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Full text of "A History of Captain Roswell Preston of Hampton, Connecticut, his ancestry and descendants ; including ancestry in the Eaton, Knowlton, Butt, Raymond, Witter, Killam, Hinds and other kindred families"




iiiiiBiiiii 



GENEALOGY COLLECTiON 



EN CPUNTY PUBU 



3 1 



833 03324 6643 






y-^- 



A HISTORY 



OF 



Capt ain Roswell Prestom- 

OS, 

HAMPTON, _CONNECT I C U T 

His 

Ancestry and Descendants 



INCLUDING ANCESTRY 
IN THE 

EATON. KNOWLTON, BUTT, RAYMOND, WITTER, 
KILLAM, HINDS 

AND 

OTHER KINDRED FAMILIES 



Compileil and Published by 

EDWARD M. PRESTON 

Nevadiv City, Calllornia 
189y 



1851344 



EATON FAMILY ASSOCIATION. 



To the Members of the Eaton Family : — 

An immense amount of work has already been done in getting 
together material for an Eaton Genealogy. There is danger that 
some of it will be lost (as some of it has already been lost) by the 
death of those now getting along in years who have spent freely and 
without recompense their time and energy in accumulating this material. 
To prevent further losSj to preserve what we have, and to stim- 
{ ulate to renewed energy those now at work as well as new workers 

j in the field, the material now at hand should be put in print. To 

I do this properly, and to print a Genealogy worthy of the Family, 

I equal in importance and thoroughness to the best of other works 

of the same kind, to prepare and print a large volume of perhaps 
] over 500 pages, including the names of perhaps 20,000 Eatons and 

; Eaton descendents, in an edition of 500 copies, will probably 

j cost three thousand dollars. It is only by doing the work in this 

I thorough way, and having it printed in first-class style by a leading 

publisher of such works, that a book can be sent out that will be 
I a real contribution to New England history. 

You are therefore earnestly requested to write Rev. W. H. 

Eaton, 700 Tremont Temple, Boston, Mass., stating what amount 

you are willing to pledge yourself to contribute to this work, 

payable when the Committee on Publication shall give you notice 

! that the work is set up in type, and also stating what number of 

j copies you will agree to take at $500 per copy, payable upon 

1 delivery of the work. We shall be glad to have you contribute in both 

' ways, or, if you prefer, to have you contribute only in one of these 

two ways. We must ask you to do this within a month. Unless 

enough favorable replies are received, the enterprise will be abandoned. 

Will you also, within a week after the receipt of this circular, 

send us the full naines and addresses of all Eatons, and all descend- 

' ents of Eatons, whether of that name or some other name, you may 

' know, and we will send them copies of this circular. 

Cousins of the Eaton Family, this matter is in your hands and 
depends upon you. If you want this work done, say so promptly. 
If it is not carried through now the attempt will be abandoned. 
\ Join us in this memorial to the Eaton Family. Some of you can 

1 contribute in cash, while others are more than doing their share by 

1 contributing' in hard brain work, time and energy freely, without 

I cost and without price. Will you do your share? 

( Jf>UN 1Cat(jn, President. 



, } A.MASA M. i'lAION, ) 

IJfjsioN, Mass., Siyiicn \ ^. ,, ( ,. 

' ' / bVI.VANUS I I AV WAKI), /Ci 

Nov. 2 7, 1000. 1 iw II !• , I 

" -^ VV. H. I'.AIOM, f 






l~ 




Presentation 

01 Jewels. 



Tbe receptiou given at Musonio Hall 
last night by Evangeline Ciinpter, 
Order of Eastern Star, in Louor of 
Mr§. Fred Zeitler, was aa event thiit I 
will long be remembered by those \ 
present. The program was an inter- | 
•stiogone and nice refreshments were j 
served. 

During the evening the Worthy Ma- j 
tron, Mrs. Kate Reynolds, on i)etialf ; 
of Evangeline Chapter, in a uent little \ 
Bpeech, preseuted Mrs. Fred Z.-itler; 
with an elegant pin, with jewels, rep-' 
resenting the emblem of the order. ' 
Mrs. Zeitler, who was taken by Eui- 
prise, replied in a very feeling and ap- 
preciative manner, ! 

An elegant jewel was presented to 
Hon. E. M. Preston, who is now a pas' 
officer of all the Masonic lodges in 
this city. The presentation Bpeech 
WU8 made by Hon. J. M. Fulweiler and ; 
Mr. PrestoB replied very hHppily. It 
was "nip and tack," as to the be'^t 
speech. Both are ranked as very fine 
and good, square talkers. 

The following was the program : 

Opening Address by Hon. E. M. 
Preston. 

Address of Welcome by Mrs. Kute 
Beynolda. j 

Song by Nevada Oommandery Quar- 
tette. ! 

Presentation of a Life-size Portrait! 
of Hon. E. M. Preston, by Hon. Juiiu j 
M. Fulweiler. During the tipeuch tbe ■ 
portrait was unveiled and for the first : 
time Mr. Preston was so surprisf^d I 
that he seemed powerless to^ive tx-* 
preeslon to the feelings of his heart. 

Song by Mrs. Ben Hall. 

Song by Miss Elsie Arbogaet. 

Original Poem by Mrs. Edmiuistei. 

Recitation by Mrs, R, Plummer. 

Urand Banqoet. 



LINE OF ANCESTRY 



Preston Family 



I. Roger, born 1614, had: 

Thomas, Samuel, John, Jacob, Levi, Elizabeth, and Mary. 

II. Samuel, born 1G51, had: 

Samuel, William, Susanna, Mary, Jacob, Elizabeth, John, 
Joseph, Ruth, Lydia, and Priscilla. 

III. Jacob, born 1G81, had: 

Jacob, Benjamin, William, Joseph, David, and John. 

IV. Jacob, born 1703, had: 

Sarah, Jacob, Abiel, Eneas, Mary, Eunice, Hannah, and 
Abraham. . 

V. Jacob, born 1733, had: 

Shubal, Jacob, Samuel, Charles, Sarah, Foster, Roswell, 
Ambros, Mary (Polly), and Chloe. 

VI. Roswell, born 1771, had: 

Chloe, Amanda, Alvah, Roswell, Mary, William, Jacob, 
Julia-Ann, and Sabrina. 

VII. Jacob, born 1810, had: 

Theodore, Edward, Marcus, Benjamin, Norman, Abner, 
and Charles. 

VIII. Edward, born 1841, had: 
IX. Myers Albert, born 1874. 




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Preston Family. 



The emigration of the Puritans to New England, which com- 
menced with the sailing of the Mayflower in 1620, continued 
unabated until 1640, when the Puritan opposition to ecclesiastical 
tyranny in Old England became so aggressive that Charles I, after 
eleven years of despotic rule, was compelled to again summon a 
parliament. The Long Parliament enacted laws which were designed 
to suppress the tyranny of the Church of England and to limit the 
despotic power of the King. The enactment of those laws and the 
political revolution which followed, for a time, checked the tide of 
emigration. While it lasted, however, over twenty-five thousand 
Puritans had settled in America. 

[I.] Roger Pkeston was one of that number. He was born in 
England in 1614. In 1635, at the age of twenty one years, he took 
/ the oath of allegiance, in London, and sailed for America in the ship 

U u- )J ) ' "Elizabeth 'and Annr His name first appears on the records of the 
town of Ipswich, Mass., in 1639. His wife Martha, whom ^le married 
in 1642, was born 1622. Roger and Martha Preston were residents 
of Ipswich until 1657 when they moved to Salem, Mass., where Roger 
died 20 January, 1666. Martha, his widow, married (second). 
Nicholas Holt of Andover, and thereafter was a resident of Andover 
taking her sons, Samuel, John and Jacob Preston with her to her new 
home. 

Martha (Preston) Holt died at Andover, 21 March, 1703, aged 

eighty years. 

Roger and Martha Preston had five sons and two daughters. 

Thomas, the oldest son, born 1643, married Rebecca Nurse, a 
daughter of the witchcraft martyr. 

Jacob Preston, born in 1658, perished at sea, 1679. 

Mary Preston married Nathaniel IngersoU, and Elizabeth married 
William Henfield, both of Salem, Mass. Of Levi, little is known. 
John Preston was a soldier in the Narragansett war, 1670-1675. He 



6 Preston — Samuel'^ — Jacob '' . 

married Sarah (Gary) Holt and settled at Windham, Connecticut, 
where, on 18 Dec, 1727, he conveyed lands as follows:— 

"I, John Preston, Sen., of Windham, sell to my cousin, John Preston Jun., of 
"Windham, land granted me for serving his majesty in the expedition to Narragansett 
"under Capt. Gardner, I being then of Andoverand called John Jun." 

[2.] Samuel-, second son of Roger and Martha Preston, was 
born at Ipswich, 1651. He was a resident of Andover where he 
married (first) Susanna Gutterson, 27 May, 1671. Susanna died 29 
Dec, 1710. Samuel married (second), 24 Sept., 1713, Mary (Roland- 
son) Blodgett, widow of John Blodgett. 

Samuel Preston died at Andover 10 July, 1788, aged 87 years. 

Samuel and Susanna Preston had five sons and six daughters born 
between the dates of 1672 and 1695. Their fifth child:— 

[3.] Jacob^ was born at Andover, Mass., 24 Feb., 1681. He 
married Sarah Wilson at Andover, 2 June, 1702. He remained in 
Andover until sometime between 1718 and 1728, when he moved to 
Connecticut and settled in that portion of Windham which is included 
in the present town of Hampton. On 23 October, 1723, he pur- 
chased lands from Robert Holt in Windham. He and his family 
remained in Windham until 1742 when he moved to the adjoining 
town of Ashford, where he doubtless passed the remainder of his 
days. He sold lands in Ashford to Jacob Preston Jr., in 1754 and 
1756. He united with church in Andover, 31 Aug. 1718, transferred 
to Second Church in Windham, 17 Nov. 1723, thence to church in 
Ashford, 13 June, 1742. 

While residing at Andover, Mass., Jacob and Sarah (Wilson) 
Preston had: — 

4. I. Jacob, b. 1703; lived in Windham and Ashford. 

5. II. Benjamin, b. 20 Aug., 1705; lived in Windham. 

6. HI. William, b. 1711; lived in Windham, had 10 children. 

7. IV. Joseph, bapt. 14 Sept., 1712; lived in Windham and 
elsewhere. 

8. V. David, b. ; lived in Windham, and Dover, N. Y. 

9. VI. John, b. 12 Jan., 1716; lived in Windham and Ashford. 
These Preston families, while not the pioneers, were yet among 

the early settlers of Windham. Although settlements had been made 



in the colony of Connecticut ninety years previous to their arrival, 
yet no permanent settlements had been made in Windham county for 
a period of fifty years after the first general court had convened in 
Hartford. This delay in colonization was due partly to the opposi- 
tion of Governor Andros to the Charter-rights of the colonists and 
partly to the adverse and conflicting titles to the lands in that region. 
Governor John Winthrop had asserted his title to the territory under 
a deed executed as early as 1G53, while Capt. James Fitch claimed 
ownership under a deed from the chief of the Mohegans conveying 
the hereditary title to the lands which were owned and occupied by 
his tribe of Indians. The general court of Connecticut had, at differ- 
ent times, recognized the validity of each of these titles. Those 
conflicting titles kept the first settlers at continual war with each 
other. Those who were accused of violence or misdemeanor were 
tried at the court in New London and, after conviction, were either 
fined, imprisoned or wJdppcd. Among the first settlers in Windham 
county were thirteen colonists from Massachusetts who, in 1G86, 
settled at Woudstock, on lands purchased from Fitch. After the 
departure of Andros, in 1681), which was followed by a restoration of 
the charter, a company of Massachusetts colonists [one of whom was 
Matthias Button of Haverhill, an ancestor of Lucy Witter Killam], 
settled on the (^uinebaug lands east of the Appaquay or Little river, 
some taking title from Winthrop and others from Fitch. The origi- 
nal town of Windham was colonized by a company of sixteen gentle- 
men from Norwich, Conn., and adjacent towns, among whom was the 
Rev. James Fitch " the excellent minister of Norwich." Title to these 
lands was conveyed by a grant or deed executed by the Mohegan 
chief directly to the company. The boundaries of the tract com- 
menced at the Appaquay meadow, at the head of Little river, 
extended southward eight miles and westward of Little river to the 
Willimantic river. The first house on this tract was built in 1680. 
On 18 May, 1691, the first town meeting was held. The township 
lines were run during the same year and conformed nearly with the 
boundaries of the original grant, embracing territory that has since 
been apportioned among the towns of Windham, Mansfield, Scotland 
and Hampton. After these transfers of title the lands were soon 
purchased and occupied by permanent settlers. The waters of the 



8 Preston — Jacob ^ — Jacob ^ . 

Appaquay, or Little river were diverted into tail-races to furnish 
power for a grist-mill, a blacksmith shop, and later for wool mills and 
other industries. The blacksmith shop was furnished with a trip- 
hammer for the manufacture of scythes. Colonel Litchfield, from 
Southbridge, Mass., first manufactured shuttles from the wood of 
apple-trees, and afterward purchased the sawmill and, for a period 
of thirty years or more, furnished lumber and shingles for Windham 
and near-by towns. 

When the Preston families arrived in Windham the land titles 
had become quieted, churches had been established and township 
organizations perfected in accordance with New England customs. 

[4.] Jacob^ Jr. (Jacob", Samuel'-, Roger^) accompanied his 
father to Windham in 1723, where he acquired lands previous to his 
marriage. [Andrew Foster and Mary Rees, married 7 June, 1GG2, 
resided at Andover, Mass., and had Abraham, born 25 May, 1G77. 
He married Mary Johnson, They had: Sarah Foster, born at 
Andover, 1708.] 

Jacob^ Preston Jr. and Sarah Foster were married at Andover, 
Mass., 21 Sept., 1730. They resided at Windham, where they had: — 

Sakah, b. 20 Aug., 1731. 

Jacob, b. 24 Feb., 1733; ra. Mary Butt. 

Abiel, b. 1 April, 1735; had a family in Ashford. 

Eneas, b. 7 June, 1737; had a family in Ashford. 

Mary, b. 18 Aug., 1739. 

Eunice, b. 20 July, 1741. 

Hannah, b. 19 Aug., 1744. 

Abraham, b. 1 Jan., 1749; had a family in Ashford. 
In the old north burying-ground at Hampton is an ancient tomb- 
stone inscribed as follows: — 

"Sarah Preston ye wife of Left. Jacob Preston, died April 14, 1751, aged 43." 

Connecticut records state that Jacob Preston was "confirmed 
and established" a Lieutenant of the 6th Company of the 5th 
Regiment, Colonial militia in the month of May, 1751— about one 
month after the death of his wife, Sarah. ^ 

Lieut. Jacob'* Preston married (second) Mary Hqmes of Woodstock, 
Conn., 1 January, 1752. In 1754 he moved from Windham to Ashford 



10. 


I. 


11. 


H. 


12. 


HI. 


13. 


IV. 


14. 


V. 


15. 


VI. 


16. 


vn. 


17. 


VHI. 



yfui<y ilJ\c(^ ti^ A i'lA^cU I ^^'^f— , ^- 

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C)V^ ^^,^'C^<,K, <^'.^>^^^, ^^>Y/>5?^- ^^'^ -^<^^.W ^0 



Appaqua 

power fo 

other irii 

hammer 

Southbrii 

apple-tre 

of thirty 

and near' 

When 

had beco 

organizat 

[4.] 
father to 
marriage 
resided at 
He marri 
Andover, 

Jacob 
Mass., 21 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 
16. 
17. 

In the 
stone inscri 

" Sarah P: 

Connect 
and establi; 
Regiment, C 
month after 

Lieut. Ja 
Conn., 1 Jan 




Preston — J<tcub'^ — J<icoh'' — Butt. 9 

where he purchased lands from Jacob Preston (doubtless of his father) 
in 1754 and 175G. About ten years later he moved to Woodstock, 
the former home of his wife Mary. He transferred from Second 
church in Windham to church in Ashford, 29 March, 175G, thence to 
church in Woodstock 10 iMarch, 17G5. His wife Mary transferred from 
church in Woodstock to Second church in Windham, 5 July, 1752; 
thence to church in Ashford in 1759 and reunited with her church at 
Woodstock, 10 March, 17G5. 

[The line of Preston ancestry from Roger' to Jacob' and copies of church 
records, were obtained through the courtesy of Charles H. Preston of . ^cylum S ta - /Vrj r/2<ry^ 
turn, Massachusetts, who is now compiling " A (lenealogy of the Preston Family 
in America."] 

[tl.] jAroB'^ Preston, born in Windham, 24 Feb., 1733, and 
Mary Butt, born in Canterbury, 28 April, 1789 (see p. 42), were 
married in 1757 and resided on their farm in Ashford for more than 
twenty years. Their children were all born in Ashford. They had: — 

SiiUBAL, b. 20 Nov., 175S. Tzrc/ H Och ^^'^^'^ 
Jacob, b. 28 Oct., 1760. 
Samuel, b. 9 Feb., 17G3. 
CiiAULES, b. 3 April, 17G5. 
Sakah, b. 18 May, 17G7. 
FosTEU, b. 22 July, 17G9. 
RoswELL, b. 15 Sept., 1771. 

Amhkos, b. 11 Aug., 1774; died at Hampton, 21 
Nov., 1793. 

26. IX. Maky (Polly), b. 23 June. 1776. 

27. X. CiiLOE, b. 12 March, 1780; d. at Hampton, 11 Nov., 
1784. 

Jacob^ and his wife Mary "owned the Covenant" and united with 
the Second church at Windham, 31 Oct., 17G2. On the same day 
their sons, Shubal and Jacob were baptized in that church. Samuel 
was baptized 18 Sept., 1763; Charles, 8 June, 1765; and Sarah, 3 
July, 17G8, — all in Windham church. The younger children were 
baptized at the church in Ashford on dates as follows: Foster, 29 
Oct., 1769; Roswell, 10 Nov., 1771; Mary, 10 Nov., 177G; and Chloe, 
25 June, 1780. 



IS. 


I. 


19. 


11. 


20. 


III. 


21. 


IV. 


22. 


V. 


23. 


VI. 


24. 


VII. 


25. 


VIII. 



10 t'redon — Jncoh'" — Buii. 

This record of baptisms indicates that Jacob and his wife, Mary, 
maintained their church relations at Windham for years after they 
settled at Ashford, The old Second church at Hampton (formerly 
Windham), for which they manifested this preference, is associated 
with the religious services of our ancestors for more than a century. 
Jacob^ Preston of Andover united with it in 1723, and four gene- 
rations of his descendants worshipped at its altar between that date 
and the year 1833, when the several families migrated westward. 
The^present church edifice was erected in 1753. It is well preserved, 
and presents much the same external appearance as it did nearly a 
century and a half ago. The sounding-board, which once overhung 
the pulpit, and the high-backed, square pews, with doors, were 
removed a few years since, when the interior was remodeled, but the 
gallery still extends around three sides of the auditorium and the old 
pipe organ occupies its accustomed " loft " opposite the pulpit. The 
wood case of the organ is battered and worn, and its pipes are bent 
with age, but it is still used in church service and peals forth its 
joyful notes the same as it did when Captain Roswell Preston and 
Mehitable Knowlton were married in that old " meetinghouse," just 
one hundred years ago. 

Lieut. Jacob ' Preston was a soldier in the Revolutionary War. 
The official record of his enlistment is as follows: — 

"CAPT. stone's company." 

" Capt. Isaac Stone, commencement of pay, Aug. 23, paid to Nov. 9th, (77)." 
"Lieut. Peter Keith, commencement of pay, Aug. 23, paid to Nov. 'Jth, ('77)-" 
" Ensign Jacob Preston, commencement of pay, Aug. 23, paid to Nov. 9th, ('77)." 
( .See Connecticut Men in Revolutionary War, pp. 504 and 505.) 

Capt. Stone's company formed a part of Col. Jonathan Latimer's 
Regiment in Gen. Poor's Brigade, and Arnold's Division of Cen. (Jate's 
army, operating along the line of the Hudson river. Ensign Jacob "^ 
Preston was the standard-bearer of his company and participated 
with it in the battle of Stillwater, 19 Sept., 1777, and in the battle 
of Saratoga, 9 Oct., 1777. It is recorded that, at the battle of 
Stillwater, the two regiments of Connecticut militia lost more men 
in killed and wounded than any other two regiments which partici- 
pated in that battle. After the surrender of Burgoyne, on 17 Oct., 
1777, the Connecticut regiments were honorably discharged from the 

\ k^\^ ^ ^^^ ^^ -^ ^vvvwt^u ^^ 

~ \\ I' '' 



Copied from official records of 
"CONNECTICUT MEN IN THE REVOLUTIONARY \TAR." 



Two large reniments of (Connecticut) militia, composed 
, of detachments from all the brigades , were ordered to re 

enforce Gen. Gates at Saratoga in the summer ot {777, 
■ They were assigned to Gen. Poor's Continental Brigade i 

Arnold's Division, and fought in both the battles with t 
'^ enemy, Sept. 19 and Oct. 9, 1777. In the first battle they 
'■ lost more than any other tvfo regiments in the figld.Upo 

their dismissal af tor the surrender of Burgoyne, Gates' 
: spoke of them as "two excellent militia regiients from 

Connecticut. " 

("Gen. Gate's abstract of a regiment in tho service 

the UNITED STATES OF AMERICA--in the Kortheri- Departmen 

commanded by Col. Latimer, in the months of Aug., Sept., 

A'^AJ-^.IlAi^lIIIZiII 

Note. The account on page 10 is copied from the 
above mentioned record, and shows that Ensign , (Afterward 
Lieutenant) Jacob Preston was with his regiment continu 
ously from the time his regiment was ordered into activ 
service until the regiment was mustered out, at the clos 
of the campaign. His commission reads, in pari as follow 

"JONATHAN TRUMBULL (^ESOUIRE:' , 
Captain General and Commander in Chief of the State of 
Connecticut, in AMERICA. 

To Jacob Preston, Gentleman, GREETING. 
You being, by the Governor and Council of Safetj .accepted 
and appointed to be Ensign of the Eth. Co.panj of the 



— — " 

Alarm List, in the 5th. ICef^iment of Militia in said Stat^ 
'reposing special Trust and Confidence in your Fidelity. 
Courage and good Conduct,! DO, by virtue of the Laws of 
this ^tate,ine thereunto enabling, appoint and iinpowe3r(,you 
the sa id _ Jacob Preston _,tq_be _En si £n_of_said_Coin^a^ 

This comiiiission proves that JACOB PRESTON was one of the 

"MINUTE MEN OF THE BEVOLUTIONARY WAP." 
AS HIS NAME WAS ON THE ALARM LIST of the Council oi Ba-te- 

x^xx:<xxxxxxxxxxx)cxxxx< .«(xxxxx..xxxxx>: xx xx xx x:^ xx xxxxx xxxxxx^: 
Crecy,an eminent British historian , names the Battle-of 
Saratoga as^qn9_qf_the JIFTEEN _DEClsai JAHLE^ 

The battlf) of Sept . 19th. '?V was begun by Burgoyne ,with 
troops conjisting of Canadians , grenadiers, light infantry 
and INDIANS, which commenced a fierce attack on Bemis ' 

':leights whi:h fortification was defended by Kosciuzko. 

During the oattle the Americans were rn-enforced by Arnolds 

Division (Of which Jacob Preston was a membtjr) and a fierce 

Dattle was fought , lasting from 4 o 'clock, P.M. until dark. 

['he loss by the enemy was BOO, that of the Americans ,40G. 

t'his is Known as the battle of Saratoga , Stillwater or 

3emi's Heights. 

During the battle of Oct. 7th. Arnold's Division attack 
Burgoyne's left, took and lost batteries time and again, 
until the British retreated in Confusion and their own 

" batteries of artillery were turned against them. i 
The Americans captured 42 pieces of brass artillery , 464? 
muskets and a large supply of ammunation,& 5804 prisonerc 
Burgoyno surrendered on October 17th. 1777. 




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HAMPTON HILL. 



1 BBAUTIPUL OLD CONNECTICUT 
TOWN. 

One of the Choice Summer Resorts of 
the State — Its ramous Men and 
Fine lllstory. 

(Correspondence of The Courant.) \ 

Hampton Hill, Aug. 22. 
Hampton Hill Justly claims promi- 
nence among the pleasant summer re- 
sorts of this state, not alone by rea- 
son of Its elevation of 800 feet or more 
above the tides, but also because of 
the real beauty of the location, Its 
general healthfulness, Its pure, dry, 
country air, and, perhaps more than 
' all, because of the beautiful views of 
the rugged country by which It is sur- 
' rounded as seen from this hill-top. 

Hampton station is sltuatetl 44 miles 
east of Hartford on the Highland divi- 
sion of the New Yorlc, New Haven 
& Hartford Railroad. When one steps 
from the train at that station he Im- 
mediately suspects he is very much in 
the country, the Ohly evidence of a set- 
tlement being" two houses, a small 
bam and a freight car. A drive of two 
miles or so brings one to the "center." 
The "center" Is at the top of the hilL 
/Tou can't say It Is "out of sight," ex- 
actly, for It is a very prominent feat- 
ure as viewed from the deep valleys 
and the surrounding hills. But it is 
certainly, "way up." Hampton has two 
churches, an Inn, a store, a post office, 
a village blacksmith, a population of 
600 Bouls and a republican majority of 
3 to 1. It is a no license town, has no 
rough characters, no "lockup," and no 
.■need for one. The visitor soon learns 
- that it is a prosperous and genteel com- 
munity. Its broad main street, large old 
dwellings with liberal grounds, well 
kept lawns, an abundance of shade 
trees and flowers give it a particularly 
attractive and park-like effect. 

AVhile the village street is well kept 
and more or less modern in appear- 
ance, the country round about is wild 
and picturesque in the extreme. It is 
\ the real New England farming coun- 
1 try — Just the place to please the lover 
1 of nature and to Inspire him anew with 
j the restful and peaceful Influences of 
country life. 



Hampton 13 situated In the hear,rbf;a; 
section which for generations has>be^Q* 
noted for its Intense Americanism, pa-? 
trlotism and public spirit. The town i 
of Brooklyn, the home of Putnam, Is 
Its neighbor, while Windham, Scotlajid, 

' Chaplin, Mansfield and other nearby 
places contain the ancestral homes of 

[ many of the best old families of the 
state. In Hampton a house Is still 
standing and owned by A. J. Qreen- 
Blit that was erecte^ during the Rev- 
olutionary War by the women of the 
town, who did the work because of 
the absence of every able-bodied man 
with Putnam In the army. 

