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Full text of "History of Chautauqua County, New York, and its people"

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HISTORY 

OF 

CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY nV 

hlEW YORK 

AND ITS PEOPLE 



JOHN P. DOWNS 

Editor-in-Charge 

and 

FENWICK Y. HEDLEY 

Editor-in-Chief 

Assisted by a large corps of Sub-editors and 
Advisory Board 



do 




III 

Society, 

CHICAGO 




1/.3 


V.3 

VOLUME 




American Historical 

BOSTON NEW YORK 

1921 


Inc 



Copyright, 1921 
AMERICAN HISTORICAL SOCIETY, INC. 






BIOGRAPHICAL 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



317 



ALBIN JOSEPH CARLSON— Without doubt 
one of the most successful of the younger business men 
of Jamestown, Chautauqua county, N. Y., was Albin 
Joseph Carlson, late of this city, whose premature death, 
Aug. 14, 1918, at the age of thirty-eight, removed from 
the community a powerful factor in its material develop- 
ment, and abruptly ended a career which held out the 
most brilliant promises for the future. 

Mr. Carlson was a native of Sweden, born at Stock- 
holm, April 29. 1880, and it was in his native city 
that his childhood and early life were passed. He 
attended the local schools of Stockholm, and continued 
his studies there until he had reached his twentieth 
year. Shorth' afterwards his interest having been 
greatly awakened in the opportunities offered by 
America for the young man of enterprise, he came to 
this country, and directly upon landing came to James- 
town, where he quickly found employment with the 
Peterson Crest Tool Company, his alert mind and will- 
ingness to work hard recommending him to those who 
came in contact with him. In the establishment of that 
concern he learned not only the trade of tool making 
but general business methods, and proved himself so 
apt a pupil that he was rapidly advanced to positions of 
responsibility. Mr. Carlson remained for eight years 
with the Peterson concern and then, having in the mean- 
time saved a considerable portion of his earnings, found 
himself in a position to carry out an ambition long 
cherished by him, that of embarking in a business upon 
his own account. Accordingly he severed his connection 
with his old employers and formed a partnership with 
Mr. J. P. Danielson under the firm name of J. P. 
Danielson & Company, and a successful tool making 
business was founded. This business was carried on 
with a very high degree of success with Mr. Carlson a 
very active partner up to the time of his death in 1918, his 
cnerg}-, industry and business talent contributing in no 
small degree to its prosperity and development. Mr. 
Carlson was always keenly interested in the welfare of 
his adopted community, although up to the close of 
his life his business interests had prevented him from 
taking the part in public affairs for which his abilities so 
eminently fitted him. 

Albin Joseph Carlson was united in marriage. Feb. 8, 
1902, at Jamestown, with Hanna Gustafson, like him- 
self a native of Sweden, daughter of Gustave Gustafson, 
of that countrj'. One child was born of this union, 
Remhold Albin Carlson, Sept. 29, 1906. Since the 
death of Mr. Carlson, his widow has retained her interest 
in the firm of J. P. Danielson & Company, and in the 
management of her concerns has proven herself a fine 
business woman. 



ELMORE M. KENT, one of the most successful 
and progressive farmers of Westfield, Chautauqua 
county, N. Y., where he has been actively engaged in 
that pursuit for many years, is a member of an exceed- 
mgly old New England family, being of the ninth gen- 
eration from the founder of the house in America. He 
is a son of Lucian H. and Mary Fay (McEwen) Kent, 
and a grandson of Moses and Jerusha Kent, natives of 
Vermont. Moses Kent, his wife and two sons removed 
from that State to St. Lawrence county, N. Y., in the 
year 1822, the journey being made by the only possible 



means of conveyance in those days, by ox-team, and in 
the middle of the severe winter, through what was then a 
practically unbroken wilderness. They travelled along 
what was known as the Port Kent road and finally 
reached their destination successfully. 

Lucian H. Kent, upon reaching his majority, saw fit 
to make up f&r his early lack of education and attended 
an academy at Pottsdam, N. Y. Later he removed to 
French Creek township, Chautauqua county, where he 
became the possessor of a fine farm of 300 acres, situated 
about half way between Clymer and Marvin Post Office. 
In 1862, however, he removed to Westfield, where he also 
had a farm, and there passed the remainder of his life. 
He was a man of unusual character and mental endow- 
ments, and possessed unusually scholarly tastes. During 
practically his entire life he was a close student of the 
best literature, and read extensively all scientific and 
philosophical subjects. He was also a keen lover of 
nature, and indeed this largely accounted for the fact 
that he chose agricultural pursuits for his life's work. 
"The surroundings appealed to his poetic nature and 
served largely as the inspiration for his modest volume 
of poems 'Sunshine' and 'Storm', the title to which he 
chose as appropriate to the coloring it had received from 
his occupation." An example of this volume deserves 
I0 be quoted here : 

I love to live because the skies 
In beauty from above 
Shed down their light from Paradise, 
In forms of mildest love. 

I love to live Tvhere truth's bright beams 

Can reach the awful shade. 
That wilful falsehood here can form 
In light which God has made. 

Mr. Kent possessed an extraordinary physical consti- 
tution and was never confined to his bed by sickness a 
single day during his entire life He lived in a period 
in which he had seen most of the great social and political 
issues which this country has had to face in the formative 
period of its development decided, and his keen intellect 
kept him constantly interested in each new problem as it 
arose. Lucian H. Kent married. June 9. 1849. Mary Fay 
McEwen, the oldest daughter of Deacon George McEwen, 
of Lawrence, N. Y. Their married life was an unusually 
happy and harmonious one, and they celebrated their 
golden wedding, June 9, 1899, at the old family home in 
Westfield, with all the living members of their family 
present. Mr. Kent's death occurred March 9. igoo, and 
that of Mrs. Kent, Nov. 17, 1903. They were the parents 
of six sons and one daughter, as follows: I. Elmore M., 
mentioned at length below. 2. Herman L., born Jan. 31, 
1854, at Hopkinton, St. Lawrence county, N. Y., formerly 
engaged successfully in the manufacture of paper at 
Westfield as the head of the firm of Herman L. Kent & 
Company ; he is now engaged in farming and fruit grow- 
ing. 3. Henry B., a graduate of Western Reserve Uni- 
versity, and author of "Grafic Sketches of the West;" 
was born Oct. 21, 1855, and died while traveling at Canon 
City. Colo., June 25, i8go. 4. Elwin R.. born Nov. 11, 
1858; for some time private secretary to Hon. Daniel G. 
Rollins, surrogate in the city and county of New York, 
and died at Westfield, Nov. 14, 1890. 5. George S., one 
of the first graduates of and for a time a teacher in the 
Westfield Academy and Union School. 6. Alice C, who 
resides at Westfield, and is identified with grape culture 
in this region. 7. Vernon A., born Jan. 17, 1866 ; a prom- 



31? 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



inent ngure in the agricultural activities of this region; 
he was postmaster at W'estfield for twelve years. 

Elniore M. Kent, son of Lucian H. and JNIarj' Fay 
(.McEwen") Kent, was born June 7, 1S50. at Hopkinton, 
St. Lawrence county, N. Y. The first seven years of his 
'iie were passed at that place, and he was then brought 
by his parents to Chautauqua county and has since that 
time made the town of Westiicld his home, with the 
exception of five years, when he resided in French Creek 
towxship. As a lad he attended the public schools of 
W'estfield and the W'estfield Academy, and upon com- 
pleting his studies became a teacher in the public schools. 
He was also employed for a short time on the staff of 
the W'estfield "Republican," and later went to New York 
City, where he worked on the staff of the New York 
"Daily Standard," which was published at No. 34 Park 
Row, by John Russell Young. He then went to Burling- 
ton, \"t., where he became associated with Mr. C. C. 
Post, who was a manufacturer of sugar maker's supplies 
on a large scale. On the death of Mr. Post, Mr. Kent 
was appointed administrator of his large estate. In 1881 
he returned to W'estfield, where he formed an association 
with his brother, Herman L. Kent, and purchased and 
rebuilt the W^estfield Paper Mills, which they operated 
i.nder the firm name of Herman L. Kent & Company. 
Mr. Kent resides at South Portage street. In addition to 
his paper business, Mr. Kent is the owner of several large 
farming properties, and at the present time devotes most 
of his time to taking care of these and other interests. 
He is a member of the W'estfield Business Men's Associ- 
ation, and is a staunch Republican, though he has never 
cared for public office or political preferment of any kind. 
Although not a member of any church, Mr. Kent attends 
the W'estfield Presbyterian Church and is a trustee 
thereof, having taken a very active part in the affairs of 
the congregation. One of the enterprises which Mr. 
Kent has conducted for the benefit of the community 
is that known as Kent's Glen, where he spends a con- 
siderable portion of each summer and where he main- 
tains an e>:cellent swimming place for boys, as well as 
walks, drives, picnic and pleasure grounds. He has also 
made many improvements on the natural park situated 
on his lands at Buttermilk Falls, which he also main- 
tains for the benefit of the public. 

Elmore M. Kent was united in marriage, June 20, 18S9, 
with Edna M. Chittenden, daughter of Varick A. Chitten- 
den, of Hopkinton, N. Y., where her birth occurred July 
12, iHl'/). Mrs. Kent was educated at the Andovcr Female 
Seminary at Andover, Mass., and died June 26, 1897. 

The W'estfield Paper Mills, which have so many years 
been prominent in the industrial development of the 
community, was founded shortly after the Civil War, 
in 186:;, by .Allen Wright, who returned to Westficld after 
having amassed a considerable fortune in the oil business. 
Mr. W'right formed a stock company and purchased the 
old "Cottage Grist Mill" which he rebuilt and fitted for 
the manufacture of pajK.-r. For a time the concern was 
engaged in the manufacture of white printing paper. 
At that time the market for this kind of jiaper was com- 
I-arativcly small in this region, and the mill was idle for 
a part of each year. The price of white paper at that 
time ranged from ts to 20 cents per jwund, however, 
and the sale of a comparatively small amount of it con- 
stituted a good business. About 1867, or 18O8, Mr. 



Wright, foreseeing the great demand there would be for 
grape baskets in this region of large vineyards, and being 
of an inventive and mechanical turn of mind, conceived 
the idea of making a grape box from paste board. 
Meeting with success in this invention, the output of the 
mill was changed from white paper to strawboard and 
special machines were invented by Mr. Wright for the 
cutting of this product into shape for the round paper 
grape boxes which were made mostly in sizes to contain 
five and ten pounds of grapes. These grape boxes were 
manufactured during that part of the year which pre- 
ceded the grape harvest and were very attractive, having 
a colored label with a cut or stem of grapes on the covers 
and the pasteboard covered with a light sheet of fancy 
paper resembling cloth finish and in a variety of designs. 
This new enterprise met with considerable success for a 
time, but the introduction of wood grape baskets event- 
ually drove them from the market and the mill remained 
idle until about 1870. In that year a brother of Allen 
Wright, Mr. Reuben G. Wright, who had also gained a 
fortune in the oil business, came to W'estfield, and in 
company with E. P. Whitney purchased the plant, a 
new partnership being formed under the name of R. G. 
Wright & Company. The mill was once more rebuilt 
and new machinery was installed for the manufacture of 
white straw printing paper, the first to be made in the 
State, and almost a new product in the country. This 
quality of paper was of a snow white color and was made 
of cheap straw, but once more the promoters of the 
industry failed to realize their expectations as the paper 
proved too brittle and did not give satisfaction to the 
printers who used it. The business was continued by 
R. G. Wright & Company from 1870 until the autumn of 
'877, however, but during that time the price of paper 
gradually fell, and with the entrance upon the market 
of the new fibre wood pulp the demand for it was dis- 
continued. Accordingly, the mil! was sold out to a Mr. E. 
A. C. Pew, of Canada, and afterwards passed into the 
hand of Bradford I. Taylor, who in 1878 leased it to 
Herman L. Kent. In 1880 the latter, in association with 
his brother, Elmore M. Kent, purchased the property 
and once more the mills were equipped with new 
machinery and used for the manufacture of "Kent's 
Economy Sugar Bags." The paper for these bags was 
stripped durin,g the process of making and was of un- 
usually heavy stock, being sold by the pound instead -of 
by the thousand as in the case of the light manilla bags. 
They were indeed the first of their kind to be manu- 
factured in the country, and in addition to them the mill 
also turned out a large quantity of wrapping paper. In 
1895 the mills were sold to Smith Brothers, a firm 
which continued to run them about two years when they 
were destroyed by fire. The firm of Herman L. Kent 
& Company was dissolved after the sale of these mills, 
but the paper business was continued in the brick block 
built by Mr. Kent in Wcstfield, his paper warehouses 
being located in the business district of the town on 
North Portage street. In the year 1890 another paper 
warehf)use was built, connected with the first warehouse 
:>nil giving a storage capacity in both buildings for over 
200 tons of paper goods. These buildings were after- 
ward remodeled and converted into the "Portage Inn" 
by John Jrmes. Elmore M. Kent was for many years 
president of the Chautauqua and Eric Grape Company. 




MR. AND MRS. E. A. BACXj AND DAUCjUTHR 

CA)KKWAN(,() VAI I l;V. N, Y. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



319 



GARNET M. HUNTER, M. D.— Instant and 
cordial recognition will be accorded to the appearance 
of this name not only by Dr. Hunter's fellow-citizens of 
Westfield, but by very many of the residents of Chautau- 
gua county. Dr. Hunter is quietly but helpfully identified 
with the most essential interests of his home town, and is 
regarded as one of her most valued citizens. 

Garnet M. Hunter was born April 18, 1876, in Tor- 
onto, Canada, and is a son of Samuel James and Char- 
lotte (Ruston) Hunter. Mr. Hunter, who was of 
English descent, and filled the position of a clerk, is now 
deceased, but is survived by his widow. Garnet M. 
Hunter was educated in public and high schools of his 
native city, graduating from the high school in 1893. He 
then entered the medical department of the University of 
Toronto, receiving in 1898 the degree of Doctor of 
Medicine. For about one year thereafter he served as 
interne in the Toronto General Hospital, and then went 
to New York City where he took a post-graduate course. 

In 1900 Dr. Hunter began practice in New York 
City, and at the end of two years removed to Sag Harbor, 
Long Island, N. Y., where he remained until 1907, when 
he came to Westfield. Here he established his own 
hospital, maintaining it for four years, and in 191 1 
entered upon a course of general practice. His clientele 
is now large and constantly increasing. He takes a 
special interest in the study of chronic diseases and 
their treatment by means of water, light, and electricity, 
and is now the house physician to the Rumsey Inn and 
Mineral Bath Corporation of Westfield. 

In all matters pertaining to his profession he keeps 
fully abreast of the times. His choice of a medical 
career was wholly voluntary, his desire being sufficiently 
strong to lead him to assist in defraying the expenses of 
his professional education. In politics Dr. Hunter is an 
independent voter. He holds membership in the Ameri- 
can Medical Association, the New York State Medical 
Society, and the Chautauqua County Medical Society. 
He affiliates with the Masonic fraternity, the Royal 
Arcanum, and the Loyal Order of Moose. He attends 
the Presbyterian church. 

Dr. Hunter married, Oct. 9, 1901, Florence M., 
daughter of William and Jane (Thomas) Rea, of 
Ottawa, Canada. They are the parents of one child : 
Garnet Rea, born Oct. 7, 1905. now attending the West- 
field High School. Like her husband Mrs. Hunter is of 
English descent. 

Devoted as he is to his profession. Dr. Hunter is 
undoubtedly a man to inspire in the physicians and 
students brought within the circle of his influence 
increased enthusiasm for medical science. 



EDWIN ALLEN BAGG, who for thirty-two years 
has been the owner and operator of a substantial business 
at Conewango Valley, Chautauqua county, N. Y., namely, 
the hardware store conducted under his own name at 
that place, and the Daisy Buckwheat Flour and Feed 
Mills, at Conewango Valley, has by a successful business 
life, and a private life marked by honorable purpose 
and action, become esteemed by his neighbors, and become 
a man in whom the residents in general have confidence. 
This is evidenced by the position he holds in the adminis- 
tration of the leading financial institution of the district; 
he has been president of Conewango Valley National 
Bank since its organization, January, 1917, and has in 



great measure aided in building that institution to its 
present condition of stability and prosperity. 

Edwin Allen Bagg was born in Ellington, N. Y., Oct. 
29, 1863, the son of Allen and Allison Lee (Boyd) Bagg, 
of that place. His father, Allen Bagg, was a farmer in 
that vicinity, who by consistently and intelligently apply- 
ing himself to the tilling of his property became a man 
of some means, and much respected as a man and a 
churchman. As a boy, Edwin A. attended the district 
school of his native place and eventually became a 
student at the Ellington High School, and in due time 
became a graduate thereof. He has spent practically 
his whole business life in Conewango Valley, and is 
probably one of the most widely-known men of that 
district. For thirty-two years he has been in independent 
business as a hardware merchant, and most of the people 
of the neighborhood have had dealings with him, in some 
branch of hardware, or in his other business capacity, as 
the owner and operator of the Daisy Buckwheat Flour 
and Feed Alills, at Conewango Valley. And the record of 
those dealings must have been good, in point of honor, 
as well as financial return, otherwise he would not have 
been elected to the office of president of the national 
bank of that place, an administrative office which demands 
of its occupier not only an amply demonstrated capability 
as a man of business but a record of undeniable moral 
integrity, in other words, such a position of honor and 
responsibility calls for a man in whom the stockholders 
and depositors might have implicit confidence that their 
holdings and deposits would be safely and shrewdly 
handled. 

Primarily, Mr. Bagg has gained substantial success 
in life by early recognizing that a trading value must 
be given as well as demanded, if the trading is to bring 
further transactions. Throughout his business life, he 
has pursued consistently that principle — of giving value 
for value. Of course, success would not come by that 
alone; one of the fundamentals of success in the staples 
of commerce is industry ; without industrious effort, 
properly and enterprisingly applied, expansion of business 
is not probable ; and Mr. Bagg for more than thirty years 
has consistently applied himself with commendable 
assiduity to his business interests, and has always sought 
to keep his business up-to-date. He has also given unself- 
ishly of his time and substance to further many local 
causes, manifesting a sincere community interest, both 
in regard to social and church functions. He has been 
a member of the First Methodist Episcopal Church of 
Conewango Valley for many years, earnest in his attend- 
ance thereat, and substantial in his support thereof. 

On June 24, 1908, at Rockland, Pa., he married Cora 
Mabel, daughter of Peter Lovell and Eleanor (Burns) 
Pryor, of that place. They have one child, Alice Eleanor, 
born on Oct. 24, 1910. 

Mr. Bagg has not taken much part in political move- 
ments, that is, in those that had no direct bearing upon 
local affairs, and he has never sought political oflSce. 
Fraternally, he is an Odd Fellow, and has been some- 
what prominent in the dispositions and functions of the 
local body of that order. Generally, Mr. Bagg has been 
a worthy, useful citizen, ready at any time to give assist- 
ance to neighbors needing such aid, and to further in any 
way possible any local project that he considered might 
tend to enhance the well-being of some phase of com- 
munitv life. 



-^20 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



CHARLES J. BELLINGER— Prominent among 
ihe citizens of Silver Creek, X. Y., is Charles J. 
Bellinger, owner and editor of the Silver Creek "News," 
who has since the inception of his business career 
been identified with newspaper work. 

Charles J. Bellinger was horn in the town of Ava, 
Oneida count>-. N. Y.. Ang. 27, 1856, the son of David and 
Mary (Warrathl Bellinger. He received his education 
in the schools of his native place, taught school for a 
short time, and then became associated with the local 
department of the Rome "Daily Sentinel." Subsequently 
going to NVatertown, X. Y., he became local or city editor 
of the Watertown "Daily Times," continuing in news- 
paper work in that city for twenty -five years. In 1908 
failing health compelled retirement from daily journalism 
and he came to Chautauqua county and bought the 
"Ripley Review," which he edited for four years, selling 
it in 1912. In 1914 he bought the Silver Creek "News" 
and has since been associated with this particular paper. 

Mr. Bellinger is a man who has stood throughout his 
journalistic career for all that makes for the betterment 
of home life and of civic welfare, and the journals which 
he has edited have been known as upholders of strict 
moral principles and high ideals in public and private 
life. 



WILLIAM ELIAL SKINNER, who for a number 
of years has been a conspicuous figure in the agricul- 
tural life of Portland township, Chautauqua county, N. 
Y.. is a member of one of the old distinguished families 
of this region which was founded here early in the nine- 
teenth century. The first of the family to settle in Chau- 
tauqua county was David Skinner, son of Daniel and 
Harriet Skinner, of Chenango county, N. Y., and grand- 
father of the present Mr. Skinner. He was born in the 
town of Norwich, Chenango county. Aug. 12, 1803, and, 
with his brother .-Mfred, came to Portland township in 
the month of October, 1819, when he was but si.xteen 
years of age. He purchased a fruit farm which he sold 
in 1824 in order to buy a larger property, the claim 
of Joel Smith. This he sold to Samuel Hull in 1835 and 
three years later bought a valuable farm of Almon 
Taylor, of which he continued the owner and which has 
remained in the possession of the family ever since, 
part of it belonging to the Mr. Skinner of this sketch. 
David Skinner was a man of the true old pioneer type, 
possessed of tremendous encrgj- and endurance, as may be 
gathered from the fact that, unaided, he cut down the 
trees and cleared the land of about 500 acres of the 
great virgin forest which at that period covered practi- 
cally the whole of the district. Indeed he was regarded 
by his fellow pioneers as the most expert woodsman and 
axeman in the rcgir^n. He was a prominent figure in tin- 
life of the community during his day, and was a staunch 
Democrat in politics. He marricfl Cfirst) on Christmas 
Day, 1825, Betsey Hill, a daughter of Lewis Hill, who 
was born Aug. 14. 1803, and died Dec. 22, 1836. He 
married ^second) CJct. 9, 1837, Mary Williams, daughter 
of Elial Williams, of Portland. By his first wife he had 
the following children: Josejih, born March 13, 1827, 
married Antoinette Morley, and removed to .Michigan; 
Homer, born June 6, 1829, and married Martha Fuller; 
I-cster, born May 12, 1831; I<o>;y Ann, born Feb. 12, 
1833, and became the wife of Mortimer I'rancis; Franklin, 



born .\pril 16, 1835, and married Catherine O'Neil. By 
his second wife three children were born to David 
Skinner, as follows : Elial William, father of William 
Elial Skinner, of whom further ; George W., born Sept. 

30, 1840, who married Susan Jane Taylor; Mary Jane,, 
I'orn May 2, 1842, who became the wife of John Gordon. 

Elial William Skinner was born Sept. 30, 1838, and was 
a grape cultivator on a large scale. He served in Com- I 
pany E, 154th Regiment, New York Volunteers, for three ! 
years during the Civil War, and was captured at Gettys- ' 
burg and held a prisoner at Andersonville for eighteen 
months. He was a Democrat in politics, and a prominent 
Mason. His death occurred June 30, 1911. Elial \\'illiam 
Skinner married, Feb. 9, 1870, Betsey Haight, born March 
I, 1840, at Smithville Flats, Chenango county. N. Y., 
died March 29, 1913, a daughter of Luke and Polly 
Haight, and they were the parents of two children: 
I. Lillian A., who resides at Portland, N. Y., where 
she operates a farm ; she was prominent in war 
work during the World War, especially in connec- 
tion with the various government campaigns for 
money, and the Red Cross ; also an active member of 
the Methodist church and the Women's Relief Corps, 
president of the Ladies' Club, and a member of the 
Eastern Star Society. 2. William Elial, of whom further. 

William Elial Skinner, son of Elial William and Betsey 
^ Haight) Skinner, was born in Portland township, Dec. 

31. 1S76, and received his education in the public schools 
of Wcstfield, attending the high school there, .-^fter com- 
pleting his studies at the latter institution, he worked 
for a time on the building of the highway and later 
engaged in the manufacture of baskets, which he sold to 
the local grape growers to contain their crops. He con- 
tinued in this line for about five years and then became 
associated with his father in the latter's agricultural 
operations. The firm of E. W. Skinner & Son was 
formed and operated a splendid farm, formerly the old 
Taylor estate, of about 300 acres, which had been inher- 
ited by the elder man. A portion of this property was 
later sold, but still later an additional 150 acres were 
secured and devoted to fruit culture and dairying. At 
the death of Mr. Skinner, Sr., the property was divided 
between his two children and at present Mr. Skinner has 
80 acres of his share given over to cultivation of the vine 
and other fruits. Owing to his knowledge of the subject, 
and the manner in which he has kept his land highly 
cultivated, Mr. .Skinner has met with great success as a 
grape grower, the product of his farm being of the best 
type, and he has shipped his grapes to many parts of the 
country for about fifteen years. Mr. Skinner, besides 
being an expert farmer and fruit grower, is a gifted 
musician. He is a delightful performer on the violin 
and an accomplished conductor, and has organized an 
fjrchestra from the native talent, with which he has 
toured the country and given many successful concerts. 
In politics Mr. Skinner is an ardent supporter of Dem- 
ocratic principles, as have been his forebears for many 
years, and has taken an active part in local public affairs. 
He has held the office of committeeman for the Second 
Election District for a luimljer of years and is a force 
to be reckoned with in the politics of the county. He is 
a member of the Methodist church and a prominent Free 
.Mason, having attained to the thirty-.second degree of that 
f.rder, and being affiliated with Lake Shore Lodge. No. 




i)tlXV)> jMUtQ 




MiMt ^. 3jame0 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



321 



851, Free and Accepted Masons. He is also a member of 
the Farm Bureau. 

William Elial Skinner married (first) Sept. 16, 1907, 
Bessie Scott, of Portland, a daughter of John Franklin 
and Cora (Phillips) Scott. Her death occurred June 14, 
1918, and on July 30, 1919, Mr. Skinner married (second) 
Viola Beatrice Fuller, of Portland, a daughter of George 
W. and M. Berdena (Fay) Fuller, old and highly 
respected residents of that place. 



HARRY JAMES— In the year 1847 John W. James 
came from England to the United States and located 
m the city of Philadelphia, Pa., where the ensuing years 
of his life were spent. There his son, Harry James, 
now one of the honored retired citizens of Dunkirk, 
N. Y., was born. For more than a quarter of a century, 
1894-1920, Mr. James has been a resident of Dunkirk 
and so established himself in public regard that he has 
been called to many positions of honor and trust, in- 
cluding the highest civic honor that could be conferred, 
that of mayor. In every position to which he has been 
called by his fellow-citizens, Mr. James has displayed a 
breadth of vision and a keen public spirit which has 
in all cases made for the benefit of his city, and his 
place in public regard is one of honor and esteem. John 
W. James conducted a livery, sale and exchange busi- 
ness in Philadelphia, and there died. His wife, Harriet 
(Hayes) James, bom in England, died in Irvington, 
N. J. They were the parents of four children, Clara 
(Mrs. Keitch) of Irvington, N. J., and Harry, of Dun- 
kirk, the only survivors. 

Harry James, second child of John W. and Harriet 
(Hayes) James, was born in Philadelphia, Pa., March 
5. 1853, and there attended public school until sixteen 
years of age. He then entered the William Butcher 
steel plant at Nicetown, Pa., near Philadelphia, going 
thence to the Baldwin Locomotive Works in Philadelphia, 
where he remained until another move took him to 
Scranton, Pa., where he was engaged with the Scranton 
Locomotive builders. After leaving Scranton he spent six 
and one half years with the Cook Locomotive Works 
in Paterson, N. J., going thence to the Richmond Loco- 
motive Works, Richmond, Va., where he remained until 
1894. Those years of experience in locomotive works 
had given him an intimate knowledge of the locomotive 
construction, and in 1894, when he located in Dunkirk, 
N. Y., he was quickly employed by the Brooks Loco- 
motive Works as superintendent of their steam hammer 
department. He continued in that position for eight 
and one-half years, then in 1903 he resigned and 
has since taken no active part in business affairs, but has 
devoted much time to the public service. When the 
Atlas Crucible Steel Company of Dunkirk was organ- 
ized by Edward Burgess, Mr. James was one of the 
first to avail himself of the privilege of purchasing 
stock, having strong faith in the future of that now most 
important industry. This well illustrates his keen fore- 
sight and business vision and his willingness to aid in 
any enterprise that promises to benefit his city. 

He has otherwise evidenced his public spirit and holds 
rank with the progressive men of Dunkirk. He repre- 
sented Ward 4 in City Council for two years, and for 
a like period was a representative from Ward 3. In 

Chau— 21 



1909 he was elected mayor of Dunkirk and gave the 
city an excellent administration. For two years he 
served on the Board of Water Commissioners, and 
was president of the board for one year. He also 
served the city as police and fire commissioner; was 
chairman of the Board of Assessors for two years, 
then resigned, and is now living a quiet, retired life, 
although deeply interested in public affairs. He is a 
Republican in political faith. Mr. James is a member of 
Irondequoit Lodge, No. 301, Free and Accepted Masons; 
Dunkirk Chapter, No. 191, Royal Arch Masons; Dun- 
kirk Council, No. 25, Royal and Select Masters; Dun- 
kirk Commandery, No. 42, Knights Templar ; Ismailia 
Temple, Nobles of the Mystic Shrine; a member of the 
Masonic Club and its chairman. 

Mr. James married, June 27, 1876, Kate S. Stuart, 
of Pliiladelphia, Pa. Mr. and Mrs. James are attend- 
■ ants of the Methodist Episcopal church. 



CHARLES HENRY ZENNS— Fourteen years 
town clerk and seven times elected by acclamation. 
This is the record of the man whose name heads this 
article and it is, to say the least, improbable that it can 
be matched by few public officials either in Chautau- 
qua county or elsewhere. Mr. Zenns is still town clerk 
of Mayville, and has filled with credit other local offices 
of trust and responsibility. 

Joseph Zenns, grandfather of Charles Henry Zenns, 
was overseer of the town of Mayville. 

Xavier Joseph Zenns, son of Joseph Zenns, was of 
Mayville and filled the position of hotel clerk. He took 
an active part in community affiairs, serving as town 
constable. His wife was Mary Elizabeth, daughter of 
Lombard and Elizabeth (Hepple) Dornbarger, and they 
were the parents of the following children : Charles 
Henry, mentioned below ; Joseph W., of Mayville. Mr. 
Zenns in now deceased. 

Charles Henry Zenns, son of Xavier Joseph and Mary 
Elizabeth (Dornbarger) Zenns, was born May 3, 1881, 
at Mayville, and attended the grammar and high schools 
of his native town, graduating from the high school 
in 1899. Prior to this he had been occasionally em- 
ployed, but he now began work in earnest, obtaining a 
position as clerk in a store. In 1900 he established 
himself as a barber, a business which he still conducts, 
being the oldest representative of that calling, in point 
of service, that Mayville can boast. Always active in 
support of Republican principles, Mr. Zenns has been 
energetic in the public service. His remarkable record 
as town clerk has already been mentioned, and his next 
reelection will retain him in office until Dec. 31, 1921. 
For two years he served on the Village Board, and he 
has also held the office of assistant fire marshal. He 
affiliates with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
serving as recording secretary, and his religious mem- 
bership is in the Protestant Episcopal church. 

Mr. Zenns married, Nov. 24, 1903, in the Protestant 
Episcopal church of May\'ille, Helen, daughter of Solo- 
mon and Laura (Case) Tallman, and they are the 
parents of two children: William Tallman, born Sept. 
2, 1904, now attending school; and Paul Donald, born 
Aug. 9, 1907. 

In twenty years Mr. Zenns has had but two months 



322 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



vacation. He is the son and grandson of men who 
rilled satisfactorily important community offices, and 
his own record more than maintains the high reputation 
of the family for honorable public service. 



AARON HEYWOOD LEACH, representative of 
one of the oldest families of the Ellington section of 
Chautauqua county, has reached venerable age. and has 
long since reached a more than sufficient material com- 
petence, and a general respect in the community and 
county such as only a man of commendable and honor- 
able life could gain. Mr. Leach still lives upon the 
farm in Ellington upon which he was born, eight\--seven 
years ago and can tell much that is interesting regarding 
early conditions of living in that section of the county. 
His father was Joseph Leach, a carpenter and farmer, 
well known in his day in Chautauqua county ; his grand- 
father. Jacob Leach, was one of the pioneers. 

Aaron H. Leach was born Oct. i, 1832, and after 
passing through the graded school of the district he 
took up the occupation of farming upon his father's 
farm, and also did much work with his father as a 
carpenter. Mainly, however, his life has been passed 
in farming, to which he has given honest labor, for 
which he has received honest return. He has never 
expected to receive more than value for value, for he 
well knew that nothing could be stable upon any other 
condition. In farming, particularly, satisfactory return 
from the soil first demands adequate labor upon the 
soil; and so it follows that success in farming is a 
true indication of the industry of that farmer. Mr. 
Leach long since reached the point where he had 
accumulated means more than sufficient for his needs, 
and that accumulation came from his own hard but 
well directed labor. 

He has been a Republican for many years, and had 
he wished it he could, upon many occasions, have been 
elected to public office, for his standing in the community 
has always been good, and his friends are widely spread 
and many. But apart from intelligently and independ- 
ently exercising his voting privilege, he has not taken 
much part in national politics. In local matters, how- 
ever, he has always been interested, and in his younger 
days took active part. The affairs of the community 
to him have always been the affairs of his own home, 
and he has ever been ready to further, financially or by 
personal seri-ice, any local project which he thought 
might tend to benefit his neighbors, or the affairs of his 
community. In church matters he was for many years 
very active. He has been a consistent churchman all 
his life, and has steadily supported the local church of 
the Congregational denomination, of which he is a 
member. At various times, he has also contributed to 
the support of other churches. 

The recent war was a subject upon which Mr. Leach 
showed that his interest was whole-souled. Many times 
during the dark days of 1917 and early 1918 he probably 
wished he could go back in age five or six decades, for 
the thrill of patriotism made him wish to be with those 
vigorous, valiant, younger patriots in France. 

Mr. Leach's private life has Ijeen estimable. He 
married, Sept. 2, i%8, in Winfield, Herkimer county, 
N. v., Martha Jane, daughter of Jacob and Hester 
Ann COoodicr) Leach. To the union came two children: 



I. Charles G., who was born on Feb. 21, 1875. 2. Hester 

A., who was bom on April 6, 1879. 

His long life, and long association with the agricul- 
turists of Chautauqua county, makes the writing of 
this record for the current history a pleasure, for his 
biography certainly should have place in it, representing 
as he does a worthy generation of Chautauqua county 
agriculturists now almost all gathered to their Maker. 
Bearing in mind his venerable age, Mr. Leach is still 
vigorous, and the clearness of his mind and cheerfulness 
of thought are definite indications of a steady, healthy 
life, one in which the canker of selfishness and discon- 
tent did not enter. 



WILLIAM ARAH PUTNAM, M. D.— The Put- 
nams of Chautauqua county trace from John Putnam, 
who was a settler in Salem, Mass., as early as 1634, 
and through John Putnam, the Pilgrim, they trace 
through sixteen generations of English ancestors to 
Simon de Puttenham, the first of the name who is of 
definite record in England. The town of Puttenham is 
mentioned in the Domesday Book, and the parish of 
Puttenham is in Hertfordshire. The coat-of-arms to 
which American descendants of the line are entitled is 
thus described : 

Arms — Sable between eight crosses, crosslet fltchee, 
argent a stork o( the last, beaked and legged gules. 
Crest — A wolf's head gules. 

Abner Putnam, the founder of this branch of the 
Chautauqua county family, was a son of Captain 
William Putnam, born in Sutton, Mass., Jan. 7, 1755, 
his wife. Submit (Fisk) Putnam, born Aug. 20, 1768. 
Their son, Abner Putnam, was born in Buckland, Mass., 
July 28, 1794, died in the town of Stockton, Chautauqua 
county, N. Y., Aug. 27, 1862. He married, in Buckland, 
April 28, 1818, Vesta Mallory, born Feb. i, 1795, died 
May 18, 1872, daughter of Hiram Mallory, bom March 
5, 1776, and Hannah Mallory, born Aug, 20, 1768. In 
the year 1818, Abner and Vesta (Mallory) Putnam 
came from Buckland, Franklin county, Mass., and 
settled in the town of Stockton, taking up land just 
south of where the Cassadaga railroad station now 
stands. Abner Putnam was a cousin of Captain Andrew 
Putnam, who came to Stockton in February, 181 7. His 
son. Worthy Putnam, was an early and successful 
teacher, county superintendent of schools, and lawyer. 
Abner Putnam died in 1862, his widow continuing her 
residence on the homestead until 1873. They were the 
parents of six sons and four daughters, all of whom 
survived their parents. This review follows thi career 
of the youngest son, Edwin Putnam, and that of his 
son, Dr. William A. Putnam, of Forestville, Chautauqua 
county. 

Edwin Putnam, son of Abner and Vesta (Mallory) 
Putnam, was born at the farm near Cassadaga, in the 
northeastern part of the town of Stockton, Chautauqua 
county, March 24, 1828, died at his farm near Waite's 
Corners in the town of Charlotte, Sept. 9, 1889. He 
was educated in the district schools, and so well im- 
proved the advantages of those early schools that he 
afterwards taught in them for several tenns. He, 
however, early in life engaged in farming, an occupation 
and business which he followed all his life. In 1856 




(^.(jiyO(yU^^L.€l^^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



323 



he went to Wisconsin and spent a year on a farm at 
Janesville, but tlie next fall he returned to Chautauqua 
county. He then, with a young man, David Peebles, 
equipped a "prairie schooner" and drove through Brown 
county, Kansas, where they located claims, built a log 
cabin and spent the winter. The next spring Mr. Put- 
nam returned to Chautauqua county, intending to 
return West with his family, but instead decided to sell 
his Kansas land and purchase a farm in Stockton. The 
political disturbances in Kansas with the ravages of the 
"border ruffians" undoubtedly aided in bringing about 
this decision, but whatever the reason it was sufficiently 
strong to keep him in the East. He bought 75 acres on 
Cassadaga creek from the Holland Land Company, 
lying about two miles south of the lakes, a property 
which he owned all his after life, and now is owned by 
his daughter. He was always interested and active in town 
affairs, often serving as school trustee, path master and 
assessor, also for two terms filling the important office 
of justice of the peace. He was a Whig in politics, but 
after the stormy political times which swept that party 
out of existence he joined with the party of Abraham 
Lincoln and ever afterward voted with the Republican 
organization. 

Edwin Putnam married (first) Sept. 15, 1853, Harriet 
Irons, daughter of Rev, Arab and Mary (Miles) Irons, 
and granddaughter of William Irons, born Jan. 27, 
1767. Rev. Arab Irons was born Aug. 13, 1803. His 
wife, Mary (Miles) Irons, was born Jan. 24, 1807, died 
Jan. 14, 1880. Mrs. Harriet (Irons) Putnam died Sept 
5, 1859, and in 1861 he married (second) Mrs. Electa 
A. (Montague) Waite, and purchased the "Waite 
Farm" near Waite's Corners in the town of Charlotte. 
There he resided until his death, over a quarter of a 
century later, in 1889. By his first marriage Edwin 
Putnam had two children, both of whom survive him : 
William Arab, of further mention ; and a daughter, 
Mary Elvira, born Feb. 20, 1857, married Oct. 28, 1880, 
William H. Roberts. By his second marriage there 
were two boys : George E., and Edwin D., both of 
whom died in childhood. 

William Arab Putnam, only son of Edwin Putnam 
and his first wife, Harriet (Irons) Putnam, was born 
at the farm near Cassadaga, town of Stockton, Chau- 
tauqua county, N. Y., July 11, 1854. After courses of 
public school study and a course at Fredonia Normal 
School he entered the medical department of the Uni- 
versity of Buffalo, whence he was graduated M. D., 
class of 1884. After graduation he practiced his pro- 
fession at Smiths Mills and Westfield for several years, 
continuing until 1897, part of that time practicing in 
association with Dr. Edgar Rood, a graduate of the 
University of Buffalo, class of 1890. In 1897 Dr. Put- 
nam moved to Smiths Mills, going thence to Forest- 
ville, in the town of Hanover, where he is yet in suc- 
cessful general practice. He has been health officer of 
the town of Hanover for fourteen years, and is highly 
regarded as a skilled physician and a public-spirited 
citizen. He is the owner of a good farm which is 
largely devoted to dairy farming and fine cattle. He 
is a member of Hanover Lodge, No. 152, Free and 
Accepted Masons, and is a Republican in politics. 

Dr. William A. Putnam married, Oct. 24, 1878, Mary 
A. Ames, bom Jan. 6, 1857, daughter of David Hardy 



Ames, born in Hancock, N. H., May 24, 1817, died Nov. 
30, 1891, and his wife, Clarissa Ann (Edson) Ames, 
born Feb. 8, 1816, died Nov. 11, 1888. Mr. and Mrs. 
Ames were married in Batavia, N. Y. Mary A. (.-Xmes) 
Putnam is a granddaughter of David Ames, born Dec. 
22, 1786, died in 1848, married, July 23, 1812, Sally 
Hardy, born Dec. 8, 1791, died Nov. 27, 1879. Dr. 
and Mrs. Putnam are the parents of two children: 
Edwin David Putnam, M. D., and Harriet Adeline 
Putnam. 

Edwin David Putnam was born at Cassadaga, Stock- 
ton, Chautauqua county, N. Y., Jan. 17, 1880. He was 
educated at Westfield Academy, whence he was gradu- 
ated, class of 1898. That was the year war was declared 
against Spain by the United States, and the young man 
on July 7, following graduation in June, enlisted at 
Buffalo in Company K, 202nd Regiment, New York 
Volunteer Infantry. He was with that command suc- 
cessively at Camp Black on Long Island, Camp Meade 
in Pennsylvania, and Athens, Ga., going thence to 
Savanah enroute to Cuba. The 202nd was one of the 
first regiments from the United States to arrive in 
Havana after its evacuation by the Spaniards, and were 
later stationed at Guanajay, in Pinao del Rio province, 
Cuba, and in the spring of 1899 returned to the United 
States via Savannah, where they were mustered out and 
honorably discharged, April 15, 1899. In October, 1899, 
the young veteran entered the medical department of 
the University of Buffalo, whence he was graduated 
M. D., class of 1903. After serving a term as interne 
at Buffalo General Hospital and one year in Erie County 
Hospital, he began the private practice of medicine at 
West Seneca, continuing three years until igo8, when 
he formed a partnership with his father and located in 
Forestville, N. Y. He married, Dec. 14, 1912, Helen P. 
Lunt, of Dunkirk, N. Y., daughter of Alfred H. and 
Dora (Popple) Lunt. They are the parents of a son, 
Alfred Lunt, and a daughter, Mary Jane. Dr. Edwin 
D. Putnam is a member of the Masonic order, holding 
the thirty-second degree of the Ancient Accepted 
Scottish Rite, member of the Chautauqua County and 
New York State Medical societies, member of the Silver 
Creek Motor Boat Club, Omega Psi fraternity, member 
of the school board and politically a Democrat. 

Harriet Adeline Putnam, only daughter of Dr. 
William A. Putnam, was born at Cassadaga, Stockton, 
Chautauqua county, N. Y., March 4, 1882. _ She was 
educated at Westfield Academy, and now resides at the 
family home in Forestville. 



MYRON A. WHITNEY— There are, perhaps, few 
residents of Chautauqua county and, more especially, 
those living in the vicinity of Sherman, who will not 
recognize this name as that of one by birth and ancestry 
a Chautauquan. In addition to being a leading agri- 
culturist, Mr. Whitney has always been actively identi- 
fied with community affairs, invariably giving his 
influence for the advancement of all that he deemed 
calculated to further the truest interests of his friends 
and neighbors. 

Orange Whitney, grandfather of Myron A. Whitney, 
came in 1829 to the farm on which his grandson is now 
living, then almost a wilderness, but having a fine rich 
soil. On the northwest comer of his land Mr. Whitney 



324 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



reared a dwelling for his family and this was their 
home for a number of years. Eventually it was 
destroyed with the exception of the old fashioned fire- 
place which remained standing until a few years ago. 

Myron A. Whitney was born July i. 1S47, on the farm 
purchased and cleared by his grandfather, and was a 
son of George Orange and Janett (Taft) Whitney. He 
received his education in the Park Hill and Mount 
Pleasant district schools. In course of time he succeeded 
to the ownership of the ancestral farm which originally 
comprised 150 acres. Additions made by Air. Whitney 
have increased this to 193, 91 J -2 of these being in Chau- 
tauqua township, while the others lie in Harmony town- 
ship. Mr. Whitney engages in general farming and has 
in addition a fine dairy, .\bout half the acreage is 
under cultivation. The improvements are modern. 
Mr. Whitney has an average of five horses, thirty cattle, 
thirty-six sheep and one hundred cliickens. He has con- 
structed most of the present improvements, and the 
estate is in every way in very fine condition. In the 
sphere of politics, Mr. Whitney is an independent voter 
and at one time held the office of school trustee. He 
belongs to the Grange and to the Chautauqua County 
Farm Bureau. His religious membership is in the 
Methodist Episcopal church of North Harmony. 

Mr. Whitney married. Sept. 12, 1S72, at Jamestown, 
N. Y., Mary A., daughter of Benjamin and May A. 
(Hay\vard) Wood. The Woods are farmers in Chau- 
tauqua county and old settlers in Harmony township. 
Mr. and Mrs. Whitney are the parents of two daughters : 

1. Mabel, educated in the district schools and Sherman 
High School ; married Leon Austin, a prosperous farmer 
of Sherman, and has two children, Lenore and .\udry. 

2. Blanche Jeanette, educated in the same manner as 
her sister: married Herbert Bliss, of Sherman, and has 
two children. Hazel and Esther Jeanette. 

Myron A. Whitney is a member of a family which 
for nearly a century has been resident in Chautauqua 
county and has aided materially in the development of 
its agricultural interests. He himself has most ably 
followed this example and in doing so has made a record 
which adds a worthy chapter to the annals of his prede- 
cessors. 



NATHAN C. COBB, native nf Chautauqua county, 
K. Y., a respected and prosperous farmer of Kennedy, 
that county, for very many years, and a veteran of 
worthy Civil War record, has by his life brought 10 
himself an appreciable measure of esteem in the neigh- 
borhood, and at various times has been elected to public 
office in the administration of that part of the county. 
He is now in his seventy-seventh year, having been 
born on .\ov. 22, 1843, in Poland, Chautauqua county. 
His parents were Richmond and Maria (Fairbanks) 
Cobb, the former a substantial farmer within the county 
for the greatcT part of his life. Nathan C. was edu- 
cated in the common schools of his native place, and 
he was only eighteen years old when he joined the 
Union forces of the Civil War. He enlisted Aug. 31, 
l%2, in the Ninth New York Cavalry, as a member of 
Company C. and during all the severe fighting in which 
that dashing regim'rnt had a glorious part from that 
time until the end of the war, Nathan C. Cobb partici- 
pated, being mustered out with honor, June 3, 1865. 



Thereafter, until the present, he has been an industrious 
farmer, living his life independently and taking his 
share in the public burdens of the county of his nativity. 

Mr. Cobb has been popular in his own district, has 
been interested, and at times has taken very active part 
in local as well as national politics, in-so-far as they 
bear upon local conditions. He has for many years 
been staunch in his allegiance to the Republican party, 
and has been a factor of some consequence in its affairs 
in the Kennedy district. Of local offices, he has held 
those of constable and collector very effectively for 
several years. And for many years he has been interested 
in the functioning of the local Grange, of which he is 
a member. 

Nathan C. Cobb was married, at Poland, Chautauqua 
county, Jan. 9, 1869, to Anne E. White, who was born 
on July 23, 1S49, in Garland, Pa., the daughter of 
Joseph L. and Sophia White. Therefore, Mr. and Mrs. 
Nathan C. Cobb have had the crowning satisfaction of 
celebrating the fiftieth, the golden, anniversary of their 
wedding, upon which occasion their many friends and 
neighbors gave them some indication of the respect in 
which they are held in that section of the county in 
which they have lived through so many decades. To 
them have been born two children : Claude W., who 
was born Dec. 19, 1878; Oren J., who was born May 
7. 1880. 

During the recent World War, Mr. Cobb followed its 
progress with keen interest, and as was to be expected, 
his own war record had some influence in inspiring 
martial and patriotic ardor among the young men of the 
district whose turn had come to bear the national 
burdens in the fighting ranks. And in home production 
of foodstuffs, which were so vitally necessary to thecause, 
and in producing abnormal yields of which American 
farmers did so commendably, Mr. Cobb, although of 
late years not so vigorous as formerly, did all that he 
was able, following events day by day with an interest 
which, at times, made him long to be again in the thick 
of the fighting. Still his service during the rigors of 
three years of campaigning such as the patriots had to 
endure during the Civil War was a sufficient national 
service for one life, and has justly brought him honor 
since. 



LUKE HAIGHT FAY, election commissioner of 
Mayvillc, Chautauqua county, N. Y., and a well known 
and popular figure in the general life of the community, 
is a native of Brocton, born Dec. 14, 1872. He is a son 
of Albert Appleton and Catherine (Haight) Fay, and 
a grandson of Captain Joseph B. Fay, one of the best 
known men in this region during his life. 

Albert Appleton Fay was born in Elyria, Ohio, Oct. 
2. 1884, his parents' name being Whitney, who died when 
he was a small boy. Soon after their death he came to 
Sinclairville, N. Y., and shortly after was adopted by J. 
B. Fay and came to Brocton, where he spent his life. 
At the outbreak of the Civil War, he enlisted in Com- 
pany D, oth New York Cavalry, and served throughout 
the war, In'ing discharged with the rank of sergeant; he 
was twice wounded in action. For twenty-one years 
Mr. Fay was one of the assessors of the town of Port- 
land, holding that position at the lime of his death, 
which fully exemplified the confidence in which he was 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



325 



held by his fellow-townsmen. At various times, smce 
the organization of Brocton as a village, he served as 
one of the trustees and was elected to that office in the 
spring of 1920. For several years he was president and 
manager of the Chautauqua Grape Company, was a 
member of the Farm Bureau, and a charter member of 
Portland Grange, Patrons of Husbandry; James A. 
Hall Post, Grand Army of the Republic; J. B. Fay 
Camp, Sons of Veterans; and Brocton Lodge, No. 284, 
Knights of Pythias. Mr. Fay married, Dec. 11, 1867, 
Kate Haight, who with three children, Luke H., of 
further mention, George A., of Corry, Pa., and Mrs. 
Vernon Mathews, of Brocton, survive. Mr. Fay died 
May 15, 1920, and the funeral services were conducted 
by the Rev. S. M. Gorden, of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. The burial, in Evergreen Cemeterj', was in 
charge of the Knights of Pythias, and eleven of his old 
soldier comrades acted as honorary bearers. 

Luke Haight Fay secured his education at the public 
schools of Brocton and the Westfield High School. He 
then entered a business college at Erie, Pa., where he 
took a commercial course, and upon completing his 
studies there secured a position in his father's coal 
business. The young man remained there for about 
three or four years and then travelled to the West, 
settling for a time at the city of Des Moines, Iowa, 
where he was employed by the Edison Electric Light 
Company for a year. His next move was to Chicago, 
where he remained for a similar period in the wholesale 
department of Marshall Field & Company's great estab- 
lishment. Returning to the East he once more became 
affiliated with his father in the latter's coal business 
and continued this association for some five years. Mr. 
Fay in the meantime had become keenly interested in 
grape culture, and severing his connection with his 
father he purchased a fine vineyard of which he took 
up the cultivation. He remained thus engaged until 
1917, when he was elected to his present position as tax 
commissioner of the township. At the present time 
Mr. Fay devotes his entire attention to the discharge 
of his responsible duties as a public officer, and has won 
the respect of his fellow-citizens of all political creeds 
and parties for the disinterested and impartial manner 
in which he has conducted his department. Mr. Fay is 
a member of Lake Shore Lodge, No. 851, of Brocton, 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; Chapter No. 191, 
Royal Arch Masons ; Dunkirk Council, No. 25, Royal 
and Select Masters ; Dunkirk Commandery, No. 40, 
Knights Templar; and Ismailia Temple, Ancient Arabic 
Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He is also affiliated 
with Brocton Lodge, Knights of Pythias, of which he is 
past chancellor commander, and the Portland Grange, 
Patrons of Husbandry. In politics he is a Republican, 
and besides his present office has also held other public 
posts, being connected with the State Census office. 
He was also secretary of the Chautauqua Grape Com- 
pany for four years, an organization which cares for the 
marketing and selling of the product of the vineyards 
in this locality. 

Luke Haight Fay was united in marriage, April 30, 
1903, with Mary F. Maginns. of Portland, N. Y., a 
daughter of Frank A. and Alma Maginns, old and 
highly respected residents of that place. Two children 
have been born of this union, as follows : Donald Whit- 
ney, aged eleven ; and Dorothy Edith, aged five. 



ORRIE ARTHUR OTTAW AY— Among its mem- 
bers of the younger generation the Chautauqua county 
bar has no representative who, in comparatively few 
years, has become more widely or favorably known 
than the citizen of Brocton whose name heads this 
article. Mr. Ottaway holds the office of justice of the 
peace for the town of Portland, and is prominently 
identified with the interests of the Masonic fraternity. 

James Ottaway, great-grandfather of Orrie Arthur 
Ottaway, wa^ the operator of a mill at Headcorn, 
England, and married Arabella . For genera- 
tions the Ottaway family has been resident in the County 
of Kent. In 1823 James Ottaway emigrated to the 
LTnited States accompanied by his brother Horatio. 
After si.x weeks' voyage they landed in New York and 
proceeded by sloop to Newburgh, going thence by steam 
and wagon to Buffalo. Leaving his family there, James 
Ottaway went in quest of land on which to erect a 
house for them and eventually took up a wild tract in 
Alina township, Chautauqua county. Nettles were 
growing on the land and this fact may have inclined 
him to its selection inasmuch as in England there was a 
tradition that the presence of nettles was an indication 
of fertile soil. He purchased a portion of lot 13 and 
built thereon a log cabin. His was the first deed of 
land in the eastern part of the town of Mina, and he 
was the first of the many Englishmen who settled in 
that region. 

John E. Ottaway, son of James and Arabella Ottaway, 
was born June 20, 1827, on the homestead, in the town 
of Mina, and received his education in the common 
schools. In the course of time he purchased the farm 
from his father and devoted himself to its cultivation. 
Inheriting the literary tastes of his father, he availed 
himself of all the means of supplying the deficiencies 
of his education which came within his reach, thus 
becoming an extremely well-informed man. The numer- 
ous offices of trust whic'n he held in his native town 
and county included that of supervisor. From the 
inception of the Republican party he was actively identi- 
fied with it, frequently representing his town at conven- 
tions. The confidence inspired by his character and 
abilities caused him to be often chosen as the executor 
of estates and the guardian of funds. For many years 
he was a director of the State Bank of Sherman. Mr. 
Ottaway married, Oct. 17, 1849, Sarah, daughter of 
Benjamin and Sarah (Hosmer) Boorman, both of whom 
were English and among the first settlers in the town of 
Sherman, having lived there since 1825. Mr. and Mrs. 
Ottaway were the parents of the following children : 
Osmer J., mentioned below; Arthur B., of Westfield; 

G. Frederick, of Mina ; Susan A., wife of Jones, 

of Mina; and Cora E., of Westfield. On Oct. 17, 1899, 
Mr. and Mrs. Ottaway, surrounded by their children 
grandchildren and close friends, celebrated the golden 
anniversary of their marriage. 

Osmer J. Ottaway, son of John E. and Sarah (Boor- 
man) Ottaway. married Ellen Hewitt, and they were 
the parents of Orrie Arthur, mentioned below. 

Orrie Arthur Ottaway, son of Osmer J. and Ellen 
(Hewitt) Ottaway. was bom Feb. 23, 1884, on the home- 
stead, in Mina township, and received his primary edu- 
cation in the local district school. When he was seven 
years old the family moved to the village of Sherman 
and he attended school there, afterward entering 



326 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



Allegheny College, Meadville. Pa. His legal education 
was received in the law department of Syracuse Univer- 
sity, where he graduated in loog with the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws. The following year Mr. Ottaway 
entered upon the practice of his profession in the office 
of Ottaway & Munson at W'esttield, very shortly moving 
to Brocton. where he was associated with F. C. Lewis. 
Subsequently the partnership was dissolved, since which 
event Mr. Ottaway has practiced alone. Steadily and 
surely he has built up an enviable reputation, winning 
the implicit confidence of his professional brethren and 
the general public. Like his father, Mr. Ottaway has 
always supported the principles of the Republicans, and 
has never been known to fail in public spirit. He is 
now justice of the peace for the town of Portland. He 
was master of Lake Shore Lodge. No. S51, Free and 
Accepted Masons, also affiliating with the chapter, of 
Dunkirk, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of 
Brocton, and the Knights of Pythias, also of Brocton, 
in which he holds the office of past chancellor. He is 
a member of the Methodist Episcopal church of Brocton. 

Mr. Ottaway married. Nov. 8, 191 1, Mabel, daughter 
of Tom and Lenora Culver, of Westfield, and they are 
the parents of one child, Elizabeth Mae Ottaway, who is 
now attending the kindergarten. 

The qualities of foresight, sound judgment and 
aggressive energy by which Mr. Ottaway's ancestors 
were distinguished "on both sides of the sea" have thus 
far contributed to his success in his chosen profession 
and now open before him a most promising future. 



WILLIAM WESLEY COLE, M. D.— For hventy- 
si.x years a practicing physician of the town of Hanover, 
located in the village of Silver Creek, Dr. Cole was one 
of the best known men of the town. He came to Chau- 
tauqua county from Baldwinsville, in Onondaga county, 
was a native son of the Empire State, and spent his 
years (si.xty) within her borders. He was a physician 
of learning and skill, highly esteemed by his brethren of 
the profession, and devoted to his work as a healer of 
human ills. He was of a family inheriting medical 
tastes, and one of four brothers, all doctors : Dr, George 
Cole, of Conneaut, Ohio; Dr. E. E. Cole, of Manlius, 
N. Y.; Dr. P. A. Cole, of Cleveland, Ohio; and William 
Wesley Cole, whose memory this review perpetuates. 

William Wesley Cole was bom at Sand Lake, 
Rensselaer county, N. Y., Feb. 17, 1859, and died at the 
German Deaconess Hospital, April 8, 1919. Though 
poor in health, he continued to look after his practice 
until a few days before his death, when blood poisoning 
developed from a slight injury to his hand. He went to 
the hospital for treatment, but his condition was such 
that he considered his case almost hopeless from the 
first, and arranged his business affairs accordingly. He 
grew to manhood in Rensselaer county, there completed 
his public school study, and began reading medicine. 
He completed professional study at Cleveland Medical 
Schof^l, whence he was graduated M. D., class of 1891, 
and the same year began practice in Baldwinsville, N. Y. 
Two years later, in 1893, he came to Chautauqua county 
and located at Silver Creek, where his remaining 
twenty-six years of life were spent in successful medical 
practice. He had a large practice in his village and 
town, and was universally esteemed. While he gave to 



his profession the strength of body, physical and mental, 
he was fond of farm life, and became an enthusiast 
on grape culture and the owner of a farm of 87 acres. 
Friendly and social by nature. Dr. Cole was interested 
in all village activities, and in all that went to make 
village life enjoyable and profitable. He was a member 
of Silver Lodge, No. 757. Free and Accepted Masons; 
a charter member of Silver Creek Lodge, Odd Fellows; 
and a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Dr. Cole married (first) Emma Cranse. who died in 
Baldwinsville, N. Y., leaving a son, Harold Wesley 
Cole, who died aged twenty-one. Dr. Cole married 
(second) at Silver Creek, N. Y., J. Belle Morrison, 
daughter of Frank Morrison, of Scotch descent, and a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church. Mrs. Cole 
died at Silver Creek, Aug. 2, 1896, and is buried in 
Glenwood Cemetery, Silver Creek. They were the 
parents of a daughter. Daphne Bell, who was an infant 
when her mother died. She had the lo\-ing care of a 
devoted father, and attended the public schools until 
completing fifth grade work, when she became a student 
at Holy Angels Academy, Buffalo, where she completed 
her education. She is a member of the Roman Catholic 
church, and was her father's devoted associate until the 
latter's death. Miss Cole married, Sept. 16, 1917, J. 
Harry Wilde, of Jamestown, N. Y., who was a member 
of Company E, which left Jamestown under command of 
Captain, now Major, Charles A. Sandburg, and went 
overseas with the 27th division, American Expeditionary 
Forces, to take part in the war between the United 
States and Germany. Mr. and Mrs. Wilde are the 
parents of a son, Cole Wesley Wilde, born Nov. 18, 
1919. Dr. Cole married (third) Ina Mereness Van 
Schoonoven in July, 1898. She now resides in Syracuse 
with a niece, Mrs. Dr. George Retan. The funeral of 
Dr. Cole was from his home, on Main street, and in 
charge of the Masonic fraternity, brief remarks being 
made by Rev, H. H. Bair, of the Methodist church. 
He was buried in Baldwinsville. 



LAMONT ALLEN JEFFERDS, a prominent 
figure in the industrial life of Brocton, Chautauqua 
county, N. Y., where he has been engaged in the manu- 
facture of furniture for a number of years, is a native 
of Randolph, Cattaraugus county, N. Y., where his birth 
occurred Nov. 7, 1878, a son of Owel and Emma (Hard- 
ing) Jefferds, his parents now making their home in 
New York City, where the elder Mr. Jefferds is the 
assistant cashier of the Seaboard National Bank. 

Lamont Allen Jefferds passed his childhood at his 
native place and there attended the local public schools 
for a time. When his parents removed to New York 
City he accompanied them and attended the public schools 
of the Metropolis until he was sent to the Chamberlain 
Institute at Randolph, N. Y. After completing his gen- 
eral education at the latter institution, he entered the 
New York Commercial School of New York City, where 
he was prepared for a career in business. He then 
entered the employ of the New York Telephone Com- 
pany, where he worked in a clerical capacity for five 
years, and was then given a position in the Seaboard 
National Bank, in which his father was an officer. There 
he remained for another five years, and then became 
associated with the Farish-Stafford Company, where he 




<^yD7% (^ if~^ -^zr^^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



IV 



was employed for six years longer. At the end of that 
period, having gained a wide knowledge of business 
methods generally and of banking in particular, he left 
New York City and returned to his native place, where 
he took a position in the Randolph Bank. His next asso- 
ciation was with the department store of T. E. Adams 
Company at Randolph, where he was connected with the 
retail department for two years, after which he entered 
the services of the Randolph Furniture Works as assist- 
ant to the secretary-treasurer. After three years spent 
there in learning the business of manufacturing furni- 
ture, Mr. Jefferds was offered the position of assistant 
manager of the factory of the Brocton Furniture Com- 
pany of Brocton, N. Y., and came to this place on Feb. 
I, 1916, to take up his new task. Since that time he has 
continued in that capacity and has done much to advance 
the interests of the important concern with which he is 
associated. He has made himself of the greatest value 
to his employers, and everything points to a brilliant 
future for him in the line of business that he has chosen. 
Mr. Jefferds has always taken a public-spirited interest in 
the general life of the communities where he has dwelt, 
and is a conspicuous figure in the social circle of Broc- 
ton. He is a Republican in politics, and a Methodist in 
religious belief, attending the Methodist Episcopal church 
of Brocton. 

Lamont Allen Jefferds was united in marriage, Sept. 
16, 1907, at Randolph, N. Y., with Tillie M. Shean, of 
that town, a daughter of Michael W. and Bridget (Mc- 
Mahon) Shean. Two children have been born of this 
union, as follows : Milton Lamont and Donald Francis. 



FRED E. MORSE — The dual interests of real 
estate and insurance are perhaps more closely connected 
than any others with the progress and prosperity of most 
communities. Certain it is that they play an important 
part in the life of Chautauqua county and equally cer- 
tain is it that they have no more successful nor aggres- 
sive representative than the citizen of Fredonia whose 
name stands at the head of this article. Mr. Morse is 
helpfully identified with other essential interests of his 
home town, and is a figure of prominence in Masonic 
circles. 

Fred E. Morse was born Feb. 29, 1856, in the town of 
Stockton, Chautauqua county, N. Y., a son of Hiram P. 
and Mary A. (West) Morse. Mr. Morse was by trade a 
blacksmith. Fred E. Morse attended local schools and 
assisted his father in the latter's work until the age of 
eighteen. He then went into business for himself as a 
carriage painter and blacksmith, but was forced by fail- 
ing health to abandon the undertaking. He then moved 
on a farm in Stockton, remaining until May 20, 1892, 
w^hen he came to Fredonia and opened a saddlery and 
hardware store, later taking over a grist mill. The next 
occupation to which Mr. Morse turned his attention was 
the one in which he was destined to score his greatest 
success — insurance. His first association with it was in 
connection with the Prudential Life Insurance Company, 
with which he remained for ten years. At the end of that 
time he engaged for himself in the same line of busi- 
ness, meeting, as the years went on, with an ever-increas- 
ing measure of success. His business now consists of 
two departments : Real estate, in which he has a partner ; 
and insurance, including all kmds, which he conducts by 



himself. He represents the following companies: Bos- 
ton, Scottish, Union, Franklin, Republic, Standard, and 
Equitable Life. The vote and influence of Mr. Morse 
are always given to the principles advocated by the Re- 
publican party, but he takes no active share in the work 
of the organization. He affiliates with the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows of Fredonia. 

Mr. Morse married, Jan. 6, 1880, Adda May, daugh- 
ter of Edward and Melinda (Berry) Sprague, of Laona, 
N. Y., and they are the parents of the following children : 
I. Harry P., married Clella Bartlett, and they have three 
children, Gerald, Donald, and Thomas. 2. Myrtle, wife 
of Leonard Carr; they have two children, Dorothy and 
Gerald. 3. Berdena, wife of Arthur Hunt. 4. Clara. 
5. Marion. 

The career of Fred E. Morse furnishes a lesson in the 
advantage of seeking the occupation for which one is 
best fitted. He persevered in the quest and on trying real 
estate and insurance was soon convinced that he had 
found his place. The public has long shared, most thor- 
oughly, his own conviction. 



WILLIAM BERNARD CONROY, president of 
the Conroy-Buchanan Lumber Company, of Jamestown, 
N. Y., is a man of pleasing personality and energy of 
character ; quick to note the possibilities of a business 
transaction and equally quick to detect any effort to de- 
fraud or misrepresent. 

Born in Irvington, Pa., July 7, 1870, the son of John 
D. and Ellen M. (Merchant) Conroy. The latter is still 
living, but the father died some time ago. It was from 
his father that Mr. Conroy inherited his business ability, 
for the elder Conroy was engaged in mercantile pursuits 
for many years. The boy's education was gained first 
at the district school and afterward at the Youngsville 
High School. After that he secured employment with 
the Western, New York & Pennsylvania Railway Com- 
pany as station agent and telegraph operator, remaining 
thus occupied for seven years; in 1900 he decided to 
make a change and entered the employ of the Indiana 
Lumber Company, continuing with them for two years. 
In 1902 Mr. Conroy saw an opportunity for advance- 
ment with the Mead Speer Lumber Company of Pitts- 
burgh, Pa., and remained there for four years. By that 
time he felt himself capable of conducting a business of 
his own, and going to Jamestown he became a member 
of the above mentioned company. 

Mr. Conroy is greatly interested in all affairs pertain- 
ing to Jamestown. He is a Free Mason, having passed 
through the Blue Lodge, Chapter, Commandery and Scot- 
tish Rite ; he is a member of the First Congregational 
Church, as are also his wife and children. In politics 
he is an independent voter, choosing the man he considers 
best for the office. He is nothing of a politician, for busi- 
ness occupies too much of his time to leave room for 
such a diversion. 

William Bernard Conroy married, Feb. 6, 1903, Annie 
L. Thompson, of Plumer, Pa. Of this union three chil- 
dren were born: Allen Thompson, Mary Louise, Har- 
old William, deceased. 

Mr. Conroy started his career with no other capital 
than experience and a determination to succeed, and now 
he is head of a thriving business which is growing more 
successful each year. 



^2S 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



EDWARD LOWRY BUCHANAN, the treasurer 
of the Conroy-Buchanan Lumber Company, is like his 
partner a self-made man, bringing to the company only 
lionesty of purpose and a willingness to work for the 
building up of the business. That they have succeeded 
in this is con.ceded by all who know the partners and 
their standing in the community. 

The parents of Edward L. Buchanan were David A. 
and Mary Jane (Fetterman) Buchanan, residents of 
Titusville. Pa., where their son was born July 6, 1871. 
David A. Buchanan died several years ago, but his wife 
still survives him. He was a farmer and also conducted 
a butchering business. The son, Edward L., was edu- 
cated in the district schools of Venango county. Pa., 
afterwards entering the Clarion State Normal School, 
'rom which he graduated in 1S05. He taught school for 
four years after graduating, and previous to that had also 
taught school. Desiring to advance in life, Mr. Buchanan 
secured a position with the Oil Well Supply Company of 
Oil City, Pa. After three and a half years with this 
company he resigned to accept an opening with the Model 
Milling Company of the same city, where he remained 
for a year and a half, going then into the office of the 
Citizens Traction Company. 'When his stay there came 
to an end. he and Mr. Conroy decided to enter into busi- 
ness together, forming the firm known as the Conroy- 
Buchanan Lumber Company in 1907. 

Mr. Buchanan is an upholder of the tenets of the Pro- 
hibition party and votes that ticket at election time. He 
is a congregationalist in religion, his wife and children 
attending the First Congregational Church of James- 
town: he is also a mem.bcr.of the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, being connected with the local lodge. 

On Jan. 2, 1899, Edward Lowry Buchanan married 
Elnora .-K. Thompson of Plumer, Pa. Of this marriage 
two children were born : Mary Isabel, 1902 ; Arthur 
Thompson, 191". Mr. Buchanan and Mr. Conroy are 
not alone business associates, but are connected by mar- 
riage, having married sisters. 



and friendship of their customers, they have no trouble 
in disposing of their wares. They are highly respected 
in Jamestown, and in the twelve years the company has 
been in existence have made a name and place for them- 
selves among the business men of that city. 



