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Full text of "History of Champaign County, Ohio, its people, industries and institutions"

g-en 



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1833 02399 2958 



Gc 

977.101 

C35m 

657178 



Digitized by the Internet Arciiive 

in 2010 witii funding from 

Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center 



http://www.archive.org/details/historyofchampai02midd 



HISTORY 



OF 



Champaign County 

"'" OHIO 

ITS PEOPLE, INDUSTRIES AND INSTITUTIONS 



JUDGE EVAN P. MIDDLETON 

Judge of the Court of Common Pleas, Second Sub-DWsion' o'f i^econtT'Tui^ioial District of Oliio. 

Supervising Editor 



With Biographical Sketches of Representative Citizens and 
Genealogical Records of Many of the Old Families 



VOLUME II 



ILLUSTRATED 



1917 
B. F. BOWEN & COMPANY, Inc. 

Indianapolis, Indiana. 



657178 

CONTENTS 



CHAPTER I— RELATED STATE HISTORY 33 

French Traders First White Men to Set Foot In the Northwest Territory — 
LaSalle's Expedition of 1670 — Subsequent Explorations and Discoveries — 
Contentions Regarding Charters of English Colonies — Indians Make Gallant 
Fight to Retain Hunting Grounds — Tecumseh, the Washington of His Race — 
French and Indian War — Pontiac's Conspiracy — Revolutionary War Period — 
First Surveys and Early Settlers — Ordinance of 1787 — Organization of North- 
west Territory — Representative Stage of Government — Division of 1800 — 
County Organization Within the Territory — Indian Wars and the Treaty of 
Greenville — Formation of a New State and Location of 'Capital — Creation 
and Revisions of Constitution — Something of Ohio's Military Record — Land 
Grants and Various "Purchases" — Connecticut Reserve, Virginia Military 
District, United States Military Lands, the Refugee Tract and Congress 
Lands — Canal Grants, Turnpike Lands and Salt and School Sections — Ohio 
Politics and a List of the Governors of the State. 

CHAPTER II— GEOLOGICAL AND TOPOGRAPHICAL FEATURES 62 

Location and Boundaries of Champaign County — Average Climatic Condi- 
tions — Drainage and the Influence of Mad River — Dredging of the River and 
Tributary Streams, With Resultant Efifect on Land Values — Notable Flood 
of 1913 and the Damage Created Thereby — Streams of County and General 
Soil Conditions — Valuable Forest Tracts — Aboriginal Mounds and Other 
Evidences of Former Presence of the Mound Builders — "Ludlow Line" and 
the Confusion It Has Created in Local Surveys — Bit of Detail With Respect 
to Israel Ludlow. 

CHAPTER III— COUNTY ORGANIZATION _•_ 81 

Act Erecting the County of Champaign — Confusion Regarding Original 
Bounds — Limits of County Prior to 1818 — Relation to Neighboring Counties — 
Townships of Champaign 'County and First Steps in Organization of 
County — Location of the County Seat and Copy of the Original Agreement 
Providing Land for the Same — County Finances and Summary of Report of 
Transactions of the Recorder — Indebtedness and Annual Expenditures of 
the County — Population Statistics and Some Words in Conclusion. 

CHAPTER IV— PUBLIC BUILDINGS OF CHAMPAIGN COUNTY 105 

Story of the Development of the Court House from the Days When Local 
Justice Was Administered in a Log 'Cabin — Third Court House, a Part of 
the Present Building, and Details Regaraing Changes in Original Plans and 
Delay in the Occupancy of the Edifice — Additions to the Old Building and 
. an Enthusiastic Editorial Comment on the Same — Development of Suitable 
Jail Quarters and Details Concerning the Erection of the Present Jail — 
County Infirmary and a Definite System of Poor Relief — County Hospital, 
Children's Home and the Care of the County's Blind. 



CONTENTS. 

CHAPTER V— ROSTER OF COUNTY AND STATE OFFICIALS 132 

Comparison Made Between the Number of Officials Required to Serve the 
Needs of the People of Champaign County Today and the Number Required 
in the Days of the Beginning of a Social Order Here — List of the Various 
County Officials and of the State Representatives and State Senators Since 
the Organization of the County in 1805— Roster of Officials Serving the 
County in 1917 and a Statement of the Salary Attaching to Each of These 
Offices. 

CHAPTER VI— TOWNSHIPS OF CHAMPAIGN COUNTY 145 

But Eleven Townships in the County Now, Though One Hundred Years 
Ago it had TAventy-three — First Three Townships Organized by Associate 
Judges, Since Which Time County Commissioners Have Exercised That 
Function — The Eleven Lost Townships — Multiplicity of Township Officials 
Under the Ohio System and Some Comment Thereon — List of Township 
Officials in 1917. 

CHAPTER VII— MAD RIVER TOWNSHIP 150 

Named for the River Which Flows Through it from North to South — 
Organized in 1805 and Later Subjected to Boundary Changes, its Original 
Bounds Comprising Practically Half of the County — First Settler and Some 
Traditions Handed Down Regarding William Owens — Arrival of Other 
Settlers and First Election — Presence of Indians a Constant Menace, Leading 
to the Erection by the Pioneers of a Stockade — Difficulties Confronting 
Pioneers — Predominance of Virginians and Important "Factors in the Early 
Settlement of the Township — Erection of Mills and Creation of Various Local 
Settlements, Including Westville, Lochardsville and Terre Haute. 

CHAPTER VIII— SALEM TOWNSHIP 172 

One of the Three Townships Established by the Associate Judges in the 
Spring of 1805 — Influence of the "Ludlow Line" and the Transfer of Military 
Lands — Early Surveyors Face a Prolific Source of Trouble^Drainage and 
Topography — First Settler in the County and the Story of Dugan Run — 
Early Appearance of "Squatters" and Details of Township Organization — 
Incidents of Pioneer Life and of the Difficulties Faced by the First Settlers — 
Farming Conditions and the Advantage of Good Roads — Creation of Settle- 
ments and the Establishment of Kingston, or Kings Creek, and Kennard. 

CHAPTER IX— CONCORD TOWNSHIP 194 

Part of the Original Bounds of Mad River Township, from Which it Was 
Set OS in 1811 — Definition of Limits of Township and a Story of the First 
Election — First Settlers and Some Other Early Arrivals — Prevalence of 
"Milk-Sickness" — Other Incidents Relating to the Life of the Pioneers — Dis- 
position of School Lands and Early Confusion in Boundaries — Atrocious 
Deed of Redskins — Organization of Schools and Churches and the Establish- 
ment of Settlements, Including Heathtown, Crayon, or Pekin, and Eris. 

CHAPTER X— WAYNE TOWNSHIP 213 

Part of the Original Township of Salem, Organized in the Spring of 1805, 
from Which it Was Set Ofif Prior to 1811, the Township as Now Constituted 
Lying Wholly Within the Virginia Military Survey, With the Exception of 



CONTENTS. 

Various Small portions in the Southwestern Part of the Township — Area and 
Topography — "The Line of Least Resistance" — Old Military Surveys and 
Original Proprietors — Original Poll-Book Record and Early Township 
Officials— Population Statistics— Early Settlers and Typical Pioneer Ex- 
periences—Organization of Schools and Churches and Development of 
Settlements, Including Those of Cable, Mingo and Middleton. 

CHAPTER XI— UNION TOWNSHIP 248 

One of the Townships Crossed by the Ludlow Line and in Consequence 
Part of its Surveys are Very Much 'Confused — Part of Salem Township Until 
Set Off from the Same in 1811 — First Election and Names of Electors — Early 
Settlers and the Beginning of a Social Order — Confusion Regarding Original 
Surveys — Early Industries and the Creation of Settlements, Including Pollock 
Town, Mutual and Catawba. 

CHAPTER XII— URBANA TOWNSHIP 261 

Definitely Established Some Time Between 1811 and 1814, Though Date of 
Original Organization is Not Known— Drainage and Topography — First 
Election and Names of Electors — Early Settlement and the Creation of the 
County Seat, Which Has Maintained Its Own Separate Civic Career — 
Limits of the City of Urbana, Which is the Dominant Factor in the Town- 
ship — Village of Powhattan and Some of the Early Industries that Flourished 
There in the Days of Water Power. 

CHAPTER XIII— GOSHEN TOWNSHIP 267 

Lying Entirely Within the Virginia Military Survey, the Apparently Hap- 
hazard Method of Laying Out Farms and Roads is Accounted For — Drain- 
age and Topography, List of Original Proprietors and Development of High- 
ways — One of the First Townships in the County to Attract Settlers and 
Contains the Second Oldest Town in the County, Mechanicsburg — First 
Settler to Leave any Official Record of His Arrival and Some Other Early 
Pioneers — Platting of Mechanicsburg, Early Industries and Other Local 
Settlements. 

CHAPTER XIV— HARRISON TOWNSHIP 278 

Smallest Township in the County Was Originally a Part of Mad River 
Township and Did Not Acquire its Present Limits Until 1828 — Drainage 
and Topography — Early Settlers and Some Interesting Incidents of Pioneer 
Days — Aboriginal Occupants of the Land Still Present in Considerable Num- 
bers When the Township Was Entered by Whites, But the Redskins Were 
Uniformly Peaceful and Never Troubled the Settlers — Early Industries and 
the Establishment of the Pleasant Village of Spring Hills, Originally Known 
as Middleburg, Which W^as Platted in 1832. 

CHAPTER XV— JACKSON TOWNSHIP 288 

Part of the Original Township of Mad River, from Which it Was Set Off 
in 1817 and Named in Honor of the Hero of the Battle of Nev^^ Orleans — 
Boundaries, Drainage and Topography and Natural Resources — List of 
Original Landowners and the Names of Some of Those Who Early Became 
Identified With the Life and Development of the Township— Some of the 
Township "Firsts," Including a Story of the First Merchant at Christians- 



CONTENTS. 

burg and Something Relating to tlie Founder of That Town and to the Early 
Industries of the Neighborhood — Railroads and Electric Lines, Changes in 
Farming" Methods and Something About the Prosperous 'Creamery at 
Thackery. 

CHAPTER XVI— JOHNSON TOWNSHIP 297 

Named in Honor of Silas Johnson, its First Permanent Settler, it Was Set 
Off from Concord Township When Population Warranted the Commission- 
ers in Granting a Petition for a Separate Civic Identity — Middle Township 
of the Western Tier of Townships in County and Contains What is Regarded 
as the Highest Point in the State of Ohio — Drainage and Topography — ■ 
Evidences of the Glacial Period — Largest Buckeye Tree in the State— Some 
of the First Settlers and Stories Relating to Pioneer Conditions — Schools 
and Churches — First Commercial Center in the Township and the Establish- 
ment of the Village of Millerstown. 

CHAPTER XVII— RUSH TOWNSHIP 310 

Originally a Part of Salem Township, Then of Wayne Township, and Was 
Set Ofif as a Separate 'Civic Unit in 1828— Prevalence of the Metes-and- 
Bounds System of Survey in Consequence of Lying Wholly Within the Old 
Virginia Military Survey — Drainage and Topography — Original Landowners 
and Something Relating to the First Settlers — List of Early Voters and a 
Story of the First Election Held in the Township — Coming of the Railroads — 
Early Mills and the Creation of Two Social Centers, the Villages of North 
Lewisburg and Woodstock. 

CHAPTER XVIII— ADAMS TOWNSHIP 320 

Last Township Organized in Champaign County, its Civil Organization 
Dating from 1828 — Originally a Part of Mad River Township, it Later 
Became a Part of Johnson Township and so Remained Until it Set Up in 
Business for Itself — Drainage and Topography — Coming of the First Settlers 
and the First Record of Deed to Land in the Township — Bad Roads Retard 
Settlement — Early Mills and Milling — Organization of Schools and Churches 
and the Establishment of the Villages of Carysville and Rosewood. 

CHAPTER XIX— AGRICULTURE 334 

Comparison of the Methods of Farming Prevailing During the Days of the 
Pioneers and Those Which Lessen the Labor of the Farmer Today — -Nature 
Indulgent to Champaign County — A Look Into the Days That Are Gone — 
Development of the Crops During the Past Hundred Years and More and 
Some Interesting Statistics Relating to the Leading Crops — Orchard and 
Garden Fruits — "Johnny Appleseed" — The Cattle Industry and Points Relat- 
ing to Live Stock in General — Interesting Description of a Hog Drive in the 
Old Days — Patrons of Husbandry and an Enumeration of the Granges in 
the County — County Fairs and a Story Regarding the Work of the Cham- 
paign County Agricultural Society. 

CHAPTER XX— THE MEDICAL PROFESSION 357 

Hardships Endured by the Followers of yEsculapius During the Early Days 
of the County's Settlement and the Close Place Occupied by the Faithful 
Family Physician in the Homes of the Pioneers — Swamps and Lowlands 



CONTENTS. 

Fruitful Breeders of Disease and Fever and Ague Proved the Scourge of the 
Early Settlements— Every Family Had its Medicine Chest and Roots and 
Herbs Were Much Relied On— First Physician to Locate at Urbana and a 
List of the Physicians of Early Record, With Biographies of Many of them^ 
County Medical Society in 1917 and a List of Physicians Now Practicing 
in the County — County Hospital and a Word Regarding Various Efforts to 
Establish Sanitariums Here. 

CHAPTER XXI— BENCH AND BAR 385 

Ubiquity of the Lawyer Consequent on Civilization's Demands for His 
Services as an Interpreter of the Ten Commandments — First Follower of 
the Original Moses to Locate in Champaign County Also Was Moses, But 
His Other Name Was Corwin — Since Then Many Lawyers Have Come and 
Gone and an Effort Has Been Made to Compile a List of all Who Have 
Practiced in the County from the Very Beginning of its Civic Entity More 
Than a Hundred Years Ago — Judicial System Prior to 1851 — First Court in 
the County — Associate Judges — Justices of the Peace — Judges of the Com- 
mon Pleas Court — Probate Court and the Jurisdiction Thereof — Prosecuting 
Attorneys, the First of Whom to Appear in This County Was Arthur St. 
Clair, Son of the Former Governor of the Northwest Territory — Court 
Library of Champaign County. 

CHAPTER XXII— CHAMPAIGN COUNTY JOURNALISM 407 

Wherein is Found an Account of the Various Newspapers, Past and Present, 
Which Have Been Influential in the Advancement and Development of Cham- 
paign County Since the Days of the Beginning — Many Papers of Many 
Names by Many Men — Files of Early Papers Missing, Creating a Confusion 
of the Record, But it is Believed That all the Newspapers That Have 
Struggled for or Established an Existence Here Have Found Mention in This 
Chapter. 

CHAPTER XXIII^CHURCHES OF CHAMPAIGN COUNTY 430 

Importance of the Church as an Institution in Creating Stable Conditions in 
the Community — With Their Very First Bringings the Pioneers of Cham- 
paign County Brought With Them the Seeds of the Christian Religion and 
These Seeds Have Sprouted and Flourished Under the Faithful Cultivation 
of Those Who Came After Them — Comparison of the Services Held During 
the "Good Old Days" With Those Held Today— Interesting Pen Picture 
of a Pioneer Church Service — Camp Meetings of Other Days — List of the 
Active Churches in Champaign County Today, With Brief Histories of the 
Establishment and Progress of Most of Them. 

CHAPTER XXIV— EDUCATION 530 

Gradual Growth and Development of the School System of the State from 
the Days When an Acquaintance With the Rudiments of the Three Rs 
Was Regarded as a Sufificient Qualification for the Teacher and a Sufficiently 
Wide Range of Knowledge for the Pupil — Growth of the Curriculum, Con- 
solidation and Centralization of Rural Schools and the Creation of the 
Present Efficient School System — Normal Schools — List of Present Teachers 
in County — Beginning of the Common School and Some Early Statistics 



CONTENTS. 

Relating- Thereto — Review of Schools by Townships — Graduates of the 
Urbana High School — Moore's Business College — Urbana University— Curry 
Institute. 

CHAPTER XXV— LITERARY CLUBS AND THINGS THESPIAN 582 

Review of the Various Organizations That Have Been Organized in Cham- 
paign County in Response to the Cultural Demands of the People, Together 
With a List of Many Who Have Tempted Fame or the Bubble Reputation 
Before the Footlights of the Stage or in the Tanbark Arena of the Circus. 

CHAPTER XXVI— MUSIC AND ART IN CHAMPAIGN COUNTY 597 

Herein is Found a Review of the Numerous Musical Societies That Have at 
One Time and Another Striven to Add to the Pleasure and Entertainment 
of the People of Champaign County, Together With a List of Those Who 
Have Striven in the Difficult Field of Art, in Which Are Found the Names 
of Some Who Have Achieved More Than Local Fame, Including One of the 
Greatest Sculptors America Has Ever Produced and an Artist Whose Work 
Was Pronounced by Competent Authorities to be as Fine as Had Ever Been 
Produced in This Country. 

CHAPTER XXVII— PATRIOTIC ORGANIZATIONS 611 

Four Posts of the Grand Army of the Republic, Several Corps of the 
Woman's Relief 'Corps, an Active Chapter of the Daughters of the American 
Revolution, Three Camps of the Sons of Veterans, a Woman's Auxiliary to 
the Same and a Command of the Spanish-z\merican War Veterans are For- 
mally Banded for the Purpose of Keeping Alive the Sacred Flame of 
Patriotism Within the Borders of Champaign County. 

CHAPTER XXVIII— FRATERNAL AND BENEVOLENT ORGANIZATIONS 626 
Review of the Various "Lodges" That Have Been Formed in Champaign 
Count}' Based on the Noble Instinct of a Common Brotherhood of Man, 
These Organizations Including Such Orders as Those of the Masons, the 
Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias, the Improved Order of Red Men, the 
Modern Woodmen of America, the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks, the Knights of the Maccabees, the Fraternal Order of Eagles, the 
Loyal Order of Moose, the Knights of the Golden Eagle, the Knights of 
Columbus, the Independent Order of Foresters, the Junior Order of Union 
Mechanics and the Junior Order of United American Mechanics. 

CHAPTER XXIX— MILITARY ANNALS 665 

Beginning With the Expedition of General Harmer Against the Indians in 
the Mad River Country in 1790, Every Generation of the Dwellers of This 
Region Has Been Stirred by War's .-Xlarms and in This Chapter There is Set 
Out as Faithfully and Accurately As May Be an Account of Champaign 
County's Part in These Successive Wars, Including the Early Brushes With 
the Aboriginal Inhabitants in the Days of the Beginning of Settlement here, 
the War of 1812, the Mexican War, the War of the Rebellion, the Spanish- 
American War and the Present Great World War, the Account Carrying the 
Names of Those from This County Who Participated in the Civil War and 
in the Spanish-American War and a List of Those Who Registered for the 
Selective Draft Upon This Country's Declaration of War Against Germany 
in the Spring of 1917. 



CONTENTS. 

CHAPTER XXX— BANKS AND BUILDING AND LOAN ASSOCIATIONS- 836 
Review of the Old Days of the ''Shin-Plaster'' Currency, "Tokens" and 
"Sharp-Shins"' and a History of the Various Banking Institutions That Have 
Been Founded in This Country, Together With Current Statements of Those 
Now Doing Business Here. 

'CHAPTER XXXI— TRANSPORTATION: HIGHWAYS AND RAILROADS___ 855 
One of the First and Most Important Problems Confronting the Early 
Settlers of This County Was the Building of Roads and This Chapter Re- 
views the Development of the Transportation Facilities of the County from 
the Days of the Beginning. 

CHAPTER XXXII— WOODSTOCK 869 

History of the Village of Woodstock Traced Back Nearly One Hundred 
Years, Including a Review of the Labors Necessitated by the Desire of the 

Early Settlers Thereabout for an Orderly Social Center. 

CHAPTER XXXIII— CHRISTIANSBURG 891 

Herein is Found a Comprehensive Review of the History of the Bustling 
Village Situated in the Southwest Corner of the County from the Days of 
Its Beginning When Platted by Joshua Howell Back in the Fall of 1817 and 
Named in Honor of His Old Home Town in Virginia. 

CHAPTER XXXIV— NORTH LEWISBURG 898 

This Village in the Northeastern Corner of the County Was Laid Out by 
Gray Gary in the Fall of 1826 and the Historian Has Endeavored to Present 
a Faithful Review of its Progress and Development from That Day to This. 

CHAPTER XXXV— MECHANICSBURG 913 

Bustling Little City in the Southeastern Part of the Coimty, Was Laid Out 
by John Kain in 1814 and in This Chapter There is Set Out a Review of the 
Progress and Development of the Place During the More Than One Hundred 
Years That Have Intervened Since Then. 

CHAPTER XXXVI— ST. PARIS 936 

David Huffman, Who Platted and Founded St. Paris in the Fall of 1831, 
Designed to 'Call His Village "New Paris," But Another Town in the State 
Had Prior Claim to That Name and He Changed the "New" to "Saint" and 
Under That Name it Has Attained a Place of Importance Commensurate 
With its Aspirations, all of Which is Set Out in This Chapter. 

CHAPTER XXXVII— URBANA, THE COUNTY SEAT 948 

In This Chapter There Are Set Out at Length Details of the Founding of 
the City of Urbana, the Creation of the County Seat of Champaign 'County, 
the Names of the Men Who Took a Prominent Part in the Establishment of 
the City and of Early Settlers Therein, Together With a Comprehensive 
History of the Growth and Development of the City Along Industrial, Social, 
Cultural and Civic Lines, With Fitting Details of the Various Stages Which 
Have Marked That Growth. 



CONTENTS. 

CHAPTER XXXVIII— CITIZENS OF A PAST GENERATION 1074 

Wherein is Set Out a Roster of Some of the Men Known Aforetime in 
Champaign County Who by Virtue of Their Talents or Superior Attain- 
ments Rose to Positions Exalting Them Above the Level of Mediocrity — 
Included in This List Are Such Names as Those of Joseph Vance, Former 
Governor of Ohio; Simon Kenton, Pioneer Explorer and Indian Fighter, 
Who Wrote His Name Large in the History of the Middle West; William 
Ward, the Founder of Urbana, and Numerous Others Who In One Way or 
Another Placed This Generation Under a Debt of Obligation to Their 
Memories. 

CHAPTER XXXIX— SIDELIGHTS; OR LIFE IN OTHER DAYS 1109 

In Which Concluding Chapter the Historian Has Assembled a Number of 
Anecdotes, Some Grave and Some Gay, But All Interesting and Illuminative 
of Conditions in the Days Now Long Gone, the Collection Setting Out in 
Various Ways, for the Instruction, Edification and Entertainment of Readers 
of the Present Generation a General Picture of Life Among the Pioneers of 
Champaign County, as Well as Numerous Points of Interest That Could 
Not Well be Touched on in the Chapters That Have Preceded This. 



HISTORICAL INDEX 



A 

Abandonment of Rural Schools 531 

Aboriginal Earthworks 71 

Acetylene-gas Plant "Lets Go" 333 

Act Establishing Count}^ 81. 

Active Churches in County 433 

Active In Friends Church Work 230 

Actors Reared In Champaign Coun- 
ty 587 

Adventurous 'Career, An 375 

Adams Township — 

Arrivals During the '30s 327 

Boundaries of 320 

Carysville 328 

Drainage and Topography 320 

Early Industries 323 

Early Settlement Retarded 323 

First Settlers 320 

Origin of Name 321 

Rosewood 331 

Schools and Churches 328, 538 

Tragic Campaign Rally 330 

When Organized 320 

African M. E. Church 469 

x\griculture 334 

Agricultural Statistics 350 

Altitude, Highest In State 297 

Amusements of the Pioneers 1113 

Ancient Mystery Unexplained 255 

Anti-War Spirit In 1861 686 

Arions Glee Club 599 

Art and Artists 597, 603 

Assassination of President Lincoln. 802 

Associated Charities of Urbana 829 

Associate Judges 393, 394 

Atrocious Deed of Redskins 202 

"A Wild, Reckless People" 317 

B 

Bad Roads Retard Settlement 323 

Baldwin Mound, The 74 



Banking In the Old Days 836 

Banks of Champaign County 836-854 

Banes, Dr. Evan 363 

Baptist Churches 475-489 

Barret, Abner 274 

Battle of Fallen Timbers 34 

Battle of Tippecanoe 33 

Baxter, Stephen 622 

Bench and Bar, The 385-406 

Beginning of Common School 536 

Benevolent Organizations 625-664 

Benevolent and Protective Order of 

Elks 655 

Big Four Railroad 864 

Birth and Death Statistics 102 

Blind of Champaign County 129 

Blockhouses of Pioneer Period 668 

Boy Commits Suicide 284 

Boy Scouts 934 

Boundaries of Champaign County 62 

Boundary Lines of State 60 

Bounties Paid Soldiers 790, 797 

Brand, William A 411, 618, 753, 1059 

Bridges, Heavy Expense for 855 

Bridges Over Mad River 66 

Breeding of Better Live Stock 345 

Brown, 'C. R . 604 

Buckeye Tree, Largest In State__ 299 

Building and Loan Associations 836 

Burden's Sharpshooters 750 

Burnside, William 273 

Byrd, Charles Willing 39 

C 

Cable, Village of i 239 

Camping Ground for Indians 254 

Camp Meetings of Other Days__ 

432, 446, 472, 1136 

Canal Grants, the 56 

Career Altered by Shipwreck 359 

Carysville, Village of 328 

Catawba 260 



HISTORICAL INDEX. 



Catholic Churches 513, 521 

Cattle Industry, The 345 

Centenarians of Champaign County, 1141 

Centennial, County 1154 

Centralized Schools 532, 547 

Champaign County In War 665, 835 

Champaign County In World War 

812-835 

Champaign County Journalism 407 

Champaign Sanitarium 382 

Chance, Frank 1104 

Chapman, Jonathan 343 

Characteristic "Obituary" 415 

Charities, Associated, of Urbana 829 

Chautauqua 927 

Cheney, Benjamin _ 251 

Chicken Fanciers 350 

Children's Home, The 126 

Chillicothe, Old Capital 47 

Chipmuck Consumes Mill's Product- 293 

Christian Churches 503-507 

Christianity In Champaign County__ 433 
Christiansburg, Village Of — 

Business Interests 895 

Indian "Medicine Men" 892 

Incorporation of 893 

McCrea's Store 891 

Postoffice, The 896 

Schools 541, 893 

Some "Firsts" 894 

When Platted 891 

Churches of Champaign County 430 

Church of the New Jerusalem 525 

Cider Press a Busy Industry 256 

Cincinnati, Founding of 53 

Circus Life Proves Attractive 593 

City of Mechanicsburg 913-935 

City of St. Paris 936-947 

City of Urbana 948-1073 

•Civil War, The 628-798 

Clifford, Billy "Single" 588 

Climatic Conditions 62 

Clothing of the Pioneers 1109 

Coal Mine "Fizzled Out" 239 

Colored Baptist Church 480 

Colored Secret Societies 662 

Columbus, Selected as Capital 48 

Common Pleas Court 394 

Communities Stripped of Young Men 744 



Company D, Third Regiment, Ohio 

National Guard 806-811, 826, 827 

Comparison With "Good Old Days" 430 
Concord Township — 

Churches and Cemeteries 208 

Confusion In Boundaries 200 

Crayon 210 

Eris 211 

Favorite Ground of Indians 202 

First Electors 195 

First Schools 205 

First Settlers 196 

Heathstown 209 

Limits of 194 

Northville 208 

Origin of Name 194 

Schools 539 

When Organized 194 

Congress Lands, the 55 

Connecticut Reserve, the 54 

Conscription Act of 1917 812 

Consolidated Schools 532, 547 

Constitution, Amendments of 1912__ 60 

Cooley, James 1093 

Co-operative Efforts Among Farm- 
ers 353 

Corn Dropped by the Wayside 279 

Corwin, Moses B 385, 389, 408 

County Agricultural Society 354 

County and State Officials 132 

County Auditors, Roster of 133 

County Clerks, Roster of 132 

County Expenditures 97 

County Fairs 353 

County Farm in 1847 123 

County Finances 92 

County Hospital, The 124 

County Infirmary, The 121-126 

County Jail 114-120 

County Limits Defined 81 

County Medical Society 362 

County Officials 132 

County Organization (1788-1810) — _ 43 

County Organization 81 

County Population Statistics 99 

County Recorders, Roster of 134 

County Seat Site Selected 90, 948, 

County Surveyors, Roster of 136 

Count}' Teachers' Institute 534 



HISTORICAL INDEX. 



County Treasurers, Roster of '.- 133 

County's First Settler 151, 177 

County's Indebtedness 96 

County's Public Buildings 105 

Court House 105-114 

Court Library, The 405 

Courts of the Older Day 391 

Cowgill, Br. Thomas, Reminiscences 

of 1118 

Crayon 210 

Creation of Early Counties 84 

Creation of Mad River Township 150 

Crimville 276 

Creamery and Dairy Statistics 346 

Creamery at Thackery 296, 346 

Crop Development Reviewed 336 

Curious Topographical Study 297 

Currency In Pioneer Times 836 

Curriculum of Early Schools 530 

Curry Institute 576, 926 

Curry, Prof. E. W. B 579, 926 

Cushman, Warren S 598, 605 

D 

Dairy Statistics 346 

Dancing Encroaches On Church 317 

Darnell, Village of 896 

Daughters of American Revolution- 612 
Daughters of Rebekah__643, 645, 648, 650 

Daughters of Pocohontas 656 

Davis, Rev. Asher A 871 

Dedication of Soldiers' Monument— 805 

Deeds and Mortgages Filed 95 

Destructive Flood of 1913 65 

Detroit, Toledo & fronton Rail- 
road 867 

Deuel, Prof. A. C 560, 800, 1136 

Development of Crops 336 

Development of Highways 271 

Devoe, W. M. 604 

Diary of James T. Woodward 706 

Difficulties Confront Pioneers 157 

Difficulties in Immigration 317 

Disposition of School Lands 200 

Distillery Did Big Business 276 

Division of 1800 41 

Doctors of the Old Days 358 

Dohrman's Grant 56 

Doolittle's Tavern, Site of 614 



Dormant Churches In County 434 

Dorsey, Charles 289 

Drafting Soldiers for World War-_ 813 

Drainage, 63, 151, 176, 213, 250, 261, 270, 

278, 288, 297, 311, 320 

Dreamed Name for a Church 481 

Dredging Increases Land Values 65 

Dredging of King's Creek 65 

Dredging of Mad River 64 

Dress of the Pioneers 1112 

Dugan Run, or Town Branch 67, 177 

Dugan, Pierre 178 

E 

Early Activities of Militia 667, 679 

Early Agricultural Methods 335 

Early Counties of Ohio 84 

Early Doctors, a List of 360 

Early French Settlements 34 

Early Judicial System 390 

Early Roads of Champaign County. 858 

Early School Curriculum 530 

Early School Statistics 537 

Early Social Centers 537 

Early Sunday School 447 

Editor Waxes Enthusiastic 112 

Education 530 

'"Egged" a Drunken Mob 876 

Eichelberger, Robert A 598, 604 

Eighty-Sixth Regiment 705 

Electric Railways 867 

Elementary Schools 552 

Eleven Lost Townships, The 145 

Elliott, a "Dream Town" 306 

English Traders 35 

Era of Prosperity 94 

Eris 211 

Episcopal Churches 512-513 

Evangelical Lutheran Churches 496-501 

Evidences of Glacial Period 298 

Evidences of Mound Builders, 71, 186,255 

Exhibits of Farm Products 353 

Expenditures of County 97 

F 

Fair Grounds 354 

Fallen Timbers, the Battle of 34 

Fame Courted by Many 591 



HISTORICAL INDEX. 



Farming in the Old Days 335 

Farming Methods, Changes In__296, 335 

Father of Thirty-two Children 198 

Files of Early Papers Missing 408 

Finances of County 92 

Fire of 1901 at Urbana 1037 

First Bank in County 837 

First Blacksmith Shop in County — 273 

First Court House 105 

First 'Court in the County 391 

First Jail 114 

First Lawyer in County 385 

First Newspaper in County 408 

First Orchard in County 292 

First Regiment 691 

First School House in County 205 

First Settler in County 151, 177 

First Surveys Zl 

Fithian, George 81, 89, 

140, 391, 593, 950, 631, 1116 

Flood of 1913, the 65 

Foley-Wilkinson Fracas, the 203 

Food of the Pioneers 1110 

Forage Crops 340 

Forests of Champaign County 70 

Formation of New State 45 

Forty-fifth Regiment 697 

Forty-Second Regiment 696 

Founder of Christiansburg 292 

Founder of Westville 161 

Fraternal Order of Eagles 661 

Fraternal Organizations 626-664 

Free and Accepted Masons 629-642 

Free Public Schools, Organization 

of 556 

Freed Sla^•es Become Settlers 185 

French and Indian War 35 

French Grant, The 53 

French Traders 33 

Friends Church 521-524 

"Frog Pond," Old Mechanicsburg 915 

Ft. Robinson 283 

Ft. Sumter, Fall of 688 

"Fuson" Corn, Origin of 279 

Fyffc, Rear Admiral Joseph 1098 

G 

Garden Fruits and Orchards 342 

General Harmar's Expedition 665 



Geology of Champaign 'County 62 

German Baptist Church 479 

German Lutheran 'Church 501 

Girty, Simon 1083 

Gist, Christopher 35 

Glacial Period, Evidences of 298 

Good Indian Story 303 

Goshen Township — 

Drainage gnd Topography 270 

Development of Highways ._ 271 

Early Industries 275 

Local Settlements 276 

Mills on Treacle Creek 275 

Original Proprietors 267 

Part of Military Survey 267 

Platting of Mechanicsburg 274 

Schools 539 

Some Early Settlers 272 

When Organized 272 

Gourdville 210 

Governors of Ohio 58 

Gowey, John Franklin 1106 

Graduates of Urbana High School-- 562 

Grand Army of the Republic 618-623 

Grange, The 351 

Granite Boulders Pay Well 299 

Graves of Revolutionary Soldiers__ 617 

Great World War 812-835 

Green, David M 965, 1149 

"Greenville Line," The 82 

Greenville Treaty, The 80 

Growth of School Curriculum 531 

Guthridge, Jules 1107 

Guthridgc, Mrs. Mary 223 

H 

Hallar, Rev. William 1103 

Hamilton, John 1091 

Harmonic Quartette 601 

Harrison Township — 

Apprehension Regarding Indians.- 283 

Boundaries of 278 

Drainage 278 

Early Industries 284 

Early Settlers 279 

Ft. Robinson 283 

Pioneer Incidents 283 

Schools 540 

Spring Hills 285 

When Organized 278 



HISTORICAL INDEX. 



Harrison, William Henry 39 

Hazelton, a "Paper" Town 193 

Heathtown 209 

Hidden Treasure 1122 

Hides Money in Stump 321 

"High Cost of Living" 93 

Higlrest Point in State 297 

High School Work 558, 559 

Highway Act, Cass, The 860 

Highways and Railroads 855-868 

Highways Gradually Developed 271 

Hill, Joseph 196 

History of Churches in County__430-529 

Hitc, Harrison 603 

Hog Drive, Description of 347 

Hoisington, Fred B 1161 

Holmes Literary Club 587 

Holt, Mrs. Sophia Sumner 870 

Home of One-Time Governor 181 

lionest Surveyor's Graceful Act 175 

Honesty of Pioneers 283 

Honor Roll of Champaign County__ 753 

Horses, Improved Strains of 344 

Hospital Statistics 124 

Howard Weaver Mission, The 524 

Howell, Joshua 292, 891, 894 

Hubbell, Raymond 593, 597 

Hull's Army Camps at Urbana 671 

Hull's Trace 187 

Hupp, Mrs. O. C, Reminiscence of_^ 920 

I 

"I Am the Newspaper" 407 

Inijnigration Difficulties 317 

Improved Order of Red Men 655 

Improved Strains of Horses 344 

Improvements in School System 550 

Indebtedness of Count}' 96 

Indenture System, The 121, 1127 

Independence, War for 36 

Independent Order of Foresters 662 

Independent Order of Odd Fellows 

642-65 1 

Indiana Territory 41 

Indian "Scare" in Harrison 283 

Indian Wars 44 

Indians a Constant Menace 155 

Indians Kill Father and Son 202 

Industries of Urbana 991-1025 

Infirmary, or ''Poor House" 121 



Influence of National Road 233 

Inter-County Highways 861 

Iroquois Grant, The 35 

J 

Jackson Township — 

Creamery Industrj- 296 

Drainage and Topography 285 

First Settlers 289 

Founder of Christiansburg 292 

Original Landowners 289 

Origin of Name 288 

Pioneer Incidents 293 

Railroads and Trolley Lines 295 

Schools 541 

Some Township "Firsts" 293 

When Organized 288 

Jail 114-120 

"Johnny Appleseed" 343 

Johnson, Silas 300 

Johnson Township — 

Drainage and Topography 297 

Early Industries 306 

First Commercial Center 306 

First Settlers 300 

Highest Point in State 297 

Millerstown 308 

Pioneer Incidents 302 

Origin of Name 297 

Schools and Churches 307, 542 

Smallpox Scourges Pioneers 303 

When Organized 297 

Journalism 407-429 

Judges of Probate Court -.,^^403 

Judiciary, The 390 

Junior Order of Ignited American 

Mechanics 658 

lustices of the Peace 389 



Kennard, Village of 192 

Kenton, Simon 115, 392, 608, 1080 

Kings Creek, Dredging of 65 

Kings Creek, Village of 191 

Kingston, or Kings Creek 191 

Kizer, Squire Joseph 304 

Knights of Columbus 659 

Knights of the Golden Circle 685 

Knights of the Golden Fleece 662 



HISTORICAL INDEX. 



Knights of Maccabees 661 

Knights of Pythias 651-655 

Knights Templar 634 

Kosko Elcne, the "Hogman" 151 

L 

Lakes of Another Day 261, 270 

Land Grants of Ohio 52 

Land Surveys, System of 2>1 

Land Values Inaccurately "Guessed" 291 
Land Values Increased by Dredging 65 

Largest Buckeye Tree in State 299 

LaSalle, the Explorer 33 

Law Defining a Blind Person 129 

Laws Relating to Schools 533 

Lawyers of Champaign County--385-406 

Lawyers Taxed in Old Days 388 

Leedom, John S 1104 

Legal Profession, The 385-406 

Liberty Loan, The 812 

Library, Public, at Urbana 1062 

Limits of County Defined 81 

Lincoln's Assassination 802 

Lincoln's Funeral Train Passes 

Through Champaign County — 803 

List of Churches in County 433 

Literary Clubs of Champaign County 582 

Lives Lost in Civil War 753 

Live Stock in Champaign County.- 344 

Locating Site of County Seat 90, 948 

Lochardsville 167 

Lodge Directory of Champaign 

County 627 

Logan, Chief of the Mingos 1084 

Looking Ahead to 2017 532 

Lost Townships of County 145 

"Love Apples" 337 

Low Tax Rate 9S 

Loyal Order of "Moose 657 

Ludlow, Israel 79 

•'Ludlow Line," The 76 

Lutheran Churches 496-501 

l.ynchings 1143 

M 

Machachee Creek 67 

Mad River, The 63 



Mad River Township — 

Boundary Changes 150 

Churches 167 

Date of Organization 150 

Difificulties of Pioneers 157 

First Election 151 

First Settler of 151 

Lochardsville 167 

Xettle Creek Settlement 160 

Pioneers of Note 162 

Schools 542 

Some of the "P'irsts" 164 

Terre Haute 169 

The Old Stockade 154 

Westville Neighborhood 161. 168 

Marietta, Old Capital 47 

Martin, Erastus 877 

Masonic Organizations 629-642 

Mathematician of Note 207 

Maumee Road Lands, The ^ 56 

Mechanicsburg, City of — 

Bit of Reminiscence 920 

City Government 929 

Development of 914 

Early Industries 916, 928 

Early Known as ''Frog Pond" 915 

Mimicipal Equipment 921 

Organization and Incorporation... 916 

Pioneer Conditions __., 913 

Schools 540, 923 

When Platted 913 

Medical Profession. The 357 

Medicinal Waters 70 

Tslennonite Church 528 

Methodist Episcopal Churches- -_435-472 

Methodist Protestant Church 473 

Mexican Imbroglio of 1916-17 810 

Mexican War, The 681 

Miami Company, The 53 

Middleton. Capt. George S 

388, 401, 811. 826, 829 

Middleton, Judge Evan Perry 396 

Middletown, Village of ___ 245 

Military Annals 665-835 

Military Headquarters at Urbana.-. 678 

Military Lands, The, 54, 173. 214, 248. 267 

Military Record of State SO 

Militia Companies Since Civil War- 806 

Militia's Earlv Activities 667 



HISTORICAL INDEX. 



-Milk-Sickness" 198 

Millerstown, Village of 306, 308 

Mill Streams. 270, 27S, 284. 294, 319, 323 

Mingo, Village of 242 

"Mingo vs. Kennard" 1138 

Ministerial Lands, the 57 

Modernization of Schools 550 

Modern Woodmen of America 660 

Molly Kiser, Captivity of 183 

Moore's Business College 566 

Moravian Grant, The 56 

Morecraft, Mrs. Hester 228 

Mortgages and Deeds Filed 95 

Mosgrove, Dr. Adam 359. 512 

Mosquitoes, Abundance of 298 

Mound Builders 71, 186 

Mounds of Chamjiaign County 

71. 186, 255 

Moved Goods on Sled 232 

Moving-Picture Houses 595 

Mulberry, Old Mingo 242 

Multiplicity of Ofncials 146 

Musical Organizations 597 

Music and Art 597 

Mutual, Village of 258 

Mc 

McCrea, William 293, 891, 896 

McDargh, Charles 1151 

McFarland, Robert 195, 201 

McFarland, Thomas Sims 1105 

McGown, William 594. 1151 

N 

Nashville 276 

National Army 813 

Natural Gas 70 

Nature Indulges Champaign County 334 

Negroes Barred by Pioneers 166 

Nettle Creek Settlement 160 

New Church Society 523 

New State, Formation of 45 

Newspaper "Obituarj''' Extraordi- 
nary 415 

Newspapers of Champaign County 

407-42W 
Xiles Sanitarium 38.'i 



Ninety-fifth Regiment 731 

Nobles of the Mj'stic Shrine 636 

Normal School 534 

North Lewisburg, Village of — 

Business Directory 911 

Conditions in 1836 904 

Incorporation of 898 

Municipal Equipment 899, 902 

Notable "Revival" Meeting 907 

Officially Not "North" 898 

Postoflice 902 

Schools 544, 900 

Situation in 1850 906 

When Platted 898 

.Northville 208 

Northwest Territory 33, 39, 42 

Notable Fight of Other Days 203 

Notable -'Revival" of 1882 907 

O 

( )akdale Cemetery 1049 

Oats, Rye and Buckwheat 339 

Odd Fellowship ___642-65l 

Officers' Training Camp 825 

Officials of Champaign County 132 

Officials of Townships 146 

Ohio Admitted to the Union 46 

Ohio Company, The 35 

Ohio Conference, Organization of_- 439 

Ohio Governors 58 

Ohio Land Company Purchase 52 

Ohio Politics 58 

Ohio State History ?>?> 

Ohio's Constitution 48 

Ohio's Part in Civil War 688, 750 

Oil Wells 70 

■•O. K." Origin of 1130 

"Old Simon." Faithful Equine 305 

Old-Time "Revival" Meetings_--460, 907 

Old Union Hall 589 

Olla Podrida Club 586 

One lUuidred and Thirteenth Regi- 
ment 738 

r)nc Hundred and Thirty-Fourth 

Regiment 743 

( )rchard and. Garden Fruits 342 

Orchard, First in Countj' 292 

Order of the Eastern Star 641 



HISTORICAL INDEX. 



Order of Haymakers 657 

Ordinance of 1787, The Z7 

Organization of Adams Township-- 320 
Organization of Champaign County 81 

Organization of Churches 430 

Organization of Concord Township 194 

Organization of Goshen Township-- 266 

Organization of Harrison Township 278 

Organization of Jackson Township- 288 

Organization of Johnson Township- 297 

Organisation of Rush Township 310 

Organization of Salem Township, 

172, 181 

Organization of Union Township — 248 

Organization of Urbana Township-. 261 

Organization of Wayne Township-- 212 

Original Proprietors, Lists of, 173, 214, 

248, 268, 289, 310 

Origin of Urbana's Name 948 

Owens, WilHam 151, 177 

Oxen, Their Use in Old Days 344 

P 

Painting and Sculpture 598 

Panic Among Settlers 283 

Passing of the Rural School 531 

Past and Present Compared 430 

Patrick, Judge William 262, 264. 

671, 686, 951, 993, 1087, 1096 

Patriarchs Militant 646, 647, 649 

Patriotic Organizations 611-625 

Patrons of Husbandry 351 

Paupers, List of in 1847 124 

Pennsylvania Railroad 866 

Pensions for County's Blind 130 

Physicians of Champaign County 

357, 382 

Pythian Sisters 652, 653. 654 

Pigs, the Story of 346 

Pioneer Church Burned 486 

Pioneer Church Service 431 

Pioneer Conditions at Mechanics- 
burg 913 

Pioneer Farmer's Difficulties 334 

Pioneer Outwits Redskin 303 

Pioneers Bar Negro Settlers 166 

Pioneers Menaced by Indians 155 

Platting of Christiansburg 891 

Platting of Spring Hills 285 



Platting of Woodstock 869. 874 

Plumbers' Union at Urbana 662 

"Plumed Knight" Glee Club 600 

Politics in Ohio 58 

Poll Rooks of Old Days 151, 182, 216, 

250, 262, 315 

Pollock Town 257 

Pontiac's Conspiracy 36 

Poor Rehef, System of 122 

Population Statistics 99 

Porter's Band 601 

Postofifice Statistics 1147 

Potatoes and Minor Crops 33<> 

Poultry Culture 349 

Powhattan, Village of 266 

Prehistoric Evidences 71, 186 

Presbyterian Churches 489-496 

Present School System 533 

Present 'County Officials 143 

Pretty, Prairie 261 

"Prison Bounds" 116 

Probate Court, The 402 

Prosecuting Attorneys 404 

Prosperity, Era of 94 

Public Building of County 105 

Public Utilities of Urbana 102^. 

Q 

Quebec Act, The 36 

Queer Way to "Save" Sinners 90H 

R 

Race Suicide Not Encouraged 202 

Railroads and Transportation 855-868 

Rally Ends in Tragedy 330 

Recollections of a Pioneer 22?i 

Recorder's Transactions 95 

Red Cross Work in 1917 828. 831 

Refugee Tract, The 55 

Reformed Church 502 

Regiments from This County in Civil 

War 684, 751 

Registrants for Selective Draft— 813, 824 

Related State History 33-61 

Relation to Neighboring Counties 85 

Religious Life in County 430 

Reminiscence of 1836 901 

Reminiscence of 1850 906 



HISTORICAL INDEX. 



Reminiscence of Doctor Cowgill lil8 

"Revival" Meetings in Old Days-460, 907 

Revolutionary Soldiers' Graves- 617 

Revolutionary War Period-- — 36 

Reynolds, Judge John 67, 132, 

177, 391, 394, 675, 838, 950, 1058, 1090 

Rival Republican Newspapers 413 

Roads and Roadmaking 856 

Roberts, Mound, The 72 

Roll of Honor, The 753 

Room for Religious Improvement-- 431 

Rosewood, Village of 331 

Roster of Lawyers 386 

Roster of Physicians 376 

Roster of School Teachers 534 

Royal Arch Masons 633 

Rural Education. History of 530 

Rural Mail Delivery 1148 

Rural Population Declining 235 

liural Schools, Development of 531 

l-iush Township — 

Boundaries of 310 

Coming of Railroads 318 

Coming of Virginians 314 

Drainage and Topography 311 

Early Election 315 

Early Industries 319 

Early Settlement 312 

l="irst Grist-mill 313 

Group of Early Settlers 317 

Original Proprietors 310 

Schools 543 

"The Crossing" 313 

Two Social Centers 316 

When Organized 310 

Russell. John 1099 

S 

Salaries of County Officials 143 

Salaries of Teachers 534 

Saloon, the Passing of 1056 

"Saint of the Diocese" 519 

Salem Township — 

Changes of Boundary 172 

Drainage 176 

Early Religious Activities 186 

(•'arming Conditions 190 

I'irst Election 182 

First School House— -_ 187 



First Settler ^^.177 

Hazleton — — 193 

Kennard 192 

Kingston — — 191 

Military Land Survey 173 

Organization of 181 

Original Landowners 173 

Pierre Dugan 178 

Home of Governor 181 

Railroads — 190 

Schools 544 

Some Early Settlers 184 

Some "Firsts" 189 

"Squatters" 180 

Story of Dugan Run 177 

When Organized — - — 172 

Salt Sections 57 

Sanitariums 382 

Saxton, Joshua — 408, 411, 618, 686 

School Attendance Declining 537 

School Examiners Sadly Deficient-- 530 

School Sections, The_-_ 57 

Schools of Champaign County 530 

School Population of County 103 

School Statistics 552 

School System of Today 533 

Scottish Rite Masonry 635 

Second County Jail . 116 

Second Court House 105 

Second Regiment 691 

Second Town Founded in County-- 271 

Secret of Longevity 199 

Secret- Societies 626-664 

Selective Draft of 1917 813 

Settlers During the '30s— 327 

Settlers in a Panic 283 

Settlers Poor Judges of Land 291 

Settlers' Precarious "Bank" 321 

Sewage — Disposal Plant at Urbana-1039 

Shakers, The 528 

Sheep, Variable History of 349, 1139 

Sheriffs of Champaign County 135 

Shipwreck Alters Doctor's Career— 359 

Shockey, Abram 158 

Sidelights On Life in Other Days 

1109-1161 

Sibley, Warren D 872 

Sixty-sixth Regiment 700 

Skeletons Provide a Mystery . 255 



HISTORICAL INDEX. 



Smallpox Scourges Pioneers 301 

Smith, Joseph P 1101 

Social 'Centers in Rush 316 

Society of Friends, or Quakers--521-524 

Society's Best Investment 550 

Sodom Campmeeting Ground 472 

Soil of Champaign County 69 

Soldier Relief During Civil War 78^) 

Soldier Relief in 1917 798 

Soldier's Diary 706 

Soldiers from This County in Civil 

War 683 

Soldiers' Monuments 614, 803, 930 

Sons of Veterans 624 

Spanish-American War 807 

Spanish-American War Veterans 625 

Spectacular Campaign of 1840 330 

Spinning Wheels. Manufacture of — 295 

Spring Hills, Village of 285 

"Squatters" Early On the Ground-- 180 

Squirrels in Hordes 183 

St. Cecelia Reading Circle 587 

St. Clair, Gen. Arthur 3') 

St. Paris, City of— 

Additions to 93') 

Business Director}- 944 

Industries 945. 947 

Municipal Improvements 940 

Name, Alteration of 936 

Old Business Directory 943 

Postofficc 937 

, Schools 542, 937 

When Platted 936 

Stage Coach Company 1153 

Stanhope, Richard 1141, 206 

State Boundary Lines 60 

State Constitution, Growth of 48 

State History 33-61 

State Representatives, Roster of 136 

State Roads 856 

State Senators, Roster of 140 

State's Military Record 50 

Statistics Relating to Highways 862 

Statistics Relating to Teachers 552 

"Strangers In a Strange Land" 516 

Streams of Champaign County 67 

Streams Provide Mill Power-.270, 275, 

284. 294. 319, 323 

Strenuous Mayoralty Campaigns 963 



Stockade in Westville Neighborhood 155 
Student Officers of 1917 825 

.Subscription Schools 554 

Suicide of Unhappy Boy 284 

Sunday Schools of the Older Day-_ 447 

Surrender of Hull's Army 669, 673 

Surveyors of the Old Days 79 

Surveys, First in Ohio 37 

.Swamps Retard Settlement 322 

•Swedcnborgian Church 525 

.Sweet, Simeon 604 

Swine, Statistics Relating to .348 

Symmes Purchase, The _ 53 

T 

Tax Rate 98 

Teachers' Contract in Early Days - 53f>' 

Teachers in Champaign County 534 

Teachers in LTrbana Schools 561 

Tccumseh 33 

Telephone Service 1048 

I'eniperance Crusade 933 

i'enijjestuous City Aflministration 

965, 1149 

Tcn-r Haute 169 

Territorial Capitals 47 

Territorial Legislature 40 

Thackery, Village of 897 

Things Thespian" 582, 587 

Third Countj^ Jail 117 

Third Court House 107 

Third Ohio Cavalry 748 

Thirteenth" Regiment 692 

Thirty-Second Regiment 691 

Three-Months' Regiment : 690 

Three Rs, The 530 

Tippecanoe, The Battle of 33 

Tobacco and Forage Crops 340 

Topography of Champaign County. 62 

Tornado of 1830 976 

Township Officials 146 

Township Schools 537 

Townships of Champaign County. 86. 115 
Tragedy Marks Campaign Rally-- 330 
Transplanted Virginia Community, 

304, 314 

Transportation 855-868 

"Turn Back the Pages of History"-- 335 
Turnpike Lands, The ^^ 56 



HISTORICAL INDEX. 



Twelfth Ohio Cavalry 749 

Twenty-sixth Regiment 693 

Typical Pioneer Experience 221 

Typical Pioneer Journey 318 

U 

"Underground Railroad" 1132 

Uniforms of Early Militiamen 679 

Union Township — 

Catawba 260 

Confusion in Boundaries 254 

Drainage and Topography 250 

Early Industries 251 

Early Settlers 251 

First El«c-tion 249 

Indian Occupancy 254 

Military Land Surveys 248 

Mutual, Village of 258 

Pollock Town 257 

Schools 545 

When Organized 249 

United Brethren Churches 507-509 

United Presbyterian Church 494 

Universalist Churches 509-512 

t^rbana, City of — 

Administration, Present 966 

As Seen in 1811 951 

Business Directory 1069 

Churches 980 

City Officials 1068 

County Seat, Location of 949 

Directory of 1858 983 

Financial Statement 969 

First Settler 948 

In 1819 1117 

Incorporation of 961 

Industrial Development 991 

Municipal History 961. 1026 

Name, Origin of 948 

Public Utilities 1026 

Review of Early Days 975 

Schools 554-566 

When Platted - 949 

Urbana Choral Society .599 

Urbana Guards, The 806 

Urbana in 1812 676 

Urbana Masonic Club 637 

Urbana Musical Union 600 

Urbana Public Schools S54-.566 



Urbana Township — 

City of Urbana 265 

Drainage and Topography 261 

Early Settlement 264 

First Election 262 

Powhattan, Village of 266 

Schools 546 

Separate from City 263 

Some Early Settlers 264 

When Organized 261 

Urbana University 527, 566 



Valley of the Mad River 63 , 

Valuable Mineral Waters 70 

Vance. Joseph 132, 138, 181, 345, 

354, 631, 679, 957, 1075 

Vanished Lakes 261, 270 

Vicissitudes of Early Farmer 334 

Victims of Smallpox Scourge 301 

"Victory!" (April 9, 1865) 800 

Village of Carysville 328 

Village of Christiansburg 891-896 

Village of Darnell 896 

Village of Kennard 192 

Village of Kings Creek 191 

Village of Millerstown 306, 308 

Village of Mutual 258 

Village of North Lewisburg 898-912 

Village of Rosewood 331 

Village of- Spring Hills 285 

Village of Thackery 897 

Village of Woodstock 869-890 

Virginia Military District, The 54 

Virginians Come in Numbers 304, 314 

Vital Statistics 102 

W 

Ward, John Quincy Adams .598, 606. 

1087 
Ward, William, 90, 133, 606, 948. 1077 1088 

War Chest Empty in 1812 674 

War Garden Coiitest 1067 

War of 1812 668 

War of Rebellion 682-798 

War Records in Auditor's Office 793 

War Records of County 665-835 

War Statistics 792 



HISTORICAL INDEX. 



War, the Tragedy of—. 682 

War With Germany 812-835 

Way, Andrew 604 

Wayne Township — 

Area and Topography 212 

Cable 239 

Decline in Population 235 

Early Religious Services 227 

Early Settlers 219 

First Electors 216 

Industries 237 

Middletown 245 

Mingo 242 

Old Military Survey 214 

Original Landowners 214 

Pioneer Experiences 221 

Population 219 

Schools and Churches 236, 546 

When Organized 212 

Weaver, Henry 1097 

Westville 168 

Wells Affected by Dredging 65 

Wheat, the Story of 338 

•'White Dove," the Tale of 1115 

"White Pilgrim," The 506 

"Wildcat" Money 836 

Wilkinson, Ashabel 324 

Williams, Dr. James 1102 

Willow Bark Institute 382 

Woman Doctor's Good Work 227 

Woman's Auxiliary, Sons of Vet- 
erans 625 



Woman's Literary Club 584 

Woman's Part During Civil War__- 789 

Woman's Relief Corps 623 

Woman's Tourist Club 585 

Woodstock, Village of — 

Beginnings of 873 

Business Directory 889 

Churches and Cemeteries 882 

Coming of Railroad 880 

Early Business Enterprises 876 

First School House 872 

Incorporation of 885 

Industrial Interests 878 

Location of 869 

Officers of 890 

Physicians of 881 

Schools 536, 543, 882 

Secret Societies 884 

Service During Civil War 877 

Some of Its "Firsts" 870 

When Platted 869 

Wright, Francis Martin 1102 

Y 
Young. John H 1103 



Zane Sections, The 

Zanesville, Old Capital. 



BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX 



Abbott, Chester P 

\bbott, John H 

\bbott, William J- 

\lcott, John M. 

-Vllgyer, Bishop S. E 

\llison, E. E. 

\lHson, Melvin 

Vmbrose, Frederick W. 
Anderson, Isaac N. 



652 

586 

848 

819 

38 

583 

101 

150 

1025 

Anderson, John J. _ 235 

Andrews, Joel C. 898 

Apple, Francis M. 627 

Apple, Frank 542 

Apple, Naaman L. 711 

\pple. Otto F. 100 

Apple, Solomon 82 

Armbuster, Peter 231 

Arney, Jacob F 450 

Arrowsmith, Isaac I. 41 

Xrrowsmith, James I. 662 



Bailar, Cory E. 533 

Bailey, Harrison S. « 971 

Baker, David McD. 720 

Baker, D. M. 921 

Baker, Edwin M. 598 

Baker, Harry O. 106 

Baker, Jacob P. 444 

Baker, John Q. 629 

Baker, William D. 601 

Bane, John F. . ^^_ 524 

Barger, Charles T. 1052 

Barger, Jacob W. 854 

Barger, John L. 232 

Barger, Samuel J. 672 

Barnett, Samuel 1045 

Barnett, J. Newton-.. 676 

Batdorf, Claude C. 75 



Batdorf, F. C. 633 

Batdorf, John H. .___ 816 

Bates, G. S. F 693 

Bates, Samuel J. C. 365 

Baughman, Anson 912 

Beatley, Alden 965 

Beaty, Elza R. 610 

Beaty, Simon F. 625 

Beck, James A. 587 

Beck, John W. 689 

Benedict. Martin L. 637 

Berry, Lou B. 88 

Berry, Albert M. 436 

Biddle, J. H. 493 

Birkhold, J. M. 743 

Black, Elias P. 864 

Black, Henry M. 680 

Black, James S. 498 

Black, James W. 371 

Black. Jasper F. 949 

Black, John R. 2,72, 

Black, Samuel F. 245 

Blazer, Wesley 839 

Blose, James I. 145 

Bldfse; Ei^sffes Or: 461 

Blue, David 345 

Bodey, E. L. 416 

Bodey, Carl 774 

Bodey, Emmet A. 1057 

Boisen, Peter A. 874 

Botkin, Granville M. 788 

Botkin, Jesse G. 221 

Bowers, Frank C. 566 

Bowers, MrSv Sarah A. 72 

Bowers & Slagl^^ 115 

Bowers, W.. J. .__. -_._ 115 

Bragunier, J. C. 90 

Brand, John F. 56 

Brand, Major Joseph C 820 

Brand, Thomas T. 550 

Brand. William A. 843 



BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX. 



Brecount. Hon. H. H. 432 

Breedlovc. Thomas E. 176 

Brelsford, David O. 762 

Bright, Alvin J. 74 

Briney, Frank H. 366 

Brown, Albert 667 

Brown, John T. 973 

Brown, L. E. 58 

Brown, William E. 341 

Brubaker, Frank D. 644 

Brunk, Joseph W. 435 

Buck, George F. 503 

Buckwalter, Joseph C. 295 

Bumgardner, Charles W. 511 

Bumgardner. Foster 966 

Burnham, Daniel 189 

Burnham, Grant 1016 

Burnham. P. J. 794 

Burns, Charles V. 925 

Buroker. Asa B. 546 

Burris, Moses 704 

Butcher, Harry G., D. D. S 506 

Byers, George L. 806 

Byler. Christian H. 591 

C 

Calland, Joseph 1014 

Calland, Miles N. 978 

Carey, Charles L. 593 

Carey, Samuel W. 388 

Carlo, Logan 714 

Carr, .Herman. H. 910 

Carson, William J. 364 

Cartmell, Minor 397 

Chance, Samuel, M. D. 247 

Cheetham, James K. 513 

Cheney, Albert 853 

Cheney, W. H. 932 

Chidester, Jacob 657 

Church, Henry A. 389 

Clark, Gwynn H. 287 

Clark, Jacob I. 375 

Clark, Joshua H. 1061 

Clark, Ora M 192 

Clem, Ivan, . 595 

Clem, Samuel 69 

Clifford, Billy "Single" 962 

Coates, Fred 164 

Coffev, William S. 832 



Colbert, Gerald 475 

Collins, Wilbur T. 927 

Connolly, Edward 581 

Conover, Charles D, 37 

Conrad, Prof. Ray D. 1059 

Cooper, Charles J, 952 

Corbet, Amasa T. 851 

Corbet, Marion 885 

Couchman, Amos N. 656 

Couchman, Guy C. 486 

Couffer, Christian N. 161 

Cowgill, John 1060 

Cowles, George 904 

Cradler, Lawrence 895 

Crane, Edgar M. 886 

Crawford, William 759 

Crim, Thomas W. 778 

Crim, William B. 837 

Crockett, Will B. 1058 

Crow, Horace M. 217 

Crowl, Denton 810 

Culbertson, William 665 

Curl, Charles H. 276 

Cushman, Charles A. 1033 



Dallas, William B. 128 

Darling. Henry H. 940 

Davis, Jasper N. 645 

Davis, Joseph H. 487 

Davis, Samuel S. 87 

Ueaton, Andrew B. C. 489 

Deaton, S. H. 731 

Deaton, Sherman S. 33 

Detweiler, David 914 

Detweiler, John P. 907 

Dctweiler, Oran E. 900 

Detweiler, Rufus -._ _1 564 

Diltz, John M. 847 

Diniond, John H. E. 310 

Dingledine, A. E. 920 

Do])bins, George W. 620 

Dodge, George L. 443 

Darsey, Michael 871 

Downs, Sherman 188 

Downs, William W. 568 

Dunn, Hiram G. 166 

Dye, T. E. 239 



BIOGKAPHICAL IJ^JSEX. 



E 

Earle, E. R., M. D. 152 

Eason, Robert J. 263 

Eichholtz, John M. 223 

Ellis, Griffith 45 

Ellsworth, Henry 197 

Ellsworth, Walter 220 

Erwin, John B. ^ 541 

Espy, Charles H. 368 

Evans, James S. 780 

Evcrhart, Edgar S. 118 

Everhart, Herbert C. 1054 

Evilsizor, John T. 789 

Evilsizor, John \\ . 1018 

I'- 

Faulkner, Charles I.. __ 053 

Fett, Amos J. 1046 

Fielder, Mrs. Hannah M. 495 

Finsterwald, Charles F.. M. 1) 103 

Fithian, Judge Geors^e 696 

Fitzgivens, James 606 

l-"rank, McClellan 521 

l-rawley, John .__ 894 

hrceman, Floyd 290 

iM-eyhof, Charles 229 

1-owhl, John A. 399 

i'"<).x, Lawrence 404 

1-udger, Edward . ^01 

h'udger, Horace M. 1044 

F'udger, Leland C. 1024 

Fulwider, David 648 

iMink. James L. 339 

G 

Gannon, l'~red E. 530 

Gannon. Michael 800 

Ganson, Charles H. 67 

Garard, Irwin ¥. 393 

Garrotte, Floyd C. 454 

Gaumer. Charles E. 251 

Gaumer, Frank C. 960 

Gaumer, Thomas .M. 993 

Gaver, Henry P. 133 

Gehman, William M. 153 

Gest, Truman B. 212 

Gifford, George H. 282 

Glendening, Allen M. 191 



(ilendenning, Abraham L. __^ 304 

(ilendenning, James M. 141 

Glendenning, William P. 123 

Good, John P. 348 

Good, Levi J. 1031 

Gordin, W. H. 899 

Gordon, Gwyn T. 60 

Goul, George F. 937 

Gowey, Marcus C. ■ 968 

Grandstaff, William A. 605 

Grimes, Robert Lee, M. D. 325 

Griswold, Obadiah E. 826 

Grove, John H. 950 

Grubb, Eugene H. — 102 

Grubbs, Benjamin 292 

Grube, Oliver - 1039 

Guthridgc, Marion 168 

Guyton, Edwin M. 211 

H 

Hall, Harden 93.^ 

Hall, Sheppard 942 

Halterman, Joseph T. 509 

Hamilton, Samuel P. 723 

Mammon, John H. 60<) 

Hanagan, Thomas M. 875 

Hanger, Arthur G. 733 

Hann, George W. 114 

Hanna, Cyle B. 126 

Hanna, Edgar V. 744 

Hanna, Elijah J. 214 

Hanna, Pearl S. 842 

Hanna, William 1064 

Hart, William 607 

Hartzler, Jonathan T. 528 

Hawley. Byron F 808 

Hawk, Kendall S. 140 

Henderson. Robert. M. D 328 

Hess, Jasper A. 142 

Hess, Will T. 165 

Hesselgesser, John 488 

Hickey, Rev. George 792 

Hines, Lewis - -1048 

Hinton, Maurice E. _. --_1015 

Hill, Charles A. 651 

Hill, Jacob S. __- 597 

Hill, William B. ...575 

Hill, William H., D. V. S. 822 

Hoak, Noble O. 473 



BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX. 



Hodge, Edgar W. 1011 

Hodge, Henry D. - 1007 

Hodge, James R. 1027 

Hodge, Willis H. 280 

Hoisington, Warren B. 76.S 

Mollis, John B. 83 

Hooley, Clyde H. 872 

Hooley, Joseph A. 5^ 

Hopkins, Asa G. 296 

Houser, Daniel C, M. D. 559 

Houston, Frank 429 

Houston, Harold W. 158 

Houx, George W. 552 

Hovey, Louis C. 515 

Howard, Lucius S. 160 

Howard, Otto N. 198 

Hubbard, Wheeler 410 

Huling, John 970 

Huling, Mary J 948 

Hull, Harry B. 424 

Humphreys, George H. 413 

Humphreys, Robert E. 206 

Hunt, Grant S. 579 

Hunt, William H. 812 

Hunt, W. L. 71 

Hunter, Albert L 380 

Hunter, Clinton A. 531 

Hunter, Nathaniel C. 332 

Hupp, Alonzo R. 758 

flupp, Otway C. 796 

Hyde. Willard B., M. D. 734 

I 

Idle. Mrs. Louisa J. 688 

Inskeep, Edward 409 

Instine, William 856 

Ireland, Anson 471 

Ireland, James H. 484 

Ivins. Alvin 406 

J 

Jamison, John M. 385 

Jenkins, Forest E. 347 

Jenkins, Stephen N. 678 

Jenkins, Judson 596 

Jenkins, Thomas J. 718 

Johnson, Alfred 908 

Johnson Family, The 979 



Johnson, Fred N. 702 

Johnson, Ivan T. 171 

Johnson, Otho G. 755 

Johnson, Peter 616 

Johnson, R. G. 1063 

Johnson, Ralph W. 647 

Johnson, Wesley 613 

Johnson, Thomas L. 814 

Johnson, William A. 257 

Jones. Caleb, M. D. - 60^ 

Jones, Pearl V. 753 

Jordan, George 314 

Journell, David C. 664 

Journell, James T. 1 91 

Jonrncll. John T. 472 

K 

Kauft'n)an, Chauncey D. 694 

Kauffman, Isaac J. 888 

Kcesecker, Edward N. 757 

Kennedy, John W. 233 

Kimball, David R. 352 

Kimball, W. C. 199 

Kings1:iury, William E. 167 

Kingsley, James L. 917 

Kirkwood, William W. 699 

Kiser, John W. 784 

Kiscr, William M. 237 

Kite, Darius E. 624 

Kite, Jason P. 457 

Kite, Lemuel 628 

Kite, Romanus M. ' 452 

Kite, Scott 392 

Kizer, Jason 692 

Kizer, William F. 640 

Knight, John P, 259 

Knight, Wilford O. 736 

Knull, Hiram 499 

Kohlmeier. Lawrence 590 

L 

Lane, William IBS 

Lee, Richard . 639 

Lecdom, Edward H. 539 

Lecdom, John S. 53 

LetTel, Calvin S. 617 

J,efTfel, Morris 504 

Leonard, Henry 712 



BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX. 



Leonard, John 342 

Leonard, Joseph P. 476 

Leonard, Walter A. 619 

Lewis, Albert F. 415 

Licklider, Mrs. Emma A. 739 

Licklider, William F. 545 

Lincoln, Charles P. 181 

Lincoln, George W. 274 

Lincoln, Ira 122 

Linville, John F. 306 

Littlejohn, Orva D. 93 

Loffer, Oliver C. 99 

Long, Clement A. : 747 

l.oudenback, C. D. 395 

Loudenback, Hylas D. 411 

Loudenbeck, David _ 327 

Lovett, William W. 63 

Lowry, W. A. 456 

Lucas, Kirby O. 675 

Mc 

McBeth, Alex T. 916 

McBeth, James 560 

McCarty, John S. 203 

McCarty, Thomas 860 

McColly, Amaziah J. 845 

McConnell, George 316 

McCrea, Hon. William B. 901 

McDaniel, William A. 570 

McDaniels, Charles A. 929 

McDargh, Charles 464 

McDonald, Duncan 407 

McDonald, Duncan B. 42 

McDonald, Henry D. 208 

Mclnturff, Charles F. 695 

McKinney, TuUey 681 

McLaughlin, Clarence M., M. D. 446 

McMorran, David 40 

McMorran, Don 92 

McMorran, John P. 710 

McMorran, Simeon 425 

McWilliams, Marshall G. 146 

M 

Madden, T. C. 279 

Maddcx, John M. 649 

Maddex, Joseph H. 674 

Maggert, James W. 727 

Magrew, Lemuel W. 1049 

Mt.gruder, Vcrsalins S. 771 



Manning, E. Walter 728- 

Marvin, C. H. 320 

Mast, Bishop Jacob 355 

Mast, Joseph K. 358 

Mast, Christian 355 

Mast, Daniel 355 

Mast, Ephraim M. 359 

Mast Family, The 355 

Mast, Isaac Wesley 357 

Mast, Jacob — 355 

Mast, John 355 

Mast, John E. 370 

Mast, Joseph F. 562 

Mast, Miriam B. 357 

Mast, P. P. 355 

Maurice, Clinton A. 716 

Maurice, Herman C. 505 

Maurice, Samuel J. 671 

Maurice, Wesley A. 693 

Mays, Andrew 614 

Mays, Fred 614 

Metz, Harry 520 

Metz, Samuel . 803 

Middleton, A. H., M. D 216 

Middlcton, J. T 65 

Miley, Samuel 924 

Millard, William T. 349 

Miller, Clement V. ' 588 

Miller, Rees H. 829 

Miller, Utah S. 318 

Miller, William H. 144 

Millice, William W. 922 

Mitchell, Claudius N. 1040 

Mohr, William H, 677 

Moody, Albert K. 863 

Moody, C. Edwin 877 

Moore, David H., M. D. 536 

Moore, John L. 255 

Moore, S. C, M. D. 445 

Morris, Elmer 526 

Morris, Thomas 463 

Monlton, Rowland C. 202 

Mundel, John P. 211 

Murphy, Joseph 976 

Murphey, Roger H. 760 

Muzzy, John H. 516 



N 



Nagel, C. F, 638 

Nagle, George D. 84 



BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX. 



X'eal, Edwin J. 501 

Neeld, Thomas 227 

Neer, J. F. 1035 

Neer, John P 48 

Neer, Jonathan S. 130 

Neer, Joseph C. 209 

Neese, Clinton A. 363 

Neese, D. Irvin 661 

Neese, Sarah E. 491 

Neese, William N. 351 

Neff, Albert C. 21^' 

Nichols, Frank 953 

Nincehelser, Grant 107 

Nixon, William A. 642 

Norman, Joseph 537 

Xorthcutt, Judge Joseph I' 80 

X'otestine, George W. 070 

Niitt, WiUiam A. 267 

O 

Outram, James 903 

Outram, John B. 557 

Overfield, Joab 278 

Ovcrfield, Samuel M. 261 

Owen, Thomas B 134 

Owen. Thomas N. 992 



I'earce, Henry M., M. 1). 46 

carcc, Richard S. 402 

ence, Benjamin F. 722 

encc. Eli 572 

Tcncc, B. F. A. 61 

I'encc, George W. 603 

I 'ence, George W. 636 

ce, Isaac S. 698 

I'encc, Jacob N. 735 

Pence, John E. 534 

ence, Joseph O. 527 

ence, Orlando 558 

Pence, William I. 632 

Pennock, Lee G. 226 

Perkeypile, Freeman 631 

Perry. Evan 175 

Perry, James 111 

Pettigrew, Elijah A. 253 

Poling, Thomas J. 271 

Polk, Elmer G. 928 

Pool. David A. 243 



Powell, Elmer E. 840 

Powell, James A. 336 

Powell, John __._■ 584 

Powers, Roy L. 470 

Poysell, James M. 269 

Preston. Henry S., M. D. 1008 

Prince, Frank M. 954 

Prince, Solomon 492 

Prince, William E. 535 

I'rintz, George H. 77 

Printz, Jean P. 1028 

Purk, Lewis F. 748 

Putnam, James B. 544 

Pylc, Thomas E. 669 

R 

RalT. Levi S. 249 

Randall, George R. 792 

Rawlings, James D. 1009 

Rawlings, Thomas 382 

Rawlings, William J. W. 323 

Reck, Harvey S 997 

Reid, Joseph 896 

\iQ'n\, Rollie 174 

Rhodes, John 418 

Rhodes, Jacob E. 338 

Rhynard, Peter 705 

Rhynard, George W. 724 

Riddle, Versailious G. 951 

Riley, Samuel 117 

Ritchie, William M. 344 

Roberts, John D. 79 

Roberts, Samuel H. 878 

Robinson, James 303 

Robinson, Samuel J. 850 

Robison, Samuel L. 767 

Rock, John W. 136 

Rogers, Henry C. 828 

Ropp, George E. 195 

Ross, John R. 728 

l^oss. Marine R. 467 

Ross, William R. 312 

Runkle, Darius T. 248 

Ruiiyan, Lemuel 420 

Russell, A. W. 96 

Russell, James E. 496 

Russell, John C. 717 

Russell, Martin L. 897 

Russell, Simeon L. 857 

Rutan, (jlenn 477 



BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX. 



s 

Sanders, Robert 288 

Sarver, John T. 765 

Sarver, William J. 783 

Sayler, John M., M. D. 622 

Sceva, George A. 272 

Sceva, John C. 555 

Schumm, Jonathan 726 

Scoby, Charles W. 709 

Sessions, Minard L. 94 

Shafer, George W. 379 

Shaffer, Joseph H. 479 

Shambaugh, Jacob M. 200 

Sharp, William H, M. D. 120 

Shaul, William R. 869 

Shrigley, Winfield T. 263 

Sidders, John W. 934 

Siegenthaler, Gottlieb . 687 

Siegenthaler, Samuel 706 

Siegle, John H. 159 

Slagle, William H. 115 

Smith, Elmer 612 

Smith, Fred B. 129 

Smith, George W. 746 

Smith, Henry 422 

Smith, Joseph B. 350 

Smith, M. L., M. D. 523 

Smith, Raymond H« 988 

Snapp, Frank 686 

Snarr, Jacob H. 592 

South, Henry C. 184 

Spain, Abram M. 881 

Spain, Paul C 32o 

Speece, David S. 1056 

Speece, Thomas 824 

Stabler, G. Frank 958 

Stabler, John E. 939 

Stabler, W. L. 500 

Stadler, Lewis A. 460 

Standish, George W. 224 

Stansbury, Chas. H. 177 

Steinbarger, Joseph 911 

Stembel, John V. 804 

Stcphan, George W. 346 

Stephenson, Alex C. 930 

Stephenson, Geor.^c E. 764 

Stevens, Maxwell G. 741 

Stevenson, Mrs. Elizabeth J. 448 

Sticklei', Smith F. 455 



Stipp, H. M. 510 

Stockwell, E. R., D. V. S. 811 

Stokes, William L. 880 

Stone, John H. P. 162 

Stone, Samuel L. P., Jr 485 

Stowe, Isaiah 752 

Stradling, Silas M. 85 

Stuart, Frank L. 512 

Sweeney, Dennis J. 64 

Swisher, James L. 861 

Swisher, James 576 

Sunday, William ,-- 391 

I 

Talbott, George A. 440 

Tarbutton, William F. 525 

Taylor, A. F. 329 

Taylor, Burton A. 883 

Taylor, Charles O. 751 

Taylor, David E. l-:v 4.38 

Taylor, John, Family 1065 

Taylor, Thomas I. 170 

Tayjor, Thomas L., D. V. S 291 

Thackery, Joseph C. 1050 

Thomas, Edward B. 574 

, Thompson, Edward M. 834 

Thompson, Thomas 866 

Thornburg, William VV.' 798 

Todd. David W. 330 

Todd, James R. 300 

Townsend, Howard 187 

Tritt, John M. 308 

Turner, Edward 775 

Tway, John W. 799 

y 

Vance, Gov. Joseph 360 

Vance, Major Alexander F. 376 

Van Meter Brothers 194 

Van Meter, Edwin K. 194 

Van Meter, J. L. 194 

Vcf-niillion, William II. 256 

W 

Waite, George 386 

Walborn, George W. 684 

Walborn, Thomas E. 750 



BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX. 



Walborn, Solomon 730 

Walters, Earl L. 427 

Ward, Fernando 322 

Ward, Lorenzo D. 343 

Ward, Noah 442 

Ward, William 3, 795 

Ware Family, The 781 

Ware, Jacob 781 

Ware, Jacob 781 

Ware, Joseph 781 

Warnock, William R. 51 

Wayre, Samuel 571 

Weidman, James A. 112 

Wcikert, Glenn 89 

Weller, John W. 707 

Werdell, R. M. 841 

Wertz, Charles E. 553 

West Family, The 1020 

West, Seth M. 298 

Westfall, Henry 110 

Whitaker, William M. 137 

AVhitmore, Samuel B. 359 

Wiant, Charles A. 959 

Wiant, James B. 458 

Wiant, Ralph W. 451 

Wilkins, Fred L. 818 

Wilkins, Jacob H. 240 

Wilkison, Gersham C. 1036 

Wilkinson, W. C. 663 

Williams, Charles W. 943 

Willis, L. E. 1053 

Wilson. Benoni R. 148 



Wilson, Forry 104 

Wilson, Frank E. 532 

Wilson, Harrison A. 548 

Wilson, Henry P. 936 

Wilson, J. T. R. 97 

W^ilson, W. W. 384 

Wilson, Walter S. - 582 

Winder, Seth S. -- 264 

Wing, Charles B. 482 

Wing, Joseph E. 944 

Wing, Willis O. 690 

Wolcott, John G. 915 

Woodburn, James D. 400 

Woodward, James T. 480 

Woolenhan, John H. 204 

W^ren, Joseph L. 776 

Y 

Yinger, William A., M. D. 700 

Yinger, William H. 701 

Yocom, William R. 890 

Yoder, Alfred L. 302 

Yoder. Isaac P. 790 

Yoder, Levi 285 

Young, Chase 831 

Z 

Zerian, Isaac N. _Jl 825 

Zcrkel, Waldo E. 635 

Zimmerman, John W. 654 

Zimmerman, Joseph M. 1038 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



SHERMAN S. DEATOX. 

Sherman S. Deaton. head of the law hrm of Deaton, Bodey & Bodey, 
former prosecuting attorne\- for Champaign county, member of the Ohio 
state Senate, and for many years one of the best-known and most influential 
lawyers at Urbana. is a Hoosier, a fact of which he never has ceased to be 
proud, but has been a resident of Champaign county since the days of his 
}oung manhood and of Urbana since the year 1894. Ele was born in a little 
log cabin on a pioneer farm in Kosciusko county, Indiana, February 23, 1865, 
son of George ^\^ and Frances (Fortney) Deaton, both natives of Ohio, 
whose last days were spent on their farm in Indiana. 

George W. Deaton was bom on a farm in Clark county, Ohio, October 
16, 1833, son of William and Catherine (Leffel) Deaton, the former of whom 
was born in Botetourt count}', Airginia, and the latter in Ohio, daughter of 
pioneer parents in Clark count}'. AA'illiam Deaton's father, George Deaton. 
died in A^irginia. at the age of thirt\'-six }'ears, leaving his widow, Susan 
(Reams), with nine children. She was so bitterly opposed to the institution 
of slavery, the evil consequences of which she had seen so much in her iMine 
state, that she determined her children should not grow up amid the condi- 
tions entailed by that institution. Accordingly, she came with her children, 
AVilliam, Andrew, Nathan, Levi, George, Samuel, Susan, Mary and Martlia, 
to this state and located in Clark county, where she spent the remainder of 
her life. Upon arriving in this part of the state the widow Deaton was prac- 
tically without money and her sons at once started out to make a living for 
the famil}-. 

William Deaton. the eldest of these children, naturally became the main- 
stay of his widowed mother and he did well his part in the work of establish- 
ing the family in their new home. He l:)ecame a farmer and saw-mill pro- 
prietor in Pike township and there married Catherine Leffel, member of one 
of the pioneer families of that neighborhood. His farm and mill were 
(3a) 



34 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

located six miles north of New Carlisle and there he and his wife spent the 
remainder of their days, useful and substantial residents of that community. 
William Deaton died at the age of forty-four years. He and his wife were 
the parents of eight children, namely: George AV., father of the subject of 
this biographical sketch; John, who died in 1916, at the age of eighty-one 
years; Calvin, who died in infancy; James, who is still living; Mary, who 
married Thomas Drake and is now deceased; Lydia, still living, wife of Dr. 
L. Baker; Susan, still living, wife of Henry Bright, and Elizabeth, also still 
living, wife of Ezra Drake. 

Reared on the home farm north of New Carlisle, George W. Deaton 
grew to manhood there and married b^rances Fortney, who also was born in 
Clark county. May 5, 1835. ^^fter his marriage he established his home 
on a farm in that county and remained there until 1863. In that year he 
disposed of his interests in this state and moved to Kosciuskc^ county, in the 
northern ])art oi Indiana, where he established his home on a pioneer farm 
and where he and his wife spent the remainder of their lives. His death 
occurred on June 30. 1878; liis widow survived him many years, her death 
occurring on Deceml:)er 12, 1804. They were the parents of eight children, 
those besides the subject of this sketch, the lifth in order of birth, being as 
follow: William Sabin. who died at the age of fifteen years; Jacob, who is 
living on the old homestead farm in Kosciusko county. Indiana ; Mary Belle, 
who died in infancy; John Iv. a grain dealer at Sidney. Indiana; Dr. U. S. 
Grant Deaton. of Toledo. Ohio: Cyrus, a farmer in Kosciusko county; Indi- 
ana, .and Charles, a merchant at Toledo. 

Reared among pioneer conditions in Indiana. Sherman S. Deaton ex})eri- 
enced all the jo}-s and pleasures incident to farm life as it existed in Indiana 
at the close of the war. He cleared much swamp land, in which work he 
drove oxen, of which his f.ather owned three yoke; he ;dso bound wheat, 
following the cradle, and performed many of the arduous tasks which fell 
to the lot of the farmer of that period. He received his elementary school- 
ing in the district schools and supplemented the same by the course given in 
the high school at Warsaw, the county seat of the home county. He then 
l)egan teaching school, teaching during the winter months and going to school 
in the summer, attending a Methodist college at Ft. Wayne. Indiana. While 
attending the college, lie lived as economically as possible, receiving food 
from home and doing his own cooking. lie had two young friends, who 
were in the same financial straits as himself, and one of them. Harvey White- 
shield, a Cheyenne Indian, did the mending for them all. Their clothing, 
of the "hand-me-down" grade, was characterized by numerous patches, but 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 35 

these discomforts did not deter them from their earnest pnrpose to secure an 
education. Air. Deaton worked on Saturdays from seven A. M. to eleven P. 
Al. in the fruit house of congressman J- B. White, for one dollar a day. At 
first he received onl}- twenty dollars a month for teaching, but later was given 
Ijetter wages. 657^178 

Ylv. Deaton was now twenty-two years of age and at this point of his 
life l^egan the second chapter of his active career in the world. In 1887 ^''^ 
came to Ohio and began teaching in Jackson township in Champaign county, 
teaching during the winter time and attending the Northwestern Ohio Normal 
University at Ada. In all, he taught seven years in Champaign county and 
during four summers of this time ( 1887-90) he was in the normal school 
at Ada, giving particular attention to the study of law, to which profession 
he had decided to devote his life. In the summer of 1889 he began the 
systematic study of law under the able preceptorship of Judge E. P. Mid- 
dleton at Urbana and on December 7, 1893, was admitted to the bar. He 
continued teaching the rest of that winter and in the following June opened 
an office at St. Paris for the practice of his profession. 

The third chapter in the life of Air. Deaton had opened. As soon as 
he was fairly launched in the practice he began to lav his plans for the 
nomination of prosecuting attorney of the county. He had been reared to 
manhood in Indiana and in that state politics plays an important part in 
e\er} man's life. It is said, and trul}- so, that there is more politics in 
Indiana in proportion to its population than any other state in the Union. 
Under the iuHuence of Hoosier politicians and schooled in their astute 
methods of maneuvering. Mr. Deaton secured the RejDublican nomination 
for prosecutor of Champaign county and was elected in the fall of that year 
Ijy an overwhelming majority, receiving two thousand and twenty-five votes 
more than his opponent. His record in the office was such that he was re- 
elected in the fall of 1896, without opposition, leading the ticket in the 
county. 

His entry into the political iield via the office of prosecuting attornev 
induced him to make the race for a seat in the upper house of the General 
Assembly of Ohio in the fall of 1908. In order to secure the nomination 
he had to make a campaign in the counties of Champaign, Clark and Madi- 
son, these three counties constituting the eleventh senatorial district. He 
secured the nomination and was triumi)hantly elected in the fall of that 
vear and served with such satisfaction to his constituency that he was re- 
elected in the fall of 19 10 for a second term. He was an active member 



36 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

in the Legislature and took a prominent part in the enactment of tem- 
perance measures. 

Another point of interest in the career of Mr. Deaton was his appoint- 
ment in June, 1901, by Gov. George K. Nash as a member of the Ohio 
state Ijoard of pardons, a position which he filled for four years. In Jan- 
uary, 1895, Mr. Deaton became associated with the late George Waite in 
the practice of law. under the firm name of Waite & Deaton. which was 
terminated by the death of Mr. Waite on July 2'], 1913. In December of 
the same }-ear Mr. Deaton entered into a partnership with E. L. Bodey. 
under the lirm name of Deaton & Bodey, and that arrangement continued 
until June, 1916, when Mr. Bodey's son, Lowell C, was admitted to the 
finu, which is now practicing- imder the name of Deaton, Bodey & Bodey, 
with offices on West Court street, across from the court house. 

Mr. Deaton has Ijeen active in the councils of the Republican party 
for a quarter of a century. Even before reaching his majority, he was 
mingling with the politicians of Indiana, than whom there are no more 
skillful in the L'nited States. From such men as Oliver P. Morton. Schuyler 
Colfax, Isaac P. Gray, Benjamin Harrison. Thomas A. Hendricks, Conrad 
Baker, "Blue Jeans" Williams and other renowned men of Indiana, Mr. 
Deaton learned his first steps in political affairs. He remembers distinctly 
the campaign of 1876, when Williams and Harrison were opponents for the 
governorship of Indiana. He was personally acquainted with the late Sen- 
ator Shively, of Indiana, Albert G. Porter and Ira Chase, governors of 
the Hoosier state, William H. Calkins, congressman from the thirteenth 
district of Indiana, and many other of the most prominent men of the state. 

While acting as chairman of the Champaign county lvepul)lican com- 
mittee, ]\fr. Deriton came into contact with William ^IcKinle}-. Hanna, Sher- 
man and Go\ernor Xash. He took a very active part in the election of 
Theodore R. Burton to the LTnited States Senate when he was in the state 
Legislature. r''or thirteen years Mr. Deaton was a member of the Repub- 
lican countv committee, seven years of which he served as chairman. Lie 
was an alternate delegate to the Republican national convention at Chicago 
in 1912. As an orator Mr. Deaton ranks not only among- the best in his 
own community, but is frequently called upon to make addresses in all parts 
of the state. Llis Decoration Day address in Urbana in 1917 was pro- 
nounced one of the best patriotic addresses ever heard in the city. 

Mr. Deaton was married to :\Ial)el A\>st, December 2},, 1898. Mrs. 
Deaton was born in Jackson townshi]) and is the daughter of George W. 
and I-^llen ( Breslin ) A\'est, lioth of whom also were born in that township. 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 37 

Her parents were members of pioneer families in that part of the county, 
and spent all their lives there, her mother dying- on March 5, 1916, at the 
age of fifty-nine years, and -her father about five weeks later, April 13, 
191 6. at the age of sixty years. 

Air. and ]\Irs. Deaton have a pleasant home at Urbana on Lafayette 
avenue. They have always taken an earnest interest in the general social 
and cultural activities of the community. Mr. Deaton is a Royal Arch 
Mason, a member of the local lodge of the Knights of Pythias, and of the 
junior Order of United American ^Mechanics. 



CHARLES D. CONO\^ER. 

The Hon. Charles D. Conover, of Urbana. twice representative from 
this county to the Ohio state Legislature and former speaker of the House 
of Representatives, is a native son of Champaign county and has lived here 
nearly all his life. Lie was born on a farm in Salem township on March 21, 
1881, son of Nicholas and Mary (Murphy) Conover, the former of whom 
was born in the state of Mew Jersey and the latter in this county, whose 
last days were spent at Bellefontaine, in the neighboring county of Logan. 

Nicholas Conover was but a lad when his parents came to Champaign 
county from New Jersey and settled on a farm in Salem township. There 
he grew to manhood and married, starting farming operations on his own 
account in Salem township. He later moved to the adjoining county of 
Madison, but after a brief residence there moved to Logan county and 
I)egan farming in the Middlesburg neighborhood, but presently returned to 
Salem township, this county, and was there engaged in farming until his 
retirement and removal to Bellefontaine, where he spent his last days, his 
death occurring there in February, 1905. His widow survived him for 
more than twelve years, her death occurring on April 20, 19 17. They were 
the parents of five children, those besides the subject of this sketch, the 
fourth in order of birth, being Clarence, Edgar, John and Mattie. 

Charles D. Conover's earlv schooling was received in the district schools 
of Salem township and in the high school at Middlesburg, after which he 
for some time was in attendance at the Ohio State Normal at Ada and at 
Ohio Wesleyan University. Upon leaving college ]Mr. Conover became en- 
gaged in teaching school and was for ten years thus engaged, seven years 
of which time was spent as superintendent of the schools at Kings Creek, 



38 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

tliere conducting the nrst consolidated township school estabUshed in Cham- 
paign county. Meanwhile, Mr. Conover had been giving considerable atten- 
tion, to the reading of law during his vacations and was also giving his 
close attention to local political affairs and the affairs of the state in gen- 
eral. In 1912 he was elected to represent this district in the state Legislature 
and his service in the succeeding session was so eminently satisfactory to 
liis constituents and the public at large that he was re-elected in 1914 and 
in the following session was elected speaker of the House, the first time 
such an honor had ever been conferred upon a rejiresentative from Cham- 
paign county. 

Jn 1903 Charles D. Conover was united in marriage to Florence Gail 
Stokes, daughter of George W. and Marie Elizabeth (Cowgill) Stokes, and 
to this union two children have been born, Richard and one who is deceased. 
Mr. and Mrs. Conover are members of the Methodist Protestant church 
and take a proper part in church affairs, as well as in the general social and 
cultural affairs of the community. Mr. Conover is a member of the local 
lodge of the Knights of Pythias and takes a warm interest in the affairs 
of the same. Politically, he is a Republican and has for years been regarded 
as one of the leaders of that party in this countv and throughout this part 
of the state. 



BISHOP S. E. ALLGYER. 

The Rev. S. E. xMlgyer, pastor of the Oak Gro^•e Mennonite church 
in Salem township, this county, a Mennonite bishop, field worker of the 
Mennonite board of missions and charities in the United States and Canada 
and for years one of the best-known figures in that communion in this 
country, is a native of the old Keystone state, but has been a resident of 
this county since he was sixteen years of age. He was born in Mifflin 
county, Pennsylvania, March 8, 1859, son of Joseph and Barbara (Zook) 
AUgyer, also natives of that state and earnest members of the Mennonite 
colony in Miftlin county, who came to this county in 1875 and settled on a 
farm in Salem township, where they spent the remainder of their lives. 
Upon coming to Champaign county, Joseph AUgyer bought a farm of one 
hundred and fifty- four acres in Salem township and there established his 
home, farming there until his death in 1884. His widow survived him for 
about eighteen years, her death occurring in 1902. They were the parents 
of five children, four of whom are still living, but of whom the subject of 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY. OHIO. 



39 



this sketch is the only one now residing in this county, he having three 
sisters, Mrs. Nancy Harshberger, Mrs. Hannah Mattler and Mrs. Joseph E. 
Zook, residing in the neighboring county of Logan. 

S. E. Allgyer was about sixteen years of age when he came to this 
county with his parents from Pennsylvania in 1875 and his schooling was 
completed in this county. From boyhood he was an earnest student and in 
addition to his labors on the home farm, after he left school, he continued 
his studies, with particular reference to the work of the church, and in 1905 
he was chosen by the congregation of the Oak Grove Mennonite church to 
serve them as pastor, and he was formally ordained to the ministry of the 
Mennonite faith. In that new relation he rendered such faithful and val- 
uable service, that he soon began to attract the attention of the church at 
large and in 1908 he was created a bishop in the church at Oak Grove. In 
the meantime Bishop Allgyer had been continuing his farming operations 
on the home place and some time after the death of his mother bought the 
interests of his sisters in the place, becoming proprietor of the same. He 
not only is a good [ireacher, but an excellent farmer and as he prospered in 
his operations added to the home place until he became the owner of two 
hundred and forty-two acres of excellent land there. In 1912 Bishop All- 
oyer retired from the active labors of the farm and has since been devoting 
his undivided attention to the affairs of the church, his evangelistic labors 
calling him to all parts of the country, his services as bishop also taking him 
into Canada, and he thus lias become one of the most widely recognized 
features in that communion in the countrv. The Bishop also is field worker 
of the Mennonite board of missions and charities, an international organi- 
zation covering l)oth the United States and Canada. His work consists of 
looking after the missions of the church and soliciting funds. The Men- 
nonites have a strong organization at Oak Grove and during his active min- 
istrations there Bishop .\llgyer has done much to extend the cause of the 
church locally, as well as throughout the country at large. 

On January 18, 1883, Bishop Allgyer was united in marriage to Pris- 
cilla Umble, daughter of Jacob and Barbara Umble, of Lancaster county, 
Pennsylvania, and to that union eight children have been born, Eva May, 
Barbara E., Maude, J. Roy, Anna M.., Ruth E., S. Maurice and John Mark. 
Eva Allgyer married N. E. Trover and has two children. Luella and Ray- 
mond. Barbara E. Allgyer married Earl M. Yoder and has two children. 
Olive and Roy. Maude Allgyer married Daniel C. Yoder and has three 
children, Geneva, Richard and Marie. J. Roy Allgyer was graduated from 
the agricultural department of Ohio State University in 191 7 and then was 



40 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

chosen as instructor in agriculttn-e in the schools at Plattsburg, Ohio, for 
the following school }'ear. All the children have had good educational ad- 
vantages and J. Roy and Barbara ha\e taught school in their home town- 
ship. The Bishop and his family have a delightful home and have ever 
taken a proper part in the general social and cultural activities of the com- 
munity in which they live, helpful in many wa}'S in promoting movements 
desioned to advance the C(immon welfare thereabout. 



DAVID McMORRAN. 



The biographical section of this work will contain no more interesting- 
account of any citizen of Champaign county than that of David McMorran, 
president of the Central National Bank at Paris, and who for many Acars 
engaged in general farming. He was born in Johnson township, this county, 
July i8, 1850, the son of Christian and Sarah ( Loudenl^ach ) ^^IclMorran. 
Christian McAb)rran was l)orn in Jackson township, this count}-, and Sarah 
McMorran was l)orn in Mad River township. Samuel T. AIcMorran 
father of Christian, was born in Scotland and came to the United 
States when a bow He married in Indiana and some time later set- 
tled in Jackson township, south of St. l^aris. He acquired large and val- 
uable tracts of land, north and south of that place. Samuel McMorran was 
the father of live sons and one daughter, all of whom are now deceased. 
He was an active member of the Baptist church and rendered valuable serv- 
ices in many directions to the neighborhood in general. 

Christian McMorran grew up in the vicinity where he was born and 
attended an old log school house, .\fter his marriage he settled down on 
])art of his father's farm. He finally accumulated an excellent farm of aI)out 
six hundred acres of prime land and became prosperous in all his under- 
takings. He was the father of eight children, as follow : Ellen, who l)e- 
came the wife of Jason Kiser; David, the subject of this sketch; Barbara, 
the wife of Sebastian Nixon, and Simeon, born to his first marriage. By 
his marriage to Susan Loudenbach, he became the father of John I'., of 
Johnson to\\nship; Stella, wife of O. P. Mitchell, Huntington county, In- 
diana ; Mary, wife of William Heater, of St. Paris, and Abraham, deceased. 

David McMorran was reared on a farm in Johnson township antl 
educated in the common schools of the district. He remained at home until 
lie was alxmt twentv-one and then worked out at farming, being thus 




yj^^(yv<^ ^//cP ^i/CoT^T^tt^riy Sc M/'i^ 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 4I 

engaged for about two years. On October 26, 1873, David McMorran was 
united in marriage to Susan Xorman, who was born in Johnson township 
on June 24, 1850, and who was educated in the common schools. About 
that time Mr. IMcMorran liouglit thirty-six acres of land, for which he paid 
three thousand six hundred dollars, going in debt for the purchase money 
and paying interest at the rate of ten per cent, for the debt. He later added 
ninety-eight acres to his original purchase and is nciw the owner of two 
hundred and seventy acres of prime land. 

To Mr. and Mrs. McMorran three children were born, one of whom 
died in infancv, the others being, Dollie B., who became the wife of C. A. 
\Viant, of Johnson township, and Don, who married I'earl Perfect and now 
lives in Jackson township. The McMorran family are members of the 
Baptist church of St. Paris, of which Mr. McMorran has served as one of 
the deacons for several \ears and has always been acti\e in church work. 
He is a Republican rmd -has ser\ed as trustee of his township. 

Mr. McMorran was one of the founders of the Central National Bank 
at St. Paris and helped to organize it. He was the tirst president, which 
official position he siill holds. He is also a director in the St. Paris Grain 
C"iim])an\- and owns three business rooms in the same town. He is a stock- 
holdtr in the National Insurance Comi)any and is interested in other local 
business interests, also owning a half section of land in Texas. 



ISAAC L ARROWSAHTH. 

The late Isaac I. .\rrowsmith, for years one of Champaign county's 
best-known and most substantial farmers, who was living retired hi the 
city of Urbana at the time of bis death on November 13, 1913. was a native 
son of this countv and was an honored veteran of the Civil ^\'ar. He was 
born on a pioneer farm in Mad River township, February 6. 1844, son of 
Wesley and Susanna Arrowsmith. Wesley Arrowsmith was a farmer and 
mill owner, living four miles west of Urbana, and he and his wife were 
the parents of four children, those besides Isaac, the youngest, being Mary 
Jane, Elizabeth and Miller, all deceased. 

Upon completing the course in the local schools. Isaac I. Arrowsmith 
t(j()k a course in a commercial college. Though but a boy when the Civil 
War broke out he enlisted for service in the Union army and served during 
the hundred-days service as a member of Company A, One Hundred and 



42 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OTIKX 

Thirty-fourtli Ivegiment, Ohio \^)hinteer Infantry. He later became a 
farmer on his own account and on Noveml^er 3, 1868, married Amanda J. 
Powell, daughter of James D. and Minerva (Hill) Powell, members of 
Iiioneer families in Champaign county and further and fitting mention of 
whom is made elsewhere in this volume. After his marriage Mr. Arrow- 
smith farmed the old Arrowsmith farm in Mad River township until 1909, 
when he retired from the active labors of the farm and he and his wife 
luoved to Crbana, where he spent his last days, his death occurring, as 
noted above, in 191.^, and where she is still living. She is a member of the 
Presbyterian church and has ever taken an earnest interest in church work. 
Mr. Arrowsmith was a Republican and e\er gave a good citizen's attention 
to local political affairs, but was not included in the office-seeking class. He 
was a member of the local lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows 
and took a warm interest in the aft'airs of that organization. As a member 
of Brand Post Xo. 98, Grand Army of the Republic, at Urbana, he took 
tui active interest in the affairs of that patriotic organization and in all 
ways did his part as a good citizen in the promotion of the best interests 
•of the conmumity in which he spent all his life. 

To Isaac I. and Amanda J. (Powell) Arrowsmitli two children were 
l)orn, James I., living on the old home place in Mad River township, who 
married Bessie Craig and has one child, a son. Marion Powell Arrowsmith, 
and JMinerva A., who married Jesse Lewis, living on the old Powell homestead, 
and has two children, Emma Jane and Charles Richard Lewis. 



DUNCAN BURTON McDONALD. 

The iate Duncan Burton McDonald, former treasurer of Champaign 
county and for many years one of the best-known merchants at Urbana. 
who died at his home in that city in the summer of 1915 and whose widow 
is still living there, was born in that city and there spent all his life, an 
important factor in the commercial and political life of the community, 
even as his father before him had been. He was born on April 7, 1844, 
son of Duncan B. and Hester (Heylin) McDonald, both of whom were 
l)orn in this state, the former in Ross county and the latter in Urbana, 
members of pioneer families, and whose last days were spent in Urbana, 
the latter dying in 1887 and the former in 1891. 

Elsewhere in this volume, in a memorial sketch relating to the senior 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 43 

Duncan B. McDonald, who for many years was one of the leading mer- 
chants of Urbana, there is set out at considerable length the history of this 
branch of the McDonald famih- in America and the reader is referred to 
that narrative in this connection, it being sufficient here to state that the 
senior Duncan B. 3»IcDonald was a son of Archibald and Margaret (McDon- 
ald) McDonald, natives of Scotland, the former born in Glencoe and the 
latter in Sutherland, who were married in this country and Ijecame early 
residents of Ohio, settling on the banks of Paint creek, in the vicinity of the 
present city of Chillicothe, in Ross county, about the beginning of the past 
century, and it was there, in that pioneer home, that Duncan B. McDonald 
was born in 1802. Archibald McDonald was born in 1759 and was but a 
bo}- when he came to the American colonies with his parents, William and 
Elizabeth ( Douglas ) McDonald, also natives of Scotland, born in Suther- 
landshire. Though but sixteen years of age when the colonists l)egan their 
war for independence, Archibald McDonald shortly afterward enlisted his 
services in behalf of the patriots and served in that cause until the end of 
the war. When eighteen vears of age, in 1820. Duncan B. McDonald en- 
tered upon his commercial career at Urbana. as a clerk in the store of 
Marcus Hevlin, whose daughter he later married, and he presently became 
a part owner of the store, later, in association with his brothers, William 
and Colin McDonald, establishing the dry-goods store, which came to be 
the leading mercantile establishment in Urbana. ^larcus Heylin, father of 
Hester Heylin. mother of the subject of this sketch, was one of the early 
merchants of Url)ana and in the davs of the beginning (^f his commercial 
activities there, his place was one of the most popular Indian trading posts 
in this whole region. 

Reared in Urbana, Duncan Burton McDonald received his schooling in 
that city and upon leaving high school entered his father's mercantile estab- 
lishment and was for a short time there engaged, but after awhile decided to 
take up farming as a vocation and with this end in view began farming on 
a (|uarter of a section of land south of Urbana and was thus engaged for 
se\eral years, at the end of which time he disposed of his farming interests 
and moved to ]\Iuncie, Indiana, where he became engaged in the grocery 
business. Several years later he returned to Url)ana and opened a grocery 
store on "the Scjuare" and there continued actively engaged in the grocery 
business until his retirement from business thirty years later. In the mean- 
time he had been elected treasurer of Champaign county,' serving in that 
pul)lic capacitv for five vears. Not long after his retirement from office he 



44 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

sold his sti)i"c and the rest of his Hfe was spent in quiet retirement, his death 
occurring in July, 1915. he then being in the seventy-second year of his 
age. During the Civil ^^'ar l\Ir. McDonald participated in the hundred- 
days service as a member of Company K, One Hundred and Thirty-fourth 
Regiment, Ohio A'olunteer Infantry, and was an active member of the local 
post of the Grand Army of the Republic, in the affairs of which organiza- 
tion he took a warm interest. Politically, he was a Republican and by reli- 
gious persuasion and inheritance was a Presbyterian, for years serving as a 
deacon of the local congregation of that church. 

In 1866 Duncrui Burton McDonald was united in marriage to Laura 
E. Lamme, who was born in P>ethel township, in the neighboring county of 
Clark, daughter of William A. and Eliza (Harr) Eamme, the former of 
whom was born in that same township and the latter in Urimna, a daughter 
of Daniel Harr, a pioneer tavern-keeper at Urbana, his tavern having Ijeen 
located on the present site of the postotifice in that city, but who later moved 
to Springfield. David Harr was a son of James Harr, a soldier of the 
]jatriot armv during the Revolutionary War. William A. Lamme was a 
son of John and Sarah Lamme, natives of Virginia, the former of whom 
took part in the War of 181 2, serving in Hull's army, and who became 
pioneers of Clark county, this state. William A. Lamme continued farming 
in Clark county until the death of his wife, after which he made his home 
with his children, his death occurring at the home of a daughter in Chicago. 
He and his wife were the parents of nine children, of whom but three are 
now living, Mrs. McDonald having a sister, Caroline, living at Portland. 
Oregon, and a brother, Edwin PI. Lamme. a successful lawyer at San Diego, 
California. 

To Duncan 1>. and Laura li. (Lamme) McDonald were l)orn two sons, 
Robert Pleylin and William Lamme, the latter of whom died years ago. 
Herbert H. McDonald married Helen James, of Memphis, Tennessee, and 
has two sons, Clarence Pleylin and James Duncan. Clarence H. ]\IcDnnald 
married Isabel Wagar and has one child, a daughter, Fdizabeth Wagar. 
James D. McDonald married Irene Gardner. Since the death of her hus- 
band Mrs. McDonald has continued to make her home at Urbana, where 
she is \er\- pleasantl} situated. She is a member of the Presbyterian church 
and has ever taken an interested part in the work of the church, as well as 
in the general good works and social and cultural activities of her home 
city, she and liei' husband having been helpful in promoting such move- 
ments as were designed to advance the common welfare of the communitv- 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 45 

GRIFFITH ELLIS. 

The late Griffith EUis, who for years \vas (jne of the best-known mer- 
chants and pubHc men at Urbana, who died at his home in that city in tlie 
fall oi T912 and whose widow is still living- there, was a native of the prin- 
cipality of Wales, but had been a resident of this country since the clays of 
his boyhood, the greater part of his life having been s[)ent at L^-bana, where 
he entered upon his successful business career at the age of sixteen years. 
He was born in the year 1830 and when ten years of age came to the United 
States with an uncle, who settled on a farm in the \icinity of Columbus, 
this state. 

AVhen he was si.xteen }ears of age Griffith Ellis was offered a position 
as a clerk in the old Gw\nn mercantile establishment at Urbana and ac- 
cepted the same, his residence at L^rbana dating from that time. Displaying 
an unusual aptitude for business, two ^■ears later he was given a partnership 
in the firm and se\'eral }'ears later became the sole owner of the store, which 
he continued to operate for a short time and then sold out and went to 
New York C\t\, where he became engaged in the wholesale shoe business. 
A few years later Mr. fillis returned to Urbana and there opened a mer- 
chant-tailoring establishiuent, which he continued to operate until his election 
to the office of county treasurer of Champaign count}- in 1880. He served 
the public in that iiuportant capacity for four years and was then elected 
clerk of court, a position he occu])ied for six years. Mr. Ellis was a stanch 
Republican and for many years was regarded as one of the leaders of that 
part)- in this state. He voted for John C. b'remont, the Repulilican party's 
first nominee for President, and ever after took an acti\-e part in the aft^airs 
of the party, serving for some time as chairman of the Champaign county 
central committee. Go\-ernor Foster appointed him a meml)er of the board 
of governors of the Ohio state penitentiary and he also ser\-ed for some 
time as financial officer of the state institution at Dayton, later returning 
to his established home at Urbana, where he sjient his last da}-s, his death 
occurring there in November, 191 2. At one time Mr. Ellis was nominated 
by the congressional convention as the Republican candidate for Congress 
from this district, but he declined the nomination. He was a member of 
the I-"irst Presb}terian church at Urbana, a York Rite Mas(ni and a member 
of the local lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

In 1857 Griffith Ellis was united in marriage to Jane Hoge Woods, 
daughter of Robert T. \\'oods and wife, of Urbana, and to this union nine 



46 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

children were born, of whom hve are still living, namely: Mrs. Jennie E. 
(iiljjjons, of Ann Arbor, Michigan; Miss Sophia R. EUis, a teacher of Latin 
in the Brooklyn high school for girls at Brooklyn, New York; Griffith Ogden 
i'dlis, of Detroit. Michigan, publisher of the Aiiicrican Boy. a popular mag- 
azine for iu^•eniles and in which com]xuiy he owns the controlling stock; 
Miss Mehina K. b^dlis, of L'rbana, and Mrs. Louise R. Inslee. a member of 
the facult\- of tlie bjnma W'illard School for Girls at Trov, Xew York. 



HEXRV M. PEARCE, M. D. 

Dr. Plenry W. Pearce, of L'rbana. former county physician and city 
health officer and for years the local surgeon for the Pennsyhania Railroad 
Company, was born in Urbana and has lived there all his life, continuously 
engaged in the practice of his profession there since receiving his medical 
degree in 1890. He was born on December 20, 1868, son of Dr. Henry 
C. and Sarah Jane ( Morgan ) Pearce, the former of whom for many years 
was one of the l)est-known physicians and medical instructors in the state 
of Oliio. 

The late Dr. Henry C. Pearce, who died at his home in Lrbana on 
December 2, 1891, also was a native son of Champaign county, born on a 
farm in Cnion township, on April 10, 1833, son of Harve}- C. and Beulah 
(Barrett) Pearce, both of whom also were l)orn in this county, members 
of pioneer families. Harvey C. Pearce was born in 1805, son of Thomas 
and Elizabeth (Cc^llins) Pearce, who were among the very earliest settlers 
of Champaign county. Thomas Pearce, a soldier of the patriot army dur- 
ing the Revolutionary War, moved from New York State to Maryland 
after the war and later came to Ohio and settled in the then wilds of Cham- 
jjaign county, he and his wife becoming influential pioneers of the new com- 
munit\' and here spending the rest of their lives. Harvey C. Pearce grew 
to manho(xl on tlic pioneer farm (mi which he was born and married Beulah 
Barrett, who also was born in this county, in 1809. a daughter of Capt. Abner 
Barrett, one of the very early settlers of Champaign county, who later served 
as an officer during the War of 181 2. l'\:>r some time after his marriage, 
Har\ey C. Pearce continued farming and then moved to Urbana and was 
for many years thereafter engaged in the shoe business in that city, the 
rest of his life being spent there, his death occurring in 1891. His wife 
had preceded him about six years, her death occurring in 1885. Harvey 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 



47 



C. Pearce took an active interest in local civic affairs and for some time 
served as justice of the peace in his home township. He \vas a duly licensed 
•'local" minister of the Methodist Episcopal church and was widely known 
hereahout as a preacher of convincing power. To him and his wife eiglit 
children were horn, Henry Clay, Lucas E., Ahner B., John W'., William 
Raper, Mary E., Richard S. and Harvey C. 

Henry Clay Pearce received his elementary schooling in the local schools 
and at the age of twenty turned his attention seriously to the study of medi- 
cine, under the preceptorship of Doctor Carter and later under Doctor Daw- 
son, and thus duly prepared for entrance to college entered Starling Medical 
College at Columbus, from which institution he was graduated in 1863, 
though for five years previously he had been engaged in practice during 
vacations at Mutual, this county. In 1864 he opened an office for the prac- 
tice of his profession at Urbana and ever afterward regarded that as his 
established home, though for many years much of his time was spent in 
Columbus as a medical instructor. From 1866 to 1874 Doctor Pearce ser\ed 
as professor of physiology and microscopic histolog}' in Starling Medical 
College and then, for a period of seventeen years, served as ]H-ofessor of 
obstetrics and surgical diseases of women in Columbus Medical College. L^n- 
many years he was an active member of the Ohio State Medical Society and 
of the American Medical Association and in 1866 was appointed local sur- 
geon for the Pennsylvania Company, a position he held until his death, the 
longest period of such service on the records of that cumpan)-. h'or nine- 
teen years the Doctor was a member of the local school board at Urbana. 
and for more than a half century he was a consistent and active member of 
the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Dr. Henry C. Pearce was twice married. In 1854 he was unitetl in 
marriage to Sarah Jane Morgan and to that union fi\e children were born, 
namely: Laura Etta, who married C. E. Macher, of Piqua ; Ella, who 
married George E. Lee and is now deceased: Charles W., of Urbana; Henry 
M., the immediate subject of this biographical sketch, and a daughter, who 
died in infancy. The mother of these children died in 1872 and in the fol- 
lowing year Doctor Pearce married Binnie A. Keller, daughter of William 
Keller, former mayor of Urbana, and to that union two sons were born. 
Dr. Frank C. Pearce, deceased, and William K., who died at the age of 
twenty-two years. The elder Doctor Pearce was a Scottish Rite Mason and 
a Knight Templar and for years took a warm interest in Masonic affairs in 
this state. 

Henry M. Pearce received a practical education in the schools of his 



48 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

home city and early entered upon the study of medicuie under the aljle pre- 
ceptorship of his learned father. Thus prepared for college he entered Star- 
ling- Medical College in 1887 and on March 4, 1890, was graduated from 
that institution, with the degree of l^octor of [Medicine. Thus equipped for 
the practice of his profession, Doctor Pearce engaged in practice at Urbana, 
in association with his father, and has ever since remained in that city, long- 
regarded as one of the leading practitioners in this part of the state. In addi- 
tion to his general practice he has served for twenty-five years as local 
phvsician and surgeon for the Penns}lv;niia Railroad Company. For eleven 
years he served as county pliysician and also for some time in the capacity 
of city health officer. The Doctor is an active member of the Champaign 
County Medical Society, the Ohio State Medical Society and of the Amer- 
ican Medical Association and in the deliberations of these learned bodies 
takes a warm interest. He is a York Rite Mason and takes an actixc interest 
in Masonic affairs; he is past master of Champaign Masonic lodge and is 
past commander of Raper Comniandery No. 19, Knights Templar. His 
])(ilitical allegiance is given to the Republican party. For six years he served 
as member of the school board, of which he was president for one year. 

