, both of whom cultivate farms near Ox- 
nard. 

For a short time after his marriage Mr. 
Laurent followed farming and the mercantile 
business in Kansas, but in 1874 he removed 
to California and settled in the Santa Clara 
valley, renting land near the present site of 
Oxnard. Both he and his wife were pleased 
with the climate and the surroundings, and 
therefore they soon decided to become prop- 
erty owners. At first they bought only a 
small strip of land, but by the purchase of ad- 
jacent tracts they acquired a farm of one hun- 
dred and sixty acres, on which the}- erected a 
substantial and commodious ranch house. He 
was among the first to adopt modern imple- 
ments suitable for caring for the different 
crops raised, and always took pride in his fine 
stock. About 1889 they rented the ranch and 
removed to Los Angeles, but soon returned 
to Ventura count}' and bought lots in Oxnard, 
where they erected an attractive and elegant 
residence. In the midst of these pleasant sur- 
roundings which his wise labors had rendered 
possible Mr. Laurent passed his last days and 
here he died February 74, 1902, when lacking 
one month of sixty years of age. The Santa 
Clara Catholic Church, of which he had been 
a liberal and earnest member, had charge of 
the ceremonies connected with his funeral, 
while citizens in general, irrespective of re- 
ligious affiliations, were as one in their trib- 
utes of respect to his memory and apprecia- 
tion of his worth. Since his death Mrs. Lau- 
rent has rented the ranch to tenants ,who have 
the land under cultivation to beans and beets, 
and maintain its reputation as one of the 
finest farms of its size in the entire state. Like 
her husband, she has been interested in public 
questions and has believed in Democratic 
principles throughout all of her life. Like 
him, too, she is earnest in her allegiance to the 
Santa Clara Church. The congregation has 
been benefited by her generous ofiferings and 
the various church societies have felt the in- 
fluence of her helpful work and executive 
abilitv. 



^f. BLANCHE BOLTON, M. D. ^ Not to 
men alone is due the credit for the rapid devel- 
opment, progress and upbuilding of this west- 
ern state, for in nearly all avenues since the pio- 
neer days the wives, daughters and sisters of 
these courageous men have proven themselves 
equally courageous and self-sacrificing. Along 
medical lines a successful exponent is named in 



the person of M. Blanche Bolton, M. D., well 
and widely known in San Pedro, Los Angeles 
county, where she has been engaged in the prac- 
tice of her profession since 1899. She is a na- 
tive daughter of the state, born in San Francisco 
one of five children in the family of her parents, 
J. J. and Mary A. (Swayze) Bolton, both of 
whom are living and are now residents of San 
Gabriel. The father, a native of England, was 
brought to Toronto, Canada, by his parents and 
there grew to manhood. He became a farmer in 
that section, where he remained until 1873, in 
which year he located in San Francisco. Later 
he followed general farming in Dixon, Solano 
county. Cal., until his removal to San Gabriel. 
His wife is a native of Montreal, Canada. One 
son, Becher Bolton, is practicing medicine in 
Napa, Cal., and another son, Manzanito Bolton, 
is also a physician, being located at Johnsville, 
Cal. William makes his home in San Gabriel, 
and Agnes is at home with her parents. 

M. Blanche Bolton was born in San Fran- 
cisco, Cal., receiving her preliminarv education 
in the public and high schools of that place. In 
1894 she became a student in the California Med- 
ical College, graduating from that institution in 
1897 with the degree of M. D., after which she 
spent one year in Guadalajara, Mexico, begin- 
ning the practice of her profession with her 
uncle. Dr. Winfield Swayze. In 1899 she came 
to San Pedro, and since that date has engaged 
in a general practice of medicine and surgery and 
has built up an extensive and lucrative patron- 
age throughout this section. She is a member of 
the Los Angeles Medical Society, the Southern 
California Eclectic Medical Society, and the 
State Eclectic Medical Society. She is promi- 
nent as a member of the Rebekahs, in which she 
is past officer. 



HAMILTON ^I. SQUIRES. Many years 
have come and gone since ]\Ir. Squires estab- 
lished his home on a ranch in San Diego coun- 
ty, and now for a quarter of a century he has 
remained on the same homestead, busily en- 
gaged in raising general farm products and 
in breeding registered stock as fine as the lo- 
cality can boast. In addition to his own tract 
of nine hundred acres he superintends nine- 
teen hundred acres owned by his wife, so that 
their united possessions represent a large val- 
uation and entail considerable responsibility 
upon the proprietor. The home place is sit- 
uated three miles south of Vista and bears im- 
provements showing the owners to possess 
thrift, energy and ample means. 

Few men are more deeply interested in the 
historv and progress of California than Mr. 
.Squires, and perhaps this fact by some may be 




Q^.O<.oLMj 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1143 



attributed to the coincidence of his birth, Sep- 
tember 7, 1850, occurring just two days before 
CaHfornia was admitted as a state into the 
Union. His earliest recollections are connect- 
ed with pioneer days in the west, and a few 
of these memories are more thrilling than 
pleasant, notably his recollection, with the 
vividness of an event happening yesterday, of 
the shooting of Sheriff "Billy" Getman in Los 
Angeles by an insane man, William Jenkins of 
the San Gabriel valley being shot in the leg 
at the same time. On another occasion his 
father was a member of the vigilance commit- 
tee of Los Angeles that dealt with Juan 
Flores, the murderer of Sheriff Barton. 

At the age of seventeen years E. W., father 
of H. M. Squires, removed from his native 
Kentucky to Missouri, and in 1847 there mar- 
ried Louisa Smith, a native of Ohio. Two 
years later the young couple started for Cali- 
fornia in a wagon drawn by oxen. After a 
long journey they arrived at Fort Lassen, 
where he engaged in the butchering business 
and sold meat to the miners. In 1850 they left 
that locality and traveled via wagon to Santa 
Clara county. During the progress of this 
journey, while they were encamped in tents in 
Grass valley, a son was born whom they 
named Hamilton i\I. Four years were spent 
in Santa Clara county and then they removed 
to Los Angeles county, settling at El Monte, 
two miles from the San Gabriel ]\ fission. In 
1858 they moved from there to the Temple 
grant about six miles south of the city of Los 
Angeles, and on a farm in that vicinity they 
spent many busy years. In the fall of 1870 
they moved to a farm near Santa Ana, and in 
1874 they established their home at Olive, 
Orange county; there the death of the father 
occurred March 18, 1906, the mother passing 
away October 22 of the same year. Their 
happy married life had covered a period of 
about sixty years. In sunshine and in shadow 
they labored together, and an honored old age 
rewarded their well-spent years. Twelve chil- 
dren comprised their family, and all but one of 
these attained mature years, ten still living in 
California. 

As an assistant to his father. Hamilton M. 
Squires early gained a comprehensive knowl- 
edge of agriculture and when he came to his 
present ranch in 1881 he was well qualified to 
conduct a farm systematically and profitably. 
While devoting himself closely to the man- 
agement of his land he still finds leisure to 
participate in local affairs and for nine consec- 
utive years served as school trustee. Political- 
ly he favors the Democratic party, but main- 
tains an independent attitude in local elec- 
tions. In September of 1807 he married ]Miss 



Mary Emma Kelly, who was born at Dead- 
wood, Placer county, Cal., and is a woman of 
refinement and culture, a devoted member of 
the Christian Church, and a loving mother to 
her two children, Ida Belle and John Hamil- 
ton. The family of which she is a member 
(mention of whom is made in the sketch of 
her sister, ;\Irs. ^Minnie Borden, on another 
page) came to California in an earh' day and 
settled among the pioneers of upper San Di- 
ego county, where ever since they have been 
orominent citizens. 



WILLIAM H. AULD. One of the most ex- 
tensive ranchmen in Alamos valley is William 
H. Auld, who is a member of one of the oldest 
pioneer families in this section. He operates 
a thirteen hundred acre ranch, half of which he 
owns, and is engaged in raising horses and the 
growing of wheat crops, the latter necessitat- 
ing the use of a combined harvester. Ele was 
born July 2, 1855, in Amador county, Cal., the 
son of George and Caroline D. (Hodges) Auld, 
both of whom died in Riverside county, the 
former July 30, 1901, at the age of eighty-three 
years, and the latter in 1S89, being then sixty- 
seven years old. 

George Auld was born on Prince Edward 
Island, Canada, July 20, 1818, his father, John, 
having been a native of Scotland. He received 
his education at the place of his birth, and in 
ihe same locality engaged, as a young man, in 
the general merchandise business. After his 
marriage, which occurred in the early '50s, he 
came to California and located in Amador 
county, from there going to Santa Clara 
county, and finally, in 1880, he removed 
to Alamos valley, where he took up land from 
the government, becoming one of the first set- 
tler.s'here. He built the first house and barns 
of the place and otherwise improved it, and as 
time passed increased his holdings by pur- 
chase from the railroads until he had acquired 
the present ranch, which embraces about four- 
teen hundred acres. Five hundred acres of the 
land is devoted to farming purposes, the re- 
mainder being in pasture. During his life Mr. 
Auld served on the school board, and from 
March 3, 1809, until the time of his death filled 
the office of postmaster at Auld. Four of his 
five children are still living and have homes in 
this locality. Eliza F. was educated in Santa 
Clara county, where she taught school for a 
time, later engaged in that occupation in 
Riverside county for five years, and is now 
housekeeper for her brothers, Henry and 
Charles, who live on and operate the home 
place. The last-named son is a member of 
the Republican county central committee, is a 



1144 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



deputy county clerk, and also clerk of the Ala- 
mos school district. Miss Auld is a member 
of the ]\Iethodist Episcopal Church. George F. 
died at the age of twenty-two years. 

William H. Auld received a common-school 
education in Santa Clara county and came to 
this locality with his father in 1880. His mar- 
riage, which occurred here in 1902, united him 
with Emily D. Higgins, a native of Missouri, 
and they have become the parents of two chil- 
dren, Alma C. and George H. r^Ir. Auld is 
one of the most substantial and highly respect- 
ed men of this communitj' and takes an active 
interest in all matters tending to improve and 
develop his part of the state. 



TAAIES MILLIGAX. Occupying a con- 
spicuous position among the agriculturists of 
Ventura county who have worked their way 
forward from poverty to independence and 
through hardships to success, mention should 
be made of James ]Milligan, the owner of a 
finely improved ranch lying three-fourths of 
a mile south of Oxnard. The farm is valuable 
by reason of its remarkable fertility as well as 
its substantial improvements. At the time of 
])urchasing in 1899, Mr. Milligan paid $265 an 
acre for sixty-three acres and at once devoted 
the soil to the raising of beans and beets. By 
subsequent purchase he has increased the 
ranch to its present dimensions of one hundred 
and seven acres, all under the plow and lying 
in one body. An abundance of water is fur- 
ished by means of an artesian well with a 
pumping plant, and with the best of facilities 
for irrigation it lias been possible for the own- 
er to raise as much as twenty-five tons of 
sugar beets per acre. The cost of bringing 
the crop to a condition for marketing is far 
greater than would he supposed by those un- 
familiar with the business. At present prices 
for labor and seed, the cost may be estimated 
as follows: S2 ner acre for seed: $2 per acre 
for hoeing and cultivating: $2.50 for plowing; 
$5 for thinning the plants ; $10 for loading the 
crop : and $6 for hauling, a total of $27.50, so 
that it costs little less than $30 per acre to 
raise beets and deliver them. 

During the ninteenth century John and 
Jane (Campbell") Milliken, natives of county 
Antrim. Ireland, immigrated to the United 
States and settled near Ogdensburg, N. Y., in 
Lisbon township, St. Lawrence county, Avhere 
the father engaged in farming until his death 
at sixty-five years, and the mother also died 
at that place. Both were descended from 
Scotch ancestors who fled to Ireland dur- 
ing the era of religious persecutions. Their 
two sons. Tames and William C. (twins). 



changed the family name for convenience to 
Milligan. They were born near Ogdensburg, 
N. Y., June 29, 1856, and William C. died at 
Worcester, Mass. James was reared on the 
home farm and received common-school edu- 
cational advantages. During April of 1880 
he came west as far as Nevada, where he spent 
one year at Reno. From there he came to 
California and settled in Ventura county. Be- 
ing entirely without means, he was obliged to 
work for wages, and for a few years Avas em- 
ployed as a farm hand, rising in time to be 
foreman of the Dixie Thompson ranch, where 
he remained for seven years in the successful 
management of the estate. With the savings 
of that period he bought thirtj'-six acres two 
miles northwest of the present site of Oxnard 
and began to engage in raising beans, but 
later he sold the land in order to purchase the 
larger ranch he now owns. When it is re- 
membered that he came to Ventura county 
practically penniless and now owns a property 
valued at many thousands of dollars, it will 
he conceded that this county ofifers many op- 
portunities to men of energy, determination 
and industrious habits. 

After coming to Ventura county ]\Ir. ^lilli- 
gan met and married Miss Elizabeth Hutchins, 
who was born near Des Moines, Iowa, re- 
ceived a fair education, and is a lady of gentle 
disposition, earnestly devoted to her family 
and to the Methodist Episcopal Church, of 
which she is a faithful member. Their family 
consists of six children, namely: Estella, 
Ralph, James, William, Robert and John. 
While JNTr. Milligan has been too deeply en- 
grossed in agricultural affairs to pei'mit of ac- 
tivity in politics, yet he always has kept post- 
ed concerning Issues before the nation and has 
given his steadfast allegiance to the Republi- 
can party, at one time serving as a member of 
its county central committee. The only fra- 
ternal organization to which he belongs is the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, his mem- 
bership being with the lodge at Oxnard. 



DR. ROBERT W. BROWN is one of the re- 
spected and highly esteemed physicians in the 
Santa Maria valley and is recognized as a man 
thoroughly well posted in all matters pertain- 
ing to his profession : in the short time that he 
has been practicing in this communitv he has 
built up an extensive practice. His fine home 
in Santa IMaria is one of the most comfortable 
in the village. Dr. Brown was bom in London. 
England, January 27, 1862. His father, Samuel 
Brown, who was a merchant, died at the age of 
fifty-two years in his native land, while the 
mother, who was !Miss Jane Palmer before her 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1145 



marriage, and also a' native of England, lived 
to be sixty-five years old. There were eleven 
children born to this family, seven of whom are 
still living, the doctor being the only member of 
the family in California. The mother was a 
communicant of the Episcopal Church and the 
son holds a membership in the same denomina- 
tion. 

Dr. Brown received his early education in a 
private school in London, where he prepared for 
his collegiate course. Then he went to Canada 
and entered the Manitoba Medical College at 
Winnipeg, later taking the lexamination at the 
University of Manitoba in the same city. In 
his studies he pursued a general line in medi- 
cine and surgery and later received his degree 
of Doctor of Medicine. From Canada he came 
to the United States, in 1893, locating at Glen- 
wood, Wis., where he remained for five years 
practicing his profession. From there he removed 
to Nipomo, Cal., where he followed a general 
practice of medicine until 1905, when he came 
to Santa Maria. In 1894 his marriage to Miss 
Anna L. Kidd, a native of Ireland, occurred, 
and to them have been born two children, Roy 
and Lucile. Mrs. Brown is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, in which she is an 
active worker. Fraternally Dr. Brown affiliates 
with the Masonic order at Santa Maria and is a 
member of the Independent Order of Red Men 
of this place. 



ARISTIDES E. STOKES. Years ago, ere 
white men had discovered the possibilities of the 
Ramona valley and ere any attempt had been 
made at permanent settlement or improvement, 
there came to this region Adolphus Stokes, a 
native of Los Angeles and a young man eager to 
acquire large tracts for his stock interests. A 
tour of inspection convinced him that abundant 
pasturage could here be obtained for his large 
herds, and accordingly he bought such properties 
as were for sale, gradually increasing his pos- 
sessions until he held the title to seventeen thou- 
sand seven hundred and sixty acres in the valley. 
Upon the land he put up a cabin of adobe and es- 
tablished himself as the first wdiite settler in the 
valley, taking up the difficult task of improving a 
homestead remote from human habitation and 
destitute of means of transportation to the mar- 
kets. As people began to be attracted to the 
country he sold oft' some of his estate, retaining 
perhaps one-fourth of the entire grant, and at his 
death, February 2T, 1897, at the age of fifty-three 
years, he left to his children about fifteen hundred 
acres of the original tract. He built three houses 
on different parts of his property and conducted 
the first stage line between Julian and San Diego. 

Wliile living in Los Angeles Adolphus Stokes 



met and married Dolores Olvera, a young Span- 
ish girl, who was born and reared in that city, 
and who was a member of an old family of South- 
ern CaHfornia. Her death occurred January 
6, 1896, when she was forty-nine years of age. 
Seven children were born of their union,. namely : 
Concepcion, wife of Ernest S. Howe, mentioned 
elsewhere in this volume ; Aristides E. ; Flora, of 
San Diego; Camilla, who married C. R. Angui- 
sola, of San Diego; Esperanza, wife of William 
O. Marr, of Coronado ; Esther, who died at 
twenty-two years of age, and Ysabella, wife of 
Robert Green, of Escondido. 

During the residence of the family in Los An- 
geles Aristides E. Stokes was born February 9, 
1872. In early childhood he came to the Ra- 
mona valley and here he attended the public 
schools. Later "he was sent to Santa Clara Col- 
lege in order that he might have advantages im- 
possible in the home locality, but ill health pre- 
vented him from completing the course and 
obliged him to relinquish his studies entirely. 
Upon regaining his strength he entered actively 
upon agricultural pursuits and carried on a part- 
nership with his father in the raising of stock. 
After the death of his father he acquired inde- 
pendent interests and now owns a ranch of about 
two hundred acres near the village of Ramona. 
where he keeps about fifteen milch cows as well 
as other stock and carries on grain and stock 
farming. The neat house on the ranch reflects 
the tastes and orderly spirit characteristic of Mrs. 
Stokes, who was fomierly JNIiss Emma J. Libby, 
being a daughter of an honored pioneer, B. F. 
Libby. mentioned on another page of this volume. 
Mr. and Mrs. Stokes were married at San Luis 
Rey February 14, 1901, and are the parents of 
four sons, Benjamin Franklin, Edward C, 
Charles Raymond and Harold L. The family are 
of the Catholic faith and have their membership 
in the San Diego church of that denomination. 
Politically Mr. Stokes favors Democratic prin- 
ciples and always votes for the men and meas- 
ures of the party. Though not caring for office 
himself, he has several times consented to serve 
as school trustee and has filled the office with 
efficiency and an earnest desire to advance local 
educational interests. The only fraternal or- 
ganization with which he has membership is the 
Ancient Order of Foresters at Ramona, Court 
No. 8520. in which he has been an active worker 
for a numlacr of years and to whose charities 
he is a contributor. 



CARROLL E. BORDEN. The family of 
which this enterprising agriculturist is a lead- 
ing representative came to San Diego county 
in an early day and has since given to their 
adopted locality men and women of high prin- 



1146 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ciples of honor, substantial Avorth and unflag- 
ging energy, citizens of inestimable value in 
the permanent development of the community, 
and contributors to educational, religious and 
philanthropic movements. Extended mention 
of the family appears on another page of this 
volume, in the sketch of Mrs. JNIinnie L. Bor- 
den, mother of Carroll E. Borden, and an hon- 
ored resident of the county. 

The entire life of Carroll E. Borden thus far 
has been passed within the limits of his native 
county of San Diego, where he was born at 
San Marcos Ma}' 13, 1884. and where he re- 
'ceived a fair education in the schools of Carls- 
bad. MHiile still a mere lad he gained a com- 
prehensive knowledge of agriculture as ap- 
plied to the soil and climate of his home coun- 
ty, hence he was qualified to engage success- 
fully in farm pursuits when, in 1903, he left 
the parental roof and started out to make his 
own way in the world. Removing to a tract 
of five hundred acres in the vicinity of Vista, 
he erected a farm house, substantial barn and 
other buildings, and has since given his atten- 
tion to the maintenance of a high class of im- 
provements on the farm. The raising of grain 
has been his specialty and the entire tract is 
under cultivation to cereals. 

To his country home Mr. Borden brou'ght a 
wife in 1905, his marriage occurring on the 
7th of Jnne of that year and uniting him with 
Miss lleonore Beller, daughter of Alexander 
Beller, a well-known citizen of Carlsbad. In 
their religious views Mr. and Mrs. Borden 
support the doctrines of the Christian Church 
and are contributors to its missionary move- 
ments and local charities. The Fraternal 
Brotherhood numbers Mr. Borden among its 
members and his interest in its work has been 
constant. Appreciating the evil wrought by 
the indiscriminate sale of intoxicating liquors, 
he has taken a firm stand against saloons and 
has given his sympathy and co-operation to 
the prohibition cause. These a lews he carries 
into the political field and gives his ballot to 
Prohibition candidates whenever that party 
puts a ticket before the voters of his localitj'. 



RICHARD O. HUNT. It has been the 
good fortune of Mr. Hunt to succeed beyond 
his expectations in the California enterprises 
in which he has been interested since his ar- 
rival in this state over thirty years ago, and 
few have more readily adapted themselves to 
western opportunities for advancement, nor 
can it be said that his youth held more than 
ordinary inducements to try to make the best 
of himself in the environments in which he 
found himself thrown. Born in Maine April 



24, 1832, he was educated in the common 
schools of his native state and there also 
learned the trade of carriage making, follow- 
ing this in Worcester, Mass., for some years 
before removing to Chicago, 111., in 1853. Af- 
ter spending about three years in the latter 
cit)' he went for a short time to Racine, Wis., 
then to Austin, Minn., following his trade with 
varied success in these different states and 
cities. December 24, 1863, he enlisted as sec- 
cond lieutenant in Company B, Second Min- 
nesota Cavalry, under General Sulley, and with 
his regiment went through the Dakotas, par- 
ticipating in several severe battles with In- 
dians. The following November he was pro- 
moted to first lieutenant and served until De- 
cember I, 1865, when he was mustered out, 
having given his countr}- two years of efficient 
service. 

Coming to California in 1872, Mr. Hunt 
opened up a carriage shop in Santa Barbara 
which is still in operation under the firm name 
of Hunt's Son & Schuster, his son Charles L., 
having this business under his supervision. 
About three years -after coming to this state 
he purchased nearly a thousand acres of land 
in the Conejo valley, Ventura county, which 
he rented out for nearly ten years, but being 
unable to procure or keep satisfactory ten- 
ants, he I'AOved upon the ranch himself in 1887, 
and since that time has made his home here 
continuously. The greater portion of his land 
is devoted to raising grain and stock, and a 
dairy of thirty-live cows. Nearly all of the 
butter produced from his dairy, averaging 
about one hundred pounds a week, is sold in 
Ventura. He has recently erected a large silo 
upon his ranch 16x31 feet, and fitted it out 
with modern machiner3^ 

The marriage of ]\Ir. Hunt was solemnized 
in Chicago. 111., in 1854, and united him to 
Mary J. Brown, a native of Oxford, Mass. 
Mr. and Mrs. Hunt have eight children, name- 
ly; Walter L., Vv'ho is in the grocery business 
in Santa Barbara ; Charles L., managing the 
carriage business founded by his father in San- 
ta Barbara ; D. Frank, formerly business man- 
ager of the Morning Press of Santa Barbara, 
1)ut now postmaster of Santa Barbara : Lorin 
E., a professor at the University of California 
at Berkeley ; Hamlet R., who has a fruit farm 
at Niles, Cal. ; Albert W., a farmer on the 
home ranch ; H. F., who is a blacksmith at 
Pasadena: and Alice F., the wife of Edward 
Hunt of Berkeley. Fraternally, Mr. Hunt is 
3 mem.ber of Ventura Lodge, F. & A. M., also 
of the Royal Arch Masons. He is also an hon- 
ored member of the Grand Army of the Re- 
public of Ventura. Ever since coming to his 
ranch in 1887 he has been a familiar figure in 




A^Oc^llJ-^ 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1149 



the neighborhood, and his kindly nature and 
general interest in his surroundings have won 
him many true friends among those who, like 
himself, are appreciators of the land resources 
of this very productive portion of the state. 
Airs. Hunt is an estimable woman and shares 
in the popularity and regard of her husband, 
fine and deserving traits of character in both 
having contributed towards making this feel- 
ing general among their friends and acquaint- 
ances. 



FATHER DANIEL WEBSTER MUR- 
PHY. The interests of the Catholic Church 
in Hollywood are zealously guarded by Rev. 
Father Murphy, who has had charge of the 
parish at this place since January 12, 1904. 

A native of County Cork, Ireland, born Jan- 
uary 12, 1876, he was brought to the United 
States when a child of four years and was 
reared and trained in Cambridge, Mass. His 
initial school training received in the east was 
continued in Redlands, Cal., whither he came 
at the age of fourteen years. All of his school- 
ing and training thus far had been with the 
object of preparing himself for the priesthood, 
and for the purpose of receiving his credentials 
he went to Baltimore, Md., in 1894. Cardi- 
nal James Gibbons conferred the solemn rites 
of priesthood upon him in 1899. TlTcreafter 
he was first appointed assistant to the Cathe- 
dral at Los Angeles, Cal., where he served 
almost four years. Hollywood at that time was 
attended from the Old Mission of Los Angeles. 

The arrival of Rev. Thomas J. Conaty in 
the southern diocese, as bishop of Monterey 
and Los Angeles, resulted in transferring 
Father Alurphy to the parish at Hollywood, 
which has been his sole charge since January, 
1904. Mass was first celebrated in this parish 
Mav 3, 1769, by the founder of all the Cali- 
fornia missions, Father Junipero Sera, and up- 
on this date also was celebrated the Holy 
A¥ood of the Cross, hence the name of Holy- 
wood, or Hollywood, the name which was aft- 
erward given to the place bv the wife of John 
L. Beveridge, of this place. When Father 
Murphy took charge of the parish it numbered 
onlv' fourteen adult parishioners, and in about 
three vears the membership has increased to 
seven hundred, including among the number 
many of the leading citizens in the surround- 
ing countrv. The neighboring towns of Col- 
grove. Sherman and Prospect Park are included 
in the Hollvwood parish. During 1905-06 
Father ]\Iurphv built the church at St. A^'ictor, 
at a cost of $10,000. this being the gift of Vic- 
tor Ponet, the Belgian consul at Los Angeles. 
He also erected the present church edifice 



soon after his removal to this parish, purchas- 
ing one and a half acres of ground upon which 
the church was later erected at a cost of $29,- 
200. 

Closely associated with the parish at Holly- 
wood is the Immaculate Heart College, which 
was founded by the sisters of the Immaculate 
Heart, under the auspices of Rt. Rev. Thomas 
J. Conaty. The site of the college is one of 
the most beautiful spots to be found in this 
part of the state, in the midst of undulating 
foothills. The building is a brick and con- 
crete structure of late mission type, erected at 
a cost of $160,000, surrounded by fourteen 
acres of land. The college is in charge of 
Mother Superior Mary Magdalene, and sixty- 
five sisters. Instruction in the college is di- 
vided into three main departments, high 
school, college, and department of music, art 
and dramatic art. Besides giving instruction 
to both resident and day pupils, ladies are 
here trained for the sisterhood. 

Not only has Father Murphy been an im- 
portant factor in the religious life of Holly- 
wood, but his influence has also been felt with 
equal force in the secular afifairs of the town 
and surrounding country. As a member of the 
board of trade he has taken a special inter- 
est in the work of street improvement, his 
eflforts along this line being productive of 
much good. The cause of temperance is an- 
other matter which lies close to his heart, and 
his influence among the young of his parish 
and elsewhere in this direction is widespread 
jnd deep. Father JMurphy is one of the char- 
ter members of Hollywood Club and is chap- 
lain of the Knights of Columbus, of Los An- 
geles, the largest body of laymen in that city. 
During their general convention in June, 1905, 
they presented the church with a beautiful 
stained glass window representing the landing 
of Columbus and the first Catholic service in 
America, October 12, 1492. Father IMurphy's 
parents, John S. and Nora (Mahoney) Mur- 
phy, also natives of County Cork, are still liv- 
ing, making their home in Redlands, Cal. An 
uncle of John 3. ^Murphy, Daniel Murphy, of 
Hobarttown, New Zealand, is the oldest arch- 
bishop of the Catholic church in the world. 



G. G. BUNDY. Ere the present prosperity 
of Southern California had taken definite form 
except in the visions of sanguine and optimistic 
citizens, Nathan Bundy, a native of Ohio, sought 
a field of employment in this part of the country 
and identified himself with the region which his 
son, G. G., has regarded as his lifelong home. 
For a brief period during his early manhood 
Nathan Bundy had been a resident of Iowa and 



1150 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



from there he returned to Ohio to choose a help- 
mate, his wife being Harriet Smith, a member 
. of a pioneer family of Ohio and a native of that 
state. Accompanied by his wife he returned to 
Iowa and there followed the painter's trade. 
Meanwhile he heard much concerning Califor- 
nia and was induced by flattering reports to re- 
move to the Pacific coast, a decision he has had 
no reason to regret. April 30, 1876, he arrived 
at Santa Monica, which then was an insignificant 
hamlet on the beach, whose attractions as yet 
had not drawn hither a large population of re- 
sorters and health-seekers. In addition to en- 
gaging at his trade he became interested in the 
buying and selling of real estate and enjoyed 
considerable profits during the progress of the 
boom. After having made Santa Monica his 
home for more than twenty years, in 1898 he re- 
moved to Los Angeles and now resides at No. 
1766 West Twenty-fourth street, on the corner of 
Congress street. 

During the residence of the family at Ames. 
Story county, Iowa, G. G. Bundy was born 
IVIarch 21, 1873, and he was three years of age 
at the time of coming to California. Primarily 
educated in the Santa Monica grammar school, he 
had the supplementary advantage of attendance 
at the high school of that city, graduating with 
the class of 1895. the first to receive diplomas 
from that institution. After leaving school he 
took up the oil business, which he followed for 
six years, and then turned his attention to the 
management of his livery business, the Santa 
[Monica stables, and to the buying and selling of 
real estate, in which he has met with encourag- 
ing success. In politics he always gives his 
alfegiance to the Republican party and takes a 
warm interest in matters pertaining to municipal 
and state welfare. The young lady whom he 
selected as his wife was Miss Adele A. Smith, 
who was born and educated in San Francisco, 
but came to Santa Monica in girlhood and was 
living here at the time of their marriage. Two 
children, a daughter and son, bless their union. 
The family occupy a distinctive position in local 
society and number a host of friends among the 
people of their home town. 



NATHANIEL AIcCLAIN, a pioneer rancher 
of Los Angeles county, is a citizen who stands 
high in the esteem of all who know him, both 
for his personal qualities of character and his 
business ability. He was born in Utah Septem- 
ber 29, 1856, a son of Francis McQain ; the latter 
was a native of Kentucky, who emigrated in 
young manhood, crossing the plains to Nevada 
in 1850. and engaging in the mines of that sec- 
tion. He met with considerable success in his 
efforts and acquired independence. Later he 



went to Utah and passed many years, finally 
locating again in Nevada, where he spent the 
ensuing seven years. At that time he was en- 
gaged in teaming to the mines. Finally locating 
in Los Angeles count}- he engaged in farming 
and stock-raising until his death, which occurred 
in 1881, at the age of forty-eight years. He was 
a man of energy and ability and accumulated 
a property of one hundred and sixty acres which 
was divided among his children. Politically he 
was an adherent of the principles advocated in 
the platform of the Democratic party and gave 
every effort toward the advancement of these 
interests. While a resident of Utah he took part 
in many Indian wars, being a resident of the 
state at the time of the Mountain Meadow mas- 
sacre. His wife was formerly Lovina Green, 
a native of lUinois, whose death occurred in 
1900, at the age of fifty-six years. Both himself 
and wife are members of the Latter Da}' Saints 
Church. H 

One of the family of nine children, all of whom 
are living in Los x\ngeles save one son who is now 
deceased, Nathaniel McQain spent the years 
of his boyhood in various locations, among them 
Nevada and Oregon and California, coming to 
Los Angeles in 1869 and here completing his 
education in a private institution. At the age 
of twenty years he began ranching for himself, 
following his early training along this line. He 
has made a success of his work, accumulating 
considerable means and at the same time build- 
ing up for himself a place of esteem among his 
fellow-citizens. In 1877 he established home ties 
through his marriage with ■Miss Martha Vick. 
a native of California and the stepdaughter of 
James S. Hart, who came to California in an 
early day and who is still living at the age of 
seventy-seven years. Mrs. Elizabeth Hart, the 
mother of Mrs. McClain, is also an old pioneer of 
the state. With her parents she started from St. 
Joseph, Mo., in 1849, traveling by ox-train, but 
both her parents died before reaching their desti- 
nation. Arriving in the state early in the spring of 
1850, Mrs. McClain thereafter made her home in 
Sacramento. She is still living, at the age of 
seventy years on the homestead in Green 
]\Ieadows, surrounded by her children, grand- 
children and great-grandchildren. Her ex- 
periences in California during the gold-seeking 
times make her an interesting conversationalist. 

After his marriage Mr. jMcQain located upon 
an eighty-acre tract belonging to his father-in- 
law, where he is still living, also owning at the 
present writing twenty acres on Manchester 
avenue, all of which is devoted to the rais- 
ing of grain. Mr. and Mrs. McClain be- 
came the parents of seven children, as fol- 
lows: Irena L., Viola L., James N., Arline C. 
Leona-N., Inez N. and Evelvn N. The second 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1151 



daughter, Viola L., became the wife of A. G. 
Williams, and at her death February 9, 1906, 
at the age of twenty-three years, left three chil- 
dren, Arville Guy, Evelyn Viola and James 
Wesley. Since the death of their mother these 
children have made their home with their grand- 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. McClain. The youngest 
child James Wesley, survived his mother seven 
months, passing away September 2, igc6, at two 
years of age. The only son of Mr. and Mrs. 
McClain, James N., married Miss Martha Barn- 
hill, who is a talented musician, and they are the 
proud parents of one daughter. Nathaniel Mc- 
Clain belongs to the Fraternal Aid Association 
of Los Angeles, and politically he is a stanch 
Democrat. His religious belief conforms with 
the doctrines of the Church of the Latter Day 
Saints, though he is not an active member of 
that body, while his wife's views coincide with 
the doctrines of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
although not an active member of the Church. 



GEORGE W. WISEMAN. Ever since com- 
ing to the state in 1893 Mr. Wiseman has been 
associated in business with his brother, Haldon 
R., and since 1904 they have owned and man- 
aged the principal book and stationery store in 
Sawtelle. The father, Abner Wiseman, was a 
native of Kentucky, born in Estill county, j\Iarch 
7, 1845, and was therefore about sixteen years 
old at the time of the outbreak of the Civil war. 
His youthful spirit needed no urging to prompt 
him to enlist, and before long his name was en- 
rolled in the Eighth Kentucky Infantry. After 
a faithful service extending over four years and 
six months he met with a severe accident re- 
sulting from the overturning of an ammunition 
wagon. This unfitted him for further service, 
and indeed it was ten years before he recovered 
from the effects of the injury sufficiently to re- 
sume business. Purchasing eighty acres of land 
in Estill county, Ky., he carried on farming there 
for about ten years, at the end of this time re- 
moving to Dent county, Md., for two years en- 
gaging in the iron works there, burning wood for 
charcoal. For a short time he was engaged in 
the same business in Oswego, Ore., going from 
there to Walla Walla, Wash., where for twelve 
years he carried on agricultural pursuits. Ad- 
vancing years, however, made it advisable for 
him. to discontinue active duties and in 1894 he 
sold out his interest in Washington and entered 
the soldier's home at Santa Monica. While on 
furlough he visits his sons in Sawtelle. Politi- 
cally he is a Republican. The Woodmen of the 
World number him among their members, as do 
also the comrades of the John A. Martin Grand 
Army post at Sawtelle. Mrs. Wiseman was be- 
fore her marriage Mary Ellen Obney, and she. 



too, was born in Estill county, Ky., December 
28, 1847. By her marriage with Mr. Wiseman 
six children were born, as follows : Sophie Anna, 
who died in Walla Walla, Wash., in 1894; George 
W., our subject; Martha J., Mrs. J. R. Arm- 
strong ; Joel S., who married Anna Shurtz ; Hal- 
don R., who is in partnership with his brother in 
Sawtelle, and Thomas B., who married Alice 
Fletcher. 

George W. Wiseman was next to the oldest 
of the family and was born in Estill county, Ky., 
February 17, 1870. When the family located in 
Washington he was still a young lad and in the 
schools of Walla Walla he gained his first knowl- 
edge of books. This training he later supple^ 
mented by a business course, which he soon put 
into pi-actice by establishing himself in the grain 
business, following this for a number of years. 
After conducting a farm in that state for two 
years he came to Los Angeles county, and in 
Santa Monica established a dairy business with 
his brother, Haldon R., and in an incredibly short 
time they found themselves in possession of one 
of the largest dairy industries in this part of Los 
Angeles county. The same spirit which prompted 
their father to lay aside his farm implements and 
enter the service of his country at the time oi 
the Civil war led the brothers to dispose of their 
flourishing business and enlist in the Spanish- 
American war. During their three years service 
they were in several skirmishes and one engage- 
ment, but unlike their father they escaped in- 
jury. It was after the return from the war that 
they came to Sawtelle and bought out the book 
store of which they are now the proprietors, and 
their success in the years in which they have been 
residents here prove them to be men of push 
and perseverance and well worthy the success 
which has followed their efforts. Politically 
they are defenders of Republican principles. 
George W. Wiseman is interested in fraternal 
matters to some extent, holding membership in 
the Odd Fellows order and the Fraternal Bro- 
therhood. 



DAVID BRUCE. As one of the progressive 
ranchmen of Arroyo Grande, David Bruce is an 
earnest advocate of every enterprise that tends 
toward the upbuilding of his community. A fine 
gentleman, successful, careful and conscientious 
in all of his business transactions, it goes with- 
out saying that he is well thought of by everyone 
with whom he comes in contact. His ranch com- 
prises forty-two acres of as fertile land as there 
is in the valley, and it is devoted to a variety 
of crops, including dewberries, beans and lem- 
ons. The family residence is a commodious 
structure, and the entire property is up-to-date 
and in excellent condition. 



1152 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Mr. Bruce is a native of Ireland, born May 
lo, i860, and there he received the most of his 
education. At the age of sixteen years, in 1876, 
he immigrated to Canada, and engaged in farm- 
ing there for six years before coming to Califor- 
nia in 1882. His father before him was a farmer 
in Ireland and the lessons of careful industry 
and attention to details which the father instilled 
in the minds of his sons was a part of Mr. 
Bruce"s education. This was supplemented with 
the adoption of the most up-to-date methods of 
ranching in this country, and from the time of 
his arrival in California' in 1882 he has met with 
great success in all of his undertakings. He 
first settled at Stockton, in San Joaquin county, 
and ranched there for four years, when, in 1886, 
he removed to Marine, where for two years he 
had charge of a large dairy ranch of twenty-two 
hundred acres. From there he went to Cholame 
and engaged in ranching and grain farming for 
sixteen years, having acquired title to three hun- 
dred and twenty acres, which he sold when he 
came to Arroyo Grande and purchased the place 
upon which he now resides with his family. In 
1904 i\Ir. Bruce married Emily Boxall, who im- 
migrated to this country from her native coun- 
try, England, and to them has been born one 
child, John Lester Bruce, 

Politically Mr. Bruce is a strong supporter of 
the principles embodied in the platform of the 
Republican party, and takes an active interest in 
all matters affecting the community, state and 
country in which he lives. Both he and his 
wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, which they support with their means 
and their labors and in all things they fill an 
important place in the life of Arroyo Grande. 
As to his antecedents, both parents of Mr. Bruce 
were natives of Ireland, the father, James 
Bruce, having died there at the age of seventy- 
seven years, and the mother, Mary (Crawford) 
Bruce,' lived to be one year older than her hus- 
band. The family consisted of six children, all 
of whom now live in Ireland except two, Joseph 
Bruce, a resident of Mendocino county, Cal, and 
David Bruce, the subject of this sketch. 



WILLIAM HARVEY HOWELL. One 
and a half miles west of Lemon, and not far 
from the Fairview school house, lies the six- 
ty-five acre ranch owned and supervised by 
Mr. Howell. A combination of circumstances 
makes this without question one of the rich- 
est and most productive ranches in this part 
of Los Angeles coimty, its rich black loam 
taking first rank among its superior advan- 
tages. Thirty acres of the tract are in walnuts, 
twenty in alfalfa (although this latter tract is 
being replaced with walnuts"), and the re- 



mainder is in grapes and deciduous fruits, the 
whole being irrigated by a pumping plant. 

The earliest ancestor of the Howell family 
of whom we have any definite information is 
the grandfather, James Howell, who was born 
in Illinois but early in life settled as a pioneer 
farmer in the adjoining state of Iowa. There 
he followed the peaceful life of the agricult- 
urist throughout the remainder of his life and 
reared a family to lives of usefulness. Among 
his children was G. AV. Howell, who was born 
in White Oak, Mahaska county, Iowa, and 
now makes his home on a farm in the same lo- 
cality. His wife, formerly Martha Cox, was 
also a native of White Oak, Iowa, her father, 
Isaac Cox, settling in that commonwealth 
during the early history of its settlement, 
three children, all sons, were born to this 
worthy couple, William H. being the eldest 
of the number. He was born September i, 
1873, on the parental homestead in Iowa and 
was partially reared in that state, but the re- 
moval of his parents to Kansas in 1885 brought 
him one step nearer to the west and the 
scene of his present labors. First in Wash- 
ington, Kans., and later in Osborne, that 
state, he attended the public schools, and it 
was during the family's residence in that 
state that the home was saddened by the 
death of the mother. 

When twenty years of age, in 1893, Will- 
iam H. Howell struck out for himself, his de- 
cision to come to California being influenced 
no doubt from the fact that an uncle, James 
Staples, an old forty-niner, was living in this 
state. Going to Dutch Flat, where his rela- 
tive lived, he remained there a short time and 
then went to Truckee, where for six months 
he was in the employ of the Truckee Lumber 
Company. From Nevada county he came to 
the southern part of the state in 1895, first to 
Los Angeles and then to Pomona, in the lat- 
ter place following the cement business for 
a time. Going back to Los Angeles, he held 
a position with a cold storage company for a 
short time, and the following year, 1896, came 
to Lemon and settled upon a rented ranch. 
Two years later he purchased his present 
ranch of sixty-five acres in close proximity to 
Lemon. A pumping plant on the ranch not 
only supplies an abundance of water for his 
own use, but he is enabled to irrigate neigh- 
boring ranches also. Everything about the 
ranch bears the stamp of the owner's person- 
ality, the residence, barns, fences and other 
appointments being kept in perfect repair. 

In Spadra Mr. Howell was married to Miss 
Grace Collins, who was born in Santa Ana, 
the daughter of D. H. Collins, of Spadra, of 
whom more mav be learned bv referring to 




^y<^^U^:^ 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1155 



his sketch, which is given elsewhere in this 
volume. Two- children have brightened the 
home life of Mr. and Mrs. Howell, Burl and 
Hazel. jMrs. Howell is a member of the 
Christian Church of Pomona, toward the sup- 
port of which Mr. Howell contributes, this 
also being true of all worthy causes that are 
brought before his notice. He is a school 
trustee of the Fairview district, and is sec- 
retary and a director of the Walnut Fruit 
Growers' Association of Walnut. The only 
fraternal organization which claims Mr. How- 
ell's membership is the Modern Woodmen of 
America, belonging to the Camp at Lemon. 



SAMUEL HELLER. Comparatively brief as 
was the duration of Mr. Heller's life, within the 
narrow limits of the years allotted to him he 
accomplished much for the advancement of his 
personal interests and the upbuilding of his home 
city. Always public-spirited and active in pro- 
moting the educational and commercial develop- 
ment of Long Beach, he was intimately asso- 
ciated with various movements tending toward 
the permanent welfare of the town. At the 
time of his demise he was officiating for the 
second term as president of the school board, 
during which service he had been an influential 
factor in advancing the interests of the public 
schools and had championed with especial earnest- 
ness the plan of building all schoolhouses two 
stories in height, besides favoring many other 
ideas looking toward the development of the 
schools. 

A native of New York City, born July 24. 
1863, Mr. Heller was a son of Bernard and Lena 
(Freud) Heller, natives of Austria, who came to 
America in early life and settled in New York 
City, where the father engaged in the retail 
furniture business. After the death of his wife 
he left New York City and during 1883 settled 
in Ohio, taking up the insurance business in 
Toledo, where he still makes his home. Of the 
four sons and four daughters comprising the 
family Samuel was the eldest son. His educa- 
tion was begun in the public schools of New 
York City and completed in a business college 
in Michigan, where he settled in 1884. After 
leaving college he took up the business of cigar- 
manufacturing and later conducted a department 
store at St. Johns. On disposing of his interests 
in Michigan he came to California in 1899 ^"^ 
settled in Long Beach, where he became in- 
terested in the buying and selling of real estate. 
In 1901 he laid out the Heller and Hayes tract 
of twenty acres, and also added to the city the 
Rose tract of seven and one-half acres. 

When the project was first formulated for 
the organization of the American National Bank 

5S 



of Long Beach Mr. Heller became an enthusias- 
tic advocate of the plan and assisted in the found- 
ing of the institution, in which he afterward of- 
ficiated as a director. In addition he was a direc- 
tor of the First National Bank, a director of the 
Long Beach Building and Loan Association and 
a director of the Long Beach Hospital Associa- 
tion, all of which institutions, along the different 
lines of their usefulness, have proved of inesti- 
mable value to the permanent growth of the town 
While working with keen foresight and shrewd 
discrimination for the advancement of his personal 
interests and the well-being of the city, he found 
leisure to participate in fraternal activities and al- 
so to keep in touch with local and national politi- 
cal affairs, in which he supported Republican 
principles. While living in Michigan he was a 
leading member of the Tent of the Maccabees 
at St. Johns, Clinton county, also the lodge and 
encampment, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
in the same town. The Modern Woodmen of 
America numbered him among their working 
members, as did also the Masonic fraternity, in 
which he affiliated with Long Beach Lodge, F. 
& A. M., Long Beach Chapter, R. A. M.,^Long 
Beach Commanderv, K. T.. Al Malaikah Temple. 
A. A. O. N. M. 'S., of Los Angeles, and the 
Order of the Eastern Star, at Long Beach, in 
which he officiated as past patron, his widow 
also being a member of the latter order. When 
he passed away, July 28, 1905, it was felt that 
one of the leading man of Long Beach had been 
lost to the town, and in his departure the ac- 
tivities in which he had participated suffered an 
irreparable loss. The estate which he left is ad- 
ministered by his wife, who continues to reside 
at the home place. No. 707 Cedar avenue, having 
with her the three children of the family, Anna, 
Merrill J. and Lillian E. Mrs Heller was born 
in Austria and bore the maiden name of Rosa 
Heinman ; at an early age she came to the United 
States and settled at Harrison, Mich., where 
she remained until after her marriage. Since 
his death his widow has carried out the plans he 
had made in the building of the Cosmopolitan 
Club building and the laying out of the Willow 
Park tract of Long Beach. 



JA:MES M. WOODS. An industrious, thriv- 
ing, and well-to-do agriculturist near the town 
of Escondido, James M. Woods is proprietor 
of a fine homestead in Woods" valley, which was 
named in honor of his father, Goolsby Woods, 
an honored pioneer of this section of San Diego 
county. His ranch, in regard to its appoint- 
ments, compares favorably with any in the local- 
ity, its neat and orderly appearance manifesting 
to the most casual observer the thrift and care 
of the owner, and bearing testimony to his in- 



1156 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



dustr_v and good management. A native born 
son of California, his birth occurred January 
1 8, 1868, in Yolo county, where he hved until 
ten years of age. 

A native of Missouri, Goolsby Woods married 
the widow L. I. Belshe, also a native of that 
state. They migrated across the plains by wagon 
and ox teams in '49 to California, where ^Ir. 
^\^oods engaged in mining. After living in 
Sonoma count}' for a time thev moved to Yolo 
county, bought a ranch, and after operating it 
finally sold out on account of his wife's health 
and in 1878 moved to San Diego county. Here 
he continued farming until his death, which oc- 
curred on his ranch August 16, 1897, at tne 
age of seventy-three. Five of his children sur- 
vive him. This part of the country was so thin- 
ly settled when he came here that he did not 
deem it worth while to throw his time awav on 
so small a public office as justice* of peace or 
constable. He was a Democrat in politics, and 
a member of the Christian Church. 

Coming with his parents to San Diego county 
in 1878, James M. Woods was educated in the 
district schools, and from early boyhood assisted 
his father in the various labors incidental to pio- 
neer farm life, attaining wisdom in agricultural 
lore. When ready to begin work for himself he 
selected the vocation with which he was most 
familiar, buying eighty acres of land near 
Escondido, and has since been actively and sat- 
isfactorily employed in general ranching. He 
raises grain and hay to some extent, but makes a 
specialty of raising poultry and of dairying, sell- 
ing chickens, milk and butter in the town, and 
receiving for his products the highest market 
price. 

November 11, 1891, James M. Woods mar- 
ried Annie C. Jacoby, who was born in Burling- 
ton, Iowa, August 14, 1873. and came to Cali- 
fornia in 1883. They are the parents of four 
children, namely : Susie, Orpha. Ellis and Inez. 
Politically Mr. Woods is a steadfast Democrat, 
but has never aspired to public office. 



LAWRENCE A. CREELMAN. A pioneer 
resident, prominent business man, and mem- 
ber of the San Diego city council is Lawrence 
A. Creelman, who has been active in the devel- 
opment and upbuilding of this city for more 
than twenty years past. He was born Maj' 4, 
T853, in Richibucto, Kent county. New Bruns- 
wick, of Scotch ]-)arentage, the families on both 
sides of the house having been old settlers in 
Canada. The projenitors on the paternal side 
came from the north of Ireland to Nova Sco- 
tia, where James R. Creelman was born. He 
was a tanner by trade and musician by pro- 
fession and tauHit all of his life. In iiW he 



removed with his family to Collingwood, On- 
tario, later returning to New Brunswick, and 
his death occurred in Pointe du Chene. His 
wife, in maidenhood Isabella Patterson, was 
born in Pictou, Nova Scotia, and died in On- 
tario. She was a member of the Presbyterian 
Church. There were fourteen children in the 
family, and one son, W. F. W., enlisted in a 
Tennessee regiment during the Spanish war, 
his death occurring later in the Philippine 
Islands. 

It was in the common schools of New 
Jjrunswick and the Collingwood Collegiate In- 
stitute that Lawrence A. Creelman received 
his education, and when his school days were 
over he learned the tanner's trade in Colling- 
wood, following it for ten years in Ontario. 
He then came to the LTnited States and was 
employed at the carpenter's trade, bridge and 
construction work successively by the Chi- 
cago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Rail- 
road and the Northern Pacific, spending two 
years on the Yellowstone division of the lat- 
ter. Returning to Ontario he resumed work 
at tanning for eighteen months, and in 1884 
worked on bridges for the Canadian Pacific 
in British Columbia. The following year he 
came to Califorjiia, spent one year in the red- 
woods of Mendocino county and a like period 
on a ranch in Yuba county, in 1887 locating 
permanently in San Diego. The succeeding 
fifteen years he was occupied as a conductor 
on the street railways of this city, in 1902 giv- 
ing up that work to engage in business for 
himself, and has ever since been proprietor of 
the Model bath house here. The cement 
plunge is 50x60 feet in dimensions and is filled 
with sea water, which is heated to the proper 
degree for comfortable bathing, and there are 
also twent3'-five tubs with fresh water, each 
room being fitted with shower appliances. 
The bath house is the largest and oldest es- 
tablished in the city, and is located at the 
foot of Sixth street. 

Fraternally Mr. Creelman was made a 
Mason in 1892, in Silver Gate Lodge No. 296. 
F. & A. M.. of which he is past master; has 
attained the thirt3'-second degree in the Con- 
istory; belongs to the Order of Eastern Star; 
was made an Odd Fellow in San Diego Lodge 
No. 153, I. O. O. F.. and has served in the 
capacity of noble grand : belongs to the En- 
campment, in which lie has passed all the of- 
fices : holds membership in the Rebekah lodge, 
and also in the Independent Order of Forest- 
ers. He was married in San Diego to IMiss 
May Chittenden, a native of Illinois, their 
union being blessed in the birth of two chil- 
dren, James and Charles. ^Irs. Creelman is 
a member of the Christian Church. She affili- 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1157 



ates with a number of fraternal orders, is a 
member, and was for several years treasurer, 
of Southern Star Chapter No. 96, O. E. S. ; 
and held the same office in Silver Gate Re- 
bekah Lodge No. 141 for a long period. Po- 
litically Mr. Creelman is an advocate of the 
principles embraced in the platform of the 
Republican part}-, and in 1903 he was elected 
as councilman from the sixth ward of San 
Diego, a flattering endorsement of his services 
in the governing body having been accorded 
him in 1905 by a re-election to the office. He 
is a member of the Union League Club and in 
every matter of social and civic interest to 
the community in which he lives lends a hearty 
and enthusiastic support. 



GUSTA\' RRELIN. Not a few of the men 
prominent in varied departments of the building 
business in San Diego have come from the far 
distant domain of Scandinavia, and among these 
may be mentioned Gustav Brelin, who has been 
a resident of Southern California since 1887 and 
of San Diego since 1890. Born in Dalsland, 
Sweden, April 8, 1864, he was the eldest among 
four children, three of whom are still living. 
His father, Andrew, was a native of tlie same 
locality and owned and operated the homestead 
known as Brene, but in 1872 he crossed the 
ocean to America, settling at Ashtabula, Ohio, 
where he remained until death. The wife and 
mother, Breta Kalin, was a native of the same 
locality in Sweden and a member of an old 
family of agriculturists. 

While still quite young in years Gustav Brelin 
saw his father depart for the new world, and in 
1879 he joined him in Ashtabula, Ohio, where 
he studied English in the common schools. In 
1881 he secured a position on a lake vessel and 
for two years led the life of a sailor, but in 1884 
abandoned that occupation, went to St. Paul, 
Minn., and began an apprenticeship to the 
plasterer's trade. On the expiration of his time 
he worked as a journeyman. In 1887 he came to 
California, located in Los Angeles and took con- 
tracts for plastering, remaining there until 1890, 
when he removed to San Diego. For three years 
he followed journe\-man work in this citv and 
then began to take contracts, in whi'ch line he 
continues to the present time, the firm of Brelin 
& Walker being one of the largest of its kind 
in the place. Since forming the connection with, 
his present partner in 1894 he has built up a 
large trade and has been employed to take charge 
of much of the plastering in business structures 
and residences. Among their contracts may be 
mentioned those for the Keating and Granger 
blocks, the Scfton block. St. Joseph's Sanitarium, 
and Pickwick theater, as well as various im- 



portant contracts in Coronado, National City, 
Lajolla and Pacific Beach. During the busy 
season employment is furnished to eighteen 
workmen, through whose labor the partners are 
aided in filling their contracts with promptness 
and accuracy. 

The marriage of Mr. Brelin and Miss Carrie 
Anderson, a native of Ostrejotland, was solemn- 
ized in Los Angeles, and has been blessed by the 
birth of three sons, Hilding, Ebbe and Gustav. 
The family occupy their new and modern resi- 
dence on the corner of University and Richmond 
streets. After coming to San Diego Mr. Brelin 
was made a Mason in Silver Gate Lodge, F. 
& A. M., also identified himself with the San 
Diego Chamber of Commerce, the Cabrillo Club, 
the Master Builders' Association, and the 
Scandinavian Society, of which latter he is a 
charter member. During 1884 he was initiated 
into the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at 
St. Paul, and now holds membership with the 
lodge of the order in San Diego. Although in- 
terested and active in these various organizations, 
his attention is devoted principally to the de- 
tails of his business and he is justly proud of the 
reputation acquired by his firm for reliable and 
honest workmanship. 



PHILIP HANF. Among the residents of 
Cajon, San Bernardino county, Philip Hanf is 
well known, as for ten years he has supplied the 
general wants of the public and has also accom- 
modated travelers. His genial manners and up- 
right business methods have gained for him a 
large circle of friends, both in business and so- 
cial connections. 

A native of Germany. Philip Hanf was born in 
Bavaria November 4, 1857, his parents also being 
natives of the Fatherland. Educated in the good 
schools for which Germany is noted, Mr. Hanf 
lost no time in preparing himself for the business 
world as soon as his school days were over, thus 
displaying an ambitious spirit which is bound to 
bring success. Besides learning the baker's trade 
he also learned the butcher's trade, and it was 
with this preparation that he set foot on Amer- 
ican soil in 1883. His first six years in this coun- 
try were spent in New York City, but as is al- 
most always the case with those who seek our 
shores he finally gravitated toward the west. Go- 
ing to ^^'ashington he there resumed work at his 
trades, which he followed continuously for six 
years, after which he went to Los Angeles and 
spent one_year. With the experience of thirteen 
years in this country to his credit he came to 
Cajon Pass in 1896 and purchased forty acres 
of land, to which he later added a like amount, 
taking up the latter from the government. At 
the time he removed to his new purchase there 



1158 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



was liUle in the way of appearance to encourage 
its cuitivation, for the land was wild and entirely 
covered with brush. Nothing daunted, however, 
he cleared it and set out fruit trees, which he 
has tended and cared for until he now has a fine 
orchard, comprising about one hundred and 
seventy-five trees, which include plums, peaches, 
cherries and apples. Before his orchard was in 
bearing condition he opened a general store upon 
his ranch, erecting the building at the time he 
built the family residence. He keeps on hand a 
choice supply of groceries and provisions of all 
kinds, besides dry goods, and also has accommo- 
dation for the traveling public. It is his intention 
to enlarge his orchard by setting out about three 
thousand more trees, besides grape vines, and in 
the future devote his time almost exclusively to 
the management of his ranch. 

In New York City, September 28, 1884, the 
year following his immigration to the United 
States, Mr. Hanf was married to Fannie Mooch- 
can, who was born in Saxony, Germany, and came 
to the United States when twenty-four years of 
age. She has borne her husband four children, 
one of whom, George, died when fifteen months 
old. The eldest child, Joseph, is a resident of 
Seattle, Wash. ; Gussie is now at home, having 
recently graduated from the Los Angeles Busi- 
ness College, and Andrew is also at home. 



JAMES HARRISON CLARK, M. D. 
Numbered among the more prominent, influ- 
ential and esteemed residents of Valley Cen- 
ter is J. H. Clark, M. D., who is actively iden- 
tified with the best and highest interests of 
this locality, being a prosperous agriculturist 
and a well known physician. He has, gener- 
all}- speaking, been successful through life, 
and giving his best efforts to whatever he has 
attempted has attained a fine position, pro- 
fessionally, socially and financially, among his 
fellow-men. A man of keen intelligence, ex- 
cellent judgment and sound sense, his advice 
and counsel are often sought, and inyariably 
taken. He is generous and kind-hearted, do- 
ing good whenever opportunity occurs, and 
freely giving professional aid and comfort to 
the poor and needy. A son of Robert Clark, 
he was born, December 3, 1841, in Cooper 
county, Mo., where he grew to man's estate. 

Born and brought up in Kentucky, Robert 
Clark was employed in both agricultural and 
mechanical pursuits during the greater part of 
his life. Becoming a pioneer of Missouri, he 
sctiled in Cooper county, where from the for- 
est-covered land he cleared and improved a 
homestead, on which he was busily employed 
until his death, in 1852. He was a man of 
some prominence in the communitv in which 



he settled, and an active Whig in his political 
affiliations. He married Rhoda Fox, also a 
native of Kentucky ; she survived him, dying 
in Missouri in 1859. She was a woman of 
Christian character, and a consistent member 
of the Baptist church. 

Brought up on the home farm, James H. 
Clark laid a substantial foundation for his fu- 
ture education in the common schools of 
Cooper county. As a boy he showed a natural 
aptitude for study, and his education was 
subsequently advanced by an attendance at 
the Kemper Select school and at a prepara- 
tory college. With two friends, Mr. Clark 
came with mule teams across the plains in 
1864, having an enjoyable trip. Locating in 
Yuba City, he taught school there for two 
years. He was in the meantime appointed 
superintendent of the Sutter county schools, 
and having filled out the unexpired term of 
Dr. E. B. Dunwell, was elected to the same 
office, and served m all about seven years. Dur- 
ing this time Mr. Clark read medicine, and was 
also employed in the drug business. In July, 
1870, he entered Toland Medical College, San 
Francisco, and after completing the first year's 
course, in October, 1871, became a student in 
Bellevue Hospital Medical College, at New 
York City, graduating from that institution 
with the degree of M.D. in March, 1872. Re- 
turning to Yuba City he was there engaged in 
the practice of his profession for two years. 
In 1874, his health failing, he went to Colusa 
county, locating at Leesville, where he sold 
goods and practiced medicine for four years. 
Settling near Los Angeles in 1878, he with 
others purchased portions of three grants of 
land at Azusa, but the investment proved dis- 
astrous. The ensuing four years he was en- 
gaged in ranching at Norwalk, Los Angeles 
county, and also followed his profession to 
some extent. . Coming to San Diego county in 
1885, the doctor purchased his present ranch 
of two hundred and forty acres, lying near 
A^alley Center, and has now one of the best 
and most productive grain, stock and poultry 
farms in this part of the country. He has con- 
tinued his labors here as a practitioner, and is 
known far and wide as an able and skilful 
physician. Politicalh^ his sympathies are 
with the Socialists and for three terms, while 
a resident of Sutter count3^ he served as dep- 
uty county clerk. Fraternally he is a member 
of Enterprise Lodge No. 70, F. & A. M., of 
A'uba City and religiously he belongs to the 
Methodist Episcopal Church South. 

In the spring of 1872, in Missouri, Dr. 
Clark married Mattie A. Robinson, who was 
born in that state, a daughter of Col. L. W. 
Robinson, who was verv influential in the af- 




Jiy?H^^ 




HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1161 



fairs of his state, having served as representa- 
tive to the state legislature and as state sen- 
ator. Of the union of Dr. and Mrs. Clark 
seven children have been bom, namely, Ida 
De Wilson of Escondido ; William Robinson ; 
Mary Rhoda, a teacher in the public schools ; 
Hallie Lewis ; James Harrison ; and Horace 
L. and Martha Amanda, twins. 



THOMAS JEFFERSON MOFFETT. A 
well-to-do agriculturist of Los Angeles County, 
and an extensive and successful apiarist, Thomas 
J. Moffett is prosperously engaged in his con- 
genial occupation on one of the most pleasant 
homesteads in the vicinity of Sherman. His ranch 
contains one hundred and sixty acres of land, a 
large part of which is under cultivation, and with 
its comfortable and convenient set of farm build- 
ings is attractive to the passer-by, giving visi- 
ble evidence of the enterprise and thrift of the 
owner. A son of James S. Moffett, he was born, 
July 4, 1840 in Pope county. Ark., near Dover. 

Born and reared in Tennessee, James S. Mof- 
fett migrated from there to Arkansas about 1832, 
taking up land, and being employed as a tiller 
of the soil until the breaking out of the Mexican 
war. When that was declared he offered his 
services to his country, and being made captain 
of Company A, Arkansas Mounted Rifles, com- 
manded by Colonel Yale, served until his 
death in San Antonio, Tex., where he received 
a soldier's burial. He married Eupha Hamilton, 
who was born in Tennessee, of excellent New 
England stock, some of her ancestors having 
crossed the Atlantic in the Mayflower. She re- 
mained in Arkansas until 1852, when she came 
across the plains in an ox-team train to Califor- 
nia, bringing her seven children with her. Locat- 
ing in lone, Amador county, she lived there until 
marrying again, when she came with her hus- 
band to Los Angeles, in which city she made 
her home until her death, at the age of seventy- 
two years. 

A wide-awake, active little hustler of twelve 
vears when he came with the family to Califor- 
nia, Thomas J. Mofifett worked for about a 
year as a farm hand, and then, although but 
thirteen years old, began placer mining on his 
own account. He was subsequently variously 
employed in Amador county, working in the 
mines,' hotel or saw-mill until 1857, when as 
a result of the Frazer river excitement, he went 
there and prospected for one season. Coming 
to Los Angeles county in 1868, he rented land 
in this vicinity for two or three years, and in 
its management met with encouraging success. 
Purchasing then one hundred and sixty acres 
or railroad land, he improved the ranch on 
which he has since lived, and in addition to carry- 



ing it on in an able manner has several seasons 
rented large tracts of near-by land in order that 
he might enlarge his agricultural operations. 
He is very practical, seizing every offered oppor- 
tunity for advancing his interests, and besides 
carrying on general farming in a scientific man- 
ner, has made a specialty of bee raising, having 
at times had as many as two hundred and twen- 
ty stands, although at the present time his apiary 
contains but fifty stands. 

January 29, 1887, Mr. Mofifett married Annie 
G. Cottle, who was born in Missouri, and came 
with her parents to California at an early day. 
Politically Mr. Moffett supports the principles 
of the Democratic party by voice and vote 
although in local affairs he is extremely liberal. 



AMBROSE WALSH. Closely identified 
with the agricultural interests of San Diego 
county is Ambrose Walsh, who is pleasantly 
situated in Valley Center, where he is profit- 
ably engaged in general farmings managing 
his affairs with ability and success. A resi- 
dent of California since nine years of age, he 
is the son of one of those brave and hardy 
pioneers who dauntlessly pushed his way into 
a wild, uncultivated country, and has left be- 
hind him a record for steadiness of purpose 
and persistent industry of which his descend- 
ants may well be proud. He is a twin brother 
of Austin Walsh, in whose sketch, which ap- 
pears on another page of this volume, may 
be found a brief personal history of his pa- 
rents. 

Born January 29, 1845, in Atchison county, 
^lo.. Ambrose Walsh lived there until nine 
years of age. In 1854 he came with the family 
to the Pacific coast, crossing the plains with 
ox teams, having a long and dangerous trip. 
The Indians, who for centuries had held the 
intervening country, were not pleased with 
the approach of the pale-faced strangers, and 
harassed the travelers in many ways, stealing 
their cattle when opportunity oft'ered, even 
going so far as to massacre, at Mountain 
Meadow, the train immediately preceding 
them. Arriving in California, the Walsh fam- 
ily settled in Contra Costa county, where Am- 
brose, in common with the other children, re- 
ceived such education as was afforded by the 
district schools. In 1868, the family removed 
to San Diego county, locating in Mission Val- 
ley. Six years later, in 1874, the son Am- 
brose, starting in life for himself, took up a 
government claim of one hundred and sixty 
acres at Valley Center, where he has since re- 
sided. From the wild land he has improved 
a valuable ranch, his energetic and judicious 
toil being well rewarded, his farm being one 



1162 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



of the best in its improvements and appoint- 
ments of any in the vicinity, bearing visible 
evidence of his agricultural skill and wise 
management. 

In 1883 Mr. Walsh married Hannah Shel- 
by, a native of California, and the}- are the pa- 
rents of two children, Lawrence, a farmer, 
who married Clara Borden, a native of this 
state and daughter of Jefferson S. Borden ; 
and Mary, residing in San Diego. Politically 
Mr. Walsh is a firm supporter of the princi- 
ples of the Democratic party, and for six years 
has served as school trustee. Religiously he 
is a member of the Catholic church at Escon- 
dido. 



REA'. W. E. JACOB. Should any writer 
of future years give to the Episcopal Church 
a complete record of the growth and progress 
of that denomination in Southern California 
prominent mention would be made of the life 
and pioneer service of Rev. W. E. Jacob, who 
since 1885 has been identified with the spiri- 
tual upbuilding of San Diego county and 
meanwhile has accomplished much in behalf of 
the permanent religious and moral develop- 
ment of this part of the state. Thoroughly 
American in sentiment and patriotic spirit, he 
is nevertheless a citizen of our country by 
adoption only, and was born in Queens coun- 
ly, Ireland, April 27, 1843, the son of a physi- 
cian and the grandson of a physician, both of 
whom were men of exceptional mental attain- 
ments and of high standing in their profession. 
.\mono- the eighteen children comprising the 
family of Dr. John and Charlotte Jacob he was 
the fifteenth in order of birth and received a 
thorough classical education, auspiciously 
comm.enced in Dublin schools, and afterward 
prosecuted in the schools of England and 
France. Before leaving Ireland for the Unit- 
ed States he married Miss Jane Rebecca, 
daughter of Rev. Samuel Madden, a clergy- 
man in the Church of England. The only 
child of their union is a daughter. Rebecca 
Charlotte, who .is now the wife of Douglas 
Garden of South Oceanside. 

Coming to the United States in 1875, after a 
sojourn of a brief period in New York City, 
Rev. Mr. Jacob removed to Nebraska and in 
Omaha, that state, he was ordained to the 
Episcopal ministry in an impressive ceremony 
conducted by Bishop Clarkson. When he came 
to California in 1885 he established his head- 
quarters at Encinitas, San Diego county, from 
which point he traveled throughout the entire 
county and into neighboring districts in the 
interests of the Episcopal Church. Not only 
did he hold the first services ever held by the 



denomination in Encinitas, but he did the 
same elsewhere. Some of his charges were 
twenty-five miles distant from his home, but 
his eagerness to preach the Gospel and estab- 
lish missions overcame his bodily fatigue, and 
lie was ever ready to respond to an appeal by 
those who were remote from churches. The 
congregations at Del Mar, Encinitas, Merle, 
Carlsbad, Oceanside, Escondido, Fallbrook, 
San Luis Rey and Murietta were established 
and organized imder his supervision, and the 
first services in each town were held by him, 
after which he remained in charge until the 
missions were able to engage a pastor inde- 
pendently. It was his custom to visit each 
congregation once in two weeks, and in order 
to facilitate this work he kept a stable of six 
horses. To this day he is a lover of good 
horses and now has one of the finest to be 
found in all San Diego county. The majority 
of professional men allow themselves a hobby 
as a relaxation from the responsibilities of 
their life work, and his hobby has been a love 
for horses: few are better judges than he of a 
fine animal, and at a glance he detects weak 
points or good qualities that might remain un- 
noticed by a less careful observer. 

For a time after 1897 Rev. Mr. Jacob had 
charge of the Episcopal Church at San Pedro 
and his wife assisted as superintendent of the 
Sunday-school and leader of the choir. In ad- 
dition he founded a mission at Terminal Island 
and established the cause at Long Beach, 
whose substantial edifice of the present day is 
the result of the pioneer work rendered by Mr. 
Jacob some years ago. Indeed, too much 
praise cannot be given I\Ir. Jacob for his serv- 
ices in behalf of his church. All through 
Southern California his name is known and 
lionored among the members of the Episcopal 
Church, and there are many who will testify 
that the present standing of the church in this 
region is largely due to his unremitting, self- 
sacrificing and judicious labors at a time when 
such work was most needed. Active as in the 
past, he now ministers to the congregations 
at Carlsbad, Merle and San Luis Rey, making 
his home in South Oceanside. 



HIRAM MUSSELIvIAN. Among the intel- 
ligent and prosperous agriculturists of Compton 
is Hiram Musselman, widely and favorably 
known throughout this section of Los Angeles 
county as an upright, honest man, of sterling 
worth, and a worthy representative of the earlier 
settlers of this vicinity. He was born, August 
27, 1832, in Pennsylvania, where he was reared 
and educated, attending first the common schools. 




&.Hc./^ 



.^.^z^^^JL^ 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1165 



and afterwards taking a part of a college course 
of study. His parents, Elias and Susan (Mes- 
senger) Musselman, were both born in Pennsyl- 
vania, and both died in Illinois, the father in 
1859, and the mother in 1862. They were peo- 
ple of high moral standing, and cons'istent mem- 
bers of the Lutheran Church. 

In his earlier life Hiram Musselman engaged 
in agricultural pursuits in his native state, meet- 
ing with success in his labors. Going from tfiere 
to Chicago, 111., he engaged in the furniture bus- 
iness for a few years, and then moved to Fair- 
field, Kans., where he changed his occupation, 
becoming a stock raiser and dealer. Coming to 
Compton, Cal, in the fall of 1883, he purchased 
a ranch of ten acres, and at once began its im- 
provement. He devotes a part of his land to 
the raising of alfalfa a part to the raising of 
fruit of different kinds, and in addition he makes 
a specialty of raising chickens, as a poultry 
farmer being quite successful. 

In Chicago, III, in 1864, Mr. Musselman mar- 
ried Julia Wheeler, who was born in Wiscon- 
sin, a daughter of Silas P. and Julia A. Wheeler, 
the former dying in New York, and the latter 
■in Wisconsin. Mrs. I\Iusselman died on the 
home ranch, in Compton, Cal.. in 1891, leaving 
three children, namely : Charles W., living at 
home; Amy, wife of Robert Harper, and living 
near Downey, Los Angeles county; and Carrie 
E., living at home. Politically Mr. Musselman 
is identified with the Republican party, and re- 
ligiously he is a Congregationalist. 



EDMUND MORRIS PEASE, M. D. In 
1634, six years after the founding of Salem, 
there came to this young settlement among 
other immigrants of Puritan temper, a certain 
John Pease. He was the first of his family 
m the new world, and eight generations have 
been marked by his courageous faith, unswerv- 
ing loyalty to truth and devotion to God, 
qualities which peculiarly characterized Dr. 
Edmund Morris Pease in his life of service to 
God and men. 

Descended from the John Pease of Salem 
through the following line of descent are : 
John, David, Benjamin, Job, Job, Asa, Asa and 
Edmund Morris. Dr. Pease was born in Gran- 
by, Hampshire countv, Mass., December 6, 
T828. After studying in the common schools 
of that place he went to Williston Seminary, 
in East Hampton, to prepare for higher train- 
ing. This he later took in Amherst College, 
fi-om which he graduated with the degree of 
A. B., in 1854. 'Three years later the degree 
of A. M., was conferred upon him by his .-\lma 
^vlater. After graduation he became a teacher. 
first instructing for a period of two years in 



a boys' school in Baltimore, and then serving 
as tutor for one year in Amherst. He gave 
up teaching however in order to prepare him- 
self for the medical profession, with a view to 
becoming a medical missionary, and in 1862 
he graduated from the College of Physicians 
and Surgeons of Columbia University. At 
this same time he pursued a course at the 
Union Theological Seminary, from which he 
also graduated. 

No sooner had Dr. Pease finished his train- 
ing ^ than came the call for volunteers in the 
Civil war, and he immediately offered his 
services. He was appointed assistant surgeon 
in the Sixteenth Connecticut Regiment. One 
year later, October 2/, 1863, he was given 
the_ position of surgeon, with the rank of 
Major, in the famous regiment known as the 
Ninth United States Colored Troops. His 
regiment was assigned to the Army of the 
Potomac, and was the first to enter Rich- 
mond when that city was taken. When peace 
had been declared, he was sent to Texas and 
was chief medical ofiicer of the Department 
of the Rio Grande. Later he was ordered to 
Louisiana, where he remained until the latter 
part of 1866, when he was honorablv dis- 
charged at Baltimore. 

Dr. Pease then entered upon professional 
life and practiced medicine for five- years in 
New York, and for six in Springfield, Mass. 
In the latter place he met Aliss Harriet A. 
Sturtevant, a native of Westport, Essex coun- 
ty. N. Y., to whom he was married in Borden- 
town, N. J., April 25, 1877. 

In early life having decided to devote his 
energies to the cause of missions. Dr. Pease 
went immediately after his marriage to the 
Marshall Islands as a medical missionary. He 
located on Ebon, where a church and 
school had already been established by former 
missionaries. After two years of labor he 
transferred the school to Kusari, one of the 
Caroline Islands, and made it an effective 
training school for native workers. During 
Dr. Pease' eighteen years of service as teacher, 
jireacher and medical missionary twelve 
churches were added to an original three, ten 
native pastors were ordained to the ministry, 
and thirteen unordained native teachers were 
installed in the Islands. After having acquired 
a mastery of the language, which by the way, 
is totally dift'erent from the Polynesian. Dr. 
Pease began immediately to translate the New 
Testament an.d revise the Gospels and Acts 
already in the native tongue. As the result of 
his untiring laliors his translation of the New 
Testament and the Psalms has been in use 
for several years. He also compiled a dic- 
tionpry of the language and some educational 



1166 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



books and added many songs to the hymn and 
tune book ah'eady in the Marshall Island dia- 
lect. 

While in the Islands two children were 
born to Dr. and Mrs. Pease, Edmund Morris, 
Jr., and Francis Sturtevant. In order to edu- 
cate his sons Dr. Pease came with his fam- 
ily in 1894 to the United States. After spend- 
ing several months in the East, he located 
near Pomona College, in Claremont, Cal., 
where he lived until his death. 

During his residence in Claremont Dr. Pease 
identified himself with all the best interests 
of the town, aiding in every way the upbuild- 
ing of the college, community and church. He 
was a Mason and was also identified with the 
Grand Army of the Republic. Although far 
from the scene of his missionary labors, Dr. 
Pease spent the last twelve years of his life 
translating the Old Testament into the Mar- 
shall Island language. It was his desire that 
the entire Bible should be in the hands of the 
natives, and this wish of his heart would 
have beeji fulfilled had he been spared for 
an additional year of labor. At the age of 
seventy-eight, while still vigorous in mind 
and body, Dr. Pease was seized with the sud- 
den illness which caused his death. On No- 
vember 28, 1906, he passed away at his home 
in Claremont. A man of heroic mold, fearless 
and devoted to God's service. Dr. Pease ranks 
as one of the great men of the missionary 
world. 



ELI JACKSON YOKAM. The fifth of a 
family of nine children of George and Sarah 
(Wilson) Yokam, Eli J. Yokam was born in 
Knox county, Ohio, December 25, 1835. Three 
years later the family moved to Franklin county 
where the boy grew up to manhood on his 
father's farm.' His early school advantages were 
limited to a few months each year in the old log 
schoolhouse, with slab benches. His two older 
brothers having enlisted in the war with Mexico, 
he became the mainstay on the farm, and at 
seventeen years of age had charge of the two 
hundred and twenty-acre farm. Supplementing 
his meager school opportunities with study at 
home he fitted himself for teaching, and taught 
a number of terms. On attaining his majority 
he rented land of his father, which he tilled on 
shares and spent the proceeds in obtaining an 
education. After graduating from Duff's Com- 
mercial College at Columbus he spent two years 
m Antioch College, and in the Ohio Weslyan 
University. 

Soon after quitting school Mr. Yokam rather 
accidentally embarked in the newspaper busi- 
ness as joint proprietor and editor of the 



Westerville Banner, Westerville, the seat of 
Otterbein University, is a good type of col- 
lege town. Determining to master the details of 
the business the new partner by the end of the 
first year had charge of the job department, and 
had formed the habit of setting up at the printer's 
case much of his local and editorial matter with- 
out committing it to writing. After over four 
years of successful management, during three 
years of which he was sole proprietor and edi- 
tor, Mr. Yokam sold the paper and plant, and im- 
mediately entered the employ of the publishers 
of the Ohio Statesman, the time-honored Dem- 
ocratic journal at the state capital, in charge of 
its advertising business. Fifteen months later 
he accepted a flattering oft'er from the publishers 
of the Columbus Dispatch, a wide-awake young 
daily, owned by J. H. Putman, private secretary 
to the governor, and Dr. Doren, founder and su- 
perintendent of the state institution for the 
feeble-minded. During his connection with the 
Dispatch he served in the several capacities of 
bookkeeper, advertising man and local writer. 

Upon a change of ownership of the Dispatch 
Mr. Yokam resigned his position and purchased 
the Columbus Sunday Herald. The Herald had 
been founded some three 3-ears before by Gen. 
Thomas Ewing for his son "Thom," who had 
strong journalistic aspirations, but the young 
proprietor had failed to place it on a self-support- 
ing basis. Taking editorial and business charge 
Mr. Yokam enlarged the paper to a thirty-six 
column folio, the largest published in the city, 
and arranged to send it out on the Sunday morn- 
ing trains and have it delivered by special car- 
riers in the towns forty miles out from the city. 
The circulation and business rapidly increased 
several hundred per cent, every issue showing a 
large net profit. The double duties assumed in- 
volved active labor sixteen hours a day on an 
average. At the end of two years of this stren- 
uous life, yielding to the importunities of would- 
be purchasers. Mr. Yokam sold the Herald in 
1876 for several times the purchase price, and 
engaged in other lines of business. 

The following year Mr. Yokam went to Illi- 
nois, and in 1880 he, in connection with others, 
published a history of Peoria county, a quarto 
volume of nine hundred pages, he being the lit- 
erarv editor. In 1882 he purchased an interest 
in the Springfield Ei-ening Post, an infantile 
journal in its swadling clothes, and took editorial 
charge. The Post had three old-established 
dailies as competitors in a city of twenty-five 
thousand, and while it reached a daily circula- 
tion of nearly two thousand copies (second 
largest in the city)', it could not obtain the Asso- 
ciated Press franchise ; and failing to reach a 
paying basis Mr. Yokam severed his connection 
with it. He soon after took the position of 




'^CcUJiU.c^ 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



115y 



general agent for a large New York publishing 
house, with headquarters in Qiicago. At the 
end of three years of successful business he re- 
signed, leaving the city May i, 1888, for Cali- 
fornia under a two-year contract with a history 
publishing firm of that city to engage in historical 
work. Before the expiration of that engagement 
he purchased the land in Highland which he 
transformed from a rough barley field into a fine 
orange grove and handsome home which he and 
his amiable wife now occupy. 

At the time of Morgan's raid in Ohio during 
the Civil war, Mr. Yokam, being a member of a 
militia company, was called out for a brief cam- 
paign as a member of the One Hundred Thirty- 
third Regiment of Ohio National Guard, unhitch- 
ing from the mowing niachine to obey the sum- 
mons of Colonel Innes. 

Since settling in Highland Mr. Yokam has 
taken an active interest in matters of local public 
concern. He was three times elected president 
of the Highland Horticultural Club. He was 
the originator of the Highland Orange Growers' 
Association, which was organized in his resi- 
dence, and has served in the capacity of direc- 
tor, secretary, vice-president and president of 
that organization. He is serving his second year 
as president of the Highland Library Club, and 
his fourth year as president of the San Bernar- 
dino County Ohio Society. Though chiefly oc- 
cupied in cultivating his fine orange and lemon 
grove, Mr. Yokam has contributed an occasional 
article for the public press upon historical and 
other subjects of general interest, and has writ- 
ten numerous papers on various topics to be read 
before public gatherings. 

Mr. Yokam was first united in marriage with 
I\Iiss Lucretia J. Hyde, October 16, 1861. On the 
28th of January, 1870. she passed away, leaving 
two children, Frank \V. and Harriet L., both 
still living. September 27, 1882, he married Mrs. 
Frances E. Loring, who is still the chief factor 
in his happy home life. 



ABRAHAM HATFIELD. Noteworthy 
among the representative pioneers of Ramona 
and its vicinity is Abraham Hatfield, who holds 
a well-deserved position among the sturdy, en- 
ergetic and successful agriculturists who thor- 
oughly understand the vocation which they fol- 
low, and are enabled to carry it on with pleasure 
and profit. He is a native of Missouri, and was 
born July 6, 1840. His father. Charles Hatfield, 
born in Kentucky, married Catherine Dale, a 
native of Virginia, and subsequently moved to 
Missouri, taking up land from the government, 
and from the unbroken forest clearing and im- 
proving a homestead. There he and his faith- 
ful helpmate spent their remaining days, both 



dying in the prime of life, the father passing 
away at the age of forty-seven years, and the 
mother when forty-three years old. They were 
people of Christian character and worth, and 
faithful members of the Baptist Church. 

One of a family of nine children, Abraham 
Hatfield, in common with his brothers and sis- 
ters, was brought up on the home farm, obtain- 
ing a limited education. Soon after the break- 
ing out of the Civil war he enlisted in Company 
A, Sixteenth Texas Cavalry, in which he served 
three and one-half years, when he was cap- 
tured, and took the oath of allegiance. Going 
to ]\Iontana in 1865, he was for a number of 
years successfully engaged in placer mining. In 
1870 he came to Southern California, and after 
living for a short time in the old city of San 
Diego settled as a farmer near Julian, buying 
three hundred and twenty acres of land, on which 
he put a number of improvements. Disposing 
of that ranch he took up a government claim of 
one hundred and sixty acres, and by dint of per- 
severing labor and good management has since 
improved the valuable farm on which he now 
resides. He has erected a substantial set of 
farm buildings, set out fruit trees and planted a 
vineyard, and as a general farmer is exceedingly 
prosperous, his specialty being the raising of 
grain and stock. He is also interested in "gold 
and gem mines in San Diego county. 

December 7, 1876, Mr. Hatfield married Sarah 
M. Casner, who was born in Alabama Septem- 
ber 13, 1837, and they are the parents of two 
children. Margaret Irene and Charles M., both 
of whom are at home. Politically Mr. Hatfield 
is not affiliated with any party, but votes accord- 
ing to the dictates of his conscience, casting his 
ballot for the men best qualified in his judgment 
to serve the interests of the people. Religiously 
he is a valued member of the Baptist Church. 



WALTER CARTER. One of the many 
capable and industrious agriculturists of Los 
Angeles county is Walter Carter, who is pros- 
perously engaged in his free and independent 
occupation in Wiseburn. His ranch is pleasantly 
located, and with its comfortable and convenient 
set of buildings, and their neat and tasteful sur- 
roundings, invariably attracts the attention of the 
passerby. A son of George C. Carter, he was 
born, January 20, 1864, in Virginia, but was 
reared and educated in Missouri. 

A native of old Virginia, George C. Carter 
removed to Missouri in the early '70s, having 
previously served as a soldier in the Mexican 
war. When the Civil war broke out he was 
made captain of a company and served under 
General Price in Missouri. He took an active 
part in several engagements, and received two 



117U 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



flesh wounds while in battle, one bullet striking 
him in the right shoulder, and another striking 
the right arm and practically paralyzing it. Re- 
turning to Virginia at the close of the war, he 
established a tobacco factory, but not succeeding 
particularly well in operating it, he sold out. 
Going then to Missouri, he bought land and im- 
proved a good farm, which he managed as long 
as he was able, and on which he is now living, 
retired from active pursuits. He married Mary 
E. Henry, who died in 1870. She was a true 
helpmeet to him, and a consistent member of the 
Alethodist Episcopal Church. She bore him 
seven children, three of whom are still living. 

Brought up on the home farm, Walter Carter 
was educated in the public schools of Troy, Mo. 
At the age of eighteen years he began the battle 
of life on his own account. Starting westward, 
he came to the Pacific coast, and at Los Angeles 
secured work as a fireman on the Southern Pa- 
cific Railroad, subsequently being promoted to 
the position of engineer. Leaving the railway, 
he was for awhile engaged in freighting on the 
desert, driving a mule team. Locating then at 
Hyde Park, Los Angeles county, he worked 
awhile for Captain Clark, and then went to Del 
Rey, where he took charge of the dredger, oper- 
ating it until the company gave up work. De- 
sirous of settling permanently, he came then to 
Los Angeles county, and in the Wiseburn dis- 
trict rented land and embarked in agricultural 
pursuits. Encouraged by his good success, he 
subsequently purchased land, buying one ranch 
of three hundred and sixty acres, and another 
containing sixty-seven acres, on which he has 
his house and buildings. His improvements are 
of a substantial character, and as a farmer he 
is exceedingly prosperous. He has also other 
interests connected with mining, and in this busi- 
ness reaps quite an income. 

Mr. and Mrs. Carter are the parents of two 
children, Le Roy and Sylvia. Politically 3Ir. 
Carter is identified with the Democratic party. 



BEX E. PATCHETT is a native son, his 
birth having occurred near San Miguel, Cal.. 
October 15, 1871, one of the four children com- 
prising the parental family. His parents were 
among the early pioneers of the state, the father, 
John "a. Patchett, having crossed the plains in 
an emigrant party in i860, and his mother, who 
was .\manda Carpenter before her marriage, 
having come to California by the isthmus in the 
same year. Both were natives of the state of 
Towa. The mother resides at Pismo. while the 
father died in 1903. at the age of sixty-two 
years. ' During his lifetime he was a strong ad- 
herent of the Republican party. 

The earlv education of Mr. Patchett was re- 



ceived in the public schools of San Luis Obispo 
county and was supplemented by a commercial 
course at Heald's Business College of San Fran- 
cisco. He began his independent business career 
in the San Joaquin valley, where he engaged in 
the stock business for seven years and soon ac-» 
quired valuable property. In 1903 he removed 
to Arroyo Grande, where he is now residing, and 
owns one of the finest and best improved ranch- 
es in this section of the state, comprising four 
hundred and sixty acres of ground, three hun- 
dred and fifty of which are devoted to the grow- 
ing of crops, the rest being pasture land. His 
beans yield a large han-est of sixteen sacks per 
acre, conclusively proving the fertility of the 
soil. The Logan Oil Conipanv well is also lo- 
cated on this farm. In politics Mr. Patchett is 
a strong Republican and earnest supporter of 
the tenets advocated in the platform of that 
party, and he takes an active interest in the busi- 
ness, social, political and religious life of the 
community. He was married in 1897 to Miss 
Sarah Bower, a native of Iowa, and to them 
have been born three children : Edwin, Ernest 
and Stewart. 



CHARLES I. MASON. Occupying a po- 
sition of prominence among the foremost busi- 
ness men of Compton is Charles I. Mason, of 
the firm of Mason Brothers, hardware dealers 
and plumbers, having their main store in this 
town, and a branch establishment in Gardena. 
Enterprising, progressive and practical in his 
view's, he is actively assisting in promoting 
the growth and industrial prosperity of his 
adopted city, and in its upbuilding is playing 
an important part. He was born in Derby, 
England, October 9, 1865. His father, Isaac 
Mason, born in England in 1835, married 
Mary Smith, also of English birth, and they 
became the parents of the following children: 
Mary Louise: G. Harold, in partnership with 
Charles I. : Alice Gertrude : J. William, of Los 
Angeles, an employe in the postoffice : and 
Charles L, the special subject of this sketch. 

By years of study in the common and high 
schools, find by subsequently taking a college 
extension course, Charles I, ]\Iason acquired 
an excellent education, which was further ad- 
vanced by the study of mechanical engineer- 
ing at South Kensington. On finishing this 
course he worked as an engineer for three 
vears, and then took up the study of plumb- 
ing in a thorough manner, becoming proficient 
in the trade. His health failing, he came to 
California in 1888, hoping in this genial cli- 
mate to regain his former ph^-sical vigor. Lo- 
cating in Compton. h.e purchased seventeen 
acres of land, and for about seven years was 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1171 



engaged in raising fruit and alfalfa. The 
ensuing two years he worked as a plumb- 
er, and in a bicycle establishment in Los 
Angeles. Returning then to Compton, 
in partnership with his brother G. Harold, he 
bought a harware and plumbing establish- 
ment, and they have since built up an exten- 
sive and lucrative business in this line, in the 
busy season employing about a dozen men. 
L'nder their present firm name, Mason Broth- 
ers, Mr. Mason and his partner have opened a 
branch store in Gardena, where thev are suc- 
ceeding beyond their expectations,' their pa- 
tronage being large and remunerative. Re- 
cently they erected one of the finest business 
buildings in ComiHon, and are now prepared 
to fill all orders promptly and satisfactorily. 

In 1896 j\Ir. Mason married ]\Iary Whaley, 
who was born in California, a daughter of the 
late Dr. Francis \A'haley, who came to this 
state as a pioneer more than thirty years ago, 
and until his death, in August, 1904, was en- 
gaged in the practice of medicine. Mr. and 
Mrs. Mason have three children, namely : 
Lawrence H.. Helen M. and Charles Ronald. 
In his political views Mr. Mason is a Pro- 
hibitionist, and religiously he is a member of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church. He was one 
of the organizers and is a director of the 
Compton Water Company. 