CONROY-BUCHANAN LUMBER COMPANY, 

William Bernard Conroy, president; Edward Lowry 
Buchanan, treasurer ; Margaret Thompson, secretary. 

In 1907 two young men arrived in Jamestown with the 
intention of starting in business, one coming from Pitts- 
burgh, Pa., where he had been connected with the Mead 
Spccr Lumber Company, and the other coming from the 
Oil Well Supply Company of Oil City, Pa. These men, 
Willard Bernard Conroy and Edward Lowry Buchanan, 
had both been trained by several years employment in 
\vr>rA products business, .so they felt fully capable of 
conducting a hardwood and veneer concern. They 
entered into partnership in the spring of 1907, continu- 
ing it until the following autumn, when they made an 
incorporated company of it, with the officers above men- 
tioned as members, under the corporate name of the 
Conroy- Buchanan Lumber Company. From the very 
b'rjjinning they were most successful, buying their goods 
in carload consignments and selling them all over New 
York State and through the Ohio Valley. Both men act 
as buyf-rs and personally attend to the sales in their 
individual territories, and as (hey only handle fine, reli- 
able gofjfls, and V,th youn>; men, have the confidi-nce 



ROSS J. GOLDSMITH, one of the successful con- 
tractors of Brocton, N. V., where he was engaged in 
business for a number of years, is a native of that town, 
his birth having occurred there on Jan. 7, 1884. He 
is a son of James and Ida (Berg) Goldsmith, the former 
a laborer in these parts for many years. 

The early life of Ross J. Goldsmith was passed in 
poor surroundings without many of the educational 
advantages which are so valuable in aiding young men 
in their start in a business career. He attended, how- 
ever, the local public schools, remaining at these insti- 
tutions until he had completed the grammar grades and 
studied for a time in the Brocton High School, and then 
found it necessary to engage in some remunerative 
occupation. Accordingly he secured a position in a 
local basket factory when little more than a child, and 
in 1906 began to serve as an apprentice in a plumbing 
establishment. He spent five years in all in the employ 
of that concern, first as an apprentice and then as a 
journeyman plumber, and in 191 1 was appointed a 
master plumber. During the time he was so employed 
Mr. Goldsmith saved with rigid economy a large pro- 
portion of his slender earnings in order some day to be 
in a position to become independent and engage in 
business on his own account. This ambition he was able 
to realize in 1911, when he severed his connection with 
his old employers and established himself as a con- 
tractor in his native town of Brocton. Since that time 
he has continued in his chosen line, has built up a great 
success throughout this region, and handles much im- 
portant work here. Among the large jobs that he has com- 
pleted in the past should be mentioned the residence of 
Conrad W. Green, who is himself the subject of extended 
mention elsewhere in this work; the handsome summer 
home of Mr. Windburn. the Bailey building, the build- 
ing of the Paul DeLaney Company, the plant of the 
Brocton Food Juice Company, all at Brocton, and the 
Memorial Hospital building at Lillydale. He has a large 
and fully equipped establishment at Brocton, and is 
justly regarded as one of the substantial citizens of the 
community, his success being due entirely to his own 
efforts. Mr. Goldsmith has always taken a lively interest 
in the general affairs of Brocton and the surrounding 
region, and is a well known figure in the general life of 
the place. He is a Republican in politics, but although 
he keeps himself always abreast of all the issues of the 
day, both local and national, has never as yet taken that 
part in public affairs for which his practical talents so 
admirably fit him. He is not a member of any church, 
but members of his family attend the local Baptist house 
of worship. Mr. Goldsmith is a member of the Ancient 
Free and Accepted Masons and the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows. 

Ross J. Goldsmith was united in marriage, March 7, 
1017, with Jessie Gustafson, of Dunkirk. N. Y., a 
daughter of Alfred and Emma Gustafson, old and 
highly respected residents of tlial place. 





'4^\^c^i^^i^\^^tyL^ 




lujjj^ l^L) . kJ{t 



y/Tuj-v^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



329 



ELMER WALTER POWERS, M. D.— No name 
stands higher in medical circles at Westfield, Chau- 
tauqua county, N. Y., than that of Dr. Elmer Wal- 
ter Powers, who has been engaged in practice here 
for a number of years and established an enviable repu- 
tation both for his ability as a physician and for the 
high standard of professional ethics which he has con- 
sistently maintained. Dr. Powers was born Dec. 9, 1870, 
at Panama, N. Y., a son of Joel and Harriette M. 
(Lewis) Powers, the former still surviving. The elder 
Mr. Powers has largely retired from active business, 
but holds the distinction of being the oldest justice of 
the peace at North Harmony. The Powers family is a 
very old and distinguished one in Chautauqua county, 
and Mr. Powers' grandfather, the Rev. Simon Powers, 
was rector of the First Baptist Church at Panama 
early in the nineteenth century. 

Dr. Powers attended as a lad the public schools of 
Panama, and later was a student at the Westfield High 
School, where he was prepared for college. In the 
meantime he had determined to follow the profession 
of medicine as a career in life, and with this end in view 
entered the medical department of the University of 
Vermont at Burlington, Vt. After having take the pre- 
scribed course in medicine he was graduated with the 
class of 1S99, winning his degree of medical doctor. 
He then entered the Mary Fletcher Hospital at Burling- 
ton, as an interne, and served in that capacity for one 
year, thus gaining the practical experience necessary to 
supplement his theoretical knowledge. Upon complet- 
ing this term of apprenticeship. Dr. Powers removed to 
the West and settled at Conneaut, Ohio, where he 
remained two years, engaged in the practice of his pro- 
fession. At the end of that time, however, he was induced 
to abandon his profession for a time and became a 
salesman for the Burns Vaporizer Company, of West- 
field, N. Y., and travelled in various parts of the country 
as their representative for two years. He then returned 
to his former career and resumed his medical practice 
at Ashville, N. Y., in the year 1904. He continued to 
be thus engaged for a period of about fourteen years 
and established a wide reputation throughout that 
region. On Sept. 15, 1918, Dr. Powers removed to 
Westfield, where he has since been actively engaged in 
his profession, and although the time has been brief he 
has already gained recognition as one of the most capable 
physicians in the community. He still possesses his 
license to practice medicine in Ohio. Dr. Powers has 
taken a lively interest in local affairs for a number of 
years, and is a well known figure in the general life of 
the community. He is a member of many important 
organizations including the Chautauqua County Medical 
Society, of which he is president, and the New York 
State Medical Society. He is also a member of the 
University of Vermont Alumni ; of Summit Lodge, 
No. 219, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons ; Lakewood 
Lodge 628, Independent Order of Odd Fellows; the 
Order of Maccabees, and the American Medical Associ- 
ation. In religious belief he is a Methodist, attending 
the church of that denomination at Westfield, and in 
politics a Republican. 

Dr. Elmer Walter Powers was united in marriage, 
Sept. ID, 190S, with Gertrude Pardee, of Harmony, N. 
Y., a daughter of James and Sophia (Gypson) Pardee, 



and they are the parents of two children, as follows : 

Harriette Elizabeth, now a student at the Westfield 

High School ; and Kenneth Pardee, who attends the 
grammar schools here. 



TIMOTHY JOSEPH DESMOND— As one of the 

heads of the widely known Desmond Coal Company and 
Desmond Fisheries the man whose name we have just 
written stands forth so prominently, not only among his 
neighbors of Dunkirk, but also among his fellow-citizens 
of Chautauqua county, as to render any words of intro- 
duction not only unnecessary but wholly superfluous. 
To say that Mr. Desmond is known in his town and 
county is distinctly an under statement, inasmuch as his 
name, from its connection with a great fisheries concern, 
is familiar in many states of the American Union. 

Timothy Joseph Desmond was born in Buffalo, and 
is a son of Timothy and Ellen (Harrigan) Desmond, 
both natives of Ireland, but married in the United 
States. The educational facilities of Timothy Joseph 
Desmond were limited, and he was early obliged to 
become a wage earner. His business ability being above 
the average, and his industry and energy equal to it, 
he found himself, when in the prime of life, one of the 
proprietors of two great concerns, the Desmond Coal 
Company and the Desmond Fisheries. The founding 
and maintenance of either of these enterprises would 
have been sufficient to place Mr. Desmond among the 
foremost business men of Western New York. 

The Desmond Coal Company handles all kinds of 
coal and gives employment to ten men. It owns its 
trucks and carries on a very extensive business. The 
Desmond Fisheries own five steam tugs and miles of 
nets, employing twenty-eight men on their own boats. 
It works by contract twelve other steam tugs and gaso- 
line motor boats on which they employ eighty-four 
hands. They own their cold storage, packing and 
fish houses, employing in these forty hands. Their 
catch averages 1,200 tons annually and is shipped 
into the states of New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, 
Massachusetts, Tennessee, Kentucky, Missouri, Mich- 
igan, Indiana, Illinois, Nebraska, New Jersey, West 
Virginia and Maryland. During the busy season they 
employ 162 men and their pay-roll exceeds $107,000 
annually. Politically Mr. Desmond is a Democrat. He 
is 3 director of the Chamber of Commerce, and his 
fraternal affiliations are with the Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks, the Knights of Columbus, Dun- 
kHrk Club, C. and B. A. He is a member of St. Mary's 
Roman Catholic Church. 

Mr. Desmond married in Buffalo, N. Y., Mary, 
daughter of Cornelius and Margaret (Darcy) Corcoran, 
and they became the parents of three children : Margaret, 
at home; John, married Lucile Frey, and they have two 
children, William and Lamar; Timothy Joseph, Jr., 
married Irene Findley. All these children were edu- 
cated in Dunkirk. Mrs. Desmond, who was a devoted 
wife and mother, passed away April 15, 1919. 

Cornelius William Desmond, son of Timothy and 
Ellen (Harrigan) Desmond, and brother of Timothy 
Joseph Desmond, was born in Buffalo, and is the 
partner of his brother in the Desmond Coal Company 
and the Desmond Fisheries. The political principles of 
Mr. Desmond are those supported by the Democratic 



^^o 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



party. He occupies a seat in the Chamber of Com- 
merce, and affiliates with the CathoHc Benevolent 
Legion. He is a member of St. Marj-'s Roman Catholic 
Church. 

Mr. Desmond married .\gnes, daughter of Thomas 
and Mar\- Clear>-, and they have live children living, 
all of whom were educated in Dunkirk with the excep- 
tion of the two eldest who received their educations 
in Buffalo: Thomas, Elinor, .-Vgnes, Elizabeth, and 
Margaret. One child. Mary, is deceased. 

The great business which these two brothers now 
successfully conduct had a small beginning, but has been 
gradually built up by their combined talent and aggress- 
iveness to its present large proportions. Their record 
is of \-alue to their descendants and this, together with 
the fact that it contains a salutary lesson for young men 
starting in life, should insure its careful preservation. 



MORRIS HENRY STIMSON— Technical lines 
have always claimed Mr. Stimson, and his active life 
has been spent in connection with manufacturing enter- 
prises in the Middle West and in the East. Since 1913 
he has been associated with Chautauqua county in the 
capacity of general manager of the United States Radi- 
ator Corporation. 

Morris Henrj' Stimson was bom in Cadillac, Mich., 
Aug. 3, 1S79, son of Warren B. and Gertrude (Beards- 
lee^ Stimson. He received his elementary education in 
the schools of Grand Rapids, Mich., and upon graduat- 
ing from the local high school in 1900, he attended the 
University of Michigan at Ann Arbor. Here he took 
a course in mechanical engineering, and was .graduated 
with the degrees of Mechanical Engineer and Bachelor 
of Science in 1904. This was supplemented by an 
apprenticeship at the Detroit plant of the American 
Radiator Company until 1908, when he became factory 
manager of the Detroit Steel Products Company, which 
position he held until 1910. The ne.xt three years he 
was engaged as manager of plants numbers three and 
fifteen for the Buick Motor Car Company, at Flint, 
Mich. In 1913 he accepted his present position of 
general manager of the United States Radiator Cor- 
poration. In no small measure has the growth of this 
concern been due to Mr. Stimson's tireless industry and 
energy. His training qualified him for carrying on a 
large enterprise, and his close application to the busi- 
ness of this firm has given him remarkable success. 
His position demands the service of one whose ability is 
of high order, and whose well-balanced forces are 
manifest in sound judgment and in ready and rapid 
understanding of any problem that may be presented 
for solution. He is a member of the .American Society 
of Mechanical Engineers, and of the Psi Upsilon fra- 
ternity, also Sigma Xi. Mr. Stimson is also a prominent 
man in the Chamber of Commerce. 

Mr. Stims<-jn married, April 24, I'x^S. at Grand Rapids, 
Mich., Helen Methcnay, and they are the parents of 
two children: Bettey Bradford, now attending State 
Normal School at Fredonia; and F'atricia Warren. 

CHARLES ANDREW STUDLEY— A vrteran in 
year^ and in business expf-ri'-nce, anrl one of the com- 
paratively few who "followed the flag" to the battle 
field* of the South in 1S62, Mr. Studley after many, 



many years of life in other states returned to his native 
New York, and in 1919 permanently located in the 
village of Fredonia, Chautauqua county. His years of 
residence in the West brought him a competence, and 
in acquiring it he brought under cultivation a large tract 
of prairie land which the plow of the white man had 
never before turned. His military service was with 
the troops of a Western State, and his recollections 
of the three years' service with those men are the most 
cherished of his life. Now nearing octogenarian honors, 
Mr. Studley is enjoying the rewards of a lifetime of 
energetic, well directed effort, and is as keenly interested 
in the trend of public events as though his years were 
of little weight. He is a descendant of an ancient 
Puritan family of Massachusetts, his branch of the 
Studley family settling in Western New York. 

His father, Philemon Studley, was a farmer in Cattar- 
augus county. N. Y., but later moved with his family to 
Dunkirk in Chautauqua county, where he was engaged in 
various occupations during the remaining active years 
of his life. He lived for a time in Gowanda, and died in 
Dayton. Cattaraugus county, N. Y. Philemon Studley 
married Elmira Starks, who died in Dunkirk and is 
buried in Forest Hill Cemetery, Fredonia. They were 
the parents of five children: David, who like his brother 
served in the Union army during the Civil War ; Mary, 
married Marion Guest; Charles Andrew, of further 
mention; Maria, married Levant Darby; Marion, a 
resident of Cassadaga, Chautauqua county. 

Charles A. Studley was born at Springville, Erie 
county, N. Y., March 13, 1842, but when young his 
parents moved to Dunkirk, where he obtained a public 
school education. He remained in Dunkirk until the 
age of nineteen, then went to Boone county, 111., locat- 
ing at Garden Prairie, where he engaged as a farm 
employee for one year. In 1862 he enlisted at Belvidere, 
III., in Company B, 95th Regiment, Illinois Volunteer 
Infantry, his company commander. Captain Loop, his 
regimental chief. Colonel Humphrey. He was in the 
service three years and took part in several severe 
battles and many skirmishes and minor engagements, 
was promoted to the rank of corporal, and at the close 
of the war was mustered out with an honorable dis- 
charge at Springfield, III. 

After the war, Mr. Studley spent seventeen years in 
the Pennsylvania oil fields, locating at Oil City. He was 
not one of the successful oil operators and finally closed 
out his business and went West, locating in North 
Dakota, where he bought and "homesteaded" 850 acres 
of prairie land in Benson county. This tract he made 
valuable by cultivation and extensive improvements, 
residing thereon for thirty-five years, and becoming one 
of the prosperous wheat growers of that section. In 
1906 he l>egan coming East to spend his winters, 
choosing Fredonia as his residence. This practice he 
continued until 1919, when he sold his farms and other 
property in North Dakota and made Fredonia his 
ficrmancnt residence. He is a member of Holt Post, 
Grand Army of the Republic, of Fredonia; the Metho- 
dist Episcopal church, the Masonic order, and in politics 
a I\ei)ulilican. 

Mr. Studley married (first) Loretta Baxter, who died 
in North Dakota, leaving three children: Ida, married 
Clarke Higgins; Nellie, married David Robertson, and 




t^.(^^LJi^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



331 



resides in North Dakota; Jennie, married Barney 
Speiglor, and resides in North Dakota. Mr. Studley 
married (second) Kathrine (Zink) Turrell, born in 
Erie county, N. Y., daughter of Leon and Josephine 
(Von Hatton) Zink, and widow of Eh Turrell. Mrs. 
Studley is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 



REV. WILLIAM L. HYDE was born in Bath, 
Me.. Dec. 27, iSio, a son of Captain Henry and Maria 
(Hyde) Hyde. He received his education in Bowdoin 
College, Brunswick, Me., from which he was graduated 
with the class of 1842. In 1849 he completed his course 
in theology and was ordained a minister in the Congre- 
gational church, and for seven years acted as pastor of 
that denomination at Gardner, Me. 

In 1856 Mr. Hyde removed to Dunkirk, N. Y., where 
he was pastor of the Presbyterian church until 1862, 
when he was commissioned chaplain of the 112th Regi- 
ment (the Chautauqua County Regiment), New York 
State \'olunteers, and remained in that station until the 
close of the Civil War. One year later Mr. Hyde 
removed from Dunkirk to Ripley, where he remamed 
until 1871 as pastor of the Presbyterian church, and the 
following three years was pastor of the church of that 
denomination in Sherman, N. Y. In 1874 he removed to 
Ovid, Seneca county, N. Y., where for the ensuing ten 
years he held the position of principal of the high school. 
In 1884 he came to Jamestown, Chautauqua county, N. 
Y., where he remained until his demise in 1896, at first 
teaching a private school and later doing editorial work 
on the Jamestown "Journal," and serving as supply 
clergyman in various pulpits in the city and vicinity. 

While living at Ripley he wrote and published the 
"History of the One Hundred and Twelfth Regiment," 
recognized as one of the most accurate and valuable of 
all the histories of New York State regiments. 
Throughout his residence in Jamestown, Mr. Hyde was 
chaplain of James M. Brown Post, Grand Army of the 
Republic, and in 1896 was elected chaplain of the Grand 
Encampment, Department of New York, Grand Army 
of the Republic, and was honorary chaplain of the 
Thirteenth Separate Company, National Guard, State 
of New York, Jamestown, up to the time of his death. 
He was a companion of the Military Order of the Loyal 
Legion. He was an active member of the Chautauqua 
County Society of History and Natural Science. In 
the Chautauqua Institution he took a great interest and 
presented to the institution a library of theological 
works. 

On May 4, 1852, Mr. Hyde was united in marriage 
with Frances Elizabeth Rice, who was born in 
Wiscasset. Me., a daughter of Thomas Rice. To Rev. 
and Mrs. Hyde were born the following children: I. 
Henry Warren, who resides in Denver, Colo. 2. Wallace 
E., who died in infancy. 3. Frederick William, whose 
biographical record follows this. They also had an 
adopted daughter, Elizabeth Clover, who married San- 
ford C. Meddick, and resides at Ovid, N. Y. Mrs. 
Hyde's demise occurred at her home in Jamestown, 
N. v.. May 17, 1892. 



Hyde received his early education in the district schools 
of this county, and later attended the high school at 
Ovid, N. Y. After a one-year course of study at the 
Fredonia Normal School, he entered the store of Levant 
L. Mason, in Jamestown, and served a four years 
apprenticeship at the watchmaker and jeweler's trade, 
at which he worked in Cleveland, Ohio, for a time. 
In 1879 he returned from Cleveland and entered the 
business offices of the Jamestown "Journal," and soon 
after became a reporter on that newspaper. Later he 
became successively, news editor and managing editor, 
which later position he continued to hold until 1905- 
He is a director of the Journal Printing Company. He 
served nearly twelve years in the Jamestown Fire 
Department as a member of Ellicott Hook and Ladder 
Company ; for seven years served in Company E, 65th 
Infantry, National Guard, of which he was captain; and 
during the Spanish-American War he was captain of 
the United States Volunteers and was honorably dis- 
charged from the army in 1898. During the World 
War he was a major in the 74th Infantry, New York 
Guard. He was an officer of the National Chautauqua 
County Bank from 1905 to 1918; later, treasurer of the 
Dahlstrom Metallic Door Company, and since Jan. I, 
1919, has held the position of secretary of the National 
Bank Section of the .American Bankers Association 
with offices in New York and Washington. 

For twenty years Major Hyde served as a clerk of 
the Board of Supervisors of Chautauqua county. 
During the legislative term in 1903 and 1904, he was 
index clerk of the State Assembly. In politics he has 
always been and is a Republican. He is a member of the 
various Masonic bodies, is a member of the .\rmy and 
Navy Club in New York City, City Club of Washington, 
D. C., Rotary Club, and Chadakoin Club of Jamestown. 

On Aug. 21, 1894, Major Hyde was united in marriage 
with Carrie Joie Jones, a daughter of Sidney Jones, 
whose biography follows. To this union were born 
on Dec. 25, 1896, twin daughters, of whom Carolyn 
Elizabeth, wife of Gale L. Cheney, of Youngstown, 
Ohio, survives. 



MAJOR FREDERICK WILLIAM HYDE was 

born in Dunkirk, N. Y., Feb. 21, 1858, a son of Rev. 
William L. Hyde, whose biography precedes this. Major 



SIDNEY JONES— In the proud list of her citizens 
known and honored throughout the business world for 
stability, integrity, and fair dealing, Jamestown and 
Chautauqua county have no cause to be other than satis- 
fied with the record of that prominent merchant, Sidney 
Jones. The methods by which he had attained the high 
position which he held in the estimation of his fellow- 
men well attested his qualities of mind and heart ; he 
was courageous, cheerful, clear of judgment, alert to 
opportunity, and untiring in labor. 

Sidney Jones was born in Jamestown, N. Y., July 27, 
1823, the youngest child and seventh son of Solomon 
and Clarissa (Hayward) Jones. His father. Solomon 
Jones, was one of the early settlers of Chautauqua 
county, coming from Wardsboro, Vt., and making his 
home in Kiantone in November, 1810, later removing to 
a place on the Chautauqua outlet, about two miles north 
of Jamestown, to which the name of Jones' Landing 
was given, now Clifton. His later years were spent in 
Jamestown, his house on East Fourth street standing 
on the site of the residence now owned and occupied by 
Sheldon B. Broadhead (1904). To Solomon Jones and 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



his wife were born fourteen children, of whom thirteen 
reached maturity. His death occurred at his home in 
Jamestown. Aug. 2. 1S62. 

Sidney Jones received his early education in the dis- 
trict schools of his native town, and in the Jamestown 
Academy. After completing his studies. Mr. Jones 
took up the mercantile business. At one time Mr. 
Jones owned a grist mill at Dexterville (now East 
Jamestown'), but later abandoned this business, and again 
took up mercantile pursuits. .\t different times. Mr. 
Jones had as partners in his business. E. C. Bailey, 
James P. Clarke, and Charles H. Howard. Mr. Jones 
retired in 1SQ4. and on Jan. 7. iQoS. his death occurred 
at his home in Jamestown, and he is buried in Lakeview 
Cemetery. 

Politically Mr. Jones was a stanch Republican, and 
though he never sought for office, when it was offered 
him as an expression of faith and trust placed in him 
by his fellow-citizens, he accepted and gave to his city 
and county the best of his ability. Mr. Jones was 
elected county clerk in 1861. and in that capacity served 
a term of three years. He also served on the Board of 
Education of the Jamestown public schools for many 
years. In religious affiliation Mr. Jones was a member 
of the First Presbyterian Church. 

On Oct. 20, 1862. at Leicester. N. Y., Mr. Jones was 
united in marriage with Anna S. Dickey, whose death 
occurred June I, 1900. To this union were born two 
daughters : Emma C, born Dec. 23. 1863, married 
William Archie Kent, of Prescott, Ariz. ; and Carrie 
Joie. born July 9. 1S65. who married Frederick William 
Hyde, whose biography precedes this. 

No element of the city's growth and improvement 
sought Mr. Jones' aid in ^'ain. He stood for advance- 
ment in public as well as in private affairs, and the 
same qualities which made him a prominent figure in 
business circles made him a citizen whose loyalty and 
support were always to be counted upon. His en- 
tire life, with the exception of three years spent in 
Mayville, was spent in Jamestown, and those who 
knew him. and his friends were numerous, entertained 
for him the warmest regard. His life was in large 
measure an exemplification of his beliefs in the brother- 
hood of mankind. He had never allowed questionable 
methods to form part of his business career, while over 
his official life there fell no shadow of wrong or sus- 
picion of evil. Kindliness and appreciation for the 
good traits of others have constituted the salient 
features in his career, and his life illustrates the fact 
of the Emersonian philosophy that — "to make a friend 
you must be a friend." 



FRANK ANTHONY OGNIBENE, M. D.— In 
1807. I Jr. Ognibene first came to I'Vcdonia. .\'. Y.. he 
then a boy of six years, accompanying his parents, Ross 
and Rosalia (Randazza) Ognibene, who in that year 
moved from Buffalo to Frcdonia, and there both yet 
reside Civio). While yet a boy, Dr. OKnibc-ne deter- 
mined upon his choice of a profession and he never 
lost sii{ht of his goal, although he was obliged to help 
finance his own medical education. ,\fter obtaining 
hik M. D., he did not at once locate in Frcdonia, and 
il vas not until March, 1919, that he returned to his 



old home where he is building up a fine reputation and 
practice as physician and surgeon. 

Frank A. Ognibene was born in Buffalo, N. Y., Jan. 7, 
1S91. but came to Fredonia in 1897 and there completed 
the courses of study furnished by the grammar and 
high schools. He then entered Fredonia State Normal 
School, pursuing the classical course to graduation with 
the class of loio. Through the financial assistance of 
his sister, Josephine, he was enabled to enter the medical 
department of the University of Buffalo, and in that 
way, with that which he was able to personally earn, 
the course was financed. He was graduated M. D., 
class of 1914. and for one year he served as interne in 
Buffalo, N. Y., and after spending three years in 
Amsterdam returned to Fredonia and is building up a 
good practice among his old friends and townsmen. 
He served the city as health officer. He is a member of 
the Dunkirk-Fredonia Medical Society, Chautauqua 
County Medical Society, New York State Medical 
Society, the Roman Catholic church, and the Knights 
of Columbus. In politics he is a Republican. 

Dr. Ognibene married. Nov. 28. 1916. Sarah Guarino, 
of Buffalo. They have a son, Frank Anthony, Jr., born 
in Amsterdam, N. Y., March 14. 1918. 

Dr. Ognibene has two brothers, Samuel and Peter, 
residing with their parents in Fredonia ; a sister 
Josephine, a teacher in Buffalo schools ; and four other 
sisters ; Minnie, Mary, Jennie, and Lucy, residing at 
home. 



DAVID JOSIAH CLARK belongs to that class 
of citizens who, undemonstrative and unassuming in 
their natures, form the character of the community in 
which they live. Mr. Clark has devoted his entire life 
to the lumber industry, and though he has engaged in 
many other enterprises he has always reverted to his 
original business. Mr. Clark, who is now living retired, 
is a veteran of the Civil War and a pioneer in the 
lumber industry of Chautauqua county. He was born in 
the town of Poland, Chautauqua county, N. Y., April 
8, 1838, a son of Joseph Clark. 

Joseph Clark (grandfather) lived in Otsego county, 
N. Y., near Schuyler Lake, where he engaged in the 
agricultural business. He married Hannah Wallace, 
and among their children was Joseph, of whom further. 

Joseph Clark (father) was born in Otsego county, N. 
v., on his father's farm, July 4, 181 1. There he attended 
the district schools of that time, and after finishing his 
education he assisted his father upon the farm. Later 
he decided to strike out for himself in the business 
world and accordingly journeyed to Chautauqua county 
on foot, a distance of some 30a miles. Arriving in Poland 
township he found employment with Nicholas DoUph, 
a lumber man of some proiriinence, and with him 
remained for nearly seven years, receiving $13 a month 
with his room board and laundry for his work. How- 
ever, desiring to engage in business for himself, he 
bought large tracts of land in Poland and adjoining 
townships and also succeeded in buying more timber 
lands in Cattaraugus county. He cut the timber and 
rafted it down the Allegheny river to Pittsburgh and 
down the Ohio river to Louisville, where he soon found 
a market for it. Not satisfied with the progress he was 




£:^-^L.<iJt<M^ (a ^ 



TkP 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



333 



making in the lumber industry he conceived the idea 
of keeping a hotel as another means of increasing his 
business interests. This he did, keeping a hotel first at 
Levant, which was known as the Levant Hotel, for seven 
years, later moving to Mud Creek Corners, where they 
located a post office and they called it Clark's Corners. 
Here he managed the A. H. Phillips Hotel, continuing 
in this occupation for nearly ten years. During this 
time Mr. Clark had increased his land holdings until he 
was the owner of about 700 acres of the best timber 
land in Chautauqua count)', and after giving up the hotel 
business he engaged in the cattle raising and agricultural 
business and continued in this until his death which 
occurred at his home in Clark's Corners, Oct. 22, 1876. 
Mr. Clark died while still in the prime of life and his 
death was sincerely mourned by his family and many 
friends throughout Chautauqua county. He is buried 
in Myrtle Cemetery, Poland township, N. Y. Politically 
Mr. Clark was a Whig until the organization of the 
Republican party, of which he was a staunch upholder, 
though he never cared for office. In religious affiliation 
Mr. Clark was a Universalist and he and his family 
were prominent in the church of that denomination at 
Kennedy, N. Y. This was built as a union church, but 
the different denominations did not agree and it was 
sold to the Wesleyan Methodist Church. 

On July 14, 1833, at Dolphville, in the township of 
Poland, Chautauqua county, N. Y., Mr. Clark was united 
in marriage with Abigail Hitchcock, who was bom Dec. 
26, 1819. in Poland township, Chautauqua county, N. Y., 
a daughter of John Hitchcock. Mrs. Clark's death 
occurred Feb. 29, 1898, and she is buried beside her 
husband in Myrtle Cemetery, Poland township. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Clark were bom nine children, as follows : 
I. Joseph L., bom Oct. 21. 1835; he was a hotel land- 
lord and lived in Chautauqua and Cattaraugus counties, 
N. Y. 2. David Josiah, of whom further. 3. Joel B., 
born Aug. 5, 1840; he was a soldier in the Civil War, 
in Company A, 112th New York Volunteer Infantry, a 
farmer, and died at Clark's Corners. 4. Caroline 
Melinda, bom Nov. 13, 1842; she married Louis Rush, 
and died at Fluvanna, Chautauqua county, N. Y. 5. 
Egbert R., born March 13. 1845; resides in Jamestown, 
N. Y., and is engaged in the railroad business with the 
Erie railroad. 6. Samuel A., born Sept. 13, 1847; died at 
Clark's Corners, Chautauqua county, N. Y. 7. Hannah 
E.. born July 21, 1850; married Revell Parks and died at 
Clark's Corners. 8. Abigail A., born Nov. 12, 1853, died 
at Clark's Corners in early girlhood. 9. Clyne A., born 
March 14, 1863 ; is residing in the State of Washington 
and is engaged in the lumber business. 

David Josiah Clark obtained his early education in 
the district schools of Poland township. After complet- 
ing his education he assisted his father in the lumber 
business, making his first trip on a raft down the river 
at the age of seventeen. He continued in business with 
his father, making as many as three trips down the 
river with rafts, until the Civil War was declared. He 
enlisted Aug. 2, 1862, in Company A. 112th New York 
Volunteer Infantry, under Colonel J. C. Drake and 
Captain John F. Smith. He served until the close of 
the war. being discharged with honorable mention from 
Washington, D. C, for bravery under fire at Raleigh, 
N. C, being mustered out of service at Buffalo, N. Y., 



July I, 1865. Mr. Clark participated in nearly every 
battle that his company engaged in and was mentioned 
twice for bravery. He was in the hospital for four 
months with fever during the year 1863, but rejoined his 
regiment and fought with them until the close of the 
war. 

After returning from the war he purchased from 
his father about 250 acres of farm land and for some 
time engaged in the agricultural business, but finding 
this occupation" rather slow and not suited to his liking 
he sold back his land to his father and engaged in the 
lumber business for himself, rafting it down the river to 
the markets in Pittsburgh and Louisville. Later he took 
up lumber contracting, delivering the logs to the saw 
mills. Mr. Clark was for some time engaged in this 
business for M. L. Fenton & Company, both in Chau- 
tauqua county and South Valley township. Cattaraugus 
county, N. Y. Later he engaged in the same line of 
work for Lyman Mason, another well known lumber- 
man of the Chautauqua county region, and was with him 
for four years, when he went with the Wheeler & 
Scudder, lumber manufacturers in South Valley, Cattar- 
augus county, N. Y., and continued working for them 
for nearly five years. Returning to Poland township, 
Mr. Clark bought the Cold Water Creamery and was 
for some time engaged in the manufacture of grade 
butter. Seven years later he settled in Falconer and 
with his son-in-law, P. B. Waite, conducted the Linden 
House for seven years under the name of Clark & 
Waite. In 1907 he gave up the hotel business and since 
then has lived retired, making his home in Falconer, 
Chautauqua county, N. Y. Mr. Clark is a member of 
the H. C. Sturdevant Post, Grand Army of the Republic, 
at Kennedy, N. Y., and is also a prominent member of 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. I\Ir. Clark has 
filled all the offices of both these organizations. 

On Nov. II, 1857, Mr. Clark married (first) Susan 
Wheeler, daughter of John and Julia (Love) Wheeler. 
Mrs. Clark's death occurred July 27, 1864, at Clark's 
Corners, and she is buried in Myrtle Cemetery, Poland 
township, N. Y. To Mr. and Mrs. Clark were born 
two children, as follows: i. Alfred, who died in infancy. 
2. David Josiah. Jr.. born April 25, 1863: received his 
early education in the public schools of Poland township 
and Jamestown public school; taught four years in the 
public school at Falconer, and is now engaged in teach- 
ing; resides at Stillwater, N. Y. Mr. Clark married 
(second) Sept. 24, 1865, Coralinn Hunt, born at Clark's 
Comers, Aug. 7, 1848, daughter of Henry N. and 
Cynthia M. (Ives) Hunt. To this union was born one 
child, Bernice M., who became the wife of P. B. Waite; 
they are the parents of one child ; they reside in James- 
town, N. Y. 

Mr. Clark is an intense lover of the out-door world 
and particularly enjoys life in the woods whither his 
business so often led him, delighting to fish and hunt 
and being very expert in both these sports. He was 
an unusually good athlete and spent as much of his 
spare time as possible in pursuit of such pleasures, 
the wholesome character of which no doubt accounts 
for the excellent health which he has enjoyed through- 
out his entire life. A man of unbounded generosity, 
gentle and genial in his nature, Mr. Clark has gath- 
ered around him a circle of admiring friends who 



334 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



feel honored by his friendship and proud of his suc- 
cess in life. His heart is ever in sympathy with the 
unfortunate and his hand ever ready to contribute to 
the alleviation of distress. His life is a happy illustra- 
tion of the honor and rewards of business fidelity and 
industrj-, when combined with high principles and un- 
sweri-ing honesty. As a business man his character is 
unimpeacliable and unclouded, and he adhered with 
staunch consistency to sound, conservative and unques- 
tionable methods. His name is known among the highest 
circles of the business world as that of a man who can 
be trusted, and with whom it was a satisfaction to 
transact business. His life teaches the old and ever 
valuable lesson that success comes only through tireless 
industry, guided by a singleness of purpose. It 
emphasizes also the priceless value of unswerving loyalty 
to right, and the assured rewards of exemplary living. 



THEODORE D. HANCHETT— Self-made in the 

truest sense of the word, successful in his business 
undertakings and aims, the career of T. D. Hanchett 
is an apt illustration of the value of character in the 
determining of the measure of success possible to 
attain. One of Jamestown's native sons, and through 
his long connection with the manufacturing business 
one of her best known manufacturers, educated in the 
public schools, trained in business methods by James- 
town manufacturers and in business in that city until 
his death, he was emphatically a Jamestown man, a true 
representative of that city, her institutions and her 
citizenship. Industry, thrift and perseverance marked 
his way through life, and to these qualities he added 
business ability of high order and an honesty of purpose 
that enabled him to avoid those business and moral pit- 
falls that abound in a large city to trap the unwary. 
He began life in a career of his own choosing, and 
during his years of service for others gained the capital 
and e.xperience with which he later entered his own 
business. He was an energetic worker and devoted to 
his work, but when his day's labor was done his own 
fireside claimed him, and there most of his hours "off 
dutj" were spent. He was most hospitable, loved to 
entertain in his own home his friends in social games 
and enlivening conversation, finding in such intercourse 
the keen enjoyment that flows from a charitable heart. 

No man attained higher reputation than he for honor- 
able dealing, and in the business world his friends were 
many. His promises or statements could always be 
relied upon, for he held his word sacred, and his excel- 
lent business judgment often enabled others to profit as 
well as himself. He gave close attention to the details 
of his large business, never dividing his energy, but 
holding closely to the one line of commercial activity he 
had chosen as his, that of manufacturer. Neither did 
ht seek to hold public office nor allow fads or amuse- 
ments to distract his mind from the great business of 
life, yet he was intensely public-spirited, every ready and 
willing to aid a good cause. 

Theodore D. Hanchett was born in Chautauqua 
county, X. Y., Nov. 4, 1X47, a son of William and 
Eveline Hanchett. He came to Jamestown when but 
one year old with his parents, and to the public schools 
of this city is he indebted for his early education. Later 
however, he t'xik a course of study in the Jamestown 



Academy, and after graduating from this institution in 
iSOi, he entered the employ of Allen & Grandin. He 
remained with this firm for one year, but being offered 
a better position with the Breed-Johnson Furniture 
Company, resigned and entered their employ. In 1883 
he entered the employ of Shearman Brothers, lounge 
manufacturers, as foreman of the woodworking depart- 
ment, a position which he held for five years, when he 
left to assist in the formation of the Jamestown Lounge 
Company. On Jan. i, 1SS8, Mr. Hanchett, with Lynn 
F. Cornell, Arthur H. Greenlund, and the late Hurley L. 
Philipps, formed the Jamestown Lounge Company, 
which was gradually developed into one of the largest 
manufacturing industries of the city. The .firm continued 
as a copartnership until Dec. 11, 1899, when the com- 
pany was changed to a corporation with the following 
officers: H. L. Philipps, president; T. D. Hanchett, vice- 
president; A. H. Greenlund, second vice-president; L. 
F. Cornell, secretary and treasurer. In 1904 Mr. Han- 
chett was elected president and held that office until he 
retired from the lounge business in 1913, but at the time 
of his death was president of the Pearl City Veneer 
Company. 

Mr. Hanchett was united in marriage with Charlotte 
R. Lamson, July 10, 1872. To this union were born four 
children, as follows: i. Bertha V., born June 20, 1873. 
2, Ralph Theodore, died in infancy. 3. Donald C, who 
resides at home, and who married Caroline L. Stumpf, 
a daughter of Henry Stumpf, a well known resident of 
this city; they are the parents of one child, Carolyn 
R. 4. Lucie R., born March 11, 1890, who is the wife 
of Marvin N. Gokey, of Jamestown, N. Y., and the 
mother of one child, Robert Marvin Gokey. 

In politics, Mr. Hanchett generally voted on the Demo- 
cratic ticket, but he wore no party collar, the character 
of a candidate and not a party emblem determining his 
vote. He was also popular in fraternal circles and was 
a member of the various Masonic bodies, including 
Mount Moriah Lodge, No. 145, Free and Accepted 
Masons, joining in 1883, and serving as master in 1892 
and 1893; of Western Sun Chapter, No. 67, Royal Arch 
Masons, serving as high priest in 1894 and 1895; of 
Jamestown Commandery, No. 61, Knights Templar, 
serving as eminent commander in 1908; and of Buffalo 
Consistory, Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite. He was 
also a member of Ismailia Temple, Ancient Arabic 
Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, of Buffalo. Mr. 
Hanchett and his family were also members of the 
First Baptist Church, they being prominent in all its 
social as well as business affairs. Mr. Hanchett served 
as a member of the board of trustees for many years, 
and was loved and respected by all who knew him. 

Mr. Hanchett gave of his best to his City, State and 
Nation, and was one of the best known and most popular 
men in the community in which he lived, and when his 
death occurred Dec. 18, 1914, it left a gap in the social 
world as well as the business world that cannot be filled. 
He was a man of the most genial, open nature, and 
that sort of cheeriness which one instinctively feels that 
it flows from a charitable heart, a manly, courageous 
and gentle heart. It has been said of him by a friend 
that people turn naturally to his kindly, sympathetic per- 
sonality as the flowers to the stmshine, and this indeed 
is ,-in apt illustration of the manner in which strangers 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



335 



were impelled to make his acquaintance, and acquaint- 
ance was speedily turned to the kind of friendship that 
does not fail. The occupation that he had engaged in 
brought him into contact with a great number of men 
of every class and type, and acquainted him with the 
motives that spring from human nature beyond the 
range of many, making him at once tolerant of his 
fellows and filling his memory with a thousand tales 
ever at his tongue's end, which made his a most delight- 
ful comrade. His home life too was ideal and he proved 
himself no less a loving husband and father than a 
true friend, a good neighbor and a model citizen. The 
true grief of his fellow-citizens at his death is shown in 
the following editorial which appeared in the Jamestown 
"Evening Journal," Friday, Dec. i8, 1914: 

The death of Theodore D. Hanchett, which occurred 
this morning, following an illness of some months' 
duration came as a sorrow to the business community, 
and to the people of the community generally where 
he spent his entire life in the activities that naturally 
attend the life of a forceful man of affairs. 

Mr Hanchett was one of the incorporators of the 
Jamestown Lounge Company, more than twenty-five 
years ago, and was an important factor in that manu- 
facturing plant during the years of its rise from a 
small beginning into one of the great industries of 
the citv. He devoted his time and talents unsparmgly 
to its 'interests, and to him and his associates came 
the knowledge and satisfaction of achieving more 
than ordinary success in the strenuous competition 
found in establishing a modern manufacturing indus- 

Alwavs ready to do his part in that which had for 
its sole" object the advancement of the interests of his 
home citv or its people, he was not one who sought 
prominence in the affairs of the community. Ready at 
all times to respond to the call of duty as he saw it, 
he had no desire to pose as a leader or to win personal 
praise for that which he did. , ^^ ■^■ 

In addition to his attention to the affairs of the big 
establishment with which he was concerned, Mr. Han- 
chett was devoted to his family, to his church, and to 
the Masonic fraternity, with which he was promi- 
nentlv identified. There were few men in that fra- 
ternity better grounded in the principles of !■ ree 
Masonrv than he. He believed earnestly in its teach- 
ings arid exemplified in his life the high principles 
which it tries to inculcate into the lives of all its 
members. He had been master of Mt. Moriah Lodge, 
F and A M.. high priest of ^Vestern Sun Chapter. R. 
a' M, eminent commander of Jamestown Commandery, 
Knights Templar, and had been advanced to the thirty- 
second degree in the mysteries of the order. He was 
for many vears a member of the board of trustees of 
the First Baptist Church, and gave freely of his time 
and support. ,. .. * 

Such men as Theodore D. Hanchett are an honor to 
the communitv in which they live, and are sincerely 
mourned and missed when they depart. They live to 
bless and to build up, not to destroy and tear down, 
and the citv of Jamestown is the better and the richer 
because of'the years that he spent here. 



FRANK L. KOLPIEN— The subject of this review 
exemplifies in a remarkable degree not only the achieve- 
ments of a man of great natural talent, but the wonder- 
ful possibilities whereby a poor boy can attain distinc- 
tion in the community in a short period of time. The 
success of Frank L. Kolpien, known in the business 
world of Dunkirk, N. Y., as the president and treasurer 
of the O'Donnell Lumber Company, in all his undertak- 
ings is so marked that his methods must be of interest 
to the commercial world. He has always based his 
business principles and actions upon strict adherence to 
the rules that govern industry, economy and strict 
integrity. His progressive spirit has made him a typical 
American in every sense of the word, and he well 
deserves mention in a work treating of the business 
life and substantial development of Chautauqua county. 



Frank L. Kolpien was born in Westfield, Chautau- 
qua county, N. Y., Oct. 30, 1868, a son of Frank and 
Dora (Lahl) Kolpien. He received a meagre education 
in the district school near Forsyth station, and later 
supplemented this with a one-year course at Westfield 
Academy. He left school at the age of fourteen as he 
was obliged to go to work. For the first six years after 
leaving school he worked among the farms and vine- 
yards in the townships of Westfield and Ripley, and then 
started his apprenticeship to the carpenter's trade, work- 
ing at this until 1892, when he formed a partnership in 
contracting with Herman Hutchinson, this partnership 
continuing for a period of three years, at the end of 
which time he established himself in the same business 
and until 1907 carried on a very successful contracting 
business of his own, employing on an average thirty-five 
men at a time, and besides building two hundred resi- 
dences in Dunkirk during these twelve years, he received 
contracts for the following buildings: Schools Nos. I, 
2, 4, and 5; the temple for the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows; St. John's Lutheran church building; 
Beacon light and keeper's building on the pier; St. 
Hyacinth's Roman Catholic Church building; Weingort 
Hardware Company's building; additions to the Dunkirk 
Electric Light Plant; No. 4 Hose Fire House of the 
local fire department. In 1907 he bought his present 
business, the O'Donnell Lumber Company, of which he 
is the president and treasurer. He employs thirty-four 
people, has his own delivery equipment, and ships lumber 
to Western New York, Western Pennsylvania, Eastern 
Ohio, New York City, Washington, District of Colum- 
bia, Cincinnati and Cleveland, Ohio. This business 
which Mr. Kolpien has built up is of very great 
value in the development of Dunkirk. A man of singu- 
larly strong personality, he has exerted a deep influence 
on his associates and subordinates, and, toward the 
latter in particular, his conduct has ever been marked 
by a degree of kindness and consideration which has 
won for him their loyal support and hearty cooperation. 
In politics Mr. Kolpien is a Republican, and has 
served one term on the local Board of Health, but the 
engrossing duties of his business take all his time and he 
has never since consented to hold office. His church is 
the Methodist Episcopal, and he has ever been an active 
member working in its cause, at present serving on the 
official board, and at the time of the erection of this 
new edifice he was chairman of the building committee. 
He affiliates with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows 
and with the Masons, being a member of the Blue Lodge. 
During the World War he did his share as a citizen, 
giving of his time to serve on the various committees 
for the Red Cross and the Liberty loans, and was also 
a member of the Legal Advisory Board. 

Mr. Kolpien married, Dec. 14, 1893, Alice Boiling. 
Mr. and Mrs. Kolpien are the parents of three children: 
I. Alton L., who, while attending the University of 
Michigan, volunteered, April 17, 1917, and became 
attached to the Michigan State Militia; he was later 
taken into the United States navy and was transferred 
to the aviation corps, subsequently becoming instructor 
of small arm fire at Wakefield, Mass., Norfolk, Va., 
Baltimore, Md., and Pensacola, Fla., where he was com- 
missioned ensign; he was then sent to Queenstown as 
chief pilot, and served in this capacity until the end of 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



the war; he is still in the service, being on the inactive 
list, but has returned to his studies at the universit>', 
from which place he will graduate with the degree of 
Doctor of i^ledicine in iqjj. 2. Esther, a teacher in 
Long Island. 3. Alma, now attending a seminary at 
Louisburg. W. \'a., 

Mr. Kolpien is in the best sense of the term a "self- 
made man." He has made his way up the ladder of 
success until he has become one of the most substantial 
and influential citizens of the community, whose life 
is inseparably identified with its general affairs. The 
simple account of his life, however, and the various 
activities engaged in. tell far more eloquently than any 
formal praise of the remarkable powers possessed by 
him. especially if it be remembered that his ardent, 
enthusiastic nature will not permit his undertaking any- 
thing which he is not prepared to do, any obligation 
which he does not observe to the fullest. His labors 
are great, but his powers are equal to their adequate 
performance. 



WILLIAM C. BRIGGS— Probably the greatest 
compliment that can be paid a man is that he has made 
himself a credit to his nation in the great commercial 
world as well as a credit to the mercantile community 
in which he lives. Public-spirited to the highest degree, 
he is ever forw-ard in encouraging enterprises which 
can in any way advance the interests of Jamestown and 
Chautauqua county. Such a man is William C. Briggs, 
who by his honorable exertions and moral attributes 
gained for himself all that a man could desire, friends, 
affluence and position. By the strength and force of 
his own character he overcame obstacles which to others 
less sanguine and optimistic would have seemed unsur- 
mountable. His fertile mind wrought many measures 
for the ultimate good of the State, and as selfishness 
was never considered a fault of his, the citizens of the 
county have felt and will continue to feel the results 
of his untiring efforts for some time to come. He is 
rigidly honest in all his dealings with the business world, 
and in fact in all his relations in life, and through his 
geniality and sociability he has acquired numerous 
friends from all walks of life. In the estimation of 
those who know him, his calling and his competent 
manner in handling weighty affairs entitle his biography 
the same place in the history of Chautauqua county as 
that accorded those who have been eminent in the up- 
building of Chautauqua county. 

William C. Briggs who, for a number of years past, 
was treasurer and general manager of the Chautauqua 
Towel Mills, but who is now living temporarily retired 
at his home at No. 404 East Fifth street, Jamestown, N. 
Y., was born in the town of Ellington. June 5, 1866, a son 
of Carey and Martha Ann (Staples) Briggs. Carey 
Briggs. son 01 Erancis Briggs. was born in the State 
of Massachusetts, and was an agrictdturist by trade. 
He married ffirst) Diana Gould, and the children by 
this union were: Clara D., who resides in Jamestown 
with her sister, Mrs. Arthur C. Wade ; Frances, wirlow 
of Arthur C. Wade; Caroline, wife of Jerry GifTord, 
both of whr^m are deceased. Mr. Briggs married 
f second; Martha Ann Staples, and they were the 
parents of three children, as follows: Martha May, who 
resides in Jamestown; Charles, who died in infancy; 
and William C, sec forward. 



William C. Briggs, whose name is the caption of this 
article, obtained his early education in the public schools 
of Ellington, and after graduating from the Ellington 
school entered the high school of Jamestown, N. Y., 
being graduated from there with the class of 1888. Im- 
mediately after leaving the Jamestown High School, he 
began reading law in the offices of Cook, Fisher & 
Wade. However, after reading law one year, Mr. 
Briggs decided that he preferred a business life to a 
professional one at the bar, and accordingly he formed 
a partnership in 1S89 with Fred E. Hatch, under the 
firm name of Hatch & Briggs, as druggists. Their 
place of business was located upon Third street, James- 
town, and there Mr. Briggs continued until 1902, when 
he disposed of his interest in the business and joined 
in organizing the Chautauqua Towel jMills. of James- 
town. Arthur C. Wade, Mr. Briggs' brother-in-law, was 
made president of the company, and Mr. Briggs was 
elected to the office of treasurer. This position he held 
until 1906, when he was elected general manager of the 
company as well. Mr. Briggs continued to hold these 
offices until 1919, when the business was sold out to a 
new concern, and since that time he has lived retired. 
Politically, Mr. Briggs is a staunch Republican, but 
never could be induced to hold office, preferring to 
devote his time and attention wholly to his home and 
business affairs. In religious affiliations, Mr. Briggs is 
a Methodist, and both he and his family are prominent 
in the church of that denomination in Jamestown. 

On June 23, 1892, Mr. Briggs was united in marriage 
with Minnie Elizabeth Clement, who was born in 
Centerville, Pa., Oct. 18, 1869, a daughter of Samuel and 
Sarah (Thompson) Clement. !\Irs. Briggs received her 
education in the Jamestown grammar and high schools, 
graduating from the latter institution with the class 
of 1888. Up to the time of her marriage, Mrs. Briggs 
was a teacher of Physical Culture and Elocution at the 
Jamestown High School. She was a prominent member 
of the Mozart and Browning clubs, a member of the 
Agnes Home Association, a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, and the Clotho Society of that church. 
Mrs. Briggs, who died at her home, Oct. I, 1919, was a 
woman of amiability and great mental attainments. Her 
true refinement and sweet personality raised for her 
a host of friends, and her death was mourned by all 
who knew her. She was a wise counsellor, sympathetic 
in difficulties, remarkable in comprehending a situation, 
reasonable and sound in her judgment. She was splen- 
didly loyal and devoted to her church, and for many 
years she was the leader in all its good work. She was 
a woman of large benefactions; not only did she help 
substantially in all the departments of the church work, 
so that she was often called afl'ectionately the "good 
angel" of the church, but her private charities were 
large. Hundreds if not thousands will rise up and call 
her blessed. She was a lady of the old school, full of 
dignity, sweetness and gracious womanhood. She be- 
lieved in the great revelations of the gospel with all her 
heart and her life was an illustration of their teachings, 
i^ler memory is an inspiration and a benediction to all 
who knew her, and her death called forth many beauti- 
fiill tributes, among which was one tendered by the Rev. 
and Mrs. Horace G. Ogden, who said in part: 

A flauRhtcr of Jamestown, Inheriting her best tradi- 
tions, trained In hor schools, moving In her best circles, 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



337 



an exemplar of all that is finest and highest in her 
life, has been called away as in the twinkling of an 
eye. 

Possessed of a great love of the beautiful, she sought 
and found it everywhere, in nature and in human life. 
The birds and flowers, landscapes and skies, all con- 
tributed constantly to her life, and from art and litera- 
ture and aspiring friends she perennially drew, to build 
more firm and true her own character. Slie was an 
adventurer after truth, and all her years followed the 
gleam, until it led her into the full-orbed Day. 

This made her an ardent student. She pursued sys- 
tematic courses of study and thus ripened into a 
"woman of wide knowledge "with a rare insight into the 
deeper realities of life. Robert Browning found in her 
an ardent admirer and illuminating interpreter because 
she brought to the study of his poems a spirit like his 
own, earnest and sincere, and a ntind "whose research 
and experience "was fitted to understand and appreciate 
this poet of the inner life. And thus for her, life 
lengthened and joy deepened. 

Mrs. Briggs steadfastly adhered to that which was 
good: she forever aspired; she had a keen sense of 
moral values and "was ever quick to discern a lo"wer- 
ing tendency in any movement of individual or com- 
munity life. She was ethically sensitive: she knew 
what she believed and why, and once convinced of the 
right course was adamant in her adherence to it. 

Because of these qualities, she was a real power in 
the community: many who knew her only in the chance 
occasional intercourse were conscious of her influence; 
to those tew who were privileged to be her intimate 
friends she gave herself without reserve, and to-day 
they feel an irreparable loss in the removal of this 
powerful and loved personality. 

Mrs. Briggs had a beautiful consciousness of God. 
and a vivid sense of His reality and abiding presence: 
she was a devout worshiper, humble, sincere and un- 
afraid. She was a gentle woman, high-minded, pure, 
serene, considerate, thorough-going, a Christian in 
whom there was no guile. 

Finally, the beauty of her home life was so perfect 
and sacred one may dare only to hint at it. "Twenty- 
seven years, lovers" "was literally true for her and her 
husband. A companionship so complete, a love and 
understanding so deep, marked their life together, 
that to him, who so long had this unspeakable happi- 
ness, goes out not only sympathy in this great hour 
of his loss, but congratulations that the great gift has 
been his. 

In Browning's "Pompilia" are found these lines 
■which may be applied most fittingly to this rare and 
beautiful character; 

"Through such souls alone, God stooping, shows 
sufficient of His light for us in the dark to rise by." 

In closing this review of Mr. Briggs' life we may say 
that in private life he is greatly beloved by all who 
know him. Genial, whole souled and fond of a joke, his 
manners are frank and kindly. His success in life 
has in no way changed him, and this is a principal 
reason for his popularity. He fought his way to his 
present position, earnestly and manfully, thus becoming 
one of the best examples of a self-made man of our 
times, and has not forgotten the difficulties that beset 
his way. This probaBly is the reason that a tale of dis- 
tress always finds him with a willing ear and a heart 
ready to alleviate suffering in all forms in which it is 
in his power to do so. His clean cut face clearly deline- 
ates his forcible character, and his contemporaries are 
glad to honor him as one of the leading citizens of Chau- 
tauqua county. 



PAUL De LANEY — Still a young man as years 
are counted in the commercial world. Paul De Laney is 
the present executive head and general manager of The 
Paul De Laney Company. Incorporated, an enterprise 
created through his initiative and ability, and since its 
foundation he has been the inspiring, guiding and con- 
troUing head. His training was received in that great 
school of commercial methods — the Chicago dressed 
meat industry — fourteen years close adherence to which 
perfectly fitted him to conduct the manufacture of food 
Chau— 32 



products which are prepared and sold under the trade- 
mark, "American Maid," by The Paul De Laney Com- 
pany, Incorporated, of Brocton, Chautauqua county, 
N. Y. 

Paul De Laney, son of Joseph R. and Sarah De Laney 
(now deceased), was born in Princeton, Mo., May 2, 
1877. He was educated in the grade and high schools 
of Cameron, Mo., class of 1894. Later he was a student 
in Atchinson, Kan., pursuing advanced courses, com- 
pleting his education in the year 1900. In 1901 Mr. 
De Laney commenced his business career with the 
Cudahy Packing Company of Chicago, in the capacity of 
salesman. He remained with that company fourteen 
years, during which time he gained the perfect confi- 
dence of the officials of the corporation, which confidence 
was expressed by the constant increasing of his respon- 
sibilities and position. In 191 5 he organized The Paul 
De Laney Company. Incorporated, for the manufacture 
of quality food products, establishing the plant at Broc- 
ton. N. Y., in the heart of the Chautauqua county grape 
belt. The corporation has developed into a very import- 
ant one, its $2,000,000 capital being invested in a large, 
modern factory plant, with the latest and best equip- 
ment, where "American Maid" foods are prepared and 
shipped to customers from coast to coast, including, 
also export business. The offices of the company occupy 
a separate building, and in the construction of both 
office and factory full emphasis has been laid on the 
features so essential to the rendering of efficient sen'ice, 
viz., light, sanitation, modern equipment throughout; 
also, a careful observance of all conditions that lead to 
the general welfare of a people banded together to pro- 
duce food products. Factory buildings are of steel, con- 
crete and brick, their walls enclosing a floor space of 
124,000 square feet. The value of the company's invest- 
ment is shown by the amount of insurance carried^ 
$760,000. The average factory payroll of the company 
numbers 240 men and women. The success of the enter- 
prise, now (1920) in its fifth year, is due to its wise 
management and the spirit of true cooperation with 
which Mr. De Lanej' has inspired his associates. 

In political faith Mr. De Laney is a Democrat. He 
has taken little part in public affairs beyond exercising 
the obligations of citizenship, having concentrated his 
entire energies upon the fulfilment of his business 
responsibilities. During the World War he was the 
deeply interested, patriotic American, aiding in all the 
activities of that period, the various "drives" receiving 
his personal support and encouragement. He is inter- 
ested in other forms of business activity, and has bank- 
ing connections in Chautauqua county and in Buffalo. 
In religious faith he is a Roman Catholic and a member 
of the Knights of Columbus. His standing in the com- 
munity is due not alone to his business prominence, but 
for the public-spirited interest shown in regard to any 
matter concerning the public welfare. 

Mr. De Laney married, June 26, 1907, Elizabeth K. 
Robbins. of Belfast, Me. Mr. and Mrs. De Laney are the 
parents of five children — one son, Rhoderick, and four 
daughters: Devonia, Mary and Lillian Ruth (triplets); 
and Pauline. The family home is in Brocton, Chautau- 
qua county. 

Mr. De Laney has won his way to responsible position 
through native ability, optimism, determination, and the 



,s 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



application of sound business principles. The manner in 
which he has solved his problems and risen to success 
should prove both an example and an inspiration to the 
young man who would have a part in twentieth centur>' 
business life. 



ERNEST JOHN BAILEY, one of the leading 
residents of Brocton. Chautauqua county, N. Y., a 
successful building contractor who has to his credit 
many large contracts, has advanced far in material 
wealth, and at the same time has held the sincere respect 
of the people of the county who have known him under 
all conditions. He has manifested commendable charac- 
teristics, is a man of distinct business ability, and has 
exhibited a praiseworthy public-spirit, and a practical 
desire to help on the wellbeing of the community in 
general, and the poor and needy in particular. In busi- 
ness enterprise, he has been very successful, and has 
many consequential associations ; he has for two decades 
had a contracting business which has found employment 
for a considerable number of men, has taken part in 
the establishment and direction of other important man- 
ufacturing concerns and is vice-president of the Brocton 
Furniture Company. 

Ernest T. Bailey was bom in Charlotte Center, Char- 
lotte township. Chautauqua county, N. Y., Oct. 2", 1868, 
the son of John J. and Barbara (Beha) Bailey, or 
Ballay. as the family is known in France, wherein is 
the original family seat. Ernest John Bailey is French 
in both paternal and maternal antecedents, the paternal 
line originating in Champagne, and his maternal ances- 
tors being from Alsace-Lorraine, provinces of France. 
Tl-.e patronymic, as originally spelled, was Ballay, and 
the .-Kmerican progenitor of the branch of the Ballay 
family to which Ernest John Bailey belongs was of that 
name, and it is not clear why the name became changed 
in spelling. It probably was wrongly written in real 
estate deeds, to substantiate the title to which the heirs 
took the .Americanized version of the French patronymic. 
However that may be, the family in America has for 
some generations been known by the name of Bailey. 

Ernest John Bailey was born on a farm, and in due 
time attended the district school nearest to his father's 
farm, after passing through which he seems to have 
commenced working at farming occupations quite early 
in his teens. By such work he accumulated sufficient 
means to carry him through business college, where he 
gained the fundamentals of executive work which were 
later of inestimable value to him in the management of 
his own important enterprises. He perhaps had mapped 
out his career well in advance, and knew the various 
steps by which sound success would come. He apprenticed 
himself to carpentry, serving an apprenticeship of five 
years, and later for six years was a journeyman car- 
penter, by which time he was thoroughly conversant 
with most phases of building construction. By steadi- 
ness of life, and by industrious continuance in work 
during the years, he had by that time acquired some 
financial means, sufficient at all events to induce him to 
enter independently into business as a builder and con- 
tractor. He had come to Brocton in 1803, and had 
worked as a carpenter upon many contracts in that 
place, so that he was comparatively well known in the 
village wh'-n he started in conlrarting business for him- 
self in \'/f}. iJuring the almost two decades to the 



present, he has had very substantial success as a con- 
tractor, and has to his credit the erection of many 
important buildings. Many of the fine residences of 
that section of Chautauqua county have been built by 
him, and among the buildings of public institutions and 
business corporations constructed by Mr. Bailey may be 
listed the following, all of which do credit to his 
thoroughness as a builder : The Brocton State Bank 
building; the Ahira Memorial Library building, Broc- 
ton ; the Crandall building, Brocton ; the Bailey building, 
which is a very fine structure, and used mainly by Mr. 
Bailey for his own business offices; the Norquist Metal 
Door Company plant, at Jamestown, a huge building; 
additions to the American Loco Works, and to the 
Atlas Crucible Steel Company plant at Dunkirk; con- 
struction work for the Buffalo and Lake Erie Traction 
Company, including the car barns at Fredonia, and all 
the stations with the exception of two between Buffalo 
and Erie, Pa. ; the Court House at Mayville, Chautauqua 
county; the Church of Christ at Chautauqua; the Chau- 
tauqua High School; the Falconer High School; the 
Jamestown Grammar School; the Sherman Library; 
the .Armour Grape Juice Company headquarters at 
Westfield, Chautauqua county; the gymnasium and 
other additions to the Normal School at Fredonia ; some 
of the building of the Redwing Grape Juice Company, 
Fredonia ; warehouses of same company at Fredonia ; 
the Memorial Hospital at Lilly Dale; the St. Hedwig 
Roman Catholic Church at Dunkirk; and the plant of 
the Brocton Furniture Company ; in addition Mr. 
Bailey has also undertaken many important building 
contracts outside Chautauqua county. He has during 
the period given employment to an average of about 
140 workmen. It may therefore be inferred that, with 
moderate success, he must have acquired an appreciable 
degree of material wealth during the many years he 
has spent in consequential business as a contractor. As 
a matter of fact, he has been universally successful, for 
he knew his business thoroughly before committing 
himself to independent work. And latterly, as a capi- 
talist, he has been brought into connection with many 
other outside enterprises. He owns stock in many 
manufacturing corporations in Chautauqua county; 
Mr. Bailey is one of the largest stockholders of the 
Brocton Furniture Company, of which he is vice-presi- 
dent. 

Politically, Mr. Bailey is an independent Democrat, 
but has been too busy with business affairs that needed 
almost his undivided attention to have much time to spare 
for participation in political movements, and he has 
never allowed himself to consider the thought of taking 
public office. He has, nevertheless, always been closely 
interested in local affairs, and has been ready to lend 
his support to any worthy local project. Religiously, the 
Ballays are Roman Catholics ; that is to say, the French 
family was of the Roman Catholic faith, although 
Ernest J. Bailey has not followed in that church. In 
fraternal affiliations, he has been faithful and is identi- 
fied particularly with the Masonic order. He has risen 
to the thirty-second degree in the order, and is a mem- 
ber of the following: Blue Lodge of Brocton; the 
Chapter, Council, and Commandery, of Dunkirk; the 
Buffalo Shrine; and the Consistory of Jamestown, also 
<A Buffalo. 

On Sept. \2., I'/X), Ivrnest John Bailey married Ruth 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



339 



Hall Pettit, grand-niece of Ahira Hall, whose genealogy 
will be found elsewhere in this historical work. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Bailey have been born three children : Kath- 
leen Elizabeth, now in high school ; Angeline Sarah, 
twin sister of the first-named, and also a high school 
student; Florence Edith, who also attends the local 
school. 

The business success of Ernest John Bailey has been 
notable, especially so, bearing in mind that it has come 
to him entirely by his own efforts, and he has a definite 
place among the worthy Chautauqua county people of 
his generation. 



HENRY RAPPOLE — Nearly nine years have 
elapsed since Henry Rappole, farmer, veteran soldier, 
and public official, passed to his reward, but his memory 
is green and will forever live in the history of his native 
county and adopted city, for he served them both in 
important position. The Rappoles came to Chautauqua 
from Eastern New York, the first of the name, Adam 
Rappole, coming to the town of Ellery, when vir- 
gin timber covered most of the fertile farms of the 
town. Adam Rappole was the father of Henry Rap- 
pole, to whose memory this review of a worthy life is 
dedicated. 

Adam Rappole, born in New York State, came to 
Chautauqua county after the close of the War of 1812, 
and settled on a 100 acre tract of timber land in the 
town of Ellery, his tract a part of the original Holland 
Land Purchase. Adam Rappole built a house from the 
logs felled on his own property, and in coiirse of time 
the forest fled before his axe, and cultivated fields fol- 
lowed, and there he lived a general farmer and stock 
raiser until his death in i860, at the age of sixty-six 
years. He is buried in Bemus Point Cemetery. He mar- 
ried Elizabeth Rice, and they were the parents of eight 
children : Nancy, married Aaron Klock, and died in 
the State of Illinois ; John, died at the old homestead in 
Ellery ; George, died in the State of Wisconsin ; Mary, 
married William Rooker, of Ellery; Electa, married 
Orsenne Richards ; Frank, died in Iowa ; Henry, of fur- 
ther mention ; and a child who died in infancy. Mrs. Rap- 
pole, who was a member of the Presbyterian church, 
died at the farm in Ellery, and is buried with her hus- 
band in Bemus Point Cemetery. 

Henry Rappole, youngest son of Adam and Elizabeth 
(Rice/ Rappole, was born at the homestead in the town 
of Ellery, Chautauqua county, N. Y., Oct. 27, 1833, died 
in the city of Jamestown, Jan. 25, 191 1. He attended 
the county district schools of Ellery and spent his years 
of minority on the farm as his father's assistant. After 
attaining legal age he engaged in lumbering, rafting logs 
down the rivers to mills below. Later he bought seventy 
acres in Ellery township, which he improved and later 
added to until he 112 acres, which he conducted along 
the lines of general farming, also maintaining a dairy 
department and raising stock. The even current of his 
life was broken in 1862 by the War between the States, 
1861-1865, and on Sept. 12, 1862, he enlisted in the 
Seventh Company, First Battalion, New York Sharp- 
thooters, under Captain Arnold. Mr. Rappole was ap- 
pointed corporal, then sergeant, but at the battle of the 
Wilderness his misfortunes began, a shot so disabling his 
left hand and arm that amputation was necessary. He 



spent several weeks in the hospital, then was honorably 
discharged and mustered out of the United States service. 

With his empty sleeve, Mr. Rappole returned home, 
and until 1879 engaged in farming. In that year he was 
elected superintendent of the county poor for Chautauqua 
county, an office he held for six years through five suc- 
cessive annual reelections. In 1882 he sold his farm in 
Ellery, and henceforth made Jamestown his home. He 
was a member of the Jamestown police force for several 
years, then was elected city treasurer, Oscar Price at 
that time being mayor. He held the office of treasurer 
three years, and then retired to private life, leaving a 
record of efficiency and devotion to duty highly credita- 
ble. Prior to coming to Jamestown he had served the 
town of Ellery as assessor and collector of taxes, and in 
every position held he gave to the duties involved the 
most careful attention and to the fullest extent of his 
ability served his constituency. He held exalted ideas of 
citizenship, and in all things measured up to the full 
standard of a man. He was a member of James M. 
Brown Post, Grand Army of the Republic, of James- 
town ; member of the Union Veteran Legion ; and in 
religious faith connected with the Methodist Episcopal 
church. He is buried in Lakeview Cemetery, Jamestown. 