At the topmost ppint of the hill over-. 
looking the morning slope and visible 
for a dozen miles around, stands the 
Old Congregational Church. The pres- 
ent edifice was erected in 1754 (10 years 
before "The Courant," was founded), 
at a time when In this part of the 
country the rifle was a mora common 
companion at the long Sunday services 
than the hymn book. For 150 years, 
nearly, this church has been recognized 
'as a powerful factor for good in the 
community and its helpful, uplifting 
influence is as strong to-day under 
the pastorate of the Rev. Charles Mor- 
gan as ever before. It seems to be the; 
center not only of the religious, but 
the social life of Hampton, and the 
people give It their most cordial sup- 
port. 

The road from the church and the 
other exalted places on the heights to 
the burying-ground is a natural one in 
Hampton as elsewhere. Perhaps, in a 
sense, more precipitous here than in 
other places, for the quaint, old ceme- 
tery is situated at the bottom of the 
hill several hundred feet below the 
main street and the road to it is steep 
and narrow. It, however, contains the 
graves of many .honored, dead, men, 
and women too, who have helped to 
make the history of this state and are 
a part of it. The inscriptions on some 
of the grave marks record births and 
deaths way back in 1600. : 






Prcdon — Jacob'"— Butt. 



11 



service. Ensign Jacob Preston received his discharge 9 Nov., 1777. 

Family records state that he was also a Lieutenant in the local 

company of Minute men. The inscriptions on the tombstones at his 

\\ grave and at the grave of his second wife, Mehitable, in the Bigelow 

"^ cemetery both designate him as " Lieut. Jacob Preston," indicating 

^"^ that his title as Lieutenant was conferred by a military commission. 

" ^ This inference is confirmed by the fact that his commission as First 

^2^ Lieutenant was in the possession of his grand-son, Jacob^ Preston of 

/^ Grass Lake, Mich., as late as 18G8. 

\^ Old deeds now in possession of our family state that Lieut. Jacob 

' \ Preston of Ashford, purchased from his father-in-law, Samuel Butt 

rx ; of Canterbury, on 29 Dec, 1780, a tract of ninety-one acres of land 

y for £300. The deed recites that this tract comprised " the northerly 

c ^ part of the land on which 1 (Samuel Butt) now dwell." This tract 

. j b^ was combined with other adjoining lands in the south-eastern part of 

^ ^ Windham township and became a part of the old Preston farm. The 

""^ '^ Niate of the above transfer is the approximate time when Lieut. Jacob 

.'^ uj ^ Preston, with luo family, moved from Ashford and re-established his 

~^^ ^^ '^ residence at Windham, the home of his boyhood. His farm was 

J 3 ^ located in that portion of Windham, whicli, in 178G, was set off and 

v^ organized into the new town of Hampton. Lieutenant Preston partici- 






i^N IX^ pated in the proceedings of organizing the town and, at the first 

N i ^ ^ town meeting held in Hampton, was elected to the office of Leather 

"^6 s)"^ Sealer. Hampton is bounded on the north by Ashford, on the east 

^"x ^ ^ by Pomfret and Brooklyn, on the south by Canterbury, and on the 

"^ ^ west by Windliam. Little/i-iver flows southward through the central 



1^ 



^ \v, portion of the township 



Above the dam on the river, half hidden 



>7 



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among clumps of birch and elm-trees, is a beautiful little lake, or mill 



p«nd, which furnished power for the grist mill and other mechanical 
industries of tae town. The hillsides on either side of the stream 
^ i"^are divided into little fields and pastures, dotted with trees and 
y ^ fenced in by stone walls. On the summit of the hill to the eastward 
- ^ is located the Preston farm and homestead, now partly overgrown 
with forest-trees. The opposite hilltop, to the westward of the 
river, is occupied by the village of Hampton Hill, with its white, 
i^ graceful church spire pointing heavenward. The village has but a 
^:v single street which extends ^mlb. pd w©»t, parallel with the river. 
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12 Preston — Jdi-ob^ — Butt. ! 

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! 

This street is ten rods wide and is covered, except in the road-way, 
by a compact green sod, which is regularly trimmed by lawn-mowers. 
It is lined on either side by a row of stately trees, beyond which are 
cottages and business houses in the midst of lawns and shrubbery. 
The village is two miles distant from the railroad station, and is but 
five miles from the wolf-den, which was rendered famous by old Israel 
Putnam. This picturesque little village presents much the same 
appearance thai it presented when Captain Uoswell Preston and his 
children wer3 associated with its history over eighty years ago. T^ v, 

Mary Butt, wife of Lieut. Jacob Preston, died at Hampton, 18 -."^ -^ v;^ 
April, 1795. i V "^ ^' 

Jacob' married (second) Mehitable, widow of William Knowlton, 'n»/^ ^ 
Jr., of Ashford, 25 Jan., IT'JS. She was daughter of Ann Eaton, the - '^ 

houseliold physician of Ashford, and was mother of Mehitable Knowl- . ^ .s ^ 
ton, who became the wife of Roswell I'reston Sr. / v A 

On 9 March, 1797, Lieut. Jacob sold his farm to his two sons, 
Roswell and Charles, jointly, receiving from them a life lease of the 
premises. 

Lieut. Jacob Preston died 5 Nov., 180G. 

Mehitable, his widow, was transferred from church in Ashford toK 
Second church in Hampton, 1798. She died 29 March, 1826, at the,^ 
residence of Capt. Rosv/ell Preston. 1 ^ 

[ J8.j Shubal'' Prestom enlisted as a private in Capt. Marcy's "^ 
company in 177G, and participated in the battles of Flatbush Pass ^' 
and White Plains. He was a member of Capt. Hill's Co. in 1778-9, a r^ 
" lister " in Hampton, 1817, and a Revolutionary pensioner at Homer, 
N. Y., in 1833. l^icci . Oc/- / 7' / ^6 ^ 

[ J 9.] Jacop.'* Pueston Jr., was a private in Capt. Durkee's Co., 
1782-3, owned land adjoining his father's farm in Hampton, 1789, 
and was a resident of Otsego Co., N. Y., in 1792. 

[20.] Samuel" Preston married Louisa Abbott and emigrated 
to New York State previous to 1800. He had a large family and a 
long line of descendants. 

[See "Preston Families in America," by C H. Preston.] 



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Preston — RustvcU*^ — Kiundion. 13 

[2J.] Cbakles'^ Preston sold liis interest in his father's home- 
stead 20 Sept., 1797, and emigrated to (lOshen, Vt., with his wife 
and three children. In 1S31 his son, Nathaniel, was the only 
surviving member of his family. 

[23.] Foster'^ Preston married in Hampton, and resided at 
Woodstock, 180G. 

[ 26.] Mary (Polly)" Preston married Zephaniah Hicks 15 Jan., 
1801, settled at Homer, N. Y. Had: Emily, b. 12 July, 1804, m. 
Silas Holt; Bowen, b. 21 Oct., 1807; Ambrose Preston, b. 10 Nov., 
1810. 

Mary (Preston) Hicks died at Homer, N. Y., 10 Nov., 1810. 

[ For Zephaniah Hick's second marriage, see p. o-}.] 

[ 24.] lioswELL^ PiiESTON and Mehitable Knowlton were married 
at the "meeting-house" on Hampton Hill, 18 Oct., 1798. They 
resided at Hampton, where they had: — 

28. I. Chloe, b. 19 July, 1799; m. Nathan Kendall; d. 11 
Nov., 1841. 

29. II. Amanda, b. 8 March, 1801; m. Edward Litchfield; d. 
20 May, 1851. 

30. HI. Alvah, b. 17 Nov., 1802; m. Olive Litchtield; d. IG 
May, 1862. 

31. IV. RoswELL Jr., b. 2 Oct., 1804; m. Frances Hurlburt; 
d. 28 March, 1877. 

32. V. Mary, b. G July, 180G; m. Edmond Comins; d. 2G 
July, 1833. 

33. VI. WiLLL\M, b. 19 Aug., 1808; m. Angeline Raymond; 
d. 29 April, 1882. 

34. VII. Jacoi!, b. 2 May, IblO; m. Lucy W. Killam and others; 
d. 30 Sept. 1881. 

35. VIII. JULLV Ann, b. 22 Aug., 1812; m. David C. Raymond; 
d. 21 March, 1883. 

36. IX. Sabrina, b. 8 June, 1815; m. Richard Ayers; d. 28 
March, 1898. 

Roswell** Sr., and his brother Charles, jointly, purchased the 
Preston homestead at Hampton, from their father, Lieut. Jacob ^ 



14 Preston — RosiorW^ — Knoidlon. 

Preston, in March, 1797. In September of the same year Roswell 
purchased his brother Charles' interest, and thereafter became the 
sole owner of the premises. The land contained so many loose stones 
and boulders that all of the fields, except one, were fenced by stone 
walls. The small field bordering on Little river was, and still is, 
inclosed by an old-style rail fence. The farm was divided into fields 
of from four to ten acres each. The quality of the land is indicated 
by Captain Roswell's tax list for 1813, of which the. following is a 
copy:— 

"Tax LIST. One head. Pour oxen, ten cows, live two-year-olds, three horses, 
one yearling colt, thirteen acres of plow land, thirty acres of English mowing and clear 
pastune, ten acres of haitl-meadow, ten acres of bog-meadow, si.xty acres of brush 
pasture, forty acres of wood-land, second rate, two fire-places, ona wooden-wheeled 
clock and twenty sheep sheared." 

From the several tax lists recorded by Captain Preston, which 
are similar to the foregoing, it appears that taxes were not, at that 
time, levied on farm implements, vehicles, cider mills, flax machinery, 
spinning wheels, looms or buildings. 

This list is copied from ('apt. Roswell Preston's account book, 
which is still in existence and is well preserved. This book records 
his business transactions for a third of a century, beginning in 1798 
and ending in April, 1882. The entries are made on debit and credit 
pages, and number nearly six thousand separate items. When the 
accounts were balanced at the end of a year, or of a period of years, 
it is found that there is but a small balance due either party, indi- 
cating that business consisted almost wholly of barter. Frecjuently, 
in balancing accounts, each party signed his name to an acknowledg- 
ment at the end of the account. Values were expressed in pounds, 
shillings and pence until about ]818, after which date dollars and 
cents were used as the standards of value, 

A record so carefully kept cannot fail to reveal an interesting 
history of the industries and economies of that household and farm. 
The following items are copied and classified from various accounts 
from the beginning to the end of the record. 

PL'RCHArfL-S. 

"One loom (for weaving) £2, Sa., one bellows 43. 'Id., one ox-yoke 4s. t!d., nine 
lbs. cod-fish 33. 3d., two shad 2s. Gd., three lbs. sugar 33. 7d., one fur hat t'l, 43., one 



Pirstoli — RoHivdV' . 15 

pair shoes l)s., one feather for training (in militia) 3b., one pair suspenders 2a. lid., one 
portmanteau 12s., making one trunk 6s., one harness $7.80, mending side-saddle Gs., 
one qt. high wines Is. Gd., \'2\ gals, brandy £1, Ss. 5d., one gal. rum 8s., one gal. West 
India rum 7s. Gd., two qts. cider brandy Is. Gd., six chestnut cider barrels £1, lis. M., 
400 barrel staves £1, 8s., l lb. tea 3s. Gd., 2 skeins silk 8d., li yds. ribbon Is., 
button-moulds Is., 1 peck seed corn Is. 9d., 2 scythes Os., 1 lb. tobacco Is. Gd., I oz. 
gnurt" 9d,, 10 lbs. Uu.\ 10s., 1 bush, line salt 12s. Gd." 



"Eight bush, potatoes ISs., 1 peck seed corn Is. 9d., 4 bushels turnips Is. Id., 3 
bush, russet apples 5s. lOd., 2 bush, sweet ajqdes 2s., 1 bush, quinces Is., 2 bush, rye 
7s , 8 bush, oats £1, 4s., - bush, corn £2, 2s., 1 bush, beans 4s. Gd., 1 bush, buckwheat 
50 cts., 1 peck red-top seed 23. Od., h\ lbs. clover seed ISs., i bush. Indian meal 7s. 
Gd., 7 lbs. wheat flour 2s. 4d., 300 lbs. English hay 9s., 1 lb. honey Is., 1 lb. candles 
Is., 1 bbl. soap £1, 8s. Gd., 1 sheep-skin 4b., 1 leather apron 2s. Gd., 1 pr. ox-bows Is. 
3d., 5 lbs. tobacco 3s. 9d., G lbs. flax 7s. 2d., 7 lbs. mutton 2s. 4d., G lbs. salt pork 53., 
13 lbs. beef 5s. 3d., 408 lbs. cheese £9, 14s. lid., 2 lbs. butter Is. lOd., 12 lbs. 
skimmed cheese 33., 2 qts. brandy 3s., 1 qt. wine 2s. 3d., 2 qts. rum 3s., 1 gal. vinegar 
9d., 3 sheep £1, 13s.,. 2 two-year-old heifers $10, 2 choates, w*t 202 lbs. £2, 8s., 1 
load wood 4s. 6d., 4 cords birch wood for coal £3, Is., 7 bush, ashes 5s. 3d., 19^ feet 
tan-bark £3, 7s. Gd., 800 bricks $4, 100 mulberry trees $5, 100 bush, coal $5, 95 bbls 
cider £23, 17s. 2d., 13 oz. hetchelled liax Is., 

Ropc--.val/:. To making 5 lbs. well-rope 2s. 9d., chalk line Is., bed-cord 2s., 
draw-ropes 2s. Gd., loom-cord Is. Gd., halter 3s. drum-cord Is. 

FLjx. To 1 day pulling flax 3s., breaking 80 bundles flax 123., 1 day hetchelling 
flax 4s., 1 day swingeling flax 33." 

FARM LAIiOU. 

Laborers, when employed by the year, were paid from $7.50 to 
$9 per month; when employed for the summer season, only, $11 per 
month. Their pay was mostly in various commodities named above 
and in home-made clothing of home-spun cloth. Ordinary laborers 
received from 2s. Gd. to 4s. per day. For haying and harvesting, Gs. 
per day. Among the sources of income from farm labor were the 
following: — 

"To threshing Al bush, of rye 23. Gd., setting 12 barrel hoops 3s., making 277 
shingles 2s. Gd , making horse-plow 7s. Gd., setting cart spokes 2s. Gd., grinding new 
scythe Is. G., 1 day grafting apple trees $1, making cart body 123. Gd., making IJ 
bbls. soap 12s., 2 days laying stone wall lOs., 1 day reaving staves 23. Gd., making 
2000 shingles $2, making plow-shear and wooden mould-board 73., making leather 
apron 2s. Gd., tapping and cupping boots 43. 6d., use of harrow 1 day Is. 6d., use of 
Dutch plow 1 day Is. Gd., making Iti bbls. cider at mill Gs. Sd." 



Income from domestic industries: — 

"Spinning 7 run and IG knots of warp Ss. 2d., weaving G yds. toe-cloth 12s., 
weaving (; yds. white toe-cloth 123., weaving 7J yds. cotton shirting ISs., weaving 
80§ yds. factory-cloth £1, Os., weaving handkerchiefs Gs., weaving 18 yds. wool-cloth 
Us., to footing a pair of stockings 3s. 7d., making great coat 8s., making 2 shirts 8s., 
making toe shirts Is., making frock Is., making 2 pr. trousers 2s., making all-wool 
jacket Gs. 7d. 

Sa/cs. To G yds. toe-cloth 12s., Ch yds. all-wool cloth £2, 16s. 3d., I'i yds. 
broad-cloth .t'9, 3s., 7 yds. shirting 14s., 2i yds. brown toe-cloth 4s. 4d., 1 toe shirt 
2s. Gd., 3 sticks twist 2s. 6d., 2 skeins silk $0.08, three knots thread $0.08, 7 yds. 
flannel shirting $5.25." 

HOR.SE-HIRE. 

"Mare and shay to Scotland 23., old mare Gs., and young mare Is. Gd., to ride in 
troop at Wookstock, mare to Boston at 4c per mile ISs., mare to Windham 2s. Gd., 
to Plainfield 2s., to Brooklyn f) miles Is. 3d., to Killingly 3s„ horse and sleigh to 
Providence 2s. Gd., sleigh to take Mr. Sprague to meeting-house 9d." 

NATHAN ALLEN'S STILL. 

" To carting 4 bbls. cider to Allen's still 18s., to mare to carry still to Allen's Is. 
Gd., carrying Allen's still to Stonington with one cask brandy £1, Is., carting 9J bbls. 
cider-brandy from .\llen's still to Norwich £1, 10s. "' 

To prevent unjust inference from these references to rum and 
brandy, it should be remembered that while such items appear in 
most of the accounts, yet the purchases were so infrequent and 
usually in such small quantities as to warrant the inference that they 
were ordinarily used for medical purposes. The cider-mill, however, 
was a regular source of income. The same is true of the spinning- 
wheel, the loom and the implements for the manufacture of the fibre 
of flax. 

FREIGHTING. 

As there were no railroads in those days the best means by which 
the producer could send his commodities to distant markets was to 
employ teams to haul his freight to the nearest point for water 
transportation. Freighting by team was then a thriving industry 
and the quaint old way-side inns were popular resorts that furnished 
"" refreshment for man and beast." For the producers at Hampton 
there were two markets: the city of Providence and the town of 
Norwich. Providence is thirty-six miles distant to the eastward, and 
was seldom frequented. Norwich is due south eighteen miles distant 



Pre.ston — lioswdl'^ . 17 

and is located at the head of navigation on the Thames river. There 

are frequent entries, in the old account book, of freight to and from 

Norwich, ranging from "2 bushels of corn at Is. Gi." to "4400 lbs. 

freight at £'2, 14s." Among these items are the following: "Taking 

cheese and bringing tobacco £1, 4s., taking poultry and bringing 3G 

bbls. salt £1, 18s., taking 1*J bushels flax-seed and bringing 1 bbl. 

tallow 13s. 7., taking 19 bundles paper and bringing 1 hogshead 

sugar £1, I'Zs., carting boxes of hats 2000 lbs. weight from L. D. 

Leach to Norwich $5. 

The following, copied from pages 3G and 37, relates to Ann 

(Woodcock) Eaton, the grandmother of his wife: — 

"W'l Ann Eaton came here to live January 8th, 180G, at four shillings per week 
January 8th, 1807, W^ Ann Eaton Dr. 

to her board, washing, etc., at 4s. per week £10, 8s. 

Sept. IL'th to her board, washing and nursing 32 weeks at Gs. per week £9, 12s. 

to 1 gallon wine and Extra troble IBs. 

Sept. 2'J, 1807, fche estate of \N'i Ann Eaton to Roswell Preston Dr. 

paid to David Fox and James Sprage for appriseing her estate 83. 

my time and troble 18s. 

March 2d, ISIQ, to one pare grave Stones .$9 ) 00 

fetching and Setting up $1 ) 

Contra by W^l Ann Eaton 
January 4th, 1807, by 30 Dollars £9 

March 17th, 1807, by nine Dollars in Cash £2, 4s. 

On page 77 is an account with his wife's mother, who was also 
his step-mother. It is as follows: — 

".\ugust 8th, 1810, W^ Mehitable Preston Dr. 

to Cash five Dollars £1, li) 

July to 12 Dollars Cash ' £3, 12 

to Cash fifteen dollars £4, 10 

October 10th 1815 cash five dollars paid to Mrs. Apider £1, 10 

August 10th 1816 to cash five dollars £1, 10 

to 18 yds toe cloth at 2s., 3d. £2, 0, 6 
January 8th 1819 cash nine Dollars." 

An account on pages 175 and 176 reads: — 

" Town of Hampton Dr. 
April 10th 1817 took John Butt and famaly vix — himself wife and Nabby at 
three dollars it Eighty three cts or twenty three shillings per week — 

Credit 

April 10 1817 by the town of Hampton $ cts 

by i)ork 35 lbs at ltd 4 37 

by 14 lbs of Bacon at Od 1 75 

bv 4 lb of dried Beef at 9d 50" 




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i?:s*& B-Zl, 







18 Presto)' — RosivelV'. 

John Butt was a brother of Captain Preston's mother. He was a 
Revolutionary soldier and, at this time, was 73 years of age. His 
account with Captain Preston extended from 1802 until 1818, and 
was settled until about 1814, after which time there were no 
credits. 

Deacon Samuel Butt, brother to John, was also a soldier. The 
account with him extends from 181H to 1817 and indicates that the 
deacon was a brick-maker. Luther Butt worked on the coal-pit 1 
Jan., 180S. These are the last traces that I have been able to find 
of any person in the male line of descent from the Butt ancestry. 

There are accounts, also, with Foster Preston, a dealer in staves 
at Woodstock, Capt. Koswell Eaton, the blacksmith at Mansfield, 
Charles C. Button the harnessmaker at Norwich, and Josiah Witter 
of Brooklyn, The foregoing include all of the names that I find in 
the record that are in any way related to the Preston family. 

On 22 May, 1801, Governor Trumbull of Connecticut issued to 
RoswelP' Preston a commission as Captain of the 5th company of the 
5th regiment of Connecticut Militia. For years thereafter Captain 
Preston was in command of this company, instructing his men in 
military tactics and ofiiciating as master of ceremonies on occasions 
of the annual muster for inspection and drill. 

Captain Preston's hospitable home was family headquarters. The 
old dwelling was a long, red building, but one story in height. A 
broad open fire place, surmounted by a massive chimney occupied 
a liberal share of one side of the living room. Swinging from 
one side of the fireplace was a long iron crane from which 
hung the pots and kettles in which were cooked the food for five or 
six generations of the Preston family. Near the kitchen door was 
a well curb from which an oaken bucket was lowered through a 
round hole in the center of the broad fiag stone which formed the 
top of the well. Beside the well was an oblong stone hollowed out 
in the form of a tray which served as the family wash baisin. North 
of the well, near the corner of the house, was an old pear-tree. 
Mehitable, widow of Captain Roswell Preston, stated that this tree 
was planted there by the hands of a Preston and that it was one 
hundred years old when she immigrated to Michigan in 1833, A 
'' Dutch oven," built of brick, occupied a place near the well and was 



^ .5\- 






m-, s ^^ I '^flW 














Presto7i — Rnswell'^ . 19 

used for baking the family bread and pastry. In 1814 Captain 
Preston built a large addition to his dwelling. The new house was 
two stories in height with an attic. The carpenter work cost $220 
and the nails $23.27. Among the latter were 58i lbs. wrought ten- 
penny nails at 13 cents per pound. 

The rooms on the ground floor were warmed by two fireplaces set 
on opposite sides of a large stone chimney whose massive founda- 
tions occupied a liberal space of the walled cellar beneath the build- 
ing. The old house was continued in use as the family kitchen and 
workshop. 

The farm buildings were across the lane to the westward from 
the dwelling house. They consisted of a large barn, a separate 
building used as a granary and hog house, which was supplied with a 
caldron kettle set in a furnace; a smaller building containing the 
cider-mill and still, and two long sheds for the shelter of the live 
stock. The description and location of these buildings were fur- 
nished by S. G. Holt, an old gentleman residing at Hampton Hill, who 
accompanied me on my visit to the site of the old homestead in 1897. 
He was the school-mate and play-fellow of Captain Preston's boys. 
From him I gathered many interesting reminiscences of the old 
homestead and its occupants. He characterized " Cap'n Presson " as 
a man of soldierly bearing, dignified yet affable and hospitable, who 
took an active part in promoting the welfare of the community 
and of the public schools. He assured me that the farm buil- 
dings were always kept in good repair, that the fences and road- 
way were kept free from brush and always presented a tidy and well- 
kept appearance. On our way from Hampton villiage to the home- 
stead, we passed the Bigelow school house, where Mr. Holt and 
"Cap'n Presson's" boys attended school. The building stands by 
the roadside. It is of brick, is fairly well preserved, and is still used 
for school purposes. Just below the school house we passed over 
the " Preston Bridge" which 'spans Little Uiver, and ascended the 
hill, past the " little field with a rail fence," along the old road, now 
partly overgrown by young birch trees, to the deserted farm on top 
of the hill. We found no buildings on the premises. They had all 
been torn down or moved away. The present owner informed us that 
he had received thirty-five dollars from the sale of the stones from the 



20 Preston— Rosivell\ 

fireplace and chimney of the new house which was built by Capt. 
Roswell Preston. 

The stone walls of the cellar, the remnant of the old chimney with 
its massive foundations, the stone steps at the front of the house, 
and the perforated flagstone which still covers the top of the well, 
with the broken stone wash-basin lying beside it, were all that 
remained to mark the location of that old New England home. The 
old pear-tree had been blown down by a gust of wintl a few years 
before. The present owner, however, pointed out the location of the 
stump, beside which we found the decayed remnants of the trunk of 
the tree, from which I secured a small piece of sound wood. A 
number of apple-trees were still standing in the orchard, but they 
present every appearance of age and neglect. From the rubbish of 
the buildings I recovered the old crane which once hung in the kitchen 
fireplece, gathered a few wrought nails and secured some chips from 
the stone facing to the fireplace which are preserved as mementos of 
the days of old. 

On the 8th of January, 1832, Captain Roswell Preston sold to 
Mason Cleveland for $2500 his farm, consisting of two hundred acres 
of land lying partly in Hampton and partly in Brooklyn, described as 
the land " which I now live upon and which is all I own in said towns." 
He immediately began closing up his business alFairs preparatory to 
starting west in searcli of a new location for a home. Previous to 
this sale four of his children had married. Two of the young families 
had already gone west, — Alvah and his wife locating at Ann Arbor 
in iMichigan territory. In June, 1832, Captain Preston and his son 
Roswell Jr., who had recently returned from Ohio, started on horse- 
back for Michigan, the father carrying his money in a belt around 
his waist. 