CUTHBERT GULLY. To the energy and 
enterprise of her young business and profes- 
sional men Long Beach owes much to her phe- 
nomenal growth and development, and in the 
furthering of this general prosperity Cuthbert 
Gully, a successful and practical civil engineer^ 
has contributed a generous share. Descended as 
he is from generations of prominent Englishmen, 
it is but natural that he should display the same 
strong qualities of character which gave to them 
leading positions in their country. His grand- 
father, John Gully, a native of Bristol, England, 
was a successful business man, a large land own- 
er, interested in coal mining and a breeder of fine 
horses, having won the Derby one year. As a 
public man he exercised his talents in parliament 
liaving been a member from York for two terms. 

Captain Henry Lawrence, the father of Cuth- 
bert Gully, was a commander in the English navy 
and at the time of his resignation at the age of 
twentv-seven years, was the youngest commander 
in service. After his retirement from luilitary 
life he engaged in the practice of civil engineer- 
ing in England for a time, then came to America 
and continued to work in Florida. Later he 
removed to the province of Quebec, Canada, and 
bought a farm on Lake Memphremagog. for 
a number of vears dividing his time between this 



IJroperty and coal mines in England which he 
owned. In 1889 the family returned to England 
and the parents reside in Southsea. Mr. Gully's 
mother, who was in maidenhood, Henrietta Wal- 
lace, is a native of London and traces her lineage 
back to Sir William Wallace on her paternal side 
and through her mother claims Robert Emmett 
as an ancestor. 

A member of a family of nine children, Cuth- 
bert Gully was born in 1878, at Lake Mem- 
phremagog, Quebec, Canada. He acquired his 
education in England at St. George's College, 
and later studied civil engineering under his 
father. In. 1894 he came to California, locating 
at Riverside, and as civil engineer entered the 
ofiice of the San Jacinto Land Company under 
W. E. Pedly, a position which he retained for 
six years. For two years thereafter he was in- 
terested in horticultural pursuits, specializing on 
(irange growing. Disposing of his ranch he was 
for eighteen months employed as assistant super- 
intendent of construction with the Riverside 
Power Company, resigning this to accept a posi- 
tion in Los Angeles with E. T. Wright as civil 
engineer and surveyor. Six months later, in 
1904, he came to Long Beach and continued the 
practice of his profession independentlv, laving 
out Willow _ Park and Long Beach Boulevard 
tracts. He is now engaged on the Long Beach 
Reclamation District work in reclaiming about 
three thousand acres of land. 

The marriage of Mr. Gully occurred in Long 
I'jeach, uniting him with Edna Sovereign, a 
native of Illinois, and they are the parents of 
one child, Edna Adalza. Mr. Gullv is an active 
member of the Episcopal Qnirch and fraternally 
was made a Mason in Temescal Lodge No. 314 
F. & A. M., in Corona. Politically lie is an ad- 
vocate of Republican principles, and as a public- 
spirited citizen who is interested in the best de- 
velopment of the city he is held in the highest 
esteem by all who have the pleasure of his ac- 
quaintance. 



JOHN KEYES MORRISON. An industri- 
ous, progressive and well-to-do agriculturist of 
Los Angeles county. John Keyes Morrison, liv- 
ing retired near Compton, has improved a fine 
homestead, which in its appointments compares 
favorably with any in the locality. With its sub- 
stantial buildings and well-cultivated fields, it 
gives proof to the most casual observer of "the 
thrift and care of the owner, and shows con- 
clusively that he has a thorough understanding 
of the business in which he has engaged, and that 
in its management he has exercised excellent 
judgment. A son of William Morrison, he was 
born. May 5. 1835. '" Philadelphia. Pa., of 
Scotch-Irish ancestrx-. 



1172 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



William jNIorrison was born and reared in 
Ireland, but when a young man immigrated to 
America, locating in Penns3'lvania, where he mar- 
ried Elizabeth Keyes, who came from Ireland 
to the United States with her parents when she 
was a young girl. She died in Philadelphia, 
Pa., leaving two children, of whom John Keyes, 
the subject of this sketch, was an infant three 
months old. After locating in Illinois the father 
subsequently married again, and by his second 
union had a family of four children. The re- 
mainder of his life was spent in Illinois, where 
he carried on farming until his death. He was 
a man of deep religious convictions, and a mem- 
ber of the Reformed Presbyterian Church. 

Coming with his father and grandfather as 
far west as Illinois when a young lad, John 
Keyes Morrison remained at home until after 
attaining his majority, receiving a practical com- 
mon-school education, and a fine training in the 
numerous branches of agriculture. When ready 
to settle in life he purchased land in Washing- 
ton county. III, not far from the parental home- 
stead, and was for several years there success- 
fully engaged in tilling the soil. In 1874 he re- 
moved with his family to California, settling near 
Compton, where he at once bought thirt}- acres of 
the land included in his present ranch. A large 
part of his original purchase he devoted to thfe 
cultivation of fruits of all kinds, a branch of 
agriculture which proved exceedingly remuner- 
ative. By purchase he has added seventy acres 
of adjoining land to his ranch, and here he lives 
retired with his family. Since his retirement his 
son John W. has taken the active care of the 
ranch, upon which he raises large crops of grain 
and fruit. 

In 1859, in Nashville, Washington county, 111., 
Mr. Morrison married Letitia L. Loughery, who 
was born in County Derry, Ireland, and came to 
America in 1846. Of the union of Mr. and Mrs. 
Morrison six children have been born, namely : 
Anna D., wife of Prof. A. J. McQatchie, of 
Montobello, Cal., and the mother of one child ; 
John W., who has charge of the ranch ; Lillie, 
in Los Angeles; Alonzo T., of Calabasas, who 
married Harriet Parker, by whom he has two 
children, a son and a daughter ; Lorenzo L., who 
married Alice Arthur and has two daughters ; and 
Margaret Letitia, living at home. 



LEON LEHMAN. Throughout the length 
and breadth of Ventura county the people are 
familiar with the rapid growth and exceptional 
popularity of the department store conducted by 
Lehman Bros., at Oxnard. LTnder the present 
firm title the founder of the business. Leon Leh- 
man, associated with his three brothers, Matthew, 
Edmond and Paul, has gained a reputation for 



reliability of business dealings and success in 
mercantile affairs. The department store owned 
and operated by the firm has its headquarters 
in a building 55x100 feet in dimension, but in 
addition there is a two-story brick warehouse 
25x100 feet, and a warehouse on Saviers 
road 40x80 feet, all of the buildings be- 
ing utilized for the storage of goods or for their 
display in the interests of customers. As Oxnard 
itself has had a rapid growth in importance and 
prestige, so this business enterprise has deve- 
loped rapidly from an unimportant size to pro- 
portions rivalling those of the large cities. 

Near the historic city of Strasburg, Erance, 
and in the province of Alsace, now a part of the 
German empire, Leon Lehman was born Feb- 
ruary 6, 1 861, being a son of Moise and Estella 
Lehman, natives of the same province and mem- 
bers of old families there. The father was a 
merchant and real estate dealer during all of 
his active years and until shortly before his 
death. All of the seven children are now in 
America and in 1893 Leon returned to Europe 
and brought to the United States his widowed 
mother, in order that she might spend her last 
days with her children, of whom he was the 
eldest. He received an excellent education in col- 
lege, and afterward served an apprenticeship to 
the dry goods trade in Paris, where he had the ad- 
vantage of studying under some of the most suc- 
cessful merchants of the continent. At the ex- 
piration of two years he came to the United 
States, proceeded direct to California, and set- 
tled in Hueneme, where in October, 1878, he 
entered the employ of Wolff & Levy as a clerk. 
Intelligence, skill and executive ability enabled 
him in 1886 to buy an interest with Mr. Wolff, 
who had succeeded to the business of Wolff & 
Levy, at which time the title was changed to 
Wolft' & Lehman. For the better accommoda- 
tion of the stock of goods the firm erected a brick 
building. 

On the dissolution of the partnership a new 
association was entered into and the firm of Leh- 
man & Waterman was organized with W. 1\I. 
Waterman as a junior member. In addition to 
carrying a stock of general merchandise they em- 
barked in the grain business, and continued to- 
gether until January, 1906, when the junior 
partner's interest was purchased by the senior 
member. The firm erected a frame building and 
started the first store in Oxnard in 1898, but 
later the building became too small for the grow- 
ing trade, and the present substantial structure 
was erected on the adjoining lot. In the incor- 
poration of Oxnard "Sh. Lehman was an active 
factor and ever since then he has officiated as 
treasurer of the city. At this writing he holds 
office as president of the Citizens Club, an or- 
ganization composed of Oxnard's leading citi- 




J^l<*2--^-y / -^y^^^/^^C^.-/"' 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1175 



zens, banded together to promote the welfare of 
the town. On the organization of the Oxnard 
Masonic Chib he became one of its charter mem- 
bers and has officiated as its treasurer for some 
time. Since coming to Oxnard he has erected 
a substantial residence on the corner of D and 
Second streets. Fraternally he is identified with 
the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks in Santa 
Barbara and the Masonic fraternity, having been 
made a Mason in Hueneme Lodge, of which he 
is past master, and the first one to be taken into 
that lodge, while at this writing he holds mem- 
bership with Oxnard Lodge No. 341, F. & A. 
M., also with the Royal Arch Chapter. Ever 
since becoming a citizen of the United States 
and of voting age, he has given his allegiance 
to the Republican party. A man of unusual 
business ability, he superintends with care and 
keen intelligence the stores at Oxnard and 
Hueneme owned by the firm and built up to their 
present dimensions largely through his persever- 
ing energy. In the growth of Oxnard his con- 
tribution as a progressive merchant and public 
spirited man has been of the greatest importance. 



PRESLEY T. HUB BERT. Bound to the 
beautiful valley of San Luis Rey by the ties of 
years of identification with its agricultural in- 
terests, Mr. Hubbert has for the region a feel- 
ing of affection deeper and more abiding than 
for any other spot of earth's broad domain. To 
the people of the valley his name is significant 
of all that is manly and noble in character, pure 
and lofty in friendship, and genial and com- 
panionable in temperament. As a pioneer he bore 
a part in the development of the resources of 
the vallev and as a citizen he contributed his 
quota to movements for the public welfare. To 
know him is to admire him for the possession 
of the qualities of mind and heart unusually at- 
tractive and deep and also for the possession of 
a sagacious judgment that gives weight to his 
counsel and permanent value to his advice. 

Of southern family and birth. Mr. Hubbert is 
a son of Matthew and Elizabeth S. (Thornton) 
Hubbert, natives respectively of Tennessee and 
Georgia. The father, who was a farmer and 
cattle-raiser, came to California in i860 and set- 
tled at Julian, but the following year removed to 
the San Luis Rey valley, where he entered 
land from the government. At the time of his 
death in 1886 he was seventy-six vears of age. 
while his wife, who lived to be eighty-five, pass- 
ed awav in 1903. They were the parent.s^ of 
fifteen children and ten of these are yet living. 
Preslev T., who was born in Attala county. Miss.. 
November 27, 1846. was eight years of age when 
the familv removed to Texas, and his education 
(which was limited to the common school 



studies) was received principally in that state. 
For a time he worked as a cowboy and during 
ten months of the war period he was employed 
in the department furnishing beef to the Confed- 
erate army. Meanwhile his father had be- 
come interested in the cattle business and had 
his range on the present site of Roswell in New 
Mexico, remaining there for four years, and the 
son aided in the business bv driving herds of cat- 
tle to and from the range. In the pursuit of this 
work he crossed the plains ten times. When 
his father closed out the cattle business and 
removed to California he returned to Texas, 
and from there came to the coast country in 
1872, journeying via steamer from Galveston 
to New Orleans, thence by rail to St. Louis, 
from there on the railroad to Denver, Salt Lake 
and San Francisco, thence to San Diego, and 
from there via stage to Julian, where he became 
interested in mining. 

After a year in California Mr. Hubbert re- 
turned to Texas for his mother, brothers and 
sisters, who came back with him to San Diego 
county. In August, 1873, he closed out his 
mining interests and came to the San Luis Rev 
vallev. where he purchased a quarter section of 
land from his father and later entered one hun- 
dred and twenty acres from the government, on 
which property he has since engaged in ranch- 
ing and stock-raising. In 1878 he was united 
in marriage with Mrs. Helen M. (Adams) Hub- 
bert, a native of Texas, and a dausrhter of Cal- 
ifornia pioneers of 1867. who settled in the Hope 
school district in San Diesro countv. Thev are 
the parents of the following children: Louis 
C, now in Mexico: Victoria E.. who is on the 
home ranch ; Jennie E. and Bavard T., who are 
attending- school in Los .\ngeles : Nannie B.. a 
student in the San Luis Rey schools, and Edsrar 
T.. at home. The familv attend the Christian 
Church, with which Mrs. Hubbert is identified 
and to which ATr. Hubbert has been a gener- 
ous contributor. Pnliticallv a Democrat, reared 
in the faith of that partv and pronounced in his 
allegiance to its principles, he is vet liberal and 
non-partisan, and in voting considers the char- 
acter of the candidate and his qualifications for 
office rather than his political views. Alwavs 
interested in educational matters, he has served 
efficientiv as school trustee and has contributed 
materiallv to the advancement of the local 
schools. 



JOHN P. VARBLE. The reputation ac 
nuired by J. P. Varble as a rancher of Los 

Angeles countv has been won entirelv by his owr 
efforts, having brought to bear in his work an 
intelligent and conscientious thought which ha« 
resulted in the accomplishment of his aims and 



1176 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



purposes. He is located near El Alonte, where 
he settled in 1903. He is a native of Franklin 
county, Ark., and was born January 23, 1865 ; his 
father, Alexander \'arble, was a native of North 
Carolina, while his mother, formerly INIargar- 
ett Houston, was born in Arkansas. The father 
died in 1880, and the mother is still surviving 
and making her home in ^lodesto, Stanislaus 
county, at the age of sixty-three years, still active 
and taking an interest in the work of the Girist- 
lan Church, of which she is a member. The 
father was a Democrat politically and prominent 
in the affairs of his adopted state. 

J. P. Varble was the eldest of ten children 
born to his parents and in Franklin county he 
received his education in the public schools. He 
came to California in 1891, after having engaged 
as a farmer in his native state, and upon his ar- 
rival here located in Stanislaus county, where he 
remained for three years. He then came to 
Los Angeles county and engaged in ranching, in 
1903 locating on his present property, which con- 
sists of one hundred and ten acres, devoted to 
the raising of alfalfa, which yields eight tons 
per acre. He owns seventeen acres of fine land 
which he intends to plant to strawberries and 
walnuts. He was married in 1886 to Miss Callie 
Owen, a native of Arkansas, and four children 
were born to this union, Oma, Truman, Ruth and 
Valda. J\lr. ^^arble is a member of the ]Mod- 
ern Woodmen of America and the \\'oodmen 
of the World. Politically he is a stanch adherent 
of the Democratic principles and both himself 
and wife are members of the Christian Oiurch. 



A. L. AL'VTTHE^^'S. Twenty years ago A. 
L. Matthews came to California and located 
at Wildomar, purchasing land upon which he 
is now raising hay and grain. • He was born 
Augu.st 21, 1845, in Chemung county, N. Y., 
the son of Isaac and Ann (Manning) ^lat- 
thews, the former being a native of New York 
and the latter born m England. The ^lat- 
thews family is one that has been identified 
with the history of the L'nited States for sev- 
eral generations, the grandfather, Kortwright 
^Matthews, having been an officer in the Black 
Hawk war and took an active part in the bat- 
tle fought at Horseheads. N. Y. The father 
was educated in New- York and became a 
Methodist Episcopal minister, having charges 
at various points, including Big Flats, Reaser 
Hill and Pine Valley. His death occurred in 
New York in 1889. at the advanced age of 
eighty-fouF years. The mother died in 1859, 
when she was fifty-nine years old. 

Reared in an intellectual and refined atmos- 
phere, A. L. ^latthews in boyhood attended 
the public schools, later studying for a time at 



.Starkey Seminar}-. In October, 1863, he dem- 
onstrated his patriotism b}- enlisting in Com- 
pany E, Fourteenth Regiment of New York 
Heav}- Artillery, and was injured by the ex- 
plosion of a shell at Fort Hamilton, the wound 
having troubled him ever since. On account 
of his disability he was discharged at Fort 
Schu^-ler. N. Y.; and in 1868 located in Ne- 
vada, Story county, low-a, where he engaged 
in ranching until 1872. He then removed to 
Hiawatha, Brown county, Kans.. remaining 
there for two years, when he located in Spring 
Hill, Johnson county, that state, and bought 
a farm upon which he lived until 1875. His 
next move was to Arkansas valle}-, Kans., 
there filing upon a homestead claim upon 
which he resided until 1886, when he removed 
to California. Locating at ^^'ildomar, he 
bought ten acres of land, improved it, and en- 
gaged in ranching. Besides this he also owns 
a quarter section of farming land in Kansas. 

June 21. 1902, Mr. ]^iatthew-s received the 
appointment as postmaster of \^'ildomar, and 
on August 15 of the same year secured the 
position of station agent for the Santa Fe at 
that point. At about the same time he also 
became proprietor of the general store which 
he now owns. He has been clerk of the school 
board for twelve years, and for the past eight 
3-ears has been deputy count}' clerk. Polit- 
ically he is an advocate of the principles em- 
braced in the platform of the Republican 
party, and religiously belongs to the JNIethod- 
ist Episcopal Church. He is also a member 
of the Riverside post of the Grand Army of 
the Republic. 

Mr. Afatthews' marriage in Hutchinson, 
Kans.. October 24, 1877. united him with i\Iiss 
]\Iar}- H. Allison, a native of Illinois, they 
.becoming the parents of two children, Anna 
and Anson Leo. both of whom died in in- 
fanc}-. As a progressive and enterprising citi- 
zen 'Sir. AFatthcw-s takes a leading place in 
his community, in which he is held in the 
highest respect and esteem by all. 



CHARLES J. MURPHY. A native son of 
California, and the representative of one of its 
early pioneer families, Charles J. Murphy is well 
deserving of mention in a work of this character. 
A well-known resident of the thriving little 
village of Oxnard, he is actively identified with 
its mercantile interests, holding an excellent posi- 
tion among the energetic and thorough going 
business men who have attained success through 
their own tact, good judgment and perseverance. 
Establishing himself here as a member of the 
firm of Murphy & Weill nearly two years ago. 
he has since built up a lucrative trade, dealing 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



117; 



principally in groceries and men's furnishing 
goods. A son of the late Thomas Murphy, he 
was born, April 17, 1874, in San Francisco, 
where he was reared and educated. 

Leaving his home in the east when a young 
man, Thomas Murphy followed the march of civ- 
ilization westward, coming across the plains with 
ox-teams ere the thought of construction a trans- 
continental railway had been conceived. With his 
brother pioneers he labored with pickaxe and 
shovel, and as a miner met with encouraging 
success. On retiring from that occupation he 
located in San Francisco, where he resided un- 
til his death. He married ^Nlary Flanagan, who 
survives him, and is now living in Alameda. 
She bore him eight children, three of whom are 
living, Charles J. being the second child. 

Having completed the studies of the public 
schools of San Francisco, Charles J. Murphy 
was graduated from a commercial college, and 
soon after that event began the battle of life for 
himself. Locating in Hueneme in 1896, he ob- 
tained a position as clerk in the store of Lehman 
& \'\'aterman, and while there obtained an ex- 
cellent knowledge of mercantile pursuits. When 
the firm removed to Oxnard Mr. Murphy came 
also, and for some time thereafter had charge of 
its hardware department. Resigning his clerk- 
ship in November, 1904, he, in partnership with 
I\Ir. Weill, started in business for himself, open- 
ing a store on Fifth street, in the ^^laulhardt 
building. Stocking his establishment with a fine 
assortment of groceries, both staple and fancy, 
and opening a men's furnishing goods depart- 
ment, he has since built up a most satisfactory 
business, his patronage being large and remuner- 
ative. 

November 15, 1905, in Oxnard, Mr. Murphy 
married Katherine Wilson, who was born in 
Hueneme, a daughter of U. S. Wilson, now a 
residence of Oxnard. Politically Mr. Murphy is 
a stanch Democrat, and fraternally he is a mem- 
ber of Santa Barbara Lodge No. 613, B. P. O. E., 
and of Oxnard Lodge No. 750, K. of C. 



MORGAN R. WATKINS. Conspicuous 
among the California pioneers who have so ably 
assisted in developing both the mining and agri- 
cultural resources of this state is Morgan R. Wat- 
kins, a prosperous farmer, living near Mesa 
Grande. His ranch is under a good state of cul- 
tivation and well improved, the buildings being 
of a neat and substantial character, betokening 
the thrift and wise management of the owner. 
Like many others of our most respected and 
successful citizens, he was born and reared in a 
foreign land, his birth having occurred, Decem- 
ber 26, 184c;, in South Wales. His parents, 
David and Elizabeth (Rosser) Watkins, were 



life-long residents of Wales, where the father was 
a well-known carpenter and contractor. They 
were people of stanch integrity, highly esteemed 
for their many excellent qualities of mind and 
heart, and were faithful members of the Inde- 
pendent Congregational Church. They reared 
a family of five children, all of whom left their 
native country when ready to settle in life, locat- 
ing in America. One son. David F. Watkins, 
was for thirtv-tliree years a missionary in Mexico 
and later was similarly engaged in South Amer- 
ica. Another son. Rev. Thomas R. Watkins, was 
a leader of the Labor Union in Pennsylvania. 

Immigrating to the Cnited States in 1865, 
^Morgan R. Watkins spent a short time in New 
York City, and then went to Pennsylvania, 
where he followed the trade he had learned in 
Wales, working in the mines as an underground 
carpenter. From there, having in the mean time 
visited his old home and friends in Wales, Mr. 
Watkins came to the Pacific coast, arriving in 
San Francisco in 1868. Resuming his former 
work, he was a foreman in the mines for a num- 
ber of years, being thus employed in Plumas, 
Butte and Nevada and Placer counties. His health 
failing he went first to Mendocino, then to San 
Diego, and thence to Mexico, where for about 
a year he had charge of a mine. Returning to 
San Diego county he purchased his present ranch 
which is advantageously located near Mesa 
(jrande, and has since been actively and suc- 
cessfully engaged in general farming, including 
stock raising. He pays some attention to the 
raising of fruit, having a productive apple or- 
chard, which yields him excellent harvests. He 
has met with good success in his agricultural 
labors, and as a man and a citizen is held in high 
respect throughout the community, his integri- 
ty and other sterling qualities being everywhere 
recognized. 

In 1872 Mr. Watkins married Mar\^ Brier, who 
was born in Santa Cruz, Cal. One year prior to 
her marriage she taught school and for twelve 
years afterwards she taught an Indian school. Her 
father. Rev. James Brier, was born October 14, 
1814, in Dayton, Ohio, of Scotch and Frencli 
ancestry. In 1839 he married Juliet Wells, a 
woman of great strength of character and much 
force of will. Several years later Air, Brier 
accompanied by his wife and three small child- 
ren, started across the plains, Mrs, Brier being 
the only woman in the company of Jay Hawkers. 
After spending six weeks in Salt Lake City the 
party were forced to push onward to California 
under Mormon guides, who deserted them upon 
arriving at Death Valley. They suffered untold 
privations, and twenty-eight of the band died of 
starvation. The survivors burned their wagons 
for fuel and in the weeks that followed their 
only food consisted of the hides of cattle, Lo- 



1178 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



eating in Los Angeltes Mr. Brier became active 
in his ministerial labors, and founded the first 
Methodist Episcopal Church established in that 
town. During his later 3ears he removed to 
San Joaquin county and made his home there 
until his death, in 1897. He was very active in 
political affairs, and as a stanch supporter of the 
Republican party stumped the state for Lincoln, 
Grant, Garfield, Blaine and Harrison, acquiring 
a wide reputation as a gifted orator, and being 
aptly called "The Old Man Eloquent." His 
wife survived him, and is still living, being an 
active woman of ninety-three years. She bore 
him six children, four of whom survive. 

Of the union of iNIr. and Mrs. \\'atkins two 
children have been born, namely : Arthur S., 
who has a fine ranch of five hundred acres ad- 
joining his father's farm, and Juliet. Politically 
Mr. Watkins is a Socialist. Religiously he is a 
Congregationalist, and ]\Irs. Watkins is an Epis- 
copalian. 



GASTON JEAN GILLY. As a general mer- 
chant Gaston J. Gilly is located in Puente and 
carrying on a business enterprise in partnership 
with J. Faure, the firm name being Gilly & Faure. 
Mr. Gilly is a native Californian, his birth having 
occurred in San Francisco January 20, 1867. 
His father, Joseph Gilly, was a native of Haute- 
Marne, France, and a tailor by trade. He came 
to America in 1866, crossing the Isthmus of 
Panama, thence by steamer to San Francisco, 
where he engaged as a merchant tailor. In 1883 
he located in Los Angeles, where he followed his 
trade until his death, which occurred January 
12, 1905, at the age of sixty-three years. His 
wife died in San Francisco in 1873. The parent- 
al family comprise four children, all of whom 
are living, the eldest being Gaston Jean Gilly. 
He was taken to France in 1877 and there edu- 
cated in the public schools, after which, in 1883, 
he returned to San Francisco and engaged as 
a compositor on the Courier, a French publica- 
tion. Six months after his father's removal to 
Los Angeles he also went there and immediately 
took up the study of bookkeeping in a night 
school. In the meantime he continued in a job 
printing office, working for a Mr. McBride, later 
was employed on the old Los Angeles Ez'ening 
Express, then on the Herald, and finally on the 
Los Angeles Progress, a French publication. He 
remained with this last named paper for three 
years, a part of the time as its manager. He 
then quit the newspaper business and entered the 
employ of G. L. Mesnager & Co.. as traveling 
salesman, his territory being Southern Califor- 
nia. Four years later he gave up this work and 
engaged as a clerk in Los Angeles and vicinity, 
until September, 1898. when, in partnership with 



J. Faure, he established the Puente store, where 
they now carry a full line of general merchandise 
while they also are large shippers of produce. 
The building which they occupy was put up by 
them in i8g8. Mr. Gilly is a member of the 
French Benevolent Society of Los Angeles, and 
politically is a stanch advocate of Republican 
principles. 



ULRIC T. COOK. The future of Califor- 
nia, as of any commonwealth, is based upon 
its 3'oung men, to whose enterprise, judgment 
and intelligence the prosperity of the country 
during the present century will be due, and 
from whose activity of mind and body will re- 
sult movements of inestimable value to the 
people. There are in San Diego county a 
large number of young men of unusual capa- 
bility, resourcefulness and discrimination, and 
among them mention may be made of Ulric T. 
Cook, who is engaged in the raising of grain 
and stock in the Sutherland valley and on 
Smith mountain and also owns an apiary of 
fifty colonies of bees. Not a little of his pros- 
perous outlook is due to the fact that he has 
the encouragement and active co-operation of 
his father, a practical farmer of long experi- 
ence, and still identified with the agricultural 
development of this county, where he and his 
son are farming upon an extensive scale. 

Los Angeles county is Mr. Cook'.s native lo- 
cality and May 22, 1879, the date of his birth. 
His parents, George and Hannah (Strong) 
Cook, were natives respectiveh' of Texas and 
Arkansas, and during the year 1868 became 
residents of Los Angeles county, Cal., having 
previously met and married in San Diego 
county. The family settled on Smith moun- 
tain when Ulric was 3'et a small child and he 
attended th.e common schools in that district. 
Upon starting out to earn his livelihood he 
formed a partnership with his father and they 
now own three hundred and twenty acres in 
Sutherland valley. The old homestead on 
Smith mountain has been sold, but the father 
now rents the place and continues to reside 
there, giving his attention to its management 
and the care of his stock, while the son is liv- 
ing on their farm in the Sutherland valley. 
Both are stanch Democrats in political views. 
At this writing the father holds offfce as dep- 
uty sheriff and the son is serving with efficien- 
cy in the position of school trustee. Before 
removing from Smith mountain Mr. Cook 
there married, February 7, 1899, Miss Annie 
L. Frye, a native of California, having been 
born near Santa Ana, and by the union they 
have four children, Ella May, Ethel Edith, 
Marian Rav and Lucile. 




^irT^. 



ISOAA^ 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1181 



CAPT. HAAIPTON P. SLOANE. The 
founder of the Sloane family in America came 
to this country from the north of Ireland and 
descended from ancestors driven from Scot- 
land at the time of the religious persecutions. 
The original immigrant, John Sloane, married 
Mary Scarborough and settled in Maryland, 
where their son, James, was born November 
i8, 1793. Two years later the family crossed 
the mountains into Kentucky and settled in 
the primitive Avilds of Bourbon county. From 
there in the spring of 1810 they removed to 
Ohio and settled in Highland count}', twenty- 
five miles north of the river of the same name, 
in the midst of a dense forest, where the most 
arduous application was necessary in order to 
clear and improve a farm. The family consist- 
ed of Lydia, Jane, James, Rachel, Abigail, 
Martha and John. The eldest son was a young 
man Avhen the call came for recruits to serve 
in the war of 1812 and he enlisted in Captain 
Wisby's Company, attached to Colonel Iveyes' 
Regiment. The raw recruits shouldered their 
flint-lock guns and marched on foot to San- 
dusky, Ohio, where they arrived about the 
time of the surrender of the British troops. 
Their services being no longer needed they 
were honorably discharged and returned 
home. 

The first marriage of James Sloane was sol- 
emnized in 1819 and united him with jNIiss 
Lacy Bell, who was a daughter of John and 
Mary Bell of Brown county. Two children 
were born of their union, namely : Eliza, April 
28, 1820 ; and John, who was born June 10, 

1821, and died August 20. 1822, the death of 
the wife and mother occurring October 18, 

1822. The second marriage of Mr. Sloane took 
place in August. 1823, and united him with 
Miss Nancy J. Pangborn, who was born in 
Kentucky August 10, 1803, and removed to 
Brown county. Ohio, at the age of sixteen 
years, accompanying her parerts, Hampton 
and Margaret Pangborn. She was a twin sis- 
ter of John L. Pangborn, and these two with 
their older brother, Samuel, formed the fam- 
ily. Always an apt scholar, she developed a 
reasoning brain and bright mind, and was al- 
ways eager to help forward movements for 
Lhe upbuilding of the race. In the early days 
of the temperance movement, when it was un- 
popular with many, she espoused the cause, 
as she did also the anti-slavery movement. 
At the opening of the Civil war she gave her 
sons her benediction as they entered the Union 
army. For more than sixty years she was an 
earnest Christian and during the last twen- 
ty-five years of her life she held membership 
with the Congregational Church. Her hus- 
band, also, after having been long a Methodist. 



united with the Congregational Church after 
the close of the Civil war and continued in that 
denomination as long as he lived. Of their 
union the following children were born : 
Hampton P., whose name introduces this nar- 
rative and who was born in Highland coun- 
ty, Ohio, May 10, 1824: Marinda B., October 
24, 1825; Margaret, July 4, 1827; Samuel P., 
July 17, 1829; Josephj born April 23, 1832, 
and deceased in infancy ; Jane, born May 7, 
1833; Sarah Annie, March 22, 1835; Lacy 
Lucky, May 12, 1838; !\Iartha Elizabeth, Jan- 
uary 26, 1841 ; and Ouincy Adams, September 
17, 1843. All of the children were born and 
reared on the Highland count}' farm and it was 
the pri\ilege of their parents to see them all 
(excepting Joseph) educated and settled in life, 
all honoring their parents by lives of virtue and 
uprightness. 

After a continuous residence of forty years 
in Ohio James Sloane removed to Illinois and 
settled in Rockford, where his eldest son had 
gone the preceding year. In 1864 he removed 
10 Cedar Falls, Iowa, but the rigorous winters 
of that latitude caused him in 1868 to remove 
to Missouri, where he settled at Windsor, 
Henry county. In 1877 he went to Sedalia to 
be nearer his children, several of whom lived 
in or near that city. August 21, 1873. he and 
his wife celebrated their golden wedding and 
on that auspicious occasion they were the re- 
cipients of the congratulations of their chil- 
dren and their many friends. In life they were 
companions for sixty-two years : in death they 
were not long divided. His death occurred 
at Sedalia, Mo.. October 24. 1885, and she 
passed away April 19, 1886. The funeral serv- 
ices of both were conducted by Rev. J. G. 
Bailey, an old friend of the family, and the 
bodies of both rest side by side in the beau- 
tiful cemetery adjoining Sedalia. 

The eldest son of this honored couple was 
Hampton P. Sloane, justice of the peace and 
an influential citizen of Ramona. San Diego 
county, Cai. Educated in the common schools 
and Hillsboro Academy in Ohio, he took up 
agriculture as his chosen occupation and re- 
mained in Ohio until 1850, when he spent a 
short time in .St. Paul and Minneapolis dur- 
ing the period that Governor Ramsey was the 
executive head of the then territory. Later he 
removed to Illinois, wliich then had only forty 
miles of railroad in the entire state. Settling 
near Rockford he engaged in farm pursuits and 
acted as assistant editor of the farmer's de- 
partment of the Rockford Rc_(;istcr. also took 
a prominent part in establishing the Winne- 
bago County Agricultural Society, one of the 
first organizations of the kind in the state. Of 
tliis he served as president for two years. Au- 



1182 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



gust 1 8, 1862, he assisted in raising Company 
C, Sevent3'-{omth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, 
of which he was chosen captain and with 
which he proceeded from Camp Fuller to Lou- 
isville, Ky. After taking part in the battles 
of Perryville and Stone river he fell ill with 
typhoid fever while the army was at winter 
quarters on the Stone river, and his illness 
was of a nature so serious as to oblige him to 
resign his commission. Returning home he 
speiit some months in regaining his health and 
in 1864 removed to Cedar Falls. Iowa, where 
he engaged in agricultural and horticultural 
pursuits." During the year 1867 he removed 
to the vicinity of Sedal'ia, Mo., and bought a 
tract of land in Johnson county. The Civil 
war had left the locality in a disrupted state 
and there was much need of conservative citi- 
zenship in order to bring order out of chaos. 
School had been closed and school districts 
disbanded, and the county court appointed him 
school director v^•ith the difficult task of re- 
establishing the schools and restoring them 
to usefulness. In this work he was signally 
successful. 

The county court in 1868 appointed Cap- 
tain Sloane justice of the peace. While fill- 
ing the office he gave the right of franchise to 
sixty Confederate soldiers and at the office 
where they registered three clerks were sta- 
tioned to aid them in the enforcing of their 
rights, these clerks being provided with wea- 
pons. In 1874 he took a four-year contract to 
convey the United States mail from Lamar to 
Carthage. Wo., and for this purpose he had a 
line of stages and six horses, which enabled 
him to make the round trip daily. At the ex- 
piration of his contract in 1878 he became re- 
porter and assistant editor of the Carthage 
Banner, with which he was connected for four 
years. In 1884 he removed to Washington 
county. Ark., and took up a soldier's home- 
stead, which he improved and on which he 
planted an orchard of varied fruits. Selling 
out the farm in 1890 he came to California and 
settled in the Sweetwater valley, but five years 
later he removed to Ramona and bought a 
ranch near town which he has since sold. 
Since 1901 he has held office as justice of the 
peace and also he has been more or less iden- 
tified with local real-estate transfers. Follow- 
ing in the example of his parents, he ever has 
been loyal to tlic cause of Christianity and has 
been steadfast in his allegiance to the Con- 
gregational Church. From the organization of 
the Republican party to the present time he 
has been a loyal supporter of its principles 
and a contributor to its local successes. He 
cast his first presidential vote for Martin Van 



Buren in 1S48. Fraternally he holds member- 
ship with the Grand Army of the Republic at 
San Diego. 

The first marriage of Captain Sloane was 
solemnized in Ohio in 1848 and united him 
with Adeline Grandgirard, who was born in 
France and died in Illinois in 1856 at the age 
cf twenty-six years. Three children were 
born of their union, namely. John, who died 
in California in 1889, at the age of forty years; 
Charles, who died in infancy ; and William A., 
member of the law firm of Luce, Sloane & 
Luce of San Diego and justice of the police 
court at San Diego. After the death of his 
first wife Captain Sloane was married in Illi- 
nois to Delia Gripen, a native of New York 
state. They became the parents of nine chil- 
dren of whom seven are living, namely: 
Charles, who is engaged in the real-estate 
business in San Diego; Ada. wife of Louis 
Kunkler of Missouri ; Samuel, living at Dehesa, 
San Diego county, Cal. ; Lydia, wife of Jo- 
seph Stockton, a resident of Ramona ; James, 
whose home is near Prescott. Ariz. ; Nannie, 
Mrs. A. H. Sheldon, of El Cajon ; and Bessie, 
whose husband, Charles A, Merritt, has charge 
of the electric light and power plant at Santa 
Barbara. 



ERNEST A. PETTIJOHN. The growth' 
of a city depends upon its leading men. When 
they are of stable character, energetic in busi- 
ness, strong principled and clean in private 
life there need be no fear of the stability, 
strength, and influence of the municipality. And 
when a city is so fortunate as to have had a 
man of this character and one who possessed 
the true public spirit as its municipal head for a 
long period of years that city is bound, as time 
passes, to continue to reflect the qualities borne 
into it and bequeathed to it by that head. The 
city of Colton, San Bernardino county, has 
been thus fortunate in the person of the late 
Ernest A. Pettijohn, who not only filled its 
mayor's chair for fourteen years, but at the 
same time occupied other influential positions 
in its official circles and was most active in ev- 
ery movement for the development and prog- 
ress of the community. 

The Pettijohn family was among the oldest 
pioneers of Illinois and the homestead in 
Schuyler county which came to them by a grant 
from President Monroe is still owned by "their 
descendants. It was on this homestead that 
Ernest A. Pettijohn was born December 3, 
1861. When he was but five years of age his 
parents removed to Missouri, and there the son 
received his early education and attended 
Dniry College at Springfield. His ambition 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1183 



from early boyhood had been to go west, and 
accordingly, after his school work was com- 
pleted he started out, locating first in Mexico, 
where he engaged in mining, and later contin- 
uing operations in Arizona, meeting with suc- 
cess at both places. In 1887 he came with his 
mother and sister Mary (now Mrs. Frederic 
W. Wessel to Colton. Mrs. Wessel is now the 
only surviving member of the Pettijohn family, 
the mother's death having occurred at Colton 
about three years ago. The first years while in 
Colton Mr. Pettijohn was engaged in the shoe 
business and subsequently until the time of his 
death was occupied as an orange grower. In 
1896 he was married to Miss Ada Robinson, a 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. DeVillo Robinson, 
well known residents of Colton. They became 
the parents of four children, of whom one son 
and one daughter now survive. 

Public affairs and politics always received a 
large share of Mr. Pettijohn's interests and he 
was for a number of 3'ears president of the lo- 
cal Republican club, a member of the county- 
central committee, and in 1904 he was the pre- 
siding officer of the Republican county con- 
vention. He was a charter member of the Col- 
ton fire department, served as a member of the 
board of city trustees for sixteen years, and 
was president of that body the greater part of 
the time. His fellow citizens were desirous of 
heaping further honors upon him, but he re- 
fused to become a candidate for the state as- 
sembly at their urging, and also declined to 
longer occupy a place on the board of trustees. 
He was devoted to his home and family and an 
active worker in the Presbyterian Church of 
Colton. contributing liberally to its support and 
that of every charitable cause which he be- 
lieved worthv. Fraternallv he was a member 
of Ashlar Lodge No. 306, F. & A. M., at Colton, 
and of the Foresters. Personally his character 
was without blemish and the motto which gov- 
erned his life is foimd in that beautiful admoni- 
tion in Thanatopsis : 

"So live that when thy summons come to join 
The innumerable caravan which moves 
To that mysterious realm where each shall 

take 
His chamber in the silent halls of death, 
Thou go not like t!ie quarry slave at night, 
Scourged to his dungeon : but, sustained and 

soothed 
By an unfaltering trust, approach thy grave 
Like one who wraps the drapery of his couch 
About him and lies down to pleasant dreams." 
His death, which occurred ]\Iarch 29, 1906, 
removed a faithful public servant, an upright 
citizen, and a tireless worker for the good of 
his citv. 



CHARLES F. ALLEN. As an inventive 
genius Charles F. Allen, the lighthouse keeper 
at Point Hueneme, Cal., has to his credit many 
important inventions which have been of great 
value in simplifying numerous mechanical pro- 
cesses in different lines of work. He was born 
October 7, 1867, near Cleveland, Ohio, of Eng- 
lish-American parentage. His father, Charles 
D. Allen, was born in England and located 
with his parents near Cleveland, Ohio, when 
eight years of age. For some 3'ears he was en- 
gaged in the lumber and buggy supply business 
there, later settling near Garrettsville, same 
state, where he became a farmer, and is still 
living at the age of seventy-two years. He did 
militars- service in the Civil war, serving six 
months with an Ohio regiment as contract 
teamster for the war department. The mother, 
who was Martha D. Bond before her marriage, 
was a native of Ohio. Her grandfather was one 
of the founders of Cleveland, he having erected 
ihe second log cabin there. Mrs. Allen died 
when her son Charles F. was a child of eighteen 
months. There were two children, but he is the 
only one now living. His boyhood days were 
spent on his father .farm near Garrettsville, 
where he received his education in the district 
and high schools. When seventeen years old 
he went to Akron and apprenticed himself to 
AVebster, Camp & Lane, manufacturers of min- 
ing, hoisting and potter}' machiner\', and spent 
two years and nine months with them learning 
ihe machinist's trade. 

In 1887 Mr. Allen came to California and lo- 
cated in San Diego, following his trade there 
for a time, and later in Los Angeles and Fres- 
no. In the latter city he was machinist for the 
Fresno Canal Company for fifteen months, hav- 
ing charge of the installation of all of their min- 
ing machinery for the Providence and Rich- 
mond mine, which they owned. He also con- 
structed the cells for the Fresno jail, which was 
then in course of construction. After the com- 
pletion of this work he went to San Francisco, 
where he was employed as machinist by the 
Central Alaska Company, by R. T. Ward at the 
Horse Fly mines and by the Sutter Street Rail- 
way Company, remaining with each about one 
year. In 1892 he entered the United States 
lighthouse sen-ice, his first position being as- 
sistant keeper at the Humbolt lighthouse, re- 
maining at that place until 1894, when he was 
appointed keeper at Point Hueneme. Under 
his management this lighthouse has been im- 
proved and now has a flashlight, as well as be- 
ing fitted with an electrical telltale appliance 
that times the machinery and tells if it stops. In 
adopting this invention of Mr. Allen's, which 
costs only $16. the government is using it to 



1184 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



replace one which cost about $250, and in addi- 
tion to the saving in cost it is considered a 
much superior attachn.ient. .'Vmong other nie- 

. chanical improvements which Mr. Allen has 
invented and patented are a beet plow, a steam 
turbine, an ore crusher, an amalgamator, a con- 
centrator, an improved drive well, improve- 
ments on driving gears, for automobiles, a wa- 
ter wheel superior to others in use, a new steel- 
clad pneumatic automobile tire, and improve- 
ments on bicycles and automobiles, as well as 
numberless other smaller inventions. He is al- 
ways at work on some mechanical contrivance 
to facilitate the running of labor-saving ma- 
chinery. 

In his home life Mr. Allen is fortunate, his 
marriage uniting him with ]\Iiss Anna H. Fran- 
cis, a native of San Francisco and the daughter 
of Capt. Samuel Francis. The latter, who came 
to California in 1849, was for many j'ears in the 
lighthouse service and was keeper of the Unit- 
ed States government supply station at Goat 
Island at the time of his death. Mr. and Mrs. 
Allen are the parents of two daughters. May 
and Melba. Fraternally Mr. Allen affiliates 
with Hueneme Camp, M. W. A., and has served 
in the capacity of clerk ever since its organiza- 
tion five years ago. He is also a member of 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows Lodge 
at Oxnard. The devotion of Mr. Allen to his 
official duties and the mechanical work in 
which he is so intensely interested does not pre- 
vent him from being an active participant in 
matters of public interest and he is an influen- 
tial citizen of the community in which he re- 
sides, wherein he is held in the highest respect 
and esteem. 



ALEXANDER DALLAS. The fact that Mr. 
Dallas retains but an indistinct recollection of 
his birthplace, the Island of Islay, in the high- 
lands of Scotland, is due to his departure from 
that home in early childhood and his removal 
across the ocean to the new world. \Vhile re- 
taining but a fleeting memory of the country, 
he displays in his character and rugged per- 
sonality the sturdy traits for which the Scotch 
race is noted the world over, and a stranger 
would not hesitate in classing him among the 
natives of the land of the heather. However, 
the greater part of his life has been passed in 
the United States, whither he came with his 
parents, William and Rachel (McTaggart) 
Dallas, natives of Scotland. Born in the high- 
lands on the ancestral homestead January 8, 1836, 
he was six years of age when the family settled 
in Greene county, Ala., his father embarking in 
the growing of cotton and owning twenty negro 
slaves. There the mother died in 1848, at the 



age of thirty-five years, and the father in 1862, 
when sixty years of age. 

The private schools of Alabama furnished 
Alexander Dallas with fair educational advan- 
tages, and the years of youth passed unevent- 
fully in study and recreation. The year that 
marked the change from youth to manhood was 
1856, when he was twenty, for at that time he 
bade farewell to family and friends and started 
out to seek his own livelihood. With three 
friends, the eldest of whom was twenty-five, 
while he was the youngest, he started on horse- 
back for the far west. With the aid of pack- 
mules he crossed the desert and the plains, and 
finally arrived in Los Angeles via Salt Lake at 
the close of an uneventful trip completed in 
only three months from the time of starting. 
Shortly after his arrival he mined on the Frazer 
river, but his first important work was that of 
cutting pile in the San Fernando canyon to be 
used in building the first wharf at San Pedro. On 
completing that work he bought six team of oxen 
and made a contract with the government (which 
General Hancock represented) to haul freight 
from San Pedro to Fort Tejon, in which employ- 
ment he continued for three years. 

On leaving the government service Mr. Dallas 
engaged in farming, rented land at El Monte. 
Three years later he bought a tract forming a 
portion of San Antonio ranch, which was one 
of the first cut and sold in small holdings. The 
land was situated eight miles east of Los Angeles 
and there he continued for eight years. On 
selling the property he removed to Arizona and 
engaged in freighting to the mines for six years. 
On his return to California he settled in Los An- 
geles and for ten years engaged in grading 
streets, a work of great importance and one in 
which he proved himself trustworthy and capa- 
ble. The year 1890 found him in Redlands, 
where he secured employment in making reser- 
voirs for the Domestic Water Company, and at 
the same time he did grading for the Bear Vallev 
Water Company. When he had completed the 
grading he sold the teams. The next venture in 
which he became interested was the making of 
ditches in Moreno valley for the Bear ^^alIey 
Company, in whose employ he had charge of dig- 
ging and filling with pipe lines fiftv miles of 
ditches. When that contract had been filled he 
opened a general store at Moreno and also for 
ten years held the office of postmaster. Since 
selling the store in November, 1905, he has lived 
retired from business cares. Included in his pos- 
sessions are ten town lots in Moreno, his home 
town, as well as forty acres of farm land in the 
vicinity. 

The marriage of Mr. Dallas was solemnized 
at El Monte, this state, in 1861, and united him 
with Jane Whiteman, a native of Texas, who died 




/j^^:2--^i.t>ui^ /^^ /^cy^^^i^^.^ 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1187 



ill 1881, at the age of forty years. Five children 
were bom of their union, namely : James, who 
is engaged in the printing business in Los An- 
geles ; Annie, who married George Williams and 
lives in Shasta county, Cal. ; Peter A., who con- 
ducts a general store at Redlands Junction ; Ray- 
mond, living in San Bernardino county, and 
Louis, whom death removed from the family cir- 
cle at the age of three years. In political views 
Mr. Dallas has been a stanch believer in Demo- 
cratic principles ever since boyhood ; reared in the 
south, he imbibed the southern spirit and a strong 
faith in its institutions. As a rule he has de- 
clined offices, but he made an exception since 
coming to Riverside county, and for four years 
filled the position of justice of the peace, in which 
office he proved himself familiar with the law and 
an impartial exponent of its teachings. 



BENJAMIN B. HIGGINS. For upwards of 
thirty years a resident of San Diego county, Ben- 
jamin B. Higgins, of Bonsall, is noted as one of 
its most valued citizens, resolute, energetic and 
enterprising, and one who has made his mark- 
in the building up of the township in which he 
resides, both socially and financially. He is en- 
gaged in general agriculture, to which he de- 
votes his whole attention, and is meeting with un- 
bounded success in his undertakings. A native 
of Oregon, he was born in Polk county, Au- 
gust 27, 1856, a son of the late Hiram Higgins. 

Born in Illinois, Hiram Higgins was brought 
up on a farm, and when old enough to start in 
life em'barked in agricultural pursuits. He sub- 
sequently resided for a few years in Missouri, 
and while there traded extensively in Mexico. 
Crossing the plains with ox teams in 1849, he 
arrived in California after a long and dangerous 
trip, and for awhile tried mining. He subse- 
quently went to Polk county. Ore., where he 
cleared a ranch from the wild land, upon which 
he made his home until locating once more in 
California. Having purchased land near Comp- 
ton he located upon it in 1867 and continued in 
his chosen occupation. About 1875 he entered 
the land now included in the present home ranch 
of his son Benjamin, and established an apiary, 
which he managed successfully for some vears. 
He married Malinda Derben, a native of Mis- 
souri, and of the eleven children, seven sons and 
four daughters, born of their union, ten are liv- 
ing, the oldest child being now sixty years of 
a2;e. Both parents united with the Christian 
Church when young, and the mother, who resides 
in Compton, in one of its most faithful and con- 
sistent adherents. 

When four years of age Benjamin B. HTggins 
came with the family to Southern California, and 
for al)nut seven vears lived in Los Angeles, where 



he laid the foundation for his future education. 
In 1867 the family removed to Compton, where 
he attended the graded schools, completing the 
full course of instruction. Coming with his 
father to Bonsall in 1875 he assisted him in start- 
ing an apiary, and for many years carried on an 
extensive business in bee farming, having on an 
average about one hundred and fifty colonies of 
bees, one season this number being increased to 
four hundred colonies. In 1889 Mr. Higgins 
bought from his father this ranch of one hundred 
and sixty acres, and has since devrited himself to 
general farming, including the raising of grain, 
beans, walnuts and peaches. He raises good 
crops, and as an agriculturist is exceedingly pros- 
perous, fortune smiling on all of his ventures. 
He also has a French Percheron stallion for 
breeding purposes. 

In 1879 Ml'- Higgins married Laura Combs, 
and they became the parents of six children, 
namely: Alfred A., of Bonsall: Frances, wife of 
Augustus Culp, of Oceanside : Lizzie, wife of 
Charles Trotter, of Oceanside : Elon, living at 
home; Benjamin, at home, and Mary, at home. 
In 1903 Mr. Higgins was again married, Sadie 
Kitching becoming his wife. Politicallv Mr. 
Higgins is identified with the Detuocratic party, 
and although not an aspirant for public office 
has long served as school trustee, for fifteen 
years being clerk of the board. Fraternally he 
is a member of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. 



JAMES BRO^^•X WATSON. Situated at 
the foot of the San Bernardino mountains, six 
and one-half miles from the city of that name 
and along the route of Highland free delivery 
No. 2, may be seen the well-improved home- 
stead owned and occupied by Mr. Watson, 
and brought by him to its present high state 
of improvement since he acquired the land by 
purchase in 1893. Immediately after buying 
the property he built a residence and barn 
and established his home on the tract. At that 
time the land was in its wild state, no attempt 
having been made at improvement, but un- 
der his energetic labors a transformation soon 
was effected. Owing to the adaptability of 
the soil to fruit, he has made horticulture his 
specialt}'. Shortly after coming here he plant- 
ed seed of various fruits, and now has one of 
the finest orcliards in the locality. The thir- 
teen acres are in navel oranges, lemons and 
grape fruit, as well as deciduous trees of the 
best varieties. Through using great care with 
the trees, some of which have their original 
tops and some have been budded twice, he has 
made his grove one of the most productive in 



1188 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



the vicinity and the fruit finds a ready sale at 
the highest market prices. 

During the early years of his life Mr. Wat- 
son was a resident of Missouri, born in Ray 
county, July 31, 1859, his parents being James 
and Rebecca (Ragan) Watson, natives of 
Kentucky and England. Educated in com- 
mon schools, the knowledge he now possesses 
has been acquired by close observation and 
careful reading rather than from early train- 
ing in school. On starting out to earn his 
own way in the world he took up agricultural 
pursuits and continued to reside in Missouri 
until he was twenty-one years of age. On 
leaving that portion of the country he came to 
California, landing at Riverside in September, 
1880, and seeming employment in that town, 
where soon he acquired a practical knowledge 
of orange culture. In the spring of 1888 he 
removed from Riverside to Highland district, 
where since he has made his home and en- 
gaged in fruit-raising with energy and grati- 
fying success. 

In all of his work Mr. Watson has been 
aided by the co-operation of his amiable wife, 
who was Elsie R. Hill, a native of Des Moines 
county, Iowa, and a daughter of William and 
Mary (Banta) Elill. Their home is brightened 
by the presence of three children, Viola, James 
Ro}^ and AI. Adele, who are attractive and 
promising children, and to whom will be 
given the best educational advantages the dis- 
trict affords. Tv^^o daughters have been taken 
from the home by death. Mary Rebecca was 
two years of age when she passed from earth 
June 9, 1899, and Lois was three years and 
five months old when the home was bereaved 
of her presence on Christmas day of 1904. 
Among their neighbors Mr. and Mrs. Watson 
are esteemed for the qualities of mind and 
heart that have won them friends in large 
numbers and given them a high social stand- 
ing; in the communitv. 



JOSIAH ALKIRE. The life which this 
narrative sketches began on Christmas Day 
of 1818, in Williamsport, Ohio, and closed at 
Kenoak, in Pomona, Cal., February 4, 1895. 
Between these two dates is the epitome of 
a career that was busy, useful and successful. 
Wherever duty called him he performed well 
his part, and the prosperity that came to him 
was directly attributable to his wise judgment 
and tireless activity. With a record of over 
forty years to his credit as a wholesale mer- 
chant in St. Louis, Mo., he came to Pomona 
in 1890 and settled down on a part of the 
famous old Palomares rancho, upon which 
was located the old adobe house erected by 



Tomas Palomares in 1840 for a family resi- 
dence. It served the purpose for which it 
was originalhr built and later became the wel- 
come half-way liouse for travelers, this in the 
early days being the principal hotel between 
San Bernardino and Los Angeles. Another 
incident worth}' of note in connection with 
this historic relic of other days is the fact 
that the first school in Pomona valley was 
held in the east room and was taught by C. 
B. Towner. When Mr. Alkire took posses- 
sion of the property in 1890 he reset the 
orchard to navel oranges and laid out the 
grounds into a beautiful park. The old adobe 
house was remodelled and replastered and put 
in excellent repair throughout, and today 
Kenoak, as the homestead is called, stands as 
a model of comfort and completeness. 

Josiah Alkire was a son of Rev. George Al- 
kire, a minister in the Christian denomina- 
tion. Up to the year 1840 he filled pulpits in 
various parts of Ohio, but in that year re- 
moved to central Illinois, where during the 
remainder of his life he went about doing good 
and fulfilling his mission as a minister of 
the Gospel. In all of his work he had the 
sj'mpathy and co-operation of his wife, who 
was in maidenhood Katie Rush. In the primi- 
tive schools that prevailed in Ohio prior to 
1840 Josiah Alkire gained such knowledge as 
the equally primitive teachers were able to 
furnish, but notwithstanding the difficulties 
under which he labored he made the most of 
his meagre opportunities and laid by a larger 
fund of information than the less ambitious 
students. In 1849 lie set out for the gold 
fields of California. The records do not state 
with what success he met as a miner, but 
it is known that he returned east soon after- 
ward and that he made a similar trip across 
the plains three years later, in 1852. In the 
fall of that year, however, he returned east 
as far as St. Louis, Mo., where he established 
him.self in the wholesale grocery business. 
From unpretentious beginnings the business 
grew and prospered with the passing of years, 
until he commanded a trade that extended 
over a wide radius, shipping goods to points 
along the Mississippi, Illinois, Missouri and 
Red rivers. He became an important factor 
in the business circles of St. Louis, where he 
had gained a record for uprightness and in- 
tegrity, and his removal to the west in 1890 
was deeply deplored. It was not until three 
years later, however, that he finally disposed 
of his business in St. Louis and thus severed 
connections which had been sustained with 
mutual pleasure and profit to himself and his 
home city for over forty years. Purchasing 
thirteen acres of the Palomares rancho near 




J4^t2>/( St/^'^^ocUif^a^^ 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1191 



Pomona and adjoining Genesha Park, he re- 
modeled and improved the adobe residence and 
set the orchard to navel oranges exclusively, 
making the homestead one of the most delight- 
ful and restful spots in this part of Southern 
California. AJr. Alkire was not long spared 
to enjoy his new home, however, for his death 
occurred amid the surroundings which he had 
learned to love February 4. 1895. 

Near Pleasant I'lams, Sangamon county, 
111., in 1864, Josiah Alkire formed domestic 
ties b)r his marriage with Aliss Lydia Tomlin, 
the daughter of Almarine and Rhoda (Smith) 
Tomlin. During young womanhood Mrs. Al- 
kire attended the Illinois Woman's College at 
Jacksonville, from which institution she was 
■graduated. Two sons blessed the marriage of 
;\Ir. and Mrs. Alkire, Frank, who is a shoe 
merchant in Phoenix, Ariz., and George, who 
is engaged in the cattle business in the same 
place. 



JOSIAH W. IIUDSOX. The agricultur- 
ists of Los Angeles county ha\-e had in J. W. 
Hudson one of their most prominent and suc- 
cessful citizens, his enterprises in this section 
of Southern California extending over a period 
of a considerable number of j-ears. He is a 
native of New York, where his birth occurred 
in Oswego, February 18, 1844; his father, J. 
W. Hudson, was born and reared in Boston, 
rVIass., the representative of a distinguished 
family of that state, and he there learned the 
trade of cooper, which he followed until his 
death, which took place in Ohio in 1894, His 
wife was formerly Sarah F. "\A^ells, of Welsli 
ancestry, her birth occurring in Connecticut 
and her death in Ohio in 1892. They were the 
parents of the following children : .\marette, 
Amos, Lottie. ]\lar_v, Susan, Sarah, and Jo- 
siah W., of this review : of this family all are 
living except Amos and Lottie. 

Josiah W. Hudson was reared in his native 
state, receiving his education in the public 
schools up to the age of fourteen years, when 
he became dependent upon his own resources. 
After leaving home he drifted further west and 
in Iowa secured emjilc-ment in .\llamakee 
county. At the fir'^t tnp of the drum in 1861. 
however, every thought but that for his coun- 
try's need was put aside and he immediately 
enli.sted for the three months' service. The 
quota of men being obtained, he was not 
needed, but nothing daunted nor satisfied that 
he would not be needed in the future, he then 
enlisted in Company K, Fifth Regiment Iowa 
Infantry, for three vears, and participated in 
manv of the most important engagements of 
that historic struggle. He was in the battle 



of luka, Corinth, siege of Vicksburg, Cham- 
pion Hill, and after the surrender of Vicks- 
l)urg because of disability he was transferred 
to Company C, Fourth United States Veteran 
Reserves, and in this he served faithfully until 
his honorable discharge in 1864. 

Returning to civic life 'Sir. Hudson was lo- 
cated in Peoria, 111., and from that point in the 
spring of 1865 joined a party for the overland 
trip to the Pacific coast. He drove an ox- 
team across the plains to Virginia City via 
Salt Lake City, and the following year he 
drove oxen to ilontana. His first employ- 
ment in the west was as a miner, with other 
prospectors going to the Big Florn mountains, 
returning via Salt Lake City and afterward 
engaging in a venture in southern Utah. In 
the m.eantime he had come to Southern Cali- 
fornia and in the year 1867 he began spending 
h.is winters in Los Angeles county, while dur- 
ing the summers he engaged in mining in 
Montana, Idaho, Utah and Colorado. He met 
with success in his work, not because he never 
lost, but because he never let misfortime daunt 
him, but went perseveringly to the task again, 
and in the main was successful in his efforts. 

In November. 1870, Mr. Hudson was united 
in marriage with Miss A^ictoria R. Rowland, 
the youngest daughter of John Rowland, one 
of the earliest pioneers of Southern California, 
who with a partner secured a grant of many 
thousand acres of land, a large part of which 
afterward passed to his children. His marriage 
in an earlv day united him with a lovely daugh- 
ter of a Spanish settler. Subsequently Mr. 
Rowland was married to Mrs. drav and their 
daughter became the wife of Mr. Hudson. 

Mr. Hudson has over two thousand acres 
of fine land, upon which is the old Rowland 
homestead, the first brick house built in South- 
ern California. The bricks were burned on the 
old farm, the house being erected by Mr. Row- 
land in t85c;. This extensive acreage is used 
principally for grain and grazing purposes, one 
of Air. Hudson's interests being in the raising 
of horses. He has been ^-ery successful in this 
effort and has ncqnired a position among the 
citizen.s of the section who hold him in hisrh 
esteem for the ability, energy and industrv he 
has displayed in the management of his prop- 
crtv. Progressive in ever}- sense of the word, 
and liberal with his large means, no citizeiT is 
more depended upon to further important 
movements in the growth and development of 
this section. When the Salt Lake Railway 
were putting th?ir line through the country he 
donated two acres of land for what is now 
known as Hudson Station. Mr. Hudson has 
been an interested witness in the developiuent 
of the countr}- as well as an active participant. 



1192 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGR-APHICAL RECORD. 



he being the man to sink the first artesian well 
in Los Angeles count}-, and in many other 
ways assisted materially in the upbuilding of 
the community in which he makes his home. 

3ilr. and Mrs. Hudson are the parents of 
three children, namely : Rowland, Lillian and 
Josiah W., Jr. Fraternally ;\Ir. Hudson is 
connected with Pentalpha Lodge Xo. 202, F. 
& A. AI., in Los Angeles, and politically he 
is Independent. He is a member of the Pio- 
neers Society of Los Angeles County. He has 
always taken a special interest in educational 
affairs of the community and his school dis- 
trict, organized in 1888. was named Hudson 
district in his honor. ]\Ir. Hudson merits the 
position of esteem and respect he holds in the 
community, having won it by the qualities of 
manhood he has displayed during his long res- 
idence in Southern California. He is account- 
ed a helpful and practical citizen, a generous 
and loyal friend, and a man who seeks always 
to advance every influence toward the better- 
ment of the moral life of those about him. 



AIOSES ATWOOD FLINT. Shortly af- 
ter his removal to California in Ma}^ 1898, Mr. 
Flint bought ten acres of improved land 
(planted to vines, olives and citrus fruit) 
which formed the nucleus of his present prop- 
erty. Since then he has added to his hold- 
ings and now owns twenty-five acres. The 
cottage has been enlarged and other improve- 
ments made as the needs of the family de- 
manded or their inclination directed. ' The 
barn which still is in use was built by the 
Mormons who years ago took up the land from 
the government. 

The family of which ;\Ir. Flint is an hon- 
ored representative comes from New England 
ancestry, and he was born in Vermont, but 
passed tlie years of youth principally in New 
Hampshire, where for some time his parents. 
Rev. :Moses and Nancy fHovey) Flint, made 
their home. The best educational advantages 
were given him that the neighborhood aflford- 
ed. On the completion of a common-school 
course he was sent to an academy, where he 
fitted himself for the work of teaching, and af- 
terward for a long period he continued suc- 
cessfully as an educator in the east and in 
Towa. For twent3'-one years he lived in Iowa 
and followed his chosen calling with gratify- 
ing success, winning a position among the fore- 
most teachers of his locality. On retiring from 
the school-room to engage in outdoor activi- 
ties, he removed to California and since then 
has resided in San Bernardino county. 

The marriage of Mr. Flint was solemnized 
>rarch iy. t86i, and united him with Hannah 
Sophronia P.alch. a native of Grafton countv. 



N. H., and a daughter of Theodore and Sally 
CLovejoy) Balch. On both sides of the fam- 
ily her ancestors were identified v/ith the ear- 
ly history of our country. Both of her grand- 
fathers participated in the war of 1812, one 
enlisting from Hebron, Grafton county, and 
the other from Lyme, same county. The pa- 
triotic spirit characteristic of the famil)^ finds 
further proof in the fact that two of Mrs. 
Flint's brothers bore a brave part as Union 
soldiers in the Civil war, and were faithful in 
their allegiance to the cause from the time of 
their enlistment with a New Hampshire regi- 
ment until the expiration of their term of serv- 
ice. Six children were born to the union of 
^Ir. and j\Irs. Flint, namel}-: Edwin At- 
wood, who was born January 3, 1863, 
in NcAV Hampshire, and received his educa- 
tion in Iowa: Theodore Balch, wdio was born 
in Iowa November 28, 1865, and now resides 
in California : Sarah Elizabeth, who was born 
April 27, 1868, and is now the wife of David 
Scoville, of Decatur county, Kans. ; Levi Car- 
roll, who was born December 28, 1871, and 
died !March 5. 1876: ■Moses Deloss, who went 
to the Philippines as a soldier in the Spanish- 
Am.erican war and since the close of the war 
has rem.ained in ^[anila as a supervisor of 
teachers : and Emma Frances, who was born 
April 2y, 1877, and is now the wife of Daniel 
Ledford. of San Bernardino. 

The family are identified with the Baptist 
Church and in former years Mr. Flint officiat- 
ed as a deacon of his congregation. In fra- 
ternal relations he became affiliated with the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows many 
years ago and has retained his interest in that 
organization, besides being identified with the 
Masonic Order in the blue lodge. As a citi- 
zen he is always found on the side of meas- 
ures for the benefit of the people and for thf 
efficient training of the rising generation, 't 
being his belief that a thorough edncAtion is 
the best preparation for a successful life. 
Through all of his labors he has shown a 
thoughtful considc-ation for others and a spir- 
it of irnoartiality and justice most important 
to a teachc. In the quiet life of an orchardist, 
remote from the turbulent world of affairs, he 
finds abundant exercise as well as a keen pleas- 
ure in the improvement of the land, and after 
years of energetic application to educational 
work he enioys the chansre to his present oc- 
ciuintion with its nccomnanying activities. 



I'LYSSES F. RICHARDVTLLE. Having 
been left an orphan in his sixth year. Ulysses 
!■'. Richardville had a childhood lacking in the 
lender care of paren*:s. and from the age of 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1195 



eleven years was obliged to make his own way 
in the world. Armed only with a scanty com- 
mon school education, his two empty hands, 
and indomitable pluck and energy he has suc- 
ceeded in acquiring a good working education 
by careful and extensive reading, and accumu- 
lated considerable property, as well as attained 
a position of some prominence in his locality, 
where he is held in the highest esteem by all 
who have the pleasure of his acc^uaintance. 
The Richardville family is of French extrac- 
tion, the first members having come to Ameri- 
ca four hundred years ago. U. F. Richardville 
was born in February, 1868, in Knox county, 
Ind., the son of Peter and Ida (Cornpint) 
Richardville, both of whom were natives of 
Indiana. The father was a farmer in that 
state, his death occurring there April 30, 1874, 
at the age of thirty years; his wife died in 
1870, when twenty-five years old. From the 
time he was eleven years old until 1892 Mr. 
Richardville worked on farms by the month 
for Indiana farmers, and in that year he de- 
cided to seek wider opportunities in the west. 
Arriving in Redlands, Gal., he worked out for 
six months, and then started to ranch for him- 
self in Moreno, beginning necessarily in a 
small way. By the exercise of prudence and 
careful and economical business methods he 
was able gradually to add to his interests un- 
til now he is recognized as one of the lead- 
ing ranchmen in the valley. 

By his marriage in Yuma, Ariz., in July, 
1898, Mr. Richardville was united with Maggie 
Suey, a native of California, and they have 
one child, Myrtle May. Fraternally Mr. Rich- 
ardville is a member of Redlands Lodge No. 
343, I. O. O. F., and of Redlands Lodge No. 
583, B. P^ O. E. Politically he is a Republi- 
can. His home ranch comprises seven hun- 
dred acres of land which is devoted to the rais- 
ing of barley and the indications are that this 
(1906) year's crop will yield ten sacks per 
acre. Besides owning all of the machinery 
necessary to operate the ranch he also has 
fourteen head of stock horses. 



CORNELIUS R. SHORT. Prominent 
among the pioneer ranchers of Southern Cali- 
fornia is Cornelius Short, now a resident of 
Los Angeles county and engaged in ranching 
near Norwalk. He has witnessed the develop- 
ment of the state and participated in its up- 
building, enduring the hardships and priva- 
tions incident to pioneer life and now in the 
evening of his days he is privileged to enjoy 
the phenomenal progress of the western com- 
monwealth. His boyhood home was on the 
Atlantic coast, his birth having occurred De- 



cember 5. 1830, in Lewiston, Delaware. His 
parents, Stanley B. and Eliza (Clifton) Short, 
were natives respectively of Baltimore, Md., 
and Lewiston, Del., the maternal grandfather 
being a patriot in the war of 1812. The par- 
ents were farmers throughout their entire 
lives, removing to Missouri, where the mother 
died at the age of fifty-five years, and to Ore- 
gon in 1864, where the father died at seventy- 
eight. One of their sons served in the Mexican 
war under General Scott and was advanced to 
the rank of captain ; he died about two years 
after the war. The other three children are 
still surviving, a daughter living in Oregon at 
the age of seventy-eight, a son in AVashington 
at eighty-four, and Cornelius R. in California 
nearly seventy-seven. 

Cornelius R. Short received his education in 
the schools of Delaware county, Ohio, where 
the parents located in his childhood, and there 
he remained until nearly fifteen, when, in 1845, 
his parents removed to Missouri. He com- 
pleted his education in that state, after which 
he learned the trade of brick mason and 
worked at it for a time, finally engaging with 
Russell, J\Iajors and Waddell, who were em- 
ployed by the government in the delivery of 
freight to all frontier forts as far as Salt Lake 
Git)'-. In 1858 Mr. Short came as far west as 
Salt Lake City and there spent the winter at 
Camp Floyd, returning then to Missouri and 
the following }'ear crossing the plains to 
Placerville, Cal. From there he went on to 
Oregon, arriving Januar}' 6, i860, and became 
occupied in furnishing miners' supplies, and 
also conducted some personal mining enter- 
prises, and engaged in the butcher business. 
In 1869 he returned to California and near the 
present site of Santa Ana, Orange county, en- 
gaged in ranching and also had charge of a 
lumber yard. Later he engaged in the stock 
business and for seven years shipped stock 
from Arizona to Los Angeles ; finally selling 
out he came to his present place as manager of 
a ranch of one hundred and five acres of the 
Glassell estate, thirty-five acres being in bear- 
ing fruit, the balance in grain land. He has 
lived on this ranch for nineteen years and has 
made it a profitable investment for its owner. 
In 1875 Mr. Short married Floretta Houghton, 
a native of Texas, and their home is located at 
No. 528 South Eastlake avenue, Los Angeles, 
where he owns property. They have two chil- 
dren, Edna, wife of Fred Davis, of New York 
City; and Claude, who married Cora Hath- 
away, of Arizona. Mr. Short is identified fra- 
ternally with the Odd Fellows, and is a mem- 
ber of the Pioneer Society of Los Angeles 
county ; in political affiliations he is a stanch 



1196 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



adherent of Democratic principles and while a 
resident of Oregon was chosen by his party to 
the office of sheriff of Josephine county, hav- 
ing previously sen-ed for two terms as deputy 
sheriff. 



BENJAMIN FRANKLIN ]\IAXSON. An 
inheritance of sterling traits of character, have 
made the members .of the Maxson family able to 
take a place among the representative citizens 
of whatever section they have made their home. 
New England ancestry gave to their de- 
scendants name and character, later members 
locating in New York, where in Allegheny 
county, Abel ilaxson, a native of Rhode Isl- 
and, engaged as a farmer. Following the ex- 
ample of his Revolutionary sires he served in 
the war of 1812, participating in several im- 
portant engagements, among them Sacket's 
Harbor. Some time after the close of the war 
he removed to Dane county. Wis., where he 
made his home until his death, which oc- 
curred in his eightieth year. He married 
Abigail Lull, a native of New York, in which 
state her death occurred. They had six sons, 
namely: Mathew, a miner, located in El Mon- 
te, and the only son living; Schuyler and Ed- 
mund, who were killed during service in a 
New York regiment during the Civil war; 
William, who served as captain in a New 
York regiment in the Civil war; George, who 
served as major in a Georgia regiment, in the 
Confederate army: and Benjamin Franklin, 
the father of the subject of this review. 

Benjamin F. Maxson, Sr., also served in 
the Civil war, enlisting in Company K, Thir- 
teenth Wisconsin Infantry, and participated 
in many important engagements, principally 
in the middle west. His hearing was serious- 
ly impaired at the battle of Nashville by the 
concussion of a shell, which injury in after 
years resulted in deafness and caused his 
death ; while crossing the Southern Pacific 
tracks at Shorb he failed to hear the oncom- 
ing train and was struck and killed in May, 
1899. After the war he remained in Wiscon- 
sin until 1867, when he came to Colusa coun- 
ty, Cal., and engaged in farming for about 
eight years. Coming to Southern California 
in 1875 he located in Tustin and purchased a 
ranch, which he improved with an orange, 
lemon and walnut grove. In 1889, having 
sold his Tustin ranch, he came to El Alonte, 
where with P. F. Cogswell he purchased a 
tract of land and set out one of the first wal- 
nut groves in the Mountain View district. 
He improved about two hundred acres of 
land, and owned at the time of his death 
about one hundred and scventv acres, which 



was considered one of the best improved prop- 
erties in this section. He was not only active 
in his personal aft'airs, but maintained a cred- 
itable interest in all matters of public import, 
being particularly associated with education- 
al and religious work, and was instrumental 
in the building of schools and churches. He 
was a liberal and public-spirited man in ev- 
ery avenue of life and one who could always 
be counted upon to uphold public honor, 
either personally or by his vote. He was a 
Republican politically, while in religion he 
belonged to the Presbyterian Church. He had 
been associated for many years with the 
Grand Army of the Republic. His wife, for- 
merly Olive Merwin, was born near Genesee 
Falls, N. Y., a daughter of James Merwin, a 
farmer, who also removed to Wisconsin. Her 
mother was a Miss Babcock, the lineage of 
Avhose family can be traced back to John Al- 
den, of Pilgrim fame. Mrs. Maxson died in 
February, 1900, leaving a family of six chil- 
dren, of whom five are now living: Al3-ra, 
wife of A. C. Drake, of El Monte ; Annie, 
wife of Thomas R. McMichael, of El Monte; 
Benjamin Franklin Jr., of this review : Fay, 
Mrs. Neely, of Manila, Philippine Islands ; 
and Olive, of El Monte. 

Born in Tustin, Orange county, Cal., Alay 
15, 1879, Benjamin Franklin IMaxson, Jr., was 
reared on the paternal farm and educated in 
the public schools in youth; entering Pomona 
College, which course was interrupted by the 
death of his father. Returning home he gave 
his attention to the management of the home 
ranch, conducting its interests for two years, 
when he located in a twentj'-acre tract and 
engaged in the management of a walnut 
grove. In 1906 he sold out, and in the mean- 
time, having purchased other property which 
he had set out in walnuts and upon which 
in 1905 he had installed a pumping plant for 
its irrigation, he immediately located upon 
this ranch and began the raising of walnuts 
and alfalfa. I'his ranch of forty acres is lo- 
cated in the Bassett district and is well im- 
proved, 1907 witnessing the erection of a 
iiandsome and comfortable residence. 

In El Monte Mr. ?\Iaxson was united in 
marriage with Miss Mary Alexander, a native 
of this place, and born of their union are the 
following children : Frances, Marjorie, Ben- 
i.amin Franklin, Jr., Stanley and Alice. Mr. 
Maxson supports the Baptist Church in its 
charities, his wife being a member of that de- 
nomination. Mr. IMaxson is a Republican in 
his political convictions. He belongs to the 
Mountain View Walnut Growers' Associa- 
tion and seeks to advance the interests of the 
<;ection in which, he makes his home. Mrs. 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1197 



Maxson is the daughter of pioneer parents, 
her father, John Henry Alexander, a native of 
the Pickett district, of South CaroHna, having 
come to Cahfornia when twenty years old, 
crossing the plains with ox-team and on his 
arrival engaging in the mines of the state. He 
became foreman of a mnie in Drytown, Ama- 
dor county, and later engaged in mining in 
Calaveras county. Disposing • of his interests 
in t88o, he came to El Monte, where he made 
his home until his death, which occurred in 
1882, at the age of fifty-three years. He was 
married in Drytown, Cal., in 1863, to Miss 
Marie Publetis, a native of Chili, whose fath- 
er, Jose, was born in that country, of Spanish 
ancestry. She came to San Francisco with an 
aunt in 1849, then a city of tents, and after 
the death of her relative at Spanish Flat she 
made her own way in the world. She, came to 
El Monte with her husband and children in 
18S0, and two years later was left a widow 
with seven children. v>diom she reared with all 
the advantages children could have, and con- 
tinued to improve and add to the value of her 
five acres of walnuts. She has six children 
living; namely: John H., of Nebraska; Al- 
bert A., in Nevada; Andrew J., a carpenter of 
El Monte ; James S., an engineer of Bassett ; 
Rosa, Mrs. Reynolds, of Puente ; and Mary J., 
wife of B. E. Maxson. Mrs. Alexander still 
survives and is prominent socially in El 
Monte, supporting the interests of the Baptist 
Church, to which she belongs. 



MRS. HELEN B. GRISWOLD. The pos- 
sessor of a comfortable home situated in Twin 
Oaks valley seven miles northwest of Escondido, 
San Diego county, Mrs. Griswold enjoys in the 
afternoon of her life the pleasures afforded by 
an equable climate and an attractive environ- 
ment. Though far removed from the land of 
her birth and the home of her childhood, she is 
happily not remote from kindred, but has the 
companionship of a sister, Mrs. Janet Craig, who 
resides with her, also of two sisters, Mrs. Jane 
O'Brien and Mrs. Agnes Andrews, who reside 
only one mile distant. The four sisters are well 
known throughout the valley and have won the 
friendship of their large circle of acquaintances 
in the county. 

Of English birth and Scotch lineage, they are 
the daughters of David McCutcheon, who was 
born at Ayr, Scotland. May 7, 1809, and by 
occupation followed mercantile pursuits. While 
still a single man he removed to England and set- 
tled at Dudlev, Worcestershire, and there, in. 
St. Thomas' Church, March 19, 1832, he was 
united in marriage with Jane Little, who was 
born in Scotland June 3, 1809. Ten children 



were born of their union, namel}' : Anthony, who 
was born in 1834 and died at Davenport, Iowa, 
at the age of eighteen years ; Margaret, who was 
born in 1836 and died in England at three years 
of age; Janet, Mrs. Craig, who was born in 1837; 
David, born in 1839, deceased in 1840 in Eng- 
land; Jane, Mrs. O'Brien, who was born in 1840; 
Agnes, Mrs. Andrews, born in 1842; Helen B., 
jNIrs. Griswold, born in 1844; William, who was 
born in 1846 and in 1862 enlisted in the Twen- 
tietk Iowa Infantry, marched to the front with 
the regiment, was taken ill at Mobile and there 
died ; Mary, who was born in 1848 and died 
in Davenport, Iowa; and Sarah, who was the 
only member of the family born in the United 
States, a native of Davenport, Iowa, and there 
deceased in infancy. 

It was during the year 1850 that the family 
left England to seek a home in the United States, 
setting sail on the ship Gypsy, from which they 
debarked at New Orleans. Thence they went 
up the Mississippi river on the Josiah Lawrence 
to St. Louis, and on the Archer to Davenport. 
Misfortune soon befell them. The father was 
taken ill with cholera and died on the 24th of 
May. His body was buried at Villa Vista Land- 
ing and the widow and children proceeded to 
Davenport, Iowa. In a few more years another 
bereavement came upon the children, when their 
mother was taken from them by death, in 1854, 
at the age of forty-five years. When the only 
surviving brother died during his service in the 
Union army, the sisters were left as the sole 
representatives of the once numerous family. 
Of the sisters Helen B. became the wife of 
Cornelius Griswold, their marriage being sol- 
emnized in Jamestown, S. Dak., whence they 
proceeded to Mr. Griswold's home at Boulder, 
Mont., and there he died in April, 1887, at the 
age of forty-one years. After a brief sojourn in 
Davenport, Iowa, Mrs. Griswold went to St. 
Paul, Minn., and there made her home for a 
number of years. About 1894 she came to Cali- 
fornia and purchased ten acres two miles south 
of Carlsbad, San Diego county, erecting thereon 
a commodious structure which she utilized as 
a hotel. For four years she lived at that place 
and it is still in her possession. Returning to 
Iowa she visited in Davenport for a year and 
then came back to the coast. After a year she 
bought thirteen acres seven miles northwest of 
Escondido and built a substantial residence with 
modern appointments, where since she has made 
her home. 

Mrs. Craig, who for some years has been with 
Mrs. Griswold, was married in Davenport. Iowa, 
in 1861, to William T. Craig, and thev resided 
in Waterloo until his death, in April of 1881, at 
the age of forty-seven years. Three children 
blessed their union, namelv : Ella I\I., wife of A. 



1198 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



L. Gartside, member of the sash and door manu- 
facturing firm of Curtis, Gartside & Co., of 
Oklalioma City, Okla. ; Edward Challen, who is 
employed as draftsman with Curtis, Gartside & 
Co.; and \Vinnifred M., wife of John A. Bev- 
ington, principal of the schools of Santa Fe 
Springs, Cal. Fraternally Mr. Craig was identi- 
fied with the Masonic Order. In religious views 
Airs. Craig upholds the doctrines of the Baptist 
denomination and Mrs. Griswold also is in sym- 
pathy with the teachings of that church. 

The next to the eldest of the four sisters is 
Jane, who in October, 1898, married Capt. Will- 
iam Thomas O'Brien, a native of Rockland, Me., 
and for thirty years a captain on the high seas. 
After their marriage they removed to his ranch 
in Twin Oaks valley, San Diego county, and 
there he died August 23, 1904, at the age of 
sixty-five years. The third of the sisters, Agnes, 
was married at Wapello, Iowa, in 1868 to Ira 
E. Andrews, who was born in Connecticut, served 
in the Civil war, and engaged in business for a 
time at Davenport, but subsequently at Newton, 
Iowa, where he died in 1886, at the age of forty 
years. Three children were born of their union. 
The sons, Ira G. and Warren, are engaged in 
the grain business in St. Paul, Minn., and the 
daughter. Lulu, makes her home with them in 
that city. In religious connections Mrs. Andrews 
holds membership with the Christian Church, 
but Mrs. O'Brien, like the other sisters, favors 
Baptist doctrines. Fraternally Captain O'Brien 
was a stanch believer in the principles of Masonry 
and long affiliated with that order. The origin 
of the O'Brien family in America has in its his- 
tory something of the element of romance. The 
captain's great-grandfather, while in England, 
was taken on board a man-of-war and forced to 
enter that country's service. Eagerly he awaited 
a chance to escape and such an opportunity came 
when the ship was ofif the coast of Maine, when 
he swam on the shore and sought a refuge 
among the Indian tribes then frequenting that 
coast. To him belonged the distinction of being 
the first white school-master on the shores of 
Maine and his descendants long lived and 
flourished in that state where he had become a 
settler unexpectedly to himself. 



HANS ANDREAS JOHNSON. The presi- 
dent of the Klamath Falls Land and Live Stock 
Company, who until recently also was proprietor 
of the Johnson Packing Company of San Diego, 
is of Scandinavian birth and ancestry, and w^as 
born in the village of Honefossen. twenty-eight 
miles from Oiristiania. His parents, Gilbert and 
Bertha (Juul) Johnson, natives of the same local- 
ity, owned and occupied an improved farm named 
Ostmocn. meaning "Eastern" or "Clearing in 



the woods." The mother was the daughter of 
parents who came from Drammen and who were 
of old Norwegian families, allied with the Luth- 
eran denomination from the epoch immediately 
following the Reformation. When somewhat 
beyond middle life she came to the United States 
and later died in Minnesota. All of her four 
children have established homes in the new 
world. Hans AVidreas, who was second among 
the four, was born June 26, 1845, and received 
a fair education in his native tongue. During 
the spring of 1861 he came to America and set- 
tled at Winona, Alinn., but soon removed to 
Chicago. 

Enlisting in the Union army in the fall of 
1862 Mt. Johnson was assigned to the One Hun- 
dred and Thirty-second Illinois Infantry, but on 
account of illness did not join his regiment. On 
his recovery he was placed on detached service 
as wagonmaster under General Steadman, with 
whom he served in Alabama, Georgia and Ten- 
nessee. At the expiration of his time, April 2, 
1865, he was honorably discharged from the 
army. Meanwhile his mother had settled in 
Allamakee county, Iowa, and there he joined the 
family, soon after which he embarked in the 
grain business at Lansing, same county, making 
shipments from there by river. In addition he 
owned warehouses and business interests in De- 
Soto, Wis., and Decorah, Iowa. During 1871 
he became interested in the hotel business at 
Mankato, Minn., but the following 'year he re- 
moved to Sioux Rapids, Iowa, and erected the 
first store building and opened the first store in 
that town, continuing in the place for some 
years. 

During the spring of 1877 JNIr. Johnson re- 
moved to the Black Hills and bought a ranch 
on the Box Elder, eighteen miles from Dead- 
wood, where he had a large range for his stock. 
Later he established a second ranch near Hot 
Springs, S. Dak., and the Diamond J Cattle Com- 
pany, of which he was the owner, became known 
throughout the aitire northwestern country, 
where his brands of J within a diamond, and two 
half circles, together with his horse brand of 
HA connected, were to be seen on many of the 
finest cattle and horses of the territory. On 
selling out his cattle and ranches in 1899, he 
canie to San Diego, where he first purchased an 
interest in the Mixon Packing Company and 
eventually bought the entire stock of the com- 
pany, whereupon he changed the title to the 
Johnson Packing Company. Besides engaging 
in the wholesale and retail grocery business he 
made a specialtv of manufacturing and packing 
»pickles, ketchup. Worcester sauce, etc., all of 
which bore the Diamond J label. On account of 
his health he closed out the business in the spring 
of 1906. since which time he has given his at- 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1201 



tenlion to the development of the Klamath Falls 
Land and Live Stock Company, recently started 
in the vicinity of Kalamath Falls, Ore. The 
company is incorporated under the laws of the 
State of California with a capital stock of $200,- 
000, three-fourths of which amount is now ( 1906) 
in the treasury, and the remainder on sale at 
fifty cents a share, par value $1 per share, fully 
paid and non-assessable. The land owned by 
the company is within the government irrigation 
project, for which $4,500,000 has been appro- 
priated; it is also within a short distance of a 
projected railroad, which will be the main line of 
the Southern Pacific Railway Company between 
San Francisco and Portland. 

The first wife of Mr. Johnson was Miss Mary 
Hanson, who was born in Norway and died at 
Sioux Rapids, Iowa, leaving three children, 
namely : George, living in Wyoming ; Mrs. Clara 
Austed, of Buford, N. Dak., and Mrs. Hattie 
Revendal, who lives near Deadwood, S. Dak. 
In Fayette county, Iowa, Mr. Johnson was united 
in marriage with Miss Carrie Clement, who was 
born in Norway. Two children were born of 
their union. The daughter, Mrs. Gina Lowman, 
lives in San Diego. The son, Carbonate O., is 
now secretary of the Klamath Falls Land and 
Live Stock Company and secretary and treas- 
urer of the Native Gem Mining Company. Mr. 
Johnson belongs to the San Diego Chamber of 
Commerce, in politics votes with the Republican 
party, fraternally was made a Mason in Storm 
Lake Lodge No. 309, A. F. & A. M.. at Storm 
Lake, Iowa, and on the organization of the 
Scandinavian Society of San Diego became one 
of its charter members, later holding the office 
of vice-president for a time. 



CHARLES A. WESTGATE. Prominetit 
among the venerable and highly respected resi- 
dents of Long Beach is Qiarles A. Westgate, a 
man of sterling worth and character, who, though 
having outlived the allotted span of man's life, 
bears with grace and dignity his burden of years. 
Thrown upon his own resources in boyhood, he 
labored untiringly, and by dint of perseverance, 
self-reliance and thrift won success in his under- 
takings, and now, living retired from active pur- 
suits, is enjoying in comfort and leisure the visi- 
ble fruits of his many years of toil. A son of 
Levi Westgate, he was born April 10, 1824, in 
Chenango county, N. Y., coming from New Eng- 
land ancestry. 

A native of New York state, Levi Westgate 
spent his early years there, following the shoe- 
maker's trade. In 1847 ^^ removed to Kendall 
county, III, locating in Little Rock township, 
where he resided until his death, August 30, 1857, 
aged sixty-five years. While young he served 



as a soldier in the war of 1812, participating in 
several engagements. He married Hannah B. 
Hall, who was born in Massachusetts, on Cape 
Cod, and died in Piano, Little Rock township, 
111., August I, 1862 aged sixty-five years. She 
was descended from a family of prominence in 
colonial days, having been a great-granddaughter 
of Charles Bunker, who owned the hill in Charles- 
town, Mass., on which the battle of Bunker Hill 
was fought, and who was killed in that memor- 
able engagement. 

At the age of nine years Charles A. Westgate 
was bound out, and thereafter received such an 
education as he could obtain in the winter terms 
of the district school. Beginning for himself when 
eighteen years old, he worked by the month for 
a number of years. In 1845 he migrated to Illi- 
nois, locating in Kendall county, where he rented 
land and for many years was prosperously em- 
ployed as a tiller of the soil. August 8, 1862, 
he enlisted in Company F, One Hundred and 
Twenty-seventh Illinois Infantry, under com- 
mand of Capt. Charles Schriver, and served until 
the close of the war. He took part in many im- 
portant engagements, including among otliers tlie 
engagements at Yazoo, Arkansas Post, the siege 
of Vicksburg, Missionary Ridge and Atlanta, 
and marched with Sherman to the Sea, driving 
a six-mule team from Atlanta to Washington, 
D. C, where, on June 11, 1865, he took part in 
the Grand Review. 

After receiving his discharge Mr. Westgate 
returned to Kendall county. 111., remaining there 
until 1867, when he located in Will county and 
started a nursery, which he conducted for about 
a quarter of a century, meeting with good suc- 
cess in that industry. He was also prominently 
identified with the agricultural advancement of 
that part of the state, more especially with that 
branch relating to the breeding of stock, be- 
coming a pioneer raiser of registered Hereford 
cattle, and one of the organizers of the American 
Hereford Breeders' Association, of which he is 
still a stockholder. Disposing of his farm and 
stock in 1890, he came to California on account 
of ill health, locating at Orange in December of 
that year. Purchasing a fruit ranch, he operated 
it for five years, when he sold out. Coming to 
Long Beach in i8g6 he invested in city property 
and also bought land northeast of town, buying 
a farm of one hundred and sixty acres which he 
sold in July, 1904, He then bought the house 
and lot where he now resides, and is living re- 
tired from the activities of business. While liv- 
ing in Illinois he was very prominent in public 
affairs, both in Kendall and Will counties, in the 
former helping to organize the town of Piano, 
and in the latter the town of Peotone, serving for 
a while as trustee of each place, and for six 
\'ears was a member of the local school board. 



1202 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



For forty years he was an auctioneer, starting 
after the war to sell condemned government 
goods throughout Illinois, Iowa, Wisconsin and 
Missouri. 

