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Full text of "History of Cass County Indiana : From its earliest settlement to the present time : with biographical sketches and reference to biographies previously compiled"



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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center 



http://www.archive.org/details/historyofcasscou02powe 



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 



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3 1833 02299 7552 977.201 

C27p 
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1137038 



HISTORY OF 



CASS COUNTY 



INDIANA 

From its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time; with Bio- 
graphical Sketches and Reference to Biographies 
Previously Compiled 



Edited by 

DR. JEHU Z. POWELL 
President of the Cass County, Indiana, Historical Society 

advisoby editors : 
Hon. William T. Wilson 
Hon. Benjamin F. Louthain 
Pkof. a. H. Douglass 



k 



VOLUME II 



<777. a^ / 



ILLUSTRATED 



THE LEWIS PUBLISHING COMPANY 

CHICAGO AND NEW YORK 

1913 



1137033 




GEN. JOHN TIPTON 



History of Cass County 



Gen. John Tipton. It is an acknowledged fact that Gen. John Tip- 
ton was the most influential and distinguished pioneer citizen of Cass 
county, and had more to do with its early history and development than 
any other one man, and no history of the county would be complete 
without a brief sketch of him. 

The Tipton family is of Irish lineage. Joshua Tipton, the father of 
this sketch, was bom in Maryland but in early manhood moved to Sevier 
county. East Tennessee, where he married Jeannette Shields. Joshua 
Tipton was an Indian fighter and was killed by them April 16, 1793, 
but it is unwritten history that his assassination was instigated by the 
Seviers, who held an old-time grudge against the Tiptons. 

It was under such, conditions and surroundings that our sub.ject was 
born August 14, 1786, and was only seven years of age at his father's 
death. In the fall of 1807, he, with his mother, two sisters and a half 
brother, moved to Brinley 's Perry on the Ohio river, in Harrison county, 
Indiana territory. He was the main support of the family and one of 
his first acts was to purchase a home for his mother, consisting of fifty 
acres, which he paid for by splitting rails at 50 cents a hundred. These 
early experiences laid the foundation of his future success in life. His 
mother died in 1827 at Seymour, Indiana. 

In 1809 the sheriff of Harrison county formed a company of mounted 
riflemen, known as "Yellow Jackets," from the color of their uniforms, 
and John Tipton became an active member. This company, under the 
command of Capt. Spier Spencer, saw active service in the Indian wars, 
terminating at the battle of Tippecanoe, November 7, 1811. Spencer's 
company was in the thickest of the fight and the commissioned officers 
were all killed, but there stood the brave ensign, John Tiptop, at the 
head of the remnant of the company when General Harrison came riding 
up and asked: 

"Where is the captain of this company?" 

To which John Tipton answered:* "Dead, sir." 

"Where are the lieutenants'?" 

"Both have been killed, sir." 

"Where is the ensign?" 

"I am here," answered Tipton. 

"Take command of your company," said Harrison, "and I will get 
relief for you in a few minutes." 

719 



720 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

General Harrison always spoke of Ensigii Tipton as the coolest and 
bravest officer in his command. Subsequently he was promoted to the 
rank of brigadier-general. < 

At the tirst election held under the state constitution he was elected 
sheriff of Harrison county and was sent to the legislature from that 
county in 1819-20, and was chosen as one of the committee to select a 
site for the location of the state capital, and this committee, on June 7, 
1820, selected the present site of Indianapolis, then in the woods, and 
on January 6, 1821, the legislature approved the action of the com- 
mittee. In August, 1821, he was re-elected to the legislature and the 
following year the governpr appointed him a commissioner to locate 
the boundary line between Illinois and Indiana. In 1823 he was 
appointed by President Monroe general agent of the Pottawattamie and 
Miami Indians on the upper Wabash and at once moved to Ft. Wayne, 
the seat of the agency, and he performed his duties with credit to him- 
self and the government. In the spring of 1828, at his suggestion, the 
agency was moved to Logausport, where he continued to reside until 
his death. 

In 1826 President John Quincy Adams appointed him a commis- 
sioner on the part of the United States to treat with the Indians for 
cession of their lands and his familiarity with the Indians greatly facili- 
tated the opening up of valuable lands in this section of the country. 

In 1831 he was elected United States senator from Indiana to fill the 
vacancy occasioned by the death of Hon. James Noble and in 1832-33 was 
re-elected for a full term of six years. While in the senate he was the 
chairman of the committee on Indian affairs, in those days a very im- 
portant committee, for which he was eminently qualified. He recog- 
nized no party in determining his line of duty, always acting from 
motives of right and public duty. As a civilian and citizen he was alike 
successful in directing and executing, to the extent of his power, what- 
ever purpose his conscience approved or his judgment dictated. Having 
made Logansport his home in the spring of 1828, he acquired title to 
the land upon which the town was built and, with Chauncey Carter, 
made the original plat of the town and later made four of its princi- 
pal additions. He was awake to the true interests of the town and gave 
a lot for the erection of the first school and public building ever built 
in Cass county, the ' ' Old Eel River Seminary, ' ' and was largely instru- 
mental in its construction in 1828-29. He also donated the square where 
the present Lincoln school building stands. Under his direction the 
first saw and grist mills in the county were erected on Eel river, east 
of Sixth street, in the summer of 1828. In short, he was the instigator 
and moving spirit, that gave form, and imparted energy, to every enter- 
prise calculated to improve society and stimulate progress, and the un- 
foldment and utilization of all the natural advantages with which Cass 
county has been so bountifully supplied. 

In 1838 Governor Wallace directed him to raise a company of sol- 
diers to superintend the removal of the last of the Pottawattomie Indians 
to their western home beyond the Mississippi, which he promptly, yet 
kindly, did, satisfactorily to all parties. 

General Tipton was a member of the Masonic fraternity, having 
received his first degree in Pisgah Lodge No. 5, at Corydon, Indiana, 



HISTORY OP CASS COUNTY 721 

in 1817, and later was grand master of the state. He was instrumental 
in the organization of the first Masonic lodge in Logansport, Avhich was 
named in his honor, ''Tipton Lodge No. 83," in 1828, and donated the 
ground for a building, the present site of the Masonic temple. 

General Tipton was of medium height, rather long face but round 
head, low wrinkled forehead, sunken gray eyes, stern countenance, large 
chest, stiff, sandy hair, standing erect from his forehead. He was twice 
married. His first wife was his cousin, IMiss Jennie Shields, daughter 
of John Shields, who became famous in the Lewis and Clark expedition. 
She was the mother of two children. Spier S. Tipton, who became a 
graduate of West Point, settled in Logansport, raised a- company and 
as its captain fought and died in the ^Mexican war; and Matilda, who 
died while at school in her eighteenth year. His second wife was Matilda 
Spencer, daughter of his old commander who fell in the battle of Tip- 
pecanoe. Three children were born to this last marriage: Harriet B., 
who married Thomas S. Dunn of Logansport and died in the West in 
the later sixties, leaving descendants in California ; John Tipton, who 
married Nenah Lamb, was a captain in the regular army, moved to 
California, where he died many years ago ; George T. Tipton, who was 
born in Corydon, Indiana, in 1825, married Sarah M. Purveyance in 
Logansport, and followed farming near the city. He died in 1873, leav- 
ing five children: John, Frank M., Matilda, and Bessie B., all living 
in Logansport, and Fannie, who married W. S. Newhall and lives in 
Cleveland, Ohio. 

On February 14, 1839, Mrs. Tipton died and on April 4, following, 
the general died after a brief illness caused by exposure to inclement 
weather and was buried on Sunday, April 7, 1839, by the Masonic 
lodge, which he had organized. He was buried on Spencer square, 
where the Lutheran church now stands, later was removed to the old 
cemetery and still later to ]\It. Hope cemetery, where a neat marble 
shaft about six feet high marks the last resting place of Cass county's 
most illustrious pioneer. 

Hon. David D. Ficki.e. Probably the law has been the main high- 
way by which more men of merit have advanced to prominence and posi- 
tion in the United States than any other road, and it is not unusual 
therefore to find among the leading citizens of a community members 
of the legal fraternity. Among those citizens of Cass county whose 
connection with law and jurisprudence have led them to eminence in 
public life may be mentioned the Hon. David D. Fickle, mayor of 
Logansport, whose high attainments as a legist are aiding him in giving 
his city an excellent admmistration. Mr. Fickle was bom Augiist 17, 
1853, in Jackson township, Cass county, Indiana, the seventh in order 
of birth of the nine children of David T. and Rebeca (Engler) Fickle, 
natives of Ohio, of German descent. 

David T. Fickle, who was a farmer by occupation, came to Cass 
county in 1844 and settled in Jackson township, at a time when that 
section was still in a primitive condition. He lived on the old home- 
stead place until about 1883, at that time moving to Galveston, and 
there his death occurred December 22, 1894, being followed by that of 
his widow several years later. Beyond being thoroughly honest and 



722 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

upright, and believing in and acting upon the principles of the Golden 
Rule, the life of Mr. Fickle was uneventful. He was an active factor 
in the development of the county during its formative period, and will 
be remembered as one of its honored pioneers. 

Like so many of the fanners' sons of his day and locality, David 
D. Fickle divided his boyhood between work on the home farm and 
attendance in the jjublic schools, and when he was nineteen years of 
age was sent to the high school at Edinburg, where he spent two years. 
In the fall of 1875, he entered Mount Union College, in eastern Ohio, 
from which he was graduated three years later with the degree of 
Bachelor of Philosophy, and succeeding this taught school until 1882, in 
the meantime sedulously prosecuting his legal studies. On March 17, 
1882, he left the law offices of McConnell, IMagee & ^IcConnell and 
embarked in the practice of law in Logansport, but in June, 1883, was 
elected county superintendent of schools, to the duties of which position 
he devoted the following six years. He resumed his law practice in 
1889, but June 22, 1895, was appointed receiver for the Logansport 
Railway Company, and for about seven years was devoted to the work 
of that office, at the end of that time again taking up the practice of 
law. In 1909, Mr. Fickle became the candidate of the Democratic party 
for the office of mayor, to which he was subsequently elected, and to 
the manifold duties of which he has since given his entire attention. 
He has given the same conscientious service to this executive office that 
has been characteristic of his activities in his private interests, and 
the citizens of Logansport have had no cause to regret of their choice. 
Mr. Fickle is a member of the B. P. O; E., and also holds membership 
in the college fraternity of Delta Tau Delta. 

On September 28, 1887, occurred the union of Mr. Fickle and Miss 
Carrie Larway, and they have four children : Florence Frances, 
Harold L., Helen J. and Robert D. The family attend the Episcopal 
church, all except ^Ir. Fickle being members thereof. 

Hon. Rufus ]\Iagee. Among Cass county's native sons, few have 
attained to greater eminence than that secured by Hon. Rufus Magee, 
whose versatile talents brought him prominently before the public in 
various fields of endeavor, and whose long and active career was given 
to the advancement of his state and his country no less than to his per- 
sonal benefit. It is all the more remarkable, in that he was practically 
self-educated, having entered upon his battle with life when a lad of only 
nine years, and his subsequent struggles were marked with steady ad- 
vancement and eventually crowned with well-deserved success. At this 
time, living in quiet retirement, he is able to look back over a useful 
and well-spent life, content in the knowledge that his eff^orts have not 
been fruitless, and that no stain or blemish mars an honorable record 
of accomplishment. 

Rufus Magee was born October 17, 1845, in Logansport, Indiana. 
His father. Empire A. Magee, was of Scotch-Irish ancestry, and of 
Covenanter religion. His father, Daniel Magee, was a soldier in the War 
of Independence. Empire A. Magee was a millwright by trade, and 
came to Logansport in that capacity in 1836, here erecting the forge 
at what was known as Four-mile. Locks, in Miami township, a strue- 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 723 

ture built of what (or was) known as "kidney iron," Later he built 
the Aubeenaubee forge in Fulton county, on the Tippecanoe river, and 
then went to Lockport, in Carroll county, and operated a grist mill, on 
selling which he moved to Montieello, where he built the mills of the 
Monticello Hydraulic Sompany, and died at that place about 1873. 

Rufus Magee resided with his parents until nine years of age, at 
which time he accepted a position as printer's "devil" with the White 
County Jeffersonian, and following his experience with that newspaper 
engaged in printing and publishing. It was largely in this school that 
Mr. Magee secured his education, although he has continued a student 
all of his life, and has never lost his love of literary work. For a num- 
ber of years he was connected with various publications, at Indian- 
apolis, Logansport, and other cities, and eventually, in December, 1868, 
purchased the Logansport Pharos. In August, 1874, he established a 
daily in connection with the weekly publication, but later sold both 
papers. For many years j\Ir. Magee was known as one of Cass county's 
most prominent and influential Democrats. From 1872 to 1878 he was 
a member of the Democratic State Central Committee, of which he was 
secretary for two years, and in 1882 was elected state senator, receiving 
the re-election in 1900, and serving in all eight years. In March, 1885, 
he was honored by the appointment to the position of United States 
minister to Sweden and Norway, by President Cleveland, and served as 
such four years and three months. In 1896 he was a member of the State 
Central Committee, but resigned therefrom because of the silver plank 
in the Democratic platform. On his return from abroad, IMr. ]\Iagee 
occupied himself in the practice of law, but in 1902 retired from activ- 
ities, and since that time has devoted himself to the demands of his 
business interests. 

In 1868 ]\Ir. Magee was married to Miss Jennie Musselman, and they 
became the parents of two daughters. 

John C. Nelson. The legists of the first several decades of the life 
of Logansport have passed away. Of those who came to the bar during 
the 'sixties, most have long since laid down their briefs. Some survive 
in retirement, enjoying the ease and dignity which lives of intellectual 
activity have earned, while fewer still continue to participate in the 
struggles which the competition of younger and more vigorous men make 
more severe and exacting. Judge John C. Nelson is one of the oldest 
in point of length of practice at the Logansport bar. Since the spring 
of 1870, now more than forty-three years, he has been in active practice, 
and still keeps an open office. 

Judge Nelson was born February 27, 1841, in Adams county, Ohio, 
his parents being natives of that state, while his grandparents, on his 
father's side English, and on the maternal side Scotch, came from New 
Jersey and Virginia, respectively. His home, from the time he was 
six years of age until he was twenty, was in the small hamlet of Eckmans- 
ville, where he attended the common schools and what was then known as 
the high school imtil he was sixteen years of age. At that time he received 
a certificate qualifying him to teach in the public schools of that county, 
his first experience as an educator being in one of the most rural parts 
of the county, in 1857, and his wages being $20.00 per month. He 



724 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

followed the profession of teacher during the fall and winter months, 
and attended a seminary during the summer seasons until the fall of 
1861, on October 18 of which year he enlisted as a private in Company 
A, Seventieth Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry. Upon the organiza- 
tion of the company, he was appointed second sergeant, and when the 
regiment was completed he became sergeant major, in which capacity 
he served until December, 1861, when he was commissioned second lieu- 
tenant of Company G. The regiment, during the winter, rendezvoused 
at Ripley, Ohio, and in February, 1862, was ordered to the front and as- 
signed to the Second Brigade of Sherman's Division, then being organ- 
ized at Paducah, Kentucky. Upon the organization of the brigade, 
Colonel Buckland commanding, Mr. Nelson was detailed to act as aid 
upon his staff. 

The division was sent up the Teimessee river on transports to Pitts- 
burgh Lauding, and was encamped about two and one-half miles from 
the river, the right of the regiment being near Shiloh church. During 
the battle of Shiloh, Judge Nelson served as aid on the colonel's staff, 
and on the second day of the battle was placed in command of his com- 
pany, and from that time lantil December, 1862, did duty with it, tak- 
ing part in the advance on Corinth, Grant's advance towards Vicksburg 
as far as Oxford, Mississippi, and the subsequent return to the line of the 
Memphis & Charleston Railroad, the regiment then being stationed at 
Grand Junction. During the month of March, 1863, he was detailed and 
served as ordnance officer on the staff of General Denver, commanding 
the division until the general was relieved from the command of the 
division by Gen. William S. Smith, when he was relieved as ordnance 
officer and detailed as aide on the staff of General Smith. He continued 
to serve in that capacity until the summer of the same year, when he 
was relieved from duty at division headquarters because he declined 
to receive and receipt for old ordnance that was ordered to be turned 
over to the ordnance officer, assigning for his reason the fact that he 
was not the ordnance officer of the division. Upon reporting to Colonel 
Cockerel, who commanded the brigade, he was immediately detailed as 
aide on his staff', and served in that capacity until January, 186-1, when 
he re-enlisted and was promoted to the rank of captain of Company C. 
While on Colonel Cockerel's staff, he was a member of the Army of 
Observation during the siege of Vicksburg, and after the surrender was 
at the siege of Jackson, ]\Iississippi. Returning from Jackson, the 
division to which the brigade belonged camped on the banks of the 
Black river, in Mississippi, and remained there until October of that 
year, when it was sent, under Sherman, with the other divisions of his 
corps, and took part under Grant at the battle of ^Missionary Ridge, in 
November, 1863. After the regiment had re-enlisted and Sherman's 
army entered upon the Atlanta campaign. Judge Nelson commanded 
Company C, of the Seventieth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, taking part in 
all the battles in which the division was engaged, among which were 
Resaca, Dallas, New Hope Church, Kennesaw Mountain, the battle of 
Atlanta, July 22nd, aJid the battle of Ezra Church, July 27th, in the 
last-named of which he was severely wounded while on the skirmish 
line, being shot through the body. After a leave of absence of sixty days, 
he returned to his regiment, in October, 1864, and was shortly afterward 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 725 

detailed as commissary of musters of the Second Division, Fifteentli 
Army Corps, Gen. W. B. Hazen, commanding. He was with Sherman 
on his memorable "March to the Sea," and with the division at the 
battle of Fort jMcAUister. On the march from Savannah to Goldsboro, 
and at the battle of Bentonville, and then moved on to Raleigh, where 
the division was stationed at the time of the surrender of Gen. Joseph E. 
Johnston. Judge Nelson also participated in the grand review, at Wash- 
ington, D. C, and afterward went West with the division, to Little 
Rock, Arkansas, where, August 18, 1865, he was mustered out of the 
service. 

With the establishment of peace, Judge Nelson exchanged the pon- 
derous enginery of war for the implements of civil life, and, recognizing 
the need of further education attended a commercial school at Cincinnati, 
Ohio, until the spring of 1866. He then spent a short time as a traveling 
salesman for a boot and shoe house, and in July of the same year, with 
a friend of his, came to Logansport, and in August opened a boot and 
shoe store. This business was conducted successfully until 1868, when 
he disposed of his interests to his partner, and entered upon the study of 
law in the offices of ]\IcConnell & Winfield, and in the fall and winter 
of 1869-70 attended the Law school, at Albany, New York. Receiving 
his diploma in the spring of 1870, he returned to Logansport and formed 
a professional partnership with Dudley H. Chase, who, in 1872, was 
elected judge of the circuit court of Cass county. In that year iNIr. Nel- 
son became the partner of Dyer B. McConnell, a connection which con- 
tinued until 'Sir. Nelson was elected .judge of the superior court of Cass 
county, which office he filled during the existence of the court. In 1881 
he returned to the practice of law, and in the following year formed a 
partnership with Quincy A. IMyers, now judge of the supreme court of 
Indiana, the connection continuing for a period of twenty-five years, or 
practically until Judge Myers was elected to his present office. 

During the years 1881, 1882, 1883 and 1884, Judge Nelson served 
as city attorney of Logansport, was mayor of the city in 1887 and 1888, 
and in 1910 was again chosen to serve as city attorney, continuin? as 
such in 1911, 1912 and 1913. Many men are honored for their ability 
to confer benefits, — for the wealth, or influence, or power they control. 
Judge Nelson is reverenced for what he is. A hero in war ; a man of 
kindly spirit, and rectitude and fidelity that no temptation has been able 
to swerve; who has taken office only that he might serve; he has drawn 
about him a wide circle of admiring friends, and the veneration of all 
who know him. 

Judge Nelson was married in November, 1871, to Mary C, daughter 
of James Cheney, whose sketch appears elsewhere. Their children are 
Alice C, (Mrs. Carl Keller) Dr. James V. Nelson, Allen E. Nelson, of 
Logansport, and Helen, (Mrs. R. C. Barnard) and Coleman C. Nel- 
son, of Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Orlando Powell was born in Wabash county, Indiana, on January 
17, 1845, and is the third in a familv of four children, whose parents 
were Jacob and ]\Iartha (Troutman) Powell. The father was a native 
of Washington county. Pennsylvania, and of Welsh descent. Orlando 
Powell was reared on the farm where he now resides, and he was edu- 
cated in the district schools, such learning as he acquired there being 



726 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

supplemented by several terms in the Logansport (Ind.) high school. 
In the summer of 1862 he joined Company K, Ninety-ninth Indiana 
Infantry, with Captain George AV. Julian in command of his company, 
and he served faithfully until the close of the war. His regiment partic- 
ipated in all the important engagements in the Atlanta campaign, includ- 
ing Resaca, Dallas, Kenesaw Mountain, Atlanta and Jonesboro, and 
marched with Sherman to the sea and up through the Carolinas. 

Upon his return from the war he was successfully engaged in school 
teaching for several years, later turning his attention to farming. He 
is a man of no little enterprise and energj% and he today owns a valua- 
ble farm of two hundred acres. He has been prominent in the political 
life of his community and has held the office of township trustee for 
several terms. He is a Republican of solid conviction, and f recpently 
comes to the aid of the party in his district by making speeches through- 
out the county, having a reputation as an impromptu speaker. He is a 
member of th.e G. A. R., and with his wife is a member of the Pres- 
byterian church in their home community. 

On October 2, 1871. ]\Ir. Powell was united in marriage with ]\Iiss 
Sarah S. McElheny, daughter of Moses and Philene (Treen) JIcElheny. 
Five children have been born, of their union, concerning whom the fol- 
lowing brief mention is made : Ada F., born Avigust 14, 1872. died 
November 17, 1889; Tacy C, born Julv 31, 1874; Dyer J., born Decem- 
ber 8, 1878; Martha P., bom July 6. 1881; and Emma B., born ]\Iarch 
6, 1883. The four last named are married, and Orlando Powell has iive 
grandchildren at this writing. 

Warren J. Butler. Prominent among those officials whose seiwices 
have added to Cass county's reputation as one of the best-governed sec- 
tions of the state, Warren J. Butler, sheriff, is entitled to more than 
passing mention. Since the time he attained to man's estate, he has been 
almost continuously the occupant of one public office or another, and 
in each capacity has shown himself a conscientious, faithful official, effi- 
ciently discharging the duties and holding tbem in the light of sacred 
trusts. His career has been marked by constant industry and integrity 
since earliest youth, and his present high position has come as a result 
of earnest youth, and his present high position has come as a result of 
earnest effort and determination, directed along Avell-defined channels. 
Mr. Butler was born in Fulton county. Indiana. April 19, 1863, and 
is a son of WilliaiW T. and Catherine (Phillips) Butler. 

Mr. Butler was reared on his father's farm in Liberty township, 
Fulton county, and divided his boyhood between work of an agricultural 
nature and attendance at the common schools of his locality. It was 
the intention of his parents that he adopt the vocation of farmer, but 
when he was twenty-one years of age he became deputy to his father, 
who at that time was sheriff of Fulton county. Thus, at the very oiit- 
set of his career, he received an introduction to the duties of official 
life, and to the responsibilities undertaken by those who enter the 
public arena. Proving an able and trustworthy assistant, Mr. Butler 
continued as deputy under succeeding sheriffs until 1894, at which time, 
during the landslide of that year, he found himself, with others of the 
Democratic faith, without office, and accordingly, during the next year, 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 727 

he acted in the capacity of attendant at the insane asylum, at Indian- 
apolis, this being succeeded by two years in the same capacity in the 
asylum at Toledo, Ohio. 

On June 17, 1896, I\Ir. Butler was married to Miss Minnie E. I\Ie- 
Dowell, whose people were among the earliest settlers of Cass county, 
and soon after this event he became a conductor on the old Logansport 
Railway Company. He continued in the service of this road, and those 
that succeeded it, for the following fourteen years, and was known 
as one of the company 's most capable and trusted employes, and a great 
favorite with its patrons. Mr. Butler, however, could not resist the 
struggles and activities of public life, and accordingly, in 1909, again 
entered the field as candidate for the office of sheriff of Cass county, 
being returned the winner in the election that followed, and taking 
office in 1910. He was again elected in 1911, on the Democratic ticket, 
and continues to hold office, being known as an efficient and courageous 
officer, with an excellent record in office. 

Mr. and Mrs. Butler now reside in a comfortable home in Logans- 
port, in which city their two children. Ben and Irene, are attending 
school. ]Mr. Butler has interested himself to some extent with fraternal 
work, and is exceedingly popular with his fellow members in the Red 
Men, the Eagles, the Knights of Pythias and the ]\Iasons, in the last- 
named of which he has attained to the Knights Templar degree. 

Ben.jamin Banta. The vocation of farming, as now practiced by 
the intelligent and practical agriculturist, is as difiPerent from the farm- 
ing of several decades ago as could be imagined. The day of the work- 
hardened, horny-handed farmer has passed. In these days the agricul- 
turist who uses scientific methods is able to retire in time to spend the 
remaining yeare of his life in the enjo^nnent of a well-earned competence. 
Among those who have profited by new methods and ideas, Benjamin 
Banta, of Jefferson township, holds a prominent place. Although now 
retired from active pursuits, Mr. Banta is widely known, not only as 
one whose activities contributed materially to the agricultural impor- 
tance of his section, but as a veteran of the great Civil war. Mr. Banta 
was born in Jefferson township, Cass county, Indiana, June 16, 1839, and 
is a son of Beaufort and Elizabeth (McNairy) Banta, natives of Bour- 
bon county, Kentucky. As a youth, Beaufort Banta removed to Ohio, 
where he was married, and in 1829 came to Indiana, settling in Jeffer- 
son towTiship, Cass county, where he passed the remainder of 'his life in 
tilling the soil. He and his ^xiie had four sons, of whom three served 
as soldiers in the Union army during the Civil war. 

Benjamin Banta was reared on the home farm, and the greater part 
of his education was secured in the school of experience and hard work, 
although he made the most of his opportunities and attended the district 
school whenever he could be spared from home. On July 22, 1862, he 
enlisted in Company 6. Seventy-third Regiment, Indiana Volunteer 
Infantry, being first under General Buell, and later in the AiTay of the 
Cumberland. He participated in a number of engagements, including 
Richmond and Perry\'ille, but February 3, 1863, received his honorable 
discharge on account of disability after a brave and faithful service. 
On his return home from the war he was appointed enrolling officer in 



728 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

the sub-distriet 131 of Jefferson township. As soon as he had sufficiently 
recuperated, Mr. Banta resumed work on the home farm in Jeffereon 
township, where, ]March 12, 1867, he was married to Elvira Wilson. She 
was born in Jefferson township, and here died September 12, 1875, having 
been the mother of three sons, two who died in infancy, and Everett, 
who married Pauline Wimer, and died January 12, 1911. Mr. Banta 
was married January 11, 1889, to Mrs. Margaret Herand, who was born 
in Boone township, Cass county, Indiana, March 14, 1847, and was first 
married to John L. Herand, by whom she had one son : John A., who is 
single. i\Irs. Banta was educated in the public schools of Jefferson 
township, and is a lady of much culture and many social graces. She is 
a well-known member of the Presbyterian church at Pisgah, and a 
member of the home and foreign missionary societies. She belongs to 
the Women's Relief Corps No. 30, Logansport, Indiana, Grand Army 
of the Republic, of which she has been president of the Women's Relief 
Corps department, and has held numerous other offices, being national 
recruiting aid, and a delegate to the national convention in 1912, as 
well as holding office in the district department. She also holds mem- 
bership in the Daughters of Liberty, Loraine Council No. 10, and in 
the Lady j\Iaecabees of the World, being especially active in the work of 
the latter and a charter member, and is a member of the Home IMaking 
Agricultural Society. 

]\Ir. Banta is a member of Logansport Post No. 14, Grand Army of 
the Republic, and is the recipient of a pension of fifteen doUai-s per 
month. In political matters a Republican, he has held numerous minor 
offices, but has not l)een a politician in the generally accepted meaning of 
the word. Although retired from active farming, he still owns 160 acres 
of well-cultivated land. IMr. and ^Irs. Banta are highly esteemed in 
their comnuinity as people whose activities are at all times promoting 
good citizenship and the spread of morality and religion. 

George Ulebich. Farming has drawn out the best efforts of some 
of the leading men of Cass county and developed their abilities, and 
through their efforts in an agriciiltural line they have become well-to- 
do and prominent in their communities. One of the substantial farmer- 
citizens of Cass county, whose intelligent knowledge of the soils and 
the most profital)le uses to which particular lands may be devoted has 
made him .justly regarded as one of those whose activities are advanc- 
ing the agricultural importance of his community, is George Ulerich, 
of Clay township, who has lived in Cass county for nearly a half a 
century. Mr. LTlerich was born in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, 
November 18, 1853, and is a son of Henry and Caroline (Fry) LHerich. 

Henry Ulerich, who was a farmer by vocation, ])rought his family 
from Lancaster coimty, Pennsylvania, to Cass county, Indiana, in the 
spring of 1866 and settled first on the old Andrew Dritt farm, where 
he remained for aliout five years, then moving to a farm near Twelve 
]\Iile, where he still resides, being eighty-seven years of age, while his 
wife passed away some years ago. 

George LTlerich commenced his education in the public schools of his 
native county, and was thirteen years of age when he accompanied his 
parents to Cass county. Here he completed his schooling, in the mean- 
time assisting his father in the work of the home farm, remaining under 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 729 

the parental roof until he had reached the age of nineteen years. At that 
time he started to work for George M. Smith, as a farm hand, and on 
leaving his employ was engaged by Sam Ilarman, with whom he also 
remained a short period, succeeding which he started to work on the 
farm of Joseph Davidson. In February, 1885, Mr. Ulerich was married, 
and at that time began operations on his own account on a rented farm 
of twenty acres, belonging to John I. ]\IcDowell, but after three years 
removed to the farm of his former employer, Mr. Davidson, where he 
continued two years. Following this he spent five years on the farm of 
Barnett Brothers, and then spent one year on a farm near the school- 
house, but eventually came to his present property, a tract of 153 acres 
which his wife had inherited. Here he has continued to reside to the 
present time, working his land with his son, who lives on an ad- 
Joining property. The old log cabin built by Mrs. Ulerich 's father still 
stands on the farm, located behind the modern frame farm house which 
was built by Mr. Ulerich, in addition to which Mr. E. C. Metsker has 
erected a new barn and made numerous other improvements on the 
place. He has engaged in diversified farming, raising good crops, breed- 
ing cattle and finding a reacly market for his dairy products. An able 
business man, his success has been due to his strict attention to the de- 
tails of his vocation and an inherent ability that has come down to him 
through a long line of agricultural ancestors. 

Mr. Ulerich was married February 13, 1885, to Miss Maggie P. 
Metsker, daughter of E. C. and Louisa C. (McDowell) Metsker, who 
lived in Cass county for many yeai*s, and to this union there have been 
born two children : Hugh, who is twenty-six years of age ; and Harold, 
aged seven years. Hugh, who assists his father in the work of the farm, 
also received a commercial course in the commercial college. He mar- 
ried Leta Ingmire, daughter of John Ingmire. Mr. Ulerich is a Demo- 
crat in his political views, but has not cared to enter the political arena, 
being content to devote his entire attention to the cultivation of his farm. 
His business integrity and honorable dealing have gained him a high 
reputation among the people of Clay township, among whom he num- 
bers many sincere friends. 

William A. Wells. It was but comparatively a few years ago that 
most men ridiculed the idea of applying science to agriculture, but sci- 
ence has never gone backwards ; it has always been progressive in nature. 
There are still many farmers who plant, reap, feed their cattle, and let 
their implements stand out in the sun and rain in the careless, thriftless 
old way, but science is revolutionizing the farming business as it has 
revolutionized almost every other modern business, and the agriculturist 
who would attain the full measure of success must keep abreast of the 
trend of the times, and bring to his labors every help which modern in- 
vention and discovery will give him. Among the good, practical farm- 
ers of Cass county who have realized the benefits to be derived from sci- 
entific, treatment of the soil, William A. Wells, of Clay township, is 
deserving of mention. A resident of Cass county for nearly a half a 
century, he has attained a position of aftluence through intelligent opera- 
tions and in the meantime has so directed his activities as to l:)eneflt his 
community. He was born at Kewanna, Fulton county, Indiana, Febru- 
ary 14, 1856, and is a son of Dudley and ^Nlary (Davis) Wells. 



730 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

The father of Mr. Wells was a native of Connecticut and the mother 
was born in New York; they were married in Ftilton county, Indiana, 
and came to Cass county in 1865. Dudley Wells was a farmer by voca- 
tion, an occupation which he followed throughout his active career, and 
his death occurred in Logansport, November 24, 1906, his wife having 
passed away September 2, 1903, in Kewanna, Indiana. 

William A. Wells commenced his education in the public schools of 
Kewanna, and was nine years of age when he accompanied his parents to 
Cass county, here completing his studies in the district schools of Clay 
township while assisting his father in the work of the home farm. He 
was thoroughly trained in all the details pertaining to the operation of 
a farm, and on attaining his majority started to work on his own ac- 
count. He is now the possessor of an excellent tract of land, which he 
devot«s to general farming and stock raising, and on which he has made 
numerous improvements. His buildings are substantial and in a good 
state of repair, his cattle are sleek and well fed, and the excellent crops 
produced each season leave no doubt as to his ability as an agriculturist. 
This farm is one of the old land-marks of the township, and on it stood 
the first schoolhouse erected within the township limits. 

On September 15, 1880, Mr. Wells was united in marriage with Miss 
Anna Freshour, daughter of George Freshour, who came to Cass county 
in 1835 among the earliest pioneers. To Mr. and Mrs. Wells was born 
one son — Kirk, who resides with his parents. He finished the public 
schools and the city high school at Logansport, and then took a full 
business course. The son is a high Mason, having taken both the Scot- 
tish and Yorke rite of masonry. He is a member of the blue lodge, coun- 
cil and chapter, at Logansport, and the Shriners at Indianapolis. He is a 
thirty-second degree INIason, and affiliates with Tipton lodge, No. 33, 
Logan chapter No. 2, Logan council No. 11, St. John's commandery 
No. 24, Murat Temple, Indianapolis, Indiana Consistory of Indianapolis. 
Mr. Wells, Sr., has interested himself in fraternal work to some extent, 
and is a popular member of the local lodge of the Odd Fellows and the 
]\Iasons. Although not a politician in the generally accepted meaning 
of the term, he has ever been faithful to the duties of citizenship, and 
for the past four years has served as a member of the board of trus- 
tees of Clay township. He is known as a man who lives up to his word 
in his business transactions, who is true in his friendships, and who, hav- 
ing succeeded himself, is willing to assist others to success. 

GiLLis McBean, Sb., was born in Scotland in 1794 and died on his 
farm in southeast quarter, section 20, Clay township, in 1839, and lies 
at rest in the old cemetery. He came to America when a boy and engaged 
in the milling business on the ]\Iississinewa river. In 1827 he moved 
to Logansport before the town was laid out or even named and acted 
as Indian agent and kept a hotel in a double hewed log cabin, situated 
on the southwest comer of Third and Market streets. The legislature 
appointed three commissioners to organize Cass county and locate its 
county seat, who met at the house of Gillis McBean in the summer' of 
1829, by direction of the legislature, and the first board of county com- 
missioners met at Mr. McBean 's house on July 25, 1829, and appointed 
him agent for the county. 



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GILLIS JAMES McBANE 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 731 

About 1832 he bought a farm and moved to Clay township, where 
he died as noted above. 

Mr. McBean represented Cass county in the state legislature in 1833. 
He was married in Corydon, Indiana, to Elizabeth Kintner. From 
this union six children were born, to wit: Margaret, Catherine, Gillis 
James and Thomas, twins ; Peter Todd and Frank, all of whom are now 
dead except Frank, now living at Canon City, Oregon, and Gillis J., who 
resides at Moscow, Idaho. 

Gillis James McBane (originally McBean), son of Gillis McBean, 
Sr., was the first white child born within the original town plat of 
Logansport, December 30, 1829, in a double log cabin, then situated on 
the southwest comer of Third and Market streets, where the Kreutz- 
berger building now stands. When a child he moved with his father 
on what is known as the Skelton farm, on the north bank of Eel river 
in the southeast quarter section 20, Clay township, opposite Spencer 
Park. When grown he worked in Coulson's, Clem's and Vigus' bakeries 
in Logansport. Later lived with Mrs. Sharts on a farm near Anoka. 
At the breaking out of the war, 1861, he enlisted in Company G, 
Seventy-third Indiana Regiment. Serving three years, he returned to 
Anoka, where he resided on a farm until 1882, when he moved to Moscow, 
Idaho, where he has lived ever since, engaged in carpentering and paint- 
ing. He made a visit to Logansport in the fall of 1912, and is still hale 
and hearty, as shown by his picture accompanying this sketch, which was 
taken when he was eighty-three years old. Mr. BcBane was never mar- 
ried and says he is short on the fair sex, although his mother was a 
woman and the best in the world. 

Mrs. Jane H. White. Among the residents of Clay township who 
l)ave witnessed the wonderful changes that have taken place here during 
the past half a century, and have done their share in promoting the 
growth and development of the county, one of the best known is Mrs. 
Jane H. White, who resides with her family in a comfortable residence 
on Logansport Rural Route No. 4. Mrs. White was born in Adams town- 
ship, Cass county, Indiana, daughter of 'Joel H. and Mary (Harvey) 
Davis. 

Joel Hubbard Davis was born near Albany, New York, of Scotch-Irish 
descent, and some time after his marriage came to Indiana, settling in 
Adams township, where he purchased a farm. Subsequently, when Mrs. 
White was one year old, the family moved to Fulton county, Indiana, 
purchasing a farm. The father died April 13, 1880, in Cass county, 
and the mother died November 5, 1879. Mrs. White grew to womanhood 
in Fulton county, and was there married January 6, 1861, to John 
Henry White, who was born of English descent in Frederick county, 
Virginia, son of Batley and Hannah (Haire) White. In 1843 the 
White family located on a farm in Clay township, and John Henry 
Wliite and his brother Joseph inherited their father's estate, the former 
receiving the present home of Mrs. White, where he resided for upwards 
of fifty-two years, dying at the age of seventy-eight years. He was one 
of his township's well known and substantial citizens, and spent his life 
in clearing, cultivating and improving his land. In 1886 he was elected 



732 , HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

justice of the peace of Clay township, a position in which he served for 
some years. 

Mr. and Mrs. "White became the parents of one son: Horace Mason, 
who was born October 20, 1861, on the present homestead. He married 
Emma Puterbaugh, daughter of Jacob and Hannah Ida (Bauchman) 
Puterbaugh. Mr. Puterbaugh came from Dayton, Ohio, and at one 
time was the leading merchant of Logansport, where he still resides at 
the age of eighty-four years, one of the oldest living early settlers. His 
wife died in 1904. Horace and Emma White have had two children, 
namely : Edith Abigail, who married Roscoe C. Smith, of Indianapolis, 
and has one child, — Newell C. Smith, aged eight years; and Fred Har- 
vey, who married Jessie C. Straw, daughter of Andrew Jackson and 
Anna Elsa (Walker) Straw, the former of whom is superintendent of 
the gardening of the Longcliff insane asylum, and they have one child 
who is ten months old. 

Mrs. White, her son Horace M. and wife, and their son Fred and wife, 
and the latter 's baby, Esther, all live in the comfortable residence on 
the old homestead. This tract, a property of 110 acres, has been greatly 
improved by Mr. White, who has done much clearing, draining and 
fencing, and it is now considered one of the valuable properties of the 
township. Mr. White is a good, practical agriculturist, who takes ad- 
vantage of all the modern improvements and appliances in his work, and 
has risen to an enviable position among the agriculturists of Clay town- 
ship. Progressive in all things, in 1912 he became the candidate of the 
so-called Bull Moose party for the office of representative in the state 
legislature. ^Irs. Jane H. White is one of the best known ladies of her 
locality, her kindness of heart and many charities having gained her 
many warm friendships. Although advanced in years, her faculties 
are unimpaired, and she recalls with unclouded memory many of the 
interesting incidents of early days in Cass county. The members of 
the family are all highly esteemed in their locality, where the name 
has always stood for strict integrity and probity of character. 

Lafayette M. Ball. A residence in Cass county that has covered 
nearly seventy years entitles Lafayette Ball, of Logansport Rural Route 
No. 4, to more than passing mention as one of Clay township's old and 
honored pioneer citizens. Coming to this township when still in in- 
fancy, he was for a long period identified with the agricultural interests 
of his section, and although he has now retired from the more strenuous 
activities of life, having reached a position when he feels he can afford 
to rest from his labors, he still takes a keen interest in all that affects 
the community in which he labored for so long. Mr. Ball was born in 
Washington county, Pennsylvania, July 24, 1843, his grandfather, Iden 
Ball, being a prominent member of the Society of Friends in the Quaker 
settlement in that county. His parents came to Indiana in 1844, and 
first settled near Twelve Mile, one-half mile east of Bethlehem church, 
in which vicinity Lafayette Ball was reared to manhood. During the 
Civil war he enlisted in the Ninety-ninth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer 
Infantry, which was mustered into the LTnited States service where the 
Spry building now stands, on Pearl street, Logansport, and with this 
organization served two years and ten months, leaving the service with 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 733 

the rank of corporal. He was a brave and faithful soldier, and when his 
military career was ended resumed the duties of peace, which he has per- 
formed in the same able and faithful manner. 

On January 8, 1891, ^Ir. Ball was married to Eleanor Johnson, 
daughter of Edward and ^latilda (Archer) Johnson. Edward Johnson 
was a native of Vermont and his wife of Williamsburg, Ohio, and they 
came to Cass county at a very early day, Mr. Johnson first engaging in 
the blacksmith business, which he gave up to devote his entire time to 
agricultural pui^suits. This latter occupation he followed throughout 
the remainder of his life, and passed away September 2, 1891, in which 
year his wife also died on August 28th. Mrs. Ball is a lady who is pos- 
sessed of a genial, cordial and kind nature, and has ably assisted her 
husband in the care of their happy and pleasant home. Three children 
were born to Mr. Ball by his first marriage, namely: Harry, Linda 
and Lillian, the latter of whom is now deceased. 

At the time of the marriage of ]\Ir. Ball and his present wife they 
settled on the old farm, formerly the property of ^Ir. Ball's father, and 
originally a tract of 80 acres. For some years ]\Ir. Ball continued opera- 
tions there. Eventually he retired from active pursuits, however, and 
sold a part of the land, he now owing forty-seven acres, while his wife 
owns twenty-two and 28-100 acres, and the greater part of this is now 
being operated by renters, and it lies in section 8, Clay to^vnship. The 
homestead of Mr. and Mrs. Ball is called "The Sunny Side Farm." 

Mr. and Mrs. Ball are members of the ]\Iethodist Episcopal church, 
in which ^Ir. Ball holds the position of steward, and both have been ac- 
tive in religious and charitable work. He is a popular comrade of the 
Grand Army of the Republic. During his long residence in this sec- 
tion j\lr. Bail has seen many changes take place, and has done his share 
in promoting the growth and development of his community. He is 
honored and esteemed by those who have made his acquaintance, and 
has a wide circle of sincere friends. The pleasant family home is situ- 
ated on Logansport Rural Route No. 4. 

Raymond C. Taylor was born in Cayuga county, New York, on Sep- 
tember 6. 1834, and died in Logansport, Indiana, on the 11th day of July, 
1909. He was a son of Smith Taylor, a mechanic and farmer, and a 
grandson of Captain Noah Taylor, who won his title in fighting for 
American independence with the colonies during the Revolutionary 
war. The mother of Raymond Taylor was Sylvia Barnes, and he was 
one of the eight children she bore her husband. She was the daughter 
of Captain Thomas Barnes, also a soldier of the Revolutionary war 
period. The advantages of Raymond Taylor in an educational way were 
limited indeed, and wlien he was tAvelve years old he began to work as a 
stock driver, an occupation which eventually led to his embarking in 
the butcher business. He came to Logansport, Indiana, in January, 
1864, and opened a meat market at Broadway and Sixth street, later 
moving his establishment to No. 501 Broadway. His business career in 
Logansport covered a period of thirty-four years, and as a result of 
creditable business methods he succeeded in putting aside a competency. 
He was well and favorably known in business circles in Logansport for 
many years, known as a substantial man of affaii*s, scpiare and true in 

Vol. li— 2 



73-t HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

all bis business relations, and indeed, in all the relations of life, and 
valued by many as a good friend and neighbor. 

Mr. Taylor was a Democrat, generally speaking, but he did not hesi- 
tate to place his support where he most approved of the candidate, re- 
gardless of party affiliation. He was a Mason of the old school, which 
may be interpreted as meaning that he was a Mason in heart as well 
as in name. He had conferred upon him all the degrees and orders 
of the York rite, and he, with his wife and daughter, were members of 
the Order of the Eastern Star. 

In 1853 Mr. Taylor married Florilla Miner, and three children were 
born to them, of whom a daughter, Flora M., and a son, Jay D., are now 
living. The mother of these children died, and in 1865 Mr. Taylor mar- 
ried Florilla A. (Doty) Taylor, a daughter of William Doty and the 
widow of his brother, T. Doty Taylor. 

The life of Raymond C. Taylor was practically uneventful, as great 
events are considered, but his career as a man in Logansport was with- 
out blemish, and he died as he had lived, — secure in the high esteem of a 
wide circle of acquaintances who knew him as a man and a citizen, and 
valued him for his many splendid traits of heart and mind. 

Jay D. Taylor, the son of the late Raymond C. Taylor, of Logans- 
port, Indiana, was born at Cayuga county. New York, on July 27, 1860. 

When Jay Taylor was eleven years old he decided to come west and 
join his father, and he accordingly went quietly about converting his 
worldly goods, which comprised a hog, some grain and other farm produce 
he had earned, into coin of the realm, and this accomplished, he started 
for Logansport, Indiana, without going through the formality of asking 
advice or permission. By husbanding his slender resources, and not 
being too fastidious as to his mode of travel, the boy was able to reach 
Logansport without undue annoyance in a financial way, and when he 
appeared before his father in Logansport, that gentleman forthwith took 
charge of the young adventurer, placing him in school where he con- 
tinued until he was graduated from the high school. He was then six- 
teen years old, and he set about learning the jeweler's trade in Logans- 
port. He was employed variously in the jewelry business -svith W. S. 
Orwin, B. Z. Lewis, H. C. Eversole, and D. A. Hawk. In 1889 he bought 
the store of Z. B. Lewis, located on Market street, but four months later 
succeeded to the business of another of the men by whom he had for- 
merly been employed, namely, — H. C. Eversole, at No. 309 Fourth street. 
Since then he has continuously carried on his business at this place, en- 
• joying something better than a fair degree of success. In addition to 
the general jewelry business, he carries a complete line of optical goods, 
and that he may intelligently and scientifically serve his patrons, he 
has taken special instruction of Dr. King, at Cleveland, Ohio, the Chi- 
cago Ophthalmic College of Chicago, and the South Bend College of 
Ophthalmics. 

Mr. Taylor is a Democrat, a Knight Templar of the Masonic fra- 
ternity, a Knight of Pythias and a Knight of the Maccabees. He was 
married on February 19, 1890, to Miss Loraine Ridinger, of Logansport, 
and one son has been born to them,— Raymond Carl Taylor, named in 
honor of his paternal grandfather, and who is employed by his father. 




DUDLEY n. CHASE 



HISTORY OP CASS COUNTY 735 

Hon. Dudley H. Chase. The life of every public man possesses in- 
terest to his fellow citizens, partcularly if his abilities have elevated him 
to honorable office in which he has displayed honest effort and fidelity 
in the performance of its responsibilities. Pre-eminently is this true 
when judicial position is involved, and especially is interest excited when 
the subject is so well known and honored a man as the late Hon. Dudley 
H. Chase, whose character as a man, whose high attainments as a lawyer, 
whose dignity as a jurist, and whose signal services in both military 
and civil life, gained him a place among Cass county's citizens that will 
long be difficult to fill. Judge Chase was born in the city in which he 
afterwards gained such high distinction in professional circles, Logans- 
port, August 29, 1837, and Was a son of Henry and Elizabeth (Donald- 
son) Chase. 

Henry Chase was born at Greenfield Center, Saratoga county, New 
York, in 1800, a descendant of a family that came with a party of colon- 
ists from Bristol, England, and settled in the region of Massachusetts 
during the early history of the American Colonies. In 1827 he made a 
visit to Delphi, Indiana, and was here admitted to the bar, but one 
year later moved to Adams county, Mississippi, where he practiced law 
for four years. He returned to Delphi in 1832 and from that place, 
one year later, came to Logansport, where he continued to carry on an 
extensive practice. He was judge of the then Eighth Judicial District 
in 1839, having been appointed to that office to complete an unexpired 
term, but in 1844 moved to New York City, which was the scene of his 
legal activities for five years. From the latter city he made removal to 
Sheboygan, Wisconsin, and there in 1854 passed away, a victim of the 
great cholera plague which swept the Wisconsin city during that year. 

At the time of the death of his mother. Judge Dudley H. Chase 
made his home with an uncle, William Chase, in Logansport, and here 
his primary education was secured. In 1856 he was appointed a cadet 
at West Point Military Academy, by the Hon. Schuyler Colfax, but 
before entering actively upon his studies he went west, and bore a 
conspicuous part in the Kansas troubles of 1856, rendering valiant service 
as a member of Sharp's Rifle Company. On his return to Logansport, 
he again took up his law studies, entering the office of the Hon. D. D. 
Pratt, and in 1858 was graduated from the Cincinnati Law School. He 
at once began practicing in Logansport, in partnership with his former 
preceptor, although later he was engaged in individual practice, and 
thus the outbreak of the Civil war found him-. As early as 1854, IMr. 
Chase had become captain of an independent local military company, 
known as the "Logan Grays," and in April, 1861, this organization of- 
fered itself for service in defense of the flag. Judge Chase fully equip- 
ping the company entirely at his own expense. It was accepted by the 
recruiting officers, and soon became Company K, Ninth Regiment, In- 
diana Volunteer Infantry. For a time Judge Chase was engaged in 
recruiting in Maine, taking with him fifty-two Indiana volunteers, and 
this was then organized into Company A, Second Battalion, Seventeenth 
United States Infantry, joining the Fifth Army Corps in front of 
Fredericksburg, immediately after the engagement at that point. Sub- 
sequently Judge Chase participated in the battles of Chancellorsville 
and Gettysburg, and on July 2, 1863, was seriously wounded in the hip 



736 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

by a shell. He was then employed in help quelling the draft riots in 
New York City, but when he had entirely recuperated from his injury, 
he returned to the field and took part in engagements at Rappahannock 
and Bristow Station, as well as the ]\Iine Run campaign. Mr. Chase 
was forced to resign his commission on account of his wounds, and Feb- 
ruary 4, 1864 left the service with an enviable record for bravery and 
gallantry. Returning to Logansport, he resumed the practice of his 
chosen profession, and in that same year was elected prosecuting at- 
torney, later being re-elected in 1866 and again in 1868. In 1872 he 
was sent to the bench for sis years, and was re-elected in 1878, but in 
1884 declined to be a candidate. However, in 1896, he was elected judge 
of the Twenty-ninth Judicial Circuit, and as such was serving at the 
time of his death, July 2, 1902. As a lawyer. Judge Chase ranked among 
the ablest in Indiana; as a jurist his decisions were marked by such 
fairness and so complete a knowledge of jurisprudence that compara- 
tively few were appealed and none were ever reversed. He took a great 
interest in the work of the Grand Army of the Republic, his local con- 
nection being with Logansport Post No. 14, and was also a member of 
the Indiana Commandery of the Loyal Legion. He belonged to the 
Odd Fellows, and on a number of occasions served as eminent commander 
of St. John's Commandery, Knights Templar, of the Masonic fraternity. 
The loss of such a man, standing for honest government and for effi- 
ciency in all measures pertaining to the city's welfare — of a man who 
contributed to the city's upbuilding during his entire residence here, 
and who entertained and illustrated the highest ideal of good citizen- 
ship, is no ordinary loss. Such men are not so plentiful that their passing 
away is a matter of only current interest. 

On October 28, 1859, Judge Chase was married (first) to Maria 
Durett, whose father was one of the founders of Logansport, and she 
died April 12, 1877, after bearing five children, namely : William ; Rob- 
ert, who is deceased; John: George and Mary. On December 7, 1880, 
Judge Chase's second marriage occurred, when he was united with Grace 
M. Corey, of Saratoga Springs, New York, she being a member of the 
Schuyler family, of Colonial fame. To this marriage there were born 
four "children : Charles D., Ruth, James and Louise. 

Charles D. Chase is the only male representative of his father's 
family in Logansport, and now makes his home with his mother and is 
engaged in the undertaking business. He was born September 27, 1882, 
was educated in the publie schools, and graduated from the ]\Iyers School 
of Embalming, at Columbus, in May, 1903. He is a member of Oriental 
lodge No. 272, F. & A. M. ; Bridge City lodge No. 305, Knights of 
Pythias; Logan lodge No. 40, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and 
Logansport lodge No. 66, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 
His political convictions are those of the Republican party, and his 
religious connection with the ^Market Street Methodist Episcopal church. 

Edgar F. Metzger was born in Miama county, Indiana, on December 
23, 1872, a son of David L. ^kletzger, who came to Cass county in about 
1885, and w^as a farmer in Clay township. He is now a resident of Indi- 
anapolis. He is a veteran of the Civil war. Edgar F. Metzger was 
reared in the counties of Cass and ]\Iiami and received his education in 



HISTORY OP CASS COUNTY 737 

the public and high schools. Until he was eighteen he lived on a farm, 
after which he taught in the country schools of Cass county during two 
terms, and then began his newspaper career as a reporter on the Logans- 
port Reporter. He continued with the Reporter in various capacities 
until 1902, when he acquired an interest in the Journal, with which he 
continued to be associated until 1907, when he disposed of his interest 
and with his brother, Harry C, founded the Logansport Tribune. In 
1912 the Journal and the Tribune were consolidated and Mr. Metzger 
is now the president of the Journal-Tribune Company. 

Mr. Metzger has no fraternal affiliations beyond his membership in 
the Elks. He is married. 

John W. Barnes, one of the owners and editors of the Logansport 
Phaios, was born in the city of Muncie, Indiana, July 7, 1855. His 
father, William Barnes, was a contractor and builder and a native of 
Pennsylvania. He married Evaline Wachtell, a native of IMaryland, at 
Muncie. 

It was in the schools of his native city that John W. Barnes was 
primarily educated. When nineteen years of age he began learning the 
"ai-t preservative" on the Muncie Democrat, but tw^o years later became 
connected with the Liberal Bepublican, a paper established for the sup- 
port of Horace Greeley for the presidency. During the campaign of 
1876 and until 1878 he was employed on the Democrat, at Anderson, 
but in the latter year came to Logansport and began work on the Pharos. 
From that time until the present, a period of thirty-five years, Mr. 
Barnes has been identified with this paper. In 1881 he purchased a 
half-interest in the Pharos, and with Benjamin F. Louthain, the owner 
of the other half, has since controlled the destiny of the oldest estab- 
lished Democratic newspaper in Cass county. 

On September 30, 1885, ]\Ir. Barnes was united in marriage with Miss 
Emma Grable, daughter of Jonathan and Hester Grable, residents of 
Cass county. 

Henry James IMcSheehy. Among the men who have brought fame 
to Logansport as a center of journalistic activity, the late Henry James 
INIcSheehy, for thirty-seven years editor and_^ proprietor of the Logans- 
port Weeldy Chronicle, held a position of prestige. A native of Ireland, 
having been born in Anniscaul, County Kerry, January 28, 1852; he was 
brought to the United States in boyhood by his parents, and here re- 
ceived his education in the public schools of the city of New Yoi'k, and 
at Lafayette, Indiana, graduating from the high school of the latter 
place with the highest honors in a class of sixty-eight pupils. On leav- 
ing school i\Ir. ]\IcSheehy became purser of the steamship "The City of 
Richmond," running from New York to Liverpool, and in this connec- 
tion became marine reporter for the New York Herald, which started 
him upon his journalistic career. In those days pressboats were sent 
out to meet all incoming ships and Mr. McSheehy's duty consisted in 
going aboard these vessels and secure stories and anecdotes from the 
passengers and crew. 

In 1875 Mr. McSheehy was appointed by his paper to accompany 
Col. Robert Ingersoll on his lecture tour and while acting in this serv- 



738 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

ice he came to Logansport, and, noting the possibilities for a good news- 
paper here, immediately wired his resignation to New York and began 
plans for the establishment of the Chronicle. This paper made its 
initial appearance April 7, 1875, and has continued to enjoy a full meas- 
ure of success to the present time. Since Mr. McSheehy's death, which 
occurred Februaiy 21, 1911, in Logansport, the Chronicle has been pub- 
lished under the same firm name by his son, Harry James McSheehy, 
who purchased it in May, 1911. He had the distinction of being the 
oldest editor and proprietor of a newspaper in Indiana in point of con- 
tinuous service on one publication. 

Aside from his vocation, Mr. McSheehy took his keenest pleasure in 
fraternal work, and became very prominent therein. He was the author 
of the Elks' ritual, serving as chairman of the ritual committee of the 
Grand Lodge of Elks for two years, was for seven years exalted ruler 
of the Logansport Lodge of Elks and through his earnest eiforts secured 
for the lodge the magnificent home it now occupies; was president of 
the building committee of the Elks and served on the building commit- 
tees of both the local lodge and the Grand Lodge of Odd Fellows. In 
Odd Fellowship he was past grand of Logan Lodge of Odd Fellows, and 
when entering Grand Lodge was raised to the high office of grand patri- 
arch. He was widely known in and out of his profession, and in his 
death Indiana newspaperdom lost one of its most conspicuous citizens. 

Mr. McSheehy married Miss Minnie Maurer, and they became the 
parents of three sons: Harry, Lloyd and Harold. 

Charles N. Cook. When the first settlers of Cass county came to 
this locality they found none of the present day developments which 
seem so essential a part of the landscape. All the land was wild, some in 
prairie, other parts covered with dense timber and a portion of it under 
water. It was a mighty task to turn the virgin sod, to fell the sturdy 
parent trees and to drain the pestilential swamps that were not only use- 
less, but bred various diseases ; yet these sturdy, determined old pioneers 
were equal to the task, and, while all did not live to see their young hopes 
materialized, they laid a sound foundation upon which the present re- 
markable structure of civilization has been built, and to them is due the 
initial credit. One of the families to whom belongs the distinction of 
having commenced this great work is that bearing the name of Cook, 
a worthy representative of which is found in the person of Charles N. 
Cook, veteran of the Civil war and a substantial farmer of Clay town- 
ship. Mr. Cook belongs to an old and honored New England family, 
whose Puritan ancestors emigrated to America on the Mayflower. He 
was born September 15, 1830, in Berkshire county, Williamstown, Mas- 
sachusetts, and is a son of Noah and Lydia B. (Bardwell) Cook. 

Charles N. Cook received the advantages of a common school educa- 
tion, and his spare time as a boy was spent in assisting his father, who 
was a cobbler by trade and who made many fine pairs of shoes for the 
college students of his town. On attaining his majority, young Cook 
went to Marysville, California, where he entered the gardening business, 
but remained there only about one and one-half years, returning to his 
father 's home in Massachusetts. In 1856 Mr. Cook came to Logansport, 
Indiana, and soon thereafter settled on a tract of land, about eleven 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 739 

acres comprising the tract, situated west of the city limits. This land 
he paid fifty dollars per acre for, and upon it he began the business of 
gardening. He carried on that industry until August 13, 1862, when 
he enlisted in Company K, Ninety-ninth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer 
Infantry, for service in the Union army during the Civil war, and with 
this organization the young truck-gardener and soldier continued to 
participate in all of its engagements until he was honorably discharged 
as an invalid, on July 8, 1865, at Davis Island, N. Y. harbor. A brave, 
faithful and cheerful soldier, he won alike the respect of his comrades 
and the esteem of his officers, and when he had completed his career as 
a soldier, he returned to Williamstown, Mass., and spent the summer 
under the treatment of a physician at the home of his parents. In the 
fall of the same year, having recuperated his strength, he returned to 
Logansport, Ind., where he took a relapse of his trouble (the camp 
diarrhoea) and becoming so depleted in strength as to give up all hopes 
of recovery to health, sold his little home west of the city and at the 
request of a friend, went to the home of the latter in Clay township 
north of Logansport, where with careful nursing, on the following 
February was so restored to health that he married Miss Margaret Ball 
and commenced housekeeping on a farm in Bethlehem township and 
followed the occupation of a farmer as his health would permit. 

In the fall of 1872, Mr. Cook bought a small farm of twenty acres 
on the north line of Clay township on which with the addition of an- 
other twenty acres adjoining he has since made his home. He is now 
in his eighty-third year and has a well-preserved vitality for a man of 
his age. He bought an old log cabin, hauled it to his farm with the 
assistance of his neighbors, fitted it up comfortably, and here he and 
his young wife lived. 

The woman who became Mr. Cook's wife and faithful helpmate 
through life was prior to her marriage Miss Margaret Ball, who was 
born in "Washington county, Pennsylvania, on INIay 5, 1841, whence she 
came to Indiana with her parents when she was a child of three years. 
She was the fifth born child of her parents, David and Maria (Baker) 
Ball, to whom were born seven children, and of which number four 
are living today, Mrs. Cook being the eldest. The others are Lafayette, 
of Clay township; Joseph, of Leiter's Ford, Indiana; and William B., 
also of Clay township. 

Wlien Mrs. Cook came to Indiana in 1844, the state was in her in- 
fancy. Miami and Pottawattomie Indians were there in plenty and from 
her childhood on Mrs. Cook experienced much in the new and untaught 
country in which her family had settled. The pioneering days of In- 
diana are thoroughly familiar to her, and she is well qualified to speak 
on pioneer conditions of Indiana that prevailed here half a century ago. 
She lived through the period when the forest was being converted into 
a rough field for cultivation; saw the use of the sickle, the scythe and 
the cradle in the field give way to more modern methods of hai*vesting; 
saw the old-fashioned fireplace, still dear to the hearts of many of us, 
the andirons, the spinning wheel, the reel, the looms for weaving the 
jeans and linseys, all pass out of use and be supplanted by the inven- 
tions and customs of a later day. None of the old time country sports 
are unfamiliar to her, or unforgotten. The quilting bee at which the 



740 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

women of the neighborhood congregated to make merry and incidentally 
to perform an unbelievable quantity of real work knew her cheerful 
presence on many happy occasions, and she was a witness at many a 
barn raising or log-rolling contest. In her childhood days she attended 
the little log cabin school in her community, and lived through the 
period when the old goose-quill pen was dying hard in the last days of 
its usefulness, when threatened by the advent of a more facile weapon. 
All these, and many other changes did she and her family see in the 
days of their early life in Indiana, and she recalls with mingled pain and 
pleasure the experiences of the days gone by. 

Mr. and Mrs. Cook are the parents of three children, — a son and two 
daughters. David William is a resident of Clay township ; Anna Bella 
is the wife of William C. Van Buren and makes her home in Fairfield 
county, Ohio, where they are engaged in the business of agriculture ; 
they have three sons and two daughters; and Lydia Ellen, the youngest 
of the three, who makes her home with her parents and is devoting her- 
self to them in their declining years. She is a young woman of admirable 
character, educated in the public schools of the county, and well ad- 
vanced in music, a subject in which she is qualified to teach. She is a 
consistent member of the Bethel Methodist Episcopal church and an 
honored member of the Ladies' Aid Society of that church. 

]Mr. and ]\Irs. Cook are genuine pioneers of Cass county, and their 
citizenship is one of which their community may in every way be 
proud. They have a host of good friends in Clay township and com- 
mand the esteem and regard of all who share in their acquaintance. 
No shadow of dishonor has fallen upon the good name of the family in all 
the years of their residence in the Hoosier state, and they are of the 
people whose identity with the state has been one of its fortuitous 
conditions. 

Hon. Harry ]\I. Gardner. Probably in no profession or avenue of 
business do men become so widely known as in journalism, not always 
as personalities, but as influences, their printed thoughts reaching thou- 
sands where their spoken ones could be heard perhaps by only a score. 
Hence the responsibility of a journalist is of exceeding weight, and his 
influence as a molder of public opinion bears directly upon the welfare 
of the community in which his labors are centered. Harry M. Gardner, 
city editor of the Daily Reporter, of Logansport, has spent his entire 
career in newspaper work, and has been connected with some of the 
leading public prints of the West and Middlewest. He was born at 
Dunkirk, New York, September 15, 1880, and is a son of William and 
Mary (Watson) Gardner, of Scotch and Irish ancestry, respectively. 
The Gardner family's advent in America occurred in Colonial days. 
William Gardner was a musician, a composer, and for a number of years 
a soloist with several of the largest musical organizations of this country. 
Both he and his wife are now deceased, as is also one of their two 
children. 

Hari'y ]\I. Gardner received his primary educational training in the 
schools of Dunkirk, Avhere he was reared, and subsequently took a course 
at the University of Buffalo. Shortly after this he began his newspaper 
career as a circulator at Dunkirk, and as a "cub" reporter on the 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 741 

Evening Observer. Succeeding this he was connected with newspapers 
at Denver, Los Angeles, Butte, Ogden, Pocatello, Fort Worth, El Paso ; 
and other points in the West, in a reportorial capacity, and in February, 
1905, came to Logansport, Indiana, which he has since made his home, 
although twice before, for short periods, he had worked here. He 
became a reporter on the Daily Reporter, and successive promotions 
have raised hira to the position of city editor of this publication. 

Mr. C4ardner is a Democrat in his political views, and in 1913 repre- 
sented Cass and Fulton counties in the state legisature. He belongs to 
the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 

Adelbert M. W'alker. Cass county, it has often been fittingly said, 
owes her greatest and best wealth to her farming communities and to 
the men who have given their lives to the cultivation of the waste places 
of the country, building up thriving communities and establishing 
happy homes in these districts that half a century ago were practically 
untouched by man. The present generation of Cass county farmers are 
carrying on to completion the worthy Avork begun by their fathers 
before them, and prominent among these may be mentioned Adelbert 
]\I. AValker, one of the well established and prosperous farmers of Miami 
township. As such, it is wholly consistent with the spirit and purpose 
of this work that some mention, though necessarily brief, be made of 
him and his work. A native son of the township and county in which 
he now resides, he was born here on August 19, 1872, and his parents are 
Eugene A. and Minerva (Thomas) Walker. The father resides in Clay 
township and enjoys the warm regard of a goodly circle of old time 
friends and acquaintances. The father was a soldier in the Union army 
during the Civil war, giving valiant service in the cause of the North, 
and is a member of G. A. R. 

Until 1898 Adelbert M. Walker made his home with his parents. 
As a boy he attended the district schools, and ably assisted his father 
with the care of the home place, learning under the able instruction of 
his worthy parent much concerning farming activities that he has 
applied in his own enterprise. He married in 1893, but continued to 
remain at the home place with his young wife until 1898, when he ac- 
quired his present farm of one hundred and ten acres, also in Miami 
township, and here has continued to reside. He has a fine place, well 
kept and carefully cultivated, and has proven himself a farmer of no 
slight capacity. Since he came into the possession of his present place 
he has built another dwelling house, more suited to the demands of his 
family, and as a result, two commodious dwellings now grace his farm. 

Mr. Walker married on September 2, 1893, Miss Mary Angle, the 
daughter of Benjamin Angle, of Virginia, and three children have been 
born to them, — Marie, Mildred and Alma. Marie received her diploma 
from the public schools in the class of 1912, and is taking musical in- 
struction ; Mildred is in the seventh grade ; Alma is in the fifth grade. 

The family are members of the Baptist church and IMrs. Walker is 
a member of the Ladies' Aid Society of the Baptist church. They have 
a worthy share in the activities of that body. Mr. Walker is a Repub- 
lican. They have lived quietly and conservatively, and are reckoned 
among the responsible and reliable people of Miami township, where the 



742 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

family have been known to the community for three successive genera- 
tions. 

Charles Oglethorpe Fenton. Among those who have made Cass 
county's history, it is fitting to record the name of Charles Oglethorpe 
Fenton. He was not a pioneer of the county ; he was not one of its old 
citizens. His brief race was run in forty-nine years, twenty-seven of 
which were spent in Logansport. Arriving here at the age of twenty- 
two, a stranger and without means, the advancement he made is worthy 
of note and emulation. How did he succeed to the title of brother, friend 
and counsellor? Those who knew him best would tell you he was dili- 
gent ; he never idled ; he was prompt ; he met his obligations the day they 
were due, not the day after. He hated gossip, for, he would say: "What 
an idle waste of time when there are so many good books to read ! " It 
was his custom to carry a favorite book to his office, hoping to find some 
golden minutes of leisure during the stress of the day in which to read. 

Charles Oglethorpe Fenton was of Irish descent, the great-grandson 
of Samuel and Ann (Shannon) Fenton, who sailed over the sea from 
Old Erin early in the eighteenth century. They settled in Newville, 
Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, and to them were born thirteen chil- 
dren, "all girls but eleven." One son, David, moved to Mantua, Port- 
age county, Ohio. His wife was Emily Dunscomb and their sons were 
Green and Grove. The fomier and Louisa Frost, the daughter of 
Elvira Kellogg and Jolui Frost, were the parents of eight sons and one 
daughter, the fourth son being C. 0. Fenton. He was bom January 
31, 1863, on the "old John Frost homestead," in Mantua, where his 
mother had been born thirty years before. When eleven years old he 
left the parental roof to make his own way, working for neighboring 
farmers evenings, Saturdays and vacations, and in the meantime attend- 
ing school at Ravenna. When seventeen years old he taught the district 
school at home, and for one summer he worked in a cheese factory, and 
while yet in his teens he engaged with the Central Publishing house, of 
Cincinnati, Ohio, to sell books, and spent eighteen monthes traveling in 
West Virginia, Tennessee and Texas. Returning home, he again taught 
school, himself attending school at such short periods as he could. So 
it is that we find him June 14, 1883, at the age of twenty, graduating 
from the Northwestern Ohio Normal school, at Ada, and it was to 
further his education he came to Logansport in April, 1885, to enter the 
American Normal College, then situated on College Hill, north of the 
city. In the winter of 1885-6 he taught in Pulaski county and it was 
there that he met Carrie Belle Tyler, whom he married May 25, 1887. 
To this union one daughter was born, Sagie Velle Fenton, August 17, 
1888. Mrs. Fenton was bom in VanBuren township. Clay county, In- 
diana, February 10, 1866, the youngest of the four children of Roxie 
VeUe Usher and Sage R. Tyler. Her father was born at Cape May, 
New Jersey, August 18, 1836. His father, Nathaniel Tyler, was of 
Scotch-Irish extraction and his mother, Abigail Scull, was born in Eng- 
land. On the maternal side, Mrs. Fenton traces her lineage back to the 
year 1730, when Hezekiah Usher, who kept the first book store in Bos- 
ton, married Abigail Cleveland. The mother of Mrs. Fenton was born 
August 21, 1839, in Madison county, New York, the daughter of Isis 



1137038 




CHARLES 0. FENTON 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 743 

Burdick and IMoses Usher. Wlien five years old she came to Indiana 
with her parents and grandparents, the latter being Dr. Nathaniel 
Usher and Lucy Palmer, of West Haddon, Connecticut. Dr. and Mrs. 
Usher were the parents of Judge John P. Usher, secretary of interior 
in Abraham Lincoln's cabinet. This branch of the Usher family re- 
moved to the state of Kansas. 

Mr. Fenton also taught school at the Stone and Clymer schools in 
Clinton township, Cass county. At the time of his marriage he had 
charge of the commercial department of the American Normal College 
and was writing editorials and reporting for the Logansport Times, 
receiving for his newspaper work one dollar per week. On May 28, 
1888, he bought the Logansport Times, then owned by twenty Prohibi- 
tion stockliolders. His first vote had been cast for James G. Blaine, 
although he was born of a line of Democrats. In November, 1888, he 
voted for Clinton B. Fisk and a straight Prohibition ticket, which ticket 
he continued to support throughout the remainder of his life. Through 
the medium of the Times, local though it was, he came to be known by 
the party leaders throughout the nation. The sagacity, tho loyalty, the 
persistency of this fearless editor became an inspiration. He had a 
distinct literary style, writing prose full of fun and pathos and some 
verse, humorous for the most part. His prose writings have been said to 
be something after the style of Mark Twain and some of his verses like 
those of Riley. His pen was his power. He was a delegate to all Pro- 
hibition state and national conventions and at the last national conven- 
tion he attended, at Atlantic City, in July, 1912, was assistant secretary. 

In 1900 Mr. Fenton added to his newspaper work the brokerage busi- 
ness and as investment broker enjoyed the confidence of a large clientele 
and was pre-eminently successful. At home his presence gave out an 
atmosphere of cheerfulness. It was his custom evenings to spend much 
of the time in reading, often aloud. He liked history, biography and 
travel and above all he loved the poets, Burns being his favorite. He 
knew most all of his poetry and said, from the moment that he turned 
the knob on his office door on FourtJi street to the moment he turned 
his door-knob at home, nine squares distant, if uninterrupted, he could 
and often did repeat the whole of "Tam O'Shanter. " In June, 1911. 
he and his wife attended their daughter's graduation at Vassar Col- 
lege and sailed from New York to spend the summer in the British 
Isles, in Holland, Belgium and France. It was in 'the land of Burns 
he took the greatest delight and day after day followed lovingly in the 
footsteps of the plowman poet. Probably his best literary productions 
were his travel letters written for his newspaper. 

Mr Fenton had often quoted: "Let me die in the harness," and so 
it was in the prime of a busy life that he was compelled to retire to the 
Battle Creek Sanitarium, Battle Creek, Michigan, for rest. Even here 
he was reading the "Life of Washington," by his favorite American 
author, Washington Irving, preparing to write an article on a visit to 
Mount Vernon, one of a series of articles descriptive of summer vacation 
trip to Atlantic City, Washington, Richmond and so forth. During 
the six weeks spent at Battle Creek he grew steadily weaker and weaker, 
and there, on the 31st of October, 1912, left this for a fuller life. It 
was said of William Morris by one of his biographers that he died of 



744 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

being William Morris. So it was with C. 0. Fenton, a man who was 
engaged in so many and so varied activities. 

John C. Rea. In the annals of early settlement in Cass county, one 
of the names which is first to he mentioned is that of John R. Rea, whose 
son is now one of the prosperous farmers of Clay township. For more 
than eighty years this name has had a place in the history of Cass county, 
and has alwaj^s been associated with solid worth and an industry which 
brings credit to the possessor and helped to create the resources and 
wealth of the community. 

]\Ir. John C. Rea, the son of the old settler, was born in the village 
of Clymers, in Cass county, on the nineteenth of May, 1864. His grand- 
father's name was Daniel Rea. His parents were John R. and Elizabeth 
Rea. His father, who was first a resident of Connersville, this state, in 
1832 came to Cass county, where he joined with the earliest settlers of 
this locality. A carpenter by trade, he was a very useful man in his 
community at Clymers, and many of the old houses of that locality were 
constructed by his hand and according to his plans. 

His death occurred in 1884 at a venerable age, while his wife passed 
away in 1886, and both are buried in the Clymers cemetery. 

Mr. John C. Rea received most of his education in' Clinton township, 
and also for two years enjoyed the advantage of college training at 
Logansport. He has had a varied, but generally progressive career, and 
since attaining manhood has been advancing every year to a better posi- 
tion in life and increased esteem of his fellow citizens. For about three 
years, he was engaged in teaching school in Cass county, but the greater 
part of his active lifetime has been devoted to farming. His present 
farm was formerly owned by his wife's father. The estate contains 
one hundred and ten acres, and Mr. Rea since locating here has made 
many improvements upon it, although most of the buildings were placed 
there by old ]\Ir. Swigart. 

On April 25, 1888, ]\Ir. Rea married Miss Anna F. Patterson, a 
daughter of Simon E. and Cicely (Amos) Patterson. Mrs. John C. Rea 
is a native of Cass county, Indiana, and was born April 29, 1866. She 
was reared and educated in her native county and is a lady of pleasing 
and social address, ever ready to fulfill her part as wife and mother. 
Her cheerful and pleasant home is ever open to their many friends. She 
traces her lineage t6 the "Emerald Isle," as her early progenitors came 
from the "Land of the Shamrock." Mr. Rea is of Scotch ancestry. 
Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Rea, and all are living: 
Harry Ralph, now a student in the Franklin College, fitting himself for 
the ministry ; Royden K. received his diploma from the public school 
in the class of 1908, and has finished the high school course in Logans- 
port; Ruth E. received her diploma in the class of 1909, and has taken 
one year's work in the high school at Logansport, and has also been a 
student in instrumental music. All three of the children are members 
of the Baptist church and Mrs. Rea is a member of the ]\Iethodist Epis- 
copal church. Mr. Rea is affiliated with Burroughs Lodge, No. 495, 
I. 0. 0. F. The homestead of the Rea family is known in Clay township 
as "The Cedars." 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 745 

Alexander Milton Buchanan, ]\I. D. Of the pioneer families of 
Cass county probably none deserved mention and permanent records in 
the annals of this vicinity more than the ikichanan family, which be- 
came identified with Logansport in 1839, and continued prominent in 
this part of the state through the career of the late Dr. Buchanan up 
to the time of the latter 's death on November 29, 1905. 

Alexander Milton Buchanan was bom at Chamhersburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, on March 2-4, 1823, and belonged to a Scotch-Irish family, which, 
had been settled in Pennsylvania for many years. The parents of the 
late Dr. Buchanan were Rev. James and Harriet (Berryhill) Buchanan, 
the foriuer a native of Pennsylvania, and the latter a native of the 
capital city of that state. They moved west with their family to 
Logansport, Indiana, in 1839, where Rev. James Buchanan was pastor 
of the First Presbyterian church from 1840 to 1843. He had jireviously 
been minister of the Presbj^terian church at Greencastle, Indiana. Ilis 
death occurred in Logansport in 1843, and his name is permanently 
identified with the early church annals of this city. There were eight 
sons and two daughters in the family, and all of them are now deceased. 
One of the sons. Dr. Andrew Buchanan, was educted at Princeton Col- 
lege and Philadelphia Medical College, and for a time practiced in Cass 
county. 

The late Alexander JM. Buchanan was a boy when the family came 
west to Cass county, and the years he spent here were during the pioneer 
period. Among many families, education at that time was not con- 
sidered a fundamental matter, bill the Reverend James Buchanan wfts 
probably in advance of ordinary public opinion in that respect, and no 
doubt encouraged his sons to prepare for their careers with the best 
professional ecjuipment that could be obtained. Dr. Alexander ]M. 
Buchanan therefore began his studies in medicine in La Porte, Indiana, 
and then went east and entered the Philadelphia I\Iedical College, the 
oldest and one of the best known institutions of medical learning of the 
time. After graduating he began practice in Illinois, where he was 
first married. Later he moved to Cass county, and spent many years 
of practice in both town and country. He really represents the old- 
time doctor in this locality, and many of the older residents now living 
in Cass county will recall his kindly character and personality and his 
helpful and sympathetic attitude to all who were in distress. He con- 
tinued in active practice up to 1895, at which time he retired and moved 
into Logansport, wiiere his death occurred in 1905. He lived at i\Ietea, 
this covinty, before retiring. He w'as a member of the Presbyterian 
church. His first marriage occurred at Kankakee, Illinois, in 1851, when 
Miss Nichals became his wife. He married on October 24, 1867, in 
Logansport, New York, INIiss IMinnie York, a daughter of Lewis and 
Delia (Babcock) York, who lived near Canandaigua, New York. One 
daughter, I\Irs. Bertha L. CoUett, wife of W. S. CoUett, an engineer of 
Logansport, Indiana, was born of this union. 

-JoPiN A. ViNEY, of tlie firm of Cummings & Viney, has been a res- 
ident of Logansport for the past forty-six years, and for the four years 
previous, from 1861 to 1865, he was a resident of Columbus, Indiana. 
He was born on March 11, 1856, in Greenbrier county, West Vir- 



746 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

ginia, aud is one of the four children born to John M. and Rachel 
(Lewis) Viney, two of the four yet living. 

John M. Viney was a farmer by occupation and was originally 
descended from French ancestry. In the subsequent history of the 
family they immigrated to the British Isles, and there by intermarriage 
became the possessors of English and Scotch-Irish blood. John M. 
Viney moved to Carroll county, Indiana, in 1860, and resided there 
^until spring in 1866, when he came to Logansport. Here ill health 
caused him to relinquish all active pursuits for the remainder of his 
days, and he died in 1871. His widow survived him six years, passing 
away in 1887. 

John A. Viney came to Logansport with his parents when a boy of 
ten years. He received but a very limited education in the district 
schools, and from the age of fifteen, when his father died, was compelled 
to fight the battle of life entirely on his own responsibility. Until he 
was nineteen years old he worked in the mills on the south side of the 
Wabash river, and in 1875 he began learning the upholsterers trade. 
He duly comialeted his apprenticeship and thereafter worked at the 
trade for twenty-three years, being associated with various firms in 
those years. 

In 1899, he formed his present partnership with Harvey R. Cum- 
mings, under the firm name of Cummings and Viney, and the new firm 
embarked in the retail furnitiire and upholstering business in Logans- 
port. This association has continued from then until the present time, 
and as both partners are practical and experienced men in their busi- 
ness, they have enjoyed their full share of the local trade, and are ac- 
counted among the prosperous business men of the city. 

Mr. Viney is the president of the Logansport Credit Exchange and 
a director in the Logansport Commercial Club. In 1881, he became a 
member of the Knights of Pythias, Apollo lodge No. 62, in which he 
has served in all chairs, and is yet a member of that society. He is also 
a member of the Knights of the Maccabees. He is a Democrat, with 
regard to his political affiliations. 

On December 24, 1877, I\Ir. Viney married lona E. Morgan of Logans- 
port. Mv. and IMrs. Viney are members of the Broadway Methodist 
Episcopal church, of which denomination Mr. Viney has been a member 
for forty-four years. 

Homer Closson. For seventeen years Homer Closson has been 
identified with the drug business of Logansport, as an independent man 
of business, previous to which he was employed in the city for nine 
years in the same line. His venture, which he launched in 1895, has 
proven to be a thorough-going success, and Mr. Closson is rightly 
regarded as one of the ablest business men of the city of Logansport 
today. 

Born near Jackson, ]\Iichigan, on September 22, 1871, Homer Closson 
is the son of Seymour M. and Kate (Smith) Closson. The father came 
to Logansport some thirty-five years ago, just following the death of 
his wife, and some years after he located in Logansport, Mr. Closson 
married Ella IMcIntyre. Both are living in Logansport. Nine children 
were born to them, seven of whom are yet living. 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 747 

Homer Closson was a small child when his mother died, and until 
he was nine years of age he lived in his native county, making his home 
with relatives of the family, and in 1880 he came to Logansport, where 
he joined his father who had previously settled here and had married, 
as is noted ahove. The boy attended the public schools of Logansport 
until he reached the age of fifteen, when he secured employment in the 
drug store of B. P. Keesling. From then until the present time he has 
been identified with the retail drug business, either in the capacity of 
employe or employer. For nine years he remained with Mr. Keesling, 
and in 1895 he began in business for himself in the place which he now 
occupies, his independent experience thus covering a period of seventeen 
years, which have been marked by a generous measure of success and 
general prosperity. The business has increased along conservative lines, 
and Mr. Closson has one of the most complete and modern establish- 
ments of its kind in the city. 

On December 1, 1897, Mr. Closson was united in marriage with ]\Iiss 
Alpha Hilton, of Logansport, daughter of William Hilton, an old 
resident of this city. Five children have been born to them : Ralph 
W., Gertrude L., George D., Frances Jean and John H. Mrs. Closson 
is a member of the Baptist church of Logansport and of the Order of the 
Eastern Star. 

Marvin M. Minnick. Among the popular and capable officials of 
Cass county, none stands higher in public esteem than Marvin M. Min- 
nick, the present incumbent of the county treasurer's office, whose serv- 
ices have contributed materially to the public welfare. A long and 
careful training, followed by an extended period spent in the school- 
room, as an educator, was succeeded by much experience in banking 
matters, thus fitting him thoroughly to discharge the duties of his office, 
the conscientious perforinance of which has thoroughly established him 
in the confidence of his fellow-citizens. Mr. Minnick bears the added 
distinction of being a native son of Cass county, having been born in 
Tipton township, near Walton, December 21, 1867, one of the six chil- 
dren, all living, born to Elias and Elizabeth A. (Lindesmith) Minnick. 

Conrad Moenich (as the name was originally spelled), the grand- 
father of Marvin M. Minnick, was a native of Hesse Cassel, Germany, 
whence he emigrated to the LTnited States in young manhood, set- 
tling in Somerset county, Pennsylvania, where Elias Minnick was born 
in 1843. The latter was reared in his native county, educated in the 
public schools, and taught the blacksmith trade, but when not yet nine- 
teen years of age enlisted, in 1861, in Company K, Ninth Regiment, 
Indiana Volunteer Infantry, as a private, for service during the Civil 
war. Enlisting at Laporte, Indiana, he was transferred to the Army of 
the East, with which he fought at Cheat Mountain. Grafton and Green- 
brier. Subsequently his regiment joined the Army of the Cumberland, 
under General Rosecrans, Mr. Minnick 's captain being Dyer B McCon- 
nell, of Logansport. With this organization he fought at Corinth, luka, 
iMurfreesboro and Pittsburg Landing, and September 20, 1863, at the 
battle of Chickamauga, he v,'as captured by the enemy. For seven 
months he was incarcerated in the awful stockade at Andersonville, and 
later he was transferred to Belle Isle and Florence, spending, in all. 



748 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

about fifteen mouths iu Coufederate prisous. He was fiually released 
on account of the close of hostilities, received his honorable discharge, 
and returned to the vocations of peace. Settling- on a farm in Tipton 
township, Cass county, i\Ir. .Minnick engaged in farming, and his sub- 
sequent life was devoted to the tilling of the soil. He was a Democrat 
in politics, but, although often solicited to allow his name to be used 
as a candidate for public office, steadfastly refused, preferring the peace 
and quietude of private life to the turmoil of the public arena. He 
was a popular comrade of the Grand Army of the Republic, and his 
religious belief was that of the Christian church, in the faith of which 
he died April 14, 1892. His widow still survives and makes her home 
at Walton, Indiana. 

Marvin M. Minnick was reared to manhood on the home farm, and was 
given good educational advantages, attending the public schools and 
for three years being a student in the American Normal College. He 
next entered Hall's Business College, at Logansport, and after his 
graduation therefrom entered upon a career of teaching which covered 
the next seventeen years. He became widely and popularly known as 
an educator, but resigned from his position to enter commercial life, 
attaching himself to a private bank at Bunker Hill, Indiana, and later 
a like institution at Walton, Indiana, and for six years was cashier of 
these institutions. He was a resident of the latter place, in 1910, when 
he became the candidate of the Democratic party for the office of county 
treasurer, and in the active campaign that followed Mr. ]\Iinnick was 
returned the winner, greatly aided, no doubt, by his wide acquaintance 
and high reputation gained during his days as a teacher. Mr. Minnick 
gave the people of Cass county an excellent and economical administra- 
tion, and in 1912 was again his party's choice for the office and elected 
by an increased ma.jority. He is a Knight Templar Mason, and also 
holds membership in the Knights of Pythias and the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows. With Mrs. ^linnick, he attends the Methodist Episcopal 
church, at Walton, Indiana. 

On September 15, 1896, ]\Ir. IMinnick was married to ^liss Lavina H. 
Green, of AValton, Indiana, and they have had three children: Edgar 
E., who is deceased; and Dallas D. and Dorothy L. 

Arthur E. Dunn. The rapid growth of the automobile interests of 
the country in recent years has created an industry which has given a 
wide field of opportunity and enterprise to many of the young men of 
the present generation, who have a predilection for mechanics, and 
Arthur E. Dunn, of Logansport, Indiana, is one of those who have made 
the most of his opportunities along these lines. Since 1908 he has been 
in the garage business, for a part of the time in partnership with one 
Harry Case, but since 1909 he has conducted the business entirely upon 
his own responsibility, winning a reputation for efficiency and service 
in the work that has brought him a considerable prominence in the city. 

Arthur E. Dunn was born on April 14, 1882, at Cissna Park, Illinois, 
and is one of the two sons of Edward A. and Lydia L. (Ashley) Dunn. 
The father was a farmer all his life. He came to Royal Center, Cass 
county, Indiana, in 1898, and continued farming there until 1903. when 
he moved to Logansport, and there he died in October, 1908. His wife 





y u 




HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 749 

passed away in April of the same year, so their two sons, Arthur E. and 
Herbert A., were bereft of both parents in the short space of six months. 

The subject attended the public schools of Logansport after the 
removal of the family to this place, and in 1903 was graduated from the 
city high school. The succeeding three years were spent in Lake Forest 
University, but he did not graduate owing to the fact that the failing 
health of his parents made it seem best that he return home and assist 
in the care of the home place. After the death of his parents, in 1908, 
Mr. Dunn entered into a partnership with Harry Case, previously men- 
tioned, and established a garage at 320-22 Fifth street, in Logansport. 
They were successful, but the partnership was short lived, and soon Mr. 
Dunn purchased the interest of his partner and contini;ed the business 
at the original location until 1910, when he moved to No. 617-623 Broad- 
way, his present location. Here he maintains one of the modem and 
up-to-date garages of the city, the property being his own, and re- 
modeled and arranged on its purchase to meet his own requirements and 
ideas of general service. He carries on a general garage business, in- 
cluding repairing and the sale of auto accessories, and is building up a 
solid and substantial trade in the city. 

Mr. Dunn is a member of the Country Club and of the ]\Iethodist 
Episcopal church. He is married, Coad Herrington, of Pana, Illinois, 
becoming his bride on June 11, 1908. 

William W. Haney. Many lives have entered into the foundation 
of the state of Indiana, and none of them more worthy to be considered 
in a history of pioneer personalities than the late William W. Haney. 
Those who have come and enjoyed the splendid prosperity of the later 
era, however important their own contributions, have all owed a great 
debt to the pioneers who first tested the capabilities of soil and climate, 
who faced the hardship of existence when only the strong and the brave 
could remain, and who laid the foundation of a greater civilization and 
permanent prosperity. 

The career of the late ]\Ir. Haney was not typical of the early settlers 
in the Wabash valley, for he was one of those remarkable men with 
great initiative and enterprise whose activities lie in a plane above that 
of the average citizen. He was a leader where others followed, he 
founded enterprises upon which they built and enjoyed the fruits thereof, 
he planned and supervised the execution of undei'takings which required 
the services of hundreds of subordinates. His career is prominently 
associated with several of the epochal movements of early Indiana his- 
tory. The late Mr. Haney belonged to the era of water transportation 
in northern Indiana, and was one of the builders of the old Wabash 
canal, which was the chief artery of commerce during the thirties and 
forties and the indistinct remains of which may be seen in Cass and 
adjoining counties to the present day. He was also associated with the 
old Indiana State Bank, and his name and enterprise are linked with 
many of the notable events and affairs of the last century. 

As a succinct summary of this notable career which belongs in the 
annals of Cass county, nothing better has been written than the follow- 
ing quotation from an address by Judge D. P. Baldwin, delivered at 
the time of the death of INIr. Haney— "The late Mr. Haney was a remark- 



750 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

able man in many respects. This, is proved by the grand fortune he 
accumulated in this little city where money is scarce and riches the ex- 
ception. I do not hesitate to say that Mr. Haney had the best financial 
brain of any man that, at least in my time, ever lived in Logansport. At 
seventy -nine years, and until his last sickness his mind was as clear and 
quick as that of any man in mid-life. Mr. Haney 's honesty was very 
remarkable. No scandal was ever connected with his great fortune. 
His word was sacred; he took no undue advantages; he was a remark- 
ably friendly man; he was as kind and sociable with a tramp as with 
a millioniare. He did not know what pride was any more than he knew 
what deceit and double-dealing were. He was always clean-mouthed. 
No one ever heard him retailing scandal or speaking unkindly. Mr. 
Haney 's great wealth brought upon him, as wealth or exceptional suc- 
cess always does, a great weight of envy or raillery, but he took it good 
humoredly. No one ever knew him to get angry or excited, much less, 
vindictive or sullen. No one knew better of good and ill of life and 
humanity. Mr. Haney did not pretend to be anything else than a 
business man, and never sought office or promotion of any kind. He 
did not set up to be a charitable man any more than a talented man ; and 
yet his kindly voice, friendly ways, and unquestionable honesty gave him 
a happy and honored old age and made him a general favorite with all 
classes. ' ' 

William W. Haney was born in Bucks county, Pennsylvania, Decem- 
ber 25, 1809, and his death occurred in Logansport April 20, 1889. His 
parents Joseph and Mary (AVeaver) Haney were people of small means 
and for that reason, and also because of the times in which he lived, 
were unable to provide their son with any education except that of the 
primitive local schools. Though not a well educated man in the mod- 
ern sense of the term, Mr. Haney had those powers of keen perception 
and fine memory, and so excelled in his judgment of men and his prac- 
tical ability in affairs that he was never at disadvantage in his competi- 
tion with the world of men. His boyhood days were spent on the farm 
where his most useful training was probably in the acquirement of a 
sound physique and a practical industry. After leaving the farm he 
worked in a hotel, then was clerk in a store, and at the age of seventeen, 
without capital, began his independent career. He joined the engineer- 
ing corps engaged in the construction of the Delaware division of the 
Pennsylvania canal, between Easton and Bristol, being on that work 
for a year. His next enterprise was boating coal along the river and 
he was also employed in a hotel at Easton. With his growing ability 
he was next made superintendent of a division of the Pennsylvania 
canal, and continued in that capacity for a year, after which he returned 
to his former enterprise of boating coal. For another two years he 
had supervision on a branch of the Pennsylvania canal, and then took a 
contract for the construction of the Delaware and Raritan canal feeder. 
After completing this work he acted as superintendent of the feeder. 

With this varied experience in constructive enterprise and general 
business, Mr. Haney turned his attention to the west. By steamboat, 
flatboat and pirogue he arrived in the state of Indiana, and on the fourth 
of July, 1835, made his advent into the frontier village of Peru. The 
Wabash valley throughout this region was then almost an unbroken 




CoOUZ^U 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 751 

wilderness, although there were stirrings of the great activity which the 
plans for the building of the Wabash canal had set in motion. Soon 
after reaching Peru, Mr. Haney took charge of a force of men and the 
construction work of this canal. They opened a stone quarry below 
Peru for the contractor of the Peru dam, and a little later he, himself 
took a contract for the construction of a section of the canal at Lewis^ 
burg. Wlien this contract was finished the following year he formed 
a partnership with Alexander Wilson and established a merchandising 
business in Lewisburg, also conducting a large trade with the Indian 
population which had not yet been removed from Indiana. Three years 
later he bought his partner 's interest in the store, and up to the summer 
of 1851 was engaged in business at Lewisburg in real estate, canal script 
and other securities. 

The late Mr. Haney dated his residence in Logansport from the 
fifteenth of July, 1851. In this city he established a general store, but 
soon retired from the mercantile field. His business from that time until 
his death was in real estate and as a private banker. During several 
years of this time he was president of the Logansport branch of the 
old Bank of the State of Indiana. During the intervals of his business 
career he had also managed to acquire a substantial knowledge of the 
law, and soon after locating at Logansport was admitted to the bar, al- 
though he never practiced in the courts, confining his business in this 
profession to a limited office practice. The estimate delivered by one of 
his friends and old time associates upon his business career needs no 
further extension. Whether as a contractor, merchant, banker or real 
estate man, his transactions were always marked by a high sense of 
honor and strictest integrity, and notwithstanding his thoroughly busi- 
ness character and high regard for the rigid principles of business pro- 
cedure, he had the kindly nature and the genial personality which made 
him popular among a great body of the citizenship. At the time of his 
death, the late Wm. W. Haney was regarded as one of the richest men 
in the state, as wealth was then estimated, his estate being valued at 
more than half a million dollars. 

Wm. W. Haney married, December 13, 1836, Miss Louisiana Fidler, 
who survived him and also attained to a good old age. Of two chil- 
dren, the daughter, Maria Emma, is now deceased and the only survivor 
is Mr. William E. Haney of Logansport, a sketch of whose career fol- 
lows. In the affection of his family and associates, the late Mr. Haney 
made a secure place. It is said that he was known either personally or 
through his kindly deeds to every man, woman and child in the city of 
Logansport. He was a member and a liberal supporter of the Broad- 
way Methodist church in this city. Among the names of the older citi- 
zenship in Cass county none deserves higher rank or more permanent 
place on the rolls of honor and sincere admiration than the late William 
W. Haney. 

William E. Haney. The son of the late William W. Haney is him- 
self deservedly classed among the old settlers of Logansport, by reason 
of a residence in that city for more than sixty years. William E. 
Haney 's career has been one of exemplary citizenship. Like many other 
successful men of hisi day, his early advantages were limited, but he 



752 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

had all the qualities of native ability and character which make sure 
success. At this time, although he has passed the age when most men 
feel fit for the struggles of active business, he still ably conducts the 
management of his extensive interests, and is a man of large and bene- 
ficent influence throughout his home city and vicinity. 

William E. Haney, a son of William W. and Louisiana (Fidler) 
Haney was bom at Lewisburg, Indiana, December 28, 1837. His edu- 
cation was confined to the advantages afforded by the common schools 
of his day, very limited when it is remembered that free public educa- 
tion had not yet been established throughout Indiana during the boy- 
hood of Mr. Haney. After the removal of the family to Logansport in 
1851, he had some further schooling and in better schools. In 1859 
associated with his father, he started in the pi'oduce business, but after 
about one year moved to a farm in Eel township, where he was engaged 
in farming for about twelve years. Returning to Logansport at the 
end of that time, he was for six months a boot and shoe merchant, but 
after the death of his partner sold out, and then for some years con- 
ducted a brokerage business on a small scale. He was also during this 
time becoming more and more associated with his father, in the latter 's 
extended business enterprise. Since the death of his father his entire 
attention has been taken up in managing the affairs of the estate, and 
in handling real estate and a general brokerage business. 

William E. Haney has inherited the best of his father's sterling 
qualities of character and business ability. He has an unassuming 
nature which throughout the many years of his active business career 
has kept him in the quieter channels of life, and he has never aspired to 
a place of mark in public affairs. 

On April 5, 1859, Mr. Haney married Miss Christina Conrad, daugh- 
ter of William Conrad, one of the pioneer settlers of Cass county. Mrs. 
Haney died in the spring of 1871. She was the mother of eight chil- 
dren, six of whom died in infancy and early childhood, while the sur- 
vivors are Carrie E. and Jessie M., the latter being the widow of INIiller 
Uhl. Mr. Haney has voted the Republican ticket throughout nearly all 
the years of the existence of that great party, although beyond his vote 
and a practical interest in home affairs and good government has never 
participated in politics. His fraternal association is Avith the Benevolent 
& Protective Order of Elks. 

Harry E. Burkit. Like many others of the county officials of Cass 
county, Harry E. Burkit, county recorder, was bora in the locality 
which he now represents and has passed his entire career within its 
borders. A product of the farm, and a member of a family that has for 
generations produced tillers of the soil, he has also held up the family 
reputation for prominence in the educational field, and for years was 
known as one of Washington township's most popular and efficient 
educators. In his official capacity he is rendering his community signal 
service, and his work has served to extend an already large acquaintance 
and to gain him many sincere friends. Mr. Burkit was born on a farm 
in Washington township, Cass county, Indiana, near Walton, October 
26, 1879, and is a son of William H. and Sarah B. (Robinson) Burkit. 
His grandfather, David P. Burkit, founded the family in Cass county, 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 753 

whence he came from Pennsylvania. He is of Irish-Scotch ancestry. 
William H. Bnrkit was horn in Cass county, and here divided his at- 
tention between agricultural pursuits and teaching school, having passed 
nineteen years in the school room in Cass county. His wife, also a 
native of the county, taught one term here, and four of their six chil- 
dren were teaching in the county schools at the same time. Mr. Burkit 
passed away January 26, 1902, and was buried in Mount Hope cemetery, 
Logansport, while his widow survives, and with her children resides on 
the old home place. 

Harry E. Burkit attended the district schools of Cass county, and 
subsequently spent two years in the Marion Normal College, and four 
terms in the graded and high schools at "Walton. Thus ecjuipped, in 
1900, he began his career as a teacher in the Long school in Washington 
township, and during the three succeeding tenns was at the head of the 
district school which he had attended as a boy. In all, he taught for 
seven winter terms, in the meantime spending his summers in the work 
of the farm, on which he had always resided until coming to Logansport. 
Mr. Burkit entered Democratic politics when he was appointed deputy 
county recorder, and after serving four years in that office was elected, 
in 1911, to the office of county recorder, entering upon the duties thereof 
January 1, 1912. His administration has been marked by efficiency and 
faithful performance of duty, and the citizens of Cass county have had 
no reason to regret of their choice. Mr. Burkit has a high regard for 
the responsibilities of public office, and is doing his utmost to give his 
community clean, able service. He is not a politician in the generally 
accepted use of the term, but has at all times supported Democratic 
policies and candidates, and is known as one of the wheel-horses of the 
party in his section. Mr. Burkit has interested himself to some extent 
in the fraternal work of the Knights of Pythias, in which he has attained 
to the uniformed rank, and in which he has many friends. He is un- 
married. 

George W. Cann. Probably no better example of accomplishment 
in spite of handicaps and misfortunes could be found than the career 
of George W. Cann, of Logansport, contractor in electric supplies. Left 
an orphan at the age of five years, his boyhood was one of hard and 
unceasing struggles, made all the more so by a serious injury, the loss 
of the left arm in a flouring mill, which left him to flght against still 
greater odds. That he has risen to a high place in the business world, 
and has been able to overcome the obstacles placed in his path, speaks 
volumes for his determination, courage and ability, and his business 
record is replete with earnest endeavor and well-won battles. Mr. Cann 
was born July 7, 1870, at Idaville, White county, Indiana, a son of 
George W. and Mary (Hastings) Cann. 

George W. Cann was but a year old when his father died. He was 
about five years of age at the time of his mother's death, and for one 
year lived with an uncle, a miller at Hoovers, in Cass county, in whose 
mill Mr. Cann met with an accident that cost his left arm. Shortly 
thereafter he was placed in the Orphans Home, where he resided until 
thirteen years of age, succeeding which he spent three years in the home 
of Dr. W. H. Thompson, for whom he acted as office boy. In the mean- 



754 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

time he had acquired a good common school education and managed 
to secure a teacher's certificate. While teaching country school in the 
winter months, he attended two summer terms at Ladoga Normal School, 
and continued teaching four years. At that time he came to Logansport 
and took a clerical position in the general offices of the Pennsylvania 
Railroad, where he was so employed for eight years. After failing to 
secure the nomination for the office of city clerk, he secured a position 
as clerk of the city electric light department, and after two years in 
this connection, resigned his position and established himself in business 
at No. 324 Broadway, where he was engaged in contracting and handling 
electrical supplies until April, 1911. At that time he came to his present 
establishment, a modern, well-equipped building at Nos. 312-14 Broad- 
way. 

In 1906, Mr. Cann received his nomination on the Democratic ticket 
for clerk of the courts of Cass county, and as such served four years. 
He is a Cumberland Presbyterian in religion, and is a member of the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Fraternal Order of Eagles, 
the Improved Order of Red Men, the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, the Knights of Pythias, and several fraternal insurance bodies. 

On September 20, 1903, Mr. Cann was married to Miss Euphemia 
Farnsley, of Medaryville, Indiana, and to this union there have been 
born three children, namely : Marguerite Ellen, ]\Iildred C. and Mary 
Josephine. The family is well known in Logansport, where its members 
have numerous appreciative friends. 

William H. Reighter. A life of quiet effectiveness, marked by a 
record of many duties well done and many responsibilities faithfully 
fulfilled, was that of the late William Harrison Reighter, of Cass county. 
He was one of the men who developed and made Cass county what it is. 
He was never in the conspicuous activities of abnormal events of the 
world, but in the round of commonplace accomplishments and in the 
faithful and intelligent performance of every task that was allotted to 
him during his long life, he left a record which may well be envied and 
admired by the generations that follow him. 

William Harrison Reighter was born at Carlisle, Cumberland county, 
Pennsylvania, and his death occurred at his farm in Carroll county, 
April 8, 1893. His parents were George and Salome (McFeely) 
Reighter. His father was a farmer and spent part of his life 
at Carlisle. He owns large tracts of land in Cumberland county. There 
were two other sons in the family, named John ]McF., and George Wash- 
ington Reighter. 

The late Mr. Reighter was one of the pioneer settlers of Cass county. 
He attained a very meagre education by private schooling and by a 
term or two in the common schools, and on ^May 14, 1839, he arrived 
in Cass county. His 'first work in this county was the building of a mill 
in Jefferson township, and he subsequently bought eighty acres of land 
in Noble township. Throughout his career he Avas one of the substantial 
developers of the agricultural resources of this county, and at the time 
of his death was owner of an estate of three hundred and twenty acres 
of land in Cass and Carroll counties. The late Mr. Reighter was in 
politics a Democrat. He was reared in the faith of the Presbyterian 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 755 

church, though during his active lifetime was not a member of any 
church organization. Neither did he have membership in any societies, 
but as a citizen was always public spirited, had a broad-minded view of 
government both national and local and was always ready to lend his 
aid in the promotion of any enterprise which would more effectively 
express the ideals of good government and a better community. He 
was a great student both of men and books. History was an absorbing 
study with him, and few among his contemporaries were better informed 
on the larger questions and topics of the past as well as the present. 
Personally he was of a jovial disposition and he was a delightful 
companion. He bestowed all the riches of a noble character upon his 
own family circle, and they appreciated his many kindnesses and noble 
qualities. 

Mr. Reighter first married Miss Agnes Houk, and the three children 
of that union are all now deceased. On December 7, 1854, he married 
Miss Cassie Graham, who was born near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and 
subsequently moved to Ohio. Her father was Israel Graham, who was 
a native of Delaware, and who came to Cass county at an early day. 
There are two children by the second marriage of I\Ir. Reighter, namely : 
Maggie, who is the wife of Samuel A. Michael ; and Harry T., a farmer 
on the old Reighter homestead in Cass county. Three children have 
been born to Mr. and Mrs. Samuel A. Michael, namely : W. H. Lulah 
M., who is now Mrs. H. D. Smith ; and Ethj^ W., who is now Mrs. Wil- 
liam R. Reel. The house in which ]\Irs. Michael and family now reside 
was built by her father about 1855, and it has been remodeled several 
times, though in its associations it possesses the charms and memories 
of one of the oldest homesteads in this county. Mrs. IMichael and her 
brother Harry have erected a beautiful monument to their father, but 
even in more enduring manner does his name and character exist in the 
minds and affections of all people who came within the radius of his 
acquaintance and friendship during his life. 

John M. Etnire was born in Logansport, Indiana, on February 24, 
1865, and is one of seven children born to Isaac and Cynthia (Baldwin) 
Etnire, of which number six are now living. Isaac Etnire was a son 
of Martin, a native of Pennsylvania, who came to Cass county in pioneer 
times, as did also two brothers, John and Abraham. 

Martin Etnire settled in the heart of the woods in the cabin home 
which he built with his own hands, and there gave himself up to the 
rearing of his family and the cultivation of his wilderness farm. In 
later life, when he was ready to retire from the activities of the farm, 
he moved to Deer Creek township, and there he passed the closing years 
of his life. His son, Isaac, the father of the subject, was reared to hard 
work on the farm and v.as early inured to the hardships of pioneer life. 
He only secured the most meagre educational advantages, the schools 
of the day affording but slight reward for attendance thereupon, and 
he lived all his days in Cass county. He served in the Civil war, or, 
more correctly speaking, he enlisted, but after a stay of some time in 
Indianapolis, he and others who accompanied him, were returned to 
their homes, owing to some technicality which existed. He was a Repub- 
lican, and his religious leanings were toward the Baptist denomination. 



756 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

His wife is a devout member of that church. On INIay 5, 1912, this 
worthy couple celebrated their golden wedding anniversary, and they 
are now living retired in Logansport. 

Cass county has been the home of John M. Etnire since his birth. 
He attended the district schools in his boyhood, and when he was 
twenty-one years old began farming on his own responsibility, that 
being the work in which he was reared in his father's home. He con- 
tinued for two years, but in October, 1887, gave up the life and came 
to Logansport, where he launched a retail furniture enterprise. Success 
attended his etforts from the beginning, which was of a most humble 
order, and thus for twenty-five years he has continued in that field of 
activity. He is the oldest fui-niture dealer, in point of continued service 
in the business, to be found in Logansport, and enjoys an excellent 
reputation for business veracity and integrity. 