The journey was uneventful until they reached the Denyke tavern, 
on the road between Detroit and Ann Arbor. That house was known 
to be a resort of hard characters, but Captain Preston and his son 
arrived there so late in the day that they were compelled to remain 
at the tavern during the night. Upon retiring, father and son occupied 
the same bed. Before retiring a huge knife was driven into the door 
casing, as an improvised lock, to prevent burglars from entering. 
During the night they heard some one trying to force the door, and 



f' 

4 

Prcatun — Roanu'li:' . 21 

prepared for emergencies. The door, however, remained immovable, 
but at daylight on the following morning, the knife blade in the door 
was found to have been bent by the efforts of the burglars to enter 
the room. They resumed their journey at an early hour and arrived 
at Alvah Preston's residence in Ann Arbor without further adventure. 
After resting a few days Captain Preston proceeded on a tour of 
inspection of government lands and finally located a 240 acre 
tract on the north half of section eight, in the township of Freedom, 
county of Washtenaw, being about fifteen miles west from Ann 
Arbor. At that time there were but five families in the township, 
the first settlers having arrived during the preceding year. The 
unbroken forest was tenanted by Indians and wild beasts. Indian 
corn was growing on the land when Capt. Preston made his location. 
After building a commodious log house and clearing the forest from 
about his dwelling. Captain Preston returned to Hampton, Connecticut, 
and passed the winter in closing up his business aft'airs, and in making 
preparations to return with his family to their nev/ home in the forest 
wilds of Michigan. Their westward journey began in May, 1833, 
The party consisted of Capt. Koswell Preston and wife, their sons 
William and Jacob, their daughter Sabrina and their married daughter 
Amanda, accompanied by her husband, Lieut. Edward Litchfield, and 
their five small children; twelve persons in all. The party proceeded 
to Norwich, Conn., where they embarked on a boat and sailed down 
the Thames river and along Long Island sound to New York City, 
thence by steamer up the Hudson to Albany, where they boarded a 
canal boat and were thus transported to Buffalo. They crossed Lake 
Erie by steamship, which landed them at Detroit. They then com- 
pleted the journey in wagons. On arriving at their destination they 
found a number of other families in the neighborhood. One of these 
was that of David Raymond, two members of which afterwards 
married into the Preston family. Before the winter season arrived 
all of the adjacent lands were located and occupied. During the 
following year, 1834, the township was named and organized. 
Captain Preston was its first Justice of the Peace. His commission 
was from Gov. G. R. Porter, and was dated March 7, 1834. 

During this first year in the territory the pioneers suffered many 
hardships and privations. Their lands had to be cleared of forest and 



22 Preston — Koswcll''— Chloc''— Kendall. 

fenced. Crops could be planted only amonjjj the stumps and roclcs. 
Provisions were scarce. Some families suffered from lack of pro- 
visions, others from sickness. Wolves and bears were numerous, 
bold and fierce. They often entered the farm yards at night, killing 
calves, sheep and pigs. At the Raymond place the wolves killed 
twenty sheep in a single night within one hundred yards of the 
dwelling. Dogs were frequently chased by wolves to the very doors 
of the dwellings. 

[See History of Township of Freedom, by Jacob Preston ] 

On the 10 January, 1835, Captain Roswell Preston and his wife 
Mehitable sold their farm of 320 acres to their sons William and 
Jacob for the sum of $1000, retaining for themselves, however, a 
life lease of the premises. This lease stipulated, among other con- 
ditions, that Jacob and William Preston — 

"shall pay unto Alvah and Roswell Preston Jr., and to Julia Ann and Sabrina Preston 
" an annuity of twenty five dollars each for the term of six years, oommencing the 
"payment of said annuity on the first day of January, A. D. 1840. Also to Chloe 
" Kendall the sum of thirty dollars to be paid the first day of January, 1847, and to 
" Ann Jeannette Comins the sum of thirty dollars to be paid on the first day of 
" January, 1848." 

[See page S3 of Book 0. of Deeds, Ann Arbor, 23 Dec, 1835] 

Capt, Roswell Preston died 16 July, 1836, aged 65 years. His 
widow, Mehitable, survived him for a period of eighteen years. 
Among her reminiscences of her childhood at Ashford she stated that 
she had once picked an apple on Sunday, but was forbidden to eat it 
because she had violated the sanctity of the Sabbath. She often 
referred with pride to the military achievements of her kindred, in 
the Knowlton family, and told amusing anecdotes of the old " blue- 
laws" of Connecticut. During her last years she was a cripple, 
having broken her hip joint. She died 27 Nov., 1854, aged 80 years. 

[28.] Chloe ^ Preston and Nathan Kendall were married at 
Hampton, Conn., 19 Nov., 1823. In 1827 they moved from Connect- 
icut to Otsego Co., N. Y., where they remained until 1836, when they 
settled at Waterloo, Jackson Co., Mich. 



1 he home oflTr. E, J. liaymona 
was a most btaiuitul scene Saturday 
September 22, liioo. The ocrrlon 
being in honor of the fiftJoKi annive. - 
8ary of the marriage of Mrs/ Hay. 
mond'8 parents, Mr. and Mrs. G. E 
states ot Williamston. The celebra- 
tion was held here on account of it^ 
being ilie same place where occnrred 
I the inarriage lifty years ago. 
_Aaio]ig the guesia were: Mrs A i 
DJeiz of Dansvilie, Mrs. L. Glover 
and danghter, Lulu, of Sylvan, Mrs 
Jra Glover and son, Liu, of M'anclies- ' 
ter, Mr. and Mrs, M. Hoyd of Chel- 
•ea, A. 11. Preston of rittsfield, Mrs 
Charlotte Preston, Chas. Preston, Mr 
aud Mrs. M. K. Pre.ston and daughter," 
Maggie, Dr. C. 8. Chadwick and fanu 
jjy of Grass Lake. 



;eL» — 

Mf Ann Kendall was born 8eptem- 
ihp»tJ^'^4, Windom C'o., Connet'out 
andiparted this life March 22. 1902. 
She Ti3 married to G. E. States, Sep- 
t«mfr 22, 1850, in Sharon, Washtenaw 
Couty, Michigan. One year ago last 
•Septinber she and her husband cele- 
brakl their golden wedding in the old 
honi where they were married. 

Mb. States is survived by a husband 
anif/hree children, JMrs. Agustus Dletz 
aq/ Mrs. Elmer J. IJaymond and son 
miFin States also one brother and two 
Misters. She was one of the early 
/pioneers coming to Michigan in 1836. 
f" She was an estimable woman, enjoy- 
ing the friendship of a large circle and 
had many excellent traits, was always 
ready to lend a helpful nand during 
sickness and trouble and will be sadly 
missed in the community, but nowhere 
will this loss be so deeply felt as in the 
home where she was best known. ^ 



LOW RATES TO THE NORTH- 



f 



li 



•Mi 

Wnf 
•ary *■ 
moDd 
dtatee 
Uion \' 

(theji 
Ai 

if.'*' 
.'J 



H 



(r 



9i)r 



Preston — Chloe"' — Amanda"' — Litchfield. 



23 



Chloe (Preston) Kendall died at Waterloo, 11 Nov., 1841. Her 
husband, Nathan Kendall, died at Sharon, Mich., 20 May, 1861. 

Nathan and Chloe (Preston) Kendall had:— n/M^c^^v'^'^ 

37. I. Mary Ann, ^k in Conn., 11 Sept.,/l824; m. Colbert . ^ 
Edwin States, 22 Sept., 1850^died at Mftft«lieBter,lMich., A^^i^f^l^C 7 

38. II. Caroline, b. 1 Nov., 1825, in Conn.; died at Sharon, 
19 Sept., 1854; unmarried. 

39. III. Cornelia, b. 11 Feb., 1827, in Conn,; m. George 
Peckens, 2 Sept., 1852; resides in Sharon, Mich. 

40. IV. Harriet, b. 21 July, 1828, at Otsego, N. Y.; resides 
in Mich.; unmarried. 

41. V. Preston Nathan, b. 1 Dec, 1829, at Otsego, N. Y.; 

d. at Waterloo, 29 June, 1848. 

42. VI. Charles, b. 24 Jan., 1835, at Otsego, N. Y.; is 
unmarried and resides in Michigan. 

[29.] Amanda^ Preston, born at Hampton, 8 March, 1801, and 
Lieut. Edward Litchfield, born at Brooklyn, Conn., 12 March, 1799, 
were married at Hampton, 28 March, 1821. They had:— 

43. I. Willl\m Royal Litchfield, b. at Hampton, 22 July, 
1822; m. Esther Cook; d. at Santn Cruz, Cal., 30 April, 1892. 

44. II. Alvah Preston Litchfield, b. at Hampton, 1 Oct., 
1824; m. Almira Boyd; d. at Dexter, Mich., 30 May, 1887. 

45. HI. Olive Litchfield, b. in N. Y. State, 14 July, 1826; 
m. William Dickinson, 10 June, 1851; resides at Dearborn, Mich. 

4(;. IV. Mary Litchfield, b. in N. Y. State, 6 May, 1828; m. 
Marvin Cadwell at Dexter, Mich., 15 Aug., 1852; resides at Detroit, 

Mich. , 

47 V. Foster Litchfield, b. 18 June, 1830, on Fullers 
farm at Hampton, Conn.; m. Lucy Smith, 30 Nov.. 1853; resides 

near Dexter, Mich. 

48. VI. Elias Litchfield, b. at Freedom, Mich., 21 Dec, 
1834 ;'m. Emaline Cadwell, 1 Jan., 1857; resides at Jackson, Mich. 

49. VII. De Forest M. Litchfield, b. at Freedom, 14 March, 
1839; m. Emma Bates, 10 Jan., 180G; resides at Dexter, Mich. 

Lieut. Edward Litchfield was a son of Daniel and Olive (Pierce) 
Litchfield of Brooklyn, Conn. He emigrated with his family to New 



'r^i\U.-x\' K^i-^Jy?(, 



24 Preston — Amanda ' — Litchfield. 

York State in 1826, and was there commissioned First Lieut, of a 
company in the 5th Reg't, N. Y. militia. He moved back to Connecti- 
cut in 1830, and settled on the old Fuller farm. In 1833, in company 
with Capt. Koswell Preston's household, he emigrated to Michigan, 
and settled on a tract of land two miles to the eastward of Capt. 
Preston's — ^ a part of which land had been presented to him by his 
wife's father, Capt. Roswell Preston. He remained there and 
prospered until 1850, when he sold out and bought another farm to 
the eastward from Dexter, Mich. 

Amanda (Preston) Litchfield died 20 May, 1851. 
Lieut. Edward Litchfield died 31 July, 1880. 

[43.] William R. Litchfikld and Esther Cook were married at 
Ann Arbor, Mich., 30 Dec, 184G. They resided first at Lima, Mich., 
where they had: — 

Olive Amanda, b. 22 Dec, 1847; m. B. 8. Jones. 

William went to California in 1852. After revisiting Michigan 
he returned to California accompanied by his family in 1858. They 
lived for a time among the hydraulic mines at Moore's Flat, subse- 
quently at Nevada City and finally at Santa Cruz, Cal., where William 
died 30 April, 1892. His widow and daughter are now residents of 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Olive Amanda Litchfield was married at Cold Hill, Nevada, to 
Byron S. Jones 15 July, 1874. 

They had William, b. 23 Feb., 1877. 

[44.] Alvah Preston Litchfield succeeded his father in the 
ownership of the Litchfield farm near Dexter, and was, in turn, suc- 
ceeded by his son, Albert Litchfield, who married Mary, the adopted 
daughter of Jacob ^ and Charlotte C. Preston 1 May, 1884. 

[For a more extended account of this family see '"Litchfield Genealogy."] 

[ 49.] De Forest M. Litchfield, during early manhood, was an 
engineer among the oil fields of Pennsylvania. On G July, 18(>1, he 
enlisted for three years, or during the war, in Co. F of Pennsylvania 
Reserve Corps of U. S. Volunteers and went immediately to the front 
with McClellan's army. His first experience in battle was at Dranes- 



/, Friday, Sept. 2ytl.. is tlie^date of the\ 
social to be ^-iveri by tl.e yoiinR- people's 
M.eiety of the M. K. chnrcl.. at tlie 
lioineof IMrsHLlbertLitehHeid. If you , 
liave not i/iefllie world's celebrities 
yon niiiy do so on that date. Convey- 
ance will be furnished forall who wisli 
to <r„. Watch for furtlier piarticulars 
in next weeiv's paper. / V^^i' 



/ Cupid's Harvest. N 

A pretty wedding- took place last 
Thursday at hijili noon at the residence 
of Mr. and Mrs. Foster Litchfield of 
Delhi Mills, where their daug-hter, 
Alma, was united in marriaf^e with 
David Witlet of Detroit, in the pres- 
ence of about 3.") of the immediate 
relatives and friends of thecontractinpr 
parties. Kev. (Jeo. Wittet, a brother 
of the groom, was the officiating- min- 
ister, assisted by Rev. Mr. Hicks of 
De.ster, the full ring service being- 
used. 'I'he maid of honor was Miss 
Elva (\>nant; of Detroit, a neice of the 
groom, and the best man was the 
bride's brother, Sidney 10. Litchtield. 

The biide was dressed in a hand- 
some dark green traveling costume 
with white silk trimmings and carried 
a bouquet of large white asters tied 
with white satin ribbon. The maid o' 
honor was attired in g-ray with while 
trimming's and also carried asters. The 
house was beautifully decorated with 
golden rod and asters, the bridal party 
fctjinding- under a canopy of golden rod 
and olher wild llowers. Immediately 
after the ceremony, a bountiful dinner 
was served to the guests. The pres- 
ents, wliich were numerous, included 
a beautiful g<dd watch and chain, a 
gift from the groom. The happy coup- 
left on a late train that evening- for a 
trip for two weeks to Niagara Falls. 
Buffalo and Si. Thomas, Ont., and will 
be at home to their friends after Ocl. 
l')lh, at .530 Toledo Ave., Detroit. Tlie 
bride is well known in Dexter and vi- 
cinity and lived with her sister. Mrs. 
C. J. SnyiU-r, in Ann Arbor, for about 
six years. Her amiable disposition and 
pleasant ways made her many friends 
who wish her much happiness and 
prosperity iu her new life. 



Preston — Alvah''— LitchfiehL 25 

ville, 20 Dec, 1861, which lasted about an hour and resulted in a 
Union victory. He participated in a lierce engagement with the 
enemy at Catalet Station in May, 1862. During the battle of Chica- 
mauga on June 20 he participated in the encounter at Savage's Sta- 
tion. At the battle of Malvern Hill on 30 June, 1862, which lasted 
from dawn until dark, he was shot through both thighs by a minie 
bullet, which broke one of his thigh bones. He lay on the battlefield 
until night, when his comrades carried him to the field hospital. 
Before morning McClellan's army had retreated leaving the wounded 
as prisoners of war in the lines of the Confederates. After vexatious 
delays and great sufliering he was finally transferred to the Libby 
Prison, where he was placed on a bunk on the fioor of the upper story 
of the building. xVlthough suffering from painful wounds he had 
neither surgical nor medical care, and was wholly dependent on his 
comrades for such scant care as he received. On Oct. 15, 1862, he, 
with many of his surviving comrades, was transported to the James 
River and paroled, and finally returned to his father's home in 
Michigan. 

[30.] Alvaii^ Preston, born at Hampton, 17 Nov., 1802, and 
Olive, daughter of Daniel and Olive (Pierce) Litchfield, born at 
Brooklyn, Conn., 16 Sept., 1807, were married at Brooklyn, 18 Aug., 
1830, and emigrated to Michigan Territory. They resided, first at 
the village of Ann Arbor, and had: 

50. I. James "* Alvah, born at Ann Arbor, 26 Dec, 1831. 

51. II. John* Litchfield, born at Pittsfield, 3 Jan., 1836. 
John** enlisted in the Union army for three years, or during the 
war, in 1861, being appointed as corporal in Company B of Col. 
Rankin's First Regiment of Lancers, Michigan Volunteers. He died 
16 Jan., 1862, of congestion of the lungs, while the troops were 
stationed at Detroit. 

Alvah' Preston purchased a farm in the township of Pittsfield, a 
few miles south from Ann Arbor, in 1832, and resided there until 
1837, when he sold out and purchased a farm at Cohoctah, Livings- 
ton county, Mich. His wife, Olive, died at Cohoctah, 30 Sept., 1846. 
He married (second) Rachael Houghtaling, 1 Dec, 1847. 

Alvah' died at Cohoctah, 16 May, 1862. 



26 Preston — RoswelV — Hurlliert. 

150.] James =* Alvah Pueston and .Sarah Jane Clarity, born at 
. Geneva, Ontario Co., N. Y., 4 June, 1836jAvere married at Owasso, 
Mich., 22 Feb., ISGO. They had: ^^^^ZZ^'^^^ fi&' ^^^^ ' n 

52. I. John Riley, b. 12 Sept., 'l863, at Cohocl'ah^^'^^^^'' ^*^ 

53. II. James Fked, b. 1 May, 1865, at Cohoctah. 

54. III. Belle, b. 2 April, 1872. '^t Howell, Mich. 

James A.* Preston resided at Corunna, Mich., until after the 
death of his father in 1862, when he, moved to the family home- 
stead at Cohoctr.h, where he remainedUntil 1870. He resided at 
Howell for a number of years and is at present a resident of Detroit, 
dividing his time between his home at Detroit and his farm at • 
Cohjctah. 

[52.] John-' R. Preston is a commercial traveler and resides at 
Detroit, Mich., where he was married to Adelaide C. Vente, 27 June, 
1894. Adelaide was born at Detroit, 28 Dec, 1863. 

[3J.] Roswell' Preston, Jr., married Frances Hurlbert 8 
March, 1837, at the residence of the bride's father, Asa Hurlbert, in 
the township of Lima, Mich. Frances was born at East Haddan, 
Conn., 2 April, 1817. Roswell and Frances Preston had: 

55. I. Mary E., b. 11 Sept., 1838; died 22 March, 1895; 
unmarried. 

56. H. Cynthl\ M., b. 26 Oct., 1840; m. Henry Shier; resides 
at Kipp, Saline Co., Kansas. 

57. HI. Henry'^ H., b. 28 May, 1843; unmarried.:3>ic^2i?/i/ /^^/7 

58. IV. Charlotte A., b. 2 March, 1846; died 25 Nov., 1871 ; ^ ^^«^J 
unmarried. 

59. V. Angeline a., b. 30 Aug., 1848; d. 8 June. 1895; 
unmarried. 

60. VI. Adelaide J., b. 8 June, 1851; m. Henry M. Blair, 
resides at Kipp, Kansas. J7>-te<^ .^^f^'^W ^^ TM ^UJfcl .liiicA^ 

61. VIH. Flora J., b. 4 Jan., 1856; d. 30 Oct., 1880; unmar- 
ried. 

Rosweir Preston, Jr., was apprenticed to a fuller, near Hampton, 
Conn,, during his boyhood. In 1830 he went to Ohio where he worked 
in woolen mills for two years. He returned to Connecticut in 1832, 
and, after a brief visit, accompanied his father on his journey to 



A 



James A. Prestao 

James A. Preston died at his farm 
in Cohoctah, Tuesday, February 28, 
1899. The funeral will be held at the 
Presbyterian church, Howell, Saturday, 
at 2:00 o'clock. 

Mr. Preston's father was one of the 

early settlers of the township, settling 

on the farm where Mr. Preston died. 

Mr. Preston has not been well for 

about four years. The family moved 

to Ilowell about 1867, where they lived 

several years. They moved back to 

the farm, but have since moved tA 

^Detroit. Mr. Preston was one of 

those men who make and keep friends. 

He was an upright, honorable citizen, 

against whom not an unkind word 

could be said. 

James A. Preston was born in Ann 
Arbor, Washtenaw County, in 1831; 
moved with his parents, Alva Preston 
and wife, to Section 23, town of Tus- 
cola, now known as town of Cohoctah, 
Livingston county, in 1838. At that 
time (1838) there were no roads leading 
into this section. The settlers had to 
leave the Main road at the Hale school 
house and came in on a trail a mile to 
the west. As they had to draw sup- 
plies from Howell, Alva, father of 
James A. Preston, decided to cut a 
new and nearer road, which is now the 
main highway leading north from the 
Hale school house, 
- , He assisted in organizing the town- 
ship, was one of the first justices of 
.the peace, also one of the first asses 
sors. The ballot box used was a bowl, 
which speaks a great de,al for th e hon 



esty of the pioneers. HIsTIrstfeMoc. , pittedftld. 



^.■■•' • arjw» Henry H. Preston. 

After two days of lUneBS and InteDse 
suffering Henry H. Preston died athla 
home In Plttbfleld townBhlp,^ Thursday, 
Yeb.iiS. I^ffl V 

. The sudden passing of this man came 
aa a sad aurprlee to his neighbors and 
jlmany friends. While he has been suffer- 
j from rheumatism, .he had of late enjoyed 
especially good health, was able to attend 
to his business, and was at church on the 
Sunday preceding his death. The Im- 
mediate cause of his death was capillary 
hemorrhage. 

Mr. Preslon was boru in Freedom, 
Mlcbip'^n, May 28, 1843 When a young 
child 'ae came with his parents to Pitte- 
held. where he has spent his life on the 
farm formerly owned by his father, Ros- 
we(l Preston. The Preeton family moved 
Ir.tb'ftsftarly days of Michigan from Hamp- 
ton, Connecticut. The large white meeting 
house, with Its double row of windows and 
tall stpeple — the very meeting house in 
which Henry Preston's grandfather, Ros- 
well Preston, was married to Mehltable 
Koow!tou«^8tl)l stands on old Hampton 
hill. The Preston family of Connecticut 
were noted for their loyalty to the church, 
♦^or their public spirit, and their moral en- 
ergy in tlie the advocacy of the truth and 
right. Mr Uenry Preston entered Into 
this rich Inheritance, and has lived among 
his neighbors, towns-folk and his brethren 
In th« church, a kind, honest, useful christ- 
ian- llfo. He Wrt9 a trnly good man '^f- 
noble spirit and loveable character. He 
■wftB baptl::ed In ti.e Baptist church at 
Ypflllanti by Kev. C E Hewitt. For s v 
pral years he was justice of the peace In 



performing the marriage ceremony was 
a pipe of tobacco, but through the In- 
convenience of getting a light, there 
being no matches at that time, he soon 
discarded the habit. He built the first 
house on the street, and in company 
with Edward F. Gay put up the first 
sawmill, the frame of which they 
raised without the aid of li(luor, not- 
withstandmg the prophesy of failure 
Without it use. ____«;_ , 



The funeral occured Monday, March 4, 
at his late residence. Hia pastor, lie?. J. 
A. Brown spoke a few comforting words 
on "Casting all your care upon Him, for 
he careth for you," and gave a loving trib- 
ute to the worth of the man. The Pltts- 
fleld choir sang. Mr. Preston leaves one 
sl8ter, Mrs. Henry Shier, who resides at 
'Jvlpp, Saline Co., Kansas and a niece, the 
[daughter of Mr. Henry M Blair, of Kipp, 
'Kai'. 
^, — , /- 

Council Proceeding. 



Preston — RosweU ' — Ha rlhert. 27 

Michigan territory. He located a tract of wild land in the township 
of Freedom, three miles east from his father's location. After 
building a dwelling house he passed the winter in Ohio working at 
his trade. In 1833 he returned to Michigan and commenced clearing 
and tilling his farm. He remained on these premises for twelve 
years, during which period his three eldest children were born. 

In 1845 he sold his farm in Freedom and purchased an improved 
farm in the town of Pittsfield, a few miles west from Ypsilanti. That 
farm is now owned and operated by his son, Henry H. Preston. 

Roswell Preston was an avowed abolitionist. He was actively 
connected with the operations of the "Underground Railroad," by 
means of which slaves, who had escaped from their masters on 
southern plantations, were enabled to reach the Dominion of Canada 
where their freedom was guaranteed. Roswell's nearest neighbor 
was Asher Aray, an intelligent and a prosperous negro, who, with his 
family, owned and operated the adjoining farm. That negro's farm 
was one of the stations on the underground railroad. Fugitive slaves 
traveled by night. During the daytime they were hiding and resting. 
They came sometimes singly; more frequently in gangs of three or 
more and, on one occasion, farmer Aray had twenty fugitive slaves 
who were fed and secreted about his premises in a single day. The 
most active period of migration of the slaves along that route was 
from 1852 to 185G. After the latter date the slave-hunters became so 
troublesome that the route of travel was changed. When pursued 
by detectives, fugitives were often secreted and fed by Roswell Pres- 
ton on his own premises. Roswell often furnished horses and wagon to 
convey them to Detroit, traveling the distance of thirty-five miles in 
a single night. The slaves would then cross the river to Canada in 
the early morning, and were free. Several of those fugitives fled as 
far west as the township of Freedom, where they were housed and 
fed by Jacob Preston, much to the dismay and dread of his children. 
They were always armed with pistols or other weapons which they did 
not hesitate to display. I well remember the terror that I felt when 
I saw one of those burly negros display his sword-cane with its nar- 
row, keen, glittering blade, which was long enough to pierce entirely 
through the body of a man. 

Roswell Preston Jr. died 25 March, 1877. 

His widow, Frances Preston, died 31 March, 1882. 



\^ 28 Preston ~ Mary"' — Covxuis— WilVuna ^— Raymond. 

"^ [32.] Maky' Pkeston and Edmond Comins were married at 

':*<^ Hampton, Conn., 4 Dec. 1826. They resided at Howard's Valley, five 

C^ miles south from Hampton Hill, Conn. 

They had but one child. 
V 62. I. Ann Jeanxette Comins, born at Hampton, 11 May, 1830 

^ Mary (Preston) Comins died at Hampton, 26 July, 1833. 

^ Edmond Comins married (se cond) widow MaryJ^itchfield in 1837, 

-gnd settled at Southbrid;^^e, Ma.ss., Tr r kir t< ^ his Tlau^^hter with him to 
his hew home, 
's::^^ Edmond Comins died at 8outhbridge, 10 July, 1880. 

His daughter, Ann Jeannette Comins, was for many years libra- 
rian of the town of Southbridge, during which time she became 
familiar with the works of famous authors and acquired discriminat- 
ing taste for all that is best in literature. The writer is under great 
obligations to her for valued suggestions and assistance in the 
arrangement and compilation of this genealogy. At the present 
time she resides with friends at Pomfret Center, a few miles to the 
eastward from the old Preston homestead at Hampton. 

[33.] William' Pijeston and Angeline Raymond were married 
4 Feb., 1846, at the residence of the bride's parents in the township 
of Freedom, Mich. Angeline, daughter of David Raymond, was born 
at Benton, N. Y., 17 July, 1810. 