November 12, 185 1, Mr. Westgate married 
Mary Jane Hall, who was born February 23, 1835, 
a daughter of David and Sarah (Jenner) Hall. 
Her parents were both born in England, were 
there married, and in 1833 immigrated to New 
York, where they resided until 1847. Removing 
to Illinois, they remained there seven years, when 
they removed to Iowa, taking up government land 
in Jones county. Later they sold from their 
land the site of the Oxford mills. Mr. Hall 
died in 1873 3-^ the age of seventy-five, and Mrs. 
Hall in 1871, at the same age, both being buried 
in Iowa. Mr. and Mrs. Westgate are the parents 
of six children, three living, namely : James E., 
Ella A., and Charles A., Jr. James E. Westgate 
was the first white child bom in Piano, 111., and 
is now a resident of Chicago; he is married and 
has four children. Ella A., the only daughter, 
is the wife of Dr. James T. Arwine, who has 
recently opened an office for the practice of his 
profession in Los Angeles. Prior to her mar- 
riage Mrs. Arwine was employed in the pension 
office at Washington, D. C, for nine years, and 
was one of two special clerks sent from that de- 
partment to the land office, with which she was 
connected for two years. Charles A., Jr., who 
is in business in Santa Ana, Cal., is married and 
has two children. Politically Mr. Westgate is a 
stanch Republican and is a member of the Grand 
Army of the Republic. Fraternally he was 
made a Mason in 1865 in Sunbaam Lodge No. 
636, A. F. & A. M., in Piano, 111. ; he assisted in 
organizing the lodge in Peotone, serving six 
years as master, and upon his retirement was pre- 
sented with a silver pitcher ; he is now a member 
of Long Beach Lodge No. 327. Mrs. Westgate 
has been a member of the Eastern Star Chapter 
since 1870 and for twenty years held office in 
Peotone, Dorcas Chapter : she was presented with 
an emblematic pin at the time she left Illinois. 
She is also a member of the Woman's Relief 
Corps. Mr. Westgate joined the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows in Little Rock, 111., in 1853 
and his wife joined the Rebekahs the following 
year. Mrs. Westgate is an artist, having some 
very fine reproductions in oil from her brush, 
her work being remarkable from the fact that she 
had never taken the brush in hand until she was 
fifty-eight years old. November 12, 1901, Mr. 
and Mrs. Westgate celebrated their golden wed- 
ding anniversary at their home on Linden street, 
and on the same day in 1906 they celebrated their 
fifty-fifth anniversary. Comparatively few cou- 
ples are spared to enjoy this privilege and the oc- 
casion was celebrated in a fitting manner, old 



friends as well as new calling to pay them hom- 
age and wishing them many more years of con- 
tinued health and happiness. 



FRANCIS J. SILLIFANT. Actively en- 
gaged in business as one of the foremost contract- 
ing plasterers of San Diego, Francis J. Sillifant 
is contributing his full share towards the advance- 
ment of the industrial prosperity of the city, and 
holds an assured position among its respected 
and valued residents. An excellent workman, fa- 
miliar with every branch of his trade, and ever 
willing to oblige all patrons, he is kept busily 
employed at all times and gives employment to 
several journeymen plasterers. An Englishman 
by birth, he was born in Launceston, County 
Cornwall, May 18, 1857, the son of William Sill- 
ifant, the latter a contractor and builder of 
Launceston, and the descendant of an old and 
respected family. 

On July 4, 1897, Francis J. Sillifant located in 
San Diego, and ere many seasons had passed 
he has successfully filled many contracts in 
plastering, winning a fine reputation for durable 
and artistic work, and building up a substantial 
business. Politically he sustains the principles 
of the Republican party in national affairs, but 
in local matters votes independent of party re- 
strictions. Fraternally he is a member of the 
Foresters of America, of the Royal League and 
of Silver Gate Lodge, No. 296, F. & A. M. 



ORVILLE S. HECOX. Early in the col- 
onial history of our country the Hecox family 
cam.e from Ireland and became identified with 
the pioneer element of Connecticut, where 
some of the name aided in the building up of 
the town of Durham. About 1786 Robert Mor- 
ris purchased a large tract in New York from 
the Seneca nation, and shortly afterward 
James Hecox, of Farmington. Conn., accom- 
panied by his son, Adna (then a 3'outh of nine- 
teen vears), and some six others of the same 
neighborhood, started out to explore the new 
purchase and after arriving at the Big Tree 
began to survey land for Air. Morris. How- 
ever, on account of the liostility of the Indians, 
immigration was temporarily abandoned, but 
later James Hecox purchased six hundred 
acres of land. In his family there were four 
sons. James, Salmon, Adna and Reuben. Of 
these Adna (through whom the present gen- 
ealogy is traced! made his home at Fort Mal- 
din in Canada and from there moved to Goose 
Island near Detroit, where his son, Adna A., 
was born January 26, 1806. While the father 
was engaged in repairing some of his farming 
imolements. on the 3d of lulv, 1812, a friend. 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



li'OS 



James Chittenden, came to his house with the 
alarming news that war had been declared 
with England. Two hours later the father and 
mother, with their six children and three hired 
men, were in two canoes on their way to De- 
troit, seeking the protection of the soldiers at 
that post. In tlie spring of the following year 
the father went to a small island, where he 
planted and han.'ested a sufficient quantity of 
corn and potacoes to keep the "wolf from the 
door" until the war had ended. Later he re- 
turned to Goose Island and after the death of 
his wife, in 1820, he bought a tract of land 
near Fort Rock, where he remained until his 
death in 1829. His life had been character- 
ized by the stirring incidents of the frontier, 
and he was a typical pioneer, honest, hospit- 
able, companionable and energetic, well quali- 
fied by a stahvart frame and robust constitu- 
tion to endure the vicissitudes of existence be- 
yond the confines of civilization. 

The early recollections of Adna A. Hecox 
were associated with scenes of peril and hard- 
ships on the frontier, where he was reared. In 
February of 182Q he married Catherine Man- 
nausan and three years later moved to St. Jo- 
seph county, Mich., where he remained for six 
years. Meanwhile, in 1834, his wife died of 
cholera while visiting at Brownstown. July 
TO, 1836, he married Margaret M. Hamer, of 
Pennsylvania, a woman of beautiful character 
and saintly life, whose memory is cherished in 
the hearts of her children. From Michigan 
they moved to Illinois, but considerations of 
health caused them to seek a more genial cli- 
mate. April I, 1846, an expedition started for 
California with three wagons and ox-teams. 
The party consisted of seven men, two women 
and seven children, among them being A. A. 
Hecox, wife and four children. When they 
reached the Chariton river the road became 
blocked with Mormons headed by Brigham 
Young, but the party of emigrants proceeded 
without pause and on their arrival at camp 
found the Mormons V,ad gone forward. On 
the 4th of Mav Ihev arrived at St. Joseph, Mo., 
thence crossed the Missouri river, and started 
vvestward via Forts Kenrny and Laramie, and 
the Platte river. While crossing the plains 
they were attacked bv a herd of buffaloes and 
Mrs. Hecox received a fracture of the collar- 
bone. While at Big ^Feadows they were vis- 
ited by "Old" Truckee and two others who 
proposed to accompany them to the new land. 
October of 1846 found them camping in the 
.Sacramento vallev. .\s soon as it became 
known that they had arrived at Sutter's Fort, 
Captain Swift of Fremont's battalion visited 
them to solicit volunteers to aid in reconquer- 
ing the Mexicans. A few of the party joined 



Captain Swift and the balance proceeded to 
San Jose in the hope of securing a permanent 
location. 

On the 1st of November the company ar- 
rived at the old mission at Santa Clara, where 
they had been told they could get shelter, but 
they found the place almost uninhabitable. 
The number of the expedition had increased 
to eighty women and children, twenty-iive 
men, and some eight boys old enough to shoul- 
der a rifle, but too young to join General Fre- 
mont. Soon typhoid fever Iiroke out among 
the emigrants and fourteen of the number died 
of the disease. In one instance a man endea- 
vored to buy a few boards with which to make 
a bed for his sick wife, but, not finding any- 
one who would sell, he took a few boards. 
With these he constructed a rude bed and a 
few days later made them into a cofifin for his 
dead wife. Afterward the alcalde fined him 
$25 and put him in jail for taking the boards. 
The first Protestant sermon e\er preached 
in California, so far as known, was preached 
by A. A. Hecox on the 15th of December, 1846, 
his audience being the few Protestant emi- 
grants who had settled in the neighborhood. 

During the spring of 1848 a report came to 
the settlers that workmen at Sutter's Fort had 
found small quantities of gold. The year pre- 
vious A. A. Hecox had moved to Soquel, San- 
ta Cruz county, and had erected a mill for 
Michael Lodge, also had built the first billiard 
table made in California, using redwood in its 
construction. While he was operating a mill 
rented of Mr. Lodge in 1848, all of his hands 
left to dig gold and he closed the mill and also 
proceeded to the mines, where he was one of 
the discoverers of the rich gold mines at 
Hangtown. On the afternoon of their arrival 
his party picked up six pounds of gold. In 
Tulv he returned to Santa Cruz, where he was 
ill for six weeks. In September he started for 
the mines of the Mokelumne river and meet- 
ing Captain .\ram he hauled his good? to So- 
nora. Though gone but fi\-e days, they cleared 
$2,200. In the fall of 1848 he returned to Santa 
Cruz, where at first he 'sold goods for William 
C. Parker & Co.. and in 1849 opened a store 
with Elijah Anthonv. In the fall of 1849 'i^ 
\\-as elected alcalde, in which office, during 
1850. he had sixtv-tliree cases (mostly crim- 
inal) in two months. After the admission of 
California as a state he was made justice of 
the peace, holding that office several terms. 
Also he served as public administrator and as- 
sociate justice of the county court. In 1861 he 
was elected county treasurer of Santa Cruz 
county, which office he filled for two years and 
six months. At the expiration of his term he 
was appointed lighthouse keeper of the Santa 



1204 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Cruz station and continued in that position 
until his death, March 17, 1882, since which 
time his daughter, Miss Laura J. F., has filled 
tlie place. 

Surviving Adna A. Hecox is his widovv, 
Margaret M., who possessed the fortitude and 
powers of endurance necessary to frontier ex- 
istence. During the war in California and 
while they lived at the old mission in Santa 
Clara, her husband was appointed one of the 
guard; for several nights he was too sick to 
fill his post, so she shouldered his rifle and 
took his place as a guard. In July, 1847, she 
was interested in the organization of a tem- 
perance society, and she still holds in her pos- 
session the pledge, written on a blank leaf of 
the Bible. The following is a copy: "Wash- 
ington Pledge, July. 1847. 

"We, the undersigned, anxious to promote 
the true principles of temperance, do pledge 
our honors that we will not use any intoxicat- 
ing liquors as beverages." 

(Signed) : A. A. Hecox 

Margaret M. Hecox 
Edwin Shaw 
James G. T. Dunleavy 
Mary Ann Dunleavy 
Michael Lodge 
William Parks 
Curtis Comstock 
lames T. Kearnv 
Henry Hill 
Robert Devereaux. 
Three of the children who crossed the plains 
with their parents are still living, namely: 
Mrs. Sarah E. Stampley, of Oakland, Gal; 
Mrs. C. M. Brown, of Berkeley; and Adna H. 
of Santa Cruz. The four children born after ' 
the family came to California are as follows: 
Mrs. Matilda Longley, of Santa Cruz; Airs. 
A. R. Organ : ?\Iiss Laura J. F., who succeed- 
ed her father as keeper of the lighthouse ; and 
the youngest, On'ille S., whose name intro- 
duces tliis article, and who was born at Santa 
Cruz, this state, May i, 1859. One of the most 
talented members of the family, Douglas Til- 
den, a nephew of Orville S. Hecox, has an in- 
teresting history. Born at Chico in i860, he 
was stricken with the scarlet fever at the age 
of five years and though he regained his 
health he was left deaf and dumb. In order to 
receive proper care he was sent to the asylum 
at Berkeley in 1883 and afterward became an 
instructor in the institution. He was twenty- 
four years of age before he discovered his tal- 
ent for the sculptor's art. In 1885 he produced 
his first work, "The Tired Wrestler," and later 
spent seven months in the National Academy 
of Design in New York, after which he went 
to Paris as a private pupil of Paul Chopin, the 



winner of the gold medal at the salon. After 
five months he began modeling without an in- 
structor. Among his exhibits at the salon were 
"Our National Game" or "The Baseball 
Player," the "Young Acrobat," "The Bear 
Hunt" and "The Football Player." Since his 
return to California he has modeled the large 
fountain erected by the Society of the Native 
Sons in honor of the admission of California 
as a state. 

Upon completing the studies of the public 
schools Orville .S. Hecox began to learn the 
trade of house painting, which he followed for 
many years. In 1886 he came to Oceanside, 
San Diego countj^ where he found ready em- 
ployment at his trade. For two years he also 
engaged in farming near Rainbow, San Diego 
county. In 1896 he went to Tustin, later fol- 
lowed his trade at Monrovia for two and one- 
half years, and May 15, T905, he returned to 
Oceanside, where now he engages in the sale 
of real estate, both city property and farm 
lands. His marriage took place in Santa Cruz, 
Mav 12, 1880, and united him with Miss Etta 
L. B., daughter of J. E. Butler, who rounded 
the Horn in 1849 ^"d settled in San Francisco, 
where he kept the Ocean house and also fol- 
lowed the trade of a builder. Removing to 
San Mateo, he took the contracts to erect the 
finest residences of that place. In 1876 he went 
to Santa Cruz and built a flour mill, but lost 
a fortune in the enterprise. In 1882 he settled 
at Riverside and two vears later came to 
Oceansifle, near where he took up two hun- 
dred acres of government land. During the 
boom he sold his property at a high figure, 
but later lost heavily through investments at 
Rainbow. While making his home at Rain- 
bow he died in 1892. Mr. and Mrs. Hecox 
have an adopted daughter, Margaret. The fam- 
ily are identified with the Advent Church and 
are honored members of the best social circles 
of Oceanside. 



LOUIS L. LARSEN. Although he has been 
conducting his restaurant business in San Ber- 
nardino but a short time Louis L. Larsen has 
built up a large trade and is conducting one of 
the most successful establishments of the kind 
in this citv. He is a native of Drammen, Nor- 
way, his birth having occurred there August 19, 
1876. His father, Olaf Larsen, was a Norwegian 
sailor, who, when he came to America, followed 
the same business on the Great Lakes, his head- 
quarters being in Milwaukee. He later removed 
to Minneapolis, where his death occurred. Mrs. 
Larsen, who was in maidenhood Christine Louise 
Olafson, is now residing in Minneapolis. 

The first nine vears of the life of Louis L. 




(Slo.,^^ Oa^ 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1207 



Larsen were spent in his native town and his 
education was received principally in the public 
schools of Minneapolis. After completing his 
school work he was apprenticed to Reagan 
Brothers of that city to learn pastry cooking, 
finishing the training in three and one-half years. 
He then took up professional cooking and spent 
a summer in Yellowstone Park as pastry cook 
in one of the hotels owned by the Yellowstone 
Park Hotel Association. From there he came to 
San Mateo, Gal., in 1897 accepting a like posi- 
tion in the St. Matthew boarding school at that 
place. Following this he held positions as pastry 
cook successively at the Arlington hotel, Santa 
Barbara, and the hotel at El Paso Robles, re- 
maining in the latter place eighteen months. His 
next position was in Los Angeles in the Imperial 
cafe as night cook. In 1899 he entered the em- 
ploy of Fred Harvey as pastry cook at Needles, 
then went to San Diego, to what is now known as 
Hotel Robinson. Again engaging himself to Mr. 
Harvey he was in San Bernardino for a time, 
then went to Ash Fork, Ariz., and finally bad< 
to San Bernardino, becoming chief cook of the 
Harvey house. He resigned this position in 1904 
to take charge of the Squirrel inn as proprietor, 
and in October, 1905, opened Larsen's lunch 
counter and has since been conducting it with 
splendid success. In 1906 he remodeled the 
quarters, put in a new range, and cold storage 
rooms, and now has a fifty-stool modern place 
which is enjoying great popularity. 

Fraternally Mr. Larsen is a member of the 
Eagles and the Benevolent Protective Order of 
Elks. He belongs to the Merchants" Association 
and also the Board of Trade. No enterprise 
tending to upbuild San Bernardino goes without 
his support and co-operation. 



CHARLES POST. The advantages afforded 
to a sojourner in the west and particularly that 
portion of the west embraced within the limits 
of Southern California find in Mr. Post an en- 
thusiastic advocate and stalwart champion. For 
a long period he has made his home in the west. 
By actual experience he has gained an insight 
into the soil, climate and possibilities of various 
portions of the country lying west of the Rocky 
mountains, .and of all this broad domain lie 
considers the finest section to be in the vicinity 
of his present home. Since 1891 he has resided 
in Redlands, and for a considerable period he 
rendered efficient service as zanjero with the 
Bear \'alley Irrigation Company. i\Iore recently, 
however, bv reason of ofiicial duties, he has had 
his headquarters in the citv of San Bernardino. 

The lineage of the Post family is traced back 
to Peter Schuyler Post, who owned sixteen hun- 
dred acres in Orange county. N. Y., and wielded 



a large influence among the men of his day and 
locality. Next in line of descent was Edwin 
Post, who passed his early years upon his father's 
vast estate in the east, but on starting out for 
himself sought the then unknown regions of 
Illinois and in the midst of the wilderness carved 
out a home for himself. The now prosperous 
city of Galesburg numbered him among its early 
settlers. For a number of years he followed 
lumbering, for a long period engaged in the 
cattle business, and also at another time carried 
on a large farm. Since his death, which occurred 
in 1894, his widow, Mary (Doolittle) Post, has 
removed to California, and now resides at Red- 
lands. The family of which she is a member 
came to this country from Holland in a verv early 
Jay. ' 

During the residence of Edwin and Mary 
Post, at Galesburg, 111., their son, Charles, was 
born there January 5, i860, and there he re- 
ceived a fair education in the grammar and high, 
schools. At the age of sixteen years he left school 
and gave his attention wholly to aiding his father 
in the care of their farm near Lincoln, Neb., 
where he remained for several years, during this 
time taking considerable interest in the cattle 
industry. During 1884 he came to California 
and in 1891 settled at Redlands, which has been 
his home. Two years before coming to Califor- 
nia he married Miss Clara Henderson, daughter 
of William T. Henderson, a prominent citizen 
of Galesburg, 111. Of their union five children 
were born, namely : Clara, Mary E., C. Alfred, 
Llewellyn C. and Katherine. Fraternally Mr. 
Post holds membership with Redlands Lodge No. 
86. K. of P., in which he now officiates as dis- 
trict deputy, and further holds office as deputy 
grand chancellor. In addition he is a member 
of the Woodmen of the World, being past com- 
mander of the local camp. The Benevolent Pro- 
tective Order of Elks number him among their 
members, his name being that of a leading mem- 
ber of No. 583, at Redlands. 

Through all of his active life, ever since at- 
taining his majority, Mr. Post has been a stanch 
supporter of the Republican party and has given 
its candidates his vote. In the various places 
of his residence he has been an influential local 
worker. At this writing he is a member of the 
Republican county central committee and ranks 
among the leading men of the part\- within the 
limits of San Bernardino county. In recogni- 
tion of his fitness for office and his services in 
behalf of the party, in 1901 he was appointed 
deputy county clerk under L. A. Pfeiffer, and 
this position he held until he was elected county 
clerk November 6. 1906, by the second largest 
majority received by any candidate in San 
Bernardino countv. 



1208 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ISAAC FUNK BAKER. The business in- 
terests of El Alonte have in Air. Baker one of 
their most important factors, his enterprise and 
progressive spirit having contributed no little to 
the material upbuilding and development of the 
place. He has built a substantial business block- 
where he is located and carrying on a mercan- 
tile enterprise which is bringing him large finan- 
cial returns. j\Ir. Baker is a native of Illinois, 
and was born in the vicinity of Bloomington, 
February 15, 1865. His father, N. S. Baker, 
was born in Somerset, Pa., in 1814, and in man- 
hood became a pioneer settler of Indiana and 
thence removed to Illinois, where he engaged in 
farming from i860 to 1875. He then located in 
Story county, Iowa, where he made his home 
until 1893, in which year his death occurred. He 
was descended from a Revolutionary family, his 
father having served as a patriot in the colonial 
amiy. By his first marriage he had two sons, 
Isaiah H., a resident of Nebraska, and David. 
They both served in the Civil war, in which serv- 
ice David was killed. Subsequently Mr. Baker 
married Mary Jones, a native of West Virginia, 
whose death occurred in Iowa in 1885. Of this 
union were born ten children, seven of whom 
are living. 

Isaac Funk Baker was the fifth child by his 
father's second marriage. When ten years old 
he became a resident of Iowa, where he grew to 
manhood, alternating home duties on the farm 
with an attendance of the public schools, which 
was completed by one year at the State Agricul- 
tural College at Ames, Iowa. His first inde- 
pendent effort was as a clerk in Colo, Story 
county, where he continued for about two years, 
and in 1886 went to Boone county and followed 
a similar occupation for six years. He then 
went to Chicago and clerked for three years, 
when, in 1895, he came to California and 'in El 
j\Ionte established a meat market with his broth- 
er, B. F. Baker, the two continuing in business 
for two and a half years. He then sold his in- 
terest and in 1897 went to San Francisco and 
embarked with an excursion party for Alaska, 
arriving at St. Michaels and thence going to 
Dawson by river boat, reaching his destination 
October i of the same year. He remained one 
year engaged in mining with success, when he 
returned to El Monte, September i, 1898, pur- 
chased a lot and put up the block in which he 
is now engaged in business. In 1904 he put 
up a brick building 52x84 feet in dimensions, on 
the corner of Lexington and San Bernardino 
road, and put in a stock of general merchandise 
which includes ever>-thing to'be found in a busi- 
ness of this character. He is one of the original 
stockholders of the First National Bank of El 
Monte, which was organized in 1903, and is now 
serving as a director. 



In Providence, R. I., September 26, 1906, Mr. 
Baker was united in marriage with Miss Jennie 
Tucker. She is a native" of Providence and a 
descendant of the famous Tucker and Greene 
families of Rhode Island, whose ancestry can be 
traced for five generations in that state. She 
was born on the old Greene homestead a mile 
from Shannock, which had been in the family 
for five generations, received her preliminary 
education in the public schools, after which she 
attended and graduated from the State Normal 
School. She came to California and in Los An- 
geles became prominent in educational work, and 
at the same time accepted the principalship of 
the El Monte schools, which position she re- 
tained for fourteen years. Her resignation took 
place in July, 1906, when she returned to Rhode 
Island and in her home in Providence was mar- 
ried in the September following. She is a 
woman of rare ability and culture, abreast of 
the times in every particular, broad-minded to an 
unusual degree, and capable of making and re- 
taining friends wherever known. 

Mr. Baker is associated fraternally with Lex- 
ington Lodge No. 104, F. & A. AL, of El Monte, 
in which he has served as master for the past 
six years, having been made a member of the 
organization in Columbia Lodge No. 202. of 
Colo, Iowa. He also belongs to the Royal Arch 
and Knights Templar of Boone, Iowa, and Al 
Malaikah Temple, N. M. S., of Los Angeles. 
His wife is a member of the Cojigregational 
Church, which he supports liberally. Politically 
he is a Republican and stanch in the support of 
the interests of this party, being an ex-member 
of the Republican county central committee. He 
is a man of splended ability, of executive force 
and strength, capable of making a place for him- 
self in whatever portion of the world his lot may 
be cast. He has won a wide circle of friends 
who appreciate him for the qualities of character 
he has displayed during his long residence in El 
i\Ionte. 



JEREMIE CHEVALIER, of El Alonte, is a 
native of France, his birth having occurred in 
Hautes-Alpes, May 23, 1868. His parents, 
Jacques and Mary (Blanc) Chevalier, both died 
in France, where as agriculturists they had spent 
their entire lives. They had five children, of 
whom Jeremie was next to the oldest. He was 
reared on the parental farm and educated in the 
common schools. He was sixteen years old 
when he came to California, arriving in Los 
Angeles February 22, 1885. Without means or 
friends he began at the bottom, securing em- 
ployment in a vineyard in this city, after which 
he went to San Pedro and engaged with Ed 
Amar in the sheep business. After four months 



HISTORICAL AXJ) BIOGRAPHICAL RF.CORD. 



V2i)9 



he went to Tehachapi and worked for ten 
months in the saine business, when he returned 
to Los Angeles county and engaged in the dairy 
business. Four years later he undertook an in- 
dependent effort, purchasing teams and renting 
land in Orange county, where he successfully 
engaged in raising grain. Four years later he 
engaged in raising alfalfa at Los Nietos, Los 
Angeles county, for a similar period, and finally, 
in 1902 he bought twenty-five acres of the Peck 
tract, where he raised alfalfa and walnuts. He 
installed a pumping plant with a fifty horse pow- 
er engine and a capacity of two hundred inches, 
with two wells one hundred and twenty-five feet 
deep each, this being in partnership with two 
other ranchers near him'. He still retains this 
property and makes it his home, at the same 
time renting land with which to carry on more 
extensive enterprises, devoting the rented land 
to grain and hay. 

In Los Nietos Mr. Chevalier married Miss 
Mary Buschard, a native of Sacramento, and a 
daughter of Frank Buschard, who was born in 
Canada of French descent, came to California in 
1849 and for years engaged in mining. He is 
now retired and living in Los Nietos. Mr. and 
Mrs. Chevalier have two children, Henry and 
Clementina. Mr. Chevalier is independent in 
politics. 



WILL LUCIUS FOWLER. The name of 
Fowler is one well known and highly honored in 
Redlands, where father and son have given their 
efforts toward the upbuilding of the city"s best 
interests and its advancement among the other 
sections of Southern California. The son. Will 
L. Fowler, is serving at the present writing as 
city marshal and ably discharging the duties that 
fall to him as an incumbent of this position : the 
father, William Fowler, was a prime factor in 
the municipal government up to the time of his 
death. The family was originally of English 
ancestry, the name being located in Connecticut, 
where William Fowler was born, a son of Bildad, 
who brought his family to Ohio and established 
the town of Fowler's Mills, near Cleveland, 
where he engaged as a farmer until his death. 
About 1852 William Fowler located in Newport, 
Minn., and followed farming until the breaking 
out of the Civil war, when, in 1861, he volun- 
teered for service in Company F, Eighth ]\Iinne- 
sota Infantry, serving a full three years" term 
as second lieutenant. At Murfreesboro he re- 
ceived his only wound during the war, being shot 
through the right hand. Honorably discharged 
in 1864 he returned to his farming pursuits in 
Minnesota, and was there honored by election to 
the state legislature two consecutive terms. 
Previous to this he had served his countv as su- 



pervisor and was a prominent advocate in the 
advancement of educational affairs. He served 
for three years as president of the Minnesota 
State Dairymen's Association, and in a like ca- 
pacity for the State Agricultural Association of 
Minnesota for two terms. In 1891 he came to 
Redlands and bought an orange grove and later 
set out more acreage to this fruit, and in this 
work and his connection with municipal affairs 
of the city as member of the city council, at first 
by appointment and later by election, and presi- 
dent of the board of trustees for seven years, he 
occupied his time until his death, which occurred 
May 20, 1905. Redlands owes much to this en- 
terprising and helpful citizen, whose name will 
forever be inscribed on the roll of the city's hon- 
ored men. He was a member of Redlands Lodge 
No. 300, F. & A. M., and was commander of the 
Grand Army post here, and also held the same 
office in Alinnesota. He was an active member 
of the Baptist Church and gave liberally to its 
support and upbuilding, while in Minnesota be- 
ing a delegate to the state convention. Politi- 
cally he was a stanch advocate of Democratic 
principles. In Ohio Mr. Fowler married Miss 
Caroline A. Lane, a native of Ohio, and she is 
now surviving and making her home in Red- 
lands. They became the parents of six children, 
of whom four are now living, nameh- : Frank 
L., engaged in horticulture in Redlands ; May C, 
Mrs. Thompson, of this city ; Nellie C, of San 
Jose ; and Will L., of this review. 

In Newport. Minn., March 16, 1875, Will 
Lucius Fowler was born and there obtained his 
education primarily in the public schools, com- 
pleting the course in the Redlands high school, 
after his location here with his parents in 1891. 
He was graduated in 1895 and the following 
year entered the University of California and- 
passed the ensuing two years. In 1898 he en- 
listed in Company G, Seventh California In- 
fantry, and was mustered in at San Francisco 
for service in the Spanish-American war. He 
was mustered out with his regiment in Decem- 
ber, 1898, with the rank of corporal, after which 
he returned to Redlands and at once engaged 
in horticultural pursuits and also in building un- 
til April, 1906, when he was elected city marshal 
and ex officio tax collector on the Good Govern- 
ment ticket. Taking the oath of office April 18, 
1906, he at once entered upon the duties of his 
position and has since given it his entire time 
and attention. In Redlands Mr. Fowler was 
united in marriage with Miss Elizabeth E. Shorey, 
a native of Omaha, Neb., but who was brought 
to California at the age of three years and here 
reared to womanhood and educated in the Red- 
lands public and high schools. Mr. Fowler is 
a member of the Spanish-American War Vet- 
erans' Association, a member of the Sons of Vet- 



1210 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



erans and the Red Men. He belongs to the First 
Baptist Church and officiates as deacon, having 
previousl)' served as superintendent of the Sun- 
day-school. He is a member of the Board of 
Trade and active in his efforts to promote the 
best interests of the city. 



GEORGE S. KLING. The milling interests 
of San Pedro have in (icorge S. Kling a com- 
petent representative and a man whose energy 
and ability are enlisted in the line of his work. 
He is now superintendent of the San Pedro 
Lumber Company's mill department, a position 
which he has filled since June, 1905, and his 
past record is one that evidences a future of 
success wherever he is located. He is a native 
of Lewis county, N. Y., his birth having 
occurred at Lowville, September 30, 1866. His 
remote ancestors were German immigrants, 
who located in New York state, where his 
grandfather, Peter Kling, was born and in man- 
hood engaged as a farmer. In the course of 
time he married and reared a family, a son, 
Stephen S., born in Schoharie county, becom- 
ing in manhood a manufacturer of sash, doors 
and blinds in Lowville, N. Y. Later he re- 
moved to New Bremen, same state, where he 
followed his business until retirement from 
active duties. During the Civil war he served 
in the Twenty-sixth New York Cavalry, be- 
ing quartermaster-sergeant in Company H. 
He is a stanch member of the Grand Army of 
the Republic, and is now Hving retired in Los 
Angeles. He married Ann Janette Hoyt, a 
native of Lewis county, N. Y., and a daughter 
of James F. Hoyt, a native of Connecticut, 
who became a pioneer of Lewis county, N. Y. 
Mrs Kling is still living and enjoying the 
evening of her days among the delights of 
Southern California. They were the parents 
of three sons and one daughter, of whom the 
sons attaining maturity are : George S., of this 
review ; Spencer J., of Cedar Rapids, Iowa ; 
and Wayland H., of Los Angeles. 

Reared to young manhood in New Bremen 
and LowrA'ille, George S. Kling received a good 
education in the public schools and Lowville 
academy, after which he began teaching in his 
county, being then but seventeen years old. 
He followed this occupation for four years, 
during the summers continuing as he had in 
boyhood by working Vv^ith his father in the 
sash and door factory. After attaining his 
majority he worked with his father steadily 
mitil the spring of 1894, when he went to 
Illinois, and in Hamilton became superin- 
tendent in the same kind of factory under 
Dickenson 8z Bartlett. v.'hich position he re- 
tained for one vear. He then went to Hermans- 



ville, Mich., and accepted the position of as- 
sistant superintendent in a hardwood flooring 
plant of the Wisconsin Land & Lumber Com- 
pany, with whom he remained for three years, 
when he resigned, and in December, 1897, 
came to California, arriving in January of the 
following year. Going to Los Angeles he 
established a real-estate business there with 
his brother Spencer J., but after two years he 
returned to the milling business, accepting a 
position as a stickerman at the San Pedro mill, 
where he remained for eighteen months. He 
then returned to Los Angeles and accepted a 
position with the Pacific Tank Company (now 
known as the Pacific Coast Planing Mill Com- 
pany), the plant being then in course of con- 
struction. He helped to install the machinery 
and remained in their employ from 1901 until 
1905, in the course of time becoming superin- 
tendent of the mill and lumber business. He 
resigned from this position in June, 1905, and 
came to San Pedro to accept the position of 
superintendent with the San Pedro Lumber 
Company, having charge of their mill, which 
is one of the largest on the coast. 

In Los Angeles, Mr. Kling was united in 
marriage . with Ardella E. Sharp, a native of 
Ontario, Canada, and they have one son, 
Spencer S., a daughter. Birdie, having died in 
infancy. . Eraternally Mr. Kling was made a 
Mason in San Pedro Lodge No. 332, and is 
also a member of the Knights of the Modern 
Maccabees. His wife is a member of the Bap- 
tist church, to which he gives a liberal support. 
In his political affiliations he is an adherent 
of the principles advocated in the platform of 
the Republican party . 



JOSEPH E. JONES. The family repre- 
sented by this progressive young business 
man of San Diego county traces its lineage to 
Wales, where many generations lived and la- 
bored. The locality where they resided was 
largely given over to the mining industry, 
hence they naturally sought their livelihood in 
this occupation, and proved themselves pa- 
tient, industrious and painstaking miners. The 
first to come to the United States found in the 
new world greater opportunities than his na- 
tive land could ofifer. After leaving Wales Jo- 
seph Jones became a miner in the southern 
part of Illinois and made his home at Chester, 
that state, in which locality his wife, who was 
a member of the Scotch family of McKinzie, 
was born, reared and educated. About the 
year 1888 they removed to California and 
eventually became established on a farm near 
San Luis Rey, where he engaged in ranching 
until 190S. the year of his retirement from act- 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1213 



ive agricultural cares. While they were living 
at Chester, 111., their son, Joseph E., was born 
December 4, 1873, and in the schools of that 
city he was primarily educated, but after com- 
ing to the Pacific coast he had the privilege of 
attending excellent schools, including the 
Santa Barbara Business College. In 1893 he 
became a clerk for the firm of Irwin & Co., 
dealers in dry-goods and general merchandise 
at Oceanside, and from a humble position he 
worked his way upward through diligent at- 
tention to every detail connected with the 
business. 

On the selling out of the mercantile stock 
in 1898, the firm of Irwin & Co. embarked in 
the ha\' and grain business at San Diego, but 
continued to be identified with the commer- 
cial life of Oceanside through the establish- 
ment of a hardware store in this town, and Mr. 
Jones was retained in the capacity of manager, 
a position that he fills at the present writing. 
In addition to conducting the business with 
judgment and energy, he has been actively 
associated with the civic life of his town and as 
a Democrat has been prominent in local poli- 
tics. In 1903 he was appointed city trustee to 
fill an unexpired term in that office and the 
following year he was duly elected to the po- 
sition, which he has since filled with charac- 
teristic intelligence and fidelity. In fraternal 
relations he is connected with various organ- 
izations in Oceanside, including Lodge No. 
346, I. O. O. P., Lodge No. 385 of the Frater- 
nal Brotherhood, and Lodge No. 4402, I. O. 
P., in the work of all of which he maintains a 
warm interest. 



GEN. SENECA PI. :MARLETTE. The 
pioneer days of General Marlette have result- 
ed in a material upbuilding for California, for 
he brought with him to the state the ability 
and perseverance which alone could give to 
the commonwealth its impetus toward the po- 
sition it now occupies among its sister states 
of the Union. He was born in New York, 
near Syracuse. January 18. 1824, a son of Will- 
iam J. Marlette, a native of New York and the 
descendant of an old Prench family, three 
brothers of the name having located in Amer- 
ica many years prior to the Revolution, in 
-.vhich a member of the family served with the 
rank of major. William J. ^larlette engaged 
as a contractor in New York, working on the 
Erie canal and other public works ; he later lo- 
cated in Ohio and engaged in railroad con- 
tracting. His last days were spent in Illinois, 
where he died at an advanced age. By his 
marriage with Lucy Balch. of INTassachusetts, 
he allied his fortunes with those of an old Rev- 



olutionary family, her death occurring in 
Iowa. Of their seven children Seneca H. Mar- 
lette was the fourth in order of birth, and aft- 
er receiving his preliminary education in the 
])ublic schools entered the Rensselaer Insti- 
tute, now the Polytechnic, at Troy, N. Y., 
from which institution he was later graduated 
with the degrees of B. N. S. and civil engineer. 
He started in as a railroad surveyor, but not 
securing the business he wished, he took up 
the study of medicine with Wright & Bryns- 
made, in Troy, but was later occupied as civil 
engineer with the New York «& Erie Railroad 
Company. He remained with this company 
until 1849, when he concluded to come to Cali- 
fornia, and accordingly he joined the Albany 
company which was organized by Bishop Kip 
and Mr. Collier. They made the journey on 
the Helena via Cape Horn, starting March 4 
and arriving at their destination September 

Mr. ?ilarlette went at once to the mines of 
Calaveras connt3^ Cal., but a short time after 
retm-ned to San Francisco for provisions, and 
while there obtained a position with the city 
surveyor. He followed surveying in that city 
at $20 per day, but having to pay $3 per day 
for the use of a compass. Later he purchased 
instruments for surveying, including a theo- 
dolite, going in debt for them and paying 6 
per cent interest per month. For Halleck, 
Peachy. Billings & Wright he made a survey 
of a part of the Larkin grant, now the western 
addition to San Francisco, surveying blocks 
and lots: during this time he had many inter- 
esting experiences with the squatters, who 
l^ulled up their stakes and came ^^'^th axes and 
threatened them for trespassing. He then sur- 
■ '\'eved a sub-division between this and the city 
for Hervey Sparks. Later Mr. Marlette made 
arangements for the publication of a map of 
San Francisco, including the AVestern Addi- 
tion. After making a trip to Santa Clara 
county he was so well impressed with the place 
that he took up a ranch, but before he could 
£ret a home on the place a friend jumped it. 
He then returned to the mines in Calaveras 
county. In the meantime he had become ac- 
quainted with ex-governor Edwards of Mis- 
.souri, and he having established a general 
merchan.dise store at Mokelumne Hill asked 
Mr. Marlette to become a partner in the con- 
cern. Not having made a success of his min- 
ing he was willing to accept the proposition, 
,-md accordingly became connected with the 
mercantile interests of that section. In 1852 
he was elected county surveyor and later was 
compelled to close out his mercantile interests 
at a loss of $1500, for which he settled by note 
at (1 per cent interest per month. He was nom- 



1214 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



inated for re-election in 1853 but in the same 
year was nominated for the office of surveyor- 
general of the state of California, and being 
elected by a good majority he assumed the du- 
ties of his position, the capital being located at 
Benicia and during his term was moved to Sac- 
ramento. He served from January, 1854, to 
January, 1856, and during this time surveyed 
most of the emigrant wagon roads. Later he 
closed the survey of the Pico grant in Cala- 
veras county, after which he purchased an in- 
terest in a mine in San Andreas and retained it 
until i860, when he went to Washoe, Nev., 
which was a part of Utah, as a surveyor. He 
was elected county surveyor of Carson county, 
Utah, and had to make his report to Salt Lake 
City until Nevada was organized as a terri- 
tory. Governor Nye appointed him surveyor 
of Story county, and he was later elected first 
state surveyor-general of Nevada. He was 
re-elected but failed to qualify because he was 
so busy making out his report ; he was later 
appointed by the governor to this office until 
the next election. 

Retiring from his professional work Gen- 
eral Marlette engaged in the lumber and water 
business in the vicinity of Lake Tahoe and 
Truckee, there building sawmills and manu- 
facturing lumber in partnership with W. 
S. Hobart, who died in 1892, after which he 
sold his interests to the estate for a small 
amount. They had been known as the Sierra 
Nevada Wood & Lumber Company, and 
owned together about eighty-five thousand 
acres of land, of which forty thousand acres 
belonged to the general. They owned what 
has since been named Marlette lake, having 
disposed of this to the Virginia & Gold Hill 
Water Company. After disposing of his in- 
terests General Marlette came to Southern 
Califronia to make his home in Los Angeles, 
having made the first trip south in 1883 in 
search of timber lands. He has become in- 
terested in Alentone and in partnership with 
William P. Mcintosh and others purchased a 
claim on INIill creek in 1884, having already 
bought other lands here, in 1887 laying it out 
and bringing water on the place, being the 
organizers of the Mentone Irrigation Com- 
pany, now owned by General Marlette and Mr. 
Mcintosh. They have about two thousand 
acres in the tract, of v/hich about four hun- 
dred acres are improved to navel oranges all 
in full bearing, water having been developed 
by a tunnel a quarter of a mile in length from 
Mill creek, while they also have wells and 
pumping plants in case of need. 

General Marlette located here in 1896, now 
owning a beautiful home on Mentone avenue, 



where he and nis wife have seventy acres in 
oranges. He was married m Washington, D. 
C, May 3, 187.4, to Miss Alice Ingham, a na- 
tive of Illinois but reared in California and 
Utah from early childhood. The general is a 
stanch Republican in his political convictions; 
in the line of his profession he is a member of 
the National Geographic Association. 



FRANCIS HARDEN STANTON. Horti- 
culture and general farming have in Mr. Stanton 
an active and capable exponent, his efforts since 
1900 being the upbuildings of his own personal 
interests in the vicinity of Bassett, Los Angeles 
county, as well as the best development possi- 
ble for the community. He came to California in 
1899. He was born in Grantville, Md., twenty- 
four miles west of Cumberland, August 5, 1855; 
his father, William Stanton, was a native of 
i\Iaryland, as was also his grandfather, George. 
The great-grandfather came from England and 
located in Maryland, where he participated in 
the Revolutionary war. William Stanton en- 
gaged in farming until his death, which occurred 
at an advanced age in his native state. He mar- 
ried JNIary Ann Ridgley, also a native of Mary- 
land and daughter of Eli Ridgley, a farmer. They 
became the parents of ten children, six of whom 
are living. One son, A. Jackson, served in a 
Pennsylvania regim.ent during the Civil war, sur- 
vived its perils and eventually located in Kansas, 
where he died. 

Francis Harden Stanton was next to the young- 
est in the large family of children born to his 
parents. He was reared on the paternal farm, re- 
ceiving his education in the public schools and 
being trained to the practical duties which have 
proven of so much benefit to him in manhood's 
years. L'pon attaining his majority he went into 
partnership with his brother, Uriah, and together 
they farmed the old homestead. He remained at 
home until the spring of 1880 when he set out 
for the west and engaged in mining in Ouray, 
Colo. He was successful and acquired some 
means with which he purchased a farm on the 
Uncompahgre river, helping to take out a ditch 
and canal for irrigation purposes, and contin- 
uing to improve and develop the propertv for 
some years. He had two hundred acres devoted 
to alfalfa, general farming and stock raising, and 
in this enterprise was uniformly successful. On 
account of his wife's health he came to California 
in 1899 and in Los Angeles engaged in a retail 
mercantile enterprise. After one year he disposed 
of this interest and in December, 1900, purcliased 
forty acres at Bassett. built a residence, barns 
and outbuildings, and engaged in general farm- 
ing once more. In 1902 he set out twenty acres 
of walnuts and followed this up two years later 




^rRMjn(^ — ~ 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1217 



by setting- out the balance in the same commod- 
ity. He also engages in grain raising at Puente. 
Mr. Stanton's wife was formerly Miss Alice 
Killen, a native of Missouri, their marriage hav- 
ing taken place in Colorado. They have eight 
children living, namely : Mary, Harry, Alva, 
Ridgley, Elnora, Francis, Robert and Eugene. 
Mr. Stanton was made a Mason in Ouray (Colo.) 
Lodge No. 37, and is now identified with Lexing- 
ton Lodge No. 104 of El Monte. He has always 
taken a deep interest in educational affairs and 
while a resident of Ouray was a member of the 
school board, and also occupied a similar posi- 
tion in Bassett until his resignation. 



DANIEL RANDAL CLAY. The present 
growth and prosperit)^ of San Pedro is a ful- 
fillment of the early visions of Daniel Randal 
Clay, for years one of the most progressive 
citizens and most sagacious authorities in real 
estate whom the town boasted in its list of 
prominent residents. Ere yet his dreams had 
come to their realization he was called from 
the activities of life, leaving a void in the 
hearts of family and friends and a vacant 
place in the business circles of his home city. 
Through his labors as a' member of the board 
of trustees for several years ; through his serv- 
ices as the first chief of the fire department 
of San Pedro : througlj his membership in the 
Chamber of Commerce, and in other capaci- 
ties he was a promoter of San Pedro's welfare, 
and his interests likewise extended into the 
business activities of Los Angeles, where he 
held membership in the Chamber of Commerce. 

Gorham, in the state of Maine, was Mr. 
Clay's native place, and November 13. 1849, 
the'date of his birth. His father, Rev. Daniel 
Randal Clay, a native of the same place and 
a minister in the P)aptist denomination, re- 
moved to \\'yoming at an early day and from 
there came to California, where now he makes 
his home in Los Angeles. In 1898 he was be- 
reaved by the death of his wife, who passed 
away at San Pedro: she bore the maiden 
name of Mary Hamlin and was a native of 
Maine. Born' of their union were four sons 
and two daughters, of whom the next to the 
youngest was given his father's name and re- 
mained in Maine until nineteen years of age, 
when he turned his steps toward the west. 
While still quite young he learned telegraphy 
and this occupation he followed throughout 
much of his active life. For eight years he 
acted as telegraph operator and station agent 
for the Union Pacific Railroad Company at 
Carbon, Wyo., from which point he removed 
to Denver and took up the real-estate and in- 
surance business. His next location was at 



Rico, in the mountain districts of Colorado, 
where he remained for two years. 

Coming to California in 1884, Mr. Clay se- 
cured employment with the Southern Pacific 
Railway Company as telegraph operator at 
San Pedro and for a brief period gave his at- 
tention to the duties of the position. In the 
meanwhile he had become interested in the 
possibilities of the town. Thoroughly believ- 
ing in its future growth, he decided he could 
advantageously engage in the real-estate busi- 
ness, hence he gave up telegraphy in order 
to devote himself exclusively to business- af- 
fairs. The firm of D. R. Clay & Co. was the 
first general real-estate and insurance busi- 
ness established in the town and under his ac- 
tive supervision it was developed into an im- 
portant institution. Among his most import- 
ant enterprises was the laying out of the Cla^'- 
subdivision to San Pedro and he was inter- 
ested in other additions, his real-estate trans- 
actions being extensive and important, and 
aiding greatly in the upbuilding of the town. 
AVhile still actively engaged in business he 
died February 18, 1904, and a few days later 
his body was interred in a cemetery at Los 
Angeles. The business since his death has 
been purchased by his son-in-law, J. W. Wal- 
ton, who conducts it under the title of D. R. 
Clay Co., and maintains the high reputation 
established durmg the lifetime of its founder. 

The fraternal associations of Mr. Clay in- 
cluded membership in the Independent Or- 
der of Odd Fellows, Benevolent Protective 
Order of Elks, Royal Arcanum, and the Ma- 
sonic Order, in which he was the first master 
of San Pedro Lodge No. 332, F. & A. M., and 
also an active member of the Royal Arch chap- 
ter. Though not a partisan in politics, he had 
pronounced convictions upon the leading ques- 
tions of the age, and gave his unqualified sup- 
port to the Republican party. Surviving him 
are his widow and two daughters. The for- 
mer, who bore the maiden name of J\lay J. 
Sanders, was born in Cardiff, England, and 
v.^as a daughter of James and Hannah Char- 
lotte fjones) Sanders, natives respectively of 
Bristol and London, England. The father, 
who was an engineer by occupation, brought 
the family to the United States and settled at 
Salt Lake City, where both he and his wife 
remained until death. In the family of Mrs. 
Clay there are two daughters, both of Avhom 
are married and reside in San Pedro. The 
elder daughter, Josie May. is the wife of J. 
W. Walton, and they have one daughter. Mary 
Lillian ; the younger, Lillian, married L. W. 
Goodhue. The Clay family residence .'stands 
on the corner of Tenth and Bacon streets and 
is one of the most attractive homesteads in 



1218 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



the city. Like her husband in political views, 
Islrs. Clay believes m the principles of the Re- 
publican party. With the other elements 
forming a rounded character religion blends 
its harmonious light. The creed which Mrs. 
Clay espouses is that of the Episcopal Church 
and to its charities she is a thoughtful con- 
tributor. In fraternal associations she is iden- 
tified with the Order of the Eastern Star and 
the Rebekah?. 



ALEXANDER GILL. The life of the noble 
pioneer will ever be held in reverent remem- 
brance in the community that he helped to build 
up. Among pioneer settlers Ventura county 
had in Alexander Gill of Springville one of its 
most enterprising citizens, a man of energy and 
ability, successful along personal lines and at 
the same time prominent in public afifairs, in 
which he constantly sought to advance the best 
general interests. He was a pioneer of Califor- 
nia, having located in the state in 1867 from his 
birthplace, Canada, he having been born No- 
vember 2, 1847, in Grinnville. His parents, 
David and Mary (Frazier) Gill, were natives 
respectively of North Ireland and Scotland, the 
father emigrating to this country at the age of 
sixteen years. They were married in Canada 
and spent the balance of their lives in that lo- 
cation, his death occurring at the age of fifty- 
six years and hers at the age of thirty. Alex- 
ander Gill received his education in the public 
schools of Canada and during the years of boy- 
hood and young manhood received parental 
training which fostered in his character those 
traits that distinguish natives of the countries 
from which his father and mother emigrated. 
He followed agricultural pursuits in Canada un- 
til 1867, in which year he came to the Pacific 
coast, and in iNIendocino county, Cal., farmed for 
about nineteen years. In 1886 he came to the 
Santa Clara valley in A'entura county and piu"- 
chased the property where he ever since made 
his home. This property, which consists of two 
hundred and forty acres, was then raw land en- 
tirely devoid of cultivation or improvements ; to- 
day his farm holds rank with the best in Ventura 
county, being well improved with a comfortable 
residence, substantial barns and outbuildings, 
good fences, and also has a fine artesian well 
which furnishes a good supply of water. In ad- 
dition to his own land he rented three hundred 
acres, his interests being principally centered in 
the raising of beans (to which sixty acres are 
devoted) and the cultivation of wheat and barley. 
He ably demonstrated his ability along agri- 
cultural lines and was accounted one of the most 
successful men of this section, as well as a liberal 
and public spirited citizen. 



Mr. Gill established home ties through his mar- 
riage in Canada, in 1876, to Miss Linda Smith, 
a native of Canada, and born of this union are 
the following children : Ernest, residing in Los 
Angeles county ; Bessie, Alice, Edmond Roy, 
George, Qiarles, Marion, Harry, John, Allen, 
Jessie and Myrtle. The family are members of 
the Presbyterian Qiurch, to which Mr. Gill gave 
liberally, supporting all its charities. Fraternally 
he was identified with the [Masonic organization, 
being a member of Oxnard Lodge No. 341, F. 
& A. M., and Oxnard Chapter No. 86, R. A. M. 
Educational matters received no little of the at- 
tention of Mr. Gill, whose best efforts were al- 
ways given toward the promotion of the best ad- 
vantages possible. For a number of years he 
served efficiently as trustee of the Springville 
school, which office he held up to the time of his 
death September 17, 1906, Politically he was a 
Republican, and although too much occupied 
with his personal afifairs to care for official recog- 
nition, was counted upon to support the men and 
measures of his party in a public-spirited man- 
ner. 



EDWIN WATERMAN COLMAN. Busi- 
ness connected with the Lumber Surveyors' As- 
sociation of Southern California receives the en- 
tire time and attention of Edwin Waterman Col- 
man of San Pedro, he having been one of the or- 
ganizers and the first president of the association. 
For more than thirty years he has been a resi- 
dent of California, the greater part of which time 
he has been identified with the development and 
upbuilding of this city. The Colman family is 
of English extraction and the name was form- 
erl\- spelled Caiman. The first members who 
came to this country settled in Massachusetts 
and the grandfather, .\mial, who was born in 
Scituate. was proprietor of and originally laid 
out Colman's Hills in Scituate and Cohasset, 
Mass. Waterman Colman, the father of Edwin 
^^'aterman, was also born in Scituate. Mass., 
and as a young man followed seafaring life. Af- 
ter making two trips he gave up that life, how- 
ever, and engaged in mercantile pursuits in Med- 
ford and West Medford. Later he came to Cali- 
fornia and is now living in Woodland, this state, 
at the advanced age of eighty-three years. His 
wife, who was before her marriage Nancy Eli- 
zabeth Loring, was born in Yarmouth, Me., of 
English descent, and her death occurred in 1890. 

The only child of his parents, the birth of 
^Ir. Colman occurred May i, 1856, in Boston, 
and he was reared in North Cambridge. After 
completing his studies in Shepherd grammar 
school he entered the high school preparatory 
course at Cambridge, being in the same class with 
ex-governor \\'illiam l^. Russell of Massachusetts. 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1221 



His eyesight failed him before the work in the 
school was completed and he was obliged to give 
up further study. For an entire year he took 
treatment for his eyes without apparent results, 
when suddenly his sight returned to him and has 
not troubled him since. He then entered the 
employ of J\lr. Woodworth of Boston and learned 
to become a proficient tea taster. His health 
becoming impaired he was obliged to give up 
this business and refusing an offer of a position 
at a salary of $3,500 in 1876 he came to San 
Francisco. Upon his arrival he secured employ- 
ment at Woodland, then became connected with 
the California Pacific Railway, at Willows he 
being engaged in checking up all of the 
material which was sent to the northern road. 
In 1884 he came to Southern California and 
took a position with the San Pedro Lumber 
Company, a year later removing to Los An- 
geles, where for the succeeding four years 
and four months he filled the position of 
foreman for the Davies-Henderson Lumber Com- 
pany. He then returned to San Francisco and 
was occupied as tallyman until 1893, when he 
took up his permanent residence in San Pedro 
and began as a lumber survej-or. In 1903 he 
assisted in the organization of the Lumber Sur- 
veyors' Association of Southern California and 
after filling the office of president for two and 
a half years refused longer service in that capa- 
city. 

Mr. Colman was made a Mason in Wilmington 
Lodge No. igS, F. & A. j\l., and is now a charter 
member of San Pedro Lodge No. 332. Politi- 
cally he is a stanch advocate of the principles 
embraced in the platform of the Republican party. 
As a public-spirited citizen he is actively in- 
terested in the upbuilding of this section and takes 
a leading part in the furthering of all enter- 
prises tending to develop the community in which 
he resides. 



SIMON FAIRBURN. Prominent among 
the large and prosperous fruit growers of Los 
Angeles county is Simon Fairburn, owner of 
one of the most valuable ranches in Burbank. 
A man of exceptional, executive and finan- 
cial ability, he has filled positions of 
trust and responsibility with great cred- 
it to himself and to the pecuniary ad- 
vantage of others, having for more than 
twenty years been connected with the Stand- 
ard Oil Company in an official capacity. A 
son of William Fairburn, he was born, May 
16, 1850, in the Shenandoah valley, Augusta 
county, Va., of substantial Scotch descent. His 
grandfather was born and reared in Pennsyl- 
vania, but subsequently settled as a planter in 
Virginia, being a pioneer of the Shenandoah 



valley. He served in the Revolution, and like- 
wise in the war of 181 2, in the latter being in 
the army until his death, in 1814. 

William Fairburn was a life-long resident of 
\'irginia, his birth occurring there in 1800, and 
his death in 1890. He was owner of a planta- 
tion, and a citizen of influence. He married 
Elizabeth Funk, the descendant of a family 
that emigrated from Germany to the United 
States in 1706, and located m Pennsylvania. 
Her birth occurred in Virginia in 1808, and her 
death in 1872. She bore' her husband twelve 
children, five of whom reached years of ma- 
turity, and four are now living. 

Brought up on the home plantation, Simon 
Fairburn assisted his father in its manage- 
ment until seventeen years of age, when, as an 
apprentice he learned the miller's trade. Sub- 
sequently leasing the mill of his former em- 
ployer he operated it successfully for three 
years. In 1874 he made a new departure. Go- 
ing to Parkersburg, W. Va., he secured a po- 
sition with the Standard Oil Company, with 
which he was connected for twenty-two years. 
Beginning wich the firm in a low position, he 
gradual!}- worked his way upward, carefully 
learning the details of the business in its every 
branch, and for three years, from 1883 until 
1886. was superintendent of their works in 
Parkersburg. In the fall of 1886 he was sent 
as a representative of the company to ^Mexico, 
with instructions to locate, construct and op- 
erate a refinery in the City of Mexico. In 1889 
he was instructed to build a refinery in Vera 
Cruz, Mexico, and was then made superintend- 
ent of the entire Standard Oil business in the 
Republic of Mexico, a position of great re- 
sponsibility, which he held until 1896. Being 
obliged to send his children north to be edu- 
cated, and wishing to be in Parkersburg a 
part of the time each year, Mr. Fairburn then 
asked the company for a transfer, and this be- 
ing refused, he at once resigned his position. 
Returning to the United States, he traveled 
through many parts, and in September, 1896, 
decided to locate permanently in Southern Cal- 
ifornia. .Accordingly, he bought sixty acres of 
land in North Glendale, near the line of the 
Pacific Electric road, paying $4,500 for the 
first thirty acres, and $2,850 for the other half. 
Taking up ranching in earnest, he has made im- 
provements of an excellent character, includ- 
ing the setting out of an orchard, and has now 
one of the most desirable estates in this part 
of the county. 

In Washington. D. C. JNlr. Fairburn mar- 
ried Bettie M. Williams, a native of Bath 
county, Va., being a daughter of Dr. R. P. 
Williams, who served throughout the Civil 



1222 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



war as a surgeon in the Confederate army. 
Mr. and Mrs. Fairburn are the parents of five 
children, namelv: Charles W., Eva E., Elora 
E., Ollie W., and Ruth A., the latter born in 
California. Air. and Mrs. Fairburn are mem- 
bers of the Methodist Episcopal Church at 
Burbank, and Mr. Fairburn is a member of the 
Masonic fraternity. 



MICHAEL BALDRIDGE. To the pioneers, 
the pathfinders to civilization and prosperity, a 
special debt of gratitude is due, and the resi- 
dents of California who now enjoy the delights 
and privileges of a locality which has no equal 
in the country, should never forget the meed of 
praise which they owe the few sturdy frontiers- 
men who made their pleasant life here possible. 
Among this noble band of pioneers who came to 
the state during the gold period was Michael 
Baldridge, whose accounts of the happenings of 
early days have probably had more readers and 
listeners than any other one of the remaining 
pioneers. He never tires of recounting the inci- 
dents of those days, which were filled with hard- 
ships which we of this day cannot even picture 
in our most vivid imagination, but even under 
these conditions kind-hearted liberality and 
brotherly love prevailed. Not only is Mr. Bald- 
ridge a fluent speaker, but he is a ready writer 
as well, and his reminiscences and anecdotes of 
pioneer life in the west are eagerly read and 
greatly appreciated, not only by those who, like 
himself, have crossed the plains and experienced 
its perils and hardships, but by the younger gen- 
erations. 

The first of the name to settle in the new 
world was the grandfather, another Michael 
Baldridge, who was born in the north of Ireland 
and upon coming to the LTnited States located 
in Little Britain, Lancaster county. Pa. In his 
religious belief he was a strict Presbyterian. His 
son John was born in Little Britain. Pa., where 
he made his home until reaching his nineteenth 
year, when he transferred his interests to Sen- 
eca county, N. Y. There he established himself 
as a tiller of the soil, an occupation which he 
followed throughout his life, or until his death 
in 1876. Not only had he lived long, but he had 
lived worthily, putting into daily and hourly 
practice the principles of his belief in Christianity 
as set forth in Presbyterian doctrines. His mar- 
riage united him with Agnes Barr, a native of 
Seneca county, N. Y., and a daughter of Rob- 
ert Barr of Scottish birth. Upon coming to the 
United States he first settled in Washtenaw 
County, Mich., and later in Kent county on the 
present site of Grand Rapids. At that time there 
was little evidence that the straggling settle- 
ment woidd ever attain its present prominence 



in the commercial world, but Mr. Barr was a 
far-seeing man and often prophesied a brilliant 
future for the town on account of its excellent 
water power. To Mr. Barr and his wife were 
born seventeen children, all of whom grew to 
mature years and all early in life established 
their independent careers, which was perhaps a 
matter of necessity rather than one of choice. A 
large family also blessed the marriage of John 
and Agnes Baldridge, and of their twelve chil- 
dren eleven attained maturity. During the Civil 
war John Baldridge, one of the sons, served in 
the engineering corps ; Robert is now a resident 
of Covina, and James was a resident of Pomona 
at the time of his death, having come to the west 
with his brother Michael in 1858. 

Michael Baldridge was born in Seneca coun- 
ty, N. Y., December 21, 1826, and was brought 
up on his father's farm, attending district school 
during the winter months and working on the 
farm in the summer. Notwithstanding the crude 
surroundings and lack of present-da}- advan- 
tages he became a brilliant scholar and was es- 
pecially apt in spelling, and in the old "spelling 
school" of former days he carried oflf the honors 
as a champion speller, being able to "spell down" 
the entire class. Among the memories of those 
days he recalls his intimate acquaintance with 
the old Cobb speller, a text-book then in general 
use and which served as an arbiter in case of 
dispute in the study of orthography. When he 
was nineteen years of age he left. the east and 
went to ]\Iontcalm county, Mich, where he had 
relatives, but it was not long before he returned 
to his native state, and later became an em- 
ploye in the counting room of C. C. Marsh, in 
New York City. It was while there that he 
heard of the French expedition to California, 
plans for wh.ich were exploited in the daily pa- 
pers, and his youth and ambition could not 
withstand the challenge. With colors flying and 
hopes high the steamer Georgia, under com- 
mand of Parker H. French, left New York har- 
bor with its load of gold seekers bound for the 
Pacific coast. On the way they touched port 
at Havana, New Orleans, Galveston and El 
Paso del Norte, in which latter place the expedi- 
tion was broken up on account of French not 
keeping his promises. From there they made 
their way as best they could, walking a distance 
of one thousand miles in reaching Mazatlan, and 
on the way passed through Giihuahua and Du- 
rango. When Mr. Baldridge started from New 
York he had $20 in ready money and as sec- 
retary of the expedition was to receive $25 per 
month for his sennces. He received nothing, 
however, and when he arrived in San Francisco 
eight months from the time of leaving New 
York, he was exceedingly short of funds. His 
prime object in coming to California had been 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1223 



to seek wealth in the mines, and for three years 
he bent his efforts in this direction. That his 
efforts did not meet with the desired results was 
evident from the fact that at the end of that 
time, in 1853, he returned to familiar scenes 
and surroundings in the east. From then until 
1857 he engaged in business in Waterloo, Sen- 
eca county, N. Y., but as that was the year of 
the panic he suffered the fate of many other busi- 
ness men and was forced to close his doors. The 
following year he again started for the Pacific 
coast, coming by way of Panama, and on this 
trip was accompanied by his brother James. Once 
more he tried his luck at the mines, but with 
about the same results as before, sometimes 
making money but more often losing, until af- 
ter thirteen years he gave it up entirely and fur- 
thermore resolved never to be tempted to try 
mining again. For twelve years he worked in 
the employ of others as clerk, remaining with 
one house in San Francisco for eight years, and 
during all of this time was a most indefatigable 
worker, his motto being how much and not how 
little he could accomplish for his employer's 
welfare. 

Thus far in his career Mr. Baldridge had 
struggled against great odds, but with the year 
1873 brighter prospects opened up before him. 
In that year he started in business on his own 
account, handling bonds and stocks under the 
title of M. Baldridge, banker and broker. A 
large commission business grew out of this hum- 
ble beginning, and he became a charter mem- 
ber of the Pacific Stock Exchange, being chair- 
man of its executive committee for seven years. 
Failing health, however, compelled him to give 
up his interests in San Francisco and in 1880 he 
located in Covina, where he started a nursery 
composed of orange trees entirely. At that time 
there was no market for these trees, so he bought 
land at $11 per acre and set out one hundred 
and eleven acres to orange trees, and in time 
was able to sell the nursery stock. He gave 
away thirty-one acres of the land, still retaining 
eighty acres, which he carried on as a nursery 
for seven years, during which time his health 
was greatly improved. At the end of this time 
he was offered $70,000 for his ranch, an offer 
which he accepted, and the same year came to 
Pomona and built his present residence on 
Kingslev and ^^'ashington streets. During the 
thirteen years which he has made this place his 
home he has built up one of the finest ranches in 
this part of the county. It comprises ten acres, 
and is supplied with a pumping plant which fur- 
nishes an abundant supply of water for both 
domestic and irrigating purposes. He also owns 
a ten acre orange grove at Bloomington, as well 
as a block of five acres on a street in San Ber- 
nardino, upon which he is erecting twenty-six 



cottages of patent stone, having put in his own 
manufacturing plant for that purpose. 

Upon his return east after his first expedition 
to California JMr. Baldridge was married, in 
1853, to Miss Elizabeth Garrison, a native of 
New York, but their married life was of short 
duration, as her death occurred four years later. 
His second marriage occurred in Indiana in 1871 
and united him with Mrs. Elizabeth (Graham) 
Lee, who was born in Ohio, and is still living. 
Politically Mr. Baldridge is a Republican. As 
may be surmised he is a member of the Society 
of California Pioneers of 1849, "on^ of whose 
members, it is safe to say, experienced more se- 
vere or prolonged hardships than did Mr. Bald- 
ridge in reaching the Golden West. His motto 
through life has been to put into daily practice 
the principles of the Golden Rule, and all who 
have been brought in contact with him will tes- 
tify that he adhered to these principles rigidly. 
His name is on the membership roll of the Uni- 
tarian Church of Pomona. 



SETH AlARSHALL. There are few citi- 
zens in San Bernardino who have so em- 
phatically impressed their worth upon their 
community as has Seth Marshall. His advent 
into the Pacific coast country dates back to 
the spring of 1875. coming hither in the hope 
that the ocean voyage would restore his health, 
wdiich had become greatly impaired by over- 
work in East Sagmaw, Mich., where he was 
then residing. His quest for health had not 
been in vain, the sea voyage and the bracing 
climate of San Francisco, where he remained 
for a time, both contributing to his welfare. 
So well pleased was he with the outlook in 
the west that he decided to remain and grow 
up v.'ith the country. 

Of Puritan stock, Seth Marshall was born 
April 25. 1850. on the old Marshall homestead 
on the W^estern Reserve, in what is now the 
citv of Paincsville, Ohio, whither his grand- 
father had immigrated from Colebrook, Conn., 
in the earlv '305. .\mong the children in the 
grandfather's family was one Seth, who be- 
came an important factor in the upbuilding 
of that new country. Before the building of 
the Lake Shore Railroad he was a clerk on 
one of the large lake steamers, and subse- 
quently was bookkeeper and later president 
of the old Bank of Geauga, an institution 
which in later years became the First Nation- 
al Bank of Painesville. Before the Civil war 
he took a firm stand in the question of slav- 
er}-, and throughout northern Ohio no one 
labored more zealously to abolish the nefarious 
institution than did Mr. Marshall, whose home 
was one of the stations on the underground 



1224 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



railroad used for the escape of the negroes. 
As one of the organizers and upholders of the 
Republican party in that state he counted 
among his friends and co-laborers such men 
as Ben Wade, Joshua R. Giddings, Salmon 
P. Chase, besides others of equal fame dur- 
ing that time. As a delegate to the national 
convention of his party Mr. Marshall had a 
hand in the nomination of Lincoln for his sec- 
ond term, and was one of the presidential 
electors from Ohio at that election. As a fit- 
ting close to his long and useful life he was 
permitted to spend his last days in the land 
of Sunshine and Flowers, passing away at 
the home of his son in San Bernardino in 1880. 

By the time he was eighteen years of age 
Seth Marshall, Jr., had completed his studies 
in the school of Oberlin, -Ohio, and was ready 
to launch upon his business career, which he 
did by becoming a clerk in the wholesale 
hardware business owned by his uncles, Mor- 
ley Brothers, of East Saginaw, Mich. It was 
not long before he had acquired an interest in 
the business, and finally became general man- 
ager of the plant, but after seven years of 
close application his health became impaired 
to such an extent that he followed the advice 
of his physicians and took an ocean voyage, 
the same "which brought him to California in 
1875. After disposing of his interests in 
Michigan he entered with vigor into the life 
of the new country and among other enter- 
prises which he assisted in founding was the 
Pacific Stock Exchange, organized in the 
summer of 1875. His interest in various min- 
ing properties in Nevada, Arizona and in the 
Ord district of San Bernardino finally led to 
his location in this country in 1880. 

With his brother-in-law, William H. Chen- 
ey, and the latter's uncle, John Cheney (the 
latter one of the original Cheney Brothers 
who founded the Cheney Brothers silk works 
at South Manchester, Conn.), Mr. Marshall 
purchased one thousand acres of land, the 
eastern part of the Muscupiabe grant. Legal 
complications which followed delayed the im- 
provement of the tract and in the mean time 
John Cheney died. Mr. ^larshall was appoint- 
ed administrator of the estate, which was 
finally bought by an eastern syndicate of 
which he was a memljer. To secure water for 
this large acreage he organized the Highland 
Ditch Company, to build a canal from the east 
side of City creek west, above the Cheney 
tract, on to North San Bernardino, where 
Mr. Marshall then owned another tract of one 
thousand acres. In time the canal was com- 
pleted to the Cheney tract, which enabled the 
land owners along the foothills of Highland 
to secure water for their lands, the Cheney 



land benefiting likewise. Subsequently this 
canal was sold to the Bear Valley Company 
with the proviso that the latter company was 
to complete the canal to north San Bernar- 
dino, which has since been accomplished. 
Mr. Marshall was also one of the organizers of 
the North Fork Water Company, of which for 
}'ears he was a director and also president. 
^\l^en the loop line of the Santa Fe road was 
built around the east end of the San Bernar- 
dino valley its construction was largely aid- 
ed by the personal effort of Mr. Marshall, he 
contributing over $3,000 and the right of way 
for over two miles through his property. Hor- 
ticultural affairs also have received an im- 
petus through his efforts, a practical demon- 
stration of which was seen at the time of the 
organization of the Highland Orange Grow- 
ers' Association, of which he is now presi- 
dent. One of the most stupendous undertak- 
ings in San Bernardino was set on foot with 
the organization of the Arrowhead Hot Springs 
Company. With the assistance of a strong 
local directorate Mr. Marshall inaugurated an 
enterprise which promises to out-distance any 
undertaking of the kind in the world. The 
companv is incorporated for $1,000,000, and 
has among its stockholders some of the lead- 
ing men in this part of the state and also of 
the east. It is the confident expectation of 
all concerned that with the natural advantages 
of scenery, climate, elevation and surround- 
ings these springs will develop a resort which 
will make the San Bernardino valley world 
renowned. 

In San Francisco, in 1878, l\Ir. ^Marshall 
was married to Frances Marie Mo3de, a sis- 
ler of Mrs. William H. Cheney, of South Man- 
chester, Conn. After almost twenty years of 
happy married life Mrs. Marshall was called 
up higher, February 15, 1897, leaving a void 
in her home as well as in the many charitable 
and social organizations with which she was 
connected. Her greatest happiness consisted 
in doing for others, and none knew her but 
to love her. She was a devoted member of 
the Episcopal Church and one of its active 
workers. 



AMASA PARKER JOHNSON, JR., the 
president of the city council of San Diego, is a 
member of one of the pioneer families of Cali- 
fornia. In a family of six daughters and two 
sons, of whom all are living except one son, he 
is next to the oldest and represents the third 
successive generation bearing the same name. 
.San Francisco is his native city, the date of 
his birth being October 29, 1866. Primarily 
educated in public schools, he later had the 




JI/-0. 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1227 



advantage of study in St. Matthew's Hall at 
San Mateo, and meanwhile became interested 
in stenography. When eighteen years of age 
he started out to earn his own way in the 
world, his first position being that of private 
secretary to Jesse D. Carr,, president of the 
Salinas Bank. From Salinas he came to San 
Diego in February, 1888, and after filling a po- 
sition as stenographer for two months he be- 
came a deputy in the office of the county re- 
corder. There he continued for five years, 
and during the last three years acted as chief 
deputy. The following five years were spent 
in the county assessor's office as deputy (a 
part of that time being chief deputy) and then 
he returned to the county recorder's office as 
chief deputy for five years. 

By the purchase of the interests of the Reed 
& Burt Abstract Company, in February, 1903, 
]\Ir. Johnson organized the Union Title & 
Trust Compan)', and by forming a combina- 
tion with the Title Insurance & Trust Com- 
pany of Los Angeles the strongest organiza- 
tion of its kind in Southern California was se- 
cured. The company has a capital stock of 
$100,000, and Mr. Johnson acts as manager, 
secretary and treasurer. 

Under appointment by Governor Pardee in 
the year 1904 Mr. Johnson became a member 
of the city council according to the new char- 
ter. The following year he was elected to rep- 
resent the eighth ward in the council, where 
he served as chairman of the street committee 
and a member of the finance and water com- 
mittees. On the resignation of Mr. Osborn as 
president of the city council, in November, 
1905, Mr. Johnson was chosen to fill the va- 
cancy and since then has acted in the capacity 
cf president. 



stock. He is progressive and enterprising and 
although young in years bids fair to make 
one of the most successful ranchers of this 
community. In August, 1901, he was united 
in marriage with Miss Marinda Sackett, who 
was born in Artesia, Los Angeles county, a 
daughter of William A. Sackett, represented at 
length elsewhere in this volume. They have 
two children, Emma and William. Mr. Orr 
is verv prominent fraternally, being a mem- 
ber of Norwalk Lodge No. 315, F. & A. M., 
and serving as senior warden, while both him- 
self and wife are associated with the Order of 
Eastern Star in the Norwalk chapter; he also 
belongs to the camp of the Maccabees of Ar- 
tesia, 'and the Odd Fellows, of Artesia, and 
self and wife are identified with the Rebekahs 
of that place. He supports the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, of which his wife is a de- 
voted member. Politically he is a stanch ad- 
vocate of Democratic principles. Mr. Orr 
stands exceptionally high in the community, 
respected alike for his business ability so early 
displaved, and bis personal qualities of charac- 
ter which have won him many friends. 



JOHN J. ORR. A native Californian, John 
J. ' Orr was born on the old Orr homestead 
near Norwalk, Los Angeles county, March 3, 
1876, a son of W. W. Orr, one of the esteemed 
pioneers of this section whose personal history 
is given at length in another part of this vol- 
vcme. His preliminary education was re- 
ceived through the medium of the public school 
of Little Lake, .ifter which he attended Wood- 
bury Business College, of Los Angeles. Re- 
turning home he remained with his parents 
until attaining his majority, when he began 
the cultivation and improvement of a ranch 
of forty acres on which he resides. This is 
largely devoted to alfalfa although he has a 
fine dairy herd of twenty cows, which net him 
a handsome income. For one year pf the time 
he has spent on this ranch he was in Tulare 
countv, where he went with a large herd of 



JAMES HENRY LEWIS. In tracing the 
genealogy of the branch of the Lewis family 
represented bv this influential citizen and horti- 
culturist of Pomona we find that he is descended 
froni ancestors who came from England with 
the Pilgrims and landed at Plymouth Rock in 
1620, they later settling in Barnstable, Mass. 
Representatives of the family finally drifted into 
Connecticut, for it was there that the great- 
grandfather, John Lewis, was born January 3, 
1754. He was a young man of about twenty- 
one years when the war for independence was 
waged between England and the colonies, and 
as one of the soldiers who fought in behalf of 
the voung nation he lived to see the accomplish- 
ment of their purpose and enjoy the freedom 
from tyranny and oppression. He died in Con- 
necticut in 1828. The grandfather, James 
Lewis, was also born in the Nutmeg state, where 
he was reared and married, but during middle 
life he settled as a pioneer in Kane county. 111., 
and there rounded out a useful career. His mar- 
riage united him with Desire Remington, she 
too" being a native of Connecticut. Among the 
children born to them was Norman Lewis, whose 
birth occurred in Suffield, Hartford county. 
Conn., and he too became a pioneer in the newer 
west. For some years he made his home in 
Ohio, and it was while the family were living in 
that state that James Henry Lewis was born. 
After the death of the wife and mother, which 
occurred in that state, the father returned to 
Connecticut, where for a time he was employed 



1228 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



as a blacksmith in Colt's armory. Coming to 
the west once more he located in Kane count)', 
111., in 1853, and the year following went to 
Iowa, where he carried on fanning until the 
breaking out of the Civil war. Going to Tama 
City he opened a general merchandise business 
which he conducted until the close of the war, 
and then, in partnership with his son James, 
engaged in the lumber business in that city. 
Later he retired from the business and for a 
number of years prior to his death had been free 
from business cares. He died in Tama City at 
the advanced age of seventy-eight years, his 
loss being deeply felt in his community, for he 
had been an active citizen and had done much to- 
ward the upbuilding of the town. He was a 
member of the county board of supersasors, 
justice of the peace and was also postmaster 
of the town. Up to the time of the war he had 
stanchly upheld the principles of the Democra- 
tic party, but thereafter he allied himself with 
the Republicans. From the age of twenty years 
he had been a member of the Baptist Church, 
and the teachings of the Qiristian religion were 
manifest in his daily life and sustained him in 
his death. His marriage united him with Lucy 
Kent, who was a native of Suffield, Conn., and 
who died in Medina county, Ohio. Four chil- 
dren were born of this marriage, three of whom 
grew to maturity, but only one of the number 
is now living. 

The only representative of his parents" family 
now living. James Henry Lewis was born in 
Akron, Ohio, June 13, 1840, and was reared in 
Ohio until he was a lad of nine years, when his 
mother having died, his father took the family 
to Connecticut. His schooling was gained al- 
most entirely during the five years they remained 
in that state, for when thev came west and settled 
on a pioneer farm in Tama county, Iowa, in 
1854 his services were needed in breaking the 
soil and preparing the fields for cultivation. In 
response to the call to arms at the time of the 
Civil war he laid down the implements of peace 
and industry and instead shouldered the musket 
in defense of the principles which he believed 
were just and upright. In August. 1862, he 
volunteered as a member of Company E, Twenty- 
fourth Iowa Infantry, being mustered in at ]Mus- 
catine, and in the following October his regi- 
ment was sent to Helena. Ark., thereafter tak- 
ing part in the siege of Vicksburs:. Champion 
Hill_, Port Gibson, and Black River Bridge. For 
meritorious service in the latter campaign he 
was promoted to corporal and with the remainder 
of his regiment was made a part of the Depart- 
ment of the Gulf and under General Banks 
participated in the Red River expedition, among 
others taking part in the battle at Sabine Cross 
Roads. By boat thev went from Xew Orleans 



to Washington, D. C, and under General Sheri- 
dan took part in the Shenandoah Valley cam- 
paign, taking part in the battles of Winchester, 
Cedar Creek and Fisher's Hill. Thereafter, 
from January, 1865, until mustered out in July 
of that year in Savannah he remained on duty 
in that city and vicinity, having in the mean- 
time been promoted to sergeant, and as such 
was honorably discharged from the service in 
Davenport in August of 1865. 

After the war Mr. Lewis prepared himself 
for commercial life by taking a course in East- 
man's Business College in Chicago, 111., and there- 
after returned to Tama City, Iowa, where for 
about six years he was engaged in the lumber 
business. Later he became interested in the agri- 
cultural implement business, first in Tama City, 
and later in Traer, following this business until 
1879. when he removed to Nebraska and once 
more took up farming. Near Oxford, Furnas 
county, he took up four hundred and eighty acres 
from the government, upon which for the fol- 
lo\\'ing fourteen 3'ears he made a specialty of 
stock-raising. Upon the sale of his land and 
stock in 1893 he came to Pomona, where for 
the past fourteen years he has been interested 
in horticulture, owning among other ranches a 
ten-acre orange grove known as the San Antonio 
tract in San Bernardino county. 

In Tama City, Iowa. Mr. Lewis was married 
to Miss Emeline Carmichael, who was born in 
New York state and died in Pomona in August, 
1901. Of the four children who were born to 
them three are now living, Qiarles N., having 
died in Pomona. Sarah L., is at home with her 
father : Arthur P.. who is a graduate of the 
College of Physicians and Surgeons in San Fran- 
cisco, is now a practicing physician in Amador 
county ; and Lucy M., who graduated from the 
University of Illinois at Champaign, is now libra- 
rian of the Agricultural College in New Alexico. 
I\Ir. Lewis keeps his war experiences . fresh in 
memorv by associating with old comrades in 
A'icksburg Post No. 61. of Pomona, of which he 
is post commander, and at one time was aide on 
the department staff. He is an active member 
of the Baptist Church, in which he is serving 
as trustee, and politically he is a Republicah. 
AMiile a resident of Nebraska he joined the Odd 
Fellows and the .\ncient Order of United Work- 
men, being an officer in the latter organization. 



\\TLLIS EARL NEWTON. The success 
achieved by Willis E. Newton since his residence 
in Bassett is the result of his own efforts and 
application, bringing to bear in his work an in- 
telligent appreciation of the difficulties to be sur- 
mounted and the best method of laboring. The 
family is of eastern origin, the grandfather. }*far- 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1229 



cellus, a native of New York, having become a 
pioneer settler of Illinois in an early date in its 
history. He made his home in tlie vicinity of 
Springfield for some time, finally removing to 
Lake Mills, Wis., where he followed farming for 
a livelihood. His son, Almond P., the father of 
Willis E., was born in Illinois and reared in Wis- 
consin, where in manhood he engaged in a land 
and loan business. He eventually removed to 
Denver and engaged in mining and real estate en- 
terprises in partnership with Eben Smith, a 
connection which was broken by the death of jNIr. 
Newton. He is survived by his wife, fonnerly 
Isabelle Lamb, a native of Wisconsin, and some 
time after Mr. Newton's death she married J. 
C. Hutchinson, of Los Angeles, in which city 
she now resides. 

Of the five children born to his parents, of 
whom four are now living, Willis Earl Newton 
was born October 8, 1873, in Waterloo. Wis., 
next to the youngest in the family. He was 
quite young when the family located in Denver 
and in that city received his education in the pub- 
lic and high schools, graduating from the latter, 
after which he entered the postoffice under Coch- 
ran and served under him and Jordan in the 
inspection department until his resignation in 
1897. In the last named year he came to Cali- 
fornia and in Los Angeles secured a position as 
traveling salesman with the John D. Farwell 
Dry Goods Company, and for the ensuing six 
years traveled over the state of California. In 
1903 he resigned and accepted a position in the 
purchasing department of the Dolge Manufac- 
turing Company, resigning two years later to en- 
gage in farming. He purchased sixty acres of land 
at Walnut Center, in the Bassett district, and has 
since set it out in walnuts and alfalfa, has install- 
ed a pumping plant which irrigates the entire 
place and has improved it by the erection of a 
residence, barns, outbuildings, etc. Equal to his 
success in other lines has been that which he has 
met with in his farming enterprise, and he is to- 
day numbered among the representative horti- 
culturists of this section. 

In Whittier, Mr. Newton married Miss Jennie 
Tyler, a native of El ?\[onte, Cal., and daughter 
of J\Irs. Tyler English, located on Villa street, 
Pasadena. They have one daughter, Majorie. 
Mrs. Newton is a member of the Presbvterian 
Church and her culture and refinement add much 
to the social circles of El [Monte. 



CHARLES FINNEY RUGGLES. While 
Oxnard was yet a small village Mr. Ruggles 
became identified with its commercial devel- 
opment and remained one of its earnest and 
devoted citizens up to the time he sold out his 
interests there and removed to Ventura. For 



some years he was the owner and proprietor 
of the largest laundry in Ventura county. The 
business was conducted in a building specially 
erected for the purpose, consisting of a main 
structure, 25x80 feet, with two additions, each 
20x20 feet, also a boiler room with a boiler of 
twenty-four horse power and an engine of 
twelve horse power. The building was 
equipped with machinery of the latest pat- 
tern and adapted for its special purpose, the 
whole being arranged so that work could be 
turned out with dispatch and yet with scrupu- 
lous care. Water was furnished from an ar- 
tesian well on the premises, and in addition 
Mr. Ruggles manufactured distilled water for 
sale, shipping the same to Santa Paula, Nord- 
hoff and other neighboring towns. 

Of eastern extraction, ]\lr. Ruggles is a son 
of William M. and Hannah (Hoke) Ruggles, 
natives respectively of Illinois and West Vir- 
ginia. The maternal grandfather, Jacob Hoke, 
was a member of the F. F. \"s and removed 
from Virginia to Illinois, settling upon a farm. 
Being a man of means and culture, he was 
solicitous to give his children the highest ad- 
vantages, and his daughter was sent to col- 
lege at Oberlin, Ohio. One of his sons, Hon. 
J.T. Hoke, held office for years as district 
judge of Kings county, Va., and now fills the 
position of American consul at Halifax, Nova 
Scotia. After having cultivated a farm near 
Dixon, 111., for some years, William M. Rug- 
gles removed to Iowa and settled in Jones 
county near ^lechanicsville, where he took up 
farm pursuits. Later he removed to Cherokee 
county, Iowa, and transformed a raw tract of 
land into a cultivated farm. Eventually he 
became a pioneer farmer of South Dakota and 
now resides in Beadle county, that state, where 
he is a county commissioner and a man of 
large influence and acquaintance. 

Of the family of William M. Ruggles three 
sons and one daughter have passed from earth, 
and two sons and two daughters are now liv- 
ing. The eldest of the family was Charles 
Finney, who was born at Jackson, Wis., Feb- 
ruary 10, i860, and passed the yeajs of boy- 
hood on a farm in Jones county, Iowa. After 
having completed the common-school studies 
he attended Mount Vernon College, the State 
Agricultural College at Ames and Hillsdale 
College, leaving school at the beginning of his 
senior year. The expenses of his collegiate 
course he had paid by teaching eight terms of 
school, following the occupation in Iowa, In- 
diana, Michigan and Ohio. After leaving col- 
lege he settled at Coldwater, Branch county, 
Alich., where he engaged in the insurance busi- 
ness, held office as city clerk, acted as pen- 
sion attorney and also served as deputy coun- 



3230 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ty clerk. Leaving oMichigan in 1889 he came 
to California and in 1890 assisted in surveying 
the colony of Dos Palos in the San Joaquin 
valley, working with the agent of the land 
department of the Southern Pacific Railroad. 
As he made a careful study of the land he de- 
cided that it was less adapted to orchard pur- 
poses than a strip three miles distant, there- 
fore he bought land in the locality he preferred 
instead of in the colony itself. On his prop- 
erty he set out a vineyard and orchard, and 
had the satisfaction of seeing the vines and 
trees start most auspiciously. jNIeanwhile the 
colony was found to be planted on land affect- 
ed by alkali and therefore not adapted for 
orchards, so afterward the colonists moved to 
the district he had preferred, and he built the 
first store building in Dos Palos. 

Coming to Ventura in 1892 j\lr. Ruggles 
bought eight and one-third acres on Ventura 
evenue and set out a lemon orchard, which he 
still owns, and which he has occupied since 
disposing of his interests in Oxnard. While 
that town was still in the incipient stages of 
its development he located there, erected a 
store building on the Plaza and engaged in the 
mercantile business, but later turned his at- 
tention to the laundry enterprise previously 
mentioned. After coming to California he was 
married at Los Angeles to Miss Asenath R. 
Waite, who was born in Michigan, received 
an excellent education, is a ladv of culture and 
a member of the Universalist Church. While 
in Coldwater, l^.lich.. Mr. Ruggles was initiat- 
ed into Masonry and the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, and is past chief patriarch of 
the encampment. For eight years he held the 
commission of lieutenant-colonel of the First 
Regiment, Patriarch Militant, also was iden- 
tified with the canton. At this writing he is 
connected with Oxnard Lodge, I. O. O. F., 
of which he is past noble grand. Politicallv 
he favors Republican principles and votes with 
that party. For several vears he was a mem- 
ber of the Iowa State Militia and later joined 
the Michigan State :\lilitia at Coldwater, 
serving altogetlier for twelve vears. 



ROBERT G. LIVINGSTON. In Robert G. 
Livingston is found one of the finest types of 
the California pioneers who crossed the plains 
in 1853, a man who has been identified with the 
business and social, public and private interests 
which have tended toward the highest develop- 
ment of the state ever since. He succeeded in 
amassing a comfortable fortune and is now 
enjoying the fruits of his labors, having re- 
tired from active business some time ago. 
Tlie Livingston family is one of the oldest in 



America and one of the ancestors of this branch, 
Robert R., was a chancellor of England who 
came to America before the days of the Revolu- 
tion and had the honor of administering to Wash- 
ington his oath of office upon his election to the 
presidency. The grandfather of Robert G. 
Livingston fought in the war of 181 2, and the 
father, George, was born in old Virginia and 
became a pioneer of Ohio, moving to a farm 
near New Lisbon with teams, where his death 
occurred. The mother was in maidenhood Sarah 
McClure, her native home having been in Vir- 
ginia. The family consisted of eleven children, 
nine of whom grew to maturity, but only two of 
whom are now living, and Robert G. is the only 
one who came to California. He was born Sep- 
tember 20, 1830, at New Lisbon, Ohio, where he 
spent his boyhood days, receiving his education 
in the public schools at that place. 

In 1848 he went to Adams county, III, locat- 
ing on a farm near Ouincy, but in the spring of 
1853 decided to push on further west. In com- 
pany with three companions he purchased four 
yoke of oxen and crossed the plains, traveling 
by the way of Council Bluff's, Salt Lake and 
Beckwith Pass. The five months" trip was ac- 
complished without important incident and the 
journey was ended at the point which is now 
Ouincy, Cal. For some years he engaged in 
placer mining and tunneling on the Feather, 
Yuba, American and Consumne rivers, meeting 
with good success. In i860 he went to Contra 
Costa county, locating near what is now Danville 
and engaged in farming. Continuing there un- 
til 1865, he then went to Lake county and farmed 
for four years, or until 1869, when he removed 
to Southern California, locating at Hueneme, 
■where he engaged in the mercantile business for 
twenty-five years. His other property interests 
embrace the ownership of a two hundred acre 
ranch located four miles southeast of Hueneme, 
which he rents for beet and grain farming pur- 
poses. It is well improved with all necessarv 
farm buildings. 

December 3, 1863, Mr. Livingston was married 
to Miss Hannah ^'. Palmer, a native of Trenton, 
Tenn., and a daughter of William Palmer. Her 
father was a native of South Carolina, who in 
his young manhood taught school in his home 
state and later removed to Bloomfield, ]\Io., be- 
came a farmer and died there. Her grandfather, 
who was also a native of South Carolina, was a 
patriot of the Revolutionary war. Her mother, 
before her marriage Pamelia IMiller, was born in 
Virginia, and died in Alissouri. Mrs. Livings- 
ton is a member of a family of twelve children, 
the most of whon] are deceased: She came to 
California in 1859 with her sister, ]\Irs. Flippin, 
and settled in Contra Costa county. She is a 
very fine woman and has done much active work 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1233 



in tlie cause of Prohibition, in which she is in- 
tensely interested, and is now president of the 
Woman's Christian .Temperance Union of 
Hneneme. Mr. and Mrs. Livingston are the 
parents of four children, of whom they are just- 
ly proud. They are Charles, a traveling sales- 
man with headquarters at Portland ; William, a 
graduate of the American College of Physicians 
and Surgeons, and who is now practicing his 
profession at Oxnard : May, the wife of Dr. 
Broughlan of Oxnard : and Lottie, a graduate of 
the Cumnock School of Expression of Los 
Angeles, and now a teacher of physical culture 
and elocution at Pasadena. Both parents are 
members of the Pioneer Society of Ventura 
county and Mr. Livingston is also a prominent 
Prohibition worker, being a member of the ex- 
ecutive committee of the Anti-Saloon League of 
Snuthern California. Fraternally he was made a 
member of the San Ramon Lodge, F. & A. M., 
became a charter member of the Ventura Lodge, 
then master of Hueneme Lodge and is now a 
member of the Oxnard Lodge. F. & A. J\I. He 
also belongs to the Order of Eastern Star. He is 
a man who is interested in every business or 
social interest that has a beneficial and elevating 
influence and is highly esteemed and respected 
b^- the whole communitv. 