In 1890 Dr. Henry M. Pearce was united in marriage to Anna M. 
Sleffel, a native of Australia, and to this union two children have been born, 
Linda Etta and Edwin Clay. Doctor and Mrs. Pearce are members of the 
IMethodist Episcopal church and take a proper interest in church work, as 
A\-ell as in the general good works and social and cultural acti\'ities of their 
home town. 



JOHN PRIXGLE NEER. 



lohn Prin.gle Xeer, one of Champaign county's most substantial farm- 
ers and landowners, an honored veteran of the Civil War, and former niem- 
l)er of the board of county commissioners, now living- retired at Urbana. 
where he lias extensive banking and manufacturing interests, is a native 
son of this count\- and has lived here all his life. He was born on a farm 
in Concord township on April 2^, 1842, son c5 Joseph and Margaret Susan 
(Monroe) Neer, earlv settlers in that section of the county, whose last 
days were spent on their farm there. 

Joseijh Neer was born in Loudoun county. X'irginia. August 7. 1804. 
and there grew to manhood, remaining there until after he had attained his 
maioritv. when, in 1826. he came over into Ohio, locating near Catawba. 





fJ€^^ 




'y'/UJ 




y^^4^. 



CHAMPAIG.\T COUNTY, OHIO. 49 

working as a cabinet-maker. He returned to Virginia then in 1831 and 
bought a tract of school land in Concord township. He set about clearing 
and improving the same, early becoming recognized as one of the most 
substantial and influential pioneers of that section. That pioneer farm is 
now held by tlie subject of this sketch. Joseph Neer was also a Avagon- 
maker by trade and did considerable work in that line in early days, as 
well as a good deal of carpentering in the neighborhood of his home. On 
November 10, 1835. nine years after he came to this county, Joseph Neer 
married Margaret Susan Monroe, who was born on November 27, 1819, 
daughter of David Monroe and wife, wdio came to this county from Virginia 
in pioneer days, and after his marriage he established his home on his Con- 
cord township farm. He and his wife were members of the Methodist 
church and ever took an earnest part in church work, as well as in the gen- 
eral good works of the community in which they lived. Mr. Neer originally 
was a AVhig. but upon the formation of the Republican party espoused the 
principles of the same and cast his vote for John C. Fremont. His death 
occurred on January 26, 1869, and his widow survived him for more than 
ten years, her death occurring on October 8, 1880. They were the parents 
of twelve children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the fourth in 
order of birtli. the others being as follow- David C, a successful farmer 
in .Vllen count}-, Kansas; Ann F., who is now living at Bakersfield, Cali- 
fornia, widow of James \\\ Ellis; Eliza AL, who died in southern Colorado 
on October 6, 1875, wife of Judge Joseph Van Offenbacker, who died at 
Washington, D. C, in January, 1895; Martha J., who died on September 
16, 1870; Nathan A., a retired farmer now living at Pasadena, California; 
Sallie C. living at Los Angeles, widow of Lowell T. Clemans; Joseph T., 
who married Lydia A. Bricker and is a well-known farmer in Concord 
township, this coimty; Mary F., wife of Charles W. McMaster, of Los 
Angeles; Samuel J., a fruit grower at Green River, Utah; Elizabeth, who 
died in infanc), and James ^1.. a farmer and stockman in Cowley county, 
Kansas. 

John P. Neer was reared on the old home farm in Concord township, 
receiving his schooling in the schools of that neighborhood, and was nineteen 
years of nge when the Civil A\'ar broke out. Ou August 19, 1862, then 
being but twenty years of age. he enlisted for service in the Union armv 
as a private in Compau}- H, Fort}-fifth Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, 
being mustered into the service at Camp Chase at Columbus, and served 
Avith that command until he was mustered out with the rank of first lieu- 
(4a) 



50 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

tenant at Canip Harker in Tennessee, June 12, 1865, the war then Ijeing 
over. Mr. Neer's first promotion in the ranks was to the position of cor- 
poral of his compan_y. Later to sergeant and then to orderly sergeant, serving 
with that rank until he received his commission as first lieutenant. During 
his long period of service he was a j)articipant in some of the heaviest en- 
gagements of the war. including the 'liattles of Resaca, Dallas, Kenesaw 
Mountain, Pine Mountain and Lovejoy Station. One of the first engage- 
ments in which he took part was the battle of Dutton Hill, Kentucky, and 
he also took part in the pursuit of General Morgan, the Confederate cavalry 
raider, through Indiana and Ohio. On October 20, 1863, he was a par- 
ticipant in the battle of Philadelphia, Tennessee, in which his regiment lost, 
in killed, wounded and missing, one hundred and sixty-eight men. Later 
the regiment served in the campaign in eastern Tennessee and on Novemlier 
15 of that same year, at Holston River, lost one hundred and one men. 
including five officers. In an engagement two davs later, November 17. 
they had a brisk encounter with the forces of General Rongstreet. \u that 
latter engagement Mr. Neer was shot through the lungs and was taken to 
a hospital, being unable to join his regiiuent until after the siege of Knox- 
ville. P'rom Tazewell, Tennessee, he then went with his regiment to Cum- 
berland Gap and thence on to Mt. Sterling, Kentuckv, where he remained 
about a month, in command of a detail left to guard the town; retin-ning 
thence to Tennessee l:)y wa}' of Knoxville, he iinalh' proceeded on with tlie 
regiment to take part in the Atlanta campaign and was present at the siege 
of Atlanta. 

Upon the completion of his military service Mr. Neer returned to hi^ 
home in this county and resumed his place on the home farm. After the 
death of his father, in 1869, he purchased from the other heirs the greater 
l)art of the old homestead and continued to farm the same, gradually adding 
to his land holdings until he now is the owner of six hundred and eighty 
acres of well-improved land. In addition to his general farming Mr. Neer 
for vears gave considerable attention to the raising of high-grade li\e stock 
and did very well. In 1881 he and a party of men w^ent to England and 
Scotland and imported a number of fine horses. Some years ago he retired 
from the farm and moved to Urbana, where he since has made his home. 
Mr. Neer is an ardent Republican and has ever taken a good citizen's interest 
in local political affairs. From 1885 to 1891 he served as a member of the 
lioard of county commissioners and in other ways has contrilnited of jiis 
time and his abilities to the public service. He is vice-president .and a 
member of the l:)oard of directors of the City National Bank of Urbana, is 





FARM HOME AND BARX OF JOHN P. NEER. 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. :^l 

connected with the ]\Ianimoth Furniture Company of that city and is also 
a stockholder and a member of the board of directors of the Urbana Pack- 
ing- Compan}\ 

In 1899 John P. Neer was united in marriage to Ida M. Goble, of 
Brooklyn. New York, a daughter of Ira and Catherine (Burke) Goble, and 
who died on April 5. 191 1. Mr. Neer is a member of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church and for years has been active in church work. He is a member 
of Brand Post No. 98, Grand Army of the Republic, at Urbana. and is now 
serving his fifth term as commander of the same, for years having been 
one of the most active members of the local post of that patriotic order. 



WILLIAM R. WARNOCK. 

The Hon. William R. Warnock. a distinguished veteran of the Civil 
War, former congressman from this district, former state senator, former 
judge of the court of common pleas, former prosecuting attorney for this 
county and for many }ears one of the best-known lawyers in this part of 
the state, now living practically retired at Urbana, was born in that city 
and has lived there all his life. He was born on August 29, 1838, a son 
of the Rev. David and Sarah A. (Hitt) Warnock and a grandson of the 
Rev. Samuel Hitt, who in 1809 had settled on a farm that is now included 
within the corporate limits of Urbana. 

The Rev. David Warnock was a native of Ireland, born on February 
14, 18 10, who came to this country when he was eighteen years of age, in 
1828, and who completed his education at Strongsville Academy, in the 
vicinity of Cleveland, this state. In 1832 he became a member of the Ohio 
Conference of the Methodist Episcopal church and spent the rest of his 
life in the gospel ministry, one of the best-known clergymen of his com- 
munion in Ohio, his long pastorate having included charges at Urbana, 
Bellefontaine, Sidney, Delaware, Circleville. Zanesville, Columbus, Cincin- 
nati and other places. In 1837, at Urbana, he married Sarah A. Hitt, who 
was born there, daughter of the Rev. Samuel Hitt, one of the pioneers of 
Champaign county and a man of large influence in his generation, and ever 
after regarded Urbana as his established home, though the itinerar\- of 
his ministry kept him much of the time in other cities throughout the state. 
The Rev. David Warnock and wife were the parents of nine children. 

\\'illiam R. \Varnock was reared at LTrbana and received his schoolino- 



52 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

in the schools of that city and at Ohio Wesleyan University, from which 
latter institution he was graduated in 1861, in the meantime having taught 
school, devoting his leisure to the study of law. In the summer of 1861, just 
after leaving the university, he recruited a company for service in the Union 
army to put down the rebellion of the Southern states, and in July, 1862, 
was commissioned captain of a company attached to the Ninety-fifth Regi- 
ment, Ohio ^^olunteer Infantry, and a year later was promoted to the rank 
of major. In December, 1864, he was promoted to the rank of lieutenant- 
colonel and was mustered out with that rank in August, 1865. 

Upon the completion of his military service Colonel Warnock returned 
to his home in Urbana and there resumed his law studies, under the precep- 
torship of Judge Corwin, and in May, 1866, was admitted to the bar, imme- 
diately thereafter forming a partnership with George M. Eichelberger and 
engaging in the practice of his profession at Urbana. In the summer of 
1868 he married and established his home at Urbana, which ever since has 
])een his place of residence. In 1872 he was elected prosecuting attorney 
for Champaign coimt}- and in 1876 was elected to represent this district in 
the state Senate. In the fall of 1879 he was elected judge of the court of 
common pleas and by successive re-elections was kept on the bench for ten 
years, or until 1889. In the fall of 1900 Judge Warnock was elected to 
represent this district in Congress and two years later he was re-elected, 
thus serving as congressman from this district from March 4, 1901, to 
March 4, 1905 ; in the meantime, while not engaged in the performance of 
his official duties, continuing the practice of his profession. Since retiring 
from Congress, however. Judge Warnock has been living practically retired 
from professional life, though still often consulted in an advisory capacity 
by his younger confreres of the bar. During the many years of his active 
practice Judge Warnock was connected with many of the important cases 
tried in the courts of this district and the reputation he won at the bar 
entitled him to recognition as one of the ablest lawyers Champaign countv 
has produced during its history of more than a hundred years. Politically, 
Judge Warnock is a Republican; by religious persuasion, a Methodist: and, 
fraternally, is a member of the local post of the Grand Army of the Republic 
and of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion, and is a Scottish Rite Mason, 
one of the few thirty-second degree Masons in Urbana. 

On August 20, 1868, Judge Warnock was united in marriage to Kate 
Murray, of the neighboring county of Clark, and to this union were born 
three children, Clifford, Ann Catherine and Elizabeth. He represented the 
Methodist I"4)isc<i])al conference at Cincinnati, at Chicago, Baltimore, Los 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY. OHIO. 



Angeles and Minneapolis. He is commander of the Loyal Legion, com- 
mander of the department of the Ohio, Grand x\i-my of the Republic, for 
many years, and trustee of the Ohio Wesleyan University for twenty-five 
vears. 



TOHN S. LEEDOM. 



In the historical section of this work there is set out at length an ac- 
ctnmt of the services rendered to this community by the late John S. Lee- 
dom, who has been referred to as probably the most brilliant lawyer Cham- 
paign county has ever produced and whose participation in the public affairs 
of this county, including his service during the period of the Civil War, 
for many years exercised a potent and a wholesome influence upon all phases 
of local activity which his talents touched; so that at the time of his death, 
in the spring of 1899, there was general and sincere mourning throughout 
this entire section of the state. 

John S. Leedom was a native of the old Keystone state, born in Bucks 
county, Pennsylvania. August i, 1825, son of Thomas and Ann (Stockton) 
Leedom, both also natives of Pennsylvania, who were married in that state 
and continued to make their home there until 1828, when they came over 
into Ohio and located on a farm in the neighborhood of St. Paris, in this 
count}-, where the}- established their home and where and at St. Paris they 
spent the remainder of their lives, useful and influential pioneers of that 
section. Thomas Leedom and wife were the parents of seven children. 
Upon his retirement from the farm Thomas Leedom moved to the village 
of St. Paris, where his last days were spent. 

John S. Leedom ^\-as but two or three years of age when his parents 
came to Champaign county and he therefore was a resident of this county 
all of his active life. Reared on a farm in the vicinity of St. Paris, he 
received his early schooling in that village and upon completing' the course 
there liegan teaching school and was thus engaged for several years, mean- 
while pursuing the course of study in the old Springfield Academy; after 
which he entered Indiana State University at Bloomington, Indiana, for 
the purpose of completing his law^ studies, which he had begun under Gen. 
John H. Young at Urbana, and was graduated from the university in the 
earl}- fifties, with the degree of Bachelor of Lav^s. Upon receiving hi 
diploma Mv. Leedom returned to Urbana, where he was admitted to the 
bar and where he engaged in the practice of his profession, in association 



54 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

with General Young ; later forming a partnership with James Taylor and 
upon the dissolution of that partnership became a partner of Jesse Lewis, 
which latter mutually agreeable arrangement continued unbroken until his 
death on April 19, 1899. The story of John S. Leedom's connection with 
the bar of Champaign county and of his services as county attorney and in 
other capacities of a i)ulilic character is given elsewhere in this work, and 
the same therefore need not be enlarged on here, only to say that in all liis 
service to the public and his practice in the courts, this brilliant lawyer ever 
had the common good at heart and his influence ever was exerted on the 
side of the right. During the progress of the Civil War, Mr. Leedom was 
a member of the Home Guard, popularly known at that time as the "Squirrel 
Hunters," and from the very beginning of the struggle between the states 
took an active part in the work of recruiting, influencing many young men 
to go to the front in behalf of the Union cause. Politically, he was a Dem- 
ocrat and for many years was regarded as one of the leaders of that party, 
not only in Champaign county and throughout this immediate section, but 
throughout the state, and his voice in the councils of his party was not 
without weight. 

In October, 1852, at Piciua, this state, John S. Leedom was united in 
marriage to Louisa J. Furrow, born on February 9. 183 1, daughter of Jacob 
and Elizabeth Furrow, and to this union four children were born. Anna 
Lawrence, Elizabeth. Louisa and Charles, of whom Miss Louisa Leedom, 
of LTrbana, is now the only survivor. Anna Lawrence Leedom died in in- 
fancy- and Charles Leedom died at the age of five years. Elizabeth Leedom 
(deceased), who was the wife of Joseph Perkins, had two children, Leedom 
Perkins and one who died in infancv. 



JOSEPH A. HOOLEY 



Joseph A. Hooley, one of Champaign county's progressi\'e farmers and 
the proprietor of a fine farm in Salem township, where he and his famil\- 
are comfortably situated, has been a resident of this county for the past 
fourteen years and during that time has made many friends here. He \\as 
born on a farm in MitTlin county, Pennsylvania, September 2, 1854, a son 
of John C. and Elizabeth (Hartzler) Hooley, both natives of that county, 
who spent all their lives there, earnest and industrious members of the large 
Mennonite connection in that place. John C. Hooley was a substantial 



CHAMPAIGX COUNTY, OHIO. 55 

farmer and a great lover of tine horses, for many years making a specialty 
of raising Percherons. He and his wife were members of the Mennonite 
church and their children were reared in that faith. Mr. and Mrs. Hooley, 
after more than fift}' years of married life, died in the same month in 1893, 
Mrs. Hooley dying on April 8, of that year and her husband on April 26. 
They were the parents of eleven children, of whom the subject of this sketch 
was the tenth in order of birth, the others being as follow : Leah, who married 
Jacob Kauffman and spent her last days in Indiana ; Mar\-, who married 
Jacob Zook and who, as well as her husband, died in Mifflin county; Cath- 
erine, who is still living in that county, widow of Peter King; David H., a 
farmer, who died in Indiana ; Lizzie, who is still living in Milf lin county, 
widow" of D. H. Zook; Rachael, who married E. A. Zook and who, as well 
as her husband, is now deceased; Levi, a retired farmer, now living at Fair- 
view, Michigan; Sarah, unmarried, who is still living on the old home place 
in ]\Iiltlin county; S. M., who is now managing that place, and Fannie, 
iinmarried, who also continues to make her home there. 

Until his marriage, at the age of twenty-six years, to Kate Hooley, 
daughter of David K. and Fannie (Hartzler) Hooley, both deceased, who 
was also born in Alifflin county. Pennsylvania. Joseph A. Hooley made his 
home on the old home farm, a \aluable aid to his father in the labors of the 
same, and after his marriage he set up housekeeping and began farming in 
that county on his own account, remaining there until 1904, when he came 
o\er into Ohio and settled in this county, buying the Jacob A. Yoder farm 
of one hundred acres in Salem township and there establishing his home. 
Since taking possession of that place he has made numerous important 
improvements to the same and now has one of the best-kept farms and pleas- 
antest homes in that neighborhood. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hooley have ten children, namely : L^. S., who is now 
farming at Elverton, Oregon: Christ C, who finished his schooling at 
Goshen, Indiana, married Mrs. Laura ^Villiams and is now farming in the 
neighboring county of Clark ; ^Minnie, who is at home ; Bessie, who com- 
pleted her schooling at Goshen, Indiana, and married Milton King, of Logan 
county, this state; Mary, a teacher, who attended school at Goshen, Indiana, 
for two years after her graduation from the local high school; John, at 
home; Mabel, who was graduated from the Kings Creek high school, took 
a supplementary course at Goshen, Indiana, and taught school for a couple 
of vears; Sarah, at home; Andrew, who was graduated from the Kings 
Creek high school and is now attending college at Colorado Springs, Colo- 
rado, and Timothy, who is at home, engaged in operating the farm for his 



50 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

father. Mr. and Mrs. Hooley have ever been warm advocates of higher 
education and their children have been given exceUent opportunities in that 
direction. The family have taken a proper interest in the general social 
activities of their home community since taking up their residence in tliis 
county and have done their part in promoting movements designed to advance 
the common welfare throughout that part of the county. They are mem- 
bers of the Oak Grove Mennonite church and take an earnest interest in tlie 
various beneficences of the same. 



JOHN FRANCIS BRAND. 

John F. Brand, a native and life-long resident of Champaign county, 
belongs to that group of citizens who do not hold themselves so close to 
the daily round of their duties that they cannot see what is going on around 
them. -Man does not live unto himself alone, and the man. who sees in 
his fellow citizens something of interest, something which they do for the 
good of the community as well as himself, is the man who makes for a 
better citizenship. 

Such a man is John F. Brand. Born in Union township on June i8, 
1848, the son of Major Joseph C. and Lavinia (Talbott) Brand, he has made 
his home in Urbana since he was three years of age. He has been a witness 
to the city's growth for more than half a century and in this growth he has 
borne a prominent part. Beginning with a year's service in the Civil War 
when he was sixteen vears of age. he has been active in business down to 
the present time, a period of fifty-foiu- years. 

His education was secm-ed in the public schools of Url)ana and Urbana 
University. In 1863 — and he was only fifteen years of age at the time — 
he became assistant engineer in the construction of the Atlantic & Great 
Western railroad, now known as the Erie railroad. The following year he 
became clerk in the commissary department of the United States army and 
served in this capacity until July, 1865. During this time he saw service 
in Virginia and Georgia and in a number of other states, .\fter resigning- 
he returned home and began clerking in a dry goods store, but soon became 
associated with his father and brother in the grocery business. But he was 
not satisfied to settle" down to the humdrum career of a grocer at the early 
age of nineteen. 

The vear 1808 found him in Indianapolis, where lie was private secre- 




JOHN F. BRAND. 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 5/ 

tary to the superintendent of the ^lerchants' Union Express Company. A 
year later he returned to his home in Urbana and Ijecame connected with the 
Cificcji and Ga:ccttc in the capacity of bookkeeper and compositor. For ten 
years he remained Avith the paper and during this decade he arose from one 
position to another until he Ijecame local editor and, eventually, business 
manager of the paper. In 1879 he retired froni the newspaper and for a 
few years engaged in the retail grocery trade, with stores at Urbana and 
Rellefontaine. When W. H. Marvin came to Urbana Mr. Brand became 
associated with him in the establishment of a wholesale grocery company. 
The Inisiness was later incorporated as the W. H. Marvin Company and 
Mr. Brand maintained his connection with the company until 1905. He 
still retains a substantial financial interest in the firm and serves on the 
board of directors. 

For many vears Air. Brand had been a stockholder and director in 
the \A>stern Mutual Fire Insurance Company and upon his retirement from 
active service with the Marvin company he became general agent for the 
insurance company. Later he was elected treasurer of the company and in 
19 1 5 was elevated to the presidency. The company has made substantial 
progress since he became connected with it in an official capacity in 1905. 

Mr. Brand has been and still is identified with other commercial enter- 
prises of the city. He is a director in the Champaign National Bank and 
the Urbana Telephone Company. In all his business connections, from his 
boyhood days to the present, he has never failed to bear his part in the life 
of the community about him. He could always be counted on to assist in 
everydiing which was advanced with the idea of bettering his city and his 
countv. In all things he has been a public-spirited citizen, never forgetting 
that we are an interdependent society, not neglecting to give of his time 
and ability to the general welfare of those about him. 

In his desire to live up to the highest standards of modern society he 
has not neglected the fraternal, social or religious factors of our life. He 
is a member of the Masonic order, a past master of the local lodge, past 
eminent commander of the commandery, and a meml)er of the Scottish 
Rite of the thirty-second degree. He is a member of Grace Methodist 
I^piscopal church and has been a member of its official board for more than 
thirty years. 

Mr. Brand was married on December i, 1870, to Fannie E. Patrick, a 
daughter of Evan B. Patrick. To this union have been born four children. 
Charles, Elizabeth, Ella and Joseph E. 

Charles, the eldest son, was born November i, 1871, and was educated 



58 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

in tlie local schdols and later attended Ohio Wesleyan University at Dela- 
ware. While attendino- high school he managed a fruit business of his 
own (luring the summer time and evinced unusual business qualifications 
for a bo}- of his age. After leaving college he engaged in the grocery busi- 
ness at Richwood. Ohio, f(jr a time and later became connected witli the 
\V. li. Afarvin C'ompau}- as a bu)-er and salesman. He has now retired 
from active service with the companv, but still retains a financial interest 
in it. b'or a number of years he has engaged in farming in the county on 
an e\tensi\e scale, and now owns and controls one thousand acres of land 
in the countA'. He is one of the largest farmers in the county and gives 
hi> personal attention to all of the details connected with his extensive agri- 
cultural interests. Jle was married on November 28, 1894. to Louisa J. 
X'ance, daughter of Major A. V. A'ance. 

Joseph 1"., the youngest son, was born July 5. 1888, and educated in 
the ])ublic schools and Url)ana University. In ic)05 he went to New York 
('it\- and engaged in a w^holesale grocery and Ijrokerage business for a short 
time and later located in Chicago, where he was similarly engaged until 
Kioo. He then returned to Urbana and became secretary of the W. H. 
Marvin Comi)any, in which capacity he is still serving. He was married 
on .\l;i\- 22, TQi :;, to Helen l^ucher. daughter of John E. Bucher. 



L. E. BROWN. 



E. E. Brown, familiarly known to his friends b}- his middle name, 
Eugene, one of the editors and proprietors of the St. Paris Xc-a's-fJis/^alcli 
and a partner with W. W. Wiant in the publication of that newspaper, is a 
native son of Champaign county and has lived here all his life. He was 
born on a farm in Johnson township, a little more than two miles northw^est 
of St. Paris, October 11, 1874, a son of A. J. and Alice (Jackson) Brown, 
the former of whom was born on that same farm and the latter in tlie state 
of Indiana, whose last days were spent on the old home place in Johnson 
to\vnship that had been settled by Eugene Brown's grandfather back in the 
earlv thirties and which is still in the possession of the family. 

A. J. Brown was born on that pioneer farm on November 21, 1837, 
and was the son of John and Nancy Brown, of German stock, who came 
up into this county from Montgomery county, they ha\ing pre\iously been 
located for awhile in the Davton neighborhood, and established their home 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 59 

in Johnson township, not far from the Miami count)- line, in the early 
thirties. They were of the Lutheran faith and their children were instructed 
in the tenets of the same. There were fifteen of these children, of whom the 
father of the subject of this sketch was the tenth in order of birth. A. T- 
Crown grew up on the paternal farm in Johnson township and after his 
marriage established his home there and there he and his wife spent their 
last days. His wife was Alice Jackson, who was born in Benton count}', 
Indiana, July 8, 1846, daughter of Abraham and Susanna Jackson, both of 
English stock, who had moved from New Jersey to Indiana and in the latter 
state died when their daughter, Alice, was but a child. The latter, thus 
orphaned, came to Ohio to join kinsfolk in this county and grew to woman- 
hood in Jackson township, where she was living at the time of her mar- 
riage to Mr. Brown, February 25, 1869. After their marriage they took 
up their residence on the Brown farm and there established a fine home, 
for many years being regarded as among the leaders in all good works in 
that part of the county. Mr. Brown was a Democrat and took an active 
part in local political afi:airs and became an influential citizen. He died on 
Alay 20, 1916, in the seventy-ninth year of his age. His wife had pre- 
ceded him a little more than five years, her death having occurred on Janu- 
arv 22, 1911, she then being in the sixty-fifth year of her age. They were 
the parents of seven children, five of whom are living, namely : b^-ank, of 
St. Paris; Eugene, the subject of this sketch; Clement, who is engaged in 
the seed and grain business at St. Paris ; Ross, who is lixing on and oi)er- 
ating; the old home place in Johnson township, and Zella, who is li\'ing at 
Indianapolis, Indiana. 

Eugene Bi"own was reared on the home farm, receix'ing his element- 
ary education in the district school in the nieghborhood of that place and 
sup]jlemented the same by a course in the St. Paris high school from which 
he Avas graduated in 1893. He prepared himself for teaching, but did not 
follow that vocation : instead, taking a position as a clerk in a grocery and 
drug store at St. Paris' and was thus engaged until the year iC)Oi, when he 
and \y. W'. Wiant formed a partnership and engaged in the job-printing 
business at St. Louis. After the consolidation of the Nc-:cs and the Dishafch 
[Messrs. Brown and Wiant felt that there would be room for another paper 
at St. Paris and in 1906 they established the Press. Two years later, in 
1909, they took over the Au-K's-Dispafch and have since conducted that news- 
paper, which is widely circulated through(^ut the eastern part of the county 
and in those sections of the neighboring counties of Miami and Clark, within 
a trading radius of St. Paris. They have made important additions t(; the 



6o CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

efjuipnient of the printing plant since purchasing the newspaper and ha\e 
one of the hest-eqnipped newspapers and job-printing estabhshments in this 
part of the state. Mr. Brown is a Democrat and has served as a memljer 
of the St. Paris school board. 

On September 17, 1902. Eugene Brown was united in marriage to 
Anna Jones, daughter of William and Mary (McMorran) Jones, and to 
this union has l)een born one child, a daughter, Genevieve A. Mr. and Mrs. 
Brown are members oi the Baptist church and take a proper part in church 
\\<vrk, as well as in the general social activities of their home town, helpful 
in atlvancing all worthy causes there. Mr. Brown is a member of St. Paris 
Podge No. 344, Knights of Pvthias, and is past chancellor commander of 
the same. 



GWVX T. GORDON. 



Gwyn T. Gordon, of L^rbana, one of Champaign county's most sub- 
stantial land(Avners, was l)orn at Ghillicothe, this state, March 17, 1855, son 
and onl}- child of Rufus Hartley and Nancy (Tompkins) Gordon, the for- 
mer of whom was Ijorn in Ross county, this state, not far from Ghillicothe, 
and ihe latter in Pexington. Kentucky, and the former of whom is still 
lix'ing, now a resident of the state oi Texas. 

Rufus Hartley Gordon grew to manhood in his home ccnmty, receiving 
his schooling there, and early entered upon a mercantile career, beginning 
as a clerk in a hardware store, but shortly becoming interested in the tirm 
and after some vears of business activity in this state moved to St. Joseph, 
Missouri, where he became engaged in business in that same line, as a mem- 
ber of the W. .\1. \\'vatt Hardware Compan\-, and was thus engaged until 
his retirement from business some vears ago. He is now making his home 
at Palestine, Texas, at a ripe old age. 

( iw\n T. Gordon was but a child when his father moved from this 
slate to St. Joseph, Missouri, and in the latter citv he grew to manhood, re- 
cei\iiig his schooling in the schools of that cit\', and early became familiar 
witli the details of the hardware business in his father's store and after 
awhile engaged in the hardware business on his own account in Nebraska, 
later mo\ ing to Kansas and after some years of business activity in the 
latter state went l^ast and was engaged in business in Connecticut until 
1894, in which year be returned to his native state and located at Urbana, 
where he lias since resided, engaged in the management of several fine pieces 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 6l 

of farm propert}- he has acquired in the neighboring counties of Union and 
Logan. 

()n October 26, 1881. Gwyn T. Gordon was united in marriage to Mary 
H. Blickensderfer, who was born near Erie, Pennsylvania, daughter of 
Nathan and Mary Catherine (Canheld) Bhckensderfer. and to this union 
one child was born, a daughter, Elizabeth, who married Eoster Twichell and 
died in 19 14, leaving one child, a daughter. Mary, who is now^ living with her 
maternal grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Gordon. The Gordons have a verv 
pleasant home at Urbana and take a proper interest in the general social 
activities of that city. They are members of the Episcopal church and take 
a warm interest in church work and in other local good works. 



F. A. PENCE. 



B. E. A. Pence, one of Champaign county's best-known and most sub- 
stantial farmers and stockmen and the proprietor of the celebrated "Shade- 
land Stock Earm" in Jackson township, two and one-half miles southwest 
of St. Paris, on the Carlisle and Ouincy road, is a native son of Champaign 
county and has lived here all his life. He was born on a pioneer farm in 
Johnson township, in the house in which his father also was born, July 17, 
1845, son of Allen and Sarah R. (Riker) Pence, who were for years regarded 
as among the leaders in that part of the county. 

Allen Pence was born on a pioneer farm, the place now o\\ ned b}- B. E. 
Pence, three miles east of St. Paris, January 29. 18 19, a son of Isaac Pence 
and wife, the latter of whom was a Wiant, who came to this county frcjm 
Virginia in the early days of the settlement of this section of Ohio and here 
spent their last days, useful and influential pioneers of Johnson township. 
Isaac Pence was twice married and by iiis first wife had six children, Alex- 
ander, Allen, Isaiah, Emanuel, Eliza and Mary, all now deceased. After 
the death of the mother of these children he married Martha Brown and 
to that union were born seven children, B. E., James E., John E., Isaac. 
Charles, Jason and Jennie. Reared on the farm on which he was born, 
Allen Pence was from the da}s of his boyhood well trained in the ways of 
farming, and after his marriage to Sarah R. Riker continued to make his 
liome on the old home place for several years, at the end of which time he 
moved to a farm one-half mile south of St. Paris, established his home there 
and there spent the remainder of his life, coming to be regarded as the fore- 



62 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

most citizen of that neighborhood, the owner of seven hundred acres of 
land and a leader in all public movements. He v^^as one of the first agita- 
tors in behalf of better roads in that part of Champaign county and the early 
gravel-road movement had a powerful champion in him. For nine years 
he was a member of the County Fair board, vice-president of the associa- 
tion for some time, and did much to promote the interests of agriculture in 
this county. Politically, he was a Democrat and for some time served as 
treasurer of his home township. He died on October 29, 1895, and is 
buried in the Spring Grove cemetery, the beautiful burial ground, the loca- 
tion of which was first proposed b}' his wife, who died in 1885, and is 
also buried there. Allen Pence and wife were the i)arents of eight children, 
six of whom are still living, those l)esides the subject of this sketch being 
George W., a farmer in Jackson township; \Vinfield S., now a resident of 
Virginia; Elizabeth, wife of J. C. Martin, of Dayton, Ohio; Amanda, widow 
of J. G. Lear Smith, of St. Paris, and Lottie, wife of Wilson Baker, of 
Urbana. The two deceased members of this family were Alary, who mar- 
ried James Wiant, and Elnora, who was the wife of T. P. Kite. 

B. F. A. Pence was about three years of age when his parents moved 
from the old Pence place in Johnson township to the farm on the outskirts 
of St. Paris, and on this latter place he grew to manhood, receiving his 
schooling in the village schools. From the days of his boyhood he was an 
active assistant in the labors of the farm and early became not only a good 
farmer, but an excellent judge of live stock and an intelligent fancier of 
good horses. He remained on the home farm until after his marriage in 
the summer of 1867, he then being somewhat under twenty-two years of 
age, and on March 10, 1868. moved onto the farm on which he is now liv- 
ing — beautiful "Shadeland Stock Farm." southwest of St. l^aris, and has 
ever since made his home there, he and his family being pleasantly and com- 
fortably situated. Mr. Pence is the owner of three hundred and twenty- 
eight acres of splendid land and has one of the best farm plants in the south- 
western part of the county. He has long given his particular attention to 
the raising of fine live stock, with particular reference to fine horses and 
made two trijis to Europe for stock to import to his farm. English Shires 
and Cleveland Bays being his specialty. As was his father,' Mr. Pence ever 
has been an ardent champion of public improvements and has done much to 
help promote the material development of the county. He was one of the 
organizers of the First National Bank of St. Paris and is also a stockholder 
in the Central National Bank of that place. Politically, Mr. Pence is a 
Democrat and is now serving as trustee of his home township. 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY. OHIO. 63 

On June 12, 1867, B. F. A. Pence was united in niarriage to Josephine 
R. Hill, who was born in Brown township, in the neighboring- countv of 
Miami, July 12, 1848, daughter of John and Hannah Hill, and to this union 
four children have been born, two of whom died in infancy, the others being 
Georgia M., who studied art in the Ohio W'esleyan College at Delaware, 
and is now the wife of George Cox, of Oberlin, this state, and Blanche E., 
also an artist, who has done some fine wood carving and who is at home 
with her parents. The Fences have a very pleasant home at "Shadeland" 
and have ever given their proper attention to the general social and cultural 
activities of the community in which they live, helpful in many ways in pro- 
moting" movements having to do with tlie advancement of the common wel- 
fare thereabout. 



AMLLFVM W. LOVETT. 



^^'il]iam \A'. Fovett. a well-known farmer and the owner of tighty 
acres of prime land, living in Adams township. Champaign county, was born 
in that township on Mrx 24. 1871. He is the son of Joshua and Mary A. 
( Calland ) LoA-ett. the former of whom was born in Adams township and 
iiis wife, who is the daughter of Joseph Calland. was also Ijorn in Adams 
U iwnship. Joshua Lovett was a son of Isaac Lovett. 

Joshua Fovett and his wife settled on a farm in .Vdams township, 
where he farmed in a general way for many years and there the}- spent the 
rest of their lives, worthy citizens, respected by alFwho knew them. They 
were active members of the Cnited Brethren church and earnestly inter- 
ested in all its good works. He was a Republican in politics, but had never 
been a seeker after office. Joshua Fovett was the father of the following- 
children: ^\'illiam \V., the subject of this sketch; Samuel K.. a farmer 
li\ing in Fogan county. Ohio; Watson, also of Fogan county; Joseph, of 
Fogan county; Jennie, wife of Charles Rosier, living in Shelby count}'. 
Ohio, and Minnie, wife of Charles Reeder, of this township. 

William W. Fovett attended the district schools of his home neighbor- 
hood and worked on his father's farm until he was twenty-one years old. 
Two years later, on October 4. 1894, he was united in marriage to Faura 
Miller, who was born in Adams township in 1876; she is the daughter of 
John and Eliza Miller and was educated in the district schools antl in Jack- 
son Center schools. Air. and Mrs. Foxett are the parents of two children. 
Atta, who was graduated from the Rosewood high school, and Jessie. The 



64 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY. OHIO. 

Lovett family are members of the Christian church at Careysville, Ohio, Mr. 
l.ovett being- one of the trustee meml)ers of the official board, and he and 
his wife and children are warmly interested in all good works of the church 
and neighborhood. 

Mr. Lovett is a stanch supp<n-ter of the Republican party. His party 
elected him justice of the peace in and for Adams township, in which office 
he served for four years. He is interested in the cause of education and 
served as a member of the school board for some time. He is a member 
of Rosewood Lodge No. 253, Independent Order of Foresters, and takes 
much interest in the affairs of that organization. Lie has a business inter- 
est in the feed mill and store at Careysville, Ohio, and was actively connected 
with the store at Careysville, Ohio, for six years, and in all these interests, 
as well as in the general affairs of the commmiity. he gives of his time and 
energy without stint. 



DENNIS T. SWEENEY. 



One of the most promising of the skilled artisans and mechanics of 
Urbana during- the past generation was the late Dennis J. Sweeney, a 
plumber l)y trade. He was born at Covington, Ohio, October 8, 1872. He 
was a son of John and Julia Sweeney, both natives of Ireland, from which 
country they immigrated to the United States when young and they w^ere 
married in this country. They subsequently moved to Darke county, Ohio, 
where they established the family home and lived until 1881, when they 
removed to Picjua, this state, spending the rest of their lives there. They 
had a large family, Dennis J. of this memoir, being the second in order of 
birth. 

Dennis J. Sweenev grew to manhood in Piqua and there attended tlie 
])u])lic schools, and when a young man he took up the plumber's trade, at 
A\hich he became an expert. AVhen twenty-one years old he located at 
(ireenville. Ohio, where he followed the plumbing business three years with 
success. Seeking a larger field, for the exercise of his talents, he came to 
Urbana in 1896 and was employed in the plumbing trade by a Mr. Stein- 
barger until 1902, giving his employer loyal, prompt and satisfactory service 
in every respect. He saved his earnings and upon severing his connection 
with Mr. Steinbarger he engaged in the ]ilumbing business for himself, 
which was successful from the start. He built up one of the largest plumb- 
ing estal)lishments c\-er known in L'rlian.-i. He carried a full line of up-to- 




DENNIS J. SWEENEY. 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 65 

(late ]iluinl)ing material and ec|uipnient and maintained a large and modern 
shop, where all kinds of repair work in this line were promptly and skillfully 
d(jne. He took many large contracts and turned out some big' jobs, doing- 
the ])lnmbing work on many of the best modern homes and business blocks 
and public buildings in L'rbana and other parts of Champaign county. 

Mr. Sweeiie}- was married in 1893 to Flora Conrad, a daughter of 
Silas S. and Kesiah ( Barns ) Conrad. To this union iive children were 
born, namely: Rhea, Margaret, Harold. Owen, and Denise. They are all 
single and live at home with their mother. 

Mr. Sweeney was a meml^er of the Knights of Columbus and the 
.\ncient Order of Hibernians. He was an independent voter. He belonged 
to the Catholic church at Urbana. in which he was a trustee and active in 
church affairs. 



T. T. ^HDDLETOX. 



J. T. Middleton, a former teacher in the schools of St. Paris and since 
1914 assistant cashier of the First NaticMial Bank of that city, is a native 
of Champaign countv and has lived here all his life. He was born in the 
city of Urbana on December i, 1884, son of .\rthur X. and Allie L. (Tay- 
lor) Middleton, the latter of whom is still living at St. Paris. 

Arthur N. Middleton was born on a pioneer farm near the village of 
Cable, in Wayne township, this countv, son of John and Mary (Macomber) 
Middleton, who came to this state from Kentucky and were among the 
l)ioneers of the eastern part of this county. He grew to manhood on the 
farm there and as a }Oung- man was for some years engaged in teaching- 
school, in the meantime giving his leisure to the reading of law and after 
his marriage began the practice of law in Urbana and was thus engaged at 
tliat place until his death on December 23. 1889. His widow, who still sur- 
Aives him, was Allie L. Taylor, born on a farm in Mad River township, 
this county, June 2, 1861, daughter of Darius and Barbara (Zimmerman) 
Taylor, the former of whom was born on that same farm, son of Benjamin 
and Sarah Taylor, who came to this county from Virginia, driving through 
in a covered wagon, and settled on the farm in Mad River township, where 
Mrs. Middleton was l)orn. She later married D. E. Kite, of St. Paris. Her 
n-iother, Barbara Zinimern-ian, also was born in that township, a daughter 
of John and Barbara ( Costenborder ) Zimmerman, the fonner of whom also 
CSa) 



66 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

was born in Mad River township, the son of German parents, and the hitter 
of whom was but three years of age when she came to this county from 
Germany with her parents, the family coming to this county and setthng 
in Mad River township. To Arthur X. Middleton and wife four clhkh-cn 
were born, of whom the subject of this sketch was the third in order of 
l)irtli, the others l)eing as follow: Lulu, who died at the age of six years: 
Blanche M., wife of L. D. Ward, of Mad River township, this county, and 
Henry A. Middleton, the latter of whom is now a student in the School of 
Theology of the Boston University. Henry A. Middleton was graduated 
from the Cable high school, in the meantime having given his serious atten- 
tion to the study of law, and then entered the Ohio State University, where 
he continued his law studies and was afterward engaged in the practice of 
his profession at Columbus for three years, at the end of which time he 
decided to take up the gospel ministry and with that end in \iew entered 
the School of Theology of the Boston University, where he is now ])ursu- 
ing his studies to that end. He married Myrtle jolinson. of Wayne town- 
ship, this county. 

J. T. Middleton was 1)ut five years of age when his father died and 
he was reared on a farm in Mad River township. com])leting his studies in 
the high school at West\ille. When little more than a boy he began teach- 
ing school in the district schools of Johnson township and was thus engaged 
there for four vears. He then, when twenty-one years of age. was engaged 
as a teacher in the graded schools of St. Paris and has since made his home 
in that citw After teaching tliere for five years and six months liis services 
were engaged as a bookkeeper in the h^irst National Bank of St. I'aris, and 
he began his connection w ith that bank in December, 1913. A year later he 
was made assistant cashier of the bank and has since been ser\'ing in that 
capacity. Mr. Middleton is a Republican, and takes an active interest In 
political afi'airs. 

( )n March 31. \()0(^. ]. T. Middleton was united in marriage to Hazel 
.\. Adlard. who was born at P.ellefontaine, this state, daughter of William 
and Clara ( Stinson ) Adlard. but wlio s])ent lier girlhood in .Mad Ri\er 
townsliip, tliis countw where her father was engaged in the milling busi- 
ness. To tliis union li\e cliildren ha\e been ])orn, naniel\- : William A.. 
John. Geoi-gf K., Clara b:iizabeth and Richard 11. .Mr. and Mrs. Middle- 
ton are members of the JMrst Baptist church and take a proper part in 
cliurcb work, as well as in the general social activities of their home town. 
Mr. Middleton is past chancellor commander of St. Paris Lodge Xo. 344. 
Knights of R\tliia^. and has also ser\-ed as county (lei)uty and as lodge 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY. OHIO. 0/ 

deputy in that order. He is also past noble grand of St. Paris Lodge Xo. 
J46, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and a member of the Knights of 
ivhorassan, and in the affairs of these several organizations takes a warm 
interest. 



CHARLES H. GANSON. 



Tlie history of Urbana would not be complete without mention of the 
late Charles H. Ganson. whose life was closely connected with many phases 
of the county's life for a long period of years. He was honored and respect- 
ed by everyone who knew him, and was recognized as a leader in every 
enterprise to which he directed his attention. His every effort was in the 
direction of better citizenship and whatever he did was done with a view to 
the improvement of the general welfare of the county honored by his resi- 
dence. 

Charles H. Ganson was 'born at Urbana on October ic^, 1836. and died 
in that city on October 9. 1916, he then lacking but ten days of being eighty 
years of age. He was a son of William H. and Amulette F. (Toxey) Gan- 
son, both of whom were natives of Pennsylvania, he of Chester county and 
she of Lancaster county. William H. Ganson was married in Pennsylvania 
and a year later he and his wife made the long overland journey to Urbana. 
where they spent the remainder of their lives, with the exception of four 
}-ears spent on a farm in this county. William H. (ianson for a time after 
coming to this county was engaged in farming, but later turned his attention 
to carriage Ijuilding in Urbana. During the Civil War he was a Democrai, 
but afterward he aligned himself with the Republican party. He and his 
wife were members of the Reformed Presbyterian church. ller death 
occurred in 1847 ^^^^^ ^^^ survived her more than thirty years, his death 
occurring in 1881. They were the parents of ti\e children, namely: Charles 
H., the subject of this review: William \l., a resident of tlie state of Illinois; 
Benjamin, living in Urbana; Anna E.. also a resident of Url)ana, widow of 
Horace Happersett. and Emma, also a resident of Urbana, widow of Alatliew 
Weaver. 

Charles H. Ganson was reared in L'rbana and on ihe farm wliere his 
[larents lived for four vears. He was gi\en the best education the local 
schools afforded and remained at home until he nioxt'd to Mason county. 
Illinois, at the age of twenty. .\ \ear later he was elected justice of the 
peace and became a leader in the life of the communit}' in which he located. 



68 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY. OHIO. 

PTe remained in the West for ten years, being engaged in farming most of 
that time. In [866 he returned to the city of his liirth and joined his father 
in l)usiness. Major Thomas McConnell being his partner for tliirty years. 
He was also associated with his brother. B. ¥. Ganson, at chtTerent times 
and was a member of the firm of C. H. Ganson & Company at tlie time of 
his death in 1916. 

Mr. Ganson's most aljsorbing interest was agricuhnre and he grachia!!}- 
acquired extensi\e land holdings in Ohio and Illinois: l)ut to whatever enter- 
prise he gave his attention, he always gave it his individual attention. Thu^ 
he became known as one of the leaders in financial circles in the county, not 
only because of his keen discernment and indefatigable industry, but also 
l)ecause of his honorable methods of handling wide interests. He pro\ed 
his deep interest in agricultural affairs by freely giving his services ; for 
lorty years as president of the Champaign County Agricultural Society, f > ir 
ten years as president of the Mad River and Miami Fair Circuit and as 
vice-president and later as president of the Ohio State Board of Agricul- 
ture. In his ofiicial position as the head of these organizations. Mr. Ganson 
did everything in his power to stimulate agricultural affairs. Nor was Mr. 
Ganson's life solely devoted to his private affairs. He took an interested 
and active part in the public life oi the city of his 1)irth. Politically, he was 
a Republican and ser\-ed his party and liis city as a member of the city 
council for a number of years. While he made an en\iable record during 
his five years on the city council, it was as mayor of the city of L'rbana that 
he left a reputation for service that has never been excelled in the city, h'or 
sixteen years he was at the head of the city's affairs. He served for a num- 
ber of years and then, after an inter\al of two years, was re-elected and con- 
tinued in office until 1898. retiring from office with the confidence and good 
will of the entire community. 

On October 8. 1856. Charles H. Ganson was united in marriage to 
Jane Rewalt, of Canton, Illinois, a daughter of Major Jonas and Oieda 
(Robins) Rewalt. natives, respectively, of Pennsylvania and of Indiana, who 
were married in Indiana while it still was under a territorial form of gov- 
ernment and later mo\ed to Illinois. Major Rewalt served in the l>lack 
Hawk War during the forties and during the Civil War served with the 
Seventh Illinois Cavalry. He came of fighting stock, his ancestors having 
fought in the Revolutionary War and in the War of 181 2. Major Kewalt 
served in the Legislature of Illinois during the time Abraham Pincoln was 
a member of that body and was otherwise actixe in county and state afl'airs 
in that state. Originally a Whig, after the formation of the l\ei)ublican 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 69 

party. lie gave his allegiance to the new party. He died on December 22. 
1882. His wife had preceded him {o the grave, her death occurring in 
Octol^er, 1878. 

To Charles H. and Jane (Rewalt) Ganson two children were born, 
Emma Amulette and Jonas Randolph, both of whom are li\ing, the former 
the wife of Theodore \\\ Cook, a retired banker, who for thirty years was 
connected with the Society for Savings at Cleveland, Ohio. Theodore \\'. 
Cook was born and educated in Cleveland, a son of Rev. Charles A. Cook. 
Air. and Mrs. Cook have three sons, Charles Ganson. Theodore Kenyon and 
Robert, all of whom are now { 1917) in college. Charles Ganson Cook is a 
student at Harvard, wdiere he is hnishing the work preparatory to taking a 
doctor's degree. He received his Bachelor of Arts degree at Western Re- 
serve University, while Robert Cook is taking his first-year work at the Uni- 
versity of Michigan, at Ann Arbor. Jonas Randolph Ganson, only son of 
Charles H. Ganson and wife, was educated at the University of Urbana and 
for nineteen years has been connected with the Society for Savings at Cleve- 
land. He married Clara Shumway, which union has been without issue. 
In closing this sketch of Charles H. Ganson, it should be added that he was 
an ardent Swedenborgian and gave as generously of his time to his church 
service as to civic affairs, and also was for fourteen years a trustee and 
tieasurer of the Urbana University schools. 



SAMUEL CLEM. 



Samuel Clem, one of Salem township's best-known and most substan- 
tial farmers, is a native son of Champaign county and has lived here all his 
life. He was born on the farm one-half mile south of where he now lives, a 
part of the large estate his father accumulated there, January 24. 1879, son 
of David and Romelia ( Peery ) Clem, the former of whom was born in this 
county and the latter in the state of Virginia, who are now li\'ing retired 
in Urbana. 

David Clem was born on a pioneer farm in Johnson township, this 
county. September 30, 1836, .son of Isaac and Rebecca (Crabill) Clem, who 
came to this county from Virginia in 1829 and settled on a farm in Johnson 
township, where they remained until 1853, when they mo\ed to a farm west 
of St. Paris, where they spent the remainder of their lives. Isaac Clem was 
a .son of Da\id Clem, who was born in Virginia, son of a German immi- 



70 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

grant who came to this country in the latter part of the eighteenth century. 
The second David Clem grew up in Johnson township, receiving- his school- 
ing in the local schools and after farming- for awhile took up the shoemaker's 
trade and for six years was engaged in that trade in St. Paris. He then 
Ijuught a farm near Millerstown, in Johnson township and ahout a year 
later bought a hundred-acre farm lying in Johnson and Adams townships, 
where he remained for four 3'ears, at the end of which time he sold out and 
moved to Missouri and bought a farm in Davis county, that state. Not find- 
ing conditions to his liking there he sold out and returned to Champaign 
county and Ijought a farm of one hundred and thirty-five acres in Urbana 
township, five years later buying a farm of three hundred acres in Salem 
township, where he established his home. .\s he pros])ered in his affairs 
he added to his land holdings until he became the owner of over one thou- 
sand acres of land, continuing his active operations until his retirement and 
removal to Urbana, where he and his wife are now living. In 1876 David 
Clem was united in marriage to Romelia Peery, who was born In Virginia, 
daughter of George and Margaret (Hensley) Peery, and to this union six 
children were born, those besides the subject of this sketch being Joseph, 
Pearl, Ivan, Blanche and Grace, the latter of whom died in infancy. 

Reared on the home farm in Salem township, Samuel Clem was edu- 
cated in the public schools and supplemented the same by a course in the 
Lima Business College, after which he returned home and renewed his 
farming operatic -ns in association with his father. After his marriage in 
191 1 his father set off to him one hundred and sixty-six acres of the home 
place and there he established his home and has continued to reside, being 
the proprietcn- of one of the best-kept and most profitably cultivated farms 
in that neighborhood. In addition to his general farming Mr. Clem feeds 
about fifty head of hogs annually and is doing very well in his operations. 
His farming is carried on along modern lines and his place is equipped with 
up-to-date appliances for the most successful agriculture. Mr. Clem is a 
Democrat and takes a proper interest in local political affairs, but has not 
))een a seeker after public office. 

In 191 I 'Samuel Clem was united in marriage to Morence Lackey, who 
was born in Virginia, daughter of Horatio Lackey and wife, who came 
from that state to this county and settled on a farm, and to this union three 
children have been born, Lucile, Melvin H. and a baby boy. Mr. and Mrs. 
Clem ha\'e a pleasant home and take an interested part in the general social 
activities of the comniunitv in which thev reside. 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY. OHIO. 



\\'. L. HUNT. 



71 



\\'. L. Hunt, cashier and a member of the board of directors of the 
First National Bank of St. Paris, this county, is a native son of Champaign 
county and has Hved here all his life, with the exception of about two years 
spent in Chicago, where he gained his initial experience in the banking- 
business. He was born in the village of Carysville, in Adams township, 
this county, September 11, 1877, •''O" of Dr. H. B. and Mary J. (Leedom; 
Hunt, both of whom were born in the neighboring county of Shelby and 
who are now living at St. Paris, which has l)een their place of residence 
since 1892. 

Dr. H. B. Hunt, one of the best-known physicians in the western part 
of this county, was born on a farm south of the \'illage of Palestine, in 
Shelby cotmty, this state, November 18, 1846, son of Justus T. Hunt and 
wife, who had come to Ohio from Connecticut in pioneer da}'s, first locat- 
ing in Butler county and coming thence on up into this part of the state 
and settling in the Palestine neighborhood in Shelby county, where they 
spent the remainder of their lives. There PI. B. Hunt grew to manhood. 
He early turned his attention to the reading of medicine and in due time 
entered the Cincinnati ^ledical College, from which he was graduated in 
1874. In that same year he married Mary J. Leedom, who was born at 
I'nlestine on April 19, 1850, daughter of Dr. J. J. and Mary Jane (John- 
s<in) Leedom, who had come to this state from Bucks county, Penns}l- 
\'ania. settling at Palestine, where iov years Doctor Leedom was engaged 
in the practice of his profession, a typical practitioner of the "old school," 
and the first of the Leedoms of that line to settle in this part of Ohio. Upon 
receiving his diploma. Doctor Hunt came over into Champaign count}- and 
opened an ofifice for the practice of his profession at Carysville, in which 
\illc!ge he established his home and where he remained until 1892, in which 
Acar he moved to St. Paris, where he and his wife are now living. The 
Doctor is a Republican, and ever since he came to this county has taken an 
earnest interest in local political affairs. He is past noble grand of the Odd 
i-^ellow lodge at St. Paris and takes a warm interest in the affairs of that 
organization. Doctor and Mrs. Hunt have two sons, the subject of this 
sketch having a brother. Dr. V. W. Hunt, a dentist, of Picjua, this state. 

Upon completing the course in the schools at Carysville, W. L. Hunt 
entered the Ohio State University and was there two years. He taught 
school in this county for three years and then went to Chicago, where he 



y2 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

worked as a clerk in the Continental and Commercial National Bank of that 
city and was thus engaged there for eighteen months, at the end of which 
time he returned to St. Paris and hecame a clerk in the b'irst National Bank 
of that city, with which institution he ever since has l)een connected. Some 
time after entering that hank he was ]>romoted to the position of assistant 
cashier and held that position for ten years, or until in January, 1914, when 
he was elected cashier of the Ijank and has since then l)een serving in that 
capacity. Mr. Hunt is also a memher of the Ijoard of directors of the hank 
and has for years gixen his attention to the affairs of the same. The hirst 
National Bank of St. Paris was organized in 1880 and renewed its charter 
in 1900. Its present officers are as follow: President, I. P. Kiser; vice- 
president, Frederk Black ; cashier, W. P. Hunt : assistant cashier, P T. 
Middleton, and the board of directors, in addition to the above-named olti- 
cers, include Miles Bodey. of St. Paris; J. W. Birkhold. of Rosewood, and 
J. ^ . Kiser, Jr., of Chicago. 

On November 28, 1901, W. P. Hunt was united in marriage to T^lma 
Kizer, daughter of I. P. and Asenath ( Cary ) Kizer, and to this union one 
child has been born, a daughter, Pauline L. Mr. and Mrs. Hunt have a very 
pleasant home at St. Paris and take an interested i)art in the social acti\i- 
ties of the cilv, helpful in promoting all worthy causes. Mr. Hunt is a 
Republican and gives a good citizen's attention to local political affairs, l)ut 
has not been a seeker after public office. 



MRS. S.\RAH A. BOWERS. 

-Mrs. Sarah .\. Bowers, one of Urbana's oldest and best-known resi- 
dents and widow of George \V. Bo\\ers, was born in that city on July 20. 
1840, a daughter of James M. and Christina (German) Steward, natives 
of Pennsylvania, who located at Urbana in 1838 or 1839 and there spent 
their last davs. James AI. Steward was a saddler and harness-maker by 
trade and upon locating at Url)ana worked at that trade for some time, 
later I)ecoming employed as a carriage-trimmer in the carriage shop of 
\Yarren & Gaumer and was thus engaged until his death, one of the best- 
known residents of that city. He was a member of the Lutheran clun-ch 
and his wife was a Methodist. They were the parents of seven children, of 
whom Mrs. Bowers was the third in order of birth, the others being as 
follow: James (i., now deceased, who was a building- contractor at Urbana 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY. OlIKl 



73 



and was later eiigageil in the '^ame line in Cohjrado and Kansas: Alar\ }.. 
also now deceased, who marrietl Conrad Marshall and moved from Urbana 
to Illinois and thence to Kansas: Daniel A\\ Steward, a well-known veteran 
»)f the ("i\il War and a carpenter at Urlxma. who married Snsan Skvles: 
Kate E.. widow <if John Wood, of Kansas, she being now a resident of 
Chicago ; William Steward, a \ eteran of the Civil War. now living retired 
at Urbana. who married Martha Ta\lor. and Charles Steward, a carriage- 
trimmer, now living at l"le\eland. this state. 

Sarah A. Steward received her schooling in the schools of Urbana and 
for four years after completing her schooling was engaged in teaching- 
school. In the meantime her eldest brother, James C Steward, had gone 
to Colorado and tipon the death of his wife there he sent for his sister Sarah 
to come out and take care of his children. It was while she was living th.ere 
that she met ( icorge W. iJowers. a veteran of the Civil War. whom she 
marrietl in that state, March J8, 1882. George W. Howers was born at 
I.ewisburg, Xorthumberland county. I'ennsvlvania. Septeml)er 25. 1836. a 
son of William and Hester liowers. both natives of that same county. 
William liowers was a hotel-keei)er at Lewisburg and also conducted a meat 
market there. Me died there when his son (jeorge was hfteen years of 
age. leaving his widow and three children. The widow afterward married 
William I'reeman. an luiglishman, and moved with the latter to W^aukegan, 
Illinois, where she s])ent the remainder of her life. ( Jecjrge W. Bowers 
accom_i)anied his mother to her new home, having, at Waukegan. learned 
the trade of cabinet-maker and carpenter. During the Civil \\'ar he re- 
turned to l'enns\ Ivania and served for ninet^• days as a member of the 
Two Hundred and Kighth Regiment. l*enns\lvania X'olunteer Jnfantr\-. 
After awhile he went West, working ;it his trade, and was presently sent 
to Coiorack) by a Chica.go bridge compau)- to build bridges in that state, 
and while thus engaged worked in many places in the West, [""or six years 
after his marriage to Sarah A. Steward. Mr. Bowers continued to make 
his home in Cokjrado and then retiu-ned to Waukegan. where his mother 
was slill living, and in the vicinitv of that citv became successfully engaged 
in farming, being thus engaged at that place until his death, on October 28. 
i<)02. he then lacking one month of being sixty-six years of age. Mr. 
iMjwers was an actiAC memljer of the local i^ost of the ( irand Army of the 
ivepublic ai Waukegan, in the affairs of which patriotic (.organization he 
took a warm interest, and was also atiiliated with the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows. 

Not long after the death of her husband Mrs. Bowers disposed of her 



74 CHAMTAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

interests in Illinois and returnt'd to her old home at Urhana, where she 
since has made her home and where she is very conifortahlv situated, hav- 
ing;- a \ery pleasant home at Xo. 324 j^ast Cdmrch street. Mrs. Bowers is 
a niemlicr ot' the Methodist l'~])isco])al church, in the various heneficences 
of which she takes a warm interest, as well as in the general good works of 
the conimnnity at large, and her gentle influence ever is exerted in hehalf 
i\\ con.imunity l.etterment. Fler niemor\- is excellent and her recollection 
of events co\ ering the period of her girlhood in Urhana and particularly 
•of sonic of the stirring incidents of ante-bellum da\s there and of her 
service as a school teacher in this cotniuunit\' many vears ago throw some 
most interesting side]ight> on that period in the development of Url)ana and 
i)f C"ham[)aign county. 



AL\1X 1. 11RI(;HT, 



Alvin j. Bright, one of the best-known lawxers in Champaign county, 
is a native son of this county and has lived here all his life, with the excep- 
tion of six years spent in the practice of his profession at Dayton, this state, 
lie was born on a farm in Jackson township, August 6, 1868, son of Henry 
and Susan (Deaton) Bright, the former of whom was born on that same 
farm and there spent all his life and the latter is still living, now a resident 
of C'hristiansburg. Henry Bright was born on I'ebruar)- 2, 1832, son of 
pioneer i)arents and w^as reared on the farm on which he was born and 
after his marriage established his h.ome there, later buying from the other 
heirs of his father's estate one hundred and four acres of the home place, 
to which he afterward added an adjoining tract of forty-three acres and 
became one of the substantial farmers of his neighborhood. ()n that place 
he spent his last days, his death occurring on September y, 1902. He and 
his wife were the parents of two sons. Ahin J. Bright having a brother. 
Dr. William \\. Bright, a well-known ])hysician and surgeon at North Hamp- 
ton, down in Clark county. 

Reared on the home farm in Jackson township. Alvin J. Bright re- 
ceived h.is earl\- schooling in the local schools of that neighborhood and later 
took a course in the scientific department of the State Normal School at 
Ada, after which for five years he was engaged in teaching school. Mean- 
while he was giving much of his leis'ure time to the study of law and ])resently 
entered the law department of the State Normal at Ada and was graduated 
from the same in 1900, with the degree of Bachelor of Laws. For some 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY. OHIO. 75 

time he maintained his law office at Christiansburg and then, in jgoi. went 
ti) Davton. where he opened an office for the practice of his profession and 
where he remained for six vears. at the end of which time he returned to 
Christiansburg- and has since resided there, he and his mother making- their 
home together. In addition to his law practice and his official duties Mayor 
liright looks after the interests of his late father's estate and finds himself 
a pretty Inisv man. He is a Rei)ublican and has for years given his close 
attention to the civic aft'airs of his home town and townshij) and of the 
count}- at large. I'or some time he served as justice of the peace in and for 
Jackson tiiwnsliip and is now the ma}-or (^f Christiansburg. to the duties of 
which important office he is gi\ing his most intelligent attention. He is a 
Jvoval Arch and York Rite Mason, a member of Mt. Olivet Lodge Xo. 226, 
b'ree and Accepted Masons, at Christiansburg, of which he is past worshipful 
master, and of the chapter at St. Paris and the commander\- at Trov. and 
takes a warm and active interest in Masonic aff"airs. 

Adam Bright, cousin of .\l\in J., of Christiansburg. came here about 
the time the railroad was l)uilt in the county; he was a large farmer, owning 
one thousand acres of land near here. He built the elevator and was one 
of the prominent men of these parts. 



CLAUDE C. BATDORF 



Claude C. Batdorf. a juvjuiinent and successful farmer and stockman, 
stockholder in several commercial enterprises, living on route 3. St. Paris. 
Champaign county, was born in Jacksfjn township on P^bruar}- 15. 1871, a 
son of David .and .\melia ( Walborn ) Batdorf, the former of whom was 
bom in John.son township, this count}-, on September 20. 1841. and the 
latter in the same township on May 22, 184,^5, both of whom were farming 
people. 

David Batdorf was a son of Samuel and Susanna ( Xeff' ) Batdorf. 
David Batdorf and his future wife. Amelia W'alborn. were reared in Johnson 
township and attended the public schools. They were married in 1857 and 
shortly afterward settled on a farm lying south and east of St. Paris, and 
are living there at the present time, practically retired from the labor of 
the farm. During his active life David Batdorf was an industrious and 
progressive farmer and was generally regarded throughout this part of 
Champaign countv as a successful agriculturist. Mr. and Mrs. Batdorf are 



76 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

inenil)ers <»f the Methodist I'-piscopal church at St. Paris and are warmly 
interested in all its good works, and have always given their support to 
e\ ery worthy ])urpose in the omniunity in which they have heen residents 
so long and where thev are esteemed as good citizens and sincere friends. 
They were the parents of three children, two of whom are living in 191 7. 
l(jla M. and Claude C. !ola M. is a graduate of the St. Paris high school 
and later attended a normal school, after which she taught school for one 
year. She married drant Kizer and the\- are living two and one-half miles 
north of St. Paris. The}' are the parents of two children, Tillie and Alta, 
])oth (jf whom are graduates of the St. Paris high school. The elder is a 
teacher in high school and the other is a teacher in the schools of Concord 
townshi]). 

Claude C. Ikitdorf was reared t)n the farm and educated in the common 
schools, which he attended up to the age of fifteen, at the end of which 
time he went to the high school at St. Paris for two years. At the age of 
t\\entv-h\e he was united in marriage to Alattie Pence, who was horn on 
.\ugust [. 1868. Their marriage took place on Septemljer 23. 1896. Mrs. 
llatdorf is tlie daughter of .\mos raid Clarinda (Browning) J'ence, the for- 
mer of whom was horn in Mad Piver township on May 24, 1822, and died 
on Januarv 2,:;, 1904, and the latter was horn in Union township on March 
20. 1838. and is now in her eightieth year, vigorous mentally and enjoying- 
good health. The\- were the parents of eight children, two, an infant and 
Lizzie, being dead: the others are l^lla, wife of Scott Kite, of Mad River 
township; Joseph M., a farmer in the same township: Emma, the wife of 
l'"ernando Ward: \'ictoria, who married Albert Berry, of Mad River town- 
ship: Jennie, who married W. H. Batford. of Columl)us, Ohio, and Mattie, 
the wife of Clautle C. Batdorf. Mrs. P>atdorf was reared on a farm in Mad 
l\i\er townshi]) and was educated in the Myrtle Tree school, which she at- 
tended until she was stventeen years of age. 

To -Mr. and Mrs. Batdorf two children were born, Clara, A., born May 
2. 1902, and died January 23, 1904. and Geneva A., born on November 2^, 
i<;o6. 'I'he l>atdorfs are members of the Baptist church at St. Paris and 
are earnest and acti\e participants in all church work. He served as trustee 
(jf the Mxrtle Tree church for several years. Mr. FJatdorf is a supporter 
of the Democratic party and served in the offices of trustee and treasurer. 
He was elected treasurer of Jackson township and served from 1898 to 
1904. He was then elected a trustee and served four years in that office, 
and his last candidac\- resulted in being again chosen in 1915 as treasurer 
of the townslii[). which '»ffice he still holds. In all these offices and in a 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 'j'J 

great manv otlier ways, Air. Batdort has given evidence of his practical 
interest in township and count}' affairs. Me is a member of the Champaign 
county agricultural bocU'd, having- Ijeen elected in i()i5, and to that board 
and also to the aft'airs of the farmers institutes he gives freely of his time, 
energy and advice, being among- the most prominent supporters of these 
valual)le institutions, establishetl for the benefit of the farmers of the com- 
munity. 

On his farm in Jackson township .Mr. liatdorf has his eighty-acre tract 
given over to general farming and stock raising. He breeds registered 
Percheron horses and all his stock is of high grade, and he is regarded as 
one of the most successful farmers of the township. In addition to his 
agricultural interests, he is a stockholder in the Central National Bank at 
St. Paris; a stockholder in the Telephone Company of St. Paris, and a 
stockholder in the National Fire Insurance Company of Columbus, Ohio. 
Air. Batdorf's ability as a farmer and a business man is recognized through- 
out the county, and his worth as a progressive citizen is appreciated to the 
full. 



GKORGE H. PRIXTZ. 



George H. Printz, junior member of the firm of J. I''.. Printz .Jt Son, 
tiealers in coal at St. Paris and one of the most active and enterprising busi- 
ness men in that cit}-, is a native son of Cliami)aig-n county and has lived 
here all his life. He was born at Steinberger Mills, in Mad River township. 
July II, 1885, son and only child of Jacol) \\. and Catherine 1^. (Hannan) 
Printz, the former a native of X'irginia and the latter of New Jersey, wh(j 
came to this count\- in the days of their }'outh, were married at Urbana 
and have ever since been residents of this count}-, having made their home 
at St. Paris since 1899. 

Jacob E. Printz was born in Page count}', \'irginia, June 12, 1845. son 
of Isaac and Eliza ( Printz) Printz. bc^h of whom were born in that same 
state, where they spent their lives, Isaac Printz being a miller, as also was 
his father. Jacob V.. Printz grew up in V^irginia thoroughl}- familiar with 
the details of the milling business and when a }-oung man came to Ohio 
and at Urbana married Catherine E. Hannan, who was born at b'lmer. New 
Jerse\-, March 9, 1857, and wbp had come to this count}' with her parents 
in her youth. She is a member of the Eastern Star and i)ast noble grand 
of the Reljekah, lodge, .\fter their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Printz located 



78 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

en a farm in the vicinitx' ot Lippincott Station, in Salem township, this 
cduntw where tlie\- remainetl tliree years, at the end of which time they 
moved to .Mad Iviver township, wliere Mr. I'rintz took charge of the Stein- 
herger mill and operated the same until 1886, when he transferred his serv- 
ices to the .\rrowsmith mill in Salem township, where he remained engaged 
in milling until 1899, when he mo\'ed to St. Paris to take charge of the 
Hour-mill at that place and became owner of the same. In 1907 he sold 
the mill to lialdwin (!t Son and bought the W'alburn & Riker coal yards at 
St. Paris and has since Ijceu engaged in the coal business at that place, long 
having been regarded as one of the leading business men of that city. Not 
long- after taking- over the coal business, Mr. Printz admitted his sou to 
partnershi]» in the business, which since has been conducted under the lirm 
name of j. \i. I'rintz i^ Son. Mr. I'rintz came to this county in 1874, a 
poor young man and by dint of persevering efiforts and good management 
has become one of the well circumstanced men of the county. In addition 
to hi^ coal interests he is -vice-president of the Central National Rank of 
.St. Paris and has odier interests there, which place him well uj) in the list 
of the men of affairs in that part of the county. Mr. Printz is a Democrat 
and for years has taken an acti\e part in local public affairs, having been a 
mem])er (.f the board oi public works at St. I'aris ever since the electric- 
light plant was l)uilt there. He is a Knight Templar and Royal Arch Mason, 
a member of the blue lodge at St. Paris and of the chapter, council and 
coiiimander}- at Urbana, and is also an acti\e member of the Independent 
Order of Odd Pellows, having attained to the encampment in that order. 

( "rcorge II. Printz was about thirteen }ears of age when his parents took 
u]) their residence in St. Paris and he coinpletetl his schooling in the high 
schi/ol there, after which he became engaged in the coal business as a partner 
of his father in the brm of J. E. Printz iS: Son and has ever since been thus 
engaged. lie also is a stockholder in the Central National P)ank of St. 
Paris aud is otherwise interested in the general business aft'airs of his home 
town. ])eing regarded as one of the "li\-e wires'" of that ])lace, acti\e in all 
mo\-ements ha\ ing to do with the ad\;incement of the common interests of 
the cit\-; he i^ manager of the h'armers and Merchants Telephone Conipanv. 
.Mr. Printz is a Democrat and takes an acti\'e interest in local political af- 
fairs, lie is ilie onl\- thirty-second degree Mason in St. Paris and takes a 
warm intei-est in .Masonic affairs, lie became a member of Pharos Lodge. 
I-"ree and ,\cce])ted Masons, at St. Paris, when twent\-one \ears of age. 
and at l\\ent\-four w;is high priest of the local chai)ter. Roval .\rch Masons, 
and a member of the council, l\o\al and Select Masters, at L'rbana. and of 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 79 

Ivaper C'omniaiulery, Knights Templar, in that city. His affiliation with 
the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite is through the consistory at Davt(jn. 

On June 22, 1908, George H. Printz was united in marriage to Stella 
W'oolcott. who was horn near Lena, in Johnson township, this county, Ma\' 
4, 1886, and to this union one child has heen horn, a daughter, I'A'elyn W.. 
horn on Fehruary 26, 1912. Mrs. Printz is a member of the Methodist 
i^piscopal church. Mr. and Mrs. Printz have a very pleasant home at St. 
Paris and take an interested and helpful part in the general social activities 
of their home town. Mrs. Stella T^rintz is past noble grand of the Rebekah 
lodge, St. Paris, and is an officer and member of Diamond Chapter. Order of 
the Eastern Star. 



JOHN D. ROBERTS. 



John D. Rol^erts, Civil War veteran, well-known farmer and general 
stockman, living- on rural route i out of St. Paris, is a native V^irginian. 
born in Page countv, \'irginia, July 29, 1844. He is the son of John and 
Harriet ( (lood ) Roberts, the former of whom was l)orn and died in J'age 
county, that state, and whose wife, flarriet Cood. was also l)orn in the 
same coimty and state ; she also died there. 

John J-ioberts and his wife were the parents of eleven children, of whom 
two ;ire now li\ ing. the subject of this sketch having a sister. Rebecca, who 
became tlie wife of Benjamin \^'ood and who are residents of Page county. 
X'irginia. John Roberts and his wife were members of the Eutheran church 
and e\ er active in its good works throughout their lives. He was affiliated 
with the old Whig party and on the formation of the Republican i)arty. 
became one of its stanchest supporters. 

jolm D. Roberts was reared on his father's farm and was educated in 
the excellent schools of Page count}'. N'irginia. He worked for a time on 
the farm and when the Civil War Ijroke out he enlisted in Company C. of 
White's Battalion and Ross's Brigade; he furnished his own horses and 
l)ridles. On May 6, 1863, he was struck Ijy a shell in the left knee at the 
battle of tlie Wilderness and he suffered for sixteen months from the eff'ects 
of his injuries. In the winter of 1864 he rejoined his command and after 
a short period of serxice was discharged, the cumniand with which he had 
l)een serving being disbanded. 

On the conclusion of his war ser\ice John D. Roljerts returned to Ids 
home and went to work on the farm. He was united in marriage to Martha 



8o CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

Ki'-er. who was a distant relative of the late John W. Kiser. Mr. Ivoberts 
lixefl in X'irt^inia until March 5, 1883. when he came to this state and located 
in ("liampaiyn c( mntv on the farm on which he now lives. He is the owner 
of one hundred acres of prime land, which is in an excellent state of ciilti- 
\ation. In addition to his work on the farm he is also extensively engaged 
in breeding- a hne strain of Jerse}' cattle. Duroc-Jersey hogs and I'lymouth 
chickens, his produce in all these various lines netting g(^od prices at market. 
Mr. and Mrs. Roberts are parents of one son, Ernest C. Roberts, l)orn in 
Se])tcmber. 187c). He married Nora Ilatdorf and they are the parents of 
two cliildren. Irene and John D. 

John 1). Roljerts has been a lifelong supporter of the Republican party, 
but has ne\er been a seeker after public office. He and his wife have a 
p!eas;int home in Jackson township, where they reside on the place known 
as the "West Farm." Mr. Roberts is held in warm regard bv his manv 
friends in St. Paris and he is admired for his u|)right character and general 
sense of justice in the affairs of life. 



JUDGI<: JOSb:PH P. NORTHCUTT. 

Judge Josei)]i P. Xorthcutt, pension attornev, justice of the peace in 
and i'or Ur1)ana townshi[), former judge of probate for Champaign county, 
an honored veteran of the C\y\\ War and for vears one of the best-known 
residents of Url)ana, is a nati\e son of Champaign county and has lived 
liere all his life. Me was liorn in the hamlet of \Vest\-ille, in Mad River 
township, August 23. 1841, son of I'vunyan and Rucinda (Pence) North- 
cutt, the former a nati\e of the state of Kentuck\- and the latter of this 
county. 

Runvan .Xorthcutt was but a child when his parents, Sh;idrick and 
Knth ( Tavlor ) Xorthcutt, came to Ohio from Kentucky, about the }ear 
1810. and settle<l on a farm southwest of W^estville, near Terre Haute, in 
this count\-, where they spent the remainder of their lives, Shadrack Xorth- 
cutt liecoming one of the substantial ])ioneer settlers of that i)art of the 
count\ . On that p>ioneer farm Runvan Xorthcutt grew to manliood, re- 
ceiving his schooling in a little old log school house in .Mad River townshi]), 
and early became a saddler and harness-maker, following that \-ocation at 
W'estxille the remainder of his life, his death occurring in 1844. He had 
married Lucinda Pence, v. ho \\as born in Urbana townshii), this countv. 




JOSEPH P. XOKTHCUTT. 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 8l 

and to that union rive children \\ere l)orn, of whom hut two are now Uving, 
tlie suhject of this sketch having- a hrother, Edmond Northcutt, Uving at 
South Omaha. Nehraska. The other chiklren of that union were John, 
Emily, who married Hugh Gibhs. and William. 

Joseph V. Northcutt was but three years of age when his father died 
and after the death of his mother, some years later, he made his home with 
his maternal uncle, Jacob Pence. He completed his schooling in the schools 
of Westville and later entered a harness shop and saddlery at St. Paris, 
Avhere he learned the trade that had been his father's and was working at 
that trade when the Civil War broke out. On September 9, 1861, he then 
being but twenty years of age, Mr. Northcutt enlisted for service in the 
Union army, as a member of Company G. Third Ohio Cavalary, and served 
with that command, attached to the Army of the Cumberland, for more 
than eighteen months. At the battle of Woodville Station, Alabama, April 
3, 1862, he was wounded six times and his horse was shot from under him. 
Three of the bullets he received on that bloody day Mr. Northcutt still 
carries in his Ijodv, the ami)- surgeons having been unable to reach them. 
On Eebruary 20, 1863. he then having been fairly convalescent from his 
wcnmds, Mr. Northcutt reci-ived an lionorable discharge from service, on a 
physician's certificate of i)hysical disability, and returned home. He re- 
sumed his work as a saddler and harness-maker, but a short time later be- 
came engaged as a clerk in a dry-goods store at St. Paris and remained thus 
connected for seventeen years, or until his health began to fail, requiring a 
more out-door mode of living. For five years thereafter Mr. Northcutt 
was engaged in buying cattle, mostl}- sheep, and was thus engaged at the 
time of his election to the i^fhce of judge of probate for Champaign county. 
Following his electi<jn Judge Northcutt moved to Urbana, entering upon his 
duties of his office on Fel~jruar\' 9, 1891, and has ever since made that city 
his home. I'or six years he served as judge of probate and for a short 
time thereafter gave his perst)nal attention t(^ a farm he had acquired years 
before and which he still owns. Not long afterward he became engaged in 
the insurance business at Urbana and also became active as a pension attor- 
ney and is still acting in the latter capacity. In 191 1 Judge Northcutt was 
elected justice of the peace in and for Urbana township and is now serving 
in that important public capacity. He is a Republican and for years has 
been looked upon as one of the leaders of that party in this county, ever 
giving his most thoughtful attention to local civic affairs. 

On November 14. 1866. Joseph P. Northcutt was united in marriage to 
(6a) 



82 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

Augusta Richeson, a daughter of Samuel and Mary Ann Richeson, and to 
this union one child has been born, a daughter, Carrie, wife of J. H. Cody, 
of Urbana. Judge and Mrs. Northcutt are members of the Presbyterian 
church and take a proper interest in church affairs. The Judge is a charter 
member of the local post of the Grand Army of the Republic at St. Paris 
and served that post as tpiartermaster and as treasurer. He also was a 
charter member of the Masonic lodge at St. Paris, but is not now actively 
connected widi that order. 



SOLOMON APPLE. 



Solomon Apple, cjne of the well-known and substantial farmers of Jack- 
son township, this county, and the proprietor of a fine farm of one hundred 
and thirty acres one mile south and a half mile east of St. Paris, was born 
on a pioneer farm one mile south oi where he now lives and has lived in 
that neighborhood all his Hfe. He was born on June ii, 1835, son of Sol- 
omon and Catherine (Snapp) Apple, the former a native of Pennsylvania 
and the latter of Montgomery county, this state, who became pioneers of 
Jackson township and there spent the remainder of their lives. 

The elder Solomon Apple came to Ohio from Pennsylvania in the days 
of his young manhood and in Montgomery county was married to Cather- 
ine Snapp, shortly afterward coming up into Champaign county. He entered 
a tract of eighty acres of "Congress land" in Jackson township and there 
established his home and proceeded to develop and improve his farm, a part 
of which at that time was swamp land. The Snapps settled in that neigh- 
borhood about the same time and the two families thus became counted as 
among the first settlers of that part of the county and were iniluential in 
the early work of development thereabout. Pioneer Solomon Apple pros- 
pered in his farming operations and added to his home farm until he batl 
there two hundred and forty acres. He also had a farm of one hundred 
acres in Johnson township. He and his wife were members of the Luth- 
eran church and took an active part in church work. They were the parents 
of eight children, of whom the subject of this sketch is now the sole sur- 
vivor. Of the others, William, Sarah, Mary, Noah and Sim<3n grew to 
maturity and two died in infancy. 

Reared on the pioneer home farm in Jackson township, the younger 
Solomon Apple received his schooling in the little old log scliool house in 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 83 

that neighborhood and from the days of his youtli was a helpful factor in 
the development of the home farm, remaining there until his marriage in 
186 r, when he established his home on the place where he is now living and 
has ever since made that his residence, long having been regarded as one of 
the substantial farmers of that community. Mr. Apple is a Democrat and 
has ever given a good citizen's attention to local political affairs, . but ha^ 
never held public office. He is a member of the Lutheran church at St. 
Paris and has for many years taken a proper part in church work. Despite 
the weight of his four-score years and more, he retains much of his former 
vigor and continues to take a warm interest in current affairs. 

On September 25, 1861, Solomon x\pple was united in marriage to 
Frances Kessler, who was born in Johnson township, this county, and t(j 
that union was born one child, a son, Perry Franklin Apple, born on October 
12, 1862, who married Rosa Prince, daughter of Abraham Prince, and has 
one child, a daughter, Ota, who makes her home with her grandfather on 
the old place. JMrs. Frances Apple died on April 18, 1914. Perry F. Apple 
was educated in the common schools and lived at home always. He is build- 
ing his own home in Jackson township, where he will reside. He has served 
as president of the school board, and is a member of the Lutheran church. 



JOHN B. HOLLIS. 



John B. Hollis. a well-known retired merchant, of Christiansburg, for- 
mer clerk and former trustee of Jackson township, is a native son of Ohio 
and has lived in this state all his life. He was born in the city of Piqua on 
August 17. 1848, son of Benoni and Lydia (Duffy) Hollis, natives of Penn- 
sylvania. His father died before he was born and his mother later married 
Cyrus Borden. By her marriage to Benoni Hollis she was the mother of 
four children, of whom the subject of this sketch is now the only survivor. 

Thrown upon his own resources in his youth. John B. Hollis had quite 
a struggle getting a foothold on the path to fortune and at the age of 
twenty-one was practically without means save a stout heart and willing 
hands. .\t twenty-six years of age he became engaged in the meat business 
and for thirty-live years was thus engaged, doing a general meat business, 
and did quite well. He formerly owned a valuable farm, but since his re- 
tirement has sold the same and is now living undisturbed by business cares. 
Mr. Hollis is a Democrat and has long given close attention to local polit- 



84 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

ic;il affairs, having- for several years served as clerk of Jackson township 
and as trustee of the township, giving to the performance of the duties of 
these offices his intelligent attention. 

In April. 1875. John B. Hollis was united in marriage to Minnie Spence, 
who was horn in the neighlxiring county of Clark, but who was reared in 
Champaign county. Mr. and Mrs. Hollis have a very pleasant home at 
Cliristianshurg and have ever given their thoughtful attention to the general 
affairs of their home town. Mr. Hollis is a Scottish Rite (thirty-second 
degree) Mason and both he and his wife are members of the local chapter 
of the Order of the Eastern Star, which Mrs. Hollis has .served in numerous 
official capacities. For twelve years Mr. Hollis Avas worshipful master of 
Mt. Olivet Lodge No. 226. Free and Accepted Masons, at Christiansburg, 
and his affiliation with the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite is through the 
consistory at Dayton. He also is a Knight Templar (York Rite), affiliated 
with the commandery at Troy, and is a Royal Arch Mason, affiliated with 
the chapter (No. 132) at St. Paris, and is also affiliated with the council. 
I\o)al and Select Masters, at Trov. for many vears having given his earnest 
attention to Masonic affairs. 



GEORGE D. NAGLF 



George D. Nagle. a well-known cement contractor at Christiansburg 
and former assessor of Jackson township, is a native of the great Empire 
state, but has been a resident of this county since he was about seven years 
of age. He was born in the city of Brooklyn, New York. June 2^, 1H62, 
son of George and Caroline (Duffern) Nagle. natives of Germany, the 
former born in Hamburg and the latter in Baden, who later l)ecame residents 
of Champaign county and here spent their last days. 

George Nagle was about fourteen years of age when he came to this 
county with his parents, the family settling in Brooklyn and there he grew 
to manhood. I'^or a time he worked in a grocery store and then learned the 
plumber's trade and was engaged in that lousiness when the Civil War broke 
out. He enlisted his services in behalf of the Union and went to the front 
as a member of Company H, New^ York Heavy Artillery, and witli that 
command served for three years and nine months. He had married before 
the war broke out and upon the completion of his military service moved 
with his familv to Canada, where he remained for about three vears, or 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 85 

until 1869, when lie came to Oliio and located at Urbana. In the meantime 
he had become a stone mason and upon coming- to this county engaged as a 
contractor in masonry and continued thus engaged until his retirement at 
the age of seventy years, making his home on a farm which he had bought 
in the neighborhood of Urbana. George Nagle and wife were the parents 
of nine children, seven of whom are still living, those besides the subject 
of this sketch being as follow : Charles, a contractor in Jackson township, 
this county; Carrie, wife of Frank Hubert, of Detroit, Michigan; Mattie, 
wife of William King, also of Detroit; Maggie, wife of William McDonald, 
of Urbana ; Willis, a contractor of cement work at Piqua, and Fred, a con- 
tractor at Urbana. 

George D. Nagle was about nine years of age when he came to this 
county with his parents and he completed his schooling in the Urbana 
schools. He early learned under the direction of his father the details of 
stone masonry and when twenty-one years of age began working along that 
line on his own account, locating at Christiansburg. where he presently 
de\'eloped a business as a stone contractor, e\'entually taking up cement work 
and in the latter line has since been engaged and has been successful. Mr. 
Nagle is a Republican and has served as a member of the Champaign countv 
Republican central committee and as assessor of Jackson township. He has 
acquired considerable real estate interests and is quite well circumstanced. 

In 1898 George D. Nagle was united in marriage to Emma L. Warner, 
who was born in Christiansburg. Champaign county. Mr. and Mrs. Nagle 
are members of the Futheran church and take an interested part in church 
work. Mr. Nagle is past noble grand of Social Fodge No. 339. Independ- 
ent Order of Odd Fellows, at Christiansburg, and is past chief patriarch of 
the local encampment. Patriarchs Militant, for years ha\ing taken an acti\e 
and earnest interest in Odd Fellowship. 



SIFAS M. STRADFING. 



Silas M. Stradling, one of Jackson township's well-known and sul)- 
stantial farmers and the proprietor of a fine farm of eighty acres one and 
one-half miles south of St. Paris, was born on the farm on which he is now 
living and has lived there all his life. In all. he owns one Iiundred and fifteen 
acres. He was born on December i. 1847. son of Henry and Fmilv 
(Mitchell) Stradling. the former a native of Pennsylvania and the latter 



86 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

of Ohio, who came to this county from Warren count}-, this slate, and estab- 
hshed their home here about 1845. spending the rest of their hves here. 

Henry StradHng was born in Bucks county, Pennsyh'ania, in 1813, 
and was married, about the year 1845, i^^ Warren county, this state, to Emily 
AlitcheU, who was l)orn in that county in 1823. Shortly after their mar- 
riage he and his \vife came to Champaign county and settled on a farm in 
Jackson township, making their first home in a little log house that had 
been built by J. Zuhle, a pioneer of that neighborhood. Ten years later, 
Henry Stradling bought a tract of eighty acres adjoining the place on which 
he had been living and in 1866 erected on that farm the house in which his 
son, the subject of this sketch, is now living. He did not long remain to 
enjoy his new home, however, for he died in 1868, a little more than a year 
after moving into his new home. His widow survived him for many years, 
her last days being spent in St. Paris. Henry Stradling was a member of 
Social Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, at Lena, and took an 
active interest in the affairs of that order. He and his wife were the par- 
ents of nine children, four of w^hom are still living, the subject of this sketch 
having a brother, Timothy Stradling, a Jackson township farmer, and two 
sisters, Mary, widow of Valander Ward, of Mad River township, and Effie, 
a spinster, living at St. Paris. 

Reared on the farm on which he was born, Silas ]\1. Stradling has lived 
there all his life. He received his schooling in the little old log school house 
in that neigh1)orhood and from the days of his boyhood was a \-aluable 
factor in the development of the home place. He was not yet twenty-one 
years of age when his father died and afterward much of the responsibility 
of farm management fell upon his shoulders. After his marriage he bought 
eighty acres of the home place from his mother, established his home there 
and has ever since continued to make that his place of residence, long having 
been regarded as one of the substantial and well-established farmers of that 
neighborhood. In addition to his general farming, Mr. Stradling has given 
considerable attention to the raising of Duroc-Jersey hogs and has done 
verv well. He is a Republican, but has not held public office. 

In 1874 Silas M. Stradling was united in marriage to Elizabeth 
Bidelstter, who was born on an adjoining farm on A])ril 13, 1852, daughter 
of George and ]\Iarv A. { Costenborder ) Bidelstter, the former of whom 
was born in h^rance and the latter in (ireene county, this state, who were 
married in that county and later came to Champaign county, establishing 
their home in Jackson township, where they spent the remainder of their 
lives. Air. and Mrs. Stradling have eight children, four sons and four 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 87 

daughters, namely: Bertha M.. wife of Joliii Clapp, of St. Paris; Cory, 
wlio is at home ; Don. who married 'Sia.yy Heaston ; Henry, who is unmar- 
ried and remains at home, helping with the management of the farm; Mary, 
also at home; George, who married Carrie Wheaton, and Nellie and Helen, 
at home. The Stradlings ha\-e a very pleasant home and have ever taken 
an interested part in the general .social activities of the communitv in whicli 
thev live. 



SAMUEL S. DA\TS. 



Samuel S. Davis, a substantial retired farmer and landowner of Cham- 
paign county, now living at Mechanicsburg, is a native of the Old Dominion 
state, but has been a resident of this county since he was twenty years of 
age, having come here with his widowed mother in 1876. He was born in 
Warren county, Virginia, September 22, 1855, son of Fenix and Adaline 
(Cattlett) Davis, both also natives of the Old Dominion, the former born 
in that section now comprised within West Virginia, who located in Warren 
county after their marriage and there Fenix Davis spent the rest of his 
life, following the vocation of bridge builder. He died there, leaving a 
widow and three children, the suliject of this sketch having two sisters, 
Anna, wife of Charles T.ayton, a farmer living near Urbana. this county, 
and Sarah^ wife of Percy Florr, a farmer of Union township, this county. 
Vox fifteen years before her marriage Mrs. Horr was a school teacher in 
this county. 

In 1876, some time after the death of her husband, Mrs. Adaline 
Davis and her children came to Champaign county from Virginia and here 
she spent the remainder of her life, her death occurring on May 8, 1909. 
As the only son of the family much of the responsibility for the maintenance 
of the family fell upon the shoulders of Samuel S. Davis after his father's 
death, the father having been a poor man and unable to leave much of a 
patrimony, and Samuel thereafter took care of his mother the rest of her 
life. L^pon coming here the family settled in .Nlad River township and for 
three years thereafter Samuel S. Davis was engaged at farm labor there. 
He then rented a farm from Simeon Taylor and his operations as a farmer 
on his own account prospered so that he presently was able to buy a farm 
of his own. That first farm that he owned was in Pike township, Madi.son 
county, and he paid for it eighty dollars an acre. When he later was made 
an offer of one hundred and twenty-five dollars an acre for the place he 



»» CHAMPAIGN COUNTY. OHIO. 

let it go and with the proceeds of the sale bought the ]\lar(|uis Grain farm 
of one hundred and sixty acres, paying for the same seventeen thousand 
tloUars. This farm he later sold for eighteen thousand dollars and then 
bought a farm of one hundred and ninety-six acres in Union township, this 
county, paying for the same one hundred dollars, and this farm he still 
(nvns. After taking possession of his Union township farm ^Ir. Davis made 
his home there for three years, at the end of which time, in 1916, he retired 
and moved to AJechanicsburg. where he is now living. Mr. Davis is a Dem- 
ocrat. bVaternally. he is affiliated with Homer Lodge. Knights of Pythias, 
at Mechanicsburg. and takes a warm interest in the affairs of the lodge. 



LOU B. BERRY 



Lou B. Berry, treasurer of Champaign countv and for vears actively 
engaged in the insurance business at Urbana, w-as born in that city and has 
lived there all his life. He was born on October 25. 1866. son of Thomas H. 
and I-uxima (Hughes) Berry, representatives of two of the most prominent 
and influential families in this part of Ohio. 

Thomas H. Berry also was l)orn at LTrbana and lived there all his life, 
with the exception of three years spent at Chicago and at Danville, Illinois. 
He was Ijorn on January 5, 1820, son of Judge E. C. Berry, one of the 
most i)rominent and intiuential men of his generation in this ccnuity and 
further and iltting mention of whom is made in the historical section of 
this work. Thomas H. Berr\' took- a prominent part in the political, social 
and religious life of his home town and county. He was an active Repub- 
lican and he and his wife were earnest members of the Presbyterian church. 
( )n Aku- 1. 1846: Thomas H. Berrv married Luxima Hughes, who was 
born on June 28. 1826. daughter of the Rev. James R. Hughes, of Oxford, 
(Jhio. who was the lirst Presb}terian minister in Champaign county and 
the hrst principal of Miami Uni\ersitv. To that union se\en children were 
l)orn. Mary Lanuue. Thomas C., James H., Charles J.. William K.. Llarry 
M.. and Lou 15. Thomas H. Derry died on November 9, 1879. 

Lou 1'.. IJerrv recei\ed his schooling in the schools of Urbana and upon 
completing his studies engaged in the insurance business at Urbana as a 
clerk in the office of C. W. Marshall, who at that time was the state agent 
for the Jlome Lisurance Company of New York. In 1891 Mr. Berry 
was appointed local agent for that company and has since been thus en- 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 89 

gaged, also representing several other tire and life insurance C(jmpanies, long 
having heen rec(\gnized as one of the leading insurance men in this part of 
the state. Mr. Berry is an ardent Repuhlican and from the days of his 
hoN'hood has ta.ken an active part in local political affairs. In the campaign 
of J 916 he \\a> made the nominee of his party for the office of treasurer 
lit Champaign county and was elected in the fall of that vear hy a large 
majority and is now serving as treasurer of this county, one of the most 
popular officials in the cotu't house. Mr. Berrv is also a member of the 
local school board and has long given his close attention to the aft'airs of 
the schools, helpful in many ways in extending the cause of education in 
his hon.ie town. 

( )n I'\>bruary 23. 1893. ^-'^^'^ ^'- l>errv was united in marriage to Carrie 
Hu])l)ell, daughter of John H. and Mar}- Hubbell, and to this union two 
children ha\e been born. I'hilij) (deceased) and Richard. Mr. and Mrs. 
Berr) are members of the Presbyterian church and take a proper interest 
in church w(M-k, as well as in the general social activities of the city and are 
helpful in prcjmoting all worthy causes. Mr. Berry is a Mason and a 
memjjer of the Junior Order of United American Mechanics and in the 
aft'airs of these two orcanizations takes a warm in.terest. 



GLENN WEIKERT. 



Glenn \Veikert, of Christiansburg, assessor of Jackson township and 
one of the best-known auctioneers in Champaign county, is a native son of 
Ohio and has lived in this state all his life. He was born on a farm in the 
vicinity of Troy, in the neighboring county of Miami. December 8, 1880, 
son of John and Erances E. (Robbins) Weikert. both of whom were bor: 
in that same county and who are now living retired at Tn^y. To John 
W'eikert and wife five children were born, four of whom are still living, 
those besides the subject of this sketch being lunmet 1^.. a Miami county 
farmer; Gertrude, wife of lutgene Rea.sor, of Troy, jind Nellie M., wife of 
William Swails, also of Miami county. 

Reared on the home farm, Glenn W^eikert completed his schooling in 
the public schools of Troy and at the age of seventeen years learned the 
barber trade and for eleven years was engaged in the barber business at 
Troy, at the same time acting as an agent for the sale of fruit trees in that 
vicinity. Ab<Hit i')09 Mr. ^^^eikert took up auctioneering as a vocation and 



90 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. , 

has -ince been thus engaged, the calls for his services in that connection 
coming from far and near throughout this part of the state. Mr. Weikert 
moved from 'rro\- to Christiansburg and he and his family are comfortably 
situated in that \illage. He is a Democrat and is now serving as assessor 
of Jackson township and of the village of Christiansburg. 

On September 8, 1903. Glenn Weikert was united in marriage to 
Harriet i''.. Hoover, who also was born in Miami county, and to this union 
ha\e !)een born four children, Roswell, Paul, Wilson and Dorothy M. Mr. 
and Mrs. Weikert arc members of the Christian church and Mr. Weikert 
is clerk of the same, both taking an earnest interest in church work. 



T. C. BRAGUNIER. 



1. C. Bragunier, a well-known traveling salesman and a resident of 
Christiansburg, this county, is a native of the Hoosier state, but has lived 
in Ohio since the days of his boyhood. He was born on a farm in the 
vicinity of Delphi, in Carroll county. Indiana, January 1. 1878, son of 
Samuel and Melvina (Ross) Bragunier. both now deceased, the former of 
whom was born in Lancaster county, in the state of Maryland, and the 
latter of Ohio, a native of Champaign county, born on the old I^oss farm in 
jack'-on township. Samuel Ikagunier was but two years of age when his- 
parents moved from Maryland to Carroll county. Indiana, and there he 
grew to manhood on a farm near Delphi. There he met and married Mel- 
\ina 1'^ Ross, of this count}-, who had gone to Carroll count}- on a \isit to 
friends, and after his marriage continued to make his home in Indiana until 
i88.|.. when he came with his famih- to Champaign county and settled on 
the old Ross farm in Jackson township, he and his wife spending the re- 
mainder of their lives in this count}', her death occurring on March 14, 
loi.v and his, Ma}- 22. 1913. They were the parents of hve children, the 
subject of this sketch having four sisters, namely: Kittie. wife of b^rank 
X'andeveer; ]\[ary K.. a stenographer at Columbus, this state; Mstella M.. 
A\-ife of J. H. Swisher, and Addie M., wife of C. W. Proctor. 

Having l)een l)ut six }-ears of age when he came to this county with 
his parents in 188.]. J. C. Bragunier grew to manhood here and received 
hi.-> schooling in the schools of this count\-. b'or sexeral }-ears he worked 
on the farm and then ])ecame engaged in the ])utcher liusiness at Christians- 
])urg and was thus engaged for six vears, at the end of which time he be- 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY. OHIO. .CJl 

came employed as a traxeling .salesman for the Moorman ^Manufacturing 
Company of Oninc}'. Illinois, representing- that company throughout western 
Ohio, and has ever since been thus engaged, one of the best-known salesmen 
traveling out of Champaign count}-. Since becoming thus engaged Mr. 
Bragunier has continued to make his headquarters at Christianshurg and 
takes an active interest in the general affairs of that thriving village. He 
is a member of Alt. Olivet Lodge Xo. 226, Vree and Accepted Masons, at 
Christian.sburg, and is the present worshipful master of the same. Polit- 
icall}-, he is a Republican and has ever taken a good citizen's part in the 
political aft'airs of his home county. 



TAMES T. TOURXELL. 



James T. Journell. a well-known general fariper, li\ing three miles 
south of Ouincv, Champaign county, 'was born in Adams township on May 
10. 1859, a son of Anderson and Elizabeth (Heath) Journell. 

Anderson Journell wa,s born in the state of Mrginia and i'dizabeth 
Heath was born in the state of Ohio. He came from Virginia and settled 
in Ohio and there he met and married Elizal)eth Heath; after their marriage 
thev settled on a farm in Concord township and lived there for several 
years. In i860 the\- went to Illinois and located in Cumberland county, 
that state, and in that place they spent the remainder of their lives. They 
were industrious farming people and were ever interested in the good works 
of the communities in which they lived. 

James T. Journell, when he had reached the age of ten vears, started 
out to work for himself, lieing employed by the month in Illinois. After a 
lapse of a few years he returned to Ohio, locating in Eogan countv, where 
he also worked ])y the month on farms. Having saved a little monev out 
of his earnings, he rented a farm for three vears. At that time he was 
married to Elizabeth Curl, a daughter of farming peo])le. In 1882 Mr. 
Journell settled on the old Curl farm, which contains sixt\--eight acres of 
prime land. He has since ijeen carrying on general farming, his compact 
holding being in an excellent state of culti\ation. and liis laljors ha\'e been 
rewarded with a marked degree of success. Since coming into possession 
of the farm Mr. Journell and his wife have continued to reside on the 
holding and are there comfortably circumstanced. The\- are tlie parents of 
two children, namelv : Orville, a graduate of the common schools, who 



92 CHAMPAIGN C0L:NTY, OHIO. 

iiiarried .Mabel Wilson and lives in Adams township, and they are the par- 
ents of three children. Wilson, Agnes j. and Rachel Iv : the other child is 
Loren, who attended the common and high schools of the township. 

The Journell family are meml)er- of the Methodist I'^piscopal church, 
of which Mr. journell is one of the trustees, and he and his wife are earnest 
supporters of the church and its good works. They also take a warm in- 
terest in all social matters having for their object the welfare of the com- 
numit\- and tlie\ ;ire held in high esteem b)- a witle circle of friends. Mr. 
journell is an ardent su])porter of the Republican party, Init has never held 
;in\- ])olitical offices. He is well known throughout the township in which 
he has so long been residing, as a progressive and industrious farmer. 



DON McMORRAN. 



Don Mc^lorran ranks among the well-known young farmers and stock- 
men of Si. Paris, Champaign county. He was born in Johnson township, 
this county, on December 20, 1883, a son of Da\id and Susan (Norman) 
.Mc.Morran. David McMorran is a descendant of Christian McMorran. 
\\h(j was among the early settlers of Champaign countw David McMorran 
and wife were the ])arents of three children, one of whom died in infancy 
and the others still living being Dolla, who became the wife of Charles 
W'iant, li\ing in Johnson township, and Don, the sul)ject of this sketch. 

Don McMorran was reared on the farm three miles northeast of St. 
Paris. Me was educated in the district schools and on the completion of 
his sch(;ol course he worked on his father's farm u\) to the time of his mar- 
riage. On .\pril 2, 1912, he was united in marriage to Mrs. Pearl Perfect, 
who was the widow of Piert \i. Perfect, her name before her first marriage 
being Pearl Parke. She was born in Union county, Ohio, in 1879. and to 
her first marriage one daughter was born. Marguerete Perfect, now a 
student in the St. Paris schools. To the marriage of Mr. and .Mrs. Mc.Mor- 
ran two (Laughters have been born, Moree, on .\ugust 13, lo'.v ''ind .Marcella, 
on .\ugust 21, 1915. 

.Mr. .McMorran and the members of his family are affiliated with the 
Paptist church at St. Paris. ^Ir. McMorran. in addition to his farming 
o]ierations. is ;i moderate feeder of cattle and hogs, and in this branch of 
his agricultural activities he has had some success. He is a supporter of 
the l\epu1)lican party, but has never been a seeker after public office. 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY. OHIO. 93 

OR\A D. LITTLEJOHX. 

Orva D. Littlejohn. a prominent and successful farmer and stockman 
of Jackson township and proprietor of the "Fair View Stock l-'arm," con- 
sisting of sixty-seven acres of prime land situated one-half mile south of 
Christiansburg, at the end of the cow-path pike, was born in Clark county, 
Ohio, on September u, 1867. He is the son of Edward and Eliza (Wag- 
oner) Littlejohn, the former of whom was born in Shenandoah Valley, 
\'irginia, and the latter was born in Logan county, Ohio. 

Edward Littlejohn. father of the subject of this sketch, came from his 
home in Virginia, accompanied by his mother, to Clark county, Ohio. The 
l(jng journe}' was made in wagons and on reaching this state they settled 
near Springfield, where they engaged in farming. Edward Littlejohn was 
twice married. I'o his first marriage three children were born, George, 
A[aticia and Marv, who is deceased. Of his second marriage the following 
children were born : Isaac. Josie. William, John, Jacob, David, Ann. Edward 
E., Lou and another, twins; Othelina and Roseline, twins. 

Orva D. Littlejohn was reared on a farm in Jackson township and 
attended the district schools, his opportunities for receiving a thorough edu- 
cation lieing limiied. He started working for himself at farm labor at an 
earl}' age and when he had reached the age of twenty-one, he had got to- 
gether the sum of two hundred dollars, as the result of his labor and thrifty 
hal)its. He commenced farming on his own account by renting a farm in 
Clark count}- and after spending some time there he rented for a while in 
-Miami countv. In 1906 he bought his present farm of sixty-seven acres in 
Jackson township, known as "h'air \'iew Stock Farm." Mr. Littlejohn, 
on becoming the owner of this holding, started immediately to improve it 
and it is now in excellent condition as the result of his etTorts ; the dwelling 
house and outbuildings are likewise in an admirable state, all indicating ear- 
nest attention on the part of the owner. Mr. Littlejohn is engaged in gen- 
eral farming and stock r;iising; he breeds the big ty])e of Poland China liogs 
and has high-gratle stock of all kinds, his success in this line being no less 
marked than in his farm work, and he is generally regarded in the district 
as a progressive and skillful husbandman. 

In Deceml)er, 1891, Orva D. Littlejohn was united in marriage to 
Clara D. Munford. who was l)orn in Clark county and educated in the 
common schools. She was a daughter (^f William H. and Nancy Munford; 
he was a native of Marvland and slie of Ohio, '^he^■ li\ed in Clark and 



94 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

-Miami cciunties. P>r)th are dead; he was a farmer. To this union two chil- 
ch-en liave been born. Harr}- C, liorn on October 21, ]8q2. was educated in 
the public schools and spent two years in high school. He married Stella 
Wheaton and is now farming in Clark county, this state. The other child 
is Emerson T.. Littlejohn, born on March 3, 1896; he attended the public 
schools and the liigh schools at Christiansburg and Troy. The Littlejohn 
family are members of the Christian church at Lower Honey creek and are 
warm supporters of all its good works. Mr. Littlejohn is a member of 
Social Lodge No. 136. Independent Order of Odd Fellows at Christians- 
I)urg. He is an ardent Democrat and served as superintendent of the gravel 
roads in Jackson township for two years, and in other wavs has given (^f 
his time and energy to the public interest. 



MINARD L. SESSIONS. 



Minard 1^. Sessions, an honored veteran of the Civil War and for vears 
custodian of the public school building at Woodstock, is a native son of 
Champaign county and has lived here all his life. He was born on a farm 
in the immediate vicinity of Woodstock, in Rush township, August 14, 
1842, son of Darius and Analine (Meacham) Sessions, the former of whom 
was a native of the state of Rhode Island and the latter of Massachusetts, 
who were married after they came to this county and here spent the remainder 
of their lives. 

Darius Sessions was trained as a carpenter in the days of his youth and 
was a skilled builder. He came to Ohio and located in this county when 
twenty-eight years of age, having married not long before coming here, and 
he and his wife established their home at Woodstock, where Mr. Sessions 
engaged in housebuilding and in trading the rest of his life, his death occur- 
ring a few years later, in 1844. he then being thirty-one years of age. His 
widow survived him many years, her death occurring" in 1895, she then 
being eighty years of age. She Avas a member of the Universalist church. 
Darius Sessions and wife were the parents of three chiUlren. of whom the 
subject of this sketch now is the only survivor, his two sisters. Mrs. Mary 
Hoisington and Cynthia, wife of Newton Ellsworth, being deceased. 

Minard L. Sessions was but two years of age when his father died and 
he remained with his mother until her death, a thoughtful and loving pro- 
vider after he had readied the age of self-support. He received but limited 



CHAMPAIGN COLXTY. OHIO. 95 

schooling", there never l^eing more tlian three months of schocil during the 
year in his neighborhood in the chiys of liis youth, and in his youth he worked 
on farms and at various tasks. In September, 1861, he then being- Imt 
nineteen years of age, Mr. Sessions enhsted for service in the l-nion army 
(ku'ing the continuance of the Civil War and went to the front as a private 
in Company A, Second Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry. His regiment 
was attached to the x\rmy of the Cumberland and he thus saw much active 
service, having been a participant in thirteen battles and skirmishes, includ- 
ing the battles of Stone's River. Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, LcnA-out 
Mountain, Kenesaw Mountain and others. .Vt the battle of Chickamauga 
he received a severe gunshot wound in the right thigh and was sent to the 
military hospital at New Albany, Indiana, where he was conhned from Sep- 
tember, 1862. to January. 1863. He then rejoined his regiment and was 
with the same until he receixed his final honorable discharge on Novemlier 
10, 1864. at Columbus. 

Upon the completi(Mi of his military service Mr. Sessions returned to 
Woodstock and a year thereafter became engaged as a clerk in the store of 
Joseph Chamberlain, in that village, and was thus engaged for seven years. 
He then for two vears was engaged with Ne\vton Chaml^erlain and then 
for fifteen years he was engaged in manufacturing tile. After that he was 
variously engaged until 1893, in which year he w-as made the custodian of 
the Woodstock public school buildings and he has since then continued thus 
engaged, one of the best-known men in that village. 

In 1867 Minard L. Sessions was united in marriage to Mary A. 
Reynolds, who was born "in Urbana. this county, daughter of Harrison and 
Elizabeth Reynolds, of that city, and to tlfis union six children have been 
born, namely: Charles H., Lenora, Harriet, Alline, Perry and Blanche. 
Charles H. Sessions received his schooling in the \\'oodstock schools and 
later took up newspaper work, in whicli he has been verv successful, now 
being one of the leading stafT writers on the Kansas City Jotinial. It was 
years ago that Charles H. Sessions went to Kansas City, Missouri, where 
he became employed on (3ne of the newspapers of that cit)' and has ever 
since been thus engaged, having given service to several of the papers of that 
city before becoming emplo}'ed on the Journal. During the incumbenc\' of 
C Governor Hoke, of Kansas, he for two years .served as private secretar\ to 
that executive. Charles H. was secretary of state of Kansas for four years 
and is now secretary to Governor Cappen, of Kansas. He is a thirty-second 
degree Mason and in his political affiliation is a Republican. Charles 11. 
Sessions married Marv Barker, of Kansas Citv, and has one child, a son. 



96 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

Charles B. Lenora Sessions married .V. E. Van Doozer, now living at 
San Francisco, California, and has two sons, Wallace and Harold. Harriet 
Sessions married Ellis Drake, of Chicago, and has two children, Marjorie 
and Frances. Alline Sessions married Malcolm McNeal and also lives in 
Chicago. She has one child, a son, Minard. Perry Sessions also went 
West and has done very well in Kansas. He served as a soldier during the 
Spanish-American War and afterward located in Kansas, where he took a 
prominent part in political affairs and is now in the secretary of state's ofiice 
of the Sunflower state. He married Rosa West and has one child, a son, 
Minard. Blanche Sessions married Manning Stoner and is living in San 
Francisco. 

Mr. Sessions is an active memher of l)a\is Post No. 612, Grand Army 
of the Republic, at Woodstock, and for years has been adjutant and (|uarter- 
master of the same, ever taking an earnest interest in the affairs of that 
patriotic organization. He also is a member of Woodstock Lodge No. 167, 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and takes a warm interest in the affairs 
of that popular organization. He and his wife have a pleasant home at 
Woodstock and have always given their best thought to doing what they 
can to advance the general interests of their home to\vn. 



A. W^ RUSSELL. 



A. \\\ Russell, farmer of Concord townshi]).. was born in this town- 
.shi[), near the Methodist church at l">is, April 4. 1859. He is a son of 
\'alentine and Margaret (Hill) Russell, who were married in 1836. In 
1842 they moved overland to Iowa, being among the early pioneers in that 
state, where they spent two years, returning to Champaign county, Ohio, in 
1844, and spent the rest of their lives on a farm in Concord township. They 
were members of the Concord Methodist church. He was a Republican and 
held local offices, including that of land appraiser. He took an active interest 
in township aft'airs. His family consisted of eight children, namely: Robert 
11., who lived in Luray, Virginia, is deceased; J. I''., and John I'\ both 
make their home on a farm in Concord township. Champaign county; Lorin 
v. died when sixteen years old; Minerxa A. is the widow^ of Nelson Long- 
fellow and she lives in Concord township; Mrs. I^liza J. \'ance lived in 
Lh-bana, but is now deceased; A. W.. of this sketch; one child died in in- 
fancv. 





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A. W. UT'SSELL ANI> FAMILY 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 97 

A. W. Russell lived at home with his parents until early manhood and 
attended the district schools; later he studied at the Ohio Wesleyan Univer- 
sity at Delaware for two years, then took a business course in a Columbus 
commercial college. After finishing- his education, he returned home and 
farmed with hi? father until he inherited part of the homestead, and later 
Ixmght more of it. There he has continued to reside, the place consisting 
of eighty acres, which he has kept well improved and well cultivated and 
the buildings well repaired. He has been successful as a general farmer 
and makes a specialty of raising cattle, hogs and horses, preparing large 
numbers annually for the market. 

On December 6, 1900, Mr. Russell married Mary E. Snarr, a daughter 
of Philip and Elizabeth (Keller) Snarr, both natives of Shenandoah county, 
\'irginia, where they grew up and married, but about a year later they 
moved to Hardy count}-. West A'^irginia, where they bought a farm and spent 
the rest of their lives. Nine children were born to them, eight of whom 
grew to maturity and seven of them are still living, namely : James and 
John are both residing in Hardy county, West Virginia; Calvin died when 
about five years old; Jacob H. lives in Concord township, Champaign county; 
Alice died in Hampshire county, West Virginia ; Martin S. fives in Salem 
township, Champaign county; Minnie is the wife of C. N. Robertson, of 
Hampshire county, West Virginia; Annie is the wife of P. L. Walker, of 
Hampshire county, that .state; and Mary E., wife of Mr. Russell of this 
sketch. The children of A. W. Russell and wife are: Philip B., born 
March 19, 1902; Richard H., born Eebruary 19, 1906, and Marvin K., born 
November 9, 1907. 

Politically, Mr. Russell is a Republican. Plis wife and son, Philip B., 
belong to the Concord Methodist Episcopal church. 



T. T. R. WILSON. 



J. T. R. Wilson, a well-known substantial farmer and president of the 
Farmers and Merchants Bank at Christiansburg, this county, was born near 
Lexington, Rockbridge county, -Virginia, on August 31, 1845. He was the 
son of Hugh and Mary (Robinson) Wilson, the former of whom was born 
in the state of Virginia in June, 18 15, and the latter in the province of 
Nova Scotia, Canada, in 18 19. 

(7a) . . 



98 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

Hugh and Mary (Robinson) Wilson grew up together on neighboring 
farms in the state of Virginia, where Mrs. \Vilson's parents had taken her 
when she was one year old. The Robinson and Wilson families lived on 
adjoining farms and the friendship formed between the young couple cul- 
minated in marriage, which took place in 1840. Hugh and Mary Wilson, 
following their marriage, continued to live in Virginia until 1855, in which 
year they arrived in Ohio and located in Miami county, west of Christians- 
burg, where they lived until his death. Mrs. Mary Wilson, following the 
death of her husband, moved to Troy, Ohio, w^here she died. 