William and Angeline Preston had: 

63. I. William Wallace, b. 22 Jan., 1837. 

64. II. Chaules Delavan, b. 3 March, 1847. 

William^ resided at Hampton, Conn., until 1833, when he accom- 
panied his father's family in the migration to Michigan Territory. In 
1835 he and his brother Jacob became joint owners of their father's 
farm, William taking the westerly portion of the tract, on which he 
built a comfortable frame house, a barn, and made other improve- 
ments. He was a thrifty and an enterprising farmer and always 
kept his premises in excellent repair. He was a member of the Bap- 
tist Church and took an active interest in educational affairs. In the 
year 1866 William sold his farm in Freedom and purchased another 
in the township of Crass Lake, Jackson county, Mich., adjoining the 
farm recently purchased by his brother Jacob. He died at Grass 



OBITUAKY. I 

the Onus,^ Lake Xowj. : 

MRS. A-NGFLINr PRESrON. | 

In Grass Lake township, March 2i-f,i 
'18S3, Mrs. Angi'linu freston, widoiv of ! 
'the late Deacoa Win Preston, in lier y;^ 1 j 
y.ir. i 

Slio wa< born in Benton Yiti-s cmnty, 

N. Y.J.ily 17.I1, iSio. Her-irMHO:! and 

)OUii^ wuii) luhood vv.-itf passed in the 

ume ciunty. tSbe came to Michig^m 

#iiL Ler l:iiher'.'< family in 1833, and >ei- 

ekd in Fieedom, Wasliteni.v county. 

Hdf muriate vvi,s in Feb., 1839. Alter 

JO>'ears iuto in tha same tow .-;i.ip tLie 

Umily came to Gra>s Like in 1865. whi-re 

iho with hff hasoand Lave since been 

koowii, and sho \v ih lii;n bus ^haro(l in 

jihe universal t'steem of tho commnnity. 

'Sbe united witli ih; Bai.ti-.t churca dur 

ing Eld' r .Spinnin^'.s pastorate. For 

years before her l)apti>m she had cber- 

isLeii a liope ;n Chiisl. but fr.nn lier nut l 

• rai diffid nee had he>iiated to make a I 

pub le prufes.sion of lier faith. S'le was u j 

steadfast (.•hri-<iian, a devoted w ite,a faith- 1 

ful m«ither, a kind neighbor, and in all j 

tbe relations ol life one of the Lord's i 

noole Women ' 

Dnrin;^ her bast days her breathing was ' 

labored and her position wearying, yet j 

not a word ol murmuring eseaoed lier! 

Up*. ll<i\- tuner.il was attend' d at the; 

Bapti.^t church on Fiiday last. She leaves 

two sons, one rtSidinK on the homestead, 

the other in Kan>as. Of the two broiliert. 

and three si.-teis *tutvi%ing. two »eie, 

pre.>en! at the luncal. A larjje ciicle ut : 

relative."* and (rifiids mouin her lo.>«s. : 




Prcf^ton — Jacob' — Killam. 



29 



LN'S EXPERIE^f 



if Great Proinlneu. 
About Her Sex. 
Boston Globe.] 
trip by a represe 
he city of Haverhil 
; Incident occurn 

of the greatest 1 
ly to our lady rea( 
i met a lady, a ■ 

1 luxurious whlt( 
ki..'gly with plerc 
esitd a straig-lit, 
jonvLiandinjr, coml 
,y lady-like and 
icute judge of huit 
:e that he was in th 

personage — one d 
re than most of h 
iiflueuoo far-rcacl 

idv was Mrs. M. W 
childhood nhe hai 
In the bodily troul 
)bably been moie , 
flerlng and savlnj^ 
an in America. It 
a what Florence Ni 
Ix were to the suf 
lances of women, 
igony and apparent 
nan aid, that she ha 
ippiness are almost 
only natural that 
•specially interested 
1 her more in detai 
ve you been engaj 
icine, Mrs. AVingau 
,n twenty-live vear 
), certainly, ilow 
• the field" at thai 
Q the professions i 
town uponV" 
t have inherited a t 
Df. J. C. Wood, of . 
,8 eminent in the pi. 
and equally earn« 
hunted considerat 
Q only 9 years old, 
I and animals he hi 

. . with medical soiei 
fatuation has conu 

, imo. " 
begin your studi ^9. 

lay when I began, i .' 
'hen I had not rei.r 



Lake, 29 April, 1882, aged 74 years. His widow, Angeline, died 
21 March, 1883. 

[63.] William** Wallace Pueston and Mary E. Divens (b. in 
Illinois, 2 June, 184G), were married in Illinois, 27 Oct., 1878, and 
settled on a farm at Montgomery, Larrimer county, Kansas, where 
they had: 

65. I. Walter Delay an,'' b. fi Nov., 1879. 

66. II. Hattie Angeline, b. 19 April, 1881; d. 30 Sept., 1885. 
Mary E., wife of Wm. Wallace, died 11 May, 1882. During the 

following year Wallace married (2d) Sarah Elizabeth Clevenger. 
who was born in Iowa, 9 Sept., 1865. They had: 

67. III. Homer Orlando, b. 14 Oct., 1884. 

68. IV. Alvah Leandek, b. 16 Aug., 1886. 

69. V. AviLLA Victoria, b. 14 Feb., 1887; and 

70. VI. Georgia Ellen, b. 13 Sept. 1889; d. 1 March, 1891. 

William Wallace was a student at the Michigan Agricultural Col- 
lege for nearly four years, when his health failed and he was obliged 
to discontinue his studies before graduating. He is still a resident 
of Montgomery, Kansas. 

[64.] Charles Delavan^ Preston and Kittie E. Cowden, a 
native of Ionia, Mich., were married at Ionia, 9 Dec. 1874. They 
remained on the family homestead at Grass Lake and subsequently 
became the owners of the premises. They had: 

William K., b. at Grass Lake, 1 Jan., 1877. 

Clarence D., b. at Grass Lake, 16 Aug., 1878. 

Ella, b. at Grass Lake, 9 Oct., 1880. 

Norma M., b. at Grass Lake, 24 April, 1882. 

Alfred L., b. at Grass Lake, 4 Oct., 1885. 

Eunice, b, at Oass Lake, 11 June, 1896. 
Charles^ D., like his father, is an enterprising farmer, and is using 
his best eiforts to give his children a good education. Two of his 
sons are now employed as teachers in the public schools and are 
ambitious to acquire college educations. 

[34.] Jacor' Preston and Lucy Witter Killam (see p. 57) were 
married 5 January, 1837, at residence of the bride's brother, Lewis 
C. Killam, in Sharon, Mich. 



71. 


L 


72. 


H. 


73. 


HI. 


74. 


IV. 


75. 


V. 


76. 


VI. 



77. 


I. 


78. 


II. 


79. 


III. 


80. 


IV. 



30 Preston — Jacoh '' — Rirhardnon — Stitt. 

They resided in the township of Freedom, Washtenaw County, 
Mich., where they had: 

Theodoue, b. 30 January, 1838. 

Edward Myers, b, 4 May, 1841. 

Marcus Killam, b, 2 Dec, 1843. 

Benjamin Tustin Killam, b. 26 Jan., 1846. 
Lucy, wife of Jacob Preston, died 26 February, 1846. 
Jacob married (2d) Lucina E. Richardson, a native of Vermont, 
2 December, 1846. They had: 

81. V. Norman Richardson, b.2 Dec, 1847; d. 10 Aug., 1848. 

82. VI. Abner Eugene, b. 21 May, 1849; d. 12 Feb., 1852. 

83. VII. Charles Adelbert, b. 23 Jan., 1851. [Unmarried, 
resides with his brother Marcus at Grass Lake.] 

Lucina, second wife of Jacob, died 16 March, 1859. 

For his third wife Jacob married Charlotte C. Stitt, 5 April, 1860, 
at the residence of the bride's parents in Augusta, Washtenaw 
county, Mich. Charlotte was born in Ingersoll, Canada West, 9 Sept., 
1826. She survives her husband and resides with her stepson* 
Marcus K. Preston, on the homestead at Grass Lake. No children 
were born to Jacob and Charlotte C. Preston, but in 1866 they 
adopted a daughter, Mary Ann, who was born at Buffalo, N. Y.^ 
20 Oct., 1854, and who subsequently married Albert Litchfield. 
[See p. 24.] 

Jacob's first employment was as teacher in the public schools. In 
1833 he accompanied his father's family to Michigan Territory, where 
he obtained employment as assistant to John K. Bingham, who was 
employed by the Government as a surveyor of public lands. In 1835 
Jacob purchased Mr. Bingham's instruments and outfit and succeeded 
him as U. S. Surveyor. This employment often led him into the 
uninhabited forest, which was infested by wolves, which often howled 
about his camp during the night, but were kept at bay by his blazing 
camp fires. 

In the partition of his father's farm and estate in 1835, Jacob 
acquired the eastern half of the farm, with the dwelling and farm 
buildings, which had been erected by his father. His mother. 
Mehitable Preston, remained with him on the family homestead, 



Preston —JacoJ,'' — Stitt. 31 

During her lifetime a portion of the kitchen garden was devoted to 
the cultivation of medicinal herbs and the rafters of the old log 
house were never destitute of bundles of various herbs, domestic and 
wild, which constituted a necessary part of the medical economies of 
the household, according to family tradition reaching back to the 
days of her talented grandmother, Ann (Woodcock) Eaton, the 
family physician of Ashford. 

In 1847 Jacob built a substantial frame dwelling-house, which 
was connected with the log-house by a covered passage, and there- 
after the two buildings were used jointly as a family residence. In 
18GG Jacob sold the premises to a German and bought an improved 
farm near the village of Grass Lake, in Jackson county, Mich. 

Jacob was an active member of the M. E. Church and took an 
equally active interest in the cause of the public schools. In politi- 
cal affiliations he was a Free Soil Democrat and a pronounced advo- 
cate of the abolition of negro slavery. He was a member of the 
Drainage Commission for Washtenaw county, which engineered and 
superintended the construction of a series of drainage canals through 
the swamp and marsh-lands of the county. Those canals drained the 
surface water from a large area of comparatively worthless swamp 
and bog and converted those lands into fertile, tillable farms. 

Between the brothers, William and Jacob, there existed a strong 
bone) of affection, which made them mutually considerate of each 
other's welfare and mutually dependent on each other for counsel in 
business and social alfairs. Their dwellings, in the township of Free- 
dom, were so near each other that conversation could easily be carried 
on between them. A well-worn path extended through the kitchen 
gardens from one dwelling to the other. The brothers were fre- 
quently in consultation before breakfast, and usually met to com- 
pare notes after the day's work was done. The intercourse between 
the children of the two families was like that of brothers. A few 
months after Jacob had located on his farm at Grass Lake William 
sold his premises in Freedom and purchased another farm adjoining 
that of his brother Jacob. 
Jacob died 30 Sept., 1881. 
William lived but seven months after the death of his brother Jacob. 



32 Preston — Theodore " — Edward^. 

[ 77.] Theodore* Preston, after taking a course of instruction 
in the State Normal School of Ypsilanti, was engaged during the 
winter seasons as teacher in the public schools. He was also a 
contractor in the construction of the drainage canals of Washtenaw 
county. Early in the summer of 1861 he enlisted for three years, or 
during the war, in Company B, Second Regiment of Col. Berdan's 
Sharp Shooters, and was assigned to McClellan's army of the Po- 
tomac. The regiment was organized into a camp of instruction, 
while serving as a portion of the military guard of the Capital at 
Washington, with headquarters in Virginia, on the west side of the 
Potomac. Owing to some delay in procuring a proper armament for 
that branch of the service the men were not sent to the front during 
their first year of service. About a year after the date of his enlist- 
ment, Theodore, while in camp, contracted a malignant fever and was 
transferred to the military hospital at Alexandria, where he died 2 
Sept., 18G2. He was buried in the National Cemetery at Alexandria, 
Va., on the right hand side of the main entrance. His grave, like that 
of thousands of otiiers in that cemetery, is marked by a small marble 
head-stone. The inscription on the stone is: — 

" 220. THEO. I'KESTON." 

[75.] Edward^ M. Preston graduated from the Agricultural 
College at Lansing with the degree of B. S., in 1862. He paid all 
his expenses at College, with the exception of one hundred dollars 
received from the estate of his grandfather Killam, from his own 
earnings. Four years after his graduation the faculty of the college 
conferred on him the degree of j\], S. In 1863 he sailed for Cali- 
fornia by way of the Isthmus of Panama. He taught school for 
several years, and was twice elected County Superintendent of 
Schools of Nevada County, In 18G8 he resigned his position as 
principal of the Nevada City schools, and engaged in the drug 
trade. He took an active part in the incorporation of the Citizens' 
Bank in 1876, and has been president of that corporation since 
the date of its organization. He was elected to the State Senate 
from Nevada county in 1888, and was a member of the legislative 
sessions of 1889 and 1891. Among the bills which he introduced 
was one establishing a State Reform School for wayward boys. 



1 



1 
1 

•10 

b-2 



inith. 

ks 2, 

IP 1. 



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ftirae, 
i\ bo- 

iitcher 

ithout 
1, 

(•econd, 
ne wall. 

It a fine 

i)allc,. ., 



Death olRIrs. Preston. 

On Sunday morning, Mrs. Majigie 
H. Preston, wife of Hon. E. M. Pres- 
ton, died at her home at Nevada City, 
having been long a siilTeier from con- 
sumption. Mrs. Preston was a native 
of Kentuck}', and came with her par- 
ents across the plains to California in 
1860. Since that time she luis been a 
resident of this county, with tlie ex- 
ception of several years spent with the 
family of her uncle, Capt. Kidd, of 
Stockton. She was married to Mr. 
Preston in 1870, and the fruit of the 
marriage was one son now 14 years of 
age. In 1884, in company witli her 
husband Mrs. Preston visited the 
Sandwich Islands for lier health and 
was much benefited by the journey, 
but for the past year iier health had 
been gradually failing, and it was evi- 
dent to herself and family that !ier 
earthly career would soon end, and she 
awaited with Christian resignation the 
coming of the great change. Mrs. 
Preston was a teaclier in the M. E. 
Sunday School, of Nevada City, an ac- 
tive and enthusiastic member of the 
Chautauqua Circle of the class of 1889, 
and was also a member of the Order 
of the Eastern Star, which Society will 
take part in the funeral services, which 
are to be held this afternoon. Mrs. 
Preston was a lady greatly beloved by 
a large circle of ac(iuaintances, who 
exemplified in her life all the attributes 
that grace the duties of a wife, motlier 
and companion, and in her death 
there will be many to mourn the loss 
of an exemplary woman, and who will 
extend a heartfelt sympatliy to a be- 
reaved husband and son. The age of 
deceased was 41 years 2 jnunths and 
24 days. The funeral will l.\ke place 
from the family residence at Nevada 
City at 2 o'clock tliis afternoon. 




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cleanly proc. 
cient to admit 
is made above si 
usually the femoi, 
yaryiug according 
is desired to presf 
jectod. The fluid en 
tory system and pe 
arterial i-aniifieation: 
ucs new chemical 
iniputrosciblo. The t 
decoujposition is arre 
;ontas-ion destroyed. 
neutralized, as is the 
employed. 

The processes of tc 
the body indefinitely, 
ods did, but as this it 
ern sentiment it meet 
and its sanitary adva: 
field as a rival to eret 
method of dLsposing ( 
As the modern met 
body all the sottness i 
tilic enterprise, if tur 
jcct, might effect a co- 
present and past by v 
be forever preserved 
pearanco to ornament 
mer residences and V 
automatic figures vvitl 
history and ouce more 
ly to our forafathers, 1 
shildren. Will this bt 
3r which bloomed belo 
ind has been transplan 
ury to the soil of mod 

ORIGIN oi 

'ho Curio u» Source! 

EngliHh ;^ 

Not only countries b 

ere a fruitful soui 

arked Prof. H. H. 

?ture. John from (J( 

iruwall or Cornish. 

ar a piece of woodla 

chard'ator near the 

rname Atwood, or J 

iamo John Hill. S 

11, etc. John living 

B John attea oak 

Ikes, or William 

b or cabin near a 

jwn as William at t 

iash, which easily c 

Thomas who live( 

n Anglo-Saxon a t 

)ecket, and thus w 

nas a'Becket. Tb 

(tions of English 

\s are ford, ham 

I the Saxon /aran 

I where a stream 

jthe name of Sh 

ave a memeni 



Preston — Edward' — A[yers\ '33 

Before its final passage tlu^ fitu. nf ih^ u-u 

SeirifP unA fi • X\ ^"^ ^''' '^^s amended by tlie 

feenate, aid the institution was otficially designated as ^Th! 

res ton Sc ooi of Industry." He has been contintfous ; eh rman 
It. board ot Trustees since the date of the organisation of^^e^^ 
_ As a member of the Grand Lodge of Mason, of Cni; ? 

t.imorma At the annual session of the Crand Lod-e in lS9fi •,« 
Grand Master of the order, he officiated at the ce.-emo„ies of U. 
lay.nK of the corner-stone of tlie Home ''«'«n»mes ot the 

Edward' M Preston and Maggie II. Hinds were married at the 
e. enee of the bride's parents in Nevada City, Cal.. 8 No^mbt 

me: Clinch ™""' "'" """""'"' "^ "^^- •'■ ''■ S'-»' Of the' 

.Maggie H., daughter of Hiram M. and Elvira (Ividd) Hinds wa, 

paients to Cal.forn.a m l«t;0, and thereafter resided with he fami v 
her uncle Capt. Geo. W. Kidd, until the date of her „ ' 
At Nevada Cty she attended the select school foryoun. ladie uX' 
to c„torsh,p Mrs. Hebbard. In 1S84 she spent severatnth^n 
the Ilawauan Islands for the recovery of her health, and wa.s great v 
^proved b,. the trip. The improvement, however, was but e mpo v 
bhe died at Nevada City, 2 June, Issii. temporary. 

Edward M. and Maggie II. Preston had • 

134.1 Mv..s.A.o%.;p„ro.^^tfer:f.:-i?/;./.l^^ 

e llawanan Islan s with his parents, and, accompanied ly lis 

father, passed two days and a part of one night along the shore o 

he bnrn.ng lake of Halemaumau, in the volcano of Kilauea o, tl e 

island of Hawaii. H-mta-Lliuro_ w],ile „m,.i,i „ g th c^B^Hjl^Z!! 

I'^t^^**;^^ fl":'^'';";f.t''" vol e an e,4ti^.4i..^,,;,^j,,t,,LJ^ 

He entered Dr. Brewer's academy, at San Mateo, in 1889 and 
sub..oquently continued his studies of the Berkeley (Jymnas'ium 



I 



34 Preston — Myers^ — Marcus'^. 

After a special course of instruction at the State University, prepara- 
tory to the study of medicine, he entered Cooper's Medical College, 
from which he graduated with the degree of M. D. in December, 
1897. He is now a student in the Hopkins' Art Institute in 
San Francisco. 

[79.] Makcus* K. Preston is a farmer, having succeeded his 
father as the owner of the family homestead at Crass Lake. In 
acquiring the property Marcus assumed obligations to pay stipulated 
legacies to his father's heirs as a part of the consideration for the 
premises. His brother, Charles, and his father's widow, Charlotte, 
reside with his family. Mary, the adopted daughter of Jacob and 
Charlotte C. Preston remained with his family until she married 
Albert Litchfield. 

After receiving a common school education Marcus took a course 
of study at the State Normal School at Ypsilanti. He is an active 
member of the Farmers' Club and of other as.sociations for increasing 
his knowledge and for promoting the success of his farming enter- 
prises. 

Marcus K. Preston and Anna E. Hawley were married IG August, 
187G, by Kev. C. \V. Armstrong of the M. E. Church, at the residence 
of the bride's p;;rents, near Mason, Mich. For their bridal tour they 
visited the Centennial Exposition at Philadelphia. 

Anna E. Hawiey was horn in Vevay township, near Mason, Mich., 
25 March, 1853. Her parents, Henry A. Hawley and Lucy Ann Hicks, 
were married 2 June, 1841, in Ingham county, Michigan, and lived on 
their farm in Vevay township, Ingham county. Mr. Hawley was born 
in Hirkimer county. New York, 19 Nov., 1815, and died 12 June, 
1881. His wife Lucy Ann Hicks was born at Homer, New York, 28 
August, 1818; and died 18 Nov., 1853. She was daughter of Zeph- 
aniah Hicks, by his second wife, Lucy Ingalls, whom he married at 
Pomfret, Conn., 4 July, 1811. Zephaniah Hicks married (first) on 15 
June, 1801, Mary (Polly), daughter of Lieut. Jacob'' Preston of Hamp- 
ton, Conn. (See p. 13.) 

Marcus K. and Anna E. Preston had: 

85. I. Lucv Ann, b. 25 Aug., 1878; d. 3 March, 1883. 

86. II. Maggie Belle, b. 5 Feb., 1880. 



.-x..,^,-,i;i uv. i\a-yors Albert Pres- 
ton and Miss Alice M«rrlll Gardner 
gathered at Trtnlty Ep,3copa? 
' weddlns. which was 



n*^' fio-iiitrea 

•' OKtirch for thel 

Hn:,.V.!.l''^'',^'^™P«"-_ 1'he bride Is the 



dnughtt _ 
Gardner, 



J 




of Mr. and Mrs. Charles F 
F ^f Ti. "." ^^^ Ki-oom the son of 
ser\ed tJie State as Sfnatqr and was <;n 

^ ^Uerffr'hT;;"'''^' ^' ^""" '^^' '' -a5 
Js, The d.'ooratlons at the church w<re 
^ f?^n ar.d whUe/,he chancel being, ', 
^ den With palms and white li!l..s "nie 1. 
ers were L. C. Carpenter, Robert I Alt; 

^ • N-mi -'"'""^^'■' 'i'l'J the bridesmaids AH^s 

^ was flower girl. ^^^' ^='^» 

wM^'' '"m^''''' ^''''■" ''■'^" '^f ^^^^Ite laco over 
v^h te satin, and the attendants wore tu le 
rib -on^trimmed frocks, and carried A„e.: 1 
Jean Beauty roses. A reoeM.i..^ ... "i' 

. bridal lifirtv tr>»vi«.^' _ Lijt; 

AN EVEMING WEDDING "'| 

^joVUvt^ TRINITY CHURCH., 

Till- wediHiig of .Miss AIIlh- tiaidiier. (iaiiKlilei 
of Mr. and Mis. C. K. Gardner, and Dr. .Mytis 
Albert Preston took place last nigh: in Trinity 
Cl)urch, the Hev. I^ \V. Claiiiixti otfi<latii)g. ' 

The bride iuoUtd chainiing in a wtdJing 
gown of white silk lace ovei- sliu and <hltToM" 
She wore a noklace of pearls und a tulle veil 
held In pla^e by orange blo^s:)nl^-. riie t-li eves 
iind yoke were of accordioii-pleattcl IuIIh and 
a garniture of pearls gave a charaiing luurii ut 
ilie pretty froiU. Slir rarried a tliower boiuni, t 
of roses and lilies of the valley. Her noid of 
honor was Ml = s Uertlia (!ar(int-r. and .Miss 
Nellie Lyoiis, .Miss Kstelle Tutiani and Mis-; 
» (.race FouldK acti d as bridesni.ibis. .Ml-is Ktliid 
Cregg was flower girl. Tile best man v.a« 
I'rank .lor.ci and the ushers Uobfrt Mtken 
Lloyd Horloii and Join Carpenter. 

After the i-liurch eereinony a rr;ep(lon \vi-- 
held at tlie bride's parents' borne, liilS liuker 
street. 

\ i ,, David'Murphy Has Narrow 
patrolinan uav.u Tnurists 

Escape While Showing Tour.s 
,iH'. Through Chinatown. 

death last "'S*;:, ,^,Uld Pa'aceHotel on JacU^ 
crated Chinese m^h old ^^^^^^^^ ^o-frouted 

J Zr/place'd a'^evolver against h.s^stc,._- 

m... 



1851344 



i 



Preston — Benjainin*^ — EdwanV^' 



35 



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foj- Se- 
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mrNoel 



V GROV 

WITH OR 
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fty. few tni 

'''Callforn 

Ik'iI Ofittaj;,.. 
GOO Montgoi 

t HUMBJ 
> 14, 



87. HI. Florence Adelle, b. 4 Sept., 1881 ; d. 21 March, 1883. 

88. IV. Jennie Hawley, b. 25 March, 188". 

89. V. Olive Dea, b. 1 April, 1886. 

90. VI. Clara B., b. 20 Dlc, 1887. 

[80.] Benjamin* T. K. Preston completed a course of studies 
at the Union High School at Ann Arbor in 18G6, and then entered 
the State University at Ann Arbor, from which he wa.s graduated in 
1871, with the degree of A. B, In 1873, accompanied by his wife, he 
went to California and located at Nevada City where, for a time, he 
was principal of the High School. Afterwards he was successively 
publisher and editor of the Truckee BepuhUcan, the Stockton Hcrahl 
and the Fresno ExjHisitor. He was afterwards employed on the San 
Francisco dailies, and was for four years in the employ of the U. S. 
Mint at San Francisco. At the present time he is Secretary of the 
Preston School of Industry located at lone, California. 

Benjamin T. K. Preston and Lucy (daughter of Alfred and Frances 
Nordman Killam), were married 25 Dec, 1872, at the residence of the 
bride's brother^ Lewis C. Killam, at Moulton, Iowa. They had: 

91. I. Edward Killam, born at Nevada City, 23 Oct., 1873. 
Lucy Killam was born at Marengo, Mich., 25 Sept., 1847. She 

died at Nevada City, California, 29 April, 1874. 

Benjamin married (second) Susie N. Tincker, 26 March, 1897, at 
San Jose, California. Susie was born in Maine, 1874. 

They had: 

92. II. Madeline Louise, born at lone, Cal., 5 March, 1898. 

[91.] Edward'-^ K. Preston received his early education in the 
public schools of San Francisco, and took a course of athletic train- 
ing at the Olympic Club. He afterwards graduated from the Union 
High School, Ann Arbor, Michigan, and took a partial course in 
electrical engineering at the State University. This was followed 
by one or two years' experience of farm life, with his uncle at Grass 
Lake, after which he returned to California and entered the service 
of the Nevada County Electric Power Company, being now in charge 
of their ofhce at Grass Valley. 



36 Preston — Julia Ann" — Hnymond. 

[35.] Julia Ann^ Preston and David C. Raymond were married 
at the residence of Capt. Roswell Preston in Freedom, Mich., 2G 
May, 1836. They had: 

MAtiViN Preston, b. 24 May, 1837. d/>f ^{} ./SGU . 

W.iLDEN W., b. 27 Oct., 1840. . . |. 

Alma G., b. at Dexter, 15 May, 1845. >>f. fc»ci^^ /i/oMi^/i l(p^*r 



93. 


1. 


94. 


II. 


95. 


III. 


96. 


IV. 


97. 


V. 