Mr. Etnire is a Republican in his political faith, though not an active 
politician, and he is fraternally affiliated with the Knights of Pythias. 
With his wife, he is a member of the Presbyterian church. 

On Jiily 25, 1886, Mr. Etnire was united in marriage with Lottie 
Hogentogler, and two children have been born to them : Ethel M., now 
the wife of Arthur W. Routh, and Cecil L. Etnire. 

Joseph Taylor. Among the men whose upright lives, sterling char- 
acters and high business abilities have added to Logansport 's commercial 
and social prestige, the late Joseph Taylor is worthy of more than 
passing mention. Coming to this city in 1870, he here founded the 
firm of Joseph Taylor & Sons, which still endures and is one of the 
city's leading enterprises. ]\Jr. Taylor was born in Burlington county, 
New Jersey, March 18, 1822, and was a son of John and Hester Taylor. 
When he was yet a boy his parents removed to a farm near Dayton, 
Ohio, and he there grew to manhood, attending the district schools, 
assisting in the work of the home farm, and later attending the public 
schools of Dayton. Prior to attaining his majority, he began clerking 
in a dry goods store at Dayton, but about 1845 moved to Greenville, 
Ohio, and embarked in business upon his own responsibility. He lived 
at Greenville many years and became closely identified with the welfare 
and progress of the community. On March 25, 1850, Mr. Taylor was 
united in marriage with Miss Josephine C. Dawes, a daughter of Elisha 
Dawes, a tanner, and a man well known throughout that section of the 
country, and with him there, for a time, Mr. Taylor was associated in 
business. During the fall of 1859, he moved to a farm near ]Monticello, 
White county, Indiana, but in 1870 came to Logansport, which was his 
home throughout the balance of his life. 

On locating in this city, Mr. Taylor founded the Joseph Taylor & 
Sons wholesale saddlery business, which yet endures, his sons, who con- 
tinue the business, keeping the original name because of both senti- 
mental and business reasons. INIr. Taylor was a plain, unassuming, hard- 
M'orking biisiness man, whose word was at all times as good as his bond 
and whose bond was always good for wiiatever he contracted. Upon 
first coming to Logansport, he established a tannery in partnership 
with his father-in-law, on the north side of the river, on Fifth street. 
Later on, this partnership was dissolved, Mr. Dawes assuming owner- 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 757 

ship of the tannery and Mr. Taylor the store which they operated in 
connection with the other business. Saddlery and hardware was a later 
addition to the regular line. 

Mr. Taylor was essentially a business man, and took little interest 
in the struggles of the political arena outside as to how they affected 
his adopted community. He was at all times ready to lend his hearty 
support and co-operation to movements which his judgment assured him 
would benefit Logansport or its people, and no enterprise of this nature 
was considered completely organized until his name was secured. For 
almost his entire life, Mr. Taylor was a member of the Presbyterian 
church, and his membership meant something more than a mere name, 
for he endeavored at all times to live and act the life of a Christian 
gentleman. In his death, which occurred February 8, 1887, Logansport 
lost one of its citizens to whom the city could point with pride as repre- 
sentative of its best activities, and he was sincerely mourned, not only 
by his immediate family and a wide circle of friends, but by all who had 
his acquaintance and knew how hard his place would be to fill in the 
life of the city. His widow survived him until ]\Iay 2, 1892. They were 
the parents of nine children, and four of their sons, Zachary, Dawes, 
Clark and Joseph, are now conducting the business founded by their 
father. 

John M. Johnston. Under our present system of government no 
office carries with it greater responsibility than that of postmaster. The 
handling of the mails of a large city entails the possession of abilities 
of a high order, a reputation that bears not the slightest stain or 
blemish, and the confidence that is only secured by the conscientious 
performance of every public duty. John M. Johnston has been post- 
master of Logansport since 1906, and during this period has displayed 
strength, force, character and resolution, qualities necessary to the best 
public service. He has worked with his hands and trodden the familiar 
but difficult self-made way to success, and throughout his career has 
identified himself vitally with the city's interests. Mr. Johnston was 
born June 3, 1860, in Mercer county, Pennsylvania, and is the second 
son of Robert F. and Sarah A. (Donaldson) Johnston. 

Robert F. Johnston was born in Stark county, Ohio, August 31, 1834, 
and was a son of John and Elizabeth (McDowell) Johnston, also natives 
of Stark county. The family moved to Wells county, Indiana, when 
that section was still in its formative state, and there Robert F. Johns- 
ton grew to manhood and acquired a good practical education, which 
was subsequently supplemented by years of close observation and wide 
and varied reading. He was a carpenter by trade, but after coming to 
Logansport, in 1863, spent a number of years in the butter and egg 
business, and then became a traveling salesman for wholesale boot and 
shoe houses of Toledo and Chicago, with which he was connected for 
twenty-two years. In this he was more successful than the average 
traveling man, his geniality, unfailing courtesy and good business qual- 
ifications being the principal contributing causes. On January 1, 1857, 
he married Sarah A. Donaldson, a native of Mercer county, Pennsyl- 
vania, and to this vinion there were born four children, namely : Isaac 
S., John M., Eben E. and Robert M. Mr. Johnston was a member of the 



758 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

Presbyterian church, was widely known in Masonry, and was one of the 
most stalwart of Republicans. He was elected trustee of Eel township 
in ]895, and served as such until his death, which occurred September 
26, 1898. 

John M. Johnston was but three years of age when brought to 
Logansport by his parents, and this city he has always since made his 
home. He was educated in the public schools, and for nine years fol- 
lowing clerked in the drug store of Rodney Strain. At that time, in 
partnership with Dr. M. A. Jordan, he entered business on his own 
account, purchasing the business of Mr. Strain, which the partners 
conducted successfully for eight years and, in 1897, Mr. Johnston be- 
came district agent for the Mutual Lfife Insurance Company, a position 
he was holding at the time of his appointment, June 20, 1906, to the 
office of postmaster, by President Roosevelt. On June 10, 1910, he re- 
ceived his reappointment from President Taft, and still continues to 
act efficiently in this office. His administration of the affairs of this 
office has been marked by a distinct advance in the service. Needed re- 
forms have been made, and innovations introduced, and the people of 
Logansport may congratulate themselves upon his appointment. He 
has always been a stalwart supporter of Republican principles and for 
four years served as a member of the Republican county central com- 
mittee. 

j\Ir. Johnston was married September 8, 1897, to Miss Emma Rosen- 
thal, and they have had four daughters, namely : Esther ; Gertrude ; 
Margaret, who died at the age of seven years ; and Frances. Mr. Johns- 
ton is a member of the Masonic fraternity, being past worthy master 
of Tipton Lodge No. 33. He also holds membership in the Logansport 
Commercial Club, and with other earnest and hard-working men has 
given of his best energies in promoting progressive anl public-spirited 
movements. 

Samuel E. Hov^e. In the death of Samuel Edward Howe, which 
occurred November 10, 1911, Logansport lost ^ business citizen whose 
activities had for many years had a direct influence upon its industrial 
importance. A poor young man when he came to this city, his prin- 
cipal capital a generous amount of ambition and energy, he so directed 
his abilities that he became one of the citj^'s leading manufacturers and 
his industry became an integral part of the business life of Logans- 
port. Mr. Howe was born October 8, 1842, in Dixmont, in the state of 
Maine, and was a son of Otis Crosby Howe, who was of English descent. 

After completing his education in the schools of his native state, 
Samuel E. Howe secured a position as traveling salesman for an eastern 
concern, and in this capacity made his advent in Logansport. A man 
of keen perception and farsightedness, he recognized the opportunity 
for establishing himself in business in this city, and accordingly started 
in a modest way to manufacture plow-handles. In the meantime, how- 
ever, he continued to discharge his duties as traveling salesman, and 
did so until his own business had grown to such proportions that it 
needed all of his time and attention. As this business continued to ex- 
tend over a wider and wider territory, Mr. Howe embarked in other 
fields of endeavor, eventually becoming interested in the lumber busi- 





CV,!^^ 



o~-t^-ir^_^ 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY ■ 759 

ness, as a holder of timber lands in the South, having been induced to 
enter this line on account of the growing scarcity of lumber. At the 
time of his death his holdings were vast in a number of southern states, 
and since his demise his sons have handled these interests. During 
the war he served on the side of the Union, a member of the navy and 
a steward therein. 

On November 3, 1870, Mr. Howe was united in marriage with Miss 
Catherine Herrick, at Delta, Ohio, she being a daughter of James S. 
and Martha (Sharpstein) Herrick. Seven children were born to this 
union, as follows : Wilson H., who married Eva Maurson ; May E., who 
married Dr. Terflinger; Abbie C, who married Dr. C. W. Russell; Otis 
C. and Laura A., who are unmarried ; John C, who married Jessie Grant ; 
and Samuel E., who married Minnie Martin. Mrs. Howe, who was the 
youngest of a very large family, lost her parents when she was still a 
child. She survives her husband and resides in her modern residence in 
Logansport, where she is surrounded by a wide circle of sincere friends. 
She is a faithful member of the Presbyterian church, and her late hus- 
band, while not a member, supported all religious movements gener- 
ously and never refused any just request for financial assistance, for, 
having succeeded himself, he was at all times ready to help those who 
had been less fortunate than he. The factory that he first erected in 
company with his partner, J. H. Tucker, and which was the scene of his 
early success, is still standing. As a business man Mr. Howe was very 
thorough in his undertakings, was frank and open, and kind to his em- 
ployes. He was a man of strict integrity, and was broad-minded and 
liberal in his views. He contributed in a philanthropic way to all 
churches. His long and honorable career stands without stain or 
blemish to mar it, and in his death Logansport lost one whose place will 
be hard to fill. 

Frank Amoss is the youngest and the only surviving member of the 
family of his parents, and he was bona in Noble township, Cass county, 
Indiana, on May 22, 1877. He is the son of Jasper W. and Sarah 
Stokes (Cox) Amoss, both now deceased. The father was born in Point 
Pleasant, "West Virginia, in 1840, and received as a boy in his native 
state the advantages of the common school. He married in 1865, and 
they became the parents of three children : Matilda, born in 1866, and 
died in 1869 ; John, born in 1868, died in 1893 ; and Frank, the subject 
of this brief review. 

While he was yet an infant, Frank Amoss moved to Logansport with 
his parents, and there he lived until he was about eight years of age; 
his mother died then, and he went back to the country to make his home 
with Joseph H. Cox, his maternal uncle. He continued to make his home 
Avith his uncle until he had completed his high school studies at Logans- 
port. Soon after this he made a trip to Porto Rico, and was absent in 
that land for about a year, investigating the opportunities which the 
country offered in various business lines. He then returned to Logans- 
port, where he became deputy county treasurer under Owen A. Mc- 
Greevey, in which post he continued until 1907, when he received the 
appointment of assistant postmaster, and is still the incumbent of that 



760 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

position. He is also connected with the undertaking firm of Chas. D. 
Chase & Co. 

]\Ir. Amoss is a Republican. He is a member of the Masonic frater- 
nity, and affiliates with its various bodies as follows: The Blue Lodge, 
Tipton No. 33; A. F. & A. M., Logan; the Chapter, No. 2, R. A. M. ; 
Logansport Council No. 11, R. & S. M. ; and he is the present secretary 
of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks Lodge No. 66. 

Mr. xVmoss v>'as married on January 8, 1908, to Margaret Estelle 
Martin, of Logansport, and both he and his wife are members of the 
First Presbyterian church of Logansport. 

MuRDOCK & Wise. The well-known firm of Murdoek & AVise opened 
their men's furnishing store at No. 404 Broadway on October 20, 1902, 
with William 0. Murdoek and Claude 0. Wise comprising the firm. 
This firm has continued uninterruptedly to the present time in the same 
spot in which it was established ten years ago. The partners, young 
men of old and honored families of Logansport, began their business 
venture with practically no capital, but with a generous fund of in- 
herited and acquired common sense and business wisdom. They have 
in the ensuing years met each and every obligation as it became due 
and have kept their names commercially clean, their integrity being 
unmarred by any business shortcomings. The business has been a suc- 
cess from the start, and much credit is due these young men for the 
progress which has been theirs. 

James H. Wise was born in Canton, Stark county, Ohio, on March 
18, 1846, and is a son of William and Isabel (Gregory) Wise, the former 
a native of Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, and the latter of Stark 
county, Ohio. The father was a farmer and served in the war with 
Mexico. In 1846, the family moved to Allen county, Indiana, and ten 
years later moved to I\Ionmouth, Illinois, where both parents died. 
Their son, James H. Wise, was reared in IMonmouth, Illinois, and there 
received a common school education. He started out for himself in the 
buying and butchering of stock, and for two years he was occupied in 
this manner on the plains of the central west, including the states of 
Kansas, Nebraska, Oklahoma, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, part of the 
time being engaged as a cattle herder, making two trips as night herder 
of freight trains across the plains. In 1868, he returned to ]\Ionmouth, 
Illinois, and resumed butchering. In the following year he came to 
Logansport, temporarily, and on January 21st married Margaret Rugh, 
after which he returned to Monmouth and there continued his residence 
until 1872, when he moved permanently to Logansport, which has since 
been his home. For forty years he has carried on, with but slight devia- 
tions, the trade of a carpenter. He is a Republican and an adherent 
of Theodore Roosevelt. He is a member of Orient Lodge No. 272, A. F. 
& A. M., and Logan Lodge No. 40 of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, in the latter having membership in the Canton, Encampment 
and Rebekah degrees. He is a past brigadier general of the Patriarchs 
Militant. Three children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Wise: Claude 0., 
of the firm of Murdoek & Wise ; Maude, the wife of Norman E. Myers, 
and Ira A. Wise. 

Claude 0. Wise was born in IMonmouth, Illinois, on June 6, 1872, 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 761 

the son of James and ^Margaret (Rugh) Wise, of whom detailed mention 
is made above. He came to Logansport in his infancy in company with 
his parents, and there was reared and educated, the public schools of 
Logansport supplying his education. In 1888, the young man began 
clerking in the store of Dewenter & Company, dealers in haberdashery, 
and for fifteen years he continued to be in their employ, during which 
time he became well versed in methods pertaining to the successful 
manipulation of such an establishment. When he severed his connection 
with this firm it was to form a partnership with William O. Murdock 
for the purpose of engaging in a similar business venture, and the store 
which they then established has continued up to the present time, and 
he en.joyed a pleasing degree of success and popularity in the city where 
both these young men have been known well and favorably all their 
lives. Thus ^Ir. Wise has for twenty-five years been identified with the 
retail men's furnishing liusiness in Logansport, and no business man 
in the city today is better known or has a better standing than he. 

The fraternal relations of J\Ir. Wise are maintained in the Blue 
lodge, chapter and council of the Masonic order, the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks, and socially he is a member of the Country 
Club, of which he was one of the organizers. He is a member of the 
Logansport Commercial Club, and is a Republican in politics. 

On October 14, 1895, ]\Ir. Wise was united in marriage with ]\Iiss 
Charlotte Shroyer, the daughter of Alexander Shroyer, one of the old 
pioneer merchants of Logansport. They have one son, J. Eugene Wise. 
Mrs. Wise is a member of the First Presbyterian church of Logansport. 

George AV. Richardson. A residence of something like forty-five 
years, during which time he has been identified with industries which 
have materially contributed to the importance of his community as an 
industrial and commercial center, entitle George W. Richardson, of 
Logansport, to a position among the representative men of Cass county. 
Although at the present time he has retired from the activities of life, 
and is now living quietly in his comfortable city home, he still takes a 
keen and intelligent interest in all that affects his locality in any way, 
and is known as a citizen who may be depended upon when supporters 
are sought in movements of a progressive nature. I\Ir. Richardson is a 
native of the Old Dominion state, born in Bedford county, Virginia, 
December 25, 1847, a son of Washington and Jane (Payne) Richardson. 

Mr. Richardson was reared in his native county, and there attended 
the district schools, although he secured only a limited education, as it 
was necessary that he devote the greater part of his time in his boyhood 
and youth to helping his father support the growing family. When he 
was twenty years of age, in the spring of 1868, he came to Cass county, 
Indiana, and with the exception of one and one-half years passed in 
Daviess countj^ this state, Cass county has since been his home. On first 
coming to this locality, Mr. Richardson was successful in securing work 
as a farm laborer, an occupation at which he was engaged for some time, 
and during this period he carefully saved his wages, being industrioua 
and thrifty and having ever in mind the idea of one day owning a home 
of his own. Eventually, in August, 1909, Mr. Richardson felt that he 
had earned a rest from his ceaseless labor, and with his wife moved to 



762 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

Logansport, where they have since continued to reside in their com- 
fortable, modern home. In political matters a Republican, he has taken 
an interest in the success of his party, was at one time known as one of 
the dependable men of its ranks in Miami township, and there served 
as supervisor for some time. 

On November 10, 1870, Mr. Richardson was united in marriage with 
Miss Eunice Montgomery, of near New Waverly, Indiana, and they 
became the parents of six children, as follows: Nellie J., who became 
the wife of William jMearns, of Cass county ; William Alvah, a resident 
of Portland, Indiana; Charles E., who makes his home in Logansport; 
Gertrude, who died at the age of seventeen years; Grace, who became 
the wife of Elijah Booth ; and Clyde, who is a resident of Keokuk, Iowa. 
Mr. and Mrs. Richardson are consistent and liberal members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. Richardson has taken some interest 
in fraternal work, and has many friends in the local lodge of the 
Masonic fraternity. 

Charles E. Richardson. Presenting as it does an excellent example 
of youthful industry, integrity and perseverance conducting to well- 
earned success, the career of Charles E. Richardson, a successful Logans- 
port business man, is worthy of emulation by those who are seeking 
business prestige and financial independence. When Mr. Richardson 
established himself in business in Logansport, he had little capital other 
than that which had been supplied him by nature, but this enabled him 
to found the little business which became the nucleus for his present 
prosperous enterprise. He has been the architect of his own fortunes 
and a review of the steps by which he has attained his present position 
may not be inappropriate in a work which shows so many examples of 
self-made manhood. JMr. Richardson was born in Miami township, Cass 
county, Indiana, January 2, 1875, and is a son of George W. and Eunice 
(Montgomery) Richardson. A sketch of George W. Richardson precedes 
this. 

Charles E. Richardson attended the district schools and remained 
at home until he was seventeen years of age, at which time he entered 
the ]\Iarion Normal school, where he spent one year. He then began 
teaching school in ]\Iiami and Clay townships in the winter months, and 
during this time furthered his own studies in the Indiana State Normal 
school at Terre Haute. Mr. Richardson was so engaged at the time of 
the outbreak of the Spanish-American war, and April 26, 1898, he en- 
listed in Company M, One Hundred and Sixtieth Regiment, Indiana 
Volunteer Infantry, with which he went into camp. There he con- 
tracted typhoid fever, and eventually received his honorable discharge, 
on account of disability, then returning to his home. He left the service 
as sergeant, February 24, 1899. For about two years thereafter, Mr. 
Richardson was employed in the capacity of fireman on the Pan Handle 
Railroad, succeeding which he was engaged in various occupations until 
July 1, 1908, when he purchased a half interest in the Logansport Dye 
Works, at No. 218 Sixth street. Four months later he bought the rest 
of the business, and in 1909 he became the owner by purchase of the 
building in which the enterprise is located. Since 1908 he has been en- 
gaged in dyeing and cleaning after the French method, and of more 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 763 

recent date he has added the manufacture of soft, stiff and Panama hats 
to his original business. His operations have proven uniformly prosper- 
ous, and he is justly rated to be one of the successful business men of 
his adopted city. 

On December 17, 1902, Mr. Eichardson was married to Miss Blanche 
E. Campbell, daughter of the Hon. B. F. Campbell, appropriate mention 
of whom will be found on another page of this work. One son, Robert 
C, was born to this union, December 25, 1904. Mr. Richardson is a 
Republican in his political views, and his fraternal affiliation is with the 
Masons, among the members of which he numbers many friends. With 
Mrs. Richardson, he belongs to the Baptist church, in the work of which 
both are active, while he serves in the official capacity of member of the 
board of trustees. 

George "W. Hoffmann. Probably there is no more exacting voca- 
tion than that of the modern pharmacist, for, next to the physician 
(with whom he must co-operate), the druggist is the one upon whom 
we rely in sickness and accident. A man of thorough training and ab- 
solute reliability, he must be also a master of several occupations beside 
his own, and, to make a success of his enterprise, must be capable in 
business, courteous in manner, and ready to serve the long hours that 
the vocation demands. The dean of the drug trade in Logansport, 
George W. Hoffmann received not only a thorough training in his youth, 
but has had the additional advantages of attendance in the school of 
practical experience. He has been a resident of Logansport for almost 
forty years, and is widely known, not only in his chosen field of en- 
deavor, but as a man who has rendered signal services to his city in 
positions of public trust. Mr. Hoffmann was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, 
July 31, 1852, one of the three sons born to the marriage of George Louis 
and Katherine (Kalb) Hoffmann, both natives of Germany, the former 
of Bavaria and the latter of Hesse Darmstadt. In 1848, George Louis 
Hoft'mann left the Fatherland to escape the compulsory military service 
of his native land, and some time during the following year arrived in, 
Cincinnati, Ohio, where he secured employment at his trade of mill- 
wright. Both he and his wife are now deceased. 

George W. Hoft'mann was reared in his native city, acquiring his 
education in the public schools and night school. When he was sixteen 
years of age he embarked upon a career of his own, his first employment 
being at grinding paint. Succeeding this, for three years he was em- 
ployed in a drug store, where he received his introduction to the busi- 
ness, and in February, 1873, came to Logansport, Indiana, here be- 
coming a clerk in the dnag store of G. W. Brown. He was thus engaged 
but a short time when he left IMr. Brown's services to become a clerk 
for the drug firm of Leonard, Dale & Company, which was succeeded 
by E. H. Borgers & Company, a concern with which Mr. Hoffmann 
continued until March, 1877. At that time he purchased a one-third 
interest in the fiirni of Leonard & Company, which then took the firm 
style of Leonard & Hoffmann, and this association continued until 
November, 1877, when Mr. Hoffmann became sole proprietor. In 1887, 
when he sold out, he became a traveling salesman for a druggists' 
sundries company of Detroit, but six months later entered the railway 



764 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

mail service, in which he also spent six months. He had for some time 
been interested in Democratic politics, and at this time was assistant 
county recorder. In 1884, he was elected to the city council of Logans- 
port on the Democratic ticket, but after one and one-half years resigned 
to devote all of his attention to his private affairs. He was then in charge 
of the establishment of Llilton Cunningham, but ill health caused his 
retirement after a few months. He has not been identified with political 
matters, having devoted himself exclusively to his pharmacy. ]\Ir. Hoff- 
mann has spent many years in the study of pharmacy, chemistry and 
the most exacting science of filling prescriptions. He has conducted his 
business under the policy that from self preservation he must attend to 
his customers with quality, care and attention; he knows conditions 
and is familiar with the necessities of his neighborhood, supplying them 
intelligently, faithfully and with not only professional but personal at- 
tention. Among his associates he is known as a man of the utmost 
reliability and strictest integrity, and the manner in which he has ever 
conducted his transactions has been such as to gain him the unqualified 
confidence of his fellow-citizens. In his religious belief INIr. Hoffmann 
is a Universalist. He belongs to the Knights of Pythias, the Woodmen 
of the World and the Knights of the Maccabees. 

On October 26, 1876, Mr. Hoffmann was married to Miss Inez E. 
Luther, of Logansport, and they have had four children, of whom two 
are living : Wilhelmina, who maiTied L. H. Wheeler ; and George L., 
a research bacteriologist in the employ of the firm of Parke, Davis & 
Company, of Detroit. 

John E. Wallace. Although not l)orn in Cass countj^, John E. 
Wallace, the popular and efficient county auditor, has resided within its 
limits since his second year, and has been identified with the official 
life of this section since 1908. In his present capacity he has proved 
a painstaking, conscientious and courteous public servant, and the 
signal services he has rendered his community stamp him as one of Cass 
county's public-spirited citizens. Mr. Wallace was born in Chicago, 
Illinois, August 7, 1877, and is a son of Mark and Mary (Farrell) Wal- 
lace. 

Mark Wallace was born in County Wexford, Ireland, December 5, 
1848, a son of John and Ellen (IMahoney) Wallace, the former a butcher 
by trade. Of the five children composing the Wallace family, Mark is 
the only surviving son and the only one to come to the United States. 
As a lad of fourteen years he started his battle with life as a farm hand, 
and although he was able to secure ample emplojnnent at fair wages, 
saw ahead of him only a future filled with hard labor with little hope of 
accumulating a competency, and, like many other of his countrymen, 
turned his face toward the New World, where, as he had l)een assured 
by friends who had preceded him here, there was ample opportunity 
for him to prove his abilities. Accordingly, he left Castle Garden in 
1869 and made his way directly from New York to Logansport, Indiana, 
where he arrived with less than a dollar in his pocket. He soon secured 
employment as a section hand on a railroad, but six months later left 
that position to become a wiper in the round-house of the Pan Handle 
Railroad, and was soon promoted to the blacksmith shop, where he acted 




tc.^^^ ^fi^^^d'^^.^-v' 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 765 

in the capacity of helper. In 1872, he was placed on an engine as a 
fireman, and his promotion to the position of engineer occurred in 1876, 
when he was given a switch engine in the Chicago yard. He continued 
so employed until 1879, when he went out on the road, remaining in the 
freight service until 1893, when he was promoted to the passenger serv- 
ice, with a run on the north end of the Chicago division. He still con- 
tinues in the service of this road, being one of its oldest and most trusted 
employes. He has been prominent in the Brotherhood of Locomotive 
Engineers, in which he has served as chief engineer and as first assistant 
chief. The family has resided in Logansport continuously since 1879. 
In November, 1874, Mr. Wallace was married, in Chicago, to Miss ]\Iary 
Farrell, and they became the parents of six children, namely : Annie, 
John E., William, Thomas, Mary and Charles. 

John E. Wallace received his early scholastic training in the public 
schools, afterwards entering Hall's Business College, where he com- 
pleted the prescribed course in the special branches he had elected to 
pursue. When sixteen years of age, he started out for himself as book- 
keeper for the firm of McCaffrey & Company, of Logansport, with 
which concern he was connected for three years, then entering the 
master mechanic's office of the Pennsylvania Railroad as time-keeper 
and clerk. In 1905, he left the employ of the railroad to become book- 
keeper for Dr. J. B. Lynas & Son, and was thus employed, in 1908, at 
the time of his appointment to the position of deputy in the office of 
the county auditor of Cass county, George W. Cann. In 1910, he became 
the Democratic party's candidate for the office of auditor, and was sub- 
sequently elected for a term of four years, succeeding Mr. Cann, a posi- 
tion which he has since filled with great ability. Under ]\Ir. Wallace's 
administration, the affairs of the auditor's office have been in excellent 
condition, and he is known as one of the county's most popular and 
obliging officials. His long and varied experience has thoroughly fitted 
him to discharge the duties of his position, and his work has been an 
important factor in advancing the best interests of the county. He is 
interested in fraternal work, belonging to the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks and the Knights of Columbus, and his religious connection 
is with the Catholic church. 

On jMay 20, 1903, Mr. Wallace was united in marriage with Miss 
Nellie ]\I. Gallagher, and thej' have had three children : Helen M., 
Harry M. and John E., Jr. 

John J. Hildebeandt, who died December 14, 1912, occupied a 
prominent place in the moral and commercial history of Logansport, a 
position attained through his own unaided efforts and by sheer force 
of character. Born in Iowa, February 8, 1863, he was one in a family 
of six children, but one now living, bom to August J. and Katherine 
(Gable) Hildebrandt, the former a native of Hesse Darmstadt, Germany. 
When five years old he was brought to Logansport by his parents and 
he was here reared and educated in the parochial and public schools. 
Being of an independent and thoughtful turn of mind, he forsook the 
religion of his parents, joined the Presbyterian church. When eight- 
een yeark of age began learning the plumber's trade at fifty cents per 
day. This he continued for some time, his first employment being on the 
Vol n— 4 



766 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

buildings of the county poor farm. When twenty-seven years old he 
embarked in the business for himself, his shop being on Pearl street. 
He was industrious, was considered an excellent workman, and as time 
(passed prospered. An ardent disciple of Izaak Walton, he often found 
time to visit lake and stream and at odd moments in his shop invented 
fishing tackle according to ideas of his own. These efforts at first be- 
came objects of ridicule for the local wiseacres, but as Mr. Hildebrandt 
invariably returned from his jaunts with a well-filled creel, his success 
aroused interest. Traveling men induced him to make tackle for them 
similar to his, and as they proved successful it was not long until the 
manufacture of fishing tackle of all kinds became an important adjunct 
to his regular business. With the passing of time this enterprise grew 
until it became an important industi-y of Logansport and made the 
founder comparatively wealthy. Such, in brief, is the history of one of 
the large commercial houses of Logansport. Of late years Mr. Hilde- 
brandt had retired from the active cares of life, owing to failing health, 
and devoted much of his time to philanthropic work. He was a man 
who loved home and humanity in general and was ever ready to extend 
a helping hand to those less fortunate than himself. The world is better 
because of his having lived in it. 

On March 22, 1892, Mr. Hildebrandt was married to Miss Katherine 
Markert, and they became the parents of three children: Hiram H., 
Ruth K. and Lois F. He was the first president of the Associated 
Charities of Logansport, of which he was made an honorary president 
for life, was a member of the Humane Society, and the T. P. A. and 
on national matters was a Republican. His business is still carried on 
by his son, Hiram H., at 408 Fourth street, shipping the goods all over 
the world, including Spain, Scotland and England, and is successful. 
Mr. Hildebrandt built the home at 817 High street eight years ago and 
where his widow now resides. Mrs. Hildebrandt is a member of the First 
Presbyterian church of Logansport. 

Wn^iJAM H. Porter. Hand in hand, in public usefulness, is the 
druggist associated with the physician and this mutual dependence is 
universally acknowledged as a condition of public safety. Healing 
remedies are older than doctors and as far back as one may delve in 
ancient lore, he may find mention of medicaments for some of the ills 
that have always afflicted the human race. At times the discovery of a 
new drug of surprising properties, cinchona, for example, has wrought 
wonderful changes and has been even a factor in advancing civilization. 
Out of the hands of the ignorant and superstitious, the lawful adminis- 
tration of drugs has long since passed, and the term druggist or phar- 
macist now means one who, after a protracted period of study and 
experiment, covering a number of the sciences, has passed a thorough 
and satisfactory examination before a learned scientific body. Into his 
hands there is practically placed life and death, for it is the knowledge 
of drugs and their effects that must guide him in handling the most 
careful of physicians' prescriptions. Thus it is no unimportant position 
that a druggist holds in a community, and his standing is usually of the 
highest. Among the leading pharmacists of Cass county may be men- 
tioned AVilliam H. Porter, of Logansport, whose connection with this 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 767 

business here covers a period of upwards of a quarter of a century. 
During this time he has firmly established himself in the confidence and 
esteem of his fellow-citizens, and has interested himself in everything 
that has pertained to the welfare of his community. Mr. Porter was 
born November 12, 1865, in Carroll county, Indiana, just across the 
line from Cass county, and is a son of Oliver H. and Rosanna (Benner) 
Porter, all of whose four children are still living. 

William Porter, the grandfather of William H. Porter, was a native 
of Fairfax county, Virginia, and came to Indiana during the earliest 
history of the state, when it was still in its formation. He settled first 
near Connellsville, in Fayette county, where he farmed after the prim- 
itive manner of those days, but during the latter 'thirties or early 
'forties moved with his family to Cass county and settled in Clinton 
township. There he passed away when still in the prime of life. Oliver 
H. Porter was born in December, 1835, in Fayette county, Indiana, but 
practically passed all of his early life in Cass county. Shortly after 
his marriage, he moved across the line into Carroll county, and there 
resided for some fifteen or twenty years, in 1879 returning to Cass 
county, where he continued farming until his death, September 5, 1898. 
His wife, who passed away November 13, 1888, was a daughter of 
Daniel Benner, who came to Logansport when this city was still a trad- 
ing post and when the Indians were as numerous as were the whites. 

William H. Porter was reared until fourteen years of age in Carroll 
county, and since that time has been a resident of Cass county. He was 
trained to agricultural pursuits, and his early education was secured 
in the district schools, but later he supplemented this with attendance in 
the Logansport public and high schools. He received his introduction 
to the drug business in 1885, at which time he began clerking in the 
drug store of B. F. Keesling, with whom he continued four years, and 
then, in 1889, established himself in business as the proprietor of a 
pharmacy of his o^\^Q. During the twenty-four years that Mr. Porter 
has been engaged in business in Logansport, he has gained the respect 
and esteem of all with whom he has had commercial transactions. His 
establishment is well equipped, and a large stock of first-class goods is 
arranged in an inviting manner. Mr. Porter possesses business abilities 
of the highest character, while his long experience has made him thor- 
oughly conversant with every detail of his vocation. Mr. Porter is a 
thirty-second degree and Knight Templar Mason and a member of the 
Mystic Shrine, and has appreciated to the full the benefits of Masonry. 

On January 4, 1900, occurred the marriage of Mr. Porter to Miss 
Alice Knowlton, daughter of Charles B. Knowlton, one of Cass county's 
early settlers. 

Churchili. p. Forgy. The Forgy family is one of the oldest known 
to American life, and members of it have from the earliest days of the 
British colonies been identified with life in this country, in various 
walks of life. The first of the name to settle on American shores was 
John Forgy, who held an office with the British government in Eng- 
land. He deserted his office, as the only alternative to being pressed into 
service in the army, and came to America, where he settled in New Jer- 
sey. He was engaged in the hotel business in Trenton, when he was 



768 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

apprehended by the British soldiery during the Revolutionary war, and 
was shot by order of the government. So much for the establishment of 
the house of Forgy in the United States. 

Churchill P. Forgy was born in Clark county, Ohio, on January 
27, 1835, and was the son of John D. and Catherine (Voorhees) Forgy. 
John D. was the son of John, who in turn was the son of the first John 
Forgy, who lost his life in the manner mentioned above. John D. Forgy, 
fathei' of the subject, was reared in Virginia, the mother being a native 
of New Jersey, where she was reared. As a boy, the subject passed some 
time in a school at Princeton, N. J., then came to Indianapolis where he 
worked as a printer, and afterwards came to Logansport. It was at 
Logansport that his father had settled in 1836, where he opened up a 
general merchandise store and continued thus in business until 1840, 
afterward going to Dayton, Ohio, and entering the employ of Churchill 
Phillips, as confidential clerk. He was with them for a year or more, 
then moved to New Carlisle, Ohio, where he bought a farm on the out- 
skirts of the town, and remained there until death claimed him in 
1844. 

After some years passed in the printing business in Indianapolis, 
C. P. Forgy finally settled in New Waverly, in Cass county, engaged in 
the general merchandise business, and took charge of the grain eleva- 
tors. He continued to be thus occupied until 1902, when he retired 
from active business pursuits. He has enjoyed a goodly share _ of 
prosperity in all his business ventures, and is well equipped to enjoy 
the remainder of his life free from business cares or worries. 

C. P. Forgy, it may be said, was one of the four children of his 
parents. He had one sister, Maria, who is now deceased; Stern W. went 
to the war as a captain in Gen. John A. Logan's army and died from 
the service in the army. The third son, Dickinson J., also joined the 
Union army in southern Illinois, serving through the war, and he died 
in New Waverly in 1909. 

On December 14, 1859, Mr. Forgy married Louise M. Quick, the 
daughter of C. R. Quick, of New Waverly, and his wife, Lucinda (Sloan) 
Quick. ]\Ir. Forgy is a member of the Presbyterian church, and his 
fraternal affiliations are with the Masonic order, in which he held the 
office of treasurer for a number of years. He is also a member of the 
Odd Fellows, and has held the same important office in that society. 

Mr. Forgy 's life in New Waverly has been one of the most beneficent 
order, and he and his estimable wife have a host of good friends in and 
about the community, where they are well known for their many excel- 
lent qualities, and for the high character of their citizenship. Mr. 
Forgy 's identification with the community has only been for its best 
good, and the place he has won and yet retains in public opinion is one 
that might well be envied. 

LouRY L. Quick, M. D. The state of Ohio was the home of the 
Quick family from the time of its locating in this country from England 
some generations past until it migrated to Indiana, in the spring of 
1856, settling in Cass county. Since that time this county has been well 
known to the family, and the people of this district have long been 
ministered to by medical men of two generations of the family. A 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 769 

soldier in his young manhood, then a doctor, and all his life a busy 
and active man, Dr. Quick has gained a wide acquaintance in Cass 
county, and his name is one that carries with it the esteem and high 
regard of all who know the kindly and genial Doctor in his professional 
capacity or in any of the relations of life. 

Dr. Loury L. Quick was born on the 20th day of December, 1846, in 
Clark county, Ohio, and is the son of C. R. and Lucinda (Sloan) Quick. 
The paternal grandfather of the Doctor was William Quick, and his 
maternal grandfather was Robert Sloan, of Dutch descent. In 1856 
the Quick family came from Troy county, Ohio, making the journey dur- 
ing the spring which witnessed the first entry of the Wabash Railroad 
into Cass county. They settled at first just a mile south of New Wav- 
erly, and remained there for one summer the father being occupied as 
superintendent of the store of a Mr. Forgy of that place. He was a 
physician and also a Methodist Episcopal preacher and engaged in prac- 
tice in the vicinity of his home, where he continued until his death, and 
it is worthy of note in this connection that his son, the immediate 
subject of this review, resumed his practice where the elder gentleman 
laid it down. 

Dr. C. R. Quick and his good wife were the parents of five children, — 
two sons and three daughters. Celia married J. Dalzelle ; Louise mar- 
ried C. P. Forgy; Raper H. married Nora Lumas; and Colonel Ells- 
worth, who was named thus because he was born on the day that Colonel 
Ellsworth was shot, married Emma Grimes. Dr. L. L. Quick was the 
third born in that family of five. 

When he was but a mere youth, L. L. Quick enlisted for service in 
the Civil war and served twenty-two months in the Sixteenth Indiana 
Battery. When he finished his militaiy service he turned his attention 
to the study of medicine, determined to follow his father in the prac- 
tice of that honored profession. He received the first part of his medical 
training at what is now known as the Chicago ]\Iedical College, at 
Evanston, Illinois, and later spent some time at the Indiana Medical 
College. He then returned to New Waverly, and here he has since been 
engaged in the practice of medicine, and has proved himself the worthy 
successor of a worthy and honored father. 

Dr. Quick has done a considerable traveling in his lifetime and is 
the possessor of one of the most complete collections to be found in this 
section of the state, both he and his wife having an unusual interest in 
things of the nature of historical relics. 

In July, 1868, Dr. Quick was united in marriage with Miss Mary 
C. Fox, the daughter of Josiah Fox, the family being one of Maryland 
birth and ancestry. One child has been born to Dr. and Mrs. Quick, — 
Otto L., who is now forty-three years of age, and who married Carrie 
Black. The son Otto is a train despatcher, and has held his present 
position for twenty-five years, being in the employ of the Santa Fe 
Railroad. 

Dr. and Mrs. Quick are members of the Methodist church, and he 
has relations with a number of fraternal and other societies among 
which are the Masons. He is a member of Lodge No. 484, A. F. & A. M. 
and of the Scottish Rite body, and for thirty-four years held the office 
of secretary of his lodge. He has also been United States Pension ex- 



770 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

amining surgeon since 1882. The Doctor has always been a man who 
had a high regard for his duties as a citizen and New Waverly has 
profited much by her possession of him as a member of society, while 
his family has added its full quota to the social uplift of the community. 

Frank P. Yeider. Although the gentleman whose name heads this 
review has lived on his present property for only a comparatively short 
period, he has made his name well known among the citizens of his locality 
through the exercise of enterprise, industry and straightforward deal- 
ings, characteristics which have always been associated with the family 
name. Mr. Yeider is a native of Pennsylvania, born in Lancaster county, 
in the Keystone State, September 17, 1851, a son of Emanuel and Nancy 
(Kirby) Yeider. His maternal grandfather, Nicholas Kirby, fought 
bravely in the War of 1812, and was one of the party of noble patriots 
who defended the breastworks when the British forces stormed a point 
on the Potomac river. Emanuel Yeider was born in Lancaster county, 
Pennsylvania, and was an infant of six months when his father met his 
death. He grew up in his native state, and in 1869 migrated to Indiana, 
settling firet in Miami township, and later removing to a farm in Clay 
township, where his death occurred, January 2, 1892, after a long and 
honorable career. The mother died April 26, 1884. 

Frank P. Yeider received his education in the schools of his native 
state, and was eighteen years of age when he accompanied his parents 
to Indiana. He continued to remain under the parental roof until his 
marriage, in 1876, to Miss Sabina Adams, who died November 14, 1880, 
leaving one son, Charles LeRoy, who was born in 1877. Mr. Yeider 's 
second marriage occurred September 11, 1884, when he was united with 
Miss Mary J. Barr, and during that fall they settled on a farm near 
that occupied by his father. During the next February they removed 
to a farm in Adams township, and there continued to reside until 1890, 
when they went to South Bend, Indiana, Mr. Yeider having accepted 
a proposition offered by the Singer Sewing Machine Company. Sub- 
sequently they located in Logansport, where they continued to reside 
until the death of ]\Ir. Yeider 's mother-in-law, at which time they settled 
in Clay township, but in 1896 he disposed of his interests here and moved 
to the state of North Dakota, that being the place of their residence for 
fourteen years. The Hoosier State finally claimed them as its own, 
however, and in 1910 they returned to Clay township, where they have 
since made their home. The present Yeider homestead, a tract of eighty 
acres, is one of the most valuable of its size in the township. Intelligent 
treatment of the soil, hard and industrious lalior and an inherent ability 
which has come to Mr. Yeider through generations of farming ancestors, 
have brought this land to a high state of cultivation, while he has also 
shown his progressive spirit by adopting modern methods and appliances. 
He has devoted the greater part of his time to agricultural pursuits, 
and is not a politician in the accepted meaning of the term, but his 
public spirit has led him to recognize the duties of citizenship, and he 
has served very acceptably in the office of supervisor of Clay township. 
With his family he attends the Methodist church. 

Charles LeRoy Yeider, son of Frank P. Yeider, married ]\Iiss Ethel 
Quick, and they have had three cliildren : LeRoy James Franklin 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 771 

Yeider, born March 19, 1907 ; Mary Sabina Ethel Yeider, born June 18, 
1906 ; Lois Mae Yeider, born July 8, 1909. 

Mrs. Solomon Jones. No history of Cass county would be complete 
that did not give an account of its women, for wliile our hearts are 
stirred by the thrilling narratives of the enterprise and deeds of the 
pioneers in trade, in manufactures, in the professions and in politics, 
ever must be borne in mind the names and the abundant works of their 
companions in courage and in toil. Tlie roll of these noble women of 
the earlier days does not contain the names of those of a later period 
who clamor for equal suffrage, and for equal opportunity in business 
and the professions, however just may be the claims and aspirations of 
the latter. The former came to found homes, to rear children who should 
be fit to carry on the work which their fathers founded. They were 
and are domestic women, not unmindful of the duties of hospitality, nor 
careless of the claims of social life, and it has ever been their province 
to bring the sweet and tender influence of their affections to soften the 
lot of the unfortunate and lowly. 

Residing on her farm in Cass township, a tract which was settled and 
cleared by her late husband, is one of the best-known ladies of her com- 
munity, Mrs. Solomon Jones, who has lived in this county all of her 
life. She is a daughter of John E. and Mercy (Rice) Howes, who came 
from New York state to Indiana during the early 'thirties, locating 
in Logansport, where they were married on the present site of the City 
High school. Mr. Howes became county treasurer of Cass county during 
the 'forties, and later was a member of the firm of Merriam, Rice & 
Howes. The subject of this review grew up in Logansport, receiving her 
education in the public schools, and was here married to Solomon Jones, 
whose death occurred in 1905. Mr. Jones was originally a farmer, 
clearing the present farm of Mrs. Jones in Clay township, erecting all 
the fencing, and putting up all the buildings with the exception of the 
milk house. He subsequently became collector of revenues, in the em- 
ploy of the government, and on completing his term of office, entered 
the money loaning bi;siness. He was a citizen of integrity and industry, 
a hard and faithful worker all of his life, and well merited the respect 
and esteem in which he was universally held. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jones had one child, John, who died in infancy. Later 
they adopted a daughter, who bore their name until her marriage to 
Dallas C. Burke. They have had two children : Helen E., who is two 
years old; and Desa Elizabeth, who has passed her first year. Mr. 
Burke is employed as an operator by the Wabash Railroad, in which 
capacity he has worked for the past seven years, and also conducts a 
dairy business from the present farm of Mrs. Jones, delivering milk to 
the various families of Logansport. Mr. and Mrs. Burke and Mrs. Jones 
all live in their comfortable residence, which is situated on Logansport 
Rural Route No. 4, and where their numerous friends are always greeted 
with old-fashioned hospitality. 

James "Whitworth. The agricultural interests of Cass county are 
well represented by a class of hard-working, efficiently trained and thor- 
oughly experienced men, who have made the treatment of the soil a life 



772 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

study and have thus been able to successfully cope with conditions and to 
maintain the high standard of agricultural supremacy here. Prominent 
in this class stands James Whitworth, who for two years has resided 
on a well-cultivated tract of thirty acres, located in Clay township. 
Mr. Whitworth was born in Alabama, January 5, 1865, and is a son of 
William and Mildred (Bowes) Whitworth, farming people of this 
county, the father being deceased. 

Mr. Whitworth received his educational training in the district schools 
of his native locality, and like the majority of farmers' lads of his day 
divided his boyhood between the work of the homestead and attendance 
at school in the winter terms. There are a multitude of matters upon 
which a good farmer should be informed, and in these he was thoroughly 
trained by his father, while his mother reared him to habits of honesty, 
sobriety and integrity. He continued to remain under the parental roof 
until his marriage, at which time he embarked upon a career of his own, 
and, being industrious and thrifty, carefully conserved his means and 
was soon able to invest in land. Since that time he has devoted his 
whole time and attention to the cultivation of the soil, and as a result of 
his activities has risen to a place of independence among the agricultur- 
ists of his section. In 1906, Mr. AVhitworth purchased his present tract, 
a farm of thirty acres located in Clay township. He has made numerous 
improvements, having a comfortable residence, located on Logansport 
Eural Free Delivery Route No. 5, and appropriate buildings of modern 
architecture and substantial character. His property is well fenced, 
his live stock in a healthy condition, his implements and appliances of 
modern manufacture, and the entire appearance of the property bespeaks 
the presence of thrift and good management. Essentially a farmer, 
he has not cared for the struggles incident to the political arena, al- 
though he takes an interest in mattere that affect his community, and has 
always endeavored to give his support to good men and measures. 

In 1885, Mr. Whitworth was united in marriage with Miss Maggie 
Hoover, the estimable daughter of Leason and Rachael Hoover, the 
former a native of Pennsylvania, while the latter was born in Ohio 
Both of 'Mvs. Whitworth 's parents were married twice. They were long 
residents of Indiana, and were the parents of the following children: 
Amanda, James and Elmer, who died in infancy; Benjamin, who mar- 
ried jMinnie Rhodes ; Egbert, who married INIabel Montgomery ; and 
Maggie, who married Mr. Whitworth. Two children have been born 
to Mr. and Mrs. Whitworth : Golda, born in 1886, who became the wife 
of Frank Griffin, of Logansport; and Ruth, born in 1891, who married 
Glen Rader, is also a resident of Logansport, and has two children, — 
Harry, who is two years of age, and Frank, who is six months old. The 
members of this family are connected with the Baptist church, and are 
liberal supporters of religious and charitable movements. 

Elihu S. Rice, whose death occurred April 26, 1912, was one of the 
"Old Guard" of Cass county pioneers. His loss was not only keenly 
felt among the members of his immediate family, but by his associates 
in business, his many friends, and thousands of people all over the coun- 
try who knew him only as the author of some of the most beautiful 
sacred music written. Born at Pavilion, Genesee county, New York, 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 773 

February 2, 1827, Mr. Rice was a son of Erastus and Lueretia M. (Howe) 
Rice. The father, who was a native of ^Massachusetts, died in 1833, and 
six years later Elihu S., then a lad of twelve years, accompanied his 
widowed mother and brothers and sisters to Logansport, which city 
was destined to be his home during the remainder of his life. In 1843 
he became a clerk for Henry Martin & Company, but in the following 
year the firm discontinued business, and in 1845 j\Ir. Rice became con- 
nected with the firm of Pollard & Wilson. In 1853 Col. Philip Pollard, 
the senior member of the firm, retired therefrom, which was then reor- 
ganized as Wilson, Merriam & Company, Mr. Rice being admitted to 
partnership. Through various changes of this firm into Merriam, Rice 
& Howes, Merriam & Rice and Merriam, Rice & Company, Mr. Rice 
remained a partner of John C. jMerriam, being associated with him until 
Mr. Merriam 's death. Afterwards the firm of E. S. Rice & Son was 
formed, with his son, Frank M. Rice, as junior partner and this con- 
tinued until 1906, when, in order to be relieved of his many business 
burdens and responsibilities, Mr. Rice sold the business, although it is 
still one of the leading establishments of Logansport, and is known as 
the Rice Hardware Company. 

In 1905 Mr. Rice was elected president of the First National Bank 
of Logansport, a position he continuously filled up to the time of his 
death. For many years he was manager and principal owner of the 
Logansport Gas Light & Coke Company, taking charge of its affairs when 
it was practically a failure and demonstrating a superior business abil- 
ity by making it a financial success. His long and eventful business 
career was characterized by fidelity and trustworthiness; he was a man 
of charitable impulses and his many good deeds will make a long list 
in the general accounting of man's work during his earthly pilgrimage. 
A good name more to be desired than riches was his. He lived up- 
rightly, and at the ripe old age of four score and five died at peace with 
all the world. He was a life long member of the Baptist church at 
Logansport, which he enriched by substantial benefactions. AVhile lay- 
ing no claim to being a poet, he was, nevertheless, a poet in the truest 
sense. The world of song was enricned Avhen he contributed to it 
"Shall We Meet Beyond the River?" and "Come! Let Us Sing Unto 
the Lord. " As a singer, his voice was frequently heard in the house of 
worship, and was also in great demand during presidential campaigns. 
During the campaign of 1856 he was a member of the famous Rocky 
Mountain Quartette. 

In 1854 Mr. Rice was united in marriage with Miss Jeannette Mabon, 
and she passed away in 1895, having been the mother of two children: 
Frank J\I., and Annie A., the latter the wife of George C. Taber, of 
Logansport. In an editorial, under date of April 26, 1912, the Logans- 
port Pharos said: 

"The death of Elihu S. Rice removes from this community a man 
who was worthy of the title of exalted citizen. His was a blameless and 
a useful life. In every sphere of human activity, he acted a noble part. 
As a citizen he responded to every demand made upon him for the bet- 
terment of social conditions. As the head of a family he set an example 
worthy to be followed. As a business man his career was characterized 
by honorable dealing. As a philanthropist, his good deeds were many 



774 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

and his favors were bestowed without ostentation. He came to Logans- 
port seventy-three years ago when yet a boy and had moved among us 
all these years. In his intercourse with the people he was kindly, shar- 
ing their joys and with their sorrows bearing a part. He walked up- 
rightly, lived cleanly and dies respected by those who appreciate true 
worth in man. ' ' 

Frank M. Kice was born in Logansport, Indiana, February 29, 1856. 
Educated in the public schools and Wabash College, on completing his 
schooling he became a clerk in his father's employ, and continued with 
him until the business was sold in 1905. In 1902 Mr. Rice organized 
the Logansport Basket Works, of which he became the first president 
and treasurer, and continued as such until he sold his interest in the 
business, in January, 1912. He has large business and realty inter- 
ests, and is a director of the First National Bank of Logansport. He 
holds membei-ship in the Country Club, the Commercial Club and the 
County Historical Society, and has manifested his interest in fraternal 
affairs by his activities in the ]\Iasonic and Elks lodges. His political 
proclivities are those of the Republican party, but he takes only a good 
citizen's part in public affairs. 

On November 19, 1884, ]\Ir. Rice was married to J\Iiss Lottie F. Lar- 
son, of Omaha, Nebraska, and they have had one child: Ollie M., who 
married Wendell C. Schmidt. 

John M. Carson. Agricultural production is the basis of practically 
all production and the ordinary laborer, the factory, the state and the 
nation are absolutely dependent thereupon, the result being that agri- 
culture is of elemental importance in the life of a person, a community 
and a nation. Such being the case, the development of the agricultural 
regions must keep pace with the advancement of the times, and the 
farmer who would gain his full measure of success must needs take ad- 
vantage of every aid that modem invention and discovery can give. One 
of the prosperous agriculturists of Cass county who has realized and 
benefitted by the results to be obtained from scientific treatment of the 
soil, is John M. Carson, of Clay township, who for ten years has been 
carrying on operations on his present place. He was born in Jennings 
county, Indiana, December 5, 1855, and is a son of John H. and Julia 
(IMcCammotf) Carson, and grandson of William Carson and Isaac 
McCammott, the family being of Irish-Scotch extraction. 

John H. Carson was born in Rutherford county, Pennsylvania, in 
1818, and was one year old when brought to Indiana by his parents. 
Here he continued to follow agricultural pursuits throughout his life, 
and died in ]\Iarch, 1877, one of his community's highly esteemed citi- 
zens. During that same year, John M. Carson, who had been reared 
and educated in Jennings county, came to Cass county, Indiana, and 
first located in Noble township, where he spent three years, subsequently 
remaining in Adams for two years, in Eel township for six years, and in 
Bethlehem township thirteen years, and then came to Clay township 
and settled on the farm on which he now resides. Here Llr. Carson 
bought eighty-two acres of land, on which he erected a new modem 
residence which is one of the most attractive in this part of the county, 
and also made numerous other improvements which have added to the 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 775 

value of the farm. He is an able agriculturist, aud has brought to his 
work that thorough knowledge of the details of his vocation which only 
conies from years of experience. His operations have been uniformly 
successful, and he is recognized as one of the leading agriculturists of 
Clay township. He has never cared for public office, preferring to de- 
vote his entire attention to his farming activities, but takes an interest 
in all matters that affect his community, and may be relied upon to sup- 
port movements for good government. 

Mr. Carson was married to Miss Mary Criss, daughter of Lawrence 
W. and Barbara (StoU) Criss, natives of Germany, who were married in 
Logansport, Indiana, and the foriner of whom died in March, 1877. 
Mr. and Mrs. Carson have had four children, namely: Chester Cecil, 
bom January 15, 1886, who is now superintendent of schools at Cowan, 
Indiana; Dottie, born August 30, 1894; Evaline, born January 29, 
1896; and John W., born May 16, 1899. The family is identified with 
the Bethlehem church. Mr. Carson has interested himself to some ex- 
tent in fraternal work, belonging to Twelve ]\Iill lodge. No. 713, Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, in which he has passed through the chairs, 
and to the grand lodge of the state. He has numerous friends in this 
order, and is widely and favorably known in other circles of activity 
in Clay township. 

David W. Cook. The agriculturists of Cass county are as a class 
prosperous and contented, living independently upon the fertile fields, 
which their energy has fully developed to the present high state of cul- 
tivation. Agriculture is well adapted to build up the American citizen- 
ship. It not only awakens interest and gives purpose, but teaches indus- 
try and self reliance. There is no other occupation that opens so wide a 
field for the profitable and agreeable combination of labor with culti- 
vated thought. Of the many well-to-do citizens of Cass county who are 
devoting their energies to the cultivation of the soil, David W. Cook of 
Clay township, is an excellent representative. He is a native of the 
county of Cass, Indiana, having been born in Bethlehem township, 
April 7, 1867, and a son of Charles and Margaret (Ball) Cook. (For the 
full chronological data of the parents of Mr. Cook see the sketch of 
Charles Cook elsewhere in this work.) 

David W. Cook was reared as a farmer's lad and received a good 
practical education in the public schools of his native county. He 
remained with his parents till his marriage, and his first residence 
was on the McKnight Williamson farm, in Bethlehem township, thence 
to the Warren Gazette farm in 1896, and in 1902, he located on his 
present estate of sixty acres, on which his residence is located, and he has 
seventy-five acres adjoining the other tract. His land is well cultivated 
and he has made substantial improvements of a modern character. Mr. 
Cook is a progressive man in his business methods, and in his political 
belief gives his allegiance to the Progressive party. He is known by his 
neighbors as being a gentleman of honor and integrity, and he and his 
family are members of the IMethodist church. 

It was January 21, 1891, that Mr. Cook wedded Miss Bertha Delo- 
plane, a daughter of William and Sarah (Zinn) Deloplane, and to this 
union five children, three sons and two daughters, have been born, and 



776 HISTOKY OF CASS COUNTY 

all are living except the son, William D., who died at the age of three 
years. Everett received his diploma from the public schools of Clay 
township in the class of 1910, and then was a student in the Logansport 
Business College. Frank received his diploma in the class of 1911, 
and he also attended the business college. Both Marguerite and Sarah 
are in the sixth grade. Mrs. Cook is a native of Butler county, Ohio, 
and was born January 30, 1872. Her parents were prominent citizens 
of Cass county, but both are now deceased. ^Irs. Cook, like a true wife 
and mother, has ably filled her sphere in the rearing of her children and 
the care of her home. 

Mr. and ]Mrs. Cook and family are citizens of Cass county, who are 
esteemed for their high moral, 1-eligious and social standing and it is 
with pleasure that this brief review is presented for preservation in the 
History of Cass County, Indiana. 

Cassius jM. Clay Swigart. In 1842, when adventurous settlers from 
the east, many from Ohio, were beginning to seek homes in Cass county, 
Samuel Swigart and wife drove their two-horse wagon, with the family 
provisions and possessions, all the way from the old Ohio home to what 
was then practically a wilderness in this section of Indiana. They were 
sturdy people, a commingling of German and Scotch-Irish blood pro- 
ducing a type that can hardly be excelled, and all their courage and re- 
sourcefulness, their strength of body and spirit, were demanded by 
the hard pioneer experiences that they were called upon to bear in those 
early days. The Swigart name has ever since been one that has been 
known and highly respected in Cass county, and a worthy representative 
of it may be found in C. ]M. C. Swigart, who is one of Clay township's 
well-informed men and enterprising agriculturists. j\Ir. Swigart is a 
son of Samuel and Jane (IMcPherson) Swigart, whose other children 
were: Frank, who married Marguerite Kline; Jessie M., who married 
Alice LaRose ; Theodore P., who married JMiss Phoebe McCoy ; Adam N., 
who married Tillie ]\Iason ; and Sarah, who became the wife of Samuel 
Carr. Seventy years ago, when Samuel Swigart first came to Cass 
county, Adamsboro was a larger town than Logansport, and in that 
vicinity he built his first little log cabin home. He continued to be en- 
gaged in agricultural pursuits during the remainder of his life, developed 
an excellent property on section 14, Clay township, and at the time of 
his death, in the early eighties, was one of his township's most highly 
esteemed citizens. He died in the faith of high morality and standard 
integrity. His wife, who passed away in 1892, was a member of the 
Presbyterian church. 

Cassius ]\I. Clay Swigart was educated in the primitive schools of 
Cass county, in the Westville Academy, under Professor Laird, and two 
years in city schools. He was also a teacher for three years in Cass 
county, and like the majority of farmers' lads of his day and locality, 
spent the summer months in the hard work of the homestead. He was 
born February 14, 1849, and was man-ied December 27, 1872, to Miss 
Rosalie E. Thomas, daughter of John and Elizabeth (Wilson) Thomas, 
and she had two sisters and one brother, namely: Sarah M., who mar- 
ried Delbert Walker, and died in 1894 ; Eugene W., who married Minnie 
Conrad; and Alice A., who never married. 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 777 

When Mr. and ]Mrs. Swigart married they moved to Portland, Oregon, 
and there he engaged in horticulture, and remained there three years. In 
1876 they returned to Clay township, Cass county, and here Mr. Swigart 
was engaged in the lumber business and agriculture for twenty years. 
Then they moved to Mount Vernon, Illinois, and he was a farmer there 
for three years, and his farm comprised one hundred and fifty-four 
acres, thence to Clay township where they now reside on a splendid 
farm of one hundred and twenty acres equipped with good buildings, 
and whilst in Cass county he has pursued horticulture and agriculture, 
and has been reasonably successful. 

Mrs. Swigart is a native of Miami county, Indiana, and was born 
September 30, 1852. Her father, John Wesley Thomas, was a native of 
Pennsylvania, born December 20, 1826, and died in 1908. He was a 
manufacturer and agriculturist and politically formerly a Republican, 
then a Prohibitionist. He and his wife were members of the Methodist 
church and both are interred in the Bethel cemetery. Mrs. Thomas was 
born in Indiana, March 5, 1831, and died February 11, 1897. Mrs. 
Swigart was reared and educated in her native county. 

To the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Swigart were born six children, 
three sons and three daughters, all living : Mabel Clare, wife of Edward 
A. Flory, a horticulturist of Miami township, was born in Portland, 
Oregon, and they have three sons. Ernest N., a resident of Clay town- 
ship, and a farmer, married Miss Lucy Angle, a native of Virginia, and 
they have two sons ; he is a Progressive politically and the family belong 
to the Baptist church. Bemice M., wife of William E. Packard, a resi- 
dent of Miami township and an agriculturist, also assessor of the town- 
ship, has seven children, three sons and four daughters, and Ruth 
Clare, the little granddaughter, lives with her grandparents. Everett P., 
a resident of Clay township and an agriculturist, was engaged in rail- 
roading a number of years. He wedded Miss Minnie Jones, and they 
have one little daughter. Leona Ruth is the wife of Aaron E. Packard, 
a resident of Clay township and an agriculturist. James G. Blaine, a 
resident of Nightingale, Alberta, Canada, wedded Miss Hattie Kline. 
He was engaged in railroad work for years, and is the youngest of the 
family. 

The homestead of Mr. and Mrs. Swigart is known as "The Eel River 
Valley Fruit and Stock Farm" and Mr. Swigart was the first man who 
successfully introduced alfalfa in Cass county, Indiana. He has devoted 
his time to general farming and stock raising, and his operations have 
been uniformly successful because he has brought to his work that intel- 
ligent and conscientious devotion that never fails to be rewarded with 
satisfactory results. His buildings are of modern design and substan- 
tial character, his land is well fenced, tiled and drained, his cattle sleek 
and well fed, and the entire appearance of his property shows the 
presence of able management. Modern machinery and appliances have 
played no small part in assisting Mr. Swigart in his march to a position 
of affluence, for he has ever been possessed of progressive ideas, and in 
this connection it may be stated that he cast his fortunes in 1912 with 
the new Progressive political party. With his family he attends the 
Christian church. 



778 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

Eugene A. Walker. For the full period of a half century, Mr. 
Walker has known old Cass county, having been a resident within the 
boundaries of this political division of the state since 1853. He is a 
man of honored and respected achievements, and owns one of the hand- 
some rural homes in Clay township. 

Eugene A. Walker is a native of Genesee county. New York, and was 
born October 24, 1845. He was the oldest of four children, three sons 
and one daughter, in the family of Lyman G. and Charlotte S. (Moon) 
Walker. Only ]\Ir. Walker and his brother Charles survive, the latter 
being a resident of Chicago, being married and having a family of one 
son, and is a Republican in politics. 

Lyman 6. Walker, the father, was also a native of Genesee county, 
New York, where he was born March 20, 1822, and he died December 27, 
1872. By trade he was a tanner and currier. In 1850 he went to Cali- 
fornia, by way of the Isthmus of Panama as a seeker for gold and spent 
two years on the gold coast, being reasonably successful, and then 
returning to his old home in New York. Before making this adventure 
he had married and had two children. Lyman G. Walker traced his 
lineage back to Old England, and the family history in America goes 
to a widow Walker who came to the colonies on board the historic May- 
flower, settling in the New England states, and becoming the founder 
of this branch of the Walkers. Grandfather Obediah Walker was a 
soldier of the Revolutionary war and died January 30, 1832. On his 
monument are inscribed these words, — "A Veteran of 1776." 

It was in the fall of 1853 that Lyman G. Walker, with his wife and 
family came to Cass county. The journey was made by rail as far as 
Cleveland, whence they took a boat to Toledo and from there to Logans- 
port came by the old Wabash canal. After remaining until the follow- 
ing spring in Logansport, the father brought his family to the farm 
where his grandson Adelbert resided in Miami township on the banks 
of the Eel river. ]\Ir. Walker bought other land and added to his 
estate until the time of his death he had a hundred and forty acres. 
He made practically all the improvements, since when he moved to the 
farm it was situated in the wilderness. He was an early enough settler 
also to have seen many deer in this locality. Lyman G. Walker was 
originally a Whig in politics, and on the birth of the Republican party 
in 1856 he cast his first vote for Fremont. He was a friend of the public 
schools and both he and his wife were members of the Baptist church, 
and their remains now rest in the Miami Baptist cemetery in this county. 
The father was also a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 
The mother was born in Genesee county, ]\Iarch 29, 1825, and her death 
occurred April 27, 1872. She was reared in her native county, and as 
a mother she was devoted to the interests of her family, and set her 
children an example of Christian fortitude and the best virtues. 

Eugene A. Walker was a boy of eight years when the family accom- 
plished the migration to Cass county. He was reared on a farm and to 
agricultural pursuits, and received his education in the public schools 
of Cass county. The first school he attended in this county was in a 
log building, and the children sat upon split-puncheon slabs, supported 
by wooden pins driven into holes on the under side. Some of the text 
books which he recalls as having used when a boy were the McGufi^ay 



HISTOKY OF CASS COUNTY 779 

readers and spellers. Mr. "Walker was nineteen years old when he 
started out for himself, and his first enterprise was on a farm. 

He has been twice married. In 1869 he married Miss Minerva C. 
Thomas, and two children were born to this marriage, both of whom are 
now living. Nettie, a graduate of the Cass county public schools, and a 
member of the Methodist church, and is the wife of Harry Kistler of 
Indianapolis, where he is connected with the Armour Packing Company 
and is very prominent in the Masonic order, having been honored with 
the thirty-second degree of Scottish Rites. Adelbert M., who is one of 
the young and progressive farmers of Cass county, and his career is 
sketched elsewhere in this volume. The mother of these children was 
born in Miami county, and was a member of the Methodist church. 
Her death occurred in 1893. On November 11, 1895, Mr. Walker mar- 
ried Miss Harriet Callahan, who was born in Miami county and reared 
and educated in Cass county. Her father is now deceased and her 
mother is a resident of Carroll county, Indiana. 

The first land which Mr. Walker bought was eighty-four acres in 
Miami township. He went in debt to the extent of thirty-two hundred 
dollars when he obtained this place in 1868, and by hard industry and 
thrift finally paid off in full. All the improvements on the land were 
put there by his own work or direction, and when he took possession 
a log house with a board roof was about the only improvement that 
could properly be named as such. In 1910 IMr. and Mrs. Walker moved 
to Clay township, where they now reside on a beautiful little country 
place of thirty-eight acres and have erected for their residence a hand- 
some bungalow which is excellently finished and furnished, and is mod- 
ern in every detail. Outside of the house are a number of convenient, 
outbuildings for the stock, grain and machinery, and the home is situ- 
ated about sixty rods from the Vandalia depot. 

Mr. Walker is a Civil war veteran, and one of the youngest in Cass 
county. He enlisted in February, 1865, when about nineteen years of age 
in Company F of the One Himdred and Fifty-first Indiana Infantry, 
under Captain Davidson, and his regiment was put in the Army of the 
Tennessee. He served until receiving his honorable discharge in Sep- 
tember, 1865. In politics he is independent, and easts his franchise 
in the direction in which he thinks it will accomplish the most good. 
Mr. and Mrs. Walker support all elevating movements and policies for 
the moral and intellectual welfare of their county and township. 

John C. Barb. The annals of Cass county show many records of the 
lives of farmers who have rounded out the duties connected with agri- 
cultural pursuits and have amassed considerable fortunes gathered from 
the fertile soil. One who has met with well-deserved success along these 
lines is John C. Barr, of Noble township, who has resided in Cass 
county all of his life, and is well acquainted with soil and climatic con- 
ditions here. IMr. Barr has made farming his life work, and through 
intelligent management of his affairs has won his way to affluence. He 
was born in Harrison township, Cass county, Indiana, November 2, 1870, 
and is a son of Thomas and Jane (Goodwin) Barr. 

The parents of Mr. Barr came to the United States from England 
in 1848, locating in Cass county. In 1852, in company with his brother- 



780 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

in-law, Thomas Goodwin, also a resident of Cass county, he left home 
to seek his fortune in the gold fields of California, leaving behind him 
a family eonsistiug of his wife and three children: Mary, Thomas and 
Jeremiah. While enroute by water, Thomas Goodwin contracted yellow 
fever, from which he died, and his body was wrapped in a sheet and 
cast overboard. ^Ir. Barr continued his journey and on reaching his 
destination began life by staking claims. At this he met with varying 
success, and after enduring the hardships incident to the rough life of 
the mining camp for about six years, returned to his family with suffi- 
cient means with which to purchase outright six acres of land. Through 
his thrift, energy and perseverance, assisted by his good* wife and his 
industrious family, he was able to add to this land from time to time, and 
at the time of his death, December 14, 1893, he left an estate of sixteen 
hundred acres, the greater part of which was under cultivation, this 
being located in Harrison, Boone and Noble townships. His wife's death 
followed January 6, 1901. 

John C. Barr received the greater part of his education in the district 
schools, although he completed it at Royal Center. He was reared to 
habits of industry and honesty, and was taught the value and dignity 
of hard work, and thoroughly trained in the work of the farm. General 
farming and stock raising have always received his attention, and his 
success has come as a result of commendable industry and practical 
management of his affairs with a fixed goal ever in view. 

On Februarj^ 2'±, 1898, ]\Ir. Barr was united in marriage with Miss 
Daisy Fisher, the oldest daughter of Jacob and Sarah Elizabeth (Suter) 
Fisher, of Cass copnty, and six children have been born to this union, all 
of whom are living. Harry R., graduated in the class of 1912, and has 
taken violin instructions ; Ray W., is in the eighth grade, also has taken 
guitar music ; Ruth, in the fourth grade, will take piano music ; Nelson 
M., in the fifth grade, will take mandolin lessons ; Grace, in the fifth 
grade, will take piano music, and Beatrice, in the third grade, is the 
youngest child. ^Irs. Barr is a native of Cass county, born May 22, 
1872, and she is the thii-d of five children, three sons and two daughters, 
two dead and three are living. Her mother is a resident of Jefferson 
township, and the father, a native of Virginia, is deceased. Mrs. Barr 
was educated in the common schools. Their beautiful home is known 
as "Glendale' Farm." 

Like his father, I\Ir. Barr is a Republican in politics, and has always 
been a stanch advocate of public improvements. With his family, he 
is a regular attendant of the Baptist church, and has always been a 
cheerful contributor to church and charitable needs when called upon. 
During his long residence here, he has formed a wide acquaintance, in 
which he numbers many warm friends. He is known as a good and 
public-spirited citizen and as an excellent farmer, and has done his 
full share in advancing the welfare of his community. 

William L. McMillen. The farming interests of Noble township 
are well represented by a group of practical, intelligent and able men, 
among whom William L. IMcMillen takes prominent place. Born July 
9, 1871, in Noble township, Cass county, he is a son of Lewis and Frances 
Jane (McCauley) McMillen. 



HISTOEY OF CASS COUNTY 781 

The Mc]\Iillen family is one of the old and honored ones of Cass 
county, where its members have been identified with the development 
of the section for eighty-five years. His grandparents, George and 
Susan (McMillen) McMillen, became residents of Cass county in 1828, 
entering upon life in the west in true pioneer style. The grandfather 
was a native of Pennsylvania and the grandmother of Highland county, 
Ohio. Locating on a farm in Noble township, Cass county, they there 
reared their family of four children : Lewis, Milton, William and Elizai- 
beth J. They experienced many of the hardships and difficulties of 
pioneer life and to the development of a new home in the forest, but 
as the years passed theirs became one of the comfortable homes of the 
community and their labors contributed not a little to the substantial 
development of their section. The grandfather took a prominent part in 
public affairs and for four years filled the office of trustee of Noble 
township, giving his support to the Republican party. He died in 
1849, at the age of forty-four years, and in the faith of the Presbyterian 
church. 

Lewis McMillen was born March 2, 1832, on the old home place in 
Noble township, and there he was reared to habits of sobriety, indus- 
try and honesty, and taught the value and dignity of hard work. He 
was married October 2, 1861, to Frances Jane McCauley, a native of 
Noble township, and daughter of Elias McCauley, and they became the 
parents of three children: James E., Minnie and William L. Mrs. 
McMillen died October 2^, 1886, at the age of forty-four years, and 
many friends mourned her loss, for her sterling traits of character had 
endeared her to all with whom she came in contact. Like his father, 
Mr. McjMillen was a Republican, and for one year served as supervisor 
of Noble township. He belonged to the Methodist Episcopal church, and 
lent his aid and influence to all movements for the public good. His 
business methods were honorable and straightforward, and his close 
application, continual perseverance and unabating energy enabled him 
to work his way steadily upward to a position of affluence. He was a 
loyal citizen, faithful in his friendships, devoted to his family, and 
enjoyed the warm regard of all with whom he came into contact. 

William L. i\Ic]\Iillen received his early education in the public 
schools of Noble township, and his vocation has always been that of 
farming, he having resided on his present property since 1896. On 
June 2, 1895, he was married to Miss Eva May Carney, of Winamac, 
Pulaski county, Indiana, and to this union there have been born three 
children, namely: LeRoy, who died August 23, 1896, aged six months; 
Naomi and Esther. During the school term of 1892, Mrs. McMillen was 
engaged in teaching the district schools of Noble township. 

Mr. ]\IcMillen has always given his support to Republican principles 
and candidates, and has several times held office, being assessor in 1900 
and trustee in 1908. He is a member of the Odd Fellows lodge in 
Logansport, and with the members of his family, attends the Methodist 
Episcopal church. He has the reputation in his community of being 
a public-spirited citizen, always ready to support movements tending 
to advance the growth and development of his community, and as one 
who is a liberal contributor to church and charitable enterprises. 



782 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

Williamson Wright was born at Lancaster, Ohio, on the 18th day 
of May, 1814, and was a noied fi^ire m Cass county m his day. His 
father, Rev. Jolm Wright, was born in Westmoreland county, Penn- 
sylvania, on P"'ebruary II, 1777. He was prepared for college at Jeffer- 
son Academy, Commonsburg, Pennsylvania, and was graduated from 
Dickinson College, Carlisle, Pennsylvania, in 1788. He studied theology 
under an uncle, Dr. James Power, a pioneer Presbyterian minister of 
western Pennsylvania, and was licensed to preach in October, 1802. In 
1805 he became pastor of the First Presbyterian church at Lancaster, 
Ohio, and he held that pastorate for thirty-one consecutive years. In 
1836 he came to Logansport, Indiana, with the expectation of passing 
the remainder of his days here in retirement. In connection with his 
ministry at Lancaster, Ohio, he had worked hard in organizing other 
churches in a large circle, and this strenuous work had seriously im- 
paired his health. His two sons, John and Williamson of this review, 
had preceded him to Logansport, and here the aged father settled to 
enjoy his remaining days. Rev. John Wright never accepted another 
pastorate, although he organized the First Presbyterian church of Lo- 
gansport, and was the first pastor of this church as well as others in 
Cass county, having an especial genius for that phase of his work. For 
fifteen years he was at the head of the Logansport Presbytery and once 
was moderator of the Synod of Indiana. He died on August 31, 1854. 
His wife was Jane Weakley, and they became the parents of three chil- 
dren : John and Williamson, both lawyers of i^enown in Logansport, axid 
Edward, who received the degree of D. D., and was, as his father be- 
fore him, a minister of the Presbyterian church. 

Williamson AVright was reared at Lancaster, Ohio, and was gradu- 
ated at Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, when he was eighteen years 
old. He read law and when he was twenty-one was admitted to the 
bar. In 1835 he came to Logansport, Indiana, and he almost at once took 
rank with the foremost lawyers of this section. In 1840 he was elected 
state senator, and in 1849 was an unsuccessful candidate for Congress. 
It was largely through his efforts, and that of his brother, that Logans- 
port gained its first railroad, and he was president of the company that 
built the road between Logansport and New Castle. He acquired owner- 
ship to considerable land in the county, but at the time of his death had 
disposed of all but about seventeen hundred acres. 

The latter years of ]\Ir. Wright 's life were devoted almost exclusively 
to looking after his large landed interests, but prior to that he was in- 
terested to a considerable extent in railroad matters. 

Mr. Wright married Eliza Sering, of Madison, Indiana, who died in 
1847, leaving two children, — John and Jennie, both now deceased. In 
1852 he married Kate Swift, the daughter of Rev. E. P. Swift, D. D., of 
Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and they became the parents of seven chil- 
dren, of whom brief mention is made as follows: Mary, the eldest, died 
when four years old. Kate married E. P. Tucker; Williamson Swift; 
Elizabeth G., who became the wife of W. H. Barnhart ; Anne Lucy, the 
wife of C. W. Graves of Logansport, of whom extended mention is made 
in other pages of this work ; Etta D. and Elisha P. S., who is dead. 

Williamson Wright died on the 28tli day of March, 1896, and his 
widow survived him less than a year, passing away on February 5, 1897. 




C^isC yi^ 



y 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 783 

Mr. Wright was actively identified with the Presbyterian church, and his 
benefactions, while large, were of the most unostentatious order. He 
was first a Whig, and then a Republican, in which political faith he 
continued all his life. 

Norman Elmer Myers. The whole life of Norman Elmer Myers 
thus far has been passed upon the farm and in the pursuit of that indus- 
try. He has met with a pleasing success in his work and is accounted 
one of the best established men in Noble township, which has been his 
home all his days. He was born in Noble township, Cass county, on 
August 18, 1872, and is the son of Henry S. and Mary Ellen (Tilton) 
Myers. 

Concerning these worthy parents it may be said that the father came 
to Indiana from New Jersey, where he was born, locating in Noble town- 
ship in the year 1858. After a residence of something like a year in 
this place he went west, and at the outbreak of the Civil war he returned 
to the state and enlisted in the Fourteenth Indiana Battery. He 
remained with his regiment through thick and thin, and was honorably 
discharged at the close of the war. One year after the war he came to 
Cass county once more and settled on a farm in section 3, and in 
1866 he married Mary Ellen Tilton, the daughter of Simeon and Sarah 
Tilton. Two sons were born to these parents : Frank Tilton ]\Iyers, 
born on i\Iarch 9, 1866, in Cass county, and Norman Elmer, the sub- 
ject of this review. 

Norman Myers was educated to a certain degree in the common schools 
of Noble township, and all his life with the exception of five years has 
been passed on the farm which he now occupies. The place is located 
in section 9 of Noble township, and consists of one hundred and thirty 
acres. It is a well cared for place, evidencing in every way the thrift 
and enterprise which mark its owner and have made him one of the 
prosperous men of the town. 

On December 5, 1900, Mr. Myers was united in marriage with Miss 
Maud Wise, the only daughter of James and Margaret (Rue) Wise. 
She was born in Cass county on April 18, 1874, and here has passed her 
life. Two children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Myers: Claud E., 
born September 7, 1901, and Mary Margaret, born on November 13, 
1905. 

Mr. Myers is a Republican in his political faith, but not more than 
ordinarily active in affairs of that nature, and he and his wife are mem- 
bers of the Presbyterian church. 

Andrew Burnetts was a native of Highland county, Ohio, bom 
there in 1828, and was a son of Edward Burnette, who was a farmer in 
that county, and a descendant of French ancestry. The advent of the 
Burnette family into America was at about the time when the American 
colonies gained their independence from the mother country, and they 
have ever since been worthy and substantial citizens of the new re- 
public. Andrew Burnette passed his boyhood on his father's farm, 
and such education as came his way was gained in the old-fash- 
ioned log school Avith its primitive and inefficient methods of instruc- 
tion. In 1847 he married Mary J. Horn in Ohio, and the year 1850 



784 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

marked the advent of the family into Cass county, when he and his 
wife settled on an eighty acre farm which they had purchased, for which 
he paid the sum of $300. Here he built a log cabin. It was no palatial 
affair; indeed, it was rude and unfinished, with its stick and mud 
chimney, its one room, eighteen feet square, and a door and a window. 
But here they settled down on their new farm and set in bravely to the 
work of making a farm out of a piece of wild land. Andrew Burnette 
and his family lived on this place until 1864, when he sold it and 
moved to a farm in Noble township, Cass county, but some time later 
moved to Clay township. Here Mrs. Burnette died on February 12, 
1899. The death of the wife and mother broke up the home circle, as it 
does too often, and Mr. Burnette thereafter made his home with his mar- 
ried children until he died on October 26, 1902. Mrs. Burnette was a 
member of the Christian church, and was one of the truly estimable 
women of her community, where she was held in the secure regard of all 
who knew her. Andrew Burnette was a Whig, later a Republican, in 
which political faith he labored the remainder of his life. He was a 
quiet, unassuming man, of kindly disposition and a most admirable 
character, and known in his community as a good neighbor and a 
genuine friend, the esteem and confidence of a wide circle of acquaint- 
ances being his. Both these worthy people are at rest in Mount Hope 
cemetery, iu Logansport. They were the parents of three children, 
of whom brief mention is here made : John H., to whom a separate 
sketch is devoted in other pages of this work ; George C. ; and Hannah, 
who is now the wife of Irvin Funston, her husband being a first cousin 
of General Frederick Funston, of Spanish-American war fame. George 
C. is married, also, and makes his home in East St. Louis. 

John H. Burnette was born in Highland county, Ohio, on February 
8, 1849, and is the son of Andrew and Mary J. (Horn) Burnette, also 
of Highland county, Ohio, of whom extended mention is made in a 
separate sketch dedicated to Andrew Burnette. When John Burnette 
was an infant in arms his parents came to Indiana, settling first in 
Fulton county and later in Cass county, in both of which places they 
were engaged in farming. Thus has the early life, as well as the sub- 
sequent practical experience of John H. Burnette, been spent in the work 
of the farm. He early became acquainted with the various processes 
which go to make up the building up of a profitable farm from a barren 
wilderness, and his young life saw many of the privations and hard- 
ships incident to pioneer life. He secured such schooling as the schools 
of his immediate vicinity afforded, and so well did he improve his op- 
portunities in that way that in the winter of 1869-70 and 1870-71 he 
taught school in his district. On April 3, 1873, Mr. Burnette married 
Lizzie J. Thornton, and then began fanning, first in Noble township, 
where he remained for two years, and then in Clay township, where he 
was busily engaged in. the pursuit of farm life from 1875 to 1908. He 
was always a successful farmer, and those years brought him a pleasing 
prosperity. In 1908 he moved to Logansport, retiring from farm life, 
and here he has since resided. 

Mr. Burnette is a Republican and has served his city as a member 
of the city council for eight years, as well as filling various other local 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 785 

positions of trust in the city which he has made his home. He is a 
member of the Masonic order and of the Knights of Pythias, and with 
his wife is a member of the Christian church. 

Mr. Burnette has been twice married. One daughter was born of 
his first marriage, — Nellie, now living in Colorado, she married ]\Iathew 
C. Warren, of Fort Collins, Colorado, of the firm of Moody & Warren. 
The wife and mother died on February 12, 1904, and on November 6, 
1906, Mr. Burnette contracted his second marriage, when Mrs. Ida 
Wagner of Kewanna, Indiana, a daughter of James Murray, and the 
widow of Frank Wagner, a prominent Kewanna lawyer, became his wife. 
Mrs. Burnette had four children by her first marriage, but one of whom, 
Don B. Wagner, is now living. 

George McjMillen, well known and prosperous in farming circles in 
this township, has demonstrated in a most telling manner his fitness for 
the life of a farmer. He was reared on the farm, but in starting out in 
independent life he decided to give up the humdrum existence he had 
so long known. Accordingly he established himself in the implement 
business in Logansport, but it is significant of the man that after fourteen 
years of honest endeavor in that business, he gave over his connection 
therewith and returned gladly to the farm, where he has since continued 
in peace and prosperity. Born on November 10, 1855, in Cass county, 
Indiana, George McMillen is the son of Robert and Rosanna (Harper) 
McMillen. The father w^as a millwright and passed his life in that work, 
death claiming him on July 7, 1890, less than a year after the passing of 
his faithful wife, who preceded him on the 26th of October, 1889. Both 
are interred in Harper cemetery in Noble township. The name McMillen 
is of Scotch-Irish origin. 

George McMillen, their son, attended the district schools of Noble 
township and later finished his education in Smithson College. After his 
college career he turned his attention to farm work for a brief time, but 
in 1890 went into the implement business in Logansport, as has been 
already mentioned. Eight years ago the call of the farm drew him back 
to Noble township, and he has here continued since that time, enjoying 
a pleasing prosperity in his chosen vocation. 

On IMarch 4, 1886, ]Mr. IMcMillen was united in marriage with Miss 
Rose Kreis, a native daughter of Cass county, and the child of Philip 
and Caroline (Scheir) Kreis, who had lived for many years within the 
confines of the county. Three children were born to ]\Ir. and Mrs. 
McMillen : Chester R. attended the common schools, Logansport high 
school and then the Logansport Business College, and is now employed 
by the Vandalia Railroad Company. He M'edded Miss Blanche Hurd 
and they are residents of Logansport. Mabel E. received a common 
school education and then graduated from the Logansport high school, in 
class of 1909, and was a successful teacher in her home township two 
terms. She wedded Wm. J. Thornton, a resident of Logansport and 
an agent for automobiles. Mrs. Thornton is a member of the First 
Presbyterian church. Mr. Thornton is a member of "The Moose." 
Margaret was a student in the Logansport high school. She is at 
home with her father. 

Mrs. MclMillen, the mother, was a native of Cass county, reared and 



786 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

educated in her home county, and was during her life a devout member 
of the Fi^'st Presbyterian church. She was a lady noted for her piety, her 
love of home and her children. Her death occun-ed in February, 1909. 
All her married life she had been an able factor to her husband in the 
building up of their happy home. Her remains are interred in Blount 
Hope cemeter}', where a beautiful monument stands sacred to her 
memory. 

Mr. McMillen's pretty little farm of twenty-one acres lies just at the 
north city limits of Logansport, Indiana. 

Mr. Mcj\Iillen is a Republican, but not especially active in political 
matters. He is a member of the Knights of Pythias, Powell Castle Hall 
No. 62, the Foresters, and the Woodmen of the World, all in Logansport, 
Indiana. He was brought up by his parents in the Presbyterian faith, 
always having attended the church of that denomination in Noble town- 
ship, and he and his children are members and attendants of that church 
today. Mr. ]Mc]\Iillen enjoys the esteem and confidence of all who share 
in his acquaintance, and he is known for one of the estimable and stable 
men of the community, his life in Noble township being one that indicates 
in a telling manner the many splendid qualities of the man. 

William R. Cogley. The appeal of the soil is very strong to some 
men, who return to farming as a means of livelihood after years spent 
in other pursuits, believing that in agricultural work may be attained 
the greatest measure of success by those who know how to till the land. 
William R. Cogley, a successful farmer and stock raiser of Clay township, 
was for years engaged in railroad work, but eventually yielded to the 
inclination that had guided a long line of agricultural forebears, re- 
turned to the tilling of the soil, and has seen no reason thus far to regret 
of his action, for today he is numliered among the more substantial men 
of his locality and stands high in the esteem of his fellow-citizens. Mr. 
Cogley was born in Dauphin county, Pennsylvania, on January 4, 1867, 
and is the son of Samuel and IMary (Endersl Cogley. The family came 
to Cass county in 1869, and Samuel Cogley is still a resident of Noble 
township, where he has been engaged in the business of agriculture for 
the past forty-four years. ' 

William R. Cogley was given the educational advantages that might 
be secured in the district schools of his day and locality, and he was 
early trained to farm work, which he followed with more or less diligence 
until he had reached the age of twenty-one years. At that time, he went 
to Logansport, and in that city was graduated from Hall's Commercial 
College. Following that addition to his education, the young man went 
to Chicago, and for eighteen months was engaged in a large mercantile 
establishment. He then returned to the home farm and for two years 
worked for his father on the home place. He subsequently entered 
the employ of the Pan Handle Railroad, beginning as a brakeman, and 
by faithful attention to his duty becoming engineer with the same 
road. He was for fourteen years employed in railroad work, and at 
the end of that time retired and bought a farm of eighty acres, which 
he is now occupying, located about two miles from the city limits, in 
Clay township. Progressive and enterprising, he has continued to add 
to his improvements on this handsome property, erecting a windmill 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 787 

and a number of substantial and commodious buildings, and by good 
management aiid intelligent working of the soil making his land pay 
him yearly substantial returns for the labor he has expended upon it. 
He has a comfortable residence, fitted with modern conveniences, and 
situated on Logansport Rural Route No. 4. 

On September 20, 1893, ]\Ir. Cogley was united in marriage to ^liss 
:Miunie M. Linton, the daughter of George A. and Alary E. (Emery) 
Linton, both of English lineage, as is also the Cogley family. Airs. 
Cogley is a native daughter of Cass county, born within its confines 
on September 15, 1872, and she is one of the eight children of her 
parents, of which number five are yet living. 

George Linton was born in Logansport, and is now a resident of 
that city, where he has long been known as a plumber and stearafitter, 
and where he is one of the popular and prominent men of the city. 
He is a Alason and a member of the Knights of Pythias, and a veteran 
of the Civil war, through which he served with valor and distinction 
and received his honorable discharge when the Union no longer re- 
quired his services. 

Airs. Cogley was reared in Logansport, and there received her 
education. To her and her husband four children have been born, 
as follows: George E., the eldest, finished with the work of the public 
schools of his community in 1910, receiving his diploma at the time, 
and is now employed as a machinist in the Vandalia shops at Logans- 
port ; Lawrence E., R. Weldon, and Ruth A. are attending the local 
schools, and are members of the eight, seventh and fifth grades, 
respectively, it being the aim of their parents to fit them for suitable 
positions in life by means of careful educations. 

Air. and Airs. Cogley are members of the Presbyterian church. 
Air. Cogley is not affiliated with any political party, but he manifests 
a wholesome interest in the political affairs of his municipality, and 
considers it his privilege to vote for the man he regards as best fitted 
for the office in ciuestion, irrespective of party lines or prejudices. 
He takes a keen and intelligent interest in all mattei-s affecting the 
welfare of his community and heartily supports all movements that 
his better judgment tells him will make for good government and loyal 
citizenship. Fraternally, he has membership in Tipton Lodge No. 33 
of Logansport, in the Alasonic order. 

Elliott E. AIcKaig. The younger generation, whose day has 
come since the comforts brought by easy communication have been 
available, marvel at the fact that all the wealth, prosperity and con- 
veniences have been wrought and brought about within the lifetime 
of men who stand among lis today. That men now living in Cass 
county fought here the wild beasts of the forest and contended with 
the hardships and privations of pioneer existence on these smiling 
farms and on the sites of cities where the roar of traffic and the heavy 
tramp of the iron wheels of factories have so lately drowned the voices 
of primeval nature, seems incredible. Every year the hoary-headed 
band that led the van of civilization grows smaller, yet there are still 
many who heard the first scream of the brazen voice of the locomotive 
which brought to Cass county wealth and prosperity, and in this class 



788 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

is E. E. MeKaig, an honored resident of Noble township. ]\Ir. jMcKaig 
was for many years engaged in agricultural pursuits, and when he 
was ready to retire took the ideal method of doing so. He retired, 
and yet he did not retire. He turned over the work to the broad shoul- 
ders of his stalwart son, and at the same time was in close touch with 
the life of the farm and ready to pass on to the younger man the 
benefit of the experience he had accumulated. 

Elliott E. ]\IcKaig was born in Noble township, Cass county, 
Indiana, November 6, 1835, the fourth son in a family of nine children 
bom to William and Elizabeth (Westfall) ]\IcKaig, the former a 
native of Kentucky and the latter of Maryland. His father was born 
of Irish descent in 1795, came to this county about 1833, and located 
upon a farm in Noble township, where he died in 1868. i\Irs. McKaig 
was born of German parentage in 1799, and emigrated with her parents 
to Ohio, where her marriage occurred to ]\Ir. McKaig, whom she ac- 
companied to Noble township, and here she died in 1874. The children 
in this family were as follows : Levi Hart, deceased, and buried in 
Shiloh cemetery; Sarah Elizabeth, also deceased, and buried in that 
cemetery ; Martha C. ; John F., who died in Kansas in 1904 and is 
buried there ; James F. ; Watson C, who died in California in 1912, 
and was buried there ; Robert N. ; Uriah F., deceased, who was buried 
in Shiloh cemetery; and Elliott E. James F. of this family died when 
two years of age. 

Elliott E. McKaig belonged to that class from which, in the struggle 
in which man pitted himself against primeval forest and aboriginal in- 
habitant, the strongest types of manhood and womanhood were 
evolved. In early life he was accustomed to the hard work which 
develops the mind and hardens the body. His education was secured 
in the primitive schools, and he was trained to agricultural pursuits, 
which continued to be his vocation until his retirement from active 
life some years ago. He had ever shown a commendable public spirit, 
and was known as a man Avho always contributed liberally to move- 
ments calculated to benefit his community in any way, as well as to 
enterprises of a religious or charitable nature. 

]\Ir. McKaig was married July 13, 1870, to Hattie Richards, who 
was born December 24, 1851, in Dauphin county, Pennsylvania. She 
was of Dutch descent, and was the second daughter of William F. 
and Rebecca (Park) Richards, natives of Pennsylvania. Ten children 
were born to Mr. and ]\Irs. IMcKaig, as follows: Enuna B., bom Sep- 
tember 15, 1871; Gertie, born September 21, 1872, died September 
11, 1874; Willie, born April 1, 1875, who lived but eleven days; Pearl, 
born February 21, 1877, died September 4, 1877; infant twins, born 
January 1, 1878, one of whom died a few hours later, and the other 
when eleven days old; Mindella, bom October 5, 1880; Beulah R., 
born November 3, 1882 ; Robert Neal, born September 10, 1888 ; and 
Allen Roy, born March 28, 1892. On October 31, 1893, the mother of 
these children was found dead in bed, having peacefully passed away 
in her sleep. 

Robert Neal and Allen Roy IMcKaig attended the common schools 
of Noble township, and later supplemented this by attendance at the 
high school and commercial college in Logansport. About 1908, 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 789 

Robert N. McKaig left the farm and since that time has been connected 
with the Pennsylvania Railroad. Allen R. has continued to remain 
on the home farm, and has succeeded his father in the work of the 
homestead, where he is carrying on general farming and stock raising 
operations. He is a Progressive, and inherited his sterling character- 
istics of honesty, industry and integrity. The family has always been 
connected with the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Of the other children, Mindella was married January 3, 1901, to 
John McCarnes, and four children have been born to this union: Ethel 
H., Wilber E., Blanch O. and Robert R., of whom Wilber E., died in 
1905 at the age of twenty-two months. On October 28, 1903, Beulah 
R. McKaig was united in marriage with Orla B. Miller, who died in 
1904, after a short illness, leaving one son, Orla E. On June 1, 1908, 
Mrs. Miller was married to William Pennock, and they have had two 
children : Helen S. and Paul Wesley. 

Elliott E. McKaig had a long and useful career, his activities serving 
not only to further his own interests, but to advance those of his com- 
munity as well. He died February 26, 1913, and he is interred in Shiloh 
cemetery. In the evening of life, surrounded by a wide circle of friends, 
and possessing the unqualified esteem of all with whom he had come 
in contact, he furnished an excellent example of the rewards that 
industry brings and the contentment that comes only after a life 
of integrity and probity. 

Doctor John B. Shultz. A life of kindly capable service to the 
community and to hundreds of individuals, came to a close on December 
8, 1912, with the death of Doctor John B. Shultz at his home in Logans- 
port. The best work of the physician does not flaunt itself before the 
public gaze, but is wrought in the hearts of his fellow-men. The spirit 
of tender and knowing love for his fellowmen has ever been the trait of 
the true physician, and though the career of the late Dr. Shultz was not 
conspicuous for those public honors and distinctions which mark the 
accomplishments of men in political and other spheres of human activity, 
yet he left his mark upon Cass county, and his long and faithful serv- 
ice, and the influence which he exerted over men and families deserves 
a more than casual tribute in this history, and surely all will agree that 
none of the past generation was more worthy of a permanent memorial 
than Dr. Shultz. 

John B. Shultz was born in the adjoining county of Carroll, this 
state September 22, 1839 and was past seventy-three years of age when 
death came to him. His parents were John and Elizabeth (Dunbar) 
Shultz, his father having been born in Pennsylvania in 1795 of German 
parentage, and locating in Carroll county, Indiana, in 1837 where he 
was one of the early settlers and where he died in 1855. 

Dr. Shultz was educated in the public schools, and graduated from 
the Cincinnati Medical Eclectic Institute in 1860. The same year he 
located in Logansport, where he practiced in partnership with Dr. James 
A. Taylor, at 420 Fourth street, continuing to occupy that office for the 
long period of forty years ; afterwards he moved across the street to 417 
Fourth street, and was there when he breathed his last. 

Doctor Shultz, though his professional duties absorbed his energies, 



790 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

was still active in citizenship, and an influential Republican. His 
part}' honored him by election to the position of county treasurer in 
1870, re-electing him in 1872, and in 1875 he became mayor of Logans- 
port, serving one tenn with honor and credit to himself and with benefit 
to his city. Dr. Shultz on July 29, 1883, married ]^Iiss Anna L. Cooper, 
of Kokomo, a daughter of Dr. Wm. Cooper also of Kokomo. Her sister 
is the wife of Senator John AY. Kern. By this marriage, Dr. Shultz 
had four children, of whom only one, Edwin, survives and he is now a 
student of AVashiugton and Lee University, Yirginia. 

Dr. Shultz was tall of stature and of commanding appearance, al- 
though he always wore a smile upon his countenance. He was sociable 
m his nature, affable in manner, accomodating to all, pleasant and in- 
spiring in the sick room, and probably was the most popular physician 
that has ever lived and practiced in Cass county. Among his patients 
he was courteous, considerate and agreeable, never engaging in argl^- 
ment or discussion with them, yielding to their whims and eccentricities, 
and endeavoring to please the more fastidious. He disliked to hurt the 
feelings of any one and hated to say no or refuse a request from the most 
humble, and would often yield to the oi^inions and exactions of others, 
although his better judgment might not approve. This engaging and 
agreeable personality, together with an indisputable ability in his pro- 
fession was the cause of his great popularity in Cass county. During 
his time he had the widest acquaintance, and the most extensive practice 
of any physician within the bounds of this county. His i^resence in the 
sick-room was so comforting that patients have gone so far as to state 
that it would be a pleasure to die under his care, and with him at their 
side. 

The late Dr. Shultz was not an erudite man nor a profound student 
of the libraries nor laboratories of his profession. However, he was a 
student of nature, and the people, human nature, and human ills were 
his study and the world his school throughout his life. He was no 
theorist and never argued upon technical points. He was preeminently 
practical, and when asked why he did thi§ or that his answer would 
be, "I have tried it." A large practical experience in life was the 
laboratory where he had made his conclusive tests, and from which he 
drew the experience which enabled him so successfully to serve his 
patients. Dr. Shultz had remarkable powers of observation and intuition 
and his judgment based upon these faculties were usually correct. To- 
gether with a natural ability, he possessed a large fund of energy, and 
throughout his life was an untiring worker. In many ways his practice 
represented the best of the old time country doctors. The night was 
never too dark, the storm too violent, the roads too muddy for him to 
visit a patient, whether rich or poor, and the ability of the patient to pay 
was never a subject of his inquiry, although that is not altogether true 
of some of the modern automobile doctors. His rule was to go wherever 
called and ask no questions. He adopted a rule, which shows his charity 
in speaking of his brother practitioners, when called to succeed some 
other practitioner he would treat the case, but would never make com- 
ment or i-eflections upon the previous attendant. This was his regular 
rule of conduct in his fraternal relations, and he expected the same treat- 
ment from his associates. 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 791 

As a practical mau Dr. Shultz occasionally took some very practical 
means in performing the exacting duties of his practice. In very busy 
times when the old ague was prevalent during the sixties, and when 
nearly every case had a malarial element, it is said that he would do up 
packages of medicine for his patients before leaving his office, and then 
would make the rounds of his day's duties, examining each patient hur- 
riedly, and throw down a package of medicine prepared in his office 
before starting out. His lilierality was extended to a fault, and often 
his sympathies overcame his better judgment. His sociabilities, his 
desire to please, his difficulty in refusing a request, made him an easy 
mark for financial sharks, and his investments in mining stocks, realty 
and other speculative properties worsted him financially, and although 
he realized quite a fortune from his large practice, yet he died a poor 
man. However, he was idolized by his patients, and the foregoing state- 
ments regarding his character and career are by no means overdrawn 
but are in fact a subdued expression of the praise and tributes accorded 
to his noble nature, both during and after his life. He died honored 
by his patients, by his party and by the many members of the Broad- 
way Methodist church, with which he had been associated for many 
years, and the entire community in which he had lived and practiced 
for nearly fifty three years, accorded him a place in its permanent es- 
teem and memory. 

Cyrus Taber. It is now ninety years since Cyrus Taber left his east- 
ern home and fared forth into an unknown country in quest of fortune 
and adventure, for it was practically as an unknown region that Indiana 
existed in the year 1824. He it was who established the name of the 
Taber family in the middle west, or in such portion of it as is represented 
by the state of Indiana, and men of his name have from that day to this 
been identified with the best interests of the state, wherever they have 
been found within its borders. Agricultiire has claimed a goodly share 
of the activities of these men, and the professions, too, have not been 
neglected by them, while the business of merchandising has known 
the touch of certain of the family. 

Cyrus Taber was born at Tiverton, Rhode Island, on January 19, 
1800. In 1803 the family moved to western New York, and later to 
Pennsylvania. When he was twenty-four years old Cyrus Taber left 
the parental roof and, filled with the zeal and ambition of the young 
man who came of a goodly parentage, he started west to carve out 
his fortune from the fastnesses of the Indiana wilderness. It is pos- 
sible that he did not suspect the magnitude of his task, but it is char- 
acteristic of the men of his family that he did not flinch for a moment 
from the hardships he saw he must undergo in order to wrest any degree 
of prosperity from the primitive country he had invaded so cheerfully. 
First locating at Fort Wayne, he began his battle with the wilderness, 
but the unhealthful conditions of the countiy at that time induced an 
attack of fever and ague, from which he was a sufferer for fully a year, 
and the savings of $400 that he had brought with him as a working 
capital were utterly exhausted and he was in debt to the amount of 
thirty dollars before he found himself able to apply himself to any 
manual labor again. However, upon recuperating from his illness, 



792 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

with courage undaunted by his experience, he began the work oi 
building log cabins and fences for the Indians and was thus associated 
with one Reuben Covert, it being the province of the latter to drive the 
oxen and haul the rails, while Mr. Taber did the cutting and splitting. 
At the end of a year he found that he had saved one hundred dollars, 
and with that sum he purchased his first eighty acres of land. This he 
cleared sufficiently to place under a degree of cultivation, and applied 
himself to the raising of corn. He saved his earnings from season to 
season, and as his means permitted, purchased additional land. 

In the light of the present day get-rich-c[uick methods, of which so 
much is seen and heard, the sweat of such labor and the privations 
endured by Mr. Taber in getting his start in the world seem almost 
incredible, and it requires a considerable flight of imagination on the 
part of the man of the world of our times to realize anything of what 
such toil meant. Indeed, the idea is practically beyond the compre- 
hension of the average man, despite the application of his quality of 
imagination. 

However that may be, the facts remain as stated in the case of Cyrus 
Taber. Because of the splendid industry and the keen business sense 
of the man, Mr. Taber was in 1827 invited into a business partnership 
with Allen Hamilton, and the firm of Hamilton & Taber became a popu- 
lar one in mercantile circles of Indiana. Mr. Taber came to Logansport 
in 1828 to take charge of the branch business of the firm established 
here, and he continued in mercantile activities here, with some slight 
changes, until 1840, following which Mr. Taber continued the business 
alone for three years, and in 1843 William Chase was admitted to mem- 
bership in the firm. In 1848 Mr. Taber retired permanently from mer- 
cantile pursuits. 

When Cass county was organized, Mr. Taber was appointed county 
treasurer by the county board of commissioners, that office then being 
an appointive one, and he served in that capacity until 1830. In 1845 
he was elected to the state legislature, and in the year following was 
elected to the senate, serving in that body during the years 1846, 7 and 8. 
He was first a Whig, but in later years adopted the faith of the Demo- 
cratic party. 

Active in all matters pertaining to the welfare of his community, 
Cyrus Taber was ever one of the foremost in promoting progressive 
movements, and it was largely through his efforts that the first railroad 
was induced to extend its lines into Cass county — a work whose good 
to the county could not well be estimated. 

In May, 1829, Mr. Taber was married to Miss Deborah Ann Coles, 
of Fort Wayne, Indiana, and eight children were born to them : Stephen 
C, Paul, Jesse C, Allen H., William S., Phoebe A., Humphrey and 
George. Concerning Stephen C, the first born son, further mention 
will be found elsewhere in this work. The wife and mother passed away 
February 15, 1847, at Logansport, and Cyrus Taber died on April 13, 
1855, in Logansport, still young in years, but one who had achieved more 
for the good of his community and county in his lifetime than most men 
are permitted to accomplish in much longer earthly careers. 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 793 

Stephen Coles Taber. Like his father before him, Stephen Coles 
Taber lived a life of the utmost usefulness and activity in his community, 
and occupied a leading place in Logansport for many years. He was 
born at Fort Wayne, Indiana, on March 8, 1830, and was the eldest son 
of Cyrus Taber, the pioneer to whom is dedicated a separate memoir in 
other parts of this work, and his faithful wife, Deborah Ann Coles. 
When a baby he was brought by his parents to Logansport, which in 
those early days was not more than a cross roads place. There his 
father was engaged in the merchandise business, and Stephen Taber 
was reared in the young and growing town. In 1849 he was graduated 
from Wabash College, and in 1852 he finished his studies in the law 
department of the State University, following which he engaged in the 
practice of law. For many years he practiced before the Cass county 
bar, and for a time was associated in a professional way with Senator 
D. D. Pratt. The latter part of Mr. Taber 's life, however, was devoted 
largely to looking after his large property interests, the extent of which 
precluded the possibility of continuing with his professional labors. 

On September 7, 1853, Mr. Taber was married to Charlotte A. 
Walker, who died on January 8, 1892, leaving three children: George 
C, Charles E. and Lavina. Mr. Taber passed away on July 15, 1908, 
in Logansport, after a long and busy life in this county, and his death 
was felt in business and social circles throughout the community. 

William B. Schwalm. One of the flourishing business enterprises 
of Logansport is that conducted by William B. Schwalm, and which 
includes the handling of seeds, hardware, buggies, harness, paints, oils 
and general farming implements. His early years were devoted to 
agricultural pursuits, but eventually he ceased his farming operations 
and turned his attention to the mercantile field, with a large measure 
of success. A man of progressive ideas, he has identified himself with 
everything that pertains to the welfare of his community or its people, 
striving earnestly to promote the cause of advancement and good citizen- 
ship. Mr. Schwalm was born October 8, 1868, in Tipton township, Cass 
county, Indiana, one of the eight children of Henry J. and Helena 
(Haemel) Schwalm. 

Henry J. Schwalm was born August 20, 1828, the only son of his 
parents. He was reared in Hesse Cassel, Germany, and received a good 
practical education. In 1852, with his widowed mother, he emigrated 
to America, arriving on a sailing vessel in May of that year. After his 
arrival, he worked for a time by the month for an uncle, who was a 
farmer in Tipton township, and then began farming for himself. He 
was frugal, honest and industrious, and at the time of his death had 
accumulated a fair amount of this world's goods. In starting his opera- 
tions, he located in Washington township on rented property, but seven 
years later bought a farm on section 26, Tipton township, in 1860, and 
there passed the rest of his life. He was married IMay 21, 1857, to Miss 
Helena Haemel, who was also a native of Germany, born near Hesse 
Cassel, March 28, 1829, the oldest daughter of Frederich and Elizabeth 
(Ellerman) Haemel. Eight children were born to this union, namely: 
George H., Sarah E., Caroline M., Eckhardt A., Augustina M., Louisa 
L., William B. and Laura E., all of whom are still living. In religion. 



794 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

]Mr. aud ]\Ii-s. Schwalni were Presbyterians, and their upright lives were 
a credit to the land of their adoption aud to the community in which 
they resided. Mr. Sehwalm was a Democrat, served three terms as 
township assessor, and also served his county as a commissioner. 