When Hugh Wilson came to Ohio he settled in Miami county w-here he 
bought one hundred and sixty acres of fine land on which he carried on 
general farming for several years. He and his wife were the parents of 
nine children, three of whom are living at the present time : J. T. R., the 
subject of this sketch; H. M., of St. Louis, Missouri, where he is engaged 
as an optician, and Frank, an insurance man, of Troy, this state. Hugh 
Wilson was a member of the Presbyterian church, in the good works of 
which he was warmly interested and in which he served as a deacon for 
several years. He was a Democrat, but never sought public office, 

J. T. R. Wilson w^as reared on the farm in Miami county and went to 
the district schools. After finishing school he remained at home working on 
the farm until he was twenty-one years old. Some time later he went to 
the state of Nevada and to the Pacific coast, where he remained for about 
three years, at the end of which time he returned to Champaign county. 
In August, 1873, he was married to Nancy J. Furrow, who was born in 
Miami county. They had been playmates from early childhood and attended 
the same schools, the acquaintanceship thus formed later terminating in mar- 
riage. After their marriage they settled on a farm in Miami county, on 
which they continued to reside until 1900. 

Mr. Wilson was one of the organizers of the Farmers and Merchants 
Bank at Christiansburg and was elected its first president, which oftice he 
still holds. The other officers are J. R. Marshall, vice-president, and R. L. 
Powers, cashier. In addition to his banking interests Mr. Wilson is the 
owner of one hundred and twenty-five acres of prime land in Jackson town- 
ship. Mr. Wilson is a member of the Presbyterian church and also attends 
the services of the Christian church. His wife died on April 21, 1916. 
They were the parents of five children as follow : Blanch, who married O. 
S. Walker, of Dayton, Ohio; Eva, deceased: Osie, the wife of W. H. Coble, 
of Christiansburg; Grace, a graduate of the Troy high school, who married 
Howard Ellis, of Lancaster. Ohio, and Josie, a high school graduate, wife 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 99 

of Frank Grove, and li\^es with her father. Air. Wilson is a member of the 
Addison Lodge No. 139, Independent Order of Odd FelloAvs, and of Ad<H- 
son Encampment No. 75. He is a past noble grand and past chief patriarch. 
In politics he is a Democrat, but has never songht pnblic office. 



OLRT.R C. LOFFER. 



Oliver C. Loffer, a well-known and progressive farmer, living on rural 
route 2 out of St. Paris, Champaign county, was born on a farm in Logan 
county, Ohio, October 16, 1881. He is the son of Henry D. and Elora M. 
( Apple ) Loffer. 

Henry D. Loff'er was born on a farm in Shelby county, Ohio, and his 
wife, Elora A J. Apple, was born in Champaign county. They married and 
settled on a farm in Logan county and operated it up to the time of his 
death, in 1898. He was unable to purchase any land and that which he 
worked was held under rent. He was known throughout his life as an 
honest and hard-working farmer and he and his wife were held in much 
resjiect in the district where they resided. Mr. Loffer was an active worker 
in the church and ever took a warm interest in the aft"airs of the Methodist 
Episcopal church and community. Mr. and Mrs. Loffer were the parents 
of seven children, hve of whom are living in 191 7, these being Alice, the 
wife of Rev. Howard Watkins, living in Athens, Ohio; Viola, who married 
Harold Fuller, who is now in the army ; Winona, the wife of Henry Muth, 
of Columbus, Ohio; Mary, unmarried, lives with her mother in Columbus, 
Ohio, and Oliver C. the subject of this sketch. 

Oliver C. Loffer was reared on the farm held by his father in Logan 
comity and was educated in the district and high schools at Ouincy, this 
state, and was graduated from the high school with the class of 1902. He 
then commenced farming for himself and he is now the owner of seventy- 
five acres of prime land located in sections 14 and 20, Jackson township. 
On his farm he has been using up-to-date methods in operating and his 
eft'orts have met with a large measure of success. 

On F'ebruary 22. 1906, Oliver C. Loffer was united in marriage to 
Maude \'. \\'ilkins, who was born near Kenard, Ohio, on x\ugust 27, 1880. 
a daughter of \\ . G. Wilkins. and was reared on the parental farm. She 
was educated in the district schools of the neighborhood in which she lived 
and later spent one year in \\^est Liberty high school. Her parents settled 



lOO CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

on a farm in Salem t(j\vnship and li\'ed on that place for seven years. In 
March, 1914. O. C. LofTer moved to Jackson township and has lived there 
exer since. To the union of Mr. and Mrs. Lofifer three children have heen 
born, namely: Phyllis K., born March 15. 1907; Rheba E., September 11, 
iC)09, and William R., December 27, 1913. 

Afr. T.cift'er and his family are members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church at Grafton chapel, Ohio, and are active in all church work, Mr. 
Loffer being- assistant superintendent of the church. He is a member of 
the Knights of Pythias at Quincy, Ohio. He is a supporter of the Repub- 
lican party, but never been a seeker after public office. He is vice- 
president of the Jackson rural district school board and in other ways has 
oiven evidence of his practical interest in all matters tending toward the 
welfare of the public at large. 



OTTO F. APPLE. 



Otto F. Apple, a progressive and well-known farmer, whose land is 
located in section 3, Jackson township, was born on April 27, 1876, a son 
of Simon and Filizabeth (Loudenback) Apple, who were farming people. 
One of the two children born to this union, Otto F. Apple was reared on 
the farm and, in consecpience of weakness in his eyesight, which prevented 
him from attending the public schools, he was educated at home. 

Otto F. Apple learned the rudiments of farming work on his father's 
farm and continued to work there up to the time of his marriage. On 
December 24, 1900, he was united in marriage to Susan D. Bishop, who 
was born in Mad River township on November 16, 1882. She was a 
daughter of Joseph and Allie (Overholzer) Bishop. Following his marriage 
Mr. Apple settled on a farm in Jackson township and worked at farming 
in that place for nine years, at the end of that period coming into his own 
neighI)orhood. He also spent two years in Clark county, this state, and 
since September. 191 2, he has been living on the tract of sixty-nine and 
one-quarter acres, which forms part of the old home farm. Here he is 
actively engaged in general farming and has met with much success, being 
recognized as one of the progressive farmers in that part of Jackson town- 
ship. 

To the union of Mr. and Mrs. Apple the following children, all 
daughters, have been born, namelv : Ruth E., Naomi A.. Clara M., Ethel I.. 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. Id 

0])al L., Mildred C. and Ida May, all of whom are living" with their parents. 
Two children died in infancy.' The Apple family are earnest members of 
the Lntheran church at St. Paris, and are actively interested in all the good 
works of the congregation, Mr. Apple serving as one of the elders of the 
church. He is a supporter of the Democratic party, but has never held any 
public office. His efforts have always been directed to the cause of good 
locrd government and he is recognized throughout the township as a citizen 
of sound judgment and dependable views on matters appertaining to the 
general welfare of the public. He and his wife take an active part in the 
work of helping to make the social conditions better. 



MELVIN ALLISON. 



Melvin Allison, proprietor of "Diamond Rock Farm," a well-kept and 
profitably cultivated place of one hundred and eighty-six acres, two miles 
west of Mechanicsburg, in Goshen township, this county, was born on a 
farm nearby and has been a resident of that community all his life, making 
his home in this county and in the neighboring county of Clark. He was 
born in Goshen township on August 28, 1862, son of Wilford and Ann C. 
(Melvin) Allison, the former of whom died in 1865, leaving his widow and 
three children, the subject of this sketch having a sister. Flora, wife of Alf. 
Jacobs, of Clark county, and Frank, who married \Mlbur Black, of near 
Dayton, Ohio. 

Mrs. Ann C. Allison was a native of the state of Virginia, born at Har- 
per's Ferry, and was but six years of age when she came with her parents 
to this part of Ohio, where she grew to womanhood and was married. After 
the death of her husband she moved down into Clark county and there Mel- 
vin Allison spent his boyhood and received his schooling. He was but three 
years of age when his father died and he early began working for himself, 
at the age of thirteen taking employment on a farm at a wage of twenty-tive 
cents a day, later receiving eight dollars a month, and until he was seven- 
teen years of age w'orked on the farm he now owns. Upon reaching his 
majority he inherited twenty-eight hundred dollars, but lost the same through 
an unfortunate investment and had to begin "at the bottom." He presently 
rented a farm and by the time of his marriage in 1890 had a home estab- 
lished. Upon buying his present farm he made a payment of eight hundred 
dollars on the same and as his affairs continued to prosper it was not long 



I02 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

until he had it all paid for and well improved. In 191 5 he erected his present 
modern house and he and his family are now very comfortably situated. 
Mr. Allison has an excellent farm plant, "Diamond Rock Farm" being- 
regarded as one of the model farms in that neighborhood, and his operations 
are carried on in accordance with modern methods. In addition to his gen- 
eral farming, he has given considerable attention to the raising of live 
stock and has done very well. Politically, he is a Democrat, but has never 
given particular attention to politics, contenting himself with rendering to 
the state his duty as a good citizen and a voter. 

On March 23, 1890, Melvin Allison was united in marriage to Alice 
Morris, who was born in the neighboring county of Madison on October 
5, 1866, and to this union four children have been born, Edna and Letha, 
graduates of the common school; Catherine, a graduate of the Mechanicsburg 
high school with the class of 191 7, and Walter, who was garduated from 
the common school in 19 17. The Allisons have a very pleasant home and 
have ever taken an interested part in the general social activities of their 
home community, helpful in promoting all movements having to do with the 
advancement of the common welfare. He is a meml^er of the Methodist 
Episcopal church at Mechanicsburg, Ohio. 



EUGENE H. GRUBB. 



Eugene H. Grubb, proprietor of a well-kept farm of one hundred and 
seventy acres in Goshen township, this county, is a native of the Old Dominion 
state, but has been a resident of this county since the days of his young- 
manhood, having come here shortly after reaching his majority. He was 
born in Virginia on December 24, 1875, son of William H. and Matilda 
(Everharts) Grubb, also natives of the old Dominion, who spent all their 
lives there, her death occurring in 1914 and his in 191 5. They were the 
parents of seven sons, of whom the subject of this sketch was the sixth in 
order of birth, the others being Oscar. Wilbert. Robert, Daise. John and 
Harry. 

Reared on the old home farm in Virginia, Eugene H. Grubb received 
his schooling in the local schools of that neighborhood, going to school until 
he was eighteen years of age, and from the days of his boyhood was a valued 
assistant in the la])ors of the home farm, remaining there until he was past 
twenty-one years of age, when he came to Ohio and began working on a 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. IO3 

farm in Champaign county. A year later he rented a farm and began farm- 
ing on his own account and two years later rented a tract on the J. J. Ware 
farm and operated that place for seven years, at the end of which time he 
bought his present farm of one hundred and thirty-three acres in Goshen 
township and has ever since made his home there, he and his family being- 
very comfortably situated. Mr. Grubb has made all the present substantial 
improvements on that place and now has an admirably equipped fami plant. 
In addition to his general farming he has given considerable attention to the 
raising of live stock and is doing very well. Mr. Grubb is a Democrat, but 
has never given any particularly active attention to political affairs, other 
than performing a good citizen's duty of voting. 

On April 4, 1901, Eugene H. Grubb was united in marriage to Anna 
Neer, who was born on a farm in Mechanicsburg, this county, daughter of 
N. O. Neer, and who was educated in the common schools of that township, 
from which she was graduated, and to this union four daughters have been 
born, Evaline, Mildred, Virginia and Marian. Mr. and Mrs. Grubb are 
members of the Methodist Protestant church and take a proper interest in 
church work and in the general good works of their community. Mr. Grubb 
is a member of the Masonic lodge at Mechanicsburg and takes a warm 
interest in Masonic affairs. 



CHARLES F. FIXSTERWALD. M. D. 

Dr. Charles F. Finsterwakl, ph\sician and surgeon at North Lewisburg, 
was lK)rn on a farm in the immediate vicinity of Athens, in the county of 
that name, this state. May 2, 1884, son of J. H. and Addie Finsterwakl, who 
are still living there. Reared on the farm, he received his early schooling in 
the schools of Athens, the county seat, continuing the same in the high school 
at Hamden. and was graduated from the latter in 1903. He then attended 
Ohio University for three }ears, at the end of which time he was made prin- 
cipal of the schools at Hamden and after serving in that capacity for two 
years was made superintendent of schools at Jacksonville, in his home county 
and served in that capacity for four years. In the meantime he had been 
giving his attention to the study of medicine with a view to becoming a 
physician, and he then entered the medical department of the Ohio State 
University, from which he was graduated four years later, in 19 16, with the 
degree of Doctor of Medicine. During this course Doctor Finsterwald was 



I04 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

an interne in the state hospital for two years, there securing the advantage 
of a practical training in his profession that has proved of incalculable bene- 
lit to him. 

Thus admiarbly (|ualihed for the jjractice of his profession, Doctor 
binsterwald located at Athens, Ohio, for a short time, then to North Lewis- 
burg, August 14, 1916. where he opened offices and where he has since Ijeen 
engaged in practice, his acfiuaintance being rapidly extended throughout that 
part of the county and the nearby sections of the neighboring, counties of 
Logan and Union. In his political views. Doctor b'insterwald is an "inde- 
pendent" and gives his close and thoughtful attention to political issues. He 
was vice-president of his class in the university during his senior year and 
during his college days was an active member of the literary fraternity, 
Delta Tau, and the medical fraternity, Phi Chi, in the affairs of Ixith of 
which lively associations he continues to take a warm interest. 

On May 6, 1909. Dr. C. F. Finsterwald was united in marriage to Maude 
MuUay, daughter of J. B. Mullay and wife, of Portland, Oregon, and to this 
union one child has been liorn, a son. James l^>ederick. Doctor and Airs. 
Finstervvaldare members of the Presbyterian church and take a proper interest 
in church affairs, as well as in other local good works, and are helpful in pro- 
moting all agencies having to do with the advancement of the common wel- 
fare. They have a pleasant home at North Lewisburg and take an interested 
part in the general social activities of their home town. 



FORRY WILSON. 



l-'orrv Wilson, farmer of Concord township. Champaign county, was 
born just west of where he now resides, January i, i860. He is a son of 
John D. and Sarah (Forry) Wilson. The father was born on the same 
farm where the subject of this sketch first saw the light of day, and he was 
a son of John and Miah (Dickey) Wilson. John Wilson was born in 
\\''ashington county. Pennsylvania, where he spent his boyhood, but when a 
young man, in 181 7, he threaded the wilderness trails in Champaign comity, 
Ohio, and entered the land from the government on which John D. and 
F(jrry Wilson were born, in what is now Concord township. The ct)untry 
was at that time very sparsely settled and vast woods prevailed, but the 
elder Wilson, like all the j^ioneers, was a man of grit and courage, and he 
carved out a home in the midst of the forest, where he spent the rest of his 




JOHN D. WILSON 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. I05 

life. He married a Miss Kunyan. In- whom two children were born. She 
died in early life and he then married Aliah Dickey, a native of Fayette 
county, Ohio, and to their union three children were born, of whom John D. 
Wilson was the youngest. John Wilson became one of the leading farmers 
and influential citizens of Champaign county in his day. 

John D. Wilson grew to manhood on the home farm in Concord town- 
ship and there he married .Sarah Forry. who was Ijorn in Logan county. 
Ohio. She was a daughter of Rudolph and Sarah Forrv and of Pennsyl- 
vania stock. He. enlisted during the Civil War in the one-hundred-day 
service in the One Hundred and Thirty-fourth Ohio X'olunteer Infantry, 
under Capt. Miles Wilson. They saw active service in \'irginia and around 
Cincinnati. Ohio (where they were known as the "Sfjuirrel Hunters"), to 
stop Morgan on his famous raid. He contracted typhoid fever and ne\er 
was strong thereafter. After his marriage John D. XA'ilson remained on 
the homestead, following general farming the rest of his life there. He was. 
a Repul)lican. and he and his wife belonged to the Presbyterian church at 
S])ring Hills, in which he was an elder for many years and active in church 
work all his life. His family consisted of six children, two of whom died 
in infanc}-; those whcj grow up were named as follow: lunma. now deceased, 
was the wife of William Daniels: l-'orry. subject of this sketch; Walter S. 
li\es on the home farm in ("(^ncord town~;liip: Miah J.ane. now deceased, was 
tlie wife of James ?*IcCroskev. 

i''orry Wilson grew up on the honie farm and received his education, 
in the district schools. He lived at home until his marriage, on March 9, 
1 886, to Flora \'. Journell, a daughter of Crocket and Margaret (Taylor) 
Journell. .\fter his marriage he located in Harrison township, but remained 
there onl\- a short time, then returned to the home place, where he con- 
tinued to reside until IQO/. when he bought his present farm, nine miles 
northwest of Uriiana, Concord township. He owns two hundred and 
sevent\- acres in his home farm and ninet}- seven acres in Salem township. 
Flis land is well improved and well cultivated and he has ])een very success- 
ful in general agricultural pursuits. He makes a specialt}- of feeding cattle 
and hogs, preparing large numbers annually for the market. He has a 
modern home and substantial outbuildings, everything about his place de- 
noting good management and thrift. 

Three children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Wilson, namely: Alta 
Fern, died aged one month; Otto M., married Lenora Colbert and they live 
on the home farm, which he helps his father operate : Leo B. is also at 



I06 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

liome and helpiii.^' \\ itli the farm work'. The mother of these children died 
■on Alav 4, l<)i I. 

I'ohticalK, Mr. Wilson is a Re|)ublican. lie is active in local public 
iiffairs and lias ser\etl two terms as township assessor. He is a member 
of the Presl)\ Lerian church at Spring Hills and has been an elder in the 
same for a numlier of vears. His wife also belonged to that church. 



HARRY O. BAKER. 

Harry O. Baker is one of the younger and among- the more progressive 
farmers oi jacks(jn tcnvnship. Champaign county, his farm being located in 
sectioit 7, that township. He was born in a log cabin on the farm which he 
now owns, and which is still standing, on januarv 18, 1878. a .son of Obadiah 
and l-"diza (Bowers) Baker. 

Obadiah Baker was liorn in Clark county. Ohit), on the farm owned 
by his father, Jacob Baker. He was reared on the farm in Clark county, 
which was occupied by his father, and was educated in the public schools 
of the district. Eliza Bowers, his wife, was also born in the state of Ohio, 
educated in the public schools and grew to \\'omanhood in Champaign 
county. Obadiah Baker and Eliza Bowers were married in this county and 
went to live in a log cabin on the farm now owned by their son. Harry O. 
Baker. After a few years of married life they built a substantial house on 
the farm of eighty acres owned by Obadiah Baker and on which he was 
engaged in general farming for the remainder of his life. He died in 1885 
and his widow died in 1896, their deaths being regretted throughout the 
community in which they had lived for many years and where they were 
held in high regard for their qualities as good citizens and good neighbors. 
They were earnest members of the Lutheran church, in the good works of 
which they were warmly interested. Obadiah Baker and wife were the 
parents of seven children, six of whom are living in 1917: William D., a 
farmer living in Jackson township; Alma, wife of J. C. Richardson, of 
Christiansburg; Jacob, a farmer li\ing in Mad I'iiver township; Sarah, wife 
of Charles Pence, of Miami county, this state; lr\-in. who lives in Christians- 
burg, and Harry, who lives on the old home place. 

Harry O. Baker was reared on his father's farm and was educated in 
the district schools of Jackson township, attending school during the winter 
jnonths and working f)n the farm during the summer seasons. His father 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. IO7 

having- died when he was about six years of age, he started earl^• in hfe to 
help in the upkeep of the home. Harry O. Baker was married, when he 
had reached his twentieth year, to Edna M. Baker, the marriage taking 
place on February 24. [898. His wife was born in Jackson township, this 
county, on September 3, 1877, a daughter of William and Abigail (Robbins) 
Baker. Mrs. Baker was educated in the public schools of Jackson township. 
Following his marriage Harry O. Baker and his wife settled on his 
present farm, where he is engaged in general farming and has been suc- 
cessful in all his operations. They are the parents of the following children : 
Vernon C. ; Rachel, attended the common schools and is now a student in 
higli school; Wilbur, wIkt is attending the common schools; Alta, ; Ada. 
deceased, and Waldo. The Baker family are members of the Mt. Zion 
Baptist church and are warmly interested in all church affairs. Air. Baker 
is a member of St. Paris Lodge No. 246, Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, in which order he is past noble grand. He is also a member of the 
encampment and fills the office of junior warden in the same, and in both of 
these popular organizations he takes a keen interest. Mr. Baker is an 
ardent supporter of the Democratic party and is now a member of the Jack- 
son township school board and is township committeeman at the present 
time. 



GRANT NINCEHELSER. 

Grant Nincehelser, a well-known and substantial retired merchant and 
farmer, of Cable, this county, and formerly and for years clerk of Wayne 
township, was born in the village of Cable and has lived there all his life. 
He was born on October i, 1871, son of Henry and Elizabeth (Strohl) 
Nincehelser, earlv residents of that coiumunity, whose last days were spent 
there. 

Henry Nincehelser, who built the first house on the site now occupied 
1)v the village of Cable, was a native of Pennsylvania, born in Berks county, 
that state, April 8, 1827, son of Jacob and Harriet ( Flart ) Nincehelser, also 
natives of Pennsylvania, who later came to Ohio, driving through, and set- 
tled in this county, arriving here with Init fifteen cents in cash. Jacob Nince- 
helser began farming on King's creek and became a substantial farmer, he 
and his wife spending the remainder of their days there. As a lad Henry 
Nincehelser was "bound out" to a blacksmith in Pennsylvania and served 
a thorough apprenticeship to that trade, remaining there and working at 



I08 CHAAIPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

that trade until he was twenty-one years of age, when he came to Oliio 
with a view to estabHshing his home in Champaign county. Upon coming 
here, the date of his arrival having been May 12, 1849. Henry Nincehelser 
found employment w-ith "Jimmie" Howard, who had a blacksmith shop on 
King's creek, near the home of Henry Mast. Presently the young man 
returned to Pennsylvania and in the village of Ephrata. in that state, on 
January i, 185 1. was united in marriage to Elizabeth Strohl. In the fall 
of that same year he came back to Champaign county, bringing W'ith him 
his bride, and established his home at tlie point on King's creek where later 
the village of Cable sprang up. There was a good well of water at that 
point, a decisive factor in the location of the new home in the then wilder- 
ness, for at that time the greater part of that section of the county was an 
unbroken forest. Henry Nincehelser cleared a small plot of ground and 
there erected a small house, the first house built in what later came to be the 
^'illage of Cable, and nearby he set up a forge and established a blacksmith 
shop, a special inducement in that direction having been the promise of much 
work that would come to him froiu Hiram Cable, who, with his Ijrother, 
Philander Cable, was a large landowner and contractor in that neighbor- 
hood and after whom the village which, presently began to take form around 
the blacksmith shop, was given its name. When the railroad construction 
crew reached that point during the time of the later construction of the Pan- 
handle railroad through this county, Henry Nincehelser and his wife boarded 
the construction hands and Mrs. Nincehelser was given the privilege of 
riding on the first train that ran between Urbana and Cable. The site of 
the house in which the Nincehelsers conducted their boarding house during 
the days of the railroad construction and w-hich was the first house erected 
at that point, occupied the site now occupied by the Rudisell Hotel. Henry 
Nincehelser continued in the blacksmithing business at Cable the rest of 
his life and was an important personal factor in the growth and develop- 
ment of the village of which he was the first settler. He and his wife wore 
among the organizers of the Jenkins Chapel Methodist Protestant church 
and ever were active in church work and other local good works. W^ien 
the Ci\'il War was at its height Mr. Nincehelser enlisted for the hundred- 
day service as a member of Company F, One Hundred and Thirty-fourth 
Regiment. Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and w-idi that command participated in 
the famous James River campaign. He had joined the Odd Fellows during 
his residence in Pennsylvania and later, when a lodge of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows was organized at Cable he became a charter member 
of the same. Originally a Whig, be became a Republican upon the fomia- 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. IO9 

tion of the latter party and e\er remained an ardent supporter oi the same. 
Mrs. Henry Nincehelser hved to a ripe old age, her death occurring at 
Cable on August 15, 1905, she then being seventy-three years of age, and 
he survived for nine years, his death occurring on August 7. 1914, he then 
being seventy-eight years of age. They were the parents of four sons, of 
whom, the subject of this sketch was the last-born, the others being as fol- 
low : John J., formerly and for years engaged in the blacksmith business 
at Cable, having there taken over his father's old-established shop, Init now 
engaged in the mercantile business in that village and who has been married 
twice, first to Lizzie Johnson and, secondly, to Sadie Jones; William j., 
who is now living at Oskaloosa, Kansas, where he is engaged in the li\ery 
and transfer business, and Oliver W., a farmer and stockman at Cable. 

Grant Nincehelser grew up at Cable and upon completing the course 
in the village schools entered the college at Ada and was graduated from 
that institution with the class of 1893. For a year thereafter he was employed 
as a clerk in the store oi Charles Dempsey, dealer in agricultural imple- 
ments at Cable, and then he engaged in business on his own account, opening 
a hardware store and a house for the sale of agricultural implements and 
general farm machinery at Cable, and was thus quite successfully engaged 
until his retirement from the mercantile business twenty years later. In 
the meantime Mr. Nincehelser had acquired a valuable bit of farm land 
near the village and he continues to give considerable per.sonal attention to 
the operation of the same. He always has given his close attention to local 
civic affairs and for seventeen years served as clerk of Wayne township, 
during that time rendering admirable service in behalf of the [jublic. 

In August, 1899, Grant Nincehelser was united in marriage to Rachael 
L. Patrick, who was born at Urbana, this count}-, daughter of Alexander 
and Catherine (Stewart) Patrick and granddaughter of Judge Patrick, one 
of the most forceful of the pioneers of this county, further mention of whom 
is made elsewhere in this work. Alexander Patrick was a cabinet-maker 
and later moved from Urbana to Cable, where he spent his last days, his 
death occurring in April, 191 5. His wife had preceded him to the grave 
many years, her death having occurred in October. 1887. They were the 
parents of four daughters, of whom Mrs. Nincehelser was the second in 
order of birth, the others being as follow : Jessie, who is now living at Loma. 
this state, widow of W^illiam Howard; Carrie, wife of John Hollis, of Iowa 
Falls, Iowa, and Grace, who died unmarried. Mr. and Mrs. Nincehelser 
are the parents of three children, Henry Stewart, Ruth Adelaide and Eliza- 
beth. The Nincehelsers have a very pleasant home at Cable and have ever 



no CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

taken an interested part in the general social activities of their home town, 
helpful in promoting- all agencies having to do with the advancement of 
the common welfare thereahout. Mrs. Nincehelser is a meniher of the Bap- 
tist church at Urbana and takes a proper interest in church work. Air. 
Nincehelser is a Mason, affiliated with the lodge of that order at Urbana, 
and is a member of the local lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows at Cable, in the affairs of both of which orders he takes a warm 
interest. 



H I^XRY WESTFALL. 



Henry Westlall, memljer of the general merchandise firm of Madden & 
West fall at Woodstock and for many years actively engaged at that place 
in the l)uying and selling of live stock, is a native son of Ohio and has Hved 
in this state practically all his life, with the exception of a couple of years 
s])ent in the West during the days of his young manhood and three years 
later si)ent at Indianapolis, where he was engaged in the railroad service, 
lie was born on a farm in Darke county. August 12, 1863, son of John and 
Susanna Westfall, the former of whom was a native of New England and 
the latter of the state of Pennsylvania, who came with their respective parents 
to Ohio in the days of their youth, and grew up in Darke county, where the\' 
were married and where they spent the remainder of their lives. 

Reared on a farm. Henry Westfall received his schooling in the district 
school in the neighborhood of his home in Darke county and continued work- 
ing on the farm until he was nineteen years of age. when he went West. 
Two \ ears later he returned to Ohio and secured employment with the Penn- 
s\l\ania Railroad ("ompan\- and was for three years thereafter engaged in 
railroad work, during that time being located at Indianapolis. He then 
returned to Ohio and located at W^oodstock, where he engaged in the lumber 
business, which he followed for two years, at the end of which time he became 
engaged tliere in the mercantile business and has continued in that business, 
ofif and on, for the ]jast thirty years or more, at jiresent l)eing engaged in that 
line at Woodstock as a member of the firm of Madden & Westfall. proprietors 
of what is regarded as the leading-general mercantile establishment in that 
thri\ing village, vov the past eighteen years Mr. Westfall also has been 
engaged in the live-stock business and buys large quantities of cattle and 
hogs, shipping to outside markets, and has done very well in that line, being 
widely known throughout this part of the state as a stock buyer. Though 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. HI 

ever giving- a good citizen's attention to local political affairs. Air. Westfall 
is "independent" in his attitnde toward parties and has never heen a seeker 
after public office. 

On l"'el)ruary 22, 1887, Henry Westfall was united in marriage to Carrie 
Louden, daughter of Benjamin Louden and wife, and to this union nine chil- 
dren have l)een born, all of whom are living save (jne, Olive, the others being- 
Ada, Harry. Pearl Mearl. Ralph, John, Howard and James. Ada West- 
fall, the eldest of these children, married Than Aladden. Harry Westfall 
married Jessie jNIurray and has two children. Darling and Evelyn, and Pearl 
Westfall married Carrie ALcClintock and has one child, Helen Louise. The 
West falls have a very pleasant home at Woodstock and have ever taken an 
interested part in the general social activities of that delightful village, doing 
much to advance the general interests of the town and of the surrounding- 
country. Though starting on his business career with limited means. Mr. 
Westfall has made a substaiitial success and has long l^een regarded as one 
of the leading factors in the business life of the eastern part of the countv. 



JAMES PERRY, 



James Perry, trustee of Union township and a substantial farmer and 
stockman of that township, living on rural mail route No. i out of Mechanics- 
burg, ^vas born in the neighboring township of W^ayne and has lived in 
Champaign county all his life. He was born on April 9. 1855, son of Evan 
and Elizabeth ( Middleton ) T'erry. the former of whom was born in the 
principality of Wales and the latter in Highland count}-, this state, who 
became residents of this county and here spent their last davs. 

Evan Perry was but a lad when he came to this country from Wales 
with his parents, the family locating in Delaware county, Ohio, where he 
grew to manhood, later coming to Champaign county. He married in Wayne 
township and there established his home, continuing actively engaged in 
farming there the rest of his life, his death occurring in 1872. lie then being., 
fifty-two years of age. His widow survived him for some years, her death 
occurring in 1903. They were the parents of eight children, of whom the 
subject of this sketch was the fifth in order of birth, the others being George. 
David L.. Evan, Charles, Jane, Xanc\- and Elizabeth. 

James Perry was reared on the home farm in Wayne township and there 
grew to manhood, receiving^ his schooling in the schools of that neighborlKx^d. 



IIJ CHAMPAIGN COUNTY. OHIO. 

He was married when twenty years of age and dien began farming on his 
o\\ n account, renting a farm in \A'ayne to\Ynship. He later moved to a farm 
in Cidshen township and remained there until 1906, \vhen he 1x)ught the farm 
of one hundred and forty-seven and one-half acres on which he is now living, 
m Union township, and has ever since made that place his home, one of the 
hcsi-known farmers in that part of the county. In addition to his general 
fanning, Mr. I'erry has for years given considerable attention to the raising 
of ]i\e stock, feeding all the grain he raises, and is doing verv well in his 
operatitins. He is a Republican, was road supervisor for his district for 
about ten years, a member of the local school board for four vears and is 
now serving as trustee of his home township, giving his most thoughtful and 
intelligent attention to the duties of that important office. 

Tn 1875 James Perry was united in marriage to Viola Yocum, daughter 
of James and Hannah Yocum, and to this union nine children have been born, 
namely : \\^illiam, who married Mabel McClemmon and had three children, 
Stewart, Lucy and \\ ilma ; Charles, who married Ella Engle and has three 
children, Irene. Hazel and Bernice : Allan, who married Pauline Weather- 
head : lesse. who married Jennie Kulp and has six children, Edna, Irma, 
Clarence, MarN, Yiola and Dorotha : Carrie, wife of Wilfred Hall; Nellie, 
W'ho married Bert Hays and has six children, Edith. Maggie, Bessie, James, 
Sumner and Nettie; Ivan, who is unmarri.ed ; Titus, also unmarried, and 
Maggie, deceased. The I'errys have a pleasant home on their w^ell-kept farm 
and have e^er given their interested attention to the community's general 
social welfare. 



TAMES A. WEIDMAN. 



One of the leading agricitlturists of Salem tc")wnship. Champaign county. 
is T. A. Weidman. who is also president of the Farmers State Bank of West 
Liberty, Ohio. He was born on a farm north of Kings Creek, in the former 
onintv. March 4, 1840, a scion of an honored pioneer f:unily, being a son 
of Abraham and Emily (Dewey) Weidman, natives of N^irginia and Penn- 
sylvania, respectively. The father came to Champaign county, Ohio, in 
1824. when twelve years old, with his father, Abraham Weidman, coming 
overland from Virginia. They were thus among the earliest settlers in this 
locality. The)- located on W'hat is now known as the Dugan road, where 
the elder Weidman bought land which be developed into a good farm in 
the midst of the wilderness and spent the rest of his life here, becoming 




^OyO^^tAX) . LyC.i//-eyL^^^U-^> 



/!Pt^n^x^ 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. II3 

iniluential in tl^^e early-day affairs of Salem township. His son, Abraham 
W'eidman, Jr., assisted him in developing the home farm, but when yonng- 
he began working at the carpenter's trade, becoming especially adept at barn 
building. He continued his trade for about eight years, then turned his 
attention to farming, starting as a renter, but later bought a forty-acre farm 
which he operated until his death in 1889. His wife died in 1884. They 
were the parents of seven children, only two of whom are now living, J. A. 
of this sketch, and Samuel W., who makes his home in Kings Creek, this 
count}'. 

J. A. Weidman gre\\' to manhood on the farm and received his educa- 
tion in the public schools. In early life he took up farming for a livelihood, 
and in 1864 went to Illinois and worked in the western part of the state at 
the carpenter's and stone mason's trades for five years. Then he returned 
to his native county and rented the old James farm of one thou.sand acres, 
in Salem township, remaining there for four years, during which time he 
was ver\' successful as a general farmer and an extensive live-stock feeder. 
He then married and rented the Longworth place, containing two thousand 
acres, which he oi)erated with his former success for five years, then bought 
one hundred acres in Salem t(^wnship which he now owns and where he 
has since resided. He also purchased at that time a farm of one hundred 
and sixtv-four acres in Concord township on the Mad river. He has later 
l^ought additional land, until he now owns three hundred and ninety-six 
acres in Salem and. Concord townships. He has brought his land up to a 
high state of culti^•atiop. and impro\ement and has an attractive and modern 
dwelling — iii fact, everything about his ))lace denotes thrift, good taste and 
g0(id n.ianagement. He has ahvays farmed on a large scale and, being a 
man of sound judgment and executive ability, has succeeded admirably. 
He is now living practically retired from the active duties of life, living 
(fuietly on the old home place in Salem township. He is a heavy stock- 
holder in the Farmers State Bank at West Liberty, and was elected presi- 
dent of this institution four years ago. He has managed its affairs in a 
manner that has reflected much credit upon himself and to the eminent sat- 
isfaction of the other stockholders and patrons of the bank, which is one of 
the sound and popular banking institutions of this section of the state. 

Mr. Weidman was married, on March 4. 1875, to Sarah Elizabeth 

Anspaw, a daughter of Jonathan Anspaw, and to their union three children 

were born, namely : Bertha, deceased ; Charles, deceased, and Lola Emma, 

who married \\'illiam Madden and has one child, Marie. The death of 

(8a) 



114 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY. OHIO. 

Mrs. Weidman occurred on .Vugust 12, 1892. at the age of forty-two years. 
Politically, Mr. Weidman is a Democrat, but he has never been very 
active in public affairs. Fraternally, he belongs to the Masonic order and 
to the Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine at Dayton. 
Ohio. Personally, he has always been regarded as a good citizen in the 
best sense of the word and a man of upright character, in every wav de- 
serving of his material success and of the estcen.i in which he is held bv all 
who know him. 



GEORGIA W. HANN. 



George W. Hann, one of the best-known live-stock dealers in Cham- 
paign county, for years engaged in that business at Woodstock, member of 
the board of directors of the Peoples P)ank of Woodstock and otherwise 
prominently identified with the general business affairs of that thriving vil- 
lage, is a native of the old Buckeye state and also lived in this state all his 
life. He was born in the village of West Jeft'erson, in Madison county. 
January 22. 1864. ^on of George and Malinda (Furrow) Hann. who later 
became residents of this county, but who later returned to Madison county, 
where his last days were spent. She still lives at West Jefferson. 

George Hann was trained as a butcher in his youth and remained 
engaged in that vocation all his life. On December 2=^, 1881. he left West 
Jeft'erson with his family and located at Mechanicsburg, this county, where 
he engaged in the butcher business and was thus engaged there for se\eral 
years, at the end of which time he returned to his old home at West Jeffer- 
son, resumed there the retail meat business and there spent his last days. He 
and his wife were the parents of five children, those besides the subject of 
this sketch being William (deceased). Mrs. Fannie Sheeders, Mrs. j\Tollie 
Bennett and Mrs. Lucy Dingier. 

George W. Hann received his schooling at West Jefferson and was aliont 
eighteen years of age when he came with his parents to this county and located 
at Mechanicsburg. There he assisted his father in the retail meat business 
until in August, 1882, he moved up to Woodstock and there estal)lished a 
meat market on his own account. Two or there months later he married, 
established his home there and has ever since made that village his place of 
residence. Mr. Hann continued in the butcher business for several years 
after locating at W^oodstock and then turned his attention to the buying and 
selling of live stock rmd has since been very successfully engaged in that line. 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. II5 

long" having been recognized as one of the leading stock buyers in this part 
of the state, his operations in that line covering a wide territory hereabout. 
His buying is mostly for the Pittsburgh market and he has done very well. 
In addition to his live-stock operations Mr. Hann has long given close atten- 
tion to the general business afifairs of his home town and has for years been 
regarded as one of "live wires" of that village. He is a member of the board 
of directors of the Peoples Bank of Woodstock and it was largely through 
his efforts that the bank erected its present handsome bank building some 
years ago. He has taken an active interest in politics since the days of his 
l)oyhood and has for years been looked upon as one of the leaders of the 
Republican party in the eastern part of the county. 

Mr. Hann has been twice married. It was on November 4, 1882, that 
he was united in marriage to Clara Kentield, daughter of Daniel Kenfield and 
wife, and to that union was born one child, a daughter, Dorothy, who mar- 
ried Claude Dunham and has one child, a daughter. Claudine. Mrs. Clara 
Hann died on September 4, 1913, and on October 22, 191 5, Mr. Hann mar- 
ried, secondly, Mrs. A^era (Miller) Hewing, which union has been without 
issue. Mr. and ]\Irs. Hann have a very pleasant home at Woodstock and 
take a proper part in the general social activities of their home town and of 
the community at large, helpful in promoting all movements designed to 
advance the common welfare. Mr. Hann is a member of the local lodge of 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and is past noble grand of the same. 
He also is a member of the local lodge of the Knights of Pythias and in the 
affairs of both of these popular organizations takes a warm and active interest. 



BOWERS & SLAGLE. 



W. J. Bowers and William H. Slagle, owners of a saw-mill at Rosewood, 
Champaign county, have been engaged in that business as partners for more 
than seventeen years and are widely known as dealers in lumber throughout 
this part of the state, the products of their mill having an extensive market. 

W. J. Bowers, the senior partner in the saw-mill business, was born in 
Hampshire county, Virginia, on March 28, 185 1, a son of Uriah Bowers and 
wife, natives of that state, who came from their home state to Shelby county. 
Ohio, in 1861, and located on a farm in that county. Uriah Bowers lived in 
that county for a short time and then went to the state of Iowa, where he 
lived for two vears. At the end of that period he returned to Ohio and 



Il6 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

bought a farm in Wood county, which he later sold and returned to Shelby 
county, where he engaged in farming and continued at that occupation, up 
to the time of his death. He met his death through a runaway horse throwing 
him out of a wagon in 1880. 

W. J. Bowers had been working on a farm and remained at home during 
the lifetime of his parents. Some years later he decided to engage in the 
saw-mill business; he employed William H. Slagle as steam engineer to 
run the saw-mill and the latter was thus engaged for about five years. The 
business acquaintance thus formed led to Mr. Bowers and Mr. Slagle enter- 
ing into a partnership in the saw-mill trade in the winter of 1901, under 
the firm name of Bowers & Slagle, and this partnership has since been con- 
tinued, with satisfactory results. They moved the mill to Ashland, Ohio, 
in April, 1902, and operated there until July of the same }ear, at which time 
they came to Rosewood and here their mill has been running ever since with 
advantage to the partnership. Mr. Bowers is a supporter of the Democratic 
party, but has never been a seeker after public ofitice. He has been making 
liis home with Mr. Slagle for the past twenty years. 

William H. Slagle, partner in the saw-mill business of Bowers & Slagle, 
was born on November 23, 1870, a son of J. W. and Mary E. (Trapp) 
Slagle, both of whom are now dead. J. W. Slagle was a soldier in the Civil 
War, being a member of Company C, Ninety-ninth Ohio Volunteer Infantry; 
he saw much service and was in many important engagements during the 
three years he served with the Federal forces. He was finally discharged at 
Camp Dennison for general disability. William H. Slagle's mother died 
Avhen he was eight years old, at which time he went to live with his grand- 
parents for about twelve months. He was educated in the public schools and 
on leaving school he farmed for some time. In addition to his interests in 
the saw-mill Mr. Slagle is the owner of a farm of iifty-eight acres of prime 
land in Adams township. 

On Octoljer 5, 1893, William H. Slagle was united in marriage to Sarah 
E. Fristoe, who was born in Fairfield county, Ohio, but was reared in Shelb}' 
county. Her mother died while she was still a child, being six years old 
at the time. She accompanied her father to Shelby county after the death 
of her mother, the father settling in that county, where he was a farmer. 
Mr. Slagle is a supporter of the Republican party, but has never been a seeker 
after public oifice, preferring to dev^ote his time to his saw-mill and farming 
interests. 

Nicholas Trapp, maternal grandfather of William H. Slagle, was a 
soldier in the Ignited States army in 1848 during the Mexican \Var, serving 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. II 7 

afc a captain. He also served in the Civil War for three months as a hrst 
term and on the expiration of that period he re-enlisted as captain in Com- 
pany K, First Ohio Volunteer Infantry and served to the end of the -.var. 
He was in several severe engagements and was wounded four times at the 
haltle of Lookout ^fountain. During the rush to the gold fields of Cali- 
fornia he joined with a numher of other "forty-niners" and remained there 
until 185 1. 



SAMUEL RH.EY. 



Samuel Riley, village councilman, a well-known huilding contractor at 
North Lewisburg and an honored veteran of the Civil War, is a native of the 
Keystone state, but has been a resident of Ohio ever since the completion of 
his service in the Union army during- the Civil War, he having located in this 
state at the close of the war. He was born in Bedford county, Pennsylvania, 
November 9, 1847, son of John and Amanda Riley, lx)th of whom also were 
natives of Pennsylvania and whose last days were spent in Bedford count}'. 

Upon completing his studies in the schools of his home county. Samuel 
Riley took up farming with his father and was thus engaged when, in 1865, 
he then being eighteen \ears of age, he enlisted ior service during the con- 
tinuance of the Civil War as a member of Company E, Second Regiment. 
.Marvland N'olunteer Infantrv. and served with that command for eighty-four 
da}s. or until mustered out at the close of the w'ar. Upon the completion of 
his military service Air. Riley came to Ohio and for eighteen months was 
engaged as a farm hand in the section lying- between Troy and Covington. 
He then married and took up the trade of plasterer at Covington, where he 
established his home and where he remained for eleven years, at the end of 
which time he came to this county and located at Cable. During a part of 
the time he was living at Covington Mr. Riley was engaged in the railway 
service and it was while thus engaged that he was sent to Cable to take charge 
of the gravel pit operated at that place by the Pennsylvania Railroad Com- 
pany. Two years later he moved to Woodstock, where he resumed his voca- 
tion as a [)lasterer and bricklaver and wdiere he remained for seven years, 
at the end of which time he moved to North Lewisburg. where he opened in 
lousiness as a general building contractor and where he has ever since been 
located, a period of more than thirty years, during which time he has exe- 
cuted contracts in all parts of the county, long having been recognized as one 
of the leading contractors in this part of the state. Mr. Riley is a Repub- 



Il8 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

lican and has long i;ivcn his earnest attention to local political affairs, and is 
now serving as a meniher of the village council. 

Mr. Riley has been married four times. It was in 1867, at Covington, 
that he was united in marriage to Sarah Earnhardt, who died at Woodstock. 
To that union five children were born, of whom two are now living, Mollie, 
\\ho married Chwnn Clark and has three children, Herbert, Charles and 
George, and Maude, who married Charles Granser and has two children. Earl 
and J.ou. Following the death of the mother of these children Mr. Riley 
married Mrs. Susan (Epps) Smith and after her death he married Adia 
Heston, following whose death he married Cora Spain. Mr. and Mrs. Riley 
have a pleasant home at North I.ewisburg and give proper attention to the 
i^'eneral affairs of their home town. Mr. Riley is a member of the Inde- 
l)endent Order of Odd Fellows, past noble grand of the local lodge of that 
order, and is also a member of the Knights of Pythias, past chancellor com- 
mander of the local lodge of that order, having for years taken a warm inter- 
est in the affairs of both these popular organizations. 



EDGAR S. EVERHART. 



Edgar S. Everhart, one of Union township's well-known and substantial 
farmers, now living practically retired from the active labors of the farm at 
his i)leasant home in that township, where he has a fine farm of one hundred 
and fifteen acres, is a Virginian, but has been a resident of Ohio since the 
days of his boyhood and of Champaign county since the early eighties. He 
was born on a farm in the vicinity of Lovettsville, in Louden county, Vir- 
ginia, October 11, 1852, son of Israel and Maria (Ropp) Everhart, lx)th of 
German descent, who later moved to Ohio and located in Clark count}', where 
they spent the remainder of their lives. 

Israel Everhart also was born in the vicinity of Lovettsville, in Louden 
countv, Virginia, in 181 1, and there grew to manhood, becoming- a building 
contract(^r. There he married Maria Ropp, who was born in that same 
neighborhood in 1817, a daughter of Nicholas Ropp, a substantial farmer of 
that vicinity, who spent all his life there, and who was the father of ten chil- 
dren, those besides Mrs. Everhart having been Polly, Melissa, Samuel, Jacob, 
John, Emanuel, Elizabeth, Eliza and Jane. Israel Everhart was one of six 
children born to his parents, the others having been Solomon, Tillie, George, 
Nathaniel and William, the last two named having been twins. In April, 



CHAMPAIGX COUNTY, OHIO. II9 

t86i. Israel I^\'erhart moved with his family from Virginia to Ohio and 
-cltled on a farm in the Catawba neighborhood, in Clark county, where he 
antl his wife spent the remainder of their lives. Israel Everhart was a mem- 
l)er of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and he and his wife were active 
members of the ]\Ieth>odist Protestant church. He died in 1883 and his widow 
surA-ived him for some years, she having been eighty years of age at the time 
of her death. They were the parents of six children, of whom the subject 
of this sketch was the lifth in order of birth, the others being William, 
Alatilda, John A., Thomas and George. The late William Everhart was for 
}ears a well-known farmer in Union township, this county, and was also 
engaged in the grain business at Catawba. He married Virginia Hunter, 
also now deceased, and to that union were born two children, Charles, a 
farmer, living in Union township, this county, and Nilette, of Butler county, 
Ohio. Matilda Everhart, now deceased, married William H. Grubb, of Vir- 
ginia, also now deceased, and was the mother of eight children, Oscar, Wilbur, 
Robert, John, Eugene, Daisy. Harr}- and Grace. The late John A. Everhart, 
further mention of whom is made elsewhere in this volume, was for years a 
well-known farmer in Goshen township, this county. He married Anna M. 
?\ear, who is now living at Catawba, and to that union were born four sons. 
Scott. Herbert, Warren and Robert. Thomas Everhart, a farmer of Clark 
county, married Ella Kimball and has two children. Elton and Bessie. George 
b'verhart, a retired farmer, now living at South \'ienna, married Margaret 
Beard. 

Edgar S. Everhart was but eight years of age when he came to Ohio 
with his parents from \'irginia in 1861 and he grew to manhood on the home 
farm in the neighborhood of Catawba, receiving his schooling in the schools 
of that place and becoming a practical farmer. After his marriage when 
t\\ enty-one years of age he began farming on his own account in Clark county 
and was there thus engaged for about nine years, at the end of which time he 
bought his present farm in Union township, this county, created there a fine 
l)lace and has ever since made his home there. This was the old John Bald- 
win place and when Mr. Everhart bought it consisted of one hundred and 
sovcnt}-three acres. He has sold part of the place, however, and now has 
one hundred and fifteen acres, well improved and profitably cultivated. In 
1895 -^i^'- Everhart erected his present handsome residence and in 1901 built 
a new barn. The general farm plant is in keeping with these substantial 
improvements and the ])lace has long been looked upon as one of the best- 
kept farms in that neighborhood. In 191 3 Mr. Everhart practically retired 
from the active labors of the farm and since then has been in a position to 



I20 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

"take thins^s eas}^" He is a stanch Republican, was for years director of 
schools in his home district and he and his wife are members of the Meth- 
odist iVcjtestant church, in the affairs of which they for years have taken an 
earnest interest. 

On June i , 1 874, Edgar S. h^verhart was united in marriage to Mary A. 
Gt-ove. of Clark county, daughter of Jacob and Sarah (Walkman) Grove, 
both of \ irtrinia stock and early settlers in Clark county and both long since 
deceased. Jacolj Grove and wife were the parents of four children, those 
beside Mrs. Everhart, the second in order of birth, having been William, 
wlio tlied at the age of twenty-one years ; David and Frank, the latter of whom 
is now deceased. To Mr. and Mrs. Everhart three children have been b(M-n, 
Albert. Laura (deceased) and Sarah B., the latter of whom completed her 
schooling- at Adrian, Michigan, and married Lew^is Melvin, a bookkeeper for 
the Armsted & Burk Milling Company at Springfield. All)ert Everhart, who 
completed his schooling in the college at Ada, this state, is now superintendent 
of the plant of the Niagara Radiator Company at Tonawanda. New York. 
}Te married Tessie Warrick and has two sons. Howard and Edgar. 



WnXTAM HOWARD SHARP. M. D. 

Dr. William Howard Sharp, well-known physician and surgeon 
at Woodstock and the jiroprietor of a well-stocked drug store in that thriv- 
ing village, is a native S(;n of the old Buckeye state and has lived in this 
state all his life. He was born at Pottersburg. in the neighboring" county 
of Union. Julv 15. 1877. son and only child of Dr. David W. and Lottie 
(Stewart) Sharj). both also natives of this state and both now deceased, 
their last days having been spent in A\ oodstock. where the elder Doctor 
Sharp died about seven years ago. 

Dr. David W. Sharp, who for years was a well-known physician and 
druggist at Woodstock, was born on a farm near Middlelnirg. in the neigh- 
boring ccnmty of Logan, and there grew to manhood, receiving his early 
.schooling in t!ie schools of his home neighborhood. He early turned his 
attention to the stud\- of medicine and after a course in Delaware College 
he entered the College of Medicine and Surgery at Cincinnati and was grad- 
uated from that institution in 1875. For the first three years after receiving- 
his diploma. Dr. David W. Sharp was engaged in the practice of his i)ro- 




DAVID W. SHARP. M. D. 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY. OHIO. 121 

fession at Potter.sburg and then he moved to Middleburg, where he was 
engajj^ed in practice for four years, at the end of which time he moved to 
\\'()odstock and there spent the remainder of his Hfe. lieing for years one 
of the ])est-kn()\vn physicians in the eastern part of the county. In addition 
to liis genera! jM'actice. he also was engaged in the drug business and con- 
(hicted a thmg stcTe at Woodstock until the day of his death, which occurred 
tliere in Xovember. 1910. Doctor Sharp was a Republican, a member of 
the I'hristian church and a Knight Templar Mason, a member of the com- 
mander)- at Urbana. He was twice married, his first wife. Lottie Stewart, 
of Harrisburg. mother of the subject of this sketch, dving at her home in 
\V(Jodstock in 1888. after which he married Nellie T. Bindon, of Wood- 
stock, who survives. 

Dr. William Howard Sharp's professional education was received at 
Starling Medical College at Columbus, from which excellent old institution 
he was graduated in 1904. From boyhood and during the time he was 
pursuing the course in the Woodstock schools he had given his close atten- 
tion to the study of medicine, his father's extensive medical library being 
open to him. Upon receiving his diploma, the 3^ounger Doctor Sharp re- 
turned home and for three years thereafter was engaged in practice at 
Woodstock in partnership wath his father. He then opened there an office 
of his own and has since been engaged in practice alone, being widely known 
throughout that part of the countr}- covered by his practice. In addition 
to his general practice. Doctor Sharp is the owner of a well-stocked and 
ui)-to-date drug store at Woodstock and does a good business in that line. 
He is a luember of the Champaign CoimtA' Medical Society and of the 
Ohio State Medical Society and in the deliberations of both of these learned 
bodies takes a warm interest, ever keeping fullv abreast of the advances 
being made in the practice of his chosen profession. The Doctor is a Re- 
publican and takes a good citizen's interest in local political affairs, but 
has not been a seeker after public office. 

On December 5. iqoj. Dr. William H. Sharp, was united in marriage 
to Mabel Fawm Kimball, of Woodstock, daughter of David R. Kimball, a 
l)iographical sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this volume. Doctor and 
Mrs. Sharp have a very pleasant home at Woodstock and take an inter- 
ested part in the general social activities of their home town. The Doctor 
is a Knight Templar Mason, being a luember of the blue lodge at North 
Lewisburg and of the commandery at Urbana. and takes a warm interest 
in Masonic affairs. 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 



IRA LINCOLN. 



The late Ira Lincoln, who died at his home in Rush township, this county, 
in 1 886. w^as a native son of Champaign county and his whole life was spent 
here. He was l)orn on what is known as the old Lincoln homestead in Rush 
township. June 4, 1848, son of Charles and Allura (Johnson) Lincoln, who 
came to this state from Connecticut and settled on a farm in Rush township, 
this county, where the}- established their home and where they spent the 
remainder of their lives, influential and useful members of the communit}' 
which the)' did much to help develop. Charles Lincoln and his wife were the 
])arents of ten clhldren and elsewhere in this volume there is set out at con- 
siderable length something" of the history of this important family, which it 
will hardly be necessary to repeat in this connection. 

Keared on the home farm in the Woodstock neighborhood, Ira Lincoln 
received his schooling in the district schools near his home and from l>oyhood 
gave his attention to farming-. After his marriage, in the spring of 1876 
he l)egan farming on his own account and established his home on a farm 
in l\ush township, \\here he spent the rest of his life, successfully engaged 
in general farming and stock raising. He was an ardent Republican and 
ga\e his earnest attention to local political affairs, but was not a seeker after 
l)ublic office. Ira Lincoln died at his home in Rush town.ship on September 
I-'. 1886, he then being thirty-eight years of age, and his widow still survives 
him, making her home at Woodstock, where she is very comfortably situated. 
She is a member of the Universalist church and takes an earnest interest in 
chin-ch work, as well as in other good works of the communit\- in which she 
has lived all her life and in the general social activities of whicii she has ever 
taken a useful and helpful part. 

It was on March 30, 1876, that Ira Lincoln was luiited in marriage, at 
Woodstock, to Martha E. Marsh, who was born in that village, daughter of 
Charles W. and Laura E. (Cranston) Marsh, the former of whom was born 
in X'ermont and the latter in this county. Charles W. Marsh, a son of the 
Rev. Joseph [Marsh, a minister of the Christian church, came to this countv 
from Virginia in the days of his young- manhood and located at Woodstock, 
where he became engaged in the blacksmithing business and where he mar- 
ried and established his home. He died on Eebruary 22. 1869, leaving four 
children, those besides Mrs. Lincoln, the eldest, being C. E. Marsh, a retired 
farmer, now living at Woodstock; Lucy D., wife of William Kimball, of 
Wood<;tock, and Ilattie, who clied in childhood. Charles \\\ Marsh's widow 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY. OHIO. 1 23 

married, secondly, Erastus i\Iartin Smith, of Woodstock, who died on Janu- 
ary 22, i8c;8. She survived for nearly twenty years, her death occurring on 
February 17. 1917. she then being- seventy-nine years of age. To that second 
unit)n one child was born, a daughter, Xina H. Smith, who, in 191 6, married 
the Rev. Harlan V.. Glazier, pastor of the Universalist church at Woodstock. 
The Rev. Harlan E. Glazier is a native of the Empire state, l)orn in Court- 
land county, New York. He was graduated from Union College in 1897 
and later became connected w^ith the Ballon & Hobegard Preparatorv School 
at Boston, as principal and treasurer of the same. Tie continued his studies 
in Harvard and was graduated from that institution in 1904, with the degree 
of Master of Arts. Later he took up the gospel ministry and for two Aears 
was stationed at Tacoma. Washington, coming from there in 191 5 to take 
charge of the Universalist church at \\'oodstock, where he is now located. 

To Ira and ?klartha l-^. (AJarsh) Lincoln, one child was born, a daugh- 
ter, Ilarriet L, born on June 3, t88i, wdio died on ?^Iay 31. 1909. 



WILLIAM P. GLENDENNIXG. 

W'illiam P. Glendenning, one of Rush township's progressive farmers 
and stockmen, was born on the farm on which he is now li\ing. on rural 
route No. i, out of North Lewisburg, and has lived there all his life. He was 
born on November 15, 1862, son of William and Mary (Hawkins) Glenden- 
ning, influential residents of that community, both now deceased. 

The Glendennings are an old family in Champaign count}-, the first of 
the name here having been James Glendenning. a native of Scotland, who 
came to Ohio with his family from Virginia in 1829 and settled on a farm 
in the Mechanicsburg neighborhood, where he established his home and 
created a good farm property. James Glendenning was born in Scotland 
and was but two years of age when his parents came to this country with their 
family, about 1795, and settled in Harrison county, Virginia, in that portion 
of the Old Dominion now comprised in West Virginia. There James Glen- 
denning grew to manhood and married Mary D. \"anhorn. who was born 
in Pennsylvania about 1793. In December, 1829, James Glendenning came 
to Ohio with his family, driving through with a team and leading one cow. 
and settled in this county. After a brief residence in Mechanicsburg he 
bought a farm of one hundred and fifty-five acres surrounding Brush Lake 
in Rush township and there established his home. They were members of 
the Baptist church in Virginia and of the Methodist Episcopal church after 



124 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

coming to Ohio. A log cabin was erected and later a duuble cabin. His wife 
died there at the age of about seventy and he later sold his farm to his sons, 
William and Webster, and thereafter li\ed with his children, surviving to the 
age of eighty-two. He and his wife were the parents of eight children, among 
whom, besides \\'illiam, were Mar\-. who married Joseph Ellsworth and 
lived in Missouri : Margaret, who married John McColly and lived near 
Cable, this county; J. Webster, who married Elizabeth Wilson and also 
made his liome in this county; 'riK)mas J., wlio was hrst married to Hester 
Stover and later to Matilda Williams, and who lived and died in Mechanics- 
burg; l<]lizabeth, who married Joseph Black and lived in Rush township, 
and James, who died at the age of thirteen years. 

William Glendenning was born at Lost Creek, in Harrison count^•, now 
in West Virginia, July 8, 1817. and was about thirteen years of age when 
he came to Champaign county with his parents in 182c; and settled in Rush 
township. His first term of schooling in this county was had at the village 
schools in Mechanicsburg and he thereafter attended the district school in 
the vicinity of his home at Brush lake. From the da}s of his boyhood he 
was a valued assistant to his father and brother in the labors of clearing 
and developing the home farm and upon his father's retirement from the 
active labors of the farm, he and his brother, Webster, bought the same. This 
farm he later sold to his brothers and his last days were sjjent at the home 
of his daughter, Mrs. Everett, at North Lewisburg, where his death occurred 
on .March 2. 1897. ^^ ^^'''^"^ ^'1*-' owner of seven hun<lred acres of land, and 
was a stocholder in the Bank of North Lewisburg. 

William Glendenning was twice married. In 1842 he was united in 
marriage to Susan Black, who died in 1850, leaving five children, namely : 
John W., who served for three years as a soldier of the Union during the 
Civil War. a member of Company H, Sixty-sixth Regiment, Ohio Volun- 
teer Infantry, with which he enlisted on July 2. 1862, serving to the close of 
the war, married Sarah Foster; Amy A., who married James Rudisell and 
after a sometime residence in Illinois returned to Cham])aign county and 
liere died in 1877; Mary E.. who married Sibley Coates and is living in 
k'ush township, this county; Delilah, who died young, and Thomas J., who 
died at the age of two years. After the death of his hrst wife 
William (jlendenning married Mary Hawkins, who was born in New Hamp- 
sliire on January 23, 1825, and who died in this count}- on September 16, 
i()03, while living with her daughter. Mrs. L. P. S])ensely, of North Lewis- 
burg. 1'o that union were born eight children, the others, exclusive of Wil- 
li.'im r., being as follow: Margaret J., who died at the age of twehe 
vears; Levi H., who died at the age of three vears ; James M., a farmer of 



CHAMPAIGN COL'XTY. OHIO. I25 

I\ush township and a biographical sketch of whom is presented elsewhere 
in this \olume; Martha C, wife of W. H. Everett, of Union 
township, this county; Ada B.. who died at the age of five years: 
Abraham L., a farmer of Rush township and a biographical sketch 
of whom is presented elsewhere in this volume, and Jennie M., who on 
December 12, 1888, was united in marriage to Lonsdale P. Spensely and is 
now living- at North Lewisburg, this county. Lonsdale P. Spensely was 
born in Medina county, this state, November 24, 1849, son of Ray and Ann 
(Falshow) Spensely, natives of England, who were married there and in 
1848 came to the L'nited States, locating in Medina county, this state, where 
they spent the remainder of their lives, the former dying in 1862 and the 
latter in 1900. Ray Spensely and wife were the parents of six children, of 
whom Lonsdale Spensely was the third in order of birth, the others being 
as follow : Annie, born in England, who married Hiram Lackc}- and is 
now living in Lawrence county, Indiana : James, who married Alice Vero- 
man and is living on the old home farm in Medina county ; Rachel, who mar- 
ried A. F. Taylor and lives on a farm west of Urbana, this county; Royal 
F., who was a veterinary surgeon and who died on the old home place in 
Medina county, and another son, who died in }()uth. In 1884 Lonsdale 
Spensely came to Champaign county and six years later Ijought a farm in 
Mad River township, where he lived for fourteen years, at the end of which 
time he sold that place and bought the McF"arland farm in Rush township, 
Viliere he remained until retirement in 1900 and removed to North Lewis- 
]myg, where he is now living. 

WilHam -P. Glendenning grew to manhood on the home farm in Rusli 
township, receiving his schooling in the schools of district No. 4. and has 
always lived on the home place. In addition to his general farming he has 
given considerable attention to the raising of live stock, making a specialty 
of Percheron horses. Shorthorn cattle and Poland China hogs, and has done 
verv well in his operations, long having been regarded as one of the sub- 
stantial farmers of that neighborhood. Mr. Glendenning is a Republican 
and has rendered public service as a meml)er of the school board for several 
years. 

On November 15, 1889, A\'illiam P. filendenning was united in marriage 
to Anna Curran, who also was born in Rush township, this county, daugh- 
ter of James and Mary (Spollen) Curran, the former a native of England 
and the latter of Ireland, who were married in England and who came t(j 
the L^nited States in 1867, setthng in this county. For two years after 
coming to Champaign county James Curran made his home -at \^'(K)dstock 
and then settled on a farm one-half mile east of that village, where he spent 



126 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

the remainder of his hfe, his death occurring there on September 30, 1912, 
he then being seventy-three years of age. His widow is now Hving at Wood- 
stock. They were the parents of five children, of whom ]\Irs. Glendenning 
was the third in order of birth, the others being as follow : John and James, 
twins, the former of whom is now living at Milford Center and the latter of 
whom for the past twenty-four years has been a conductor on the Erie rail- 
road, with headquarters at Toledo ; William, who is a conductor on the 
Pennsylvania railroad, with lieadquarters at Columbus, and Margaret, who 
married P. J. Hannegan and is living at Urbana. 

To William P. and -Vnna (Curran) Glendenning five children have 
been born, namel}': Hazel, wife of Harry Earl Cranston, a telegraph oper- 
ator for the Pennsylvania Railroad Company at \\''est\ille ; Ralph, who is 
home, assisting his father in the management of the farm; Helen and Ruth, 
twins, the former of whom died in infancy and the latter of whom is the wife 
of W. T. Augar, of Urbana, and Paul, at home, who was graduated from 
the North Levvisburg high school with the class of 1917. The Glenden- 
nings have a very pleasant home and have ever taken a proper part in the 
general social affairs of the community in which they live. They are mem- 
bers of the Methodist Episcopal church and take an interested part in church 
work, as well as in other neighborhood good works. 



CYLE BRIGHT HANNA. 

Cyle Bright Planna, a well-to-do retired farmer and former trustee of 
Concord township, now living at Urbana, is a native of Virginia, but has 
been a resident of this county since he was thirteen years of age. He was. 
born on a farm in Nicholas county, Virginia, in April, 1854, son of Moses 
and Sarah (Kellison) Hanna, both also natives of the Old Dominion, the 
former born in Nicholas county and the latter in Pocahontas county. 

Moses Hanna was a farmer and stock dealer and died at his home in 
Virginia not long after the close of the Civil War. He was twice married. 
By his first wife, Sarah Kellison, he was the father of five children, of whom 
the subject of this sketch was the last-born, the others being as follow : 
Nathan, deceased; Elijah J., a retired merchant of Urbana, a biographical 
sketch of whom is presented elsewhere in this volume ; David, who died dur- 
ing the Cixil \\'ar. and Elizabeth, of Kanawha count}'. West Virginia. Upon 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 12/ 

the death of the mother of these children Moses' Hanna married Martha 
H inkle, of Nicholas county, Virginia, and to that union one child \\as horn^ 
a son, Abraham L., who is living on the old home place in Nicholas countw 

Cyle B. Hanna had small opportunities for schooling in his boyhood,, 
there being at that time no organized schools in the vicinity of his home in 
Nicholas county, now a part of West Virginia. When he was thirteen years 
of age he came over into Ohio to make his home with his elder brother, 
Elijah J. Hanna, mentioned above, who was engaged in the mercantile busi- 
ness in Concord township, and until his marriage when twenty-one years 
of age was engaged working as a farm hand in that vicinity. After his 
marriage ]\Irs. Hanna began farming on his own account and was thus 
engaged in the townships of Salem, Concord and T^'Iad River until his retire- 
ment from the farm in April, 1916, and removal to Urbana, where he and 
his wife are now living and where they are very comfortably situated. Mr. 
Hanna is the owner of two hundred acres of valuable land and during his 
long residence on the farm did very well, in addition to his general farming 
having given considerable attention to the raising of high-grade live stock. 
During his residence in Concord township he served for some time as trus- 
tee of that township and in other wa}s gave his intelligent attention tu local 
pul)lic affairs. 

It was on March 3, 1875, that Cyle B. Hanna was united in marriage 
to Margaret Nichols, of Westville, this county, a daughter of Augustus 
and Mary Ann (Hoak) Nicholas, the former of whom was born in Virginia 
and the latter in this county, a member of one of the (^Id families in the 
Westville neighborhood. Augustus Nichols grew up in his native Virginia 
and when a young man walked over into this part of Ohio and settled in 
Champaign county, locating at Westville, where he opened a shoe store and 
was engaged there as a shoemaker until he later bought a farm in Concord 
township, where he remained engaged in farming the rest of his life. Augus- 
tus Nichols and wife were the parents of five children, of whom Mrs. Hanna 
was the second in order of birth, the others being Laura A., deceased; Mrs. 
Mary L. Bowman, of Edna, Kansas; John Henry, deceased, and E. E. 
Nichols, of Columbus, this state. To Mr. and Mrs. Hanna two children 
have been born, Emmet C, who died in 1900, at the age of twenty-six years,, 
and Pearl S., wife of Vatia Offenbacher, who is now farming Mr. Hanna'.s. 
farm in Mad River township. Mr. and Mrs. Hanna are members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church and take a ])roper interest in chmrh work and 
other o-ood w orks. 



128 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 



VVILLlAAl n. DALLAS. 



William \>. Dallas has ]>een satistied to spend his life on the home- 
stead, "under the r(x)f that heard his earliest cry," rather than seek un- 
certain fortune elsewhere. He was ])orn on the farm he now lives on, May 
4, 1854. He is a son of William S. and Elizabeth W. (Boyd) Dallas, both 
natives of Big Si)rings, Cumberland county. Pennsylvania, the father born 
in 1809 and die mother in 1808. His parents brought him to Greene county, 
Ohio, in i8rn, Init the family remained there only a short time. William S. 
Dalla> was a son of Judge James and Isabelle (Sprote) Dallas, natives of 
Ireland and I 'ennsyh ania, respectively. James [Dallas immigrated to Amer- 
ica when a young man and located in Pennsylvania, where he married and 
engaged in farming until 18 10, in which }ear he moved to Greene county, 
Ohio, later removing to Champaign county, locating on a farm on the state 
road. He was industrious and a good manager and became owner of over 
four hundred acres. He was one of the leading farmers of the county in 
pioneer times. In 1847 '^^ ^^'^s appointed by the state Legislature as an 
associate judge of Champaign count}-. He also served as county commis- 
sioner, holding that office when the present court house was built. He also 
helped build die state road, which connects Cincinnati with Cleveland. He 
look an active part in public affairs and did much for the early development 
of the county. 

To Judge James Dallas and wife nine children were Ijorn. namely: 
William S., father of the subject of this sketch; Nancy J.. Isabelle, Wilson, 
Samuel, James, Lemuel, Elizabeth and Rachael. 

William S. Dallas grew to manhood on the home farm antl he attended 
the early-day schools here. He devoted his life to farming in Urbana town- 
ship, becoming owner of a fine farm r)f f(jur hundred and thirty-two acres. 
He was one of the progressive and influential citizens of the township. His 
family consisted of five children, namely; Belle married Rev. Rufus John- 
son; Martha is deceased; James lives in Springfield, Ohio; Jennie, who is 
deceased, was the wife of Ben Blair; and William B. of this sketch. 

William B. Dallas grew' to manhood on the home farm and attended 
the district schools. After his marriage, he took up farming for himself, 
remaining on the home place, which he rented, but he later bought fifty-two 
acres of the same, which he has kept well improved and w-ell tilled. 

Mr. Dallas was married, on December 5. 1889, to Lottie M. Hutchin- 
son, and to their union four children have been born, named as follows: 




WILLIAM B. DALLAS 




MRS. LOTTIE M. DALLAS 



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CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. I 29 

Russell. ?joycl, Hazel and Ross. The daughter is the wife of Frank Nichols 
and they have one child, Xirginia Margaret Nichols. 

Politically. Mr. Dallas is a Republican, and he is a member of the 
United Presbyterian church. The Dallas famih- has been one of the best 
known in Champaign county since ])ioneer days and have been influential 
in local affairs. 



I'RKD B. SMITH. 



I'Ved B. Smith, treasurer of the village of Wo(xlstock. formerly engaged 
in the mercantile business there and a substantial landowner of Rush town- 
ship, now living- retired at Woodstock, was born in that village on April 3, 
i860, son of Curtis and Mary R. (Bennett) Smith, the former of whom also 
was born at Woodstock and the latter in the state of Vermont. 

Curtis Smith was a son of Rlias and Huldah Smith, natives of Vermont, 
the former of whom was a son of Philip Smith and wife, Fairzona, who 
came to this county from Vermont and settled on what is now the site of the 
\illage of Woodstock, where they established their home. Elias Smith and 
wife had three sons, of whom Curtis Smith was the first-born, the others 
being Philip A. and Krastus Smith, who became substantial farmers of the 
Woodstock neighborhood and there spent their last days. Reared on the 
home farm at Woodstock, Curtis Smith received his schooling in the village 
school and at Antioch College and remained on the home farm, an industrious 
and energetic farmer, all his life. During the progress of the Civil War he 
served as a member of the Home Guards. He was a stanch Repubfican, but 
was not an office seeker. Elias Smith was one of the organizers of the 
Christian church at Woodstock and took an active interest in the various 
beneficences of the same, as well as in the general good works and social 
affairs of the community. Curtis was an active member of the old Wood- 
stock Cornet Band. Curtis Smith died in 1864. leaving a widow and two 
sons, the subject of this sketch having had a brother, Orvis Smith, who died 
in [900. Orvis Smith was for years a well-known music teacher in this 
county. He married Florence Bryan. Some time after his husband's death 
the Widow Smith married George W. Hutchinson and moved to Missouri, 
later going to Kansas, but later returned to Woodstock, where she spent her 
last days, her death occurring there at the age of seventy-six years. 

Fred B. Smith was but four years of age when his father died and he 
(9a) 



130 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY. OHIO. 

was reared in the home of his (Grandfather Smith on the old Smith home 
place, where he remained nn.til he was twent\'-one rears of age, when he mar- 
ried Winnie Standish., of AA'oodstock, a meniher of one of the old families 
of rhampai^n eonnt\', further an.d htting- mention of which family is made 
elsewhere in this \()lume. After his marriage Air. .Smith hegan farming on 
kis own account at P'ountain I 'ark and there remained, activel\- engaged in 
farming, until 11)03, when he hecame engaged in the mercantile Inisiness at 
\A'o(>dstock in partnershi]) with I'rank W. .Smith: continuing thus engaged 
until his retirement from husiness in igif). Air. Smith is the owner of a 
line home in W'oodstock and an excellent farm of one hundred and fort\- 
acres iri Rush township, lie is a Repuhlican and has served as a memher 
of the l(;cal school hoard and is the present treasurer of the village. 

To h^red B. and Winnie { Standish ) Smitli three children ha\e heen horn. 
\l\h Al., wife of William T.. Alorse. of C'olumlms, Ohio; Ruhy W., wife of 
Herhert Clark, of \A'oodstock, and Huldah, who is al home with her i)arents. 
The Smiths are memhers of the ITiiversalist church and take an interested 
])art in the affairs of the same. Mr. Smith is a memher of the local lodge 
of the Independent Order of Odd l'"ellows at Woodstock and has long taken 
a warm interest in the affairs of that organization. 



JON.ATHAX S. XEER. 



Jonathan S. Xeer, ma^or of Alechanicshiu-g and one of the ])est-known 
dairy fanners in Cham])aign countw was horn in Pleasant t<iwnship, in the 
neighboring county of Clark. Alarch 2^. 1S51, son of Joseph C"off'e\- and 
Dorothy (Smith) Xeer, natives of that same count}- and memhers of pioneer 
families in this section, the former of whom, an honored \etei"an of the Oi\il 
War, spent his last days in this eount\- and the latter of whom died in 
Kentucky. 

Jose]jh Coffey Xeer also was horn in Clark count}', l'"el)ruar}- 7, 1 <S_'o, 
son of Knos and Sarah ( Coff'ey ) Xeei", the latter of whom was the hrst 
w'hite child horn in Pleasant township, that county, l^nos Xeer was a \'ir- 
ginian, horn in Loudoun count}', who came lo this section of Ohio with his 
])arents when a l)o\' and grew u]) in Clark countx', where he manned, estah- 
lished his home in Pleasant township, that count}', hecame a substantial 
farmer of that neighborhood and there spent the remainder of his life, dxing 
at the age of se\'entv-h\'e vcars. Mis widow did not long sur\i\e him, her 



CIIAMPAICN COUNTY, OHIO. I3I 

death (icciirrin<^- in the se\-ent)'-ninth year of her age. They were earnest 
members of the Methodist Protestant chnrch and tonk a ])r(>minent part in the 
work of creating" proper social conchtions in tlie earl}- days of the settlement 
of the community in which the)' had their home. They were the parents 
of three children, Jose])h Coffe\- .\eer ha\-ing- had a brother, Nathan, who 
was a farmer in Clark and Cliampaign counties, and a sister, Jane, who was 
the wife of X'ewton Lemmon, of Clark county, and who flied in Indiana. 

Being the eldest of the children in his familw Joseph C. Neer was 
ke])t prett^• bus\' on the home farm in the (la}s of his boyhood, the task 
of clearing- the place being no inconsiderable one. and he recei\efl but a 
limited education. Dm-ing the progress of the Civil War he enlisted, in 
1864, and went to the front as a member of the Sixteenth Ohio, with which 
command he serxed for nine months, the greater part of which lime was 
spent on guard dut\- in the citv of .\ew- Orleans. He had married when little 
more than twent\- \ears t^f age and he continued to make his home in Clark 
countv until i(S68, when he came up into Champaign county and settled on 
a farm in Coshen township, ;ibout three miles from Mechanicsburg. where 
he lived for nine years, at the end of which time he went lo Kentucky, 
where he bought a farm and where he li\ed until some little time after his 
wife died there, when he disposed of bis interests in that state and returned 
to this county, locating at Mechanicsburg. where he spent the rest of his 
life, bis death occurring there in Max'. i()02. be then being sexenty-two 
xears of age. He was a member of the local post of the ( irand .\rmy of the 
Republic and he and bis wife were earnest memliers of the Methodist I^pis- 
copal church. The\- were the ]jarents of six children, those besides the sub- 
ject of this sketch being as follow: Sarah Margaret, who died unn-iarried ; 
-Vlbert Iv.. who is connected with the offices of the International Harxester 
Company at Columbus; Fred, xvho is engaged in the creamery business at 
Milford Center, in the neighboring county of L'nion ; Maude, wife of Clinton 
Hunter, a farmer living near Mechanicsburg. and Xettie. xx ife of Rimer W'bit- 
more. now living- in California. 

Reared on the home farm in Goshen toxvnship. J(»nalhan S. Xeer receix'ed 
his earlv schooling in the schools of that neighborhood and su])plemented 
the same by a course in the Ohio Xormal College at Lebanon, Ohio. .\t 
the age of txventy-txvo, after his marriage, be began farming on his own 
account, renting a farm in Goshen township, xvbere he made bi> home for 
eighteen x-ears. at the end of xvbich time he bought a farm in that townslii]) 
and there resided until the time of his a])i)ointment. in Kjio, as a meniber 
of the board of land appraisers, when he moxed to Mechanicsburg. where 



iJ,J CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

he ever since has made his home and where he and his family are ver\' com- 
fortably situated. Despite his retirement from the active labors of the 
farm", Mr. Neer Continues to maintain one of the finest herds of dairy cattle 
in the state, having more than sixty head of fine Jersey stock, and also 
gives considerable attention to the raising of hogs. It was in 1896 that he 
began to pay s])ecial attention to dairying and he ever since has devoted 
close attention to that phase of farming, long having had an excellent (lair\ 
on his place near Mechanicsburg. In addition to his service as land appraiser 
Mr. Neer has given considerable attention to public affairs in other directions, 
having served for some years as a member of the school board, and is now 
serving as mayor of Mechanicsburg, to which important executive ])osition 
he was elected in November, 191 5. 

It was on October 28. 1875, that Jonathan S. Neer was united in mar- 
riage to Emma Darling, a school teacher of this county, who was born in 
(ioshen township, city of Mechanicsburg. a daughter of San ford and Sarah 
(Riddle) Darling, the former a native of Virginia and the latter of this 
county, who were well-to-do farming people of Goshen township. San ford 
Darling and his wife were the parents of four children, those besides Mrs. 
Neer being Charles, deceased; Harry Darling, former mayor of Mechanics- 
burg, who is engaged in the blacksmith business in that city, and James, who 
was killed in a railway wreck in the South. 

To Jonathan S. and Emma (Darling) Neer six cliildren ha\e been 
horn, namely: l^^thel, who was class instructor in the Miami Valley Mos- 
pital at Dayton and who died at the age of thirty-four years; Doroth\ , 
who also was trained in hospital work and is now superintendent of the 
Robin Hood Hospital at Toledo, having had a varied service in hospital 
work, including four years in the City Hospital' at Cincinnati, head nurse 
in the hospital at Springfield for ten years, one year as superintendent of a 
hospital at Colorado Springs. Colorado, and a period as assistant superin- 
tendent of the New Haven Hospital at New Haven, Connecticut ; h'rank, 
who died at the age of seven years; Charles, who took a course in the State 
Agricultural College and is now operating his father's dairy farm in (ioshen 
township, who married Willora Pratt and has two cliildren, P^lizabeth and 
Virginia; Alice, a former student of the Ohio State Cniversity, who mar- 
ried Wilbur Morgan, of Marysville, this state, and has one child, a daughter, 
Margaret, and Dorris, a graduate of Ohio State University, who is now 
engaged as a teacher of domestic science in the schools of Columbus. The 
Neers are members of the Methodist Protestant church, in the various bene- 
ficences of which they take a proper interest. Mr. Neer is a member of 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY. OHIO. 1 33 

the Grange and has long taken an active interest in the affairs of that organi- 
zation. His son. Charles Neer, also is a member of the Grange and is like- 
wise a member of the Mechanicsburg lodge of Masons, taking an active inter- 
est in the affairs of both of these organizations; he also is a member of the 
school board. Mr. Neer is a public-spirited and energetic business man and 
his service as mayor of Mechanicsburg has proved very satisfactory to the 
people of that progressive and hustling little city. 



HENRY P. GAVER. 



Henr}- P. Gaver. former trustee of Union township and the proprietor 
of a farm of ninety-six acres on which he is now living retired, in that town- 
ship, is a native of the state of Maryland, but has been a resident of Ohio 
since 1883. He was born in Fredericks county, Maryland. August 11. 1853, 
son of John P. and Elizabeth ( Kleine ) Gaver, both natives of that same 
count}-, who spent all their lives there. John P. Gaver, who was a farmer, 
was a son of Peter Gaver, a native of Germany, who located in Fredericks 
county, Maryland, upon coming to this country and there became an exten- 
si^■e landholder, owner at one time, it is said, of all the northern half of that 
coimty. Peter Gaver was ri man oi unbounded hos])itality and generosity 
and it is said that he gave away all but a small portion of his land to deserv- 
ing families of the community in which he lived. John P. (laver and wife 
were the parents of eleven children, of whom eight are still living, John T., 
George T., Elias, James L., Charles L.. Henry P., Louisa and Rebecca. 

Reared on the home farm in I^Vedericks county, Maryland, Henry P. 
Gaver received his schooling in the schools of that neighborhood and early 
learned the cooper's trade, following that trade during the winters and farm- 
ing during the summers and was married there in 1877. In 1883 he came 
to Ohio and began working as a cooper at Dayton, later starting as a tobacco 
farmer in that vicinity, and remained there until 1887, when he moved to a 
farm in Miami county. Four years later he moved to Parke county and was 
there engaged in truck gardening for several years, at the end of which time 
he came to Champaign count}- and rented a farm in Salem township, making 
his home there for five years. He then bought the farm of ninety-six acres 
in Union township on which he i-s now living and continued engaged there 
in general farming until after the death of his wife in the spring of 1916. 
since which time he has been living retired from the active labors of the farm. 



134 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

thont^ii contiiniinii' to make his home there. Mr. Gaver has a weh-improxed 
farm, having two sets of Iniiklings on the ])hice, and is one of the suhstantial 
citizens of that section of t!ie county. lie is a Democrat and has taken an 
interested jiart in the civic affairs of the community and ser^•ed for some time 
as trustee of L'nion township. 

In i('^77. in -\hirykmd, Flenry 1'. Ciaxer was united in marriage to Cath- 
erine Murle)-, (kuigliter of Moses and Mahaki ( Stottlemever ) Murle\', and 
lo this union ele\ en chiklren were liorn, namely: Charles, who married 
.Myrtle (ieyton and has four children, .MeKia, Bernice, Cecil and Thelma : 
Luther, who married Margaret Moodv and has one child, a son, Kenneth: 
Minta., wife of l-'rank \\'oods : Delia, who married Dr. David Rowen and has 
f(nn- children, Catherine, Rollin, Ruth and Carris: Maud, who married 
Howard Mumma and has four children, Mildred, Margaret, Richard and 
lulgar: droxer, who married ( ilenna l^iselstein and has one child, a son, 
Donald: ISert, xvho married Xellie \Villiams and has three children, Christina, 
Leona and a son: Walter, who married ^label l*\aulk and has two children, 
.Mary and a daughter, and Clarence, (iladvs and M.ariorie. The mother of 
tliese children died in April, iqt6. 



THOMAS B. OWEN. 



Thomas P.. Owen, head of the law hrm of Owen, A\are & Owen at 
L"rbana and former prol)ate judge of Champaign count}', is a natixe son 
<if this count}- and has lived here all his life. lie was horn in the \illage of 
Mechanicshurg on July 13, !<%/, son of William V>. and Sarah 1 '. ( Bond) 
Owen, the former of whom was l)orn in Ohio and the latter in the state of 
\'irginia. W^illiam H. Owen located at Mechanicshurg, where he became 
engaged in the mercantile business and \\here he spent tlie remainder of 
his life, his death occurring there in 1897, he then being eight\-one _\ear? 
of age. Fie was a leader in the Rei)ublican ])arty in this count}' and held 
several iniblic offices at one time and another. Me and his wife were mem- 
bers of the Methodist church and were e\er acti\e in local good works. 
They were the jjarents of seven children, of whom the subject of this sketch 
Avas the fifth in order of birdi, the others being Mrs. Callie r>ond, O. V., 
A. P. (deceased), O. T., of Indianapolis: \A'. 1'.., of .Mechanicshurg, and 
Mrs. Lillian Matt. The mother of these children is -still living at her home 
in Mechanicshurg. 



CIIAMPAICX COUXTY, OHIO. I35 

Uptm completing- the course in the high school at l\Iechanicsl)urg, Thomas 
B. Owen hegan teaching school m Union and Wayne townships and was 
thus engaged for seven 3^ears, meanwhile g'i\ing his leisure to the study 
of law under the able preceptorship of judge E. P. Middleton at Crlxma, 
and in 1896 was admitted to the bar. In that same year he opened an office 
for the practice of his profession at Alechanicsburg and in 1901 formed 
a partnership with T. B. \\'are, of that place, which mutually agreeable 
arrangements continues to this day, and he remained in practice until in 
I'^ebruarv, 1903, when he mo\ed to Urbana to enter upon the duties ni the 
<:ffice of pr(^bate judge of this count}-, to which he has Ijeen elected as the 
n(Miiinee of the Republicans of Champaign county and he ever since has 
remained a resident of that city. l^^)r six vears Judge Owen serxed as 
judge of probate and he since has been engaged in general practice. Jn 
June, 1915, the old established law firm of Owen & Ware received an addi- 
tion in the person of Judge Owen's son, Marion Owen, a graduate of the 
law school of Ohio State University, who was admitted to the bar in that 
month, and the firm has since been known as Owen, Ware & Owen. Judge 
Owen is an ardent Republican and has for years been an acti\-e campaigner 
in behalf of the principles of his party, one of the best-known and most 
effectixe "stump" speakers in. the state, his services as a speaker being in 
wide demand. He is a meml)er of the board of directors of the National 
Bank of Urbana and has long gixen his close attention to the general busi- 
ness alTairs of the cit\- and of the county at large. I'^or years Judge Owen 
has been one of the most actixe promoters of the interests of the Champaign 
County h^air Association and is now serving as president of that associa- 
tion. He and his wife are members of the Aletlu)dist I'rotestant church in 
the general good works of their home town. h'raternally. Judge Owen is 
a Mason, a member of the Independent Order of Odd b'ellows and of the 
Knights of Pythias and in the affairs of these sex'eral fraternal organiza- 
tions takes a warm interest. 

On January i, 1888, Judge Owen was united in marriage to Dollie 
McAdams. daughter of Samuel and Winnie (Thompson) McAdanis. and to 
this unif)n six children have been born, namely: \\'illiam C., who died at 
the age of eighteen years: Marion, who is associated with his father and 
Mr. Ware in the practice of law, as noted aboxe : .\melia, who married B. 
F. Miller, a well-known attorne\--at-law at Urbana, and has one cliild. a son. 
Thomas Owen, and Benjamin l-".. Alice Irene and Dorothy. Marion Owen, 
junior member of the law firm of Owen, Ware & Owen, was btjrn at 
Mechanicsburg and recei\-ed his earl}- schooling in the schools of that city. 



J3<"> CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

later attending high school at Urbana and supplementing the course there 
by a course in Urbana University, after which he entered the law department 
of the University of Obit) and there pursued his studies for three years. 
at the end of which time, in June, 191 5, and in that same month was 
admitted into partnership with his father and Mr. Ware and is now actively 
engaged in the practice of his profession. He is a member of the college 
fraternity Phi Gama Delta and continues to take an active interest in the 
affairs of that association. He married Edna Cone and has a very pleas- 
ant home in Urbana, he and his wife taking an active interest in the general 
social and cultural activities of their home town. 



JOHN VV. ROCK. 



The late John \V. Rock, a substantird landowner of Champaign county 
and for years ont of the best-known and most successful live-stock dealers 
in the county, former county commissioner and at the time of his death, 
in IOCS- 'I member of the public service commission of Urbana. was a 
native son of Champaign county and lived here all his life. He was born 
on a pioneer farm in Union township on December 22, 1850, son of John 
\V. and .\melia (Cope) Rock, who came to this county from V^irginia and 
settled on a farm in Union township, where they established their home 
and where they spent the remainder of their lives. John W. Rock was 
an energetic farmer and a successful business man and became the owner 
of (|uite a large tract of land in that part of the county. Of the children 
born to him and his wife, Hve grew to maturity. 

Reared on the i)aternal farm in Union township. J. AV. Rock received 
his schooling in the schools of that neighborhood and from the days of 
his boyhood was a valued assistant to his father in the labors of improving 
and developing the home farm. After completing his schooling he con- 
tinued thus engaged, farnu'ng with his father, and after the death of his 
parents he took over the old homestead farm of two hundred and eleven 
acres in Union township. He there remained successfully engaged in gen- 
eral farming and stock raising until his removal in 1897 to Urbana. where 
he spent the remainder of his life, engaged in the live-stock business. In 
i8f)i Mr. Rock had been elected a member of the board of county commis- 
sioners from his district and served in that important public capacity- for 
six \ears. in the meantime crintinuing to develop his live-stock interests. 







.TOHX W. ROCK. 



CHAMPAIGX COUNTY, OHIO. 



^:!>7 



giving special attention to the raising of all iknds of livestock. Upon the 
completion of his term of pnblic service he left the farm and moved to 
Urbana, where he e\ er afterwrird was engaged in the bu\ing and selling of 
livestock, becoming one of the best-known and most snccessful dealers in 
that line in the ccnmty. ?\lr. Rock was an ardent Repnblican and ever gave 
his most earnest attention to local political affairs. In arldition to serving 
as a member of the board of county commissioners, he for some time serve<l 
as a member of the public service commission of Urbana and was serving 
in that latter capacity at the time of his death, on November 17. 191 5. He 
was an active member of the Methodist Episcopal church, as is his widow, 
and ever took an earnest part in church work. bVaternallv, he was afifil- 
iated witli the local council of the Junior Order of United American 
Mechanics. 

On September 12. 1873. J. W. Rock was united in marriage to Lucy 
\i. Uraig. who also was born in Union township, this count\-. a daughter 
of X'inccnt and Xanc}- ( Synies ) Uraig. natives of N'irginia. who were mar- 
ried in that state and later came to this county, settling in Union township. 
where lhe\- spcTit the rem.'iinder of their lives. X'incent Craig was a suc- 
cessful farmer and became a well-to-do landowner. To Mr. and Mrs. Rock 
li\e cnildren were l)orn. Harry, .Sylvester J-. Francis. L. Laylian and Emil. 
.Since the death of her husband Mrs. Rock has continued to make her home 
at Urbana. where she is verv ])leasantl\- situated. She is a member of the 
.Methodist i^pisco])al church, as noted above, and has ever given her earnest 
.attention to local good works. 



WILLLVM M. WHnWKER. 

\\'illiam M. Whitaker. a retired carriage-maker living at Urbana. one 
of the best-known citizens of that city, an honored veteran of the Civil \\ ar 
and for years actively interested in the better affairs of his home city, is a 
native "Buckeye" and has lived in this .state all his life, a continuous resi- 
dent of Urbana since the summer of 1888. He was born on a pioneer farm 
in Miami county, near Piqua, this state, March 13. 1838, .son of James Irvin 
and Mary A. ( McClure ) Whitaker, both also natives of Ohio, the former 
born in Warren county and the latter in Miami county, whose last da\s 
were spent in the latter county. 

Tames Irvin Whitaker was a son of lonathan Mitchell Whitaker. who 



138 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

was l)(jrn on March 10, 17S5, and wlio was thrice married, his hrst wife 
lia\-in,^- l)een Jane lr\-in, oranchiiother of the snhject of tliis sketch; the sec- 
ond wife, Ann Mclntyre and the third Ahary ('"['oily'") Miller, lie was the 
father of t\\el\e children, of whom James I. was the hrst-horn, tlie others 
hax'ino- heen as follow: Alary Ann, who married Alexander Morrow: Alary 
H., who died in childhood: Ahiry Jane, who also died yonnt^- : AA'illiam Alitchell. 
who married Sarah J. AlcCandless; Jnlia Ann, who died in yonth : Sarah, 
who died nnmarried : Daxid Xewton, who also tlied nnmarried : Alartha, 
who died unmarried: Jonathan M., who married Rehecca AlcCandless: Alar- 
garet, who died unmarried, and Airs. Alar^• Jane Reeder. James 1. W'hitaker, 
who remained a larmer in Aliami co^mt^■ all his life, was twice married 
and h_\- his unio]i with Alary A. AlcChn-e had three children, the snhject of 
this sketcli, the hrst-horn, ha\-ing two sisters, Alargaret Jane, wife of John 
Syp, and Alar)- hdizaheth, wife of Henry Al_\ers. .After the death of the 
mother of these children he married Alartha Wiley, hy which second union 
he had one child, Sarah Agnes, who died unmarried in young womanliood. 

AA'illiam Al. WHiitaker was reared on a farm and remained at home there 
for a year after his father's death and then made his home with Jonathan 
Drake, near Pitjua and there learned the carriage trade, remaining there 
until he was tw'enty-one years of age, when he went to Lima and there liecame 
connected with Rohert Bowers in the carriage-making hu.siness and was thus 
engaged when the Civil AA'ar hroke out. On .August 29, iSru, Air. W'hitaker 
enlisted for service in the Cnion ami}- as a memher of C'ompau)- II, Thirty- 
second Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and was with that command until 
it was mustered out at the close of the war, the history of his serxice during 
the war heing practically a history of the mo\ements of that regiment, with 
which he was constantlv associated save for a hrief time in the spring of 
|<S64, when he was fnrloughed home on sick lea\e. ( )n .\o\emher 1, i<S()_\ 
two months after his enlistment, he was promoted to die rank of co]-poral 
and on A larch ly . 1865. was made a sergeant. Ah". W'hitaker was with his 
regiment during the siege of A'ickshurg and upon the fall of that cit\' was 
stationed there on garrison dut\- until Alarch. iS(')4, when he was fui-]oughed 
home on account of illness. He rejoined his regiment at Resaca, (Georgia, 
partici])ated in the hattle at that place and was thereafter with Sherman's 
armv during the .Atlanta campaign until die fall of .Atlanta, aflerward heing 
assigned to detail dutv and was stationed at .Xaslnille until Sherman reached 
Savannah. He then received orders to i-ejoin the command and hastening 
to New A'ork hy hoat and hv rail proceeded South, rejoining Sherman the 
dav hefore the surrender of (General Lee at .A[)pomatox Court Llouse. -After- 



CIIAMPAIG.X COfXTY, 



39 



ward Mr. W'hitaker participated witli his regiment in tlie Grand Review at 
W'asliington and was nmstered out at Lduisville, Kentuckx', luh' _'0. i>^(>^. 

During the time he was h^me on a furlough in tlie spring of 1864. Mr. 
Wliitaker had sold his interest in the carriage factory and after his return 
to Lima upon the completion of his military serxice did not hnd conditions 
there wholly to his satisfaction and shortly afterward moved o\-er to Sidne\'. 
where for nineteen years he made his home, l)eing there engaged in carriage- 
making. In June, 1S8S, he moved to L'rhana, where he engaged in the 
same line and was thus engaged there for twehe vears, at the end of which 
time he retired from active Inisiness and has since then heen taking things 
comparati\el_\- "eas}-". h^)r se\-eral years after his retirement from l)usi- 
ness ^Iv. W'hitaker ser\-ed as local truant ofhcer and has in other wa\s 
given his time to the puhlic ser\ice. .Mr. W'hitaker is an actixe meml)er 
of W. A. lirand Post X^o. 98, (irand Armv oi the Repuhlic. at L'rhana, and 
for eight }-ears served as adjutant of that ])atriotic organization. He is a 
member of the Baptist church and takes a pro])er ])art in church work 
and in the general good works of his home town. In i8()(), at Lima, he 
became a Mason and since making his home at L'rhana has l)een afhlialed 
with the local lodge of that ;mcient order at that ])lace. 

In Se[)ten]l)er, i860, William M. \\'hitaker was united in marriage to 
-Marv I'^lizabeth McCirew, of Pi(jua, a daughter of llar\e\- AlcOrew, and 
to that union eight children were born, namely: f'jnma Harrison, l)orn on 
October JO. 1861, who married ("leorge D. Devo and died on December 3, 
1913. leaving one child, a son, Harold: Edwin McClure W'hitaker. of Ander- 
son, Lidiana, born on l''el)ruar\- 2!:^. 1863, wIkj married Jessie M. IJerry 
and has one child, a son. Berry M., who is athletic director of Texas State 
I'niversity, and now is in the ofhcers training camp at Leon Springs, Texas: 
Ida Aia\', April 30, i86r), who married James M. Pearson and after his 
<leath married Henrv S. Wernicke of ( u-eencastle, Indiana, and died on June 
25. 191 5: Charles L, January 23, \S'()J. who married on June 13 of that 
same^'ear: William Harxey. l-'ebruar\- i. 1870, who died on June r3, 187^); 
E.stella Ma}-. .Vugust 20, 1873, who married iM-ank S. Lhance, freight agent 
for the Erie Raihva\- Companv at L'rhana. and has two children, a son. 
Harr\- W'hitaker. b(jrn on December 29. 1899. and a daughter. Helen Louise, 
March 3, 1903: Robert, December 2y, '8/4. who died on July 3, 1873, and 
Mary Elizabeth, January 13, 1878, who married Alfred L. Abadden, a well- 
nown traveling salesman of L'rhana. Mrs. Mary b^lizabeth W'hitaker died 
on Se])tember 9, rc)09. 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 



Ki<:NDALL S. HAWK. 



KeiKlall S. Hawk, former trustee of Union township, a former well- 
known teacher in this county .'Uid the ])roprietor of a hne farm of two hundred 
acres in Union township, where lie has Uved practically all his life, a portion 
of that farm having^ been the tract on which his father settled back in pioneer 
days, was born there on December 31. 1852. son of Jonathan and Margaret 
( Brunner ) Hawk, natives of Chester county, Pennsylvania, who became 
pioneers of his county, settling in the woods of Union township, and here 
spent their last da}s. 

Jonathan Hawk was reared to the trade of shoemaker at his home in 
Chester county, Pennsylvania, and followed that trade a good bit of his time 
after settling in this county. It was in 1840 that he and his wife came to 
Champaign county and settled in the Kings Creek neighborhood in Salem 
townshi]), but a short time later he bought a tract of twenty-five acres, part 
of the land now owned by the subject of this sketch, in Union township, pay- 
ing ten dollars an acre ff)r the same, and there he spent the rest of his life. 
That tract at that time was wild woodland and Jonathan Hawk had to clear 
a spot for the erection of a log cabin on the same. He gradually cleared 
away the woodland and got the place under cultivation, though much of his 
time was given over to shoemaking, his shop proving a great convenience for 
the people of that vicinity. Both Jonathan Hawk and wife lived to ripe old 
agt'N. They helped to (organize the Methodist Episcopal church at Montreal, 
Ohio. .She died in 1897 and he survived until March 21, 1899. They were 
the parents of h\'e cliildren. of whoiu but two, the subject of this sketch and 
his sister Rebecca, are now living, the others having been Joseph L., Edward 
and (^elesta. 

Of the above-named children of Jcjnathan Hawk and wife, Kendall S. 
hiawk was the last-born. He grew up on the home farm in Union township, 
receiving his schooling in the old ^^ankee Hill school house, and for four 
years after leaving school taught school during the winters. He then attended 
a special com^se in penmanship and bookkeeping at Delaware College and 
for five or six years thereafter was engaged in conducting classes in penman- 
shij) and bookkeeping throughout Champaign and adjoining counties and 
achieved (piite a distinctive reputation hereabout as an instructor in tho.se 
branches. Upon deciding to give his whole attention to farming Mr. Hawk 
bought the (jld home place, which then consisted of fifty-four acres, and began 
farming on a practical scale, later increasing his holdings to include his ])res- 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OFIIO. I4I 

ent fine farm of two hundred acres, in Union townshii). In addition to his 
general farming ^Jr. Hawk has given considerable attention to the raising 
of live stock and has d<Mie well. He is an ardent champion of alfalfa cul- 
ture and in the summer of tqt^ had seventy acres planted to this valuable 
forage crop. Mr. Hawk is a Democrat and has served the public in the 
\-arious capacities of land appraiser, school director and township trustee. 

In 1886 Kendall S. Hawk was united in marriage to Alarv Mc Adams, 
daughter of Samuel A'IcAdams and wife, and to this union six children have 
been born. Howard. Florence. Merrill, Imo, Ruth and Agnes. Florence 
Hawk married Walter Jones and has two children. Richard and Robert. The 
Hawks have a very pleasant home and have ever taken an interested [)art in 
the communitv's general social affairs. 



JAMFS M. GI.ENDFNNING. 

I^lsewhere in this volume of biography there is set out at considerable 
length the history of the Glendenning family in Champaign county, one of the 
oldest and most widely and substantially representative families in the county, 
the family having been established here in 1829 by James Glendenning, grand 
father of the subject-of this sketch, a native of Scotland, who came here with 
his family in 182c) from Virginia and settled on Brush lake, in Rush town- 
ship, where he established his home and became one of the most substantial 
and influential pioneer farmers of that neighborhood. He and his wife. 
Alary D. Van Horn, were the parents of eight children, of whom William 
Glendenning was the second in order of birth. William Glendenning was 
born in Harrison county. Virginia, now comprised in West X'irginia, July 8, 
1 81 7, and was about thirteen years of age w-hen he came with his parents to 
this county. He grew up on the home farm in Rush townshiji and there 
spent the rest of his life, becoming the owner of more than seven hundred 
acres of land, his death occurring; there on March 2, 1897. He was twice 
married and was the father of thirteen children, five by his first marriage and 
eight by his second marriage: a list of these children and something regarding 
their lives being set out elsewhere in this volume, as noted above. The second 
wife of William Glendenning was Mary Hawkins, who was born in New 
Hampshire on January 23. 1825. and who died at her home in this countv on 
September 16. 1903. 

James M. Glendenning. first-born of the children l)orn to William and 



14-" 



CIIAArPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 



Man- (Hawkins) ( ".lendeiiniiii;-, was l)i>ni on the olcl Glendennint;- farm in 
l\n-h tnwnship on July 12. 1N57. ar.cl recei\-e(l his schooh'ng in the (h'strict 
:-cli().'l< "f tliat neii^iil)()rh()()(l. h^roni the days <>i his boyhood he was a valued 
aid in the worl< of dexxdopin^- and ini])ro\-in^- the home place and remained 
at homt until his marria.^e at the aj^e of twenty-four \-ears. after which h.e 
located on a tract of one hundred and forl\-ei,^-ht acres, known as the Will- 
iam ( iunn farm, a i)art of his present well-impi-o\ ed farm, in Rush township, 
;ind tlu're estahlished his home. L'])on taking- possession of that place he 
proceeded to remodel the house, huilt three ])arns and other essential farm 
buildings and othei-wise impro\ed the ])lace. .\s he ])rospered in his affairs. 
Mr. rilendenmn^in' added to his land holdings until now he is the owner of a 
line place of two hundred and eij^htx-three acres and one of the best and most 
up-to-date farm plants in that part of the countw In addition to his general 
farming, Mr. ("ilendenning has gixen considerable attention to the raising of 
li\e <tock and has done (pu'te well, long having been regarded as one of the 
leading farmers of that neighborhood. 

In i8Si James M. ( ilendenning was united in marriage to ("arrie l'"inle\ . 
who was born m the neighboring count\- of Ldiion, daughter of josejjh and 
Ann l-'inlcy, X'irginians, and earl\- settlers of I'nion cctuntw and to this union 
three chiMren have been born, Lloyd. Walter and C'leo, all of whom are ai 
home. The < ilendennings ha\e a \er\- pleasant home and have e\er taken an 
interested jiart in the general social acti\ities of the community. Thev are 
nuMuber.-^ of the Methodist l'4)isco])al church and take a proper part in church 
woi'k and in othei' neighborhood good works. Mr. (Ilendenning is a Repub- 
lican and takes a good citizen's interest in local political affairs, but has not 
been a seek-er aftei- ])ublic office. 



I.\siM':r a. iii'.ss. 



The late |a-~])cr A. Mess, foi" years one of the best-known farmer- of 
Wayne township, this county, but who, about three \ears before his death in 
the summ-r of Hji;. retired from the farm ;ind nioxed to (."able. whei-e his 
widow is siiji living, was a natix'e son of (b.-impaign countv and here spenl 
all his life. lie was born on a farm in Wa\ue township on januar\- 7. iS-l^, 
son of ( a])t. ( ;./orge ;md bdiza ( Dowers) I less. n;iti\es of X'irginia, who were 
married in that slate and later came o\ei- into ( )bio and settled on a faian in 
W axiie township, this countw the remainder of theii' lives being spent here. 



CHAMPAIGN COUXTV, OHIO. I45 

Capt. (ieorge Hess was for vears ])r()mineiit in the ranks of the ( )hiM Stale 
Militia and served for some time as captain of the local conipan_\- of militia. 
Tie was the father of two children, the su1)ject of this memorial sketch -tnd 
another .son, John. After the death of Captain Mess his widow married Dr. 
(ionld john-on. a ])rominent pinsician of this conntv, and h\- that marria.^e 
was the mother of one child, who died in infanc}-. 

iveared on a farm in \\'a\ne township, jasper A. Hess received his 
scho(,Hnc;- in the schools of that neighl^orhood and from the da^'s of his boy- 
IkhhI was en-ag-ed in farming". After his marriage in 1867 he rented .. farm 
and hegan 1 arming on his own account, a few _\ears later huying a small 
farm of thii'i\-^e\en acres and there established liis home. lie was an excel- 
lent farmer and as he prospered in his operations cidded to his holdings until 
he became the owner of a tine farm of one hundred and thirt\--se\'en acres, 
on which he continued to make his home until his retirement froni the farm 
in ]')IJ and remo\al to Cable, where his last (la}s were spent. hi> death 
occui"ring there on August 18. I<;i5. Mr. Hess was a Republican :ind e\er 
ga\-e a go(,d citizen's attention to local political affairs, but had not been 
included in the office-seeking class. 

On Jruiuarv !, 1807. J .\. Hess was united in marriage to I'^idelia Town- 
send, who w:'s born in the neighboring count}- of C'lark. a daugliler of J<jse])h 
and M;ir\- ( I.inville ) Townsend. the former of whom was a nati\e of Oliio 
.md the latter of l'enns\ Ivania. who later became well-to-do residents of this 
county. Jose])h Townsend was ijorn in the eastern part of the state and 
there grew to manhood, learning the carpenter's trade. lie later came over 
into this ]jart of the st.ate and located in the Woodstock neighborhood, in 
this county, becoming engaged there in the carpenter business and while thus 
engaged helped to Imikl some of the rtrst houses in Cable. Me married in 
Clark count\- and after living there rd)out a \ear after his marriage returned 
to Champaign count\- and settled on a farm in the southwestei-n part of 
\\'avne township, where he spent the rest of his life, farming and working- 
as a carpenter, fie became owner of (|uite an e\tensi\ e tract of land and 
was accounted one of the substantial residents of that ])art of the county. 
Joseph Townsend and his wife were the parents of eight children, of whom 
Mrs. Mess was the first-born, the others being Josephine. Adella. iMnma. 
Ernest. Benjamin. Effie and Lydia. Mrs. Mess is a member of the Meth- 
odist I'^ijiscoijal church and has e\er taken an interested part in church work, 
as well as in the general good works of the communitx' in which she li\es. 
Since the death of her husband she has continued to make her residence at 
Cable, where she is ver}- pleasantly situated. 



144 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

WILLIAM H. MILLER. 

William II. Miller, one of the most substantial retired farmers of 
Wayne township, is a native son of Ohio and has lived in this state all his 
life. He was l)orn on a farm in Warren county on May 19, 1842, son of 
John and Ilannah ((ireen) Aliller, the former of whom was born in \'ir- 
i^inia and the latter in Warren county, this state. John Miller came to Ohio 
with his parents when he was thirteen years of age, the family settling- in 
Warren county, where he i>"rew to manhood, married and spent the rest of 
liis life farmini^, his death occurring in 1888. His wife had preceded him 
to the grave many \ ears, her death having (occurred in 1847. They were 
the parents of four children, of whom the subject of this sketch and his 
brother. James, were the only ones to come to Champaign county. James 
died in 190Q. 

William II. Miller was but five years of age when h's mother died. He 
grew to manhood on the home farm in Warren county, receiving his school- 
ing- in the schools of that neighborhood, and when twenty-one years of age, 
in iSf)^, came to Champaign county with his brother James and located on 
a farm that belonged to their father, in Rush township. There they re- 
mained two years, at. tl-ie end of which time the}^ moved up into Logan 
county and for a year were located on a farm in Zane township. William 
II. Miller then returned to Champaign county, having married meanwhile, 
and settled on the f.arni in Wayne townshij) on which he is now living 
and where he ever since has made his home, being for many years (jne of 
the leading farmers and stockmen in that part of the count}-. Upon taking 
])ossession of that farm the place consisted of but ninet}- acres, but Mr. 
Miller was a progressive and energetic former and as he prospered in his 
farming and stock-raising operations he added to his holdings until he be- 
canie the owner of more than six hundred acres and had created one of the 
Ijest farm plants in the county. He continued actively engaged in farming 
unlil 1914, when he retired and is now "taking things eas}," though con- 
tinuing to make his home on the place which has been his place of residence 
for a half century and where he and his family are very comfortably sit- 
uated. He is one of the most public-spirited men in the county and bears 
the reputation of doing more for other ])eople than an}- other man in the 
countv. Mr. .Miller is a Democrat and has served as road supervisor for 
his district. 

Mr. Miller has been twice married. In b>I)ruar\-, [865, be was united 



CHAMPAIGX COUNTY. OHIO. I45 

in marriage to Eliza Stokes, daughter of Daniel Stokes, and to this union 
one child was born, a son. Pearl Miller, who married Rose Lewis and has 
four children. \"aughn. Lorraine, Hubert and Vivian. Mrs. Eliza Miller 
(lied in looi and Mr. Miller later married Mrs. Lavina Jenkins, daughter 
of Jonathan and Sabina Morrison, of Chester county, Penns3'lvania. The 
father was a blacksmith and wagon-maker, and also a bell-maker. Mrs. 
Aliller has made a dice quilt during her lifetime containing four thousand 
nine hundred and forty blocks. 

Mrs. Miller was born in 1840, in Madison county, at Plain City, then 
known as Pleasant \'alle}-. and remembers when the local paper, The Advo- 
cate, was published by tread power operated by a large Newfoundland dog, 
I'lic Advocate is now in the hands of the family, Mrs. Miller's niece, Mrs. 
OUie Macklin. being the editor. 



TAMES L BLOSE. 



James L Blose, for years actively engaged in the grain, produce and 
general real-estate business at Urbana, is a native son of this county and has 
lived here all his life. He was born on a farm in Mad River township, 
October 18, 1852, son of Daniel and Louisa (Colbert) Blose, the former of 
whom was born in Virginia and the latter in this county. 

Daniel Blose was but a boy when he came to this county from Virginia 
with his parents, Henry Blose and wife, and here he grew to manhood, 
became a farmer in Mad River township and there spent his last days, his 
death occurring at the age of fifty-five years. He was twice married and by 
his first wife, who was a Pierce, was the father of three children. His second 
wife, Louisa Colbert, mother of the subject of this sketch, was a daughter 
of John Colbert and wife, pioneers of this county. She survived her hus- 
band for many years, her death occurring in 1901. 

Reared on the home farm in Mad River township, James L Blose 
received his early schooling in die district schools of that neighborhood 
and supplemented the same by a course in Urbana University, after which 
he became employed in a clerical capacity in the offices of the Pennsylvania 
Railroad Company at Urbana and was thus engaged there for a year, at the 
end of which time he entered into a partnership with John C. Edmiston, under 
the firm name of Blose & Edmiston, to engage in the grain business at 
f loa) 



146 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

Urbana; a connection which continued until his election six years later, in 
1876, to the office of treasurer of Champaign county. He served two suc- 
cessive terms as county treasurer. Upon retiring from his office in the court 
house Mr. Blose resumed his former business calling, again engaging in the 
grain business at Urbana, and at the same time became a general produce 
merchant, which business he has continued to this day, long having been 
recognized as one of the leading grain and produce dealers in this part of 
the state; doing an extensive business in the buying and shipping of grain, 
feed, hay and general farm produce. In addition to this, Mr. Blose also 
for years has given considerable attention to the general real-estate business 
in and about Urbana, with particular reference to farm properties, and d(X^s 
an extensive business in that line. 

On December 28, 1876, James I. Blose was united in marriage to Lucy 
Ann Straw, who was born in Cary, Wyandot county, tliis state, daughter 
of David Straw and wife, and to this union three children have been born, 
Corrinn, Lucy and Helen. Mr. Blose is a Mason of high degree and takes 
an active interest in Masonic work, being a member of Harmony Lodge 
No. 8, Free and Accepted Masons; Urbana Chapter Ncx 34, Royal Arch 
Masons; Raper Commandery No. 19, Knights Templar, at Urbana; of the 
consistory. Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite, at Dayton, and a noble of the 
Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, affiliated with Antioch 
Temple, at Dayton. 



MARSHALL G. McWILLLAMS. 

Marshall G. McWilliams, an honored veteran of the Civil War, former 
commander of Brand Post No. 98, Grand Army of the Republic, and for 
years a craftsman in the railroad shops at Urbana, now living retired in thai 
city, one of the best-known residents thereof, is a native "Buckeye" and has 
lived in this state all his life. He was born on a farm in Berlin township. 
Delaware county, this state, August 17, 1845, son of Edward Marshall and 
Clarissa (Smith) McWilliams, both of whom were born in \Varren count}-. 
New Jersey, the former in 1802 and the latter, x'Vugust 11, 1826, whose last 
days were spent in this state. 

Edward Marshall McWilliams was trained as a stonemason, but when 
he came to Ohio in 1826 he entered a tract of land in Delaware county. 
cleared the same, later established his home there and there spent the remain- 
der of his life, his death occurring on November 12. 1876. His widow sur- 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. I47 

vived him for fifteen years, her death occurring- on July lo, 1891. They 
were members of the Presbyterian church and their children were reared in 
that faith. There were five of these children, those besides the subject of 
this sketch being as follow : Smith, who served as a soldier of the Union 
during the Civil War, a member of Company H, One Hundred and Forty- 
fifth Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and was for years a school teacher 
in Delaware county and city clerk of his home town, who died on January 
13, 1916, aged ninety-five; Lydia J., who married Edward Gregory, of Dela- 
ware county; William, also a veteran of the Civil War, a member of the 
Forty-fifth Ohio, with which command he served for three years, fourteen 
months of which time he was held in durance vile in a Rebel prison pen, 
and who died in 1908, and Ann, who lives at Benton Harbor, Michigan, 
wife of William L. Moore, a veteran of the Civil War. 