De Witt D., b. at Danville, 18 Aug., 1848 



5^^ 



LIE wiTT u., u. at L>anvme, is Aug., ib4i>. , l^/ffZ, 

Elmer J., b. at Danville, 4 Mar., 1854. J ■ ^' ^'ft^'^^- ' ^'^^^ 

David C. Raymond was born in Orange County, N. Y., 13 Dec, 
1803, emigrated with his father's family, to Michigan in 1833 and 
settled in the township of Freedom. After his marriage he resided 
for a time at Dexter, Mich., where he was proprietor of a shoe store. 
About 1847 he purchased and worked a farm near Danville, Ingham 
County Mich, lie died 13 March, 1869. 

Julia Ann' Preston, when her father's family emigrated to Mich- 
igan, in 1833, remained at Hampton to nurse her invalid sister, Mrs. 
Mary (Preston) Comins. Mary lived but a few weeks after the 
departure of her parents. After her death Julia Ann, accompanied 
by her deceased sister's husband, Edmond Comins, went west and 
joined her father'^- family in iMichigan. Mr. Comins, after a short visit, 
returned to his home in Connecticut. 

Juliii ' Ann (Prooton) Raymo nd-drc d 21 Match, 1883 ;- 

[93.] Marvin Preston Raymond enlisted first in 1861 in the 
16th Regiment of Ohio Volunteers, for three month's service in the 
Union Army. After his discharge he re-enlisted as a private for 
three years, or during the war, in Company I, of Col. Berdan's Sharp 
Shooters and was assigned to McClellan's Brigade. He participated 
in the battles of Painesville, South )>Iountain and Antietam and for 
gallantry was promoted to the rank of sergeant. During the battle 
of Antietam his superior officers were all killed or disabled and he 
was placed in command of his company, and was ordered to cross the 
Potomac at Blackmer's Ford, to dislodge the Confederates from 
their riHe pits on the opposite shore. During this gallant charge he 
was killed by a bullet from the rifle of one the enemy's sharpshooters. 
His body was recovered from the river by his comrades and buried 
among thi.; unknown dead in the National Cemetery at Antietam. 



I'lYfitdii — Julia Ann' — /idyiaund. 37 

Had he lived another week he would have been commissioned lieu- 
tenant for gallantry in battle, as the order had already been made 
for the signing of his commission. The date of his death was 18 
Sept., 18G2. 

[94.] Walden W. Uaymond enlisted 10 Sept., 1862, in Co. E 
of Seventh lieginient of Michigan ('avalry, and was assigned to 
Custer's Brigade. From June, 1868, until the surrender of Lee, in 
April, 1865, Lis regiment participated in sixty-two engagements with 
the enemy. Walden fought in fifty of those battles. His horse was 
shot from under him at the battle of Gettysburg and before he could 
again overtake his company he had missed five battles. While run- 
ning to overtake his company he was so closely pursued by the enemy 
that he fell to the ground and feigned death to avoid being made a 
prisoner. The Confederates, however, were driven back by the 
Union forces and Walden was rejoiced to find himself again within 
the Union lines. He secured another horse and in less than a month 
that horse wa 3 shot from under him, being pierced by two bullets. 

L)e Forest Litchfield, who was also a soldier in the Union Army, 
states that, among army men, Walden liad the reputation of being 
one of the most fearless and effective soldiers in the cavalry service. 

Walden received an honorable discharge at the close of the war; 
returned to Michigan, married and settled on a farm in Ingham 
County and enjoys the reputatien of having one of the best equipped 
farms in his section the county. 

Sh u di e d- 3- G -i Jept., 1866. 

in g , MiQ\h — Id Muirr J ed and haa a mA rr ied-da - ught e r and - one grand - 

[97.] Elmer J. Raymond married, first, Ida Doan, 14 Feby., 
1881, at Chelsea, Mich. They had: 

98. 1. Edna, a daughter, born in Mich. 

They went to California in 1883 for the benefit of Ida's health. 
Ida (Doan) Raymond died at Live Oak.Cal., 27 Sept., 1884. Elmer, 
with his daughter, then returned to Michigan. 



38 Preston — Sdhritia'' — Ayers. 

Elmer J. Raymond married (second) Estelle (Kendall) States, 30 
Jany., 1894, at Mason, Mich., and now^y^itkiirtffl the Kendall farm 
in Sharon, Washtenaw Co., Mich. ^^'--^^ 

[36.] Sabkina^ Pueston married Richard Ayers, 10 Dec, 1840, 
at the residence of Jacob Preston in Freedom, Mich. 

Richard and Sabrina (Preston) Ayers resided for a time in Sharon, 
Mich., where they had: — 

9i). I. Mary Jerusha, b. 20 Sept., 1843; d. 5 Jan., 1862. 

100. II. Alfonzo, b. 14 Aug., 18 IG; d. 1 Dec, 1846. 

101. III. William L., b. 14 Nov., 1847. 

After leaving Sharon the family resided at several places and is 
now located on a farm at Elbridge, Oceana Co., Mich. 

Richard Ayers \¥a3-born in the State of New York, 17 Oct., 180G., 
. U^ die^l 20 March, 1898. 
/) / \A^^^ Sftbrina (P i eb tmiT"lty^Ptv4ied-28-Mttrcti7^r^S. 

^ [ lOt.] William L. Ayers and Lydia Holmes were married 3 

Dec, 1874, at Hamlin, Mich. (lu>.\A(i vi/ ir^cti^lv^, 'hUjC^^ 
They had:— / 

102. I. Orla L., b. 21 Dec, 1875. 

103. II. OuviL J., b. 14 Aug., 1882. 

104. III. Olena (dau.), b. 14 Aug., 1882. 



BURIAL PLACES. 



k',..^' 



In the old North burying-ground near Hampton, Connecticut, are 
to be found the oldest of any of the/tombstones that mark the tinal 
resting place of the descendants of Roger' Preston. The oldest 
inscri})tion is: 

"John Presson, died 2 '> July, 1733, in y^ Ad year of liis age." 
[ NoTi].--The family name was often spelled " Presson" previous to 1750.] 
"Sarah I'restun, y*^ wife of Left. Jacob Preston, died April 14, 1751, in y^^ 43d 
year of her age." 

Near these are two other stones, one of which reads "Mr. John 
Presson," the other "Sarah Preston, 1731." These latter were 
once believed to mark the resting places of the old Narragansett 
soldier and his wife Sarah. They, however, may have been footstones^ 
to the tirst mentioned graves. u>t^^'t- >i^— ^<- -^-^ ^^^/^c^^^^ 

BIGELOW CEMETERY. 

On 23 November, 1815, Uriah Litchfield of Hampton deeded to 
Capt. Roswell Preston and fifteen others, and to their heirs forever, 
the IJigelow burying-ground, comi)rising two-thirds of an acre of 
land with the " privilege to pass and repass to and from said piece 
of land north of my dwelling house." The Bigelow cemetery is 
located midway between the town of Hampton Hill and the Preston 
homestead, on the west side of the Appaquay, or Little river, a half 
mile to the northward from the Bigelow school house. In 1897, I 
copied inscriptions there as follows: 

" Mrs. Mary, wife of Mr. Samuel Butt who died Dec. 15, 1767, in y^-' Gist year 

of her age." 

" In memory of Samuel Butt, who died April 11, 17'J1, in ys 8 Itb year of his age.' 

"Chloe, daughter of Jacob and Mary Preston, died July 25th, 1784." 

" Ambrose, son of Jacob and Mary Preston, died Nov. 21, 1793, in 20th year of 

his age." 

" Mary, consort of Mr. Jacob Preston, died April 18, 1795." 
"Lieut. Jacob Preston, died Nov. 5, 1806, aged 74." 



40 nurinl Phur^s. 

" Mrs. Alehitable l\-'jston, wife of Lieut Jacob Preston, died March 29, I -;2(;. 
aged 86 years." 

"Mrs. Mary Comins, wife of Edniond Comius, died July 2>), 1S33, daugliter of 
Capt. Rosweli Preaton." 

The following inscription from a stone placed in that cemetery by 
Capt. Roswell Preston has since been forwarded to me: 

"In memory of widow Ann Eaton, relict of Mr. Joshua Eaton, formerly of Ash- 
ford, who died Sept. 5, 1S07, in the 8S year of her age." 

■'The sweet remembrance of the just 
Shall flourish when they sleep in dust." 

All of these tombstones, except the marble monument at iMary 
Comins' grave, are of blue slate rock and are fairly well preserved, 
except that the letters are worn and partly covered with lichens. 

THE FKEEDOM CEMETEKY. 

It is located on the farm originally owned by Edward Litchlield 
in the township of Freedom, county of Washtenaw, Michigan, In 
that cemetery are marble headstones, with dates of death as follows: 
Capt. Roswell Preston, 16 July, 183G; his widow Mehitable Pres- 
ton, 27 Nov., 185-1; Jacob Preston, 30 Sept., 1S81; his wife Lucy. 
26 Feb., 1846; his second wife Lucina, 16 March, 1859; his sons 
Norman, 10 Aug., 1848, and Abner E., 12 Feb., 1852; Chloe (Preston) 
Kendall, 11 Nov., 1841, and her son Nathan Preston Kendall, 29 
June, 1848. 



lOU^^ A vu /Ot^toi a-i let <o li^ ' of 7(0 o /yiin ^<^<^^' 






BUTT ANCESTRY. 



Kichai;l>\ Samuel-, SAMUEL'^ Mauy', ('"*' Lieut. Jacob Pkeston). 

KicHAUD^ Butt, a native of England, settled at Uorchester> 
Mass., as early as 1675, where, by his wife Deliverance, he liad nine 
children. The town records give the births in detail, showing that 
Nathaniel,- the eldest, was born 2 Dec, 1670; Samuel'- on 1 Marc'.u, 
1673-4, and ]\Iary, the youngest, 18 .March, 1682. Stephen' and 
Hannah (Makepeace^) Hoppin.^f Dorchester, had a daughter. Deliver- 
ance, who was horn in 1648. Modern authorities state that she 
became the wife of Richard Butt."*' Tiie dates are all consistent \,ith 
this statement. On the other hand the church records read: "The 
26, 3(16)78 was the wife of Ilichard Butt baptized, being lately 
admitted a member, and y*^ same time her children were also bap- 
tized, whose naines are: Smith Woodward, Nathaniel, Sherebiah, 
Samuel and Elizabeth." With this record for its authority Savage's 
Genealogical Dictionary asserts that the wife of Richard Butt had 
been widow Deliverance Woodward, "tliough name and residence of 
her are unknown." It states, further, that she died 22 July, 1699, 
aged 74 years, which would make her 45 years of age when her son 
Nathaniel was born, and 57 years of age when her daughter Mary 
was born. 

On 30 July, 1690, Richard Butt executed his will because he was 
*' going forth a soldier in the present expedition against the French," 
i. e., the abortive crusade against Quebec. This is the last record 
which we find of Richard. His wife, Deliverance, was named as 
executrix. His two eldest sons, Nathaniel and Samuel, were not 
mentioned in the document. The will was probated in 1694, and in 
1699 Sherebiah Butt succeeded his mother as administrator of the 
estate. 

Samuel-, son of Richard' and Deliverance Butt, was born at 
Dorchester, Mass., 1 March, 1673-4. 

Sarah^ daughter of Samuel^ and Mary^ (Davenport^) Maxfield, 
was born at Dorcester, 1 July, 1680. 



; 



SU|^Uv ii5|^(-^ w^.-^ ^^t^ a^.-r^-^ /^'^-^--'- 



t■f I ■-— 






42 Butt Ancestry. 

SamueP Butt and Sarah Maxfield were married 11 June, 1701, at 
Dorchester by Rev. John Danforth. They settled at Canterbury, 
Conn., where they had: 

1. Samuel'', born at Canterbury, 30 Nov., 1707. (See Canter- 
bury records.) 

Sarah, wife of SamueP Butt Sr., died at Canterbury 27 Aug., 1727. 

Samuel'^ Butt Sr. died at Canterbury, oO May, 1717. 

Samuel^ Butt Jr., and Mary (Cleveland), widow of Richard"' 
Adams, were married 8 January, 1735 -G. They resided at Canterbury, 
where they had: 

I. Mauy, b. 28 April, 1789; ra. Lieut. Jacob Preston. 
II. Samuel'*, b. 20 Dec, 1742; was a Revolutionary soldier. 

III. John*, b. 1 March, 1745; was a Revolutionary soldier. 

IV. JAMES^ b. 14 June, 1748. 
V. Hannah, b. 8 Aug. 1750. 

Mary, wife of SamueP Butt Jr., died at Canterbury, 16 Dec, 17G7, 
aged 60 years. 

SamueP Butt Jr., died at Canterbury, 11 April, 1791. 

Deacon Samuel'* Butt and John* Butt were neighbors of Capt. 
Roswell Preston, near Hampton, as late as 1818. [See p. 18.] Tiiis 
is the latest trace that I have been able to find of any of the 
descendants of Richard* by the name of Butt. 



EATON ANCESTRY. 



JohnS John-, Thomas ^ Joshua ^ MEniTABLE% 
C^' Wm. Knowlton.) 

JoHN^ Eaton and (widow) Abigal Damon were married at St. 
James Church, Dover, Eng., 5 April, 1630. They had three children 
at Dover: Mary, born, 1G31; John Jr., and Thomas, born, 1G34. 
Mary and John Jr. were christened in St. James' church. A few 
months later John Jr. was buried from that church. 

Mrs. Abigal Eaton, with her children, Mary and Thomas, embarked 
in April, 1635, on the ship "Elizabeth and Ann" for New England. 
The name of John^ Eaton does not appear on that ship's passenger 
list, and yet John took the "freeman's oath" at Watertown, Mass., 25 
May, 1636. Abigal, his wife, was a member of the church at 
Watertown. They had a son, John^ Jr., born at Watertown about 
1636. In 1637 the family moved to Dedham, Mass., where John^ Sr. 
died 17 Nov., 1658. 

John- Jk. married Alice and lived at Dedham, where he 

had a family of eight children, born on dates ranging from 1665 to 
1687. Four of his sons lired to maturity, married, and left a 
numerous posterity. 

Thomas^ son of John- and Alice Eaton, born at Dedham, Mass., 
23 July, 1675, and Lydia, daughter of Nathaniel Gay, were married 
at Dedham, 5 Oct., 1697. They resided first at Koxbury, Mass., 
where three children were born to them. Previous to 1704 they 
settled at Woodstock, Conn., where six additional children were born. 
They finally settled at Ashford, Conn. Thomas^ was, by occupation, 
both blacksmith and farmer. He died at Ashford, 14 Aug., 1748. 

Jos^UA^ son of Thomas^ and Lydia Eaton, was born at Wood- 
stock, 24 Sept., 1709. Joshua^ Eaton and Ann Woodcock were 
married, 15 Dec, 1737. They resided at Ashford, Conn., where they 
had: 

1. Mehitable, b. 17 Oct., 1740; m. (1st) William Knowlton; 
(2d) Jacob Preston. 






44 I'Jdlon Aiircslri/. 

II. Ann, 1). 20 Nov., 1728: tl. 17 Oct., 1740. 

III. Samuel, b. 14 Nov., 1742. 

IV. Ann, the second, b. 11 Oct., 1749. 

Joshua ' Eaton died at Ashford, 27 March, 1785. 

His wife, Ann, born at Dedham, Mass., 24 Feb., 1720, was daugh- 
ter of Samuel and Ann (Herring) Woodcock, who were married at 
Dedham, 12 Feb., 1710. Ann Herring, born 12 July, 1G05, was 
daughter of Thomas and Mehitable Herring, of Dedham. 

"Ann Woodcock Eaton rode as a physician in diseases in ^^enerai and oliiciated 
at 1931 births." 

This quotation is a literal copy from the Eaton family records, 
which were in the possession of Jacob Preston, of Grass Lake, 1870- 
On 8 January, 180G, widow Ann Eaton went to Hampton, to reside 
with her grand-daughter, Mehitable, wife of Capt. Uo.swell Preston, at 
a stipulated rate of four shillings per week for her maintenance. 
She died 5 Sept., 1807. ,sVc ^^M-^ /7. 

Mehitable, daughter of Joshua and Ann Eaton, married (1st) 
William Knowlton, by whom she had a daughter, Mehitable, who 
married Koswell Preston. William Knowlton died Jan'y-, 1784. 
His widow married (2d) Lieut. Jacolj Preston, of Hampton, 25 Jany., 
1798, She died at the residence of hor son-in4aw, Capt. Roswell 
Preston, at Hampton, 25 March, 1S2G. 



KNOWLTON ANCESTRY. 



Williams Joiin'S Joiin^ NathanielS Natiia\iel\ William", 
William', Mehitable'S ('' Capt. Roswell Pkeston.) 

Cai'T. William Knowlton and Ann Elizabeth Smith were mar- 
ried in England about lOOi). In IGo^, with their four children, they 
sailed for America in a ship commanded by Capt. William Knowlton 
and of which he was a part owner, ('apt. Knowlton died during the 
voyage and was buried at Shelbourne, Nova Scotia. His family 
subsequently settled at Ipswich, Mass. 

2. John'-, son of William^ and Ann E. Knowlton, born IGlU, 
and Margery Wilson, a native of England, were married about 1632. 
They resided at Ipswicli and had three children. John- was a shoe- 
maker; became a citizen in 1G39; took the oath of allegience 9 June, 
1641, and died 8 Oct., 1G54, 5. 

5. Joii.\'\ son of John- and Margery Knowlton, born at Ii)swich, 
1633, married Sarah Whipple .') July, 1661. Sarah was daughter of 
John and Sarah Whipple, of Ipswich. John'^ and Sarah Knowlton 
resided at Ipswich, where they had ten children. John'' was a shoe- 
maker, was drafted into the Narraganset expedition in 1670, took 
the freeman's oath 16 Oct., 1680, moved to Wrentham in 1()79, and 
died Oct. — , 1684. 

19. Nathaniel^, born at Ipswich 24 July, 1658-9, was the fifth 
child of John''' and Sarah Knowlton. He married Deborah Jewett 
2 May, 1682. Deborah was daughter of Benjamin and Deborah 
Jewett. Nathaniel^ was a Commoner in 1697, and a deputy of the 
General Court from 1700 to 1720. He died 18 Sept., 1726. 

Nathaniel and Deborah Knowlton had seven children, the eldest 
being: 

74. Nathaniel'', born at Ipswich, 3 May, j()83. He married 
Mary Bennett 13 Feb., 1703, resided at Ipswich, and had seven chil- 
dren. His second child was: 

197. William'', born at Ipswich 8 Feb., 1706. 

Willi:im'' Knowlton and Martha Pindar, of Boxford, were married 



// 

of 



'^^^ ^^(iXuJ^'' ^^.M^ Ah. ,^ , ^'"oidton Avrcstry. I ^ 

/f ^cccy,,^' f^ 13 Feb., 1728. Martha was a liheal descendant of the Pynde/s oj 
-^uJ^ ^'^^^^.incoln county, >^ngland, who were granted a coat of arms in 1538, 
.c7>w ^.Jj y as appears from the records in the Herald's College, London. (See 
^/•f,^^//rv ' P- 'i'*. Knowlton Ancestry.) She was a granddaughter of John Pyn- 
.xcu ^cV^ t'^ ^^®r' 0^" l'yn^J(ir. England, and a great-granddaughter of Henry and 
^ •^zx^iMc^'uyi ^^'^^y I'ynder, who sailed from England for America in 1GH5 in the 
C^e. v^uJ^c^ s^^P "^usan and Ellen." She survived her first husband and married 
k , (-^^) Col. Dean, of Taunton. William'' Knowlton was a housewright. 

I ^ He resided at West Boxford until 1748 when he moved to Ashford, 

I -\ ^ Conn. His name does not appear on the church records, yet he is 

i 2 ^ said to have been a liberal supporter of the church. He died at 

^ ^, ^ "Ashford 18 March, 1758."''ii '''^'^t*^^ '^'^^^^'Uci^ q<.^ ^.^ V 



William'' and Martha (PindarVKnowlton hadf 

^ i^ ^ 421. Lucy, died young. 

^ Jj c^ 422. Lucy, b. 20 Feb., 178(3; m. Abijah Brooks, 

'r* ^ ^ ^ 423. William ^ b. 23 Dec, 1788; m. Mehitable Eaton. 

i 1 I ^ 424. Daniel, b. 23 Dec, 1738. 

^ / "^ ..' 425. TuoMAS, b. 80 Nov., 1740; m. Anna Keys. 

^ '^ ^ 42G. Nathaniel, b. y I\Lay, 174G; died young. 

l^ J 427. Mary, b. 9 May, 1740; m. Ezekiel Tiffany. 

^ '^ 428. Sakah, b. ; m. Joshua Kendall of Ashford. 

^"^ J 429. Pkiscilla, b. ; unmarried. 

l'^ Z (423.) WiLLiAii', b. at West Boxford, Mass., 23 Dec, 1738; and 

Mehitable Eaton (see p. 43) born at Ashford, Conn., 17 Oct., 1740, 

"^ were married about 1759. They resided at Ashford, where they had 



i 



J -A, ^" nine children; 

-"^^ (1032.) Joshua, b. 21 Oct., 17G0. 

• i ^ , (1033.) Harney, b. 12 Nov,, 1762; m. a Miss Wheeler. 

^ "S (1034.) Fanelia (dau.), b. 2 Feb., 17G5; m. — Wheeler, resided 

";$ .| inN. Y. 

I -^ (1035.) William % b. 1 January, 17G7. 

£ ^ (103G.) Stei'IIEN, b. 10 Nov., 1768; m. Eunice Swan. 

-:S X (1087.) AciiSAii, b. 29 Aug., 1772. 

-\.- (1088.) Mehitable^ b. 27 April, 1774; m. Roswell Preston. 

"^ (1039.) Ei'IIRaim, b. 27 April, 1774; d. G April, 1797. 

(1040.) Ann, b. ; married — Delamater; lived in N. Y. 

(423.) William ^ died at Ashford 9 Jan., 1784. His widow. 



J 

4 



^ 






The Knowlton Genealogy states that WILLIAM 
KNOV/LTON (^197), born at Ipswich, Mass . Feb. 8th. 
1706 married Martha Pindar of Boxford,Mass. 

The Preston family records, in tracing the 
Knowlton ancestry of the Preston family, state 
that this particular WILLIAM KNOWLTON married a 
daughter of ?|PW SAMUEL CHANDLER of Woodstock 
Connecticut, who, with his brother John of Worces- 
ter, vrere original grantees of certain Colonial 
lands in New fcituate (now West Ashford) Conn. 
Among the old documents in possession of Y^^ the 
Preston family are 15 or more copies of old deeds 
showinty the transfers that Samuel and John Chand- 
ler made of the lands mentioned, previous to the 
year 1754. The careful preservation of those 
old documents lends plausibility of the claim of 
a Chandler ancestry for the Preston faiBily. 

Yet there is nothing in the deeds referred 
to that appears to throw any light upon the 
subject of my inquiry. On the otfeer hand, all of 
the other items of our genealogy of that period 
6SJ'?i58? investigation, been found to be strictly 



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43 






CITIZENS BANK. 



^ir,.,.,/» '<c,yy, '^»//..>.,..^. April aath.iooa. ^- 



Hon. D. A. BaXer, 

Town Clerl:, Aahford, 

Dear slr:- 

With grateful reoolleotlon of past favors reoeivod at yoiir 

hands I again take the liberty of writing you for the purpose of 

deciding a controverted point in genealogy. 

6 

Records left to ne by nr/ father atate that Wliilam ,the 

father of Ool. Thomas Knowlton , married the dai^hter of Hon.Sanuel 

Chandler. The Chandlers, Knowltono find Batons were all nore or 

less interested in the "Mew Soituate lands" in West Aahford,and from 

the 20 or more Chandler deeds that have been preserved among our 
less intereaxea in i;ne -now acniuaT.e j.anQS" an ffem A8hford,and from 

the 20 or more Chandler deeds that have been preserved among our 

family papers, it would aaem that there must hsve been some line 

of Kin-ship between the Chandlers and the Prestona. 

On the other hand, the Knowlton genealogy states that 
6 
William Knowlton 'Tarried Martha Plnd«r,and that on the decease of 

ffllllam his widow married Col. Dean. 

If grasK you will kindly assist me in determining these 
points or will direct me to some other reliable sauroe of inform- 
ation you will confer a great favor and 1 shall be glad to repav 
yj/a for your time and tro-abl©. 

Thanking you in advanc-i for auor. attention as you may be 
able to gove t^) rr/ request I remain sinoaraly yoxr":). 






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KnowUo)i Ancestry. 47 

Mehitable, married (second) Lieut. Jacob Preston of Hampton, Conn. 
(See p. 12.) /i^.fi u^^ fi.<> [r<^c^ ^'-^^ 

[NoTh:. — The inar^nnal uuinbers are cuiiied as they appear in the volume of The 
KnoivUon Ancestry.] 

Two of the uncles of Mehitable, wife of Capt. Koswell Preston, 
served as soldiers boih in the Colonial and in the lievolutionary wars. 

Lieut. Daniel' Knowlton (424) enlisted tirst in 1757 to tij^ht in 
the French and Indian wars. lie often served as a sQOut. In the 
expedition to Fort Edward, in 1757, he saved the life of Gen. Israel 
Putnam by shooting an Indian who was in the act of tomahawking 
him. He was a sergeant in Cipt. Durkee's company, 17G1; was with 
Lyman's regiment at Crown Point in 17G2; in the Lexington Alarm 
of 1775; at the battle of Flatbush Pass, 177G; and in the battle of 
Harlem Heights, IG Sept., 177G, when his brother, Col. Thomas 
Knowlton, was killed; and was Lieut, in Capt. Durkee's company of 
Matrosses, 1782. 

(424) CoL. Thomas' Knowlton, at the age of sixteen, accom- 
panied his brother Daniel in the campaign which terminated in the 
conquest of Canada. He had a narrow escape from death while 
fighting Indians at Wood Creek, 1758, and was at the capture of 
Ticonderoga in 1759. He was at the siege of Havana, and was com- 
missioned Lieutenant, 17G2. In 1774 he was chosen Captain of the 
Ashford minute men and led this company in his heroic defense of 
Breed's Hill, at the battle of Bunker Hill, IG June, 1775. His com- 
pany was selected by Washington as his body guard. He became 
Major and subsequently acting Colonel of the Twentieth Regiment, 
of which he was Paymaster. He was commissioned Lieutenant- 
Colonel 12 Aug., 177G. A few days later, by skillful strategy, he 
saved his regiment from capture after the disastrous defeat at Long 
Island. Soon after this engagement the regiment of Knowlton's 
liangers was organized from picked men from various regiments, 
with Col. Thomas Knowlton in command. This regiment became 
Washington's body-guard, receiving their orders directly from him. 
At the battle of Harlem Heights, New York, IG Sept., 177G, in which 
the Americans defeated a much larger force of the British, Col. 
Knowlton's regiment was in the thickest of the tight. During this 
battle Col. Knowdton fell, mortally wounded. He died a few hours 
later. His statue, in marble, now adorns the grounds of the State 
Capitol at Hartford, Conn. 