Henry Rappole married, in Mayville, N. Y., July 5, 
185s, Celina Carpenter, born in Pittstown, Rensselaer 
county, N. Y., died in Jamestown, April 18, 1920, at 
the age of eighty-two years, ten months and twelve days, 
daughter of Stephen R. and Prudence (Brownell) Car- 
penter, her parents old settlers of the town of Ellery. 
On July 5, 1905, Mr. and Mrs. Rappole celebrated the 
golden anniversary of their wedding day, and six years 
longer they trod life's pathway together ere their paths 
separated, and the wife was left to walk alone. Mrs. 
Rappole was one of the oldest residents of the city, a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and the 
Woman's Relief Corps. She was a woman of strong 
Christian principle, and in the home which Mr. and Mrs. 
Rappole erected and maintained so long, love and happi- 
Tiess reigned. Their children were : Frances E., who 
died in childhood ; and Nora R., married Frederick L. 
Bush, of Jamestown, representative of the Fleischmann 
Compressed Yeast Company; they have a daughter, 
Frances E., wife of William G. Ritzer, of Jamestown, 
and they have a daughter, Eleanora Jane Ritzer. 

Said the Jamestown "Evening Journal" editorially, 
Jan. 25, 191 1 : 

In the death of Henry Rappole another worthy vet- 
eran of the Civil War has gone to his reward. Like 
thousands of other gallant boys of fifty years ago, 
Henry Rappole responded to the call of his country 
for men to preserve the Union and defend the honor of 
the Stars and Stripes. After ser\'ing faithfully through 
the war and leaving a good arm on a Southern battle- 
field, he returned to home and friends in Old Chau- 
tauqua, where he had lived an honorable life, taken 
his part in the affairs of the day. faithfully performing 
the part assigned to him as citizen and public official. 
.\s superintendent of the poor of Chautauqua county, 
as a member of the local police force, as treasurer of 
hl.s city for a number of years, Mr. Rappole served his 
fellow-citizens honestly and capably, leaving as a 
heritage to his wife and daughter an untarnished 
name, and to his comrade-in-arms the memory of a 
courageous soldier, and a courteous and genial com- 
panion. 



DELOS J. EIGENBROADT— At the end of a 

long and useful life covering a period of seventy-two 
years, spent entirely in the village of Ellington, Delos 



340 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



T. Eigenbroadt passed away, leaving behind him the rec- 
ord of a well spent lite distinguished by industry and 
integrity. 

Prior to the Revolution Peter Eigenbroadt came to 
this country, probably from Germany, and settled at 
Palatine Bridge in the Mohawk Valley. His son, George 
Eigenbroadt, a soldier of the Revolution, was the father 
of Daniel Eigenbroadt and grandfather of Delos J. 
Eigenbroadt, to whose memory this review is dedicated. 

Daniel Eigenbroadt was born in iSio, and died in 1899. 
He moved from the Mohawk \'aUey to Chautauqua 
count\- in 1832, settled in the village of Ellington and 
there started a blacksmith shop. He followed his trade 
for several years, then added a general store business 
to his activities, being assisted by his sons. Mr. Eigen- 
broadt married (first) Phoebe Helmick, born in 1811, 
died in 1S38. He married (second) Lovina Todd, born 
.•\pril 14, iSio, died March i, 1S95, a member of the 
Bela Todd familv of Cassadaga, Chautauqua county, 
X. Y. 

Delos J. Eigenbroadt, son of Daniel and Lovina 
(Todd) Eigenbroadt, was born at the homestead in 
Ellington, Chautauqua county, N. Y., June 22, 1841, and 
died at his home adjoining his store, Dec. 11, 1913. He 
attended the village public school and Ellington Academy, 
but his education came largely through reading and con- 
tact with the business world. In boyhood he worked in 
his father's blacksmith shop and general store, the latter 
business, however, making a stronger appeal to him he 
eventually assumed the responsibility of the store man- 
agement. Upon the death of Daniel Eigenbroadt, the 
eldest son, Lafayette, took over the blacksmith shop and 
Delos J. became owner of the store. He had entered the 
business when a youth of si.xteen ; he "marked his first 
bill of goods," and at the time of his death in his seventy- 
second year was regarded as one of the successful mer- 
chants of Chautauqua county. He greatly developed the 
business and became both widely and favorably known 
as a man of enterprise and integrity. He built a brick 
block with dwelling attached ne.xt door to the homestead. 
Mr. Eigenbroadt was a Democrat in politics, but was 
never actively identified with political life, regarding the 
successful conduct of his private business as calling for 
his entire attention. Yet he did not live selfishly and 
was freely consulted by his neighbors on matters of 
grave importance. He continued in business until the 
last, and closed his useful life honored and respected by 
all who knew him; his acquaintance was a very wide 
one. 

Mr. Eigenbroadt marrie<I (first) March 3, 1870, Au- 
gusta H. Stockwell, who died in 1886, leaving an adopted 
daughter. Belle Todd Sherman, who married Edwin D. 
Lines, of Jamestown. Mr. and Mrs. Lines are the par- 
ents of three children : Jessie Augusta, Stephen V. R., 
and Janet. Mr. Eigenbroadt married (second) Jan. i, 
1</X), Ciora Goulding, of Ellington, who survives him, 
daughter of Burr and Sarah (Morse) Goulding. She 
has no children, but since being left a widow has adopted 
a daughter, Eleanor Colvin, born Noveinbcr 9, 1912. Mrs. 
Eigenbroadt successfully conducted the business left to 
her management until 1916, when she disposed of it to 
the George B. Waith Company. She has proved herself 
a woman of K'><><\ business ability, and with it has a 
public-spirited interest in her village. During the World 
War i»eriod she was very active in support of the lib- 



erty loan and other "drives," as town chairman of the 
Fourth and Victory Loans, contributing a great deal 
toward their success. She is widely known and highly 
respected. 



ABRAHAM WILSON DODS, M. D.— Fredonia 
has no citizen whom she respects more highly than the 
man whose name we have just written. Not only is Dr. 
Dods eminent in his profession, but its engrossing cares 
and widespread interests have never rendered him un- 
mindful of the claims of his home community. 

Abraham Wilson Dods was born Jan. 27, 1854, in 
Dingwall, Scotland, a son of Thomas Palliser and Kath- 
arine (Wilson) Dods, the former a farmer and land 
agent. When Abraham Wilson Dods was one and a half 
years old the family moved to Hexham, Northumberland, 
England, where the boy attended district school from 
four to eight years; private grammar school until the 
age of twelve; private boarding school in Sunderland 
until si-xteen. He was then apprenticed to a farmer for 
two years, and at the end of that time, in 1872, emi- 
grated to the United States, settling in West Charlton, 
Saratoga county, N. Y. After working for one year as 
a farmer, Mr. Dods entered Fredonia Normal School, 
graduating in 1875, in the classical course, and then spent 
one year at Syracuse University, following this with 
another year at the New York Homoeopathic Medical 
College, New York City. He then matriculated in the 
Chicago Homoeopathic Medical College, graduating in 
1878 with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. During his 
last year he served as interne in Hahnemann Hospital. 
It is eminently worthy of note that such was Dr. Dods' 
desire for a medical education that, though a young man 
with his way to make in a new country, he did not hesi- 
tate to incur, in order to attain his ambition, an amount 
of debt which would have appalled a man of less indomi- 
table will power. In 1878 Dr. Dods began practice at 
Silver Creek, Chautauqua county, remaining until 1884, 
when he went to Scotland and took a post-graduate 
course in surgery at Edinburgh University. In 1885 he 
established himself at Fredonia, where he has continu- 
ously practiced ever since, but now limits his work ex- 
clusively to surgery, in which he has been extremely suc- 
cessful, earning a most enviable reputation. He is sur- 
geon at Brooks Memorial Hospital, Dunkirk, N. Y., and 
holds the same position with the New York Central 
Railroad Company. 

Politically Dr. Dods is an inependent Republican. 
During the World War he served the Home Defense 
Reserve Corps as medical examiner for Dunkirk-Fre- 
donia Draft Board, District No. i. He is a member of 
the American Medical Society, the American Institute 
of Homceopathy, the New York and New England Asso- 
ciation of Railway Surgeons, the New York State Medi- 
cal As.sociation, the New York State Homoeopathic Asso- 
ciation, the Homoeopathic Association of Western New 
York, the Chautauqua Coimty Medical Association, the 
I'Vedonia and Dunkirk Medical Association, and the 
Volunteer Medical Service Corps. He affiliates with 
Forest Lodge, No. l6fj. Free and Accepted Masons, of 
Fredonia, and Westfield Chapter, No. 239. 

Dr. Dods married (first) Dec. 12, 1878, Aura, daugh- 
ter of John N. and Nancy (Le Barr) Porter, of Broc- 
ton, N. Y., and they became the parents of three chil- 
dren : I. John I'alliscr, attended Fredonia public and 




U0f/^^ /Jtti^. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



341 



high schools, and then spent two years at Phillips Acad- 
emy, Andover; in 1908 received from Cornell University 
the degree of Mechanical Engineer, having worked his 
way through the institution; was a member of the 'Var- 
sity Crew, 1905-06; has been with Blue Book (automo- 
bile) since 190S; in now western manager in Chicago; 
married Annette Bruce, of Boston, Mass., and they have 
two children, John and Annette. 2. Katharine Wilson, 
educated in Fredonia grammar and high schools ; mar- 
ried R. I. Mulholland, of Dunkirk; they have two chil- 
dren, Marcia and Katharine. 3. Marcus, educated in 
Fredonia grammar and high schools, Fredonia Normal 
School, and the Peddie Institute; died in 1917, at the 
age of twenty-seven. Mrs. Dods passed away in 1909. 
Dr. Dods married (second) September 18, 1911, Helen T. 
Jones, of Fredonia. 

In the character of Dr. Dods are combined the best 
traits of the Scotsman with many of the distinctive 
qualities of the American, acquired in the course of an 
almost lifelong residence in the New World. When 
Scotland sent Abraham Wilson Dods to the United 
States she gave us the material for an eminent surgeon 
and a public-spirited citizen, true alike to the land of his 
birth and the country of his adoption. Would that old 
Caledonia might send us many more of the same type. 



MARTIN PRENDERGAST WHALLON— The 

characters of a successful farmer and a faithful public 
official are combined in Mr. Whallon, of Mayville, who 
now holds the office of supervisor. This good citizen 
takes a lively interest in all that concerns the welfare 
of his community, and is active in its social and fra- 
ternal circles. 

Martin P. Whallon was born Jan. 17, 1870, in May- 
ville, and is a son of William Murray and Martha (Pren- 
dergast) Whallon, both members of families long resi- 
dent in Chautauqua county and township. The education 
of Martin P. Whallon was received in the public schools 
of his native town which he attended until 1887, when he 
went to Wisconsin and entered Racine College, where he 
took the regular course, but did not graduate, and then 
for a time studied, under private tuition, the principles 
of commercial law and business. In 1889 Mr. Whallon 
returned to Mayville, where for five years he conducted a 
wholesale harness establishment. At the end of that time 
he decided to devote his entire time and attention to 
agricultural pursuits, being the owner of two farms, 
one of which he inherited from his father's family and 
the other from his mother's. Mr. Whallon is perhaps 
the only man in Chautauqua county who derives his land, 
originally, from the Holland Land Company. A de- 
tailed history of this organization may be found on 
another page of this work. In the cultivation of his 
farms, which he accomplished by the most enlightened 
methods, Mr. Whallon was eminently successful and to 
their management he still pays constant attention. The 
deeds for the land are now in his possession. Politically 
Mr. Whallon is a Republican, and in 1913 was elected 
supervisor of his township. So satisfactory was the 
manner in which he performed his duties that he is still 
retained in the office, his present term expiring in 1921. 
He affiliates with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
and is a member of the Protestant Episcopal church of 
Mayville. 

Mr. Whallon married, Nov. 20, 1894, on the grounds of 



the Chautauqua Institution, Mary G., daughter of C. G. 
and Alice (Porter) Herrick, and they are the parents 
of one son, William, born July 6, 1897, who was edu- 
cated in the public schools and high school of Mayville, 
and in the late war enlisted in the army. He is now the 
assistant of his father in the management of the farms. 
The home of Mr. and Mrs. Whallon is one of the most 
attractive in Mayville. During his school days Mr. 
Whallon was quite an athlete and he still takes a great 
interest in fishing, hunting, baseball and all outdoor 
sports. 

Martin P. Whallon is one of the men who count in 
his community, not only because he is a leading farmer 
and the incumbent of a public office, but mainly because 
in both these capacities he has sought to develop the best 
interests of his township and to minister to the truest 
welfare of his friends and neighbors. 



SIMEON WILLIS PARKS, son of Simeon and 
Elizabeth (Curtiss) Parks, was born in Wells, Vt., Sept. 
18, 1810, and died in Jamestown, Aug. 21, 1883. At the 
age of fourteen years, he came to LeRoy, N. Y,, where 
for six years he made his home with his brother, Elisha 
Parks. In 1830, a youth of twenty years, he moved to 
Mina, Chautauqua county, where he became a clerk in 
the mercantile establishment of J. R. & S. B. Keeler; 
he remained in the employ of this firm until 1834, when, 
having been licensed to preach, he resigned his position 
and for four years traveled a circuit as a minister of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. At the expiration of this 
time, his health, never robust, became seriously impaired, 
and he was forced very reluctantly to relinquish his office. 
In 1838 Mr. Parks located in Jamestown, where the re- 
mainder of his life was spent. From November of that 
year until 1851, he was associated with Zalmon G. Keeler 
m general merchandise business. He continued dealings 
in general merchandise, clothing and furniture, part of 
the time with partners and part of the time independently 
until 187S, when he retired from active business life. His 
interest in public affairs was broad and sympathetic. In 
1855 he was supervisor of the town of Ellicott. He was 
greatly interested in educational work, and for many 
years served as town school commissioner, and later ren- 
dered valuable assistance in the organization of the pub- 
lic schools, then known as the Jamestown Union School 
and Collegiate Institute, and was frequently referred to 
as the "father of the Union School system" in James- 
town. He was a member of the Board of Education 
from the organization of the school until 1878, and for 
several terms was president of the board. Mr. Parks 
was a man of culture, keen and progressive, and in many 
ways was in advance of the thought of his time. He 
devoted both his time and his talents to the great causes 
of temperance and anti-slavery, and was often heard 
upon the lecture platform in support of his views. 

On June 26, 1838, Mr. Parks was united in marriage 
to Anna Maria Carter, of Randolph, N. Y., who died 
Jan. 20, 1S89. They were the parents of five children: 
I. Mary Elizabeth, married Robert T. Hazzard (de- 
ceased) and resides at Lakewood. N. Y. 2. Charles Ed- 
win, a resident of Jamestown, N. Y. 3. Annette Maria, 
married C. Perry Harris (deceased) ; her death occurred 
at Jamestown, Nov. 24, 1919. 4. Willis Simeon, died 
May 6, 1881. 5. Ella Augusta, lives at the family home 
in Jamestown. 



3-P 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



SHERMAN B. VANDERVOORT, president of 
the \'andervoort Supply Company, and Service Coal and 
Coke Company, wholesale coal, of Jamestown, N. Y., 
which companies are leading ones in the line of building 
supplies aiid coal, has lived in Jamestown practical!}' 
all his life, being only a year old when his parents mo\ed 
to that city. He was born in Buftalo, N. Y., Aug. 25, 
iSSi, the son of Charles R. and Sarah A. Vandervoort. 
Lharles R. Vandervoort brought his family to James- 
town in 1SS2, and has since been a constant resident much 
respected and responsible. He has been identified with 
the Broadhead Worsted Mills for many years. 

Sherman B. \'andervoort received his academic educa- 
tion in Jamestown schools, attending the grammar school 
for the elementarj- grades, and eventually graduating 
from the high school. He had decided to take up a pro- 
lessional life, and as his natural inclination was to engi- 
neering he took the technical course at the Allegany Col- 
lege, eventually becoming a civil engineer. In 1907, as 
elsewhere recorded in this historical work, he formed 
business partnership with ^^'alter Griggs, of Jamestown, 
and as the Hollow Stone Company the partners began to 
manufacture cement blocks. Mr. Vandervoort acquired 
the interest of Mr. Griggs in the business and incor- 
porated it under the name of the Vandervoort Supply 
Company, an account of which follows. In 1916 was 
formed the Service Coal and Coke Company, distributors 
of anthracite and bituminous coal, of which Mr. Vander- 
voort is sole owner ; the business is strictly wholesale ; 
the enterprise has been verj' successful, and at the pres- 
ent time (1920) is handling a large tonnage. 

Mr. \'andervoort is an excellent business man, and 
has many sincere friends in Jamestown. He is always 
ready to assist, personally or financially, in any public 
project having for its object the betterment of conditions 
within the citj-, or the ultimate advancement of the citj-. 
He belongs to the Jamestown Board of Commerce, and 
the Jamestown Builders' Exchange, of which organiza- 
tion he is secretar\-. Socially, he is a member of the 
Jamestown Club, and of the Bradford Club, at Brad- 
ford, Pa. He is an ardent sportsman, and interested in 
the conservation of game, and as such is a member of a 
sportsman's organization. Fraternally, Mr. Vandervoort 
is affiliated with the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks ; and religiously, he is an Episcopalian. 

On April I, 1918, at Buffalo, N. Y., Mr. Vandervoort 
married Lucile Baker. They have one child, Sherman 
B.. Jr. 



THE VANDERVOORT SUPPLY COMPANY, 

Jamcitown, X. V., of which incorpnrritcd company Shir- 
man B. V'andcr\-oort is president, and C. R. Vandcrvcjnrt 
h sccretarj- and treasurer, was established in 1907 as a 
co-f/artncrship under the name of the Hollow Stone Cnm- 
p-any to mantilacture and sell cement blocks for buiUiing 
pur[;'y^'-s. The partners were Walter Griggs and Sher- 
man B. Vandervoort, and they operated a plant on Cel- 
eron road, Jamestown. In 191 1 the plant was removed 
to the Eric Freight House, on East Second street, and 
in that year Mr. Vandervoort ac'iuircd the interest of 
Mr. Origins. The conse'iucnt reconstruction of the firm 
IrouKht many chant'fs ; the company took on corporate 
existence, under the trading designation of the Vander- 
voort Supply Comfany, and with an authorized capital 



of $5,000. The manufacture of cement stone was dis- 
continued, and the company aimed to considerably develop 
its business in building supplies. In 1912 the company 
again moved its plant and supplies, locating at Monroe 
and Clinton streets and Isabelle avenue, and in 1915 added 
coal to its line of trading. Since then the company has 
purchased the L. F. Shcdd Estate, upon which is located 
a large coal elevator, the only one in Jamestown, and with 
their two >'ards the company now has the largest coal 
yards in Western New York State. The Vandervoort 
Supply Company has had satisfactory development, and 
in 1916 its increased volume of trading caused its princi- 
pals to increase its authorized capital from $5,000 to 
$50,000, which may indicate the extent to which !Mr. Van- 
dervoort has developed the business since the direction 
of its affairs passed, mainly, into his hands. 



EBBIE PIERSON SHORES— In the little village 
of Irving, in the town of Hanover, in the extreme north- 
eastern corner of Chautauqua county, E. Pierson Shores 
was born, a son of Ebenezer Pierson Shores, his birth 
occurring two months after his father's death, at Irving, 
a little village on the railroad, and naturally the lad was 
attracted to the tracks of the Lake Shore, and the con- 
stant association implanted a desire to become a railroad 
man, an ambition he realized ; at the time of his death 
he was a freight conductor on the Lake Shore & Michi- 
gan Southern railroad, meeting instant death while in 
the discharge of his duties. He was a man highly 
esteemed by all who knew him and held the perfect con- 
fidence of the railroad officials under whom he served, 
always ready, willing and e.xact in the performance of 
every duty assigned him. 

Ebenezer Pierson Shores was a shoemaker by trade, 
and for several years was postmaster of Irving, Chau- 
tauqua county, N. Y., where he died in .^pril, i8''6. He 
married Anna Insley Mott, who was born in England, 
and at the time of her marriage to Mr. Shores was the 
widow of Thomas M. Mott. She died at the home of 
her son, Ebbie P. Shores, in Lackawanna, N. Y., and is 
buried in the cemetery at Hanover Center. The family 
were attendants of the Protestant Episcopal church. 

Ebbie Pierson Shores was born in Irving, town of 
Hanover, Chautauqua county, N. Y., June 8, 1866, and 
was instantly killed at Brocton, Chautauqua county, N. 
Y., Aug. 19, 191S. His father's death antedated the birth 
of his son by two months, and the absence of a providing 
head of the family early threw responsibilities upon the 
lad. At the age of fourteen he left public school to enter 
the employ of the Lake Shore &. Michigan Southern rail- 
load as water boy with a section gang. Later, he became 
himself a section worker, and in course of time was made 
a section foreman. On Aug. 4, 1890, having gone 
through a course of preparatory study, he passed suc- 
cessfully an examination in Buffalo, which qualified him 
to act as railroad brakeman. He was a brnkcman on 
the eastern division of the Lake Shore & Michigan 
Southern for twelve years until Nov. 25, 1902, when he 
was promoted to the position of freight conductor on 
(he same division. For sixteen years he continued a con- 
fluctor, with the exception of one year as passenger con- 
ductor, always running freight trains. 

Mr. Shores met his death at Brocton, N. Y., instantly 
and without warning. His crew were making up his 




\-^%V_)oc^ cy^--^v V) o^-</-^\!!^^r 




MR. AND MRS. H. P. MIORHS 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



343 



train, and duty calling him he crossed the railroad track 
just in time to be struck by a rapidly moving freight car, 
which was being drilled into position in the train. He 
was taken to his home in Silver Creek, and then laid at 
rest in Glen wood Cemetery there. He was a member of 
the Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen, and the Lake 
Shore Mutual Association, an attendant of the Protestant 
Episcopal church, and faithful to every duty as he saw it. 
Air. Shores married, Sept. 26, 1893, Margaret E. Schnei- 
der, daughter of John B. and Mary Ann (Zimmerman) 
Schneider, of Syracuse, N. Y. Mr. and Mrs. Shores 
were the parents of five children : Francella, married 
Howard Armbruster, and resides in Dunkirk, N. Y. ; 
Henrietta, married Stanley Boor, and resides at Silver 
Creek; Harry; Ebbie John; and William N. Mr. Shores 
was devoted to his family and was happiest in his home. 
Mrs. Shores and the children are members of the Roman 
Catholic church of Silver Creek. 



AUGUST P. OLSON— This family name, origi- 
nally Olsen, was changed to Olson by August P. Olson 
after his coming to Jamestown, and so he always wrote 
it. In later 3'ears his daughter, Ellen J., the talented 
entertainer, reader, and impersonator of Shakespearian 
roles, reverted to the original spelling, Olsen. August P. 
Olson was for nearly half a century a resident of James- 
town, N. Y., coming to that city a young man, thoroughly 
skilled as a cabinet maker and worker in wood. About 
1874 he entered Jamestown's business life as an exclusive 
manufacturer of tables, and at the time of his death, 
forty-five years later, was president of the Diamond 
Furniture Company, and recognized as one of the able 
business men of his city, and one who had materially 
aided in its upbuilding. He was the son of Jens Olsen, a 
farmer, located on the island of Bornholm, Denmark, at 
the time of the birth of his son, August P. Many Danes 
settled in Jamestown upon coming to this country and 
there aided in creating a city of homes and manufactories. 
Although upon first coming to the United States Mr. 
Olson did not locate in Jamestown, he came a little later, 
and from his coming until his death in 1919, made that 
city his home and business headquarters. While he be- 
came an intense and patriotic citizen, and served with all 
the zeal of a native son, he never lost his interest in and 
love for his native land. 

August P. Olson was born on the island of Bornholm, 
Denmark, Aug. 22, 1849, died in Jamestown, N. Y., Aug. 
5, 1919. He obtained a good education in the Danish 
schools, and learned the cabinet maker's trade, continuing 
in Denmark until nineteen years of age. In 1868 he 
came to the United States, locating in Titusville, Pa., 
where he was engaged at his trade until his coming to 
Jamestown, where in 1874 he began business for himself 
as a manufacturer of tables. His was the first exclusive 
table manufactured in Jamestown, Mr. Olson's little plant 
being located in the old Wood building that stood upon 
the site of the later Warner building. Making tables of 
a superior quality, the Olson tables quickly found a 
place in the furniture market, and in 1878 Mr. Olson 
found it advisable to admit a partner and enlarge the scope 
of his business. He found the partner in the person of 
John Love, also of Danish birth, and a man of fine 
mechanical and business ability. The business was con- 
ducted under the firm name of A. P. Olson & Company 
tor many years, and through the good judgment, fore- 



sight, and energy of the partners, was a success. The 
slogan of the company was "best material and workman- 
ship," and on that foundation a business was built that 
has endured for nearly half a century, constantly increas- 
ing in volume. The little plant was succeeded by a large 
factory built at the corner of Taylor and Fillmore streets, 
and when the business outgrew the resources of the two 
men, the Diamond Furniture Company was incorporated, 
but was controlled by Mr. Olson and Mr. Love. As a 
corporation" the business has continued its prosperous 
course, and although the strong arm of the founder has 
been withdrawn, John Love, his able associate of forty 
years standing, retains the office of vice-president, 
although he has practically retired. But both men left 
able sons, whom they trained in the business, Louis A. 
Olson and Henry F. Love, the former being trained in 
the selling department, the latter in the offices of the com- 
pany, and both contributed largely to the success of the 
company. 

Through their long business career as manufacturers, 
Messrs. Olson and Love maintained the most cordial and 
satisfactory relations with their employees, who, in turn, 
were invariably loyal to the interests of their employers. 
Each partner gave personal attention to the details of 
his department and both being men of conservative nature 
and inspired by a common interest, there was no friction 
in the management, but the best of feeling always existed 
between the two men. Early in the twentieth century, 
Mr. Olson visited his old home in Denmark, and while 
abroad informed himself as to the actual conditions in 
foreign markets. He continued the active executive head 
of the Diamond Furniture Companj- until his death. 

Mr. Olson married, in Jamestown, Ida Johnson, born 
in Gottenburg, Sweden, who died April 12, 1896, daugh- 
ter of Jesse Johnson. They were the parents of three 
children who, deprived of a mother's care when young, 
found in their father a loving friend and tender, faithful 
guardian. Children : i. Louis A., who, after finishing 
his education, became a travelling salesman in the em- 
ploy of the Diamond Furniture Company ; he now resides 
in Detroit, Mich. 2. Ellen J., who was educated in the 
Jamestown public schools, and the Curry School of Ex- 
pression in Boston, and became a public reader and enter- 
tainer, covering in her varied repertoire a wide range of 
subjects from the light sketch or ballad to Browning 
and Shakespeare. The principal numbers in her reper- 
toirs are: "Julius Caesar;" "The Merchant of Venice;" 
"Much Ado About Nothing;" Browning's "A Blot in the 
'Scutcheon ;" and Lovell's "Ingomer." She impersonates 
the leading characters in these plays, and every recital is 
given from memory, entirely without the use of notes. 
Miss Olson married, May 8, 1913, Alfred Holmes, born 
in Copenhagen, Denmark, who came to Jamestown, N. 
Y., in October, 190Q, and is an architect. They are the 
parents of a son, Ernest L. Holmes. 3. Evel.vn Isabel 
Olson, who is a graduate of the Jamestown (N. Y.) High 
School, class of 1906, and was her father's housekeeper 
up to the time of his death; she is now associated with 
the Art Metal Construction Company and resides at the 
old home, No. 63 Barrett avenue. Jamestown. 

The Jamestown "Journal," at the time of the death of 
Mr. Olson, said editorially: 

Death has removed another Important flg-ure in the 
development of the Industries of Jamestown, August 
P. Olson, the head of the Diamond Furniture Company, 



344 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



who has been honest and earnest in his eftorts for the 
betterment of the conditions of the men in his employ, 
and for the advancement of the best interests in 
Jamestown as an industrial centre and a place of resi- 
dence. The community has lost an earnest worker 
and a good man in the passing- of A. P. Olson. 



HENRY SALEM EDMUNDS, M. D.— There are 
few names so well known in the medical profession, 
especially among the younger and rising physicians, as 
that of Dr. Henry Salem Edmunds, of Fredonia, Chau- 
tauqua county, N. Y.. who has established himself in 
the forefront of his profession in this region and has 
won the respect and admiration alike of his professional 
colleagues and the community-at-large. 

Dr. Edmunds was born Feb. 8, 1883, on a farm at 
Sheridan, N. Y., and is a son of Walter A. and Minnie 
E. (Daniels) Edmunds, old and highly respected resi- 
dents of Sherman, where the former is the owner of 
the Sherman Steam Mills, one of the largest concerns of 
its kind in the western part of the State. The Edmunds 
family is an exceedingly ancient one, not only in this 
countn- but in the Old World, the members of the 
family being able to trace their descent back to the 
time of William the Conqueror, their ancestor having 
come over with that Monarch from Normandy to Eng- 
land in the year 1066. A. D. 

The elder Mr. Edmunds located at Sherman, N. Y., 
when his son was about nine years of age, the latter 
having begun his elementary education at the public 
schools of Sheridan. He continued his studies at the 
similar institutions of Sherman and graduated from the 
High School there in the class of 1902, having been 
prepared for college. He had by that time determined 
upon the medical profession as a career in life, and with 
this end in view entered the medical department of the 
University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, from which he 
v,-as graduated with the class of 1908, taking his meaical 
degree. He then entered the hospital in connection 
with the University of Michigan, where he served for a 
time as interne, and later held the same position at the 
Shcnango Valley Hospital at Newcastle, Pa. Upon 
completing this period of apprenticeship, he returned to 
his native region and began the practice of his pro- 
fession at Sinclairville, Chautauqua county, where he 
remained six years and made for himself an enviable 
reputation. His next move was to Cassadaga, where 
he practiced medicine until the entrance of America into 
the World War. He volunteered his services in April, 
1917. being one of the first physicians to do so, and 
was commissioned on June 30, following. Dr. Edmunds 
was then sent to Fort Benjamin Harrison, where he 
s,tudic'] at the Officers' Training Camp for five weeks, 
and was then ordered to Kelley Field, San Antonio, 
Tex., the famous aviation camp. After remaining four 
weeks there, he brought his squadron to Mincola, L. 
I., where after remaining three weeks they embarked 
for England. Here they were quartered at South- 
hampton until their removal to France, the unit landing 
at Havre in that country. From Havre they were sent 
to Clermont, where Dr. Edmunds was apjiointcd sur- 
geon to the Seventh Aviation Center, where he super- 
intended the building of the Rase Hospital. He was 
next ap7)ointed surgeon to the Officers' Training Camp 
Hospital and for some time occupied the position of 
chief surgeon at this post. From there he was sent to 
Valbonnc, in the neighborhood of Lyons, where he was 



connected with the Valbonne Hospital, and still later 
was sent to Advance Depot No. i, in Isle-Sur-Tille. 
At the latter place he superintended the construction of 
a 1,000 bed hospital. He alsosawserviceonmanyoperating 
teams and remained at this point until he himself became 
a casual, having been gassed in March, 1918. He was 
not, however, seriously injured on this occasion and was 
soon at work again, but was once more gassed, Sept. 22, 

1 918, this time with almost fatal results, and was sent 
to Base Hospital No. 17, at Dijon, where he remained 
from Sept. 22, to Oct. 3. On the latter date he was sent 
to Base Hospital No. 20 at Beau Dessert, where he was 
also a casual. By this time, however, he was back in 
active duty and so great was the press of work that it 
was necessary for him to operate and care for the 
wounded in spite of his own hurt, the hospital being 
crowded at that time with the injured from the front. 
He had charge of two of the largest wards in the hos- 
pital and remained actively employed there until he was 
finally sent back to the United States as adjutant in 
charge of 2,500 wounded men. He landed at Hoboken, 
N. J., Dec. 17, 1918, and was sent to the Base Hospital 
at Camp Merritt, where he did Evacuation Hospital 
Work, in charge of the sending out of the wounded men 
to their various State hospitals when they were able to 
be moved, although still a casual himself. Dr. Edmunds 
was then sent to the United States Army Hospital No. 
:, as a casual, and received a thirty-day furlough, and 
spent the inonth of Jan. 6 to Feb. 6, igig, at home. He 
then reported back to Base Hospital No. i and was 
honorably discharged from the army there on Feb. 15, 

1919. He was sent, however, by the Federal Board 
of Rehabilitation to New York City, where he remained 
under observation until July 21, 1919. On Sept. i, 1919, 
he came to Fredonia, and has here purchased a beauti- 
ful house on Teinple street. He has once more resumed 
practice and has already won wide recognition for 
himself. Dr. Edmunds specializes in surgery, in which 
his work at the front has given him such wide experi- 
ence, and he is familiar with all the latest surgical 
methods, many of which have been developed purely as 
a result of that experience. Dr. Edmunds is a member 
of the Methodist Episcopal church, and in politics is an 
independent Republican. He is affiliated with a number 
of important organizations here, fraternal and otherwise. 
He is a member of the American Legion, composed of 
the veterans of the Great War; Silivan Lodge, No. 303, 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, of Sinclairville ; 
Buffalo Chapter, Royal .'Xrch Masons; Council, Royal 
and Select Masters; Commandery, Knights Templar; 
Temple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine; and Buffalo Consistory, Sovereign Princes of 
the Royal Secret, and has taken his thirty-second degree 
in Free Masonry. He is also a member of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, and holds the rank of 
past noble grand of Cassadaga Lodge. Besides his 
private practice. Dr. Edmunds holds the position of 
medical examiner for the Mutual Life Insurance Com- 
pany, the New York Life Insurance Company, the 
Metropolitan Life Insurance Company of New York 
City, the Prudential Life Insurance Company of New- 
ark, the Order of Maccabees, the National Protective 
League, the Northwestern Life Insurance Company, 
and a number of beneficial companies in this region. 

Dr. Edmunds married (first) Kathrine Francis, by 




A^/^ 




I 

1 

I 




oL^. 



y, 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



345 



whom he had two children, Frances Helen and Mar- 
garet. He married (second) Nov. 24, 1909, at Corry, 
Pa., Mable A. Mead, a daughter of Dr. James and 
Sada (Bushnell) Mead, old and highly respected resi- 
dents of that place, where Dr. Mead died Dec. 13, 1918. 
Two children have been born of this union, as follows : 
Richard Mead and Dorothy. 



HARRY BROWN THOMPSON— The Forestville 
"Free Press," the medium through which Harry B. 
Thompson has made himself best acquainted with Chau- 
tauquans, was founded by Edward L. Husted in Febru- 
ary, 1891, Mr. Husted having previously founded the 
Sinclairville "Spectator." Twelve years later the "Free 
Press" passed under the control of Harry B. Thompson, 
who has successfully guided its destinies as editor and 
publisher for seventeen years, 1903-1920. Mr. Thompson 
began his career in journalism with the opening of the 
present century, his early experiences as a reporter being 
a fitting preparation for the post he has ably filled. He 
is a son of De Hart and Orlantha (Brown) Thompson, 
his father formerly a well known merchant of Sinclair- 
ville, N. Y. 

Harry Brown Thompson was born in Sinclairville, 
Chautauqua county, N. Y., March 23, 1874. He was edu- 
cated in Sinclairville grade and high schools. Chamberlain 
Academy, Randolph, N. Y., Alleghany College, Mead- 
ville. Pa., and Erie Business College, Erie, Pa. He 
was variously emploj'ed during his early manhood 
years, but in 1900 entered upon his career as a journalist 
as a reporter on the Randolph "Register," at Randolph, 
N. Y. He spent three years as a reporter with the 
"Register," then was for a time otherwise engaged, 
but in 1903 became editor and publisher of the Forest- 
ville "Free Press," a weekly publication foimded in 1891 
and conducted by Edward L. Husted through its first 
twelve years of life. 

The "Free Press" under the editorial and business 
management of Mr. Thompson has steadily grown in 
circulation and influence, and circulates freely in the 
four townships of Arkwright, Villenova, Sheridan and 
Hanover, while in Forestville it is a welcome visitor 
in three-fourths of the village homes. It is an eight 
page newspaper, appearing every Friday from a well 
equipped printing plant, which also includes a job print- 
ing department. In politics the "Free Press" is Repub- 
lican. The local reporters and assistants are Mrs. H. 
B. Thompson and Helen R. Barnard. 

Mr. Thompson is also the head of another prosperous 
business, writing fire, life, liability, theft, auto and 
tornado policies, known as the Forestville Insurance 
Agency. This business was established in 1865 by S. 
W. Reynolds and now represents such leading companies 
as : The Hartford, Home. Aetna, Continental, Great 
.A.merican, Globe; London, Liverpool and Globe, North 
America, Phoenix, Franklin, Connecticut, Springfield 
Fire and Marine, and the National Liberty. The busi- 
ness of the agency has greatly increased under Mr. 
Thompson's management and is the leading business of 
its kind in that section of the county. He is also inter- 
ested in the Commercial and Improvement Association 
of Forestville, which he serves as secretary. 

Mr. Thompson married, at Auburn, N. Y., April 30, 
1901, Elnora A. Coe, daughter of George and Sarah 
Ann (Mixer) Coe, of an old Steamburg, Cattaraugus 
county, family. 



JOSEPH NELSON— The business which Joseph 
Nelson and his brother Robert founded in Dunkirk, N. 
Y., in 1850, under the trade name, Joseph Nelson & 
Company, wholesale jewelry and silverware dealers, 
is notable as the oldest in its particular line of all firms 
in the United States operating under a firm name. 
Joseph Nelson, after his brother's resignation from the 
firm, continued the business until his retirement late 
in life. His three sons-in-law, Henry F. Vander Voort, 
James Lyman van Buren and J. Franklin Gilbert, were 
taken into the business by Mr. Nelson during later years. 
Mr. Vander Voort resigned from the business before 
Mr. Nelson's death and went to Buffalo to conduct a 
similar business of his own. After Mr. Nelson's death 
the two sons-in-law, Messrs. van Buren and Gilbert, 
continued the business until their own death and since 
that year, 1916, the name of this well known firm became 
e.xtinct. This house operated all those years under the 
same name, Joseph Nelson & Company. Joseph Nelson 
built into warp and woof a name and reputation for the 
house, and for himself a character beyond reproach. 

Of ancient Scotch Covenanter blood, his Nelson fore- 
bears fled from Scotland in the days of religious perse- 
cution and settled in the North of Ireland, whence came 
that famed Scotch-Irish people, so many of whom came 
in early days to the American colonies. Joseph Nelson's 
grandmother was a descendant of John Knox, Scotland's 
great reformer. His parents were Joseph and Mary 
Jane (Gilbert) Nelson, of Dromore, County Down, 
and Banbridge, Ireland. Joseph Nelson, the father, was 
a noted clock maker, his specialty the olden time "Grand- 
father's clock," many of which were sent to the United 
States. He was also a manufacturing jeweler, and 
taught the business to his sons. His wife, Mary Jane 
Gilbert, was the daughter of a divine of the Scotch 
Covenanter church. Rev. .A.dam Gilbert, D. D., who 
became a Presbyterian after the merger of the denomi- 
nations. Joseph and Mary Jane (Gilbert) Nelson were 
the parents of four children: Robert, Ann, Joseph and 
Gilbert. Robert and Joseph came to the United States, 
as did their sister Ann, this review following the career 
of Joseph. 

Joseph (2) Nelson was born in Dromore, County 
Down, Ireland, Aug 7, 1832, died in Dunkirk, N. Y., 
June 28, 1909. He obtained a good education, and from 
an early age was allowed to become familiar with the 
details of his father's business, displaying marked 
aptitude. After the death of Joseph and Mary Jane 
(Gilbert) Nelson, their children, Robert, Ann, Joseph 
and Gilbert, disposed of the jewelry business and all 
other property pertaining to the estate and came 
to the United States, arriving in Dunkirk, N. Y., May 
4, 1850. The brothers at once established in business 
along the same lines their father had so successfully 
followed in Ireland and for several years they prospered, 
but as retailers only. They then decided to become 
wholesale jewelry dealers and dissolved partnership, 
Robert establishing in Toledo, Ohio, Joseph continuing 
under the firm name, Joseph Nelson & Company. The 
latter built up a strong business house, admitting later 
his sons-in-law, Vander Voort, van Buren and Gilbert, 
but he continued himself the active head of the business 
up to the time of his death. 

For more than half a century he was a pillar of 
strength to the First Baptist Church of Dunkirk, 
although he was reared in the Presbyterian faith of 



346 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



his moiher. But he liberally supported all Christian 
organizations and benevolences, and was most public- 
spirited and progressive, supporting all forward move- 
ments, civic and moral. He was devoted to his home 
and family, belonging to neither club nor fraternity. 
He was a man who won public confidence to an un- 
usual degree, and when the time came to show him a 
tinal mark of respect all business houses of the city 
stood closed during the funeral hour. 

Joseph Xelson married, in the town of Sheridan, 
Chautauqua county. X. Y., June 29, 1858, Julia Ann 
Bartholomew, bom in Sheridan, Dec. 12, 1S40, daughter 
of Henry and Isabella (Patterson) Bartholomew, her 
father of Xew England birth but from boyhood a resi- 
dent of Chautauqua county. Joseph and Julia Ann 
(Bartholomewl X'elson were the parents of four 
daughters, as follows : I. Isabelle Bartholomew, married 
John Franklin Gilbert, whom she survives (q. v.). 2. 
Leah, married Henry \"ander Voort, and has three 
children ; Hildegarde, Joseph Xelson, Henrj' Ferdinand 
\ ander \"oort. 3. Julia, married James Lyman van 
Buren. whom she survives (q. v.). 4. Josephine, died in 
infancy. Mrs. Xelson, Mrs. Gilbert and Mrs. van 
Buren continued their residence in Dunkirk after 
widowhood. Mrs. Julia Ann (Bartholomew) N'elson 
survives her husband, and resides at Dunkirk where she 
is held in the highest esteem. 

(The Bartholomew Line). 

This surname was derived from the ancient Hebrew 
or Syriac personal name Bartholmai, modified in Greek 
and Roman spelling. Like the other names of Christ's 
.■\postles. Bartholomew came into use as a baptismal 
name in every Christian country even before the use 
of surnames. 

The Bartholomew family in England appears to date 
back to the origin of the use of surnames. The ancient 
coat-of-arms : Argent a chevron en.?railed between 
three lions rampant sable. One branch of the family 
bears this: Or three goats' heads erased sable. Crest: 
.\ demi-goat argent gorged witli a chaplct of laurel vert. 

John, Robert and Richard Bartholomew were living 
about 1:50, in Warborough. Oxfordshire, England. 
Robert and Richard were brothers, and from the fact 
that John's son was an overseer of Richard's will it is 
infercd that John was a brother also. They were land 
owners, church wardens and men of consequence in the 
community. They frequently used the term, "alias 
Martyn," after Bartholomew, presumably having adopted 
the name of a maternal ancestor, as was frequently the 
case, to secure an inheritance. Oliver Cromwell's name 
is K\v':n in early records alias Williams, his maternal 
ancestors boing of the Williams family. 

CI) John Bartholomew lived in Warborough. England. 
He married there Alice Scuttor, who was probably his 
second wife. 

(U) John (2) Bartholomew, son of John (i) Bar- 
tholomew, married in Warborough, Margaret Joyes. 
He wa<i made overseer of his uncle Richard's estate in 
1:77, His four sons apparently all settled in the neigh- 
boring towns of Oxford and i'urford. Children : John, 
baptized June 19, 1356. married Ales Vicarage; Row- 
land, baptized Dec. 5, i;Or, died I.387; Richard, twin of 
Rowland, buried in Burford, April 29, 1632; William, 
of whom further. 



(III) William Bartholomew, son of John (2) Bar- 
tholomew, was baptized in Warborough, Feb. 7, 1567, 
and buried May 6, 1634. He settled in Burford, where 
he was a mercer, a dealer in silks and woolens. His will 
was dated April 25, 1634. He married Friswide, daugh- 
ter of William Metcalfe, mayor of New Woodstock, a 
neighboring town. She was buried in Fulbrooke, Dec. 
10, 1647. Children : Mary, married, June 28, 1620, Richard 
Tidmarsh; John, inherited his father's estate and busi- 
ness, and died Nov. 15, 1639; William, of whom further; 
Henry, born 1606-07, died Nov. 22, 1692, in Salem, 
Mass. ; Richard supposed to have died in London, or 
on a return trip from London to Massachusetts ; Francis, 
baptized in Burford, Feb. 13, 1613-14; Thomas, baptized 
June 30, 1616; Abraham, died in Burford, March 22, 
1646-47; Sarah, baptized .-^pril 14, 1623. 

(IV) William (2) Bartholomew, son of William (i) 
Bartholomew, was born in Burford, England, 1602-03. 
He received a good education. He went to London, 
and married Anne, sister of Robert Lord, afterward his 
ne.xt neighbor in Ipswich, Mass. Before September, 

1634, he had entertained the famous Anne Hutchinson 
at his London home. On Sept. 18, 1634, he arrived in 
Boston, Mass., in the ship, "Griffin," in the same com- 
pany with Anne Hutchinson, Rev. John Lothrop and 
others. He was admitted a freeman, March 4, 1634-35, 
and at the same time was given permission to trade with 
vessels at Ipswich, where he settled. He received 
several grants of land there in 163S, and was deputy to 
the General Court the same year, serving again in 
1636-37-41-47-50. He was often on the jury, was com- 
missioner, town clerk, assessor, selectman, treasurer of 
tlie county, and often on important committees. He 
removed to Boston about 1660, and in 1662 was overseer 
of the mill of William Brown, of Boston. He is called 
a merchant of Boston. He died in Charlestown, at the 
home of Jacob Green, Jan. 18, 1680-81. His grave is 
in the Phipps Street Cemetery, Charlestown, near that 
of John Harvard, the founder of Harvard College. His 
wife Anne died in Charlestown, Jan. 29, 1682-83, and 
her gravestone is still standing. Children : Mary, 
married (first) in Gloucester, Dec. 24, 1652, IMatthew 
Whipple, (second) Jacob Greene; Joseph, born about 

1635, resided in London, England, in 1693; William, of 
further mention. 

(V) Lieutenant William (3) Bartholomew, son of 
William (2) Bartholomew, was born at Ipswich, 1640-41, 
and died in the spring of 1697. He learned the trade of 
carpenter, and settled first in Ro.xbury. He sold his 
Roxbury land in 1676-77, and removed to Deerfield, 
Mass., where he bought the home lot of Peter Wood- 
ward. At the time of the raid of the Indians on Hat- 
field, Sept. 19, 1677, he was there with his family. His 
daughter Abigail, aged four, was among tlie captives 
taken to Canada and was ransomed eight months later. 
In 1679 he removed lo Branford, Conn., where he was 
granted twenty acres of land, built a saw mill and kept 
an ordinary inn. He was elected surveyor and fence 
viewer. In 1687 the town of Woodstock requested him 
to build a mill in their town and offered him a grant of 
land. He was commissioned ensign of the new Rox- 
bury crjmpaiiy, as Woodstock was then called, July 13, 
168/), and in 1691 became lieutenant. In 1692 he was 
the first deputy to the General Court from Woodstock. 
He died in Woodstock, in 1697. He married, in Rox- 





K'. -Y( 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



347 



bury, Dec. 17, 1663, Mary Johnson, born April 24, 1642, 
daughter of Captain Isaac and Elizabeth (Porter) 
Johnson, granddaughter of John Johnson, who held 
the title of "Surveyor of all ye King's armies in Amer- 
ica." Her father was killed in the Narragansett fight, 
Dec. 19, 1675, as he was leading his men over the 
bridge (a fallen tree) into the enemy's fort. Children: 
Isaac, born Nov. i, 1664, died Oct. 25, 1727; William, 
born Oct. 16, 1666; Mary, born Oct. 26, 1668; Andrew, 
of further mention; Abigail, bom Dec. 8, 1672, married 
(first) Jan. 11, 1691-92, Joseph Frizzel, (second) 1709, 
Samuel Paine, died 1732; Elizabeth, born March 15, 
1674-75, married, Nov. 21, 1699, Edmund Chamberlain; 
Benjamin, born about 1677; John, born about 1679; 
Joseph, bom about 1682. 

(VI) Andrew Bartholomew, son of Lieutenant 
William (3) Bartholomew, was baptized Dec. 11, 1670, 
in Roxbury. He managed his father's mills in Branford 
after the latter's removal to Woodstock, and after his 
father's death owned and operated them in company 
with his brother Benjamin. On Jan. 11, 1711-12, the 
property was divided and Andrew bought large quanti- 
ties of land in Branford, Wallingford and adjoining 
towns. He removed to Wallingford before 1729, and 
continued there the remainder of his life. He was a 
leading citizen, and often held positions of trust. He 
was admitted to the church there in 17GI. He married 
Hannah Frisbie, who died Feb. 2, 1741, daughter of 
Samuel Frisbie, of Branford. Children : i. William, 
born Feb. 2, 1699. 2. Susannah, bom Feb. 4, 1 701-02. 3. 
Hannah, bom Aug. 17, 1704; married, Nov. 19, 1724, 
Joseph Barker. 4. Samuel, born Sept. 12, 1706, died 
1795- 5- Daniel, born Oct. 16, 1708, died Oct. 25, 1777. 
6. Rebecca, born March 28, 1712; married, Oct. 19, 1732. 
Peter Hall; died Oct. 3, 1791. 7. Rev. Andrew, bom 
Nov. 7, 1714; graduated at Vale College, 1731 : was 
settled minister at Harwinton, Conn., Oct. 4, 1738, and 
continued as pastor thirty-five years. 8. Timothy, born 
Feb. 28, 1716-17, died April 27, 1749. 9. Joseph, of 
further mention. 10. John, born Feb. 8, 1723-24. 11. 
Martha. 

(VII) Lieutenant Joseph Bartholomew, son of 
Andrew and Hannah (Frisbie) Bartholomew, was bom 
in Branford, Conn., May 6, 1721, and died in Walling- 
ford, Conn., Oct. 27, 1781. He marched on the Lexing- 
ton Alarm of April 19, 1775. and served eight days. His 
commission of lieutenant from the General Court placed 
him in command of all the men in town subject to 
military duty. He married Jan. 13, 1741, Mary Sexton. 
Children : Hannah, Andrew ; Joseph, died young ; Jona- 
than ; and Joseph, of further mention. 

(VIII) Joseph (2) Bartholomew, son of Lieutenant 
Joseph (i) and Mary (Sexton) Bartholomew, was bom 
in Wallingford, Conn., in 1748, and died .April, 1821. 
His farm was on what was called "Whirlwind Hill," 
now known as East Farms, in Wallingford, a large part 
being yet owned in the family. He married (first) 
Martha Morse, who died about 1781 ; married (second) 
about 1784, Damarius Hall, who died Nov. 6, T819. 
Children, first three by first wife: Isaac, married Lydia 
Curtiss; Levi Moss, married (first) Lucy Ives, (second) 
Pamelia Potter; Joseph, of further mention; Samuel, 
married (first) Sylvia Hood, (second) Hannah, widow 
of Stoddard Neal; Ira. married Eunice Hall; Orrin, 
married his second cousin, Emmeline Bartholomew. 



(IX) Joseph (3) Bartholomew, son of Joseph (2) 
Bartholomew, was born in Wallingford, Conn., settled 
in New Vork State, first at Sheridan, where he was an 
early settler. The tract of land he purchased was virgin 
wilderness, but he erected a log cabin, cleared a farm 
and prospered. He lived and labored there the remain- 
der of his life. He married, March 18, 1804, Julia 
Howd. Children: l. Eliza, married Harry H. Parker. 
2. William, died aged nineteen years. 3. Polly, married 
Harry Hall. 4. Sylvia Ann, married Ives Andrews. S- 
Stephen Decatur, died young. 6. Almon, died aged 
nine years. 7. Henry, of further mention. 8. Joseph, 
a prominent dry goods merchant of Dunkirk; married 
(first) Cornelia Horton, (secotid) Elizabeth Pearson. 
9. Nelson, built and managed the Dunkirk Opera House ; 
died unmarried. 10. William A., died unmarried. 11. 
Stephen Decatur (2), married Julia E. Allen. 

(X) Henry Bartholomew, eldest son and seventh 
child of Joseph (3) and Julia (Howd) Bartholomew, 
was born in Wallingford, Conn., June 7, 1818, and died 
in Dunkirk, N. Y., Nov. 3, 1871. He came to Sheridan, 
N. v., with his father, and for several years followed 
farming. He then removed to Dunkirk, where he was 
a successful manufacturer of boxes of various kinds. 
In his later years he retired from business and returned 
to Sheridan, residing on a farm of about 300 acres, 
where his last years were spent, afterwards dying in 
Dunkirk. He married Isabella Patterson, lxir:i in 
Oneida county, N. Y., July 7, 1819, died 1854. Children: 
A son dying in infancy, and three daughters, namely : 
I. Julia Ann, married Joseph Nelson, (q. v.) 2. Mary, 
married (first) Wilham A. Post, a captain in the Civil 
War, killed while employed on the Erie railroad as 
engineer; child, William A. (2) Post; she married 
(second) Charles Van Wagner. 3. Helen Isabella, 
married William L. Slater, of Dunkirk, now a resident 
ot Jamestown. 



JOHN FRANKLIN GILBERT— Although born in 
Ohio, Mr. Gilbert spent his adult years in Dunkirk, N. 
Y., where from the age of eighteen he was connected 
with one of the sterling business houses of the city, 
Joseph Nelson & Company. He was a grandson of Samuel 
and Susannah Gilbert, of Cornwall, England, who came 
to the United States, he in 1840, and his wife in 1843. 

Henry Gilbert, son of Samuel and Susannah Gilbert, 
learned the cabinetmaker's trade in Cornwall, England, 
where he was born about 181 5. He came to the United 
States in 1842, settling first in Ravenna, going thence 
to Loudonville, Ashland county, Ohio. In Loudonville 
he was councilman and member of the School Board, 
and about 1850 there married Elizabeth Sprague, bom 
in Loudonville, daughter of William Jasper and Rebecca 
(Jones) Sprague. They were the parents of a large 
family, their second child a son, John Franklin Gilbert, 
whose career is herein reviewed. 

John Franklin Gilbert was bom in Loudonville. Ohio. 
June 30. 1854, and was there educated. At the age of 
eighteen he located in Dunkirk, N. Y., where he secured 
a position in the wholesale jewelry house of Joseph 
Nelson & Company. He rose rapidly to a responsible 
position with that house, and until his death was closely 
identified with it, it being one of the oldest in Dunkirk 
and for many years the only wholesale house in the 
city. After his marriage in 1896 Mr. Gilbert was ad- 



34- 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



I 



mined to a partnership, and from IQIO until his death in 
1910 he was head of the firm. He was an excellent busi- 
ness man. sterling in character, and universally liked 
and esteemed. His life was a successful one, and his 
years of manhood were years of usefulness. Mr. Gil- 
ben was a member of the Masonic order, affiliated with 
Dunkirk Lodge, No, ;D, Free and .\ccepted Masons; 
Dunkirk Chapter, Xo. 25, Royal Arch Masons; Dunkirk 
Council, Royal and Select Masters ; Dunkirk Com- 
mandery, Xo. ~. Knights Templar; and Ismailia Temple, 
.\ncient .\rabic Order Xobles of the Mystic Shrine. 

Mr. Gilbert married, at Dunkirk, Oct. 15, 1896, Isabella 
Bartholomew Xelson, eldest daughter of Joseph and 
Julia -A.nn (Bartholomew') Xelson, of Dunkirk (q. v.). 
Mr. Gilbert died in Dunkirk, July 2S. 1916, aged sixty- 
two years and one month. Mrs. Gilbert survives her 
husband. She is a member of the Church of Christ 
(. Scientist ~>, having joined the Mother Church in Boston 
in lOor, after experiencing a healing from a severe 
nervous condition which had caused her great suffering 
for years and baffled the best physicians of New York 
and Paris. She was one of the organizers of the First 
Church of Dunkirk; was for several years its First 
Reader, and her example and influence has aided in 
building up a strong church in Dunkirk. 



JAMES LYMAN VAN BUREN— Although the 
career of James L. van Buren closed at the age of 
forty-three years, they had been from boyhood years of 
constant activity, and he had attained unusual business 
prominence and was one of Dunkirk's substantial and 
highly esteemed citizens. He was a son of James Henry- 
van Buren, and a grandson of Henry Broadhead van 
Buren, the last named a native of Pompey, N. V., who 
in 1825 located in Dunkirk, Chautauqua county, N. Y. 
James H. and Henry B. van Buren, young men, estab- 
lished a mercantile business in 1826 or 27, and were long 
well known general merchants of Dunkirk. In 1S27 
they moved into the east store of a new brick block, 
subsequently becoming interested in a line of boats 
from Dunkirk. Henry B. van Buren was the first 
insurance agent in the village, and there died, in 1872, 
aged sixty-nine. 

James Henry van Buren was born in Dunkirk in 
18.31. and there spent his life, and died ."Xug. 9, 1889. 
He was associated with his father in the insurance 
business and later became general agent for one of the 
leading Xew York companies, a position he held for 
over a quarter of a century, being one of the oldest 
general agents in the State. He was also general agent 
for the Connecticut Fire Insurance Company of Hart- 
ford, for the State of Xew York. A Presbyterian in 
religion, he served the church in Dunkirk as an elder, 
and in his political faith was a Republican. 

Mr. van iJurcn married, in 1856, Lydia I'cechcr Cole- 
man, born June 8, 18,37, 'I'd '^ct. 8, 1872, daughter of 
Tnieman Rowley Coleman, born in Connecticut, later 
a merchant of EllicMtville, in Cattaraugus county, treas- 
urer of the county, i84''>-47; moved to Dunkirk in 1854, 
and e<itabli>.h'd the Lake Shore Bank, of which he was 
president until his death, Aug. 18, 1884. Mr. Coleman 
married, at F.llicottville, April 21, i8,V, Sophia M. 
I'cechcr, and their fourth child was Lydia Becchcr 
0<l'-man, wile of James Henry van Buren. .She was a 
meml^cr of the Kpiscopal church. 



James Lyman van Buren was born in Dunkirk, N. 
Y., April S, 1867, died at his home on Central avenue, 
in his native city, Feb. 26, 1910, and was buried in Forest 
Hill Cemetery, Fredonia. He was educated at Dunkirk 
.-Vcademy, and at the age of nineteen began his business 
career as a clerk in his father's insurance offices. In 
18S8 he had so developed as an underwriter that he was 
admitted to partnership, and when a year later his 
father passed away the son succeeded him as head of the 
business and largely increased the lines carried, repre- 
senting at one time eighteen companies, life, fire, accident 
and liability. Finally he withdrew from the insurance 
field and became associated with his father-in-law, Joseph 
Nelson, of Joseph Nelson & Company, wholesale jewelers, 
i\Ir. van Buren developed strong qualities as a merchant, 
and to his energy and ability the success of the company 
was in a large measure due. After the death of Joseph 
Nelson the business was continued by Mr. van Buren until 
his own death in igio. He died in the prime of his splen- 
did manhood, honored and respected by all who knew him. 
As a mark of respect and a testimonial to the high 
regard in which he was held by his fellowmen, the 
business houses of Dunkirk were closed during the 
hours of Ills funeral. He was a member of the Sons of 
the American Revolution ; a director of the Board of 
Trade, and of several other organizations of the city, 
and a member of the Presbyterian church, 

Mr. van Buren married, June II, 1890, Julia Nelson, 
daughter of Joseph and Julia \. (Bartholomew) Nelson 
(q. v.), Mr. and Mrs. van Buren were the parents of 
si.x children : Josephine, married George R. Nixon, and 
resides in Dunkirk; Nellie, married George Patterson 
Crandall, of Westfield, N, Y. ; James Henry (2), a 
merchant of Buffalo, N. Y. ; Joseph Nelson, engaged in 
mercantile business in Buffalo, married Mary Mac Leod, 
of Versailles, Ky, ; James Lyman, residing at home; 
Robert, died aged two years. 

The three sons served in the World War, James 
Henry and Joseph N. in the Aviation Corps of the 
United States army, and James Lyman in the navy. 
Mrs. van Buren survives her husband and continues 
her residence at the old home on Central avenue, Dun- 
kirk, her aged mother, Mrs. Joseph Nelson, residing 
with her. 



SETH W. THOMPSON— In a review of his own 
life and family written by himself and finished under 
date of Jan. s, 1914, he thus concludes: 

This simple tale I dedicate to my posterity on Janu- 
.ary 5, 1014, my seventy-eijarlitli birtliday, and my wife 
wlio is now liere by me joins witli me. Slie is now 
sevent.y-flve years old and we are enjoying life and 
our fatuities to a good degree tor people of our age. 

May tlie Good Father who gives us our life and all 
manifold blessings bless and keep you always. My 
abiding faith and trust is that in the great and eternal 
future we shall all In some mysterious and wonderful 
w;iy which we cannot comprehend be united in another 
existence. 

Four years after writing the above, Mr. Thompson 
was a!)le to comprehend that "mysterious and wonderful 
way," and but a year later husband and wife were 
united in another sphere. Three of their children are as 
follows: John F. and Charles C. Thompson, of New 
York City, and Mrs. Carrie T. West, of Jamestown, In 
this review of the life of Mr. Thompson his own 
account will be relied upon for the facts. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



349 



Seth W. Thompson was a son of John and Pamelia 
(Bush) Thompson, who about 1833 settled on a farm of 
fifty acres within half a mile of Ellington Center, 
Chautauqua county, N. Y. The parents of JohnThomp- 
son were born in Maine, but later lived in Madison 
county, N. Y., where his father worked at the carpenter's 
trade. Later he went West to work upon the Erie canal, 
and never returned to his family, being stricken by a 
fever which proved fatal. John Thompson, a boy of 
eighteen when his father died, and his youngest brother 
Seth aided their mother, and they were able to keep 
the family together, John remaining single until thirty 
years of age, then taking his mother and two unmarried 
sisters into his home. He married Pamelia Bush, about 
1827, and began married life on a little farm of forty 
acres in Aladison county, N. Y., where they lived until 
about 1834. when he sold his farm, and with his mother, 
wife and three little daughters. $500 in cash, with his 
household possessions loaded in a heavy wagon drawn 
by a two-horse team, started West. Their journey of 
perhaps 200 miles ended in the town of Ellington, Chau- 
tauqua county, N. Y.. where John Thompson bought a 
farm of fifty acres on which was a log house and stable. 
The pine timber had been almost entirely taken from the 
tract, but by hard work he removed the stumps and pine 
tops from a small amount of land, and the following fall 
was rewarded by a good crop. His wife, a tailoress, 
aided with her needle, and in course of time a certain 
degree of prosperity was attained. In speaking of his 
boyhood and his parents, Mr. Thompson writes : 

We always had comfortable clothing and an extra 
suit for Sunday and church, which was always at- 
tended, although we lived on a farm four and a half 
miles from the church. They were always generous 
to the poor, and no one ever went from their door 
hungry, friend or stranger. 

About 1840 the little farm was sold, and another of 
150 acres was bought. Until 1851 the family, then con- 
sisting of seven children, lived in the old log house, but 
for several years had been getting lumber together, and 
in 1851 a new frame house was finished. With this 
house completed the hardships of pioneer days may be 
said to have ended for the Thompson family, and the 
fortunes of Seth W. Thompson will alone be followed. 

Seth W. Thompson was born in the log cabin on 
the home farm in Ellington, Chautauqua county, N. Y., 
in 1836, the fifth child of his parents. He was educated 
in the district school, and in the winter of 1853-54 he 
taught school in Ohio, four miles south of Madison, his 
married sister, Frances Turney, engaging the school for 
him. The next winter he taught the district school 
west of the old farm in the town of Ellington, the 
same school which he had attended when a small boy. 
He taught in Chautauqua county each winter until that 
of 1860-61, which was his last. His salary was from 
$16 monthly the first winter to $26 the last winter, 
and at all the schools except the last in the village of 
Ellington, he boarded around. He was a successful 
teacher, ever looking back upon the winters he taught 
with great pleasure. 

During my school days in the winter of 1S55-56, I 
made the acquaintance of Miss Emma L. Pratt, a 
sprightly, black-eyed girl, with whom I fell in love. 
She also taught several terms of school, her last term 
being in the Union School at Dunkirk. New York, On 
October 2, 1S59, after nearly four years of pleasant 



courtship, we were married. Our life has been a very 
pleasant one and we have been unusually favored in 
niany ways. We have no'w passed our forty-first anni- 
versary (they were married fifty-nine years ere death 
dissolved this happy marriage). We have been fairly 
successful in business ventures, and wonderfully 
blessed in our children who have always been and are 
still to us a blessing which we cannot express, meas- 
ure or weigh. 

In May, 1861, John M. Farnham, tlie hardware merchant 
of Ellington, offered Mr. Thompson a partnership, which 
was accepted. -In the fall of 1861 he bought out a tin 
and stove shop in Cattaraugus, N. Y., Mr. Thompson 
taking charge of that branch, Oct. 28, 1861, and two 
weeks later his wife, and son John, then fifteen months 
old, arrived with their household goods. The next 
year his father and mother joined their son in Cattar- 
augus, and in 1866 they all moved into a fine house. In 
1869 that house was sold, and in December, i86g, a 
new house was occupied for the first time. In 1870, 
through a combination of circumstances, the firm, S. W. 
Thompson Company, sold out and a new partnership 
was entered into with Henry Chaffee, Mr. Thompson 
remaining in charge of the Cattaraugus store, Mr. 
Chaffee taking charge of the firm's business in Randolph. 
About 1872 the Cattaraugus store was sold, Thompson 
& Chaffee then concentrating all their energy on the 
larger, better store in Randolph, which later they sold 
to Knapp & Son. Shortly afterward Mr. Thompson 
sold his interest in a patent milk pan business in which 
he had been engaged for some time, and he entered into 
partnership with J. M. Farnham, who had been his first 
partner in the tin shop in Cattaraugus. Mr. Farnham 
was head of a large hardware business in Jamestown, 
and after settling up his affairs in Randolph Mr. 
Thompson joined him, his department being the manage- 
ment of the office. Before removing his family and 
irrevocably committing himself to the partnership, he 
found that the business was not as he expected to find 
it, and by mutual consent the partnership was not con- 
summated. He returned to Randolph and some time 
afterward he became partner in a hardware store that 
I'.ad been started after Thompson & Chaffee had sold 
out. He conducted a prosperous business for six years, 
then sold out and took a partnership in a tannery at East 
Randolph, which he retained for about three years. He 
was next interested with Amos Dow in a private bank- 
ing business in East Randolph, the business being con- 
ducted under the firm name, Dow & Thompson, bankers. 
They continued a quiet, prosperous banking business for 
four years, and in 1878 he exchanged his interest in the 
bank for a general country store in East Randolph 
owned by his partner, Amos Dow. Mr. Dow and he had 
previously lost some money in the oil fields of Pennsyl- 
vania through fire, but this loss Mr. Thompson recouped, 
and during the eight years that he operated the general 
store he added $15,000 to his capital through the profits 
from the store. In 1880 Mr. Thompson toured Cali- 
fornia, where his only brother and a sister were living, 
and became enamored of the great West. In December, 
1885, his mother passed away, and in June, 1886, his 
father passed away in his eighty-eighth year. The lad 
promised his parents not to remove West so long as 
they lived, and having ministered to them and provided 
for their every need during their old age he could con- 
sider a western removal with a clear conscience. 



"y^O 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



Going West, he bought a tract of 600 acres of farm 
land at Luverne. Rock comity. Minn., and the next day 
purchased an additional lOO acres. In May. 1SS7, he 
sold his store in East Randolph and availed himself of 
an offer to secure an interest in the First National Bank 
of Luverne. His son Charles C. Thompson, then with 
the Seaboard National Bank of New York City, was 
given important position in tlie bank, and with his wife 
and daughter. Carrie T., Mr. Thompson arrived in 
Luverne. in September. 18S7. 

Although Charles C. Thompson had been elected 
cashier at the age of nineteen, probably the youngest 
man ever elected to that important office, he felt that 
a small Minnesota town did not offer sufficient induce- 
ments for the future, and after four years in Luverne 
he accepted an offer to return to the Seaboard National 
Bank. New York City, of which his brother, John F., 
was cashier. In Luverne, the only daughter of the 
family, Carrie T.. married Henry Brennan, a young 
man from Smethport, Pa., they returning East. The 
loss of their children decided Mr. and Mrs. Thompson 
to return East, and within another year he sold the 
home he had built in Luverne and his stock in the bank, 
but retained his farms on which he had good tenants. 

On his return he located in Newark, N. J., his son, 
Charles C. who had returned to Minnesota in January, 
1892. and brought back with him a bride, Emily Brown, 
making his home vs'ith his parents. In August, iSga, 
Mr. Thompson returned to Minnesota to look after his 
farm interests, and stopping at Jamestown, N. Y., was 
offered by his old friend, Mr. Charles Dow, a position 
in the Jamestown National Bank. He removed to James- 
town in the fall of 1802, and in March, 1893, moved 
into a comfortable brick house on Lakeview avenue, 
where he resided until death. His position at the 
bank was in the loan department, his business being 
to interview applicants for loans and to determine 
whether they as individuals and the security they offered 
were worthy. He resigned that position after four years' 
service, and for two years held an interest in the 
Southern Lumber Company, operating in Southeastern 
Missouri. This was his last active connection with the 
business world, although he had large private interests 
in many enterprises. He was a man of quiet, domestic 
tastes, and in his last years his home, garden, and family 
ties had for him the greatest joy and brought him 
unlimited happiness. His business life was a financial 
success, and he saw his children all well settled and 
leading useful lives. He had been instrumental in 
starting several young men in business, and in his quiet 
way had ever had a helping hand for others. From 
whatever angle viewed, his life was a success, and he lift 
to posterity a name unsullied and honor untarnished. 
He died in Jamestown. N. Y., .April 15, 1918. 