Marshall G. McWilliams grew up on the home farm in Delaware county 
and when sixteen years of age enlisted for service in the Union army during 
the Civil War, going to the front as a drummer boy in Company C, Fifth 
Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infant r)-. attached to the Army of the Potomac. 
After eighteen months of service as a drummer he was made regimental 
postmaster and later was appointed brigade postmaster. After the battle 
of Gettysburg he was sent West and was in the battle of Lookout Mountain, 
later joining Sherman's army in the Atlanta campaign and then on to 
Savannah, and was present at the surrender at Goldsborough, North Caro- 
lina. Mr. McWilliams's service covered a period of three years and six 
months and he was mustered out at Baltimore at the close of the war in 1865. 

Upon the completion of his military service Mr. McWilliams returned 
to his home in Delaware county and remained there until 1867, when lie 
went to Urbana and became engaged in the car shops there and was thus 
engaged as a carpenter, painter and car builder until his marriage in the 
summer of 1872, after which for three years he made his home on a farm 
in Urbana township. He then returned to Urbana, established his home 
there and resumed his place in the car shops, continuing thus engaged until 
liis retirement from active labor in 1906, since which time he lias been taking 
things comparatively "easy." 

It was in June, 1872, that Marshall G. McWilliams was united in niai- 
riage to Mary A. Fulton, daughter of James W. and Ann (hlick) Fulton, 
the former a native of Virginia and the latter of Clark county, this state. 
James W. Fulton was but eighteen years of age when he came to tliis count v 
from Virginia. He presently bought a tract of land in Urbana township, 
established his home there, erected a large brick house and there spent the 



140 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

remainder of his life. He and his wife were members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church and were among the leaders in all good works in the com- 
mnnity in which they lived. They were the parents of three children, Mrs. 
McWilliams having had two sisters, Catherine, who married Charles Lay- 
cock and is now deceased, and Fannie, who died at the age of eighteen years. 
Mrs. McWilliams is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church at Urbana 
Mr. McWilliams is an active member of Brand Post No. 98, Grand Army 
of the Republic, at Urbana, and was commander of the same for three years. 
Marshall G. and Mary A. (Fulton) McWilliams had one child, a daughter, 
Fannie, who married Earl Shofstall, now residing in Crbana. They have 
two children, Ethel, who married Dr. Chauncey North, a dentist at Akron, 
and Kenneth. 



BENONI R. WILSON. 



iJenoni R. Wilson, a veteran of the Civil War and one of Champaign 
county's best-known and most substantial farmers, now living practicall)- 
retired at Urbana, which has been his place of residence since 1902, is a 
naii\e son of this county and has lived here all his life. He was born on a 
farm two and one-half miles southwest of St. Paris, in Jackson township, 
August 24, 1843, a son of John and Margaret (Johnson) Wilson, the former 
of whom was born in this state and the latter in Virginia, whose last days 
^\ ere spent on their farm in Jackson township. 

John Wilson was born on Buchanan's Hill, in Butler county, this state, 
December 8. t8o.|. a son of Andrew and Jemima (Robins) Wilson, the 
former of whom was born in the old fort at Harrodsburg. Kentucky, and 
the latter in Butler county, this state. In 1807 Andrew Wilson came up 
into Ohio and settled on Lost creek, ten miles east of Troy, in Miami county, 
and remained there five years, at the end of which time he went over into 
Indiana and settled on a half section of land he had traded for in Owen 
county. Tie later returned to Ohio with his family and settled on a farm 
at the head of Honey creek, one mile north of Christianburg, in Jackson 
township, this county, and there he and his wife spent the remainder of their 
]i\-es. The\- were the parents of nine children, Benoni. Sarah, John, Samuel, 
Abigail. Robert K.. Ann, Elizabeth and Andrew. 

By the time he was seventeen years of age John Wilson had cleared 
fi\e acres of land and had thus earned his father's permission to leave home 
and start out on his own account, and in 1821 went over into Indiana and 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. I49 

in Owen county, that state, began working in the general store and still- 
house of a Mr. Bigger. \Vhile thus employed he was required to make a 
lri[) of twenty-iive miles with an ox-team to a salt-works in the middle of 
w inter and on the trip both of his feet were severely frozen. He later made 
a trip to New Orleans on a flatboat with stuff for the Southern market and 
while in that city saw oysters for the tirst time. He was told that for twenty- 
fne cents he could have all the oysters he could eat and he tackled the propo- 
sition, but after downing the first oyster concluded that he had had his money's 
W'irth and from that day forward never again ate an oyster. In 1825 he 
returned to this county and located at St. Paris, where he remained until his 
marriage in 183 1 to Margaret Johnson, who was born in Giles county. Vir- 
ginia, N'ovember 13, 1804. After his marriage he located two and one-half 
mil':;s south of St. Paris and there entered on a contract to split rails for 
twenty-live cents a hundred. He later bought a tract of land near there, 
paying live dollars an acre for the same, and on that tract established his 
home and spent the remainder of his life. He was a Republican and he and 
h's wife were members of the Honey Creek Baptist church. They had two 
children, the subject of this sketch having had a sister, Elizabeth Jane, who 
die' I at the age of eleven years. 

Benoni R. Wilson was reared on the home farm in Jackson township 
and received his schooling in the schools of that neighborhood. From the 
days of his early boyhood he was a valued assistant to his father in the lalwrs 
of developing and improving the home farm. On Ma}' 2, 1864. then 
being but twentv vears of age. he enlisted for service in the Union armv, a 
member of Company T. One Hundred and Thirty-fourth Regiment, Ohio 
\V)lunteer Infantry, and served for three months, that command being then 
stationed at Point of Rocks, on the James river in A'irginia. Upon the com- 
pletion of his military service he returned home and after the death of his 
]jarents came into possession of the home farm, where he continued to live 
until 1902, when he retired from the active labors of the farm and moved to 
Urbana, where he and his wife are now living, thougli most of their winters 
are spent in Florida or California. Mr. Wilson has been successful in his 
farming operations and has a well-improved farm of three hundred and two 
acres. He has also given considerable attention to the raising of tine horses 
and a good grade of cattle, long ha^■ing been recognized as one of the leading 
stockmen in the southwestern part of the county. He is a member of the 
board of directors of the Urbana Canning Company and has other interests. 
Mr. Wilson is a Republican and has served as a member of the countv cen- 



150 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

tral committee of that party, as well as a frec[uent delegate tt) the county cun- 
^c^tions of his part}'. 

On i^'el)ruarv 21, 1867. Beiioni R. Wilson was united in marriage to 
^lary h' ranees Aiaxew wht) was born near South Charlestown, a daughter 
oF John and Tliarit}' ( Starr) Alaxey, the former of whom also was born at 
S(juth CTtarlcstdwn and the latter at Xenia. this state. John Maxey. who 
Avas born in i8i-j. was a farmer and extensive stockman at South Charle^- 
tiwn and lired Lhere all his life. He was a Republican and serve<l for some 
liiiie as a member of the board of county commissioners from his district. 
Ik- difd in 1877 an.d his widow, who was born in 1821, survived him for 
abou*: live }('ars, her death occurring in 1S82. They were earnest members 
of the Methodist Episcopal church and their children were reared in that 
faith. There were six of these children, of w'hom ■Mrs. W'^ilson wa- the 
second in or.ler oi hiirtli. tlie others being as follow: Stephen William, of 
South Solon, this state: I'^dizabedi, \\ho for more than thirty years served as 
a missionary in C aJcutta, Indiana; Laura, who is living at London, this state. 
widow of ( ieorge Caiinon : Charles S.. of b'resno. California, and John W.. 
deceased. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wilson have one daughter, Laura Jane, who married Dr. 
C. B. Forward, of Urljana, and has one child, a daughter, Frances Lottie. 
Mr. and Mrs. Wilson retain their membership in the Honey Creek Baptist 
church and ha\e for \ears been active in church work, as well as in all neigh- 
borhood good works. Mr. Wilson is a member of Brand Post No. 98. 
( Irand Armv of the Republic, and takes an active interest in the affairs of 
that patriotic organization. 



FREDERICK W. AMBROSE. 

iM-ederick W. Ambrose, former superintendent of the Urbana water- 
works plant, for many years assistant cashier of the Champaign National 
Bank in that city and for years clerk of the city school board, now living 
practicall}' retired at his pleasant home in Urbana. is a native son of that city 
and has lived there all his life. He was born on November 22. 1849, son of 
Newton and Alice Ann (Ward) Ambrose, both of whom were born at 
Urbana, the former on June 6, 1819, and the latter, October 16, 1830, who 
were for many years among the best-known residents of Urbana. Newton 
Ambrose having l)een postmaster there during the sixties. 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. I51 

Newton Ambrose was a son of P'rederick Ambrose, who was born in 
I'^rederick county, Virginia, and who came to Ohio in 1799, settUng on the 
Mad river, in that part of the state later comprised within the bounds of 
Cliampaign county. AVhen Urbana later was laid out he mo\ed to town and 
there started a pottery. He also was somewhat engaged in the mercantile 
Ijusiness, was quite active in local politics and served as one of the early 
slierifTs of the county. Frederick .Vmbrose was twice married, his first wife 
having been Jennie Tanner, of Irish descent, and his second wife, Mary Poff, 
of Kentucky. By his first marriage he was the father of nine children and 
l^y the second marriage, six children. Xewton Ambrose grew up at Urbana 
and his first employment was as a bookkeeper in a mercantile establishment. 
He later was engaged in the mercantile business on his own account and also 
for some time Avas engaged in the manufacture of glue. During the years 
1860-68 he served as postmaster of Urbana and was for years one of the 
local leaders of the Republican party in this county. His death occurred in 
1884 'iiid his widow survived him for fourteen years, her death occurring in 
1898. They were earnest members of the Methodist Episcopal church and 
dieir children were reared in that faith. There were seven of these children. 
of whom the subject of this sketch was the first-born, the others being as fol- 
low : Mary E., wife of B. F. Ganson; Alice, widow of Thomas Sullivan, of 
Tacoma, Washington; Margaret, wife of Edward H. Houtz; Emma, who is 
making her home with her brother, Frederick W. ; Anna, wife of John Bene- 
dict, of Portland, Oregon, and Newton, who married and is now living at 
AA'interhaA'en, Florida, where he is engaged as a traveling salesman. 

Frederick W. Ambrose received his schooling in the schools of Urbana. 
Much of his youth was spent on a farm and he later became engaged in the 
United States postal service, being thus engaged for several years, at the end 
of which time he transferred his services to the local office of the United 
States Express Company and was thus connected until several years later, 
when he was appointed superintendent of the Urbana waterworks plant, a 
position he occupied for about twelve years, at the end of which time, in 
1893, he was made assistant cashier of the Champaign National Bank of 
Urbana and was thus connected until his retirement in 1914. For twenty- 
three years iN'Ir. Ambrose was clerk of the city school board and during that 
long period of service in behalf of the schools did much to advance the cause 
of education in the cit}-, his membership on the school board having covered 
the period in which most of the present modern and highly efficient school 
])lant was erected. 

On November 18. 1895, Frederick W. Ambrose was united in marriage 



152 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

to Kerin H. Patrick, who also was born in Urbana, daughter of E. B. Pat- 
rick, a well-known furniture manitfacturer of that city. Mr. and Mrs. 
Ambrose are members of the Methodist Episcopal church and take a proper 
interest in church work as well as in the general social activities of their home 
town, ever helpful in promoting such movements as are designed to advance 
the common welfare. 



E. R. EARLE, M. D. 

This is an age of specialists. There have been such gigantic strides in 
the scientific world during the past few decades that one man can no longer 
claim to be proficient in many lines of endeavor. This is especially true of 
the medical profession. One of the successful of the younger doctors of 
Champaign county is Dr. E. R. luirlc, ear, eye. throat and nose specialist at 
Urbana. 

]>)ctor Earle was !)orn in Hopkins county, Kentucky, March 10, 1880. 
He is a son of Dr. Benjamin P. and Mary (Roberts) Earle. both natives of 
Kentucky, where they grew up, attended school and were married and estab- 
lished their future home. The father is a physician and is in the active 
practice of his profession near Dawson Springs. Kentucky, where he has 
long been well and favorably known. 

Dr. 1{. R. Earle grew to maturity in Hopkins county, Kentucky, and 
there received a common-school education. Later he took a course in the 
Hospital College of Medicine at Eouisville. Kentucky, in which in.stitution 
he spent four vears. making an excellent record and graduating with the 
degree of Doctor of Medicine, with the class of 1902. 

After leaving college, he located at Paducah, Kentuck}', for the practice 
of his profession, and while there served as assistant surgeon of the Illinois 
Central Railroad Hospital for a period of six years and built up an extensive 
general practice in Paducah. Upon leaving that city he went to Vincennes. 
Indiana, and took a course in the Knapp Sanitarium, completing a special 
course of study in treatment of the eye, ear, nose and throat. In 1911 he 
located in Urbana, Ohio, and has remained here to the present time, building 
up a verv satisfactor\ and growing practice as a specialist. 

Dcjctor I'^arle was married in 1908 to b'lise Wright, a daughter of Dr. 
Charles O. Wright, and to this union one child has been l)orn. lietty Isabelle 
Earle. 

Doctor Earle is a member of the Champaign Coimty Medical Society. 




K. U. KAltLE. M. 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY. OHIO. 



DO- 



the Ohio State Medical Society and the American Medical Association. 
I'olitically, he is a Democrat. He belongs to the Episcopal church and is a 
member of the vestrv of the same. 



WILLIAM M. GERMAN. 

When the House of Representatives of the eighty-first General Assem- 
bly of the state of Ohio in connection with the announcement of the death 
of Hon. William M. Gehman, late of Champaign county, formally resolved 
''that in the minds of the men who knew him his memory is imperishable, 
and that the community will not forget his life and ser^•ice in the years to 
come," that distinguished body gave solemn utterance to a statement of 
exact fact; and w4ien it further declared, in this same connection, that "the 
salvation of the American government lies in the product of such men ; 
the preservation of our country lies in their service when with us, and the 
strength and inspiration of our youth lies in their memory after they have 
gone," it meant just what it said. Although those resolutions were adopted 
by a Legislature sitting twenty years after William H. Gehman had served 
in that body, there were man}' there who new him well and all were familiar 
with his services to the state, so that with one mind they rejoiced in the 
ability thus to offer fitting testimony of the public's appreciation of the 
service he had rendered during the period of his activities in the public's 
behalf. For he had done well his part. 

The late William H. Gehman, former representati\'e in the Legislatin-e 
from Champaign county and for many years a substantial farmer of this 
county, was a native son of this county and had lived here all his life, a 
continuous resident of the farm on which he was born and where his widow 
is still living, in section i6 of Salem township, the famil}- home adjoining^ 
the village of King Creek, the farm lying at the edge of the \-illage. He 
was born on October 23, 1851, son of the Rev. Benjamin W. and Eliza- 
beth (Morris) Gehman, natives of Pennsylvania, who had settled in Cham- 
paign count}- in 1842, the year of their marriage, and here spent the remainder 
of their lives, useful and influential members of the Kings Creek commun- 
ity, in which for many years the Rev. Benjamin \\'. Gehman labored as a 
minister of the Methodist Episcopal church and in which he also acquired 
a fine piece of farm property. 

As noted above, the Rev. Benjamin \\'. Gehman was a native of the 



154 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

old Kentucky state, born in Lancaster count}^, I'ennsylvania, January 9, 
1820, son of Benjamin W. and Magdalene (Weaver) Gehman, natives of 
that same state, the former born in that same county, a son of Benjamin 
W. Gehman, a Hanoverian, born in the kingdom of Hanover in 1741. who 
was but nine years of age when he came to this country with his ])arents 
in 1750, the family settling in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, where the 
Gehmans have ever since been represented. The first Benjamin ( lehman 
grew to manhood in that countv, married there and established his home on 
a farm, spending the remainder of his life in that county. His son, the 
second Benjamin Gehman, gre^^' to manhood on that farm and in 1809 mar- 
ried Magdalene Weaver. In 181 3 he moved to the neighboring county of 
Berks and there established his home in an old house that had been built 
in 1774 and had been occupied as a block house during the Revolutionary 
War and during the subsecjuent Lidian troubles. The stone walls of this 
house were three feet in thickness and the small barred windows and the 
doors of double thickness of stout oak planks rendered it impregnable against 
assault. In that house was born Benjamin W. Gehman, third, and there 
he lived until he was fourteen years of age, when his father sold a portion 
of the homestead tract, reserving that part of the farm lying in Lancaster 
county, where he erected buildings and where he spent the remainder of his 
life. The second Benjamin W. Gehman and his wife were the parents of 
nine children. 

Early in life the third Benjamin W. ( rehman began to "do for him- 
self." At eleven years of age he was performing the duties of a teamster 
and was thus engaged until he was eighteen years of age, in the meantime 
picking up such schooling as the meager facilities in the educational \vay 
in his community afforded, and was then presented by his father w ith a horse. 
About that time, in 1837, there was a call for the assembling of a company 
to start from Iowa to lay out an overland route to Oregon, ^■oung Ben- 
jamin determined to join that expedition and mounting his horse started 
for the Iowa country, at that time a part of the then x^isl Territoiy of 
Wisconsin, and rode through to the point of rendezvous. l'])on his arrival 
there, however, he found that the expedition had been abandoned, there not 
having been a sufficient response to the fall to form a company strong enough 
for the undertaking. Nothing daunted, however, he determined to continue 
his travels and before returning- to his home in Pennsylvania made a tour 
of more than four thousand miles on horseback. When sixteen years of age, 
in January, 1836, he had united with the Methodist I^piscojjal church and 
had developed marked powers as an "exhorter," and in August. 1840. at 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 



55 



^lorgantown, Pennsylvania, was licensed as an exhorter Ijv the Methodist 
Episcopal conference. Two years later, in Angust, [842, he married Eliza- 
beth Morris and at once started for the West, with the intention of estab- 
lishing his home in Iowa. Upon arriving in Champaign count}', en route, 
he and his wife stopped to make a visit to the family of his brother-in-law, 
Mr. Zook, and while here his wife was taken seriousl\- ill. The physician 
called in the case advised strongly against the continuance of the trip West, 
friends and kinsmen also joining in this advice and urging that the newlv- 
married couple settle in this county, and Mr. Gehman decided to remain liere. 
In pursuance of that determination he bought from the Re\-. (ieorge W. 
Walker, a Methodist minister, a tract of two hundred acres in section 16 
of Salem township, adjoining the Kings Creek settlement, paying for the 
same eleven dollars an acre, and there established his home, spending the 
rest of his life there, the place now occupied by the widow of his son, Will- 
iam M. Gehman. In 1848 the Rev. Benjamin W. Gehman was licensed as 
a preacher by the Methodist conference and in 1856, at Ri])le\-, was ortlained 
by Bishop Ames and continued actively engaged in the ministr\- of the Meth- 
odist church until his death, with a record of more than two hundred con- 
^•ersions during his ministry. He established the Methodist Episcopal church 
at Kennard (Forbes Chapel) and the Local Preachers' Chapel, three and 
one-half miles northeast of Urbana and for years was one of the best-known 
clergymen of that faith in this part of the state. He not only was success- 
ful in the ministry, but was successful in his farming operations and gradu- 
ally increased his land holdings until he was the owner of a hue farm of five 
hundred and thirty acres at the time of his death in Fel)ruary, 1882. The 
Rev. Benjamin W. Gehman was twice married and by his first wife was 
the father of four children, Ella M.. .\nna M., Benjamin l\ and William 
M. The mother of these children died on Januar\- 31, 1870, and on May 23, 
1878, he married Helena Brown, daughter of J. C. Brown, who survived 
him. 

William M. Gehman was reared on the lK)me farm at Kings Creek and 
received his schooling in the local schools, in the Urbana high school, in 
Lancaster Academy and at the Ohio State University at Colum])us, in which 
latter institution he spent three years. Upon leaving the academy he taught 
school for a while, earning money with which to enter the University, and 
upon completing his studies there resumed teaching and was thus engaged 
for eleven years, in the meantime spending his summers on the lH)me farm. 
Retiring from the school room in 1880 he thereafter gave his attention to 
farming and after his marriage in the fall of 1882 established his lionie on 



156 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, Olin). 

the old home place and there spent the rest of his life, becoming the owner 
of the farm, a fine place of five hundred and thirty acres, now owned by his 
widow, who continues to make her home there. Mr. Gehnian died on March 
2, 191 5, and was sincerely mourned throughout the neighlx)rhood in which 
he had spent his whole life, for he had been a good citizen, doing well those 
things his hands had found to do. In addition to his legislative services he 
had served for some years as trustee of Salem township, had helped to organ- 
ize the Kings Creek Farmers' Institute in 1892, and was for six years pres- 
ident of that organization, and had in other ways taken an active part in 
the general affairs of his community, for years being regarded as one of the 
big "all-around" men of his generation in Champaign county. 

Mr. Gehman was an ardent Republican and was for years one of the 
leaders of that party in this section of the state. In 1895 he was elected to 
represent this county in the House of Representatives of the Seventy-second 
General Assembly of the state of Ohio and served a term in the House with 
honor, his services on behalf of tlie public being rendered with such con- 
spicuous ability and with so high a regard for the ]mblic good as to incur 
the opposition of a certain powerful element in the party and it is said that 
when he became a candidate for re-election in tlie succeeding campaign 
Marcus Hanna, the then leader of the Republican part}- in Ohio, sent three 
thousand dollars into Champaign county to defeat his candidacy. History, 
however, had a different view of Mr. Gehnian's services to his state, and 
upon the announcement of his death in March, 19^5. the Legislature, then 
in session, unanimously adopted the following resolution ( H. R. 36). otifered 
bv the Hon. C. D. Conover, then sitting for Champaign county in the house: 
"Relative to the death and public services of Hon. William M. Gehman, of 

Champaign county, a former member of the House of Representatives : 

U'hcrcas, William M. Gehman, of Champaign count}-, member of this 
House in the seventy-second General .\ssembl}-, has passed away: and 

IVhcvcas. as a member of the General Assembly and in the various 
l)laces of public service Mr. Gehman ga\e unusual evidence of a broad and 
useful public spirit, and as a leader of ])ublic opinion in his section of the 
state : 

IJ'lirrcas, in his passing the state has lost the service of a useful and 
inlluentia! citizen and the comnuinity in \vhich he lived has lost a dependable 
and ])atriotic friend : therefore, be it 

Rcsoknl. l)y the House of Representatives of the eighty-first General 
Assembly, that our sympathies are extended to the family *of Mr. Gehman 
in their hour of bereavement, with the assurance that in the minds of the 



ClfAMPAIGX COUNTY, OHIO. 1 57 

men who knew him his memory is imperishable, and that the community will 
not forget his life and services in the years to come. The salvation of the 
American government lies in the product of such men ; the preservation of 
our country lies in their service when with us, and the strength and inspira- 
tion of our youth lies in their memory after they are gone ; 

Resolved, That these resolutions be adopted by a rising vote, that they 
be spread upon the Journal of the House, and that a copy be sent to the 
family of the deceased." 

On October 26, 1882, ^Vi]liam At. Gehman was united in marriage to 
Martha E. Chance, who was born in Union township, this county, a daughter 
of William and Henrietta (Jones) Chance, both also natives of this state, 
the former born on a farm in the vicinity of Catawba, in Clark county, and 
the latter born in Union township, this county, and who settled in the latter 
township after their marriage. William Chance was a son of a native of 
Wales, who came to this country and located on a farm in the neighborhood 
of Catawba, in Clark county, this state, where he spent the remainder of his 
life. Upon establishing his home in this county after his marriage. William 
Chance bought what then was known as the Jones farm in Union township 
and there lived until 1893, in which year he retired from the farm and he 
and his wife moved to Urbana, where their last days were spent, his death 
occurring on November 22, 1904, and hers. August 6. 19 F 2. They were the 
parents of eight children, four of whom are still living. Mrs. Gehman having 
a brother. Dr. Joseph Chance, of London, this state, and two sisters, Ella, 
wife of Erank Magrew, and Lulu, wife of William Berry. For some years 
before her marriage, Mrs. Gehman was a teacher in the public schools at 
L'rbana. She was educated in the L'rbana schools, under Prof. A. C. Deuel. 
and at Ohio Wesleyan Liniversity at Dela\\are, and upon completing her 
university course was recommended b}- Professor Deuel for a position on 
the teaching staff of the Urbana city schools and was thus serving at the 
time of her marriage to Mr. Gehman. To that union four children were 
born, namely: ^Morris, who since May, 1916, has been connected with tlie 
a\'iation service of the L^nited States government, now stationed at New 
^'ork. and who married Marie Miller and has three children, Gordon, Ben- 
jamin and Louis : W'alter, now a student at Northwestern Universitv at 
Evanston; Ruth, wife of Basil Sidders, of West Liberty, and Ralph, who 
is now managing the home farm for his mother and who married Elizabeth 
^^'alter and has one child, a daughter. V>lma. Mrs. Gehman is a member 
of the Methodist Episcopal church, as was her husband, and has ever taken 
an interested jjart in the general good works and social activities of the 



150 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

comniunil}- in which she H\'es. Mr. Gehman was an active worker in the 
church and was for years one of the leading- figures in the local Sunday 
school, his influence ever being exerted in behalf of the right training of 
the youth. 



HAROLD VV. HOUSTON. 

Harold W. Houston, prosecuting attorney for Champaign county and 
one of Urhana's l)est-known and most successful young lawyers, was born in 
LTrljana and has lived there all his life. He was born on January 18, 1886, 
son of Dr. Henry C. and Sarah ( Warnock ) Houston, both of whom also 
were born in this state, the former at Lebanon and the latter in this county, 
further and extended mention of whom is made in a memorial sketch relat- 
ing to the late Dr. Henry C. Houston, presented elsewhere in this volume. 

Dr. Henry C. Houston, who died at Urbana on January 8, 1916, was 
the son of Dr. AVilliam M. Houston, who moved from Lebanon to Urbana 
shortiv after the close of the Civil War, in which struggle he had served as a 
surgeon of the Second Brigade, Third Division, Sixth Army Corps, and who 
engaged in ]Dractice in Url^ana and there spent the remainder of his life, his 
son having lieen in practice with him at the time of his death. The latter 
v.^as but a lad when his parents located in Urbana and he early turned his 
attention to the study of medicine in his father's office. Upon receiving his 
degree from the Cleveland Homeopathic College he entered upon the practice 
of his profession at Urbana and was thus engaged the rest of his life. He 
and hi-^ wife were the parents of three children, the subject of this sketdi 
liaving an elder brother, Dr. M. C. Houston, of Urbana, the third Doctor 
Houston in direct line in that city, and a sister, Helen, wife of Stockton, 
Ra}'mond, of New York City. 

Reared at I'rbana, H. W. Houston was graduated from the high school 
in thai city in 1905 and later entered the law department of Ohio State Uni- 
versit}', from which he was graduated in 1909. He was admitted to the bar 
in this countv in June of that same year and immediately thereafter opened 
an office for the practice of his profession in his home city. In 1910 he was 
elected cii\- s<:)licitor. in which responsible capacity he served for two terms 
and in MJ14 was elected jirosecuting attorney for Champaign county. So 
satisfactor)- did his services in that office prove that he was re-elected in 
1916 and is now ser\ing his second term. Mr. Houston is a Republican 
and is looked upon as one of the leaders of liis party in this county. In 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 1 59 

addition to his official duties he has considerable interests in a commercial 
and industrial way in Urbana and is a member of the board of directors of 
the Citizens National Bank of Urbana, vice-president of the Urbana Ice Com- 
pany and a member of the board of directors of the Urbana Furniture Com- 
pany. Fraternally, Mr. Houston is a Mason and a mem])er of the local lodge 
of the Knights of Pythias and in the atTairs of these popular fraternal organ- 
izatic'Us takes a warm interest. 

On September 14, 1912, H. W. Houston was united in marriage to 
Pauline Pratt, daughter of C. S. and Belle ( Rogers) Pratt, and to, this union 
one child has been born, a daughter, Janet. Mr. Houston is the teacher of 
the famous class Xo. 8 of the Sunday school of the Baptist church, a class 
which was organized by his late father man}- years ago and which is said 
to have been the first Sunday school class regularly organized as a Men's 
Bible Class in the United States. Mr. and Mrs. Houston have a ver}- pleas- 
ant home at Urbana and have e\er given their close personal attention to the 
general social activities of their home town, helpful in many ways in pro- 
moting movements designed to advance the cotumon welfare hereabout. 



JOHN H. SIEGLE. 

John II. Siegle, sheriff of Champaign count}' and one of the best known 
and most popular residents of Urbana, is a native "Buckeye" and with the 
exception of the time spent in traveling during the consideraI)le ])eriod oi 
In's life spent as a professional basel)all player has lived in this state all his 
life, a resident of Urbana since he was three years of age. Ide was born in 
h'ranklin count}-, this state, July S, 1874. son of John G. and Charlotte Siegle, 
the former of whom was Ixirn in that same count}' and the latter in Musk- 
ingum count}', this state. John G. Siegle, who is a veteran of the Civil War, 
was trained to the trade of a broom-maker and in 1877 moved with his family 
to Urbana, where he became engaged in broom-making and wliere he still 
lives, now connected with the White- Valentine Broom Compan}-. 

Reared at Urbana, John H. Siegle received his schooling in the schools 
of that citv, completing his schooling in the high school. He early learned 
the trade of broom-making and followed the same until 1900, in which year 
he took up professional baseball and was connected with the great American 
game for sixteen years. For five years he was connected with the New York 
State League of Baseball Clubs, for one \ear with the Cincinnati team of 



l6o CHAMPAIGI^ COUNTY. OHIO. 

the Xational Leaj^ue. tor one year with the liKhanapohs team of tlie .Vnieriean 
Association, for three years with Nashville. Tennessee, team in the Southern 
J.eac^ue, for a x&xr manager of a team in Alaliama. in 1913 manager of the 
Akmn team and was then manager of the team at Huntington. West Vir- 
ginia, until his retirement from the. game, meanwhile continuing to regard 
Urbana as his permanent home. Mr. Siegle is a Republican and has long- 
taken an active interest in local political affairs. I^ir two years he served as 
<Ie])ut\ sheriff of Champaign county and in i()i6 was elected sheriff. He 
entered upon the duties of that office on January i. 1917. and is now serving 
in that capac!t\-. one of the most popular officials about the court house. 

In [006 John 11. Siegle was united in marriage tr) I-^lla C. Michael. 
daughter of C'hristo])her and Rebecca Michael. Mr. and Mrs. Siegle are 
members of tlie Presbyterian church and take a proper interest in church 
work, as well as in the general social activities of their home town. Mr. 
Siegle is a Ivoyal Arch and York Rite Mason, a member of the blue lodge, 
the chapter, the council (Royal and Select Masters) and the commandery at 
Urbana, and takes a warm interest in Masonic affairs. 



LUCIUS S. HOWARD. 



One of the progressive and well-known business men oi Champaign 
county is Lucius S. Howard, secretary, treasurer and general manager of 
the Howard Paper Company of Urbana. He is a scion of a sterling" old 
.Southern family, and was born near Lebanon, Kentuck}', \vhere he grew to 
manhood and received his education, in part, later attending Central College 
at Danville, Kentucky. After leaving school he became connected with 
the .\etna P'aper Mills at Dayton, Ohio, where he soon mastered the various 
phases of the paper business, and remained with that concern until he came 
to Urbana in 1909. He was one of the principal organizers of the Howard 
Paper Company, which beg-an business in Ma}-, r()JO, and which, under his 
able management and wise foresight, has had a steady and satisfactory 
growth and is now one of the well-known paper mills of the Middle West, 
employing from one hundred and fifty to two hundred people and working 
twenty-four hours a day. The demand for the products of this popular 
mill is always beyond the mill's capacity, owing to the high-grade work done 
there. The products of this mill are shipped all over the United States, also 
to many of the leading foreign countries of the world, including various 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. l6l 

cities of South America, England, France, India and the Phihppines. The 
plant is modern in all its equipment and has a capacity of seventy thousand 
pounds in twentx-four hours. The company's payroll is as large if not 
larger than any factory or other establishment in the city of Urbana. Ex- 
cellent facilities are enjoyed, a spur of the Pennsylvania railroad being built 
to the plant. The Ho\\'ard Paper Company is the largest manufacturer of 
one grade of bond paper m the United States. They make paper for the 
g(j\eriiment, some of which is used in making stamped envelopes. 



CHRISTL^X N. COUFFER. 

The late Christian N. Couft'er, an honored veteran of the Civil War, for 
years one of the best-known and most influential merchants of Urbana, 
fomier president of the Oak Saddlery Leather Company and one of the 
organizers of the Oak Leather Company, who died at his home in Urbana 
in 1916, was a native of the state of Pennsylvania, but had been a resident 
of this state since he was three or four years of age and of Urbana since the 
days of his young manhood. He was born in Aiercerburg, Pennsylvania, 
June 12, 1847, son of William and Martha Couffer, both of whom were born 
in Ohio and who returned to this state from Pennsylvania about 185 1 and 
located at Covington, where William Couffer engaged in the dry goods 
business and where he and his wife spent the remainder of their lives. 

Reared at Covington, Christian N. Couffer received his schooling in 
the schools of that place and early acquired a liking for commercial pursuits. 
As a young man he located in Urbana and there started clerking in the shoe 
store of John Wallace, later working for A. E. Lewis in that same store 
and was thus engaged until he and W. W. Wilson bought the store and 
continued operating the same under a partnership arrangement for some 
time. Air. Couffer acting as manager. While thus engaged Mr. Couffer 
became interested in the Oak Saddlery Leather Company and w-as made 
president of the same, a position he held until the concern finally went out 
of business. He later sold his shoe store and engaged in the dry goods 
business at Urbana. occupying the store room now occupied by the Powers 
dr}- goods store and remained engaged in that business until his retirement 
from business nineteen years later. Mr. Couffer also was interested in other 
business enterprises during his long connection with the affairs of Urbana 
(iia) 



l62 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

and was one of the organizers of the Oak Saddlery Leatlier Company. He 
was an ardent Republican and ever took an earnest interest in public affairs, 
but was not a seeker after office. During the Civil War Air. Couffer liad 
enlisted for three-months' service and he was an active member of the local 
post of the Grand Army of the Republic. 

On March 24, 1875, Christian N. Couffer was united in marriage to 
Anna Pettit, who was born in the neighboring county of Miami, a daughter 
of Henry and Nancy Pettit, the former of whom was l^orn in the state oi 
New Hampshire and the latter at Dayton, this state. Henry Pettit came 
to this state from New Hampshire in the days of his young manhood and 
engaged in the mercantile business in Montgomery count}^, later moving to 
Troy, in Miami county, where he became a merchant and where he spent 
the rest of his life, for years serving as mayor of that city. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Couffer two children were born, a son, William N.. who married Estelle M. 
Orewiler, and a daughter, Martha, who married J. Carr Robison. Since 
the death of her husband Mrs. Couffer has continued to make her home in 
Urbana, where she is pleasantly situated. She is a member of the Episcopal 
church, as was her husband, and has ever taken an earnest interest in church 
work and in other local good works. 



TOHN H. P. STONE. 



John H. P. Stone, (jne of the oldest and best-known citizens of Urbana 
and for many years assistant cashier of the Citizens National Bank of that 
city, now living retired, was born in Frederick county, V'irginia, March 30, 
1829, son of Ferdinand and Mary ( Pidgeon) Stone, both of whom also were 
born in that county, h^rdinand Stone, who was a miller, came to Ohio in 
1847 and settled in this countw where he engaged in milling and where he 
spent the remainder of his life, both he and his wife dying in the eighties. 
He was a member of the Lutlieran church and she was a member of the 
I'resbyterian church. They were the ])arents of fixe children, of whom the 
subject of this sketch was the lirst-born. the ethers being as follow: Samuel 
.Stone, of Urbana; Dr. Joseph Stone, who was mortally wounded in a duel 
with Ciovernor Bliss, of Montana, and whcj died at Denver. Colorado, he then 
serving as a member of the historic "rump" Legislature in Colorado: herd- 
inand Stone, now deceased, who married Aernes Pee and was for \ears 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 163 

engaged in the liardware Imsiness at Urliana, and Sarah, who (Hed in her 
giiUiood. 

Iveared in L'rederick coiintA-, \'irginia, John H. P. Stone completed his 
schcjoling- in the -Benjamin Ilalowell school at Alexandria, that state. He 
early had some experience as a clerk in a conntry store in his home connt}' 
and then went to Baltimore, where he was engaged as a clerk in a store for 
two years, at the end of which time he returned to Virginia and started a 
store at Wadesville. In 1858 he disposed of his interests there and came to 
Ohio, locating at Urbana", where he became engaged as a clerk in William 
^'onng's hardware store and was thus engaged for several years, at the end 
of which time he was employed l)y Henry Weaver to open a dry-goods store 
at Urbana and was thus engaged as manager of that store for two years, 
then l)ecame a member of the firm of Rock, Cohvell and Ellis, running a gen- 
eral dry-goods store. Then in 1882 he was made assistant cashier of the 
I'itizens National Bank of Urbana and continued thus connected until his 
retirement in 1909. 

On h'ebruar\' 10. 1864. John H. P. Stone was united in marriage to 
Sarah McDonald, of Urbana, daughter of Colon and Nancy ( McCullick ) 
McDonald, Ix^th of whom were born in this state, the former in Ross county 
and the latter in J.ogan county. Colon McDonald was one of the early drv- 
goods merchants of Urbana and later engaged in farming in the vicinity of 
that city, both he and his wife spending their last days in Urbana. prominent 
and inriuential residents of that comnumitv. They were members of the 
Presliyterian church and were ever helpful in local good works. Ten chil- 
dren were born to them, six of whom grew to maturity, those ])esides Mrs. 
.Stone being as follow: I'^lizabeth. widow of Samuel M. Rock, of Urbana: 
Margaret, widow of Thomas McConnell. of Urbana; Colon, who is living at 
Columbus, this state: George, who died at Dubuque. Iowa, and Wilbur, a 
retired farmer, now living in Urbana. 

To John H. P. and Sarah (McDonald) Stone four cliildren have been 
born, namely: Mary Louise, a graduate nurse, at Forest Glen. Maryland; 
Xancy McDonald, wife of Bartley Whitaker. ;i wholesale druggist at Dayton, 
Ohio; Samuel M.. who married Alice Bailey and is living at Hartford, Con- 
necticut, where he is vice-])resident of the Colt's Patent h'ire Arms Companv, 
and Joseph 1'^.. who married Florence Foote and is living at Chicago, a sales- 
man for the .Stanley Rule and Tevel Compan}- of New' Britain, Connecticut. 
Mr. and Mrs. Stone are memlDers of the Presbyterian church and have ever 
given proj)er attention to church work and the general .social activities of 



164 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

their home town, helpful in promoting all worthy causes hereabout. Mr. 
Stone is a Mason, a member of Harmony Lodge No. 8. Free and Accepted 
]\Tasons, at Urbana, and for years has taken a warm interest in Masonic 

affairs. 



FRED COAXES. 



Oile of the leading fanners of Rush township. Champaign county, is 
Fred Coates, who was born March 28, 187.^, in the ai)o\e named towns!)' 
He is a son of Sibley R., also a native of Rush township, this county, born 
August 9, 1847, who was a son of George and Marion (Sibley) Coates, 
Ijoth natives of Champaign county, each representing pioneer families of 
this locality, and they spent their lives on a farm in Rush townshi]). S 
R. Coates grew up on the home farm in his native township and there he 
attended the district schools. Fie devoted his life to general farming \v 
Rush town.ship. He was a Democrat in his earlier life and later a Repub- 
lican. He served as township trustee for six years. On December 20, i86(j. 
he married Mary E. Glendenning, a native of Rush township, and two chil- 
ilren were born to them, namely: Fred, of this sketch; and Glen VV., wlu 
was born I'^ebruary 10. 1878, and died March c), 1904. The death of Sibley 
R. Coates occurred on January 15, 1906. 

h'red Coates grew to manhood on the old home place, and he received 
his education in the local district schools. He has always lived on the home 
farm and engaged in general farming and stock raising. On December 20, 
i()o6, he married Josephine E. Beck, who was bom in Union countw Ohio. 
She is a daughter of Thomas M. and Priscilla (Craty) Beck, the former a 
native of Loudoun county, Virginia, and the latter of Cnion county, Ohio. 
I**lr. Beck left the Old Dominion when a young man and located in Union 
county, Ohio, and established his home on a farm. He was a soldier during 
the Civil War. His death occurred in 19 14. His widow is still living. 

Four children were born to Fred Coates and wife, named as folk)\v : 
Max Sibley, Mary Pri.scilla, Ruth Eloise, and Fred, Jr. 

Mr. L'oates is a loyal Republican. He has served in a most praise- 
worthy manner as trustee of Rush township during the past six years, and 
he takes an active interest in political affairs. Fraternall}-, he belongs to 
the Masonic order and the Knights of Pythias at North Lewisburg. His 
wife belongs to the Methodist Episcopal church and his mother to the Meth- 
odist Protestant church. 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. l6s 

WILL T. HESS. 

Will T. Hess, one of the best-known and most substantial farmers of 
Mad River township, proprietor of "Elmwood Place," a well-improved and 
profitably cultivated farm consisting of ninety acres on rural route No. 9 
out of Urbana on the Piqua and Urbana pike, is a native of West Virginia, 
born on a farm in Harrison county, that state, June 16. 1861, the son of 
T. H. and Sarah J. (Martin) Hess, Ijoth of whom were natives also of 
Harrison county, W^est Virginia. 

T. H. Hess and his wife were both born and reared in West Virginia, 
where they lived all their lives. He was a soldier in the Union army during 
the Civil War, being a member of a company of West Virginia Volunteer 
Infantry, serving from the time of his enlistment until the close of the war, 
his death occurring a few years after his return home from the service. 
He was a Republican in politics, but not active in political affairs, being con- 
tent to look after his farming interests and home duties. His wife wa^ a 
member of the United Brethren church, in which faith she lived and died. 
She survived her husband many years, her death taking place on the old 
home place in West Virginia. T. H. Hess and wife were the parents of 
two sons, twins, Sherod C, who died at the age of fourteen, and Will T. 

Will T. Hess lived on the home farm in West Virginia until he readied 
manhood, receiving his education in the district schools of his home town- 
ship. After his marriage he bought a farm in Harrison county, West Vir- 
ginia, where he lived until 1902, at w'hich time he sold his holdings in West 
Virginia, and came to Champaign county, Ohio. He located first on a farm 
close to North Lewisburg, which he bought, and here he conducted a dairy 
known as the "Elmwood Dairy." He disposed of this farm later and pur- 
chased a farm four miles south of Urbana, where he lived three years, after 
which he sold this place and moved to Urbana, where he lived two years. 
In 1915 he bought the farm where he is now living in Mad River township, 
and has since made this his place of residence. Here he is engaged in 
general farming and stock raising, and is making a start in the line of pure- 
bred Holstein cattle. He also conducts a dairy on this place on a small 
scale, and has been very successful in his farming operations. 

On September 19, 1888, Will T. Hess w-as married to Myrtle Tetrick. 
who was born and reared in Harrison county. West Virginia. Mr. and 
Mrs. Hess are the parents of two children. Hardy W.. who is a graduate of 
the high school at North Lewisburg. was a student at the Ohio Wesle\an 



l66 CriAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

College at Delaware. Ohio, and is now teaching- in the schools at Westville, 
and Amy Berenice, also a graduate of the high school at North Lewishm-g, 
is a talented musician, and is living at home with her parents. The famil\ 
are earnest and devoted members of the Baptist church at Urhana. and i)op- 
ular in the social and religious life of the community. 

Mr. Hess is a Republican in politics, and while warml\- supporting all 
measures having for their object the welfare and betterment of his home 
community, yet is not a partisan or seeker after public office. 



HIRAM G. DUNN. 



Hiram G. Dimn. a farmer of Rush township, Champaign county, was 
lH)rn in the house he now lives in, November 23, 185 1. He has fully appre- 
ciated the opportunity of spending his life on the home acres, a privilege 
not granted to many. He is a son of Nelson and Mary A. (Garwood) Dunn. 
The father was born in Pennsylvania in 1816. The mother was born in 
J.ogan county, Ohio. When a child Nelson Dunn was brought by his par- 
ents to Hampshire county, Virginia, and about 1840 he moved to Rush 
township, Champaign county, buying land where the subject of this sketch 
now resides. He cleared and improved about two hundred and thirty-five 
acres himself. He was very industrious, managed well and became a lead- 
ing farmer of Rush township. He was a Democrat, and belonged to the 
J 'resbyterian church. His death occurred August 25, i8fj6, at the age of 
eighty years. His wife died April 24, 1876, at the early age of forty-six 
\ears. He subsequently married for his second wife Angeline Warren Gar- 
wood, a native of Champaign county. Ohio. Her death occurred a number 
of years ago. Two children were born to the first union, namely: Hiram C... 
oi this sketch, and Virginia A., who married Wilton Bales, first, and later 
A\'illiam Winder, of North T.ouisburg. this county: her deatli occurred on 
l'"ebruary 2J, '917. 

Hiram G. Dunn worked on the homestead when he was a boy, and he 
received a common school education. He has remained on the home farm 
and has ke[)t it under a fine state of cultivation and improvement. He car- 
rier on general farming and stock raising. He owns one hundred and eightv 
acres. 

Mr. Dunn was married on June 17, 1878, to Susie B. Cockrell, who 
was born in Berkley county. West Virginia. To Hiram G. Dunn and wife 



CHAMPAIGX COUNTY, OHIO. 167 

one child, a daughter, Mary E., was born. She is the wife of LeCIare 
Dukes, and ihey hve on a farm in Hancock county, Ohio. They have one 
daughter, Helen Dukes. 

Politically. Mr. Dunn is a Democrat. Fraternally, he belongs to the 
Kniglits of Pythias at North Lewisburg. He attends the Methodist Epis- 
copal church. 

The Dunn emigrant came to America from England with William Penn 
and helped found the colony at what is now Philadelphia. Members of the 
family served in the Revolutionary War and descendants have been promi- 
nent in A^arious walks of life throughout the United States. 



WILLIAM E. KINGSBURY. 

Believing that Salem township. Champaign county, furnished all the 
opportunities for happiness, William E. Kingsbur3\ a farmer of that town- 
ship, has been content to spend his life here. His birth occurred on June 8, 
1846, on the old homestead in the above named locality. He is a son of 
Samuel and Lucinda (Graves) Kingsbury. The father was born in Penn- 
sylvania. The mother was a daughter of Asa Graves, who came to Cham- 
paign county in an early day, locating on a farm in the southeastern part of 
Salem township. He also burned lime and operated a stone quarry during 
his latter years. The subject of this review now occupies the farm he owned 
here. His family consisted of two children, Lucinda, mother of the subject 
of this sketch, and William, who established his home in the state of New 
York. 

In earl}- life Samuel Kingsljury was a pilot on the Susquehanna river 
in Pennsylvania. He came to Ohio with Asa Graves and they continued to 
li\e in the same house, in 1850 locating on the farm now ow-ned by William 
E. Kingsbur}- in Salem township. Champaign county, the place consisting 
of one hundred and ten acres. The land was at that time heavily timbered, 
but they cleared it up and placed it under cultivation by hard work. Their 
first residence w-as a rude log house, which later gave place to a more com- 
fortable frame dwelling. Samuel Kingsbury continued to live on the place 
until his death, in 1868, at the age of sixty-five years, his widow surviving 
until 1882, dying at the age of sixty-nine years. They were members of 
Kings Creek Baptist church, and he was a Republican. They were parents 
of seven children, named as follows: Emilv, Harriet, Lucinda, Maria and 



l68 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

Eunice, all died single; Irene lives with tlie subject of this sketch; William 
E., the young-est of the family. 

William E. Kingsbur}' grew up on the home farm, and he attended the 
public schools in his vicinity. On November 8, 1877, he married Ann Hop- 
pock, who was born in New Jersey. She is a daughter of George and Eliza- 
beth (Snyder) Hoppock, natives of Pennsylvania and New Jersey, respect- 
ively. They came to Greene county, Ohio, in 1852, and lived there during 
the Civil War, then settled near Mount Tabor, Salem township, Champaign 
county, living at different places in that locality until the\- bought a farm 
near Mingo and were there four years, then moved to the tillage of Mingo, 
where Mr. Hoppock died in 1900, his wife having preceded him to the gra\e 
in 1874. They were parents of seven children, named as follows; Matilda 
is the widow of John Harvey and she lives in Champaign county; John lives 
in Illinois ; Ann, wife of Mr. Kingsbury of this sketch ; George lives in San 
Diego, California ; William died at Mingo, Ohio ; James died in Nebrasl<a ; 
Amanda, who remained unmarried, died April 12, 191 7. 

Two children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Kingsbur}- : Charles Edward, 
who died in infancy; and Eva Mary, who is the wife of Chark.s Linvillc. of 
Bellefontaine, Ohio. 

Mr. Kingsbury has always carried on general farming on the old iionic 
place. Politically, he is a Republican and he belongs to the Baptist church 
at Kings Creek. 



MARION GUTHRIDGE. 



Marion Guthridge, a well-known merchant at Mingo, an honored vet- 
eran of the Civil War, for many years treasurer of Wayne townshij) and 
for a half century owner and operator of the saw-mill at Mingo, is a native 
son of Champaign county and has lived here all his life. He was born on 
a farm one mile south of Cable, in Wayne township. September 20, 1848, 
son and only child of William and Polly ( Answorth) Guthridge, both of 
whom also were natives of this county and here spent all their Kves. 

William Guthridge was also born in Wayne township, a son of the 
Rev. John Guthridge, a farmer and pioneer preacher of the Baptist church 
and one of the earliest and most influential settlers in the northern part of 
this county, further and fitting mention of whom is made in the historical 
section of this work in the chapter relating to the church history of the 
county. Reared on a farm, William Guthridge became a farmer in turn 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 169 

and thus remained all his life, becoming one of the sturch' and well-to-do 
farmers of Wayne township. Several years after his marriage he moved 
to Cable and there lived the rest of his life, operating his farm from that 
\illage. 

Marion Gnthridge, only son of his parents, was but three years of age 
when his parents moved to Cable and h.e received his schooling in the schools 
of that pleasant village. Though but a boy during the progress of the Civil 
War, he enlisted for the hundred-da}- service as a memlier of Companv V. 
One Hundred and Thirty-fourth Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and 
upon the completion of that service began working in the E. C. Williams 
saw-mill at Mingo. A few years later he bought that mill and for hhv 
years continued as owner of the same, during forty-two years of which 
period he operated the saw personally, never missing a day while the mill 
was in operation. In 1916 Mr. Gnthridge sold the mill an.d has since been 
engaged in the general merchandise business at. Mingo. The saw-mill he 
ownerl and operated for a half century was established in 1864 and is the 
lirst and only saw-mill ever operated at Mingo. Upon selling his rdftll Mr. 
(luthridge erected a store building at Mingo and stocked the same with a 
line of general merchandise, now conducting there one of the neatest and 
most up-to-date village stores in this part of the state, and is doing verv 
well in his business venture. Mr. Gnthridge is a stanch Republican, an 
undeviating su])porter of the principles of that party, and for seventeen 
years .and six months served his home township as township trustee. He 
•ilso for S(,nne years was a meml)er f>f the local school board and in other 
ways has unselhshly contributed of his time and energies to the public 
service. 

In 1873 Marion Gulhridge \\as united in marriage to Agnes Hunter. 
daughter nf Thomas and Xanc)- Hunter, and to tliat union were born three 
children, two of whom are still living, lulgar, who married Edith Callahan 
and is living at Dayton, Ohio, and \A'alter, a member of the United States 
Signal Corps, now stationed at Seattle, Washington. U])on the death of 
the mother of these children, Mr. Gnthridge married l^lla Z. Robinson, 
daughter of Jesse and Mary Robinson, which union has l)een without issue. 
Mr. an.d Mrs. Gnthridge are members of the Methodist Episcopal church 
at Mingo and take an active part in church affairs, as well as in other local 
good works. Mr. (iuthridge having been a member of the board of stewards 
of the church for more than a (juarter of a century. There is no man in 
the northern part of the county who has a wider acquaintance than he and 
he has ever stood for progress and good gOA'ernment in that community. 



CHAMPAIGX COUNTY, OHIO. 



THOMAS IRVIN TAYLOR. 



One of the oldest native-born citizens of Salem township, vl'hanipaign 
•county, is Thomas Irvin Taylor, a well-known farmer of thai township, who 
lias been content to spend his life in his native locality, believing" that here 
existed all the opportnnities necessary for one's happiness and success. He 
was born on the old Ta}lor homestead at Kings Creek, Ohio, October J3, 
1841. He is a son of Thomas Taylor and wife, a pioneer family of this 
vicinity, a sketch of whom appears on another page of this work. 

Thomas I. Taylor grew up on the homestead, where, like all boys of 
pioneer parents, he found plent}- of hard work to do. Howe\er. unlike p.kjsi 
of them, he had the advantage of a good education, h-aving attended school 
1)oth at Urbana and Bellefontaine, Ohio. He remained Oii the old home 
place until 1875. Then he married, on March 8. 1866. Hannah Stewart, 
who was born at Kings Creek, Champaign county. She is a daughter of 
Matthew and Lucinda (Martin) Stewart. He was born at Kings Creek, and 
lier birth occurred in Kentucky. The grandfather of Mrs. Taylor was also 
named Matthew. He was a native of Ireland, from which country he came 
to America with his parents, when twelve years of age, the family locating 
at Kings Creek, and engaged in farming in Salem tow nshij), being thus among 
the early settlers here. Grandfather Stewart's death occurred here at the 
advanced age of ninety-three years. His wife preceded him to the grave when 
sixty-nine }ears of age. They were members of the Bai)tisl church at Kings 
Creek. 

Nine children were born to Matthew and Lucinda Stewart, namely : 
Sarah married John Seaton, of Salem township, and both are now deceased ; 
Samuel married Margaret Jones and they live in Auglaize county, Ohio : 
William, who followed school teaching for man}- years, married Addie 
Boone, and he died in Salem township; Hannah, who married Mr. Taylor 
of this sketch: Thomas is a plasterer at Zanesville, Ohio; Charles married 
Serepta Taylor, who lives in Kings Creek. Ohio, he being now deceased; 
John died when two years old ; Eliza married J. K. Michael and they live in 
Urbana; Elizabeth, who married William Jones (she deceased) lived in 
Kings Creek, Ohio. 

The following children have been born to Thomas I. Taylor and wife; 
Barton A., a banker at St. Paris. Champaign county, married .\da Allen, 
and they have two children. Burton A. and Martha E. ; Cora G. married 
O. K. West and thev live in the dtx of Columbus; their daughter, Madge. 



CHAMPAIGX COUNTY, OHIO. I^I 

married Floyd Hoffman, and they have one child. Elizabeth: Effie M.. the 
child of the subject of this sketch, died when nineteen years of age : Frank 
S., who operates a garage at Springfield. Ohio, married Iva Herr, and they 
have one child, Neoma V. ; Nellie M. married Clifford Beatley. of Columbus, 
and they have three children, Cleo. Carroll and Louise : Blanche B. is at 
home; Floyd married Winifred Shrigley and lives at Youngstown, Ohio. 
The Taylor children all received good educational advantages, attending the 
schools at Kings Creek, Urbana and Columbus. 

Mr. Taylor lived in Clark county, Ohio, five years, and north of Urbana 
two \ears, then spent six years in Madison county, this state. He lived on 
the old home place nine years, then purchased his present farm in Salem 
township, known as the J. Gerard place. It consisted of one hundred and 
fortv-nine acres, but has since added fifteen acres, and has been very suc- 
cessful as a general farmer and stock raiser, making sheep raising a specialty 
for many years. 

Politically, Mr. Taylor is a Republican. He is acti\e in the aft"airs of 
liis community and for some time served as school director, also as super- 
visor. Fie is a memlier of Kings Creek Baptist church. 



IV-VN T. lOHNSON, 



Ivan T. Johnson, a farmer of Salem township. Champaign county, was 
born in the locality where he still makes his .home, on November 27, 1858. 
He is a son of Hiram M. and Margaret (Brown) Johnson, the mother 
being a native of Virginia. The father was born in Wayne township, Cham- 
])aign count}', Ohio. August 6. 1808, and was a son of Jacob and Martha 
( Boggs) Johnson. Jacol) was born in Maryland. Juh- J/. T776. and his 
wife was born October 20, 1774. They made the overland journey from 
the old Oriole state to Ohio in an early day, taking up their residence in 
the wilderness of what is now Salem township. Champaign county, in 1804. 
settling on land on the east side of King's creek, but a year later moved to 
the north side of the Mingo valley, there clearing and develo])ing a farm 
which is still in possession of the Johnson family. He and his wife were 
the first white settlers in that part of the county. They endured the usual 
hardships of frontier people. It was in the midst of the Indian country, 
however, the red men disturbed them but little vmtil they were removed from 
the country, in 1803, to Wayne township. It was on this farm that the great- 



172 CHAMPxMGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

grandparents of the subject of this sketch hved and died and were buried. 
There were no community or pubHc cemeteries in those days and over one 
hundred pioneers were buried in the old burying ground on the Johnson 
farm. The great-grandfather Johnson died in 1820, his wife having pre- 
ceded him to the grave in 181 7. Their son, Jacob Johnson, paternal grand- 
father, remained on the home place until his death in 1845, l^is widow surviv- 
ing until 1854. Only nine acres had been cleared on the original Johnson 
farm, which had been done by the Indians, and had been under cultivation 
for some time. Jacob Johnson became one of the leading farmers and influ- 
ential citizens of Champaign county in his day. owning a farm of four hun- 
dred and seventy-eight acres, of which he cleared one hundred acres himself. 
Owing to an accidental injury while hauling logs, he was not able to farm 
actively during the last twenty-two years of his life. His family consisted 
of nine children, only four of whom grew to maturity, namely : Mary, 
Hiram, Nelson B. and Alfred. 

Hiram Johnson, father of the subject of this sketch, lived on the old 
home place, the three brothers holding the estate in common, he remaining 
there until he was fifty-eight years old, at which time they owned a total of 
nineteen hundred acres At that time the property was di\'ided, by mutual 
consent, without the aid of any legal advice. The total value of the property 
was one himdred and twenty thousand dollars. 

On May 15, 1851, Hiram Johnson married Margaret Brown, a daugh- 
ter of David and Hester Brown, and to their union four children were born, 
namely: Jacob, Marie Theresa, Nelson B. and Ivan T., of this sketch. 

Hiram Johnson was one of the progressive general farmers and stock- 
men of his day in this county, operating on a large scale. He raised immense 
quantities of grain, a large portion of which was fed to live stock. He 
shipped many carloads of cattle and hogs to the markets every year. 
He owned over eight hundred acres of valuable land, which he brought up 
to a high state of improvement and cultivation. He established a commo- 
dious and modernly equipped home in the midst of attractive surroundings 
and he had a large group of substantial outbuildings. Part of his land was 
in Logan county. His death occurred in rqoo. His widow survived until 
1907. His personal reputation was always that of a man of unquestioned 
business ethics and integrity in all walks of life. He was public-spirited and, 
like his father before him, enjoyed the good will and esteem of all with whom 
he came in contact. 

Ivan T. Johnson, tlie inimediatc subject of this sketch, grew to man- 



CHAMPAIGX COUNTY, OHIO. I73 

hood on the home farm. He received his education in the puhHc schools of 
Wayne township. He remained at home, farming with his fatlier, until he 
was thirty-three years old, at which time he and his Ijrother, Xelson B.. 
began farming in partnership until 191 1. Since then he has been operating 
liis own land and has been very successful as a general agriculturist. He 
owns one of the choice and most desirable farms in the county, which con- 
sists of four hundred and ninety-eight acres, in Salem and Wayne town- 
ships. It is highly improved, the best methods of up-to-date, twentieth cen- 
tury farmers being adopted in all departments. He has a beautiful home, 
modern in every appointment. In connection with raising large crops of 
grain he prepares a nmnber of carloads of live stock for the market annu- 
ally, always raising good grades of stock. 

Ivan T. Johnson was married on October 18, 1892, to lona Igou, a 
daughter of Peter and Lucretia (Bayless) Igou. She was born in L'nion 
township, Champaign county, where she grew to womanhood, and she attend- 
ed the local schools. Her parents were also natives of this county, her father 
of Wayne township and her mother of Union township. Here they grew 
to maturity, attended school and were married, after which the}- established 
their future home on a farm in Union township. Mr. Igou was one of the 
first to offer his ser\-ices to the Union at the outbreak of the Ci\il War, and 
he ser\'ed in an Ohio regiment four years, becoming an efficient and brave 
soldier, taking part in numerous important battles and campaigns in the 
South. After he was honorably discharged he returned to Champaign coun- 
ty, married and spent the rest of his life here, successfully engaged in gen- 
eral farming. His death occurred in 1903. 

The father of Peter Igou (subject's wife's father) was Peter Igou, Sr., 
who was one of the brothers of French descent who were among the first 
pioneers of Champaign county, Ohio. Peter Igou was a farmer and finally 
owned several hundred acres of land and put up houses on his several farms. 
They were adherents of the Quaker church. 

Ten children were born to Peter Ogou and wife, named as follows: 
lona, wife of Mr. Johnson of this sketch ; Hugo. Albert. Richard. Arnet. 
Effie, Duward, Dale, Edward and Maude. 

Eleven children have been born to Ivan T. Johnson and wife, named 
as follows: Coppiela, who married Rolla Dagger; Benjamin W.. Louis. 
Roger, Marion. Alargaret, Julia is deceased: Alice. I.sabelle. Alfred and 
Lowell. 

!Mr. Johnson is an independent voter, being liberal in his views on 
pul)lic questions. He desires to see honest and capable men in office, no mat- 



1/4 CHAMPAIGX COUNTY, OHIO. 

ter what their pohtical affihations may be. He lias never sought pohtical 
leadership, preferring to devote his attention to his large farming interests 
and to his home. His wife is a member of the Baptist church at Kings 
Creek. 

The Johnson family has been one of the best known, most representa- 
tive and highly honored in Champaign county since the early pioneer days, 
or for one hundred and thirteen years, and their record is eminently deserv- 
ing of a conspicuous position in this biographical compendium. 



ROLLIE REID. 



Ivollie Keid, farmer of Union township. Champaign cotuity, was born in 
\('rmillion county, illinois, September 4, 1871. He is a son of James and 
-Mar) (Savior) Reid. The father w-as born in Union township, Champaign 
county, Ohio, and the mother was a native of Logan county, Ohio. He grew 
to manhood in his native township and attended the public schools, but left 
school to enlist for service in the Civil War, in Company E, One Hundred 
and Thirty-fourth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, in which he served one hun- 
dred days Ui)on his return home he took up farming, but later went to 
Illinois, locating in \'ermillion county on a farm, where he spent about 
twent\- \ears, then moved to Logan county, Ohio, locating at DeGraff, and 
rL-niained there until he removed to Champaign county and made his home 
with his son, Rollie, of this sketch, until the autumn preceding his death, 
when he went West and spent his last days at the home of his son, Charles 
Keid. 

Xine children were Ixtrn to James Reid and wife, six of w^iom are still 
living, namely: Mabel, who married James Hodge, of Union township; 
(irace, John, Charles, James C. and Rollie. 

Rollie Keid was young when his parents brought him from Illinois to 
Dedraff. Ohio, where he attended school. When a young man he took up 
farming in the vicinity of DeGraff, with his father, continuing general farm- 
ing and stock mising until two years before his marriage. He then farmc' 
as a renter for one year, after which he took up the blacksmith's trade, at 
which he became ffuite proficient and followed the same at DeGraff for eight 
years. He was regarded as one of the best blacksmiths in this section of 
the country and he drew his customers from a wide territory. Upon leav- 
ing DeGraff he moved to Santa Fe. Logan county, and lived there itntil 1007. 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY. OHIO. 1 75, 

w heii he moved to Union township, Champaign comity, and rented one Iiun- 
(h-ed and seventy acres for seven years, then moved to the WilHs Hodge 
place of four hundred and fifty acres, which he still rents. He raises much 
i^rain, most of which he feeds to live stock, being a large feeder of sheep 
and hogs, sencUng a number of car loads to the markets every year. 

In 1895 ^'^1'- Reid married Josephine Kress, a native of Logan count} .. 
Ohio, and a daughter of Jacob and Nancy (Curl) Kress, of Logan count} . 
Ohio. He was a farmer and butcher. She is dead. He is living in Belle- 
fontaine. Ohio. 

Five children have been born to RoUie Reid and wife, namely: Saylor 
C. is the eldest: Mary and Martha are twuns; James and Robert. 

Politicall}', Mr. Reid is a Republican. He belongs to the Methodist 
Episcopal church at Catawba. 



EVAN PERRY 



Evan Perr}-. farmer of Union township. Champaign county, was born 
in \Vayne township, this county. August 12, 1857. He is a son of Evan 
and Elizalieth ( Middleton) Perry, the former of whom was born in the 
principality of Wales, and the latter in Highland county. Ohio. They spent 
their last years in Champaign county. Evan Perry, Sr., was brought to 
America by his parents when he was a child, the family locating in Delaware 
county, Ohio, where he grew to manhood. He finally located in Champaign 
county. He married in Wa}'ne township and there established his future 
home on a farm, continuing actively engaged in farming there until his 
death, which occurred in 1872. at the age of fifty-two years. His widow 
survived him many years. They were the parents of the following children: 
George. Jane, Frances Ann. Elizabeth. James. Evan. jr.. l)a\id P.. Charles 
and Nancy. 

E^■an Perr}- grew to manhood on the home farm and he received his 
education in the public schools of Wayne township, however, his education 
was limited, for he left home when sixteen years old and began working out 
;is a farm hand, continuing until he was married. He then rented the Wood- 
ward farm of t^vo hundred acres, which he operated for fifteen years, after 
which lie moved to near Westville. but a year later located in Union town- 
ship on the Judge \^^arnock place, which he has been renting for twenty-one 
years. He operates two hundred acres successfully, carrying on general 
f;irnu'ng and stock raising, feeding most of his grain to live stock. 



I/O CHAMPAIGN COUNTY. OHIO. 

Air. i'errx- was married in 1879 to Ella McAdams, a daughter of Na- 
thaniel and lunnia (Brown) McAdams, and to their union eight children 
liave been l)orn, namel}- : Ethel married Charles Blair and they have four 
children, 'i'helma, Kenneth. Arnold and Paul; Claude died in infancy; Clara 
married George Meyers and they have two children Dorothy and Lois; Oma 
married l^arl Maddox but their union has been without issue; Thurle mar- 
ried Eva Albright and they have three children, Coryl, Louisa and Lillian : 
Kent married Fannie Reynolds and they have one child. Gail Duane; Frank 
married V'ernie Story and they have one child, Richard; Gail married Wilma 
Holmes and lives at Columbus, Ohio. 

Mr. I'erry is an independent voter. He is a member of the local school 
hoard and was formerly trustee of Union township. He belongs to the 
Methodist Episcopal church at Mutual. He is active in its afifairs, being at 
present a trustee and assistant superintendent of the Sunday school. 



THOMAS E. BREEDLOVE. 

There is no more up-to-date farmer in Wayne township. Champaign 
c(junty, than Thomas E. Breedlove, who was born in Salem township, this 
ccmnty, Feljruary 13, 1862. He is a son of Henry C. and Mary J. (Stone) 
Breedlove. The father was born on March 2, 1836, in Ross county, Ohio, 
and his death occurred on March 12. 1892. Mary J. Stone was born in 
l'\-iirfield county, this state. Henry C. Breedlove was twelve years old when 
he was brought to Champaign county by his uncle, Elijah Breedlove, with 
whom he lived in Wayne township imtil he was twent}-one \ears old, when 
he started out in life for himself. About that time, on April 28, 1859. 
he married Mary J. Stone, a daughter of Thomas F. and Mary Stone, who 
]i\'ed on a farm north of the village of Cable. Mr. Breedlove followed farm- 
ing in Salem township for some time. Fie lived north of Kennard two years, 
then moved to Wayne township, locating south of Cable and later lived 
northwest of Mingo, where his death occurred. His wife died in Piqua, 
Ohio, at the age of seventy-three Avears. He devoted most of his active life 
to farming and stock raising. He was a Republican and served as town- 
ship trustee. He belonged to the Methodist Episcopal church at Mingo. 
Flis family consisted of only two children, Efifie, who married Dr. W. N. 
Unkefer lives in Pif|ua. this state, and Thomas E., of this sketch. 

Thomas E. Breedlove grew to manhood on the home farm and attended 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. I77 

the district schools, later spending one year in college at Ada, Ohio. He 
lived at home until he was twent}-three years old. On October 22, 1885, 
he married Minnie D. Hunt, who was born in Monroe township. Logan 
county, this state. She was a daughter of Jacob D. and Samantha Hunt, 
who lived many years in that county; the father died there, and the niother 
now makes her home in West Liberty. Ohio. 

The death of Mrs. Breedlove occurred on October 12, 1912, leaving one 
child, Inez Marie, who is now the wife of Roy Robinson, a farmer, and 
they make their home with the subject of this sketch. 

After his marriage Mr. Breedlove continued to live on the old home place, 
in all for a period of nearly fifty years. He kept the land well tilled and 
well improved, so that it lost none of its original fertility. He finally bought 
the ]£li Cowgill i)lace. where he now resides, the farm consisting of forty- 
six acres. He has retained his former place, which consists of one hundred 
and seventy acres, and has been very successful as a general farmer and 
stock raiser. He has also bought stock to feed for the market, handling 
large numbers annuall}v, and has been feeding livestock for years, pre- 
paring several different herds for the market each year. 

Politically, Mr. Breedlove is a Republican. His daughter is a member 
of the Methodist Episcopal church, to which his wife also belonged. 



CHAS. H. STANSBURY. 

Chas. H. Stansbury. one of Champaign county's best known and most 
substantial citizens, a former coal dealer at Urbana and now occupied in 
looking after his considerable land interests in this county, was born in 
Urbana and has lived there all his life. He was born on November 7, 1854, 
son and only child of Alfred M. and Mary (Kimber) Stansbury, the former 
a native of Maryland and the latter of Pennsylvania, whose last days were 
spent at Urbana. where Alfred M. .Stansbury, son of Dr. James B. Stans- 
biuT, was for some years engaged in the mercantile business, having been 
thus engaged at the time of his death in 1857. 

Alfred M. Stansbury was born in the city of Baltimore and was but a 

child when his father, Dr. James B. Stansbury, one of the heroes of the 

War of 1812. came to this county, in 1835, and settled on a farm three 

miles east of L'rbana, later moving to Urbana, where he spent the remainder 

f 12a) 



1/8 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

of his life, his death occurring- there on January 15. i860, he then being- 
seventy-six years of age. I'^oUowing his death, in i860, a local newspaper 
said of Doctor Stansbury that in his death "society has lost one of its 
brightest ornaments, the town one of its best citizens, and the church one 
of its most valuable members. He was truly a gentleman of the 'olden 
time,' frank, plain, modest, graceful and dignified in all his intercourse with 
the world. His memory long will be cherished by his friends and neighbors 
(jn account of his exemplary deportment, bis consistent life and undeviating 
integrity." 

Dr. James B. Stansbury played a distinguished ])art in the War of 1812 
and as a young- merchant turned privateersman in the city of Baltimore car- 
ried consternation into the ranks of British shipping circles, doing much in 
that war for the maintenance of free trade and sailors' rights. Having 
sailed from Baltimore in the merchant vessel "Hannibal" with a cargo of 
coffee for France in 181 2, he was captured by the British squadron then 
blockading the coast, and under the British "orders in council" was run into 
Plymouth and his vessel and cargo confiscated, leaving him penniless. He 
was subsequently returned to this country by Great Britain as a "govern- 
ment pauper," in a vessel kept for that purpose. Having lost all he had, 
he determined to take vengeance in some way on the authors of his ruin, 
and when, a short time later, war was declared against Great Britain, on 
account of the repeated confiscation of United States vessels, he, with Ca])- 
tain Boyle as commander, fitted up a vessel at New York, the "Chasseur," 
and sailed for the coast of England as a "privateer" on their own hook. In 
a cruise of eighteen months they captured eighteen brigs, ships and merchant 
vessels, with cargoes worth, in the aggregate, fifteen million dollars ; l^ut 
they sank and destroyed the most of these vessels, so that but few were 
brought back to the port of New York. While ofif the coast of England, 
surrounded by British men-of-war, brigs and frigates, they ran up into the 
I'ritish channel and the Captain and himself issued the following "procla- 
mation" in the true Paul Jones style, handing it to neutral parties and 
through them having it posted at Lloyd's in London : 

I'ROCLAMATIOX. 

Whereas, It has become customary with the Admirals of (Jreai r.i'itain. (■(iiiiiu.iinliii.ur 
smaU forces on the coast of the United States, particuhtrly with Sir .John Hoslairc W.u rcii. 
;iud Sir Alexander Cochran, to declare all the coasts of tlie Unileil States in a stale «f 
strict and rigorous blockade, without possessing the power to .iustify such a declaration. 
or stationing an adequate force to maintain said blockade. 

1 do therefore, by virtue and authority in me vested ( jiossessiiig sullicient for<-e.) 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 1 79 

declare all the ports, harbors, bays, creeks, rivers, inlets, outlets, islands and seacoast 
of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland in a state of strict and rigorous 
blockade. And I do further declare, that I consider the force under my command ade- 
nuate to maintain strictly, rigorously and effectually the blockade. I do hereby re<iuire 
the resi)ective otiiccrs whether captains, commanders or commanding otticers under my 
(■(immand. employed t)r to be employed on the coast of England, Ireland and Scotland, to 
|iay strict attention to the execution of this proclamation. And I do hereby caution and 
forbid the ships and vessels of all and every nation in amity and peace with the United 
States, from entering or attempting to enter, or from coming, or attempting to come ont 
of said ports, harbors, bays, creeks, rivers, inlets, outlets, islands or seacoast, imder any 
Itrotence whatsoever. And that no person may plead ignorance of this i^roclamation. I 
have ordered the same to be made public in England. 

Given under my hand, on board the '•('hassenr," day and date as above. 

TiioJiAs Boyle. 

By command of the commanding officer. 

J. B. Stansisuky, Secretarj-. 

After his return from this successftil privateering- expedition Doctor 
Stansbitry returned to Baltimore and on board a schooner ran through a 
blockading squadron of Great Britain, joined Commander Stockton on board 
the "Comet," then cruising in the Chesapeake to protect American vessels, 
and afterward rendered important service during the attack of General Ross 
upon Baltimore. The Doctor's widow and a large family of children and 
grandchildren survived him. He was twice married and was the father of 
seven children l\v his first marriage, of whom Alfred M., father of the sul)- 
ject of this sketch, was the fourth in order of birth, the others being as 
follow : Dickson, who early went to Colorado, but later returned to Urbana. 
where he spent his last days, for years engaged in the internal revenue 
service; Charles, who went to Raritan, Illinois, in the days of his young 
manhood and there spent the rest of his life; Edward, who became a well- 
established merchant at Urbana, where his last days were spent; George, 
a veteran of the Civil \Var. who went to Kansas upon the completion of 
his military experience and there spent his last da\s; James, who engaged 
in the real-estate business at Baltimore and there spent his last days, and 
Joseph, a merchant in Urbana. who died there. B)- his second marriage 
the Doctor was the father of three children. Marcus, a veteran of the Civil 
\Var. a member of the Ninety-hfth Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, 
who married Jennie McDonald and went to Monmouth, Illinois, where he 
engaged in the mercantile business; Theodore, also a veteran of the Civil 
War, a meml)er of the Sixty-sixth Ohio, who settled at Paducah, Kentuckv, 
after the war. and Lainbert, a merchant, of Urbana and Galesburg, Illinois. 

Alfred M. Stansbury was reared at Urbana. having been but a small 
child when his father came here from Baltimore, and he completed his 



l8o • CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

scliooling in a college at Cincinnati. As a young man he began his mer- 
cantile career as a clerk in the Gynne store at Urbana and later became en- 
gaged in merchandising on his own account, owning a store situated on "the 
•^((uare" in that city, where he was engaged in business until his death i'^ 
icS57, leaving a widow and one child, a son, the subject of this sketch, the 
latter at that time but little more than two years of age. Alfred M. Stans- 
bury was a charter member of the local lodge of the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows at Urbana and he and his wife were members of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal church. The latter was born in Pennsylvania, Mary .\. 
Kimber, daughter of lunmor and I'iiocbe Kimlier. also natives of Penn- 
sxlvania, who came to Ohio in 1835 and located at Pi(|ua. where they re- 
mained until (837. when they moved to Urbana and there established their 
permanent home, spending the remainder of their lives. In his early life 
lunmor Kimber was a stone mason and \Nas a contractor on the Schuylkill 
canal. While living at Reading. Pennsylvania, he helped to establish the 
First Methodist Episcopal church there, buying an old school building, which 
he worked over and fitted uj) for a church. He was a strong Al:)olitionist 
and after having been for some years a resident of this county was a can- 
didate for sheriff on the Al)olition ticket, but received only seven votes, indi- 
cating the pro-slavery sentiment of the community at that time. During 
tlie Civil War he served as chaplain of the Twenty-sixth Regiment, (^hio 
A'olunteer Infantry, and upon the completion of his military serxicc w 
in the coal business at Urbana, and there spent the rest of his life. When 
lie arrived in Urbana in 1837 he bought a quantity of the material that had 
entered into the construction of the old court house, situated in the public 
square, and with that material built a house for himself and family at the 
northwest corner of Miami and High streets, which old house is still stand- 
ing and in an excellent state of repair, now the home of his son-in-law, 
John J. Ander.son. l^mmor Kimber died in 1885. His wife had preceded 
hill} to the gra\e about a }'ear, her death having occurred in 1884. The\- 
were the [larents of six children, of whom Mary, the mother of the subject 
of this sketch, was the third in order of birth, the others being as follow : 
Kliza J., who married Judge Corwin, of Urbana; George E., of Urbana, 
who served as a soldier of the Union during the Civil War, a member of 
the Sixty-sixth Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry; Salome, who married 
I. 1\. Roberts, of West Liberty, this state; Harriet, E., who married John J. 
Anderson, of Urbana, and Samuel P., who was the first boy to learn 
art of telegra[)hy in Urbana and who served with General Canby during 
the Civil War and afterward had charge of the Western Union Telegraph 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. I»I 

Company's construction work in the West. After the death of Alfred M. 
Stansbury his widow married Robert R. Colwell. a cabinet-maker and lum- 
l)er dealer at Urbana. and to this latter union one child was born, a daughter. 
Anna Laura, who married Elwood Dow Bancroft, of Urbana. 

Chas. H. Stansbury received his schooling- in Urbana and at the age of 
eighteen began working in the factory of Staymen & Colwell and was thus 
engaged for three years or more, at the end of which time he engaged in 
the coal business with his grandfather Kimber and later in partnership with 
J. ]. Anderson, and continued thus engaged for ten years. He then sokl 
his interest in the coal yard and ]:)ought land in Wayne and Mad River town- 
shi])s an.d has since then given his attention to his farming interests, though 
continuing to make his home at Urbana. Mr. Stansbury was formerly iden- 
tilied with the Republican party but being- dissatisfied with their attitude on 
the temperance question became a Prohibitionist and for all his life has 
been one of the leaders in the teniix^rance cause in this county, his efforts 
ha\'ing been earnestly directed toward the promotion of that cause, not onlv 
in this count\-, Init throughout the state at large. 



CHARLES P. LINCOLN. 

.Vnother of the (jld and honored families of Champaign countv is that 
represented l)y Charles P. I-incoJn, a farmer of Rush township. He was 
born .\pril ij, 184-I. on the old Lincoln homestead, known as "Loamland."" 
in the above named township and county. He is a son of Charles and Allura 
(Johnson) Lincoln, both natives of Hampton. Connecticut. Charles Lin- 
coln was about nine \ears old when he came to this county and here he grew 
to manho(.)d. He was bound out to A. Howard of Union county, and lived 
with him until he was twenty-one years old. His wife. Mlura Johnson, was 
a daughter of Josej)h and Lydia ( Cook ) Johnson, natives of Rhode Island. 
From New England the}- removed to Champaign county. Ohio, when their 
daughter. Allura. was eight months old. Llere she grew to womanhood. 
Her death occurred in 1868 at the age of tifty-two years. Her parents 
located their future home in Rush township, Joseph Johnson burning the 
brick for his home on his farm there. They remained here until 1859 when 
they removed to Clinton. Illinois, where they spent the rest of their lives. 
Mr. Johnson dying at the age of eighty years. He was a farmer and mill 



l82 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

man, also operated a distillery for some time. His family consisted of six 
children, namely : Celinda, lea, Eason, Alhira, Joseph and Lydia. 

Charles Lincoln was a son of George and Delia (Ingles) Lincoln, na- 
ti\es of New England. Their children were named as follow: Samuel, 
(ieorge, Sallie, William, John and Charles. 

Charles Lincoln had little opportunity to attend school. He married 
in Rush township, after which he lived two years in Union county, then 
located on thte farm in Rush township known as "Loamland." The land 
he purchased was new, which he cleared, built a log cabin and, by persever- 
ance and close application, developed a good fann on which he spent the 
rest of his life, dying in 1880, at the age of seventy years, his wife having 
preceded him to the grave in 1868. at the age of fifty-two years. He had 
become one of the leading farmers and influential citizens of the county, 
owning one thousand acres of good land and carried on general farming 
and stock raising on an extensive scale. He handled live stock in large num- 
bers, sending many carloads to the market annually. While living in Union 
county he lost all he had, but nothing daunted, he forged to the front again 
through his own efforts. He was not only a man of indomitable courage and 
tireless industry but also of rare soundness of judgment and foresight. He 
made a specialty of raising thoroughbred Shorthorn cattle, which he exhibited 
at fairs all over the United States and Canada, winning many premiums. 
He also bred Clydesdale horses, being the first to introduce this breed into 
this section of Ohio. He was a man of fine personal traits, honest and u])- 
right in all his relations with the world and he was respected and esteemetl 
l)y all who knew him. He was a Republican, but never very active in public 
life. He served as trustee of his township at one time. He attended the 
Universalist chiuxh. 

Ten children were born to Charles and Allura Lincoln, namely: Lydia 
Lincoln is the widow of John Hudson, a farmer of Rush township, thi?- 
county, who was a soldier in the Civil War, dying during the service at 
Bermuda Hundred, Virginia ; they had one child, Eugene, who lives at 
GlenuUin, North Dakota. George Lincoln, a farmer and stockman of Rush 
township, died here in 1885; he married Marcia M. Kimball, who now makes 
her home in the village of Woodstock, that township. Harriett Lincoln died 
in young womanhood, unmarried. Charles P. Lincoln, subject of this sketch 
^\■as fourth in order of birth. Oliver E. Lincoln, who lived in Champaign 
county for some time, later moving to Union county, Ohio, where his death 
occurred, married Sarah Coolidge. who still lives in that count}-. L-a, who 
remained on the old home farm in Rush tow'nship, was a farmer and stock- 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 183 

man. and his death occurred in 1886: he married Martlia Marsh, who is now 
Hving in ^Voodstock. this county. WilHani Lincoln followed farming in 
Rush township ; he married IMary Martin, who lives in the village of Wood- 
stock: his death occurred in 1912. Ada Lincoln married Dr. P. N. Pratt 
and they make their home in Woodstock, Ohio. Alice Lincoln died in in- 
fancy. Dwight Lincoln, the youngest of the family, also died when a child. 

Charles P. Lincoln, the immediate subject of this review, grew to man- 
hood on the home farm, and he received his education in the common schools. 
He assisted his father with the work on the farm until his marriage, Jan- 
uary 30, 1868. to Octavia Inskeep, a native of Allen township, Union county. 
Ohio, and a daughter of William and Keturah (Warner) Inskeep, the father 
l)()rn in Logan county. Ohio, in 1807, and the mother's birth occurred in 
that county in 18 12. They grew up and were married in their native county 
and later bought land in Union county, Ohio, where he continued to reside 
until i860. Her death occurred in 1854, in which year he removed to Rich- 
land county, Illinois, and after residing there five years he returned to Ohio, 
locating at North Lewisburg, Champaign county, where Mr. Inskeep died 
in 1888. His first wife died at the age of forty-two years, and he married 
for his second wife, Amanda Stone, a native of Virginia. Eight children 
wore born to his first marriage, namely : Hope, who married William 
Milligan of North Lewisburg, are both now deceased ; Hester married Peter 
Young, after which they removed to Illinois then to Iowa and died in that 
state; Hepsibeth married S. G. Smith, now deceased, but she is living in 
Woodstock, Champaign county ; Delilah married Andrew J. Smith, a farmer, 
and they both died in California; Mary married Azro Smith, a farmer of 
]iear Woodstock; Emily married M. C. Young, after which they moved to 
Illinois and died there: Octavia, who married Mr. Lincoln of this sketch; 
and Laura married J. F. McElroy, a farmer and they make their home in 
Oregon. One child was born to William Inskeep and his second wife, May, 
who married W. Hunter, first, and second, Samuel Callan. She lives at 
Ml Blanchard, Ohio. 

Two children have been born to Charles P. Lincoln and wife, namely : 
Warren G., who resides in Woodstock, this county, and is manager of the 
McCoy Canning Company, of Woodstock, married Rena Dix; Charles B.. 
who is engaged in farming in Union county, Ohio, married Lulu Witter. 

After his marriage Charles P. Lincoln located on his present farm in 
Rush township, known as the Mitchell place. It was only partly improved, 
being a new farm, and iMr. Lincoln put on the present improvements, build- 
ing at first a small house which he lived in for fifteen years, then built his 



l84 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY. OHIO. 

present line home. He has a productive and well-kept farm of one hundred 
and twenty-six acres in the home place, also owns four hundred acres of 
excellent land in Union county, Ohio. He is one of the most successful 
farmers and stockmen in his locality. He feeds large numhers of cattle and 
hogs annually for the market and is regarded as an especiall}' good- judge 
of livestock. He is a man of sound judgment and keeps well informed 
regarding the modern methods of agriculture and stock raising. However, 
during the past four years he has merely overseen his farm in a general 
way, renting out his land. Politically, he is a Republican, and he attends 
the Universalist church. He enlisted in the One Hundred and Thirty-fourth 
Regiment during the Civil War. 



HENRY C. SOUTH. 



The veterans of the great Union army that saved the nation a half cen- 
tury ago are now growing comparatively few in number and they are monthly 
surrendering by hundreds to the only foe they could not successfully meet. 
Those who remain among us, like Henry C. South, a retired farmer of Salem 
township. Champaign count}-, should receive our every homage, for they 
made possible our present state of prosperity and advanced civilization. 

Mr. South was born, September i6, 1841, near Baltimore, Maryland. 
He is a son of Henry H. and Hannah (Walker) South, both natives of 
Pennsvlvania, where thev grew up, married and made their home imtil 1861, 
when they moved to Champaign coimty, Ohio, locating in Wayne townshij).. 
where Mr. South \\as a lime burner and farmer. H^is death occurred in 
Wavne township, flis familv consisted of twelve children, four of whom 
are now living, nameh- : Mary lives in Milford Center, Ohio; Samuel also 
lives in Milford Center; Joseph, wh(^ makes his home in Columbus, has been; 
an engineer on the Pennsylvania lines for the past thirty-1i\e years; Henry, 
of this sketch. 

Henry South had little chance to obtain an education. He grew up on 
the home farm and lived at home until he was twenty years of age. In Ma>-, 
1862, he enlisted in Company H, Eighty-sixth Ohio \^olunteer Infantry, and 
in May, 1864, enlisted for a second term in Com])any E, One Hundred and 
Thirty-fourth Ohio N'olunteer Infantry, serving four months in each enlist- 
meiU. He was first sent to Maryland and later into West Virginia. Dur- 
ing his last term of enlistment he served before Peter.sburg and was in sev- 




HENRY C. SOUTH 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 185 

cval raids and skirmishes. He was honorably discharged in the fah of 1804. 
After the war Mr. South located in Salem township. Champaign count}-. 
Ohio, and resumed agricultural pursuits. He hired out as a farm hand for 
son.ic time, in fact, worked for Andy Mcllwain for a period of ten years, 
then farmed the Alason place for a period of thirty years. In 1909 he 
moved to Kinnard. Salem township, where he has since made his home,, 
living retired from active life. 

Mr. S()uth was married, tirst, in 1866, to Sarah Richardson, who died 
in 1873, leaving two children, namely: Delia, whose death occurred in 1880,. 
and Margaret, wdio married Da^ id ].\Iitchell and lives in V»^est Carlton, Ohio. 
In 1876 Mr. South married, for his second wife, Frances Dennell, who was 
horn in Wayne township, Champaign county. She is a daughter of Hiram 
and Sarah Dennell, natives of Kentucky and Brown county, Ohio, respectively. 
These parents settled in Wayne township. Champaign count}-, in an early 
day and there Mr. Dennell engaged in farming until his death. 

Four children have been born to Mr. South by his second wife, namelv r 
Nellie, who lives at home ; h^arl, who is engaged in farming in Salem tow-n- 
ship, married Nora Moyer ; Sallie married Pearl John.son and the}- live south 
of Cable, Ohio: and Ethel, who is clerking in Springfield. Ohio. 

Mr. South is a member of the Grand Army of the Republic at Urbana, 
Ohio, and also belongs to the Union League. His w-ife is a member of' the 
MedKMJist Episcopal church. 



WILLIAM LANE. 



William Lane is now living in retirement in his pleasant home at Nortli 
Lewisburg, Champaign county, after a very active and successful life. He- 
was born at West Mansfield, Ohio, May 17, 1838. He is a son of Levi and 
M;u-}- ( Skidmore) Lane, the father a native of North Carolina and the 
mother of Columbiana count>-, Ohio. Levi Lane was four }-ears old whi 
his parents, Benjamin Lane and w-ife brought him to Warren county, Ohio, 
the family later moving to Logan county, where Levi grew to maturity and 
there he attended school and married. After farming several years he 
moved to Union county, this state, dying there at the age of fifty-one years. 
His wife died at the age of sixty-five. He was first a Whig, later a Repub- 
lican. They were lioth members of the Baptist church. Fourteen children 
were burn to Levi Lane and wife, namelv: Ruth lane, Marv, Angeline. 



l86 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

KaclKiel. Samaiitha, Serepta are all deceased; Melinda lives in Michigan: 
] jenjamin is deceased ; William, of this sketch ; Joseph lives in Indiana : 
Lemuel li\es in East Liberty, Ohio; Thomas is deceased; John, of West 
Afansfield, Ohio; the youngest child died in infancy unnamed. 

Williatii Lane grew up on the farm and attended the district schools. 
He lived at lidme until his marriage, April 7, 1859, to Emma Munsell, a 
native of West Alanstield, (^hio, and a daughter of Alvin and Mary (Strong) 
Mlinsell, natives of the state of New York. They settled where West Mans- 
held now ^t^'.nds. the country then being a wilderness. They were among 
the lirst settlers in that locality. Mrs. Mary Munsell was a licensed physi- 
ciaji and she l)uilt up a large practice. Mr. Munsell devoted his active life 
to farming. Thev both died in Logan county. Their family consisted of 
seven children, named as follow : Dannie. William, Nancy, Phoebe, Eliza, 
Caroline and iunma. who married Mr. Lane of this sketch; she is the onl\- 
one of the family now living. 

Ten children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Lane, namely: Corey 
is engaged in the insurance business at Bellefontaine, Ohio ; Calvin, who 
was a Fi-ee Will Baptist preacher, later took up farming, owing to failing 
health, and he now lives in Canada; William is engaged in the grocery busi- 
ness at ^'ork Center, Union county. Ohio; Benjamin owns and operates a 
large ranch in North Dakota ; Laura, now deceased, married William Cur- 
ran ; James Ward is a barber in .Springfield, Ohio ; Asa died when twenty- 
one years old; Obed is farming at Middleburg, Ohio; Zella is the wife of 
O. H. Spain, of North Lewisburg, Champaign county; Herbert is employed 
Iw the telephone company at Zanesville. Ohio. 

After his marriage William Lane located on a farm southeast of West 
Mansfield, Laiion county, Ohio, where he remained eleven years, then moved 
to Logan countv, Ohio, where he lived until 1892, then came to North 
Lewisburg. Champaign county, where he has since lived on a farm, owning 
a well impro\-ed and attractive place. He is now retired from active work. 

Mr. Lane enlisted on February 16, 1864. in Company C. Seventeenth 
Ohio Volunteer Infantry, at West Mansfield, and was soon sent South, into 
1'ennessee, reaching Missionary Ridge just after the battle. He took part 
in the Atlanta campaign and was under General Sherman in his march to 
the sea. He was taken sick at Ringgold. Georgia. He marched to Buzzard 
koost. then back to Chattanooga. Tennessee. He was in the hospital at 
Louisville, Kentucky, for five months. He was a nurse in the officers hos- 
])ital for eight months. Lie obtained a di.scharge at his own request and 
started for the front, and was three months on the road, endeavoring to 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY. OHIO. 187 

rejoin his regiment, which lie reached April 24. 1865, '^^ Tallon Springs. 
He soon started to Richmond, then went to W^ashington, D. C. where he 
took part in the Grand Revie^^'. He was lionorably discharged July 21. 
1865. after which he returned home and resumed farming. 

AJr. Lane was a member of the post of the Grand Army of the Repuhhc 
at W est ^Mansfield, and later l^elonged to the post at Middleburg. Ohio. He 
was formerly a member of the Free Will Baptist church, and now belongs 
to the Methodist Episcopal church at North Lewisburg. Politicalh-, he is 
a Republican. 



HOWARD TOWNSEND. 



Howard Townsend. a farmer, near North Lewisburg, Rush township. 
Champaign county, was born in the northeastern corner of this county, July 
22. 1863. He is a son of James Townsend, who was born in 1830, in Mor- 
gan county, Ohio. He married LLinnah Hall, who was born in Salem town- 
ship. Champaign county, Ohio. James Townsend was a son of Joseph 
Townsend, a native of Harrison county, Ohio, who later located in Morgan 
county, this state, where he spent the rest of his life. He married Elizabeth 
I^)eck. of Morgan county, and to their union four children were born, namelv : 
Ross, Anthony, James and Anna. 

James Townsend, father of the subject of this sketch, grew up on the 
farm and was educated in the district schools of jNIorgan county, Ohio. 
About 1840 he changed his residence to Middleburg, Oliio, later 
moved to Rush township, this county, where he married, and there he located 
at North Lewisburg. He was a carpenter by trade, which he followed all 
his life, becoming quite an expert workman. He was a Republican. He 
was the first to join the Masonic lodge at North Lewisburg. He took an 
active interest in lodge work. He was a member of the Universalist church. 
His death occurred March 31, 1893, his widow surviving until August 3. 
i<;oi. To these parents the following children were born: Oscar, who lives 
at North Lewisburg, married Essie Warner; Henry, who is farming in 
L'nion countv, Ohio, married Lena Spain ; Howard, of this review ; Anna 
married P. H. Dolan and they live at North Lewisburg. 

Howard Townsend received a common school education at North 
Lewisburg, his schooling being somewhat limited, in view of the fact that 
he started out in life for himself when only eleven years old, working at dif- 
ferent things during his boyhood, including the blacksmith's trade. He 



l88 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

operated ;i dvxvj; store at North Lewisburg" eight years, in partnership with 
his ])rother. He has had thirty-live different stores in different towns :>. 
was a ver) successful merchant. He also owned ele\'ators at Mingo, Irvin 
and Woodstock. Ife has" been connected with the State Fair Association 
for the past thirtx-four years. Me has lived in Irvin, Ouincy, Big Springs, 
Centerville and Columbus, in the latter three different times. In July, 1913, 
he bought his present excellent farm of one hundred and twenty-eight acres 
near North Lewisburg and is engaged in general farming and stock raising. 
His home is an attractive one and he has good convenient outbuildings. 
He still handles considerable hay and grain. He started in life a poor boy 
and without aid from any one he lias forged to the front, being now the 
p(jssessor of a comforta])le comi)etency. He has educated himself by contact 
with the world and by wide miscellaneous reading. 

Air. Townsend has long been prominent in Masonry, belonging to the 
blue lodge and chapter at North Lewisburg, the commandery at Urbana, 
and the Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mvstic Shrine at Davton, 
Ohio. 



SHERM.VN DOWNS. 



An(jther farmer of Rush township. Champaign ceunt}^, who employs 
twentieth century methods, is Sherman Dtnvns. who was born near Mt. 
Tabor cliurcli in Salem township, this county, Octol)er J4. 1864. He is a 
son of josei)li and i^sther (Usher) Downs, the father a native of Salem 
township, Chami)aign county, and the mother was born in Cuyahoga countw 
Jose|)h Downs. Sr., the paternal grandfather, was a native of New Jersev 
and the Hrst memlier of the famil\- to come to Ohio. He was one of the 
early settlers near Mt. Tabor church. C'hampaign countv, spending the rest 
of his life there on a farm, his death occurring in 1863. His family con- 
sisted of ten children, all now deceased. Joseph Downs, Jr.. was reared on 
tile home farm whicli he assistetl in de\eloping from the wilderness. He 
attended school in a little log house in the woods. He remained on the 
homestead all his life, engaging in general farming, and died there in 1908. 
After his death his widow lived in Urbana a while and now makes her home 
in Columbus. Ohio. He was a Republican. His family consisted of four 
children th;it grew to maturity, namely: l*"lnier died when thirtv-eight years 
old; Clara, who is deceased. \\ as the wife of William Linville and he lives 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY. OHIO. I89 

near Cable. Ohio; Shernian, of this sketch; Eugene, a bookkeeper, married 
Miwy WilHanison; Ralph died in 1863 when a child. 

Sherman Downs grew up on the old home place where he worked when 
a bo}-. He received a common school education and lived at home until his 
marriage on May 21, 1895. to Emma Staub. who was born in Salem town- 
shi]>. Cham])aign county, where she grew to womanhood and w-as educated 
in the common schools. She was a daughter of John and Susan (Black) 
Staub. who spent their lives on a farm in Salem township, both being now 
<leccased. The death of Mrs. Downs occurred on April 30, 191 /. leaving 
four children, namely: Malcomb Black, a telegraph operator who lives at 
Springfield. Ohio ; Nellie. Milton and Cornelia all live at home. 

Vfter his marriage Mr. Downs engaged in farming in Logan and Union 
counties for four years, then moved to Wayne township. Champaign countv, 
where he farmed for fifteen years. He spent one year on a farm near Wood- 
stock, and for the past three years he has operated three hundred acres of 
the Miller farm in Rush township. He carries on general farming and 
raises a great deal of grain of various kinds which he feeds to live stock. 

Politically, Mr. Downs is a Republican. His wife was a faithful mem- 
ber of the ]\Tethodist Episcopal church. 



DANIEL BURNHAM. 



.V highly honored and successful farmer of Rush townshij). Cham- 
paign county, during a past generation was the late Daniel Burnham, whose 
record is well worth preserving on the pages of local history. He was born 
on the old Bumham homestead in the above named townshi]). February 2, 
1826. Lie was a son of Elba Burnham, who was born December 25, 1791, 
in Connecticut. He married Lorenda Burnham. also a native of Connecticut. 
\vb(^se birth occurred March 22. 1803. She died September 14, 1839, and 
lie married for his second wife Xancy P>ingham. who was born in 1789; 
her death occurred July 28. 1866. She \\as also a nati\e of C\)nnecticut. 
Elba Burnham grew to manhood in New lingland and was married there. 
He devoted his life to general farming and stock raising. He was one of 
the early settlers in Rush township, Chami)aign county. Ohio, where his 
grandchildren now reside. He cleared a place on which to build his log- 
cabin, and began life here in typical pioneer fashion. He persevered and 
succeeded, the log house later giving wav to a comforta!)le frame dwelling. 



190 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

and here his death occurred on November 9, 1861, at the age of seventy 
vears. His children were named as follov^' : Laura, born Alarch 2, 1822, 
married Nathan Lamborn. and they moved to Iowa in i860, where her death 
occurred; Daniel, of this sketch, was second in order of birth; Charles, born 
January 23, 183 1. lived in Rush township until he moved to Iowa, where he 
spent the rest of his life on a farm; he married Elizabeth Dee. Martha, 
born April 7, 1834, married R. Ellsworth, who was a soldier in the Civil 
\Var, li^•ed in Missouri for some time, but later went to South Dakota, w^here 
he died; David, born December 10. 1835, served in the Civil War. after 
which he lived in Missouri. Kansas and Oklahoma, dying in Kansas; he 
married Mary L. Parke. 

Daniel Burnham, subject of this memoir, grew up c^n the home farm 
and attended the early-day schools. During the Civil \\'ar he enlisted for the 
one-hundred-day service in Company D. One Hundred and Thirty-fourth Ohio 
Volunteer Infantry; on September 9, 185 1, he married Catherine Hamilton, 
who was Ixirn in Ross county. Ohio, but was reared in Union county. She 
was a daughter of James and Marie (Blue) Hamilton, natives of Virginia, 
from which state they came to Ohio in 1835, locating in Union county, where 
the town of Marysville is now located, there being but a few houses there 
at that time. Mr. Hamilton settled on land just north of the village, in the 
woods, where he put up a cabin, cleared and developed a farm by hard work 
and perseverance, and there they spent the rest of their lives. The follow- 
ing children were born to them : John lived in Union county ; James and 
Silas were farmers in Union county; Elizabeth also lived in that county; 
Catherine, wife of the subject of this sketch ; Alexander, who devoted his 
life to farming, went to Illinois, where he died. 

I'ivt children were born to Daniel Burnham and wife, namely: Lorenda 
Iv, born l'"ebruary 3. 1853, married Joseph Perkins, an undertaker, and they 
reside in Alar\s\ille, Ohio; Delphine, born October 15, 1854, is unmarried 
and lives at home; i^lba V., born September ly. 1857, married Mabel Bellers, 
December 31. 1886; was married in Iowa but in a short time returned to 
this township and lived here about three years, then returned to Iowa, where 
she died, July 24. 1889. I^lba \'.. who married Mabel Bellers, has one 
child, Edna, who married R. L. Pratt, b^lnathan IT., born Noveml)er 14. 
1859, is single, lives at home and has always followed farming; Eeroy. born 
September 0. 1862, died Eebruary 12. 1898. 

The above named children were educated in the home schools. Two 
of the sons and a daughter live on the old home place, which contains two 
hundred and seven acres of line farming land, and the\' lune kept it well 



CHAMPAIGX COUNTY, OHIO. I9I 

improved and under an excellent state uf cultivation. They raise tine sheep 
and a good grade of cattle, hogs and horses. They built a large modern 
home in 1900, containing eleven rooms. There are also two large barns 
and other convenient outbuildings. 

The death of Daniel Burnham occurred in 1S87. 



AIXEN M. GLENDENING. 

Allen M. Glendening. farmer of Rush township, and at this writing- 
one of the commissioners of Champaign county, was born in West Middle- 
burg, Logan county, Ohio, January 15, 1881. He is a son of John W. and 
Sarah R. (Foster) Glendening. The father was born in Rush township, 
this county, and the mother in Logan county, Ohio. John \\'. Glendening- 
grew to manhood on the farm, attended the rural schools, and during the 
C i\il War he enlisted in Company C, Sixty-sixth Ohio Volunteer Infantry. 
in which he made an excellent record as a soldier for the Union. He re- 
ceived an honoraljlc discharge at the close of the war and returned home. 
After his marriage he settled on a farm in Rush township where he spent 
his life, dying in 1887. His widow survives and makes her home in Belle- 
fdutaine, Ohio. To these parents three children were born, namely: Stella 
married Jeff D. W>lty, a railroad man of Bellefontaine, employed by the 
l>ig Four railroad, and his family consists of two children — Reba and 
Kichard; ]£arl L., a brakeman on the Toledo & Ohio Central railroad, living 
at Cokmibus. Ohio ; he irrarried Grace Darnell and they have three children, 
and Allen M., of this sketch. 

Allen AL Glendening grew to manhood on the home farm, and he at- 
tended the district schools, but he started out in life for himself when only 
sixteen years old, working out by the month for three years. He went to 
Bellefontaine where he followed teaming for some time. Li 1901 he mar- 
ried Carrie G. Owen, of Woodstock, Ohio. She is a daughter of Thomas 
and .Sarah Owen, of Rush township, Champaign county. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Glendening eight children have been born, named as follows: Robert X.. 
Dorothy E., Fred O., William T., Donna E., Mary J., Harriet May. and 
L)uis, who died in infancy. 

After his marriage the subject of this sketch located in Wayne town- 
ship, this county, on a farm, owning at one time one hundred three and 
one-half acres of the old home place, buying out the other two heirs. Later 



192 CMAMPAIGX COUNTY, OHIO. 

he traded tb.e farm for the brick livery barn in North Lewisburg, and con- 
(kicted the same for a short time, but not hking the livery business he traded 
liis l)ani iov a farm in Logan county and lived there three years, then sold 
out and bought one hundred and seventy-two acres in Union county. He 
,si)ld se\'ent}-tive acres of that place, then bought sixty-one acres in that 
county, which was well improved. Returning to North Lewisburg he lived 
there three }ears then rented three hundred and sixty acres in Rush town- 
ship, where he has been engaged in general farming and stock raising for 
the past six \ears. Lie lias been very successful and has a well cultivated 
])lace. He feeds a large number of cattle and hogs annually for the market. 
alxi makes a s])ecialty of lireeding Belgian horses. He now owns two hue 
stallions, "Indigene HL' and "Major De Russelede." He also owns two 
thoroughbred inares, "Alice" and "Finna De Bars," and several head of 
Holstein cows. He also carries on a small dairy business. He keeps Duroc- 
Jersey red hogs, raising from one hundred and fifty to two hundred annually. 
Politically, he is a Republican. He was elected commissioner of Cham- 
paign county in 1915 and is still incumbent of that ofhce. the duties of which 
he is discharging in an able and satisfactory manner. Fraternally, he be- 
longs to the Masonic order, including the blue lodge and the chapter at 
North Lewisburg, and the commandery at Urbana, and the Knights of 
Lythias at North Lewisburg. He is a member of the Grange. 



OR A M. CLARK. 



Ora M. Clark, one of the best-known sheep breeders in the L^nited States, 
proprietor of the grain elevator at Cable, this count}-, dealer in coal at that 
place and a manufacturer of stock foods, former trustee of Wayne township 
and for years actively identified with the general business interests of that 
part of the countv. is a native son of Champaign county and has lived here 
all his life. He was born on a farm in Wayne township, about two and a 
half miles south of Cable, May 18, 1877, scmi of Peter and Lucy Clark, natives 
(if Virginia, who caiue to Ohio after their marriage and located in Cham- 
paign countv, making their home on the farm above mentioned south of 
Cable, where they still live, ir^eter Clark was trained as a carpenter, but 
upon coming to this countv became .a farmer and was successful. Li addi- 
tion to his general farming, he engaged extensi\el\- in raising live stock, 
particularl}- sheep, .and did very well. Though now living practically retired 




ORA M. CLARK 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 19^ 

from the acti\e labors of the farm, he continues to give considerable personal 
attention to the sheep business and finds much pleasure in the same. 

Reared on the home farm south of Cable. Ora M. Clark received his 
education in the schools of that neighborhood and from the days of his boy- 
hood was a valued aid to his father in the work of developing and improv- 
ing the farm and in assisting in the raising of the purebred Hve stoclc his 
father early started on the place. He early gave his particular attention to 
sheep raising and he and his father became widely known among the breed- 
ers of purebred Cottswold sheep throughout the United States. When Mr. 
Clark decided to go into the Cottswold lin.e on an extensive scale he went to 
Canada and personally selected his stock from the famous flocks of the Gar- 
butts, the Thompsons and others of equal note there and thus stocked the 
Clark farm with as good stock as could be found. Consecjuently, it was not 
long until he became onie of the best-known "knights of the crook" in the 
United States, the products of the Clark flock taking prizes all over the 
country. In 190 1 ]\Ir. Clark's sheep took first prize and sweepstakes at the 
New York state fair at Syracuse and they also have taken firsts or seconds 
at the state fairs in Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Minnesota and Nebraska. On 
the fine Clark farm of four hundred acres south of Cable there is a flock 
generally maintained at about two hundred head of thoroughbreds and repre- 
sentatives of this flock are shipped to all parts of the country, calls coming 
from other breeders from coast to coast. In 1908 Mr. Clark engaged in the 
coal and grain business at Cable and there also became engaged in the manu- 
facture of his widely known stock food, "Vermi-Salz". which is in wide 
demand among stock raisers throughout the country. Mr. Clark also owns 
elevators at Mingo and at Hagenbaugh and has done well in the grain business. 

In 1896 O. M. Clark was united in marriage to Myrtle Hinton, daughter 
of Taylor Hinton and wife, and to this union one child has been born, a 
daughter, Marjorie. Mr. and Mrs. Clark are members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church and Mr. Clark for years has been an ofiice bearer in the 
same, having held at one time and another nearly every office in the church. 
Politically, Mr. Clark is a Republican and has long given his earnest atten- 
tion to local civic affairs. For some time he served as trustee of Wayne 
township and in other way^ has done his part in the public service, ever help- 
ful in promoting movements designed to advance the common w^elfare in 
the com.munity in which he has spent his life so usefully. The Clarks have 
a very pleasant home at Cable and take a proper interest in the general social 
activities of the village. Mr. Clark is a Scottish Rite (thirty-second degree) 
(13a) 



194 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

^lason and a noble of the Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine, affiliated with the consistory. Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite in the 
"valley" of Dayton and with the shrine at Dayton, and takes a warm interest 
in Masonic affairs. 



VAN METER BROTHERS. 

Among the best known and most progressive farmers and stockmen 
of Champaign county are the Van Meter Brothers, proprietors of beautiful 
"Woodbine Earm," in Union township, and breeders of Duroc hogs, Ram- 
bouillet sheep, also S. C. W. Leghorn chickens. Edwin R. and J. L. Van 
Meter are representatives of one of the honored old families of this section 
of Ohio. They are sons of Joseph R. and Sarah (Bretney) Van Meter, 
both natives of Clark county, Ohio, where they gre^\- to maturity, atteiiding 
school. When a young man the father worked on the home farm, contin- 
uing there until he removed to Union township, Champaign county, buying 
the place where his sons, Edwin R. and J. L., now reside. He improved 
the place and was successful as a general farmer and was an extensive stock 
raiser. At one time he owned two hundred and forty acres of fine farming 
land in this township, which he kept well improved, and he ranked among 
the leading agriculturists of his locality. He carried on active farming until 
his death, which occurred in 1902. His wife preceded him to the grave in 
1894. To these parents four children were born, namely: ]ulwin R.. 
Charles R., L. Harry and J. L. 

J. L. Van Meter grew up on the home farm, and he received his edu- 
cation in the rural schools of Union township, then took up farming on the 
home place, but a few years later he went to Kentucky one year, where he 
secured a position as clerk in a store, finally coming back to Clark county. 
Ohio. After an absence from home altogether of about ten years, he re- 
turned to the home farm in Union township. Champaign county, and as- 
sisted in operating the home place until the death of his father, when he 
and his brother, Edwin R., took over the homestead, in 1903. and they ha^•e 
since operated the same in partnership, owning one hundred and forty-six 
acres. They have kept the land under a high state of improvement and cul- 
tivation. Although they carry on general farming successfully, raising a 
large quantity of grain from year to year, they make stock raising their 
chief business and their fine stock is greatly admired by all, and it finds a 
very ready market whenever offered for sale, owing to its superior quality.. 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. I9S 

The\ are among the most prominent breeders of live stock in Champaign 
and adjoinmg counties, of the type of which they make a specialty. Their 
Duroc hogs are of the hnest and their Rambouillet sheep are in demand all 
over the country for breeding purposes and are shipped over a wide terri- 
tory. Their fine Teghorn chickens are also in great demand. They are 
exceptionally good judg"es of all kinds of live stock and, being close students 
of all that pertains to this line of business, they keep well abreast of the 
times in their line. They have substantial, convenient and modernly equipped 
buildings for the i)roper care of their stock, and everything about the place 
denotes good management and thrift. 

J. L. \'an .Meter is unmarried, but luhvin K. married Amelia Van I'ch. 
a nati\ e of Kentucky, and the daughter of Cyrus N. Van Pelt, who married 
Mildred Hope, of Clark county, Ohio, she of Kentucky. He was a saddler 
and in early life worked in a drug store. 

Four children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Edwin R. Van Meter, 
namely : Rollin C. and Sarah, living, and Ross M. and Joseph R., deceased. 
■ Politically, the Van Meter brothers are Republicans, and they belong to 
the .Methodist Episcopal church of Catawba. 



GEORGE E. ROPP. 



One (jf the well-remembered and highlv esteemed citizens of Union 
lownship, Champaign county, during the generation that is past was the 
late George E. Ropp. who devoted his life to general agricultural pursuit - 
He was a scion of a sterling old southern family, and his birth occurred in 
Loudoun county. Virginia, April 15. 1848. He was a son of John W. and 
Almina \'irginia ( Penhorn) Ropp, both natives of Virginia, where they 
grew up. were married and established their home on a farm. They re- 
mained there until removing to ('lark county, Ohio, and later they came to 
Champaign county and bought the place where the widow <jf George E. 
Rop]> is now living, and here they spent the rest of their lives, the death of 
John W. Ropp occurring in 1882. He had devoted his life to general fa- 
ing. His family consisted of three children, namely: George E., Mrs. B. E. 
Hull, and one that died in early life. 

George E. Ropp grew to manhood on the home farm and he helped 
his father \\ ith the general work there. He received a common school edu- 
cation in Clark county, later was a student at W'ittenliurg College at Spring"- 



196 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

field, conipletinji;' the law course there, and receiving" the degree of Bachelor 
of Laws. 

Upon completing his education Mr. Ropp located in London, Ohio, and 
at the age of twenty-three was practicing law and also served one term as 
mayor of London. However, not fancying the law as a life work, although 
i;i\ ing promise of becoming one of the leaders of the bar in Madison county. 
he went to Missouri and turned his attention to teaching school, becoming 
superintendent of schools at the town of Holden, Missouri, remaining there 
eight years, during which time he did much to build up the schools, intro- 
ducing new and improved methods and putting them under a superb sys- 
tem. He was jjopular with both pupils and teachers, and was regarded as 
one of the leading educators in that section of the state. 

After his teaching career in the West Mr. Ropp returned to Ohio and took 
up farming on his father's farm in Union township, Champaign county, on 
\vhich he si)ent the rest of his life, engaging in geneial farming and stock 
raising with success. He became owner of two hundred acres of good land, 
which he kei)t well improved and well cultivated, and kept the buildings well 
repaired and the surroundings attractive in general. 

Mr. Ropp was married at Holden, Missouri, on July 10. 1883, to Anna 
L. Batsell. She was born in Simpson county, Kentucky, July 16, 1864, an( 
when young went to Holden, Missouri. She was educated in the public 
-schools. She is a daughter of John and Ellen (Whiteside) Batsell. He 
and she both were born in Simpson county, Kentucky, near Franklin. He 
was a farmer all his life. They lived most of their lives in Kentucky, 
and she are both dead. They had six children, Florence, Alice, William, 
Frank, Anna L., Gordon. They were members of the Baptist church at 
Lf olden, Missouri. 

To George F. Ropp and wife three children were born, namely : Ouide 
B., married Mayme Long and they have one child, George, a farmer on the 
home ])lace ; Kersey C who married Kate Smith and lives on the home 
jilace; RoUa married lassie Stipp and they have two children, Horace F. 
and Carrol, who lives in Goshen township, a farmer and member of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows. Ouide B. and Kersey C. are members of the 
A'lasonic order at Meehanicsburg. 

Politically, Mr. Ropp was a Democrat and was one of the leaders of 
his ])arty in Champaign county, active and influential in public affairs. He 
was a member of the school l)oard. l'>aternally, he belonged to the Masonic 
order at Holden, Missoin-i. 

Mr. Ropp was called to his eternal rest on July 29, 191 5, and was buried 
at Meehanicsburg, Ohio. 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY. OHIO. I97 

HENRY ELLSWORTH. 