RAYMOND ANCESTRY. 



Ephriam Ramuxg was a native of France. He, with three of his 
brothers, sailed to America and settled in the colony of New York. 
Ephraim had a son, Samuel, who was born 1740. Samuel Raymond 

married Froena Agnes , about 1765. They settled in Dutchess 

county, New York, where they had: 

I. David, b. 18 Nov., 17G7. 

The family afterwards moved to Eenton, in Yates county. Cap- 
tain Samuel Raymond was in command of a company of militia during 
the Revolutionary War and afterwards commanded a boat that sailed 
on the Hudson river between New York and Albany. He died 
19 March, 1821, aged 81 years. 

Froena Agnes Raymond, his widow, died at Benton, Yates county. 
New York, 22 May, 1822, aged 82 years. 

David, son of Samuel Raymond, and Mary Baily were married 
26 Jan., 1796. Mary was born 15 Anril, 1777. Her mother was 
Barbary Bailey, of whom it is recorded that, although of Irish 
descent, yet " she was married to a Yanke." 

David and Alary (Caily) Raymond lived in Benton, Yates county* 
N. Y., v/here they had: 

1. Ayeks, b.4 May, 1797; m. Sanantha Tubbs, 10 Feb., 1819; 
d. 1821. 

II. Mautha, b. 18 June, 1798; m. Elipha Peckens; d. 5 Nov., 
1886. 

III. Samuel Baily, b. 1 April, 1800; m. Charlotte Sweet, 
28 Nov., 1822; d. 1 Sept., 1887. 

IV. Betsy, b. 28 Jan., 1802; d. 15 Sept., 1889; unmarried. 

V. David C, b. 18 Dec, 1803; m. Julia Ann Preston, 26 May, 
1836; d. 13 March, 1869. 

VI. James G., b. 18 Jan., 1806; d. 16 Dec, 1893; unmarried. 

VII. Cyrus, b. 14 May, 180S; m. Lorena Dickensen, 20 June, 
1833; d. 9 Feb., 1896. 



i\ tl 'i b %y 



.f,)' 



Rdi/inond Aiiccstrij. 49 

VlII. Anglline, b. 17 July, 1810; m. William Preston, 4 Feb., 
1836; d. 21 March, 1883. 

IX. Nanty Jane, b. 10 July, 1813; d.3 May, 1897; unmarried. 
X. Mary Ann, b. 26 Aug., 1S17; d. 1 Sept., 1869; unmarried. 

David Raymond, accompanied by his wife and children, excepting 
Martha and Ayers, emigrated to Michigan in 1833, and settled on a 
farm in the township of Freedom, Washtenaw county, in the same 
neighborhood as Capt Roswell Preston. That farm became the 
permanent residence of the parents and unmarried children. 
Cyrus and Samuel each owned farms in the adjoning town of Sharon. 
David C. lived for a time at Dexter, Mich., and afterwards pur- 
chased a farm in Ingham county. 

Barbary Baily died at the residence of David Raymond in Free- 
dom, 1845, aged 95 years. 

Mary Bailey, wife of David Raymond, died 15 March, 1856. 

David Raymond died 28 June, 1858, aged 90 years. 



WITTER ANCESTRY. 



Wiluam\ Joseph-, Ebenezer^ Josei'hS Elijah^ Elizabeth'' 

("• B. T. KlLLAM.) 

William^ Witter, born in Great Britain in 1584, was one of the 
first settlers at Lynn, Mass. His title to his land was acquired 
directly from the Indians, as is set forth in a deposition made by 
him on IG June, 1657. The following is a copy of his affidavit: 

" Black Will, or Duke William, came to my house when Thomas Dexter bought 
" Nahant for a suit of clothes. He (Witter) said: Black Will asked me what I would 
" give him for the land my house stood on, it being his land and his father's wigwam 
" stood thereabouts. Joseph Sagmore and John and the Sagmore of Agwara and 
" others: and George .Sagmore, being a youth, was present. All of themacknowledg- 
" ing Black Will to b'' the owner of the land my house stood upon; and Sagmore hill 
" and Nahant were all his. He (Witter) adds that he bought Nahant and Sagmore 
" hill and Swampscol of Black Will for two pestle-stones." 
* * * * * 

On 28 April, 1643. William Witter was presented to the Court 
of Salem for his conduct regarding infant baptism — he regarding it 
as a sinful rite. He :^nswered humbly and confessed his ignorance 
and willingness, and (upon Mr. Morris, our minister, his speech) 
seemed to be staggered, inasmuch as he came into Court meetingly. 
The Court sentenced him to acknowledge his fault and to ask Mr. 
Corbit forgiveness in saying he spoke against his conscience, and 
enjoyned to be here next Court at Salem. 

April 26, 1646, William Witter, of Lynn, was presented by the 
Grand Jury at the Court of Salem for saying that: "They who stayed 
at the baptism of a child do worship the Divell." Being dealt there- 
about he further said that: "He who stayed at the baptism of a 
child do take ye name of the Father, Sonne and Holy Cost in vayne." 

He was accused, also, of breaking the Sabbath, & confessed, & 
justified his former speech. The sentence of the Court was an 
injunction the next Lord's Day that he make a public confession, to 
satisfaction, in the open congregatiuti at Lynn. Or else to answer it 



Y.,. i 



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X' 



Witter Ancestry, 51 

at the next General Court & concerning his opinion the Court 
expressed their patience towards him and admonishing him till they 
see if he continue obstinate. Said Witter not appearing, accordmg 
to order, was directed to appear at the Court of Assistants of 
Boston. 

July 22, 16 16, William Witter not appearing at Court in Boston, 
it is ordered that the Major-General do take order for his appearance 
at the next General Court of Assistants to answer for his offenses. 

Sept. 19, 1651, John Clark. Obediah Holmes and John Crandall, 
being the reprasentatives of the church in Newport (First Baptist), 
upon request of William Witter of Lynn, arrived there, he "being a 
brother in the Church who, by reason of his advanced age, could not 
undertake so great a journey to visit the Church." He lived about 
two miles out of Lynn and, the next day being Sunday, they spent in 
religious services at his house, and was there apprehended by 2 
constables at the instance of the Mass authorities "for the dire 
offense of holding their little meeting, & on other frivolous pretexts." 
Obediah Holmes was fined, imprisoned and whipped. 

( Copied from old records.) 



William Witter, the subject of the foregoing record, and the 

first of his line in America, married Ann|^ , (or AgHoo — ) 

in 1635. He died at Lynn in 165i), aged 75 years. 

William^ and Anne Witter had: 

L JosiAH-, b. at Lynn about 1638. 

Josiah' married Elizabeth daughter of Thomas Wheeler, of Lynn, 
by whom he had: 'f^ ^/' f^'^' ' ^^''^ "^^ '^ ">i ^ ' '. ^^^*-^> 

I. Elizabeth, b. 15 March, 1663. ^ ""^ J '"^^ ^ <^c^' / 177_ . 
II. Mary, b. 20 February, 1665. \ 

HI. EBENEZER^ b. 25^1ay, 1668. (A f ^^UA*^ 

Elizabeth, mother of the foregoing, died at Lynn, 7 Oct., 1672. 
Josiah- married (second) Sarah, daughter of John Crandall, by whom 
he had four children. 

Ebenezer^ .son of Josiah^ and Elizabeth Witter, settled first on 



r|2 -^^- 



J '^t.ca^iiJ 



Witter 



Anrc^tri/. 



".^-HKjP^..,^ 






the Pettsquamscuit Purchase (now South Kingston), Pthode Island. 

In 1G92 he moved thence to the town of Preston, Connecticut, where 

he purchased eight acres of land on the south slope of Wis^iuador 
Jlill, bounded on the south by New l.ondon town and Poquetannock 

brook. On this land he erected' a grist mill, which is still in 
-operation, and which was, until 1897, in possession of his lineal 

descendants. . .; _ , . yurrK/t*^ 

- The town of Preston isseven miles east of Norwich, which was 
the market town of the Weston families residing at Hampton. It 
was incorporated in 1^54 deriving its name, doubtless, from the town 
of Preston in EnglamL the niitivo pla«o of jovoral of tho ^ ^rrm^ o t ' ii, ov ('k-^ 
" fits-t ^ftttl r rs , of t'v^ nonnpf-rifit tnmn i.f I'rn-fnn p^p nf_thr -n \^\ jr hfA -^ 
th»4U^ John Thompson . wh,).jo ohildrun marriud i nto tho Park f am- 
i4y. Another was Thomas' Park, whose granddaughter, Dorothy 
Morgan, married EbenezerMVitter. Thomas ^^{ose was also one of ^./7*/- ■ 
the grantees. His granddaughter, Sarah lioseTmarrieOolm KAw' 
lam. Thomas^ Pcse is described in the records as "gentleman" and 
the town records indicate that he was a gentleman by birth and by 
education. He married Hannah Allyn,^Uiai^t^. His son, Joseph^ dutc cL Uh^ 



:^ NO 



lx< 



^ 



Rose, married Sarah Pelton, by whom hehadaTdaughter, Sarah, who, Qjiiuy\, il; 

' doubtless, was the Sarah Rose who married John Killam. JtujtL*>\" 

Robert Park, "gentleman," in 1600, married Martha, daughter of i 

Capt. Robert Chaplin, of Bury, Eng., by whom he had: William, Sam- : 

uel and Thomas, all born in the town of Preston, England. Robert ' '■ 

Park and his three sons sailed from the Isle of Wight for America 
in the ship ''Arabella," 29 March, 1G30, with seventy-six passengers. 
Robert Park was companion and secretary of John Winslow, who was ; 

also one of the passengers on the "Arabella," and who afterwards i 

became Governor^^of_the_colony of Connecticut^ ^/^^ ^^, ai^^ IGI't^\\ 
Thomas^^fsoFoF^RoberTPark- married Dorothy, the daughter of '^•^^-*^^SJL\ 
Rev. Johuyi ^ompso n of the town of Preston, Jbywhom he had a l^^i" h 

daughter, Doroth^^TlfuvtiTC CliU^ <^^^*^Wf7 ' ^ 

Joseph, son of James Morgan b; 29 Oct., 1G4G, and Dorothy, j 

daughter of Thomas Park, b. G M«^1G52, were married in April, fl 

1 1670./ They lived at Preston, where they had: '• 

1 I. Dorothy, b. 29 Feb., 1G7G. 



N Dorv^rft^ ^^yii^}iiJ\,i^^, 4. L h^a^cA fGS'X 



*i 









irtLrwi 






c/14'^ ^M^^^*^ 



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J-f-^ ll'U tic-i-i^rL' 



/ayi/<^ 



J- /> Af, /'!^4l ^^- /5^7f m.o&t, place. Iuc-U.a 'C>i)uitt\ 

Lv^rt-i? /^ fvzA'i^ f^-C-'C^CX ^//^^ /c'-C'c u^xk./H^i<-yl3 <-^^-^ 
7\ — ~t 'TT '^j "^ — "" "^ / 



li 






ac^.^^''^^^ ^^' /i^— <^^^. ^^,^^- ^^i^^^^^'^y^' 









u^a^ 










PAUPAC RIVER ON KILLAM HOMESTEAD 



r 



"^ 



■ll 



^ 



IJf 



H7//('/- Ancestry. 



53 



EBENEZEir WiTTEK and Dorothy (Park) Morgan were married 5 
May, 1(593. They were residents in Preston and had: 

I. Joseph*, b. 12 June, 1G98, besides three other sons and 
one daughter. 



Joseph* Witter and Elizabethl(tit7rH. (or (Jeerjjwere married 13 

Aug., 1722, lived at Preston and hacIT "" 

I. Samuel^ b. 28 May, 1723. 
JosEiH^ b. 15 Dec, 1724. 
EZKA, b. 22 Jan., 1727. 
Hannah, b. 8 Oct., 1730. 



II. 
III. 
IV. 

V. 

VI. 

VII. 



EBENEZEll^ b. 11 8ept., 1732. 
[ELIJA^^ b. 2G Sept., 1735.] 
Eunice, b. 8 Dec, 1747. 

Elijah's naine does not appeap^jimong the births of Joseph's* other 
chi]dreH(jnthe__t own~ recordsoF Pre jEoLA The date of his birth and 
his nativity are recorded, however, in the Killam family records. The 
town records do show that Elijah Witter conveyed to his father, 
Joseph Wilier, 7 Oct., 17G0, certain lands which Elijah had purchased 
12 Oct., 1759 [See page 408, vol. 7, Record of Deeds, town of Pres- 
ton]. The marriage records show that he was twice married in that 
town, of which he was a resident for a period of thirty-five years. 
These several records of Elijah are all consistent with each other. 
The dates harmonize. These, with the declaration in the deed, 
clearly establish the parentage of Elijah and prove him to be a lineal 
descendant of William^ and Anne Witter, of Lynn, Massachusetts. 

Elijah Witter married (1st) Lucy Clark, 18 Nov., 175G. After 
the death of his first wife, Elijah married (2d) Elizabeth Storey, 29 
May, 1770. Elizabeth was born2G Sept., 1749. (P.irth date is from 
Killiam records; marriage date from records of town of Preston.) 

Soon after their marriage Elijah^ and Elizabeth (Storey) Witter 
moved to Pennsylvania and settled on farming lands on the Paupac 
river in Pike county. They had a daughter, Elizabeth '% born at 
Paupac 3 Sept., 1773. She was the first white child born in that 
settlement. 

Elizabeth Witter married Benjamin Tustin Killam. (See p. 56.) 

After the marriage of this daughter, Elijah and his wife moved 
to the State of New York, where they died; Elijah in 1815, aged 80 
years- and Elizabeth in 1839, agedj^ years. 



a-c^ 



f o ^- { 



/ 



KILLAM ANCESTRY. 



[Henry] AusTIN^ JoHN'^ Samuel^, John*, Zadok^, Moses*^, 
Benjamin X•^ Lucy% (*'• Jacob Pkeston). 

Existing records show that the Kilhani families had resided in the 
parish of Kilham, in the West Riding of Yorkshire, Eng., for eight 
successive generations previous to 16G5. Tradition says they have 
been there since the days of William the Conqueror. 

Henry Kilham and Alice Goodale, married 12 August, 1582, were 
residents of Bennington, Suffolk county, England, where the parish 
records mention the baptism of several of their children and of one 
of their grandchildren. 

Austin \ son of Henry and Alice (Goodale) Kilham, born at Den- 

nington previous to IGOO, married Alice . They were residents 

of ■ Bennington, Eng., where they had several children; Baniel, the 
eldest, being baptised in that parish in 1G20. In May, 1G37, Austin, 
with his wife and children, sailed from the port of Yarmouth for 
New England and landed at Salem, Mass. They lived for brief periods 
at Bedham and Chelmsford and, in 1G38, established a permanent 
home at Wenham, Mass. From the wills of Austin and Alice Kil- 
ham, executed in 1G67, we learn that they had three sons: Baniel, 
John and Lott, and three daughters: Sarah, Elizabeth and Mary. 
The following entries are to be found in the town records at Wenham: 

"Austin Killam dyed ye 5th of ye 4th mo. 1GG7." 
"Alice Killam dyed ye 18: 5 mo. IGG7." 

Baniel^, eldest son of Austin Killam, m. Sarah Fairfield, lived 
at Wenham, had four sons, some of whose descendants settled 
at Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, where there is now a large colony of 
Killams. 

Lot"-^, son of Austin Killam, born at Wenham, 11 Sept., 1G40, 
m. Hannah Goodale 21 May, IGGG, settled at Enfield, Conn., where 
some of his descendants are still living. 



9-11-1053. 

John Kcllium oi" Wciilinin lialh sold unto Charles 

wenhuni. ^^^'^^ <'* ISaloiii, ills d\vcllin<2; house in Wenham with 

twenty-tive acres of upland thereto adjoining; and 

twelve acres of meadow of that which was Austin Kelhanrs 

lyin"- in the great meadow, as by deed dated 14- Nov., 1053. 

John-, second son of Austin and Alice Killam, born in England, 
ra. Alice Pickworth, lived at Wenham, iMass., where the birth of his 
children is recorded as follows: 

" Hannah, daughter of John Kellum, borne 29 April, 16G0." 
"Samuel', ionn of John Killim, borne 1 August, 16G2." 
"Anne, daughter of John Killam, borne the 4(1) mo. 1073." 
"Benjamin-', son of John Killim, borne 3 February. 1074." 

Samuel^ Killam (John% Austin\ Henry) married Deborah , 

1694, lived at Wenham, and had* 

I. Hannah, b. 22 March, 1695; m. John Moulton. 

*II. John\ b. 7 Sept., 169S; m. Sarah Rose. 

HI. Benjamins b. 6 Feb., 1700. 

IV. Josephs h. 1 April, 170G. 

V. Nath.\nielS b. 1 Sept., 1711; m. Sarah Fairfield. 

VI. Abigal, b. 23 March, 1714. 

VII. Eijenezek'', b. 9 May, 1719; m. Mary Gilbert. 

John"* Killam (Samuel'^, John", Austin*) was a resident of the 
town of Preston, Conn., where on 5 March, 1718, he m. Sarah Rose 
(See p. 52). John^ and Sarah (Rose) Killam had two sons, Phineas 
and Zadok. 

Phineas'', the eldest, settled ai Canterbury, Conn., where, by his 
wife. Thankful, he had six daughters: Olive, Sarah, Elive, Thankful, 
Abigal, and Esther. 

Zadok ^, son of John^ and Sarah Rose Killam, b. 8 Nov., 1720, 
was a resident of the town of Preston, where he married Hannah 
Button, 8 Nov., 1744. Hannah Button's probable line of ancestry 
was: 

MatthiasS Daniel", Matthias^, Peter^, Matthias^ 

Matthias* Button, a Dutchman, resident of Boston, by his wife, 
Lettice, had: Daniel, born 22 Feb., 1635. Matthias* afterwards 
moved to Haverhill, Mass., where he died, in 1672, at an old age. His 
grandson, Matthias^, of Haverhill, was a member of a Massachusetts 
company which, in 1690, colonized the Winthrop lands, located on 
the east side of Little river, in Windham county, Connecticut. Peter* 

[*See Killam Genealogy, by G. S. Brown of Boston. Scrutinizing inquiry has 
failed to throw any discredit on this identification of John Killam of Preston.] 

20-3-J^54. .^ /^ i-y ^^ — — 

Whereas John Kelham hath sold unto Charles- 

Wenham. <^ott late Deacou of Salem twenty-tive acres of iiiK 

land and twelve acres of mea(h)w in Wenham, now 

this record te-stilieth that Austin Kelham and Alice, his wife, 

did freely consent to the sale, and the said Alice did resi^rn 

her interest of her thirds in the said land, as by writiu<r dated 

tiO, 3'""., under the Dejjuty (Jovernor's Jmnd appcareth. 



56 k'ilhtiii Ancc>>try. 

Button, was a resident of New London, Conn. lie had: 

Matthias"', born at New London, 1GD2, who was a resident of the 
town of Preston and was (doubtless) father of Hannah Button, who 
married Zadok Killam. 

[The remaiuder of the Killam history is from family records.] 

Zadok'' and Hannah Button Killam had three sons: iMoses", Silas, 
and Ephraim. 

MosES*^ KiLL.v.M, born 1747, and his wife, .Mary, born 1759 (the 
family record reverses these dates), settled at (loshen, N. Y., where 
they had: 

I. Benj.v.min' Tustin, b. 21 June, 17S1; m. Elizabeth Witter. 

II. Mo.sES^ b. 1783; m. Lucy Kimble. 

Moses ^, with his wife, Mary, and their two sons, moved to Penn- 
sylvania previous to 1796 and settled on lands on the Paupac river, 
in Pike county. 

Mary, wife of Moses*^, died at Paupac, 16 May, 1816. 

Moses'i, Killam died at Paupac, 15 May, 1831, aged 84 years. 

Benjamin ' Tustin Kill.am and Elizabeth Witter were married at 
Paupac, 1797. Benjamin was a lumberman and a farmer. His pos- 
sessions embraced fertile bottom lands on both sides of the Paupac 
river and timber lands on the adjacent mountains. During the flood 
waters of the springtime he and his sons floated rafts of logs down 
the river to Philadelphia, where the tiniber was sold. Fish and game 
were plentiful in that region and both he and his sons were experts 
with the rod and gun and frequently supplied his table with the deli- 
cacies of the forest and stream. The substantial dwelling and farm 
buildings which he erected at the beginning of the present century 
are still occupied and are well preserved. He was a man of piety 
and often officiated at local church gatherings as clergyman. Six of 
his children, after arriving at maturity, emigrated to the Westward 
and finally settled in the Territory of Michigan. A few years privi- 
ous to his death he and his wife visited their kindred in Michigan, 
which visit afforded the only opportunity that many of his grand- 
children ever had of looking upon his benevolent features. On 
returning to Pennsylvania he made a will bequeathing to his several 
heirs some portion of his estate. His son Marcus succeeded to his 
estate and faithfully executed the provisions of his will. 



KiUcoii Aarcstri/. 57 

Benjamin T. Killain died at I'aupac [) May, 1856, aged 75 years. 
Elizabeth, his widow, died at Paupac 1 July, 1872, aged 97 years. 
Tlieir children were: 

I. Anna, b. 7 March, ITHS; m. Thomas Bortree, died 27 
March, 1884. 

II. James, b. 11 May IIW; d. in Penn., — , Nov., 1800. 
111. Lewis Collins, b. IG Oct., ISOl; m. Elizabeth Bortree; d. 
7 April, 1851. ♦ 

IV. Emeline, b. 24 Dec, 18()o; m. John Bingham; d. 5 April, 
1898. 

V. Alfred, b, 23 Mar., l;sOG; m. Frances Nordman; d. 21 
Sept., 1853. 

VI. Elijah, b. 2 June, 1808; m. Sarah Rockwell; d. 18 April, 
1851. 

VII. Moses, b. 19 July, 1810; d. 3 July, 1830. 
VIII. Lucy Witter, b. 16 July, 1812; m. Jacob Preston; d. 26 
Feb., 1846. cl. S<Uy itij'jVo^L- n /- li-u<J^u. 

IX. MAiccus NAroLEON Boneparte, b. 6 Feb., 1816; m. Nancy /"^^ f 

J. Bennett; living. -^ 

X. Polly, b. 4 April, 1820; m. James Van Camp; d. 26 April, 
1895. 

Anna, daughter of Benjamin T. and Elizabeth Killam, and 
Thomas Bortree, b. Feb., 1792, were married Sept., 1819. They had: 
I. Esther Ann, b. 10 Sept., 1820; m. David W. Noble; d. 10 
Nov., 1894. 

II. Benjamin K., b. 4 Feb., 1822; m. Matilda Shouse; had 9 
children. 

III. Mary H., b. 7 March, 1824; ra. Shay Depuy; d. 14 Feb., 
186L 

IV. Margaret Jane, b. 4 Feb., 1826; m. Ludoc van Storch; 
d. 26 Feb., 1850. 

V. Lewis S., b. 11 Nov., 1827; m. Eliza Marcy; lives at To- 
ledo, Ohio. 

VI. Emeline K., b. 1 May. 1830; m. Ichabod Quimby; lives at 
Grand Kapids, Mich. 

VII. Elizabeth K., b. 24 May, 1832; d. 13 Dec, 1856. 
VIII.-IX. Lucy B. and Lucy Preston both died young. 



58 Killaiii Anrc-itry. 

X. Moses K., b. 14 May, ISol); m. Mary Culver, living at 
Grand Rapids. 

Tliomas Bortree died 1 1 Feb., 18G4, aged 72 years. 

Emeline K., dau. of Thomas and Anna (Killam) Bortree, and 
Ichabod L. Quimby, were married 2 June, 18-i'.). They lived at (]rand 
Rapids, Mich., and had: 

I. (1eor(;e I., b. S Nov., 1851; m. Josephine Maddock; d. 15 
May, 1893. ^ 

II. Claka S., b. 23 June, 1856. 
III. Ethelyx, b. 9 Nov., 1869. 
Ichabod L. Quimby, died at Grand Rapids, 24 Mar., 1889. 

Lewis^ Collins Killam, b. 16 Oct., 1801, and Elizabeth Bortree, 
b. 4 July. 1809, were married 2 Nov., 1830. They lived at Sharon, 
Wfishtenaw Co., Mich., where they had: 

I. Makgauetta Ann'-*, b. 22 Feb., 1832; m. Austin Cravath. 
II, Ror.EiiT'-' Benjamin, b. 24 Jan., 1834; m. Theadate Hayden; 
d. April, 1877. 

III. Lewis'' Leandeh, b. 25 Aug., 1835; m. Nancy C. Friend. 

IV. C.\rlotte Emily, b. 11 April, 1837. 

V. TusTiN Edward, b. 12 Dec, 1839; m. Susan Andrews. 
VI. Irene Soi'Hiah, b. 7 July, 1842; m. Robert Compton; 
d. April, 1866. 

VII. Lucy Jane, b. 6 May, 1845; m. Wm. Hall; lives at Los 
Gatos, Cal. 

Lewis'^ Collins Killam died at Sharon, Mich., 7 April, 1851. 
His widow, Elizabeth (Bortree) Killam, married (2d) Jonas Tvvit- 
chell. She died in Minnesota. February, 1892, 

Margaretta^ Ann Killam and Austin Cravath were married 29 
June, 1853, They had: 

I. Lewis Killam Cravath, b. 1854; m. Katherine Ferris, 1880. 
II. Myrtillus Cravath, b. Aug., 1858; m. Clara Moore, 1884. 
Robert"-' Benjamin Killam and Theadate Hayden were married 
Jan'y, 1858. They had: 

I. Nellie, b. 1859; d. 1875. 
IL Collins^", b. 1869. 



Killmn Ancednj. 59 

Lewis'-^ Leandbr Killam and Nancy C. Friend were married 14 
Sept., 1859. They live at Saratoga, Minnesota, where they had: 

I. Lily Evaline, b. 25 Jan., 1861; m. Milford Strange, 1884. 

II. Nellie Elvina, b. 31 Mnr., 18G3; m. (ieo. Patterson, 188G. 

III. Emily Esther, b. 28 Mar., 1809; m. Thomas Glensted, 1893. 

IV. Bektiia Eliza, •!). 8 Nov., 1873; m. Leonard Cronk, 1892. 
V. Robert Ray, b. 7 Nov., 1886. 

Tustin'-* Edward Killa.m and Susan Andrews were married July, 
1862. They live at Redwood Falls, Minnesota, where they had; 
I. Mary, b. Oct., 1866; m. J. V. McGetrick. 
II. William Henry, b. June, 1869; d. Feb., 1890. 
III. Claude, b. Dec. 1875. 
W. TusTiN Arthur, b. 1881. 