AVARREN COOPER LUKENS was born 
in Harrison county, Ohio, March 20, 1845, 
and is the second oldest son of a family of six 
children born to William E. and j\[argaret 
I'Cooper) Lukens. The former was born in 
Pennsylvania, the latter in Maryland and were 
both members of the Society of Friends. The 
father was a farmer in Harrison county, Ohio, 
and later was a miller in Sterling, 111., where 
tlie parents died. One of their sons is Theo. 
P. Lukens, superintendent of Forest Reserve, 
residing in Pasadena, a man of much promi- 
nence and influence, ?^^r. Lukens was educat- 
ed in the common schools until the age of six- 
teen when at the first tap of the drum he vol- 
unteered in Company B of the Thirteenth Illi- 
nois A^olunteer Infantry and was mustered 
into the three months" service. Early in 1861. 
and before the expiration of his time, he re- 
enlisted May 24 with Company P., Thirteenth 
Illinois Infantry, serving under General Curtis 
in the Army of the Southwest, until Novem- 
lier. 1863, when on account of physical disabil- 
ity he was mustered out in St. Louis, Mo. He 
then returned to Illinois, but his constitution 
had received such a setback that he never re- 
covered, and for four years was unfit for any 
labor. For two years he engaged in horti- 
culture in San Jose and then returned to Sterl- 
ing, 111., following the same business until 



1880, when he came to Pasadena, Cal., when 
there was but one store and blacksmith shop 
in the place. He purchased thirteen acres 
and set out a peach and apricot orchard, which 
at the time of the boom he, in 1887, sold to 
good advantage. He then removed to Red- 
lands where he purchased thirteen and one-half 
acres of cacti and sage-brush and started a 
nursery and at the same time set it out to 
oranges, which he sold in 1900. In the mean 
time, in 1899, he had purchased seventy-nine 
acres at Oak Glenn in the Upper Yucaipe val- 
ley and with four others formed a private com- 
pany known as the Oak Glen Land and Water 
Company. The water was brought bv ditch 
and pipe-line from Oak Cilenn creek to irrigate 
their farms and he set out thirteen acres to 
apples, now an excellent blooming orchard. 
lie with four others of the Oak Glenn com- 
pany in the Southern California exhibit at St. 
Louis received the highest award for apples. 
In March of 1905 he removed to Los Angeles 
and located at No. 2707 Normandie avenue. 

His marriage occurred in Fairview. 111., 
uniting him with ^laria Jane iMcIlmoyl and to 
them have been born five children : AA'illiam 
Ellis, who died in Redlands ; Annie M. and 
Ernest B. of Los Angeles ; Charles .\. of Oak 
Glenn and Walter at Colon, on the Isthmus of 
Panama. Mr. Lukens is a member of Bear 
Valley Post. G. A. R., at Redlands, and his al- 
legiance politically is with the Republican 
party. 



JOHN HEXRY FAIRBANKS. Of original 
English extraction the Fairbanks family in co- 
lonial days settled in Massachusetts, and from the 
time when the great-grandfather, Nathaniel, gal- 
lantly fought for freedom in the Revolutionary 
war until the present day its members have been 
closely identified with the upbuilding and devel- 
opment of our country. John Henry Fairbanks. 
who was born July 20, 1837, in Schoharie county. 
N. Y., was a son of John B. and a grandson of 
John Fairbanks, both of whom were natives of 
Worcester, Mass. The grandfather lived on the 
old family homestead in Worcester and served in 
the war of 181 2. The father was by trade a con- 
tractor and stone mason and at the age of twenty- 
five years removed to New York state, where he 
was married to Hannah Granidier, a native of 
that state, her family being of German and 
French extraction. Her father, Abraham, was 
one of the earliest settlers in New York, and he 
also was a soldier in the war of 1812, in which 
he attained the rank of major. Seventeen years 
after locating in New York state Mr. Fairbanks 
went to Racine. A\'is., and engaged in business as 
a contractor and builder, and it was while resid- 



1234 



HISTORICAL AXD BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ing in that state that the death of his wife oc- 
curred. In 1849 he joined the rush of gold seek- 
ers to Cahfornia, crossing the plains with his old- 
est son, and for three years they worked at min- 
ing. Two years later the son died at Sacramento 
and the father returned to Racine, where his 
death occurred. 

A member of a family of seven children, four 
sons and three daughters, John Henry Fairbanks 
is the only son now living. One of his brothers, 
Abraham F.. served as a second lieutenant in the 
Fifty-first Regiment of Wisconsin \'olunteers 
during the Civil war. His own boj'hood days 
were spent in Wisconsin, where he attended the 
district school in the primitive log schoolhouse 
furnished with slab benches. With generations 
of patriotic blood flowing in his veins it is not 
surprising that his decision to offer his services 
to his country at the outbreak of the Civil war 
was quickly made. After leaving school he had 
occupied himself as a teamster, going from Ra- 
cine and Milwaukee to Burlington, and later was 
foreman of Norton's ranch for four years. He 
was working on a threshing machine when the 
news of the declaration of war reached him. and 
turning the job over to his father he immediately 
vohmteered his services. In 1861 he was mus- 
tered in at Milwaukee as a member of Company 
C, First Regiment of Wisconsin Infantry, and 
among the engagements he took part in were 
those at Murfreesboro, and Marietta, assisting in 
the taking of Atlanta ; was wounded in the bat- 
tles at Buzzard's Roost and at Oiickamauga, hav- 
ing been shot from his horse and made insensible 
at the latter place. He was an officer in the ord- 
nance department, having supervision over the 
ammunition of the Fourteenth Army Corps, to 
which he had been previously attached. At the 
expiration of his time of enlistment he was re- 
turned to ?\Iilwaukee and there mustered out in 
1864. After the close of the war he went to 
Sparta, bought a farm, and continued to raise 
stock and conduct a threshing business until 1884. 
For eighteen continuous seasons he operated a 
Case thresher, made many inventions for the ma- 
chine and helped J. I. Case, who had been a boy- 
hood schoolmate, with many improvements both 
on the thresher and the steam engine. Having 
disposed of his farm Mr. Fairbanks retired from 
active business for five years and resided in 
Sparta. 

In 1889 he came to Los Angeles and made 
his home in that city for two years, after which 
he went to Downey, purchased a ranch and im- 
proved it and raised fruit and hay. still owning 
ten acres of land there. He had early purchased 
a lot on West Third street. Long Beach, and the 
residence which he erected thereon is still the 
family home. He has witnessed many changes 
in the citv since first coming here and himself 



farmed land which is now occupied by city 
homes. By his marriage in Monroe county, Wis., 
he was united with Phoebe Ann Dame, a native of 
Maine, and they became the parents of three 
children : Imogene, who married Lewis Millard, 
of Long Beach ; Mattie. who became the wife of 
a Mr. Whalen and died in Los Angeles in 1905 : 
and J. T., who resides on the ranch at Downey. 
]\Ir. Fairbanks is a strong Republican, has served 
on the county central committee for years and 
has been sent as delegate to conventions. He is 
a member of Long Beach Post, G. A. R., and 
Mrs. Fairbanks is a member and active worker in 
the Baptist Church. In all matters relating to 
the social and civic development of the city he 
takes an energetic and enthusiastic interest, and 
is held in the highest respect and esteem through- 
out the communitv. 



ALBERT JOHNSON. As clerk of the board 
of school trustees of Long Beach Albert Johnson 
is recognized as one of the most progressive 
citizens of this city, for those men who interest 
themselves in the cause of education -are the most 
valuable citizens a community can have. On 
his mother's side he is a direct descendant of 
Governor Bradford of Massachusetts, and his 
father's family comes from old English stock. 
jNIr. Johnson was born July 8, 1843, in Stock- 
bridge, Mass., the son of Jonathan and Eunice 
(Bradford) Johnson, the former .a native of 
Stonington, Conn., and the latter of Massachu- 
setts, her father, William, having been born in 
Connecticut. There were five children in the fam- 
ilv, and of them William Bradford came to Cal- 
ifornia in 1852. via the Isthmus, his death oc- 
curring in Petaluma in' 1857; Edward L. is a 
resident of Dixon, III; Mrs. S. J. Carr lives in 
Los Angeles; Mrs. Brewer died in Dixon, and 
Albert was the youngest child. 

Reared on his father's farm in Massachusetts. 
Air. Johnson received a preliminary education in 
public schools, and then entered Lennox Acad- 
emy to prepare for Williams College. August 20. 
1862, he demonstrated his patriotism by enlist- 
ing in Company F, Forty-ninth Regiment of 
j\Iassachusetts Volunteer Infantry, and was mus- 
tered into service in Pittslield, having enlisted for 
a term of nine months. He was first sent to New 
York City on provost duty on the steamer Illi- 
nois, went from there to the gulf and New Or- 
leans under General Banks, took part in the 
siege of Port Hudson, being there at the time of 
its surrender, and was engaged in skirmishing 
until he had served three months over time. He 
was then ordered back to INIassachussetts and 
mustered out at Pittsfield. In the fall of 1868 
he removed to Dixon, 111., where he farmed for 
a short time, but in 1875 entered the county re- 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1235 



corder's office as deputy circuit clerk and deputy 
county recorder. At one time he also conducted 
a large abstract business in partnership with Ira 
W. Lewis, under the firm name of Lewis & 
Johnson, in all of his work meeting with good 
success. 

The condition of Mrs. Johnson's health neces- 
sitating a change of climate the family removed 
to California in 1894, locating in Los Angeles, 
where Mr. Johnson engaged in the real estate 
business. In 1902 he came to Long Beach and 
continued to deal in realty, the greater part of 
his time being devoted to the handling of his own 
property. The family residence is at No. 225 
West Fourth street. Mr. Johnson was united in 
marriage with Emily Comstock, a native of Lee, 
Mass., and they are the parents of three children : 
William Bradford, teller in the German-Ameri- 
can Savings Bank of Los Angeles ; Lottie, Mrs. 
John T. Laing, who resides in Dixon, III. ; and 
Emma L., who makes her home under the par- 
ental roof. Mr. Johnson is an active member of 
the Presbyterian Church, of which he is an elder. 
Fraternally he is a member of the Modern Wood- 
men of America and belongs to Long Beach Post 
G. A. R. He is an advocate of Republican prin- 
ciples and in all matters of social and civic in- 
terest lends his influence to the furthering of 
those enterprises which tend to elevate and up- 
build. 



SYLVANUS THURMAN. Prominent 
among the old pioneers of Southern California is 
Sylvanus Thurman, who came to the state with 
his parents in i860, a lad of ten years, and since 
that time has made his home in the land adopted 
by them, content to pass his declining years in 
its pleasant surroundings. He was born in Ta- 
ney county. Mo., April 5. 1850, the eldest in a 
family of four sons and one daughter ; their 
father, Elisha A. Thurman, was a native of 
Kentucky, where the paternal grandfather, John, 
located from Virginia and engaged in farming, 
finally removing to Missouri and following the 
occupation of flatboating on the Mississippi river. 
He was a soldier in the war of 181 2, serving un- 
der General Jackson at New Orleans. Elisha A. 
Thurman located in Taney county. Mo., and en- 
gaged as a farmer and stockman, and in i860 
outfitted with ox-teams and necessary provisions 
and brought his family across the plains, via the 
Platte, Sweetwater, Fort Hall on the Snake 
river, across the Humboldt, thence by the Car- 
son route to California, making the journey in 
seven months. He located in lone, Amador 
county, and engaged as a farmer, and remained 
there until 1866, when he went to Jackson coun- 
ty. Ore., and followed a similar occupation for 
tile period of three years. Returning to Califor- 



nia in 1869 lie located in Los Angeles county and 
near the Seventeen Mile house at Anaheim en- 
gaged in the stock business. In 1872 he bought 
a farm at La Puente, later resided in El Monte, 
and finally located in the vicinity of Downey, 
where he farmed until his death, which occurred 
in 1902 at the advanced age of eighty-two years. 
His wife, formerly Eliza Phillips, was born in 
Tennessee, a daughter of John Phillips, who re- 
moved to Moniteau county. Mo. ; she died in El 
Monte. Besides Sylvanus, there were three sons 
and one daughter, namely : Columbus, who died 
in Downey; William C, located in Humboldt 
count}', Cal. ; Elisha A., Jr., who died in Red- 
lands ; and Susan, wife of O. H. Beardsley, of 
Mentone. 

S}'lvanus Thurman was reared in Missouri to 
the age of ten years, when he accompanied his 
parents on the memorable journey across the 
plains. He helped drive the ox-teams and the 
cattle, taking his turn at standing guard, and 
early learning the lessons of self-reliance and 
courage. Besides his father's two wagons, his 
mother's brother had a team and wagon, and he, 
having crossed the plains before, knew the way 
and they came through without trouble. After 
locating in Amador county he attended the pub- 
lic school, after their removal to Oregon assist- 
ing in the management of the home farm. He 
remained at home until attaining his majority, 
when he began for himself, starting in the sheep 
business two years later at Puente, and continued 
there until 1877. This being the dry year, he 
sold out and then engaged in farming at El 
Monte, and after two or three years spent one 
year at Verdugo, and then went to Tombstone, 
Ariz., and took charge of a freighting outfit for 
Springer & Van Tazzle. One year later he re- 
turned to California and in 1882 located on Mill 
creek just below the Tyler ranch and engaged in 
farming and the conduct of a pack train, he run- 
ning the first passenger pack train over the San 
Bernardino mountains from his ranch to Bear 
valley and Seven Oaks. He continued this work 
for many years and was very successful in it. In 
1891 he purchased a ranch of one hundred and 
twenty acres at Bluff lake, and now has two 
hundred acres. In 1884 this was named Bluff 
lake by the Bear Valley dam workers ; it has an 
altitude of seventy-five hundred and seventy-five 
feet, and consists of a beautiful meadow a mile 
long and a quarter of a mile wide, with the lake 
in the center ; the plateau is surrounded by. pines 
and fir trees, one fir being eight feet in diameter 
and one hundred and fifty feet high. Here he 
has erected log cabins and shake cabins which 
are used for cottages, Mr. Thurman himself con- 
ducting the dining room, running a dairy in con- 
nection with it and having his own beef to sup- 
ply the table. Since 1891 he has made this place 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



his home, spending his winters in Crafton and 
his summers in this beautiful resort. He also 
owns four hundred and forty acres a mile from 
Crafton, and this property is devoted to the rais- 
ing of hay, grain and stock. He has an orchard 
on the place which supplies all his own fruits and 
also for market. There are eleven mountain 
springes on his ranch which supply ample water. 

In Redlands in 1892 ^Nlr. Thurman was united 
in marriage with ^liss Mary Abbie Pillsbury, a 
native of New Hampshire and a graduate of Alt. 
Holyoke College of Massachusetts and who has 
been a resident of California since 1889. They 
are members of the First Congregational Qiurch 
of Redlands, and are liberal supporters of its 
charities. PoUtically j\lr. Thurman is a stanch 
advocate of the principles advocated in the plat- 
form of the Democratic party. 



GEORGE A. LAXE. Oceanside has a full 
quota of live, energetic business men, promi- 
nent among whom is George A. Lane, who, as 
one of the re-organizers and managers of the 
Bank of Oceanside, is carrying on a substan- 
tial general banking business. In the varied 
occupations in which he has been employed 
he has gained valued experience and become 
well and favorably known in mercantile and 
financial circles. A son of Gilbert Lane, he 
was born, in 1856, at Long Branch, N. J., be- 
ing descended from an old and honored fam- 
ily. His father v/as born in New Jersey eighty 
years ago, and during his active life was en- 
gaged in the transportation business in New 
York City. Pie and his wife, whose maiden 
name was Catherine Hathaway, are still liv- 
ing. Of their four children, George A., the 
subject of this sketch is the only one residing 
in California. 

Brought up in Long Branch. George A. 
Lane attended llie public schools when young, 
completing his education at a business col- 
lege in Poughkeepsie, X. Y. Starting in life 
on his own account when a young man. he 
went to Wamego, Kans.. where he was for a 
time engaged in mercantile pursuits. Locat- 
ing in Trinidad, Colo., in 1879, he remained 
there a number of years, first as a merchant. 
after which he took a contract with others to 
supply ties for the Utah extension of the Den- 
ver & Rio Grande Railroad. Later he engaged 
in the cattle business with a partner, his in- 
terest.? remaining there until 1890. In the 
meantime in i88(), he went to Flagstaff, Ariz., 
to take the management of the commissary 
department of the .\rizona Lumber Company. 
Disposing of his property in that locality in 
iSqo. he came to California, and for the next 
ten vears was in the emnlov of a wholesale 



iiardvvare company in Los Angeles, and while 
in the pursuit of his duties in that capacity 
became associated with many of the promi- 
nent business men of Southern California. Re- 
signing his position in 1900, he removed to 
Winslovv, Ariz., to take the position of cashier 
of tlie Xavajo County Bank, which he held 
for five years. Returning to California in the 
spring of 1905. he. in company with J. X. 
Woods, bought and re-organized the Bank of 
( Jceanside. and he is rapidly building up a 
large and lucrative business as a banker, and 
in addition to managing that institution or- 
ganized, in 1906, the First Xational Bank of 
( )ceanside, and is also interested to some ex- 
tent in real estate in this vicinity. Since the 
death of J. X Vi'oods he has been elected to 
the presidency of both banks, giving to these 
institutions his personal supervision. The 
present officers of the First Xational Bank of 
Oceanside are: G. A. Lane, president; W. \'. 
Xichols, vice-president ; and E. S. Payne, 
ca.shier; while those of the Bank of Ocean- 
side are : G. A. Lane, president ; C. S. Libby, 
vice-president ; and E. S. Paj-ne, cashier. 

In Los Angeles, Cal., Mr. Lane married 
?(Iav Welch, a native of Wisconsin, and they 
have one child, Edith. Politically l\Ir. Lane 
is a Republican, and fraternally he was made 
a jMason in Los Animas Loclge Xo. 28, F. 
& A. ]\I.. Trinidad, Colo., and is now a mem- 
ber of Oceanside Lodge Xo. 381. F. & A. M.. 
of Oceanside, of which he is junior warden; 
he is also a member of AVinslow Chapter. R. 
A. M., of Winslow, Ariz., and both he and 
his wife belong to the Order of the Eastern 
Star. Mrs. Lane is a woman of culture and 
refinement, highly esteemed, and is a consist- 
ent member " of the ?*Iethodist Episcopal 
Church. 



^^TLLIAM C. HUXT. The active, able and 
progressive business men of San Diego have no 
better representative than William C. Hunt, who 
is widelv known as one of the leading contract- 
ing painters of Southern California. Endowed 
l)v" nature with many gifts, he has cultivated his 
perceptive faculties, developing to an eminent 
degree his mechanical skill and his knowledge of 
form and color, becoming, in truth, an artist with 
both pencil and brush. He is noted for his fine 
workmanship, and as a sign writer and painter 
has no peer in the county. A native of Dublin, 
Ireland, he was born May 3, 1852, 

Learning the trade of a painter when voung, 
Mr. Hunt located in Xew York City in 1875. and 
there followed both carriage painting and house 
painting for awhile, being subsequently similarly 
employed in Xew Jersey. Pennsylvania and 



^ 



'^ 






GOTFRIED MAIJLHARUT 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHIC.VL RECORD. 



1239 



r^fassachusetts. From the latter state he came, 
in 18S3, to C)akdale. Stanislaus county, Cal., 
which was then the terminal point of the railway, 
and was there profitably employed at his trade 
for four years. In 1887 he took up his residence 
in San Diego, and has since been engaged as a 
contracting painter, and has built up a thriving 
and lucrative business, not only as a painter of 
houses and carriages, but as a sign painter, in 
the latter line especially winning an enviable 
reputation. He does much of the contract work 
of the city, keeping from ten to twenty hands 
employed during the busy season, and in the 
filling of his contracts invariably giving satisfac- 
tion to all concerned. 

In the Isle of iNlan Mr. Hunt married Fannie 
Ireland, a native of England, and they are the 
parents of two children, namely: \\'illiam 
Charles, engaged in the painting business at Santa 
Clara, and Dorothy Frances. 'Sir. Hunt is a 
member of the San Diego Chamber of Com- 
merce, and of the ^Master Painters" Association, 
which lie assisted in organizing. He is one of the 
most active and prominent Odd Fellows of the 
county, being a member and past grand of Sun- 
set Lodge No. 328, I. O. O. F. ; past district dep- 
uty grand : a member and past chief patriarch 
of San Diego Encampment No. 58 ; while Mrs. 
Hunt is a member and past grand of the Re- 
bekahs, and past district deputy. Mr. Hunt 
also belongs to Silver Cate Court. Foresters 
of America. 



GOTFRIED M.VULHARDT. In the rush of 
twentieth century enterprise we often fail to give 
the credit due to the unostentatious patriots and 
pi(ineers of the century g<Mie by. and often too 
we fail in appreciation of the work accomplished 
by the men and women who laid the foundation 
of the present ])rosperity ; hence it were well 
to record their names in the annals of local 
history in order that future generations mav give 
their memories the tribute of respect they deserve. 
From the time of his arrival in \'entura county 
in 1867 until his death more than thirty years 
afterward Mr. ^ilaulhardt lived up to the measure 
of an honest and conscientious oublic and pri- 
vate life. Though of German birth he was in- 
tensely American in ideals and spirit, and he 
w^as one of those men who, in pursuing the even 
tenor of their way, form the bone and sinew 
of Americanism. 

Dutterstadt. Germany, was ^Ir. Maulhardt's 
native place, and May 27, 1836, the date of his 
birth, he being a son of Jacob and Giristine 
(Krukenberg) ATaulhardt. lifelong residents of 
Germany, where the father followed the builder's 
trade. Three of the sons came to California, 
namelv : Tacob and Gotfried. who died in A''en- 



tura county, and Anton, who died in Los Angeles. 
On the completion of the studies of the common- 
schools Gotfried IMaulhardt learned the carpen- 
ter's trade and at the expiration of his apprentice- 
ship he worked as a journeyman in his home 
locality. On coming to America in 1867 he 
proceeded direct to California and settled in Ven- 
tura county, where he rented land and engaged 
in raising grain and stock. After a time he in- 
vested his savings in four hundred and ten acres 
situated one and one-half miles from the present 
site of Oxnard, and on this place he followed 
general farm pursuits with gratifying success. 
When land in the vicinity became very valuable 
he disposed of a portion of the ranch, but the 
bulk of the propertv is still owned by his estate. 
On the homestead he remained engaged in ranch- 
ing until his death, which occurred on Giristmas 
day of 1898. In politics he voted with the Demo- 
cratic party after becoming a citizen of the L'nited 
states, while in religion he was an earnest mem- 
ber of the Roman Catholic Church. 

Some years before leaving his native land 
Mv. Maulhardt established domestic ties, his 
marriage in 1862 uniting him with Miss Sophia 
Maena, a native of the same locality as him- 
self. On the liome farm of her parents, John 
and Dora (Peter) Maena (both .of whom are 
now deceased), she grew to womanhood, mean- 
•\vhile fitting herself for the practical duties of 
a housekeeper and also receiving a fair educa- 
tion in German schools. Of all her family she 
was the only one to emigrate to America, and the 
death of her husband now leaves her alone, yet 
her life is far from lonely, for .she is surrounded 
by warm friends and well-wishers and has a large 
circle of acquaintances in Oxnard, where since 
1904 she has made her home on E street. Reared 
in the Roman Catholic faith, she always has re- 
mained true to its teachings and has given gener- 
ously to its charities and missionary organiza- 
tion. Not only has the church been the recipient 
of her generosity, but also other movements of 
a practically helpful nature have commanded her 
ready sympathy and active co-operation, and 
probably no one in Oxnard is more deeply in- 
terested than she in the progress of all that makes 
for the permanent prosperity of the city. 



MELYIN WILLARD HURST. A man 
of many estimable qualities is ^lelvin Willard 
Hurst, one of the i3rn|)rietors of the Dream- 
land skating rink at Oxnard, who has been a 
resident of this state since 1878. He was born 
October 8. 1858, at Connersville, Tnd., a .son of 
Rennett and Cynthia Simp.son Hurst, both na- 
tives of Indiana. His grandfather. Sanford 
Hurst, was a stockman and farmer, and the 
father still resides on his farm nine miles from 



1240 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Connersville. The mother, who died many 
years ago, gave birth to three children, two of 
whom are now Hving. ?.Ir. Hurst spent all of 
his youthful days on the home farm in Indiana 
and received his education through the medi- 
um of the public schools. At the age of twenty, 
years, being of an ambitious nature and desir- 
ing to see something of the world, he turned 
his steps toward the land of the setting sun 
and arrived in Santa Barbara in 1878. Ap- 
prenticing himself for three years to a carpen- 
ter, when he had mastered the trade he went 
to Pasadena and worked for a similar period. 
Following this he spent a short time at work 
in Los Angeles, then spent five years at Ven- 
tura assisting in building operations. From 
there he went to San Francisco for a few 
months, when he came to Oxnard, in the 3'ear 
1898, and helped to build the third structure 
erected in the then new town. The following 
three years he was engaged as contractor and 
builder, having formed a partnership with J. 
H. Myers, and at the close of this period went 
to Arizona and prospected in the mines for 
six months. 

Mining did not prove as attractive and prof- 
itable as he had hoped it would, however, and 
upon his return to Oxnard he accepted the 
position of foreman of the contracting firm of 
M3'ers & Abplanalp, retaininsr the place until 
the spring of 1906, Avhen he formed a partner- 
ship with Mr. ]\rcAndrew and built the large 
Dreamland skating rink on C street. The 
building is a very large and commodious one, 
measuring 72x120 feet, the fine maple floor 
covering a space 60x120 feet, the capacity of 
the floor being sufficient for two hundred 
skaters. The equipment is of the finest and 
the skates are the best Spaulding and Union ball 
bearing. Many high class entertainment feat- 
ures are given from time to time, including 
masked parties, dances and races. A regula- 
tion double bowling alley is also run in con- 
nection with the rink. ^fr. Hurst is interested 
in other property in Oxnard, among his 
holdings being two residences in the city. Fra- 
terrially he affiliates with the Independent Or- 
der of Odd Fellows' Lodge of Oxnard. and po- 
litically he is an earnest advocate of the prin- 
ciples embraced in the platform of the Repub- 
lican party. He is well informed on social 
and economic subjects and is a public-spirited 
citizen, highly respected by the whole com- 
munitv. 



his birth having occurred in Piedmont, January 
6, 1856, the second in a family of three children 
born to his parents ; his father, Peter, was also 
born in Piedmont, of an old and distinguished 
family, and both himself and wife died in their 
native country. Joseph Ferrero was the only one 
of the family who ever came to America. He 
was reared on his father's farm in Italy, receiv- 
ing a rather limited education in the public schools 
of his native country, after which he engaged 
independently in farming operations. Deciding 
in 1886 to try his fortunes in America he crossed 
the ocean and came to Los Angeles, Gal., where 
he remained for five years employed principally 
on ranches. He then purchased a ranch in the 
vicinity of Whittier and remained there until 
1898, when he came to Puente and engaged in 
the raising of grain on the Puente ranch, in 1903 
purchasing the eighty-five acre ranch which he 
now owns, adjoining the town of Puente. He 
has added improvements to the place and brought 
it to a high state of cultivation, installing a 
pumping plant, equipped with a twenty-three 
horse power engine, with a capacity of eighty 
inches. He has set out eight acres in a walnut 
grove, while the balance is devoted to alfalfa and 
hay. 

In Italy Mr. Ferrero was married to Carlotta 
Fea. a native of Italy, where her death occurred. 
Of their three children, two are living, Peter, a 
farmer in Puente, and IMaddelena. Mrs. Faure of 
Puente. Mr. Ferrero was married a second time 
to Dominica Boggetti, a native of Italy, and born 
of this union are the following children : George. 
Mary, Joseph, Albert. Dominic, Frank, Vincent, 
^Marguerite and David. 



JOSEPH FERRERO. A business man of 
Puente. Joseph Ferrero is engaged in dealing in 
alfalfa and ha\-. and managing a fine ranch in the 
vicinity of thi-; place. ITc is a native of Itnlv, 



D. E. BOWMAN. A^'aried occupations pre- 
sent themselves as a source of livelihood to the 
residents of Southern California, and not the 
least important of these is the management of 
an apiary. Experience has proved that certain 
sections are well adapted to bee-culture, and 
availing themselves of this fact a number of men 
have devoted themselves successfully to the in- 
dustry. Nuinbered among the enthusiastic 
apiarists of Valley Center may be mentioned Mr. 
Bowman, who owns an apiary of one hundred 
and nine colonies and at one time had as many 
as seven hundred colonies. Long experience has 
given him a thorough knowledge of the busi- 
ness and there are in the community few men 
more thoroughly acquainted with the industry 
than is he. The apiary is situated on his ranch 
of forty-five acres and forms the principal source 
of revenue from the property. 

A native of Berlin, Canada, born in 1839, Mr. 
Bowman is a son of John B. and L>-dia E. (Erb~) 
Bowman, both of whom are deceased. .\s a bov 



/^^, 



jy^ |*Bf^ 




^^7^^-^"^ c>f/= 




MISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1243 



1k' was given the best educational privileges the 
neighborhood afforded, and on leaving school be- 
gan to teach not far from the old home, where 
he remained for a considerable period following 
the profession of a teacher. In 1869 he removed 
to Lawrence, Kans., and for a few years resided 
in that city and state, but in 1874 he proceeded 
west to the Pacific coast and settled at Valley 
Center, San Diego county, where he soon ac- 
quired e.xtensive apiary interests. During 1886 
he became interested in mining at various mines 
and for twelve years he devoted himself almost 
wholly to that occupation, but since 1898 he has 
given his time to the bee business. His knowl- 
edge of bees embraces every detail connected 
with their habits and their needs, and by reason 
of his long experience and thorough knowledge 
he is enabled to bring to the markets honey of 
superior quality and unsurpassed richness of 
flavor. 

After having remained a bachelor for years, 
in December of 1905 he was united in marriage 
with j\Irs. Jennie Strong, who shares with him 
the esteem of acquaintances and with him is an 
attendant upon services at the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church. Thoughtful reading and a close 
study of conditions relating to capital and labor 
have made of him a socialist. In him the poor 
have a helpful friend, and his sympathies are 
ever on the side of the unfortunate and op- 
pressed. The course of a long and active life 
has brought him a wide knowledge of the human 
race and of the conditions under which the poor 
struggle for their daily bread, and this knowl- 
edge has broadened his outlook as well as deep- 
ened his sympathies. To the people of Valley 
Center, where he holds the rank of a very old 
settler, he has many warm and sincere friends, 
who have been drawn to him by his earnestness 
of character and kindness of heart. 



JAMES FINLEY. One of the modern and 
up-to-date residences in Long Beach is Em- 
erald Cottage, at No. 37 Lime street, which 
was formerly the home of Mr. Finley, and is 
still the home of his widow and children. In 
thus naming his home Mr. Finley perpetuated 
a name which is dear to all natives of the Em- 
erald Isle, for he was a native of Ireland, born 
in County Antrim in 1845, a son of William 
and Eliza (Hanna) Finley, of Scotch and 
English antecedents respectively. 

During his boyhood James Finley was 
reared on his father's farm until he was 
eighteen years old, but the routine of the 
work was irksome to him and he determined 
to prepare himself for work in another line. 
The raising and preparing of flax into articles 
of commerce is one of the chief industries in 



his native country and it was along this line 
that his inclinations led him. He learned the 
art of flax dressing and became so expert at 
the work that before long he was placed in 
charge of the mill, holding this position for 
several years, or until resigning in 1867 to 
come to the United States. Going direct to 
Painesville, Ohio, he obtained employment 
with Stores, Harrison & Co., nurserymen in 
that city, with whom he remained for about 
one year, at the end of that time coming to 
California. Locating in San Jose he obtained 
a position with the Saratoga Paper Mills Com- 
pany, while there learning the details of the 
business and finally rose to the position of su- 
perintendent of the mill. Subsequently he was 
interested in a tannery in Santa Cruz, but was 
overtaken by disaster in this undertaking when 
he had been in it about a year, thus losing all 
that he invested in it. Going then to Santa 
Rosa, Sonoma county, he accepted a position 
as traveling salesman and engineer for Joseph 
Enright. a large dealer in steam harvesters. 
Returning to San Jose, it was in 1880 that he 
entered the fire department of that city as en- 
gineer, a position which he held for five years, 
or until March, 1885, when he resigned to ac- 
cept his appointment as superintendent of the 
.Santa Clara County almshouse. In this as in 
all other positions which he had filled he gave 
his undivided pttention to the duties that fell 
to him. with the result that he left a record 
behind him which was greatly to his credit. 
After eight years as manager of the alms- 
house he" resigned in 1892 to take chargeof his 
ranch of forty acres near Downey, which he 
had purchased some years previously. He set 
out the entire tract as a walnut grove, erect- 
ing a fine residence and other necessary im- 
provements, making of it one of the finest 
ranches in that part of Los Angeles county. 
After making his home there for eight years 
he disposed of the property and removed to 
Long Beach, erecting the residence on 
Lime street occupied by his widow and 
children and known as Emerald Cot- 
tage. Here he lived retired during his 
latter years, although his death occurred at the 
California Hospital, whither he had gone for 
treatment. An operation finally became im- 
perative, but even this expedient failed to 
bring desired results and he passed away Sep- 
tember 25, 1904. He was recognized as a pub- 
lic spirited man, self-made in every sense im- 
plied by the term. 

In San Jose, November 24, 1881, Mr. Finley 
luarried Sarah E. McGary. who was born in 
Yamhill county. Ore., four miles north of Mc- 
Minnville. The INlcGary family was for manv 
years well known in the. south, especially in 



1244 



. HISTORICAL AXD BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Kentucky, where the grandparents of Mrs. 
Finley, James and Martha (Thomasson) '\lc- 
Gary, were born and reared and there spent 
their entire lives. Their son, Garrett W., was 
born near Frankfort, Ky., and continued to 
make his home there imtil a few years prior to 
the rush to California as the result of the find- 
ing of gold. Leaving Kentucky in 1847 he 
crossed the plains by means of ox-teams and 
arrived at his destination in Oregon six 
months later. The Cayuse Indian war broke 
out soon afterwp.rd, and with the other settlers 
he did his part in quelling the disturbances, 
serving as lieutenant of his regiment. He 
came to the west with the idea of settling 
down as a farmer, and the first property which 
he owned was in Polk county. Subsequently 
disposing of this he purchased a half-section of 
land near Mc^Iinn-^-ille. which was the home 
of the family at the time of the birth of his 
daughter. In 1868 he located near San Jose, 
Cal.. where he carried on a farm until 1884, 
when he removed to Downey and engaged in 
wainut-growing. He died on th.e ranch which 
he had established there December 20, 1897, 
at the age of sevent3--five 3'ears and six 
months, firm in the faith of the Christian 
Church, of which he was a member. The wife 
of Garrett W. AIcGary was before her marriage 
Catherine Sparks, a native of Surry county. N. 
C, and a daughter of INIathew and Sarah (El- 
mer) Sparks, both also natives of North Car- 
olina, and the latter of English descent. From 
North Carolina ]\Ir. and Mrs. Sparks removed 
to Lone Jack. Mo., but later, in 185 1, brought 
their family across the plains to Oregon, two 
sons having preceded them to California in 
1849. Settling on a farm in Polk county they 
there passed the remainder of their lives, hav- 
ing become the parents of ten children, of 
whom seven are living. Four children were 
born to ATr. and Mrs. Finley. all of whom are 
residents of Long Beach, and with the excep- 
tion of the eldest, who is married, are still at 
home with their mother. Named in order of 
their birth thev are as follows : Bessie, Mrs. 
W. W. Brady :' William J., Edward Ayer and 
James Robert. During his earlier years Mr. 
Finlev was a Re])ublican in his political belief, 
but during later years took sides with the Pro- 
hibitioni.sts. Religiously he was a member of 
the Holiness Association, while Airs. Finley is 
a member of tlie Christian Church of Long 
Beach. 



W. A. WICKERSHAAI. As a progressive 
and successful ranchman Air. Wickersham of 
San Diego county is ranked among her leading 
citizens. Bv the exercise of thrift and good 



business judgment he has become the owner of 
two very fine ranches, although he is yet a 
young man. His birth occurred December 10, 
1872, in Kansas City. AIo., his parents, Joshua 
J. and Damearis (Hipes) Wickersham, both 
being natives of Indiana. The father was a con- 
tractor and builder by trade, a Republican in 
politics, and an adherent of the Quaker sect in 
religion. His death occurred at Rainbow, Cal. 
at the age of sixty-eight years. The mother, 
who is a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
Giurch, makes her home with her son. A\'. A., 
he being one of three children. With his father 
Air. Wickersham came to Califoniia when ten 
years of age. receiving his education in the pub- 
lic schools of San Luis Obispo and Los Angeles. 
At the latter-named place he learned the • 
printer's trade, although he followed it for a 
short time only. Later he came to San Diego 
county and filed on a piece of government land 
comprising eightv acres, and also bought twenty- 
five acres. Starting with fifty swamis of bees, 
he engaged in the production of honew his gain 
for the first season being $165. He has eight 
acres of ground devoted to the raising of raisin 
grapes, while on the homestead he cultivates hay 
and grain crops. 

Air. Wickersham"s marriage to Ada Z. Cole- 
man, a native of Kansas, occurred in 1899. 
Roy Walter,, the only child born to them, died .ui 
infancy. In 1891 Air. Wickersham also suffered 
the bereavement of his wife. He leans toward 
the religious opinions of the Alethodist Episco- 
pal denomination and politically is a strong ad- 
herent of the Republican party, at present fill- 
ing the office of deputy clerk of San Diego 
county. He is one of the most highly esteemed 
citizens of the communitv in which he resides. 



SALITH LEEDOAI. Since 1902 Smith Lee- 
dom has been engaged as a liveryman in San Ber- 
nardino where he is well known as the proprie- 
tor of the Santa Fe stables located on D street. 
He was born in 1837 near Ricksmill, in Alusking- 
um county. Ohio, where his father followed the 
occupation of farmer. Educated in the public 
schools, when he grew to maturity he resolved 
to continue in the work to which he had been 
trained through his boyhood and engaged in 
agricultural pursuits. On June 24, i8r)3. he was 
united in marriage with Aliss Annie E. Humph- 
rey, born near Cumberland. Ohio, her father. 
Thomas Humphrey, having been a native of the 
same state and the son of parents who claimed 
\'irginia as their native home. Air. Humphrey 
was a successful farmer, drover, stock dealer 
and business man, who, after a life of useful- 
ness, died in Ohio, mourned by all who had the 
pleasure of his acquaintance. Airs. Lecdom's 




^^'^'^-^^^ ^^^£>^t^ 



HISTORICAL AXD BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1247 



mother, who was Louisa Ann Harlan before her 
marriage, died when her only child was Init two 
years of age. 

After their marriage Air. and !Mrs. Leedom 
operated a farm for about two years near Ricks- 
mill, afterward locating near Cumberland and 
following the same business until 1888. In that 
year they removed to California, settling in Col- 
ton. Two years later they removed to Redlands 
locating on Xinth and State streets, and after- 
ward bought an orange ranch west of Redlands, 
known as the Barton tract. Air. Leedom engaged 
m ranching for a number of }ears in this locality 
and in iyo2 purchased the livery Ijusiness in San 
Bernardino, which he now conducts. Of the ten 
children born to Mr. and Mrs. Leedom we men- 
tion the following : Allen H. and Walter are 
successfully engaged in the automobile busine-^s 
in Colton ; W. T. is in the same business in Red- 
lands ; Jennie, J\Irs. Littlefield, resides in San 
Bernardino, where her husband is a plumber : 
O'Dell is also engaged in the automobile business 
in Colton : Etta became the wife of John Bost- 
wick, who is successfully following the painter's 
trade in Colton ; Harry, a lather and shingler by 
trade, lives in Los Angeles; Orra died in Colton 
at the age of nineteen years ; Clarence died in 
Redlands when ten years old : Alary became the 
wife of Willie Gillogey, who is a carpenter by 
trade and owns a residence in Redlands. Mrs. 
Leedom is a member of the Baptist Qiurch. Po- 
litically Mr. Leedom is a Republican and frater- 
nally is a JNIason, having attained the master's 
degree. As an enterprising and progressive citi- 
zen he is held in the highest esteem by all who 
know him. 



WILLIAM WHITE. Prominent among 
the early pioneers of Sherman was the late 
^^'illiam White, who during his thirty years of 
residence in this locality was known and re- 
spected as an industrious and worthy citizen, 
a kind neighbor and a loving husband and 
father; and his death, which occurred Januar}' 
24, 1904, at the homestead where he had long 
resided, was a cause of general regret. He 
was born August 12, 1822, in Harrisburg, Ky., 
where he grew to man's estate. 

Going to Trenton, Grundy county, Mo., in 
1845, while yet a young, single man, William 
WHiite laid a soldier's warrant on a tract of 
land, and purchased an adjoining tract, ob- 
taining title to many acres. He subsequently 
served as an officer in the Mexican war. for 
which he was entitled to a pension from the 
government, the papers having arrived at his 
home just four days after his death. At the 
close of the war he married and settled as a 
carpenter in his Missouri home. In 1862, hear- 



ing glowing descriptions of the lands to be 
bought for a song farther west, he, accom- 
panied by his wife and two small children, 
went across the plains with ox-teams to east- 
ern Dregon, locating near the present site of 
Baker Cit}-, where he took up land on which 
he lived and labored for a year. Forced to 
leave there on account of ill health, he located 
in the Willamette valley, near Eugene, Ore., 
where he bought eighty acres of land. Renting 
his land, he afterwards followed his trade in 
that vicinity until 1875. Selling out in that 
year, he came to Los Angeles county, settling 
near the present site of Sherman, where he 
purchased one hundred and sixty acres of wild 
land, which he parti}- cleared and improved, al- 
though not domg quite as much as he would 
had he been physically more able and strong. 
When he came here, neither railways nor tele- 
graph or telephone wires spanned the country, 
and the native Indians and the wild beasts had 
not fled from the advancing steps of civiliza- 
tion. He lived, however, to see the country 
well settled and himself the owner of a good 
ranch, fairly well improved, and yielding good 
crops. 

On July 14, 1850, Air. White married Alar- 
tha F. Blew, who was born November 17, 1833, 
in Huntsville, Randolph county, AIo., and they 
became the parents of four children, nameh- : 
Robert AL, of Hollywood, Cal. ; William 6., 
wdio died at the age of thirty-three years ; 
Thomas L.. owning a part of the old home- 
stead ; and Charles R., also owner of a portion 
of the old home farm. Since giving up pos- 
session of the ranch to her sons. Airs. A\niite 
has lived in the village of Sherman, where 
she owns a small house. Politically Air. 
White was a zealous supporter of the princi- 
ples of the Democratic party, and for one term 
served as constable. He joined the order of 
the Ancient Free and Accepted Alasons when 
young, and in 18^5 both he and his wife united 
with the Christian Church. Although he was 
in poor health for many years, he was confined 
to his bed but two days before death relieved 
him from his sufiferings, the end coming sud- 
denly in the midwinter of 1904. 



GEORGE \y. FRAZER. A man who has al- 
ways had the best and highest interests of hu- 
manity at heart and has done much work in the 
promotion of elevating influences throughout 
the state is George W. Frazer. of Colton, whose 
profession is that of horticulturist. He was born 
January 29, 1831. in Greenbrier county. \'a.. 
and when a child of three his parents removed 
to Will county. Til., where he spent his boyhood 
days and was educated in the public schools. 



1248 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



At a tender age he was deprived of a mother's 
loving care. The father, John Trazer, was a 
native of Virginia who settled in Illinois in 1834 
and continued to reside in that state until the 
time of his death in 1864. He was an active 
member of the ^Methodist Episcopal Church and 
an enthusiastic class leader and Sunday-school 
worker and surrounded his family with every 
elevating and refining influence at his command. 

From Illinois Mr. Frazer went to New Orleans 
and Texas, remaining for one winter, after 
which in 1852 he came to California across the 
isthmus via Nicaragua route, landing in San 
Francisco July 14. His experiences on this 
trip came near to proving disastrous. The sail- 
ing vessel which he boarded, after leaving the 
isthmus port was becalmed in midocean for six- 
ty-seven days with only twenty-five days' rations, 
and when help reached them crew and passen- 
gers were nearly famished. Arriving in San 
Francisco he left shortly for the mines, but his 
health being very poor, he soon left that employ- 
ment and went to Contra Costa county, where he 
engaged in ranching until 1858. The following 
twenty years were spent in Salano county in the 
cattle business. In 1861 he settled on a piece 
of government land there and the succeeding 
year was married to Miss Eliza Root, a native 
of Indiana, a family of eight children blessing 
their union: Albert, Alice, George, Guy, Lulu, 
Fred, Adele, and' Jessie. The mother's death 
occurred when she was forty-four years of age. 

In 1888 INIr. Frazer located in Southern Cal- 
ifornia and was a fruit dealer in Monrovia for 
two years, and in 1890 he came to Colton where 
he has bought a fine home and expects to spend 
the remainder of his days. Since i860 Mr. 
Frazer has been a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church and has always been an en- 
thusiastic worker in religious circles. He is 
a stanch Prohibitionist and at one time was very 
active in the Good Templars lodge in which he 
held ofifice many times. In Contra Costa county 
he was state lecturer for the Grange organiza- 
tions there, and served that county officially as 
deputy sheriff and constable. He is a broad- 
minded man of strong principles and is held in 
the highest esteem by all who have the pleasure 
of his acquaintance. 



D. N. DODSON. Probably no man in San 
Diego county is better acquainted with real life 
in the west, southwest and northwest than D. N. 
Dodson, the well-known editor and proprietor 
of the Ramona Sentinel, who has lived in many 
states and has had a varied experience. Learn- 
ing the printer's trade at the compositor's case, 
he has since been more or less identified with 
journalistic work, and as owner of the Sentinel 



for the past four years has greatly increased its 
literary excellence and its circulation. Public- 
spirited and enterprising, he has endeavored 
through its columns to promote all progressive 
civic movements and to further advance the edu- 
cational, business, social and moral welfare of 
the community in which he resides and whose 
welfare he has at heart. A son of John H. 
Dodson, he was born, August 31, 1851, in Du- 
buque, Iowa. 

The grandson of one of the earliest settlers of 
Ohio, John H. Dodson was born and reared in 
that state, and during his earlier life was there 
a farmer and hotel keeper, and subsequently a 
merchant, dealing exclusively in boots and shoes. 
Going from there to Wisconsin, he was for a 
short time employed in lead mining, but without 
sufficient success to continue there. Removing to 
Iowa, he bought land near Dubuque, and for 
awhile was engaged in tilling the soil. Locating 
then in Texas, he carried on general farming 
and stock-raising until his death, at the age of 
seventy-one years. He was a man of much in- 
fluence in the places in which he lived, being 
active in the Republican party, a Mason and an 
Odd Fellow, and a valued member of the JNIeth- 
odist Episcopal Church. He married Mary Ann 
Noleman, who was born in Ohio, and died, at 
the age of fifty-five years, in Texas. She was a 
woman of rare personal worth, and a consistent 
member of the Baptist Church. Of the six sons 
born of their union, three are residents of San 
Diego county, namely: J. H., a rancher in the 
EI Cajon valley, now serving as justice of the 
peace; A. E., of San Diego, an insurance and 
government land lawyer; and D. N., the special 
subject of this sketch. 

Having acquired his elementary education in 
the common schools of Iowa Falls, Iowa. D. N. 
Dodson served an apprenticeship at the printer's 
trade in Fort Dodge, Iowa, remaining there 
until twenty years of age. Going then to Texas, 
he followed his trade for six years, in the mean- 
time studying law. Being admitted to the Texas 
bar in 1878, he practiced his profession at Den- 
ton, Tex., for two years, and while there served 
as mayor of the city one term. He was after- 
wards a resident for a time of Clay county, 
Tex., and there was justice of the peace. Sub- 
sequently, in partnership with one of his brothers, 
he was for a year or more engaged in the print- 
ing business at Dallas, Tex. In December, 1887, 
he came from there to San Diego. Cal. and tHe 
following three years was similarly employed in 
that city. Subsequently locating in Escondido. 
he bought four hundred acres of wild land an4 
began the improvement of a ranch, at the same 
time owning and managing a newspaper at Otay. 
Disposing of all of his in"terests in that locality, 
he went to Alaska, investing his money in Yaka- 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1249 



tat claims, which proved worthless. Not in the 
least discouraged, Mr. Dodson, in company with 
a ]\Ir. Patterson, then located in Valdez, 
Alaska, where he practiced law, and also served 
as notary public for a few years. Accumulating 
some money, he erected eight cottages, all of 
which were soon after entirely swept away 6y a 
sudden rise in the Glacier stream. Returning 
then to the States, he lived for six months in 
Washington, traveling for an insurance com- 
pany. Coining back to San Diego county, he 
started life anew, without moQey, rich only in 
friends and courage. With characteristic enter- 
prise he continued his labors, and in his pro- 
fessional career has met with eminent success. 
Four years ago he bought the Ramona Sentinel, 
which he has managed so ably, and while as- 
sisting the material and financial growth of the 
town, has added to his own wealth, building a 
good residence here and accumulating other 
property. He takes an intelligent interest in 
everything concerning the public welfare, and 
is now serving as notary public. 

In Denton, Tex., in 1880, Mr. Dodson married 
Tillie Cleveland, who was born in Missouri, and 
died in San Diego December 24, 1889, at the 
early age of thirty years. She was a woman of 
refinement and culture, greatly esteemed and be- 
loved by a large circle of friends, and was a 
member of the Baptist Church. Four children 
blessed their union, namely : Bruce, residing in 
Los Angeles; Clare, wife of Clarence M. Tel- 
ford, of Ramona, a carpenter and ranchman ; 
Nellie, who died at the age of eighteen years, in 
Ramona; and William, seventeen years old, liv- 
ing in Glendora, Los Angeles county. Possess- 
ing the courage of his convictions, Mr. Dodson 
votes for the best men and measures, independent 
of party restrictions, and fraternally he is a mem- 
ber of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 



HIMALAYA MINING COMPANY. Col- 
lectors of precious gems are today finding an al- 
luring field for study and discovery in the tour- 
maline, a beautiful and brilliant gem from 
Nature's treasure house which connoisseurs de- 
clare to be second only to the diamond. Like the 
diamond, the tourmaline is not found in paying 
quantities in many localities. Indeed, there 
hitherto have been but three fields to yield this 
gem, Maine and Connecticut in the United 
States and Ceylon in India. The gem has been 
found in Brazil and other countries, but not in 
sufficient quantities to render successful mining 
possible. Up to the present time the demand 
has far exceeded the supply, hence the discovery 
and successful development of new mines pre- 
sents points of great interest to those engaged 
in buying and selling stones and gems. 



Recent important discoveries of tourmaline 
have been made in the Mesa Grande mountain 
district, fifty-four miles from the city of San 
Diego and thirty miles from the town of Foster, 
the nearest railroad station. Three companies 
have been pioneers in developing this rich field, 
namely: Tannebaum JNIining Company, whose 
properties cover eighty acres ; San Diego Tour- 
maline Compan}-, forty acres ; and Mesa Grande 
Tourmaline and Gem Company, seven hundred 
and eighty-four acres. It was in 1891 that Prof. 
George F. Kunz, while prospecting in Mesa 
Grande mountain, found tourmaline in distinct, 
isolated crystals, many of which were translucent 
and even transparent, with separate forms and 
perfect prisms. Though the rubelite predomi- 
nated, there were also to be found specimens 
made up of four or five distinct sections, re- 
sembling those at Haddam Neck, Conn., and 
Paris, Me. ; while the Brazilian form is also to 
be found; with the exception that those have the 
interior of the crystal red inclosed in white, with 
green exterior, while the Mesa Grande crystals 
show green in the interior or yellow green in- 
closed in white, with the exterior red. 

Ten years after making his original statement 
concerning this discovery Professor Kunz re- 
ported that $15,000 in gems had been taken from 
the mines, of which almost one-half were found 
within twelve feet of the surface although the 
best stone was taken out at a depth of fifty feet. 
Some of the stones he stated to have more bril- 
liancy than anything in the world with the sole 
exception of the diamond. In value the tour- 
maline ranges from $5 to $50 a carat according 
to qualit}' and size. The rubelite tourmaline is 
taking the place, in a large degree, of the ruby. 
The demand continues to exceed the supply and 
there is every encouragement for stockholders in 
the various companies to push forward the work 
of mining with all the celerity possible, as the 
results cannot be otherwise than gratifying. 

The Himalaya Mining Company, which lo- 
cated eightv- acres in 1900, is owned by Lippman 
Tannenbaum of New York City, one of the 
largest importers of diamonds in the world. The 
general manager and superintendent of the com- 
pany's interests is J. Goodman Braye, Jr., who 
ranks as one of the expert tourmaline miners in 
the world and has a knowledge of the Mesa 
Grande mines exceeded by no one. 



JAMES WEIR, president of the board of 
trustees of San Pedro, is also chief engineer of 
the San Pedro Lumber Company, besides which 
he is first vice-president of the Harbor City 
Savings Bank, in the organization of which he 
took an active part. He is a native of Mercer 
county, Pa., born September 21. i860, the eldest 



1250 



HISTORICAL AXD BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



of four children and the only one to locate on 
the Pacific coast. His father, George Weir, was 
a native of Scotland, from which country he 
immigrated to America and in Pennsylvania en- 
gaged as a farmer until his death. His wife, 
formerly Eliza Craig, was also a native of Scot- 
land. 

Educated in the district schools, which he at- 
tended hetween the years of six and sixteen, 
James ^^'eir, began the battle of life with a sub- 
stantial foundation upon which to built future 
knowledge. At the age of sixteen years he left 
school and accepted a position as apprentice to 
learn the trade of machinist, and upon his mastery 
of the work began a prosecution of his trade in 
Pennsylvania. He made that place his home un- 
til 1892, when he came to Madera, Cal., and en- 
tered the employ of the Madera Flume and Trad- 
ing Company in the capacity of engineer and 
machinist. He remained widi them for about 
four years, when, in 1896, he came to San Pedro 
and accepted the position of chief engineer at 
the mill of the San Pedro Lumber Company, 
which was just then completed. This position 
he has subsequently filled with efficiency, and since 
the installation of the engine and machinery im- 
provements his responsibilities have been lessened 
considerabl}-. 

In this city 'Sir. \\'e\r married Delia Hann. a 
native of Indiana, and they are now the parents 
of two children. James and Mabel. Mr. Weir 
is prominent in fraternal circles, being a member 
of San Pedro Lodge \o. 332, F. & A. j\l.. in 
which he was first initiated into the order, 
is also enrolled among the members as high 
priest, of San Pedro Qiapter. No. 89. R. 
A. M., and is identified with the Modern 
Woodmen of America. He has taken a deep 
interest in the development of San Pedro in 
1902 being elected a member of the board of 
trustees for a term of four years, and two years 
later selected as president of the board. In 1906, 
at the April election, he was re-elected to his 
office and made chairman by the members which 
position he holds at the present writing. He is 
a man of ability and a citizen of worth, who is 
best appreciated where best known. 



WILLLVAl L. CL.\RK. superintendent of 
the Cleveland-Pittsburg Gold ^Mining Com- 
]5any and one of the most efficient and ex- 
perienced mining engineers of the west, has 
held his present position for several years, 
coming here from Colorado. The mine of 
which he has been given the charge has been 
in operation for ]ierhaps one-half a century 
and is owned by the company named, whose 
main offices are in Pittsburg. The location of 
the mine is on a ])ortion of ihc rancho Rincon 



del Diablo of one hundred and thirty acres, 
situated two and one-fourth miles southeast 
of Escondido, and here he may be found busily 
engaged in the details of his work, which he 
superintends with business acumen and expert 
skill. 

^Ir. Clark was born in Pennsylvania, near 
Pittsburg, in 1859, and is a son of D. S. and 
X. H. (Long) Clark, the former of Scotch 
ancestry, and the latter of Irish extraction. 
During an early period in the history of the 
west Mr. Clark removed from the east across 
the plains with ox-teams and embarked in busi- 
ness in the then small village of Denver, with 
whose commercial development he remained 
identified until his death. His wife also con- 
tinued to reside in that city as long as she 
lived. Their son, William L.. was educated in 
the schools of Golden and at early age gained 
an excellent knowdedge of mining, being es- 
pecially skilled in engineering work. When 
onlv sixteen years of age he became interested 
in mining at Leadville and later formed min- 
ing interests at Aspen. While making these 
two towns his headquarters he traveled over 
every part of the United States and ]\Iexico 
where mines are to be found and was retained 
as engineer in many responsible connections. 
Later he took up work in the Cripple Creek 
mines, where he continued from 1892 until his 
removal to California in 1903, and since the ist 
of August of the latter vear he has been in 
charge of the Cleveland-Pittsburg Gold Alin- 
ing Company's interests at Escondido. 

The marriage of Mr. Clark took place in .\s- 
pen, Colo., in June, i88g. and united him with 
Anna L. Girard. who was born in Pennsyl- 
vania and received superior educational ad- 
vantages. One child, a son. Girard. blesses 
their union. Airs. Clark is a daughter of a pio- 
neer of 1849. J- B. Girard. who was born and 
reared in Pennsvlvania, and at the time of the 
discovery of gold in California came west by 
wagon across the plains and engaged in min- 
ing. After a time he returned to the east and 
eventually settled in Colorado. WMien the 
.\ncient Order of United Workmen became 
established in Pennsvlvania he was one of the 
charter members of tlie original lod.ge and 
took a warm interest in the development of 
the fraternity. During the Civil war he ren- 
dered faithful service as a member of the 
Union army and later identified himself with 
the Grand Army of the Republic. He died in 
.-\spen in 1891. In their church affiliations 
Air. and Mrs. Clark are Episcopalians, but 
maintain liberal views and contribute as far as 
possible to all worthy religious movements 
without reference to creed or doctrines. In 
fraternal relations he holds affiliations with 



PDSTOLUCAL AXD BIOGRAPHICAL Rl-:CORD. 



iLloi 



the Masons, having been prominent in the 
work of Cripple Creek Lodge No. 96, A. R. & 
A. M., also a member of the chapter in the 
same city. 



GEORGE A. HAILS. Prominent among the 
successful men of \ entura county is George A. 
Hails, a rancher located five miles southeast of 
Oxnard, where he has been a resident for nearly 
twenty years, establishing his personal fortunes 
on a secure basis and at the same time lending 
his aid toward the furtherance of all movements 
toward the general welfare of the community. 
Mr. Hails is a native of New England, his birth 
having occurred in Sudbury, Mass., September 
23, 1856; his father, Richard Hails, was born 
in Newcastle-on-the-Tyne, and in young man- 
hood immigrated to the western world, where, in 
Sudbury (then Quincy) Mass., he engaged as 
a merchant tailor. He remained in that loca- 
tion until 1873 when he came to California and 
passed the remainder of his days, dying at the 
advanced age of eighty-four years. He is sur- 
vived by his wife, formerly Abbie Jones, who 
was born in South Lincoln, Mass., a daughter 
of James Jones, a native of the same vicinity 
and the representative of an old New England 
family, prominent in the history of that section. 
She resides in Santa Barbara at the present writ- 
ing. Of her children, Abbie resides in Santa 
Barbara ; Charles died in young manhood in that 
city; George Alvin is the subject of this review, 
and Alary, wife of John T. Torrance, resides in 
Santa Ynez, Cal. 

The first seventeen years of George A. Hails' 
life were spent in his native state, where he re- 
ceived an excellent education in the pub- 
lic and high schools, fitting him for the 
work of his young manhood. In Oc- 
tober. 1873, he came with his parents to 
Santa Barbara, and shortly afterward secured 
employment on a ranch in Santa Barbara coun- 
ty. This occupation he decided to make his life 
work and from that time on he followed ranch- 
ing, being associated with his brother at Goleta. 
In 1887 he came to his present location, which 
was a part of the Scott estate, purchasing prop- 
erty upon which he has since placed all of the 
improvements. He has erected a handsome and 
modern residence, commodious barns and out- 
buildings, has his property well fenced, and the 
land in a high state of cultivation. He has set 
out a fine orchard as well as numerous shade 
trees, which greatly enhance the beauty of the 
place. For a time he was engaged in the raising 
of grain and stock, but has since devoted the 
greater part of his time to the cultivation of 
iicans and beets, in which he has met with suc- 
cess. In addition to the one hundred acres he owns 



he also rents one hundred and fifty acres, the 
entire property being devoted to beans and beets. 
His methods are strictly modern and up-to-date, 
his interest keen in the science of farming, and 
in the conduct of his farm has well earned the 
position he holds among the ranchers of \'entura 
county — that of a progressive and enterprising 
farmer. 

In Goleta, Santa Barbara county, Mr. Hails 
was united in marriage with Miss Ettie Kenyon, 
a native of Michigan and the daughter of Ger- 
don Kenyon, who became a pioneer rancher in 
the vicinity of Goleta. They are the parents of 
three children, Mary E., Eva M., and Elsie I. 
Mr. Hails has not allowed his personal affairs 
to so engross his attention as to render him value- 
less as a citizen, but has instead interested him- 
self on all questions of the day and has kept 
closely in touch with progress along all lines. He 
is specially active in educational interests, and 
since the organization of the Oxnard Union higli 
school district has served as a member of the 
board of trustees, assisting materially at the time 
of the erection of the high school building. He 
has also served as a member of the Ocean Mew 
school board of trustees. Fraternally he is iden- 
tified with the Knights of Pythias and the Fra- 
ternal Brotherhood, while politicallv he gives 
his stanch support to the principles advocated 
in the platform of the Republican party. The 
support of the family is given to the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, of which Mrs. Hails is a 
member, although all charitable enterprises, 
whether denominational or otherwise, receive 
financial aid from them. Mr. Hails merits the 
high esteem in which he is held by all who know 
him, either in a business or social way, for he 
has carried into active practice his belief in 
stanch principles of integrity and honor. Pleasant 
and courteous in demeanor, he has won many 
friends who appreciate him for his sterling 
traits of character. 



P. H. BARTRON is a native of Tioga countv, 
N. Y., and was born April 19, 1842. Taken by 
his parents to Potter count}'. Pa., he there had 
the advantages of the public schools, of a prac- 
tical agricultural training and an apprenticeship 
at well boring, which he has followed at inter- 
vals during his entire active career. 

Mr. Bartron was nineteen years old when the 
proclamation of Abraham Lincoln fell like a 
clarion call upon the heart of every able-bodied 
son in the land. Enlisting in Company K. One 
Himdred and Forty-ninth Pennsylvania Infan- 
try, he served for three years, taking his part 
in camp, on the march and in battle until dis- 
abled. This injury necessitated his retention in 
the hospital at West Philadelphia for three 



1254 



HISTORICAL AXD BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



months, after which he rejoined his regiment and 
participated, among others, in the battles of Get- 
tysburg, The Wilderness, Chancellorsville and 
Fredericksburg. He was a brave and fearless 
soldier, and during his career accumulated a fund 
of interesting information. 

After the war Mr. Bartron engaged in lum- 
bering in Pennsylvania for abottt four years, 
and in 1871 removed to Wisconsin, where the 
Eau Qaire river offered excellent opportunity 
for the same industry. The following year he 
married Elsie Dodge, a native of Wisconsin, 
and soon afterward returned to Pennsylvania, 
where he worked in a grist and saw mill for a 
couple of years. In 1878 he brought his family 
to California, settling on land near Hanford, 
Kings county, where he lived three years, and 
from where he came to Santa Barbara county 
during the summer of 1881. He had, in the 
meantime, both made and saved money, and this 
he invested in property which is devoted to pas- 
ture, hay and stock-raising, besides which he 
owns lots in Santa Maria. 

Of the children born to Air. and Airs. Bartron. 
Elison is the wife of J. H. Mahurin ; Myra D. is 
the wife of John Grant ; Bert is at home ; Isabelle 
is the wife of John Aubert : and Ethel, James and 
Roy live with their parents. Mr. Bartron is a 
Republican in politics, but confines . his political 
activity to casting a conscientious vote. He is 
a member of Foote Post No. 89, G. A. R., and 
Mrs. Bartron is a member of the Woman's Re- 
lief Corps. Mr. Bartron's reputation is based 
upon practical efforts as a farmer and well borer, 
upon courage as a soldier, and honesty as a citi- 
zen of a prosperous and moral community. 



JOHN BARTLEY SMITHSON, JR. The 
present deputy sheriff of Needles, Cal., John B. 
Smithson, Jr., is the descendant of English an- 
cestors on the paternal side, but it is not 
definitely known when the family was first rep- 
resented in this country. It was prior to the 
birth of the grandfather, Allen F. Smithson, 
however, for it is known beyond a doubt that 
he was born in Mississippi. Leaving the south 
with his family in 1846 he started for the west, 
his son, John Bartley Smithson, Sr., then being 
a lad of about five years. Several years were 
spent in Colorado and Utah, and it was not until 
1850 that they finally reached San Bernardino, 
Cal. Here they found th'e Indians more numer- 
ous than white settlers and as a matter of safety 
they built a fort as a retreat for the women and 
children. John B. Smithson, Sr., well recalls 
these pioneer conditions, and as he was of an 
age to be of service in driving the teams he 
proved a valuable assistant. Subsequently he en- 
gaged in teaming and farming in this locality. 



following this dual occupation for nineteen years, 
and in the mean time accumulating considerable 
land. At one time he owned four hundred and 
eighty acres, set out to apples principally, al- 
though he also raised other fruits and vegetables 
m addition to managing a dairy. With his wife, 
formerly Miss Jane Cadd, he is now living re- 
tired in San Bernardino, loved and respected 
by many who are familiar with his long and in- 
teresting career. 

Of the large family of children born to' these 
parents ten are now living and of these John 
Bartley Smithson, Jr., is the second, his birth 
occurring in San Bernardino September 18. 1868. 
During his boyhood and youth he attended the 
public schools of his home town, and as soon 
as old enough and when his school duties would 
permit, he worked for his father, assisting him 
in freighting and caring for the home ranch. 
Subsequently he accepted a position in the Atchi- 
son, Topeka & Santa Ee boiler shops in San 
Bernardino, filling the same until 1901, when he 
relinquished it to engage in business for him- 
self. Seeing a good opening ahead in running 
a line of teams to the mountains he secured 
the necessary teams and outfit and for about two 
years, or until May, 1903, carried on a very 
profitable business along this line, giving it up 
on the date last' mentioned, however, to accept 
his appointment on the police force of San Ber- 
nardino. In January of the following year he 
was promoted to his present position as deputy 
sheriff' and special officer for the Atchison, Topeka 
& Santa Ee Railroad, having charge of the 
station at Needles, and to which he devotes his 
entire time and attention. 

The family home however is in San Ber- 
nardino, at the corner of Ninth and I streets, 
and is graciously presided over by Mrs. Smith- 
son, who before her marriage was Miss Florence 
Case, a native of this city and the daughter of 
James H. Case. The home of Mr. and Airs. 
Smithson is brightened by the presence of one 
child, Lois Alene, who is the joy and pride of her 
parents and will receive every advantage in their 
power to bestow. Fraternally Air. Smithson af- 
filiates with the Woodmen of the World, and 
also with San Bernardino Parlor, N. S. G. W., 
and in his political belief he is a Republican. 
Personally he is well liked for the many fine 
traits of his character, which is in keeping with 
his stalwart and well-built frame. 



AIILLS BROTHERS. California is rich in 
the possession of men of ability and enterprise 
who have given their best efforts toward the 
material growth and progress of the state. 
Among these prominent mention may be made 
of two native sons, the Alills brothers, Francis 



HISTORICAL AXD BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



E. and Edward T., located in the vicinity of EI 
Monte, and actively engaged in the improvement 
and cultivation of a fine walnut grove. Their 
father, E. T. Mills, was born in Buffalo, N. Y., 
in 1833, their grandfather, Abel, being a native 
of the same state and the descendant of Eng- 
lish ancestry. E. T. Mills engaged as an assist- 
ant in his father's business, which was that of 
a miller, until he was seventeen years old, when 
he came to California ; he outfitted with ox- 
teams and in company with a large train set out 
across the plains for the Mecca of the fortune 
hunter's dreams. They had many exciting and 
fearful experiences during the journey, running 
out of provisions, which forced them to eat mule 
meat in preference to starvation. They finally 
abandoned their wagons and made the remainder 
of the journey as best they could, arriving in 
Hangtown after several weary, trying months, 
where Mr. Mills found employment in the mines. 
After several years in this occupation he came 
to Southern California and in San Bernardino 
county engaged in lumbering. Following his 
marriage there he removed to Los Angeles 
county and became a pioneer settler of El 
Monte, where he followed farming and stock 
raising, and also conducted a freighting busi- 
ness between Los Angeles and San Bernardino 
beforfe the railroads supplied the early hotels of 
the former city. He always retained an inter- 
est in the mining operations of the state. He 
was a stanch Republican, an ardent advocate of 
all upbuilding enterprises, and foremost in what- 
ever looked toward the betterment of the com- 
munity. His death occurred in 1887, while his 
wife, formerly Mary Margaret Cleminson, a 
native of Missouri and sister of James Clemin- 
son, whose history appears elsewhere in this 
volume, passed away in 1879. They were the 
parents of three children, Francis Eugene, Ed- 
ward Theron and Imogene, Mrs. Thompson, of 
Azusa. 

Francis Eugene Mills was born on the Qem- 
inson place in El Monte, February 5, i860, 
while Edward Theron Mills was born on the 
present site of the high school building of this 
town, July 10, 1862. They were classmates in 
the public schools of El Monte, studying to- 
gether, playing together, and as early as 1875 
began working land together. They leased land 
in the vicinity of El Monte and engaged in 
general farming and the raising of grain, which 
occupation proved successful and gave them 
means, with which, in 1884, they began the im- 
provement of ten acres of land. Slowly adding 
to this property with their accumulated means 
they have now thirty acres, finely improved and 
capable of the highest cultivation, all devoted 
to apples and walnuts, which make of the prop- 
erty one of the fine groves of this section. They 



have been successful in their efforts, have ac- 
cumulated a competence, and at the same time 
established for themselves a place among the 
progressive and enterprising men of this section. 
Francis E. Mills is married, his wife in maiden- 
hood being Gertrude Hall, a native of Vermont. 
She was reared in Kansas and came to this state 
with her parents in 1880, her marriage occur- 
ring in El Monte. They have had five children, 
namely : Ellsworth, Francis, who died in in- 
fanc)'; Gertrude, Mary Imogene and Ruth 
Gladys. Both brothers are members of the 
Mountain View Walnut Growers' Association, 
in which Francis E. is a director, and officiates 
as treasurer. Both are stanch adherents of Re- 
publican principles. 



FRED G. BIERLEIN. A popular and suc- 
cessful young business man Fred G. Bierlein of 
Long Beach has within the three years of his 
residence in this city made himself a leader among 
automobile dealers and is conducting a rapidly 
growing trade. The family is of German de- 
scent, Mr. Bierlein's grandfather having been 
born in Germany and after coming to this coun- 
try he settled on a farm in Frankenmuth, Sagi- 
naw county, Mich., where his son, Mathew, was 
born. The birth of Fred G. occurred July 9. 
1880, in Richville, Tuscola county, Mich., his 
father now owning a farm near that place. His 
mother; who is also living, was before her mar- 
riage Anna M. Ranke, a daughter of Fred Ranke, 
who was a native of Pennsylvania and became 
an early settler in Saginaw county, Mich., and 
was there engaged in farming. 

A member of a family comprising thirteen 
children, Fred G. Bierlein acquired a common- 
school education and helped his father until 
twentj'-one years of age, then went to Bay City 
and secured employment in the West Bay City 
Sugar Company's factory, and within two years 
had risen to the position of assistant to the super- 
intendent. Desiring to secure a commercial 
education he went to Lansing and entered the 
Lansing Business University, from which he 
graduated in 1902. The following year he filled 
the position of bookkeeper and office man with 
the Huber Manufacturing Company in Lansing, 
and in December, 1903, came to Los Angeles and 
was employed bv L. T. Shettler, agent for the 
Oldsmobile, as bookkeeper and salesman. Re- 
taining this place until January, 1905, he con- 
ducted an Oldsmobile agency in Riverside for 
four months, then came to Long Beach and built 
the old Palace garage on Fourth street, becoming 
the proprietor and securing the agency of the Reo 
and Winton automobiles. In the spring of 1906 
he sold out and started an automobile supply 
business at No. 38 Locust street and erected a 



1256 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



new garage at No. 232 Pacific street, moving into 
the new quarters in September, 1906. The build- 
ing is 50x190 feet, the materials used in its con- 
struction being entirely of brick and stone, mak- 
ing it an absolutely fireproof structure. In the 
front are the spacious salesrooms and offices, and 
back of this is the main room for machines, 
equipped with private lockers for regular cus- 
tomers, air tanks and everything that goes to 
make a thoroughly up-to-date complete garage, 
no expense having been spared to instal every 
modern convenience. Automobiles are kept for 
rent and Mr. Bierlein has the agency for the 
Reo, Winton and Strothers machines, his busi- 
ness in every department being the larg-est of 
the kind in the citw 

^Ir. Bierlein's marriage in Bay City, Alich., 
united him with Miss Emily A. Kloha, a native 
of that state, and they have become the par- 
ents of one child, Leon Jacob. They are mem- 
bers of the Lutheran Church, whose charities 
and benevolences they support liberally, and ex- 
ert an elevating and progressive influence 
throuo-hout the communitv in which thev reside. 



S.AAIUEL TRELOAR is one of those fine old 
gentlemen whom it is always a delight to meet, 
and the various paths which his life has followed 
and the stirring scenes through which he has 
passed make him an interesting conversational- 
ist. His father, also Samuel Treloar, wiis born 
in England and with his family came to this 
country in 1834, when his namesake was but 
two years old. Settling in the territory of Wis- 
consin, he there reared his eleven children, 
seven of whom grew to maturity, and of these 
two now make their homes in California. The 
mother passed away at the age of fifty years, but 
the father attained the advanced age of eighty- 
six years. 

As has been previouslv stated Samuel Treloar 
is a native of England, his birth occurring No- 
vember 9, 1832, but as he was brought to the new 
world when he was a mere child he has no per- 
sonal knowledge of his native land. His boyhood 
and youth were associated with the pioneer con- 
ditions which then prevailed in Wisconsin, and 
in the mean time he attended the subscription 
schools in the vicinity of the family homestead. 
In 1852, before he had attained his majority, be 
joined a party of immigrants bound for Cali- 
fornia, and upon reaching the state went at 
once to the Placerville mines. From Eldorado 
county he went to Sierra county, following mining 
in both localities for about twenty-seven years, 
and in the mean time had investigated the mining 
prospects of the Eraser river country. Returning 
to his old home in Wisconsin, he remained there 
seven vears, at the end of tliat time retracing his 



steps to the Golden state. Going to Yuba coun- 
ty, he there settled down as a tiller of the soil, 
in addition to which he also followed mining. 
Selling out his interests there in 1896 he came 
to the southern part of the state, and near Car- 
pinteria, Santa Barbara county, purchased one 
hundred acres of choice land upon which he still 
malces his home, although the work connected 
with the management of the ranch is performed 
by others. 

In 1864 ^Ir. Treloar was united in marriage 
in Forest City. Sierra county, with Lizzie Lee, 
who was a native of his childhood home, Wis- 
consin. Nine children were born to them, and 
with the exception of two, all are married and 
established in homes of their own. Named in 
order of birth the children are as follows : Liz- 
zie J., who is the widow of Ed Jeffrey ;; Frank 
Benjamin ; Carrie, the wife of George Martin ; 
William, who married Hattie ^^'ebster : Forrest, 
who chose as his wife Ora Lentz ; Qiarles, who 
married Mabel Baton ; Stella, the wife of Philip 
Dane: ^[yrtle E. and Albert Lee. Since 1864 
Mr. Treloar has been identified with the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, and has passed 
through all of the chairs of the order, this also 
being true of the United Workmen Lodge, of 
which he is also a member. For three years he 
was a member of the Home Guard in Califor- 
nia. Politically he supports Republican prin- 
ciples, and in religion he affiliates with the Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church. 



PATRICK QUINN. As the owner of the 
Ouinn granite quarry, Patrick Ouinn is known 
as one of the successful and progressive business 
men of Temecula, where he has one hundred 
and sixty acres of mountain land with a front- 
age of half a mile of solid granite. The stone 
is of fine quality and is used for head stones, 
building and curbing purposes, and is shipped 
at the rate of about fifty carloads per year to San 
Francisco and Los Angeles markets. 

Mr. Quinn was bom in April, 1853, in Gal- 
way county, Ireland, where he received his ed- 
ucation. .At the age of seventeen years he came 
to the United States and located at Waltham, 
Mass., there learning the trade of stone cutter. 
His arrival in California dates from 1876, when 
he reached San Francisco. Subsequently he 
traveled all over the coast section and in 1886 
came to Temecula and began his present busi- 
ness, which was the first one of the kind in this 
section, and has now grown to proportions re- 
quiring the employment of sixteen men in the 
quarries. Mr. Ouinn is a public spirited citizen, 
interested in the development of his section of 
the state and lends his support to all enterprises 
tending towards its upbuilding. 





'^.^^^'^^^^-r 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1259 



GEORGE H. JOHNSON. The owner of one 
of the finest orchards in the San Jacinto Val- 
le}-, George H. Johnson is known as one of the 
most successful and highly respected citizens of 
this section of the state. His ranch was in a very 
neglected condition when he bought it, but he has 
improved it until it is now considered a very de- 
sirable property. It is located diree-fourths of 
a mile east of \'alle \'ista, on Florida avenue, 
and the greater part of the forty acres is devoted 
to oranges, although he also raises sufficient hay 
for his own use. The birth of jNIr. Johnson oc- 
curred December 5, i860, in Phelps county, ]\Io., 
he being the son of JMilton and Trythene (Deem) 
Johnson, both of whom were natives of Indiana. 
They settled in Missouri in early years, in 1862 
becoming residents of Indiana, where they re- 
mained twelve years, the succeeding ten years 
being spent in Illinois, and in 1884 they removed 
to the still further western state of Kansas, lo- 
cating in Burr Oak, where ]\Irs. Johnson's death 
occurred. The father then came to California, 
arriving here in 1893, lived in San Jacinto and 
\'alle \'ista until 1897, when he returned to Kan- 
sas, his death occurring a short time later at the 
age of sixty-seven years. 

The education of Mr. Johnson was received 
in the schools of Indiana and Illinois, in which 
latter state he was married, February 25, 1884, 
and the following year he removed to Kansas, 
whither his parents had already located. A de- 
sire to come still further west induced him to 
make another change in the spring of 1891, at 
which time he settled in Diamond valley. River- 
side county, Cal., later removing to the San 
Jacinto valley and purchasing a half interest in 
the ranch upon which he now makes his home. 
The death of his wife occurred in Kansas in 
1890, the year previous to his removal to this 
state. She was before her marriage Miss Mary 
Belle i\Iason, a native of Illinois, in which state 
she was married. Two children were born of 
diis union, Roy, whose death occurred in his 
eleventh year, and Earl, now nineteen years of 
age, who lives at home with his father. Frater- 
nallv Mr. Johnson is a member of San Jacinto 
Camp No. 100, W. O. W., and Hemet Lodge No. 
190, I. O. O. F. He is a man who takes an 
especial interest in educational matters and served 
on the school board of his district for two vears. 



GEORGE A. TELFORD. The attractive 
country home situated one-half mile south of 
Ramona has been occupied and owned by Mr. 
Telford during the entire period of his residence 
in the west. On coming to California in 1890 
he at once settled in Ramona and purchased a 
ranch adjacent to the village, where he set out 
an orchard of thirtv-five acres of all kinds of 



fruit. About the same time he erected a mod- 
ern and substantial residence containing ten 
rooms and ecpiipped with the latest improvements, 
ibis being still recognized as one of the most 
elegant farm houses in San Diego county. Every- 
thing on the place bears an appearance of thrift 
mdicative of the energy and judicious manage- 
ment of the owner, who in addition to super- 
intending the farm takes contracts for the erec- 
tion of residences and other buildings. 

The Telford family is of eastern stock, coming 
from New York State. For many years David 
W. Telford was a prominent member of the bar 
uf Cayuga county and ranked high for his knowl- 
edge of jurisprudence and the fundamental prin- 
ciples of the law, but eventually he retired from 
practice and established himself upon a farm. For 
a time he also filled the office of surveyor of Ca}'- 
uga county. There he continued to reside until 
his death, which occurred in 1900, at the age 
of eighty-nine years, many years after the de- 
'.nise of his wife, Caroline (Mason) Telford, who 
had passed away in 1865, at the age of thirty-four 
} ears. Among their children was George A., 
born in Cayuga county, N. Y., April 28, 185.^, 
and educated in public schools and Red Creek 
Academy. During 1872 he started out for him- 
self and went west as far as Missouri, where 
he settled in Meadville, Linn county. As time 
passed by he acquired various interests and form- 
ed important business relations, becoming one of 
the well-known men of his town. The packing 
and poultry industries were his principal occupa- 
tions for some time and he also held a position as 
traveling salesman with J. H. Dunn, while in ad- 
dition for twelve vears he engaged in contracting 
and building in that town and county. 

\Miile making his home in Missouri Mr. Tel- 
ford was united in marriage in 1876 with Miss 
Eva J. Butler, a native of Beloit, \'\'is., but from 
childhood a resident of Missouri. Four chil- 
dren were born of their union, namcl}' : Ida, who 
married J. C. Bargar, represented on another 
page of this volume ; Eunice, wife of William 
Stockton, who is engaged in the stock business 
and resides at Ramona ; Clarence M.. who mar- 
ried Oara Dodson and resides in Ramona, and is 
liis father's partner both in the cultivation of the 
farm and the contracting business, and Carrie E., 
who remains with her parents on the home farm. 
The family stands high in social circles of the 
neighborhood and is identified with the Congre- 
gational Church in religious connections. In poli- 
tics Mr. Telford for years has been a believer in 
Republican principles and a voter of that ticket 
at all elections. Fraternally he holds member- 
ship with Court No. 8520, Ancient Order of For- 
esters. The general esteem of the people is ac- 
corded him, and he enjoys the confidence of all. 



1260 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



for his uprightness of Hfe and probity in business 
transactions have been such as to commend him 
to tlie people with whom he has liad associations. 



FRED P. SMITH. Varied business ex- 
periences in different parts of the east were fol- 
lowed by l\Ir. Smith's removal to California, 
where since January, 1897, he has been em- 
ployed by the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe 
Railroad as their agent at the Carlsbad station. 
IJorn and resred in New York City, he is a 
member of an old eastern family of Quaker 
ancestry and he was by birthright a member of 
the Society of Friends, but forfeited his mem- 
bership through enlisting in the Civil war, 
participation in warfare being in direct oppo- 
sition to the societj^'s teachings. His parents. 
Dr. John T. S. and Amelia (Franklin) Smith, 
Vv^ere natives respectively of New Bedford, 
Mass., and New York City, and the former, re- 
moving to the metropolis at an early age, 
there established a homeopathic pharmacy. 
When seventy-three j^ears of age, in October, 
1876, he died in New York City, and his wife 
also died there at the age of fifty-six years. 

Born December 5, 1849, Fred P. Smith was 
given an excellent education in private schools 
of New York City and later assisted his father 
in the pharm.acy business, eventually becom- 
ing a partner in the same business with his 
brother, Henry ^T. Smith. About 1875 he 
lurned his attention to the provision business, 
in which he remained for seven years. The 
next occupation in which he became interested 
was that of nursing, in which capacity he was 
retained by patients of homeopathic physi- 
cians in New York. On leaving that city he 
removed to Camden, N. J., and acted as agent 
for the Wheeler & \A'ilpon Sewing Machine 
Company for a short time, afterward engag- 
ing in the grain business for the Pennsylvania 
Railroad Company. On leaving the Atlantic 
seaboard he settled in Toledo, Ohio, where he 
had charge of collecting rents for his brother- 
in-law's real estate business and for a time he 
also filled the position of warden in the Home- 
opathic hospital of Toledo. Removing to the 
Pacific coast in 1886, he soon afterward settled 
in Twin Oaks valley, San Diego county, and 
made his home in Escondido for two years or 
more, since which time he has resided in 
Carlsbad, and is a well-known citizen of this 
place. 

Tiiough very young when the Civil war was 
in progress Mr. Smith was accepted as a mem- 
ber of Company K, Eighth New York State 
Militia, and served until the expiration of his 
tim.e. Later he affiliated with the Grand ,\rmy 
of the Roinibltc, in the activities of which he 



has maintained a constant interest. Among 
the other organizations in which he has borne 
a part may be mentioned the Knights of 
Pythias (his membership being with the Es- 
condido Lodge) and the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows (affiliating with the Oceanside 
Lodge). While living in New York City he 
there married, in 1874, Miss Josephine Stevens, 
a native of Michigan. Two children were born 
of their union. The daughter, Marion, mar- 
ried James Furber and resides in Rahway, N. 
J., while the son, Sherman S., also makes his 
home in the same citv. 



CAPT. LEWIS ALBERT PAINE. Since 
November, 1901. Capt. Lewis A. Paine has been- 
a resident of California and in the city of Long 
Beach has given his best efforts toward advance- 
ment along all lines calculated for the upbuilding 
of this section of the state. He is at the present 
writing serving as deputy city clerk, and al- 
though but a brief time has elapsed since his ap- 
pointment to this position by the city council he 
has ably demonstrated his ability and' bids fair to 
rise to higher positions of trust and responsibil- 
ity in the gift of the people. Captain Paine is the 
descendant of an old New England family, his 
father, Elbridge M., and grandfather, William 
Henry, both being natives of the state of Ver- 
m.ont, where the elder man engaged in agricult- 
ural pursuits for many years. He eventually 
brought his family to the middle west, where in 
the vicinity of Fond du Lac and Manitowoc, 
Wis., he spent his last days. Elbridge M. Paine 
was reared on the paternal farm in Wisconsin to 
years of maturity, when he removed to Charles 
Citv, Iowa, passing a brief time in that location ; 
returning to Wisconsin he was occupied as a 
farmer for three years and then became a resi- 
dent of Boone county, Neb., where in the vicinity 
of Cedar Rapids he engaged in general farming 
and stock-raising. Locating in Long Beach in 
1901 he has since lived retired from the active 
cares of life and is now numbered among the cit- 
izens who are enjoying the advantages produced 
by their early years of efifort. His wife, who is 
also living, was formerly Rhoda Emigh, born in 
the northern part of New York state, a daughter 
of Henrv Emigh, a farmer who later in life lo- 
cated in Fond du Lac, Wis. 

Of the three children born to his parents Lew- 
is Albert Paine is the second in order of birth, he 
being a native of Charles City, Iowa, born April 
2, 1875. His childhood days were passed in Ne- 
braska, where he attended the public schools, sup- 
plementing this training by a course in the high 
school of Cedar Rapids and the University of 
Nebraska at Lincoln. He left the university to 
enlist for service in the Spanish-American war. 




/ 



'/ryi^ 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1261 



becoming- a member of the Second Regiment Ne- 
braska Volunteer Infantry, in Company A, after 
an eight months' service being honorably dis- 
charged as corporal. Following his release from 
the army he spent one year in traveling, after 
which, in 1901, he came to Long Beach with his 
parents and for the ensuing four years engaged 
in contracting. In May, 1906, he was appointed 
by the city council to his present position of dep- 
uty city clerk. He takes a deep interest in the 
advancement of all public enterprises and has a 
firm faith in the future of this city, where he has 
invested in real estate. 

On the 2i.st of December, 1.904, Mr. Paine was 
one of the organizers of Company H, Seventh 
California National Guard, and was at that time 
elected second lieutenant. May i, 1906, while in 
service at Oakland following the great San 
Francisco disaster, he was elected captain of the 
company. In matters fraternal he is identified 
with the Modern Woodmen of America (of which 
he is venerable consul). Knights of Pythias and 
Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. He is an 
honored member of the Spanish-American War 
A^eterans of Long Beach. 



WILLIAM SINGLETON. ' In the citizen- 
ship of San Bernardino and Riverside counties 
AVilliam Singleton occupies a prominent posi- 
tion, esteemed alike for his business character- 
istics as well as for personal qualities which 
have been displayed during his long residence 
in this section of Southern California. Mr. 
Singleton was born in Lancashire, England, a 
son of James and Ann (Houghton) Singleton, 
both natives of the same place. His grandfather, 
William Singleton, was a brewer in Lancashire, 
where he spent his entire life. James Single- 
ton engaged as an engineer and machinist in 
his native country until 1853. -when he brought 
his family to America, arriving in New 
Orleans, transferred to river steamer and land- 
ing at Keokuk, Iowa, and completing the 
transcontinental journey h}- means of the time- 
honored ox-teams. Arriving in Salt Lake City 
he engaged in farming until 1857, when he 
once more loaded his worldly effects into an 
ox-wagon and finished the trip to the Pacific 
coast, arriving in San Bernardino, and there 
securing employment as a machinist and en- 
gineer in a sawmill and also entering a farm, 
locating upon the same in 1868. With his son 
\Villiam he purchased the old Roubideaux 
place of forty-four hundred and forty acres, 
and there followed agricultural pursuits until 
his death, which occurred in 1881 at the age 
of sixty-seven years. One-half of this large 
propert)' was sold to a farmer located near 



them and the remainder kept in the family. His 
wife, a daughter of William Houghton, a 
miner in England, survived her husband until 
1894. They had two children, William, of this 
review, and Ann, now ]\Irs. Hiram Haskell, of 
this place. 

Born November 13, 1834, William Single- 
ton was reared in his native country and edu- 
cated in a private school to the age of eleven 
years, when he engaged with his father to 
learn the trade of machinist. He was first em- 
ployed as a wiper and from that learned the 
trade. In 1853, on February 8, the family em- 
barked at Liverpool on the sailer Elvira Ow- 
ens, bound for New Orleans, and after seven 
weeks they^ arrived at their destination. They 
went up the Mississippi river to St. Louis, 
thence to Keokuk, where they outfitted with 
ox-teams and necessary provisions and set out 
on the journey overland to Salt Lake City. 
Arriving in that cit}^ October 6 Mr. Singleton 
began farming with his father, and remained in 
that location until 1857, when they again out- 
fitted and came overland to San Bernardino. 
Here he first followed the work of engineer in 
a sawmill, remaining so occupied for the pe- 
riod of two years, and then again becoming 
interested in farming. In 1868 with his father 
he located on the farm before mentioned, and 
with him developed and unproved it, erecting 
a residence in which he now resides, and con- 
ducts an extensive dairy business and cream- 
ery, as well as general farming operations. 

In San Bernardino Mr. Singleton was united 
in marriage with j\Iiss Lydia Brooks, a native 
of St. Louis, IMo. ; she came to California in 
1852, crossing the plains with her father, 
James Brooks, to Salt Lake City, and ten 
years later came to Southern California. They 
are the parents of the following children : An- 
nie, Mrs. Goetting, of El Casco ; William 
James, engaged with his father; Helen, at 
home; Thomas Henry, fanning near Beau- 
mont; and Charles Edward, at home. For 
many years Mr. Singleton served as school 
trustee of the San Timoteo district and has al- 
ways taken a practical and helpful interest in 
educational matters. In political affiliations 
he is a stanch Democrat. The business inter- 
ests of Redlands had in Mr. Singleton one of 
its prominent factors, as with his nephew, W. 
H. Singleton, mentioned at length in this vol- 
ume, building the Club Stables and operating 
them until their sale some time since. He en- 
joys the esteem of the citizens of this section 
who have known him for a half century, and 
merits the high place he holds as a representa- 
tive rancher, stockman and business man. 