Henry Ellsworth, farmer of Rush township, Champaign county, was 
born in Plymonth county, Iowa, in June, 1861. He is a son of William and 
Harriet (Kimble) Ellsworth, natives of Rush township. William was the 
son of Jacob Ellsworth, a native of \''ermont. who married Sarah Runyon, 
and they were early settlers in Rush township. They reared a large family 
and several of their sons were in the Civil War, William being one of the 
younger children. He was educated in the common schools, and he married 
in Rush township in 1845. H^ went to Iowa overland in a wagon in an 
early day, bought land there, and his death occurred near Sioux City. His 
family consisted of live children, namely: Frank is farming at Grand 
X'alley, South Dakota ; Abbie married Ezra Woodward of Columbus, Ohio : 
Walter is farming in Rush township; Henry of~this sketch; and Mary, who 
married Jacob Swisher of Mechanicsburg, Champaign county. The mother 
of these children were married a second time,' her last marriage being to 
E]:)hraim Woodward of Chester county, Pennsylvania, and he w'as an earh' 
settler of Wayne and Rush townships, this county. His death occurred in 
1902 at the age of ninety-one ^-ears. His wife died in 191 1 at the age of 
seventy-four years. They had one daughter, Jane W^oodward. who married 
James Sparks, and they live at Irvin Station, Ohio. 

Henr\- Ellsworth grew^ up on the home farm and he received a limited 
education in the public schools. At the age of five years he went to live 
with his aunt. Mrs. Lucy Guy. of ^ladison county. Her death occurred when 
he was thirteen years old. and he then lived with his mother at different 
places, remaining with her until his marriage on June 10, 1880, to Ada Wil- 
son, who was lx3rn in Wayne township. Champaign county. She is a daug'h- 
ter of William and .\Iac}' (Winder) Wilson, natives of Wayne township. 
Mr. Wilson died at North Lev/isburg in 1913 at the age of seventy-nine 
years. His wife died in Wayne township in 1879 at the age of forty-four 
\ears. They were members of the Friends church. Five children were horn 
to William Wilson and wife, namely: Nettie is deceased; Rettie, deceased, 
was the wife of John Peterson; Thomas lives in Little Ivock, Arkansas: 
Charles is farming in Ru.sh lownship, and Ada. who married the subject of 
this sketch. 

'["wo children have been born to ]\Ir. and Mrs. Ellsworth, namely: 
Mabel married Rev. Charles Shinn. a minister in the Baptist church and a 
leader in the state Sundav school work, being secretarv of the Ohio State 



198 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

Sunday School .Xssociation ; Mr. and Mrs. Shinn have one son, Lawrence. 
Pearl Ellsworth married Julia Hanson and they had two children, namely : 
Catherine and Harold, deceased. Both children of the subject of this sketch 
received good educational advantages. 

After his marriage Mr. Ellsworth settled on a farm in Wayne town- 
sliip for a short time. In 1901 he bought his present farm of one hundred 
and fifty-three acres. It was formerly owned by Pearl Howard and is known 
as the "Eazy Man's Rest." He carries on general farming and stock raising. 

Politicalh', Mr. Ellsworth is a Republican. He is a member of the 
local school board. He belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Eellows. 
Lodge No. \6/, at Woodstock. His wife is a member of the Friends church. 



OTTO N. HOWARD. 



Otto X. Howard, proprietor of "Oakland Place," Rush township, 
Champaign county, was born in Milford Center. Ohio. May 15. 1868. He 
is a son of Nathan and Helen M. (Hathaway) Howard. The father was 
born in Irwin, Union county, this state, where he grew U]) and attended 
school. The mother was also a nati\e of that count}- where she grew to 
womanhood and received her education, .\fter their marriage they located 
two and one-half miles west of Milford Center, Ohio, where they spent the 
rest of their lives engaged in farming and stock raising. I'olitically, Nathan 
Ploward \yas a Republican and was active in the affairs of his county. Pie 
served as county commissioner. His father, WiUiam How^ard, was one of 
the first settlers at Irwin. Union county. He married Mary McDonald, and 
devoted the rest of his life to farming there. He had but three children — 
Nathan, father of the subject of this .sketch: William, of Union county, 
deceased. 191 7. and Marv. who died in infancy. 

Nathan Howard and wife had three children, namely: Charles Mack, 
who is engaged in farming and stock raising at Hammond, Kansas, married 
Lucy Reichenecker : Cone, who is a farmer and stockman of near Milford 
Center, Ohio, married Alice Hunt; Otto N., of this sketch. 

Otto N. Ploward grew up on the home farm and he was educated in 
the schools of Milford Center, Ohio, then attended the State University at 
Columbus. After leaving school he took up farming, finally buying the 
I. I). Cranston place in Rush township. Champaign county, one and one-half 
miles nfirth of Woodstock, which place consists of iixe hundred acres. He 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 199 

also owns three hundred acres in Union county, Ohio. Both farms are under 
a fine state of improvement, with substantial and convenient sets of build- 
ing;s and the land is kept well tilled. General farming and stock raising is 
carried on extensively, large numbers of cattle and hogs being fattened each 
year for the market. He has made a specialty of breeding Belgian horses 
since 1914. He is one of the progressive and industrious general farmers 
of the county, being an advocate of modern scientific methods. Everything 
about his place denotes thrift, good taste and good management. He has 
an attractive home with up-to-date conveniences. He keeps well posted on all 
agricultUTal topics as well as general questions of public import. 

Mr. Howard was married on March 23, 1892, to Eunice Smith, of Rush 
township. Champaign county, and a daughter of A. J. and Delilah Smith, 
who lived on a farm in Rush township many years, but in 1890 removed 
to California w here they spent the rest of their lives, his death occurring in 
1894 and she died in March, 1916. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Howard three sons have been born, namely: Paul S., 
~\iax S. and Donald D. The last named died February 21, 1916. 

Mr. Howard is public-spirited and always ready to assist in any move- 
ment having for its oliject the general good of his locality, but he does not 
aspire to political leadership. Fraternally, he belongs to the Masonic blue 
lodge and chapter at North Lewisburg, also the chapter and Knights Tem- 
])lar at Urbana, and the Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine at Columbus. He is a man of excellent business acumen and person- 
ally is neighborly. companional)le and honest in all his relations with his 
fellowmen. 



WILLIAM C. KIMBALL. 

William C. Kimball, farmer and stockman at Woodstock, Champaign 
county, was born on December 17, 1862, in Rush township, this county. He 
is a son of Truman M. and ^lary Jane (Chatfield) Kimball, natives of Ver- 
mont. For a record of the Kimball ancestry, the reader is referred to the 
sketch of D. R. Kimball, which appears on another page of this work. Tru- 
man M. and Mary Jane Kimball were parents of two children, namely : 
Romette married I. D. Howard and they live in Colorado Springs; William 
C, of this sketch. 

William C. Kimball received his education in the home schools. He 
began life for himself in 1883, continuing general farming on his father's 
home place until the fall of 1909, when he moved to Woodstock and built 



200 CilAMPAIGN COL' NT Y, OHIO. 

a beautiful home. He is now owner of a fine farm of two hundred and 
fifty-seven acres in Rush township, which is well improved, including a sub- 
stantial set of building's. He has been very successful as a j^eneral farmer 
and stock raiser. 

On November 15, 1883, Mr. Kimball married Lucy ]). Marsh, a daugh- 
ter of Charles and Laura E. Marsh, who were descendants of Vermont stock. 
Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Kimball, namely : Edward 
Marsh Kimball was educated in the home schools and the Ohio State Uni- 
versity, also the Bliss Business College at Columbus; he married Celia Mar- 
tin, of Woodstock, and to their union three sons have been Ixjrn, Robert 
Martin, William Henry and James Edward. Edward ^f. Kimball is oper- 
ating his father's farm in partnership, and in connection with general farm- 
ing he deals extensively in live stock. Marjorie Kim!)all, second child of 
the subject of this sketch, was educated in the home schools, later taking a 
course of two years in domestic science at Athens, Ohio, after which she 
taught one year in Woodstock; on ^lay 3. 1917, she married Herbert L. 
Hobert, a farmer of LInion county, Ohio. Louise Kimball, youngest child 
of the subject of this sketch, is unmarried and liviwg at home; she is receixing 
a good education. 

Politically, Mr. Kimball is a Republican. He is president of the school 
l:)oard at ^^'oodstock, and has been trustee for five years. Was a member 
of the school board of Rush township for five years. He T>eIongs to the 
Masonic lodge at North Lewisburg and the Knights Templar at L^rbana. 

Mr. Kimball is a stockholder and director in the People's Bank of WiuhI- 
stock. The wife of this subject was educated at Woodstock, Oliio, and grew 
to womanhood at this place. Her father was a buggy maker and black- 
smith at Woodstock and died here when the wife of subject was small. 
Her mother died February 17, 1917. They hafl three children. Martha I''.., 
Charles E. and Lucy D., wife of subject. 



JACOB M. SHAMBAUGH. 

Jacob M. Shambaugh, one of the most progressive farmers of Irbana 
township, this county, and widely recognized as one of the leading breeders 
of pure-bred Poland-China (large type) hogs in this part of the state, is a 
native of the old Keystone state, but has been a resident of this county 
since the days of his young manhood. He was born in York county, I'enn- 
sylvania, January 24, 1872, son of Jacob and Elizabeth ( Burkh.eimer) Shani- 



CHAMPAIGX COUXTY, OHIO. 20I 

baugh, both natives of that same state, who spent their last days tliere. '1 he 
senior Jacob Shambaugh was reared a farmer and. when a young- man, came 
over into Ohio and settled on a farm in the vicinity of Alansfield. Presently 
he returned to Pennsylvania, where he married and settled down on a farm 
in York county, and there spent the remainder of his life. He and his wife 
were the parents of five children, of whom the subject of this sketch was 
the third-born, the others being David, William, Minnie and Aimie. 

Reared on the home farm in York county, Pennsylvania, Jacob A I. 
Shambaugh received his education in the schools of that county and when 
but a boy began working as a farm hand on his own account. When he was 
nineteen years of age he came to Ohio and began working on a farm in this 
county. He was married at the age of twenty-four and then rented a farm 
of four hundred and eightv^ acres in Union township, where he remained for 
two years, at the end of which time he moved fartlier north in the count\- 
and there rented a farm for four years. Pie then rented a farm in Urbana 
township, three years later moving to the Pettigrew place, in that same town- 
ship, where he remained for two years, at the end of which time, in 1907, he 
moved to the Pledges farm of three hundred and sixty-five acres in that same 
township' where he ever since has made his home and where he has very 
successfully engaged in general farming and stock raising. For years Mr. 
Shambaugh has given particular attention to the breeding of Poland-China 
liogs for stock purposes and annuall}- sells from one hundred to one hundred 
and fifty hogs for this purpose, long having been rec<_)gnized as one of the 
leading breeders of this type of swine in Ohio. With his hogs Mr. Sham- 
baugh has won enough ribbons to form a good-sized blanket, wliich he dis- 
plays with his exhibits at county and state fairs. In 1913 lie carried ofi:'*the 
first prizes for both boars and sows in the Poland-China class at the state 
fair and has always carried off honors at the count v fair — that is, ever 
since he entered into the breeding business on something like an extensixe 
scale, about twelve years ago. Mr. Shambaugh is a Republican and during 
his residence in Union township served for three years as supervisor of 
highway construction in that township. 

In 1896 Jacob M. Shambaugh was united in marriage to Jeannette 
Wagner, daughter of Joseph and Nancy W^agner, of Clark county, and to 
this union five children have been born, Amos, Joseph. Margaret, Anna 
Mary and Minnie, all of whom are at home. The Shambaughs are meml)ers 
of the Baptist church and take a proper part in church work, as well as in 
the general social activities of the communits' in which they li\-e. Mr. Sham- 
baugh is a member of the lodges of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 



202 CH VMl'Air.N COUNTY. OHIO. 

at Urbana. of the Knights of Pytliias at Mechanicsburg and of the Junior 
Order of United American Mechanics at Mutual, in which latter lodge he 
has held all the ''chairs". He carries on his farming in accordance with 
up-to-date methods and is widely known throughout the county as one of 
the progressive agriculturists of this section. 



ROWLAND COTTON MOULTON. 

One of the sterling pioneer citizens of Champaign county, whose name 
is deserving of perpetuation on the pages of local history, was the late Row- 
land Cotton Moulton, of Rush townshij). He was born in West Randolph, 
Vermont, P^ebruary 5, 182 1. He was a son (jf Phineas and Mariah (Cotton) 
Moulton, natives of Vermont, where they grew up, married and established 
their home, spending their lives there on a farm. Their family consisted of 
two sons and eleven daughters. One of the daughters, Lavinia, taught music 
tliree years in Mechanicsburg, Ohio. 

Rowland C. Moulton grew to manhood in Vermont and was educated 
in the public schools and the academy at West Randolph. He read law and 
was admitted to the bar. When a young man he went to Wisconsin, being 
a pioneer of that state, later locating at Grand Detour, Illinois, where an 
uncle had preceded him. He became a successful lawyer, specializing in set- 
tling estates. He subsequently moved to Woodstock, Champaign county, 
Ohio, where he did a great deal of the legal work of Erastus Martin. 

• Mr. Moulton was married in Rush townshii) to Olive Pearl Howard, 
who was born in that township, and there she grew to womanhood - and 
attended a private school at Mechanicsburg. Her birth occurred on Febru- 
ary 3, 1832. She is a daughter of Anson and Olive (Pearl) Howard. Mr. 
Howard and wife were natives of Hampton, Connecticut. In 18 17 they 
came to Champaign county, Ohio, locating among the pioneers of Rush town- 
ship, Mr. Howard buying military land. He developed a good farm and 
became one of the leading farmers and stockmen of his locality. He was 
influential in public affairs, and served as county commissioner. He also 
took an active part in the Christian church. The brick house which he built 
on his farm in Rush township is now occupied by Mrs. .\[oulton, widow of 
the subject of this memoir. Mr. and Mrs. Howard spent die rest of their 
lives on this farm, dying here many years ago. The}- had three sons and 
one daughter, namely: Anson Pearl Howard married Elizabeth Jane Mc- 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. JO;, 

Donald, became an extensive farmer in Rush townsiiip where he died some 
time ago; George P., deceased; married Celesta Chapman, of Woodstock, 
and she later married a Mr. Purcell; Charles Philip died in infancy; Olive 
Pearl, who married Mr. Monlton, of this sketch. 

Two children were born to Rowland C. Monlton and wife, namely: 
Olive Pearl Monlton, died wdien four years old. and Mary, who married 
Charles Bell Whiley, an attorney and banker of Lancaster. Oliio. and they 
have two children, namely : Dorothy Bell Whiley, who married Philip 
Rising Peters, a banker of Lancaster, who has three children, namely : MarA' 
Idelle, Philip Rising and Henry Charles, who were twin sons. Olive Pearl 
AAHiilc}- is single and living at home. 

After his marriage Mr. Monlton located on the farm where his widow- 
is still living, in Rush townsiiip, and here he spent the rest of his life. He 
was a successful farmer and took great interest in his fine stock, especially 
the raising and breeding of Rambouillet sheep and Shorthorn cattle. Pie 
^\•as a loyal -RepublTcan. He was a member of the Episcopal church. He 
Avas a man of honor and bore an imtarnished reputation. The death of 
^Ir. Moulton occurred on May 2y, 1908. 



TOHN S. McCARTY. 



John S. McCarty. farmer of Rush township, (■hampaign county, was 
born on the old home farm in this township, Noveml^er 19. 1865. He has 
been content to spend his life in his native locality, rather than seek uncertain 
fortune in other counties or states. He is a son of Enoch and Rebecca 
(Morgan) McCarty. The father was born on Januar}^ 11. 1833, in this 
county, and he was a son of Stephen McCarty, of Virginia, from which 
state he came to Champaign county, Ohio, in an early day, built a log cabin 
in the woods, cleared and developed a good farm and here spent the rest 
of his life. Rebecca Morgan was born in Wayne township, this county, and 
is still living on the home place. She is a daughter of Abel Morgan, who 
tirst married Naomi Cox. and secondly Keziah Blair, of this county. Mr. 
Morgan devoted his life to farming. He went to Kansas in later }-ears and 
died there. He was the father of eight children, four l)v each wife. To 
Stephen McCarty and wife six children were born, namely : Betsy Ann, 
who first married John Stowe, and secondly a Mr. Meyers : James, who is 
farming in Wayne township, married, first. Sallie Ann Leese, and secondly 
Nancy Johnston ; John married Minerva Johnston, moved to Auglaize county. 



204 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

Ohio, and died there; Daniel married Angeline Zimmerman, of Auglaize 
county; Enoch, father of the subject of this sketch, and Thomas, who died 
in early life. 

Enoch McCarty devoted his life to general farming and stock raising. 
He was a Republican, but was never active in political affairs. His family 
consisted of but two children, namely: Sarah Louise, who married John \\\ 
Katchford, a farmer of Urbana township; John S., of this sketch. 

John S. McCarty grew to manhood on the home farm and was educated 
in the public schools. He has always lived on the homestead and has devoted 
his life successfully to general agricultural pursuits. He owns a finely 
improved and well cultivated farm of three hundred and twenty-four acres 
in Rush township. He has a pleasant home and such outbuildings as his 
needs require. He raises a good grade of live stock and breeds a good many 
cattle. He raises large quantities of grain which he feeds, for the most part, 
to cattle and hogs, preparing several carloads each year for the market. 

Mr. McCarty was married on December 22, 1891, to Susie Cushman. 
of Woodstock, this county, where she grew to womanhood and attended 
school. She is a daughter of Charles A. Cushman, a sketch of whom appears 
on anodier page of this work, to which the reader is respectfully directed. 
One child has been born to Mr. and Mrs. McCarty, Charles E. McCart}-, 
whose birth occurred on September 7, 1907. 

Politically, Mr. McCarty is a Republican, but he has never aspired for 
office. He is a member of the Universalist church at Woodstock. 



JOHN H. WOOLENHAN. 

John H. Woolenhan, a well-known building contractor at Urbana and 
an honored veteran of the Civil War, is a native son of Ohio and has lived 
in this state all his life, a resident of Urbana since 1887. H^e was born on 
a farm in the neighboring county of Logan on September 25, 1840, son of 
Joseph and Hannah (Havens) Woolenhan, the former a native of the state 
of Marylrmd and the latter of this state, whose last da\'s were spent in Logan 
county. 

Josei)h Woolenhan came to this state from Maryland in the day> of liis 
young manhood antl presently acquired a tract of unimproved land in Logan 
county and proceeded to clear and de\elop the same. After his marriage lo 
a flaughter of one of the i)i(^neers of that neighborhood he estalilished his 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 205 

Iiome on the place he had taken and there he and his wife spent their last 
days, useful and influential members of that pioneer coniniunit\ . Joseph 
AA'oolenhan originally was a Whig in his political affiliations, hut upon the 
organization of the Republican party cast his lot and allegiance with tliat 
party and remained a stanch Repu1)lican to the time of his death. He and 
his wife were earnest members of the Methodist Episcopal church and were 
helpful in all neighborhood good works. They were tlie ])arents of two 
children, the subject of this sketch having had a sister, So])hia. long since 
deceased. 

John H. Woolenhan grew up on the paternal farm in Logan county and 
received a limited schooling in the somewhat primitive schools of that time 
and place, the school house in which he received his schooling having been a 
little old log school house of the type familiar in pioneer days, with slabs 
for seats and but the crudest helps to learning. As the onl}- son of tlie family 
he w-as from the days of his boyhood a xalued aid to his father in the labors 
of improving and developing the home place and w-as \vorking at home when 
the Civil War broke out. Though but twenty years of age at the time 
President Lincoln issued his first call for volunteers he enlisted for service 
in the Union army, on April 22, 1861, becoming a private of Company A. 
Thirteenth Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, with whicli command he 
served until the expiration of the three-months term of ser\ice on w-hicfi his 
enlistment was based. Three days after his return home from that term 
of service he re-enlisted and went to the front as a memljer of Company G, 
First Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Lifantry, and was mustered into the service 
for the second time at Dayton, being sent thence to Cincinnati and later to 
Louisville, where the command was organized and attached to the Depart- 
ment of Ohio. Later the First Ohio was attached to the Fourth Army 
Corps, Army of the Cumberland, under General Thomas and General W'ard, 
and in that service Mr. Woolenhan took part in the battle of Shiloh, the 
siege of Corinth, on to Huntsville, Alabama, and then jjarticipated in the 
battle of Stone's River, in which latter engagement he was taken prisoner 
by the enemy and held for some little time before being exchanged. After 
rejoining his regiment he participated in the battles at Chickamauga, Mis- 
sionary Ridge, Kenesaw Mountain, Resaca, Dallas and numerous skirm- 
ishes. He served under Sherman during the Atlanta campaign and at tlie 
close of the war received his discharge at Chattanooga, Tennessee. 

Upon the completion of his military service John H. \A cnilenhan returned 
home and resumed the pursuits of peace on his father's farm. He married 
in 1866 and continued farming, at the same time taking uj) the carpenter 



_'06 CHAMPAIGN COUiXTY, OHIO. 

trade and prtsently became an expert Iniilder, after awhile giving his whole 
attention to that vocation. In 1887, seeking a wider held for his building 
operations, Air. Woolenhan moved to Urbana, started in business there as a 
Ituilding contractor and has ever since been thus engaged in that city, being- 
one of the best-know n builders in Champaign county. Not long after taking 
up his residence in Urbana, Mr. Woolenhan was made a member of that 
city's police force and for fifteen years served in that capacity. He is a 
stanch Republican and has ever given a good citizen's attention to local civic 
aflairs, an ardent advocate of good government. 

In 1866, in Logan county, John H. Woolenhan was united in marriage 
to Anna Ferguson, of Rochester, New York, and to that union three daugh- 
ters have been born, namely Jennie, who married Wesley Smith, of Urbana, 
now residing at Cleveland, where he is serving as auditor for the Adams 
Express Company, and has two children, l/'aul S. and Louise ; Minnie, pro- 
prietor of a millinery store at Urbana, who married Grant Wooley, an 
Urbana traveling man, and Lelah, who married Frank Conyers, an Url^ana 
jeweler, and has one child, a son, George. Mr. and Mrs. \Voolenhan are 
members of the Methodist Episcopal church and take a proper interest in 
church work, Mr. Woolenham is an active member of W. A. Brand Post No. 
98, Grand Army of the Republic, in which he has held nearly all the otitices 
at one time and another, and takes a warm interest in the affairs of that 
patriotic organization. 



ROBliRT EARL HUMPHREYS. 

Robert Earl Humphreys, head of the firm of Humphreys & Son, pro- 
prietors of the oldest undertaking establishment in Champaign county, and 
for years one of the best-known citizens of Urbana, is a nati\'e son of Ohio 
and has lived in this state all his life. He was born on a farm in the vicinit\ 
of Enon, in the neighboring county of Clark, Ma\ 11, 1872. son of George 
H. and Ida ].. (Miller) Humphreys, both of whom were born in that same 
county and the latter of whom is still living at her comfortal)le home in 
Urbana. 

In a memorial sketch presented elsewhere in this \-olume and relating to 
the late George Harvey Humphreys, an Ixjnored \ eteran of the Civil War 
and for vears engaged in the undertakmg business at L-'rbana, who died at 
his home in that citv on February 27. it)i(>. there is set out at c()nsideral)le 
Icngtli something of the hislory <>f the Huinphre_\s and .Miller families in 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 20J 

this part of the state, and the attention of the reader is respectfully called 
to that sketch for further details of a genealogical character in this connec- 
tion. Sufifice it to say, for the purposes of this present narrative, that George 
H. Humphreys was born in Clark county, this state, on November 27, 1842, 
a son of James and Catherine (Kiefer) Humphreys, the former of whom 
was born in Virginia and the latter in Maryland, who were married in the 
spring of 1824 and settled on a farm in Clark county, this state, where they 
became useful and influential pioneers and where they spent the remainder 
of their lives, the former living to nearly eighty years of age. Of their ten 
children, George H. Humphreys was the ninth in order of birth. He left 
Williamsburg College when eighteen years of age to enlist for service in 
behalf of the Union cause during the Civil War and went to the front with 
the Sixteenth Ohio Batten-, with which command he served from August,. 
1861, to August, 1865, being mustered out with the rank of corporal. After 
his marriage in 1868 he continued to live in Clark county, engaged in farm- 
ing, until 1872, when he moved to Urbana, where he bought an old estab- 
lished undertaking establishment and continued engaged there as a funeral 
director until his retirement and transfer of the business to his son and for 
years his partner, the present head of the business. George H. Humphre}s 
and wife were the parents of two sons, the subject of this sketch having 
had a younger brother, Harry French, born on October 8, 1876, who died 
at the age of four years and two months. 

Robert E. Humphreys was but an infant when his parents moved from 
the farm to Urbana and he was reared in that city, being made familiar with 
the details of his father's business from the days of his boyhood. Upon com- 
pleting the course in the Urbana high school he entered Wittenberg College 
at Springfield, and after three years of study there took a course of one year 
at the Cincinnati Business College, at the end of which course he became 
actively connected with his father in the undertaking business at I'rbana and 
in 1892 was made a partner of his father, the firm thereafter 1)eing known 
as George H. Humphreys & Son, that mutually agreealjle arrangement con- 
tinuing until in 191 5, in which year the elder Humphreys retired, selling his 
interest in the concern to his son, who has since continued the business, 
which is now conducted under the firm name of Humphre}s & Son, R. E. 
Humphreys having admitted his son, R. M. Humphreys. t<i ]>artnership in 
the concern. For ten years after he became a partner in the l)usiness R. F.. 
Humphreys traveled for the Spring-field Metallic Casket Company, calling 
on the wholesale trade throughout the East. The concern of which lie is 
tlie head is the oldest undertaking estalilishment in Champaign countv and 



2o8 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

one of the best equipped in the state. For forty-three years its business was 
carried on at the southeast corner of Church and Main streets and after Mr. 
Humphreys bought out his father's interest and assumed control of the 
business he bought the old Stadler home and converted the same into an 
undertaking establishment, at the same time adding to his equipment until 
he now has eveiything thoroughly up to date and modern in appointment. 
Mr. Humphreys is a Republican. Fraternally, he is a member of all the 
local Masonic bodies, including the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite and Con- 
sistory, of Dayton Ohio, and is a noble of the Ancient Arabic Order of 
Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, affiliated with Antioch Temple, at Dayton. He 
also is a member of the United Commercial Travelers' Association and of 
the local lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and in the affairs of 
all these organizations takes a warm interest. 

On Noveml>er 24, 1894, Robert E. Humphreys was united in marriage 
to Rovilla Edna Mumpher, daughter of John J. and Augusta (Gest) Mumpher, 
and to this union one child has been born, a son, Robert ^lumphcr Humi^h- 
reys, who is associated with his father in the undertaking- business. 



HENRY D. McDonald. 

Henr\ D. McDonald, one of the Ijest known merchants of Urbana for 
half a century, was born in the city October 5, 1831. and died here October 
(J, 1901. His whole career Avas spent in the city of his birth and such w'as 
liis life that he merited the high esteem in which he was held by all those who 
knew him. He was a son of Duncan and Eleanor (Wallace) McDonald, 
his father being one of the earliest merchants of the city. The history of 
the McDonald family from the time they left Scotland until they located in 
Urbana is given in the sketch of Duncan McDonald elsewhere in this volume. 

Henrv D. AfcDonald was reared in Urbana and educated in its public 
schools. He spent his boyhood vacations in his father's store and l)efore 
reaching his majority had g-ained an intimate knowledge of his father's busi- 
ness. His father retired from the business in i860 and at that time turned 
the store over to his sons. For forty years he was engaged in business and 
during these two score of years he became as well known by the ]ieople of 
the county as any man living in it. 

It seems Htting to make special mention of his ability as a buyer of dry 
goods. He had gfxxl taste and was often offered positions in the T^ast while 



ClIAMPAIGX COUNTY. OHIO. 20g 

Lu\iiig- goods, l)iit always refused them, preferring to remain in Qrbana. 
His- store had the best goods which the markets of New York could provide 
and in his annual trips to that city he selected the highest price goods which 
he thought could be sold in the county. His store set the pace in fashions 
for half a century and it was to his credit that he educated the people of the 
county to a realization of higher notions of art in the matter of sartorial 
raiment. 

Henry D. McDonald was married November i8, 1853. to Leah Read, a 
daughter of Joel and Leah Read. To this union were born six children : 
Joel R.. born August 9, 1854, died July 2t,, 1896; Mary, born October 31, 
]856. married Charles Brown; Emily, born May 9, 1864, died October 31, 
1897: she married C. C. Glessner; Harry R., born November 18, 1866; Leah, 
Ixirn June 7, 1872, now residing in Urbana; William Wallace, born Decem- 
ber 12, 1875, died June i, 1880. The mother of these children died, May 
15, 1878. Mr. McDonald later married Elsie Critchfield. a daughter of 
Enoch and ^Laria Critchfield. 

Mr. McDonald was a Republican in politics and while he was interested 
in the general civic development of his city and county, yet he never made 
an}- attempt to court political favor. He was a member of the Presbyterian 
church. He will be remembered by the citizens of the older generation as a 
quiet and unostentatious man, below- the medium height, of genteel appear- 
ance and a man who always attended strictly to his own affairs. He was 
one of the last of the ATcDonalds to engage in business and his career was 
a fitting close to the example set by the earlier members of the family in 
Champaign county. 



JOSEPH CARL NEER. 

Prof. Joseph C. Neer, county superintendent of schools for Champaign 
count\% is a native son of this county and has lived here all his life with the 
exception of a few months during his childhood when he lived in Kansas. 
He was born on a farm in Urbana township on November 16, 1875, son of 
Joseph and Sarah (Chance) Neer. both of whom also were born in this 
count}-, the former in Concord township and the latter in Mad River town- 
ship, both the Neers and the Chances being old pioneer families in Cham- 
])aign countv. Joseph Neer was a farmer and continued engaged in that 
vocation in this county until 1876, when he moved with his family to Kansas, 
■ (14a) 



2IO CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

where his wife died the same year. Xot long afterward he disposed of his 
holdings in that state and moved on down into Texas, where he spent the 
remainder of his life, his death occnrring some years ago. 

Joseph C. Xeer was luit eight months old when his mother died and 
shortly after that sad event his father sent him hack to the old family home 
in this county and he was here reared 1)\ his uncle and aunt, Thomas and 
jane Hupp. Upon completing the course in the common schools he began 
teaching in one of the district schools of Concord township and for four 
}ears taught in one district there, the school being conducted in a small one- 
room building. Meanwhile he was in attendance on the summer courses in 
Wittenberg College at Springheld and upon completing the course there was 
graduated from that institution with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. When 
the schools of Concord township were consolidated Professor Neer was 
made superintendent of the townshiji high school and held that position for 
four years, at the end of which time he was called to accept the principalship 
of tlie South Ward school in Urbana. a position he occupied for seven years, 
rendering such excellent service there that he then was. made principal of 
the Urbana high school and was occupving that position when, in 1914, 
upon the crea.tion of the new ofifice of county superintendent of schools, under 
the new sdiool law, he was elected the first county superintendent of schools 
for Champaign county, which position he now occupies and in the perform- 
ance of the duties of which he has rendered a very distinct service in behalf 
of the schools of this county, coming to be recognized widely as one of the 
leading school men in this part of the state. Professor Neer is a Repul> 
lican in his political affiliation and has for years given his close attention to 
local political affairs, a most earnest exponent of good government. 

On September 8, 1898, Prof. J. C. Neer was united in marriage to 
Avanell Loudenback, daughter of Elijah and Sidney (Kelly) Loudenback, 
and to this union has been born one child, a son, Robert. Professor and 
Airs. Neer are members of Grace Methodist Episcopal church and take an 
earnest interest in the general beneficences of the same, the Professor being" 
a member of the official board of the church. The Professor is a Knight 
Templar and Royal i\rch Mason, present junior warden of the local Masonic 
lodge, and is a noble of the Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mvstic 
Shrine, affiliated with Antioch Temple at Dayton, and takes an active interest 
in Masonic afifairs. As the first incumbent of tht- office of county superin- 
tendent of schools in Champaign count)-. Professor Neer faced a rather tax- 
ing task upon opening that office and in initiating the system under which 
the schools of the countv have since done such admirable work, but his km'-- 



CHAMPAIGX COUNTY, OHIO. 211 

experience as a school man and his thorough famiharity with conditions both 
in the city and county schools, gave him the ability to meet the task intelli- 
gently and with full knowledge of the needs of the schools and his course 
as superintendent has met with the warm approval not only of the patrons 
of the schools throughout the countv, but of the local school authorities. 



EDWIN M. GUYTON. 



Edwin M. Guyton, a farmer of Rush township, Champaign county, was 
born north of INIutual, Union township, this county, November 6, 1864. He 
is a son of Samuel and Nancy (Yeazel) Guyton, the father a native of Clark 
county, this state, and the mother was born in Union township, Champaign 
county. Samuel Guyton was brought to Union tmvnship, this county, when 
young and here he spent his boyhood days and attended the common schools. 
As a young man he took up farming north of Mutual, was married and spent 
the rest of his life on a farm in that vicinity. His death occurred there in 
October, 1913, at the age of seventy-two years. His wife died in June, 
1905. They were members of the Methodist Episcopal cliurch. To these 
parents six children were born, namely: Belle is the wife of Henry Ackles, 
of Atlantic, Iowa; Mary, unmarried, is a milliner and li\es in Louisiana: 
Edwin M., of this sketch; Minnie, who married Charles Black, is now 
deceased ; Nellie married Robert Ray and they live at Norwood, Ohio ; 
Myrtle is the wife of Charles Gaver, a farmer of I'nion township, this 
county. 

Edwin M. Guyton grew to manhood on the home farm and he was 
educated in the Yankee Hill school, in this county. He continued to work 
on the home farm until his marriage, which took place in September, 1(88/. 
to Jennie Parker, a native of Union township, Champaign county, and here 
she grew to womanhood and attended the public schools. Slie is a daughter 
of Erank J. and Annie (Romine) Parker, the father a native of New Hamp- 
shire and the mother a native of Goshen township, this county. Mr. Parker 
spent his boyhood in New England, coming to Champaign county, Ohio, 
when a young man and located in Union township, before the bi-eaking out 
of the Civil War. When hostilities began he enlisted in Company I, Sixt\- 
sixth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, in which he served until the close of the 
war, proving to be a brave and efficient soldier of the I'nion. After his 
honorable discharge he returned lionie and engaged in general farming in 



212 CIIAATl'ATGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

Union township until his death in 1875, his widow surviving until i8yo. 
Jennie, who married Mr. Guyton, of this review, was their only child. 

Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Guyton, namely : Gail 
Parker, born October 9, 1890; Lois Marie, born September ly, 1904, and 
P^ ranees died at the age of nine months. 

After his marriage Mr. Guyton located on a farm in I'nion lowtihsip. 
near Mutual, where he resided two years, then moved lo Rush township and 
bought the Stephen K. Smith place of seventy-three acres, and here he has 
carried on general farming and stock raising ever since, with very satisfac- 
tory results. He keeps a good grade of cattle, hogs and horses. He moved 
here in 1891. He has made many important improvements on the place and 
has a good group of buildings. 

Mr. Guyton is a Republican. He has been a member of the school board 
at W^oodstock for some time and is now ])i-esident of tlie board. He belongs 
to the Grange. 



TRUMAN B. GEST. 



Truman B. Gest, a prominent retired farmer and Hxe-stock dealer of 
this county and former general manager of the L'rbana I'acking Company, 
with residence at Urbana, is a native son of Champaign county and has lived 
here all his life. He was born on a farm in the immediate vicinity of Mt. 
Tabor on February 16, 1855, son of William B. and Harriet Matilda (Parke) 
Gest, he a native of Greene county, this state, and she a native of New 
Jersey, and whose last days were spent in this county. 

William B. Gest was a son of Jeremiah and Parmelia Gest, the former 
of whom was a New Englander and the latter a nati\-e of (3hio, wlu^e last 
days were spent in Greene county. Jeremiah Gest was one of the early set- 
tlers and best-known residents of Greene county, a miller and large land- 
owner. He and his wife were the parents of three sons, the Hon. Joseph 
Gest. one-time prosecuting attorney for Greene county, former representa- 
tive in Congress from that district and a large landowner, who took a very 
prominent part in the public affairs of his home district; Truman B. Crest, 
who became a wealthy merchant tailor, the scene of his business activities 
having beeji in Maryland and Virginia and whose last days were spent in 
Urbana, where he died at the age of eighty-three years, and William B. 
Gest. the father of the subject of this biographical sketch. \\'i]liam !>. Gest 
Q-rew to manhood in his home count\- and was there married. Aliout 1848 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 213 

lie came to Champaign county and bought a farm in the Alt. Tabor neigli- 
l)orliood, where he established his home and where he remained until his 
retirement from the farm and removal to Urbana about 1883. He was one 
of the large landowners and stockmen of this part of the state and was wide- 
ly known on account of his extensive operations. William B. Gest died in 
1888, at the age of sixty-three years and his widow survived him for twelve 
years, her death occurring at Urbana in 1900, she then being seventy-eight 
years of age. She was an active member of the Methodist Episcopal church 
and was ever a leader in local good works. William B. Gest and wife were 
the parents of four children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the 
third child born, the others being as follow : Augusta, who married J. J. 
Mumpher, of Urbana, and has three children, Rovilla, wife of Earl Humph- 
ries, of Urbana; Ethel, wife of Clyde Brown, of Seattle, Washington, and 
Helen; Laura, who died in 1883, at the age of thirty-two years, and Belle, 
who married J. F. Kimball, of Mechanicsburg, this county, and died in Feb- 
ruary, 1888. 

Truman B. Gest grew up on the home farm in this county and early 
began paying particular attention to the live-stock business. In addition to 
his extensive general farming he became a large dealer in livestock, for 
eight years buying cattle for Nelson Morris, of Chicago, and for twelve years 
buyer for Alexander Greenwald. He was one of the most active promoters 
of the organization of the Urbana Packing Company in 1906 and was made 
president and general manager of that concern upon its establishment. Air. 
Gest remained as manager of the packing plant until 19 15. when he retired 
from active business. He has a very pleasant home in Urbana and is very 
comfortably situated. Mr. Gest retains his \\ell-im[)roved fann in Salem 
township and continues to take much interest in the farming and stock-feeding 
operations carried "on there. He is a Republican in his political affiliations 
and has ever taken a good citizen's interest in local civic affairs, ])ut has not 
been a seeker after public office. 

On December 15, 188 1. Truman B. Gest was united in marriage to 
Mamie B. Enoch, of West Liberty, this state, daughter and only child of 
John and Amelia (Taylor) Enoch, prominent residents of that place, the 
former of whom was a son of John and Elizabeth Enoch, natives of Vir- 
ginia and early settlers at \\'est Liberty. To Mr. and Mrs. Gest five chil- 
dren have been born, namely: Laura E.,'wife of George L. Thomas, buyer 
and assistant manager of the "Hub"" .store at Chicago, and who had one 
child, a daughter. Catherine ^^'., who died on March 21, 190Q, at the age 
of seven years and six months ; Amelia, who married \\' . G. Bailey, super- 



214 CH\J\1)''AIGK COUNTY, OHIO. 

intendent of the Cincinnati division of the Big Fonr railroad, with head- 
quarters at Springfield, this state, and has one child, a son, William Gest : 
William B., of Toledo, this state, a car-route man for the G. H. Hammond 
Company, of Chicago; Belle K., at home, and Harriet Eliza, wife of Will- 
iam Marvin Johnson, of Urliana, connected with the W. B. Marvin Com- 
pany and also a farmer and stockman. Mr. Gest is a Mason and a member 
of the local lodge of the Knights of Pythias, in the affairs of both of which 
organizations he takes a warm interest. He and his wife are members of 
the Pres%terian church and have ever taken a proper interest in church 
work, as well as in the general good works of the community, ever helpful 
in promoting all mo^-ements designed to advance the common welfare here- 
about. Mr. Gest is a public-spirited citizen and has done much to promote 
tlie industrial and commercial activities of Urbana and of the county at 
large. As a stockman there are few men in that line in this part of the 
state better known than he and he has done much to advance the live stock 
industrv throughout this section. 



ELIJAH J. HANNA. 

Elijah J. Hanna, an honored veteran of the Civil War and a well- 
known retired merchant of Urbana, is a native of Virginia, but has been a 
resident of this county since he was fifteen years of age. He was born in 
Nicholas county, Virginia, now a part of West Virginia, x\pril 7, 1844, son 
of Moses and Sarah (Kelfison) Hanna, both also natives of the Old Domin- 
ion, the former born in Nicholas county and the latter in Pocahontas count}-. 

Moses Hanna was a farmer and stockman and spent all his life in his 
native county, his death occurring there not long after the close of the Ci\il 
War. He was twice married. His first wife, Sarah Kellison, died in 1854. 
leaving five children, of whom the sul)ject of this sketch was the second 
in order of birth, the others being as follow : Nathan, deceased ; David, who 
died during the time of the Civil War; Elizabeth, of Kanawha county. West 
Virginia, and C. B. Hanna, a well-known retired farmer of Mad River town- 
ship, this county, now living at Urbana and a biographical sketch of whom 
is presented else^vhere in this volume. 

Reared on the farm, Elijah J. Hanna received a limited schooling in 
the primitive schools of his home neighborhood. He was ten years of age 
when his mother died and when fifteen years of age, in T859. i-^ame o\'er into 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY. OHIO. 21 5 

Ohio and located in this county, presently becoming engaged as a clerk in 
a store in Concord township and was living there when the Civil War broke 
out. In the fall of 1861 he enlisted for service in the Union army as a mem- 
ber of Company C. Sixty-sixth Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Capt. 
J. O. Baird and Col. Charles Candy, and with that command went to Vir- 
ginia to join Shields' army. At the battle of Cedar Mountain Mr. Hanna 
was shot in the right shoulder, the bullet passing through his body and com- 
ing out near the backlx>ne. Thus seriously wounded he was taken captive by 
the enemy and was sent to Libby Prison. About a month later he was 
paroled and sent to Ft. Delaware, where about six months later he received 
his honorable discharge on a physician's certificate of disability and was sent 
home. Upon regaining his wonted health Mr. Hanna re-enlisted as a mem- 
ber of the Twelfth Ohio Cavalry and with that command went to Kentucky, 
thence to Tennessee and thence on with Sherman in that general's march to 
the sea, continuing his service until the close of the war, receiving his final 
discharge at Columbus, this state, in 1865. Upon the completion of his mil- 
itary service Mr. Hanna returned to this county and presently engaged in 
the mercantile business at Crayon and was thus engaged at that place until 
1903, in which year he moved to Urbana, where he opened a second-hand 
store and was engaged in that line for a couple of years, at the end of which 
time he retired from business and has since been living retired, continuing 
to make his home in Urbana. Mr. Hanna is a Republican and has ever 
given a good citizen's attention to local political affairs, but has not been a 
seeker after public office. 

In 1873, in Concord township, this county, Elijah J. Hanna was united 
in marriage to Margaret J. Crin, who was born in that township in Januar}-, 
1854, a daughter of William and Melissa (Barger) Crin, natives of Virginia 
and early settlers in this county, and to that union six children were born, 
namely: Anna Frances, who married J. K. Bosler, a farmer, who makes his 
home with Mr. Hanna in Urbana ; Zeda, who married Mary Kite and is 
living at St. Paris, this county, engaged in the railway mail service ; John, 
who married Ella Fitzpatrick and is engaged as a motorman on the street 
railway at Springfield, this state ; Charles Elmer, who also is engaged in the 
railway mail service, who married Hazel Blose and makes his home at 
Urbana; Commodore, unmarried, who is a broom-maker at Urbana, and 
Cecil Blanch, also unmarried, who likewise makes his home at Urbana. Mr. 
Hanna is an acti\'e member of Brand Post No. 98, Grand Army of the Repub- 
lic, at Urbana, and is the senior vice-commander of the same. He former- 
ly was a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, but is no longer 
actively affiliated with that order. 



l6 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 



A. H. MIDDLETOX, Al. D. 



Success in any enterprise demands that some person shall learn to do 
some thing better than it has been done before. It is especially true in the 
medical profession. As a successful general physician Dr. A. H. Middleton, 
of Cable, Champaign county, has done much for the cause of suffering- 
humanity and has won the evidences of deserved success for himself. He 
was born two and one-half miles southeast of Cable, Ohio, January 24, 
1863. a son of John and Mary (AlcCumber) Middleton. He is one of the 
best known representatives of this generation of the sterling and honored 
old Middleton "family, members of which ha^■e been prominent in the affairs 
of this section of the Buckeye state since pioneer days. A full history of 
the family will be found in the sketch of Judge Evan P. Middleton, editor 
of this work, on another page of this \olume. 

Dr. A. H. Middleton grew to manhood in his native community and 
received his education in the common schools of Wayne township. He 
began life for himself by teaching school, which he followed for five years 
in Wayne, Rush, Mad River and Adams townships. His services were in 
good demand and he ga\'e eminent satisfaction to both pupils and patrons. 
iVlthough giving ])romise of becoming one of the leading educators of this 
section of the state, he finally decided that the medical [jrofession had greater 
attractions for him and. aband(ining the school room, he entered the Cleve- 
land Homeopathic Medical College, where he spent three years, making an 
excellent record and .was grriduated witli the degree of Doctor of Medicine 
in 1887. On May 20th of that year he began practice at Cable, continuing 
until 1890. when he moved to Terre Haute, this county, but after a year 
there returned to Cable and has since practiced here. He enjoyed from the 
first a large and satisfactory^ patronage and takes high rank among the med- 
ical men of Champaign and adjoining counties. He has remained a close 
student of all that ])ertains to bis jirofession and has kept well abreast of the 
times. 

D(jCtor Middleton was married, on January 1. r.S88. to Alice Baker, a 
daughter of .\. J\. and Rebecca (^^'eaver) Ilaker. She was born in Mad 
lvi\er township, this countv. where she grew to womanhood and attended 
scIkjoI. In that township also her parents grew up ;ind married. Her 
grandparents. I'rederic and Lydia Baker, who came to Champaign county 
from Maryland, were pioneer settlers in Mad River township, where they 
spent the rest of their lives on a farm. .\. R. Baker also devoted his life to 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 2 1 ^^ 

farming- in AJad River townshii). His family consisted of fi\c children, one 
of whom died in infancy, namely: Harry: Effic married Brown Seibert : 
Gertrude married [Monroe Berry: Alice is the wife of Doctor Middleton. 
A. R. Baker died (m January i. 1917, and his wife died on February I'j, 
190J. 

The union of Doctor Aliddleton and wife resulted in the birth of four 
chiklren. only one of whom is now living, Rollin Perry, who married Nellie 
Gettles, and they have one child, Alice Jean. 

Politically, Doctor Middleton is a Republican and has long taken an 
abiding interest in public affairs. He has held the of^ce of justice of the 
l)eace and has also been health officer at Cable for a number of years, dis- 
charging his duties in both positions in an aljle, faithful and satisfactory 
manner. He belongs to the JNIethodi'^t E])iscopal church and is a trustee in 
the same. 



HORACi<: M. CROW. 

Horace >l. Cmw. city auditor of Urbana, former city solicitor and for 
years a practicing attorney in that cit} , was born in the city of Cincinnati 
on April 4. 1855, son of Thomas D. and Henrietta < Downs ) Crow, who 
located in Urbana early in the sixties. Thomas D. Crow was an attorney- 
at-law and upon locating at UrbaiKi engaged there in the practice of his 
profession and was thus engaged until his death, the greater part of that 
time being associated in practice \vTth his elder son, Herman D. Crow, who 
later moved West to the' state of Vv^rt^ington and served ele\en years on 
the supreme bench of that state and died on October 22. 1Q15. while in office. 

Upon completing the course in the Urbana i)ublic sclnjols, Horace Af. 
Crow entered Ohio Wesleyan University and after a course of two years 
there began teaching school and was thus engaged, in Champaign and Frank- 
lin counties, for three years, in the meantime studying law. Fie later be- 
came a clerk in a mercantile establishment at Urbana. but continued to study 
law, under the direction of his father and brother, and in December, 1878, 
was admitted to the bar and entered upon the practice of his profession at 
Urbana. In the spring- of 1881 he moved to \'an Wert, was married in the 
fall of the next year, and continued to make his home at \'an Wert until 
1884, serving- one term as deputy clerk of the courts while living- there. Upon 
his return to Urbana in 1884, Mr. Crow resumed the practice of law in that- 
city and was thus engagetl there until in h'ebruary, 1887, when lie moved to> 



2lH CHAiMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

C'olumlms, where lie entered upon the duties of the office of deputy in the 
office of the clerk of the state supreme court, to which he had been appointed, 
and upon the com])letion of his service in that capacity in 1893 returned to 
Urbana and resumed his practice. Tn 1895 he was elected city solicitor and 
served in that cap;icity until i8o(). in which year he re-entered the practice 
of the la\\ and has since been practicing alone. In 1910 Mr. Crow was 
elected cit>- auditor and is still serving- in that important public capacity. In 
1893. npon the organization of the Industrial Building and Loan Associa- 
tion at Urbana, Air. Crow was elected secretary of that association and has 
ever since occupied that position. 

It was on October 19, 1882, while living at Van Wert, that Horace M. 
Crow was united in marriage to Frances Kenaga, daughter of W. F. Kenaga 
and wife. Mr. and Mrs. Crow are members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church and take a proper interest in church work, as well as in the general 
>()cial activities of their home town. Mr. Crow is a member of the local 
-Masonic lodge and takes a warm interest in the affairs of the same. He is 
one of Urbana's active, public-spirited citizens and has been helpful in pro- 
moting nunierous agencies designed to advance the common welfare here- 
about. 



ALBERT C. NEFF 



Albert Cleveland Neff, manager of the Urbana Telephone Company 
and one of the best-known men in Champaign county, is a native son of 
this county and has lived here all his life, with the exception of some years 
spent in the telephone service in the neighboring cities of London, Belle- 
fontaine and Kenton. He was born at Terre Flaute. in Mad River town- 
ship, March 26, 1865, son of Jacob and Celesta (Baker) Neff, both of whom 
were born , in that same township, members of pioneer families in that part 
of the county, the former dying at his home in Mad River town.ship and 
the latter is living at Dayton, to which city she moved after the death of 
her husband. 

Jacob Neff was born on a pioneer farm in Mad River township on 
(Jctober 2, 1838. son of Samuel and Fdizabeth ( Strickler ) Neff, who came 
to this county from X'irginia in 1830 and settled on a I'arm in Mad River 
township, where they spent the remainder of their lives. Sanniel Neff be- 
came one of the most substantial and influential pioneers of the Terre Haute 
neighborhood and for twenty years served as trustee of his home township. 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 219 

lie also was elected to the office of justice of the peace, I)ut declined to serve 
in that capacity. He was one of the leaders in the local congregation of the 
Methodist church and rook an active part in all neighborhood good works. 
Samuel Neff died in 1865 and had lived to rear the largest family ever reared 
in ^fad River township, eighteen children. He was thrice married. By 
his hrst wife, Elizabeth Strickler, he had ten children, five of whotn, Isaac, 
Alary, Peter, David and Abraham, were l)orn in \'irginia. and live, John, 
Henry G., Joseph, Caroline and Jacob, in this county. The mother of these 
children died on March 23, 1840, and in Octoljer of that same year .Samuel 
Neff married Rachel Romick, who died in 1845, leaving four children. 
Michael. Barbara, Samuel R. and Daniel W. After the death of the mother 
of these children he married Rachael Landaker, who died in December, 
1863, 'I'l^l t" that union were born four children, Aaron. Caroline, Jonas and 
i'^mma. 

Reared on tlie home farm, Jacob Neff received his sch(x)ling- in the 
neighboring schools and early learned the trade of wagon-making, presentlv 
opening a wagon shop in the village of Terre Haute in partnership with 
•Xnanias Lutz, which he operated in connection v.itli his farming, and lj€came 
one of the best known men in that part of the coun.ty, his wagon shop-ever 
being a popular gathering place for the farmers of that \icinity upon their 
shopping- trips to the village. Jacob Neff married Celesta Baker, who also 
was born in that township, daughter of Peter and Ann Baker, pioneers 
of that neighborhood, and to that union three children were born, the sub- 
ject of this sketch having a sister, Clififie A., who married E. PI. Foltz, and a 
lirothcr, Adene, who is living in Dayton, Ohio. Jacob Neff died at Terre 
Haute in 1889 and his widow is still living in Dayton, Ohio. 

Albert C. Neff grew up at Terre Haute, receiving his schooling in the 
schools of that village, and earl}- i)repared himself for teaching, for fifteen 
years thereafter being engaged as a teacher in the schools of Mad River 
and Jackson townships and in the high school at Mutual, this county. In 
1899 he became connected with the office of the Central Pinion Telephone 
Company at P^rbana and a year later was made manager of the office of that 
company in the neighboring- county seat of Pondon, remaining thus engaged 
in that city for four years, at the end of which time he was given charge 
of the offices of the company at Belief ontaine and Kenton, serving as man- 
ager of those offices until 1904. He then returned to Urbana and was 
manager of the Central Union Telephone Company, until 1910, wheij the 
Crl)ana Telephone Company, an independent concern, oft'ered him the posi- 
tion of manager of the office and plant of that companv at P^rbana and he 



220 niAIVIl'AlGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

accepteci, evt-r since ser\ in^- in that capacity. During Mr. Neff's managerial 
connection with the Url^ana Telephone Company la^e has done much to 
extend the service in that city and adjacent territory and by the introduction 
of the modern automatic .system has done wonders in the way of populariz- 
ing- the service of the company with which he is connected. 

In j8.S(^ \ll)ert C. Xeff was united in marriage to Ida B. Fansler, 
daughter of ( icorge and Sarah Fansler, of Mad River township, and to 
this union two cliildren have ])een born, Esta and Hazel, both of whom are 
at li(tmc. The Xcffs are meml)ers of the Lutheran church. Mr. Neff is a 
Mason and an Odd Fellow and takes a warm interest in lodge affairs. He 
lias served as nolilc grand of the local lodge of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and as chief patriarch of the encampinent. Politically, he is an 
"independent." 



WALTER ELLSWORTH. 

Walter Ellsworth, a farmer of Rush townshii), Champaign county, was 
born August 2, 1861, in Plymouth county, Iowa. Me is a son of \\'illian: 
and Harriet (Kimball) Ellsworth, both natives of Rush township. Champaign 
county. Ohio. The paternal grandparents (jf the suliject of this sketch were 
Jacob and Sarah ( Runyon) Ellsworth, natives of A'ermont, from which 
state they came to Champaign county, Ohio, in an early day. locating on a 
farm in Rush township. The}- reared a large faniilx'. se\eral of their sons 
serving in the Cnion army during the Civil War. \\'illiam Ellsworth, wlio 
was one of the younger children, grew u]) on the home farm, and lie was 
educated in the public schools and was married in Rttsh township. In 1845 
he made the overland trip to Iowa in wagons. He was one of the pioneers 
of that state. He owned a good farm, which he developed from the virgin 
prairies, and spent the rest of his life in that state, dying near Sioux City. 
His family consisted of five children, namely : l-'rank is farming near Grand 
Valley. Corson county. South Dakota; Abbie married Ezra Woodward, of 
Ccjlumbus. Ohio; Walter, of this sketch; Henry is a farmer of Rush town- 
ship, this county; and Mary is the wife of Jacol) Swislier, of .Mechanics- 
burg. 

Tlie mother of the above named children married a second time, her 
last husband ])eing b^phraim Woodward, of Chester county. Pennsylvania, 
and an early settler of Wayne and Rusli townships, this county. His death 
occurred in i<)02 at the age of ninet\-one \ears. His widow surxived until 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 221 

1911, dying at the age of seventy-four years. One child, a daughter, was 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Woodward, namely; Jane, who is the wife of James 
Sparks, of Irwin Station, Ohio. 

Walter Ellsworth had little opportunity to obtain an education. He 
was a child when his parents brought him to Champaign county. As a box- 
he was bound out for four years to James McElroy. and he worked at dif- 
ferent places until he was married, July 13. 1884, to Estella Smuh, a native 
of \Voodstock, this county, where she grew to womanhood and attended 
school. She is a daughter of Philip A. and ]\Iary (Hopkins; Smidi, who 
spent their lives on a farm in Rush to\vnship. He died October 16, 1881. 
She died January 22, 19 10. They \vere members of the Christian church. 
Politically, Mr. Smith was a Democrat, and he was at one time trustee of 
his township. To these parents only two children were born, namely : Leon 
C, who is a conductor on the Norfolk & Western railroad, with headcjuar- 
ters in Columbus, married Gertrude Crossan, and they have one child, Philip 
H. ; and Estella, wife of Mr. Ellsworth, of this sketch; Eannie Walker is 
an adopted daughter. 

To Mf. and Mrs. Ellsworth two children have been born, namely: 
Truman, Avho is now employed at the Dupont Powder ^^'orks in Washing- 
ton ; and Howard, who died at the age of eighteen. 

After his marriage, Mr. Ellsworth located in Woodstock, this county. 
x\herc he continued to reside until 1886, when he bought his present farm of 
eighty acres in Rush township, which he has since operated with gratifving 
results, carrying on a general farming and dairying business. 

Politically, Mr. Ellsworth is a Republican. Eraternally, he belongs to 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at Woodstock. .Mrs. Ellswortli is 
a member of the Christian church at Woodstock. 



JESSE G. ROTKIN. 



Jesse G. Botkin, well-known florist and hot-house gardener at Crbana, 
proprietor of the well-appointed "East Lawn Gardens" at the edge of that 
city, is a native son of Ohio and has lived in this state all his life. He was 
born at Plattsville, in the neighboring county of Shelby, .March 5. 1869, 
son of Amos and Elizabeth (Vorris) Botkin, both of whom also were born 
in that same county. For a number of years after his marriage Amos 
Hotkin remained in Shelby county, wliere he was engaged in farming, and 



222 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

then moved to Clark county, where he estabhshed his home on a farm and 
where he is still living, being now in the eighty-fifth year of his age. To 
him and his wife seven children were born, of whom six are still living, 
but of whom only two are residents of Champaign county, the subject of 
this sketch having a sister, Mrs. Samuel NefT, living here. 

Having been but a child when he went with his parents from Shelby 
to Clark county, J. G. Botkin was reared on the home farm in the latter 
county and in the schools of that county received his early schooling. He 
supplemented that schooling by a course in Ohio VVesleyan University and 
two years after leaving that institution took up seriously the vocation of 
gardening and after a careful study of the technical side of that dilBcult 
vocation was made ground keeper and gardener for the A^ational Home for 
the Junior Order of United American Mechanics at Tiffin and laid out 
the present beautiful grounds of that institution. Two years later Mr. 
Botkin determined to go into gardening as a business and with that end in 
view came to Champaign county and began gardening on a tract of land 
he secured near King's Creek, in Salem township. A year later he moved 
to Urbana, where he bought nine acres of land on the edge of the town and 
there established his ''East Lawn Gardens," which have become so popular 
as a source of supply not only for choice garden products, but for the choice 
products of the florist's skill, among the people of Urbana and the county 
at large, Mr. Botkin long having been regarded as the leading market 
gardener and florist in Champaign county. When Mr. Botkin started "East 
Lawn Gardens" his financial means were somewhat limited and he was 
corajx:lled to start in a small way, his initial plant under glass consisting of 
but six hot-beds. He now has more than six thousand square feet under 
glass and more than two hundred and fifty hot-beds and in addition to his 
extensive florist business raises for market large ([uantities of celery and let- 
tuce and se\eral hundred of thousands of cabbage plants annually. He has 
his plant equipped with the Skinner irrigation system and has one of tlie 
best-equipped plants of the kind in this part of the state. Mr. Botkin is a 
Republican and gives a good citizen's attention to political afifairs, but has 
never been a seeker after public office. 

Li 1893, '^t Tiffin, this state, J. G. Botkin was united in marriage to Ella 
Kramer, daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth Kramer, and to this union seven 
children have been born, Wenner, Esther, Jesse Lee, Ethel, Morris, Theodore 
and Otto. Mr. and Mrs. Botkin are members of the First Methodist Epis- 
copal church at Urbana and take an interested part in church work and in 
the general social activities of the city. Mr. Botkin is a Mason and is a 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 223 

Knight Templar in that ancient order. He is past chancellor commander of 
the local lodge of the Knights of Pythias, a member of Salem Grange at 
King's Creek and an honorary member of the Junior Order of United Ameri- 
can Mechanics, and also past grand in Urbana Lodge, Indej^endent Order 
of Odd Fellows, in the affairs of all of which organizations he takes a warm 
interest. 



TOHX AI. EICHHOLTZ. 



John M. Eichholtz, one of the oldest and best-known retired farmers, 
of Champaign countv, ncnv living at Urbana, was born in Lancaster county, 
l^ennsylvania. August i, 1836, and was but three years of age when his par- 
ent, John and Mary (Alyers) Eichholtz. also natives of Lancaster county, 
drove across the countrv into Ohio seeking a new home in 1839. 

Upon coming lo this state the elder John Eichholtz rented a farm in 
tlie neighborhootl of Midway and lived there for one season, at the end of 
which time he moved to Salem township, this county, and there bought a 
tract of two hundred and sixty acres of partly improved land, paying for 
the same hfteen dollars an acre. .\l)out iifty acres of that tract had been 
cleared and there had been erected on the same a log cabin and a log barn. 
John luchholtz comi)]eted the clearing of the i)lace and made substantial 
improvements on the same, sjjcnding there the remainder of his life. His 
widow spent her last days in Urbana. Thev were the parents of nine chil- 
dren, of whom the subject of this sketch now is the onl}- sur\ivor, the others 
having been Jacob, Catherine. Ilenry. Mary, Solomon, Cynthia and tw<j whcj 
died in infancv. 

John M. I'j'chholtz \\as reared on the pioneer farm of his father in 
Salem township, receiving his schooling in the primitive scIkk^Is of that time 
and place, and from the da}s of his boyhood was a \alued assistant to his 
father in the lal)ors of developing and improving the home place. He 
remained at home until he was twenty-seven years of age and then went to 
Dayton, where he l)ecame employed in cooper shop, remaining there two 
years, at the end of which time he returned home, but after a winter spent 
there went to Stark county, this state, where he bought a small farm and 
where he was married. He later established his home on a better farm in 
that county and there he remained for twenty years, at the end of which 
time he came to this county and bought a (|uarter of a section of land near 
Kingston, in Salem township, not far from the home of his boyhood, and 



224 ClIAMP.vIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

tliere he lived until his retirement from the farm and removed to Urbana in 
1016. Some time after locating" in Salem township Mr. Eichholtz bonght 
the old Tallidtt farm of one hnndred and ten acres and in addition to his 
farm holdings is also the owner of considerable real estate in the city of 
L'rbana and is acconnted ([uite well-to-do. He has been a hard worker all 
his life and is ver\- jiroperly entitled to be called a self-made man, for the 
])ro[)erty he has accumnlated has been secnred through his own well-directed 
efforts. 

As noted above, it was shortly after he located in Stark county that 
John M. b'.ichholt.z was united in marriage to Almira Baer, of that county, 
wh(» died, leaving two children, daughters, .\nna. who married Bruner 
Kcnaga, who died, leaving two children, John and Grover, and who, after 
the death of her first husband married Thomas Allen, of Urbana, and died 
leaving another child, a daughter, Clara, who is noAV keeping- house for her 
grandfatlier. George Allen, of Urbana, and Alary, who died unmarried. 



GEORGE AV. STANDISH. 

George W. Standish, superintendent of the Champaign county infirm- 
ary and "poor farm," is a native son of Champaign county and has lived 
here all his life. He was born on a farm in Rush township on February 20, 
i860, son of George W. and Ellen (Riddle) Standish, and is a rep 
five in the ninth generation by direct descent from Capt. ■Miles Suhkh-^ii. 
one of the most famous of the Pilgrim Fathers, whose courtship of Pnscilla 
Mullens was commemorated by Longfellow, in his "Courtship of Miles Stan- 
dish," wherein it is pointed out that the bashful Captain Standish engaged 
the services of his friend, John Alden, to present his court to the sprightl\- 
Priscilla, whose heart, instead of responding to the Captain's plea, prompted 
lier to hint c(uite openly to John that he might fare well in a similar suit 
if he would but speak for himself. Though Captain Standish did not get 
the fair Priscilla, he presently did marry another of the Pilgrim maiden - 
and reared a family, the descendants of whom now form a considerable 
family, represented widely throughout the country. Alexander Standish 
(eldest son of Captain Miles Standish) married the eldest daughter of 
John Alden and Priscilla and the subject of this sketch is a direct descendant 
of them. Capt. Miles Standish came with the Pilgrims to America in i()20 
and led the exploring expeditions to discover a suitable place for settlement. 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 225 

He was appointed military captain of the colony in 1O61 and was thus the 
first commissioned military officer in New England, and rendered valuable 
service in repelling Indian hostilities. In 1625 he visited England as agent 
of the colony and returned with supplies in 1626. Captain Standish founded 
Duxbtiry in 1632; was a member of the executive council, and for many 
years treasurer of the colony. George W. Standish traces descent from ( i ) 
Capt. Miles Standish through the latter's son, (2) Alexander, (3) Ebenezer. 
(4) Moses, (5) Mo.ses. (6) Moses, (7) Miles, (8) George W., Sr., (9) 
George W., Jr. 

The senior George W. Standish was born in New York City on March 
24, 1838, and came to this county in the days of his young manhood, fol- 
low:itig here the trade of butcher and settling in Rush township after his 
marriage to Ellen Riddle. When the Civil War broke out he enlisted as a 
member of Company G, Ninety-fifth Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, 
and with that command went to the front. While thus serving he was taken 
prisoner by the enemy and was sent to Libby prison, where he remained until 
exchanged. He later re-enlisted as a member of Company D, One Hundred 
and Thirty-fourth Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and w'hile serving 
with that command died at Cumberland, Maryland, June 29, 1864. 

The junior George W. Standish was but four years of age when his 
soldier father died and he was reared at Woodstock, in the schools of which 
village he received his schooling. He early began to work as a farm hand 
and after his marriage rented a farm and began to farm on his own account, 
at the same time engaging in the buying and selling of hay and straw. He 
later bought a farm and w-as there engaged in farming until 1906, in which 
year he was appointed superintendent of the county infirmary and the quarter 
of a section of land surrounding the same, in which capacity he has so well 
performed the duties attending that important commission that the county 
commissioners "have ever since retained him in that position. Since Mr. 
Standish's appointment the commissioners have erected a hospital at the 
infirmary, the same having a capacity for twenty-five persons, and Mr. 
Standish keeps the place in first-class condition, his methods of manage- 
ment conforming in all ways to the latest and best-approved principles for 
tlie management of eleemosynary institutions of this class. 

In 1886 George W. Standish w-as united in marriage to Martha Cush- 

man and to this union two children have been born, daughters both, Winnie. 

who married James Zerkle, and Louise, who married Floyd Winner and has 

one child, a daughter. Miriam. Mr. and Mrs. Standish are members of the 

(15a) 



220 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

Universalist church at Woodstock and take a proper part in church work, 
as well as in the general good works of the community in w-hich they li\e. 
Mr. Standish is a Republican and has long been accounted one of the lead- 
ers of that party in his part of the county. Fraternally, he is affiliated with 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and with the Patriarchs Militant 
degree of the same, and has served his loyal lodge as noble grand and the 
encampment as chief patriarch, having for years taken a warm and acti\e 
interest in Odd Fellowship. 



LEE G. PENNOCK. 



Lee G. Pennock. city treasurer of Urbana. former postmaster of that 
city, former member of the city council, former deputy county treasurer 
and for years one of the l>est-known merchants in Urbana, was born in the 
neighboring county of L(\gan, but has been a resident of Urbana since he 
was seven years of age. He was born on Septeml)er 19. 1865, son of John 
W and b'liza (Gordon) Pennock, w'ho moved from Logan county to Urbana 
in the early seventies, John ]'. Pennock becoming connected with the Hitt 
tS; Iniller dry-goods store in that city, a connection lie retained for vears. 

FTaving been but seven years of age when he moved to Urbana with 
his parents, Lee G. Pennock received all but his primary schooling in tliat 
city and upon leaving school began working in the Gaunier carriage factor\- 
and was thus engaged for se\eral years, at the end of which time he took 
employment with the Illinois Car Compan\- and for a time worked in the 
plant of that company at Urbana. He then began working in the \\'. E. 
IJrown clothing store and was thus engaged for nine years, at the end of 
which time he was made de])uty treasurer of the countv. serving during the 
incumbency of D. P.. McDonald, county treasurer. During this time Mr. 
Pennock also served as a member of the city council and during that service 
was the chairman of the linanre committee of the council and of the pur- 
chasing committee. In 1907 Mr. l^ennock was appointed postmaster of 
Urbana, his appointment having been sent to the Senate In- President Roose- 
\elt three times l)efore it finally was confirmed, and he served in that impor- 
tant public cai)acity from H)07 to .\ugust, 1913. Upon the completion of 
his official service, Mr. Pennock engaged in the retail lumber business at 
Urbana, but a short time later sold his business to the Murphy Lumber 
Company and engaged in the grocery business, buving the old Berrv gnx-erv 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY. OHIO. 22/ 

Stand that was established in 1845, ''»<J ^'^^^ si"ce been thus enijaged at that 
old-estal)hshed stand, doing a very good business. Mr. Pennock is a Repub- 
hcan and for years has been looked upon as one of the leaders of that party 
in this county. In addition to the ])ublic service rendered by him and which 
has been mentioned above, he is now serving as treasurer of the city. 

In 1893 Lee G. Pennock was united in marriage to Edna AI. Ellis, daugh- 
ter of Robert Ellis and wife, and to this union one child has been born, a 
daughter, Elizabeth. Mr. and Mrs. Pennock are members of the Presbyte- 
rian church, Mr. Pennock being a deacon of the local congregation, and 
take a proper part in church work, as well as in the general social affairs of 
their home town. Mr. Pennock is a Knight Templar and a Royal Arch 
Mason, a member of Harmony Lodge No. 8, Free and Accepted Masons, at 
Urbana; a member of Urbana Chapter No. 34, Royal Arch Masons; a mem- 
ber of Urbana Council No. 59, Royal and Select Masters, and of Raper 
Commandery No. 19, Knights Templar, and takes a warm interest in Masonic 
afifairs, long having served as secretary of Harmony lodge, of wliich he was 
also past master. 



THOMAS NEELD. 



Thomas Neeld, an honored veteran of the Civil War, former trustee of 
Salem township and one of the best-known retired farmers of Champaign 
county, now living at Urbana, where he has made his home for the past 
ten years or more, is a native son of Ohio and has lived in this state all his 
life. He was born at Waynesville, in Warren county, this state, May lO, 
1837, son of Joseph and Ellen ( Halloway ) Neeld. the farmer a native of 
Pennsylvania and the latter of Ohio. 

Joseph Neeld was born in Bucks county, Pennsylvania, and there grew 
to manhood, learning there the trade of a shoemaker. As a young man he 
came to this state and located at Waynesville, where he presently opened a 
shoe shop and became quite successful in that line. There he married Ellen 
Halloway, who was born in that place, and to that union were born five 
children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the second in order of birth, 
the others being as follow : Martha, born on February 4, 1837, who died 
at the age of eighteen years; Lavina, June 18, 1841, widow of John Marsh, 
who is now making her home at Topeka. Kansas; Mary Iv, June 18, 1844, 
who married Alfred Hale and is also living at Topeka. and Eliza E., Novem- 
ber 2^. 1845. who first married Elias \\"est and after his death married the 



228 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

Rev. Parker Moon, a noted preacher of tlie Friends church, and is now Hving 
at Carthage, Missouri. The mother of these children died in the latter 
forties and Joseph Mundel, the father, survived her several years, his death 
occurring in 1854, he then being fifty years of age. 

Thomas Neeld received his schooling in the schools of W'aynesville and 
at the age of eighteen liegan farming in his home county, continuing thus 
engaged until he went to the front as a soldier of the Union in 186 1. He was 
married in January of that year and on May 17 following, enlisted for ser- 
\'ice during the continuance of the Civil War as a member of Company .1-', 
Sixtli Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, known as the Gray Regiment. 
After some preliminary service in West Virginia Mr. Neeld went widi his 
regiment to Nashville and was later present at the battle of Pittsburg Land- 
ing and then took part in the siege of Corinth. He then was transferred to 
the gunboat service and serving in Company F, First Marine Regiment. 
Mississippi Brigade, on the gunl)oat "Baltic," took part in tlie siege of Vick.s- 
burg and in some other important engagements along the river, including 
the battles of Greenville, Milligan's Bend. Fort Gibson. General Banks' 
expedition up the Red River, and numerous skirmishes, receiving liis hnal 
discharge at Vicksburg on January 19, 1865. 

Upon the completion of his service Thomas Neeld returned to his home 
at Waynesville and presently moved from there to a farm in the vicinity of 
Hillsboro, in Highland county, this state, where he remained for about fif- 
teen years, at the end of which time he came with his family to Champaign 
county and settled on a farm in Salem township, where he li\cd, actively 
engaged in farming, from 1882 to 1906, in which latter year he retired from 
the farm and moved to Url)ana, where he since has made his home. Mr. 
Neeld is a Republican and has for years taken an active part in local civic 
afifairs. During his residence in Salem township he served for six years as 
trustee of that township and in othei' ways contributed of his time and 
energies to the public service. For four years he served as a member of the 
county infirmary board and during his many years of residence liere lias 
gained a wide acquaintance throughout the county. 

Thomas Neeld has been twice married. It was in January, 1862. that 
he was united in marriage to Martha Atin Knotts, who was born in Fligli- 
land county, this state, daughter of James and Flizab«th Knotts, and who 
died at her home in Salem township, this county, in 1901. To that union 
eight children were born, namely : Walter, of Columbus, this state ; Mary, 
who married Perry Swisher and is now deceased ; Charles, a carpenter and 
farmer, of Salem township, who married .Maggie Derr and following her 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 229 

death married Elida Wadenian and by the latter union has one child, a 
daughter, Martha M. ; Mertie, who married John Pool and died, leaving two 
children, Miller and Roscoe; Lewis, a coal dealer, of Springfield, this state, 
who married Catherine Gibson and has two children, Thomas and Martha 
C. ; William, who is engaged in railroad construction work and who married 
Louise Jones and has two children, Mabel and Joseph ; Gertrude, who died 
at the age of five years, and Arthur, who married Martlia Vingard and died 
at the age of twenty-eight years, leaving his widow and four children, George 
Perry, Louis and Edna. 

Li 1905. Mr. Neeld married, secondly, FA\a Pangle. who was born in 
this county, a daughter of James and Susanna (Shepard) Pangle, who came 
to this county from the neighboring county of Clark, where they originally 
had settled upon coming from Pennsylvania to Ohio, and were substantial 
farming people in Wayne township, this county. James Pangle and wife 
were the parents of six children, of whom Mrs. Neeld was the second in 
order of birth, the others being as follow : Effie May, now deceased, was 
was born on August 31. 1864: William H., November 10, 1868, al.so deceased: 
Bert E., March 29. 1871, who married Ella Racer and m.akes his home in 
L'rbana; Emma. Januar\- 23, 1875, deceased, and Margaret R., July 29, 
1878, also deceased. Mr. Neeld is an active member of Brand Post No. 98, 
Grand Army of the Republic, and takes an earnest interest in the affairs of 
that patriotic organization, in whicli he has, at one time and another, held 
nearh' all the offices and is now serving .'is junior vice-commander of the post. 



CHARLES FREYHOF. 



Charles Freyhof, well-known florist and market-gardener at LJrbana, is 
a native of Kentucky, but has been a resident of this state since the days 
of his childhood. He was born on a farm in the vicinity of Bardstown, in 
Bullitt county, Kentucky, not far south of Louisville. September 26, i85(>, 
son of John and Eva Freyhof. both natives of the Rhine country in Germaiiw 
who came to America in the daws of their youth, were married in Kentuck}- 
and there established their home in 1848. John Freyhof became a farmer 
in the Bardstown neighborhood and was making good headway toward get- 
ting a good start when Morgan's raiders made a swoop down on his farm 
during the Civil War and took his horses, leaving in the place of the same 
some old "plugs" that were valueless for farming purposes. This incident 



230 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

of war so disgusted him with the location in which he had settled that he 
decided to "pull up stakes" and get into a city. With the "plugs" left by 
the Morgan raiders he drove with his family and his household goods to 
Cincinnati, settling there at Glendale, a suburb of the city, where he began 
working as a gardener for General Thompson, where he remained until 187 (, 
when he came up into this part of the state and located at Urbana, where 
lie bought a twenty-acre tract of ground on the edge of the city and began 
market-gardening, which vocation he followed there the rest of his life, 
his death occurring in [890. His wife had preceded him to the grave six 
years, her death having occurred in January, 1884. They were the parents 
of nine children, of whom seven are. still living, but of whom the subject of 
this sketch is the only one now living in this county, the others being George 
.W., William, Louis, Kate, Louise and Airs. Lizzie Monroe of Coldwater. 
Michigan. 

Charles Freyhold was but a child when his parents practically were dri\en 
out of Kentucky by the Morgan raiders and his early youdi was spent in 
Glendale, where he received his elementary schooling. He was twelve years 
of age when they moved to Urbana and he completed his sclnxjling in the 
high school in that city, later taking up gardening with his father ami was 
thus associated with the latter until 1884, when he rented the home place 
and started to operate it on his own account. The same year he married and 
moved to a farm near Urbana, where he was engaged in farming tor six 
years, at the end of which time he moved to Cincinnati. After a year spent 
in that city Mr. Freyhof returned to Urbana, bought the market garden 
where he is now engaged in business and has ever since been thus engaged 
at Urbana, for years having been regarded as one of the leading florists and 
gardeners in Champaign county. Upon starting in business there Mr. h'rey- 
hof had but a few hot-beds and started in a modest wa\-, but lie now has 
more than three thousand square feet under glass and has built up an excel- 
lent business. Mr. Freyhof is a Republican and takes a proper interest in 
political affairs, but has not been an office seeker. 

It was on September 25, 1884, that Charles Freyhof "was united in mar- 
riage to Cynthia Roof and to this union three children ha\e been born, 
Grace, wife of Joseph Leonard, Oscar and Theodore, who married Alva 
McLaughlin. The Freyhofs are members of the Lutheran church and take 
an active part in the various beneficences of the same, Mr. Freyhof having 
served for two years as an elder in the church, for nine years as a deacon 
and for four years as secretary of the official board. He is a member of 
-Vfosgrove Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, at Urbana. of which 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 23 1 

lodge he is the present noble grand; is past chancellor commander of the 
local lodge of the Knights of Pythias and for sixteen years has been secre- 
tary-treasurer of the local "tent" of the Knights of the Maccabees. He also 
is treasurer of the local encampment of the Odd Fellows and is a member of 
the relief committee of the local lodge of that order. 



PETER ARMBUSTER. 



Peter Armbuster. well-known manufacturer of "stogie" cigars at 
Urbana, is a native of Ohio and has lived in this state all his life, with the 
exception of a few years spent in the West. He was born in the village 
of Temperanceville, Belmont county, November 2, 1865, son of Peter and 
Magdalena (Haren) Armbuster, the former of European birth and the lat- 
ter born in Ohio. 

The elder Peter Armbuster was born in the kingdom of Wurtemburg, 
where he grew to manhood and where he was trained as a carpenter and 
builder. As a young man he came to this country and for two years was 
located at Wheeling. West Virginia, where he followed his trade. He 
then came across the river into this state and located at Temperanceville, 
in Belmont county, where he married Magdalena Haren, who was born in 
Monroe county, this state, and until 1875 was engaged in the carpenter busi- 
ness at that place. He then bought a hotel at Temperanceville and contin- 
ued there in the hotel business for more than forty years. He also became 
an extensive landowner in that vicinity and was accounted a well-to-do citi- 
zen at the time of his death. He and his wife were the parents of nine 
cliildren and his widow and six of these children are now living at Urbana. 

The junior Peter Armbuster was reared at Temperanceville, where 
he received his schooling, and early became employed on one of his father's 
farms, remaining at home until he was twenty-one years of age, when he 
went West, where he remained for three years, at the end of which time he 
returned home and in February. 1890, became engaged in the manufacture 
of "stogie" cigars at Temperanceville, in a partnership, under the firm name 
of Dorster & Armbuster. In June, 1892, Mr. Armbuster's brother, John 
Armbuster, bought Dorster's interest the business and in September of that 
same year the brothers moved to Urbana and set up their establishment 
in that city, the date of their arrival there being the i8th of that month. 
The business was a success from the start and in 1899 the demand of the 



CHA]\IFAIC,N COUNTY, OHIO. 



growing trade required the erection of a new factory, a building thirty-two 
by sixty feet, two stories and a basement. In 1908 the capacity of the 
plant was increased by the erection of an additional story, which, with the 
basement now gives four working floors for the busy estabhshnient. In, Feb- 
ruary, 19 1 6, Peter Annbuster bought the interest in the concern held by his 
brother, John, and is now the sole owner of the business, one of the leading 
"stogie" factories in the country. When Mr. .\rmbuster started in business 
the capacity of the plant was about fifteen hundred "stogies" a day. Xcnv 
the plant is turning out more than three hundred thousand a month and from 
thirty to forty persons are employed in the industry. Mr. Armbuster's 
leading brands are the "1890," the "A. B. S.", the "A. B. C." and the "New 
Armbuster." 

On April 23, 1896, about four years after moving to Urbana. I'eter 
Armbuster was united in marriage to Elizabeth Thuenker. daughter of 
Richard and Mary (Bresnahan) Thuenker, and to this union two cliilthen 
have been born, Beatrice and .Peter Donald. 



JOHN L. BARGER. 



John L. Barger, a well-known and progressive farmer of Harrison town- 
ship, living on rural route No. i, out of West Lil>erty, Ohio, was born in 
the western part of Virginia, in Botetourt county, on August 13, 1861, the 
son of William L. and Sarah E. (Wilhelm) Barger, both of whom were 
natives of the same state, she of Rockingham county. William L. Barger 
lived all his life in Virginia, his death occurring in 1902. while his witUnv 
still survives him, making her home in her native state. William L. Barger 
and wife were the parents of thirteen children, eight of whom are still living: 
John L., the immediate subject of this brief review ; William C, a resident 
of Charleston, West Virginia; Mrs. Anna McPherson. living in Craig county, 
Virginia : Fred, living in West Virginia ; Ira. a resident of Charleston. West 
Virginia; Frank, also a resident of Charleston; Mrs. Emma Rnedelbarger. 
living in Virginia, and Martin, also living in Virginia. 

John L. Barger lived at home with his parents until he reached the age 
of twenty-two years, receiving his education in the limited district schools 
of his home neighborhood. In young manhood he left his native state and 
came to Champaign county. Ohio, and for some time Avas employed b\ the 
month as a farm hand. After his marriage he engaged in farming for him- 




LEWIS BARGER 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 233 

self and has since been continuously engaged in agricultural pursuits. lie 
is a general farmer and stock raiser and has met with a Aery commendable 
degree of success in his chosen calling. 

On January ii, 1887, John L. Barger was united in marriage to Anna 
M. Hewling, who was born in this township, the daughter of Abel and 
Euphemia (Ross) Hewling, well known and respected farmers of the town- 
ship, the latter of whom is still living at her home in the township, while 
the former is deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Hewling were natives of Champaign 
county, Ohio, he being born on May 31, 181 3. His father, Joseph Hewling, 
was among the first settlers in Harrison township, coming from New Jersey. 
He married Margaret Johns and he died aged eighty }ears ; she died aged 
eighty-six years. Abel Hewling became well-to-do. owning five hundred 
and four acres of land. Mr. and Mrs. Barger are the parents of eight chil- 
dren, as follow: John W., living in Bellefontaine. Ohio; Harry, of Spring- 
field, Ohio: Cecil, a farmer living in Johnson township, this county: Florence, 
at home : Lewis, of Newport. Rhode Island, is in the United States navy, 
in which he enlisted in June, 1917, being now in the naval training station: 
Elizabeth, living at home; Max and Mary, students in the local school. The 
family are earnest and consistent memliers oi the Methodist Episcopal churcli 
at Wesley chapel in Harrison township, in which they take an active and 
interested part, Mr. Barger serving as trustee of the church. He is a Demo- 
crat in politics and takes a good citizen's interest in public affairs, especially 
those pertaining to the welfare of his home community. 



JOHN W. KENNEDY. 

The late John W. Kennedy, an honored veteran of the Civil War and a 
former well-known farmer of Concord township, this county, but who for 
some years prior to his death in 191 6 had lived retired at Crbana, where his 
widow is still making her home, was a native son of Champaign county and 
lived here all his life. He was born near the village of Mutual, in Union 
township, March 2, 1843, ^o" of Daniel and Sarah Kenned}-, natives of Vir- 
ginia, who became early settlers in the Mutual neighborhood. Daniel Ken- 
nedy was a miller- and was for years employed in the Arrowsmith mills, 
spending his last days in that communit}'. He and his wife \\ere the parents 
of eight children, namely : Samuel, who died while serving as a soldier of the 
Cinion during the Civil War: George, deceased: John W.. the subject r.f this 



,'34 CHA-MPAIGN COUNTY. OHIO. 

memorial sketch ; Kate, widow of Nathan Elliott, who is now making lier 
home at Spring Hill ; Ella, who died unmarried ; Daniel, who is living at 
llellefontaine ; Thomas, deceased, and one who died in infancy- 
John \\'. Kennedy received a limited education in the schools at Mutual 
and early began working at farm labor and in the saw-mill, and was thus 
<.Migaged when the Civil War broke out. Though but eighteen years of age 
when President Lincoln issued his first call for volunteers, he resix)nded to 
that call and went to the front as a private in Company C, Second Regiment, 
Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and served with that command for three years, 
participating during that time in some of the severest service of the war. 
His toes were frozen off as the result of a season of dreadful exposure during 
the service and at the battle of Chickamauga he received a bullet wound in the 
forehead, from which he suffered all the rest of his life. Upon the comple- 
tion of his military service Mr. Kennedy returned to his home in this county 
and resumed the peaceful pursuit of farming. He presently acquired a fanri 
of sixty-one and one-half acres in Concord township and after his marriage 
in the summer of 1883, established his home there, remaining there until 
his retirement from the farm in 1904 and removal to L'rbana, where he 
spent the remainder of his life, his death occurring there on February 19, 
1916. Mr. Kennedy was an active member of W. A. Brand Post No. 98, 
Grand Army of the Republic, at Urbana. and ever took an earnest interest 
in the affairs of that patriotic organization. He also belonged to the Relief 
Corps in Concord township, and handled funds for relief of widows and 
<n-phans of the Civil War. 

It was on June 14, 1883, that John W. Kennedy was united in mar- 
riage to Katharine E. Seibert, who was born in a log cabin on West Ward 
street, in the city of Urbana, July 5, 1842, daughter of George and Ann 
( Remsburg) Seibert, the former a native of the state of Virginia and the 
latter of Maryland, who were married in Circleville, Ohio, and later came to 
Champaign county. Upon coming to this count)- George Seibert bought a 
farm in the vicinity of George's Chapel, but later disposed of his interest 
there and moved to Urbana, where he began clerking in the store of George 
Aloore. Upon the outbreak of the Mexican War he enlisted for service and 
went to the front with General Scott's army, but before the close of the war 
w^as discharged on a physician's certificate of physical disability, he having 
<leveloped a serious dropsical aft'ection. His last days were spent at Mans- 
field, this state. His wife died at Urbana. They were the parents of three 
children, Mrs. Kennedy having had an elder sister, Frances, now deceased, 
who married John M. Carter, who also is dead, and a younger brother. 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 235 

George Seibert, a well-knoAvn attorney-at-law at Urbana atul tornier clerk of 
courts for Champaign county. For fifty years Mrs. Kennedy has been a 
member of the Episcopal church at Urbana and her life has ever been devoted 
to good works, always doing what she could to make better the conditions 
of living in the community in which she was born and which she has spent 
all her useful life. 



JOHN T. ANDliRSON. 



John J. Anders(jn, a well-known retired building contractor, of Urbana. 
former marshal of that city, former jiresident of the city council and an 
lionored veteran of the Civil War, is a native of Virginia, born in Augusta 
county, that, state, but has been a resident of Urbana since the year 1856. 
He was born on March 9. 1835. son of John and Frances (Clark) Anderson. 
l)oth natives of that same county, the former of whom was the son of John 
Anderson, w^ho was the son of John Anderson, a native of Scotland, who 
came to this country and settled along the Middle river, near the old stone 
church, in Augusta county, Virginia, where he established his home and 
where he spent the remainder of his life. The subject of this sketch is 
therefore the fourth John Anderson in direct line. His grandfather, John 
Anderson, son of the Scottish immigrant, married Isabel King, of Virginia, 
and had two children who grew to maturity. Isabel, who married Thomas 
Clark and spent her last days near Middletown, and John, third, the father 
of John J. The third John .\nderson grew up on the old Anderson home 
place in Augusta county and farmed there all his life, one of the best-known 
citizens of that community, being known, on account of his connection with 
the militia, as Captain Anderson. From the time he was fifteen years of 
age until his death he was a deacon in the Presbyterian church and was for 
}'ears local school director. He married Frances Clark, who was [)orn in 
tliat same neighborhood, and to that union ten children were l)orn, namel\- : 
Mary, now deceased, who married Greenburg Rhodes, of Augusta county. 
X'irginia, also deceased; James W.. an Urbana druggist and a notable worker 
in the church, who married Caroline Baldwin and died in igi^: George D.. 
who married Rebecca Barger and who for thirty years was a miner and 
farmer in California, retiring then and returning to his boyhood home in 
\'irginia, where he spent his last da)s; Jane C, who married Henry Korner 
and both of whom are dead : Isabel, who married Daniel Korner and who, 
as well as her liusband. died in California: John J., the immediate sul)ject of 



236 C:|[AMPA1GN COUNTY, OHIO. 

this biographical sketch: Francis, who died in infancy; Norvall W., who 
became connected with his brother, John J., in the Imilding Hne in Urbana 
in the latter fifties and who enlisted for service in the Union army during 
the Civil War, going to the front with Company A, Second Regiment, Ohio 
X'olunteer Infantry, and was killed at the battle of Stone's River; Martha 
l'^., who died in infancx'. and Sarah Margaret, who, in 1864, married George 
Killian, a farmer of Augusta county. \'irginia, now deceased, his widow 
making her home in Salem, N'irginia. Capt. John Anderson, father of 
these children, died in 1S56 and his widow, in company with three of her 
sons, James A\'., fohn J. and Norvall W., and her youngest daughter, 
Sarah Margaret, came over into Ohio and located at Urbana. but in i860, 
she returned to her old home in X'irginia and there spent her last days, her 
death occurring in 1885. 

John J. Anderson was about twenty-one vears of age when he located 
in Urbana and there he and his brother, Norvall, engaged in carpentering 
and were thus associated in business together until the breaking out of the 
Civil War, when both enlisted for service in the Union anny, the younger 
brother later meeting a soldier's fate at the battle of Stone's River. It was 
on the President's first call for volunteers that the Anderson brothers enlisted, 
John- J. going to the front as a member of Company K, Second Regiment, 
Ohi(; Volunteer Infantry, and his ill-fated brother as a member of Company 
A of that saiue regiment. Upon the completion of the three-months' ser- 
vice, in July, 1 861. John J. Anderson re-enlisted and was attached to Com- 
pany G, Third Ohio Cavalry. His first service under fire was at the battle 
of Shiloh and he afterward was in many battles and skirmishes, serving in 
the Army of the Cumberland until the close of the war and was a member 
of the command which took Jefferson Davis, president of the defeated con- 
federacy, captive. Not long after entering the service, Mr. Anderson was 
])romoted to the rank of first sergeant, later being raised to the rank of 
orderly sergeani. At the battle of Murfreesboro, Tennessee, he was severe- 
ly wounded and was for some time compelled to lie in the field hospital, 
lie received his final discharge at Nashville, Tennessee, in the fall of 1865. 

Upon com])leting his military service John J. Anderson returned to 
Urbana and resumed his vocation as a building contractor. He was mar- 
ried in the fall of 1868 and continued working at his trade until his election 
to the office of city marshal in 1872, serving in that important capacity for 
twelve years. In 1872 he stopped contracting and opened a store, handling 
coal, cement, and building materials. He conducted this store until 
he retired from active business in 1907. For six years he also 



CHAMPAIGN COU.NTY, OHIO. 237 

served as a niembt-r of the city council and four }ears of that time was presi- 
dent of the council. For two years he was a member of the city board of 
health and in other ways has contributed of his time and energies to the 
public service. Mr. Anderson is a Republican and has ever given his earnest 
attention to local political affairs, an ardent champion of good government. 
It was on September 17. 1868. that John J. Anderson was united in 
marriage at Urbana to Harriet E. Kimber. who was born in that citw 
daughter of Amer and Phoebe Kimber. natives of Pennsylvania, whose last 
days were spent in Urbana. where Amer Kimber for years was engaged as 
a stone mason. Mrs. Anderson died on September 23, 1912. She was an 
earnest member of the Methodist Episcopal church, as is Mr. Anderson, the 
latter being a member of the board of trustees of the local congregation of 
that church. He is a past commander of Brand Post No. 98, Grand Armv 
of the Republic, and has for years taken an active part in the affairs of that 
])atriotic organization, all the offices in which he has filled at one time and 
another. ]\'Ir. Anderson is the oldest Odd Fellow in Urbana, is past noble 
grand of the local lodge of that order and has for man\- vears taken an 
active part in lodge work. 



WILLIAM M. KISEK. 



The late William M. Kiser. a well-known and substantial retired farmer 
of Champaign county, who died in 1908 at his home in Urbana, where for 
some years he had been living in comfortable retirement, was a native son 
of this county and Hved here all his life. He was born on a pioneer farm in 
:\Iad River township on Tune 12, 1836, son of George and Sarah (Crabill) 
Kiser, the former of whom also was born in that same township and the 
latter in the neighboring county of Clark, prominent among the early settlers 
of the southern part of this county, who spent their last days there. 

George Kiser was a son of Philip Kiser and wife, of German stock, 
who were among the earliest settlers in Champaign county, having come here 
in the early days of the settlement of this part of the state and establishing 
their home in Mad River town.shii), taking a useful part in the development 
of that region from its primitive state. Philip Kiser was a soldier in the 
War of 1812 and he l)ecame a large landowner in Mad Ri\er township and 
a man of much influence in the pioneer neighborhood in which his last days 
were spent. George Kiser also became an extensive landowner in his turn 



2 1,S CH.v:\i.PAlGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

and hail a Ijik- i)iece of farm property in that same township. His lirst 
land was a tract he entered from the government and he gradually added 
to that until he became one of the most substantial farmers in that part of 
the county. He married Sarah Crabill, a daughter of one of the pioneers 
(jf the adjoining county of Clark and established a very comfortable home 
on his farm. He and his wife were members of the Baptist church, taking 
an acti\ e part in church work, and their children were reared in that faith. 
They were the j^arents of nine children, of whom Imt four grew to maturity 
and of whom but one, Eiuery Kiser. formerly a resident of Springfield, died 
in March. Kji/. The others, besides the subject of this memorial sketch, 
were Wilson, a farmer of Mad River township, w-ho later went to Pueblo. 
Colorado, where he spent his last days, and George, who died years ago. 

William M. Kiser grew up on the old Kiser farm in Mad River town- 
ship, receiving his schooling in the primitive schools of that community, 
and in turn became a fanner on his ow'u account in that same township, 
remaining on the old home place, of which he presently became the owner. 
until 1X07. when he retired from the active labors of the farm and moved 
to LJrbana, where he bought a comfortable residence and where he spent 
the rest of his days. In addition to his general farming Mr. Kiser had long 
gi\en consideral>le attention to the raising of high-grade live stock and had 
done (|uite well in his operations, at the time of his retirement being regarded 
aN one of the most substantial farmers of that section of the county. In his 
])olitical affiliation he was a Democrat and for some time was a member of 
the school Ixjard in his local district and in other ways did his share in con- 
tributing to the public service. He was a member of the local lodge of the 
h'ree and .\ccepted Masons at Urbana and for years took a warm interest 
in .Masonic affairs. William M. Kiser died at his home in Urbana on Octo- 
ber _^ I . i()o8, and bis widow is still living there, being very pleasantly sit- 
uated in a delightful home at 708 South Main street. 

Mrs. Kiser was born. Sarah C. Peck, in Perry county, Pennsylvania, 
a daughter of John and Mary (Powers) Peck, both of whom were born in 
that same county and who came to Ohio witli their family many years ago 
and settled in Clark county, where Sarah C. I'eck grew to womanhood and 
w here she was living at the time of her marriage to Mr. Kiser. Her father. 
h>hn i'eck. was a blacksmith and upon settling in Clark county he estab- 
lished a smithy there and continued in that vocation until his death, both 
he and his wife s])ending their last days in that county. They were the 
])arents of five children, of whom Mrs. Kiser w^as the third in order of 
birth, the others being as follow: h'Jizabeth. who married John Regie, of 




T. E. DYE. 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO.. 239 

Clark count)-, unci l.'iter moved to Topeka, Kansas, where she died ; Cath- 
erine, wife of John Enoch, of Springfield, this state; Ellen, deceased, who 
was the wife of David Zerkle, and Susan, also deceased, who was the wife 
of James Rector. 

To William M. and Sarah C. (Peck) Kiser five children were born, 
namely; Pierson, who is now living in the West; Serepta, wife of Charles 
Dagger, a farmer of Concord township, this county; Mary, who died in 
1887; Elmer H., a farmer of Mad River township, this county, and Laura, 
who is at home with her mother. These children were well educated and 
are doing well their respective parts in life. Mrs. Kiser is a member of 
the Methodist Episcopal church and has ever taken a warm interest in church 
work and in other communit)' good works, helpful in many ways in pro- 
moting movements designed to advance the common welfare. 



T. E. DYE. 



T. E. Dye, chairman of the Democratic central committee in Cham- 
paign county and for years actively and successfully engaged in the insur- 
ance and real-estate business at Urbana, is a native Hoosier, but has been a 
resident of Urbana for the past cjuarter of a century and is one of the best- 
known and most influential citizens of Champaign county. He was born 
on a farm eight miles from the city of Richmond, in \\'ayne county, Indiana. 
December 19, 1866, and was l)ut sixteen years of age when his father died. 
He later came to this state and became employed in the plant of the Colum- 
l)us Buggy Company at the state capital, but two years later returned to his 
boyhood home in Indiana and resumed farming. Several years later he 
liecame engaged in the fi^e-insurance business in that state and was thus 
engaged there until 1893, the year following his marriage, when he returned 
to Ohio and located at Urbana. where he since has made his home. 

Upon moving to Urbana Mr. Dye bought an interest in the old-estab- 
lished insurance agency of Blake & Cameron, of that city, and later bought 
the agency, which he since has operated alone, having Ijuilt u\) an extensive 
business in the general insurance and real-estate line llu-oughout this and 
adjoining counties. Mr. Dye ha.s the local agency of several oi the leading 
insurance companies of the country, including that of the Ohio Farmers 
Insurance Company, and his is regarded as one of the leading agencies of 
the latter company in the state. Ever since taking uj) his residence in 



J40 ^CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

L'rbana, Mr. Dye has given his close and earnest attention to local political 
affairs and has for years been recognized as one of the leading Democrats 
in this part of the state. He is now chairman of the Democratic county com- 
mittee for Champaign county and in that capacity has rendered yeoman 
service in behalf of his party. He is also a member of the state executive 
committee of his part}'. 

In 1892. the \car before taking up his residence in Urbana, T. E. Dye 
Avas united in marriage to Anna Burke, daughter of Thomas and Mary 
J'urke, of Liberty, and to this union three children have been born, all sons, 
T. (J. Dye, of Rochester, New "S'ttrk, and Paul F. and Roy Dye, who are 
at home. The Dyes are members of the Catholic church and take a proper 
part in the general affairs of the parish. Mr. Dye is a member of the local 
lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and has served as noble 
grand, the highest ofiicer of the same. Fie takes an active part in the gen- 
eral business affairs of his home town and has for years been regarded as 
one of the most influential men not only at Urbana, but throughout the 
county at large. T. O. Dye is at the officers training camp, Madison Bar- 
racks, New York. I'aul ]•". is at I-"t. Benjamin Harrison, Indianapolis, in 
tlie officers training camp. 



JACOB H. WILKINS. 



Jacob FI. Wilkins, a farmer of Wayne township, Champaign county, 
was born in Belmont county, Ohio, December 18, 1862. He is a son of 
George W. and Sarah A. (Pickeral) Wilkins, both natives of Randolph 
county, Virginia. The father grew up in the Blue Ridge nu)untains of his 
native state and there he was married. He followed the trade of shingle- 
making in the mountains until 1855, when he moved to Belmont county, Ohio, 
where he turned his attention to farming, renting a place for .some time, 
later buying a farm of his own. He remained in that count}- imtil 1876, 
when he removed to Champaign county, kxating in Wayne township on the 
farm where his son, Jacob H., now resides. He rented the place and spent 
the rest of his life engaged in general farming there, his death occurring in 
1893. His widow is still living, making her home with her daughter. Jennie. 
Twelve children were born to George W. Wilkins and wife, six of whom 
are now living, namely: W. F., of Salem township; Jennie; Albert lives in 
Marion, Ohio; L. H. lives at Mingo, Champaign county; Anna and Jacob H. 

Jacob H. Wilkins grew up on the farm in Belmont county and received 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 24I 

his education in the public schools in that county and in Champaign county. 
He continued working on the farm with his father until his marriage. He 
then moved to Columbus, where he operated a dairy for nine years with 
gratifying results. He then returned to Wayne township, Champaign 
county, and bought the old Cowgill place, consisting of one hundred and 
three acres, and here he has since resided. He has added eighteen acres, 
the place now containing one hundred and twenty-one acres. He has kept 
the land well cultivated and under a fine state of improvement. He carries 
on general farming and stock raising, feeding much of liis grain* to live stock, 
especially hogs, marketing a large number annually. 

Mr. Wilkins was married in 1884 to Lydia L. Wilkins. of Hocking 
county, Ohio, and a daughter of John and Sarah Wilkins. Five children 
have been born to Jacob H. Wilkins and wife, namely : Ethel, who married 
Floyd Linville. has one child, Roy Harvey ; Mary, who married Emerson 
Hitter; Walter married Maggie Ritter: Agnes is single and lives at home; 
Clara is deceased. 

Politically, Mr. Wilkins is a Republican and served as trustee of Wayne 
township for six years. He is a member of the Friends church. 



TOHN P. MUNDEL. 



John P. Mundel, an honored veteran of the Civil War and one of the 
best-known retired farmers living at Urbana, is a native of the old Key- 
stone state, but has lived in this county since 1869, a resident of Mad River 
township until his retirement from the farm and removal to Urbana. where 
he is now living, \ery comfortably situated. He was born in Chester county. 
Pennsylvania. July 26. 1842. son of James and Ann (Miller) Mundel, both 
natives of that same county, where they spent all their lives. James Mundel 
was a potter and a substantial citizen. He was a Republican in his political 
affiliations and he and his wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. They were the parents of eight children, of whom the subject of 
this sketch was the third in order of birth, the others being as follow: Isaac,' 
who was an auger-maker in Pennsylvania and is now deceased; Anna May, 
who married Daniel Grayson, of Pennsylvania, and is also deceased; David, 
a ship builder, who served during the Civil War as a member of the Eighth 
J Delaware Regiment and of the One Hundred and Seventy-fifth Pennsylvania 
(i6ar 



24J CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

Regiment; William, who came to this state, and was a mechanic at Spring- 
field; Francis A., a painter, who died in Indiana; Granville, who came to this 
state and was a potter at Mansfield, and one son who died in infancy. 

Reared in his home county in Pennsylvania, John P. Mundel received 
his schooling there and early learned the potter's trade under the skillful 
direction of his father, beginning to work in the pottery when nine years of 
age, and he was thus engaged until he enlisted for service in the Union army 
during the Civil War. The date of his enlistment was September 5, 1861. 
and he wenfto the front as a member of Company E. Purnell's Legion, Mary- 
land Volunteers, being sent down the eastern shore of Maryland to Camp 
Charles, Virginia, where the command was in camp from October, 1861, to 
February, 1862; thence on to Harper's Ferry and on to Bolivar Heights, 
where they put up breastworks, mounted cann(jn and proceeded to shell the 
city of Charlestown, eight miles away. Later engagements participated in 
by Mr. Mundel included the battle of Front Royal, Virginia, May 31, 1862; 
Cedar Creek, June i ; Catlett's Station, August 2. In the last-named engage- 
ment the command with which he was serving met with a reverse and retired, 
forming a square in the woods, later taking refuge in an old freight ware- 
house at Catlett's Station. There Mr. Mundel was captured by the enemy, 
but in the confusion presently created by a heavy downpour of rain he made 
his escape and rejoined his command in camp, resuming the campaign in Vir- 
ginia with the battle of Gainsville on August 28 ; Groveton, August 29, and 
the second battle of Bull Run. August 30. In the latter battle Mr. Mundel 
was shot through the right foot and was temporarily out of the fighting. 
The only other wound he received during the war was a bullet hole in his left 
side, received at the battle of Cold Harbor in June, i8f34, a wound which 
kept him confined in the hospital at Alexandria and later in the hospital at 
Arlington for some time. Barring the time thus lost recuperating from his 
wounds, Mr. Mundel participated in all the active service in which his 
regiment took part, including some of the bloodiest engagements of the war, 
and received his final discharge on October 24, 1864. 

Upon the completion of his military service John !'. .VUmdel returned Id 
his home in Chester county, Pennsylvania, was married there the next fall 
and remained there until 1869, in which year he came over into Ohio and 
settled in this county, taking up farming and gardening in Mad Rixer town- 
ship, and was thus engaged there until his retirement and remoxal to Urbana. 
Upon moving to Urbana Mr. Mimdel bought a house at 612 Storms avenue 
and after a residence of nineteen years there bought his present house at 425 
South Walnut street, where he since has made his home and where he and 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY. OHIO. 243 

his wife are very comfortably situated. Mr. Mundel is a stanch RepubHcan 
and for the past twenty years has been serving as assessor. Since leaving 
the farm he has been quite extensively engaged in the sale of nursery stock. 
It was on November 23, 1865. that John P. Mundel was united in mar- 
riage to Anna E. Goss, of Boston, Massachusetts, and to this union two sons 
have been born, Frederick K., who is connected with a big shoe store at 
Indianapolis, Indiana, and Francis A., a cigar-maker at Urbana. Mr. and 
Mrs. Mundel are members of the Presbyterian church and give proper atten- 
tion to church work. Mr. Mundel is an active member of Brand Post No. 
98, Grand Army of the Republic, and takes a warm interest in the afifairs of 
the sarne, having held nearly all the offices in that patriotic organization at 
one time and another. He also is a member of the Union Veterans' Union. 



DAVID A. POOL. 



David A. Pool, an honored veteran of the Civil War and a well-known 
retired farmer of this county, who has been living retired in Urbana since 
1909, is a native son of Champaign county and has lived here all his life, with 
the exception of a few years during the seventies, when he was farming 
in the neighboring county of Shelby, and for some time in his youth when 
the was living in Logan county. He was born on a farm in Concord town- 
ship on September 30, 1845, so" of Thomas A. and Nancy T. (Monroe) 
Pool, who came to this county from Shelby county and later moved to Logan 
county, where they spent their last days. 

Thomas A. Pool was a member of one of the first families of Shelby 
county, his parents, George and Vercy (Wilkinson) Pool having been among 
the early settlers of that county, entering a tract of land there from the 
government and establishing their home there in pioneer days, spending the 
remainder of their lives in that county. They were the parents of seven chil- 
dren, all now deceased, and of whom Thomas A. was the second in order of 
birth, the others having been as follow : Polly, who married Mason Arrow- 
smith and became a resident of Champaign county; Esther Jane, who mar- 
ried James Mulford, of Logan county, later moving to Jay count} , Indiana : 
William, who lived in Logan county ; Samuel, who made his home in Shelb\ 
county; Gatch, who lived in Logan county, and Anna, who married Joseph 
R. Smith and also lived in Logan county. 

Thomas A. Pool was reared on the i)aternal farm in Shelbv qjuiUn , 



244 CHAM I'.NIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

growing up familiar with pioneer conditions in that neighborhood, and 
remained there until his marriage, after which he came over into Champaign 
county and settled on a farm in Concord townsiiip, later moving up into 
Logan county, where he spent the rest of his life, a well-known and influen- 
tial resident of the community in which he lived. In addition to his fann- 
ing oi>erations he also was for years engaged as a Iniilding contractor and 
built numerous school houses and dwelling houses. I"'or twelve years he 
was a member of the board of county commissioners of Logan county and 
was serving on that lx)ard at the time of his death. He- was a Republican 
and was long regarded as one of the leaders of that part\- in Logan county. 
For years he was a class leader in the Methodist church ;uk1 took an active 
part in church work and in other good works. He \\ as a well-read man and 
was well informed on general and current matters. Thomas .\. Pool died 
at his home in Logan county on March 20. 1869, he then Ijcing fifty-one years 
of age. His widow survived him many years, her death occurring in March. 
1910. She was born in 1821, a daughter of David and Morence (Taylor) 
Monroe, and was the third and last-born of the children born to that union, 
the others having been Angus, who went West in the fifties and diere died, 
and Susan, who married J. P. Neerand lived in Concord township, this 
county. David Monroe was a farmer of Concord township and was twice 
married, his second wife having been a E'letcher. To that second union three 
children also were born, Florence, who married a Wilson and lived at 
Degraff; Felina, who married Henry LIuling, of Logan county, and Relx-cca. 
who married James McFarland. To Thomas A. and Nancy T. ( Monroe) 
l*ool seven children were born, of whom the subject of this sketch was the 
third in order of birth, the others being as follow : Philena, who married 
Marion Pegg, of Shelby county; George W., a retired farmer, now living 
at Ouincy, this state: Mary, who married Robert Moore, of Logan county, 
and is now deceased; John, a carpenter and blacksmith, now li\ing at Saw- 
telle, California; ]<"lora, widow of George Stewart, who is now making her 
liome at Ouincy, this state, and Emma, widow of J. W. Allinger, of Sidney. 
David A. Pool was reared on a farm and completed his schooling in 
the schools at Degraflf. after which he taught school for a time. On May 
10, 1864. he then being but eighteen years of age, he enlisted for .service 
in the Union army and went to the front as a member of Conipanv 1*". One- 
Hundred and Thirty-second Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, with whicli 
command he served until the clo.se of the war, the greater part of the 
service being performed in the line of guard duty at Bermuda Hundred, 
Virginia, on llie James i-i\er. I'pon the completion of his niilitar\- scrxicc 



CHAMPAICN COl^NTY. OHIO. 243 

Mr. I'ool returned home and after the death of his father in 1S69 he took 
charge of the home farm. .Vfter his marriage in the spring of 1871 lie 
located on a farm in Shelhy county, where he remained for five years, at 
the end of which time he came to this county and located on a farm in Adams 
township, later moving to a farm in Salem township, where he established 
his home and where he remained, quite successfully engaged in farming, until 
1909, in which year he retired from the farm and moved to Urbana. buying 
a house at 115 Lincoln avenue, where he and his wife have since made their 
home and where they are very comfortably and \ery pleasantly situated. 
It was on March 2, [871, that David A. Pool was united in marriage 
to Louisa J. Harl)our, who was born in Concord township, this county, 
(laughter of Henry and Nancy Harbour, pioneer residents of that community, 
who spent their last days there, and to this union eight children have been 
born, namely: John H., night clerk in the Lrbana postoffice, who first mar- 
ried Myrtle Neeld and after her death married Charlotte McDarr; Thomas 
Emmet, a mail carrier at Columbus; Otto, who married Eftie Powell and is 
engaged in farming in Salem townshij). this county; Clarence, who married 
Lulu Wood nancy and is farming his father's farm in Salem township; 
Verdie. who married Fern Anderson and who since the death of her hus- 
band has been making her home with her parents; Carl, unmarried, who is 
farming in Alberta. Canada; Harry, a member of the class of 1918. North- 
western Medical College, Cleveland, and Raymond D., who died in 1902, 
at the age of twelve years. Mr. and Mrs. Pool are members of Grace Metho- 
dist Episcopal church and take a proper part in church work, as well as in 
the general good works of the community. Mr. Pool is a member (^f W. A. 
Brand Post No. 98, Grand Army of the Republic, at Url,)ana. and takes an 
active interest in the affairs of that patriotic organization. 



SAMCEl, E. BLACK. 



Samuel E. Black, farmer, v.ho owns land in l)oth kust and Wayne 
townships. Champaign count}-, was born in Wayne township, this county, 
Xovem])er 26, 185 1. Me is a son of Peter and Catherine (Felgar) Black, 
who were married March 9. 1850. I^eter Black was born in Wayne town- 
ship. Champaign countv. and he w.'is a son of Peter Black of Pennsylvania, 
who married Mary Hutrhcs of that slate. He was of German stock. He 
was the tir>t of the Black famil}- to come to Chamijaign county. Ohio, and 



J4^ Cf[AATl'y\TGN COUNTY. OHIO. 

was an early settler in Wayne t(^\vnship. becoming- owner of one thousand 
acres a1 Brush Lake, and here he spent the rest of his life. His family con- 
sisted of the following children; Isaac was the eldest; Sarah married Samuel 
Mitchell: Hannah married, first. J- Harlan, and later Hartland Gowey; 
Lydia married J<^hn Chapman: Peter, father of Samuel F. Black nf this 
sketch. 

Peter Black was reared on the home farm here and attended the early- 
ilay schools, taught in a log house. He went to Iowa about 1849, locating in 
Henry county, where he spent one year, then returned to Champaign county 
and bought a farm in Wayne township, on which he spent the rest of his 
life, dying December 26. 1900. His wife died February ti. 1907. He 
became, like his father before him. one of the leading farmers of his locality, 
owning abotit one thousand acres of valuable land at Brush Lake, and car- 
ried on general farming and stock raising on an extensive scale. His family 
consisted of nine children, namely: Samuel F.. subject of this sketch; 
Isaac F.. born October 3, 1853. married January 2, 1876, Eliza Corbett. and 
they live near Mechanicsburg. this county: Henry E., born January 14, 1856. 
married Jennie Swisher, who lives near Cable, Champaign county, he being 
now deceased; Jasper A., born September 26, 1858, died November 8. 1864; 
Peter A., born September 25. 1861, married ?21sie Freeman and they live 
in Rush township; Mary L., born August 28, 1863, married William Berry, 
of Cable; Emma, born April 2, t866, died December 20, 1891, she had mar- 
ried Joseph Diltz, December 2y, t888: Charles B.. born March 10. 1868, is 
engaged in the real estate business at Ithica. New York; he married a Miss 
Giten, first, and later Bertha Shistzer; Cora, youngest of the seven children, 
was born September 18. 1871. and died February 11, 1896. 

Samuel F. Black was reared on the home farm, and he attended the 
district schools in Wayne township. He remained at home until 1876 when 
he took up farming for himself in Wayne township on rented land, later 
bought his present excellent farm, in January, 1907, on which he has made 
man) improvements and has since carried on general farming and stock 
raising successfully. He has a good farm of one hundred and thirty-seven 
acres and a fine home and good outbuildings. On September 8. 1890, he 
married Laura G. Stokes, of Salem township, this county, and a daughter 
of William and Margaret (Petty) Stokes, of Salem township, a sketch of 
whom appears elsewhere in this work. Mr. Black also owns fifty acres in 
another part of Wayne township. He carries on general farming and stock 
raising successfully. He raises a good grade of cattle, horses, hogs and 
sheep. Politically, he is a Republican. 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 247 

SAMUEL CHANCE. Al. D. 