Emma L. f Pratt I Thompson was born in Hinsdale, 
N. Y., Dec. 15, 1838, and died at the Thompson homo. 
No. 'rry Lakeview avenue, Jamestown, N. Y., .April 30, 
t'/i'j. daughter of Homer and I%lccta A. fNewcomb) 
Pratt, who at the time of the birth of their daughter 
wcrr enfiutc from Madison county, N. Y., to Missouri. 
Subsequently the Pratts settled in Ellington, Chautauqua 
county. N, Y,, where Mr. Pratt conducted a store until 
hi% death in 18^)3. Mrs. Pratt rlicd at the home of her 
daughter, Mr$. Thompson, in Jamestown, in the spring 



of 1S03, aged eighty. Mrs. Thompson was educated in 
Ellington .\cademy, and for several terms prior to her 
marriage. Oct. 2, 1859, taught school. Mrs. Thompson 
was a woman of broad culture and charming manner. 
Essentially a home-maker, she found her greatest 
enjoyment in the family circle. She was active in the 
work of the First Congregational Church, and was a 
member of the New Century Art Club, Jamestown 
Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution, and 
the Warner Home for the Aged. She was a gifted 
writer and had prepared many papers of note for the 
various organizations with which she was connected. 
During the war with Germany Mrs. Thompson was 
an active Red Cross worker and rendered other patri- 
otic service. 

Seth W. and Emma L. (Pratt) Thompson were the 
parents of two sons and a daughter: i. John F., bom at 
the home farm in Ellington, Chautauqua county, N. 
Y., July 12, i860; he was educated in Chamberlain 
Institute. Randolph, and Allegheny College (one term), 
then began business life as a clerk with the private bank- 
ing firm. Dow & Thompson ; he has continued in the 
banking business ever since, having been teller of the 
Bradford National Bank of Bradford, Pa., cashier of 
the Seaboard National Bank of New York City, and in 
1003 became vice-president of the Bankers' Tru-^t Com- 
pany, a position he resigned from four years later on 
account of failing health; he then made his home on the 
Island of Jamaica, British West Indies, where he 
bought 4,000 acres, and became deeply interested in 
tropical fruit farming; he married, in 18S0, Hattie Dow, 
and they are the parents of five children. 2. Charles 
C. born at Cattaraugus. N. Y., Aug. 16. 1868; he was 
educated in the public school and Chamberlain Insti- 
tute, but at the age of fourteen left school to take a posi- 
tion in a bank at Bolivar, of which his brother John F. 
was cashier; after two years with his brother he went 
with his father in his store, later going to the Seaboard 
National Bank, of New York City; he remained with 
that bank until 18S7, when he joined his father in 
Luverne, Minn., where for four years he was cashier 
of the Luverne National Bank, being but nineteen when 
elected ; he then returned to the Seaboard National 
Bank in New York, filling the position of assistant 
cashier until succeeding his brother as cashier, then 
serving in that position until 1013, when he was elected 
vice-president; he married Emily Brown, of Luverne, 
Minn., and they are the parents of one son, Seth Waldo. 
3. Carrie T., born in Cattaraugus, N. Y., Oct. 16, 1870; 
she married (first) in Luverne, Minn., Henry Brennan, 
of Smethport, Pa., who died leaving five children: i. 
Mildred E. Brennan, married her cousin, John Stuart 
Thompson, and has three sons, John D., Philip Brennan, 
and Charles H. Thompson; ii. Ruth Marion Brennan, 
married Fred E. Hatch, Jr.. of Janicstfiwn, and has three 
children, Katherin T., Marjorie C, and Mildred Hatch; 
iii. John Thompson Brennan, married Vivian Evans, 
who died Oct. 26, 1018, leaving two children, John 
Thompson (2) and Janet L. Brennan; iv. Theodoria 
Brennan ; v. Carolyn E. Brennan, both attending school. 
After the death of her husband, a prosperous business 
man, Mrs. Brennan moved to her home in Jamestown, 
N. Y., prepared for her by her parents, and was the 
great comfort of their declining years, her home being 



BIOGRAPHICAL A ^ 0"^"7fV> 



351 



near theirs. She married (second) Julius E. West, of 
Jamestown, and they reside on Lakeview avenue, James- 
town. 



JAMES KNAPP— For more than a decade of the 

last years of his life, James Knapp was an honored 
resident of Jamestown, N. Y., a man of wealth and 
enterprise, highly esteemed by all who knew him. He 
was always deeply interested in family history, and 
during liis lifetime carefully traced his own descent 
from Nicholas Knapp, who came with Winthrop's 
fleet in 1630. The family was transplanted from Con- 
necticut to Chautauqua county, N. Y,, in 1821, John 
Knapp. grandfather of James Knapp, settling in the 
town of Harmony in November of that year. James 
Knapp married Ellen Lewis, of the Vermont branch of 
the Lewis family, who survives him. continuing her 
residence in Jamestown, she and her son, Lewis D. 
Knapp, the only survivors of the family. 

(I) Nicholas Knapp was born in England, and died 
ir Stamford, Conn., April 16, 1670. He settled in Water- 
town, in 1630, and was there listed a proprietor in 
1636-37, and in 1648 moved to Stamford, Conn., where 
three generations of his descendants in the branch 
lived. His first wife Eleanor, the mother of all his 
children, died in Stamford, June 16, 1658. Their 
children : Jonathan, Timothy, Joshua. Caleb, Sarah, Ruth 
and Hannah were born in Waterford. Closes and Lydia, 
it is thought, were born after the removal to Stamford. 
Descent to James Knapp is traced through Caleb, the 
fourth son. 

(II) Caleb Knapp, son of Nicholas and Eleanor 
Knapp, was born Jan. 20, 1637, and in 1648 was taken 
to Stamford with the family. His will is dated Oct. 
3. 1674. and in it is named his wife Hannah, and 
children : Caleb, John, Moses, Samuel, Sarah and 
Hannah. Descent in this branch is through the second 
son John. 

(III) John Knapp, son of Caleb and Hannah Knapp, 
was born in Stamford, Conn., July 25, 1664, and there 
spent his life. He married, June 10, 1692, Hannah 
Ferris, and they were the parents of five children : 
Samuel, John (2), Hannah, Charles, Deborah. This 
line traces through John (2), the second son. 

(IV) John (2) Knapp, son of John (i) and Hannah 
(Ferris) Knapp, was born in Stamford, Conn., Aug. 
14, 1697. He married and among his children was a 
son John (3). 

(V) John (3) Knapp, son of John (2) Knapp, was 
born about 1730. and settled in Danbury, Conn. In the 
history of Stamford he is named as having served for 
223 days in the Revolutionary army, during the year 
1776. He married Ruth Gregory, and they were the 
parents of seven children: Samuel, Elizabeth, Jehu, 
Ruth, John, Chloe and Levi. With John, the fifth child, 
Connecticut ceased to be the family seat, he settling in 
Chautauqua county, N. Y. 

(VI) John (4) Knapp, son of John (3) and Ruth 
(Gregory) Knapp, was born Nov. 17, 1767. In Novem- 
ber, 1821. he settled on lot No. 49 in the town of Har- 
mony, Chautauqua county, N. Y., and is buried in 
Panama in the same town. He married Lois Wood, 
and they were the parents of ten children : Noah, who 
came to Harmony with his father in 1821, settled on the 



adjoining lot. No. 41, and later inherited the homestead 
farm; Lucy, married a Mr. Kilpatrick ; Levi; Lucinda, 
married a Mr. Haines, and lived in Panama ; Nancy, 
married a Mr. Joslyn ; John, who died in Auburn, N. Y. ; 
Darius, of whom further; Orrin, who moved to 
Michigan; Cyrus, who was killed by a falling tree; 
Harriet, married Hiram Smith. 

(VII) Darius Knapp, seventh child of John (4) and 
Lois (Wood) Knapp, was born April 24, 1805, and died 
Jan. 24, 1866. He was educated in the public school, 
and spent his life as a farmer. He was a land owner 
and a substantial citizen of Panama, Chautauqua county, 
and held some of the offices of the town of Harmony. 
He was a member of the Presbyterian church, and in 
politics was a Republican. He married Polly Edwards, 
born Nov. 3, 1807, and died Dec. 5, 1877, daughter of 
Kbenezer and Sibyl (Seeley) Edwards. They were the 
parents of five children: Ebenezer, died young; Elpha, 
died young; Charles, born May 16, 1838, married Alice 
Berry, and died Sept. 10, 1868; Mary, born May 31, 

1840, married Henry C. Steward; James, of whom 
further. 

(VIII) James Knapp, youngest child of Darius and 
Polly (Edwards) Knapp, was born at the farm in the 
town of Harmony, Chautauqua county, N. Y., Sept. 23, 

1841, and died in Jamestown, in the same county, March 
20, 1910. He was educated in the public schools, and 
spent his youth upon the farm, his father's assistant, and 
after the death of Darius Knapp in 1866 he succeeded to 
the ownership and management of the estate. He 
resided in the village of Panama and there conducted 
farming operations until 1889, when he moved to James- 
town, which was his home until death, twenty-one 
years later. In Jamestown he engaged in the real estate 
business and in the care of his personal estate. He was 
a capable business man, and to his inherited wealth 
made substantial additions. He was kindly-hearted and 
generous, public-spirited and deeply interested in public 
affairs. He was a Republican in politics, and an attend- 
ant on the services of the Baptist church. He was a 
man of quiet domestic tastes, devoted to his home and 
family, eschewing club and fraternity life. His life was 
a useful and honorable one, and he passed away deeply 
regretted. He is buried in Lakeview Cemetery. 

James Knapp married, at Panama, Jan, 6, 1869, Ellen 
Lewis, born in Panama, Oct. 24, 1846, who survives her 
husband, a resident of Jamestown. Mrs. Knapp is a 
daughter of Perrin Lewis, and a granddaughter of 
Emos Lewis, born in April, 1773, and died April 26, 
1861, a resident of Rutland county. Vt. His wife Eunice 
was born in 1772, and died May 15, 1862. Their son, 
Perrin Lewis, was born in Rutland county, Vt., April 2, 
1803, and died Jan. 29, 1890. He was a cabinetmaker by 
trade, and until 1832 resided in Vermont, then came to 
Chautauqua county, N. Y., where he worked at his 
trade and operated a farm. Perrin Lewis married 
(first) Oct. 27, 1825, Emily Frances, born Nov. 30, 1806, 
died Nov. 25, 1826. He married (second) Feb. 7, 1827, 
Lury Cook, born Dec. 8. 1803, died Jan. 30, 1892, 
daughter of Francis and Susanna Cook, of Hamburg, 
Erie county, N. Y. Francis Cook died in 1810, leaving 
a widow and seven children who lived in Hamburg. 
During the second war with Great Britain the Cook 
home was visited by the Indians and Lury was sent by 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



her mother to obtain aid. She could not return, and 
i: was not until after the burning of Buffalo in 1814 
that the Indians departed and the Cook family were 
reunited. Perrin and Lur\- (Cook") Lewis were the 
parents of the following children : Emily, died at the 
age of eleven years: Cherlina. married (tirst) Dr. 
John R. Bush, (second") William Walrodt; Martha, 
married Moses Bush : Eunice, died at the age of two 
years: Alta. married Rev. Austin D. Bush: Eunice (2), 
died young: William Henry, removed to Iowa; Ellen, 
bom Oct. 24. 1S46, now the widow of James Knapp; 
Charles .\lbert, moved to Michigan. 

James and Ellen (Lewis') Knapp were the parents of 
two children : i. Lewis D., born in Panama, N. Y., Oct. 
S, 1872; he was educated in the grade and high schools 
of Jamestown, finishing at Jamestown Business College ; 
he engaged in the drug business in Jamestown for five 
years, but has for many years devoted himself to the 
management of the family estate ; he is a Republican in 
politics, and a member of the Baptist church. 2. Mabel, 
born Feb. 2S, 1S74, died .-Vpril 16. IQ03: she was educated 
in the Jamestown grade and high schools: she became 
the wife of Royal C. Bumham, Sept. 14, 1893; Mr. and 
Mrs. Bumham had a son Kenneth, born Oct. 9, 1894; 
they reside in Lancaster. Cal. : she was a devoted member 
of the Baptist church, and a woman of gentle, lovable 
Christian nature. 



DR. MATTHEW S. MOORE— Placed in these 
pages as a memorial to Dr. Moore, this record has 
especial value from the fact that the greater part of 
its text is quoted from the writings of a close personal 
friend of Dr. Moore's, the Hon. Oscar W. Johnson. 
Many years have passed since Dr. Moore went in and 
rut of Chautauqua county homes on his missions of 
ministration to bodily ills, but the influence of a life 
such as his can never be lost, and the example of a 
man who used his opportunities to a splendid end will 
long stand as an inspiration and example to those who 
follow him. 

Dr. McKTjre's family has been prominent in the history 
of South Carolina for a number of generations. His 
grandfather, Kiichard Richardson, and in more recent 
jears his cousins, James Richardson, John L. Manning, 
and Richard Manning, each served as governors of the 
State. The family is connected by both blood and 
marriage to George McDufFie, Wade Hampton, the 
war governor of Reconstruction Days, the Pinckneys, a'.l 
01 whom took prominent part in the early history of 
the nation. His cousin, .•\ngclica Singleton, married 
the son of Martin Van Buren, and, the wife of Prcsideni 
\ an Buren being then deceased, she i)re:ided as lady 
of the White House during his administration. 

Matthew Singleton Moore was born in .Aiken, S. C. 
He received his literary education at the University of 
\'irt'iniri, and his professional education at Jefferson 
Medical College, Philadelphia. He was an only child, 
and his father died in infancy. lie inherited about 
-.'f/t acres of cotton bearing lanrls. which gave him an 
income b<-yond his wants or desires, but tliis did not pre- 
vent his practicin>( his profession, which he loved as a 
means <A alleviating human suffering. 

.•\t the commencement of the Civil War, he was 
appointed surgeon of the Eirst South Carolina ,\rlillcry 
and was stationed at Fort Sumter from the surrender 



of General .-X.nderson to the close of the war. When the 
war closed, his wealth had vanished; his plantations 
were a barren waste ; his associates and friends had 
been scattered like leaves in the tempest ; the tax 
gatherer made demands he could not meet; a large 
family demanded protection and support. He resolved 
to come North and prepare a new home for them. The 
advice of Dr. Strong, of Westfield, an early friend, led 
him to visit Fredonia in 1867, He called upon many 
of our citizens, and with a characteristic frankness 
told them of the part he had taken in the war, of his 
desire, if they could welcome him as a man and 
physician, regardless of the past, to cast his lot among 
them. He asked no charity that he did not give. From 
the hour of this meeting all were his friends. They 
recognized a brave and magnanimous man, struggling 
against adversity. If they thought he had erred they 
knew he had never sinned against his own convictions. 
In about two years he removed his family. 

The incidents in the life of Dr. Moore are easily 
written, but when we attempt to describe the man, as 
he seemed to us, v/e feel inadequate to the task. In 
head and heart he was an exemplification of true man- 
hood. He was a man of broad and liberal culture, 
whose thoughts and studies were not bounded by the 
limits of professional investigation. His mind was 
enriched by books and by a close observation of life 
in many forms. The northern and the southern heart 
had been opened to him; he had been tried by prosperity 
and adversity. He was distinguished for his courtesy, 
not the courtesy that is prescribed by rules, but that 
which comes from the eye, that is quick to see, and 
the heart overflowing with kindness and generous im- 
pulses toward all humanity. As a physician he was the 
acknowledged peer of the ablest in Western New York. 
His cheerful nature and genial sympathy endeared him 
to every family he visited. His cheerfulness was won- 
derful, and it did not desert him when he was con- 
scious that disease was upon him and that "he was 
walking in the valley of the shadow of death." He 
said to the writer that he did not fear to die, that he 
had been face to face with death until it had lost all 
terrors, but he shrank from the long suffering and 
helplessness which sometimes attended his disease and 
which no human skill could alleviate. All this was 
mercifully spared him, as in the twinkling of an eye 
death affixed its seal upon the features where his 
accustomed smile still lingered. 

Dr. Moore had a heart large enough for the North 
and the South and he loved them both, and after the 
whirlwind of war had passed would have given his 
life that they should remain "one and inseparable" 
forever. He chose to sleep his last sleep among his 
Northern friends, not forgetting, however, his child- 
hood's home in the sunny South or the graves of gener- 
ations of his kindred with whom he had once hoped to 
rest. He had as nnich of his practice and as many 
friends in Dunkirk as in Fredonia. At his funeral 
services, which were held in the Protestant Episcopal 
church, hundreds of families from both places were 
represented, and the exhibition fif sorrow was as if 
death had smilten one in every household. As his 
affections and sympathies and charities were broader 
than any school, class or sect, so from all sources alike 
came the tributes of respect to his true and loyal nature. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



353 



Surely in his earlier home, friends with tenderer hands 
and warmer hearts could not have borne him to his last 
resting place or felt a more assured hope that it will 
be well with him hereafter. 

Dr. Matthew Singleton Moore and his wife, Martha 
Screven (Murray) Moore, were the parents of eleven 
children : Matthew S., Jr., Elizabeth B-, John I., Sarah 
R., Arthur Rose; Samuel M.; Martha and Screven, 
twins; Mary C, Burchell R., and MacDonald. Dr. 
Moore died Jan. 6, 1884, aged fifty-six years. 

Mrs. Moore is a descendant of John Hart, who came 
from England to Pennsylvania with William Penn in 
1682, and in 1683 married Susanna Rush, of Byberry, 
near Philadelphia. John Hart was the eldest son of 
Christopher and Mary Hart. From John and Susanna 
Hart the descent is as follows: Their eldest son, John 
Hart, married Eleanor Crispin; their fifth son, Oliver 
Hart, married Sarah Brees, of Bucks county, Pa. ; their 
eldest daughter, Eleanor Hart, married Thomas Screven, 
March 6, 1770, he a son of Thomas and Mary Screven, 
of Charleston, S. C; their eldest daughter, Martha 
Screven, married Benjamin Bonneau, Feb. 26, 1/95; 
their only child, Elizabeth Vanderhorst Bonneau, 
married Samuel J. Murray, May 25, 1820; their fourth 
child, Martha Screven Murray, born Dec. 18, 1826, 
married Dr. Matthew Singleton Moore. 



ARTHUR ROSE MOORE— For thirty-five years, 
1885-1920. Arthur R. Moore has been engaged in the 
practice of law in Fredonia, N. Y., having opened offices 
there immediately upon his admission to the bar. The 
years have brought him the rewards of his profession as 
well as the esteem of his fellow-townsmen, and he is 
most highly regarded both as a professional man and as 
a citizen. 

Arthur Rose Moore was born in Slateburg, Sumter 
county, S. C, Jan. i, 1855. He was named for a college 
friend of his father. Dr. Arthur Rose, of Charleston, 
S. C. He spent the first fourteen years of his life in 
his native place, being under the tuition of governesses 
and private instructors. After coming to Chautauqua 
county. N. Y., he attended Westfield Academy for two 
years, then pursued the classical course at the State 
Normal and Training School, Fredonia, for four years, 
following his classical course with two years' study in 
medicine in his father's office. But the medical pro- 
fession did not appeal to him and he discontinued study 
thereof to begin the study of law under the preceptor- 
ship of Norris & Lambert, Fredonia, N. Y. He was 
admitted to the New York bar at Buffalo in January, 
1885. and at once began practice in Fredonia and so 
continues to the present (1920). In February, 1885. 
he was admitted to practice in the District Court of the 
United States for the Northern District of New York, 
and on Jan. 25, 1895, on motion of Senator David B. 
Hill, of New York, was admitted to practice in the 
Supreme Court of the United States. While his practice 
is general in character, Mr. Moore has given particular 
attention to probate, corporation and real estate law, and 
has often been appointed by the courts to important 
receiverships which were managed and closed success- 
fully and most satisfactorily. He is a member of the 
Bar Association of Northern Chautauqua and New York 



State Bar Associations, and is held in high esteem by 
his brethren of the profession. 

A Democrat in politics, Mr. Moore was elected to that 
strongly Republican body, the Chautauqua County 
Board of Supervisors, in 1886, representing the town of 
Pomfret for one term. He was elected president of the 
Fredonia Village Corporation in 1895, and while holding 
that office was appointed by President Grover Cleveland 
postmaster of Fredonia to fill out an unexpired term. 
That appointment was made in March. 1895, and in Feb- 
ruary, 1896, was followed by appointment for a full 
term of four years. Upon the expiration of his term 
in February, 1900, the Republicans not being able to 
agree upon a successor, he held over until the end of the 
year, about ten months. It being contrary to the law 
to hold the office of postmaster in connection with any 
other public office, Mr. Moore resigned his office of pres- 
ident of the village, but the trustees refused to accept 
it. The post office department ruled that inasmuch as he 
had resigned he had complied with the law and advised 
that he take no further action. He continued as village 
president until the expiration of his term, then of course 
declined reelection. In 1894-95, he was chairman of the 
Chautauqua County Democratic Committee; from 1900 
to 1907, inclusive, member of the board of managers of 
the State Normal and Training School, Fredonia. secre- 
tary-treasurer of that board, 1904 and 1905. and chair- 
man, 1906-1907, inclusive. He is a member of the 
Masonic order and a past master of Forest Lodge, No. 
166, of Fredonia, having been master of that lodge in 
1890-1891. He is a member and senior warden of 
Trinity Protestant Episcopal Church of Fredonia. 

Mr. Moore married, at Louisville, Ky., June 6, 1895, 
Sally Doom MacLeod, daughter of John and Mary L. 
(Doom) MacLeod, her father a prominent railroad and 
bridge engineer. Mr. and Mrs. Moore are the parents 
of five children : Matthew Singleton, who died July 22,, 
1913. aged sixteen years; John MacLeod, Arthur Rose, 
Jr.. Mary Elizabeth, Sally MacLeod. 

From boyhood a resident of the village which has 
ever since been his home and place of business. Mr. 
Moore has won the confidence and good will of his 
townsmen to a remarkable degree, and in return has 
given them his best efforts as a professional man, a 
public official, and is found in support of all movements 
tending to Fredonia's good. Public-spirited, courteous 
and efficient, he has a wealth of friends whom he loyally 
serves as opportunity permits. 



ZATTU GUSHING — .\ great deal of pioneer his- 
tory centers around Zattu Gushing, born in Plymouth, 
Mass., in 1770. His father losing his fortune by the 
depreciation of Continental money, Zattu Gushing was 
apprenticed to a Boston ship carpenter, with whom he 
served his full time. He moved from Boston to Sara- 
toga county, tlience to Oneida county, N. Y., 
where he cleared a farm. In 1779 he was employed to 
'build a vessel at Presque Isle, now Erie, Pa., and on 
his way back to Oneida county he stopped over night 
in the wilderness of Fredonia, and was so pleased that 
he resolved to make the place his home. In February, 
1805, he left Oneida county for this purpose with his 
wife and children. Two sleds, each drawn by a yoke 



354 



CHALTTAUQUA COUNTY 



of oxen, carried his family and worldly goods. They 
were three weeks performing- the journey which now 
i?. by the flyer on the railroad, performed in seven 
hours. They started from BufTalo on the ice to go up 
the lake. At night a terrible tempest came unexpect- 
edly. They feared to move, as there were points where 
the ice was broken. The judge blew the old-fashioned 
dinner horn at intervals, thinking it might attract some 
settlers. Two men heard it, and taking it for a signal 
of distress, came with lanterns and piloted them ashore 
near the mouth of Eighteen Mile creek. Before day- 
light the ice had receded miles from the shore. When 
he reached Canadaway he found the lot he designed 
for a home had been taken up by Thomas McClin- 
tock. hut fortunately he found a partly-built log house, 
which made them a home for the winter. He drove 
four cows, and brought a barrel of salt, a half-bushel 
of apple seeds, and two men to assist in chopping. His 
apple seeds were the germs of the oldest orchards in 
Chautauqua. He procured potatoes for planting from 
the Indians. Zattu Gushing was eminently a pious 
man. His first thought when he came into the wilder- 
ness was to establish a church. This he did with the 
help of eight others, two of whom were women. Thus 
the first Baptist church was organized, and services 
held in his barn, which was the most spacious edifice 
in the community. He was a licensed preacher, and for 
years held regular meetings in the back settlements, 
men coming for miles to listen to him. 

Up to 1S07 all the county was the township of Chau- 
tauqua, with the town meetings at the Cross Roads, 
now Westfield. Judge Gushing rallied all the voters 
of his part of the county to go to Westfield, and they 
voted the town meeting here. This caused the creation 
of Pomfret. At its first town meeting he was elected 
overseer of the poor. In 1808 he was appointed one 
of the judges of Niagara county, of which Erie county 
was a part, and tried and sentenced to prison the first 
convict from Buffalo. At the organization of Chautau- 
qua county in 1811, he was appointed first judge. Law- 
yers from Buffalo would come and stay with him over 
Sunday, and on Monday they would go on horseback 
through the woods to Mayville. He served as a private 
in the War of 1812. He was delivering a Fourth of 
July oration when news came of the landing of some 
British soldiers at the mouth of the Canadaway. For 
a wonder, the orator hastened to the scene of danger 
more rapidly than his audience. James Mullett and 
Daniel W. Douglass in their haste undertook to ride 
one horse, which fell with them and left them help- 
less at the roadside. Seldom in the history of ivar 
hai the whole cavalry of an army been rendered use- 
less by a single accident. The two heroes were covered 
with mud instead of glory. 

In 1H17 a law was passed to aid agricultural societies, 
which were to Ijc organized at the court house in the 
respective counties. Two or three days before the 
time, the judge rode from house to house as far as 
Cattaraugus creek and notified every man to rally for 
Mayville. The judge headed the procession of several 
hundred. There were not as many horses as men, so 
«omc would ride a certain distance and tie the horse 
to give the footman behind a chance. At the appointed 
hour they emerged from the forest, fdled the court 



house, organized with Judge Gushing as chairman, and 
voted the "Fair" to Fredonia. Premiums remitted for 
the purpose formed the nucleus for the Fredonia Acad- 
emy Library. 

In 1826. just after the opening of the Erie canal, 
Judge Gushing built, in company with others, a canal 
boat within the limits of Fredonia, using the tools he 
used to build the "Good Intent" at Erie thirty years 
before. The boat, named "The Fredonia Enterprise," 
was drawn to Dunkirk by one hundred yoke of oxen, 
loaded with wheat by Todd & Douglass, and towed to 
Buffalo by the steamer "Lake Superior." This was 
the first wheat ever shipped from Chautauqua to the 
New York market. 

In 181 6 the wife of Judge Gushing died. Up to 
that time many of the residents had never attended a 
funeral in Chautauqua county. They came on foot 
and on horseback and with ox-teams from the remotest 
towns to pay the last tribute of respect to the dead. 

In the hard season of 1816, blessed with ample 
means. Judge Gushing would not sell his grain, but 
loaned it to be returned when harvests should come to 
the borrower. When his family remonstrated with 
him for indiscriminate benevolence, he told them it was 
better to aid ten hypocrites than to turn away one that 
was needy. 

In 1822, after fourteen years of service, he retired 
from the bench with the reputation of an upright, dig- 
nified, and clear-headed judge. He was a peacemaker. 
Men gathered around his deathbed for a council. His 
influence was not in his words as a preacher, but in 
the heroic Christian life back of it. He died in 1839, 
respected, honored, even reverenced, by his fellow-men. 

Six hundred acres of land converted from the wilder- 
ness to cultivated fields attested his energy. He was 
an ardent patriot, but to him the vision of the great 
struggle to be waged for the life of the Republic, and 
in which the heroism of his grandson was to make the 
name of Gushing immortal in history, did not come. 

At the first term of court held after the death of 
Judge Gushing, Jan. 13, 1839, the bar of Chautauqua 
county procured his portrait, as the first judge of 
Chautauqua county, to be hung in the court house over 
the judge's bench. By vote of the supervisors of 
Chautauqua county, a group of photographs of his 
four heroic grandsons are now fittingly placed beneath 
this portrait. 



THE GUSHING BROTHERS— Dr. Milton Buck- 
ingham Gushing, son of Judge Zattu and Rachel (Buck- 
ingham) Gushing, was burn at Paris, N, Y., July 20, 
1800, and died at Gallipolis, Oliio, April 22, 18.17. He 
was a physician and a merchant, and an energetic, 
clear-sighted, persevering Ijusiness man of high char- 
acter and vigorous intellect, influential and public- 
spirited. 

Dr. Gushing married (first) Abigail Browning Tup- 
pcr, who died in Zancsville, Ohio, daughter of Col. 
Tuppcr, grandson of Gen. Tuppcr of the Revolution; 
her mother, a daughter of Gen. Rufus Putnam. There 
were three children born of this marriage: Bciijamm 
Tuppcr, a law partner of Salmon P. Chase, in Colum- 
bus, Ohio, where he died at the age of twenty-five; 
Edward Anselni, a physician, who died before reach- 




f ^SeiVULama t.Brn 



/'ir^ ^Z)u^^^^^ . CO^t-H.^^, 



cc^c^-ooO^^ , 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



335 



ing his twenty-fifth year; Rowena Sophia, married Asa 
Brown, and died in Wilmington, N. C. 

Dr. Milton B. Gushing married (second) in Colum- 
bus, Ohio. Mary Barker Smith, of Boston, born in 
Salem. Mass.. Sept. 24, 1S07, died at the home of her 
only surviving child, Mrs. E. H. Bouton. in St. Joseph, 
Mo., March 26, 1891. She was a daughter of Elisha 
Smith, a lineal descendant of John Alden, and related 
to John Adams, the Hancock, Madison and Phillips 
families. She used to relate that her earliest recollec- 
tion was of attending the funeral of her grandfather, 
Josiah Smith, member of Congress, and said that the 
carriage of President John Adams (a cousin) headed 
the funeral procession. Seven children were born of 
this second marriage of Dr. Milton B. Cushing. 

The first son of Dr. Milton B. Cushing was Milton 
Buckingham (2), bom in Columbus, Ohio, April 20, 
i8,!7, died in Dunkirk, N. Y., Jan. i, 1886. He was a 
paymaster in the United States army, serving with 
distinction. He married, in 1868, Ellen Delia Gros- 
venor. who died in Dunkirk. May 31, 1898, daughter of 
Judge Thomas P. Grosvenor. 

The second son. Howard B. Cushing, was bom in 
Milwaukee. Wis., Aug. 22, 1838, and killed in Arizona, 
May 5, 1871, by Cachise, the noted Apache chief. He 
was then a first lieutenant in the Third Regiment, 
United States Cavalry. A monument was erected to 
the memory of Lieut. Cushing by the citizens of Tuc- 
son. Ariz. 

The third son. Col. Alonzo Hereford Cushing, was 
born Jan. 19, 1841, and was killed at the battle of 
Gettysburg, July 3, 1863. His birthplace was Dela- 
field, Wis. His father dying, the family came to Fre- 
donia to live, and Alonzo H. was appointed to the 
Military Academy at West Point through Hon. F. S. 
Edwards, member of Congress of the Tliirty-first Dis- 
trict of the State of New York. He entered the acad- 
emy July I, 1857, and was graduated Jan. 24, 1861, as 
second lieutenant, and commissioned first lieutenant, 
Fourth Artillery, June 24, 1861, breveted captain Dec. 
13. 1S63. for gallant and meritorious service at the bat- 
tle of Fredericksburg, Va. He was made major May 
2. 1863. for like ser\-ice at the battle of Chancellors- 
ville, \'a., and promoted to lieutenant-colonel July i, 
1S63, for conspicuous gallantry at the battle of Gettys- 
burg, Pa., where he was killed. After graduating, he 
was first of his class ordered into the field, and was 
assigned to the duty of instructing volunteer regiments 
preparatory to the move on Manassas, in which move- 
ment he commanded a section of a regular battery and 
was with General McClellan as chief of ordnance on 
General Sumner's staff, with the rank of captain, par- 
ticipating in ever}' battle of the Peninsular campaign. 
For a time he was transferred to the Topographic 
Corps, and while here he made a map of the Antietam 
battlefield. His favorite arm of service was the artil- 
lery, to which he was returned at his own request, and 
was assigned to the command of Battery .-V of the 
Fourth Regiment. His battery was placed under Gen- 
eral Hancock in the Second Corps in the campaign into 
Pennsylvania ; and at Gettj-sburg, in the face of that 
last wild charge of Pickett's division, he was placed 
with Battery A at Cemetery Ridge, a crucial point on 
the battlefield, with nothing to mask his position, men, 



guns and horses standing out in bold relief against the 
sky. After all his men had been shot down and every 
gun of his battery dismounted but one. he stood among 
his dead and dying men, himself mortally wounded, 
and with the foe not thirty feet away pulled the lanyard 
and fired his last gun upon the charging columns of the 
enemy, saying to an officer who was riding up with 
reinforcements: "We will give them one more shot, 
General Webb," and fell back dead, his work of de- 
fense accomplished, the tide of battle there turning 
toward victory for the Union army. 

The fourth son, William Barker Cushing, will have 
further and extended mention. 

The youngest and last survivor of this family, Mary 
Isabel Cushing, was born in Chicago, 111. She mar- 
ried, in Fredonia, N. Y., June 11, 1867, E. F. Gayle, of 
Salem, Mass. She married (second) April ig. 1S81, 
E. H. Bouton, of St. Joseph, Mo., but later of Chicago, 
111. The other children died young. 

When Dr. Milton B. Cushing died, Mrs. Cushing 
was left with the care of five young children, and with- 
out means. Nobly she responded to the task allotted 
her, and her four sons, even when quite young and in 
school, testified their appreciation of her labors by aid- 
ing in furnishing the family purse outside of school 
hours. She removed to Fredonia, N. Y., to be near her 
husband's relations, and opened a school in her own 
home on Green street. No words can express the great 
nobility of her character ; no mother was more faithful 
to her fatherless ones; and no Spartan mother braver 
in sacrificing her sons to her country's welfare. She 
was a woman of refinement and culture, mentally and 
morally strong, simple and unaffected in manner. 



COMMANDER WILLIAM BARKER CUSH- 
ING, U. S. N. — Three supremely great names in the 
naval history of the American Republic are those of 
John Paul Jones, Oliver Hazard Perry, and William 
Barker Cushing. Cushing is as completely the repre- 
sentative of the highest naval strategy and the type of 
the greatest individual daring of the great Rebellion 
as were Perry and Jones of the earlier naval wars. 

William Barker Cushing was born in Wisconsin, 
Nov. 4, 1842, youngest son of Milton B. and Mary B. 
(Smith) Cushing. He was descended from an old 
Puritan family of New England, his grandfather. 
Judge Zattu Cushing, born in Plymouth, Mass., and 
one of the leading figures among the pioneers of Chau- 
tauqua county, serving its courts of justice from their 
organization until 1824. Judge Cushing's son. Milton 
B. Cushing, married Mary B. Smith, a near relative of 
Rear Admiral Smith, and removed to Wisconsin, 
where he died, leaving four young sons. Mrs. Cush- 
ing returned to Fredonia so that her children might 
enjoy good educational advantages, but after the close 
of the Civil War, bereft of her sons, she went back to 
the West, where she died March 26, 1891. 

William Barker Cushing received his early education 
at Fredonia, and in 1857 was appointed to the U. S. 
Naval Academy at Annapolis, Md., but resigned 
March 23. 1861. In May of the same year he volun- 
teered and was appointed master's mate on the U. S. 
Ship "Minnesota," and on the day of her arrival at 



"^O 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



Hampton Roads captured the "Delaware Farmer," a 
tobacco schooner, the first prize of the war. He was 
attached to the Xorth .-\thntic Blockading Squadron 
durinc: the war, served part of the time on the South 
.\tl3ntic coast, and repeatedly distinguished himself 
by acts of bravery. 

He was commissioned lieutenant July 16. iS6j. and 
in November of the same year he was ordered to cap- 
ture Jacksonville. Fla.. intercept an important mail, 
and destroy the Xew Juliet salt works. He captured 
the mail, took prizes, and shelled a Confederate camp, 
but was unable to cross the bar to Jacksonville. He 
then served on the Blackwater and in the sounds of 
North Carolina, where he distinguished himself upon 
several occasions. During 1S63 he added to his repu- 
tation for daring bra\ery and good judgment by an ex- 
pedition up the Cape Fear and Little rivers, and his 
operations on the Nansemond. It is not possible to 
give in detail all of his brilliant exploits, distinguished 
services and hair-breadth escapes. His most brilliant 
exploit and which made world-wide his then already 
national reputation, was the destruction of the Confed- 
erate iron-clad ram "Albemarle" on the night of Oct. 

The ".Mbemarle" had successfully encountered a 
strong fleet of Union gunboats and fought for several 
hours without sustaining material damage. There was 
nothing able to cope with her in the Sounds, and grave 
apprehensions were entertained of the Union iron-clads 
being able to prevent her from sweeping everything 
before and shelling the principal Northern seaport 
cities. Cushing volunteered to destroy her and van- 
ish the nightmare of terror which her presence cast 
upon the Union fleets. With a steam launch and a 
volunteer crew who fully realized the importance and 
danger of the mission upon which they were going, 
he a.^cendcd the Roanoke river towing an armed cut- 
ter. The river was lined with Confederate pickets to 
"Ttiard against just such an attack as this: but Cush- 
ing's phenomenal good luck did not desert him. and he 
was within a few yards of the "Albemarle" before he 
was discovered. Casting off the boat he had in tow, 
with orders to attack a picket post nearby, he drove 
the launch straight at the hugh bulk of the iron-clad, 
whose crew rushed to quarters and at once opened a 
hea\->- fire on their a<lvancing foe. The launch replied 
eflfcctivcly with her howitzer until Cushing reached 
the raft of heavy logs which had been built around the 
ram. Over this the launch was driven, and by the time 
she received her death wound from the ".'Mbemarle's" 
guns. Cushing had coolly swimg the torpedo boom 
under the great ship's overhang and exploded the 
charge. A large hole was blown in tlie iron-clad's side, 
and she sank at her moorings. 

Cushing left his sinking boat and '^\vam down stream 
a half mile, where he reached the river bank thoroughly 
exhausted. Wlvn he recovered strength, he plunged 
into a dfmse sw.'imp, and after hours of tedio'is wading 
came out on the shore of a creek where he found a 
Union picket ti'jat. He and only one other of his com- 
panion--. escaped. For the sinking of the "Albemarle" 
he received the thanks of Congress, and was shortly 
afterward-j elevated to the rank of lieutenant-com- 
mander, his 'ommi^sion being dated Oct. 27, 1864. 



.•\t Fort Fisher he buoyed out the channel in a small 
skifT and completed his work in six hours. In the 
final assault on its frowning wall he led a force of 
sailors and marines from the "Monticello" in an attack 
on the sea front of the fort, and amid an unceasing 
fire at short range which cut down his inen in wind- 
rows, he crossed one hundred rods of sand, rallied his 
men. and gave such efficient support to the land forces 
that before midnight the fort was surrendered. 

During the war he received five commendatory let- 
ters from the Secretary of the Navy, and at the close 
of the struggle was appointed to the command of the 
"Lancaster" in the Pacific squadron. In 1868 he was 
placed in command of the "Maumee," and for four 
years was attached to the Atlantic Squadron. On the 
return of the "Maumee" to the LTnited States, Lieut.- 
Com. Cushing was advanced to the rank of commander, 
to date from Jan. i, 1872. he being at that time the 
youngest officer of that rank in the navy. He was 
allowed leave of absence, but his health, which had 
been impaired by over-exertion, failed completely, and 
he died of brain fever in Washington, D. C. Dec. 17, 

1874. 

As during the Civil War, Cushing was noted for 
finding opportunities for upholding the honor of the 
navy and the flag, so in times of peace his intense pa- 
triotism kept him ever alert to enhance the glory of his 
beloved country. A notable instance occurred in No- 
vember. 187,1. 

Cushing was in command of the U. S. S. "Wyoming" 
at Aspinwall, when an urgent telegram was received 
from the U. S. Consul at Kingston, Jamaica, telling of 
the "need of a warship, and describing the capture, on 
the high seas, of the steamer 'Virginius,' and the shoot- 
ing as pirates of her captain and part of her crew at 
Santiago de Cuba by order of the Spanish Governor- 
General Burriel, and that more .'American lives were in 
peril." 

Believing it his duty to lose no time in representing 
his government, Cushing sailed at once for the scene, 
without waiting for orders, and arrived at Santiago, 
November 15. The British frigate "Niobe" was in 
the harbor. Her commander. Sir Lambert Lorraine, 
liad made an earnest protest to the Governor, demand- 
ing that no more British subjects be shot. Gen. Bur- 
riel had ignored the letter, and two days before Cush- 
ing appeared, had shot twenty-eight more men, six- 
teen of whom were said to be British subjects. Imme- 
diately upon Cushing's arrival, he despatched a letter 
of protest to the Governor, and followed it up by a 
personal call, accompanied by some of his officers. Re- 
fusing to take the general's oft'crcd hand, he looked him 
squarely in the eye and demanded that not another 
Iirisoner shoidd be shot, for if any more executions 
took place, he would better remove the women and 
children, as he (Cushing) should bombard the town. 
Awed and impressed by the words and bearing of the 
American officer. Gen. Burriel gave the desired prom- 
ise — and kept it. 

The following year a joint resolution (House Reso- 
lution No. .SX) was introduced in the American Con- 
gress, "tendering the thanks of Congress to Sir Lam- 
bert Lorraine of the British navy, for his humane and 
generous interposition at Santiago de Cuba in protect- 





COMMANDED WILLIAM BARKER GUSHING 
America's X;i\:il Ht-ii. from Ch:uit:niqiia Count> 



llllS. MAl;"! B. CLSHIXi; 
Motlirr (jf Coniini'iid*-!- Ciisliing 





( jL^ryX ^^/ihyU<z.^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



357 



ing the lives of the survivors of the Virginius expedi- 
tion." etc. The Committee on Foreign Affairs, to 
whom the resolution was referred, reported that upon 
investigation they were pleased to add it was Com- 
mander W. B. Gushing, and not Sir L. Lorraine, who 
had caused the executions to cease," and "your commit- 
tee believe that said joint resolution ought not to pass." 
"It fully appears that Capt. Gushing did his duty com- 
pletely and gallantly in asserting the rights of the 
American government and its citizens, and upholding 
the honor of the .American flag." Gushing, when only 
a junior officer, received the thanks of Congress in 
1864 for the "Albemarle" exploit, but there were those 
who felt he had earned it a second time — which, if 
granted, would have been an unprecedented occurrence. 

A few days after Commander Cushing's protest to 
Gen. Burriel, the U. S. S. "Juanita," commanded by 
Commander D. L. Braine, arrived from New York, 
sent to adjust matters, and Gushing returned to his 
station at Aspinwall. 

That a hero's name and deeds arc not forgotten, it 
should perhaps be recorded that so recently as 1915 
two notable events in remembrance of this gallant offi- 
cer took place. The first was the launching of the 
second torpedo destroyer to be called "Gushing," at 
Quincy, Mass., his daughter, Marie, giving it the cher- 
ished name. In the late World War the "Gushing" 
was the flagship of the torpedo destroyer fleet sent to 
England. 

The second event in the same year was the unveil- 
ing of a splendid granite monument by his younger 
daughter, Katharine, at his birthplace at Delafield, 
Waukesha county, Wis. The State of Wisconsin ap- 
propriated a large sum of money and in connection 
with the Waukesha County Historical Society erected 
the stately shaft in a park of eight acres of the original 
farm where Alonzo and William were born. Howard 
was also born in the State, at Milwaukee, so the park 
is called "The Gushing Memorial Park." As it now 
belongs to the State Park System, it will be cared for 
in perpetuity. 

Commander Gushing married, Feb. 22, 1870, Kath- 
erine Louise Forbes, daughter of Col. D. S. Forbes, of 
Fredonia. To them were born two daughters, Mary 
Louise, and Katherine A. Mrs. Gushing, a woman of 
taste and refinement, yet resides with her daughters in 
her pleasant home in Fredonia. 

The memory of William B. Gushing has been hon- 
ored by the various Grand Army posts in Wisconsin 
and other States of the Union named after him; while 
on the water the seagoing torpedo boat "Gushing" 
suggests by its character the daring of him for whom 
the vessel was named. A thousand pens have written 
of him and his deeds, and among the just and deserved 
tributes recorded in honor of his achievements the 
following are selected: 

"A country and the navy may be proud of this most 
adventurous of their heroes." "Gushing, by repeated 
daring and successful achievements, has rivaled the 
fame of Paul Jones and Perry, and associated his 
name with theirs in immortality." 

"That intense earnestness of purpose, that wonder- 
ful spirit of daring, md that supreme contempt of 
death "which characterized the heroes of the great 
Rebellion, as well as the cool and deliberate calcula- 
tions of its great leaders and master spirits, were 
qualities possessed by Gushing in the higrhest degree; 



while in addition to all this he was gifted with a mili- 
tary ability, a futility of invention and all-powerful 
■will, which places him among the greatest naval 
heroes of all time." 

"No Cleopatra of ease ever lured Gushing from any 
action of life and no thought of death ever cast a 
shadow of fear upon any enterprise, however danger- 
ous, which he had conceived. He was always in the 
battle where the iron hail fell the thickest and his 
place in the picture was where the blaze of the cannon 
was the brightest." 



ROBERT HOUGHWOUT JACKSON— In the 

year igi,s Robert H. Jackson was enrolled among the 
practicing lawyers of the Chautauqua county bar, he 
having chosen Jamestown as a location and there set- 
tled immediately after receiving his degree from 
the Albany Law School. The subsequent years have 
brought him success in his professional work, and he 
is firmly established among the rising young men of 
the Chautauqua bar. Robert H. Jackson is a son of 
William Eldred Jackson, now deceased, who at the 
time of the birth of his son was engaged in lumbering 
and farming in Spring Greek township, Warren 
county. Pa. The Jacksons were the earliest settlers in 
Spring Creek township, Elijah Jackson, great-grand- 
father, being the first settler. William E. Jackson 
married .A-ngelina Houghwout, of Farmington town- 
ship. Pa., and shortly after the birth of their son, they 
moved to Frewsiburg, in the town of Carroll, Chautau- 
qua county, N. Y., where William E. Jackson died, 
and his widow yet resides (1920) as do Mr. Jackson's 
sisters: Ella, now Mrs. Erie J. Springer, and Helen. 

Robert H. Jackson was born on the farm cleared 
by his great-grandfather in Spring Creek township, 
Warren county, Pa., Feb. 13, 1892. He began his edu- 
cation in the public schools of Frewsburg, finishing 
with graduation from high school in 1909. He was a 
student in Jamestown High School, and during that 
period represented the school in several interscholastic 
debates. He was graduated with the class of 1910, 
and then began the study of law with Dean, Mott & 
Armstrong, of Jamestown, and a year later entered 
Albany Law School, Union University, whence he was 
graduated LL. B., class of 1913. Immediately after 
graduation he began practice at Jamestown and con- 
tinued with great success until 1917, when he went to 
Buffalo and became temporarily associated with Nor- 
ton, Penny & Killeen, a leading law firm of that city, 
representing many large corporation interests. Mr. 
Jackson's work there was as trial counsel, represent- 
ing principally the International Railway Company. In 
this work he was very successful, but preferring the 
more general practice and the environment of the 
smaller city he returned to Jamestown in 1918 and 
resumed practice as the junior member of the law 
firm. Dean, Edson & Jackson. He enjoys the confi- 
dence of a large clientele, among which are public util- 
ity and industrial corporations. As a trial lawyer he is 
a familiar figure in the courts of Western New York. 
He is a member of the New York State Bar Associa- 
tion, the Jamestown Bar Association, and the Buf- 
falo Lawyers' Club. In business life he is a director 
of the Bank of Jamestown, the Warren & Jamestown 
Street Railway Company, and of several other cor- 
porations. 

In politics Mr. Jackson is an independent Demo- 



35? 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



crat and was formerly prominent in the activities of that 
party. He served two terms upon the Democratic 
State Committee, hut in lOiS declined to become a 
candidate for reelection and has since taken no active 
part in the party orsranization. though still an alert 
and active participant in public affairs, but never a 
candidate for any office. He was for one term the 
Democratic member of Jamestown civil service com- 
mission, resigning that honor in igiS. In that year he 
was appointed by Mayor Carlson acting corporation 
counsel. He is a member of the Moon Brook Country 
Club. Jamestown Club, Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks, and Fraternal Order of Eagles, having 
served the last named one term as president. He is 
deeply interested in literary, political and economic 
questions, belonging to the University Club, also a 
founder and the first president of the Saturday Night 
Club. To both these organizations he has contributed 
papers on various subjects and is a frequent, forceful 
and eloquent public speaker. 

Mr. Jackson married, .April 24, iqi6, at St. Peter's 
Episcopal Church, .Albany. N. Y.. Irene .Alice Ger- 
hardt. of that city. Mr. and Mrs. Jackson are the 
parents of a son. William Eldred, born July ig, 1919. 



ROBERT BURTIS BLANCHARD, M. D.— There 

is no better known or more popular physician in 
Jamestown. Chautauqua county, N. Y., than Dr. Rob- 
ert Burtis Blanchard, of No. 8 East Second street, a 
native of this city, where his birth occurred March 27, 
1S83. Dr. Blanchard is a son of Dr. R. Newland 
Blanchard. and a grandson of Flint Blanchard, the 
elder a well known agriculturist of Ellicott, Chautauqua 
county. His father was one of the pioneer physicians 
of Jamestown. He married Belle Burtis, who sur- 
vives him, and continues to make her home in James- 
town at the present time. 

Dr. Robert Burtis Blanchard attended as a lad the 
public schools of his native town, graduating from the 
high school in the year 1902, where he was prepared 
for college. He then attended the medical school of 
the University of Buffalo, where he took the degree of 
M. D. and was graduated with the class of iqo6. Fol- 
lowing his studies at this institution. Dr. Blanchard 
acted as interne in the Erie County Hospital for one 
year, and in 1907 began the practice of his profession 
at Jamestown. Since that time he has developed a 
large practice here and is regarded as one of the 
leaders of his profession. Dr. Blanchard is promi- 
nent in social and fraternal circles at Jamestown, and 
is a member of various Masonic bodies, including Mt. 
Moriah LrAgc, Free and Accepted Masons: Western 
Sun Chapter, Royal .Arch Masons: and Jamestown 
Council, Royal and Select Masters. He is also a mem- 
ber of the Order of Eagles and was for some years 
the phy?.ician of this society. He is affiliated with the 
Jamestown Medical Society, the Chautauqua County 
Medical Sr^iefy, the New Vork State Medical Associa- 
tion, and the Amr-rican Medical Association. Besides 
his private prarticc, fJr. Blanchard is medical examiner 
for the John H.Tncock Life Insurance Company, the 
NorlhweMcrn .Mutual Life Insurance Company, the 
Connecticut G'neral Life Insurance Comjvany, the 
Union Central Insurance Company, and the Bankers' 



Life Insurance Company. In politics he is a Repub- 
lican, and for eight years held the important post of 
city physician of Jamestown. 

Dr. Blanchard was united in marriage, June 25, 
1914, with Lorene A. Rogerson, a daughter of David 
and Alberta M. Rogerson, highly respected residents 
of Jamestown. Two children have been born to Dr. 
and Mrs. Blanchard, as follows: Robert Burtis, Jr., 
.Aug. 0. 1915; and Roger Newland. Dec. 18, 1917. 



WILLIAM H. MARVIN— Son of a Chautauqua 
farmer and reared on one of the fertile farms of the 
town of Hanover, Mr. Marvin early felt the call of a 
business life, and at the age of seventeen left the farm 
for the shop, and since 1886 has been associated with 
Forestville's commercial interests. Since 1898 he has 
been in business under his own name and has built 
up a solid, substantial trade. Furniture and under- 
taking have been the lines followed, and under dif- 
ferent firm names his has become the leading estab- 
lishment of the town. William H. Marvin is a son 
of Henry Floyd and Mary (Devinney") Marvin, his 
father a farmer of Smith's Mills, Hanover, Chautau- 
qua county. Mr. and Mrs. Mar\'in were the parents 

of four children: Josephine, married Clark, of 

Cuba, N. Y. ; Chester E., of Cuba, N. Y.; Jennie, 
married Daniel A. Dye, of Forestville; and William 
H., of further mention. 

William H. Marvin was born at Smith's Mills, Han- 
over, Chautauqua county, N. Y., Jan. ,1, 1869. He was 
educated in the district public schools, and until Feb. 
18, 1886, remained on the farm, his father's assistant. 
He moved to Forestville, in his home town, on the 
date mentioned, and at once found employment in the 
furniture and undertaking business with F. D. Ellis. 
For about a dozen years he continued an employee, 
becoming very proficient, then in partnership with 
Daniel A. Dye he began business on his own account, 
under the firm name of Marvin & Dye. They pros- 
pered abundantly and conducted the business until 
191 5, when Marvin & Dye sold their business to Bury 
& Williams, of Springfield. Later, Mr. Mar\'in bought 
the Williams interest, and in partnership Marvin & 
Bury conducted the business until 1919, when he 
bought Mr. Bury's interest, the business now being 
known as William H. Marvin. 

The farm has never been without its attraction for 
Mr. Marvin, and he has been for several years an 
extensive grape grower and general farmer. He is a 
member of the Masonic order, holding the thirty-second 
degree of the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite; member 
of the Order of the Eastern Star, the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks, and the Silver Creek Motor Boat Club. 
In politics he is a Republican, and during the years 
1916-17-1K he served as the duly elected sheriff of 
Chautaui|ua county. In religious affiliation he is 
connected with the Methodist Episcopal church. In 
1920 he was elected president of the First National 
Bank of Forestville, of which he was an organizer and 
incorporator. 

Mr, Marvin married, Sept. 7, 1898, in Forestville, 
Alice L. Reynolds, ilaughler of Sylvester and Frances 
(Goidd; Reynolds, of Forestville. 





w///^. 



^^i/VUiJ 



^^^^'-Z'^tO^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



359 



LAWRENCE WARREN WILTSIE— In 1875, 
Mr. Wiltsie was admitted to practice at the New 
York bar, and the same year he settled in Jamestown, 
in his native Chautauqua county. There during the 
forty years which have since intervened, he has con- 
tinuously been engaged in the practice of his pro- 
fession, his standing high with a large and influential 
clientele. Mr. Wiltsie is a descendant of an ancient 
Dutch Colonial family founded in New Amsterdam 
(New York), by Phillippe Martin Wiltsee. a soldier in 
the Dutch army, who came in the ship "New Nether- 
lands," with his wife, two children and two servants. 
He was one of those detailed to build Fort Orange 
(Albany), but when the Indians forced the first Colon- 
ists at Fort Orange to return to New Amsterdam, 
Phillippe M. Wiltsee and his family settled at Waal 
Bogt, N. Y. Later he and his sons, Pierre and Hen- 
drick, were killed by Indians at Swaanendael. His 
wife was Sophie (Ter Bosch) Wiltsee, born in Hol- 
land, who after the death of her husband is believed 
to have returned to Holland with the younger members 
of the family. Descendants settled all along the Hud- 
son Valley from New York to Albany, and thence 
west along the Mohawk Valley, radiating eventually 
through all Western New York counties, this branch 
settling in Chautauqua county. 

Mr. Wiltsie is a great-grandson of John Owens, a 
soldier of the French and Indian War and the Revo- 
lution, whose daughter, Elsie Owens, in i8o6, married 
George W. Fenton, the father of Rueben E. Fenton, 
once Congressman, Governor of New York, and 
United States Senator. John Owens was born in 
Windsor, Conn., who, after his Revolutionary War 
service, left New England, and in 1808 settled in the 
town of Carroll, Chautauqua county, N. Y. He kept 
a tavern in Carrol! for the entertainment of lumber- 
men and travelers all over the State road from Chau- 
tauqua county into Pennsylvania. He also operated a 
private ferry over the Conewango, and died in Car- 
roll, Feb. 6, 1843, at the wonderful age of one hun- 
dred and seven, probably the oldest citizen who ever 
lived in the county. His military service was with the 
English army under General Wolfe at the capture of 
Quebec, and with Ethan Allen at the taking of Ticon- 
deroga. He was a jovial, story-loving man, and his 
house was very popular with the weary raftsmen who 
sought his hospitality when tied up for the night. 

Lawrence Warren Wiltsie, son of David and Jane 
P. (Hadley) Wiltsie, was born at the home farm in 
Carroll, Chautauqua county, N. Y., March 30, 1850, his 
father a farmer and lumber dealer at Frewsburg. He 
attended the public schools of Frewsburg, and the 
Union School of Jamestown, later studied law, and on 
April 9, 187s, was admitted to the New York bar at 
Rochester. He opened law offices in Jamestown the 
same year, rose rapidly in his profession, and is 
rated one of the strong men of the Chautauqua county 
bar. Mr. Wiltsie is a member of the Chautauqua 
County Bar Association, the New York Bar Associa- 
tion, Sons of the American Revolution, and is affili- 
ated with Mt. Moriah Lodge, Western Sun Chapter, 
and Jamestown Commandery of the Masonic order. In 
politics he is a Democrat, and has been the party stand- 
ard bearer in several campaigns, but the normal ad- 



verse Republican majority is rarely overcome by a 
Democratic candidate in Jamestown. 

At Olean, N. Y., Oct. 31, 1883, Mr. Wiltsie married 
Caroline P. Ahrams, who died March ig, 1918. leaving 
a son, David Hadley Wiltsie, born in Jamestown, 
March 13, 18S8. He was educated in Jamestown grammar 
and high schools ; Phillips Exeter Academy, Exeter, 
N. H.; Yale University, A. B., class of 1912; and the 
University of Berlin, being a student there in 1914, 
when the world was fanned into a flame of war 
through the action of Germany. Mr. Wiltsie had a 
hard time in getting out of Germany, but finally 
reached England, his health seriously effected. He 
returned to Jamestown, where he died July 3, 1920. 



FRED VICTOR ANDERSON, an alderman of the 
city of Jamestown, and assistant cashier of the Liberty 
National Bank, is a native of Jamestown, born Jan. i, 
1886, a son of John A. and Emma C. (.'\brahamson) 
Anderson, both of whom are now living. The elder Mr. 
Anderson is at the present time connected with the 
firm of .A-brahamson-Bigelow Company, the owners 
of the largest department store in Jamestown, an asso- 
ciation which has existed for many years. 

Fred Victor Anderson received his education as a 
boy in the local public schools, completing his studies in 
the grammar grades and continuing for two years in 
the high school. Being ambitious to begin the active 
business of life, he then gave up his studies with that 
institution and entered the Jamestown Business Col- 
lege, where he took a commercial course and was grad- 
uated in the year 1904. Upon completing his studies 
there, he at once secured a position in the Bank of 
Jamestown, where he remained for about thirteen 
years, gaining in the meantime an intimate know- 
ledge of banking and business methods generally. For 
one year following his connection with the Bank of 
Jamestown, Mr. Anderson was associated with the 
International Flag Company, but retired from that 
position in order to accept the offer made to him by the 
Liberty National Bank to become its assistant cashier. 
He has continued in this office ever since and has 
made himself exceedingly useful to this concern. Mr. 
Anderson has been exceedingly active in local public 
affairs, and is a very prominent member of the Repub- 
lican party in the county, his voice being heard in all 
their councils. It was in the year 1917 that he was 
elected to the Board of Aldermen of Jamestown and 
still serves on that body, having proved himself a 
most capable and disinterested public servant. He has 
also participated prominently in the war work of the 
community, and is chairman of the finance committee 
of the Board of Aldermen, positions of great responsi- 
bility for so young a man. In his religious belief Mr. 
Anderson is a Lutheran and attends the First Luth- 
eran Church at Jamestown. He possesses an unusual 
talent for music, and at the present time is choir direc- 
tor of the Swedish Methodist Episcopal Church, pos- 
sessing himself a fine and well-trained baritone voice. 
His love for music induced him to take a full course in 
that art at the Jamestown Conserxatory of Music, so 
that he is thoroughly educated in this line, and for 
three years was a member of the Presbyterian quar- 



-.6o 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



tfttc here. Mr. Antierson is a member of Mt. Moriah 
Loiige. Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, and is now 
passing through the chairs of this lodge. He is also 
a member of Mt. Tabor Lodge, Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, of which he is past noble grand, of the 
Xorthern Club, of the Scandinavian-American Founda- 
tion ^charter member), and a director of the Young 
Men's Christian .Association. 

Fred \'ictor .\nderson was united in marriage June 
4. I0!J. at Jamestown, with Elma E. Sandburg. 



CARL FRANKLIN STRATFORD, the well 
known and popular citi.ten of Jamestown, N. Y., where 
he is secretary of the Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tion, is a native of St. Thomas, Ontario, Canada, where 
he was born, .\ug. 31, 18S0. He is a son of Eli T. 
and Minnie (Moore) Stratford, his father having been 
a railroad worker upon coming to the United States, 
and was also engaged as a sub-contractor. \\'hile Carl F. 
Stratford was still an infant, his parents moved to 
Buffalo. X. Y.. where the family resided for a num- 
ber of years, and it was here that he received his pre- 
liminary education, attending the grammar schools and 
later the Buffalo High School, He was but twelve 
years of age when he became interested in the Young 
Men's Christian Association work, and after leaving 
high school, Mr. Stratford continued his studies in the 
schools of the Young Men's Christian Association, 
identifying himself and becoming acquainted with all 
the details of the work of this splendid organization. 
Upon reaching the age of nineteen, Mr. Stratford was 
gi\ en his first official appointment in the employ of the 
".Association." namely, that of assistant at the Buffalo 
Central "Y." He held this post for a period of two 
years and then, upon reaching his majority, was ap- 
pointed secretary of the Lackawanna branch of the 
Young Men's Christian Association at Buffalo. Mr. 
Stratfr.rd filled this post with exceptional skill, and it 
w.-is flue to his able management and clear foresight 
that the Lackawanna branch owes its rapid growth and 
development. Mr. Stratford's next appointment was 
that of membership secretary of the Young Men's 
Christi.in .Association at Erie, Pa., where he continued 
his brilliant work. It was not long after receiving this 
fK.st that Mr. Stratford was sent to Kane, Pa., there 
to take charge of the Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tion work, and at this city he was given tlic position 
of general secretary, a most deserving office. In Au- 
tf'ivt. 1017. h'- ramr- to Jamestown to accept the office 
of general secretary of the "Y" here, and up to the 
present Mr. Stratford can claim the honorable service 
of eleven years with the Young Men's Christian .Asso- 
ciation. Mr. Stratford may be classed as a "miracle 
man" with regard to the exceptional progress he has 
m.-id'- with the work entrusted to him. He has a strong 
p'rson.-dity, and an ability to handle men, and at prcs- 
rnt has no less than ten assistants who aid him in his 
important duties 'onnccted with the "Y" work. The 
YounK Men's (Jirislian Asso'ialion building here is a 
hand-orne edifice and h.is r'>'im for seventy-five guests. 
It al-o rt,n(\iiri>, ,1 summer branch on Lake Chautau- 
'I'la. Mr. Stratford enjoys his works, csperi.illy that 
branch which has always been so attractive to him, 



namely, the Boys' Department, in which he takes a 
very active interest. 

During the World War, Mr. Stratford ser\'ed as 
publicity director for Chautauqua county in all the 
Liberty Loan drives; as campaign director for the 
county in the United War Fund Campaign, and local 
director for the Young Men's Christian Association 
and Red Cross drives. In his religious belief Mr. 
Stratford is a Presbyterian, and attends the church 
of this denomination in Jamestown. He is a member 
of the national organization of the Young Men's Chris- 
tian Association workers. Mr. Stratford does not take 
an active interest in politics, due to the exacting duties 
connected with his important post at the "Y." He 
is not affiliated with any party and may be regarded 
as an independent voter, preferring not to ally him- 
self with any political party whatsoever. 

Carl Franklin Stratford married, at Buffalo, N. Y., 
-Aug. 22, 1912, Edith Thomas, a resident of that place, 
and a daughter of F. A. and Ida (JefTeries) Thomas, 
old and highly respected citizens. The Thomas fam- 
ily originally came from Rochester, N. Y. Mr. and 
Mrs. Stratford are the parents of two children: Ruth 
Thomas, and Thomas Alanson. 



CHARLES A. JOHNSON, a well regarded and re- 
sponsible citizen of Jamestown, N. Y., for more than 
thirty-five years, and a leader among the Swedish peo- 
ple of that place, has for thirty years been a director of 
the Atlas Furniture Company, under that name and 
under its former trading designation, the Swedish Fur- 
niture Company, and has been vice-president of the 
company for twenty-four years. Charles A. Johnson 
is quite a self-made man, as that term is known: the 
success which has come to him has been entirely by 
his own efforts, by his resolute application to study, 
even after he had begun his business life, and by his 
honesty of purpose and moral integrity. He applied 
himself steadily to honest production, and that pro- 
duction in due course brought an honest return. And 
some of his outside associations indicate that he is a 
man in whom others have confidence, and that in the 
affairs of his fellow-citizens of Swedish antecedents 
he has taken an active interest. He is a director of 
the American National Bank, and is president and 
director of the "Scandia," a .Swedish newspaper. 

Charles A. Johnson was born Feb. 2.3, i860, in 
Sweden, and in due course attended the school of his 
native place. His father, now deceased, was Jonas 
Johanson, and on his father's farm Charles A. worked 
during his boyhood. He remained near his parents 
until he li.id reached the age of twenty-two years, but 
then decided to come to America, his brother having 
already gone, and, according to report, having suc- 
cessfully settled in Jamestown, N. Y. Therefore, 
Charles A. came, and upon arrival in America came to 
Jamestown, where ever since he has remained, inces- 
santly working, and for the greater jjart of the time 
working amid associations of consequence or [jromise 
to the city of Jamestown. He has taken appreciable 
part ill I he maintenance of the city in continued pros- 
I/i-rify duriuK llic last tliirty years, for the companies 
with which he has actively been connected, in rcspon- 





Oyd^ 




BIOGRAPHICAL 



361 



sible capacity, have been steady producers, and steady 
employers of labor, in the production of a commodity 
which has been marketed almost exclusively outside 
the city. Upon arriving in Jamestown, in 1S82, he 
began to work for the Jamestown Banding Company, 
with which company he remained for five years. In 
his early years, he was much handicapped because of 
a poor understanding of English, and he saw that in 
other academic and fundamental subjects his Swedish 
schooling was deficient. Therefore, he assiduously 
studied during the early years of his residence in 
Jamestown, attending local night schools for the pur- 
pose, but mainly studymg at home. He was a young 
man of alert intelligence, apt in most things, and he 
soon became a skilled workman; and his private learn- 
ing soon closed the gap in his knowledge of general 
subjects. And by steady attendance at his work, and 
consistent thrift, he was able to grasp other opportuni- 
ties which came. In 1887, he acquired an interest in 
the Swedish Furniture Company, which, under a later 
reconstruction, became the Atlas Furniture Company, 
under which name it now trades. Charles A. Johnson 
has had charge of the finishing and shipping depart- 
ments of that company for the last twenty-five years; 
has been director for thirty years, since i88g; and has 
been its vice-president since 1896; so that he has held 
a sufficiently responsible capacity in the affairs of a 
substantial industry of Jamestown. Mr. Johnson is a 
member of the Norden Club of Jamestown, and of the 
"Swedish One Hundred Member Society." For many 
decades he has been an earnest member of the church, 
and in Jamestown attends the Swedish Zion Church, 
to which he has given due support. 

Mr. Johnson was married, in Jamestown, in 1901, to 
Hannah Collin. They have tliree children: i. Lillian, 
who is now a high school undergraduate. 2. Mildred, 
who attends the elementary school. 3. Marion, who 
also attends the public school. 



THE ATLAS FURNITURE COMPANY of 

Jamestown, now among the large manufacturers of fur- 
niture in Western New York, was founded principally by 
L. E. Erickson and Gustave Holmberg, and others, in 
1883, under the corporate title "The Swedish Furniture 
Company," Gustave Holmberg, president; L. E. 
Erickson, secretary and treasurer. The original plant 
of the company was located on East Second street, 
Jamestown, but a fire destroyed that building and new 
quarters were found on Harrison street, which were 
occupied until 1887, when a plant was purchased in 
Randolph. N. Y. At that time the capital stock was 
increased and about fifteen new stockholders admit- 
ted. The officially active members were and always 
have been but few in number, and among them are 
F. O. Strandberg, C. A. Johnson and L. E. Erickson. 
At about this time the corporate name was changed to 
the Atlas Furniture Company, F. O. Strandberg, pres- 
ident ; C. A. Johnson, vice-president, and L. E. Erick- 
son, secretary-treasurer; the latter died in 1905. Gus- 
tave Holmberg relinquished active part in the new 
organization in favor of the new members, his home 
being too far from Randolph for him to continue 
active in the management. The plant of the company 
in Randolph was occupied four years, then sold, and 



a large modern plant erected on the Allen street exten- 
sion in Jamestown. This plant was enlarged as needs 
required until 1910, when the Atlas Furniture Com- 
pany purchased the nearby plant of the Liberty Fur- 
niture Company on Blackstone avenue. The company 
now (1920) employ about 200 highly skilled mechanics 
and manufacture high grade bedroom furniture. The 
present officers of the company are: President, Frank 
O. Strandberg: vice-president, Charles A. Johnson; 
secretary-treasurer, John A. Hagg. The directors 
are: F. O. Strandberg, C. A. Johnson, Andrew Wal- 
lin, Gustave Wallin, Carl Nelson, Andrew Venman, 
Lester Strandberg. 

The Atlas Furniture Company since its inception 
has enjoyed remarkable success and prosperity. Its 
products are well known in the furniture world and 
dealers are supplied in all parts of the United States, 
as well as some in foreign countries. 



GEORGE WASHINGTON JUDE, one of the 

most prominent and successful attorneys of James- 
town, N. Y., where he has an office in the Wellman 
building, is a native of Chautauqua county, his birth 
having occurred there Feb. 22, 1867. Mr. Jude is a 
son of Joseph and Mary (Graham) Jude, and a mem- 
ber of an old English family, his ancestry having held 
an important position in the community where they 
lived. The elder Mr. Jude followed the occupation 
of farming for many years in this region, and is now 
deceased, as is also his wife. 