1262 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



LEWLS CALVIN LINDSEY. Since his 
location in Long Beach ]\Ir. Lindsey has 
taken an active interest in the development 
of the city and has manifested his faith in the 
permanency of conditions here by investing 
largely in real estate holdings. He is prac- 
ticalh' retired from active business cares, 
seeking a needed relaxation in the evening 
of his days. Mr. Lindsey is a native of Nor- 
wich, ]\Iuskingum county. Ohio, his birth 
occtirring February 22, 1830, the tenth of a 
family of thirteen children, of whom but two 
are now surviving. His father. Joseph Lind- 
sey, a native of Penns^h-ania, \vas a carpenter 
and builder who located m .Muskingum coun- 
tv, Ohio, and in addition to his building enter- 
prise engaged in the improvement and culti- 
vation of a large farm. He spent his last 
years in Cedar county, Iowa. His wife, for- 
merly Ellen Miller, a native of Ohio, died in 
Illinois. 

Lewis Calvin Lindsey was reared in Ohio 
until he was seven years of age, when he was 
taken by his parents to Illinois, in Champaign 
county, receiving a limited education throu^'h 
an attendance of the public schools whose 
sessions were held in tlie log cabin of the day. 
At the age of twenty years he removed to 
Iowa, having at that age been dependent upon 
his own resources for five years. His prin- 
cipal occupation was as a farmer in Iowa, im- 
proving a farm of one hundred and twenty 
acres in the ^'icinity of ^^'ilto^ Junction, break- 
ing prairie with five yoke of (jxen. He re- 
mained a resident of Iowa until 1881, when he 
removed to Nebraska and three miles west of 
Hastings purchased and improved a farm. 
Later he purchased a farm of one hundred and 
sixty acres in Hayes county. Neb., which 
property he still owns. Finally retiring from 
active farming life he located in Hastings 
where he made his home until the fall of 1901, 
when he came to Southern California and lo- 
cated in Covina. Two years later he came to 
Long Beach, where he now owns a com- 
modious residence and also owned a ranch 
of three acres near Signal Hill. 

In Cedar county, Iowa. February 22, 1852, 
Mr. Lindsey married Ellen Halderman. a na- 
ti\e of Illinois, and born of this union were 
ten children, eight of whom are now living: 
Martha J., wife of Nelson Ridenour of Custer 
county, Neb. : Mary, wife of Eugene Nye ; 
Laura, widow of John Elmer De Forest, of 
Los Angeles; William, of Long Beach; Clara, 
Avife of Eugene Hammond, of Hastings, Neb. ; 
Charles Upton, of Long Beach; INIinnie, wife 
uf C. F. Casebeer; and Irene, wife of Fred 
Hart, of Seattle, Wash. :\lrs Lindsev is a 



daughter of Christian Halderman, who was 
liorn in Germany, and after his immigrating 
to America engaged as a farmer and carpenter 
in Illinois. Later in life he located in Cedar 
count}-, Iowa, and on Rock creek operated a 
flour mill and also engaged in farming, being 
a pioneer of that section. He died there in 
early life. His wife, formerly ]\Iartha Lake, 
was a native of Ohio, whose death occurred 
when her daughter was but four years old. 
Mr. Lindsey is a Democrat in his political 
affiliations and takes an acti\-c interest in the 
iirincinlcs he endorses. 



JEFFERSON HAIL HATHAW.VV. The 
family represented by Mr. Hathawa}' of Pomona 
is traced to Old Virginia, where the grandparents 
were born, but later years numbered them among 
the residents of Alissouri, the birth of their 
son Jefferson M. occurring in St. Joseph, that 
state. When he was a lad of about seven years 
removal was made to Texas, and in that state 
he was reared and received such meagre edu- 
cational advantages as were in keeping' with 
the pioneer conditions. When the fever of ex- 
citement following the finding of gold in Cali- 
fornia had somewhat subsided a more conserva- 
tive class of homeseekers followed in the wake 
of the forty-niners, and among the number who 
came to the state with this object in mind was 
Jefferson M. Hathaway. Behind . a team of 
slow plodding oxen he crossed the plains in 
1853, passing through Arizona, and finally 
reached Santa Ysabel, San Diego county. From 
there he came on to El Monte, Los Angeles 
county, and then crossed over into San Bernardi- 
no county. After his marriage, which occurred 
in the latter county, he returned to El Alonte and 
engaged in farming, following this until 1867. 
when he went to Rincon and purchased a ranch 
in that vicinity. Sixteen years later he removed 
to Azusa, and four years later, in 1887, he 
took up ranching near Pomona, and it was here 
that his earth life came to a close December 14, 
1905. His wife was formerly !\Iartha M. Rus- 
sell, who was born in Illinois, the daughter of 
Hiram Russell, who brought his family across 
the plains in 1858 and settled in San Bernardino 
county. Mrs. Hathaway is still living and makes 
her home at No. 808 West Ninth street. Pomona. 
Seven sons and three daughters were born to 
this worthy couple, and of the number four sons 
and three daughters are now living. 

Next to the oldest of the surviving children 
is Jeff'erson H. Hathaway, who was born in El 
i\[onte, Los Angeles county. March 14, 1863. 
He was a child of only two years wlien the familv 
removed to Rincon and settled upon a raiicli 




CAPT. JOSEPH MASSEMN 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



12(35 



ill that vicinit}-. As soon as he was old enough 
to he of assistance on the ranch he gave his ser- 
vices to his father, at the same time attending 
the puhHc schools when in session. This as- 
sociation crintinued until i8(jg, when the son, who 
had always displayed a mechanical turn of mind, 
estahlished himself in the bicycle business in 
I'oinona, in connection with which he also does 
general machine and repair work. I lis shop 
is located at Xo. 443 West Second street, where 
may be seen a good assortment of second-hand 
bicycles, as well as new ones of his own manu- 
facture. His interests are not solely absorbed 
in the business just mentioned, however, for he 
is the owner of a fine ten-acre alfalfa ranch near 
Chino. 

Mr. Hathaway's fraternal associations are 
numerous and include membership in the In- 
dependent Order of Odd Fellows, belonging to 
the Encampment and the Rebekahs ; the Inde- 
pendent Order of Foresters, P'raternal Aid and 
Fraternal Brotherhood. In politics he is a Demo- 



CAPT. JOSEPH MASSE LIN was born in 
Havre, France, August 16, 1830, and was reared 
on a farm until he went to sea, sailing out of 
liavre. In 1849 he came around Cape Horn 
to .San Francisco. He sailed on the coast and 
bay of San Francisco, becoming captain of 
vessels and later on owned his own vessels, 
which he sailed as master, among them being 
the Garibaldi, Jean Fredrick and Safety. The 
latter was burned in San Francisco bay. In 
1870 lie sold his vessels and located in Los 
.\ngeles and for many years was successfully 
engaged in the sheep business, ranging them on 
La Brae and Cienaga ranches in Los Angeles 
county. In about 1880 he purchased a farm 
of one hundred and forty acres, part of the 
Cienaga ranch, and there engaged in farming 
until his death, October 21, 1898. 

Captain Masselin was married in San Fran- 
cisco October 29, i860, to Miss Marie Sehabia- 
gue, who was born in Basses-Pyrenees, France, 
the daughter of Alichael and Dominica Se- 
habiague, who were successful agriculturists 
in the south of France. By way of Cape Horn 
Mrs. .Masselin came to California in 1859, leav- 
ing Havre on tiie sailer Chatelon, and after 
a voyage of six months and fifteen days land- 
ed in San Francisco. Since the death of her 
liusband she has continued to reside on her 
ranch looking after her interests. It is lo- 
cated on Wilshire boulevard, one and one-half 
miles west of the city limits, and aside from 
engaging in general farming she has it leased 
to an oil company, which has several produc- 



ing wells, two of them flowing. Six children 
were born to Mr. and Mrs. ^Masselin, namely: 
John B., a grocer on west Pico street, Los 
Angeles; Zellie, wife of Pierre Sarrail, pro- 
prietor of the Ramona Bottling Works of Los 
Angeles ; Eugenia, Joseph, Julia and Cornelia, 
all under the parental roof. Captain Masselin 
was a very enterprising man and always ready 
to give of his time and money towards the up- 
building of his community. He was much in- 
terested in education and for many years 
served as trustee of the Cienaga school dis- 
trict. 



A [ARK McLaughlin. Throughout Ven- 
tura county are to be found men of wealth and 
position who came to this country from the 
British Isles poor in purse, but with an unlimited 
stock of energy and perseverance, and who by 
untiring industry and wise management have 
acquired a competence. Prominent among this 
number is Mark McLaughlin, a large landholder, 
who is now living retired from active pursuits 
on his well-appointed ranch near Oxnard, en- 
joying a well-earned leisure. One of the earlv 
settlers of the Santa Clara valley, he has ever 
taken a warm interest in its development, en- 
couraging and supporting all beneficial projects, 
and as a man and a citizen is held in higli es- 
teem. He was born, April 20, 1843, in Ireland, 
where his parents, Patrick and Ellen (Wynne) 
McLaughlin, spent their long and usefuf lives, 
the father attaining the age of eighty-eight years, 
and the mother living until eighty-two vears old. 
Of the twelve children born into their household, 
eleven grew to years of maturity, and two came 
to America, one son settling in Detroit, Mich., 
and the other, Mark, being the subject of this 
review. 

In common with his brothers and sisters. 
Mr. IMcLaughlin attended the district school until 
about fourteen years old, when he began to be 
self-supporting. At the age of seventeen years, 
being firmly convinced that there were greater 
facilities for a poor boy to better his financial 
condition in America than in his own country, 
he crossed the Atlantic, landing in New York- 
City, where he remained eighteen months, a 
part of that time being night watchman in some 
of the wholesale stores. Coming to California 
in 1863. he lived for six months in San Fran- 
cisco, after which he was engaged in farming 
in Alameda county for several seasons, working 
by the month. Desirous then of making a per- 
manent settlement, in 1870 he came to the Santa 
Clara valley, locating near Hueneme, where he 
made his first purchase of land, buying three 
hundred and eighteen acres. In its care and 
management he was very successful, and as he 



1266 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



accumulated money lie at once invested it in 
additional land, and now owns, besides his origi- 
nal farm, a ranch of one hundred and twenty 
acres near Oxnard, one of two hundred and 
forty-three and one-half acres near Camarillo. 
and has also considerable land in Los Angeles 
county near the Palms. His home ranch he 
devotes to the raising of beans and sugar beets, 
and his other two ranches to the growing of 
beans and hay. All of these are profitable crops, 
yielding excellent harvests, the beans averag- 
ing a fair number of sacks to the acre, and the 
beets doing equally as well in this fertile valley. 
To some extent he is also engaged in the cattle 
business, raising enough horses for his own use. 
In 1871, in the Santa Clara valley of the 
Southern Coast, J\Ir. AIcLaughlin married 
Margaret Clyne, a native of Ireland, and into 
their home nine children were born, three of 
whom have passed to the life beyond, two dying 
in infancy, and Alargaret Ann at the age of 
thirteen years, while six are living, namely : 
Thomas F., who married Annie Lidle, and has 
four children ; James P., living at home ; Mary 
Kate, wife of Henry Borchard; Nellie, wife of 
Frank Borchard ; and Caroline and Sarah E., 
both at home. Politically Mr. McLaughlin is 
a straightforward Democrat, and for over twen- 
ty years has served as school trustee. Fra- 
ternally he is a member of the Knights of Colum- 
bus, and religiously he and his family belong to 
the Catholic Giurch. He is connected with the 
People's Lumber Company of Ventura county, 
being one of its directors, a capacity in which 
he is doing much to promote the interest of the 
organization. He is also a stock holder in the 
Oxnard Commercial Bank, and is also similarly 
identified with the A. Levy bank. 



THOMAS FREER gives to the state of his 
birth his most loyal allegiance, upholding her 
interests in every possible way, supporting her 
principles, and is enthusiastic concerning the 
future which awaits California among the com- 
monwealths of the nation. He was born in 
Berryessa, Santa Clara county, December 25, 
1859, a son of William H. Freer, one of the early 
pioneers of California. For a full account of 
his career refer to his personal sketch, which ap- 
pears elsewhere in this volume. Reared in Santa 
Clara county until he was fifteen years old, 
Thomas Freer received his education in the 
public schools of that section, attending for a 
brief time the schools of El Monte, Los Angeles 
county, to which place his father removed. He 
remained on the paternal farm until July 25, 
1893,. when in El Monte, he married Miss Vic- 
toria Schmidt. She was born in San Gabriel. 
Los Angeles county, the second in a family of 



five children born to Henry and Eliza Schmidt, 
the father a native of France and the mother of 
California, the latter being a daughter of Will- 
iam Slack, a pioneer of this state. 

After marriage Mr. Freer engaged in farming 
in the IMountain ^'iew district and later con- 
ducted a dairy of sixty cows on the old Freer 
homestead. In 1903 he located in El Monte and 
is now engaged in walnut raising, having pur- 
chased twenty acres of land in the Mountain 
View district. He is enterprising and pro- 
gressive in spirit, putting forth an intelligent 
effort in the management of his property and 
is proving himself a popular and profitable citi- 
zen of this section. He upholds the best in- 
terests of the community, educationally and 
socially, and is an advocate of Democratic princi- 
ples. Fraternally he belongs to the Ancient 
Order of United Workmen. He has a family 
of three children, Walter, ^lerle and Thomas, Ir. 



LEE FREER. Inheriting the qualities of 
character which have made the Freer name re- 
spected and esteemed throughout Los Angeles 
county and indeed all Southern California. Lee 
Freer holds rank as one of the representative 
citizens of El Monte. He is a native son of 
the state, his birth having occurred in San Jose 
April 6, 1870, and five years later he was brought 
by his parents, William H. and Zerelda (Stucker) 
Freer, to Southern California, where all of his 
life has since been passed. Reared in Savannah 
he received his education in the public schools 
and St. Vincent's College, after which he went 
to Tehachapi, and worked on a farm for one 
year. Returning to El jNIonte he entered the em- 
ploy of John Barton, with whom he remained 
until 1889. when he purchased his present ranch 
of forty-six acres. This was then new land, 
which he has since improved and cultivated. 
After following farming for some years he finally 
set it out in walnuts, which are now all in bear- 
ing and his grove is pronounced one of the fine- 
est in the section. He has built a handsome resi- 
dence, barns and outbuildings, and added every 
possible comfort and convenience, and during 
this time also improved a thirty-six acre tract, 
which he subsequently sold. 

In Savannah Mr. Freer married INIiss Caddie 
Adams, who was born in this place, a daughter 
of Rev. Abrani Adams. The latter was a native 
of Lowndes county, Ala., and son of .\bram 
Adams, Sr., who removed from his birthplace 
in North Carolina to Alabama, where he be- 
came a planter and accumulated considerable 
wealth, continuing this occupation until his death 
in 1869. He served in the war of 1812. and 
also in the Mexican war, in the latter acting as 
captain of a company. He was of Scotch-Irish 





^..<.L-^ 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1269 



ancestry and adhered to the behef of his ances- 
tors in rehgion, being a member of the Presby- 
terian Church. Abram Adams, Jr., became a 
minister in the Methodist Episcopal Church 
South, and preached in INIobile, Ala., and Colum- 
bus, Adiss., being presiding elder in the church 
in the latter state. In 1869 he came to Los An- 
geles and in that city established the first church 
of his denomination, and until 1891 followed 
the ministry in various parts of Southern Cali- 
fornia. Retiring from the ministry in the last 
named year he gave his attention to the ranch 
which he had purchased in the year of his arrival 
in the state, and continued its improvement and 
cultivation up to the time of his death, which 
occurred April 10, 1901, at the age of seventy 
years. In early life he adhered to the principles 
of the Democratic party, but finall}' affiliated him- 
self with the Prohibition party. He married 
Isabella Williams, a native of Greene county, 
Ala., and a daughter of Benjamin Williams, a 
native of South Carolina, who located in Ala- 
bama and engaged as a planter until his death. 
Her mother was in maidenhood Edna Hitt, 
whose father was an emigrant from Wales. Mrs. 
Adams died in El Monte, in February, 1892, at 
the age of fifty-one years. They were the 
parents of nine children, namely : Annie ; Augus- 
tin; Belle, Mrs. East; Caddie, wife of Lee 
Ereer; Margaret, wife of William Pearson; 
Mary ; Jeannette, Mrs. Kasling ; Alice, deceased ; 
and Abra, wife of Edward Hayes, all of the 
living children being residents of El Monte with 
the exception of Mrs. Kasling, who resides in 
Salida, Colo. 

Mr. and Mrs. Freer became the parents of the 
following children ; Zerelda ; Ruth ; Wesley ; 
Shirley, who was burned to death in Tehachapi; 
Margaret, who died in El Monte; Haven, Em- 
mett and Edwin Allen. Mr. Freer supports the 
charities of the Presbyterian Church, of which 
his wife is a member. Politically Mr. Freer is 
a Democrat. He is associated with the Mountain 
View Walnut Growers' Association, and is prom- 
inent in all matters of public import. 



JOSEPH GISLER. Near the shores of the 
far-famed lake of Luzerne, whose beauty of 
scenery and calm loveliness overshadowed by 
the snow-capped mountains have attracted 
tourists from every part of the world, for 
many generations the Gisler family lived and 
labored in simple content. The first to seek 
the possibilities of the new world was INTax 
Gisler, who crossed the ocean and settled in 
California in 1877. Later the family joined 
him at El Rio, where he bought land and en- 
gaged in general farming. When he died, in 
January, 1890, at the age of sixty-two years, 



he ov.med a well-improved farm of fifty acres, 
the same representing his efforts after coming 
to California. In his native country he had 
married Josepha Blouser, who was born and 
reared there, and died at El Rio September 
9, 1905. Survivmg the parents are all of their 
children, namely : Sigmund, of Oxnard ; Gab- 
riel, farmer at Spring-ville, Ventura county^ ; 
Samuel, who is engaged in agricultural pur- 
suits in Orange county ; Solomon, who oper- 
ates land near Oxnard ; Edward, a farmer liv- 
ing in the vicinity of Ventura ; Max, also farm- 
ing near Ventura ; Frank and Joseph, who 
have been partners in extensive farming oper- 
ations : Mary, a resident of Oxnard ; Theresa, 
whose home is at Camarillo, Ventura county ; 
and Hannah, who lives at Spring\-ille, this 
county. 

The youngest of the eleven children is the 
gentleman whose name mtroduces this sketch 
and whose birth occurred May 14, 1873, in the 
Canton of LTri, Switzerland, near the village 
of Altdorf on the bay of Uri. When six years 
of age he was brought to the United States, 
the family joining his father in California, 
where he attended common schools and helped 
in the cqltivation of the farm. At the age of 
nineteen years he and his brother, Frank, en- 
gaged in raising beans on the Jack Hill place 
and later leased a part of the Patterson ranch, 
successfully cultivating four hundred acres in 
grain, beans and beets. During 1900 they 
bought one hundred and fifty-seven acres 
north of Oxnard and there raised beans and 
beets with encouraging success. A division 
was made of the property in 1905, and Joseph 
now owns eighty-three acres on the Saviers 
road one mile north of Oxnard, the same form- 
ing a very valuable farm. Irrigation is ar- 
ranged for by means of a pumping plant, in 
which Mi-. Gisler owns an interest. The sub- 
stantial modern residence was completed in 
1905 and to it ]Mr. Gisler brought his bride, 
whom he married in Oxnard in February, 
1906, and who was Miss Adeline Brooker, a 
native of San Francisco. Both are identified 
with the Santa Clara Catholic Church and 
contribute to its maintenance with generosity, 
as well as aiding other movements for the 
uplifting of humanity. 

While Mr. Gisler has been averse to ac- 
tivity in public affairs, he has kept posted con- 
cerning national problems, is well informed 
as to the issues of the age, and gives unquali- 
fied support to the Republican party and its 
principles. The only fraternity with which he 
holds membership is the Order of Knights of 
Columbus. His attention has been given 
closely to agricultural aflfairs and the manage- 
ment of his interests has required such close 



1270 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



attention as to preclude ])articipation in other 
affairs. Already a large degree of success has 
come to him, his home farm one mile north of 
Oxnard being quite valuable, while in addi- 
tion he and his brother own about fifty-six 
acres at El Rio. Industry and perseverance 
have aided him in the accumulation of a com- 
petency and tlie attaining of financial inde- 
pendence, while a course of steadfast integ- 
rity in all dealings has brought him the re- 
spect of his community. 



JAAIES BASCOM FREER, the second son 
of William H. Freer, whose name is known and 
honored throughout Southern California as that 
of a pioneer, was born in Trenton, Grundy coun- 
t\, AIo., April 15, 1843, remaining a resident of 
his native state until 1849, when he was brought 
across the plains to California, .\lthough a child 
of but six years the events of that ever-memor- 
ble journey are fresh in his mind. His duty was 
to assist in driving the cattle, which he performed 
faithfully to the close of their six months' trip, 
and although parties ahead and behind them were 
attacked by the Indians they were mercifully 
spared this added trial. Leaving Missouri in 
April they arrived in California in September,and 
in 1850 they located in San Jose, where James B. 
received his education in the primitive schools 
of the day. He remained at home until he was 
twenty-five years old, when he started out for 
himself, engaging in farming on the old Palla 
ranch, near San Jose, being interested principally 
in the raising of grain. In 1869 he came as far 
south as Ventura county and purchased a stock 
ranch in Hopper cafion, improved the place, and 
at the same time raised cattle in the mountains. 
He remained a resident of that section until 1884, 
when he located in Los Angeles county, con- 
ducted his father's place for two years, then 
farmed in the Rowland tract for several years. 
In 1888 he went to Oregon and near Penning- 
ton, Umatilla county, he followed stock-raising 
for two years, after which for one year he was 
located in Puente. Cal. In 1891 he located on 
his present ranch near El Monte, consisting of 
forty-five acres, all set out in walnuts. 

In Santa Clara county, March 25, 1868, Mr. 
Freer was united in marriage with Miss Sarah 
Hopper, who was born near Lone Jack, Mo. 
Her father, .\ri, was horn in Indiana and re- 
moved to Missouri, where he en.gaged in farm- 
ing. In 1850 he crossed the plains to California 
by means of ox-teams, and for a time following 
his arrival worked in the mines. He returned 
to Missouri by way of the Isthmus of Panama, 
and in 1852 once more made the trip across 
the plains, bringing his wife and two children to 
California. Thev located first in Petaluma and 



then in the Santa Clara valley, and in 1868 
settled in \'entura county, where Mr. Hopper 
purchased land in what was afterward known 
at Hopper canon. He farmed there for many 
years, eventually removing to Covina, Los An- 
geles county, where he spent his last days, dy- 
ing January 22, 1898, at the age of seventy- 
si.x: years. He was survived by his wife, for- 
merly Susan Easelv, a native of North Carolina, 
whose parents removed to ^Missouri when she 
was a child. She passed away in Covina No- 
vember 18, 1905, at the age 'of seventy-eight 
years. They had three children, all of whom 
attained maturity, two now surviving, of whom 
Mrs. Freer is the eldest. 

Mr. and Mrs. Freer are the parents of seven 
cliildren, namely: Albert, an engineer residing 
in El Monte: Mary, Mrs. Miller, of Los An- 
geles; Ida, Mrs. Avis, of Los Angeles; Henry, 
a farmer in El Monte; Eldridge, an engineer 
residing in El ]\Ionte ; Wallace and George at 
home. Mr. Freer supports the Baptist Qnirch 
of El Monte, the oldest church of that denomina- 
tion in Southern California, having been built 
in 1853, and of which his wife is a devoted mem- 
ber. Mrs. Freer is prominent in the social 
circles of El Monte, belonging to the Degree of 
Honor and the Shakespeare Club. Mr. Freer is 
a Democrat and has served as delegate to county 
conventions. He is a member of the Society 
of Los Angeles County Pioneers. 



GEORGE F. BRIXKERHOFF, One of 
the best known and successful ranchers of Los 
Angeles county is George F. Brinkerhoff. lo- 
cated in the vicinity of Compton and engaged 
in the cultivation of a well-improved farm. He 
is a native Californian, his birth having oc- 
curred in Santa Barbara county. October 12. 
i860, his parents being Peter S. and Jane 
(Nidever) Brinkerhoff. Peter S. Brinkerhoff 
was born in Oswego, N. Y., where he taught 
school and followed farming for many years. He 
made a trip to California by water in 1852 and 
five vears later married Jane Nidever, who had 
crossed the plains in the same }ear. He engaged 
in farming" in the vicinity of San Francisco and 
later was located in Santa Barbara county, his last 
days being spent with his sons near Compton. 
His death occurred June 16, 1891, at the age of 
seventy-six years. He had witnessed the de- 
velopment of the western state and participated 
in large measure in its advancement. He made 
five round trips to the east, seven passages be- 
ing made by water and three bv land. He was 
twice married, having si.x children by his first 
union, and seven by the second. Alice B. I^w- 
ton and John N. live in Santa Barbara : David 
H. in Compton : Henry R. in The Palms : 




/^ ^- 



^/^^U?.cA<JL^- 



2^^. 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1273 



Roelit C. in Riverside: and Sarah Breckenridge 
in Compton. Mr. Brinkerhoff was a devoted 
member of the Methodist Episcopal Churcli. 
while his wife, who died January 15, 1870, was 
a Presbyterian. 

Georg-e F. Brinkerhoff received his education 
in the schools of Santa Barbara, after which he 
was taken by his parents across the Isthmus 
of Panama and thence by water to New York 
City ; from that point they went to Michigan, 
where their home remained for four and one- 
half years. The next residence was in Kansas, 
to which state they moved by wagon, and there 
the father rented land for two and one-half 
years, after which they came overland to Cali- 
fornia and located in Santa Barbara county. In 
1880 he came to his present ranch in the vicinity 
of Compton, consisting of one hundred and 
twenty-two and one-half acres and at the same 
time purchased fortv acres of land near here, 
and has since carried on general farming and 
dairying, having at the present time eleven milk 
cows. 

In October, 1894, Mr. Brinkerhoff married 
^liss Rose Brunton, a native of Kansas. They 
have no children of their own, but have taken 
into their home two little girls, Alice and Edna. 
Mr. Brinkerhoff" is a nephew of George Nidever, 
who found an Indian woman on the Island of 
St. Nicholas, and to the best of all calculations 
she had been there about eighteen years. She 
iiad been taken there as a hostage and was the 
only one of the tribe left, the remainder having 
been killed by the Northwest tribe. Her dress 
was made of birdskins and sewed together with 
sinews. ]\Ir. Brinkerhoff' is a member of the 
Fraternal Aid. to which society his wife also 
belongs, and both are members of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church. He is a stanch adherent of 
the principles advocated in the platform of the 
Prohibition party. 



JOHN ENGEBRETSEN. One of the most 
successful and enterprising of the foreign- 
born citizens of San Diego is John Engebret- 
sen, who for years has conducted a general 
contracting business and has taken contracts 
for street paving, grading and excavating, 
with a specialty of cement work. At his office. 
No. 614 Fifth street, he superintends his work 
and furnishes estimates for all kinds of ce- 
ment and stone work, street paving, excavat- 
ing, grading and all kinds of hauling. His 
yards are at the northwest corner of IT and 
Twelfth streets. During the busy season he 
furnishes employment to fifty hands and util- 
izes twenty-five teams, and the management 
of a business of such magnitude makes him 
one of the busiest men in his home citv. 



In the southeastern part of Norway, near 
the city of Drammen, lies the little hamlet of 
Harbro, where John Engebretsen was born 
j\Iarch 5, 1858, being next to the youngest 
among eight children, only two of whom sur- 
vive. His parents, both of whom are de- 
ceased, bore the names of Engebret Petersen 
and Maren Olie Nilson, the latter being the 
daughter of a harness-maker. The father, who 
was born near Drammen, became an iron 
manufacturer at Harbro, but later engaged in 
the lumber business at Drammen, where he 
died. When the family removed to Drammen 
John was a small child and his education was 
principally recei\-ed in the schools of that 
town. After leaving school he learned the 
lumber business. In 1880 he shipped on the 
bark Beta via Cape Horn to the Sandwich Isl- 
ands, where he landed after a voyage of more 
than four months. Eighteen months were 
spent on the islands, where he followed team- 
ing. In 1882 he shipped for California on the 
vessel Emma Augusta, and arriving in this 
state settled at Eureka, Humboldt county, 
where he secured employment at lumbering. 
In 1884 he went to San Francisco and from 
there to Martinez, Contra Costa county, where 
he learned the stone-cutter's trade. For one 
season, beginning in 1886, he operated the 
Concord quarries under lease. 

On coming to San Diego in the fall of 1887 
]\rr. Engebretsen leased the quarry at Teme- 
cula and engaged in the cut-stone business, 
furnishing all the stone used in building in San 
Diego and shipping also to San Francisco. Af- 
ter a time the railroad between Temecula and 
Oceanside w^ashed out and he then removed to 
San Bernardino, where he took contracts for 
street paving of a most important and sub- 
stantial character. The contracts were com- 
pleted in t^vo and one-half years, and he then 
returned to San Diego, where he has since en- 
gaged in general and street contracting. 
Among his contracts have been those for open- 
ing and grading Logan avenue, IMilton avenue. 
Elm street. Thirteenth street, L street, E 
street, Third street. Brooks avenue, Columbia 
street, Robinson avenue. Fourteenth street. 
Main street. India street and others; also he 
has had the contract for most of the grading 
at the Homestead, Point Loma, and roads in 
the county. The amphitheater, golf links, 
foundations, etc.. at Point Loma are fine ex- 
amples of his skill and workmanship. 

The first ^•acation -which Mr. Engebretsen 
allowed himself from his work occurred in 
1894. when he spent four months in the old 
country after an absence of many years. While 
abroad he visited the legation at Christiania 
and made a tour of inspection to many points 



127^ 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



of world-wide interest, besides enjoying a 
pleasant visit with those of his relatives and 
boyhood friends who still remained in Nor- 
way. His marriage iook place in Los Angeles 
in 1895 and united him with Miss Augusta Pe- 
tersen, who was born in Norway and reared 
in Wisconsin. Her death occurred in San Di- 
ego April 2, 1896. For a decade or more ^Ir. 
Engebretsen has been identified with the In- 
dependent Order of Odd Fellows. During 1896 
he was initiated in San Diego Lodge No. 153, 
in which he is past officer. Besides being a 
member of the Encampment and senior war- 
den of the same, he is past captain of San Di- 
ego Canton No. 22. and a member of the Or- 
der of Rebekahs. In religion he was reared a 
Lutheran and always has been in sympathy 
with the doctrines of that denomination. In 
national politics he votes with the Republican 
party. In 1896 he was appointed and com- 
missioned deput}- consul at San Diego for 
Sweden and Norway and two years later was 
made acting consul pending his appointment 
and commission as consul, said appointment 
occurring April 29, 1901, confirmed by Secre- 
tary of State John Hay June 5, 1901. Since the 
dissolution of the union between Norway and 
Sweden he has been instructed to continue to 
act as consul for each country, and was reap- 
pointed for Norway in 1906. On the organiza- 
tion of the Scandinavian-American Society of 
San Diego he became one of its charter mem- 
bers and since then has been actively inter- 
ested in its meetings and its work. 



HENRY T. COOK is a native Californian 
and the son of one of the pioneer settlers of the. 
state. His father. John J. Cook, was born in 
Michigan, and his mother, who was Miss Mary 
Ann Turley before her marriage, was a native 
of Canada. There were five children born to 
them, Henry T. first seeing the light of day 
one year after the emigration of the family 
to California. The father died at the family 
home in San Bernardino county when fifty-six 
years old. and the mother, who later made her 
home with this son, lived to be seventy-seven 
years of age. The birth of Henry T. Cook oc- 
curred February 9, 1863, in San Bernardino, and 
his education was received through the medium 
of the public schools of that city and Los An- 
geles county. After ranching in the San Joaquin 
valley for one year he removed to Hollister, 
where he remained for three years, and from 
there in 1876 moved to the Santa Clara valley 
of Southern California and purchased the ranch 
which is now his home. It comorises one hun- 
dred and twenty acres of as fertile land as there 
is in the vallcv, and of this he has ninety acres. 



of beans, the rest being bay land. He has more 
recently planted sixty acres to walnuts, which 
will soon yield him a handsome income. 

Mr. Cook's marriage united him with Sarah 
E. Wilkinson, who was born in Illinois, and 
to them have been born two children, both of 
whom are now married. William H. married 
Winnifred Huff, and Walter A. married Irene 
Stockton, and to them one child has been born. 
Mr. Cook is a member of the Odd Fellows 
Lodge at Santa Paula, and takes a lively in- 
terest in political matters, being a member of 
the Republican county central committee. He 
is a hale fellow well met, highly respected and 
esteemed and in every way a successful business 
man. 



ROY HOLCO]\IB. Prominent among the 
most popular, progressive and highly esteemed 
young farmers of A alley Center is Roy Holcomb, 
who is actively and successfully employed in 
agricultural pursuits. He is distinguished not 
only for the excellent New England ancestry 
from which he is descended, but a native born 
son of California, his birth having occurred Oc- 
tober 12, 1880, in Bear Valley, San Diego coun- 
ty, on the homestead of his father, the late 
Benajah Holcomb. 

A native of New England, Benajah Holcomb 
was born in 1846 in Connecticut, where he was 
reared and educated. Public spirited and 
patriotic, he oft'ered his services to his country 
during the Civil war, enlisting in Company I, 
First Connecticut Heavy Artillery, with which he 
was connected three and one-half years. Suf- 
fering the trials and hardships of army life, he 
lost his health, and soon after receiving his honor- 
able discharge came to California, hoping in this 
genial climate to regain his former physical vigor. 
He lived for a while in jMariposa county, but 
subsequently settled in San Diego county, taking 
up a homestead claim near A'alley Center, and 
improving the ranch now owned and occupied by 
his son Roy. He engaged in dairying and grain- 
raising, living here until his death, in April, 1903. 
He was a man of sterling qualities of heart and 
mind, a useful and valued citizen, and his death 
was deeply deplored throughout the community. 
He married Nancy Holcomb, who was born in 
Illinois, and died on the home farm, at Valley 
Center in 1895. Of their union, seven children 
were born, namely: Clara, wife of H. Shelby, 
of Paradise ^Mountain ; Bertha, wife of Edward 
Hunter, of Randsburg; Nettie, wife of C, M. 
James, of Lusardi : Myrtle, living on the home 
ranch Avith her brother ; Ray on the home ranch : 
Walter, of San Diego; and Roy, the special sub- 
ject of this sketch. 

Receiving a good common school education, 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1275 



Roy Holcomb was subsequently employed as a 
farm hand or surveyor for a number of years, 
always keeping busy. Since 1900 he has been 
carrying on general ranching on his own account, 
managing the old home farm of one hundred 
and sixty acres. Energetic and industrious, lie 
is meeting with well merited success in his un- 
dertakings, and is carrying on general farming 
and dairying after the most approved modern 
methods, and though young in years has attained 
a noteworthy position among the prosperous 
ranchers of this part of the community. He 
shows excellent judgment in his business opera- 
tions, being regarded as one of the rising young 
men of \'alley Center, and is in every way 
worthy of the respect and esteem accorded him. 
In October, 1905, Mr. Holcomb married Allie 
Risdon, who was born in Kansas, a daughter of 
Nathaniel Risdon, now living in this valley. Mr. 
Holcomb is a stanch Republican in politics, as 
was his father, who was likewise a member of 
the Grand Army of the Republic. 



FANKHANEL BROTHERS. Recognized 
throughout the vicinity of Ramona, San Diego 
county, as enterprising and prosperous agricult- 
urists, H. O. and F. E. Fankhanel hold a posi- 
tion of note among the esteemed and respected 
citizens of their community. Although young in 
years, their energy and progressive spirit have 
placed them where they rightfully belong, and 
many men twice their years might be proud to 
lay claim to their achievements. Besides owning 
a fine ranch of three hundred and twenty acres 
stocked with high-grade cattle, they also rent a 
tract of three hundred and fifty acres devoted en- 
tirely to the raising of grain, all in all owning 
and managing one of the most productive ranches 
in the county. 

Although the father, C. F. Fankhanel, was a 
native of Germany, at a very early age he was 
brought to the United States, growing up in an 
atmosphere of push and independence which de- 
veloped like qualities in himself and resulting in 
the accumulation of a large property. Ill-health, 
however, made inroads upon his constitution and 
means and a change of climate was the only al- 
ternative. Selling his farm of eight hundred 
acres in Butler county, Kans., in 1893 he started 
by wagon for California with his family. Innu- 
merable hardships confronted them on the jour- 
ney, and by the time El Paso, Tex., was reached 
it was deemed advisable to give up the original 
plan and complete the trip under less trying condi- 
tions. After disposing of the outfit tliey boarded 
a train for San Diego and reached their destina- 
tion without further inconvenience. As soon as 
Mr. Fankhanel's health would permit he once 
more became interested in agricultural afifairs 



and folloAved ranching throughout the remainder 
of his life. His death occurred December 16, 
1899, at Barona Valley, at the comparatively ear- 
ly age of fifty-four years. His political sym- 
pathies were in accord with Republican princi- 
ples, but he was never ambitious to hold public 
office, preferring to discharge his obligations by 
way of casting a conscientious ballot. The wife 
and mother, before her marriage Jennie McLen- 
on, was born in Ohio and her marriage to Mr. 
Fankhanel was celebrated in Kansas. She is still 
living and makes her home with her sons. One 
daughter, Laura, was born in 1876, and is now 
the wife of George L. Frey, of Poway. 

At the time of the removal of the family to 
California Henry Olvin and Frederick Earl 
Fankhanel were fourteen and eight years old re- 
spectively, the birth of the former occurring in 
Butler county, Kans., June i, 1879, and the latter 
in the same place January 6, 1885. On account 
of the ill-health of the father their chances for an 
education were rather limited, and at an early age 
they began their self-support by working out on 
neighboring ranches. The father's death a few 
years later was a sad blow, but their previous ex- 
perience had prepared them to assume the re- 
sponsibilities which fell to their lot. By careful 
financiering they were enabled to purchase their 
present ranch near Ramona in 1903, and have 
since become known as progressive and thor- 
oughgoing ranchers in this part of the country. 
As was their father before them both are Re- 
publicans, and the elder son, H. O., is filling the 
office of school trustee and roadmaster in his dis- 
trict. San Diego county is fortunate in possess- 
ing two such progressive citizens as the Fank- 
hanel brothers, and judging from their early ef- 
forts and the results accruing therefrom it is not 
too much to expect that the coming years will 
find them among the most prosperous ranchers 
and successful business men in this part of the 
state. 



JOHN FRANCIS. Twelve miles from Red- 
lands and located in the San Timoteo caiion is 
the ranch of twenty-three hundred acres operated 
by John Francis, one of the progressive and en- 
terprising dairymen and ranchers of this section 
of Southern California. He is proprietor of the 
T. C. creamery and in his work has proven him- 
self a reliable business man, prompt and accurate 
in his methods, courteous and obliging to all cus- 
tomers, and showing himself possessed of un- 
usual executive ability and shrewd judgment. 
May 10, 1866, Air. Francis was born in Mont- 
gomery county, Wales, a son of John Francis, 
Sr., also a native of that place, where his death 
occurred some time since, having followed farm- 
ing throughout his life. He is survived by his 



1271 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



wife, formerl}- Ellen Manford, also a native of 
Montgomery comit}-, Wales, where she now 
mal<es her home. 

Of the three children born to his parents John 
Erancis, Jr.. is the only son and the eldest child; 
he was reared in his native country and educated 
in its public schools, where he continued until 
attaining the age of seventeen years, when he 
came to the United States anxious to make the 
best of the abundant opportunities olfered here. 
He finally located in Iowa City, Iowa, and in the 
vicinity of that place followed general farm work. 
He was located in that place for about four years, 
when, in 1887, he came to California and in the 
vicinity of Los Angeles engaged in general farm- 
ing and dairy pursuits. Two years later he came 
to Riverside county and in San Timoteo canon 
entered the employ of David Johnson, a dairy- 
man of this section, in the capacity of butter 
maker. With his accumulated earnings he was 
able four years later to buy out his employer's 
interests, and leasing land from ]vlrs. Clough he 
engaged in the dairy business and general farm- 
ing, operating twenty-three hundred acres, of 
which five hundred acres are tillable and the bal- 
ance is in pasture and alfalfa. Irrigation is sup- 
plied from twenty-five wells one hundred and 
sixty feet deep, and also from a ditch from the 
San Timoteo creek. He has a dairy of one hun- 
dred and seventy cows of Holstein stock, and a 
herd of cattle of five hundred head. The T. C. 
creamery is equipped with every modern de- 
vice for a successful conduct of this business, 
having a combined separator and churn with a 
large capacity, and the products are considered 
among the finest on the market. 

In Los Angeles jNIr. Francis was united in 
marriage with ^liss Anita Hovera, a native of 
San Bernardino county, Cal.. her father being 
a resident of this caiion. They became the par- 
ents of the following children : Herbert, Row- 
land, Gladys, Agnes and Anita. Fraternally Mr. 
Francis is associated with the Foresters of Nor- 
walk, and politically adheres to Republican prin- 
ciples. 



E. M. WILLIAMS. One of the well-known 
and successful ranchmen of Santa Paula is E. 'SI. 
Williams, who owns a property of two hundred 
and fifty acres of fertile land devoted to stock 
and the raising of beans. His father, Edward 
r>enton Williams, was born in Xew York City, 
and his mother, who was Elizabeth Rogers before 
her marriage, was also a native of New York 
state. In 1855, when his son E. M. was an infant, 
the father came to California by way of Panama, 
and in San Francisco was employed in the H. 
C. Hudson & Co. spice mill. In December, 1866, 



he came to X'entura county, and in the vicinity 
of Saticoy engaged in agricultural pursuits. 
Twenty years later, in 1886, he removed to Santa 
Paula and since then he and his wife have 
made their home with their son E. M. The 
father is now in his eighty-first year, and both 
himself and wife are members of the Presby- 
terian Church. Both father and son afSlia'te 
with the Republican party and give it their loval 
support. 

E. M. Williams was born in Oneida county, 
N. Y., February 3, 1855, and was an infant when 
he was brought to California. He received his 
education in San Francisco and afterwards came 
to \"entura county and engaged in ranching near 
Saticoy. where he purchased a ranch in 1882. 
In 1895 he was married to Ida Hudson, who 
is a native of California, the daughter of John 
Hudson, her grandfather, H. C. Hudson, being 
the pioneer cofifee and spice manufacturer of 
San Francisco. Mr. A\'illiams is a member of 
the Fraternal Brotherhood Lodge at Santa Paula, 
and of the Presbyterian Church, both himself 
and his wife giving the latter their support as 
active members. 



XORMAN ASHCROFT. The postal service 
of Hollywood, Los Angeles county, is under the 
able supervision of Norman Ashcroft, who has 
risen to his present position as the result of ef- 
ficient work while in the rural delivery service 
in this locality for a number of years, His initia- 
tion in the rural service dates back to the post- 
mastership of Philo J. Beveridge, and he also 
served under his successor, Hervey Friend. The 
resignation of Mr. Friend made a vacancy which 
Mr. Ashcroft was selected to fill, which came to 
him as a reward for faithful and conscientious 
work as carrier. 

Mr. Ashcroft is the son of New England par- 
ents, Norman and Mary I\I. (Davis) Ashcroft, 
having been born in New York state and Maine, 
respectively. Before the bjrfh of their son, how- 
ever, they had settled in the Mississippi valley, 
his birth occurring in Kankakee county. 111.. 
February 19, 1870. With the education received 
in the schools of his native county he started out 
in business, first as a grocer and later as an em- 
ploye of the Adams' Express Company. Sub- 
sequently he held a position with Armour & Com- 
pany, where for three vears he was in the time- 
keeping department. For five and a half years 
following he was car-shop clerk with the Pro- 
vision Dealers Dispatch, a position which he held 
up to the time of starting for the west. He left 
his Illinois home February i, 1900, and in due 
time arrived in Antelope valley, where he re- 
mained for about eight months. Coming to 
Hollvwood at the end of this time, he became 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1279 



interested in ranching, a business which he car- 
ried on for about three years, or until giving it 
u]5 to accept a position under the government as 
rural mail deliverer under Philo J. Beveridge. 
As has been previously stated his selection as 
postmaster of Hollywood followed the resignation 
of Mr. Beveridge's successor, Hervey Friend, 
and since February ii, 1906, 2ilr. Ashcroft has 
given efficient service as chief of the department. 
Two rural routes radiate from Hollywood and 
carry mail into the outlying districts. 

In Chicago, 111.. January 31, 1900, Norman 
Ashcroft and Libbie White were united in mar- 
riage. Mrs. Ashcroft being a daughter of Robert 
and Emma (Levy) White. The only child bom 
to Mr. and Mrs. Ashcroft is Harold! The fam- 
ily occupy a commodious residence of ten rooms 
on Iowa and Wilson streets, Hollywood, which 
JNlr. Ashcroft erected in 1905. Its location in the 
center of the best residence district in the city 
makes it a valuable piece of property, which is 
a credit alike to the owner and to the city. In 
their religious views Mr. and Mrs. Ashcroft 
are Baptists, and in the church of which thev 
are members Air. Ashcroft has served as clerk. 
Politically he is independent in the casting of his 
vote, his ballot and influence both being given in 
favor of candidates and measures opposing the 
liquor traffic. 



J( )HX BURR. Prominent among the lead- 
ing agriculturists and fruit growers of Fer- 
nando is John Burr, who has had many years 
of practical experience in his chosen "field of 
labor, and in his various operations has met 
with eminent success. Descended from a long 
line of honored Scotch ancestry, he was born, 
November 13. 1849, '" Scotland, the country 
of industry, thrift and frugality. 

Completing his studies in the common 
schools of his native land, John Burr subse- 
quently turned his attention to horticultural 
pursuits, for seven years working as a garden- 
er. Becoming proficient in his work, and de- 
siring to try life in the new world, he crossed 
the Atlantic in 1872, and immediately made 
his way across the continent to San Francisco. 
Locating soon afterward in San Mateo coun- 
ty, he secured a position as landscape garden- 
er ^^ ith Senator Fulton, whose grounds he laid 
out in a most attractive and artistic manner. 
His abilit}^ in that line becoming known, he 
had no trouble in finding an ample amount of 
congenial work, and remained in that vicinity 
until 1884. Going then to Tulare county, he 
settled near Visalia. where he purchased a 
ranch of two hundred and fifty acres, a part of 
which he set out with vines, while on the re- 
mainder he raised \vheat, continuing thus oc- 



cupied for three years. Disposing of that 
property in 18S7, he came to Fernando, Los 
Angeles county, with a view to locating here 
])ermaneiitly. With two partners he bought 
forty acres of land and immediate.ly began the 
cultivation of oranges and small fruits. The 
\cnture proving successful, he subsequently- 
purchased the interests of his partners and has 
since carried on the business alone. From time 
to time he has bought additional land, and has 
at the present time sixty-two acres devoted to 
the growing of oranges, fifteen acres of olives, 
and in addition has a grain ranch containing 
one hundred and ten acres. He is constantly 
adding to the improvements on his home es- 
tate, which is one of the most beautiful and 
rttractive in this section of the county, bear- 
ing visible evidence of the intelligence, ability 
and thrift of the owner. 

In England J\Ir. Burr married Anna Phil- 
liott, and they are the parents of three chil- 
dren, namely: John a'^l Charles, both resi- 
dents of A-^isalia: and A\'il!iam, living at home. 
Politically Mr. Burr is an active member of 
the Republican party, and as sheriff of Los 
Angeles county from T894 until 1898. and as 
horticultural connnissioncr for the count}' for 
<.ne and one-half years, rendered excellent 
service to the people. In Masonic circles he 
stands high, being- a thirty-second degree Ma- 
son : he is a member and past worthy master 
of Fernando Lodge No. 324, F. & A. M., also 
belonging to the Mystic Shrine of Los An- 
geles. In 1877, at Redwood City, he joined the 
Odd Fellows, and is now a member of the 
lodge at Fernando ; he also belongs to Los An- 
geles Encampment, and is a member of the In- 
dependent Order of Foresters. 



GEORGE F. JACOBY. An active and i>rac- 
tical agriculturist, energetic and ambitious. 
George F. Jacoby is iiieeting with excellent re- 
sults in his chosen occupation. His ranch of 
eighty acres is pleasantly located at \'alley Cen- 
ter, and from its thrifty appearance it is evident 
that he takes pride in his business, his land being 
finely improved and under a good state of culti- 
vation and well supplied with all the accessories 
of a first-class estate, having a substantial set of 
farm buildings and all of the needed machinery 
to facilitate the otherwise slow and tedious work 
of a farmer. A son of Herman Jacoby, he was 
born. January 6, 1872, in Bloomington. 111., but 
his childhood days were spent in Iowa. 

Herman Jacoby moved with his family from Illi- 
nois to Iowa in 1872. and was there a resident 
eleven years. His family came to California in 
1883. and has since resided in this state. .A 
faitlifid and loyal citizen, during the Indian 



1280 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



troubles he served under General Crook. He 
married Elizabeth Fleshnian, and they became 
the parents of three children, namely : Albert F., 
residing in Orange county ; Annie C, wife of 
James Woods, of Bear A'alley, San Diego coun- 
ty; and George E., the subject of this sketch. 

But eleven years of age when he came with 
his mother to this state, George E. Jacoby con- 
tinued his studies in the common schools, ac- 
quiring a practical education. Coming then to 
\'alley Center, he lived for a few years with an 
uncle, in the meantime becoming familiar with 
farm work. Wishing to know more about the 
northwestern country before making a perma- 
nent settlement in life, JNIr. Jacoby and his wife 
made two trips to \\'ashington and Oregon, being 
away about six years, working and sight seeing 
throughout those states. Einding no place that 
pleased them especially, they returned to X'alley 
Center, invested money in land lying a few miles 
above their present homestead, and began its 
improvement. Subsequentlv selling out at an 
advantage, Mr. Jacoby bought his present ranch 
of eighty acres, which is one of the most valuable 
in many respects of any in the valley. He has 
since made improvements of an excellent char- 
acter, erecting all of the buildings required on 
a well-kept homestead, and is now devoting his 
time and attention to grain raising, dairying and 
chicken raising, intending to make a specialty of 
the two latter branches of industr}\ 

In 1894 Mr. Jacoby married Miss Ivy West- 
moreland, a daughter of A. S. and Emma A. 
(May) Westmoreland. On the breaking out of 
the Civil war, Mr. Westmoreland, then a resi- 
dent of Tennessee, was a volunteer in the South- 
ern army, in which he served until the close of 
the war. In 1881 he came with his family to 
California, and here he and his wife reared their 
family of eleven children. In their religious be- 
liefs Mr. and Airs. Jacoby are in sympathy with 
the creeds of the Southern Methodist Episcopal 
Church. Politically ]\Ir. Jacoby is an uncompro- 
mising Democrat, and for a number of years has 
been a school trustee. Eratemally they are mem- 
bers of Escondido Camp. I. O. F. 



FRANK D. FOOT. When the enterprising 
men of San Pedro are mentioned the name of 
Frank D. Foot is always found in the list. He is 
well known in the community, for his various in- 
terests bring him in contact with all classes of 
people. As a general contractor and proprietor' 
of the Foot Transfer Company he has demon- 
strated his right to the title of a successful busi- 
ness man. His father, Solomon R. Foot, was a 
native of Ohio, and a pioneer of Sterns county, 
]Minn., immigrating to that section in the early 
days and starting in business as a stock raiser. 



The Sioux Indians were on the war-path and 
soon put him out of the stock business and came 
very near putting him out of the world. In those 
early days of the settlement of the west, men 
seeking homes in a new country not only had to 
endure the privations incident to pioneer life, but 
frequently were called upon to protect their fam- 
ilies and their homes from the bloodthirsty sav- 
ages who were ever ready to make raids on un- 
protected settlers. The Foot family, consisting 
of himself, his wife and two little ones, and a 
neighboring family by the name of Erickson find- 
ing themselves in danger from the Indians, for- 
tified one of the houses to withstand attack. The 
Indians came as expected and for two days and 
nights harassed the families, badly wounding 
both men. During a suspension of hostilities the 
men finally persuaded the women to take the chil- 
dren and make an attempt to reach the fort, 
charging them as they valued their lives to travel 
only at night and to keep a constant watch for 
the Indians who were liable to discover them at 
any time, and discovery meant death, and death 
in its most horrible form. AMth the little ones 
the women set out to reach the fort and on the 
second day of their journev met a party of sol- 
diers, who conducted them to the fort. In the 
meantime Foot and Erickson were rescued by 
some men passing their way and were brought 
by them to the fort, where they and their families 
were happily reunited. Both men recovered from 
their wounds, and very soon afterward Mr. Foot 
enlisted in the Minnesota Volunteer ^Mounted In- 
fantry, and served in the campaign against the 
Sioux Indians. In 1862 he was at the Indian 
massacre at Green Lake, where he received a 
gim-shot wound through his right lung and six 
buckshot in his back. At the close of the war he 
took his family and located in Melrose, where in 
addition to farming he kept a hotel on the stage 
route. In 1883 he removed from ^Minnesota to 
North Dakota, near ]\Iinot. and again engaged 
in the stock business. In 1888 he came to CaH- 
fornia and located at San Pedro, where he lived 
until his death in 1903. 

Frank D. Foot was bom at IMelrose. Minn.. 
Augitst 25. 1867, the youngest of his father's 
family of six children, four of whom are still liv- 
ing. His mother died when he was twelve years 
of age. He hved in the town of Melrose and at- 
tended school there until he was sixteen years 
old and then went to North Dakota and engaged 
in stock-raising until 1889. In the last-named 
vear he came to California and located on a farm 
near Gardena, where he engaged in grain-raising 
for nine years. In 1898 he came to San Pedro, 
.ind seeing an opening for business he started a 
liverv stable at the corner of Second and Beacon 
streets. It proved to be a profitable investment 
for him and he awaited his opportunity to enlarge 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1281 



his business in the same hne. When the Pony 
hvery stable was for sale he purchased it, run- 
ning it until November, 1905, when he sold it. 
Since then he has devoted considerable attention 
to his transfer business, the Foot Transfer Com- 
pany having the largest business of the kind in 
San Pedro. In addition to his transfer business 
he has taken up a line of general contracting, do- 
_ ing an extensive business in grading, building 
and all contract work of that class. 

While living in North Dakota Mr. Foot mar- 
ried Annie Miller, who was born in Galesburg, 
111., of Scotch descent. They have one child, a 
son, Clyde, and have a beautiful home on Ninth 
street near Palo A^erde. Mr. Foot is a member 
of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, is 
president of the Eagles, and a member of the In- 
dependent Order of Foresters. In politics he is a 
Republican. 



GEORGE W. COLE. When George W. Cole 
arrived in Los Angeles county from Texas in 
1864 and settled near what is now Downey things 
looked quite different from what they do at the 
present day. Los Angeles was a very small 
frontier town with a population composed mostly 
of Spaniards and Mexicans and the country 
around was in a wild and unsettled condition, 
with scant vegetation to lend beauty to the 
scenery. Mr. Cole at first purchased one hun- 
dred and sixteen acres of the old Downey ranch, 
but later, in 1875, located on his present ranch 
near Whittier. Originally it contained two hun- 
dred and twenty acres of land, but he is now 
the owner of but sixty acres, having divided the 
balance among the various members of his 
family. 

April 3, 1827, occurred the birth of George 
W. Cole in Bureau county. 111., his parents, 
Sampson and Vina (Tompkins") Cole, being na- 
tives respectively of Kentucky and Tennessee. 
They were among the pioneer settlers of Bureau 
county and spent their last days in California. 
When their son George was twelve years old the 
family moved to Carroll county. Ark., and after 
a short sojourn there went to the Cherokee 
nation, near the Grand river. There the father 
bored salt wells under contract for the Indians, 
the sinking of the famous Grand Saline well 
having befen accomplished in the completion of 
his contract. Subsequently the family lived for 
several years in Jasper county. Mo., and next 
located on the Colorado river, thirty-five miles 
below Austin, Tex. At the expiration of a year 
in Texas George W. Cole enlisted in the Jack 
Hayes regiment of Texas rangers, being first 
under command of Zachary Taylor, and later 
under General Scott. Their principal work was 
in the skirmishing line, although they participated 



in the battle of Buena Vista. His term of service 
lasted one year and fifteen days, after which 
he returned to Burleson county, wiiere the fam- 
ily were living. A little later he went to Jasper 
county. Mo., where he was married November 
15, 1848, to Olive Margaret Chilson, who was 
born in Indiana in 1832. Her parents, Emer and 
]\Iary (Osgood) Qiilson, were natives of Ver- 
mont and Maine respectively and pioneers of 
Bureau county, 111. Mr. Chilson died in Califor- 
nia and his wife in Missouri. After his mar- 
riage Mr. Cole returned to Burleson county, 
Tex., and for years engaged in general fanning 
and stock raising there. In 1853 he came to 
California on a prospecting tour, but remained 
only a short time. Ten years later he enlisted 
in Captain Turner's company, C. S. A., and 
while he fought in the battle of Donaldsonville, 
on the JNIississippi river, he was principally oc- 
cupied as a scout and skirmisher. Upon the ex- 
piration of his term of enlistment he returned 
to Texas, a'nd in the spring of 1864 he started 
for California, making his way over the plains 
with a wagon and ox-team, the journey taking 
about eight months. Since permanently locat- 
ing on his present ranch, near Whittier, he has 
witnessed many changes in the country and in 
many of them he has been an active participant. 
Mr. Cole is a. Democrat in politics, with strong 
independent tendencies. Fraternally he is as- 
sociated with the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows at Downey, and is a charter member 
of the local lodge. He is a member of the 
Baptist Church and contributes generously to- 
wards its support. To Mr. and Mr. Cole have 
been born eight children : Aurelia, Mrs. John 
Tweedy; Mary E., Airs. William Keller; Cali- 
fornia, wife of Henderson Cheney ; George W. ; 
Charles E. ; Dora, wife of Jacob Ginther: Joseph 
A. and Bvron S. 



CHARLES ANDREW. The ranch now oc- 
cupied by Charles Andrew, located two and a 
half miles south of El Monte, has been brought 
to a high cultivation by his own personal efforts. 
Energetic and ambitious, he has given his entire 
lime and attention to the upbuilding of his in- 
terests and has succeeded in making for himself 
a place among the prominent ranchers of this 
section. He is a native Californian, his birth 
having occurred in San Bernardino February 14, 
1875, his father, Tilghnian D. Andrew, an hon- 
ored resident of El Monte, having been one of 
the early pioneers of the state. ■ For more com- 
plete details concerning the life of the latter re- 
fer to his personal biography, which appears else- 
where in this volume. 

Brought to Los Angeles county by his father 
in 1881, Charles Andrew grew to manhood in the 



1282 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



^Mountain \"iew district, receiving his education 
in the pubHc schools uf El ;\Ionte. He remained 
with his father until attaining his majority, when 
he engaged in teaming and general farming in 
the vicimty of El Monte. In 1899 he began farm- 
ing on the damp land owned by the Baldwins 
in La Puente school district, raising grain, al- 
falfa, potatoes, etc.. and meeting with a success 
in his venture which enabled him to accumulate 
sufficient means to purchase in 1903, twenty-one 
acres of land, upon which he has since made his 
home. This property lies alxiut two and a half 
miles from El I\Ionte and after his purchase was 
set out in walnuts, while he at the same time 
raised alfalfa and potatoes. He improved the 
ranch by the erection of a good residence and 
all necessary outbuildings, and the place now 
stands as a substantial evidence of the young 
man's energy and ambition. His home is pre- 
sided over by his wife, formerly IMiss Edna A. 
Taylor, who was born in ^Michigan, the daughter 
of George Taylor, who died in that state. She 
then came to California and was reared by her 
maternal grandfather, M. D. !Mason, of Alham- 
bra. Mr. and !Mrs. Andrew are the parents of 
four children, Florence, Ra}^ and Roy (twins), 
and George. J\Ir. Andrew is quite prominent 
fraternally ; he belongs to the JNIodern Woodmen 
of America, and is past officer of the lodge in El 
^lonte; holds a like position in the Alodern 
Brotherhood of America, and is past chief temp- 
lar of the Independent Order of Good Templars. 
In politics he is a stanch Prohibitionist. 



MARCUS L. SPARKS. One of the tine ap- 
pearing ranches in the Pomona valley is that 
owned and managed b\' ]Mr. Sparks, comprising 
one hundred and thirty acres and lying in close 
proximity to Lordsburg. Although he has been 
a resident of the state since 1875, 't was not un- 
til 1890 that he came to this vicinity, the nu- 
cleus of his present large property consisting of 
twenty acres, to which he has added from time 
to time as his means would permit until today he 
has one of the large ranches of Los Angeles 
county. 

Mr. Sparks is a native of North Carolina, 
born in Wilkes county, March 20, 1853, one of 
seven children, three sons and four daughters, 
born to his parents, Joseph and Mary (Gray) 
Sparks, they too being natives of North Caro- 
lina. It was about 1866 that the father left the 
south with his family and located in Kansas, 
which was the family home for about nine years. 
I'pon coming to California in 1875 he located in 
the Sacramento valley, where his remaining 
years were spent, his death occurring when he 



was in his sixty-sixth year. Up to the time of 
his death he was a stanch- member of the Baptist 
Church, of which denomination the mother was 
also a member. December 5, 1906, she passed 
away at the home of her son, Marcus L., who, 
with the exception of a sister in Oregon, is the 
only one of the children living. 

The schools of North Carolina during the boy- 
hood of i\Ir. Sparks were far from complete 
as compared with the temples of learning in 
that state today. Such as they were he attended 
them with as much regularity as the home duties 
would permit, and at night in after years con- 
tinued his studies by the light of the pine knots 
on the hearth at home. \\l:en he was thirteen 
}-ears old he removed with the family to Kansas. 
In 1875 he came to California with his father 
and settled in the Sacramento valley, for about 
five years working as a ranch hand in that lo- 
cality. In 1880 he came to Pomona valley and 
W'ith the means which he had accumulated pur- 
chased five acres of land. In connection with 
the cultivation of his own land he still continued 
to work for others, following this for about 
six years, when he came to the vicinity of Lords- 
burg and purchased the nucleus of his present 
ranch. He now has fifty acres in navel oranges 
and lemons, all of which he set out himself, and 
the remainder of the land, eighty acres, is in 
grain. Water is supplied from a pumping 
station on the ranch, which makes it possible ' 
to irrigate the land thoroughly. 

In 1880. during his residence in the Sacra- 
mento valley, ^Ir. Sparks was married to ^liss 
Nancy AI. ^lichael, and of their union three 
children have been born. Nellie became the wife 
of L. L. Ehresman and is now the mother of 
three children ; Elsie is the wife of W. A. Keat- 
ing and the mother of one child, the family resid- 
ing in Lordsburg: Edith is unmarried and at 
home with her parents. The family attend the 
Baptist Church of Pomona, of which Mr. Sparks 
is a member, and fraternally he is affiliated with 
the Ancient Order of United Workmen. Air. 
.Sparks has always -been an ardent advocate of 
good schools. He is now serving as trustee of 
the grammar school at LaVerne. and is presi- 
dent of the board of trustees of the Boneta high 
school, both in Los Angeles county. Two organ- 
izations in which he takes a special interest and 
which bring him into close association with other 
ranchers of this vicinity, are the La\'ernc Citrus 
.\ssociation and the San Dimas Land and Wa- 
ter Company, in both of which he holds the office 
of president. Politically he casts his vote for 
Democratic candidates at national elections, but 
in the choice of local candidates he supports the 
Proliihition ticket. Mr. Sparks has a genial- 
ity of nature that wins and retains friends, and 
these he numbers bv the score. 




(^ J^ }io^i^^ 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1285 



LAKE W. HOUGHTOX. Those who 
have enjoyed the hospitahty of the Houghton 
home in Rivera and who have noted with ar- 
tistic appreciation the comforts evidenced 
throughout the entire residence of twelve 
rooms, unite in bestowing upon Mr. Hough- 
ton the highest praise for the success he has 
attained b}' unaided exertions. Possessed of 
a sterhng character and contented spirit, he 
was no less at ease amid the frontier environ- 
ment of the early days than when surrounded 
by the luxuries of the twentieth century, seat- 
ed in his attractive home, with telephone at 
hand to furnish private conversation with any 
of the four telephone stations on his ranch. 
Though identified with Rivera for a brief 
period only, having moved to the town in Sep- 
tember of 1905, he has formed a large circle of 
acquaintances and has gained a reputation for 
public spirit and energy. 

Not many years after Texas had secured its 
freedom from Mexican rule and had acquired 
independence, W. L. Houghton removed to 
that then unknown country, where he re- 
mained from 1844 until his removal to the Pa- 
cific coast twenty-four years later. In his 
family was a son, James D.. who with his wife, 
Nancy E. (Hastings) Houghton, became an 
early settler of Hopkins county, Tex., at that 
time a stock-growing region, but now studded 
over with large cotton plantations. While 
James D. Houghton was still in the prime of 
life he was taken from his family by death and 
soon afterward the widow determined to re- 
move to California. During 1868, in company 
with W. L. Houghton and wife, and with her 
two sons and three daughters, she traveled 
overland with wagon and team, via Denver, 
Colo., the wagon road running almost parallel 
with the present route of the Union Pacific 
Railroa^!. 

For one year the Houghton family remained 
in Northern California, where they occupied a 
ranch near Modesto (then called Paradise 
CitvL the county-seat of Stanislaus county, 
and from that locality they traveled south, fol- 
lowing the coast road through to Santa Bar- 
bara. In the vicinity of Santa Fe Springs they 
bought a tract of forty-four acres, where the 
grandparents and the mother died soon after 
settling in Southern California. Reared to a 
knowledge of ranch life, it was natural that 
Lake W. Houghton should select agriculture 
«<; his life work, and the record of his years 
proves that he made no mistake in his choice. 
Though by birth a Texan (having been born 
near Sulphur Springs, Hopkins county. .'Kpril 
2=;. 1858, he has been a resident of California 
since a boy of ten years, and is thorouglily in 
touch with the histor}- of this commonwealth 



and its rapid progress toward permanent pros- 
perity, Througii the exercise of industry and 
wise management he has acquired a tract of 
iwo hundred and seventy-five acres of farm 
and pasture land near Studebaker, which is de- 
voted to alfalfa and dairy. Of recent years he 
has also turned his attention to the raising of 
soft-shell walnuts and now has fifty acres in 
that profitable product. 

The first wife of Mr. Houghton bore the 
maiden name of Julia Borden and died in 1893. 
Five children were born of that union, name- 
ly: Roy J., Archie (who died at eleven 
years), William L., Ella and Stella (twins). 
After the death of Mrs, Julia Houghton on the 
home place, Mr. Houghton was united with 
Miss Jennie Brooks, by whom he has a daugh- 
ter, Nannie. Though well posted in state and 
national afifairs, he is not a politician and 
maintains an independence of attitude in re- 
gard to politics, voting for the men he deems 
best qualified to represent the people, irre- 
spective of their political views. Downev 
Lodge No. 220, F. & A. M., has his name en- 
rolled as an active member, and the doctrines 
of brotherhood and charity promulgated by 
the order receive his stanch support and svm- 
pathy. 



ABRAHAM ONTIVEROS. The ranch of 
two thousand acres owned and occupied by 
Abraham Ontiveros is his by inheritance, and 
was -the property of his father, Juan Pacifico 
Ontiveros, who was born in Los Angeles 
county, in 1782. Juan Pacifico inherited the 
qualities of martial ancestors, and in early life 
joined the Spanish soldiery in their eflfor'ts to 
subdue the Indians and protect Spanish in- 
terests in Southern California. As reward for 
services rendered he was given a tract of land 
known as the Cajon de San Ouan ranch in 
Los Angeles county, and which he eventually 
sold for what in those days constituted a large 
fortune. He then purchased the Tepusquet 
ranch of nine thousand acres, now the home 
of his son, where he attained to ninety-five 
years, the possessor to the last of gracious 
qualities of mind and heart, and of the respect 
and good will of all with whom he had ever 
been associated. His wife shared his fortunes 
luitil her eightv-ninth vear, and in the mean- 
time reared a family of thirteen children, nine 
of whom are living. 

At the age of fifty-four Abraham Ontiveros 
is one of the fortunate men of California. He 
has a beautiful home, a large income, a family 
of children who have largely realized his ex- 
pectations for them, and a host of friends. 
His reputation as a rancher is unexcelled, and 



1286 



HISTORICAL AXD BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



in the iiianagenieiit of his propert}- he con- 
forms to the> standards of the progressive 
farmer. He is a breeder of line horses, owns 
two hundred and fifty head of blooded cattle 
and raises large quantities of grain, grapes, 
oli\-es, walnuts and general produce. He built 
a reser\oir of two hundred thousand gallons 
capacity on a hill one hundred and fifty feet 
Jiigh and brings the water from the mountain 
springs for family use and irrigation. He has 
lived on his present ranch for half a century, 
coming here in 1856 from his father's ranch 
in Los Angeles county, where his birth oc- 
curred April 5, 1852. In 1879 he was united 
in marriage to Doraliza Vidal, a native of 
Santa Barbara county, and around his hearth- 
stone have grown to maturity six children: 
Ozell A., Erasmus A., Edmund F., Evanoy L., 
Blanche and Ida. In 1904 he married Petra 
Arellanes, of the city of Santa Barbara. He 
is a Republican in politics, and a member of 
the Catholic Church. His energies have been 
devoted to the improvement of his extensive 
holdings, to a quiet and dignified interest in 
public afifairs, and to the exercise of a delight- 
ful hospitality. 



WILLIAM H. PEIRCE. Travels through 
manv sections of the country, followed by the 
establishment of his home in San Diego coun- 
ty, gave to Mr. Peirce an excellent knowledge 
of coiulilions of soil and climate through va- 
j-ied localities, and convinced him that no re- 
gion jiossesses a climate more equable than 
that of his home. For some years after set- 
tling in this county he followed the carpen- 
ter's trade and later for a number of years held 
the position of collector for the Linda ^'ista 
irrigation district, following which in 1899 he 
removed to Mesa Grande, and in 1902 bought 
a ranch of one hundred and sixty acres near 
the town, where since he has engaged in rais- 
ing grain and cattle. Besides the supervision 
of his ranch he owns and operates the stage 
line between Mesa Grande and Ramona and 
also carries the United States mail. 

During the earlier half of the nineteenth 
century there resided in Middleboro, Plym- 
outh county, Mass., a carpenter and contract- 
or bearing the name of William S. Peirce, who 
was a native of the old Bay state and a de- 
scendant of an old family. During 1844 he 
lost his wife. Prudence fDean) Peirce, who at 
the time of her death was thirty-four years of 
age. At the time of the discovery of gold in 
California he was among the first to start for 
tlie new gold fields and in 1849 he set sail from 
Xew Bedford, Mass., rounded the Horn and 
cventuallv landed at San Francisco, from 



which point he went, to the mines. Soon he 
returned to San Francisco, leased lands and 
erected houses, but three times in the early 
fires that destroyed that city he suffered the 
loss of his property and so decided to return 
to the east. During 185 1 he went back to 
Massachusetts, where he engaged in contract- 
ing and building. \Mth the exception of one 
year spent in Kansas he remained in Massa- 
chusetts until his death, which occurred in 
1859, at the age of forty-eight years. 

Among the children of William S. Peirce 
there was a son, William H., who was born 
in jMiddleboro, Plymouth county, Mass., June 
13, 1836, and was orphaned by his mother's 
death when he was a boy of eight years. 

After having completed his education in the 
public schools and Peirce Academy he learned 
the carpenter's trade and followed the same in 
Massachusetts until 1857, when he removed to 
Lafayette, Kans., and became interested in the 
building business. Two years later he left that 
town and during the next fifteen years he 
traveled much, visiting' many sections of the 
country and acquiring mining interests in Col- 
orado. From that state he went to St. Joseph, 
AIo., in January, 1861, and there joined a party 
en route for the Pacific coast, making the jour- 
ney with teams and wagons and arriving in 
safety at Auburn, Ore. From that point he 
proceeded into Idaho and in December of 
1864 came to San Francisco, but during the 
same month took passage on a steamer and 
returned to his old home. After nine months 
in Massachusetts he secured employment in 
Xew York City and remained there until the 
failure of his health in 1867 demanded a 
change of climate. For that reason he went 
south to Texas and spent a year in Galveston, 
returning from there to New York City and 
then rem.oving to Sumner county, Kans., 
where he engaged in farming until he trans- 
ferred his residence to his present county. 

The marriage of Mr. Peirce took place at 
Oxford, Kans., June i, 1876, and united him 
with Miss Margaret M. Bain, a native of In- 
diana, but from four years of age a resident of 
Iowa and after 1871 making her home in Kan- 
sas, where her father, Samuel, engaged in ag- 
ricultural pursuits. Five children were born 
of the union. Edith A. taught four terms of 
school in San Diego county and then entered 
the Leland Stanford University, where she is 
now a student. Roland E. follows the black- 
smith's trade in San Francisco. Eldred E. was 
formerly a student in the Lowell high school 
and now is taking a course in mining engi- 
neering at the Lake school in San Francisco. 
Earl D. is a student in the State Agricultural 
College at San Luis Obispo. Everett C, the 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1287 



voungest member of the family, is a student 
in Lick University. While in Massachusetts 
in 1865 Mr. Peirce was initiated into Masonry 
and ever since has been a believer in the phil- 
anthropic principles of the fraternity. With 
his wife he attends the Baptist Church and 
contributes to its charities. In politics he votes 
with the Republican party. 



ALLEN J. RUSSELL. Although a compara- 
tive newcomer in Fallbrook, Allen J. Russell is 
well and favorably known and is numbered among 
its best men, socially and financiall}-, being es- 
pecially valued as a large-hearted, public-spir- 
ited citizen, whose enterprise and liberality have 
done much towards advancing the welfare of the 
conmnmity and adding to the comfort and hap- 
piness of its people. As an agriculturist he is 
meeting witH marked success, his large and well- 
kept ranch bearing visible evidence of his energy, 
thrift and good management. A son of Allen 
Russell, he was born August 29, 1856, in Buch- 
anan county, Pa., where he lived until after at- 
taining his majority. 

Born in the mountainous section of Tennessee, 
Allen Russell migrated when young to Missouri, 
going there in 1837. He subsequently took up 
land" in Buchanan county, and there began life 
for himself as a tiller of the soil. During the 
excitement that followed the discovery of gold in 
California he came across the plains in an ox- 
team train, arriving in San Francisco in 1850. 
Becoming discouraged as a miner, he boarded a 
vessel and started for home. At Mazatlan, Mex- 
ico, the boat was shipwrecked, and he made his 
way from there back to ]Missouri by mule back. 
Resuming his former occupation, he was sub- 
sequently there engaged in agricultural pursuits 
until his death, in 1883, at the age of sixty-three 
years. He married Eliza Wolf, who was born 
in Pennsylvania, and died in Missouri in early 
womanhood. 

Left motherless when a mere child, Allen J- 
Russell attended the district schools, remaining 
at home until after the death of his father. Going 
to Kansas in 1884, he followed farming in that 
state for about a year, when he returned to Mis- 
soiiri, and there continued as a farmer for sev- 
eral years. Starting overland from Missouri 
June 9, 189.S, he followed the southern route 
through the panhandle of Texas and New Mex- 
ico, crossing the Pecos river at Eort Sumner, the 
Colorado river at Fort Yuma, thente by Banning 
Pass and Temecula to San Diego county, arriv- 
ing at Fallbrook with his five wagons, stock and 
horses on December 8 of that year. Althougli 
long, the trip was a pleasant one, and much en- 
joyed. There were twenty-one days of the time 
when not a white person was seen by any of the 



family. Since settling here, ;Mr. Russell has been 
actively engaged in his independent calling, and 
has now a magnificent ranch of seven hundred 
acres, the larger part of which he devotes to the 
raising of grain. He exercises good judgment 
in financial matters, and in the establishment of 
beneficial enterprises gives willing aid and en- 
couragement. In 1903 he was one of the or- 
ganizers of the Mercantile Store, of which he 
has since been a director, and he is likewise one 
of the directors of the Fallbrook Hardware Com- 
pany. 

December 24, 1882, in Missouri, Mr. Russell 
married Martha Elizabeth Russell, who was born 
in that state, and they are the parents of four 
children, namely : Opal W., Cleveland Lee, Jessie 
Obern and Thomas Franklin. Politically Mr. 
Russell is a straightforward Democrat, and re- 
ligiously he belongs to the Baptist Church. 



WILLIAM WILEY. Among the earlier set- 
tlers of Los Angeles county was the late Will- 
iam Wiley, who located near Downey when this 
section of the country was comparatively new, 
and was one of the most interested witnesses of 
its development and growth. Turning his at- 
tention to agriculture, he improved a fine ranch, 
raising principally walnuts and fruits, in this 
line of industry meeting with signal success. A 
native of Pennsylvania in the vicinity of Pitts- 
burg, he was born September 22, 1836, and died 
at his home in Downey, November 9, 1896, his 
death being a loss to the community, as well as 
to his immediate family and many friends. When 
a child of only five years he was orphaned by 
the death of his mother, and later he began his 
education in the primitive schools of his native 
state. Until seventeen years of age he lived on 
a farm in that state, and then went to Minnesota, 
remaining there for two years. In 1855, when 
nineteen years of age, he came to California, 
driving an ox-team for the government. Upon 
reaching Salt Lake City he remained there for 
a short time and then resumed the journev to 
San Bernardino, and from there later came to 
Los Angeles county. Subsequentlv for five vears 
he drove teams from Los Angeles to Wilming- 
ton. His first experience in the west as an agri- 
culturist was on rented property near El Monte, 
and later, in 1868, he came to the vicinity of 
Downey. To his first purchase of twenty-five 
acres he later added ten acres adjoining, also 
purchased thirty-one acres in this locality, be- 
sides which he owned seventy-three acres at Wil- 
lows, but this latter tract Mrs. Wiley disposed 
of in 1906. In his political preferences Mr. 
Wiley was a Democrat, and fraternally affiliated 
with the Society of Chosen Friends. As a con- 
stalilc he rendered acceptable service to his con- 



1288 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



stituents, and was a stanch advocate of good 
schools. 

^Ir. Wiley married, J\Ia_v 19, 1872, Elizabeth 
M. Simmons, who was born in Rapides Parish, 
La., and is the only survivor of the four chil- 
dren, three sons and one daughter, of James 
Simmons, of Orange county. Gal. A native of 
Mississippi, James Simmons moved when a young 
man to Rapides Parish, La., where he resided a 
number of years. In 1868 he came across the 
plains to California, and is now living near San- 
ta Ana, on the ranch which he has improved. 
He is a man of sterling worth, highly respected 
throughout the community, and is a faithful mem- 
ber of the Baptist Church. In politics he in- 
variably supports the principles of the Demo- 
cratic party. 

The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Wiley was 
blessed by the birth of eight children, five sons 
and three daughters, as follows : Robert T., of 
Tustin, Cal. ; James H., Jil. Lulu; WalteV C, 
\\'illiam K., Frederick E., Lena E. and Iva Mae. 
Since the death of her husband Mrs. Wiley has 
lived on the home ranch, which is under the su- 
pervision of two of her sons, Walter C. and Will- 
iam K. The home place, as well as the thirty- 
one acre tract in the vicinity, is devoted to the 
raising of apples and walnuts, both of which 
yield abundantly and from which a good annual 
income is realized. 



ALEXANDER J. CUNEO. An example of 
the results of well-directed efforts coupled with 
pluck and persistence is to be found in the per- 
son of Alexander J. Cuneo, a resident of San 
Gabriel and its principal merchant, who set out 
in the world dependent upon his own resources 
and with nothing but his native qualities to 
presage any future success. He has won the 
esteem of the entire community through his 
business methods, his fair dealing with the pub- 
lic, and has built up an extensive custom which 
has brought him' large financial returns. Born 
in Genoa, Italy, March 7, 1870. Mr. Cuneo is 
a son of M. and Mary (Garibaldi) Cuneo, both 
natives of Italy, and immigrating to America 
many years ago. Their first home was in New- 
York City, but they soon removed to Los An- 
geles county, Cal., for two years making their 
iiome in the city of that name, and thereafter 
being residents of San Gabriel. The father died 
in 1884 in San Gabriel and the mother in 1897 
in Los Angeles, leaving a family of nine children, 
of whom four are surviving, those besides 
Alexander J. being a daughter in Nome, Alaska, 
one in San Diego, and one in Los Angeles. Mr. 
Cuneo was a stanch Republican politically; in 
religion he belonged to the Catholic Church. 

.\lexander J. Cuneo left his native land at 



three years of age, and coming to New York 
City with his parents remained there nearly two 
years, when he was brought to California, which 
ever since that time has remained his home. His 
education was received in the public school of 
San Gabriel, and his first employment was as 
a clerk in a mercantile establishment. In 1896 
he engaged independently in this occupation, 
establishing himself in San Gabriel with a fine 
stock of goods, to which he has continued to add 
with the passing years until to-day he is proprie- 
tor of one of the best equipped grocery, dry 
goods, hardware, feed and grain enterprises in 
this section of the county. He has built his trade 
to lucrative proportions and now employs two 
delivery wagons to handle his country custom. 

On the 27th of August, 1897, Mr. Cuneo 
was united in marriage with Miss May Slack, 
a daughter of William Slack, a well-known 
pioneer resident of San Gabriel, in which place 
she was born. Both himself and wife are mem- 
bers of the Catholic Church. He is a Republi- 
can in politics, a progressive and public spirited 
citizen, and one whose interest in public affairs 
results in practical helpfulness at all times. 



THOMAS D. MENDENHALL. Fertile val- 
leys lying between the stern and rugged stretches 
of foothills and plains afford opportunity for the 
carrying forward of agricultural pursuits under 
favorable surroundings, and the numerous val- 
leys for which San Diego county is noted are the 
sources of the considerable agricultural wealth of 
this part of the state. Bear valley is not without 
its fertile farms and among them may be men- 
tioned the ranch of four hundred ' and eighty 
acres occupied and managed by Mr. Menden- 
hall, who is a native son of California and a life- 
long resident of the coast county. The family 
of which he is a member came from Southern 
ancestry and early was established in the far 
west. His father, Enos T., was born and reared 
in North Carolina. When General Fremont 
blazed a path for emigrants across the desert 
and mountains, and reports were brought back 
by the expedition concerning the fertility of 
the lands in that unknown and unsettled region 
lying west of the Rockies, the plans of many 
were turned toward immigration, and he was one 
of the number who braved the vicissitudes of 
the perilous trip in order to gain the possible 
returns that Destiny might bring. As early as 
1847 lis followed the overland route to Oregon 
and conveyed in his wagon the first fruit trees 
ever taken into that state. 

After having engaged in teaching school in 
Oregon. Enos T. Mendenhall was led to remove 
to California bv reason of reports concerning 
the discovery of gold, and during 1849 he became 




C , (jj. dyS^-rr-u^ 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1291 



a pioneer of San Francisco. A short time after- 
ward he went to Placer county and opened a 
general store near the mines, also operated a 
sawmill and a hotel in Colfax (then known as 
Iliinoistownj. For a long period he retained 
important business interests in that region, but 
during 1870 he removed to Bear valley and 
took up a tract of land from the government. 
In addition he bought the claims of many set- 
tlers who needed money more than they needed 
land, and in this way he increased his holdings 
until at the time of his death he owned more 
than seven thousand acres in Bear valley and 
on Smith mountain. His death occurred Decem- 
ber 20, 1904, at the age of eighty-two years. 
In early life he married Emily Mills, who sur- 
vives him and now, at the age of seventy-three, 
makes her home at Oakville, in Napa county. 

During the residence of his parents in Sacra- 
mento, this state, Tliomas D. Mendenhall was 
born November 2. i860. Few educational oppor- 
tunities blessed his yoirth. For a few years he 
attended the public schools of Placer county, but 
while still quite young he began to earn his own 
livelihood, and from that time to the present he 
has depended upon his own exertions. His 
first occupation was that of railroading. At the 
age of sixteen years he was employed as brake- 
man "on the narrow gauge railroad between Col- 
fax and Nevada City, and at the expiration of 
three years he was given charge of a freight 
train, which he ran for seven years. On resigning 
his position as conductor he spent two years in 
Napa county and in 1899 came to Bear valley, 
where since he has occupied and managed a farm 
in this fertile region, giving his attention closely 
to the details of the work and laboring with un- 
wearied energy to maintain a profitable and sys- 
tematic condition in the agricultural possibilities 
of the place. 



CHARLES EDWIN COLTON. Some 
men's lives are passed quietly in the enjoy- 
ments of their home and family, while others 
are so rudely buffeted in the voyage through 
life : are thrown into such strange company ; 
meet with so many thrilling adventures : have 
so many hairbreadth escapes ; and are engaged 
in so many diversified occupations, that a true 
account of their work and wanderings sounds 
like a romance. Prominent among those whose 
career in this world has been thus character- 
ized is Charles E. Colton, a prominent and 
highly esteemed citizen of Glendale. Leaving 
home when a boy, he has since, by his own 
efforts risen from a condition of comparative 
poverty to one of influence and affluence. An 
early pioneer of the state, he was actively 
identified witln some of the important historical 



events of the territory of California, and to 
some extent assisted in establishing its claim 
to statehood. A native of Michigan, he was 
born, October 26, 1834, at Utica, Macomb 
county, a son of Philander and Polly (Merrill) 
Colton, both of whom were born and reared 
in New York state. The first of the name to 
settle in America was Quartermaster George 
Colton, of England, in 1640 and from this pro- 
genitor has descended the entire Colton race. 

Between the ages of two and ten years 
Charles E. Colton lived in Cook county. 111., 
and then, with his parents, went to Iowa. Two 
years later, in 1846, he left home without 
warning, going on foot to Fort Leavenworth, 
Kans.. and from that time became self-sup- 
porting. Entering the service of Lieut. George 
Stoneman, who was afterward commissioned 
general, and still later was governor o'f Cali- 
fornia, he accompanied him as far as Santa 
Fe, when he was assigned as servant to P. C. 
Merrill, of the Mormon Battalion, under Col. 
St. George P. Cook, with whom he went first 
to Mexico, and from there came to California. 
After a short stop in San Diego he spent six 
weeks in San Luis Rey, and on April 12, 1847, 
arrived in Los Angeles, where he remained 
until honorably discharged from the service, 
July 16, 1847. During the time, Mv. Colton, 
then a beardless youth, assisted in raising the 
first flag ever hoisted in the place, going on 
June 8, 1847, with a detachment of thirty-one 
soldiers to Mill creek to get poles for a flag 
staff. Taking one six-mule and one four-mule 
government team to carry the provisions and 
the poles, they performed the journey success- 
fully, securing two poles, which when spliced 
and bound together with raw hide, gave a 
staff a hundred feet in length. On the Fourth 
of July, 1847, ^ ^^w daj^s after the return of the 
detachment, the Mormon Battalion under com- 
mand of Col. John Stevenson, raised the flag 
on Fort Hill,' then called Fort Moore, the 
people there assembled singing "The Star 
Spangled Banner" during the raising, and 
cheering lustily as its folds were unfurled to 
the breezes. 

After his discharge from the service, ^Ir. 
Colton with twenty-two companions, guided 
byCapt. Jeft'erson Himt, went north, first to 
San Francisco, then to San Jose, from there 
proceeding to Stockton, where the)' learned 
from a party of INTormons that Samuel Bran- 
flon had gone across the mountains to meet 
Brigham Young and his followers. A few 
days later the little band went in Fort Sutter, 
where they fell in with two men who said 
they had been lost from the Mormon party 
that left Los Angeles for the interior of Cali- 
fornia at the same time that Captain Hunt and 



1292 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



iiis party started northward. Very soon after, 
the Hunt company left Sutter Fort, crossed 
the mountains, and while in camp on the spot 
where the Donner party was afterwards massa- 
cred, was joined by Samuel Brandon, who in- 
formed the leader that Brigham Young was 
located at Salt Lake City. The party, there-- 
fore, followed the old Indian trail along the 
Humboldt river to Goose creek, thence across 
Snake river to Fort Hall, which at that time 
belonged to the Vancouver Fur Company, and 
was under the charge of Captain Grant. Con- 
tinuing along the trail, the party arrived at 
Salt Lake City in October, 1847, and there 
Mr. Colton spent the winter, living during the 
time on thistle roots and wolf meat, having 
generously given his allowance of flour, etc., 
to the pld people. 

In the spring of 1848, Mr. Colton planted a 
patch of corn, but the entire crop was eaten 
up by crickets. Going to Fort Bridger in the 
fall, he stayed with the American Fur Com- 
pany, No. 42, until spring, when he returned 
vo Salt Lake, where he again tried farming for 
a year. In the spring of 1851 he guided a 
party across the Rockies to Sacramento, Cal., 
arriving there with an ox-team train in July, 
with four hundred head of cattle. Leaving 
Sacramento in the fall, he began mining on 
the present site of the Folsom Penitentiary, 
and was thus engaged about a year, working 
along the Yuba river to Marysville. Locating 
in Sacramento in 1853, he spent a year in that 
vicinity, during which time he carried the 
mail from there to Salt Lake City. The jour- 
ney was tedious and perilous, on several oc- 
casions having encounters with the Indians, 
who at one time stole his flour, for which he 
had paid $1 a pound. In the spring of 1854 
he married, and settled as a farmer in Provo, 
remaining thus employed for about three years, 
in the meantime taking part in the Indian 
troubles. In 1857 he with twenty-five others 
was called upon by Brigham Young to go to 
the North Platte to bring up supplies, and the 
little band met in Young's barn to make ar- 
rangements for the trip. In 1859, through Mr. 
Young's influence, he obtained a position as 
guide, and in that capacity brought a company 
of men and a band of cattle to San Bernardino, 
Cal. 

Remaining in that place, Mr. Colton had 
charge for a short time of his father-in-law's 
ranch of two hundred and forty acres, but not 
liking that part of the state came to Los 
Angeles in the spring of t86o, and resided there 
two years, in the meantime filling a hay con- 
tract under Gen. Winfield Flancock. Going 
back to San Bernardino in the spring of 1862, 
he was engaged in the freighting business in 



that locality for twenty-two consecutive years, 
working for the government, and carrying 
goods to the various mining camps. During 
the time he made twenty trips across the desert 
to Salt Lake, (eiglit times being accompanied 
by his wife) then up into JNIontana, while in 
1868 he was a contractor on the Union Pacific 
Railroad, his family making their home the 
greater part of the time in -San Bernardino. 
While thus employed, IMr. Colton became in- 
terested in cattle raising, and when the estab- 
lishment of railways encroached upon his busi- 
ness he gave up freighting and devoted him- 
self exclusively to stock raising on a ranch 
in Colorado, where he purchased a squatter's 
claim to one hundred and sixty acres. Dis- 
posing of his interests in that state in 1884, 
he moved with his family to Ogden, Utah, 
that his younger children might have better 
educational advantages. 

In the spring of 1885, Mr. Colton, desirous 
of locating his two older sons in business, 
went with them first to Oregon, and then to 
Raft River, Idaho, where he started them in 
the stock business. In September, 1887, he 
brought his family to California, settling at 
Red Bluff at first, but soon after going to 
Chico, arriving there on October 22. There 
leaving his family, he proceeded to Sacramento, 
where he made arrangements to buy mules to 
ship to the Sandwich Islands. After buying 
the mules in Utah he shipped them from San 
Francisco, making considerable money in the 
transaction. Joining his sons, then, at Raft 
River, Idaho, he sold his ranch and cattle, and 
the following summer lived at Chico. Going- 
then to Santa Rosa, he rented a vineyard of 
one hundred acres, but subsequently sold out 
his lease, and went to Ogden, Utah, where, 
in the spring of 1889, he purchased land, and 
embarked in sheep raising, stocking his ranch 
with a band of sheep which he owned, and at 
the time was leasing out. He remained in 
Ogden the greater part of the time for six 
years, his family in the meantime coming to 
Los Angeles, where he joined them in 1895. 
In 1898 he made a trip to Inyo county, and 
purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land 
which was stocked with cattle. In 1901 he 
traded that ranch for property in Burbank. 
He has crossed the desert many times, includ- 
ing among others many trips to Arizona, and 
upon two of these was accompanied by his wife. 
He is now living retired from active pursuits in 
Glendale, enjoying the fruits of his many years 
of toil and labor. Pie owns valuable property 
at the corner of Eighteenth street and Central 
avenue, and also has a ranch of fifteen acres, 
all cultivated, yielding abundant crops of fruits 
and berries. 