William B. Sehwalm was reared on the home farm and secured his 
education in the district schools. After attaining his majority, he con- 
tinued working- on the home farm for six years, and when twenty-seven 
years old started farming on his own account, purchasing a tract of 
sixty acres in Tipton township, to which he subsequently added eighty 
acres more. This property he later sold to his brothers, and in 1900 
came to Logansport, where he embarked in the implement and seed 
business. His venture proved a decided success, and to the original 
line he has since added hardware, buggies, harness and stoves. 

j\Ir. Sehwalm was a Democrat up to 1912, but the policies of the old 
old parties not suiting him and believing in the things advocated by 
Colonel Roosevelt and the Progressive platform, he cast his fortunes with 
the young organization and was its candidate for county commissioner 
from the second district. Mr. Sehwalm is a strong advocate of tem- 
perance measures, not alone on the licpior cjuestion, but on temperate 
measures of all kinds. He belongs to the Presbyterian church, and is 
a ^Master ]Mason and a Knight of Pythias. 

On June 5. 1895, ]\Ir. Sehwalm was married to Louise E. Ramer, of 
Washington township, Cass county, and they have two children : ^ler- 
ritt R. and Ruth C. 

Charles W. Graves has been a resident of Logansport for many 
years and has been identified with the business activities of this city 
along various lines through all the years of his residence. Since 1896 
he has been the owner and proprietor of what was fonnerly known as 
the Giffe Book aud Music Store, and in this enterprise he has experienced 
a worthy success. Born in Wayne county, Indiana, October -1, 1861, 
Mr. Graves is the son of George ]M. and Judith ]\[. (Harwood) Graves, 
both of whom were natives of Massachusetts. His father first located in 
Cincinnati, Ohio, and later in Richmond, Indiana, where he was in 
business until the outbreak of the Civil war, when he enlisted in 1861 
in Company F, Thirty-sixth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, rising to the 
rank of captain, and serving as aeting adjutant on the staff of Colonel 
Gross. In the battle of Chiekamauga he received a gun-shot worind 
through his right shoulder, which of itself was not necessarily fatal, but 
owing to his enfeebled condition, due to a recent sickness, he was unable 
to withstand the shock of the injury and died some days later. His 
body was brought to the north and laid to rest in the cemetery in Rich- 
mond. His widow was left with three small children, the only daughter, 
Lillie, being now Mrs. John A. McCullough, of Logansport. Indiana. 
At the time of the death of the father, the eldest of the three children 
was about six years old, and the widow reared her little family through 
many hardships. She died in Logansport in November. 190-4. 

Charles W. Graves received his education in the common and high 
schools of Richmond. When he was about sixteen years old he began 
clerking in a grocery store in his home town, and later was employed 
as a bookkeeper. He then became a clerk in the railroad office at Rich- 




.^yr~f0U^^^^:y^^::^.a^y^ 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 795 

moiid, his older brother, George C, being' chief clerli at that time, in 
the employ of the Columbus, Cincinnati and Indiana Central Railroad, 
which later became the Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, Chicago and St. Louis 
Railway. When the chief of the office moved to Logansport, in 1881, 
he ott'ered i\Ir. Graves the position of chief clerk, which he promptly 
accepted and accordingly came to Logansport to fill the i:)Osition, as- 
suming the duties of his new office in January, 1882. Since that time 
Logansport has been his home. Two years later Mr. Graves was made 
chief clerk and private secretary in the office of the division superin- 
tendent, which he retained until 1894, when he resigned and bought an 
interest in the Logansport Journal, of which he became business man- 
ager. He was thus associated for aliout two years, when he bought the 
Giffe Book & Music Store, and this establishment he has condue1;ed 
ever since, moving to his present quarters. No. 417 Broadwaj^, in July, 
1908. 

In 1900 or thereabouts, Islr. Graves was the organizer of what was 
known as the Logansport Co-operative Association, of which he was 
elected president. This was brought into existence to correct the abuses 
that had grown up in the commercial district with regard to premium 
giving, trading stamps, prizes, discounts, etc. Thousands of dollars 
were lost to the general business men of the city, and many of the 
smaller houses were forced to the edge of bankruptcy by the unfair 
methods then in vogue. The Logansport Co-operative Association had 
a precarious existence at the start, and owing to the faot of the trouble 
being so firmly entrenched in the general system, only the steadfast 
courage of those at the helm enabled them to finally stamp out the seeds 
of the scourge. ]Mr. Graves Avas also active in the organization of the 
Citizens' Natural Gas Company, of which he was elected secretary. 
This was in about 1891, and the company was organized to check abuses 
then in vogue by the concerns that at that period had charge of the 
distribution of the natural gas. He has also been identified with the 
various commercial clubs and movements that have had as their object 
the betterment of conditions existing in Logansport and the surround- 
ing community, and has in all these A^arious associations done most ex- 
cellent and praiseworthy work in behalf of the city. 

Mr. Graves is a Republican, with progressive tendencies, and is also 
an active worker in the temperance cause. He is a member of the First 
Presbyterian church, of which he has been an official for years, and he 
is now elder and clerk of the session. He is also identified with the 
work of the Siinday school, and is a member of the board of directors 
of the Indiana Sunday School Association. 

On October 18, 1888, ]\Ir. Graves was united in marriage with Miss 
Anna Lucy AVright, the daughter of "Williamson Wright, a pioneer of 
Cass county. 

Andrew J. Murdock. In ability as a financier and in general busi- 
ness affairs, Cass county had no stronger character or one better known 
among all classes than the late Andrew Jackson Murdock, for many years 
president of the First National Bank of Logansport. In the broader 
fields of citizenship, as well as in business, he performed a large scope 
of useful service which has properly identified him for all time with. 



796 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

the history of this locality. Mr. Murdock was a type and example of 
one who succeeds in life, though his youth was passed in comparative 
poverty, and with only such advantages as he could procure by his own 
labors and ambitions. 

The late Andrew J. Murdock was born in Livingston county, New 
York, November 19, 1827. The first eight years of his life were spent 
in his native state, and he then accompanied the family to Michigan. 
Michigan, during the thirties, was almost on the frontier, and the best 
settled regions were but a field for hardships and privations of pioneer 
existence. It was amid such scenes and with such limitations in advan- 
tages of education and otherwise that Andrew J. IMurdock was reared. 
At the age of thirteen he was thrown upon his own resources, and from 
that forward depended entirely upon his own exertions for his advance- 
ment. 

In 1853, Mr. Murdock became a resident of Logansport, so that he 
had identified himself with this city at an early period in its growth, 
and at a time when his vigorous enterprise and honorable character were 
important elements in the development as a city along the lines which 
have made it conspicuous among the larger' centers in northern Indiana. 
A year after his arrival in this city, he engaged in business on his own 
account, opening a store, with which his name was connected for twenty- 
four years. He had a trade which few other merchants in the city and 
county could equal, and throughout his lifetime, enjoyed the confidence 
and good will of all with whom he came in contact. His business inter- 
ests gradually extended, by investments and otherwise, and in 1865 he 
was made a director of the Logansport National Bank, and in 1878 was 
elected its president. Five years later this bank was consolidated with 
the First National Bank, of which Mr. Murdock was chosen president, 
and this position he filled with splendid executive ability up to the time 
of his death. May 3, 1905. In the field of practical finance, as well as 
in his judgment of men, which is an element just as essential to the suc- 
cess of a financier as his more technical expertness in financial opera- 
tions, Mr. Murdock was recognized as one of the strongest representa- 
tives in Cass county. Among the varied interests owned by Mr. Mur- 
dock was the fine tract of land, consisting of more than three hundred 
acres lying between Logansport and the park on either side of the Elec- 
tric railway. 

Though a man whose influence in business and civic affairs of Logans- 
port, was for many years conspicuous, ]\Ir. Murdock was a citizen who 
was never in the public eye, as the general sense of that term is under- 
stood, and modesty was his chief characteristic. He was always a Re- 
publican in good standing, and supported the party candidates and prin- 
ciples, though never seeking office for himself. His contributions and 
support were accorded to nearly every important enterprise of public 
nature in Logansport for thirty or forty years, yet his name appeared 
less frequently than that of many whose active support was less. On 
Augiast 4, 1862, Mr. Murdock was married, and his home and family 
always represented the chief sphere of his leisure activities. He wedded 
Maggie C. Chadwick, of Newark, New Jersey, daughter of Thomas and 
Margaret (Pickles) Chadwick. Their three children are: May, wife of 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 797 

Samuel Patterson ; Flora, wife of Samuel Emmet Mulholland ; Gertrude, 
wife of Edward H. Donovan. Mr. Murdock attended the First Presby- 
terian church, being a prominent contributor thereto, and he built the 
Murdock Hotel. The Murdock home was one of the social centers of 
Logansport, and the family have always been among the most representa- 
tive of this city. 

Moses B. Lairy. In the roster of those who have gained prominence 
at the Cass county bench and bar, are to be found many eminent names, 
none of which, however, have stood out in greater relief than that of 
the Hon. Moses Barnett Lairy, Judge of the Appellate Court, who has 
gained an enviable distinction through the medium of his great ex- 
perience, his great good sense, his stainless integrity, his perfect im- 
partiality, his wide discernment and his abundant learning. A worthy 
representative of a family that for years has been identified with the 
commercial, agricultural, professional and public interests of the county, 
he early entered upon a legal career, and so ably has he directed his 
activities that today he is recognized as one of his State's leading 
jurists. Judge Lairy was born in Harrison township, Cass county, 
Indiana, August 13, 1859. 

Daniel Lairy, the paternal grandfather of Judge Lairy, was born 
in Ohio, and as a young man became a pioneer to Tippecanoe county, 
Indiana, settling within its borders when that section was almost an 
unbroken wilderness and there spending the rest of his life. Thomas 
Lairy, son of Daniel, and father of Judge Lairy, was born in Butler 
county, Ohio, January 20, 1807. As early as 1837 he entered land 
from the government in Harrison township, Cass county, but did not 
move to this property until many years later. He had accompanied his 
parents to Tippecanoe county in his boyhood, and was reared to man- 
hood among pioneer scenes, receiving his early training in the hard 
work of plowing, planting and cultivating the fields. Subsequently, 
he moved to LaFayette, where for a number of years he was engaged 
in carpentering. ^Mr. Lairy was married (first) to Belinda Miller, who 
died without issue, and his second union was to Mrs. Eliza (Barnett) 
Thornburgh, daughter of Moses Barnett, a pioneer of the county. 
While a resident of LaFayette i\Ir. Lairy belonged to the militia, and 
served in a company during the Black Hawk war. He was a member of 
the Christian church, in the faith of which he died January 11, 1877, 
his widow surviving him a long time and passing away May 14, 1892. 
They had two children : Moses B. and John S. 

Moses Barnett Lairy was reared on the Cass county farm which his 
father had entered from the government, and attended the district 
schools of Harrison township until he was seventeen years of age, at 
that time being compelled to give up his studies to operate the home 
farm, his father having died. Later he spent one term in the Northern 
Indiana Normal School, and then began teaching school in the winter 
terms, his summers being spent on the home farm. His first experience 
as an educator was at Fletchers Lake sehoolhouse, just across the line 
in Fulton county, and in all taught for about nine years, carefully 
saving his earnings that he might further his own studies in the 



798 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

Northern Indiana Normal School. During the last years of his school 
teaching experience, he took up the study of law under the direction of 
Judge Dudley H. Case, and in 1888 entered the law department of 
the University of Michigan, where he was graduated with the class 
of 1889. Succeeding this, in September of the same year, he began 
practice in Logansport, alone, but four years later became associated 
with DeWitt C. Justice. For fourteen years he also maintained a 
professional partnership with M. F. Mahoney. A Democrat in politics 
and an active worker in his party's interests, as his abilities became 
recognized his name began to be mentioned for judicial honors, and 
in 1894 he was made his party's candidate for the judgeship of the Cass 
county circuit court. Political conditions at that time, however, caused 
his defeat with the others on the ticket. On April 1, 1905, he was 
appointed by Gov. Matthews to fill the unexpired term of Judge D. 
B. IMcConnell, resigned, and on completing his term of twenty months 
was succeeded by Judge D. H. Case. His election to the Appellate 
bench occurred in 1910, since which time he has continued to faithfully 
and capably discharge the duties of his high office, maintaining the dig- 
nity and best traditions thereof and being known as a fair and impartial 
judge. Fraternally, he is connected with the Masons and the Benevo- 
lent and Protective Order of Elks. 

On April 14, 1892, Judge Lairy was married to Miss Mazetta Rogers, 
daughter of Thomas B. Rogers, of Logansport, she having been for 
some years a teacher in the public schools of the city. They attend the 
First Presbyterian clnirch. 

Hon. John S. Lairy. Occupying a position of high credit and dis- 
tinction among the leaders of the legal profession in Cass county, Hon. 
John S. Lairy, judge of the twenty-ninth judicial district, has, during 
a long and useful career, exemplified the best type of American citizen- 
ship. As a lawyer, he early took a foremost position among the practi- 
tioners of the Logansport bar. his gifts as a speaker and his capacity 
for close, logical reasoning making him a peculiarly forceful and ef- 
fective advocate. As a judge he has made a record that holds out a 
stimulus and example to all men who are called upon to bear the high 
responsibilities of a place iipon the bench. The souncl judgment, the 
well-balanced judicial mind ; the intellectual honesty and freedom from 
bias which are required in a judge — these attributes have been all his 
and have enabled him not only to give opinions which are widely quoted, 
but to maintain the best traditions of the judicial oifice. Judge Lairy 
was born in Llarrison township. Cass county, Indiana, September 7, 
1864, and is a son of Thomas and Eliza (Barnett) (Thornburgh) Lairy. 

Judge Lairy belongs to an old and honored family which originated 
in Ireland, and the American progenitor of which came to this country 
in 1727, soldiers of the name fighting in the Colonial army during the 
War of the Revolution. Daniel Lairy, the paternal grandfather of 
Judge Lairy, was born in Ohio, and some time after his marriage made 
removal to what was then the wilderness of Tippecanoe county. Indiana, 
the rest of his life being spent in clearing and cultivating a farm. 
Thomas Lairy, son of Daniel, and father of Judge Lairy, was born 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 799 

January 20, 1807, in Butler county, Ohio, and as a lad was taken to 
Tippecanoe county, Indiana, where he was reared amid pioneer scenes. 
Later, he moved to LaFayette, where he was engaged in carpentering, 
and while residing in that locality, pre-empted land from the Govern- 
ment in Harrison township, Cass county, for $1.25 an acre, although 
he did not settle thereon until during the fifties. The rest of his life 
was spent in farming, and his death occurred January 11, 1877, in the 
faith of the Christian church, of which he was a life-long member. 
While a resident of LaFayette, he was a member of the state militia, 
and served with a company during the Blackhawk war. Mr. Lairy 
married (first) Belinda IMiller, who died without issue, and his second 
union was with JNIrs. Eliza (Barnett) Thornburg, daughter of Moses 
Barnett, a pioneer of Cass county. Mrs. Lairy passed away IMay 14, 
1892, having been the mother of two sons: Moses Barnett, judge of the 
appellate court ; and John S. 

John S. Lairy was reared on the home farm and secured his early 
education in the common schools and the American Normal School, at 
Logansport. He then spent several years in teaching school, in the 
meantime devoting himself to the study of law, and in 1895 and 1896 
attended the law school of the University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, 
where he was graduated in 1896 with the degree of Bachelor of Laws. 
In August of that year he entered upon the practice of his profession 
in Logansport, which city has been his home to the present time. Shortly 
after beginning practice. Judge Lairy served two years as deputy state's 
attorney, his services in the discharge of the duties of this office bring- 
ing him favorably before the public. In 1900 he became the Democratic 
candidate for the office of .judge of the twenty-ninth judicial district, 
and was subsequently elected, taking office in 1902. He was reelected 
in 1906, and in 1912 again became the candidate of his party for re- 
election. Judge Lairy has shown himself a worthy member of the 
.Indiana bench, the soundness and eciuity of his decisions having never 
been questioned. A hard sti;dent and a man of high scholarship, with 
a well-poised mind, and ever ready with his legal knowledge, his opin- 
ions have been widely quoted, and he has not only attained a position 
of prominence in the field of jurisprudence, b^^t his business and per- 
sonal excellencies have made him a leader of worth and sagacity. He 
has interested himself in fraternal work to some extent, being a memiier 
of the Elks, the Knights of Pythias and the Loyal Order of Moose, in 
all of which he has numerous warm friends. 

On July 17, 1912, Judge Lairy was united in marriage with Miss 
lea Campbell, whose home was in Logansport. 

Ben.jamin p. Keesling is of Indiana nativity, his birth occuiTing 
at Mechanicsburg, in Henry county, on February 18, 1850. Mechanics- 
burg might well have been named Keesling, for here, in 1828, came 
Peter Keesling, with George, John, Jacob and Daniel, all brothers, and 
each of these brothers married in the course of time, and each reared 
a large family. So numerous did they become in that vicinity that 
practically .every person one met either bore the name of Keesling, or 
was related to the family by marriage. Originally the family came to 
America from Germany and for generations lived in Virginia. With the 



800 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

spirit of the pioneers, members of the family moved to Ohio, and from 
there moved to Indiana and settled at what is now Mechanicsburg. 

John Keesling, the grandfather of Benjamin P., built his log cabin 
in the woods from growing timber and there passed some time in gi'ub- 
bing, clearing, planting and harvesting, the regular routine of the 
pioneer farmer. He subsequently built a farm house. One of his sons, 
Peter Keesling, the father of Benjamin P., was married to Margaret 
Loy, who become the mother of ten children. Peter Keesling, like most 
of the others of his name, was thrifty and industrious and possessed 
of the necessary courage to fight the battle of life to a successful issue, 
even under the adverse conditions of those primitive days. 

Benjamin P. Keesling was born in Henry county, Pebruary 18, 1850. 
Growing up on the farm he learned all that could be taught him of farm 
life, and hard, continuous work was the portion of his youthful days. 
After attending the neighboring schools he went to the graded schools 
at New Castle. When about twenty years of age he began clerking in 
a general store at the latter named place, but in April, 1874, came to 
Logansport and associated himself with Dr. John Needham in the drug 
trade. A few years later he bought the interest of Dr. Needham in the 
business and continued in it alone until 1900, when the property was 
destroyed by fire. The ensuing four years he was in Boston and Pitts- 
burg, then returned to Logansport and in December, 1907, bought the 
Metzger Brothers' interest in the Logansport Daily Journal. With his 
son, Arthur R., the Logansport Daily and Weekly Journal flourished 
until October, 1912, when it was consolidated with the Tribune, and is 
now the Journal-Tribune. Under the new arrangement, Mr. Keesling 
became a stockholder and is the present secretary-treasurer of the cor- 
poration. 

]\Ir. Keesling is a Republican, and in 1892 was elected treasurer of 
Cass county, being the only successful nominee on his ticket. On Pebru- 
ary 18, 1875, ]\Ir. Keesling married Anna B. McCune, of Middletown, 
Indiana, and one son, Arthur R., was born to them. Mrs. Keesling is 
a member of the Llethodist church. 

Jacob Sellers. Por sixty years a resident of Cass county, during 
fifty-five of which he has made his home in Logansport, Jacob Sellers 
is entitled to a position among the representative men of his city not 
only for the length of time which he has spent within its borders, but 
also as a citizen who has continuously had the best interests of his com- 
munity at heart. Mr. Sellers has devoted the greater part of his time 
to the cultivation of the soil and to attention to his duties in the railroad 
shops, but he has never been so engrossed in his own affairs that he has 
not found time to lend his interest and support to those movements 
which he believes will benefit his adopted city or its people. Mr. Sel- 
lers was born August 15, 1834, in Wittenburg, Germany, in what is 
widely known as the Black Porest. His father, Michael Sellers, was a 
baker by trade and died in the old country, his widow, who bore the 
maiden name of Katherine Cook, married (second) Gottlieb Prick, and 
the family emigrated to the United States in 1847, and located at Buffalo, 
New York, where they lived five years. In the spring of 1853 the family 
came to Cass county, Indiana, and located four miles east of Logansport, 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 801 

where Mr. Frick found employment working for Thomas Green, who 
operated a large forge there, and succeeding this went to what is known 
as the "Indian Reserve" in Washington township. They moved to 
Logansport three years later, and here both Mr. and Mrs. Frick passed 
away. 

Jacob Sellers was thirteen years of age when he accompanied his 
parents to the United States, and his education was confined to a few 
terms in the common schools. The greater part of his life has been 
passed in farming and working in the railroad shops, and his success 
has been due to well-applied energy, ambition and perseverance, in 
connection with integrity of the strictest order. While so doing he has 
gained and maintained the entire confidence of his fellow-citizens, who 
have recognized in him a man of general worth and probity of char- 
acter. Mr. Sellers was married June 20, 1867, to Miss Fredericka Adler, 
daughter of Christopher Adler, who was a native of Austria and came to 
the United States in 1853. Mr. Adler died on his farm near Winamac, 
Indiana. To Mr. and ]\Irs. Sellers six children have been born, as fol- 
lows : Carrie C, who became the wife of Edward Hanke ; Edward D., 
a sketch of whose life will be found in another part of this work ; Charles 
J. ; Mamie, who married Manuel Connor and is now deceased ; Frank 
F. ; and Emma L., who became the wife of Clarence Ammons, and is a 
resident of Logansport. 

Early in 1865, ]\Ir. Sellers enlisted for service in the Union army 
during the Civil war, becoming a member of Company C, One Hundred 
Fifty-fifth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry. Owing to the war 
being practically over, he was detailed to do guard duty until peace 
was declared, when he received his honorable discharge and returned to 
the duties of private citizenship. 

Edward D. Sellers. Among the prosperous establishments of 
Logansport, one which started in a modest manner and has enjoyed a 
rapid and continuous growth is the clothing and furnishing business of 
Helvie & Sellers, composed of Samuel S. Helvie and Edward D. Sellers. 
The junior member of this partnership has been engaged in this line 
of endeavor ever since boyhood, and has brought to his work a bound- 
less enthusiasm, coupled with wide experience, natural business ability 
and inherent integrity which has gained him the confidence of his 
patrons and fellow-citizens. Edward D. Sellers is a native of Logans- 
port, and was born July 4, 1871, a son of Jacob and Fredericka (Adler) 
Sellers. 

Jacob Sellers was born August 15, 1834, in the Black Forest, Witten- 
berg, Germany, and is a son of Michael and Katherine (Cook) Sellers, 
the former of whom, a baker by trade, died in Germany, while the latter 
married (second) Gottlieb Frick, and emigrated to the United States 
in 1847. First locating at Buffalo, New York, the family spent five years 
in that city, and in the spring of 1853 came to Cass county, Indiana, 
and settled four miles east of Logansport, where Mr. Frick found em- 
ployment with Thomas Green, the proprietor of a forge. Later, they 
went to what is known as the "Indian Reserve," in Washington town- 
ship, but three years later moved to Logansport, and there both Mr. and 
Mrs. Frick passed away. Jacob Sellers was thirteen years of age when 



802 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

he accompanied his parents to this country, and his education was 
secured in the common schools, in which he passed a few terms. He 
has passed the greater part of his life in agricultural pursuits and in 
working in the railroad shops, and has been unifonnly successful in 
his ventures. On June 20, 1867, he was married to ]Miss Fredericka 
Adler, daughter of Christopher Adler, who was a native of Austria and 
came to the United States in 1853, dying on a farm near Winamac, 
Indiana. Six children have been bom to Mr. and Mrs. Sellers : Carrie 
C, who married Edward Hanke ; Edward D. ; Charles J.; Mamie, who 
married IManuel Connor and is now deceased; Frank F. ; and Emma 
L., who became the wife of Clarence Ammons, and lives in Logansport. 
The father of these children fought valiantly in the Union army during 
the Civil war. 

Edward D. Sellers received his education in the public schools of 
Logansport, and at the age of sixteen yeai's commenced upon his business 
career as a clerk in the clothing store of Harry Frank, with whom he 
remained for live years. Succeeding this, for two years he clerked for 
Joseph Grace, and in 1896, in partnership Avith Samuel S. Helvie, he 
embarked in the clothing and furnishings Ijusiness under the tirm style 
of Helvie & Sellers, an association that has continued to the present 
time. The firm has enjoyed a laealthy gi'owth, and now has a large 
trade, embracing some of the best business in Logansport. Mr. Sellers 
is a young man of the highest business integrity, with a reputation for 
straightforward and honorable dealings. He has been industrious and 
enterprising, and has never failed to take advantage of modern ideas 
and methods. In politics he was formerly a Republican, but since 1912 
has been allied with the new Progressive party. His fraternal connec- 
tion is with the ]\Iasous. 

On June 6, 1900, Mr. Sellers was married to IMiss ]\Iattie Gibbons, 
formerly a resident of Sheldon, Illinois. 

William B. Enyart. A citizen who has left his impress on the 
business interests of Logansport, and whose activities entitle him to rank 
with the solid, substantial men of the city, is William B. Enyart, for 
thirty-five years the proprietor of a bottling establishment here. He 
belongs to that class of business men who have found time from their 
personal operations to give to the public needs, and at various times 
has been elected to positions of trust and responsibility, in wliich he has 
proven himself able and conscientious. Now, at an age when most men 
are willing to turn over their interests to men of the younger generation, 
he still conducts the management of his entei"prise with unabated activity 
and energy, giving to its smallest details the close attention that has been 
the secret of its success. ]\Ir. Enyart has spent his entire career within 
the confines of Cass county, with the exception of the time when he was 
serving as a soldier in the Union ranks, during the Civil war. He was 
born in Clay township, September 19, 18-15, and is a son of Israel and 
Temperance (Foy) Enyart. 

Benjamin and Sarah (Miller) Enyart, the grandparents of William 
B. Enyart. came to Cass county in 1834, settling in Clay township, 
where for many years they kept a tavern known to all the old settlers 
as "Four-Mile House." The grandfather, who died in December, 1845, 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 803 

was detailed as a teamster during the War of 1812. In religious belief 
he was an old-fashioned Methodist. Israel Enyart was born in Janu- 
ary, 1821, and was reared to hard work, clearing, grubbing and doing 
general farm labor, and the limited education he acquired was secured 
in the little log schoolhouse, having but few chances during his entire 
life to receive schooling. He lived with his people until he reached man- 
hood, and then went to farming on Mill Creek, near Kewanee. Two 
years later he bought a tract of land on section 21, Clay township, where 
the balance of his career was spent. During his later life he joined the 
church, and died a Christian. His chief characteristics were honesty 
and liberality, and whatever he possessed was always ready for his 
neighbors' use. Mr. Enyart married Temperance Foy, whose people 
came to Cass county from Virginia in 1835, and to this union there were 
born six children : William B. ; Mary Elizabeth, who is deceased ; Hiram 
Wilson, also deceased ; Sarah A., who is now INIrs. Alexander Davidson ; 
and Laviua and Asbury Newton, who are both deceased. ]\Ir. Enyart 
died January 12, . 1892, and his widow followed him to the grave in 
Augtist, 1896. 

William B. Enyart was reared on the old home farm, and secured 
his education in the comnion schools. When just past eighteen years 
of age, November 2, 1863, he enlisted in Company' H, Seventy-third 
Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, viith which organization he 
participated in numerous engagements, including Athens, Decatur, Ala- 
bama, although the latter part of his military career was spent in 
doing garrison duty. He received his honorable discharge, after a brave 
and faithful service, December 11, 1865, and returned to the pursuits 
of peace, learning the plasterer 's trade, at which he worked for fourteen 
years. In 1884 he turned his attention to the bottling business, and 
this he has carried on to the present time, having built up an excellent 
trade through the exercise of native integTity, high ability and honor- 
able dealing. For some years he was in partnership with a Mr. Cham- 
bers, under the firm style of Enyart & Chambers, but is now associated 
with his son. Known as a thoroughly reliable Inisiness man, whose 
operations have been of a strictly legitimate nature, he has gained the 
confidence and respect of all who have done business with him. He has 
invested in realty to some extent, and is at this time the owner of some 
paying property in Cass county as well as city real estate in Logans- 
port. iNIr. Enyart is a Republican in his political views, and in 1902 
was a member of the common council from the Fourth ward. In 1904 
he was again elected to that office, serving in all four years, and in 
1906 was the successful nominee of his party for the office of county 
sheriff. Two years later, however, he was defeated for re-election with 
the other members of his ticket. He is a popular comrade of the Grand 
Army of the Republic, and his fraternal connections are with the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Fraternal Order of Eagles 
and the Loyal Order of Moose. 

On March 10, 1873, ]\Ir. Enyart was married to Miss Louisa Tip- 
pett, a native of Cass county, Indiana, who died some years later, leav- 
ing four children: Charles I\I., who is associated in business with his 
father; Nora S., who married Frank Etnire; Carrie B., and Frank L. 



804 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

Mr. Enyart was married (second) February 11, 1886, to Kate May, a 
native of Pulaski county, Indiana. 

John S. Kline is a pioneer of pioneers in the state of Indiana, where 
for sixty-nine years he has made his home, and this residence is the 
more notable when it is known that he is living today in the identical 
spot where his family settled when they migrated from Ohio in 1844, 
bringing him as a boy of seven years. Few men in any part of the 
country can boast a continued residence of almost seventy years in one 
spot, or indeed in one single community. His life has been a busy and 
active one, and he has taken an industrious part in the industry of the 
township, which has long been and still is that of farming. 

The natal day of John Samuel Kline was August 27, 1837, and his 
birth occurred at Eaton, Ohio, where the family had long lived. He was 
the son of William Kline, who served as a soldier throughout the "War of 
1812, and who after settling in Miami township, devoted his remaining 
days to the business of farming. He died at the age of sixty-two, and 
his widow, who in her maiden days was Isabel Snodgrass, died at Logans- 
port, Avhen she was ninety-three years old. They were the parents of 
six children, concerning whom brief mention is made as follows : Jacob 
]\I., who married ]Miss INIarietti Baldwin ; William T., married Miss 
Letitia Sizor ; JMary became the wife of Peter Heffley ; ]\Iargaret mar- 
ried Frank Swigart ; Henry married ]\Iiss Ella Leas ; and John S., who 
is the immediate subject of this brief sketch. 

In 1844 the Kline family migrated from their native state, making 
the trip into Indiana overland, the wagon route being most popular in 
those early days, and eleven days were consumed in the journey, which 
would not be made in a few hours. The father secured land in ]\Iiami 
township, and they settled down to country life, occupying a little log 
house that already graced their home farm. Here John S. Kline was 
reared and educated. With the passing years he took a wife, Mary 
Etnire, the daughter of Abraham Etnire. She was a native of Canton, 
Ohio, and she died on September 20, 1864. The present Kline residence 
was begun by William Kline, the father, prior to his death, which oc- 
curred in 1855, and was completed by John S. Mr. Kline, early in his 
career, bought eighty acres of land, to which he has added from time 
to time until today he has a farm comprising one hundred and thirty and 
a half acres. 

Two children were born to John S. and Mary Kline, Joseph Slaton 
and Charles. The latter died in 1904, but the other son, who is known 
as Slate Kline, still shares the home place with his father. He is now 
fifty-one years of age, and is his father's business partner. Slate Kline 
has been twice married. His first wife, who was Cora Scott, died in 
1902, and he later married Anna AVilliams. They have one child, 
Victor S. Kline, now three months old. To the marriage of Slate Kline 
\Aith Cora Scott were born three children, named as follows : Hattie, 
now the wife of Blaine Swigart, and living near Strathmore, Canada, 
on a farm ; Mary, who is engaged in teaching school ; and Charles who 
has finished high school and intends to take up farming. The other son 
of John S. Kline, Charles Kline, who died in 1904, left one son, Kenneth, 
who is now of age and resides with his mother at Los Angeles, California. 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 805 

The Kline family are members of the Baptist church and their 
politics are those of the Republican party, whose stanch adherents they 
are in all things. They are among the best known and most estimable 
people in the township, and enjoy a high standing in the community. 

Robert M. Elliott. While the soil of Cass county is very fertile, 
water plentiful and easily obtained and weather conditions nearly ideal, 
good crops cannot be raised unless the land is properly worked and sci- 
entifically conditioned, and the high standard set by the agriculturists 
of the county is therefore of great credit to them. Many of the leading 
farmers of this county have lived here all of their lives, thus becoming 
thoroughly familiar with the character of the soil and climate, and in 
this way being able to direct their operations along lines that will insure 
success, and in this class stands Robert M. Elliott, of Clay township, the 
owner of 110 acres of well cultivated land. Mr. Elliott was born June 
18, 1864, in Cass county, and is a son of Alfred and Emily (Williamson) 
Elliott. His father, a native of Montgomery county, Indiana, came to 
Cass county in 1849, and here erected a frame house, the first one of this 
character to be built in the county. His subsequent life was devoted 
to tilling the soil, and he was uniformly successful in his operations, at 
the time of his death, in 1900, being considered one of the substantial 
men of his community. His widow still survives him, at the age of sev- 
enty-three years, and makes her home on the old farm. They were the 
parents of six sons and two daughters. 

Robert M. Elliott acquired his education in the district schools of 
his native locality, and was reared to the work of the home farm, his 
boyhood being divided between agricultural work in the summer months 
and attending school in the winter terms. Thus he acquired a good edu- 
cation and a sturdy body, well fitting him for the duties he was to be 
called upon to discharge in later life. He continued to remain under 
the parental roof until 1894, in which year he was married to Miss 
Eleanor G. McDowell, a daughter of John McDowell, who brought his 
family to Cass county from Ohio. 

Mrs. Robert Elliott is a native of Cass county, Indiana, born Oc- 
tober 7, 1869, and a daughter of John and Amanda (Dritt) McDowell. 
There were three daughters in the family — Mrs. Elliott, eldest ; Adria, 
wife of James Cassel, a resident of Logansport, and proprietor of The 
Star Laundry, has three children; Elizabeth, wife of Wiley Sharp, 
also of Logansport, has four children. John McDowell was of Scot- 
tish lineage but was born in Stark county, Ohio. He served as a 
soldier in the Rebellion and was a stanch Republican politically. Mrs. 
McDowell was of German lineage and was born near Lancaster, Penn- 
sylvania. She died September 14, 1912. Both he and wife were mem- 
bers of the Presbyterian church. He died April 27, 1889. 

At the time of his marriage, Mr. Elliott began farming on a tract 
of sixty-five acres, located in Clay township which was the property of 
Mrs. Elliott's parents and subsequently purchased this, and some 
time later he added to this an additional tract of forty-five acres, and 
on this latter property erected all the buildings. He also owns a fine 
tract of land in Sanilac county, Michigan, has bank stock in Logans- 
port, and other good securities. In addition to general farming, 



806 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

he has been engaged in dairying to some extent, and his opera- 
tions have succeeded because of his untiring industry, his tliorough 
knowledge of his business, and the intelligent manner in which he has 
directed all of his actions. He is a thorough believer in the efficacy of 
scientific methods and uses modem machinery and appliances in his 
work. Among his associates Sir. Elliott is known as a man of the highest 
business integrity, whose success has been gained through no chicanery 
or c(uestionable methods. He has for some years been a member of the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, in which he has numerous 
friends. In politics, he has always given his support to Democratic pol- 
icies and candidates, and from 1901 to 1901 served very acceptably as 
a member of the board of coiinty commissioners of Cass county. 

Mr. and Mrs. Elliott have one daughter : Esther E., who is living 
with her parents. She graduated from the public schools in the class 
of 1910 and attended two and one-half years in the city schools of Logans- 
port and has also taken musical instruction. The members of the family 
are affiliated with the Presbyterian church. 

Mrs. Elliott was educated in the public schools of Cass county. She 
has nobly filled her sphere as wife and mother and her pretty home is 
her haven. The beautiful estate of Sir. and Sirs. Elliott lies on the 
highest point of ground in northern Cass county and is known as "The 
Summit Lodge. ' ' 

John SIcDowtell, a highly respected citizen of Clay township, died 
at his home on Saturday, April 27, 1889. He had suffered for years 
with lung trouble, but only during the past two years was he compelled 
to quit work. He contracted a deep cold while serving a second term 
on the petit jury which hurried his end. The deceased was a man of 
good character, upright in all his dealings, and well liked by all who 
knew him. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. Dr. Putman 
and the remains were interred at Mt. Hope cemetery. 

Mr. McDowell was born in Stark county, January 21, 1810, and was 
therefore forty-nine years of age. His father moved to this county 
while John was yet a boy. He has three brothers living: Silas Mc- 
Dowell, of Noble township ; Butch SIcDowell, of Silver Lake, and Isaac 
SIcDowell, of Illinois. He has also three sisters, but one of whom is 
living, Sirs. C. E. Sletzger, who resides in Clay township. 

Sir. SlcDowell was married to Sliss Amanda Drift in Slarch, 1868. 
To this union three daughters have been born, who with their mother 
survive to mourn their loss. 

Robert Guthrie was born on April 2, 1850, in Cass county, Indiana, 
and received his education in the common schools of the county and in 
the Logansport Seminary. He is the son of SVilliam and Margaret 
(Japp) Guthrie. 

William Guthrie was tlie son of John and Elizabeth Guthrie, and 
was born in the city of Perth, Perthshire, Scotland, in the year 1795. 
The son of wealthy parents, he was graduated from the University of 
Edinliurgh, and soon after, on the demise of his father, finding that the 
law of i3rimogeniture and entail was against him and stung by a sense 
of outraged justice, he turned his back on the home of his youth and 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 807 

emigrated to the United States. He settled in Switzerland county, 
Indiana, in about the year 1825, and here he engaged in general farming. 

He married Margaret Jajjp, the daughter of Thomas and Agnes 
Japp, who was born in the year 1812 on the river Doon, in Scotland. 
Orphaned in infancy, she emigrated to America with foster parents in 
the year 1819, and with them settled in Switzerland count3\ Here she 
became acquainted with William Guthrie. Their acquaintance ripened 
into friendship and culminated in their marriage in 1828. To their 
union thirteen children were born. 

Mr. Guthrie continued his farming operations in Switzerland county 
until 1848, when with his wife and nine children, he moved to Cass 
county, settling in the wilderness along the shores of Rock creek seven 
miles south of the then village of Logansport, and here began that 
Herculean task that required stout hearts and willing hands, — the build- 
ing of a new home in the wilderness. The children who then graced the 
family home were John, William, Agnes, Thomas, Jane, Alexander, Ann, 
Joseph and James, having previously lost their son Isaac by death, and 
here, surrounded by primeval forests and confronted with all the hard- 
ships and privations incident to pioneer life, the family was blessed 
with three more children, — Elizabeth, another who died in infancy 
unnamed, and Robert, the subject of this sketch. 

Here in this new home William Guthrie spent the remainder of his 
life, — a life largely given over to the clearing away and subduing of the 
forests, and devoted to the best interests, the upbuilding and the onward 
march of civilization. To him and such as him we owe our gratitude. 
He died on September 9, 1855. In 1857 his widow married again, 
Richard Downham becoming her husband, and they continued to reside 
iipon the farm until 1864, when she accompanied her husband to the 
west, but returned again in 1873, widowed for the second time in her 
life. She spent her declining years in Cass county, dying on July 2, 
1880. 

Robert Guthrie upon leaving school accepted a position as salesman 
in his brother's clothing house in Logansport, but in the following year 
took up the study and practice of law, being admitted to the bar in 
June, 1876. Soon, however, he gave way to the allurement of the 
wilds and embarked in the lumber business in which he continued with 
varying success until September 20, 1883, when he was married to Miss 
Laura A. Funston. Five children were born to this union : i\Iay Anna, 
John Roy, Alta Lola, Edna Elizabeth, and Jane Nora. I\Irs. Guthrie 
was born on January 28, 1860, in Clark county. Ohio, and was the only 
daughter of AVilliam and Rebecca (Black) Fimston. She moved to Cass 
county with her parents on March 9, 1865, and the family settled on a 
fami in Noble township. She was educated in the common schools of 
Cass county. 

Subsecpient to his marriage, Mr. Guthrie gave up the lumber busi- 
ness and settled on a farm in Harrison township, which place he con- 
tinued to operate until April, 1896, when he located in Logansport and 
engaged in the real estate and insurance business, afterward accepting 
a position with the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, in whicli capacity 
he served until November 17. 1903, when he moved with his family to a 
farm in Noble township. Here he is still employed in the peaceful occu- 
pation of farming, trvick gardening and horticulture. 



808 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

In 1908 the ex-students and teachers of East Sandridge organized a 
pioneer school reunion association, the first of its kind in Cass county, 
and Mr. Guthrie was elected president of that organization. His address 
delivered at the reunion the following year is here presented in full : 

Fellow students: When I look into your faces and survey these 
surroundings, I am forcibly reminded of those beautiful lines which 
read like this : ' ' How dear to my heart are the scenes of my childhood, 
when fond recollections present them to view." We are brought back 
here today, not only in remembrance, but we are brought face to face, 
as it were, with the scenes of our childhood. Brought back once more 
to Sandridge; back to this old familiar school-house playing ground. A 
place made sacred by memories of the past. For here it was you spent 
so many of your childhood days. 'Twas here you skipped and played 
in childish glee, and here again you toiled o 'er lessons hard ; then played 
your games of ball, of tag, and blindman's buff. 'Twas here you 
planned the spelling bee, the bob sled ride, or the social party at a 
patron 's house. And now to think you 're here again ! to look each other 
in the face and grasp each other by the hand. No wonder recollections 
of the past come crowding to our mind. And now what of Sandridge? 
Sandridge holds a warm place in the hearts of many. Sandridge 
throughout all the years that she has existed as a place of learning has 
maintained a reputation for being one of the very best common schools 
in all this broad land. And the reason for this may be found in the 
fact that in the very beginning she was surrounded by a loyal, peace 
loving, honest and honorable constituency. And the children of those 
sturdy pioneers who came here to receive instructions in the funda- 
mental principles of an education emulating the examples set by their 
fathers, though none have risen to preeminence among men, yet, upon 
the whole, they have made honored and respected citizens. Men and 
women who have gone into the world and have fought and are still fight- 
ing the great battles of life, and discharging the duties of citizenship in a 
way that has been a credit to themselves, a credit to the school and a 
credit to the great commonwealth of Indiana. 

And now, fellow students at East Sandridge, I am glad to be with 
you here today ; for I see among you those who have passed the zenith of 
their lives, who years ago, as boys and girls while the flush of youth 
was yet upon their cheeks and the fire of ambition shone in their eyes, 
roamed these woods and fields ; who coasted down, and played upon this 
ridge of sand. You are here today, fellow students, to engage in 
reminiscence and recreation ; to once more conuningle your voices in 
commemoration of those happy days gone by ; God bless you all. 

An original poem by Mr. Guthrie, entitled "Early Recollections" is 
here presented as written: 

Somewhat back from Roekcreek's swampy, muddy banks, 

Midst prickly ash and wild hawthorn. 

With its clapboard roof and latch string door, 

Stood the old log cabin where I was bom. 

Its broad and ample fireplace 

Was built from sticks and mud and clay 

And round its cheerful glowing hearth 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 809 

"We worked and played and sang each day. 
How well do I remember 
Those awful swamps and sloughs, 
For when we'd walk around a while 
Water came in our shoes. 
And when we'd take a ramble 
At the surrounding woods to peep 
Some ancient frog behind a log 
Would say "Knee deep, knee deep." 
Then when the August sun shone forth 
And the leaves began to dry 
The way we 'd have the ague chills 
Was enough to make one cry. 
My father settled in those swamps. 
From across the deep blue sea. 
But how he lived and reared us kids 
Seems passing strange to me. 
^ But he was wise and very learned 
From delving into lore. 
I've often thought he had some coin 
Brought from Scotland's shore. 
However that may be he loved that land 
Which then was but a jest, 
But now it don't require a sage 
To tell that it's the best. 
But many changes have taken place 
Since the day that I was born; 
Where once was naught but woods and swamps 
Grow fields of ripening corn. 

William H. Stoughton. Probably there is no class of people who 
so quickly grasp anything new and progressive like the modern farmer. 
Although residing away from the hustle and the bustle of the city, a 
considerable distance from the manufacturing centers, it is really sur- 
prising to note how familiar the agriculturist is with improvements that 
relate to his vocation. It is in this way, and in this way only, that the 
farmer of today is able to attain to a full measure of success, for this 
success comes only as a result of full and prosperous crops, which, 
in turn, come only from treatment of the land by modem methods. 
Among the progressive farmers of Cass county, who have recognized the 
value of using up-to-date measures in their work, William H. Stoughton, 
of Noble township, holds a prominent position. He is a native of Cass 
county, and was born February 22, 1858, a son of Ira and Nancy 
(Mathews) Stoughton. 

Ira Stoughton was born in New York, and was married October 17, 
1852, to Nancy Mathews, a native of Indiana. They settled down on a 
farm in Cass county, and their children were all born here, as follows 
Horace, September 24, 1853; Mary E., January 8, 1856; William H. 
and Elsie J., June 18, 1873. Horace was married first to Martha E 
Helvey, deceased, who was the mother of four children; Arthur G. 
Lutie, who died at the age of six years; Leora, who married in Novem- 



810 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

ber, 1900, Edward Smith, a farmer of Roann, Indiana, who has one 
child. — Arthur INI. ; and a child who died in infanc5^ Mr. Stoughton 
married for his second wife OUie Miller, of Ohio, and they have had one 
child, who died at an early age. Mary E. Stoughton was married April 
7, 1880, to Allen G. Benton, of Cass county. Elsie J. Stoughton was 
married May 15, 1902, to Harry A. Jamison, who is connected with the 
Vandalia line of the Pennsylvania system. 

William H. Stoughton was educated in the common schools of Xoble 
township, and his entire career has been devoted to farming and stock 
raising. On ^larch 9, 1880. he was married to Miss Hattie E. IMichael, 
of Cass county, daughter of Charles and Lucy A. (Bowyer) ]Miehael, 
who were long residents of Cass county. INIrs. Stoughton was educated 
in the schools of this county. In the fall of 1880, ]\Ir. and ]\Irs. Stough- 
ton went West, and for about five years were residents of Southern Illi- 
nois. While there, October 30. 1884, a son, Ira Ray, was born to them. 
They subsequently lived for about nine years in Southwestern Kansas, 
and then moved on to Texas. They were living in the Lone Star State 
in 1900, when the terrible flood caused such damage to the city of Galves- 
ton, and it appears as though only a dispensation of Providence saved 
their lives. At the time the storm began, ]\Irs. Stoughton was at home 
with her son, and as the hurricane increased she became alarmed and 
with great difficulty managed to make her way to the home of a neigh- 
bor. They had not yet reached their refuge, when a terrific blast 
struck the little home which they had just left, completely demolishing 
it, with all the other buildings on the place, easting its timbers some 
thirty rods distant, and driving great beams so deep in the ground that 
later they could not lie extracted by the utmost exertions of a strong 
man. There is no doubt but that ^Mrs. Stoughton and her son would 
have been killed had they remained in their own home. In the mean- 
time. ]\Ir. Stoughton, who had started home when the storm began to 
threaten to become serious, was overtaken by the terrific hurricane some 
seven miles from home, and there was compelled to remain, himself suf- 
fering greatly, as well as being in an agony of anxiety as to the welfare 
of his loved ones, whom he was powerless to help. 

When the little family was again readjusted, ]Mr. Stoughton gath- 
ered his scattered belongings together and returned to Cass county, and 
here his son continued the studies started in Texas, completing them in 
the commercial college at Logansport. He is now engaged in assisting 
his father in the work of the home farm, which has lieen brought to a 
high state of cultivation, and has been improved with good buildings and 
modern appliances. In political matters. ]\Ir. Stoughton is a stalwart 
Prohibitionist, although his only interest in public matters is that taken 
by every good citizen and voter. With his family, he attends the Presby- 
terian clnirch. 

William Riley. Classed among the prominent and enterprising 
farmers of Washington township is found AVilliam Riley, another of the 
men whose success in life has been gained through the medium of their 
own efforts. From boyhood. Avhen he was left an orphan, ]Mr. Riley's 
life has been one of incessant industry, and in the face of discouragrement 
and misfortune, he has slowly but surely worked his way up the ladder 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 811 

of success, and his efforts have been rewarded by the accumulation of a 
tine farm of eig"hty-tive acres, lying on the Riley road, about seven miles 
from Logansport. Mr. Riley was born June 15, 1851, in the city of 
Cleveland, Ohio, and is a son of Andrew and Catherine (Hoover) Riley. 
His father, a marble cutter by trade, came to Indiana when a young man 
and took up land in Cass county, but subsequently entered the rail- 
road contracting business, and in that line was engaged at the time of 
his death. .At that time AVilliam Riley was but seven years of age, and 
during the next three years he lived with an elder brother. The latter, 
however, enlisted in the Union army at the outbreak of the Civil war, 
and the youth was left alone in the world. After drifting around for 
some time, seeking a home, he was taken in charge by his uncle, on whose 
farm he was reared, and who gave him the advantages of a country 
school education. Mr. Riley continued to reside with his uncle until 
he was twenty-seven years of age, in the meantime carefully saving 
his earnings, with the end ever in view of one day being a property 
owner himself. His ambition was realized, in 1878, when he became the 
owner of his present property, a tract of eighty-five acres of fine land, 
which he has brought to a high state of cultivation. From time to time, 
as his finances permitted and circiimstances demanded, ]\Ir. Riley added 
to the buildings and improvements on his land, thus adding to the value 
of a property that in itself was of much worth. He has devoted himself 
to general farming, and has also been successful in the raising of live- 
stock. This land was all cleared by Mr. Riley from its virgin state, and 
its present condition reflects great credit upon his industry, enterprise 
and good management. The multitudinous duties of his work have pre- 
cluded the idea of his entering the political field as a seeker for per- 
sonal preferment, but he has observed the duties of good citizenship, 
and has given of his time and means in supporting movements for the 
public welfare. 

On October 8, 1882, ]Mr. Riley was united in marriage with j\Iiss 
Charlotte Gotsehall, and to this union there have been born three chil- 
dren, as follows : ^laiide, who married Fred Stackhouse, a Cass county 
farmer, and has one child, — Ray; Harvey, who is single and lives on 
the home farm, which he is assisting his father to cultivate ; and Katie, 
who also lives with her parents. The family belongs to the United 
Brethren church, in which all of its members have numerous friends. 
The life of j\Ir. Riley is worthy of emulation by aspiring youths and 
teaches the lesson that integi-ity and industry are bound to bring success. 

H. Harvey Gotshall. Among the agriculturists of the second 
generation who are carrying on the work that their fathers commenced 
in the development of Cass county, Harvey Gotshall is entitled to promi- 
nent mention. He was born on the old Gotshall homestead in Washing- 
ton township, December 16, 1866, and is a son of Henry and ]\Iaria J. 
(Rodrick) Gotshall. 

Peter Gotshall, the grandfather of Harvey Gotshall, was a native 
of Pennsylvania, and in 1837, with a large party of emigrants seeking 
homes in what was then the far West, with twenty-eight teams alto- 
gether, came by way of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and Richmond, Indi- 
ana, with the intention of settling in Illinois. On the way, however, Mr. 



812 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

Gotshall stopped for a visit in Indiana, and was so attracted by the com- 
munity that he rented a piece of land eight miles south of Terre Haute, 
on which he remained until 1845, in that year coming to Cass county, 
and settling in Noble township. Here he spent the remainder of his 
life in agricultural pursuits, dying in 1857, when fifty-seven yedrs of 
age. He married Ann Woodling, who survived him until seventy-nine 
years of age, and they had a family of seven children : John, who resided 
in Kansas City, Missouri ; Henry, the father of Harvey ; Elizabeth, 
deceased; Frank, Jacob and Eliza, who were residents of Noble town- 
ship ; and Alva, deceased. 

Henry Gotshall was born April 25, 1827, in Pennsylvania, and was 
ten years of age when his parents emigrated to Indiana. His early edu- 
cation was secured in the primitive subscription schools, and it was not 
until he was twenty-one years of age that he secured advantages in the 
first free school taught in the state. The entire subsequent period of his 
active life was devoted to farming, and his success was commensurate 
with the hard, intelligent and persistent labor which he expended upon 
his work. He was a Whig and later a Republican in politics, although 
only a voter, and with his family attended the German Baptist church. 
Mr. Gotshall was married to Mary J. Rodrick, a native of Maryland, 
who came as a child to Washington township, and they became the par- 
ents of the following children : Sarah, who died leaving five children ; 
Alice, who died at the age of seven years; Charlotte, who married Wil- 
William Riley, and has three children ; Hamlin Franklin, deceased, who 
lived on a portion of his father's land; Amanda, who married Charles 
Wilson, of Tipton township, and had two children; and Harvey. 

Harvey Gotshall received his education in the country schools of 
Washington township, which he attended during the winter terms, his 
summers being devoted to the work of the home place. He has always 
devoted himself to agricultural pursuits, and at this time is the owner 
of 64 acres of good land in Washington township, where he raises large 
crops and breeds valuable live stock. Like his father, he is known as a 
good, practical agriculturist, and one Avho takes advantage of new meth- 
ods and modern farming machinery, and his property shows the pres- 
ence of good management. 

In March, 1907, Mr. Gotshall was married to Miss Hattie Amen, 
daughter of David and Mary (Hunter) Amen, and they have one 
child in the family, Everett. Mr. Gotshall has never sought public 
office, preferring to devote his entire time to the cultivation of his land. 
He is a public-spirited citizen, however, and lends his support to all pro- 
gressive movements in the way of education, religion and good citizen- 
ship. 

Willis R. Tousley. Fifty years in the service and still at the key, 
such is the record of W. R. Tousley, of Anoka, one of the oldest opera- 
tors of the Pittsburgh, Chicago & St. Louis Railroad. Railroading in 
all of its various branches attracts young men ; there is something about 
the glamour of the vocation that draws youths from every walk 
of life. It is also true that commensurate rewards and steady employ- 
ment are given those who are willing to work hard, to place their com- 
pany's interests before their own, to at all times sacrifice self for the 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 813 

service; for those who are not willing to do so, and who have not the 
necessary ability, the great railroad systems have little use. The rail- 
road man is a soldier no less than he who fights under his country's 
flag; his first duty is to obey orders absolutely. It will thus be seen 
that a man who has remained in the service for one of the large trans- 
portation companies for a period covering a half a century of time, must 
necessarily be possessed of the qualities of intelligence, integrity, faith- 
fulness to duty and keen perception, and all of these Mr. Tousley pos- 
sesses in no small degree. Althoiigh he has reached an age when most 
men are willing to retire from active labor, and is the owner of a com- 
fortable home which the years of constant industry have secured for 
him, like others before him he feels himself boiind by the ties of loyalty 
to his company, and is loath to leave its service. 

Mr. Tousley was horn February 19, 1848, at Clinton, Michigan, and 
is a son of Isaac and Julia (Murdock) Tousley. His father came from 
the East, in young manhood, settling first in Michigan, and later in 
1851 coming to Logansport, where he followed merchandising and paint- 
ing as a contractor up to the time of his death. He and his wife were 
the parents of five children, as follows : Edwin ; W. R. ; Henry ; Charles, 
who is deceased ; and Fannie. 

W. R. Tousley was little more than two years old when he was 
brought to Logansport by his parents, and here he received his first 
instruction in the old public school at Tenth and ]\Iarket streets. Sub- 
sequently, he attended the old Stone Seminary and the high school, 
but when his father died he was compelled to seek employment, and 
accordingly became a messenger boy in the service of the Pittsburgh, 
Chicago and St. Louis Railroad, with which he has been connected in 
one capacity or another to the present time. He was advanced to the 
position of agent after some time, his evident endeavor to properly 
perform his duties attracting the attention of his employers, and while 
thus engaged he learned telegraphy, eventually becoming an operator. 
It was in that capacity that Mr. Tousley came to this junction, one of 
the important points on the line, where he still continues to faithfully 
perform his duties, one of his company's most trusted employes. 

Mr. Tousley was married twice, first to IMiss Alice Jack ' and one 
child was born, Charles E. Mrs. Tousley died and Mr. Tousley wedded 
the sister to his first wife, Miss Sarah Jack, and four children graced 
this union, namely: M. C, C. A., Lillian, and C. T. Mr. Tousley is a 
member of the ]\Iasonic lodge of Walton, Indiana, and the I. O. 0. F. at 
Anoka, Indiana, and in both orders he enjoys the true friendship and 
brotherhood of the orders. His political inclinations are in sympathy 
with the Democratic party, although he has never cared nor sought for 
public office. He has been thrifty and industrious, and is now the owner 
of a pleasant home in Anoka, as well as a farm of one hundred and 
twenty acres in Washington township, the latter of which is being oper- 
ated by renters. Mr. Tousley is respected and esteemed by all who have 
his acquaintance, as a man who has lived an upright and honorable life, 
and as a citizen who has ever held the best interests of his community 
at heart. 



814 HISTOEY OF CASS COUNTY 

James Hobney. No longer does the traveler through Cass county 
view neglected farms and poor, unremunerative stock, the agriculturists 
of this section today being men of experience and ability. However, it 
is not every farm that shows the same sleek and shining cattle, well 
nurtured and thoroughbred in appearance, that may be found on the 
handsome, highly-cultivated farm belonging to James Horney, in Noble 
township. Mr. Horney is a native of Cass county and has passed his 
entire life here, being thoroughly familiar with soil and climatic condi- 
tions, and thus able to manage his operations satisfactorily. He was 
born February 10, 1849, and is a son of James and Matilda (Page) 
Horney. 

James Horney, Sr., was born in North Carolina, October 18, 1804, 
and his wife, a native of Virginia, was born March 6, 1816. He came 
to Cass county in 1829, and in 1836 James Horney, Sr., was sheriff 
of the county, being later elected associate judge with Judges Biddle 
and "Wright. For a number of years he held the office of township trus- 
tee, and during the drafting period of the Civil war was chosen by a 
number of drafted citizens to take a voluntary contribution of $2,700 
to Indianapolis to buy up substitutes to take their places. This he 
succeeded in doing and returning home within twenty-four hours. He 
died February 6, 1882, on his farm, after a life given in large part to 
the benefit of his fellowmen, and one which left a distinct impress upon 
his community. His widow survived him some years, and passed away 
April 9, 1898. 

James Horney, Jr., was educated in the district schools of Noble 
township, to which community he had been brought with two older chil- 
dren when a mere child. He was reared to farming pursuits, which he 
has followed all of his life, and in connection with which he was for 
some years an extensive buyer of timber for James Van Buskirk, a 
dealer of Logansport. Like his father, Mr. Horney bears an enviable 
reputation in business circles, and is known as an able farmer and good 
citizen. On November 4, 1875, Mr. Horney was married to Miss Nancy 
J. Wilson, daughter of John and Keziah (Maple) "Wilson, and one of 
eleven children. About 1836 the parents of Mrs. Horney came to Cass 
county with their twx» oldest children, locating in Lewisburg. By trade 
Mr. "Wilson was a blacksmith, and at Lewis he established himself in 
business, a great deal of his trade, being with the Indians in sharpening 
arrowpoints, etc., and he also did a large business shoeing horses for the 
boatmen on the canal that ran through Logansport. An incident worthy 
of note, in that it shows his ability and good workmanship, relates of his 
shoeing a team of oxen for a company of young men en route to Cali- 
fornia, these shoes not being removed until the party reached its des- 
tination some six months later. During the Civil war, he purchased a 
farm in Miami township, and there he resided for some forty years, 
dying about the year 1901. 

Two children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Horney, namely : 
Harry D., born August 23, 1878; and George A., boni July 4, 1884. 

Mrs. Horney was born in Lewisburg, Indiana, August 5, 1850, and 
there reared and educated in the common schools. She is a devout 
member of the Baptist church. Both of the sons of Mr. and Mrs. Horney 
are living, the eldest is Hariy D., born August 23, 1878. He received 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 815 

his diploma from the common schools and pursued a full commercial 
course at Logansport. He has been an accountant, working for one 
firm in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, for fifteen years. He is now an 
agriculturist and a resident of Braidentown, Florida. He wedded Miss 
Harriett F. Jordan, and she is a member of the Baptist church. He is 
a Republican. George A., born July 4, 1884, also received his diploma 
one of the highest grades in the county at that time, then he was a 
student in the Logansport high school and subsequently took a commer- 
cial course, at the Logansport Commercial College. He married Miss 
Hazel H. De Laroter (whose progenitors were French) and they have 
one little son, Richard Albert, aged two years. George is a carpenter by 
trade. He was a member of the Indiana National Guards, and his 
wife has embroidered a handsome piece of embroidery — exhibiting all 
the officers' and guards' names in beautiful needlework. Mrs. Horney 
received her diploma from the public schools and was one of eighty- 
one who passed the examinations, and one of the number was a great- 
granddaughter of the old Indian Chief Godfrey. In politics Mr. Horney 
was a Republican until recent years, but now believes in voting rather 
for the man than the party. He has never been an office seeker himself, 
having been content to confine his activities to the cultivation of his 
land. 

Mr. and Mrs. James Horney of this sketch have one hundred and 
twelve acres of good land in Noble township. They passed the winter 
of 1912 in Florida. Their comfortable home lies on the Pleasant Grove 
Pike, two miles north of the city, and is known as "Forest Home," the 
abode of hospitality. 

Harry Fultz. One of the most successful farming men to be found 
in this section of Cass county may be designated in the person of Harry 
Fultz, who has a fine farm of eighty acres in Noble township, where he 
is regarded among the most prosperous and influential of the citizens 
of his community. 

Harry Fultz was born in Logansport, on July 26, 1871, and is the son 
of Andrew J. and Julia Ann (Boyer) Fultz. The father was an Ohioan, 
born in Stark county, where his people had long lived, and the mother 
came from Pennsylvania in 1868, settling in Edward township. Her 
people were of German descent. Andrew J. and Julia Fultz became the 
parents of three sons, two of whom died young, — Charles when six 
years of age and Lawrence in infancy. Harry being the only surviving 
child of his parents. 

When he was a child, the parents of Harry Fultz moved to Peoria, 
Illinois, and from there located in Iowa. They later moved back to 
Indiana, settling in Noble township, and here Mr. Fultz lives today on 
the farm they occupied there in his boyhood. Concerning the father of 
Mr. Fultz, it may be said that he was born in Stark county, Ohio, on 
August 31, 1844. His mother died in 1854, when he was but ten years 
old, and when he was sixteen having been accustomed to making his 
own way for some years, he engaged in railroad work, — -a business he 
followed with great success until 1898. He was an engineer on the road 
for twenty-eight years and he has the distinction of having run the 
first coal burning engine from Logansport to Chicago over the Chicago 



816 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

& Great Eastern Railroad. After leaving off railroad work, Mr. Fultz 
settled on a farm in the vicinity of Logansport, and there lived until the 
time of his death. 

It was the occupation of the father in his capacity as a railroad 
engineer that necessitated the several changes of residence that Harry 
Fultz experienced as a boy. These changes, however, it is safe to say did 
him no harm, and he has for some years been devoting himself to the 
farm work with an intensity and fervor that have won him success and 
well-being in a financial way, and the regard and esteem of all who 
regard with favor the energetic application of a man's best qualities in 
the work he sets himself to do. 

On February 7, 1895, Mr. Fultz married Miss Lena Quade, the 
daughter of Frank L. Quade and his wife, Louise (Schwab) Quade, and 
they have three children : Burton, born June 15, 1896 ; LeRoy, born 
July 11, 1904; and Alice, born February 27, 1905. 

The family are members of the Presbyterian church, and Mr. Fultz 
maintains an independent attitude in his political activities. 

Charles B. E. Young. One of the business men of Logansport, 
whose activities have covered a period of twenty-two years, and whose 
energy, sagacity and industry have enabled him to build up a large 
and important enterprise, is Charles B. E. Young, proprietor of a har- 
ness store, where are also sold carriages, automobiles and their accesso- 
ries. Mr. Young has been a resident of Cass county since his second 
year, was reared and educated here, and here received his business 
training. His actions at all times have entitled him to the respect and 
esteem of his fellow-men and as a public-spirited citizen he has rendered 
signal service to his community in assisting to a. successful conclusion 
many movements for the public welfare. Mr. Young was born in 
Franklin county, Indiana, February 14, 1863, and is a son of Alexander 
and Susan (Teague) Young. 

Alexander Young and wife, with their three children, Carrie, Alta 
R. (since deceased), and Charles B. E., came to Cass county in 1865, 
locating on a farm nine miles east of Logansport, on Pipe creek. After 
their arrival here another son, Albert, was born. Alexander Young 
was a farmer all of his life, and attained a reasonable amount of suc- 
cess, but passed away when still in middle life, February 12, 1872. His 
widow still survives him, as do also three of their children. During the 
Civil war, Mr. Young was a member of the Indiana Home Guards that 
repelled the attack of the raiding Confederate general, Morgan. 

Charles B. E. Young grew up on the family farm on Pipe Creek, 
his boyhood being passed in assisting his father, and during the winter 
terms he acquired his education in the country district and public 
schools of Logansport. Just prior to attaining his majority, he became 
a drug clerk in Logansport, continuing in that business for seven years. 
For one year suceeding this he traveled for a wholesale cigar and tea 
house of Indianapolis, but in 1891 decided to enter business on his own 
account, and accordingly, on August 1st of that year, purchased the 
harness shop of Charles McNitt. He has continued to be the proprietor 
of this establishment to the present time, and of recent years has added 
carriages and automobiles and their accessories to his stock. His busi- 



HISTOEY OF CASS COUNTY 817 

ness has enjoyed a steady and healthy growth, yielding commensurate 
returns for the labors of Mr. Young who is an energetic, though well- 
balanced, business man. In national affairs, Mr. Young gives his polit- 
ical support to the Republican party, but in local matters reserves the 
right to vote for the man he deems best fitted for the office, irrespective 
of party lines. He is a Royal Arch Mason and a member of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, takes much interest in fraternal 
work, and is popular with his fellow lodge members. 

On June 8, 1893, Mr. Young was united in marriage with Miss 
Sarah F. Place, and they have become the parents of three children: 
Helen, Clark and Frances. Mrs. Ybung is a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, where she has a wide circle of sincere friends. 

John T. Flanegin. Thirty-three years ago, John T. Flanegin 
came to Logansport and opened a modest stove and tinware store, tak- 
ing a position among the early merchants of Market street, where he has 
since continued his operations. During the period to the present time 
he has enlarged his establishment and his stock, which now includes 
general shelf hardware, and today he is known as one of the substantial 
veteran business men of the city. Mr. Flanegin was born on Raccoon 
creek, in Washington county, Pennsylvania, July 11, 1847. He is one 
of two children, both living, born to John and Mary (Johnston) Flane- 
gin, who were natives of Pennsylvania and descended from Irish parent- 
age. In the old country, the name was Flanekin, but for some unknown 
reason the name here has been spelled in its present style. 

John T. Flanegin was reared in southeastern Ohio, whence his par- 
ents removed when he was a boy, and there received his education in 
the public schools. When fifteen years of age he became a clerk in a 
general store at Zanesvile, Ohio, and subsequently held a like position 
in a store at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. For some years following, he 
was engaged in working out at various occupations, such as herding 
cattle, clerking, driving drays and various other vocations, but upon the 
sickness and subsequent death of his father he returned to the Ohio 
town, where he resided until 1880. That year saw his advent in Logans- 
port, and marked the beginning of his successful career as a merchant. 
Having had some experience in the tinware business, he opened a shop, 
and also installed a line of stoves, and to this, with the passing of years, 
he added general shelf hardware. Coming here in moderate circum- 
stances, through industry, energy and an intelligent comprehension of 
the needs of his locality, he has built up a business that has gained him 
a position of prestige among his fellow merchants. He is known as 
strictly reliable in all his dealings, having an enviable reputation for 
integrity, and among his associates is recognized as a shrewd and cap- 
able business man, possessed of foresight and acumen. An American 
first, last and all the time, he endeavors to lend his influence to the 
cause of good government and general progress, and those movements 
which promise the advancement of his community's interests are sure 
to find in him a loyal supporter. In his political proclivities he is a 
Democrat, although he has never sought personal preferment in the 
public arena. Mr. Flanegin has taken some interest in fraternal mat- 
ters, being a member of the Masons, the Knights of Pythias and the 



818 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, in all of which he is popular 
with his fellow members. 

On January 6, 1875, ]\Ir. Flanegin was married to Miss Alice A. 
Moore, of Bloomington, Illinois, and to this union there have been 
born three children: Blanch, who became the wife of C. L. Baker; 
Thomas J., and Lorin A. Mrs. Flanegin died February 3, 1910, in the 
faith of the Presbyterian church, of Avhich her husband is a member. 

George A. Linton is one of the oldest native-born citizens of 
Logansport, his birth having occurred in this city August 9, 1848, on 
North street, in the second house east of the present site of the Masonic 
Temple. Samuel B. Linton, his father, was born at Chillieothe, 
Ohio, and was a carpenter and contractor, coming to Logansport 
in that capacity in 1825, when there were but three houses in the 
place. He did not remain long at that time, but moved on to LaFayette, 
where he continued to reside for two years, but in 1827 settled perma- 
nently in Logansport, where he made his home during the balance of 
his life. He here worked at his trade, but with the passing of time the 
structures erected by him have been rebuilt. In addition to a number 
of residences and business establishments, he built two canal boats to 
ply on the Erie canal and these he operated from shortly after the 
completion of the canal until the year 1840. Joseph Dale was associated 
with him in the building of one of these boats. Attracted by the glow- 
ing reports from the gold fields of California, Mr. Linton started over- 
land for that locality in the spring of 1852 and was there three years, 
building flumes and flatboats on Feather river and at Sacramento. He 
returned to the east in 1855, but again returned to California in 1859, 
to recuperate his failing health, going by boat around Cape Horn, a 
trip that lasted six mouths. Seeing the futility of his mission, he re- 
mained there but a short time, returning to Logansport and dying in 
July, 1860. He was married twice, first to a Lliss Blaine, a cousin of 
the Hon. James G. Blaine, and she bore him seven children, none of 
whom are now living. His second wife was Eliza Dale, daughter of 
Christopher Dale, who bore him two children: Thomas, who died in 
infancy ; and George A. Mr. Linton was a man rather small in stature, 
weighing about 150 pounds. His frequent association with the Indians 
enabled him to speak the Pottawatomie and Miami tongues. Resolute 
and firm, he never embarked on any undertaking without carrying it 
into execution. In his later life he joined the Methodist Episcopal 
church and died in that faith. He was a AVhig in politics and later 
became a Republican, and served Logansport as town marshal in 1857 
and 1858. 

George A. Linton has always claimed Logansport as his home, al- 
though he has not lived here continuously. He received his education 
in the public and paid schools of this city. On February 4, 1862, when 
not yet fourteen years of age, he enlisted in the field service in the 
L^nion army and was assigned to duty in Knetucky, under General 
Nelson, for whom he w^as moimted orderly. In February, 1863, he was 
sent back to procure horses and while there, his guardian, Capt. 
Alexander Hardy, w^ho had been made such while young Linton was at 
the front, secured him and permitted him to enlist in the Twenty-fourth 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 819 

Indiana Light Artillery. He participated in the pursuit of General 
Morgan, who had made raids into Indiana and Ohio, and from here 
went into Eastern Tennessee, under General Bui'nside. They were 
penned in at Knoxville until relieved after the battle of Missionary 
Bidge, and from Knoxville (including all the attendant campaigns 
preceding and following the battle) went to Charleston, Tennessee, in 
the spring of 1864. There the command was merged with the Second 
Brigade, Twenty-third Army Corps, under General Schofield, and entered 
the Atlanta campaign, having seen the first engagement at Snake 
Creek Gap, Dalton, and the continuous fighting until July 21. It was 
at the battle of Kenesaw Mountain that Capt. Alexander Hardy, com- 
manding the company of which Mr. Linton was a member, fired the 
gun loaded with a spherical shell that killed General Pope. After the 
fall of Atlanta, Mr. Linton was a member of the command that pursued 
General Hood north and participated in the battles of Franklin and 
Nashville. Here they went into camp at Fort Negley, and this, with 
the exception of some guerilla fighting, completed iMr. Linton's military 
career. He was wounded at Leonore's Station, through the left wrist 
and arm, and was discharged August 3, 1865, at Indianapolis, by order 
of the War Department. 

Returning to Logansport, he was engaged in the occupations of 
peace until February, 1867, when he enlisted in the general field serv- 
ice of the Regular Army and was stationed at Vicksburg, Mississippi, 
there passing safely through the cholera epidemic. He was then assigned 
to the Eleventh United States Infantry of the Fifth Military District, 
which comprised Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas, and was under the 
command of Gen. Joe Reynolds, at San Antonio, Texas, being detailed 
to the Mounted Police whose duty it was to quell the disturbances of 
the frontier desperadoes, the Indians and the offi-scourings of both 
armies, and in general to see that law and order were maintained. He 
was finally discharged March 4, 1870. He returned at that time to 
Logansport and for a time was engaged in railroad work, but in 1879 
embarked in the pump and well business, in which he continued until 
1895. Since that time he has been associated with Adam Graf in the 
plumbing and heating business. A thoroughly reliable and capable 
business man, i\Ir. Linton has the confidence and esteem of his associates,- 
and his judgment is always consulted on questions of importance. He 
is a Republican in politics, but has not entered actively in the struggles 
of the public arena, for his whole attention has been given to his busi- 
ness enterprises. He takes a keen and intelligent interest in the welfare 
of his city and its people, however, and always supports measures that 
make for good government and good citizenship. He is a valued mem- 
ber of the local lodge of IMasons and has risen to the Knight Templar 
degree. 

On June 11, 1870, Mr. Linton was married to Miss Mary E. Emery, 
and they have had eight children, as follows : Horace B. ; Minnie, who 
married William R. Cogley ; Gertrude, who married M. Mexicans ; Mary 
E., who became the wife of L. E. Slick ; Elizabeth, Alice and Carrie, 
who are deceased ; and Charles A. Mrs. Linton died July 14, 1912, in 
the faith of the IMethodist Episcopal church, of which ]\Ir. Linton is a 
consistent member and liberal supporter. 



820 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

John Alber, for many years identified with the crockery business 
in Logansport, and one of the widely known and prominent business men 
of the city, was born in Logansport, Indiana, on September 11, 1852. 
He is the son of Jacob Alber, who was a native of Lichtenstein, Austria, 
and his wife, Sophia Dierkson, a native of Bremen, Germany. 

Jacob Alber learned the trade of a housepainter and decorator in his 
native land and in Italy, and in 1848, or thereabouts, he emigrated to 
the United States. He first located at Wabash, Indiana, but in 1849 
came down the canal to Logansport, where he began working at his 
trade. He also became connected with the trade of a stone mason, and 
worked for a time as a bricklayer, as well as at various other employ- 
ments of a kindred nature. In 1850 he met and married Sophia Dierk- 
son. She came to Baltimore with a family of the name of Albers, and 
from there to Indiana with the family of James G. Cox, who settled in 
Bethlehem township, in Cass county, Indiana. There they were mar- 
ried, and during the remainder of his life Jacob Alber worked at his 
trade in and about Logansport. He was ever a hard-working and indus- 
trious man and in later life was reckoned fairly well-to-do. He was 
twice married. By his first wife he became the father of two children, — 
John and Philip, the latter of whom died at the age of two years. 

The father, who was born January 7, 1821, died July 24, 1891, and 
the mother, born on May 15, 1813, died April 4, 1883. 

John Alber is the only surviving child of his father. He was edu- 
cated in the public schools of Logansport, and at Notre Dame University, 
from which he was graduated in 1868. His first employment upon leav- 
ing college was a clerk in the store of Mitchell, Walker & Ranch, boot 
and shoe dealers of Logansport, and he remained with them for a year. 
He then accepted a position with Morris & Snider, as a clerk in their 
crockery establishment, then as traveling salesman. In 1880 he severed 
his connection with that firm and began traveling for Hollweg & Reese, 
wholesale crockery dealers of Indianapolis, and for twenty-nine years 
Mr. Alber remained with them with the exception of a two-year- 
period when, in partnei^ship with W. H. Snider, he was engaged in the 
wholesale and retail crockery business in Logansport. When that asso- 
ciation was suspended Mr. Alber resumed his old place with the Indian- 
.apolis house, continuing with them until 1909. In that year he again 
embarked in the wholesale and retail crockery business in Logansport, 
and again his business partner was W. H. Snider. On January 17, 1911, 
Mr. Alber bought his partner's interest in the business and has since 
conducted it alone, with a pleasing degree of success. 

Mr. Alber is a Republican in his politics. He is a Mason of the 
Scottish Rite branch, and a member of the Knights Templar -and ]\Iurat 
Temple of the Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. 

On April 14, 1879, Mr. Alber married aiiss Betty B. Dawes, daughter 
of Elisha Dawes, and they have one daughter, — Aline Sophia, now the 
wife of Joseph T. Graffis, whose home is at Indianapolis. Mrs. Alber 
is a member of the Episcopal church. 

Henry Tucker, for forty-seven years a resident of Logansport, is 
of New England nativity, his birth occurring in the village of Norway, 
Maine, on INIarch 27, 1843. His paternal grandfather located at that 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 821 

place in the year 1802 and established himself in the harness and sad- 
dlery business, and upon his death he was succeeded by his son, Ben- 
jamin, and a son of the latter succeeded him, at the close of the Civil 
war, in which he served in the Army of the Potomac. Upon his death 
a nephew took over the business, and he continues in it to the present 
time, thus making four generations of the Tucker family in a direct line 
to have conducted the harness and saddlery business in Norway, Maine. 

Benjamin Tucker was the father of Henry Tucker. He was born at 
Norway, Maine, there married Sarah Millett, the mother of Henry, 
and passed his life in the place of his birth, employed in the business 
which descended to him on the death of his father. 

Henry Tucker attended the district schools and the academy in his 
boyhood, and learned the harness and saddle-making trade under his 
father. While he was yet a boy, on November 9, 1861, he enlisted in 
Company G, Fourteenth Maine Volunteer Infantry, receiving the ap- 
pointment of corporal of his company. In 1862 he was promoted to 
sergeant and with his regiment became a part of the command of Gen. 
B. F. Butler, on the expedition to Ship Island, Mississippi, and thence 
to New Orleans, arriving at the latter place the day Mumford was 
hanged by order of General Butler for pulling down the American flag 
from the city hall. By reason of ill health, ]\Ir. Tucker received an 
honorable discharge from the service on July 5, 1862, and for some time 
thereafter was unable to actively engage in any arduous undertaking. 
On May 1, 1864, his strength renewed by his continued relaxation from 
duty, he reenlisted and became first sergeant of Company H, Maine 
State Guards, stationed at Fort McClary, Portsmouth Harbor. He re- 
ceived his final discharge on July 4, 1864. 

Mr. Tucker then determined that his education was not sufficiently 
complete, and he accordingly took a course of study in the Business Col- 
lege of Brj'^ant & Stratton, at Portland, Maine, after which he set out 
for the west in search of a favorable locality in which to engage in busi- 
ness. For a year he made his home at Elgin, Illinois, but in April, 
1866, he came to Logansport, Indiana, and in the following August he 
bought the J. W. Fuller harness shop. Here for a period of nearly forty 
years Mr. Tucker was engaged in the business at that stand, and in the 
course of his business transactions during that time gained an acquaint- 
ance with almost every man in Cass county. For the past few years, 
however, Mr. Tucker has been occupied with the undertaking business, 
in which he has experienced a goodly measure of success. 

In the quiet, unobtrusive way which characterizes Mr. Tucker, he 
has lived so as to leave an indelible impress for good upon every enter- 
prise with which he has been identified. He is a Mason, having joined 
the order in Maine many years ago, hut is now a member of Orient 
Lodge No. 272 A. F. & A. M. of Logansport, of which he has served as 
worshipful master. He is also a member of Logan Chapter No. 2, of 
Logansport, the Council No. 11 of Logansport and St. John Command- 
ery. No. 24, serving as eminent commander in 1881-82, and the oldest 
in point of membership of the Scottish Rite in the county. He is also 
a member of Logansport Post No. 14 Grand Army of the Republic. 

Mr. Tucker has been twice married. In 1871 he married Emma Stal- 
naker, who died about one year later. In 1876 he married Julia Mer- 



822 , HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

riam, daughter of J. A. Merriam, one of the leading business men of 
Logansport, and they are the parents of two daughters, — Minnie and 
Florence, both of whom are married. Minnie is the wife of N. W. Blem- 
ming, now living in Fort Scott, Kansas, and Florence is married to 
J. Burt Wintei-, of the firm of Elias Winter & Son, who was born and 
has always lived in Logansport. 

Isaac Himmelbergee was one of the noted men of Cass county and 
was always a credit to the community wherein he made his home. He 
was bom August 13, 1840, in Berks county, Pennsylvania, and was one 
of seven children born to Charles Himmelberger and his wife, Lavinia 
(Hain) Himmelberger. 

Reared at Lancaster as a boy, Isaac Himmelberger received not more 
than a common school education. When he was eighteen years old he 
moved with his parents to Meyerstown, Pennsylvania, and there he was 
later associated with his father in the milling business, and still later 
with an uncle, Levi Hain, in the grain business. From Meyerstown he 
came to Indiana in 1865, and with Levi Hain, Henry Sherk and John 
Myers, engaged in the lumber business about two miles north of the 
town of Walton, in Tipton county. Here they established a sawmill in 
the swamp, acquired a tract of three hundred and eighty acres, and at 
once began to convert the towering timber into lumber. When the work 
here had been completed and the supply of raw material been exhausted, 
Mr. Himmelberger and Perry Kessling leased a tract of land near On- 
ward, there erected a mill, and began the work of sawing as they had 
done near Walton. Llr. Himmelberger then came to Logansport and in 
partnership with a Mr. Dewey, built a mill and established a general 
lumber business, buying timber throughout the entire country surround- 
ing them. It was during this time, in 1878, that he became the candi- 
date of the Republican party for the office of sheriff of the county, and 
notwithstanding the fact that the nominal Democratic majority in the 
county was something like six hundred, Mr. Himmeberger was elected. 
He served a two year term in the office of Sheriff, and it was during 
this period that he bought out his partner's interests in the business. 
Soon after his retirement from office he went to Buffington, Missouri, and 
there started a sawmill, moving the equipment from Logansport to the 
Missouri town, to augment the equipment of the mill already in opera- 
tion there. A few years later he formed a partnership with John Burris 
in the stave business at Dexter, Missouri, in connection with his other 
business, and this partnership existed but a comparatively short time, 
but Mr. Himmelberger still continued the lumber business at Buffington, 
Missouri, and later at Morehouse, Missouri, a place of which he was 
really the founder and builder. His son, John, was associated with him 
at these two latter places. At IMorehouse he built one of the largest 
hardwood lumber plants ever known in the southwest, if not, indeed, 
in the entire country. They acquired approximately 100,000 acres of 
land and at times employed more than two hundred mill hands. Mr. 
Himmelberger, while yet in the prime of life and while the future yet 
held glowing promise of attainment, was suddenly stricken with an 
illness which culminated in his death on July 16, 1900. 

His was a life that held many lessons. He began his independent 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 823 

career without other means than his own courage and willing hands. 
His courage never faltered in all the years of his activity, and repeatedly 
he was called upon to overcome obstacles that would have overwhelmed 
many with dismay, and would have been the sure defeat of many an- 
other. Through all the years he steadily pressed forward, achieving a 
success far beyond that which the average man meets. At no time was 
the honesty and fairness of his dealings ever questioned. With him 
"whatever was worth doing at all was worth doing well" and that old 
axiom he held up for the constant admonition of all who were associated 
with him in his work. He died as he had lived, — an honored and re- 
spected citizen, and his untimely death was deeply mourned by all 
who came within the circle of his acquaintance. 

In 1860 Mr. Himmelberger was married to Catherine Haak, and 
seven children were born to them, four of whom lived to reach years of 
maturity, as follows : John, who is now engaged in conducting the 
business in Missouri which was founded by his father; Jane, the wife 
of Samuel Fisher; Lillia, the wife of H. J. Crismond; and Nettie, who 
married W. 0. Murdock, and is now deceased. Mrs. Himmelberger, 
who still lives and is the grandmother of twelve children, is the daugh- 
ter of Henry and Sarah (Bassler) Haak, who were natives of the state 
of Pennsylvania, and like the Himmelbergers, people of German ances- 
try. 

John W. Guard was born in Dixon, Illinois, on March 1, 1863, and 
is one of the five children of John L. and Anna Mary (Gable) Guard, 
all of the five being alive today. 

John L. Guard, the father of the subject, was a minister of the Eng- 
lish Lutheran church, an occupation which he followed all through his 
busy and active life. He was a native of Virginia, descended from 
German-Hessian ancestry, and his wife's people originally came from 
Bavaria. Rev. John L. Guard died in Carroll county, Indiana, on Octo- 
ber 18, 1895, and his wife died in Peoria county, Illinois, in ]March, 1868. 

Carroll county, Indiana, was the home of John "W. Guard until he 
was fifteen. Camden was the town where he was reared, and he lived on 
a farm between the ages of fifteen and twenty-one. He received his pre- 
liminary education in the common schools of his community, further 
advantages not being afforded him. In 1885 he came to Logansport, 
Indiana, and there engaged in the draying business, which appeared to 
him to offer a chance of success. He handled the draying contracts for 
EUiott, Stroyer & Company, wholesale grocers, they being among his 
largest patrons, and after he gave up draying he was for three years 
engaged in ranching in southwestern Kansas, after which he returned 
to Logansport, in 1890, and for sixteen years thereafter was employed 
as a clerk in the retail grocery store of Lewis Ray. He then bought an 
interest in the Rice Hardware Company, and has since been engaged in 
that business, at present being the treasurer of the corporation. 

Mr. Guard is a Republican, and his fraternal relations are with the 
Masons, in which he is a member of Tipton Lodge No. 33, A. F. & A. M. 
He is a member of St. Luke's English Lutheran chui'ch, as is also his 
wife, who was Miss Anna Hildebrandt, and to whom he was married on 
November 23, 1903. 



824 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

Moses R. Frazee. With the exception of a four years' period which 
he spent in Minneapolis, Minnesota, Moses R. Frazee has been a resident 
of Logansport for the past fifty-two years. He was born on August 
26, 1834, in Miami county, Ohio, a son of David and Mary (Price) 
Frazee. The father of David Frazee came to America from the Isle of 
Jersey, and the mother was a native of Wales. David Frazee was a 
farmer and JMoses R. made his home upon the farm home until he was 
about fifteen years old. He helped with the work of the home place as 
a boy and attended the old fashioned school common to his time, finish- 
ing his schooling with two years in the schools of Piqua. After this 
latter experience he clerked in a general store for something like two 
years, in the employ of I. B. Whipple. He then went to Marion and 
managed a store which Mr. Whipple owned there, and some fifteen 
months later, in 1857, he came to Logansport. Here Mr. Frazee em- 
barked in a general dry goods business on his own responsibility. His 
stock in the early days consisted of boots, shoes, general dry goods, prod- 
uce and clothing. He sold his store in 1866 and went to Minneapolis, 
where with his brother-in-law, William Murphy, he built a flouring mill 
and for four years was engaged in the milling business. This was one of 
the old stone buhr mills and had a capacity of three hundred barrels 
daily. During this time the firm of Frazee & Murphy had sold a two- 
thirds interest in the business, and finally disposed of the remaining 
one-third to Charles Pillsbury, and under his management and eventual 
control the mill was changed over to the patent roller process, and made 
millions for its owners. Mr. Frazee returned to Logansport in 1870 and 
once more embarked in the dry goods business, in which he has been 
continuously engaged since that time, and he is the oldest merchant 
now doing business in this city. 

On August 21, 1864, Mr. Frazee was united in marriage with ]\Iiss 
Mary Higgins, a daughter of Capt. A. M. Higgins, who was one of the 
early and well known men of the county. Three children were bom to 
Mr. and Mrs. Frazee, as follows: Helen, who died in infancy; Jessie, 
who lived to be five years old; and Stuart R., who died on November 20, 
1912. The wife and mother died on November 5, 1902. 

Mr. Frazee is a Republican and cast his first presidential vote for 
John C. Fremont. He is one of the best known men in Logansport, 
esteemed by a large circle of friends and acquaintances who have known 
him for many years as one of the substantial citizens of Logansport. 

WiLLARD Elliott. Among the old and honored families of Cass 
county whose members have been identified with the growth and develop- 
ment of their section's commercial, industrial and agricultural impor- 
tance, that of Elliott is among the best known. Its members have for 
years resided in Harrison township, where the history of the family has 
been commensurate with that of the community, and have contributed 
in no small degree to its public service. A worthy representative of the 
name is found in Willard Elliott, of Logansport, assistant clerk at the 
City Light Company, and a man who has represented his city and county 
in various positions of trust and responsibility. Mr. Elliott was born 
December 26, 1868, in Harrison township, and is a son of Alfred and 
Emily (Williamson) Elliott. 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 825 

Joseph Elliott, the grandfather of Willard Elliott, was a farmer by 
occupation, and owned a tract of land in Harrison township which had 
been secured from the government by one Skinner, who erected log build- 
ings thereon. When Mr. Elliott secured this tract of eighty acres, the 
wolves were still plentiful in the community, and pioneer conditions of 
all kinds had to be met and overcome, but he was of a sturdy and per- 
severing character and managed to make a good home for his family, 
replacing the log buildings with more modern structures of frame and 
making various other improvements. Alfred Elliott followed in his 
father's footsteps as a farmer, and was also engaged for some years as 
a carpenter contractor. He died in 1902, at the age of sixty-five years. 

Willard Elliott secured his education in the public schools of Har- 
rison township, and grew up on his father's farm, it being his father's 
intention that he adopt the vocation of agriculturist. As a young man, 
however, Mr. Elliott entered the field of politics, becoming deputy 
auditor of Cass county, a position which he held for several years. Sub- 
sequently he became receiver for the Baldwin banks, and after three 
years in that position became connected with the City Light Company, 
where he now acts in the capacity of assistant chief clerk. Here he has 
displayed his ability in numerous ways, his services having been of a 
high order. 

On April 29, 1894, Mr. Elliott was united in marriage with Miss 
Mary Burton, who was born in Cass county, daughter of Levi Burton, 
a complete review of whose career will be found in the sketch of J. J. 
Burton in another part of this work. One child has been bom to this 
union : May Burton, born March 18, 1896. Mr. Elliott has interested 
himself to some extent in fraternal work, being a valued member of the 
local lodges of the Knights of Pythias and the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks. They attend the Christian church, where they have 
numerous friends. Mr. Elliott is known as a man who has taken a lead- 
ing part in every movement that has had for its object the betterment 
of the community, and his long and honorable career has been marked 
by constant fidelity to duty and the strictest integrity and probity of 
character. 

Jehu T. Elliott has long occupied a place of prominence in the com- 
mercial and civic life of Logansport, where he has been engaged in 
business since the year 1871. Many and varied are the changes which 
have marked the growth and development of this city, but every suc- 
ceeding change in the business of Mr. Elliott has served but to mark 
its greater advance and its higher status in the business interests of the 
city. 

Bom in Cambridge City, Indiana, on March 24, 1844, Mr. Elliott is 
the son of William and Eliza (Branson) Elliott. His early school priv- 
ileges were but meager, owing to the facilities for education which that 
period provided, and he was but twelve years old when he set about 
making his own way in the world. From then until the present time he 
has been self-supporting, and it is small wonder that success and pros- 
perity should attend the efforts of a man who as a lad of twelve had the 
courage and hardihood to shoulder the responsibility of his own future. 
His first independent work was as a salesman for his brother, Dewitt C. 



826 HISTOEY OF CASS COUNTY 

Elliott, with whom he remained until he reached his majority, and in 
1865 he engaged in the dry goods business as a partner with Henry and 
A. E. Shroyer, under the firm name of Shroyer, Elliott & Company, 
but some little time later they disposed of their business, and Mr. Elliott 
purchased the grocery store which his brother owned in Newcastle, 
Indiana. There he continued to operate until 1870, when he went to 
Chicago and secured a position as a bookkeeper in a packing house. 
After a year he gave up his work and came to Logansport, where he 
became identified with the wholesale grocery concern of Elliott, Pogue 
& Shroyer, which firm was later changed to Elliott, Shroyer & Company. 
In 1889 the brother of the subject died, he being a member of the firm, 
and in the next year Mr. Shroyer withdrew, leaving the firm Elliott & 
Company. In 1896 Mr. Elliott"sold his interest to William M. and S. J. 
Elliott. His next business move was to engage in the wholesale grocery 
business again, the firm name being J. T. Elliott & Son. Some little time 
later Elliott & Company and J. T. Elliott & Son consolidated under the 
firm name of J. T. Elliott Company, and in 1907 was reorganized under 
the firm name of the Elliott Grocei-y Company (Incorporated), J. T. El- 
liot being president of the company. That firm still exists and is one of the 
most prosperous and well known institutions in the business directory of 
the city, bearing a reputation that is unassailable, and occupying a lead- 
ing place in the community. Since the reorganization in 1907 Mr. Elliott 
has been president and manager. The firm conducts a wholesale grocery 
business and furnishes employment to twenty-five people, including road 
salesmen. Mr. Elliott has been in his present quarters since 1874, and 
has been identified with the wholesale grocery business for forty-one 
years, a record of which he may well be proud. 

Mr. Elliott is a Eepublican, and has ever taken an active and inter- 
ested part in the political and civic life of his city. He was for eighteen 
years a member of the Logansport school board, and much credit is due 
him for the work he did as a member of that board and a number of 
beautiful schoolhouses were built during his term of office as evidence 
of his achievement. He has long been a member of the Wholesale Gro- 
cer 's Association of Indiana and of the Traveling Men 's Protective Asso- 
ciation. He is a Mason of high degree, and has been since 1866. He was 
a member of the board of directors for the Masonic Association for the 
construction of the Masonic Temple of Logansport, which gave to the 
city a magnificent building in the Temple. Mr. Elliott was president 
of that board, and much of his enterprise, energy, loyalty to the ordei*, 
and general public spirit is manifested in the splendid structure which 
resulted from the efforts of the society, under his direction. He has been 
for years also a member of the Knights of Pythias and of the Modern 
Woodmen, as well as of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks in 
later years. He was a director of the latter named order when their 
magnificent Temple was built in Logansport. A number of the Method- 
ist Episcopal church at Broadway, this city, Mr. Elliott has been its 
treasurer for thirty-five years, a splendid record for service, surely. 

On May 16, 1865, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Elliott and 
Miss Caroline Shroyer, of Newcastle, Indiana. Three children were born 
to them : Harry S. ; Esther E., the wife of Harry Uhl, and Arethusa, 
the wife of Edward B. Bliss. Mr. and Mrs. Elliott have occupied the 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 827 

same residence in Logansport for the past thirty-eight years, and have 
a host of friends in the city. 

John R. ^Iillman. Among the enterprising and progressive young 
farmers and stock raisers of Cass county may be mentioned John R. 
Millman, who is engaged in cultivating his father's farm of one hundred 
and sixty acres, located on the Millman road, about four and one-half 
miles southeast of Logansport. Mr. Millman comes of a long line of 
agriculturists, and has spent his entire life in the work of cultivating 
the soil. Although still a young man he has demonstrated his ability, 
and his enthusiasm and progressive spirit has resulted in the cultivation 
of an excellent property. John R. Millman was born November 7, 1880, 
at Remington, Jasper county, Indiana, and is a son of Orville M. and 
Lizzie (Benson) Millman. 

Orville M. Millman was born in Putnam county, where he was reared 
and educated, and when still in young manhood, in 1872, migrated to 
Jasper county. There he was engaged in agricultural pursuits until 
1895, in which year he brought his family to Cass county and settled 
first north of and then in Tipton township. He is still engaged in active 
pursuits and is the owner of a fine farm of fifty-eight acres. ^Ir. ]\Iill- 
man married ]\Iiss Lizzie Benson, of Jasper county, Indiana, and they 
became the parents of four children, namely : John R. ; Hattie, who lives 
with her parents in Tipton township ; Lawson A., and William F., also 
at home. 

John R. ]\lillman secured his early education in the common schools 
of Jasper county, and finished it in the country schools of Cass county, 
whence he accompanied his parents when fifteen years of age. He has 
always lived at home, and his training in agricultural matters has been 
most thorough. At the age of eighteen years he began farming on his 
own account, and being the oldest of his parents' children was put in 
charge of the home farm upon attaining his majority. He has shown 
skill, good judgment and thorough knowledge of all the details of modern 
farming, believes in the use of modern machinery and methods, and is 
considered an excellent judge of stock. Like his father, he has always 
supported the principles and candidates of the Republican party, but 
has not cared to identify himself with public life, having been too busy 
in his farming operations. He has found time, however, to lend his 
support to those movements which he has been led to believe will benefit 
his commimity or its people, and has also been identified with fraternal 
work to some extent as a member of the Masonic order, Tipton, Lodge 
Logan, in which he has many warm friends, as he has, indeed, in the 
various walks of life. 

On December 18, 1907, IMr. Millman was united in marriage with 
Miss Edna ^lartin, who was born in Cass county, a member of an old 
and honored family of this section, and a daughter of William P. and 
Eliza (Berry) Martin, farming people. ]\Ir. and ]\Irs. Millman have one 
little daughter, Margaret R., born November 8, 1912. Mr. and ]\Irs. ^lill- 
man are consistent members of the English Lutheran church. Their com- 
fortable home, situated on the Millman road, is often the scene of pleas- 
ant social gatherings, as both the young people are popular in social 
circles of the community. 



828 HISTOEY OF CASS COUNTY 

Jerome McClain. Among the citizens of Cass county who devoted 
their lives to the development of the agricultural interests of this sec- 
tion, one who will be remembered by the older generation was the late 
Jerome McClain, who for many years cultivated a fine tract of land on 
the jMcClain road, about six miles south of Logansport. Coming to this 
vicinity in young manhood, when the country was still in its formative 
shape, he materially aided in bringing about the present prosperous con- 
ditions, and will be remembered as a man of the highest integrity and 
probity of character. Mr. IMcClain was born January 5, 1824, in Day- 
ton, Ohio, in a house on McClain street, named in honor of the family, 
and as a youth learned the trade of carpenter, and also worked at har- 
ness making and blacksmithing. He was still a young man when he 
migrated to Cass county, and here, in the city of Logansport, was mar- 
ried. After the birth of his oldest child, Frank McClain, he returned 
to Ohio in November, 1848, and for ten years worked at his trade in 
Dayton, but in November, 1858, again came to Cass county, this time 
taking up land and clearing a space for a log cabin. During the remain- 
der of his life, ]\Ir. jMcClaiu was engaged in tilling the soil, and became 
one of the best known and most highly esteemed of his community 's citi- 
zens. He cleared the greater part of a valuable eighty-acre farm, which 
is still in the possession of the family, and on which he erected good 
buildings, made other improvements and continued to carry on general 
farming and stock raising. In his death, which occurred September 2, 
1911, Cass county lost a good, practical agriculturist, and a citizen who 
always had the best interests of his community at heart. 

Jerome McClain was married in Logansport to ]\Iiss Cazaline Holly, 
a member of an old Cass county family, and they became the parents 
of eight children, as follows: Benjamin F., now a resident of Kokomo, 
Indiana, who is married and has nine children ; Pulaski, who is still operat- 
ing the old homestead; Sarah E. ; Granville M., who also resides at 
Kokomo, and has four children ; Dowell, who is deceased ; Mary E. ; 
Margaret C. ; also Doe and Noah, deceased. 

Pulaski McClain, son of Jerome McClain, was born in Dayton, Aug- 
ust 8, 1853 and his sister, Mary E., who lives with him and manages the 
household affairs, was born on the old home place on .McClain road. His 
early education was secured in the Galveston schools, and later he 
attended the district schools, his summer months always being spent in 
the work of the home place. His sister secured her education in the 
West school in Washington township. On completing his education, 
Mr. McClain commenced working at odd occupations, and being pos- 
sessed of much more than the average mechanical ability, has had little 
trouble in finding plenty of employment, in addition to managing the 
home farm of eighty acres. He is known as one of the enterprising 
men of his community, and both he and his sister have many warm 
friends in the vicinity of their home. They are attendants of the Chris- 
tian church in AVashington township. The McClains are of Scottish 
lineage, and the original spelling of the name was McLean. 

John ]\I. LaRose. In the earlier history of this country, there are 
many accounts of the trials and brave sacrifices of those who are num- 
bered among the pioneers of certain districts. The tide of civilization 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 829 

was then ever moving westward, and as soon as a section was fairly well 
developed, there would always be some venturesome souls eager to 
press still further towards the frontier, making new boundary lines 
for the outposts of civilization. Without these the United States would 
not lie from ocean to ocean, but would still be clustered along the At- 
lantic seaboard ; without these courageous pioneers, who braved the sav- 
age Indian and wild beast, the great commonwealth of Indiana would 
still be a waste of prairie and timber land, and where is now heard 
the cheerful bustle of urban existence, the prairie chicken and wild 
turkey would wing their low flight. Among the families that are 
largely responsible for the Cass county of today, that bearing the name 
of LaRose is well known, and a worthy representative of this name is 
found in the person of John M. LaRose, of Clay township, the owner 
of a part of the old LaRose homestead. He was born on the property 
which he now occupies, April 25, 1854, and is a son of John S. and 
Lucre tia (Chestnut) LaRose, natives of Ohio. 

The ancestry of the LaRose family can be traced back to John Lewis 
LaRose, the great-great-grandfather of John M. LaRose, who was a 
native of Germany and came to America in 1740, locating in Lehigh 
county, Pennsylvania, where the Rev. John Jacob LaRose, the great- 
grandfather of John M., was born and reared. He was a tailor by trade, 
but when the "War of the Revolution was inaugurated he put aside all 
business and personal consideration to aid in the cause of independence. 
The son of this Revolutionary soldier, Philip J. LaRose, was bom in 
Guilford county, North Carolina, and was there married to Mary 
Shearer, also a native of that county. In 1826 they left their southern 
home and came to Wayne county, Indiana, and in 1834 made removal 
to Cass county, locating on an eighty-acre tract of land in Clay town- 
ship. To that property Mr. LaRose kept adding from time to time as 
his financial resources increased until his landed possessions aggregated 
over 700 acres. His was a busy and useful life, and his success was well 
merited. He died March 28, 1871, at the advanced age of ninety-one 
years, and the community thereby lost one of its honored pioneer set- 
tlers. He and his wife had a family of eight children, among whom was 
John S. LaRose. The latter, following in the footsteps of his father, 
made agricultural pursuits his life work, and became one of the success- 
ful and greatly esteemed citizens of Clay township. He married Miss 
Lucretia Chestnut, and theyhad two living children: John Marion and 
Annie V. 

John Marion LaRose attended the district schools of the vicinity of 
his home, and supplemented this by three years of attendance in the city 
schools of Logansport. On completing his studies he at once settled 
down to agricultural pursuits, which he has followed with uniform suc- 
cess throughout his career. He now has 210 acres of land, all in a high 
state of cultivation, on which he has made numerous modern improve- 
ments which have greatly enhanced the value of the property. The 
family residence, which succeeded the little log house in which Mr. La- 
Rose was born, is located on an elevation on the farm, and can be seen 
for miles in every direction. Mr. LaRose is known as a good, practical 
agriculturist, and as one whose abilities are such as to allow him to 
gain a full measure of success from his labors. His standing as a citi- 

Vol. II— 8 



830 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

zen is equally high, and among his business associates he is known as 
a man who lives up to all of his obligations. The homestead house is 
known as "The High View Stock Farm," and he raises the "Mule 
Foot" swine which is registered. 

On March 5, 1876, Mr. LaRose was united in marriage with Miss 
Nancy Miranda Brown, who was bom in Cass county, daughter of Isaac 
and Elizabeth J. (Custer) Brown, for years a prosperous farmer of 
this locality. To this union there has come one child : John Brown, born 
in 1895. Mr. and Mrs. LaRose are members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, while his political affiliation is with the Democratic party. 

George W. Bubkhart. A resident of Cass county since 1866, George 
"W. Burkhart, veteran of the Civil war, former manufacturer of lumber, 
retired farmer and public-spirited citizen, has had a long and honorable 
career, and has been closely identified with the growth and development of 
this section. His life furnishes an example of the success that is to be 
gained through upright living, strict integrity and constant devotion to 
the principles of honorable dealing and public-spirited citzenship, and 
among the people of his community he is held in the highest esteem, 
Mr. Burkhart was born September 17, 1846, in Center county, Penn- 
sylvania, and is a son of John G. and Susan (Felmey) Burkhart. His 
father, a native of the Fatherland, came to the United States when about 
sixteen years of age, and sv;bsequently followed the trades of miller and 
baker, in addition to carrying on agricultural pursuits. He successively 
lived in Pennsylvania, Ohio (where he worked at his trades in Bucyrus 
and Sandusky), Fulton county, Indiana, and finally Cass county, where 
his death occurred in his sixty-sixth year, some time during the Civil 
war. A thrifty and industrious German, he accumulated a competency 
and some years before his death was able to retire. Mr. Burkliart mar- 
ried Susan C. Felmey, a native of Pennsylvania, who passed away at 
the age of fifty-five years, and they became the parents of three children : 
John W., who now lives in Kent, Wisconsin ; George W. ; and Cecelia, 
who married Thomas Detmore, and had three children, — Oliver, Lucinda 
and Nora. 

George W. Burkhart was five years of age when taken to Ohio by 
his parents, and there he was reared to hard work, being given only 
three months schooling in all his life. If his education was slight, his 
opportunities for culture of a genuine sort were more so, but one cannot 
be in Mr. Burkhart 's presence long before pealizing that he is a man of 
wide knowledge and general information, close observation and much 
reading having given him an education that has made up for what the 
earlier years lacked. He was thrown upon his own resources at the age 
of thirteen years, at which time he began to work at odd jobs, chopping 
wood and working as a farm hand, in fact accepting whatever honorable 
employment presented itself. In 1861 the family came to Fulton county, 
Indiana, where young Burkhart worked on a farm for about one year, 
and in 1862 he began his military career as a private in Company A, 
Twenty-sixth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, Col. John 6. Clark 
commanding, with which organization he served faithfully for three 
years. He was in the Thirteenth and Sixteenth Army Corps, and later 
connected with the Department of the Gulf, and throughout a long and 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 831 

arduous service maiutained the reputation of a cheerful, brave and 
faithful soldier, winning alike the respect of his comrades and superior 
officers. Among his battles were Vicksburg, Nashville, Yazoo Pass, Prai- 
rie Grove, Sterling Plantation, Mobile Bay and Spanish Fort, and 
numerous minor engagements and skirmishes. For about a year he 
also participated in the Missouri troubles, during the time when the 
notorious Quantrell and his gang of desperadoes were terrorizing that 
state. 

On the completion of his military service, Mr. Burkhart returned to 
the vocations of peace, and for a number of years he followed lumber- 
ing and engaged in the manufacturing and sale of building material, 
but eventually turned his attention to agricultural pursuits, and still 
owns forty acres of land south of Logansport and a well-cultivated prop- 
erty of one hundred and seventy and three-fourths acres on the Kokomo 
Road. His ventures have been characterized by honest dealing, and 
although he is now retired from active pursuits he still holds the con- 
tidenee of a wide business acquaintance. For a number of years Mr. 
Burkhart was actively engaged in Democratic politics, especially as a 
"stump" speaker, but in 1912 cast his fortunes with the young Pro- 
gressive party, whose candidate he became for joint representative. In 
the years of 1898 and 1899 he was representative of Cass county, Indi- 
ana, in the state legislature. In a number of township offices he demon- 
strated his ability as a public executive, and his services are still in 
demand as an orator at various gatherings, celebrations and social 
events. Probably no other man in his part of the county is better posted 
upon the history of the country, especially as to its presidents and 
eminent statesmen. 

On April 11, 1872, IMr. Burkhart was united in marriage with Miss 
Rosetta H. Seybold, daughter of John G. and Ursula (Munger) Seybold, 
and six children have been born to this union : John Irvin, who married 
Pearl Kay; Harry F., of Fulton county, who married Susan Weisner, 
and has two children, — Zoe and Luretta ; Joseph A., who married Anna 
Leffert, and has two children, — George and Harry ; Frank, who married 
Ethel Kochel, and has two children, — Rosetta and Bernice; Clarence, 
residing in Logansport ; and Geneva, who is single and resides with her 
parents. 

Harry C. Jones. On the Kokomo road, about four miles from 
Logansport, is situated the finely cultivated eighty-acre farm of Harry 
C. Jones, a tract which has been in the family since 1857, and on which 
Mr. Jones was born. He is one of his section's enterprising and ener- 
getic agriculturists, belonging to that class of farmers who are quick to 
adopt advanced methods and progressive ideas, and among his neigh- 
bors and associates is recognized as a man who at all times is ready to 
aid movements tending to better his community. Mr. Jones was born 
on his present property, Ausust 10, 1855, and is a son of Josiah and 
Emily (Updegraff) Jones. His father, a native of New York, spent his 
early years in the Empire State, where he was engaged in farming, and 
was about forty years old when he migrated to Indiana. Here he set- 
tled in Cass county on the present farm of Harry C. Jones, then a wild 
tract on which there had been no improvements made. He spent his sub- 



832 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

sequent years in clearing and cultivating this land, and died with a 
comfortable competency and the esteem and respect of those with whom 
he had come into contact. Josiah and Emily Jones had two children : 
Harry C. ; and Jennie, now Mrs. John M. Burkit. 