George Washington Jude attended as a lad the dis- 
trict country school, and at the same time assisted his 
father with the work on the latter's farm. Later he 
became a pupil of the Sugar Grove Seminary at Sugar 
Grove. Pa., where he was prepared for college. He 
then matriculated at Otterbein University, Westerville, 
Ohio, from which he graduated with the class of 1891, 
taking at the same time his degree as Bachelor of 
Arts. After completing his general education. Mr. 
Jude taught in Sugar Grove Seminary, and then went 
to the University of Chicago, where he took a number 
of special post-graduate courses. The following two 
years were spent as a teacher in the same school, dur- 
ing which time he determined to follow the profession 
of law as a career, and with this end in view entered 
the law office of Green & Woodbury, prominent attor- 
neys of Jamestown, where he pursued his legal studies 
to such good purpose that he was admitted to the 
Chautauqua county bar in July, 1899. Mr. Jude had 
during this time been obliged to engage in remunera- 
tive occupations of one kind or another in order to 
pay for his tuition in the various institutions of learn- 
ing which he had attended. LIpon his admission to the 
bar, he opened a law office in Jamestown and since 
that time has been active in the general practice of his 
profession here. Mr. Jude has proven himself particu- 
larly well qualified for his legal practice and has built 
up for himself an enviable reputation, both on account 
of his ability and the high standard of professional 
ethics which he has maintained. He has now one of 
the largest clienteles in the city and handles a great 
deal of important litigation in the region. Mr. Jude 
is also active in the general life of Jamestown, and is 
a member of a number of important organizations here. 



362 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



He i? keenly interested in local politics and classes 
himself as an independent Republican, having been 
elected to a number of public offices on the ticket of 
that party. Although entirely unambitious for politi- 
cal preferment, he has held the office of judge of the 
Police Court for one term and has served on the 
Board of Education for three years. He also repre- 
sented Jamestown in the State Legislature in 1913, and 
in all these capacities has proved himself a most able 
and disinterested public servant. Mr. Jude is a mem- 
ber of Mt. Moriah Lodge. Ancient Free and Accepted 
Masons; Jamestown Lodge. Scottish Rite Masons; 
Mt. Tabor Lodge. Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows: and the Sons of St. George. 

George Washington Jude was united in marriage, 
Dec. 29. 1002, with Lyda Pearl Boardman, a daugh- 
ter of .-Mphonso M. and .Mice (Kay) Boardman, old 
and highly respected residents of Bradford, Pa. One 
child has been bom of this union, Robert Boardman, 
Nov. S. 1906. 



JARED HEWES, well known as an agriculturalist 
and man of affairs, is one of the prominent figures in 
the agricultural, industrial, business and social life of 
Chautauqua county. He has for thirty-five years been 
a director and for thirty years secretary of the Patrons' 
Fire Relief .Association of Chautauqua counti. . N. Y., 
and has seen the growth of this association from a 
small beginning to one carrying an outstanding insur- 
ance at the present time amounting to $15,931,130, 
insured on property exclusively within Chautauqua 
county. .And his identity has meant much to the 
material increase in the Order of the Patrons of Hus- 
bandry, as well as other things which he has been iden- 
tified with. 

Jared Hewes. son of Daniel H. and Abigail CIrwin) 
Hewes. was born July 23. 184S, in Chautauqua county. 
His birthplace was on the ground which was later 
occupied by the well known Chautauqua Institution. 
Hi? father, native of the East, came from Saratoga 
Springs. N. Y., and was amongst the first pioneers of 
Chautauqua county, and here became a prosperous 
farmer, stock dealer and butcher. He was prominent 
in local affairs, being a supervisor of the town of 
Chautauqua, and during the Civil War was an agent 
for the L'nited -States Government, his duty being to 
purchase horses for army service. 

In his youth, Jarcd Hewes attended the rtjmmon 
schools of his town, after which he, with his brothers, 
assisted his father in farming .Tiid the butcher busi- 
ness. The meat business in which they engaged became 
the well-known firm of Daniel H. Hewes & Sons, and 
for many years supplied people on the Chautauqua 
Grounds. When still quite a young man Jarcd Hewes 
taught school for five winter terms, and by his con- 
sistent effort he prospered, and as a result he acquired 
a farm, about f876, consisting of 50 acres of unim- 
proved land and later added lo this 150 acres. He 
cultivated and did much to develf)i> his farm, and thus 
earned the reputation of being one of the county's 
best know farmers. He remained in the pursuit of a 
farmer for a number of years, and in 1918 ^old his land 
and establi<ihrd a home at Cheney's Point on Lake 
Chautauqua. 



The Patrons' Fire Relief Association was organized in 
1S77. and he being a member of the Patrons of Hus- 
bandry insured his farm property in the association, 
the first insurance he ever carried of any kind. He 
took an active interest in this organization in connec- 
tion with his farm work, and in 1885 was elected a 
director, and in iSgo succeeded Walter C. Gilford as 
secretary. Both positions he ably filled until his retire- 
ment in 1920. While Mr. Hewes was secretary, he 
originated an accounting system for the association's 
records, which was one of the most simplified methods 
that could be employed in the large field of insur- 
ance. He devoted the greater portion of his time to 
the duties of his office, and was a regular attendant at 
the meetings of the Patrons of Husbandry, attended 
exclusively by farmers, and with them Jared Hewes 
was one of the ardent workers. He represented the 
Patrons' Fire Relief Association at the annual meet- 
ings of the New York Central Organization of Co- 
operative Fire Insurance Companies, and in igig was 
chairman of the memorial committee. As a member of 
the legislative committee of the New York State Cen- 
tral Organization, which represented one hundred 
twenty companies of the State, he did much to pro- 
mote good understanding and relations in the insur- 
ance world. Besides the foregoing activities, he was 
able to identify himself with other important inter- 
ests, being a director of the Bank of Jamestown upon 
its organization in 1903 and until his resignation in 
1920; director of Jamestown Metal Furniture Com- 
pany from its organization until the sale of this com- 
pany to the Art Metal Construction Company; an offi- 
cer in the Federal Land Bank and the United States 
Treasury Department as an appraiser of farms, with 
headfiuarters at Springfield, Mass. He was one of the 
organizers of the Chautauqua County Farm Bureau, 
the third of its kind in New York State, of which he 
served as president for five years. A Republican in 
politics, Mr. Hewes represented the town of Harmony 
in the Chautauqua County Board of Supervisors, 1890- 
189s, inclusive, succeeding Loren B. Session, who held 
the office continuously from 1873 to 1889; at numerous 
Congressional, State, and County conventions he has 
represented his party as a delegate. He was one of the 
charier members of Stedman Grange, No. 241, Patrons 
of Husliandry; the Harmony Farmers' Club, and an 
attendant of the United Brethren Church of Chau- 
tauqua. 

Mr. Hewes married, in the town of Chautauqua, 
N. Y., Dec. 2-), 1871, Lorilla Wicr, born April 17, 1846, 
in Washington county, N. Y., died in Chautauqua 
county, N. Y., April 7, 1915, daughter of Hiram and 
Maria (GifTord) Wier, both of Washington county, 
N. Y., and later of Chautauqua county. Two children 
were born to Mr. and Mrs. Hewes; i. Clara, born 
.April 23, 1873, educated in the district schools, May- 
ville High Sciiool, and Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, N. Y.; 
married Jesse F.. Ford, of Harmony, and to this union 
there are two children, Helen L., and Jared H. 2. 
Walter W., born .Sept. 23, 1875, educated in the district 
schools and Jamestown High School; married Edith 
C. Cowles, and to them were born two children. Cath- 
erine C, and Warren J. 

jared Hewes conies from a long line of descent; a 




(9^v:u . c^ . 






BIOGRAPHICAL 



363 



number of his forebears were amongst the first colon- 
ists into America, his great-grandfather, George R. T. 
Hewes, who died at the age of one Inmdred nine years 
and two months, was the last survivor of the old Bos- 
ton Tea Party, and Joseph Hewes was among the 
signers of the Declaration of Independence. 



JOHN SHIRLEY EDDY— The Eddys came to 
the town of Harmony, Chautauqua county, N. Y., 
about 1830, from Rutland county, Vt., settling on a 
farm at Watts Flats, which John Eddy bought. He 
left a son, Jonathan Eddy, born in Rutland county, Vt., 
who married Bessie B. Holbrook, born in Hamburg, 
Erie county, N. Y., and they were the parent? of John 
Shirley Eddy, who lives on, owns and cultivates the old 
homestead farm, bought from the Holland Land 
Company by his wife's father, Lucius Button. 

John Shirley Eddy was born on the farm at Watts 
Flats, town of Harmony, Chautauqua county, N. Y., 
July 1, 184s, and resides near Panama, seventy-five 
years later, a successful, substantial agriculturist. He 
was educated in the public schools of his district, and 
from youth has been familiar with farm labor and man- 
agement. He is a member of the Patrons of Hus- 
bandry, a Baptist in religious faith, and a Republican 
in politics. 

Mr. Eddy married, in Panama, Chautauqua county, 
N, Y,, Feb. 9, 1867, Mercy M. Button, born April 12, 
1847, in Panama, daughter of Lucius and Almira 
(Lamb) Button, her parents born in Rutland county, 
Vt. Mr. and Mrs. Eddy are the parents of four chil- 
dren: I. Lucius Button, born Feb. 18, 1869, married 
Bertha Sherwood, and has three children: Shirley T., 
Neta, and Ruth. 2. Eugene R., born April 3, 1878; 
married Inez Eddy, and has one child, Beth; the fam- 
ily resides in the State of Washington. 3. Martin C, 
born March 7, 1S81 : farmer and resides on the farm 
adjoining that of his father; married Eugenia Swart, 
and has four children: Edith, Dorothy, Clemons, and 
Robert. 4. Almira May, born Dec. 2, 1884; married 
W. W. Towne, and has three children: Allison Hol- 
brook, Bruce Eddy, Alma Marie Towne; they reside 
in the State of Washington. 



CHARLES EMIL ANDERSON, of the firm of 
Anderson & Drake, and one of the best known dentists 
in Chautauqua county, N. Y., where he has been in 
practice for upwards of thirty years, is a native of 
Sweden, his birth having occurred in that country, 
May 6, 1864. His childhood was passed in his native 
land, and he there began his education, attending for 
that purpose the local public schools. 

Dr. Anderson is a son of John B. and Mary Ander- 
son, and when a mere lad was brought by them to the 
United States, the family coming direct to Jamestown, 
where he continued his education and was prepared for 
college. He entered the Philadelphia Dental College 
and there took the regular course in dentistry, gradu- 
ating from that institution with the class of 18S8, and 
at the same time receiving his degree. He at once 
returned to Jamestown and formed a partnership with 
Dr. E. J. Swetland, under the firm name of Swetland 
& Anderson, and here carried on his profession with a 



high degree of success. This association continued 
uninterruptedly until the year 1915, when Dr. Swet- 
land retired from active practice. Dr. Anderson then 
took Dr. L. R. Drake as a partner and the business 
is still continued under the name of .Anderson & 
Drake. A large and high-class clientele has been 
built up by this firm, which is now recognized as one 
of the leading concerns of its kind in Jamestown, and 
Dr. Anderson is personally the possessor of an en- 
viable reputation both for ability and for the high 
standards of professional ethics maintained by him. 
Dr. Anderson has always been keenly interested in the 
general welfare of his profession, and is a member of 
the Jamestown Dental Society, the New York State 
Dental Society, and the National Dental Association. 
He is also a conspicuous figure in the general life of 
the community, and affiliated with a number of impor- 
tant organizations here, both social and fraternal, 
among which should be mentioned, the Ancient Free 
and Accepted Masons, Royal Arch Masons, Royal and 
Select Masters, Knights Templar, and Ancient Arabic 
Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. In addition to 
these Masonic bodies, he is also a member of the 
Jamestown Chamber of Commerce, and has been very 
active in promoting the general material welfare of 
the community in this capacity. His club is the Nor- 
den, which claims a large and distinguished member- 
ship among the numerous citizens of Swedish birth 
and origin in these parts. 

Dr. Anderson was united in marriage, June 26, 1889, 
at Jamestown, with Henrietta C. Johnson, a daughter 
of Gust. A. and Mary Johnson, of Jamestown. Dr. 
and Mrs. Anderson are the parents of one daughter, 
Sherleigh Anderson, who became the wife of D. H. 
Mitchell, of Santa Paula, Cal. 



T. HENRY BLACK— In reviewing the past history 
of any individual it is often necessary to touch upon 
their antecedents as bearing directly on the character 
and make-up of the person described. Thomas Henry 
Black, subject of the present sketch, is a well known 
photographer and business man of Jamestown, N. Y., 
and has been prominently identified in his profession 
for many years, being one of the leading photograph- 
ers of Chautauqua county. He numbers among his 
patronage many important personal, commercial and 
landscape subjects of the city and surrounding coun- 
try. The studio which Mr. Black conducts is known to 
be one of the oldest in the county, being in existence 
for many years before his coming to Jamestown in 
1884. Originally this building was a hotel, but in 
1871 it was remodeled into a studio, the entrance being 
directly from the side street. In those days it was 
operated by veteran photographers who made their 
own photographic plates and paper, and, in fact, Mr. 
Black has a number of valuable negatives made by 
these photographers that are marvels of workman- 
ship. These negatives depict many of the residents 
back in the early days of Jamestown's history. Mr. 
Black had his photo taken in this studio many years 
ago as a small boy in knee pants and it is treasured by 
him as a unique souvenir of photography in those days. 

Thomas Henry Black, son of Thomas and Eliza 
(Gormley) Black, is a native of Toronto, Canada, born 



364 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



Nov. 2-. IS^,-. His father came from the North of 
Ireland. likewise his mother, and it was in their native 
land that the parents of Thomas Henrj- first met. 
They were mairied in Ireland in iS6,^. and shortly 
afterwards emijn^ted to Canada, locating in Toronto. 
Thomas Black, the father, was a remarkably talented 
man in many ways, and was widely noted as a land- 
scape crardener. his services beincr freqviently sought to 
oversee the work of laying out large estates. He spent 
a number of years in Toronto, and about 1S71 he came 
to the United States, bringing with him his family, 
going direct to Titusville, Pa., during the oil excit 
ment. His brother John had preceded him there, and 
together they built a home for their respective families. 
It was while living in Titusville that Mr. Black met 
Henry Harley. then the country's oil king, and Mr. 
Harley made a flattering proposition to him to go to 
Long Point, on Chautauqua Lake, and take complete 
charge of Mr. Harley 's countn,' estate at that place. 
This commission was accepted, and in 1875 Mr. Black 
and his family became residents of Chautauqua county. 

While at Long Point, Mr. Harley gave him cartr 
bhinclu- over the entire estate and during the following 
nine years the development of horticulture and agri- 
culture made of Long Point one of the model show 
places and farms on the lake. It was here that his 
son, Thomas Henry Black, spent his early boyhood, 
and attended the district school at West Ellery, some 
considerable distance from home. In fact, it was the 
remoteness of Mr. Black's home from schooling facili- 
ties that influenced him to come to Jamestown in 1884, 
and so. with regret, his resignation was tendered to 
Mr. Harley in that year. 

The subsequent years were spent in Jamestown, with 
the exception of a short period in the South as fore- 
man over a large plantation, and in a part of this city, 
then called Dexterville, he operated a successful truck 
farm, and later managed the estate of the late Gov. 
R. E. Fenton. At the time of his death he was engaged 
by Frank Edward Gifford, president of the First Na- 
tional Bank. Honesty, simplicity and a desire to serve 
were the prevailing characteristics of this man, who by 
earnest toil carved for himself an enduring place in 
the hearts of all who knew him. His death, in 1890, 
came as an extreme loss. Thomas and Eliza (Gorm- 
ley) Black were the parents of nine children, of whom 
Thomas Henry is the only surviving one. 

Very early in life Thomas Henry Black showed a 
remarkable talent for art, and was able to sketch in 
freehand drawings objects of interest. He was never 
tired oi drawing pictures of scenery, and frequently 
adorned the blackboard in the district school with 
accurate reproductions of local scenes. In fact his 
pencil was more frequently employed in drawing pic- 
tures than in fi^ring sums, and as a result his lessons 
were frc'iuently neglected. As he grew older his 
natural talent ior drawing was augmented by his desire 
to write, and had he received proper encouragement at 
this period in life along these lines, he would have 
later 'li tingiiished hims'lf as an artist or a litterateur. 
Hi^ parents, however, had other aims in view and so 
after leaving school he went into business, drifting 
from one thing to another in quest of his ideals until 
finally he sailed into the harbor of photography, where 
he anchorf-d for life. 



.\s has been stated, his boyhood days were spent on 
the farm at Long Point. The year 1884 marked the 
real beginning of his literary life, and on March 4, 
1SS4, he began writing a diary and, remarkable as it 
may seem, kept a constant record of his life for thirty- 
five consecutive years. This practice gave him experi- 
ence in writing so that he was able to contribute to 
various newspapers and magazines. In fact he was 
the editor of the first news publication in the old 
Jamestown Union School in 1886. In 1893 he was 
interested in newspaper work and got out a creditable 
Chautauqua Lake edition to the Jamestown "Sunday 
Sun." 

Although Mr. Black never made use of his literary 
ability as an asset, he is gifted with a poetic sense and 
has written some creditable poems. These are char- 
acteristics of the man which are not generally known, 
but which serves to show his artistic and literary ten- 
dencies. 

Mr. Black's early training in his chosen profession 
was with B. E. Prudden, one of Jamestown's best 
photographers in those days. This was in 1893. In 
1S90 young Black's father died and he was left with his 
widowed mother to battle with life's problems. Dur- 
ing this time he essayed writing short stories and did 
considerable newspaper work up to the time he began 
traveling for the North American Portrait Company, 
at that time a progressive and thriving enterprise of 
Jamestown. For several years he represented this 
house on the road. In iSg,'! he made his first venture 
into business and bought out a third interest in the 
Loucks Aristotype Company, of Jamestown, N. Y. 
This company, composed of Tom, George and Will 
Loucks, manufactured printing-out paper for the use 
of photographers. Later in this same year Mr. Black 
exchanged his interest in this company for the photo 
studio which is still conducted by him. In 1895 he 
conducted a branch studio in the village of Sinclair- 
ville for over a year. In 1899 the big convention of the 
Photographers' Association of American was held at 
Celoron, N. Y.. in which Mr. Black was prominently 
identified, and he captured one of the prize's for good 
workmanship. In 1905 Mr. Black traveled extensively, 
visiting New York City, Boston, Philadelphia, and 
other large cities in quest of e.xperience in his chosen 
work. The year 1914 marks a sad period in the life 
of Mr, Black, as it was in this year he lost his mother, 
a sainted woman, whose influence for good was felt 
by all who knew her. This irreparable loss cast a 
gloom over the events immediately after, and a series 
of misfortunes attended every step. It was in the 
latter part of this year that Mr. Black ventured into 
the moving picture business while also conducting his 
photo studio, but owing to mismanagement of those 
he employed to run his moving picture business, this 
venture came to grief. This, however, taught him a 
lesson, since which time he has confined his entire time 
and attention to his photographic affairs. As a result 
he has succeeded in bringing the business to its pres- 
ent high degree of success and efficiency. 

Mr. [{lack is identified with numerous social organi- 
zations of the city, lie belongs to the Fraternal Order 
of Eagles, the Loyal Order of Moose, the Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks, and the Jamestown 
Board of Commerce. During his early life in James- 




',5/ 



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?^:j: 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



365 



town, he took an active interest in the Young Men's 
Christian Association, just then starting; and in 1886 
was confirmed in the Episcopal church, and was for 
several years librarian of the Sunday school. 

Modest and retiring in disposition, earnest and con- 
scientious in his work, it is but natural that he is get- 
ting the recognition he deserves, and future history 
will record the name of Black as among those who 
worked and won. As an example of Mr. Black's liter- 
ary efforts in his early days, the writer submits the fol- 
low poems : 

JIOONLIGHT ON CHAUTAUQUA. 

Pray come with me, those who have never tried 
The sweet enjoyment ot a moonlight ride 
Upon Chautauqua, sparkling in the light 
Of Luna, lovely Goddess of the night. 

The dipping oars so gently move the boat, 
The silver moon reflected, seems to float 
Beneath the clear calm surface of the lake 
And sheds soft radiance o'er the rippling wake. 

The quiet stillness, which o'er all prevails, 
Emhues our nature with responsive thrills. 
We're lost in thought, scarce moves the oars apace, 
And silence reigns supreme in every place. 

What are our thoughts as o'er the lake we glide. 
Surrounded by the peaceful eventide? 
Are they of love, or hate, or philosophic lore, 
Of present, future, or of days no more? 

Nay. none of these, we think of nature fair. 
More lovely far than artist's pictures rare, 
O. rapturous beauty of the silent night. 
Clothed in voluptuous robes of pale blue light. 

CHAUTAUQUA CHIMES. 

Dedicated to the Bells at Chautaqua. in the vear 1SS8, 
by T. Henry Black. 

Chautauqua Chimes, Chautauqua Chimes, 
Methinks I hear them now at times, 
Filling my soul with melody, 
Inspiring thoughts of poetry. 

Hark! in the chambers of my brain 

Again I hear that sweet refrain. 
And with it happy thoughts of yore 
Come drifting through my memory's door. 

Blissful the walks beneath the trees. 
Fanned by the cooling evening breeze. 
While clear the notes ring from the bells 
In silvery tones the cadence swells. 

AUTUMN. 

Autumn is here, the time of year 

When Dame Nature doth appear 

In a twofold character. 

Sad, though gay, she seems to say, 

I'll rejoice, then die away. 

The autumn breeze sighs through the trees 

Adorned with many colored leaves. 

Which, blown around, lie on the ground. 

In every nook and corner found. 

Rustling now beneath our feet. 

Trampled in the muddy street. 

Floating lazily through the air. 

Suggesting sadness everywhere. 

Flushed, though faded, there they lie. 

The cymbol of a summer sigh. 

The birds are gone, we miss their song 

At eventide, and at the dawn, 

As flying round from tree to tree 

They filled the air with melody. 

The crickets, too. which chirped all through 

The summer days, have bid adieu; 

Likewise the bee no more "we .'^ee. 

Nor the butterfly floating idly. 

For silence reigns throughout the land. 

Touched by autumn's withering wand. 



ABRAHAM LINCOLN GLEASON— During his 

lifetime A. Lincoln Gleason built up a high reputation as 
a breeder of pure Holstein cattle, as a dealer and ship- 
per of live stock, and as the owner of Apple Grove 
Farm, apples being a specialty with him for many 
years. He was well known far and near as a thor- 
oughly modern, progressive farmer, a reliable, ener- 
getic business man and as a man of upright life and 
high principles. He was a son of Rufus and Marie 
Etta (Northrop) Gleason, his father a farmer who 
came from Connecticut and early settled in Chautauqua 
county, N. Y. 

A. Lincoln Gleason was born at the home farm. 
Open Meadows, town of Harmony, Chautauqua coimty, 
N. Y., Aug. I, 1866, and died on a farm in the same 
town, May 21, 1920. He was educated in the public 
schools, and adopted his father's calling, beginning his 
farming and stock growing operations when a young 
man. At his death at the age of fifty-four he was the 
owner of a fine farm consisting of 250 acres of well 
improved land, his apple orchard the most extensive 
in the county. He was an enthusiastic breeder of Hol- 
steins, his pure bred nearly white cattle being a prize 
herd. He dealt heavily in live stock, and was one of 
the best known shippers in the county. Apple Grove 
Farm, named for its orchards, was equally well known 
in the produce market, the annual shipment of fruit 
being very large. Mr. Gleason was a member of the 
Patrons of Husbandry, the Methodist Episcopal 
church, and in politics a Prohibitionist. 

Mr. Gleason married, Nov. 26, 1903, at Open 
Meadows, Chautauqua county, N. Y., Johanna Peterson, 
born in Denmark, March 28, 1882, daughter of Peter 
and Johanna (Swanson) Peterson, her parents of 
Swedish birth. Children: Ellen Maryetta, born Sept. 
16, 1904; Eva Hazel, born July 25, 1906; Ethel Mar- 
tin, born March 7, 1908; Abraham Lincoln, Jr., born 
Sept. 14, 1911; John Samuel, born Feb. 21, 1913; 
Richard Norman, born Dec. 18, 1918. Mrs. Gleason 
survives her husband and continues the management 
of Apple Grove Farm. 



JOHN EVELEN CANEEN, M. D., graduate of 
the University of Buffalo, medical department, in 1883, 
has passed many years of his professional practice in 
Ripley, Chautauqua county, N. Y., even though from 
1901 to 1918 he was in medical practice in Nebraska. 
From 1887 until 1901, Dr. Caneen practiced success- 
fully in Ripley, to which place he returned in 1918 
to resume his practice. 

John Evelen Caneen is a native of New York, bom 
in Cattaraugus county, Aug. 20, 1855, the son of 
Thomas and Dollie (Cooper) Caneen. His father was 
a successful merchant, having extensive business in 
that part of the State, and the son was given good 
educational opportunities. For primary instruction he 
attended the district schools, later taking a preparatory 
course in the Rudolph Academy, and subsequently 
entering the State Normal School, from which he grad- 
uated in due course. Then he proceeded to the Uni- 
versity of Buffalo, and became an undergraduate in 
the medical department. After proper application to 
the study of medical science for the requisite period. 



;66 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



he srraduated. thus gaining the degree of Doctor of 
Medicine. That was in iS8,i. He began to practice as a 
general practitioner in that year at Cherry Creek, 
Chautauqua county. N. Y., removing to Ripley in 1S87, 
and there practicing continuously until iqoi, when he 
went to Nebraska, there engaging in professional work 
until lOlS. when he returned to Ripley and resumed 
liis practice. 

Dr. Caneen is well regarded in Ripley, and in Chau- 
tauqua county generally, and during his earlier prac- 
tice in this State had good place among his profes- 
sional confreres. He has held membership in the 
American Medical Association, the New York State 
Medical Association, the Chautauqua County, New 
York Medical Association, and the Nebraska Medical 
Association. Religiously, Dr. Caneen is a Baptist, and 
fraternally he belongs to the Odd Fellows. 

Dr. Caneen married (.first) Minerva Graham, of 
Olean. N. Y., by whom there was issue, a daughter, 
Ethel, who now is Mrs. George Mcintosh. He mar- 
ried (second) Bertha S. Stilson, of Cheiry Creek, 
Chautauqua county, N. Y., to whom also one child 
has been born, Dorothy Kathryne, who attends school 
in Ripley. 



FRANCIS GEER— At a ripe old age, Samuel Geer, 
a pioneer of the Fredonia district of Chautauqua county, 
N. Y., died, leaving a son Francis Geer, born in Fre- 
do:iia, .\pril 19, 1812, who died in Jamestown, Aug. 8, 
lb«S7. He grew to manhood at the home farm and 
attended the district school, remaining his father's assist- 
ant until coming of age, then learned the tanner's trade, 
which he followed for several years. He then located 
in Jamestown, where he learned furniture finishing and 
became an expert in that line. He was well known in 
the furniture trade, and continued in business in James- 
town until his death. He was a member of the Baptist 
church, and a Republican in politics, coming to that 
party upon the collapse of the Whig party. He was a 
man of quiet, domestic tastes, temperate in all his habits, 
never using tobacco, and was of most correct, upright, 
moral life. He is buried in Lakeview Cemetery. 

Francis Geer married, in Jamestown, Julia Marsh, 
born in Kiantonc. Chautauqua county, N. Y., daughter 
of .Asa B. and Delia f Davis) Marsh. Mrs. Geer was 
a member of the Baptist church, and a woman highly 
esteemed. She died July 16, iH'M, and is buried beside 
her husband in Lakeview Cemetery. Mr. and Mrs. Geer 
were the parents of eight children : Judson Francis, a 
Union soldier in the Civil War, who died in the army; 
ThC'dorc Orlando, also a soldier of the Union, who 
died in the service; Isadore, married Joseph Hegeman, 
both deceased, she a teacher in Jamestown prior to her 
marriase; Lester Clement, deceased; Delia Elmira, died 
agfd twelve years; Louise E., of further mention; 
Emerson E., deceased; Adalaide, a resident of James- 
town; Emma, died in youthful womanhood. 

Louise E. Geer was born in Jamestown, N. Y., where 
she was educated in the public schools, finishing with 
his;h school ({raduation. After a special course in the 
normal department, she began teaching in the Fairmount 
public =rhool; she remained here for one year. This 
wa5 follov.ed by a long term of service in the public 
schools of Jamestown, N. Y. ; this was preceded by five 



years with the school at Sinclairville, as well as a 
number of district schools. In 1888, she began her 
career as an educator in Jamestown, as principal of the 
Central School, succeeding Mrs. Ella Lakin. For thirty 
years Miss Geer continued head of Central School, 
retiring in 1917, after forty years of able, faithful 
service as an educator. The good which has come to the 
youth who have come within her sphere of influence as 
teacher and principal cannot be reputed, but her friends 
are legion, and she is rich in the love and respect of 
thousands of former pupils. 

Miss Geer continues her residence in Jamestown. She 
is a member of the County and State Teachers' Associa- 
tion and other societies, a communicant of the Baptist 
church since 1870, and a teacher in the Sunday school 
for about the same period, and an interested Christian 
worker. In 1912, she toured Europe, visiting the differ- 
ent Capitols and thoroughly enjoying the opportunities 
olTered to a lady of her culture and refinement to enjoy 
the art treasures and senic wonders of the countries 
visited. 



NORMAN R. THOMPSON— The Thompsons came 
to the town of Stockton, Chautauqua county, N. Y., at 
an early date, Abel Thompson erecting the first house in 
the town. Newell C. Thompson, son of .'\bel Thompson, 
and father of Norman R. Thompson, was born in Cen- 
tral New York, in 1811, and was brought to Stockton 
by his parents in 1813. He married Saniantha Bailey, 
and they were the parents of ten children, two of whom, 
George M. and Norman R., are now (1920) residing in 
Jamestown, N. Y. Abel Thompson, upon coming to 
Stockton in June, 1812, purchased 100 acres of lot 29, 
and 178 acres of lot 37, his land extending west beyond 
the creek and north to and including a part of the village 
of Delanti. His house was square, built of logs, with 
a split log floor. In the spring of 1813, while the snow 
was yet deep and covered with a crust, he brought his 
familv, using an ox team for the purpose. He died in 
1831. 

Newell C. Thompson, aforementioned, was a tailor by 
trade, a Republican in politics, held several town offices, 
and died in the faith of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
The children of Newell C. and Samantha (Bailey) 
Thompson were: Harriet C, became the wife of W. W. 
Seeley ; Byron W., a veteran of the Civil War, wounded 
in battle, married Louisa Bissell; Frederick; Almedia ; 
Sarali J., died young; Ella M., became the wife of 
Samuel Riddle; Mary F., became the wife of Hiram 
Hart; George M., married Harriet Miller; Eva; and 
Norman R., of whom further. 

Norman R. Thompson, son of Newell C. and Samantha 
C Bailey) Thompson, was born in the town of Stockton, 
Chautauqua county, N. Y., Sept. 10, 1837, and since 
1883 has been a resident of Jamestown, his present home 
(1920) No. 50 Allen street. He was educated in the 
district school and Westfield Academy, and after a 
short period as a farmer began teaching school, a pro- 
fession he only abandoned after teaching forty consecu- 
tive terms. In March, 1876, he was appointed by J. P. 
Wickensham, Pennsylvania Superintendent of Public 
Instruction to fdl a vacancy in the office of County 
Superintendent of Schools for Warren county, and for 
two years continue'! in that office under appointment. 




«^y^£^. ^^^tZ^^^'^^^i^^c 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



367 



He was then elected by the people for a full term and 
served until its close with efficiency and fidelity. In 
1883 he moved to Jamestown, Chautauqua county, N. 
Y., and until 1890 was engaged as a bookkeeper. In 
that year he was appointed treasurer of the city of 
Jamestown, an office he held continuously for eight 
years. In 1899 Mr. Thompson was appointed to a 
position in the office of the adjutant-general at Albany, 
N. Y., his duty the compiling of Civil War records of 
New York State men. In that capacity he compiled the 
officers' records for the work, "New Work in the Civil 
War." He remained in that position for twelve years, 
1899-1911. 

When a young man of twenty-three years, on Aug. 
21, 1S61, Mr. Thompson enlisted at Stockton in the 
Union Army to serve three years. He was mustered 
into the United States service on Aug. 30 following, as 
corporal of Company G, 49th Regiment, New York Vol- 
unteer Infantry, and went to the front. Colonel Daniel 
D. Bidwell commanded the regiment, and Captain 
Jeremiah C. Drake commanded Company G. The 49th 
was a fighting regiment, and with that command Mr. 
Thompson saw three years of strenuous military life. 
He was promoted to the rank of sergeant, Dec. 26, 1861, 
was wounded in action at the battle of Antietam, Sept. 
17, 1862, and at the battle of the Wilderness, May 12, 
1864. On July 30, 1864, he was promoted regimental 
commissary sergeant, and on Oct. 18, 1864, was honor- 
ably discharged and mustered out at Buffalo, N. Y. Two 
monuments mutely testify to the valor of the 49th, one 
on the battlefield of Gettysburg, erected by the State 
of New York, another marks the "Bloody Angle," 
erected by the survivors of the regiment near Spottsyl- 
vania Court House, Virginia, erected in 1902 by the then 
surviving members of the regiment, Norman R. Thomp- 
son being a member of the committee in charge of the 
raising of funds. The monument was dedicated on Oct. 
9, 1902. At the ceremonies attending the dedication of 
the Gettysburg monument, July 2, 1893, Mr. Thompson 
was one of the speakers. He is an official of the Forty- 
ninth Regimental Association, and in 1920 was one of 
the thirteen survivors who attended the annual reunion 
at Kennedy. N. Y. 

Mr. Thompson is a member of James M. Brown Post, 
No. 285, Grand Army of the Republic, and of the Union 
Veteran Legion. He has recently been elected quarter- 
master-general of the National Union Veteran Legion 
for the seventh time. He is also a Master Mason of 
Mount Moriah Lodge, Jamestown, and a member of 
other beneficial and fraternal orders. In religious faith 
he is liberal, and in politics a Republican. 

Mr. Thompson married, Aug. 18. 1S68, Kate F. Swift, 
daughter of Gordon and Hannah M. Swift; the former 
was born in Vermont, and the latter in Worcester, N. 
Y., but later were residents of Chautauqua county, N. 
Y., residing in Carroll and Jamestown. The only son 
of Mr. and Mrs. Thompson, Carl Gordon, born in 1870, 
died in June, 1900. 

This brief record reveals Mr. Thompson as a good 
soldier and a good citizen. He has never sought prefer- 
ment or public position, every honor which has been 
conferred upon him coming unsought. He has won the 
commendation of his superiors in office and rank, in 
peace and in war, every duty having been ably and 



honorably fulfilled. His long life has been a useful 
one and he holds the confidence and respect of all who 
know him. 



CHARLES PETER DAHLSTROM— Western 

New York, and particularly Chautauqua county, owes 
much of its prosperity to the activities of a number of 
distinguished citizens of Swedish birth or ancestry, mem- 
bers of this n'ation having settled here in large numbers 
during a considerable period. Among these distin- 
guished citizens none is better known than the late 
Charles Peter Dahlstrom, who was for many years 
identified prominently with the industrial interests of 
the community, and who as head of the Dahlstrom 
Metallic Door Company of Jamestown won a position 
high in the esteem of his fellow-citizens and did much 
to promote the material advancement of the region. 

The Dahlstrom family is of Swedish origin, and Mr. 
Dahlstrom himself was born on the Island of Gotland 
in that country, Sept. 4, 1872. He was a son of Lars 
Peter Dahlstrom, likewise a native of the Island of 
Gotland, Sweden, and a man of culture and education. 
For many years he held a high rank in the Swedish 
military organization, and acted as practical instructor 
for the army. After his retirement from this position 
he returned to his native land, to the old Ducker Farm, 
which has been in possession of the family for over 
two centuries, where he has since resided. He is a prom- 
inent member of the Swedish Lutheran church. At one 
time the elder Mr. Dahlstrom paid a long visit to his 
son in the United States, but eventually returned to 
Sweden. Lars Peter Dahlstrom married Jacobina 
Strom, and they were the parents of the following 
children: Olga, who became the wife of Captain Hjelmer 
Osterman, to whom she bore two children, Ehrich and 
Shea ; Charles Peter, with whose career we are here 
especially concerned; Andries Frederick, born in 1875, 
died in 1907; Ervid, born in 1S79, died in 1907; and 
Laura. 

Charles Peter Dahlstrom passed his- childhood in his 
native land, and attended the public schools of Gotland 
until he had reached the age of twelve years. He then 
became a student in a school of technology at Stockholm, 
where he completed his education. After graduation 
from the latter institution, he served an apprenticeship 
in the trade of tool and die-making, and immediately 
afterwards, in the year 1890, came to the United States. 
He was an exceedingly skillful mechanic and had made 
a reputation for himself for inventive genius and the 
skill he had in devising improvements on machinery 
and the construction of new mechanisms adapted to 
special uses. When he first came to this country he 
settled in Buffalo and secured employment there at his 
trade. After several years spent in that city, three of 
which were passed as an employee of the Spalding 
Machine & Screw Company, where he invented a num- 
ber of devices and took out several patents, he went to 
Chicago and worked in the same line in that city and in 
Milwaukee. His old employers, however, valued his 
services so highly that they persuaded him to return to 
Buffalo and again enter their service. Mr. Dahlstrom, 
however, was anxious to find new openings for himself, 
and after a short period with the old concern, left them 
a second time and went to Pittsburgh, where he was 



368 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



given a position witli the Westinghouse Electric & 
Maiiuiactiiring Company. While thus associated, Mr. 
Dalilitrom was brought to the attention of George 
Westinghouse, the remarkable inventor and scientist, 
and the two men formed a close personal friendship, 
which continued until the time of the former's death. 

It was in the year iSoo that Mr. Dahlstrom first came 
to Jamestown. X. Y.. and in this city he first entered 
the employ of the Art Metal Construction Company, 
with which concern he signed a live years' contract. 
During his employment by this company, Mr. Dahl- 
strom invented a metalic door, the great possibilities of 
which he was quick to realize, so that on the expiration 
of his contract he at once withdrew from his associa- 
tion with the Art Metal Construction Company and 
organized the Dahlstrom Metallic Door Company, of 
which he was the head. At first the concern was a 
small one. with a plant at Jamestown occupying but a 
single floor of the old Gokey building, but his door met 
with such instant favor among architects and builders 
that his business grew by leaps and bounds. The Dahl- 
strom Metallic Door is especially adapted for use in 
high buildings and hotels, where its fireproof qualities 
render it invaluable, since by its use fires may be con- 
fined entirely to the room in which they started, thus 
saving immense loss in life and property. It was not 
long before Mr. Dahlstrom found it necessary to in- 
crease his quarters, and with this end in view he erected 
a four-storj' brick plant on Buffalo street, Jamestown. 
At the time this building was first designed, it appeared 
adequate to the needs of the company for some years, 
yet so rapid was the increase of his business that even 
before its completion extensive additions were planned 
and begim. The Dahlstrom door has been adopted 
almost exclusively by construction companies in this 
countr>'. and an enormous number of them are now 
disposed of throughout the United States. Its advan- 
tages have recommended it beyond the confines of this 
country-, however, and it is now extensively used in 
Canada and even in Europe. The whole of this great 
growth occurred under the direct management of Mr. 
Dahlstrom himself who. up to the time of his death, 
which occurred .Xpril lo, TOOO, continued as its active 
head, and it was his genius both as an inventor and 
business man which is responsilile for the enormous 
proportions to which the concern has grown. 

Mr. Dahlstrom always took a keen interest in the 
public affairs of Jamestown, and was a Republican in 
politics, but the tremendous demands upon his time and 
cnerg>' made by the huge development of his business 
interests rendered it impossible for him to take that 
part in the general life of the community for which his 
talents and abilities so admirably fitted him. He was, 
however, exceedingly public-spirited and always dis- 
charged to the full his duties as a citizen as well as 
supporting liberally every movement undertaken for the 
public wellfare. It has sometimes been held that men 
f)05sessing unusual inventive genius lack the practical 
power necessary to market the results of that genius 
successfully, but certainly this theory has not been justi- 
fied in many American inventors who have reaped 
durins" their lives the fruit of their genius, and especially 
was it not justified in the career of Mr. Dahlstrom, 



whose invention was placed before the public so suc- 
cessfully that almost over night it became a universal 
public necessity. In addition to his inventive genius 
and to his practical grasp of affairs, Mr. Dahlstrom 
had another quality which undoubtedly played a part 
in shaping his success. He was a man of most genial 
and warm hearted personality and possessed in an un- 
usual degree the power of making and keeping friends. 
Nowhere was this ability more conspicuously shown 
than in his relations with his employees, over whom he 
exercised a most extraordinary influence. The men 
who worked in his plant felt him to be their friend and 
held him in the highest esteem and warmest aft'ection. 
On the occasion of his death they petitioned to be 
allowed to refrain from work in order to attend his 
funeral in a body, and otherwise showed the deep 
devotion which they had for him. The factory of the 
Dahlstrom Metallic Door Company was perhaps the 
most important industrial establishment in Jamestown, 
and was an important factor in the industrial develop- 
ment of the community. ]\Ir. Dahlstrom was also a 
prominent figure in the social and fraternal circles of 
the community, and was affiliated with Mt. Tabor Lodge, 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and the Jamestown 
Lodge, Knights of Pythias. In his religious belief he 
was a Lutheran and attended the First Lutheran Church 
of that denomination in Jamestown. 

Charles Peter Dahlstrom was united in marriage, 
Oct. 20, igoo, at Jamestown, with Anna Elfrida Phillips 
Petersen, like himself a native of Sweden, where she 
was born at Stockholm, March lo, 1873, a daughter of 
John Phillips and Matilda (Fagerstrom) Petersen. Mr. 
Petersen was born in Sweden. May i, 1839, and died 
Aug. 27, 1878. He was a stone mason by trade, highly 
respected in the community where he dwelt, and a prom- 
inent member of the Lutheran church there. He married, 
in 1863, Matilda Fagerstrom. born Dec. 21, 1841, died 
April 2, 1904. Mrs. Petersen was a woman of many 
virtues and was a most devoted mother and wife. Mr. 
and Mrs. Petersen were the parents of the following 
children: Augusta, who became the wife of John Burk- 
land, of Jamestown, N. Y., to whom she bore two 
children, Mar.garet and Vivian ; Anton Phillips, who 
married .A.ugusta Ax, by whom he has had two children, 
Burdette and Rose; Amanda, who became the wife of 
Charles Johnson, of Jamestown, and the mother of two 
children, Norman and Chester; Anna Elfrida Phillips, 
who became Mrs. Charles P. Dahlstrom, as mentioned 
above; and Alma, who was a nurse in the Women's 
Christian .Association Hospital of Jamestown ; she died 
April 7, 1919. These children of John Phillips Petersen, 
after coming to the United States, dropped their family 
name and are now known by their father's middle name 
of Phillips. Anna Elfrida Phillips (Petersen) Dahl- 
strom received her education at the schools of her native 
city of .Stockholm, and after coming to the L'nited 
States took a special course in English. She is a woman 
of strong Christian character, and is a prominent figure 
in the life of Jamestown, where she enjoys the highest 
esteem and regard. Mr. and Mrs. Dahlstrom became 
the parents of two children, as follows: Phyllis M;itilda 
Margarette, born July 13, nioi ; and Frederick Phillips, 
born Sept. 7, i'X)3. 




/vbC j^^c^^-^^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



369 



HERBERT B. VINCENT— Long passed from 
mortal view, Herbert B. \'incent lives in the memory 
of his many friends in Jamestown, where his widow yet 
resides. He was one of the men who, when clouds of 
war broke over our land, rallied to the defence of the 
old flag and maintained a government of free people. 
He Hved long and well, his record and his life unspotted. 
His parents, Edward F. and Lucinda (Boise) Vincent, 
resided at Warren, Pa., on a farm, finally moving to 
Hesperia, Mich., where Mr. Vincent, Sr., continued 
farming operations until his death. 

Herbert B. Vincent was born in Warren, Pa., Jan. 3, 
1836, and died in Jamestown, N. Y., Feb. 14, 1905. He 
was educated in the public schools of the district, and 
upon arriving at a suitable age learned the harness- 
maker's trade, worked at it several years, and established 
a business of his own. Later he sold out and moved to 
Spottsylvania Court House, Va.. where he purchased 
a farm which he operated for five years. He traded 
off his Virginia property for a farm in McKean county. 
Pa., locating there, where he remained for five years. 
Here he "struck oil." He then traded this farm and 
oil field for a farm in Chautauqua county. He lived in 
Jamestown one year, then went to the farm for four 
years, after which he moved back to Jamestown and 
retired, residing there until his death. 

Mr. Vincent enlisted in Company I, 109th Regiment, 
New York Volunteer Infantry, Dec 2, 1S61, serving 
under Captains A. W. Alvord and S. R. Jones, Colonels 
B. F. Tracy, and Coxlen, the regiment part of the 1st 
Brigade, 3rd Division, gth Army Corps, Army of the 
Potomac. Until April, 1864, Mr. Vincent was on guard 
duty, later was engaged at the battles of the Wilderness, 
Spottsylvania, Ann River. Cold Harbor, Bethesda 
Church, Petersburg, Welden railroad. Reams Station, 
Hatcher's Run, and witnessed the surrender of General 
Lee, April 9, 1865. On May 31, 1865, he was trans- 
ferred to Company I, 51 st Regiment, New York Inlan- 
try, Capt. W. W. Hatch, Col. J. J. Wright, and was 
mustered out June 3, 1865. He was held at Washington, 
D. C, and at Alexandria, Va., on special service, 
finally receiving honorable discharge at Alexandria, July 
25, 1865. All his after life Mr. Vincent retained a lively 
interest in his war comrades and was long a member of 
McKean Post, No. 347, Grand Army of the Republic 
of Smethport, Pa. He was also a member of the 
Masonic order, and the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks. He is buried in Lakeview Cemetery. 

Mr. Vincent married, April 17, 1859, Julia A. Ogden, 
born June 9, 1839, in Apalachin, Tioga county, N. Y., 
daughter of Isaac and Julia (Jewett) Ogden, who yet 
survives her husband, residing in Jamestown, active 
and well preserved, her friends many and devoted to 
her. Children : i. William, born Aug. 23, i860, died Nov. 
24, 1864, 2. Susan E., born Feb. 23, 1863 ; married, 
April 2, 1883, at Jamestown, J. A. Yerdon, and has a 
son, Herbert B. 3. Robertine, born Aug. 16, 1865; 
married, June 17, 1890, Daniel Bacon, and has three 
children : Ivan Julia, born Sept. 4, 1892 ; Ellen, born Oct. 
21, 1893, died Oct. 16, 1918; and Margaret, born Jan. 22, 
1905. 4. Willard E., born Nov. 13, 1875, now engaged in 
the drug business in Buffalo, N. Y. ; married Clemen- 
tine Crum, of Indianapolis, Ind. 5. Edith, bom Sept. 



I, 1877, died Sept. 17, 1877. 6. Earl R., born March 
18, 1879; married Grace Waller, and resides in Indian- 
apolis, Ind. He has one daughter Margarett. 



DANIEL A. SULLIVAN, who was for many years 
one of the most prominent figures in the lumber interests 
of Chautauqua county, N. Y., and whose death at his 
home in Jamestown, May 17, 1904, was felt as a severe 
loss by the entire community, was a native of County 
Cork, Ireland, where his birth occurred April 12, 1863, a 
son of Michael and Susan Sullivan. He was but two 
years of age when his parents removed with him to 
England and settled in the town of Olewitch, where they 
made their home for about four years. They had in the 
meantime, however determined to come to the United 
States, and in 1869 set sail for this country, and after a 
long voyage reached the port of New York City. It is 
probable that their destination had already been deter- 
mined upon before leaving England, as they did not 
tarry in the metropolis, but came on at once to the 
city of Salamanca, N. Y., where they have since made 
their home. 

Daniel A. Sullivan was but six years of age at that 
time, and his childhood and early youth were spent at 
Salamanca, where he attended the local public schools 
and obtained his education. He was still young, how- 
ever, when he gave up his studies and went to the 
village of Red House and there secured employment 
with Daniel Griswold, who was one of the pioneer lum- 
bermen of the region. Mr. Sullivan was sent to work as 
a woodman in this region, and for a time worked in 
that capacity for Mr. Griswold. He was exceedingly 
ambitious, however, to become independent in business, 
but realized that further education would be a valuable 
asset to him before embarking on an enterprise of his 
own. Acordingly, he became a member of Mr. Gris- 
wold's household in Jamestown and there attended the 
high school until he had qualified himself as a teacher. 
Mr. Sullivan then was appointed to take charge of a 
school near his old home at Salamanca, and taught in 
that institution for one year. He was keenly interested 
in his profession and decided to study further in order 
to perfect himself in that line. About this time, how- 
ever, his attention was forcibly called to the great oppor- 
tunities offered by the lumber business, and by the time 
he had completed his course of study at the Fredonia 
Normal School, Fredonia. N. Y., he had practically 
decided to take up this occupation. For two years he 
rafted lumber for a Mr. Quinn on the Allegheny river, 
below Corydon, transporting the rough logs down that 
stream to the southern market, where he disposed of 
them for his employer. During this time he made the 
acquaintance of Mr. Robert Carson, of Randolph, and 
entered his employ, opening for him a general store 
at Quaker Bridge. He also looked after the lumber 
interests of Mr. Carson, and continued thus occupied 
until the spring of 1893, making his home at Quaker 
Bridge in the meantime. In that year, however, he 
severed his connection with his employer and came to 
Jamestown, N. Y. Here he formed a copartnership 
with C. A. Breed and D. D. Hazeltine, under the name 
of the Union Lumber Company, and began operations 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



here. In tlie year 1S94 Messrs. Breed and Hazeltine 
retired from the business, leaving Mr. Sullivan the sole 
proprietor thereof, who continued it under the old name 
until 1S07. He then admitted M. D. Stone into the con- 
cern as a partner, who remained with him until 1903, 
after which Mr. Sullivan became once more the sole 
proprietor of the company. His business developed to 
large proportions under his exceedingly capable manage- 
ment, and he was regarded as one of the most sub- 
stantial citizens of Jamestown, his home there, which 
was situated at Xo. 314 West Fifth street, being one of 
the handsomest in the place. He was very active in 
the general life of the community, and was especially 
prominent in Masonic circles, being a member of all 
the Masonic bodies in the city. He was also affiliated 
with the Jamestown Club, and was a director of the 
bank in Jamestown for many years. The Masonic 
bodies with which Mr. Sullivan was connected were 
as follows : Mt. Moriah Lodge, Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons ; Western Sun Chapter, Royal 
.Arch Masons : Jamestown Council. Royal and Select 
Masters; Jamestown Commandery, Knights Templar; 
Ismailia Temple, .Vncient Arabic Order Nobles of the 
Mystic Shrine; Buffalo Consistory, Sovereign Princes 
of the Royal Secret; and the Jamestown Lodge of Per- 
fection. He was also a member of Jamestown Lodge, 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 

Daniel .A. Sullivan was united in marriage. May 0, 
18SS, with Mary Elizabeth Grunder, of Warren, Pa., and 
they became the parents of two children; Irene S., who 
resides at the family home at Jamestown, and Paul 
Revere, who is mentioned at length below. Mr. and 
Mrs. Sullivan were members of the Presbyterian church, 
and are buried in Lakeview Cemetery here, the death 
of the latter occurring Feb. 27, 1919. 

Paul Revere Sullivan, only son of Daniel A. and 
Mary Elizabeth (Grunder) Sullivan, was born at James- 
town. Dec. 4, 1894. He attended as a lad the public 
schools of this city, and later the Military .'\cademv at 
Poughkecpsie, N'. Y., from which he was graduated with 
the class of 1914. He then took a commercial course 
at the Bryant & Stratton's Business College at Buffalo, 
upon completing which he returned to Jamestown, 
whore he became interested in the automobile business. 
He continued in thi.? line until the entrance of the United 
States into the great World War, when he enlisted as 
a m'-mber of the Reserve Force Aviation Service, con- 
nected with the United States navy. He served therein 
until the close of the war, when he was retired with 
the rank of cnsipi. Upon receiving his honorable dis- 
chari;c, Mr. Sullivan reentered the automobile business 
and has already met with considerable success in this 
line. He is a Presbyterian in his religious belief and 
attends the church of that denomination in Jamestown. 

Paul Revere Sullivan married. May 10, 1919, at 
Jamestown, Ursula Jones, a daughter of Cyrus E. 
and Mary fBcebe) Jones, old and highly respected 
residents of Jamestown. 

.■\t the time of the death of Daniel A. Sullivan, there 
was printed a Ion? obituary article dealing with his 
life, in the course of which the following appears: 

A I Ih^ llmo of bin 'Ir;ath ho w-ih at the hfia'J of thfi 
Vnlon I..ijrnber Company an'I hlH bunlniBs .iMIIiIik won 
for him a rfjcojcnlze'l plarc amontf the lumhcr f]<;iI(,rH 
of ih<; country, .lu«t an'I honorahlo In hl« <l<;allnK«, 



grenerous and considerate to associates, gentle and 
kind-hearted in his family relations, his death will 
he regretted by all who knew liim, and his family will 
have the sympathy of the community In their great 
bereavement. 



JOHN H. TOUSLEY— Among the prominent busi- 
ness men and merchants of Jamestown, Chautauqua 
county, N. Y., the name of John H, Tousley, whose 
death occurred Aug. 3, 1909, stands high. Mr. Tousley, 
who had nearly completed his seventy-ninth year at the 
time of his death, was a native of Madison county, N. 
Y., his birth occurring in the town of Morrisville, Dec. 
28, 1827. The family is of old New England stock, and 
Mr. Tousley's father, William Tousley, was a native 
of Connecticut and came to New York State in early 
manhood. He located at Morrisville, Madison county, 
where he followed the occupation of farming and was 
also a successful blacksmith until the close of his life. 
He married Charlotte Houghton, a daughter of John 
Houghton, who came from England as a young man 
and settled in this country before the Revolution. John 
Houghton was impressed in General Burgoyne's army, 
but eventually escaped and joined the Colonial troops 
and supported the American cause to the end of that 
momentous struggle. William Tousley and his wife 
were the parents of six children, the youngest of whom 
was John H., of whom further. 

John H. Tousley passed his childhood and early youth 
in his native town of Morrisville. and as a lad attended 
the local district schools, but abandoned his studies at an 
early age in order to learn the trade of carpenter, which 
he continued to follow until 1855. In that year he 
opened a bakery and confectionery store at Rush ford, 
N. Y., but in 1864 removed from that town to James- 
town, where he engaged in the wholesale and retail 
bakery and confectionery business, opening an estab- 
lishment on East Third street. For a quarter of a 
century thereafter Mr. Tousley was successfully engaged 
in that business, and built up one of the largest estab- 
lishments of its kind in the entire region. He enjoyed 
an enviable reputation for integrity and fair business ■ 
methods, and was one of the leading figures in the busi- 
ness world here. 

John H. Tousley was united in marriage, Jan, 16, 
1855, with Mary Elizabeth Parker, a native of Rushford, 
N. Y. Mr. and Mrs. Tousley celebrated their golden 
wedding, Jan. 16, 1905; the following 6th of December 
Mr. Tousley died. Mrs. Tousley survived her husband 
for a number of years, her death occurring Sept. 26, 
191 7. She was prominent in the social circles of the 
city, and was a member of St. Luke's Episcopal Church. 
Mr. and Mrs. Tousley were the parents of three child- 
ren, as follows: I. Charles, who died at La Junta, 
Colo., and who married Adeline Furlow, by whom he 
had one child, Doris. 2. John H., a successful merchant 
in Jamestown, where he married Mayme McGinn, by 
whom he has three children: John M., Howard J., and 
Laurence Charles. 3. Ruth C, who is well known as a 
public school teacher in Jamestown, where she has 
t;ingli( for more than thirty-six years. 



EDWARD E, DUFFEE— .\ man of varied experi- 
enr<-, having been engaged in a great many widely diver- 
gent lines of business, lidward E. Duffee is what might 




"T 



^^rr^y^ 



:V.. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



371 



be truly called a self-made man. From his boyhood up 
to the present time, his life has had very little playtime 
in it, for as soon as one occupation came to an end, 
another was at once adopted to take its place. 

Edward E. Duffee, was bom in Buckley, Schuylkill 
county. Pa., April 30, 1853, his parents. Neil Duffee and 
his wife, Nancy (Schmidt) Duffee, living in the oil field 
regions at that time, his father being actively engaged 
in oil production. Neil Duffee is now deceased, as is 
also his wife. 

Edward E. Duffee was given a good common school 
education, attending both grammar and high schools in 
Oil City, Pa., until sixteen years old. though he did not 
graduate from the high school. His first step on the 
business ladder was as clerk in the general department 
store of Shcppard. Son & Stone Company, where he 
continued for seven years. He then became interested 
in oil and in 1878 started prospecting and operating in 
that line in Clarion county, Pa., later going to McKean 
field, continuing in the oil business from 1888 to 1891. 
In December, 1891, he went to Jamestown and opened a 
dr>' goods store in the Broadhead block. No. 16 South 
Main street, remaining there until 1899, when he moved 
to the New Arcade. Eighteen months later he moved 
again to the White block, where he carried on his busi- 
ness until igo6; then Mr. Duffee sold out and moved 
to Pittsburgh, going into the real estate business. In 

1907 he returned to Jamestown, and in the spring of 

1908 started to operate the Excelsior Furniture Com- 
pany, having built the factory for that purpose. After 
some time spent in this occupation, he sold his interests 
in the furniture line and bought a half interest in the 
dry goods business of Charles Samuels ; seventeen 
months later he bought the other half, conducting the 
business alone. This proved very satisfactory, but a 
short time after the transfer was effected, the building 
caught fire and he was burned out. Three months later 
business was resumed, only to be destroyed by another 
fire in less than a year. But, like the Phoenix, Mr. 
Duffee's business arose from the ashes, and on Dec. 15, 
igio, he opened his present store, the E. E. Duffee dry 
goods, cloaks, suits, carpets and drapery business, which 
has proven to be a most successful concern. Mr. Duffee 
is a Republican in political faith, and is interested in 
the work of his party, though he has seldom held any 
public office. At one time he was a member of the 
School Board, from 1906 to 1909. He is a Free Mason 
having passed through all degrees up to the thirty-second, 
and is a Knights Templar. In religion Mr. Duffee is 
a Presbyterian, he and his family attending that church. 

Edward E. Duffee married Ella E. Vossard, in Oil 
City, Jan II, 1887. They have four children: I. Oppo, 
now the wife of W. G. Eckman. 2. Floss G., who 
married William Gokey, Jr. 3. Fleda F., living at home. 
4. Diege D., also at home. Mrs. Duffee is a very efficient, 
capable woman, and in addition to the care of her home 
and family, assists her husband in the store, the business 
having grown so large as to require constant supervision 
by one or the other of them. Mr. Duffee is ranked 
among the successful men of Jamestown. 



Anderson, who has been for many years one of the most 
prominent farmers of the district and a man who, 
through his long career, has earned the high esteem and 
admiration of his associates and the community-at- 
large. Mr. .Anderson is a son of Edwin and Catherine 
Ann (Crosby) Anderson, the former a farmer at Elling- 
ton, and a native of that place, where his birth occurred 
April 7, 1858. .As a lad he attended the high school at 
Chamberlain, N. Y., and upon completing his studies at 
that institution took up the occupation of farming which 
he has followed ever since with a high degree of suc- 
cess. Mr. Anderson is also interested in the financial 
affairs of Ellington and Jamestown and is affiliated 
with the Jamestown National Bank. He takes a keen 
interest in local politics and is a strong supporter of the 
Republican party, of which he has been a member for 
many years. He is a member of the local grange and is 
well known as having done much to promote the farm- 
ing interests of the community. In his religious belief 
Mr. Anderson is a Methodist. 

James Brace .Anderson was united in marriage. June 
18, 1884, at Salamanca, N. Y., with Cora Sarah Ewing, 
a native of that city, where her birth occurred Oct. 
-"■ 1857. Mrs. Anderson is a daughter of Henry and 
.Augusta Loraine (Willis) Ewing. Mr. and Mrs. Ander- 
son are the parents of the following children : .Archi- 
bald, born Feb. 22, 1887, and died July 26. 1896; Sada 
Loraine, born Aug. 27, 1889; Harriett Louise, born 
March 19, 1892; Frank K. Henry, born Dec. 24, 1897, 
enlisted, Dec. 24, 1917, in Company I, 4th Regiment of 
Infantry, in the regular army of the United States, and 
served until May 28, 1919, with the .American Expedi- 
tionary Force in France, a period of fourteen months 
in all, during which he saw action in three great battles 
of the war; and Emmons Edwin, born Oct. 30, 1901. 



JAMES BRACE ANDERSON— There is no figure 
better known in the agricultural world of Ellington, 
Chautauqua county, N. Y., than that of James Brace 



DELMAR T. FREDRICKSON, president of the 
Fredrickson Brothers Veneer Mill, Basket Factory and 
Saw Mill, was born in Stockton, N. Y., June 6, 1888. 
He was a son of .Alfred D. and Matilda (.Anderson) 
Fredrickson. Alfred D. Fredrickson is a farmer and a 
strong ally of the Prohibition party. Three sons have 
been bom to Mr. and Mrs. Fredrickson : Delmar T., 
of further mention ; Paul W. ; Albin L., whose sketch 
follows this work. 

Delmar T. Fredrickson was educated in the grammar 
and high schools of his native place. After leaving 
school he served an apprenticeship to the plumber's 
trade at Buffalo, N. Y., later going to Kane. Pa., where 
he was employed in a glass factory for a short period. 
He then became associated with Charles .A. Hall, who 
owned a large steam power plant for basket making. In 
1912. together with Otto S. Bussing, Mr. Fredrickson 
bought this mill and the business was continued until 
1919, when Paul W. Fredrickson and .Albin L. Fred- 
rickson, brothers of Delmar T. Fredrickson, bought the 
Bussing buildings and added them to the already exten- 
sive plant, making this one of the largest enterprises of 
its kind in Chautauqua county. Logs are bought from 
nearby woodlands and the entire process of the making 
of the fruit baskets is done at this plant, where 85 men 
and girls are employed for this purpose. In politics Mr. 
Fredrickson is a Republican, and is a member of the 
Stockton School Board. He affiliates with the Inde- 



37^ 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



pendent Order of Odd Fellows, and is a member of the 
First Baptist Church, of Stockton, of which he is also 
a trustee. 

On Sept. ;:5. 1015. Mr. Fredrickson married Pearl L. 
Johnson, of lohnsonburg. Pa., and they are the parents 
of one child. Lillian O. 



ALBIN L. FREDRICKSON, vice-president of 
Fredrickson Brothers \eneer Mill, Basket Factory and 
Saw Mill, is a native of Stockton. N. Y., where his hirth 
occurred Jan. 31. 1800. Mr. Fredrickson is the son of 
Alfred D. and Matilda (.Anderson) Fredrickson. 

The education of Albin L. Fredrickson was obtained 
in the schools of his native place, and after graduating 
from the Stockton High School he secured a position in 
the basket factor)- of Charles Hall, but remained there 
for a short time only, going thence to Jamestown- N. 
Y., where he served an apprenticeship as a metal cabinet- 
maker in the .\rt Metal Construction Company. He 
next established himself in the business of basket mak- 
ing and was thus engaged until July 10, iQlS, wdien he 
enlisted in the United States Army. After being at 
Camp Dix for a month he sailed for France with Com- 
pany H, 346th InfantTT.-. After eight months of service 
he returned to the United States and received his 
honorable discharge at Camp Upton, April II, 1919. 
Upon his return to Stockton he became associated with 
his brothers, Delmar T., and Paul W., in Fredrickson 
Brothers Basket Factory and was made vice-president 
of the organization. Albin L. Fredrickson is a man of 
good judgment and business foresight, and he has done 
much towards making this enterprise one of the largest 
of its kind in this region. Although possessed of wide 
popularity and the respect and esteem of his fellow- 
citizens. Mr. Fredrickson has not taken any prominent 
part in local affairs nor has he entered politics. He 
affiliates with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows 
and with Lodge No. 851, Free and Accepted Masons. 

On Nov. 15, 1919, Mr. Fredrickson was united in 
marriage with Ellen Unsworth, of Jamestown, N. Y. 



REV. JOHN EMMANUEL HILLBERG— Since 

November, 1^52, the date of its organization, the First 
Swedish Methodist Church of Jamestown, N. Y., has 
had twenty settled pastors, the first. Rev. Olof Hamrin, 
scTving the church from June, 1853, until July, 1834, 
the rule of the itinerancy then limiting a pastor's term 
to one year. The twentieth pastor of the church 
preached his first sermon to the congregation in October, 
1917, succeeding Rev. Eric Philip Swan, who was pastor 
from 1912 to 1917. The founder of the church. Pastor 
O. G. Hc-dstrom, watched over the little congregation 
until the arrival of its first stationed pastor. Rev. Olof 
Hamrin. A history of the church published in the 
Swedish language in 1912, commemorating its sixtieth 
birthday, gives photographs of its first nineteen pastors, 
and of the first six all arc dead except the fourth, T'tcv. 
Bongt .■Xiigu'.t Carls'u, who served the church from 
October 18''/). until iHOj. He is now living in Stockholm, 
Sweden, and is in his eighty-seventh year. The present 
paitor, R»",-. John E. Hillberg, is a graduate of the 
South'rn .Academy in Stockholm, Sweden, and of 
Evanifon Theological Seminary, Evanston, III., his 
pastoral work beginning in New York in iHij^, was 



broken by a term of five years as professor, and one of 
six years as editor-in-chief of a religious journal 
"Sandebudet" (The Messenger). Since his return to 
the ministry in 1917, he has served the First Swedish 
Methodist Episcopal Church of Jamestown with great 
acceptability. 

The first church building erected by the First Church 
was begun in 1S57, on Centre street, and was dedicated 
to the service of God. Jan. i, i860. A Sunday school 
was organized in 1872, and in 189S that church building 
was removed to Chandler street, rebuilt, and on Sept. 
15 of that year was re-dedicated. In iSgo the present 
beautiful structure was finished and dedicated, and in 
1804 the present parsonage, the third in order, was 
erected. In 1919 a "Memorial Hall" was added to the 
property as a meeting place for the returning soldiers. 
It is a beautiful room. Seventy-eight men had stars on 
the service flag of the church. Three stars turned 
golden. The church is finely furnished, and in all 
respects a worthy home for the large congregation it 
accommodates, the present membership being 700. 

Rev. John E. Hillberg, twentieth pastor of the First 
Swedish Methodist Episcopal Church of Jamestown, 
"Forsta Svencka Metodist Forsamlingen," was born in 
Malmkoping, Sweden, Dec. 9, 1S73, son of Rev. John 
and Emma Ulrika Oscaria (Molin) Hillberg, his father 
a clergyman. John E. Hillberg attended the public 
schools of Gothenburg and Stockholm, Sweden, and is 
a graduate of Southern Latin Academy, in Stockholm. 
He then spent two years at the Institute of Technology 
in Stockholm, and three years with an engineering firm 
in the same city, coming to the L'nited States in 1892. 
After coming to this country he studied for the ministry, 
and in 1895 was graduated from the Theological Semi- 
nary, Evanston, III. He was ordained a minister of the 
Methodist Episcopal church in 1896, became a member 
of The New York East Conference, and began pastoral 
work in New York State in 1895. His first charge was 
at Mt. \'ernon, N. Y.. and between 1895 and 1906 he 
was pastor in charge of Mt. Vernon, Bridgeport, Conn., 
and Brooklyn, N. Y., at that time the largest Swedish 
church in the denomination. 

In 1906 he accepted a professorship in Swedish Theo- 
logical Seminary, Evanston, III., and until 191 1 filled the 
chairs of history and languages at that institution. He 
then resigned to accept a position as editor-in-chief of 
the Swedish religious paper, "Sandebudet" (The 
Messenger), a post he ably filled until 1917, when he 
returned to the active ministry and was appointed to the 
pastorate of the First Swedish Methodist Episcopal 
Church of Jamestown. The churcli has progressed 
under his leadership, and each department is faithfully 
prosecuting its especial line of work. 

Rev. John E. Hillberg married, in Worcester, Mass., 
Jime 7, 1807, Hannah Christine Lundgren, daughter of 
John and Edla Christine Lundgren. They have an 
adopted daughter, Emma Louise, born in Sweden, Nov. 
30, 191 1. During the summer of 1920, Rev. Hillberg 
visited Sweden in the capacity of speaker for the Choral 
Club of Chicago, then touring abroad. King Gustav 
then conferred upon him the Knighthood of the Order 
of Vasa. During the war he also paid a visit to said 
country at the invitation of the government of Sweden. 
Hf served our co\mtry in the World War as speaker 
on the Bureau of I'liblic lnformatir)n. 




o^^ 



~^^^'y'z^''^'7'A^ c2^t^'^ 





AycJ/^ ^^. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



v?y 



AXEL E. ANDERSON— As Jamestown is a center 

for manufacturing, it follows naturally that shoe stores 
in plenty may be found there. Among them is the shoe 
emporium of Axel E. Anderson, at No. io8 Main street. 
For more than twenty years Mr. Anderson has en- 
deavored to keep the feet of the Jamestown people 
comfortable and trimly fitted with foot-covering, and 
that he has met with considerable success may be taken 
as a fact as he was compelled to move from the 
original place of business to a more commodious loca- 
tion a few years ago. 

Mr. Anderson is a Swede by birth, but as he has lived 
in this country ever since his infancy his interests are 
all American. Born Feb. I, 1871, in Sweden, the child 
met with a serious misfortune when only two weeks old, 
his father dying at that time. His mother came to the 
United States with her baby, and having married for 
the second time, the boy became known by the name of 
his step-father, Anderson. His early education was 
obtained at the village school of EUery, N. Y., taking a 
course afterwards at the business college at Jamestown. 
During the time he attended school young Anderson 
worked at whatever his hands found to do, having a 
morning paper route, delivering goods, etc. 