C^J^^^t^^^^ 



HISTORICAT. AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1295 



In April, 1854, ^Ir. Colton married Alary 
Ann Kelting-. and into their household eleven 
children were born. Joseph P., of Burbank, 
married Adelaide Rollins, by whom he had 
four children, Mrs :Minnie Elizabeth Ropes, 
Ella Minerva, E'.arl, (deceased), and Harry 
Leslie; Charles Plenry. a freight conductor, 
married Rosa Wollin, and they have two sons, 
William Edwin and Jay ; George Frederick, of 
Los Angeles, the discoverer of the Searchlight 
mine, married first Matilda Firth, by whom 
he has two children, Ella IMoore of Colton and 
George ; his second marriage was with Melvina 
Leatherberv ; Ella R., living in Fresno, is the 
widow of the late T. B. Dowd and has f^ve 
children, George, Clarabelle, Charles, James 
and Mary: Ravmcnd is deceased; William, of 
Searchlight. Nev., married Electa Weaks, and 
they have four cliildren, Clara, Hazel, Edna 
and Letha; Frank of Searchlight, married 
Minnie Corber and they have one son. Glen- 
wood ; by a former marriage he had one daugh- 
ter, Pearl Ethel, who was reared by INIrs. Col- 
ton; James is deceased; Mae, the wife of H. 
Sellers, of Los Angeles, has one daughter, 
Mildred lone; the two children who died m 
infancy were Edwin and Mina. Politically 
Mr. Colton is a Democrat. 



MARX A. LESEM. In two points at least 
the lives of Marx A. Lesem and Sebastian 
Kneipp, the recognized father of the water cure, 
were parallel, both being of German birth and 
both becoming afflicted with what was thought to 
be an incurable disease when they were at the 
pinnacle of expectancy for success m their re- 
spective life callings. The Kneipp method of treat- 
ment as practiced by its founder m Germany 
became world-renowned during his lifetime and 
the little parish-town of Woerishofen has grown 
from a mere hamlet to a prosperous, cosmopolitan 
health resort. The records show that from 1891 
to i8g4 over fifty thousand patients sought 
Father Kneipp's help, and it was no uncommon 
thing for four hundred afflicted persons to seek 
relie'f in a single day. Many eminent physicians, 
recognizing the merit of his system, came to him 
for mstruction in his methods' of curing dis- 
eases with the result that Kneipp institutions 
were -established in all of the large cities of Eu- 
rope. Thus, with the wide distribution of liter- 
ature on the' subject, the knowledge of the meri- 
ti^rious svstem spread to all parts of the world 
Thus it was that Mr. Lesem, after he had tried 
all other known remedies without any relief, be- 
came an inmate of the famous institution, leav- 
ing it eight months later entireh cured. In the 
meantime he had become deeply interested m the 
method of treatment and had made a pi'actical 



studv of the system, the outcome of which was 
the establishment of M. A. Lesem's Kneipp San- 
itarium in San Diego, Cal., in 1896. 

A native of Rheinpfalz, Bavaria, Germany, 
born Alarch 4, 1844, Marx A. Lesem is a son of 
Alexander and Caroline (Deutch) Lesem, both 
natives of the Fatherland. In his native land 
the father was an extensive dealer in grain, giv- 
ing this up in 1859 to take up life in the new 
world. He survived only a few months to enjoy 
his new surroundings, tor his death occurred at 
Quincv, 111., in October, 1859, when in his sixty- 
fourth year. His wife survived him many years, 
passing awa\- in New York City at the age of 
ninety-four 'vears. Of the five sons and two 
daughters who blessed their marriage three sons 
and^one daughter onl> are living, Marx A. being 
next to the voungest of the family. His child- 
hood years were "spent in the place of his birth, 
and among the pupils of the schools in that vi- 
cinitx- none was more deeply devoted to his_ 
studies than :\Iarx A. Lesem. In fact, all of 
his spare time out of school was spent in ac- 
quiring knowledge. Although through his en- 
tire life he has ""continued to be a student, his 
school davs, strictly speaking, came to a close 
in 1859, for it was in that year that his father 
brought the family to America. Settling in 
Ouincy, Adams county, III, three of his brothers 
there opened a merchandise business on Fourth 
street, in which he was interested as clerk until 
he also became a partner in the business. 

It was while associated with his brothers in 
business that Mr. Lesem was taken ill.^ Local 
physicians were unable to give him relief, and 
after consulting the best-known practitioners of 
Chicago and New York he was still in the same 
condition. Disposing of his interest in the busi- 
ness in 1879 he returned to Bavaria, Germany, 
in the vague hope that in his native land he 
might find relief from the disease which had fast- 
ened itself upon him. He first tried Marien- 
bad. one of the renowned health resorts, but this 
treatment resulted like all previous ones, and it 
was at this time that his attention was called to 
the Kneipp water cure. As a patient in the san- 
itarium at Bavaria he soon began to note an 
improvement in his health, which not only greatly 
encouraged him in the hope of complete recovery 
but elicited his interest to such an extent in the 
system emploved that during the eight months 
which he spent there he had become a convert to 
the belief that all diseases if taken in time could 
be cured bv Nature's simple remedv. His re- 
turn to his'home and friends in Illinois in i88i 
was looked upon as a miracle, for when he left 
nearly tw^o years before none expected to see him 
come' back 'alive. Resuming business life, for 
several years thereafter he was located in Chi- 
cago occupied in looking after his interests there. 



1296 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



The ill health of his wife made a change of 
climate a necessity at this time, and thus it was 
that his attention was drawn to the equable cli- 
mate of Southern California. He came to San 
Diego in 1887 and in 1888 established a merchan- 
dise business, which he continued to carry on 
for five years. During all of these years plans 
had been maturing for the establishment of a 
water-cure sanitarium, and in 1896 he opened the 
Kneipp Sanitarium of which he is now the pro- 
prietor in his residence at No. 2467 First street. 
Basing his belief in his treatment on the cure 
which was brought about in his own case he 
takes for his motto "What man has done man 
may do," and with this as his watchword he has 
carried on his humanitarian work for the last 
ten years with the greatest satisfaction to him- 
self, for he has the assurance that he has saved 
many lives and alleviated much suffering. No 
matter what the disease may be or of how long 
standing Mr. Lesem has absolute faith in his 
ability to eft'ect a cure if the patient will be per- 
sistent and determined in following the treat- 
ment. Requests for admission into the sanitarium 
far exceeded the ability to furnish accommoda- 
tion, but with the erection and equipment of a 
new building this difficulty has been obviated. 
The long list of unsolicited testimonials which Mr. 
Lesem has received during the past years shows 
that his patients have not been confined to his 
home city or county, but on the other hand they 
have come from all over the United States and 
even from the British Isles. 

While a resident of Ouincy, III., Mr. Lesem 
was united in marriage with Theresa Greene- 
baum of Chicago, 111., who was born in that city, 
where her family was well and favorably known. 
Of the children born to them five are living, as 
follows : Regina, now J\Irs. Apple and a resident 
of Springfield, 111. ; Lillie, at home : Alexander 
M., who is a merchant in Danville, 111. ; and James 
G. and Henry F., both of whom are in business 
in Chicago. Mr. Lesem was made a Mason in 
Chicago and still holds membership in the lodge 
there. His interest in the advancement and 
progress of his adopted city has from the first 
been one of his most noticeable characteristics, 
and the Chamber of Commerce of San Diego has 
no more interested member than he. In him also 
the Republican party has a strong ally. Mr. 
Lesem is a man who justly holds a high position 
in the community where he lives and is honored 
and esteemed for his recognized worth. 



W. WALTER COULTAS. Ranking high 
among the industrious, thrifty and well-to-do 
agriculturists of Ventura county is W. W. Coul- 
tas. who 15 engaged in his pleasant and profitable 
vocation near Oxnard. A hard-working, per- 



severing man, one who observes and thinks for 
himself, he is meeting with genuine success in 
his labors, and as a man of integrity and honesty 
holds a good position among the leading citizens 
of the town. A son of Benjamin Coultas, he 
was born February 3, 1846, in Scott county, III. 
and was there educated. His father emigrated 
from England to Illinois, settling in Scott county, 
where he was engaged in farming and stock- 
raising until his death, at the age of fifty-five 
years. On first coming to this country he was 
identified with the W'higs, but was afterwards a 
Republican in politics. In Illinois, in 1836, he 
married Sarah Clark, who was born in England, 
and died in \^entura county, Cal., at the ad- 
vanced age of seventy-seven years. Both he and 
his wife were members of the Qiurch of Eng- 
land. Five children blessed their union, and of 
these W. W., the subject of this sketch, is the 
only survivor. 

After completing his studies in the cominon 
schools of his native town, W. W. Coultas as- 
sisted his father on the home farm. At the age 
of eighteen years he started in life for himself, 
and in course of time became owner of a fine 
farm of two hundred acres in Scott county, and 
in addition to carrying on general farming was 
a large stock-raiser and dealer. In 1884 he sold 
out and removed to Sedgwick county, Kans., 
where he purchased one hundred and sixty acres 
of land, on which he resided two and one-half 
years. Disposing of that property, he came to 
Ventura county in 1887, and the following six- 
teen years had the management of the one thou- 
sand-acre ranch belonging to his uncle, the late 
Thomas Clark. The estate being divided after 
the death of Mr. Clark, he has since purchased 
three hundred and thirteen acres. In addition 
to this he has other property in Ventura county, 
a ranch containing one hundred and forty-six 
acres of land lying near Oxnard, and has ten 
acres of valuable land in Toluca, Los Angeles 
county, in the center of the fruit belt. He de- 
votes his land to the raising of barley. ' He has 
some fine horses, keeping both driving and farm 
horses, in all having about thirty head of val- 
uable animals. 

March 12, 1867, in Illinois, Mr. Coultas mar- 
ried Ruth A. Wells, who was born in Illinois, in 
1S40, and died in Ventura county, September 6, 
i8g6. Of the union of Mr. and ]\Irs. Coultas 
thirteen children were born, namely: Luella I\I.. 
wife of Samuel Chamberlain, of Toluca : Edith, 
wife of William Wheeler, of Sawtelle; Jessie, 
who died in infancy : Albert W., of this county, 
who married Susie Chamberlain ; Grace A., who 
(lied at the age of nineteen years; Theresa; 
Thomas ; Alexander ; Percy, who died in in- 
fancy : Bertha : A^entura : Frederick ; and Ruth 
A. Politically ]Mr. Coultas is a stanch Repub- 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1299 



lican, and while in Kansas served as township 
treasurer, and since the building of the Union 
high school he has served as a member of the 
board. Fraternally he is a member of Oxnard 
Lodge No. 341, F. & A. M., and of Oxnard 
Chapter No. 86, R. A. M. Religiously he be- 
longs to the Christian Church, with which he 
united in Illinois. 



LUAL\X H. GASKILL. The name of L. 
H. Gaskill belongs among those noble citizens 
who braved the dangers of the pioneer days 
and swept them successfully from his path 
and gave the first impetus toward the great- 
ness of California stateliood. He was born 
in Steuben county, Ind., Juh' 17, 1843, a son 
of Cortland Gaskill a pioneer throughout his 
entire life. The elder man was born in New 
Jersey, inheriting the sturdy traits of his 
Scotch ancestors which induced him to face 
fearlessly the trying conditions of frontier 
life. In young manhood he located in the 
state of New York and engaged in stage driv- 
ing until 1835 v'hen he removed to Steuben 
county, Ind., where he hewed a farm from the 
wilderness lands in that state. He eventually 
removed to Michigan whence in 1855 he came 
to California via the Isthmus of Panama. He 
engaged in the dairy business in Petaluma 
and later followed a similar occupation on the 
Russian river in Mendocino county. Finally 
returning to Petaluma he made that place his 
home until his removal to San Diego county, 
where he resided in Campo, the scene of his 
sons' activities, until his death which occurred 
at the age of eighty-seven years. His wife, 
formerly Theresa Brink, was born in Pennsyl- 
vania, a daughter of Moses Brink of Holland 
ancestry, and her death occurred in Sonoma 
county. They were the parents of six chil- 
dren, four of whom came to California, and 
three still surviving. 

The early boyhood days of Luman H. Gas- 
kill were spent in his home in Michigan where 
his parents had located in the vicinity of Bat- 
tle Creek. He attended the public schools un- 
til he reached the age of fourteen years, when 
he accompanied his mother to California, the 
father having preceded them two years. They 
went to New York City and took passage on 
the Star of the West to Aspinwall, there 
crossing the isthmus and completing the voy- 
age on the old John L. Stevens and arriving 
in sSan Francisco in July, 1857. They were 
met by his father who took them to the home 
which' he had established in Petaluma. There 
the youth engaged with his father in dairy 
farming and remained so occupied until i86t 
when he with countless others joined the Corn- 



stock rush at Virginia City, Nevada. He en- 
gaged in prospecting and mining and the de- 
veloping of chi;ns, owning three mines, one 
of which was the extension of the Warren 
Wells. They struck a sheet of ore that as- 
sayed $2,000 to the ton, but it was all worked 
out in a month, yielding only sixteen tons. 
Mr. Gaskill returned to California in 1866 and 
spent the ensuing year on the Russian river 
in Mendocino county. In 1867 he came south 
to Santa Barbara county, during the trip hunt- 
ing along the way, spending some time in 
Ventura county, and finally locating in San 
Bernardino where he engaged in gardening 
with his brother, the two entering a tract of 
one hundred and sixty acres at the mouth of 
City creek. They built a ditch and irrigated 
the land themselves and set out an orchard 
and vineyard. They remained in that location 
but one year when they removed to San Jacin- 
to and purchased one thousand acres and en- 
gaged in farming and bee culture. In the 
spring of 1868 they came to San Diego coun- 
ty, the two purchasing immense tracts of land 
in the vicinity of the present town of Campo, 
which place they established by building the 
first store, blacksmith shop, grist mill and 
other enterprises, and where for sixteen years 
Mr. Gaskill served as postmaster, w^as justice 
of the peace for twelve years and school trus- 
tee for twenty years, he and his brother build- 
ing the first schoolhouse at that place. They 
engaged in the raising of stock, their range 
extending into Mexico and Lower California, 
and as superintendent of their cattle inter- 
ests for six years ^Ir. Gaskill made his home 
in Ensenada where he also conducted a meat 
market. They were also extensively inter- 
ested in bee culture, having four dift'erent 
apiaries of about four hundred colonies which 
produced many carloads of honey, one sum- 
mer their crop being over thirty tons. They 
v.^ere the second largest apiarists in the United 
States, being exceeded in this enterprise by 
only their honorable old friend, J. S. Harbison 
of San Diego. 

The cattle interests of the Gaskill Brothers 
were finally removed to the Colorado river 
where the sons of Luman H. Gaskill looked 
after their interests. In igoi the cattle in- 
terests were disposed of and in January, 1902, 
the property in Campo was sold and partner- 
ship dissolved between the two brothers, when 
they both came to the city of San Diego and 
established their homes. Luman H. Gaskill 
purchased a residence on the corner of Third 
and Elm streets where he enjoys the com- 
forts and fruits of an industrious life and where 
his friends are ever w^elcome to his hospital- 
it\-. He has invested his means in property 



1300 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



in and about San Diego, among bis posses- 
sions owning a fifty-five-acre rancb in Mis- 
sion Valley wbicb he rents for garden pur- 
poses. Mr. Gaskill's home is presided over 
by his wife, formerly i\Iiss E. J- Benson, a 
native of San Bernardino, and with whom he 
was united in marriage in San Jacinto. They 
are the parents of six children ; Walter, a 
stockman in Lower California; Marion, de- 
ceased, was a business man in the city of 
I\Iexico ; Carrie, wife of H. A. Jenkins of Cal- 
lexico; Erma, ,vife of P. W. Preston of Wash- 
ington; and Ava and Leo at home. Politically 
Air. Gaskill is a stanch adherent of the prin- 
ciples in the platform of the Republican part3^ 
While the two brothers were engaged in 
their business interests in ' Campo they had 
manj' exciting experiences with Mexican des- 
peradoes, as the town was located on the 
iDorder. It was frequently necessary for them 
to stand guard night and day. Both he and 
his brother, Silas E. Gaskill, were excellent 
marksman and owing to this the desperadoes 
were very careful in their method of attack. 
The most serious encounter which they ever 
had was on December 4, 1875. After the death 
of \'asquez, the leader of the desperadoes, 
Cruiz Lopez became the leader in his stead 
with his lieutenant, Chavez, who planned the 
attack on the Gaskill Brothers. On the day 
of the attack they left nine men standing on 
the hill in ambush, wdiile six came to the store 
armed. Two of them came into the store 
where Luman Gaskill was showing merchan- 
dise, Lopez waiting at the door to give the 
signal to the three outside. Air. Gaskill hap- 
pened to be looking ui:) and saw the signal of 
Lopez and instnntly 'shouted to his brother, 
who was on the outside of the store, and at 
the same time crawled under the counter for 
his gun. Before he could reach it the des- 
perado had jumped over the counter and in 
the struggle with Mr. Gaskill held him for 
Lopez to shoot. Just as the latter touched the 
trigger "Mr. Gaskill twisted his body and re- 
ceived a ball in the lungs instead of the heart, 
but became unconscious for a short period. 
Lopez always prided himself on his marks- 
manship and did not fire a second time. In 
the mean time Silas Gaskill was having trou- 
ble on the outside, having dodged a mortal 
shot but received a wound in the side and arm, 
as he rushed for his gun in the rear of the 
shop. As the attack occurred, a Frenchman 
rode up and was "wounded by a stray bullet 
from the effects of which he afterward died. 
He was not so disabled, at this time, however, 
as to prevent his firing at the miscreants, 
and raising his gam on the pommel of his sad- 
dle he shot Lcpez, who died from the effects 



of the wound a year later. Silas Gaskill hav- 
ing secured a gun rushed back to the attack 
and felled two men, one of whom was Theo 
Vasquez, who a few minutes later was shot 
and killed by Luman Gaskill from the inside 
of the shop ; the other was Rafel Martinez 
who was only wounded. While these stirring 
events were taking place, Luman Gaskill re- 
covered sufficiently to take in the surround- 
ings and by an effort reached his gun and ob- 
tained a position that enabled him to shoot 
Jose Alvis. He then made his way around 
and under the store and shot Jesus Alveto 
just as he was mounting his horse to escape. 
Alvis and Martinez were captured and im- 
mediately hanged to a tree by the citizens 
of the piace. Of the six desperadoes, Alonzo 
Goto was the only one not wounded and who 
also made his escape. He was never again 
heard of in this vicinity, but some time after- 
ward a man from Sonora passed through 
Campo who had run across Goto, who want- 
ed to know if the men were still alive that 
he had once called upon, remarking that he 
would not make a second visit. Erom him 
was learned of the death of Lopez which oc- 
curred about a year after the fight. When 
the affray was over the citizens of Campo 
telegraphed to San Diego for medical aid and 
Dr. Millard and the sheriff started for Campo 
immediately, making the seventy-five-mile 
trip in twelve hours via Tia Juana and Tia 
Carte Mexico v/ithout stopping to feed their 
team. In thirty days Luman Gaskill was suf- 
ficiently recovered to be out again, while Silas 
Gaskill was not even confined to his bed from 
the effects of his wound. The Frenchman, 
who was shot and who was the cause of 
Lopez's death, died in San Diego some time 
later. 

Among his curios Mr. Gaskill has a large 
copper kettle made in 1710 from native cop- 
per which was hammered out over a boulder, 
the beating being done with a rock. It has 
a capacity of fifty gallons. The copper car- 
ries some gold and it is estimated there is 
about $150 worth of gold in the kettle. He 
has gathered about him many interesting souv- 
enirs of his early life in California, his remin- 
iscences making him an interesting and en- 
tertaining companion. His natural character- 
istics of courage and an indomitable will have 
led him into many dangers but have also 
brouglit him safely through. His life has tjeen 
an exciting one, but while he has enjoyed in 
experiences he has given his efforts toward 
a personal success as well as interesting him- 
self in the upbuilding and development of 
whatever section he has made his home. He 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1301 



is highly esteemed b>' all who know him and 
held in regard as a representative of the earl}' 
pioneer. 



JACOB RUDEL. (Jne of the substantial 
ranchers of Los Angeles county and a man who 
has done much for the advancement of the wine 
and grape industry in this section, j\Ir. Rudel 
has with two associates, recently established a 
winery at a cost of $20,000. He is thoroughly 
in touch with the spirit of his work, and has 
succeeded in acquiring a success which places 
him among the substantial citizens of this local- 
ity. Born in Frankfort-on-the-J\Iain, German)-. 
July 27, 1853, he is a son of Henry and Mar}- 
(Hartmann) Rudel, both natives of German)-, 
where they spent their entire lives as agricul- 
turists, the father passing away at the age of 
eighty-nine years and the mother at seventy- 
six. There were three children in the family, 
Jacob Rudel being the only one who came to 
America, a sister still surviving and making 
her home in Germany. 

Jacob Rudel received bis education in his 
native country, after which, at the age of eighteen 
years, he came to the United States, having 
previously learned the trade of coppersmith in 
Germany. While following his trade in New 
York City he attended night school in a fur- 
ther pursuit of education, which has proven of 
benefit to him in later life. After three years in 
the metropolis of the western world, he came to 
California and in Sacramento followed his trade 
for a railroad con-ipany in that city. He re- 
mained in that location for five years, when he 
came to .Southern California, arriving in Los 
Angeles, where shortly afterward he established 
a coppersmith business for himself. - The pro- 
fits of two )ears enabled him to turn his atten- 
tion to more desirable occupation, and he accord- 
ingly invested his means in property in the 
country, first purchasing forty acres of raw land, 
to which lie added from time to time, until he 
now has one hundred and thirty acres in one 
bod)-, upon which he has set out a vineyard of 
one' hundred acres. .\t the time of purchase 
all of the land was devoid of improvements with 
the exception of forty acres in vines, but with 
the industry and perseverance inherited from his 
forefathers he set himself to the task of bring- 
ing it to rank witJ-i the most highly developed 
ranches of this section. That he has succeeded 
cannot be doubted when viewed in the light of 
events. His initial venture as a manufacturer 
of wine dates back to the year 1885, and formed 
the nucleus of his present business. This was or- 
ganized in 1905 with himself as president. About 
one hundred thousand gallons of wine are turned 
out per year, and sold at wholesale to the east- 



ern trade. The output from Mr. Rudel's vine- 
)-ard is not quite sufficient to supply the capacity 
of the winery and he therefore buys grapes from 
other producers in his section. He has put 
up substantial improvements on his property, 
a comfortable residence, barns and outbuildings, 
and has made it one of the model ranches. 

In 1885, in Los Angeles county, Mr, Rudel 
was united in marriage with ]\Iiss Eliza \'ogel, 
a native of Switzerland and a daughter of Jacob 
A'ogel, a pioneer of Southern California now- 
deceased, his wife still surviving and making 
her home in Los Angeles. They have two chil- 
dren, jNIillie, aged nineteen, and Atwood, aged 
seventeen. Mr. Rudel is independent along poli- 
tical lines, reserving his right to cast his ballot 
for the man he considers best qualified for of- 
ficial duties. He takes an active interest in the 
growth and upbuilding of Los Angeles, and is 
-Still a stockholder in the First National Bank 
of that citv. 



JACOB SECKINGER. A'entura county has 
many well-to-do and successful farmers who 
have accumulated what they have of this world's 
goods through their own individual efforts. 
Among this class Jacob Seckinger occupies a 
position of note. Living near the village of Ox- 
nard, he has a valuable ranch, and is industri- 
ously engaged in the prosecution of his indepen- 
dent calling, in which he is meeting with un- 
questioned success, A son of Thomas Secking- 
er, he was born. April 17, 1864, in Richland 
county. 111., of thrifty German ancestry, 

A native of Germany, Thomas Seckinger was 
reared to agricultural pursuits. In i860 he im- 
migrated with his family to the United States, 
and finding in the rich prairie soil of Illinois an 
excellent place for following his chosen occupa- 
tion, he settled in Richland county, where he has 
since been employed in general farming, being 
now seventy-four years of age. In the Father- 
land he married Catherine Deimel, who died on 
the home farm in Illinois in 1894, at the age of 
sixty-five years. 

Acquiring a practical knowledge of the vari- 
ous branches of study pursued in the coirunon 
schools of his native county. Jacob Seckinger 
was subsequently well drilled in the art and 
science of agriculture by his father, remaining 
at home until after becoming of age. Coming to 
California in 1886, he was employed as a tiller 
of the soil in Santa Barbara for three years. 
Removing to the Santa Clara valley in 1889, he 
purchased forty acres of land, and by dint of 
earnest work improved a good ranch, which he 
afterwards sold at an advantageous price. In 
January, 1905, he purchased his present valua- 
ble estate of one hundred and five acres, lying 



1302 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



near Oxnard, and in its care and cultivation has 
met with satisfactor}- results. He makes a spe- 
cialty of raising lima beans, of which he has 
ninety-five acres, while on the remainder of 
his ranch he reaps excellent crops of alfalfa. 

October 29, 1890, Mr. Seckinger married Laura 
Reiman, a daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth 
(Schneider) Reiman, with whom she came to this 
country from Germany when a girl. Immigrat- 
ing to the United States with their family in 
1881, Mr. and Mrs. Reiman came directly to 
the Santa Clara valley, where he was engaged 
in general ranching until his death. His wife, 
an active woman of seventy-six years, now 
makes her home with Mr.- and Mrs. Seckinger. 
Of the union of ^Nlr. and ]Mrs. Seckinger, three 
children have been born, INIary, Bertha and 
Elizabeth. Politically Mr. Seckinger is identi- 
fied with the Republican party, and religiously 
both he and his wife are members of the Catho- 
lic Church. 



W. C. BIXNS. Standing high among the 
younger generation of thriving agriculturists of 
Ventura county is W. C. Binns, a well-known 
rancher and fruit-grower of Moorpark. With 
characteristic perseverance and diligent labor he 
is carrying on mixed farming with unquestioned 
ability and success, his property, with its many 
valuable improvements, ranking among the most 
attractive and desirable estates in this section of 
the state. A son of Rufus H. Binns, he was bom. 
May 28, 1871, in Mahaska county, Iowa, where 
he grew to manhood. 

Born in Columbus, Ohio, Rufus H. Binns lived 
there during his boyhood. In 1842 he went with 
his parents to Iowa, and when ready to choose 
a life occupation selected farming as the most 
congenial employment. In the years that fol- 
lowed he made a number of trips to California, 
and in 1892 settled permanently in Ventura 
county, where he owns property on which he is 
now residing. He has always taken an active 
interest in public affairs, in his earlier life be- 
ing identified with the Democratic party, and 
afterwards being a Populist. While in Iowa he 
was elected supervisor on the independent ticket, 
and served in that capacity three terms. In 
Iowa he married Nancy Griffee, who was also 
born and reared in Columbus, Ohio. She came to 
Califomia with him, and died, at tlie age of 
fiftv-one vears, in 1896, at the home of her onlv 
child, W: C. Binns. 

Educated in Mahaska county. Iowa, W. C. 
Binns attended first the public schools, subse- 
quently taking a course at the Oskaloosa Com- 
mercial College. Returning then to the home 
farm he remained beneath the parental roof- 
tree until December, 1892, when he came to 



Southern California. After living for a short 
time in \'entura he purchased his present ranch, 
of which he took possession in 1893, and has 
since been profitably employed in its management. 
He has two hundred and fifty-five acres, about 
fifteen of which he devotes to the raising of apri- 
cots, the remainder being sowed t o grain or 
planted to beans. He makes a specialty of dr_\- 
ing apricots, selling on an average eight or nine 
tons of dried fruit a year. He deals to some 
extent in stock, raising cattle for the market, 
and in his agricultural and horticultural opera- 
tions is very successful, raising profitable crops 
and disposing of them advantageously. 

In August, 1 90 1, Mr. Binns married Flor- 
ence Lloyd, who was born in California, but as 
a girl spent several years in Nebraska, return- 
ing to this state when twelve years of age. Mr. 
and Mrs. "Binns have two children, Alice and 
Helen. Politically Mr. Binns is an independent 
voter, casting his ballot in favor of the men and 
measures he deems best, unhampered by party 
restrictions, and socially he is a member of the 
Fraternal Aid Association of Simi. Religiously 
Mr. Binns belongs to the German Reformed 
Church, and Mrs. Binns is a member of the 
Presbvterian Church. 



THOMAS BOYD. The Santa Maria valley 
claims no more successful rancher than Thomas 
Boyd, whose property is admirably located, ly- 
ing six miles from the village of that name. Of 
the four hundred acres comprising the ranch 
twenty acres are in apricots, while the remainder 
is in grain and beans, the latter commodity pro- 
ducing nine sacks to the acre. 

A native of Ireland, Thomas Boyd was born 
in County Fermanagh June 25, 1850, being one 
of nine children born to his parents, Edward 
and Mary A. (Stephenson) Boyd, both also na- 
tives of the Emerald Isle. Mrs. Mary A. Boyd 
died at the early age of thirty years, and some 
time afterward the father was again married, 
this union resulting in the birth of six children. 
He passed away in his native land when in his 
sixty-fourth year, in the faith of the Established 
church, of which he was a member, as was his 
first wife also. Thomas Boyd has two brothers 
who are residents of California, besides two 
half-brothers. He himself was reared and edu- 
cated in his native land until twenty years of 
age, when he took upon himself the responsibili- 
ties of his own maintenance. Crossing the At- 
lantic in 1870, he arrived in New York City in 
due time, and for about two years engaged as a 
stone mason and stone setter in that metropolis. 
Frugal in his habits, he laid by from his earnings 
whatever remained over and above actual ex- 
penses, and thus it was that he was enabled to 




,^a/V-<^^ ^ j'L>LA^J<^e^T^ 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1305 



come to the west in 1872 for the purpose of set- 
tling here permanently. In order to familiarize 
himself with the methods of farming in this 
country and furthermore to enable him to look- 
about for a choice location he worked out as a 
ranch hand for about two and a half years, the 
greater part of the time in the vicinity of San 
Jose, Santa Clara county. Coming to the Santa 
iNIaria valley in 1874 he lived on rented land 
for a time, but later took up a quarter section. 
Subsequently he sold half of the tract, but in 
1880 purchased three hundred and twenty acres 
adjoining the remainder, the whole combining 
to form his present ranch of four hundred acres. 
The land was in its primitive condition at the 
time it came into his possession, so that all of 
the improvements which have been necessary to 
bring it up to its present state of development 
are the work of his hands. All of the buildings 
are of a substantial character, and are in keep- 
ing with the family residence, which is one of 
the most elegant and up-to-date houses in the 
valley. 

In 1884 Thomas Boyd was united in marriage 
with Miss Emma Griffith, who is a native of the 
state, having been born in San Jose. Six chil- 
dren were born to them, but of these two died 
in infancy, and those now living are : Edna, the 
wife of J. F. Bradley ; Elmer and Ruth, both of 
whom are attending school ; and Emma Bernice. 
In his political views Mr. Boyd favors Republi- 
can principles, and fraternally he is identified 
with the Masonic order, belonging to Santa Maria 
Lodge No. 340, F. & A. M. Mrs. Boyd is a 
faithful member of the Presbyterian Church of 
Santa Maria, toward the support of which i\Ir. 
Boyd contributes freely, in fact no worthy ob- 
ject fails to number him among its supporters, 
for he is a lover of his fellow-man and adopted 
home and appreciates to the fullest degree what 
both have meant to him in his struggle for a 
competency during the past thirty-two years. 



DAVID A. KUGHEN. Holding a note- 
worthy position among the active and enter- 
prising men who settled in Los Angeles when 
that thriving city was in its infancy is David 
A. Kughen, now a well-known and highly es- 
teemed resident of Burbank. For many years 
he has been prominently connected with the 
agricultural and horticultural interests of 
Burbank and its vicinity, contributing his full 
share towards the industrial prosperity of the 
place. He is a man of great integrity and 
worth, keenly alive to the need of encourag- 
ing and supporting all beneficial projects, and 
as a strong Prohibitionist is especially inter- 
ested in advancing the temperance cause. A 
nati^•e of Greene county. Pa., he was born, 



August 9, 1839, in Wayne township, where he 
was brought up and educated, living there 
until se\ enteen years of age. 

Going to Illinois in 1857, ^Ir. Kughen 
worked on a farm in Bureau county for four 
years, when he migrated to Warren county. 
November 8. 1861, he enlisted in Company H, 
Eleventh Illinois Volunteer Cavalry, under 
command of the late Col. Robert G. Ingersoll, 
and served as a private until discharged on 
account of physical disability in 1862. Return- 
ing to Warren county, he remained there un- 
til 1866, when he came as far west as A Ion- 
tana, residing there until 1883. During this 
time he was actively and prosperously en- 
gaged in ranching and mining until the spring 
of 1881, when he embarked in mercantile pur- 
suits. Coming to Southern California in 1883, 
he opened a grocery store in Los Angeles, 
which was then but little more than a village, 
and for two years carried on quite a business, 
when he sold out, turning his attention to real 
estate, which was then booming. Moving to 
San Bernardino county, in 1887, he purchased 
one hundred acres of wild land and immedi- 
ately began its improvement, setting out twen- 
ty acre? to oranges and lemons. Selling his 
ranch in 1891, he once again became a resi- 
dent of Los Angeles, and for a time was there 
engaged in the grocery business. Locating 
in Burbank in February, 1894, he bought his 
present ranch of thirty-five acres, situated 
one-half mile west of the village, at the same 
time purchasing his residence property in the 
village, where he has since made his home. 
On his ranch he has seven acres of walnuts, 
and the remainder of the land is in alfalfa and 
general farming. He is verv progressive, us- 
ing the most approved modern methods em- 
ployed by scientific agriculturists, and in 1898 
installed on his ranch the first pumping plant 
used for irrigating purposes in Burbank. He 
now rents a part of his land for the growing 
of small fruits and berries, and in the manage- 
ment of the remainder is meeting with char- 
acteristic success. In 1906 he disposed of ten 
acres. 

In February, 1882, in Missouri, Mr. Kug- 
hen married Elizabeth Lovely, and of their 
union six children were born, namely: Flora 
Elizabeth, a student in Occidental College : 
Cassie Pearl, deceased : David L., John Thom- 
as \A'hitman, who died December 31, 1905; 
Maude Hope: and Glenn Omar. From 1864. 
when he cast his first presidential vote, until 
1895 Mr. Kughen was an earnest supporter of 
the principles of the Republican party, but 
since that time he has been one of the lead- 
ing Prohibitionists of Los Angeles countv and 
an active worker in party ran1<s. Both him- 



1306 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



self anu his wife are faitliful members of the 
Christian Church, in which he is serving as 
an elder, and toward the support of which he 
is a liberal contriliutor. 



FRANK GISLER. The experiments of re- 
cent years have proved that much of the land 
in ^'entura county is well adapted for the rais- 
ing of beans and beets, and thus these two 
crops now form the principal products in a 
certain portion of the county. To an amateur 
the raising of these two products presents many 
formidable obstacles, and success only comes 
after repeated failures and discouraging ex- 
periences : yet in the end, to those who thor- 
oughly learn the business, no occupation pre- 
sents greater opportunities for the earning of 
a neat income as the result of a year's applica- 
tion and energetic devotion to the work. Per- 
haps few men in the county have a more thor- 
ough knowledge of the growing of beans and 
beets than Mr. Gisler possesses and as a re- 
sult of his sagacity and energetic application 
he now owns one of the finest farms in the 
vicinity of Oxnard. 

A native of Canton Uri, Switzerland. Erank 
Gisler was born January 17, 1872, being a son 
of T^Iax Gisler and a brother of Joseph Gisler, 
well-known among ^'entura county's agricult- 
urists. When he was about seven years of 
age he accompanied his mother to America, 
joining his father in California, and here he 
was sent to the public schools until he had 
acquired a fair English education. When only 
a small boy he began to assist his father and 
in youth was the possessor of a thorough prac- 
tical knowledge of agriculture. With his 
brother, Joseph, in 1893 he began to farm on 
the Tack Hill place, where more than four 
hundred acres were placed under cultivation 
to grain and beans. Later he was employed 
at SpringA'ille for one year and in 1897 he and 
his brother leased four hundred acres of the 
Patterson ranch, where they made a specialty 
of raising grain and beets. With the money 
thus earned in 1900 they bought one hundred 
and fifty-seven acres, known as the Clemens 
ranch, lying just north of Oxnard, and here 
they found themselves the owners of very fer- 
tile land, well adapted for beet-raising. On 
the division of the property in 1905 Frank re- 
ceived about seventy-five acres of plow land, 
and in addition he and his brother own fifty- 
six acres of beet-land at El Rio. the income 
from the two properties amounting to a grati- 
fying sum. 

The marriage of Frank Gisler was solemn- 
ized at El Rio .'\pril 8, tgoi, by Rev. John 
PVijol. and united him with ]\iiss Grace East- 



wood, a sister of Ernest Eastwood, in whose 
sketch the family histor}' appears. ]\Irs. Gis- 
ler is a daughter of George J. Eastwood and 
was born in Ventura, received an excellent 
education in the county schools, and after 
leaving school held office as deputy in the El 
Rio postoffice, of which her mother was then 
postmistress. Mr. and Mrs. Gisler are the 
parents of one child, Raymond. The family 
hold membership w^ith the Santa Clara Catho- 
lic Church and contribute to its maintenance 
and miss'onarj' enterprises, as well as to other 
movements for the benefit of their community 
and the uplifting of the human race. While 
Mr. Gisler has not identified himself actively 
with politics and has not displayed any par- 
tisan spirit in his opinions, )'et he stanchly ad- 
vocates Republican principles and bv his bal- 
lot gives support to the party and its platform. 



HERBERT ALFRED BURDICK:. As the 
oldest business man in El Alonte Herbert A. 
Burdick has witnessed and participated in the 
development and upbuilding of the town and 
community and is still actively interested in all 
public aft'airs. He was bom in Cortland county, 
N. v., February 18, 1855, the second in a fam- 
ily of seven children, five sons and two daugh- 
ters, of whom four sons are now in California. 
The father, Amos, was also born in that place, 
as was the grandfather, Joseph, who as a fron- 
tiersman engaged as a hunter and trapper, and 
in summers as a farmer. Amos Burdick fol- 
lowed his early training and became a farmer, 
in young manhood removing to Wisconsin, where 
he enlisted in Company B, Thirteenth Regiment 
W^isconsin Infantry, and served in the Civil war 
for three years and nine months. Returning to 
civic life he located in Milton, Rock county, and 
pursued agricultural lines until his final removal 
to California, where he located in Pomona, thence 
returning east and dying in North Loop, Neb. 
His wife was in maidenhood ]\Iartha Spencer, 
who was born in Cortland county, N. Y., a 
daughter of Oliver Spencer, who as a carpenter 
passed his entire life in the state of New York. 
Mrs. Burdick died in Modesto, Cal. 

Herbert A. Burdick was reared in Wisconsin 
and in North Loop. Neb., and was educated in 
the public schools. Reared upon a farm, he con- 
tinued this occupation when starting out fiir 
himself. He later homesteaded property in 
Greeley county, after which he went to Sheridan 
county and entered land and improved a farm, 
eventually owning two large and well improved 
farms. Having learned the blacksmith's trade 
in the meantime he built a shop in Rushville and 
worked at his trade. In 1888 he came to Cali- 
fornia and located in St. Helena. Napa county. 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1307 



remaining there for one year, and then came to 
El Monte and leased the shop which he is now 
conducting, two years later purchasing the same 
and continuing in business to the present writing. 
In 1896 he rebuilt the shop, installing an eight 
horse power engine, and added to his equipment 
until he now has the best equipped blacksmith 
shop in El ]\Ionte. He has also built a residence 
here. 

In North Loop, Neb., INIr. Burdick was united 
in marriage with Miss Sarah Elizabeth McDow- 
ell, a native of Michigan, and they are the par- 
ents of two children : Lester, engaged in the 
plumbing business in El Monte, and Thisba. 
Fraternally Mr. Burdick is a member of the In- 
dependent Order of Foresters, the Ancient Or- 
der of United \\^orkmen, INIodern Woodmen of 
America and Fraternal Brotherhood. In religion 
he is a member of the Seventh Day Adventists, 
belonging to the Los Angeles church of this de- 
nomination. Politically he is a Republican. 



ALBERT HADLEY. In the financial cir- 
cles of Whittier and the surrounding country no 
name stands out in greater prominence than that 
of Hadley, two of whose representatives. Wash- 
ington and Albert (father and son), organized 
the First National Bank of Whittier October 
I, 1900, under national laws, and have since 
held the positions of president and vice-presi- 
dent respectively in the institution, the son be- 
ing now the general manager of the entire bank- 
ing business controlled by the company. In ad- 
dition to his connection with this solid institu- 
tion he acts as a director of the Whittier Sav- 
ings Bank, wliich also is in a flouishing condi- 
tion ; and furthermore he has been on the direc- 
torate of the \\Tittier Home Telephone Com- 
pany. During the existence of the Wliittier 
Light and Fuel Company he was its president 
and manager, holding that ofifice until the plant 
was sold to the Edison Electric Companv. 

A native of Annapolis, Ind., Albert Hadley is 
a son of Washington and Naomi f Henley ) Had- 
ley. and a grandson of Micajah Henley, a promi- 
nent Quaker of Wayne county, Ind. ; also a 
grandson of Jonathan and Ann (Long") Had- 
ley, natives respectively of Pennsylvania and 
Virginia. When the family lived in Parke 
county, Ind., Albert Hadley had the advan- 
tages offered by Bloomingdale academy, and in 
early manhood he served as a clerk in the office 
of the treasurer of Parke county for a year. 
His first knowledge of the banking business was 
acquired while acting as errand boy in the Parke 
County Bank. During the four years nf his 
employment by the bank he was promoted to be 
bookkeeper and teller. On resigning the latter 
position he removed to Kansas and in October, 



1865, assisted in organizing the National Bank 
of Lawrence, in which he first held the position 
of bookkeeper and later was teller, assistant 
cashier and cashier successively, being with the 
same institution for twenty years. During the 
period of his residence in the town he was for 
two years associated with the Lawrence Sav- 
ings Bank, but at the expiration of that time he 
returned to the National Bank. Besides his 
other connections he was identified with the 
\\'estern Farm Mortgage Company, a local in- 
stitution of Lawrence, in which he officiated as 
a director. Though not a partisan he was a 
stanch believer in Republican principles and 
while in Lawrence consented to fill the office of 
deputy city treasurer for one term, but with that 
exception he refrained frorn any participation in 
local politics. 

On the removal to Denver, Colo., of the main 
office of the \^'estern Farm Mortgage Company. 
Mr. Hadley bore an active part in the work and 
assisted in establishing the organization in its 
new quarters. It was his intention to remain 
with the company at Denver, but the altitude 
proved injurious to his health and for that rea- 
son he sought a more favorable climate in re- 
moving to California in 1890 and settling at 
\Miittier. Immediately after coming to his new 
location he secured the position of paying teller 
and assistant cashier of the National Bank of 
California, in Los Angeles, in which later he 
was promoted to the cashiership. After an ac- 
tive association of eleven years with that insti- 
tution he resigned on account of ill health and 
for a year relinquished all activities, but on the 
expiration of that time, having partiallv recov- 
ered his former strength, he again assumed 
business relations with a bank, this time begin- 
ning his connection with the institution in which 
he is now an officer. 

The marriage of Mr. Hadley was solemnized 
at Rockville, Ind., and united him with Mary 
J. Brown, who was a member of an old New 
York family and died at Los Angeles in 1900. 
Three children survive her, namely: Freder- 
ick W., who by gradual promotions worked his 
way up to be paying teller in the National Bank 
of California and is now assistant cashier of 
the First National Bank of Whittier; Meda N.. 
who was educated in the Marlborough school, 
Los Angeles, and died in Los Angeles Novem- 
ber 3, 1903, at the age of twenty-two years ; and 
Mildred M., a graduate from the IMarlborough 
school, and now a student in Stanford Univer- 
sity at Palo Alto. The family are identified 
with the Whittier Congregational Church, in 
the organization of which Mr. Hadley was an 
active worker and to which he has been a gen- 
erous contributor. In fraternal relations he is 
connected with the Masons and Ancient Order 



1308 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



of United Workmen. A man of varied talents, 
strong of mind, keen in analytical powers, quick 
in decision, energetic in action and resourceful 
in ideas, he has been a promoter of the per- 
manent prosperity of Whittier and has accom- 
plished much in behalf of its banking interests, 
its religious upbuilding and its educational de- 
velopment. 



ALBERT G. BARTON. \\'orthy of repre- 
sentation in a volume of this character is Albert 
G. Barton, an esteemed and highly respected 
resident of San Pedro, who has been active and 
influential in the upbuilding of this section of 
Los Angeles county, and has been somewhat 
prominently identified with public affairs. A son 
of James Harvey Barton, he was born, in 1838, 
in Eaton township, Lorain county, Ohio. 

A native of New York state, James Harvey 
Barton was born and brought up there, but in 
earl\- manhood settled as a wheelright in Lorain 
county, Ohio. Following the march of civili- 
zation, he went to Wisconsin in 1845, and taking 
up a tract of land in Cottage Grove, Dane coun- 
ty, improved a fine farm. Retiring from active 
pursuits in his old age, he spent his last years in 
Stearns county, Minn., at the home of his son 
Albert, of whom we write. He married Eliza 
Bassett, a native of New York, and a daughter 
of Samuel Bassett, who subsequently settled as 
a pioneer in Ohio. She died on the home farm 
in Wisconsin. Of the live children born of their 
union, five grew to years of maturity and three 
are now living. Two of the sons served in the 
Civil war, namely: Sylvester, who served in a 
Wisconsin regiment during two terms of enlist- 
ment, and Albert G. 

About seven years of age when his parents re- 
moved to Wisconsin, Albert G. Barton was 
brought up on a farm, and educated in the dis- 
trict schools of Dane county. Going to Minne- 
sota in 1858, he worked in what is now Kandi- 
yohi county for about four years. In the fall of 
1862 he enlisted in Company D, Minnesota 
lilounted Rangers, and until mustered out, a 
year later, was employed in subduing the Sioux 
Indians. Re-enlisting, in the spring of 1864, in 
the Minnesota Independent Battalion V^olunteer 
Cavalry, he was located on the frontier for two 
years. Returning then to Stearns county, Minn., 
he was there extensively and prosperously em- 
ployed in farming and stock-raising for a num- 
ber of years. Deciding then to change his 
place of residence and his occupation, he came 
to San Pedro, Cal.. in 1883. and was here en- 
gaged in contracting and building for six years. 
Being appointed postmaster in 1889. he served 
for some little time after the change of admin- 
istration, in 1893. He subsequently carried on 



general ranching at Altadena for a short time, 
but not satisfied in that part of the county soon 
returned to San Pedro, and having erected a good 
residence at the corner of Center and Santa 
Cruz streets has since made this his home. 

In Melrose, Stearns county, Minn., Mr. Bar- 
ton married Emeline J. Foote, who was born in 
Ohio, and they are the parents of three chil- 
dren, namely: Mrs. Cora Evelyn Mclntire, of 
Pasadena; Mrs. Alberta Adeline Nichols, of 
San Pedro; and A-Irs. Ina Ozella Fawcett, of 
San Pedro. Politically Mr. Barton is an uncom- 
promising Republican, sustaining the principles 
of his party at every opportunity. Fraternallv 
he is a Master Mason, and socially he is a mem- 
ber of Harbor City Post No. 185, G. A. R., of 
San Pedro. Religiously both Mr. and Mrs. 
Barton are valued members of the Episcopal 
Church. 



GEORGE B. WEIDLER. Throughout Los 
Angeles county are many young men of promise, 
who are already important factors in developing 
and promoting the industrial prosperity of South- 
ern California, prominent among the number be- 
ing George B. Weidler, a poultry raiser and deal- 
er, living near Wiseburn. Endowed with a re- 
markable degree of energy and push, he is rapid- 
ly building up for himself a substantial business 
and winning an excellent reputation for ability 
and worth. A son of the late Samuel W. Weid- 
ler. he was born, in 1880, in Cincinnati, Ohio, 
where he grew to man's estate. 

Born, reared and educated near Lancaster, Pa., 
Samuel W. Weidler resided in his native town 
until 1875, when he moved to Ohio. Locating in 
Cincinnati, he built the mill and warehouse that 
still bear his name, and successfully operated both 
until his death, in 1904. He married Mary A. 
Beal, a native of Ottawa, Canada, and they be- 
came the parents of three children, all boys, one 
of whom died in infancy, the others being George 
B., the special subject of this sketch; and Frank 
K., who is in business in Los Angeles, being a 
member of the Advance Buggy Company. 

Inheriting considerable property from the par- 
ental estate, which was sold after the death of the 
father. George B. Weidler came to Los Angeles 
county, and in April, 1905, invested in land, buy- 
ing his present ranch, comprising thirteen acres, 
near Wiseburn. He has since erected some fine, 
up-to-date chicken houses, fenced off yards, and 
has already established a good market business 
as a raiser of full-blooded White Plymouth Rock 
chickens, catering to the high-class hotel trade in 
Los Angeles. His ranch is well improved, hav- 
ing a substantial residence, and a good barn, and 
all of the most approved modern conveniences for 
successfully carrying on his chosen work. 




,..^^^Cc.^i.A^ c/ ^ 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1311 



CHARLES I. DORN. As postmaster and 
general merchant of j\foorpark, Ventura coun- 
ty, Charles I. Dorn is named among the repre- 
sentative business men of this section. Like 
many others of the men who are substantial 
citizens of California, Mr. Dorn is a native of 
the middle west, his birth having occurred ip 
Ridgeway, Iowa, November lo, 1873. His pa- 
rents, Anderson and Arvilla (Reimay) Dorn, 
Avere also natives of Iowa, from which state 
they emigrated to California in 1879 and in 
Contra Costa county made their home for 
about nine years. Removing to Ventura coun- 
ty in July, 1888, they located in the Cuyama 
valley, where the last days of the mother were 
spent, her death occurring in 1898. at the age 
of fifty-six years. Subsequently the father re- 
moved to Bakersfield, where he died in 1902, 
at the age of seventy-eight years. 

About six years old when his parents 
brought him to California, Charles T. Dorn re- 
ceived his education in the public schools of 
Contra Costa county, which remained his 
home until his fifteenth year. After locating 
in A'entura county he became interested in the 
oil fields, engaging in this business in both this 
county and Los Angeles county, and remain- 
ing so occupied up to within four years ago, 
.\t that time he took charge of the hotel which 
he had previous!}' purchased at Fillmore and 
witli a partner ran a livery business, conduct- 
ing these combined interests for the period of 
two years. Severing his connections with Fill- 
more in 1904, he came to Moorpark and estab- 
lished a general merchandise business, carry- 
ing a very complete line of groceries, hard- 
ware, furnishings, and a general dry goods 
stock, and in addition buys and ships hay, 
grain and beans, doing a general commission 
business. He was appointed postmaster in 
1904 and has since ably discharged the duties 
devol\-ing upon him. He is a man of business 
ability, combined with good judgment and en- 
ergy, which have brought about his success in 
whatever line of work he has taken up. 

In Bardsdale, April 30, 1902, Mr. Dorn was 
married to Miss Mattie Lemmon. a native of 
Texas, and born of this union is one son, Law- 
rence M. In his fraternal relations Mr. Dorn 
is a member of the Alasonic lodge of Oxnard. 
and also of the Fraternal Brotherhood. He is 
a liberal and pr.blic spirited citizen and takes 
an active interest in advancing the welfare of 
the community, serving for some time as 
school trustee. 



Hautes-Alpes, August 20, 1866, a son of 
Pierre, the representative of a family which 
traces its ancestry back six hundred years, 
Tlie elder man was a farmer and stockman in 
the south of France, being so engaged 
throughout his entire life in that location, 
where his death eventualh^ occurred. He is 
survived b}' his wife, formerly Leontine Mar- 
chant, also representing an old family of 
southern France, who makes her home on the 
old farm. They became the parents of eight 
children, of whom seven are living, the third 
child being Emile, He was reared on the pa- 
ternal farm in France, receiving his education 
in the public schools and Gap College, At the 
age of twenty-one years he enlisted in the Sec- 
ond Battalion, Second Company, One Hun- 
dred and Fifty-second Infantry, of the regular 
army of France, and after serving for three 
years was honorably discharged. In 1892 he 
came to California and in Los Angeles entered 
the employ of the Southern Pacific Railroad, 
remaining so occupied for a year, when he 
bought out his uncle, Seraphin Rambaud, who 
owned the pioneer store at Puente, since 
which time he has continued the business 
profitably. He conducts a general merchan- 
dise establishment, carrying a full line of 
goods generally found in such an enterprise. 

In Los Angeles Mr, Rambaud was united 
in marriage with Miss Marian Oxarart, a na- 
tive of Los Angeles, and a member of one of 
the old families of this section, and they are 
the parents of two children, Emelianne and 
Gaston. V.r. Rambaud is an active Republic- 
an and is interested in all matters of public 
import, having served one term as school trus- 
tee. 



EMILE RAMBALTD. The oldest mer- 
chant in Puente, Los Angeles county, is Emile 
Rambaud, who was born in France, near Gap, 



HENRY HORACE WEBB, Among the 
enterprising business men of Santa Monica who 
have attained success in their work is Henry 
Horace \\'ebb, well known as an extensive dealer 
in ice and as a transfer agent. A man of ener- 
getic temperament, honest and upright, he is well 
worthy of the assured position which he holds in 
the estimation of the people of the community. 
.V native of Canada East, he was born September 
II, 1851, at Roxton Falls. His fatlier, Henry 
Webb, born in England, migrated as a young 
man to Canada East, where he married Salinda 
Hall, He followed the trade of brickmaker 
during the greater part of" his active career, 
first in Canada, then in Fillmore county, Alinn, 
Coming to California as a pioneer of Santa 
Monica, he was for a time employed in buying 
and selling property, Init afterwards lived re- 
tired. 

Going with his parents to Minnesota, Henry 



1312 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Horace Webb completed his early education in 
the public schools of Fillmore county, remain- 
ing at home until becoming of age. Going then 
to Boone county, Iowa, he was there prosper- 
ousl}' employed in the transfer business for five 
years. In search of a broader field of action, 
he came from there to California in 1878, locat- 
ing in Los Angeles, where for eight years he 
managed a large transfer business, having an 
office at first at the corner of Los Angeles and 
First streets, but subsequently removing it to 
the new brick block which he built at No. 233 
Los Angeles street. He was likewise actively 
engaged in mercantile pursuits, running a gro- 
cery, and in both lines of industry was very 
successful, carrying on a fine business until after 
the collapse of the great boom. Coming then 
to Santa Monica, in partnership with F. W. 
Vogel, he established an ice business and in addi- 
tion has also established a larg'e and lucrative 
business as a transfer agent, at the present time 
keeping about twenty-four horses employed. 

In Boone county, Iowa, Mr. W^ebb married 
]\Iary W. Aliller, a daughter of Charles [Miller, 
a pioneer settler of Iowa, and into their house- 
hold three children have been born : Winnie B., 
Perry H. and Clarence E. Politically Air. Webb 
is identified with the Republican party, support- 
ing its principles by voice and vote. Fraternally 
he is a member of the iMasons, Benevolent Pro- 
tective Order of Elks, and the Royal Arcanum. 
He is a fine representative of the self-made men 
of our county, by his own efforts having acquired 
considerable wealth. He has a pleasant home at 
the corner of Oregon and Eighth streets, and is 
likewise interested in Santa ^Nlonica real estate. 



AVIXFIELD SCOTT FLINT. An ac- 
quaintance with the west begun during the 
period of his service in the regular army first 
attracted the attention of Mr. Flint to the ad- 
vantages offered by the Pacific coast, and 
upon receiving his honorable discharge from 
the government ser\'ice he returned to the 
coast country, where he has since made his 
home. Of eastern birth and parentage, he was 
born in Rensselaer county. N. Y., September 
22, 1865, and is a son of Clement and Hester 
( Gould) Flint, natives respectively of New 
York and Florida. For many years the father 
engaged in tlie practice of medicine and sur- 
gery in Brooklyn . and New York City, but 
while still in the prime of life he established 
himself in Rensselaer county, and continued 
professional work in that section of the state. 
When advancing years brought a desire for a 
release from the arduous life of a busy physi- 
cian he relinquished his large practice and 
sought the genial climate of California, set- 



tling in 1883 in the Poway valley in San Di- 
ego county, where- now, at the age of eighty- 
three years, he is enjoying a merited rest from 
professional and business activities. His wife, 
who is fourteen years his junior, is also living 
and possesses mental and physical faculties in 
unimpaired strength. 

Little occurred to individualize the youthful 
years of W. S. Flint until his departure from 
the old homestead to take up the active duties 
of life for himself. In 1882 he enlisted in the 
regular army as a member of Company F, 
Twenty-first United States Infantry, and 
shortly afterward was sent to Washington 
with the regiment, being stationed at A^an- 
couver Barracks, where he remained for six 
months. Later he was stationed at Fort Sid- 
ney, Neb., until his discharge from the army. 
During his brief period of service in the west 
he had been favorabh' impressed with the 
coast region and determined to return thither 
•with a view to making a permanent location. 
During December of 1884 he arrived in San 
Francisco and there began to learn the black- 
smith's trade, of which he acquired a thorough 
knowledge during the period of his appren- 
ticeship. 

On coming to San Diego county in 1885 Mr. 
Flint settled at Santa Ysabel and .soon after 
his arriA^l he took up a homestead from the 
government. This he improved and made his 
home, giving his attention to the raising of 
stock and also of such varieties of grain as 
suited the soil and climate. Until 1896 he gave 
his attention unreservedly to agriculture, but 
during the year named he bought a black- 
smith's shop at Santa Ysabel and gained a po- 
sition of prominence in his locality as an up- 
right business man and expert horseshoer. 
Near the village he owns one hundred and 
seventy acres of ranch land and his residence 
close to town gives him a modern, substantial 
home with all of the advantages of country 
life. Before her marriage Airs. Flint was Mil- 
lie Paine, her marriage to Mr. Flint occurring 
in this county January 24, 1889. She was born 
in Maine and in 1869 was brought to Califor- 
nia by her father, C. Paine, Avho established 
the family home at Poway. Later Air. Paine 
removed to Mesa Grande and since then has 
remained in that localit}', engaging in the fruit 
business and in general ranch pursuits. Airs. 
Flint passed away November 20, 1906. She 
was an earnest member of the Congregational 
Church, a lady of gentle character and noble 
traits, a wise mother to their three children. 
Alargaret F.. John W. and Mary F.. and pop- 
ular in the best social circles of the commun- 
ity. 

For si3me vears Air. Flint has held member- 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1313 



ship in Banner Cvourt No. 8522, A. O. F., at 
Julian, and to its helpful work he has been a 
regular contributor. Though not a partisan in 
politics and at no time a seeker for office, he 
nevertheless has stanch convictions concern- 
ing tariff problems and national issues and 
gives his allegiance to the Republican party. 
He was appointed deputy sheriff under F. M. 
Jennings and took up the duties of its position 
in San Diego January i, 1907. Few men of 
his community are more fond of reading than 
he, and much of his leisure time is devoted to 
a study of current events as depicted by the 
daily press and leading magazines. As a con- 
sequence of this study he has gained a famil- 
iarity with current affairs, local, state and na- 
tional history, and measures for the advance- 
ment of the people, which gives him a place 
among the best informed citizens of his local- 
ity. 



AARON E. KEENER. About one mile 
west of Lemon, and not far from the Eair\-iew 
school house, ma}^ be seen one of the fine 
looking and productive ranches which abound 
in Southern California. When Mr. Kepner 
took possession of this property a little over 
twenty years ago there was apparently little 
to encourage one in undertaking to trans- 
form a barley field (for such it was), but the 
passing of years has noted marvelous changes. 
Clearing away the barley stubble he set out 
a vineyard and also some deciduous fruits, in 
those "days watering his fields by means of a 
barrel, but in spite of this laborious and unsat- 
isfactor)' method of irrigation his horticultural 
undertaking was a complete success and for 
years he bore the distinction of having the 
finest vineyard of ]\Iuscats in this vicinity. 
His vineyard has since been replaced by wal- 
nuts, having a grove of twentv acres, sixteen 
acres in deciduous fruits, while the remaind- 
er of his sixty-acre ranch is used for alfalfa 
raising and. general farming. 

Born in Nora, Jo Daviess countv. 111., De- 
cember 5, 1849, Aaron E. Kepner is a son of 
B. H. and Sarah (Bushey) Kepner, both na- 
tives of Pennsylvania. They were married in 
the east and three of their thirteen children 
were born before their immigration to the 
frontier of Illinois in 1847. Settling on a farm 
in Jo Daviess countv the father carried on 
agricultural pursuits throughout the remainder 
of his active years and there reared his large 
family of children. ^A'ith the wife of his 
young manhood, who had uncomplainingly 
shared the inconveniences and vicissitudes of 
pioneer life, he was spared to enjoy a free- 
dom from care in his later vcars. which were 



passed in California, both dying in Lemon. 
The eldest of tJie parental family born in Illi- 
nois, Aaron E. was brought up in that state 
until he was twenty years of age, in the mean 
time attending the public schools of Nora. 
With the knowledge of farming which he had 
gleaned by assisting his father on the home 
farm he set out to try his own luck along the 
same line, settling on a farm near Montrose, 
Henry count}-. Mo., in 1869. After remain- 
ing there fifteen years, or until 1884, he dis- 
posed of his interests in the Mississippi val- 
ley to ccme to California. His wisdom in the 
selection of another choice piece of property 
was demonstrated when, during the same year, 
he purchased his present sixty-acre ranch in 
the . Fairview district, not far from Lemon. 
From an unpromising barley field he evolved 
first one of the finest vine^'ards in this part 
of the state, and now on the same acreage has 
one of the most productive walnut groves in 
the vicinity. Besides the twenty acres in wal- 
nuts he has sixteen acres in deciduous fruits 
and twenty-four acres devoted to alfalfa and 
general farming. All in all the Kepner ranch 
is considered one of the best in this part of 
Los Angeles county and its proprietor is rec- 
ognized as one of the important factors in the 
county's upbuilding. 

In Lafayette county, Wis., September 29, 
1872, Aaron E. Kepner was united in marriage 
with JMiss Roxie Rowe, who was born in Penn 
Yan, N. Y. Her father, Delevan Rowe, also 
a native of the Empire state, carried on a hotel 
and also a planing-mill and cabinet-making 
business in the east, but after his removal to 
Illinois settled upon a farm near the Kepner 
family in Jo Daviess coimt}-. Subsequently 
he removed to Iowa, and now resides on a 
farm near Iowa Falls, in which locality he is 
a power in the ranks of the Republican party. 
Mrs. Rowe was before her marriage Sarah 
Shaw, born in Orange coimty. N. Y., and who 
counted among her kinsmen the well-known 
Kernochan and jMcCartney families of that 
state. The death of Mrs. Rowe occurred in 
Illinois, at which time she left three chil- 
dren, of whom her daughter Roxie, now Mrs. 
Kepner, was the eldest. Six children were 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Kepner, but only three 
of them are now living. The eldest, Etha, 
who before her marriage was one of the most 
talented music teachers in Pomona, is now the 
wife of Dr. E. L. Johnson, of To])eka, Kans. ; 
Ida died in Missouri when seven years of 
age; Ross P., who graduated from Pomona 
College in 1906 with the degree of B. S., is 
now taking a post-graduate course in engi- 
neering in the University of Michigan : Flor- 
ence fknown bv her f;imilv and intimate 



131-i 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



friends as Birdie) died in Pomona in 1899, 
when seventeen years of age; Ernest died in 
infancy ; and the youngest, Louis, is attend- 
ing the Pomona high school. Both Mr. and 
and Mrs. Kepner are members of the Baptist 
Church of Pomona, exempHfying in their daily 
living the principles of their professed religion. 
Mr. Kepner is a member of the ^^'al^ut Fruit 
Growers' Association. 



j.VMES G. WARREN. The career of James 
G. Warren has been diversified and full of inter- 
esting events, his school days being interrupted 
to answer the call of his country to arms in de- 
fense of the Union ; the long, weary and heart- 
rending service to 1865 being given uncomplain- 
ingly ; his return to civic life ; and following, a 
location in various states of the Union and under 
all circumstances, from the most unfavorable to 
the most propitious. He is now an honored cit- 
izen of Southern California, successful in his 
personal enterprises and prominent among the 
residents of El Monte. He was born in East Au- 
rora, Erie county, N. Y., April 21, 1842, a 
grandson of Gen. William Warren in command 
during the war of 1812 at Buffalo, N. Y., and 
whose great-grandfather, William Warren, was 
a cousin of the General Warren who fell at 
Bunker Hill, the name having been established 
in America by two brothers who crossed the 
Atlantic in the Mayflower. Mr. Warren's 
grandfather, an old-line Whig, died at the age of 
ninety-four years. 

When ten years old Mr. Warren's parents took 
him to Geauga county, Ohio, where the next 
five years of his life were passed. He attend- 
ed the public schools up to the age of fifteen 
years, when he left home and went to Buchanan 
county, Iowa, where he engaged in working on 
a farm. The inherited patriotism within him 
stirred to life by the needs of 1862, he enlisted 
for service in August of that year, in Company 
C, Twenty-seventh Regiment Iowa Infantry, 
was mustered in at Dubuque, Iowa, and at once 
sent against the Sioux Indians in Minnesota. 
After three months in the north his regiment 
was transferred to the scene of activities in Ten- 
nessee and Mississippi, where he participated in 
the siege of Vicksburg, was with the Red River 
expedition, Sabine Cross Roads, etc. ; then re- 
turned to the relief of General Sturgis, checked 
Forest's cavalry, and participated in the siege 
of Nashville. Following this he was in the siege 
of Mobile and the capture of that city, and Forts 
Spanish and Blakely. He came safely through 
the historic struggle and never received the 
slightest wound. He was mustered out of ser- 
vice in 1865, at Clinton. Iowa, and immediately 
afterward returned to Manchester, same state. 



! 'ntil iSfiS Mr. Warren engaged in farming 
and teaming in Manchester, when he went to 
Adams count}' and purchased land upon which 
he remained four years, with the exception of 
one year spent in Belleville, Kans. In 1875 he 
went to Jewell county, Kans., and near Mankato 
homesteaded one hundred and sixty acres, upon 
which he engaged extensively in general farm- 
ing. Later he took up the barber business in 
Mankato, while his wife, conducted a milliners- 
store. These combined interests were contin- 
ued until 1894 when Mr. Warren disposed of 
his business and came to California, making 
his home for six months in Ontario, after which 
hn went to Pasadena and engaged at his trade. 
Selecting as a more desirable vocation that to 
which he had early been trained, in 1896 he lo- 
cated on the farm which he now owns, consist- 
ing then of five acres of walnuts, to which after 
three' years he gave all of his attention, having 
in the meantime disposed of the barber shop 
which he had established in El Monte. Later he 
purchased ten acres of walnuts on the ^Monrovia 
road, and also owns forty acres near Chino, San 
Bernardino county, which he is farming at the 
present writing. A part of his attention at pres- 
ent is given to the raising of fine poultry, white 
Plymouth Rocks and Buft' Orpingtons being his 
principal fancy stock, the latter, in connection 
with the massive pines on his place, giving the 
nanie of Pines Orpington ranch. 

Mr. Warren has been twice married, by the 
first union, with Cordelia L. Beagle, having five 
children, namely : Ernest, Fred, Lulu, Edith and 
Vivian. His present wife was formerly Mrs. 
J\lary A. (Kchler) Trump, a woman of rare qual- 
ities, a member of the Presbyterian Qiurch, and 
one who has many friends. Mr. Warren was a 
charter member of Jim Lane Post G. A. R., at 
JNIankato, and served as its conimander for two 
years, and is now identified witli Pasadena Post. 
Politically he is a stanch adherent of the prin- 
ciples advocated in the platform of tlie Repub- 
lican party, which ticket he has always voted. He 
belongs to the ]\Iountain View Walnut Growers' 
Association. 



HENRY AUSTIN WARNOCK. Thor- 
ough familiarity with the agricultural condi- 
tions of San Diego county, acquired by a life- 
long residence in this portion of California, 
admirably qualifies Mr. W^arnock for the wise 
and successful supervision of his large landed 
interests in the vicinity of Ramona. The peo- 
ple of his home neighborhood give him a high 
position in their esteem and confidence, this 
respect being accorded him as a result of their 
acquaintance with his liberal views, high in- 
telligence and niarked uprightness. A lifelong 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1317 



resident of his present district, he was l^orn 
at the old Warnock homestead on Santa Ter- 
esa rancho, September 3, 1865, and is a son of 
William and Ellen (Denig) Warnock and a 
brother of W. J. Warnock, in whose sketch 
appears the family history. During his boy- 
hood years he was sent to tlie district schools 
and later had the advantage of a course of 
study in St. Vincent's College at Los Angeles, 
after which he took a commercial course in 
Heald's Business College at San Francisco. 

Returning home on the completion of his 
collegiate course Mr. Warnock took up inde- 
pendent ranching. From the first he was in- 
terested in stock-raising and kept on his ranch 
about one hundred head of cattle and from fif- 
teen to twenty head of horses. In the year 
1900 he enlarged his responsibilities by the 
purchase of a ranch adjoining the old home- 
stead and here he now has twelve hundred 
and twenty acres of land, of which three hun- 
dred and fifty acres are under cultivation, and 
about fifteen acres are planted in apple trees 
now in bearing condition. Each year wit- 
nesses some improvement made on the ranch, 
for the owner is a man of progressive spirit 
and is not satisfied with anything less than 
the best. In his desire to advance the inter- 
ests of the ranch he has the active co-opera- 
tion of his wife, formerly Elizabeth E. Wolfe, 
and a native of Tennessee, but reared in 
Southern California, where their marriage 
took place October 26, 1901. Born of their 
imion are three children, William A.. Mabel 
Elizabeth and Eugene Douglas. While Mr. 
Warnock has always given his support to 
Democratic principles he has never sought lo- 
cal leadership in the party nor has he accepted 
any political office except that of constable. 
While filling the position of school trustee for 
two terms he gave his district faithful service 
in the interests of its educational progress and 
proved himself to be capable, well informed 
and progressive, aiming constantly to promote 
the welfare of the schools. 



ALBERT J. FREEMAN. During the years 
immediately following the discovery of gold 
in California the tide of emigration drifted 
ronstantly from the east toward the shores of 
the Pacific. Among the thousands of home- 
seekers and Argonauts came William D. Free- 
man, who crossed the plains in 1854 in com- 
pany with a large party of emigrants making 
the journe}'' with ox-teams and wagons. A 
native of New York, he was born in Chautau- 
qua county, September 27. 1827, and for many 
vears he lived in Illinois, where he was a pio- 
iieer nnd honored citizen of McHenry county. 



. Upon coming to the west he engaged in min- 
ing in Amador county, but later settled in 
Marin county, where he and his wife still live 
at their old homestead, the former now seven- 
ty-nine years of age, and the latter seventy- 
two. Both are earnest members of the Chris- 
tian Church and for years have been identified 
with its fellowship. The wife and mother bore 
the maiden name of ^lary Halstead and was a 
native of Canada, but came to the United 
States in girlhood, and September 15, 1850, be- 
came the wife of William D. Freeman. Born 
of their union were twelve children, of whom 
two daughters are now deceased. Ten are now 
living, among them being H. D., a well-known 
resident of Santa Barbara. 

After the famih' had settled in Marin coun- 
ty a son was born February 5, 1858, who was 
named Albert J., and who. in common with his 
brothers and sisters, received a public-school 
education and grew up to a thorough knowl- 
edge of ranching. From early manhood he has 
been interested in the poultry business and 
still makes a specialty of that work. Until 
about 1898 he remained in Marin count}-, but 
at that time he moved to Santa Barbara coun- 
ty and settled on his present farm near Santa 
Maria. Of his tract of eighty-three acres he 
has forty acres sown in grain and twenty-five 
acres planted in corn. In his poultry yards he 
has three thousand young chickens and thir- 
teen hundred hens. During the hatching sea- 
son he uses five incubators with a capacity of 
from five hundred and four to five hundred and 
seventy-six each. These incubators he con- 
structed without other aid, for he possesses 
considerable ability as a mechanic and exe- 
cutes work with skill. Other necessary ar- 
rangements have been made on his well- 
equipped chicken ranch, and. the neat appear- 
ance of the place proves him to be a man of 
energy- and wise judgment. 

The marriage of Mr. Freeman was solemn- 
ized February 20, 1901, and united him with 
Miss Emma L. Hardisty, a native of Illinois, 
and they are the parents of two children. Ivy 
and Vina. Mrs. Freeman is a daughter of 
Charles W. and Clarinda (Meadows) Hardis- 
ty. the father born in Savannah, Mo., in 1844. 
and the mother born in Abingdon, 111., in 1849. 
In 1879 ]\Ir. Hardisty removed from Missouri 
to Montana and during 1883 arrived in Cali- 
fornia, settling in .Santa Rosa, Sonoma coun- 
ty. A thoughtful study of present-day condi- 
tions has made Mr. Freeman a convert to the 
doctrines of socialism, which he upholds not 
only theoretically, but also at the polls. His 
wife holds membership in the Christian 
Church and both contribute to its mainte- 
nance. For sonip vears ^frs. Freeman was one 



1318 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



of the leading members of the Bloomtield 
Lodge of Rebekahs m Sonoma count}- and 
during the entire period of her passing through 
the chairs therewith she did not miss one 
meeting of the lodge. At different times she 
filled all of its chairs and in recognition of her 
able leadership and deep interest in the lodge 
its members honored her with the past grand 
jewel of her office. 



HEXRY B. PRATT. The records that give 
the genealogy of the Pratt family show that 
its representatives of past generations, like 
those. of the present, held positions of honor- 
aljle prominence in the various localities of 
their residence. The first of the name in this 
country settled along the Atlantic coast in 
New England, later generations following the 
trend of emigration toward the west. Julius 
D. Pratt, a native of Connecticut, became a 
pioneer of Illinois in 1836 and took up a large 
tract of raw laiid near Sterling, where he en- 
gaged in farm pursuits and also for a time 
taught school. When thirty-one years of age 
he died in 1841 and his wife, Mary (Bowman) 
Pratt, a native of Pennsylvania, died the year 
following his demise. Their son, John B., was 
born in Dixon, 111.. March 24, 1835, and re- 
mained at home until the discover}- of gold in 
Pike's Peak, when he went to the mines of Col- 
orado. Two years later he procee_ded to Au- 
burn, Ore., and during the next' five years he 
engaged in freighting between that country 
and Illinois and other points of the Mississippi 
valley, after which he spent a year at his old 
Illinois home. Going next to Iowa, he settled 
on a raw tract of land in Mitchell county, 
where he gave his attention to the develop- 
ment of an improved farm. Though prospered 
financially, he found the climate unpleasantly 
rigorous and therefore removed to California 
in" 1892, settling on a farm near Ramona. Ten 
vears' later he rented the land and since then 
has lived in retirement. In addition to his 
tract of two hundred and forty-one acres in 
this valley he owns one hundred and fifty-two 
acres in the Sorrento valley. Politically he 
has voted the Republican ticket ever since the 
organization of the party. 

While living in Mitchell county, Iowa, John 
B. Pratt married Julia Agnes Holbrook, a na- 
tive of Wisconsin. Three sons comprise their 
family, namely : Henry B., living near Ra- 
mona ; Clarence L., who is interested in a 
store at Pacific Beach. Cal. : and Arthur Earl 
of Ramona. The eldest of the thr^e sons was 
born in INIitchell county, Iowa, September 6. 
1874, and in early boyhood was taken to How- 
ard countv, Iowa, where he attended the pub- 



lic schools. In J 892 lie accompanied the fam- 
ily to California and soon afterward rented a 
tract of farm land. During 1901 he bought his 
present farm of thirty-six acres and in 1906 
purchased eighty acres in the San Pasqual 
valley, besides which he rents two hundred 
acres which he has under cultivation to grain, 
with a certain portion utilized for the pastur- 
age of stock. Like his father, he is a thorough 
believer in the principles of the Republican 
party and alwaj-s votes that ticket. For some 
years he has been actively identified with the 
Modern Woodmen of America at Ramona. 
His marriage was solemnized in the village of 
Ramona and united him with Miss Katherine 
M., daughter of John Sause, of Iowa. Mrs. 
Pratt was born in Iowa, but from girlhood 
has been a resident of Southern California, 
and remained in her father's home until her 
marriage, October 19, 1899, when the young 
couple began housekeeping on a rented farm, 
later moving to a farm of their own. The}' are 
the parents of three children, Alice ^larie, 
Agnes Flora and Charles Henry. The family 
attend the Congregational Church and are 
Identified with its membership, as well as lib- 
eral contributors to its charities. 



RICHARD L. ANDREWS. Numbered 
among the representative agriculturists in the 
vicinity of Hynes is Richard L. Andrews, a 
prosperous tiller of the soil, who is devoting his 
time and attention to general farming and dairy- 
ing. He was born June 10, 1869, i" Canada, 
which was likewise the place of birUi of his 
father, Joshua Andrews. 

Learning the trade of a blacksmith when 
young, Joshua Andrews followed his chosen oc- 
cupation in Canada for many years, being very 
successful. Aligrating with his family to Cali- 
fornia in i88r, he resided for two years in San 
Francisco. Coming from there to Los Angeles 
county, he followed blacksmithing a number of 
years, first in Downey, and later at Norwalk. 
Settling near Long Beach in 1895, he devoted 
himself to the growing of lemons for a number 
of seasons, but his fine lemon grove is now 
in the process of being sub-divided, and from 
the sale of lots he will realize a handsome in- 
come. He married Elizabeth D. Moat, a native 
of England, and of their four children three 
survive. Politically he is a sound Democrat, 
active in party ranks, and has served as road 
overseer. Fraternally he belongs to the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, and to the 
Knights of Pythias. His wife is a member of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

Receiving a limited education in the common 
schools of Canada, Richard L. Andrews came 




^. l4i. ^^/-o^. 



?I1ST0RICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



13l>l 



with the family to CaUfornia in 1881, and in 
1883 came with the others from San Francisco 
to Los Angeles county. Beginning to learn the 
trade of blacksmith in Downey, he worked with 
his father until about twenty years old, when he 
started in business on his own account in Nor- 
walk. He subsequently spent a year in Port- 
land, Ore., but on his return continued in busi- 
ness for himself in Norwalk for a year or more. 
Changing his occupation then, he rented a part 
of the Bixby ranch, which he managed about five 
years meeting with excellent results in his opera- 
tions. Thus encouraged, he bought, in Novem- 
ber, 1897, his present tine ranch of one hundred 
acres, near Hynes, and as a general farmer has 
since been exceedingly prosperous. He raises 
good crops of corn and alfalfa and also carries 
on a large and profitable dairy business, keep- 
ing about thirty cows. 

In October, 1895, Mr. Andrews married Maria 
E. Harris, who was born in Texas, a daughter 
of William Harris, a native of Missouri. Mr. 
and Mrs. Andrews are the parents of four chil- 
dren, namely : Mabel I., Gertrude L., Richard J. 
and Susie E. In national politics ]\Ir. Andrews 
is a straightforward Democrat, but in local af- 
fairs he votes independent of party lines, consid- 
ering the fitness of the man for the office for 
which he is nominated. 



CHARLES M. GIFFORD. Conspicuous 
among the industries contributing to the material 
development of San Diego may be mentioned 
the olive oil factory and pickling and canning 
factory established by Mr. Gilford in this city 
upon a very small scale in 1900, the original 
plant being- limited to an equipment for the 
pickling of olives. In 1903 an olive canning 
plant was added for the canning of the largest 
olives grown in the state, known as GiiTord's 
Best. At the present writing (1906) a factory 
is under process of construction providing a 
larger capacity than was previously possible. The 
new brick structure is looxioo feet in dimensions 
and two stories in height, provided with engines 
of suitable power and with all the equipment 
necessary for the proper management of the 
business upon the extensive scale now estab- 
lished. Competent judges claim that the factory, 
when completed, will be the finest in the state 
for the purposes desired, and alreadv the repu- 
tation of the plant has become so widely known 
that shipments are m^ade from points as far 
distant as Stockton and the San Joaquin valley. 

The Gif^'ords are an old eastern family. Hiram 
Gifford was a contractor and builder in New 
York and later in Pennsylvania and his son. 
Frank, a native of the former state, learned 
under him the carpenter"? trade, in all of its 



details, afterward following the occupation at 
Northeast, Erie county, Pa., but eventually re- 
moving to Illinois to spend his last days. The 
wife of Frank Gifford bore the maiden name 
of Kate Linnian and was born in New York, 
but now resides in Los Angeles. Through her 
father, Peter, the lineage is traced back to John 
Linnian, a native of Denmark. The genealogy 
of the family shows a direct descent from Mar- 
tin Luther. In the family of Frank Gififord 
there were five children, only two of whom are 
now living. During die Civil war the father 
enlisted in a Pennsylvania regiment and his four 
brothers also fought for the defense of the 
L'liion. 

The next to the eldest among the five chil- 
dren, Charles M. Gii?ord, was born at North- 
east, Erie county. Pa., May 7, 1856, and re- 
ceived common school advantages. At the age 
of fourteen he removed from Pennsylvania to 
Ohio and settled on a farm near Cleveland. 
When twenty years of age he went to Cheboy- 
gan, ]\Iich., from which point he and his 
brother, D. F., ran the steam yacht Katie for 
two years. On selling the yacht they built the 
tug Gifford and for ten years carried on busi- 
ness with the same, selling out in 1886. The 
following year the Gififord was lost in the Straits 
of Mackinaw. During 1886 Mr. Gifford made 
his first trip to California and, being favorably 
impressed with San Diego county, he removed 
hither a year later, settling on a ranch eighteen 
miles east of San Diego. On the land he planted 
an orange grove and an olive orchard, securing 
the necessary irrigation facilities from a spring. 
Later he bought one hundred and one acres ad- 
joining. Twenty acres of the property were 
in an orchard, while the balance was devoted 
to general farm pursuits. While engaged in 
horticultural and farm pursuits Mr. Gifford's at- 
tention was directed to the fact that the olive 
business presented a new and profitable field 
for investment, and accordingly he began to de- 
vote himself to the same, with such success that 
in the fall of 1895 he sold the ranch in order that 
he might give his time exclusively to business 
affairs. 

The marriage of ]\Ir. Gififord took place in 
Cheboygan,- Mich., and united him with Miss 
Rachel \\'lieeIock, a native of that city. They 
have three children, DeWitt, Ruth and'Orville. 
the eldest of whom now assists his father in the 
factorv. Mrs. Gifford is a member of the Christ- 
ian Giurch and the family are contributors to 
its work and missionary activities. Politically 
Mr. Gifford votes with the Republican party, 
but takes no sjjccial part in local politics and 
has never been a candidate for office. The San 
Diego Chamber of Commerce is one of the pro- 
gressive bodies whose work he upholds bv his 



1322 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



membership and influence. After coming to 
San Diego he was initiated into Sunset Lodge, 
I. O. O. F., of which he is past grand. Later 
he became connected with the Encampment (of 
which he is past chief patriarch) the Canton and 
the Rebekahs, to which latter organization his 
wife also belongs. In preparation for the Grand 
Encampment of 1905, held in San Diego, he was 
appointed a member of the executive committee 
having in charge the plans for the gathering. 
Those in attendance were enthusiastic in their 
tributes to the excellent management and sa- 
gacious ability displayed by those having the 
work of preparation in charge, and the conven- 
tion undoubtedly did much to direct the atten- 
tion of visitors from other points to the superior 
advantages offered by San Diego as a city of 
homes and a center of refinement and culture. 



WILLIAM ANDREW. Tliere is always a 
peculiar interest attached to the history of any of 
those residents of the L^nited States who have 
come here from a foreign land, and more partic- 
ularly of those who have settled in that part of 
it with which we are most familiar. This is es- 
peciallv true of William Andrew, of San Diego, 
who has had a varied experience during his active 
career, and has been associated with the actual 
life of three continents. A son of John Andrew, 
he was born October 24, 1858, in the highlands 
of Scotland, his birth occurring in Wick, Caith- 
ness county, where, among its rugged hills and 
mountains, he grew to sturdy manhood. His 
father, a farmer by occupation, spent his entire 
life in Wick, and his mother, whose maiden name 
was Elizabeth St. Clair, was also a life-long 
resident of Scotland. They were the parents of 
ten children, all of whom are living, William, the 
subject of this sketch, and Daniel being the only 
ones in California. 

At the age of fifteen years, having obtained a 
practical common school education. William An- 
drew began learning the carpenter's trade in 
Wick, and two years later went to Edinburgh, 
where he completed it. In the meantime he at- 
tended the night schools of that city, further 
fitting himself for his chosen occupation by tak- 
ing a course in drawing and architecture. In 
1878, making a bold venture, he sailed from 
Glasgow, Scotland, for New Zealand, going b\- 
way of the Cape of Good Hope, and after a voy- 
age of four months and five days arrived at 
Dunedin. For two years he followed his trade in 
that vicinity, after which he enlisted in Company 
5, Seventh Regiment, New Zealand Field Force, 
in which for three years he fought the Maoris. 
On being mustered out of service he left that 
country, going around Cape Horn to Rio Jan- 
eiro, Brazil, where he was employed in carpen- 



tering for three months. Not at all pleased with 
that city he returned to Great Britain and after 
working for a short time in England went to 
Scotland, where he assisted in the construction 
of the immense bridge across the Firth of Forth, 
being foreman of a gang of men for fifteen 
months. Immigrating to the United States in 
1886, he followed his trade in Philadelphia for 
two years, and from 1888 until 1901 was em- 
ployed as a contractor and builder in Qiicago, 
111. In 1901 he spent a short time in Louisville, 
Ky., but not satisfied with his prospects returned 
to Chicago. In October, 1902, he came to San 
Diego, and has since been very successfully em- 
ployed as a contractor and builder, he and his 
brother Daniel, under the firm name of Andrew 
Brothers, having had charge of the erection of 
many of the finest residences in the city. The 
development of his native mechanical skill and 
artistic ability, combined with his practical ex- 
perience, has given Mr. Andrew a complete mas- 
tery of his trade, and he has obtained recognition 
as one of the leading contractors and carpenters 
of this part of the county. 

In Glasgow, Scotland, jMr. Andrew married 
Alexandria Henderson, a native of that city. She 
died in San Diego, leaving four children, namely : 
Jessie, George, Arthur and Esther. Mr. Andrew 
is active in rhe business circles of San Diego, 
belonging to the Qiamber of Commerce, and to 
the Master Builders' Association. Politically he 
is a steadfast Republican ; fraternally he is a 
member of the Knights of Pythias, and religiously 
he is a Presbvterian. 



JOHN D. FARLEY. From the time of his 
arrival in San Diego county when he was a lad in 
his "teens" until the present time, when he ranks 
among the energetic farmers and stock raisers in 
the vicinity of Romona, Mr. Farley has borne his 
share in the agricultural development of his dis- 
trict and has maintained his position as an hon- 
orable and high-minded citizen. The family of 
w'hich he is a member belonged to the pioneer 
citizenship of the Mississippi valley and his par- 
ents. Andrew and Susan E. ( Finch ) Farley, were 
natives of Jeft'erson county. 111., being residents 
of Burlington, Iowa, for some years after their 
marriage. While making that city their home 
John D. Farley was born into their family circle 
July 20. 1857. and he was a boy of eleven years 
when the then long journey was made, to the 
shores of the western sea. From 1868 until 1872 
the family had their headquarters near Petal- 
uma. .Sonoma county, where the father engaged 
in raising stock and carrxing on a dairy business, 
but in 1872 he brought the family to San Diego 
county and bought a claim at Otay. Six months 
later he removed to Tia Tuana, this count\', and 




^-^'p^'n^i^ u^ ^^j-^UupC^..a-»^^ 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1325 



-,n i88f) lie made a final removal to Descanso, 
where he died in March of the following year, at 
the age of fifty-seven years. Since his demise 
the wife and motlicr has removed to Ramona, 
where she is now living at the age of seventy- 
four years. 

Accompanying his parents in their various re- 
movals, John D. Farley assisted his father in farm 
duties and proved an efficient helper in the de- 
velopment of ranch land. Upon the death of his 
father he took charge of the home place and con- 
tinued to operate the same until 1901, when he 
sold his interest in the property and removed to 
a farm near Ramona belonging to his sister, the 
widow of George M. Stone. Having never mar- 
ried, he finds a pleasant home with his sister, 
while she, in turn, has the advantage of his 
intelligent supervision of the land. The farm 
comprises about four hundred acres and was 
purchased many years ago by George M. Stone, 
a native of JNIichigan, but from early manhood a 
resident of San Diego county, where he married 
Miss Farley at Tia Juana. His death occurred 
March 8, 1900, and there remained to mourn his 
loss a large circle of warm friends, besides his 
wife and their only child, Violet Pearl. The 
daughter is now a student in the Ramona high 
school. The farm is advantageously situated in 
close proximity to Ramona and its value is en- 
hanced by the fact that gem mining is being 
conducted on it with excellent prospects of pay- 
ing results. The mine is known as the Surprise 
and has yielded white and blue topaz, pink 
beryl, hyacinth and tourmaline. In political views 
Mr'. Farley has sympathized from youth with the 
principles of the Republican party and has always 
given stanch support to its candidates. The only 
fraternal organization with which he holds mem- 
bership in Court Xo. 28, American Order of 
Foresters, at San Diego. 



JOHN BACON JUDSON. The founder 
of the Judson family in the new world was 
William Judson, who accompanied by three 
sons came from England in 1634 and estab- 
lished a home in the wilds of Connecticut. 
Some of that name bore a part in the early 
wars with the Indians, and they" were also 
identified with the original settlement of 
Woodbury. Conn., where at dififerent times 
two hundred and seventy-six representatives 
of the family made their home. From that 
vicinity Lemon Jud.son removed to ^''ermont 
about 1780 in early manhood and afterward 
made his home in that state. During the war 
of 1812 he enlisted in the service of his coun- 
try and rose to the rank of major. Next in 
line of descent was Lemon. Jr., a native of 
Chittenden countv, Vt.. where he met and 



married Philena Bacon, daughter of Lieut. 
John liacon, an officer of cavalry in the war 
"of 1812, and a granddaughter of Capt. John 
Bacon, who was born in 1735 and had the 
honor of establishing the first iron foundry 
in the state of Vermont. When the Revolu- 
tionary war began Captain Bacon was ap- 
pointed to lead a company of Vermont sol- 
diers and he remained in their command until 
he fell on the battlefield ot Bennington. 

After having engaged in the tannery, shoe 
and harness business in Canada for eight 
years. Lemon Judson, Jr., accompanied by his 
family, removed to Indiana in 1840 and set- 
tled upon a tract of raw land -which he devel- 
oped into an improved farm. As early as 
1856 he came to California and settled on a 
farm in Sonoma county, but eventually re- 
moved to the San Pasqual valley in San Diego 
county; he died in 1891, at the age of eighty- 
four years. His wife was born in Chitten- 
den county. \'t., in iRog. and died some years 
prior to his demise. Of their twelve chil- 
dren five are now living, namely : Homer, who 
makes his home near \\'liittier, Los .\ngelcs 
county; ?*lrs. Sarah Wilcox, residing at Tus- 
tin. Orange county ; Mrs. Lucy Campbell, of 
San Francisco ; Frank, who is now at Gold- 
field, Nev. ; and John Bacon, who w-as born in 
Chittenden county, Vt.. November 23, 1829, 
and now makes his home in San Diego, prac- 
tically retired from lieaAy business cares. 