Like all country boys of his day and locality, Harry C. Jones divided 
his early years between attendance at school in the winter terms and 
working on the farm in the summer months. He was reared to habits 
of industry and sobriety, taught to realize the value of hard work, and 
thoroughly trained in all the details of farm labor. In the meantime his 
mind was being trained in the district schools and the old stone seminary 
in Logansport, after leaving which he continued to work on the home 
place. At the time of his father's death, Mr. Jones inherited one-half 
of the homestead, and after a few years, when he decided to make a 
home of his own he puchased his sister's interest in the property, and 
since that time has been its proprietor. At that time Mr. Jones was mar- 
ried to ]\Iiss Sarah J. Vernon, March 25, 1875, and they have had a 
family of nine children, as follows: William H., who married Anna 
Ramer, and has one child, — Blanch J. ; Arthur C, who married Pearl 
Nichols, and has one chi^d, — Howard N. ; Josiah P., who married Flora 
Barnes, and has one child, — Harry E. ; Frank V., who married Elsie 
Bopp and they have one daughter, Dorothy ; Charles E., who married Ida 
Mosby, and has one child, — Ralph V. ; Thomas E., who married Mae 
Condon ; and Quincy A., who wedded Miss Mildred Dussard ; Paul 
Revere and Carl B., all of whom reside at home and assist their father 
in the work of the farm. This eighty-acre tract is one of the finest of 
its size in Washington township. Years of intelligent, practical and 
painstaking cultivation have resulted in the development of an excellent 
property, which produces large crops annually. Mr. Jones is a Repub- 
lican in his political views, but is not a politician in the generally ac- 
cepted use of the term, although in 1912 he allowed his name to be used 
as a nominee for the office of commissioner. His fraternal connection 
is with Lodge No. 417, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, in which the 
family is well represented, six of Mr. Jones' sons also belonging to this 
order. He also holds membership in St. Paul's Evangelical Lutheran 
church, which he attends constantly and supports liberally. The home- 
stead of Mr. and Mrs. Jones is called "The Cedars" and is the abode of 
hospitality. 

Charles Quinct Palmer. Industry, perseverance, intelligence and 
good judgment are the price of success in agricultural work in these 
modern days of farming, when the hard, unremitting toil of former 
days has given way to scientific use of modern machinery and a knowl- 
edge of the proper treatment of the soil. Cass county boasts of many 
skilled farmei-s who treat their vocation more as a profession than as 
a mere occupation and take a justifiable pride in their accomplishments. 
In this class may be mentioned Charles Quincy Palmer, of Washington 
township, the well-tilled tract of two hundred acres owned by his father 
and himself being located not far from Logansport and who is also 
carrying on operations on his father's tract, the latter being retired from 
active life. Mr. Palmer was born in Washington township, Cass county, 
Indiana, May 28, 1874, and is a son of John and Mary (IBest) Palmer. 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 833 

His father was born in Irwin, Ohio, from whence he came to Indiana 
during young manhood, and here carried on agricultural pursuits with 
well deserved success until his retirement several years ago. There were 
three children in the elder Palmer 's family, namely : Charles Quincy ; 
George H., who makes his home in Logansport ; and Dr. A. L., a well 
known physician of Logansport, who is acting in the official capacity of 
coroner of that city, 

Charles Quincy Palmer was given the advantages of a good educa- 
tion, attending both the district schools of Washington township and 
the graded schools of Logansport, and after leaving the latter resumed 
work on the home farm. Subsequently, he learned the trade of horse- 
shoer, which he followed for six years in connection with his agricul- 
tural operations, but eventually gave up this vocation and now devotes 
his entire attention to tilling the soil. The two hundred-acre tract has 
been put in a high state of cultivation, the buildings thereon are modern 
and in a good state of repair, and altogether the property gives eloquent 
testimony to Mr. Palmer's skill as a farmer. He has realized and taken 
advantage of the use of modern methods in his operations, and may 
take pride in the fact that he has one of the valuable properties of his 
community. Among his neighbors he is known as a man of the strictest 
integrity in all matters of a business nature, and one who, having suc- 
ceeded himself, is at all times ready to assist others to a like success. 
Essentially a farmer, he has taken little interest in politics, but move- 
ments which have for their object the betterment of his community may 
always depend upon his support and co-operation. In fraternal matters, 
Mr. Palmer is popular with the members of the local lodge of the Frater- 
nal Order of Eagles, in which he has passed through all the chairs. 

On March 21, 1900, Mr. Palmer was united in marriage with Miss 
Martina Miller, daughter of John and Elizabeth (Sinunons) Miller. 
They have no children. Mr. and Mrs. Palmer attend the English Luth- 
eran church, in the work of which Mrs. Palmer has been very active, and 
both are popular in the social circles of Logansport, their home being but 
three miles south of that city. 

Newman H. Settles. Since earliest history the vocation of tilling 
the soil has been numbered among the most honored vocations. A lib- 
eral profession, embracing a knowledge of the physiology of the earth 
and the products that grow out of it, it requires also a philosophy of 
economics that understands the necessities of demand and supply by 
which these products are kept moving over the face of the earth. Among 
the good, practical agriculturists of Cass county, who thoroughly under- 
stand their vocation, and are securing a full measure of success through 
the application of intelligent treatment of the soil, none stand higher 
than Newman H. Settles, who for thirty-five years or more has be'en 
cultivating land in Noble township. Mr. Settles is a native of Ohio, 
born March 10, 1846, a son of John and Julia Settles, natives of Vir- 
ginia and New York, respectively. Mr. Settles' parents were married 
in Ohio, and from that state came to Adams county, Indiana, in 1859, 
and thence to Cass county, first locating in Harrison township, on a 
farm of eight acres. There the father erected a shop and followed the 



834 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

cooper trade until 1872 when he moved with his wife to Kansas and in 
that state died in 1904, Mrs. Settles having passed away in 1882. 

Newman H. Settles was a lad of thirteen years when the family 
came to Cass county, Indiana, and here his education was completed in 
the common schools. On the completion of his studies he entered busi- 
ness with his father, from whom he had learned the trade of cooper, 
and after his father had moved to the West he continued to operate the 
business until 1877. At that time he took up his residence in Noble 
township where he rented a larger farm, and here, through tireless in- 
dustry, constant thrift and persevering determination, aided by a keen 
intellect and a comprehensive knowledge of land values, he has been 
able to accumulate a handsome property of eighty acres in section 12. 
In 1903, in which year Mr. Settles bought this farm, it was in poor con- 
dition, due to mismanagement on the part of the former owner, but 
during the ten years that it has been in Mr. Settles' possession, he has 
developed it into one of the valuable tracts of his township. Modern 
buildings have been erected, innovations have been introduced, and 
scientific treatment of the soil has tended to increase the productive 
ability of the property. 

On October 28, 1864, Mr. Settles was married to Miss Anna Craw- 
ford, who was born in Ohio, September 15, 1852, daughter of Robert 
and Margaret Crawford, who came to Cass county in 1854 and settled 
on a farm in Boone township. Six children were born to this union : 
Julia, Willard, Margaret, Jennie, John and Franklin. Julia died in 
1872, at the age of eleven months; Willard was married (first) in 1896 
to ^liss Ida Smith, of Cass county, and had two children : Eva and 
Paul. His first wife died in 1902, and in 1906 he was a second time 
married, the ceremony taking place in Detroit, Michigan. In 1904 
Jennie Settles was married to William Wright, of Logansport, and they 
have two children : Dorothy, born in 1905 ; and Margaret, born in 1908. 
Margaret Settles was married in 1910 to Charles Lew, an engineer on 
the Pennsylvania Railroad. On December 25, 1909, John Settles mar- 
ried Miss Florence Grable, of Cass county, and on September 17, 1912, 
Franklin Settles married Miss Anna Holland, also of Cass county. 

Newman II. Settles has never cared for public office, although a 
supporter of good government, and an active participant in progressive 
movements. With his wife and children, he attends the Methodist 
Episcopal church. - 

Henry Rhoades. It has been given to some to help develop the 
country, to shape their surroundings according to their needs, and to 
bring forth tlie present high degree of civilization. Cass county, 
Indiana, became the home of many a sturdy pioneer, who did not ask 
for anything more than raw land to work upon. Bravely, uncomplain- 
ingly, these forerunners of civilization went to work, and many of them 
still survive to see the fruits of their years of labor. Among these is 
Henry Rhoades, himself a pioneer and a member of an old and influen- 
tial family of tne Hoosier state, who is now the owner of eighty acres 
of fine farming land about five miles from Logansport. Mr. Rhoades, 
who has the added distinction of being a veteran of the Civil war aod 
an honor to those who wore the blue, was born October 17, 1846, in 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 835 

Pulaski county, Indiana, and is a son of Mike and Mary (Niss) Rhoades. 
His father, who was born in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, came from that 
city to Pulaski county, Indiana, in 1848, and there spent the rest of 
his life in cultivating a farm. He was the father of eight children, 
namely : William, deceased ; Daniel, Henry, Sarah, deceased ; Hattie, 
Kate and Angelina; and Silas, deceased. 

Henry Rhoades was reared to agricultural pursuits, and received 
his education in tlie district schools, starting to work out on neighbor- 
ing farms when he was only twelve years of age. He was so engaged 
when the Civil war broke out, and with other youths of his locality, 
went to Winamac, Pulaski county, and there enlisted in the Union 
army, becoming a member of the Eighty -seventh Indiana Volunteer 
Infantry. His regiment was assigned to the Army of the Cumberland, 
and he subsequently participated in a number of hard-fought engage- 
ments and took part in the famous "March to the Sea," under Gen. W. 
T. Sherman. After completing a brave and honorable service, Mr. 
Rhoades returned to Pulaski county and to agricultural pursuits, re- 
maining in that section until he was about twenty-five years of age, 
when he came to Cass county. Being possessed of but little capital, 
commencing at the lowest round of the ladder of life he worked on 
shares until he was able to purchase his present land, which he has 
developed into one of the best tracts of its size in Washington township. 
General farming and stock-raising have held his attention, and he is 
known as an able agriculturist, who is thoroughly conversant with mod- 
ern ideas and methods, and whose activities have served to contribute 
to the farming importance of his township. 

On December 23, 1869, Mr. Rhoades wedded Miss Florence C. Fink, 
daughter of Jacob and Mary (Skillen) Fink. Her parents came to Cass 
county from Pennsylvania in an early day. In the Fink family there 
were three children: Florence, Sarah and Eli, and all of the children 
are living. 

Six children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Henry Rhoades : Daniel 
W., who married Miss Myrtle Lucy and they have four children: 
Orvilla, Henry, Lester L. and Wayne; Mary, wife of Burton Nether- 
cutt, the parents of six children: Orville, May, Henry, Russell Mosie, 
Bessie and Paul; Elizabeth, wife of Herman Leffert and they have five 
children: Herbert, Irene, Arthur, Mary and Wayne; Lottie, wife of 
Oliver Marshall, who have four children: Florence, Hazel, Harold 
and Opal ; Walter, who married Flossie Reese and has no children ; and 
Harvey, who wedded Edna Rush and has one child, Helena. 

In his political views, Mr. Rhoades is a Democrat, but he has never 
sought public office, preferring to give his entire attention to his farming 
operations. With his wife and family, they attend the Lutheran church, 
of which he has always been a liberal supporter. Mr. Rhoades belongs to 
that class of men who appreciate their success the more because it has 
been self -gained, and because it has come through honest effort and by 
no questionable means, aided by his estimable wife. His standing as 
a citizen is high, and during his long residence in Cass county he has 
gained and maintained many sincere friendships. His good wife shares 
equally well the friendship and good wishes of their many friends. 



836 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

Mrs. Rhoades lias a sunshiny smile and a royal welcome for all who may 
enter the portals of their pretty home. 

Nelson Warner Cady, j\I. D. In a career of thirty-five years as 
physician and surgeon of Cass county, Dr. Cady has come to rank 
among the foremost men of his profession in this county, has done much 
good service both as a doctor and as a citizen for the welfare of his 
home city, and is well known for his ability and high character in his 
profession over the state. 

Nelson Warner Cady was born October 3, 1850, at Indianapolis, and 
belongs to an old family of Indiana, and its members have been distin- 
guished for worthy and honorable position in practical affairs and social 
life. The parents of Dr. Cady were Charles Warner Cady and Abigail 
Aikman Kiersted. The father was born at Keene, New Hampshire, in 
1810, located in Indianapolis about IS-IO as the first general fire insur- 
ance agent in the state, and died in that city in 1855. The mother was 
born at Fort Washington, (now Cincinnati, Ohio), in 1824, and died 
at her home in Indianapolis in 1900. She was a type of Indiana's noble 
women during the last century. She was deeply interested in the 
work for the soldiers during the Civil war and made and presented a 
regimental banner to Lew Wallace's regiment of zouaves. The father, 
during his early manhood, learned and followed the trade of saddler, 
but subsequently took up fire insurance and after some years in the 
business had the distinction of establishing the first fire insurance office 
in the state of Indianapolis. Besides Dr. Cady, the other children of 
the family are mentioned as follows: Eudora Dunn Cady, who married 
Woodford Tousey, and who died at Indianapolis in 1913 in her 
seventieth year; Albermarle Cady, who died in infancy; Anna Kiersted 
Cady, born in 1845, and died in 1901, first married W. 0. Stone and 
second Dr. Hammond of Indianapolis; Ella Wilder Cady, Avho married 
John Lawrie, a merchant ; Jeremiah Kiersted Cady, born in 1855, and 
married Paget Daniels, is now an architect in Chicago. 

Dr. Cady after leaving the Indianapolis high school, entered Cornell 
university at Ithaca, New York, where he was graduated Ph. B. in 
1874. His medical education was acquired in the Bellevue Hospital 
Medical College of New York, and he was graduated jM. D. in 1877. 
Many years ago Dr. Cady acquired the art of stenography, and was 
among the first young men in Indianapolis to use this art as a reporter 
on the Indianapolis Journal, and he has practiced more or less through 
all his career, being now a contributor to newspapers and medical 
journals. 

Dr. Cady located in Logansport, Indiana, in June, 1877, and has 
practiced medicine in this city for more than thirty-five years. With 
a genius for mechanics, as well as for the subtler arts of his profession, 
Dr. Cady has used his skill in inventing a number of fracture splints of 
a new design, and now used extensively by the profession. For several 
years he held a position on the Logansport board of health, and has been 
as public-spirited in his citizenship as in his profession. 

Dr. Cady for many years supported the Republican party, but his 
politics now is of the Progressive brand. He is a member of the Cass 
County and Indiana State Medical Society, and of the American Medi- 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 837 

cal Association. His fraternal affiliations are with O'rient Lodge No. 
272 A. P. and A. M., Logan Chapter No. 2 R. A. M. and Logansport 
Council No. 11 R. and S. M. 

Dr. Cady was married August 22, 1883, to Miss Jennie M. Miller, of 
Waverly, New York, a daughter of Samuel W. and Adaline Parmenter 
Miller, her father being a butcher by trade. Dr. Cady and wife have 
the following children: Margaret Abigail Cady, born August 20, 1864, 
died February 5, 1886; Eudora Helena Cady, born March 2, 1888, liv- 
ing at home with her father; and Wallis Albermarle Cady, born Feb- 
ruary 14, 1888, and now a newspaper reporter at Toledo, Ohio. The 
family worship with the Episcopal church. 

Horace Milton Funk. Among the progressive and enterprising 
agriculturists of Cass county, one who has gained success through the 
medium of his own efforts, and now holds an enviable position among 
his fellow-citizens, is Horace M. Funk, the owner of one hundred and 
twenty acres of well-cultivated land in Clay township. Mr. Funk has 
been an agriculturist all of his life, and has lived at various places in 
Indiana, and wherever his activities have been located he has gained 
the friendship and good will of all with whom he has come in contact. 
He is a native of Pennsylvania, and was bom September 19, 1859, a 
son of Joseph G. and Mary (Ward) Funk, and a grandson of George 
Funk. 

The parents of Mr. Funk came to Cass county in 1867, Mrs. Funk, 
his grandmother, being the owner of the first farm on which they settled 
and this property Mr. Funk and his father worked on shares. For 
some time the family lived in a frame residence in Clay township. The 
farm of Mr. Funk's parents is now one of the valuable properties of the 
township. Joseph G. Funk is still operating this land, but the mother 
passed to her final rest on April 4, 1894. 

Horace N. Funk received his education in the district schools of 
Clay township, and his boyhood and youth were spent in assisting his 
father, and in learning the multitude of details with which a good 
farmer must be conversant. On attaining his ma,jority he began opera- 
tions on his own account, but he continued under the parental roof 
until 1889, when he went to Miami township, and there carried on 
operations for one year. Returning to Clay township in 1890, he con- 
tinued farming there until the following year, when he went to Peru, 
Indiana, and continued to live there until removing to Adams town- 
ship in the fall of 1892. He spent about four and one-half years in 
that vicinity, and then purchased another property, but before he had 
settled thereon grasped an opportunity to sell it at a satisfactory 
advance, and then came to his present farm, a tract of one hundred and 
twenty acres in Clay township. Here he has made a number of valuable 
improvements, having a handsome residence situated on Logansport 
Rural Free Delivery Route No. 5, with appropriate barns and out- 
buildings. His land is in a high state of cultivation, and yields bumper 
crops in return for the intelligent labors which Mr. Funk expends 
upon it. Through honorable dealing and strict integrity in all his trans- 
actions, he has gained a reputation for honesty and straightforwardness, 
and no citizen of his locality stands higher in public esteem. He is a 



838 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

Republican in his political views, and, although not a politician in the 
generally accepted meaning of the term, has recognized the duties of 
citizenship, and has served his township both as trustee and supervisor. 
With his family, he attends the Christian church, and has ever been a 
liberal supporter of those movements which go to make for morality, 
education and good citizenship. 

Mr. Funk was married to JVIiss Mattie G. Scott, February 6, 1889, 
daughter of Benjamin D. and Belinda (Carr) Scott, and they have had 
three children, namely : Ruth A., who became the wife of William 
English, and lives in Clay township ; Ward S., eighteen years old, and 
Eveleen E., ten years of age. Ruth and Ward both received their 
diplomas from the public schools, and the daughter Ruth was a student 
one year in the high school and Ward has finished the full curriculum 
of the high school. Eveleen is in the sixth grade. Mrs. Funk was a 
daughter of Benjamin D. and Belinda (Carr) Scott. Benjamin Scott 
was a native of Cass county, born in 1831, and he died in 1895, aged 
about 64 years. He was a carpenter and joiner, also an agriculturist 
and a Republican in his political sentiment. His wife was a member 
of the Christian church. Mrs. Funk was educated in the common schools 
and the American Normal, formerly of Logansport, and she was a suc- 
cessful teacher in Clay and IMiami townships. 

jMr. Funk is an honored member of the Knights of Pythias, also of 
the IMaccabees. The comfortable home of Mr. and Mrs. Funk is known 
as "The Sunny Lawn Homestead," and their home is ever open to 
their many friends. 

James Alvin Higgins is well known among the farming men of 
Cass county as one of the most successful breeders of hogs in the vicin- 
ity of Logansport. He has devoted his entire life to the farm and its 
diversified interests, winning prosperity and success in all his under- 
takings, and his position is one of no little prominence in the city and 
county which has represented his home and the center of his activitiea 
all his life. Born on the 6th day of December, 1848, in Logansport, 
James Alvin Higgins is the son of Alvin McCaslin and Eliza Jane 
(Reyburn) Higgins. 

Alvin M. Higgins was a man of eastern birth and ancestry, and 
he came to Indiana in 1834 from Portland, INIaine. En route to 
Fort Dearborn (Chicago) in company with his brother, both were 
stricken with a dangerous illness at Peru. The brothers were taken 
into the home of Col. William M. Reyburn and there were cared for 
by those kindly and gentle people. The brother died, but Alvin Higgins 
was nursed into convalescence by the daughter of his good Samaritan 
host, and upon his ultimate recovery he married the lady who had 
saved his life. Alvin and Eliza Higgins, upon the happy culmination 
of their romantic acquaintance and courtship, established a home in 
Logansport, and here JMr. Higgins took up the trade in which he had 
been trained in his boyhood — that of a tin and copper smith. He 
opened a small shop, which was later supplemented by a line of stoves 
and hardware, and to him was accorded the distinction of having been 
the first man to introduce the heating stove into Cass county. Mr. 
Higgins, it may also be said, was the first man in Cass county to own 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 839 

a thoroughbred Durham bull, and it was about the year 1855 that he 
made the purchase. He was one of the first to recognize the importance 
of introducing blooded stock into the country, and with a Mr. Buchanan, 
made the purchase. The transaction was one fraught with considerable 
difficulty, as they were obliged to go to Kentucky to make the purchase 
— a big undertaking in those early days. 

Mr. and Mrs. Higgins were the parents of eight children, of whom 
the following brief facts are here incorporated: William R., who was 
educated for the ministry. He began preaching in 1865 and was 
called out of Cass county. He died in Terre Haute, Indiana, on July 

4, 1895. Emma B. died on the 8th of January, 1846 ; Sarah C. died 
February 12, 1890; Mary C. died on the 4th of November, 1902; Eliza 
Jane died on May 4, 1894; James A., of this review; Ella F. died on 
June 19, 1907 ; Elizabeth A. died on January 8, 1902. With but a 
single exception, the deceased membei's of this family lived past middle 
age, Emma B. having died when she was about five years old. The wife 
and mother died on August 8, 1859, and Mr. Higgins died on March 

5, 1885. Mr. Higgins was a captain of a military company, organized 
in Logansport and he saw active service on various occasions when 
Indiana troops were called into action, in the troubles incident to those 
early days. He was a man of much public spirit and a citizen who 
never shirked his duties and responsibilities in the way of public serv- 
ice. He served two terms as city councilman and one term as probate 
judge. He was county treasurer during two terms of office and was a 
member of the school board during practically all of his life in Cass 
county. In all of these offices he served faithfully and well, winning 
the respect and esteem of his fellow citizens and establishing a reputa- 
tion for solid worth and integrity that will live while the same endures. 
He was a member of Logansport Lodge, A. F. and A. M., and was a 
charter member of the first Odd Fellows lodge in Logansport, and had 
a similar experience with regard to a lodge known as the Sons of Tem- 
perance. In about the year 1858, Mr. Higgins disposed of his tinsmith 
and hardware business and engaged in the lumber industry, making 
black walnut the principal item to which he devoted his operations. 
He died on March 5, 1885, after an illness of a year or more, and his 
death deprived Logansport and Cass county of one of the most worthy 
men they had ever known. 

James Alvin Higgins was educated in the schools of Logansport, 
finishing his education with the high school. He saw himself as one of 
the successful farmei-s of the future in Cass county, and early in life 
set about the realization of his young ambition. Thus all of his busi- 
ness life has been devoted to farms and farming, and success has most 
generously rewarded his efforts. In later years Mr. Higgins turned 
his attention to hog raising, and that enterprise has taken the best part 
of his time since then. 

On the 22nd of January, 1873, Mr. Higgins was united in marriage 
with Miss Emma Thornton, the eldest daughter of Harvey and Catherine 
(Murray) Thornton. Mrs. Higgins was born in Cass county and was 
given her early education in the schools of Noble township, later at- 
tending school in Cincinnati, for a year, and completing her studies 



8iO HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

at the Presbyterian Academy in Logansport — tiiat institution stand- 
ing in the relation to Logansport as the high school of today. 

Three children came to Mr. and Mrs. Higgins, as follows: Warren 
T., born on August 5, 1874; Reybum A., born on February 27, 1877; 
and Mary E., whose natal day is September 23, 1881. All three are 
living. The second son, Reyburn, married Lillian Stewart Jones on 
July 8, 1909, and he is engaged in educational work as a teacher in the 
schools of Louisville, Kentucky. Mary is also a teacher, and is carry- 
ing on her work in the schools of North Vernon, Indiana. 

The family are members of the Presbyterian church, in which Mr. 
Higgins was carefully reared by his staunch Presbyterian parents, and 
all are worthy members of society, filling admirably the places they 
have made for themselves in their various communities. 

William H. Dbitt. Cass county, it will not be denied, owes much 
of its present day prosperity and growth to the pioneer farmer who 
came in and opened up the waste places of the county more than a 
half century ago and set on foot a cycle of solid improvement that has 
gone on from then until now and is still in progress. In 1848 the 
father of William Dritt settled on the identical spot now occupied by 
the latter, and devoted the remainder of his life to the business of con- 
verting the rugged wilderness into a series of blossoming meadows. 
How well he succeeded in his work, self-imposed, though it was, is no 
secret to any who are familiar with the history of Noble township, and 
the worthy work of that sturdy pioneer has been worthily carried on by 
his son, who is the subject of this review. 

Born February 24, 1865, William Dritt is the son of Daniel and 
Sarah (Schilling) Dritt. They had seven children, but only two are 
living. Daniel Dritt was born in Pennsylvania, of German parentage 
and ancestry, on January 29, 1826, and was the son of Andrew and 
Elizabeth (Fishel) Dritt. He died on July 9, 1881, and the wife and 
mother died June 18, 1898. 

William Dritt was reared on the home farm, and upon his father's 
death fell heir to the old home place, where he has since carried on the 
work of the farm. He was married on February 16, 1888, to Miss Ella 
Cornell. 

Mrs. Dritt is a native of INIiami county, Indiana, born February 28, 
1869, and the eldest of two daughters born to Jeremiah and IMaria 
(Moose) Cornell: Mrs. Dritt and her sister Clara, wife of Albert 
Chandler, a decorator, of Peru, Indiana. Mr. Cornell was a native of 
Indiana, and was an agriculturist. He was educated only in the 
common schools, was a soldier in the Civil war and received his 
honorable discharge. Both he and his wife were members of the 
Presbyterian church. ]\Irs. Cornell was also a native of Indiana, and her 
parents were natives of New York. Mrs. Dritt was educated in the com- 
mon schools. She is a lady of excellent judgment and has well performed 
her part in the building up the home and in the rearing of her children. 
She is a member of the Presbyterian church, also an honored member 
of the Progressive Club in Logansport, a club devoted to literature, 
art and music. 

The following children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Dritt: Ethel 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 841 

S. received her diploma from the public schools in 1904 and graduated 
from the Logansport high school in 1909, and she has taken musical 
instructions. She wedded Elmer Young, resident of Logansport, and 
a salesman. Florence P. received her diploma from the public schools 
in 1906, and then attended the Lincoln Seminary of Logansport, and 
has also taken music. She married J. Jay McCormick, a resident of 
Logansport, and he is engaged in the elevator business. Harry 
J. received his diploma from the public schools in 1908, and was a 
member of the graduating class in Logansport high school in 
1913. He is associated with his father on the farm. Madge grad- 
uated from the public schools in 1908, and the Logansport high 
school at the early age of seventeen in the class of 1912. She is 
a vocalist of more than ordinary merit. It is noticed in this sketch 
that Mr. and Mrs. Dritt have given their children the best of advan- 
tages in acquiring good educations, fitting them for the higher walks 
of life. The homestead of the Dritts is known as "Glen Dale Farm," 
and their many friends will always find a cordial welcome there. 
The farm comprises one hundred and sixty acres, and many of its 
present day improvements in the way of buildings, etc., may be credited 
to the present occupant of the place. 

Mr. Dritt is one of the leaders of thought and opinion in his com- 
munity, and attends the Presbyterian church, his life has been one 
entirely consistent with his profession of faith. He is a Republican, 
and has pronounced political views, though he is not more active in 
the field of politics than good citizenship demands of him. He and 
his family maintain a high place in the esteem and regard of their 
many friends in and about Noble township, where they are known for 
their many excellent traits of heart and mind, and where they are 
regarded as the best of neighbors. 

William Pubcell Pow^ell, deceased, was born on February 25, 
1828, in Ohio, the son of Benjamin and Sarah (Carroll) Powell. He 
came with his parents from Jefferson county, Ohio, the place of his 
birth, to Indiana, in 1835, and they located in Cass county, settling on 
a wild tract of land in Harrison township, of which they hoped to make 
a farm for themselves. Here they builded a cabin home and set about 
clearing up the wilderness and improving the place as best they might. 
They were pioneers in the truest sense, and the first election ever held 
in his community was held in the old Powell home. 

Here was William Purcell Powell reared, and here in early life he 
married Harriet Smith, who died without issue. His second wife was 
Mrs. Delilah Isabell Gressinger, a daughter of James and ]\Iary Ann 
(Carrier) Spaeey, and the widow of Adam Gressinger. Mr. Powell was 
one of the old fashioned men who held as one of the tenets of his faith 
that honesty was one of the cardinal virtues — a belief still in good 
repute to some extent, but not held so commonly perhaps as in those 
early times. He was extremely temperate in his habits, and this, no 
doubt, led to his retaining his mental faculties unimpaired to the end 
of his days. He was a Democrat in politics, always keenly alive to the 
progress of the times, but never sought public office. He was a 
Universalist in his religious belief and during his later years derived 



842 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

much simple and wholesome pleasure from the study of the Scriptures. 
He was a man of much courage and unlimited faith in the future, an 
example of which is given in the fact that he began his married life 
with a cash capital of tifty cents. His first home was no sooner com- 
pleted than it was destroyed by fire, but it Avas characteristic of the 
man that adversity of that order was insufficient to keep him down. He 
at once rebuilt his home, and with the passing of time, he prospered, 
not by waiting on fortune, but by the hardest kind of work, economy and 
the application of excellent business judgment in his every-day affairs. 
A noteworthy trait in him was his sturdy honesty and his high general 
character. He was a kindly man in his disposition, temperate in all 
things, charitable and generous in his benefactions for the public good. 
He died as he lived, an honored and respected citizen, death coming to 
him on October 5, 1876. 

J. E. Hertsell still retains and operates the fine old place that 
his grandfather came into possession of when he first came to Cass 
county, Indiana, more than half a century ago, although he no longer 
makes his home on the place, having a fine home of his own acquired 
in Clay township, where he carries on the business of farming on an 
extensive scale, and along the most approved modern methods. 

Born in Miami township, Cass county, on October 21, 1885, J. E. 
Hertsell is the son of Jesse and Jennie (Bird) Hertsell. The father was 
the son of another, Jesse Hertsell, and the mother was the daughter of 
one Eli Bird, people of English descent. The family located in IMiami 
township when Jesse Hertsell was a youth, and he passed his life on 
the farm his father purchased, and upon his death, which occurred in 
February, 1912, the old home came into the possession of the son. 

J. E. Hertsell received such education as the schools of Miami town- 
ship afforded, and early in life began to devote himself to the work of 
the farm. He has been successful in his operations along these lines 
and has acquired a fine place of his own in recent years, located in Clay 
township, and there he makes his home. In 1909 I\Ir. Hertsell married 
Ruth Mannen, the daughter of Henry IMannen, and two children have 
been born to them: Reta, who died when six months old in 1910, and 
Helen Esther, who is now fifteen months old. 

M. Hertsell and his wife are members of the Baptist church, and 
take an active share in the works of that body, while Mr. Hertsell has 
membership in the Knights of Pythias. They occupy a secure place in 
the esteem of their many acquaintances in Clay township, as well as in 
Miami township, and enjoy the friendship of many who know them for 
their many excellent qualities of character. 

Jesse Martin. For many years the citizen whose name heads this 
short review was one of the leading agriculturists of Washington town- 
ship, and his entire career was one of industry, integrity and honorable 
dealing. Although not a native of Cass county, he came to this section 
at an early date, and his activities were such as to gain him the respect 
and esteem of his fellow-citizens, not alone in business matters, but in 
the political arena and in the work of the church. Mr. Martin was 
born May 4, 1834, in Somerset county, Pennsylvania, a son of Peter and 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 843 

Rebecca (Long) Martin. He died February 11, 1909, and his wife died 
September 8, 1908. 

Peter Martin, on first coming to Cass county, purchased land on 
section 27, Washington township, but in 1848 removed to section 22, 
where the rest of his life was spent. He and his wife were the parents 
of eight children, all born in Pennsylvania and reared in Cass county, as 
follows: Francis, Simon, Jesse, Herman, Caroline, Catherine, Manassas 
and Matilda. All are now deceased. 

Jesse Martin commenced his education in the public schools of his 
native state, where he resided until he was fourteen years of age, and 
after coming to Indiana, completed his schooling in a private institu- 
tion of Logansport. For several years thereafter, he devoted his at- 
tention to teaching school during the winter months, while he farmed 
in summers, but eventually gave up the educator's profession in order 
to give his entire time to farming and stock raising, in which he be- 
came very successful. He took a keen interest in the affairs of his 
community, was well and favorably known among the leading business 
men of his township, and for upwards of half a century was identified 
with the work of the Presbyterian church, in which he acted as elder. 
He had a family of eight children, of whom seven are living : Emeline, 
deceased, who was the wife of John Wendling; Edwin F., who married 
Edna Crane, and had five children ; Stanley, deceased ; Esther, Joseph, 
Rachel and Jesse ; Roland, who married Lina Schwalm, and had six chil- 
dren — Earl, Ethel, Eunice, Helen, Ruby and Lois; Albert, who married 
Julietta McCreary; Irvin, who married Emma Foreman; John P.; 
Manassas, who married Laura Schwalm, and has one son — Roy; and 
Frank, single, who lives on the old homestead of 120 acres. 

John P. jMartin, son of Jesse Martin, was born on the old home- 
stead farm, October 18, 1868, and received his education in the public 
schools of Cass county, in the meantime assisting his father in the work 
of the home farm from the time that he was old enough to grasp the 
plow handles. At the age of twenty years, he began farming on his 
own account, purchasing eighty acres of land from his father, on which 
he has made numerous improvements, including modern, substantial 
buildings. He has always been a leader in Republican politics, and for 
a time lived in Indianapolis while serving as a member of the clerical 
force of the state senate. Like his father, he has been a member of the 
' Presbyterian church. During his long career in Cass county he has 
ever possessed the respect and confidence of his fellow citizens, and in a 
work of this kind deserves honorable mention. 

William H. Sharp. The career of William H. Sharp, one of the 
foremost of Washington township's representative agriculturists, il- 
lustrates strikingly the opportunities that are open to young men of 
foresight, good judgment and business ability, for solely through the 
medium of his own efforts and good business talents he has steadily 
advanced until he is now one of the most substantial of his community 's 
citizens. Since early manhood he has engaged in buying, cultivating 
and selling farming land, and his operations have carried him all over 
Cass county, where he is known as a man of the highest integrity. At 
this time he is operating a tract of sixty acres, located on the Kokomo 



844 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

road, about five miles from Logansport. Mr. Sharp was born August 
3, 1860, in Pickaway county, Ohio, and is a son of Samuel M. and 
Isabel (Bailey) Sharp. 

Samuel M. Sharp was born in Columbus, Ohio, November 11, 1837. 
The family is of Scotch-Irish extraction, and was founded in the United 
States by Abraham Sharp, the great-grandfather of William H. Sharp, 
a native of Erin and a carpenter and millwright by trade. On first 
coming to America, Abraham Sharp settled in Maryland, and while 
working at his trade there made a tool chest, which many years later 
was in the possession of J. S. P. Marshall, a resident of Missouri, who 
was also in possession of many interesting facts regarding this old and 
honored family. Mr. Sharp became one of the pioneers of Franklin 
county, Ohio, and at a point three and one-half miles southeast of 
Columbus cleared a tract of land and made a comfortable frontier home. 
In that county he married a IMiss Howard, who lived to the remark- 
able old age of one hundred and two years, eleven months and seven 
days, passing away in Illinois where Mr. Sharp had entered a quarter 
section of land, on the present site of the city of Peoria. The chil- 
dren of this union were : William, the grandfather of William H. ; 
Elizabeth, who was married in Ohio to John Reader; George, who 
married Susan Cramer ; Nancy ; Rachel, who married Andrew Shanklin ; 
and Nathaniel, who married ]\Iary Gregg. 

William Sharp was born May 12, 1806, and was married to Miss 
Mary Teegardin, who was born July 17, 1812, in Pickaway county, 
Ohio, a daughter of John and Mary (Brobst) Teegardin, and she died 
March 21, 1880. The first two persons of the name of Teegardin to 
come to this country were George Teegardin, the father of John, Bar- 
bara, Anna (Graul), Aaron and Mary, the grandmother of William H. 
Sharp ; and William, the father of Peter, Abraham and others. George 
and William Teegardin came to Ohio in 1811, settling on land near 
Ashville which their father, Aaron, from Westmoreland county, Penn- 
sylvania, had entered; the latter, two years later, located there with 
his sons. His children were George, William, Jacob, Daniel, a daugh- 
ter who married Mr. Lauffer, Solomon, and Ann, who first married a 
man named Kanouse and afterwards a man named Fippen. George 
married a Miss Brobst, daughter of Jacob Brobst. The Teegardins have 
been generally members of the Lutheran church. John Teegardin be- 
came a pioneer farmer in Pickaway county, Ohio, and during the War 
of 1812 fought valiantly in the ranks of the American army. 

William Sharp, after his marriage, settled on a farm in his native 
county, and was successfully engaged in agricultural pursuits there 
until his death, which occurred in the prime of his life, at the age of 
thirty-seven years, June 30, 1845. He was a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, and was a man whose many excellent traits of char- 
acter won the confidence and respect of all' with whom he was in any 
way associated. His children were Nancy, Peter, Samuel, Samuel M., 
Aaron T. and Margaret. 

Samuel I\I. Sharp, father of William H. Sharp, was given but meagre 
educational advantages in his youth, as his father died when he was 
eight years of age, and he was compelled to early begin his battle with 
life. He was reared by his mother and guardian, the latter his uncle, 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 845 

Aaron Teegardiii, a farmer of Pickaway county, in whose household 
he remained until he was twenty years of age. He was married in 
Pickaway county to JMiss Isabel Bailey, who was born in IMadison town- 
ship, that county, daughter of Reason W. and Annie (Hoymen) Bailey, 
and granddaughter of William and Phoebe (Wells) Bailey. Her father, 
a native of Maryland, and a carpenter by trade (although he spent the 
greater part of lus life in agricultural pursuits) moved from Maryland 
to Ohio and subsequently to Indiana, locating in Clay township, jMiami 
county, where he died in 1873, at the age of seventy-two years. He was 
an industrious man, honest and upriglit in every way, and was a worthy 
member of the Lutheran church. His children were as follows : Eliza 
A., Mary, Mahala, Isabel, Jama, Solomon L., Joseph L., Louis B., Phoebe 
and Ellis. 

After his marriage Samuel ^1. Siiarp settled on a farm in Pickaway 
county, and made that place his home until 1873, when he moved to 
Miami county, Indiana, arriving there on the 4th of March. He 
began life without any capital whatever, but by industry and good 
judgment, and with the assistance of his loyal and loving wife, he . 
accumulated a competency. On locating in Miami county, he pur- 
chased 100 acres of land, to the value of which he added greatly by 
honest, well-directed toil. Both Mr. Sharp and his wife were actively 
identitied with the Church of the United Brethren in Christ, aided ma- 
terially in the erection of the first house of worship in their neighbor- 
hood and were always prominent in church work, Mr. Sharp being class 
leader in the local church of his vicinity. His political inclinations 
made him a Democrat, and fraternally he was connected with the 
Masons. The following children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Sharp : 
Mary M., William H., Eliza ^I., Jennie D., Annie M., Maggie ]\I., George 
L., Myrtle A., Leon C, Edmund G., Ruby N., and two who died in 
infancy. 

William H. Sharp was about twelve years of age when he accompa- 
nied the family from Ohio to ]\Iiami county, Indiana, and during his 
entire school period he assisted his father in the work of the farm. In 
young manhood, his first real business venture was the clearing of a 
heavily timbered tract of 100 acres of land, the timber from which he 
sold, thus making for himself a considerable capital with which to start 
operations. At the age of twenty-one years he went to Wabash county 
and worked on a farm for three years, at the end of which time he first 
came to Cass county, here spending the next five .years. He next pur- 
chased a team and began farming on shares on a tract of sixty acres, 
but after a short time returned to ]\Iiami county. There he was engaged 
in cultivating a rented farm for a short period, but eventually came 
back to Cass county and bought ninety acres of land, which he farmed 
for eight yeai-s, finally selling that to purchase his present property, ilr. 
Sharp has been uniformly successful in all of his business ventures, 
because of the exercise of shrewdness and excellent business acumen. He 
is an able .judge of land values, is known as an efBcient farmer, and 
among all who have had business dealings with him is held in the highest 
respect. 

On March 3, 1892, Mr. Sharp was married to Miss Carrie W. Bu- 
chanan, daughter of James and Mary (Buchanan) Buchanan. They 



846 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

have no children. Fraternally, Mr. Sharp is connected with the Masons, 
Tipton Lodge No. 33, and he and Mrs. Sharp are attendants of the 
Lutheran church. He has Democratic proclivities, and, while not a 
politician in the generally accepted meaning of the term, has served 
efficiently as a member of the election board. The pretty homestead of 
Mr. and Mrs. Sharp is known as ' ' The Cedars. ' ' 

John L. Warner. Cass county is largely agricultural but its thriv- 
ing towns, its numerous industrial enterprises, its schools and its 
churches prove that a vigorous life underlies every activity, although 
here, as in every section of the world, dependence is necessarily placed 
on the products of the land and the labor of those who develop it. No 
matter how men may toil or how much they may achieve in any direc- 
tion, they must be fed, and it is the farmer, in the background, who 
turns the wheels, who fights the battles, and who provides for the sur- 
vival typified in "the passing of the torch." Happily there are in 
Cass county contented owners of land who intelligently and willingly 
carry on the peaceful pursuits of agriculture and, although they do not 
seek svich a term of approbation, are, nevertheless, benefactors of man- 
kind. They are often men of wide information on many subjects, usually 
are men qualified for offices of public service, for the proper cultiva- 
tion of the soil and a realization of its utmost yield require knowledge 
on many subjects. Among the representative citizens of Cass county who 
have devoted their energies to the tilling of the soil, none are held in 
higher esteem than John L. Warner, of Clay township, a man who 
has impressed himself upon the community not only as an agriculturist 
but as a public-spirited citizen whose services in official office have aided 
materially in his locality's effort towards good government. 

Mr. Warner was born January 22, 1867, in Clay township, Cass 
eoiuity, Indiana, and is a son of Fielding G. and Florence (Maurice) 
Warner, and a grandson of David Warner. His father was of French 
and Welsh descent and was born at Dayton, Ohio, November 4, 1837, 
and died December 27, 1907, in Clay township, while his mother, who 
was born in France and came to this country when she was nine years 
of age, still survives and makes her home with Mr. Warner's brother, 
Samuel, who lives on the farm adjoining that of John L. Warner. Mr. 
Warner 's parents had six children, as follows : David, who died when 
aged one year; Alice, who married Will Smith and died when thirty- 
four years of age; Emma, who was eight years old at the time of her 
death ; Florence, who died at the age of six years ; John L. ; and Samuel, 
who married Blanche Powell, and has one child : Florence, who was born 
December 3, 1907. 

John L. Warner attended the district schools of Clay township and 
is a graduate of Hall's Business College in Logansport, Indiana. He 
was reared to agricultural pursuits, in which he has been engaged all 
of his life. His present farm, a tract of one hundred and seventy-two 
acres, is one of the finest in this part of the county, and during the twenty 
years he has resided here he has brought his land to a high state of culti- 
vation. New and modern structures have been erected by Mr. Warner, 
and his entire property testifies eloquently to his able management and 



-y-^ 




HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 847 

good judgment. Progressive in all matters, in 1912 he allied himself 
with the so-called Bull Moose party, and at the present time is efficiently 
serving as a member of the county council. He has also served as trus- 
tee of Clay township and has always brought to his official services the 
same conscientious devotion to duty that has made him so successful 
in his business affairs. His brother, Samuel Warner, is the present as- 
sessor of Bethlehem township. With his family, Mr. Warner attends 
the Christian church. 

On December 20, 1888, Mr. Warner was married to Miss Minnie 
Alma Shilling. One child was born to this union : Florence Ruth, who 
died at the age of five months. 

Mrs. AVarner is a native of Clay township, Cass county, and was born 
May 12, 1865, a daughter of Samuel and Elizabeth (Maurer) Shilling, 
and her parents were natives of Ohio, of German lineage, and both are 
deceased. 

Mrs. Warner was educated in the common schools and the city 
schools of Logansport. She is a member of the Bethel Methodist Epis- 
copal church and a member of the Ladies' Aid Society in the Spring 
Creek Christian church. 

Mr. Warner is a member and deacon in the Spring Creek Christian 
church. They are people who enjoy life in their beautiful country seat, 
known as "Summit Lodge," and they have a five-passenger Hupmobile 
touring car. They are citizens who stand high in the social world of 
Cass county. 

Adelbert L. Hoover. The name of Hoover has long been promi- 
nently associated with the agricultural history of Cass county, where 
for years members of the family have contributed materially to the 
growth and development of what is now one of the most prosperous 
sections of Indiana. They have also enrolled among those who have 
promoted movements for the advancement of education, morality and 
good citizenship, fairly earning the right to be classed with their com- 
munity's representative men. Adelbert L. Hoover, a well-known mem- 
ber of this old and honored family, is maintaining the high standard set 
by his forebears, and is one of the agriculturists of AVashington town- 
ship who take a pride in developing their land through the use of 
modern methods and appliances. He was born August 22, 1871, in 
Richland county, Wisconsin, and is a son of Thomas and Laura (Yates) 
Hoover, the former of whom brought the family to Cass county more 
than a quarter of a century ago and is still living on his farm. There 
were four children in the family : Mrs. ^lary Berryman, William, 
Jacob and Adelbert L. 

The early education of Adelbert L. Hoover was secured in the public 
schools of AVisconsin, and his tuition was completed in the institutions 
of Cass county, whence he had come when he was about fifteen years 
of age. During his early youth, in his struggles to secure a property of 
his own, he met with the usual difficulties that bar the path of a youth 
who without capital or influential friends is seeking a competence and 
independent position, but each experience added to his fund of knowl- 
edge and prepared him to better face the next obstacle. Industry and 
perseverance finally triumphed, and at this time he is the owner of a 



848 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

handsome property of 100 acres, which produces large crops, and on 
which he has made manj- valuable improvements. He devotes his whole 
time to general farming and stock raising, in both of which lines he 
has met with uniform success, and among his neighbors and associates 
he is known as a good, practical farmer and an excellent judge of live 
stock. 

On JMay 2, 1901, INIr. Hoover was united in marriage in Cass county 
with ]\Iiss Margaret Alma ilartin, daughter of Herman and Margaret 
(Blozier) JMartin of this county. They have had no children. ]Mi*s. 
Hoover is a member of the Union Presbyterian church of Washington 
township and has taken an active part in work of a religious and 
charitable nature. Fraternally, Mr. Hoover is popular with the members 
of the local lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, No. 314 of 
Wallen, while his political connection is with the Democratic party, in the 
activities of which he has taken a leading part in his section, although 
he has n^ver cared for nor sought piiblic office. Air. Hoover's life has 
been a busy and a useful one, his business methods have ever been 
unmarred by stain or blemish, and at all times he has been true to the 
obligations and duties that have rested vipon him. As a man who has 
the best interests of his community at heart he enjoys widespread 
esteem, and his acquaintance is large and his friendships numerous. 
I\Ir. and Mrs. Hoover's homestead is known as "Cottage House" and is 
one of the pretty properties of the county. 

James Vernon. Cass county is the home of some excellent citizens 
who have employed themselves in tilling the soil. j\Iany of these have 
spent their entire lives on the property which they are now cultivating, 
and in this class stands James Vernon, of Washington township, who 
owns forty acres and farms about eighty acres on the township road. A 
member of a family which has been connected with agricultural affairs 
for a number of generations, his whole training has been along this 
line, and as a result he has made a success of his operations, and is justly 
considered one of his community's most skilled agriculturists. ]\Ir. 
Vernon was born in the old home, which still stands on his present farm, 
August 12, 1850, and is a son of Pickering and Elizabeth (Burkit) 
Vernon. His father, a native of Greenville, Darke county, Ohio, came 
to Indiana in young manhood, and purchased land from the government 
in Cass county for $1.50 per acre, here spending the remainder of his 
life as a farmer, and dying advanced in years with the respect and 
esteem of the people of his community. He married Elizabeth Burkit, a 
member of an old and honored Cass county family, and they became the 
parents of nine children, as follows: William, who is deceased; Ensley, 
John, James, Jane, Thomas and IMargaret, who are deceased ; Mary, 
and Daniel, who is deceased. Both Mr. and ]\Irs. Vernon were deeply 
religious people and reared their children to honest. God-fearing lives. 

James Vernon was given only ordinary educational advantages 
during his youth, hut close observation and much reading and discus- 
sion of timely subjects have made him an exceedingly well-informed 
man. With his father and brothers, he spent his youtliful days in clear- 
ing, grubbing and general farm labor, and when he reached the age 
of twenty-four years embarked upon a career of his own. For some 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 849 

years he rented land from his father, working faithfully and indns- 
trionsly and earefully saving his earnings until sueh time as he was 
able to invest in property, his first small purchase forming the nucleus 
for his present farm. ]\Ir. Vernon is one of the most progressive of 
farmers, and is always ready to adopt new methods and to experiment 
with new inventions. As a re.sult. his land is in a high state of cultiva- 
tion, and is considered one of the most valuable farms of its size in this 
part of the township. Although general farming has occupied the 
greater part of his attention, he has also devoted himself to some extent in 
raising stock, his .success in this line having been commensurate with 
the labor he has expended upon it. Mr. Vernon has never cared to enter 
public life, his ambitions being satisfied in his farm and his home, but 
he is known as a public-spirited citizen, and any measure which com- 
mends itself to his judgment as one which promises to be of benefit to the 
community can depend upon his hearty support. He holds member- 
ship in the Christian church, which he attends consistently and sup- 
ports liberally. 

Mr. Vernon was married September 25, 1873, to Miss Mahala 
F. West, daughter of Paynter and Catherine (Myers) West, and to 
this union there were born two children, namely : Rose, deceased, who 
was the wife of Alva Knapp, a Cass county farmer, and had one 
child, Ellis, who is also deceased ; and Blanch, who married Emmett 
Small, and had two children — John and Zelma Olive; On September 
7, 1909, Mr. Vernon was married to IMrs. Katie (Eberley) Honicker, 
and three children have been born to them — Frank, Walter and Car- 
rie. The pretty homestead of Mr. and Mrs. James Vernon is known as 
"Park Lawn." 

RoLLTN T. Martin. It is a noticeable fact that the agriculturists of 
any section who have the best farms are those who take the most pride 
in the prosperity of their community and the most active part in the 
upbuilding and development of the section in which they reside. This 
holds true in Cass county as elsewhere, and one of these representative 
farmer-citizens is Rollin T. Martin, who has always been in the lead- 
ing ranks of any movement likely to prove of benefit to his locality. 
INIr. Martin has spent his entire career in this part of the state, and is 
thoroughly acciuainted with soil and climatic conditions, as well as 
with the most minute detail of the vocation of farming. He was born 
IMay 9, 1862, on the old JMartin homestead in Washington township, 
Cass county, Indiana, and is a son of Jesse and Christina (Miimmey) 
Martin. Jesse Martin was engaged in agricultural pursuits in Cass 
county, and a full sketch of his career will be found in another part of 
this work. 

Rollin T. Martin was reared in his native township, securing his 
education in the district schools, which he attended only when the 
weather was such that farm work conld not be done. He continued to 
assist his father until he reached the age of twenty-two years, at which 
time he began fanning on his own account. Later he bought his 
present property from his father, and this tract of eighty acres, situated 
on the Walton road has continued to be his home until the present time. 
Mr. Martin is an able agriculturist and an excellent judge of live stock. 



850 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

He has made numerous valuable improvements on his land, which is 
equipped with a comfortable home, a commodious barn, and outbuild- 
ings for the shelter of his stock, grain and implements, all substantial 
in character and of an attractive architectural design. Modern meth- 
ods and improved machinery are used exclusively, and the excellent 
crops that are raised justify the procedure. 

On May 14, 1885, Mr. jMartin was united in marriage with Miss 
Caroline M. Schwalm, of Cass county, a member of an old and honored 
family of this section, and to this union there have been born six chil- 
dren, namely: Earl G., who was educated in the schools of Logans- 
port, and now resides at home assisting his father in the management 
of the farm; Ethel L., who also resides with her parents; Eunice P. and 
Helen M., who are teachers in the public schools of Cass county ; Ruby 
G., who is attending the Walton high school; and Lois E., a graded 
school pupil. The family is connected with the Presbyterian church, 
of which Jesse IMartin was a charter member, while Rollin T. is now 
acting in the capacity of deacon. Mr. Martin bears the reputation of 
being a man who has always attended strictly to his own business, and 
has not been desirous of entering public atfairs. However, he takes an 
interest in all that affects his community, and his hearty co-operation 
and support are given to those measures which he feels will be of benefit 
to his community. The Martin farm is noted for its Short-horn cattle, 
which bring top-notch prices in the markets. The homestead of ]\Ir. and 
Mrs. Martin is known as "Maple Lawn Farm," and is the abode of 
hospitality. 

Manasseh M. ]\L\rtin. One of the old and honored families of Cass 
county is that of Martin, whose members have been identified with Ihe 
agricultural interests of this section for many years, and whose activi- 
ties have served in material manner to promote the growth and develop- 
ment of the community and its interests. Styles and methods of farm- 
irfg have changed during the past half a century, but the family con- 
tributes to the new school of practical, scientific farming just as it did 
to the old style. A worthy representative of the name is found in 
Manasseh M. Martin, of Washington township, who is cultivating an 
excellent tract of sixty acres, located on the Walton road, about nine 
miles southeast of Logansport. Mr. Martin has been a life-long resi- 
dent of this section, and years of experience have given him a practical 
knowledge of conditions in this vicinity, where he is known as an in- 
dustrious agriculturist and exemplary citizen. He was born on the old 
Martin homestead, located in Washington township, Cass county, 
Indiana, January 11, 1871, and is a son of Jesse and Christina 
(Mummey) Martin. Jesse Martin was for many years one of the leading 
farmers of his part of the county. A complete review of his life and 
labors will be found on another page of this work. 

Manasseh M. Martin secured his education in the same manner as 
most farmers' sons of his day, being a student in the district schools 
when he could be spared from the work of the home farm, principally 
during the winter months. He was thus fitted mentally while secur- 
ing a strong constitution and a knowledge of the principles of his 
chosen vocation, for even in his youth he had decided to follow in the 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 851 

footsteps of his forefathers and to continue a tiller of the soil. He re- 
mained on the old homestead, assisting his father until he reached his 
majority, at which time he left the parental roof and started to make 
his own way in the world. Not long thereafter he located on his pres- 
ent property, which then had but few improvements and was far from 
being fully productive. With youthful energy he settled down to 
develop his land, determined that he would one day be the owner of 
one of the best farms of its size in the township. That he has suc- 
ceeded in his efforts, is shown by the general appearance of the prop- 
erty, every detail of which gives evidence of a wise and capable manage- 
ment. General farming has been given the greater part of his atten- 
tion, although he has also devoted some time to the raising of stock, 
and is known as a. good .judge of cattle and horses. Like other success- 
ful men of his locality, he has realized that one of the surest ways to 
advance one's private interests is to advance the interest of the com- 
munity, and has acted acordingly, lending his hearty support to every 
movement that is calculated to advance public progress. He has been 
identified with Republican politics for some time, and was chairman of 
the precinct committee although his identification with public life has 
been rather as a director than as an active participant in search of 
honors. With his family, he attends the Presbyterian church. 

Mr. ]\Iartin was married May 14, 1895, to Laura B. Schwalm, the 
estimable daughter of Henry and Helena (Haemal) Schwalm, a sketch 
of whose careers will be found in anotlier part of this work under the 
caption of George Schwalm. Mr. and I\Irs. ^lartin have had one son : 
Roy E., who graduated from the public schools in the class of 1911, and 
who is a practical agriculturist, being associated with his parents. Mrs. 
Martin is a native of Cass county, born September 16, 1871, and edu- 
cated in the common schools. She has been treasurer of the Missionary 
Society for ten years and is in the office yet. She has been one of the 
efficient Sunday school teachers for twenty-two years — of girls — and 
some of these girls are now married. Mrs. Martin and her class put in 
two stained or art glass windows in the Presbyterian church in Wash- 
ington township. She has been one of the most active ladies in the 
county in all work pertaining to the advancement of her home com- 
munity. She has been an able factor in the establishment of her beau- 
tiful home known as "Shady Nook." She is a member of the Home 
Makers' Club of Cass county, which was organized February, 1913. 

WiLLARD E. Shanteau, proprietor of the Twin Beeches Farm, a 
tract in AVashington township that has been developed from its virgin 
state to its present excellence by its owner, was born ]\Iarch 28, 1870, 
in a house at the corner of Twelfth and Broadway, Logansport, 
Indiana, and is a son of Sylvester and Lydia (Rogers) Shanteau. 

Sylvester Shanteau was born near the city of Toledo, in Lucas 
county, Ohio, where as a lad he drove horses on the canal. Subse- 
quently, he worked his way to Logansport, Indiana, where he learned 
the trade of blacksmith, an occupation which he followed during the 
remainder of his life in Cass county in connection with farming. He 
became one of his community's best known citizens, and at the time of 
his death was in comfortable circumstances, and had a wide circle of 



852 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

warm friends. ^Ir. Shanteau married ]\Iiss Lydia Rogers, and they 
became the parents of seven children, namely : Willard E. ; ]\Iarcus : 
Frank, who resides in Logansport ; Charles, of Cincinnati, Ohio ; and 
three who died young. 

Willard E. Shanteau was still a lad when brought to Washington 
township by his father, and here he secured his education in the public 
schools during such time as he could be spared from the work of the 
farm. He was an ambitious, industrious lad, making the most of his 
opportunities and thoroughly training himself in every detail of farm 
work, and by the time he was twenty years of age was able to make 
his first payment on his present farm, a tract of forty acres of land. 
This property was in rather poor condition, but ]\Ir. Shanteau 's intelli- 
gent treatment of the soil, his untiring perseverance and his patient in- 
dustry ha^'e worked wonders, and the land is now considered one of 
the valuable tracts of the township. General farming and stock rais- 
ing have received his attention, and his ventures have proved success- 
fill liecause of his close application to his work. He has not entered 
public life, and cares but little for politics except as a voter, but has 
interested himself to some extent in fraternal work, and is a popular 
member of the local lodge of the Modern Woodmen of America at 
Walton. 

M. Shanteau was married November 25, 1890, to Miss Fannie L. 
Jenness, daughter of Perry and ^Margaret (Walters) Jenness, residents 
of Logansport, and to this union there have been born three children, 
two sons and one daughter: Owen, now eighteen years of age and 
who resides with his parents, assists in the cultivation of the home 
farm, and spends the winter terms in teaching school in Washington 
township. The members of the family are affiliated with the Christian 
church, in which all have many warm friends. 

John J. Hummel. Some of Cass county's best agriculturists are 
men who originally engaged in other pursuits, but who, coming of 
families whose members had for generations been tillers of the soil, 
eventually found the call of the land too strong, and returned to the 
occupation of their forefathers, finding therein the medium in which 
they have worked their way to success and independence. In this 
category is found John J. Hummel, who is carrying on operations on 
a well-cultivated tract of 188 acres, situated on the Hummel road, 
about six and one-half miles from Logansport. ]\Ir. Hummel is one of 
his section's good, practical farmers, and his large crops testify to his 
ability to cultivate his property under the most modern methods. He 
was born on the old Hummel place, in Washington township, Cass 
county, Indiana, September 3, 1871, and is a son of George A. and 
Elizabeth (Deitz) Hummel. His father, a native of Hummelstown, 
Dauphin county, Pennsylvania, came to ]Madison county, Indiana, in 
1862, as a young man, but after a short stay there made removal to 
Cass county, and here he was engaged in farming up to the time of 
his death, in August, 1908. He and his wife were the parents of five 
children, namely : Anna, who is deceased : John J., of this review ; 
William G., living on the old home place; ]\Irs. Minnie E. Cripe; and 
Mayme M., who also lives on the Hummel homestead. 







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HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 853 

John J. Hummel secured his education in the district schools in 
the vicinity of his father's farm, in the meantime l)eing trained to the 
occupation of agriculturist. He also devoted himself to learning the 
carpenter's trade, became a skilled mechanic, and for some years was 
SQ engaged, erecting many houses, barns and other structures in this 
section. In 1892, ^Ir. Hummel returned to farming, purchasing his 
present property, then a poorly cultivated tract which boasted of but 
minor improvements and was considered of only nominal value. 
Twenty years of intelligent treatment has worked wonders with this 
soil, and JMr. Hummel may now lay claim to being the owner of one of 
the handsome properties of his county. He is always quick to take 
advantage of new innovations, realizing that modern methods bring 
better results than the hit-or-miss operations of former years, and the 
appearance of his fai-m testifies mutely, but elociuently, to the pres- 
ence of good management. His stock are sleek and well fed, and Mr. 
Hummel bears the re])utation among his neighbors as being an excellent 
judge of cattle. 

In ]\Iarch, 1897, ]\Ir. Hummel was united in marriage with ]\Iiss 
Nora B. Shanks, daughter of Henry and ]Mary (Blue) Shanks, and to 
this union there have been born two children: Forest J., who is now 
in his third year of high school, a member of class 1914 ; and Ide Lorea. 
who is attending the Young America school in the seventh grade. 
Mr. Hummel has interested himself to some extent in fraternal work, 
and is a popular member of the Odd Fellows Lodge No. 477, and 
Moose loclge. His religious belief is that of the Lutheran church and 
Mrs. Hummel's of the Baptist. 

Reuben George Ball. Among the pioneer families of Cass county 
whose long connection with the agricultural interests have made their 
names well known in this section of the state, none have attained greater 
prestige, perhaps, than that of Ball. Coming to the then wilderness 
of Indiana at an early day, representatives of this name bore their full 
share in the early development of the locality, and their descendants 
have ably carriecl on the work which they started. Located in Clay 
township, on Rural Free Delivery Route No. 5, is the handsome property 
belonging to William B. Ball, a tract that is now being intelligently 
operated by i\Ir. Ball's son. Reuben G. Ball, a yoimg man of industry 
and enterprise who has inherited the sterling traits of character which 
have gained the bearers of the name the esteem and respect of their fel- 
low-citizens in years past. Reuben G. Ball was born August 28. 1886, 
on the old Ball homestead, which he now operates, and is a son of Wil- 
liam B. and Jennie (Coons) Ball. The family was founded in Cass 
county by his grandfather, David Ball, who was born in Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania, October 2, 1811, and came to Indiana in young manhood. 
Here William B. Ball was born in a little log house, the original pioneer 
home of the family, and grew^ to manhood in the woods, being trained to 
agricultural pursuits. He still survives and is one of his township's 
leading citizens. William B. Ball was married (tirst) to Jennie Coons, 
the daughter of George Coons, also an early settler, and she died on 
November 11, 1892. In 1905, IMr. Ball married (second) Mrs. Etta 
(Graiiel) Metzger, the widow of Dave IMetzger. 



854 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

Reuben G. Ball received his education in the district schools of Clay 
township, and was reared to the woi'k of the farm. As a young man 
he also learned the trade of carpenter, which he followed for five years, 
and spent another year in the west, working in INIontana. On his re- 
turn, he resumed farming, and on the day following his marriage located 
on the present property, which he has since been conducting for his 
father. This tract consists of 100 acres, and is in a high state of cultiva- 
tioji, the land being fertile, with an abundant water supply, and sup- 
plied with all modern appliances and improvements. A fine set of 
buildings enhance the value of this farm, the residence, built in 1898, 
and the barn, erected in 1900. having been put up by ^Ir. Ball and his 
father. j\Ir. Ball is a man of progressive ideas, and has demonstrated 
that he is fully capable of obtaining a full measure of success from his 
operations. 

On ilarch 6, 1912. Mr. Ball was married to INIiss Agnes B. Wilson, 
who was born in Benton county, Indiana, daughter of Robert and Jane 
(Henderson) Wilson, natives of Scotland. Mr. and JMrs. Ball are the 
parents of one little daughter, Catharine Irene, born January 16, 1913. 
Mr. and I\Irs. Ball are members of the Baptist church, and have been 
active in its work. In his political views Mr. Ball is a Republican, but 
so far he- has found no time to devote other than a good citizen 's interest 
in matters of a public nature. However, his support and cooperation 
are given to movements calculated to be of a beneficial nature to his 
community or its people. He is a member of the Eel River Lodge, I. 0. 
O. F., corner of Fifth and North streets, Logansport. A young man of 
pleasing personality, he has a wide acquaintance in Clay township, and 
is bighly regarded by a wide circle of personal friends. The homestead 
of Mr. and ^Irs. Reuben Ball is known in Clay township as "The 
Pleasant View Stock Farm." 

Hakry N. Little. Some of the most enterprising agriculturists of 
Cass county belong to the younger generation who bring to their work 
the enthusiasm and ambition of youth, while they profit by the expe- 
riences of those who have preceded them. A large proportion of the 
farmers of this class come of old agricultural families, whose members 
have for generations been tillers of the soil, and thus they contribute 
to their labors a natural inclination that is helpful in solving the many 
problems that arise to try the abilities of the agriculturist. Harry Lit- 
tle, an energetic and successful young farmer and stock raiser, may be 
said to belong to this class. For about five years he has been operating 
his father's property, a tract of 172 acres of well-cultivated land, lo- 
cated about two miles northwest of Onward, and the satisfactory results 
he is securing from his labor stamps him as one of his section's able 
young farmers. ]\Ir. Little was born on the old Little homestead, in 
Miami county, Indiana, March 17, 1886, and is a son of Lewis and, Alice 
(Sullivan) Little. His father, one of the leading farmers of Miami 
county, has been engaged in tilling the soil, all his life, and is still en- 
gaged in extensive farming and stock raising operations there. He and 
his wife have had five children, namely: Susan, who became the wife of 
John Williams ; ]\Iinnie, who married Arthur ]\Iays ; Laura, who is the 
wife of Homer Reed; Charles and Harry. 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 855 

Harry Little was reared on his father's homestead place in Miami 
county, and there commenced his schooling which was finished after he 
came to Cass county. He was thoroughly trained in the multitude of 
duties with which the modern agriculturist must be familiar to obtain a 
full measure of success, and continued to work in association with his 
father until he reached the age of twenty-two years. At that time, having 
demonstrated his ability, he was placed by bis father in the management 
of the farm on which he is now carrying on operations, and which, in 
the short space of five years, he has made one of the finest in his part of 
Tipton township. The greater part of his attention has been given to 
general farming, although stock raising has also come in for a share of 
his activities, and in all departments of farm work he has shown him- 
self possessed of ability, good judgment and farsightedness. Numerous 
improvements on this land have been made under his supervision, and 
substantial buildings have been erected, the latest being a modern home, 
equipped with all comforts and conveniences, substantial in character, 
and of architectural beauty. 

On August 26, 1908, INIr. Little was united in marriage with Miss 
Olive E. Mays, the daughter of Edward and Florence (Mackey) Mays, 
of Cass county, and to this union there has been born two sons, Gordon 
M. and Nelson L. With his wife, Mr. Little attends the Christian 
church, in the work of which they have been active, and in which they 
have numerous friends. He has not taken other than a good citizen's 
interest in matters of a political nature. 

Charles B. Wilson. Belonging to a family which has resided in 
Cass county for more than eighty years and has taken an impoi'tant 
part in the advancement and development of the agricultural interests 
of the county, Charles B. Wilson, of Tipton township, holds prestige 
as a worthy representative of his section's best farming citizenship. He 
is now the owner of 176 acres of excellent land, in addition to cultivat- 
ing which he is serving capably as a member of the township board of 
trustees. Mr. Wilson was born in a log cabin located just across the 
road from his present farm, on the IMarion road, about seven miles from 
Logansport, and is a son of Andrew and Eleanor D. (Tucker) Wilson. 

Andrew Wilson was born in Virginia, April 7. 1812, and when six 
months old was taken by his parents to Greenbrier county, in that state, 
where he was reared to manhood. About the year 1829 he left the Old 
Dominion, journeyed overland by team, and settled near New AVaverly, 
and in 1839 came to Tipton township and took up a government claim. 
Here he purchased two hundred and ten acres of land at a dollar and a 
quarter per acre, built a little log cabin, and at once began the difficult 
task of developing a farm from the heavily timbered land. As the years 
passed he continued to add to the improvements of his property, and 
when he died, December 22, 1892, he was one of the substantial men 
of his community. He was a member of the United Brethren church, 
and in his political affiliations was a Republican. On November 10, 
1842, he was married to ]\liss Eleanor D. Tucker, who was born in Clark 
county, Ohio, daughter of James and Charlotte (Dunn) Tucker. To 
this union there were born the following children : William H., bom 
December 4, 1843, and now deceased; Harry G., born in 1845, a resident 



856 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

of Chicago ; Mareellus T., born in 1847, a resident of Tipton township ; 
Alice, born December 26, 1848, who married A. J. Sharts; Carrie, bom 
May 4, 1851, a resident of Los Angeles, California; Linnie J., born Au- 
gust 8, 1853, who married Andrew Shirley ; JMary Louise, born June 22, 
1855, deceased; James A., born October 5, 1857, who died in infancy; 
Jennie, born February 24, 1859, who married J. M. Stucky, and is now 
deceased; Charles B. ; Martha E., born November 1, 1863, who married 
Thos. East ; and Laura, born October 12, 1868, who married Grant Hug- 
hell, resident of Madison county. 

Charles B. Wilson divided his boyhood days between work on the 
home farm and attendance at the old AVilson school, and he subsequently 
was a student in Logansport for one year. On reaching his majority he 
engaged in farming on his own account, and as the years passed gradu- 
ally bought more and more of the old homestead, finally purchasing the 
interests of the other heirs to his father's estate. He now has a well- 
cultivated property of 176 acres, and is justly regarded as one of his' 
township's most substantial citizens. He uses the most approved mod- 
ern methods in his work, takes a pride in being able to advance his in- 
terests by the use of the latest invented machinery, and a consequence 
has attained a full measure of success. He is known as a man of public 
spii'it, who has the welfare of his community at heart, and his neighbors 
and associates cheerfully testify to his integrity in matters of a business 
nature. 

Mr. Wilson was married to IMiss Amanda Catherine Gottschall Janu- 
ary 1. 1884. Mrs. Wilson was liorn in Cass county, Indiana, August 25, 
1863, the fifth in a family of six children, two sons and four daughters, 
born to Henry and ]\Iaria Jane (Roderick) Gottschall. Both of her par- 
ents are deceased. ]\Irs. Wilson was reared and educated in her native 
county and is a lady of pleasing address, sociable, and has a kind word 
for all. The eldest of Mr. and Mrs. Wilson's children is Chester H., who 
received his diploma from the public schools, class of 1912, and put in 
one year at high school work at Onward, Ind. Byron A. received his 
diploma from the public schools at the age of thirteen and spent one 
year in high school. Clara Louise is in the seventh grade and has also 
taken music. IMr. and Mrs. Wilson are giving their children good prac- 
tical educations. ]\Ir. AVilson is a trustee of Tipton township and was 
elected to that office in 1908 for four years, but his term is extended and 
will end in 1914. ]\lr. and ]\Irs. Wilson are consistent members of the 
ITnited Brethren church, and he is affiliated fraternally with the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, of Anoka, Indiana. Their homestead 
is known as Maple Grove Stock Farm. 

Adelbert C. Powyer. One of the best known families of Cass county 
and of the most hiahlv esteemed ones, is represented worthilv by Adel- 
bert C. Bowyer, a well k"0wn farmer in the vicinity of New AA'averly. in 
this county. A sketch of the family is presented elsewhere in this work 
in the bioeraphy of John Bowyer. the paternal grandfather of the sub- 
ject, and for details of the father of Adelbert Bowyer, the reader is re- 
ferred to the life of John M. Bowyer mentioned above. It suffices to say 
at this iunctiire that Adelbert C. Bowyer is the son of Allen W. and 
Elizabeth (William) Bowyer, and the grandson of Lewis ]\I. Bowyer, 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 857 

pioneers of this section of the state and esteemed throughout their long 
and useful lives as only honest and worthy men are honored. 

Adelbert C. Bowyer was born in ]\liami township in this county, on 
February 7, 1866. As a boy he attended the school at Walton and the 
Cross Roads, after which he turned his attention to the farm and its 
care, early learning much of the practical side of farming as a result of 
his association with his father in the home work. At the age of twenty 
tlie young man had rented a tract of farm land from his paternal grand- 
father, who assisted him greatly liy the advice and instructions he was 
so well qualified to offer. The lessons he had early learned in industry 
and general good management soon enal)led him to purchase land in the 
vicinity of AValton, where he lived for some years, eventually buying his 
present farm near Lewisburg. The place is a well managed one of one 
hundred and fifty acres lying on Pipe creek, and is well known for one 
of the most thrifty and productive places in the community. Prosperity 
and contentment are attributes of the Bowyer home that are readily 
discernible to the most casual observer and the family is one that enjoys 
the friendship and high regard of all who share in their acquaintance. 

Mr. Bowyer in young manhood married Miss IMary C. Fidler, Feb- 
ruary 27, 1887, and to them have been born two children, Clifford A., 
their first born, married Luella Flannigan, and AVayne W., is the 
younger child. 

Fraternally IMr. Bowyer is affiliated with the Improved Order of 
Red Men, Kokomo, Howard county, and he and his family are mem- 
bers of the New Light Christian church. He gives all due attention to 
the duties of citizenship, and has a share in all the works of civic im- 
provement carried on in his town and county. The homestead of j\Ir. 
and ^Irs. Bowyer is known as ' ' Pine Lodge. ' ' 

Oscar Wilson. Among the members of that class of self-made men 
of whom Cass county has reason to be proud, men who, unaided, have 
fought the battles of life without capital or influential friends, and have 
worked their way to the top through the sheer force of their own abil- 
it}^ and industry, Oscar AVilson, now a farmer of Tipton townshii?, takes 
prominent place. He has been a resident of this part of Indiana all of 
his life, and has accumulated a haiidsome property of 200 acres, located 
on the banks of the AVabash river, near Lewisburg. Mr. Wilson was 
born April 7, 1856, near Peru, in Peru township, Miami county, In- 
diana, and is a son of Absalom and Magdalena (Fisher) AVilson. The 
parents of Mr. AA^'ilson both came from Clarksburg, West Virginia, not 
long after their marriage, settling in Miami county, where they passed 
the remainder of their lives in the cultivation of the soil. They were 
the parents of nine children, namely: Oscar, Thomas J., George F., 
Omer, Absalom, Olive, IMargaret A., Ella and Noah. 

Oscar Wilson received his educational training in an old log school 
house in the vicinity of his native home, which he attended during the 
short winter terms, the whole period of his lioyhood lieing devoted dur- 
ing the spring, summer and fall months to work on his father's farm. 
For some years after attaining his majority he rented land from his 
father, liut subsequently acquired enough means to purchase a property 



858 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

on Big Indian creek, in Pnlaski connty, where he managed to bring 160 
acres of land under a high state of cultivation, although when he first 
located thereon it had been in its virgin condition, without improvement 
of any kind. There he continued to reside until 1895, in which year he 
came to his present location, here purchasing 100 acres, to which he has 
added from time to time, now having 200 acres of some of the best land 
to be found in this part of Cass county. He has carried on general 
farming and stock raising, and has made improvements of a substantial 
and valuable nature, the general appearance of his land testifying to his 
ability as an agriculturist and business man. Among his neighbors and 
associates, ]\Ir. Wilson bears a high reputation for integi'ity and probity 
. of character, and he is generally esteemed by all who know him. Mr. 
and Mrs. Wilson reside in their modern, eight-room residence, recently 
erected by Mr. Wilson, and equipped with all modern conveniences and 
comforts. Here they entertain their numerous friends with old- 
fashioned hospitality. 

On February 22, 1881, ]\Ir. Wilson was married to Miss Julia C. Sco- 
vel, daughter of Harmon and Cornelia (Huested) Scovel. Her father, 
a native of Germany, emigrated to the United States when nineteen 
years of age, locating first in New York, and later at Fort Wayne, In- 
diana, and finally settled on a farm in Allen county. Mr. and Mrs. Wil- 
son have had five children : Elma M. and Zelma C, twins, the former of 
whom is deceased, while the latter resides with her parents ; Carrie, who 
is deceased ; Nola L., residing at home, and Harmon, who is a student at 
Defiance, Ohio. Mr. Wilson is a member of the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, No. 52, of Peru, Indiana, among the members of which 
he numbers many sincere friends. His religious affiliation is with the 
Christian church, of which for years he has been a consistent member 
and liberal supporter. He has been a lifelong adherent of Democratic 
policies and candidates. His career has been a long and honorable one, 
and now he may look back over a life that has been not alone of benefit 
to himself but to his fellowmen, content in the knowledge that no stain 
or blemish mars an honorable record. 

George P. Sharts. Among the Qld and honored residents of Cass 
county who are devoting their activities to the cultivation of the soil, 
George P. Sharts, of Tipton township, holds prominent place. Mr. 
Sharts has been a resident of Tipton township since 1849, and has borne 
no small part in the development of this section from a practical wilder- 
ness, into one of the most productive sections of Indiana, and bears a 
high reputation among the people of his vicinity, who know him as an 
industrious agricultiirist and a citizen who has always had the best in- 
terests of his community at heart. His present sixty-acre farm is lo- 
cated on the Galveston road, about ten miles from Logansport. Mr. 
Sharts was born November 9, 1839, near Germantown, in ]\Iontgomery 
county, Ohio, and is a son of George and Frances (Bear) Sharts. His 
parents were born in the vicinity of Hagerstown, Maryland, from 
whence they moved to Frederick county, that state, and later removed 
to Montgomery county, Ohio, where they resided for some years. In 
1849 they came to Cass county, Indiana, settling first on the farm now 
occupied by N. B. Richinson, and lived in a little log house for some 



HISTOEY OF CASS COUNTY 859 

years, until this shelter was replaced by a dwelling of more modern 
character and architecture. A large portion of this land was covered 
with a heavy growth of timber, which was cleared by Mr. Sharts and 
his sons, and there he spent the remainder of his life, his death occur- 
ring in 1853, when he was fifty-three years of age, and that of his wife 
in 1875, when she was seventy-two years old. They became wealthy and 
substantial people of their section, although the elder Sharts did not 
live to see his labors bear their full share of fruit. George P. and 
Frances (Bear) Sharts became the parents of the following children: 
Mary M., Rose Ann and Elizabeth, who are all deceased ; Mrs. Cather- 
ine Hahn ; Mrs. Jane P. Phillips ; Abraham and John, who are both de- 
ceased; George P.; William O., who is deceased; Abijah J., who is en- 
gaged in farming in Tipton township, and Caroline Lucas, who is de- 
ceased. 

George P. Sharts was only sixteen years of age when his father died, 
and, being the eldest of the sons he was 'Called upon to bear the brunt of 
the farm work as soon as he was old enough to do so. His educational 
advantages were somewhat limited, but he made the most of his oppor- 
tunities, and being an intelligent and observing youth soon acquired a 
good schooling. On leaving the parental roof, he started working out 
among the agriculturists of his locality, thriftily saving- his earnings 
with the end in view of becoming the owner of land of his own, and this 
ambition has been accomplished, for his present land is now one of the 
best properties of its size in this part of the township. He is engaged 
in general farming and stock raising, and the success that has rewarded 
his efforts may be taken as an indication of his ability in his chosen 
line of endeavor. ]\Ir. Sharts is a member of the local lodge of the ]\Ia- 
sonie fraternity at New Waverly. No. 484, and his religious connection 
is with the Christian church, which he attends consistently and sup- 
ports liberally. 

On February 13, 1861, Mr. Sharts was united in marriage with Miss 
Maria Surface, who was born July 21, 1843, daughter of the Rev. Adam 
Surface. She was born in Preble county, Ohio, and .joined the United 
Brethren church when she was fifteen years of age, continuing to be a 
faithful member thereof until her death, December 19, 1885. Mr. and 
INIrs. Sharts had two children : George A., born August 20, 1876, who 
lived only six months; and Elnora M., who married Fremont Haynes, 
is a resident of Tipton township. The home of ]\Ir. Sharts is known as 
"The Sunset View Farm." 

John A. Rush. To the uninitiated in farm lore, no especial credit 
attaches to the accomplishment of the man who begins his farming ac- 
tivities as a renter, dependent upon the extent of his crop for the means 
to reserve to himself the privilege of harvesting another crop in the fol- 
lowing year; but to one who has seen something of the trials of the rent- 
ing farmer, or better yet, has experienced in some measure the hard- 
ships that follow thick and fast through some seasons, the success that a 
renter finally evolves stands out, brave and staunch. John A. Rush is 
one of these men who command the admiration and esteem of every 
honest man who has witnessed something of his rise in agriculture in 
the past forty years. He is known today for one of the ablest and most 



860 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

successful farmers and stock raisers in the county, and his place is sit- 
uated in the fine farming neighborhood south of the Wabash river, near 
the mouth of Hart creek in Tipton township. A native of the county, 
here reared, he has been identified practically all his life with the indus- 
try of agi'iculture and its associated business of stock raising, and from 
his slender start as a renter, he has accumulated a very substantial and 
productive property, while in his capacity as a citizen and a member of 
the social community, is one of the most highly esteemed men in Tipton 
township. 

Mr. Rush was born on the old Lendall Smith farm, near Onward, in 
Tipton township, on IMarch 11, 1857. His parents were John and Eliza- 
beth (Colvin) Rush, and the father was a native of the state of Penn- 
sylvania, whence he came to Indiana as a boy with his parents, and it 
may be mentioned here, that they were the first of the name of Rush to 
locate in Cass county, which has ever since known the business and so- 
cial influence of the family. The ten children of John and Elizabeth 
Rush were named as follows, and nearly all of them are living today in 
places of usefulness in various parts of this county : Silas, the eldest, is 
now deceased; Mary; William; John A., of this review; Frank; ^lilton ; 
Ira ; Willard ; Charles and ]\Iay. 

As a boy John A. Rush attended the common schools of Miami 
county, and there he received a practical schooling that well equipped 
him for the career he has since followed. While a school boy he was 
being trained thorougbly in the duties of the farm, building up a sound 
physical constitution that has stood him in excellent stead all through 
his rugged life in the farming industry. At the age of twenty-three 
he began independent farming as a renter, and from his good manage- 
ment and the profits of his lalior, was in later years able to purchase his 
present estate. In early life he wedded Emma J. Grimes, the davighter 
of John and Nancy (Gard) Grimes, and to them have been born three 
children, as follows: ^linnie B., the eldest, is the wife of Harry Griffith; 
they have thr'ee children — Dorsey, Esther and Thelma ; Edna May, the 
second child of the Rush home, is the wife of Harry Rhodes, and their 
one child is named Helen; Walter E., the third and youngest child, is 
yet a school boy, and gives promise of a life of usefulness in maturity. 

Mr. Rush and his family are active members of the Christian church, 
and are prominent in the social affairs of the community. During his 
residence in Tipton township, ]\Ir. Rush has taken an active and whole- 
some interest in civic affairs, and any improvements calculated to bet- 
ter conditions in his community never fail of his generous support. 

John T. Decker. Too nuich cannot be said in praise of the worthy 
influence emanating from the life of a man who devotes his entire life 
to the development of a given section of the country, and who continues 
in that M'ork despite the discouragements and misfortunes that may 
attend his efforts. It may be said that the man who devotes his life to 
the wresting of prosperity from the soil is lienefited as much ihere])y 
as is his community, and some trutli is found in that counter-claim, l)ut 
the fact remains that it is thuswise that prosperity comes to any com- 
munity, and so it must continue to be attained. Among the well estab- 
lished farming men of Cass county who have given years of toil to the 



^-^"^^ ,'^>^: 




HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 861 

uplniilding of his particular pai't of the town may he mentioned John 
T. Decker, who is a native son of the county, born within its confines 
on April 10, 1862, and thus has better than half a century of identifica- 
tion with the county to his credit. His parents, Moses and Sarah 
(McHenry) Decker, came from Ohio in their younger days, here settling 
and passing their remaining days. The Decker family is one of New 
Jersey ancestry and associations, and is of German and Irish blood. 
IMoses and Sarah (McHenry) Decker were the son and daughter or 
John Decker and John ]\IcHenry, and they were married in Cass county, 
where they settled down on a farm and here reared their family. The 
father built with his own hands the log cabin in which his children 
were born, and there he lived in quiet and contentment until death 
claimed him in 1897. 

John T. Decker, the jMiami township farmer whose name heads this 
review, lived on the old home place until December, 1911, when he 
moved to his present tine place of two hundred acres. He was married 
November 15, 1881, to Miss Esther A. Scott. ]\Irs. Decker is a native 
of Fulton county and was born December 10, 1861, and educated in the 
common schools. Both her parents are deceased. She is a lady who has 
the universal respect of all w-ho know her, as she is a woman of pleasing 
and agreeable pei^sonality, and has always aided her husband in counsel 
and advice. Her pretty and comfortable home is her paradise. To 
Mr. and Mrs. Decker one son was born, Claude, who was taken by death 
when he was a promising young man of twenty-four years. He was 
provided with many noble attributes of character and loved by all. 
Since deprived of the aid and companionship of his one son, Mr. Decker 
has continued to care for his farm without the help of any, and he has 
one of the most attractive and productive places in the township. He 
is regarded as one of the prosperous and competent farming men of the 
vicinity, and his standing among his fellow-men is one of the highest 
order, and of which he is in every way worthy. With his good wife, 
he attends the Christian church, and he is a Republican in his political 
faith. He has served his township on occasions as supervisor, giving 
praiseworthy service on those occasions, and he is known for one of the 
capable and consistent citizens of the township. 

John M. Bowyer. A resident of Cass county for more than seventy 
years, and of Tipton township for a period exceeding forty-five years, 
John M. Bowyer is entitled to mention as one of the old and honored 
citizens of his section, and as such is deserving of mention in a work of 
this nature. IMr. Bowyer has devoted his whole life to the cultivation 
of the soil in Cass county, and has witnessed and participated in the 
wonderful changes that have transformed what was once a wilderness of 
timber and brush into one of the most productive agricultural sections 
of Indiana. He is now the owner of ninety acres of fine farming land 
on the Anoka river, about ten miles southeast of Logansport. Mr. Bow- 
yer was born April 24, 1841, in Miami township, Cass county, and is a 
son of Lewis and Malinda (Wilson) Bowyer. His father, a native of 
Germany, came to the Ignited States in young manhood, and first set- 
tled in Pennsylvania, from which state he came to Indiana at an early 



862 , HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

day, locating in Cass county, where the remainder of his life was passed 
in farming and stock raising. He and his wife became the parents of 
fourteen children, of whom only two survive at this time : John M. and 
Sylvester. 

John M. Bowyer began to receive instruction in agricultural work 
when he was still a small boy, and long before he had passed his early 
'teens was able to do his full share in the work of the home place. In the 
meantime he was securing his literary training in the district school of 
his neighborhood, which he attended during the short winter terms. He 
grew to manhood in Miami township, and with his father laid out a part 
of Lewisburg from the home property, there continuing to reside until 
reaching majority. At that time he begau to carry on operations on 
his own account, and was so engaged at the time of his marriage, No- 
vember 30, 1865, to Miss Mary S. DeLawter. She was a daughter of 
Ezra and Sophia (Heck) DeLawter, wlio were born in Frederick county, 
Maryland, the former in 1818 and the latter in 1817, and who went to 
Ohio as young people with their parents, being married in the Buckeye 
state. Mr. and Mrs. DeLawter had four children, namely: Mary S., 
who married Mr. Bowyer; Sarah E., who married a Mr. Esquire Fenton; 
Jacob W., who makes his home near the Bowyer place; and Rebecca, 
who married Mr. M. T. Wilson. Dr. DeLawter became an early settler of 
Cass county, and here spent the remainder of his life in agricultural 
pursuits. Mr. and Mrs. Bowyer have had eleven children, as follows: 
Charles Lewis, who married Maggie Layton, and has eleven children; 
Ella E., who is deceased; Horace, who married Minnie Helver, who died 
leaving three children: Milfred, Maria and Ocal; Edward; Effie Mae, 
who is deceased ; Alvin, who married Rosa Timmons, and has six chil- 
dren; Elmer E., who is deceased; Carrie, who married Clyde Smith, and 
has one child: Josephine; Marshall, deceased, who married Mattie Rob- 
inson and has one child : Susan ; lona, who married Seward Sullivan and 
has three children : Helen, Cleo and Carl ; and Owen, who married Ruth 
Wilson. Mrs. Bowyer is a member of the Methodist church. 

Shortly after his marriage, in 1866, Mr. Bowyer came with his vdfe 
to Tipton township, which has since been his home. His ninety-acre 
farm is in a high state of cultivation, gives eloquent evidence of the 
presence of good management and untiring industry, and is considered 
one of the valuable tracts of the township. j\Ir. Bowyer has been a life- 
long Republican, but has not entered public life, having been content to 
devote his activities to his farm. He is one of his township's highly es- 
teemed citizens and has gathered about him a Avide circle of sincere 
friends. 

Aaron Floby. The farming industry has received long and careful 
attention from men of the name of Flory in Cass county, and horticul- 
ture has come in for its full share of the attention of Aaron Flory, the 
immediate subject of this review, and his father, David Flory. The 
winter banana-apple was produced by these gentleman after years of 
experimenting and discouragements and the science of horticulture is 
directly indebted to them for this addition to the fruit bearing trees of 
the country. 

Aaron Flory was born on the 5th of September, 1866, on the old 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 863 

homestead farm in Miami township that his father has settled some years 
prior to his birth. In the log' cabin bnilt by the fatlier on the place all 
but three of the children of David and Sarah (Heffley) Flory were born. 
David Flory was the son of Henry Flory, a native of Dart county, Ohio, 
and it was in about 1843 that the father of the subject came from that 
place to Cass county. He was twice married. His first wife, whose 
maiden name was Richardson, died in about 1844, leaving him two chil- 
dren, William and Henry. He later married Sarah Heffley, and she bore 
him ten children. They may be mentioned as follows: Frank, who 
married Grace Adams ; James, who married Lizzie Adams, a sister of 
Grace ; Samuel, who died in infancy ; ]\Iary, who became the wife of Dr. 
J. C. White ; Isabelle, died at the age of twenty -one ; Florence, died 
Avhen she was twenty-two years old ; David, who married Marguerite 
Kelley ; Charles, who married Ottie McCauley ; Edward, who married 
Mabel Swigart ; and Aaron, the subject of this brief record. 

David Flory was a cooper by trade, and he devoted his winters to 
that work, while he gave himself to his farming and horticultural 
research work in the summer seasons. He was a devoted student of 
horticulture, and with his son succeeded in producing the famous win- 
ter banana-apple, as mentioned in a previous paragraph. During his 
later years he discontinued his work as a cooper, and confined his at- 
tention to the farm thereafter. 

Aaron Flory has by skilfull work and careful attention to business 
come to be the owner of a nice place in Miami township of eighty acres 
and ninety acres in Clay township, both places being in a fine state of 
improvement, and in appearance indicating something of the care and 
labor that their owner has expended upon them. Mr. Flory is recog- 
nized among the substantial farming men of the community, where he 
enjoys the friendship and esteem of the best people. He is a member of 
the Christian church, with his family, and is a Democrat. His fraternal 
relations are with the Knights of Pythias. 

On August 19, 1892, Mr. Flory was married and he and his wife 
became the parents of three children: Evan L., bom May 28, 1892; 
Wilmer B., bom December 23, 1895 ; and Marselles N., born May 18, 
1902. 

Schuyler Flory. Another of the younger generation of Cass 
county farming men who have ably demonstrated their fitness to carry 
on the worthy work inaugurated by their fathers in the taming of the 
wilderness sections and the settling of the waste places is Schuyler Flory, 
who has passed all the years of his life on the farm he now occupies. 
He was born there on April 20, 1886, and his parents, who reside in 
Logansport, Indiana, and operate the farm in partnership with their 
son, Schuyler Flory of this review, are David M. and Marguerite (Kelly) 
Flory. The father is a son of another David M. Flory, and the mother 
is a daughter of Nelson Kelly. 

Schuyler Flory was educated in the district schools of his native com- 
munity, and received an excellent training in farm lore at the hands 
of his father, who has long been known for one of the most practical 
and successful farmers and horticulturists in the township of Miami. The 
farm, w^hich comprises seventy-four acres, is operated on shares by father 



864 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

and son, and the arrangement has continued to prove itself a most satis- 
factory one. The principal business of the place is the cultivation of 
small fruits, in which they have experienced a pleasing success and gained 
considerable prominence as producers of that variety of fruit. 

The Flory farm, as it stands today, represents many hours and 
weeks of unremitting toil on the part of the father and sou and to the 
former must be given the credit for having erected every building that 
stands on the farm today. The place is well kept, wisely cultivated and 
is a source of pleasure and profit to its owners, to whom it is endeared 
through long years of constant association. The family are members of 
the United Brethren church, and ]Mr. Flory and his son are adherents 
to the faith of the Democratic party, though not active beyond the de- 
mands of good citizenship. 

John S. Crockett. It is difficult for those of the present generation 
to realize the numerous difficulties and hardships with which the pioneers 
of Cass county were forced to contend. First were those of getting here 
from homes far distant. ]Many of these earl.y residents endured weeks 
of wearisome travel, literally passing through fire and flood to reach their 
destination. Then, after a habitation was secured, it often was a very 
meager protection against the elements and wild beasts. Subsequently 
came the clearing and subduing of the virgin soil, and the cost of the first 
plowing was often three times the cost of the land if purchased from the 
government. Other difficulties were appearing, but through them all 
these stvirdy, courageous, self-reliant men battled bravely and steadfastly, 
valiant soldiers in the strife of peace. Without them, this section would 
still be the haunt of the wild beast; the prosperous, luxuriant farming 
land would not know the plow. Among the citizens who have assisted 
materially in the growth and development of Cass county, none stands in 
higher regard than John S. Crockett, of "Washington township. This 
veneral)le citizen is the owner of a fine tract of land one mile east of the 
Kokomo road, about seven miles south of Logansport, of which he has 
himself cleared every acre of the eighty. Mr. Crockett was born April 
19, 1837, in Carroll county, Indiana, six miles from his present home, 
and is a son of William and ^Mary Ann (Stanley) Crockett, natives of 
Ohio and Kentucky respectively. William Crockett moved to Carroll 
count.y in young manhood, and he and his wife were the first couple to 
be married in Washington township, that county, the ceremony being 
performed in 1835. John S. was the oldest of their ten children, also 
the oldest living descendant of either the Crockett or Stanley families. 

John S. Crockett is a self-made man in all that the term implies. 
His education was secured in the little time that could be spared from his 
duties on the home farm, for like other farmers' sons of his day and 
locality, and especially the older sons, he was expected to be his father's 
assistant, and to share with him the hard work pertaining to the subduing 
of a practical wilderness, ilr. Crockett came to his present farm in 
18-48, embarking upon his career with but little capital, his early home 
being a little log cabin. By degrees he managed to clear and cultivate his 
land, gradually adding improvements as his means would permit. He 
has continued to reside on this property, and although he has reached 
an age when most men are content to transfer their duties to younger 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 865 

shoulders he is still actively engaged in the management of his affairs, 
unimpaired in faculties or energies. Mr. Crockett is not a politician, 
Init the confidence in which he is held by his fellow-citizens has resulted 
in his election to a number of township offices, in which he has shown 
himself capable and conscientious. He is regarded as one of the pillars 
of the Universalist church. 

Mr. Crockett was married in 1859 to Miss Mary J. Circle, of Ohio, 
who is now deceased, and they had a family of eight children, namely: 
Frank H., Clara C, Leroy i\I., Ella J., Mattie, Rebecca, Charles and 
Mary Elizabeth, the last-named deceased. The family further consists 
of twenty-six grandchildren and five great-grandchildren. 

Thomas L. East. About seven miles from Logansport, on the Anoka 
road, is situated the farm of Thomas L. Bast, a tract of seventy-seven 
and one-half acres of well-cultivated land that represents the result of 
a life of industry and well-applied energy. IMr. East embarked upon his 
career with but a meager capital of cash, nor was he possessed of influen- 
tial friends who could start him on the road to independence and posi- 
tion, but his possessions as expressed in ambition, determination and 
perseverance were large, and today he finds himself one of the success- 
ful farmers and stock raisers of his township, with a full appreciation of 
his success because it has been self gained. He is a native of Kentucky, 
born September 15, 1857, in Garrard county, a son of James and Eliza- 
beth (Land) East. His father was born in the same county, where the 
grandfather, also named James East, founded the family at an early 
day. The father grew to manhood in the Blue Grass state, and there 
engaged in agricultural piirsuits, in which he continued to be engaged 
throughout his life, meeting with a fair measure of success. He and his 
wife were the parents of ten children, of whom five grew to maturity : 
Thomas L., Calvin, Owen, Daniel and Sallie, all born and reared in 
Garrard county. 

On completing his education in the district schools, which he at- 
tended during the winter terms while working on the home farm in the 
summer months, Thomas L. East came to Indiana to live with an uncle, 
Owen Land, who was the owner of an extensive farm in Brown county. 
There he grew to manhood, and on leaving his uncle's home came to 
Cass county and began working as a farm hand. He was industrious and 
ambitious, and carefully saved his earnings, having determined to become 
the owner of a farm of his own, and eventvially he was able to make his 
first payment on his present farm in Tipton township, this section having 
been his home ever since. He is now the owner of seventy-seven and 
one-half acres, all in a high state of cultivation, on which many fine 
improvements are to be found. The buildings are of substantial char- 
acter, including a modern residence, good barns and appropriate out- 
buildings, and the entire appearance of the property bespeaks the thrift 
and good management of its owner. Essentially an agriculturist. Mr. 
East has not entered the political arena, nor has he identified himself 
with organizations of a social or fraternal nature, but has applied himself 
assiduously to the work which he chose in his youth as the medium 
through which to attain success. LTe has succeeded in a monetary way, 



866 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

and has also gained the esteem of his fellow-citizens and the warm re- 
gard of a wide circle of friends. 

On April 6, 1880, ]\Ir. East was married to Miss Martha Wilson, who 
was born in Cass county, a daughter of Andrew and Eleanor D. (Tucker) 
Wilson. Her father, a native of Virginia, came to Tipton township in 
1839 and took up government land, on which he spent the remainder of 
his life, passing away December 22, 1892, one of the substantial men 
of his community. His wife was a native of Clark county, Ohio, and 
they had children as follows: William H., Harry G., Marcellus T., 
Alice, Carrie, Linnie J., Maiy L., James A., Jennie, Charles B., Martha 
and Laura. IMr. and Mrs. East have had two children: Calvin and 
Edith, both residing at home with their parents. Edith graduated in the 
public schools and then from the commercial course in Marion, Indiana. 
She is a member of the North Baptist church. Calvin was educated 
in the common schools and at home. The homestead of Mr. and ]\Irs. 
East is called "Cedar Lawn." 

Clarence A. Archey. At an early period of our American history, 
representatives of the Archey family located in the Old Dominion. 
Energy, honesty and industry have been some of the marked character- 
istics of the family, and the elemental strength of character in Clarence 
Archey, of Tipton township, shows that these qualities are predominant 
in his nature. Mr. Archey is one of Cass county 's examples of self-made 
manhood, for he has been self-supporting since his twelfth year, and at 
this time is known as one of his township's enterprising and progres- 
sive young farmers, and one who is rapidly forging his way to the front. 
Mr. Archey was born in Shelby county, Indiana, August 12, 1874, and 
is a son of Thomas and Belle (Lacy) Archey. His grandparents, Peter 
and Abbey Archey, were F. F. V.'s in the Old Dominion, from which 
state they migrated to Shelby county at an early day, and there spent 
the remainder of their lives in the peaceful occupation of farming. 
Thomas Archey was born in Breckenridge county, Virginia, and was a 
small lad when he accompanied his parents in their migration to the 
Hoosier state. He was reared in Shelby county, became a farmer on 
reaching his majority, and passed the entire period of his active career 
in tilling the soil. For some years he has been living a retired life, and 
now makes his home in Lafayette, Indiana, his wife having passed away 
many years ago. 

Clarence Archey was the only child born to his parents and lost 
his mother when he was but ten months old. When about two years of 
age he was taken to Tippecanoe county, and there spent his boyhood in 
farm work, attending school during the short periods when he could be 
spared from the work of the farm. His opportunities for an education 
were not great, but he was an ambitious and intelligent youth and made 
the most of his chances, thus securing a somewhat better schooling than 
many who were given greater benefits. He was only twelve years of 
age when he embarked upon a career of his own, but had been thor- 
oughly trained in all the subjects with which a good farmer and stock 
raiser must be conversant, and his subsequent rise has been steady and 
continuous. At the present time he is renting the old Louthian farm, 
where he carries on general farming and stock raising, in addition to 





c^ 






HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 867 

which he devotes some time to working on shares. His private interests 
have al>vays demanded his entire time and attention, and through 
careful management, sound judgment and unflagging industry he has 
been able to overcome many obstacles and discouragements and to gain 
a place for himself in the esteem and respect of his fellow-citizens. 

On August 27, 1902, Mr. Archey was united in marriage with Miss 
Edna Layman, the estimable daughter of Benjamin Layman, and to 
this iinion there have been born four children : Robert L., who is at- 
tending school ; Madeline M., residing at home ; and Mildred and Thomas, 
who are deceased. Mr. Archey holds membership in the local lodge of 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at Anoka, Indiana, in which he 
has many warm friends. With his wife, he attends the Seven Mile 
United Brethren church, where he acts in the capacity of superintendent 
of the Sunday school. 

Rev. Charles E. McCoy. The ministry of the Christian church has 
held the chief interest and activity of Charles E. McCoy for the past 
fifteen years, but he has of late found time to give some little attention 
to the business of farming, and at the present time he is busily occupied 
in the work of building on his farm. He has been pastor of a number 
of churches, among them pulpits at Independence, Kokomo and Win- 
amac, and lastly he was located at New "VVaverly, where in addition to 
his duties as pastor he had charge of the postoffice. His life has been 
a busy one from his. earliest time, and he has proven his worth as a 
live citizen in whatever community he has lived since he reached man's 
estate. 

Born on April 7, 1874, in Monroe township, Howard county, this 
state, Charles E. McCoy is the son of Sampson and Jane (Vernon) 
McCoy. Sampson McCoy was born in the state of Ohio, and his father 
was a native of the state of Maine, coming from that state to Ohio, and 
his son drifting into Indiana in young manhood. The McCoy family 
is one of pure Irish ancestry, the first American ancestors having come 
to these shores from Ireland at an early date. Sampson and Jane 
(Vernon) McCoy became the parents of thirteen sons and daughters, 
the most of whom lived to assume places of responsibility in their various 
communities. 

Up to the age of twenty-one years, Charles McCoy lived on the 
home farm, and from then until he had reached the quarter century mark 
he was employed variously in the community. At that age he married, 
and he established his first independent home in Winamac, Indiana, 
where he took charge of the church of the Christian denomination, and 
discharged the duties of a pastor with all satisfaction. He then moved 
to Howard county, where he was occupied in the ministry for a few 
years, when he moved to Kokomo, Indiana, and once more resuming the 
pastorate of the Winamac church. From there he moved to Miami 
township, in Cass county, and took charge of the Christian church at 
New Waverly, at which point he has also been occupied as postmaster. 
In later years he has done some farming, as well as his ministry. 

Rev. McCoy's primary educational training was begun in the public 
schools. Then he entered the New London, Indiana, high school and 
spent two and a half years there, after which he entered the Frankfort, 



868 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

Indiana, high school, and thei'e finished the third year of the high school 
work. Next he took the full normal course of instructions, and then 
entered the theological department of the DePauw University in 1894, 
and completed part of the course there. Then he entered and com- 
pleted the full four-year course in the Northwestern Indiana Chris- 
tian Conference, and has been chairman of the educational executive 
board and is the present incumbent. Rev. INIeCoy is a man who is well 
qualified for the profession or calling of the ministry, since he is a 
logical and cultured gentleman of pleasing j^ersonality, and has been 
an able factor in tlie aJfairs of his home township. He is ever ready to 
lend his aid to all measures for the advancement and elevation of the 
moral, spiritual and intellectual development of his county and state. 

Rev. Mr. McCoy is a member of the ^Masonic order at New Waverly, 
Indiana, and has been a trustee of ]\Iiami township for the past four 
years. 

On July 23, 1899, Rev. Mr. McCoy was iinited in marriage with Miss 
Blanche Griffith, the daughter of Tatman and Irene (Adams) Griffith, 
the father of Dutch ancestiy, born in Jennings county, and the liiother 
was born in Cass county, Indiana. Four children have been born to ilr. 
and ^Irs. ^IcCov : Ursela Irene, born April 22, 1901 ; Leland D., born 
February 13, 1902; Paul G., Iiorn February 27, 1904; and Chelsa E., 
born February 5, 1907. Politically Rev. ■NlcCoy was a Republican, but 
now gives his allegiance to the Progressive party. 

Franz S. IMartin. The pioneers of this great middle west were 
those who blazed the way to civilization, and made the wilderness to 
bloom and blossom like the rose. Mr. Martin, the subject of 
this sketch, w'as the founder of a family of most worthy descendants 
who have aided very materially in building up the great common- 
wealth of Cass county, Indiana. He was a direct descendant of the Ger- 
man, as his grandfather, Peter jMartin, emigrated to America in 1780, 
and settled in Pennsylvania, near Philadelphia. 

Mr. Franz S. Martin was born October 22, 1830, and died April 30. 
1907, in Somerset county, Pennsylvania. He was educated in the primi- 
tive schools of that state and was more than an ordinary mathematician. 
He was mostly self educated and was a teacher. He with his parents in 
1S49 came to Cass county and the trip from the Keystone state over- 
land was made in one of the old fashioned wagons, crossing swollen 
streams and over mountains, and finally reached Cass county. The fam- 
ily settled on section 27, in AA'ashington township, and the first habi- 
tation they lived in was a log cabin with a puncheon floor and after- 
wards the largest frame house in the township. 

]Mr. JMartin wedded ]Miss Caroline Sine November 29, 1853, and 
eleven children, three sons and eight daughters, were born, and all are 
living but one. Charles H. married and is a resident of Logansport ; he 
was an agriculturist, and is a Democrat politically. IMary H., widow of 
Rev. Amos Jones, is a resident of Zion City, Illinois; Rev. Jones was a 
Presbyterian. Herman E. is represented elsewhere in this work. Re- 
becca is the wife of Dr. ]\I. J. LaRose, a resident of Zion City, Illinois, 
and a health officer. Harriet is a resident of Zion City, Illinois. George 
"W. is a resident of IMemphis, Tennessee, employed in the lumber interests ; 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 869 

he married Miss Anna Gregg. Ellen V. is a resident of Zion City, Illi- 
nois; she was educated in Logansport, Indiana, and at Hanover Col- 
lege in Indiana, and was a successful teacher for fifteen or eighteen 
years in Cass county, Indiana. Lucy D. is the wife of Rev. IMahlon 
Krauss, a resident of Richmond, Indiana, and he is a member of the 
Methodist church. Carrie V. is the wife of Cyrus B. Carleton, a resi- 
dent of Rochester, Indiana, and a dealer in grain. Elsie J. is the wife of 
Dr. F. jM. Kistler, a resident of Royal Center, Indiana, and a practicing 
ohysician. 

Mrs. Martin was born in ^Maryland January 8, 183-1, and died May 
8, 1910. She was but a child when her parents left ^Maryland for Penn- 
sylvania, and there they resided for years and from Pennsylvania the 
Sine family came to Cass county overland liy wagon. She was educated 
]n the common schools and was a devout Christian of the Presbyterian 
faith. She was a mother and friend to the poor and needy and the 
hungry never went from her door in need. 

When ]Mr. Martin was about twenty-two years of age he went to Iowa 
and purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land but sold it and 
came to Cass county and here he remained during his life and was a suc- 
cessful man and accumulated five hundred and twenty-five acres, all in 
AVashington township, so it is readily seen that he had been a man who 
had been careful and had taught his children the lessons of economy 
and integrity. Politically he was a Jaeksonian Democrat and he ad- 
hered to those principles till late in life and then advocated the Prohi- 
bition principles. Officially he was assessor of Washington township 
eight years. He was a man who was appealed to by the citizens to take 
an active part in the affairs of the community and in the adjusting of 
estates. He was ofttimes selected as delegate to the county and state 
conventions at various times. In 1876 he attended the Centennial at 
Philadelphia and the scenes of his childhood. Religiously he was an ar- 
dent si;pporter of the Presbyterian doctrines, and was one of the char- 
ter members of the Union Presbyterian church of Washington township, 
which is now, in 1913, one of the most prosperous religious societies in 
Cass county. He was one of the trustees of the official board and was 
elder of the church a number of years, and was one of the leading fac- 
tors in the Sunday school, being superintendent. 