The late Dr. Samuel Chance, formerly and for years one of Urbana's 
best-known druggists and physicians, was a native of this county and here 
spent all his life. Ele was born ii] the village of Westville on September 15, 
1833, a son of James and Mary (Kenton) Chance, the latter of whom was 
the daughter of Thomas Kenton. James Chance was a native of Maryland, 
who came to this county in the days of his young manhood and later married 
and established his home on the old Kenton homestead, where he spent the 
remainder of his life. ?Ie was twice married, his second wife having been 
Deborah Morris, widow of John Morris. By his first marriage he was the 
father of four children and by his second, two. 

Reared on a farm, Samuel Chance received his early schooling in the 
Westville schools and afterward taught school and sold clocks for a time. 
He then entered jNIiami Medical College and was graduated from that insti- 
tution in 1859. He married in that same year and after a year spent in 
hospital work entered upon the practice of his profession at Kings Creek, 
in this county, where he was located for five years, at the end of which time 
lie moved to Urbana. where he opened a drug store and was there engaged 
in the drug business and in the ])ractice of his profession until his retire- 
ment in 1888. After his retirement Doctor Chance continued to make his 
home in Urbana and there spent his last days, his death occurring in 1892. 
Doctor Chance was a Democrat and took an active part in local politics. 
He was a Knight Templar Mason and took a warm interest in Masonic 
affairs. He was a member of the Baptist church and took a proper interest 
in church work. 

It was on June i, 1859, that Dr. Samuel Chance was united in marriage 
to Elizabeth Steinbarger, who was born near Urbana, a daughter of David 
and Lucy H. (Gaines) Steinbarger. both natives of Virginia, the former of 
whom was a son of John Steinbarger. a native of Germany and a soldier in 
the patriot army during the Revolutionary War, who first settled in Vir- 
ginia and later moved to Indiana Territory and settled near Taylorsville, in 
the White Water valley, where he spent his last days. After the death of 
his father David Steinbarger came over into Ohio and settled in this county, 
engaging in the milling business on Mad River. To Dr. Samuel Chance and 
wife two children were born, Lucy, who is at home with her widowed mother 
and who has for years been the assistant secretary of the Home Loan Com- 
])any of Urbana. and Frank S.. station agent for the Erie Railroad Company 



248 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY. OHIO. 

at Urbana. Frank S. Chance was born at Urbana on September 15, 1870, 
and was graduated from the high school there in 1891. After a year spent 
in a drug store at Dayton he entered the employ of the Erie at Urbana and 
in 19 1 6 was made agent for the company at that place. He married Stella 
Whittaker and has two children, Harry and Helen. 



DARIUS T. RUNKLE 



Darius T. Runkle, agent for the Krie Railroad Company at Mingo, this 
county, president of the school board of that village and for many years 
actively identified with the growing interests of that place, is a native son 
of Champaign county and has lived here all his life. He was born on a 
farm in the Mt. Tabor neigh Ix:)rhood, in Salem township, September 22, 
1850, son of Lewis and Janet ( Rarks ) Runkle. natives of New Jersey, who 
were married in that state, where they remained. Lewis Runkle was there 
engaged in the blacksmithing business tmtil about 1840. when they came to 
Ohio and settled in Champaign county, where thev .spent the remainder of 
their lives. Upon coming to this county Lewis Runkle l^ought an eightx- 
acre farm near Mt. Tal)or and there established his home. He was a good 
farmer and prospered in his operations, becoming one of the substantial and 
influential farmers of that section of the county, giving all his children, after 
their marriage, ample assistance in the way of seeming homes for themselves. 
Lewis Runkle died at his honre in .Salem tcnvnship on February 23, 1901. and 
his widow survixcd liini for eleven years, her death occurring in 1912. The}' 
were the parents of six children, those besides the subject of this sketch 
being as follow; John IL. of Mingo; Dr. VV^ S. Runkle. of Washington, 
Kansas: Don I*. Runkle, of iVlingo; Ida, wife of F>ank Benson, of Le Mars. 
Iowa, and Ada, wife of Robert Kelly. 

Reared on the home farm, Darius '!'. Runkle received his early school- 
ing in the schools in the neighborhood of his home and uiion completing the 
course there went to Columbus, where he took a course in a business college, 
upon the completion of which he w;is engaged as a clerk in the store of J. L. 
(iuthridge at .Mingo. 'I"v,<i years later he began working in the local office 
of the Erie Railroad C"onipan\- at Mingo and on (October 1. 1874, he then 
being twentA-four years of age. he was made agent for the l'>ie at that station 
and has ever since occui)ied that jjosition, having thus been in the service of 
the railroad conipau}- longer than any other station ;igent on that division of 




DARIUS T. RUNKLE. 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY. OHIO. 24Q 

the roac!. .Mr. Runkie has ever given his close attention to the duties attend- 
ing- Iiis .^cr\ ice with the raih-oad company and has Hkewise lahored diHgentlv 
for the nplniilding- of the village in which he so long has made his home. 
He is now president of the local school hoard and in other ways has con- 
trjhiited of his time and energies to the pnhlic service, long having lieen 
recognized as one of the leading citizens of Mingo. 

Tn iS/.;] Darius T. Runkie was united in marriage to I.ouie J. Johnson, 
daughter of Jonathan and Sarah J. ( Guthridge ) Johnson, and to this union 
one child has heen horn, a daughter. Xellie. who married L. C. Petrv and has 
one child, a daughter. Ruth Mar}-. .Mrs. Runkie <lied on Decemher 2i^. 
1902. Mr. Runkie is a men-ihcr of the Baptist church and for forty-five 
years has Ijcen clerk of the local congregation (jf diat church. He also is a 
member of the board of deacons of the church and has ever given his earnest 
attention to church affairs. He is a Knight Templar Mason and gives his 
close attention to the affairs of the order. 



LEVI S. RAFF. 



Levi S. Raff, an honored xeteran of the Cixil \\ ar and a retired car- 
penter and cabinet-maker living at L^rbana. was born in Wayne countv. this 
state. September 29, 1848. son of Henry B. and Jaut (Rutter) Raff, botli 
of whom were born in Lancaster county. Pennsylvania, and who had come 
to this state in the days of their youth, their last days being spent in West 
Liberty. 

Henry B. Raff was left an orphan when se\ en \ears of age. one of the 
four children left by his parents, three sons and one daughtei-. the other sons 
having been John and Christopher. He Jater came to this state with the 
Rutter family and with them settled in Logan county. Fe\i and Polly Ann 
Rutter and their family being among the early settlers of that count}-. The}- 
had seven children. Jay, James. Levi. Josiah. Louis. Mattie and Jane. Henr\- 
B. Raff grew to manhood in Logan county, receiving a limited schooling in 
the primitive schools of that time and place. He married Jane Rutter. 
youngest daughter of Levi Rutter. and then located in Wayne comu}-. h^)r 
.some time he was engaged as a foreman in railroad work and in 185^^ 
returned to Logan county, where he was living when the Ci\-il \\';n- broke out. 
He enlisted for service in the Union army and went to the front as a mem- 
ber of Company L Forty-second Regiment. Ohio \^olunteer Infantry, and 



.'.^O CHAMPAIGN COUNTY. OHIO. 

served for three years in the j\rmy of the Cumberland, under General Grant. 
In the meantime his wife and the family moved to West Liberty and upon 
the completion of his military service he rejoined them there and engaged 
in the carpenter trade at that place, there spending the rest of his life, his 
death occurring in 1906, he then being eighty-six years and ten months of 
age. He was an active member of the local post of the Grand Arm}- of the 
Republic at West Liberty and he and his wife were members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church. They were the parents of nine children of whom the sub- 
ject of this sketch was the fourth in order of birth, the others being as fol- 
low : Jerry, who enlisted for service in the L'nion army during the Civil 
War, a member of Company I, First Regiment, Ohio Volunteer infantry, 
and died in camp in Kentucky in 1862; Christian, who died in January, 
1866; Mary Jane, unmarried, who is living at West Liberty; William, a 
lawyer, living at West Liberty: James A., a stonecutter, of West Liberty: 
Rosalie, wife of Edward Mathews, of West Liberty: Osmer L., a cigarmaker, 
now deceased, and Elmer, who died at the age of three months. After the 
death of the mother of these children, Henry B. Raff married, secondly, 
Esther Elder, of West Liberty. 

Levi S. Raff received his schooling at West Liberty and when lifteen 
years of age enlisted at that place for service in the Union army during the 
continuance of the Civil War, going out with Company C, Twelfth Regi- 
ment, Ohio Volunteer cavalry. At Camp Cleveland the Twelfth Ohio was 
divided, part of the regiment going to Columbus, another part to Camp 
Denison and a third, to Johnson's Island. It was at this latter station that 
Mr. Raff found himself stationed at the beginning of his service and he 
remained there until March, 1864, when the detachment to which he was 
attached was sent to Camp Denison and was there mounted, equipped and 
drilled for the cavalry, a few weeks later being ordered to Louisville, Ken- 
tucky, as a part of the First Brigade, First Cavalry, and was sent through 
the South on scouting service, being known as Burbridge's "Night Owls." 
(^ne June 9, 1864. this detachment was in action against Morgan's raiders 
at Mt. Sterling, Kentucky, and on June 1 1 at Cynthiana, thence back to Lex- 
ington, where it remained in camp a few weeks, at the end of which time it 
was sent on a raid through Kentucky and Virginia, doing general scout duty. 
On October 2, 1864, these "Night Owls" met with a reverse at Saltville. 
Virginia, and returned to their base at Lexington, later joining Stoneman's 
forces at Nashville, Tennessee, a part of the noted force known as Stone- 
man's Raiders, and from Nashville made a dash through to Chattanooga, 
Knoxville, Strawberry Plains. Bean Station, thence on another extensive 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY. (1T1IO. 25 1 

raid through X'irginia. Georgia, the Carolinas. Alabama and Tennessee, being 
seventy-three days in the saddle with very little rest, operating on Sherman's 
extreme left wing, and were later ordered back to Tennesse to join General 
Thomas and thereafter performed scout duty until the close of the war. 
During this taxing period of service Mr. Rafif was laid up for nearly two 
months with an attack of typhoid fever and his health was badly impaired. 
He was mustered out at Nashville on November 14. 1865. 'i"^' returned to 
Ohio, where he received his final discharge. 

Upon the completion of his military service Mr. Raff returned to West 
Liberty and there became employed at cabinet-making. After his marriage 
in 1873 he located at St. Paris, in this county, and five years later moved to 
Urbana, where he has since made his home. Upon taking up his residence 
in Urbana Mr. Raff took up his trade as a carpenter and cabinet-maker and 
continued thus engaged until his retirement from active business. 

As noted above, it was in 1873 that Levi S. Raff' was united in mar- 
riage to Mary C. Long, of St. Paris, this county, daughter of Jesse and 
Nancy Long, the former of whom was a tailor, and to that union was born 
one child, a son, Frank B. Raff, a telegraph operator for the Big Four Rail- 
road Conipan}' at Urbana. Frank B. Raff married Victoria Brown and has 
three children. Gladys, Lucille and Richard. He is a Mason and a member 
I if the local lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at Urbana. Mrs. 
Mary C. Raff is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 



CHARLES EDMUND GAUMER. 

It is not too much to say that the career of a newspaper man is richer 
in possibilities than practically any other vocation in life. His business is 
to find out what other people are doing, and having found this out. to present 
such of it to the pubHc as in his judgment the public should know. Too 
often the editorial management finds itself in conflict with the business man- 
agement of the paper. Jtist what shall be said of the citizens of the com- 
munity the paper serves, and just how much, are two considerations that 
the editor must face day by day. Shall he tell all he knows of official short- 
comings or shall he keep such facts out of his paper — if a promoter comes 
to his city with a dubious proposition shall he tell his readers about it — if 
anything goes awry in the community shall he set forth the facts? In 



2-,2 CHAMPAIGN COUXTY, OHIO. 

Other words, it is a wise man who can run a paper these clays and do full 
justice to both the editorial and business sides of his paper. 

Charles E. Gaumer is a newspaper man who has tried to the best of 
his ability to manage a paper from both viewpoints, and the results of his 
efforts show that he has been attended with an unusual degree of success. 
He has been in the business since his boyhood days ; in fact, it might be 
said that he grew up in a newspa])cr office, his father before him having 
been a newspai)er man. While still in the Urbana high school he was 
helping his father edit the Davocrat. and immediately on his graduation 
from the high school in 1894, at the age of eighteen, he took over the com- 
plete management of the paper. Mc continued as head of the paper until 
-August 2^, 1898, when he bought the Monticello, Illinois, Bulletin. He 
remained there three years and then, June 10, 190T, bought the Middletown. 
Ohio. Signal, which he managed successfully for the following seven years. 
His next change took him to Champaign, Illinois, where he served on the 
editorial staff of the Daily Sens from September 15, 1908, to August i. 
1910. On the latter date he returned to his old home at Urbana. and be- 
came associated with his bn^tber. I'"rank C.. as managing editor oi the 
Democrat. 

\\r. (i.'uuiier remained with the Dcinucrat in the capacity of managing- 
editor for seven \ ears, leaving the paper in August. 19 17, to become assistant 
managing editor of the Marion, Ohio, Daily Star, of which Senator Warren 
(]. Harding is owner and publi.sher. During his long connection with the 
local paper in Crbana he had the satisfaction of seeing its circulation increase 
from \ear to year, and no small credit for this steady growth was due to 
his al)ilit\- as editor. Possessed of a ready pen and a gift for pungent ex- 
]jression his st\ie was of the kind which makes a paper readable. His long 
ac(|uaintance with the peo[)le of Urbana was another factor which enabled 
him to write clearly of k»cal happenings from tlay to day. while he naturally 
added to his store of knowledge of local conditions with each succeeding- 
vear. However, he decided that a change of location would be an advantage 
to him and when tlie op])ortunity presented itself to l)ecome associated with 
tile Marion Daily Star he deci<led to accept it. lie still retains his interest 
in the ' iaunier rublishing Companx. 1 lis many friends in L'irljana regret 
to see him lea\ e the citw and wish him contiiuied success in his new field. 

Air. (laumer was born in .Marseilles. Ohio. Xovember 28. 1876. a son 
of Dr. Thomas M. and Eliza M. Gaumer. His father died in 1893 and his 
mother is still residing in Urbana. .\ sketch of Doctor Gaumer appears else- 
where in this \o|ume and the reader is referred to it for the genealogy of 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 253 

the Gaunicr family. l( might he added, however, in this connection, that 
Doctor Gaumer was a practicing physician for several years before he 
engaged in newspaper work. He spent the hist several years of his life in 
the editorial chair. His three sons have followed in his footsteps, each of 
them now being in active newspaper work. 

Charles E. Gaumer was married on Septeml)er 7. 1898, to Effie Aletta 
Landis, a daughter of Samuel W. and Jennie M. Eandis. Mrs. Gaumer was 
l)orn in Urbana on -\ugust 17. 1879. and is the youngest of four children, 
the others being James. George and Earl E. Mr. and Mrs. Gaumer have 
three children: Lois Mahala, born Noveml^er 30, 1899; Edmimd Landis, 
b(jrn January 29, 1901 ; Robbin Irene, born May 14, 1906. The family are 
members of the Urbana Lutheran church. Mr. Gaumer is a deacon in the 
church and was superintendent of the Sunday school for the four vears 
preceding 1914. bVaternally, he is a member of Harmony lodge. Free 
and Acce]itc(l Masons. 



ELIJAH A. JM^TTIGREW. 

Elijah A. Pettigrew. a well-known and substantial retired farmer of 
Champaign county, now living at Urbana. where he has made his home 
since 1907. is a X'irginian In birth, but has been a resident of this county 
since he was twenty-one years of age. He was born in Nicholas county, in 
West Virginia. March 9, 1859, son of Andrew Jackson and Sarah J. 
( Stephenson ) Pettigrew. she born in West Virginia and he in X'irginia. 
and whose last days w^ere spent in Nicholas county. 

Andrew Jackson Pettigrew, whose father was a native of Dublin, J re- 
land, wdio had come to this country in his youth and had established his 
home in X'irginia. grew up in Rockbridge county, that state, near the "nat- 
ural bridge." and became a carpenter, later moving to Nicholas county, in 
the western i)art of the state, where he began working at his trade and where 
he married, established his home and spent the rest of his life. He died many 
}ears before his wife, wdio survived him until 1914- ■'^lie being eighty-two 
years of age at the time of her death. She was a cousin of George Wesley 
Atkinson, former governor of XX'est X'irginia and for years judg-e of the 
L'nited States court of claims. She was a member of the Methodi.st Epis- 
copal church and her husband was a member of the Baptist church. They 
were the parents of eleven sons, of whom the subject of this sketch was the 
hfth in order of birth, the others being as follow: David, who is a farmer 



254 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 



living in Ashtabula county, this state: John, a carpenter, who died in Clay 
county, West Virginia, in 1908: George, who died in his youth; Samuel F.. 
a toolmaker, living at Springfield, this state; James, a merchant, of Sum- 
mersville, West Virginia; Albert, a merchant, of Jefferson, this state; Harvey 
B., a rural mail carrier living at Urbana; Charles, a farmer living in Green- 
briar county. West Virginia ; Walter, a farmer living in Nicholas countVr 
in that same state, and Henry, a farmer, living at Akron, this state. 

Elijah A. Pettigrew was reared on a farm in Nicholas county, receiv- 
ing his schooling in the schools in the neighborhood of his home, and re- 
mained there, farming, until he was twenty-one years of age. when, in the 
spring of 1880, he came to Champaign county and became engaged in farm- 
ing in Concord township and was there for three years, or until after his 
marriage in 1883, when he located in Mad River township. Two years 
later he moved on a farm on Pretty Prairie, in Urbana township, and there 
estal)lished his home and made that his place of residence until his retire- 
ment from the active labors of the farm and removal, in 1907, to Urbana, 
where he has since resided and where he is very comfortabl}- situated. Mr. 
Pettigrew is the owner of a fine farm of one hundred and twenty-nine acres 
on I'retty Prairie and continues to give his close personal attention to the 
general management of the same. In addition to his general farming he 
has given considerable attention to the raising of live stock, including sev- 
eral race horses that have attained more than local fame. Mr. Pettigrew is 
a Republican and gives a good citizen's attention to political affairs, but 
has not been a seeker after public office. 

Mr. Pettigrew has been thrice married. As noted above, he was united 
in marriage in 1883 to Elizabeth Hough, of Concord township, this county, 
a daughter of William and Margaret Hough, and to that union one child 
was born, a son, Floyd H., born on .Vpril 15, 1885. Floyd H. Pettigrew. 
who is now engaged in the plumbing business at Hamilton, Ohio, married 
Fmma Johnson and has two children, Ruth and Helen. After the death 
of his first wile Mr. Pettigrew married Martha J. I'Vance. of this county, 
daughter of John France, a cabinet-maker, and after her death he married 
V^erna E. Mearns. of Summersville. West Virginia, daughter of A. J. and 
Lola Mearns. the former of whom was a merchant at that place. Mr. and 
Mrs. Pettigrew have a pleasant home at Urbana and take a ])roper part in 
the general .social activities of their home town. Mrs. Pettigrew is a mem- 
ber of the Presbyterian church there and both she and her husband do their 
])art in helping to promole the general good works of the commimit\ . 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 255 

JOHN L. MOORK. 

The late John L. Moore, an honored veteran of the Civil War and for 
years a well-known bnildin.e^ contractor at L'rbana, who died at his home in 
thaf city on February 2, 191 7, was a native of the state of Pennsylvania, born 
on January 2. 1842, son of the Rev. William and Margaret ( Tatman ) Moore, 
who were the parents of five children, of whom the subject of this memo- 
rial sketch was the eldest, the others being as follow : Kate, who married 
David Chaney and lives at Wausau, Wisconsin ; Sarah, who married John 
Shull and lives at Riley, Kansas ; Samuel, who lives at South Blooming- 
ville, Ohio, and Margaret, who married William Hammond, and lives at 
Portis, Kansas. The Rev. William Moore was a minister of the Methodist 
Episcopal church and during the many years of his ministrv preached in 
Pennsylvania, in Ohio and in Kansas. 

John L. Moore early learned the trade of carpenter and became a skilled 
workman in that line, afterward engaging in building contracting on his own 
account and was quite successfully engaged until his death. He was but 
nineteen years of age when the Civil War broke out and there being parental 
objection to his participation in that struggle, he ran away from home and 
enlisted in Indiana as a private in Company H, One Hundred and b^ifth Regi- 
ment, Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and served with that command until the 
close of the war. Upon the completion of his military service Afr. Moore 
located at Chillicothe, this state, where he engaged in carpentering and 
where he married, later moving to Dayton, wliere he remained until 1896. 
in which year he moved to Urbana, where he spent the remainder of his 
life, successfully engaged as a building contractor. His wife died in Urbana 
in 1899, three years after moving there. Mr. Moore was an active member 
of W. A. Brand Post, Grand Army of the Republic, at L'rbana. and took a 
warm interest in the afTairs of that patriotic organization. On his deathbed 
he confessed faith in the Catholic church and received the last rites of that 
church. His wife and children were members of the Methodist b4:)iscopal 
church. 

At Chillicothe, this state, John L. Moore was united in marriage to 
Lydia A. Atkinson, who was born at Albany, West Virginia, July 8, 1854. 
daughter of James and Margaret Atkinson, and to that union three children 
were born. Minnie A.. W^illiam C. who died at the age of nineteen years, 
and Frank C. who also died at the age of nineteen years. 

Minnie A. Moore was born at Chillicothe. Ohio, and was united in 



2^(> CHAMPAIGN COUXTV. OHIO. 

marriage to VVilliani K. Burton, wlio was horn at Dayton, Ohio, and who at 
the age of three years moved to Urljana, where he spent the rest of his Hfe, 
his death occurring- on Deceniher 24, 1915. He was a painter and decor- 
ator and for years was connected with the work of the IlHnois Car Company 
at Urbana. To William K. and Minnie A. (Moore) Burton two children 
were born, William and Helen, both of whom are making their home with 
their mother at Crbana. William Burton is a barber, at which trade he 
fc^rmerly worked at Cleveland and was at one time the owner of two barber 
shops at Urbana. On June 11, 1909, he married Martha Smith, of Ken- 
tucky, and has one child, a daughter, Helen Marie, born on July J", 1916. 



WILLIAM H. VERMILLION. 

William H. Vermillion, a veteran of the Civil War and a substantial 
farmer and dairyman of Union townshi]), born on a farm in the south- 
west part of Union township on March 19, 1844, son of Daniel and Eliza 
(Zumbro) Vermillion, the former of whom was born in Muskingum county, 
this state, and the latter in the state of Virginia, whose last days were 
spent in the village of Mutual, this county. 

Daniel Vermillion was but a child when his parents, (ieorge Vermillion 
and wife, natives of Virginia, moved from Muskingum countv to Cham- 
paign county and he grew to manhood here and was here married. During- 
the days of his young manhood he had been engaged wcMking as a cabinet- 
maker in Urbana, but after his marriage he located on a farm on Buck 
creek, in Union township, and was for nine years there engaged in farming. 
He then moved with his family to the village of Mutual and became engaged 
as a carpenter, following- that vocation until he was past middle age, when 
he took up wagon-making and was thus engaged at that place the rest of his 
life, his death occurring there in 1872. Daniel Vermillion and wife w'ere 
the parents of nine children, of whom five are still living, those besides the 
subject of this sketch being John, Samuel, Sarah and Jane. 

William H. Vermillion received his .schooling in the village of Mutual, 
the first school he attended being held in a little log school house, and at 
the age of twelve years he began working on a farm. He continued engaged 
at farm labor until May 2, 1864, when he enlisted for service in Company 
1^ One Hundred and Thirty-fourth Regiment. Ohio \^)lunteer Infantry, 
and with that command served for one hundred da\s. He then returned 




WILLIAM H. VERMILLION 



CHAMPAIGX COUNTY, OHIO. 257 

home and re-enlisted as a member of Company E, One Hundred and Eig-hty- 
lifth Regiment. Ohio Vokmteer Infantry, and with this latter command 
served for eight months, at the end of which time he returned to this countv. 
After his marriage, in the spring of 1866, he established his home on a farm 
he rented, continuing as a renter until he bought his first land, a tract of 
thirty-six acres, a part of his present well-improved farm of one hundred 
and seventy acres in Union township, where he ever since has made his 
home and where he and his family are very comfortably situated. All of Mr. 
Vermillion's farm is under cultivation save a small tract of woodland. For 
years he has devoted a good deal of his attention to dairying and at present 
is maintaining a herd of thirty-five dairy cows and has an extensive busi- 
ness in that line. His place is on rural mail route Xo. i out of Cable. 

Mr. Vermillion has been twice married. On March 31, 1866, he was 
united in marriage to Elizabeth Booth, daughter of John and Marian Booth, 
and to that union three children were born, Edwin, who married Matilda 
Gurnis; Effie, wife of Charles Smith, and Gertrude, wife of Earl Heller. 
The mother of these children died in 1895 ^^^ ^^^- Vermillion later married 
Mary Speakman, to which union two children have been born, Gladys and 
Robert. Mr. and Mrs. Vermillion are members of the Methodist Epispopal 
church, in which for years Mr. VermilHon has served as a class leader. He 
also is a steward of the church and a member of the board of trustees and 
has long given his earnest attention to church affairs. Mr. Vermillion is an 
active member of the local post of the Grand Army of the Republic at Urbana 
and takes a warm interest in the affairs of the same. 



WILLIAM A. JOHNSON. 

William A. Johnson, a substantial landowner and stockman of this 
county, former trustee of Union township and former trustee of Wayne 
township, now living at Cable, where he is extensively engaged in the 
live stock business, is a native son of Champaign county and has lived here 
all his life. He was born on a farm in Union township on April 22, 1857. 
son of James and Mary (Woodard) Johnson, both of whom also were 
born in this county, the former in Wayne township and the latter in Rush 
township, and whose last days were spent in Union township. 

James Johnson was a son of James and Matilda Johnson, Virginians, 
(17a) 



258 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

who came to this state after their marriage and located in Champaign eountw 
setthng hrst in Wayne township and later moving down into Union town- 
ship, where they established their home and where they spent the remainder 
of their lives, useful and influential pioneers of that part of the county. 
The junior James Johnson was but a lad when his parents moved to Union 
township and there he grew to manhood on the home farm. After his 
marriage to Mary \Voodard, who was born in the neighboring township of 
Rush, daughter of pioneer parents, he established his home on a farm in 
Union township and there he spent the remainder of his life, one of the 
best-known and most influential farmers of the neighborhood in which he 
lived. His death occurred in March, 1901. His wife had preceded him to 
the grave about a year, her death having occurred in 1900. They were the 
parents of seven children, of whom but three are now living, the subject of 
this .sketch having two brothers, Olney and Charles Johnson. 

William A. Johnson grew to manhood on the home place in Union 
township, receiving his schooling in the district school in that neighborhood, 
and from the days of his boyhood was a valued assistant to his father in the 
laljors of developing and improving the home farm. He later became a 
jx'irtner of his father in the operation of the farm and after awhile bought 
the home place of one hundred and two and one-half acres and there con- 
tinued farming and stock raising until in March. 1909. when he retired 
from the farm and moved to Cable, where he has since made his home. 
Upon leaving the farm Mr. Johnson turned his attention to the buying and 
selling of live stock and has since l)een engaged in that business, shipping 
to the Pittsburgh markets. Xot long after locating at Cable he bought a 
fine farm of one hundred and ten acres in Wayne township, to the operation 
of which he gives considerable personal attention. Some time ago he sold 
his farm in Union townshij). Mr. Johnson is a Republican and for years 
has given close attention to local political affairs. \un seven vears he served 
as trustee of Union township and for four \ears as trustee of Wayne town- 
ship and is now serving as a member of the local school lx)ard at Cable, in 
that ca]:)acity doing nmch to promote tlie interests of the schools in that 
pleasant and flourishing village. 

On April 22, 1886, William .\. Johnson was united in marriage to linola 
Durnell, who was born in Wayne townshij). this countv. daughter of Booker 
R. and Catherine (Hall) Durnell, both of whom also were born in that town- 
ship, members of pioneer families, and were there married. Booker R. 
Durnell was a son of Hiram and Sarah (Middleton) Durnell, Virginians, 
who came to this countv at an earlv dav in the settlement of the same and 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 



^59 



btcanie substantial pioneers of Wayne township, where they estabhshed 
their home. During the progress of the Civil War Booker R. Durnell 
enlisted for service in behalf of the Union and went to the front as a private 
in Company K, One Hundred and Thirteenth Regiment, Ohio Volunteer 
infantr}-, with which command he served valiantly until he met a soldier's 
fate about a year later, at the battle of Kenesaw Mountain, June ij, 1864. 
iiis wife had died a little more than a year previously, her death having 
occurred on June 16, 1863, and their children were thus orphaned early. 
There were three of these children, Mrs. Johnson having two brothers. 
I firam and Kichard Durnell. Mr. and Mrs. Johnson have no children of 
iheir own, but they have reared four children with as much care and con- 
sideration as though they had been their own indeed. They are members 
of the Methodist Episcopal church and take a proper interest in church 
work and in other local good works. Mr. Johnson is one of Cable's most 
stil)stantial citizens and is in the forefront in all movements having to do 
with the advancement of the general interests of that thriving village. 



JOHN P. KNIGHT. 



The late John P. Knight, for years one of the best-known and most 
substantial farmers of Champaign county, who died at his home in Urbana 
township in 1905, was a native son of Ohio and lived in this state all his 
life. He was bcjrn in the neighboring county of Miami on February 18, 
1839. a son of William D. and T'^lizabeth (Palmer) Knight, also natives of 
that same county, members of two of the oldest families in this part of 
the state. William D. Knight's father was a native of Redstone, Penn- 
sylvania, who came to this state in the days of his young manhood, locating 
near Cincinnati, where he married and reared his family and died. On a 
])ioneer farm "William D. Knight grew to manhood and, with his mother, 
moved to Miami county and there later married Elizabeth Palmer, daughter 
of ])ioneer parents, and established his home on a farm in the neighborhood 
of her old home near Casstown. He moved to Champaign county in 1853 
and settled on a farm two and one-half miles south of Urbana, on the State 
road. He later retired, moved to Urbana, where he died in December, 
i8go. He and his wife were the parents of seven children, of whom but 
two now surviA-e. .Sidney Knight, of Urbana. and Stephen Knight, a prom- 
inent law>er at Chicago, who is now serving as countv attorney of Cook 



26o CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

county; the others, besides the subject of this inenKjrial sketch, having been 
Thomas. Wilford, Catherine and Margaret. 

Reared on the liome farm in Miami county, John P. Knight received 
his earh' schooHng in the district school in the neighborhood of his home 
and supplemented the same l)y a course in the Urbana school, after which 
for seven or eight vears he spent his winters in teaching" school, continuing 
meanwhile to farm during the sunmiers. After his marriage in 1865 he 
established his home on a farm in Urbana township, this county, and there 
spent the rest of his life, becoming a successful farmer and a man of wide 
influence throughout that part of the county. Mr. Knight was an earnest 
Republican and for years was looked upon as one of the leaders of that 
party in his part of the county, l-'or years he served as director of schools 
in his local district and did much to advance the cause of education there- 
about. He was an ardent advocate of any proper movement that would 
tend to increase the efficacy of the scho(;ls and took much interest in educa- 
tional affairs, giving his children every opportunity for acquiring liberal 
educations. Mr. Knight was an active member of the Baptist church, and 
ever took an earnest interest in church affairs and other good works. He 
had many warm friends throughout the county and his death on March 12. 
IQ05, w^as widely mourned. He enlisted at the beginning of the Civil War 
for three months service in Compan^■ H, Eightv-sixth Ohio \ ohmteer In- 
fantry. 

It was in the 3-ear 1865 that John P. Knight was united in marriage 
lo Jennie Rawlings. who was born in Urbana township, this county, a 
daughter of James and Susanna (McRoberts) Rawlings. prominent residents 
f>f that comnuinitw the former of whom was born in Kentucky and the 
latter in Urbana township, this county, daughter of pioneer parents. James 
Rawlings was twenty years of age when he came from Kentucky to Cham- 
]iaign county, Ohio, and there he v,'orked for farmers until he married. 
He then bought a farm on I'retty Prairie, where he spent the remainder of 
his life. After the death of his wife Susanna he married, secondly. Mrs. 
Jane Osborn. widow of James 0.sborn and a daughter of David Todd. By 
his fir-st marriage James Rawlings was the father of six children, of whom 
iVfrs. Knight, the third in order of birth, is now the only survivor, the others 
ha\'ing been as follow: William J. W., a memorial sketch of whom is pre- 
sented elsewhere in this volume; Mary, who was the wife of Mitchell Todd, 
a farmer of Urbana township; Thomas, who married Emma Humes and 
was also a farmer in ITrbana township; James, who married Laura Townley 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 261 

and was also a farmer in Urbana township, and Douglas, who married 
Alice Townley and was also a farmer in Urbana township. 

To John P. and Jennie (Rawlings) Knight four children were born, 
namely : William J. Knight, a graduate of Oberlin College, now engaged 
in the seed business at Urbana. who married Florence L. Dempsey and has 
three children. Paul D., Robert P. and John P. ; Edwin Knight, who served 
in the Second Illinois Volunteer Infantry in the Spanish- American war, and 
was on the firing line at the battle of Santiago, who died in his youth ; 
Harley 1^. Knight, who married Fannie Clark and is now farming the old 
home ])lace in Urbana township, who has five children, Mrs. Stella K. 
(irowden, Harold U.. Ruth H., Kenneth Ray and Edwin Sanford, and Earl 
Ivawlings Knight, who received his technical education at l\irdue University 
and is now engaged as superintendent of an extensive electrical concern, a 
branch of the .Mlis-Chalmers plant, at Norwood, a suburb of Cincinnati. 
Mrs. Knight is now making her home with her son, William J. Knight, at 
Urbana. She retains an active interest in church affairs, having for years 
been a member of the Methodist l^piscopal church, and in other local good 
works and has ever exerted her gentle influence in behalf of movements 
ha\-in<r to d<> with communitv betterment. 



S.\MUEL M. OVERMELD. 

.*~^amuel M. Overfield, postmaster at Woodstock, former mayor of that 
village and former member of the village council, has for years been re- 
garded as one of Woodstock's most energetic and influential citizens. He 
was born in this county on July i, 1862, and has lived here all his life. The 
Overfields were among the earliest settlers of Champaign county, having 
c(ime out here from \'irginia in 1826 and the family has been widely repre- 
sented throughout this part of the state in the succeeding generations since 
then. 

Samuel Overfield. great-grandfather of Postmaster Overfield. was 
the founder of the familv in Ohio. He was born in \'irginia. son of a 
Welshman who had come to this country during tlie progress of the Revo- 
lutionarv War and had been recutired before his departure from his native 
land to take an oath of allegiance to the crown. He landed on these shores 
shortly before the battle of \'orktown and was a witness to that engage- 
ment. Though strongh- sympathetic toward the cause of the colonists, his 



262 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

(lath of feall\- to his kin<^ prt-vented his participation on the side toward 
which his heart went out. He settled in \^irginia and there estaWished his 
lionie, becoming- a well-to-do citizen. His son, Samuel Overfield. became a 
freifjhter and for some time was engaged in hauling- between Staunton and 
Rnmnev, driving a six -horse team. He saved the money thus earned and 
presently bought a tract of five hundred acres of ^■'irginia land, nine miles 
from Clarksburg, established his home there and proceeded to clear and 
develop his land. He had made considerable prog;ress toward the develop- 
ment and stocking of his farm when one day a man drove up and informed 
liim that he would ha\'e to vacate the land, that he had no title to the same, 
the title under which he held possession having been fraudulently bestowed, 
iiivestig-ation revealed the truth of this statement and Samuel Overfield 
ttiok his horses and his movable belongings and came over into Ohio, driving 
on out to Champaign county and settling in Rush townshij), where he estab- 
lished his home and where he sjient his last days, an honored pioneer of that 
(•()mmunit\. lie and his family suffered numerous hardships, along with 
their pioneer neighbors, and some of their horses were stolen l)y the Indians, 
))ut they persevered and finally found themselves well established. Samuel 
( )verfield's wife. Mary Butcher, was of English descent. She was born at 
Mermantown. Pennsylvania, and was a child living there at the time of the 
])attle of Germantown during the Revolutionar}- War and ever retained a 
distinct recollection of the incident of the soldiers of the Continental army 
l)i]ing cannon balls in the dooryard of her father's home when they left 
for Virginia. Vmong- the children born to Samuel and Mary (Butcher) 
Overfield was Joab Overfield. who was born in Harrison county, Virginia, 
in 1803. 'i"^' ^^"''*' ^\'<i^ about twenty-three years of age when he came to 
( hampaign county with his parents. He became a substantial farmer in 
Rush township and there spent his last days. He married Beers-helba 
Tucker, also a member of one of the pioneer families in this county, and to 
ihat union six children were born, namely: Samuel, !\lary, Rebecca, Di.'uia. 
John and Susan. 

Reared on a farm in Rush town>liip, Samuel M. Overfield, great- 
grandson of the Virginian, Samuel Overfield, who became a pioneer of 
(hampaign countv, received his schooling in the district schools in the neigh- 
borhood of his home and as a young man was engaged for some time in 
farming. He then clerked in a store at Woodstock for awhile and then 
started a livery stable there which he conducted for five years, at the end 
of which time be established a general store in the village and was thus 
engaged in mercantile business for nine years. In 1803 ^1^' ^^'''^-'^ appointed 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY. OHIO. 263 

piistmaster of \\'ooc!.stock and served in that important public capacity from 
.\u.srust 3, 1893. to August 14. 1897, ^"d o" December 9, 1909. received his 
second commission as postmaster of the village and has since been serving 
in that capacity. Mr. Overfield is an active Democrat and has for years 
been regarded as one of the leaders of that party in the eastern part of the 
county. For four years he served as justice of the peace in and for Rush 
ttnvnship. was mayor of Woodstock for two years and also served for some 
time as a member of the village council, to all of which official duties he 
l)rought his most thoughtful attention, ever concerned for the welfare of 
the pubjic. Mr. Oerfield also for twelve years held a commission as a 
notary public and is widely known throughout that part of the countv in 
which his life has been spent. 

On June 19, 1901, Samuel M. Overtield was united in marriage to Alta 
Ruth Ott, of Mechanicsburg. and to this union two children have been born. 
Marion W. and Donald M. Mr. and Mrs. Overfield are members of the 
Christian church and give their interested attention to church work and 
the general social activities of their home town, helpful in promoting all 
worthy causes. Mr. Overfield is a Mason, a member of the lodge of that 
ancient order at Xorth l,ewisburg. and takes a warm interest in Masonic 
affairs. 



ROBERT J. EASON. 

Robert J. Eason, vice-president of the Bank of North Lewisburg and a 
well-known and substantial retired merchant and grain dealer is a native 
of the Keystone state, but has been a resident of Ohio and of North Lewis- 
burg since 1873. He was born at Pittsburgh. Pennsylvania, December 27, 
1854, son of John and Anna (Sly) Eason, both natives of England, born 
at Castle Cary, in Somersetshire, who were married there and after their 
marriage came to this country and were for a short time thereafter located 
at Brooklyn, New York, where John Eason became engaged in the milling- 
business, to which vocation lie had been trained in his native land. Some 
time later he moved to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where he further followed 
the milling business for several years, at the end of which time he located 
at Franklin, in that same state, where he followed his trade until presently 
he bought a mill at Columbus. Pennsylvania, and moved there. Not long 
afterward he sold that mill and bought another at Titusville, Pennsylvania, 
which he continued to operate until his death. John Eason came of a famih^ 



264 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY. OHIO. 

of millers, his father and his grandfather having l)een engaged in that voca- 
tion, and he became quite successful. Besides his milling operations at 
Titusville he was the owner of several grain elevators, including one at 
North Lewisburg, in this county. 

Upon completing the course in the liigh school at Titusville Robert J. 
Eason entered the Clinton Liberal Arts Institution at Clinton, New York, 
and after a course of instruction there entered Hamilton College. Uj^on 
completing his studies in the latter institution he returned home and f<)r a 
time thereafter occupied himself in acquiring a further acquaintance with 
his father's milling business and in 1873, he then being about eighteen 
years of age, was sent to North Lewisburg. this county, to take charge 
of his father's grain elevator at that place, and there he ever since has made 
his home, for many years one of the most progressive and influential busi- 
ness men in the northeastern part of the county. For twenty-fi\e years 
Mr. Eason remained engaged in the grain business at North Lewisburg and 
then he sold his grain elevator and for some time thereafter was engaged 
in the real-estate and general merchandising, being thus engaged until 
his final retirement from business. During all these years he gave his earnest 
attention to the general business affairs of his home town and years ago 
was elected vice-president of the Bank of Lewisburg. a position vvhicli he 
still occupies, one of the well-known bankers in Champaign county. 

Robert J. Eason married Jennie Hollingsworth. daughter of Doctor 
HoUingsworth and wife, and to this union two children have been born, Carrie. 
who married Doctor Boulger and has two children, Robert and Janet, and 
Robert H. Eason, of North Lewisburg. In his political belief Mr. Easdu 
is independent. He is a Knight Templar Mason and has for years taken a 
warm interest in Masonic affairs. 



SETH S. WINDER. 



Seth S. Winder, a retired farmer of North Lewisburg. Champaign 
countv, was born on December 14, 1841, in Zane township. Logan county, 
Ohio. He is a son of Thomas and Hannah (Wileman) Winder, both 
natives of Clark county. Ohio, where they grew u]) and were married, in 
1841 they moved to Logan county, Ohio, where they spent the rest of their 
active lives on a farm. He died at 'he age of seventy-seven years and she 
when seventv-three years old. They were life members of the bViends church. 




MR. AND MRS. SETH WINDER 



CHAMPAIGN COl'NTY. OHIO. 265 

Tlieir family consisted of ten children, named as follows: John, Edward. 
Aaron, Elizabeth and Abner are all deceased ; William lives in North Lewis- 
burg, Ohio: Maria W. is the wife of Caleb Lewis and they live in North 
Lewisburg-: Seth S., of this sketch: Deborah is deceased: and Seneca, who 
lives in Marion, Indiana. 

Seth S. Winder grew up on the home farm in i.ogan county and there 
he attended the common schools. There he engaged in farming until i8<)S. 
in which year he moved to North Lewisburg, Champaign county, where lie 
has since resided. He sold his farm in Logan county and bought his pres- 
ent home and several lots where he now lives. He has a Jinc cherry orchard 
and raises small fruits and garden truck. 

Mr. Winder was married in the fall of 1869 to Margaret A. Linvill, 
who was bom in Wayne township, this county, where she was reared and 
educated. She is a daughter of Hanes and Ann Lin\ill. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Winder four children have been born, two of whom died in infancy ; Lena 
M. married Frank Christopher and tliev- reside in W'ashington Court House. 
Ohio, and have two children, Marion and Margaret : Seneca married Alberta 
Hadley; thev live in Marion, Indiana, and have one child. Lowell. Mr. 
\^'inder is an ardent supporter of the temperance cause. He has been a 
member of the Friends church all his life. 



wiNi'ib:Ln T.\\L(^R shriglI':y. 

Winheld Taylor Shriglev. a well-known and suljstantial retired farmer 
of Wayne township, this county, and former trustee of that township, now 
living at Cable, was born in Coshocton county, Ohio. August 31. 1847. son 
of James and Eliza ( Shafifer ) Shrigley, the former of whom was a native 
of this state, born in Noble county, and the latter, of Virginia, born in 
Loudoun county. They were married in Noble c(xinty and later moved to 
Coshocton ccnuity, where for }ears James Shrigley was engaged in the 
mines and where he spent his last days, his death occurring there in 1892. 
he then being seventy-two years of age. His wife had ])receded him to the 
gra\e a year, her death having occurred in 1891, she then being seventy- 
three years of age. Thev were the parents of live children, of whom the 
subject of this sketch was the first-born, the others being as follow : John 
v.. a farmer and carpenter, of Roscoe. this state: Albert, a farmer, also of 
Roscoe: F.milv [.. deceased, and Marw widow of [ohn Pickerel, of Cable. 



266 CHAMPAKiN COUNTY, OHIO. 

lames Shriglei was a veteran of the Civil War, having- served as a member 
lit the One Hundred and Forty-tliird Regiment. Ohio Volunteer Infantry, 
during the huiulred-day service, rmd was stationed at Point of Rocks on 
tlie James river. 

Reared in (.oshocton county. Winfield T. Shrigley received his school- 
ing there and early began working in the mines. In the -spring of 1864, he 
then being hut sixteen years of age, he enlisted for service during the con- 
tinuance of the Civil War, as a member of C'ompany F. Eightieth Regiment. 
( )hi() X'olunteer Infantry, but on account of his youth and undersize he was 
rejected and his ambition to become a soldier thus was thwarted. He mar- 
ried in 187J and contiiuied to make his home in Coshocton county, where 
he Ijecame engaged in farming, until the early eighties when he came to this 
ccjunty and bought a farm of tifty-six acres in Wayne township, one and a 
lialf miles west of Cable, and there he made his home until the fall of 1916, 
when he retired from the active labors of the farm and- moved to Cable, 
where he is now living and where he and his family are very pleasantly 
situated. Mr. Shrigley is a Republican and ever since coming to this county 
has given local politics his earnest attention. For six years he served the 
public in the capacity of trustee of Wayne township and in other ways he 
has given ungrudgingly of his services in behalf of the public. 

Mr. Shrigley has been twice married. It was in 1871 that he was united 
in marriage to Martha Pickerel, of \'irginia, a daughter of William and 
Sarah Pickerel, and to that union two chddren were born, Mar}' Belle, who 
died when seventeen years of age, and one who died in infancy. Mrs. 
Martha .Shrigley died in 1876 and on October 19, 1880, Mr. Shrigley mar- 
ried, secondly, Mrs. Rebecca J. (Foderj Williams, widow of William Will- 
iams, of Coshocton county. William Williams was a farmer and saw-mill 
man. He died in 1877, at the age of twenty-nine }'ears, leaving three chil- 
dren, namely : Minnie Fay. who married I'Vjrrest Gatton, of Toledo, Ohio, 
and has two children, Mildred and Pearl; .Vlpha I'^., who married William 
Morgan, living near King's Creek, this county, and has one child, a .son. 
Wendell, and Bertha, who married Wilbur X'oung. of C'able, and has one 
son, Linville. 

To Winfield T. and Rebecca j. (J.oder) Shrigley two children have 
been born, Wintield, now engaged in the insurance business at Springfield, 
this .state, who married Moy Taylor and has tw(j children, daughters both. 
I'hyllis and Virginia, and I .etha Ma} , who married S. B. Skidmore, a farmer, 
living near Cable, and has one child, a son, Robert Maxwell. Mrs. Shrigley 
is a member of the King's Creek IVqjtist church and both she and her hus- 



CHAMPAIGX COUXTY, OHIO. 26 



1)cUk1 give their earnest attention to the general good works of the commu- 
nity in which the}" live. Mr. Shrigley is a member of tlie. local lodge of 
the Junior Order of United American Mechanics and has for vears taken 
a warm interest in the affairs of that order. 



WILLIAM A. XUTT. 

The late William A. Xutt. f<)r years one of the best-known grain 
dealers in this part of the state, an honored \-eteran of the Civil War, 
\vho died at his home in L^rbana in igii, was a native son of the old 
Buckeye state and lived in this state all his life. He was born on a 
farm in the vicinity of Sidney, in the neighboring county of Shelby. 
March 28, 1843. a son of Irwin and Barbara ( Persinger ) Xutt, the former 
a native of Ohio and the latter of Virginia, who spent their last days on 
their well-established farm near Sidney. 

Irwin Xutt was l)orn on January 31, 181 1, at Centerville," in Montgom- 
ery county, this state, and there grew to manhood. On February 25. 1834. 
he married Barbara I'ersinger, who was born on September 2/, 1812. in 
Botetourt county. Mrginia. and who was but three years of age when her 
parents came to ibis state and settled on a farm in the neighborhood of 
Xenia. where she grew to womanhood and where she was married. After 
his marriage Irwin X"^utt established his home on a farm in Shelby count)-, 
not far from Sidne}-. and there he and his wife spent the remainder of their 
lives, useful and influential residents of that community Irwin Xutt was 
a good farmer and developed a fine piece of property there. He also for 
years was actively engaged in the grain business and he and his sons estab- 
lished a grain elevator at Pemberton and later at Ouincy. Ohio, doing a tine 
business in that line. He and his wife uere active members of the Metho- 
dist l"^piscopal church and took an earnest part in church work, as well as 
in the work of developing the schools in their home neighborhood, and were 
in other wavs influential factors in promoting projjcr social conditions there- 
uhouts. The}' were the parents of seven children, of whom but one, J*)hn 
Xutt. of Los -\ngeles, California, is now living. 

W'illiam A. Xutt grew up on the home farm in the vicinity of Sidne}- 
and received his .schooling in the Sidney schools. Upon President Lincoln's 
second call for volunteers to help suppress the rebellion of the Southern 
states in 1861 he went to the front as a memlier of Compan}- F. Twentieth 



268 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

kegiment. Ohio Volunteer infantry, attached to the Second Brigade, Third 
Division, which company was commanded by his brother, Captain Nutt. and 
with that command served until the close of the war. being mustered out 
with the rank of sergeant-major. For eleven months of this period of serv- 
ice Mr. Nutt was attached to the hospital staff. He had the honor of march- 
ing with Sherman to the sea and during his long service participated in some 
f)f the most stirring engagements of the war. 

Upon the completion of his military service Mr. Nutt returned home 
and for some time thereafter was engaged in the road-contracting business. 
\Vhile thus engaged he was married and later engaged in business at Quincy, 
in partnership with (ine of his brothers, the firm operating elevators, as noted 
above, and he was thus engaged at that place until November i, 1898, when 
he moved to Urbana and was there engaged in the grain business until his 
death on November 30. 1911 ; having then been continuously engaged in 
that line for a period of forty-three years, during which time he became 
known as one of the leading grain men in this part of the state. Mr. Nutt 
was an ardent Republican and ever, took an active part in local political 
affairs, but was not a seeker after public office. 

It was on December 10, 1872, that William A. Nutt was united in 
marriage to Eleanor (Campbell) Lilley, who was born at Columbus, this 
state, April 22, 1852, daughter of Capt. Mitchell and Amanda (Brooks) 
Lilley, the former of whom was Ijorn in Augusta county, \'irginia, July 18. 
1819, and the latter, near Paris, Illinois, October 4, 1830. Capt. Mitchell 
l.illey, who, as noted above, was a Virginian, was reared at Columbus, this 
state, to v.'hich city he had gone to make his home with an uncle when ten 
years of age, his parents ha\ing died in Virginia. When the Mexican War 
broke out he enlisted for service and was promoted to the rank of captain 
in service. Upon the outbreak of the Civil War he went to the front as 
cai)tain of a company and served in that capacity until his health failed and 
he was hcMiorably discharged with the brevet rank of colonel. Captain 
I^illey was a bookbinder by trade and for years had charge of the Ohio state 
bindery at Columbus, one of the best-known and most influential residents 
of that city. He and his wife were the parents of thirteen children, five of 
whom are still living, three sons, Alexander, William and Thomas M. Lillev. 
and two daughters, Kate, wife of J. II. Haller, and Anne, wife of VV. C\ 
Willard. Mrs. Nutt survived her husband for about three years, her death 
occurring at her home in Urbana on March 14, 1914. She was an earnest 
member of the b"irst Methodist Episcopal church, as was her hu.sband, and 
both were active in local good works. Mr. Nutt was an active member of 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, t)lll(). 269 

^\'. A. Brand Post, Grainl .\niiy of the l\ei)ul)lic, at Urbaiia, and over took 
a warm interest in the affairs of that patriotic organization. He also was 
a member of the local lodge of the Knights of Pytliias and of the Junior 
Order of United American Meclianics. 

To William A. and Eleanor (Campbell) Nutt six children were born, 
two sons and four daughters. The sons, Wilbur and Thomas, both died 
in chldhood and the daughters, the Msses Lilley, Besse. Harriet and 
Hazel Nutt, are still living at the old family home in Urbana, where thev 
are very pleasantly and very comfortably situated. The Misses Nutt are 
members of the h'irst Methodist Episcopal church and have ever given their 
earnest attention to church work and other local good works, as well as to 
the general social activities of their home town, and are helpful in many 
ways in helping to promote such movements as are designed to advance the 
common welfare of the i^eople of the city and of the county at large. 



JAMES MAGRUDER POVSI^T.L. 

James Magruder Poysell, one of the best-known of the older citizens 
of Urbana, a retired marble cutter and an honored veteran of the Civil War. 
who has been a resident of Urbana for the past half centur)- or more, is a 
native son of Ohio and has lived in this state all his life. He was born at 
West Libert}- in the neighboring county of Eogan, September 28. 1841, son 
of John and Sarah (Stafford) F^oysell, the former of whom was born in 
Pennsylvania, of German stock, and the latter in England, whose last days 
were spent in this state. 

John Poysell was trained in Pennsylvania as a mill man and followed 
that vocation all his life. Tie was married in Pennsylvania and later came 
over into Ohio, driving througlt to Springfield and later moving up to West 
Liberty, where he worked aliout a feed-mill and a saw-mill, and there spent 
the remainder of his life, one of the best-known residents of that place. For 
fifty years he was a class leader in the Methodist church and was ever active 
in local good works. After his death his widow made her home in Urbana, 
where she spent her last days. They were the parents of six children, of 
whom the subject of this .sketch was the fourth in order of birth, the others 
being as follow: Samuel, who served three years as a .soldier of the Union 
during the Civil War, a member of Company E, Ninety-fifth Regiment, Ohio 
Volunteer Infantry, and met his death by drowning in the Mississippi river: 



270 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, (HllO. 

iM-ank, iKjw deceased, who was a printer at West Liberty and at Springfield: 
J(jhn M.. now deceased, who was a miller at West Liberty; William VV., 
who went t(^ the front during the Civil War as a member of Company E, 
Xinety-fifth Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, in which he served for 
three years, during a portion of which time he was held a prisoner at Ander- 
sonville prison, and was later drowned in the Mississippi river, meeting death 
at the same time as did his jirother. Samuel, mentioned above, both brave 
soldiers of the I'nion. and Sarah, who married William Taylor and is now- 
deceased. 

James Ai. I'cjvsell was reared at West Liberty, receiving his schooling 
in tlie schools of that town, and there learned the trade of a marble cutter 
and was working at the same when the Civil War broke out. On August 7, 
J 862, then being under twenty-one years of age, he enlisted for service in 
the Union armv as a private in Company 1, Ninety-sixth Regiment, Ohio 
\ (jlivnteer Infantrw the same regiment in which his elder brothers were 
serving. He enlisted for the three-year service and joined the regiment at 
Cincinnati, under Capt. William Beatty and Col. J. W. X'arner, the command 
l>eing assigned to the Second Brigade. Inrst Division, Thirteenth Army 
Cori)s, Armv of the (julf. Thus engaged Mr. Poysell participated in the 
battles of Arkansas Post, Bayou Mississippi, Ft. Hinneman, Port Gibson, 
Champion Llill, Big Black River; w^as present for fifty-tw^o days during the 
-.iege of \'icksburg, then t(jok part in the battles of Carrion Crow Bayou 
and Crand Coteau and on .Xovemljer 3. 1863, was taken prisoner by the 
eneni\- and was held a |)risoner on the Red river for about five months before 
being exchanged. After rejoining his regiment he participated in the Red 
i-i\er expedition, the regiment later moving to Mobile Bay, he thus partic- 
ipating in the l)atlles of Ft. Morgan and Fi. (iaines, in the siege of Mobile, 
and in the jjattles at i^t. Blakely, Spanish l""ort and at Whistler, Alabama, 
tlie latter battle being fought on April 13, 1865. four days after the surrren- 
der of (leneral Lee at .Appomatox Court House. Upon the conclusion of 
tile war the Ninet\-sixth Ohio was returned .Morth and on July 29, 1865, 
at Cam]) Chase, tin's state, Mr. I'ovsell was mustered out with the command 
with which lie had ser\ed for one week less than three years. 

LIpon the completion of his nn'litary ser\'ice Mr. I'oysell returned to 
his home at West 1 .ibert^• and there resumed the pursuits of peace, taking 
up his old trade as a marble cutter, and there remained for about eighteen 
months, at the end of which time, in 1867, he moved to Urbana, recognizing 
the l)etter o|)portunities for the exercise of his skill in that city. A few 
months later he married and established his ])ermanent home in that city. 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 27I 

continuing" his operations as a marble cutter until his retirement from active 
labor may years later, since which time he has been living quietly retired. 

It was on January 7, 1S68, a few months after he located at Urbana, 
that James M. Poxsell was united in marriage to Alary Eliza Alarsh, who 
was born in that city on Seprember 1. 1848, daughter of Leonard and Anna 
1^. ( Richardson) Marsh, the former of whom was born in Baltimore. Mary- 
land, and the latter in the city of Urbana, a member of one of the old fami- 
lies of Champaign county. Leonard Marsh was but a boy when his parents 
moved from Baltimore to Urbana and in the latter city he grew^ to man- 
hood, there learning the trade of a tailor, which vocation he followed the 
rest of his life, both he and his wife spending their last days in Urbana. To 
James M. and Mary Eliza (Marsh) Poysell three children were born, 
namely : Leonard Ross Rowsell, an electrician, who was accidentally killed 
at Stanton, Illinois. August J 6. 1909: Louella. who died on April 16, '^"'^ 
at the age of nine years, six months and live days, and l^aura, who, since 
the death of her mother on June 11, 19 16. has been housekeeper for her 
father. Mr. Poysell and his daughter are members of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church and have ever given their earnest attention to the affairs of the 
church and the general good works of the community. Mr. Poysell is an 
active member of W. A. Brand Po.st No. 98. Grand Army of the Republic, 
at Lrbana. in the aft'airs of which patriotic organization he has for years 
taken a warm interest, and has filled nearly all the olHices in that post at one 
time .tnd another. 



'IHOMAS I. POLING. 



Thomas J. Poling, farmer and carpenter, living in Rush township, 
C'hampaign county, was born in Union county. Ohio. March 29. 1868. He 
is a son of George W. and Sarah Jane (Hudson) Poling. The father was 
born in 1838, in X'irginia. and the mother was born in Rush township. 
Champaign county, of an old family of that township. 1 le was a son of 
Samuel Poling, a native of \'irginia. who moved here in an early day. mar- 
ried here and established the family home in Rush township. Later in life 
he made his home with his son, George W'.. and died there. His family 
consisted of six children, namely : iunanuel, who established his home in 
West \^irginia; Daniel first lived in Rush township, this count}-, later moving- 
to the state of Nebraska; George \\'.. father of the subject of this sketch: 
Minnie married Charles Oliphant and the\- live in Iowa: John, who lived 



2/2 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY. OHIO. 

many years in Rusli township, this county, died in the village (if North 
Lewisburg; the youngest child, a daughter, died in infancy. 

George \\'. Poling grew up (in the home farm and was educated in 
the rural schools. He was fourteen years old when his parents moved to 
Rush t<jwnshi]j. After living in Union county, Ohio, three years he moved 
hack to Rush township, then moved hack to Union county and died there 
in 1889. He devoted his active life to general farming. His widow sur- 
vived twent}- years, dying in 1909. To these parents three sons were born, 
namely: Charles died when two years old; O. H., born in 1866, died in 
K)!o. was a carpenter Ijy trade and lived at home; Thomas J. of this sketch. 

Thomas J. Poling grew up on the home farm and was educated in the 
home schools. He continued to live on the home farm until the death of 
his mother. He learned the carpenter's trade when a young man and has 
'••"'' .led working at it, becoming a highly skilled workman and his services 
lia\e I>een in good demand. He has also followed farming since his boy- 
hood. He owns a good farm of one hundred and sixteen acres in Rush 
township. 

Mr. I'oling was married on November 20, 1910. to Mrs. Bessie M. 
rieltz. who was born in Union county. Ohio. She was the widow of Howard 
iJeltz. and a daughter of Bert Moore and wife of Logan county, Ohio. Mrs. 
I'oling had no children by her first marriage but adopted a daughter — 
Nimena, who lives at home and is attending school at Woodstock. 

Two children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Poling, namely : Clifford. 
who is at home; and Richard, deceased. 

Politically. Mr. Poling is a Republican. He belongs to the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows at Woodstock, Ohio. He is a member of the Metho- 
dist Protestant church at North Lewisburg. 



GEORGE A. SCEVA. 



The late George A. Sceva, a soldier of the Union army during the Civil 
War and for years a substantial farmer of Union township, who died at his 
home in that township on January 19, 1914. 'i«d whose widow is still living 
there, was born on that farm and lived there all his life. He was born on 
August 28, 1839, son of Aaron and Mary Sceva, both of whom were born 
in New Hampshire. Aaron Sceva came to Ohio in the days of his young 
manhood and worked as a blacksmith in this countv. He married in New 




MR. AND MRS. GEORGE A. SCEVA 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. J73 

Hampshire and later became engaged in farming in Union township, remain- 
ing there until 1848, when he went to Utah on a prospecting trip and' there 
died, leaving his widow with four children, Mary Jane. George A., Ange- 
line and Charles. His wife died in Union township. 

George A. Sceva was nine years of age when his father left for the 
West and from the days of his boyhood, as the elder son, he was a valued 
aid in the labors of improving and developing the home farm. He received 
his schooling in what then was known as the Sceva school house, in the 
neighborhood of his home, and continued at home helping in the work of 
the farm until his mother's death, when he and his brother Charles assumed 
the management of the place and continued farming together until the latter's 
death, after which George A. Sceva bought from his sisters their interest 
in the place and continued farming the same as sole proprietor. He did well 
in his operations and as he prospered added to his holdings until he became 
the owner of a fine farm of one hundred and seventy-one acres and was 
accounted one of the substantial farmers of that section, remaining there 
until his death, on January 19, 1914. During the Civil War Mr. Sceva 
served as a member of Company E, One Hundred and Thirty- fourth Regi- 
ment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and was an active member of the local post 
of the Grand Army of the Republic at Urbana, in the affairs of which patri- 
otic organization he took a warm interest. He was a Republican and for 
some time served the public very acceptably as trustee of Union township, 
and was for nineteen years a member of the local school board, during that 
time doing much to advance the cause of education in his district. For more 
than thirty years he was a member of the Methodist church at Mutual and 
for some years served as a member of the board of trustees of the same. 

On March 30, 1871. George A. Sceva was united in marriage to Isadore 
Middleton, who was bom in this county, in Wayne township, daughter of 
Thomas and Susanna (Hess) Middleton and a member of one of tlie old 
families of Champaign county, further and fitting mention of which family 
is made elsewhere in this volume. Her father was also a native of Wayne 
township and her mother was a native of Virginia. They were married in 
Wayne township, but later moved to Union township, where they spent the 
remainder of their lives. They were the parents of six children, of whom 
Mrs. Sceva was the third in order of birth, the others being Amanda 
(deceased), William, Jacob (deceased), George and Rachel. To George 
A. Sceva and wife six children were born, of whom but three are now liv- 
ing, Henry, of Mutual, who married Nora Leavitt and has three children, 
(i8a) 



274 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

Paul, Mabel and Martha ; William, who married Emma McCoy and has 
two children, Francis and Elizabeth, at home, and Essie, who is at home 
with her widowed mother and is employed in a millinery store in Urbana. 
The Scevas have a pleasant home in Union township and have ever taken 
an interested part in the general social affairs of the community in which 
they live. Mrs. Sceva is a member of the Methodist church at Mutual and 
her daughter, of the Baptist church at Urbana, 'and both take a proper inter- 
est in the various beneficences of these societies. 



GEORGE W. LINCOLN. 

In the memorial annals of the Woodstock neighborhood there are few 
names held in better memory than that of George W. Lincoln, for years one 
of the most substantial farmers of Rush township, president of the Wood- 
stock Bank, an extensive breeder of live stock and in other ways actively 
identified with the interests of that community, and whose widow, Mrs. 
Marcia M. Lincoln, a member of one of the old families of Chamjiaign 
county, is still living at her pleasant home in Woodstock. 

George W. Lincoln was born on the old Lincoln homestead in Rush 
township, this county, February 29, 1841, son of Charles and Allura (John- 
son) Lincoln, both of whom, were born at Windom, Connecticut, the former 
born on September 7, 1809, and the latter, December 19, 18 16, who later 
became pioneer i-esidents of Champaign county and here spent their last 
days, influential and useful residents of the Woodstock -^ae^hborhood. 
Charles Lincoln and his wife came to Ohio and located in this county shortly- 
after their marriage, establishing their home on a farm in Rush township, 
which farm still continues in the possession of the family, widely known as 
the old Lincoln farm. Charles Lincoln was a good farmer and was also 
largely interested in the raising of cattle, having been one of the leaders in 
that latter line in the eastern part of the county in his day. He died at his 
fine farm home in Rush township on January 31, 1868, and his widow sur- 
vived him for twelve years, her death occurring on February 9, 1880. 1 hev 
were the parents of two children, of whom the subject of this niemcjrial 
sketch was the second in order of birth, the others being as follow : Lydia, 
born on November 9, 1838, now living at Glen Ullem, North Dakota, widow 
of John Hudson; Harriet C, July 21, 1842, who died on May 24, 18O3; 
Charles P., April 27, 184-I, a substantial farmer of Rush township, this 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 2/5 

county; Oliver E., July 4, i8-|6, who became a farmer in the neighboring 
county of Union and there spent his last days; Ira, June 4, 1848, who mar- 
ried Martha Marsh, of Woodstock, and died on September 12, 1880; Will- 
iam Henry, August 3, 1850. who married Mary S. Martin and is now 
deceased; Ada A., May 3, 1852, wife of P. N. Pratt, of Woodstock; Alice. 
Ju]>- 2, 1856, who died on November 13 of that same year, and Dwight, 
Ma} 12, 1859, who died on September 8, i860. 

George W. Lincoln was reared on the home farm, receiving his school- 
ing in the neighborhood school, and remained at home, a valued aid to his 
father in the work of developing and improving the home place, and there 
remained until after his marriage in the winter of 1869, when he began 
farming on his own account in Rush township and gradually developed 
there a very tine piece of farm property, remaining there, actively engaged 
in farming and stock raising, until his death on October 5, 1885. In addi- 
tion to his farming operations Mr. Lincoln took an active and energetic part 
in the general business affairs of his home community and was the president 
of the Woodstock Bank, which financial institution he was largely instru- 
mental in organizing and developing. He was an ardent Republican and 
ever took an active interest in politics, but was not a seeker after public 
office. He was widely known throughout the eastern part of this county and 
in the adjoining counties of Union and Logan and at his death there was 
sincere mourning, for he had done well those things which his hand had 
found to do. 

It was on January 20, 1869, that George W. Lincoln was united in 
marriage to Marcia M. Kimball, who also was born in Rush township, 
daughter of Truman M. and Mary (Fullington) Kimball, prominent resi- 
dents of the W^oodstock neighborhood and further and fitting reference to 
wliom is made elsewhere in this work, and to this imion two children were 
l>orn, a daughter and a son, Edna A. and Charles K., both of whom are still 
living. After the death of her husband Mrs. Lincoln maintained her resi- 
dence on the old home farm for some time and then moved to Woodstock, 
where she now resides, she and her widowed daughter living together. ver\ 
comfortably situated. 

lulna A. Lincoln married James H. McMuUen. who was born on a 
farm in the neighboring county of Union on June 18. 1867, son of Charles 
A. and Martha (Ilathaway) McMullen, both also natives of Ohio, the for- 
mer born in Madison county on January 28, 1840, and the latter born in 
L'nion countv, who later came to Champaign county and settled on a farm 
in Rush township, where they spent the remainder of their lives. Charles A. 



2/6 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

AlcAlullen (lying there on September i, 1901, his widow surviving him for 
less than one year, her death occurring on August 7. 1902. Charles A. 
McMullen was a substantial farmer and he and his wife were the parents 
of six children, those besides James H., mentioned above, the third in ordgr 
of birth, being as follow: Walter C, born on January i, 1865, ^^'ho died 
<<n August 17, 1876; Lydia F., April 31, 1866, who died on August 21. 
following; Mar}- J.., December 31, 1869. who married Arthur Marsh and 
died on September 13, 191T, leaving one child, a daughter, Martha; Anna H., 
March 7, 1875. now living at Pueblo, Colorado, and Jane H., May 20, 1876, 
who died on March 3, 1877. James H. McMullen was reared on the home 
farm in Rush township and comi)leted his schooling in Antioch College and 
in the Ohio State University. He married Edna -V. Lincoln and established 
his home on a farm in Rush township, remaining there engaged in general 
farming and sheep raising, until his retirement in 1909 and removal to 
Woodstock, where he spent his last days, his death occurring on December 
26, 1915, and where his widow still lives. James H. AlcMullen was a Re- 
i)ublican in his pohtical affiliation and, fraternally, was affiliated with the 
Knights of Pythias, in the affairs of which order he took a warm interest. 
Charles K. Lincoln, only soti of George W. and Marcia M. (Kimball) 
Lincoln, is now living in Woodstock, a substantial retired farmer. He mar- 
ried Maud Chamlicrlain and has two children, WillianrC". and George 1. 



CHARLES PL CURL. 



Charles H. Curl, an honored veteran of the Civil War and a resident 
of North Lewisburg since 1872, now living retired in that i)leasant village, 
is a native son of Ohio and has lived in this state all his life. Pie was born 
in Greene county on July 7, 1844, son of William and Hannah (Borden) 
Curl, the former a native of Virginia and the latter of "New Jersey, who 
liecame residents of Greene county in the days of their youth and were there 
married. 

William Curl was a son of James Curl and wife, the latter of whom 
was a Brown, who early came to Ohio and settled in Greene county, where 
their last days were spent. They were the parents of eight children, live 
sons and three daughters. James Curl was a cooper and his son, William, 
learned that trade and followed it until he was thirty-one years of age, when, 
in 1854, he became a brakeman on die Panhandle railroad between Xenia 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 277 

and Dayton and while thus employed was killed b}' a train the next year. 
1855. He left a widow, who was Hannah Borden, and four children. Of 
these children the subject of this sketch was the first-born, the others being- 
as follow-: Franklin, a painter, now living in Florida; Emma L.. wife of 
Edward Inskeep, of North Lewisburg. and Phoebe Ann, wife of John Holy- 
cross, of North Lewisburg. The Widow Curl married, secondly, Adam 
Beltz, of Union county, and to that union two children were born. Janet, 
wife of William Hoffman, of Urbana, and Joseph, who joined the regular 
army and whose present W'hereabouts are imknown to his family. 

Charles H. Curl was about eleven years of age when his father was 
killed on the railroad and at the age of twelve he was taken to rear by a 
family in Greene county and was a member of that household until he was 
eighteen years of age, when he began farming on his own account and was 
thus engaged wdien, in the fall of 1863 he enlisted at Cleveland for service 
in the Union army during the continuance of the Civil War, as a member 
of Company I, One Hundred and Twenty-eighth Regiment, Ohio Volunteer 
Infantry, with which command he served until the close of the war and 
was discharged at Camp Chase on July 13, 1865; most of his service having 
been performed w^ith his regiment at Baltimore. Upon the completion of 
his military service Mr. Curl returned to Ohio and located at Zanesville. 
where he learned the trade of plasterer and w-here. in 1867, he married, 
remaining there until 1872, in which year he moved to North Lewisburg. 
this county, where he since has made his home and where he is now living 
retired. He built the home in which he is living and he and liis family are 
very comfortably situated there. Mr. Curl is a Republican and has ever 
given his close attention to local political affairs, but has noi been a seeker 
after public office. 

It was in 1867, at Zanes\ille, that Charles H. Curl was united in 
marriage to Elizabeth McKinney, of that place, who was born in West 
Virginia, daughter of John and Lucinda (Curl) McKinney, the former of 
wdiom was killed by a boat explosion on the Ohio river, near Parkersburg, 
and the latter of whom spent her last days at Zanesville. John McKinney 
and wife were the parents of five children, of whom Mrs. Curl was the next 
to last-born, the others being as follow: Alexander, who died in 1916: 
Sarah, who is living at Zanesville; John, who died in j868. and James, 
of Zanesville. To Mr. and Mrs. Curl seven children have been born, namely : 
Belle, deceased: Louisa, wife of Jeft'erson Goof, of Indianapolis; Dora, widow 
of Janites Iv. Thompson, who is now making her home with her parents; 
Walter, wlio died at the age of eighteen months; Edward, of Ckveland, 



278 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

Ohio; Ralph, who died at the age of seven years, and William, who is 
engaged in the barber business at North Lewisburg. Mr. Curl is an active 
member of John Briney Post No. 193, Grand Army of the Republic, at 
North Lewisburg, and takes a warm interest in the affairs of that patriotic 
order. He is the oldest Odd Fellow in North Lewisburg, having become 
a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows on July 2, 1873, at 
North Lewisburg, and Mrs. Curl is a member of the local lodge No. 320 
of the Daughters of Rebekah, both taking a warm interest in local Odd- 
fellowship. 



JOAB OVERFIELD. 



Joab Overfield, automobile dealer and proprietor of an up-to-date garage 
at North Lewisburg, assessor of that village, former village clerk and former 
member of the common council, is a native son of Champaign county and 
has lived here practically all his life. He was born on a farm two miles south- 
west of North Lewisburg, in Rush township, June 30, 1876, son of Samuel 
and Clarissa Overfield, well-to-do farming people of that neighborhood and 
miembers of pioneer families in this county. Samuel Overfield was a farmer 
all his life. He was a son of Joab Overfield, a Virginian, who came to 
this county in pioneer days and settled in Rush township, where he became 
a substantial farmer and where he spent the remainder of his life, one of 
tlie influential members of the community in which he lived. Some years 
before his death Samuel Overfield retired from the farm and moved to 
Woodstock, among his children after the death of his wife, where his last 
days were spent, his death occurring there in 1914. His wife had preceded 
him to the grave twenty years, her death having occurred in 1894. They 
were the parents of seven children, those besides the subject of this sketch 
being. Louisa, Delmar, Cyrus, John, Gould and Bursha. 

Reared on the home farm, Joab Overfield received his early schooling in 
the district school in the neighborhood of his home and completed the same 
in the high school at North Lewisburg. Upon leaving school he worked 
for five years as a handle turner in the factory of his brother at Nortli 
Lewisburg and at Xenia and then returned to the home farm, which he 
farmed for a couple of years, at the end of which time he bought a store 
at Pottersburg and \vas there engaged in the general mercan- 
tile business for two years or more. He then moved to North Lewisburg, 
where for six years thereafter he was engaged in the lumber business and 



CHAMPAIGN' COUNTY, OHIO. 279 

^\here, in 191 5. lie engaged in the automobile business and has since been 
very successfully engaged in that line. Mr. Overfield is the local agent 
for the sale of the Ford automobile and has built up an extensive market 
hereabout for that car. He has a well-equipped garage, thirty by one 
hundred and sixty-five feet in dnnensions and in addition to handling a 
general line of automobile accessories has made his place a popular service 
station. Mr. Overfield is a Democrat and is now serving as assessor of his 
home town. For two years he served as a member of the village council 
and for four years as clerk of the village, giving to his public service his 
most thoughtful attention. 

In 1899 Joab Overfield was united in marriage to Martha Coffey, daugh- 
ter of Joseph Coffey and wife. Mr. and Mrs. Overfield have a pleasant 
home at North Lewisburg and take an active interest in the general social 
affairs of the community, helpful in advancing all worthy causes there- 
about. 



T. C. MADDEN. 



T. C. Madden, lumber dealer, at North Lewisburg. this county, and 
one of the most active and energetic business men of that thriving vil- 
lage, is a native son of Ohio and has lived in this state all his Hfe. He was 
born on a farm in Clinton county, August 13, 1869. son of Cyrus W. and 
Jane (McCray > Madden, the former of Quaker stock and the latter of Scot- 
tish descent, lx)th members of old families in this part of the state, whose 
lives were spent in Clinton and Warren counties. 

Cyrus W. Madden was born in Clinton county, son of Solomon Mad- 
den and wife, the former of whom was a son of George Madden, the stem 
old Quaker who headed the Madden colony into Clinton county in 1811, 
coming over from North Carolina, which state they left out of their hatred 
for the institution of slavery, arriving in Clinton county on the day on 
which the battle of Tippecanoe was fought. George Madden became one 
of the most influential pioneers of Clinton county and his son and grandson 
(lid well their respective parts in developing the community in which they 
hxed. Cyrus W. Afadden, who was a farmer and blacksmith, was an ard- 
ent Abolitionist in the days preceding the Civil War and he and his family 
took a prominent part in the operations of the Underground Railroad., 
through the agency of which many fugitive slaves were enabled to make 
their wav to libertv across the Canadian border. He and his wife were the 



28o CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

parents of tight rhiklren. live of whom are still living, those besides the 
subject of this sketch l)eing- as follow : W. H. Madden, who is engaged in 
the lumber business at Waynesville. this state: Clinton Madden, aishier of 
the I^'armers' National Bank at Clarksville, this state ; Addie, who is teach- 
ing school at Morrow, Ohio, and Rlla. wife of Charles Crawford, of Marion. 
Indiana. 

Reared on a farm, T. C. Madden received his elementary schooling in 
the public schools of Clinton and Warren counties and supplemented the 
same by a course at the old normal school at Lebanon, after which he 
taught school for several years and then entered Wilmington College, 
working his way through that institution by teaching mathematics in the 
college, and was graduated therefrom in 1902. He then resumed teaching 
and was thus engaged, in Franklin and Clinton counties, for six years, 
four years of which time was spent as a teacher in the high school at 
Sabina. During his teaching career Mr. Madden taught for seventeen years, 
or until 1908, when he located at North Lewisburg and there started a 
lumber yard and has ever since been engaged in the lumber business at 
that place, having built up an extensive business in that line. His lumber 
yard is well stocked and well equipped, several large buildings giving him 
ample facilities for the proper handling of his trade, and he has done very 
well, now devoting his whole time to his growing business. Mr. Madden is 
a Republican and gives a good citizen's attention to local political afifairs and 
to all proper movements having to do with the advancement of the general 
interests of his home town and of the county at large. 



WJLIJS H. HODGE. 



Willis H. Hodge, one of Champaign county's substantial landowners. 
the proprietor of the grain elcA'ator at Catawba .Station, a line farm of six 
hundred and sixty acres in Union township and the tine ])lace on which he 
lives at the west edge of the city of Mechanicsburg. is a native son of Cham- 
])aign county and has lived here all his life. He was born on the farm he now 
owns in Union township on October 23. 1875, son of J. H. and Miranda 
(Hunter) Hodge, l)oth of whom were born in the neighboring county of 
C'lark, meml)ers of pioneer families there, and whose last days were spent at 
Mechanics1)urg. to which place they had moved upon their retirement froni 
the farm. ^ 




J. H. HODGE. 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 201 

J. H. Hodge was born on January 2, 1834, a son of James and Elizabeth 
Hodge, who had come up into Ohio from Kentucky in pioneer days and had 
settled in Clark county, where they established their home and spent their 
last days. On that pioneer farm J. H. Hodge grew to manhood, remaining 
there until after his marriage in 1861 to Miranda Hunter, who also was born 
in Clark county, when he came up into Champaign county and bought a farm 
in Union township and there settled. He w'as an excellent farmer and a 
good business man and as he de\eloped his farm added to the same until he 
became the owner of about six hundred acres. He was a Democrat and he 
and his wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal churcli. he for years 
serving as a trustee of the same and also as an ofifice bearer in other capacities 
in the church. In 1891 he retired from the farm and moved to Mechanics- 
burg, uhere he and his wife spent their last days. Her death occurred on 
March 11, 1901, and he survived a little more than six years, his death 
occurring on October 17, 1907. They were the parents of three children, of 
whom the subject of this sketch is the only survivor, the others having died 
in infancy. 

Reared on the home farm in Union township, Willis H. Hodge received 
his early schooling in the district schools of that neighborhood, supplement- 
ing the same by a course in the Mechanicsburg high school and in the business 
tlepartment of the Ohio Wesleyan University at Delaware. He early became 
engaged in the grain business at Mechanicsburg, in partnership with C. W. 
Gu}- and others, and in 1901 became the sole owner of the elevator at 
Mechanicsburg, continuing to operate the same until he sold it in 1907. In 
1898, the )ear of his marriage, Mr. Hodge bought the grain elevator at 
Cata^^l)a Station and has ever since continued to own and operate the same, 
being one of the best-known grainmen in the southeastern part of the count}'. 
At the same time he gives close personal attention to the operation of his 
well-kept farm of six hundred and sixt_\' acres in Union township, though 
continuing to make his home in Mechanicsburg, where he and liis family are 
very comfortably situated. Air. Hodge is a Democrat and has ever given a 
good citizen's attention to local i:)olitical affairs, but has not been a seeker 
after office. 

On December 2^. 1898. Willis II. Hodge was united in marriage to 
Irma Van Ness, who was born near the \illage of Irwin, in the neighboring- 
county of Madison. She is the daughter of Jacob I', and Mary Melinda 
(Brown) Van Ness and came with her parents over into Champaign countv, 
the family settling in the Eive Points neighborhood in Goshen township, 
where <he grew to womanhood and where she w-as living at the time of her 



2»2 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

marriage to Mr. Hodge. To that union a daughter, Mary Frances, was 
born on March i, 1901. Mr. and Mrs. Hodge are members of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal chiu'ch at Mechanicsburg and take an interested part in 
church work, as well as in the general good works and social activities of 
the place, Mr. Hodge being a member of the official board of the church. 
He also is a member of Homer Lodge Xo. 474. Knights of Pythias, at 
Mechanicsburg, anrl takes a warm interest in lodge affairs. 



(;e()rge eiowland gii<ford. 

(jeorge Howland Gifford, one of the real old settlers of Champaign 
county, an honored veteran of the Civil War and a farmer of Rush county, 
wlio for more than a half century has resided in the house he now lives in, 
in the pleasant village of Woodstock, is a native of the Old Bay State, but 
has l>een a resident of Ohio and of Champaign county since he was four 
\-ears of age and is therefore as thoroughly familiar with the develo|>ment 
of this county during the past three-(|uarters of a century and more as one 
"native and to the manner born." He was born near New Bedford, Massa- 
chusetts, September 24, 1832, .son of Daniel and Catherine (Wing) Gifford, 
both members of old Colonial families, who later came to this county and 
here spent their last days, both living to ripe old age, useful and influential 
pioneers of the Woodstock settlement. 

Daniel Gifford was the eighth in order of birth of the ten children born 
to his parents, William and Susanna (Brown) Gifford, the former of 
whom was a son of Recompense Gifford and wife, who had two other chil- 
dren, John and Ruth. The other children born to William Gifford and 
wife, besides Daniel, were Jedediah. John, George, William, Sarah, Ruth, 
Artsa, Hicks and Jason. On September 24, 1818, Daniel Gifford married 
(."atherine Wing, who also was born in the neighborhood of New Bedford, 
Massachusetts, and in 1834 he and his family came to Ohio and settled in 
Champaign county. Daniel Gifford rented a farm in Rush township, one 
mile north of Woodstock, and there established his home and proceeded to 
clear the farm and make it fit for cultivation. He later moved to Madison 
county and located on a farm seven miles south of London, the county seat, 
but later came back to this county and located at W()odstock. where he and 
his wife spent their last days. Daniel Gift'ord died at the age of seventy-five 
years and his widow survived him many years, she living to the great age 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY. OHIO. 283 

of ninety-eight years. Thev were members of the Christian church, in 
the work of which they ever took an earnest interest, and their children were 
reared in that faith. There were five of these children, of 'whom the sub- 
ject of this sketch was the last-born, the others being .Susan. Stephen Wing. 
Almira and Daniel Hicks. 

SiLsan Gifford, Ix^rn on July 9. 1819. died at her home in Woodstock. 
Mrs. Susan Swan, November t8. 1891. She was twice married and by her 
first husband. FrankHn Cushman, w-as the mother of four children, Julius 
J.. Charles A., Lucy Lucinda and Warren Sibley. Julius J. Cushman, who 
was born on September 11, 1838, enlisted for service during the Civil War 
as a member of Company D, Second Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, 
and was killed at the battle of Hoover's Gap. June 18, 1863. Charles A. 
Cushman, born on September 12. i8'40, married, February 18, 1863, Jw^i'^ 
Standish and had thirteen children, Frank, Martha, Julius J.. Margaret J., 
Susan B., Charles W.. Harriet, Arthur, Jared, Robert K.. Sarah. Warren 
H. and Lucy. Lucy Lucinda Cushman born on September 17, 1842, mar- 
ried. May 15, 1861. Nicholas P. Hewitt and had seven children, Susie, Anna 
May, Warren Cushman. T^icy, Nellie F., Lena Almira and Georgiana. She 
died on January 16, 1893, and her husband, who was born on May 5, 1832, 
survived until December 14. 1901. \Varren Siblev Cushman, born on June 
rj, 1844. married. March 21, 1867, Celia Calender, who was born on May 
18, 1848, and who died on March 6, 1881. and to that union four children 
were born, namely: Ernest Scott, born on August 11, [868, w'ho married 
Pattie Owen on October 19, 1893; ^I^J^el C. December 17, 1871, who mar- 
ried Thomas L. Wright on April 16. 1900; Byron G.. August 2. 1873, who 
married Edna Milner on June 2"], 19 16, and Charlotte, July 23, 1880, wh<» 
married Law-rence Longfellow on June 30. 1907. 

Stephen Wing Gifford died unmarried on June 29. 1843. 

-Vlmira Gififord married Franklin Jackson, who was born on June 18, 
1828, and who died on June 3, 1858, and to that union was born one child, 
a son, Josiah Cross, bom on April 8, 1854, who died on July 24, 1856. 
Mrs. Jackson survived her husband and son many years, her death occurring 
on Februan- 16, 1900. 

Daniel Hicks Gififord. born on October 6, 1830, married Mary Case 
and had five children, namely : Katie, who married William A. Scoville 
on December i, 1880, and has five children; Susan, who married Frank 
Fenner on Febniary 24, 1881, and has two children; Almira, who married 
Oliver Compton on April 15, 1885, and has three children, Frank and Riley 
Clifford. Daniel H. Gifford died in 191 5. 



284 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY. OHIO. 

(ieorge Howland Gifford was but four years of age when his parents 
came to tliis county from ^Massachusetts and he grew to manhood on tlie 
home farm in Rush township, receiving his schoohng in the primitive sub- 
scription schools of that neighborhood. He later lived for awhile in Madi- 
son county, but returned to this county, and for fifty-four years has been a 
resident of W'oddstock, living all that time in the house which he now occu- 
pies. Until his retirement with the advance of years Mr. Gifford remained 
an active farmer and did very well in his operations. During the progress 
of the Civil War he enlisted. May 8. 1S64, as a private in Company D, One 
Hundred and Thirt}-fourth Regiment, Ohio X'olunteer Infantry, and served 
with that command until the following September, most of this time on 
picket and guard dut}- at Columbvts Heights, bor }ears he has been a 
member of the local post of the Grand Army of the Republic and has ever 
taken a warm interest in the affairs of that patriotic organization. Despite 
the fact that he now is eighty-five years of age Mr. Gifford retains the 
liveliest interest in current affairs and. is a keen observer of events. He 
retains vivid recollections of the early days in this county and is a veritable 
mine of iirf()rmation with respect to happenings of the days long ago. 
Politically, he has held allegiance to the Re])ublican ])arty ever since the 
organization of that ]>arl}- and has ever taken a gixxl citizen's interest in 
local civic aff'airs, Imt has not been included in the ofhce-seeking class. His 
wife is a member of the Liniversalist church and both ha\e ever done their 
part in ])roi.noting agencies designed to advance the common welfare of the 
c((mmunity in which they have had their home for so manv }ears. 

It Avas on b\'bruary 25, 1862, that George 11, (lift'ord was united in 
marriage to Josephine Myers, who was born in 'i>ov, this state, August 9, 
[846, and to this union nine children ha\e l)een born, namely: Effie M., 
Daniel Hicks, Catherine Theresa, George Augustus. Walter Cu.shman. Laura 
Marsh, Nicholas P. H., Edward Cranston and Rosanna. 

I^ffie M. (iitT(jrd. born on Decem])er _•(). i8()j, marrietl Daniel A. Fox 
on August <), ]88_:^, and to that union eight children have been born, namelv : 
l-jnery G.. ])orn in June, 1884: Chester H., Xovember ri. 1886; Walter S., 
I'^ebniary 15. 1880; Ivan 1!., July 17, 1891; brancis M., January 15, i8c)4; 
Kenneth K., .September 2, i8(;6, who died in September. 1897; Daniel D.. 
b'ebruary 14, 1900, and Harold, July 17, i<;o_'. who died in 1916. 

Daniel Hicks (jifford, l)orn on Januar\- 10, 1866, is married and lives 
at liellefontaine, this state, v^'here he is engaged as a carpenter. 

Catherine Theresa Gifford, born on A])ril 20, 1867, died on April 11, 
:886. 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. _'85 

George Augustus GiftOrd. Ix^rn on June 30, i86y. married Eva Spicer, 
June Q. 1897. '^'^'1 ^'^'^^ ^^'^ children. Catherine, Louise, Wilbur. Josephine 
and Charles. 

Walter Cushni;ui Gifford, horn on July 9. 1871. married Catherine 
Martin on July 23. 1896, and has two children. l'h}llis and I'hilip. tie and 
his family now make their home in Urbana. 

Laura Marsh Gififord. born on April 10, 1874, died on September 20, 
^875. _ 

Nicholas L. H. Giftord. now living at Columbus, Ohio, was born on 
August 4, 1876. On September 22. 1900, he married Nora Si>ellman and 
has three children. Marion. Paul and Donna. 

Edward Cranston Gifford, who is a carpenter and builder at Woodstock, 
was born on September 15, 1880. On April 22, 1907, he was united in mar- 
riage to Gatha Huffman, who died on May 3. 191 1. leaving two children. 
Opal F., born on April 12, 1908, and Dorothy R.. September 6, 1910. 

Rosa^inaGifford, who was born on December 2, 1884, was united in mar- 
riage on Ma}- 16, 1905, to George F. Thompson and has six children, namely : 
Francilla, born on February 20, 1906; Robert O.. September 30, 1907: 
DeWitt, October 16, 1910, who died on November 2/, 1910; Gifford, born 
on February 27, 19 14. and Grace Annabelle, August, 191 6. 



LEVI YODER. 



Levi Yoder, a well-known and substantial retired farmer of the -neigh- 
boring county of Logan, now living at North Lewisburg, this county, is 
a native Ohioan and has lived in this state all his life. He was born on a 
farm in Logan county on November 3, 1852, son of Le\i and Nancy (Det- 
wiler) Yoder, natives of Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, who were married 
in that county and lived there until after four of their children were born. 
In 1848 Levi Yoder and his family moved to Ohio and located in Logan 
county where he bought a farm in the white-oak woods and proceeded to 
clear the same and there establish his home. He died there in April, 
1852, leaving a w^idow and five children. Of these children the subject 
of this sketch was the last-born, the others being as follow : Martha, w ho 
died in 1913; Jonathan, who died on January 13, 1917; Jacob, who lives 
in Iowa, and Eli, who lives in Indiana. Levi Yoder and wife were mem- 
bers of the Mennonite church and their children were reared in the simple 



286 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

faith of that church. The Widow Yoder married, secondly, Jacob K. Yoder. 
also of Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, and to that union one child was born, 
a daughter, Lizzie, of West Liberty, this state, Mrs. Yoder died in Logan 
county in February, 1890, and lier husband survived her until 191 2. 

As will be noted b}- a comparison of the above dates, the junior Levi 
Yoder was a posthumous child of his fatl>er and his widowed mother named 
him in honor of her deceased husband. John C. Yoder was his guardian 
and he was reared as a farmer. He was married at the age of twenty-four, 
and, in 1877, he began farming on his own account in Salem township, 
this county, and was thus engaged for five years, at the end of which time 
he returned to his home county and bought a farm in McCarthy town- 
ship Xl^ogan county), where he made his home for sixteen years and six 
months. He then disposed of his interest there and moved to Zane town- 
ship, same county, . where he bought a farm and where he remained for 
fourteen years, or until in December, 191 3, when he retired from the active 
labors of the farm and moved to North Lewisburg, where he since has made 
his home and where he and his wife are very comfortably situated. Mr. 
Yoder still owns his well-improved farm of one hundred and thirty acres 
in Logan county and continues to give considerable personal attention to tlic 
operation of the same. 

It was on January 16, 1877, that Levi Yoder was united in marriage 
to Rebecca J. Hartzler, who was born in Logan county, Ohio, a daughter 
of Joel and Lydia (Plank) Hartzler, natives of MifHin county, Pennsyl- 
vania, who in 1885 came to Ohio and located in Logan county, later mo\ing 
to Salem township, this county, where Joel Hartzler bought a farm and 
where he and his wife spent their last days, his death occurring in 1902 
and hers in 1910. They were members of the Mennonite church and their 
children were reared in that faith. There were seven of these children, 
of whom Mrs. Yoder was the third in order of birth, the others being as 
follow: Isaac, deceased; David, of West Liberty, this state; Samuel, 
deceased; Benjamin, deceased; John, of West Lil^erty, and Jonathan, who is 
farming in this county. To Mr. and Mrs. Yoder ten children have been born, 
namely: Laura, deceased; Nannie, who married R. J. Eberling, of Sandusky 
county, this state, and has two children, Wilbur and Bertha; Harvey S., wlm 
maTrrcd^ Mary "Warner and died on July 30, 1916, leaving one child, a son, 
Carlton ; Eli, who married Corena Folsenlogan and is now living at Indian- 
apolis, where he is engaged as a bookkeeper; Rudolph, a farmer, of Logan 
county, who married Norma Harding and has one child, a son, Floyd ; Lydia 
Ann, deceased; Bessie, who married Henrv Coates, of Anderson, Indiana, and 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 287 

lias two children, Ivan and Russell; Roy, deceased; Emma, of Anderson, Indi- 
ana, and Dora May, deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Yoder are members of the 
Mennonite church and have long- given their earnest attention to church 
work and other local good works. 



GWYNN H. CLARK. 



Gwynn H. Clark, a well-known liuilding contractor at Woodstock and 
formerly and for twenty-five years a member of the common council of 
that pleasant village, is a native son of Champaign county and has lived here 
all his life. lie was born on a farm in Rush township, in the vicinity of 
Woodstock, October 15, i860, son of George W. and I\)lly (Kimball) 
Clark, the former of whom was l)orn in the state of Massachusetts and the 
latter in this state. 

George W. Clark was but a lad when he came to Ohio with his parents 
from Massachusetts, the family locating near Brighton, where he remained 
until some time during the fifties, when he married and came to this count^^ 
settling on a farm in the Woodstock neighborhood in Rush township, where 
he was living when the Civil W'ar broke out. He enlisted for service in 
ihe Cnion arm}- as a private in Company G. Ninety-fifth Regiment, Ohio 
\()lunteer Infantry, and served with that command for nearly five years, 
(luring that time participating in some of the most notable engagements of 
the war. including the siege of A'icksburg and the battle of Gettysburg. 
During his militar}' service Mr. Clark incurred physical disabilities that ren- 
dered liini unfit for the continued hard w'ork of the farm and some time 
after his return home he gave up farming and moved to Woodstock, where 
he engaged in the hardware business and was thus engaged for about seven 
years, at the end of which time he became a building contractor and was thus 
successfully engaged until his retirement in the middle eighties. He con- 
tinued to make his home in \\'oodstock, where he had become very con-i- 
fortably established, and there he spent his last days, his death occurring in 
i<;t4. He and his wife were the parents of four children, those besides the 
sul)ject of this sketch teing Carrie (deceased), Celia and Guy. 

Gwynn H. Clark was but a child when his parents moved from the farm 
to Woodstock and he received his schooling in the schools of that village. 
As a boy he learned the practical details of the carpenter's trade under the 
careful instruction of his father and has e\er since followed that trade, for 



288 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

the piist t\v:ei;t}-tive or thirty years lia\ ins;- )jeen engaged as a huilding eon- 
tractor at Woodstock. Dining that long ])eriod as an active builder Mr. 
Clark has erected mc^st of the business houses at Woodstock, as well as 
the larger part of the dwelling houses, and has long been regarded as one 
<»f the leading contractors in Champaign county. He is a Republican and 
has ever given his earnest attention to local civic affairs, for twenty-five 
years having served as a member of the common council of his home vil- 
lage, during which time he did much to promote the general interests of 
the town. 

( )n I'Y'bruary 5. 1888, Cwynn H. Clark was united in marriage to 
.\lollie Riley, daughter of Samuel Riley, and to this union four sons have 
l)een born. Corwin (deceased), Charles. Herbert and George. Herbert 
Clark married Ruby Smith and has two children, Winifred and Clairette. 
The Clarks are members of the Universalist church and take a proper interest 
in church affcurs. Mr. Clark is past noble grand of the local lodge of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows and has for years taken a warm interest 
in Oddfellowship. 



R0BE:RT SANDERS 



Robert Sanders, a retired manufacturer of glue and soaj) at Urbana and 
■one ()f the best-known citizens of that city, is a native of Scotland, but has 
l)een a resident of this country since 1849 and of Urbana since 1853 and is 
therefore fully entitled to be enrolled aomng the real "old settlers" of Cham- 
Ijaign county. He was born in the town of Linlithgow, capital of the county 
!if that naaie and one of the mo.st interest-ing county ?;eats in Scotland, situ- 
ated seventeen miles west of Edinburgh and twenty-eight miles north and east 
of Glasgow. Einlithgow is the seat of an ancient royal palace, supposed 
to have been erected by Edward I of England and the .birthplace of Mary 
Oueen of Scots. The old palace is preserved as one of the show places of 
Scotland and Mr. Sanders has been in the room in which the unfortunate 
-Vlary was born in 1542. 

The date of the birth of Mr. Satiders was January 24. 1826. His par- 
ents. Robert and Elizabeth (Forgie) Sanders, also were born in Linlithgow, 
wlicre they spent all their lives. Robert Sanders was a manufacturer of 
glue and was a citizen of some substance. He and his wife were the parents 
of six children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the third in order 
of birth, the others being as follow : John, who spent all his life in his native 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 289 

Scotland, living lo the advanced age of eighty-four years; Margaret, who 
(Hed in infancy; JMary, who died in Scotland; David, a carpenter, who came 
10 the United States in 1850. coming on out into Ohio and locating- at 
L'rbana, where he nKule his home for years, but is now living in Kansas, and 
janies, also a carpenter, who is now living at Minneapolis, Minnesota. 

At the age of twelve years Robert Sanders left his native Linlithgow 
and went over to the neighboring city of Edinburgh, where he served an 
apprenticeship of six years in a saddlery establishment, becoming thoroughly 
]jroficient in that line and also learned to become a skilled craftsman in the 
liner lines of wood-working with particular reference to the making of violins. 
In this latter line of craftsmanship Mr. Sanders retains to this day a hearty 
interest, the making- of violins continuing" to Ije one of the most engaging 
"hobbies" of the pleasant evening time of his life, a happy means of reliev- 
ing- what otherwise might be a tedious retirement from the more active labors 
of life to one who has been as busy during a long and useful life as he has 
been. Upon iinishing his apprenticeship at Edinburgh he returned to Lin- 
lithgow and there assisted his father in the manufacture of glue until 1849. 
when — he then being twenty-three years of age — he decided to come to this 
country, believing that he could pursue his trade to more advantage and 
I letter profits over here. Upon landing in this country Mr. Sanders came on 
out to Ohio and located at Chillicothe. where for two years he was engaged 
in the glue business. He then went to Columbus, where he spent eighteen 
months in the same line of business, and then, in 1853, located at Urbana, 
\\here he ever since has made his home. Upon locating at Urbana Mr. 
Sanders formed a partnership with Mosgrove & Moore for the manufac- 
ture of glue and soap and three years later took over the business on his 
own account and until his retirement in 1907 continued engaged in the manu- 
facture of those products, building up quite an extensive establishment and 
creating a wide market for his products. 

Robert Sanders has been twice married. In the fall of 1853. the year 
in which he settled at Urbana. he was married at Columbus to Maria Andover. 
who was born in this state and who died at Urbana. He later married 
Christina McDonald, who was born in the north of Scotland, and to this 
union one child was born, a daughter, Jessie, who died in infancy. Mr. 
Sanders built a line brick house on College Way and there he and his wife 
are still living, very comfortably situated in their declining years. They are 
earnest members of the Presbyterian church and Mr. Sanders for years has 
1)een a member of the board of trustees of the same. In 1847 he joined the 
(19a) 



290 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY. OHIO. 

Independent Order of Odd Fellows in Scotland and in 1850 joined again at 
Chillicothe. later transferring his membership to the lodge at Urbana, and 
still retains a hearty interest in Odd Fellowship, one of the oldest continuous 
members of that order in Ohio, his connecticjn with the order covering a 
period of sixtv-seven vears. 



FLOYD FREEMAN. 



Floyd Freeman, well-known undertaker and funeral director at Nortii 
Lewisburg and a former member of the common council of that village, is 
a native son of Champaign county and has lived here all his life. He was 
born on a farm near Mechanicsburg, in Goshen township. March 28, 1875. 
son of G. L. and Sarah E. (Moody) Freeman, both of whom were also 
born in this county and whose last days were spent at North Lewisburg. 

G. L. Freeman also was born in Goshen township, son of George and 
Fleasey (McCarty) Freeman, natives of Pennsylvania, who came to this 
county during the twenties of the past century and located on a farm in 
Goshen township, where they spent the remainder of their lives, substantial 
and useful pioneers of that community. On that pioneer farm G. L. Free- 
man grew to manhood and after his marriage to Sarah E. Moody, who \\ as 
born on a farm near Mutual, in Union township, established his home (in 
the home farm, which he later came to own. a very well-improved place of 
one hundred and fifty acres, and there he made his home until 1890. when 
he moved to Mechanicsburg, where for a short time he was engaged in ihe 
furniture and undertaking business. He then disposed of his business there 
and moved to North Lewisburg, where he engaged in the undertaking busi- 
ness and was thus engaged in that business there until the latter nineties, 
when his son, the subject of this sketch, took over the business and he retired. 
To G. L. Freeman and wife eight children were born, of whom seven are 
still living, those besides the subject of this sketch being as follow : Maria, 
wife of Paul Hollingsworth ; Metta, wife of Oliver J. Morgan; Lee, of 
North Lewisburg; Harry, of Columbus, this state; Carrie, also of Colum- 
bus, and Alice, at home. 

Floyd Freeman completed his schooling in the liigh school at North 
Lewisburg" and then began working in the grain elevator at that place and 
was thus engaged until 1898, when he entered Professor Renouard's Col- 
lege at Columbus and took a thorough course in embalming and the arts 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. OQI 

pertaining to the undertaking business, after whicli he returned home and 
took over his father's undertaking business, which he ever since has been 
very successfully conducting. Mr. Freeman's undertaking establishment is 
admirably equipped, everything being up-to-date and in confonnance with 
the latest advances in that line, his equipment including a fine automobile 
hearse. Mr. Freeman is a ReJDublican and has served the public in the capa- 
city of councilman from his ward in the village council. 

In 1900 Floyd Freeman was united in marriage to Pauline R. Moore, 
daughter of J. F. Moore and wife, and to this union one child has been born, 
a son, Leonard. Mr. and Mrs. Freeman are members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church and Mr. Freeman is a member of the official board of the 
same. Fraternally, he is affiliated with both the Masons and the Knights 
of Pythias and is past master of the local Masonic lodge and past chancellor 
commander of the local Pythian lodge, in the affairs of both of which popular 
order he takes a warm and active interest . 



THOMAS L. TAYLOR. D. V. S. 

Dr. Thomas L. Taylor, veterinarv surgeon and one of the best-known 
residents of North Lewisburg, this county, was born at Norton, in Dela- 
ware county, this state, April j8, rS/S, son of Dr. I^^lam and Margaret 
Tavlor, the former a native of this state and the latter of New York state, 
whose last days were spent in DeL'iware county. 

Dr. I^lam Taylor. :dso a veterinary surgeon, was a veteran of the Civil 
War. having served for iwo years as a member of the One Hundred and 
Twentv-first Regiment. (Jhio Yolunteer Infantry, and four of his sons, half 
hrothers of the subject of this sketch, served as soldiers of the Union during 
the struggle between the States, one of these s(M1s, Albert Taylor, dying in 
Andersonville i)rison. The othei soldier sons were j(jel I').. Adam H. and 
Henry Tayl(jr. Dr. I''.lam Taylor was twice married. 1)\' his first wife iiav- 
ing had iivc children, one tlaughter. Mary, besides the sons above named. 
Lipon the death oi the mother of these children he married again and by his 
wife. Margaret, had sex-en. children, those besides the subject of this sketch, 
the last-born, l)eing James !>.. Carrie 1^".. Hattie R., I'^ffie. Josephine and 
Louis. 

U])on ct)mpleting the course in the ])ublic schools at Norton. T. L. 
'J'avlor worked for a few \'ears as a farm hand in the neighborhood of his 



292 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY. OHIO. 

home and then Ix-gan the study of nie(Hcine in the ottice of hi.^ half-brother. 
])r. Joel B. Taylor, at Broadway, in Union county, at the same time liecom- 
ing engaged as a clerk in a drug store at that place, and was thus engaged 
for nine years, at the end of which time he decided to take up veterinary 
surgery, the profession to which his father had devoted his life, and with 
that end in view entered the Ontario Veterinary College at Toronto, and 
after a course of two years" study there entered the Grand Rapids \'eterin- 
ary College, at Cirand Rapids, Michigan, from which he was graduated in 
ig04, with the degree of Doctor of \^eterinary Surgery. Thus admirably 
<iualified for the practice of his profession. Doctor Taylor opened an office 
at North Lewisburg in that same year and has ever since been engaged in 
practice there, his professional duties taking him through three counties, his 
held of operations extending into the neighboring counties of Logan and 
Union, as well as wideh' throughout Champaign county, where he has an 
extensive practice. 

In iQOi, Dr. T. L. Taylor was united in marriage to .Vrie Harrington. 
a daughter of Lorenzo Llarrington and wife, and to this union two chil- 
dren have been born., Bernard and Ruth. Doctor and Mrs. Taylor have a 
pleasant home at North Lewisburg and take a proper part in the general 
social activities of their home town, helpful in promoting all good causes 
thereabout. The Doctor is a Republican in his political affiliations and fra- 
ternally, is affiliated with the local lodge of the Free and Accepted Masons, 
in the affairs of which order he takes a warm interest. 



BENJAMIN GRLIBBS. 



Benjamin Grubbs, a substantial retired farmer and lionored veteran 
of the Civil War, now living at North Lewisburg, where he has resided 
since 1899, is a native of Ohio and has resided in this state all his life, with 
the exception of a period during the eighties and nineties when he was 
engaged in farming in Kansas. He was born on a pioneer farm near Last 
Liberty, in the neighboring county of Logan, June 30, 1838, son of Chris- 
topher and Elizabeth (Skidmore) Grubbs, both of whom were born at 
Culpeper Court House, Virginia, and who had come to Ohio whh their 
respective parents in the days of their youth, the families settling in this 
part of the state, the Grubbses in Logan county and the Skidmores in Union 
county. 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 293 

Christopher Grubbs was born at Culpeper on February 19, 1804, and 
was but a child when his parents, VViUiam Grubbs and wife, also Virginians, 
the former born on August 20, 1778, and the latter, November 21, 1778. 
came to this state in 1806 and settled at Middleburg, in Logan count w 
where William Grubbs opened a tavern and where he and his wife spent 
the remainder of their lives, influential pioneers of that community. Will- 
iam Grubbs and wife were the parents of nine children, the others' being as 
follow: Mary, born in February, 1807; Abraham, December 22, 1809: 
Atlanta, November 2, 1810; Evelyn, July 10, 181 2; Levi; Benjamin, May i, 
1817; William, February 19, 1820, and Rebecca J., May 29, 1822. Chris- 
topher Grubbs grew up on a farm and after his marriage to Elizabeth Skidmore 
established his home on a farm in the immediate vincinity of East Liberty, 
in Logan county, but later moved to the adjoining county of Union and 
there he and his wife spent the remainder of their lives, influential and useful 
residents of the community in which they lived, the latter dying at the age 
of forty-eight and the former at the age of tifty-eight. Christopher Grubbs 
for years served as justice of the peace in and for his home township and was 
familiarly known far and near as "Old Squire Kiffey Grubbs." He was an 
ardent Abolitionist and was a strong influence throughout this part of the 
state in behalf of the abolition movement during the days when that move- 
ment began to have serious agitation throughout the North. By religious 
persuasion he was a LTniversalist. His wife was a member of the Free Wilt 
Baptist church. They were the parents of ten children, of whom the sub- 
ject of this sketch was the sixth in order of birth, the others being as fol- 
low: William S., a farmer, whose last days were spent in Logan county, 
this state; Atwell, a farmer, who lived in Union and Logan cotmtres; Lydia 
-\nn, deceased; Atlanta, who died in Kansas; James Madison, who is liv- 
ing at East Liberty, at the age of eighty-one years; Thomas S., a farmer 
and a veteran of the Civil War, he having served as a member of Company 
C, Seventeenth Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, who died at North 
Lewisburg; Evelyn, who died in Logan county; Oliver H.. a farmer, li\- 
ing at Holton, Kansas, and Christopher, a farmer, of Pottersburg. this 
state. 

Benjamin Grubbs was reared on the home farm, receiving his schooling 
in the primitive subscription schools of his home neighborhood in Union 
county and early became engaged in farming on his own account, being 
thus engaged when the Civil War broke out. On August 25, 1861, at 
Middleburg, he enlisted for service as a private in Company C, Seventeentli 



_X)4 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO, 

Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, the hrst three-year regiment, under 
Col. J. M. Connell, and after thirty days at Camp Dennison went to the 
front, the regiment spendirig the following winter at Wild Cat Gap and at 
Somerset, Kentucky, in the spring of 1862 proceeding to Nashville and 
then to Pittsburg Landing to help General Grant, and was in every battle 
of the Middle department, under Generals Rosecrans and Thomas. At first 
the Seventeenth Ohio was equipped with the old Harper's Ferry muskets 
and it was some time after it entered the service before it was properly 
armed. Among the notable engagements participated in by Mr. Grubbs 
were the battles of Stone's River, Shiloh, Missionary Rid^e, Jonesboro, the 
Atlanta campaign, and he was with Sherman on the march to the sea and 
thence to Washington, D. C, where he took part in the Grand Review 
at the close of the war and received his discharge in July, 1865, being mus- 
tered out with the rank of sergeant-major. During all that period of ser\'ice 
he was absent from the regiment on sick leave but thirt\ da}s. 

Upon the completion of his militaiy service Mr. Grubbs returned home 
and resumed the pursuits of peace on the farm. He married in 1866 and 
continued farming in Union county until 1882, when he disposed of bis 
interests there and moved to Kansas, buying a farm in Jackson county, that 
state, and remaining there for seventeen years, or until i899, when he sold 
his Kansas farm and returned to Ohio, locating at North Lewisburg. where 
he ever since has made his home, now living comfortably retired. 

Mr. Grubbs has been twice married. As noted abo\e, it was in 1866 
that he was united in marriage to Mary Norvall, of Union county, who died 
in 1880. To that union one child was born, a daughter, Frances A., wIk^ 
died at the age of seven years. On August ly, 1882, Mr. Grubbs married, 
secondly, Hester Good, who \vas born at North Le\visburg. this county. 
May 25, 1843, daughter of Dr. Thomas and Flizabeth (Moore) Good, the 
former a native of Virginia and the latter of Pennsylvania. Dr. Thomas 
(Tood was for years one of the best-known physicians in the northeastern 
part of this county and had a wide practice throughout the North Lewis- 
burg neighborhood. Fie and his wife were the parents of four children, 
those besides Mrs. Grubbs being Sarah, Clark and Emma. After the death 
of Doctor Goo<l his widow married Jesse Reems and to that union two 
cliildren were born, Harris and Lydia. To P>enjamin and Hester (Good) 
Crrubbs one child has been born, a son. Clark C. Grubbs. of Dayton. Ohio, 
a traveling salesman for Bolding & Company, who married Inio Waymire 
and has three children. Paul. William S. and Marv Hester. Pieniamin (Grubbs 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 295 

and wife are earnest members of the Methodist church and have ever given 
proper attention to local good works, helpful in all movements having to 
do with the advancement of the best interests of their home town and of 
the county at large. 



JOSEPH C. BUCKW ALTER. 

Joseph C. Buckwalter, head of the Buckwalter Hardware Company at 
North Lewisburg and one of the most enterprising and progressive young 
merchants of that thriving village, is a native of the state of West Virginia, 
but has been a resident of Ohio since the days of his infancy, and of Cham 
paign county for the past ten years or more. He was born on a farm in 
Hampshire county. West Virginia, July 23. 1881, son of D. W. and Ellen 
L. Buckwalter, both natives of that same state, who came to Ohio in 1882 
and located in Greene county. D. W. Buckwalter was a farmer and upon 
moving to Greene county established his home on a farm there and there 
spent the remainder of his life. 

Reared on the home farm in Greene county, Joseph C. Buckwalter 
received his schooling in the public schools of that county and after completing 
his studies became engaged in farming and was thus engaged for several 
years, at the end of which time he left the farm and became a Iwokkeeper 
for a mercantile firm at Ottawa, in Putnam county. Shortly afterward he 
A\as transferred to a store cnvned by that .same firm in Xenia and after a 
sometime further service as a bookkeeper there he went to Dayton, where 
he was similarly engaged for four years, at the end of which time his 
services were engaged by the Standard Oil Company and he was sent back 
to Ottawa, where he was employed in the interests of that company for 
six months. He then came to Champaign county and from 1906 to 1910 
was employed with a hardware firm at Mechanicsburg. It was in 19 10 
that Mr. Buckwalter located at North Lewisburg, where he formed a part- 
nership with G. E. Jordan and engaged in the hardware business there, 
under the firm style of Buckwalter & Jordan. In 1914 Mr. Jordan retired 
from the firm and Mr. Buckwalter formed a company and incorporated the 
same as the Buckwalter Hardware Company and under that corporate title 
has since continued to carry on the hardware business at North Lewisburg 
and has done very well, the business annually assuming greater proportions. 
Mr. Buckwalter's store occupies two floors of a building twenty by seventy- 
five feet in dimensions, with an ample warehouse for storage purposes for 



2Q6 CHAMPAIGX COUiXTY. OHIO. 

farm machinery maintained in connection with the same. The store is well 
stocked and the business is conducted in accordance with modern and up-to- 
date methods, Mr. Buckwalter's long experience in the mercantile busi- 
ness giving him exceptional advantages in that direction. 

In 1905 Joseph C. Buckwalter was united in marriage to Clara Unken- 
holz, daughter of Frederick Unkenholz and wife, and* to this union two 
children have been born. Joseph H. and Frederick C. Mr. and Mrs. Buck- 
waiter are members of the Methodist Episcopal church and take an actiAe 
interest in the various beneficerices of the'' same, Mr. Buckwalter being a 
member of the board of trustees of the church. Politicall}'. he is a Repub- 
lican, giving his earnest attention to local political affairs, and, fraternal]}-. 
he is connected with the local camp of the Modern Woodmen of America, 
in the afifairs of which he takes a warm interest. 



ASA G. HOPKINS. 



Asa G. Hopkins, a veteran of the Civil War and the proprietor of a 
dairy farm on rural route No. 4 out of Mechanicsburg, on the Urbana pike, 
one and a half miles northwest of Mechanicsburg. in Goshen township, this 
county, is a native son of Ohio and has lived in this state nearly all his life. 
He was born on a farm in the neighboring county of Union on Januar\- 
22, 1847, son of George and Sarah (Bates) Hopkins, the former a native of 
that same county and the latter a native of the neighboring county of Logan. 
George Hopkins was a son of Benjamin Hopkins, a native of England, whose 
early manhood was spent as a sailor and who. upon his retirement from the 
sea, came to this country and settled in Union county, this state, where 
he established his home and where he spent the remainder of his life, (jeorgc 
Hopkins grew to manhood and there married and established his home, 
remaining a life-long farmer. He and his wife were- the parents of six 
children, four sons and two daughters, of whom the subject of this sketcli 
was the second in order of birth. 