When eleven }-ears of age John Bacon Jud- 
son accompanied his parents from Canada to 
Indiana, where he attended country schools. 
Later he studied in the schools of Ypsilanti. 
Mich., and then taught school in northern In- 
diana until 1852. when he crossed the plains 
with teams. For a time he worked in the 
mines near the old town of Shasta and from 
there went to Hangtown. where he remained 
from January, 1853. until the 4th of July, 1854. 
.\t the latter date he removed to Sonoma 
county and bought land, where he engaged in 
farming. About twent}" busy yeans were 
passed in tliat county, at the expiration of 
which time, in 1875, he sold out and removed 
to San Diego county, settling upon a ranch 
of one thousand acres in San Pasqual valley, 
where, he erected buildings as needed and 
made other improvements. The land has since 
been given to his children, and he resides in 
.San Diego, where he owns a spacious and 
comfortable home. However, much of his 
time is still spent on the ranch with his chil- 
dren, for he is more deeply interested in their 
success than in his own comfort. No one has 
done more than he to advance farming in- 
terests in .San Diego county. His efforts, con- 
tinued through n long period of vears, were 



1326 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



helpful to the cause of agriculture in this lo- 
cality, proving what could be accomplished 
by men of energ>% judgment and resource- 
fulness. A man of high honor as well as busi- 
ness ability, he is respected by acquaintances 
and esteemed by associates. 

The first marriage of Mr. Judson was sol- 
emnized in Bloomfield, Sonoma county, Cal., 
in October, 1859, and united him with Rebec- 
ca, daughter of James Pettit, originally of Elk- 
hart county, Ind. ^Irs. Rebecca Judson died 
in January, 1900, at the age of fifty-nine 
years, and two years later Mr. Judson was 
united with Mrs. Ida B. Latta. His children, 
eight in number, Avere born of his first mar- 
riage, and are named as follows: Charles and 
Helen, both of whom died at two years of age ; 
Elizabeth, who m.arried Frederick H. Rob- 
erts, represented on another page ; Andrew, of 
ihe San Pasqual valley, who married Mary 
Boyle of Illinois and has three children ; Ered 
E., who married Lillian Paris, a native of 
Virginia, and has two children; Newton, who 
married Harriet Frazier ; May, who died at 
three years of age : and Herbert, who mar- 
ried Dr. Sophia Johnson and has one child. 

Politically a Republican, Mr. Judson al- 
ways has sunk politics beneath his consider- 
ation for the welfare of county, state and na- 
tion. For some time he served as school 
trustee and from 1891 to 1895 he represented 
the fourth district of San Diego county as a 
member of the county board of supervisors. 
Since coming to San Diego county he has ren- 
dered helpful service in the interests of the 
stock business, having been among the first 
to introduce thoroughbred registered Durham 
cattle in the count}-. Later he brought in 
some fine registered Jerseys. In addition, he 
was the first man to use a cream separator. 
He established the first creamery in San 
Diego county and this he owned and operated 
until IQ03. when he sold out, the plant being 
taken by a co-operative company. The first 
barb wire ever brought into San Pasqual val- 
ley or San Diego county was ordered by him. 
and he paid twenty-five cents a pound for it 
in San Francisco, besides paying the freight 
from there to his ranch. Another helpful con- 
tribution to the agricultural interests of the 
community was his sowing of alfalfa, and he 
was the first farmer to sow this important 
product anywhere in San Diego county. Since 
then the raising of alfalfa has transformed 
the dairy business and has become one of 
the most 'important industries of the countv. 
Hundreds of acres are now in alfalfa where 
before the land lay unprofitable and unculti- 
vated: and three hundred separators are now 
in use in the countv. where he was the firsi 



to purchase such a device, so that in . more 
than one respect he has been most helpful to 
the agricultural development of the county and 
is deserving of a high place as a benefactor 
of the agriculturists in this part of the state. 



WILLIAM ALBERT EACHES. A fund 
of energy, ability and resource was the capi- 
tal with which William A. Eaches came to 
California in 1891, at the age of twenty-five, 
and undertook the upbuilding of his personal 
fortunes, while at the same time he gave his 
best efforts toward the material development 
of the community in which he has made his 
home for over fifteen years. During this 
time his name has been associated with a num- 
ber of enterprises, in Pomona, where he lo- 
cated in that year, but it is perhaps as pro- 
prietor of the Opera stables that he is best 
known, having purchased the stock and equip- 
ment of the former owner. F. H. Merrill, in 
1905. 

A native of Missouri, Mr. Eaches was born 
in St. Louis, on the corner of Thirty-first and 
Pine streets, August 30, 1866, and on both 
sides of the family is directly descended from 
good old Virginia stock. The grandfather on 
the paternal side. Dr. A\'illiam Albert Eaches, 
was an able and distinguished medical prac- 
titioner in St. Louis. ;\[o., whither he located 
after his graduation from the medical col- 
lege in Washington, D. C. His entire profes- 
sional life was spent in the former cit}-, and 
his death removed from that community one 
of its stalwart citizens. His son, D. A., was 
born in old Virginia, but as he removed to 
St. Louis while he was still quite young he 
was practically reared there. For many years 
lie filled the capacity of cit}- weigher of St. 
Louis, in fact he held this position until he 
retired from business altogether, spending his 
last years in retirement. During young man- 
hood he chose as his life companion Miss 
Amanda Quisenberr}-, who like himself was 
a native of old Virginia. Her father, Hon. 
James Quisenberr}' of that commonwealth, 
removed to the frontier of Missouri and be- 
came a pioneer farmer in the vicinity of the 
present city of St. Louis, where in later years 
he became well known in legislative circles, 
representing his district in the state legisla- 
ture. His strong mental characteristics were 
borne out in his physically strong make-up, 
being extremely tall and capable of great 
physical endurance. ]\Irs. Eaches is still liv- 
ing, and makes her home in St. Louis, a spot 
dear to her through the associations of many 
years. both of her girlhood years and of her 
later married life. 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



132 



\\'illiam A. E.aches was the youngest of the 
two children born to his parents and was tlie 
only son. As his parents were well able to 
give him a good education he passed from 
the public to the high school, acquitting him- 
self creditably in each, and thereafter was 
permitted to complete his education in a pri- 
vate school. As has been previously intimat- 
ed, he remained at home until reaching his 
twenty-fifth year, when, in 1891, he left par- 
ents and friends and started for the west to 
make a start in the business world. Coming 
direct to Pomona in that year he entered the 
employ of A. I. Stewart, a general contractor 
in the building of streets, and remained with 
this employer for about five years. Subse- 
quently he became interested in freighting be- 
tween Pomona and Los Angeles, making two 
trips per week with his eight-horse team and 
trailers, an undertaking which was remuner- 
ative until the building of the San Pedro, Los 
Angeles and Salt Lake Railroad. It was this 
change in his plans that led him into the liv- 
ery business, purchasing the Opera stables 
from F. H. Merrill in 1905. He has since con- 
tinued the business in the same quarters. No. 
245 West Third street, which is a large, com- 
modious brick structure, giving ample capac- 
ity for his boarding and sales stables. Be- 
sides the usual equipment of fine horses and 
vehicles, he has a number of tally-ho coaches 
used for pleasure trips to the mountains, one 
of these coaches having a seating capacity for 
fourteen passengers. He also runs a stage 
between Pomona and Claremont, making three 
trips a day. 

^Ir. Eaches is a Democrat, and as an earn- 
est and broad-minded citizen gives his sup- 
port to all movements and enterprises best 
calculated to advance the general welfare. 
This characteristic is emphatically borne out 
by his membership and valuable assistance in 
two of the town's most active organizations, 
t the Board of Trade and the Business Men's 

Association. 



BENJAMIN FRANKLIN FAl LOR. What 
is known as Summit ranch, in the Garapatos 
canyon, sixteen miles north of Santa Monica, 
has been the home of Mr. Failor for the past 
thiiteen years, he having located here in 1894 
in the hope of recovering his health. Too 
close application to the profession of law was 
the beginning of his physical break-down, and 
thereafter he followed teaching, mining and 
contracting and building in the order named, 
in the hope that he would not be compelled 
to give lip work entirely, but in this he was 
disappointed, and in the }-ear mentioned he 



relinquished his business interests in Los An- 
geles and removed to the higher altitude in 
the Garapatos canyon. Here he not only en- 
joys excellent health, but from a financial 
point of view is meeting with splendid suc- 
cess as an apairist, having about one hundred 
stands of bees. 

A native of Ohio, Mr. Failor was born in 
Upper Sandusky September 24, 1853, ^"^ """ 
til he was twelve years of age was reared and 
educated under the training of his father, 
whose death in 1865 left him an orphan. He 
was then taken into the home of his uncle, 
Major B. M. Failor, who was also his guar- 
dian, and who had recently served as a sur- 
geon in the Civil war. Going to Jasper coun- 
ty, Iowa, with his uncle, he there attended a 
private academy for about six years, when, at 
the age of eighteen, he was enrolled as a pupil 
in Wittenberg College at Springfield, Ohio, 
remaining there for three years. After one 
year in a private school in Iowa he began the 
study of law in the Iowa LTniversity, complet- 
ing his legal training m a private law office 
in Newton, Iowa. His admission to the bar 
occurred in 1876, and the same year he be- 
gan to practice in Newton, later going to Stew- 
art, that state, and remaining there about two 
3'ears. Relinquishing his practice in 1879 he 
came west and for a time engaged in pros- 
pecting and mining in Montana, Idaho and 
British Columbia, interspersing this work with 
teaching, for which he had a special liking and 
aptitude. When he was sixteen years of age 
he received a teacher's certificate and for 
some time he had charge of a school in Iowa. 
His identification with California dates from 
the year 1884, at which time he located in San 
Francisco and for about a year engaged in 
contracting and building there. Transferring 
his interests to Los Angeles at the end of that 
time he there continued contracting until the 
partial failure of his health in 1894 made it 
necessary for him to discontinue the business. 
Thereupon he came to the Garapatos canyon 
in search of a desirable spot for a country 
home, and the squatter's right which he then 
bought formed the nucleus of his present 
ranch of two hundred and seventy-six acres. 

While the year 1884 is memorable as mark- 
ing Mr. Failor's introduction to the Golden 
state, it is even better remembered as the year 
of his marriage, for on January 14 of that 
}-ear he was united with Mary A. Carroll, 
who though born in Sacramento was reared 
in Washington. The only fraternal order to 
which Mr. Failor belongs is the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, being a member of 
Semi Tropic Lodge No. 371, of Los Angeles. 
^^.'hilo in college he joined the Greek letter 



1328 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



society known as Beta I'heta Pi, and has since 
retained his interest in the order, though not 
an active member. While nominally he might 
be called a Democrat, he yet retains the privi- 
lege to vote as he sees fit. JNIr. Failor is ap- 
preciated for his many sterling qualities of 
heart and mind, his unfailing good nature and 
general interest in all things that tend to- 
ward the betterment of his fellowmen. 



ALLEN RUSSELL. No state of our great 
Lnion alTords greater opportunities to the poor 
man than California, as here an industrious, 
frugal man has an excellent opportunity to ac- 
cumulate wealth. It is true that many fail to 
do so. but the best of our population lay by 
some of their earnings, make wise investments, 
and soon find themselves, through their own 
strenuous efiforts, in the possession of a hand- 
some property. Conspicuous among this num- 
ber is Allen Russell, familiarly known as "Budd" 
Russell, who has been in truth the architect of 
his own fortunes, and is now one of the leading 
agriculturists of Fallbrook, where he is well 
known and very popular. A son of Joseph T. 
Russell, he was born, October ii, 1854, in Bu- 
chanan county. Mo. 

A native of Tennessee, Joseph T. Russell was 
a pioneer settler of Missouri, and while yet a 
young man cleared and improved a farm from 
the wilderness. In 1866, before the days of rail- 
roads, he went to Dallas, Tex., where he pur- 
chased cattle that he drove back to ]\Iissouri, and 
was subsequently there employed in general 
farming and stock-raising until his death, while 
yet in manhood's prime. He was born Augtist 
14, 1829, and died May 4, 1869, being in the 
fortieth year of his age. December 5, 1850, in 
Missouri, he married Mary E. Russell, who was 
born in North Carolina, February 7, 1835, and 
died at Clearwater, Kans., October 29, 1899. 
He was the youngest of a family of nine chil- 
dren, of whom but one,. Elijah Russell, of 
Miami county, Kans., is living. The latter is 
now a venerable man of over four score years. Of 
the eighteen children born to Joseph T. and Mary 
E. Russell fifteen are living, a large and note- 
worthy family. 

The earh' educational advantages of Allen Rus- 
sell were limited to a brief attendance at a pri- 
vate school, and at the age of sixteen years he 
became a cowboy in Texas. After spending five 
years in that occupation he returned to Missouri, 
and for about a year and a half was employed 
as a tiller of the soil in Buchanan county, the 
ensuing two years being similarly engaged in 
Holt county. ' Removing from there to Miami 
county, Kans., he remained there until 1886, 
when he came to Fallbrook, Cal, where he car- 



ried on general farming about four years. Not 
quite satisfied with the result of his labors, he 
went back to Kansas, purchased land in Miami 
county, and after farming there two years dis- 
posed of his interests in that section and re- 
moved with his family to Oklahoma county, 
Okla., where he purchased a claim, on which he 
resided two years. 

June 9, 1895, Mr. Russell started for Cali- 
fornia overland. Leaving Oklahoma City, he 
came with a train composed of five wagons 
drawn by horses, in the party being Mr. Russell, 
wife and six children; his brother, Lee Russell, 
and his wife ; and A. J. Russell, wife and four 
children. Following the southern panhandle 
route, the little band passed through Texas, 
thence by way of White Oaks to F'ort Sumner, 
where they camped a number of days. Contin- 
uing along the trail to Fort Craig, the river at 
that point being too high to cross, the party 
had to go up stream one hundred and fifty miles 
to get on the other side, and return to Fort 
Craig. From there, by way of Mule Gap and 
Hudson Hot Springs, they crossed the Colorado 
at Yuma, thence by way of Palm Springs and 
Banning they came to San Diego county, arriv- 
ing in Fallbrook after a long but pleasant trip, 
the California line having been crossed on Octo- 
ber 27. At once taking up the independent oc- 
cupation to which he was reared, Mr. Russell 
has been very fortunate in all of his undertak- 
ings, and has attained a noteworthy position 
among the most prosperous and most intelligent 
farmers of Southern California. Arriving here 
without pecuniary resources of any kind, he has 
labored perseveringly, conquering all obstacles, 
in his square and just dealings with all men ob- 
taining a fine reputation for honesty and worth, 
his word being considered as good as his bond 
at any time. 

October 16, 1881, in Miami county, Kans., 
]\[r. Russell married Mary A. Chilson, and of 
their union nine children have been born, name- 
ly : Joseph Oliver, who is married and lives at 
Pomona ; Hartwell Cook ; Myra, who is the wife 
of Ernest Hiller, and lives on the home ranch ; 
Dollie, attending the high school : i\Iary R., at- 
tending the district school ; Esther E., also a 
school girl: Candace Lee: Allen George: and 
Alice Treat. Politically Mr. Russell is a stanch 
Democrat; fraternally he belongs to Fallbrook 
Lodge No. 317, F. & A. M., and to Fallbrook 
Lodge No. 339, I. O. O. F. ; and is a supporter 
of church work. 



CHARI-ES JNIANVEG. The influences 
which tended to mold the character of Charles 
Manveg in early boyhood were such as clus- 
tered around the province of Alsace-Lorraine, 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RF.CORD. 



1331 



while it was still a French dependency. He was 
born February 24, 1861, to the marriage of 
Emil and Mary Manveg, who like their son 
were natives of France. Both of the parents 
are now deceased. 

The public schools of his native locality sup- 
plied all of the book learning which fell to the 
lot of Mr. Manveg to enjoy and formed the sub- 
stantial foundation for the later knowledge 
gained by extensive travel. The restless spirit 
of adventure and craving for life upon the high 
seas, took possession of him when was litttle 
more than a child in years, for he was only ten 
years old when he boarded a vessel in France, 
bound for New York City. Although he land- 
ed in that metropolis with the ship's crew, the 
voyage on the outgoing ship was awaited with 
keen interest, and from 1871 until 1882 he was 
on the water continuously, anchoring at many 
of the largest seaports in the world. In the year 
first mentioned he landed in the harbor of San 
Pedro, Cal., but at that time was not sufficiently 
attracted by its appearance to give up the sea 
for the life of a landsman, although after eleven 
years of sea-faring he again came to San Pedro, 
in 1882, and until 1901 was engaged as seaman 
on the wharves. In the mean time, from 1890 
to 1892, he was interested in seal-fishing, an oc- 
cupation which took him into Alaska and other 
Arctic countries. From San Pedro he came to 
Wilmington in 1901, carrying on a saloon here 
for about four years, or until embarking in the 
real-estate business April i, 1905. He has be- 
come the owner of considerable property, both 
improved and vacant, in the dis]X)sition of which 
he is meeting with the success which his energy 
deserves. He is also interested in mining prop- 
erty near Mexecala, ^Mexico, Lower California. 
in 1894, in San Pedro, Mr. Manveg was mar- 
ried to Catherine Gangnear, who was also born 
in France, and three children have come to 
bless their home, Amele. May and Qiarles, Jr. 
Fraternally Air. Alanveg belongs to the Ancient 
Order of United Workmen, holding member- 
ship in the lodge at Gardiner, Ore., and also be- 
longs to the Eagles at San Pedro, being one of 
the charter members of the latter order. Since 
becoming of age Mr. IManveg has studied the 
principles of the two great political Iwdies to 
satisfy himself as to their respective merits, and 
the fact that he now supports the Democratic 
part\- shows the result of his investigation. 



JOHN ROBERT JOHNSON. An enterpris- 
ing, wide-aw^ake rancher of San Diego county, 
near Wvnola, is John Robert Johnson, who is a 
native son of the state, having been born in 
Contra Costa county. The father, who also bore 
the name of John R., was a native of England. 



and from the time he was quite a small boy dis- 
played a predilection for sea-faring, finally be- 
coming a full-fledged sailor. This life brought 
him in contact with people from all over the world 
and enabled him to keep himself informed on all 
current happenings. Probably none of the re- 
ports which came to him from other countries 
was as alluring as that resulting from the dis- 
covery of gold in California. Suffice it to say 
that the year 1849 found him in the state bus- 
ily engaged in delving for the hidden treasure. 
In addition to mining he later took up cabinet- 
making, a calling which appealed to him more 
strongly perhaps than mining, for he was of a 
mechanical turn of mind. He died in San Luis 
Obispo in 1894, at the age of sixty-six years. 
His marriage was celebrated in California and 
united him with Miss Antonia Troll. She was 
born in Germany in March, 1834, and was christ- 
ened in the Roman Catholic Church in Baden. 
She has no personal recollection of her native 
land, having been brought to this country when 
only one year old. At the age of seventy-tliree 
}-ears she is in the enjoyment of good health 
and makes her home with her son, J. R., in San 
Diego county. By her first union six children 
were bom and by her second marriage, with the 
late Robert Reed, four daughters were born. 

Born in Contra Costa county. Cal., May 9, 
1856, J. Robert Johnson can recall the removal , 
of the family to San Liiis Obispo county in 1861, 
an event which the child of six years enjoyed to 
the fullest extent. Going to Los Angeles county 
six vears later he became a pupil in the common 
school of Downey, and the period which he 
spent in this temple of learning represented his 
entire school life. Reading and observation in 
later years, however, have given him a broad and 
comprehensive knowledge, and all who know 
him either in a business or social way unite in 
praise of his breadth of mind, steadfast principles 
of honor and uniform courtesy towards all. He 
first came to San Diego county in 1873, and until 
1874 had charge of the store at Warners ranch, 
on the Julian road. In the latter year he became 
interested in mining in Mesa Grande, and was 
later similarly occupied at Julian, and although 
the miner's life is more or less subject to danger, 
he was fortunate in escaping any serious injury. 
It was in 1902 that he settled down perma- 
nentlv to the life of the agriculturist, purchasing 
his present ranch of four hundred acres which 
forms one of the representative enterprises in 
this part of the state. The raising of stock and 
growing of grain form his chief source of income, 
although his orchard of ten acres also yields 
abundantly, and what is raised over and above 
that used for home consumption is readily dis- 
posed of at good prices. 

I^nlike his father, who was a Democrat in hi? 



1332 



HISTORICAL AXD BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



political belief, ]\lr. Johnson is a Republican, and 
in him his party has a stanch ally. His interest 
in fraternal affairs is shown by his membership 
in San Diego Lodge No. 153. I. O. O. F.. and 
Court Julian Banner No. 8522, A. 0. F.. at 
Julian. Mr. Johnson possesses in a large degree 
those sterling and reliable traits which are bound 
to win appreciation in any community, and his 
success and enterprise are matters of no ordinary 
pride with his many friends and associates. 



EDMUND F. BO^^'EN. It is a fact of gen- 
eral recognition among the people of the little 
town of Ramona that Mr. Bowen has accom- 
plished much in behalf of commercial, educa- 
tional and civic progress and has given freely 
of his time toward the development of move- 
ments for the general welfare. While busily 
engaged in the management of his meat mar- 
ket, the supervision of his large stock ranch 
and the charge of his slaughter-house, he finds 
leisure to aid any measure helpful to the peo- 
ple and has maintained an especial interest in 
educational afifains. For six years he held of- 
fice as trustee of the grammar school and at 
this writing is one of the high school trustees, 
in which capacity lie has proved efficient, 
prompt, intelligent and resourceful. Another 
movement which commands his time is that 
of the public library and he is now acting as 
a member of the library board of trustees, be- 
sides which he is one of the town trustees. 

A native of Wisconsin, Ijorn in Creen C(iun- 
ty, on the 4th of July. 1850, Edmund F. Bow- 
en is a son of Jared and Lucy Ann ( Fleek) 
Bowen, natives respectively of Pennsylvania 
and Virginia. As early as 1S44 his father be- 
came a pioneer of the then wilderness of A\^is- 
consin, where he was among the first settlers 
-of Green countj^ and took up a tract of raw 
land from the government. All of the arduous 
labors of pioneer existence fell to his lot. but 
gradually he brought the land under cultiva- 
tion and was in a position to enjoy the labors 
of a lifetime of agricultural activity. On the 
old homestead he remained until his death, 
which occurred in 1886, at the age of sixty- 
four years. He is survived by his wife, who 
makes her home at Broadhead, Green county, 
and remains physically robust for one who has 
reached the age of eighty-one y^ears. 

The country schools of Green county af- 
forded Edmund F. Bowen fair advantages and 
he attended the same at such times as he 
could be spared from farm work at home. On 
starting out for himself he entered the occupa- 
tion in which he had been reared and settled 
near the old homestead in Green county, re- 
maining in that localit}- until 1891, when he 



removed to California and established himself 
in San Diego county. Soon after his arrival 
he took up a homestead near Mesa Grande 
and later added to tlie tract by various pur- 
chases, until no^v he is .the owner -of a stock 
ranch of nine hundred acres. The land is suit- 
able for pasturage and therefore meets the 
needs of one desiring to keep constantly on 
hand a supply of young and growing stock 
for the later demands of the market. 

.^ome years before leaving Wisconsin Mr. 
Bowen established a home of his own through 
his marriage to Jennie Stanton, a native "of 
Indiana, who became his wife at Broadhead, 
AVis., October 5, 1887. and has since minis- 
tered to his comforts with housewifely skill. 
Ever since girlhood she has been interested in 
religious activities and has attended services 
at the Congregational Church and contributed 
to the work of that denomination. The family 
consists of two children, namely : ]\Iax. who 
was born December 15. 1888: and A'erne. who 
was born }.lav 6. i8qo. 



CHARLES L. HOLLIDAY. One of ihe 
large land operators and ranchmen of the county 
of San Diego is ^Ir. Holliday. whose identifica- 
tion with this region began a number of years 
ago and has continued prosperously up to the 
present time. At his present home in the San 
Pasqual valley he leased and occupies a ranch 
comprising six hundred and fifty acres of land 
adapted to the grazing of stock, besides which he 
has a farm of one thousand acres near Lajolla. 
Both farms are devoted to the raising of cattle, 
horses and hogs, and on his home ranch he en- 
gages in the dairy business, milking about thirty 
cows and selling the product in the local markets. 
While he is an exceedingly busv man. he yet 
finds leisure to keep in touch with national is- 
sues and county affairs, and few men in his 
community are better ]iosted than he nor are 
lliere many more fond of good literature as the 
sine qua non of mental development. 

During the residence at Rock Island, 111., of 
J. L. and Anna (Baker) 'Holliday, natives of 
Indiana, their son. Charles L.. was born Feb- 
ruary 9, 1871, and he was a boy of seven years 
when the family came to California, settling at 
Byron, Contra Costa county. For many years 
the father engaged in tlie stock business in that 
portion of the state, but in 1895 he came to San 
Diego county, where now he makes his home at 
Lajolla. Supplementarv to a common school ed- 
ucation Charles L. Holliday was sent to the 
Normal Institute and Business College at Stock- 
ton, and upon leaving school he took up agri- 
cultural pursuits in Linn county. Ore., where 
he remained for five years busily engaged in the 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1333 



\ 



routine work of farm life. At the expiration of 
that time he removed to San Diego county and es- 
tablished himself on a stock ranch at Lajolla, 
where he still retains interests, although for some 
years he has made his home in the San Pasqual 
valley. The demands made upon him in the dis- 
charge of his duties as a stock raiser and large 
landed operator leave him little leisure for parti- 
cipation in politics, in which, indeed, he takes no 
part aside from voting the Democratic ticket. 
His pleasant home is brightened by his two chil- 
dren, Charles L., Jr., and Laura M., and blessed 
by the presence of a devoted wife and mother. 
Mrs. Holliday was formerly JNIarion M. Thresher 
and was bom in Chicago, 111., but at an early age 
came to California and at the time of her mar- 
riage, in July of 1898, was making her home in 
San Diego, where she has a large number of 
warm personal friends. 



I 



THOMAS BELL. The Bell family has been 
established in Los Angeles county since 1858, 
when W. C. Bell crossed the plains to California 
and on the 20th of October of that year arrived 
in El Monte, where the name has since become 
prominent in agricultural circles as well as in 
the general upbuilding of the community. W. C. 
Bell was born in Washington county, Pa.. Sep- 
tember 17, 1S32, the second in a family of five 
sons and two daughters, of whom five are now 
surviving. His father, William Bell, was also a 
native of Pennsylvania, who in 1850 removed to 
Richland county, III, where he engaged as a 
farmer and millwright. His wife was in maiden- 
hood, Jane Caldwell, also a native of Pennsyl- 
vania. W. C. Bell was reared in his native state 
until he was fifteen years old, when he came as 
far west as Ohio, where in Concord, he learned 
the trade of shoemaker. It was in 1852 that he 
first started to California, taking passage on the 
old steamer Saluda, which blew up at Lexington, 
whence he walked to Independence and thence 
to St. Louis. He then went to Clinton, III, and 
followed his trade, and subsequently was vari- 
ously located until 1857, when he went to Texas, 
thence the following year to California by the 
southern route. He was a member of the train 
commanded bv Captain Coffee. Upon his arrival 
in El Monte he engaged in freighting to Arizona 
by the Owens river, and continued this occupa- 
tion for fifteen years, after which he located 
permanently in the El Monte district and en- 
gaged in farming. He is now retired from active 
cares and makes his home in El Monte. He has 
held various public positions, among tliem that 
of road overseer under Martin two years, and 
under Cook four years. He was married in El 
Monte in the spring of 1839 to Mrs. Rebecca 
Ann (Fears) Cundifif, a native of Clinton, 111., 



who came to California in 1858 across the plains 
and died in El Monte in 1901. They became 
the parents of the following children : Thomas, 
of this review ; Charles AL, in Arizona ; John, in 
Los Angeles; Susie, wife of George Wandling, 
of Los Angeles, and Annie, Mrs. Baker, of Ocean 
Park. 

Thomas Bell was born in El Monte October 
5, 1859, and in this place was reared to young 
manhood, receiving his educational training in the 
public schools of the place. Upon attaining ma- 
turity he engaged in general farming for himself, 
leasing the old Temple place, where he conducted 
a dairy farm, having four hundred acres of pas- 
ture land and from twenty-five to thirty head of 
milch cows. He met with success and accumu- 
lated sufficient means to enable him to purchase 
his present property, which consists of twentv 
acres located two and a half miles south of El 
Monte, which he cleared from tules and willows, 
and this peet land he now rents for gardening 
purposes. He continued his dairy enterprises 
until 1904, when he sold out and built a resi- 
dence in El Monte, put out walnut trees and 
otherwise improved his property. He is enter- 
prising and progressive, seeking to upbuild the 
general interests of the community, while he at 
the same time carves out his own fortunes. Fra- 
ternally he is identified with Lexington Lodge 
No. 104, F. & A. M.. and politically is a stanch 
adherent of Democratic principles. 



HENRY C. BEASLEY. Fidelity to duty may 
be attributed as the keynote to the success which 
has always followed the efiforts of Mr. Beasley. 
formerly as a stationary engineer, and latterly 
as a rancher in ^'entura county. The six hun- 
dred acres over which he has control forms a 
part of what is known locally as the Las Posos 
.grant, and in the cultivation of the same Mr. 
Beasley is interested especially in the raising of 
beets, beans and barley. 

A native of the state in which he has made 
his life-long home, Mr. Beasley was born in 
Mendocino county, Cal., and is a son of David 
T. and :\[artha Polly Bea.sley, natives of New 
York and i\lassachusetts respectively. Both of 
the parents settled in the Golden state during 
the days of its early history, and before the dawn 
of the present prosperous conditions which ex- 
ist throughout the length and breadth of the 
state, the father was called hence, his death oc- 
curring at the age of seventy years. By trade he 
was a blacksmith. He was a man who took con- 
siderable interest in the aflfairs of life, a fact 
which was demonostrated nowhere no more 
strongly perhaps than in the ]\Iasonic Lodge of 
which he was a member. His widow is still liv- 
ing, at a .good old age, making her home in 



i;!;j4 



mSTURleWL AXD BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Texas. Throughout her life she has been an ac- 
tive member of the jNIethodist Episcopal Church. 

Born January 6, 1862, ]\Ir. Beasley was a lad 
of ten years when, in 1872, he became associated 
with affairs in Ventura county. An inborn love 
for things of a mechanical nature became appar- 
ent at an early age, and the first opportunity 
which he found for giving vent to his ambition 
in this direction was running the engine of a 
threshing machine. He later had charge of an 
engine in a starch factory, also ran engines which 
propelled machinery used for boring wells, and 
altogether his experience as a traction engineer 
covered over seventeen years. About 1895 his 
interest turned toward agriculture, and an ex- 
perience in the employ of others for twelve years 
gave him the knowledge and assurance necessary 
for managing an undertaking on his own account, 
which was followed by his assuming control of 
his present property. 

In 1892 H. C. Beasley was united in marriage 
with Tennie Glenn, a daughter of Joseph and 
jNIary (Crowns) Glenn, and who was born in 
Kern county in 1864. Like his father Mr. Beas- 
ley takes considerable interest in fraternal mat- 
ters, belonging to Oxnard Lodge No. 361, F. 
& A. M., and to Lodge No. iiooo, M. W. A. 
at Somis. Politically he is interested in what- 
ever affects the Republican party, and his vote 
may always be depended upon to support its 
candidates. Personally he is a broad-minded, 
progressive citizen, thoroughly believing that 
what is worth doing at all is worth doing well, 
a belief which has had practical demonstration in 
whatever he has attempted. 



E. SMITH. Standing prominent among the 
active, intelligent and progressive agriculturists 
of San Diego county is E. Smith, a successful 
rancher and fruit-grower of Lakeside. His 
small but valuable ranch is pleasantly located, 
and is well improved, everything about the prem- 
ises indicating the thrift, industry and keen judg- 
ment of its owner. A son of M. Smith, he was 
born, March 30, 1870, in Mexico, where he re- 
ceived an excellent education. 

A Mexican born and reared, M. Smith was 
engaged in agricultural pursuits in Mexico dur- 
ing the earlier years of his life, and was quite 
successful. Coming with his family to Califor- 
nia in 1888, he lived for a year in San Diego, 
and then settled on the famous Canado De Los 
Cochis ranch, one of the noted Spanish ranchos, 
which he managed for five years. Settling then 
in this valley, he purchased his present ranch 
of ten acres, and has since been extensively en- 
gaged in the growing of raisins, in addition rais- 
ing some grain. He has met with good re- 



sults in his undertakings, becoming one of the 
leading agriculturists and vineyardists of this 
locality, and one of the most respected citizens, 
being known far and wide for his generosity and 
benevolence. Mr. and Mrs. Smith were married, 
in Mexico, and are the parents of three children, 
two sons and a daughter. 

Coming with the family to Southern California 
in 1888, E. Smith assisted his father in his agri- 
cultural labors, while thus employed on the 
Canado De Los Cochis ranch obtaining a 
thorough knowledge of the leading branches of 
agriculture and horticulture. In 1892 he bought 
his present ranch of five acres, situated in Lake- 
side, and in its improvement has taken much 
pride and pleasure, by his industry and ju- 
dicious labor bringing it to a high state of 
cultivation. 

i\Ir. Smith's first wife, to whom he was mar- 
ried in 1892, died leaving five children, Marcel, 
Lomez. Pas, Aurora and Edward. In 1905 he 
married for his second wife Candelaria Martinez, 
who was born and educated in California. Polit- 
ically Mr. Smith is an Independent voter, and 
religiously he is a member of the Catholic 
Church. 



ROBERT HOLMES MACLAY. Occupying 
an assured position among the thriving agri- 
culturists and highly esteemed citizens of 
Fernando is Robert Holmes Maclay, who :s held 
in high estimation throughout the community as 
a man of undoubted integrity and sterling worth. 
A native of California, he was born October 27, 
1857, in Santa Clara county, a son of the late 
Senator Charles Maclay, of whom a brief sketch 
mav be found elsewhere in this volume. 

Completing his early education in the public 
schools of his native county, Robert H. Maclay 
remained at home until 1874, when he came with 
his parents to Fernando. At once embarking in 
agricultural pursuits, he settled not far from 
the village, where he now owns a well cultivated 
ranch of fifty-seven acres, from which he derives 
a good yearly income. He has likewise valuable 
property in the village, his residence being one 
of the most attractive on Hagar street. Enter- 
prising and active, he has met with financial suc- 
cess in his various business transactions, and is 
in all respects one of the solid men of his com- 
munity. 

In Fernando, ^Ir. Maclay married Jennie 
Beale. a native of Oregon, and thev have one 
child, a daughter named Mary. Politically Mr. 
Maclav is an earnest Republican, and religiously 
both lie and his wife attend the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church, and are liberal contributors to- 
wards its support. 




fl^L^y-^^^-'-^^^ JtiAiX^, 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHIC.\L RECORD. 



1337 



HIRAA'I KEYES. Numbered among the 
veteran agriculturists of San Diego county who 
have achieved success in their independent occu- 
pation is Hiram Keyes of Ramona, who has made 
farming his life work, and having acquired a 
competency is now living free from business ac- 
tivity and care. Intelligent and well-informed, the 
possessor of excellent judgment and sound sense, 
he is ably performing his duty as a faithful cit- 
izen, and is everywhere respected. A native of 
Ohio, he was born December 5, 1832, in Morgan 
county, of good old New England stock. His 
father, Phineas C. Keyes, a native of iNIaine, 
learned the tanner's trade when young, and for 
many years carried on a successful business in 
Morgan county, Ohio. He was a man of strong- 
individuality, a noted abolitionist, and a valued 
member of the Presbyterian Church. He married 
Mary Gould, who was born in Massachusetts, 
and they became the parents of eig'ht children, six 
of whom have passed to the life beyond, one 
daughter, Mary G. Benedict, a resident of Kan- 
sas, and Hiram, the subject of this sketch, being 
the only survivors. 

Brought up in Ohio, Hiram Keyes attended the 
common schools of Morgan county, after which 
he attended a high school in Washington county, 
his early education being completed by an at- 
tendance of one term at Oberlin College. Re- 
turning home from the latter institution, he 
taught school a few years, in the mean time 
assisting his father in the tan yard whenever he 
was at leisure. In 1855, while Kansas was yet 
a territory, he there took up a pre-emption claim 
of one hundred and sixty acres of land and en- 
gaged in farming. In 1856 he took part in the 
Border Ruffian war, serving under "Jim" Lane, 
In 1861, when the Civil war broke out, he en- 
listed in Company K, Eleventh Kansas Volun- 
teer Infantry, and served under command of 
General Blount for three years, when he re- 
ceived his honorable discharge from the army. 
Returning then to his Kansas home, he resumed 
his labors as a tiller of the soil, remaining there 
twenty or more years. Coming to California in 
1886 he located first in San Diego, and was after- 
wards engaged in ranching near Julian, after 
which he lived at Banner one year. He subse- 
quently located a homestead claim to one hun- 
dred and sixty acres of land at Eagles Nest re- 
sort, near Warner Hot Springs, where he resided 
a number of years. About 1900 he purchased 
a ten-acre ranch in Ramona, and having improved 
it, is now living here retired, enjoying a well- 
earned leisure. 

In 1858 Mr. Keyes married Lucinda C. 
Hovey, who was born in Washington county, 
Ohio, July 23, 1838, a daughter of Harvey Qark 
Hovey, the latter a son of William Hovey, an 
officer in the Revolutionarv armv. Eleven child- 



ren were born to Mr. and jNlrs. Keyes, namely: 
Charles, who died in infancy ; George C, of 
Pasadena ; Harvey Stanley and Phineas Stanton, 
twins, who died in infancy ; Clara, a teacher in 
Manila, Philippine Islands; Mattie, who died at 
the age of twenty-three years ; Mrs. Charlotte 
Janeway of Ramona : Edwin E., a lawyer in 
Berkeley ; Lucile, wife of Henry A. Hanigan, first 
lieutenant in a United States regiment in the 
Philippine Islands ; Hiram, who died in childhood 
and Minnie, who died in infanc}-. Politicallv Mr. 
Keyes is a straightforward Republican, and 
religiously he is a member of the Congregational 
Church. He served as justice of the peace while 
living near Warner, and while in San Diego was 
a member of the Grand Army of the Republic 
For his services during the Civil war he receives 
a pension. 



EDWARD C. COOMER. In her young men 
is a country's hope, and when by honesty and in- 
dustrious personal effort a man of but twenty- 
six years becomes as prosperous and successful 
as is E. C. Coomer, they are also her pride. Mr. 
Coomer is of southern parentage, his father. 
Thomas Coomer, having been born in Kentucky 
and his mother belonging to a Virginia family. 
Thomas Coomer served four years in the Union 
army during the Civil war, having enlisted in 
Company I, of the Twenty-seventh Illinois Vol- 
unteer Infantry, and had the honor of serving on 
General Sheridan's staff. His was not idle camp 
service, but the forward firing line was his favor- 
ite post an.d he carries the scars of four wounds 
received in battle. He is now an honored mem- 
ber of the Grand Army of the Republic in the 
Carpinteria Post, for both he and his wife are 
now living in the Carpinteria valley, they having 
moved here with their son in igoi. Fraternally 
he affiliates with the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows lodge. 

Edward C. Coomer was born in Edgar county, 
111., February 15, 1880. His parents moved to 
Canada when he was quite small, then went back 
to Michigan when he was five years old. After 
remaining there for five years they next made 
their home in Tennessee, where Mr. Coomer re- 
ceived a common-school education. This he sup- 
plemented with a commercial course, specializing 
on shorthand, and for two years after his gradua- 
tion he did stenographic reporting. Later he ac- 
cepted a position near Covington, Ky., where he 
had charcre of coke ovens and also acted as in- 
spector. This work did not agree with him, how- 
ever, and his health requiring a change of climate 
he came with his parents to California. After lo- 
cating in the state he purchased eighteen acres of 
land in Arroyo Grande, San Luis Obispo county, 
but has since disposed of it and now has a fine 



];;;j8 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ranch of twenty acres near Carpinteria which he 
has improved, thirteen acres being planted to wal- 
nut trees. 

In 1903 Mr. Coomer was united in marriage 
with !Miss ^lay B. Fowler, a native daughter of 
California. Politically he is a stanch Republican 
and is prominent in all matters of interest in the 
upbuilding of the community in which he resides. 
He enjoys the good will and esteem of a host of 
friends and acquaintances, who value him as one 
of their leading citizens. 



CHARLES WALTER SAMERS. Among 
the industrious, far-sighted and prosperous farm- 
ers of Oxnard, C. W. Savie'rs is worthy of spe- 
cial mention. Starting in life with no other 
endowments than strong hands, a willing heart, 
and the elements of character essential to noble 
manhood, a brief review- of his life affords a 
good illustration of the exercise of perseverance 
and resolution under the pressure of financial 
disaster as well as amid the sunshine of pros- 
perity. He has labored with untiring energy 
and zeal to establish a home for himself and 
family, and is now the owner of a ranch which, 
with its appurtenances, is one of the best and 
most attractive in his neighborhood, bearing visi- 
ble evidence of the intelligence and ability of 
the owner. A son of the late J. Y. Saviers. he 
was born, November 11, 1866, in Yuba City, 
Sutter county, Cal.. but has spent the larger 
part of his life in Ventura county. 

A native of Ohio, J. Y. Saviers was a tiller 
of the soil from early life until his death. In 
1850 he came to California, following the trail 
of the gold seekers, but was not fortunate enough 
as a miner to accumulate any amount of the 
glittering mineral. Returning therefore, by way 
of the Isthmus, to Ohio, he remained there for 
a number of years, working as a farmer. In 
i860, however, he concluded to again try his 
luck in the extreme west, and as captain of a 
train came with ox-teams across the plains. He 
had no special trouble on the trip, but after 
his arrival in California was wounded in a 
scrimmage with the Indians. Locating in Ven- 
tura county, he resumed his agricultural labors, 
continuing as a rancher until his death, which 
occurred in Oxnard. in February, 1904, at the 
advanced age of eighty-one vears. He married 
Elizabeth Jones, who was born in Ohio, and 
died, in 1867, in California, leaving four chil- 
dren, three sons, all of whom reside in this state, 
and a daughter, who is now living in Bell coun- 
ty. Tex. 

Left motherless in infancy, Charles W. Saviers 
was brought to ^^entura county when but eigh- 
teen months old. and was here brought up 
and educated. As early as practicable, he was 



initiated by his father into the mysteries of farm- 
ing, and proved a most faithful worker, remain- 
ing on the home farm until twenty-one years of 
age. Starting then for himself, he worked for 
wages for awhile in Ventura county, after which 
he spent four years in Taylor county, Tex., 
where he had a brief and rather disastrous ca- 
reer as a general farmer. Returning to this 
county, he was again a wage earner for three 
years. Accumulating some capital, he again be- 
gan life for himself on rented land, and in its 
management was quite successful. In 1902 he 
purchased his present ranch of one hundred and 
sixty acres, and has since carried on an exten- 
sive and lucrative business as a grower of beets 
and beans, two of the staple crops of this sec- 
tion of the state. In addition to this he leases 
seven hundred and fifty acres of land, which he 
devotes almost entirely to the raising of barley, 
harvesting on an average from fifteen to twenty 
sacks, of eighty-two and one-half pounds each, 
to the acre. As a general farmer, he has been 
fortunate, and as a stock raiser, on a moderate 
scale, is meeting with success. 

Mr. Saviers' marriage united him with Lot- 
tie M. Eggleston, who was born in Iowa, of New 
England stock, her Grandfather Eggleston hav- 
ing been a native of Massachusetts. Her par- 
ents were married in San Francisco, but after- 
wards removed to Iowa. ]\Ir. and ]\Irs. Saviers 
are the parents of three children. Walter J., Roy 
A. and Annie. Mr. Saviers is a stanch Repub- 
lican in politics, and is now serving as school 
trustee. 



ELI_ MILTON HADDOX. Liberal and en- 
terprising, throughout his residence in the vicin- 
ity of El Mcnte Mr. Haddox has won a place 
among the representative citizens who may al- 
w-ays be counted upon to uphold public interest 
and public honor. He is a native of Hancock 
count)', Ohio, and was born in the vicinity of 
Findlay, February 14, 1853. His grandfather 
William Haddox, was a pioneer of Ohio, having 
immigrated from Virginia with his family at an 
early date in the history of the middle west. Hi^ 
father, Eli Haddox was born in Virginia and 
reared in Ohio, where the family located in 1802. 
By trade he was a wagon maker, but in man- 
hood he followed farming, remaining a resident 
of Ohio until his death. He married Elizabeth 
Oliver, a native of Virginia, who settled in Ohio 
with her parents. They had ten children, four 
of whom are living, the youngest being Eli Mil- 
ton Haddox. 

Reared in Ohio, Eli M. Haddox received his 
education in the public schools, remaining at home 
until twenty years old, when he became depend- 
ent upon his own resources. He engaged in farm- 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1339 



ing for a livelihood, renting land at first and 
finally purchasing forty acres, upon which he 
continued his work. In 1882 he removed to Ne- 
braska and at Fort Kearney bought three hun- 
dred and twenty acres of railroad land, which he 
improved and cultivated for four years. Remov- 
ing to Stirling (now Buffalo county) he home- 
steaded one hundred and sixty acres of land and 
improved this property also. In 1900 he disposed 
of these interests and came to California and in 
El Monte engaged in farming, having in the 
meantime (1896) purchased forty acres from the 
Bassett property which was immediately set out 
in walnuts, a pumping plant installed in 1899 
with a ten-horse power engine, with a capacity 
of one hundred inches, this being the first pump- 
ing plant on the east side of the San Gabriel 
river. Twenty acres of his property has since 
been given over to the raising of apples, while 
the remainder is in walnuts and alfalfa. He car- 
ries on general farming on leased land in the 
neighborhood and is uniformly successful in his 
enterprises. He has improved his own property 
by the erection of a residence, barns and out- 
buildings, good fences, and every convenience 
that bespeaks the thrifty and successful farmer. 
In Putnam county, Ohio, October 3, 1875, Mr. 
Haddox married Miss Caroline Riter, a native of 
Findlay, that state, and the daughter of John 
M. Riter, an old settler of that section of Ohio. 
They are the parents of the following children : 
Eliza, Mrs. Gunnels, of Oxnard : Benjamin, in 
Los Angeles ; Jefiferson, of Oxnard ; James and 
Milton, of Los Angeles ; and the others at home, 
Peter, Cora, Wallace, Emmet, Goldie and Ar- 
nold. Mr. Haddox is a Republican on all na- 
tional issues, although locally he can always be 
counted upon to support the man best qualified 
for ofificial duties. Fraternally he is identified 
with the Odd Fellows and the Ancient Order of 
United Workmen. 



CHARLES RICHARDSON. A pioneer of 
California, and the son of a pioneer, Charles 
Richardson, living near Simi, \"entura county, 
has had a varied experience in life, meeting with 
fortunes and with misfortunes, but in the end 
overcoming all obstacles. When he came to this 
state the country was largely in its original wild- 
ness, game being abundant, and the Indians num- 
erous. There being no railways, transportation 
was with ox-teams chiefly, and the trading points 
were few and far between. Possessing a vast 
fund of historical information in regard to pio- 
neer days, and being an intelligent and interest- 
ing talker, with a good memor}-, Mr. Richard- 
son is a most entertaining conversationalist, and 
one whom it is a pleasure to meet He was born, 
August 27, 1836, in Warren county. Mo., be- 



ing one of the thirteen children of the late John 
Richardson, all of whom with the exception of 
two that died in Wisconsin came to California to 
reside. 

A native of New York state, John Richardson 
migrated to Missouri at an early day, and after 
spending some years in that state went to Wis- 
consin. From there lie came in i860 to the Pa- 
cific coast, crossing the plains with ox-teams, 
starting from Missouri in a train composed of 
eighteen families. While on the journey his old- 
est child suddenly disappeared, and it was three 
days before he was found, that incident being 
the only one to seriously mar the pleasure of the 
trip. He was a man of strong convictions, a 
Democrat in politics, and an old-school Baptist 
in religion. In Missouri he married Lucy 
Wright, who was born in Kentucky, and died 
at an advanced age in Ventura county, near Ox- 
nard, while his death occurred in Sutter county. 
He was a soldier in the war of 1812, and during 
his entire life was a loyal and faithful citizen, 
and instilled into the minds of his children the 
spirit of true patriotism. 

Accompanying his parents to Wisconsin in 
April, 1847, Charles Richardson was there edu- 
cated in the common schools of Grant county. 
Thirteen years later he came with the family to 
California, having a four months' trip across the 
plains in the train commanded by Captain Mc- 
Farland, and arriving in Shasta county April 
9, i860. He subsequently spent several months 
in Sacramento, from there going to the San Joa- 
quin valley, where he bought land and was en- 
gaged in ranching for two years, being in part- 
nership with his father and brother. Disposing 
of his interest in the land he continued his agri- 
cultural' operations alone, being first located in 
Sacramento, and then in Sutter county, where 
he resided eleven years. Selling out, he went to 
Santa Barbara in 1874, and was there for four- 
teen years, busily employed in tilling the soil. 
Again disposing of his land he moved to San 
Diego, bought land, and embarked in general 
farming, remaining there eleven years, when he 
had the misfortune to lose title to his ranch. 
Locating in Ventura county in 1900 he carried on 
farming on an extensive scale for three years 
on rented land, in his ventures succeeding well. 
In 1903 he purchased his present ranch, near 
Simi, and now has a highly improved farm of 
forty acres, which he devotes principally to the 
raising of fruit, having a large orchard of apri- 
cots and prunes, also making a specialty to some 
extent of raising chickens. 

In Wisconsin, in 1859, Mr. Richardson married 
Candace Burton, who was born in Warren county, 
Mo., being one of the ten children of Alsop and 
Lucy (Graves) Burton. Her father was born 
in ^^irginia, and died in Wisconsin, at the age 



1340 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



of fifty-seven years, and his wife, who was born 
in Kentucky, died in Missouri, aged sixty-seven 
years. Thirteen children blessed the union of 
Mr. and Mrs. Richardson : Lionel W., of Ven- 
tura county, married ]\Jary Rystrum, by whom 
he has seven children; Laura died in infancy; 
Letitia S., wife of Fay Colby, of Sonoma coun- 
ty, has five daughters ; Sarah M., wife of J. 
W. Lewis, of Camarillo, has five children; 
Charles W., of Sawtelle, married Florence Wil- 
son, and they have four children ; Ida C, wife of 
Lorenzo Jackson, of Sonoma county, has two 
children ; Lucy A. died at the age of nineteen 
years; Viola D., wife of Harry Wilson, of Saw- 
telle, has three children ; Lizzie, who married 
John Houston, died at the age of thirty years, 
leaving three children; Vesta B. is the wife of 
Robert Beardsley; and Thomas H., Roxie, qind 
Samuel C. are living at home. In his political 
relations Mr. Richardson is a strong- Democrat, 
and has served many terms as school trustee and 
as road overseer. Fraternally he is a member 
of Ventura Lodge No. 120, K. of P. 



JOHN R. DOIG, M. D. During his resi- 
dence in San Diego county, J. R. Doig, M. D., 
has become known as one of its able and skilful 
physicians and surgeons, and by his genial man- 
ners and kindly courtesy endears himself to all 
classes of people. Cultured and talented, his 
long-continued studies and his wide experience 
as a general practitioner have given him a thor- 
ough knowledge of the many branches of his 
profession and gained for him a place of promi- 
nence in medical circles. While devoted to his 
life work, the doctor takes great interest in the 
progressive movements of the day and his sym- 
pathies are as broad as humanity. The son of 
Prof. James R. Doig, he was born, March 8,. 1845, 
in Wa)'ne county, Ohio. 

A native of New York state, James R. Doig 
received excellent educational advantages, in 
early manhood being graduated from Union Col- 
lege'. Fitted for a professional career, he moved 
to Ohio after his marriage, and for several years 
held a chair in Franklin College, at New Athens, 
Harrison county. Going from there to Wash- 
ington. Washington county, Iowa. Professor Doig 
served as president of the college there until its 
destruction by a tornado in 1864. Removing then 
to Monmouth, III, he was for ten years professor 
of languages in Monmouth College, resigning the 
position on account of his advanced age. He 
subsequently lived retired at Vinton. Iowa, un- 
til his death, in 1885, at the age of seventy-three 
vears. He was a stanch Republican in politics, 
at all times being active in advancing the inter- 
ests of his party, and was a faithful member of 
the United Presbvterian Church. Professor 



Doig was twice married, first to Hannah Rankin, 
a native of Washington count}', Pa. She died 
at the age of twenty-seven years in 1850, leav- 
ing four children, one of whom is J. R. Doig, 
M. D., of this review. He married for his second 
wife Agnes Rankin, who was born in Pennsyl- 
vania, and of this union nine children, five sons 
and four daughters, were born. 

Removing with his parents to Iowa when a 
boy, J. R. Doig attended the college which his 
father established in Washington, there complet- 
ing his early education. During the progress of 
the Civil war, enthused by patriotic ardor, he en- 
listed in 1862 in the Nineteenth Iowa \'olunteer 
Infantry, from which he was later transferred to 
the medical department and in the fall of 1863 
he was discharged. Subsequently he re-enlisted 
in Company L, Second Iowa Cavalry, in which 
he served until the close of the war, being under 
General Hearn at first, and later under command 
of Gen. Edward Hatch. With his comrades he 
took an active part in many of the noted engage- 
ments of the period, including among others the 
battles at Vicksburg, Miss., and at Nashville. 
Tenn. After receiving his honorable discharge 
from the army he began the study of medicine, 
and in 1869 was graduated from the University 
of Iowa. Beginning the practice of his profes- 
sion, he met with success from the first. In 1884, 
desirous of further advancing his professional 
knowledge, he took a post-graduate course at 
the College of Physicians and Surgeons in Chi- 
cago, 111., while there making a special study of 
the diseases of women and children under the 
eminent specialist. Dr. J. Reeves Jackson. Re- 
turning then to Kansas, his former field of labor, 
he practiced in that state for two years, acquir- 
ing a fine reputation for skill and ability. In 
1886, on account of ill health, he was forced to 
seek a milder climate, and therefore came to San 
Diego, Cal.. where he remained for twelve years, 
building up a large practice in both medicine and 
surgery. Returning then to Kansas, he was for 
six years traveling surgeon for the LTnion Pacific 
Railroad Company, a good position which he had 
to resign on account of failing health, his old 
enemy, asthma, again attacking him. Coming 
to Ramona in 1905, Dr. Doig has here found re- 
lief from his physical troubles, and is so much 
improved in health that he has purchased prop- 
erty and intends to make this his future home. As 
a physician and surgeon he has built up a large 
and remunerative practice, and has gained to an 
eminent degree the confidence and good will of 
the community, his professional skill and ability 
being recognized and appreciated. 

In 1880 Dr. Doig married Nellie E. Seiver. 
a native of Muskegon, Mich., and they have one 
child. Ruth P.. a pupil in the San Diego Normal 
school. The doctor is a Republican in his polit- 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1343 



ical affiliations, and for a number of years served 
as pension examiner for the United States gov- 
ernment. Fraternally he is a member of Ells- 
worth (Kans.) Lodge No. 146, A. F. & A. M. ; 
of Ellsworth Chapter, R. A. j\[.; demitted from 
Ellsworth Commander)-, K. T. ; and is a mem- 
ber of Isis Temple (Salina, Kans.j, A. A. O. N. 
M. S. ; and of Ancient Order of United Work- 
men. He is also a member of the Grand Army 
of the Republic. 



PROF. JOHN HARVEY STRINE. Rank- 
ing as one of the foremost educators of Cali- 
fornia, Prof. John Harvey Strine has, during 
the twenty years of his active work in this 
field, given much valuable service both in the 
schoolroom and in an official position, for he 
served a term as superintendent of the Los 
Angeles county schools, during which time he 
greatly impro\ed the school system. Genera- 
tions ago the ancestors of Professor Strine 
immigrated to America and showed the value 
of the inheritance of the best blood of Eng- 
land, Holland and France by becoming active 
participants and leaders in the development of 
the new country. On both paternal and ma- 
ternal sides Professor Strine's grandparents 
were natives of Pennsylvania, the former hav- 
ing spent their entire lives in Franklin coun- 
ty and the latter in Lancaster county. Tlie 
family made a commendable reputation for 
patriotism during the Civil war. Peter Strine, 
a great-uncle, fought in the arm}' of the Po- 
tomac during the entire conflict ; Samuel G. 
Strine, an uncle, in the Eighty-third Illinois 
Regiment of the Army of the West, served 
throughout the war; Jacob Strine, another 
uncle, in 1861 enlisted for a term of nine 
months and at the expiration of that time re- 
enlisted for three years, and was killed at 
Petersburg just two days before the surren- 
der of Lee ; the third uncle. Jonathan G. Strine, 
who had also enlisted for three years, was 
shot in the head at Petersburg, the same bat- 
tle in which his brother's life was lost, and in 
spite of his wound is yet living, his home be- 
ing in the vicinity of Greencastle, Pa. 

On October 26, 1858, occurred the birth of 
John Harvey Strine, in Newbridge, Franklin 
county. Pa., he being a son of John and ^laria 
Catharine (Long) .Strine. tlie father having 
been born Februarv 28. 1829, in Franklin coun- 
ty. Pa., and the mother December 25, 1832. in 
Lancaster county, of the same state. The 
father died February 13, 1906, and those of the 
family now living besides John Harvey are 
his mother, his sister, A. ]\r. Strine, and his 
brother, D. L. Strine, all residents of Downey, 
Cal.. and A. T. Strine. of Los Angeles. 



John H. Strine's school days began at the 
early age of five years in Roxbury, Pa., and a 
}ear later, his father removing to ^lartins- 
burg, W. Va., where he conducted a brick- 
yard, he attended the common schools, and 
when he was twelve years of age he com- 
menced to work for his father during vaca- 
tions. The father also purchased a farm near 
Martinsburg, and when business was espe- 
cially brisk in the brickyard he left the man- 
agement of the farm to his sons. In 1877 the 
family removed to Missouri, after which John 
Harvey Strine, whose educational privileges 
until that time had been confined to the com- 
mon schools, entered the state university of 
Missouri. In 1882 he graduated from the 
teacher's course, having earned his expenses 
by teaching a part of the time. At the time 
of his graduation he also passed an examina- 
tion which entitled him to a life diploma as 
a teacher in JMissouri, and after his arrival in 
California he was given a similar certificate as 
a high-school instructor. He taught for a 
time in the district schools of Missouri, but 
soon arose to the position of principal of the 
Rolla public schools, and after filling it for 
two years, resigned in order to remove to Cali- 
fornia, he having been offered a position at 
the head of the Downe)^ schools. 

Professor Strine's arrival in Downey dates 
from July 30, 1887, at which time he assumed 
his duties in the schools, his first work being 
the grading of the pupils. His amljition was 
to have his school produce as high class work 
as any in the state, and within a short time 
the results of his efforts began to show, in a 
short time pupils from Downey being accepted 
in other higher schools without examination. 
During his residence in Downej^ Professor 
Strine has been a leader in many lines, his su- 
perior education, talents and position natural- 
ly giving him a prominent place in the com- 
munity. In Jul}', 1891, upon the re-organiza- 
tion of the Downev P>ank, he w^as unanimously 
elected a director by the stockholders and was 
immediately placed upon the auditing com- 
mittee. In i8qo he was appointed a member 
of the board of education of Los Angeles coun- 
ty, and in 1892 was made president of that 
body, being re-elected the following year. 

In Julv. 1893, Professor Strine was elected to 
the principalship of the IMonrovia Grammar and 
High schools, and continued in that position 
until 1899, when he resigned in order to en- 
ter upon his duties as superintendent of the 
county schools. In recognition of his efficient 
work in the interests of the schools of the 
county he was at the time of its organization, 
in T895. elected to the presidency of the Los 
Angeles Pedagogical Society and continued to 



i;j44 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



till that position, also, until his election as 
county superintendent. He was one of the 
most earnest and zealous incumbents of that 
office that the county has ever had, and the 
influence of his work and methods are still 
felt in the schools throughout the county. This 
was followed by two years of faithful service 
as -secretary of the California state text-book 
committee.' While it would be natural to ex- 
pect Professor Strine to find his greatest in- 
terest in matters educational, he has not con- 
fined his talents to those lines, but has been a 
moving influence in other matters of progres- 
sive interest to the community in which he 
lives. He is the possessor of considerable 
musical talent and was repeatedly made presi- 
dent of the Apollo Club of JNIonrovia, and also 
assisted materially in the organization of th'' 
INIonrovia Opera House Company, the chief 
purpose of Avhich was to provide a suitable 
hall for public assemblages, and the enterprise 
as carried out has been of untold benefit to the 
citv. During the past two years he has been 
organizing syndicates, which have been among 
the most successful in the state in quickly han- 
dling large tracts of valuable lands. He is a 
prominent Mason and is past master of Mon- 
rovia Lodge No. 308, F. & A. M. He always 
stands ready to aid any measure for the bene- 
fit of the people, whether from a religious, 
moral or educational point of view, and does 
not neglect any of the duties of an intelligent 
citizen. 



contains three hundred and eleven acres of land, 
most of which is tillable. The farm is well im- 
proved, having a fine residence and a good 
orchard, at one time selling for $75,000. Mr. 
Reed has now excellent prospects of becoming 
a mine owner and discovering on his estate gems 
or tourmaline, as on the ridge which passes 
through it mines have been opened, and bid fair 
to yield valuable minerals. 

in 1903 Mr. Reed married Dorothy Mufifley, 
who was born. in Grant county, Wis., and the 
home over which she so graciously presides is 
pleasant and attractive. Politically Mr. Reed is 
a stanch Republican, and fraternally he is a mem- 
ber of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows 
and of the Independent Order of Foresters. 



FRANK H. REED. Wide-awake, ambitious 
and enterprising, Frank H. Reed, of \'ista, is 
numbered among the younger generation of suc- 
cessful and prosperous agriculturists of San 
Diego county, and as a man of upright charac- 
ter and good principles is fast winning for him- 
self an enviable reputation in both the business 
and social affairs of his adopted home. A son 
of Dr. J. H. and Ella (Halbert) Reed, of Wis- 
consm, he was born, February 2, 1880, in Ne- 
braska, but was brought up in Grant county, 
Wis., where his parents settled when he was a 
small child. 

Immediately after his graduation from the 
high scliool, Frank H. Reed was obliged to leave 
home on account of ill health, the climate of 
Wisconsin being too severe for him. Coming to 
Southern California to recuperate, he spent three 
years at Redlands and Long Beach, inhaling the 
iife-giving air, each day feeling the beneficial in- 
fluences of the invigorating breezes from the Pa- 
cific. Turning his attention to agricultural pur- 
suits, he located in San Diego county in 1905, 
and at once assumed possession of his present 
property, known as the Edge Hill ranch, which 



CLAUDIUS OTIS DEMSEY. Early in the 
colonization of America the Demsey famih- came 
from Scotland to aid in the development of the 
new country. John M. Demsey, M. D., a son 
of the immigrant, was born in .Ohio, and there 
practiced his profession, later becoming a promi- 
nent physician of Decatur, 111., and serving as a 
surgeon in the Blackhawk and Mexican wars. 
The lady whom he married, !Miss Alary Duncan, 
M. D., was a graduate of a medical college in 
Edinburgh, Scotland, and possessed unusual en- 
dowments of mind and character. Under their 
influence it was natural that their son, C. F., a 
native of Akron, Ohio, should take up the study 
of materia medica, for which indeed he seemed 
to possess inherited talents. After having ac- 
companied the California Hundred to the west 
in 1858 and having gained further knowledge of 
the country and mankind through his service as 
a non-commissioned officer in the Second Massa- 
chusetts Cavalry during the Civil war, at the 
close of that historic struggle he entered Rush 
Medical College, took the complete course and 
subsequent to graduation practiced in Missouri 
and Decatur, 111. The year 1886 found him 
again in California, viewing with gratification 
the many improvements wrought by the passing 
years. For a time he practiced in San Fran- 
cisco and then removed to Mojave as surgeon 
of the Southern Pacific Railroad for that dis- 
trict, and since then he has remained in that 
town, engaged in the practice of medicine and 
in the oversight of his mining interests. The 
Republican party receives his support in all elec- 
tions, and fraternally he affiliates with the Grand 
Army of the Republic and the Independent Or- 
der of Odd Fellows. During early life he met 
and married Clarinda Gates, who was born in 
Ohio and died at Pasadena, Cal., in 1901 ; her 
father and two of her brothers served in the 
Union army during the Civil war. Her mother 
was a member of the Barrett familv. 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1347 



The older among two children and the only 
son in the family, Claudius Otis Demsey was 
born in Dayton, Cass county. Mo., JMarch i, 
1870. At an early age he displayed energy ot 
character and force of will. When ten he began 
to learn telegraphy and at the age of thirteen he 
was appointed night operator on the Pleoria, 
Decatur & Evansville Railroad at Warrensburg, 
111. The year 1886 found him in California, 
employed in the electrical department of the 
Southern Pacific Railroad at San Francisco. 
The example of his father, grandfather and 
grandmother led him to take up the study of 
medicine in 1888 in Rush INIedical College, but 
a course of lectures covering two years was suf- 
ficient to convince him that his talents did not 
lie in the direction of therapeutics, and he re- 
turned to the employ of the Southern Pacific 
Railroad Conipan_\- in San Francisco and Oak- 
land. In 1897 he married Miss lunma Solari. 
who was born and reared in \'entura, her father, 
Augustine Solari, a native of Zoagli, Italy, hav- 
ing been a representative of one of the oldest and 
most honored families of that county. 

After his marriage Mr. Demsey resigned from 
railroad work and went to the City of Mexico 
in the employ of Wells-Fargo Company, his 
work being the changing of rates at the adop- 
tion of the metric system. For such a responsi- 
bility his knowledge of the Spanish language 
admirably qualified him. At the expiration of 
six months he became an operator at Mojave 
and later was made train dispatcher at Bakers- 
field. At the latter town, with three others, he 
located three hundred and fifty acres of oil lands, 
which he later sold at a fair profit. In 1902 he 
came to Los Angeles as train dispatcher for the 
Coast Line at River station, but a year later re- 
signed the position, and in August, 1904. came 
to Redondo, where he and a partner purchased 
the grocery stock of Spradling & Lyon. Sep- 
tember II, 1905, he sold his interest to J. M. 
Qirisman, and in January, 1906, opened a 
grocery and bakery in the Bank building. Here 
he has the latest type of oven, with a capacity 
greater than that of any similar plant in the 
town. The entire equipment is modem and in- 
cludes a refrigerator and ice machine. Besides 
his other interests he owns stock in the People's 
Savings Bank and the First National Bank. 
With his wife and two sons. Raymond and Clem- 
ent, he occupies a comfortable home in Redondo 
and has manv friends in the town. Since com- 
ing to this place he has been a leading member 
of the Board of Trade and a local worker in the 
Republican party. Though he no longef- follows 
telegraphy, he is still an active member of the 
Order of Railway Telegraphers, and also affili- 
ates with Lodge No. 99. Benevolent Protective 
Order of Elks at Los Angeles, and is worthy 



past president of the Order of Eagles at 
Redondo. 



WILLIAM M. THOMAS. Among the 
active, progressive and substantial citizens of 
Long Beach, William M. Thomas occupies an 
assured position. As a street grader and con- 
tractor he has carried on an extensive busi- 
ness for a number of years, and to his skilful 
and S}-stematic work is the city largely in- 
debted for the excellent condition of its prin- 
cipal public thoroughfares. A son of J. E. 
Thomas, he was born, April 13, 1871, in Brown 
county, Kans. A native of Virginia, J. E. 
Thomas was reared to agricultural pursuits, 
and when a young man followed the march 
of civilization v.'estward, settling as a pioneer 
farmer in Brown county. Kans., where he was 
engaged in general farming for many years. 
Coming to California in 1892, he was first en- 
gaged in ranching in Santa Ana, but is now 
retired from active pursuits, having a pleas- 
ant home on Atlantic avenue. Long Beach. 
He married Lizzie Ramey, who was born in 
Virginia, and they became the parents of eight 
sons and two daughters, William M. being 
the eldest child. 

Brought up in Kansas, William M. Thomas 
left school when fifteen years of age, and from 
that time was self-supporting, working at any 
honorable employment. In February, 1890, 
before attaining his majority, he came to Cali- 
fornia, settling at Santa .\na. where he rent- 
ed an alfalfa ranch, which he managed suc- 
cessfully for about six years. In 1897 he lo- 
cated at Long Beach, and with the two teams 
that he brought with him established the Pio- 
neer Truck Company. Engaging at once in 
heavy hauling, street grading and contract- 
ing, he has built up a large and remunerative 
business, keeping now ten teams of his own 
constantly at work, besides having many 
more. When he located here there was but 
one street graded, and under his supervision 
almost all of the other streets and public high- 
ways have been constructed and graded. He 
has acquired some city property, and at the 
corner of Seventh street and Linden avenue 
has an attracti^'e residence, in which his ofifice 
is located. 

Mr. Thomas was first married in Whittier. 
Cal.. to Minnie Shank, who was born in Texas, 
and died at Long Beach. He married for his 
second wife, in Los Angeles. Cal.. Neva Crav- 
en, a native of Nebraska, and they have one 
son. William M., Jr. In his political affilia- 
tions AFr. Thomas is a strict Bepublican, ever 
Inyal 10 the interests of his party. 



13tt8 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



A. R. ROB BINS. In promoting- the devel- 
opment, growth and material prosperity of 
Ocean Park A. R. Robbins stands second to 
none, his influence being apparent in industrial, 
business and social lines, and to him belongs 
the distinction of having the original name of 
the town, South Santa Monica, changed to the 
name by which it is now known. A son of Chand- 
ler Robbins, he was born, October 30, 1859, in 
Aladison, Ind., of substantial Puritan ancestry. 
His grandfather, Chandler Robbins, Sr., was 
born and reared in Connecticut, and in early 
manhood went with Gen. Rufus Putnam to Ohio, 
settling on the Western Reserve with the New- 
England colony of brave pioneers. 

Chandler Robbins was born in Marietta, Ohio, 
March i, 1818, and died in Topeka, Kans., May 
I, 1885. A talented musician, he was in his 
earlier life a professor of music in some of the 
best known colleges of the east, and was after- 
wards for many years connected with W, W. 
Kimball & Co., music publishers in Chicago, 111. 
Subsequently reiuoving to southern Illinois, he 
was in business for himself in Cairo until 1877, 
when he went to Kansas, where he spent his re- 
maining years. 

But a }ear old when his parents located in 
Chicago, A. R. Robbins lived there until fifteen 
years old, receiving his elementary education in 
its public schools, and completing his studies in 
Cairo, 111., and in Kansas. Beginning life for 
himself as a merchant he was first located in In- 
dependence, Kans., and afterwards in Topeka. 
Retiring from mercantile pursuits after a brief 
experience, he entered the service of the Santa 
Fe Railroad Company, from 1885 until 1888 be- 
ing employed in the treasury department at To- 
peka, His health failing, he then went to Las 
Vegas, N. Mex., to recuperate, and was there 
claim clerk for the same company for two years. 
Being then appointed by President Harrison post- 
master of the city, he served for four years, be- 
ing well liked and prominent in the community. 
In the spring of 1894 he came to Los Angeles 
county and for three years, as agent of the Santa 
Fe Railroad Company, had charge of the upbuild- 
ing of South Santa i\Ionica, now called Ocean 
Park, Continuing with his em]3loyers, he was 
afterwards made oil inspector of the Fullerton 
oil wells, a position that he retained for some 
time. Going then into business on his own ac- 
count, he was engaged principally in promoting 
oil properties in the Puente district and in Ven- 
tura county, continuing until the boom abated. 
Returning to Ocean Park, he embarked in the 
real-estate business, helping to organize the 
Southern California Realty Company. Subse- 
quently selling his interests in that firm, he 
started the Robbins Realty Company (Inc.), of 
which he has since been elected president. This 



company is carrying on an extensive and sub- 
stantial business, its main office being located at 
No. 144 Pier avenue. Ocean Park, with branch 
offices at Santa Monca, \'enice, and at Shakes- 
peare Beach, all of these being places which 
have been largely developed through ^Ir, Rob- 
bins' forethought and good judgment of prop- 
erty values. 

In July, 1883, Mr, Robbins married Laura N. 
Rowe, and into their home five children have 
been born, namely: Gardner, Earl, Gilbert, Ber- 
tha and Vivian. Politically JNIr. Robbins is a 
Republican, and is now serving as Republican 
precinct committeeman and as notary public in 
Ocean Park. 



HENRY ALLGEYER, a rancher located a 
mile and a quarter from El Monte, Los An- 
geles county, was born in Rhineland, Mont- 
gomery county, Mo., March 25, 1875. The fam- 
ily is of German origin, and thfe grandfather, 
who was seven feet in height, served as body- 
guard to Kaiser '\\'ilhelm. The father, John B. 
Allgeyer, was born in Baden, Germany, where 
until 1868 he engaged in viticulture. In that 
year he immigrated to the United States and 
located in Missouri, there following a similar 
occupation in addition to general farming. 
Coming to California in 1881 he spent four 
months in Napa, after which he returned to 
Missouri and settled down to his old occupa- 
tion. Subsequently he again came to the state 
and located in Anaheim, Orange county, en- 
gaging as a vinej-ardist. A year later he Avent 
to Norwalk, Cal., and after spending another 
year in the state returned to his old home in 
Missouri. Two months later he concluded to 
locate permanently in California, and accord- 
ingly sold his property and in the fall of 1885 
brought his fam.ily to Norwalk. He remained 
in that location for three years engaged as a 
vineyardist, when, in 1888, he located in El 
Monte and purchased sixteen acres of new 
land, which he set out in walnuts and other- 
wise improved and cultivated until his retire- 
ment. His death occurred in this location No- 
vember 5, 1906. Ever since his location in the 
United States he had been deeply interested in 
its public afifairs and was a stanch Republican. 
His wife, Martina Mair, was also born in Ba- 
den, Germajiy : she survives her husband and 
still resides in this section, being now seventy- 
two years old. They were the parents of four- 
teen children, of whom seven grew to 3'ears of 
maturit)' and five are now living. 

The youngest of the children born to his 
jDarents. Henry Allgeyer was reared in Mis- 
souri until attaining the age of ten years, when 
lie was brought to California by his parents 




-^m^AxA. 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1351 



and here completed his education in the public 
schools. He remained at home and engaged in 
farming until 1900, when he purchased the 
home farm and continued its improvement and 
culti\'ation. He also purchased adjoining prop- 
erty until he now owns twenty-eight acres on 
the San Bernardino road, all in walnuts and 
ten acres of peet land, which he is engaged in 
farming. He has been successful in his work 
and at the same time takes a deep interest in 
all movements calculated to advance the gen- 
eral welfare, like his father supporting the Re- 
publican party and advancing its principles. He 
is one of the charter members of the Mountain 
View \\'alnut Growers' Association. In Ana- 
heim Mr. .Mlgeyer married j\liss Emily Martin, 
a native of Germany, and daughter of Ludwig 
Martin, who died in Anaheim. They have three 
children. Pearl, Albert and an infant daughter 
unnamed. 



WILLIAM H. NEHER. Though still a 
young man in the prime of life, Mr. Xeher 
has attained a success for which many give a 
lifetime of arduous effort. Eor some j^ears he 
has made his home on a ranch one mile south 
of Inglewood. Upon coming to this property 
in 1896 he bought five acres on the install- 
ment plan. Erom time to time he added to 
the original tract until he finally acquired 
ninety acres, but afterward he sold seventy- 
acres of the ranch at a gratifying advance on 
the first cost. Twenty acres are left in his pos- 
session, bearing modern improvements, in- 
cluding a neat residence. In the cultivation of 
the land Mr. Neher found the raising of pop- 
corn and Indian corn especially profitable and 
these he made his specialties. In the midst 
of his ranching operations he found leisure to 
invent and construct a corn harvester which is 
unique in that it will not only cut the corn, but 
also husk and shell the ears. At this writing he 
is devoting his attention to a number of impor- 
tant inventions and, in order to concentrate 
his thought upon their perfection, he has rent- 
ed his ranch and devotes himself exclusively 
to his patents. 

Near Salem, in the count}- of ^Marion. III., 
]Mr. Xeher was born October 21, 1872, being 
a son of John and Margaret (Beydler) Neher, 
natives of Indiana, and a grandson of Daniel 
Neher, who was a pioneer of Indiana, going 
there from Pennsylvania. Upon attaining 
man's estate John Neher left Indiana and set- 
tled in Illinois, where he improved a tract of 
land near Salem arid remained for a number of 
years. When Kansas was attracting settlers 
to its rich farm lands, he took his family to 
that state, and in 1889 came to California, set- 



tling at Lordsburg. Five xears later he re- 
moved to Texas, but e\entually settled in 
Oklahoma, and now, at sixty-three years of 
age, is making his home in that territory. 
During the residence of the family in Kansas 
his wife died at forty years of age. She was 
a daughter of an American family of German 
extraction and her parents were natives of 
Pennsylvania, removing from there to Indiana 
and securing government land in an early day. 

The children of pioneer families have few 
advantages for acquiring educations, and the 
early life of William H. Neher proved no ex- 
ception to this rule. It early became neces- 
sary for him to earn his own livelihood. Being 
ambitious by nature, he did not allow obsta- 
cles to discourage him, but at the age of six- 
teen years began to be self-supporting and 
worked his way through the college at Mc- 
Pherson, Kans. In 1890 he entered school at 
Lordsburg, Cal., where, as before, he paid his 
own way, earning a neat sum by teaching 
singing classes. Later he secured a teacher's 
grammar-grade certificate and for two years 
taught a country school in Riverside county, 
but in 1896 gave up that work and came to 
Inglewood, Los Angeles county, where he has 
since resided, engaging in ranch pursuits and 
in the perfection of various inventions. 

Mr. Neher has met with success with his 
inventions and has just perfected and put on 
the market a crude oil generator for use on 
any gasoline engine, the use of which reduces 
the cost of operation fifty to seventv-five per 
cent. The generator will be manufactured by 
Fairbanks-Morse of Los Angeles. During 
T906 he perfected a water system for irrigat- 
ing five hundred acres of land in his vicinity, 
by sinking two wells to a depth of two hun- 
dred and thirty and four hundred and eighteen 
feet, giving a flow of two iiundred inches, and 
by using his crude oil generator he lifts the 
w'ater one hundred feet at a cost of only thir- 
ty cents per hour, which is one-half of the for- 
mer cost. 

As the development of adecpiate water su]")- 
ply is made possible and the ability to distrib- 
ute the same at small cost becomes known 
ihere is reason to suppose that a demand for 
the Neher generator will grow as soon as the 
public at large are convinced of its merits. 

In politics Mr. Neher has been an ardent 
Republican ever since casting his first ballot 
and has been interested in the success of his 
party. Always active in school affairs, he 
has served efficiently as a school director and 
has maintained a warm interest in the educa- 
tion of the young. In 1895 he was united in 
marriage with TiTiss Lottie E. Elory, who was 
born in Grcclev. Colo., and has made Califor- 



1352 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



nia her home since girlhood. Four children 
were born of their union, namel)' : May E. 
and Maude E. (twins), Minerva Josephine 
and Virgil William. It is Mr. Neher's ambi- 
lion to give to his children the opportunities 
and advantages which he was denied, and the 
success he has achieved is especially gratify- 
ing to him, because it enables him to surround 
his family with every comfort and give his 
children the encouraging aid so helpful to 
their moral and educational development. 



GEORGE S. RAYCRAFT. Among the suc- 
cessful business men of Compton is George S. 
Raycr'aft, who has for many years been actively 
identified with the manufacturing interests of 
this locality as a harness-maker. A man of reso- 
lution and ambition, enterprising and self-re- 
liant, he has made his own way in the world, and 
in every sense implied by the term is a self- 
made man. He was born September 20, 1852, 
in Cleveland, Ohio, and at the age of eighteen 
months, his mother dying, he was placed in the 
]\Irs. Benjamin Ross Orphans' Home, in that 
city. He is of English ancestry, his father, Tim- 
othy Raycraft, having been born in Yorkshire, 
while his mother, a descendant of the House of 
Stuart, was born and reared in Lancashire. The 
father, a well-educated man, was a skilled me- 
chanic, a cabinet, maker by trade, and after com- 
ing to the United States was foreman for the 
Brooks Importing Company, in Cleveland, Ohio. 
At the age of twenty-one years he married, his 
bride being a girl of sixteen. After her death 
he went to the Black River mining regions. 

.\t the age of nine years George S. Raycraft 
made his escape from the home in which he had 
been placed, and from that time paddled his own 
canoe. He worked as opportunity offered, at- 
tended the common schools, subsequently, in 
Chicago, 111., earning enough money to pay his 
tuition for a year in Allen's Academy. Leav- 
ing Chicago, he went to Sterling, III, where he 
served an apprenticeship of three years at the 
harness-maker's trade, in the mean time making 
his home with Rev. Jerome T. Mason, a Bap- 
tist minister. Becoming familiar with his trade, 
he had charge of his employer's shop for some 
time. . Resigning his position in 1885, he made 
his way to California, and for a short time re- 
sided in Los Angeles. Coming from there to 
Compton. he was for eight months in the em- 
ploy of Charles Lyman, receiving a salary of $t8 
a week. In 1886 he started in business on his 
own account, and with the exception of a short 
time has since resided here. In his operations 
he has met with success, having built up a large 
and lucrative patronage, his reputation for hon- 



est, reliable work Ijeing known throughout this 
part of the county. 

In Los Angeles, Cal., December 25, 1887, 
Mr. Raycraft married for his first wife lanthea 
Rae, assistant principal in one of the public 
schools, the marriage ceremony being performed 
in the Methodist Episcopal parsonage by Rev. 
R. E. Moore. She was a daughter of Thomas 
Rae, who was born and reared in Maine, and 
is now a resident of Sonoma county, Cal. Eigh- 
teen months after their marriage, which was an 
especially happy one, Mrs. Raycraft died, leav- 
ing a babe of six months. This child, i^Iyron 
Leslie Raycraft, now a young man of eighteen 
years, is living with his maternal grandparents 
in Sonoma county. Mr. Raycraft married for 
his second wife, December 25, 1890, Bertha 
Voight, a daughter of David Voight, who was 
born in Berlin, Germany, and immigrated to 
America with his family, settling in Lake county, 
Cal, where he has since resided. From this 
wife ^Ir. Raycraft was divorced, and their only 
child, ^Marvel Addie, fourteen years old, lives 
with her mother in Lake county. In politics 
Mt. Raycraft casts his vote for the best men and 
measures, regardless of party restrictions. In 
1872, while living in Illinois, he joined the Odd 
Fellows, passed through all the chairs of his 
lodge, and three times served as state represen- 
tative. In 1895 he was made a member of 
Anchor Lodge No. 273, F. & A. M., of Comp- 
ton, of which he is now past master. 



JOHN M. WESTLUND. From Sweden have 
come some of the most loyal subjects of the 
United States, and wherever they may be located 
we find them among the most highly respected 
and successful citizens and business men. John 
M. Westlund, of Santa Paula, was born in 
Sweden April ig, 1870, and when only nine years 
old he was left motherless. There were six 
children in the parental family, only one of 
whom, the subject of this sketch, lives in Cali- 
fornia. The father immigrated to America and 
settled in Kansas, where he finally died, at the 
good old age of eighty-two years. John M. 
Westlund received his education in the common 
schools of Sweden and was fifteen years old 
when he came to the new world and joined his 
father in Kansas, where they engaged in farm- 
ing, and also worked on the ^lissouri Pacific 
Railroad. 

After three years' residence in Kansas, in 1888 
John M. Westlund, removed to A'entura county, 
Cal., and worked on the wharf at \^entura for 
three years. He was anxious to resume ranch- 
ing, however, and upon a ranch near Saticoy, he 
remained about thirteen years, after which he 
moved onto the place where he now resides. He 



HISTORTXAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1353 



carries on operations on a large scale, and be- 
sides cultivating the thirty-three acre ranch of 
walnuts which he owns, he rents a tract con- 
taining a hundred acres on which he has thirty 
acres of walnuts and seventy acres of beans. On 
another ranch of one hundred and forty acres 
he has twenty acres in walnuts and one hundred 
and twenty acres in beans. He has lived in his 
present home for eight years. 

In 1902 Mr. Westlund was united in marriage 
to Sarah Wilson, a native of Nebraska, and to 
them three children have been born: Francis, 
Mary and Carl. Both Mr. Westlund, who is a 
member of the Lutheran Church, and his wife, 
who belongs to the JNIethodist Episcopal Church, 
are deeply interested in religious matters and 
contribute liberally to the support of both de- 
nominations represented by their membership. 
Fraternally Mr. Westlund affiliates with the 
Foresters Lodge of Saticoy, and politically be- 
longs to the Republican party. 



JOSEPH EUGENE SHREWSBURY. The 
present efficiency of the fire department of Long 
Beach is in large measure due to the efforts of 
Chief Joseph E. Shrewsbury, with which de- 
partment of the city's activity he has been con- 
nected since May 27, 1902. At the same time he 
has built up for himself a position of prominence 
among the business men of this city, being as- 
sociated with the firm of W. W. Lowe & Co., 
real-estate dealers. Mr. Shrewsbury is a native 
of the middle west, his birth having occurred in 
Stillwater, i\Iinn., August 19, 1867, although 
California has been his home since he was three 
years of age. His father, W. P. Shrewsbury, 
located in Minnesota from his native state, Ohio, 
having served in the Sixty-third Regiment Ohio 
Infantry during the Civil war, a member of the 
Signal Corps. After his removal to Minnesota 
he engaged in the livery business in Stillwater, 
where he remained until 1870; in that year he 
located in Point Arena, Mendocino county. Cal., 
and engaged in ranching for a time. In Clover- 
dale, Somona county, he followed the livery busi- 
ness until his removal to Skagit county. Wash., 
where he now resides. His wife, formerly Nora 
Kerns, died in Seattle. Wash. 

One of three children born to his parents. Jo- 
seph Eugene Shrewsbury received his education 
in the public school of California, which he at- 
tended up to the age of fifteen years, when he 
became dependent upon his own resources. For 
several years he was employed in the lumber 
milling business in Mendocino county, after 
which he was engaged in Seattle as a stationary 
engineer, later going to Butte. Mont., and fol- 
lowing the same occupation, .\fter seven months 
in tilt last i.amcd pb.co he went to Strum, ^^'^s., 



and remained in that locality until 1896. Com- 
ing then to Southern California he located in 
Long Beach and with a friend, JNIr. Lollich, con- 
ducted the Long Beach Steam Laundry, the first 
enterprise of its kind here. Later he sold his 
interest to James Clewett, after which he operat- 
ed a stationary engine and engaged as a ma- 
chinist for the Mineral Hill Mining Company. 
Returning to Long Beach in 1902 he purchased 
an interest in the real-estate business of W. W. 
Lowe & Co., and has continued an active mem- 
ber of the firm ever since. He was actively in- 
terested in the laying out of the Atlantic avenue 
subdivision. Overlook Park tract. Mew Acre 
tract, Summer Villa tract, Fry Walnut tract. 
Palm Vista tract. Van Orman tract and others. 

In Seattle, Wash., Mr. Shrewsbury married 
Miss Maggie Baldridge, a native of Wisconsin, 
and born of this union are two children, Elenora 
and Ruby. INIrs. Shrewsbury is a woman of 
culture and refinement, prominent in social cir- 
cles and gives her religious support to the Con- 
gregational Church, of which she is a member. 
Mr. Shrewsbury from the first has taken a promi- 
nent part in public affairs, one of the first of his 
official positions being city plumbing inspector, 
he being the first incumbent of this position. 
r^Iay 27, 1902, he became connected with the 
Long Beach fire department, having previously 
had experience in Anacortes, Wash., as captain 
of a truck company. Three months after he be- 
came associated with the fire department of 
Long Beach he was elected chief and assumed the 
duties in the volunteer department. In Janu- 
ary, 1 906. upon the organization of a new de- 
partment, he was again elected chief by the mem- 
bers of the department. The central house is lo- 
cated on Third street and Pacific avenue, with 
branches at Second and Lime, Tenth and Lime 
and at Terminal ; many improvements have been 
made in the methods and management of the de- 
partment, its equipment, which is thoroughly 
modern and up-to-date, consisting of a steamer 
and combined chemical engine and hose wagon ; 
also two ordinary hose wagons ; and hook and 
ladder, while there has been installed a machine 
shop where they manufacture their own fire 
hydrants, the invention of this department. The 
fire alarm system is one of unusual merit, and 
unlike most systems an adequate protection for 
the city. Mr. Shrewsbury is keenlv alive to the 
success of the department and is enthusiastic in 
his work. He is a member of the Pacific Coast 
Fire Chiefs' Association and the National Fire- 
man's Association. Fraternally he is associated 
with the Knights of Pvthias, of which he is past 
chancellor commander : Uniformed Rank, 
Knights of Pythias, of which he is ex-lieutenant ; 
and of the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. 
He is likewise a member of Sons of ^''eterans, 



1354 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



being associated with Lawton Camp Xo. 2 and 
is one of the state councillors. He is a member 
of the Chamber of Commerce, the Good Roads 
Societ_y and the Cosmopolitan Club. Politically 
he is a stanch adherent of the principles advo- 
cated in the platform of the Republican party. 
Mr. Shrewsbury merits the high position which 
he holds in the esteem of all who have been as- 
sociated with him throughout his residence in 
Southern California, appreciated alike for his re- 
markable qualities along business lines and the 
characteristics of the man and citizen. 



WILLIAM H. CARPENTER. In the de- 
velopment and advancement of the material and 
industrial prosperity of Compton no one per- 
son was more active and influential than the late 
William H. Carpenter, who during the quarter 
of a centurv that he resided here was identified 
with the establishment of every beneficial enter- 
prise of importance. Industrious, thrifty and 
capable, he accumulated wealth and distinction 
through his own strenuous efforts, became prom- 
iment in business circles, and as a man and a 
citizen was held in the highest regard through- 
out the community, his many sterling traits of 
character and upright moral principles winning 
the respect of all witli whom he was brought in 
contact. A native of New York state, he was 
born. July 20, 1855, in the city of Utica, where 
he lived until nine years old. 

Reared in the Empire state, Mr. Carpenter at- 
tended the public schools as a boy and youth, 
completing his early education at the Clinton 
Liberal Institute, in Clinton, N. Y. At the age 
of twenty-one years he came to California, join- 
ing his father, who had three months previously 
settled in Rakersfield, Kern county. A few 
months later, in October, 1877, Mr. Carpenter 
located in Compton as a pioneer of this section 
of Los Angeles county. Purchasing land, he 
engaged extensively in agricultural pursuits, and 
in his independent occupation met with eminent 
success. He farmed on a large scale, at one 
time having four thousand acres of grain to care 
for, at the same time running a threshing out- 
fit. Continuing his operations, he was each sea- 
son well repaid by the bountiful harvests pro- 
duced in his fertile, well-tilled fields and or- 
chards, which readily responded to his care and 
management. December 3, 1901, while yet in 
manhood's prime, he was called to the life be- 
yond, his death being a sad loss to the commun- 
ity as well as to his immediately family and 
friends. Politically he was a stanch Republican, 
active in party ranks, many times serving as 
delegate to county and state conventions. Fra- 
ternalh' he was a prominent Mason and Odd 



Fellow, holding all of the important offices m 
the lodges of both organizations. 

December 18, 1881, in Compton. I\Ir. Car- 
penter married Mary, daughter of William and 
Lucy (Heath) Malott, natives of Virginia, who 
came to California about 1875, purchased a part 
of a Spanish grant near Compton, and there spent 
tlieir remaining years. Of the union of Mr. and 
Mrs. Carpenter six children were born, two 
daughters and four sons. The daughters, Mabel 
C. and Helen L., died in childhood, and the 
sons are living, as follows : William O. and 
Arthur L., attending the Los Angeles Military 
Academy; and Lawrence E. and Raymond, liv- 
ing with their mother. 