When nineteen years of age the young man obtained 
regular employment in the shipping department of the 
Jamestown Lounge Company, remaining with them five 
years, and in 1S94 went with the Jamestown Desk Com- 
pany, also as shipping clerk. A year later he accepted 
a position with the Chautauqua Steamboat Company, 
but after two years with that company he entered the 
shoe store of J. F. Peterson as salesman. For four 
years he continued in Mr. Peterson's employ and then, 
having learned the business, Mr. Anderson started a 
shoe store of his own at No. 305 Main street. For three 
years he conducted this alone, then the business having 
grown rapidly, he felt the need of assistance, so in 
1901 formed a partnership with Charles Sandburg. This 
was a most satisfactory arrangement, continuing for 
several years, but the trouble on the Mexican border 
requiring the services of the National Guard, necessitated 
the departure of Mr. Sandburg for the scene of action, 
he being a member of the guard. Mr. Anderson bought 
out his partner's share in the business and continued it 
alone. Later Mr. Sandburg volunteered in the United 
States army for the term of the World War, his rank 
being that of major. Mr. Anderson was at that time 
occupying his present quarters at No. 108 Main street, 
having moved there after Mr. Sandburg entered the 
firm in 1901. He has the agency for the Stetson shoe, 
also the Justright shoe. 

Mr. Anderson's political principles are those of the 
Republican party, though he does not trouble himself 
greatly with the trials and worries of politics. In 
religious belief he is a Baptist, being clerk of the First 
Baptist Church of Jamestown. He is afiiliated with the 
local lodge of the Order of Maccabees. 

.Axel E. Anderson married, in Jamestown, Dec. 29, 
1892, Edith May Kingman, of that city, the daughter 
of J. Frank Kingman. To Mr. and Mrs. Anderson 
two children were bom; i. Grace Margaret, who was 
educated in the public schools of Jamestown, later taking 
a course in elocution at the University of Syracuse. 
At the present time she assists her father in the shoe 
store. 2. Wilton H., also educated in the public schools 



of Jamestown and afterward went to the University of 
Illinois, serving in the Student's Training Corps there. 
The young man's ambition is to enter Colgate Univer- 
sity at Hamilton, N. Y. 

As a citizen Mr. Anderson is highly respected ; as 
a business man he has the confidence of his customers, 
and he is a devoted husband and father. 



H. RALPH WILLSE, M. D., graduate in medicine 
of the Buffalo University, and for the last eighteen years 
a well regarded and successful medical practitioner in 
Westheld, Chautauqua county, N. Y., and widely known 
throughout that section of the county, was born at 
South Columbia, Herkimer county, N. Y., Nov. 30, 
1875. the son of Dr. Hudson G. and Frances (Vrooman) 
Willse. His father, Dr. Hudson G. Willse, is one of the 
oldest practicing physicians in Western New York, and 
is still in active practice at North Bay, N. Y., notwith- 
standing that he is now more than seventy years old. 
Dr. Hudson G. Willse is also a graduate in medicine 
of Bufi^alo University, and it is noteworthy that his 
entry into medicine came by his own resolute determi- 
nation, for he had to work his way through Buffalo 
University, graduating in 1883. 

His son, H. Ralph Willse, in due course attended for 
primary instruction the public schools of his native 
place, and later became a student at the New Berlin, 
N. Y., High School, graduating therefrom in 1893. 
To prepare himself further for academic credits when 
he ultimately took up the study of medicine, he took 
post-graduate high school work for a while at Richfield 
Springs, N. Y., but in 1896 he entered Buffalo University 
as a medical student, and like his father also worked 
his way through without outside assistance, and in 1900 
was creditably placed among the graduates in medicine 
of that year, receiving in due course the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine. For one year prior to graduation 
he was connected with a hospital, observing much 
clinical work, and for one year after gaining his degree 
he was resident physician of the Emergency Hospital, 
of Buffalo. He was thus well fitted by actual experi- 
ence in extensive and varied practice to enter confidently 
into private practice, and as a general medical practi- 
tioner he opened an office in Westfield, Chautauqua 
county, N. Y., in 1901. Since that year he has been in 
constant practice in that neighborhood, and now has a 
very extensive practice. Dr. Willse is a member of 
many professional organizations, of County, State, and 
National operation ; his college fraternity is the Alpha 
Omego Delta ; and he is a member of the Dunkirk 
branch of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, 
and of the Westfield encampment of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows. Politically, Dr. Willse is a Re- 
publican, but he gives his time and thought to pro- 
fessional matters and not to political. 

His wife, whom he married in Westfield, N. Y., April 
21, 1903, was Lillian Day, daughter of Professor Day, 
a well known educator in Canada, and founder of a 
noted school, the Day Institute, in Toronto, Canada. 
Dr. and Mrs. Willse have three children: Hudson Day, 
born Jan. 26, 1904; .Allen Ray, born Jan. 6. IQ05; 
Lillian Edith, born April 7, 1908. The family attend the 
Presbyterian church at Westfield. and Dr. and Mrs. 
Willse take appreciable part in community affairs. 



374 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



ARCHIBALD D. FALCONER— The family and 
village of Falconer have been closely associated for 
many years, the village being named in honor of the 
family which was foimded in Chautauqua county, N. 
v.. by Robert Falconer, a Scotch gentleman of means, 
who arrived in Jamestown in 1S17. He is remembered 
in the Lake Chautauqua region by the steamer, "Robert 
Falconer." which was one of the earliest steamboats to 
be launched on the lake, and he was the man responsible 
for the coming of the first Swedes to Jamestown. His 
kind heart led him to adopt two little Swedish girls 
whom he found with their parents in Buffalo, and after 
they were safely sheltered in his home in Sugar Grove, 
Pa., he brought their parents there and found Ihem 
empIoNTTient. This family attracted others and from the 
little Sugar Grove settlement came the two women who 
were the first actual Swedish settlers of Jamestown. 
.\rchibald D. Falconer, a twentieth century representa- 
tive of the family, is a grandson of Robert Falconer, 
and a son of William Falconer, whose business life was 
spent in Kennedy in the town of Poland, Chautauqua 
county, N. Y. 

Rol^ert Falconer was born at Inveraven, Scotland, 
Dec. 22. 1780. and died at Sugar Grove. Pa., Oct. 2^, 1852, 
scion of an ancient and honorable Scottish clan. He 
spent years of his minority in Scotland, and in the year 
1800 he was graduated from .Aberdeen University, his 
object being to pursue a professional career in his na- 
tive land. Having wealth at his disposal, he decided to 
visit the L'nited States, and he is first found located in 
New York City, where he traded in cotton, shipping to 
Liverpool and Glasgow raw cotton, his shipinents be- 
ing filled from Charleston, S. C. and New York City. 
The War of 1812 seriously interfered with his ship- 
ments, and after his marriage he retired from the cot- 
ton business and came to Western New York, arriving 
in Jamestown in 1817. Shortly afterward he took up a 
large tract of land at Sugar Grove. Pa., but in 1819 he 
came again to Jamestown and settled on the property 
purchased two years earlier. Jamestown was his home 
for ten years, and during that period he became identi- 
fied with several enterprises, notably lake navigation, 
and one of the earlier steamboats bore his name. 

In i82'>. Robert Falconer moved to Warren, Pa., 
where he engaged in banking, becoming the first presi- 
dent of the Lumbermans' Bank of Warren. He remained 
in Warren until 1840, then went to Sugar Grove, where 
•he last ten years of his life were spent. He was a 
man of kindly heart, strong, upright character, and one 
of the valued citizens of his day. He married, in 1812, 
F.liza F.lliot, who died in 1810, leaving three sons, 
Robert, Patrick, and William T. Robert, the eldest, 
located in Sugar Grove, Pa., where he became a prom- 
inent lumberman. Patrick, the second, became a lawyer 
and wa'i a mcrnber of the law firm of Hazeltinc & Fal- 
coner. In 1843. his father needing his assistance in the 
mansK'-ment of his business enter[)ris(f. Patrick Falconer 
alrandoned law practice, and until his death in Falconer, 
F'b 17. 1887, he was identified with the business interests 
of thr village and of Jamestown. 

William T. Falconer the young'st son of Rfjbcrl and 
F.liza CFIliot> F'alroner, was born in Sugar Grove, Pa., 
April I, 1825, and died at Kennedy, Chautauqua county, 
.*.'. Y„ Jan. 16, i8>'/,, aged <,ixty-three. He was left 



motherless when but two years of age, and was yet a 
minor when his father died. He was, however, named 
as an e.xecutor of the will, special legislation being 
required to enable him to act. He was well educated, 
and although not keen to be known as a money maker 
conducted a large business in Kennedy, having grist 
mills, lumber mills and a general store. He was a 
large land owner, having over 1000 acres in the town of 
Poland, where he located about 1850. He was free- 
handed and generous, his kindness of heart leading him 
into business indiscretions, and he lost a large amount of 
money through endorsing paper for friends and 
acquaintances. He was the donor of sites upon which 
to build the three churches of Kennedy, but was not a 
member. In politics he was a Republican, and repre- 
sented the town of Poland in the Chautauqua County 
Board of Supervisors during the years 1859-60-61-62-63. 

Mr. Falconer married Helen J. Dailey at Waterville, 
N. Y., June 19, 1831, and she died at Jamestown, N. 
Y., Oct. 31, 1904; she was a member of the Baptist 
church. Mr. and Mrs. Falconer were the parents of two 
sons: Archibald D., of whom further; and Frank M., 
born Sept. 10, 1872. died Tan. 12, 1901. 

-Archibald D. Falconer, son of William T. and Helen J. 
(Dailey) Falconer, was born in Kennedy, Chautauqua 
county. N. Y., Oct. 12, 1869. After graduation from 
Hillsdale College, Hillsdale, Mich., he began the study 
of law in the offices of Cook, Fisher & Wade, of the 
Chautauqua county bar, and was later admitted to 
practice. He opened offices in Jamestown, where he 
remained until IQ18, when he moved to his present 
offices in the First National Bank building. Falconer. 
He is a Republican in politics, a member of the Masonic 
order, and interested in various other activities, busi- 
ness and social. 

Mr. Falconer married, Oct. 20, 1896, Abbie Lillian 
Brown, a fellow student at Hillsdale College. They are 
the parents of three children : Robert, Frank and 
Catherine. The family home is at No. 32, Prospect 
street, Jamestown. 



EDWIN FORREST SAMPLE— As a contractor 
and builder, Edwin F. Sample is well known in the 
towns of Ellery and Jamestown, his life from boyhood 
having been associated with the building business, fol- 
lowing in the footsteps of his honored father under 
whom he learned the carpenter's trade. In social life 
and fraternity affairs Mr. Sample takes an active part 
and lends his influence to all movements that tend to 
uplift and advance the standard of right living. Edwin 
F. Sample is a son of Hugh and Dorothy (Keil) Sample, 
who were residents of Warren, Pa., that State being 
the birthplace of their son. 

Hugh and Dorothy Sample came from Pennsylvania 
to Chautauqua county, N. Y., in 1874, when Edwin F. 
was but a youn,'; boy. They resided at several places 
in the town of Ellery and in 1884 located on a farm in 
the town of Ellery, near the village of Ellery Center, 
and there established the family home. Hugh Sample 
was a carpenter by trade, and in addition to the culti- 
vation of his farm did a good deal of building in his 
scrlion. Hugh Samph; was a member of Company E, 
F'ifth United .States Light Artillery, ami was in many 
engagements during the Civil War, being cited for his 




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BIOGRAPHICAL 



375 



brave conduct. The children of Hugh and Dorothy 
(Keil) Sample were as follows: Lydia A.; Edwin F., 
mentioned below; Elizabeth L., Lona D., and Frank 
T. The two oldest were born in Pennsylvania, and the 
remainder were born in the town of Ellery. 

Edwin F. Sample was born in Newmanville, Clarion 
county, Pa., Jan. ii, 1872. When very young his parents 
moved to Chautauqua county and here Edwin F. attended 
the district schools and acquired a good education. In 
youth he was taught his father's trade and became a 
skilled carpenter, later adding to his activities the busi- 
ness of contractor. His reputation as a reliable builder 
is well established, and along the shores of Lake Chau- 
tauqua there are many houses that stand as monuments 
to his skill and integrity. He has executed contracts in 
different towns of the county and in the city of James- 
town, and he also built school house No. 13 in the town 
of Ellery. In connection with his building he specializes 
in the asbestos "Century Shingle," which is fast attain- 
ing popularity as a roofing material. Mr. Sample was the 
first to introduce this shingle in this county and has 
since sold many carloads of them. 

Mr. Sample's home on the lake road in the town of 
Ellery is surrounded by fruit orchards and gardens, 
making him quite eligible to the Patrons of Husbandry. 
He is also a member of Jamestown Lodge, No. 105, 
Loyal Order of Moose, of which he is a charter member; 
Chautauqua County Historical Society; the Saturday 
Night Club; the Protective Home Circle; and was vice- 
president of the Fluvanna Free Library Association, 
and now secretary, an institution which has added greatly 
to the enjoyment and education of the younger genera- 
tion as well as benefiting their elders. In politics Mr. 
Sample is a Republican, and in religious affiliation a 
member of the Methodist Brotherhood. 

Mr. Sample married, at Bemus Point, N. Y., July 2, 
1902, Edith May Griffith, who died Nov. 27, 1910, the 
only child of Guy S. and Carrie (Messenger) Griffith, 
old and highly respected residents of Ellery. Two 
children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Sample in Ellery: 
Hazel A., born Jan. 8, 1904; and Merton R., born Sept. 
18. 1906. Both are graduates of the Fluvanna public 
school and now (1920) are students of Jamestown High 
School. 



THE FLINT FAMILY— One of the founder- 
families of Portland, Chautauqua county, is that repre- 
sented in this generation by the brothers who own and 
keep in splendid production the bulk of the tract of 
wild land first owned by their grandfather, Abial Flint, 
in 1S17. The form, as it is today, is one of the best 
maintained acreages in the district, and presents an 
altogether different appearance to what it did when the 
pioneer ancestor first set about the stupendous task 
of winning it from the wilderness. Its present con- 
dition represents the grit, the steadfastness, the resolute 
persistence in the pioneer work, despite hardships and 
discouragements, of three generations of the Flint 
family, and the place of respect the family holds in the 
community to-day is the result of useful lives well lived. 

Abial Flint, the pioneer ancestor of the Chautauqua 
county, N. Y., branch of the Flint family, was born at 
East Windsor. Conn., Sept. 5, 1768, the son of Arkalis 
and Betsey (Elmer) Flint. He appears to have come 



into New York State in early manhood, for it was in 
Rome, Oneida county, N. Y., that he married, Sept. 26, 
1802, Mary Brown, who was born in Coventry, Conn., 
Nov. 30, 1780. About the year 1812 Abial Flint brought 
his wife and family of three children into Chautauqua 
county and settled at Priestville. About 1817 he bought 
a tract of fifty acres of wild land in Portland and 
moved his family to that land. He was by trade a 
tanner and currier, and also a shoemaker, but the desire 
to own his own home and sufficient land for the susten- 
ance of his family proved irresistable, and he entered 
upon the great task of clearing the wilderness from his 
land with resolute purpose and cheerful spirit. His wife 
ably and courageously assisted him, withstanding all 
the rigors that came to them, both of them buoyed up by 
the prospect of having eventually a home wrought by 
their own hands from the wilderness. That was the 
inspiration that softened all their labors, that gave them 
renewed courage when all seemed dark, and when it 
appeared that it would be barely possible that they could 
live to the time when their tract would be sufficiently 
cleared to afford them more than a sparse living. They 
experienced most of the trials and hardships which 
have been the lot of most pioneers, and they manifested 
the same resolute spirit that has been shown by so many 
of the great pioneers of this country. And notwith- 
standing everything they prospered, and raised a family 
of eight children in the original log house Abial Flint 
built. For twenty-one years the family lived in a log 
house, as it was not until 1S33 that Abial Flint built a 
frame house, their youngest child at that time being 
ten years old. Mrs. Flint died fifteen years later, on 
May 5, 1849, at the age of sixty-eight years, but her 
husband lived to reach the venerable age of ninety-one 
years, his death not coming until Jan. 15, i860. Both 
were buried in Evergreen Cemetery, and were honored 
as pioneers of the district, and as good people. They 
were Methodists, of earnest spirit, and took part in the 
formation of the first church, both being members of 
the first class formed in Portland. Politically Abial 
Flint was a Whig and in general was a man of strong, 
upright character. He lived on his Chautauqua county 
farm for forty-three years, and had the satisfaction of 
seeing it mostly cleared and in cultivation before his 
death. To those of this generation who consider farm- 
ing an arduous occupation it must seem almost incon- 
ceivable that men should voluntarily take upon them- 
selves the life time task of excessively hard labor that 
the clearing of a large acreage of wilderness must repre- 
sent; but it was by much valiant effort that practically 
the whole of the present rich territories that compri-^e 
the United States were won for civilization ; and much 
of the stalwart and rugged characteristics of the pioneer 
ancestors has descended to, and is evident in the suc- 
ceeding generations of the old American families. The 
descendants of Abial Flint, of Portland, have been 
many but, in general, those descendants have done well 
in life, the immediate family of Abial and Mary 
(Brown) Flint reflecting in their lives the wholesome 
ruggedness of their early life in the log house. The 
eight children of Abial and Mary (Brown) Flint were: 
I. Daniel E., born .Aug. 22, 1805, and eventually married 
Eliza Goddard ; he settled in Shipman, 111., in 1863. 2. 
Mary B., bom April 23, 1807, and married John Wilbur, 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



in Portland. Chautauqua county, subsequently going 
with her husband to Elgin, 111., where he took a farming 
property. 3. Jonathan T., born Nov. 30, 1S09; married 
Harriet Shuniway. in Genesee county, N. Y., and 
settled in Buffalo, in 1S40. 4. Abial, Jr., born May 25, 
1S13: married Jane Cook, in Portland, Chautauqua 
county, and settled in Missouri, in 1857. 5. Henry, of 
whom further. 6. Harriet, born Oct. 6, 1816, and now 
lives in Hanover, N. V.. having married James Wilson, 
of that place. 7. John VV., born Aug. 26. iSiQ; married 
Lovina McGaffan. of Youngstown, N. Y., and eventually 
settled in Brant, Erie county. 8. Caroline, born Dec. 3, 
1S23; married Ephraim Ballard, of Westfield, and 
settled in Silver Creek, Chautauqua county. 

Henry Flint, fifth child of Abial and Mary (Brown) 
Flint, and father of the brothers, Virgil Henry and 
Byron Herbert Flint, who now own the ancestral prop- 
ertv, was born Jan, 18, 1S15, He received such education 
as was possible in that sparsely populated section in the 
days of his boyhood, and after leaving school gave his 
whole time to his father, to assist him in the cultivation 
of the land already cleared, and in the clearing of the 
remainder. Eventually he married Nancy A. Hall, of 
another pioneer family of Portland, and they lived the 
whole of their married life upon the Flint homestead, 
which eventually passed into his possession. When 
public improvements and the development of the town 
made it necessarj- to run a street through part of the 
Flint property, Henry Flint sold an acre, so that he 
would not have divided land, and subsequently pur- 
chased twenty-five acres of adjoining land from Charles 
Van Gasbeck. To Henry and Nancy A. (Hall) Flint 
were born thirteen children, a worthy family and char- 
acteristic of the earnestness of their lives. The children, 
in order of birth, were: I. Helen. 2. Effie, who event- 
ually entered the teaching profession. 3. Mary, who 
married Mark Haight, of Portland. 4. Abial. 5. Carlos 
Hall, who now lives in Fredonia. 6. Burnell, now de- 
ceased, who went to South Dakota, and there married 
Elsie Clark. 7. Julia. 8. Cora. 9. Virgil Henry, of 
whom further. 10. Elmer, now deceased. 11. Hattie, 
who is a bookkeeper in New York City. 12. Byron 
Herbert, of whom further. 13. Kate Irene. 

Virgil Henry and Bryon Herbert Flint, ninth and 
twelfth bom children of Henry and Nancy A. (Hall) 
Flint, have worthily continued in good cultivation the 
ancestral home of the Flint family. The farm is one of 
the best kept in the district, and well adapted to the 
purpose, general and dairy farming, and grape growing, 
to which it is put by the brothers. They are proving 
themselves to be enterprising, progressive and up-to-date 
farmers, have some good, pure-bred Holstein cattle, and 
have about fourteen acres of grape vineyard, which 
gives them good returns. The brothers are unmarried, 
are industrious, and have executed many improvements 
upon the property. The house, barn, and other build- 
ings are modern, and were all built by them. They 
interest themselves actively in public movements in their 
community, and have very many friends, being generally 
well regarded. They have reason to be satisfied with 
their personal records, and with the place the Flint 
family has in the founding and development of that 
section of the county. 



THE UNION FURNITURE COMPANY, which 

today and for many years has been an industrial enter- 
prise of consequence to the city of Jamestown, N. Y., 
had its inception in 1903 in the enterprise of four mem- 
bers of the Nord-Norquist family of that city. Edward 
C. Nord, August F. Nord, Alfred A. Nord, and F. O. 
Norquist, all substantial business men of experience in 
wood working, and the manufacture of furniture, 
formed partnership to enter into the manufacture of high 
grade dining room suites. They erected a factory build- 
ing, four stories in height, 250 feet long and 60 feet 
wide, at No. 234 Crescent street, Jamestown, and 
equipped it with such modern machinery as they deemed 
necessary and commenced to produce the line of furni- 
ture proposed. 

Satisfactory development came, and in 1904 the organ- 
izers sought corporate powers, eventually being em- 
powered to trade under its original name of the Union 
Furniture Company, by which name the enterprise has 
since been known. As the company developed markets, 
the original plant became inadequate for their opera- 
tions, and recently it was decided to erect a five-story 
brick structure, which is now completed and has floor 
space of 100,000 square feet in addition to the 65,000 
square feet in its old building adjoining. The old as 
well as the new building is equipped with individual 
electric motors and most modern machinery. The 
results of these new installations will be for purposes of 
economy and safety. The motive power of the old and 
new plant is electric, which is developed on the com- 
pany's grounds. 

The success which has come to the Union Furniture 
Company, at which steady employment is provided for 
about 300 people, reflects credit upon the executives who 
have directed its affairs since its original establishment. 
The present officials and stockholders are : August F. 
Nord, president; Alfred A. Nord, vice-president; and 
Edward C. Nord, treasurer and secretary. The company 
is represented on the Jamestown Chamber of Commerce, 
the Manufacturers' Association of Jamestown, and the 
Merchants' and Manufacturers' Association of New 
York State. The product of this company has remained 
the same, high grade dining room suites, and its market 
is in all parts of this country and the firm enjoys a 
well earned reputation in the furniture world. 



AUGUST F. NORD, well known business man, 

manufacturer, and president of the Union Furniture 
Company, was born in Smoland, Sweden, July 2, 1868. 
His father was a farmer, and the boy grew up on the 
farm assisting in the work at home. He attended the 
common schools of the village and received a good, 
elementary education. 

When he was twenty years old he determined to 
come to the United States, having a brother, John Nord, 
in this country who had done well in a business way. 
The young man went directly to Jamestown, N. Y., after 
landing, his brother being employed there in the carving 
room of the A. C. Norquist Company. August F. Nord 
entered the employ of the Norquist Company in the 
finishing room, and continued with them for eleven 
years, then became associated with the Nord Furniture 



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BIOGRAPHICAL 



377 



Company on Second street, of which he was a stock- 
holder, remaining there for three years, taking an active 
part in the business. He then sold out his interest in 
the firm to his brother. John Nord, in order to start 
with his other brothers, Edward and Alfred, the Union 
Furniture Company. In the beginning of the concern 
Mr. Nord was made vice-president, but was later elected 
president of the company. Besides his otificial position, 
his share of the work of the corporation is to superin- 
tend the output of the factory. 

Mr. Nord is a member of the Norden Club and of the 
Swedish Methodist Episcopal church, in which he is 
greatly interested, being a steward of that church body. 
He is a stockholder in the American National Bank, 
and a member of the Republican party. Of a quiet and 
reserved temperament, Mr. Nord has not become inter- 
ested in the public life of Jamestown, though he is well 
known among the Swedish residents of the city, having 
many friends in their midst. 

.\ugust F. Nord married Anna E. Sandburg, in 1894, 
in Jamestown, and they have the following children: I. 
AUdor, born Nov. 15, 1898; educated in Jamestown 
public and high schools, and University of Pennsylvania. 
2. Elsie, born Nov. 8, 1901 ; educated in Jamestown 
public and high schools, now a student of Wellesley 
College for women. 3. Gladys, born July 10, 1905 ; 
educated in Jamestown public and high schools, now 
preparing for college. 4. Frances, born Feb. 9, 1912 ; 
now attending Jamestown grade schools. 



EDWARD C. NORD, who has been a resident in 

the city of Jamestown, N. Y.. for twenty-nine years, a 
young man without much means and little education 
at the time of his coming to this country, but by dint 
of perseverance, study, industry, and natural ability as 
a man of business, he steadily advanced in prosperity 
until today he is among the leading citizens here. He is 
one of the organizers of the Union Furniture Company, 
of which he has been secretary, treasurer and genera! 
manager since its organization. 

Edward C. Nord was born in Sweden, May 9, 1871, 
the son of Andrew M. Nord. He was given the public 
school education customarily afforded to a boy of his 
station, and assisted his father on the home farm. In 
1801 the family came to America, and settled in James- 
town, where some of their relatives were. The Nor- 
quists of Jamestown, so well known in the city, and so 
successful in business during the last few decades, 
belong to the Nord family, of Sweden, the name "Nord" 
being the derivative, the termination "quist" simply 
meaning "branch of." 

For three years after coming to Jamestown, Edward C. 
Nord found employment in the furniture factory of the 
A. C. Norquist Company. Then he helped to organize, 
and became a stockholder in the Nord Furniture Com- 
pany, which opened a store on East Second street, 
Jamestown, for the retailing of furniture and allied 
lines. Edward C. Nord with his brother, John Nord, 
conducted the store for eight years, and in 1903 he sold 
his interests to his brother and in conjunction with 
August F. Nord, Alfred A. Nord, and Frank O. Nor- 
quist, formed partnership to establish a firm for the 
manufacture of dining room furniture, thus was the 
organization of the Union Furniture Company of James- 



town. The history of the Union Furniture Company 
as shown in a preceding narrative indicates the active 
interest Edward C. Nord has taken in this company. 
He has given most of his time to the affairs of his 
company, and has taken interest in other movements 
wherever time would permit, especially in the civic 
welfare of Jamestown. He is a member of the James- 
town Board of Commerce and the Norden Club. 

Mr. Nord- is identified with the following organiza- 
tions as director : The' American National Bank, of 
which he was one of the organizers ; Jamestown Marble 
Iron Company; Jamestown Mutual Insurance Company; 
and he was on the board of the Vinculo Sugar and 
Kealty Corporation of Cuba, which had large holdings on 
the island. He is a member of the Republican party in 
which he is a firm believer. He has been a consistent 
member of the Swedish Methodist Episcopal church, 
Jamestown, since he came here, and has been one of its 
trustees, for many years. 

Mr. Nord married, in Jamestown, 1896, Rose H. 
Ogren, of this city. They have three children: i. Carol 
B., born Jan. 16, 1899; educated in the Jamestown public 
and high schools, now studying at the University of 
Pennsylvania. 2. Olive H., born Sept. 10. 1902 ; 
educated in the Jamestown public and high schools, now 
preparing for college. 3. Helen E., born May 21, 1909; 
now attending school in Jamestown. 



ALFRED A. NORD, well known in the furniture 
industry at Jamestown, and vice-president of the Union 
Furniture Company, a busy corporation formed by 
the Nord brothers, was born in Smoland, Sweden, 
Feb. 18, 1875. The family lived on a farm and this son, 
like the others, was brought up to assist in the farm 
work, and here he attended the village school. When 
Alfred A. Nord was sixteen years old he came to Amer- 
ica, in company with his father, mother, and others of the 
family. The boy went at once to Jamestown, where he 
had brothers, and obtained employment with the New- 
man Bed Spring Company; later he became employed 
in the A. C. Norquist Company, in 1892, in the machine 
department. Here he remained for a time and learned 
the wood carving trade. He subsequently followed the 
wood carving trade with the Atlas Furniture Company, 
Empire Case Goods Company, and Jamestown Mantle 
Company, and then returned to the A. C. Norquist Com- 
pany. In 1902, he with his brothers, August F. and 
Edward C, founded the Union Furniture Company, a 
sketch of which appears herewith. It is much to Mr. 
Nord's credit that while he worked at his trade he 
studied evenings at the Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tion night school where he acquired considerable learn- 
ing. Alfred A. Nord was made vice-president and 
has continued as such almost since the organization of 
the company. His special part in addition to his official 
duties is to oversee the output of the cabinet department. 
Mr. Nord is a member of the Swedish Methodist Epis- 
copal church of Jamestown, also a member of the official 
church board. He is a staunch Republican in politics. 

Mr. Nord married, in Jamestown, March i, 1905, 
Esther Ogren, of that city. Of this union were born 
four children: i. Wesley Alfred, bom April 2, 1907; 
educated in the Jamestown public schools, now prepar- 
ing for high school. 2. Jeanette Ester, born Sept. 12, 



37S 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



uxV?: now attending public school. 3. Kermit John, 
bom Tan. jo. 1013 : now attending public school. 4. 
Charles Lowell, bom Feb. 4. ipKi'. 



NATHAN E. BEARDSLEY, M. D.— Any history 
01 the medical profession of Chautauqua county would 
be incomplete without the name of Dr. Nathan E. 
Beardsley. who for nearly thirty years has been engaged 
in the active practice of his profession at Dunkirk, N. Y. 
Dr. Beardsley is prominently identified with the life of 
his community, being respected and valued as a con- 
scientious, public-spirited citizen, no less than an able 
and devoted physician. 

Nathan E. Beardsley was bom March 23, 1S67. in 
Chautauqua county, N. Y., the son of the late Noah 
and Esther M. (RandalD Beardsley. His primary 
education was received in the public schools of South 
Dayton, N". Y., and Gowanda High School, which latter 
school he left at the end of his second year, to com- 
mence the study of medicine with his uncle, C. C. 
Johnson, a practicing physician at Gowanda, N. Y. 
.\fter ayear and a half spent pursuing a course of medical 
reading under the guidance of his uncle, he entered the 
medical department of Buffalo University, from wliich 
he was graduated with the degree of Doctor of Medicine 
in iSoo. After serving his intemeship of one year at the 
ButTalo General Hospital, he entered upon the practice 
of his profession in May, 1891, and has ever since, with 
occasional intervals of aliscnces, made his home in 
Dunkirk, and there achieved his great professional suc- 
cesses. He has done post-graduate work in the medical 
universities of New York City, Bonn and Frankfort, 
Germany, and has also attended the Heidelberg Univer- 
sity. He belongs to the American Medical Association, 
the New York State Medical .Association, the Chautau- 
qua Medical Society, and the Dunkirk-Fredonia Med- 
ical Society. He is on the medical stafif of the Brooks 
Memorial Hospital, and is medical officer at St. Mary's 
Orphan .-Xsylum. In everything relative to the welfare 
of his home city. Dr. Beardsley takes a keen and active 
interest, and is an interested member of the Chamber of 
Commerce. He is a Mason, affiliating with the blue 
l''d!.'e. chapter, and commandery. He attends the Bap- 
tist church at Dunkirk. 

Dr. Beardsley married, April 12. 1892, Rose Coxe, 
'■i Wyoming county, N. Y., and they were the parents 
ri a child, Ru!h Esther, a school teacher of Redlands, 
Cal. Mrs. Beardsley passed away May 3, 1910. 

Strength of character, tenacity of purpose, breadth 
<• f mind, and liberality of sentiment, these are the 
qualities that have been strikingly manifested through- 
out iJr. Bcardsley's career. With a thorough knowledge 
o! human nature, tolerance of its weakness, and ajjprc- 
ciation of all that it has of good; ardent and loyal in his 
attachments, he numbers his friends by the legion both 
in and out of his profession. 



OTTO E. WALTER— A native son of Dunkirk, 
.Mr. V.'all'-r had th<rc parsed the years of his useful 
life, which h'gaii Juni! 22, ifW. but closed with his 
accidcnial death, June 13, lOM- Otto E. Walter was of 
German parenla;fc, his father dying soon after coming 



to Dunkirk, leaving his widow, Ernestine, with a family 
to care for. 

Otto E. Walter was but three years of age when his 
father died, but his mother gave him all the advantages 
of the public schools, which he attended until he was 
fourteen. He then became an apprentice in the boiler 
department of the Brooks Locomotive Works of Dun- 
kirk, and after becoming proficient continued there as a 
journeyman for several years. He left the locomotive 
works to accept an appointment as a member of the 
Dunkirk police force, on which he served for si.x years. 
He again entered the employ of the Locomotive Works, 
and later was promoted to the position of foreman of 
the boiler department, a position he filled most capably 
for nineteen years. Ill health then compelled him to 
resign his post to accept the lighter work of an inspector 
in the same department of the works, and in that position 
he continued until his death. Mr. Walter was a member 
of Dunkirk Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons ; the 
Lutheran church, and in politics an independent Republi- 
can. He was well known in Dunkirk and was highly 
regarded as a man of honor, public-spirited and enter- 
prising. He served under Charles J. Wirtner as a 
member of the Board of Fire and Police Commissioners, 
was for a time assistant chief of the Fire Department, 
and in all things measured up to all the requirements 
of good citizenship. 

Death came to Mr. Walter without warning, June 13, 
1914. He with his brother-in-law, Frederick G. Bird, 
the latter's son, George Bird, and others, were on their 
way to Wesleyville in an automobile when they suddenly 
found themselves on the railroad track at Forsythe 
crossing near Ripley, in front of a rapidly approaching 
Eastern Express. There was no time to do more than 
realize the danger before the train struck the car, Mr. 
Walter, Mr. Bird and his son George, being killed in 
the collision. Mr. Walter is buried in Forest Hill 
Cemetery, Fredonia. 

Otto E. Walter married, in Dunkirk, Millie Ludwig, 
daughter of John and Elizabeth (Schulte) Ludwig, her 
parents both bom in Germany, but old residents of 
Dunkirk. FVcdcrick G. Bird, brother-in-law of Mrs. 
Walter, was born in Dunkirk and for many years was a 
foreman in the Brooks and American Locomotive works 
at Dunkirk and at Schenectady, N. Y.. being general 
foreman of the Dunkirk works at the time of his death, 
June 13, 1914. Mr. Bird married (first) Elizabeth 
Paxton, mother of George Bird, who was killed with his 
father and uncle. He married (second) Carrie Ludwig, 
sister of Mrs. Walter, and they were the parents of a 
daughter Mildred. Mr. Bird was a member of Dunkirk 
Lodge, l''rer and Accepted Masons. Both Mrs. Walter 
and Mrs, I'.ird continue to reside in Dunkirk. 

MICHAEL J. RATKOWSKI— Among the promi- 
iiint liti/rns of f(jreign Ijirlli residing in the town of 
|)nnl:iik, Chautauqua county, N. Y., where he has 
],i conir :i conspicuous figure in the mercantile life of the 
conirnunity, is Michael J. Ratkowski, a self-made man in 
the best sense of the term, who by his own efforts has 
attained a respected position and the high esteem of his 
fellow-townsmen. 

Mr. Ivatkowski w.as born Aug. 27, 1R73, in Poland, 




-^o JU-<L^i^^^^ Jl . QoOC<y(^(:^oc<A 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



379 



and is a son of Michael and Mary Ratkowski, residents 
of that country. The elder Mr. Ratkowski -died about the 
time of his son's birth, and shortly after, his wife came 
to the United States bringing her child with her, then 
but five years of age. They settled at Dunkirk, N. Y., 
and it was there that the earliest associations of the lad 
were formed and there that he gained his education as 
he grew older, attending for this purpose the parochial 
school of St. Hyacinth's Catholic Church. His mother's 
circumstances being none too good, he worked as a lad 
on the fruit farms of the neighborhood picking fruit 
Upon completing his studies, he secured a position in 
the local planing mill of Alcott, Ross &: Skelley, and 
worked in that establishment for three years. His next 
position was in the grocery store of D. Scannell, where 
he served successively as order boy, delivery man, and 
was eventually put in charge of the delivery department 
of the business. He tlien left Dunkirk for a time to 
take a place as salesman for the wholesale grocery 
house of W. H. Granger & Company, of Buffalo, and 
was on the road for this concern about eighteen 
months. From the time of his first employment as order 
boy young Mr. Ratkowski had taken a keen interest in 
his work, and up to the time of his resignation from 
the Buffalo house had devoted himself with the most 
commendable industry and ambition to learning the 
grocery business in all its branches, both retail and 
wholesale. He was accordingly excellently well fitted 
to engage in business on his own account, when on 
March 26, 1909, having saved up sufficient capital, he 
returned to Dunkirk and started a grocery store of his 
own. It was not long before he had established an 
enviable reputation for honesty and fair dealing, and 
his enterprise rapidly grew in size and importance until 
igi8, when he opened another grocery store, which has 
likewise prospered. His ventures having turned out so 
well, Mr. Ratkowski decided to extend the realm of his 
operations into allied lines, and in 1910 opened his 
present meat market, also in Dunkirk. He now con- 
ducts these three flourishing establishments and enjoys 
a large and high class patronage throughout the city. In 
addition to his private business, Mr. Ratkowski has 
become interested in the Serv-us-Stores, a chain of 
mercantile establishments dealing in groceries with 
branches in Dunkirk and elsewhere, where a large and 
growing business is done, 

From early manhood Mr. Ratkowski has actively 
interested himself in local affairs and has become an 
influential figure in politics, being affiliated with the 
Democratic party, of the principles and policies of which 
he is a strong supporter. In 1920 he was elected fire 
and police commissioner for Dunkirk for a two year 
term, and is now discharging the difficult and responsible 
duties of his office with an efficiency and disinterested- 
ness which has commended him to all classes of the 
community. In his religious belief he is a Roman Cath- 
olic and attends St. Hyacinth's Church at Dunkirk, 
serving the parish as a member of the finance committee. 
He is a member of the local chapter of Knights of 
Columbus and of the Order of Maccabees. 

Michael J. Ratkowski was united in marriage at 
Dunkirk with Florence Barbara Kosciuszko, a member 
of one of the most distinguished Polish families, and 
a daughter of Marcell and Staniszewska Kosciuszko. 



Eight children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Rat- 
kowski, as follows: Sophia, Mary, Helen, Bernice, died 
aged nine years; Stesia, Leon, Edward, and Agnes. 



ARCHIE VINCENT PARLATO, D. D. S.— 

Among the most popular and successful of the younger 
professional men of Dunkirk, Chautauqua county, N. 
v., where he is engaged in the practice of dentistry, 
is Dr. Archie -Vincent Parlato, who has recently opened 
a handsome office here. Dr. Parlato is a native of 
Buffalo, where his birth occurred, Nov. 12, 1893, and a 
son of Vincent and Frances (Barone) Parlato, of that 
city, the former being engaged in agricultural pursuits 
in the neighborhood. To Vincent Parlato and his wife 
seven children were born. Dr. Parlato being the only 
son. As a lad he was brought by his parents to this 
region and attended the grammar and high schools of 
Fredonia. After graduation from the latter institution, 
he entered the Fredonia Normal College and was grad- 
uated there in 1915. The young man had, in the mean- 
time, decided to take up dentistry as a profession, and 
with that end in view entered the dental department of 
the University of Buffalo as a member of the class of 
1918. Shortly after the entrance of the United States 
into the great World War, he left his studies to enter 
the artillery forces of the United States army and was 
sent to Camp Dix, where he remained one month. 
He was then temporarily discharged in order to permit 
him to complete his professional studies and returned to 
the University of Buffalo, where he was graduated in 
1918. He also served for six months as demonstrator 
and instructor in pathology and bacteriology at the 
same institution, and won an enviable reputation for 
earnest interest in his work and good scholarship. He 
reenlisted in the Medical Reserve Corps at the time 
of his discharge from the artillery and held himself 
ready to respond to his country's call to that branch of 
the service. On Feb. 12, 1919, he opened his present 
handsome office at Dunkirk and since that time has 
been actively engaged in the practice of his profession 
here. During this brief period, Dr. Parlato has built 
up a large practice, which is steadily growing, and is 
already to be numbered among the most popular dentists 
of the place. Dr. Parlato is a Roman Catholic in his 
religious belief and attends the St. Anthony Italian 
Church of that denomination at Fredonia. He is a 
prominent member of the local branch of the Order of 
Knights of Columbus. He is a Republican in politics. 



CLESSON ALLEN PUTNAM, a prominent citi- 
zen of Crocton, Chautauqua county, N. Y., and one of 
the organizers and owners of the Naboth Vineyards, 
Incorporated, is a native of the town of Stockton, N. 
Y., where his birth occurred April 5, 1864, a son of 
Allen and Marilla (Smith) Putnam, old and highly 
respected residents of that place. 

Mr. Putnam as a lad attended the public schools of 
Stockton and later, having determined to follow the 
profession of teaching, entered the Fredonia Normal 
School. He did not, however, follow out his intention, 
but afterwards took a commercial course at the Cole- 
man Business School of Newark, N. J. Thereafter he 
was employed in the railway mail service for a number 



^8o 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



of years, until he met with an accident in the year 1902. 
Upon returning to his native region from that city. Mr. 
Putnam rented a line 00 acre farm in Portland township, 
Chautauqua county, which he cultivated for a time. He 
then gave up this work, and in association with a number 
of other gentlemen founded the Naboth Vineyards, 
Incorporated. This flourishing organization was founded 
in the year 1003 with Franz C. Lewis as president. Mr. 
Putnam as secretary and treasurer, and \'ernon Mathews 
as vice-president. It was originally designed to manu- 
facture grape and other fruit juices, but has since that time 
been expanded into a cannery and packing establishment. 
where all sorts of fruits are canned and packed as well 
as many other farm products. A branch of the business 
which has recently assumed large proportions is that 
of the manufacture of tomato catsup. It was reorgan- 
ized on April I, 1919, with James R. Nicholson, presi- 
dent. Mr. Putnam, secretary, and Franz C. Lewis as 
general manager. Since this time it has carried on the 
same line of business and increased greatly in size and 
importance. The first building erected for the company's 
plant measured 65 x 40 feet and was five stories in 
height, but in 1908 two additions were made, both five 
stories in height and measuring respectively 30 x 70 
feet and 90 x 90 feet. There is included in this large 
plant a complete steam power equipment as well as all 
kinds of modern machinery and devices for the carrying 
on of the work. At the present time about 150 men 
are employed, and the products of the factory are sold 
over the entire United States. Mr. Putnam is a Repub- 
lican in politics, and a member of the Methodist Episco- 
pal church. He is also affiliated with the Lake Shore 
Lodge. Ancient Free and .\ccepted Masons, of which he 
was secretary for several years, and with the local lodge 
of Knights of P\-thias. 

Clesson Allen Putnam married (first) Nov. 27, 1893, 
Persis Peek, of Portland township, a daughter of Ashael 
and Ann Peek. Her death occurred in the year 1901. 
On Jan. 4, 1914, Mr. Putnam married (second) Jane V. 
Martin, of Brocton, a daughter of William and Lodeska 
(Hall I Martin, of that place. 



THE WELLMAN FAMILY— It is quite evident 
that the Wellman family took its name from the city 
of Wells in Somersetshire, England, which in turn 
obtained its name from a well called St. Andrew's Well, 
near the Bishop's palace, and from the fact that the 
foundf:r of the family had received from one of the 
bishops charge of St. .XTidrow's Well, and had been 
called at first John the Well-man, or William the Well- 
man, which later became John or William Wellman. 
The name has been variously spelled as Wellman, Well- 
mane. Wcllmon, Welmnn. Welmon, Wclmin, Wilman, 
Wilmon. U'illman, Willmon, Willsman, Wellsman, and 
Weelman. In .America the practice of spelling this 
name as Wellman began quite early and has increased in 
practice until it is nearly universally used by all of the 
family here. 

The gen<al'<Ky and history of the Wellman family 
and its origin in the Old World has been made with 
some success. InvcstiKation in this country seem, to 
show that the early immiKrant Wellmans were only 
two in number, Thomas Wellman and William Wellman. 
However, family recollection p'^ints to a third, in the 



person of Barnabas Wellman. The name Barnabas 
has been carried through several generations and it is 
thought that a Barnabas may have been one of the 
immigrants, and if not at least one of the sons of 
William Wellman. Thomas Wellman was in Lynn, 
Mass., as early as 1640. He bought land, lived and 
died in Lynn End (now Lynnfield), Mass. William 
Wellman was in Marshheld, Mass., as early as 1642, but 
moved that j'ear to Gloucester, Mass., and thence in 1650 
to New London, Conn., and thence, a few years later, to 
Killingworth, Conn., where he died. It was from Killing- 
worth, Conn., that the following Wellmans came. 

There is a line of seven generations bearing the 
name of Barnabas Wellman, but the first of whom there 
is any information was a Captain Barnabas Wellman, 
a seafaring man, who made many voyages between 
America and China. On one of these voyages he brought 
home a set of china dishes, a picture of his ship on each, 
and these were long preserved in the family, another 
Barnabas Wellman, who represented the family in the 
American Revolution, and last, a Barnabas Wellman 
who was an early settler in Chautauqua coimty, N. Y. 

Barnabas Wellman, the Revolutionary soldier, was 
born Aug. 15, 1756, in Killingworth. Conn. According 
to records, he was a drum major in the War of the 
Revolution. His brothers and sisters were: Freelove, 
bom May 22, 1753; Molly, born March 13, 1755; Paul, 
born April 15, 1757; and John, date of birth unknown. 
Like Barnabas, his brothers Paul and John fought in the 
Revolutionary army. He married and had the following 
children: James, born Nov. 30, 1783; Homer, born 
March 9, 1786; Barnabas, born Sept. 16, 1793, whose 
sketch appears elsewhere in this work; Ford, of whom 
further; Leander, born Oct. 14, l8oi. There were also 
two daughters named Millie, and Hannah. 

Ford Wellman, son of Bamabas Wellman, was born 
in Killingworth, Conn., Jan. 3, 1796, and at the age of 
sixteen years, or in 1812, he was among the first 
pioneers who came into Chautauqua county. He 
followed the occupation of a farmer for many years, 
and died in the town of Harmony. He married Sally 
Patchin, by whom he had the following children: 
Harriet, William Dighton, of whom further; Calvin M., 
Phylander H., Sally, Alvira and Fidelia. 

William Dighton Wellman^ son of Ford and Sally 
(Patchin) Wellman, was born in the town of Busti, 
Chautauqua county, N. Y., Aug. 2, 1819. He followed 
the occupation of farmer a number of years, and later 
moved to Jamestown, where he resided until his death, 
Dec. s, 1895. He was a leading member of the Repub- 
lican party. He married Laura Louisa Martin, like him- 
self a native of Busti, N. Y., born Feb. 11, 1825, a 
daughter of George and Laura (Hatch) Martin. 
William Dighton and Laura L. (Martin) Wellman were 
the parents of the following children : Warren Dighton, 
whose sketch follows; Julia E., who married H. N. 
Urmy, of Los Angeles, Cal., where they now live ; Elmer 
Ellsworth, whose sketch follows; and Arthur Martin, 
whose sketch follows. 



DR. WARREN DIGHTON WELLMAN, who has 

for many years occupied a prominent place among the 
active physicians of Jamestown, Chautauqua county, N. 
Y., is a native of the town of Harmony, in this county, 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



381 



where his birth occurred Feb. 15, 1855. He is a son of 
William Dighton and Laura Louisa (Martin) Wellman, 
old and highly respected residents. 

The childhood of Dr. Warren Dighton Wellman was 
passed in his native town of Harmony, where he 
attended the local district schools. He was later a pupil 
at the public schools of Sugar Grove, Pa., and still 
later at the Jamestown Union School and Collegiate 
Institute (now the Jamestown High School), where he 
was prepared for college. He then entered the Roches- 
ter Business University at Rochester, N. Y., from 
which he graduated in 1877. Having in the mean- 
time determined to follow medicine as a profession, 
the young man entered the Electric Medical Institute 
at Cincinnati, Ohio, from which he was graduated 
with the class of 1881, taking at the same time his 
degree as Doctor of Medicine. He then began practice 
at Sugar Grove, Pa., where he remained a number 
of years, but in the spring of 1S88 removed to James- 
town, where he has been practicing his profession ever 
since. In addition to his professional activities Dr. 
Wellman has also become interested in the business life 
of the community, and is now the president and a 
member of the well known firm of Wellman Brothers, 
Incorporated, owners of the Jamestown Sample Fur- 
niture Company. He is also a director of the Liberty 
National Bank, and is one of the most influential citi- 
zens and business men of Jamestown. Dr. Wellman is 
a member of Mt. Moriah Lodge, Free and Accepted 
Masons ; the Protected Home Circle, the Jamestown 
Medical Society, the Chautauqua County Medical Soci- 
ety, the New York State Medical Society, and the Amer- 
ican Medical Association. In politics he is a Republican. 

Dr. Warren Dighton Wellman was united in marriage, 
July 14, 1886. at Merritton, Ontario, with Dora Phelps, 
a daughter of Noah and Adeline (Loveland) Phelps. 
Mr. and Mrs. Phelps were natives of New York and 
Pennsylvania, respectively, and the former was president 
of the Lincoln Paper Mill Company, and also engaged in 
business as a lumberman in Ontario. Dr. and Mrs. 
Wellman are the parents of two children, as follows : 
Clarice Louisa, a graduate of Simons College, Boston, 
and Syracuse University; Donald P., who is now a 
student in the senior class of the University of Penn- 
sylvania, where he is taking the usual classical course. 



ELMER ELLSWORTH WELLMAN, president of 
the Liberty National Bank, of Jamestown. Chautauqua 
county. N. Y., and one of the well known financier.s of 
the county, is a member of the old and prominent Well- 
man family. 

Elmer Ellsworth Wellman, son of William Dighton 
and Laura Louisa (Martin) Wellman, is a native of the 
town of Harmony, Chautauqua county, N. Y., and as a 
lad attended the local public schools. Later he was a 
student at the Tidioute High School, Tidioute, Pa., 
from which he graduated with honors. He was am- 
bitious to begin his business career, and shortly after 
leaving school he secured a position as a traveling repre- 
sentative for a Jamestown concern, in which he was 
exceedingly successful, and finally secured enough 
capital to engage, with his brother, Dr. W. D. Well- 
man, in the retail drug business on his own account at 
Sugar Grove, Pa. From the outset Mr. Wellman 



showed himself. to be a most capable business man and 
this enterprise, which they continued to conduct for 
some six years, was successful. He then came to James- 
town, where they opened a retail drug store in 1S88, 
and conducted the same until 1916, a period of twenty- 
eight years, during which time they had developed one 
of the largest and best known drug establishments of 
its kind in the city. In the latter year Mr. Wellman 
sold his business interests and organized the Liberty 
National Bank, which was opened for business, July I, 
1919, Mr. Wellman being elected its president. This 
bank has already made an important place for itself in 
the financial interests of the community, and bids fair 
to be one of the most prosperous organizations of the 
city, under the capable management of its founder and 
president. In addition to his banking interests, Mr. 
Wellman is also a member and vice-president and treas- 
urer of the firm of Wellman Brothers, Incorporated, of 
which his brother, Dr. Warren Dighton Wellman is the 
president. This concern is owner of the Jamestown 
Sample Furniture Company, deals very largely in fur- 
niture, and possesses a market for this commodity 
throughout a very large territory and to cities within 
a radius of hundreds of miles. 

Mr. Wellman is a staunch supporter of the Republi- 
can principles and policies; although he is well known 
and popular, he has consistently avoided holding public 
oflice. He is prominent in fraternal and club circles 
here, and is especially prominent in Masonic circles, in 
which he has attained the thirty-second degree of Free 
Masonry. He is a member of Mount Moriah Lodge, 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons ; Western Sun 
Chapter, Royal Arch Masons ; Jamestown Commandery, 
Knights Templar; Jamestown and Buff'alo Consistories; 
and Ismailia Temple, Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of 
the Mystic Shrine. He is also affiliated with the local 
lodge of the Order of Eagles, with the Jamestown 
Board of Commerce, and the Sportsman's Club, of this 
city. In religious belief Mr. Wellman is a Presbyterian 
and attends the church of that denomination at James- 
town. 
Elmer Ellsworth Wellman was united in marriage, Sept. 
II, 1895, at Jamestown, N. Y., with Bertha Julia Fenton, 
a daughter of Elliot A. and Helen (Leslie) Fenton, 
both members of old and distinguished New York fam- 
ilies. One child has been born to Mr. and Mrs. Wellman, 
as follows : Robert Fenton, who is now attending high 
school at Jamestown. 



ARTHUR MARTIN WELLMAN, well known 

business man and prominent member of the Wellman 
Brothers' interests of Jamestown, is secretary of this 
well known concern and general manager of the James- 
town Sample Furniture Company. 

Arthur Martin Wellman, son of William Dighton and 
Laura Louisa (Martin) Wellman, was born Feb. 18, 
1666, in Busti, Chautauqua county, N. Y. He was 
educated in the district school at Harmony and Sugar 
Grove Union School. He assisted his father at farm 
work until he was about twenty years of age, and then 
went with his brothers. Dr. Warren D. and Elmer E., 
as clerk in their general store at Sugar Grove, Pa. 
When the two elder brothers came to Jamestown and 
located their drug business here, Arthur M. Wellman 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



followed within a few months afterwards, and joined 
his brothers in ;heir new undertakincr. The W'ellman 
business gradually increased, and in iSoS he was officially 
taken into the nmi partnership by his two brothers. The 
subsequent years following and up to the present time, 
Mr. W'ellman has entirely devoted his time to the busi- 
nesses conducted by the Wcllman Brothers, of which 
he is secretary, as well as being general manager of the 
Jamestown Sample Furniture Company. He is also a 
director of the Liberty National Bank, of which his 
brother. Elmer E. W'ellman, is president. Mr. W'ellman is 
of a retiring disposition and his club and fraternal life 
is quite limited, being a member of the Masons. Pro- 
tected Home Circle, and the Rotary Club. He is a 
staunch member of the Republican party. 

He married, in 1901, .\da Orr, daughter of Austin J. 
and Elizabeth M. (Nichols) Orr. of Jamestown. N. Y. 
To this union were born two children : Howard Q. D., 
bom May 3. 1902; and Albert A., born April 23, 1905. 

The business romance of the well-known W'ellman 
Brothers of Jamestown, has been one of success from 
its very inception. This success was brought about by 
the consistent effort and practical views taken by the 
three brothers in all the enterprises in which they en- 
gaged. In 188S. when Messrs. Warren D., Elmer E. and 
Arthur M. W'ellman located in Jamestown and started 
the W'ellman Brothers Drug Store, it was little thought 
at that time that this enterprise was the nucleus of the 
businesses which have followed and made the Wellman 
name a record in Chautauqua county history. The drug 
business prospered and as larger quarters were needed 
the W'ellman building was erected in 1898, at the corner 
of West Third and Cherry streets, and this business 
was conducted therein until their retirement from it in 
1016. In lOio more room was required to meet the 
demand for rentals and a large addition was built on 
Cherry street, adjoining the original Wellman building. 
These buildings now house the Liberty National Bank, 
the W'ellman Brothers Store. Paquin Jewelry Store, 
besides many suitable offices and the quarters of the 
Jamestown Chamber of Commerce. The Jamestown 
Sample Furniture Company conducted in this building 
by Wellman Brothers is a very well known concern 
among the furniture dealers and consumers, and the 
business, like all other Wellman enterprises, is remark- 
ably increasing its sales from year to year. The Liberty 
National Bank, of which Elmer E. Wellman is president, 
has likewise enjoyed a prosperous era and much cr?dit 
can be given the Wellman spirit in this institution. 



ALFRED TRACY LIVINGSTON, M. D.— Lev- 
ing. a Hungarian noble, came to Scotland in the train 
of .Margaret, Queen of Malcolm HI of Scotland, about 
107^, and from him sprang the ancient and noble family 
of Livingston, a corruption of "de Levingstoune," 
adopted as surname by William, granrlson of Loving. 
In .Amcrioi the name is an honored one, and in the State 
capitol at Albany, N. Y., their armorial bearings art 
sculptured, a mark of public honor. Eight Livingstons 
were in command of troops at the battle of .Saratoga; 
Chancellor Livingston stands chief among the chan- 
cellor? of New Vork and is honored with a full figure 
bronze statue in the State capitol; William Livingston 
was New Jersey'.? famous war governor during the 



Revolution: and all are descended from Rev. John 
Livingston, a Non-Conformist clergyman of the twenty- 
tnird generation of tlie descendants of Leving, the 
Hungarian noble, and the immediate ancestor of this 
branch of the American family ; Dr. Alfred T. Livings- 
ton tracing from Rev. John Livingston through the 
lattcr's youngest son James. 

John Livingston, the founder of this branch in Amer- 
ica, and a lineal descendant of Rev. John Livingston, of 
Scotland, came from the county of Monaghan, Iroland, 
to Saratoga county, N. Y., about 1764. Later he moved 
to Salem, W''ashington county, N. Y., and there died. 
He was called out several times during the Revolution 
and each time rendered the service required. His wife, 
who was a Miss Boyd, came with him from Ireland. 

The line continues through Dr. William Livingston, 
son of John Livingston, founder, who was born at Still- 
water, Saratoga county, N. Y., Feb. 15, 1768, died May 8, 
1S60. He was a physician of Hebron, Washington 
county, N. Y., and of Esse.x county. He came to Chau- 
tauqua county, N. Y., in 1828, but returned after a few 
years to Essex county. He was a leading physician of 
his day, a prominent Whig, and was four times elected 
to the Legislature from Washington county. He 
married (first) Sarah Tracy, and among their children 
was a son, John Jay. 

John Jay Livingston was born at Hebron, N. Y'., Oct. 
10, 1708, died at Jamestown, N. Y., Aug. 3, 1890. He 
came to Chautauqua county in 1830, but in 1832 went to 
\'enango county (later designated Clarion county). Pa., 
where for fifty-four years he was a resident of Shippen- 
ville and Tylersburg. He was a surveyor and civil 
engineer, and after attaining the age of eighty per- 
formed professional field work with his instruments for 
twenty-seven consecutive days. He was active to the 
end of his years, ninety-two. He spent the last years of 
his life in Jamestown at the home of his son, Dr. Alfred 
T. Livingston. He married (third) Elizabeth Jane 
Whitehill, born April 8, 1809, near Bellefonte, Pa., died 
June 7, 1886, daughter of James Whitehill, a skilled 
smith who conducted a forge and foundry in Center 
county. Pa., and later in Clarion county. 

Alfred Tracy Livingston, only child of John Jay 
Livingston and Elizabeth Jane (Whitehill) Livingston, 
was born in Shippcnville, Clarion county. Pa., April i, 
1849, now (1920) living retired at his home at Driftwood 
on the shores of Chautauqua Lake. He was educated in 
the Jamestown public schools and academy and Alle- 
gheny College, graduating from the latter in class of 
:870. He then began the study of medicine with his 
brother, L!)r. James B. Livingston, and later under Dr. 
Benton, at Tarr Farm, Pa., going thence to the medical 
department of the University of Buffalo, receiving his 
M. D. with the class of 1873. He Ix'gan the practice of 
his profession in Buffalo, but in the autumn of the 
same year accepted appointment as assistant physician 
at the .State Insane Hospital, Utica, N. Y., there remain- 
ing five years. He spent the nc.\t eight years in Phila- 
delphia, Pa., there establishing the first Home Hospital 
for the treatment of mental disease. In 1886 he removed 
to Jamestown, N. Y. In lOO) he purchased a fruit plan- 
tation near Dorado, Portr> Kico, where he spends half 
of each year. He is a nuinbrr of the American Med- 
ical Association, New Vnrk State and Chautauqua 




f^/^//.a^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



383 



County Medical societies, and has written many papers 
on medical subjects. He is a member also of the Amer- 
ican Electro Therapeutic Society. 

Dr. Livingston married (first) Jan. 16, 1879, Catherine 
Packer, born May 13, 1853, died July 13, 1883. He 
married (second) June 21, 1899, Nellie Elizabeth 
Hallock, born Jan. 26, 1862, daughter of Rev. William 
Allen and Clara M. (Hall) Hallock (q. v.). Dr. and 
Mrs. Livingston are the parents of a daughter, Clara 
Elizabeth, born in Jamestown, May 5, igoo. 



REV. WILLIAM ALLEN HALLOCK is an hon- 
ored and devoted minister of the Congregational church, 
who spent a part of his mature life in Chautauqua 
county. 

Through his mother he traced his descent to the 
Pilgrims, counting five ancestors who came over in the 
"Mayflower." His father's family settled in Southold, 
L. I., in 1640, Peter Hallock being the first of the name 
in this country. Mr. Hallock's great-grandfather, also 
named William, married Alice Homan, of Chilmark, 
Nantucket, and about 1766 moved to Goshen, Mass. He, 
with his two sons, Jeremiah and Moses, served in the 
War of the Revolution. 

The Rev. Moses Hallock was graduated from Yale 
College in 178S, and on the completion of his theological 
studies was ordained pastor of the Congregational 
church in Plainfield, Mass., which he served for forty- 
five years. In addition to his ministerial duties, he 
established in his home a classical school for boys in 
which he fitted more than 300 for college. Among 
them were seven of the early missionaries, more than 
fifty clergymen, and others widely known including the 
poet Bryant, Marcus Whitman, who saved Oregon, 
and John Brown, of Ossowatomie. 

His wife was Margaret (Allen) Hallock, of Chilmark, 
Nantucket, a descendant of Thomas Mayhew, the first 
governor of Martha's Vineyard and Nantucket, as well 
as a successful missionary to the Indians living on those 
islands. Of the four sons who received their early 
training in the home school. Rev. William A. Hallock, 
D. D., was for fifty years at the head of the American 
Tract Society; Gerard, for over thirty years editor of 
the New York Journal of Commerce ; and Homan, a 
missionary printer, made the first Arabic type in Syria. 
The remaining son, Leavitt H. Hallock, father of Rev. 
William A. Hallock, was born in Plainfield, Jan. 21, 1798, 
where he spent most of his life. He was a general 
merchant, for some time a tanner, and a farmer. He 
served several terms as justice of the peace, was post- 
master, and in 1849 was elected to the Massachusetts 
Legislature. He died Oct. 16, 1877, at the home of his 
son, Rev. Leavitt H. Hallock, D. D., in West Winstead, 
Conn. In 1829 he married Elizabeth Porter Snell, 
daughter of Ebenezer and Deborah (Porter) Snell, of 
Cummington, Mass., her Aunt Sarah being the mother of 
William CuUen Bryant. The children of this marriage 
v;ere twin daughters, Fanny and Eliza ; Fanny married 
Rev. Henry M. Hazeltine, of Jamestown, where she 
died Jan. 10, 1920; Eliza married Rev. Thomas H. 
Rouse, who was pastor of the First Congregational 
Church of Jamestown from 1856 to 1868; Rev. William 
A. Hallock, born in Plainfield, Aug. 27, 1832; also -i 



younger brother, Rev. Leavitt H. Hallock, D. D., now 
of Portland, Me. 

Rev. William A. Hallock was graduated from 
Amherst College, in 1855. He entered Yale Theological 
Seminary, but owing to an accident was obliged to drop 
his studies. A voyage on a sailing vessel to Constan- 
tinople restored his health, and in 1859 he was graduated 
from the Hartford Theo4ogical Seminary and accepted 
the pastorate, of the Congregational Church in Gilead, 
Conn., where he remained for four years, until a rail- 
road accident compelled him to give up his work. He 
then moved to Jamestown and when his health again 
improved preached acceptably in Kiantone, Frewsburg, 
Sugar Grove, and Ashville. In 1877 he went to Con- 
necticut, where he served the Congregational church in 
Bloomfield for twelve years. He then returned to James- 
town, N. Y., which he considered his home for the 
remainder of his life, though much of the last years 
were spent in Porto Rico. He died Sept. 4, 1911, and 
is buried in Jamestown. The funeral service was held in 
Pilgrim Memorial Church, and was unusually impres- 
sive, his brother, Dr. Hallock, delivering a beautiful 
tribute of love and appreciation. 

Mr. Hallock had a strong character. He was an able 
pulpit orator, abounding in energy and enthusiasm. 
The churches which he served prospered under his 
leadership. In Jamestown, after retiring from active 
ministerial work, he took a deep interest in the Sunday 
school out of which grew Pilgrim Memorial Church, 
and was for some years its superintendent. He gave 
the site for the Young Men's Christian Association 
building in Jamestown, and his portrait hangs in the 
library. Mr. Hallock was active and impulsive, at 
the same time showing an unusual perseverance in 
carrying through any enterprise he undertook. 

He married, Sept. 19, i860, Clara M. Hall, daughter 
of William and Julia (Jones) Hall, born in James- 
town, July 5, 1836, died Sept. 17, 1897. A son, William 
Hall, born in 1864, died in 1894, after several years 
study in Germany, where he had gone after completing 
his college course at Amherst. A daughter, Nellie 
Elizabeth, graduated at Smith College, and on June 21, 
1899, married Alfred Tracy Livingston, M. D., of James- 
town, who now (1920) has a summer home at Drift- 
wood-on-Chautauqua, but spends the winters in Dorado, 
Porto Rico. Dr. and Mrs. Livingston have one daughter, 
Clara Elizabeth. 

William Hall, father of Mrs. Clara M. (Hall) 
Hallock, was born in Wardsboro, Vt., Aug. 17, 1793, 
died in Jamestown, N. Y., July 6, 1880, having been a 
resident there for sixty-four years, son of William and 
Abigail (Pease) Hall, his father a Revolutionary soldier. 
William Hall came to Jamestown in 1816 and became 
one of the leading business men, a public-spirited citizen. 
He married Julia Jones, daughter of Solomon Jones, 
and they were the parents of: Colonel William C. J. 
Hall; Rev. Elliot C. Hall; and Clara M. Hall, wife of 
Rev. William Allen Hallock. 



JOHN CHAMBERLAIN MASON— From boyhood 

John C. Mason has been identified with the jewelry 
business, serving an apprenticeship under his honored 
father, Levant L. Mason, a wonderfully skilled jeweler 



3S4 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



and engraver, and Jamestown's oldest merchant at the 
time 01 his death in ion. In the course of time his son 
succeeded him but not in the store which had been their 
mutual business home for so long. John C. Mason mov- 
ing a block further north to Ko. 305 Main street, his 
present location. Xot alone as a successful business 
man is he known in Jamestown, the city of his birth, 
but as a man of genial, social nature, gifted in mind, 
a good entertainer, and versatile writer. Who does not 
recall his minstrel shows with their burlesque of the 
Board of Aldermen and other local characters, written 
by Mr. Mason, full of pungent wit and humor, wit with- 
out malice or sting, and humor clean and wholesome. 
The ladies of the Warren Home for the Aged remember 
his entertainments in their behalf, and in countless ways 
Mr. Mason has added to the fund of humorous enter- 
tainments. He is a son of Levant L. and Eunice 
(Stevens) Mason, and a grandson of Belden B. and 
Mercy (Whitcomb") Mason, who came to Jamestown 
from Erie county, N. Y.. in 1831. 

Levant L. Mason was born at Clarence. Erie county, 
\. v.. Dec. 25. 1S26. died in Jamestown, N. Y., in 191 1. 
His parents came to Jamestown in 1831, and that city 
was ever afterward his home with the exception of the 
years spent in Rochester, N. Y.. learning the jeweler's 
trade. He was engaged in the jewelry business in 
Jamestown, occupying several locations before finally 
purchasing the building at No. 217 Main street, where 
he continued in business until his retirement after sixty 
years of service. He served Jamestown as trustee and 
village president; as a member of the Board of Educa- 
tion for si.xteen years ; and as secretary and superin- 
tendent of the Lake View Cemetery Association from 
1876 for more than a quarter of a century. For more 
than half a century he was vestryman or warden of St. 
Luke's Protestant Episcopal Church ; was a past master 
of Mt. Moriah Lodge. Free and Accepted Masons (an 
honor also held by his son. John C. Mason) ; was a 
companion of Western Sun Chapter. Royal Arch 
Masons ; and a sir knight of Jamestown Commandery, 
Knights Templar. 

Levant L. Mason married, at Rochester, N. Y., May 
10. 1850. Eunice Stevens, and on May 10, 1900. they 
celebrated the golden anniversary of their wedding day, 
their home during all of that period having been at the 
corner of Lafayette and West Second streets. Mrs. 
Mason died Dec. 7, 1903. They were the parents of 
three children : John C., of further mention ; Caroline, 
married Henry S. Penfield ; Lucy H., married Fred- 
erick P. Hall, of Jamestown. 

John C. Mason was born in Jamestown. N. \.. Oct. 5, 
1851. and there spent the years of his minority. He passed 
the grades of Jamestown's primary, grammar and high 
schrx-jis, then served a regular apprenticeship to the 
jeweler's trade under his father, with whom he re- 
mained until attaining legal age, in 1872. In that year 
he opened a jewelry store in Mayvillc, Chautau(|ua 
county N. V., there remaining seven years. The next 
four years were "^pe-nt in the jewelry business in Ran- 
dolph. N. v., then after an absence of eleven years .Mr. 
Mason relurn'd to Jamestown and his father's employ. 
They were aisoriat'd in business at No. 217 Main street 
fr/T all the years which intervened until Levant L. Mason 
retired, but not as partners, the son a salaried man, but 



carrying the heavier responsibilities. During this period 
John C. Mason perfected himself in the optician's art 
by a course in Cleveland and added that as a special 
department of the business. Finally Levant L. Mason, 
then an octogenarian, disposed of his stock at auction 
and retired. John C. Mason then moving to his present 
location, No. 305 Main street, where with new, fresh 
stock and fixtures he opened a modern jewelry store 
with an optical department. That was in 1910 and there 
he still continues, well-established and prosperous. He 
is a member and a former president of the Jamestown 
Jewelers' .•\ssociation, resigning that oflice in 1919. 
Honorable and upright in his business life, Mr. Mason 
retains leading position in the business which has been 
conducted in Jamestown under the Mason name for 
over seventy years. 