Reared on the home farm in Union county, Asa G. Hopkins received 
his schooling in the schools of that neighborhood and was living there when 
the Civil War broke out. Though but sixteen years of age at that time. 
his heart was stirred by the appeal to arms and he wanted to go to the 
front, but had to wait. Later, however, he was able to enlist as a meml)er 
of Company H. One Hundred and Thirty-sixth Regiment, Ohio Volun- 




HAROLD M. HOPKINS. 




JAMES It. HOPKINS 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 



297 



teer Infantry, and served with that command until the expiration of the 
war. Upon the completion of his military service he retiu-ned to his home 
in Union county and shortly afterward went to St. Petershurg-. Pennsylvania, 
where for twelve years he was engaged in the oil business. In the mean- 
time, December 31, 1874, he married and not long afterward bought the 
farm on which he is now living, in Goshen township, this county, and there 
has made his home ever since, he and his family being very comfortab]\ 
situated. Mr. Hopkins has for years given particular attention to the dairv 
feature of his farming and has one of the best-equipped dairy farms in 
the county and a fine herd of Jersey cows, the general management of which 
of late years has been tinder the direction of his younger son. Harold M. 
Hopkins, one of the best-known dairymen in this county. Mr. Hopkins is 
the ovi^ner of two hundred and seventeen acres in the home farm and he 
and his son have an excellent farm plant. In addition to his farming and 
dairying interests, Mr. Hopkins also gives considerable attention to the gen- 
eral interests of the communit}- and is a member of the board of directors 
of the Farmers Bank of Mechanicsburg. 

On December 31, 1874, in the neighborhood of Irwin, close to the tri- 
county line, Asa G. Hopkins was iniited in marriage to Nettie C. Miller. 
\\ho was born at what then was known as Liverpool, in Madison county, 
daughter of James and Emaline (Burnham) Miller, who in 1861 moved 
from there to the vicinity of Irwin, where they established their homo. 
James Miller and wife were the parents of five children, three of whom are 
still living, Mrs. Hopkins having two brothers, John B. and Frank C. 
Miller, who are living on the old home place in the neighborhood of Irwin. 
Two sisters died in childhood, Emma Z. at the age of two years and Clara 
E. at the age of seven years. Mr. and Mrs. Hopkins have two sons, James 
Roy, born on INIay 17, 1877, and Harold M.. the latter of whom is unmarried 
and is making his home on the old home place, managing the dairy and also 
giving his attention to the afi^airs of the Home Dairy and Standard Ice 
Cream Company, of which he is a stockholder and manager of the creamery 
and ice plant and also of the ice cream department. 

James Roy Hopkins, an instructor in the \rt Academy ai Cincinnati, 
has had a distinguished career as an artisi and his name is widely known in 
art circles both in this country and in Europe. Following his graduation from 
the Mechanicsburg high school, he entered Ohio State Univer'^ity at the age 
of nineteen and. after two years of attendance there, began to specialize in 
his art studies at the university. I'resently he entered the Cincinnati Art 
school and it was not long until his work began to attract s])ecial attention. 



298 CHAMPAIGN COUXTV, OHIO. 

He 'later uent abroad and his work was exhibited in both London and Paris, 
the young- artist thus attaining- international fame. Three years ago he was 
made a member of the faculty of the ( 'incinnati Art Vcadem}- and now occu- 
l)ies that position, one of the liest-known artists in that city. His wife, who 
was .Mrs. lulna ( Beachbcjard ) I>oies. and whom he met at Cincinnati, also is 
an artist of international reputation, her pictures hanging- in some of the 
most noted art galleries in the world. She was born in Michigan and her 
education in art was completed in Paris, in which city she made her home 
ior some \ears. ller specialty is wood block printing. They make their 
liome in Cincinnati. 

Asa (i. tlopkins and his wife are members of the Methodist b4jisc(^pal 
church at Mechanicsburg and have for years taken an earnest interest in the 
various beneficences of the .same. Mr. Hopkins being a member of the board 
of trustees of that church. Mr. Hopkins is a member of the local lodge of 
the Masons at Mechanicsburg. as is his son, Harold, and both he and his 
wife are members of Caroline Chapter No. T,i). Order of the luistern Star. 
Mrs. Hopkins being ]jast worthy matron of the same, and all take a \varm 
interest in local Alasonic affairs, as w-ell as in the general social activities of 
the community in which they live, helpful in promoting all agencies having to 
do with the advancement of the common welfare thereabout. 

Mr. Hopkins is a Republican and was townshi|) trustee about twelve 
years, being always active in politics. 



SETH M. WEST 



Seth M. West, an honored veteran of the Ci\il War and a well-known 
and substantial retired farmer of Logan county, now living at North Lewis- 
burg, which has been his place of residence since 1S96, is a native son of 
(Ohio and has lived in this state all his life. He was born in the neighbor- 
ing county of Union on. February 16, 1844. a son of Frederick R. ;ind Eliza 
( Norvall) West, the former a native of the state of Massachusetts and the 
latter, of Ohio, whose last days were spent in Union county, this state. 

Frederick R. West was born at Lee, Massachusetts, and there grew- to 
manhood, later coming to Ohio and settling in Medina count}-, presently 
moving up into Union county, where he married Eliza Norvall. a member 
of one of the pioneer families of that county, and there he remained for 
some years, at the end of which time he mo\ed on up into Logan county. 



CHAMPAKIN COUNTY, OHIO. 299 

where he spent his last days, becoming a substantial farmer. He was a 
Repftibliean and he and his wife were members of the Methodist Protestant 
church and their children were reared in that faith. There were eight of 
these children, namely Henry D., who is a farmer in Kansas: Seth M., 
tlie subject of this biographical sketch; Alonzo P., deceased; William Allen. 
of Kings Creek, this county: David L.. a Kansas farmer; two who died 
in youth, and Olive L. 

Seth Mt West grew up on the home farm, receiving his schooling in 
tlie local schools, and in September, 1861, he then being but seventeen years 
of age, he enlisted for service in the Union army during the continuance of 
vlie Civil War, a member of Company C. Seventeenth Regiment, Ohio 
Volunteer Infantry. He enlisted at Middleburg and from Camp Dennison 
went with his regiment to Kentucky, thence to Tennessee and then on into 
(Georgia, where the command was attached to General Thomas's command, 
[•"ourteenth Army Corps. The first engagement in wdiich Mr. West par- 
ticipated was tire battle of Wild Cat, Kentucky, and in cjuick succession fol- 
lowed the battles of Perryville. Jonesboro. Hoover's Gap, Tennessee, and 
then on into the thick of the Atlanta campaign, and was thus serving when, 
on March 26, 1863, he received his discharge on a physician's certificate of 
disability, a severe attack of rheumatism having incapacitated him from 
further service. He then spent the following summer at home recuperating 
and in September of that same year. 1863, re-enlisted in his old company 
and rejoined his regiment, which later took part in the Atlanta campaign, 
under General Sherman, and was with Sherman on his march to the sea 
and later on up through the Carolinas and on to Richmond. Mr. West 
participated w-ith his regiment in the Grand Review at Washington at the 
close of the war and upon being mustered out returned to his home in Ohio, 
resuming there his place on the farm. He was married in the spring of 
1872 and continued farming in Logan county until in November, 1896, wdien 
he retired from the farm and moved to North Lewisburg, where he since 
has made his home and where he is very comfortably situated. Though 
long retired from the active labors of the farm, Mr. West continues to retain 
a close personal interest in farming and gives considerable ])ersonal atten- 
tion to Ws well-kept farm up in Logan county. 

Seth M. West has been twice married. It was ()n April 12. 1872. in 
Logan county, that he was united in marriage to Lucetta In.skeep. who was 
born in that county, a daughter of Joel Inskeep and wife, and who died 
on March 12. 1885. leaving one child, a son. Marshall C. West, now an 
automobile dealer in Detroit. Michigan, who married Maude Mason and 



300 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY. OHIO. 

has one child, a daughter, Helen. Sime time after the death of his hist 
wife Mr. West married Anna Waugh, who was born in Washington count) . 
this state, daughter of WilHam S. and Rebecca (Graham) Waugh, natives 
of Pennsylvania, who were married in that state and later came to Ohio, 
locating in Washington count}^ where they remained until 1880. when they 
moved to North Lewisburg, this county, where they spent their last days, 
Mr. Waugh being engaged there as a photographer and in the inidertaking 
business. William S. Waugh and wife were the parents of four children, 
of whom Mrs. West was the second in order of birth, the others being 
James G., Deborah (deceased) and William E. (deceased). 

To Seth M. and Anna (Waugh) West one child has been born, a 
daughter, Rebecca Jane, who married John R. Wilson, Jr., and is living in 
Logan county. Mr. and Mrs. West have a pleasant home in North Lewis- 
burg and take a warm interest in the general social activities of their home 
town. They are members of the Methodist Episcopal church and Mr. 
West is a class leader and a member of the board of stewards of the church. 
He is an active member of the local post of the Grand Army of the RepulDlic 
and a member of King's Lodge No. 54, Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 
in the affairs of both of which organizations he takes a warm interest. 



JAMES RAWLINGS TODD. 

James Rawlings Todd, one of Champaign county's best-known and most 
substantial retired farmers and dairymen, former trustee of Union town- 
ship and for years actively interested in the public affairs of the community, 
is a native son of this county and has lived here all his life. He was born 
on a farm on Pretty Prairie, in Urbana township, March 9, 1863, son of 
Thomas Mitchell and Mary Martha (Rawlings) Todd, the former of whom 
was a native of Pennsylvania and the latter of this county, prominent resi- 
dents of the Pretty Prairie neighborhood. 

Thomas Mitchell Todd was born in Dauphin county, Pennsylvania, on 
April 17, 1827, son of David and Sallie Todd, who came to this state from 
Pennsylvania in 1846, locating first in Warren county and coming thence, 
in the spring of 1847, to Champaign county and settling in Urbana town- 
ship, where they established their home and where they spent the remainder 
of their lives. Thomas M. Todd was twenty years of age when he came to 
this county and on March 12. 1857, ten years later, he married Mary Martlin 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OIIFO. _:;OI 

Rawlings, who was born in Urbana township on December 25. 1831, daugli- 
ter of pioneer residents of the Pretty Prairie section. After his marriage 
he established his home on a farm five miles southeast of Urbana, where he 
developed a fine piece of farm property and where he and his wife continued 
to make their home until in April, 1896, when they and their daughter, Alma, 
moved to Urbana. There Mrs. Todd died on December i, 1905. Mr. Todd 
died in October, 191 1. They were the parents of seven children, of whom 
the subject of this sketch was the third in order of birth, the others being 
as follow: Susanna, born on March 18, 1858, who died on December 14, 
1862; David Solon, born September 8, i860, who after years of successful 
farming in Union township, moved to Urbana, married Florence Engle, De- 
cember 24, 1884, and had two children, Herbert E., bom on June 29, 1886, 
and Wilbur M., born January 6, 1890; Alma, born October 9, 1864, who is 
now making her home in Urbana; Henry William, born August 7, 1867, who 
died on July 16, 1883; Thomas Rawlings, born March ly, 1870, a well- 
known Champaign county farmer, who, on November 14, 1895, married 
Laura V. Swinley; Pearl C, born November 18, 1872, who died at San 
Antonio, Texas, March 20, 1909, leaving a widow, Eveline (Cartmell) Todd, 
to whom he was married on September 16, 1902. and one child, a daughter. 
Margaret L., born on March 23, 1904; the widow and iier daughter now 
living at Urbana. 

James R. Todd was reared on the home farm on Prett\ Prairie, a 
valued assistant to his father and brothers in the labors of improving and 
developing the same, and received his early schooling in the neighborhood 
schools, supplementing the same by a two-years' course in Oberlin College, 
after which he returned to the old home place and there continued engaged 
in farming for about three yeai^-s, at the end of which time he began farm- 
ing on his own account and later became a landowner in Union township, 
establishing his home there after his marriage and continued farming there, 
his farm being a part of the old Todd farm, and there continued to make his 
home until 1912, when he moved to Urbana township, where he remained, 
operating a daiiy farm, until in March, 191 7, when he retired from the farm 
and moved to Urbana, where he and his family are now living and where 
they are very comfortably situated. During Mr. Todd's long residence on 
the farm he was quite extensively engaged in the raising of cattle and horses, 
in connection with his general farming, and did very well in his operations. 
He is a stanch Republican and for twelve years served as trustee of Union 
township. He also served for six years as director of the county infirm- 
ary and in other ways has given his personal attention to local public affairs. 



302 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY. OHIO. 

It was on October 6, 1892, that James K. Todd was united in marriage 
to Kate A. Preston, of Mutual, this county, who was born in Nelsonville. 
over in Athens county, this state, daughter of Dr. H. S. and Charity (Hush- 
owa) Preston, who became residents of Mutual in 1876, where the Doctor 
is still engaged in the practice of his profession. Doctor Preston was born 
in Columbus, this state, and is a graduate of Sterling Medical College in 
that city. It was in March, 1876, that he located in Mutual, where he ever 
since has made his home, engaged in practice and in the mercantile business. 
He and his wife had four children, those besides Mrs. Todd being William 
(deceased), Abba, wife of Frank Stone, of Springfield, this state, and 
Charity, wife of E. A. Baker, of Springfield. 

To James R. and Kate A. (Preston) Todd two children have been born. 
Elise Alma, wife of Harry Carnahan, head chemist for the Caldwell & Bloos 
Company, of Mansfield, this state, and Imogene, who is at home with her 
parents. Mr. and Mrs. Todd and their daughters are members of the Pres- 
byterian church and have ever taken a warm interest in church afifairs. as 
well as in the general social activities of the community, helpful in numerous 
ways in advancing such movements as are designed to advance the common 
welfare. Mr. Todd is a Mason and a member of the local lodge of the 
Knights of Pythias, and in the affairs of these popular organizations takes 
an active interest. 



ALFRED L. YODER. 



Farming in the good, old-fashioned way has been a good enough occu- 
pation for Alfred L. Yoder, of Salem township, Champaign county; he has 
been at it since a boy. He was born in Holmes county, Ohio, September 8, 
1875. He is a son of David J. and Susanna (Garber) Yoder, both natives 
of Holmes county, this state, where they grew up, at Wallen Creek, German 
township, and there they were married and established their home on a farm, 
where they remained until 1892, when they removed to Champaign county 
and located on the place on which the subject of this sketch is now making 
his home. The father bought sixty acres in Salem township, which he oper- 
ated until 1907, when he retired from active life and is now making his home 
among his children, of whom there were five, named as follow: Joas D., 
A. D., Elizabeth, one died in infancy, and Alfred L.. of this sketch. David 
J. Yoder, the father, was a son of John and Katherine (Miller) Ycxler^ both 



CIIAiMl'AlGN' COUNTY, OHIO. 303 

natives of Pennsylvania, from which state they came to Ohio in an early day, 
settling- in Holmes county. 

Alfred L. Yoder, of this sketch, grew to manhood on the farm, where 
he worked with his father when he became of proper age. He received his 
education in the rural schools of Holmes county. He continued farming 
there until 1907, when the family moved to Salem township. Champaign 
county, at which time he began farming for himself on the home place, his 
father retiring at the time, and here he has continued raising a g-eneral line 
of crops and live stock of various gi-ades, renting the land from his father. 
He makes a specialty of fattening horses for the market, handling about 
twenty-five head annually, also many hogs. 

The mother of Alfred L. Yoder died in 1900. 

Mr. Yoder was married in 1905 to Elizabeth Kenegy, who was born 
in 1880. She is a daughter of Levi Kenegy and wife, natives of Logan 
county, Ohio. 

Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Yoder, namely : Clara 
Belle, Laura Ellen, and Lavina Catherine. 

Politically, Mr. Yoder is a Republican. He belongs to the Mennonite 
church at Oak Grove. 



TAMES ROBINSON. 



Another of the painstaking farmers of Salem township, who is con- 
tented to earn his bread by the sweat of his brow, is James Robinson, who 
was born in Coshocton county, Ohio, July 20, 1854. PTe is a son of George 
and Lucinda (Bailey) Robinson, both natives of Virginia, from which state 
they moved to Coshocton county, this state, in an earl}- day, where the}' 
spent the rest of their lives, dcA^oting their active days to general farming. 
They had three children, namely: Elizabeth, who married Michael Fox: 
Nannie, who married L S. Williamson, and James, of this sketch. 

James Robinson received a limited education in the rural schools of his 
native community, leaving school when fifteen years old, and began life for 
himself as a farm hand, which work he continued until he came to Cham- 
paign county, in 1 881, first renting sixty-five acres in Wayne township, later 
took charge of the Cowgill farm of six hundred acres, \\hich he conducted 
successfully and on an extensive scale for a period of thirty-one years, hi 
T914 he bought his present farm of sixty-one acres in Salem township, 
known as the old Seth Thomas place, and here he intends to niakc his future 



304 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

liome. He has made up-to-date improvements in general and liis home is 
pleasantly located. 

On September 3, 1885, Mr. Robinson was married to Alice Metz, a 
native of Wayne county, Ohio, and a daughter of Samuel and Eliza Met/, 
who resided in Champaign county after the Civil War. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Robinson four children have been born, namely : Sam- 
uel Milroay. who married Mary Breedlove, lives in Wayne township ; George 
l^rederick, Edith and Mabel, all three li\'e at home with their parents, and 
are unmarried. 

Politically, Mr. Robinson is a Democrat, but votes independently, en- 
deavoring always to put the best men in office, regardless of their party 
affiliations. 



ABRAHAM L. GLENDENNING. 

There are few families in Champaign count}' better known or more 
widely represented hereabout than the Glendenning family, which was estab- 
lished in this county in 1829 and has ever since been prominently represented 
in the life of the C(.)unty. James Glendenning was the founder of the family 
in Champaign county. He was a native of Scotland and ^vas but two years 
of ;tge when he came to this country with his parents in 1795. the famih- 
settling in Harrison county, Virginia, in that part of the Old Dominion now 
comprised within the bounds of AA'est Virginia. There he grew to manhood 
and married Marv D. Van Horn, who was born in Pennsylvania about 1793. 
After his marriage he continued to make his home in Virginia until 1829, 
when he drove through with his family to Ohio, arriving at Mechanicsburg 
in December of that year. Not long afterward he settled on a farm of one 
hundred and fifty-five acres on Brush lake, in Rush township, this county. 
and there established his home and spent the rest of his life, living to the 
advanced age of eighty-two. His wife died at the age of seventy. They 
were the parents of eight children, a list of whom is set out elsewhere in this 
volume, where extended mention is made of the Glendenning family in this 
cdunty. 

Of the eight children born to James Glendenning, the pioneer, and wife, 
W illiam Glendenning was the second in order of birth. He was born in Vir- 
ginia on July 8, J817, and died at his home in this county on March 2, 1897. 
All his life he was a farmer and came to be the owner of more than seven 
hundred acres of l;uid. \V'illiam Glendenning was twice married and by his 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 305 

first wife was the father of five children and by his second wife, eight, as set 
out in the general history of the Glendennings presented elsewhere in this 
volume. The second wife of William Glendenning was Mary Hawkins, 
who was born in the state of New Hampshire on January 2^, 1825, and who 
.survived her husband more than six years, her death (xxurring on September 
16. 1903. 

Abraham L. Glendenning, sixth in order of birth of the eight children 
born to William and Mary^ Ann (HaAvkins) Glendenning, was born on the 
old home farm in Rush township, this county, July 16, i860, and there grew 
to manhood. He received his elementary schooling in the district school in 
the neighborhood of his home and in 1880 attended the Woodstock schools. 
In 1881-82 he attended the North Lewisburg schools and during 1883-84 was 
in attendance at Antioch College. W^ith a view to taking up the law as a 
profession, he then read law for fifteen months in the office of Lew Johnson, 
but later decided that the medical profession would be more to his liking and 
for eleven months read medicine in the office of Dr. W. G. Wagstaff. Then 
turning from the professions, Mr. Glendenning took up practical fanning 
and has ever since been engaged in farming, in which vocation he has done 
very well. After his marriage in 1890 he received from his father the 
Johnson farm of one hundred and twenty acres two and one-half miles north 
of Woodstock, in Ivush township, and has ever since made his home there. 
Since taking possession of that place Mr. Glendenning has made many sub- 
stantial improvements on the same and has a fine home and one of the best- 
c(}uipped farm plants in the neighborhood. In addition to his general farm- 
ing, Mr. Glendenning has for years given considerable attention to dairy 
farming and the raising of high-grade live stock, being recognized as one 
of the most progressive and up-to-date farmers in that section of the county. 
I'olitically, he is a Republican and has ever given close attention to local civic 
affairs, but has not been included in the office-seeking class. 

On February 22. 1890. Abraham L. Glendenning was united in mar- 
riage to Charlotte E. Burnham. who also was born in Rush township, this 
county, daughter of Capt. Philo and Charlotte (Perkins) Burnham, the 
former of whom was born in that same township and the latter in the state 
of Massachusetts. Capt. Philo Burnham, who was a substantial farmer of 
Kusb township, was a son of Erastus and Elizabeth Burnham. natives of 
Massachusetts, who drove through from that state and settled in Champaign 
county in pioneer days. During the Civil War Captain Burnham commanded 
a company in one of the Ohio regiments. His wife originally was a member 
(20a) 



306 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

of the Methodist Episcopal church, Imt later Ijecame a memljer of the Chris- 
tian church. They were the parents of five children, of whom Mrs. Glen- 
dennini^ was the fourth in order of l>irth. the other being, Annette, who mar- 
ried Adolphus Horn and is now deceased : William P., for many years a well- 
known farmer and grain dealer in Rush township, who died in 1913; Mary 
O., who married Janies M. McMahill and who, as well as her husband, is 
now deceased, and the Hon. Phild G. Buniham, a prominent attorney of 
Dayton, this state, who for some time represented the Dayton district in the 
Ohio state Senate. Philo G. P>urnham received his early schooling in the 
Woodstock schools and later attended Antioch College and the law depart- 
ment of the University of Michig'an at .Ann Arbor. For two years he taught 
school at Covington, this state, and then, twenty years or more ago, entered 
upon the practice of law at Dayton and has ever since been located there. 
He is a stanch Republican and in addition to serving as a memljer of the stale 
Senate, has served as city solicitor for the city of Dayton. His wife, before 
her marriage, was Erli C. Baer. 

To Abraham P. and Charlotte \\. ( Burnham ) (ilendcnning one child 
has been born, a daughter. Martha Mary, who died at the age of two years. 
Mr. and Mrs. (ilendennino- are members of the Christian Science church. 



TOHN F. LINVILLE 



The "song of the forge" has long been pleasant in the ears of John V. 
Linville, retired blacksmith of Kennard, Champaign county. He was born 
in Wayne township, this county, September 16, 1856. He is a son of Ellis 
and Rachael A. (Middleton) Linville. The father was a native of Lancas- 
ter county, Pennsylvania, and the mother was born in Champaign count \. 
Ohio. The father was brought to Ohio when three years old by his parents. 
Solomon and Louise Linville, who first located at Springfield, where they 
lived about ten years, then moved to Champaign county, locating on a farm 
in Wayne township, where he also worked as a carpenter, following the two 
occupations the rest of his life. Ellis Linville grew up on the farm and 
attended the common schools in Champaign and Clark counties. After lea\ - 
ing school he took up the carpenter's trade which he learned under his father, 
also followed farming in Wayne township, this county, until 1873, when he 
moved to Salem township and continued farming, renting land until \X~(>. 
when he took charge of the Cowgill farm of three hundred acres, whioli he 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 307 

conducted until 1897, when he engaged in the mercantile business at Ken- 
nard, enjoying a good trade, and continued in that line until 1910. He then 
sold out and retired from active life, but remained at Kennard until his 
death, June 15, 1914. He was a soldier in the Civil War, having enlisted 
in Company H, Forty-fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, in which he served 
faithfully for nearly three years. The fact that he came home carrying 
thirteen bullet marks on his body would indicate that he did not spend those 
three years on a pleasure excursion. The fact is, he was in the midst of 
some of the leading battles of the war, and, according to his comrades and 
officers, was a brave and efficient soldier. He was mustered into the service 
at Camp Chase, Columbus, Ohio, and served with that command until he 
was mustered out and honorably discharged. Among the engagements in 
which he participated were those of Resaca, Dallac, Kenesaw Mountain, Pine 
Mountain and Lovejoy Station. One of the first engagements in which he 
took part was the battle of Button Hill, Kentucky, and he also took part in 
the pursuit of General Morgan, the Confederate cavalry raider, through 
Indiana and Ohio. On October 20, 1863, he w'as at the battle of Philadel- 
phia, Tennessee, in which his regiment lost sixty-eight men, killed, wounded 
and missing. Later the regiment served in the campaign in eastern Tennes- 
see, and on November 15th of that year at Holston River, lost one hundred 
and one men, including five officers. In an engagement two days later. 
November 17th, they had a brisk encounter with the forces of General Long- 
street. From Tazewell, Tennessee, the regiment went to Cumberland Gap 
and thence to Mt. Sterling, Kentucky, and finally on into Georgia to take 
part in the Atlanta campaign, and was present at the siege of Atlanta. 

After his military service Ellis Linville returned to his home in Cham- 
paign county and resumed farming and carpentering, but owing to his many 
wounds he was never a robust man thereafter. His family consisted of the 
following children, namely : John, of this sketch ; Louise, Sherman. T-'annie. 
William, Augustus, Louis, Margaret, Charles and Edward. 

John F. Linville, of this sketch, grew up on the farm in Wayne town- 
ship, and he attended the rural schools. When a young man he took up 
farming and carpentering under his father, continuing at these occupations 
in his home community until 1883, when he took up the blacksmith's trade, 
at which he became highly skilled, and contii^ied the work until 191 7, when 
he retired; however, he still does a little wood work. He was married in 
1879 to Rebecca F. Sheppard, a native of Belmont county, Ohio. She is a 
daughter of Jeremiah and Anna Mary (Ball) Sheppard. 

Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Linville. two of whom 



30<S CHAMPAIGN COUNTY. OHIO. 

are deceased; Richard, who married Ada Clark, Hves in St. Paris, Ohio, and 
they have two children, Ethel Pacola and Alice. 

Politically, Mr. Linville is a Republican, and he l)elont>-s to the Friends 
church. 



JOHN M. TRITT 



John M. Tritt, a well-known hardware enipknee of Xorth Lewishurg. 
this county, member of the Buckwalter Hardware Company, former marshal 
of that vilage and whoe wife is postmistress there, is a native son of Ohio and 
has lived in this state all his life, a resident of Champaign county since he 
was twenty-two years of age. He was born in Scioto county on November 
7, 1 861, son of Jacob and Margaret (Rickey) Tritt, also natives of this 
state, the former born in Columbiana county and the latter in Scioto county. 

Jacob Tritt was a son of Joshua Tritt and wife, the latter of whom was 
a Deselom. Joshua Tritt also was born in Columbiana county, this state, 
and lived there all his life, a substantial farmer. He and his wife were the 
parents of nine children, those besides Jacob having been John, Joseph, Daniel, 
Elizabeth. Mary, Esther, Lucy and Matilda. At the age of twelve years 
Jacob Tritt went to Scioto county and there grew to manhood, becoming a 
carpenter and farmer. There he married Margaret Rickc}". \\ho was born in 
that county, daughter of Isaac and Mary (Beck) Rickey, early settlers of 
that county, whose last days were spent there. Mrs. Margaret Tritt died 
in Scioto county in 1879, at the age of thirty-nine years, leaving six chil- 
dren, of whom the stibject of this sketch was the second in order of birth, 
the others being as follow : James, who died at the age of twenty-eight ; 
Ivachael, who married Edward McGowan and lives in West Virginia; Isaac, 
who is a land dealer at Spokane, Washington ; Phoebe, who married Edward 
Mault and also lives at Spokane, and Margaret, who died unmarried. Some 
time after the death of his first wife Jacob Tritt married Elizabeth Braine and 
continued to make his home in Scioto county until 1897. when he moved 
to Spokane, VV^ashington, where he died on October 19. 1915, and where 
his widow is still living. Jacob Tritt was a Democrat in his political atifilia- 
tion and by religious persuasion was a Methodist. 

John M. Tritt received his schooling in the schools of his home county 
and remained at home there until he was twenty-two years of ago, when 
he came up into Champaign county and began farming in the neighlx)rhood 
of Woodstock, in Rush township, continuing thus engaged until 1897, when 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. :^0<> 

he became employed in the hardware business at North Lewisburg", in that 
same township, in association with Creviston & Dominy, and later, with 
Buckwalter & Jordan. By reason of a reorganization of this latter concern 
the firm name later became the Buckwalter Hardware Company and Mr. 
Tritt has been a stockholder in the same for the past three years or more. 
Ever since locating at North Lewisburg he has given his earnest attention 
to the general business affairs of that thriving little city. Mr. Tritt is a 
Democrat and served for one year as marshal of North Lewisburg. While 
thus sen'ing he was shot by a yeggman who had broken into the postoffice 
on the night of November i6, 1908, and received a bullet wound in the 
left knee which incapacitated him for more than two years. 

On November 27, 1903, at North Lewisburg, John M. Tritt was united 
in marriage to Elizabeth L. D. Inskeep, who was born in that village, a 
daughter of Isaiah G. and Rachel (Tallman) Inskeep, lx)th of whom were 
born in the neighboring county of Logan. Isaiah G. Inskeep was an honored 
veteran of the Ci\^il War, having gone to the front as a member of Compan\' 
C, Seventeenth Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, with which command 
he served as corporal until the fall of 1862, being discharged on account of 
disability incurred by reason of a severe attack of measles suffered while in 
the service. lie re-enlisted September 26, 1863, and served until the close 
of the war. At the time of his discharge he was first corporal of his com- 
pany. Mr. Inskeep was for some time the proprietor of a general store 
in Logan county and later became engaged in the saw-mill business and 
became a building contractor, many years ago taking up his residence at 
North Lewisburg, where he li\ed for forty years, his death occurring in 
191 5, he then being eighty years of age. His widow is still living there. 
Isaiah G. Inseep was a Republican and was for Acars an active meml^er of 
the Independent Order of Odd F"ellows and local post of the Grand Arm\' 
of the Republic, in the affairs of which patriotic organization he took a 
warm interest. He and his wife were the parents of six children, of whom 
Mrs. Tritt was the last born, the others being as follow : Ella, who married 
Michael Dehaven and is now deceased; Thomas, who died in infancy; Charles, 
who also died in infancy ; Clyde, who died as an infant, and Anna, who died 
at the age of twenty-three years. 

In 1909 Mrs. Tritt was appointed postmistress of North Lewisljurg, 
under civil service, and has since been sending in that important public 
capacity. She grew up at North Lewisburg and upon completing the course 
in the high school at that place took a supplementary ccjurse in the college 
at Ada and for four years thereafter was engaged in teaching school, teach- 



310 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

ing two years at Mingo and two years in her home town. She is a mem- 
ber of the local branch of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union. Mr. 
Tritt is a Democrat and takes an active part in local political affairs. He is 
a member of the local lodge of the Knights of Pythias and takes a warm 
interest in the affairs of the same. 



I JOHN HENRY ELSEN DIMOND. 

John Henry Elsen Dimond, a well-to-do retired carriage manufacturer 
and landowner, of Urbana, former member of the city council and for 
years one of the most active figures in the business life of that city, is a 
native of England, but has lived on this side of the water since he was 
fourteen years of age and has been a resident of Urbana since the year 
1872. He was born in the town of Chudleigh, in Devonshire, son of Samuel 
and Ann W. (Elsen) Dimond, also natives of that place, who spent all their 
lives there. Samuel Dimond, who was the overseer of a large estate, died 
at the age of forty-two years. His widow married William Chaft'e and 
lived to the advanced age of eighty years. By her first marriage she was 
the mother of eight children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the 
last-born, the others being as follow : William, who is a farmer in Canada ; 
Mary Ann, who died in England ; Eliza, who also died in England ; Jack- 
son, who as a boy joined the British navy, in 1850 joined the new Argo- 
nauts in the search for gold in California, made and lost several fortunes 
in the West and is now in a Lutheran home on Puget Sound; Elizabeth, 
who died in 1916; Samuel R., who served in the British army and is now 
living retired at Manitoba, Canada, and Fannie, who married \\'illiam Chaft'e 
and is living in Canada. 

John H. E. Dimond received his early schooling in his native town 
of Chudleigli and in 1863, he then being fourteen years of age, crossed the 
Avater and joined his elder brother at Mitchell, Canada, where he completed 
his schooling in a night school and where he lived until 1868, learning 
there the rudiments of the carriage-making trade. In the year last named, 
he then being nineteen years of age, he went to Detroit, Michigan, and in 
that city worked at his trade until 1871, in which year he went to Chicago 
and was there engaged working at his trade for a year, at the end of which 
time he went to Indianapolis and after a short stay there, in 1872. lie came 
over into Ohio and located at Urbana, where he ever since has made his 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 3II 

home. Upon Mr. Dimoncl's arrixal in Urbana he secured employment in 
the carriage factory of Warren & Gaumer and was for four years engaged 
in that establishment. He then transferred his services to the like estab- 
lishment of Auginbauch & ^IcComb and remained thus connected for four 
years, at the end of which time he bought a carriage factory on South Main 
street, later erected there a three-story brick factory building and was there 
engaged in business on his own account for twenty-eight years, or until he 
rented his factory in 1916 and retired from active business. During all, the 
years of his connection with the carriage manufacturing business MrjjDimond 
made a point of the strictly hand-made character of his output and his 
buggies and carriages thus came to have a distinctive character and qualit}' 
which strongly recommended them to the trade and he built up an extensive 
market for the output of his factory, becoming one of the best-known car- 
riage manufacturers in Ohio. 

From the time he arrived in Urbana in 1872 Mr. Dimond has taken a 
warm interest in local affairs and as his business interests there began to 
expand, took a gradually increasing interest in the development of the city's 
industrial and commercial life, until he presently came to be accounted one 
of the most active and influential figures in the business life of the com- 
munity. When the telephone became a practical adjunct to business and 
social intercourse, he took an active part in the organization of the local 
telephone company, helped to establish the plant and has been a member of 
the board of directors of the local telephone company and chairman of the 
e.Kecutive committee of the same ever since the company was organized. 
He also is a stockholder in the Champaign National Bank of Urbana and 
the National Bank of Urbana. a stockholder in the Howard Paper Com- 
])any. the owner (^f a fine farm of two hundred and twenty-seven acres 
south of Urbana and has other important interests. Mr. Dimond is a 
Ivepublican and for fifteen years sensed as trustee of Urbana township. He 
also gave valuable service to the public as a member of the Urbana city 
council and was for some time chairman of the finance committee of that 
])ody. In all movements having as their object the betterment of local con- 
ditions he has contributed of his time and influence and for some time served 
as the president of the local health league organized for the purpose of 
ameliorating the living conditions of the poor. 

On November 30, 1875. about three years after taking u]) his residence 
in Urbana. John H. E. Dimond was united in marriage to Su.san A. Dill- 
inger, who was born in Westmoreland county. Pennsyhania. daughter of 
Joseph M. and Catherine Dillinger. natives of that same county, who came 



312 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

()ver into Ohio, lirst settling- in Hancock county and in 1861 coming t«»' 
' "hanipaign county, where they established their home. Mrs. Dimond died 
on -April 24. 1QI7. Joseph M. Dillinger was a carpenter and farmer and 
his last davs were spent in this county. His widow later moved to Spring- 
field, this state, where her last days were spent. They were the parents of 
six children, of whom Isabel, of Springfield, is the only survivor, the others 
having been Nathan. Mary, Kittie and Martha. Mr. and Mrs. Dimond 
had one son. William E. Dimond. who formerly was engaged in the car- 
riage manufacturing business with his father, acting as a salesman, and who 
is now engaged in the live-stock business at Urbana. William E. Dimond 
married Geneva Lohr and has three children, Lee E., Richard D. and \^'ill- 
iam E. The Dimonds are members of the Baptist church, of the l>oard of 
trustees of which Mr. Dimond has for years lieen a member, and is now 
president of the board and chairman of the building committee. He is a 
thirty-second degree Mason, affiliated with the blue lodge (Gbampaign 
Eodg^e No. 525) at Urbana and with the consistory. Ancient Accepted Scot- 
tish Rite, at Dayton. He also is affiliated with the Independent Order of 
C^dd Fellows and is a past nolile grand of the lodge of that order at Urbana. 



Wn.LIAM REYNOLDS ROSS. 

The late William Reynolds Ross, who was an honored veteran of the 
Civil \^ ar and for years vice-president of the Champaign National Bank of 
Urbana, was born at Urbana and lived there all his life, with the exception 
of the period spent during his service as a soldier of the Union and a short 
time thereafter, when he was employed in a bank at Nashville, Tennessee, 
lie was born on Mav 7, 1841, son of Philander B. and Jane (Reynolds) 
Ivoss. who were the ]:)arents of two children. 

Philander Ross was but a youth when he came to Champaign county 
with liis parents and for a time after coming here he lived on a farm, but 
presently moved to Urbana. where he engaged in the mercantile business, 
one of the early merchants of that city, and followed a highly successful 
business career the rest of his life there, lie t(iok a very active part in the 
general business affairs of the city and was for years one of the most influen- 
tial men in this county, long serving as president of the Champaign National 
Rank, lie was twice married, his .second wife having been Julia Slater. 

I\e;ircd ;it L'Hiana, William R. Ross received his schooling in the schools 




WILLIAM R. ROSS. 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 313 

of that city and was clerking in his father's store there at the time the Civil 
War liroke out. He enlisted for serxice as a member of Company K, Sixty- 
sixth Regiment, Ohio Volimteer Infantry, and with that command served 
for two years, at the end of which time he w^as discharged on a physician's 
certificate of physical disability. During the period of his service wath the 
Sixty-sixth Ohio Mr. Ross participated in numerous of the most important 
battles <:)f the w^ar and also served for some time in the commissary depart- 
ment. Upon the completion of his military service he returned hoine, but 
shorily thereafter went to Nashville, Tennessee, where for a short time he 
was em])loyed in a bank there, presently returning to Urbana to take a posi- 
tion in the Champaign National Bank, of which his father at that time wms 
the president. With that sound old financial institution Air. Ross remained 
connected the remainder of his life, gradually rising from a clerkship to 
the position of vice-president of the l)ank, a position he held for years and 
which he w^as holding at the time of his death, on December 23, 1915, long" 
hax'ing been regarded as one of the most substantial and influential bankers 
and general business men in this part of the state. Air. Ross was a Repub- 
lican and ever took a good citizen's interest in local political altairs, but was 
never a seeker after public office. 

^^'illiam R. Ross was twice married, his first wife having been Margaret 
WeWt Brand, daughter of J. C. Brand, of Urbana, further and fitting men- 
tion of wh<MU is made elsewhere in this volume. To that union one child 
was born, a son, John R. Ross. Some time following the death of his first 
wife Mr. Ross married Ella Taylor, daughter of William S. and Mary (Hick- 
man) Taylor, who became residents of Champaign county about 1830. Both 
W'illiam S. Taylor and his wife were born in Shepardstown, \'irginia (now 
in West \'irginia), and were married there, -\bout 1830 they came o\er 
into Ohio and settled on a farm on Buck creek, in this count)-, where they 
remained until 1853, when they left the farm and moved t(^ Crbana, where 
both spent the remainder of their lives, Mr. Taylor dying in 1858 and his 
widow surviving until 1871. They were the parents of live children, of 
whom Mrs. Ross is now the only survivor. The other children were Lucian. 
Virginia, Lee and Jane. Mrs. Ross is a member of the Grace Methodist 
Episcopal church and has for many years taken an active interest in its affairs. 
She is also interested in the general social activity- of her town and has always 
helped to promote such agencies as were designed to advance the general 
welfare of the community in which she has spent practicalh ;dl her life. 

A concluding word should be saitl regarding the attitude of William R. 
Ross toward his fellow citizens, lie was one of those men who stood square 



314 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

(lu every proposition and never achanced an opinion without carefully weigh- 
ing what he had to say. He was one of the most respected and at the same 
time one of the most public-spirited men of the county. A\'hether he was on 
the street, in a business affair, or in the church— it mattered not; his conduct 
was always the same. If there was a proposition, which looked doubtful to 
him he had nothing to do with it. In other words he tried to make his every- 
day life square with what he preached. He was an active worked in Grace 
Methodist Episcopal church and for over forty years was a member of its 
offickU board. - I'"or twenty years of this time he was superintendent of the 
.Sunday school. Thus, taking e\erything into consideration, William R. 
i\oss may be set down as one of Champaign coutUy's truly emineiU citizens. 



GEORGE JORDAN. 



George Jordan, an honored veteran of the Civil War, former recorder 
of the neighboring county of Union, but for the past ten years or more 
engaged in the grain, coal and hay business at North LewMsburg, this county, 
head of the firm of Jordan & Sons, and owner of the grain elevator at that 
place, is a native of Ohio and has lived in this state all his life. He was 
bom in the neighboring county of Union March 14, 1844, son of William 
and Nancy (Westlake) Jordan, the former of whom was born in Scotland 
and the latter in this state. 

William Jordan was well grown when he left his native Scotland and 
came to this country. For a time after his arrival here he was located in 
New York state and then he came to Ohio and located in Union coimtw 
where he presently married and where he spent the remainder of liis life, 
following his vocation of stonemason, a trade he had learned in his youth 
before coming to this country. His widow survived him for some years, 
her last days being spent in the home of her son, the subject of this sketch, 
at North Lewisburg. William Jordan and his wife were members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church and their children were reared in that faith. 
There were nine of these children, of whom the subject of this sketch was 
the last-born, the others being as follow : Samuel, noAv deceased, who was 
a farmer in Union county ; John, who went to California in the days of 
the gold ritsh and there died; William, now deceased, who served as a 
soldier of the Union during the Civil War, a member of Company C, Se\- 
enteenth Regiment. Ohio Volunteer Infantrv. witli which he served for four 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 3I5 

years, and was later successfully engaged in farming in L'nion and Cham- 
paign counties; Isaiah, deceased; Mary A., who married Calbert Bergen- 
tine and who, as well as her husband, is dead ; Elizabeth, who married John 
Corbett, a veteran of the Civil War, a member of Company C, Seventeentli 
Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry; Christine, who married Joel Burrows 
and who, as well as her husband, is dead, and Nancy Jane, now deceased, 
who was the wife of Adam Wilford, a carpenter. 

George Jordan supplemented the schooling he received in the common 
schools of his home county by a course in a commercial college at Columbus 
and in March, 1862, just after passing his eighteenth birthday, enlisted for 
service in the Union army and went to the front as a private in Company C. 
Seventeenth Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, being sent to Spring Hill, 
Tennessee. The month after his enlistment he took part in the battle of 
Shiloh and was in the later battles at Corinth. Mississippi ; Perryville, Ken- 
tucky; Hoover's Gap, Stone's River and Chickamauga. In the latter battle, 
September 20, 1863, Mr. Jordan was shot through the left forearm, just 
below the elbow, the bullet making a very aggravated wound. Crude first- 
aid attention was given the wound when Mr. Jordan was taken back to 
the field hospital and he then was taken in a government wagon across the 
mountains to a railway station and thence by rail to Nashville, where he 
was placed in government hospital No. 19, it being nine days after receiv- 
ing his wound before it was given proper medical and surgical attention. 
For about five weeks thereafter Mr. Jordan was confined in the hospital 
and he then was furloughed home on convalescent leave. Upon the termi- 
nation of his furlough he reported at Camp Denison and after about two 
months there received his final discharge and returned home. 

Upon the completion of his military service Mr. Jordan engaged in 
farming in Union county and after his marriage in the fall of 1865 estab- 
lished his home on a farm there, remaining engaged in farming there for 
twenty years, or until his election to the oflice of recorder of Union count}-. 
He served six years in that office and upon the completion of his term of 
public service came over into Champaign county, in 1906, and located at 
North Lewisburg, where he since has been engaged in the grain, hay and 
coal business, owner of the grain elevator at that place, doing business under 
the firm name of Jordan & Sons, three of his sons being engaged in busi- 
ness with him, and is doing a fine business. 

It was in November, 1865. in Union county, that George Jordan was 
united in marriage to Nancy C. Holycross, of that county, and to this tmion 
four children have been born, namely: Delmar N., who married Clara 



3l6 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY. OHIO. 

Brown and is now living at Marysville; Samuel W'., who married Edith 
Ballinger and is engaged in business with his father; Frank A., who mar- 
ried Gertrude Ballinger and is also in business with his father, and William 
F.. who married Lulu Gray and is in business with his father and brothers. 
Samuel A. and Frank A. Jordan are members of the local lodge of the 
Knights of Pythias at North Lewisburg and William F. Jordan is a mem- 
ber of the local lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. The 
Jordans are members of the Methodist Episcopal church and take a proper 
part in church work, as well as in the general good works of the community 
and the general social activities of their home town, helpful in promoting 
all proper agencies for the advancement of the common welfare thereabout. 
Mr. Jordan is an active member of John Burney Post No. 193, Grand 
Army of the Republic, at North Lewisburg. and has held various offices in 
that patriotic organization. He is an excellent business man and has done 
much to promote the general business activities of the town since taking up 
his residence there in 1906. 



CxEORGF McCOX X IvLL. 



George ^NlcConnell. .president of the Desmond-Stephan Manufacturing 
C'ompanv. of L'rliana. a member of the board of directors of the Citizens" 
X'^ational Bank of that city, former secretary of the I'rbana WaterwcM'ks 
Company, and in other ways interested in the general business and imlus- 
trial life <.){ his home city, is a native son of Champaign county and has lived 
here all l-iis life. He was born on January i, 1875, son and only child of 
.Major Tiiomas and Margaret (McDonald) McConnell, both of whom were 
horn in this state and the latter of whom is still living at Urbana. 

The late Major Thomas McConnell. an honored veteran of the Ci\il 
War, was a native of Warren county, born on a farm in the vicinity of 
Lebanon on January 18, 1839. son of James M. and Eleanor (Murray) 
McConnell. both of whom were born in Berks count}-. Pennsylvania, of Scot- 
tish descent, and who came to Ohio .shortly after their marriage and settled 
in U'arron county, later removing to Chaiupaign county, where they settled 
on a farm and where they spent the remainder of their lives. The\- were 
the ])arents of eight children, of whom the Major was the second in order of 
birth. 'I'lic latter was reared on the home farm in this county and recei\ed 
his sciiooling in tlic local sclvx^ls. L'i)on tlic outbreak of the Ci\il Wai" lie 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY. OHIO. 3IJ 

responded to President Lincoln's first call for troops in April. iSOi, and went 
to the front as a private in Company K. Thirteenth Regiment, Ohio Volun- 
teer Infantry, with which command he served until the end of his initial 
term of enlistment, after which, in 1862, he re-enlisted for service an.d 
returned to the front as first lieutenant of Company A, Sixty-sixth Regi- 
ment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, later heing promoted to the captaincv of liis 
company and then to major of the regiment, with which rank he was mus- 
tered out at the close of the war, receiving his honorable discharge on July 
15, 1865. During his long service. Major McConnell participated in some 
of the most important engagements of the war. He was in charge of his 
coiumand at the battle of Lookout [Mountain and served all through the 
Atlanta campaign. At the battle of Chancellorsville he received a serious 
wound and for some time thei'eafter was confined to the hospital. Upon the 
completion of his mihtary service, Alajor McConnell returned home and in 
1868 was elected sheriff of Champaign county. After four years of ser\ice 
in that important capacity he engaged in the livery business at Urbana and 
was thus engaged the rest of his life, one of the best known and most pro- 
gressive citizens of that place. The Major was an active member of the 
local post of the Grand Army of the Republic and of the local lodge of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and in the affairs of both of those organ- 
izations took a warm interest. Major McConnell died at his home in 
Urbana on September 30, 1901. His widow is still living at Urbana. She 
was born in this county on January 26. 1843, ^largaret McDonald, daugh- 
ter of Colin and Nancy (McColloch) McDonald, also natives of this state, 
the former born in Ross county and the latter in Logan county, and was 
married to ALajor McConnell on June 2S, 1866. To that union but one child 
\\as born, a son, George McConnell, subject of this biographical sketch. 

George McConnell was reared at Urbana and upon completing the 
course in the schools of that city took a further course in Urbana Univer- 
sity, after which he entered the Eastman Business College at Poughkeepsie. 
Xew York. In 1898, he was made secretary of the Urbana Waterworks 
Company, and for about four years thereafter was manager of the water- 
works plant. He then became manager of the Mammoth Inn-iiishing Com- 
pany and was thus engaged for three years, at the end of whicli time, in 
1907, he bought the plant of the Desmond-Stephan Manufacturing Com- 
pany and has been president of that company and manager of the manufac- 
turing plant contrc>lled bv the same ever since, long having been regarded 
as one of the leading manufacturers and business men of Urbana. In addi- 
tion to his manufacturing interests, Mr. McConnell has other important 



3l8 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

connections in Urbana. is a member of the board of directors of the Citi- 
zens' National Bank of that city, a member of the board of directors of tlie 
Urbana Canning Company and a director of the Mammoth Furnishing- 
Company, and a director of the Perpetual Building and Savings Associa- 
tion, to the at^airs of all of which concerns he gives his earnest personal 
attention. Mr. McConnell is an ardent Republican, as was his father, and 
has ever taken an active interest in local political affairs, but has not been a 
seeker after public office. 

In May, 1900, George McConnell was united in marriage to Ida M. 
Stone, of Urbana, daughter of S. L. P. and Julia (Geiger) Stone, and to 
this union two children have been born, a son and a daughter, Robert and 
Margaret Frances. Mr. and Mrs. McConnell are members of the Presby- 
terian church, in the various beneficences of which they take an active inter- 
est, Mr. McConnell being one of the deacons of the local congregation. He 
is a Knight Templar and Royal Arch Mason, president of the board of 
trustees of the Urbana Masonic Temple Association, and is a noble of the 
Ancient Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, ai^filiated with Antioch Tem- 
l)le at Dayton, and has for years taken a warm interest in Masonic affairs. 



ITTAH S. MILLER. 



Utah S. Miller, one of Salem township's most progressive and substan- 
tial farmers, was born on the farm in that township on which he now li\es 
and which he owns, and which was owned in turn by his grandfather and 
his father, and has lived there all his life, one of the best-known residents 
of that part of the county. He was born on April 23, 1861, a son of Josepli 
and Fannie ( Herr) Miller, the former a native of Virginia and the latter 
of Pennsylvania, for many years prominent residents of the Kings Creek 
neighborhood and the latter of whom is still living, now a resident of Urbana. 

Joseph Miller was born in Page county, Virginia. March 2, 1S22, and 
when a young man came to Ohio and helped in the construction work at 
the time of the building of the Sandusky division of the Big Four railroad. 
In Salem township, this county, he married Fannie Herr. who was born in 
Pennsylvania in 1832, daughter of Abraham and Fannie Herr, also natives 
of Pennsylvania, who came to this county in the early forties and settled 
on a farm on the state road in Salem township, four miles north of Urbana, 
where they established their liome and where they spent the remainder of 



CHAMPAIGN COUXTY. OHIO. ^IQ 

their lives. Abraham Herr and wife were the parents of seven cliildren, those 
besides Mrs. Miller having been Abraham, David. Benjamin. Jacob, Eliza- 
beth and Barbara. After his marriage Joseph Miller located on the William 
Long place and after a sometime residence there m.oved to a farm near West 
Liberty, but a year later came back to this county and bought the old Herr 
home place on the state road in Salem township and there established his 
home. He built a new house and made other substantial improvements to 
the place and continued actively engaged in farming there the rest of his 
life, his death occurring on December 6, 1901. He was a Democrat and 
served for some time as township trustee. He was a member of the Kings 
Creek Baptist church, as is his widow, and their children were reared in that 
faith. There were seven of these children, those besides the subject of this 
sketch, the fifth in order of birth, being as follow: Benjamin F., who was 
accidentally killed at Urbana; Albert S., now a resident of Columbus, this 
state, where he is engaged in the real estate business; Abraham H., a hard- 
ware merchant at L^rbana; William H., of Detroit, Michigan; Charles Grant, 
who has long been engaged in the newspaper business and who is now living- 
in New York City, the metropolitan correspondent of the Cleveland Leader. 
and Efifie, wdfe of J. W. Ambrose, a hardware merchant at Crbana. 

Reared on the home farm in Salem township, Utah S. Miller received 
his schooling in the local schools. He early devoted himself to farming and 
lias always remained on the home farm, a fine place of one hundred and nine 
acres, wdiich he now owns and where he is quite successfully engaged in gen- 
eral farming. His farm plant is well equipped and his farming is carried on 
in accordance with modern methods of agriculture. He pays considerable 
attention to- the raising of high-grade live stock and in this latter line also 
has done quite well. In his political affiliation, Mr. Miller is a stanch Dem- 
ocrat and has ever given a good citizen's attention to local political afifairs, 
hut has not sought public office. 

On September 9, 1902, Utah S. Miller was united in marriage to Bertha 
Harvey, who also was born in Salem township, a daughter of John and 
Martha Harvey, the former of whom was a son of Rev. James 
P. Harvey, a pioneer minister of the Kings Creek Baptist churcii. 
John Harvey, an honored veteran of the Civil War, was a farmer 
all his life and his last days were spent on his farm in Salem town- 
ship, where his death occurred in February, 1908. His widow is now making 
her home with Mr. and Mrs. Miller. During the war John Harvey ser\ed 
the Union as a member of Company E, Sixty-sixth Regiment, Ohio Volun- 
teer Infantry, with which command he served all through the war. He and 



3-;0 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

liis wife were the parents of five children, those besides Mrs. Miller, the 
third in order of birth, being as follow : Grant Harvey, who lives in Salem 
township ; William Harvey, who lives in the neighboring county of Logan ; 
Susan, wife of M. D. Fox, of Wayne township, this county, and Edna, wife 
of S. E. Zook, of Logan county. 

To Utah S. and Bertha (Harvey) Miller one child has been born, a son, 
Robert, born on May i8. 1909. Mrs. Miller is a member of the Kings 
Creek Baptist church. 



C. H. MAR\'IX. 



C. H. Marvin, president of the VV. H. Marvin Company, of Urbana. 
president of tlie Champaign National Bank of that city, president of the 
McCoy Canning Company, president of the Crbana Telephone Company, 
formerly and for years a member of the local school board and in other ways 
actively identified with the growing interests of the city in which he has made 
his home for the past thirty years or more, is a native son of Ohio and has 
lived in this state all his life, a resident of Urbana since the middle eighties. 
He was born at Cardington, in Morrow county, September 11. i860, son of 
William H. and Loretta F. (W'olcolt ) Marvin, both of whom were born in 
Genesee count}-. New York, the former at Lero)' and the latter at Oakville, 
whose last days were spent at Urbana, where the elder Marvin established 
the tiourishing business which still bears his name and of which his son, the 
subject of this biographical sketch is now the head. 

William H. Marvin was bom on December 15. 1829, and was but a lad 
when he moved with his parents from Genesee county, New York, to Mor- 
row county, this state, \\here he grew to manhood. When (if teen years of 
age he began his successful mercantile career as a clerk in the store of J. S. 
1>umble at Mt. Gilead, in that county, and was thus engaged for three years, 
at the end of which time, he having meantime saved eight dollars, he opened 
a small store of his own in the ncighlioring hamlet of Sparta and was thus 
engaged in the latter place for three years, during which time he did so well 
that he determined to embark in business on a somewhat more extensive 
scale and, with that end in view, moved to Cardington, where he opened a 
<lry-goods store which proved to be a very successful enterprise. Mr. Marvin 
married and established his home in Cardington, early in his business career 
there becoming recognized as one of the leading figures in the commercial 
life of that town. In 1876 he aided in the organization of the First National 




WILLIAM H. MARVIN. 




CXXV-- 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 



321 



I Sank of Cardingtoii and was elected president of the same. He also became 
interested in banking concerns at Shelby, at Gahon and at Columbus and con- 
tinued to make his home at Cardington until 1886. in which year he moved 
io Urbana, where he engaged in the wholesale grocery business, under the 
firm name of W. H. AJarvin & Company, and was thus actively engaged until 
in 1896, when the comi)any discontinued the grocery end of the business and 
gaA-e its full attention to the manufacture of mince-meat, the canning of fruit 
and the importing ol currants from Greece and in this line Mr. :\rarvin con- 
tinued actively and very successfully engaged until his death, which occurred 
at Urbana on May 11, 1898. He was an active member of the Episcopal 
church and was a Royal Arch Mason. 

C. FI. Marvin was reared at Cardington, the place of his birth, and was 
earl\ inducted into the details of his father's business. Upon completing the 
course in the schools of his home town he took a course at Kenyon College 
and upon leaving college was given a place in his father's bank at Cardington. 
later transferring iiis services to the Morrow County National Bank, at Mt. 
(iilead. the comity seat, and was thus engaged at that place until in 1886, 
when he moved with his father to Urbana and there engaged with his father 
in the grocery business. Later he became one of the most important fac- 
tors in the concern of W. H. Marvin Company, canners, manufacturers of 
mince-meat and importers of currants, and while thus engaged with his father 
became secretary and treasurer of the company, a position he held until his 
election to the presidency of the company in 1915. which position he now 
occupies. It is perhaps not too much to say that the firm of W. H. Marvin 
Company has done more to "put Urbana on the map" than any other single 
agency in that cit}-. During the busy season it employs more than one hun- 
dred and twenty-fi\e persons in its l)ig plant and its products are shipped all 
over the country, the goods bearing the Marvin stamp being widely known 
and in great demand on account of their uniform excellence. In addition to 
the extensive interests he represents as head of VV. H. Marvin Company, Mr. 
-Marvin also has for years taken an active and influential part in the general 
business affairs of the city and has long been regarded as one of the city's 
most forceful "boosters" and "live wires." Since the year 1907 he has been 
the president of the Champaign National Bank of Urbana, and is also presi- 
dent of the Urbana Telephone Company and of the McCoy Canning Com- 
pany. He is an ardent Republican and has ever taken an earnest interest in 
the general civic affairs of the city and county, but the only public office 
\\ liich has had any personal appeal to him was a place on the local board of 
(2ia) 



2)22 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY. OHIO. 

education, his warm interest in educational affairs prompting him to accept 
a place on that board and to retain the same for ten or twelve years, during" 
which term of service he was able to do much in the way of advancing the 
interests of the schools. Mr. Marvin has always been an advocate of public 
progress and in many ways has done his part toward placing- Urbjtna in the 
front rank of Ohio municipalities of its class. 

On January 30, 1889. C. H. Marvin was united in marriage to Amelia 
Talbutt, daughter of J. G. Talbott. and to this union two children have been 
born, C. H., Jr., and Kathryn C. Mr. and Mrs. Marvin are members of the 
Episcopal church and have ever taken an earnest part in church affairs, as 
well as in the general social and cultural activities of their home town, and 
have been helpful in many ways in promoting- the common welfare. Mr. 
Marvin is a Scottish Rite (thirty-second degree) Mason, a member of the 
consistory at Dayton, and is also a noble of the Ancient Arabic Order of 
Nobles of the .Mystic Shrine, affiliated with Antioch Teiiiple. at Dayton, and 
takes a warm interest in Masonic affairs. 



FERNANDO WARD. 



Fernando Ward, a farmer living on route nine, L'rbana, Ohio, was born 
in Mad River township, June 17, 1856, a son of Sylvester and Louisa V. 
(Smith) Ward. Sylvester Ward, father of Fernando Ward, was boni on 
December 12, 1826, on the old Ward farm, and he died December 30, 189-'. 
He was a son of George and Barbara (Strickler) Ward. JJoth he and his wife 
were natives of Virginia and lived there until after their marriage. They 
came to Ohio in 18 16 and settled in what is now Mad River township. Me 
entered land here and built a cabin in which he began life in the woods. 
They lived here the rest of their days. 'J'he children of George and Barbara 
Ward were: Maria, Barbara, Jerusha, Sabra, Gideon. Joseph, Noah. S\-l- 
vester and Sylvenius (twins), and Edemon. 

Sylvester Ward grew to manhood in this county. His marriage to 
Louisa Smith occurred November 30, 185 1. They settled on a farm where 
they continued to live the rest of their days. Their children were: Phil- 
ander, Fernando, Lauretta, Rennetta. Philander is deceased, Lauretta be- 
came the wife of Monroe Frank, Rennetta was the wife of Milton C. Harter. 

Fernando Ward, our subject, was reared on the old home farm and 
received his educatir)n bv attending the district schools in the winter season 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 323 

when w ork on the farm was not pressing. He had no time to attend .school 
during the spring and summer season. He was married to Emma E. Pence, 
January ii. 1881. She was born in Mad River township, April 6, i860, a 
daughter of Amos and Clarinda (Browning) Pence. Amos Pence was born 
in Mad River township. May 24, 1822: his wife was born in Delaware county, 
Ohio. March 20, 1838. She is still living in St. Paris, Ohio. Her husband 
died January 24. 1904. They settled on a farm and spent their active years 
in farming in IMad River township. 

Fernando Ward owns seventy-fi\e acres of land, a part of the old Ward 
farm. He is a Democrat in politics, but has never been active in party 
affairs. Mrs. \\'ard is a member of the Myrtle Tree Baptist church. The\- 
have no family. 



WILLIAM J. W. RAWLINGS. 

The late William J. W. Rawlings, for years one of Champaign coun- 
ty's best-known and most substantial farmers, who died at his home in 
Urbana township in the spring of 1898, was a native of this county and 
spent all his life here. He was born on a farm on Pretty Prairie, in Urbana 
township, April 29, 1830, son of James and Susanna (McRoberts) Rawl- 
ings, the former a native of the state of Kentucky and the latter of this 
county, whose last days were spent on their farm on Pretty Prairie. 

James Rawlings was but a child when his parents came to this county 
from Kentucky and he rode ahead of his father on horseback on the jour- 
ney up. The family settled on Pretty Prairie and there James Rawlings 
grew to manhood and married Susanna McRoberts, who was born in this 
county, a member of one of the pioneer families in the southern part of the 
county. After his marriage he established his home in that .same section and 
there he and his wife spent the remainder of their lives, useful and influen- 
tial farming people. They were active members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church and their children were reared in that faith. There were six of these 
children, of whom the subject of this memorial sketch was the first-born, the 
others being as follow : Mary, who married Mitchell Todd, u farmer, of Ur- 
bana township, and who late in life retired to LTbana, where both died: Jane. 
who married John Knight and occupied the old home farm in LIrbana town- 
ship ; Thomas, also a farmer in Urbana township, who married Emily Humes 
and died at his home in Urbana township, his widow spending her last days 
in LTrbana; James Harrison, also a farmer in Urbana township, who died 



324 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

after his retirement from the farm and removal to Urbana and who was 
twice married, after the death of his first wife, Laura Townley, he having 
married Emma Funk, and Douglas, ho married Alice Townley and died 
of his farm in Clark county, his widow spending her /last days in Springtield, 
that same county. 

Reared on the home farm on Pretty Prairie, William J. W. Rawlings 
received his schooling in the schools of that neighborhood and from the da\ s 
of his early boyhood w^as a valued aid to his father in the labors of impro\- 
ing and developing the home place. After his marriage in the summer of 
{863, he began farming for himself in Urbana to\vnship and became a suc- 
cessful and substantial farmer and landowner, spending the rest of his life 
diere, actively engaged in farming, his death occurring on March 29, 1898, 
he then being just one month under sixty-eight years of age. He was a 
Republican and ever took an earnest interest in local political affairs, but 
had not been included in the office-seeking class. As a member of the Pres- 
byterian church he also took an active interest in church work and in other 
neighborhood good works and did his part as a citizen iti promoting all good 
<:auses throughout that part of the county. 

It w^as on June 11, 1863, that William J. W. Rawlings w'as united in 
marriage to Elcetta M. Mumper, of this county, who was born in Macomb, 
McDon6iigh county, Illinois, a daughter of Jacob and Ann (AVagner) Mum- 
per, natives of Pennsylvania, the former born in York county, that state, and 
the latter in the neighboring county of Cumberland, who were married there 
and in 1839 went to Illinois and located at JNIacomb, where Jacob Mumper 
engaged in the distilling business and also owned a farm. Presently he met 
Inisiness reverses and lost practically all he had, after which he came with 
his family to this state and located in ^liami county, where he was engaged 
in farming for three years, at the end of which time he came over into 
Champaign county and for two years thereafter was engaged in farming on 
a farm on the Ludlow road. After that he W'as for six years engaged in 
farming the P)akhvin place and then he bought a farm on Pretty r^-airie. on 
the south county line, where he established his home and where he s[)ent the 
remainder of his life, his death occurring in his seventy-fourth year. His 
widow later moved to L^bana, -where her last days were spent, her death 
occurring there in the eighty-fourth year of her age. They were members 
of the Presbyterian church and their children were reared in that faith. 
There were seven of these children, of whom Mrs. Rawlings was the sec- 
ond in order of birth, the others being as follow : Jane. wIk^ married John 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO 



3^5 



Todd, a substantial farmer of Urbana township, and has seven children , 
Abram, a farmer of Clark county, who married Sarah Hutton and also has 
seven children; John, a retired farmer living at Urbana; Anna, widow of 
E. P. Kingsley, a commercial traveler, who died in March, 191 5, leaving 
one child, a daughter, Catherine, who married FYank Ganson, an automo- 
bile dealer, of Urbana, and they have one child, a son, Kingsley ; Emma, wife 
of Dr. Luther Woolford, of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, and Ellen, wife of 
Charles Nichols, of Urbana. 

To William J. W. and Elcetta M. (Mumper) Rawlings six children were 
born, namely : Anna, who married Major Fred Phelps, a retired ofificer of 
the United States army, now engaged in the recruiting service, and they 
have one child, a son, Ralph; James D., a retired farmer and stockman, now 
living at Urbana, who married Ida Willoughby and has four children, Marie, 
who married Dr. Arthur C. Bible, a dentist, of Urbana, and has one child, 
a daughter, May V., and Christine, Eloise and William; Thomas, who mar- 
ried Blanche Hume, of Union township, this county, and has three children, 
Caroline, Margaret and Corinne; Ralph and Ruelle (twins), the former of 
whom, a traveling man living in Detroit, married Katherine Van Meter and 
has one child, a son, Edward, and the latter of whom married Dr. E. W. 
Ludlow, of Urbana; Warren, now engaged with a manufacturing concern 
at Atlanta, Georgia, who married Pearl Minturn and has one child, a son, 
Leslie. After the death of her husband, Mrs. Rawlings moved to Urbana, 
where she has since made her home at 127 West Market street with her 
two daughters. 



ROBERT LEE GRIMES, M. D. 

Dr. Robert Lee Grimes, of Westfield, Ohio, was born in Carroll, Mary 
land, in i860. He is a son of Dr. G. S. Grimes, a citizen of Maryland, who 
died in Virginia in 1876. For many years he practiced his profession in 
Maryland. 

Dr. R. L. Grimes was left to his own resources at the age of sixteen 
years. In 1876 he went to Front Royal, Virginia, for the purpose of taking 
a course in pharmacy. Later he entered a medical college at Baltimore, 
Maryland, completed the prescribed course of study and graduated as a full- 
tledged physician. During the time of his college study he secured the 
means to meet his expenses by working in a drug store, and engaging \n 
such other work as opportunity afforded. After his graduation lie engaged 



3-26 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

in the practice of his profession in Montg-omery, West Virginia, and. in 1892, 
he came to Westvilie, Ohio. He soon estabHshed a successful practice here 
and continued until 191 2, when he retired from practice on account of his 
health. He married Bertha R. Taylor, daughter of Simeon Taylor. She 
was born near Westvilie on the old Taylor homestead in Mad River to\\'p- 
ship. 



PAUL C. SPAIN. 



Paul C. Spain, one of the best-known merchants at North Le\visl)urg, 
tl)is county, member of the firm of Spain & Dolan, dealers in general hard- 
ware and farm implements, and who was former clerk of that village and is 
now serving as treasurer of the same, is a native son of Champaign county 
and has lived here all his life. He was born on a farm in the immediate 
vicinity of North Lewisburg, in Rush township, September 11, i88f, son 
of Joseph W. and Flora E. (Clark) Spain, both of whom also were horn 
in this county and who are now living in North Lewisburg. 

Joseph W. Spain was born on a pioneer farm in Rush tcnvnship, in 
1 85 1, son of Wright and Lucy (Crowder) Spain, natives of Virginia, who 
had come to this county with their respective parents in the days of their 
)'Outh, grew up here, married and established their home in Rush town- 
ship and there spent their last days. Joseph W. Spain grcAx to manhood 
on the home farm and married Flora E. Clark, a member of one of the old 
families in that part of the county, and in turn became a farmer in Rush 
county, a vocation he ever since has continued, though for some years past 
living practically retired from the active labors of the farm at his pleasant 
home in North Lewisburg. He and his wife have three sons, the subject 
of this sketch having two brothers, Howard and Robert J. Spain. 

Reared on the home farm in Rush township, Paul C. Spain received 
his early schooling in the schools of North Lewisburg and supplemented the 
course there by a course in Bliss Business College at Columbus, after which 
for four years he was engaged as a clerk in the hardware store of Crevis- 
ton & Dominy at North Lewisburg, thus acquiring a thorough acquaintance 
with the hardware trade. He then bought Mr. Dominy's interest in the 
store, the firm thus becoming Creviston & Spain, which arrangement con- 
tinued for about nine years, at the end of which time, in 1913, Mr. Crevis- 
ton sold his interest in the concern to Mr. Dolan and since then the l)usi- 
ness has been conducted under the firm name of Spain & Dolan. The firm 



CIIAMPAIGX COUNTY. OHIO. ^i^"] 

occupies a two-story store building, twenty by ninety feet, and an additional 
warehouse for the storage of agricultural implements, and carries a large 
and comprehensive stock, including general hardware and farm implements, 
together with such other goods as are usually carried in a store of that char- 
acter, and has a large and growing business. Mr. Spain is a Republican 
and has long given his active attention to local political affairs, being at 
present a member of the county central committee of his party. He served 
for some time as clerk of the village of North Lewisburg and is now serving 
as treasurer of the same. 

In 1905 Paul C. Spain was united in marriage to Lenora A. Townsend, 
daughter of O. S. Townsend and wife, and to this union two children have 
been born, Dorothy and Floriene. Mr. and Mrs. Spain have a very pleasant 
home at North Lewisburg and take an earnest interest in the general social 
activities of their home town. Mr. Spain is an active Mason, past master 
of the local lodge of that ancient order, and is a member of the local lodge 
of the Knights of Pythias, in the affairs of both of which organizations he 
takes a warm interest. He is one of the most active and energetic business 
men in North Lewisburg and has long been recognized as among the leaders 
in all movements having to do with the promotion of the substantial inter- 
ests of that town. 



DAVID LOUDENBECK. 

David Loudenbeck lives on a farm located on rural route number nine, 
^lad River township, Urbana, Ohio. He was born on this farm in March. 
1843, ^"^ this has always been his home. He is a son of Jonas and Susie 
(Snyder) Loudenbeck, old residents of this county. 

Jonas Loudenbeck was born, January 28, 181 6, on the farm now owned 
by Alfred Taylor, in Mad River township. Jonas was a son of Daniel and 
Mary (Pence) Loudenbeck. They came from Virginia, where they were 
horn, reared, educated and married. They came to this county in 18 10 and 
entered a tract of government land, improved the same and established a 
liome, in which they spent the remainder of their days. Daniel Loudenbeck 
\\ as a blacksmith and worked at his trade along with his farming work. He 
lived to be nearly ninety years old; the wife died at the age of ninety-six. 
They were the parents of four children. 

Jonas Loudenbeck grew to manhood on the old home place. After his 
marriage he removed to the farm on which our subject now lives. He 



328 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

cleared up this farm and put up buildings and added improvements from time 
to time until he had a farm in a good condition for cultivation and for the 
production of good crops. He made this his home until his death, which 
occurred in 1903. His wife also died in this home. They had three chil- 
dren: David, our subject; Jane, wife of Abraham Pence, living in Shelln- 
county; Sarah, the wife of Isaiah Smith. 

David Loudenbeck was reared on the farm and received his education 
in the common schools. He remained at home doing his share of work on 
the farm until his marriage. He Avas married in 1866 to Roanna Colliert, 
a sister of Isaiah Colbert, whose biographical sketch appears in. another 
place in this work. Mr. and Mrs. Loudenbeck have three children : Edgar. 
living at home; Walter D., at St. Paris. Ohio: Edna, wife of Walter Alban. 
of Springfield, Ohio. 

Mr. Loudenbeck is a member of Urbana Lodge, No. 46, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows. Politically, he is a Democrat. His greatest interest 
is centered in the care and cultivation of his one hundred and eighty-seven 
acres of land, some of the best in the township. The land is well adai)ted 
for stock raising and for the production of abundant crops of grain and 
other farm products. The condition of the farm and of everything about 
the premises shows good taste and intelligent management, and that modern 
methods are employed in the operation of the farm. 



ROBERT HENDERSON, M. 1). 

Dr. Robert Henderson, one of Champaign county's best-known ])li\- 
sicians, is a Virginian, but has been a resident of Ohio since the latter 
seventies and of the city of Urljana since the year 1884. being thus very 
properly entitled to be regarded as one of the "old settlers" of this county. 
He was born in the city of Parkersburg, Virginia (now in West Vir- 
ginia), on March 22, 185 1, son of Richard H. and Ann Maria ( Shank- 
lin) Henderson, both natives of that same state, and was reared there 
and in Wheeling, in which latter city he completed his work in the com- 
mon schools. While engaged as a clerk in a store at Parkerslxirg he l)egan 
the study of medicine and after awhile entered the College of Physicians 
and Surgeons at Baltimore, being graduated from that institution in i>^-i^. 

For a short time after receiving his diploma Doctor Henderson was 
engaged in the practice of his profession in \\'est Virginia and then came 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY. OHIO. 



3-'' 



to Ohio, locating at New Moorefield. in Clark county, where he remained 
until the fall of 1884, when he moved to L'rhana, opened there an otiice 
for the practice of his profession and has ever since been thus engaged in 
that city. Doctor Henderson is a member of the Champaign County Medi- 
cal Society, a member of the Ohio Medical Society and a member of the 
American Medical Association, in the affairs of which organizations he takes 
a warm interest, ever keeping fully abreast of the ad\ance being made in 
his profession. The Doctor is an active Democrat and during the second 
Cleveland' administration served as a member of tlie ])ension examining 
board for this district. He is a Mason and takes much interest in the affairs 
of that ancient order. 

In 1875, several years before coming to this state. Doctor Henderson 
was united in marriage to Elizabeth S. Thomas, of Pf)int Pleasant, West 
Virginia, and to this union two children have been Ijorn. Richard T. and 
Helen. Dr. Richard T. Henderson was graduated from the Starling Medical 
College at Columbus in 1900, having been prepared for college by stud}' 
under his father's preceptorship, and is now associated with his father in prac- 
tice. Helen married William C. Bonebrake, a civil engineer of the Penns\ 1- 
'\"ani;i railroad at Pittsburti'h. 



A, F. TAYLOR. 



A. F. Taylor is a retired farmer and yet is interested in farming under 
the firm name of A. F. Taylor & Son, proprietors of the Hereford cattle 
farm consisting of two hundred and seventy-five acres, heated three mile-< 
west of Urbana, on the Urbana and Piqua pike. 

Mr. Taylor was born in Cambridgeshire, England, Xovember 8, 1850. 
He came to the United States in 1854, locating in Ontario county. New 
York, and came to Champaign county, Ohio, in 1875. In 1887 he located 
on a farm one mile west of \\'oodstock, in Chaiupaign county, and three 
years later he came to his present farm. He recei\ed his early education in 
New York state and remained at home until he was twenty-one, when he 
started out for himself without a dollar. He first took a contract for fui- 
nishing plaster rock, one thousand tons, at seventy-five cents a ton. This 
gave him a little start, and he came to Stnnmit county to engage in farmin-. 
He rented a farm and, in connection with his brother, began the experiment 
of farming and stock raising, in which he was quite successful. He after- 



330 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY. OHIO. 

wards iKircliased a half interest in a farm of one hundred and sixty acres, 
his brother-in-law taking the other half. After two years he purchased the 
other half interest and operated the farm alone. 

Mr. Taylor was married to Rachael Spensly. She was born in Medina 
county, Ohio, where she was educated and engaged for some time in teach- 
ing. Edward T. is the only son of Mr. and Mrs. Taylor. He was born on 
h'ebruary 15, 1878, and was educated in the district schools, graduating in 
the IJrbana high school and in the agricultural school at Columbus, Ohio. 
He married Mabel Jenkins, of St. Paris, Ohio, who was educated in the 
graded schools and a graduate of the St. Paris high school. They have one 
ciiild, Melvina A., born June, 1909. 

Mr. Taylor is a member of the Universalist church, of Westville, Ohio, 
and is one of the trustees of that church. He is a charter member of Magrcw 
Lodge No. 433, Knights of Pythias, and served as treasurer of that order. 
He is a Republican, but has never taken an active part in party afifairs. 

Mr. Taylor is largely interested as a breeder of Hereford cattle and has 
a herd of three hundred, and is a feeder of a large number of hogs. 

Mr. Taylor's house was destroyed by fire in 19 14 and he built a modern 
bungalo in which he now lives. It is a very comfortable home and nicely 
located. 



DAVID W. TODD. 



Judge David W. Todd, an honored veteran of the Civil War, former 
probate judge of Champaign county, former assistant postmaster at Urbana 
and for maiiy years one of the best-known lawyers at Urbana. is a iiati\-e 
son of the old Keystone state, but has been a resident of Ohio and of this 
county since he was eleven years of age and may thus very properly be 
accounted as one of the real "old settlers" of Champaign county. He was 
born in Dauphin county, Pennsylvania, December 31, 1835, son of David 
and Sarah (McCormick) Todd, both natives of that same state, who came 
to Ohio in 1846 and in 1847 settled on a farm on Pretty Prairie, in Urbana 
township, this county, where they spent the remainder of their lives, useful 
and influential residents of that sterling community, the death of the senior 
Todd occurring there in 1868. 

Reared on the home farm on Pretty Prairie, David \V. Todd receixed 
his elementary schooling in the schools of that neighborhood and supple- 
mented the same by a course in Miami Univcrsit^•. at Oxforrl. this state, from 




D. W. TODD. 



CPIAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 33 I 

which he was graduated in i860. Meantime he had been giving- close atten- 
tion to the study of law in private readings and upon lea\ing the univer- 
sity entered the law office of Shellabarger & Good at Springfield and there 
completed his legal studies and was qualified for practice. Upon being 
admitted to the bar in 1863 he opened an office for the practice of his 
profession at Urbana and in the fall of that same }'ear he was elected county 
attorney of Champaign county, in which official position he served so satis- 
factorily that he was re-elected in 1865 and thus served as county attorney 
for two terms. During this time he had given some attention to the work 
of developing the industries of Urbana and in 1873 was made general super- 
intendent of the Urbana Machine Works, a position whicli he occupied 
for a couple of years, at the end of which time he resumed tlie practice 
of his profession and in 1878 was elected probate judge in and for Cham- 
paign county and by successive re-elections was retained in that office for 
four terms, or imtil 1890, since which time he has been engaged in the 
practice of his profession and in looking after his other interests in and 
about Urbana. Judge Todd has ever given his earnest attention to local 
civic affairs and for ten years served as assistant postmaster at Urbana. 
retiring in 19 16. He is an ardent Republican and has for many years been 
looked upon as one of the leaders of that party in this count}' and through- 
out this part of the state. 

The above brief review of Judge Todd's professional and civic activi- 
ties has made no reference to his distinguished military service during the 
progress of the Civil W^ar. mention of which has been reserved for a separate 
paragraph. Upon President Lincoln's first call for volunteers in that 
memorable -\pril of 1861, Judge Todd responded to the call with patriotic 
fervor and on April 29 enrolled his name as a member of Company F. 
Second Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, at Springfield, with which com- 
mand he served until the following July. In 1862 he assisted in organizing 
a Springfield company of recruits and went to the front with them as seconrl 
lieutenant of Company B, Eighty-sixth Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, 
and was presently promoted to the rank of first lieutenant, later becoming 
regimental quartermaster, and was mustered out with that rank at Camp 
Delaware on September 25. 1862. On May 6. 1864. he was commissioned 
lieutenant-colonel of the One Hundred and Thirty-fourth Ohio and after 
some active service with that command in the advance on Petersburg was 
finally mustered out with the rank on August 31, 1864. Judge Todd has for 
years been one of the most active members of W. A. P>rand Post. Grand 
.\rmy of the Republic, at l^rbana. has held numerous offices in that patri- 



33'-' CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

Otic organization and has long been a familiar and enthusiastic figure at tlu- 
annual encampments of the Grand Army of the Republic. Department of 
Ohio, and has likewise attended several national encampments of the Grand 
Army. 

Judge Todd has been twice married. It was in 1863 that he was united 
in marriage to Virginia Hamilton, who died in 1868, leaving two sons. 
Lee H. Todd, for many years proprietor of a book store at Urbana, and 
Robert M. Todd. In 1869 Mr. Todd married, Ella W. Hovey and to this 
union three children were born, Nancy H., wife of Gary G. Glessner; Frank 
\V. Todd, who is one of the best-known newspaper men in Urbana, and 
Helen Todd, who died at an early age. Judge and Mrs. Todd are members 
of the Presbyterian church and have for years been regarded as among the 
leaders in the \^arious beneficences of the same, ever taking an earnest inter- 
est in church work, as well as in the general good works of the city and 
county at large, and have been helpful in many ways in promoting such 
agencies as have been designed to advance the common welfare hereabout. 



NATHANIEL C. HUNTER. 

The late Nathaniel C. LIunter, for years one of the best-known and 
most substantial farmers and landowners of Salem township, this count}, 
who died in 1908 at his home in Urbana, where he had been living retired 
from the active labors of the farm for more than twenty years, was a native 
son of Champaign county and all his life was spent here. He was born on 
the old Hunter homestead place in Salem township on November i, 1825. 
son of John and Jane (Humphries) Hunter, prominent residents of that 
part of the county, whose last days were spent there. 

John Hunter was a son of Nathaniel and Ann (Porter) Himter, natives 
of Ireland, who were among the very earliest settlers in the northern part 
of this county and who took an influential part in the work of creating proper 
social conditions in the formative period of that now well-established and 
prosperous farming community. Nathaniel Hunter was bom in County 
Down, Ireland, on a farm about twelve miles from Belfast, December 4. 
1768, of Scottish descent, his forbears having crossed from Scotland into 
the north of Ireland in 1607. On February 2, 1790, he married Ann Porter, 
who was born on May 15, 1772, also of Scottish descent, and in 1793 he 
.ind his young wile and their baby daughter. Mary Ann. came to this conn- 



CHAMPAIGN COUXTV. OHIO. 33:; 

try and located in Greenbriar county, Virginia, where they estabhshed their 
home and where they remained for fifteen years or more, at tlie end of 
which time they disposed of their holdings there and in 1810 came out into 
what then was regarded in the East as the "wilds" of Ohio. Chillicothe 
was their point of destination in this section and upon his arrival there 
Nathaniel Hunter began looking about a bit for a suitable place for settle- 
ment. He presently bought a three-year lease to a tract of hmd on I'ossuni 
Run, eight miles south of London, in Madison county, and the next spring 
put out a planting of corn on that tract. He later started out seeking a 
place for the establishment of his permanent home, finally deciding that in 
Champaign county there were as fruitful possibilities as in any section of 
this part of the state. So well pleased was this stalwart pioneer with the 
appearance of things in this county that he bought nine hundred and fift\ 
acres of land in Salem township, two miles west of Mt. Tabor and three 
miles southwest of West Liberty. Then, with the assistance of his elder 
sons, he cleared a patch in the forest, built in that clearing a log house and 
made some other improvements on the place, and in the spring of 1814 
moved his family into the new home. Meantime, during the family's resi- 
dence in Madison county, another baby had been born into the Hunter 
household, the last daughter, Elizabeth, and thus when the new log house 
in the wilderness was furnished there was need for the cradle. At that time 
there still were numerous Indians hereabout and wild game in abundance 
and with the exception of an occasional small settlement here and there the 
land was a veritable wilderness. The Indians were not troublesome at that 
time, however, and the Hunter family was not disturbed in its home-making 
there in the woods of that Mt. Tabor country, and that home presently 
came to be recognized as one of the best-established and most hospitable in 
all that region roundabout. Nathaniel Hunter was a good farmer and 
lived to see his land, which is still in the ownership of the Hunter family. 
developed into a fine bit of farm property. 

To Nathaniel and Ann (Porter) Hunter nine children were Ijorn, namely: 
Mary Ann, born on October 9, 1791. who married a Casebolt ; Alexander. 
February 11, 1795, who became a substantial farmer in the Mingo neigh- 
borhood; Jane, November 11, 1796, who married a Miller; Thomas, Jan- 
uary 22, 1799, who also had his home near Mingo; John, March 20, 1801, 
father of the subject of this memorial sketch ; Nancy, April 30, 1803, who 
died unmarried: Samuel. March 23, 1805, who married Maria Miller and 
also established his home in Salem township; Sallie J., October 13, 180^). 
who married a \Vhitehead and moved to Michigan, and Elizabeth. March iS. 



3.U CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

1813, who married a McFerrin and made her home m Salem township. The 
mother of these children died not many years after the family took up 
their residence in Salem township and the father married, secondly, a Ward 
and by that marriage had two children, Maria, born on September 2, 1821. 
wdio married James Funk, and Hester Ann, March 2, 1825, who died 
unmarried. 

John Hunter was twelve or thirteen years of age when the family took 
u]j their residence in this county and he grew to manhood on the home 
farm in Salem township and continued farming there all his life. He married 
Jane Humphries, member of one of the pioneer families in that neighbor- 
hood, and to that union three children were born, Nathaniel, Washington 
C. and William H. Hunter. Washington C. Hunter was born on Septem- 
ber 15, 1827, and grew to manhood on the home farm in Salem township. 
He married Agnes Duel and after spending some years farming in this 
county went to Pasadena, California, where he engaged in the lumber busi- 
ness and where he is still living. He and his wafe were the parents of 
two sons, both of W'hom are now deceased. Major William H. Hunter, 
who gained his title while serving as a soldier of the Union during the 
Civil W'ar, was born on September 29, 1840, and also grew to manhood 
in this county. He married a McDonald and made his home in Salem town- 
-^liip and in West Liberty until late in life, when he went to Birmingham. 
Alabama, where he engaged in the real-estate business and where he speiil 
liis last days, his death occurring there on Jul)^ 31, 1904. 

Nathaniel C. Hunter was reared on the farm which his grandfather 
liad opened in Salem township and completed his schooling at Delaware, this 
state. For a time he was engaged in the mercantile business' at Urbana 
and at \Vest Liberty, but later returned to the old home farm in Salem 
township and there established his home, engaging in farming there until 
1885, in which year he retired from the active labors of the farm and moved 
to Urbana, where he spent his last days, his death occurring there on Febru- 
ary 18. 1908. During his many years of residence on the farm Mr. Hunter 
was one of the most active and influential farmers in that part of the county. 
He was a stanch Republican and held various township offices, giving to 
his public service his most earnest thought. He was a great reader and 
kept fully informed on matters of current interest and was particularly- 
interested in matters of local historical interest. In this connection he wrote 
a history of the Mt. Tabor Methodist Episcopal church, which to this da}- 
is regarded as the most authoritative history of that church and the greater 
part of which is reproduced iii the his"torical section of this work. For sixt\-- 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 33:5 

five years Mr. Hunter was a member of that church and during fifty years 
of that time was the superintendent of the Sunday school, the last eight 
years being superintendent in Urbana. He also held all other offices in 
the church at one time and another and took great pleasure in the work 
of the church. He was a busy man, energetic and practical and his farming 
and other interests prospered under his prudent management, so that he came 
to be recognized as one of the Champaign county's most substantial citi- 
zens. 

Mr. Hunter was twice married. It was on May 17, 1849, that he 
was united in marriage to Helen M. Purdy, who was born at Erie Cit\. 
Pennsylvania, and who died on April 20, 1880. To that union three sons 
were born, John G., Albert L. and William P. Albert L. Hunter was born 
on August 4, 1852, and remained a farmer on the old home place in Salem 
township, where he spent his last days, his death occurring there in August. 
1909. He married Mary Frances North and to that union four children 
were born, namely: Grace, who married Quincy Yocum, of Concord town- 
ship, this county; Edna, wife of Alva Kiser, of Troy, this state; Fern P., 
who married the Rev. Milton Swisher and died in Iowa, and Elsie, who mar- 
ried Daniel Leamman, a farmer living near St. Paris, this county. William 
P. Hunter was born on March 12, 1855, and died at San Antonio, Texas, 
January 5, 1882. John G. Hunter, who was born on June 17, 1850, moved 
to Michigan, where he became a farmer and where he spent his last days, 
his death occurring there on January 9, 1916. He married Eva Crookston 
and was the father of two children, Maud, wife of John Clapper, of Bay 
City, Michigan, and Charles W., who married Marybelle Wilcox and is now 
living at Toledo, Ohio. 

On January 20, 1883, Nathaniel C. Hunter married, secondly, Mrs. 
Anna Eliza (Seaman) Enoch, widow of Henry Enoch, of West Liberty, 
who died in 1858. Since the death of her liusband Mrs. Hunter has con- 
tinued to make her home in Urbana. where she is very comfortably situa- 
ted. She reared two nieces. Cora and La\inia Seaman, who continue to 
make their home with her. Mrs. Hunter was born at Xenia. this state. Sej)- 
tember 2, 1832, a daughter of Lewis and Lavinia (Smith) Seaman, the former 
of whom was born in Frederick county, Virginia, in 1805. son of Jonas and 
Catherine (Sheets) Seaman, natives of that same county, who came to Ohio 
with their family in 18 10 and located at Chillicothe, a }ear later moving 
to Clinton county, where they spent the remainder of their lives, Jonas Sea- 
man dying there in 1836. Jonas Seaman and wnfe were the parents of eight 
children, Jonathan, Philip, George, Lewis. Jonah, I^Iiza. Joseph and Miles. 



336 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

Lewis Seaman became a blacksmitli and left Clinton county to locate at 
Xenia, where he remained engaged in that vocation until 1836, when he 
bought a farm in Logan county, established his home there and there spent 
the remainder of his life. He was an active worker in the Mt. Tabor 
Methodist Episcopal church and helped to build two churches. He and his 
wife, Lavinia Smith, were the parents of six children, those besides Mrs. 
Hunter being as follow : Josiah. who died at the age of four years ; Will- 
iam, who for some time farmed in Illinois, but later returned to the old 
home place in Logan county, where he died, leaving a widow, Frances 
Bebee. and one child, a daughter. Josephine; Elisha, a veteran of the Civil 
War, who served as a member of Company A, Sixty-sixth Regiment. Ohio 
Volunteer Infantry, formerly and for years a farmer and now living at 
Columbus, this state, who had been twice married, his first wife, Nettie 
V'otaw, a native of Indiana, having died on February 7, 1881, leaving three 
daughters, Nettie, Cora and Lavinia, after which he married Nellie Fisher. 
also of Indiana, and by that union has three children, Anna, Bertha and 
Lewis; Maria Louise, who married James Stanton and is now deceased, 
and Martha, who married William Winder and died in 1894 at Urbana. 
tliis countv. leaving one daughter, Florence. 



JAMES A. POWELL. 



It is a fine thing to be permitted to spend one's life at the old home- 
stead, about which cluster memories and associations which cannot be found 
elsewhere. Such has been the privilege of "James A. Powell, farmer, of 
L'rbana township. Champaign county, who was born on the same farm where 
lie now resides on November 27, 1856. He is a son of Samuel Smith 
Powell and Eliza A. (Showers) Powell, the mother a native of Urbana 
township, this county. The father was a son of Abram Powell, who was 
1)orn March 2. 1791, in Kentucky, and in early pioneer days he came to 
Champaign county, Ohio, and established the family home in Urbana town- 
ship, where he devoted his life to farming, developing a farm from the 
virgin soil. He was a soldier in the War of 181 2. He died at the unusual 
age of ninety-one years. His wife was a Miss Osborn. They were parents 
of the following children: Samuel Smith, father of the subject of this 
sketch; James, Clay, Miller and Flanders, all of whom lived and died in 




FLOYD S. POWELL 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 



337 



Urbana township ; Nancy died unmarried ; John is still liA^ing in Urbana 
township. 

Samuel S. Powell, mentioned above, was reared on the home farm in 
Urbana township and he attended the rural schools there. He burned the 
brick that went into the present substantial dwelling on his farm, and he 
made all other necessar}^- improvements. He was a Republican and he 
served as school director of his district for some time. He gave the ground 
on which to found Hickory Grove church, which he also helped build. He 
was always very active in church affairs, his home being a favorite meeting- 
place for church people. It was his delight to lavish old-time hospitality 
and he frequently entertained at dinner as many as one hundred guests at 
a time. He was very well known throughout the county and a friend to all 
who knew him. His death occurred in 1886, at the age of sixty-seven years. 
He was born on July 4, 1819. His wife was born on October 22, 1827, and 
<lied in September, 1876. They were married, October 22, 1846, and their 
children were named as follows: George W., born July 20, 1848, is farm- 
ing at Rosewood, Ohio; David W.. born December 2^, 1849, was a soldier 
in the regular army and died in California; Daniel W., born March 27, 
185 1, died in early life; John Andrews, bom May 13, 1853, is deceased; 
Charles Franklin, l3orn December 18, 1854, is deceased; James A., of this 
sketch; Mary Elizabeth, born April 27, 1858, is deceased; Martha Jane, 
lK)'-n Januar}- 6, i860, is deceased; ^Villianl Lincoln, born December 30, 
i860, died in Fel)ruary, 191 7, at Huntington, Iowa, where he was foreman 
in the railroad shops; Clara Bell, born March ]i. 1863, is deceased; Emma 
Jane, born November 30, 1864, is deceased ; Fannie Ellen, born August 7, 
1866, is single and living at Rosew^ood, Ohio; Amanda Jane, born May 7, 
1868, married Ben Sandy, and she is now deceased. 

James A. Powell grew up on the home fann and attended the common 
schools. He lived with his parents until his marriage on October 14, 1879, 
to Sarah Ellen Dye, a native of Miami county, Ohio, and a daughter of 
James and Mary (Evilsizer) Dye, both natives of Ohio, he of Miami county, 
and she of Champaign county. To James A. Powell and wife one son was 
born, Floyd Smith Powell, whose birth occurred on February 2, 1881. His 
death occurred on February 26, 191 3. He married Elnia May Range, and 
one son was born to them, James Wesley Powell, whose birth occurred on 
October 10, 1908. Floyd S. Powell grew up on the home place where he 
spent his life. He received a good education and was a young man of much 
promise, well known and popular all over the county. He served as deputy 
(22a) 



33^ CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

sheriff and was finally elected to the responsihle office of sheriff, the duties 
of which he was ably and faithfully discharging when he died. • Frater- 
ally, he belonged to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Knight.-; of 
Pythias and the Junior Order of United American Mechanics. ; 

After his marriage, the subject of this sketch dived on the home farm 
a short time, then built his present home on the state road, known 'as *'East 
View Fann," his place containing fifty-seven and. one-half acres. He makes 
a specialty of belted Hampshire hog's in connectioii with general farming. 
He also farms other land in his vicinity which he rents. He votes the 
Republican ticket. His wife is a Baptist. 



JACOB E. RHODES. 



Jacob E. Rhodes is a farmer, living on rural route number four, Urbana. 
Ohio, one mile north of Terre Haute, Ohio. He was born in Strasburg, 
Shenandoah county, Virginia, November 20, 1859, a son of Noah and Cath- 
erine (Stover) Rhodes. Noah Rhodes was a son of John and Mary (Cra- 
bill) Rhodes, who were natives of Virginia, and spent their entire lives in 
that state. 

Noah Rhodes was reared in Virginia and lived in that state until after 
his marriage. He came to Champaign county, September, 1856, coming' 
with his wife and all his belongings conveyed in a covered wagon. The 
distance of this journey was about five hundred miles and it took tliein 
twenty-two days to make the trip. They slept in the wagon and cooked 
their meals by the roadside. He had purchased one hundred and twenty- 
acres of land in this county, nearly all in the woods. Here he established a 
home and began the work of clearing timber from his land and gettitig it in 
shape for cultivation. He afterwards made an additional purchase of land, 
making in all one hundred and eighty acres in the farm. He and his wife 
were members of the Baptist church and active in all church affairs, l^uliti- 
caliy, he was a Democrat for the most of his life, but later affiliated witli llie 
Greenback party. He died, June, 1897; his wife died June, 1916. The 
children of this family born in Virginia, were: Jacob E., Joseph (li\ing), 
and. John E. (deceased). One child, Joshua, was born in Champaign 
county, Ohio. 

Jacob E. Rhodes was nearly five years old when he came with his par- 
ents to this county. He was reared on the farm and attended the ])ul)lic 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 



339 



school during the winter season. He was married to Mary Cook, November 
15, 1877. She was born in Mad River township, near Terre Haute, Ohio, 
.\pril 3, 1855, a daughter of Calvin and Elizabeth (Hupp) Cook.: Her par- 
ents were both natives of Virginia. Her father was born April 12, 1819, 
and died in 1909; her mother was. born April 23, 1819, and died in 1905. 
They had eleven children, six of whom are living: William, of Mad River 
township ; Raper, of Rice county, Kansas ; Louis, of Urbana township : 
George, of Clark county, Ohio; Samuel, of Auglaize county, Ohio, and Mrs. 
Rhodes. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Rhodes four boys have been born : Wilber, married 
Addie Neese; Ona C, married Cora Alorris, of Clark county, Ohio; War- 
ren J., married Mary Blue, Mad River township; Carl P., at home. Mrs. 
Rhodes is a member of the Harmony Baptist church. Mr. Rhodes affiliates 
with the Democratic party. He has been a member of the school board for 
twelve years, and one of the trustees for six years. He moved tO the farm 
where he now lives in the summer of 1878, and has turned his attention to 
general farming and stock raising. 



JAMES L. FUNK. . _, ..,-. 

While James L. Funk, a retired grain dealer of Liberty, Ohio, lives 
just across the line in Logan county; nevertheless, he has long been inter- 
ested in the affairs of Champaign county and his biography is not out of 
place in a history of the latter. He was -born on the old Funk homestead 
in Salem township. Champaign county, June 3, 1861. He is a son of Jacob 
S. and Sarah (Long) Funk, the father a native of Fredericks city, Mary- 
land, where he was born in 181 5. The mother was a native of Salem town- 
ship, born on August 24, 1822. When a small boy, Jacob S. Funk moved 
from the Oriole state with his parents to Pennsylvania, and when he was 
fifteen years old he accompanied the family to Champaign county, Ohio, 
locating in Salem township on the state road, in 1830, thus being one of the 
pioneer families in this locality. His parents were Joel and Elizabeth 
( Kanagy) Funk. Joel Funk became a leading citizen of his vicinity. He 
purchased land here, which he cleared, improved and added to, until at the 
time of his death he owned l.)etween four hundred and five hundred acres of 
land. His family consisted of the following children, namely : Jacob S., 
father of the subject of this sketch; Emily, who married Jacob Myers: 



340 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

Caroline, who married Levi Share; Augusta, who died during the Civil 
War of a. fever which she contracted while nursing a Union soldier, and 
Aaron Benson Funk (deceased), who was a farmer in Salem township. 

Jacob S. Funk attended school in Pennsylvania, also in Salem township, 
Champaign county, also attended a college in the state of Kentuck}-. Vfter 
leaving school he took up farming in Salem township, locating on the farm 
that his son, James L., and daughter, Rovilla. now own. and here he spent the 
rest of his life engaged in general farming, his death occurring on March i8. 
{897. His widow survived until March 25, 1909. He was well known and 
influential in his township and county. He served as road supervis(,)r and 
school director of Salem township. His family consisted of live children, 
namely: Lee W., who lives in Washington, D. C. ; Theodore K., an attorney, 
living in Portsmouth, Ohio; Rovilla lives on the old liome place; lutgene 
resides in Valparaiso, Indiana, and James L. of this sketch, [■iovilla Funk 
attended Delaware College, Ohio, and is a cultured lady. She has always 
lived on the home place in Salem townshij). 

James L. Funk grew up on the farm and was educated in the common 
schools of Salem township and the high school at Urbana, from which he 
was graduated. LTpon leaving school he returned home for a short time, 
and received an appointment in the railway mail service which position he 
held for over one year, then returned home and managed the farm until 
1906, when he moved to West Liberty, Logan county, where he engaged in 
the grain business for a period of nine years, when he sold out. He has 
since devoted his attention to looking after his farms in Champaign and 
Logan counties. He is a member of the board of directors for the Peoples 
Building and Loan Association of West Liberty. 

Mr. Funk was married in June, 1910, to Nellie I'dliott, a daughter of 
Benjamin and Martha Elliott. Their union has been without issue. Politi- 
cally, Mr. Funk is a Republican. He belongs to the Masonic order, embracing 
the blue lodge of West Liberty and the Knights Templar of Urbana. He 
belongs to the Methodist Episcopal church and is a member of the official 
board of the same. 

Mr. Funk's mother, Sarah (Long) Funk, was lx)rn in Salem town- 
ship, two and one-half miles southeast of Kings creek. She was a daughter 
of James and Martha (Turner) Long. He was born in Kentucky, she. in 
Logan county, Ohio. James Long as a boy came with his parents from 
Kentucky to Champaign county and bought a farm in Salem township. They 
were of Scotch-Iri.sh descent. They built a stone house, and there James 
Long grew to maturity. James Long became a farmer and ver)- well-to-do. 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY. OIIK!. 34I 

iinally owning- seven hundred acres of land. They belonged to the Methodist 
Episcopal church and he was a real Christian man. He owned a stone 
quarry on his farm. He built a large brick house and had it well finished 
with fine mantels, woodwork, etc. James Long was married twice, first, to 
Martha Turner, and she died, leaving twin daughters three months old. 
One was Sarah (Long) Funk. The other girl, Mary, died aged twenty -five. 
Then James Long married Susannah Cheney. 



WILLL\M E. BROWN. 



William E. Brown, one of Urbana's best-known and most, substantial 
I)usincss men. actively identified with the commercial and industrial affairs 
of his home town, is a native son of Champaign county and has lived here 
all his life. He was born in this coimty. December 29, 1861, son of Harvey 
and Lucy (Harper) Brown, also natives of this county and members of 
pioneer families, the former a son of Emanuel and Christine (Henkins) 
Bmwn. and tlie latter a daughter of John and Elizabeth (Wilson) Harper. 
Virginians, who came to this county about 1820 and became substantial and 
useful pioneers of the Pisgah neighborhood. Both the Browns and the Har- 
pers are of Scotch-Irish descent and of Colonial stock, and both families 
were honorablv represented in the struggle of the colonies for independence 
dtu-ing the Revolutionary War. 

Bereft of his father in the da^s of his bo} hood, William 1-^. Brown early 
batl his own way to make and he was but a boy when he entered upon his 
successful mercantile career as a clerk in a store at Urbana. From the very 
beginning of that career Mr. Brown has given his most earnest thought to 
the business, and it was not long until he found his way clear to enter busi- 
ness on his own account. As he prospered he gradually enlarged his stock 
and his establishment grew in importance until it has long been recognized 
as one of the leading clothing and men's furnishing establishments in this 
part of the state. Mr. Brown now being the oldest clothing merchant in 
coininuous ser\ice in Champaign count)-. In addition to his extensive mer- 
cantile interests, Mr. Jirown has other imjwrtant commercial connections in 
Urbana. and has for vears been regarded as one of the real "live wires" of 
that flourishing city. For several years he was secretary- and treasurer of 
the Urbana Mills Company, manufacturers of worsted cloth, is a member of 
the board of directf)rs of the Champaign National Bank, vice-president of the 



34^ CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

People's Savings and Loan Company of Urbana, a member of the board of 
directors of the Ohio Oil and Refining Company, and has other interests, all 
combining to make him one of the important personal factors in the business 
life of this community. 

On October 15, 1890, in the vicinity of Monticello, in White county. 
Indiana, William E. Brown was united in marriage to Marietta Burns 
daughter of William and Etna (Mclntyre) Burns, of Scottish ancestry and 
prominent and substantial pioneers of that county, and to this union two 
children have been born, daughters, Lucy Burns, who was married to J. 
Ivan Murphy on October 28, 1916, and Christine Etna, who is now a stu- 
dent at the University of Wisconsin. Mr. Brown has a delightful home at 
Urbana and has ever taken an earnest interest in the general social and cul- 
tural activities of his home town. He is a member of the Baptist church 
and for thirty years Mr. Brown has been the teacher of a class of young 
men in the Sunday school of that church. Mrs. Brown is a member of the 
Christian Science church and at one time was second reader. Mr. Brown is 
a Knight Templar and Scottish Rite (thirty-second degree) Mason and a 
noble of the Ancient Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, affiliated 
with the blue lodge, the chapter, the council and the commandery at Urbana 
and witK'the consistory and the shrine (Antioch Temple) at Dayton, and has 
for years given his earnest and active attention to Masonic affairs. 



i JOHN LEONARD. 

[ohn Leonard, a farmer, living on nn-al route number four. Urbana, 
Ohio, was born on the farm he now owns, September 12, 1864, a son of 
J. P. and Elizabeth ( Kesler) Leonard. The father was born in Jackson 
township. John Leonard is the oldest of a family of four children. The 
others are, Wilson, Elmer and Charles. 

John Leonard spent his boyhood days on the old home farm and 
received his education in the district schools. He was sufliciently educated 
to engage in teaching and he followed that vocation for eighteen years, 
teaching in the schools of the county. He was married, April 22. 1890, 
to -Alvirta Fitzpatrick, a daughter of \\'illiam and Lucinda (Lemnion) 
Fitzpatrick. After marriage they settled down on the farm where they 
now live. He bought thirty-seven acres and has made all the improvements 
on the farm. Two children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Leonard: Wilbur 



CI1A]\IPATGN COUNTY, OHIO. 343 

F., died at the age of eight months, born in 1891 ; Enier}- C, born Janiiar}- 
9. 1892, graduate of the schools at Thackery and Lawrenceville high school. 
He is also a graduate of the Wittenberg agricultural school, and of the 
State University, receiving the degree of Master of Arts in the latter institu- 
tion, and is at present one of the instructors in the university. He is a member 
of the St. Paris Lodge No. 355, Free and Accepted Masons; a member of 
St. Paris Chapter No. 132. Royal Arch Masons, and a past high priest of 
the Raper Commandery No. 19, Urbana, Ohio. 

John Lebtiard is a Democrat in his political belief. He served for 
live years as justice of the peace in his township. He is a stockholder in 
the Springfield Building and Loan Company. He is a mason by trade and 
does some work in that line in addition to his farming work. 



LORENZO D. WARD. 



On November 15, 1879, Lorenzo D. Ward was born on a farm adjoin- 
ing the one on which he now lives, in Mad River township, Ohio. He is a 
son of Philander and Mary E. (Stradling) Ward, both of whom are natives 
of Champaign county, the former born in Mad River township, March 10. 
T852; the latter born in Jackson township, September, 1852. Mary E. 
Ward is a sister of Silas Stradling and is still living. 

Philander Ward and Mary E. Stradling were married in Jackson town- 
ship and settled down on a farm in Mad River township, where Mr. Ward 
continued to live the remainder of his life. He died July 16, 1904. He was 
a member of the Universalist church in Westville. In politics he was a 
Democrat. He was the father of three children, one of whom died in 
infancy. Lottie, a sister of Lorenzo D. Ward, is the wife of C. F. Louden- 
back, of Sidney, Ohio. 

Lorenzo D. Ward was reai'ed on a farm near where he now lives, and 
Avas educated in the district schools of which he is a graduate. He also 
attended the Westville high school. On October 5, 1904, he was married 
to Mary B. Middleton, daughter of Arthur and AUie L. (Taylor) Middle- 
ton. She was born February 16. 1883, and was educated in the Westville 
schools, graduating from the high school. After their marriage Mr. and 
Mrs. Ward settled on a farm in Mad River township and have continued 
to make their home in this township. They have five children: Beulah L., 
liorn July 16, 1905: Marjorie M., born February 19, 1907; Adelaide G., born 



344 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

lanuary 21, 1909; Loretta E., born April 10, 191 1; Robert M., born Felj- 
niary 2, 191 3. 

Mr. Ward is a member of Magrew Lodge, No. 433, Knights of Pythias. 
WestAnlle, Ohio. He is a Democrat in poHtics and is trustee of the town- 
ship. He owns one hundred and eight acres of land, a well improved farm 
and well adapted for general farming and stock raising, a line of industrv 
in which he is extensi\^ely engaged. 



WILLIAM M. RITCHIE. 

The farm of William M. Ritchie lies in Goshen township, in the south- 
eastern corner of Champaign county, being known as "Goshen Fruit Farm." 
Mr. Ritchie was born in Loudoun county, Virginia. February i, 1845. ^e 
is a scion of one of the sterling families of the Old Dominion, being a son 
of Solomon and Eliza A. (Ropp) Ritchie, both natives of Loudoun county, 
Virginia, where their ancestors settled in an early day. There they grew 
to maturity and were married, then moved to Clark county, Ohio, locating 
on a farm in Pleasant township and spent the rest of their lives there. The 
father was also a carpenter by trade, which he followed in connection with 
farming. His family consisted of six children, three of whom are living in 
191 7, namely: William M., of this sketch; Charles N.. who is farming in 
Pleasant township, Clark county; Edward H. is also engaged in farming 
in that township and county; one died in childhood; John S. was a soldier 
in the Civil War and gave his life for his country; Mary E.. who married 
Oliver Young, is deceased. 

William M. Ritchie was reared on the home farm in Clark count}-, 
Ohio, and was educated in the district schools. He worked on the home 
farm and also learned the carpenter's trade with his father, remaining at 
home until he was twenty years old. He is a mechanic of unusual abilit} . 
In 1879 he started a fruit farm in Goshen township and here he has since 
made his home. He owns sixty-one and one-half acres, which he has placed 
under excellent improvements and it is one of the most desirable fruit farms 
in the county. He has made a close study of all phases of horticulture, and 
is an authority in this line. In connection with fruit growing, he is a 
breeder of registered Duroc hogs. He finds a very ready market for his 
fine stock whenever he offers them for sale, owing to their superior quali- 
ties. He bought his farm in 1875. 

Mr. Ritchie was married on November 4, 1869, to Mary A. Brown. 




WILLIAM M. RITCHIE 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 



;>45 



who was born on the farm where she now Hves, June lo, 1850. She was 
reared in Goshen township and attended the district schools. To this union 
three children have been born, namely: Celia O., is single and lives at 
home; John E. married Josephine Lowe and they live in Dayton, Ohio; 
Anna L. is the wife of A. J. Wilson and they live in Pleasant township. 
Clark county. 

Politically, Mr. Ritchie is a Republican. He has served as a member 
of the local school board for many years, and was for some time chairman 
of the board. He and his wife are members of the Methodist Protestant 
church at Mechanicsburg and have long been active in church work. He 
served as superintendent of the Sunday school for a number of years and 
has also been a deacon of that church. 



DAVID BLUE. 



David Blue lives on his farm located six miles southeast of St. Paris, 
Mad River township. It is known as the "Sugar Grove Earm" and consists 
of sixty-four acres, on rural route number five, St. Paris, Ohio. David 
Blue was born on a farm south of where he now lives, July 29, 1862, a son 
of Nelson R. and Mary (Shaffer) Blue. 

Nelson R. Blue was also born in Mad River township. Champaign 
county. His wife was born in Virginia and came with her parents in earl\ 
life to Champaign county, Ohio, whei'e she grew to womanhood and was 
married. After marriage Nelson R. Blue and wife began housekeeping on 
a farm adjoining the one on which David Blue now lives. He owned a 
farm of one hundred and sixty acres here and made this his liome durni- 
life. Air. Blue was a good farmer and a good citizen. He was an advo- 
cate of the principles of the Republican party. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Nelson R. Blue six children were born, one of whom 
died in infancy. They are: J. E. Blue, a farmer in Mad Ri\er townshi]); 
David, Rosa, wife of Wilson Leonard, living in Mad River township; Mary 
E., widow of Ezra Lutz, Westville; Nancy, deceased, wife oi Silas Jenkins. 

David Blue w^as reared and educated in the old lionic, attending the dis- 
trict schools. He remained at home until he was tweiit}-three years of age. 
working on the farm. December 20. 1885, he was married to Ella Gabriel, 
a daughter of Samuel Gabriel. Mr. and Mrs. David Blue began housekeep- 
ing on a farm and this has been his occupation all his life. Ke Ijought the 



346 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

^'arm which he at present owns. He made the purchase without any means 
to make a payment, going in debt for the whole amount of purchase. Sam- 
uel Deibert endorsed his notes and backed him in getting a start. Mr. Blue 
made good, clearing the farm mortgage and getting himself free from debt, 
lie has made all the improvements on the farm. He built a comfortable 
residence in 1904. and a good barn in 191 2. The house in which he lives is 
a modern home of eight rooms, and all conveniences. 

Mr. and Mrs. Blue have two children: Edna L., wife of O. C. Bishop. 
of Springfield, Ohio; Mamie C, at home. Mr. Blue is a Republican in 
politics and takes an active part in party affairs. He is a member of the 
I unior Order of Mechanics, of Terre Haute. Ohio. 



GEORGE W. STEPHAN. 

George W. Stephan, a well-known millman and dealer in hardwood 
lumber at Urbana, is a native son of Ohio and has lived in this state all 
his life. He was born at Upper Sandusky, in Wyandot county, son of 
Henry and Mary (Weingard) Stephan, who were the parents of seven 
cliildren. two of whom died in infancy. Henry Stephan was born in the 
kingdom of Bavaria and upon coming to this country proceeded on out to 
Ohio and located at Springfield, where he became employed at his trade, 
that of a cabinet-maker, and where he married, later moving to Upper San- 
dusky, but after a sometime residence there returned to Springfield, where 
he spent the rest of his life and where for thirty years he had charge of the 
plant of the O. S. Kelly Company. He died in December, 1885. 

Upon completing his schooling in the Springfield high school, George 
\V. Stephan entered the factory with his father and after his father's death 
took the latter's place in the same. For a time he and his brothers, Henry 
and Charles, were engaged in the lumber business and they then moved to 
Urbana. where they engaged in the lumber business and later started the 
Desmond-Stephan Manufacturing Company, manufacturers of injectors, 
brass goods, emerywheel dressing and certain other supplies of a kindred 
character. Charles Stephan later sold his stock in the concern and returned 
to Springfield, where he is now engaged in the manufacturing business, 
and Henry Stephan died in 1912. Upon coming to Urbana in 1899 George 
W. Stephan continued his connection with the lumber business and has since 
been very successfully engaged in that line, operating several mills in this 



CHAMPAIGN COUiXTY, OHIO. 347 

part of the state, where the hardwood timber is still accessible. He has 
ever taken an active part in the general bnsiness affairs of his home town, 
is connected with the Citizens National Bank of Urbana, and was for some 
time engaged in the automobile business there. 

George W. Stephan was united in marriage to Mary Miller, of Spring- 
field. Mr. and Mrs. Stephan have a very pleasant home at Urbana and take 
a proper part in the general social activities of their home town. Mrs. 
Stephan is an active member of the Episcopal churcli and takes an earnest 
part in the affairs of the local congregation of that church, interested in 
all local good works. Mr. Stephan is independent in his political views, 
but takes a good citizen's interest in local civic affairs and is ever helpful 
in promoting- movements having to do with the general advancement of the 
business interests of the citv. 