Emelixe^, second daughter of Benjamin'' T. Killam, born during 
the administration of Jefferson, the third President, lived until the 
administration of William McKinley, the twenty-fifth President. 
During the Indian war of 1812, she was one of the occupants of a 
fort which was garrisoned by women and one man. During an Indian 
attack on the fort the women melted lead and made bullets while the 
man fired at the Indians and kept them at bay until re-enforcements 
arrived and the beleaguered women were rescued. She arrived at 
Detroit when it was a French fort and trading-post. She passed 
through Ann Arbor when that city consisted of but two log houses. 
The mistress of each house was named Ann, and this circumstance is 
said to be the origin of the name "Ann Arbor." She married John 
K. Bingham at Paupac, Penn., 9 Sept., 1822, resided for a time at 
Wheatland, N. Y., and then settled in the county of Washtenaw, 
Michigan Territory. During their residence in that county from 
1826 to 1835 Mr. Bingham was a surveyor of Government lands. 
Jacob Preston, his future brother-in-law, was his assistant. Together 
they surveyed and staked out many of the section and township lines 
in that portion of the state. Mr. Bingham moved to Marshall in 1836. 

John K. and Emeline (Killam) Bingham had: 

I. IIezekiah, b. 12 January, 1825, at Wheatland, N. Y.; 
deceased. 



60 k'ilhnii Ancftitri/. 

II. liEXJAMix, b. 28 Feb., 1827, at 8cio, Mich.; m. Sarah 
Carr 14 Mar., 18-12; deceased. 

III. Eliza Ann, b. 17 Jan., 1821), at Scio, Mich.; m. Dr. 
Charles W. Ilawiey 15 June, 1851; lives at Plainwell, Mich, 

I\'. ErxiCi:, b. 8 July, 1831, at Lima, Mich.; m. John Kimble, 
9 April, 1851. 

V. Elizabeth, b. 25 March, 1834, at Lima; m. James 
McRoberts, 20 Sept., 1858; resides at Grand Kapids, Mich. 
VI. Moses, b. 3 Sept., 183G, at Marshall, Mich. 
VII. Sarah, b. 7 Dec, 1838, at Antwerp, Mich.; m. H. Bogar- 
dus, 1 Jan., 1857; resides at Dalton, Georgia. 

\m. Maky, b. 9 Feb., 1842, at Antwerp ; m. Charles Newlands, 
13 Sept., 18G4; resides at Rutland, ^lich. 

IX. -X. Ruth and Amenzo P., both died young. 

XL Charles Edgar, b. 28 Nov., 1848, at Gunn Plains; m, 
Ilattie Ives. 

John K. Bingham died at Oxford, Mich., 23 April, 18G0. 
Emeline Killam, his widow, died at the residence of her daughter 
Eliza, wife of Dr. Charles W. Hawley, at Plainwell, Mich., 4 April, 
1898, aged 94 years. 

Alfred*^, son of Benj.'' T. Killam, went to Michigan Territory in 
1827, and located a farm on government land in the town of Marengo, 
Calhoun county. In 1831 he visited iiis parents in Pennsylvania and, 
on his return to Michigan, was accompanied by his sister Lucy, who 
kept house for him until the date of his marriage. 

Alfred** Killam and Frances Nordman were married at the 
residence of the bride's parents in the town of Lima, 17 May, 1835. 
Frances was daughter of (lOtlob Nordman and was born at Berlin, 
Prussia, 12 October, 180(J. Lewis'', the son of Alfred" Killam, 
furnished substantially the following statement relative to the 
Nordman ancestry: 

The father of Gotlob Nordman, though not of royal blood, was a 
member of the titled nobility of Prussia. He was a man of wealth 
and large possessions in Berlin, and had numerous men-servants and 
women-servants in his employ, Gotlob Nordman, born about 1780, 
inherited a large estate from his father. Under King Frederick 



KiUdV) A II re. -it nj. 61 

Wilhelm III. (Totlob was appointed Governor of the Noblemen's Cadet 
at Berlin, the royal military academy of the realm, and thus became 
the instructor of the heir apparent, Wilhelm 1, afterwards Emperor 
of Germany. "When Berlin was besieged by the armies of Napolean, 
Gotlob became one of the Council of Twelve whom Frederick 
Wilhelm 111. summoned to act as his military advisers. During the 
financial panic and political upheaval that followed, as a result of the 
war, Gotlob lust both his fortune and his office. One account states 
that his reverses were caused by the panic — another, that he had 
incurred the king's displeasure and was banished for political reasons. 
He then, in 1829, emigrated to America, taking with him his wife 
and four unmarried children, together with his personal effects, 
including a valuable library of scientific works. A married daughter 
remained in Berlin. He lived at Philadelphia for three years where 
' he was a teacher of languages. In 1832 he emigrated to Michigan 
Territory and settled on a farm on section 2'J, in the town of Lima, 
Washtenaw county, where he passed the remainder of his days. 
Before his death he presented his valuable library to the University 
of Michigan at Ann Arbor. His two sons and two daughters married 
Americans and settled on farms near his own. 

[Edward'^ Killam Prfdton.(91) is a great-grandson of Gotlob Nordman.] 

Alfred'' and Frances (Nordman) Killam lived at Marengo, Mich., 
where they had: 

I. Philander'* B., b. 4 Aug., 1836. 

n. Lewis'-* C., b. 9 Dec, 1837. 

HI. Harvey, b. 24 Sept., 1839; d. G Oct., 1843. 

IV. Thusenelda, b. 17 Dec, 1841; m. Davi<l Bachman; d. 7 
Feb., 18G5. 

V. Marcus^ B., b. 29 April, 1844; enlisted, in 1862, in Co. A., 
2d Batt. of 17th Regt., U. S. Infantry, Sykes' Division, Army of the 
Potomac. He was killed in the battle of Gettysburg, 2 July, 1863. 

VI. Lucy A., b. 25 Sept., 1847; m. B. T. K. Preston; d. 29 April, 
1874. 

Alfred ** Killam died at Marshall, Mich., 2 Sept., 1853. 

Frances (Nordman) Killam died 15 April, 1861. 



62 Killam Anceatry. 

PniLAXDEu'^ B. Killam and Maggie Smith were married 16 May, 
1857. They lived at Marengo., where they had: 

I. Alfred^" A., b. 3 Jan., 1859; m. Carrie M. Beck,"30 Nov., 
1879; lives at Carson, Mich.; had: Lee Killam, b. 17 Sept., 1884. 

Maggie (Smith) Killam died 15 July, 1860. 

Philander *' B. married (2d) Martha B. Catlin, 16 March, 1864. 
Martha died 24 Dec, 1868. 

Philander B. married (3d) Addie Mills, 22 Feb., 1871. They lived 
at Matherton, Mich., where they had: 

II. WiLLLV.M^^ P., b. 8 Dec, 1872; m. Lottie Dodge, 15 June, 
1893, and had: Buelah B., b. 18 Mar., 1896; d. 6 Mar., 1897. 

III. Mattie^" B., b. 23 Nov., 1873; m. John D. Hamilton, 25 
Aug., 1897. 

IV. Maryi^ F., b. 31 March, 1875; m. Herbert F. Rice, 3 Oct., 
1895; has daughter, Lucile.' ^ 

V. Mildred^ \ b. 5 Sept., 1877; d. 12 April, 1878. 
VI. Aktiiur^'^ G., b. 11 Sept., 1880. 

Lewis'' C, son of Alfred^ and Frances Killam, married Lucinda 
M. Bryan., 20 Feb., 1806, at Marengo, Calhoun county, Mich. They 
settled at Aloulton, Iowa, where they had' 
I. Frank !<> L., b. 8 Jan., 1869. 
II. Cora Belle, b. 4 Dec, 1870. 

They also had: (Jrove S., Claude, and Mary, each of whom died 
during infancy. 
Lewis'* C, Killam now resides at Tacoma, Washington. 

Elijah'^, son of Benj. T. and Elizabeth Killam, settled in the town 
of Lima, Washtenaw county, Mich., in 1833. He married Sarah 
Rockwell, by whom he had two sons and one daughter. They 
are reported to be living near their birth-place, but have failed to 
furnish copy of their family record. 
Elijah died 18 April, 1851. 

Lucy'* Witter, daughter of Benj.". T., and Elizabeth (Witter) 
Killam, remained with her parents at Paupac until she was nineteen 
years of age. In 1831 she accompanied her brother Alfred, to his 
home at Marengo, Mich., and kept house for him until his marriage 



iTHE HAWLE\WrilVlES 



Thursday, July 31, 1902, 



ueatta OfAiy bid l>lo^ej^ 

MaVoua''N.,B.JR;iljt< 
ly re8pected_^i|j'" "**■ 



hi8„W' 



3 Callaway, Editor and' 



KiUam Ancedry. 



63 



in 1835. While visiting her sister, Mrs. Bingham, in the town of 
Lima, she met Mr. Bingham's assistant, the young surveyor, who was 
destined to become her future husband. 

Lucy Witter Killam and Jacob Preston were married, 5 Jan., 1837. 
Lucy W. died in the town of Freedom, Mich., l^G Feb. 1846. [See 
page 29.J 

Marcus** Napoleon Bonapakte, youngest son of Benjamin T. 
and Elizabeth Killam, succeeded his father in the ownership of the 
homestead and the management of the lumber business at Paupac. 
He was a skillful marksman during his prime, and delighted in 
hunting bi<^ game. After the death of his mother, in 1872, he sold 
the old homestead on the river and bought a smaller farm about a 
mile to the eastward, where he still resides with his family. He 
married (first) Olive Kimball 20 April, 1845, she died 19 July, 1847. 
He married (second) Nancy Jane Bennett 19 June, 1848. Marcus 
N. B. and Nancy J. Killam had: I^kviChS .N- {^ ^ llUuv^^ ot*-(^i ^^ 

L Benjamin FKANKLIN^ b. 4 July, 1849. '?uu :^ut, ?6iui ^HdUojH (^l 
H. Olive Elizabeth, b. 19 Nov., 1850. 
HI. Alfred'-' K., b. 27 July, 1853. 

lY. Esther Bennett, b. 30 Jure, 1855. She is unmarried and 
resides with her parents at Paupac. 

Benjamin F^, son of Marcus N. B. and Nancy Killam, is a lawyer 
and farmer and resides at Scranton, Penn. He married Frances E. 
Hollister 27 Sept., 1871. They have three daughters: 

I. Emalene^«, b. 9 May, 1874; m. Dr. Edson M. Green, 28 

April 1898. ^^ ^^^^ 

H. Yolland^*^ Adelene, b. at Paupac 3 June, 188d. 

HI* Frances^ " Marie, b. at Paupac, 12 Aug., 1892. 

Olive E^, eldest daughter of Marcus N. B. and Nancy Killam 
married Samuel E. Edgar 13 Dec, 1871. She died at Scranton 6 

June, 1883. 

Samuel E. and Olive E. Edgar had: 
L Marcus Killam Edgar, b. 21 November, 1872; resides at 

Scranton. . , n, i i.^ 

IL Anna Florence Edgar, b. 30 Sept., 1875; married Sylvester 

Tillson; resides at Rochester, N. Y. 



"HE, HAWLEY .TIMES 





mM^^ii . 




Ueaih Of All OKI i'louei 

MarcuaN. B.Kiliapj^- 
respected cit' " 



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Publisher 



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. ^u o«l and hi 
izeu of ratfpkck; died 
...le lesidtuue last Tliuredav tuorn- 
/ og. aged about 87 years. Deceased iiad 
( been iq feeble health for nearly a year, 
but was not considered dangerously ill 
until two days prior to bis death. 

IMr. Killam was a worthy representa- 
tive of one of the oldest and most procu- 
inent families in Pike county, its Tarious 
members huviug won for the name an 
euviuble distinction by their intelligence 
and worth. 

This family is of English extraction 
and their ancestry can be traced back 
to 1637, in which year Austin Kiilam and 
wife sailed from England and settled in 
Salem. I*lass: From 'their son John 
sprang the branches to which Marcus be- 
longed, John was oae ol the first set- 
tlers in Preston, Conn. Zidduck. a son ol 
John w:is one of the very first farmers in 
Pikecouuty. He lived in a cabin near 
the old Wallenpaupack fort, a crude con- 
structiou built for protection agaiuit the 
Indiaus. Mossd, son of Zvdock, was 
paternal grandfather to]j;the subject of 
this sketcii. Ho was a native of Connec- 
ticut and when a youaglman (setUed {in 
Palmyra township, f ike county, where he 
became prominentgm politics and busi- 
ness, B=>njauiia T. KiUam a 6oaJof|' 
Moses Killara Jr., was the father^of Jlar- 
cus. He was born in I'ike coualy. where 
he spent hia entire life engaging in fiirrn- 
iog upon the lands cleared by the Indians 
along the flits of the P^upack river and 
later in life devoted his actenlion exten- 
sively to lumb.}ring. He was also a local 
minister of the Methodist Episcopal 
church and his hospitality to all denom- 
inations was well known throughout 
Wayne and Pike counties and diatiuguish^ 
ed him as an earnest Christian worker. 

He married one Elizabeth Witter who 
gave birth to our worthy subject, M. N. 
B. Killam. She is said to be the first 
white child born in Wayne or Pike coun- 
ties. Her pireats were driven from thpir 
home about the time of the Wyoming 
Massacre. 

The subjuct of our sketchjwas borojio 
Paupack township Feb. G, 1S15, where 
he spent nis ent.re Jlife. He was] twice 
married, His first wife was Miss Olive 
Kimble, who died in 1847. One daughter 
was born to them but she died in 1^61, 



•• ir... I 



of tliat place. Mr. I'leive b;>s expi'essod 
a Avlllin^uess to paj' taxes ou tlie real 
aud personal properties belou^iug to 
him, but denies ab.solutely that the fi.sh 
are taxable. The authorities are anx- 
ious to have him pay the taxes, and 
then bring suit for the recovery of the 
uuouut, but this he has refused to do 
Legal opinions obtained by Mr. 
Pierce unite in the oouclusiun that 
here is no precedent for the collection 
)f these taxes. Even in England, 
vhere the protection of lish and game 
igainst poachers is a well stablished 
act lu jurisprudence, there is said to 
je no precedent that tits the i)resent 
.•^ase, while, under the laws of Wlscon 
sin, there is said to be no justillcatiou 
lAiiatever for the levying of taxes on 
ive lish.— St. Louis Globe-Democrat. 



Scotch •' Drip Stone." 

Years ago a Scotch great grandpa 
)rouglit to America a piece of sand 
ock tliat some persons thought was 
nteuded for a grindstone. What 
caused them to think so was not be- 
cause it was round, but ou the upper 
side it was hollowed out like a saucer, 
and the other side had a small projec- 
tion like a chocolate drop in shape aud 
size. Soon this was discovered to be 
what is termed a "drip stoue," and 
when set In a shady place and the 
saucer side tilled with water, will de- 
liver crystal pure and cold drops from 
the other side. The water is absolutely 
clean and pure as the result of this 
homely process, and in summer would 
be a delight. It is much better to drink 
such water than ordinary Ice water 
and the Idea was orginally taken from 
the Orientals, no doubt. The method, 
while primitive, is quaintly pleasant to 
observe In action, and a charming ad- 
junct to any household, however mod- 
ern.— >,'ew York Press. 



A Monarcti'8 Degire. 

The late King of Saxony, Avho had a 
roctted objection to exchanging his old 
clothes for new ones, is said to have 
one day sighed for "the good time the 
old knights had In their armor. They 
were troubled with no creases." 



327 1 

«»«. to«. 

G«DaiB 

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THE •:• HOUSEHOL 

ONLY 25 Ci 

A 200-PAGE ILLUSTRATED BOOK OF I 
FOR THE FARMER AND THE 

And every other man and woman who is d< 
perience of those brainy and patient souls i 
practicing the results of those experiments, 
obtain the bes* knowledge as to how certniti 



64 Killam Ancestry. 

Sylvester and Florence E. Tillson had: 
I. Mark D. Tillson, b. 18SG. 

Alfred ^ youngest son of Marcus N. B. and Nancy B. Killam, 
married Lizzie Wallace 10 Feb., ISSO. They reside on a farm at 
Paupac and had: 

I. Maucus^" Alfred Killam, b. 5 Nov., 1885. 
U. UuTH Killam, b. 6 May, 1890. 

Polly % youngest daughter of Benjamin T. and Elizabeth Witter 
Killam, married James Van Camp, Aug., 1838. 

Polly (Killam) yan Camp died 2G April, 1895. 

James and Polly Van Camp owned and occupied a farm at Salem, 
Penn., where they had: 

I. Mary Elizabeth, b. 20 Aug.. 1839; m. A. J. Van Gorder. 

II. Marcus Aurelius, b. Feb.. 1841; m. Ellen Sheerer. 

III. Adelaide, b. 7 Mar., 1814; married; had three children; 

d. 1888. 

IV. James Wilson, b. 14 April, 184(3; m. Angeline Whitley, 1865. 
V. Olive Ann, b. 5 Nov., 1848; m. Wm. Swartz. 

VI. Emmaretta, b. 23 July, 1853; m. John Hornbaker. 
Mary Elizabeth Van Camp and A. J. Van Gorder were married 
January, 18G1. They resided at Salem, Penn., where they had: 
1. Lydia, (deceased). 

II. Arthur, b. 1 Feb., 18G4. He is a photographer at Scranton, 

Penn. 

III. Edith, b. June, 1868; ra. C. F. Crampton, 189S. 

IV. Myrtle Irene, b. 25 Sept., 1879. 

M0SES^ son of Moses'' and Mary Killam, married Lucy Kimble. 
They resided at Paupac, where they had: 

I. Daniel\ b. Feb., 1809; m. Margaret Rhoebucher. 
II. Irene, m. Amsi Woodward; had three children. 

III. BENJAMIN^ m. Mary Ann Quick; had three sons. 

IV. RUSH^ m. Ada Kimble; had one son and three daughters. 
V. Ephriam^ b. 1819; m. (first) Catherine Nash, by whom he 

had three children; ra. (second) Martha Nash (widow), by whom he 
had eight children, all of Paupac, Penn. 

[Ephriam- wrote an unpublished history of Paupac] 



Jiillavi Ancestry. 65 

VT. Esther, m. Wm. Conklin; lived in Wayne Co., Penn.; had 
three children. 

VII. Christine Ann, m. Joseph Gibson ; lived in 111. 
VIII. Milcenie; m. Arthur Kimble; childless. 
IX. Eunice; m. Chester Arthur; childless. 
X. Margaret; bj^ second husband, McCoinb; had one son. 
XI. Augusta; unmarried. 

XII. George N.; m. Josephine Kimble; resides at Paupac; has 
five sons and one daughter. 

DanieP, eldest son of Moses' and Lucy Killam, was a wholesale 
merchant in New York City, wliere he died in 1898. He married 
]\Iargaret Rhoebucher, by whom he had a daughter, Addie, a musician, 
known to the public as Addie Worth. 



HINDS ANCESTRY. 



The first ancestor of the Hinds family in America was a native of 
France. lie settled in that portion of Mississippi which was after- 
wards set otf and orjjanized into Hinds county^ His son, Samuel 
Hinds, was born about 17S0, in a fort in Hind^^ county, Miss, Samuel 

married , and settled m Wayi.; cc»in , , Kentucky, where 

he had: Samuel Jr., James, John, Smith, Thor as, William, Sally, 
Martha, Adeline, Fingal and Hiram Magee. 

Hiram Magee Hinds was born 22 Oct., 181 1. 

Elvira Kidd was born in Wayne Co., Ky., 12 Oct., LSIS. 

HiUAM M. IIixi.s and Elvira Kidd were married 23 Oct., 1837. 
They owned and occupied a farm near (Jlasgow, Barren county, 
Kentucky, where thoy had: 

I. John W., b. 17 Feb., 1840; rr,, Rosa, adopted dau. of Geo. 
W. and Pha'be A. Kidd. 

H. Louisa J., b. i) July, 1811; m. Richard W. Tally. 
HI. FiN(;al S., b. 17 March, ISIG; m. Augusta Manning. 
IV. Maggie H., b. 8 March, 1818; m. Edward M. Preston. 
V. Samuel J., b. 22 — — , ISHO; m. Jennie Wing. 
VI. Mary E., b. G Feb., 1834; m. (1st) E. A. McCluud; (2d) B. F. 
Thomas. 

VII. PiiiEHE A., b. 2G Feb., 1858; m. Joseph M. Rose. 

Mr. Hinds, although a resident of a slave State, was not a slave 
owner. He settled on a tract of wild land among the "barrens,' 
that is, valley land, destitute of timber. His dwelling was located 
near Barren Fork, a branch of Green river, about thirty miles south 
of the Mammoth Cave, in 18G0 Mr. Hinds sold his farm and, 
accompanied by his family, emigrated across the plains and settled 
in Nevada City, California, where he was afterwards engaged as a 
rnelter and assayer of gold bullion for the bank owned by Capt. Geo, 
W. Kidd. Mrs. Hinds was a sister of Captain Kidd. They were 
natives of Kentucky, and of Scotch descent. Captain Kidd was one 



Ifinds Anrcsb-i/. 67 

of the early settlers of Nevada City, where he owned a large interest 
in the "Gold Tunnel" quartz mine, which laid the foundation of his 
fortune. He was owner and captain of the steamer " Washoe," 
which carried passengers and freight between Sacramento and San 
Francisco on the Sacramento river. During the great flood at 
Sacramento in 18G1-2, the steamer " Washoe," under command of 
Capt. Kidd, was instrumental in saving many people and valuable 
property in the f 3ded districts. In later years Capt. Kidd resided 
at Stockton, wh -^ I e conducted a bank and a fruit ranch. He 
Hnally settled at , \n Fri. xisco, where he died 22 April, 1879. 

H. M. Minds an family resided at Nevada City for seventeen years. 
In 1877, he and his • fe moved to Fresno, Cal., where they occupied 
a fruit ranch owned y their son, John. 

Elvira Kidd, wife of H. iM. Hinds, died at Fresno, 24 Oct., 1888, 
and wa.s buried at San Jose. 

Mr. Hinds spent his declining years with his daughter, Phcebe, 
and her husband, J. M. Rose, on their farm at (Jriswold, Sharv's 
Island, Washington, where ' 'i died 20 July, 181)4, aged 80 years. 



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Cliloo 

lTiiy-lS41. 
u\. N:Uh;iu KciKhkU. 

Aiuiuni;i 

iwil-lsr>l. 
111. Lt Kd. LilolillelU. 

IT'.l'.i-lKWl. 

Alvilh 

IK(|^-1S(W. 
Ill ()\\\n Lilclilielil. 

lS07-lSJfi. 

Uoswell 

180-1-1877. 
111. Kninces Hurlbert. 

1«I7-1S8-.'. 

M;iiv 

IS'Hi-lKH. 

111. KilniDnd Coiiiius. 
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Williiuu 

18()S-lSK-,>. 

ui. .^u^'L■liu^: HayiiKiiut. 
1810-KsH.S. 



•i .S4. .lacoh 1 

I 18l()-ls81. r 

I 1 111. 1st, Lucy \V. Killuiu. i 

I 181:,'-18Jti. ) 



111. id. Luciuii E. Ricli;vrtl.S()U. I 81. 
-18.V.I. I 

I s-.i. 

Ki. 



Tlu'oiloru 

is;is-iMi-.'. 

Kilwiki-d Myors 

1811- 

111 M;kg^'iu H. Hinds. 

1818-1881/. 



M.u-L'U.s Killivtii 

i8i;i 
111. .\iiuik a. Uiuvicy. 

18iJ3- 



l.8d,(-:iuvrlottc C. Still. 
1K2IJ- 



,Iuli;k Aim 

18r2-188.S. 

m. David C. U:iynioiid. 
18im-18ti'.i. 

S;kbrin;i 

18ir)-iS'.i8. 
III. l{iLli;ird Aycrs. 

lS(lti-lS'.l8. 



Bciij;imiu Tastin Kilhiui 

1810- 
111. 1st, Lucy Kilhuii. 

1847-1874. 
m -id Susiii N. Tiiickei'. 

1874- 

Norniaii Rictuirdson 

1847-18-18. 

Aliniii- Euj^euc 
18HMS,V,'. 

CliiH-los Adidlirrl 
18.')1- 

Mai-y Adu 

(IJy adoptioui 
1851 
111. AUifi-t Lilchtlcld. 



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Myers Albert 

1871- 



jiicy Anil 
1878-188;{. 



188tl- 



Florcucu Adi'Ui 
1851-K83. 



.k'liuic; Hawli-y 

1884- 



Dlivi! lU-a 

l.KSli - 



Clara U. 

1887- 



lOdwai-d Killain 
187:i- 



Mailrlinu Louisu 

18'.t8- 



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I8S ALICE GARDNER'S en* 
V Easement Is announced. The 

1? nf "^'f" ^° ^^ congratulated 
Is Dr Meyers Alfred Preston. 
sOn of ex-Senator Preston of 
Nevada City, ThU Information comeg In 

^ d not enjoy Mlsa Ganiner'a contkience 
S-??t%"I'" ""'^'^'"^ '-^'^'^ ^-- ^-^ com.- 

■H?ad•«^''/'^'^^■f''^^'''■^'^"^*^'^ ^rom Miss 
Sre that ih "' ^'^'■"^^■"as time, and be- 

l4ed MYi'^r '^" schooldays were flu 
ii^nea Miss Gardner was to have a bril 
Hunt social career-at least that wl rh 

STnT'lt, »;';,„''/"« "-•"'iSi' t'a^e'^; 
V-edd ng is tx^^^,n'yr''L'*'''' ^" elaborate 
brlde^ ^iffl!"'' ''"' '"''^»^e a charmlne 

the daughter of Charles FP<f,,i^J^.,''^ 
prominent attorney Hnri » !f.l ^"'"^^- J«-'^'- 
Gardner. the w';"l^cnown phy tcfan"' '''■• 

f,^ ;ment Is Announced of 
' a . hysician and a Pop- 
'ular and Accomplished 
■ Girl of San Francisco. 