Social and genial in nature, Mr. Mason has long been 
identified with leading fraternal orders and has recently 
extended his connections by entering the Ancient 
Accepted Scottish Rite of the Masonic order. He is a 
past master of Mt. Moriah Lodge, Free and .•\ccepted 
Masons: past high priest of Western Sun Chapter, 
Royal Arch Masons ; member of Jamestown Council, 
Royal and Select Masters ; and Jamestown Commandery, 
Knights Templar. He is also past exalted ruler of 
Jamestown Lodge, Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks. The partisan preferences of earlier years have 
given way to a cooler view of matters political, and 
"Independent" best expresses his present position. He 
is a member of St. Luke's Protestant Episcopal Church. 

Mr. Mason was for many years interested in local 
amateur theatricals, his special field little plays of his 
own composition, a burlesque on local politicians and 
others, put on under the guise of a minstrel show. He 
frequently recited at lodge and social entertainments 
selections from humorous writings, but best pleased his 
audiences by poems of his own. bringing out good-natur- 
edly the traits, sayings and characteristics of the local 
"Great or nearly Great." He was a good entertainer and 
has not entirely outgrown the pleasures a good entertain- 
ment afl^ords. He has prepared for this work a chapter 
on the Elks lodges of Chautauqua, and in a pleasing 
manner shown some of the beauties of that order. His 
recreations in his younger years were those of the out- 
of-doors, trout fishing especially appealing to him. 

Mr. Mason married, in Randolph, N. Y.. Caroline J. 
Mason, of Schenectady, N. Y., a distant relative. They 
are the parents of a son and daughter: William C, 
married Harriet Staples and they arc the parents of a 
son, Charles : Eunice Stevens. 



ARTHUR WHITE SWAN— The business career 

of Arthur W. Swi'U, cashier of the National Chautauqua 
County Bank, of Jamestown, N. Y., began in a mercan- 
tile house, but banking early attracted him and for 
twenty-one years he has steadily pursued that branch 
of business activity. The position he now ably fills 
came to him through a scries of earned promotions, 
ftjr he began at the bottom and has risen through merit 
alone. He is a son of Daniel S. and Margaret E. 
(White) Swan, of R.-mdoIpli. Cattaraugus county, N. Y. 
Arthur W. Swan was Iiorn in Randolph, April 8, 1880, 
and there spent his youth and earliest manhood. He was 




^0x1 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



385 



educated in the public schools and at Chamberlain Insti- 
tute, Randolph, and when school years were completed 
he entered business life as clerk in a Randolph store. 
In 1899 he became an employee of the State Bank of 
Randolph and there found his true vocation. Three 
years were spent in the Randolph bank, then, at the age 
of twenty-two, he came to Jamestown and in igoj be- 
came a clerk in the National Chautauqua County Bank. 
That was eighteen years ago and from clerk he has 
risen through promotions to the cashier's desk, having 
held that position since 1916. He is a young man of 
character and integrity, well versed in the principle of 
the business he follows, and highly regarded in the 
banking fraternity. In his younger years athletic sports 
strongly appealed to Mr. Swan, but his out-of-doors 
recreation now is with rod and reel. He is a member of 
the Sportman's Club, and his holidays are usually spent 
on Chautauqua Lake, and Mrs. Swan is as enthusiastic 
a bass fisherman as her husband. Mr. Swan is a mem- 
ber of the Jamestown Rotary Club and Chamber of 
Commerce, lending his influence and personal aid to 
forward the work of these two organizations of business 
men who are laboring for the advancement of local 
interests. He is a past master of Mt. Moriah Lodge, 
Free and Accepted Masons, and past chancellor com- 
mander of Crescent Lodge, Knights of Pythias; a 
member of the First Presbyterian Church, and in politics 
an independent voter. 

Mr. Swan married, in Jamestown, Oct. 4. 1906, Sadie 
M. Loucks, daughter of Wallace and Mary E. Loucks, 
of Jamestown. Mr. and Mrs. Swan are the parents of a 
son, Daniel A., born Aug. 16, 1907. 



CLARENCE A. HULTQUIST— For about forty 
years Clarence A. Hultquist has been a resident of 
Jamestown, and since 1903 has been numbered among 
the enterprising, prosperous merchants of that city, 
being proprietor of The Fair, a high-class variety store, 
and vice-president of the Jamestown Upholstery Com- 
pany, manufacturers of upholstered furniture. He is 
one of the successful business men of Jamestown, wdiich 
has long been his home, and has contributed his full 
share to its development. 

Clarence .\. Hultquist was bom in Sweden, June 25, 
1864, and there spent his youth. Some of his relatives 
had come to the United States and hadMocated in James- 
town, N. Y., and he decided to join them. He arrived 
here in 1881, and after locating his relatives he found 
employment, spending three years with the Jamestown 
Worsted Mills. Factory life held no attraction for him, 
and leaving the worsted mills he became connected 
with J. B. Collins, the founder of The Fair, a variety 
store at the corner of Third and Main streets, James- 
town. There the young man found more suitable em- 
ployment, and from that year imtil the present he has 
been engaged in the field of retail merchandizing. He 
began as a clerk under Mr. Collins and continued with 
him in constantly advancing position until 1903, when 
Mr. Hultquist made his first venture as an independent 
merchant. For one year he operated a store on Second 
street, then opened his present establishment at No. 18 
East Third street, which he conducts under the same 
name as that of the old store in which he was so long 
a clerk. The Fair may properly be classed as a variety 
Chau— 25 



store as its lines are many, but perhaps crockery and 
glass-ware best describe it. A wonderful line of toys 
and games is carried, kitchen-ware of all kinds, the store 
being well arranged and stocked with an abundance of 
standard and seasonable goods. The volume of business 
has steadily increased with years, and The Fair is con- 
sidered one of Jamestown's foremost stores. When the 
Jamestown Upholstery Company was organized by 
former employees of the Jamestown Lounge Company, 
Mr. Hultquisf secured an interest which has been 
increased, he having been vice-president of the company, 
his son, Carl A. Hultquist, secretary, another son. Earl 
O. Hultquist, treasurer. The company manufacture 
upholstered furniture at their plant. No. 300 Crescent 
street, Jamestown. Fred A. Nelson, one of the incor- 
porators of the company, is president (1920). The 
company is a conservative, well-managed corporation 
with a modern factory plant, and has grown to a con- 
dition of prosperity and reliability. 

Although essentially a business man, Mr. Hultquist 
has many outside interests, social, fraternal, and religi- 
ous, which have brought him much into the public eye. 
He is a member of the Norden Club, the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks, the Swedish Brotherhood, 
Knights of the Maccabees, and Lief Erikson Lodge, No. 
26, Scandinavian Fraternal .'Association of America. He 
is a long time member of the First Lutheran Church of 
Jamestown and its present treasurer. In politics he is 
a Republican. 

Mr. Hultquist married, in Jamestown, Carlotta Matilda 
Peterson, of Jamestown. They are the parents of 
three children : i. Carl A., secretary of the Jamestown 
LIpholstery Company; residing at home with his parents. 

2. Earl O., secretary-treasurer of the Art Metal Con- 
struction Company and treasurer of the Jamestown 
Upholstery Company; he married Marguerite Peterson, 
and they reside at No. 105 Chandler street, Jamestown. 

3. Bessie A., the only daughter, resides with her parents 
at the family home No. 839 Prendergast avenue. 



FRANK JOHN KANE, D. D. S.— Among the most 
successful and prominent of the rising dentists of 
Dunkirk, Chautauqua county, N. Y., is Dr. Frank J. 
Kane, a native of that city, whose entire life up to the 
present, save for the short period of his college career, 
has been identified with its afifairs. Dr. Kane is a son 
of Daniel and Mary (CliiTord) Kane, old and respected 
residents of Dunkirk, who still reside there. The elder 
Mr. Kane and his wife were the parents of four 
children, Julia, Frank John, with whom we are here con- 
cerned, Daniel and John. 

Dr. Kane was born at Dunkirk, Feb. 26. 1894, and passed 
his childhood at the home of his parents in that city, 
attending, when he became old enough, the public 
schools. He passed through the grammar grades and 
later entered the high school, where his general educa- 
tion was completed and he was prepared for a collegi- 
ate course. As a youth he was ambitious of a profes- 
sional career, and accordingly matriculated at the Dental 
School of the University of Michigan at Ann .\rbor. 
There he took the prescribed course and graduated with 
the class of 1916, having established a reputation as 
an intelligent and industrious student. In 1916 also he 
passed the examinations of the state boards of Michigan 



386 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



and Xew York, and for the following year was asso- 
ciated with a prominent dentist of Detroit. It was in 
1017 that he opened his own office at Dunkirk and began 
the practice of his profession there. His office is one 
of the most perfectly equipped in the city, having all 
the most modern instruments and appliances for the 
dental surgeon, and his own skill and knowledge is 
generally recognized so that his practice has developed 
in the three years of his activities here and is still grow- 
ing rapidly. Dr. Kane has always interested himself in 
the general life of the community and takes a prominent 
part therein, being a member of a number of organiza- 
tions of various kinds. He became a member of the 
t'hi Psi Phi fraternity during his college days, and 
since then has become affiliated with the local chapter 
of the Knights of Columbus of the third degree and 
the^ .\merican Preparedness League. In politics he is an 
Independent, associating himself with no party but pre- 
ferring to exercise his own judgement on all matters 
of public issue without regard to partisan considerations 
of any kind. He is a Roman Catholic in religious belief, 
and attends the Church of St. Mary of that denomina- 
tion at Dunkirk. 



CHARLES L. ECKMAN— Throughout the length 
and breadth of our country we find men who have 
worked their way unaided from the lowest rung of the 
ladder to positions of eminence and power in the com- 
munity, and not the fewest of these have been of 
foreign birth or descent. The more credit is due them 
for the additional obstacles they had to overcome, and 
the indomitable courage with which they have been 
possessed. Financial affiairs have been especially bene- 
fited by this influx of foreign ideas, and those of 
Swedish birth or descent have earned distinction to an 
even greater extent than those of other nations. An 
example in point is the life of Charles L. Eckman, 
of Jamestown, X. Y., who was born May 9, 1866^ near 
Kaimar, Sweden, a son of N. P. and Sophie Eckman. 
.Mr. Eckman, Sr., was a native of Sweden, but came to 
this country in 1869 and was for many years employed 
ir. the business of refining petroleum in Western Penn- 
sylvania. He is at present living retired. 

Charles L. Eckman received his education in the pub- 
lic schools of Titusville, Pa., and Buffalo, N. Y., and 
after finishing his studies became a telegraph operator, 
continuing along this line for some time, then accepted 
a position as clerk in the Commercial Bank of Titus- 
ville. He later became an accountant for S. S. Bryan 
& Company of the same city. In 1894 he became suc- 
cessively, secretary, treasurer and general manager of 
the Breed-Johnson Furniture Company of Jamestown, 
and some years later Mr. Eckman, with his brother, 
J. A. Eckman, purchased the interests of the other mem- 
bers of the firm and the name was changed to The 
Eckman Furniture Company, of which Mr. Eckman is 
now the head. 

Politically Mr. Eckman is a staunch Republican, but 
he has never cared for the emoluments of office. He is 
a member of the commission governing the O. E. Jones 
Ocn'-ral Hospit'd, and was formerly on the Board of 
the Farmers and Mechanics Bank, but since the organ- 
ization of the American National Bank has been on its 
executive committee, which office he holds at the present 



time. Fraternally Mr. Eckman is a member of the 
Masonic bodies ; a member of the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows; a member of the Norden Club, of which 
he was oite of the founders and president for some 
time; was also the first vice-president of the Board of 
Commerce from its organization up to 1920; on the 
executive committee of the Manufacturers' Association; 
on the Board of the Swedish Chamber of Commerce of 
New York; is the chairman for this district of the 
American Scandinavian Foundation of New York; and 
is a member of the Swedish Historical Society of Amer- 
ica. Ever since the Jamestown Furniture Market Asso- 
ciation was organized he has served as its treasurer. 
Mr. Eckman also had the high honor of being knighted 
by King Gustav V, of Sweden, receiving the degree, 
Royal Order of Vasa, First Class, in 1916. In religious 
affiliations Mr. Eckman and wife are prominent mem- 
bers of the First Lutheran Church of Jamestown, and 
are active in all its social as well as business afl'airs. 
Mr. Eckman is chairman of the Pension Committee of 
the Lutheran Augustana Synod for the Eastern States. 

On Aug. 5, 1897, in Jamestown, N. Y., Mr. Eckman 
was united in marriage with Agnes Branney, a daughter 
of Caroline Branney. Mrs. Eckman is a woman of true 
refinement and culture and is very popular in the social 
circles of Jamestown. She is a member of the Board 
of Education of the city, secretary of the Visiting Nurse 
Association, also active in other organizations in James- 
town as well as elsewhere. 

It can be said that the business career of Mr. Eckman 
has been one which he carved out for himself, his 
advancement being due to the exercise of his powers, 
and to the possession of an industry which his will 
never allowed to falter, as well as to a close study of 
business conditions and his utilization of opportunities 
which others might have employed had they as carefully 
sought the way to success. He is a man of progressive 
ideas, has been successful in his business, and has proved 
his ability as manager of an enterprise which calls for 
intelligence, tact and skill. He has long been one of 
Jamestown's representative citizens, ever ready to give 
practical aid to any improvement which he believes will 
advance the public welfare. He is, as all who know him 
can testify, a man of pleasing manners, and what is 
better still, he is equally well known as a man of experi- 
ence and trained mind. He is a most conspicuous 
example of the man who wins the confidence and respect 
of his fellowmen by strictly following the rules of life, 
both in a private and business way. 



HENRY R. HOUGHTON— Prominent among the 
successful farmers of Chautauqua county, N, Y., is 
Henry R. Houghton, born in Lewis county, N. Y., April 
24, 1849. the son of Thomas Bennett and Elizabeth 
(Lamphier) Houghton, both old and highly respected 
residents of that region, where the elder Houghton 
followed the trade of painter, later turning his attention 
to farming. 

Henry R. Houghton received his education in the 
district schools of his n;itivc place, but was forced to 
leave school at the age of fifteen years in order to help 
his family, who were left without support about that 
time. His father had enlisted in the Union army, in 
the Civil War, and there gave his life for his country, 




yiC^^-€^^^^^^-^ X^ ^3^^^ 




A^?Ji-x.^Jk~ u^ , ^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



387 



and his son took up the burden of caring for the family. 
In 1S63, Mr. Houghton came to Ripley and began his 
life as a farmer, and has now one of the most prosper- 
ous and flourishing farms in this region. Mr. Houghton 
is prominent in social and fraternal circles here, being 
a member of the local lodge of the Ancient Free and 
Accepted Masons and the Scottish Rite bodies of this 
place. He is also past noble grand of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, and a member of the encamp- 
ment as well as the local grange. He is a staunch sup- 
porter of the Republican party, and although he has 
never been desirous of holding public office has taken 
an intelligent and active interest in local public affairs 
as well as in tlie nation-at-large. He is a member of 
the Jlethodist Episcopal church. 

Henry R. Houghton was united in marriage at Ripley, 
Nov. 5. 1S73, with Effie A. Rhinehart, a native of Ripley, 
a daughter of James and Jane (Binder) Rhinehart, and 
they are the parents of three children, as follows: I. 
Leon Eugene, born Nov. 23, 1S74; he was educated in 
the public schools of Ripley ; married Lyda Mattice, a 
native of Canada, Nov. 26, 1895 ; they are the parents 
of two children: Harold E., born Nov. 16, 1890, enlisted 
in the United States Army in May, 1917, but was shortly 
afterwards killed in a railway accident at Erie, Pa. ; and 
Hazel L., born March 3, 1898. now the wife of Harry 
Swab, to whom was born one child, Albert, April 10, 
1918. 2. James Bennett, born April 6, 1881 ; was edu- 
cated in the schools of his native town ; has always 
followed the occupation of farming ; like his father he 
is prominent in social and fraternal circles in Ripley, 
being a member of the local lodge of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, of which he is past noble grand, 
also past member of the Grand Lodge; a member of the 
local lodge of the Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, 
a member of Ripley Grange, No. 65, Patrons of Hus- 
bandry ; is an active participant in the affairs of the 
Republican party, having been supervisor of elections 
for twelve years ; he has held the office of township 
assessor for two years, his present term expiring in 
1921 ; he attends the Methodist Episcopal church ; 
James Bennett Houghton married Mary Elizabeth 
Marwood, of Franklin, Pa., Feb. 17, 1904; Mrs. Hough- 
ton was formerly a resident of Ohio, where her birth 
occurred ; three children have been bom of this marriage, 
as follows : Ralph Marwood, born Feb. 20, 1905 ; Laura 
Jane, born Nov. 22, 1906; both being students in the 
local high school; Marjorie E., born March 15, 1910, 
a student in the public school here. 3. Elizabeth G., 
lorn Nov. 10, 1885; graduated from the Ripley High 
School and later graduated from Allegheny College; 
she taught school a few years ; was married. May 29, 
1912, to Joseph D. Piper, also a graduate of Allegheny 
College ; one girl, Marian Jane, was born from this 
union. Jan. 4, 1918; Mr. Piper, a resident of Derry, Pa., 
is an ordained Methodist minister, who was later made 
chaplain of the 137th Regiment, 88th Division, in the 
World War. 



to several families which have long been prominent in 
this region, notably that of Douglas, the members of 
which have taken active part in many different callings 
hereabouts. 

George G. Crosby is a son of Ransom and Mary 
(Hunt) Crosby, being one of five children, namely: 
Eugene, William, George Guion, Dr. Birdina and Lillian. 
As a lad Mr. Crosby attended the public schools of his 
native region. He was quite young when he began his 
business career, and for fifteen years was occupied 
variously. He entered into his present business of cattle 
dealing a number of years ago and later added farming 
to his occupation. At the present time Mr. Crosby 
manages a fine vineyard of fifty-eight acres and has 
done considerable to promote the grape-growing in- 
dustry in this part of the county. He also continues 
dealing largely in cattle, buying and selling on an aver- 
age of 200 head each year. He also dresses cattle for 
market, which he sells to local butchers, and does con- 
siderable private trade both in wholesale and retail 
dressed beef. 

Mr. Crosby has always been keenly interested in the 
general life of the community, and is a member of 
several important organizations at Brocton. He is 
affiliated with the local lodge. Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, and Brocton Lodge, Free and Accepted 
Masons. In politics he is an Independent Republican, 
and in his religious belief a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church, which he has supported liberally here. 



GEORGE GUION CROSBY, who has been prom- 
inently engaged in agricultural pursuits, and is also a 
dealer in cattle at Brocton, Chautauqua county, N. Y., 
is a native of this place, his birth having occurred in 
Portland township, April 9, 1881. Mr. Crosby is related 



GEORGE EDWARD SMITH, M. D., who has 

been one of the most prominent figures in medical circles 
at Dunkirk. Chautauqua county, N. Y., and has at the 
present time one of the largest practices in the city, is 
a native of Attica, Wyoming county, N. Y., his birth 
having occurred there May 13. 1863. His parents were 
Howard Powers and Philena (Nichols) Smith, the 
former for many years engaged in the business of 
cabinetmaker and carpenter at Rochester, N. Y. He 
afterwards became a contractor and builder and was 
very successful in this line at the same place. He and 
his wife were the parents of three children, as follows: 
George Edward, with whose career we are here especially 
concerned; Elizabeth, who died in infancy; and C. P., 
who became a prominent undertaker at Buffalo, N. Y., 
and resided at that place until his death. 

George Edward Smith passed his childhood in a 
num.ber of localities in Western New York, including 
his native town of Attica and the city of Rochester, 
and obtained his education at the public schools of 
Wj'oming and Genesee counties. He attended the 
Wyoming County Seminary for a number of years and 
later the Attica High School, completing his elementary 
education and preparing himself for college at the latter 
institution. He had by this time determined upon a 
medical career, and with this end in view matriculated 
at the Medical School of the LTniversity of Buffalo, 
from which he was graduated with his degree as Doctor 
of Medicine with the class of 1886. He returned to New 
York State and established himself in practice at Alex- 
ander, where he also took an active part in public life 
and held the office of town clerk in 1887 and 1888. After 
a few years spent in Alexander he removed to Busti, 
N. Y., and from there to Cherry Creek, where he 



3^8 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



served as health officer. Dr. Smith first came to this 
neighborhood in the year 1904, when he moved to Fre- 
donia. where for a short time he continued in active 
practice and held the office of town physician. Later he 
opened h.is present office in Dunkirk and since that time 
has been practicing there, being now recognized as one 
of the leading members of his profession. Dr. Smith 
has been prominent in the general life of Dunkirk and 
is a member of many organizations, professional and 
otherwise, including the Dunkirk and Fredonia Medical 
Socier\-, of which he was at one time president ; the 
Chautauqua County Medical Society, of which he is now 
second vice-president : the New York State Medical 
Societ>- : and the .\merican Medical Association. He is 
also affiliated with the Masonic order and the local 
chapter of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and 
is past grand of the latter. He is a Republican in 
politics, and always keenly interested in public questions, 
but his professional duties prevent him from taking so 
active a part in politics as his abilities fit him for. In 
his religious belief he is a Baptist and attends the First 
Baptist Church at Fredonia. 

Dr. Smith was united in marriage, July 30, 1890, with 
Lydia .-Vnn Lowell, of .\ngelica, X. V., a daughter of 
Daniel D. and Lydia (Carpenter) Lowell, of that 
place. They are the parents of one child, Chester Alan 
Smith, who is now a student at Dunkirk High School. 



FRANKLIN W. RICKENBRODE— As a farmer 
of many years' standing and unusual success Mr. Rick- 
enbrode easily holds a conspicuous place among the 
agriculturists of Chautauqua county. His neighbors of 
Ripley know him also as a public-spirited citizen, active 
in community matters and greatly interested in fraternal 
affairs. 

Henry Rickenbrode, father of Franklin W. Ricken- 
brode. was a farmer of Walton, Eaton county, Mich., 
subsequently moving to Ripley. He married Harriett 
Kinch and their children were: Alice A., Franklin W., 
mentioned below; William W,, and Clara A. 

Franklin W. Rickenbrode, son of Henry and Harriett 
CKinch I Rickenbrode, was born July 24, 1859, on his 
father's farm at Walton. Eaton county, Mich., and was 
six years old when the family moved to Ripley. There 
he was educated in local schools, assisting in the labors 
of the farm until he attained his majority. He then 
entered upon an independent course of life and a few 
years later, by going deeply into debt, he was able to 
purchase a farm of fifty-six acres. This land he now 
devotes to (general f.irming and grape culture and has 
cxtf-nsively improved, having erected two large barns 
and varic-us outbuildings, all of the latest and best in 
structurf and equipment. In his residence, which is a 
very fine old Colonial house, he has made no alterations 
cxccf>t such as were necessary in order to put it in 
pcrfft r'-pair. In addition to the care of his own farm, 
Mr. Rickenbrode manages the homestead in which his 
brolhfT. his sifter and himself each have an interest. 
This farm, which consists of .sixty-three acres, is also 
kept in a Kood state of cultivation. Politically he is an 
indejiendent voter. He b'-longs to the finmgc. Patrons 
'•f Husbandry, affiliates with the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, beinK past noble granfl of his own lodge 
and in the Grand Lodge holds membership. His religious 



afliliations have been and are with the Methodist Episco- 
pal church. 

Mr. Rickenbrode married, June 4, 1884, Ella F., 
daughter of Albert G. and Clarrissa Tillinghast, and they 
are the parents of one child, May Alice, educated in 
Ripley, and now at home on the farm, 

Franklin W. Rickenbrode is living a large life. His 
interests are many and he neglects none of them. He 
has built up his own fortune and in doing so has ren- 
dered himself useful to his community, winning the 
sincere respect and cordial liking of his neighbors and 
fellow-citizens. 



FREDERICK PERRY HALL— In the year 1876 
the Jamestown "Journal" passed into the hands of John 
A. Hall, whose previous political contributions to the 
press under the pseudonym of Paul Pry had given him 
some inclination toward a journalistic career, but who 
was primarily interested in its purchase by his young- 
est son, Frederick Perry Hall, then a mere lad of six- 
teen years, who for a year or two previously had oper- 
ated an amateur printing outfit. Taking his son into 
his employ as the business manager, Mr. Hall, Sr., 
started the "Journal," which had been established in 
1826, upon a successful career. He soon took the son 
into a full partnership, the firm being known as John 
A. Hall & Son until the death of the father in 1886. 
Frederick P. Hall then associated with him Fred W. 
Hyde and Walter B. Armitage, as copartners in the 
firm of the Journal Printing Company, which was estab- 
lished as a corporation in 1894 with Mr. Hall as its 
president, general manager and principal stockholder. 
The "Journal" from 1870 had both a daily and weekly 
issue, the latter being changed to a semi-weekly in 1892 
and a tri-weekly in 1901. The "Journal" occupies its 
own building at Nos. 12-14-16 West Second street. Its 
present officers are : Frederick P. Hall, president and 
general manager; J. A. Clary, vice-president and man- 
aging editor; Henri M. Hall, treasurer and business 
manager; and Levant M. Hall, secretary and advertising 
manager. 

Under the Hall management the "Journal" has grown 
into closely intimate relations with Chautauqua county, 
and the name Hall is practically synonomous with 
"Journal" to Chautauquans, and is apt to continue to be, 
for from 1006 a third generation of this family has been 
associated in the management. Mr. Hall has been rated 
in public opinion more the publisher than the business 
man. more the journalist than the manufacturer, the 
banker, the public-spirited citizen, when the facts are 
that he has long been identified with a number of other 
successful enterprises in Jamestown, and a prominent 
factor in its social, political, fraternal, philanthropic 
and religious circles. 

Frederick Perry Hall, youngest son of John A. and 
Emily (Perry) Hall, was born in the town of Busti, 
Chautauqua county, N. Y., Nov. 8. 1850, and there spent 
the first twelve years of his life. In 1872, with his 
parents, he moved to Jamestown, where he continued his 
studies in the Jamestown Union School and Collegiate 
Institute until 1876, when he gave up his schooling to 
enter the employ of his father, who on May 20, 1876, 
had purchased and taken over the Jamestown "Journal," 
soon becoming a partner with his father in the piibli- 







-^^C^L^^Jc /^TTFti-t^^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



389 



cation of the "Journal," and after his father's death in 
1886, the controlling factor in the paper. Mr. Hall has 
devoted his business career to the conduct of this news- 
paper which is recognized as one of the most successful 
and influential papers in this end of the State. Recog- 
nition of his standing among publishers is evidenced by 
the fact that he has been honored by selection as presi- 
dent of the New York State Press Association in 1894, 
of the Xew York Associated Dailies in 1908, and a vice- 
president of the National Editorial Association in 1909, 
at the time its annual meeting was held in Seattle, Wash. 
He was a member of the executive committee, vice- 
president, and in 1901 president, of the New York State 
Republican Editorial Association ; has frequently been a 
delegate to conventions of newspaper men, and was 
named a member of the executive committee of the new 
State Association of Publishers, formed in 1920. 

A Republican in politics, Mr. Hall has aided in the up- 
building of a strongly Republican community (Chautau- 
qua being a banner Republican county) not alone 
through the columns of the "Journal" but by personal 
work. He was chairman of the County Committee in 
1898-99, the county under his leadership rolling up one 
of its largest Republican majorities, and in 1920, as 
president of the Harding & Coolidge Club of Jamestown, 
he was a directing factor in the effective campaign of 
that year. 

Mr. Hall's interests outside of the "Journal" have 
been many. He early became a director of the Union 
Trust Company, which was established in Jamestown 
in 1S94, was for years its treasurer and is now a vice- 
president of that institution. He is also a director of 
the National Chautauqua County Bank. He is presi- 
dent of the Chautauqua Abstract Company, and has 
been since the company was first organized and started 
in business at Mayville, the county seat. In 1912, Mr. 
Hall was invited to become president of the Salisbury 
Wheel & Axle Company, a leading industry of James- 
town, then at a critical period of its history on account 
of lack of working capital to take care of its rapidly 
expanding business. Through Mr. Hall's assistance the 
affairs of the company were placed on a sound financial 
basis, the plant largely expanded, and the business in- 
creased from a production of a million dollars a year to 
approximately five millions a year. In 1919 the plant 
was sold to Eastern interests. 

A bronze tablet in the Furniture Manufacturers' nine- 
story building at West Second and Washington streets 
records the fact that Mr. Hall was one of a board 
of five men which formulated the plan, secured the 
finances, and built the splendid structure which con- 
tributes much to the success of the furniture industry 
in Jamestown. Mr. Hall has been the secretary and 
treasurer of the company from its beginning. 

Few men have taken a more interested, a more in- 
fluential, or a more useful part in the various com- 
munity interests of Jamestown than Mr. Hall. Since 
1883 he has been a director of the Young Men's Chris- 
tian .\ssociation, since 1887 a vestryman of St. Luke's 
Protestant Episcopal Church. He succeeded his father 
as a trustee of Lakeview Cemetery Association, and 
has been for several years president of the board. He 
was appointed a member of the city's first Park Com- 
mission and has ever since that time continued to have 



a hand in the planning and maintenance of the parks of 
the city. During the World War he served in a prom- 
inent position on all Liberty Loan and war charity 
drives, and is a member of the budget committee of the 
Jamestown Community Chest, charged with fixing the 
quota of all local charities in the annual appeals for 
their support. He was by appointment of Governor Levi 
P. Morton made a member of the board of managers 
of the State Hospital for the Insane at Buffalo, and was 
for a time, its vice-president. He declined reappoint- 
ment at the hands of Governor Roosevelt but did yield 
to the request of the State Charities Aid Association to 
accept appointment upon the board of visitors to the 
State Hospital at Gowanda, a position he yet holds. Mr. 
Hall holds all degrees of the York and Scottish rites 
of Masonry up to and including the thirty-second, be- 
ing a member of the various Jamestown units. He is 
a member of the Jamestown Club and the Moon Brook 
Country Club. In the intervals of a busy life, Mr. Hall 
has travelled extensively in this country and abroad, 
having made his first trip abroad with a party of four 
other young men in 1878. 

Mr. Hall, Sept. 12, 1883, married Lucy Mason, the 
younger daughter of Levant L. and Eunice Mason, of 
Jamestown. They have had five sons: Henri i\Iason, 
of further mention ; Levant Mason, of further mention ; 
Frederick Perry, Jr., of further mention; Charles Ed- 
ward, born Feb. 22, 1900, died April 28, 1919 ; and John 
Adams, born Feb. 2, 1903. 



Henri Mason Hall, eldest son of Frederick Perry and 
Lucy (Mason) Hall, was born in the city of Jamestown, 
N. Y., Dec. 19, 1884, where he has ever since made his 
home. His education was secured in the Jamestown 
public schools, from which he graduated in 1901, 
Phillips Exeter Academy at Exeter, N. H., class of 1902, 
and Harvard University, A. B., 1906, A. M., 1907. En- 
tering the office of the Journal Printing Company, pub- 
lisher of the Jamestown "Journal," the day of his 
return, after completing his course at Harvard Uni- 
versity in June, 1906, he has ever since continued his 
labors there. In fact, much of his summer vacations 
for years previous had been spent in some department 
of the newspaper work. He is now treasurer and busi- 
ness manager of the company, being closely associated 
with his father in the direction of the affairs of this 
well known newspaper. Like his father, taking part in 
newspaper publishers association work, he has been 
honored by selection as secretary-treasurer of the New 
York Associated Dailies, a position he has held for two 
years at this writing, and as a vice-president of the New 
York State Press Association. 

Mr. Hall took a prominent part in the organization of 
the Jamestown Board of Commerce, was a member of 
its first board of directors, continuing so to serve for 
four years. In 1914, he was appointed a member of the 
Jamestown Board of Health, a position he has ever 
since held, and when in 1920 the taxpayers of the city 
voted to conduct a Municipal Milk Plant, Mr. Hall was 
appointed a member of the commission to erect and 
operate the plant. In the political campaign of 1916, 
Mr. Hall was chairman of the executive committee of 
the Hughes-Fairbanks Club of Jamestown. For about 
ten years Mr. Hall has been a trustee of the Chadakoin 



39° 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



Boat Club and was its treasurer for seven years. He 
has been president and trustee of the Jamestown High 
School Ahimni Association. He is a member of Mt. 
Moriah Lodge. Xo. 145, Free and Accepted Masons; 
Western Sun Chapter, No. 6;, Royal Arch Masons; 
Jamestown Council, No. 32, Royal and Select Masters; 
Jamestown Commandery, No. 6r, Knights Templar: 
Ismailia Shrine of ButTalo ; Jamestown Aerie, No. 816, 
Fraternal Order of Eagles; University Club, Moon 
Brook Countrj- Club. He was the excellent high priest 
of Western Sun Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, in 1913. 
He was one of the organizers and a charter member of 
the Jamestown Rotary Club. He is a member of St. 
Luke's Protestant Episcopal Church. 

Henri M. Hall, on June 30, 1014, married Jessie 
Phillips, the elder daughter of Brewer D. and Ida 
(Moss) Phillips, of Jamestown. 



Levant Mason Hall, the second son of Frederick 
Pcrr>- and Lucy (Mason") Hall, was born at James- 
town, N. Y., Dec. 25, 1886. He was educated "in the 
Jamestown public schools, from which he graduated as 
president of his class in 1005, and at Williams College, 
completing his course there for the A. B. degree in 
June. 1909. He entered the employ of the Journal 
Printing Company, Jamestown, N. Y., the same year, 
and is now secretary of the company and advertising 
manager of the newspaper. He is a member of Mt. 
^foriah Lodge, No. 145, Free and Accepted Masons, 
Western Sun Chapter, No. 67, Royal Arch Masons, 
Moon Brook Country Club. He is a member of St. 
Luke's Protestant Episcopal Church. 

On Oct. 21, 1913, Mr. Hall married Mildred Griffiii, 
the younger daughter of Frank A. Griffin, then of Pitts- 
burgh, Pa., and now of Jamestown, N. Y. 



Frederick Perry Hall. Jr., third son of Frederick 
Perr>' and Lucy (Mason) Hall, was born April 7, 1891, 
at Jamestown, N. Y. Completing his studies in the 
Jamcstr.wn public schools, from which he graduated 
in K/To. he entered Cornell University, where he took 
a mechanical engineering course, graduating with the 
class of 1914. He entered the employ of the Salisbury 
.Axle Company. . of Jamestown, where he is now the 
chief engineer. He is a member of the Society of Auto- 
motive Engineers, and of Crescent Lodge, No. 308, 
Knights of Pythias. 

On June 27. 1916, Mr. Hall married Helen Thompson, 
the elder d;iiightcr of Samuel W. and Emily Thompson, 
of Jamestown, and to them have been born Helen 
Haydcn. July 23. 1917, and Frederick Perry, third, 
Jan. I, 1920. 



COMMODORE THEODORE EDWIN GRAN- 
DIN — While American trade annals contain records 
01 many m'-n who have been architects of their own for- 
t'.inf.'., there has been no record more creditable by rca- 
.V/n of undaunted energy, well formulated plans and 
straightforward dealing,-, than that of Theodore Edwin 
Grandin, in whose death Jamestown has sustained a loss 
which will f/c scvt-T'Iy fell for many years. It is impos- 
.^iWe to estimate at least during their lifetime the value 
to a community of siirh men as the late Theodore Eflwin 
Grandin. Tlie influence which they exert ramifies 



through all commercial, financial, and industrial life, ex- 
tending itself to the entire social economy. Every man 
from the toiling laborer to the merchant prince receives 
benefit from them. Bold, aggressive, but cool and pru- 
dent, farseeing but exact, prompt to the moment in all 
his engagements, holding his verbal promise as an abso- 
lute obligation even in trifles. A natural negotiator, yet 
a more keen listener and a looker than a talker, at work 
early and late, always coming out right in practical 
results, he belongs to that class of distinctively American 
men who promote public progress in advancing individual 
prosperity, and whose private interests never preclude 
active participation in movements and measures which 
concern the general good. His entire life was devoted 
to the performance of the duties devolved through his 
associate business interests. He was justly ranked 
among the most useful citizens of Jamestown. 

Theodore Edwin Grandin was born in Jainestown, 
Chautauqua county, N. Y., Aug. 9, 1844, a son of Daniel 
H. and Louisa (Waite) Grandin. Daniel Grandin, the 
founder of the family in America, was born in 1694, on 
the Isle of Jersey, and came to America when grown 
to manhood, locating in Monmouth county, N. J., where 
he made his home until the time of his demise. He mar- 
ried Mary Thowkmorton. They had a son, Samuel, who 
was born in Monmouth county, N. J., and died there in 
1776. He married Susannah Johnson, by whom he had 
nine children : Daniel, John, Mary, Samuel, Sarah, Abi- 
gail, William, Susan, and Elizabeth. 

John Grandin, son of Samuel and Susannah , (John- 
son) Grandin, was born in the town of Freehold, Mon- 
mouth county, N. J., and died in 1833. He married 
Catherine Hunt, a daughter of Thomas Hunt. They 
were the parents of the following children : Samuel, 
born in 1800, died in 1888; Anna Eliza, born in 1809, 
died in 1877; Daniel H., of whom further; Almira, born 
in 1816, died in 1844; Joseph Osborne, born in 1817, died 
in 1850; Clara, who married Peter Yost. 

Daniel H. Grandin, son of John and Catherine (Hunt) 
Grandin, and father of Theodore E. Grandin, was born 
in Monmouth county, N. J., July 2, 181 1. He was 
educated in his native town and there grew to man- 
hood. He came to Pleasantville, Pa., and there located 
with his brother Samuel. With him he became the 
owner of a large tract of land. He remained here 
only a short time, then moved to Jamestown, N. Y., 
and formed a partnership with Daniel Hazeltine, and 
with him became engaged in the wool manufacturing 
business, continuing in this for some years. Later, undc 
the firin name of Allen & Grandin, their place of business 
was situated at Brooklyn Square, the name now being 
Roosevelt Square, where the new Gifford building stands. 
In this occupation he was very successful, becoming the 
owner of several buildings. Later they took Jerome 
Preston into the partnershij), and the firm name was 
changed to Allen, Grandin & Preston, wool manufac- 
turers. Later Mr. Grandin owned the Old Stone Mill 
which was located on East First street, and there engaged 
in the feed and flour business for some years, continuing 
so engaged up to the time of his death, which occurred 
Sept. 2, 1893. His remains are buried in I.akevicw Ceme- 
tery. He married, in February, 1839, at Middleburg, N. Y., 
Louisa R. Waite, born there, a daughter of John Waite. 
Her death occurred May 15, 1890, in Jamestown, N. Y. 




c/ (Cj &rayU cAa^^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



391 



To this union were born six children: i. Olive Cerelle, 
married John W. Weller, and they were the parents of 
three children : John Grandin, died in manhood ; Mary 
Louise, secretary ol the Associated Charities in James- 
town, N. Y. ; Georgianna, married Edward Stevens, m.cr- 
chant of Fredonia, N. Y. 2. Isabella, married A. Brooks 
Fletcher; both deceased. 4. Theodore E., of whom fur- 
ther. 5. Samuel Sherwood, resides in Westfield, N. Y. 
6. Clarence Merritt, died in June, 1917, in Buffalo. 

Theodore Edwin Grandin, whose name is the caption 
of this article, received his early education in the James- 
town public schools, and after being prepared there for 
college entered the Clinton Liberal Institute, of Clinton, 
N. Y. Upon concluding his studies at the institute and 
returning home, Mr. Grandin entered the Grandin Grist 
Mills, which his father had conducted for many years. 
Later he accepted a position as salesman in the dry goods 
store of Andrews & Preston, of Jamestown. He re- 
mained with this firm some time, then became an operator 
in the oil fields of Warren county. Pa. After returning 
to Jamestown he became interested in steamboating, and 
it was not long before he was one of the most proniir.ent 
captains of Chautauqua Lake. He owned and commanded 
the first steamer, "Jamestown," on Chautauqua Lake. In 
time he became the superintendent of The Red Stack, 
one of the principal lines of steamboats on the lake, and 
on account of his reputation as a commander of steam- 
boats he was known throughout the remainder of his life 
as Commodore Grandin. 

Commodore Grandin took an active interest in ath- 
letics and boating, as the quoted newspaper article will 
show : 

OLD TIME BOAT RACE RECENTLY RECALiLED. 



The Regatta against time heretofore mentioned took 
place last Friday. Theo. E. Grandin, Lewis Smith, and 
A. P. Kent left Mayville at 5 P. M. and three minutes 
before S reached the boat landing at Jamestown. 22 
miles in 2:57. This showing is considered by all judges 
as a great feat. 



Back in 1S6S. on the 30th day of June. Captain Theo- 
d re E. Grandin raced against time from Mayville dock 
, .1 Chautauqua Lake to Jamestown steamer dock on 
the Chadakoin, a distance of 21 miles in a row boat. 

Captain Grandin was a young athlete in those days 
and a skilled oarsman. 

He accomplished the stunt in his skiff named "Rob 
Roy" in just 3 hours, 9 minutes, and 30 seconds. 

The race is called to mind by an excellent photo- 
graph taken of Captain Grandin in his skiff at the 
close of the race. It has been presented to E. A. 
Brooks and in a handsome frame occupies a conspic- 
uous position in one of the windows at the store of 
the Brooks News Company. Captain Grandin has 
changed much since the picture was made, but 
acquaintances say that the picture "looks just as 'Ted' 
did in those bygone days." 

In 1897 Mr. Grandin retired from the navigation busi- 
ness, and engaged with his son in the operation of the 
Old Stone Mill, which had been conducted by his father 
for many years. On account of his health, however, he 
could not continue in this occupation, and in 1S97 he 
retired from business life altogether. He died at his 
home on Allen street, Jamestown, N. Y., Oct. 23, 1905. 
and is buried in Lakeview Cemetery, Jamestown. 

Mr. Grandin married, Nov. 5, 1873, in Jamestown, N. 
Y., Belle Emily Carpenter, born Feb. 20, 1851, a daugh- 
ter of Col. Elial F. Carpenter, whose biographical record 
follows. They were the parents of three children. 



Frances Eileen, who died in infancy; Julia Norwood, 
who died in childhood ; and Daniel H., of whom further. 

Daniel H. Grandin, only son of Commodore Theodore 
Edwin and Belle Emily (Carpenter) Grandin, was born 
in Jamestown, Nov. 25, 1875. He received his education 
in the public schools of Jamestown, and after laying 
aside his text-books became associated with his father in 
the operation of the Old Stone Mill. On account of his 
father's ill health, Mr. Grandin took care of the active 
part of the work, but upon the death of his father, he 
assumed full charge of the business. The mill was 
destroyed by fire in 1913, and in the same year he builr 
another, which was located in Falconer, N. Y. This mill 
is one of the best of its kind, having been installed with 
all the new improved machines. It is operated under 
Mr. Grandin's supervision, and is one of the most suc- 
cessful mills in Chautauqua county. Daniel H. Grandin 
married Martha Townsend Griswold, a daughter of the 
late Daniel and Mather (Townsend) Griswold. They 
were the parents of two children : Daniel Griswold and 
John. 

Commodore Grandin was a member of the various 
Masonic bodies, including Mount Moriah Lodge, No. 145 ; 
Western Sun Chapter, No. 65, Royal Arch Masons ; 
Jamestown Council, No. 32, Royal and Select Masters ; 
and Jamestown Commandery, No. 61, Knights Templar. 
In political affiliation Mr. Grandin is a staunch Democrat, 
though in local afifairs he voted for the men and measures 
that were for the best interest of all the people. 

Mr. Grandin's entire life had been spent in Jamestown, 
and those who knew him — and his friends were many — 
entertained for him the warmest regard. Of large and 
liberal views in all matters of business, full of enterprise, 
and believing much in courage and perseverance, he 
could always be found in the van of every movement 
looking for the accomplishment of real and practical 
good. Of extensive acquaintance and very popular 
socially, charitable to an extent altogether dispropor- 
tionate to his means, unostentatious in ever\-thing, one 
of the truest men to his friends that ever lived, and one 
of the most lenient to his adversaries after the combat 
was over, he was a man of whom any community migh' 
be proud. While in his business career he had passed on 
to a position of wealth and prominence, he had never 
neglected the opportunity to assist a fellow-traveler upon 
his way, his hand being often down reaching to aid one 
to whom nature, fate or environment had seemed less 
kindly. His life had, in a large measure, been an exem- 
plification of his belief in the brotherhood of mankind. 
He never allowed questionable methods to form a part 
of his business career, while over the record of his entire 
life there falls no shadow of wrong or suspicion of evil. 
Kindliness and appreciation of the good traits of others 
had constituted salient features in his career, and his 
life illustrates the fact of the Emersonian philosophy 
that to have friends you must be one. When he passed 
to a better world he left to his son and his children the 
priceless heritage of an untarnished name. 



WILLIAM CARPENTER. JR., late of James- 
town, Chautauqua county, N. Y., where his death 
occurred Jan. 28, 1864, and where for many years he was 
one of the most respected and influential citizens, was a 
native of the city where he resided so long, the date of 



392 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



his birth being Sept. 7, iS.'j. Ho was a son of William 
Carpenter, Sr., a native of England, who was a victim 
of one of the press gang crews of those days, and at the 
age of fourteen was seized and placed uix>n a British 
man-of-war and forced into service. Among many ad- 
ventures that befell him in that service was the tinal one 
that brought him to tliis country and made him a citizen 
here. The vessel upon which he was an unwilling hand 
was cruising in American waters, and at one time, when 
off the coast of Maine, young Mr. Carpenter was sent 
ashore to cut grass for the ship's goat. He went ostensi 
bly upon his quest, but never returned, disappearing into 
the interior. For a time he lived in Maine, occupied with 
such work as he could tind, and eventually came to Chau- 
tauqua county. \. v., and there located at Dexterville 
among the earliest settlers of the place. His experi- 
ence at sea led him to seek employment on the great 
inland waters of this region, and he was occupied for a 
time as a master of the rafts that were floated down the 
river to various points. He also drove the iirst stage that 
ran between Mayville and Jamestown. He eventualh 
became himself interested in the lumber business and 
operated along the Allegheny river, and he was one of 
the builders and later the commander for some time of 
the first steamboat to sail the waters of Lake Chau- 
tauqua. The elder Mr. Carpenter was a very religious 
man and a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
and about middle age became greatly interested in the 
cause of temperance, he and his wife touring Western 
Xew York and Pennsylvania, delivering addresses upon 
the subject and arousing great interest wherever they 
wont. While yet living in Maine, before coming to 
Chautau(|ua county, he married Nancy Blake, by whom 
he had twelve children, one of his sons being Col. Elial 
Foote Carpenter, a sketch of whom follows, and another 
WiMiam Carpenter, Jr., of this sketch. His death 
occurred in 1869, while on a visit to his daughter at Oil 
City, Pa. 

The childhood of William Carpenter, Jr., was passed 
in his native city of Jamestown, and it was there that he 
received his somewhat meagre educational advantages, 
though with the customary ambition and industry of the 
lads of the period, he made the most of his opportunities. 
He bccan work at a very early age, and for years was 
employed in the lumber industry in this region, which 
wa.s then at the height of its development. He also spent 
some time during his early youth on a plantation in Ken- 
tucky, where he occupied a position as a sort of sui)er- 
iritendent and had many negro latercrs imdcr his direc- 
tion. Upon returning to Jamcstov/n, he began work in 
the axe factory of bis brother-in-law, Charles L. Jeffords, 
the well known manufacturer of edge tools of James- 
town, and while there was mortally injured by the Inirst- 
inK of an emery wheel, from the effects of which he tlied 
twenty-two hours later. Like his father, \W. CariKiitev 
was a d-eply religir,ns man and a member of the Metho- 
dist church, and his death was a truly Christian one. It 
was shortly after his nvirriagc that he became convrteM 
throtii'h the prea'ihing of ihe Rev. Mr. Peat, and from 
that time to the close of his life he remained a devoterl 
m'-mfKT of thf f hurrh. In politics .Mr. Carpentir was a 
Whiif, and althouj^h he was keenly interested in |r,ial 
affairs ard fulfdhd all his duties as a rood cilizeji, never 
was ambitious for [K.liti'al offire and r,,nfwc'\ his activi- 



ties to his private affairs. He was an affectionate hus- 
band and father, and his personal relations with his 
family and neiglibors were above reproach in all par- 
ticulars. 

William Carpenter was united in marriage, March 10, 
1846, at Jamestown, with Sybbel M. Jeffords, a native of 
Mayville, Chautaucpia county, N. Y., a daughter of John 
and Phebe (Wood) Jeffords and sister of the late Charles 
L. Jeffords, the axe manufacturer. Mrs. Carpenter sur- 
vives her husband, and is one of the best known and 
loved women of Jamestown, where she is popularly 
known as "The Grand Old Woman of Jamestown." In 
spite of her age, having recently passed her ninety-fourth 
birthday, when many friends called to offer their con- 
gratulations, she is enjoying good health and her facul- 
ties arc not greatly impaired. She still takes a deep 
interest in the affairs of the community, as she has 
always done. She is a member of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church of Jamestown, ar.d is a practical Christian, 
putting into her everyday conduct the precepts of her 
religion in a degree seldom seen, and performs her duties 
with a cheerfulness and zeal which are a part of the 
highest Christian life. She has been particularly devoted 
to her children's welfare, and has reared them all to be 
Christian men and women. To Mr. and Mrs. Carpenter 
six children were born, as follows: i. Charles Franklin, 
who was killed at the age of five years in an accident. 
2. Elial Foote, mentioned below. 3. Phebe Wood, who 
died March g, igo8, was the wife of Nicholas U. Hiller, 
deceased, and to this union were born two children : Clyde 
and Elizabeth. 4. Mary Ida, who became the wife of 
Alexander Hiller. 5. Charles Jeffords, mentioned else- 
where in the work. 6. Julia W., .who becaine the wife 
of Bartie R. Hiller, who was the American Express 
Company's agent for upwards of thirty years, and died 
in Jamestown, April 18, igi2, his remains interred in 
Lakeview Cemetery ; they were the parents of one child, 
Richard Carpenter Hiller, wdio is now employed with the 
Erie railroad at Corry, Pa. 

Elial Foote Carpenter, seconrl son of William and 
Sybbel M. (Jeffords) Carpenter, was born in Westfield, 
N. Y., Oct. 6, 1849, and was educated at the Jamestown 
public schools. He was but fourteen years of age when 
his father met his death in an accident, and the circum- 
stance forced him to give up his studies and go to work 
at a very early age. He secured a position in his uncle's 
axe factory, where his father had worked before him, 
and there learned the craft of axe making. After a time 
spent in that establishment, he withdrew from it and 
started in the same business on his own account. He 
met with success from the outset, and in 1881 organized 
the Jamestown Axe and Edge Tool Company in associa- 
tion with his elder brother, Charles J. Carpenter and 
John Kofood. He was himself the most active partner 
and worked with (he greatest industry towards its de- 
velopment up to the time of his death, which occurred 
July 3, 1887, in the prime of his young manhood. Besides 
his business activities, he was prominent in public affairs 
in the city and for four years served on the Jamestown 
Board of Aldermen, being at the lime the youngest man 
on that body. He was a member of the Unitarian church 
anrj was a good Christian man who enjoyed the respect 
anrl esteem of all his fellow-citizens. He was a mem- 
ber of Mount Mori.ih l.<«lge, No. 1,1.=;, Ancient I'Vee an-i 




O ^Cct^ tA^yt>/^^ CcfA ^y^^^^^^^t^U^i^. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



393 



Accepted Masons ; Royal Arch Masons ; Royal and Select 
Masters ; and Knights Templar. 

Mr. Carpenter married, Oct. i6, 1879, at Jamestown, 
Florence R. Dawley, daughter of Samuel B. and Lucy 
Jane (Cook) Dawley, who survivies him, and by whom 
he had two children, Clara F. and Ethel H., the latter 
becoming the wife of David C. Ward. Mr. Carpenter 
was always especially devoted to his mother, who ten- 
derly cared for him from childhood to manhood and 
whom he held in the highest honor and consideration and 
consulted upon every important move in his career before 
undertaking it. Nothing could more conspicuously illus- 
trate the depth of his love and respect for his mother, or 
throw a clearer light on the manner of man that he was 
than the followi:;g letter, written shortly before his death, 
which will form a fitting conclusion to this brief sketch : 

Griswold House. Detroit. Michigan. 
October 17, 18S4. 
My dear Motiier: — 

Tlie matter of writing you has been constantly be- 
fore me. still have been obliged to defer the pleasant 
duty until the present moment, it being the first favor- 
able opportunity that has presented itself, and. al- 
though it may not reach you until my arrival, believe, 
however, it will be none the less acceptable. Knowing 
the deep interest, anxiety and kind regard which you 
possess for your children's w'elfare. prompted by the 
pure, sincere and unfailing love of the self-sacrificing 
mother, which is my privilege and honor to possess 
and for which I will never cease to be grateful. Its 
influence has directed all my business transactions in 
the direction of honesty and integrity. Surrounded as 
we all are with temptations, and at times debating in 
our minds whether it is best or proper to do this thing 
or that, apply the test of mother's approval or dis- 
approval, be guided by it. and we will at all times be 
found in the proper place, our conduct such as will 
raise us in the estimation of the people, strengthen our 
self-respect, and above all leave us with the pleas- 
ant reflection of having done right. 

So far this trip has been exceptional in one respect, 
that of affording me an opportunity to see and hear 
some of the noted men of the day. Have had the pleas- 
ure of shaking hands with both James G. Blaine and 
General Logan, the former at Saginaw last night and 
the latter at Cincinnati Saturday night. The prominent 
positions which these men occupy ought to act as a 
strong incentive to every man, beginning as they did 
at the bottom of the ladder. In regard to business it 
is extremely dull, but the general opinion is that it 
will revive a trifle after the November election. Have 
had some good promises made me in regard to trade 
for next season and hope in the near future that it 
will turn out to have been one of the most profitable 
trips I have made. I know, dear Mother. I have your 
prayer and best wishes for success, and it strengthens 
and stimulates me to put forth every effort, ^'e are 
gaining steadily step by step and are doing better than 
a great many in our line. Give my love to all. Say 
to brother Charlie that I offer an apology for not writ- 
ing to him. but my time has been closely occupied and 
that he will take the will for the deed and a promise 
to do better in the future. 

There are many things I wish to say to you but will 
forbear with the exception of this one statement. I 
fully realize our position and that our success depends 
entirely upon ourselves, for we have as good a start 
as any young men could have who haven't money. Of 
course competition is sharp, but nothing worth hav- 
ing in this world comes without an effort: if we would 
wear the crown we must bear the cross. I know we 
can succeed in building up a large and profitable busi- 
ness, and to that end let us put forth every effort and, 
dear mother, may we all be spared to see your wishes 
and ambition gratified, in that of seeing your two 
sons honorable and respected men and their efforts 
crowned with success in establishing with their own 
hands a large and profitable business. 

With best wishes and kindest regards to all, I am 
vour affectionate son. 

(elgned) ELIAL,. 



COLONEL ELIAL FOOTE CARPENTER— 

There are men whose memories are always green in the 
minds of those who knew them; whose personalities are 



so vivid that the recollection of them is fadeless ; men 
of whom we cannot say, "They are dead," because their 
life still throbs in the hearts that loved them. To this 
class of men belonged Col. Elial Foote Carpenter, for 
many years prominent in the commercial and social 
circles of the city of Jamestown and State of New York, 
and who still lives as one of the signal men in our coun- 
ty's history whose name and record can never be for- 
gotten by the people of Chautauqua county. 

Col. Elial Foote Carpenter was born in Jamestown, 
May 8, 1826, the third son of William and Nancy (Blake) 
Carpenter. He was reared in Jamestown and educated 
in her public schools, and soon after leaving school went 
on a visit to one of his sisters who resided in Kentucky. 
Here he passed two years as manager of a large tobacco 
plantation, but the cruel and inhuman treatment expected 
by his employer to be shown to the slaves was more than 
his nature could bear, and although offered large pay he 
resigned his position and returned to Jamestown, where 
he engaged in the lumber business, buying along the 
Allegheny river and its tributaries, and rafting to Pitts- 
burgh, Cincinnati and Louisville. He subsecjuently be- 
came engaged in the manufacturing of axes at James- 
town, and the breaking out of the war found him in the 
oil fields of Pennsylvania. 

Hearkening to his country's call to arms, he laid aside 
his pursuits as a private citizen and enlisted, Aug. 16, 
1S61, in the 49th Regiment, New York Volunteers, and 
upon the organization of the regiment was elected second 
lieutenant of Company K. In April, 1862, he was pro- 
moted to first lieutenant. He participated in the battles 
of the Peninsular campaign under Gen. McClellan. Upon 
the organization of the 112th Regim.ent it was decided 
that its staff officers should be men of tried ability and 
military experience. Lieut. Carpenter was transferred 
from the 49th to the 112th Regiment, made major, and 
was soon after promoted to be lieutenant-colonel of the 
regiment, and for some time prior to his death was in 
active command. The first battle in which this regiment 
was engaged occurred on Friday, Jan. 30, 1863, near 
Suffolk, Va. From this time Col. Carpenter was at the 
front almost constantly with his regiment, with the ex- 
ception of four months passed in recruiting service, and 
the hardships endured, the heroic achievements of the 
Il2th, and the important duties they performed is part 
of the history of that ever memorable struggle. After 
the transfer of his regiment to the Army of the James, 
Col. Carpenter was in constant command. At the battle 
of Drewry's Bluff, near Bermuda Hundred, his regi- 
ment was ordered to the right wing of the army to sup- 
port Gen. Heckman, who was in desperate straits. This 
was between four and five o'clock in the morning, and a 
thick fog so obscured the vision that they had to grope 
their way. When they arrived at the place where Gen. 
Heckman's troops should have been, not finding them, 
Col. Carpenter sent Lieut. Hedges forward to recon- 
noiter ; he soon fell into the hands of the rebels. As he 
did not return, Col. Carpenter, an.xious about his fate, 
putting spurs to his horse, rode forward to see what had 
become of him. The fog was so thick that it was im- 
possible to see objects clearly, but all at once Col. Car- 
penter found himself within the lines of a rebel brigade, 
who rose up on all sides of him and demanded his sur- 
render. Instead of surrendering, he wheeled his horse 



394 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



and retreated, at the same time ordering his men to fall 
back. He was followed by a perfect shower of bullets, 
one of which struck him in the side, passing through his 
lungs, but he was saved from capture by his horse, which 
bore him to the rear. He received all the care and atten- 
tion it was ix)ssible to bestow upon him, but in vain ; the 
wound was fatal, and on the morning of May i8, 1S04, 
two days after he had received his death wound, his 
spirit passed awa\- from earth at a farm house where he 
had been carried by his devoted followers. 

On July 3. 1S4S. he married Julia .\. Jeffords, a daugh- 
ter of John and Phoebe i,\\"ood) JefTords. To Col. and 
Mrs. Carpenter were born three children: i. Belle E., 
wife of Theodore E. Grandin, whose biographical record 
precedes this. 2. Franc C, who married (first) Henry 
Charles Blanchard. and (second) Frederick A. Bright- 
man. (See following sketches'). 3. .-Vddie J., who mar- 
ried \V. P. Frink. 

In religious affiliation. Col. Carpenter was a member 
of the Methodist Episcopal church and was a sincere 
Christian. Politically he was a Republican, but never 
cared for o/nce. Col. Elial Foote Carpenter was endowed 
with those qualities which naturally constitute men lead- 
ers, and by sturdy observation and careful examinatioi, 
and application 01 principles he greatly overcame all the 
disadvantages which he confronted, and made his life 
useful and honorable, and his death universally mourned 
and regretted. This is a splendid ideal. For years, to the 
best of his ability and according to the light God gave 
him. Col. Carpenter tried to follow it. Will men say as 
much of the rest of us when we lay down our burdens' 
.•\nd, if they should, should we not gladly admit that he 
was one of the first to follow it, and by the fame he won 
and the example he set put us on the way? 



HENRY CHARLES BLANCHARD— The Blanch- 
ard family herein reviewed came to Western New York 
from the State of Xew Hampshire about 1824, and 
arrived in the town of Ellicott, Chautauqua county, ten 
yc-ars later. .\mos Blanchard, the founder, was born in 
.•\ntrim, \. H., in 1799. died June 16, 1891. at his farm 
in Ellicott. Upon coming to Western Xew York in 1824, 
he ."iettlcd in Erie county, at .•\urora, there residing until 
i8j4. when he moved to Chautauciua county, purchasing 
a large farm in the town of Ellicrtt, and for over half 
a centur>' devoted himself to its improvement and culti- 
vation. He was a Democrat in politics, and an official 
memb'T of the First Presbyterian Church of Jamestowti. 
He married Eunice Flint anfl they v/ere the parents of 
seven sons and a daughter. Amos Bl.-inchard was a son 
of Caleb Blanrhard, also born in the "Granite Slate," in 
the villag<- of .'\ntrim. where his life v.-as passed as 
farmer and merchant. .Amos Blanchard lived to the great 
at'f of ninety-two years, and of these years sixty-seven 
w'-T" <.;Knt in W'-stern New York, fifty-seven being 
sixTt in the town of Ellicott. 

H'ury CTiarl's Blanchard, .son of Amos and Eunice 
f Flint) Blanchard, was born in Aurora, Eric county, 
N'. Y., Jan. i;;. i8r', died Aug. 27, i88t, in Jamestown, 
and i^ buried in l-akeview Cemetery. He studied mcdi- 
cir<? imd'T Dr. Gray, of Jamestown, and later ent'-red 
Dartmouth College, whence he was graduated. After 
rfceivintf hii 'Ufrnc he bf-fan prartirc at Aurora, N. Y., 
but not lontf afterwards located in Buffalo, N. Y., where 



he successfully practiced his profession for twenty years. 
He flien returned to Jamestown, opening an office at No. 
210 West Third street, his residence being on Chandler 
street. He became a well known, influential citizen of 
Jamestown and was regarded as a skilled and successful 
physician. 

During the Civil War, Dr. Blanchard offered his serv- 
ices to the government and served with distinction as a 
surgeon, attaining the rank of lieutenant-cclonel and 
later colonel of his regiment, the 78th New York. Dur- 
ing the war he served his country in many hard- fought 
battles, and in one of the battles toward the end of the 
war he was wounded ; later received his honorable dis- 
cliarge from the service. He was a Democrat in politics, 
and a Presbyterian in religion. Among his professional 
brethren and friends, his standing was high, his intel- 
lectual attainments and ability as a physician being 
recognized, and as a soldier he was one of the bravest 
of the brave. 

Col. Blanchard married (first) Caroline Lamson, ot 
Detroit, who died a year after her marriage. He mar- 
ried (second) in June, iSSo, at Jamestown, Franc C. Car- 
penter, daughter of Col. Elial Foote Carpenter, and sis- 
ter of Mrs. Belle Grandin and Mrs. W. P. Frink, of 
Jamestown. Col. Elial Foote Carpenter was lieutenant- 
colonel of the ii2th Regiment, New York Volunteer 
Infantry, and at the battle of Proctor's Creek was mor- 
tally wounded and died the following night. May 8, 1864. 
Col. and Mrs. Blanchard were the parents of Henry 
Charles (2), of whom further. 

Henry Charles (2) Blanchard was born in James- 
town, N. Y., Jidy 4, 1 881, died in Paris, Okla., Sept. i, 
1913- He completed public school courses of study with 
graduation from Jamestown High School, and entered 
Hobart College, whence he was graduated with honors. 
Deciding upon his profession, he entered Rensselaer 
Polytechnic School, Troy, N. Y., whence he was gradu- 
ated C. E. For eight years after graduation he was 
engaged in professional work in Jamestown in connec- 
tion with the city engineering department. During a part 
of that ix?riod he was engaged in the survey of the rail- 
way between Jamestown, N. Y., and Warren, Pa. He 
was also engaged on the survey for the steamboat land- 
ings in the city and along the lake. He closed his work 
in Jamestown and went West, being for a time in Coffey- 
ville, Kan., going thence to Fort Smith in 1907, then 
accepting a position as assistant to the city engineer in 
charge of street paving. Two years later (1900) he 
accepted the call of the city engineer of Hugo. Okla., 
and there continued until his passing away. 

In Hugo, Mr. Blanchard with Hiram Phillips, a con- 
sulting engineer of St. Louis, laid the broad plan of the 
city's splendid water works system, and it is due to Mr. 
Blanchard's untiring activity, his tact and ability, that 
the city has its water plant, for opposition was strong 
and at times oidy his coolness and wise counsel prevented 
an overthrow of all his plans. The plant was finally 
completed at a cost of $265,000. He al.so built for Hugo 
a .$75,000 sewer system, and seven miles of paved streets, 
costing $200,000, making Hugo the best paved city in 
Oklahoma. This completed his life work, but in Hugo 
these public works stand as momnnents to his ability 
and faithfulness. He was ill but a few weeks; an opera- 
tion becoming necessary, he was taken to the Aiken Hos- 



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BIOGRAPHICAL 



395 



pital in Paris, Okla., and there died. He was brought 
to Jamestown and laid at rest in Lakeview Cemetery. He 
was a moniber of the Benevolent and Protective Order ot 
Elks, the Fraternal Order of Eagles, and the Free and 
Accepted Masons. 

Col. Blanchard (as he was always called) married, in 
April, 1910, Helen Reinbold, at her home in Wichita, 
Kan. They were the parents of two children, Helen and 
Jane. Said the Hugo "Daily Husonian :" 

Should a stranger have asked in Hugo what man is 
best beloved bv his friends the answer would have 
been "Colonel" Blanchard. With his sunny smile, his 
cheerful greeting, a meeting with him on the street 
was like a rav of sunshine. Open and above board in 
all his dealings the respect ot all was his, faithful and 
true to his task, giving his ail to his work, admira- 
tion of the man's character was involuntary. A faith- 
ful husband, a loving son, a devoted father, in his 
home life he was an example to be followed. 

Mr. Blanchard's mother, Mrs. Frederick A. Brightman, 
of Jamestown, N. Y., was with her son at the last, and 
with her daughter-in-law brought his body to James- 
town for burial. 

Mrs. Franc C. (Carpenter) Blanchard, widow of Col. 
Henry C. Blanchard, M. D., survived her husband and 
married (second) June 23, 1900, in Jamestown, N. Y., 
Frederick Allen Brightman, born in Clymer, Chautauqua 
county, N. Y., son of Joseph and Priscilla (Allen) 
Brightman. 



FREDERICK A. BRIGHTMAN was educated in 
the public schools of Panama, Chautauqua county, N. Y., 
at Fredonia State Normal School, and Albany Law 
School. He taught school in Chautauqua county for 
several years after graduation from "Normal." He then 
began the study of law under the preceptorship of Wal- 
ter Loran Sessions, an eminent Chautauquan, then prac- 
ticing in Panama. After his admission to the New York 
bar, he began practice in Panama as a partner with Mr. 
Sessions under the firm name Sessions & Brightman. 
Later, when Mr. Brightman located in Jamestown, he 
practiced his profession with A. C. Pickard as partner 
and later with D. D. Dorns. Finally Mr. Brightman 
abandoned the practice of law, and for seventeen years 
was connected with the Art Metal Construction Company 
of Jamestown. He is now and for several years has been 
associated with the American Express Company in 
Jamestown. He is a Republican in politics, a member of 
the Methodist Episcopal church, and the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows. 



MARVIN N. EVERETT— The name Everett is 
derived, according to two noted authorities on English 
nomenclature, Bardsley and Harrison, from old Eng- 
lish, French and Teutonic word forms, the former trans- 
lating them as boar plus brave, the latter as boar plus 
counsel. The name was originally doubtless a descriptive 
title designating its bearer as the possessor of staunch, 
aggressive courage or keen sagacity. The first form was 
Everard, the next change Evered, and then the final 
"d" was sharpened into "t" in Everett. A distinguished 
record in civil, military, and religious callings has been 
written in the family name in England, and its Ameri- 
can history dates from 1636. when Richard Everett 
founded a numerous progeny in New England. The 



Everett family herein mentioned, however, records its 
first annals in this country at a later period, through 
John Everett, though its origin traces back to the same 
common ancestor in England. 

Arms — Gules, a chevron paly of eight or and azure, 
between three mullets argent; a bordure wavy of the 
second. 

Crest — A griffin's head sable erased gules charged 
with three barrulets, that in the middle argent, the 
other two or, over all a pallet wavy ermine. 

Motto — Festina lente. 

(I) The first generation of this line of the Everett 
family of whom there is record extant was a Rev. 
Everett, a Presbyterian minister of England, who re- 
mained in that country all of his life. The name of 
John is a tradition in the family, and it is probable that 
this was the name he bore. He was the father of an 
only child, John Everett, the immigrant ancestor, who 
came to this country about 1770. 

(II) John Everett, founder of his line in America, 
was a young man of venturesome spirit and independ- 
ent nature and did not come kindly under the strong 
religious discipline of his father, the Rev. Everett. Con- 
sequently, in early young manhood, he came to America 
with two other youths of his own age, arriving in New 
York about 1770. He followed the Hudson river north- 
ward, and settled in Saratoga county, N. Y., this being 
the first definite location of this branch of the Everett 
family in America. According to family history, he 
was a Revolutionary soldier, and fought in the Ameri- 
can army in battles and campaigns in the neighborhood 
of his home. Records show that John Everett is listed 
as a private in Col. Malcom's regiment and in the Third 
Regiment of Orange County Militia during the Revolu- 
tionary War. John Everett married, and had two sons : 
John, of whom further; and Daniel. 