FOREST E. JENKINS. 



Forest E. Jenkins, subject of this sketch, was born in Jackson township, 
October ii, i860, and is living on his farm on rural route numl^er one. North- 
hampton, Ohio. He is a son of Joseph and Abigail (Zirkle) Jenkins. 

Joseph Jenkins was born near St. Paris, Jackson township, Ohio, in 
1831, and died in 1875. Abigail (Zirkle) Jenkins was born in Mad River 
township, in 1833, and died in 191 5. Joseph Jenkins was one of the early 
settlers of the township and contributed a large share in the development of 
the country. He was an honest, upright citizen, a man of influence and 
liighly respected by the people of the community in which he spent his life. 
Their two living children, Forest and Nettie, live together and they cared 
for their mother during her widowhood. One child, Edward L., died in 
1868, aged two years. 

Forest E. Jenkins was born and reared on the farm in Jackson town- 
ship, and was educated in the district schools of the township. He married 
Tena Neese, in 1888, who was born in Mad River township, daughter of 
Elias and Sarah Foltz (both deceased), who lived in Mad River township. 
She died March 14, 1906, and left no children. They were members of the 
Lutheran church in which Mr. Jenkins was a deacon for several years. He 
is a member of Thackery Lodge No. 874, Independent Order of Odd I' el- 
lows, and is a past noble grand in that order. Nettie Jenkins was a mem- 
ber of the Rebekah lodge, of Thackery. and is past noble grand of the lodge. 



348 CPIAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

In his political affiliation Mr. Jenkins is a Republican. He serx^ed on the school 
bt»ard many years. 

Forest E. Jenkins and his sister are the owners of two hundred and 
ninety acres of land. Two hundred and eight acres of this land is the part 
on which they have their residence. Mr. Jenkins is engaged in general farm- 
ing and is also a breeder of fine graded stock. He raises French horses, 
.Shropshire shee]) and Chester White hogs. The land which he owns is w-ell 
.•((lapted to this line of industry and ])rofitable returns are realized. 



[OHN P. GOOD. 



A public-spirited, industrious and honored citizen of Salem township. 
Champaign county, during the generation that has just passed, was the late 
John P. Good, whose name is deserving of a place in this biographical and 
historical compendium. He was born in the above named county, October 
14, 1859. He is a son of Jonas and Julia Good, early settlers in this sec- 
tion of Ohio, establishing the family home on a farm, and there the subject 
of this memoir grew to manhood and assisted with the general work on 
the place during the crop season. In the winter time he attended the district 
.schools. 

John 1'. Good continued working with his father on the homestead until 
his marriage, T^bruary 29, 1888, to Eveline Kavenaugh, of Salem town- 
ship, this county, where .she was reared and educated in the common schools. 
She is a daughter of Samuel and Margaret (Hanger) Kavenaugh, the 
mother a native of Virginia and the father of Champaign county. Mr. 
Kavenaugh's parents were born in Ireland, his father, Matthew Kavenaugh, 
immigrating from that country to America when a young man, l>efore his 
marriage, and settled in Champaign county, on a farm, among the early 
settlers. His family consisted of six children, namely: John, Francis, 
James. William, Samuel (father of Mrs. Good), and Aima. Peter Hanger, 
maternal grandfather of Mrs. Good, married Susan (iroxes. He was a 
native of V^irginia, from which state he came to Champaign county, many 
years ago, and here he still resides. His wife was born in Holland. Ten 
children were born to Peter Hanger and wife, namely: Fred, Adam. Peter. 
Jr.. David, James, Elizabeth. Mary, Margaret, Susan and Eveline. 

To Samuel and Margaret Kavenaugh the following children were born : 
Lizzie, the wife of Hezekiali Miller, and thev reside in Illinois: Matthew, who 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 



349 



lives in Union county, Ohio; Mary Jane married James Blaycock and tliey 
live near West Liberty, Ohio : Eveline, widow of Air. Good, of this sketch : 
Myra and Marjorie are twins: Myra is single and lives on the home place: 
Marjorie is the wife of Jerry Shelton and they live in Springfield. Ohio: 
Annie is the wife of Robert Sidder and they live in Salem township. Cham- 
paign county, and William makes his home with his sister, Mrs. Good. 

iVfter his marriage John P. Good located on the old Kavenaugh farm 
in Salem township, where he engaged in general farming and stock raising 
until his death. He took a good deal of interest in public affairs and was 
influential in the general upbuilding of his community. He was a stanch 
Democrat and served for some time as a member of the local school board. 
Fraternally, he belonged to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at West 
Liberty : he held membership in the Christian church and took an abiding 
interest in the affairs of the same. 

The union of Mr. and Mrs. Good resulted in the birth of one child, 
John Denton Good, who farms the home place; he married Lela Fidler, of 
Ouincy. Ohio, and they have one child, John Franklin Good. The death 
of John P. Good occurred on March 26, 191 5. He was good to his family, 
a good neighbor and citizen and had a host of friends. 



WILLLAM T. MILLARD. 

Among the farmers of Salem township. Champaign county, who believe 
in employing advanced methods of tilling the soil, so far as they apply 
to this latitude, is William T. Millard. Fie was born in Cumberland county, 
Pennsylvania, August 29, 1877. He is a son of Thomas and Ivy (Johnsoji) 
Millard. The mother was born in Champaign county, Ohio, and the father 
was a native of Cumberland county. Pennsylxania, xxhere he grew to man- 
hood and attended school, and from there he migrated to Champaign count} . 
in the latter seventies. He worked at dift'erent places, principally at Urbana. 
His death occurred in 1905. His family consisted of seven children, named 
as follows: Robert and Lizzie, who both live in Springfield. Ohio: Henry, 
in Warren county. Ohio: Ella. Lou and Xettie, all three reside in Spring- 
field, this state, and \\'il]iani T., of this skctcli, who was tliird in order of 
birth. 

^\■illiam T. Millard was a small child when his parents brought him to 
<hampaign county, and here he grew to manhood and received his educa- 



350 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

tion in the Urbana public schools, but he left school when only eleven years 
old and began to work out at whatever he could find to do and until he 
was twenty years old he followed various occupations. At that age he 
married Nora McGuire, a daughter of James and Elizabeth (Shafer) 
McGuire, who lived on a farm in Champaign county. The father is now- 
deceased, but the mother makes her home in Salem township. They were 
parents of nine children, namely : Sallie, living at home in Salem township ; 
Nora, wife of Air. Millard, of this sketch ; James, in Los Angeles, California ; 
Lessre, in Kennard, Champaign county; Maggie, in Dayton, Ohio; Lizzie, 
who makes her home at Urbana, and Nicholas, Ollie and Theresa, all three 
reside in Salem township. Five children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Millard, 
named as follows : Harley. Blanche, Edna and Edgar are twins, and Glenna. 
After his marriage Mr. Millard lived in Springfield, Ohio, for about 
four years, where he was employed at the Kelly foundry. He then engaged 
in farming in Harrison township. Champaign county, for about nine years. 
Since 1910 he has resided at Lippencott, farming a two-hundred-acre place 
and he has made a success as a general farmer and stock raiser. Mr. 
Millard votes independently— for the best man. He has never aspired to 
office for himself. 



JOSEPH B. SMITH. 

Joseph B. Smith, an honored veteran of the Civil War, and a well- 
known farmer and substantial citizen of Johnson township, living on his well- 
improved farm of twenty-five acres located on rural route No. 4 out of S(. 
Paris, was born in Page county, Virginia, June 15, 1845, the son of James 
and Catherine (Deeds) Smith, both of whom were natives of the Old Domin- 
ion State, and who are mentioned elsewhere in this volume in connection 
with the sketches of their sons, Henry and George Smith. 

Joseph B. Smith was the fifth child in order of l)irth born to his parents, 
and was but a small boy when brought to Champaign county, Ohio, by his 
parents, w'ho emigrated in 1857 from Virginia to this state. He received 
his education in the district schools of Johnson township, and grew to man- 
hood here. . Following the example of his two brothers, he enlisted for 
service in the Lhiion army on October 21, 1863, when he joined Company 
C, Twelftli Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Cavalry, and served until the close 
of the war. He saw much hard service and was twice wounded, receiving 
a shot in the right limb, and also receiving severe blow over the head from 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY. OHIO. 



351 



a revolver. After the close of the war lie returned to Johnson tounshii), 
this county, after being mustered out on November 14. 1865. at Nashville, 
Tennessee, and engaged in farming, in which vocation he has continued since 
that time. He has an attractive little place of twenty-five acres near the 
village of Millerstown, where he is very comfortably located. 

Soon after his return from the army at the close of the Civil War. 
Joseph B. Smith was united in marriage to Eliza Jane Nicholas, and to 
this union five children were born, namely Gary, of Ouincy, Ohio: Laura, 
the wife of David Moody, of Urbana; Nevada, unmarried, the youngest 
daughter living, and Wilber. who married Hazel Applegaie. and George 
L., living at home with his father. The mother of these ciiildren died, Janu- 
ary 26, 1912. The family are earnest and devoted members of the Baptist 
church, in which they take an active and warm interest. Air. Smith is a 
Republican in politics, and while taking a good citizenship's interest m the 
civic affairs of his community, yet is not active in political affairs. He was 
a member of the Grand Army of the Republic, Post No. iii. St. Paris. 
Ohio. 



WILLIAM N. NEESE. 



William N. Neese, a farmer living on rural route number fotu", Urbana, 
Ohio, was born in Auglaize county, Ohio, Eebruary 9, J 858, a son of Josiah 
and Mary A. (Weaver) Neese. The father was born in Rockingham, Vir- 
ginia, July 21, 1829. He was a son of Jacob and Elizabeth (Bowman) 
Neese. 

Jacob Neese was married in Virginia and came with his family to Ohio. 
He found a location in the south part of Mad River township, and made 
that his home for a number of years. Then he sold that farm and bought 
a farm which William Deibert now owns, and there they spent the remainder 
of their days. He was the father of ten children : Josiah, Josephus. John. 
Johanna, Jorem B., Jerome, Jacob, Jeremiah, Jes.se, Sarah. Three of these 
are now living: Jorem, Jesse and Jeremiah. 

Josiah Neese, father of our subject was a carjjenter by trade. He mar- 
ried Mary A. \\^eaver, November 27, 1855. She was born near Terre Haute. 
Ohio, January 13. 1835. a daughter of ^^'illiam and Rebecca Weaver. She 
was reared on the farm and after marriage lived for a time in Mad Rixer 
township, then removed to Auglaize county. Ohio. The}- lixed there until 
1864, when thev returned to this county and settled in .\[ad River town- 



3^2 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

ship, where the}- spent the rest of their days. 'J'hey \\ere the parents of 
two children: \\ilham N., our suljject: James A., who is a farmer and agent 
for a fertiHzer company. 

WiUiam N. Neese was reared on a farm and received his education 
in the district schools, in which he qualified himself for teaching. He 
hegan teaching, Octoher 4, 1877, and continued in that husiness imtil April 
21, 1916, a period of more than thirty-nine }cars. He tauglit nineteen 
years in Mad River township, seventeen years in Urbana township, and 
three vears in Jackson township, all in Champaign county. With the many 
changes and innovations in methods of teaching during this period it goes 
without saying, that, in order for a teacher to keep abreast of the times 
and meet the requirements of the modern educational methods, it must he 
necessary to continually apply himself to a study of the new metliods. This 
Mr. Neese did, by attending the normal school at Ada. Ohio, in t88i and 
1883, and by study and attention to all other educational advantages. He 
has always been active in educational matters and ardently devoted to the 
cause. 

Mr. and Mother Neese are members of the Methodist Episco])al church, 
of Terre Haute, Ohio, and active w'orkers in the church. He is a member 
of the St. Paris Lodge, No. 246, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and 
a past grand in that order. He is also a member of Pharos Lodge No. 355, 
Free and Accepted Masons, and St. Paris Chapter No. 132, Royal Arch 
Masons; Urbana Council No. 59, R. and S. M., and Raper Commandery 
No. 19, Knights Templar, at Urbana, Ohio. He is a Republican in politics. 



DAVID R. KIMBALL 



David R. Kimball, of Woodstock, well-known and substantial farmer 
and banker, proprietor of beautiful "Maple Hill l'"arm,'" two miles or more 
south of Woodstock, in Rush township: former president of the Woodstock 
Bank and, since the organization of the Peoples Bank of Woodstock, presi- 
dent of that latter institution, former member of the Champaign county 
council and for years actively identified with the affairs of his home county. 
is a native son of this county and has lived here all of his life. He was 
born on a farm in Rush township, July 2, 1848, son of Truman M. and 
Mary Jane (Tullington) Kimball, the former a native of the state of Ver- 
mont and the latter, of this state. 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 353 

Truman M. Kimball was bom at Stowe, Vermont, April i, 1803, and 
was but a child when his parents, Ira Kimball and wife, came to Ohio and 
settled in this county, making their home on a farm in the neighborhood 
of Woodstock, in Rush township. There Truman M. Kimball grew to 
manhood and 1:)ecame a large landowner, substantial farmer and man of 
affairs. He was a Republican and for some years served as trustee of his 
home township, doing much to develop the general interests of the same 
and being helpful in many ways in advancing the common welfare in the 
eastern part of the county. In addition to his general farming, he was 
widely known as a stockman and did very well in his operations, for years 
being regarded as one of the most substantial citizens in that part of the 
county. His death occurred on December 19, 1894. 

Truman M. Kimball was twice married. His first wife, who was 
Mary Jane Tullington and who was born in Madison county, this state, 
June 18, 181 3, died on February 27, 1858. To that union twelve chil- 
dren were born, of whom the subject of this sketch was the eighth in 
order of birth, the others being as follow : Claretta A., born on November 
24, 1835, who married John Mcllroy and died on July 20, 1868; Harriet 
E., January 29, 1837, who married William Ellsworth and died in 191 5; 
Lucy R., October 13, 1838, who married Erastus Guy and is now 
deceased; Truman M., Jr., August 28, 1840, who died in his youth; Susan. 
February 11, 1842, who is now living at Irwin, in the neighboring county 
of Union, widow of James Mcllroy; Martha J., May 15, 1843, "<^w deceased, 
who married David Chatfield and after his death married Thomas McCarthy; 
Marcia M., August 11, 1845, "<^w living at Woodstock, widow of George 
Lincoln; Samuel P., September 6. 1850, now living near Salem, Oregon, 
where he has a large fruit orchard; Jefferson F., October 6, 1852, a retired 
farmer and banker, now living at Mechanicsburg, this county; Charles P., 
February 6. 1855, w'ho married Grace Cushman and is engaged in the hard- 
Avare business at Woodstock, and James G., February 13, 1858, who died on 
August ID, 1858. After the death of the mother of these children Mr. Kim- 
ball married Mary Jane Hunter, whose last days were spent in Kansas, and 
to that union two children \vere born, Rometta, who married Gail Howard 
and now lives at Colorado Springs, Colorado, and William C. who married 
Lucy Marsh and is now living at Woodstock, a retired farmer. 

Reared on the home farm in Rush township, David R. Kimball received 
liis early schooling in the schools of that township and supplemented the same 
by a course in Oberlin College. After his marriage he established his home 
(23a) 



354 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

on beautiful "Maple Hill Farm", two and one-half miles south of Woodstock 
and there became extensively engaged in general farming and stock raising, 
coming to be regarded as one of the most progressive and substantial farm- 
ers in the eastern part of the county. On that farm Mr. Kimball made his 
home until 1907, when he retired from the active labors of the farm and 
moved to Woodstock, where he built his present handsome residence and 
where he since has made his home. Even before leaving the farm Mr. Kim- 
ball had long been giving his active attention to the general business atYairs 
of the community and was the president of the old Woodstock Bank of Wood- 
stock. In 1906, the year before his removal to the village, he became out- 
of the organizers of the Peoples Bank of Woodstock and was elected presi- 
dent of the same, which position he since has occupied, and in that same year 
erected the substantial building in which the bank has since been housed. 
In other ways he has also done much for the growth and development of his 
home town and has long been regarded as one of the leading men of affairs 
of that pleasant and flourishing village. Mr. Kimball is a Republican and 
for six vears served as a member of the county council, during- that incum- 
bencv giving the affairs of the county his most earnest an.d thoughtful atten- 
tion. 

Mr. Kimi^all has been thrice married. On October 8, 1875, he was 
united in marriage to May Smith, of Woodstock, daughter of Courtland 
Smith, for years postmaster of that village, a shoemaker by vocation, whose 
last davs were spent at Milford, and to that union two children were born, 
Faimie Fern, who married Dr. John Hathaway, of Mechanicsburg, and has 
one child, a son, John, and Mabel Fawn, wife of Dr. W. li. Sharp, of \A^ood- 
stock, a biographical sketch of wdiom is jiresented elsewhere in this volume. 
The mother of these children died on Ma}' 4, 1888. and on May 10, 1889, Mr. 
Kimliall married Mary Hathaway, of Union county, who died in 1906, after 
which he married Fluldah Putnam, of Washington county, this state. Mr. 
and Mrs. Kimball have a very pleasant home at Woodstock and take an inter- 
ested part in the general social activities of their home town, helpful in pro- 
moting all proper causes there and throughout the county at large. Mrs. 
Kimball is a member o\ the Universalist church and is a teacher in the Sun- 
day school of the same. Mr. Kimball is a Knight Templar and a Royal Arch 
Masf)n and takes nmch interest in Masonic aft'airs. He was made a Mason 
in the local lodge at Mechanicsburg many years ago and is connected with 
the local chapter of the Royal Arch Masons at Urbana and with the com- 
mandery of Knights Templar in that city. 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 355 

THE MAST FAMILY. 

There are few families in Champaign county who have had a weightier 
influence upon the affairs of this county or who are more widely represented 
than the Mast family, the numerous progeny of the pioneer, John Mast, 
who settled here in 1830, now forming one of the most extensive connec- 
tfionfe'lin this part of the state. In his old home over in that sterling old 
Mennonite community in Berks county, Pennsylvania, John Mast had been 
a farmer and school teacher. There he married and six or seven years 
later, in 1830, moved with his family over into Ohio and settled in Cham- 
paign county, buying here a quarter of a section of good farm land at ten 
dollars an acre. He had little money to invest in his land and in 
the necessary live stock and farming implements, and soon found himself 
in a financial struggle, as the markets for his farm products gave no large 
returns. The means of transportation in those days also were so unsatis- 
factory as to prove a further discouraging feature of pioneer living, and 
he had to haul his wheat over the mud roads to Dayton, where he received 
but thirty-three cents a bushel for the same. But as the country became 
more thickly settled, the land began to increase in value and the farmer 
was given better prices for his products, the gradually improving" roads also 
affording better facilities for transportation. John Mast was not only a 
good farmer, but an excellent business man, and he soon began to clear 
off his debts and it was not long until he came to be recognized as one of 
the leading farmers in Champaign county, as well as one of the foremost 
factors in the work of developing the community in which he had settled. He 
took an active part in the affairs of both church and state and established a. 
family which has ever been noted for fidelity to the true principles of com- 
munity life hereabout. In 1865 John Mast retired from his farm of three 
himdred and twenty acres, which he divided among his children. 

The Mast family in America is descended from Bishop Jacob Mast, a 
leader in the Mennonite church, a Swiss by birth, who was born in 1738 
and who was early orphaned. While he was still in his boyhood he came 
to this country from Switzerland with his four sisters and a younger brother, 
John, the children being in the care of their benevolent uncle, Johannes Mast, 
and settled in Berks county, Pennsylvania, where the family is still influen- 
tially represented. It was on November 3, 1750, that the party landed from 
the ship, "Brotherhood," at the port of Philadelphia, young Jacob Mast 
being then twelve years of age. They joined the .\mish Mennonites in 



^^6 CIIAMI-AIGX COUNTY, OHIO. 

Berks county and there the lad grew to manhood, hnnly grounded in the 
simple faith of his father and of his daily associates. There he married 
Magdalene Holly and there he established his home, the warrant giving 
him title to his tract of one hundred and seventy acres of land in Carnar- 
von township, that county, bearing date of November 19. 1764. There he 
erected a comfortable log house, "close to a lusty spring which flows directly 
from a stratum of limeless sandstone," and there he spent the remainder 
of his life, diligent in all good works and a faithful servant in the Lord 
to the people whom he had been elected in 1788 to serve as bishop, ever 
"sound, hopeful and trustful in religious convictions, which had fitted him 
admirably for his vocation." Bishop Mast died in 1808 and "his neigh- 
bors carried his body out of his old home and buried it in a quiet spot on 
the broad acres he had tended and loved." His grave is marked with a 
carved sandstone bearing inscription near the northwest corner of the wall 
of what is known as Pine Grove cemetery. His widow survived him until 
October 26, 1820, she then being eighty years of age, and is buried at his 
side. 

Bishop Jacob Mast and his wife, Magdalene Holly, were the parents 
of twelve children, of whom it is related that they "had strong constitu- 
tions and in general had good health and led temperate, moral, honest Chris- 
tian lives and imparted these same good qualities to their children and grand- 
children, for whic-h give God the glory. During their childhood days they 
were commanded before retiring at night to all repeat our Lord's Prayer in 
concert." These children were as follow : John Mast, who married Mary 
Ivurtz ; Magdelena, who married Christian Zook ; Barbara, who married John 
Hochstetler and after his death, John Zuck. Jacob Mast, who married 
Barbara Kenage and was the father of John Mast, the Champaign count} 
pioneer; David Mast, who married Mary Kurtz; Mary, who married John 
Coffman ; Nancy, who married Adam Kurtz ; Fannie, who married John 
Zuck ; Elizabeth, who married Christian LI oily ; Christian Mast, who mar- 
ried Susan Kurtz ; Esther, who married Christian Zuck and after his death. 
Peter Holly, and Daniel Mast, who married Charity Zook and after her 
death, Catherine Kurtz and after the death of the latter, Mary Morgan. 

Jacob Mast, second son and fourth child of the Bishop whose name 
he bore, was born in 1768 and died in 1852 with infirmities incident to old 
age, at his home, known as the Petcrshime farm, north of the old Conestoga 
Tavern, in Carnarvon township, Berks county, Pennsylvania. His early 
training was along agricultural lines and he devoted himself all his life to 
the cultivation of farms in the Conestoga valley, "his sterling integrity, good 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 357 

sense and unostentatious sincerity of purpose winning for himself a high 
place in the esteem of the people," and he was frequently called upon to fill 
positions of honor and trust. On April 22, 1792, Jacob Mast was united in 
marriage to Barbara Kenage, daughter of John and Dorothy (Nafzger) 
Kenage, the latter of whom was a daughter of Matthias Nafzger, a native 
of Switzerland, and to that union eight children were born, of whom John 
Mast, the Champaign county pioneer, was the first-born, the others being 
as follow : Joseph, who married Frances Plank and after her death married 
I'hoebe Ann Plank; Elizabeth, who married John Zuck; Mary, who died 
unmarried, at the age of twenty-seven years; Jacob K., who married Fanny 
Gehman ; Isaac, who married Ann Gehman, and Leah, who married the Rev. 
George Hunter. 

John Mast, grandson of the Bishop and eldest son of Jacob Mast, was 
born in Carnarvon township, Berks county, Pennsylvania, October 29, 1793, 
and became a farmer and school teacher in that county. There on December 
4, 1823, he married Elizabeth Trego, who was born in Chester county, that 
same state, January 26, 1804, daughter of Eli and Mary Trego, and con- 
tinued to make his home in Berks county until 1830, when, as noted above, 
he came to Ohio and became a permanent resident of Champaign county, 
his death occurring at his home in Salem township on March 7, 1881. For 
forty-three years he was a member of the board of education, was a class 
leader in the Methodist Episcopal church for fi[fty-four years and for forty- 
eight years a steward and a member of the board of trustees of the same. 
His wife had preceded him to the grav€ something more than a year, her 
death having occurred on January 25, 1880. They were the parents of 
eight children, namely: Phineas Price, Miriam B., Isaac Wesley, Anna 
Keemer, Elizabeth F., Joseph Kenage, John Emory and Ephraim Milton. 

P. P. IMast, former mayor of Springfield, this state, and for years one of 
tlie most prominent manufacturers and business men in that city, died at 
liis home there on November 20, 1898. He was the owner of much valuable 
land in Springfield, Ijesides more than three thousand acres of land in Trego 
county, Kansas, an equal acreage in the peach belt of Georgia and the great 
J3andarita ranch in Mariposa county, California. He married Anna Maria 
Kirkpatrick, of Galesburg. Illinois, who died in April, 1895. without issue. 

Miriam B. Mast died on March 20, 1885, unmarried. 

Isaac \\''esley Mast, an honored veteran of the Civil War, died at his 
home in Salem township, on March 14, 1882. He was twice married, by 
his first wife, Laura A. Smith, having had one child, a daughter, Sarah 
Elizabeth, who married George H. Frey, of Springfield, and has three sons. 



358 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

Harrison, John and Philip. By his second wife, Anne Keating- Smith, he 
had three children, Anna Maggie, deceased; Elizabeth, who married Francis 
Butler Loomis, of Marietta, this state, former United States -^minister to 
Venezuela, and later to Portugal, now living at Springfield, and had three 
children, of whom but one, Francis Butler, now survives, and Florence, who 
married Charles Kilgore Rogers, of Springfield and died in that city in 
1901, leaving one child, a son, Richard Harrison, who died in the year fol- 
lowing. 

Anna Keemer Mast married Alexander J. Stewart, a veteran of the 
Civil War, and both she and her husband spent their last days at Erie, 
Pennsylvania. They were the parents of five children, none of whom are 
now living". 

Elizabeth F. Mast, n(,)W living at Los Angeles, California, is the widow 
of John R. Lemen, whom she married in this county and who died in South 
Bend, Indiana, in 1892, leaving two children, Eva Florence, who married 
Ezra E. Clark, a teacher of art at DePauw University, and has one child, 
a son, Donald, and Edward Grant, now a manufacturer and traveling sales- 
man at Chicago, who married Daisy B. Morse. 

Joseph Kenage Mast, who is still living in this county, was a farmer 
ir( Salem township until his retirement from the farm in 1910, since which 
time he has been making his home among his children, he now being in 
the eighty-fourth year of his age. He has been twice married, his first 
wife, Catherine Eichholtz, of Urbana, dying in August, 1883, after which 
be married Josephine Anderson, of Minneapolis, Minnesota. My that first 
marriage seven children were born, namely: John Weslev, who was killed 
when nine years of age by a fall from a horse ; Charles Henry, a farmer 
of this county, who married Mary L. Swisher and has three children, Paul 
Harvey, Avise Tabitha and Adrah Mary Louise; Joseph h'rank, a farmer 
of Salem township and a biographical sketch of whom appears elsewhere 
in this volume, who married Malinda Instine, of Urbana, and has two 
sons, Burleigh Frank and Harry Wright ; Emma, who married John Milton 
Strasser, of LIrbana, now living at LaGrange, Illinois and has five children, 
Roland John, Marie Jeanette, Ethelyn Beatrice, Florence Louise and Joseph 
Mast; Elizabeth, w'ho married Clark A. Mclnturfif, of Urbana, now ]i\ing in 
New York City, and has one child, a son, Joseph Mast ; Cicero Phineas, a 
soldier during the Spanish-American War, now a grocer at Dayton, who 
married Caroline Schroeder, of that city, and Ivy, wife of the Re\-. J. Ernest 
Balmer, a clergyman of the Methodist Episcopal church, stationed at Wil- 
liamstown, Michigan. 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 359 

John Emory Mast, a biographical sketch of whom appears elsewhere 
in this A'olume, is still living in this county, one of the best-known and most 
substantial farmers of Salem township. He married Minerva J. Stone- 
l)raker, of King's Creek, and has eleven children. 

Ephraim Milton Mast, an honored veteran of the Civil War, a member 
(if Company M, First Ohio Light Artillery, died at the home of his son, 
John C. Mast, in Urbana, on April 7, 1910, at the age of sixty-eight years. 
He left this county in the fall of 1869 and had afterward lived in Illinois, 
Missouri and Kansas, and was a well-to-farmer. He married in 1866 Sallie 
J. Brown, of Urbana, and was the father of four sons, namely : Edgar Leroy, 
who married Sarah Angeline Runkle, of St. Paris, this county, and has 
one child, a daughter, Cora Emma ; John Clinton, who married Sarah 
Augusta Klickow, of Urbana: Charles Clinton, now living in Florida, who 
married Nellie Blanche Neer, of Westville, this county, and Alfred Phineas, 
who married Arvesta Foltz, of this county, and has two sons, Roland and 
Homer. 



SAMUEL B. WHITMORE. 

Samuel B. Whitmore, a farmer living on route nine, Urbana, and route 
five, St. Paris, Ohio, two miles west of Westville. Ohio, was born on the 
farm that was entered by his great-grandfather, John Whitmore. He was 
l)orn in Virginia and came to Ohio in an early day and entered three hun- 
dred and twenty acres of land all heavily timbered. He cleared off a little 
space on which he built a cabin and then began the work of cutting off the 
timber and getting enough grotmd in sliape for cultivation and raise a crop. 
This meant an immense amount of labor but it was an experience common 
to all pioneer settlers. In time he had considerable ground under cultiva- 
tion and had a comfortable house in which to live. He built a barn on 
the farm and this barn is still standing. He had three sons and one daugh- 
ter, Jacob, David. John and Mary. Jacob married Catherine Zimmerman, 
and their children were. Barbara. Sarah, Elizabeth and Simon. Simon 
married Elizabeth Wiant and they had five children : Sylvia, wife of Ross 
Wiant; Minnie, w^ife of D. S. Seibert; Samuel B., Dottie. wife of William 
(iumpert; Harry D., a farmer in this township. 

Simon Whitmore settled down on the farm on which he was born. 
He received his education in the common schools and worked on the farm. 
He became the owner of one hundred and ninety-seven acres of land which 



360 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

he cultivated and improved. He was an active member of the Baptist church 
at Myrtle Tree. 

Samuel B. Whitmore was reared on the old home farm and recei\cd 
his education in the common schools of the neighborhood. On December 28, 
1898, he was married to Ora E. Neff, who was born in Alad River town- 
ship and educated in the schools of the vicinit}- of her home. The children 
born to this union were: S. Joe, born October 13. 1899. graduate of the 
common schools; Mary C, born in 1910; Lulu died at the age of four years, 
and one child died in infancy. 

Mr. Whitmore is a charter member of Magrew Lodge No. 433, Knights 
of Pythias. In politics he affliates with the Democratic party. 



GOV. JOSEPH VANCE. 

Ever since the period of the incumbency of Gov. Joseph Vance in the 
chair of the chief executive of the great state of Ohio in the latter thirties 
the people of Champaign county have been justly proud of the fact that 
this county has furnished to the state a governor, and it is but proper and 
fitting that in a collection of biographies relating to the persons who have 
done well their part in the work of developing this county, mention here 
should be made of this distinguished figure in the civic life of the state and 
prominent factor in the pioneer life of Champaign county. 

The Hon. Joseph Vance, a captain of militia during the time of the \\''ar 
of 1812, for years a legislator from this district, governor of the state dur- 
ing the gubernatorial period of 1837-39, member of Congress from this dis- 
trict for eight terms and a member of the state constitutional convention of 
1851, was a native of Pennsylvania and a later resident of Kentucky, but 
had been a resident of Ohio since territorial days, having come here in 1801, 
and of Champaign county since the year in which the county was organized 
as a civic unit, he thus having been one of the real pioneers of this county. 
He was born in the old Indian town of "Catfish", now the city of Washing- 
ton, Pennsylvania, March 21, 1786, a son of Joseph C and Sarah (Wilson) 
Vance, natives of Virginia, the former of whom was a soldier of the patriot 
army during the war for independence, and who later moved to Ketitiicky. 
coming thence up into the then territory of Ohio and, after a .sometime resi- 
dence in the region now comprised in Greene county, came up into this sec- 




JOSEPH VANCE 
Tbii'teentb Goveruor of Ohio. 



ciia;mpAign couxty. ohio. 361 

tioii and became one of the organizers of Champaign county, spending here 
the rest of his Hfe, one of the most iniluentfal pioneers of this county. 

Joseph C. V'ance was the youngest of a large family of children born to 
his parents in Virginia and in the Old Dominion grew to maturity. His 
father, a native of Ireland, of Scottish ancestry, had come to the colonies 
with a considerable number of Presbyterians, emigrating from Ireland with 
a view to setting up homes in the new land across the water, and by the time 
of the breaking out of the Revolutionary War had his home well established 
in Virginia. Joseph C. Vance was old enough to render service in that 
struggle for independence and served throughout the war as a member of 
Saul Vail's company with the famous rifle regiment of General Morgan. In 
1 78 1, the year the war closed, he married Sarah Wilson, who was born in 
Loudoun county, Virginia, and straightway he and his bride started to what 
then was practically an unknown \\''est, with a view to setting up their home 
amid pioneer conditions, the great western county of Virginia, Kentucky, 
being their objective point. When they reached a point in the immediate 
vicinity of the old Indian village of "Catfish", now the city of Washington, 
Pennsylvania, they made a temporary home and there remained for several 
years, during which time, in the spring of 1786, in that little village, was 
born their son, Joseph, who later was to become governor of the state of 
Ohio. Two years later, in 1788. Joseph C. Vance loaded his little family 
and his few belongings on a raft and floated down die river to a point now 
known as \'anceburg. where he built a house and established bis home in the 
wilderness, becoming the founder of the Vanceburg settlement. A few years 
later he concluded to penetrate farther into the wilderness and again started 
down the river, his family and goods on a flat-boat, and stopped on the Ken- 
tuckv side, a few miles above Mays Lick, where he established his home and 
where he developed a good farm. There, among the Indians and amid con- 
ditions typical of a frontier settlement, the future governor of Ohio grew to 
manhood, becoming a sturdy and vigorous man, inured to all the hardships 
and privations common to the pioneers of that place and period. With a 
capacity for work and a willingness to perform the hardest kind of manual 
labor, he developed his body by toil in the fields and his mind by close applica- 
t'um to the few books that he could command as he sat about the fireside dur- 
ing the long winter evening.s. In 1801 Joseph C. Vance again decided to 
move on, his true pioneering instinct leading him again to face the wilder- 
ness, and he came with his family across the river and up into the then terri- 
tory of Ohio, settling in the region now comprised within the confines of 
Greene county. Four \ears later he "pulled up stakes" there and came up 



362 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

into tilis section, thus being here when Champaign countv was organized in 
that same year. The Vance family settled at Urbana, which had just a short 
time before been laid out, and when it came time to establish a county seat 
the father of the future governor was one of the men instrumental in having 
the local seat of government located at that place. Joseph C. Vance was a 
man of much force of character, possessing a vigorous personality, and his 
])ioneer neighbors turned to him instinctively as a director of afifairs, he thus 
becoming the first director of the county. He also was elected first clerk 
of the county and first recorder, and continued active in local civic aiTairs 
until his death, on August 5. 1809. 

Joseph \ance was eighteen or nineteen years of age when he came to 
this county with his father and he was one of the first young men in the new 
county to apply for a license to marry, the faded old record of marriage 
licenses in the court house showing that on December 17, 1807, he was united 
in marriage to Mary Lemon, the record disclosing that the ceremony was 
performed by the Rev. John Thomas. Before the War of 18 12 began young 
Vance had been elected captain of a company of local militia and his com- 
pany was called out on several occasions prior to the actual opening of 
hostilities in order to quell incipient Indian uprising. Some time prior to 
1 812 he and his company erected a blockhouse up in Logan county, near the 
Ouincy, which was long known as Vance's blockhouse. In the fall of 18 12 
Joseph Vance, who meanwhile had been growing greatly in fa\ or among his 
pioneer neighbors, was elected to represent this district in the state Legis- 
lature and served as a member of the lower house during the eleventh and 
twelfth sessions (1812-13). In the fall of 1815 he again was elected to the 
Legislature and served through the fourteenth and fifteenth sessions, his last 
service in the lower house being rendered during the eighteenth session, 
1 819. In the succeeding election, 1820. he was elected to represent this dis- 
trict in the Congress and by successive re-elections served in that body from 
March 4, 1821, to March 4, 1833. six terms, during which period of service 
he be«ame one of the best-known members of the Ohio delegation in the 
national House of Representatives and a man of much influence in that legis- 
lative body. Jn the fall of 1836 he was elected governor of Ohio and thus 
served as chief executive of the state during the years 1837-39. In the fall 
<.)f the year following his retirement from the governor's of^fice, Governor 
Vance was elected to represent this district in the state Senate and served in 
that body during the thirty-eighth and thirty-ninth sessions (1840-41). He 
then was re-elected a member of Congress from this district and returned to 
Washington, serving two terms ( 1843-47), at the end of which time he retired 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. ^6^ 

to private life, with the avowed intention never again to allow his name to be 
proposed for public otifice. However, when the constitutional convention of 
[851 was called. Governor Vance was found as one of the leading members 
of that historic body and it was while in the active performance of his duties 
as a member of that convention that he was suddenly stricken with paralysis 
and was compelled to relincpiish his duties. He never recovered from the 
stroke and died on his farm, two and one-half miles north of Urbana, less 
than a year later, August 24. 1S52. he then being in the sixtv-seventh year of 
his age. 



CLINTON A. NEESE. 



Clinton A. Neese, engineer of the Thackery Creamery Company, was 
born in Mad River township, July 26, 1875. He is a son of Reuben B. 
and Laura (Weaver) Neese. Reuben B. Neese was born in Mad River 
township, a son of Elias and Sarah (Foltz) Neese. 

The Neese family were natives of Virginia and came to Ohio at an 
early day. They were among the early settlers of Champaign county. Laura 
Weaver Neese, mother of our subject, was born in Mad River township, the 
daughter of W. E. and Elizabeth (Leonard) Weaver. The Leonards were 
also of old Virginia stock. The father and mother of our subject were 
both reared in Mad River township. After marriage they settled near 
Terre Haute and he was engaged in work at the carpenter trade for about 
forty years. They are now living in the village of Thackery. They had 
six children, all of whom are still living. They are : Clarence, Tliackery. 
Ohio; Clinton A.\ Elliott S., Seattle, Washington; Warden O., Hobart. 
Washington; Thaddeus K., Seattle, Washington; Mabel, wife of William 
Hecker, Mad River township. 

Clinton A. Neese was reared to manhood in Mad River township. At 
the age of sixteen years he Avent to Arkansas, where he was employed for 
two years working on the farm for Jolui W. Wea\er. Then he went to 
Birmingham, Alabama, where he remained for one year; then to Dallas, 
Texas, for four months. He then went to Poplar Bluff, Missouri, where 
he was employed for sometime as hoisting engineer, and in the machine shops 
at that place. In 1900 he returned to Champaign county, Ohio, where he 
was employed by McMorran Brothers working in grain elevators for fifteen 
years. Then he was with the Furnas Ice Cream Company, at St. Paris, 
Ohio, for one year. In 1916 he came to this ])lace and was made engineer 



364 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

of the Thackery Creamery Company, and has been thus employed since 
that time. 

On September 4, 1903. CHnton A. Neese and Lottie B. Faulkner were 
united in marriage. She is a daughter of George W. Faulkner. Further men- 
tion is made of the Faulkner family in another place in this work. Mr. Neese 
is a member of the Junior Order of Mechanics, of Terre Haute, and is a 
Republican in politics. Mrs. Neese is a member of the Lutheran church at 
Thackerv. 



WILLL\M T. CARSON. 



VVliliam J. Carson, an enterprising farmer and stock raiser of Salem 
township, Champaign county, was born in Ross county, Ohio, April 9, 185 1. 
Me is a son of William and Martha (Bradford) Carson, both natives of Ohio, 
he of Ross county and she of Montgomery county. The father grew to 
manhood and was married in his native county, and there he owned a farm, 
which he operated until 1854, when he came to Champaign county, locating 
in Urbana township, where he bought one hundred and sixty acres, for 
which he paid thirty dollars per acre. His means were very limited when 
he started out in life, but by perseverance and good management he pros- 
pered and at one time owned four hundred and twenty-five acres of valuable 
land here, carrying on farming on an extensive scale. He was also one of 
the leading stock raisers of his locality. He was a leader in public and 
church affairs in Urbana township, being an active worker in the Presby- 
terian church. He continued to operate his farm here until 1891, when he 
retired from active life and moved to Urbana, where his death occurred in 
1903, at the advanced age of ninety years. He was born in 1813. His 
wife was born in 1825 and died in 1896. To these parents four children 
were born, namely: William J., of this review; Robert, deceased; James, 
also deceased, and Anna, who is living in Urbana. 

William J. Carson grew to manhood on the home farm, and he recei\'ed 
his education in the rural schools of Urbana township. He remained on the 
home place, farming with his father until 1881, when he was married and 
moved to Salem township, locating on one of his father's farms, the same 
place he now lives on, which i)lace reverted to him upon the death of his 
father. He has kept the land well improved and well cultivated. He has 
an attractive home and numerous convenient outbuildings. His holdings 
embrace three hundred and fortv-five acres and is one of the most success- 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 36^ 

fill farmers and stock raisers in his townsliip. He feeds large numbers of 
cattle and hogs annually for the market. 

Mr. Carson was married in February. 1881, to Ida fence, a daughter 
of Jacob and Sarah (Dugan) Pence, natives of Urbana township, Champaign 
county, and lived and died there. Mrs Carson v,as born in Urbana town- 
sliip on her father's farm. To Mr. and ^Irs. Carson eight children have 
been born, namely: Nellie lives in Columbus, Ohio; Maliel, who married 
Fred Pearce, has one child, Betsy; Alice married Earl Beatley, lives in 
Columbus, Ohio, and has one child, Charles; Grace is the wife of Golden 
Dagger; they live in Columbus, Ohio, connected with the Ohio State Uni- 
versity agricultural extension department ; Jeanette is the wife of Ray Wil- 
bur Vorhis; Beatrice lives in Philadelphia. Penn.sylvania ; John is single and 
lives on the farm with his parents; Marcella is at home, attending high 
school. These children were all given excellent educational advantages and 
are all graduates of the local high school. 

Politically, Mr. Carson is a Republican. He served as a member of 
the school board in his district for ten years. He belongs to the Grange in 
Salem township, and the United Presbyterian church at Bellefontaine, Ohio. 
His wife and children lielong to the Baptist church at Kingston. 



SAMUEL J. C. BATES. 



Another of the successful tillers of the soil in Salem township, who 
has been content to spend his life in Champaign county, is Samuel J. C. 
Bates, who was born on the old Captain Thomas farm here. September 
13, 1862. He is a son of William W. and Selinda (Kenton) Bates. The 
father was born in Montgomery county, Ohio, and when a young man he 
came with his mother to Champaign county, where he subsequently married 
and settled on a farm in Concord township, where he lived a few years. In 
1857 he settled in Salem township on the James Kenton farm where his 
son, the subject of this sketch, now lives, Mr. Kenton ha^•ing been the lat- 
ter's grandfather. James Kenton built the brick house on this place in 1840, 
burning all the brick for the same himself. He also built the barn in 1847, 
for which he got all the timber off his own farm. William W. Bates and 
w^ife spent their lives on the farm, his death occurring in 1871 at the age 
of fifty-two, his widow surviving until March 18. 1897, dying at the age 
of seventv. In earlv life William W. Bates was a miller and operated the 



366 ClIAMPAIGX COUNTY. OHIO. 

Vance mill tor some time. He was lirst a Whig and later a Republican. 
His wife was a member of the Baptist church at Kings Creek. They were 
well known and highly respected in their community. Eight children were 
born to them named as follows: Mary, who died in 1868, married M. V. 
Patten and they located in Montgomery county, Ohio ; Duncan died when 
young in years; Janie also died in early life; James K. died in 1887; Benja- 
min died in 1888; Samuel J. C, of this sketch; Gustaf lives in Spring Hill, 
Ohio; Lucy is single and makes her home with the subject of this review. 

Samuel J. C. Bates grew up on the home farm, where he assisted with 
the general work when a boy, and he received his education in the district 
schools. He has always remained on the home farm, which he has kept 
well improved and under a high state of cultivation, rotating his crops and 
carrying on diversified farming in such a manner that the soil has retained 
its original fertility. He has never married, neither has his sister, Lucy, 
w'ho has also remained at the old home and keeps house for him. They are 
both members of the Baptist church at Urbana, and politically, he is a Repub- 
lican, but he lias never been active in public affairs nor aspired to political 
office. 



FRANK HOWELL BRINE V. 

One of the enterprising farmers of Rush township, Champaign count)-, 
is Frank Howell Briney, who was born near Yellow Springs, Clark county. 
Ohio, in September. 185 1. He is a son of Mark DeMoss Briney, a native 
of Warren county, Ohio. His grandfather was pilot on the Ohio river. 
Mark D. Briney grew up in his native county and married Amanda E. Eber- 
sole, who was born in Springfield, Ohio. Her people came to America from 
Holland. The Ebersole family located in Clark county. Ohio, and there 
the parents of Mrs. Mark D. Briney spent the rest of their lives, the father 
dying at the age of sixty-five and the mother at the age of seventy years. 
Mr. Briney was a preacher in the Christian church for many years in Cham- 
paign and Clark counties. He was also a school teacher and farmer. He 
was first a Whig, later a Republican. Mr. Briney moved to Champaign 
county in 1854. 

To Mark D. Briney and wife the following children were born: John 
K., who w'as a soldier in the Civil War, was killed at Port Republic in 1862. 
while a private in Company A, Sixty-sixth Ohio Volunteer Infantry ; Emil}- 
married Tohn E. Emmons, and thev both died in Pennsylvania: Jennie is 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 36/ 

the widow of Charles Emmons and she resides in Cleveland, Ohio; Horace 
died when young ; Mary is single and lives at Kirkwood, Missouri ; Frank 
H., of this sketch; Sallie is single and lives in Cleveland; Rose, deceased, 
was the wife of Leroy M. Reed ; Florence died in early life : Charles died 
single, and Mark also died single. 

Frank H. Briney grew up on the farm and he attended the Black school 
in Rush township. He lived at home until his marriage, September 7, 1880, 
to Clara Belle Smith, who was born in Clinton, Dewitt county, Iowa. She is 
a daughter of Rozalvo and Betsy (Cranston) Smith, both natives of Rush 
township. Champaign county, Ohio. Rozalvo Smith was a son of Dexter 
Smith and wife, natives of Vermont, from which state they came to Cham- 
paign county, in pioneer days, locating at Woodstock on a farm, where they 
spent the rest of their lives. Mrs. Clara Belle Briney was their only child. 
Rozalvo Smith was a soldier in the Civil War, belonging to the Second Ohio 
Volunteer Infantry. Mr. Smith married a second time, his second wife 
being Elizabeth Hewett, and four children were born to their union, namely : 
Elmer M., who lives in Chicago; Ulla Dell, of Rockport, Illinois, and Nora 
and Mattie, deceased. 

Five children have been born to Frank H. Briney and wife, namely: 
Horace B., died in infancy; H. Clifford received a good education in the 
Woodstock schools and is a graduate of Ohio State University, and he i.'^ 
now in New York City \\ith the George Battin .\dvertising Company; he 
married Catherine Stone; Mabel C. who is at home, was educated at Wood- 
stock and the University of Urbana. and a graduate of ]\Iiami University, 
and she is now principal of the Woodstock schools; F. DeWitt, who was 
educated in the home schools, also the high school at Pendleton, Oregon, 
now lives in that town ; Leroy, who is now assisting his father on the home 
farm, was educated in the local schools, the schools of Coltimlnis. Oberlin 
College, and the College of New York City. 

Frank H. Briney has always lived on the old home place, which he has 
kept well improved and well cultivated. He has been successful as a general 
farmer and stock raiser. He keeps Jersey cattle and does a dairy business: 
also handles Percheron horses and Duroc-Jersey hogs. Politically, he is a 
Republican, and he and his wife are members of the Christian church at 
Woodstock, Ohio, and they are active in church work. Both were superin- 
tendents of the Sunday school. He was county organizer for Sunday schools 
for five years. His wife has driven over four thousand miles in her Sunday 
school work. One or the other of them has been vice-president of the County 
and president of the township Sunday School Associations for over twenty- 



368 CHAMPAlGiY COUNTY, OHIO. 

live years. He has been clerk and deacon in the church, also held other 
offices in the same. Mrs. Briney is descended from one of the oldest families 
of the Buckeye state. Her great-grandfather, John Cranston, a native of 
Rhode Inland, who married a Miss Edwards, came to Ohio in i<So8 and 
settled in Union county, where they spent the rest of their lives. Their 
children were : Phoebe, Stephen, John B., Ephraim, Christopher and Edward. 
John B. Cranston, Mrs. Briney's maternal grandfather, married Betsy 
Lathrop, of Connecticut, and they came to Champaign county, in pioneer 
times, locating in Rush township, where he hired out, first receiving thirty- 
seven and one-half cents per day. He devoted the rest of his life to farming 
I'ere. His family consisted of the following children: Mary Ann, who 
married Joseph Johnson; Peleg, John, Dollie, Betsy, and Aim B. The last 
named is the only one living at this writing, 1917; she makes her home on 
the old homestead, where she has resided for seventv-nine vears. 



CHARLES H. ESPY. 



Charles H. Espy, progressive farmer, engaged in stock raising for 
tliirty years, and holder of various public offices of trust, living on route 2, 
Degraff, Champaign county, was born on the old Espy farm near Spring- 
hill, Ohio, on March 18, 1861. a son of David H. and Rebecca (Kinsinger) 
Espy. 

David H. Espy, at the outbreak of the Civil War, joined the Union 
forces by enlisting in Company G. Sixty-sixth Volunteer Infantry. He 
saw considerable service and was in many engagements during that long 
struggle between the states. He received severe wounds at the battle of 
Cedar Mountain and was removed to the Alexander hospital, in which insti- 
tution he died some time later. His widow married William Ritter, who 
is now deceased, and she is living at Degraff, Ohio. David H. Espy and 
wife were the parents of one child, Charles H. Espy, the subject of this 
sketch. 

Charles H. Espy was reared on the old home farm in Adams township 
and was educated in the public schools of the district. At the age of thir- 
teen, and following his mother's second marriage, he started to work on 
farms by the month at ten dollars per month and continued thus engaged 
for about five years. He then commenced at team work, at which he 
remained for another five years. During those ten years he was saving all 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 369 

available money with the view to acquiring land of his own. He subse- 
quently bought forty acres of land, which he immediately put into cultiva- 
tion, setting the tract out to general farming. As he prospered in his farm- 
ing operations he added to his holdings, finally becoming the owner of two 
hundred and twenty-eight acres of prime land. In addition to his farming 
activities, he is also extensively engaged in the breeding and shipping of 
live stock, with which branch of agricultural life he has been identified for 
thirty years, and in both phases of work he has met with marked success. 
He is also the owner of two nice residence properties in Bellefontaine, this 
state. 

On December 30, 1883, Charles H. Espy was united in marriage to 
Mary Wilson, who was born in Adams township in 1862, a daughter of 
William A. Wilson and wife. She was reared on her father's fann and 
educated in the common schools of her home district. To the union of Mr. 
and Mrs. Espy three children have been born as follow : Ethel, who was 
graduated from the Rosewood high school and is now the wife of J. W. 
Burkhold, of Rosewood, this county; Bonnie, also a graduate of the Rose- 
wood high school, "who later married F. E. Bailor, and Raymond, who was 
graduated from the high school and is now a student in the State Univer- 
sity. These children are members of the United Brethren church at Rose- 
wood. 

Mr. Espy has long been a supporter of the Republican party and has 
ever taken a keen interest in public affairs. He served for a period of six 
years as county commissioner and for five years was treasurer of Adams 
township. Later, he became a member of the district school board, serving 
in that capacity for eight years, and during his incumbency the Rosewood 
schools were built. His services in all of these responsible positions met 
with general approval and his work on behalf of the schools has always 
l^een recognized as above the average, his efforts on behalf of educational 
matters being at once genuine and practical. His interest in fraternal organ- 
izations is not less marked. He is a member of Rosewood Lodge No. 242, 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of which order he is a past noble grand. 
He is also a member of the encampment, of which he is past chief patriarch. 
He holds membership in the Knights of Pythias at Degraff, Ohio, and in 
ihe affairs of the.se several ho<lies he takes a prominent part. Mr. and Mrs. 
I^spy display a warm interest in all community affairs and are ever ready 
to assist in all movements having for their object the welfare of the town- 
ship and county. 
(24a) 



370 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

JOHN EMORY MAST. 

John Emory Mast, one of the best-known and most snbstantial pioneer 
farmers of Champaign connty and the proprietor of a fine farm in Salem 
township, is a native son of this county and has hved here all his life. He 
was born in that township on September 12, 1838, son of John and Elizal>eth 
(Trego) Mast, natives of Pennsylvania, the former born in Berks county and 
the latter in Chester county, who became residents of Champaign county in 
1830 and here reared their family and spent the remainder of their lives, 
being long accounted among the most influential and useful residents of tlie 
community which they had helped to develop from its wilderness state. 
Elsewhere in this volume, under the 1i€ad of "The' Mast Family", there is 
set out at some length something of the genealogy and the history of that 
well-known family in this county and the attention of the reader is respect- 
fully called to that interesting narrative for additional information in con- 
nection with the present sketch. The pioneer John Mast and wife were the 
parents of eight children, five sons and three daughters, of whom further 
mention is made in the narrative above referred to, and of these cliildren 
the subject of this sketch was the seventh in order of birth. 

Reared on the pioneer home farm in Salem township, John E. Mast 
has lived there all his life, his present fine farm including a portion of the 
old home farm which his father divided among his children when he retired 
from the active labors of the farm many years ago. On April 13, 1869. 
at Mutual, this county, he was united in marriage to Minerva J. Stonebraker, 
who was born in this county, a daughter of ArnoM S. and Sophia (Rems- 
burg) Stonebraker, and to this union eleven children have been born, Ellis 
Heber, Marie May, Lulu Grace, Willie E., John Arnold, Clayton, Clarence 
Simpson, Jennie Irene, Cleveland H., Evelyn Sophia and Earl Talmage. 
Mr. and Mrs. Mast are earnest members of the Methodist Episcopal churcli 
at Kings Creek and their children were reared in the faith of that church. 

Ellis Heber Mast, born on May 24, 187 1, is now living at Cleveland. 
where he is engaged as a conductor on an electric railroad Marie May 
Mast, born on February 10, 1873, ^^^^s married at Urbana on Januar\- 6 
1901-, to William C. Brucker, who was born at Oketo, Kansas, July 12, 
1 87 1, son of Fred and Emma (Zimmerman) Brucker, the former a nati\e 
of France and the latter of Prussia. After their marriage William C. I'ruckcr 
and wife lived in Gage county, Nebraska, for five years, at the end of which 
time, in 1906, they moved to the farm on which they are now living in 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 371 

Jewell county, Kansas. Luhi Grace Mast, born on January 22, 1875, was 
married on July 29, 1897, to David L. Thomas, who was born in Canada 
on September 30, 1870, son of David J. Thomas, and who is now living at 
Fernhill, Ontario. To them six children have been born, namely : Mast 
Leroy, born on April 29, 1898; Glenn Abner, September 15, 1899, who died 
on April 25, 1900; Blanche Leona. April 16, 1901 ; Evelyn May, May 20, 
1903 ; Velma Feme, July lo, 1905, and Earl Theodore, June 10, 1907. 
Willie E. Mast, born on September 8, 1876, died on September 27, follow- 
ing. John Arnold Mast, born on November 25, 1877, is now living near 
Ozone, Idaho, on a four-hundred-acre farm. Clayton Mast, born on Decem- 
ber 15, 1879, died on April; 8, i88o.' Clarence : Simpson Mast, born on 
December 15, 1879, is now living at Abington, Illinois, where he is engaged 
as teacher of science in the Abington College. On August 22, 1906, at 
Delaware, this state, he was united in marriage to Clara Glenn Buck, who wa-^ 
born on January 5, 1880, a daughter of the Hon. Henris Edmund and 
Jennie (Glenn) Buck, of Delaware. Jennie Irene Mast married Clifford 
Johnson (deceased) who was born on June 29, 1882; she lives at Coffey- 
ville, Kansas; Cleveland H. Mast, born on December 13, 1884, died on 
December 14, 1886. Evelyn Sophia Mast, born on February 10, 1887, died 
on December 18, 1891. Earl Talmage Mast, born on December 29, 1890, 
is now living at Cleveland. 



JAMES W. BLACK. 

James W. Black, farmer and banker, of Salem township, proprietor of 
ihe old Black homestead which was entered there by his grandfather, Capt. 
Alexander Black, back in 1809, an extensive landowner and for years actively 
engaged in the live-stock business, one of the most substantial citizens of 
Champaign county, is a native son of this county and has lived here all his 
life. He was born on the place on which he is now living and of which he 
is now proprietor, a place that has been in the family for more than one 
hundred years, October 28, 1854, son of James and Caroline (Culbertson) 
Black, the former a native of Kentucky and the latter of Pennsylvania, 
who were for years accounted among the most influential residents of the 
northern part of this county. 

James Black was born in Clark county. Kentucky, F^ebruary 8, 1798. 
son of Capt. Alexander and Jane (Crockett) Black. Virginians, who came 



372 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

Up into Ohio in 1809 and settled in Salem township, this county, there 
establishing the old Black homestead that has ever since been in the pos- 
session of the^'family. Capt; Alexander Black was born in the colony of 
Virginia on October 14, 1765, a son of Capt. William Black, who became 
captain of a company in the patriot army during the Revolutionary War. 
Capt. William Black, who was a son of Alexander Black, who had come 
to the Colonies from Ireland and had settled in the Old Dominion, joined 
the Continental army at the age of fifteen and before the War of Inde- 
pendence was at an end was promoted to the rank of captain. He later 
crossed the mountains into Kentucijy, locating at Strouds Ford, three miles 
from Windiester, where he remained for three years and during which time 
he became a companion of Daniel Boone. In 1792, in Rockbridge county, 
Virginia, Capt. William Black married Jane Crockett, a cousin of David 
Crockett, and then returned to Kentucky to make his permanent home. He 
served with General Scott's Kentucky Volunteers and was with General 
Wayne when the latter scored his decisive victory over the Indians at 
the battle of the Maumee in August. 1794, being wounded in the face in 
that battle. In 1809 he came up into Ohio with his family and settled 
in this county, entering a tract of land in Salem township. During the 
War of 181 2 he was given a captain's commission and with his company 
guarded the settlers against the attacks of Tecumseh and liis Shawnees 
and against Batiste, who with his Wyandots had gone over to the English. 
Capt. Alexander Black was a warm personal friend of Gen. Simon Kenton 
and had no \o\e for the Indians. He continued to make his home in this 
county, a substantial and honored citizen, until his death in 1854. His 
A\'idow survived him for five years, her death occurring in 1859. 

James Black was eleven years of age when his ])arents came up into 
Ohio and he grew to manhood on the homestead farm in Salem township 
and there spent the remainder of his life, one of the leaders in the com- 
munity life of this region, and a very successful farmer and stockman. He 
received excellent schooling for that period and became a very well informed 
man. From the days of his boyhood he took an active part in his father's 
live-stock operations and when fourteen ov fifteen years of age began to 
accompany the drovers on the long trips through the wilderness with dro\ es 
uf cattle or hogs for the Detroit market. He grew to be a man of powerful 
physique and was accounted one of the hardiest pioneers of this section. 
In early life he was a Henry Clay Whig, but upon the formation of the 
Republican party threw in his allegiance with that party and was ever there- 
after a sta«€h Re])uWican and one of tlie local leaders in that party. James 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 



^75 



Black lived to be past eighty-four years of age, his death occurring on July 
3, 1882. His widow survived him less than a year, her deatli occurring in 
1883, she then being eighty-three years of age. 

It was in 1832 that James Black was united in marriage to Caroline 
Culbertson, who was born in Erie county, Pennsylvania, January 26, 1810. 
daughter of James Culbertson and wife, who became pioneers of Champaign 
county and here spent their last days. James Culbertson was born in Lan- 
caster county, Pennsylvania, son of Samuel Culbertson, a native of Eng- 
land, who had served with the patriot army during the Revolutionary War 
and who settled in Lancaster county, where his last days were spent. James 
Culbertson sensed as a private during the War of 1812 and later came to 
this coimty, where he died in 1835. To James and Caroline (Culbertson) 
Black were born eight children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the 
last-born, the others being as follow: Jane, who married William Kiser, 
of Logan county, this state, and died there, after which her husband mar- 
ried her younger sister, Lucy, who died in Los Angeles in 1915; Susan, 
who married John W. Staub and died in Logan county; Lucy, mentioned 
above, who died in Los Angeles in 191 5; Alexander, who married Mary 
Courts and is now living retired at Eddyville, Iowa ; Caroline, who died 
unmarried; John R., now deceased, who for years was a partner of his 
brother. James W'.. and of whom more extended mention is made below, 
and Lizzie, now deceased, who was the wife of Daniel Donovan. 

John R.- Black was bora on the old home place in Salem township and 
there grew to manhood, completing his schooling in the high school at West 
Liberty. He early took up farming and stock raising, making a specialty 
of the latter, and was a partner of his brother, James W. Black, in opera- 
tions in that line until his retirement from business in 1901. In addition 
to his extensive land interests in this county he also was the owner of prop- 
erty in West Liberty and was a stockholder in the Farmers Bank of that 
place. He ever gave his earnest attention to the promotion of the agricul- 
tural interests of his home county and was for fifteen years a member of 
the board of managers of the Champaign County Agricultural Society, foi- 
some years serving as vice-president of the same. He was a stanch Repub- 
lican, ever giving a good citizen's attention to local civic affairs, but was 
not included in the ofiice-seeking class. He was a Knight Templar Mason 
and a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and took a warm 
interest in the affairs of these fraternal organizations. On December 9. 
1886, John R. Black was united in marriage to Belle Robbins. of Logan 
count^^ who was born in Hunterdon county, New Jersey. Septeml)er 21, 



374 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

1856, a daughter of John W. and Rebecca (Huff) Robbins, the former of 
whom was born in the state of New York and the latter in Hunterdon 
county, New Jersey. John W. Robbins was a blacksmith and in 1857 came 
to Ohio with his family and settled in Logan county, where he spent the 
rest of his life, his death occurring at West Liberty in 1887, at the age of 
fifty-four years. He and his wife had three children, Mrs. John R. Black 
having a brother, William, who is now living in California, and a daughter, 
Mrs. James W. Black. John R. Black died on May 16, 1904, and his widow 
is now living at West Liberty. She has three children, Maude, Wayne C. 
and Yale D. 

James W. Black was reared on the old home farm in Salem township 
and has lived there all his life. He received his schooling in the public 
schools and after his marriage in 1882 he and his wife took up their resi- 
dence in the fine old house that his grandfather, Capt. Alexander Black, 
had erected there in 181 8. Upon beginning his farming operations on his 
own account James W. Black entered into a partnership with his elder 
brother, John R. Black, and this mutually agreeable arrangement continued 
until the latter's retirement in 1901, since which time Mr. Black has carried 
on the extensive operatiojis begun by the brothers alone, continuing to make 
a specialty of live stock. Mr. Black has about six hundred acres of valuable 
iand, besides valuable real estate interests at West Liberty and is a member 
of the board of directors of the F'armers Bank of West Liberty, in which 
sound old concern he has quite a goodly block of stock. Mr. Black is a 
stanch Republican and has ever taken an active interest in local political 
affairs, but the only public service he has sought has been as a member 
of the school board, in which capacity he has rendered admirable service 
in behalf of the local schools. Fraternally, he is affiliated with Liberty Lodge 
No. 96, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and takes a warm interest in 
the affairs of the same. 

On December 21, 1882, James W. Black was united in marriage to 
Lizzie Robbins, who was born in the neighboring county of Logan, March 
8, 1862, daughter of John W. and Rebecca (Huff) Robbins and sister of 
Mrs. John R. Black, mentioned above, and to this union four children have 
been born. Burr R., Geneva B., Howard C. and Virginia. Burr R. Black, 
born on January 15, 1885, is now assistant cashier of the Farmers Bank 
of West Liberty. He married Hazel Stickinger and has one child, a 
daughter, Beatrice, born in November, 191 4. Geneva B. Black, bom on 
March 9,' 1891, married Raymond F. Hughes, who is connected with the 
J. W. Bobbs wholesale grocery firm at Columbus, and has two children. 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 375 

Maxine, born iti October, 1914. and James Raymond, October, i9i(). How- 
ard C. Black, wlio was born on May 24, 1894, remains at home, a valued 
assistant to his father in the management of the home place. He was gradu- 
ated from the West Liberty high school and supplemented that course by 
two years of attendance at the State University and a year at Oberlin 
College. Virginia Black, born on August 23, 1901, is still in school. The 
Blacks have a very pleasant home, one of the historic old places in the 
county, and. have ever given proper attention to the general social activities 
of the cotilniunity. 



JACOB I. CLARK. 



Jacob L Clark, farmer and stock raiser of Salem township, Champaigni 
county, was born in Clarke county, Ohio, January 31, 1872. He is a son 
of Jacob and Susanna (Swisher) Clark, both natives of Virginia, where 
they grew to maturity and were married. Upon leaving their native state 
they came to Champaign county, but in a short time went on to Clarke 
county, where they lived on a farm eighteen or twenty years, then returned 
to Champaign county, locating on the Jennings farm in Salem township, 
where they spent three years, then moved south of Hagenbaugh village, buy- 
ing a farm there of one hundred and twenty-six acres, where they spent the 
rest of their lives. Isaac Clark, father of Jacob Clark, was also a native of 
Virginia and he came to Champaign county, Ohio, shortly after his son. 
Jacob, moved here, but later moved to Clarke county, where he remained a 
number of years, then came back to Champaign county, locating in Wayne 
township, southeast of Cable, and there spent the rest of his life. Eleven 
children were born to Jacob Clark and wife, seven of whom are now living, 
namely: Joshua, Gabriel, Samuel, Elmer; Charles and John are deceased; 
Laura married W. E. Briggs, Cora married Griffith Fox, Eliza married 
John Powell, and she is now deceased ; Delia who married xA.be Hondshall ; 
she also is deceased. 

Jacob L Clark, of this sketch, grew up on the home farm and he received 
his education in the district schools of Salem township. Champaign county. 
He worked with his father on the farm until he was twenty-five years old, 
then started farming for himself, buying a place of one hundred and eleven 
acres and he has since made his home on this place, carrying on general 
farming and stock raising. He later added to his original holdings until he 
now has one hundred and ninety-seven acres, which he has brought up to a 



376 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

high state of improvement and cultivation. He is a breeder of good graded 
live stock. He feeds the grain raised on his place. 

Mr. Clark was married on December i6, 1896, to Lucinda Nincehelser^ 
a daughter of Joseph and Lucinda (Eicholtz) Nincehelser. The death of 
Mrs. Clark occurred on January 27, 19 12, leaving one child. Mary von Clark. 
The death of the father of the subject of this sketch occurred on May 6, 1903^ 
but the mother is still living, making her home near Hagenbaugh, Salem 
township, this county. 

Politically, Jacob I. Clark is a Republican. He was a member of the 
school board in his district for a period of eight years. He is an active 
member of the Baptist church at Kings Creek and is an ordained deacon of 
the same. 



MAJOR ALEXANDER F. ^^\NCE. 

Major .Vlexander F. Vance, president of the National Bank of Urbana 
and for years one of the most active and influential figures in the business and 
civic life of Champaign county, is a native son of this county and has lived 
here all his life with the exception of the period spent in the service of the 
Union during the Civil War and for about live years afterward when he was 
engaged in business in New York Cit}-. He was born on what is know^n as 
the old Eichholtz homestead in Salem township, this county. January 26. 
1840, .son of Judge Alexander F. \'"ance and grandson of Gov. Joseph Vance, 
the latter of whom was a son of Joseph C. Vance, a Virginian and a soldier 
in the patriot army during the Revolutionary \Var. Tlie latter became one 
of the leading factors in the organization of Champaign county, helped to 
establish Urbana as the county seat, became the first director of the count}-, 
served as first clerk and as first recorder and in other ways did much toward 
establishing a proper social order hereabout in the days of the beginning of 
things out here on w'hat then v^-as practically the frontier of Western civil- 
ization. Elsewhere in this volume in a Ijiographical sketch relating to Gov. 
Joseph Vance, the only resident of Champaign county to become governor 
of the great state of Ohio, there is set out at considerable length further 
details of the history of the Vance famil}', one of the very first families of 
Champaign county, and the attention of the reader is respectfully invited to 
a consideration of that sketch in connection with this. 

Judge Alexander F. Vance, who served as judge of probate of Cham- 




MAJOll ALKXANDEK F. VANCi:. .IK 




JUDGE ALEXANDER F. VANCE. 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. ^JJ 

paign count} longer than any other man ever elected to that office, was a 
native son of this county, born on the old Vance farm on August 25, 181 1, 
son of Joseph (afterward governor) and ]\Iary (Lemon) Vance. He grew 
to manhood in this county and completed his schooling in old Miami Uni- 
versity. On August 6, 1835, '^c married Mary R. Ward, a daughter of Col. 
William Ward, one of the most prominent citizens of this section of Ohio, 
and after his marriage established his home on what is known as the old 
Eichholtz farm, where he remained for several years, at the end of which 
time he moved to Saratoga and was there iit charge of a mill until a short 
time before his father's death in the summer of 1852, when he returned to 
the old home and upon his father's death received the old homestead. There 
he contimted to make his home until 1859, when he moved to Urbana and 
there engaged in business, opening a hat store in a building at the southeast 
corner of the square, and was thus engaged at the time of his election to the 
office of judge of probate for Champaign county in i860, after which he sold 
his store. By successive re-elections Judge Vance was retained as judge of 
probate until 1879, a longer period of service than that of any other incumbent 
in this office. 

When the Civil War Ijroke out Judge Vance raised a company and was 
elected captain of the same. This command was mustered in at Camp 
McArthur and Judge Vance tendered its services to the governor, but the 
state's quota at that time was already filled and the offer could not be accepted. 
Circumstances prevented Judge Vance from enlisting, but he was repre- 
sented in the w-ar by four sons. Upon retiring from the bench he continued 
to make his home in Urbana and there spent his last days, ever active and 
useful in good works. He and his wife were earnest members of the Presby- 
terian church, of which he was a ruling elder ior many years. The Judge 
was a Royal Arch and York Rite Mason and a member of the c<)uncil. Royal 
and Select Masters, becoming a Royal Arch ]\]ason on May 15. 1845, and 
a Knight Templar in 1869, and for many years was one of the most promin- 
ent figures in Masonic circles in this county, an active worker in Harmony 
Lodge of that order at Urbana. He and his wife lived to celebrate their 
golden w'edding anniversary and were the parents of thirteen children, of 
whom eight grew^ to maturity, those besides the subject of this biographical 
.sketch Ijeing William W., Joseph C. John. C. H. Cohvcll. Mrs. Rev. John 
Woods, Mrs. Thomas C. Berry and Ella P. 

The junior Alexander F. Vance was the third in order of birth of the 
children born to his parents and was about seventeen years of age when his 



378 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

1/arents moved from the old home farm to Urbana. where he completed his 
schooHng. When eighteen years of age he accepted a clerkship in the dry- 
goods store of Simon Weaver at Urbana and later became bookkeeper in the 
office of his uncle, proprietor of the Stony Point mills, serving in that capacity 
until 1862, when he was made a clerk in the paymaster's department of the 
L'nion army and in January, 1865, was promoted to the position of pay- 
master, with the rank of major of cavalry. Upon the completion of his 
service in the army Major Vance went to New York City and was there 
engaged in the wholesale boot and shoe business for five years, at the end of 
which time he returned to this count}' and was here engaged in farming until 
January i, 1875. when he was elected teller of the old Third National Bank 
<'f Urbana. He was afterward made assistant cashier and, upon the death 
of 1^. G. Wiley, cashier, on February 28, 1881, he was elected cashier, con- 
tinuing as such when the Third National was succeeded by the National 
Bank of Urbana. He was elected vice-president on January 17, 1910, and 
])resident on January 10, 191 1. For several years also the Major served as 
jnesidentof the- Natural Gas Company and has in other ways taken an active 
])art in the business affairs of the city and county. He is a Republican and 
lias for years been regarded as one of the leaders of that party in this county, 
l)ut the only public position he has sought was that as a member of the board 
of education, in which capacity he served for some years, rendering an admir- 
able service in behalf of the schools. 

In February, 1868, Major Alexander I'. Vance was unitetl in marriage 
to Mary Glen Jamieson and to this union has been born one child, a daughter, 
Louise, wife of Charles Brand, a well-known and substantial farmer of this 
county. Major Vance is one of the most prominent and distinguished Masons 
in the state of Ohio, being a member of the supreme council of Sovereign 
Grand Inspectors-General of the thirty-third and last degree of the Ancient 
and Accepted Scottish Rite for the northern Masonic jurisdiction of the 
United States of America, the supreme power of the Rite. He became 
affiliated with the consistory, Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite, on February 
18. 1873, and in 1885 received the thirty-third degree at Boston. In the 
local bodies of the Masonic order the Major has taken an active part for 
years and has served as master of his lodge; as high priest of the chapter. 
Royal Arch Ma.sons; thrice illustrious master of the council. Royal and Select 
Masters, and eminent conuuander of the commander}'. Knights Templar. 
He is one of the best-known and most influential Knights Templar in the 
state, having served as grand commander of the grand commandery of Ohio. 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. j^jqj 

It is worthy of note that in this faniilw grandfatlier. father and son, the 
snbject, haA-e all been masters of the Harmony Lodge No. 8. Free and Accepted 
Masons of Urbana, Governor Vance having l>een master of this lodge in i8i s 
and again in 1817. 



GEORGE W. SHAFER. 



George W. Shafer, one of Salem township's best-known and most 
progressive farmers and stockmen and the proprietor of a fine farm in the 
Kings Creek neighborhood, is a native son of this county and has lived 
here all his life. He was born on a farm near Terre Haute, in Mad River 
township, May 25, 1864, son of Nicholas and Louise (Cook) Shafer, the 
former of whom was born in Germany and the latter in this county and 
both of whom are now dead. 

Nicholas Shafer grew up on a farm in his native country and remained 
there until he w-as twenty-six years of age, when he came to this country-, 
landing here with but a five-franc piece (one dollar) in his pocket. For a 
short time after coming to this country he worked as a farm hand in Virginia, 
receiving for that service twenty-five cents a day. He then made his way 
over into Ohio and stopped in the Terre Haute neighborhood, in this county, 
where he worked as a farm hand until his marriage there to Louise Cook, 
who was born in this county, daughter of pioneer parents, after which he 
bought a farm and began farming on his own account. His first farm was 
a tract of one hundred and twenty-five acres, in the Aicinity of Terre Haute, 
where he made his home until 1867, when he moved to Salem township and 
bought a farm of three hundred and fourteen acres at the point then known 
as Saratoga. There he established his home and as he prospered in his 
farming operations added to his holdings until he became the owner of nine 
hundred and seventy-five acres of land in Salem township and was regarded 
as one of the most substantial farmers in that part of the county. Fie also 
gave much attention to the raising of live stock, particularly sheep, and 
always had about three hundred head of the latter on his place. Nicholas 
Shafer died in 1900. His wife had preceded him to the grave about eleven 
years, her death having occurred in 1889. They were the parents of five 
children, the subject of this sketch having two sisters, Elizabeth and Martha, 
and two brothers, Henry and Charles. 

George W. Shafer was about three years of age \\hen his parents 
moved from Mad River township to Salem township and in the latter town- 



380 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

sliip received his schooling- and grew to manhood. From the days of his 
boyhood he was a vahiable aid to his father and brothers in the labors of 
the home farm and remained on the home farm until his marriage in 1890, 
w hen he began farming for himself on a farm north of the place on which 
lie is now living, to which latter place he moved in 1904 and has ever since 
made his home there. Mr. Shafer is the owner of two hundred and fifty 
acres, but only farms one hundred and six acres of this himself, renting- 
t)ut tile remainder. In addition, to his general farming he has long given 
considerable attention to the raising of hogs, feeding from one hundred 
to one hundred and fifty head annually, and has done very well. His place 
is well improved and equipped in truly up-to-date fashion and is regarded 
as one of the best farms in that neigh1)orhood. Mr. Shafer is a Democrat, 
but has not been a seeker after public office. 

On July 15, 1890, George W. Shafer was united in marriage to Florence 
Slick, who also was born in Randolph county, Indiana, daughter of Samuel 
and Mary Stick, and to this union has been born one child, a daughter, 
Mice, who is at home with her parents. The Shafers are members of the 
Kings Creek Baptist church and take a proper interest in the afifairs of the 
same, as well as in the general good works of the community, helpful in 
advancing- all worthy causes thereabout. Fraternally, Mr. Shafer is affiliated 
w ith the Urbana lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and takes 
a warm interest in the affairs of that popular organization. 



.ALBERT L. HUNTER. 



The late Albert L. Hunter, who died at his home in SaJem township in 
1909, and whose widow is now living at Kings Creek, was born in that town- 
ship and there spent all his life, becoming one of the most substantial farm- 
ers in that community. He was born on a pioneer farm in that township in 
1845, son of Nathaniel C. and Helen M. (Purely) Hunter, prominent resi- 
dents of that community, the former of whom also was born there, on the old 
Hunter homestead, son of John and Jane (Humphries) Hunter, the former 
of whom was born in Virginia, son of Nathaniel and Ann (Porter) Flunter, 
natives of Ireland, who came to this county after their marriage and settled 
in Virginia, where they remained until 1910, when they came to this state 
and after a brief residence in Madison county came over into Champaign 
comity and establi?hi?d tlteir home in Salem township, where they spent the 



CIIAMI'AIGN COLNTV. 01li(». 3S I 

remainder of their lives. In a memorial sketch relating to the late Nathaniel 

C. Hunter, father of the subject of this memorial sketch, presented elsewhere 
in this volume, there is set out at considerable length something of the his- 
tory of the Hunter family in this county and to that interesting narrative 
the reader is respectfully referred for additional details in this connection. 

Reared on the old home place, Albert L. Hunter received his earl\ 
schooling in the schools of that neighborhood and supplemented the same 
by a course in the college at Delaware. From the days of his boyhood he 
had been a valuable aid to his father in the labors of the farm and after his 
marriage in the late fall of 1876 he established his home on the old home 
place and there continued farming for five years, at the end of which time 
he took a farm in the vicinity of Cable, where he remained for nine years. 
He then moved back to the old Hunter farm, bought two hundred acres of 
the same, and there spent the remainder of his life, his death occurring there 
in August, 1909, he then being sixty-two years of age. AII)ert L. Hunter 
was an excellent- farmer and did well at his farming operation.s, developing a 
fine farm. He was a Republican and ever gave a good citizen's attention to 
local political affairs, but had not been a seeker after public office. He was 
a member of the Mt. Tabor Methodist Episcopal church, as is his widow, and 
took a proper part in all neighborhood good works. 

In November, 1876, /Vlbert L. Hunter was united in marriage to Mar}- 
Frances North, who also was born in Salem township, on the old North home- 
stead, a daughter of Abel and Elizabeth (Herr) North, the latter of whom is 
still living, now making her home at Kings Creek. The late Abel North and 
his wife were the parents of ten children, of whom Mrs. Hunter was the 
first-born, the others being as follow : Luc}-. who married J. S. Ewing and 
is now deceased; Adelaide and Adrelina, twins, the former of whom mar- 
ried J. N. Fields and is now living at Cleveland, and the latter of whom was 
burned to death when twelve years of age ; Sarah Elizabeth, who died at the 
age of seventeen years; Charles L., who is now farming the old North home 
place; Cora, now deceased, who was the wife of Prof. John Hamilton, super- 
intendent of the city schools at Cincinnati ; A\'illiam North, a prominent 
attorney at Cincinnati; Grant, who died in youth, and P>irdie. wife of I'rof. 

D. C. Bryant, principal of schools at Columbus. 

To Albert L. and Mary Frances (North) Hunter, four children were 
born, namely: Grace, who married Ouinn M. Yocum. a farmer, of Salem 
township, and has two children, daughters. Helen M. and Margaret E. ; 
Edna, who married Alva Kiser, of Troy, this state, and has three children, 
Truman A., Paul and Mary V. : Fern P., born on No\'ember 22. 1882. who 



382 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

married the Rev. Milton S. Swisher, a clergyman of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, now living in Illinois, and died on November 13, 1905, leaving one 
child, a daughter, Dorothy, who is now making her home with her grand- 
mother, Mrs. Hunter, and Sarah Elsa, who married Daniel C. Lemon, a 
farmer, living in the neighborhood of St. Paris, in this county, and has two 
children, Mildred and Donald. Besides these children, Mr. and Mrs. Hunter 
have an adopted son, John Hunter, who is now farming the home place. Some 
time after the death of her husband Mrs. Hunter moved to Kings Creek, 
where she is now living and where she is very comfortably and very pleas- 
antly situated. 



THOMAS RAWLINGS. 



The late Thomas Rawlings, for years one of Champaign county's best- 
known and most substantial farmers, who died at his delightful farm home 
on Pretty Prairie, in Urbana township, in the fall of 1912, was a native son 
of this county and lived here all his life. He was born on a pioneer farm in 
Urbana township, August 28, 1836, son of James and Susanna (McRoberts) 
Rawlings, the former of whom was born in the state of Kentucky and the 
latter in this county, whose last days were spent on their farm in Urbana 
township. 

James Rawlings was but a child when his parents came up here from 
Kentucky and settled on a tract of land in Urbana township, this county, 
becoming useful and influential pioneers of the Prett}' Prairie neighborhood. 
He grew to manhood on that farm and married Susanna McRoberts, who 
was born in this county, daughter of pioneer parents, and after his marriage 
established his home on a farm on the Springfield pike, in Urbana township, 
and there he and. his wife spent the remainder of their lives. They were 
the parents of six children, of whom the subject of this memorial sketch was 
the fourth in order of birth, the others being as follow: William J. W., now 
deceased, who married Electa Mumper, now living in Urbana, and a memorial 
sketch of whom is presented elsewhere in this volume; Mary, who married 
Thomas M. Todd, a farmer of Urbana township, and who, as well as her 
husband, is now dead; EHzabeth J., widow of John P. Knight, a farmer of 
Urbana township and a memorial sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this 
volume; James, now deceased, who was a farmer in Urbana township and 
who married Laura Townley, who also is now deceased, and Douglas A\ ., 



CHAMPAIGN COT-NTY, OHIO. 383 

also deceased, whose widow, wlio was Alice Townley, now lives in Spring- 
field. 

Reared on the home farm in Urbana township, Thomas Kawlings received 
his schooling in the schools of that neighborhood and from the days of his 
boyhood was a valued assistant to his father and brothers in the labors of 
developing and improving the home place, remaining tiiere until his marriage 
in the spring of 1864, when lie established a home of his own on a farm 
on Pretty Prairie, where he spent the remainder of his life, successful]}- 
engaged in general farming and stock raising. long ago becoming recognized 
as one of the substantial farmers of that community. Mr. Rawlings was a 
Republican and ever took a good citizen's interest in local political affairs, 
but was not a seeker after public office. He built up an excellent farm and 
at the time of his death on September 18. 1912. left his widow in good cir- 
cumstances. 

It was in March, 1864. that Thomas Rawlings was united in marriage 
to Sarah Emily Humes, also a native of this county, Ixirn on a farm on 
Dugan Prairie, in Union township, a daughter of Samuel and Mary A. 
( McNeill) Humes, both of whom were born in Virginia and who came out 
here after their marriage and settled on Dugan Prairie, becoming substantial 
and useful pioneers of Union township, and spent the rest of their lives on 
their well-improved farms. Mrs. Humes died at the age of sixty-seven and 
Mr. Humes survived her for some years, he being eighty-four years of age 
at the time of his death. They were earnest members of the Buck Creek 
Presbyterian church, of which congregation Mr. Humes was for fifty years 
an elder, and their children were reared in the faith of that commtimon. 
There were ten of these children, of whom Mrs. Rawlings was the sixth in 
order of birth, the others being as follow : Sidney Elizabeth, who was born 
in Virginia .shortly before her parents came to this county and who married 
Charles Stanbury and went to Illinois, where she spent the rest of her life: 
John Seymour, who married Caroline Porter and also spent his last days in 
Illinois; Nancy Margaret, who died unmarried; Samuel R., who also died 
unmarried ; David Merrill, who went to the front as a .soldier of the Union 
during the Civil War and died in service; William Andrew, who married 
Elizabeth Price and is also deceased ; James Calvin, who died in his youth ; 
Mary Eliza, who also died young, and Edwin K.. a retired farmer, now 
living in Urbana, who married Caroline ^^lumma and has had five children. 
Crystal (deceased). Florence. Blanche. Bertha and Homer. 

Shortly after the death of her hu.sband Mrs. Rawlings rented her farm 
of one hundred and eighty-four acres of land and moved to I'rbana, where 



384 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

she is now- living" and where she is very pleasantly situated. She has been 
for many years a member of the Buck Creek Presbtyerian church, as was 
jier husband, and has ever taken an active interest in church work and in 
other neighborhood good works, helpful in many ways in advancing the 
cause of the common welfare in the community in which she has lived all 
lier life. 



W. W. WILSON. 



V\'. \V. Wilson, president of the Citizens National Bank of Crbana and 
an honored ^•eteran oi the Civil War, is a native son of this county and has 
lived here practically all his life. He was born on a farm in Concord town- 
ship on May i. 1842. son of Elias R. and A[ar\- (Russell) Wilson, both of 
whom were born in that same township. Elias R. ^^'ilson died in 1846, 
leaving his widow and two sons, the subject of this sketch having a bnither, 
John R. Wilson. The widow Wilson later remarried, but this fact did not 
materially increase the prospects of the boys and when eight years of age 
\V. W. Wilson found himself face to face with the serious responsibilities 
<jf life, beginning then practically to look after himself. He took up farm- 
ing and was thus engaged when the Civil War broke out. Later he worked 
his way through school and was graduated from the Urbana high school. 

Upon the first call to arms in April, 1861, W. W. Wilson became a mem- 
l>er of a compaii}^ of Home Guards, of which A. ¥. Vance, Sr., was captain, 
and in September of that year he enlisted for a period of three years as a 
member of Company G, Sixty-sixth Regiment, Ohio \'olunteer Infantry, and 
in the following January went to the front with his command, bearing the 
rank of sergeant. In the following June, at the battle of Port Republic, 
Virginia, Mr. Wilson received an injury to one of his legs which totally dis- 
abled him from further service and which later necessitated three different 
stages of amputation. While thus sulTering Mr. Wilson was captured by 
the enemy and for four months was held prisoner, being confined successively 
in the Weier's cave prison at Waynesboro, in the prison at Lynchburg and 
.in Libby prison, until he finally was exchanged, and in December, 1862, he 
received his honorable discharge on a physician's certificate of disabiHty. 

Upon the completion of his military service Mr. Wilson returned to 
Urbana. During the sessions of the Ohio Legislature in 1866 and 1867 he 
.served as journal clerk for the House of Representatives and in the latter 
part of 1867 was appointed U^nitcd States revenue collector for this district. 




W. W. WILSON. 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 385 

riiat position he liekl tor eleven years, or until the time of his appointment 
to the position of cashier of the Citizens National Bank of Urbana, a posi- 
tion he held until his promotion, in 1916, to the presidency of the bank, which 
])Osition he now occupies, one of the best-known and most influential figures 
in financial circles in this part of the state. Mr. Wilson is an active member 
of \y. A. Brand Post No. 08. Grand Army of the Republic, at Urbana, and 
has for years taken a warm interest in the affairs of that patriotic organ- 
ization. 

In t868 W. \V. Wilson was united in marriage to Anna Virginia Rus- 
sell, who died in 1898, leaving three children, William R., Carrie V. and 
I'Vank C. In 1900 Mr. Wilson married, secondly, Mrs. Mary B. Murray, 
widow of Rev. James Murray. Mr. and Mrs. Wilson are members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church, of which Mr. Wilson has been a steward for 
fifty vears. He al.'^o for years was superintendent of the Sunday school and 
for manv vears has been and is still a teacher in the same. 



JOHN M. JAMISON. 

John M. Jamison, a well-known interior decorator at Urbana, was born 
in that city and has lived there the greater part of his life. He was born on 
September 25, 1850, son of David and Mary (Bell) Jamison, the fonner a 
native of the state of Pennsylvania and the latter of whom was bom in 
Urbana, a member of one of the oldest families in this county, the Bells, of 
Irish descent, having been among the very first settlers in Urbana. David 
Jamison was a young man when he came to this county from Pennsylvania 
and located at Urbana, where he married and where he engaged in the man- 
ufacture of carriages, one of the first persons thus engaged in that city. In 
1852 he moved to Marysville, Illinois, and a few years later moved from that 
place to a farm in the near vicinity of Marysville, later called Potomac, in 
Vermillion county, that same state, where he became a well-established 
farmer and where he spent the remainder of his life. He and his wife were 
the parents of twelve children, four of whom are still living," the subject of 
sketch having two sisters, Mary Ellen and Belle, and a brother. Merrill 
Jamison. 

When his parents moved to Illinois J. M. Jamison remained at Urbana 
with his aunt, Mrs. Sarah Smith, and was reared by her in that city. He 
(25a) 



386 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY. OHIO. 

received his schooling in Urbana and early learned the trade of carriage paint- 
ing, a vocation he followed for years afterward. When eighteen years of 
age he started out as a "journeyman" carriage painter and in this capacity 
visited numerous cities throughout the country, in several of the cities in 
which he worked being made foreman of the shops in which he was employed. 
During all this time, however, he kept in close touch with his home town and 
m 1891 returned to Urbana. in order to take care of his cousin, John N. 
Smith. Sarah's son, in his declining years, as he had cared for him in his 
youthful days, and he since has made his home there. Upon his return to 
Urbana Mr. Jamison set up an establishment for interior decoration and 
has since been quite successfully engaged in that line, having built up an 
extensive business. 

On September 18. 1869. J. N. Jamison was united in marriage to 
Adeline Keneaster, daughter of Henry Keneaster and wife, and to this 
union two children have been born, Harry, who married Anna Young and 
has one child, a son. Jack, and Marie, wife of Warren Law. The Jamisons 
have a pleasant home in Urbana and take a proper interest in the general 
affairs of the citv. 



GEORGE WAITE. 



One of the leading lawyers and esteemed citizens of Champaign county 
during the generation that has just passed, was the late George Waite, for 
a long lapse of years a well-known figure in the city of Urbana, where his 
influence for good in the general welfare of the locality was by no means a 
negligible quantity. He was born at Woodstock, Ohio. January 12. 1862. 
He was a son of Cicero and Julia (McDonald) Waite, both natives of 
Champaign county, where they grew up. attended the common schools and 
were married. The mother was a daughter of George and Rachael McDon- 
ald. The father of the subject of this memoir established his home at Wood- 
stock, where he engaged successfully in the manufacture of tile. His first 
wife, mother of George Waite. died there, and the father later married again 
and spent the last years of his life in Union City. Indiana, where his death 
occurred. His second marriage was without issue, and only two children 
were born to his first marriage, George, of this sketch, and Cyrus, now a 
resident of Anderson, Indiana. 

George Waite grew to manhood at Woodstock, where he received his 
early education in the public schools. He began life for himself as a teacher. 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 387 

which profession he followed for a period of twelve years in Champaign 
and Union counties. He was a very successful educator and his services 
were in great demand. He was a man of advanced ideas and introduced many 
advanced methods into the schools where he taught. He was always poi)u- 
lar with both pupils and patrons. 

Finally deciding that a legal career held greater opportunities for hhn. 
Mr. Waite abandoned the school room for the bar. He had been for some time, 
during his leisure hours, perusing Blackstone and Kent, and he read law 
under Judge E. P. Middleton, later took the regular course in the Cincin- 
nati Law School, where he made a good record and from which institution 
he was graduated with the class of 1892. Returning to Champaign county 
he began the practice of his profession at Urbana, forming a partnership with 
Sherman S. Deaton, the partnership continuing until the death of Mr. Waite. 
They built up a large and satisfactory legal business. Mr. Waite, with his 
habits of industry, strict application to business, natural aptitude to the legal 
profession, and care in the investigation and preparation of cases, had 'the 
right to confidently expect a larger and wider boundary for the exercise of 
his abilities, and he was not disappointed ; his career at the bar was eminently 
satisfactory. •* ' - i -- :^- > 

Mr. Waite was married in 1887, to Mollie Hanley. of Woodstock, Ohio, 
u here she was reared and educated. She is a daughter of David and Cath- 
erine Hanley, wdio lived on a farm near Woodstock for many years, dying 
there. To David Hanley and wife the following children were born : Mar- 
garet, deceased; Catherine, living in Columbus, Ohio: Julia, living in Ander- 
son, Indiana; David, who makes his home at Urbana, Champaign county; 
Mollie, who became the wife of Mr. Waite, of this review; Guy, v/ho died 
in Woodstock ; Ann, living at Anderson, Indiana, and several other children 
who died in early childhood. 

To George Waite and wife one child, George Waite, was born, his 
birth occurring at Woodstock, Ohio, August 3, 1890. There he spent his 
childhood, and received his education in the public school of Urbana, includ- 
ing the high school. Later, he was a student in Wittenberg College, also the 
Ohio State University. Deciding early in life to follow in the footsteps of 
his father in a professional way, he began studying law at home, when but a 
boy, later entered the Cincinnati Law School, where he made an excellent 
record, and was graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Laws, on Febru- 
ary I, 1917. He is now engaged in the practice of his profession in Urbana 
and is making a very promising start. He makes his home with his mother. 
He was admitted to the bar January 2. 191 7. Fraternally, he belongs to 



388 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

the blue lodge of Masons, the Alpha Tau Omeoa fraternity and the I'lii 
Alpha Delta legal fraternity. 

George Waite, Sr., was a member of the Masonic order, including the 
chapter and council, also the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He was 
a member of the Universalist church. His death occurred on July 27, 19 13, 
in his fifty-second year, while still in the prime of life and usefulness. 



SAMUEL W. CAREY. 



Samuel W. Carey, one of Urbana's progressive and enterprising florists 
of Urbana, is a native son of this county and has lived here all his life. He 
was born on July 14, 1879, son of David and Sarah J. (Perry) Carey, the 
former of whom was born in this state and the latter in Pennsylvania and 
the former of whom is still living at Urbana at a ripe old age. 

David Carey was born in Defiance, this state, but when he was a child 
his parents moved to Piqua, where he received his schooling and where he 
grew to manhood. While living in Miami county he married Sarah J. 
Perry, who was born in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, and wlio was but 
four years of age when she came to this state with her parents, the family 
first locating at Gallipolis and later moving to Piqua, where she was living 
at the time of her marriage. Shortly after his marriage David Carey came to 
Champaign county and became engaged in farming at Lippincott Station, 
later moving down in the Dugan Valley section, where for thirty years he 
was engaged in farming. He then moved to Urbana, where he is still living, 
one of the oldest and best-known residents of that city. During his resi- 
dence on the farm Mr. Carey was quite extensively engaged in the raising 
of broom corn and after moving to Urbana became connected with the 
Urbana Broom Company and was thus connected until his retirement from 
business some years ago. To him and his wife seven children were born, 
of whom six are still living, those besides the subject of this sketch being 
William N., George E., Charles J., Mary and Hattie. 

S. W. Carey received his schooling in the schools of Urbana and at 
tile age of fourteen years began working in the greenliouse of the Reeser 
Floral Company, with which he was connected for about eight years, during 
which time he thoroughly familiarized himself widi the details of the florist 
business and at the end of which- time he started a greenhouse of his own 
and as since continued in that business, gradually building up his plant to its 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 389 

present extensive proportions, and has long been recognized as one of the 
leading florists in this part of the state. Upon starting in business for him- 
self Mr. Carey erected two greenhouses, seventy feet in length, carrying 
about two thousand square feet of glass; and this has been enlarged as the 
growing demands of his trade warranted until he now has seven greenhouses, 
one hundred and forty feet in length, carrying about fifteen thousand square 
feet of glass. His extensive plant is well equipped and up-to-date and his 
tioral products cover a wide variety, suitable to all demands requisite to the 
needs of this section. Mr. Carey is a Democrat and gives a good citizen's 
attention to local political affairs, but has not been a seeker after public 
office. 

In 1906 S. W. Carey was united in marriage to Catherine A. Plank, 
daughter of Samuel and Elizabeth Plank, and to this union four children 
have been born, Howard, Claude, Sarah E. and Goldie. Mr. and Mrs. Carey 
are members of the Lutheran church and take a proper interest in church 
work, as well as in the general social activities of their home town. Mr. 
Carey is a Royal Arch Mason, a member of the blue lodge, the chapter and 
the council at Urbana, and takes a warm interest in Masonic affairs. In the 
conduct of his business he is energetic and enterprising and is accounted one 
of the public-spirited business men of Urbana. 



HENRY A. CHURCH. 



Henry A. Church, superintendent of beautiful Oakdale cemetery ai 
Urbana, is a native of the old Green Mountain state, but has been a resident 
of Ohio and of this county since he was eight years of age and is therefore 
very properly entitled to be numbered among the old settlers of Champaign 
county. He was born at Woodstock, in Windsor county, Vermont, Novem- 
ber 29, 1847, son of Joel and Elizabeth (Bennett) Church, both natives of 
that same county, who in 1855 came to Ohio and settled on a farm in the 
neighborhood of Woodstock, in Rush township, this county. There Joel 
Church died on August ij, 1861, about six years after his arrival in thi>, 
county, he then being thirty-eight years of age. His widow survived- him 
many years, her death occurring in November, 1907, she then being in the 
eighty-fourth year of her age. They were the parents of two children, sons 
both, the subject of this sketch liaving a brother, Charles B. Church, who is 
engaged in the insurance business at Los Angeles, California. 



390 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 



Reared in this county, Henry A. Church received his early schoohng in 
the common, schools here and supplemented the same by a course of two 
years in college at Delaware, this state. Upon leaving college, he took ser- 
vice with the Urbana Elevator Company and was engaged with that concern 
for four years, at the end of which time he entered the service of the Penn- 
sylvania Railroad Company and was thus engaged at Urbana for two years. 
He then spent seven years engaged in the agricultural-implement business and 
was thus engaged from 1877 to 1885, two years as a traveling salesman and 
Hve years locally connected with the business. In February, 1886, Mr. 
Church was appointed superintendent of Oakdale cemetery at Urbana, a 
position he ever since has occupied and to the duties of which he has ever 
given his most thoughtful attention. During his long period of superin- 
tendency Mr. Church has succeeded in effecting many l)eautifying changes 
in Oakdale, which has long been recognized as one of the most admirable and 
V)eautiful cemeteries in Ohio, the people of Urbana and of this section being 
v^ery- propferly proud of the luanner in which this silent city of the dead is 
kept up. Mr. Church is a Republican and has ever given a good citizen's 
attention to local political affairs, but has not been a seeker after public 
ofifice. 

On September ly, 1872, Henry A. Church was united in marriage to 
Sarah E. Miller, wiio was born in Urbana, a daughter of Sylvanus and Mar- 
garet (Pence) Miller, who came to this county from Rising Sun, Indiana. 
After a sometime residence in Urbana, Sylvanus Miller moved to Concord 
township, this county, and upon his retirement from the farm returned to 
Urbana, where he died in 1882, at the age of sixty-two years and past. His 
wife survived him many years, her death having occurred in 1914, she then 
lieing ninety years of age. They were the parents of seven children, those 
besides Mrs. Church, the last-born, being Charles (deceased). John 
(deceased), James T. (deceased). Edward F., of Toledo. Ohio; Fannie 
(deceased), and Irene B., of Springfield, this state. 

To Henry A. and Sarah E. (Miller) Church five children have been 
born, four of whom, Harry, Harley, Arthur and Frank, died in childhood, 
the survivor being Sylva, who married Charles D. Siegel, of Pittsburgh. 
Pennsylvania, and has two children, -Lois and Arthur. Mr. and Mrs. Church 
are members of the Baptist church at Urbana and take an active interest in 
the various beneficences of the same. Mr. Church is a Knight Templar and 
Royal Arch Mason and is afifiliated with the Royal and Select Masters, a 
member of the blue lodge, the chapter, the council and the commander}- 
( Knights Templar) at Urbana, and takes a warm interest in Masonic affairs. 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 39I 

WILLIAM SUNDAY. 

William Sunday, a retired farmer, living at Kingston. Salem township, 
Champaign county, was born in York county, Pennsylvania, December 15, 
1847. H^ is a son of John and Ann (Herman) Sunday, both natives of 
Pennsylvania, where they grew up, were married and established their home. 
The father was a carpenter by trade, which he followed in his native state 
until 1852, when he removed with his family to Miami county, Ohio, where 
they lived a year or two and then came to Champaign county, locating on a 
farm three miles southwest of Urbana, which he rented. John Sunday 
remained in this county until 1871, when he went West and bought a farm 
in Clay county, Illinois, where he farmed the rest of his life, dying in the 
year 1898. His wife died in 1904. They were parents of eight children, 
five of whom are still living, namely: Mary, Sarah, Missouri, Frank and 
William. The last named is the only one of the family now living in Cham- 
paign county. 

William Sunday grew up on the farm, and he attended school in Urbana 
township. Champaign county. When a young man he began farming here, 
which he continued until 1870, then went to Clay county, Illinois, where he 
farmed a year, in partnership, then married and began farming for him- 
self, remaining in that county until 1882, when he returned to Champaign 
county, locating on a farm four miles southwest of Urbana, renting land 
there for some time, then moved to Salem township and bought sevent}- 
acres, which he operated until 1913, when he retired from active life and 
moved to the village of Kingston, owning three acres and a cozy home, and 
here he has since resided. Besides working his own land he rents a small 
tract of corn land each season in his vicinity. 

Mr. Sunday was married in 1871, to Mary E. Thackery, a daughter of 
John and Racliael (Hammond) Thackery, and to their union two children 
ha\e been born, one of wliom died in infancy; Anna May is the wife of 
.\. B. Swisher, the village blacksmith of Kingston, and they have two chil- 
dren, Herman R. and John Harold. Mrs. Mar}^ E. Sunday was born three 
miles southwest of Urbana, Ohio. Her father came to this country from 
England, when fourteen years old, landing in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 
with his parents, the family coming on to Champaign county, and locating in 
the southwestern part of the county, in the timber. Here John grew to 
manhood and helped clear and develop the farm. After his marriage he 
moved to Mad River township, this county, where he spent the rest of his 



392 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OlttO. 

life on a farm. She was a native of Philadelphia, from which city she came 
to Champaign county with her parents at an early date. Ten children were 
born to John Thackery and wife, six of whom are still living, namely: Martha, 
James, Mary, Alma, Minerva and Joseph. 

Politically, Mr. Sunday is an independent Democrat. He is a member 
of the Baptist church, in which he is now a fleacon. and is active in cliurch 
work. 



SCOTT KITE. 



The subject of this sketch lives on his farm in Mad River township, 
three and a half miles east of St. Paris, and one-half mile north of the Piqua 
and Urbana pike. His farm consists of three hundred and twenty acres lying- 
in Mad River township and about sixtv acres in Jackson township, all fme 
land and well improved. 

Scott Kite was born nn this farm, in the old brick house which is still 
standing-, .April 15, 1856. He is a son of George W. and Nina (l-'uson) 
Kite. George W., who was born on this farm and reared here, w'as a son 
of Adam and Elizabeth Kite, who came to this county from Virginia, in 
t8o8. and settled here on government land which he entered. Here tlie}- 
lived and died and are buried in the okl Kite burying ground on this place. 
Nina Fuson was born in Champaign county, Ohio, a daughter of Rev. ^^'ill- 
iam Tnison, an old pioneer Baptist minister and circuit rider. He was one 
of the best known men of his day. a man of sincere convictions and with the 
courage to declare them anywhere and at all times. He lived and died in 
Jackson township and his remains nov.' lie in Mt. Zion cemetery in this town- 
ship. 

After marriage George W. and Nina Kite settled on part of the old 
Kite land, living in a log cabin. Eater they built the brick house, for which 
they burned brick on the place, this house being the one in which the subject 
was born. There they lived until Mrs. Kite died, when he removed to another 
farm located on the Piqua-Urbana pike, where he spent the remainder of his 
days. For his second wife he married the widow of Isaiah Kite. George 
W. and Nina Kite were the parents of ten children, of whom the subject is 
the only one living and the youngest one of the family. The children were 
named : Jane. Angeline, James. Diadena. Sarena. Thomas P., John, Scott, 
our subject ; Elizabeth and William. The family were members of the Myrtle 
Tree Baptist church and always took an active part in the affairs of their 



CHAMPAIGN COIJXTY. OlilO. T^g:^ 

church. The father was regarded as one of the pillars of the. churcli. He 
was a man of great industry and was regarded as a successful man in his 
day. He accumulated considerable means and was the owner of about four 
hundred acres of land. In politics he was a Democrat, hut did not take an 
active part in political affairs. 

Scott Kite was reared on the old Kite farm, in .Mad River town- 
ship. He was educated in the district schools of the township and lived at 
home until grown to manhood. He was married. .\oveml)€r 5, 1874. to 
Ella Fence, daughter of Amos and Clarinda (Browning) Pence. After 
marriage they set up housekeeping in the house where they now live, later 
removing to the red brick hcnise. and then, after that house began to decay, 
they removed back to the new modern home which they now occupy, which 
was built in August, 1902. It has thirteen rooms rmd is modem, having- 
electric lights and other improvements. 

'J\) ^Ir. and Mrs. Kite (-hree children have been horn: Richard, who 
died in infancy; Daisy Ala}' married Elmer .Vpple and they have two children, 
Donald S. and Doretha l'~. : Grace Maude married \Vill)er J^^aulkner. of 
.S{)ringfield. Ohio, and the\- ha\e two sons. Kite and Wilbur. 

Mrs. Kite is a meml>cr of the Mxrtle Tree Baptist church. In politics 
.Mr. Kite affiliates with the Democratic party and he served six years as 
trustee of his township and twenty years on the township school board. 



IRWIN F. GARARD. 



Agriculture, in its varied phases, has claimed the attention of Irwin 
F. Garard, of Salem township. Champaign county, and he has made a suc- 
cess of his chosen life work, partly because he likes it and partly because he 
is energetic and persistent. He was born in Fond-du-Lac county, Wiscon- 
sin, July 10, 1856. He is a son of John R. Garard, who was born in Berke- 
ley county, now a part of West Virginia. In 1845, when a young man, he 
came on horseback from his native state to Ohio. The old saddlebags in 
which he brought his clothes along are still in possession of the subject of 
this sketch. He first stopped in Greene county, working in a saw-mill there 
about a year, the mill being bu.sy getting- out timber with which to build the 
woodwork of the Big Four railroad. He then came to Champaign countw 
locating on Pretty Prairie, in Urbana township, where resided his sister, 
Ruth, who had married Hamilton Hedges. There he took up farming and 



394 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

iiiarried IVTary Jane Osborn, of Urbana township. Later, Mr. Garard bought 
a farm just south of the town of Urbana and farmed there about five years, 
then went to Fond-du-Lac county, Wisconsin, where he remained about two 
years, returning to Champaign county in 1864. locating in Salem township, 
where he bought a farm where Airs. Cogal now lives and stayed there five years, 
then bought the farm w-here T. I. Taylor now lives. He built a substantial 
home there in 1896 and improved the place in a general way. He later 
moved to Urbana, where his death occurred on April 9, 1905, at the advanced 
age of eighty-two years. His wife died in 1885 in Salem township. He was 
a Democrat and active in public afifairs. He made the race for county com- 
missioner and \\ as only defeated by a few votes. He also received the nom- 
ination of his party once for representative to the state Legislature. He 
belonged to the Presbyterian church. He also took a great deal of interest 
in the Champaign county annual fairs and held \arious ofilices in the associa- 
tion. He did much to make the fairs here a success during his lifetime. He 
was well known throughout the county and highly esteemed by all who knew 
him. 

Nine children were born to John R. Garard and wife, named as follow: 
Mrs. Nellie Armstrong, wdio died on May 30, 1917, lived in California: 
Martha is single and lives in Kingston, Ohio; Addie died in February, 191 2: 
Irwin F., of this sketch; Warren H. lives in Urbana, Ohio; Mrs. Martha 
Miller lives in Findlay, this state ; Sidney W. is engaged in mercantile busi- 
ness at Kingston, Ohio; Frank M. and Mary F. are twins; Frank M. lives 
in Nashville, Tennessee, is a lawyer by profession and now holds the office 
of assistant city attorney there; Mary F. is the wife of Aaron L. Covault, a 
train dispatcher for the Erie Railroad Company at Marion, Ohio. 

Irwin F. Garard received his education in the public schools of the coun- 
try, also spent one term in school at Urbana. He and two sisters remained 
at home with their father until the latter's death. On April 4, 191 1, he mar- 
ried Elizabeth Runyan, of Clark county, Ohio. 

Mr. Garard was a member of the police force at Urbana, Ohio, for 
three and one-half years. He was also connected with the Urbana Ice Com- 
pany for a period of seven years and spent one year in the car shops there. 
He also worked one year at concrete bridge construction. On March 11, 
191 5, he located in Salem township, where he has since resided, owning a 
well-improved farm of eighty acres. 

Mr. Garard is a Democrat and has been active in the affairs of his party 
for many years. He is at present serving in the office of trustee of Salem 



CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 



395 



township. He at one time made a close race for the office of couirty com- 
missioner. Fraternally, he is a member of the Knights of Pythias. His 
wife belongs to the Baptist church. For two years, 1897-1899, Mr. Garard 
was a guard at the Ohio state reformatory at Mansfield. Ohio. 



C. D. LOUDEN BACK. 



C. D. Loudenback, cashier for the Northwestern Light and Lower Com- 
pany, of Urbana, is a native son of Champaign county and has lived here 
all his life, with the exception of the time spent in college and a few years 
spent in Arizona during the days of his young manhood. He was born at 
Westville, in Mad River township, son of Eugene F. and Martha (McCor- 
mick) Loudenback, both members of old families in this county, the latter 
of whom was a daughter of Jeremiah McCormick, and both of whom died 
w hen their son, the subject of this sketch, was a child. 

Eugene F. Loudenback also was born in Mad River township, son of 
David and Charlotte M. (Hebbard) Loudenback, who were among the most 
prominent of the early settlers of that part of the county, David, better known 
as Squire Loudenback, having been one of the wealthiest and most influential 
men of his generation in Champaign county. Squire Loudenback was a 
Virginian by birth, born in Page county, in the Old Dominion, March 20, 
1808, and was nine years of age when his parents. David and Susanna L. 
Loudenback, came with their family to Ohio and settled in Mad River town- 
ship, this coimty. It was on November i. 18 17, that the Loudenbacks 
arrived in this county and the family ever since has been prominently repre- 
sented here, other reference to this family being made elsewhere in various 
portions of this work. The elder David Loudenback and wife were the 
parents of eight children, five sons and three daughters, Benjamin, Ann. 
David, Rebecca, Emanuel. Barbara, John and Martin. 

The junior David Loudenback. the Squire, grew up on the home farm 
in Mad River township, and on June I, 1829, began teaching school there, 
his pay for such service l>eing ten dollars a month, out of which sum he had 
to pay his board, and he taught for fourteen consecutive terms, meanwhile 
continuing engaged in farm work. He later began clerking in a store at 
Westville and was thus engaged for three years, during which time he became 
engaged as a money lender, or private banker, at the same time carrying on 
a general real-estate business, and he gradually extended his operations along 



396 CHAMPAIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 

this line until he presently came to be recognized as probably the wealthiest 
man in Champaign county and one of the wealthiest in this part of the state. 
At one time Squire Loudenback was the owner of twelve hundred acres of 
land, all of which he had under cultivation. He also was one of the chief 
stockholders in the old Third National Bank of Urbana, now the Urbana 
National Bank, and had other large interests hereabout. During his school 
teaching days he had been employed for some time as deputy county surveyor 
and there were few men who had as intimate and thorough an acquaintance 
with Champaign county as he. For ten years he also served as clerk of Mad 
River township and in 1842 he was elected justice of the peace in and for 
that township and by successive re-elections was retained in that magisterial 
office for thirty-six years, during which time never was one pf his decisions 
reversed. The Squire also was for thirty years treasurer of his home town- 
ship and in other ways did much for the public service. He was ever in 
demand as an administrator of estates or as a guardian of minor wards and 
it is still said that there never has been in this county a man who was called 
on to administer as many estates or to act as guardian for as many children 
as was Squire Loudenback. From 1830 until the time of his death he was 
a member of the Universalist church and was largely instrumental in build- 
ing up the church of that denomination at Westville. He cast his first vote 
for Andrew Jackson for President and remained ever afterward a stalwart 
Democrat, for many years one of the leaders of that party in this part of 
the state. 

Squire Loudenback was twice married. It was in 1838 that he was 
united in marriage to Charlotte M. Hebbard, member of one of Champaign 
county's pioneer families, and to that union were l)orn nine children, Eugene 
F.. Hylas, Noah. Eliza, David, Henrietta, Charles G., Lucy A. and Devilla. 
The mother of these children died on June 26, 1857, and on July 22, 1858, 
tlie Squire married Mrs. Elizabeth A. (Custer) Smith, to which latter union 
were born three children, Rienzi, RoUa and Glendora. The eldest of these 
children, Eugene F. Loudenback, father of the subject of this sketch, com- 
pleted his schooling in Urbana University and afterward became associated 
with his father in the real estate and loan business, making his home at VVest- 
\'ille. He married Martha McCormick, daughter of Jeremiah McCormick 
anfl wife, pioneers of this county, and to that union were born three children, 
of whom the subject of this sketch is the only one now Hving. Eugene 1\ 
Loudenback continued in business with his father and was quite successful, 
but his promising business career was cut short by his early death. His 
\vid<t\\' (lifl not long snrvixe him. 



CHAMl'AIGN COUNTY, OHIO. 397 

Bereft of his parents in liis youtli. C. D. Loudenback was reared l>y his 
grandfather, and upon completing the course in his home school, took a 
course in Miami University at Oxford, this state, during which period of 
study his health began to fail and he went to Arizona, seeking restoration 
in the equable climate of that region. When restored to his wonted healtli 
Mr. Loudenback returned to this county and w\is engaged here in looking 
after his land interests until in 1907, when he became connected with the 
Northwestern Light and Power Company of Urbana and was made cashier 
of the same, a position he ever since has held. Mr. Loudenback is a Demo- 
crat, as were his father and his grandfather before him. and has ever given 
a good citizen's attention to political affairs, but has not been a seeker after 
public office. 

On May 17, 1897, C. D. Loudenback was united in marriage to Lulu 
B. Winchester, daughter of Clement Winchester and wife, and to this union 
has been born one child, a son, Richard. Mr. and Mrs. Loudenback are 
attendants at the Universalist church and take a proper interest in church 
work, as well as in the general social and cultural activities of their home 
town, and are helpful in promoting local good works. Mr. Loudenback is 
a member of the Springfield lodge of the Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks and takes a warm interest in the affairs of that organization. 



MINOR CARTMELL. 

Minor Cartmell, one of the l>est-known of the older residents of Urbana. 
dLix honored veteran of the Civil War and a retired cabinet-maker and wood- 
worker, is a native son of Ohio and has lived in this state all his life. He 
was born on a farm five miles west of West Jefferson, on the national road, 
in Madison county, August 18, 1845, ^^ son of Joseph H. and Rebecca (Bay- 
less) Cartmell, both of whom also were born in this state, the former in this 
county and the latter in the neighboring county of Madison. 

Joseph H. Cartmell was born on a pioneer farm in Union township, this 
county, on October 2^, 1809, son of John Cartmell and wife, the former of 
whom was one of four brothers who had come over here from Virginia about 
the year 1800 and had become pioneers of this county. John Cartmell set- 
tled in Union township and there he and his wife, Sophia Lance, established 
their home, early becoming recognized as among the leading and most influ- 
ential pioneers of that section of the county. They