It was in March, 1887. when ]\Ir. and Mrs. ^Martin vacated the old 
homestead on the farm and located at 1408 North street, Logansport, but 
he had several properties in the city. Both i\Ir. and ]Mrs. Franz S. ]Mar- 
tin were citizens of Cass county who as shining lights to the younger 
generation show that honesty of character as well as true integrity 
present to a finished earthly existence. They were well known for their 
deeds of benevolence and good will, and no needy one would have left 
their hospitable door empty handed. Both are interred in ]\It. Hope 
cemetery, where beautiful stones stand sacred to their memory. 

William Keiser. Practical scientific farming has taken the place 
of the old hit-or-miss style, and as a result land that at one time could 
be purchased for almost nothing, is today worth hundreds of dollars 
an acre. Much of this has been brought about by the use of improved 
machinery and the application of scientific methods, as well as by gen- 



870 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

eral progress and the increase in population. One of the practical farm- 
ers of Tipton township, whose activities have been of such a nature as 
to firmly establish him in a position among the representative men of his 
community, is William Keiser, the owner of ninety-two acres of land 
located on the Keiser road. Mr. Keiser has been an eye-witness to and 
an active participant in the wonderful change that has transformed this 
part of Cass county from a practical wilderness into a veritable flower 
garden. Mr. Keiser was born on the old Hilderbrandt farm in Tipton 
toAvnship, Cass county, August 15, 1856, and is a son of Eekhart and 
Anna Catharina (Dorn) Keiser, natives of Germany. Eekhart Keiser 
was an industrious, hard-working citizen, but in his native land lacked 
the opportunities to achieve success. Accordingly, when about forty 
years of age, he gathered his little family together and brought them to 
the United States, settling in Cass county, Indiana. He had only a small 
capital, and was entirely lacking in influential friends, and consequently 
his progress was slow. Faithful labor and commendable perseverance, 
however, paved the way to success, and at the time of his death he 
was the owner of a snug little farm, on which he raised good crops. He 
and his wife were the parents of four children, namely : Martha, who 
is deceased ; Henrietta ; Minnie, the widow of Harvey Sehuman, now liv- 
ing in Walton ; and William. 

William Keiser 's boyhood was spent in his little log cabin home, on 
his father's farm, and in the district schools. The greater part of his 
education was secured in the school of hard work, as he was his father's 
only son and it was necessary that he give all of his time possible to 
the work of the fields. Thus he was reared to habits of industry, fru- 
gality and thrift, and given a thorough training in all the details of farm 
work. At the age of twenty-one years Mr. Keiser commenced farming 
on shares, and a short time thereafter he had accumulated enough capi- 
tal to warrant his embarking in business on his own account. He there- 
fore purchased a small tract of land, to which he has since added from 
time to time, and now has ninety-two acres, all in a state of cultivation. 
He is known among his neighbors as a man of integrity, who can be 
depended upon to support movements that make for progress and de- 
velopment. An excellent farmer, he is also a good judge of livestock, 
as his herd of sleek, well-fed animals proves. He has made a number 
of modern improvements to his place, and the most approved methods 
find in him a willing disciple. 

On November 11, 1885, Mr. Keiser was united in marriage with Miss 
Lucinda Smith, daughter of Alexander and Mary (Burkit) Smith, of 
an old family of Cass county, and three children have been born to this 
union, namely : Roswell IMelroy, Charles G., and William L. Roswell 
M. received his diploma in 1905 at the public schools and from the Wal- 
ton high school in 1909, and he spent four summers in the Valparaiso 
University, and he also taught two years in the common schools and two 
years in the former high school. He is a Democrat and is a member 
of the Presbyterian church. Charles C. received his diploma from the 
common schools in 1907, and graduated i-n Walton high school in 1911. 
He is a student at Winona, Indiana, and a member of the Presbyterian 
church. William Leslie received his diploma from the common schools 
in 1908, and graduated in Walton high school in 1912. He is a member 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 871 

of the Presbyterian church. With their family, Mr. and Mrs. Kaiser 
consistently attend the Presbyterian church. Mr. Keiser is a Democrat 
and is a member of the I. 0. 0. F., No. 314, and the M. W. of A., No. 
7244, in Walton, Indiana. 

Harvey O. Bird. The younger farming men of Cass county have 
wrought worthily and well in carrying forward the splendid work of de- 
velopment that was put in motion by their fathers and grandsires in 
years gone by, and it will hardly be denied that the greater part of the 
real prosperity of the county and the wealth of the communities have 
resulted from the application and energy of these sturdy farmers and 
honest and admirable citizens. Among the more prosperous and com- 
fortably situated agriculturists of Cass county, of whom there are indeed 
many, H. 0. Bird of Walton is one who is deserving of especial men- 
tion in this historical and biographical work dealing with the county of 
Cass in Indiana. He was born in Deer Creek township, this county, on 
February 27, 1887, and is the son of J. W. and Essie (Rhinehart) Bird, 
of whom the former is now deceased. J. W. Bird was bom in Ohio, 
where he devoted himself to farming and was very prominent in the 
community that represented his home for years before he identified 
himself with the fortunes of Cass county. He was the father of seven 
living children, named as follows : Francis A. ; Harriet, who married 
a Mr. Walter Barnes; Benjamin F. ; Harvey 0., of this review; Charles 
R. ; Eva J., and Ruby. 

Harvey 0. Bird in boyhood attended the Crockett school in his com- 
munity, and during his vacation seasons applied himself diligently to 
the work of the home farm, as was required of him. He was nineteen 
years of age when on February 22, 1906, he married Ercie Banks, the 
daughter of Harry and Lorinda (Riish) Banks, and one son, Clark Bird, 
has been born to them. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bird are members of the Christian church and have an 
active part in the work of the church in its various departments. Po- 
litically Mr. Bird is identified vdth the Republican party, and takes 
the interest of a good citizen in all affairs of a political and civic nature 
in his community, where he has a prominent place of which he is well 
deserving. 

Louis Kaufman. Located on the township line between Washington 
and Tipton townships is situated the ninety-acre farm belonging to 
Louis Kaufman, a veteran agriculturist of Cass county, whose residence 
here covers a period of almost a half a century. His energies have always 
been devoted to his farming interests, and he is known as an honorable, 
upright business man, whose sterling worth has gained him high regard. 
Mr. Kaufman was born at Dayton, Montgomery county, Ohio, April 27, 
1858, and is a son of Henry and Anna (Wiegand) Kaufman. His father, 
a native of Germany, left the Fatherland in young manhood, and settled 
in Montgomery county, Ohio, where he carried on agricultural pursuits, 
as he did also in Darke county, where he subsequently moved. About the 
year 1865 he came to Washington township, Cass county, Indiana, here 
continuing to follow farming until his death. He was a successful busi- 
ness man of his day and locality ,_ took a keen and intelligent interest 



872 HISTORY OP CASS COUNTY 

ill the needs of his to^vuship. and succeeded in winning the respect and 
esteem of those about him. He and his wife were the parents of five 
children : George, Elizabeth. Martha, Louis and Catharine. 

Louis Kaufman secured his education in the public schools of ]Mont- 
gomery and Darke counties. Ohio, mostly in Cass county, Indiana, and 
during the summer months worked on his father's farm, assisting him 
materially in his work and gaining a thorough knowledge of the multi- 
tudinous subjects on which a good fanner should be informed. He was 
about six years of age when he accompanied his parents to Washington 
township, and continued to remain under the parental roof until his 
marriage, when he embarked upon a career of his own. He had been a 
thrifty and industrious youth, and had carefully saved his earnings, so 
that he was able to make a payment on a farm in Washington township 
of seventy-five acres. This he sold and purchased his present farm, 
which is situated aliout nine miles southeast of Logansport, on the Wash- 
ington-Tipton township line. Here he settled down to clear and cultivate 
the soil, each year seeing further advancement made, until he now has 
the full ninety acres, except eight acres of timber, under the plow. He 
carries on general farming and also devotes some attention to stock rais- 
ing, and his success has been such as to make him one of the sulistantial 
men of his community. He has erected commodious buildings, with mod- 
ern conveniences, for in this matter, as well as in others, he believes in 
the use of up-to-date methods and ideas. His machinery is of the latest 
and most highly improved manufacture and his entire property is a 
model of neatness and order. 

October 10, 1896, Mr. Kaufman was united in marriage to Miss 
Anna Lebert, who is deceased. He was married to Miss Augustina 
Schwalm, September 7, 1898, and to this union there have been 
born two children : Wilbur and Helena, and both are in the eighth, 
grade in the public school, and both are taking music. With his 
family, he is connected with the Presbyterian church, where he has 
been liberal in his support of religious and charitable movements. He is 
independent in politics, casting his vote for the man best fitted for the 
party. He has also stanchly supported measures which he has felt will 
advance his community, taking a keen interest in those things which vi- 
tally affect it. Thus he has become a potential force in his locality, where 
he is looked to for counsel, advice and leadership. The pretty home- 
stead of Mr. and Mrs. Kaufman is known as "Hill A^iew Farm." 

Oscar B. Ferguson. Upwards of half a century ago the father of 
Oscar B. Ferguson settled in Cass county, and at a time when the most 
primitive conditions existed throughout this region, set himself to the 
herculean task of hewing a farm and a home out of the pristine wilder- 
ness that prevailed. Only those who have seen something of the hard- 
ships of such an undertaking are capable of making any adequate 
estimate of the courage, energy and perseverance that these sturdy peo- 
ple brought to bear in the taming of the wilderness and in tlie eventual 
evolving of a home from the conditions then existing. When Oscar 
Ferguson came into possession of the place it had passed beyond the 
stage of storm and stress peculiar to the early years, but he has done his 
full duty in carrying it forward to its present state of cultivation and 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 873 

giving it the appearance of fruitfulness and prosperity that it now 
wears. The place comprises one hundred and thirty acres on the bound- 
ary line pike and its owner is properly regarded as one of the pros- 
perous and successful men of the community. 

Born in Adams township, in Cass county, Indiana, December 13, 
1865, Mr. Ferguson is the son of James P. and jMariah V. (Dillman) 
Ferg-uson. They were farming people of Adams township, where they 
passed their lives for the most part, and became the parents of six chil- 
dren, as follows: Oscar B., of this review; Luman N., now deceased; 
Henry D.; Sylvia M. ; Cora D. and Maud E. The father, James P. Fer- 
guson, was the son of Richard and Phoebe Ferguson. The thickly tim- 
bered district in which he settled in his yomig manhood has, as intimated 
above, since that time given place to fertile hills and valleys, and during 
the years when the transformation was being slowly wrought, he reared 
the goodly family just mentioned. 

Oscar B. Ferguson as a boy attended the Thomas school near his 
home, and later, through the wisdom of his father, Avho recognized the 
studious qualities which his son evidenced, he was permitted to attend 
Logansport Seminary and the Central Normal at Danville, Indiana, so 
that he secured educational advantages in advance of what the average 
youth of his day received. He married Miss Arria R. Bowyer, the 
daughter of Charles 6. and Isabelle (Craighead) Bowyer, but no chil- 
dren have been born to them. In the goodness of their hearts, however, 
they took a little girl, Mary M. Enyart, to rear and educate, and it can 
be truthfully asserted that little Mary will have a home of sweet influ- 
ence and religious training, as well as high moral teaching. Mrs. Fer- 
guson's father, Charles Graules Granville Bowyer, was a descendant 
of the well known Bowyer family of Virginia, and he was born in 1837 
and died on the 18th day of February, 1912. She was one of the seven 
children of her parents, the others being: Mary D., Mavilla B., and 
Vesta J., all deceased; May B., AVillard N., and Ellis. The surviving 
children are all filling places of usefulness in the various spheres to 
which they have been called. 

Mr. Ferguson is prominent in his membership in the ]\Iasonic fra- 
ternity at Walton Lodge No. 423, and in the Knights of Pythias, Powell 
Lodge No. 62, Logansport, Indiana. He is also a member of the Order 
of the Eastern Star as is his wife, and both are popular and prominent 
in social circles of their community, where they are held in the highest 
esteem and regard by all who share in their acquaintance. Mr. Fer- 
guson has always taken a wholesale interest in civic activities in the 
community, and in politics has voted with the Republican party, but 
has never been an office seeker at any time in his life, content with the 
duties of citizenship, but averse to the responsibilities of official life. 
The beautiful estate of Mr. and Mrs. Ferguson is known as "Locust 
Lawn," and it is the abode of hospitality and good cheer. They are 
citizens who take great interest in church work and are members of the 
Disciples of Christ church at Walton, Indiana. They take great interest 
in the Sunday school also. 

Oliver J. Pierson. Cass county's history has been developed by the 
men who first settled here, and more pages are constantly being added 



874 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

by, those whose lives are now being enacted. The agricultural sec- 
tions of this county are extensive, in fact it may be called a farming 
county, so that a large number of its residents are engaged in tilling 
the soil and raising stock, with benefit to themselves and profit to their 
communities. An excellent example of the progressive, up-to-date Cass 
county farmer is found in the person of Oliver J. Pierson, of Wash- 
ington township, the owner of forty-two and one-half acres of land, 
which he has brought to a high state of cultivation. Although not a 
native of Cass county, Mr. Pierson can lay claim to being an "old set- 
tler," as he was but one year old when brought to this section. Here 
he has continued to be identified with agricultural matters to the pres- 
ent time, in the meanwhile establishing himself fii'mly in the confidence 
and esteem of his fellow-citizens by upright living and honorable deal- 
ing. Mr. Pierson was born September 25, 1867, in White county, In- 
diana, and is a son of Matthew H. and Mary A. ( Jenness) Pierson. 

Matthew H. Pierson was born in Preble county, Ohio, from whence 
he migrated in young manhood to White county, Indiana, in which local- 
ity he was married and had one child. He subsequently came to Cass 
county, in 1868, and here was engaged in agricultural pursuits during 
the remainder of his active career, fairly winning the regard of his 
neighbors and accumulating a competency. He and his wife became the 
parents of six children : Oliver J. ; Mrs. Carrie Small ; Mrs. Gertrude 
Ramer; Emma, the wife of Adelbert Planigan, who had one child, — 
Estella D., who is living with Mr. Pierson; Mae, who married Benjamin 
F. Crockett, and has two children, — Gilbert P. and Herbert P. ; and Mrs. 
Maud Toney. 

Oliver J. Pierson was reared to agricultural pursuits, and secured 
his education in the common schools. His entire life has been spent in 
farming, and at the age of twenty-four years he became the possessor, 
through purchase, of his present land. He has brought his property to 
a high state of cultivation through the use of modern methods, and in 
addition to producing large crops devotes some attention to the raising 
of valuable livestock. He has made a study of soil conditions, rotation 
of crops, and kindred subjects necessary to scientific treatment of his 
land, and as a result is known as one of his township's foremost agri- 
culturists. In addition to his Cass county property he is the owner of 
valuable holdings in the state of Texas. 

On August 30, 1892, Mr. Pierson was married to Miss Effle E. Mar- 
tin, daughter of John T. and Caroline (Martin) Martin, and to this 
union there has been born one son: Donald M. Mr. Pierson 's fraternal 
connection is with the local lodge of the INIodern Woodmen of America, 
Camp 7244, at Walton, Indiana, in which he was venerable counsel and 
in which he numbers many friends. With his family, he attends the 
Presbyterian church. 

Samuel W. Ullery, who was long connected with the business in- 
terests of Logansport, where he was known for one of the most reliable 
and enterprising merchants of the city, was born at Covington, Ohio, 
on Januai-y 17, 1813, and was a son of Jacob and Elizabeth (Fager) 
Ullery, both of German descent. 

Jacob Ullery was bom in Maryland and there reared, moving to 





^L/un^ 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 875 

Ohio in young manhood and there passing the remainder of his days. 
He was a farmer ctnd it was in the many details of farm life that 
Samuel W. UUery passed his younger days. He attended the district 
schools, securing in his somewhat intermittent period of study, a limited 
education, but that handicap was insufficient to deter him from his 
purpose, which was to succeed in some established business. His busi- 
ness career he began as a hardware merchant in his native town, but in 
1848 moved to Greenville, Ohio, where he conducted a similar business 
until 1866. Three years later he came to Logansport, Indiana, and 
under the iirm name of S. W. UUery & Company, with William M. 
Wilson as his partner, he embarked in the hardware business again. 
In 1886, I\Ir. Wilson withdrew from the firm, upon which G. L. Ullery, 
a son of the head of the firm, became a partner under the firm title of 
S. W. Ullery & Son, a name that endures to the present time, although 
both father and son are now deceased. 

Samuel Ullery w^as a prosperous man, although his prosperity was 
never of a spasmodic order. He made constant, steady progress in the 
business world, his achievements being ever wrought through the appli- 
cation of his powers of keen discernment and practical business sense, 
together wdth the abundant energy which characterized his life. In the 
early years of its life, the business was conducted in a retail way, but 
gradually developed into a wholesale establishment, though still con- 
tinuing its retail trade. 

]\Ir. Ullery was one of the organizers and a director of the State 
National Bank of Logansport, and also for a time was vice-president of 
the bank. Upon the reorganization of the National Bank of Logansport, 
lie became one of its stockholders. 

In all his many business relations and dealings, jNIr. Ullery 's reputa- 
tion as an honorable, straightforward business man was never ques- 
tioned. As a private citizen he commanded the respect and confidence 
of his fellow men. He was a Republican in politics, although never an 
aspirant for public office. 

In 1849, he married Sarah Kessler, and for thirty-six years there 
continued a most ideal marriage relation, broken by the death of Mrs. 
UUeiy. They were the parents of two children : G. Lincoln, who died 
June 20, 1901, and Juniata, the only survivor of the family, and the 
wife of George P. Bliss, the present manager of the firm of S. W. Ullery 
& Son, of whom extended mention is made in other pages of this work. 
Mr. Ullery died on June 1, 1899. 

George P. Bliss. Since 1897, George P. Bliss has been connected 
in an important capacity with the hardware business of S. W. Ullery 
& Son, and in recent years became manager of the company, ^vhieh 
position he now holds. Born at Bluffton, Wells county, Indiana, on 
May 5, 1852, he is the son of Jeoffry Bliss, Avho was engaged in the busi- 
ness of making fanning mills during the early part of his business life, 
and later was identified with mercantile pursuits, at Bluffton, where 
he passed away. 

George P. Bliss remained at home until he was about fifteen years 
old, and attended the public schools of his native community. He also 
assisted his father in the making and painting of the fanning mills, and 



876 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

later secured work as a clerk in a local store. For some time he worked 
iij the private bank of John Studebaker & Company, and still later, he 
was for a number of years employed as a bookkeeper. In the following 
years he was variously engaged in a number of places, fourteen years 
being passed in a flouring mill at Toledo, and something like five years 
in Cleveland. When the Clover Leaf Railroad was yet a narrow gauged 
track to St. Louis, j\Ir. Bliss was engaged as paymaster of the road for 
about four years, after which he served for a matter of two years as 
cashier of a bank at INIarkle, Indiana. 

In 1897, Mr. Bliss came to Logansport in the capacity of clerk and 
bookkeeper in the wholesale and retail hardware concern of S. W. Ullery 
& Son, and ever since has been identified with the firm. Upon the 
death of the junior Mr. Ullery, Mr. Bliss became manager of the estab- 
lishment, and he is yet serving in that important position. 

On November 18, 1896, j\Ir. Bliss was united in marriage with 
Juanita Ullery, and they have one son, Harold P. Bliss. Mr. Bliss is a 
member of the Country Club and the Logansport Commercial Club, and 
is a director of the latter organization. He is a Republican, and with 
his wife attends the First Presbyterian church of Logansport, of which 
she is a member. 

Herman E. Martin. Among the enterprising agriculturists of Cass 
county who have been progressive in inaugurating improvements on their 
properties, and have shown their ability and progressiveness by taking 
advantage of modern inventions to increase their capability and decrease 
the cost of production, Herman E. Martin, of Washington township, 
holds a place in the foremost ranks. Coming of an agricultural family, 
which for years have contriljuted its members to the tilling of the soil, 
he has made a place for himself among the substantial men of his 
community, and his finely cultivated tract of one hundred and fifty- 
eight acres, located on the Ramer and IMartin road, about nine miles 
from Logansport, elociuently testifies to his ability as a farmer. 

Mr. Martin was born on the farm which he now occupies, March 14, 
1859, and is a son of Franz and Caroline (Sine) Martin. Like most of 
the farmers' sons of his community, Mr. Martin secured his educa- 
tion in the district schools during the winter months, his summers being 
devoted to helping his father in the cultivation of the homestead, a 
part of which he assisted in clearing. On attaining his majoritj^, he 
worked on the farm at home, and also woi-ked at the carpenter's trade, 
which he had picked up in his youth, and thus earned the means to 
invest in a tract of eighty acres in Tipton township. On this land he 
labored industrioiisly and A^dth a fair amount of success for a period of 
eleven years, carefuly saving his earnings. At the end of that time he 
disposed of his Tipton township laud, and bought his father's old home- 
stead, which he has continued to operate to the present time. Mr. Martin 
is a self-made man in the truest and best sense of the word. Giving his 
closest attention to the smallest details of his work, at all times being 
willing to experiment with new innovations, and constantly seeking 
methods which would advance his interests, he has been able to add 
materially to his property, and to make it one of the most valuable of 
its size in this part of the county. General farming has received the 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 877 

greater part of his attention, and he has also spent some time in raising 
stock, and. his crops have been large and prosperous, while his cattle 
bring top-notch prices in the markets. While he has at all times seized 
every opportunity to advance his interests, he has always done so in an 
honorable manner, never taking an unfair advantage of others, and 
for this reason has won the respect and confidence of his fellow- 
citizens. 

Mr. Martin was elected trustee of Washington township in 1900, and 
served four years in that important office. At the present time he is 
chairman of the county council. The members of the Cass county coun- 
cil at the present time are Messrs. Herman E. Martin, John Warner, 
Alva Crook, Dr. Z. U. Loop, Daniel Woodhouse, William Farrell and 
Allen Snyder. Mr. Martin is also a member of the board of trustees of 
the Presbyterian church. 

Mr. Martin was married December 25, 1882, to Miss Melissa Stough, 
a daughter of Samuel and Maria (Carman) Stough of Cass county. 
To the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Martin, the following children were 
bom: Edith Myrle, who married Rev. Alexander E. Cameron, and re- 
sides in Morning Sun, Iowa, where he is pastor of the Presbyterian 
church. Mr. Cameron was educated in the University of Chicago, while 
his wife was graduated from the public schools at the age of fourteen, 
and spent one year in the Logansport high school and later was a student 
at the Marion Normal College. For two terms she was a successful 
teacher in her own county before her marriage. She and her husband 
are the parents of three children: Colin E., Frances M., and Paul P. 
Ralph Emerson, second of the family, received his diploma from the 
public schools and was a student in the Marion Normal. He died Febru- 
ary 19, 1907. A member of the Presbyterian church, he was a young 
man of model habits and character, and was greatly beloved by all. 
Chester Monfort, third, finished the public schools, and is now a pi-actieal 
farmer associated with his father. He is a member of the Presbyterian 
t^iurch, and cast his first ballot for William J. Bryan. Hazel Eunice, 
the fourth, married Evan G. Marquardt, of Toledo, Ohio, where he is 
a hardware merchant. They have a little daughter named Carolyn. 
Mrs. Marquardt after attending the public schools spent two years in 
the Oberlin IMusical Conservatory as a student of both instrumental and 
vocal, and is an accomplished young woman, highly capable of presid- 
ing over her home and has active membership in the Presbyterian church. 
Inez Helen, who attended the public schools and graduated from the 
Logansport high school, was a student in the Eastern College of Music 
at Manassas, Virginia, and is now engaged in teaching music, and is 
likewise a member of the Presbyterain faith. Armeda Marie is a gradu- 
ate of the public schools, and is proficient in music, being also a member 
of the same church as her parents. Homer Carlton, after leaving the 
public schools spent two years in the Logansport high school and is now 
taking a course from the Scranton School of Correspondence ; Raymond 
Stough is a student of the eighth grade, and Doris Esther, the youngest 
of the family, is in the sixth grade of the public schools. Mr. and Mrs. 
Martin have made it their ambition to give their children the best of 
educational advantages, and have thus fitted them for the higher places 
of usefulness in the world. 



878 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

Mrs. Martin was born in Cass county, September 21, 1859, the third 
in a family of six children, three sons and three daughters, and five of 
the Stough family are living in 1913. The father, born in Pennsylvania, 
sprang from good old German stock, and when a young man came west 
to the state of Indiana, where he was married. By vocation he was a 
brick and stone mason, and had the distinction of erecting the first 
Lutheran church in Walton, Indiana. In this connection it should be 
stated that Mr. Martin's father erected the first Presbyterian church in 
Washington township. Mr. Stough was a Democrat in politics and was 
the first superintendent of the Lutheran Sunday school in Walton, and 
was known throughout that community as one of the best vocalists and a 
great lover of music. Mrs. Stough, the mother of Mrs. Martin, was bom 
in Pennsylvania, and died at the age of seventy-four, while her husband 
passed away when seventy-seven years old. Mrs. Martin was educated 
in the common schools and with a fine endowment of character, a pleas- 
ing personality, she has ably filled her part of wife and mother to this 
happy Cass county home. She is a devout member of the Presbyterian 
church. Mr. and Mrs. Martin's hospitable home, which is always open 
to welcome many friends, is known as "Pine Lawn." 

John H. Persinger. The real history of the Civil war is written 
deepest on the hearts of those who participated in that mighty conflict. 
The sacrifices of the volunteers did not cease when peace was declared, 
for none of them came out of the war as they had entered it. Those who 
were fortunate enough to escape bullet, shell and imprisonment, were 
for years troubled by the seeds of disease, while shattered nerves will 
be the mementos of others as long as life lasts. The brave, gallant, dash- 
ing and laughing youths who left their homes to fight for the flag of their 
country, returned to those homes, when they did return, saddened, sor- 
rowed men, old in experience if not in years. The country owes a debt 
of gratitude to the ' ' boys in blue ' ' which it can never repay, and for this 
reason the veterans of the Grand Army of the Republic still inspire 
respect and veneration even after the passage of more than a half cen- 
tury of years. Cass county sent its' full quota of brave, hard-fighting 
men to the front when secession reared its gory head, and among these 
none had a more honorable record than John H. Persinger, whose ser- 
vice covered more than four years. Mr. Persinger is now a resident of 
Tipton township, where he is engaged in agricultural pursuits, and 
throughout his life has performed the duties of peace in the same able, 
cheerful and faithful manner that characterized his actions when serv- 
ing in the ranks under the "Stars and Stripes." 

John H. Persinger was born October 2, 1835, in Warren county, 
Ohio, and is a son of Eli and Sophia (Blinn) Persinger. His father, a 
native of Virginia, removed to Ohio in young manhood, and about the 
year 1850 brought his family to Indiana, the remainder of his life 
being passed in agricultural pursuits in Cass county, where both he and 
his wife passed away. They were the parents of the following children : 
Christopher, who is deceased ; John H. ; Mary Ann and Julia Ann, who 
are now deceased ; Harrison and Amanda. John H. Persinger received 
his education in the district schools of his native state, where he was 
reared to agricultural pursuits, and taught the dignity and value of hard 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 879 

labor. He was still engaged in assisting his father when the War of 
the Rebellion broke out in all of its fury, and with youthful patriotism 
he at once offered his services to the Union army. They were accepted 
and he was enrolled vipon the list of privates of the Forty-sixth Regiment, 
Indiana Volunteer Infantry, Captain Thomas. This hard-fighting regi- 
ment was detailed to the Army of the West, and participated in some of 
the bloodiest engagements of the war, at all times acquitting itself with 
the utmost gallantry. Mr. Persinger continued to take part in all the 
movements of this regiment for four years, and after a service marked 
by bravery in action and duty well performed, he received his honorable 
discharge and returned to his home from Louisville, Kentucky. He at 
once resumed farming, and at the time of his marriage came to Tipton 
township, where he has since made his home, now being the owner of 
some valuable property. He carries on general farming and stock rais- 
ing, has wisely invested his means, and is considered one of his locality 's 
substantial men. He receives a pension from a grateful government. 
Mr. Persinger is popular with the comrades of the local Gr-and Army 
post, and has numerous friends in business and social life. 

In 1868, ]\Ir. Persinger was united in marriage with Miss Mary Mil- 
ler, who was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, and they have had three chil- 
dren: Mitchell, Ira and Mrs. Bessie Berk. Mr. Persinger is a member 
of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

William Smith. Located in "Hilltop," Washington township, 
about six miles south of Logansport, is the eighty-acre farm of William 
Smith, a tract that compares favorably with any of its size in this part 
of Cass county. From his boyhood Mr. Smith has been engaged in 
agricultural pursuits, and the position he has gained among the success- 
ful farmers and stock breeders of his locality has come through consci- 
entious labor and intelligent management of his affairs. Born January 
31, 1844, near Hamilton, Butler county, Ohio, Mr. Smith is the son of 
Samuel and Elizabeth (Schafer) Smith. 

Samuel Smith was born in Pennsylvania, and was a young man when 
he left his native state and journeyed to Ohio. He did not remain in 
the Buckeye state for long, however, but pushed on to Indiana, and 
here settled at once in Tipton township, Cass county, having made the 
journey by way of wagon. He became successful in his operations, was 
a large land owner, and in his death Tipton township lost one of its 
best citizens. He married Elizabeth Schafer, and they became the par- 
ents of eleven children, as follows: William, David, John, Elizabeth, 
Sarah, Samuel, George, Mary, Daniel, Alta and Caroline. 

William Smith was a lad of nine years when he accompanied his par- 
ents to Tipton township, and completed his education in the log school- 
house of his locality, in the meantime assisting his father in the work 
of the home farm. He was married first to Miss Sarah Long, a sister 
of Simon Long, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this work, and 
she died after becoming the mother of four children : Marvin, who mar- 
ried first Anna Showtax, and they had three children, — Marie, Gladys 
and Irene; he married a second time and had four children, — Adah, 
Leffie. Evelyn and Charles. William B. married Ruby Easton, and had 
two children, — Fern and Hazel. Walter married Ellen McMillen, and 



880 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

had two children, — Sarah and Josephine. William Smith was married 
October 8, 1902, to llrs. Mary H. (Beeler) Atherton, the widow of 
August Atherton, by whom she had eight children: Ida, Albert, 
Gertrude, Daniel, Walter, Cora, Willie, deceased, and Elmer. Mrs. 
Smith is the daughter of Daniel B. and Margaret (Schafer) Beeler. Mr. 
Beeler was born in Pennsylvania, and removed to Darke county, Ohio, 
in young manhood, becoming one of the successful farmers and stockmen 
of that locality, where the rest of his life was spent. He was the father 
of six children : William, Joseph, Lizzie, Mary, George, and Samuel. 
After his marriage, JMr. Smith settled on his present farm in Wash- 
ington township, which he has brought to a high state of cultivation. He 
is thoroughly conversant with crop and climatic conditions, understands 
crop rotation and other scientific methods of gaining the best results from 
his land, and is a believer in the use of modern farming machinery. He 
supports movements tending towards progress and is always found 
among those who are advancing their community by promoting its 
interests. He has always been a man of temperate habits, and indicates 
his inclinations by supporting the candidates and principles of the Prohi- 
bition party. His religious faith is that of the Christian Science church, 
and he is a man who has good reason to be a devotee to the Christian 
Science and its great miraculous healing of body and mind. The Sci- 
entists are to erect one of the most beautiful and costly church edifices in 
the city on the corner of Ninth and North streets, Logansport. 

Charles O. Roush. In eveiy community there may be found among 
its citizenship men who direct their lives in harmony with the old rule 
known as that of the "Three P's — Push, Pluck and Perseverance." 
Given to any town one or more men of that stamp, a fair degree of pros- 
perity must inevitably characterize that place, for they invariably stand 
for prosperity and advancement, whatever may be the nature of the 
community wherein they are found. C. 0. Roush is undeniably one of 
these plucky and persevering men. His farm, one of the fine places 
of the township of Tipton, is in section seventeen, and its eighty acres 
is intersected at one corner by the Pennsylvania Railroad. Its owner, 
one of the j'oung and successful agricultural men of Cass county, began 
his career in that uncertain and ofttimes unsatisfactory status of the 
renter, has risen above many unpropitious conditions, and is today one 
of the most capable and prosperous farming men in the county, as has 
already been said. 

C. 0. Roush was born on June 23, 1882, and is a son of Christopher 
and Martha (Long) Roush. The father, who was born in Wabash 
county, was for many years a farmer in Benton, and after a successful 
career, is now living retired from active business. His four children 
were: Charles, Mary, Tammie and Burdette. 

Charles O. Roush attended the Green school in Jasper county, this 
being one of the largest schools in the county. His schooling was inter- 
spersed with vacation periods of active work on the home farm, and 
throughout his boyhood days he was carefully instructed in the duties 
and responsibilities of farm life, so that when he had finished his school 
work, he was well equipped to take his place as an intelligent and prac- 
tical farmer. The lessons learned under the able tutelage of his father 



HISTOEY OF CASS COUNTY 881 

have stood him in excellent stead in the years of his independent farm- 
ing career, and have gone far toward establishing his present success. 
• For seven years after he began his work on his own responsibility Mr. 
Roush was a renter, and from his savings in that length of time he was 
able to purchase the George Enyart farm, which is his present home. 
The improvements in evidence on this farm today are all of first-class 
order, the dwellings and outbuildings, fences and well-kept fields, all 
offering indisputable testimony to the thrift, energy and good man- 
agement of this young husbandman. 

Mr. Roush was married on November 26, 1902, to Miss Cynthia 
Julian, a daughter of Elias and Harriet (Dresbach) Julian. The father 
of Mrs. Roush was a farmer, originally from Sheldon, Illinois, and he 
was the father of eight children, as follows : Milton, Milo, Guy, Lucien, 
Cynthia, Amanda, Nancy and Ruth. To Mr. and Mrs. Roush have been 
born two daughters, Lillian and Harriet, both of whom are attending 
school in the home community. The family are members of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal church. 

Charles E. James. Agricultural methods have changed very 
materially during the past' decade or two, and now that even the chief 
executive of the nation is taking a deep interest in progression among 
the farmers, there is every reason to suppose that still further advance 
"will be made along all lines. Interurban service, telephones, automo- 
biles, and the consequent bettering of the roads on account of the 
latter, have brought the farmers much closer together, and as vs^ell have 
placed them in close touch with the centers of activity, and the man 
who today devotes himself to the cultivation of the soil is more inde- 
pendent than any other worker in the world. Among the progressive 
and enterprising farmers and stock raisers of Cass county, one who 
has recognized the value of modern methods and innovations and has 
profited accordingly is Charles E. James, whose well-cultivated tract 
of land is located in Noble township. Mr. James is a native of this 
township and was born October 13, 1881, a son of John and Nancy 
J. (James) James, who came to Cass county, locating on the farm on 
section 2, where Mrs. James is still making her home. John James 
was an agriculturist throughout his life, was a loyal and public-spir- 
ited citizen, and in his death, which occurred in 1906, his community 
lost one of its best and most highly esteemed men. 

The early education of Charles E. James was secured in the district 
schools of Noble township, and in boyhood he was accustomed to the 
hard work which develops the mind and hardens the body. Spending 
his time in assisting his father on the home farm, he was thoroughly 
trained in all the details of agricultural work, and this he chose as his 
life vocation, nor has he had any desire to follow any other line of 
endeavor. He has been unifornaly successful in his operations because 
of hard, industrious labor, intelligently directed along well-defined 
lines, and the soil of his land has responded gratefully for the work 
expended upon it, yielding him large and profitable crops. Mr. James 
has realized the value of modem machinery and scientific methods, 
and is an advocate of progress along all lines, not only in his owti work, 
but in movements making for the public welfare. Such movements 



882 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

have always had his hearty support and co-operation. He has never 
had any desire for public office, being essentially a farmer, and has 
never, therefore, entered the public arena, although a stanch advocate 
of good government. 

On August 7, 1901, Mr. James was united in marriage with Miss 
Nora Lontz, who was born March 1, 1882, in Carroll county, Indiana, 
daughter of William A. and Sarah Lontz. The latter died in Decem- 
ber, 1885. Mr. Lontz served one term as county assessor of Cass 
county, his term ending in 1902, and shortly thereafter he left for the 
West, where he has since made his home. Mr. and Mrs. James have 
had one child: Clarence E., who was born April 14, 1903. Both Mr. 
and Mrs. James are widely and favorably known in Noble township 
and are recognized as representatives of Cass county's best people. 

James M. Deniston. Among the citizens of Cass county who are 
adding to the commercial importance of their section by their activi- 
ties in the business field, James M. Deniston, of Onward, holds a fore- 
most place. A product of the farm, reared to agricultural pursuits, 
he belongs to that class of men whose versatile talents allow them to 
meet with success in more than one line of endeavor, and has proven 
himself as able a business man as he was a fanner. He is now the 
proprietor of a general store at Onward, where he handles a large 
trade in merchandise and farming implements, his customers being 
drawn from a "v\ade contiguous territory. Mr. Deniston was born De- 
cember 25, 1862, in ]\Iiami county, Indiana, and is a son of Thomas 
B. and Elizabeth (Wilkinson) Deniston. His father, a miller by trade, 
came to Miami county, Indiana, from Ohio, and here spent the rest 
of his life in agricultural pursuits. He and his wife had six cluldren : 
Eva, Clara, who is deceased; James M., Belle, deceased; Charles and 
William. The mother of these children died in 1873. 

James M. Deniston attended the district schools of Miami, but the 
greater part of his education was secured in the schools of hard work 
and experience. An energetic, industrious youth, he spent his early 
years in faithful labor, carefully saving his earnings with the idea ever 
in view of becoming the owner of a property of his own. His per- 
severance and industry were rewarded by the accumulation of a farm 
of one hundred and twenty acres, located in Pulaski county, Indiana, 
on which he carried on operations for a number of years, but in 1892 
he decided to enter upon a commercial career, and accordingly traded 
ninety acres of land for his present store. Here, by good judgment, 
honorable dealing, and attention to minor details as well as large ones, 
he has succeeded in building up a large trade, carrying a full line of 
articles demanded by the people of his community and an up-to-date 
stock of farming implements. He is known as a man of the strictest 
integrity, and possesses the full confidence of all who have had deal- 
ings with him. In addition to attending to the affairs of his store, he 
also carries on agricultural operations in Cass county. 

Mr. Deniston was married in 1882 to Miss Rebecca Leffel, and to 
this union there were born four children, namely: William, a resi- 
dent of Logansport and bookkeeper in the First National Bank. He 
graduated from the public schools, and then took the teacher's course 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 883 

of the Marion Normal, of Marion, Indiana, and taught two terms. He 
also graduated from the Logansport business college. He wedded 
Miss Anna Leffel, and they are members of the Christian church, and 
he is a Mason. Herman C., graduated from the public schools and is 
an agriculturist in Pulaski county, Indiana. He wedded Miss Alice 
Kelsey, and they have two children, Herbert and Mildred. He is a 
member of the United Brethren church and a Mason, and his wife is 
a member of the Progressive Brethren. Minnie is the wife of T. J. 
Sullivan, a resident of Adams township, and they have one son, Lloyd. 
He is an agriculturist and a Mason. ]Mabel, the youngest, is at home 
and in the sixth grade of the public schools. Mrs. Deniston is a 
native of Cass eountj^, Indiana, and was reared and educated in her 
home county. She and her husband are consistent members of the 
United Brethren church, located at Twelve Mile, Adams township, 
Cass county. Mr. Deniston has interested himself to some extent in 
fraternal work, and is affiliated with the local lodge of the ^Masonic order 
at Twelve JVIile. All matters pei-taining to the betterment of his com- 
munity or its people find in him a hearty supporter, while among his 
associates he is known as a man who, having succeeded himself, is always 
ready to help others to succeed. 

Albert O. Brandt. Noble township is the home of some excellent 
citizens who have employed themselves in tilling the soil. Many of them 
have spent their entire lives on the farm and have known no other oc- 
cupation, and in this class stands Albert O. Brandt, who for the past 
thirty years has been engaged in cultivating his present tract of land. 
Mr. Brandt was born in Noble township, June 21, 18.59, and is a son 
of Charles A. and Rosanna (Adair) Brandt. He has a full genealogical 
tree, and traces his lineage back to 1760, as his progenitors came from 
Germany. 

Charles A. Brandt Avas born in Fairfield county, Ohio, December 14, 
1828, and is a pioneer of Noble township. He is the oldest son born to 
John and Hannah (Coulson) Brandt. His father immigrated to Indiana 
in 18.37, from Fairfield county, Ohio, with his wife and three children, 
having been persuaded to come l^y David B. Coulson and Jacob Bimes- 
dorfer, brothers-in-law, who were at that time residing here. Charles 
A. Brandt was but nine years of age at the time of the immigration, 
and when he was seventeen years old he was apprenticed to E. B. 
"Williams, of Logansport, with whom he remained one year, learning 
the trade of wagon maker. He continued working at his trade in 
Logansport and LaFayette until 1850, when he started for Oregon, 
but on account of illness he did not proceed farther than St. Louis, Mis- 
souri, being compelled to return home from that point. Again, in the 
following spring, he started on another trip, with Oregon again as his 
destination. Leaving Logansport, ]\Iareh 18, 1851, by ox-team, in com- 
panj' with two other young men, he journeyed to St. Joseph, ^Missouri, 
where he joined a company then en route for his point of destination. 
On September 27th of the same year the party reached Oregon City, 
and shortly thereafter ]\Ir. Brandt journeyed to California and there 
engaged in mining. Some months later he returned to Oregon and en- 
gaged in the packing business, in conveying provisions from there to the 



884 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

mines in California by pack mules. In this line he was quite successful, 
and continued in the business until June, 1854, when he decided to 
return to Indiana, although the return journey was filled with diffi- 
culties as regarded methods of travel. Leaving San Francisco, June 1, 
1854, on the steamship Yankee Blade, he traveled to Panama, went 
thence by foot to Cruces, on the Chagres river, and then by railroad to 
Aspinwall, a distance of twenty miles, for which he had to pay $12.50 
in gold. He then again boarded a steamship, and landed at New York 
City, June 22d. He left New York on the following day, going by rail 
to Buffalo, where he laid over one day, and then continued by rail as 
far as South Bend, Indiana, arriving in Logansport June 27th on a 
stage-coach. He has resided in Cass county since that date. In 1855, 
he located on a farm in section 20, Noble township, and in 1864 he 
purchased and removed to a farm on section 21, in the same township, 
where he resided until 1889. At that time he made removal to his 
present farm in the same township. In 1857, with his father and 
brother, he built a grist-mill on what is known as Cottonwood creek, and 
was here engaged in milling until 1860. In the spring of 1860, Mr. 
Brandt made a trip to Pike's Peak, Colorado, but returned in the fall 
of the same year, and in the fall of 1866 went to Kansas, and returned 
one year later, these trips being more of a prospective nature than with 
any idea of permanently locating there. 

On March 30, 1855, Mr. Brandt was united in marriage with Miss 
Eosanna Adair, who was born August 5, 1834, in Noble township, the 
daughter of Benjamin and Anna (McMillen) Adair, of Ohio and Penn- 
sylvania, respectively. Two children were born to this union : James 
M., born October 28, 1857, and died the following day; and Albert 0. 
On March 30, 1905, the golden wedding anniversary of this honored 
couple was celebrated, an added interest at the time being the wedding 
of their granddaughter, Nellie R., the daughter of Albert 0. Brandt. 
After a long and useful life, Mrs. Brandt passed away June 5, 1909. 
Mr. Brandt's political faith is that of the Republican party, with which 
he has been connected since its formation, prior to that time having 
been a AVhig. With his family, he attends the Shiloh Christian church. 
Mr. Brandt takes a deep interest in biographical and genealogical mat- 
ters, having in his possession much information in regard to Cass 
county and its early history and being a pleasing and entertaining con- 
versationalist. He has ever been honest and straightforward in his 
dealings, and his reputation is that of an excellent neighbor, a true 
friend, a capable business man, and a loyal citizen. 

Albert 0. Braaidt received his education in the district schools and 
the county normal school, and has always been engaged in farming. 
He has lived on his present property since November 8, 1883, and is 
now engaged in farming his own land and working with his father, and 
like him is known as a man of good habits, loyal to his township's in- 
terests, and a capable man of business. On September 12, 1880, he was 
joined in marriage with Miss Annie B. Grable, daughter of Joram and 
Lucy Anna (Carson) Grable, of Adams township, Cass county. Mrs. 
Brandt is a native of Cass county, Indiana, born August 31, 1858, and 
is the fifth in a family of six children, one son and five daughters, but 
there are only two children of the Grable family living, Mrs. Brandt 



HISTOKY OF CASS COUNTY 885 

and her sister, Samantlia, wife of Isaac "Watts, residents of Pulaski 
county, Indiana. 

Mrs. Brandt was educated in the common schools and also received 
a normal ti^aiuing for the profession of teacher. She taught five years 
in Cass county. She is a member of the Shiloh Christian church and of 
the L. A. S. Her father was a native of Pennsylvania, and was a well 
educated gentleman, and followed the profession of teacher both in 
Pennsylvania and Indiana, but most of his life was spent as an agri- 
culturist. He was a Republican, and both he and his wife were mem- 
bers of the Presbyterian church. 

To the union of ilr. and I\Irs. Brandt there have been born two 
children : Olive A., born July 10, 1881, who died September 1, 1881 ; 
and Nellie R., bom September 21, 1886, who was married March 30, 
1905, to Oliver 0. Leach, an agriculturist, who resides near her parents. 
On this last-named occasion, the house was decorated in white and gold, 
and three guests were present who had attended the wedding of Mrs. 
Leach's grandparents, fifty years before. ]\Irs. Leach received a good 
education, receiving her diploma from the public schools in 1899, 
and in 1900 entered the Logansport high school, and spent two years 
there as a student. She is a musician of merit, and taught music in her 
• home township. Both she and her husband are members of the Shiloh 
Christian church. 

Mr. Brandt has always been a faithful member of the Shiloh Chris- 
tian church, which he attends regularly, and is an official worker in the 
township and county Sunday school association, in connection with 
his church. In politics he has always been a stanch Republican, but has 
never cared for public office, preferring to devote all of his time and 
attention to his farming operations. His fraternal connection is with 
Royal Center Lodge No. 585, Free and Accepted Masons, in which he 
has many warm friends, as he has, indeed, in all circles of his com- 
munity. The homestead of Mr. and Mrs. Brandt is known as "Blake- 



Majrion E. Reed. Among the public-spirited men of Cass county 
who are filling official positions with marked ability and conscientious 
devotion to duty, none stands higher in general esteem -than ]\Iarion E. 
Reed, postmaster at Onward, a capacity in which he has acted for more 
than six years. In choosing the men who handle the United States 
mail, the government is careful in securing only those individuals who 
have proven their worth in business, their loyalty as citizens and their 
general fitness for public office as displayed in their past careers. I\Ir. 
Reed has not only met all of these qualifications, but by his courteous 
and obliging manner has won the friendship of all who have had occa- 
sion to come in contact with him in his official capacity. He is a native 
of Cass county, and was born on the Reed homestead, about one and 
one-half miles east of Onward, November 4, 1869, a son of George M. 
and Martha J. (Smith) Reed. Mr. Reed's mother's people were natives 
of Pennsylvania, from whence they migrated to Ohio and later to Cass 
county, Indiana, where they were engaged in tilling the soil. George 
M. Reed was born in Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, a son of John 



886 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

and Jane (Brandt) Reed, and was brought by his parents to Cass 
county as a lad, the family settling on government land, which Greorge 
M. assisted in clearing from its native state. He is remembered as one 
of the very early settlers of Cass county and as an able agriculturist and 
sterling citizen. He and his wife were the parents of seven children, 
namely: Marvin, who is deceased; and Marion E., Yirgie, Estella, Ed- 
ward, Homer and Otho. 

Marion E. Reed first attended what was known as the Cross Roads 
school and later the Kinsey school, and finished his education in Onward. 
He was reared to the occupation of farming and remained under the 
parental roof until he was twenty-five years of age, at which time he 
embarked in agricultural pursuits on his own account, being engaged 
therein for about ten years. He then turned his attention to mercantile 
pursuits, in which he was engaged until recently, and in which he 
met with the same success that had rewarded his agricultural efforts. 
He has recently sold his business, and now resides quietly on his valu- 
able town property, devoting his attention to looking after his realty 
interests. Mr. Reed has been a lifelong supporter of Republican poli- 
cies and candidates, and on January 8, 1907, received the appointment 
of postmaster of Onward from President Roosevelt, a position which 
he has held to the present time. 

On Marcli 27, 1895, ]\Ir. Reed was married to Miss Lovina Wessinger, 
who was born in Miami county, Indiana, a daughter of Isaac and Mar- 
garet (Blubaker) Wessinger, and they have had two children: Roscoe E., 
who is dead, and Janice, who is attending school in Onv/ard in the third 
grade. Mr. Reed holds membership in the Ancient Order of Gleaners 
lodge, located in Walton. With his family, he attends the Christian 
church, in the work of which he has always lieen active. The family 
name has always stood for reliability and good citizenship, and Mr. 
Reed is ably maintaining the high standard set by his forebears. 

Levpis B. W.UjTErs. The town of Onward, Indiana, is situated in 
the center of a great grain belt, and one of the chief industries of the 
locality is the handling of the products of the agriculturists of the 
section. A prosperous and gi'owing enterprise of Onward is the gi'ain 
elevator of N. E. AYalkei* & Company, the superintendent of which, 
Lewis B. Walters, has risen to his present business through well-applied 
energy and inherent business ability. Mr. Walters has been identified 
with the grain business for nine years, and for four years of this 
time has been a resident of Onward, where he is known as a citizen 
who takes an interest in all matters pertaining to the welfare of his 
community. He is a native of the Hoosier state, having been born in 
Clinton county, near Frankfort, March 24, 1876, a son of Samuel 
and Amanda (Finney) Walters. 

Samuel Waltere was born in Pennsylvania and came to Indiana ^rith 
his parents when still a babe, the family settling in Clinton county, 
where Mr. Walters was reared and educated. He became engaged in 
agricultural pursuits, and was working on a farm when the Civil war 
broke out, when he enlisted in the Eighty-ninth Regiment, Indiana Yol- 
unteer Infantry, for three years. In his first large battle, at Mumfords- 
ville, Kentucky, he was captured by the Confederates, but was ex- 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 887 

changed and sent home on a three months' furlough to recuperate from 
a serious illness contracted in a southern prison. On rejoining his 
regiment, he served under General Smith, in the Army of the Potomac, 
so continuing until receiving his honorable discharge at the close of 
his service. He was a faithful and gallant soldier, and when his 
military term had expired returned to the occupations of peace, and 
throughout the remainder of his active career devoted himself to the 
tilling of the soil. 

Lewis Walters received his education in the district schools of his 
neighborhood and the public schools of Clinton, after which he became 
engaged in farming. In 1904 he entered the grain business and was 
on the road for one year. In 1909 he came to Onward and became 
associated with the firm of N. E. Walker & Company, where he has 
since remained. Faithful devotion to his duties and earnest appli- 
cation in behalf of his company's interests gained him rapid promotion, 
and at this time he holds the position of general superintendent of the 
Onward elevator. He is widely known in the grain trade, and has 
won an enviable reputation as a shrewd, capable man of business. 

On September 6, 1899, j\Ir. Walters was married to Miss Effie Newlin, 
daughter of Alfred G. and Ella (Mote) Newlin, and they have the 
following children : Lawrence A., in the seventh grade of the public 
schools ; Samuel A., in the fifth grade ; and Bernice and Gertrude. Mrs. 
Walters was born in Iroquois county, Illinois, March 7, 1880, the fourth 
in a family of ten children — six sons and four daughters — and three 
are living at present. Her mother is living in Clinton county, Indiana. 
Mr. Walters is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, No. 
455, at Onward, in which he has numerous friends. He has been a life- 
long adherent of Republican principles and has served his township as 
a member of the election board. With his wife and children, he attends 
the Christian church at Onward. 

John H. Minnick. Among the successful agriculturists of Cass 
county who have devoted their lives to the tilling of the soil, and who 
now have large, well-cultivated properties to show for their years of 
labor, John H. Minnick holds a prominent place. He has spent his 
entire career within the borders pf the county, and his life, from earli- 
est boyhood, has been one of industry and energy. Today he is the 
owner of a handsome tract of ninety -one acres, located on the Thomas 
road, which, through intelligent handling, he has made one of the 
valuable tracts of his locality. Mr. Minnick was born in Tipton town- 
ship, Cass county, Indiana, July 5, 1855, and is a son of Henry and 
Mary (Bechdol) Minnick. His father, a native of Somerset county, 
Pennsylvania, was brought by his parents to Cass county in boyhood, 
and here he took up agricultural pui'suits, in which he was successfully 
engaged during the remainder of his life. Heniy and ]\Iary Minnick 
became the parents of eight children, of whom six survive at this 
time: Daniel, William, Charles, Joshua, Charlotte, who became the 
wife of Mr. Fred Gibson, of Tipton township ; and John H. 

The early education of John H. Minnick was secured in the old 
Flynn school in Tipton township, which he attended during the short 
winter terms, his summers being devoted to the hard and unremitting 



888 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

work of the home farm. An industrious and energetic youth, he was 
ambitious to thoroughly learn every detail of farm work, in which he 
was trained by his father, while by his mother he was taught to be 
honest and upright in his dealings. Thus growing to manhood, he 
continued to work with his parents, and to remain on the homestead 
until his marriage, when he established a home of his own and embarked 
upon a. career, following the training of his youth and engaging in 
agricultural pursuits. Selecting his present property on the Thomas 
road, he settled down to improve and cultivate it, and to make it one 
of the valuable tracts of the township, and in this he has been suc- 
cessful, as a visit to his well-tilled fields will demonstrate. His build- 
ings are substantial and of a modern style of architecture, and the 
general air of prosperity that pervades the whole place shows that 
Mr. Minniek made no mistake in his choice of a vocation. 

October 3, 1873, Mr. Minniek was united in marriage with MisS 
Lillis Doud, and to this union there were born four children, namely: 
Merlon, who is deceased ; Jennie, who married Wm. Ramer ; Clarence, 
who is deceased; and Alvin, who resides at home and assists his father. 
The last named, Alvin, finished the public schools and then took a 
business course at the Miami Business College. The following para- 
graph is taken from one of the Walton papers : 

"Lillis Minniek was born near Chili, Miami county, Indiana, April 
10, 1853, and died at her home near Walton, Cass county, Indiana, June 
10, 1907, aged fifty-four years and two months. She was the daughter 
of Lorenzo and Lydia Dond. On October 30, 1873, she was united in 
marriage to John H. Minniek. To this union were born four children, 
three sons and one daughter. A husband, one son, one daughter, three 
sisters, two brothers, two grandchildren and a host of friends are left 
to mourn her departure, two sons, three brothers, two sisters, father 
and mother having gone on before. She was converted and united 
with the M. E. church at Chili at the age of fifteen, but later united 
with the Christian church near her home, of which church she remained 
a faithful member until called to go to her Heavenly Father. She ex- 
pressed a desire to live, yet she was willing to go. There has departed 
from our midst a devoted wife, a faithful, sacrificing mother, a sincere 
friend, beloved by all. The funeral services were held in the Christian 
church northwest of Walton, Jvine 13, 1907, at 10 a. m., conducted 
by Rev. W. M. Amos in the presence of many sympathizing friends, 
and interment was made in the Walton cemetery. 'We cannot say and 
we will not say that she is dead, she is just away. With a loving smile 
and a wave of the hand she has wandered into an unknown land, and 
left us dreaming; how very fair it needs must be, since she lingers 
there. And you, you, who will often yearn for the old-time step 
and the glad return, think of her just the same, we say, she is not dead, 
but just away.' " Friends. 

On April 27, 1909, Mr. Minniek was married to Mrs. Edna (Pat- 
ton) Swafford, daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth (Berry) Patton. 
Mrs. Minniek is a native of Cass county, born January 4, 1874, and she is 
the younger of two children, both living. She was educated in the com- 
mon schools and at the Walton high school. She wedded Archibald 
Swafford and six children were bom and only two are living: Gettis 0., 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 889 

who graduated iu the common schools and is a resident of Tipton, 
engaged with the Pennsylvania system; and Harry B., in the fourth 
grade. Mr. and Mrs. Minniek are members of the Presbyterian church, 
in the congregation of which they have many friends. He has taken a 
prominent part in township affairs, not particularly as an incumbent 
of public office, but as a man who is ever ready to give his time and 
means to promoting movements for the public welfare. He is held in 
high esteem by his fellow-townsmen, and may be justly named one of 
the representative men of his township. Mr. and Mrs. Minniek 's beau- 
tifiil estate is known as "Pleasant View Lawn." 

William P. Burkit. One of the representative farmers of Wash- 
ington township, who has been an eye-witness of the marvelous growth 
and development of Cass county during the past four decades, and who 
has contributed materially to that development, is William P. Burkit, 
township trustee and a man who has always been devoted to the best 
interests of his community. During a long and honorable career, he has 
given his attention to the cultivation of the soil, and at tliis time is 
the owner of a well-cultivated tract of 380 acres of some of the best 
land in Washington township, situated about nine miles southeast of 
Logansport. Mr. Burkit was born February 21, 1866, in an old log 
cabin in Washington townsliip, Cass county, which had been built by 
his father, Alvin Burkit. The latter was a native of Jefferson township, 
Cass county, where he received his education and was reared to man- 
hood, beginning his operations as a farmer when still a youth. A self- 
made man in the truest sense of the word, he was honored and respected 
by his neighbors as an energetic, industrious farmer, and reared a family 
that was a credit to the community. At about the age of eight years 
Alvin Burkit came to Washington township, and during the remainder 
of his lifetime cleared the greater part of the farm that is now the 
home of William P. Burkit. He married Miss Sarah Small, also of 
Washington towmship, and they had a family of six children, of whom 
but two now survive: William P. and Charles A., the latter now resid- 
ing in the city of Logansport. The mother, now aged seventy-two years, 
is a resident of the city of Logansport, Indiana. 

William P. Burkit passed his boyhood much as other farmers' sons 
of his day and locality. His early education was secured in the district 
schools, which he attended during the short winter terms, the summers 
being spent in assisting his father in clearing the home farm. He had 
reached his twenty-sixth year before he embarked in farming on his 
own account, at that time renting a small property from his father. 
An industrious, sober and thrifty youth, he was soon able to purchase 
a small tract of land, and to this he has added from time to time, until 
he now has one of the finest farms in his part of the county, 380 acres 
in area, all in a high state of cultivation. In addition to his home 
property, he owns two other valuable farms, and is justly considered one 
of his township's most substantial citizens. The homestead farm pre- 
sents a strikingly different appearance than it did during Mr. Burkit 's 
boyhood. The little log cabin that was his birthplace has been replaced 
by a modern residence, erected by Mr. Bui'kit, and numerous other 
changes and improvements have been made, the entire property giving 



890 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

evidence of the presence of able management. A Democrat in politics, 
in 1908 Mr. Burkit became his party's candidate for township trustee 
of Washington township, and in the election that followed he was 
returned to the office by a handsome majority. He has since continued 
to discharge its duties, laboring faithfully in behalf of the best interests 
of his community and its people. 

On 'June 17, 1891, Mr. Burkit was united in marriage with Miss 
Matilda Zollman, who died August 29, 1895, daughter of Charles and 
Martha (Bell) Zollman. One child was born to this union — Virginia A. 
— who is now the wife of Chester Buschbaum. Mrs. Burkit was a de- 
voted member of the Presbyterian church, was actively interested in 
church and charitable affairs, and was widely known and greatly be- 
loved. 

George H. Schwalm. To its enterprising and progressive agricul- 
tural class, Cass county owes its marvelous development during the 
past several decades, a development that has transformed what was 
once almost a valueless waste to a center of agricultural, commercial 
and educational activity. A great many of the pioneers of this section 
have passed to their final reward, but their sons and grandsons are 
continuing their work, and just as sturdy, self-reliant and industrious 
a class of men may be found here today as those who braved the dangers 
of an unknown region during the county's formative period. A family 
that has contributed of its members to work of this development is that 
bearing the name of Schwalm, a worthy representative of which is 
found in George Schwalm, whose postoffice address is Logansport Rural 
Route No. 3, and who is cultivating his own property of 100 acres and 
the homestead, which consists of eighty acres, in section 26. Mr. 
Schwalm was born March 2, 1858, in Washington township, Cass county, 
Indiana, and is a son of Henry and Helena (Haemel) Schwalm. 

Henry Schwalm was born in Germany, August 20, 1828, and was 
educated in the Fatherland, from whence he came to the United States 
in 1852 and began working for his iincle, Henry Schwalm. Subse- 
quently, he took a lease to clear forty-five acres of land in Washington 
township, and from that time continued to carry on agricultural opera- 
tions on his own account, becoming the owner of the old SehwaJm home- 
stead. On May 21, 1857, he was married to Miss Helena Haemel, daugh- 
ter of Frederick and Elizabeth (Ellerman) Haemel, and they became the 
parents of eight children, as follows : George ; Sarah E., who married 
Mr. D. P. Hurd ; IMrs. Caroline M. ]\Iartin ; Eckert A. ; Mrs. Augustina 
M. Kaufman; Louisa L., who is single and resides with Mr. and INIrs. 
Kaufman; William B., a resident of Logansport; and Mrs. Laura E. 
Martin. All the members of this family, except Mrs. Hurd, are mem- 
bers of the Presbyterian church and take an active part in church work. 

George Schwalm received his education in the Flynn public school 
in Tipton township, and as the eldest son of his parents spent his boy- 
hood and early youth in assisting his father in the work of the home 
place. When he was twenty years of age, he began teaching school, 
carefully saving his earnings and investing them in farming land, and 
when he had accumulated a small capital he gave up the vocation of 
educator and returned to farm work. He has since been engaged in 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 891 

tilling the soil and in raising stock and has met with uniform success 
in all of his ventures. 

On September 21, 1882, Mr. Sehwalm was united in marriage with 
Miss Laura E. Martin, daughter of Simon and Eliza (Shuman) Martin, 
and she died, leaving four children: Grace, Edna M., Florence I. and 
Edith R., all living at home. Mr. Sehwalm was married to 
Miss Orpha C. Bechdol, and they have two children : Mary H. and 
Elma C. ]\Irs. Sehwalm is the ninth in a family of twelve children, 
three sons and nine daughters, born to Elias and Mary J. (Stough) 
Bechdol, and there are seven living. Both parents are deceased and 
both were members of the Lutheran clnirch. The Sehwalm family is 
connected with the Presbyterian church. Mr. Sehwalm has not cared 
for the activities attendant upon public life, but willingly lends his sup- 
port to progressive movements, and on a number of occasions has shown 
that he has the welfare of his section thoroughly at heart. The pretty 
estate of Mr. and Mrs. Sehwalm is known as ' ' Eutopia. ' ' 

William H. Snyder. Many of Cass county's leading agriculturists 
are carrying on operations on the fai-ms on which they were born, and 
which were taken up by their fathers from the government and devel- 
oped from their virgin state. Having spent their entire lives on these 
properties, their owners are thoroughly conversant with climatic con- 
ditions and the needs of the soil, and are thus able to secure a full meas- 
ure of success from their labors. In this class stands William H. 
Snyder, of Tipton township, an agriculturist of long standing, and a 
citizen who has at all times held the respect and esteem of his fellow- 
townsmen. In his early years ]Mr. Snyder was engaged in other lines 
of endeavor, but eventually returned to the old homestead, content that 
his abilities fitted him best for the occupation of his forefathers. Mr. 
Snyder was born on the old Snyder homestead in Tipton township, 
located about one mile west of Onward, at the junction of the Thomas 
and Snyder road, July 1, 1857, a son of Levi and Madeline (Rothen- 
berger) Snyder. His father, a native of Pennsylvania, left that state 
as a young man and came to Clinton county, Indiana, from whence he 
enlisted in the United States army for service during the Mexican war. 
After the close of that stiniggle, he came to Cass county, and here took 
up land, cleared a farm and spent the remainder of his life in farming, 
his death occurring in 1900, at an advanced age. He and his wife were 
the parents of three children : William H., ]\Iaiy E. and Mrs. Martha 
J. Shank. 

William H. Snyder was given excellent educational advantages, 
attending the district schools near his home in Tipton township, and 
completing his studies imder Professor Neff, at the normal school. Dur- 
ing this entire period, he had spent his spare time in assisting his father 
on the home farm, being thoroughly trained in the vocation of farming. 
When he was twenty-one years of age he left the parental roof and 
engaged in school teaching for a period, but subsequently served an 
apprenticeship to' the carpenter trade, which he also followed for some 
time. Eventually, however, he again tiirned his attention to the tilling 
of the soil, and in 1900 bought the interests of the other heirs to his 
father's land, of which he is now the sole owner. He has eighty acres 



892 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

of land, all in a high state of cultivation, and his able management of 
the property is evidenced by its general air of prosperity and the large 
crops raised thereon. He believes in the use of modern machinery and 
methods, has made a thorough study of crop rotation and other meas- 
ures which have so advanced agriculture during the past several 
decades, and his property compares favorably with any of its size in 
the township. Mr. Snyder is essentially a farmer and has not cared 
for public life, taking only a good citizen's interest in mattera of a 
political nature. His fraternal connection is with the Knights of the 
Maccabees, and in religious matters he affiliates with the German 
Reformed church, while his wife belongs to the United Brethren faith 
and daughter to the Methodist. 

Mr. Snyder was married to Miss Rachael M. Surface May 1, 1884, 
and they have had three children: Leotine B., deceased, who married 
W. H. Haas and died without issue; Edgar F., who resides at home; 
and William R. Mrs. Snyder was born June 17, 1865, and was edu- 
cated in common schools. Both of her parents are deceased. Edgar 
received his diploma from the common schools and was a student in the 
Marion Normal College. He was superintendent of the high school 
one year, and is again superintendent for 1913-14. He is a member 
of the B. P. 0. E. and deputy county treasurer of Cass county. Wil- 
liam R. received a public school diploma and graduated from the county 
high school in Onward and was a teacher in Cass county but is now 
messenger at Logansport State Bank. He is a member of the Red Men. 

John W. Kendall is another of the progressive farming men who 
have added not a little to the development and prosperity of Cass county 
and Noble township as a result of his up-to-date and modern methods of 
operation. He was born on August 26, 1855, in Carroll county, Indiana, 
and came to Cass county in 1883. He is the son of Thomas and Maria 
(Graves) Kendall, the father having been a Civil war veteran. He en- 
listed in an Iowa regiment and saw much of the hardships of actual war. 
It was during his service that he contracted an affection of the lungs 
that resulted in his death in 1908. The mother is still living in Cass 
county. 

When John W. Kendall came to Cass county, a young man of twenty- 
three or thereabout, he settled on Avhat was then known, and is yet called 
the Tabor farm, in Washington township. There he began the business 
of general farming, an occupation in which he has ever been successful 
and prosperous. In 1894 he branched out in the diary business, and in 
1905 he came to Noble township, here settling on the farm he now oc- 
cupies on what is called College Hill. Here he has enjoyed a pleasing 
degree of success in his general farming and dairying. The farm, which 
comprises eighty acres, has under Mr. Kendall's care reached a splendid 
state of improvement and cultivation, and is known to be one of the best 
kept places in the township, while the place boasts one of the most com- 
plete and perfect silos in the state of Indiana, the same being built on a 
twenty-four inch foundation, four bricks deep, and is thirty feet high, — 
one of the most valuable adjuncts in connection with the operation of his 
dairy farm. 

On January 2, 1881, Mr. Kendall married Miss Henrietta Wright, 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 893 

and to them were born seven children, named as follows : Pearl, Gertrude, 
John Ellis, Harry N., Jesse, Hattie and Ethel. Harry N. died in 1897 
at the age of four years, and Ethel was taken by death in the same year, 
at the tender age of two years. In August, 1912, the eldest daughter, 
Pearl, married Charles Emmery, a manufacturer of mineral waters and 
pop in Logansport. Gertrude married George Case, in 1906, and they 
conduct "The Island View Hotel" in Logansport, Indiana. 

i\Ir. Kendall has always been an adherent of the Republican party, 
though not particularly active in the ranks, and his fraternal relations 
are represented by his membership in the Redraen and the Tribe of Ben 
Hur. The family attends the Universalist church. A man of much 
public spirit and enterprise, Mr. Kendall has always been a strong 
cooperator in every movement of a public nature that has for its ulti- 
mate object the betterment of the community and may always be de- 
pended upon to give generously of his means and his support in any 
worthy cause promulgated for the good of his fellows. 

JION. Dyer B. McConnell, for many years one of the prominent 
legists of Cass county, was born in Highland county, Illinois, on Feb- 
ruary 15, 1835. He is one of the ten children born to Dr. James B. 
and Sarah Dean (Stewart) McConnell, five of that number now living. 

James B. McConnell was a physician and came to Cass county in 
1848, locating in Royal Centre, where he practically passed the re- 
mainder of his professional life. He died at the home of his father, 
Samuel C. McConnell, a farmer of Harrison township. Samuel C. 
McConnell came from Ohio to Cass county in 1839 and followed farm- 
ing in Harrison township. He was a native of South Carolina and of 
Scotch-Irish ancestry, but his southern nativity did not prevent him 
from being a strong abolitionist and a member of the first anti-slavery 
organization in the county. The McConnell family came to America 
in Colonial days, religious prosecution in their own country causing 
their emigration. 

Dyer B. McConnell received his scholastic training of earlier xesrs 
at Russelville, Brown county, Ohio. He came to Cass county in 1852 
and finished his education with a four months ' term in a private school, 
conducted by JMessrs. Glenn and Rogers, graduates of Miami Univer- 
sity in Logansport. He was reared in the expectation that he would 
embrace the medical profession, but for seven years he taught school 
in Indiana and Illinois and subsequently engaged in the manufacture 
of lumber in Harrison township. On August 27, 1861, ]\Ir. McConnell 
enlisted in Company K, Ninth Indiana Volunteer Infantry as a private. 
He went first to West Virginia and served three months on scouting 
duty on Cheat ^Mountain. In January, 1862, he camped with his com- 
mand at Felterman and at this . time, January 29, 1862, was elected 
second lieutenant of his company. On April 12th following he was 
made first lieutenant, upon the death of Lieutenant Joseph S. Turner. 
Close upon this promotion followed his election to the post of captain 
on August 21, 1862. He continued in the service until October 29, 1864, 
when he resigned owing to ill health, but he was not mustered out until 
November 9, 1864. His military service from April, 1862, was join- 
ing the command of Don Carlos Buel at Nashville, Tennessee. They 



894 HISTOET OF CASS COUNTY 

moved in the direction of Pittsburg Landing in March and reached 
there on the evening of the first day of the light. At that time he was 
acting quartermaster of his regiment. By special request he was re- 
lieved of his duties as quartermaster that he might participate in the 
second day's tight, and he was in command of Company K after the 
wounding of Fii-st Lieutenant Turner, who commanded the company, 
the captain acting as major of the regiment. During this engagement 
the Ninth Regiment lost more men in killed and wounded than any 
other regiment in that action. The Century Company, in their pictorial 
histoi-y of the war, paid a high tribute to the efficiency and bravery of 
the Ninth on tlie second day of that fight. Succeeding this engage- 
ment, he was in the Corinth campaign, then was on the campaign 
through Mississippi to Florence, Alabama, thence north into Tennessee. 
Mr. McConnell's history from this on was the history of the Ninth 
Regiment. He participated in the battles of Greenbriar and Buffalo 
Mountain, the second day of the battle of Shiloh, all the engagements 
of Corinth, Perryville, Kentucky, Stone river (two days' fight) Chick- 
amauga, Lookout Mountain, Mission Ridge, Resaea, Peach Tree Creek, 
Kenesaw Mountain, Buzzard's Roost, Dallas, New Hope Church, Jones- 
boro, Lovejoy Station, and the reduction of Atlanta. Mr. McConnell 
was then sent in pursuit of Hood to Dalton, Summerville and 
Galeville, and at this latter point separated from General Sherman's 
command. After various other engagements and campaigns, he went 
to Pulaski, Tennessee, where he resigned from the service. 

Returning to Logansport, Mr. McConnell took up the study of law 
and was admitted to the bar in 1865. Soon thereafter he was appointed 
by Governor Morton prosecuting attorney for the common pleas court. 
He continued in active practice until elected judge of the Twenty-ninth 
Judicial Circuit in November, 1888. He served the unexpired term 
caused by the resignation of Judge Maurice Winfield, and in 1890 com- 
menced serving his own term of six years. He resigned in 1895, then 
continued in practice until 1904, when he became referee in bankruptcy, 
his private practice being reduced considerably by his service in that 
office. 

On February 4, 1864, Judge McConnell was married to Hattie Gib- 
son, who died on December 19, 1910. They were the parents of eight 
children, the following being those who yet live : Edgar Boyd ; May ; 
Elizabeth; Helen, the wife of George Ross; and Grace. Judge Mc- 
Connell is a progressive Republican in his politics and is a member of 
the Grand Army of the Republic. 

Since 1910 Judge McConnell has been practically retired from active 
business pursuits. 

Stewart T. JMcConnell, for over half a century a lawyer in the 
active practice of his profession at Logansport. and the present senior 
member of the firm of McConnell, Jenkines, Jenkines & Stewart, is 
a son of Dr. James B. ]\IcConnell, who came to Cass county, Indiana, 
in 1848, and lived for many years at Royal Centre. Appropriate 
record is made of the life of Dr. McConnell in connection with the 
biography of Judge Dyer B. ]\IcConnell, immediately preceding this. 

Stewart T. McConnell was born in Highland county, Ohio, in the 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 895 

village of Greenfield. October 16, 1836, and his boyhood days were 
passed in attending the neighboring school and assisting an uncle, with 
whom he lived, in farming. Before attaining his majority he attended 
a scientific and classical school for four years, paying his way with 
the proceeds derived from his own labor. He came to Cass county 
in 1859, and taught school for a number of terms. Influenced by the 
advice of Judge Horace P. Biddle, he decided to become a lawyer and 
while teaching school he became a student of Hon. D. D. Pratt and 
Judge D. P. Baldwin. In December, 1861, he was admitted to the 
bar and very shortly thereafter engaged in the practice of his profession. 
For a period of more than fifty years Mr. ]\IcConnell has occupied a 
conspicuous place in the legal history of Cass county, and in most of 
the important litigation covering this period, his name is to be found 
as counsel. As counsellor or trial lawyer he has few equals in the 
state, which is famous for great lawyers. AVhile aggressive, he is in- 
variably courteous and thus commands the respect of his fellow mem- 
bers of the bar. His knowledge of the law is profound and a legal 
position once assumed immediately commands the instant attention of 
court and jury. 

Contrary to the usual custom of lawyers, Mr. McConnell has never 
sought political honors, although at one time he was the nominee of 
both political parties for the office of common pleas prosecutor and 
served as such one term. He has always manifested a deep and prac- 
tical interest in education, temperance and religion, and to all matters 
pertaining to the public weal his support is enthusiastically given. 

On April 3, 1860, he married I\Iiss Louisa Gibson, and to them 
were born four children. ]\Irs. McConnell died in the spring of 1884, 
and in November of the follawing year he married Eloise Landis Stuart. 

Few men in Cass county stand higher in public confidence and esteem 
than does Stewart T. McConnell. 

Dr. Arthur N. Baker. Among the professional men of Logansport 
who have gained success in their chosen fields of endeavor. Dr. Arthur 
N. Baker has firmly established himself in a position of prestige in the 
practice of optometry. He has been a resident of, the city practically 
all of his life, and is a native of the Hoosier state, having been born at 
Culver, Marshall county, February 19, 1869, a son of Dr. Ira J. and 
Eliza A. (Duddleston) Baker, of Wyandotte county, Ohio. Dr. Ira J. 
Baker was a physician and came to Logansport about 1877, this city still 
being his home and that of his wife. During the Civil war he served 
in the Union army as a member of the signal corps. 

Arthur N. Baker attended the public and high schools of Logans- 
port, succeeding which for several years he was a teacher in the Cass 
and Fulton county schools. He then became a student in the Chicago 
Opthalmic College and Hospital, where he was graduated June 1, 1895, 
and subsequently took a post-graduate course at the Northern Illinois 
College of Opthalmology and Otolog>% where he was granted a diploma 
in May, 1899. In June, 1895, Dr. Baker established himself in the 
optical business in Logansport, and here he has continued to the pres- 
ent time, from a small and modest beginning having built a substantial 
business along optical lines exclusively. Here he has his own instru- 



896 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

ments for grinding lenses and for the prosecution of the various other 
operations of his chosen vocation, and by his skill has gained a position 
in the confidence of the people and a reputation in optical circles. Upon 
the passage of the law in 1907 creating a state board of five members, 
appointed by the governor, of Registration and Examination in 
Optometry, Dr. Baker was chosen one of its members, and he has since 
continued to be a member of that board. He is a Democrat in polities, 
and his fraternal connections are with the Masons, the Knights of 
Pythias and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 

In April, 1894, Dr. Baker was married to IMiss Lillie Condon, and 
they have been the parents of one daughter, namely: Helen IMaurine. 

Harry Fidlee. In the annals of Cass county are found numerous 
instances of youths who have risen to affluence and prestige in social 
and business life, but it is doubtful if any cases can be discovered that 
parallel the career of Harry Fidler, of Logansport, whose phenomenal 
advancement has brought him, within the comparatively short period 
of two decades, from selling newspapers and blacking shoes to the man- 
agement of one of the city's leading business establishments. Mr. 
Fidler is still a young man, but his accomplishments have been great, 
and a sketch of his remarkable career should prove of a beneficial and 
encouraging nature to those who have become discouraged because of 
the apparently insurmountable obstacles placed in their path. 

Harry Fidler was born in Logansport, Indiana, September 25, 1881, 
and is one of the two surviving children of a family of six born to 
August W. and Lydia J. (Powell) Fidler. His opportunities for secur- 
ing an education in his youth were extremely limited, and when he was 
only ten years of age he went out upon the streets of Logansport, selling 
daily papers, and carrying his little boot-blacking kit. The bright, cheery 
and ambitious youth soon applied for and secured the position of errand 
boy for the jewelry establishment of Charles Church, and on leaving 
that occupation was employed as an assistant in the office of Dr. J. H. 
Shultz. This proved the turning point of Mr. Fidler 's career, for Dr. 
Shultz so impressed upon him the importance of securing an education 
that he began to attend the public schools whenever he could be spared 
from his duties and also undertook a course of private instruction. 
Later, having tasted of knowledge, he thirsted for more, and attended 
the Logansport Business College, where he made an excellent record in 
his studies. For a short time succeeding this he was employed in the 
drug store of W. H. Porter, and in May, 1900, he became office assistant 
for Seth M. Velsey, where his services were so satisfactory that within 
the short space of three months he was given entire charge of one branch 
of the business, and in 1903 was given full management of the office. 
At the time of the deaths of his father and IMr. Velsey, which took 
place about the same time, the settlement of both estates fell upon the 
shoulders of the youth and both were settled to the entire satisfaction 
of all concerned. By express stipulation in the will of Mr. Velsey, Mr. 
Fidler was given absolute charge of the settlement of the Velsey estate, 
one of the largest in Cass county, and within twenty-two months this 
had been accomplished. Since that time IMr. Fidler has succeeded to 
the business founded by IMr. Velsey, and has given his attention to its 
management to the present time. 



HISTOEY OF CASS COUNTY 897 

Mr. Fidler was instrumental in raising funds for the erection of 
the Protestant and Catholic mausoleums at Mount Hope cemetery. He 
is a thirty-second degree Scottish Rite and Knight Templar York Rite 
Mason, a member of the Mystic Shrine, a Knight of Pythias and a 
member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. For ten years 
he has been an officer of rank in Logan Company No. 26, Uniformed 
Rank, Knights of Pythias, of which, for the past eight years, he has 
been captain. He has been an unswerving Republican all of his life. 
Although his duties in a business waj' have been such as to preclude the 
idea of his entering actively in the struggles of the political arena, he 
takes a keen and intelligent interest in all matters that affect his com- 
munity or its citizens, and has stanchly supported measures making for 
education, morality and good government. He has the utmost con- 
fidence of all with whom he has come into contact in a business or social 
way, and his friends in Logansport are legion. 

On November 8, 1911, Mr. Fidler was united in marriage with Miss 
Fay Lucy, of Logansport. 

John G. Keip. Since his seventeenth year, John G. Keip, of Logans- 
port, one of this city 's leading business citizens, has been the architect of 
his own fortunes, and his long and interesting career is a striking example 
of the fact that true success is the result obtained by steadfast integrity, 
constant industry and unremitting perseverance. Mr. Keip came to 
Logansport, September 1, 1894, and within his recollection the city has 
grown and developed from a rude, undeveloped community into a muni- 
cipality noted as a center of education, culture and commercial activity, 
its public improvements have been fostered and forwarded, and many 
of its handsomest business structures have been erected. As resident 
manager of one of Logansport 's principal enterprises, the Columbia 
Brewing Company, Mr. Keip holds a position of unquestioned prestige 
in business life and his public spirit has led him to identify himself 
with all movements calculated to benefit the city and its people. 

John G. Keip was born in the city of Toledo, Ohio, November 8, 1857, 
a son of Joseph and Katherine (Rees) Keip, natives of Germany, both 
of whom are now deceased. His father was a painter and decorator 
at Toledo, where his death occurred in 1871. Receiving his early educa- 
tion in the public schools of Toledo, Mr. Keip supplemented this by 
attendance at Canisius College, Buffalo, New York, where he was grad- 
uated in 1875, and for a number of years succeeding worked in various 
clerical capacities. In 1880 he made removal to Chicago, where he 
became a clerk in a wholesale clothing establishment, then becoming 
the traveling representative of a Chicago wholesale house in Kansas, a 
position which he held for four years. At this time he became interested 
in politics, and for a time was employed in the water and police depart- 
ments in Chicago, following which he accepted a position in the 
Department of Internal Revenue. It was while acting in the capacity 
of revenue officer that he received his initiation into the distilling and 
br-ewing business, the details of which he thoroughly mastered. In 
1900 the Columbia Brewing Company went into the hands of a receiver, 
and ]\Ir. Keip was appointed to close up its affairs. When the estate 
had been settled, he accepted the position of manager of the new con- 



898 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

cern, and since that time he has acquired a proprietary interest in ilie 
business, has continued steadily with it, and is its present resident 
manager. As the directing head of this large enterprise, Mr. Keip has 
displayed marked ability, and his reputation among his associates is 
that of a well-balanced man of business, capable of handling large issues 
and thoroughly the master of every detail of the company's operations. 
His business interests have been so large and important that in late 
years he has given but little attention to political matters, but at all times 
has displayed a keen and intelligent interest in movements concerning 
his city's welfare. He has been identified with fraternal work to some 
extent and at this time is a member of the Elks, the Moose, the Eagles 
and the Travelers Protective Association. 

While still a resident of Chicago, November 19, 188-1, Mr. Keip was 
united in marriage with ^liss Etta Provost, and they became the par- 
ents of three children, all of whom are deceased. ]Mr. and Mrs. Keip 
also adopted three children, one of whom died, one returned to its par- 
ents, and one. Bertha Henrietta, is now living with Mr. Keip. ]\lrs. 
Keip passed away ^larch 15, 1912, as the result of injuries sustained in 
an automobile accident some two years previously, ilr. Keip was mar- 
ried to Annie M. Clark, of Michigan City, Indiana, on November 5, 1912. 

William T. Wilson. Among those who are members of the Cass 
county bar may be found many native sons of this section ; men belong- 
ing to old and honored families, members of which have been promi- 
nently connected with commercial, professional and public life for 
many years. It is in this class that William T. Wilson holds prestige, 
for he has not only gained a high reputation in his chosen profession, 
as well as along business lines, but is a son of one of Logansport 's early 
merchants, the late Thomas H. Wilson. 

Thomas H. Wilson was born ]\lay 31, 1818, near the village of Denton, 
Caroline county, Maryland, a son of John and Sarah (Hopkins) Wilson, 
both of English descent. The sixth of a family of ten children, he passed 
his early years on a farm, and at the age of eleven years, at the time of 
the death of his father, he went to live with an uncle, Thomas Hopkins, 
who was his guardian, and in whose store and mill he worked for some 
time. In 1834 he became a clerk in a store at Camden, Delaware, and 
in 1837, when this firm was dissolved, came with, one of his employers, 
Daniel Atwell, to Logansport, Indiana. Here, in 1840, he became one 
of the principals in the mercantile establishment of Pollard & Wilson, 
which concern, in 1843, built a grain warehouse on the Wabash & Erie 
Canal. Mr. Wilson, through his extensive mercantile, commission and 
forwarding interests, became widely and favorably known throughout 
this part of the state. About 1853, owing to changes, the firm became 
Wilson, ]\Ien-iam & Company, although the firm of Pollard & Wilson 
continued to do business until the death of the senior partner in 1856. 
Failing health, caused by close attention to his duties as executor of 
the estate of ilr. Pollard, led to Mr. Wilson's resignation from the firm, 
but he continued in the produce trade until 1875. In May, 1865, he 
became president of the Logansport National Bank, and served as such 
until his death, December 27, 1877. He was originally a Whig in his 
political views, but when the organization of the Republican party was 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 899 

brought about, he cast his fortunes with the new movement. He was 
reared, religiously, in the faith of the Friends, or Quakers, but all 
religious denominations benefitted by his liberality, and no charitable 
movement with a worthy cause ever appealed to him in vain. In his 
death the poor, needy and afflicted lost a true friend, who had never 
forgotten them. Mr. Wilson was thrice married, his first union occurring 
in 1842, when he married America Weirick. She died three years later, 
and in 1849, Mr. Wilson married Mary A. I. Dexter, who passed away 
in 1854. His third marriage took place in 1856, when he was united 
with Elizabeth E. Hopkins, who survived him irutil 1898. Mr. Wilson 
had four sons: William T., Ellwood G., Thomas H. and John Charles. 

William T. Wilson was born in Logansport, Indiana, in 1854, and his 
early education was secured in the public schools. Subsequently, he 
entered Princeton University, New Jersey, from which institution he 
was graduated in 1874, and in the following year commenced reading 
law in the office of the Hon. D. D. Pratt, of Logansport, being admitted 
to the bar during the same year. He immediately entered upon the 
practice of his profession, and has gained an enviable reputation among 
his associates and in the confidence of the people of his community. 
His practice has been of a general character, and he is known as a 
thoroughly learned and sound lawyer, a logical and convincing reasoner 
and a persuasive and successful advocate. He is a Republican in poli- 
tics, although of the kind that seeks the establishment of the right prin- 
ciples of government rather than the acquisition of the honors of office 
or the spoils of partisanship. Since 1877, the year in which his father 
died, he has been officially connected with the First National Bank of 
Logansport, of which he has been a director for a quarter of a century, 
and various other positions of prominence have been capably filled by 
him. With Mrs. Wilson, he attends the Presbyterian church. 

In 1880 Mr. Wilson was united in marriage with Miss Martha L. 
McCarty, daughter of Joseph P. McCarty, of Logansport. Their four 
children are : Thomas H., associated with his father in the practice 
of law; Elizabeth, wife of Mr. Frank H. Worthington, of the Vandalia 
Railroad, residing at Terre Haute; Joseph and Dorothy Dexter, living 
at home. 

Simon Long. It has been stated, and truthfully, that agriculture 
offers blessings in the greatest plenty, but does not allow us to take them 
in idleness. True there are those who are content to travel along the 
rut of mediocrity, taking from their land a bare living, but the full 
measure of success in farming only comes to those who are willing to 
work hard and faithfully, to observe changed conditions and practices, 
and to constantly remember that the only true success in life is that 
gained through the practice of honorable dealing. In this connection it 
is not inappropriate to briefly sketch the career of Simon Long, a self- 
made man of Cass county, whose long and honorable career has been 
crowned with well-deserved success secured through the medium of his 
own efforts. Mr. Long was born September 10, 1845, in Cass county, 
Indiana, and is a son of William and Elizabeth Long. His father, a 
native of Pennsylvania, came to Indiana in young manhood, and here 
spent the remainder of his life in agricultural pursuits. He and his 



900 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

wife were the parents of nine children, namely: Eliza, who is deceased; 
Mrs. Catherine Beal; Sarah, Angelina, William, Aaron and Samuel, all 
of whom are deceased; Simon; and Joseph, also deceased. 

Simon Long received rather limited educational advantages in his 
youth, the death of his father making it necessary that he early start 
out in life for himself, but in his later years he has accumulated a wide 
fund of information, and is known as a man of good educational attain- 
ments. When he was still a small lad he went to live at the home of an 
elder brother, and at fifteen years of age began to gain experience in 
the world by working out on neighboring farms. His salary was small 
and his hours long, but the youth was industrious and persevering, and 
carefully saved his earnings, and thus, by the time he had reached the 
age of thirty years, he was able to purchase the farm on which he now 
resides. This land was almost entirely uncultivated and what improve- 
ments had been made upon it w^ere of a primitive nature, but the industry 
and integrity with which Mr. Long took up his work soon changed con- 
ditions, and as the years have passed the land has become productive 
and the buildings modern and substantial. He now has eighty acres in 
a high state of cultivation, it being located near the Marion road, five 
miles from Logausport. Mr. Long is justly considered one of the able 
agriculturists of this part of the county, and as a citizen he is known to 
be progressive and public-spirited. During his long residence here he 
has formed a wide acquaintance, in which he numbers many sincere 
friends. 

On March 28, 1871, Mr. Long was united in marriage with Miss ]\Iary 
Anna Leedy, daughter of Daniel and Jane (Nelson) Leedy, one of the 
old and prominent families of Cass county, and she died in 1909, and was 
laid to rest in Mount Hope cemetery. Eight children were born to this 
union, namely: Charles, who married ^lyrtle Shuey, and has two chil- 
dren, Benton and Norma ; Jasper, who married Dot Stover, and has 
four children, Mae, Glenn, Homer and Donald; Wilda, who married 
August Snyder, and has three children, Dorothy, Wayne and Verda; 
Angeline, who married Homer Cragen; Joseph, who married (first) 
Freda Snyder, and (second) Mrs. Emma Cohan Henshaw; Ruby, who 
man-ied Carl Wilson; and Jennie and Albina, who are deceased. With 
his family, i\Ir. Long is a member of the English Lutheran church, which 
he attends consistently and supports liberally. 

Michael L. Fansler. Probably no family has contributed more 
materially to the professional prestige of Loganspoi"t than that of 
Fansler, members of which have attained eminence in law and medicine 
and have rendered signal services in public office. Among the worthy 
representatives of the name may be mentioned the late ]\I. D. Fansler, 
and Michael L. Fansler, father and son, whose records have been asso- 
ciated intimately with the history of Cass county. 

M. D. Fansler was born June 25, 1857, in Wyandotte county, Ohio, 
his parents being Dr. David N. and Mary D. (Caldwell) Fansler. The 
family is of a mixed ancestry, being Irish-Scotch on the mother's side 
and German-French paternally. Dr. David Fansler was an early physi- 
cian of Logansport, but in his later years removed to Marion, Indiana, 
where his death occurred. M. D. Fansler received his early education in 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 901 

a minor capacity iu a printing office, and was practically self-educated, 
yet he became one of the leading flgiu-es at the Cass county bar. Coming 
to Logansport. in 1879, he became prosecuting attorney in 1884 and 
held that office until 1888, following which he returned to private prac- 
tice, in which he was engaged up to the time of his death. May 2, 1896. 
Mr. Fansler was admittedly one of the finest orators that ever practiced 
before the Cass county bar. Of fine taste and great erudition, his read- 
ing covered a wide range, both in the line of his profession and in the 
broader field of polite literature. He loved books and was a dis- 
criminating critic, and possessed the happy faculty of being able to store 
up the useful and essential things in his mind, which was a perfect 
treasure house of knowledge. In his death Cass county lost not only 
one of its most able legists, but a citizen who in every walk of life was 
honored — esteemed not for what he had but for what he was. On May 
4, 1881, Mr. Fansler was united in marriage with jMiss Johanna (Nannie) 
Mulcahy, whose father, a native of Ireland, came to Indiana in 1870 and 
until his death was an employe of the Pennsylvania Railroad. Four 
children were born to Mr. and ]\Irs. Fansler, of whom three are stiU 
living. 

Michael E. Fansler was born iu Logansport, Indiana, July 4, 1883, 
and has never known any other home than this city. He received his 
preliminary educational training in the public schools, and in 1901 
entered Notre Dame Univei'sity, from which noted institution he was 
graduated in 1905, receiving the degree of LL. B. He at once entered 
upon the practice of his profession at Logansi^ort, where he now has 
a large and representative clientele. In 1906, Mr. Fansler formed a 
professional partnership with George C. Custer, with whom he con- 
tinued four years, Mr. Custer being prosecuting attorney during this 
time and Mr. Fansler assisting him in the proseeiition of criminal cases. 
In 1910 ^Ir. Fansler succeeded ^Ir. Custer in that office, and this was 
followed by his re-election in 1912. During these two terms, ]\Ir. 
Fansler has demonstrated his ability as a lawyer and his entire fitness 
for public office. He holds the duties of his office in high regard, and 
has brought to his work the enthusiasm and conscientious attention to 
detail that made him so successful in his private practice. He has inher- 
ited much of his father's oratorical ability, has a wide and comprehensive 
knowledge of law and .iurispr^^dence, and during his career has been 
connected with many notable criminal trials. In his political views he 
is a Democrat and he has at all times been a stanch adherent of the 
principles and candidates of his party. ]\Ir. Fansler 's religious viewg 
are those of the Catholic church. 

On June 30, 1909, jMr. Fansler was married to Katherine Hall, 
formerly of Peni, Indiana. 

Abraham L. Jones. To the realty dealers of this section, Cass 
county owes much for its growth and development during the past sev- 
eral decades. Those who are expert in land values, who have the peculiar 
ability necessary to encourage settlement from outside communities, 
and whose activities serve to promote the erection of structures which 
add to tlie commercial and industrial prestige of their community, form 
the medium through which Cass county, and notably the city of Logans- 



902 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

port, have gained their present high place as centers of all lines of 
business activity. Among this class of citizens stands Abraham L. 
Jones, of Logansport, who in comparatively a short space of time has 
risen from a humble farmer's youth, working for a meagre stipend, to 
the position where his operations involve several hundreds of thousands 
of dollars annually. Mr. Jones is a native son of Indiana, born in 
Madison county, August 24, 1864. When six years of age he came to 
Cass county with his parents, Richard T. and Drusilla (Nighbarger) 
Jones, who located on a farm in Clay township. During the next four 
years Richard T. Jones was engaged in operating a rented farm, but 
then moved across the line into Fulton county, there purchased land and 
continued to be engaged in agricultural pursuits during the remainder 
of his life. He died in 1900, and on the same day that he was laid to 
rest his widow passed away. They were the parents of eleven children, 
of whom four sons and five daughters survive, and of these three reside 
in Cass county. 

Abraham L. Jones resided with his parents until his eighteenth year, 
in the meantime attending the district schools and assisting his father 
in the work of the home farm. The spring before his eighteenth birth- 
day, he secured employment on a neighboring farm, and until twenty- 
five years of age was thus engaged, then turning his attention to rail- 
roading, as a fireman in the employ of the Peiuisylvania Railroad. 
Fourteen months later he began braking on a freight train on the 
Vandalia road, in the service of which he continued for nearly one year, 
and then started to work at the carpenter's trade, which he had picked 
up in his youth. During this time, Mr. Jones had saved his earnings 
industriously and thriftily, and when an opportunity presented itself 
he invested in several Logansport building lots, on which he erected 
houses. This was his introduction into the real estate business, and 
as time passed he continued to follow the same system, building up an 
excellent business from, a humble nucleus. Financial depression came 
on, however, property values declined, and I\Ir. Jones retired from the 
real estate field for a time to engage in the grocerv and meat market 
business, a venture which occupied his attention for a year or more. He 
then again returned to the real estate field, conditions having become 
more settled, and he now does a business that averages approximately 
$200,000 annually. ^len there may be who have risen as rapidly in 
the business world as Mr. Jones, but none has done so more steadily 
or surely through legitimate means and the medium of their o"qti 
efforts. While he has always been ready to grasp any opportunity that 
presents itself, he has also respected the rights of others, and has not 
taken a questionable advantage of his associates or business competitors. 
In political matters he is a Republican, but his inclinations have led 
him to support the more progressive branch of the party. His religious 
faith is that of the Christian Science church. 

On June 29, 1890, j\Ir. Jones was marri^ed to Miss Ida J. Kinnaman, 
daughter of Nathan K. Kinnaman, and they have two daughters. Fay 
and Margery. 

George B. Fobgy, investment banker and broker of Logansport, 
Indiana, was bom at New Carlisle, Ohio, on September 13, 1851, and 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 903 

is the son of John A. and Polly (Brown) Forgy. He has been a resi- 
dent of Cass county since he was a child of three years, and his identi- 
fication with Logansport dates back to the year 1879, in which year he 
established himself in his present business. His success has been one 
worthy of the name, consistent with the energy and enterprise which he 
has invested in his operations, and he is well known and esteemed most 
highly in all circles in Logansport, whether of a business or a social 
nature. 

The father of Mr. Forgy, John A. Forgy, was also born near New 
Carlisle, Ohio, and there he was reared and in young manhood married 
Mary Brown, who died leaving three children. He then married liis 
second wife, who was a sister of his deceased wife, and she bore him one 
son, George B., of this brief review. She, too, was called by death, and 
in later years he married Catherine Forgj', the widow of a cousin, 
and she accompanied him to Cass county, Indiana, in 1853, and settled 
on a farm in JMiami township. Mr. Forgy subsequently laid out the 
town of New Waverly, and he was identified wath various activities dur- 
ing his life. He farmed, but did not confine his attention to that work. 
He was for a time engaged in the merchandise business at Waverly, 
operated a saw mill for a season and sold lumber, being generally 
known for one of the most invetei^ate traders, withal one of the most suc- 
cessful, that lived in Cass county in his time. He was a prominent mem- 
ber of the Presbyterian church, and a fine, manly character, regarded as 
one of the most congenial and approachable men in the county. He 
manifested the most unbounded faith in his fellow man, and was always 
found ready and willing to aid with counsel and more substantial aid in 
the form of finances, any worthy cause that was brought to his attention. 
This trait redounded to his great financial disadvantage in his later 
years, and he died a comparatively poor man, as far as this world's 
goods is regarded, but rich in the love and gratitude of the many who 
had occasion to know his generous kindly heart and his open-handed 
benefactions. 

George B. Forgy, the only child of his second marriage, came with 
his parents to Cass county when he was a small child. He was reared 
at New Waverly, the town which his father virtually made, and received 
in that place a common school education. When he was about eighteen 
years old he started out for himself, and his first work was that of a 
fruit tree salesman for John Wampler, an old Dunkard nurseryman 
of the vicinity of Dayton, Ohio. His next venture was as a clerk in a 
dry goods store at Peru, Indiana, and soon after was placed in charge 
of the collections in four states for the Howe Sewing Machine Company, 
the headciuarters of which large concern was then located in Peru. He 
was associated thus for something like five years, when, in company 
with E. W. Shirk, he organized the Tipton County Bank, the two 
being equal owners in the firm. They continued at Tipton for three 
years, and in 1879 Mr. Forgy came to Logansport and established him- 
self in his present business, that of an investment banker and broker. 
He has continued successfully up to the present time, and is rightly 
regarded as one of the solid and substantial financial men of the city 
and county. ^Ir. Forgy is a Mason and his political affiliations are with 



904 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

the Republican party, but he is not especially active in the interests 
of the party, being more attentive to his own affairs than any others. 

In 1876 Mr. Forgy was united in marriage with INIiss Alice 
0. Crowell, of Peru, and one son has been born to them — Ben C, who 
is now engaged in operating a farm in Boone township, Cass county. 
Both Mr. and Mrs. Forgy attend the Presbyterian church, but neither 
of them are members of that or any religious organization. 

Silas McDowell was one of the well known farmers of Cass county, 
ajid as such is deserving of more than passing mention. He was born 
in the state of Ohio, Starke county, on September 8, 1840, a son of John 
A. McDowell who came to America in the later '50 's and farmed on 
the Michigan road in Clay township until his death. Silas McDowell 
was favored with but little education in his youth, and his whole life 
was one of hard and unremitting toil. He was yet in his teens when 
he came to Cass county with his parents, and being the eldest of seven 
children, all of whom grew to maturity, much of the burden of the 
work of the old farm fell upon his young shoulders. He made his home 
with his parents until he married, after which for about two years 
he rented and operated land belonging to his father. AVhen he was 
sufficiently prosperous to warrant the venture, he purchased eighty 
acres of unimproved land in Noble township, on which he caused to 
be erected a small fiA'e-room house. In this he settled with his little 
family and began the strenuous work of cleaning up his potential farm. 
As his means increased from year to year, he finally added an additional 
eighty acres in Noble township and then seventy-tive acres in Clay town- 
ship, which gradually brought him generous returns. Beyond the fact 
of his hard work and clean, wholesome life, his life was as that of the 
average man, and his career uneventful. His industry and his splendid 
practical business sense made it possible for him to accumulate a con- 
siderable property, a fact which enabled him to extend material aid 
to each of his children when they started out in life for themselves. 

A Republican in politics, he was in no sense a politician or a seeker 
for official preferment at any time, his life being all too busy in the care 
and maintenance of his family and his property. ■ It is doubtful if he 
possessed a stronger characteristic than that of his rugged honesty and 
his intense distaste of anything that savored of trickery. He was a 
generous man and contributed liberally of his means to the support of 
all worthy objects that came to his notice, and was a valued member 
of the Cumberland Presbyterian church, to which he gave generously 
all his life. 

Mr. IMcDowell married Catherine Drift and eight children were 
born to them, as follows: Andrew, who was accidentally killed at the 
age of twenty-three ; Horace B., who married Martha Wadkins and 
lives at Akron, Indiana; Willard N., married Lucy Sweeney and now 
lives in Logansport; Jennie E., the wife of Theodore Sharp, of near 
Saginaw, Michigan; Minnie E., who married "Warren J. Butler, present 
sheriff of Cass county; Harry D., appropriate mention of whom follows 
this sketch; Charles E., who married Cecil Powers and resides in 
Logansport ; and Sarah, who died in infancy. Mr. McDowell died on 
March 26, 1896, and his widow survived him until September 4, 1906. 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 905 

Harrt D. McDowell was born on his father's farm in Noble town- 
ship, on the 14th of December, 1870, and there was reared. He is the son 
of Silas McDowell and Catherine Dritt, his wife, and is one of the eight 
children of these parents. Further mention is unnecessary with regard 
to the family, as a full sketch is dedicated to the father just preceding 
this. 

The district schools of his native township supplied the early educa- 
tion of Harry D. McDowell, after which he took a thorough course at 
Hall's Business College. Between the years of 1895 and 1908 the 
young man farmed on his own responsibility, occupying a part of his 
father's generous estate, but in 1908, having purchased the James Reed 
hardware and implement store in Logansport, in association with his 
brother, Charles E., he gave up his farming, and moved to the city, 
where he has since made his home. Charles E. McDowell had moved 
to Logansport some time prior to this and established himself in the 
meat market business, Harry D. being his partner in the venture, which 
proved a successful one. The two brothers have continued in partner- 
ship up to the present time, and are now the owners of a considerable 
valuable land, a meat market and a hardware and implement business, 
and are reckoned among the capable and prosperous business men of 
Logansport. 

Harry D. McDowell was married on April 29, 1896, to Miss Sarah 
J. Dalzell and to their union seven children have been born, named as 
follows: Frederick, Blanche, Doris, Gladys, Harry, George and John. 
Mr. McDowell is a Republican in his political adherence, and his wife 
is a member of the Presbyterian church. 

Carlton A. Price, well known in Logansport and surrounding dis- 
trict in the monument business, was born in White county, Indiana, on 
January 26, 1873, and is the son of William H. and Mahala (Shull) 
Price, and a grandson of Aaron and Mary (Hancock) Price. The fam- 
ily is one of Scotch-Irish ancestry, which made its early advent into 
this country in Colonial days. 

Aaron Price and his wife came to what is now Logansport in 1827. 
At that time but one log cabin marked the site of the future city, and 
the surrounding country was in a state of wildness such as to make 
true courage one's most valuable asset in attempting to establish a home 
in the region. Mr. Price located on a tract of land near Lockport in 
Carroll county, later moving to the vicinity of Idaville, where he lived 
retired until his death in 1882. He was a great hunter, and enjoyed 
to the utmost the pursuit of the wild game that inhabited the country 
in his early days in Indiana. He worked on the old canal at times, but 
the best years of his life were spent in farming, in which he experienced 
much of success and prosperity. Seven children came to their home, 
and of that number William H. Price was the fourth born. 

William H. Price was reared on his father's farm and has always 
followed the business in which he was there trained. In 1891: he moved 
to near Camden, in Carroll county, and three years later moved to 
North Dakota, where he now resides. He and his wife became the par- 
ents of ten children, seven of whom are yet living. 

Carlton A. Price is the third born child and the second oldest liv- 



906 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

ing child of his parents. He passed his youthful days on the old home 
place and as a boy attended the neighboring district school, in conuuon 
with the other youths of his community. He was just past his majority 
when he set out for himself and began an independent farming career, 
but in 1902 he gave up that plan and came to Logansport, where he set 
about learning the trade of a granite cutter. He liked the work, became 
a skillful workman, and in five yeare from the time he identified him- 
self with the business as an apprentice, he bought the marble shop of 
Henry L. Foust, and has since been successfully engaged in the monu- 
ment business in Logansport. His business relations and activities are 
not confined alone to this city, but reach out to other cities and towns 
in the coimty and adjoining states, in which he is coming to be well 
known in his line of enterprise. 

]\Ir. Price is a Democrat, independent in his views, and holds mem- 
bership in the Woodmen of the World. On Noveriiber 12, 1902, he was 
united in marriage with Eva IMcManus of Washington township, and 
they are the parents of two children, — Forrest and Kathleen. 

William S. Richardson was born in Logansport, Cass county, Indiana, 
on April 25, 1838. When he was one year old his parents moved to 
what is now a part of the city of Logansport, and here he lived con- 
tinuously from that time, covering a period of seventy-five years. In 
those years he lived an active and helpful life in the community, and 
conducted a business in carpentering from early manhood until recent 
years, when he retired from the cares of active industrial life. 

The early opportunities of Mr. Richardson for the securing of an 
adequate education were extremely limited, and such learning as he 
possesses was acquired in the practical school of experience. He learned 
the carpenter trade under the instruction of his father, who was also 
engaged in that trade during his life-time, and on December 1, 1861, was 
sworn into the United States service as a member of Company B, of the 
Forty-sixth Indiana Volunteer Infantry. He was made quartermaster 
sergeant early in his military service and upon the resignation of the 
quartermaster was promoted to the rank of first lieutenant. With his 
regiment he participated in all the Engagements and movements of his 
command, the detailed history of which is to be found in the article 
devoted to the Forty-sixth Regiment in other pages of this work, and he 
was discharged from the service on September 11, 1865. 

After the close of the war, Mr. Richardson returned to Logansport 
and there resumed the work of his trade, and in that work he con- 
tinued steadily until in more recent years, when he gradually withdrew 
from business life and was afterwards practically retired from the 
building industry and the cares of business life. 

On August 17, 1865, when he was home from the war on a furlough, 
the young lieutenant was united in marriage with Susan Flory, the 
daughter of Emmanuel Flory, an old settler of the county. She was 
born in Montgomery county, Pennsylvania, in March, 1840. They be- 
came the parents of one child, .who died in infancy. 

Mr. Richardson was made a Master Mason on December 11, 1865, 
and was also a member of the 6. A. R. He was a member of the Broad- 
way ^Methodist Episcopal church, as is also his wife, and for thirty- 
five years he sung in the Methodist choir, as well as being a member of 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 907 

the G. A. R. quartet for some years. The death of this honored old 
citizen occurred on the 12th of February, 1913. 

Franklin Henry Wipperman was born on December 15, 1861, at 
Angels Camp, Calaveras county, California, and is the son of Henry 
and Matilda (Ossenbeck) Wipperman, both German people. Henry 
Wipperman was born in Germany on February 23, 1832, and came to 
America when but a few months old in company with his parents. They 
settled in Indiana in September, 1837, making Clinton township their 
home, and there Henry Wipperman received the meager training 
afforded by the log-cabin schools of that primitive period. In 1852 
he went to California, prior to which time he had learned the car- 
penter's trade, and he remained in California until 1866, when he 
returned to Cass county and there remained until his death, which 
took place on February 7, 1904. He was a man who enjoyed the confi- 
dence and esteem of his fellow citizens at all times, and at one time in 
the eighties he held the office of county commissioner. He married 
Matilda Ossenbeck on February 14, 1861. She was born in Cass county, 
the daughter of German born parents, her birth occurring on Septem- 
ber 21, 1837, on the farm which remained her home during her young 
life. While yet in her teens she went to California in the expectation 
of bettering her health, and there she completed her education in 
Stockton, where she met and married her husband. She returned to 
Indiana with her husband in 1866, and in July of the following year 
death claimed her. 