/ur liidiLd. 



At an Informal tea given yesterday by 
Miss Nelle Lyons, daughter of Mr. and Airs. 
Charles Lyons of 2120 Central avenue, the 
engagement was announced of Miss Alice 
M. Gardner and Dr. Myers Albert Preston. 

Miss Gardner is Ihe daughter of Mr. and 
Mrti. C. F. Gardner of G03 Baker street. She 
ia a remarkably pretty young woma,u, high- 
ly accomplished. 

Mr. Preston Is a graduate of Cooper Med- 
ical College and is the son of ex-Scuator E. 
M. Preston of Nevada City. 

The date of the wedding has not been set, 
but it win probably take place in June. 
• The Lyons home was charmingly dec- 
orated for the engagement tea and the af- 
fair was most pleasant. Among the guests 
were: Mrs. Samuel Crlm, Mrs. Fred Cart- 
wright, Mrs. Burton Ilullngs, Miss Nelle 
Carpenter. Mlsa Minnie Evans, Miss AlU- 
Bon Carpenter, Miss Cornelia Vyer, MIpS 
Florence Duggan, Miss Florence Plppy, Miss 
Loyns and Misa Virginia Follz of New York. 

The Lyons tea will bo followed by n\i- 
merous similar functions given by Misa 
Gardner's friends In her honor. She has 
been the recipient of many beautiful en- 
gagement cups and added quite a few to her 
collection at Miss Lyons' tea. 



SOCIAL EVENTS. 




Mr. and Mrs. Charles F. Qardne 



nounce the engagement of their daugh- 
ter Alice to Dr. Myera Albert Preston 
also of Sail Frunclsoo, formerly of Ne- 
vada City. The young lady l3 a na- 
tive of Sacramento, where the greater 
portion of her life was spent. She l3 
the eldest daughter of C'harles F. 
C.urdner, an attorney and Secretary of 
the West Side Lumber Company and 
who for ten years was Receiver of 
Public Moneys in Sacramento. Miss 
GardneT's early education was received 
here and later she entered Mills Col- 
lege and Miss Head's school at Berk- 
eley, h:ivlng graduated from the lat- 
ter at Christmas time. She Is a charm- 
ing young lady with a viva<:lty of man- 
ner that has endeared her to. her many 
friends, who will rejoice at her good 
fortune. Dr. Preston Is a graduate of 
the University of California and of 
Cooper's Medical College. He now 
holds a responsible position in the 
Crocker, Woohvorth National Pank of 
San Francisco, having inherited a 
taste for the banking business from 
his father, Senator E. M. Preston of 
Nevada City, this SUte, who for many 
years has been the President of the 
Citizens' Bank of that city. 



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To the Descendants of Lawrence Litchfield, Immigrant, and 
all other Litchfields and their descendants: 

. I'-..| ill... lit t«.. \>-.,r<. I Itlw .lll.l.TSii;il.',l) hllV.- 1 11 l'lll.-;l^'Cll ill -:llll.'l II.J 1.. ' r . ,- 1,, , 1, -■,,.,,, I rl„ | , , ji,:, M 

iMliiilv ill llii« .•..iMlliv. -llic Mint.Tiiii ;iir.M.iv LMlll'-iv.l ill -^i. J^ll.Tt limn li.i* ,x. . ; , I _ ,. -• ,...:.,>„ 

1111.1 I'li'll. ^niill.'il hiiV.. flliilil.-.l IM.-I.. lii'iLiiiii til.- l..l...r Willi ].l|.iisiiri.iiii.l , ■,..:■ 1; i ; •, ■ t ,- ,-t 

:i,-lii..v.-iiil-iit. I li..]..- ti. I I.I.. t.. |iiil.li--li III.. Ili-I..rv "illiili livi. v.-.irs. I i-:ill ii| ■■■. . i- v. .1. -. ■ i.i i ,r ..1 ., I ,•, l,ii, Li .,, a;,! ,,, . ,, .v 

w;iv t.nMiiil 111,. .Ii.-iii..l ..ml. Ilii. iiiiir.iiiil ..f tiiii.^ riii.l iiiLiic'v iili-eiiilv ox|.|.nilc.l hii^ ii liu-.., iiii.l fumif l:il,..r will he utti'ii.!,-'.! 

wil'li .'V|...|iilitiii.'.- Ml II.. U->-. I.iil |i..|liii|.s -i.MtPi- iiiii.iiiiu. 

Ill is.-i,-,. tli.i.. ii|,|.i.iiiv.l in tw.. ..I 111.' l;..iii^t..|< i.l lli.j Now Enjjlim.l llistnrii--(:i.iii.iil.ip;iciil Sneietv, iv liist.iiy ,if tlio ilosi.i.|ia- 

riiil- ..I l.ii.M.'ii... I.il.-lili.-l.l. til.. I'liiitiiii. Tlii^ w:is writ l.v li.-v. Al i- M..r-.' ..f Sli.'i l,.,ni. >I.w^., :,' l.iiii..,i.. -l-ii.'iili.-i-i, tutli.T 

..I 1 1. .11. Klii.li \ M. ..--.■ ..I c. lit. .11. M;i-- .hi-l ill.. I. ■,.-.. 11 «liv Mr. M.,i-.. |.i. |. n , I i ',.. ^. ,, ,1,.^ , , . , . i, ,,,. , :i. , 1. 1,..,, . I, ,, m.v 

I... ,'..|li|..'llll..|. riii. i;..ii...,l,,^v. ,.x....ll..hl ;.^ I,.i :.« il U...-. llM.il-ll 11..I will.. '. ■ ; ■ l ;.■• -,:.!. ■:\\- 

./.'urrri'l lii-l..n ..f 1 li.. I.in.il v .'i.'. ].i .'i.... .-.1. I'll.' iiii.l.'i-imi.'.l li:i- liik.'i. Il.|. i . i _■ - . i .,: , ■, ■,'(.. ■! ■. . .::,.,;. 

ii,-i-iir.iti. iiii.l ihl.'i.-li.i:: .|i.' lMi-1-. Iii-I..iv ..I 111.- Ml. liii.'l.ls li.. Ii..|..- 1., |.i|..i,-l, \1.. M..... ■, , ■ ■ .:,,.-. 1 

|.|..|...-.- ,!.■.■ |..ill;l|.- |il|..< t.. til.- ..Xtl-lll lil.lt -.'..111- Ui-.' ..Il.i .■..li-i-t.llt Hilh 11... .pilil .,t .-.li .. . _: . , _ ' -.,, i r..,„,^,. 

III.' .I,iiii;lll.'l ..I :i l,il..hli,.|.l i^ f.,iv..,l l.v i-ll«l..lll I.. . I..'..i;.- I... ".."..■. ...1 1... i..:ilii.i^.'. I.. >l..i'i. I '- 'I .ili.t 

ih. r.'l.i -!).■ h .. .-.11 h.'i-.'ll iiir r..i',.v..r rr..iii III.' 'iili.i n..ii .1 li.i In. l.li.l.l :iii.', -rn ..r ili ir .' ■,,,., i. . ,.,,i 

.1 i..- 1.. I..I .■l.il.l>,n MU.I irMiii.l.-liil.lirli. .\ .-liil.l .,.,.; li.iMMii lii- I'li'.-i.'.il I i .il ii.ilin.' .i.ii. h n, . . i 1, . . . ..i... ' - Ir,,, n illl 

lli.'.iiic.-liv ..I III- iii..tli.'r lli.ill tlliil ..f hi- iMtli.-r; li.ii..'. ii..t ..lilv tli.' Iii-t..i iivii li.it ills., tlio I'tlliciil viilu.' ..t K.'ii.'ni.'^'i.nl n'^.'iiirll 

.11.1 I.. •..r,r..f tl,.- I.'iii.il,' l.i;iii..|i..s ..I 11 l.iiiiii;. 

Ill 1-Llll. Ii.'i.-,.ii 1-1. 1. 'I-. I,iti'lili.-I.l ..f s.il.i,l.-i.n'|.;ii...l M I'll. lit I ill ih.' I..r f :i niiiijlilv-ili-invii fro,.) of 110 fiiiiillic!! „f l.iti-h- 

li.'i.l-. .Mr. M..I..' 1.1. -I- t.. Ilii= ill hi- ::-,'ii.:.l..i;\. r..|,i..s ,.1 ilii- .'t ■' iir.' in .'xi-lfiirc. luiil f o iiip iiiii.-li iiii.ro l.viiiililiillv 

.Ir.iuii. Ih.' ..lii^iuil .Ir.iuii.L' liN- .li..i|.|...:ii.'.l I. nil... ni lilv if in.t |..'riiKiiinitl v. I!.'.' Iv -V. -\. Viiiiil ..f N..rw..|| ].n.|.:in..l :i very 

!;■ I .■hurt (l|..t 11 ■■111.' ■ , l.,i,n;iim ni.iiii ..t III.' ■.'.'iiinnlinii, I., lli,- ],n-,nil ii , hut th'i-. i.^ li.'itln-l' .•..iii|.l.'t.' iii.v In-.. rr..iii vin.r. 

I'lii'iviii.. ..ih.T.'li.iit. ..iMi .1 1,1 ..I ill il,.' I .'--i..ii ..f viirii.ii.* hraiu-h.'s i.f tin' fiiniilv. >li«. ICll.-ii ,S. ( l.it.-liti.'l.i) Williiril ..( 

M. .11. .1.1 lliii-i.l.'. M;i--....Mi,. 11 I..'; tulh .ini.Mi I .it .lilh-l.l ■• 1 1 .■.■,'■ w lii.'li hii^ 1 11 |.li..t.>ni).li,-.l. -rhi^ i< |ii ih'lini ll v I ill' .=111110 Hi 

III.- II.- I. -..11 l-i.i.-l l.ilrhlii-l.l -Ml-.-.-.- In x.ni..ii- l..«ii iili.I liiniily lii-l..i-i.- iiiiiy h.' In I -In. It iinyniint.- i.f l.riiin-liys 'or Ihi- I,iti-ll- ' 

in-l..:i .,r '^|..in-li.'-l.l (\-|.i. Ili«l..n ..I llin-li'ini'i M.i--..), l-;;il..ii ■. Ili-h.rv ..1 hi..iiiiist..ii, i-ly. (Ml-,), linii ii ii-'w i.tlii-rs.^ Nnni: nf 

ili.-.-..i.--i..-i,„i..iv..i-.-..iM].l,-i.-. ■ .3)r. 1.-^, ^<.->.- - if^ // <r^.,i --- 

■ l.iii .111 -.- l.--i.-lil.-il.|" .11- .hi- ii; i- -|.,-ll.-.l ..11 til.- r I vim. Ill h r..l.,iiy lii-,-..i,l-, w:i- .-I r.-i.l.-nt ..f niiril-tilhli-. Mil-., in 

mil. .111-1 rli.-il ill ^. in...!.-. M i-*Mu/lii-'.'l- Hi- wil.- «..- W4^ |.iii l i . ilil|. .Iiiililli .V l h 'ii; -In- -iiiviv.-l li.-i- Ini-h 1. iiiiil lli-t. -1. 1(1.111^-" 

r|.|..]...-,- ;il - i-h ..111 II.. -..111.- i-M.-nt ;ilr..il.h- .I..11.-1 iili.l |.l;n-i- in 



I.l M- h.- 11. inn- i- ...mim.lilv -|..-ll.-.l) ll.nl li.jn- ,-liil.lr 
.--.tit ..I illl :i.-.-i.l.-llt ; V.^.1 K.-lin-lill.k4t44i^-'. ;i iliii 



li- 11. inn- i- ...mim.lilv -|..-ll.-.l ) ll.nl li.jn- i-liil. 

ntit ..I illl :i.-.-i.l.-llt ; V-^.l K.-lin-lill.k4t44i^-'. ;i .liiiit;lit.T. l-i.i'll 1.1.. hill. I\ ill Hill li-tiil.l.-, u In 



b^-^■^:n^::;^l::.l?^;l■l":^^;,':::;l' , , _ 

rji*'''"in,n hi.M- III iiii.-.l :, .l..li,i I .,„,- - ., II., 11. . It ; ^l.) .i.,-i;,l,-, n -i./i, Imrii ill .S-il iiiil... .\|il. :(. llUti wli..-.' will- u;i- Siiiiih ItiiU.-r iin.l 

"In. l..-.-:iiii.- tin- l.illn-i-. l.v li.-r. ..f -.-\.-ii I 71 vliil.lr.-lj, wll.is,. il,-yvll,li,iit-, it is tin- Imiiii |iill-)...- tin- iiii,l.-i -il: 1 t.i i-.-v..i-,l in 

llii- i,r..|...-,-,l lii-l,.iv. Ti..- i.-.-..i,l,-.l l.,-r ,.f tlii-e .lysi-oiiiliiiits is, at tli,' li|-,'s.'iu Inn.-, i,i.|,r..\ii„;il.-l y, lillllll, with wry llliiliy 

111. .11- I. Il.-,ii-,l li..iii. ' ' 

ill Ih.. Iiirlh |.l;i.-.-, I..II.-II1.I;;.- iin.l nn.-.-ti-v i.f I.iiwroni-ft I,iti-llliol,l, in.lhiii;,' [...-itii.- i- ;.l |.|-i-..iil kii..« n. l-lilwiivil lliilih.-il-il- 

l.il.-hli.-l.l, l!i....l,h.i. N. \ .. h:,- .-ml.-.iM.i.il. tiii-.m^'h tin- ,-x|.,-iiiritiiri- ..I iiun-li iii..ii.-\ iiii.lli in i.-.-;ir.-li «..i-k liy liiiii.-i-ll iiiiil 

li-nliliir .-N|.. II-. I., liml ...It wln-in-,- Iin.l li..«. I,iiwi.-ii,-i-i l,iti-llli.-l,l vil In llii- i-.iiinirv, l.iil In- i-.-|,..i-l- M-i v lilt li- '.i.-linili- r.-iilt. 

/ ? I'll.- l.il.-hli.-M l.iiiiih t- .,,ii|,- .,1,1. il.-iiim- h:n-|, |,, nil., linn . .. f 11 1.' . li . . wu,-w\i-u<-AinrrtT-7i. lit I. -list. 'I'In-i.- iiri- mill liiiv.' I.i-i-il Imiiiv i.f 

Ih'-iiiiim- 111 111^ il l.ii-^ l,-..iii.-..f wlnis,. ,l,-,-,-ii.l;iiil- liiiv.-v..iii..williiii:i.-.-iiliii-y t.i.\iii..|-ii-ii: tin-.- iiiiim- ill,-, in iiiiiny instiiin-,-, 

l-mi"! 111. I " -.-.-,. i-.l,-,l hv tin- iiii,l.-i-i..;li.-,l, win. ;i-ks nil siii-li |i,-|--,.iis ti. si'n.l llii-ir lliilin- lunl filinil v iliitu t,i-lliiil. Tlin 

-il|,|.,,-,-,l rniiiily , t-,,l-iii-|iis is ,li'.s,ril..-.l 11- fi.lh.u- : I'.-i ,-li.-v.-..ii -iilil.. mi, I iii-;,',-iil in i-lii,-l tin,-,- l,-,i|.iir,ls- |i!,.,.s; tin- ,-i-,.et ; All 

■II' ' -"■'"'"■■ '■! wnil. in lliiml, II -w.,,.l. |.i-..|..-i; tin- limit..: S.-i i- |,ii-i,ai-,- |,iii-,it,is (Always ,.i-..|,ai-,-,l l„i- l.atti,.). 

Til.- -'t ■■ HI till. |.i-,-,.iit.s|i..|lin;; ..I III.- la. ..ill 11.11111- i- an lnl.-ii..|..-i-. \..| until tilt- iiiiiMI.. nf lln- lKtl|-.-«iliii-v ,li,l ihis-evljui. 
4..n»-|- ii|.|juit; tin- s|i,-lliii!; nf tin- liiim- -h...il.l I..- ;.- it i- I. .nil, I ill l-;in;laii.l. i. .-., I.ii-lili,-l,l, wliivll. ili-rivi-il Iri.in twi. .\ii^-l,.-.-iiix..il 

W..1.I-. Ill- II Ii,.|,l ,.1 ,l|.a.l li..,li,-,--a- a|.|.li.-,l t.. tin- |.la,-,- ill Knulauil wln-H-n lai-;;-,' iliuiilifl- flilVi I marl nil,. in in tin- tini.. 

"I Hi... l.-iiiii. Illl- i-ity ..f M.-lili. -I.l. l-;ni., I Ihi-lnwiinl l.ilvlili.-l.l. n./. lia\.- i"iA aiu-t-ftrill i-niinei-tinii « illi llii- t ilv. I.it,-h- 

li,-M. Ill . "I- n 1 fi'.r Kihviii f.- l,iti-lili.-l.|. ii |.i-..iiiiii.-nt i-ailr..a.l ..|..-Mlt..(^ 

\ ,-1 V liltl,- is kiinwil lit pi-l-i-ill ,-,,11,-,-i-liiili; 111,- li r.awri-ln-,- l.it,-liri,-l,l. Il,> lio,-:inn>, in 10411. a in.-iiil..-r ..I 111 it milit.ilv 

..l;-'aiii/.ili..li w ,-iill.-.| till. --.Vm-i.-iit ami 1 Ininniilil.-- .\rl illnry r f r,..s|..ii.- anil it i- -ii|.|.,,-,-,l thai In- i .-ii,l,-i .-.I inii.-li ai.l In 

till- stni-irliii;.' ,-..l„iiv ill ,-ivil 1111,1 inilitiirv lit,-. II,- f..iii:lit l.ravi-lv ivilli til," llnlian- ami a- a -..l.li.-i. -.1 an .-\.-.-ll.-nl .-vaiiiiilt- 

li,.|,ny hi- il,-,-,-n,l.iii:-. It i- ii iiiiilti.r ..f ri-.il j.Viil.- t.. -ay Hint in m. ■sti-iiiruh- in h.-half ..t .-ivil ..r i.li-i,.ii- til,,-, tv in Ihi- inn v. 

..11 I, 111, I ..I- s.-.i. h.i- till, naiiii- ,.l Mti-hli.-l.l h.-.-n al.-.-iit-fi-..iii tin- rnll ..f I -. N'aliiialh ..I ,i |..,.i.-.,|iil I |..-raiii.-nt ami pi.-l.-i-iini: 

Il i.-t III 111.- I1..111.- tn tl i-,. ,.r .-..m.-l. 1.1. «ln-ii Invalty ami Irin- iili,,...l h;,!.- 1 11 ,-all,-,l iiiti. a.-timi, tin- l,it.liti,-liis. 

■-..I". IV- |.ir|,n.-,l 1..1- l.atth-."' Inn.- I iiaitln- (...-I i.f .hit v. ' Ki-iini I In- .-... li.--l -1 1 iiu -1,-- in llir Fri-m-h iiliil Imlian war- tn mil- 

l-il'- Iliit in III,- riiili|.i.iii.-. a 1.-1 .iilaliv.- iiiiiiili,-r ..f'this lainil, lia--hai.-.l -1 ami vi.-t..ri.-s. ■|'li,- taiiiih i- init 

,h-liii;iii-h.-.l .,- .1 l.uiiily, in. I- has il |„,„|„ 1 any \v..ll.l-laiil..ns iiiiiii i.r'w an. Il ha- h.-.-n an linm^st. iliiliislri..ii-, h..ln..-l..viinr. 

I.u\-.ii.|.liii;;, (,.,.l-l,-.iiili:; la.-.- ..1 |..-..|.l.-, ami a-' -in-ll, ma y stimil i|iial liint inn w il h lln- l.i-t ill tin- laiiil. "hn,,,, 1,,,., hu,- 

h,-,-li il- ain-,-tl-\ a.-n.-s tin- -.-a-, in thi- .-..iinti v it lia- -In.wll it-i-lf t.. h.- ..I tin- liin- :iri-l..i-ra.-y wlii.il iiiaki-- t- 1 _' ■ ,-■ - --. 
■|'ln- I iiiiily has i.i,„|n. .-,1 a l.-,v 11..1..I.I.- iin-ii ami u ..im-ii. nln. in Ir-^isliitiv ,- halls.,,,, li.-l.l- „f l.atti.-, in .-iiii ami .-,.',-,. 1 - -. 

ill tli...l..l.a|-tiin-iits ,.| I It,-.., 1,1 1. ..,,,. I -.-i.-.i,-.-. I tin- W..1I.I ..f ,-,„ -,-,- ami liiiaii.-,-. haw r,-tl,-,-tt.,l linlinr ii|„.ii il ' n,, i - . --I 

,lisliiiL'ni-lii-,l m,-iiih,-i- wa- l-'i aiiklin'- l.ii-hli.-l.l. M. Ik. a iria.liialp ..f ilai-Mii.l in Isio. (a -,,11 „( Kvy. I'aiii-'- Ml. I ni ,. a 1 - 

|ihysi,-iiii ill III,' \V,-i Imli,- a, I, I f s ,-.,n-nl al I'in-rt,, raln-lhi, V /in-la, t,,r tw ,-iit y M-ars. If,- iiiiirli,-,! iiil,. a .li-l iliirni-li.-.l 

V.'n.'/ii.-kiii kiniily 1111,1 w.i- tin- |..i-,.n 11 hi.-n.l ..I Siim.n ll.ilivar, tlio "W a-hin-tnn- ..I Sniltll .\liii-lii-a. an.l lii-l|.,-il liiiii in -aiiiiii:; 
its iii,l,-|„.|i,l,-in-,-. 'I'lii- wa- al lln- 1,--- iiiniii- ..I lln- |.l.-.>iil v.-iitillv. Williiii a l..w im.iitlis, llm iiml.-l-sinii,-,! Iia- .-lit,-ri-,l illt,. ,a.r- 
ii'-l. .11 i.-in-.' with ,l,-.,-,'mlint- ..I 111. Ki.iiiklin l.il.-lili.-l.l, wlin am a'll l...-at...l in \'.-ii.'/,il.-la. an.l win,, as a (aiiiilv. m-itlli'i- s|,..|iU 11. ir 
wiii.- l-:ii;;li.|i. A -k,'t.-h ,.t this lainilv is l„-i,i-.; |n-,-|..ii-.-,l fni- iln- llis|..,y. 

I'll.- 1. 1. ink- « hi. -h an- -,-iit iiiit'iii ,-,.iiii,-,-li,ni with llii- ,-ii-,-ii|ar'ai .- I.. 1..- lill.-.l in a- i-..iii|.l.-l.-K a-lln- kii.in I.-.i::,. lit tlii- 
iviii.-i.hi- I-,. I Mi,.-- .„- tli. -mis, will |..-i-iiiil. AV.-i-w u.niio, j.lnre and :Jiae is .-s,-iilial ami -In. 11 1. 1 I..- i_'i\.-ii il km.iMi ..r iii.iy hi- fnilliil. 

Il,, in. I r.-.|iiii-,- ,.r tin- ,-,.ni|,ili.i- tl v|.i-ii.lil ill 1- ni ti mill lin.li.-y ..n his ].ait. wln-ii l.v a litlli- .-\.-lti, ,1 ,-;,|-i- nil tli,-'|imt ,.f tlio 

.111.' tiHiii;; Illl- hl.iiik. tin- la,-t may I..- I. .11ml, i-|.,-..i-.l.-.l anil s.. hn lilway- |,l I'-i'lvo.l. Mi,'l,llp iiimn-s. if nxistin^-, sin. ill, 1 iilwiiys hi- ]iiil 

ill, ami 111.. i„'ii<lrn naiiio nf tlio ninth. -1. I. |.|.li.-,l. .\l,iro hiniji-aiihii-al ami Inoal liis|,„-y i- ii,-,.,l,.,l. .Mwav- s;iy,. tli,. i„','ii|.iil i..ii 

an.l |ioi's,,nil ir.iit- nf tlio -nhj.'.'t, ami ri'lal no inli'rostinj; .=t,,i-y 1.1- iii.-i,l,-iil ,-.. .-t.al with III,' |ii-i-s,nrs (if,.. .Vhnvo all ,1,. n,,t 

lnl-n',-1 that what v,,ii ,-,,,1 nrirlv; -i-ml l,,r thi- family lii.sti,|-y. liiilV ho ,,f im-stimahh- vaUlo t,i Konoi-atiuus vot. linhnni, us woU as nl 
iiil,'i'.'-l I., v..ni-„.iy,.s iin.l .-hil.li-.-n. ' ' \ 

ri.-.i-,- -.-ai,-li nl.l a,-,-..,i,it I ks. I.il.l.-. .1 Is. jri-uvostimos, ].i-..l.;il.- an. I t..wii roooi-il.e fni-ilnta, mill .si\iil ill with hlaiiks. 

liof,.,.. ,h,. hi.|,,i V is |.iihli-ln li it i- tin- illl. -mi. .11 ..f tlio onlllliilor to son.l all a, , nl ,,1 oiioli linln,-li of tlio fiiinilv us oiini|iiloil tn 

111,- ,,,!,- iin.-l ini.-i,-l..,l ,,1 nn.-t .|iialili.-.l f. .-liti.-i-.- iiinl onrrect, ill ,11,1,-1 Unit ,-rr,,rs may ho fow anil tlio 1100,111m i.f llie fiiliiily he 

I'lii-iin^' that Ihi- ,ii.-i7liii- uill I..- tin- im-aii- ..f oiili«tin.; y..ii ami ..tli.-rs in my w..i-k ami that tlio l.ni.k may ho tho iiinro 

I I'liii, Very truly yniirs, 

uTi.FiiHi) .i.vcon" i.rn'iiFiKi.i), (M. .s.) 

fli. Isr.T. S f Mhvii -M. riitt;, - f r-.inin-'-. -1.11 i.f .liiinos-, son i.f Nii'liolas', .son ,if Nioholiis\ son nf .InsiiiliU, son of 

nlson 111 .>Siiinm.li, son nf SiiiiiiioF, sou of .losiiih^, son of I.awreiicek] 



l,ani-,-n,-.k .\l-..;;i.-a|.i;roat-Kl-aln|s..ii ol .>Siiinm.li, son of SiHillloF, sou of .losiii 
s,,i nnmiinii:, M.v-s.. h~,.l. U...: w, s..|.t. ja, l>ail., ■7-7 C-- A- t^ H > ■: . CK/. y , T^,, ; 




N. MANCHESTER. 
INDIANA