January 22, 1903, Mrs. Carpenter married Lee 
O. Funk, of Compton, a prosperous agriculturist, 
engaged in general farming and dairying, his 
ranch of two hundred and sixty-four acres ly- 
ing two miles east of the village. Mr. and Mrs. 
Funk, however, live in Compton, having a fine 
home in the pleasantest part of the town. They 
have one daughter, Lucille Funk, who was born 
January 26, 1906. 



CHARLES Y. FORD. The position of post- 
master at Wynola, which he has filled for a 
period of about ten years, occupies the attention 
of J\Ir. Ford to some extent, but the duties are 
not sufficiently heavy to deter him from engaging 
in other activities. Accordingly he devotes con- 
siderable attention to the care of his farm in the 
Wynola district, where he and his sister. Miss 
Mary E. Ford, have established a comfortable 
home and invested their savings in the .land and 
its improvement. The tract comprises one hun- 
dred and twenty acres, the larger portion of 
which is under cultivation to farm crops or in 
pasturage, but twenty-five acres have been set 
aside for a fruit orchard and apple and cherry 
trees have been planted that now produce bounti- 
ful crops of their special varieties. 

On a farm near Pinckneyville, Perry county, 
111., Charles Y. Ford was born October 20, 1865. 
his parents being John P. and Louisa H. 
(Youngblood) Ford, natives respectively of Ken- 
tucky and Illinois. His father was but a small 
boy when the family removed from Kentucky to 
the then frontier of Illinois, and hence much of 
his active life was passed in the developing en- 
vironment of a new community. In time he be- 
came one. of the well-known farmers and stock- 
raisers in the vicinity of Pinckneyville, and he 
continued in the same locality until 1885, when 
he came to California and settled on a ranch near 
Santa Ana. On that homestead his death oc- 
curred December 27, 1904, when he was four- 
score years of age, and his wife passed away in 
1897, ''t the age of seventy. 




<Lyi^y^hz>£,$?icz^'-^ 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1357 



Un removing to California Charles Y. Ford 
was a young man about t\vent\' j'ears of age, 
ready for the active responsibilities of earning a 
livelihood and ambitious to work his own way in 
the world. Shortly after his arrival in the state 
he purchased the land which he still owns and in 
which his sister also is interested. In addition to 
managing the home property he rents land which 
he sows in grain. Recently he has erected a com- 
fortable farm residence that adds greatly to the 
appearance and value of the farm. In 1897 he 
was appointed postmaster and has held the office 
under a Republican administration, although he 
is stanchly Democratic in his opinions. His sister 
liolds membership with the Baptist Church and 
he is a contributor to religious measures, al- 
though not identified with any denomination. 
Fraternally he has his membership with Court 
Julian Banner No. 8522, A. O. F., at Julian. 
During the long period of his residence in the 
locality he has gained the confidence of acquaint- 
ances and has won an assured position in the es- 
teem of those with whom business or social rela- 
tions have brought him into contact. 



NILES NELSON. One among the oldest 
settlers of San Diego county and the oldest 
resident of Poway, Niles Nelson was born 
near Kongsberg, Norway, July 15th, 1832. He 
was the son of Ole and Anneken (Stabeck) 
Nelson, who were among the most substantial 
and honored old families of the Northland. In 
1842 they sold their farm and made the long 
journey of that day to the New World, bring- 
mg their family. The father died while cross- 
ing Lake Michigan. At Milwaukee they were 
met by Mrs. Nelson's brother, Clement Sta- 
beck, who had settled in Illinois in 1839 ^"'^ 
by teams they proceeded to Rock Run, Step- 
henson county, Illinois. Mrs. Nelson still had 
sufficient funds to purchase a good farm near 
what is now the town of Davis, and there she 
resided until her death in 1883 at the -age of 
eighty-three years. She was a woman of 
strong character, high ideals, and great moral 
worth, her amiable disposition and strong re- 
ligious convictions endeared her greatly to her 
large circle of friends. Her teachings left their 
deep imprint on Mr. Nelson, who grew to re- 
spect, honor and regard them as his guilding 
star tlirough life. 

Mr. Nelson is now the only survivor of the 
family. He grew to manhood on the farm and 
attended the common schools, but they were 
limited in those days and most of his educa- 
tion was obtained by self-study at night after 
a hard day's work and by experience when in 
contact with the problems of the business 
world. When nineteen years of age he and 



jiis half-brother, Thurston Kiuidson, joined a 
company starting for the gold fields of Cali- 
fornia. Outfitting with ox-teams and wagons 
ihey left April 25, 1852, crossing the Alissouri 
river at Council Bluffs and on up the Platte 
river, then a wilderness with herds of buffalo 
and roving bands of Indians. They crossed 
the summit of the Rockies at South Pass and 
followed the old Oregon trail to Bear river, 
vvhere they crossed to the Humboldt, which 
they followed until arriving at the Upper 
Humboldt Meadows, vv-hen they came by the 
Lassen route to Shasta count}', California, aft- 
er a six months" trip. There they engaged in 
placer mining lor about lour years on Clear 
Creek, meeting v.dth considerable success, 
and as they made money they sent it to Illi- 
nois and purcliased land. Concluding to return 
east they left San Francisco on the steamer 
Cortez, April, 1836, to go via the Nicaragua 
'oute, but on account of the Walker insurrec- 
tion the steamer went on to Panama, landing 
them just before the Panama riots of April 15, 
1856, and history gives credit to the valor and 
courage of the passengers of the Cortez (re- 
turning California miners) for saving the day 
for the Americans against the greasers. Dur- 
ing the rict ]\Ir. Nelson was robbed of gold 
dust to the amount of $1,500, but under the 
circumstances was fortunate to escape with his 
life which had also been attempted. From 
Aspinwall they took a mail boat to Havana, 
Ihenceito Ne^v York City, and returned to Il- 
linois. There he engaged in farming until 1861, 
when he again returned to California via Pana- 
ma. He followed mining at the Orofino mines, 
next in Josephine county. Ore., where he re- 
mained until 1862, when he made his way to the 
Caribou mine on Williams Creek, B. C, where 
he mined until fall : tlien he went to the Boise 
mines, in Idaho, via San Francisco. The fall 
found him in Astoria, Ore., where he remained 
until the spring of 1865, when he returned to 
Illinois via the Panama route. He located on 
his farm adjoining Davis and engaged in the 
pursuit of agriculture for eight years. But the 
Pacific coast had such attractions for him that 
he could not content himself. During his min- 
ing experience he had met and formed the 
friendship of A. E. Hortcn, the founder of San 
Diego, and in May, 1873, he sold his farm and 
removed to the southland. He embarked in 
business in San Diego with the prospect that 
Thomas Scott Avould build the I'exas Pacific 
R. R.. but when the financial crash came Scott 
failed in business and San Diego suffered ac- 
cordingly. He then located on a homestead 
in Pow-ay and there began improving a farm 
and building a liouse in what was then prac- 
tically a wilderness. He has met with sue- 



1358 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



cess as a farmer and horticulturist and now 
owns four hundred and tliirty acres of land 
devoted to raising grain and cattle ; has a 
vineyard of thirty-five acres raising both table 
and raisen grapes and also an orchard of eight 
acres. He has also installed a pumping plant 
for irrigating a small aiea. 

At Davis, III, jNIr. Nelson was married Oc- 
tober 25, 1865, to Miss Helene Joranleid, who 
was born near Christiania, Norway, the daugh- 
ter of Hans and Ingeborg (Bratlien) Joran- 
leid, who were very substantial and extensive 
farmers. Mrs. Nelson came to America in 
1856 and has been truly a helpmate to her 
husband. She is a woman of much native 
ability and is greatly appreciated by her many 
friends, who esteem her for her excellent quali- 
ties. They are the parents of four children, 
three of wdiom are living, namely: Henry Os- 
car, a farmer and horticulturist in Poway, Gal. ; 
Albert I., assists his father in the management 
of the home ranch ; Ida Glarisse, wife of Will- 
iam L. Stone, proprietor of the Jersey Dairy 
in San Diego ; and Nels who died in his teens. 

Mr. and Mrs. Nelson adhere to the teachings 
of the Lutheran Church and are strong advo- 
cates of temperance. Mr. Nelson is a very 
public-spirited and enterprising man and has 
ever been active in the upbuilding of his com- 
munity. The schools have always received 
his hearty support and co-operation. For 
many years he was a member of the byard of 
school trustees, a part of the time acting as 
clerk. Other enterprises that have been start- 
ed from time to time have always received 
his liberal support and aid. 



H. P. SGHOFIELD. Several successive 
generations of the Schofield family have made 
their homes in the LTnited States, the first of 
the name in this countr}^ having been Arthur 
-Schofield, a native of Schofield, England, and 
by occupation a manufacturer of broadcloth. 
On coming to America he embarked in busi- 
ness at Pittsfield, I\Tass., where he made the 
first yard of broadcloth e\'er manufactured in 
the United States. At the time of his death 
he had rounded out a full centun,' of useful- 
ness and activity. Next in line of descent was 
Arthur, Jr., Avho learned the trade of carriage- 
making and followed the occupation with con- 
siderable success in South Egremont, Mass., 
remaining a resident and business man of that 
city until his death at sixty-eight years. 

Although his early years were passed in 
Massachusetts, famed for the high character 
of its literary institutions and the wide scope 
of its educational opportunities, it was not pos- 
sible for H. P. Schofield to attend school ow- 



ing to conditions over which he had no control. 
Horn in Sheffield, Mass., the son of Arthur, 
Jr., he was only eight years of age when he 
ran away from home and from that time on- 
ward he was self-supporting. The success 
which he later achieved was not the result of 
educational privileges or the help of others, but 
came as the result of his unaided exertions in 
the field of business enterprise. The world 
was his school-room and experience his teach- 
er, and who shall say that he failed to learn 
his lessons under the rigid discipline of his 
stern instructor? After having served a full 
apprenticeship to the trade of carriage-maker 
in Massachusetts, at the age of eighteen he en- 
listed in the Union army for service during the 
Civil war. As a member of Company K, Four- 
teenth New York Infantry, enlisting at Hud- 
son, N. Y., he accompanied his regiment to 
the front, where he remained for two years. 
He was then summoned to Washington, D. C, 
where he served nearh^ one }-ear in the quar- 
termaster's department. 

At the expiration of the Civil war in 1865 
Mr. Schofield went to Rochester, N. Y., and 
opened a carriage-manufacturing plant, which 
proved a success from the inauguration of the 
enterprise. After ten profitable years in the 
same location he went into the oil regions as 
an operator and contractor and builder, be- 
sides which he operated at Elmira, N. Y. The 
next industry which engaged his attention 
was in Chicago, where he manufactured ma- 
•chinery under special patents. The plant on 
Canal street gave employment to one hundred 
and fifty workmen and produced machinery.' 
for the filing of every variety of saw! from the 
smallest hand saw to the largest circular kind. 
By this process the work of filing, previously 
done by hand, was entirely revolutionized and 
simplified. From a small beginning the bus- 
iness grew, vvithout the aid of any traveling 
men whatever, until orders were received 
from every part of the United States and 
eventually from every portion of the civilized 
world. 

After a remarkably successful business ca- 
reer as a manufacturer of his inventions and 
patents l\Tr. Schofield eventually disposed of 
his interest in the factory to his partner, L. L. 
Filstrup. Being thtis released from business 
cares, he was able to seek the delights of a 
genial climate and thereupon came to Southern 
California, where he built his beautiful home, 
Walholla, at Ocean Park. Though his busi- 
ness life was one of great responsibilities and 
his labors often kept him at his desk from dawn 
until midnight, yet he retains to a large degree 
the robustness of youth. In a large measure 
this is due to his temperament and fine poise 



HTSTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1359 



of mind. Business cares were left behind when 
the office door was closed. Anxious moments 
he had, as do all who control great enterprises, 
yet he never allowed himself to be worried or 
irritated by his anxieties, and thus has re- 
tained his physical and mental strength and 
alertness. In fraternal matters he affiliated 
with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows 
and Benevolent Protective Order of Elks while 
living in Chicago. While living in Rochester, 
N. Y., just after the close of the Civil war. he 
married Mary A. Darling-, who died in New 
York, and later he married Margaret Buttrey, 
who was born in London, Canada, and was 
making her home at Galesburg, this state, at 
the time of their union. 



FRANCIS PERRY SAPPINGTON, M. D. 
The family with which Dr. Sappington, of El 
Monte, is connected is one of the oldest and most 
prominent of St. Louis, Mo., the town of Sap- 
pington, in St. Louis county, being his birth- 
place. His father, T. J., was born there, while 
his grandfather, John, belonged to an old family 
of Kentucky and in 1803 settled in St. Louis, 
which was then a part of the Louisiana territory. 
He inherited the patriotic spirit which induced 
him to serve in the war of 1812, an ancestor, 
John Sappington, of Maryland, having served 
throughout the Revolutionary war, after which 
he removed to Kentucky and became a planter, 
serving in the state legislature and becoming rec- 
ognized as one of the strong upbuilding factors 
of the section. He had seventeen children, all 
of whom he sent to Missouri to buy land nine 
miles from St. Louis and agreed to come himself 
as soon as Jefferson purchased the territory. John 
Sappington, Jr., became the owner of three 
thousand acres of land and received a medal 
from the Missouri legislature for having the 
model farm of the state. In the war of 18 12 he 
was the first man to plunge into the Mississippi 
river and swim across to join Governor Edwards, 
of Illinois, for service. T. J. Sappington became 
a farmer in Missouri, where his death occurred 
at an advanced age. He was a friend of Gen- 
eral Grant and helped him build his loghouse at 
what was known as Hardscrabble. He married 
Julia Leffingwell, a native of Beloit, Wis., and 
daughter of William Leffingwell, of Salem, 
Mass., and a descendant of Alayflower ancestry 
and Revolutionary sires. He himself served 
with Perry in the war of 1812 as a musician. 
The mother still survives and makes her home in 
Sappington, Mo. 

The oldest in a family of four children, all of 
whom are living, Francis Perry Sappington was 
born in the town of Sappington, September 8, 
1871. He was brought up on his father's farm 



and educated primarily in the public schools and 
Kirkwood Military Academy under Professor 
Haight. He then entered the medical depart- 
ment of Washington University, from which in- 
stitution he was graduated in 1893 ^^''^h the de- 
gree of M. D. Locating in Sappington, he prac- 
ticed medicine there for nine years. In No- 
vember, 1902, he came to California and in Whit- 
tier engaged in the lumber business in partner- 
ship with A. G. Oabaugh, the firm name being 
Clabaugli & Sappington. Six months later he 
sold out his interest in this enterprise and re- 
turned to Missouri, where he settled up his busi- 
ness and in January, 1904, once more located in 
the Pacific state. In El Monte he purchased a 
fifteen-acre ranch on Tyler street, erected a 
handsome residence, and at the same time es- 
tablished a lumber business and the first lumber 
yard in the town. He now owns an acre on the 
railroad, where he has put up sheds, etc., and is 
carrying on an extensive and constantly increas- 
ing business. 

In St. Louis, i\Io., Dr. Sappington married 
I\Iiss Fannie Walls, a native of that city and a 
daughter of William C. Walls, a broker. They 
have three children, Thomas Jeiiferson, and twin 
daughters, Mildred Halpain and Joyce Harbison. 
Fraternally the doctor was made a Mason in 
Whittier Lodge No. 323 and now belongs to Lex- 
ington Lodge No. 104, of El IMonte. He is also 
identified with the Independent Order of For- 
esters and Modern Woodmen of America. In 
religion he is a member of the Episcopal Church, 
and politically is a Democrat. 



GEORGE ELLIOT. An instance of a man 
who has gone out to meet opportunity, who has 
had the alertness to grasp it and the ability to 
develop it, is found in George Elliot, a rancher 
engaged in strenuously promoting the grain and 
bean industry in the neighborhood of Santa 
Maria. Mr. Elliott possesses the steadfastness 
of purpose and perseverance of the Scotchman, 
and that determination which minimizes obstacles 
and rises upon defeat. He was born near Edin- 
burg, Scotland, October 11. 1850, the son of 
Francis and Jane (Douglas) Elliot, who, in 
1862, brought their family to America and set- 
tled on a farm in Delaware county, N. Y. The 
elder Elliot was an experienced dairyman, and 
he continued to follow this occupation until a 
few years before his death, at the age of eighty 
years. His wife died in 1877, at the age of forty- 
four. She was the mother of eight children, of 
whom one daughter died at the age of thirty- 
seven years, and of whom three sons live in Cal- 
ifornia. 

George Elliot was twelve years old when his 
youthful activities were shifted from Scotland to 



VMO 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



Delaware county, N. Y. There he learned all 
about dairying from his father, and at irregular 
intervals attended the public schools. In 1873 he 
came to California to seek the rewards of an in- 
dependent life, settling in San Jose, where he 
found employment for a couple of years. In 1875 
he came to the Santa i\Iaria valle_v, rented a 
ranch for two years, and then engaged in the 
stock business in the mountains for four years. 
For the following two jears he was emplo_\-ed on 
a ranch in the valley, and in 1886 purchased the 
farm of two hundred acres which formed the 
nucleus of his present large property. From 
general farming and stock-raising he eventually 
changed to grain and beans, and these crops 
proved so profitable that in 1903 he added two 
hundred acres to his farm, the majority of it un- 
der these two products. Excellent improvements 
have resulted from his occupation of this large 
estate, and all are of a practical and enduring na- 
ture. The owner has studied well the economic 
side of agriculture, and is quick to adopt the new 
order of things. 

The family of ]\Ir. Elliot consists of his wife, 
formerly Ellen Bradley, a native of California, 
and whom he married in 1886, and a son, Fran- 
cis. His political affiliations are with the Repub- 
lican party, and as its chosen representative he 
has served as a member of the board of educa- 
tion. Fraternally he is connected with the Santa 
Alaria Lodge No. 340, F. & A. M., and the 
Knights of Pythias. He finds a religious home 
in the Presbyterian Church. The life and labor 
of Mr. Elliot, as an expression of earnest and 
praiseworthy resolve, is entitled to enrollment 
among those adopted sons of the state who are 
adding to its material, intellectual and moral 
wealth. 



SAMUEL H. FLINT is one of the highly re- 
spected pioneers of Ventura county who has been 
very successful in his ranching projects. He was 
born January 22, 1834, in Clinton county, N. Y., 
being a member of a family of ten children, nine 
of whom grew to maturity, but only two are now 
living: Samuel H. and John, the latter living in 
Iowa. The father, Samuel Flint, was born in 
New Hampshire, and the mother, who was Ann 
Dominy before her marriage, was a native of 
Long island, N. Y., and was married in Clinton 
county. In 1835 the father went to Ohio with 
his family and there he remained until his death, 
at the age of fifty-five years. He was a Demo- 
crat in politics and belonged to the Masonic fra- 
ternity. The mother also died in Ohio, when 
forty-five years old. 

Samuel H. Flint was less than two years old 
when his parents took him to Ohio and in that 
state he received a part of his education in the ear- 



ly subscription schools. From Ohio he went to La- 
Salle county. 111., with an older brother and there 
finished his schooling, after which he engaged in 
farming. He later was the owner of a fine farm, 
but he finally sold it and came to California in 
1875. He went to Santa Barbara county, living 
near what is now Montecito, where he remained 
one year. He then came to the Santa Clara val- 
ley of Southern California and bought his pres- 
ent ranch, upon which he has resided ever since. 
Besides the fifty-two acre ranch near Santa Paula 
he also owns fifty-five acres near Saticoy, which 
is devoted to farming purposes. The home ranch 
is planted to corn and barley, and the fact that 
Mr. Flint has always given his attention to farm- 
ing and not divided it with other pursuits may be 
one reason why he has met with the success that 
has been his. Practically all the improvements on 
his ranch are of his own making. 

In 1857 Mr. Flint married Miss Eliza J. Sin- 
clair, a native of Kentucky. Six children were 
born to them, three of whom died in infancy, and 
the three living are Henrj' A., Lizzie and Clara. 
Politically Mr. Flint affiliates with the Demo- 
cratic party on national issues, being a Cleveland 
Democrat. 



JACKSON FREER, son of William H. Freer, 
who is represented elsewhere in this work, was 
born April 6, 1870, in San Jose, Santa Clara 
county, Cal. In 1875 he was brought to South- 
ern California by his parents and was reared to 
young manhood on the parental ranch, receiv- 
ing his preliminar}' education in the public 
schools and completing it in St. Vincent's Col- 
lege. He remained at home with his father un- 
til he was twenty-three years old. assisting in 
the cultivation of the ranch, when, in 1893, he 
located on his present property, of forty-six 
acres, which he had purchased upon attaining 
his majority. This he began to improve and 
cultivate, installing a pumping plant, building 
a house and barn, and setting the land to walnuts, 
the grove nov.- being pronounced one of the finest 
in this district. 

In El Monte Mr. Freer married Miss Eliza 
Jane Schmidt, a native of El Monte, whose 
father, Henry Schmidt, was born in Lorraine, 
France. October 15, 1842. Her grandfather, 
Henry Schmidt, was born in Bordeaux. France, 
and was superintendent of the Count of Ham- 
burg's dominion in Lorraine until his death in 
1866. His wife, ^Margaret, also died in that 
location. They were the parents of sixteen chil- 
dren, of whom fifteen attained maturity. Henry 
Schmidt was the ninth in order of birth ; in 
boyhood he was apprenticed in Luxemburg to 
learn the trade of blacksmith. After completing 
his apprenticeship he traveled throughout France, 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1363 



Belgium and Holland, and finally went to Poland, 
returning thence to Paris in 1863 and making 
that city his home for three years. In 1866 he 
came to California via the Nicaragua route, and 
from San Francisco went to San Jose, where 
he worked at his trade for a time. He was next 
located in Marysville, then \"irginia City, Nev. ; 
then to Winnemucca, same state ; thence went 
to Silver City and Boise City, Idaho; and from 
the last-named place overland to Alaska. Forced 
back by the snow he returned south and located 
for a time in Salt Lake City, thence went to 
Wliite Pine, then Lincoln county, Nev., and in 
1869 came to El Monte, Cal., where he estab- 
lished a blacksmith shop and has ever since 
followed his trade. He married in El Monte 
Eliza Slack, a native of Cole Creek, Utah, and 
a daughter of William Slack, mentioned at 
length in the sketch of his son, George Slack, 
found elsewhere in this volume. They had the 
following children : Eliza Jane, wife of Jackson 
Freer ; Victoria, wife of Thomas Freer ; Frank. 
a butcher located in Arizona ; Maggie, wife of 
William Chambers, D. D. S., of Los Angeles; 
and Camilla, who became the wife of Herman 
Piatt, and whose death occurred in Los Angeles. 
Mr. and Mrs. Freer had three children, only 
one surviving, Delma. ATr. Freer is a member 
of the Ancient Oder of United Workmen, while 
politically he is a stanch Democrat. He is a 
charter member of the Mountain A'iew Walnut 
Growers' Association. 



JOHN CROSBY OLMSTED is remem- 
bered in Southern California as one of the 
noblest pioneers whose aims and purposes 
were always for the upbuilding of his adopted 
state, the development of its resources, the 
promotion of great public enterprises, rather 
than for personal gain, while his hand was 
ever held out to assist those less fortunate 
than himself, his death in 1891 removing from 
the community a man. citizen and friend whose 
place could never be filled. His sterling traits 
of character were an inheritance from an old 
New York family, members of which had been 
prominent in public affairs for generations. 
His father, John Olmsted, was president of the 
First National Bank of Yonkers, to which 
place he had removed from New York City, 
where John Crosby Olmsted was born, the 
oldest son of his parents. He was reared in 
Yonkers, receiving his preliminary education 
in its public schools, after which he graduated 
from Williams College, then he went south and 
engaged as a tutor for a short time. The west 
held out great attractions to a young man of 
energy and ambition and accordingly in 1864 
he turned his face toward California, making 



the journey to San Franicsco via the Isthmus 
of Panama and upon his arrival engaging with 
A. Rowan, the most extensive book and sta- 
tionery dealer in that city. His education and 
scholarly tendencies made of Mr. Olmsted a 
very successful man in this line, and it was 
not much later that he became a partner in a 
similar business with a Mr. Cohn, the firm 
name being known as Olmsted & Cohn, lo- 
cated on Kearney street. In 1877 he disposed 
of his business interests in San Francisco and 
cam« to Los Angeles, where under the firm 
name of Olmsted & W^ales he conducted a 
book and stationery business on First street 
between Main and Spring streets, and later 
was located on South Main street. Some time 
after this his partnership was dissolved and 
alone he established a similar enterprise on 
South Spring street, where he remained oc- 
cupied until his death, which occurred Jan- 
uary 6. 1891. He had been active in religious 
work ever since his location in Los Angeles, 
being a member of the Third Presbyterian 
Church in which he officiated as elder many 
years. Politically he was an ardent Republi- 
can and gave his support to the advancement 
of these principles, although locally no man 
could be counted upon more to further public 
welfare, regardless of party affiliations. 

Mr. Olmsted was married in San Francisco 
June 17, 1868, to Miss Millicent Marshall 
Hickcox. a native of Cleveland. Ohio. She 
boasts an ancestry which has given to her 
some of the best blood of the eastern states, 
^Massachusetts and Connecticut being the home 
of the name originally, her paternal grand- 
father. Benjamin, born in Durham county, 
Conn., in 17,^6, having married Miss Hannah 
Clark, of Norwich, Mass., whose direct ances- 
tor was mate on the Mayflower in its memor- 
able voyage. Benjamin Hickcox became a 
pioneer of Oneida county, N. Y., and was 
postmaster at Clinton, and there Edward Y. 
Hickcox, the father of Mrs. Olmsted, was 
born. He was a merchant in Bufifalo for many 
years, later was located in Cleveland, Ohio, 
in the management of a furniture business un- 
der the firm name of Chas. & D. A. Shepard. 
In 1863 he came to California via the Isthmus 
of Panama in search of the health which the 
state has since given to countless numbers of 
the world's seekers. He lived but three years, 
dying in !^an Jose in 1866. He was survived 
by his wife, formerly Sophia L. Scott, who 
was born in Mayville, Chautauqua county, N. 
Y., her mother being a member of the Holmes 
family. Orsamus Flolmes, a great-uncle of 
Mrs. Olmsted, was a soldier under Washing- 
ton in the Revolutionary war. She afterward 
made her home with her daughter in Los An- 



i;^64 



HISTORICAL AXl) BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



geles, where her death occurred in 1893, at 
the age of eighty-five years. She was the 
mother of the following children : Sophia, w-ife 
oi Judge James Gary, who came to California 
in 1852. She died in San Francisco; 
Edward, who came to California in 1853, 
and engaged in mining, his death oc- 
curring in Idaho in 1863; John S., of Wash- 
ington, D. C, who served as superintendent of 
the Senate folding room for over twenty years ; 
Harriet, who died at the age of nine years; 
Benjamin, who died in infancy; Seth H., of El 
Monte; and Millicent M., Mrs. Olmsted, who 
was horn January 18, 1844, in Cleveland, Ohio. 
She was educated in the Cleveland semi- 
nary and in 1863 accompanied her parents to 
California, where in San Franicsco she was 
married to Mr. Olmsted. In 1877 she came to 
Los Angeles and after the death of her hus- 
band she continued to make that city her home 
for about ten years, when she came to El 
3.Tonte and about a mile and a half north of 
the town purchased the property where she 
now resides. This consists of forty acres de- 
voted to walnuts. She is also interested in 
real estate in Los Angeles, with her brother 
owning a building which was erected at Xo. 
452-454 South Main street, also JLos Angeles 
street property, as well as residence prop- 
erty throughout the city. Mrs. Olmsted is a 
member of the Central Presbyterian Church, 
of Los Angeles. She is a woman of rare 
worth of character, eager to give of the best 
of her life to others, rather than to keep for 
herself, glad of her ability to lessen some of 
the trials and troubles of the world. Her 
chief aim and ambition is the founding of a 
hospital, and for this purpose she placdl in 
the hands of Dr. Hugh Walker the power 
to select a board of trustees for the erection 
of such a building, but this has later devel- 
oped into a Presbyterian Hospital. This is to 
be conducted on humanitarian principles, and 
will be the foundation of a substantial l^uild- 
ing to be conducted as a Presbyterian Hos- 
pital, constructed and suoported by dona- 
tion and endowments of those who desire to 
assist such a worthy enterprise. One of the 
main objects which ]\Irs. Olmsted has in mind 
is that this enterprise be not wdiolh- for physi- 
cal needs, but will prove of untold benefit 
spiritually, in her donation requesting that it 
be conducted on spiritual grounds and that all 
the nurses be Christian womeiv. This will at 
its consummation be one of the noblest and 
far-reaching influences in the upbuilding of 
l^hysical and moral betterment, and will for- 
ever perpetuate the name of its donor — rich in 
the Higher things, broad in the truest con- 



ception of Christianity, and gladly holding out 
her influence to extend beyond "life's little 
dav." 



E. W. SELBACH is a successful business 
man of El IMonte, Los Angeles county, where 
he is conducting a fine meat market, modern 
in all its appointments, a refrigerator of con- 
siderable capacity, a three-horse power gaso- 
line engine, all appurtenances for the manu- 
facture of sausage, lard, etc., and since his es- 
tablishment of this enterprise he has built up 
a wide custom. Mr. Selbach is a native Cali- 
fornian, born in Pleasanton February 7, 1871 ; 
his father, A. Selbach, was born near Ham- 
burg, Germany, became a butcher b}' trade, 
and in the early "50s came around the Horn 
to California, arriving in San Francisco and 
starting a butcher business, owning two stalls 
in the old California market for many years. 
He established his home in Pleasanton. Lat- 
er in life he went on the stock exchange and 
lost the greater part of his accumulated fort- 
une. He then returned to the butcher business 
and worked for wages, first in San Felipe, then 
in Lemoore, Kings county, in the latter place 
establishing a market which he conducted for 
fifteen years. His death occurred in that loca- 
tion. Fraternally he was an Odd Fellow, and 
politically cast his ballot for the Republican 
party. His wife was formerly Pauline Bots- 
ford, a native of ^Michigan and daughter of a 
pioneer of California ; her death also occurred 
in Lemoore. 

From the age of six years E. W. Selbach 
was reared in Lemoore and in that 'place re- 
ceived his education through the medium of 
the public schools. His business education 
was obtained in the Chestnutwood Business 
College, of Santa Cruz, through which he 
worked his own way. He continued with his 
father until attaining his majority, when in 
1892 he came to Los Angeles and engaged in 
the butclier business, which he had learned 
from early boyhood. He was employed by 
Vickrey & Hines until they went out of bus- 
iness, when lie went to \\"ilmin,gton and con- 
tinued for George Hines, and in time became 
manager of the Wilmington department. LTp- 
on the death of his father he resigned this 
position to look after the interests of the es- 
tate, which was finally sold and settled up, 
when he returned to Los Angeles. He was 
then identified Avith the business of John Brin- 
er, of Pasadena, with whom he remained but 
a short time, however, when he purchased a 
ranch in the peet lands, consisting of forty 
acres, which he improved for two years. Dis- 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RI-XORlJ. 



1.1(55 



posing of this property at a good figure, he 
then went to jNIonrovia, Cal., and engaged at 
Iiis trade until 1900, when he located in EI 
Alonte. He here established a meat market, 
which has since grown to lucrative propor- 
tions, a wide trade growing up throughout 
the country, and an equipment modern and 
up to date in every way following in order to 
respond to the large demands made upon the 
business. 

Air. Selbacli lias built two residences here, 
and has also improved a lot with a store build- 
ing, which he still owns. He was married in 
Los Angeles to Miss Mariette Teague, who 
was born in Uniontown. Kans. He is one of 
the original stockholders of the First National 
Bank of El JMonte, and in other ways has tak- 
en every interest in the upbuilding of the town. 
Fraternally he is a member of the Modern 
^^'oodmen of America, Ancient ( )rder of Ignit- 
ed AVorkmen, and a charter member of the 
Lemoore Parlor, X. S. G. \\\ Politically he is 
a Republican. 



CHARLES M. STONE. Not a few of the 
men now prominent in commercial and financial 
circles in Pomona are those whose initial train- 
ing in these lines was obtained in the east. Such 
is the record of Charles M. Stone, cashier of the 
First National Bank of Pomona, the oldest and 
most influential financial institution in the Po- 
mona valley. Under its original charter, granted 
in Alay, 1886, a flourishing, though conserva- 
tive, business was carried on for twenty years, 
when, in May. iyo6. a new charter was granted. 
The bank is capitalized for $100,000, with sur- 
plus and profits amounting to the same figure, 
and has a record for reliability and conservatism 
unequaled by any similar institution in Southern 
California. The First National occupies its own 
building, known as the First National Bank 
block, and is the only bank in the city able to 
make this boast. Besides doing a general bank- 
ing business the bank has a fine equipment of 
steel vaults, of the most modern construction, 
where valuables of all kinds may be stored with 
perfect safety. 

The Stone family was represented in New 
England by at least three generations, and the 
grandfather, Micah Stone, founded a settlement 
in Vermont which in his honor was named 
Stoneville ; it is now a part of the town of Enos- 
burg. There he reared his family and carried 
on a manufacturing Inisiness throughout his 
active years. Among his children was Micah 
H., who was born and reared in Eno.sburg, Vt. 
In his young manhood he was assistant postmas- 
ter of the cit\- of Burlington, Vt.. and later es- 
tablished himself there, in the scneral merchan- 



dise business, making that his home throughout 
the remainder of his life, although his death oc- 
curred in Pomona, while visiting his son. His 
marriage united him with Alary Converse Gil- 
mour, who like himself was born in Vermont, 
and was a daughter of Duncan Gilmour, who 
was born in Scotland and became well known in 
mercantile circles in Burlington. The mother 
])assed away in Burlington in March, 1906, hav- 
ing become the mother of six children, of whom 
Charles AI. is next to the oldest and the only one 
in California. 

Born in Burlington, Vt., August 4, 1863, 
Charles M. Stone was given good school advan- 
tages and was a diligent student in the public 
and high schools of his native city. A desire to 
put his education to practical use, and at the 
same time establish himself in the business 
world, led him to accept the position of book- 
keeper with a lumber firm. Later he secured a 
position with the Alerchants National Bank of 
Burlington, but after remaining with them for 
a few months as assistant bookkeeper he re- 
signed his position and came west, reaching Po- 
mona in December, 1887. For two years there- 
after he was with the Pomona Land and Water 
Company as cashier, giving this up, however, to 
accept the position of assistant cashier of the 
People's Bank, an institution which was found- 
ed as a state bank in 1887. l^pon the death of 
J. H. Dole, the cashier. Air. Stone was elected 
to that position, in T898, filling the same credit- 
ablv until the People's Bank was consolidated 
with the National Bank of Pomona in 1901. His 
connection with the latter bank as cashier con- 
tinued uninterruptedly until January of 1904. 
when he resigned to accept the cashiership of the 
First National Bank of Pomona, a position 
which he still holds. His broad knowledge along 
financial lines makes him a valuable assistant in 
the management of the bank, to which is added 
a charm of personality which makes friends with 
all who are broue^ht in contact with him. .\s a 
member of the Board of Trade of Pomona he 
is actively interested in all measures that come 
before that body which will enhance the welfare 
of the community, in fact his support is gfiven 
freely and unstintedly to all helpful and uplifting 
undertakings. Besides holdiuD- the position of 
cashier in the First National Bank he is treas- 
urer of the Del Alonte Irrigating Company, and 
has interests in other business enterprises in his 
home city and surrounding country. 

In Pomona, June i, 1895, Air. Stone was mar- 
ried to Afiss Alabel Wilcox Ruffington, who was 
born in Onawa, Towa, and three children have 
been Ixirn to them. Edmund, George and Alarian. 
The familv are communicants of the Pilo-rim 
Congregational Church of Pomona, of which 
Mr. Stone is treasurer. Fraternally he was 



];!(iG 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



made a Mason in Pomona Lodge No. 246, F. & 
A. AL, and at this writing" is filling the position 
of treasurer of his lodge, likewise holding the 
same position in the chapter and commandery, 
in both of which he is a valued member. He is 
also identified with Al Alalaikah Temple, A. A. 
O. N. M. S., and with the Woodmen of the 
World. Coming to Pomona at a time when it 
was little more than a village Mr. Stone has seen 
it rise and take rank as one of the prominent 
cities of the Pacific coast, and in its transforma- 
tion he has taken more than a passing interest, 
for many helpful measures have originated and 
been carried to completion through his personal 
efforts. 



AVILLIAM J. BUTLER. One of the old- 
est settlers in San Diego county is William J. 
Butler, who first crossed the plains to Califor- 
nia in 1856, but did not become a permanent 
resident of the state until 1876, some years 
later settling in San Diego county and from 
that time until the present identifying himself 
with the upbuilding of this section. The But- 
ler family is of English and Welsh descent, 
and the early members who came to this coun- 
try were pioneers in Virginia. The grand- 
father, Joel Butler, was born in South Caro- 
lina, early settled on a farm in Tennessee and 
later removed to Kentucky, where he died. 
The father, B. F. Butler, was a native of Lin- 
coln, Tenn., and in 1840 removed to Spring- 
field, Mo., where he conducted a carriage and 
wagon shop. In 1856 he came to California 
with his family, making the trip with ox 
teams, and bringing a herd of cattle to the 
new country, the journey from Springfield, 
Mo., to Marysville, Cal.. requiring exactly five 
months. In 1857 he located in Napa county, 
where he purchased and improved a ranch 
upon which he raised grain and stock. It was 
later decided that this land belonged to one of 
the Mexican grants and Mr. Butler was 
obliged to vacate it. He then went to Salinas 
and made that city his home until his death, 
when sixty-two years of age. His wife, who 
was before her marriage Harriet Shipp, was a 
member of an old Virginia family and a native 
of Lincoln, Tenn. She survived her husband 
many years, and passed away January g, 1902, 
having' attained the advanced age of eighty- 
four years. 

William J. Butler was a member of a family 
of five children and is the only one now living. 
His bii-th occurred Novemljer 18, 1842, in 
Springfield, Mo., and on the trip across the 
plains in 1856 he rode a mule and drove the 
cattle. Four years later he resolved to return 
to the east and in t8C>o left Napa, came down 



through Southern California, taking the old 
Butterfield stage route via Sherman to Spring- 
field, Mo. After arriving there he entered 
Carrollton College. In 1861, at 'the outbreak 
of the Civil war, he enlisted in Campbell's 
Battalion of Missouri State Guards, subse- 
quently joined Cornell's Regiment, which lat- 
er consolidated with the Second Regiment of 
Alissouri Cavalr}' under Price, and served un- 
til the close of the war. Going to New Or- 
leans at the close of his military service he 
was employed by a commission merchant for 
a time, and afterwards carried on farming 
near \A^arrensburg until 1876, when he re- 
turned to California. Locating at Salinas he 
entered the employ of Vanderhurst, Sanborn 
& Co., a ■ hardware firm, as a boy having 
learned the wheelwright's trade. He contin- 
ued here until 1887, in which year he came to 
San Diego and engaged in the real estate busi- 
ness. Later he purchased ten acres of raw 
land at La Mesa, which he improved and upon 
which he engaged in raising berries. In addi- 
tion to carr^'ing on this industry he also took 
building contracts in San Diego county and 
citv. In July, 1905, he sold the ranch and re- 
moved to No. 3742 Third street. San Diego, 
and is now devotmg his entire time to con- 
tracting and building. 

By his marriage in Johnson county. Mo., 
Air. Butler was united with Miss Lavinia Ir- 
win, a native of that state, and of this union 
six children were born, and all of those living 
make their home in San Diego. Named in or- 
der of their births the children are as follows: 
Julia, now Mrs. A. P. Johnson, Jr. ; Hattie, 
:\Irs. O. C. Crane; Alary, Mrs. Burt Watkins ; 
Alartha, who died in San Diego; Thomas I., a 
draughtsman; and Belle, deceased. Air. Butler 
is a member of the Alethodist Episcopal 
Church South, which he supports liberally 
with both his means and personal service, be- 
ing at the present time a member of the board 
oftrustees. As a citizen he is active and pro- 
gressive and is held in the highest esteem by 
all who know him. 



DAVID POWELL. For more than ten 
years David Powell, now a successful real- 
estate dealer of Long Beach, has been actively 
identified with the "business interests of this 
thriving city and aided in its upbuilding and 
development. He was born Alay 27. 1861, 
in Alichigan City. Ind., the son of William 
and Jane (Crandall) Powell, the former a 
native of Ontario, Canada, and the latter born 
in Illinois, of an old New England family. 
Her fath'T. David, was a farmer and trapper 
of the tvpical pioneer frontier type, and his 




^- ^'^^.^^ 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1369 



death occurred in Missouri. William Powell, 
who was left an orphan when young, located 
Avith his foster-parents in Michigan City, 
where he cleared a farm for himself and lived 
the remainder of his life. His wife still lives 
in the old home. 

The only son of a family of four children 
David Powell spent his boyhood days on his 
father's farm, was educated in the grammar 
and high schools of ^Michigan City, and after 
his graduation from the latter was occupied 
for a time as a farmer and dairyman. Later 
he conducted a men's furnishing establishment, 
disposing of it, however, to deal in real estate, 
a business which he followed until 1893. when 
he came to Los Angeles as a merchant. One 
year later, in 1894, he took up his residence 
in Long Beach and conducted a grocery on 
Pine street near Ocean avenue for over three 
years. He then sold out and returned to In- 
diana, where he still owned a farm of eighty 
acres within the limits of Michigan City and 
]5roceeded to plat it, forming two additions, 
which he named Powell's and Powell's Gardena 
additions. It took three years to finish the 
work and dispose of the lots and after its 
completion he returned to Long Beach. He 
bought a berry ranch at .Signal Hill and for 
three and one-half years engaged in horticult- 
ural pursuits. In IQ06 he sold the ranch 
and established himself in the real-estate busi- 
ness again, buying and selling property for 
himself and transacting a general business. 

Mr. Powell was married in Michigan City 
to Miss Grace Boothroyd, a native of that 
city, and five children have been born to bless 
the union ; Lee is paying teller in the Long 
Beach National Bank : Ralph is a special officer 
of Long Beach ; Harry is a barber here ; Guy 
is employed in the Long Beach National Bank ; 
and Mildred lives at home. Mr. Powell is a 
stanch advocate of the principles embraced in 
the platform of the Republican party, and both 
for his personal worth and superior qualities 
as a progressive and public-spirited citizen is 
highlv esteemed and respected. 



EXUPERE SENTOUS. A very ' success- 
ful business man and one who enjoyed a 
wide esteem throughout Southern California, 
was Exupere Sentous. a member of one of the 
families of this section whose best interests 
have always been parallel with the upbuild- 
ing and development of the general welfare. 
He was a resident of this section just twenty- 
five years, having emigrated from his native 
land at the age of twenty-two years and made 
this place his home until his death at the age 



of fort}-seven. He was born in Haute- 
Garonne, France, March 22 1859, ^ son of 
Francisco and Marie (Fadeuill) Sentous, life- 
long residents of that section, where the father 
engaged as a prosperous farmer and stockman. 
There were eight children born to his father 
(who was married twice), and all are located 
in California. The first to emigrate was John 
Sentous in 1852; tlien Louis in 1855: \^incente 
in 1S74, and finally, in 1881, Exupere Sentous 
left his native land and coming to Los An- 
Sfeles made this place his home the remainder 
of his life. 

In the common schools of France Exupere 
.'^entous received his education, after which he 
engaged with his father in stock-raising, in 
which he learned much that proved of benefit 
to him in .Southern California. Following his 
brothers to the western world in 1881 he en- 
tered into partnership with his two brothers. 
Louis and Vincente, and for fifteen years the 
firm of Sentous Brothers carried on business 
on San Fernando street. At the ex- 
piration of that period Louis Sentous retired 
from the enterprise, and the two left removed 
their business to the corner of Los Angeles 
and Aliso streets and continued in partnership 
for nine years. 

Desiring at that time to give more of his 
personal attention to his ranch at Lemon, 
Exupere Sentous disposed of his business in- 
terests and removed to the country in the fall 
of 1903. He owned eighteen hundred ' acres 
of land, of which nine hundred acres were 
devoted to grain and the balance was a stock 
range. Lie raised sheep, cattle and horses 
and was one of the prominent farmers of 
Southern California. Politically he was a Re- 
publican and although never desirous of per- 
sonal recognition gave his efforts toward the 
advancement of the principles he endorsed. 
In religion he was a member of the Catholic 
Church. His death occurred June 10. 1906, 
through a stroke of apoplexy. 

December 4. 1894. in Los Angeles, Mr. 
-Sentous was unitei! in marriage with Miss 
Anna Goaillardeu, born in the Pyrenees, 
France, a daughter of Francois and Marian 
(Higetie) Goaillardeu, her father a farmer and 
builder of that section, where they both died. 
Thev had six children, two daughters and four 
sons, of whom four are in America. Mrs. 
Sentous was next to the oldest in the family 
nnd came to California in 1891. She is the 
mother of four children, namely: Zoe, 
Alphonse. Francois and .Antoinette. She is a 
member of the Catholic Church. Since her 
husband's death she has removed to Los .An- 
geles and now makes her home on Berendo 
street. 



137U 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



ISAAC D. STOCKTOX. Among the active. 
progressive and substantia! ranchers of Wmtura 
county is Isaac D. Stockton, of ^Nloorpark, who 
is carrying on general farming, including the 
raising of beans and fruit, with excellent pe- 
cuniary results. He possesses strong individual- 
ity, a hearty and genial disposition, is patriotic 
and public-spirited, and has an enviable reputa- 
tion as a straightforward and upright man and 
a loyal citizen. A son of Dr. I. D. Stockton, he 
was born March ii, 1859, in Sonoma county, 
coming from distinguished ancestr\-, teing a 
cousin twice removed of General Stockton, 
prominent in the early history of California, 
while on the paternal side he also had eleven 
great-great-uncles in the Revolutionary war. 

Dr. I. D. Stockton was born, reared and ed- 
ucated in Illinois, and there married Louisa M, 
Spiller, a native of Tennessee. He subsequent- 
ly removed to Kansas, where he was engaged in 
the practice of medicine until 1856. Coming then 
to Sonoma county, Cal., he continued his pro- 
fessional labors, and was also engaged to some 
extent in horticultural pursuits and in raising 
grapes. Moving from there to Kern county in 
1872, he took up a homestead claim of one hun- 
dred and sixty acres, and there continued as a 
physician and a farmer, building up a litcrative 
professional practice and improving a good 
property, which he called Lakeside ranch. He 
was an able and successful ph}'sician, during his 
fift}- years of active practice being well patron- 
ized and traveling many miles through valleys 
and over mountains. He attained the venerable 
age of eighty-three years, dying in 1900. His 
wife died in Los Angeles, Cal.. when fifty-six 
years old, having borne him nineteen children, 
fifteen reaching maturity and fourteen of whom 
are still living. While in Illinois he served in 
the Pdack Hawk war in 1832. He was a mem- 
ber of the Christian Church, and was a member 
of Santa Rosa Lodge, F. & A. ]\[., which he 
served as worshipful master, and was an active 
member of the Republican party. 

Acquiring his education in Kern county, 
where his father settled in 1872, Isaac D. Stock- 
ton remained at home until about seventeen years 
old, when he began life for himself. Going to 
Montana, he was for a while employed in 
freighting and blacksmithing. and then, after 
living for a year in Los Angeles, he traveled on 
horseback through Arizona, Idaho and Montana, 
becoming thoroughlv familiar with that part of 
the country. Locating in Ventura county in 
1888, he farmed for two years in El Rio, and 
then, in 1890, purchased one hundred acres of 
his present home ranch. It now contains two 
hundred and eiglity-three acres of rich and fer- 
tile land, and in addition to its management he 
has also leased one hundred and fift\' acres. He 



makes a specialty of raising beans, having two 
hundred acres, which yield on an average ten 
sacks to the acre, besides which he raises consid- 
erable hay. He also has a valuable apricot or- 
chard of twenty acres. 

April 17, 1886, Mr. Stockton married Ida B. 
Duncan, a native of Kansas, and a daughter of 
William Duncan, who removed from that state 
to California, locating in ]\Iariposa county with 
his family. He died there in 1903, when seven- 
ty-three years of age. Mr. and Mrs. Stockton 
became the parents of ten children, namely : 
Nellie E., Isaac Denton, Jr,, Robert Ivan. Louis 
M., William Allen, Mary Belle, and an infant, 
N. Duncan : the others dying in early childhood. 
Politically Mr. Stockton supports the principles 
of the Republican part}', antl fraternally he be- 
lons:s to \'entura Lodsre No. 201, I. O. O. F. 



HAR\^EY E\'ANS. A pioneer settler of 
\'entura county, Harvey Evans, of Oxnard, has 
for many vears been actively identified with its 
industrial interests, and is recognized as one of 
its most intelligent and thorough-going farmers, 
being the owner of as comfortable a homestead 
as can be found in this locality. During his long 
and busy career he has pursued the even tenor 
of his way as an honest man and a good citizen, 
advancing the interests of his community as he 
has had opportunity, and is now reaping the re- 
ward of his persistent toil and enjoying the con- 
fidence and respect of his neighbors and friends. 
A son of the late Thomas J. Evans, he ^vas 
born ^larch 29, 1847. in Platte county, Mo. 

Thomas J. Evans was a Kentuckian by birth 
and breeding. After his marriage to Catherine 
King, a Virginian, he went with his wife to Mis- 
souri, migrating to that state at the time of 
the Platte purchase, and there began the im- 
provement of a farm from the forest-covered 
land. In 1852 he crossed the plains with ox- 
teams, taking his family to Linn county. Ore., 
where he took up six hundred and forty acres 
of wild land and embarked in general farming. 
Removing in 1858 to Jackson county. Ore., he 
spent a Vear in that localitv, and the ensuing 
ten vears was a resident of Sonoma coimty, Cal. 
Coming to Ventura county in 1869, he located at 
Saticoy, and was there engaged in tilling the 
soil until his death, in 1887, at the age of four 
score years. His good wife preceded him to 
the better land, dying in 1886, at the age of sev- 
enty-eight years. 

Spending the days of his Ijoyhood and youth 
in Oregon and in Sonoma countv, Cal.. Harvey 
Evans completed his earlv education at the Santa 
Rosa Academy. In 1867 he located in i\Ion- 
terey, Cal.. where he followed farming for two 
years. In 1869 he came with the family to \'en- 




^ t^ dia^a^^ 



HISTORICAL .VXD BIOCiRAPHICAL RFX'ORD. 



(3 



tura county, and for a year assisted his father in 
the management of the home farm at Saticoy. 
Purchasing then the farm which he now owns 
and occupies, he labored energetically, and in 
his struggle with nature has been successful, 
his eighty acres of land being well improved an(l 
finely cultivated, yielding abundant crops of 
beets, beans and loarle}-. 

March 9, 1873, in Napa county, Cal., Mr. 
Evans married Nancy Eliza Montgomery, a na- 
tive of Oregon, and into their home three chil- 
dren were born, namely : Frances Josephine, 
wife of Archie Hart, of \'entura county ; Mrs. 
Lillian V. Mitchell, of Los Angeles ; and Clar- 
ence Harvey, who died, at the age of seven 
weeks, in 1889. Mr. and Mrs. Evans have also 
an adopted son, Albert W., whom they love and 
cherish as their own. Mrs. Evans is a member 
of the Christian Oiurch, in which she is a faith- 
ful worker. Mr. Evans has never cared for pub- 
lic office, but has served as trustee of the Spring- 
ville schools. 



ALVIN B. HANCOCK. The name of Alvin 
B. Hancock, deceased, is inseparably connected 
with every detail of the development and up- 
building of the community surrounding San 
Bernardino, in which section he spent his life 
from the age of four years. He was the son of 
Joseph Hancock, who was born near Cleveland, 
Ohio, in 1822, the latter's parents being Solomon 
and Alta (Adams) Hancock, born in Massachu- 
setts in 1793 and Vermont in 1795 respectively, 
both being of English descent. The great- 
grandfather was one of the signers of the De- 
claration of Independence, and the great- 
grandmother was a daughter of General Ward 
of Revolutionar)' fame. Thomas Hancock, the 
grandfather of Joseph, enlisted in the Revolu- 
tionary army when but fourteen vears of age 
and fought valiantly for the freedom of his 
country. 

When Joseph Hancock was ten years old his 
father removed to Clay county. Mo., where he 
lived three years and experienced many hard- 
ships. Some of his neighbors were less fortu- 
nate than he, however, and upon one occasion 
the son gave his shoes to another boy who had 
none. Four years later the family went to 
Adams county, 111., and remained there for three 
years, after which they resided a like period 
in Hancock county, that state. In 1846 they 
left Illinois and from that time until 1851 made 
their home in Council Bluffs, Iowa. That year 
they pushed on further west and became early 
settlers of L^tah. The trip on this occasion was 
fraught with many dangers and ]>rivations, and 
in crossing the Missouri river they barely escancd 
drowning. After stopping a short time in Salt 



Lake City they finally resumed their journey 
to California. During the early part of the 
journey Mr. Hancock was very sick with chills 
and fever, and while crossing the desert between 
Salt Lake and Bitter Springs nearly perished 
for want of water, the entire train being 
almost without that precious commodity. Al- 
though burning with a raging fever Mr. Han- 
cock refused to drink, insisting upon saving the 
scant supply for the children. A Mr. Thorn, 
who with his family was a member of the train, 
ran entirely out of water about this time, and 
athough Airs. Hancock had but a scant pint left 
she divided it with his children, who were crv- 
ing pitifully from thirst. It is needless to say 
diat the train was devoutly thankful when Bitter 
Springs was reached. On this part of the trip 
Mrs. Hancock had walked and driven the team. 

The first piece of land which Mr. Hancock 
purchased upon his arrival in San Bernardino 
consisted of five acres, and he later added to this 
holding fifty-six acres, upon which he built a 
new house, thereafter the family homestead. 
He had many interesting stories to tell bearing 
on his life's exciting experiences, and possessed 
numerous interesting relics of- bygone davs, 
among them being a board which was used as 
their table when crossing the plains, and a pow- 
der horn used in the war of 1812 bv an ances- 
tor who took part in that conflict.' The first 
marriage of :\Ir. Hancock occurred in Hancock 
county, III, and united him widi Miss Harriet 
Brook, a daughter of Samuel Brook, of Pennsyl- 
vania. Her death occurred in Council Bluffs, 
Iowa. In 1848 he wedded Miss Nancy Bemis, 
and of this union seven children were born : 
Alvin B., who married Elizabeth Nish and is 
now deceased ; Solomon, who married Eudora 
Hammock; Elenora, the wife of George Miller: 
Jerusha, wife of Charles Tyler: Lucina, wife 
of George Lord, Jr. : Foster, who married Kate 
Mapstead : and Joseph. 

The birth of Alvin B. Hancock occurred Jan- 
uary 13, 1850, near Council Bluff's, Iowa, and in 
1854 he was brought by his parents to San Ber- 
nardino county, where he received a common 
school education. After the completion of his 
studies [le ranched with his father on the home 
place until he attained his majority, when he 
began his independent business career. In 1882 
he was married to Miss Elizabeth Nish, who was 
born in San Bernardino. Her parents, William 
and Isabelle (Henderson) Nish, were both na- 
tives of Scotland and immigrated to this coun- 
try when very young, living with their parents 
in Iowa and Alissouri before their marriage, 
which occurred in the former state. Airs. Han- 
cock's father received a good education in Scot- 
land, where he was engaged as a contract miner, 
and her mother attended the public schools of 



1374 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



the United States. The)' came to San Bernardino 
county in 1856 and hved there the remainder of 
their lives, the father dying in 1872, at the age 
of forty-two years, and the mother in 1890, at 
fifty-five years. Mrs. Hancock became the moth- 
er of seven children, namely; Robert, who 
married Eula Hamilton, has one child and lives 
in San Bernardino ; William, Lester, James, 
Beauford, Earl and Clyde. Mrs. Hancock is the 
owner of a fine ranch of sixty-acres, upon which 
is grown grain and hay, which yield her a very 
comfortable income. Mr. Hancock was a stanch 
advocate of the principles of the Republican 
party during his lifetime and fraternally was a 
member of the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows at San Bernardino. 



THOMAS H. SIMONTON. Among the 
highly respected and esteemed citizens of Santa 
jMonica is Thomas H. Simonton, who by his in- 
dustry, thrift and business ability, has acquired 
enough of this world's goods to enable him to 
live retired from active life. A son of Hamil- 
ton Simonton. he was born October 2, 1827, in 
Frankstown, Pa. A native of Perry county, Pa., 
Hamilton Simonton spent the earlier part of his 
life in that vicinity. Subsequently removing 
with his family to Indiana, he carried on a large 
business as a canal contractor until 1837, when 
the state, from whom all contracts were let, sus- 
pended payment, and he stopped work. The en- 
suing three years he was employed as a miller. 
The state then settling for fifty-five cents on a 
dollar, he purchased five hundred and sixty 
acres of land in Miami county. Embarking in 
agricultural pursuits, he met with marked suc- 
cess, continuing thus employed until his death, 
in 1852. He was a member and an elder of the 
Presbyterian Church, and a man of sterling char- 
acter. His wife, whose maiden name was 
Keziah Woodburn, was born in Perry county, 
Pa., and died in 1895, aged eighty-two years. 

The oldest of a family of eight children, Thom- 
as H. Simonton attended first the public schools, 
completing his early education at a private 
school in Peru. Ind., and at the Gambia school 
in Ohio. While in the latter institution, in 1850, 
he had an attack of the California fever, and 
after a short visit at home started for the gold 
fields. Going to St. Joseph, Mo., he paid $200 
to Jerome. Hanson & Smith, who conducted a 
train of twenty- eight wagons across the plains. 
The. train broke up at Salt Lake City, where Mr. 
Simonton remained nineteen days. Continuing 
then his journey, he and his comrades had a 
fight with the Indians, but none of the party were 
seriously injured. Arriving in Hangtown, now 
Placerville, he mined successfully until stricken 
with the cholera, with which he was sick the en- 



tire winter. He was then engaged for some time 
in mining along the Feather river, after which, 
with three companions, he located twelve miles 
west of Marysville, where he put up hay, haul- 
ing it to the Marysville market. Subsequently 
purchasing mule teams, he was engaged in 
freighting to the mines northeast from Sacra- 
mento, from 1851 until 1854, when he re- 
turned east. For a short time thereafter he re- 
mained on the old homestead, and then went to 
Peru, Ind., where he speculated in grain, hogs 
and produce for two years, carrying on a prof- 
itable business. In 1859 he outfitted, and went 
to Denver, Colo., and later to Redclifif, Eagle 
county, where he engaged in farming, stock- 
raising and mercantile pursuits, having two stores 
in that place. In each of these vocations he met 
with success, staying there until 1900. Coming 
from there to California for the sake of his wife's 
liealth as well as his own, they took up their 
residence in Santa Monica, and are now respect- 
ed citizens of this community-. 

In Indiana, Mr. Simonton married Frances 
M. Reed, a native of that state, and they became 
the parents of five children, namely : Clara, at 
home; George and Frank, merchants in Victor, 
Colo. ; Jennie, wife of Newton Riley, of Victor, 
Colo. ; and Fannie E., who died aged twenty-one 
years. Politically Mr. Simonton is a steadfast 
supporter of the Republican party. 



OSCAR D. STEWART. Not far from Cama- 
rillo, A'entura county, lies the ranch of ninety- 
eight acres which has been the home of Mr. 
Stewart for nearly forty years. Born at Battle 
Creek, Calhoun county, JNIich., August 20, 1845, 
he is a son of Enoch and Nancy A. (Oscar) 
Stewart, both of whom claimed the Empire state 
as their birthplace. Following the life to which 
he had been reared the father immigrated to 
Michigan at an early day in the history of that 
commonwealth, and upon the farm which he es- 
tablished there made his home for many years. 
His later life, however, was spent under the 
sunny skies of California, his death, February 
I, 1896, closing a career of seventy-nine years 
of usefulness. After the birth of their three 
children the wife and mother was taken from 
them. Oscar D. at the time being a verv small 
child. 

Calhoun county, Mich., was the scene of the 
early life of Oscar D. Stewart, in fact he was 
about twenty years old when he severed connec- 
tions with his surroundings in that state and 
struck out boldly for the west in 1864. After 
remaining in California for one year a strong 
desire to see his old home and kinsmen once 
more caused him to return to Michigan, but 
the following ^•ear found him readv to return to 




7jr^%cr4\A^ 



^i^i^ 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1377 



the west permanently. For about two years he 
was located in the vicinity of Sacramento, but 
in 1868 he came to Ventura county, and with 
the exception of two years spent in Oregon he 
has made his home in this county continuously. 
For a few months he worked as a farm hand on 
ranches in the county, but in the fall of the same 
year located on the ranch which he now occu- 
pies, which fell as an inheritance to his wife. 
The greater part of the ranch is in beans, which 
form his principal crop, and yield from twelve 
to fifteen sacks to the acre. 

A marriage ceremony performed on his ranch 
in 1869 united the destinies of Oscar D. Stew- 
art and Fredericka Lucy Sip, the latter a native 
of Iowa. The home of Mr. and }ilrs. Stewart 
was blessed and brightened by the birth of five 
children, all of whom are now grown and es- 
tablished in homes of their own with the excep- 
tion of the youngest, who although married still 
remains with his parents. George, born June 
II, 1870, married Lilie Shields and resides in 
Camarillo; Edward J., who was born Septem- 
ber 24, 1871, chose for his wife Lucy Russell, 
and he too lives in this vicinity ; Walter O., born 
July 16, 1873, married Anna Sebastian, their 
home being near Oxnard ; Clara A., born Feb- 
ruary ig, 1875, is the wife of George Hughes; 
and Arthur Clyde, born October 30, 1883, and 
who married Catherine Schmitz, still makes his 
home on the old homestead. During the long 
period of his residence in this county Mr. Stew- 
art has won and retained the respect of associ- 
ates and has a large circle of friends among 
the pioneers of this part of the state. His polit- 
ical views coincide with the principles laid down 
in the platform of the Democratic party, and its 
candidates rarelv fail to receive his vote. 



CAPT. WILLIAM EDWIN HOFMAN. 
California is a favorite location for retired army 
officers who seek a place of rest and comfort for 
their declining years after a life of nomadism and 
active campaigning. Capt. William Edwin Hot- 
man, who spent more tlian twenty-five years of 
his life in military service, has been living in 
Elsinore since 1897 and has a nicely improved 
home in this city. He was born on Christmas 
Day, 1836, in Mansfield, Ohio, the son of Jacob 
and Jane W. (Caruthers) Hofman, the father 
being a native of the Shenandoah valley, Va.. 
and the mother of Mansfield, Ohio. On his 
father's side Captain Hofman is descended from 
German ancestors and from his mother he re- 
ceived Scotch-Irish blood. The elder Hofman 
was an early settler in Ohio and was occupied 
as a jeweler in Mansfield until 1840, when he 
removed to I\It. Carmel, 111., and from there to 
Olney, where for twelve years he filled the office 



of clerk of Richland county, after which he re- 
tired. Both parents died in Olney. There were 
six children in the family, three of whom are 
now living. One son, John, who was a rail- 
road man, was killed by accident in Kansas 
City, while Rudolph, who served in the Civil 
war in the same company and regiment as his 
brother. Captain Hofman, was wounded at Big 
Shanty, Ga., and died from the effects nine days 
later. 

The education of Captain Hofman was re- 
ceived in the public schools of Illinois and when 
a young man the congressman from their dis- 
trict offered him a cadetship. His mother ob- 
jected to his accepting it, however, and it was 
then given to Wesley Merritt of Salem, 111., who 
afterwards became major-general. He then 
served a four-years' apprenticeship to the man- 
ufacture of tin, copper and sheet iron, and in 
1859 left Olney for Pike's Peak, traveling by 
team from Leavenworth, Kans. Locating at 
Central City he mined in Russell and California 
gulches until 1861 when he returned to his home 
in Illinois. In 1862, after the breakmg out of the 
war, he assisted in raising Company B, Ninety- 
eighth Illinois A-^olunteer Infantry, was mustered 
in at Centralia on September 3, and was com- 
missioned by Governor Yates as first lieutenant 
of his company. After the battle of Stone river 
the regiment was mounted the same as the 
mounted cavalry and took part in the engagement 
at Hoover's Gap and in the Tullahoma cam- 
paign, which ended with the battle of Chicka- 
mauga. Following this he took part in the 
Georgia campaign until the capture of Atlanta. 
He was in Girard's cavalry which was dismount- 
ed in order to turn the horses over to Kilpat- 
rick for use in Sherman's march to the sea, and 
was then sent to Louisville, Ky., for new mounts 
and outfits, when the regiment was sent in pur- 
suit of Morgan. They did not meet him, how- 
ever, and were ordered back to Georgia, Mississ- 
ippi and Alabama. From then until the close 
of the war he served under General Wilson, took 
]">art in \\'ilson's raid and the capture of several 
cities in the south, while a portion of his reg- 
iment assisted in the taking of Jefferson Davis. 
He had in the meantime been promoted and 
commissioned as captain, and when mustered out 
at Nashville, in August, 1865, he was the senior 
captain of the regiment. 

Returning home Captain Hofman began to 
look about for a business opening. Following the 
suggestion of his cousin. Col. Mc. E. Dye. he 
decided instead to enter the regular service. Six 
months after making his application he was com- 
missioned as a first lieutenant. June 12. 1867, 
and was later assigned to Company K, Thirty- 
first Lnited States Infantry. Going to Ft. Tot- 
ten. N. Dak., he was a participant in the Tur- 



1378 



HISTORICAL AXD BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



tie Mountain Indian troubles until iSCjiy, when 
he was sent to Ft. Sully, S. Dak. About this 
time the army was reduced in numbers but he 
was retained and assigned by General Han- 
cock to the Xinth Infantry as first lieutenant of 
Company H, and sent to Ft. Russell, Wyom. 
Later he went to Ft. Saunders and in 1873 escort- 
ed the surveying part\- which ran the prelimi- 
nary line for what is now the Northern Pacific 
Railroad from the Missouri river to Yellowstone. 
From there he was stationed at Ft. Omaha, Xeb., 
and subsequently sent to various points, includ- 
ing Ft. McKinney, Wyom., Ft. Russell, and Ft. 
Bridger, then was promoted to a captaincy and 
returned to Ft. Russell to accompany an expe- 
dition to Crisfield. Kans.. in 1885. In 1886 he 
was sent to Ft. ^^'ing■ate. X'. !Mex., and was in 
command of three companies from his regiment 
in the Geronimo campaign until that warrior was 
captured. L'pon his return to Ft. \\'ingate he 
applied for sick leave in order to come to the 
western coast, but when his application reached 
General Howard he ordered Captain Hofman"s 
company from Ft. Wingate to San Diego, Cal. 
This was in 1887. and after remaining there for 
six months Captain Hofman was retired in 1888 
for disability. He remained in San Diego for 
a time, then removed to Alurrietta, and in 1897 
came to Elsinore. 

Captain Hofman was married in Clay county, 
III. to Miss Sarah Hance, and they became the 
parents of one daughter. Alice, who is now the 
wife of E. Michener of Elsinore. Captain Hof- 
man is a member of the T. B. Stevens Post. G. 
A. R., at Elsinore, of which he is past com- 
mander, and politically affiliates with the Repub- 
lican party. He served his city one year on the 
board of trustees and in every way has proven 
himself a valuable citizen, interested in every 
cause tending toward the upbuilding of the coni- 
munitv in which he resides. 



GIDEOX ED\\"ARDS THURMOXD. A 
fine type of the southern gentleman of that school 
which is rapidly passing away is G. E. Thm-- 
mond, one of the best known and most highlv re- 
spected citizens of Santa Barbara county. Both 
his father, Thomas J- Thurmond, and his mother, 
who was Sarah Franklin before her marriage, 
were born in North Carolina. There were seven 
children in the familv and two of the sons were 
killed during the Civil war while doing active 
military service in the Confederate cause. The 
father died before the commencement of the war. 
at the age of forty-five years, and his wife sur- 
vived him but a short time, she also dying at the 
same age. Thomas J- Thurmond was a memlier 
of the ]\Iasonic fraternitv and during bis lifetime 
occupied a prominent place as a leading and 



highly respected citizen of his home community. 

G. E. Thurmond was born in Hardeman coun- 
t)-. Tenn., Xovember 27, 1843. His preliminary 
education was received in the common schools, 
after which college preparatory work was done 
at Wilson Hall in Mississippi for entrance into 
the University of North Carolina. When war 
was declared between the north and south Mr. 
Thurmond enlisted in Company B, Seventeenth 
Regiment of Mississippi Infantry, and became a 
member of the Featherstone Brigade. His gal- 
lantry, bravery and worth as a soldier were rec- 
ognized in his appointment to the position of 
first lieutenant of Company B during the first two 
years of his service, and during the last two years 
of the war he filled the higher office of captain of 
the same compan\-. With his regiment he took 
part in the battles of Bull Run, Balls Bluff. Seven 
Pines, and the seven days" engagements before 
Richmond, and later in the Fredericksburg cam- 
paign, and other minor engagements. At the close 
of the war he returned to Tennessee and taught 
school near Bolivar for two years, and after that 
he removed to Texas and engaged in the mer- 
chandising business for a like period. In ]\Iay, 
1868, he decided to follow the then popular road 
to the west, and reached San Jose, Cal.. as his 
first stopping point. He remained there for a 
short time only, however, before removing to the 
Carpinteria valley, which has ever since been his 
honie. l*"or a number of years he owned and 
managed a store in Carpinteria, finallv disposing 
of it to devote his time to the duties of the office 
of county superintendent of schools of Santa Bar- 
bara county, which office he held for nearly a 
quarter of a century. At the time of assuming 
the duties of this position in 1874 there were 
eleven districts and fifteen teachers, and at the 
end of twenty-five years there were fiftv-six dis- 
tricts and one hundred and forty teachers. Mr. 
Thurmond held the office longer than any other 
incumbent of the same office in Southern Califor- 
nia. WHien it is remembered that Santa Barbara 
county is a strong Republican district and Mr. 
Thurmond is an equally strong Democrat, the 
long period during which the people continued 
him in office is a flattering tribute to the personal 
popularity and official efficiencv of the man. Aft- 
er this long term of office holding j\Ir. Thurmond 
retired to private life, feeling that he had given a 
just share of his years of active work for the 
good of the schools in his section — and no work 
is of more importance and far-reaching influence. 
He now resides on his ranch, which consists of 
about thirty acres of land, a third of it being 
planted to walnuts. He takes a deep interest in 
matters of public import, and throughout the 
county claims the admiration and respect of all 
who appreciate what he has accomplished. 

Fraternalh' ^Tr. Thurmond affiliates with sev- 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1379 



eral lodges, among them the Knights of i'ythias, 
the Maccabees and Fraternal Brotherhood. He 
is an adherent of the Episcopal faith and his wife 
is a Presb\-terian. a liberal support being given 
to all religious benevolences and charitable 
causes in Carpinteria. The marriage of Mr. 
Thurmond to Miss Ellen Dickinson of Glade 
.Sjjring. \a., occurred November 23, 1870, and 
four children have blessed the union : Hunter, 
who has charge of the commercial department in 
the O'xnard high school ; Gwyn, who married 
Edith Shepard and has two children ; Mary, who 
married lien llailard and is the mother of five 
children: and Miklred, a student in Pomona col- 
lege. 



MILETUS HENRY SNOW. The prosperity 
of any community depends upon its business 
activity, and the enterprise manifest in commer- 
cial circles is the foundation upon which is biiild- 
ed the material welfare of town, state and nation. 
The most important factors in public life at the 
present day are therefore the men who are in 
control of successful business interests, and such 
a one is Mr. Snow, well known as the manager 
of the Pomona Lumber Company, which has 
one of the largest lumber yards in the Pomona 
valley, and is located at No. 491 East Second 
street. 

A native of Kansas, Air. Snow was born in 
Winfield, Cowlev county, the eldest of five sons 
born to his parents, A. 15. and Marietta (Brown) 
Snow, the former a native of Illinois. Before 
leaving his native state the father had become 
interested in the lumber business and upon his 
removal to Kansas during his young manhood 
he established himself in that Inisiness in Cow- 
ley county. After continuing there for several 
years he transferred his business to the adjoining 
territory of Oklahoma, and still later removed 
further south into Indian territory. The locality 
in which he located was almost a wilderness as 
compared with present activity, and" among those 
who were instrumental in organizing the settle- 
ment now known as Chickasha, none was more 
active than A. B. Snow, for it was he who put 
up the first building, it being portable and hauled 
in with cattle : he also put in the first stock of 
lumber. With his wife he is now living in 
Long Beach, among whose citizens he is classed 
as one of her active business men, for he is 
still engaged in the lumber business. 

Born in Winfield, Kans., October 9, 1877, 
Miletus H. Snow attended school first in his na- 
tive state and later in Oklahoma and Indian ter- 
ritory. As far back as his memory can carry 
him he recalls associations connected with hi.s 
father's lumber yard, and in fact when he was 
fourteen vears old he entered his father's em- 



ploy. So thoroughly did he learn the details 
of the business that he became an invaluable 
assistant, the two working harmoniously to- 
gether for a number of years in Chickasha, I. T. 
In March, 1904, Mr. Snow came to California 
and the following June located in Pomona. In 
1904 his father and brother organized the Pomo- 
na Lumber Company, Inc., of which A. B, Snow 
is president, and Miletus H. Snow is manager. 
Besides lumber of all kinds usual to an establish- 
ment of this kind they carry a full line of shin- 
gles, sash, doors, lath, lime and cement, and 
under the capable management of the son a 
flourishing business has grown up which dis- 
tinguishes it as one of the thriving institutions of 
tl-.e Pomona valley. 

In Qiickasha, I. T., Miletus H. Snow was 
married to Miss Nellie Ellis, a native of Texas, 
and two children have come to add brightness 
to their home life. Pearl and Gladys. Mr. and 
Mrs. Snow are consistent members of the First 
Presbyterian Church of Pomona and are active 
in the various departments of benevolent work 
carried on by the local church. While in Indian 
territory Mr. Snow became identified with the 
Odd Fellows organization, being initiated into 
Chickasha Lodge, and since coming to Califor- 
nia has transferred his membership to Pomona, 
and he also belongs to the Modern Woodmen of 
America. Politically he gives his support to 
Republican principles, and is a member of the 
Board of Trade. 



EARLE CARR. The magnificent section of 
countrv in Southern California has been devel- 
oped and improved by some of the most stirring 
and enterprising men of this day and age, no 
part of the globe having been more quickly 
transformed from its original wild condition into 
a beautiful garden spot, rich with bloom and 
harvests, than that portion of \'entura county 
Iving in and around the town of Oxnard. One 
of the leading spirits in this wonderful trans- 
formation is Earle Carr, an active and progres- 
sive agriculturist, and one of Oxnard's most in- 
fluential citizens, occupying a position of promi- 
nence in industrial, business and social circles. 
A son of P. S. Carr, he was born December 24, 
1878, in Kalamazoo county, Mich. 

A native of Michigan, P. S. Carr was brought 
up on a farm, and for many years was engaged 
in agricultural pursuits in that, state. In 1888 
with a view to bettering his financial condition, 
he came to California, settling in \'entnra coun- 
tv. where he has since been prosperously em- 
ploved in his chosen calling. He is a man of 
strict integrity, and is very prominent in Ma- 
sonic circles, being a Scottish Rite and a York 
Rite Mason, and belonging to ^'entura Com- 



1380 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



mandery, K. T. He married Mary Ann Earle, 
who was born in England, and they became the 
parents of three children, all of whom are liv- 
ing. 

Coming with his parents to Southern Cali- 
fornia when ten years of age, Earle Carr was 
educated principally in \'entura county, attend- 
ing first the common schools, and afterwards the 
Ventura Business College, ^^'hile Remaining at 
home he assisted his father in the management 
of his ranch, acquiring in the mean time valuable 
agricultural knowledge. In 1896 he began the 
battle of life for himself as a ranchman, and by 
dint of perseverance, thrift and wise judgment 
has succeeded almost beyond his most sanguine 
expectations. In 1901 he took possession of his 
present ranch of three hundred acres, and has 
since placed all of the land under a high state 
of cultivation, devoting twenty-five acres of it 
to beets, and two hundred and seventy-five acres 
to beans. Both are profitable crops to raise, the 
latter yielding on an average nineteen sacks to 
the acre. In the care of his farm, Mr. Carr 
takes genuine pride and pleasure, sparing neither 
time nor expense in his efforts to improve it, 
his ranch in its appointments being one of the 
best in the neighborhood. 

In 1896 Mr. Carr married Winnifred Fair- 
banks, who was born in Hueneme, Cal., a daugh- 
ter of E. B. Fairbanks, for twenty-five years 
foreman of the wharf. Three children have 
blessed the union of Mr. and Mrs. Carr, namely : 
Philetus Sprague, Robert and Earle Edward. 
Politically Mr. Carr upholds the principles of 
the Republican party by voice and vote. Fra- 
ternallv he is a member of Oxnard Lodge No. 
341, F. & A. M.; of Oxnard Chapter No. 86. 
R. A. M.; of A'entura Commanderv No. 18, K. 
T.; and of Al :\Ialaikah Temple, A." A. O. N. M. 
S., of Los Angeles. He is highly esteemed in 
Masonic circles, and is now serving as worship- 
ful master of Oxnard Lodge. 



NOAH R. SMITH, D. D. S. Prominent 
among the leading professional members of the 
industrial community of Santa Monica is Noah 
R. Smith, D. D. S., who has a large and re- 
munerative patronage, his natural talents and in- 
dustry placing him among the most noted and 
successful dentists of this part of the county. A 
native of Missouri, he was bom in Pike county, 
February 11, 1874. 

Having completed his preliminary education 
in the common schools of his native state, Noah 
R. Smith was graduated from La Grange Col- 
lege, in La Grange, Lewis county. Mo. He aft- 
erwards went to Kansas City, Mo., there en- 
tering the Western Dental College, from which 
he was graduated with the class of 1896. Im- 



mediately opening an ofiice in Howard county, 
Mo., Dr. Smith remained there five years, being 
successfully engaged in the practice of his chosen 
profession. Desiring a complete change of clim- 
ate, he came to Los Angeles county in 1901, lo- 
cating as a dentist in Santa Monica, where he 
has built up a splendid practice, his professional 
knowledge and skill having won for him the con- 
fidence and esteem of his numerous patrons. 

In Howard county, Mo., Dr. Smith married 
Roberta M. Todd, a native of that county, as 
was her father, H. M. Todd. She came of pio- 
neer ancestry, her grandfather, Joshua Todd, 
having been a pioneer of Howard county, and 
also being distinguished as having been the first 
settler of Omaha, Neb., getting his grant from 
the old Council Bluffs Ferry Company. The 
doctor and Mrs. Smith have three children, 
namely : Nelson R., John Robert, and an infant 
unnamed. The doctor is domestic in his tastes 
and practices, his home being far more to him 
than any club, and is a valued member of the 
Baptist Church. 



THOMAS IMcCORMICK. One of the in- 
dustrious and thoroughgoing ranchers of Ven- 
tura county is Thomas [NlcCormick, whose well- 
appointed and productive ranch is pleasantly and 
conveniently located two miles from Camarillo. 
Becoming a tiller of the soil from choice at an 
early age, he has followed that vocation ever 
since, and since locating on his present ranch 
has made a specialty of raising beans and barley. 

Of foreign birth and antecedents, Thomas Mc- 
Cormick was born in County Longford, Ireland, 
Julv 9, 1867, and is a son of James 'and Cath- 
erine (McCormick) McCormick, both of whom 
were also natives of the Emerald Isle. ]Mr. Mc- 
Cormick has no personal recollections of his 
father, for the latter died when he was an in- 
fant. His mother, however, endeavored to sup- 
ply the loss to her family by giving them the 
care and protection of both parents, with the re- 
sult that the children were trained to lives of use- 
fulness and high ideals. The death of the mother 
occurred in 1904, when she was about fifty-six 
years of age. Prior to coming to the United 
States in 1888 Thomas McCormick had taken 
advantage of every opportunity offered in his 
native countv for obtaining an education, and the 
foundation there laid has been greatly added to 
in the later years by intelligent reading and care- 
ful observation. Landing in New York City, he 
soon made his way across the continent, coming 
at once to what is now Oxnard, Ventura county, 
where for seven years he worked in the employ 
of others, an experience which was of great ad- 
vantage to' him, in that it gave him an excellent 
opportunity to learn the methods of farming in 




1 



i 



HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD. 



1383 



this country. Before becoming a land owner, 
however, he tested his ability as a rancher by 
starting out for himself on rented land, operating- 
leased land from 1895 ""'^il 1902, in which latter 
year he came to his present location. Besides 
owning a tract of one hundred and twelve acres, 
he leases one hundred acres of land adjoining, the 
entire acreage under his control being devoted 
to the raising of beans and barley exclusively. 
The raising of beans constitutes his chief indus- 
try, and in harvesting twenty-three sacks to the 
acre he is exceeding by far the average yield for 
that commodity. 

October 27, 1901, Thomas McCormick and 
Elizabeth McGrath were united in marriage, the 
ceremony taking place in El Rio. The three 
children born of their marriage are, Mary Jose- 
phine Dolores, Thomas Hubert and James 
Dominick. The family are adherents of the 
Roman Catholic faith, and worship in the church 
of that denomination at Oxnard. Politically Mr. 
McCormick is a Republican, and the only fra- 
ternal order with which he is connected is the 
Knights of Columbus. Few citizens of the coun- 
tv enjoy to a greater extent than does Mr. Mc- 
Cormick the confidence and esteem of his fellow- 
townsmen, nor are any more in touch with the 
needs, aspirations and successes of the commun- 
ity. 



FORREST :^,1AKLEY ERSKINF. The suc- 
cess which has accompanied the efforts of Air. 
Erskine since his location in California has 
been such as to place him among the repre- 
sentative citizens of the vicinity of Bryn 
Mawr, win him a competency, and establish 
his fortunes on a firm basis. A native of 
Stoughton, Mass., Forrest Manley Erskine was 
born" February 4, 1850. a son of Robert, of 
.\bingdon, that state, a shoemaker by trade, 
and who lived to the age of eighty-one years. 
His mother, in maidenhood Joan Whitmash, 
was born in Abingdon, Mass., where she also 
passed away at the age of seventy-two years. 
They were' the parents of eight children, of 
whom seven are now living, a son, Frank, hav- 
ing served in the Civil war in a Massachu- 
setts regiment. 

The fourth in his father's family, Forrest 
Manley Erskine was reared in his native state 
and educated in its public schools, after which 
he learned the trade of shoemaker, engaging 
first as heeler and then as heel trimmer on 
the machine with various companies in 
Stoughton and Brockton. He was employed 
bv the Stacy Adams Company and made $100 
per month as heel trimmer. He came to Cali- 
fornia in October, tSqt, with $1,500, the en- 
tire amount that he had been able to accumu- 



late in the passing years, and secured a posi- 
tion with Isam Mitchell, acting as foreman 
on his ranch for ten years. Duripg this time 
he had become interested in horticultural pur- 
suits and had purchased ten acres of land and 
set it out in navel oranges; three years later 
he bought ten acres adjoining, and later bought 
twenty acres of raw land, now owning twenty 
acres in full bearing. He made all the im- 
provements on the property and about five 
years ago began to devote his entire time and 
attention to his groves and now has one of the 
finest properties of this section. 

In Stoughton. Alass., Mr. Erskine was unit- 
ed in marriage with Miss Alice Eldora Mad- 
an, a native of that place, and they have one 
child, Gladdys Wayne, now Mrs. \'. G. Klien- 
berger, of Los .\ngeles. She was educated in 
private schools. Politically Mr. Erskine is a 
true blue Republican. 



STEPHEN LEXTON. A central figure in 
commercial and agricultural affairs in Long 
Beach was the late Stephen Lenton, whose death 
in 1905 removed from the community an enter- 
prising and able citizen. He was a native of Eng- 
land, his birth having occurred in the vicinity of 
Birmingham in 1847. He there grew to man- 
hood and after serving an apprenticeship in land- 
scape gardening engaged in that business for 
some rears. Deciding to locate in the LTnited 
States 'he brought his wife, formerly Mary Fluck, 
also a native of England, and their two children 
across the Atlantic in the year 1873. and after lo- 
cating in the state of Mississippi followed farm- 
ing for a livelihood. Later he went to New Jer- 
sey, where he engaged as a florist for seven years, 
meeting with success in his efforts. His next 
move found him a resident of Elgin, 111., where 
the same business offered him opportunities for 
advancement, and in that section he remained un- 
til his final location in California. He first set- 
tled in Piru, Ventura county, where he engaged 
for a time on a ranch, in the nursery department, 
after which he embarked in the nursery business, 
following the same for the period of eight years. 
During this time his wife died at the age of fiftv- 
five years. Coming to Los Angeles in 1896. he 
established a floral store and also raised many 
varities of flowers and plants. In .\pril, 1899, ^i^ 
came to Long Beach and on the corner of Fourth 
and Alamitos avenues conducted a nursery and 
floral establishment. At the time of his death 
there were four and a half acres in the home 
place, which has since been subdivided. 

In 1899 Mr. Lenton was united in marriage 
with ]\Trs. Jennie (Braly) Hargrave. the widow 
of Judge J." P. Hargrave. of Prescntt. Ariz., and 
she now makes her home in Long Beach. By his 



1384 



HISTORICAL AXI) B10GRAPHIC.\L RECORD. 



first marriage he had tlie following children : 
Rose, widow of E. \'. Lawson, of Long Beach ; 
Albert, also of Long Beach ; Ada, wife of A. 
, Alartin of \'entura, Cal. ; Lavinia, a teacher ; and 
Alice, a trained nurse. 

Albert Lenton, the only son, was born in Eng- 
land, May 6, 1872, and was brought to America 
when only one year old. In the schools of New 
Jersey and Illinois he received his scholastic 
training, graduating in the Elgin schools. He 
learned the trade of landscape gardener and 
florist under the instruction of his father, with 
whom he worked a considerable portion of his 
time, remaining in Fullerton, Orange county, 
Cal., where his father had located after leaving 
Los Angeles, prior to his settlement in Long 
Beach. Following his father to this city he en- 
gaged as foreman in the ornamental department 
of the Orange County Nursery in Fullerton, 
during which time he was offered the position of 
foreman of the University grounds in Berkeley, 
Cal. After thirteen months in that location he 
returned to Long Beach on account of his fath- 
er's failing health, and here took up the duties 
of his father's business. For about two years 
he held the Fourth street nursery independently, 
but since his father's" death he has removed to 
Fullerton in the employ of the Orange County 
Nurserv. 



ARTHUR PINCKNEY NELSON, super- 
visor of the Fifth Supervisoral district, is a well 
known horticulturist and is superintendent of 
the Whittier ranch at Redlands Junction, in 
which work he has met with great success. Of 
southern lineage, he was born in ^^'hite countw 
Tenn., July 22, 1848, and was thus a lad of 
nearly thirteen years at the time of the breaking- 
out of the Civil war. His father. Jesse T.. was 
born in A'irgiiiia and reared in North Carolina, 
when he removed to Tennessee and engaged at 
his trade of wagon and carriage maker, and also 
was occupied in farming. At the breaking out 
of the war the family was located in Spencer, 
^'an Buren county, where Mr. Nelson was 
prominent in public affairs, serving as justice of 
the peace and in other positions of i'mportance, 
his livelihood at that time being obtained as a 
miller. Because of his avowed Union sympathies 
he was constantly threatened by the Secession- 
ists, and finally in 1863 he started his family for 
Illinois by team, and with his son (who was then 
reaching an age when he would be forced into 
the Confederate army) traveled at night to Ken- 
tucky, and thence to Illinois. Up to this time 
they had acted in the interests of the famous 
underground railway, Arthur P. Nelson assist- 
ing as conductor in aiding the Union men to es- 



cape from Tennessee to the Federal lines in 
Kentucky, piloting them by night from his fath- 
er's house over the mountains to their next place 
of refuge. In Olney, Richland county, III, the 
father located his family, and there engaged in 
farming until his death, which occurred in 1866. 
His wife, formerly Sarah liarckley. was born in 
North Carolina and died in Illinois, leaving a 
family of seven children. 

The eldest in his father's family, Arthur 
I'inckney Xel^nn, rccei\e(l his preliminary edu- 
cation in the district schools of Tennessee and 
also attended Llurrett College at Spencer one 
term, when the war interrupted educational pur- 
suits. In February, 1865, after his escape from 
his native state, he enlisted in Company E, One 
Hundred and Fifty-fifth Illinois Volunteer In- 
fantry, was mustered in at Springfield and 
served in Tennessee within sixty miles of his old 
home. He was honorably discharged in August 
of the same year and soon after his return home 
his father died,' leaving him the head of the fam- 
il}' at the age of seventeen years. He engaged 
in the management of the home farm and until 
1875 cared for his mother, brothers and sisters, 
and then, having previously learned the trade 
of carpenter, worked at this jjursuit for two 
years. He then accejited a i"isition in the de- 
]5artment of bridges. lniiMinL:s and water sup- 
ply for the Ohio & AlisMssijipi Railroad, now 
the Baltimore & ( )hio, and retained his connec- 
tion with the road uiitil 1887. Coming to Cali- 
fornia in this year he looked about in Riverside 
and San Bernardino, and finally accepted em- 
ployment as a carpenter on the Mound City 
buildings. The bench at that time was covered 
with sage-brush, where he shot jack rabbits and 
quail. He worked in Southern California until 
February of 1889, when hc'deciiled to go to San 
Francisco, and from there continued to Portland, 
where he followed the building business until 
fall. He then returned to California and worked 
at his trade in Berkeley until April, i8go, and 
then came again to San Bernardino county, as 
he had previously become interested in the nurs- 
ery business in ^'lound City and felt it necessary 
to return to attend to his interests. After locat- 
ing here in 1890 he took charge of the work him- 
self and in the fall of the year bought property 
and continued the work, improving first four 
acres and later adding fifteen acres, the latter 
property still being in his possession and now 
devoted' to oranges. In 1894 Mr. Whittier called 
upon him to accept the management of his ranch 
of one hundred and seventy acres, of which one 
hundred and sixty-five acres are in oranges and 
grape fruit, being set out by Mr. Nelson and 
thoroughly improved by him, irrigated, etc., the 
residence, barns, outbuildings, wells, pumping 
plant, all being his own work. He has made a 



HISTORICAL AXD BIOCIRAPHIC.VL RECORD. 



13S5 



success of his work and is one of the most suc- 
cessful horticulturists of this section. 

Mr. Nelson has been twice married, the first 
ceremony being performed in Richland county, 
111., and uniting him with Miss ^larv L. Bowen, 
who was born in Ohio and died in Illinois. In 
San Bernardino county he married Miss Lou 
Perkins, a native of Michigan. Mr. Xelson was 
made a ^lason in Olney, 111., and now belongs to 
Redlands Lodge No. 300, F. & A. M. Political- 
ly he is a stanch Republican, and in 1904 was 
elected supervisor of the Fifth Supervisoral 
district, and is now discharging the duties of that 
position. For years he has served as a member 
of the Republican Count\ Central Committee. 
As a member of the Redlands Board of Trade he 
is active in advancing the business interests of 
this section. 



JOSEPH E. WILSHIRE. The name which 
heads this review is one well known in Southern 
California and held in the highest esteem by 
those whose pioneer efforts toward the devlop- 
ment of the state left nothing to be desired in 
the present generation but the same self-sacri- 
ficing devotion to the cause of their forefathers. 
Joseph E. Wilshire is a native of California. His 
father, George T., was born in England and emi- 
grated to America in }oung manhood. After 
spending some time in Boston, Mass., he located 
in the middle west, married in St. Louis, Mo., 
and from thence in 1855 he crossed the plains 
to Salt Lake, where he followed farming for the 
period of two years. In 1857 he came to San 
Bernardino county by means of ox-teams, and 
purchasing a farm on \\'orm creek, he the