Franklin Henry Wipperman was the eldest of the two children 
born to these parents, his brother dying at the age of two months, 
shortly following the death of their young mother. The common schools 
of his native community afforded Franklin Wipperman his early edu- 
cation, and in 1885 he was graduated from the Logansport high school. 
He passed his early days on the home farm in Washington township, 
in Cass county, and continued there until he was about twenty-nine 
years of age, or until December 1, 1890, when he removed to the city 
of Logansport and engaged in the abstract business, buying a part 
interest in the old John F. Dodd's office and later becoming full owner. 
In 1902 ]Mr. AA^ipperman was induced to become secretary and treas- 
urer, in the new Logansport Loan & Trust Company, just organized 
at that time, and he has remained in that office up to the present 
writing. 

. Mr. Wipperman has devoted himself assiduously to business and has 
given no attention to public affairs of an official nature and has never 
been an office holder. He was reared a Democrat, but broke away from 
the party in the famous money campaign of 1896, since which time he 
has voted for Republican candidates for president until 1912, when 
he was drawn into the Progressive party. In local affairs, his sup- 
port is given to the individual whom he regards as being best fitted to 
the office, it being his firm opinion that party prejudices have no place 
in local governments. 

On June 18, 1890, Mr. Wipperman was united in marriage with 
Clara M. Bazin, daughter of Josiah and Matilda Bazin, of Logansport, 
Indiana. Mr. Bazin was an old time and faithful employe of the Penn- 



908 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

sylvania Railroad until he was pensioned by that road, and eaine to 
Logansport from Grig-gsville, Illinois, in 1872. Two children have 
been born to Mr. and Mrs. Wipperinan : Frederic Bazin, born January 
6, 1892, and Walter Kendall, born January 21, 1898. The elder son 
is a graduate of Cornell University and Walter Kendall has recently 
completed the local high school course, both being yet pursuing their 
education in the higher bi-anches. 

Air. Wipperman is a member of the Apollo Lodge, Knights* of 
Pythias, since 1886, and of the Uniform Rank of the same order since 
1888. He was a member of Ebenezer Lutheran church in Clinton town- 
ship since he was fifteen years old until the year 1888, when he trans- 
ferred his membership to St. Luke's Lutheran church in Logansport, 
and he has held various official positions in the church and synod of this 
denomination in the years that he has been associated with it as a 
member. 

Joseph Ensminger Cbain was born in Montgomery county, Indiana, 
January 2, 1844, and is one of the five sons and three daughters born 
to James Harvey and Elizabeth (Ensminger) Crain, of which family 
three sons and two daughters are living today. 

James H. Grain was born at Lebanon, Ohio, on August 27, 1809, 
and when ten years of age moved with the family to Montgomery county, 
Indiana, and was there reared on the home farm. He received a com- 
mon school education, after which he learned the carpenter's trade, 
thereafter following that business for something like fifteen years after 
he became of age. His father, Elihu Grain, was a brick mason by trade, 
and he it was who built the first brick building in the city of Cincin- 
nati. James H. Crain with his wife and two children came to Cass 
county, Indiana, in 1845, and located on a farm in Washington town- 
ship, three miles south of Logansport. He followed farming during the 
remainder of his life and died on February 22, 1897. Although a man 
of but limited schooling, he was exceptionally well informed. He 
realized the importance of an education and lost no opportunity to sup- 
ply his early lack in that respect. By a course of self-imposed study 
and systematic reading, he acquired an excellent practical education 
and was known as one of the best informed men of his day in Cass 
county. In his religious views Mr. Crain was a Baptist, and was one 
of the charter members of the Second Baptist church in Logansport. 
His wife was bom at Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, February 28, 1822, 
and died on September 9, 1902. She was reared a Presbyterian and 
later in life embraced the Baptist faith. 

Joseph E. Grain has never considered any place but Cass county as 
his home. He was brought up on the old home farm in Washington 
township, educated in the district schools and under the tutelage of 
his father, who looked to the education of his children in the common 
school branches and industrial pursuits. His real start in life was 
probably at the time when he enlisted in the Civil war. Three times 
did he endeavor to enter the service before he was finally accepted, being 
once rejected for being under age, and once owing to rheumatic trou- 
bles from which he suffered. On January 28, 1865, he was enrolled as 
a member of Company F, One Hundred and Fifty-first Indiana Volun- 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 909 

teer Infantry, and was discharged on September 19, 1865. His military- 
activity consisted largely of doing guard and picket duty at Nashville 
and TuUahoma, Tennessee. He had the rank of corporal at the 
time of being mustered out of the service. For two years after the 
close of the war Mr. Grain was occupied in farming, and in the fall of 
1867 he moved to Logansport, where for seventeen years he was employed 
in carpentering. Since then he has devoted himself -exclusively to archi- 
tecture, the last ten years of his life as a carpenter being devoted 
to the especial study of that subject. He is regarded as one of the 
most capable architects in Logansport today, and among the build- 
ings which he has erected and designed are the ]\Iasonic Temple, the 
Market Street Methodist Episcopal church, the Elliott building, the 
Crawford building, the IMcCaffrey building, the Windfall M. E. church, 
the Frankfort Protestant Methodist church, the Kimmel M. E. church, 
and scores of other churches, private residences and commercial build- 
ings in and about Logansport. Two residence buildings designed by 
Mr. Crain are especially deserving of mention: these are the Himmel- 
burger residence and the residence of J. W. Rogers. 

Mr. Crain is a Progressive Republican in his politics, and he has 
taken an active part in the political life of the country and his city. 
In 1894 he was elected county commissioner, serving one term of three 
years, and in 1904 he was elected a member of the county council, 
serving three years in that body. He is a man who has ever performed 
his full share in the good works that have been carried on in his com- 
munity, both in a civic way and in his private capacity. He has long 
been a member of the JMarket Street Slethodist Episcopal church, — 
forty-three years having passed since he first became thus identified, 
and for thirty-five years he has been a member of the board of trustees 
of that church. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and is Past 
Worshipful Master of Tipton Lodge, No. 33, Ancient Free & Accepted 
Masons. He is also a member of, and past commander of Logansport 
Post, No. 14, G. A. R., and he is a member of the famous Logansport 
Grand Army Quartet, organized in 1878. In further reference to his 
musical prowess, it may be mentioned here that for thirty-two con- 
secutive years Mr. Crain was the leader of his church choir. 

On October 19, 1865, Mr. Crain was united in marriage with Miss 
Sarah Elnor Updegraff, of Washington township, Cass county, and seven 
children were born to them, of whom brief mention is here made as 
follows: Edna M., who married Edwin F. Martin, is a resident of this 
county ; Schuyler Colfax married Hattie Weymer, who is now deceased, 
and he is engaged in contracting in Portland, Oregon ; Barton Keep 
married Elizabeth Pherson, and is now engaged in the Round Oak 
stove business, and lives at Dowagiac, Michigan; Rodney James, who 
married Eva Cline, is a railroad engineer, and makes his home in 
Logansport; Harriet Ann is the wife of George Shank of Grand 
Rapids, Michigan; Charlotte Belle is in Portland, Oregon, and is 
engaged in keeping house for her brother, Schuyler Colfax; Horace 
Ensminger, who married Elsie Landerholm, is engaged in commercial 
pursuits in Portland, Oregon. 

Vol n— 13 



910 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

George A. Custer. Among- the men whose high attainments have 
brought prestige to the Cass county bar, none are more deserving of 
mention in a work of this kind than George A. Custer, of Logansport, 
whose well-disciplined intellect, admirable self-control, great ability and 
many years of industrious application to all branches of professional 
practice have rendered him a bright ornament to a bar which boasts 
of many men of great intellect and wide range of knowledge in the 
field of jurisprudence. Having taken a prominent part in a number 
of noted trials during the past fifteen years, both in private practice 
and as a city official, he has been always cautious, always honorable, 
always fair, and the infiuence of his example has had much to do with 
giving the Cass county bar its enviable reputation of being one of the 
most honorable in the state. Mr. Custer has the added distinction of 
being a native of Cass county, as liis birth occurred in Clay township, 
AugvTst 11, 1873, one of the two living children of a family of three born 
to George D. and Katlierine (]\lorehart) Custer. His father, a native of 
Fairfield, Ohio, came to Cass county, Indiana, about 1870, and began 
farming in Clay township. Here he was married and continued to 
reside until the opening of the Rosebud Reservation, in Gregory county, 
South Dakota, when he journeyed to that section and purchased a relin- 
quishment of a claim. Subsequently, he was followed by his daughter, 
who also bought a relinquishment, and they are now residing in Tripp 
county. Mr. Custer has always been prominent in Democratic politics 
wherever he has resided, but has not aspired to public office. His wife 
passed away in 1879. Her father, Adam ^lorehart, with his wife and 
family,, came to Cass county from Pennsylvania by ox-team at a very 
early period in the history of the county, and here spent the rest of his 
life in agricultural pursuits in Clay township. 

George A. Custer lived on the home farm until eight years of age, 
at which time he removed with his father to Marion, Indiana. There 
he continued a public school education that was begun in Clay town- 
ship, and this was concluded in Logansport. Subsequently, after read- 
ing law for one year in the office of Judge John C. Nelson, of this city, 
he became a student in the State University at Bloomiugton, and was 
graduated therefrom June 16, 1897. He at once came to Logansport and 
began practice with Charles E. Yarlott, under the firm style of Custer 
& Yarlott, and was later associated with W. C. Dunn, of Chicago, 
Illinois, under the firm style of Custer & Dunn, succeeding which he was 
in individual practice for a short time. In 1906 he was the Democratic 
nominee for the office of prosecuting attorney and in the election that 
followed was easily elected, leading his ticket with a majority of 536 
votes. In 1908 he again became his party's candidate, and this time 
was elected by the still further increased majority of 970 votes, the 
largest majority ever given a candidate in Cass county. During this 
latter term, Mr. Custer was appointed by Governor Marshall to prose- 
cute in the case of "State of Indiana ex. rel George A. Custer, prosecut- 
ing attorney, within and for the Twenty-ninth Judicial Circuit of the 
State of Indiana, vs. the Chesapeake & Ohio Railway Company of 
Indiana, et al. " This was a case where it was charged the defendants 
were making an attempt to unload about $40,000,000 watered stock 
upon the public, attracted widespread attention, was considered to be 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 911 

of great importance as setting precedents, and ended in a victory for 
the state as represented by Mr. Custer. At the time of his first election, 
Mr. Custer had formed a partnership with Michael L. Fansler, who 
became his deputy, and this continued four years, but since the expira- 
tion of JMr. Custer 's second term of office, he has been engaged in individ- 
ual practice. As a lawyer, conducting cases from the original con- 
sultation, through their preparations in his office and contlicts at the 
bar, to the final engrossment after the last decree of the last tribunal, 
Mr. Custer is systematic, patient, vigorous and powerful. He is an 
associate most valuable, an antagonist most worthy. On February 10, 
1911, while in Washington, D. C, on business, he took the examina- 
tion and was admitted to practice before the Department of the Inte- 
rior, of which the patent office is a branch. His registered number is 
9934, and he is the only lawyer in Cass county to be so registered. ]\Ir. 
Custer has also contributed special articles on legal subjects, which 
have been widely quoted, to legal journals all over the country, includ- 
ing such a well-known authority as Hawkins' Legal Counsellor and 
Form Book. Fraternally, he is connected with the IMasons and the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 

On November 12, 1903, Mr. Custer was married to Miss Julia Mc- 
Reynolds, of Kokomo, Indiana. 

Benjamin F. Long. To properly interpret the law in all its com- 
plexities and unerringly apply its provisions to establish human rights 
and defeat injustice, demands such a comprehensive knowledge not only 
of books but of life itself that he who reaches a high plane in this pro- 
fession must command more than negative consideration in the minds 
of his fellow men. It is told in both history and romance that a kind 
of law is upheld among savages, but when explained it resolves itself 
into the old axiom that "might makes right," and in modern, civilized 
life it becomes the task of the exponent of the law to overcome this only 
too prevalent idea. Hence, on a solid educational foundation, must be 
built up a thorough knowledge of what law means to the present day 
man and how it can be applied to circumvent evil, protect the helpless 
and bring happiness and safety to the deserving. Among the legal 
practitioners of the Cass county bar whose activities have brought them 
prominently before the public, none stands in higher esteem than 
Benjamin F. Long, of the firm of Long, Yarlott & Souder, of Logans- 
port. A native of Cass county, he has spent his entire life within its 
limits, and belongs to a family that has been well known here for more 
than three-quarters of a century. Mr. Long was born in Washington 
township, Cass county, Indiana, January 31, 1872, a son of AVilliam and 
Joanna (Penny) Long. His grandfather, William Long, Sr., was a 
native of Somerset county, Pennsylvania, from whence he moved to 
Indiana with his family in 1843 and located on the old home place in 
Washington township, where he spent the rest of his life in agricultural 
pursuits. He was widely known as IMajor Long, that title having been 
acquired while he was a member of the Pennsylvania State ]\Iilitia. 
William Long was the eldest child of IMajor Long, and, like his father, 
spent his life in farming. He died October 5, 1893, in the faith of the 



912 HISTOKY OF CASS COUNTY 

English Lutheran church, while his widow followed him to the grave 
Deeemher 12, 1902. 

Benjamin P. Long was reared on the home farm, and during his 
boyhood attended the district schools. In 1891 he graduated from the 
Logansport high school, and during the succeeding two winters taught 
the district school which he had attended as a lad, in the meantime 
assisting his father in the work of the farm during the summer months. 
In 1893 he entered the state university at Bloomington, but after two 
years was compelled to leave the university on account of lack of 
funds, as he had been paying his own way through college. With a 
commendable spirit of determination, he returned to Logansport and 
secured a position as teacher of history in the high school, there continu- 
ing from 1895 to 1899, and in the latter year reentered the state uni- 
versity, where he completed the prescribed course in literature and 
received the degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Laws. Return- 
ing again to Logansport, he entered upon the practice of his profession, 
and shortly thereafter was selected associate professor in the law depart- 
ment of the state university, a position which he continued to hold for 
one year. He then resigned his chair and came again to Logansport, 
where he has since continued in a lucrative practice. From 1903 to 
1906, I\Ir. Long served as deputy prosecutor, being a partner of the 
prosecuting attorney, George AV. Walters, under the fimi style of 
Walters & Long, from Jamiary 1, 1903, to January 1, 1908. Since 
the latter date" he has been a member of the firm of Long, Yarlott & 
Souder, and has been very successful in obtaining a representative 
clientele. He is recognized as one of the learned, thorough and reliable 
attorneys, and among his confreres is respected as a legist who respects 
and recognizes the unwritten ethics of the profession. In politics he 
is a Republican, but has taken no very active part in public matters. 
With his wife, he attends the English Lutheran church. 

Mr. Long was married September 10, 1902, to Miss Lucy Nichols, 
of Marshalltown, Iowa, and they have one son : Benjamin. 

Charles H. Stuart. Among the families of Cass county which can 
claim residence here of three-quarters of a century or more, that bear- 
ing the name of Stuart holds prominent place. In its ranks have been 
found eminent professional men, soldiers, merchants and financiers, lead- 
ers in public and civic life and prominent figures in social activities. 
One of the representatives of this name, who is well known to the legal 
profession of Cass county, is Charles H. Stuart, United States com- 
missioner at Logansport, and an attorney of deserved reputation. 

Hon. William Z. Stuart, the Cass county progenitor of the branch 
of the family to which Charles H. Stuart belongs, was an early attorney 
of Cass county, whither he came early in 1836. He was admitted to 
practice at Logansport, February 20, 1837, and soon attained rank 
among the legists of the state, many of whose names subsequently 
became widely renowned. Of necessity, his practice covered all branches 
in the early days, but during his later years he gained reputation 
as a railroad lawyer and for a long period was chief attorney for the 
Wabash Railway Company. Beginning in 1843, he served one year as 
state's attorney, and from 1853 to 1857 he was judge of the state supreme 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 913 

court. He married (first) Minerva Potter, who died, leaving three 
children: Venitia, Selden P. and Francis H. Later, Judge Stuart 
contracted a second marriage. 

Selden P. Stuart, son of Hon. William Z. Stuart, and father of 
Charles H. Stuart, was born September 16, 1842, at Logansport, Indiana, 
and at the outbreak of the great Civil war was a student in the prepara- 
tory school. On December 26, 1862, he enlisted in Company K, Ninety- 
ninth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, subsequently being promoted to first 
sergeant, and to second lieutenant of his company. May 1, 1865, and 
received his honorable discharge June 5, 1865. For the most part he 
was actively connected with all the movements of his company until 
the close of the war, the one exception being when he was detailed as 
acting aide-de-camp to General Oliver, brigade commander. He married 
Eloise Landes, and they became the parents of two children, one who 
died in infancy and Charles H. Mr. Stuart died in November, 1881, 
while his widow still survives him and is now the wife of Stewart T. 
McConnell, an attorney of Logansport. 

Charles H. Stuart was born in Logansport, Indiana, May 7, 1878, 
and here prosecuted his preliminary studies in public and private 
schools. Subsequently he became a student in the Culver Military Acad- 
emy, Culver, Indiana, and then entered Lawrenceville Academy, New 
Jersey, after graduation from which, in September, 1896, he started 
upon his collegiate course in Princeton University. He was graduated 
therefrom in 1900, with the degree of Bachelor of Arts, and returned to 
Logansport, where he was admitted to the bar in September of the same 
year. Shortly thereafter, however, he went to Chicago, Illinois, where 
he acted in the capacity of clerk in the First National Bank for two 
years, being connected with the legal department. During this time he 
also attended the legal department of Lake F<3rest University, and in 
1902 he returned to Logansport and entered upon the active practice 
of his profession. Mr. Stuart has succeeded in building up an excellent 
professional business of a representative character, and is recognized 
by his confreres as a legist who respects the unwritten ethics of the 
profession. Well versed in the principles of law and jurisprudence, 
he has been a constant and assiduous student, and the success that has 
come to him in his chosen field of endeavor has been an appreciation of 
his high abilities. During the past eight years, Mr. Stuart has served 
as United States commissioner at Logansport. In 1912 he cast his 
fortunes with the new Progressive party, and at that time became its 
candidate for the office of judge of the circuit court of Cass county. As 
a citizen he stands high in the esteem of his fellows, being known as a 
man of progressive spirit and one who is at all times ready to contribute 
of his time or means to any worthy cause promising the welfare of 
Logansport or its people. He has been interested in historical work, 
and at this time is secretary of the Cass County Historical Society. 

On June 17, 1903, Mr. Stuart was married to Miss Marie Watson 
Rogers, of Cass county. 

David C. Arthur was admitted to the bar in 1899 and he has been 
engaged in practice continuously since that time, his activities being 
conducted in Logansport, both as an independent practitioner and as a 



914 HISTOEY OF CASS COUNTY 

partner in the firm of Fickle & Arthur. Mr. Arthur was bom in Darke 
county, Ohio, on February 25, 1862, and is one of the family of ten 
children born to his parents, Abner and Mary (Bowman) Arthur, of 
which number eight are yet living. 

Abner Arthur was a farmer by occupation, and in 1867 he removed 
to Randolph county, Indiana, where he and his good wife yet live. 
David C. Arthur was reared in Randolph county, and received his 
elementary education in the district schools of the home community. 
For a time he attended the National Normal University at Lebanon, 
Ohio, also attending the state university at Bloomington, Indiana, for 
two terms. This schooling was secured through the strictest economy 
and the most strenuous effort, for the young man found it necessary 
to earn his own wa}^ He worked on the farm, taught school, made 
brick and tile, did janitor work, in fact, did anything he might find at 
which he found it possible to turn an honest penny in his efforts to 
secure an education. After he left Bloomington, he engaged in teach- 
ing, and it was while thus engaged that he came to Logansport in 1894 
as principal of the high school. He was thus employed for five years 
in this city, and while here he took up the study of the law in the offices 
of Kistler & Kistler. In 1899 he was admitted to the bar and at OTice 
began the practice of his profession in Logansport. He continued in 
independent practice for a time, then entered into a partnership with 
John M. Asliby, which association endured for two years. Since 1909 
he has been the partner of Hon. D. D. Fickle, doing business under the 
firm name of Fickle & Arthur. 

Mr. Arthur is a Democrat in his politics. In 1910 he was elected 
a member of the city school board, of which he is secretary, and his early 
educational work has especially qualified him for the duties of that 
position. Mr. Arthur has been identified with many of the secret, 
benevolent and fraternal organizations of the city, and is popular and 
prominent in whatever circles he is found. He is a member of the 
Presbyterian church, in which he has for many years been an elder, 
and his wife also holds membership in that cluirch. 

On Christmas day, in 1894, Mr. Arthur was united in marriage with 
Miss Ellen Jameson, of Lebanon, Ohio, and they are the parents of two 
children, Mary and Robert. 

Sylvester S. Cragun. Of the many valuable farms found in Cass 
county, one of the most valuable is that known as Hill Top farm, which 
is devoted to stock raising and is located on the Hill Top road. Here its 
owner, Sylvester S. Cragun, is breeding a superior line of Percheron 
horses and other valuable stock, and his activities have made him well 
known among the successful men of his community. ]\Ir. Cragun belongs 
to an old and honorable family, and was born in Clinton township, Cass 
county, May 20, 1852, a son of Zachariah and Elizabeth N. (Shideler) 
Cragun. The family was founded in America by Patrick Cragun, who 
came from Dublin, Ireland, prior to the Revolutionary war, and took 
part in the struggles of tlie American colonists that resulted in the 
winning of independence. Patrick Cragun was the father of several 
children, among them Joshua Cragun, the grandfather of Sylvester S. 

Zachariah Cragun was born in 1824, in Clinton county, Indiana, on 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 915 

his father's farm, and was nineteen years of age when he came to Cass 
county. He had been reared to agricultural pursuits, working on the 
farm during all of his school period, and until he was married, was 
employed as a farm hand. Sulisequently he became the owner of a 
tract of his own, and the remainder of his life was passed in tilling the 
soil. His wife was born near Eaton, Preble county, Ohio, and was a 
small girl when she came to Cass county with her parents, who became 
prominent farming people of Clinton township. 

Sylvester S. Cragun was born in a little log cabin on the old 
Cragun homestead, as were his two sisters, Dora, who became the wife 
of Andrew Y. Shanklin, and Ellen, who is now deceased. He was 
educated in the common schools of his day, and was an able assistant 
to his father in the clearing of the home place, on which he remained 
until reaching his twenty-fourth year. At that time he left the parental 
roof and embarked upon enterprises of his own, eventually accumulating 
enough capital to purchase his present tract, Hill Top farm, a property 
of eighty acres, which he has brought to a high state of cultivation. 
He feeds his farm products to his stock, and has been unquestionably 
successful in his breeding operations. He is recognized as an excellent 
judge of livestock, and his advice is often sought by the stockmen of 
his community. In business affairs he has ever proved reliable and 
trustworthy, and his reputation is that of a man of integrity in busi- 
ness matters and public-spirit in affairs affecting his township. With 
the birth of the so-called Bull ]\Ioose party, in 1912, he was one of the 
first men in the United States to be nominated as a candidate on that 
ticket, making a veiy creditalile campaign for the office of commissioner 
of Cass county. He is a member of the Anoka Lodge, Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, No. 630, and Logansport Lodge, Free and Accepted 
Masons Tipton Lodge at. Logansport. 

On ]\Iarch 29, 1877, JMr. Cragun was married to ]\Iiss Candace S. 
Marshall, daughter of John and ^Margaret (Kendall) Marshall, the 
former of whom was born in Kentucky in 1804 and came to Carroll 
county, Indiana, in 1834. ^Ir. and Mrs. Marshall had eleven children, 
of whom five are still living: George K., Susana, Sarah, Candace S., 
and James J. Mr. and ]Mrs. Cragun have had foiir children : Harry 31. 
and Ruth, who are both deceased ; Homer J., who finished the public 
schools and spent two years in high school, married Angeline Long, and 
is engaged in farming; and 31iss iMargaret, a graduate of the Cass 
county schools, class of 1909, also spent two years in the Logansport 
high school and then attended commercial college. 

IMrs. Cragun was born in Carroll county, Indiana, October 23, 1856, 
the youngest in her father's family. She received a good common 
school education and in her life's work she has ably performed her part 
as wife and mother in the building up of their beautiful home and 
rearing her children. She is an honored member of the Jewel Rebecca 
Lodge of the city of Logansport. 3Ir. and ]Mrs. Cragun and children 
are eligible to become members of the Sons and Daughters of the 
Revolution. Their homestead, ' ' Ingleside, " is a beautiful estate, located 
live miles from the city of Logansport, Indiana. 



916 HISTORY OF CASS COUJ^TY 

James D. McNitt. A name that has become widely known in 
business and financial circles of Logansport during the past decade is 
that of James D. McNitt, president of the Logansport Loan and Trust 
Company, and a citizen who has shown himself possessed of all the 
essential qualities of a useful and successful business man. Quick to 
perceive, ready to act, he meets minor business questions with great 
ease, while, careful to act rightly, larger matters are the subject of full 
consideration. His operations in the feeding, buying and shipping of 
stock have been extensive, and in every line of business activity he is 
known as one whose commercial ideals are of the strictest nature. Mr. 
McNitt has been a resident of Indiana since he was six months of age, 
coming here from Juniata county, Pennsylvania, where he was bom 
July 3, 1845. His parents, James G. and Jane (Naginey) McNitt, were 
also bom in this country, but were of Scotch ancestry. James Gr. 
McNitt, his father, came to Cass county, Indiana, by wagon in 1845, 
the trip consuming six weeks, and located on Crooked creek, in Jeffer- 
son township, where he was engaged in farming until his death in 1847. 
His widow survived him nine years, her death being brought about by 
fighting a prairie fire. Thus the six children were left to shift for 
themselves, and all are now deceased with the exception of James D. 

James D. McNitt was the youngest of his parents' children,' and 
his boyhood was divided between attendance at the district school and 
work on the farm. Later he took a course of one term in the Old 
Seminary, at Logansport, and thus equipped, taught district school. 
After three terms, however, he decided his abilities could be directed 
to better advantage in a different field of endeavor, and accordingly he 
turned his attention to farming and stock raising. About the year 
1873, Mr. McNitt ceased active agricultural pursuits and came to 
Logansport, where he embarked in the wholesale and retail grocery 
business with a partner, under the firm style of Uhl & McNitt, a connec- 
tion that continued profitably for eleven years, the buying of wool 
being an important factor in the conduct of the business. However, 
the constant confinement and excessive labor connected with his duties, 
told heavily upon Mr. IMcNitt's strength, his health began to fail, and 
he was finally compelled to sell his mercantile interests. He again took 
up stock buying, feeding and shipping, and to this he has given the 
greater part of his attention ever since, with marked success. In 
1902, Mr. McNitt assisted in the founding of the Logansport Loan and 
Trust Company, and on the completion of the organization, he was 
elected its president, a position in which he has served to the present 
time. Honorable and honest in his affairs, courteous and easily 
approached, considerate and broad in his judgment of general busi- 
ness conditions and tendencies, and a most certain and intuitive judge 
of the character of men, Mr. McNitt deserves and receives the full 
esteem and regard of his associates, and is justly judged one of the 
community's foremost men of business. 

In December, 1872, ]\Ir. McNitt was married to Miss IMary Ellen 
Tlhl, daughter of Joseph lUil, and seven children were born to this 
union: Caroline N., Mary Ethel, deceased, S. Miriam, Robert J., 
Willard C, Helen U. and Esther U. Mr. and Mrs. McNitt have given 
their children excellent educational advantages, sending them to the 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 917 

best colleges and universities in the country and fitting them for what- 
ever positions in life they may he called upon to fill. He was president 
of the city schools of Logansport nine years. The family are consistent 
members of the Broadway Presbyterian church, Logansport. ]\Ir. Mc- 
Nitt is a Democrat in politics, but has never aspired to public office, 
preferring to give his entire time and attention to his business affairs. 
He is always ready, however, to support movements for the welfare of 
Logansport or its people, and to co-operate in advancing education, 
morality and good citizenship. 

George Washington Bishop. A career of more than half a century 
of time, during which he has risen from obscurity and a humble position 
in life, to an acknowledged position among the foremost business citi- 
zens of his community, proves the right of George Washington Bishop 
to the title of representative man of Walton. In this long period he 
has been identified with various interests, commercial, industrial, agri- 
cultural and financial, in all of which he has left the impress of his 
remarkable business capacity, his great quickness of perception and 
his wonderfully systematic mind. Although now retired from business 
activities, having reached an age when he feels himself entitled to a 
rest from the worries and struggles of former years, he still exerts a 
distinct influence in the life of the city, with whose history his own has 
been almost commensurate. Mr. Bishop was born September 18, 1836, 
at Tiffin, Ohio, and is a son of David and Eliza (Douden) Bishop. 
His father, a native of Pennsylvania, went to Kentucky in young man- 
hood, and later made his home for some time at Cincinnati, with Gov. 
R. M. Bishop's father who is a second cousin of George W. Bishop, 
succeeding which he moved to Tiffin, Ohio, and there passed away at 
a ripe old age. He and his wife were the parents of twelve children, 
all of whom reached years of maturity : Mrs. Ellen Huffman, John T., 
Mrs. Mary Lightner-Darling, Mrs. Julia Betts, Eliza, W. H., Alvira 
Booker, Mrs. Lovina Flynn, Catherine Shafer and Ida Baumgardner, 
all of whom are deceased; George Washington and Laura Penrose. 

George W. Bishop remained under the parental roof until he was 
fourteen years of age, working with his father, who was a carpenter, 
and learning the trades of carpenter and bricklayer. In 1852 he first 
came to Walton, Indiana, walking about two hundred miles to Lewis- 
burg, as the railroads had not reached this point and the canal was 
frozen over. He then returned to Tiffin, but in October, 1854, again 
came to Walton and for a time worked at his trades. Soon, however, 
he recognized the opportunity for entering the mercantile field, and, 
returning to Tiffin, Ohio, invested his modest capital in a little stock of 
general merchandise, which he brought back to AValton. The business 
thus started became one of the large enterprises of the town, Mr. Bishop 's 
intelligent management, tireless industry and sound business sense serv- 
ing to constantly widen its scope and extend the range of its operations. 
For twenty years he was also engaged in the manufacture of excelsior, 
and then turned the store over to his sons. His next venture was the 
buying of the Bank of Walton, which he sold four years later and retired 
from active life. Mr. Bishop is the owner of three handsome farms, 
one being the Bishop home place, on the Walton and Bunker Hill road, 



918 HISTORY OP CASS COUNTY 

a tr^et of sixty-five acres north of Walton, a part of which is in the 
city limits; another is the old Harrison McVeecly farm on the township 
line road, a tract of 160 acres about two and one-half miles northwest 
of Walton; and the third tract, of 117 acres is located in Jackson town- 
ship, about two miles southeast of AValton. 

Mr. Bishop was married April 25, 1860, to Miss Sarah Corbley, 
and they became the parents of five children: Ida and Alonzo, 
who are deceased ; Myrtle, the wife of Aaron ]\IcKee, who has two chil- 
dren, — Harold and Keith ; Claude, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere 
in this volume; and George Walter. Mr. Bishop was married again, 
April 2, 1891, to Mrs. Vora (Watson) Sumption, widow of David Ward 
Sumption, a full review of whose career will be found on another page 
of this work, and to this union there has been born one son: Richard 
Edgar, a graduate of Walton High school, who spent two years in Wabash 
University and is now at Purdue University. Mr. and I\Irs. Bishop 
attend the Lutheran church, and have interested themselves in its work. 
He is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and she was 
a Rebekah. The high rewards that are attainable in fortune, character 
and infiuence through a life of industry and probity, guided and regu- 
lated by a sense of Christian obligation, are illustrated in ^h\ Bishop's 
career. With no extraordinary endowment of faculty, unaided by 
inheritance or friendly support, he was content to enter into the life 
which a rising community offered in a humble station, and to follow 
up the opportunities that opened before him with steadiness and indus- 
try, gaining, step by step, the rare fruits of well directed enterprise. 
Today he finds himself in the possession of a handsome competency and 
the friendship of his fellow men. and the head of a family which refieets 
credit upon the wise and guiding hand that has trained its harmonious 
members to lives of usefulness and honor. 

David Ward Sumption. Although a resident of Walton for only 
a comparatively short period, the late David Ward Sumption will 
be remembered by many of the older citizens here because of his con- 
nection with the manufacturing interests of the city, as well as 
one of the pioneer "Knights of the Key" whose occupation called them 
to various parts of the state. Mr. Sumption was born in 1857, at St. 
Joe, Indiana, and was a son of Robert and Barilla (Ward) Sumption, 
the former of whom was for a number of years an inn-keeper and hard- 
ware merchant at Ridgeville, Randolph county, Indiana. There were 
four children in the family : ]\Irs. Josephine Tyrrel, who now resides 
at Santiago, California ; Albert, who is traveling auditor for the Union 
Pacific railroad, with headquarters at Carney, Nebraska ; David Ward ; 
and William, who is deceased. 

David Ward Sumption was educated in the common schools of Jay 
county, Indiana, and learned the trade of telegrapher at Union C'ity, 
subsequently becoming railroad agent at Ridgeville. Later he spent 
a short time at Elwood, after which he returned to Ridgeville, where 
for a few years he was engaged in the hardware business, but again took 
up his vocation as a telegraph operator, and as such came to Walton 
in 1873, here continuing as agent for five years. He then turned his 
attention to the manufacturing business, which he followed until his 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 919 

removal to ^ladison, Nebraska, and his death occurred in ]\Iadison 
county, Nebraska, April 15, 1881. After his death, his widow took up 
his work, tmt gave up that occupation to engage in school teaching, an 
occupation which she followed until her second marriage, to George 
W. Bishop, of Walton. 

Mr. Sumption was married to Miss Vora Watson, October 27, 1870, 
and they became the parents of three children, as follows: G-ertrude, 
a graduate of the State Normal school, at Terre Haute, and for some 
time a school teacher, married Sanford Bell, and had three children, — 
Portia, Geneva and Josephine, and the family home is now located at 
Denver, Colorado; Homer, now residing in San Diego, California, who 
married Amelia Walters, of Sheridan, Wyoming, and has one child, — 
Vora; and Josephine, director of music in the Denver (Colo.) College, 
and organist in Trinity Llethodist Episcopal church, who married F. 
M. White, of Noblesville, Indiana. J^I^. Sumption was a member of the 
Universalist church, and was a man of integrity and probity of char- 
acter. He was always interested in fraternal work, and was popular 
with the members of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the 
Knights of Honor. Those who knew him will remember him as a man 
who was always ready to assist others, who never knowingly made an 
enemy, and who never lost a friend except through death. 

Joseph T. McNary has been actively identitied with the growth and 
development of Cass county for more than a quarter of a century. 
Born in Harrison county, Ohio, Seistember 26, 1850, he is a son of 
James and Harriett (Thompson) ]\IcNary, both of whom were natives 
of Washington county, Pennsylvania. His scholastic training was ob- 
tained in the schools of Bloomfield, Ohio, and Union College, from 
which latter institution he received his diploma in 1864. He tirst came 
to Cass county, Indiana, in 1865, but the ensuing two years he passed 
in Tipton county, teaching school and studying law, upon which he had 
settled for his professional career. 

In 1868 Mv. McNary continued his legal studies under 0. P. Blake 
of Peru, Indiana, and in coiniection with legal pursuits, was engaged 
in handling real estate at Peru until 1870. Since the latter date he has 
resided in Logansport. It would seem that real estate dealings are 
especially to his liking, for he has never ceased to be more or less 
engaged in transactions along that line, and for the past ten years prac- 
tically his entire attention has been devoted to the real estate and loan 
business. For a number of years John R. IMcNary, his brother, was 
associated with him. 

Actively identified with the Republican party since early manhood, 
Mr. McNary was firet elected to the city council of Logansport in 1881, 
and by continued reelection, served some sixteen years in that office, 
during which time some of the most important laws on the city govern- 
ment were enacted. It was also during this time, and largely through 
the instrumentality of j\Ir. IMcNary that the first traction line of the 
city was built and since that time, he has been closely identified with 
the construction of all the other lines. The purchase of Spencer Park 
by the Street Railway was another important measure in which Mr. 
McNary bore a conspicuous and worthy part. The deal was engin- 



920 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

eered entirely by Mr. McNary, and the gift to the city by the Street 
Eailway Company of eighteen acres was through his influence. It 
was dedicated and named McNary Park and afterwards called Spencer 
Park. He was closely identified also with the locating of Riverside 
Park. He assisted in the reorganization of the State National Bank 
after its failui'e and for many years has been a part of almost all impor- 
tant public events in Logansport. The Northern Indiana Hospital for 
the Insane became a Logansport institution largely by reason of his 
personal efforts, and many another movement has felt his influence in 
a direction that would be of the greatest possible benefit to his home 
city. 

Mr. McNary has achieved success in life wholly through his own 
efforts. He came to Logansport with scarcely a dollar to his name, but 
success in his case came only after years of tireless energy and industry. 
Of late years he has devoted a considerable time to travel, and there 
is not a state, territory or important or interesting city in the Union 
that he has not visited. He has made one trip abroad, and is planning 
to continue his travels as opportunity affords. 

Mr. McNary was united in marriage on October 7, 1875, to Miss 
Belle Thompson, of Wabash county, Indiana, and their beautiful home 
in Logansport is a most ideally happy one. 

Otto Fike. The citizens of Walton, Indiana, need no introduction 
to Otto Fike, the popular general blacksmith, who has built up a thriv- 
ing business through excellent workmanship, general reliability and 
courteous treatment of customers. His career from boyhood has been 
one of steady industry and persistent endeavor, and is worthy of emula- 
tion by the aspiring youths of today, teaching an example of upright 
living and well-directed effort. ]\Ir. Fike is worthy in every waj^ of the 
respect in which he is held, and among his many acquaintances he can 
count many friends. 

Otto Fike is a native son of Indiana, having been born in IMiami 
county, August 26, 1883, and is a son of David and Lavina (Dickson) 
Fike. His father was born near Mexico, Indiana, from whence he went 
to Bunker Hill, Indiana, and there carried on his business of black- 
smith and general mechanic. He and his wife were the parents of two 
children : Edward, who is an automobile trimmer ; and Otto. The early 
education of Otto Fike was secured in the district schools of Miami 
county, but later, when his parents moved to Logansport, he went to 
the public schools, there finishing his training. He was a resident of 
Logansport for eighteen years, and there, in Joseph Emy's shop he 
began to learn the trade of blacksmith. When he had thoroughly mas- 
tered all the details of this vocation, he came to Walton, where he has 
since continued to carry on a profitable business. Mr. Fike is alert and 
shrewd in business dealings, but his career has been free from trans- 
actions otherwise than those of a legitimate character. He is an excel- 
lent mechanic, and his trade is attracted from a wide contiguous terri- 
tory. Public life has held out no inducements to him. He has been 
too busy making a place for himself among the business men of Walton 
to think of political preferment. His home and his business have always 
been of the greatest value to him. However, he has not been unmindful 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 921 

of the duties of citizenship, as is demonstrated on every occasion when 
movements for the welfare of the community are promoted, for in him 
they tind an intelligent, energetic and reliable supporter. 

In March 7, 1906, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Fike with 
Mrs. Sarah (Brooher) Laird, who had two children by a former mar- 
riage: Juanita and Violet. Mr. and Mrs. Fike have had one son: 
David Edward. The family belongs to the Lutheran church, and is 
liberal in its support of religion and charity. Both J\Ir. and Mrs. Fike 
have a wide acquaintance and their friends are legion. 

Edw^ard F. Small. A complete account of the little business and 
agricultural community at Walton and vicinity could not be comprised, 
with reference to the affairs and activities of the last half century, 
without mention of the firm known as Small Brothers, comprising W. 
L., Ed. F., and Otho A. Small, three brothers who for many years have 
been influential factors in the business enterprise of this part of Cass 
county. 

Mr. Edward F. Small, the second of these enterprising brothers, was 
born on the old Small homestead in Washington township, Cass county, 
on the twenty-third of March, 1867, his parents, Andrew Jackson and 
Mary (Ijams) Small. One in a family of seven children Edward F. 
Small obtained his education in the common schools, and a principal 
part of his early training consisted in the work and experiences of the 
home farm. It was after attaining to manhood and some independent 
venturing of his own that he founded the association with his two broth- 
ers for engaging in the grain business. The firm of Small Brothers, 
starting from this point in business affairs, enlarged the scope of their 
operations, and through their individual application to business, they 
extended and built up a business which is one of the largest and most 
successful of the kind in Cass county. It has had a substantial and 
steady growth, always being expanded on the solid basis of capital and 
prospect of assured returns. 

Mr. Edward F. Small was married November 18, 1903 to Miss 
Flora E. Flanagan, a daughter of Charles and Jennie (Waite) Flana- 
gan. Mr. and INIrs. Small are the parents of two children, named Inez 
and Herbert. Fraternally he is affiliated with the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, No. 314 at Walton, and also the Masons Lodge, No. 
423 and he and his family are members of the Christian church. 

Washington L. Small. Among the really useful men of a commun- 
ity are found those in whom their fellow citizens can rely in affairs of 
public importance ; to whom they can come for assistance in seasons of 
financial distress; men who have won this confidence by the wisdom of 
their own investments and by the honorable lives they have led on every 
field of effort and as neighbors and friends. Very often, in prosperous 
towns, these men are retired farmers, frequently they are bankers. Such 
a man is W. L. Small, president of the Cass County State Bank, of Wal- 
ton, an energetic business man, well qualified to conduct the affairs of 
of a financial institution, whose material success has been alike benefi- 
cial to himself and to the place in which he has labored. Mr. Small 
was bom on a farm in Washington township, about nine miles from 



922 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

Logansport, Indiana, September 20, 1847, and is a son of Andrew Jack- 
son and Mary (Ijams) Small. The eldest of his parents' seven children, 
his education was secured in common schools, which he attended when 
he could spare the time from the duties of the home farm. He was 
thrifty anil industrious as a youth, carefully saving his earnings with 
the idea ever in view of embarking upon a career of his own, and 
eventually, with his two bi-others, Ed. F. and Otho A. Small, entered 
the grain business. Instead of hiring their work done by others, the 
three brothers performed their own labor, each striving earnestly for 
the success of their enterprise. This method soon began to show results, 
and as time went on and their capital permitted they added to their 
holdings and equipment, and were successful in building up one of the 
important industries of this section. During this time W. L. Small 
had continued to be engaged in farming, and at this writing is the 
owner of an excellent tract of 170 acres, with modern buildings and 
valuable improvements. In 1911, Air. Small became a stockholder in 
the Cass County State Bank, and soon thereafter he was elected to the 
presidency of this institution. That his choice displayed good judg- 
ment on the part of the directors is shown by the fact that since he has 
been shaping the policies of the institution the business has developed 
an increase of tifty per cent. His personality had much to do with 
instilling confidence in the depositors, while among his associates he 
is recognized as a shrewd, careful and farsighted citizen, and a man 
of the strictest integrity and probity of character. 

]Mr. Small w'as married to Mary E. Spohn, January 6, 1881, and to this 
union there has been born four children, namely : Frank, who is single 
and engaged in managing his father's farm; Emmet, who married 
Blanch Vernon, daughter of James Vernon, and has two children, — Zelma 
and John ; Claude ; and Nora, who married Peter Erny. The family is 
connected with the Christian church. Mr. Small is not a politician, nor 
has he sought political preferment, but he is at all times ready and 
anxious to do his full duty as a citizen, and no movement of importance 
is considered complete until his name is enlisted in the ranks. Like 
other successful business men here, he takes a pride in the aecomplisli- 
ments of his city, in that he has assisted in making these accomialishments 
possible. 

Otho A. Small. The average Cass county farmer, of an industrious 
and energetic nature, is generally loath to retire from the work in which 
he has spent the best years of his life and acquired a competence, but 
when he does turn over his interests to other hands and moves to the 
near-by town or village, he becomes one of his new community's good 
citizens, investing his capital in its industries and adding his support 
to its progressive movements, thus being a welcome addition to the 
section's population. Among the retired farmers now living in Walton, 
is Otho A. Small, who is probably better known as "Bert" Small, and 
who for years was engaged in carrying on agricultural operations in 
this vicinity. Mr. Small has resided in Cass county all of his life, having 
been born on the old Small homestead place in Washington township, 
June 5, 1869, and is a son of Andrew Jackson and Mary (I.jams) Small. 

Mr. Small comes of an agricultural family, and in his youth he was 




MR. AND :\IRS. J. CHARLES THOMAS AND FAMILY 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 923 

trained to agricultural work and to habits of industry, sobriety and 
honorable living. As a youth he secured such advantages as were to 
be obtained in the district schools of his community, and he continued 
to assist his father in conducting the home place until he was nineteen 
years of age. At the age oi nineteen years he and his brother, Edward 
F. Small, rented small pieces of lancl, on which they managed to get 
a start in life, after they had refused to be disheartened by a number 
of hard knocks. Working industriously on their own property and in 
the meantime assisting their father in cultivating his land, the boys 
secured a little capital, and eventxially realized their ambition of enter- 
ing the grain business, in coiniection with which they bought and sold 
stock. Later, the three brothers, Edward F., Otho A. and W. L., built 
an elevator at Walton, and this was developed into one of the leading 
business enterprises of the place. ' ' Bert ' ' Small is known as a business 
man who has ever borne a high reputation beca^^se of honorable trans- 
actions. He alwaj's devoted himself strictly to legitimate lines, and 
the business which he assisted in developing will stand as a monument 
to his ability. He is now living in quiet retirement, in the enjoyment 
of the fruits of his early labors. It is not to be supposed, however, that 
he has dropped entirely out of the life of the community, for he still 
interests himself in its movements, and, as spectator, takes a keen and 
intelligent interest in the battles of the political arena. He belongs to 
the Odd Fellows, in which he has a number of warm friends, and is a 
deacon and trustee of the Christian church. 

On February 3, 1897, Mr. Small was united in marriage to J\Iiss 
Carrie Jane Pierson, daughter of JIatthew and Mary Jeanette Pierson, 
and they have had one son : Orel R., fourteen years of age, a bright, 
intelligent lad, who is attending the Walton public schools and will 
enter the Walton high school. In 1908 Mr. and Mrs. Small erected 
their pretty modern residence in Walton, Indiana. 

J. Charles Thomas. "When agriculture flourishes," observes 
Xenophon, the Greek historian and philosopher, "all other pursuits are 
in full vigor; but when the ground is forced to lie ])arren, other occupa- 
tions are almost stopped." This statement is as true in these modern 
times as when it was written many centuries ago. To the farm each 
country must look for its sustenance, and it is therefore of such vital 
importance that those in whose charge have been placed the agricultural 
interests of any community must be men of ability in their vocation, able 
to produce their full share of the necessities without which other in- 
dustries are sorely handicapped. Among the agriculturists who have 
raised the agricultural imi^ortance of Cass county to such a high stand- 
ard as that it now enjoys, is found J. Charles Thomas, of Clay town- 
ship, who was born May 23, 1857, a son of William and Porter and 
Margaret (Stafford) Thomas. 

William Porter Thomas was the son of Giles Wheeler Thomas, who 
was born near Baltimore, Maryland, on October 31, 1794, five years 
prior to the death of General Washington. He learned the trade of a 
tanner in Blacksburg, Virginia, under the instruction of Harmon 
Sifford, and migrated to what was then known as Champaign county, 
Ohio, now called Clark county, and there he wedded Agnes Black, a 



924 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

daughter of William Black. She was bom on April 28, 1798, and died 
on October 4, 1851. In later years Giles Thomas married a second time, 
Mrs. Julia (Stafford) Funston, connected by marriage with the famous 
Funston family of which Gen. Frederick Funston, of the United States 
Regular Army and of Philippine war fame, is a member, becoming his 
wife. She was born on September 10, 1804, and died in September, 
1881. Giles Thomas died on Januaiy 6, 1870. His son, "William Porter 
Thomas, the fatlier of J. Charles Thomas of this brief review, married 
Miss ^Margaret Stafford, a daughter of Ralph (native of Ireland) and 
Catherine (Saylor) Stafford, and to them were born a goodly family of 
ten children, seven growing to manhood and womanhood, and six are 
living at this time. They are named as follows : Giles Stafford and 
George Wheeler, twins, of whom Giles S., who is a resident of Geneva, 
Nebraska, was married to Sadie Wheeler and is a retired agriculturist and 
was a soldier in the Civil war. 

George W., who lives in Peru, Indiana, married Grizzle Black, and. 
is a retired farmer. He was also a soldier in the Civil war. The 
brothers were members of Company K, Ninety-ninth Regiment, 
Indiana Volunteers. Martha Virginia married Uriah W. Oblinger and 
both died in Nebraska. Uriah W. Oblinger was a soldier in the Civil 
war, a member of Fifty-seventh Regiment, Indiana Volunteers. Ellen 
Annette is the wife of D. S. Bailey of Minneapolis, Minn., a contractor 
and builder. Samuel Greene, a farmer of Middletown, Indiana, mar- 
ried Sarah Pawabaker. William Rowen, a farmer of Tipton township, 
married Lorretta Miller and J. Charles Thomas of this review. 

J. Charles Thomas received his education in the district schools of 
Tipton township, and there was reared to agricultural pursuits, remain- 
ing on the home farm and assisting his father with the home duties until 
his marriage, when he left the parental roof and engaged in farming on 
his own responsibility. He is now the owner of a fine tract of sixty-eight 
acres of well cultivated land, on which he has brought about numerous 
improvements, including the erection of a number of substantial build- 
ings. He has devoted his life to the business of general farming and 
the success he has attained has been the result of his own industry, 
perseverance and faithful labor. Mr. Thomas was for many years a 
supporter of the principles and doctrines of Republicanism, but of re- 
cent years has transferred his allegiance to the Prohibition party. He 
has interested himself in fraternal work, and is a member of the Wood- 
men of the World, and of Tipton lodge. Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons. Mr. Thomas and his family are members of the Methodist 
church. 

On January 17, 1886, Mr. Thomas married Miss Jeannette Beal, 
daughter of John D. and Catherine (Long) Beal, the latter a daughter 
of William Long. Mr. Beal came to the United States from France 
about the year 1830, at that time the family name being rendered 
D'Beel, since then the present form coming into popular usage. 
His wife came from Pennsylvania in 1840 and their marriage occurred 
in Cass county, Indiana, in 1859. They settled in Washington town- 
ship, where Mr. Beal was engaged in the business of farming until his 
retirement from active farm life, since when they have been living at 
No. 25 Market street, in Logansport, Indiana, where their golden wed- 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 925 

ding anniversary was celebrated in 1909. Mr. and Mrs. John D. Beal 
had eight children, as follows : Joseph A., who married IMollie Thorn- 
ton ; John Henry, who married Libbie Herr ; Jeannette, Mrs. Thomas ; 
William V., who married Effie Carney ; James Adrian, who married 
Julia Grover; and three others, who are deceased. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Charles Thomas are the parents of four daughters, 
namely: IMabel Annette, the wife of Everett Hubler, to whom one 
daughter has been born — Vere Catherine by name. Mrs. Hubler was 
graduated from the public schools of her native community and was a 
student in the IMarion normal, after which she was engaged as a teacher 
in Cass county. Her husband is one of the more successful farming 
men of Allen county, Indiana. Ethel Ursula was educated in the public 
schools and she has since specialized in instrumental music, in which she 
is quite successful. Eulalia Marie is also proficient in musical ability ; 
and Margaret Catherine, the youngest of the four, is yet a student in 
the public schools, and will graduate with the class of 1914. 

i\Ir. and Mrs. Thomas have given to their daughters the advantage 
of the best education available, and their school instruction has been 
amply supplemented by the most admirable home and church training 
— a phase of education which is all too often neglected in American 
homes, but which is the basis of all genuine training and the founda- 
tion of the happiest homes. With the exception of the eldest, the 
daughters are at home with their parents. 

j\Ir. Thomas and his estimable wife, who has long been his able 
counselor in all the affairs of life, are citizens who are held in high re- 
gard by all who know them. Tlieir cozy homestead known as "Rose 
Lawn," is one where genuine hospitality abounds. 

Both parents come of families that gave worthy service to the flags 
of their respective countries, and it is of such blood that the best 
citizenship must inevitably spring. The paternal grandfather of ]\Irs. 
Thomas, John D. D'Beal, was a native of Prance and a soldier under 
Napoleon Bonaparte, with whom he was serving at the time of the 
famous retreat from Moscow, while the maternal grandfather of Mr. 
Thomas was a soldier in the Revolutionary war, through which connec- 
tion members of the family today are eligible to membership in the 
society of the Sons and Daughters of the American Revolution, a dis- 
tinction dear to the hearts of all patriotic Americans today, and one 
which is a true patent of American nobility. 

Henry Franklin Small. There has been no period in recorded 
history when the earing for the dead has not been a feature of even 
savage life, and the ceremonies have been of a character that has been 
marked by the measure of civilization. Study habits and customs of 
every nation and it will be found that a reverence has been paid to the 
dead, oftentimes such as was not given to the living, and even the most 
brutal savage tribes in the deepest wilderness, even those who still 
make human sacrifices as a part of religious rites, can point to their 
stone crypts, their burning temples, their funeral barks or their tree- 
top burials. There never has been, however, a time when the proper, 
dignified, sanitary conduct of funeral obsequies and disposal of the 
remains of those whose life work has ended has been so complete as 



926 HISTORY OP CASS COUNTY 

• 
at present. Funeral directors and undertakers of tlie present day in 
America are no longer mere mechanics but, on the other hand, are care- 
fully trained in this profession and often are graduates of more than 
one college. ^Methods of body preservation which formerly were consid- 
ered lost arts are well known now and have been vastly improved upon. 
Henry Franklin Small, whose tact, dignity and kindly sympathy have 
made him a comforting figure in tbe homes where death has visited, 
is the proprietor of a modern undertaking and embalming establish- 
ment at AValton, Indiana. He was born July 16,_ 1848, in Washington 
township, Cass county, Indiana, near the present home of W. L. Small, 
and is a son of Daniel and Nancy (Overleese) Small. 

The grandfather of ^Ir. Small was a native of Germany, and in 
young mauhood emigrated to the United States, settling in ]\Iaryland, 
where he spent the remainder of his life. Daniel Small was born in 
Maryland, and there passed his boyhood and youth, but when still a 
young man migrated to Indiana, and for a short time resided near 
Crooked Creek. Subseciuently, he came to Cass county and took up 
government land, making the first settlement in Washington township. 
There he and his wife spent the remaining years of their lives, devot- 
ing themselves to the tilling of the soil. They were the parents of nine 
children, as follows: Harriet, Susanna, Andrew Jackson and jMargaret, 
who are all deceased : John ; Elizabeth and Alexander, who are both 
deceased; Mrs. Sarah Burget, a widow living in Logansport ; and Henry 
Franklin. 

Henry Franklin Small was reared on the old homestead, where he 
worked during the greater part of his school period. At the age of 
twenty-five years he left the parental roof and came to Walton, where 
he took up the trade of carpenter, and gradually drifted into contract- 
ing. During the next twenty years he followed this line of endeavor, 
and many of the structures erected 1\v him still stand, their excellent 
state of preservation testifying to good workmanship and honest mate- 
rial. At the end of that period, ]Mr. Small took up the undertaking 
trade, and first attended the Indianapolis School of Undertaking, from 
which, he received his diploma, succeeding which he took the Barnes 
course in Chicago and received his certificate. He immediately returned 
to Walton, and here he has continued in this liusiness to the present 
time, now being the proprietor of a well equipped establishment, fur- 
nished with every device for the proper handling of the dead and with 
every comfort for the bereaved. His reputation is that of a man of 
unquestioned integrity and probity of character, and well merits the 
high respect and esteem in which he is universally held. 

Mr. Small was married (first) to Miss Elizabeth Younglove, and 
after her death married her sister, Hattie Younglove, they being daugh- 
ters of Charles and Elizabeth (Hoyt) Younglove. ^Ir. Small has inter- 
ested himself in fraternal work, and is a member of the ^Masons, the 
Odd Fellows, the Order of the Eastern Star and the Tribe of Ben Hur. 

Henry A. Crockett. Although he has reached an age when most 
men begin to think of laying aside the cares and duties of active busi- 
ness strife, Henry A. Crockett, of Washington township, still continues 
in the management of his affairs, and each day attends to his various 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 927 

duties, thus satisfying an energetic nature that from his boyhood has 
caused his life to be one of constant industry. A member of an agricul- 
tural family, which has for generations contributed its full quota of 
men to the farming vocation, he has followed in the footsteps of his 
forefathers and has devoted his entire career to the tilling of the soil. 
JMr. Henry Crockett has passed almost his whole life within the borders 
of Cass county, has here achieved a success, and today ranks with the 
foremost of his community's valued citizens. He was born September 
13, 1849, in Deer Creek township, Cass county, Indiana, and is a son 
of Asher and Susannah (Plank) Crockett. His father, a farmer, was 
born near Greenville, Ohio, from whence he came to Cass county, 
Indiana, in young manhood, and here spent the remainder of his life. 
There were six children in the elder Crockett 's family, namely : Henry, 
Jane, Elizabeth, Sarah, James and Alice, the latter deceased. 

Henry A. Crockett was reared in Cass county, where he secured his 
early education in the district schools, but when still a lad the family 
moved to Miami county, and there he completed his studies. He event- 
ually returned to Cass county, and settled on his present farm, an 
excellent tract of eighty acres which is located on the Crockett and 
Richeson road. ]Mr. Crockett has continued to devote his attention to 
the tilling of the soil, and his property is one of the valuable ones of 
the township. As the years have passed and his leisure and capital 
would permit, i\Ir. Crockett has made numerous improvements in the 
shape of substantial buildings and draining and tiling. His ventures 
have proved uniformly successful, and through the use of good judg- 
ment, natural ability and constant industry, he has accumulated a com- 
petence, gained a position of importance among his fellows, and reared 
his family in comfort. Mr. Crockett is essentially a farmer, but has 
not ignored the duties of citizenship, and at this time is acting capably 
in the capacity of .iustice of the peace. 

On January 15, 1876, in Cass county, Mr. Crockett was united in 
marriage with ]\Iiss Catherine Knight, of Cass county, Indiana, and to 
this union there have been born eight children : Carrie, who lives with 
her parents; Benjamin Franklin (Frank), who is engaged in farming 
in Tipton township, married Mae Pierson, and has two children, — Gil- 
bert and Herbert ; Harvey, who married Ethel Hymon, and is the father 
of one child, — Opal; Laura and David, who are residing at home; 
Mae, who married Daniel Brunner, and has three children, — Wilmer, 
Florence and Velma ; Chester, who married Hannah Pippinger, has one 
little son, Clifford Keith ; and June, who lives with her parents. The 
members of this family attend the Christian church, where they all 
have numerous friends. Judge Crockett belongs to the class through 
whom communities prosper, for with others he has been an agitator 
for the advancement of progress. During his long and honorable career, 
he has formed a wide acquaintance, and no citizen stands in higher 
esteem in his community. The beautiful estate of Mr. and Mrs. Crockett 
is known as "Highland Crest." 

Christian F. Wendling. That the farmer is the backbone of the 
nation is a trite saying, but nevertheless a true one, and no circum- 
stances or conditions might arise that would ever lessen the importance 



928 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

of the agricultural industry to the country at large or decrease the 
prominence of the active and successful farmer in the scale of values 
prevailing today throughout the broad land. Many successful and 
ambitious farmers are to be found in Cass county, and the late Chris- 
tian F. Wendling occupied a high place in the agricultural class in the 
county. Following in the steps of his worthy father, Mr. Wendling 
came to be one of the most prosperous farmers in Walton or, indeed, 
in the county, and as such is properly accorded a place in an historical 
and biographical work of this nature. 

Born in Butler county, Ohio, October 8, 1858, Christian F. Wendling 
was the son of Michael and Mary (Schmitt) Wendling, Mr. Wendling 
was a native born German and Mrs. Mary Smith Wendling was a native 
of France. Michael Wendling was credited with being one of the most 
skillful farmers in Cass county, and it is therefore but fitting that more 
than a merely cursory mention be made of him in this sketch dedicated 
to his son. He was born in Alsace, then a part of France, but now within 
the border of Germany, and was the son of John and Margaret (Schini) 
Wendling. He was fifteen years of age when he came to America, in 
company with his parents, who immigrated hither in 1845. Up to that 
time he had received excellent educational advantages, being versed 
both in French and German in his native schools. The family first 
located on a farm in Butler county, Ohio, and there the parents of 
Michael Wendling passed their remaining days, the father being seventy- 
two years of age when he died. He was twice married, his first wife 
having died in Germany, and his second wife having been the mother 
of Michael, who was one of the three children of the second marriage, 
the others being Christian and Catherine. 

In 1863 Michael Wendling came to Indiana, and in this state located 
in section 34, Washington township, Cass county, which place there- 
after represented his home and the scene of his farming activities until 
the day of his death. He was a successful farmer, carrying on his 
affairs priadently and scientifically, and while the tract of land he first 
selected in Cass county was not the most promising then to be found 
within its borders, he proved that all land is good land if properly 
treated, and his place came to be one of the richest and most productive 
in the county. 

On Januaiy 10, 1854, Michael Wendling married Miss Mary M. 
Schmitt, a daughter of George and Barbara (Mochel) Schmitt, both 
natives of France, where Mrs. Wendling was born on the 3d of July, 
1830. She same to America in 1848, alone, and settled in Pittsburg, 
Pennsylvania. Seven children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Wendling, 
as follows: John H., born in 1855 and married to Emmeline Martin, 
they living in Cass county and are well and favorably known here; 
George W. is a civil engineer; Christian F. is the subject of this sketch; 
William D., a Cass county farmer, is now deceased; Charles C. ; Jacob 
S., deceased and Eli E. Mr. Wendling was a stanch Democrat, and 
was all his life a member of the Lutheran church. He died on the 14th 
of November, 1904. 

Christian P. Wendling was bom on the 8th day of October, 1858. 
He received his education in the common schools of Cass county, where 
he was reared from the age of five years, the family removal from But- 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 929 

ler county to Cass county taking place at that time. He was well 
disciplined in farm work in his youth, and was identified with the 
home place until the age of thirty-two, when, in 1887, he married and 
established a home of his own. His wife was Miss Laura B. Walker, 
the daughter of T. H. and Maggie (Bennett) Walker, and their mar- 
riage took place on the lith of April, 1887. Four children were born 
to them: George C, Jesse E., Grace B. and Alonzo E. George C. 
received his diploma from the Walton high school, class of 1910, graduat- 
ing with honors, and is now in his third year at Purdue University, 
studying civil engineering. Jesse E. completed the eighth grade. He 
married Miss Laura Preiser, and they have one daughter, IMargaret 
Wilodene, born March 4, 1913. Grace B. received her diploma in 
1906. Alonzo E. received his diploma with the class of 1911, and 
entered the Walton high school. 

Mrs. Wendling is a native of Cass county, born May 31, 1872, and 
was educated in the Walton public school. Her parents are both living 
in Kokomo, Indiana, and her father was formerly engaged in mer- 
chandising. In earlier years he was a teacher, and he was educated in 
Ohio. 

Mr. Wendling became the owner of a fertile and productive farm 
of eighty acres, situated about a half mile from the town of Walton, 
where his family united with him in making a comfortable and happy 
home. He demonstrated beyond all question his skill as a farmer, and 
the early training he received at the hands of his father was to him a 
boon in his independent career, although he was never content to con- 
tinue in the industry without progressing in the scientific knowledge 
pertaining thereto. He took a hearty interest in the civic and political 
affairs of the community and was one of the best known men in his dis- 
trict, wherein he was long and favorably before the people. Pratenially 
he was a member of the Masonic order, lodge No. 423 at Walton; of 
the Maccabees, Tent No. 103; and of Ben Hur Lodge, Tribe No. 233, 
and was a charter member and a deacon of the Lutheran church of Wal- 
ton, his family also sharing in his religious faith. Mr. Wendling occu- 
pied a place of respect and esteem in the town and county, and his death, 
on the 9th of February, 1913, was mourned by a large circle of friends. 
He was laid to rest in the Odd Fellows cemetery. 

Cassius M. Ide, successful and prosperous in the business of diver- 
sified farming, in which he has been occupied in Cass county for a num- 
ber of years, was born on April 13, 1856, in Howard county, Indiana, 
and came to Cass county in 1872. He is the son of Reuben P. and 
Sarah (Gifford) Ide, and he was a small child when his father died in 
Howard county, Indiana. The mother married a second time, and he 
was one of the three children of her first marriage. When they came 
to Cass county in 1872 the family comprised the mother and her three 
children. Bedford B. Ide, the brother of the subject, still lives in Cass 
county, and for a long period has held a responsible position with the 
Pan Handle Railroad. The sister married Alexander Copland and is a 
resident of Logansport. 

Cassius M. Ide received the rudiments of an education in the pub- 
lic schools of Howard county, his schooling continuing up to the age 



980 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

of twelve years, after which he took upon himself the business of find- 
ing a living. His first independent venture was in the draying line in 
Logansport, and he continued to be connected with the work there for 
five years. For three years thereafter he was interested in an active way 
in the livery business in the same city, and by that time he felt he was 
ready to settle down to farm life. With his wife he came to the farm 
inherited by Mrs. Ide, consisting of one hundred and twenty acres in 
section 16, Noble township, where he has since continued to be occupied 
with a general or diversified farming business. He has experienced an 
agreeable amount of success in his work, and is accounted one of the 
prosperous and progressive farmers of the township. 

On October 31, 1883, j\Ir. Ide was married to IMiss Jane Braith- 
waite, who was born in Cass county, June 2, 1860, the daughter of 
James and Peggy (Eglin) Braithwaite, who came to these parts from 
Yorkshire, England, their native land, in 1844 and 1848, respectively. 
They were married in Cass county, June 28, 1851, and in the following 
year, 1852, moved to Kosciusko county, Indiana, where they continued 
to reside for four years. Then they returned to Noble township, Cass 
county, and purchased a farm of eighty acres, which location was their 
home until the death of ]Mr. Braithwaite, July 10, 1882, when he had 
reached the age of seventy-one years. A few years after locating in 
Noble township he purchased two other farms in the same township ; 
one of 160 acres and one of 80 acres. ]\Irs. Braithwaite is living and 
is a resident of the city of Logansport. She was eighty-two years of age 
January 12, 1913. Mr. and Airs. Ide became the parents of four chil- 
dren : Nolo Fay, born October 10, 1884, graduated from the public 
schools and spent three and a half years in the Logansport high school. 
She wedded Carl Hardy, an agriculturist, and they have a tittle daughter, 
Peggy Feni, born July 4, 1903. James Reuben, born August 27, 1886, 
received his diploma from the public schools and spent two years in 
high school, after which he pursued a commercial course in Logansport. 
He was census enumerator of Noble township in 1910, and is at present 
serving his fifth term as financial secretary of the Cass County Detec- 
tive Association. He is now with his parents on the farm. His frater- 
nal relations include membership in the Odd Fellows order at Logans- 
port, of which he was financial secretary two years and is now its per- 
manent secretary. He affiliates with the Republican party and is a 
meml)er of the Christian church. ]\lary Juanita, born November 7, 1888, 
graduated from the common schools and in the Logansport high school, 
class of 1908, and wedded John Webber, February 10, 1909. He is an 
agriculturist. Both Mr. and Mrs. Webber are members of the Cumber- 
land Presbyterian church, and they are residents of Harrison town- 
ship. Jane Braithwaite, their daughter, was born March 31, 1913. 
Clay Braithwaite, born September 27, 1897, the .youngest of the children 
of Mr. and j\Irs. Ide, graduated from the common schools and is now 
a student in the Logansport high school. He is a member of the Chris- 
tian church. 

]\Ir. Ide is a Republican and has always lent his support to the fur- 
therance of that party, and his fraternal relations are represented by 
his membership in the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Eel River 
Lodge, No. 417, and the Knights of Pythias, both of Logansport. He 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 931 

was one of the promotors in the erection of the Odd Fellows Temple iu 
Logansport, a building which is a credit to the city. He is a stock- 
holder therein, and for twelve years has been one of the building's 
trustees. It is also a fact worthy of mention that in the engraving of 
the old seminary on Thirteenth street, which was replaced in 1874, to 
be seen in the prospectus which preceded this publication, Cassius ^l. 
Ide may be seen at the base of the belfry of the seminary, with arm 
outstretched and viewing the scene below. He and his family have 
always attended the Christian chui'ch. Their homestead in Noble town- 
ship is named after the old Braithwaite homestead in Yorkshire, Eng- 
land, "Greenat. " 

Frederick M. Markert, remembered by many of the oldest 
settlers as one of the early coopers in Logansport, was a 
native of Wurtemburg, Germany, his birth occurring on March 31, 
1822. He was reared in his native country, received but a limited edu- 
cation, and after serving seven years in the German army he enlisted 
again and served an additional period. He learned fruit gardening 
after his military service was concluded, his principal attention being 
given to the culture of the grape. It was about 1846 when he emigrated 
to the United States, and after landing at Castle Garden, New York, 
he went to Cleveland, Ohio, and there worked at the cooper's trade for 
two years. In 1848 he came to Logansport, Indiana, via Lake Erie, to 
Toledo, and from there by the Erie canal. Until 1850 he worked in the 
old Cecil tlouring mill cooperage shop, located on the south bank of 
Eel river at the intersection of Sixth street. In 1851, in association with 
Gotlieb Schaefer and Charles Luy, he embarked in the brewing business 
on the north side of Columbia street, between Sixth and Mary streets, 
but three years later disposed of his interests in that enterprise and 
once more engaged in the cooperage business, his location being on Pleas- 
ant Hill. For manv years he continued in this business, retiring in 
1886. He died on April 3, 1901. 

In 1854 Mr. Markert married Fredericka Rombold, who was also 
a native of Wurtemburg, Germany, and eight children were in time 
born to them, concerning whom brief mention is made as follows : Fred 
C, died on Ma}' 17, 1911 ; Charles F., is a resident of Logansport ; 
George H., who married Dora Schaefer, lives in East St. Louis, Illinois; 
William, died when twelve years of age ; Katherine, is the wife of John 
J. Hildebrandt, of Logansport ; Christine, married Dr. J. Z. Powell, of 
Logansport; Andrew, died in infancy, and John D., who married Agnes 
Morgan, now lives at East St. Louis, Illinois. 

Mr. Markert was a member of no religious organization, but to a 
certain extent held to the belief of the Swedenborgians ; in his political 
faith he was a Democrat. Mi*s. IMarkert died on October 5, 1897, a 
member of the Evangelical church. 

Charles F. Markert is a son of Frederick M. and Fredericka 
(Rombold) Markert, natives of Wurtemburg, Germany, of whom de- 
tailed mention is made in an article dedicated to the father in other 
pages of this work. Charles F. was born on the place where he now 
resides, Pleasant Hill, in Logansport, Indiana, his birth occurring on 



932 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

October 11, 1858, and this city has always been his home. A common 
school education was granted to him, after which he started out for 
himself, being eighteen years old at that time. He learned the cooper's 
trade with his father, and later learned the trade of a marble polisher 
with C. B. Sanderson, but he did not adhere to either of those occupa- 
tions for any length of time. In 1881 he turned his attention to garden- 
ing, and he has since continued in that work without interruption, and 
his efforts have resulted in a most favorable manner. He was the first 
gardener in Cass county to undertake hot house gardening, and in that 
work he enjoyed a pleasing success and prosperity. 

His marriage with Miss Catherine Newman, a daughter of John 
Newman, a well known farmer of Harrison township, was solemnized 
on November 12, 1891, and four children have been born to them — 
George L., Esther F. H., Ellen L. and Mary A. Mr. Markert is a Dem- 
ocrat and he and his wife are members of the Evangelical Association. 

Nathaniel Tilton, a well known general agriculturist of Noble 
township, has been an important factor in farming circles of Cass 
county, and his popularity is well deserved, as in him are embraced 
the characteristics of an unbending integrity, unabated energy and an 
industry that never flags. He has been interested in all that affects his 
community, and has especially identified himself with movements mak- 
ing for the advancement of religion, education and morality. Mr. 
Tilton was bom October 25, 1854, on a farm in section 1, Noble town- 
ship, Cass county, Indiana, and is a son of John Tilton. 

John Tilton came to Indiana from Ohio with his wife and eight 
children, locating on the farm now occupied by Nathaniel Tilton, where 
he spent the remainder of his life in agricultural pursuits, and was also 
associated with other earnest and hard-working citizens in advancing 
his community's interests. After coming to Cass county he and his 
wife had two other children: Maria Ann, who was married in 1877 to 
George Fergus, and still resides in Cass county; and Nathaniel. 

Nathaniel Tilton received his education in the district schools of 
Clay township, and was reared to the vocation of farmer, which he has 
followed all of his life. He is progressive in his methods and ideas, and 
each year finds his property fui'ther improved with good buildings and 
other features. His land is in a high state of cultivation, his crops are 
always large and bring top notch prices in the markets, and the appear- 
ance of his farm testifies eloquently to the presence of able manage- 
ment. He has always been a strong advocate of public improvements, 
ever being among the first to declare himself in favor of what he thinks 
will benefit his community or its people. Although not a politician in 
the generally accepted meaning of the word, he served for two terms 
as supervisor of district No. 1, Noble township. 

On April 12, 1877, IMr. Tilton was married (first) to Miss Henrietta 
Roberts, a native of Fulton county, Indiana, and to this union there 
was born one son, William I., November 30, 1881. While this child was 
still in its infancy, its mother died very suddenly, in February, 1882. 
During the following year, Mr. Tilton married (second) Miss Eva A. 
Ulerick, who was born in Pennsylvania, October 30, 1857, and whose 
parents, Henry and Caroline (Fry) Ulerick, came to Cass county, 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 933 

Indiana, from the Keystone state in 1864. Mrs. Tilton came with her 
parents to Cass county, where she was a little maiden of eight years and 
here she was reared and educated. Her father was a native of 
Pennsylvania, but of German lineage, as his mother came from 
Germany. He was a butcher by occupation and was a self-made man, 
and is now a resident of Cass county. He is a Democrat politically and 
is a member of the United Brethern church and his wife was a member 
of the German Baptist. Mrs. Ulerick died November 20, 1889. 

Mr. and ]\Irs. Tilton have had two children, namely : Henry A., born 
March 14, 1884; and Chauncey E., born January 2, 1889. Henry A. 
graduated from the common schools, and then took a full commercial 
course at the Logansport Business College, and he paid his way par-- 
tially by raising melons. The first year he cleared $150 by this industry. 
At the present time he is connected with the R. T. Crane Iron and 
Steel Company of Chicago, and is located at Lima, Ohio, where he has 
charge of the business in that locality. He is one of the stable young 
men that Cass county, Indiana, claims, and is strictly a self-made 
man. He married Miss Bessie Vernon and they have one little son, 
Vernon, aged five years. Henry Tilton and wife are members of the 
Christian church and were converted under the preaching of Rev. 
"Billy" Sunday. He is a Republican and a member of the K. of P. 

Chauncey E. is one of the successful young farmers of Noble town- 
ship and he and wife have a model little home near his parents' home. He 
is a young man of good practical education, and is associated with his 
father on the estate. He wedded i\Iiss IMyra Yund, and one little son, 
Leslie Kenneth, graces this marriage. Chauncey is a Republican and 
he and wife are members of the Presbyterian church. 

]\Ir. and Mrs. Tilton may be proud of the honorable lives of their 
children, who are a credit to their aged parents. 

Mrs. Tilton is a lady of most genial manners, sociable and cordial, 
and a model housekeeper, and she and her worthy husband are citizens 
who are held high in the respect and esteem of the people of Noble county. 

Their pretty homestead is known as "The Upper Valley Farm." 

Both the Tilton and Ulerick families have been close attendants of 
the Presbyterian church, and their members are widely known in 
religious circles. Mr. Tilton succeeded his father as elder in the church, 
a position he has held since the elder man's death. During his long 
residence in Noble township, Mr. Tilton has formed a wide 
acquaintance, in which he numbers many warm friends, while every- 
where he is known as a man of the highest business integrity and moral 
probity. 

Elmer Dallas Snyder, M. D. Having risen to influence and obtained 
recognition through solid merit, founded upon good natured abilities, 
ripened by liberal scholastic training and matured by thorough scien- 
tific study and long, continuous and assiduous practice, Dr. Elmer 
Dallas Snyder, of Onward, Indiana, is known as one of the leading 
medical practitioners of Cass county. He belongs to that class of pro- 
fessional men who value their success the more because it has been 
gained through their own individual effort, rather than through outside 
influence and assistance, and during the fifteen years that Onward has 



934 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

been his field of endeavor has impressed himself favorably upon his 
fellow-townsmen by the interest he has manifested in the welfare of his 
community. Dr. Snyder was born on his father's farm, located one 
mile west of Onward, in Cass county, December 1, 1865, and is a son 
of David and Maria (Waite) Snyder. 

The Snyder family originated in Germany, from whence the great- 
grandfather of Dr. Snyder emigrated to the United States, settling in 
Berks county, Pennsylvania. From that section the grandparents of 
Dr. Snyder, Henry and jMary (Martz) Snyder, came to Cass county, 
Indiana, with their eleven children, who were named as follows : Simon, 
Levi, Elizabeth, Henry, William, Sarah, John, David, Kate, Mary and 
Leah ; of whom David and J\Iary are still living. Henry and 
Mary (^lartz) Snyder both passed away in Cass county, where they had 
been engaged in agricultural pvirsuits. David Snyder was born in 
Carroll county, Indiana, and accompanied the family to Cass county 
more than a half a century ago. Like his father, he was a farmer, and 
was so engaged iintil his retirement, when he and his wife moved to 
the state of Washington, their present home. They had five children: 
Dr. Elmer D., Mrs. Dora Smith, Alonzo D., ]\Irs. Cora IMavs and ]\Irs. 
Nora Bell. 

Dr. Elmer Dallas Snyder was reared to agricultural pursuits and 
spent his boyhood in assisting his father in the work of the home farm, 
but it became his early intention to enter upon a professional career. 
The necessary funds for an education along medical lines were lacking, 
but he did not allow this to stand in his way, for he had inherited 
much of his father's ability to make his own way in the world. His 
early schooling was secured in his native locality, and subsequently 
he attended the schools of Logansport, following which he took up the 
vocation of educator, thus earning the means with which to gain his 
cherished medical training, which was secured in the Louisville Medical 
College. Following his graduation from that institution, in 1893, he 
began practice at Kewanna, Fulton county, later moved to Burr Oak, 
Marshall county, and finally settled in Onward, his home locality, where 
he is now firmly established in a representative practice. 

Dr. Snyder was married first to Miss Ettie M. Apt (no issue), 
and on IMarch 15, 1907, he married Mary Catherine Eckert, daughter 
cf John and Leah (Eckhart) Eckert, members of a prominent 
family of Carroll county. Dr. and INIrs. Snyder are members of the 
]\Iethodist Episcopal church, and in addition to the various medical 
organizations he belongs to the Knights of the Maccabees. Although 
not a politician, having preferred to give his entire attention to his 
professional work, Dr. Snyder has not been insensible to the duties of 
citizenship, and for a period served capably and faithfully in the capac- 
ity of county coroner. 

Samuel S. Helvie. Among the better known and more prosperous 
business men of Logansport, Samuel S. Helvie holds a leading place, 
and in his capacity as such is eminently deserving of some mention, 
however brief it may be, in a historical and biographical work of the 
nature of which this publication partakes. Mr. Helvie has experienced 
a gradual rise in life in a financial and business way, and from a farm 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 935 

home in Tipton township, has come into his present important place in 
the business life of Logansport. 

Born in Tipton township, Cass county, Indiana, on November 30, 
1852, Samuel S. Helvie is one of a family of thirteen children born to 
Samuel M. and Anna (Ulery) Helvie, eight of that goodly number 
being alive today. The father was a Virginian by birth and when a 
boy moved with his parents to Miami county, Ohio, where he later mar- 
ried Anna Ulery, the daughter of a well known Kentucky family. He 
received in his boyhood but little education out of books, and was early 
inured to the hard work of the farm, on which he lived until his mar- 
riage. In April, 1849, wdth his wife and ten children, he came to Cass 
county, Indiana, the journey being made from Virginia to this county 
in a wagon, drawn by horses, the popular method of travel in those 
early days. They settled in Tipton township ou a slightly improved 
farm, owned by W. W. Haney, and here Mr. Helvie continued to be 
engaged in farming activities until his death, April 14, 1878. The 
■ftddow survived him until September 26, 1896. Both these worthy people 
were members of the United Brethren church. Mr. Helvie was a life- 
long Republican, but was never an aspirant for political office or favor. 
His life was a (j[uiet and uneventful one, and he lived among his acquaint- 
ances in Tipton township, esteemed and respected in the highest man- 
ner. He was honest as the day, to employ a term often used in speak- 
ing of him by those who knew him best, and was a good friend and 
neighbor, ever ready to lend a helping hand to those less fortunate than 
himself. He was a man particularly fond of hunting, and was known 
to be one of the best marksmen in Cass count3^ 

Samuel S. Helvie was the youngest of the children of his parents, 
and he was born after the family removal to Tipton township. There 
he was reared and educated, and being the family Benjamin, remained 
at home until he was seventeen, contrary to the custom of other mem- 
bers of the family. When he was seventeen he set about learning teleg- 
raphy at Anoka, and after he had mastered the key, he was stationed 
at Anoka Junction as night operator, a place he continued to hold for 
almost seventeen years. In 1886 he began operating the flouring mill 
at the falls of Pipe creek, his father-in-law, John Costenborder, having 
been the original builder of the mill. He continued to be the active 
operator of the plant until the fall of 1890, when he gave up his per- 
sonal connection with it and employed a miller to handle the place for 
him, upon which basis it was then operated for the ensuing three years. 

From early manhood Mr. Helvie had taken active interest in politics 
as a Democrat, and in 1890 he was the nominee of his party for the office 
of county auditor, to which office he was elected by a majority of two 
hundred and seventj'-two. He served a term of four years, when, in 
accordance with the prevailing I'ule, he retired from office, after a period 
of service marked by the greatest efficiency and general satisfaction to 
all concerned. Upon the expiration of his term of office, Mr. Helvie 
accepted a position as clerk in a clothing store in Logansport, in the 
employ of Joseph G. Grace. Two years later, on November 26, 1896, 
Mr. Helvie, in association with Edward D. Sellers, succeeded to the 
business under the firm name of Helvie & Sellers, and they have since 
that time become firmly established in the commercial world of Logans- 



936 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

port. Their business is a prosperous one, and both partners hold envi- 
able positions in the community. 

On October 30, 1874, Mr. Helvie was united in marriage with Elvira 
Costenborder, and to them nine children have been born: Lewis E., 
Walter M., Gertrude M., Ora E., Harry A., Etta, Bertha, Marie and 
Ocle. Mr. Helvie is a Mason of the Kjiights Templar degree, and Mrs. 
Helvie is a member of the Christian church of Logansport, where the 
family attend. 

Daniel W. Clary. The Clary family in Cass county dates back to 
the period before the removal of the Indians from this part of the state, 
and the different members have witnessed all the transformations in 
conditions from the time of the first settlement down to the twentieth 
century era. Daniel W. Clary has long been a prominent farmer and 
citizen of Harrison township, which is his native home, and has acquired 
a position of influence in this township. 

Daniel W. Clary was born in Harrison township, August 14, 1864. 
His parents were Isaac N. and Rebecca (Remley) Clary. The paternal 
grandfather was John Clary, and the maternal grandfather was Daniel 
Remley. The father of Daniel W. Clary came to Cass county at a very 
early date. When his father first started out for himself he bought 
a place of about 310 acres, on which he put up a rail pen and slept 
on a rail bed for some time. In this rough abode he lived, though with 
some improvements in conditions, until his marriage, at which time he 
erected a log cabin home, and thereafter lived in increasing comforts 
until his death. His marriage occurred in 1843. He was a resident of 
the county at the time the Indians were removed to their western homes, 
and he took some part in assisting in this removal. He spent many years 
of an active and prosperous life in the county, and in 1893 moved from 
the farm which he had first settled to the place now occupied by his 
son. In 1863 he had bought the present homestead there, and occupied 
it for the following year. All the substantial buildings were erected by 
the father, though Mr. Daniel W. Clary has himself, during his pro- 
prietorship, instituted a great many improvements and has continued 
to keep the farm apace with modern progress in agricultural conditions. 

Daniel W. Clary was married on the twenty-third of November, 
1887, to Miss Martha E. Conn, a daughter of David and Sarah (Herbert) 
Conn. David Conn was a soldier in the Seventy-ninth Indiana during 
the last two years of the Civil war, and his death occurred on April 
17, 1886. Mr. and Mrs. Clary are the parents of three children, their 
names being: Berlin A., born October 17, 1888, received a common 
school education ; David Earl, born January 3, 1902, in the sixth grade, 
and Lillie Ellen, born August 28, 1907. All the children live at home. 
The family are members of the Zion M. E. church, and Mrs. Clary is a 
member of the Ladies' Aid Society in the church. Mr. Clary is a Dem- 
ocrat in politics and one of the influential citizens of this community. 

George H. Lynas. The life work of the late Dr. J. B. Lynas, of 
Logansport, Indiana, whose death occurred January 28, 1901, was the 
founding and developing of a business that has become one of the prin- 
cipal industries of the city and is of national reputation. Entering 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 937 

upon the manufacture of proprietary medicines in a small way, only 
as an accommodation for his numerous patients, in the alleviation of 
whose ills he had spent many years, he found that instead of retiring 
from active life, as he had planned, he was but entering upon a still 
more strenuous career, and one which was to make his name known all 
over the country. The business, thus started in a humble way, has 
grown and developed, until its agencies are found from coast to coast, 
and its products, which first included only certain medicines of the 
doctor's own compiling, now cover a wide range of household neces- 
sities. 

Dr. J. B. Lynas was born in Dearborn county, Indiana, February 14, 
1835. In 1862 Dr. Lynas was married to Miss Sarah E. Reed, who was 
born in Wisconsin and who died in Logansport, January 18, 1911. 
George H. Lynas, son of Dr. Lynas, and the present directing head of 
the great enterprise that bears his name, was born in Logansport, Janu- 
ary 10, 1874, educated in the public schools, and at the age of eighteen 
years entered his father's business, with which he has been connected 
to the present time. His administration of its policies has served to 
advance the business in no small way, at the same time following his 
father's strict rule of honorable and upright dealings with the thou- 
sands of agents working for him. He was married October 31, 1905, 
to Miss Ethel Hanawalt, of Logansport. Dr. J. B. Lynas received his 
preliminary education in the public schools of Henry county, whence 
he had been taken by his father when five years of age, and after spend- 
ing some time in the study of medicine received his diploma from the 
Eclectic Medical School, Indianapolis, in 1874. At that time he entered 
upon the practice of his profession in Logansport, and during the years 
that followed built up a wide and representative clientele throughout 
Cass county. It was the desire of Dr. Lynas, however, to retire from 
active practice, but at the same time to meet the wishes of his patients, 
and accordingly he started to manufacture remedies at his home, these 
being compiled from old and well-proven remedies which he had used 
in his practice and which he had found successful in the relief and cure 
of many diseases. At the start he little foresaw the extent that this 
business was destined to grow to, but it was not long before the merit 
of his goods caused the demand to exceed the supply that could be 
manufactured in the limits of the doctor's home, and, accordingly, in 
1884, he established a laboratory at No. 409 Fourth street. During this 
time the business began to extend outside of the limits of Cass county, 
and when it began to reach out into other states the firm purchased 
and moved to No. 210 Sixth street. Dr. Lynas was the dominating 
factor of this great organization until his death, and his wise adminis- 
tration of its affairs made him one of Logansport 's best known business 
citizens, but even after his demise the business continued to grow, and 
in 1904 was incorporated under the name of Dr. J. B. Lynas & Son, 
with a capital stock of $100,000. In 1906 it was found necessary to 
again seek larger quarters, and accordingly they purchased and located 
in the present factory and laboratory, at Nos. 517 and 519 Market 
street. Here Dr. J. B. Lynas & Son have a well equipped building, 
fitted with the latest improvements and appurtenances, the utmost care 
being taken to preserve sanitary conditions. The products now include. 



938 HISTOEY OF CASS COUNTY 

in addition to the well known J. B. L. medicines, all kinds of spices, 
teas, sachet powders, fruit colors, toilet articles, toilet soap, extracts, 
perfumes, stock preparations and miscellaneous articles. The J. B. L. 
trademark is a guarantee of absolute purity and excellence, and the 
agents of the company located in all parts of the United States are 
instructed at all times to replace any article that is not satisfactorj^, 
thus, without tiaring newspaper advertisements the confidence of all 
users of these J. B. L. products are gained. It is this policy of giving 
customers the benefit of honorable and upright dealing that has had 
all to do with the phenomenal success of the enterprise. The first offi- 
cers of the incorporated company were George H. Lynas, president, 
and Sarah E. Lynas, vice-president and treasurer. At this time George 
H. Lynas retains the presidency, while Dr. J. F. Noland is treasurer, 
and R. C. Overmeyer is secretary. April 1, 1913, there was between 
fourteen and fifteen hundred people working for J. B. Lynas & Son. 
They are located in nearly every state in the union. At the above date 
they were employing additional workers at the rate of about sixty per 
month. To take care of this fast increasing business, many traveling 
representatives, as well as a large office force, are required. 

Robert F. Frushour. One of the citizens of Cass county who 
began their career in primitive and often times log cabin homes, to 
labor with courage and industry to develop a wilderness of forest into 
a broad landscape of farms, and have subsequently reaped the rewards 
of such diligence in ample material prosperity, is ]\Ir. Robert Frushour 
of Harrison township, whose postoffice address is Logansport. This 
family is one of the oldest in Cass county, and two generations have 
assisted in the progress of this county. 

Robert F. Frushour was born in Bethlehem township, Cass county, 
October 16, 1856. His parents were George V. and Charlotte (Rowan) 
Frushour. Both grandfather and father came to that county at a 
very early date from Virginia, where they bought a great deal of land, 
most of it from the government, and set to work with characteristic 
industry to develop homes out of the forest. The only roads in the 
country at that time were the rough trails blazed through the woods, 
and the pioneer scenes and difficulties, which are described on other 
pages of this history, were, almost without exception, experienced by 
the Frushour family during its career here. The brothers and sisters 
of Mr. Robert F. Frushour were as follows: Harmon T., whose first 
wife was Harriet Orwin and his second wife was Anna Turner, both 
himself, as also his wives, now being deceased ; George, Jr., who married 
Lucy Thompson; William V.. who married Etta Gundrum; Anna, who 
became the wife of Arthur Wells, and Ida, Avho was the wife of Ira 
Maudlin. 

On February 18, 1880, Mr. Frushour married Miss Mary E. Brown. 
Her parents were Isaac and Elizabeth (Custer) Brown. One of her 
grandfathers was also named Simpson. Various members of her family 
became early residents of Cass county, having located here during the 
decade of the early forties. Tlie brothers and sisters of Mrs. Frushour 
were as follows: George, who married Effie Schilling; Albert, who died 
at the age of forty-two; Samuel, who married Anna Newberry; Jay, 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 939 

who died at the age of thirty-one years, laumarried ; Nancy, who married 
John M. LaRose. The father of Mrs. Frushour died in 1872, and her 
mother passed away in 1884. 

j\Ir. Frushour and wife were the parents of the following children : 
Delia, born August 18, 1881, is now the wife of John Spencer; Olive, 
born May 27, 1883, married Lora Early, and Lottie, born July 24, 1888, 
married Harley ^loore. Industry and thrifty management have been 
characteristic of I\Ir. Frushour 's career throughout his many years of 
activity as a farmer. He has been the owner of three different farms 
in this immediate section of the county, and has improved them all 
with excellent buildings, and other facilities for high-class agriculture. 
At the present time, he is just completing the building and general im- 
provement of his third farm. Much of the land has been cleared by 
his own labor, or under his immediate supervision, and he is a farmer 
who has never relaxed his attention to business, and keeps all his inter- 
ests to the highest point of efficiency. He still works untiringly, and 
his prosperity is well deserved and earned. He and his family are mem- 
bers of the Presbyterian church. His pretty home is known as "Forest 
Glenn," located about five miles from the city of Logansport. ^ 

Ben.jamin F. Yantis. Seventy-seven years ago the family of Ben- 
jamin F. Yantis made their way by ox team and by boat from their home 
in Spencer county, Kentucky, to Cass county, Indiana, and from then 
until the present writing, Cass county has been the home of this represen- 
tative family, and has known the activities and influence of its members. 
The subject, Benjamin F. Yantis, was born in Spencer county, Ken- 
tucky, on February 2, 1831, and was thus a young lad when the migra- 
tion of the family changed his home to Cass county. He is the son of 
Aaron and Martha (Cockran) Yantis. The father, Aaron Yantis, came 
from Germany with his brother George in the year 1760 and settled in 
Kentucky. The mother of the subject was of Scotch parentage. With 
the arrival of the family in Logansport from their Kentucky home, they 
settled there, remaining for two years, and then taking up their residence 
on a farm at the place where the street car line now ends, within fifty 
yards of the city limits. It was in the spring of 1841 that they removed 
to the George H. Harland farm in Bethlehem township for six years 
and then to the present farm, or the one that is now owned and occupied 
by Benjamin F. Yantis. 

Benjamin F. Yantis was one of the eight children of his parents. One 
brother, John, secured some prominence in engineering as the result 
of much work on the Wabash & Erie canal in Indiana. The Yantis resi- 
dence was destroyed by fire in 1906 and since that time Mr. Yantis has 
replaced the old brick residence with a new and handsome brick house, 
one of the finest to be found in the township. The place boasts many 
improvements, all of which have been installed by the owner and 
proprietor. 

Mr. Yantis has taken his place in the activities of the township in a 
public way, and one time served as township treasurer. He was drainage 
commissioner of the county for six years and served as trustee of the 
township for nine years, giving the most efficient service on all those 
positions, and proving his merit and calibre as a citizen. 



940 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

On September 13, 1855, Benjamin F. Yantis married Mary J. Hill, 
the daughter of Joseph and Esther (Jenkins) Hill. Eight children 
were born to Joseph and Esther (Jenkins) Hill, concerning whom brief 
mention is made as follows: William married Sarah Horn; Stephen J. 
married Hannah Conrad; Elizabeth A. married Isaac W. Wilson; Mary 
J. married B. F. Yantis ; Martha A. married Jackson L. Thompson ; 
Orlando married Savina Garber; Hannah died at the age of seven years; 
and Israel J. married Martha Gordon. 

Mrs. Yantis is a native of Washington county, Pennsylvania, born 
May 21, 1831, and she was reared in her native state. Her father was a 
farmer and lawyer in Pennsylvania and Indiana. He was a Republican, 
and he and his wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal church, al- 
though she was reared as a Quaker. Both of Mrs. Yantis' parents are 
dead. The mother died in Fulton county, Indiana, June 21, 1873, and 
the father died in Bethlehem township, May 12, 1876. Father Hill was 
a splendid scholar, a fine penman and could write the German text. To 
the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Yantis were born eight children, four sons 
and four daughters; five are living, as follows: Mary E., wife of Charles 
J. Moss, resident of Chicago and engaged in mercantile business; they 
have three children, two sons and one daughter. They are members of 
the Episcopal church. Elvira A. is the wife of Sumner .E. Buck, a farmer 
in Bethlehem township. They have four children, one son and three 
daughters, and are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. Ruth 
A. resides at home with her parents. She was educated in the common 
schools and then took the Logansport teachers' course and musical in- 
struction in Chicago, both vocal and instrumental. She is a member of 
the Presbyterian church. Joseph A. is a farmer in Bethlehem township. 
He married Miss Frances Calvert. They are members of the Baptist 
church and he is a deacon therein and a Republican in politics. Lyman 
A. is a farmer in Bethlehem township. He wedded Miss Maude Evans, 
and they have two sons and two daughters. The name Yantis is of 
German extraction and was formerly "Yandes. " Two brothers came 
from Germany during the time of the Revolutionary war and were 
soldiers in the war. 

Mr. Yantis, though now in the eighty-third year of his life, is active 
and strong, and is enjoying these later years of quietude and plenty in 
the home he has so long cherished and cared for. He is a prominent 
man in his community, and has all his life enjoyed the esteem of all who 
have shared in his acquaintance. The estate of Mr. and Mrs. Yantis is 
known as "Highland Place." 

Noah L. Bess has had a successful agricultural career, covering a 
number of years, and as one of the skilled farmers and stockmen of 
Washington township is deserving of personal mention in connection 
with biographical sketches of other representative men of this locality. 
Mr. Bess is a native of jMissouri, having been born in Bollinger county, 
April 2-1, 1868, and is a son of John and Malinda (Shell) Bess, the latter 
of whom lives with her children. John Bess made removal to Illinois 
about 1875, settling in McLean county, where he became a leading 
farmer and land owner, and where the rest of his life was spent. He 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 941 

and his wife were the parents of seven children, of whom three are now 
living : Noah L. ; Jefferson Monroe and Siebert I. 

Noah L. Bess was about seven years of age when he was taken by 
his father to IMeLean county, Illinois, and in that locality he secured 
his education in the public schools. Reared to agricultural pursuits, 
he has followed the vocation of farming throughout his active years, 
and about 1900 came to Cass county and settled on his present farm 
in Washington township, a tract consisting of 124 acres of well- 
cultivated land. Here he has made numerous improvements, erecting 
handsome buildings, thoroughly ditching, draining and tiling the land, 
and keeping his implements in the finest condition. That he is an able 
manager is testified by the general prosperous appearance of the farm, 
and he has demonstrated his ability as a stock grower by breeding some 
of the best stock to be found in his section. He is essentially a farmer, 
and has not cared for public life, his private affairs having left him no 
time to take an active part in politics aside from casting an intelligent 
ballot in the support of the principles which he believes will best se- 
cure the welfare of the nation. He is regarded as one of the busiest, 
most energetic and enterprising men of Washington township, and his* 
methods in his business dealings have firmly established him in the 
respect and confidence with all who have come into contact with him. 
His fraternal connection is with the Modern Woodmen of America of 
Forest, Illinois, and he is popular among the members of the local lodge 
of that order. 

Mr. Bess was married in Bollinger county, Missouri, to Miss Ellen 
Perkins, October 9, 1888, a member of an old and honored family of 
that county, and to this union there has been born one son, Grover I., 
who was born in ]\IcLean county twenty-three years ago. He was 
educated in that locality and has been reared to an agricultural career, 
now being his father's aid in the management of the home farm. In 
November, 1910, Grover I. Bess was united in marriage with Miss 
Lena J. Furst, who also belongs to an old Illinois family, and they have 
one daughter, Jessie j\Iay. All of the members of this family belong to 
the Union Presbyterian church. Mr. Bess has a No. 17 Buiek, five- 
passenger touring car and he and family can take many hours of 
pleasure and recreation. Their beautiful homestead is known as 
' ' Englewood. ' ' 

John A. Frushour. The leading hardware establishment in the vil- 
lage of Lucerne, in Harrison township, is that conducted by John A. 
Frushour. Mr. Frushour took charge of this business some years ago, 
and by his ability as a merchant has succeeded in more than doubling 
his trade, and now has an enterprise which is probably second to none 
of its class in northern Cass county. 

John A. Frushour was born in Harrison township on the tenth of 
January, 1861. The family have been residents in this county for more 
than seventy years, and have always been industrious citizens, and 
highly respected for their personal character. The name Frushour, how- 
ever, is of Belgian lineage. Mr. Frushour 's gi'andfather was named 
Mathias, while his father was the late John W. Frushour. The maiden 
name of the mother was Cecelia Bierd. The late John W. Frushour, the 



942 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

father, was twice married. The nine children by his first wife were as 
follows : Michael W., Samuel J., James E., John A., Francis X., Eleanor 
E., George M., Edward W., and Sarah J. His second wife bore the 
maiden name of Amanda M. Boyle, and she was the mother of four chil- 
dren, namely: Mary R., Joseph E., Rose and Margaret. The father of 
the Lucerne merchant, came to Cass county about 1840, his original home 
having been in Morgan county, Virginia. He was accompanied by his 
father, and their first settlement was in Noble township, on what is known 
as the old Tipit farm. He resided at different places in Noble township, 
and finally moved into Harrison township, which was his home until his 
death, at an advanced age in 1911. His first wife passed away in 1871. 

John A. Frushour married October 22, 1892, Miss Mary A. Hoynes, 
a daughter of James and Margaret (Glenn) Hoynes. Seven children 
were born of their marriage, six of whom are living and one deceased, 
namely : John Leo, born January 15, 1894, and died February 14, 1911 ; 
James A., Ruth, Austin G., Margaret E., Edward H., Mary C. 

Mr. Frushour was reared in his native vicinity where he attained 
such schooling as afforded him a practical preparation for life, and 
remained at home working on the farm and other occupations, until the 
time he was thirty-one years of age. During his youth he had acquired 
the trade of a carpenter, and when he began life on his own account, it 
was as a carpenter contractor, a business which he followed for about 
twenty yeare, with considerable success. It was on retiring from that 
occupation that he entered the hardware business at Lucerne, where he 
has since been a prosperous merchant. He bought out the present estab- 
lishment, and as already noted, has more than doubled the business in 
the years in which he has been engaged in same. His family attend 
the Catholic church, St. Elizabeth's, in Harrison township. 

LuYE J. Claby. Both industry and enterprise are required in the 
development of a first class farm from land which is in practically its 
native state. Mr. Clary, of Harrison township, has been characterized 
by these two qualities, and though still a young man he has succeeded 
beyond the ordinary, and is considered one of the most substantial men 
of his vicinity. 

Mr. Clary was born in Harrison township, September 22, 1877. His 
grandfather and his father were both named Isaac. His mother's maiden 
name was Susan Julian, a daughter of Samuel Julian. Mr. Clary had 
three brothers and three sisters, whose names are as follows: William; 
Arthur, who married Blanche Morrison ; Harvey, who married Mollie 
Tucker; Ida, who married Ervin Hull; Nellie, who married Roy Wol- 
ford; and Fern, who married George Bell. 

On the eighteenth of February, 1906, Mr. Clary was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Daisy Wolford, a granddaughter of Abraham and 
daughter of Phillip Wolford. Her father was one of the old settlers 
of Cass county and the name Wolford is well known in this vicinity. 
The brothers and the one sister of Mrs. Clary are as follows : IMary, 
who was the wife of Bert Herd ; George, who married Cora Clary ; Owen, 
married Hazel Deck; and Rowell, at home in Harrison township. Mr. 
and Mrs. Clary are the parents of one daughter, Esther, who was born 
November 17, 1906. After their marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Clary lived 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 943 

for some time in Fulton county, where they were farmers for four years 
and in that time did a great deal to establish a firm foundation for their 
subsequent prosperity. Mr. Clary had forty acres in that vicinity and 
during his residence there rebuilt the house, put in a cellar and also 
constructed a silo and many other minor improvements about the estate. 
From there he and his wife moved to the present farm in Harrison town- 
ship, Cass county, where he owns eighty acres in the homestead, besides 
^ty-one and one-half acres situated about half a mile from here. The land, 
when he took hold of it, had no improvements, and he has built a good 
house and put the entire place in condition for profitable agriculture. 
Mr. and Mrs. Clary are members of the Christian church, and in polities 
he is independent. The pretty homestead of Mr. and I\Irs. Clary is known 
as "The Sunny Side Farm." 

Richard Winn. Among the foreign born citizens of Cass county 
who have contributed their full quota to the best development and 
advancement of this district, the name of Richard Winn stands well to 
the forefront, and it is wholly consistent with the spirit and letter of a 
work of this order that more or less extended mention be made of his 
life and deeds on the pages of this historical and biogi-aphical record. 
Richard Winn has for many years figured prominently in the agi'icultural 
activities of Harrison township, this county, and of late years has con- 
cerned himself to a large extent with mercantile lines, although his inter- 
est has not been of an active nature. He has served in numerous public 
offices of prominence and has been prominent in church work for many 
years. He is now practically retired from all business activities, and 
his winters are spent in the warmth and sunshine of Florida. 

Born in Yorkshire, England, on August 3, 1836, Richard Winn is 
the son of Richard and Alice (Batty) AVinn, and the grandson of William 
Winn, a farmer in England. Richard and Alice Winn were the parents 
of a goodly family of eight children, named in the order of their birth 
as follows: William, Richard, Edmund, Thomas, Agnes, Isabelle M., 
Thomas B. and Leonard W. 

In Harrison township Richard AVinn, Sr., with his family, settled 
down in the resumption of farm life, further devoting himself to the 
business of cattle raising, in which he achieved a worthy success, his 
operations being more than usually extensive. He found that his entire 
time was absorbed by his own affairs, and thus never saw the day when 
he felt free to dip into political or municipal affairs. He was sixty-nine 
years old when he diecl in August, 1875, honored and esteemed by all 
who knew him. 

Richard Winn, Jr., was twenty-four years old when he married and 
settled down on the home farm, on which he lived and prospered for 
many successful years. His farm, comprising five hundred acres, was 
one of the finest in the county, and yielded abundantly to his skilful 
manipulation. He later interested himself in the grain business at 
Lucerne, securing a half interest in a grain elevator at that place, and 
continued to be thus -identified for many years, also becoming connected 
with certain other mercantile enterprises, all of which brought him 
bountiful returns, although his interest was always that of the silent 
partner, he never having connected himself actively with their operation. 



944 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

Success always attended his efforts, and his identification with a business 
venture ever seemed sufficient to insure its practical success. 

On August 23, 1860, Mr. Winn married Miss Isabelle Herd, the daugh- 
ter of John and Agnes (Stainton) Herd, who, like the Winns, were also 
natives of England, Yorkshire being their ancestral home. Mrs. Winn 
was a daughter of John and Agnes (Stainton) Herd, and there were 
nine children in their family, five sons and four daughters, and there are 
five living : Mrs. Richard Winn ; Thomas, a retired resident of Gas City, 
Indiana, and married ; William, a retired resident of city of Logansport ; 
George, an agriculturist of Harrison township ; and Elizabeth, widow of 
Peter Castle, a resident of Logansport, Indiana. 

The children of Richard and Isabelle (Herd) Winn are named 
as follows : Agnes, the eldest, married Edward Morrison, and they have 
two children, Blanch and Mary. John was accidentally killed some 
three years ago ; he had married Mavy J. Hall, who with their four chil- 
dren yet survive him, they being named, Maurice, Paul, Chester and 
Harold, last deceased; Mary Ellen, the third born child of her parents, 
married James Stevens and they have four children, JMyrle, Ethel, 
James IMonroe, and Florence ; Alice died at the age of five years ; 
Thomas died when three years old ; Charles Emmett married Edith 
Myers, and they have five children. Earl, Dott, Mildred, Victor, and 
Irene; Harry married Violet McCoy, and they had two children, Wiley 
and Ruth, deceased ; James married Catherine Wyand, and tfieir only 
child died in infancy. Florence, wife of W. A. Brown, has eight chil- 
dren, Ralph, George, Carl, Mabel, Elmer, Russell, Harold and Horace. 
Edna, the youngest born of the family, is married to Ervan S. Grove. 

Mr. AVinn has been more or less prominent in municipal affairs dur- 
ing his career, and has held a number of important offices in the service 
of his town and county. He served two terms as county commissioner, 
was trustee of his township for a number of terms and has held other 
similiar offices. He has long been active in the Zion church and is at 
present, and has been for some years, one of its trustees. It is some 
years since Mr. Winn has been active in business, having retired to enjoy 
the fruits of his labors extending through several decades of useful and 
valuable citizenship. He has long enjoyed the high esteem and regard 
of his fellow townspeople, and is known for one of the most valuable 
men of the community, and an example of a high order of citizenship 
which the present and coming generations can not do better than to 
emulate. 

WiLLARD Winn. The president of the Bank at Lucerne, also the 
owner of a Harrison township farm of two hundred and twenty acres, 
is one of the native sons of this township, and represents a family, which 
has been identified with the development of this part of Cass county for 
more than sixty-five years. The Winn family came here when most of 
the country was in the wilderness, before any railroads were built, and by 
their own labors they contributed in no small degree to the substantial 
development and improvement of this part of Indiana. 

Willard Winn was born in Harrison township on March 2, 1866. His 
father, William Winu, was for many years a well known citizen of the 
township, and passed away in 1908. The mother, whose maiden name 



HISTORY OP CASS COUNTY 945 

was Susan Michael, was a daughter of Peter Michael, whose original 
home was in Virginia, from which state the Michael family came to 
Indiana. Richard Winn, the grandfather of Willard was a native of 
England, and in 1847 came to America and settled his family on a farm 
in Harrison township, Cass county. The place had already undergone 
considerable improvement, since it had a three room brick house, which 
at the time was considered one of the most substantial residences in this 
section, but nearly all of the land was covered with dense timber, and it 
was many years before the arduous labor of the members of the family 
succeeded in getting all of the land ready for cultivation. It was in 
that old brick homestead and on that farm that William Winn, the 
father, was reared, and after attaining his majority he started out for 
himself, and during his long lifetime won a commendable degree of 
prosperity. 

Willard Winn had three brothers, whose names were Albert, Edmond 
and Gilbert. In November, 1886, Mr. Willard Winn married Miss Peggy 
Burton, a daughter of Levi and Ann (Eglin) Burton. Mr. and Mrs. 
Winn are well known in social circles of Harrison township, and possess 
a very attractive and beautiful homestead. The two hundred and twenty 
acres of land, comprising the farm are among the best in the township. 
Mr. Winn began his career by attending the district schools, and with 
the advantages of only such an education and largely upon his own 
resources, he has acquired a position where his influence counts for much 
in this part of Cass county. He is a breeder of fine registered stock, 
such as The Short Horn Cattle, Shropshire Sheep and blooded Barred 
Plymouth Rock chickens, and he is also a producer of "The Winn's 
Improved Reid's Yellow Dent Seed Corn." The estate of Mr. and Mrs. 
Winn is known as "The Indian Creek Stock Farm," located about ten 
miles from city. 

Jacob W. Clary. Beginning life in a log cabin in Harrison town- 
ship and reared amid conditions which might truly be called of pioneer 
character, Mr. Jacob Clary has now for more than forty years been one 
of the prospering farmers of this county, and has acquired many evi- 
dences of his thrift and business ability, as also the thorough esteem and 
respect of his fellow citizens. 

Jacob W. Clary, who was a son of Isaac N. and Rebecca (Remley) 
Clary, concerning whom further details appear in other biographies in 
this work, was born in Harrison township, Cass county, December 14, 
1848. At the time of his birth, the family habitation was a log house 
and he was old enough to witness some of the first trains which ran over 
the first railroad in this county, and has been a witness of nearly every 
other subsequent development of importance in this part of the state. 

Mr. Clary was married on the fourteenth of November, 1869. to Miss 
Eliza Rush, a daughter of David and Lavina (Julian) Rush. Mrs. 
Clary, after more than thirty years of happy married life, passed away 
on March 29, 1901. She was born December 14, 1853, and was forty- 
seven years of age at the time of her death. Her remains now rest in 
Harrison township. The ten children of Mr. and ]\Irs. Clary were named 
as follows : Lonzo, who married Nellie Wilson ; William, who died at the 
age of two years ; John, who married Anna Conn ; Minnie, who married 



946 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

Bert Helkert ; Rene, who married James Lamostros ; Charles, who mar- 
ried Cora Thomas; Bertha, who married John Cummins; Cora, who 
married George Wolford ; Hanford, who married Jessie Day ; and LeRoy 
who is unmarried and resides at home. Mr. Clary moved to his farm in 
Harrison township, near Lucerne, in 1872. It was then unimproved 
with buildings, and everything in this nature has been the result of his 
own labors and management. He is now the owner of two hundred acres, 
some of the best land in the northern part of Cass county, and his busi- 
ness-like methods of cultivation have resulted in a substantial prosperity 
for himself and family. The first house on his farm was a small two- 
room structure, situated in the woods, and it was in that little cabin that 
he and his wife resided for six years, and some of the children already 
mentioned were born in this place. His father had given him eighty acres 
at the beginning of his career and it was from this nucleus^ that he built 
up his present estate, consisting of almost three times as much in quantity 
and many times more in value than what he started with. Mr. Clary 
also owns several houses in the town of Lucerne. He is a member of 
the Presbyatrian church, and fraternally is affiliated with the Indepen- 
dent Order of Odd Fellows in Lucerne. In politics he is now a Democrat. 
I\Ir. Clary married February 20, 1913, Mrs. Mabel Mummert, and they 
reside in the village of Lucerne, Indiana. 

Joshua Tucker. For a period of about forty years, Mr. Joshua 
Tucker has been one of the progressive farmers of Harrison township. 
He has spent practically all of his life in this vicinity, which is the loca- 
tion of the original settlement of this family in this county more than 
eighty years ago. No name is better known in that part of Cass county 
than Tucker, and few have with such credit to themselves and value 
to the community carried on their burden and life work during all 
these years of residence. 

Joshua Tucker was born on a farm just a mile north of his present 
homestead in Harrison township, on the thirty -first of ]\Iarch, 1850. His 
father's name was Abraham and that of his grandfather Michner. The 
maiden name of his mother was Margaret Witters, who was a daughter 
of David Witters. The grandfather came from Lafayette to Cass county 
about 1832, and was one of the first settlers who secured his land from 
the government. He cleared up a large tract, and his descendants still 
possess a considerable part of the land which he obtained direct from 
the government. The grandfather is buried in Noble township, and the 
father rests in Zion cemetery at Harrison township. 

On September 28, 1873, Joshua Tucker married Miss Barbara Bailey, 
a daughter of Henry and Catherine (Mogle) Bailey. The children in the 
family of Mr. and Mrs. Tucker are as follows: Harry A. born July 7, 
1874 ; William W. born September 24, 1876 ; Charles M. born December 
28. 1879 ; Walter J. born July 12, 1883 ; Arthur T. born November 20, 
1888 ; Elmer R. born May 17, 1893, and Russell L. born April 25, 1896. 

Soon after their marriage, in 1873, Mr. Tucker and his wife moved to 
their present farm, where he is the owner of ninety-two and a half acres. 
This place, when he first took possession nearly forty years ago, was very 
little improved, and had poor buildings, and was not yet developed to a 
point of highly profitable cultivation. Since then Mr. Tucker has not 



-^ 



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7^^c^ 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 947 

only developed the land and the possibilities of the soil as a means of 
producing wealth, but has also made many improvements which increase 
the comforts of the place as a home, and now enjoys one of the best rural 
homes in the northern part of Cass county. During his youth in this 
county, Mr. Tucker had to walk a mile to school, and the term lasted for 
only about four and a half months out of the year. He thus came to 
know many of the deficiencies and difficulties of life in the early years 
of this county, and is in a position to realize and to appreciate the modern 
advantages. He and his wife are members of the Methodist church, and 
in politics he is a Progressive. He is also affiliated with the Knights of 
the Maccabees. 

Captain Daniel H. Mull, one of the most highly respected citizens 
of Logansport, died at his home in this city on January 12, 1903. After 
earning his rank and title by gallant service in the Civil war, he was for 
nearly forty years identified with the commercial life of Logansport, and 
his loss was not only a personal one, but also left a gap to be filled in 
the business world. Of a genial and generous disposition, he made 
friends wherever he was, and his undoubted ability and capacity for 
hard work made him a valuable man in the world of business and in 
the civic community. His father, Daniel Mull, was a German and his 
mother. Miss Anna Sites, of Irish descent, both of North Carolina; soon 
after their marriage they settled in Indiana. The late Captain Mull 
was born December 27, 1821, at Spencer, Owen county, Indiana, being 
in his eighty-third year when death came to him. His trade was cabinet- 
maker, and carpenter, and it is interesting to note that he helped to 
build the original Methodist church on Eighth and Broadway in Logans- 
port. In the family were two other sons and three sisters, and John 
Mull of Spencer, Indiana, was the last to pass away of that generation 
of the family. 

Daniel Hart Mull obtained a common school education in Owen 
county, and was a young man when he came to Cass county, being un- 
accompanied by any other members of the family but had a sister (i\Irs. 
Richard Hensley) living here, with whom he made his home until his 
marriage. He enlisted at the outbreak of the Civil war, and rose to the 
rank of captain of Company H in the Seventy-Third Indiana Infantry. 

He was taken prisoner May 3, 1863, and twenty-three months of his 
military experience were passed in Libby Prison. On the close of the 
war he engaged in the retail shoe business, and for many years was a 
leading member of the firm of D. H. Mull & Company, and also of the 
firm of J. B. Winters & Company. The late Captain Mull was a stanch 
Republican in polities, but never occupied official position. His fraternal 
affiliations were with Tipton Lodge of the Masonic order, and with the 
Grand Army of the Republic. 

On ]\Iay 28, 1846, Captain Mull married Sarah Simpson Jones, daugh- 
ter of Thomas Jones, who at one time served as sheriff of Cass county. 
Mrs. Mull died on July 30, 1904. Of their five daughters, two survive, 
namely: Mrs. Anna R. Clark of Indianapolis and Miss Fannie Mull of 
this city. The attractive homestead at 801 North street in Logansport 
was built by Captain Mull more than sixty years ago and is a landmark 
in the residence district and the center of many kindly memories and 



948 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

associations for the family. Captain Mull and family in early years 
worshiped at the Methodist church, and his body now rests in ]\It. Hope 
Cemetery. 

Dr. John J. Burton. A career of honorable and useful activity, 
largely devoted to the service of his fellow-men, has been that of Dr. 
John J. Burton, in Harrison township. Dr. Burton is now one of the 
oldest physicians in point of years of practice in his section of Cass 
county, and he is one of the best examples of that ideal type of the 
countrj^ doctor. 

Dr. John J. Burton was born in Harrison township on the twenty- 
third of March, 1850. The family have been residents in this section since 
pioneer days, and as farmers and public spirited citizens, have always 
done their part in the community. The doctor's parents were John and 
Susan (Sagaser) Burton, the latter a daughter of Henry Sagaser. Dr. 
Burton's father was born in 1816, and died in 1868, while his mother 
was born in 1815, and died in 1876. The father was a native of York- 
shire, England, and was about two years of age when his family crossed 
the ocean, and settled in northern Indiana. The doctor's mother was a 
native of Kentucky, and the five daughters and three sons who com- 
prised the family of which the doctor is a member were named as follows : 
Sarah Jane, who married John ]\Iorphet ; Amanda, who married Peter 
Montgomery; Elizabeth and Emma, who died in infancy; Elizabeth, who 
married Richard Brown ; Leonard R., whose first wife was Emma Baker, 
and whose second wife was Lena Batty ; John J., the doctor, whose mar- 
riage is mentioned in the following paragraph; and William L., whose 
first wife was Priscilla Murry, and who married second, Jane Conn. 

Dr. John J. Burton, when a boy, attended the district schools near the 
farm on which he was raised. Subsequently he studied in the high 
school at Logansport, and when his ambition has been set upon the study 
of medicine, and the privileges afforded him for preparation, he entered 
a medical college at Cincinnati, where he continued his studies until 
graduation, with his medical degree May 9, 1876. On returning from 
college, he began his practice in the vicinity of his old home, and has 
built up his patronage in the vicinity of people who have known him all 
his life, and who thoroughly esteem him for his ability and integrity of 
character. There is now only one physician practicing in this county, 
who was here at the time he began his practice. Dr. Burton has never 
held any office, though he is a Democrat in politics, and his family are 
membei-s of the Christian church. He was married June 21, 1877, to 
Miss Mary B. Lumbirt, a daughter of Hiram and Maria (Anderson) 
Lumbirt. The doctor and wife have no children. 

Rev. Joseph Todd. For many years a minister in the service of the 
Presbyterian church, but since 1904 engaged in the merchandise business 
in a general way, Rev. Joseph Todd has seen life from the viewpoint of 
the clergyman and the business man, and in these widely separated fields 
of activity has met with experiences that have rounded out his mentality 
and his entire nature in a most inclusive manner. As postmaster for 
nine years in Lucerne, appointed by President Roosevelt, he has seen 
something of service in the civil service department, and his fraternal 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 949 

relations in the popular organizations of the country have given him an 
acquaintance with men that he would never acquire, either in his churchly 
or business relations with fellows. 

Joseph Todd was born in Home county, Ohio, on June 23, 1861, and 
is the son of William and Mary (Moorehead) Todd. The father was the 
son of another William Todd, and the mother was the daughter of James 
Moorehead. The father of the subject was a farmer in Home county, 
who died in 1889, but the mother yet lives. As a boy, Joseph Todd had 
the advantages of the schools of the community wherein he made his 
home, which schooling was later supplemented by four years' study 
in college in Wooster University in Ohio. He succeeded in preparing 
himself for the ministry, and served in his ministerial capacity in his 
native state, also in White county, Indiana. He preached three years in 
the Presbyterian church in Lucerne, that service completing fourteen 
years of work in his ministerial capacity. In 1904 he returned to Lucerne, 
and since has here been engaged in the general merchandise business, 
in which he has realized a substantial success. He has served as post- 
master of the place for nine years, but beyond that has held no other 
office of a public nature. 

Fraternally ]\Ir. Todd is a member of the Masonic and Odd Fellow 
societies, and has considerable prominence in both orders. 

On September 29, 1893, Mr. Todd married Miss Cora Baker, the 
daughter of William P. Baker and his wife, who was Lydia Needham in 
her maiden days. Six children were born to them: Orville W. was 
born on December 31, 1896 ; Mildred A., born June 13, 1898 ; Louis I., 
born July 22, 1900 ; Forrest E. and Edna Fay, twins, were born on Octo- 
ber 27, 1907 ; and Thelma M. The family has made its home 
in Cass county since April 1, 1892, moving hence from White county, 
this state, and prior to that time had resided in the state of Ohio, where 
Mr. Todd and his wife were born. Both Mr. and ]\Irs. Todd were the 
children of fathers who fought for the preservation of the Union, the 
senior Todd having served throughout the war in the One Hundred and 
Sixty-sixth Ohio Infantry, while Mr. Baker served in the Eighty-seventh 
Indiana. 

No family in Lticerne enjoys a wider circle of friends than does the 
Todd house, and they are accounted among the more substantial people 
of the community. 

Clayton C. Campbell, ^L D. Perhaps it is true that each individual 
is born with oiae natural gift, but not every one seeks to discover it, or, 
finding it, has the opportunity to nurture or develop it. History and 
biography prove, however, that many of the most brilliant professional 
men of our land have felt this natural bent from youth — in the direction 
of law, medicine, the church or literature, and, with enthusiasm, con- 
trolled by circumstances, have sought advancement along this line. Not 
so many, perhaps, have reached the cherished goal in their most recep- 
tive years, some, indeed not until middle life, but here and there are 
found those who, at the open door of manhood, find also the door open 
to their chosen field of effort. Respectful attention, in this connection, 
is called to Dr. Clayton C. Campbell, of Walton, Indiana, whose persist- 
ent devotion to the self-imposed duties of his profession have gained him 



950 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

a position among the medical practitioners of his section that might be 
envied by many men a number of years his senior. Dr. Campbell was 
born August 14, 1879, in Preble county, Ohio, and is a son of Rome and 
Jennie (Disher) Campbell. There were four children in the family: 
Clayton C. ; Mrs. Isa Lairy ; Mrs. Ethel McNeely ; and Leonard, who is 
a civil engineer of Cambridge, Ohio. 

Clayton C. Campbell received his early education in the common 
schools of Eldorado, Ohio, and was still a lad when his father died, at 
which time the little family moved to Indianapolis, the courageous mother 
making it possible to keep her children about her by establishing herself 
in business as a milliner. In that city young Campbell accepted odd jobs 
at whatever honorable employment presented itself, carefully saving his 
money in the meanwhile, as he already had intentions of entering, if 
possible, upon a professional career. Finally he was able to enter the 
drug business, and after seven years spent therein had enough capital 
to pay for his first year's tuition in the College of Physicians and Sur- 
geons, Indianapolis, following which he took special courses on diseases 
of the eye with Dr. G. S. Row, of Indianapolis. He entered medical 
college in 1900 and graduated therefrom in 1904. He was president of 
the college Young Men's Christian Association, and was interested in 
all branches of its work, and when he entered the Deaconess Hospital 
was the first man of his college to become connected with that hospital. 
Thus thoroughly prepared, Dr. Campbell entered upon the practice of 
his profession in Indianapolis, but one year later went to Harrodsburg, 
Monroe county, and after two years in that town came to Walton, which 
has since been his field of endeavor. He is now in the enjoyment of a 
large and representative practice, and his success in a number of com- 
plicated cases has served to establish him firmly in the confidence- of the 
people of his community. 

In 1904 Dr. Campbell was married to Miss Mary I. Garvin, of Cam- 
bridge, Ohio, and to this union there were born three children : Clayton 
C, Jr. ; Elizabeth, who died when three years of age ; and Flora A. Dr. 
Campbell is prominent fraternally. He is a past master of the Masonic 
Lodge No. 723, Walton, and a member of the Knights of Pythias, the 
I. 0. 0. F., the Modern Woodmen of America and the Red Men. He 
is also a member of the County District and State Medical Societies. 
The family has always been prominent in the work of the Lutheran 
church, in which Dr. Campbell is serving as deacon. He has been act- 
ively interested in everything pertaining to the upbuilding of Walton. 

Ambrose Elliott. A family which has been represented in Harri- 
son township and Cass county for the greater period of its history is 
that of Elliott, represented by Mr. Ambrose Elliott of Harrison town- 
ship, where he is one of the most prosperous and progressive farmers. 

Ambrose Elliott was born in Montgomery county, Indiana, February 
9, 1840. His parents were Joseph and Martha (Lincoln) Elliott. Both 
of them came to Cass county at an early date. The father, who was of 
English descent, was for many years a substantial citizen and gave his 
family the best advantages procurable at the time, and under the con- 
ditions of life as it was then lived in this section of Indiana. Mr. 
Ambrose Elliott was married, after growing into manhood in this county, 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 951 

to Miss Agnes Winn, a daughter of Richard and Alice (Battie) Winn, 
After their marriage IMr. and Mrs. Elliott located upon a farm in Har- 
rison townsliip which contained one hundred and eighty-five acres, and 
which had been bought by his father. About forty acres of this land 
was cleared and a large part of the labor, during his early years as a 
farmer, was spent in clearing off the land and increasing the quality of 
cultivable soil. Mr. and Mrs. Elliott became the parents of five children 
whose names are as follows: Harvey, born December 6, 1867, married 
Susie Lovett, and they were the parents of two children, Floyd and 
Earl; Ida, the second child, born March 16, 1871, became the wife of 
Isaac Wilson and was the mother of four children, Ethel, Edna, and 
Roy still living, while Harvey died at the age of two years; Wilbert, 
born December 4, 1874, married Myrtle McCaughy, and they were the 
parents of two children, Lottie and Margaret ; Elmer, born September 
10, 1877, married, for his first wife. Viva Mahaffy, and for his second 
wife, Grace Burkell ; Albert, the youngest of the family, was born March 
30, 1880, and married Effie Brown, by whom he has two children, Forrest 
and Maud. For several years now, Mr. Elliott has lived retired, his 
earlier career having been prosperous to a high degree and giving him 
a competence with which he can enjoy his remaining years in leisure. 
In politics he is a Democrat, and has membership in the Methodist church, 

Benjamin Franklin Stuart. Though now a resident of Carroll 
county, Mr. Stuart had all his early associations with Cass county, and 
his family were identified with this county from 1856. He has had an 
active career, and is held in the highest esteem in old Cass. 

Benjamin Franklin Stuart was born in Floyd county, Indiana, July 
26, 1852, and is of Scotch descent on his father's side, and English on his 
mother's. Robert F. Stuart, his father, was born near Natchez, Missis- 
sippi, in 1818. When thirteen years old he came to Floyd county, Indiana. 
He married Susan Atkins, who was born in Floyd county in 1830, 
Neither of the parents had many advantages in the way of schooling, but 
were practical and substantial people, and did well for their family. 
They came to Cass county in 1856, locating two and a half miles west 
of Royal Center, in Boone township. While the father lived on a farm, he 
spent most of the time working at the cooper's trade. He was the 
first man to operate a cooper shop in Royal Center and shipped the first 
load of barrels from that place to Chicago. In politics he was a Whig, 
an Abolitionist and Republican. He voted and supported the Repub- 
lican ticket from 1856 till the time of his death. He never held any 
office and exercised his influence on civic affairs as a private citizen. 
He was a member of the Presbyterian church, and his death occurred 
on his farm in 1875. Benjamin F. Stuart had five brothers and two 
half-sisters and one half-brother, namely : Carolina, born in 1845 ; Maria, 
born in 1847; Stephen G., in 1849; Thomas J., in 1854; Robert A., in 
1858 ; John M., born in 1860 and died in 1875 ; Warren E., bom in 1863 ; 
Charles H., born in 1867, and died in the same year. 

Benjamin Franklin Stuart, as a boy, attended school at the Burr Oak 
schoolhouse in Boone township, and the Herman school in Jefferson 
township. Later he was in the graded school at Burnettsville, and the 
State Normal school. For forty years Mr. Stuart has been interested 



952 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

in and connected with tlie pnblic school system, as student, teacher, and 
as patron. He was four years old when the family came to Cass county, 
and many years of his life were spent in Boone and Jetferson townships, 
but at the present time he has his home on a fann in Carroll county. 
For eight terms he taught country school, and is still remembered by 
many of his old pupils. Later he took up farming as a regular occupa- 
tion, and has done quite a business as a dealer in live stock and as an 
auctioneer. His only noteworthy connection with public affairs to be 
mentioned was as trustee for the Seceder Cemetery Association, and 
outside of this has been content to exert his influence outside the medium 
of any public office. He is a Republican, and has been an admirer of 
the careers and personalities of Blaine, Harrison and Taft. 

On June 2, 1880, Mr. Stuart married Miss Mary I. Love at Idaville, 
the minister performing the ceremony having been Rev. Gilbert Small. 
Mrs. Stuart's parents were William and Deborah Love, who were sub- 
stantial farming people, and for fifty-eight years lived on one farm, 
located two and a half miles south of Burnettsville. The children of 
Mr. and Mrs. Stuart are mentioned as follows : Lucretia, born in August, 
1881, and died February, 1893; William, born May, 1883, died July, 
1883 ; Robert F., born June, 1884, now a student at Purdue University ; 
Pearl A., born June 18, 1887, a graduate in music, and formerly a teacher 
of that art, and now the wife of Larry Guthrie, a farmer in Carroll 
county; Mary Love, born October, 1891, a former student of the State 
Normal school, and now engaged in teaching; John M., born August 18, 
1894, now in the fourth year in the Burnettsville high school; Mason 
W., bom September, 1896, and in the third year in the Burnettsville 
high school. 

Mr. Stuart and family are members of the Presbyterian faith. Wliat 
Mr. Stuart regards as the best remembered and most eventful day in 
his life, contains incidents which are of interest beyond their individual 
associations with his own career. He looks back to a day in the early 
history of Logansport, in the month of October, 1860, a day of great 
festivity, when Cassius M. Clay was the principal orator of the occasion. 
Young Stuart was then eight years old, just at the time when impres- 
sions are deepest, and the memory will persist throughout life. He then 
saw for the first time the flag of the country, and heard the fife and 
drum and the "wide-awakes" marching to the music. He also heard 
the roar of cannons for the first time. Then it was that he looked upon 
the dashing waters of the Wabash and the Eel rivers, and viewed the 
long covered bridges which existed at that time. He saw a grist mill — 
the forest mill, and marveled at the canal and its boats, and the old 
aqueduct and escaping waters. All those things were Hvonderful to the 
boy of eight years, and all of them are pictures of a past-time in Logans- 
port and recall some of the institutions which were once an intimate part 
of life and activity in this county. 

Claude C. Bishop. A representative of one of the old families of 
Cass county which since early days has been prominently connected 
with the commercial development and substantial progress of this sec- 
tion of the state, Claude C. Bishop is now worthily sustaining the high 
reputation of the family by his honorable connection with the mer- 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 953 

can tile interests of Logansport. He was born at Walton, Cass county, 
June 13, 1869, a son of George W. and Sarah (Corbly) Bishop. His 
father, a native of Tiffin, Ohio, is a carpenter by trade, but for the 
greater part of his active career has been engaged in mercantile pur- 
suits, and at this time is residing at Walton, Indiana, where he is widely 
and favorably known among business men. 

Claude C. Bishop was reared at Walton, and primarily educated in 
the public schools of that place. Subsequently this was supplemented 
by attendance at the National Normal School, at Lebanon, Ohio, at the 
age of nineteen years, and in 1890 he was graduated from the scientific 
course of that institution. From this date for three years he and his 
brother, George W. Bishop, Jr., conducted a store at Walton, which had 
been founded by their father, but in 1893 he decided to take up the 
study of law, and accordingly entered the legal department of the Uni- 
versity of Michigan, at Ann Arbor. He was graduated therefrom in 
1895, and immediately thereafter came to Logansport and established 
himself in practice, but in 1897 returned to Walton and again took up 
merchandising. In 1906 he again came to Logansport, and with his 
brother bought the elevator formerly belonging to the Johnson Elevator 
Company. This the brothers conducted until May, 1911, when George 
W. Bishop, Jr., retired from the firm, and Mr. C. C. Bishop has since 
been the sole proprietor. In addition to running this elevator in a 
successful manner, Mr. Bishop has dealt in coal, flour, feed and tiling. 
By his honorable and upright business methods, he has gained and main- 
tained an enviable reputation, and among his business associates he is 
regarded as a shrewd, far-sighted man, whose judgment may be relied 
upon in matters of importance. In politics a Republican, he has been 
active in the support of his party's principles and candidates, and in 
1912 was the candidate for the office of representative to the State Legis- 
lature. Fraternally, Mr. Bishop is connected with the Masonic order 
and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. His career has proven 
that true success in life may be attained through the medium of personal 
effort and consecutive industry, and that the road to success is open to 
all young men who have the courage to tread its pathway, keeping ever 
in mind the rights of others. 

On April 7, 1892, Mr. Bishop was married in Walton, Indiana, to 
Miss Lulu Minnick, of that city, daughter of Justus Minnick. Three 
children have been born to this union, namely : Ralph H., John H. and 
Helen M. Both Mr. and ]\Irs. Bishop have many friends in Logansport, 
and are well known in social circles. 

]\IosES L. Plitmmer. Practically all his life a resident of Cass 
county, Moses L. Plummer gave the active yeare of his career to the 
farming industry in this section of the state, and it may be said in all 
sincerity and truth that few men in Cass county held a higher place in 
public confidence and esteem than did I\Ir. Plummer when he died. His 
life was characterized by the highest integrity and usefulness, and it is 
to such men as he that the splendid reputation which the county bears 
for stability, progressiveness and prosperity, is in a great measure due. 

When the late Moses L. Plummer was a lad of eight years his parents 
came to Cass county and settled in its fertile farming district. Here 



954 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

he was reared, and here he lived continuously until death called him 
January 1, 1871. 

Born on August 2, 1825, in Fayette county, Indiana, he was the son 
of John and Nancy (Ladd) Plummer. The father was born on the 6th 
day of September, 1772, in North Carolina. In 1800 he located in Vir- 
ginia, moving thence to Georgia, where he was married in June, 1810. 
In the following year he came to Ohio, and in 1814 moved into Fayette 
county, Indiana, remaining there busy in the farming industry until 
the year 1833, when he came to Cass county. Here he purchased a 
goodly farm, secured his patent rights from the government, the place 
being situated in section 16, in Clay township, and kno\vn down to the 
present day as the old Plummer homestead in Cass county. He died at 
his home there on July 4, 1855, when he had reached the fine old age 
of eighty-three years, and his widow followed him on July 7, 1859. They 
were the parents of eight children, as follows: Noble, Mary A., Thomas, 
Elihu, Elizabeth, John, Nancy and IMoses, the latter named being the 
subject of this review. 

As has already been mentioned, Moses Plummer was a boy of eight 
when he first saw Cass county. He was educated in the common schools 
and gave the usual amount of his time to the work of the farm home 
that the average country youth contributed to such employment. When 
he discontinued school the young man remained at home and gave dili- 
gent and faithfv;l service at the family homestead, and when he mar- 
ried on December 22, 1884, he left home and rented a place, it being 
his intention to establish an independent home. He was very successful 
in his farming enteiprise, and though he rented for the first few years, 
he eventually secured a place of his own and gained a position of prom- 
inence and undeniable influence in the county as a farmer of means 
and intelligence. 

Mr. Plummer married Miss Catherine Yohea, December 22, 1854, 
the daughter of Henry and Lydia (Ault) Yohea, who came from Wash- 
ington county, Pennsylvania, many years ago and located in Ohio. They 
later moved to Fulton coiuity, where ]\Irs. Plummer was reared. Six 
children were born to Mr. and i\Irs. Plummer. The eldest, Elihu, mar- 
ried Caroline Sullivan, and they have two children — Charles W. and 
George A. Plummer ; Emma is married to William O. Thomas, and 
they have three children living and one dead — Alvan M., Bessie and 
Owen, and Otho ]\I., deceased; ]\Iary married George J. Nichols, who is 
now deceased, and they have one living son — Kedar J. ; John L. lives 
at home on the old homestead; and Etta, the next to youngest of the 
family, shares the old home with him, John having been born on the old 
Plummer place. The family received their schooling in the schools at 
Onward, and are living lives of usefulness in the communities where 
they are established in homes of their own, all bearing the same high 
reputation that characterized the life of their deceased father in the 
many years that he passed in Cass county as an active participant in the 
industrial affairs of the district. 

Mrs. Plummer and her children have two old parcliment deeds, one 
executed Jime 25, 1841, and signed by President John Tyler, the other 
dated April 1, 1848, and signed by President James K. Polk. This 
makes the third deed of the kind found in Cass county, and are valu- 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 955 

able heirlooms in the Plummer family. The son John has his great- 
grandfather's will, dated October 26, 1805, and in the deed he willed 
three negroes, valued as follows: one at $2,500, one $2,000 and one at 
$1,800. This deed was executed in Florida. 

The Plummer family each year has a family reunion and herewith 
is presented a protrait of the reunion of the family at Spencer Park, Lo- 
gansport, Cass county, Indiana, in 1912. The pretty homestead is 
known as "Wood Lawn" in Tipton township. 

Philip Voorhees first came to Logansport, Indiana, in 1889, here 
identifying himself with the lumber industry of the place. Since that 
time he has made continued progress in his business, and has 
added a planing mill, in addition to which he has engaged in the handling 
of hardware, cement and lime. His success has been of a solid growth, 
each year marked by a significant advance in his fortunes, and he is 
today one of the leading business men of the city. Born in Coshocton 
county, Ohio, on April 16, 1857, Philip Voorhees is the son of Stephen 
and Eliza Ann (Heishman) Voorhees. 

Stephen Voorhees moved from Coshocton, Ohio, with his family to 
Carroll county, Indiana, locating southwest of Delphi, and there en- 
gaged in farming. He was a cooper by trade, and in the winter he occu- 
pied himself in that manner, giving up his summers to active farming. 
The first winter that Mr. Voorhees was in that community he worked 
in the woods, hauling his cordwood to Delphi, where he disposed of it. 
The following summer he rented a field and planted ten acres of it to 
corn. In the autumn, while he was engaged in making barrels, before he 
thought the corn ready for the harvest, the owner- of the field appeared 
on the scene, harvested the ten acres of corn, husked it and made off, 
thus beating Mr. Voorhees out of his season's work. This experience, 
however, was not sufficient to daunt the courage of the man, and he 
located a farm, which he operated in summers and applied himself 
to coopering in the winter seasons. He passed the remainder of his 
life in Carroll county, and carried on his daily work until the infirmities 
attendant upon advancing age made it impossible to longer keep up his 
activities. Although he was a renter for a number of years, good man- 
agement and economy made it possible in time for him to secure a farm 
of his own, and when he died he left a competency to his widow. He 
died in 1903, aged seventy-three, and she survived him until 1909, and 
was eighty-two years of age at the time of her passing. She was a 
member of the IMethodist Episcopal church and was a devout and much 
loved woman. These parents had a family of fifteen children. The first 
born and the last two died in infancy, six sons and six daughters yet 
surviving. 

When Philip Voorhees was two years old he came with his parents 
« from Ohio to Carroll county, Indiana. He was the youngest of the 
family at that time. As a boy at home he shared in the work of the farm, 
early learned something of the cooper's trade, and when he was nine 
years old made a creditable barrel, much to the pride of his father. He 
attended the district schools and remained in the home until he reached 
man 's estate. When he was seventeen years old he began working at the 
carpenter's trade and he continued in that work until 1889, when he en- 



956 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

gaged in the saw mill and lumber business at Flora, Carroll county, 
Indiana. In 1897 he came to Logansport and straightway identified him- 
self with the lumber business. He operated saw and planing mills for 
some time, and was afterwards at Flora, and eventually worked into the 
handling of hardware, cement, lime and builders' supplies. He is also 
interested in a cream separator factory at Lebanon, Indiana, known as 
the "Dairy Queen Separator Company," and he is the president of the 
company, which was organized in 1911. He is the owner of several hun- 
dred acres in Dakota, in Jefferson county, Indiana, and in Lafayette 
county, Arkansas. He is now engaged in those various lines of enter- 
prise, and is enjoying a pleasing success in the business world of Logans- 
port. One son, Arthur V., has a one-fourth interest in the business with 
Mr. Voorhees. 

On March 27, 1885, Mr. Voorhees was united in marriage with Miss 
Flora Baer, of Carroll county, Indiana, and Arthur W., previously men- 
tioned, is their only living child, one other having died in infancy. 

Mr. and Mrs. Voorhees are members of the Christian church, and Mr. 
Voorhees supports the platform of the Prohibitionist party. He is a mem- 
ber of the Order of Ben Hur. 

Benjamin F. Louthain. More than thirty-tive years ago Benjamin 
F. Louthain first attached himself to the Logansport Pharos, and since 
1877 he has been the chief editorial writer on its staff. That he has 
borne an emphatic part in the moulding of sentiment in Cass county 
along lines of public interest and civic development is undeniably true, 
and it is a truth patent to all that the influence of such a man as he has 
ever proven himself to be could only be for the best good of the com- 
munity in which his opinions and utterances hold sway. 

A native son of Cass county, Benjamin F. Louthain was born on the 
farm of his father, a short distance from the then village of Logansport, 
in the year 1847. His parents, William Preston and Elizabeth (McGrew) 
Louthain, were pioneers of the AVabash valley, and their son was reared 
in pronounced primitive fashion, as might be expected in consideration 
of the period and station of the family. It is significant of the boy that 
he was always a student, and his tastes in that line were early demon- 
strated by his buying a Uliited States history with the first money he 
ever earned. Diligent effort made it possible for him to enter the high 
school at Logansport when he was seventeen, and it was but a short time 
from then that he began work as a teacher. He was soon made principal 
of the school in Walton, Indiana, in which position he was especially 
successful. It was in about 1875 that he began to take a lively interest 
in the activities of the Democratic party, and in that year he was ap- 
• pointed deputy sheriff of Cass county, in which position he acquitted 
himself in a most creditable manner. He was particularly active in the 
campaigns of his party in the year of 1882, 1884, 1892, 1894 and 1896, in 
those years serving as chairman of the Democratic county central com- 
mittee, and has since held the same position in the party. In 1890 he 
served as a member of the Democratic state central committee, and his 
public services also include membership on the board of trustees of the 
State normal school at Terre Haute. 

The Logansport Pharos has long been recognized as the able exponent 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 957 

of the principles of the Democratic party, and it has in Mr. Louthain one 
of its stanehest advocates. 

Mr. Louthain has always given a deal of thought to the public school 
system of education, and has been the friend of advanced methods and 
more efficient service throughout. He has given valuable service to the 
city as a member of the school board, and for four years was postmaster 
of the city. 

On May 4, 1881, Mr. Louthain was united in marriage with Mrs. 
Matilda M. Emslie, of Logansport. 

George W. Walters. Displaying energy and resource, and measur- 
ing up to the standards and requirements of his profession, George W. 
Walters, of Logansport, has attained to an enviable place at the Cass 
county bar, and is well deserving of mention among those who have 
added to his adopted city's professional prestige. Losing his mother 
when he was an infant, his life from earliest boyhood has been passed 
practically among strangers, but his commendable perseverance has won 
him recognition as an attorney, and his admirable personal qualities of 
character have drawn about him a wide circle of appreciative friends. 
Mr. Walters was born in Boone township, Cass county, Indiana, July 19, 
1862, and is the one survivor of the two children born to Jacob and 
Emily (Washburn) AValters. His father, in early life a farmer, and later 
justice of the peace in Boone township, is now deceased, while his mother, 
as before stated, died when he was an infant. 

George W. Walters was reared in the village of Royal Centre, where 
he secured his education during the winter terms, while his summers 
were spent in working at whatever honorable employment presented 
itself. Ambitious and industrious, he seized every opportunity that came 
within his reach to gain an education, and when only sixteen years of age 
had qualified to teach school, in which vocation he continued for eight 
years, at intervals. For four years he was superintendent of the Royal 
Centre schools, but in 1883 gave up teaching to enter the National Normal 
University, of Lebanon, Ohio, being graduated from the scientific course 
thereof in 1884. Four years later, Mr. Walters came to Logansport and 
took up the study of law in the offices of McConnell & LlcConnell, and in 
the following year became an employe of the United States government 
at Washington, D. C, as a special agent of the labor department. In 
1893 he returned to Logansport and entered upon the active practice of 
his profession, which he has continued to follow to the present time. 
In 1903 and again in 1905 he was elected prosecuting attorney of the 
twenty-ninth judicial district, serving, in all, four years, and during this 
time displayed high abilities as a public executive. Mr. Walters has 
accomplished the task of the translation of the aspiring boy to the full- 
fledged lawyer with an acknowledged position at the bar. His early 
years were a period of struggle, of privation, of incessant labor with 
head and hands, but never with lessening of purpose, rather with eye 
firmly fixed on the goal, each obstruction in the way an incentive to in- 
creased endeavor and greater energy. Such a career should carry its 
own lesson, and prove inspiring to the youth of today who consider 
themselves handicapped by lack of funds and influential friends. For- 
merly a Republican, Mr. Walters in 1912 transferred his allegiance to 



958 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

the new progressive movement that resulted in the birth of the so-called 
"Bull Moose" party. His fraternal connections are with the Masons, 
the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and the Knights of 
Pythias. 

In 1886 Mr. Walters was united in marriage with Miss Lillian Barron, 
and they have two daughters: Edna and ]\Iildred. They attend the 
Broadway Methodist Episcopal church, in which they have many sincere 
friends. 

Dr. Adelbert Lee Palmer in the nine years of his identification 
with the medical profession in Logansport has come to be one of the 
best knowTi and most successful practitioners in the city or county. 
His advance has been constant and his rise in the public favor has seen 
a healthy growth since he established himself in practice in Logansport 
after he received his M. D. degree from Rush Medical College at Chi- 
cago, and once more has it been demonstrated that a man need not cut 
himself off from his native community in order to experience success in 
his chosen field of activity, the old aphorism to the contrary notwith- 
standing. 

Born in Washington township, Cass county, Indiana, on September 
27, 1878, Dr. Palmer is a son of John and Mary (Best) Palmer. John 
Palmer is a native Ohioan, born near Ironton, that state, of Scotch-Irish 
ancestry. He was a farmer, and first came to Cass county in 1852 in com- 
pany with his parents, settling on a farm in Clinton township, but after 
a short time the family moved to Logansport, thence to Washington 
township, where he has since resided, thirty-five years representing the 
time he has spent on the place he made his own in that locality. In 1870 
he married Mary Best, whose people were Pennsylvanians, and they be- 
came the parents of three sons, Charles Quincy, George Harrison and 
Adelbert Lee. The mother died on July 20, 1910. Mr. Palmer has 
served in varied local positions of trust in this community, and is known 
as a strong Democrat in his political faith, while he is a member of the 
Masonic fraternity. 

Dr. A. L. Palmer was reared on the home farm located three miles 
south of Logansport, on the Kokomo pike, and thus his acquaintance with 
the city has dated from his earliest boyhood. He attended the district 
schools in boyhood, later the schools in Logansport, and in September, 
1897, he entered the State University of JMichigan for the purpose of 
taking preliminary instructions in the study of medicine. He remained 
there until June, 1898, then matriculated at Rush Medical College in 
Chicago, and in 1903 was duly graduated from that institution with the 
degree of M. D. The newly fledged doctor straightway turned to his 
home community and there established himself in medical practice, and 
so well has he succeeded that he has never considered a removal to other 
fields, being well content to exercise his skill in the city which has known 
him all his life, and which has not been slow in recognizing his talent. 

In 1905-6 Dr. Palmer was secretary of the city board of health, and 
in the latter part of 1909 and in 1910 was county coroner of Cass county, 
being appointed to fill an unexpired term. In both these offices he dis- 
charged the duties intrusted to him admirably and to the entire satis- 
faction of all concerned. In 1910 he was elected to succeed himself in 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 959 

the office of coroner, his re-election following in 1912. Dr. Palmer is 
a Democrat in polities, and his fraternal relations are centered in the 
Masonic order, in which he has membership in the Knights Templar and 
the Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He is also 
a member of the Cass county and Indiana state medical societies and 
the American Medical Association. 

On June 28, 1906, Dr. Palmer married Miss Daisy Grace, daughter 
of "William Grace, of Logansport. 

John P. Hetherington, M. D., has been established in practice in 
Logansport since 1890, and has found a sure place in the esteem of the 
community at large in the passing years, as well as winning a high posi- 
tion in the ranks of the medical profession in this section of the state. 
Born in Cicero, Indiana, on February 15, 1869, Dr. Hetherington is the 
son of Dr. Augustus and Catherine (Teter) Hetherington. 

The Hetheringtons spring from one of the old Scottish clans known 
to history in Scotland from the Middle Ages. The American ancestors of 
the doctor came to America in the late half of the seventeenth century, 
settling in New York. The father, Augustus S. Hetherington, was a 
native of the state of Ohio, and he died in Hamilton county, this state, 
when his son, John P., was scarcely more than an infant. The widowed 
mother later wedded Dr. D. L. Overholder, of Logansport. Dr. Hether- 
ington died in 1872, when he was but forty-two years of age. 

Until he was five years old, Cicero represented the home of John P. 
Hetherington, after which he went to Logansport, where he remained 
until he was about fifteen. He was a student in the schools of the city 
during those years. In 1887 he began reading medicine under the ad- 
vice and instruction of Dr. Melntyre at Unadilla, Nebraska, and in the 
following year matriculated in the Eclectic Medical Institute in Cin- 
cinnati, from which he was graduated in 1890, with the highest honors 
in his class. Almost immediately the young doctor established himself in 
practice in Logansport, in association with Dr. J. B. Shultz, with whom 
he continued for the long period of twenty-one yeara. Since then he has 
conducted an independent private practice. 

Dr. Hetherington is local surgeon for the railroads and the inter- 
urban roads at Logansport, and he has the distinction of being one of the 
first doctors in this community to introduce the X-ray into his profes- 
sional work, and probably the first to own a heavy X-ray machine. 
• "While engaged in general practice, he has given especial attention to 
surgery and has won a considerable local prominence in that branch of 
his work. He is a member of the American Medical Association, the 
county and state medical societies, and also a member of the "Wabash & 
Pennsylvania Railroad Surgical Association. In a fraternal way he is 
affiliated with the Masonic order, being a Knight Templar of St. John's 
Commandery, and a member of the Knights of Pythias. He is a 
member of the Broadway Methodist Episcopal church. In the line of 
public service Dr. Hetherington has done good work as county coroner 
of Cass county, as well as serving on the city council at one time. 

Dr. Hetherington has been twice married. His first wife was Mary 
Lux, who was a past grand matron of the Eastern Star of Indiana. She 
died in April, 1910. The doctor later married Mrs. Bertha Miller, of 
Muncie, Indiana. 



960 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

Michael F. Mahoney. Undoubtedly while some men achieve success 
along certain lines and in certain professions, there are those who are 
born to them, their natural leanings and marked talents pointing unmis- 
takably to the career in which they subsequently achieve distinction. 
With some the call of the church cannot be disobeyed; to others the 
science of healing appeals; the business mart or the political arena en- 
gages many, while there are still others who early see in their visions of 
the future their achieving in the law and the summit of their ambition. 
To respond to this call, to bend every energy in this direction, to broaden 
and deepen every possible highway of knowledge and to finally enter 
upon this chosen career and find its rewards woi'th while — that has been 
the happy experience of Michael F. Mahoney, one of the leading attorneys 
of the Logansport bar. Mr. Mahoney was born at Delphi, Indiana, De- 
cember 18, 1863, one of the eight children, six now living, of ]\Iichael and 
Katherine (Ryan) Mahoney. His parents were natives of County Lim- 
erick and County Cork, Ireland, respectively, and each came with their 
parents to the United States, locating at Delphi, Indiana, where they 
were married. For twenty-seven years Mr. Mahoney, Sr., was in the 
employ of A. T. Bowen, the old-time banker of that place. In 1867 the 
family moved to Washington township, Carroll county, and there Michael 
Mahoney was reared. 

Until he was eighteen yeai-s of age, ]\Ir. Mahoney divided his time be- 
tween work on the home farm and attendance in the country schools. In 
1884 and 1885 he attended the State University at Bloomington, and in 
1886 and 1887 Georgetown College, Washington, D. C. He then came to 
Logansport, and in April, 1887, entered the law office of Michael D. 
Fansler, then prosecuting attorney. He practiced in the justice and city 
courts until he was admitted to the bar by examination, and immediately 
thereafter became Mr. Fansler 's assistant. In 1888 he became assistant 
to John W. McGreevy, prosecuting attorney, and served as such four 
years. In 1892 he became his preceptor's partner, the firm being known 
as Fansler & Mahoney, which continued uninterruptedly until Mr. 
Fansler 's death in May, 1895. In November of that year Moses B. 
Lairy, present appellate judge, retired from the circuit bench, and with 
him, under the firm style of Lairy & IMahoney, Mr. Mahoney continued 
in practice until January 1, 1911. By a singular coincidence Judge M. 
B. Lairy was elected appellate judge, defeating Judge J. M. Rabb, who 
had served on the appellate bench for four yeai's, and Judge Rabb, on 
June 1, 1911, became Mr. IMahoney 's partner, under the firm name of 
Rabb & Mahoney, which has since continued. During the session of the 
legislature of 1889, Mr. IMahoney was committee clerk in the house of 
representatives ; in 1894 he was countv attorney, and also held that office 
in 1896, 1897, 1898 and 1899 ; in 1908 and 1909 he was a member of the 
Logansport school board. In political matters he is a Democrat, and in 
1888 was secretary of the Democratic county central committee. Ever 
since being admitted to the bar, by reason of his legal associations, Mr. 
Mahoney has been connected with nearly all of the noted criminal cases 
in the judicial circuit. He is a Roman Catholic in religion, and belongs 
to the Sigma Chi college fraternity. 

On June 20, 1894, ]\Ir. Mahoney was married to Katherine Farrell, 
and they have two children, Madeline and Raymond. 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 961 

David Payson Hurd. Although he has been the owner of his pres- 
ent farm on the Walton and Bunker Hill road for only seven years, D. 
P. Hurd is one of the old residents of this part of Cass county, whence 
he came as a lad of seven years. His subsequent career covers a period 
spent in the grain business and in extensive agricultural operations, and 
at this time he is the owner of an eighty-acre tract two miles west of 
"Walton. In all of his operations, ]\Ir. Hurd has been uniformly success- 
ful, and he has not only been fortunate in a material way, but has suc- 
ceeded also in firmly establishing himself in the good graces of all with 
whom he has had transactions. Mr. Hurd is a native of the Prairie 
state, born April 12, 1861, at Lawn Ridge, Marshall county, Illinois. 
His father, a native of Nashua, New Hampshire, migrated to Illinois in 
young manhood, and was there married and settled down to agricultural 
pursuits. In 1868 he came to Walton, Indiana, and embarked in the 
sawmill business, in whieli he continued throughout the remainder of 
his life. He also did an excellent business in handling grain, and was 
known as one of Walton's substantial business citizens. He and his 
wife were the parents of six children: Walter, deceased, D. P., Ma- 
tilda, Willard, Lyra and Frank. 

D. P. Hurd was a boy of seven years when he accompanied his par- 
ents to Walton, and there he received his education in the public schools. 
In the meantime, he had assisted in the work of his father's mill, gaining 
experience that had proved very valuable to him in subsequent years. 
He was ambitious and industrious, and when he had thoroughly mastered 
all the details of the grain business, he embarked therein on his own 
account and soon built up a thriving trade. Eventually, however, Mr. 
Hurd decided to enter agricultural pursuits, and accordingly, in 1906, 
he purchased his present handsome property, a tract of eighty acres 
which he has brought into a high state of cultivation. He is progress- 
ive himself, and believes in progressive measures, which he has applied 
to his work with a large measure of success. Experience has shown him 
that modern ideas and methods obtain far better results than the old hit 
and miss style, and he uses the latest improved machinery in his work. 
His buildings are large and substantial and the entire place speaks of 
the presence of able and thrifty management. , 

On April 13, 1882, Mr. Hurd was married to ]\Iiss Mary C. Bowyer, 
who died not long thereafter. On November 26, 1885, Mr. Hurd was 
married (second) to Miss Sarah E. Schwalm, and they became the par- 
ents of the following children : Lyra IM., Jessie H., Henry N., George 
^I., David O. and ]\Iabel. Lyra M. received her diploma in public 
schools and spent two years in the high school at Logansport. She died 
at the age of twenty-three. She was a member of the Lutheran church 
and was a teacher in the Sunday school, a member of the Ladies' Aid 
and Literary club. She is interred in the Walton cemetery, where a 
beautiful stone marks her grave. Jessie H. received her diploma in the 
public schools and she graduated from the Walton high school in 1908. 
She spent one term in Valparaiso LTniversity and one term in Earlham 
College. She is a member of the Lutheran church. Henry N. received 
his diploma from the public schools and graduated from the Walton 
high school in the class of 1912. He is at home and an agriculturist. 
George M. received his- diploma from the public schools and also gi'adu- 



962 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

ated from the Walton high school, class of 1913. He is at present at 
Winona College. David 0. finished the public schools and received his 
diploma. Mabel died August 14, 1909. Mr. and Mrs. Hurd's children 
have all received the benefits of good education, fitting them for the 
higher walks of life. INIrs. Hurd is a native of Cass county, born April 9, 
1859, and was educated in the common schools. She is a model house- 
keeper and her home is her paradise. She is secretary of the Ladies' 
Aid Society. With his family, Mr. Hurd attends the Evangelical Lu- 
theran church. He has found no time to enter polities as a seeker after 
personal preferment, but in him good government and good citizenship 
have always found a stanch friend and supporter, as do movements 
tending to advance the cause of education, morality and general progress. 

I. N. Crawford. A Resident of Logansport since 1869, I. N. Crawford 
has had a career crowded with varied experiences, marked by ventures 
of extent and importance, characterized at all times by the strictest in- 
tegrity and adherence to honorable business methods, and stamped with 
the approval of all with whom he has come into contact. A pioneer of 
Indiana in various lines of business activity, he has identified himself 
with diversified enterprise, in all of which he has met with uniform 
success, and today he is justly regarded as one of the foremost of his 
city's commercial geniuses. Mr. Crawford was born February 17, 1843, 
at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, a member of the family of five sons and one 
daughter, all living, born to James and Ann Jane (Creighton) Crawford, 
farming people of the vicinity of Pittsburgh. 

I. N. Crawford was reared to agricultural pursuits and educated in 
the public schools of his native locality in a log schoolhouse with punch- 
eons floor and with the cracks filled with mud. These same cracks 
afi'orded the scholars much pleasure in kicking out the mud to get 
fresh air. Mr. Crawford believed that further west better opportunities 
were furnished for ambitious and energetic young men, and accordingly 
when twenty-five years of age he left home. For some time he traveled 
through the middle West, visiting St. Paul, Chicago and other points, 
but eventually decided to cast his fortunes with the growing town of 
Logansport, and in 1869 embarked in a lumber business at Fifth and 
North streets. Three years later he disposed of his interests to his 
brother, and started buying and shipping lumber, being the first here 
to ship poplar to Boston. In 1873 he bought an interest in a hardware 
store, and was associated with T. J. Immel for two years, but in 1875 
bought I\Ir. Inimel's interest and ever since that date has been the sole 
owner of this establishment, one of the oldest in the state. Not long 
thereafter ]\Ir. Crawford secured a half interest in a stone quarry at 
Alton, Illinois, and for three years divided- his time between Alton and 
Logansport, but eventually traded his interest in the quarry for a steam- 
boat, with which he carried salt, cotton and provisions to the Cherokee, 
Choctaw and Creek Indians, having previously effected a contract with 
these tribes for that purpose. About the year 1886 he embarked in saw- 
milling on the St. John's river, in Florida, becoming the pioneer in ship- 
ping cypress shingles to the East, fiirnished lumber for the Ponce de 
Leon, Csnomica and Alcazar hotels, and for five years shipped on the 
high seas, his product going to the Bermudas and eastern port cities of 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 963 

the United States. The mill burned about 1891, and after a few years 
spent in retirement, recuperating from his strenuous labors, Mr. Craw- 
ford started a sawmilling business at Dixon, Kentucky. There he con- 
tinued for some five or six years, and while located at that point secured 
the contract for the building of the Bourbon county (Ky.) court- 
house, a deal that concerned some $250,000, and which he successfully 
completed. After a few years Mr. Crawford turned his attention to 
farming at West Baden, in Orange county, Indiana, but in September, 
1912, disposed of this land. During all of this time Mr. Crawford had 
continued to conduct the hardware store in Logansport. For about 
fifteen years he has been a stockholder and director in the City National 
Bank, of which he is vice president, and at this time acting president. 
Mr. Crawford is a man of sound judgment, and not only can plan 
brilliant business enterprises, but has the business ability to carry them 
into successful operation. His career has been governed by the strictest 
regard to the ethics of commercial life and his reputation is unassailable. 
In addition to the activities' before mentioned Mr. Crawford is the pos- 
sessor of an excellent military record, being a veteran of the war between 
the states. He enlisted in 1862 for nine months' service in Company H, 
One Hundred and Twenty-third Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteer In- 
fantry, with which organization he participated in numerous engage- 
ments, including Second Bull Run, South Mountain, Antietam, Freder- 
icksburg and Chaneellorsville. He was never absent or sick a day, and 
received his honorable discharge at Harrisburg in 1863 by reason of the 
expiration of his term of service. He is a valued comrade of the Grand 
Array of the Republic. In political matters he is a Republican, but has 
not cared for public life. 

In 1869 Mr. Crawford was married to Miss Isabel J. Ross, of Alle- 
gheny, Pennsylvania. They are members of Broadway Presbyterian 
church. 

Although past seventy years of age Mr. Crawford claims that he can 
throw more dirt off of his feet on the store floor than many of the young 
American boys of the present generation. 

Joseph S. Craig, who died in Logansport on March 28, 1910, was 
a man of more than usual force of character. He was bom in Green- 
ville, Darke county, Ohio, on January 19, 1830, and was a son of 
James and Matilda (Quinn) Craig. By the time he was eight years of 
age both his parents had been claimed by death and he was reared to early 
manhood by an uncle, J. C. Quinn. When he was sixteen years old he 
began life 's battle upon his own responsibility, and in June, 1849, went 
to Huntington, Indiana, where he married Emily Johnson. He moved 
to LaGro, Wabash county, where his three children were born, and where 
Mrs. Craig died in 1862. In the following year, 1863, he moved to 
Wabash, where he served as deputy sheriff for the county until his en- 
listment in Company G, Seventeenth Indiana Volunteer Infantry. He 
subsequently helped to recruit the One Hundred and Thirtieth Indiana 
Volunteer Infantry and mounted to the rank of captain. After being 
honorably discharged at the close of the war he was engaged in merchant 
tailoring at Wabash until 1872, when he came to Logansport, and this 
city ever afterwards was his home. Here he conducted a merchant tailor- 



964 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

ing establishment successfully and profitably. He was a man whose 
sterling character commended him to his fellow men at all times, and held 
the esteem and confidence of all who knew him. He joined the Odd Fel- 
lows in 1856 and was a charter member of the Knights of Pythias lodge 
of Logansport, and a Methodist in religion. In 1866 he remarried, his 
second wife being Minerva Pickering. 

William D. Craig is the only living child of his parents, Joseph S. 
and Emily (Johnson) Craig. He was born at LaGro, Indiana, Septem- 
ber 4, 1856, and was reared at Wabash, where he acquired his early 
education in the public schools. He came to Logansport in 1872, and 
having worked for his father in the merchant tailoring business, he 
became a partner in the business, under the firm name of J. S. 
Craig & Son. 

In 1889 Mr. Craig disposed of his interest in the business and em- 
barked in the manufacture of overalls under the name of the Thomas 
Manufacturing Company, and in a short time he became the sole owner 
of the business. He continued in the manufacturing of overalls until 
1907, since which time he has devoted his entire time to the manufacture 
and jobbing of juvenile suits. It is probable that not more than a few 
people in Logansport realize that the business conducted by Mr. Craig 
in this line is one of the largest manufacturing establishments of the 
city. He is also running d branch factory in Tipton, Indiana, started in 
May, 1913. He employs as many as one hundred people, mostly girls, 
and does an annual business of one hundred thousand dollars, his 
product being marketed in almost every state in the Union. 

Mr. Craig is a Republican, and is a member of the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks, the T. P. A., and the Country Club. He is also 
a member of the Deutsch Verein. 

In April, 1888, Mr. Craig married Miss Frances M. Place, and they 
have one child, Virginia D. Craig. 

John E. B^vbnes. During a period covering more than a half cen- 
tury, John E. Barnes, of Logansport, has been engaged in contracting 
and building in Cass county, where his activities have left a distinct 
impress upon the community and contributed materially to its progress 
and development. A self-made man in the broadest meaning of the title, 
his advancement has been steady and continuous, and today he holds an 
enviable position among the business men of this flourishing Indiana city. 
Mr. Barnes came to Cass county in November, 1854, with his parents, 
the family locating in' Logansport. His father, Thomas Barnes, was a 
native of England, where he married Ann Beame, and they became the 
parents of twelve children, all with the exception of one being born in 
Great Britain, and six of whom still survive. Thomas Barnes was a stone- 
mason by trade, and followed that vocation and contracting throughout 
his career. For one year after coming to this country he resided in 
Brooklyn, New York, and his death occurred in Logansport about the 
year 1864. 

John E. Barnes was born in England, September 8, 1841, and was 
thirteen years of age when his people came to Logansport. He received 
only a limited schooling in his youth, and the ample education which he 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 965 

now possesses was obtained in the school of experience. Even before 
he had attained his majority, he began his career as a contractor, and 
this occupation, in a large extent, he has followed throughout life. He 
was for eleven years in partnership with John Medland, under the firm 
style of Medland & Barnes, which firm, among other structures, erected 
the Cass county courthouse, the First Presbyterian church, and a number 
of business blocks and school buildings. Since closing his partnership 
with Mr. Medland, Mr. Barnes has had his sons associated with him, and 
they have erected the Logansport public library, the Logansport high 
scliool and a number of the buildings of the Culver Military Academy, 
and also rebuilt the Presbyterian church. Mr. Barnes' buildings are 
monuments to his skill and reliable workmanship, and he has always 
been known as a man of the highest integrity, who has at all times lived 
strictly up to the letter of his contracts. A Republican in his political 
proclivities, he has served efficiently as a member of the city council, and 
as a member of the board of trustees of the waterworks. 

In 1864 Mr. Barnes was married to Miss Elizabeth J. Bates, and they 
have been the parents of eight children, of whom the following six still 
survive: Clara A., who married George W. Funk; Charles H., W. W. 
Curry, James I., and Benjamin F. and George W., twins. The family 
is connected with the Universalist church. Fraternally, Mr. Barnes is 
connected with the Masons and Odd Fellows, is president of the Odd 
Fellows' Hall Association, and holds the position of secretary of the 
Odd Fellows' Hall trustees. He is also president of the Home for the 
Friendless, a position to which he was elected to fill the vacancy occa- 
sioned by the death of former President Rice. Since the winter of 1854 
Mr. Barnes has not only been an eye-witness to the development of Cass 
county, but has done his part in bringing about the changes which have 
contributed to its present prosperous condition. As one of its leading 
and public-spirited citizens he is held in the highest esteem, and his many 
friends testify readily to his personal character and great popularity. 

James I. Barnes. No record of the successful business men of Cass 
county would be complete did it not contain a sketch of the career of 
James I. Barnes, whose work in the construction of many of Logans- 
port's most substantial buildings has been of a character to leave its 
impress on the city for many years to come. A native of this city, 
educated in its public schools and reared in the business in which he 
has gained such high reputation, he early displayed a certain progress- 
iveness, a marked intuitiveness and a prophetic shrewdness that prom- 
ised a subsequent distinction in his chosen field of endeavor, a promise 
that has been amply fulfilled. James I. Barnes was born January 5. 
1872 in Logansport, Indiana, and is a son of John E. Barnes. On com- 
pleting his public school education, he at once associated himself in 
business with his father, whose partner he was until the elder man's 
retirement. That his work has been of an extensive and substantia] 
character is evidenced by the list of large enterprises with which he has 
been connected, among his contracts being the following: The Haney 
residence, the AVestern Motor AVorks building, Rauth packing house, 
English Lutheran church, Strecker bakery building, IMaiben laundry 
building. Elks temple. Odd Fellows building, Aldine fiats, all in Logans- 



966 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

port ; Royal Center high school building, James Taylor building and 
electric light plant, at Royal Center, Ind. ; the Goodman and Harleeker 
buildings at Monticello, Ind. ; high school and bank building at Attica ; 
mess hall for the military academy at Culver ; a church building at Cen- 
tralia, Illinois ; township high school building at Kinmundy, Illinois ; 
high school buildings at Pennville. Shelbyville and New Salem, Indiana; 
ward school building at Alliance, Ohio ; high school buildings at ^lilt'ord 
and Sidney, Ohio ; Carnegie Library at Gary, Indiana, and high school 
at Pawnee, Illinois. All of this work has been accomplished during the 
past five years, in addition to which ]\Ir. Barnes has laid stone and 
gravel roads in Cass county, Indiana, to the extent of twenty-five miles. 
In August, 1899, ]\Ir. Barnes was married to Miss Emily C. Engle- 
brecht, of Logansport, Indiana, and they have had six daughters: Dor- 
othy Lucile, Emily Aldine, Doris Eleanor, Marjorie May, Clara Louise 
and Elizabeth Jane. The last-named, who was the second in order of 
birth, is deceased. ]\Irs. Barnes is a member of the German Lutheran 
church, and is well known in religious work and social circles. Mr. 
Barnes belongs to the Masons, the Knights of Pythias and the Elks. He 
is a Republican in his political views, but has taken only a good citizen's 
interest in public mattei-s, and, to use his own language, has never 
aspired, and never will, to public preferment. Essentially a business 
man, he has devoted his entire attention to his large interests, his ambi- 
tions being satisfied by the prestige he has gained among the men to 
whom Logansport is indebted for its commercial importance. 

John Hermann, M. D., who died August 8, 1889, was one of the 
strongest characters in the medical history of Cass county; a man 
of unusual force of character, one whose career and achievement in 
his field of endeavor if fully chronicled would alone fill the pages of a 
reasonably large volume of intensely interesting material. He was 
born in the Kingdom of Wurtemburg, Germany, August 27, 1834. 
His father occupied a prominent place in the political history of 
the Fatherland, having served as commissioner of public domain, an office 
that entailed the keeping of the king's forest. As a boy, Dr. Hermann 
attended the primary educational institutions, subsequently being gradu- 
ated from the Polytechnic school at Stuttgart. He then entered the Uni- 
versity of Tubingen, from which he received his medical diploma, suc- 
ceeding which he received the appointment of physician in the Orthopedic 
hospital at Coustatt, where he remained two years. With many of his 
countrymen he became embroiled in the revolutionary movement for 
free suffrage and home rule, which, proving a failure, he was obliged to 
flee his native land, and in 1864 came to America and for a time prac- 
ticed his profession at Buffalo, New York. While there, he met and 
married Miss Angeline deVillers, the daughter of a French army sur- 
geon. Unfortunately, he here lost the greater part of his means through 
unsuccessful investments, and largely because of this he determined to 
start anew in another locality. 

Locating in Chicago, Illinois, Dr. Hermann succeeded in getting fairly 
started and had a home prepared, but while he was going to meet his 
family, who had remaiuecl behind in Buffalo while he was establishing a 
residence for them, his property was destroyed by fire, and he was once 
more practically without means. Nothing daunted, with his family he 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 967 

started for the East in 1867, but owing to the illness of his daughter he 
stopped off at Logansport, Indiana. While at the hotel, where he was 
compelled to remain a few days, it was learned that he was a physician, 
and he was importuned by the German residents to remain. His success 
in several complicated cases won him early recognition, and he soon had 
more calls than he could attend to alone. Thus encouraged to remain, for 
nineteen years he was associated in successful practice here with Dr. 
William H. Bell. Dr. Hermann was a superior diagnostician and a phy- 
sician of unusual ability. Large in stature, jovial in nature, he radiated 
cheer in the sick room or wherever he went. His wide experience in this 
country and abroad, his extensive acquaintance with notable men, his 
education and profound knowledge along special lines, all made him an 
ideal companion and one whom it was a pleasure to know. Dr. Hermann 
was a notable example of the professional success and social prestige to 
be gained by foreign-born citizens, and his career may prove encouraging 
to those who are struggling to overcome obstacles in their endeavor to 
reach a position of independence. Dr. Hermann and his wife had four 
children, Arthur J. ; Jennie, the wife of Dr. Francis M. Bozer ; Francis 
J., and William. 

Dr. Francis Joseph Hermann, the second son of Dr. John Hermann, 
was born in Logansport, Indiana, July 4, 1875, completed his literary 
education at Canisius College, from which he was graduated in 1893, and 
received his early medical training under the preceptorship of his father. 
In 1894 and 1895 he attended Rush Medical College, Chicago, and the 
succeeding two years was a student at Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 
New York, which granted him a diploma in 1897. In this same year he 
began practicing in the office he now occupies, and here he has since con- 
tinued. As a physician and a citizen. Dr. Hermann is an able successor 
to his distinguished father, and well merits the universal esteem in which 
he is held. On June 26, 1907, he was united in marriage with Miss 
Honora I. McHale, of Logansport. 

William H. Ramer. Among the citizens of Cass county who are 
rendering their community signal services in public office may be men- 
tioned William H. Ramer, of Washington township, who in the capacity 
of assessor has given the voters of his community no reason to regret 
their choice. Essentially an agriculturist, reared in the atmosphere and 
to the work of the farm, he has proven himself an efficient, painstaking 
and courteous public official, and has added to the friendships that long 
years of honorable dealing had previously gained for him. I\Ir. Ramer 
has spent his entire life on the farm on which he now lives, a well-culti- 
vated tract of 120 acres, located on the Ramer road, about nine miles 
southeast from Logansport. Here he was born February 4, 1870, in the 
old home, a son of Justus and Georgina (Ritter) Ramer. 

Henry Ramer, the paternal grandfather of William H., was a native 
of Germany, and in his youth came to the United States, locating first 
in Pennsylvania, where he carried on farming until 1841. In that year 
he made removal with his family to Cass county, Indiana, where his 
subsequent years were spent, and where he died honored and respected 
b}" all. Justus Ramer, his son, was born in Pennsylvania, and was a lad 
when he accompanied his father to Cass county. Like him, he devoted 
his attention to the tilling of the soil, meeting with success in his ven- 



968 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

tures aud gaining the respect of his fellow-citizens. He married Geor- 
gina Ritter, and they became the parents of six children, namely: Wil- 
liam H., Mrs. Louisa Schwalm; George, a resident of Chicago, Illinois; 
i\Irs. Emma Jenness ; and John and Myrle, of Washington township. 

The education of William H. Ramer was secured in the district 
schools of Washington township, which he attended during the winter 
months, and, being the eldest of his parents' children, when his father 
died the management of the home place and the care of the family de- 
volved upon him, although at that time he was but eighteen years of 
age. Thoi'oughly trained in farm work, industrious, persevering and 
ambitious, he was able to take up the work of the home place where his 
father had left it and his subsequent success has resulted from constant 
and industrious labor, well directed. He has a tract of 120 acres, on 
which he raises excellent crops, and here he has made numerous im- 
provements of a modern character. His buildings are substantial, his 
stock sleek and well-fed, and his farming implements of the most mod- 
ern manufacture, and the entire appearance of the property gives elo- 
quent evidence that he is a practical and scientific agriculturist. 

On June 3, 1896, i\Ir. Ramer was married to Miss Jennie ^Nlinnick, a 
daughter of John H. and Lillis (Doud) Minnick, of Washington town- 
ship; and two children have been born to this union: Blanche M., who 
is a high school student ; and Edgar M., who is in the seventh grade 
school. Mr. Ramer has taken a keen and intelligent interest in political 
affairs, and in 1908 was elected assessor of AVashington township, a 
position which he continues to fill to the entire satisfaction of all con- 
cerned. He is a member of the I. O. 0. F., Walton lodge. No. 31-i, and 
he is a past grand. With ]\Irs. Ramer, he attends the Presbyterian 
church, in the work of which all the members of the family are very 
active. The beautiful estate of Mr. and Mrs. Ramer is known as "Wal- 
nut Dell Stock Farm." 

Jasper Newton Nefp, M. D. Belonging to a family that has made 
Cass county its home for upwards of three-quarters of a century, and 
members of wiiich have, during this time, been identified with the various 
occupations, professions and industries to which this section of Indiana 
owes its importance. Dr. Jasper Newton Neff, of Logansport, prominent 
physician and extensive land owner, holds a position of prestige in the 
business and professional life of his locality. He has been a resident 
of Logansport since the fall of 1895, and while his large landed in- 
terests and the duties of his vocation have demanded the greater share 
of his attention, he has not been unmindful of the duties of citizenship, 
his public-spirit having been manifested on various occasions when the 
welfare of the city or its people has been at stake. Dr. Neff was born 
on his father's farm in Deer Creek township, Cass county, Indiana, Jan- 
uary 2, 1852, and is a son of Jacob and Henrietta (Berry) Neff, natives 
of Ohio. His father was a son of Joseph and Polly (Sink) Neff, who 
came to Cass county from the Buckeye State in 1838, and during the 
rest of their lives lived in Deer Creek township. They became the parents 
of six children, namely: Jacob, Allen, Josiah, Frank, Alexander and 
Mary, all of whom are deceased. Jacob Neff was still a lad when he 
accompanied his parents to Deer Creek township, and there he grew up 
and was married to Henrietta Henderson Berry, daughter of Henderson 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 969 

Berry. Following their marriage they located on a farm in Deer Creek 
township, there spending the rest of their useful lives in the tilling of the 
soil. They became the parents of four sons, all of whom were well edu- 
cated and fitted for whatever positions they were called upon to fill, and 
all have reached honorable places in life, Joseph H. being a leading mem- 
ber of the bar of Logansport, Indiana; Dr. Jasper N., the well-known 
Logansport physician; Francis M., being a musician of distinguished 
ability, residing here in Logansport, and Dr. Jacob L., having reached 
a recognized position aixfong the medical practitioners of Logansport, 
Indiana. 

Until he was seventeen years of age Jasper N. Neff worked as a farm 
hand in Cass county, during which time he attended the neighborhood 
school. Subsequently he spent one year in the Lebanon (Ohio) Normal 
school, and was eighteen years of age when he passed the required exami- 
nation necessary to secure a teacher's certificate. At that time he was 
placed in charge of a school in Deer Creek township, and during the next 
three years he divided his time between teaching this school and attend- 
ing the normal. While here he decided to enter the profession of medi- 
cine, and accordingly gave special attention to the study of anatomy, 
physiology and chemistry, and in 1876 graduated with honors at the 
College of Physicians and Surgeons, Indianapolis, where he received his 
degree of Doctor of Medicine. At this institution the late Dr. Robert N. 
Todd, president of the college, acted as his preceptor, and in addition 
to his kind encouragement and assistance, gave him his personal attention 
during a severe spell of sickness, for which Dr. Neff will ever hold his 
memory in grateful remembrance. After his graduation Dr. Neff estab- 
lished himself in practice in Walton, Indiana, where he continued in the 
enjoyment of a large and representative clientele during the next twenty 
years. During this time he had been a heavy investor in farming prop- 
erty, and through intelligent transactions and shrewd foresight his 
holdings had become so large and required so much attention, that it was 
his intention to retire from active practice, and with this end in view 
came to Logansport. He has not been permitted, however, to leave the 
ranks of active practitioners, although he now confines himself to office 
practice and consultation. He is widely known in professional and busi- 
ness activities of Logansport, and with his family enjoys the friendship of 
a wide circle of congenial friends, his home being a center of social re- 
finement. 

In 1891, Dr. Neff was married to Miss Lavina Flynn, who died in 
1894, and in the following year he was married to Mrs. Flora Bennett, 
daughter of Thomas Elwood Trueblood, for many years one of Howard 
county's most prominent and highly respected citizens. 

Dr. John H. Barnfield was born in Jersey Shore, Lycoming county, 
Pennsylvania, July 2, 1864, and is the son of William Nelson Barnfield, 
a Pennsylvania lumberman. Dr. Barnfield was reared in his native 
town, and after completing the course prescribed by the village schools 
became a student at Millersville state normal school. He then took up 
the study of medicine under Dr. J. F. LIcClure, of Watertown, Penn- 
sylvania, and in 1883 entered Jefferson Medical College, from which 
he was duly graduated in 1886. 



970 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

Dr. Barnfield began the practice of his profession in Irvona, Penn- 
sylvania, and while there was surgeon for the Witmer Land and Coal 
Company. He remained in that place for three years, then became medi- 
cal examiner in the relief department of the Pennsylvania Railway 
Company, serving in that capacity for four and a half years. In June, 
1894, he came to Logansport, and established himself in the general prac- 
tice of medicine, and this city has represented the scene of his professional 
activities since that time. In 1905 Dr. Barnfield took a post-graduate 
course in the Chicago Polyclinic, thus further fortifying himself in the 
knowledge of his profession. 

Dr. Barnfield is a Democrat in his politics. He is a member of the 
Logansport Commercial Club, in which he is chairman of the executive 
committee. He is a member of the Cass county and state medical socie- 
ties, and of the American Medical Association. 

Dr. Barnfield was married in 1894 to Miss Mae S. Schlater, of Rich- 
mond, Indiana. 

Ira Blackburn. A native citizen of Cass county, whose worth and 
character are material factors in the recent progress of this community, 
is Ira Blackburn, whose rural home is situated in Harrison township, an 
old place which has been in the family for many years. Three genera- 
tions of the Blackburn family have been identified with Cass county, and 
they have always been known as thrifty citizens, and worthy members of 
the community. In ancestry they are of English and French descent. 

Ira Blackburn was born in Harrison township, Cass county, January 
26, 1874. His grandfather was James Blackburn, and his father was 
David Blackburn. The latter, who is now a retired resident of Harrison 
township, married Susan Batty, a daughter of Thomas Batty. David 
Blackburn, the father, was also born in Cass county, and his father, the 
grandfather of Ira, put up the first building that stood on the farm now 
occupied by the grandson. This was in the pioneer days, when practically 
all the country was new, and the Blackburn family found their land in 
its virgin state, and have made practically all the improvements that have 
appeared thereon during the succeeding years. 

Ira Blackburn was reared in his native locality, attending the country 
schools, and on attaining manhood became a partner with his father in 
the management of the home farm. He and his father now conduct the 
homestead together, and make a very profitable business out of its culti- 
vation. Mr. Ira Blackburn is owner of forty acres of "his own, situated 
opposite the old homestead. On June 1, 1898, he married Miss Mattie A. 
Herd, a daughter of John and Emma (Burton) Herd. The three chil- 
dren born to their union are : Blanche, born May 22, 1901 ; June, born 
June 24, 1904, and Mae, born June 2, 1911. 

Jesse W. Neff. One of the representative farming men of Bethle- 
hem township who is worthy of mention in this biographical and historical 
work by reason of his accomplishments as a tiller of the soil and one of 
the world's workers, is Jesse W. Neff, a resident of this township since 
July, 1889. He was born on May 15, 1852, in Darke county, Ohio, and 
is the son of Alfred J. and Nancy (Wilson) Neff. His paternal and 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 971 

maternal grandparents were Wilson Neff and James Wilson, and his 
father's people were of German ancestry. 

Alfred J. and Nancy (Wilson) Neff became the parents of seven 
children, four of whom are now deceased. John V. died in infancy; 
Frank P. died in 1871 ; Laura died in 1879 ; Ira W. died in 1879 also. 
James L., Emma and Jesse W. yet survive. 

Jesse W. Neff came to Cass county on July 15, 1889, from Miami 
coujaty, where he had previously been located. He settled on a small 
farm and devoted his time to the improvement of that place and to the 
acquiring of more land. Today he and his wife have a fine place of one 
hundred and forty acres in an excellent state of cultivation, with com- 
fortable buildings of every description, all new and modern, and the work 
of their own hands. 

On June 27, 1888, Mr. Neff was united in marriage with Miss Keren 
Harter, the daughter of John and Mary E. (Kreider) Harter. She was 
born in Miami county, Indiana, December 16, 1860, and there reared. 
Four children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Neff, as follows: Ruth, 
who died at the age of three years; Leon H., born June 27, 1892; Paul 
v., born October 22, 1894 ; Jessie, born November 23, 1896, and Wayne B., 
born November 17, 1902. 

The family are members of the Presbyterian church, and Mr. Neff is 
prominent in the local lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
which he joined at the age of twenty-one years, and has been faithful 
and true, and in which he has held many offices. He is a Democrat 
and a leading citizen of his community. In 1910 Mr. Neff 's father died, 
but his widowed mother still lives on the old home place in Miami county, 
where they located a number of years ago. 

Lemuel Povpell, a pioneer farmer of Bethlehem township, was born 
in Jefferson county, Ohio, on October 24, 1834. He came to Cass county 
with his parents, Jo»siah and Margaret (Mugg) Powell, when he was two 
years old, and has resided continuously in the county since that early 
date. At that time Bethlehem township was a wilderness, with a cabin 
in a small clearing here and there, and with no schools or churches in the 
community. Mr. Powell has borne a worthy part in the development of 
the township and making of it what it is today, and is by reason of that 
fact deserving of an honorable mention in the pages of this history. 

Mr. Powell was educated in the old log school house of his boyhood 
days, and acquired a fair education for his time. He is a quiet, unas- 
suming man of the strictest honesty and probity, and no man in the 
county bears a better reputation for uprightness of character and genuine 
moral worth than does Mr. Powell. Although he is small in stature, he 
makes up for this in the excess of mental and physical energy he has 
ever displayed, and which have redounded to the good of the community 
which has represented his home so many years. With his wife he owns 
two hundred and fifty acres of fine land, all lying in Bethlehem town- 



Mr. Powell was married on February 7, 1864, to Sarah A. Roberts, 
who died on November 15, 1866, leaving one son, Choral G., born May 
13, 1865. This son is now married, his marriage to Laura W. Douglass 
occurring on December 7, 1892, and they have a family of seven children. 



972 , HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

On December 5, 1872, Lemuel Powell married a second time, when Mary- 
Martha Gray became his wife. Three children were born to this latter 
union, as follows: John V., lx)rn on September 5, 1874; Warren, born 
April 17, 1876, died July 10, 1892, being drowned accidentally; and 
Edna, born October 12, 1880. John V. and Edna are still under the 
parental roof, and there care for their aged parents and the entire family 
are highly esteemed in Bethlehem township — the elder ones as worthy 
citizens who have helped to reclaim the district fi'om a state of wilderness 
which existed when the white man made his first appearance in these 
parts in the early thirties, and the younger ones as worthy successors of 
their parents, who may be expected to do well their part in the further 
development of their native country. Mrs. Powell is a native of Jefferson 
township, Cass county, where she was bom July 9, 1839. She is the 
youngest of six children and the only daughter born to James and 
Catharine (Duncan) Gray, and is the only sui'vivor of the family. She 
was educated in the common schools of the neighborhood, and several 
terms walked two miles to attend the log cabin school, so well known 
at that time in that section of the county. Mrs. Powell was a member 
of the Presbyterian church. 

Mr. Powell is a Republican politically and cast his first presidential 
vote for John Fremont, the first Republican candidate, and has voted 
for each Republican candidate since. ]\Ir. and Mrs. Powell have two of 
the old parchment deeds executed March 30, 1837, that bear the signa- 
ture of President Van Buren. 

Levi B. Horn. The business of farming has occupied the best years 
of the life of Levi B. Horn thus far, and he is known for one of the suc- 
cessful and well-to-do agricultural men of the township of Bethlehem, 
where many of the leading citizens of Cass county may be found devoting 
their energies to the tilling of the soil and enjoying to the fullest their 
free communion with Dame Nature in the pursuit of their calling. Levi 
B. Horn, unlike many of his neighbors, is not a native resident of the 
county, nor of the state. He was born in Washington county, Pennsyl- 
vania, on September 12, 1851, and is the son of Thaddeus and Lina 
(Burson) Horn, his paternal grandfather being George Horn. The 
Horns are of German ancestry, while the Bursons are of Scotch descent. 

Mr. Thaddeus Horn did not receive any but the most meager common 
or district school education, but the business of life has kept his wits 
shai*i3 and his mind has been one ever open to impressions and to expan- 
sion, so that his lack of schooling has been in a large measure overcome. 
In 1852 Mr. Thaddeus Horn came to Bethlehem township and purchased 
the old John White farm from Joseph Sellers, and for a few years he 
lived on the place and gave diligent attention to its cultivation. He later 
sold the farm to a Methodist minister of the name of Terrill, and he him- 
self became identified, in a way, with sawmill work, where he continued 
for a year. He then turned back to farming, and bought the Noah Martin 
farm, another well-known place in Bethlehem township, and the Henry 
Barnett place. He later added to this by repeated purchases until today 
Levi Horn, his son, has a fine place of one hundred and sixty acres. 
When Thaddeus Horn came into possession of the farm it was covered 
with a heavy growth of timber, the most of which has given place to clean 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 973 

and smooth fields that are under the careful cultivation of their owner. 
Levi Horn saw to most of the building work that has been carried on at 
the place, and has a number of commodious buildings of all descriptions. 
On the whole, -his enterprise has yielded a satisfactory income, and he 
has a home of which any man in the community might well be proud. In 
addition to his farming interests he is also a stockholder in the First Na- 
tional Bank. 

On April 2, 1874, Mr. Horn married Fannie, the daughter of Aaron 
and Jane (Cuthberson) Tilton. Nine children have been born to them, 
of which number three are now deceased. Those who live are named as 
follows: Mary A., the wife of William Lemmon; Bertha E., the wife 
of R. J. Johnson; Franklin Y., married to Amy Dreutzer; Ada wedded 
Kirk AVells; Flora and Burson. The deceased children were named 
Amy, Carrie and Fannie. 

The family are members of the Presbyterian church, in which Mr. 
Horn has been an elder for forty years. His position in the community 
is wholly consistent with his place in the church, and he is known as one 
of the most estimable and honorable men in the township. Fraternally 
he is a member of the Masonic order, belonging to Orient Lodge No. 
272. The daughters. Bertha, Ada and Flora, are members of the Eastern 
Star. The present beautiful homestead of Mr. and Mrs. Horn is known 
as "The Aberdeen Stock Farm," as Mr. Horn is a breeder of the reg- 
istered Aberdeen cattle, which are known by cattle breeders throughout 
the United States. 

Abiah J. Sharts. In naming the representative farmers of Cass 
county, any work would be incomplete that did not give a sketch of 
the career of Abiah J. Sharts, of Tipton towTiship, located on a farm 
of one hundred and sixty acres on the Anoka road, about one-half mile 
east of Anoka. Mr. Sharts was born October 24, 1845, in Montgomery 
county, Ohio, and is a son of George P. and Frances (Bear) Sharts. 
His parents were natives of Maryland, born in the vicinity of Hagers- 
town, from whence they moved to Frederick county, ^laiyland, and 
later to Montgomery county, Ohio. In 1849 they came to Tipton town- 
ship, Cass county, Indiana, settling first on the farm now occupied by 
N. B. Richinson, and lived in a little log house until this primitive dwell- 
ing was replaced by one more modern in character. A great deal of 
the land was covered with a heavy growth of timber, which was cleared 
by Mr. Sharts and his sons, and here he continued to reside during the 
remainder of his life, his death occurring in 1853, when he was fifty- 
two years of age, while his wife passed away in 1875, being seventy-two 
years old. From a small beginning they became wealthy citizens of 
their community, while their standing among their neighbors was that 
of honest, God-fearing people who always endeavored to live up to the 
dictates of their conscience. They were the parents of the following 
children : Mary M. and Rose Arm, who are deceased ; Elizabeth, also 
deceased ; Mrs. Cathei'ine Hahn ; Mrs. Jane P. Phillips, who died Jan- 
uary 7, 1913 ; Abraham and John, who are both deceased ; George P., 
an agriculturist of Tipton township ; William 0., who is deceased ; A. 
J. and Carolina Lucas, deceased. 

Abiah J. Sharts received his education in the old Wilson district 



974 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

school, a log building which was standing until within recent years, 
although it had not been used for a long period. He was only eight 
years of age when his father died, and this necessarily cut his schooling 
off before it was completed, as his services were needed to help in the 
work of the homestead. He was so engaged when the Civil war broke 
over the country, and when not yet eighteen years old, in June, 1863, 
enlisted for service in the Union army, as a private of Company F, 
One Hundred and Sixteenth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, 
Capt. Sangford C. Thomas, Army of the Cumberland. He was mus- 
tered in at Indianapolis, and from there went with his command to 
Lafayette, Indiana, and later to Detroit, Michigan, where he was in 
camp until sent to Cleveland, Ohio. Later he was transferred to Camp 
Nelson, Kentucky, subsequently participating in the battle of Knox- 
ville. During the greater part of his services he was under General 
Bumside, doing guard duty at Cumberland Gap, Greenville, and Taze- 
well, Tennessee. He served until March, 1864:, when he was mustered 
out of the service at Lafayette, Indiana, and returned to the pursuits 
of peace. On returning home, he once more took charge of the farm, 
which he operated until 1879, and then removed to his present prop- 
erty, a tract of one hundred and sixty acres, which he has brought to 
a high state of cultivation and improved with substantial buildings 
and other modem improvements. He is known as an excellent agricul- 
turist, with a thorough knowledge of all the details of his vocation, 
and as a business man whose word is as good as his bond. He belongs 
to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at Anoka, Indiana, was a mem- 
ber of the Grand Army of the Republic, and has many friends in l)oth. 
With his family, he attends the United Brethren church, where for 
years he has been a lilieral suppoi-ter of its movements. 

On October 10, 1867, Mr. Sharts was married to JMiss Ellen Alice 
Wilson, and to this union there have been born six children: Harry 
who is deceased; Benjamin F., graduated from the common schools 
and is at present cashier of the City State Bank of Logansport, In- 
diana. He taught two terms of school in Tipton and one in Washington 
township. He belongs to the Masons, and both he and his wife are 
members of the Presbyterian church. He married Pearl jMcManus and 
has two children, Victor and Robert. Elmer E., graduated from the 
common schools and spent one term in Logansport Business College. 
He married for his first wife IMamie Richinson, and had one child, 
Truman; he married a second time and by this marriage has two chil- 
dren : Thomas and Alice. Blanche M., graduated from the public 
schools and from the business college and is a finished stenographer. 
She is the wife of George D. DeYoe, and they are residents of Chicago. 
Walter, deceased. Charles, a resident of Tipton township and one 
of the young progressive farmers, was born on the farm on which his 
father originally came on many years ago, and has here resided all 
of his life. He is now the manager of his father's property, and is 
known as one of Tipton township's good, practical young agriculturists. 
He resides in a modern residence erected by his father. He gi-aduated 
from the public schools and spent one year in high school. He wedded 
Miss Edith Mason, and they have two little children, Paul and Margaret. 
Mr. and Mrs. Sharts may well be proud of their children, as they all hold 
high places in the esteem of the people who know them. 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 975 

Mrs. Sharts is a native of Cass county, Indiana, born December 26, 
1848, and she is the fourth in a family of twelve children, five sons 
and seven daughters, born to Andrew and Eleanor (Tucker) Wilson, 
and there are five of the children of the Wilson family still living, 
and all are residents of Indiana, except Mrs. Carrie Stukey, of Los 
Angeles, California, and Harry CI. Wilson, a resident of Chicago. 
Mrs. Sharts was reared and educated in her native county. She has 
worthily filled her place as wife and mother in the building up of their 
beautiful home in Tipton township which is known as "Forest Glen 
Home," and it is the abode of hospitality. Mr. and Mrs. Sharts have 
a fine Great Western five-passenger touring car, and they enjoy life. 

John W. Redd. Continued hard work and persistent effort have won 
for John W. Redd a degree of prosperity he might never otherwise have 
attained, and he has to thank his own sturdy energy for his present suc- 
cess, rather than any outside agency. He was born on April 7, 1835, at 
Battle Ground, Indiana, and is the son of William and Martha (Shigley) 
Redd, the people of the latter being of German descent. The father was 
a son of Joseph Redd, a native Pennsylvanian, and was born in Wash- 
ington county, that state. He was yet very young when he left his native 
state and moved to the Pan Handle in Virginia, where he engaged in the 
operating of a distillery, going thence to Wayne county, Ohio, and from 
there to Tippecanoe, Indiana. Bethlehem township, in Cass county, saw 
him next, and it was in the year 1838 that he arrived here and settled 
down on a farm. 

Thus it was that William Redd came to be reared in Bethlehem town- 
ship, and here he has passed practically all his life. He was reared amid 
the quiet country scenes peculiar to the time, attended the country 
schools at intervals, and was well taught in the business of farming. In 
due time he chose a wife, who in her maiden days was Mary Ann 
McCarthy, the daughter of Berryman McCarthy, who in his young man- 
hood was shot and killed while on his way to the house of a friend, being 
mistaken for a deer by a careless hunter, John Rush by name. The 
mother of Mrs. Redd in her maiden days was Phqebe Marsh, and she and 
her family were residents of Fulton county. Four children have been 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Redd, as follows : William B., the eldest, married 
Lou Burrows; Phoebe E., married Charles White; Ida F., married R. E. 
Merritt, and Joseph A., married Dollie Livingston. 

Mr. Redd has lived on his present farm since 1862, and with the pass- 
ing years many goodly improvements have found place upon the prem- 
ises, so that he farm is one of the finest in Bethlehem township today. 
He has not always been a landed proprietor, as one might say, and the 
first forty-five acres of land he acquired caused him much hardship and 
many hours of honest toil. But to toil he has never been a stranger, and 
work is no hardship to one of his energetic and wholesome nature, so that 
with the years that have gone, he has been able to add bit by bit to his 
place until it is now represented by two hundred and eighteen acres of 
well cultivated lands. The first thirteen years of his residence here was 



976 HISTORY OP CASS COUNTY 

marked by his occupancy of the log cabin home that stood upon the place 
when it came into his possession, and which has later given place to the 
present commodious dwelling. 

Mr. Redd is a Methodist and politically he is of the Progressive party. 
He has taken a lively interest in the political activities of his community, 
and is known for a man of excellent qualities of citizenship. 

Anderson B. Stanton came to Cass county, Indiana, from 
Indianapolis, in 187-1, thus having lived here for thirty-nine years. He 
was bom in Shelby county, Indiana, on December 13, 18-43, and was 
the son of Eli and Eunice (Barnard) Stanton. Eli Stanton followed 
farming through the greater part of his life. He was a pioneer of 
Shelby county, having located there when the district was practically 
all dense woods. He was a Quaker, reared in that rugged and simple 
faith by his parents, and his life exemplified in every way the train- 
ing he had received in the faith. His faithful wife died in ^larch, 
1850, and he later married Elizabeth Gardner, a cousin of his first wife. 
She, like his earlier helpmate, was a Quaker. Three children were born 
of this second marriage. In 1864 he sold his place and returned to 
Union county, Indiana, where he had lived previous to his Shelby county 
experience, and there he passed the remainder of his life, death claim- 
ing him in 1895. 

Anderson B. Stanton, the immediate sul)ject of this somewhat brief 
review, was reared in a Quaker home and under the strict influences 
which characterize a home in which that sturdy old religion predomi- 
nates. Plenty of hard work was jTi-ovided for him in the work of the 
farm, and three months schooling in each year constituted his educational 
privileges. When he had attained his majority, he still continued on 
the home place with his father. When he was twenty-three years old he 
found himself in debt to the amount of forty dollars, and he left home 
and hired out as a farm hand, in order to secure the money to pay 
his obligations. He soon found work more remunerative and also 
more suited to him, and for a number of years was employed by the 
Singer Manufacturing Company as general agent in Indiana and 
Illinois. In the latter part of 187-4 he opened a music store in Logans- 
port, and since that time he has continued to make his home in this city. 
He continued in the music store until the year 1877, when he sold the 
place, and has since been engaged in farming and in handling stock. 
He owns a fine farm of four hundred and three acres in Washington 
township, which he oversees, and is known as one of the most successful 
men in an agricultural way in the county — a fact no doubt due in large 
measure to his thorough early training in farming in his boyhood home. 

Mr. Stanton is a Republican in politics, and a member of the Chris- 
tian church since he was twenty-eight years old. He was married on 
November 25, 1875, to Priseilla A. Justice, and they are the parents 
of three children, as follows : Nellie, the wife of George Kistler : James 
J., a practicing physician of Logansport, of whom more extended men- 
tion is made elsewhere in this work; and Elizabeth Cady Stanton. 



HISTORY OP CASS COUNTY 977 

Dr. James J. Stanton was born in Logansport, Indiana, on July 
9, 1880, a sou of Anderson B. and Priscilla A. (Justice) Stanton, and 
the grandson of Eli and Eunice (Barnard) Stanton, concerning these 
ancestors appropriate mention being made in the sketch devoted to 
Anderson B. Stanton, in other pages of this work, so that further details 
with regard to the parentage of Dr. Stanton are superfluous at this 
juncture. 

Dr. Stanton was reared on his father's farm, to a large extent, and 
he was an attendant of the schools of Logansport during the winter 
seasons. In 1899 and 1900 he was a student at Hiram College, in Hiram, 
Ohio, and in September, 1901, entered Jefferson ]\Iedical College, at 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, from which he was duly graduated on 
June 2, 1905. For one year following his graduation he was occupied 
as house physician at McKeesport (Pa.) hospital, and on September 1, 
1906 the young doctor opened an office in Logansport. He has since 
continued here in active practice. He conducts a general practice, with 
special attention to surgery, and in the years that he has been identified 
with the professional life of Logansport, he has acquired a pleasing 
reputation for efficiency and progressiveness which makes his future 
success a well assured fact. 

Dr. Stanton is a member of the county and state medical societies, 
and fraternally is affiliated with the Masonic order and the Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks. He also retains membership in the Nu 
Sigma Nu, his college fraternity. 

The doctor was united in marriage with Miss Jean ^Murray, of Logans- 
port, on June 22, 1910. 

Job Smith. It requires very few words to tell of hopeful pioneers 
settling in a forest and with energy attacking the subjugation of the 
land and developing cultivated and productive farms thereby, but this 
outline is but a superficial covering for some of the most trying expe- 
riences through which men and women have bi'avely and triumphantly 
passed and which deserve to be remembered. The first log cabin of the 
Smith family in Indiana, was biiilt in 1836, in Bethlehem township, 
Cass county, after a space had been cleared, by William R. Smith, on 
his timbered tract of 240 acres, to which he and his wife had come after 
weeks of tedious travel from an eastern state. In all probability it was 
but poor protection at first against the elements and possibly the Indians 
and wild creatures of the forest, but its comforts were increased as 
time went on, family life developed and expanded, and within its walls 
were born and reared the three children of the family. The Smiths 
were pioneers in every sense of the word, the ancestiy belonging to 
Scotland, and as typical of that land their sturdy independence and 
moral qualities made them leaders and organizers of the stable institu- 
tions and promoters of good government in the section which they 
had selected as their home. Among the worthy representatives of this 
family is found Job Smith, of Bethlehem to\vnship, who for many years 
was engaged in farming here, and who still resides in this township. 
Mr. Smith was born October 28, 1841, in a log cabin on the farm which 
he now owns, and is a son of "William R. and Amanda F. (Simpson) 
Smith, and a grandson of Job Smith and James Simpson. His parents 



978 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

were natives of New Jersey, and were married in Ohio, in which state 
the.y lived for about twelve years, and then, in 1836, made their entrance 
into Indiana. They continued to be residents of Cass county until their 
deaths, and were numbered among their township's substantial and 
highly respected people. They had four children, namely : Job ; James, 
who married Amanda Campbell ; Raehael, who married Joseph Champ ; 
and Hannah, who died at the age of five years. 

Job Smith received only meager educational advantages in his youth, 
the district school being two miles from his home and the school term 
lasting only three months in the winter, but he was an intelligent and 
ambitious youth, made the most of his opportunities, and managed to 
gain a good education. On completing his studies, he was engaged in 
teaching for two years, and then turned his attention to farming, which 
occupied his attention throughout the balance of his active career. He 
is now the owner of 133 acres of well-cultivated land, on which he 
erected all of the present substantial buildings, and this is known as 
one of the valuable properties of his township. For the past eight 
years he has lived a retired life, having been afflicted with blindness. He 
"has been a life-long member of Spring Creek Christian church, of which 
he was deacon for many years. ]Mr. Smith is highly regarded in his 
locality, being known as a kind neighlior, an honorable business man, 
and one who has always been true to his friendships. 

On January 16, 1868, Mr. Smith was married in ]\Iiami county, 
Indiana, to i\Iiss Emmeline Code, daughter of Powell and Lydia 
(Carlisle) Code, the former of whom died in 1878 and the latter in 
Februarj", 190-1. j\Irs. Smith's parents came to Indiana from New 
York state, and settled in iliami county at a very early date, first 
erecting a log cabin, and later replacing it with a more modern struc- 
ture. They were the parents of six children, -as follows : Christopher, 
who married Sallie IMurden ; John, who married Caroline Charles ; Ira, 
who remained single and died at the age of thirty-nine years; Angeline, 
who married James Hallock ; Josephine, who married Henry Lewis ; and 
Emmeline. Mr. and Mra. Smith have had the following children : Omar 
T., born February 8, 1869, who married Daisy Lawrence: Nora E.. born 
February 8, 1872 ; Ego, born January 14, 1875 ; I\Iilo J., born February 
19, 1877; Laurie, born ]March 17, 1880, who married Edith White; and 
Elmer, born August 31, 1884, who died in Julv, 1908; and Berniee B., 
November 7, 1886. 

George' W. Conrad. ]\Iany of the leading agriculturists of Ca.ss 
county are residing on the farms on which they were born, and which, 
in their youth, they helped to clear from the Aargin growth of timber. 
Life-long experience has given them a thorough knowledge of soil and 
climatic conditions, and this has aided, them materially in gaining the 
position of prestige that they now hold. In this c^ass stands George "W. 
Conrad, of Bethlehem township, experienced farmer and well-informed 
citizen, whose entire career has been spent ^^^thin the limits of Cass 
county, where he has gained and maintained the esteem of his fellow- 
citizens through strict integrity and honorable dealings. Mr. Conrad 
was bom on his present property, a part of the old Conrad homestead, 
February 8, 1867, and is a son of Stephen G. and Margaret (Cowel) 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY • 979 

Conrad. His grandfather, David H. Conrad, was born in Pennsylvania, 
of German descent, and came to Indiana in 1840, locating in Cass 
county, where he continued to be engaged in agricultural pursuits up the 
time of his death. Stephen G. Conrad was born in Washington county, 
Pennsj'lvania, and was a young man when he accompanied his parents 
to Indiana, here assisting his father in the work of the home farm until 
the outbreak of the Civil war, when he enlisted for service in the Union 
army as a member of Company F, Indiana Volunteer Cavalry. On his 
return from the war, he resumed his agricultural operations, in which he 
was employed during the remainder of his active career. 

George W. Conrad received a district school education, and was 
reared to the occupation of agriculturist, which has been his vocation 
throughout life. In his boyhood and youth he worked so faithfully for 
his father, that on attaining his majority he was given eighty-five acres 
of land, and to this he has continued to add from time to time, as his 
finances have permitted, until now he is the owner of 210 acres. The 
present buildings were all erected by Mr. Conrad and his father, but 
have been greatly improved during the son's residence here, and the 
land, heavily wooded at one time, is now all under the plow and yields 
abundant crops. Mr. Conrad has kept abreast of the times, and takes 
advantage of all the improvements and inventions which have been 
brought about by invention and discovery. He has not entered politics 
except as a voter for Democratic principles and policies, 1nit has never 
failed to support movements for good government, and those measures 
which affect his to\\aiship or its people have always had his intelligent 
attention. With his family, he attends the jMethodist church, where for 
some years he has held an official position. 

On September 6, 1890, Mr. Conrad was married to Miss Dora ]\I. 
Bray, of Fulton countv, Indiana, and thev have had six children, as 
follows: Russell L., Harry N., Thelma B.,' Ethel G., Edith M. and Ida 
Pearl. The members of the family are highly esteemed in the community 
where the name has stood for integrity and probity for nearly three- 
quarters of a century. The pretty homestead of Mr. and Mrs. Conrad 
is known as "Walnut Glenn Homestead." 

Ira B. Maudlin is one of the well established and prosperous farming 
men of Bethlehem township, where he has made his home for many 
years — practically since his infancy, for the old home of his parents is 
located in this township, where they located in 1864. Farming life has 
always been his portion, and in it he has demonstrated a measure of 
ability and capability sufficient to win him a place among the more 
prominent men of his community. 

Born in Kewanee, Fulton county, this state, Ira B. IMaudlin is the 
son of Benjamin and Abigail (Woolf) Maudlin, who were the son and 
daughter of Edwin Maudlin and Jonas Woolf. They came to Bethlehem 
township in 1864 and here the father ended his days, death claiming 
him in 1898. The mother yet lives, and is a member of the household 
of her son, Ira B. of this review, and has reached the age of eighty-two 
years. The old homestead of the Maudlin family is located one mile 
south of Fletcher's lake in this- township, where the father first acquired 
the o'RTiership of one hundred and twenty acres of land and built a 



980 ' HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

log house for the shelter of his young family. The land was covered 
with a dense growth of timber, which the passing years saw give place 
to rolling fields that enriched their owner in a comfortable degree. The 
old log house still stands there, as a monument to the industry of its 
builder. Four children were born to these parents — two sons and two 
daughters. Amos, the eldest son, was twice married, first to Irene 
Beattie, and later to a ]Mrs. Rosa Landis. Marguerite married George 
HoUenback ; and Hannah died about 1880. 

Up to the age of twenty-seven years Ira B. Maudlin remained at 
home, and performed his share of the work of the home place. As a 
boy he received certain advantages of schooling, somewhat limited it is 
true, but as good as the average country youth of his day received, and 
he has made good use of such learning as he did accjuire in those early 
days. He was born on January 29, 1863, just prior to the time when 
his parents moved to their Bethlehem township farm, so that his earliest 
recollections begin with that old place. INIay 29, 1889, 'Sir. Maudlin was 
married, and he settled then on his first independently operated farm. 
This was a place of seventy-five acres, and adjoined his father's place. 
It boasted a small frame house, which he improved from time to time 
and built on as occasion made necessary, and is today a fine old farm 
house. He added to his land holdings until he had a total acreage of 
one hundred and fifteen acres, and there he remained until 1911, when 
he removed to his present fine place of one hundred and five acres. The 
farm is under an excellent state of cultivation, has fine new buildings, 
and is in every way suited to the convenience and wishes of the family. 
May 29, 1889, Mr. ^Maudlin married ]\Iiss Ida Frushour, the daughter of 
George and Charlotte (Rowan) Frushour, and they have one son, George 
B., who was born on November 19, 1890. He received his diploma from 
the public schools in 1906 and then entered the Media High School of 
Bethlehem township for two years. In 1908 he entered the literary and 
commercial department of the Marion Normal at Marion, Indiana, for 
one term and then was a student in the Logansport High School. He 
is a practical agriculturist and assists his father on the estate. Mrs. 
Maudlin is a native of Cass county, born IMay 23, 1862, and reared and 
educated in her native county. Mr. JMaudlin erected a lovely home in 
1911, which is heated by furnace, has acetylene light and is finished in 
hardwood. The homestead is known as "Oak Lawn." 

Mr. Maudlin has long been a prominent man in his township, and 
has been identified with much of its public life. He was a trustee of 
his township from 1904 to 1908, and gave excellent service in that office. 
He ajid wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church at 
Fletcher's Lake, and he has long been a trustee and a steward of the 
church. 

David N. Jameson has been a resident of Cass county since 1853, in 
which year he migrated from his native state, Ohio, and settled in Clay 
township. He was a boy of twelve at that time, and since then he has 
been identified with the history of this part of the county, in a more 
or less prominent and significant manner. Though he began his 
independent career without other assets than his native ability and 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 981 

determination, he is today well established in a worldly way, and is one 
of the comfortably situated farming men of Bethlehem township. 

Born in Ashland county, Ohio, on March 27, 1841, David N. Jameson 
is the son of John and ^linerva (Niekols) Jameson. The father, John 
Jameson, was the son of Albertus Jameson, and the family was long 
identified with the history of Ohio in the years of her earliest gi'o\\1;h 
and development. The mother of the subject was bom in Ashland 
county, Ohio, and she died when her son, David, was a small boy. The 
father died in IMareh, 1857. He came to Cass county in 1853, bringing 
his family with him, and settling in Clay township, and there he spent 
the remainder of his life. 

John Jameson was married three times and by his marriage to ]Miss 
Minerva Niekols there were three children born, but David N., the siib- 
ject, is the only child living of the three different marriages, and he 
was the oldest of the three born. 

When David N. Jameson was fifteen years old he went to live with 
an older brother, and he remained there for five years, or until the out- 
break of the Rebellion. With the first intimation of war, he enlisted in 
the army and served until 1863, Avhen he was honorably discharged. 
Three months of his time he was with the Ninth Indiana, the remainder 
of his period of service being spent in the Twenty-ninth Indiana Regi- 
ment. Following his return from the war April 16, 1863, Mr. Jameson 
married Mary E. Metsker, the daughter of David and Margaret (Edgar) 
Metsker, who with his wife died in the year 1849. After the marriage 
of Mr. Jameson, he settled in Cass county on his present farm, and 
here he has since resided, carrying on an active agricultural business 
in the community, and his seventy-five acres of fine land is regarded 
as among the best in the county. The place, as it stands today, repre- 
sents years of the most arduous toil, with much of disappointment, as 
well as much of prosperity and happiness as the reward of his efforts. 
He built primitive log cabin buildings on the place where he first took 
possession, and with the passing of time the farm took on a pros- 
perous and well-kept appearance that spoke well for the industry and 
effort of its owner. 

Two children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Jameson. The eldest, 
Samuel Edgar, died in 1892, when he was thirty years of age. The 
other, John W., married Gertrude Fergus, and they have seven chil- 
dren, named as follows: Edith, Charles, Glenn, George, John L., Frank 
and Louise. All this fine little family are living, and their gi'and- 
parents find much pleasure in the contemplation of their growth and 
development. Mrs. Jameson is a native of Cass county, born September 
21, 1842, and she was the eldest of four children, one son and three daugh- 
ters born to David and Margaret (Edgar) Metsker, but is the only sur- 
vivor of that family. She was educated in the common schools. Mr. 
Jameson has been a teacher in the Sunday school for twenty years, also 
superintendent. 

The family are members of the Presbyterian church, and Mr. 
Jameson is a member of the Grand Army of the Republic. The pretty 
homestead of Mr. and Mrs. Jameson is known as "The Sunny Crest 
Grange. ' ' 



982 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

James Cheney. Among the notable men whose careers were in large 
part spent in Cass county, and the county claims for the honor and dis- 
tinction of its citizenship, the late James Cheney' was one of the most 
successful as a banker and business man. He came to Cass county before 
the war and was for many' years identitied with financial affairs of such 
importance that he had more than local prominence, and was a well 
known figure in the banking circles of New York city. His death 
occurred at Fort AVayne, Indiana, December 13, 1903, and his remains 
now rest in the Logansport cemetery. 

James Cheney was born in Sutton, Vermont, December 15. 1817, 
and was of English and New England stock. His parents were Roswell 
and Abigail (Willard) Cheney. His mother was a relative of Frances 
E. AVillard. The father was a contractor in Vermont and after finish- 
ing his common school education, James Cheney went into the same busi- 
ness and assisted his father for a numlier of years. He left New Eng- 
land when a young man and in 1840 located in Toledo, Ohio, and in 
1856 came to Cass county. 

The late James Cheney organized at Logansport one of the branches 
of the old Indiana State Bank, and served as cashier of the local institu- 
tion. From that time until his death he was closely identified witli 
the larger interests of financial and business affairs. In 1859 he engaged 
with ]\Ir. Uhl in the milling business and subsequently was in the real 
estate business. He removed from Cass county in 1871 to New York 
city, where he was known as a banker and in the stock and bond business. 
He held a seat for a number of years on the New York Stock Exchange 
and was connected with the National City Bank and with the Farmer's 
Loan and Trust Company. A fact of his business career which is 
specially noteworthy is that he was one of the organizers and builders 
of the first Atlantic cables during the decade of the fifties. 

The late jNIr. Cheney was affiliated with the ilasonie order, and his 
church was the Presbyterian. On :\Iay 1, 18-1:2, he married IMiss Nancy 
B. Evans, of Defiance county, Ohio, where she was the first white child 
born. Her father was Pierce Evans. The children of the late James 
Cheney and wife, three daughters and one son, are mentioned as follows : 
]\Irs. Alice Knight of Fort Wayne ; ^Mrs. Helen Kimberly, of Wisconsin ; 
Mrs. Mary C. Nelson in Logansport ; and Willard Roswell Cheney of 
California. 

Henry S. jMurdock, of Cass county, has had a more varied career 
than usually falls to the lot of the average man. If the story of his life 
was properly written, it alone would make an interesting volume of 
reading. Mr. Murdock was born December 10, 1835, at Clinton. Michi- 
gan, and is the only survivor of a family of six children born to 
Tilson and Fannie (Blossom) Murdock, who were natives of Vermont, 
and of Scotch ancestry. The father was a farmer, but for the most part, 
worked at carpentering. He moved to Clinton, Michigan, at a time when 
the country was in a most primitive condition, and there passed the 
remainder of his days. 

The boyhood of Henry S. Murdock was passed in a manner not 
unusual in' those days, and in the course of his early years acquired the 
rudiments of an education in the district schools of his native com- 
munity. When old enough to begin to work, he secured a place clerk- 



fc -" 





^^^<2:<^c<_^ 




HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 983 

ing in a general store at Clinton, and was there employed for several 
years. His mother and married sisters having removed to Logansport 
in the intervening years, Mr. Murdock in 1853 came to this city, the 
canal furnishing his mode of travel from Toledo. Here he began 
clerking in the store of Thomas Stevenson, his brother-in-law, a general 
stock of goods being on hand at this jjlace, including linsey-woolsey, 
delaine, calico, ginghams and all the required dry goods staples com- 
mon to the times, as well as complete lines in other branches. About the 
year 1856 he began clerking for his brother. Andrew J. Murdock. who 
had embarked in a merchandise business at the corner of Fourth street 
and Broadway, but in 1860, in partnership with Joseph ]\IcGaughey, 
he began in the general dry goods business for himself. When he left 
for the war a brother-in-law, Jacob H. Hicks, took his place in the 
firm, with the understanding that on Murdock 's return he was to pay 
simple interest on invoice. This arrangement was scrupulously carried 
out. In August, 1862, he enlisted in the Seventy-third Regiment Indiana 
Infantrj' and the rendezvous was at South Bend. He was made 
orderly sergeant. They left there August, 1862, and went to Kentucky. 
For a time his command was stationed in Kentucky and Tennessee, but 
the first real engagement in which he participated was the battle of 
Stone river. Following this he became a part of Colonel Straight's com- 
mand, which steamed down the Cumberland river to the Ohio river, 
thence to Padueah, where the brigade was provisioned, and from there 
to Eastport, ]\Iississippi, via the Tennessee river. Here the command 
disembarked and were deployed as cavalry to resist the rebel general, 
Forrest, who was threatening to break through. The history of the 
capture, imprisonment and escape of Colonel Straight has been told in 
history and story. !Mr. ^Murdock was captured May 3, 1863 ; he was 
incarcerated first in Libby prison, where he was relieved of all his valu- 
ables and where he remained for one year. He was then confined in 
another prison across the river for a short time, after which he was 
taken to Macon, Georgia, and from there to Charleston, South Caro- 
lina. At this place he was in three different prisons, and at one time 
was exposed to the fire of Federal gunboats at ]\Iorris Island three miles 
distant. From Charleston he was taken to an open camp at Columbia, 
and while here succeeded in making good his escape in December, 1864. 
By traveling at night and "laying up" in the daytime, getting food 
from negroes and directions from the few loyal men he encoiintered, 
he succeeded in getting two hundred miles near the Union lines, but 
was finally recaptured near Pickens, Xorth Carolina courthouse, taken 
back to Columbia Camp — then taken to Wilmington, North Carolina, 
where he was exchanged in March, 1865. After a brief visit home, he 
rejoined his command in Northern Alabama, but the war by this time 
was virtually at end, and until his final discharge in July, 1865, with 
the rank of First Lieutenant, he was employed at guard duty. 

Following the close of the war Mr. Murdock resumed merchandising 
in Logansport, with his brother, Andrew J., as a partner, thus continuing 
for nineteen years. Andrew J. Murdock then became president of the 
First National Bank, and Henry S. Murdock continued in the merchan- 
dise business until 1900, since when his time and attention have been 
occupied in looking after his private property interests. 



984 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

Such, in brief, is the career of Henry S. Murdock. Much could be 
said of intense interest to embellish these plain statements, but lack of 
space prevents. 

In 1868 Mr. ]\Iurdock was married to Miss Emma Woods, who died 
in 1870, leaving one son, Harry W. IMurdock, of Lockport, New York. In 
1874 at Des Moines, Iowa, Mr. Murdock married Theodosia Owens, who 
died in 1900, leaving four sons: William 0., Karl F., Charles E. and 
J. Fred. 

Mr. IMurdock is a Republican and although one of the party's 
staunch followers he has never sought office. He is also a member of the 
Grand Army of the Republic. 

James McTaggert was born in County Tyrone, Ireland, August 15, 
1824, and was one in a family of five sons and three daughters born to 
John and Rose (McGovern) McTaggert. The father, John McTaggert, 
was a teacher, land agent and collector, and his children received rather 
better than average educational advantages. James McTaggert passed 
his youthful days at home and while a young man he spent a year in 
Scotland, working at whatever honest employment he might turn his hand 
to, and returning to his home in Ireland in 1847. The unhappy con- 
ditions existing then in Ireland caused him to turn to America as a place 
where he might prosper better than in his native land, and the winter 
of 1847 found him aboard a sailing vessel bound for New York, and after 
a journey of seven weeks he landed in America. It chanced that aboard 
the vessel were some of his Irish acquaintances who were bound for 
Logansport, Indiana, and they induced him to accompany them to that 
point, a decision he was not slow in arriving at, as he had set sail with 
no objective point in mind, other than that he intended to come to 
America. They made the trip from New York by Hudson river to 
Albany, thence by canal to Buffalo, by lake to Toledo, and from that 
place down the Erie canal to Logansport. The spring of 1848 found 
the little party from Ireland arriving at Logansport, and during a part 
of the summer ensuing j\Ir. JMcTaggert was occupied at farm work, receiv- 
ing a stipend of fifty cents per day. He found employment for a time 
in helping to build the old seminary, after which he became a canal boat 
captain. He was industrious and ambitious, and he frugally saved every 
possible penny from his earnings until he was able to buy a horse and 
cart. With this capital he began doing contract work, the excavating of 
cellars and basements being his line of work. From that he branched 
out into street contracting, and from time to time added new ventures 
to his enterprise. Mr. McTaggert built the macadam work on Fourth 
street between Market and Broadway, and this was the first macadamized 
street in Logansport. Among other contract jobs which he handled, was 
the building of a section of the Pennsylvania Railroad. In 1856 Mr. 
McTaggert gave up contracting and turned his attention to the grocery 
business, locating at the corner of Fourth street and Broadway. He 
owned the property where his store was located and here he continued in 
a thriving grocery business until 1871, when he sold the store, and in 
1872 engaged in the retail clothing business on Market street. In 1882 
he retired from active business pursuits, and he died on April 28, 1886. 

It is a significant fact that, despite his early hardships and the 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 985 

slenderness of his resources when he set sail for America, Mr. McTaggert 
was able to build up a business, in various lines, that permitted him to be 
accounted a fairly wealthy man when he died. Every success he met with 
in his business career came as the direct result of his well placed ett'orts 
and the sturdy determination with which he went about every business 
project he took in hand. He was always a hard working man, and he had 
the advantage of knowing the* value of a dollar to the last penny. His 
means, as they were accumulated with the passing years, were carefully 
and wisely invested, and he died in comfortable, if not indeed, affluent cir- 
cumstances. After he had become established in business here, Mr. 
McTaggert saved money with which to bring his parents and others of 
the family from Ireland, and in Fe))ruary, 1851, he married Sarah Dona- 
hoe, a daughter of James and Rose Donahoe, of County Tyrone, Ireland. 
They became the parents of eight children, three of which number died 
in infancy. The remaining five were : Catharine A., the wife of James 
McGourty ; Sarah C, now Mrs. John McGreery ; Rose ; John Joseph, who 
died when twenty-eight years of age; Mary J., the wife of Richard 
IMcGreevy. The mother died on June 20, 1908. She, like her husband, 
was a devout member of the Roman Catholic church all her life. 

Mr. McTaggert was a Democrat in his political convictions, and served 
in the city council with credit to himself and to the good of the city. 
in 1868 he was the nominee of his party for the office of county treasurer, 
but was defeated by Dr. Schultz by the narrow margin of 86 votes. 
Though not an office holder to any extent, he was a citizen of sterling 
worth, always interested in the good of the community, and liearing his 
full share of the civic burdens. 

Finis E. Fouts. For the past eighteen years, Finis E. Fonts has been 
engaged in farming and stock raising operations on his present farm, a 
well cultivated tract located on the Kokomo road, in Deer Creek town- 
ship. During this period he has established a reputation for integrity and 
honorable dealing, and is now accounted a worthy representative of one 
of the honored pioneer families of Cass county that have been identified 
with the progress and development of this section of the State since an 
early epoch in Indiana's history. ]\Ir. Fouts was born on his father's 
farm in Cass county, November 21, 1866, and is a son of Solomon and 
Margaret (Bridge) Fonts. His father, who, with Mr. Neflf, shared the 
distinction of being the first two white children born in Montgomery 
county, Indiana, came to Cass county in 1834, and here spent the remain- 
der of his life, accumulating a handsome competency and attaining a high 
position in the esteem and regard of his fellow-citizens. 

Finis E. Fouts was given the advantages of a good education, first 
attending the old Runaway school in Deer Creek township, later going to 
the district schools in Carroll county, and finally, in 1894, entering Pur- 
due University, where he took a course in agriculture and mechanical 
engineering. In the meantime, he had spent his vacations in working 
upon the home farm, thus getting practical experience in the vocation 
which he intended to make his life work, and eventually, well equipped, 
embarked upon a career of his own. Mr. Fouts came to his present 
property in 1895, and here he has met with unqualified success. His land, 
brought to a high state of cultivation, yields him a golden tribute in 



986' HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

return for the labor and care he bestows upon it. All of the machinery 
and buildings on the place are of the most modern construction, and 
indicate the owner to be a most progressive and enterprising farmer; 
and such is the reputation he bears throughout the community. In addi- 
tion to general farming, he also carries on stock raising, and his business 
is so carefully and systematically managed that he has won a high degree 
of prosperity, and at the same time has gained and retained the respect 
and confldeuce of those with whom he has had business transactions. He 
takes a pardonable degree of pride in what he has accomplished, in that it 
has been won through his own unaided efforts. 

On October 29, 1891, ]Mr. Fouts was married first to Miss Nellie 
M. Pottenger, daughter of Thomas and Hannah (Safer) Pottenger, and 
to this union there were born five children, namely: Glenn P., Elda, 
Marvin, Rufus and Laura. His second marriage took place July 6, 1911, 
when he was married to Mrs. Louanna (Kitchell) Shanks, daughter of 
Daniel Kitchell and widow of the late Frank H. Shanks, and this union 
has been blessed by the birth of one daughter: Margaret. By her first 
marriage, Mrs. Fouts had three children: Carol E., Ellen C. and Frank 
J. IMr. and Mrs. Fouts are members of the Presbyterian church, and have 
been liberal in their support of religious and charitable movements. 

George Davis was among the earliest pioneers of Cass county. His 
parents were Virginians and were of Welsh ancestry. He married Kath- 
erine Miller and settled at Richmond, Indiana, at a time when the Indians 
were more numerous than the whites. He was a carpenter by trade, 
although he followed farming for the most part throughout his life. In 
the late fall of 1831, together with his family, he came to Cass county, a 
pair of cows hitched to his wagon being the means of transportation, the 
cows doing double duty in that they provided food for the children, as 
well as taking the place of horses or oxen. Upon their arrival at Eel 
river, they were compelled to have the cows shod in order that they might 
cross upon the ice. They located on one hundred and sixty acres of 
land on section 19, in Jefferson township, half of w'hich was pre-empted 
from the government, and here they began clearing, grubbing and farm- 
ing. Mr. Davis also worked at his trade, and many of the log cabins 
and old fashioned log barns were designed and built by him. 

]\Ir. Davis was a soldier of the war of 1812, and served in all of Gen- 
eral Harrison's campaigns. His father, Joseph Davis, assisted the 
Colonies in their struggle for independence and he was a participant in 
some of the great battles of the Revolutionary war. To George Davis 
and his wife six sons and three daughters were born, three of the sons 
serving in the war with Mexico. George Davis was in many ways a 
unique character. He abhorred the liciuor traffic and many times had 
difficulty in getting his crops harvested because of his unwilling-ness to 
provide whiskey for the farm "hands." He was a member of the ilefho- 
dist Episcopal church at Burnettsville, which he helped to organize, and 
of which he was an official for years. He died in 1840. 

Richard Pedrick Davis was the youngest of the sons of George Davis. 
He was born at Richmond, Indiana, in 1828, came with his parents to 
Cass county when he was six years old and as a boy assisted with the 
work of tile home farm. His chief characteristic was his untiring 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 987 

energy. He once worked for two weeks to get enough money to buy an 
axe. His opportunities for education was extremely limited, but being 
a keen observer and possessed of an unusual fund of good, practical sense, 
he was able in later years to supply in a measure the training which 
his early years lacked. Along in the early history of the Burnettsville 
Normal School he attended that institution for three years, after which 
he taught school for several terms. His remuneration at one school was 
$25 for a three months ' term, and he was compelled to chop his own wood, 
act as janitor, and "board around" as well. He was one of the best men 
that ever lived in Cass county, and for forty years was an elder in the 
Christian church. He served four years as justice of the peace, was 
deeply religious, and an outspoken advocate of the cause of temperance, 
and was an ardent Democrat. 

In partnership with his brother, David, Eichard P. Davis operated 
the first threshing machine ever brought to Cass county. 

To his marriage with Jane Hildebrand, which occurred in, 1850, nine 
children were born, six of that number growing to maturity and being 
named as follows : Sarah Ellen, Lucy Ann, George B., Mary Jane, and 
Fred and Frank, twins. Mr. Davis died in April, 1906, and his widow 
survived him until May, 1911. 

The eldest son of Richard P. Davis is George B., born July 14, 1857. 
He completed his schooling in Burnettsville Academy, and since 1875 
he has been a teacher in the public schools. For the past ten years he 
has been principal of the Franklin school, in Logansport. He married 
Minnie Cullen in 1881, and Fannie, John C, Mary E. and Dr. Charles 
S. are their children. i\Ir. Davis is present chainnan of the Democratic 
County Central Committee. 

Frank Davis, present commissioner of Cass county, was born on 
March 6, 1864, and is the twin brother of Fred Davis, the youngest chil- 
dren of Richard P. Davis. At the age of nineteen years he and Fred 
started farming on shares, continuing to be thus occupied for six years, 
after which Frank Davis bought out his brother's interest and continued 
alone.' In 1892 he bought sixty acres of land, later adding forty-eight 
acres thereto, and in addition, he and Fred, by purchase, now hold the 
old homestead place in partnership. In 1908 he was elected county 
commissioner on the Democratic ticket, re-elected in 1910, and in Feb- 
ruary, 1911, moved to Logansport, where he now resides. On January 
9, 1889, he married Emma Byers, and they have two children : Jessie M. 
and Jefferson Grover Cleveland. The latter married Mamie Strosser, 
and they have one daughter, Maxine. They live on the old place, thus 
making the fifth generation to have resided on this homestead. 

Mr. Davis is a Democrat, and Odd Fellow, and an exceptionally able 
county official. 

George I. Wolf. This prominent farmer and highly respected 
citizen of Deer Creek township may be counted among the pioneers 
of Cass county, since he has faithfully done his share in the development 
of his section of the state, both materially and intellectually. Such men 
constitute the mainstay of a commonwealth, and it becomes the duty of 
the biographer to encourage the formation of a character that builds up 
the best interests of the state. Mr. Wolf is a self-made man, having 



988 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

gained his present position through individual industry, and the salient 
features of his career go to show that he has ever displayed an enterpris- 
ing, energetic nature, even from boyhood. Born in Preble county, 
Ohio, in 1834, he is a son of Jacob and Barbara (Hiser) Wolf. His 
father, a native of Frederick county, Maryland, migrated to Preble 
county, Ohio, in young manhood, and after some years there, came to 
Carroll county, Indiana, in 1836. There he spent the remainder of his 
life in agricultural pursuits, dying advanced in years, with the full 
respect and esteem of his fellowmen and having accumulated a com- 
fortable competency. 

George I. Wolf spent his boyhood days in Carroll county, where he 
secured his education in the district schools, in the meantime gaining 
a thorough knowledge of farming by assisting his father in the work of 
the homestead place. He early learned the dignity and value of labor, 
being taught to be industrious and honest, and his success in after life 
was due in large part to the benefits accruing from this early training. 
He continued to remain under the parental roof until he had reached 
his majority, at which time he started upon a career of his own, first 
on rented property and later on a farm for which he went into debt. He 
subsequently cleared off his indebtedness, sold his land and came to 
Cass county, where he purchased the farm on which he is now carrying 
on operations, a tract of eighty-three acres, located in Deer Creek town- 
ship, not far from Young America. His modern home is located on 
Galveston Rural Free Delivery Route No. 13, and he also has commodi- 
ous barns and appropriate outbuildings, of handsome architecture and 
siibstantial character. His land has all been brought to a high state 
of cultivation, and yields abundant harvests, while his ventures in stock 
raising have met with an equal measure of success. 

In 1859 Mr. Wolf was married to Miss Margaret Tolen, who also 
survives, and they celebrated their Golden Wedding anniversary in 1909, 
at which were present their children and grandchildren, as well as 
many of their friends, who recalled pioneer days in Cass county and 
wished the aged couple many more years of happy life. Mr. and Mrs. 
Wolf have been the parents of seven children : Mary, who became the 
wife of W. L. Burrows; Sarah, who married Wm. Henry; Eva, who 
became the wife of Abraham Smith ; Ladosky, wife of Mr. Michael ; 
Anna, wife of David McClusky ; Carrie, at home, and Charles. Charles, 
who is married, resides on the old homestead, and is his father's manager, 
having gradually taken over the elder man's duties. He is maintaining 
the family reputation for integrity and industry, and is known as one 
of his section's good practical farmers. The family is connected with 
the German Baptist church. 

Dr. C. L. Thomas. Thirty years of devotion to his profession is 
the record of C. L. Thomas, M. D., a veteran physician of Washington 
township — thirty years of his life given to the calling which he chose 
as his life work in young manhood ; a third of a century of time spent 
in the alleviation of the ills of mankind. Such is indeed a faithful 
service, a record of which no man might be ashamed. Always giving 
of his best energies, always faithful to his trust, never sparing himself 
in the accomplishment of his tasks, his life has surely been a useful one. 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 989 

and he may now look back over the years that have passed with a sense 
of duty well done and take a pardonable pride in a work that has served 
to assist humanity, as well as to add to the professional prestige of his 
adopted community. Dr. Thomas was born October 25, 1846, in Car- 
roll county, Indiana, and is a son of Samuel and Catherine (Johnson) 
Thomas. His father, a native of Virginia, accompanied his parents to 
Indiana in boyhood, and the remainder of his life was given to farming 
and the millwright business, dying in advanced age, with the entire 
respect and esteem of the people of his community. He and his wife 
were the parents of eight children. 

Dr. C. L. Thomas prosecuted his preliminary studies in the country 
schools near Asbury church, and was reared to the occupation of farm- 
ing. The young man, however, had decided upon a professional career, 
and accordingly took the examination and certified as a teacher in the 
public schools. At this time, however, the Civil war came on, and 
young Thomas, fired with patriotism, joined a regiment of Indiana 
volunteers, and fought bravely in defense of the country's flag. On 
the completion of his military career, he resumed teaching in the dis- 
trict schools and was so engaged until he entered upon his medical 
studies. He spent some time in preparation at Battle Ground, Tippe- 
canoe county, Indiana, and in 1879 received his degree of Doctor of 
Medicine at Indianapolis, subsequently spending some time in practice 
at Burlington, Carroll county, and eventually coming to Logansport. 
Here he has continued to the present time, in the enjoyment of a large 
and representative practice, which is not confined to his immediate 
community, but is drawn from all over this part of the county. A 
deep thinker and consistent student, he has ever devoted himself to 
research and study, and has taken a special course in Bellevue Hos- 
pital, New York City. His sympathetic nature and kind and gentle 
personality have assisted him greatly in his work, and have made the 
aged physician one of the most beloved of his profession in Cass county. 
He has taken a keen interest in the work of the various medical organiza- 
tions, and at this time is president of the Cass County Medical Society, 
in addition to acting as a member of the pension board. The Doctor 
specializes on medical and surgical diseases and treatment of the eye 
and his practice is not confined to Cass county but to all the adjoining 
country. 

Dr. Thomas was married in 1876, to Miss Mary E. Cheney, of Clin- 
ton county, Indiana, and they have had one son: Willard, who mar- 
ried Miss Jessie Wilson, and has two children: Marie and Charles. 
The family is highly esteemed in this vicinity and its members number 
many warm friends in Logansport, near which city their home is 
situated. 

Fred G. Drompp is a native son of Logansport, Indiana, born in 
the city on December 28, 1869, and is the son of Gottleib F. and Sophia 
(Arnold) Drompp, both natives of Wittenberg, Germany. 

Gottlieb Drompp was reared and educated in his native land, and 
there he married. He came to America in young manhood, and 
after a year spent in Chicago, came to Logansport, the time of 
his ari'ival hei-e being in the '50 's. Here he learned the cooper's trade, 

Vol. II— IS 



990 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

a business which claimed his attention through the remainder of his 
life. He was a member of the German Lutheran church and reared 
his family in that faith. He died on December 29, 1891, his widow 
surviving him until February 22, 1894. They were the parents of 
twelve children, six of whom are yet living. 

Fred G. Drompp has always made his home in Logansport. He 
was educated in the German Lutheran parochial school, and when he 
was fourteen he became a bundle boy in the old Keller-Troutman & 
Company dry goods store. He remained with this firm until it ceased to 
exist, working his way up from bundle boy to a clerkship. He was 
later employed in the store of George W. Seybold & Brother until 
July 12, 1900, when he, associated with Henry Kammerer and 
Ferdinand Graas, under the firm name of the Stewart Dry Goods Com- 
pany, embarked in the dry goods business in Logansport. Their begin- 
ning was a humble one, and they occupied a room at No. 31.5 Fourth 
street. The firm was duly incorporated, with a capital stock of $1.5,000, 
"Sir. Drompp being president, Mr. Graas, secretary, and i\Ir. Kammerer, 
treasurer. This firm has ever since continued without change in its per- 
sonnel, and the business has prospered with the passing years. In 1903 
an additional room \\a.s requisitioned for the growing demands of their 
patronage, and the firm employs about twenty-four people, aside from 
the mend^ers of the firm. They carry a complete stock of dry goods, 
ladies' ready-to-wear goods, carpets, rugs, curtains and linoleums — and 
is one of the leading houses in its line in the city. Mr. Drompp is also 
a director of the City National Bank. 

Mr. Drompp is a Democrat, but not an active politican. He is a 
member of the German Lutheran church and is treasurer and trustee 
of that body. 

On June 18, 1895, IMr. Drompp was married to Miss Lena E. Grabs 
of Union City, Indiana, and they have two children: Esther A., attend- 
ing high school, and Frederick G., who attends the German Lutheran 
parochial school. 

LeRoy F. Bird. Many of the leading agriculturists of Cass county 
are carrying on operations on farms upon which they were born and 
where they have spent their entire lives, and this may be given as one 
of the reasons for their success. Having passed their entire careers 
here, they are thoroughly conversant with climatic conditions and the 
needs of the soil, and as a result they can bring to their work an 
intelligent knowledge of what methods wnll bring the best results. In 
this class stands LeRoy F. Bird, the owner of 170 acres of fine land sit- 
uated in Deer Creek township, section 5, an enterprising agriculturist 
and public-spirited citizen. ]\Ir. Bird belongs to that class of men who 
have not been content with what has been accomplished by their fathers, 
but have continued to improve their properties and to contribute to the 
general prosperity of the community. He w^as bom on his present 
farm, December 13, 1857, and is a son of Benjamin F. and Harriet 
(Small) Bird. His father, a native of Decatur county, Indiana, en- 
gaged in agricultural pursuits early in life, and continued to be so 
engaged throughout a long and useful career. He w^as known as a 
practical farmer and shrewd business man, and won the respect and 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 991 

esteem of his fellow-townsmen by his inte^ity and honorable dealing. 
Benjamin F. and Harriet Bird were the parents of three children, 
namely : William, deceased, formerly a farmer of Cass county, who 
married Estella Rhinehart, and had seven children, Adelbert, Hattie, 
Benjamin, Otis, Eva, Charles and Ruby; A. F., who makes his home in 
Walton ; and LeRoy F. ^ 

LeRoy F. Bird secured his early educational training in the old 
Deacon district school in this township, after leaving which he attended 
the Walton public schools for some time. In the meanwhile he spent 
the summer seasons on the homestead, assisting his father in his work, 
and learning to cultivate the soil and raise stock. Ambitious and enter- 
prising, he applied himself assiduously to his tasks, gaining a thorough 
knowledge of his chosen vocation and carefully saving his earnings. 
He has never left the old homestead, and still carries on operations there, ' 
having- met with a full measure of success. His crops are large and 
find a ready market, and he is known as a good judge of cattle, his herds 
being sleek and well fed. 

Mr. Bird has never married. He is a popular member of the local 
lodges of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Knights of 
Pythias, and was reared in the faith of the Universalist church, of 
which his parents were life-long members. Public life has never at- 
tracted him, and the only interest he has taken in political matters is 
that of any good citizen who has the welfare of his community at heart. 
His many friends testify to his general worth as a neighbor and a man. 

William R. Deacon. Although now living retired from active 
pursuits, the greater part of his time being devoted to looking after his 
farm, William R. Deacon still takes a keen and intelligent interest in 
matters pertaining to the welfare of Cass county, where he has resided 
for nearly half a century. A veteran of the Civil war, when he had 
completed his service to his country, he returned to his Indiana home, 
and here for a long period was connected with the painting and decorat- 
ing business. A brief sketch of his career will show that he has ever 
lived an industrious and energetic life. Mr. Deacon was born April 
4, 1841, in Liberty, Union county, Indiana, and is a son of W. C. and 
Sarah (Dawson) Deacon. His father, a native of Lexington, Virginia, 
was about thirty years of age when he walked to Liberty, Indiana, 
and there he followed the trade of painter, which he had learned in 
his native state, continuing in Liberty from 1832 to 1864, in which 
year he came to Deer Creek township, Cass county. He continued to 
spend the remainder of his life in this section and died with a comfort- 
able competence and with the esteem and respect of those who knew 
him. He and his wife became the parents of six cliildren,- namely: 
William B. ; George; Mary E.; Martin, and Lucy A., who are deceased; 
Alice J. and Annie. 

' William R. Deacon was educated in the schools of Liberty, Indiana, 
and as a youth was engaged in assisting his father, thus learning the 
trade of painter and decorator. He was so engaged at the outbreak of 
the Civil war, when he went to Richmond, Indiana, and enlisted in 
the First Battalion, Fifteenth United States Infantry, under General 
Buell. On the completion of a brave and gallant service, he came to Cass 



992 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY . 

county and joined his parents, and here for a time was employed in a 
sawmill in Deer Creek township. Succeeding this he began to work at 
the trade of decorator, and was so engaged during the remainder of his 
period of activity. An excellent workman, thoroughly reliable in his 
transactions, he soon secured a large business, and built up a reputation 
for responsibility and honesty^ 

On May 11, 1865, Mr. Deacon was united in marriage with Miss 
Sarah J. Zeek, the estimable daughter of Isaac and Catherine (Robin- 
son) Zeek, and to this union there have been born five children: Albertus 
and Lucy, who are both deceased ; Minnie, at home ; Edna, who is the 
wife of John Jackson; and George Franklin, who married Minnie 
Sprinkle, and has one child, Geraldine. With his family, Mr. Deacon 
attends the Methodist church. His daughter, Miss Minnie Deacon, 
belongs to the Rebekahs. Mr. Deacon has formed a wide acquaintance 
during his long residence in Cass county, and in it he numbers many 
warm friends, drawn about him by his many excellencies of mind and 
heart. 

LoRA Wilson. An example of well directed industry conducing to 
success is found in the cai'eer of Lora Wilson, of Deer Creek township, 
an enterprising and progressive agriculturist who has won financial 
independence and a position of prestige through the medium of his own 
efforts. Some twenty years ago he began his farming operations as a 
renter of land, and his progress has been steady and continuous, until 
today he is the owner of a well-cultivated tract of eighty acres, and is 
classed among his township's successful farmers and stock raisers. Mr. 
Wilson was born on the old Wilson farm in Deer Creek township, Cass 
county, Indiana, March 28, 1874, and is a son of George Washington 
and Catherine (Beamer) Wilson. 

George Washington Wilson was born on a farm in Union county, 
Indiana, near the village of Liberty, on May 11, 1843, and when he 
was twelve years of age accompanied his father to Cass county, In- 
diana. His educational advantages were meager, as his services were 
needed in cultivating and improving the home farm of one hundred 
and sixty acres of wild land, on which, when the family first settled 
thereon, not one furrow had ever been turned. 

Upon the death of his father in 1871, Mr. Wilson took charge of 
the homestead, which he continued to operate during the period of 
his activity, and in addition, accumulated a tract of seventy-eight 
acres on section 20, in Deer Creek township. He placed both tracts 
under a high state of cultivation, made most of the improvements on 
them, and continued to carry on general farming and stock raising 
for many years, attaining financial success and the confidence of all 
with whom he had transactions. He was a Republican in politics, and 
his religious affiliations were with the Christian church. On January 
29, 1873, George W. Wilson was married to Miss Catherine Beamer, 
and to them were born six children, as follows: Hairy, now a farmer 
of Deer Creek township; Lora, of this review; Stella; Carl; William 
A. and Almi I., the last two named now being deceased. George Wash- 
ington Wilson was a Republican and a lifelong member of the Chris- 



HISTORY OP CASS COUNTY 993 

tian church. He was born on May 11, 1843, and died on March 30, 1911, 
and his wife was born September 1, 1845, in Virginia and is living. 

Lora Wilson was early trained to the duties of farming, spending 
the summer months in assisting his father on the home place, while 
the winter seasons were passed in attendance at the district schools of 
his native township. He received the equal of a grade school education 
of the present day, after which he had some training in the Normal 
schools of various nearby cities, and his education was terminated by 
a year in the agricultural department of Purdue University. When he 
was eighteen years old he began teaching school, and for the ensuing 
tive years he gave himself to that work, spending the summers either 
in school, in the pursuit of further knowledge, or helping with the 
work of the home farm, which he so well knew how to carry on. Mr. 
Wilson was twenty-one years old when he began to farm independently, 
renting the farm of his father as a beginning and operating the place 
on shares for something like ten years. At the end of that time he had 
so prospered that he was able to purchase an eighty acre tract for him- 
self, and his attention since then has been devoted to the cultivating 
and improving of this place. It may well be assumed that Mr. Wilson 
has made many improvements along modern lines in the conduct of his 
farm, and the erection of commodious and substantial buildings is not 
the least feature along the line of such improvement. His stock in its 
appearance indicates his thorough knowledge as a breeder, and modern 
machinery of all kinds betrays the progressive spirit of the man in his 
farming capacity. 

Mr. Wilson has maintained the family reputation for honesty and 
integrity in business affairs, and his pleasant personality has gained 
him a wide circle of sincere friends. He is a Republican, and is a mem- 
ber of the Masonic fraternity, but has no other associations that would 
detract from his attention to his fami and his home. 

On March 22, 1905, Mr. Wilson was united in marriage with Miss 
Grace Idel Billiard, of Carroll county, Indiana. She is the daughter 
of Lewis and Susan Amanda (Debolt) Billiard. Lewis Billiard was 
a farmer of Carroll county, and served as a soldier during the Civil 
war. Mrs. Wilson received her education in the grade and high schools 
of her native community, and takes her place among the most estimable 
and highly regarded women of the township, where she has a host of 
good friends. Three interesting children have been born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Wilson, Florence, George and Lucille, all of whom were born 
on the farm near Young America, where the family home is maintained. 
The eldest was born on September 9, 1906 ; the second on November 
19, 1909, and the third born claims July 7, 1912, as her natal day. 

John W. Cost was born at Fairfield, Green county, Ohio, July 
24, 1844, his parents being Henry Joseph and Anna (Steele) Cost. 
He was of a family of four children, three sons and one daughter, all of 
whom are deceased except John W. Mr. Cost was six years of age when 
the family made removal to Dayton, Ohio, and there the mother passed 
away February 8, 1858, following which they removed to Logansport, 
Indiana. In his early boyhood, Mr. Cost attended school at the old 
seminary, and when he was sixteen years of age began an apprentice- 



994 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

ship with George W. Brown, in the drug trade. He was so engaged in 

1863, when he enlisted in the One Hundred and Sixteenth Regiment, 
Indiana Volunteer Infantry, in the six months' service, and March 1, 

1864, his time expired and he was mustered out of the service. During 
the following week he re-enlisted in the Seventy-third Regiment, In- 
diana Volunteer Infantry, remaining therewith until February 1, 
1866, and during these enlistments participated in a number of import- 
ant engagements, among them being: Stone River, Murfreesboro, Ten- 
nessee ; Decatur and Athens, Alabama ; and Franklin and Nashville, 
Tennessee. In addition there were a number of minor engagements and 
skinuishes, in all of which he took an active part. At the close of his 
services, he returned to school in the old seminary for one year, and 
then resumed his training in the drug business, this time with Henry 
Bringhurst. During the following five years he engaged in the drug 
business with Rodney Strain, and at the end of this time embarked in 
business on his own account, in the old J\lagee Block, in what is now 
known as the George Hoffman store location, on Fourth street. Suc- 
ceeding this, Mr. Cost moved to the Thomas Bringhurst room on Broad- 
way, now occupied by Hall Smith's jewelry establishment, and in 
1883 he came to Young America, where for thirty years he has been 
considered one of the town's leading business men. 

On October 11, 1876, Mr. Cost was united in marriage with Miss 
Amanda Stapleton, the eldest daughter of J. J. Stapleton, and to this 
union there have been lx)rn two children: Joseph Albert and Clara 
Alice. Joseph Albert Cost is now timekeeper for the Kokomo factory 
of the Pittsburgh Plate Glass Company ; Alice Cost became the wife of 
W. E. Kirkpatriek, of Young America. Mrs. Amanda Jane (Staple- 
ton) Cost was born in Bethlehem township, Cass county, Indiana, March 
4, 1855, and has been a resident of this county all of her life. 

The foregoing is a brief review of the salient points in the career 
of one of Young America's ablest and most highly esteemed business 
men, a veteran in the drug trade, and a citizen who has ever been 
devoted to the best interests of his adopted community. During the 
thirty years that he has been the proprietor of an establishment here, 
he has' ever held a reputation for the strictest integrity and business 
honor, and each year has seen the extension of his wide circle of friends. 
He is a popular member of the Masonic fraternity, and with his family, 
attends the Christian church. 

John W. Sprinkle. Among the progressive and enterprising agri- 
culturists of Cass county, one who has gained financial independence 
and business prestige through the medium of his own efforts is John 
W. Sprinkle, of Deer Creek township. Embarking' upon a career of 
his own when he was a young man, without financial assistance or 
influential friends, he so well directed his efforts that today he is the 
owner of a handsome property of 160 acres of land, on the Walton 
road, in addition to having other valuable interests. Mr. Sprinkle was 
born on what is known as the old Sprinkle home place, near Sprinkle 
Chapel, in Cass county, Indiana, February 13, 1862, and is a son of 
John and Margaret (Roach) Sprinkle. His father, a native of Rock- 
bridge county, Virginia, was a machinist by trade, but after coming to 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 995 

Cass county, in young manhood, followed farming and stock raising, and 
also operated a sawmill and threshing machine. He and his wife were 
the parents of eight children, as follows: Ellen, who became the wife 
of a Mr. Orr; Wilson; William, who is deceased; Elizabeth, deceased, 
who was the wife of a Mr. McDonald ; Hannah, who married a Mr. Brit- 
ton ; John W. ; George ; and LeRoy. 

John W. Sprinkle began his education in the old Logan school and 
subsequently became a student in the Babb school, where he completed 
his training. On finishing his studies, he took up the trade of machinist, 
under the preeeptorship of his father, and subsequently worked in the 
sawmill and with the threshing machine, traveling all over this and 
surrounding counties, but when the land became partly cleared, he 
turned his attention to farming. On reaching his majority, he embarked 
upon a career of his own, and through industry, energy and perseverance 
has gained an enviable position among the agi'iculturists of his section 
of the county. Starting in a modest manner, as the years passed and 
his finances would permit, he added to his land, to his stock and to his 
improvements, and now has a tract of 160 acres that is well cultivated 
and fitted with modern buildings. He believes in the use of modern 
machinery and scientific methods, and the success which has rewarded 
his efforts marks him as one of the substantial men of his community. 
He is also the owner of 320 acres of government land in South Dakota, 
located near Redfield. A man of the highest integrity, his business 
dealings have always been of a strictly legitimate nature, and his methods 
have gained him an enviable reputation and a wide circle of friends. 

Mr. Sprinkle has been twice married, his first wife, Eva Crawford, 
dying without issue. His second marriage was to Miss Lillie Ruth, of 
Cass county, a member of a prominent farming family, and to this union 
there have been born five children, as follows : Clifford, who married 
Pearl Plank, and has three children, Pauline, Luella and Ellsworth ; 
Addie, the wife of James Kay, who has one daughter. Prances; and 
Gracie, Edith and Gladys, all of. whom reside with their parents. The 
family is connected with the ]\Iethodist Episcopal church, in the sup- 
port of which they have always been liberal. Mr. Sprinkle holds mem- 
bership in the local lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

Samuel Hursh. A substantial representative of the agricultural 
interests of Deer Creek township is found in the person of Samuel 
Hursh, the owner of 160 acres of excellent farming land, located about 
one and one-half miles east of the village of Young America. Although 
a resident of Cass county only since 1903, he has become widely aud 
favorably known among the citizens of his locality, and his ability 
and integrity have been recognized by his election to official position, 
in which he has served efficiently and conscientiously. Mr. Hursh is a 
native of the Hoosier State, and was born March 26, 1863, in Carroll 
county, a son of Martin V. and Sarah E. (Quinn) Hursh. His father, 
a native of Butler county, Ohio, came with his parents to Indiana in 
boyhood, settling in Carroll county in 1842. There he continued to be 
engaged in agricultural pursuits during the remainder of his life, 
accumulating a comfortable competency and being highly esteemed as 
a neighbor and citizen. He and his wife are both deceased, and are 



996 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

buried in the cemetery at Flora, Indiana. They were the parents of 
six children, namely : Samuel, Ada, Minnie, Mollie, Fannie and Ambrose. 
Martin V. Hursh was a member of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. 

Samuel Hursh attended the Carroll county schools, and was reared 
to the vocation of farming, an occupation in which his ancestors had 
been engaged for generations. At the age of twenty-one years, he left 
the parental roof and embarked upon a career of his own in Howard 
county, Indiana, where he continued operations until 1903, which year 
saw his advent in Cass county. Settling in Deer Creek township, 
Mr. Hursh began to cultivate and improve his 160-acre farm, and 
his substantial buildings in good repair and his well-tilled fields give 
eloquent evidence of his thrift and enterprise. This property, known 
as the old Harness farm, is being devoted to general farming and stock 
raising, in both of which lines Mr. Hursh has attained a full measure of 
success. Through the careful direction of his business interests and by 
indefatigable industry, he has acquired a handsome property and at the 
same time has so conformed to the ethics of business life that he has 
the unqualified confidence of all with whom he has had trade transactions. 

In August, 1894, Mr. Hursh was united in marriage with Miss Alice 
Harness, the estimable daughter of Jackson and Louise (Fisher) 
Harness, and to this union there have been born three children: Obie, 
who is engaged in farming in Deer Creek township, married Miss Laura 
Snider, and has two children, Robert and John; lea, residing with her 
parents, a graduate of the local schools ; and Oca, also living at home, 
who is still a pupil in the schools of the township. Mr. Hursh is a 
popular member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, as was 
his father, and takes a great cleal of interest in its work. His political 
belief is that of the Democratic party, and at the present time he is 
serving as a member of the board of trustees of Deer Creek township, 
where he is laboring faithfully in behalf of the best interests of his 
community and its people. With his family, he attends the Christian 
chiirch. 

John L. ^Maurice came to Logansport, Indiana, in 1862, and with 
the exception of about four years has ever since made this city his 
home. He is a native of Departemant des Voge, Canton de St. Die, 
France, his birth occurred on June 13, 1841, and in 1852, when he was 
eleven years old, he came with his parents, Nicholas and Margarte 
(Markuere) Maurice, to America. 

Nicholas Maurice located on a small tract of laud near Dayton, 
Ohio, after coming to this country and engaged in the business of 
agriculture, in which he continued until his death. 

All the education John L. ]\Iaurice ever received was in the schools 
of his native county and a winter in the schools of Dayton. When 
he was twelve years of age he started out on his own responsibility 
and his first employment was as a farm laborer, and for his services 
he received four dollars a month and his keep. He continued work- 
ing as a farm laborer, with gradually increasing wages, until he grew 
older, and in 1861 he went to Indianapolis, Indiana, where for a year 
he was employed as a clerk in an ice cream parlor. The next year he 





Qf:^.c^, 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 997 

came to Logansport and for a year thereafter he worked in the black- 
smith shop of John Jackson. On July 9, 1863, he enlisted in the 
IMississippi I\Iarine Brigade and at first was a member of Company D 
Cavalry, which later becam.e Company K Infantry. The duty of the 
command to which Mr. Maurice belonged was to patrol the IMississippi 
river and disperse bands of guerrillas. His militarj^ career was one of 
continual activity, and while he participated in no general engagement, 
he was continually exposed to attacks from the rebels. His command 
took part in the Red River expedition under General Banks, and he 
was finally honorably discharged from the service with the rank of 
corporal, his discharge taking efi'ect on January 21, 1865. His original 
company comprised one hundred and four men, and of this number only 
sixteen were left at the close of the war. Succeeding the return of peace 
to the land, ]\Ir. Maurice returned to Logansport, soon thereafter going 
to Dayton, Ohio, gardening about two years, and at the butcher busi- 
ness one year. He then returned to Logansport again and established 
a meat market at the coi^ner of North and Sixth streets. For a period of 
thirty-eight years he conducted a market at this corner, and he still owns 
the corner where the shop stood, althoiigh he retired from active busi- 
ness in 1910. He was at that time the oldest living butcher in Logans- 
port. It is a fact that when he first began his meat market he had 
to borrow the money to buy a horse, and when he first opened his doors 
his capital was so limited that he could only buy one beef at a time. 
He has prospered in the most unmistakable manner, and bore the 
reputation of being an excellent butcher, a careful buyer, a good sales- 
man, always courteous and square in all his dealings with his patrons, 
and enjoyed during his entire career the patronage of many who first 
frequented his little shop with its modest siipplies. Mr. Maurice is 
a man of excellent habits of life, temperate and saving, and these quali- 
ties have made possible the accumulation of his present property. 

Mr. JMaurice has been twice married. He has two sons by his first 
marriage — David W. and Charles L. In 1893 he "was married to Mrs. 
Indiana Connolly, the daughter of James S. Wilson, an old pioneer of 
Logansport, and the widow of Robert J. Connolly. IMrs. IMaurice has 
one son by her first marriage — Wilson J. Connolly. She is a member of 
the Second Presbyterian church. 

Mr. Maurice is a Republican and is a member of the Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks. 

James S. Wilson. An old and distinguished citizen of Logansport 
in Cass county was James S. Wilson, who came to Logansport on a canal 
boat, became identified with the local milling industry, and for many 
years was one of the leading manufacturers of the city. James S. Wilson 
was bom at Elizabethtown, in Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, October 
9, 1823, was of staunch American stock, and a son of Andrew and Eliz- 
ai)eth (Shooley) Wilson, natives respectively of Pennsylvania and Eng- 
land. Until he was twelve years old he received an education in the 
common schools of his native town, and his first practical experience was 
as a clerk in a drug store. This he followed for three years, and it led 
him to take up the study of medicine, but he soon abandoned his inten- 
tion of becoming a physician and instead went West and found a position 



998 HISTOEY OF CASS COUNTY 

as steward on a packet boat plying along the Wabash and Erie Canal in 
the freight trade between Logansport and Toledo. In this way he visited 
Logansport, and practically became a permanent resident in 1845. For 
several years he was connected with the 'canal transportation, and in 
1850 left that and accepted a clerkship with William Beach & Co. in the 
Forest Mills, an illnstration of which old mills will be found on other 
pages of this history. Seven years later, having a thorough experience 
in all departments of the mill, he formed a partnership with Cecil & 
Co., and subsequently became proprietor of the Logansport mills. He 
was a prosperous miller and local manufacturer until 1890, at which 
time he sold out the water power and mills to the city of Logansport, 
which converted it to the use of municipal power and lighting purposes. 

On May 21, 1844, Mr. Wilson married Delilah Creding, of Akron, 
Ohio. To their marriage were born two children: Indiana, first 
married Robert Connolly, and after his death became the wife of John 
L. Maurice, and now lives in Logansport ; Virginia became the wife of 
G. W. Stevens, who is president of the C. & 0. Railway, with residence 
at Richmond, A^irginia. James S. Wilson was a Republican in politics, 
and was affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and 
the Elks of Richmond, Virginia. 

James G. Johnson. After spending many years in mercantile lines 
in Young America, J. G. Johnson is now living retired from active 
pursuits, the greater part of his time and attention being given to 
looking after his realty interests. A worthy representative of an old 
and honored family, he has been a resident of Indiana since infancy, 
and his entire career has been one of industry and energy conducing 
to well-merited success. J. G. Johnson was born September 27, 1838, 
near Cincinnati, in Hamilton county, Ohio, and is a son of William 
and Sarah (Godfrey) Johnson. His father, born and reared in Ham- 
ilton county, received excellent educational advantages, became a 
physician, and after some years of practice came to Spencer county, 
Indiana, in 1838, and here lived for several years; then came to Young 
America, Cass county, where he practiced medicine. Thence he moved 
to Durham, Missouri, where he died. He became a well-known mem- 
ber of the Indiana medical profession, accumulated a comfortable com- 
petency, and when he died left a wide circle of friends to mourn him. 
He and his wife were the parents of tive children, namely: William, 
Martha, Robert, Eliza Ann and J. G., all dead but the last named. 

J. G. Johnson was educated in the common schools of Spencer county, 
and his boyhood was spent much the same as that of any other country 
•physician's son. He was eighteen years of age at the time he first 
came to Cass county, at that time locating in Deer Creek township, 
where for some time he worked as a farm hand. Subsequently he 
became apprenticed to the trade of mason, and after thoroughly master- 
ing its details followed that occupation for some time, eventually, how- 
ever, turning his attention to mercantile pursuits. Mr. Johnson became 
one of the pioneers in his chosen line in Young America, and for years 
was a leading business man of this town. Always trustworthy and 
reliable, he built up a business that covered the entire contiguoiis 
territory, and, while he was shrewd and farsighted in his business 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 999 

operations, his transactions were ever of a legitimate nature, and not 
only did he establish himself in the confidence of his business associates 
through the force of his integrity, but also gained the friendship and 
esteem of his customers by a pleasant, genial and obliging personality. 
He continued to enjoy a steady and well-balanced trade until several 
years ago, when, feeling that he had earned a rest from his years of labor, 
he retired. He still retains an active and intelligent interest, however, 
in all that affects his community, giving the support of his influence, 
his time and his means to promoting its welfare. Although nearing 
his seventy-fifth year, his faculties are unimpaired, his memory is excel- 
lent, and he recalls in a pleasing conversational manner many incidents 
and experiences of early days in Young America. Everywhere he has 
the respect and esteem of his fellow citizens. ]\Ir. Johnson holds prestige 
in the Masonic fraternity as the first man in Young America to receive 
his IMasonic emblem. With his family, he attends the Christian church. 
On July 19, 1862_, Mr. Johnson was married to Miss Margaret P. 
Burrows, and they had three children: William H., Sarah J. and John. 
All these children died before the mother. Mr. Johnson is a Prohibi- 
tionist, but is not an office seeker. 

A. A. Segraves. One of the native sons of Indiana who has conferred 
honor and dig-nity upon the state of his birth is A. A. Segraves, general 
farmer and stock raiser of Deer Creek township, who owns and operates 
a handsome tract of 180 acres on the Kokomo road. Reared to agricul- 
tural pursuits, he has made this his life vocation, and his success has 
come as a result of persistent industry, unfailing energy and integrity 
in business matters that have won him the confidence of his associates. 
Mr. Segraves was born January 2, 1859, in Carroll county, Indiana, 
and is a son of William and Mary (Plank) Segraves. 

Elam and Martha (]\Ioore) Segraves, the paternal grandparents of 
A. A. Segraves, were natives of the Old Dominion, from which state they 
migrated to Ohio as pioneers, settling near Eaton. There their son, 
William, was born and reared, taking up the occupations of farmer 
and carpenter and subsequently coming to Carroll county. During the 
Civil war, William Segi'aves enlisted in the Seventy-second Regiment, 
Mounted Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and he starved to death with 
others at Andersonville prison. He and his wife were the parents of 
three children, namely: A. A.; James H., who died unmarried, March 
2, 1885 ; and Martha, who became the wife of William Johnson and 
has three children. 

A. A. Segraves was a boy when brought to Deer Creek township, 
and here he secured his educational training in the district schools, 
finishing his course in the Swamp school. In the meantime he had 
spent the summer months in working upon the home farm, thoroughly 
assimilating all the details of agricultural work, and continued to remain 
under the parental roof until he was twenty-four years of age, at 
which time he embarked upon a career of his own. He began his 
operations by renting land from John Hendrickson, but subsequently 
became his stepfather's partner, and since then his rise has lieen steady 
and continuous. His present farm of 180 acres, on the Kokomo road, 
has been brought to a high state of cultivation and improved with good 



1000 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

buildings, and is known as one of the valuable tracts of the township. 
Mr. Segraves has other business interests and in numerous ways con- 
tributes materially to the importance of his community as a center of 
business activity. 

On May 8, 1884, Mr. Segraves was married to Miss Clara Crockett, 
a daughter of John Crockett, a sketch of whose life appears in another 
part of this work. Five children have been born to them : William 
E., an enterprising young agriculturist who is managing his father's 
interests, married Lola Bowman, and has two children, Irena and 
Geneva, also Mary, deceased ; Earl, of Saskatchewan, Canada, manager 
of his father's half-section of rich farming land, who married Mabel 
Noakes and has three children, Anal, Harold and a baby daughter, 
and ]Mary Mabel, Ruth and Lenna, all at home with their parents. Mr. 
Segraves is a member of the Knights of Pythias, and with his sons holds 
membership in the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Mrs. Segraves 
being a member of the Rebekahs. The family's religious affiliation is 
with the Uuiversalist church. Mr. Segraves has proved himself in all 
the relations of life an earnest, honest, upright man, and a citizen of 
whom any community might be justly proud. 

Allen Snyder. Cass is essentially an agrieiiltural county. It has 
its factories, its mills and its business houses, and the professions are, 
of course, well represented, but the chief industries here have been 
those of farming and stock raising, and along these lines the leading 
citizens have attained their positions of prestige. Among the men 
who have devoted their lives to the tilling of the soil, and through their 
operations have added to the general prosperity and welfare of the 
community, Allen Snyder takes prominent place. He is the owner of 
two farms, of one hundred and sixty and forty acres, respectively, and 
has also been active in public affairs, being at present a member of the 
common council of Logansport. He has been a resident of this section 
all of his life, ha\dng been born in the old house now standing on his 
present farm in September, 1863, a son of "William and Catherine 
(Senseman) Snyder. William Snyder was born in Lancaster, Penn- 
sylvania, and came to Cass county, Indiana, as a young man, taking 
up land in the vicinity of Galveston, where he spent the remainder of 
his life in agricultural pursuits. He and his wife were the parents of 
fourteen children, as follows : Samuel ; John, who is deceased ; Wil- 
liam ; Charles; Allen, of this review; Justina, who is deceased; Eliza- 
beth ; Mary ; Jennie ; Martha ; ]\Iinnie ; Frank ; Sarah and Henrietta. 

Allen Snyder firet attended the Runaway school and later the Pep- 
permint and Washington schools, in Washington township, and during 
his entire school period worked on the home farm, assisting his father 
and brothers in clearing, cultivating, plowing and harvesting, and in 
the thousand and one tasks that occupy the busy farmer's attention. 
William Snyder had a large farm and there was plenty for each of the 
sons to do, but their educations were not neglected, nor was their 
moral training forgotten, the good mother rearing them to habits of 
industry, honesty and thrift. On attaining his majority, Allen Snyder 
embarked upon a career of his own on a part of his father's farm, and 
as the years passed he added to his holdings and continued to put up 



HISTORY OP CASS COUNTY 1001 

new buildings and make other improvements until his farms are con- 
sidered some of the most valuable in the township. Although he does 
not engage as actively in the farm labor as in former years, Mr. Snyder 
still superintends the operations, and is known as a practical farmer 
and excellent judge of cattle, of which he has large herds. 

On March 5, 1887, Mr. Snyder was united in marriage with Miss 
Anna Eckerle, daughter of Leopold and Nancy (Mallory) Eckerle, who 
came to Cass county from Ohio, and here took up land at an early date. 
There were eight children in the Eckerle family : Frank ; Charles ; Anna, 
who married Mr. Snyder ; Alice and ^Martha, who are deceased ; Wil- 
liam; Rose and I\Iary. Mr. Eckerle, a retired mechanic, still survives 
and makes his home at Flora, Indiana. Mr. and Mrs. Snyder have 
had five children : Eddie L., w^ho has charge of the home place, where 
he resides, married Myrtle Bone; Howard, who married Mary Lam- 
bert ; RoUie ; Marvin and Vera. Mr. Snyder has taken a keen interest 
in public matters, and was recently elected a member of the common 
council of Galveston, where he has rendered efficient and conscientious 
service. He is a member of the Knights of Pythias of Young America 
and of the Democratic party. He has a widespread reputation for 
integrity and honorable dealing, and his friends are only limited to 
the number of his acquaintances. 

Andrew J. Gray, M. D., physician and surgeon at Young America, 
Indiana, is one of the eminent professional men of this part of Cass 
county, and his activities as doctor, civic official and public-spirited 
citizen have marked him as a representative of the best type of progres- 
sive American citizenship, and gained him the esteem and confidence 
of his fellow townsmen and the sincere regard of a \ride circle of per- 
sonal friends. Since locating in Young America, in 1890, Dr. Gray 
has identified himself with various movements for the public welfare, 
his connection with which has caused his election to positions of honor 
and trust, and in his discharge of the duties of which he has displayed 
the same faithfulness and conscientiousness that have marked his pro- 
fessional career. Dr. Gray was born October 1, 1854, in Jackson town- 
ship, Cass county, Indiana, and is a son of John and Harriet (Culver) 
Gray. 

John Gray was born in Juniata county, Pennsylvania, and was 
reared to agricultural pursuits. On leaving the Keystone state, he went 
to Butler county, Ohio, but remained there only a short time, subse- 
quently coming to Carroll county, Indiana, where his father had taken 
up land. Mr. Gray spent the remainder of his life here in agricultural 
pursuits, and died with a comfortable competence and with the full 
esteem and respect of his numerous friends. He and his wife were the 
parents of four children, namely : Jacob, James, Joseph and Andrew 
J., of whom James is deceased. 

Andrew J. Gray received his early education in the common schools 
of Jackson township, and during the summer months assisted his father 
in the work of the farm. Follo^^•ing this he took a finishing course at 
Walton, and then prepared for a collegiate course by attendance in the 
preparatory school at Valparaiso. Succeeding this, he entered the 
Indiana Medical University, at Indianapolis, where he was graduated 



1002 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

with the degree of Doctor of Medicine in 1897, and immediately entered 
upon the practice of his profession at North Grove, Miami county, 
Indiana, where he continued for ten years. In 1890, Dr. Gray came 
to Young America, where lie has since become the possessor of a large 
and representative professional business. He has been a close student 
and is the possessor of a valuable medical library, the perusal of which 
occupies whatever time he can spare from his professional duties. He 
has a well-appointed office, equipped with the most highly improved 
ec]uipment of the profession and everything that will in any way add 
to the comfort and convenience of his patients. He belongs to the Cass 
County and Indiana State IMedical Societies and the American Medical 
Association, in the work of which he takes great interest, and his fra- 
ternal connections include membership in the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows and the Knights of Pythias. 

On November 10, 1891, Dr. Gray was married to IMrs. Kate P. Ham- 
ilton, the widow of Joseph Hamilton, of Kokomo, Indiana, and they 
have one child, Joseph P., who is engaged in teaching school in Cass 
county. For four years Dr. Gray served efficiently in the office of 
trustee of schools, and during his administration the present Young 
America high school was erected. At the present time he is a member 
of the board of Cass county commissioners, and is giving his best 
services in behalf of the community in which he has resided for so 
many years. 

Claude Beck. It is almost entirely upon the standing of its busi- 
ness men and leading citizens, upon their reliability, integrity, enter- 
prise and public spirit, that the standing of any community rests That 
locality is indeed fortunate when it can boast of a number of self-made 
men, for, while they have been advancing their own interests, they have 
at the same time been forwarding the growth and prosperity of their 
community, and, having succeeded themselves, are almost invariably 
ready to assist others to success, thus materially contributing to the 
public welfare. Among the citizens who have been the architects of 
their own fortunes, and who have builded wisely and well, none stands 
higher in general esteem than Claude Beck, of Deer Creek township. 
Losing his father before his birth, his life from earliest boyhood has been 
one of incessant activity, and today he is the owner of a finely cultivated 
tract of more than two hundred acres of land. Mr. Beck was born 
August 18, 1872, near the ^^llage of Liberty, Union county, Indiana, and 
is a son of Alvin and Cynthia T. (Showalter) Beck. His father, also a 
native of Union county, was a farmer by occupation, and died when still 
in the prime of life, leaving Jiis wife with five small children, George E., 
Edwin A.. Bruce and Garry, who are now deceased, and Claude. 

The educational advantages of Claude Beck were somewhat limited, 
owing to the fact that it was early necessary for him to become self- 
supporting, but he attended the schools of Young America, made the 
most of his opportunities, and, being ambitious and industrious, man- 
aged to acquire a much better education than many who had much better 
chances. When still an infant he was brought by his mother to Cass 
county, and here when still a lad he began his career as an agriculturist. 
When yet in his teens he started operations on a tract of rented land 




FRANK V. GUTHRIE 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 1003 

in Deer Creek township, and as tlie years passed invested his earnings 
in property nntil at the present time he has, as before stated, two hun- 
dred acres. Here he has made numerous improvements, his buildings 
being' large and substantial and of modern architecture, and liis ma- 
chinery being of the latest manufacture and in the best of repair. The 
greater part of his attention has been given to general farming, but he 
has also experimented in stock raising with a full measure of success. In 
business affairs Mr. Beck is a man of keen discrimination and sound .judg- 
ment, of energy and perseverance, and the prosperity which has at- 
tended his efforts is the merited reward of his own faithful labor. 

In May, 1892, Mr. Beck was married to Miss Mary A. Roach, and 
they have had a family of eight children : Maude, who is deceased ; 
Ethel E., who became the wife of Carl S. Zook and resides on her father's 
farm ; Ruby S., Tonawanda, Virgil, Alvin, Bruce and Victor. The chil- 
dren have all been given good chances for an education, and fitted for the 
positions in life which they may be called upon to till. Mr. Beck is a 
popular member of the local lodges of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and the Knights of Pythias. 

Frank V. Guthrie. It not infrequently occurs that the men in a 
family will display an inclination to follow the same business or voca- 
tion, and this is especially true in the professional occupations. Where 
the son has inherited the father's predilection and ability, it is but 
natural that his bent should be along the same line, and Cass county 
furnishes a number of instances of one profession being passed down 
from one to the succeeding generation. An example of this kind is found 
in Frank V. Guthrie, the capable county attorney of Cass county, 
whose career before the bar is but a continuation of the success gained 
by his father in the practice of law. It is probable, however, that Mr. 
Guthrie's high position can be accredited as much to his hard, faith- 
ful work, as to any qualities of a hereditary character, for his has been 
an active and industrious career, filled with earnest, painstaking 
endeavor directed along well-defined lines. He is a native of Cass 
county, having been born in AVashington township, August 19, 1865, 
and is one of six children, five sons of whom are now living, born to 
Alexander and ]\lary (Brosier) Guthrie. 

Alexander Guthrie was born in Switzerland county. Indiana, and 
was ten years of age Avhen he accompanied his father, "William Guthrie, 
to Cass county. Here he was reared on his fathei-'s farm, early in life 
became a school teacher, and eventually took up the study of law, a 
profession which he followed for about thirteen years from 1870. His 
death occurred in 1906, and he is survived by his widow. 

Frank V. Guthrie attended the public and high schools of Logans- 
port, graduating from the latter in 1886, and follo^ving this began the 
study of his chosen profession under the preceptorship of his father. 
Subsequently he entered the offi.ee of DeWitt C. Justice, although 
prior to this time he had been elected justice of the peace, an office 
in which he served four years. In 1892, IMr. Guthrie took the examina- 
tion and was admitted to the bar, and since that year has continued 
in constant practice in Logansport. He was associated with his former 



1004 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

preceptor in a professional partnership until Mr. Justice's death, and 
since that time has practiced alone. He was not long in securing recogni- 
tion as a lawyer of high attainments, and soon acquired a large and 
representative i^ractice. His activities in Democratic politics won him 
the chairmanship of the Democratic Central Committee of Cass county 
in 1906, and as such he served until January, 1912. In the meantime, 
on January 1, 1909, he w^as the successful nominee of his party for the 
ofifice of county attorney, a position in which he has served with the 
greatest ability to the present time. Mr. Guthrie has been connected 
with much of the important litigation of recent years in Cass county, 
and has acquitted himself in an able manner in all the cases with 
which he has been connected. Among his associates at the bar he is 
recognized as a valuable associate and as an antagonist to be feared. 
His religious connection is with Eel River English Lutheran cliurch, 
while fraternally he belongs to the Odd Fellows Lodge No. 417, and 
Lodge No. 66 of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 

On June 25, 1890, Mr. Guthrie was married to ]\Iiss Catherine Miller, 
of Logansport, who was bom and reared here, and to this union there 
have been born two sons, namely: Earl F. and Asa B. 

BiVBT SwAPFORD. The life history of the gentleman whose name 
heads this brief review has been commensurate with that of Cass county, 
where he has made his home since 1866. It is difficult for the enter- 
prising and energetic farmer, after spending long years of earnest toil 
in cultivating a property, to retire from active pureuits and turn his 
property over to younger hands, but when he eventually arrives at the 
conclusion that he has reached an age when he is entitled to rest from 
his labors, he generally removes to a nearby city or village, and there 
becomes a welcome addition to its population as a man whose long ex- 
perience makes him valuable in forwarding his community's interests. 
This remark is in no sense inappropriate to Mr. SwafEord, who is now 
living a life of retirement in Lincoln, whence he removed when he turned 
over the management of his 160-acre farm to his sons. 

Bart Swafford was born in Preble county, Ohio, on the 22d day 
of May, 1845, a son of Archibald Swafford. His parents were farming 
people of Preble county, where they spent their lives, both now being 
deceased. They were the parents of eight children, namely: William, 
Bart, John, Emmett, Reese, James, Mary and Ella. Bart Swafford 
received his education in the district schools of his day and locality, and 
was reared to agricultural pursuits on his father's farm. He was 
thrifty and industrious in his youth, carefully saving his earnings with 
the view of becoming a property owner himself, and in 1866 was able 
to realize his ambition when he came to Deer Creek township and pur- 
chased his present land. Each year he added to his property and made 
improvements thereon, until it became one of the valuable tracts of the 
township. He erected a modern home, substantial barns and good out- 
buildings, and was successful in the raising of good stock and abundant 
crops. At the time of his retirement he moved to Lincoln, where he has 
since resided, and has taken a keen interest in the growth and develop- 
ment of his adopted place. He has not entered public life, having no 
desire for public office, but has done a good citizen's part in promoting 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 1005 

the welfare of his community and its people, and has never been back- 
ward in supporting those movements which he has believed would work 
out for the ultimate good of all concerned. 

Mr. Swafford was married to Miss Melinda Toney, and they reared a 
family of seven children, namely : Reese, John, Archibald, Beverly, Em- 
mett, Dennis, who is now deceased, and Mrs. Roxie Maryland. 

Beverly and Emmett Swafiford, sons of Bart Swafford, are the owners 
of a sixty-acre farm just across the road from the homestead, and also 
rent the latter place from their father. Both were educated under the 
veteran Cass county teacher, John Babb, working On the farm during 
their school period and continuing to be tillers of the soil after attain- 
ing their majorit}'. They have been successful in farming and stock 
raising operations, and have maintained the family reputation for in- 
dustry and integrity. 

AViLLi.vM O. Burrows. One who has considered the pursuits of pri- 
vate life as abundantl}^ worthy of his best efforts, and who has concen- 
trated his interests, energies and attention upon his home county, la- 
bored persistently for its advancement and growth, and at the same 
time has promoted his private interests so that he holds a place of 
prestige among his fellow citizens, is Wiliam 0. Burrows, of Deer Creek 
township, the owner of 145 acres of excellent farming land. 

The subject always closest to Mr. Burrows' heart has been agricul- 
ture, and he has not only gained an enviable position in his chosen call- 
ing, but has marked his career by a memorable showing forth of the 
utmost fidelity to principle and to the highest standard of human con- 
duct. He was born on the old Burrows homestead, owned by his brother, 
John E. Burrows, in Deer Creek township, Cass county, December 21, 
1855, and is a son of Joseph and Mary (Custenborder) Burrows. His 
father, a native of Greene county, Ohio, came to this township as a j'oung 
man, and during the remainder of his life was engaged in the cultivation 
of the soil, becoming one of his community's substantial and influential 
citizens. He and his wife became the parents of six children, namely : 
Sarah, who became the wife of Peter Pierson; Priseilla, who married 
David Studebaker; Mary C, Amanda, widow of Chauncey C. Mummert; 
William O. and John E. 

AVilliam O. Burrows commenced his education in the old Thomas 
school and passed all of his school days in the country. His boyhood 
was spent much the same as other farmers' youths of his day and locality, 
there always being plenty of work on the homestead to keep his hands 
busy and his mind occupied. In the meantime he was securing experi- 
ence of a practical nature that was of gi'eat value to him during the 
years that followed. He was always industrious and ambitious, and on 
attaining his majority embarked upon a career of his own, first renting 
land and later going into debt for his present property. He was able 
after some years of labor to clear his land from its incumbrance, and 
from that time his rise has been steady and continued. He is engaged 
in general farming and stock raising, in both of which lines he has met 
with a full measure of success, and his land is constantly increasing in 
value. As a farmer Mr. Burrows is inclined toward modern methods 
and ideas. In his everj^-day citizenship he displays the same enterprise 



1006 HISTOKY OF CASS COUNTY 

and practices the same creed. He has enriched his community and added 
to its importance by developing a choice property, and for this reason, 
if for no other, deserves a place among Deer Creek township's represen- 
tative men. 

On December 31, 1879, Mr. Burrows was married to Miss Eliza J. 
Blue, daughter of Uriah and Mary (Cohen) Blue, and they have had the 
following children : Grace ; Delbert, who married Grace Seward and has 
four sons — Harold, Robert, Arthur and Richard; Elmer, who died at 
the age of iifteen years; and Margaret, who is attending school. Uriah 
Blue was born in Carroll county, Indiana, and there spent many years 
on a farm, but eventually came to Cass county. He and his wife were 
the parents of four children: Eliza J., who married Mr. Burrows; Ella 
M., JMary Ann and Oretta. Mr. and Mrs. Burrows are prominent mem- 
bers of the German Baptist church. 

John R. Babb. There is no vocation in which man can engage that 
is more highly honored than that of the teacher. Placed under his care 
are the plastic minds of youth, eager for knowledge, easily impressed, 
and the responsibility resting on the shoulders of the educator is a 
heavy one. Each year the standard of education has been placed higher, 
and he who would keep abreast of his calling must constantly study, 
even as those under him study. For forty years John Babb has been 
engaged in teaching in the public schools of Cass county, and during 
this time he has made a name for himself in his profession, has been 
also a successful agriculturist, and as a citizen has gained the respect 
and good will of all with whom he has come in contact. He is now the 
owner of a farm of forty acres, on which he still resides, located on Lin- 
coln rural free delivery route No. 15, in Deer Creek township, although 
he has retired from active agricultural pursuits. jNIr. Babb is a native 
of Ohio, born near Greenville, in Darke county, August 31, 1850, a son 
of William H. and Maiy C. (Anderson) Babb. His father brought the 
family to Cass county when John Babb was still a lad, settling on a 
farm in Deer Creek township, where he continued to be engaged in till- 
ing the soil during the remainder of his life. He met with a reasonable 
amount of success, and was known as one of his section's industrious 
men and practical farmers, and as a citizen who ever had the welfare of 
his community at heart. He and his wife were the parents of ten chil- 
dren, of whom five grew to maturity, namely : John, James N., David B., 
Reese M. and Ulysses S., who is deceased. 

John Babb commenced his educational training in the old Salem 
school, originally a log church, following which he attended the public 
schools of Valparaiso and a preparatory school at Lebanon, Ohio. Thus 
equipped he secured his teacher's license and at once entered upon his 
pedagogic work, in which he has since become known all over Cass 
county. In the meantime he has followed farming to some extent, de- 
voting himself to his calling in the winter months, and spending his 
summers in cultivating his fields, although he retired from the latter 
occupation some years since. Mr. Babb is known as an ideal educator, 
who has the much-desired quality of being able to impart to his students 
his own extensive knowledge. Many of his pupils have gone out into 
the world and made names for themselves in various lines of endeavor, 



HISTORY OP CASS COUNTY . 1007 

and have frequently given credit to their preceptor for his wise and valu- 
able teachings that stai-ted them off well prepared for the serious business 
of life. 

Mr. Babb was married in 1877 to Miss Indiana Toney, who died, 
leaving two children: Claude D., who married Florence Kelly, and has 
three children — Omer, Elwin and Wilma ; and Clyde, who married 
Laura Daggert, and has two children — Hilda and Robert. 

Mr. Babb belongs to the Methodist Episcopal church and has been 
liberal in his support of religious and charitable movements. He has 
not entered public life, having had no desire for personal preferment, 
but has not been unmindful of the duties of citizenship, and has done 
all in his power to further the interests of his community and to aid 
in securing good government. His long connection with educational 
matters has made him widely known, and everywhere he is esteemed as 
a man whose long life has done much to better his locality and those 
about him. 

James Alexander Nelson. An excellent illustration of the rewards 
to be gained through a life of industry, energy and probity, is to be 
found in the career of James Alexander Nelson, of Deer Creek township, 
now the owner of 403 acres of valuable land, whose success has been 
attributable to individual worth. A resident of Cass county since boy- 
hood, he has been closely identified with the growth and development of 
this section, and has done his full share in bringing about the wonderful 
changes that have marked Cass county's history during the past several 
decades. James Alexander Nelson was born September 25, 1851, in 
Union county, Indiana, and is a son of John and Nancy (Allen) Nelson. 
His father, also a native of that county, spent his life in tilling the soil, 
and became one of his commtinity's prominent and substantial citizens. 
There were four sons in the family : John, William, Jacob, who is now 
deceased, and James A. 

The early education of James A. Nelson was secured in the schools 
of Lybrook, Union county, and he was still a lad when he was brought 
to Cass county, here completing his studies in the common schools. He 
was reared to agricultural pursuits, and remained with his mother until 
he was twenty-one years of age, at which time he embarked on a career 
of his own, taking up a tract of land in Deer Creek township. As the 
years have passed and his finances have permitted, he has added to his 
land from time to time, and now has about 403 acres, over 200 acres of 
which have been cleared by himself. 

He carries on general farming and stock raising, using the most ap- 
proved methods, and has taken advantage of modern machinery in cul- 
tivating his land. Progressive along all lines, he has recognized that the 
successful farmer best helps himself who helps the community, and 
accordingly has done all in his power to advance the interests of Deer 
Creek township. His reputation in business circles has ever been that 
of a man of integrity and honorable principles and he justly merits the 
high esteem in which he is universally held. 

Mr. Nelson was married to Miss Ella Barnhart, and they have been 
the parents of six children, namely: Roy, who married Esther Peters, 
and has one daughter — Geneva I. ; Bertha, who married a Mr. Babb, 



1008 . HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

and has two children — James and Esther; Edna, single and residing at 
home with her parents, and Everett and Emmett, who are attending 
school. The oldest child. May, died at the age of sixteen years. With his 
wife and children Mr. Nelson attends the New Light church. He is a 
Democrat politically. 

Martin Van Buren Burrows. Among the residents of Deer Creek 
township who are successfully carrying on the work of breeding and 
dealing in live stock and developing the fields according to modern 
methods of farming, is numbered Martin Van Buren Burrows, whose 
home is on Galveston rural free delivery route No. 13. Here he has a 
farm of seventy-one acres, on which he has carried on operations for 
many years, during which he has gained a widespread reputation for 
integrity, probity and good citizenship. He was born November 15, 
1837, in Greene county, Ohio, and is a son of Benjamin and Mary 
(Stottler) Burrows. His father, a native of Maryland, migrated west 
to Ohio in young manhood, settling in Greene county, where he was 
engaged in farming until he brought the family to Cass county in 1865. 
In addition to carrying on farming he followed the trade of blacksmith 
for a long period, and accumulated a large tract of land. He became 
widely known in his part of the county and was accounted one of Deer 
Creek township's best citizens. He and his wife were the parents of 
three children, namely: Martin Van Buren, William Jackson and Mrs. 
Mary Founda, both of whom are now deceased. 

After completing his education in the common schools of Greene 
county, Ohio, Martin V. Burrows started upon his career as an agricul- 
turist. His early training was secured in his native county, for, being 
his father 's youngest son, he was put to work in the fields almost as soon 
as he was large enough to grasp the plow-handles. Reared carefully, by 
Christian parents, he was taught the value of industry and honesty, 
being trained under the teachings that success in life was only to be 
obtained through the medium of constant application and tireless per- 
severance. 

Mr. Burrows was about twenty-eight years of age when he accom- 
panied his parents to Cass county, Indiana, and here his first farm con- 
sisted of rented land. It was not long, however, until he purchased a 
property of his own, although it was some time before he had it entirely 
clear of indebtedness. Laboring faithfully and intelligently along well- 
defined lines, as the years passed he was able to make improvements on 
his land, to add thereto from time to time, and as his means would 
permit to erect substantial buildings to take the place of those originally 
built. His labors have borne fruit, and today he finds himself in pos- 
session of a handsome property which compares favorably with any of 
its size in the towTiship. He always has been known for his integi'ity in 
matters of business, is accounted a good neighbor, and his numerous 
friends testify to his general popularity. 

On June 16, 1859, Mr. Burrows was united in marriage with Miss 
Mary Campbell, daughter of John and Elizabeth (Braun) Campbell. 
The Campbells were from Indiana, while the Braun family migrated to 
this state from Pennsylvania. Six children were born to Mr. and Mi-s. 
Burrows, as follows : Anna, who passed away at the age of fifteen years ; 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 1009 

Warren L., who married a Miss Wolf, and has two children — Otis W. and 
Etta M. ; Frank, the wife of Jacob Cripe, who has four children — Lee 
and Mae, twins, Fern and Geneva; Albert, who married (first) Ella 
Yernon, by whom he had one child — Blanch, and married (second) 
Elsie Hart, and has two children — Grace and Ross; Mary, the wife of 
Ira Smith, who has two children — Edna and Earl, and Walter, who 
married Mattie Bruner. Mr. and i\Irs. Burrows belong to the Dunkard 
church. 

Otha a. Davis. Residing in a pleasant home on his 120-acre farm, 
located on Walton route 16, about ten miles south of Logansport, Otha 
A. Davis is numbered among his community's successful agriculturists. 
A tSvau of strong individuality and indubitable probity, he has gained 
position through the exercise of industry and perseverance, and has at 
the same time promoted the general welfare while enhancing individual 
prosperity. Today he ranks among the most progressive and enter- 
prising agriculturists of Deer Creek township and has gained a position 
of distinctive prominence bj^ reason of his superior ability, close appli- 
cation and sound judgment. He has also maintained a lively interest 
in the industrial and popular activities of the community and has con- 
tributed materially to the general progress and upbuilding. 

Otha A. Davis was born August 3, 1869, in Washington township, 
Cass county, Indiana, on the old Anthauer farm, and is a son of N. M. 
and Mary (Deacon) Davis. His father came from near Eaton, Preble 
county, Ohio, to Cass county, and here continued to be engaged in agri- 
cultural pursuits during the remainder of his life, accumulating a com- 
rortable competency in worldly goods and gaining and retaining the re- 
spect and esteem of his business associates and neighbors. 

He and his wife had a family of four children, as follows : Elmer 
E., a farmer of Deer Creek township; Otha A., of this review; Eliza- 
beth, who is deceased ; and John W., who is engaged in business in 
Chicago, Illinois. 

The educational training of Otha A. Davis was secured in Deer 
Creek township, where he attended Deacon School District No. 2 
during the winter months, while in the sununers he assisted his father 
in plowing, cultivating, planting and harvesting, and in the multi- 
tudinous duties that form a part of the life of the busy Indiana farmer. 
When he was nineteen years of age, he began farming on his own 
account, first renting small tracts of land, later increasing his tracts, 
and eventually buying from his earnings a property of his own. This 
he brought to a high state of cultivation and disposed of at a profit, and 
at that time bought his present farm, a tract of 120 acres, which he is 
devoting to general farming and stock raising, in both of which lines 
he has met with success. The general appearance of his farm at once 
stamps the owner as a man of intelligence and good management as 
well as one of untiring energy, the buildings being substantially built 
and of modern architecture, the fields being well laid out and neatly 
fenced, and the cattle healthy, sleek and w^ell fed. He takes an inter- 
est in political matters, especially those of a local nature, but merely 
as an onlooker, having never had any aspirations for public office. He 
has been interested to some extent in fraternal work, being a valued 



1010 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

member of the Free and Accepted Masons, the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows and the Knights of Pytliias, being senior warden in the 
last named and popular in all, while Mrs. Davis belongs to the Daugh- 
ters of Eebekah. 

On December 26, 1888, Mr. Davis was united in marriage with Miss 
Luella Jane Crockett, daughter of John Crockett, a review of whose 
career will be found on another page of this work. Seven children have 
been born to Mr. and Mrs. Davis, namely: One who died in infancy; 
Enunett, a Logansport business man, who married Esther Hyman ; 
Homer E., who assists his father in the work of the home farm ; and 
Janet, Lowell, Wilmer and Joseph, all residing with their parents. 
The family attends the Universalist church, and its members have ever 
been liberal in their support of religious and charitable movements. 

Thomas McElheny. A native son of Logansport, widely known and 
highly regarded by all classes, Thomas LIcElheny, clerk of the court of 
Cass county, has spent his entire career in this city, and has won recog- 
nition in business and public life through the medium of his own efforts 
and abilities. Since the time when he completed his schooling, as a small 
lad, he has made his own way in the world, directing his ambitious activ- 
ities along well-defined paths and characterizing his operations with a 
high regard for the rights of others and an earnest desire to assist his 
city and its people that has won him friends everywhere. Thomas 
McElheny, or "Tom," as he is more familiarly known, was born in 
Logansport, Indiana, October 20, 1878, a son of Robert and Ida 
(Mason) McElheny. 

The IMcElheny family was founded in the United States by the 
great-grandfather of our suliject. who came to this country from Ire- 
land. The grandfather, Thomas R. IMcElheny, was born in Dayton, 
Ohio, from whence he came to Cass coianty, Indiana, in pioneer days, 
locating in Logansport, Indiana, where, with his son, Robert, he was 
engaged in the grocery business for many years. Contrary to what 
might be expected from their nationality the members of this family 
were Protestants. Robert IMcElheny was a member of Company B, 
Forty-sixth Regiment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, serving one year 
during the Civil war, after the close of which he returned to the pur- 
suits of peace, spending the rest of his life in merchandising, and pass- 
ing away February 29, 1898. His widow survives, living in Logansport, 
and has been the mother of nine children, Thomas, the fourth in order 
of birth, being one of three siirvivors. 

Tom McElheny was reared to manhood and has always resided in 
Logansport. His education was secured in the common schools, and 
w^hen still a small lad he began to make his own way in the world, 
accepting whatever honorable occupations presented themselves. Being 
of a thrifty and industrious nature, he carefully saved his earnings, 
and Avhen twenty-four years of age established himself in a general 
insurance bi;siness. Four years later he added a real estate depart- 
ment to his enterprise, and in both lines he has met with well-desei*ved 
success. The companies represented by Mr. McElheny & Company 
organized in 1902, are as follows: Home Insurance Company, In- 
surance Company of North America, North British and Mercantile, 



HISTOEY OF CASS COUNTY 1011 

Fireman's Fund, Fire Association, Franklin, Royal, Standard Fire, 
Globe Indemnity, Ocean Accident Guaranty Corporation, New York 
Plate Glass, Hartford Steam Boiler, "international Live Stock, 
Standard Accident, National Surety Company, National Life of Vermont. 

While he has supported the Republican party as a rule in national af- 
fairs, he has been broad-minded enough to criticise what he deems 
wrong in his party's policies, and probably could be better termed an 
independent Republican. In 1910 he entered the public arena as a 
candidate for the office of clerk of the Cass county court, was elected 
by a handsome majority, and has continued to capably fill tbat office 
to the present time. Mr. ]\IcElheny has been prominent fraternally as 
a member of the Masons, in which he holds membership in the Blue 
Lodge, Chapter and Council. He is also a Scottish Rite ^lason and a 
Shriner, a member of IMurat Temple, Indianapolis. He holds member- 
ship also with the Knights of Pythias and Benevolent Protective Order 
of Elks. With his family he attends the Methodist Episcopal church. 

On June 7, 1904, Mr. McElheny was married to JMiss ^label Pitman, 
of LaFayette, Indiana, and they have three sons: Tom, Jr., Joseph and 
Richard. 

Edgar D. Robinson. From the Old Dominion state have come many 
of Cass county's best agriculturists, men reared to the soil wlio have 
brought with them many of the sterling, sturdy traits of their fore- 
fathers. In this class stands Edgar D. Robinson, of Deer Creek town- 
ship, who migrated to Indiana in young manhood with no capital save 
a laudable ambition, an energetic spirit and a persistent nature, which, 
however, constituted a sufBcient foundation upon which to erect a 
structure of siiccess. Today, Mr. Robinson is the owner of eighty acres 
of excellent land, and has a recognized place among the substantial 
men of his community. He was bom in Virginia on the 3d of May, 
1865, and is a son of Alexander and Caroline ( Gather) Robinson, 
natives of that state, where they spent their entire lives in farming, 
and both have now passed away and are buried in their beloved Virginia. 

Edgar D. Robinson received his educational training in the schools 
of his native vicinity, and from earliest boyhood was trained by his 
father in the duties of the farm. He continued to assist his father 
until he was twepty-two years old, at which time he left the parental 
roof and came to Cass county, which has since been the scene of his 
labors. On his advent here, he first located at Walton, where he secured 
employment Avorking on the farm of the Wendlings, situated near that 
place. He was thrifty, industrious and enterprising, carefully saving 
his earnings, and was eventually able to secure his present property, 
a farm of eighty acres. This land had but few improvements when Mr. 
Robinson became its owner, but since that time it has been converted 
into one of the most valuable tracts of its size in the township. As 
time has passed and his resources have permitted, he has added to his 
buildings and equipment, making necessarv improvements in a modern 
way and keeping his implements and buildings in the best of repair. 
Although the greater part of his attention has been given to general 
farming, he has also met with some success as a. stock raiser, his sleek, 
well-fed herds of cattle giving evidence of his ability in this line. In 



1012 HISTORY PF CASS COUNTY 

business matters he has always displayed the strictest integrity, thus 
winning and retaining the eontidence and respect of those with whom 
he has had transactions. 

Mr. Robinson was united in marriage with Miss Ursula DeHaven, 
and to this union there has been born one child: Clarence, ilrs. 
Robinson is a consistent member of Salem Methodist Episcopal church, 
and they are liberal in their support of church and charity. He has 
shoAvn some interest in fraternal matters, being a member of the 
Masonic order, but aside from this has given his entire attention to 
his farm and his honie, which have satisfied his ambitions. He has not 
eared for public life, and is no politician, taking merely a good citizen's 
interest in matters that affect his community. It is such men that form 
the bone and sinew of any section, and to them must be given the credit 
for the great advance enjoyed by Cass county along agricultural lines. 

John Hynes. The pioneers of Cass county have done their work, 
and the result of their efforts is shown today in the magnificently de- 
veloped farms, the flourishing towns and cities, the splendidly kept roads 
and the perfectly equipped schools. All this was not brought about in 
a day, but is the resiilt of years of unceasing endeavor, coupled with 
constant faith in the locality and appreciation of its possibilities. One 
of the representative farmers of this locality, who belongs to an old and 
honored family, and who has himself been identified with the agricul- 
tural history of his part of the county, is John Hynes, the owner of 318 
acres of well cultivated land in section 11, Clinton township. Mr. Hynes 
was born on the farm which he now occupies, August 18, 1849, and is a 
son of John and Nancy ( Coble ) Hynes. 

John Hynes, the elder, was born in Westmoreland county, Pennsyl- 
vania, in December, 1811, and in 1828 came to Cass county and entered 
land. Returning to IMontgomery county, Ohio, he was married to Nancy 
Coble, who was born near Dayton, Ohio, in December, 1811, and in 1832 
they returned to Cass county, where they spent the remainder of their 
lives in agricultural pursuits, Mr. Hynes dying in 1890 and his wife in 
1881. They were the parents of fourteen children, of whom four are 
living at this date: Nancy J., who is the widow of Hugh Fitzer; i\Iar- 
garet, who is the widow of W. K. Canada ; Ella, the wife of William H. 
Tyner, and John, of this review. 

John Hynes was reared on the homestead place, and attended the 
district schools during the winter terms vmtil he was twenty-one years 
of age, in the meantime spending his summer months on the farm. He 
was first married to Miss Ella Parks, who died without issue, as did also 
his second wife, who bore the maiden name of Alice Hilderbrand. His 
third wife was Ella Loesh. On November 19, 1885, Mr. Hynes was mar- 
ried (fourth) to Jennie Gasaway, who was born in Clinton township 
and educated in the district schools here, and they became the parents 
of two children : Alda, who resides at home, was given an excellent edu- 
cation in music and is now a teacher ; and Rachel, also single and at home, 
a graduate of the district and high schools and Purdue University, in 
which institution she took the short course. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hynes and their children are members of the Christian 
church at Pleasant Hill, where Mr. Hynes is acting as an elder. He is 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 1013 

a member of Burrows Lodge No. 495, I. 0. 0. F., and of the Grand 
Lodge, and is past grand therein ; and of Logansport Lodge of the Tribe 
of Ben Hur. He is a Democrat in his political views, served as assessor 
of Cass county for four years, and at this time is superintendent of the 
Hynes & Porter gravel road. 

Mr. Hynes has devoted his entire life to agricultural pursuits, and 
at this time is the owner of 318 acres of good land. Farming, as con- 
ducted today, is an enterprise requiring close calculation and scientific 
management, a technical trade full of demands for exact information 
and the deft touch, and to win the full measure of success the modern 
farmer must be a man of sobriety, industry and energetic nature. A 
glance at Mr. Hynes' well-regulated property will assure the visitor that 
he is possessed of all of these faculties, while his sleek cattle, well-fed 
hogs and standard bred horses testify to his ability as a stockman. Per- 
sonally he is a man of pleasing address, and his many admirable quali- 
ties of mind and heart have won him hosts of friends and admirers. He 
has invested his means judiciously and intelligently, and is a stockholder 
in the Farmers and iMerehants Bank at Logansport. 

Hon. Willard C. Fitzer. The unusual and versatile talents that 
go to make for success in diversified fields of endeavor are seldom pos- 
sessed in full degree by any one individual, but in the case of the Hon. 
Willard C. Fitzer, of Clinton township, it would seem that nature had 
been prodigal in her gifts. The brilliant professional man seldom proves 
the successful agriculturist, or vice versa, and while it is not unusual for 
either to become the influential legislator, it is not so frequent that one 
man combines all the qualities of the three. ]\Ir. Fitzer is an excellent 
example of an exception to this rule, as he has proven his ability and 
has made a distinct success of his farming operations, and in the legis- 
lative halls is a recognized power. He is a native son of Cass county, 
having been born in Clinton township, a son of Hugh and Nancy J. 
(Haynes) Fitzer. 

Hugh Fitzer was born in the state of Ohio, and as a young man, in 
1831, migrated to Indiana, settling on the farm in Clinton township on 
which his son Willard C. now resides. He became a large owner of 
land, one of his community's public-spirited citizens, and his death, 
which occurred in 1906, was sincerely mourned by a wide circle of 
friends. Although a modest and unassuming man, who never allowed 
his name to be used in connection with public office, he took a keen and 
intelligent interest in politics, and always worked energetically in the 
interests of the Democratic party. With his wife, he attended the 
Methodist Episcopal church, and everywhere was known as an honest, 
industrious and law-abiding citizen. Mr. Fitzer was married in Clinton 
township to Nancy J. Haynes, a native of Indiana, and they became the 
parents of two children: Hon. Willard C. and Harry J. 

Willard C. Fitzer was reared on his father's farm, and in boyhood 
entered the district schools of Clinton township, which he continued to 
attend until he was seventeen years of age. At that time he took up his 
studies in the preparatory department of Purdue University, and one 
year later entered upon a regular course of four years in that institu- 
tion, being graduated therefrom with the degree of Bachelor of Sciences, 



1014 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

in 1890. At that time he hecame a student in the law department of the 
University of ]\Iichigan, where he received the degTee of LL.B. in 1893, 
and ahnost immediately thereafter opened a law office in Logansport, 
which was the scene of his professional endeavors during the next ten 
years. During this time he acted in the capacity of prosecuting attorney 
.of the twenty-ninth judicial circuit of Cass county, to which office he 
was elected on the Democratic ticket, having inherited his father's po- 
litical proclivities. Subsequently he was sent as a representative to the 
sixty-seventh general assembly from Cass county, his services in which 
were given their appreciation when he received the re-election in the 
sixty-eighth general assembly, of which he is now a member. 

Mr. Fitzer returned to the Clinton township farm in 1904, and since 
that time has given the greater part of his attention to the raising of 
pure-bred Angus cattle and high grade sheep and hogs. A capal)le, 
practical farmer and stockman, taking advantage of modern ideas and 
methods, his success has been due to intelligent effort, directed along 
well-defined lines and at all times characterized by the highest degree of 
integrity. The home farm, a tract of 620 acres, has been brought to a 
high state of cultivation, and its entire appearance denotes the presence 
of able management, thrift and industry. Although his farming opera- 
tions and the duties of his public office leave Mr. Fitzer little time for 
outside affairs, he has not been insensible to the social amenities, and 
is popular with the members of Tipton Lodge No. 33, A. F. & A M. ; 
Bridge City Lodge No. 305, Knights of Pythias, and B. P. 0. E. Lodge 
No. 66. 

Jerome Justice. Many of the leading agriculturists of Cass county 
have spent their entire lives within its limits, a number having been 
born on the land which they are now cultivating. In this class is Jerome 
Justice, a farmer of section 11, Clinton township, who was born on the 
farm he is now cultivating, January 4, 1856, a son of James M. and 
Mary (Shortridge) Justice. 

The Justice family is one of the old and honored ones of the county, 
and can be traced back to the year 1610, when Mr. Justice's forefathers 
were driven out of Ireland, taking refuge in Holland, from which country 
the progenitor of the family in this country came in 1743. Six brothers 
of the name were living in the Ameincan colonies at the outbreak of the 
Revolutionary war, all enlisted in the colonial army, and three died 
while Avearing the uniform, one of the others, the great-grandfather of 
Jerome Justice, being with General Washington during the memorable 
winter at Valley Forge, and afterward living to the remarkable age of 
one hundred and four years. The grandfather of Jerome Justice, John 
Justice, was a Pennsylvania school teacher, and married Rosa Hood, a 
native of Ireland, their children being : Joseph, who was a paymaster in 
the Army of the Cumberland during the War of the Rebellion; John, 
who was an auctioneer and peddler in Cass county prior to the advent of 
railroads here ; Frank, a clerk and trader ; William, who passed his life 
in Winchester, Kentucky; Clarissa, who became the wife of Benjamin 
Porter; Rosie, who married William Porter, a pioneer of Cass county of 
1832; and James M. 

James M. Justice, the father of Jerome Justice, was born in Lan- 



HISTORY .OP CASS COUNTY 1015 

caster county, Pennsylvania, in 1809, and upon coming west in early 
manhood located in Fayette county, where he was married (first) to 
Malinda Porter, daughter of William Porter. Soon thereafter they 
made removal to Cass county, and October 8, 1837, became residents of 
Clinton township, their home being- located three miles west of what is 
Clymer station. Mr. Justice entered a quarter section of land from the 
government, developed a fine farm, and made his home thereon for 
fifty-six years. He was a very successful farmer, managing his interests 
with that ability, foresight and energy that seldom fail to bring the de- 
sired financial returns. In addition to his agricultural pursuits he also 
practiced veterinary surgery. In his political views he was a stalwart 
Republican and on that ticket was several times elected to the office of 
township trustee. He belonged to the Christian church, was a man of 
exemplary habits, and his many excellencies of character won him the 
regard of all with whom he came in contact. In his death, which oc- 
curred July 17, 1894, his community lost one of its best citizens. Mr. 
Justice's first wife died, leaving seven children, as follows: Elizabeth, 
the waf e of Warren Millard, of Carroll county, Indiana ; Rosanna, de- 
ceased, who was the wife of Isaac N. Myers; William; Joseph, who is 
deceased ; James, who belonged to the One Hundred and Eighteenth 
Regiment, Illinois Volunteer Infantry, during the Civil war, rising to 
the rank of brigade quartermaster ; Clara, the wife of A. C. Chapman, 
of Sacramento, California ; and Caroline, who became the wife of Robert 
Houston. Mr. Justice was married (second) to Mary Shortridge, who 
was born in Fayette county, Indiana, and they became the parents of 
seven eliildren, of whom five are living: Jerome; Lorinda, the wife of 
William Shaffer, of Carroll county, Indiana; Frank, a contractor living 
in Logansport; Parker, a veterinary surgeon of Winnipeg, Canada; and 
Millory, a retired farmer of Burroughs, Carroll county, Indiana. 

Jerome Justice w^as reared to agricultural pursuits on the home farm, 
and as a youth was given excellent educational advantages, attending 
the district schools, the seminary at Logansport, the Ladoga Normal 
School and the Danville Normal School, and eventually was given a 
teacher's certificate, of which, however, he never made use. On com- 
pleting his education he made a trip to California, where he remained 
for two years, at the end of that time returning to Cass county, where 
he took up farming on the homestead. He now owns 118 acres, of 
which eighty were originally included in the property settled and cleared 
by his father, and the entire tract is now in an excellent state of culti- 
vation, producing large crops and giving ample evidence of Mr. Justice's 
ability as an agriculturist. In addition to farming he carries on stock 
raising and his ventures have proved successful, because he has applied 
himself to his work, has given his personal attention to each detail 
thereof, and has used intelligent, practical and modern methods, equip- 
ment and machinery. 

In 1889 Mr. Justice was married to Miss Belle Martin, who waa 
born and reared in Carroll county, Indiana, and there educated in 
the district schools, and she died March 29, 1890, having been the mother 
of one child, Martin E., a graduate of the Winona schools, of Indiana 
College and the University of Illinois, who is now engaged in farming 
in Carroll county. Mr. Justice was married November 16, 1892, 



1016 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

to Miss Jennie Myers, who was born in Miami county, Indiana, 
and tliere reared and educated. One daughter, Ethel B., was bom to this 
union, December 31, 1895. She was educated in the common schools of 
Clinton township, and has also been given a musical education in Lo- 
gansport, being a young lady of no small talent. 

In political matters Mr. Justice is a Republican, although in the cam- 
paign of 1912 he was disposed to incline towards the young Progressive 
party. During his long residence here he has gained a wide acquaint- 
ance, among which he numbers many friends. He has been reliable and 
straightforward in all his dealings, and his neighbors and numerous 
acquaintances are invariably unstinted in their commendation of his 
methods. 

Charles B. Chambers. Undoubtedly travel and experience are 
helpful in the successful pursuit of any calling, for in this way the mind 
is broadened, new ideas are introduced and strange methods are given a 
trial, thus adding to the traveler's stock of information and widening 
his scope. Few of the citizens of Clinton township have enjoyed better 
advantages along this line than has Charles B. Chambers, who is engaged 
in farming and stock raising on section 10, and whose career is of in- 
terest because it has been marked by constant endeavor along well-defined 
lines, showing the success that may be gained by a poor boy whose only 
capital in early life is pluck and energy. IMr. Chambers was born on a 
farm in Clinton township, Cass county, Indiana, March 1, 1859, and is 
a son of Thomas and Christiana Chambers, the former a native of Ken- 
tucky and the latter of Germany. His parents came to Cass county as 
young people, were here married, and spent the rest of their lives in 
farming. They were the parents of four children, namely : Richard, 
Charles B., Samuel L. and V. P. 

Charles B. Chambers was reared on his father's farm in Clinton 
township, and was attending the district schools at the time of his 
father's death. Although he was but fourteen years of age he was com- 
pelled to give up his studies and start to work to assist in the support 
of the family, his first employment being at wood chopping. Later he 
started to work on neighboring farms, and continued to be so engaged 
until his marriage, in 1879, when he became engaged in operations on his 
own account. Thrifty, industrious and energetic, as the years passed he 
added to his land from time to time, in the meantime carrying on general 
farming and stock raising. In this connection he has traveled through- 
out the southwest, observing the methods of breeding stock in various 
sections of the country and taking advantage of any innovations with 
which he was formerly not familiar. He has a fine home on his farm of 
171 acres. 

In 1879 Mr. Chambers was married to Miss Emma Neff, also a native 
of Clinton township, a daughter of Washington Nef¥, an agriculturist of 
this part of the county, and they had three children : Charles B., Jr., 
who was educated in the common, high and commercial schools; Bessie, 
the wife of Ira Cree, of Logansport, and a graduate of the common and 
high schools and a private school of Tjogansport ; and Russell, who is 
taking a post-graduate course in the Logansport high school. The wife 
and mother died May 16, 1913. 



HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 1017 

Mr. Chambers has interested himself in fraternal work to some extent, 
being a member of Eel River Lodge No. 417, I. 0. 0. F., at Logansport. 
In his political affiliations he was a Republican until 1912, in which year 
he east his vote with the new Progressive party. He has shown a deep 
interest in the cause of education, and all that tends towards the advance- 
ment of the moral, physical or material welfare of his community. He 
has done much to bring about desirable results and, as such men are all 
too few in any communitj^, is esteemed and respected accordingly by all 
who know him. 

Asa J. Shideler. Among the enterprising and progressive agricul- 
turists of Cass county who have spent their entire lives on the farms 
which they now occupy, Asa J. Shideler, of Clinton township, holds 
a prominent place. Born and reared in Clinton township, from earliest 
youth he has been trained to a knowledge of soil and climatic condi- 
tions here, and the result has been the development of a property which 
produces abundant crops and gratefully repays its owner for the toil 
he has expended upon it. Mr. Shideler was born on his present farm, 
the old Shideler homestead, March 10, 1867, and is a son of Abraham and 
Elizabeth (Mummey) Shideler. 

George Shideler, the grandfather of Asa J. Shideler, was born in 
Washington county, Pennsylvania, in 1793, went to Laneester county 
in young manhood, and later to Preble coiinty, Ohio, and as early as 
1832 came to Cass county, settling among the pioneers of Clinton town- 
ship on a farm which he had purchased while on a visit some four 
years before. His subsequent years were spent in clearing, cultivating 
and developing this land, and throughout the remainder of his life gave 
his entire attention to agricultural pursuits, his only outside connection 
being that which he maintained with the Dunkard church, of which he 
was a faithful member. His death occurred at the home of his son, 
Abraham, in 1875, and his wife followed him to the grave in 1881. Mrs. 
Shideler had been Miss Elizabeth Neff, a native of "Washington county, 
Pennsylvania, and a daughter of Jacob Neff, a farmer of the Key- 
stone state. She and her husband had the following children : Lavina, 
who was the wife of Martin IMiller : Mary, who was the wife of Thomas 
Dillard ; Catherine, who married Jacob Neff ; Naomi, who married Adam 
Yost ; Jonathan ; Jacob ; Elizabeth, the widow of Zachariah Cragun, of 
Clinton township ; and Abraham and Isaac, twins, the latter a retired 
clothing merchant of Logansport. Of these children, Elizabeth and 
Isaac are the only survivors. 

Abraham Shideler, son of George and father of Asa J. Shideler, was 
born on the Shideler homestead in Clinton towoiship, Jidy 22, 1835, and 
there spent his entire life, his death occurring in May, 1910. His 
parents trained him to habits of honesty, industry and thrift, and he 
was early taught to respect the dignity and value of hard work. While 
assisting his father in the work of the homestead, he attended the dis- 
trict log sehoolhouse of his vicinity during the winter terms, this train- 
ing being supplemented in his after life by close obser\'ation, much read- 
ing and years of practical experience. He made farming his life work, 
and his unquestioned success was 'ample evidence of his intelligent and 
well directed efforts. Politically a Republican, he was widely known 



1018 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

in public life from a period shortly after he attained his majority, when 
he was elected township assessor, a position to which he was re-elected in 
later years. In November, 1894, he was called to the office of county 
commissioner, in which, he served until December, 1897, and during the 
last year was chairman of the hoard, the ilarket street bridge in Logans- 
port being but one of the many improvements brought about through 
the energy and influence of Mr. Shideler and his fellow-commissioners. 
He was fraternally connected with the Masons, in which he had reached 
the degree of master, and his religious faith was that of the Christian 
church. 

On April 14, 1859, Mr. Shideler w^as married to Miss Elizabeth 
Mummey, daughter of John and Barbara (Libenguth) ^Nlummey, the 
former a representative of a Pennsylvania family of German origin, 
and to this union there were born three children : Amelia, the wife of 
Herman Homburg, living at No. 209 Burlington avenue, Logansport ; 
Elmer G., who died at the age of twenty-four years, five months; and 
Asa J. 

Asa J. Shideler was reared on the home farm, and secured his educa- 
tion in the district schools, which he attended until he was about eighteen 
years of age. At tliat time he began to give his entire attention to 
farming, which has been his occupation to the present, and now resides 
on the old Shideler homestead of 160 acres, in addition to whfeh he 
has a property of 132 acres in Clinton township. A man of congenial 
and affable manners, he has gained the esteem of his neighbors and 
business associates, and in his wide acquaintance numbers numerous 
warm friends. As an agriculturist he is recognized as a man who is 
thoroughly conversant with all the details of his business, and as a 
citizen he has demonstrated his public spirit whenever movements for 
the betterment of his connuunity have been in need of his support. He 
is a popular member of Tipton Lodge No. 33, A. F. & A. ]M., and his 
family is prominently connected socially. Mr. Shideler has taken an 
active interest in politics, and at one time served on the Clinton town- 
ship Republican Central Committee', but in 1912 cast his fortunes with 
the new Progressive party, the principles of which he ardently sup- 
ports. 

On November 25, 1896, Mr. Shideler was united in marriage with 
I\Iiss Florence Tyner, who was born, reared and educated in Clinton 
township, daughter of William and Ella (Hynes) Tyner. Two sons have 
been born to this union: William Abraham, bom December 1, 1897, a 
student in the district schools ; and Elmer G., born April 25, 1899, also 
a district school pupil. 

]\Iatthew Moroney. Celtic blood flows in the veins of Matthew 
Moroney in generous measure. Indeed, his paternal and maternal ances- 
try were of Irish birth and breeding, and his parents were born and, 
reared in County Clare, in Ireland, whence they came to America 's shores 
in 1850. It may be said concerning these worthy people that they came 
to America in their early wedded life, the year being 1850, and from 
New Orleans, where they landed, their journey to Indiana, where they 
eventually settled, covered a period of about five years. They first 
stopped at Memphis, Tennessee, going from there to Cincinnati, where 




^caz/i:i:^=l4lc 




a 




HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 1019 

the father was employed variously. At Hagerstown, Indiana, he stopped 
with his little family for some time, then came on to Cass county, Indiana, 
where, in 1855, he settled on a farm some thi'ee and a half miles from 
Lucerne, the place being now owned and occupied by John Hall. Four 
years he spent there, then moved to the farm that is owned today by his 
son, the subject of this review. 

The father was Matthew, son of Matthew Moroney, and the mother 
was Marguerite Manix, both of fine old County Clare families, where 
they were born and bred. When they settled on the farm which is now 
the home of the subject, he was yet unborn. The place was more a 
wilderness than a farm, and the building that might be termed a dwelling 
was a one room log cabin. The head of the little family straightway 
secured the aid of a carpenter to make a suitable addition to the home, 
and while the work of building was being carried on Matthew Moroney 
was born, on November 8, 1860. The carpenter who was employed upon 
the new home, built a cradle for the new comer, which, though crude 
a,nd rough as it doubtless was, held him as close and warm as any much 
more elegant shelter could possibly have done. The father later built the 
barn, which still stands on the old place, although it has in recent years 
been moved from its original location. At that early time, little if any 
clearing had been done on the place, hardly worthy as yet to be called a 
farm, but ^Mr. Moroney gave himself unreservedly to the task of cleaning 
up the land and making a pi'oductive farm from it. He succeeded most 
admirably, and when he died in 1876 left a fine place to liis son, 
Matthew of this review. He was fifty-six years of age at that time, and 
his widow survived him for twenty years, passing away in 1896 when 
she was seventy-seven years old. She, it may be said, had been twice 
married. Her first marriage, also contracted in Ireland, culminated in 
widowhood, when she was left with tliree children, named as follows: 
Nancy Burke, who later married Patrick Kearney ; Mary, the wife of 
David Campbell ; and John Burke, who is unmarried. By her second 
marriage she had three children, — Matthew, ^Marguerite and Katherine. 
Marguerite married William ]\Iurphy, and is now deceased ; Katherine 
married John Carroll, and is also dead. 

Upon the death of the father, Matthew Moroney continued on with 
the home farm, and finally came into its ownership. He has made 
worthy progress in the farming industry and has carried to completion 
the work that his father began many years ago, winning the right to be 
regarded as one of the substantial and progressive farming men of the 
community. 

On November 9, 1881, Mr. Moroney married Mary Backus, the 
daughter of Richard and Rose (Fitzsimmons) Backus. For one quar- 
ter of a century Mr. and Mrs. Moroney traveled life's journey — 
but in the year 1906, she passed away. Mrs. Moroney was an 
affectionate and loving wife and mother, and a friend to all. She 
was a lady who commanded the univei-sal respect and friendship of 
all with whom she came in contact. She had faithfully reared her 
children in religious teachings, and her daily life was a lesson to her 
children. She was ever ready to counsel and advise her husband in 
life's battle, and when she passed "to that bourne from whence no 



1020 HISTORY OF CASS COUNTY 

traveler returns," the golden circlet in the home was severed. She 
was a devotee to the Catholic faith and was ever loyal to her church, 
which was the Saint Eliza1)eth Roman Catholic church in Harrison 
township, where her husband and children are also members. She 
passed away loved and respected by all who knew her, leaving her hus- 
band and nine children, named as follows : Alice, born August 25, 
1882; Katharine, born January 21, 1884; William, born October 3, 
1886 ; Matthew M., Ijorn March 29, 1889 ; Rose, born on September 19, 
1890; Charles, born December 28, 1892; Nellie, born August 21, 1898; 
]\Iary, born February 25, 1901 ; and Richard, born September 18, 1902. 

Mr. Rloroney has taken his place among his townsmen as one of the 
wide-awake men of the community, and has been called to serve as 
trustee of Harrison township for one term, as well as in the higher 
office of county treasurer of Cass county, in which official position he 
acted with all etHciency for two terms, the quality of his service being 
one that fully justified the people in returning him to the office, and 
which marked him as a capable and praiseworthy citizen "and public 
official. He is a Democrat, stanch and firm in his political convictions, 
and his religioiis affiliations are with Saint Elizabeth's Roman Catholic 
church, of Harrison township. 

Mr. Moroney is also a member of the B. P. 0. E. lodge, No. 66, and 
the Knights of