(III) John (2) Everett, son of John (i) Everett, the 
immigrant ancestor, was born about 1795, in Saratoga 
county, N. Y. He became a manufacturer of measures, 
and his products were periodically shipped down the 
Hudson river to New York City, where they were sold 
in the open market. He was the owner of a substantial 
business, and acquired title to considerable land in Sara- 
toga county; two parcels were deeded to him in 1820 
and 1836. He remained in Saratoga county many years, 
then moved to Fulton county, N. Y., locating at Cran- 
berry Creek, where he died at the age of fifty-five years. 

Mr. Everett married, in Saratoga county, N. Y., about 
1822-23, Elizabeth Walker, of Poughkeepsie, N. Y. The 
first pioneer families of Dutchess county, N. Y., in- 
cluded the Walker family, the members of which were 
well known and highly respected. Elizabeth (\^'alker) 
Everett was a devout Christian, finding in religious 
work and belief the inspiration for a life that, at its 
best, lacked many of the comforts and pleasures of the 
present day. To her family she was devotion itself, 
and to them she transmitted her many excellent quali- 
ties of mind and heart, a strong intellectuality, a love 
of literature, and reverence for the word of God. She 
was an ideal homemaker, spun the family garments, and 
performed much of the work of the house herself, mak- 
ing it a place where her family, relatives and their 
friends, loved to gather. She died in 1881, at Falconer, 
N. Y., where she had come is later years with her chil- 
dren. John and Elizabeth (Walker) Everett were the 



396 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



parents of eight children, as follows: i. John, of whom 
further. 2. Marvin X.. of whom further. 3. Benjamin, 
died at the age of seventeen years. 4. Nelson, died at 
the age of lifteen years. 5. Miranda, died at the age 
of eighteen years. 6. Washington, married Alary 
Adams ; he was a farmer by occupation, and also was 
a Civil War veteran. 7. William, died at the age of 
twenty-one years. 8. Melvin, a carpenter by trade, and 
the only sur\-iving member of the family: he resides 
at Falconer. X. Y., and is unmarried. 

(W) John (3) Everett, son of John (2) and Eliza- 
beth (,\Valker"l Everett, was born in Saratoga county, 
X'. Y.. Feb. 18. 1S25. He worked at home with his 
father. like his brother, Marvin X\, and when a yotmg 
man removed to Chautauqua county, X^. Y. He became 
a builder of fiat boats, in association with his brother, 
Marvin X.. on whicli they shipped various cargoes down 
the .\llegheny river to the Ohio river, thence to Pitts- 
burgh. Pa., where their products were sold in the mar- 
ket. He prospered in this enterprise, and later became 
a manufacturer of sash and doors, and one of the most 
prominent citizens of Falconer, N. Y. 

Nfr. Everett married Elizabeth Yaw. and to them were 
born the following children : Martha F., w'ho became 
the wife of Jackson C. Meridith, a business man of 
Jamestown : Walter R.. whose sketch follows ; John. Jr., 
married Jennie Young, by whom he liad three children. 

(I\') Marvin X. Everett, son of John (2) and Eliz- 
abeth (Walker) Everett, was born at Maxon Hill, Sara- 
toga county, X. Y., March 24, 1828, and died in James- 
t''Wn, X. Y., Feb. 4, 1909, aged eighty 3'ears, eleven 
months and twenty days, and was buried in Lakeview 
Cemeter>-. His youth was passed in Saratoga county, 
in association with his father, who was a manufacturer 
of measures. In 1850, at the age of twenty-two years, 
the young man left home and made his way westward, 
finally locating at Worksburg, now Falconer, Chau- 
tauqua county. X. Y. There, with his brother John 
he engaged in the building of flat boats, which they 
loader! with produce and sent down the .-Mlegheny river 
to Pittsburgh. In 1854 he sold his business interests 
at Falconer to his brother, and spent the following six 
years in the .'^tate of California, as a millwright in 
Sacramento, and later located in Trinity county, where 
he became a successful gold miner. In i860 he returned 
to Chautauqua county, N. Y., and bought a large farm 
in the town of Gerry, which he owned and conducted 
for five years. In 186^ he married, and later went W'ejt 
on account of his wife's health, locating in Kansas. 
There Mr. Everett iKjuglit considerable land, and also 
f ngagod in the brokerage business in Minneapolis, Kan. 
.Xftrr spending two years in Kansas, he again returned 
to Chautauqua county, locating in the town of Gerry. 

.^fter the death of his wife he made his home in Fal- 
coner, where he married again, in [875, and in 1881 
built a fine residence in Falconer, which he occupied 
until i8';5, then moved to Jamestown. In 1887 Mr. 
E\-crctt drew plans and built the Hotel Everett on West 
First 'trect, Jamestown, at a cost of $50,000. This was 
a stib^ilantial building of brick and stone, five stf^rics 
in h'ight, W'll apiKjinted, and one of the leading hotels 
in its day. He contimied owner of the hotel until 1892, 
when he sold it and retired from active business. 

Mr. Everett was very fond of mechanical work, a 
genius in many ways, fond of scientific studies, and a 



constant reader. He also at one time had quite an ex- 
tensive apiary, and was deeply interested in bee culture, 
to whicli he devoted much time and study. Strictly 
temperate himself, he strongly advocated the cause of 
temperance in the most pronounced way, and to his in- 
terest and generosity the building of the First Metho- 
dist Church of Falconer is due. The beautiful house on 
Main street. Falconer, was sold by Mr. Everett in 1895, 
and a residence established at No, 105 West Second 
street, Jamestown, where he resided until his death. He 
was a Republican in politics, and strictly adhered to the 
policies of his party. He was ever interested in the 
welfare of the community and gave much of his time 
and material assistance to public-spirited movements. 

Mr. Everett married (first) June 23, 1S66, Emily J. 
Perry, daughter of Ebenezer and Susan (Coil) Perry. 
He married (second) March 3, 1875, Viola D. Oburg, 
daughter of Oscar and Bebe (Wellman) Oburg, of 
Ashville, Chautauqua county, N. Y. Mrs. Everett sur- 
vives her husband, a woman of forceful character, busi- 
ness ability, and womanly virtues. She was always a 
true partner and helpmate, and of real assistance to her 
husband in his business undertakings. When his health 
failed she assumed the management of the Hotel Everett 
and so continued until that property was sold. In 1908 
she occupied the Marvin House of twenty-one rooms, 
and in 1909 she bought the property from the heirs of 
the Isabelle Marvin estate and has since operated it with 
success. She also built, adjoining the Marvin House, 
a three-story brick block, the first story now occupied 
by tlie American Railway Express Company and the 
Williamson Veneer Company'. The upper stories con- 
stitute the Lawrence Hotel. In addition to these prop- 
erties, Mrs. Everett is the owner of other valuable real 
estate in Jamestown, where she is known and recog- 
nized as a woman of rare executive ability. She is of 
deeply charitable impulse, and interested in all public 
movements for the good of her community. She has a 
host of friends and is highly esteemed. Mr. and Mrs. 
Everett were without children. 

(\") Walter R. Everitt, son of John (3) and Eliza- 
beth (Yaw) Everett, the former spelling his name 
"Everitt" and the latter "Everett," was born March 
16, 1855, in Falconer, Chautauqua county, N. Y. He 
was educated in the common schools in Falconer and 
Jamestown High School. At the age of twenty years 
he went to the State of Kansas, remaining for a year 
on account of poor health, then returned East, going to 
Bradford, Pa., where he engaged in the wagon manu- 
facturing business with a Mr. Larson. In those days 
there were no pipe lines to convey the crude oil found 
in the oil fields about Bradford and wagon making was 
an allied industry, thus the wagons made by Mr. Everitt 
were used to transjKirt oil to market. A few years were 
si)ent here and then he returned to his native town, Fal- 
ctmer, where he assumed the management of the affairs 
of his father's estate. In 1887 he built a large ware- 
house and grist mill in P'alconer and took in as a part- 
ner, Wellington Warner. .'Xfter Mr. Warner's death in 
i8()(;, Mr. Everitt sold the mill and retired from active 
business life. He lived retired in I'alconer until the 
latter part of I'JOS, when he went to San Diego, Cal., 
to benefit his health, remaining a year and a half; he 
then came East to look after some of his interests. He 
left Falconer a second time for California and his health 




'7^}JU€L 1^ S ^^Cruti 




/A/t (^.iC. 



^^, 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



397 



was seemingly improved by travel and change of climate; 
in 1908 he became connected with a biological station at 
La Jolla in a minor position. This station has since be- 
come the Scripps Institution for Biological Research of 
the University of California. Here Mr. Everitt acquired 
much knowledge, training and experience in the study 
of biology, his duties at La Jolla being to collect and 
care for molluscs, fish and various other marine ani- 
mals. In the course of time it was recommended by Dr. 
Ritter, who was director of the station, that Mr. Everitt 
be transferred to the University at Berkeley. The 
recommendation was accepted by the faculty and subse- 
quently he was with the department of zoology for 
several years. During his residence in California he 
made a large personal collection of things pertaining 
to biology and one of the finest assortments of sea shells 
known in this country. The shells are now being prepared 
and will be presented presently to the University of Cali- 
fornia as the Walter R. Everitt collection. In 191 1 he 
returned a third time to Falconer and remained eight 
years, until Nov. 30, 1919, when most of his interests 
here were settled. He then decided to go to La Jolla, 
Ca!.. established a home and spend the remainder of his 
life. His health was apparently good and improved 
from its condition in earlier life, and his sudden death 
from heart trouble came as a great shock to his wife, 
relatives and friends, Sept. 30, 1920, and later he was 
laid at rest in Pine Hill Cemetery, Falconer, N. Y. 

Mr. Everitt was a man of retired nature and did not 
indulge in fraternal or club life, being a great lover of 
the home. His recreation was one of study, being a con- 
stant reader. He did considerable research work during 
his leisure moments in the study and collection of marine 
life. He was a true student of nature, very fond of 
travel, and a keen observer, .Another of his favorite 
pastimes was to care for his garden, in which he did 
much to develop horticulture and agriculture. He was 
a strong advocate of outdoor life, as has been shown by 
his outdoor activities. In politics he was affiliated with 
the Republican party, but independent and progressive 
with his vote, and in religion, while he was not a mem- 
ber of anv church, he most devotedly lived a Christian 
life. 

Mr. Everitt married (first) in 1895, Catherine Cryan, 
of Dunkirk, N. Y. ; she died in IQ02. He married (sec- 
ond) in 1920, Mrs. Ada (Pew) Mayo, of Helena, Mont., 
daughter of George W. Pew. Mr. Pew was a graduate 
of Cornell LTniversity and held life certificates as a 
teacher in the States of New York, Wisconsin and 
Iowa. 

(The Oburg Line). 

The name Oburg is one of old origin in Sweden, and 
many people bearing it are of high station in life ; this 
is evidenced by the fact that several of Sweden's fore- 
most citizens bear this name. 

Oburg (Oberg) Arms — Or. two lozenges conjoined in 
fesse sable. 

Crest — Out of a tube or three peacock plumes proper, 
charged witli two lozenges of the shield. 

Supporters — Two lions rampant reguardant or. 

The life of Oscar Oburg, in which this narrative chiefly 
deals, is one which bears out the traditions of the Oburg 
family. This line-of the Oburg family of Sweden was 
founded in the United States by Peter Oburg, who was 
bom near Stockholm, Sweden, and lived there until 1849, 



when he and his family emigrated to America, arriving 
at New York City. From New York City he came to 
Chautauqua county, N. Y., by the way of Buffalo and 
Dunkirk, thence to Jamestown, mostly by boat and stage 
coach. 

^Ir. Oburg married, in his native land, Margaret 
, and to them were born five children before com- 
ing here: I. Caroline, married John Anderson, and they 
lived near Sugar Grove, Pa., later at Red Wing, Minn., 
where they died. 2. Mary, died young, unmarried. 3. 

Pontius, married Mary ; they went to Indiana, 

where both died at an early age. 4. Oscar, of whom 

further. 5. Frank, married Eliza ; he went to 

Peoria, 111. ; during the Civil War he enlisted in the 
army, sersdng for four years, taking part in many im- 
portant battles. 

Oscar Oburg, son of Peter and Margaret Oburg, was 
bora Feb. 25, 1833. near Stockholm, Sweden. At the 
age of sixteen he came to this country with his parents, 
and upon his arrival in Jamestown, N. Y., he found em- 
ployment at the old Shaw Hotel in this city, which was 
located at the corner of Main and West Third streets, 
the site now occupied by the Prendergast block. The 
Shaw Hotel was a regular stop for stage coaches, then 
practically the only means of travel, a change of horses 
being necessary at the hotel stables, and it was here that 
the young man secured his first employment. Later 
Oscar Oburg went to Ashville, Chautauqua county, N. 
Y., where for some time he was engaged in the tailor- 
ing business, having learned the trade in his native land. 
He remained in this business for some time, subse- 
quently becoming interested in the shoe business, which 
he continued until after the Civil War, when he turned 
his attention to farming, following this calling until old 
age compelled his retirement. Mr. Oburg was a Re- 
publican in politics, and was active on the local town 
election boards; a devoted member of the Methodist 
Episcopal church of Ashville for more than sixty-six 
years. He was greatly interested in church work, being 
at various times steward, trustee, class leader, super- 
intendent of the Sunday school, and filled various other 
offices. He was a man of high religious character, kind- 
hearted and beloved by all who knew him. From an 
humble immigrant boy he arose to a station of high re- 
spect and esteem in his community. 

Oscar Oburg married, in Ashville, Feb. 27, 1852, Bebe 
Wellman, daughter of Barnabas and Pamela (Bullock) 
Wellman. Mrs. Bebe (Wellman) Oburg. like her hus- 
band, was a devoted Christian, affiliated with the Ash- 
ville church from the age of fifteen years. Oscar Oburg 
died at Ashville, April 9, 1919, aged eighty-six years. 
His wife died at Ashville, .April i, 1918, aged eighty- 
three years. Mr. and Mrs. Oburg were the parents of 
six children, all born in .Ashville, N. Y. : i. Elon M., 
born Dec. 20. 1852 ; a farmer at Busti, Chautauqua 
county, N. Y. ; married Mary Sherman. 2. \'iola D., 
born Nov. 14, 1854, who married Marvin N. Everett 
(see Everett IV). 3. Minnie N., born Oct. 26, 1856; 
resides at the family homestead at Ashville; unmar- 
ried. 4. Lelia C, born March 20, 1859; married (first) 
Jr'hn C, Walter, deceased; she married (second) Rollin 
Lee, a business man in .Ashville. 5. Abbie D.. 
born Jan. 3, 1861, who became the wife of 
Charles \\"ellman, who is connected with a large indus- 
try in Jamestown, N. Y. 6. \'ictor F., born .April 9, 



39S 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



iSOj: a railroad man in Pittsburgh, Pa.: married Irene 
Grunder. 

iThe Wellman Line). 

It is quite evident that the Wellman family took its 
name from the city of Wells in Somersetshire, Eng- 
land, whicli, in turn, obtained its name from a well 
called St. Andrew's Well, near the Bishop's palace, and 
from the fact that the founder of tlie family had received 
from one of the bishops charge of St. Andrew's Well, 
and had been called at tirst, John the Well-man, or Wil- 
liam the Well-man, which later became John or William 
Wellman. The name has been variously spelled as Well- 
man, Wellmane, Wellmon, Welman, Welmon, Welmin, 
Wilman, Wilmon, Willman, Willmon, Willsman, Wells- 
man, and Weelman. In America the practice of spelling 
this name as Wellman began quite early and has increased 
in practice imtil it is nearly universally used by all of tlie 
family here. 

Arms — Argent, on a bend gules between two apples 
vert, three mullets or. 

Crest — A demi-llon argent holding bet'ween his paws 
an apple as in the arms charged with a mullet or. 

Motto — Dei providentia juvat. 

The genealogy and history of the Wellman family and 
its origin in the Old World has been made with some 
success. Investigation in this country seems to show 
that the early immigrant Wellmans were only two in 
number, Thomas Wellman and William Wellman. How- 
ever, famiiy recollection points to a third, in the person 
cf Barnabas Wellman. The name Barnabas has been 
carried through several generations and it is thought 
tl;al a Barnabas may have been one of the immigrants, 
and, if not, at least one of the sons of William Well- 
man. 

Thomas Wellman was in Lynn, Mass., as early as 
1640. He bought land, lived and died in Lynn End 
(now Lynnfield), Mass. 

William Wellman was in Marshfield, Mass., as early 
as I '4-2. but moved that year to Gloucester, Mass., and 
thence, in l'J50, to Xcw London, Conn., and a few years 
later to Killingworth, Conn., where he died. 

There is a line of seven generations bearing the name 
of Barnabas Wellman, tlie first of whom there is any 
inf.jrmation being a Capt. Barnabas Wellman, a sea- 
faring man, who made voyages between Amefica and 
China. On one of these voyages he brought home a set 
of china dishes, a picture of his ship on each, and thece 
were long preserved in the family. Another was Barna- 
bas Wellman, who represented the family in the .Ameri- 
can Revolution ; and last, a Barnabas Wellman, who was 
an early settler in Chautauqua county, N. Y. 

Barnabas Wellman, the Revolutionary soldier, was 
y>m .Aug. 1.5, 1756, in Killingworth, Conn. According 
to records, he was a drum major in the War of the 
Revolution. His brother and sisters were: I'reelove, 
U)rn May 22, 475,3; -Molly, born March 13, 1755; and 
P;iiil, b'/rn .April 13, 1757. He married, and had the 
I' Ilow'nK children: r. James, born Nov. 30, 1783. 2. 
Hom'T, born March f>, 1786. 3. Barnabas, of whom fur- 
Ihi-r. .4. Ford, born Jan. 3, 1706, 5. Lcandcr, born Oct. 
14, i''oi. There were also two daughters, Millie and 
Hannah. 

Barnabaj (2) Wellman, son of Barnabas Cl) Well- 



man, was evidently born at Killingworth, Corm., Sept. 
16, 1793. He is later recorded amongst the first settlers 
of Chautauqua county, N. Y., locating in the town of 
Ashville. He had a small farm there, but he was chiefly 
occupied as a stone mason, and it is said he was a man 
uf strong character, very religious, and preached in the 
village church in the absence of the local minister. He 
was noted for his fine voice, which he used in connection 
with his church work and local entertainments. He 
was a kind-hearted man, reverenced by all, and known 
to the townsfolk as "Uncle Barney," 

Mr. Wellman married Pamela Bullock, born Sept. 14, 
170S, daughter of Jonathan (2) and Dorcas (Tabethy) 
(Cody) Bullock, and granddaughter of Jonathan (l) 
Bullock, of English descent. Jonathan (l) Bullock was 
resident in Kentucky, and it is believed that he later 
went from there to Berkshire, Mass., where he married 
Bebe Brown, and when their son was eight months old 
the father left for service in the French and Indian War, 
dying in the army from quinsy. Jonathan (2) Bullock 
married Dorcas (Tabethy) Cody, daughter of Joseph 
and Mary (Whitney) Cody, and migrated to Ontario 
county, N. Y., about 1797. Children of Jonathan (2) 
and Dorcas (Tabethy) (Cody) Bullock: Jonathan, 
bom Nov, 7, 1788, died at Panama, Chautauqua county, 
N. Y., 1885; Bebe, born March 8, 1790, died at Sugar 
Grove, Pa., 187S; William, bom Aug. 6, 1794, died in 
Eusti, Chautauqua county, N. Y.; Pamela, of previous 
mention, married Barnabas Wellman, and died in .Ash- 
ville, Chautauqua county, N. Y., in 1874; Joseph, bom 
April 18, 1S03, died in Ontario county, N. Y., in young 
manhood; Alfred, Mary P., and Shubel, all died young. 
Barnabas and Pamela (Bullock) Wellman were the par- 
ents of nine children: i. Henry, married Alvira Pierce, 
a farmer of Three Rivers, Mich. 2. Malinda, died aged 
ten years. 3. Alfred, married Theodia Covey; he was 
a farmer living near Three Rivers, Mich. 4. Matilda, 
died at the age of thirty, unmarried. 5. Barnabas, mar- 
ried Harriett Phelps; he was the owner of a lumber mill 
at Cherry Creek, Chautauqua county, N. Y. 6. Delila, 
married (first) Israel Millard, who died; she married 
(second) Seymour Millard, an oil man at Titusville, 
Pa., and a brother of her first husband. 7. Rachael, 
married Alphcus Alexander, a farmer in Harmony, 
Cliautauqua county, N. Y. 8. Bebe, married Oscar 
Oburg (see Oburg line). 9. Lucinda, married (first) 
A. Ilerrick, who died; she married (second) Nathaniel 
Smith, a farmer of Harmony, Chautauqua county, N. Y. 
Tlicso children were all born in Ashville, Chautauqua 
county, N. Y'. 

The Wellmans arc a well known family in Chau- 
tauqua county, N. Y., and number among the first rank 
citizens. Among them are a number of well known 
professional and business men, and this name stands 
foremost in the commtmitv. 



HENRY E. MOSHER, D. S. C— On that historic 
morning of June 26, 1917, when the "First Contingent" 
of -America',s famous First Division set foot on the soil 
of France at St. Nazaire, Chautauqua county was rep- 
resented in the person of Lieut, (later Capt.) Henry 
K. Mosher, Company K, 28th United .States Infantry. 
Company K was the first company to disembark, Capt. 
G, A. Hadsell commanding them as they landed, with 




&0JnAAl^^' 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



399 



J. L. Dunn as first lieutenant, and Harry E. Mosher as 
second lieutenant, Second Lieut. Hood attached to the 
company being detailed in unloading. As a matter of 
historic interest, Capt. Mosher sent home a photographic 
copy of the following statement : 

France, July 6. 1917. 
Company K, 28th Infantry. 
I certify that this organization landed from the 
U. S. Transport Tenddores at about 10;00 A. M., June 
26th, 1917, at St. Nazaire, France, and that it is the 
first company of American soldiers ever in history to 
land on European soil for service in war. 

G. ARTHUR HADSELL. 
Captain 2Sth Infantry, 

Comd'g Co. K. 
The above statement is correct. 

WM. L. SIBERT. 
Major General. U. S. Army. 
Comd'g. First American Expeditionary Division. 

Henry E. Mosher, captain, Company K, 28th Infantry, 
American Expeditionary Force, killed in action at Can- 
tigny, May 28, 1918, first officer of his rank to set foot 
on French soil in command of American troops for 
service in war, and first soldier from Chautauqua county 
to give his life in France in the service of the United 
States, was born at Falconer, N. Y., June 18. 1S92, one 
of the twin sons of Stiles B. and Martha M. (Cook) 
Mosher. He was educated in the Falconer public schools, 
Jamestown High School, and at St. Braden's School 
at Highland Falls. In 1913 he entered West Point, 
where he spent one year. In October, 1916, he passed 
an examination at Fort Slocum, and on March 22, 1917, 
was commissioned a second lieutenant in the United 
States Army, assigned to the 28th Infantry, and ordered 
to Fort Leavenworth for a course of training in the 
Army Service School. When his course was but half 
completed his regiment was ordered abroad as part of 
General Pershing's "First Contingent," landing in 
France, June 26, 1917. Promotion came rapidly, to first 
lieutenant in the summer of 1917, and in February, 1918, 
to captain, in which rank he had acted since the preced- 
ing August. From July to October, the 28th Infantry, 
as part of the First Division, was in training with the 
French, the third battalion being stationed at St. Amand, 
Meuse. During October and November the regiment 
occupied the Sommervillier sector in Lorraine, and from 
January to .-^pril the Ansauville sector, north of Toul, 
from which station it was called to relieve the French 
and push back the German advance in the Montdidier- 
Noyon sector. 

Says the Regimental History : 

The German offensive launched on March 21 has 
readied such proportions as to call forth every re- 
source at hand for checking it. It TS'as at this time 
that General Persliing placed at the disposal of Mar- 
shal Foch the entire forces of the United States in 
France. A survey of tlie American forces showed four 
divisions whose training was considered complete 
enough to allow of their taking an active part. The 
First was chosen as the most fit to place at the point 
of danger. The British and French had stayed the 
German drive for the channel ports only after the 
wedge had been driven down past Montdidier. At the 
apex of this salient lay the village of Cantigny — taken 
by the 2Sth Infantry on the morning of Jlay 2S — the 
first American offensive, which General Pershing char- 
acterized in his report as "a brilliant action with elec- 
trical effect." as it demonstrated our fighting qualities 
under extreme battle conditions, and also that the 
enemy's troops w^ere not invincible. 

It is significant of the standing of the regiment that 
the 28th was given the place of honor among all the 
regiments of the American Expeditionary Force, and 



Capt. Mosher counted it the honor of his life that he 
was chosen to lead his company in the assault. 

"It was the memorable morning of May 28," wrote 
a member of the company: 

K Company of the 2Sth Infantry, commanded by 
Captain Mosher, was on the left of the attack at Can- 
tigny. Since 4 A. M. the counter batteries from the 
5th, 6th and 7th Artillery had been smashing a path 
for the planned advance of the infantry. Thirty min- 
utes before this advance the trench mortars hurled 
their load across No Man's Land. Then, at 6:45, sup- 
ported by five tanks manned by Frenchmen, the Amer- 
icans went over the top. The infantry got across with 
few casualties, and commenced to dig in. The rais- 
ing of earth works was observed from the air by the 
enemy scouts, signaled to the German batteries and 
then hell began. Six times the Germans counter- 
attacked and six times were repulsed. Their lines were 
but fifty and seventy-five yards away. After the first 
counter-attack, Captain Mosher sent three messengers, 
one after the otlier, with verbal messages to the bat- 
talion commander. They never came back. Shell 
from the enemy batteries was falling too accurately 
for that. So Captain Mosher decided to send another 
message, tliis time a written one. Crawling up and 
down the lines past his company in the shallow tempo- 
rarv trench he counted the casualties among; his men. 
Then, crouching behind the earthworks, just high 
enough for protection against the enemy machine-gun 
fire, he began his message to his commander. He 
wrote the words "Have suffered — " and fifty feet be- 
hind him burst a shell, a fragment of which struck 
him in the back of his head and the pencil was 
stopped. 

Captain Mosher was a man of fine physique and bore 
a dauntless spirit in a sound body. Inheritance as well 
as training had fitted him for his career. He counted 
among his ancestors John Vassal, a member of the Vir- 
ginia Company who had commanded his ship in the 
fleet which destroyed the Spanish Armada; John 
Adams, of the "Fortune," 1621, brother of Henry 
Adams, from whom descended the presidential family ; 
John Abbey, of the "Bonaventure," 1634, a soldier in 
king Philip's War; Hugh Mosher, of Salem, 1636, 
friend and companion of Roger Williams in his exile; 
Maj. Jonathan Bush and Capt. Thomas Abbey, of Con- 
necticut, who served with Gen. Washington throughout 
the Revolution. 

Stiles Burt Mosher, father of Henry E. ilosher, was 
born in Poland township, Chautauqua county, N. Y., 
March 27, 1851, and married, at Olean, N. Y., Oct. 29, 
1879, Martha M. Cook, daughter of John Norbert and 
Anna Kohley Cook. Stiles Burt Mosher was a son of 
Ephraim Mosher, born in Oppenheim, Fulton county, 
N. Y., May 8, 1802, died in Falconer, N. Y., Jan. 15, 
1875, and Harriet Lucretia (Abbey) Mosher, born in 
Guilford, N. Y., Sept. 3, 1816, died in Falconer, N. Y., 
Feb. 23, 1897, daughter of Henry and Eva (Ingersoll) 
Abbey. Ephraim Mosher was a son of Peter and Mary 
(Rarrick) Mosher, settlers in Fulton county, N. Y., in 
1796. 

Always characterized as a strict, courteous, and effi- 
cient officer whose word was law, Capt. Mosher de- 
veloped under stress of battle unusual qualities of lead- 
ership and comradeship. An enlisted man who served 
under him recounted how, after the company's objec- 
tive was gained and the positions consolidated, he went 
about commending and encouraging his men. adminis- 
tering first aid to the wounded and comforting the dying. 
Almost his last act was to drag a wounded private, 
under heavy shellfire, to a place of safety. Letters re- 
ceived by relatives from an officer of the 28th Infantry 
say, in part : 



400 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



with 
jreat 

him. 
their 
none 

that 



I cannot express to you how infinitely cool and brave 
were iiis actions as we advanced upon and attacked 
the German trenches surrounding: the fortified town of 
Cantigny. With his trench cane hooked over his left 
arm he dealt death to five Germans, shooting them 
down with his automatic as nonclialantl\" as if at tar- 
Kel practice, and almost his last act was to drag- a 
wounded private through heavy shell fire to a place 
of safety. His example was an inspiration to all his 
olBcers and men. and we are filled with grief at his 
going. 

Lieutenant Samuel Parker, of tlie 2Sth Infantry, also 

wrote : 

I love and respect him above all other soldiers 
whom I liave been thrown in contact during the | 
war. He was a man and a soldier — ever\" inch of 
1 have seen the intluence of many officers over 
men. but I can honestly say that I have seen 
whose death was felt so keenly by every one 
knew him. 

Capt. Mosher's name appears among those cited by 
Gen. R. L. Bullard for conspicuous gallantry in action 
during the operations connected with the capture and 
defense of Cantigny. He was awarded the Distin- 
guished Service Cross by Gen. Pershing, the citation 
reading : 

During a heavy bombardment near Cantigny, France, 
on May 2Slh. 191S. he displayed heroic conduct and 
utter disregard of his own safety while successfully 
directing the consolidation and defense of the position 
taken by his command. After succeeding in the 
accomplishment of his task he was struck by enemy 
fire and killed. 

.■\ third citation for "conspicuous gallantry in action 
and especially meritorious serv-ices" was bestowed by 
General Summeral, later in command of the First Divi- 
sion. 

Capt. Mosher and two of his lieutenants were buried 
where they fell. later being removed to the French 
civilian cemetery at Cantigny and still later to the 
-American cemetery at Villers Tournelles, Somme. 
Eventually his body is to rest among his kindred in Pine 
Hill in the village of Falconer, where the Henry Mosher 
Post of the .American Legion, formed by his boyhood 
companions and schoolmates, commemorates the name 
of Chautauqua county's first soldier to make the supreme 
sacrifice in his country's service in France. 

Thus passed Henry Mosher, Christian gentleman, and 
soldier. 

He wa.H a captain born and bred. In years 

Thoueh yet a boy. he was a man in soul. 

Ij«d older men and hob! them in control. 

In danuer Htood enct and fuelled their fear.s. 

When ";<'alh caH.s su'h a. captain, he but hears 

A« 'twere a dlHtant bugle and the roll 

(ft far-off druniH. We wronfr him If we toll 

Th»- mournful bell. Give him our cheers, not tears! 

ThrouKh deadly scorch of battle flame and gas, 

Throiirh Iron hail and burst of shrapnel shol), — 

SmlllrK,' an wIkti we pl.ayed at mimic wars, — 

He ■.'.as our I'arbr. I.- It, then, not well, 

That he xhoiiM bad before us to the stars? 

.Stand at ait<-ntlorir Let his brave ."oiil pass! 

(.1. liralnerd Thrall In "The Outlook"). 



OBED EDSON — There arc other rural counties in 
.\'ew lork State that have had a more thrilling history 
to record th;m Chriiitauf|itri, but none which has had a 
more faithful historian than Obed Kdson. His passing, 
in h\s eighty-eighth year, seems almost to close the 
t<f/'/k of th'- pioneer history of the crninty, for there is 
no man left v,h'> has anything aiiproarbing his knowl- 
edge of if. 



In the field of original historical research, Mr. Ed- 
son had no superior in Western New York. The fruits 
of his patient toil are fortunately gathered in perma- 
nent form. He was an important contributor to 
"Young's History of Chautauqua County," published a 
generation ago, which deals especially with the early 
settlers. He was the principal author of the county 
history published in 1S04 by W. A. Ferguson & Com- 
pany, which contains the annals of each town and much 
information regarding the geology and archeology of 
the county, branches of science with which Mr. Edson 
was thoroughly familiar, especially in relation to this 
region. He had reached the age of seventy, and was 
then, perhaps, at the zenith of his splendid intellectual 
powers, when, in IQ02, he contributed his "Annals of 
Chautauqua County" for the "Centennial History of 
Chautauqua County." The annals comprise three hun- 
dred and sixty pages of that work, and for thein he 
gleaned from the fruits of his historical studies the facts 
most valuable for ready reference. Many special in- 
dividuals and periods have since been covered in his 
papers for the Historical Society and in his magazine 
articles, so that the entire amount of his historical writ- 
ings is very considerable in voluiue and will be priceless 
in value to future Chautauquans. He well deserved the 
title commonly bestowed on him of "county historian." 

When, in 1919, the history of Chautauqua county was 
proposed, he gave it his hearty support and cooperation, 
and is the author of several chapters of the work, all 
of which bear his name and may be considered his last 
work for the people of his beloved county, in fact his 
valedictory, and in a way his monument, as he was an 
advisory editor up until the time of his death. 

But it would be a mistake to remember Obed Edson 
only as a historical student. This was his recreation. 
His profession was that of an attorney, and he was at 
the time of his death by many years the senior in serv- 
ice of any luember of the bar in the county, having 
been admitted in 1853. He came of a pioneer family, 
bis father, John M. Edson, having removed to Chau- 
tauqua county from Madison county in 1810. His father 
was a stepson of Maj. Samuel Sinclair. This family 
settled at Sinclairville, where Obed Edson was born in 
1832, and where he was laid at rest. There the boy went 
to school, later attending Fredonia Academy. Then, 
in 1851 he studied law in the office of E. H. Sears, and 
to ihe little village he came home from the Albany Law 
School to hang out his own shingle and to practice there 
for sixty years, before taking up his residence with his 
son, Walter H. Edson, at Falconer. 

As a youth, Mr. Edson was a surveyor, and in 1850 
served as a cliainman on the New York & Erie railroad, 
the year before its coinplction to Dunkirk and its memo- 
rable opening by Daniel Webster. As late as 1867 he 
ran the line of the Dunkirk, Allegheny Valley & Pitts- 
burgh railroad down the Cassadaga valley and through 
his lionie village. Sinclairville was in early days a com- 
munity of more relative importance in the county than 
it is to-day. It once aspired to be the county seat, 
being located in the center of the county. Political con- 
ventions were held there for tnany years. It numbered 
many strong jnen among its citizens, b'rom tlu- bills 
and valleys of the township of Charlotte, men have tome 





^gal^ £hU^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



401 



who have made their names known beyond the limits 
of the county. 

Of the pioneer families of Charlotte, several belonged 
to the Democratic party, among them the Edsons. Obed 
Edson became naturally one of the Democratic leaders 
in a strongly Republican county, and was steadfast in 
his support of the candidates of that party. He was sev- 
eral times nominated for public offices, for district attor- 
ney in 1865, for member of Assembly in 1873 and 1874, 
and for State Senator at a much later date. His elec- 
tion to the Assembly in 1874 from the old Second Dis- 
trict gave him the distinction of being one of the two 
Democrats elected from this county since the Civil War 
period, the other having been the late Charles H. Cor- 
bett. of Sherman, chosen in 1882. At that time both 
Jamestown and Dunkirk were in the same district, which 
Mr. Edson represented. That Assembly was Demo- 
cratic and served during the first year of Governor Til- 
den's administration. 

Mr. Edson was uniformly kind and courteous in all his 
personal relations. He retained until the last a keen 
interest in public affairs. This and his frequent visits 
with younger men, all of whom enjoyed his company, 
kept him young at heart even when he was an octo- 
genarian. So he approached the end of his days with 
a contented mind, and was a welcome guest at many a 
public gathering. His relation to the community in which 
he lived was that of a genial sage. He had lived more 
than his allotted time. He had lingered later than his 
fellows, as some lone pine upon our wintry hills defies 
the storm and the woodman's axe. We find at the close 
of his "Annals of Chautauqua County" Bryant's familiar 
lines, "To a Water Fowl." which seems to suggest a com- 
parison with his own last days : 

Tet stoop not. weary, to the welcome land, 

Thoug-h dark the nigrht is near. 

And soon that toil shall end 

Soon Shalt thou find a summer home and rest. 

Obed Edson, fourth in direct line to bear the name 
Obed, was of the eighth generation of the family founded 
in New England by Deacon Samuel Edson, of Warwick- 
shire, England, who was a descendant of Thomas Edson, 
the earliest identified male ancestor of the Edsons of 
England and America. Thomas Edson was born about 
1480, married Juliana Bustard, lived in Oxfordshire, and 
died during the reign of Henry VHI. 

Deacon Samuel Edson was born in 1612 or 1613, mar- 
ried, at the age of twenty-five, Susanna Orcutt, who was 
four years his junior, and immediately after his mar- 
riage sailed with his bride for New England, arriving at 
Salem, in July, 1639. I^i 165 1 he moved to Bridgewater, 
where he was one of the fifty-six original proprietors, 
and may have been its first settler, at least was one of 
the first. He was a man of intelligence, industry and 
thrift, acquiring in course of time large property inter- 
ests in land and mills. From 1676 until his death, July 
ID, 1692, he was in public office, and from 1667 until the 
end of King Philip's War he was a member of the Coun- 
cil of War, and from 1664, when he was elected one of 
the first deacons of the Bridgewater church, until his 
death, he filled that office. Of strong character, upright, 
honorable life, he possessed great influence and was one 
of the leading men of his town. His wife, Susanna, had 
a happy disposition, modest deportment, dignified pres- 

Chau— 26 



ence and graceful manner. The characteristics of the 
founder and his wife have been transmitted to their de- 
scendants, and in Obed Edson the old Pilgrim had 
almost a reincarnation. Susanna Edson died Feb. 20, 
1699, and in the old burying ground at Bridgewater the 
oldest monument of its kind is that standing over the 
graves of Deacon Samuel and Susanna Edson. 

Deacon Samuel Edson was succeeded in Bridgewater 
by his son, Samuel (2) Edson, a prominent and highly 
respected citizen and office holder, and a man of prop- 
erty. He married Susanna Byram, and was succeeded 
in time by his son, Samuel (3) Edson, the first of the 
family to join the Established Church of England. He 
married Mary Dean, and their fourth son was Obed (i) 
Edson, who was a sergeant in the French and Indian 
War, taking part in several expeditions against the 
French. He died in Richfield, N. Y., having gone there 
in his old age it is believed to be with his son, Obed (2) 
Edson. Sergeant Obed Edson married (first) Katurah 
Willis, of Bridgewater, and they were the first of the 
branch to settle in New York State. 

Obed (2) Edson, like his father, was a soldier of the 
French and Indian War, and for several years lived in 
Lanesboro, Mass. Between 1790 and 1793 be moved to 
what is now Richfield, Otsego county, N. Y., but then 
a part of the town of German Flats, Montgomery covmty. 
There he engaged in farming, and kept an inn in the local- 
ity now known as Monticello. He was a man of much 
natural ability, and a good musician. Prior to his death 
in Richfield, May 9, 1840, at the age of ninety-three years 
and seven days, he freed his only slave, "Ike," whom he 
had long owned. Obed (2) Edson married Prudence 
How, of Welsh descent, and they were the parents of a 
son, Obed (3) Edson. 

Obed (3) Edson was born during the residence of his 
parents in Lanesboro, Mass. He then lived in Otsego 
county, N. Y., at Cooperstown and Richfield, later mov- 
ing to Eaton, Madison county, where he died Aug. 6, 
1804, aged thirty-two years. He was a clothier by trade; 
a member of the Masonic order; an Episcopalian, and 
like his father a follower of the political teachings of 
Thomas Jefferson. He was a man of education, a reader 
of good literature, and always a student. He married 
(second) Fanny Bigelow, born in Colchester, Conn., 
daughter of Captain Elisha Bigelow, an officer of the 
Revolution, as were two of his sons, a third serving as 
a private. Her mother. Thankful (Beebe) Bigelow, 
whose ancestor served under Cromwell, died in Sinclair- 
ville, Chautauqua county, N. Y., at the great age of 
ninety-seven years. After the death of her husband, at 
the age of thirty-two years, Fanny (Bigelow) Edson, 
then a woman of less than thirty years, married (second) 
Maj. Samuel Sinclair, with whom she and her children 
came to Sinclairville, in 1810, the site then a wilderness, 
but a village growing thereon later was named in his 
honor. Mrs. (Edson) Sinclair was a woman of intelli- 
gence and education, one of the Chautauqua mothers 
who filled an important place in early county life, dying 
in. Sinclairville. Jan. 12, 1852, widely known and honored 
for her many virtues and useful life. Maj. Samuel Sin- 
clair, her second husband, was a soldier of the First New 
Hampshire Regiment, serving from the age of fifteen 
until eighteen under his uncle. Col. Joseph Cilley. He 



40_' 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



was at \'alley Forge, Saratoga, Moniuouth, and with 
General Sulli\-an in his campaign against the Indians. 
Maj. Sinclair was one of the founders of the Masonic 
lodge at Sinclairville, and of Forest Lodge, Free and 
Accepted Masons, of Fredonia, the first in Chautauqua 
county. 

John Milton Edson, son of Obed (3) and Fanny (Bige- 
low) Edson, was born at Eaton, Madison county, N. Y., 
July 30, iSoi, and died in Sinclairville, Aug. 21, 1S85. 
He was but three years of age when his father died, and 
nine when with his stepfather, Maj. Samuel Sinclair, his 
mother, his brother and sister, he came to Chautauqua 
countN', in 1810. the family settling at what later becaiue 
Sinclair\-ille. He obtained a fine education principally 
through home teaching and reading, as there were no 
schools then in his section. But in after life those who 
met him never failed to be impressed with his large and 
original views, and to feel a regret that a thorough edu- 
cation had been denied him. But he was a thorough 
woodsman, skilled in all the arts of the frontiersman, an 
excellent rifle shot, a leader among the pioneers. He- 
was a noted athlete in his younger years, and greatly 
interested in military life, holding tlie rank of lieutenant- 
colonel of the Western New York Regiment, appointed 
May 22. 1S30. He was justice of the peace for the town 
of Charlotte for fourteen years : was supervisor three 
terms; deputy United States marshal one term; judge 
of the Court of Common Pleas, April 17, 1S43, until July 
I, 1847, when the court was abolished. He was the first 
master of Sylvan Lodge, No. 303, Free and Accepted 
Masons, of Sinclairville, his stepfather, Maj. Samuel Sin- 
clair, the first master of the "Masonic Society" organized 
there in i8ig. He married, in 1831, Hannah Alvcrson, 
bom in Halifax, Windham county, \'t., June 3, 1804, died 
Nov. 22, 1878, in Sinclairville, N. Y. She was a daugh- 
ter of Jonathan and Ursula (Church) Alverson, and in 
1S21 came with her mother to reside in the town of 
Cerr>', Chautauqua count>'. They were the parents of 
two children : Obed (4) Edson, Chautauqua's "grand 
old man," whose life is herein commemorated; and a 
daughter, Fanny Ursula, born June 4, 1834. married 
Henry Sylvester. 

Such were the antecedents of Obed (4) Edson, and 
thrriugh the men and women named he received a rich 
Ictrncy, good health, strong physique, worth, ambition, 
quick intelligence, upright character, and love of the 
right. His ancestors were unusually long lived, and he 
fulfilled the promise of his youth in every particular, h'S 
career transcending in usefulness and brilliancy that of 
any of his race, and clo.5eIy resembling that nf his first 
.Vmcrican ancestor, Deacon S;unuel Edson, of three cen- 
turies ago. Eighty-seven were the years of his life, and 
until their very close he was "in the harness," death com- 
ing to him quietly and gently at the midnight hour, while 
h" ".I'-tit. hi- passing in keeping with the ide.il life he had 
long If'l. 

Ob"'! O) F/Ison, only son of John ^^i!ton and Hannah 
f .\\\<:r-,',n) Eflson, was born at Sinclairville, Chautauf|ua 
county, X. Y.. F'fb. 18, 1832, and died at the home of his 
son, Walter H, Ed'-on, in Falconer, N. Y., Nov. 22, 1919. 
He attended the public schools of Sinclairville, and was a 
student at Fredonia Academy, there completing his school 
years. He ih'-n pursued the study of law imd'-r the 
direfti'n of E. If. Sears, of Sinclairville, '-nt'-rin;; Albany 



Law School in 1853, and gaining admission to the New 
York bar, Aug. 8, 1S53, he then being in his twenty- 
second year. At the age of eighteen years he had been 
engaged in land and railroad surveying and later he ran 
surveys for railroads and county roads. But from 1853, 
when admitted to the New York bar, he continuously 
practiced his profession in Chautauqua county, and, well 
trained in the law, an able advocate, an honest man, he 
stood high among his brethren of the profession, and he 
possessed the entire confidence of his clients, even his 
adversaries feeling that they had no injustice to fear at 
his hands. And at all times he was a polished gentle- 
man of the old school, who would rather be of service 
than cause ofifense to any man. At Sinclairville he was a 
law partner with Judge E. F. Warren, later co-partner 
with C. Frank Chapman, and subsequently was with his 
nephew, Fred H. Sylvester. 

Although not actively engaged in practice in the last 
few years, he continued to give some time to his pro- 
fession, and recently the local newspapers noted his re- 
port as referee in County Court proceedings which was 
entered just a few days before his eighty-seventh birth- 
day. His historical researches, his early recollections, 
and his wonderful memory for events, dates and details 
made him a veritable encyclopedia of local information, 
which was always open to his friends or the public. It is 
not too tuuch to say that the information he collected and 
stored away in his records and his retentive memory was 
often of much greater value to others than it was to 
himself. He never attempted to commercialize his talent 
for historical research ; to him it was a labor of love. 
He took greater interest in it and gave it more atten- 
tion than he did his profession. He was one of the 
founders of the Chautauqua County Society of History 
and Natural Science, and was its backbone through all 
the years since its formation. He retained his interest 
in the county historical society up to the time of his 
death, and attended the annual meetings of that organi- 
zation as long as he was able to do so. 

Mr. Edson was a contributor to "The Continent," "The 
Chautauquan," and other leading magazines, generally 
upon historical subjects. He first gathered and collected 
the facts respecting the expedition of Col. Daniel Broad- 
head, which was sent against the Indians of the upper Alle- 
gheny river by Gen. Washington during the War of the 
Revolution to operate in conjunction with General Sulli- 
van. Mr. Edson prepared a full history of this expedi- 
tion, which was published as a leading article in the No- 
vember number of the "Magazine of American History" 
for the year 1879. He was the author of several local 
histories, among which is a portion of "Young's History 
of Chautauqua County," and all of that part of it which 
relates to its Indian, French and early history. He lec- 
tured before the Chautauqua Institute, and delivered the 
historical address at Westfiidd in 1902, on tlie occasion 
of the Centennial celebration of the settlement of Chau- 
tauf|ua county. He made a similar address at the cele- 
bration of the Centennial of the settlement of the city of 
Falconer, and he dcli\ered many addresses and lectures. 
He was president of the Chautauqua County Historical 
Society, member of the County and State Bar Associa- 
tions, member of the BufTalo Historical Society, and 
president of Evergreen Cemetery Association of Sin- 
rbiirvilUv 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



403 



Mr. Edson was a lifelong Democrat and prominent in 
the councils of his party for many years. In 1874 he was 
elected member of Assembly from the old Second Assem- 
bly District, defeating Harvey S. Elkins, Republican, by 
two hundred and twenty-five majority, although the Re- 
publican State ticket had one thousand majority in the 
district. The preceding year he was defeated by only 
seventy-two majority, his successful Republican oppo- 
nent being John D. Hiller. Mr. Edson was the only 
Democrat ever elected to the Assembly from the old 
Second Assembly District, which then included both 
Jamestown and Dunkirk. Beside his term in the Assem- 
bly, he served several years on the Board of Supervisors 
as the representative of his native town. He was for 
nearly si.\ty years a member of the Masonic fraternity, 
and served Sylvan Lodge, of Sinclairville, as master in 
1862 and again in 1912 — just half a century later, as well 
as several terms between those years. He was also a 
member of Western Sun Chapter, Royal Arch Masons, 
of Jamestown. During the ministry of the Rev. Dr. 
James G. Townsend at the Independent Congregational 
Church in Jamestown, Mr. Edson took an active interest 
in the work of that church. 

Mr. Edson married, at Sinclairville, May 11, 1859. 
Emily Amelia Allen, born at New London, Conn., Nov. 
27, 1835, died in March, 1899, daughter of Caleb T. and 
Emily E. (Haley) Allen. Her father, Caleb J. Allen, in 
his youth, was a sailor on a Pacific ocean whaling ship, 
but later located in New London, Conn., where he be- 
came a hatter ; was mayor of New London, and also 
represented that city in the Connecticut Legislature as 
State Senator. Later he was a merchant of Sinclairville. 
Obed (4) and Emily A. (Allen) Edson were the par- 
ents of eight children : i. Fanny A., born April 28, i860; 
married John A. Love, now residing at Bellingham, 
Wash. 2. John M., born Sept. 29, 1861, now living at 
Bellingham, Wash. 3. Samuel A., born Sept. 15, 1863, 
died Nov. 16, 1872. 4. Mary U., born Sept. 11, 1865, died 
Nov. 27, 1872. 5. Hannah, born Feb. 15, 1869, died Dec. 
10, 1881. 6. Walter H., a sketch of whom follows. 7. 
Ellen E., born April 21, 1875, died March 31, 1887. 8. 
Allen O.. born Sept. 3, 1880, died Jan. 16, 1882. John 
Milton, the eldest son, is a well known ornithologist of 
Bellingham, Wash., and has made many valuable contri- 
butions to the literature of that science. He married 
Alma B. Green, a former teacher in Chautauqua county 
schools. 

Such was the life and deeds of Obed (4) Edson, whose 
years, eighty-seven, were spent entirely in Chautauqua 
county. While he held various positions of public trust 
and confidence, was a lawyer of high repute and identified 
with many good movements ; he was best known and will 
be long remembered as a local historian. A monument 
to his historical labors has been erected in every history 
of Chautauqua county that has been written for the past 
half century. Mr. Edson knew more about the early 
history of Chautauqua count}', and of conditions and 
peoples connected with the Chautauqua lake region long 
before the advent of the white man, than any other man 
who has ever made a study of these things. Living a life 
of activity and good works, modestly and quietly pursu- 
ing the open road that lay before him, never making an 
effort to avoid the responsibilities that came to him, nor 
seeking honors that did not belong to him, he lived and 



labored long beyond the allotted years of man, and goes 
to his rest and reward with the respect and the love of 
the people of Chautauqua county, the old and the young, 
the rich and the poor, to a very marked degree. 



WALTER HENRY EDSON— Since his admission 
in February, 1898, Walter H. Edson has practiced at the 
Chautauqua county bar continuously, and as a lawyer of 
learning, sound judgment and integrity he occupies high 
and honorable position. As a citizen, Mr. Edson is most 
earnest, well-informed and public-spirited, always at the 
service of individual or organization in aid of the cause 
of education, religion or good government. His spirit of 
helpfulness is well known and he is freely called upon 
for platform service to enlighten and instruct audiences 
seeking light upon perplexing questions of City, State 
and National policy. His interest never lags and he gives 
freely of himself to every worthy cause which needs an 
advocate. He is a native son of Chautauqua, and 
through his father, Obed Edson, of blessed memory, is 
heir to a rich inheritance of county ancestry dating to 
John Milton Edson, who came to the county in 1810. 
He is a descendant of Deacon Samuel Edson, of War- 
wickshire, England. ( See ancestry in memorial review 
of the life of Obed Edson). John M. Edson was a step- 
son of Maj. Samuel Sinclair, founder of Sinclairville. 
Through his mother, Emily A. (Allen) Edson, another 
line of Chautauqua county lineage is established, her 
father coming from New England to become a merchant 
of Sinclairville. Walter Henry Edson is the sixth child 
of Obed and Emily A. (Allen) Edson, and has always 
been true to the county of his birth and is well known in 
the county. His home was the abode of his honored 
father during the latter's last years, and the association 
between the two men was closer even than the natural 
bond. 

Walter H. Edson was born in Sinclairville, Chau- 
tauqua county, N. Y.. Jan. 8, 1874. He completed public 
school courses of study with graduation from Sinclair- 
ville High School in 1891, then pursued a genera! classi- 
cal course at Cornell University, whence he was gradu- 
ated with the usual bachelor's degree, class of 1896. He 
read law under his father and attended the College of 
Law, Cornell University, receiving his LL. B., class of 
1897. From 1896 to 1898, he was a clerk in the law office 
of Obed Edson, and upon his admission to the Chau- 
tauqua county bar in 1898, formed a partnership with 
Harley N. Crosby, now surrogate of Chautauqua county. 
The firm Edson & Crosby opened a law office in Falconer, 
March i, 1898, and there continued a successful general 
practice until Jan. i, 1914, when the firm dissolved, Mr. 
Crosby retiring, Mr. Edson continuing practice in Fal- 
coner alone until Jan. 6, 1915, when he was appointed 
assistant United States attorney for the western district 
of New York, with headquarters at Buffalo. He gave 
up practice at Falconer upon accepting the government 
appointment, and gave his time exclusively to the duties 
of his office until Nov. 13, 191S, when he resigned and 
resumed private practice as a member of the law firm of 
Dean, Edson & Jackson, Fenton building, Jamestown, 
N. Y. On March 20, 1920, he was appointed special 
assistant to the United States attorney and is still serv- 
ing (Dec. 20, 1920) in that capacity. The law and his 
public service has filled Mr. Edson's life to the exclu- 



404 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



siop. of business activities to a large extent, his only 
important connection being with the National Chau- 
tauqua County Bank, which he served as director, trust 
officer and counsel. On Jan. i, 1921, he began service as 
vice-president and trust officer 01 the National Chau- 
tauqua County Bank of Jamestown, devoting his entire 
time to that work. He is retained by otlier of the cor- 
p^'raticns of Jamestown in a legal capacity and he ad- 
mi::isters many trusts. 

The politics of the Edsons has for generations been 
Democratic, and Obcd Edson was long prominent in 
party councils. His mantle fell upon his son, and since 
early life Walter H. Edson has been rated a party leader 
and one of the strong men of the party. Chautauqua is 
strongly, almost hopelessly, Republican, and official life 
is but a dream to those loyal to the Democracy. But Mr. 
Edson has always been a strong and loyal supporter of 
the partj- and its great leaders. In 1912 he was one of 
the eight Wilson supporters on the New York delega- 
tion to the National Democratic Convention at Baltimore. 
In Falconer, he was president of the Board of Educa- 
tion in 1905, and as above noted held the office of assistant 
United States district attorney for Western New York, 
Jan. II, ir)i4-Nov. 13, 1918, that appointment coming 
from the fact that the Nation and State were Demo- 
cratic in their executive departments. 

During the Great War period, Mr. Edson was assist- 
ant United States district attorney; he joined the army 
and trained at Fort Niagara, N. Y., receiving a second 
lieutcr.ant"s commission, Nov. 2~, 1917. He was assigned 
to duty with the 90th Division at American Lake, Wash., 
and served until Dec. 11, 1917, when he resigned and re- 
turned to his post. He is a member of Cornell Chapter, 
Delta Chi. and Sylvan Lodge, No. 303, Free and .Accepted 
Masons, of Sinclairville, a lodge of which his father, 
Obcd Edson, was a member for sixty years and of which 
he was twice master, just a half century elapsing be- 
tween his first term, 1862, and his second, 1912. John 
Milton Edson, grandfather of Walter H. Edson, was the 
first master of Sylvan Lodge, and his stepfather, Maj. 
Samuel Sinclair, the first master of a "Masonic Society" 
organized in Sinclairville in 1819. In religious faith Mr. 
Edson is a Unitarian, affiliated with the First Church of 
Jamestown. 

Mr. Edson married, at Shumla, Chautaunua county, N. 
Y., June 27, 1899, Florilla Belle Clark, daughter of Fran- 
cis Drake and Isabel M. (Grover) Clark. Mrs. Edson it a 
preat-grcat-Kranddaughter of Maj. Samuel Sinclair and 
hJA first v.ifc. Sarah ("Perkins) Sinclair. Mr. Edson is a 
Kreat-grandchild of Maj. Sinclair's second wife, Fanny 
^Bip'-low) Edson, widow of Obcd (3) Edson, inotlicr of 
John Milton Edson, and grandmother of Obcd C4) Ed- 
son, father of Walter Henry Edson. Mr. and Mrs. Ed- 
son arc the parents of two children : Francis Drake and 
Isabel E. Edson. The family home is in Falconer. Mrs. 
E'hon i' a m'-mber of the Daughters of the American 
V..■■.■^^■^^v.v.. 

WARREN BREWSTER HOOKER— With the 

passim: of th'- eminent Judge Warren B. Hooker, one 
of the strong men of Chaiitau'iua county retires from 
earthly vc-n's, and v.ilh him ftasse", some phases of 
county [ifjlitiral life with whirh fKiliticians of th'- old 
school alone arc familiar. Judge Hooker began his pub- 



lic career where other famous Chautauquans began, on 
the Board of Supervisors, and was a recognized party 
leader before Governor Black appointed him to the Su- 
preme Bench in 1898. A member of Congress at the 
age of thirty-four, he became an influential factor in 
the National House of Representatives, and under 
Speaker Reed was awarded a most important committee 
chairmanship — Rivers and Harbors. He was four times 
elected to Congress, and in his district during his long 
period of public service he gathered around him a group 
of men loyal in their Republicanism, but to their leader 
as loyal and as true. It has been said of Judge Hooker 
that he served his friends too well, but it is the testimony 
of all the attorneys who practiced before him that he 
was one of the most impartial judges who ever sat in 
New York courts. Loyalty to his friends was a striking 
characteristic of his whole life, but a friend was never 
recognized as such in his judicial hearing, or the testi- 
mony just quoted would not have been given. While he 
was a politician of the most astute type, he was also the 
gracious gentleman and the just judge. Those who knew 
him best loved him most, and as friend and neighbor he 
will long live in the hearts of his townsmen. They will 
not recall the fact that he entered Congress unknown, but 
by sheer force of personality became one of a small 
group wliich dominated that body: nor that for fifteen 
years he served with ability and integrity as a justice of 
the Supreme Court of his native New York, but they 
will remember that his great dominant trait was kindli- 
ness, that his timely aid started man.v a Chautauqua boy 
on a useful career, and that his long public career was 
marked by countless favors to those who were less for- 
tunately situated. "Were everyone for whom he has 
done some loving kindness to bring a blossom to his 
grave, he would sleep to-night beneath a wilderness of 
flowers." So it is not as the forceful politician of a 
period when men gave and received hard blows in their 
political controversies, nor as the just and upright judge 
who almost held life, death and the future at his behest, 
nor as the successful business man that Chautauquans 
remember Judge Hooker, but as a friend whom they 
mourn with a deep and a genuine sorrow, pride in his 
achievement being lost in sorrow at his passing. 

Judge Hooker was a native son of New York, his 
parents, John and Philcna (Waterman) Hooker, com- 
ing from near Brandon, Vermont, to Perrysburg, in 
Cattaraugus county, N. Y., and there their son, 
Warren B. Hooker, was born Nov. 24, 1856. He 
died at his home in Fredonia, Chautauqua county, N. 
Y., March 5, 1920, and is buried in Forest Hill Ceme- 
tery. His education, begun in the public schools, was 
continued at Forestville Free Academy, from whence he 
was graduated, class of 1876. Choosing the profes- 
sion of law, he studied under the preceptorship of John 
G. Record, of the Chautauqua county bar, and until 1879 
was a student in the lattcr's office in Forestville. In 1879 
h(! was admitted to the bar, and until 1882 practiced law 
in Chautauqua county, with offices at Forestville. In 1882 
he went to the State of Washington, and for two years 
practirerl his profession in the city of Tacoma. He re- 
turned to Chautauqua county in 1884 and at once estab- 
li-^^hcd law ofTices in Fredonia, that village continuing his 
home until his death, thirty-six ycnrs later. 

Until 1890 Mr. Hooker successfully practiced law in 




^^ff.c/ /J^.^. 



47 CT /&^. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



405 



Fiedonia, then gave himself wholly to the public service 
as Congressman from the then Thirty-fourth New York 
District. He continued in Congress through successive 
reelections until November, 1898, when he was appointed 
by Governor Black a justice of the Supreme Court of the 
Eighth Judicial District to fill a vacancy. At the elec- 
tion in November, 1899, he was elected to the same high 
office for a full term of fourteen years. On Dec. 
8, 1902, he was appointed by Governor Odell to the Ap- 
pellate Division in the Second Department and went to 
Brooklyn, where he served until 1909, then returned to 
trial work in his own district. Upon the expiration of 
his term in 1913 he retired to private life. He was, how- 
ever, recalled to the bench late in the summer of 1919 as 
official Supreme Court Referee by appointm.ent, and dur- 
ing the fall and winter heard a number of cases. The 
last trial over which he presided was in Allegany county, 
but two weeks prior to his death. 

The record Judge Hooker made while on the bench 
shows him to have been a diligent worker and most 
anxious that nothing but justice should proceed from his 
decisions. He was learned in the law, but never rendered 
a decision until after deep search and profound study of 
lavi' precedent and authority to fortify his own opinion. 
Eminently just in this judicial decision, he was equally 
noted for his fairness and impartiality. 

The fifteen years Judge Hooker spent upon the Su- 
preme Bench came as a crowning honor to a life of public 
service that began while he was yet a law student. A 
Republican in his political affiliation, he was of the domi- 
nent party, but his was a day of personal politics, and it 
was necessary to success that a politician maintain a 
strong organization loyal to him as well as to the party. 
This Judge Hooker early learned, and he proved one of 
the strongest of leaders of organized politics in his dis- 
trict. He fought his political battles according to the 
rules laid down by former leaders and by contempo- 
raries ; he a;ked no quarter, and gave and received hard 
blows with equal equanimity. 

His career in the public service began in 1878, the 
\-ear before he was actually admitted to the bar, when he 
was elected special surrogate of Chautauqua county. He 
held that position for three years. After returning from 
the West, Mr. Hooker immediately began taking an 
active interest in public affairs, and in 18S9 was elected 
supervisor from the town of Pomfrct. In 1890 he was 
reelected, receiving the support in that election of both 
kading political parties, which was a compliment to his 
efficient service. In the fall of 1890, when yet but thirty- 
three years of age, he was nominated by the Republicans 
of th; Thirty-fourth Congressional District of New York 
for representative in Congress. The district comprises 
the counties of Chautauqua, Cattaraugus and Allegany. 
His election followed by a majority of 5,726. He was 
reelected in 1892 and again in 1894, receiving in the latter 
election a plurality of 15.300 votes. In 1896 he again re- 
ceived the nomination and was again elected by the hand- 
some plurality of 27,436. He was elected for the last 
time in 189S. At the time he was elected for the first 
time he was the youngest member of Congress. He was 
nominated at that time over old and experienced men of 
the party. His subsequent renomination by acclamation 
was a compliment to his popularity and faithful service. 



During the Fifty-fourth Congress, Speaker Reed named 
Mr. Hooker chairman of the important Rivers and Har- 
bors Committee. His bill passed by big majorities by 
both houses of Congress, and over the President's veto 
won for him many warm compliments. In one of his 
appropriation bills during his term as chairman of this 
committee, was included a generous appropriation for 
the Dunkirk harbor with which most important improve- 
ments were made. In 1898, before he had completed his 
last term in -Congress, Governor Black appointed him a 
justice of the Supreme Court for the Eighth Judicial 
District. This ended his political career, and upon the 
expiration of this term in 1913, he practiced law and en- 
gaged in business as a manufacturer of sand glass in 
Pennsylvania. 

Most of Judge Hooker's time after his retirement from 
the bench was spent in Fredonia, where his genial nature 
and pleasing manner won all hearts. He was sympathetic 
and responsive to every reasonable appeal, and during 
the last few years of his life took deep interest in the 
affairs of Trinity Protestant Episcopal Church. He was 
a member of the Masonic order, affiliated with Forest 
Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons, of Fredcnia. In 1899 
Hamilton College conferred upon him the honorary de- 
gree LL. D. 

Judge Hooker married, Sept. 11, 1S84, Etta Elizabeth 
Abbey, who survives him, youngest daughter of Chaun- 
cey and Elizabeth (Chase) Abbey, her father one of 
Fredonia's strong business men of an earlier day, bank 
president and eminent citizen, who died in 1894. Eliza- 
ijeth (Chase) Abbey died March 28, 1855. Mrs. Hooker 
is a member of Benjamin Prejcott Chapter, Daughters 
of the American Revolution, and of Trinity Episcopal 
Church. She is of the eighth generation of the .•\bbey 
fam.ily in America, descent being traced from John Ab- 
bey, who was of Salem, Mass., Jan. 2, i''38. Judge and 
Mrs. Hooker were the parents of two children, born in 
Fredonia : Sherman Abbey Hooker, secretary of the 
Benjamin Franklin Institute, New York City ; Florence 
Elizabeth, married Eben D. Jiloon, of Elkhart, Ind., and 
they are the parents of three sons : Warren DeWitt, 
Eben DeWitt, Jr., and David Erownell Moon. 

Two tributes from the press of Western New York 
close this review of a valuable life. Buffalo "Times" (in 
part only) : 

Jlany years ago we were present in court when 
Judgre Hooker sentenced to death a young man who 
had been convicted of murder. Tlie magistrate showed 
more emotion than did the defendent. The carefully 
restrained but distinctly evident sorrow of the .ludge. 
his pallor, his manifest sense of the tremendous and 
melancholy responsibility he was wielding left an im- 
pression which has never been effaced. It ■was a 
memorable example of human feeling in exercising the 
powers of .iustioe. and was consonant with the breadth 
of vision Judge Hooker showed in afterward granting 
that unfortunate young man a new trial. 

It seems to us that this incident is more typical of 
Justice Hooker than anything that could be conveyed 
in an editorial of the conventional kind. 

Jamestown "Journal" (closing paragraph) : 

And now, some years after the days of his activity, 
when he goes to his long rest after a strenuous life, 
when he has laid down the burdens which he courage- 
ously bore so many years, we pay tribute to his genius, 
and join with those who sorrow at his passing from 
the realm of the living to take his place in the silent 
chambers of the dead. 



400 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



CHAUNCEY ABBEY— A quarter of a century has 
eUpscd since Cliaunccy Abbey walked Frcdonia's streets, 
but his mcnwry is still green and monuments to his 
memory are I'oimd on every hand. Nearly forty years 
prior to his passing he organized with others the Fre- 
donia Bank, a State institution, which later became the 
Fredonia Natior.al Bank, of which Chauucey Abbey was 
the able president during the last twelve years of his life. 
Beginning life on a farm, he was very successful as an 
agriculturfst, and as the years passed he broadened and 
expanded until his activities touched nearly every de- 
partment of Chautauqua county life. His life was a 
successful and a useful one, for it was not given up to 
selfish ends or ignoble purposes. He prospered, but it 
was not at the expense of others, and his wealth was 
both rightly acquired and rightly used. Seventy-nine 
were the years of his life, and from the age of eight 
years he was a resident of Chautauqua county, and from 
arrival at legal age a landowner. 

This surname is \-ariously spelled. Abbe and Abbey 
being the commoner forms. The origin of the word as 
a surname is self-evident, the first to bear it taking ad- 
vantage of the nearness of his home to the abbey to 
adopt that v.-ord as his surname. The family in England 
bore arms : Gules, five fusils in fesse, between three 
scallop shells. Crest: On a wreath of three colors of 
the shield, gules and argent, an eagle's head erased or. 

Chauncey Abbey traced his descent through si.x gen- 
erations of New England ancestors to John Abbey, who, 
tradition says, was of Norwich, Norfolkshire, England. 
John .-\bbey was admitted an inhabitant of Salem, Alass., 
Jan. 2, 1636, and allotted an acre of ground "for an 
house" and "three acres of planting ground." He had 
other lands granted him in Salem, and is mentioned in 
the Wenham records in 1643; was a constable in 1669, 
and according to Savage was at Reading, Mass., in 1685. 
He died about 1690, aged not far from seventy-four 
years. His first wife, Mary Abbey, who died Sept. 9, 
1672, was the mother of Samuel .-Vbhey, througli whom 
Chauncey .Abbey traced his descent. 

Samuel Abbey was born about 1630, in Salem or Wen- 
ham, Nfass.. died in Windham, Conn., in March, 1697-98. 
He was a landowner and surveyor of Wenham, lived in 
Salem Village, bought and sold several tracts of land in 
Essex county, Mass., prior to Dec. 21, 1697, when he 
was admitted an inhabitant of Windham, Conn. He 
married, at Windham, Mass., Oct. 12, 1672, Mary Knowl- 
ton, who survived him and married a second husband, 
Abraham Nfitchell. Descent is traced to Chauncey Ab- 
Ky throuirh Ebenezer Abbey, son of Samuel and Mary 
( Knowlton ) ,^bbey. 

Eb<:nczor .Vbbcy was b<^<rn in .Salem Village, Mass., 
July 31, 1683, died Dec. 5, 1758. He was of Norwich, 
G-,nn., and Windham, Conn.' and in 172.1 was a mem- 
ber of the Hampton church. He is traced by his lantl 
transactions, and may have lived at Mansfield, as he there 
married, Oct. 28, i/f/?, Mary, daughter of Joshua Allen, 
on'- of Mansfi'-ld's early settlers. They were the parents 
'it thir'<'n children, descent being traced in this branch 
thro'it'h the eldest child, Ebenezer Abljcy. 

Ef(enezer (2) .Abbey was born in Windham, Conn., 
J'lly 27, i7f»S. H'- married Abigail, surname tmknown, 
Feb. 22, 1729, and th'v were the prir<iits (if seven chil- 



dren, descent being traced through the si.xth child, John 
Abbey. 

John Abbe\- was born in Windham, Conn., Aug. 23, 
1743, died in Bellows Falls, Conn. He was a soldier of 
the Revolution, serving with the Connecticut Line. He 
married, April 2y, 170S, Dorothy Bugbee, and they were 
the parents of David .Abbey, the fouiider of the family 
in Chautauqua county, N. V., and grandparents of 
Chauncey Abbey. 

David Abbey was born at Bellows Falls, Conn., in 1789, 
died in Chautauqua county, N. Y., in 1876. He was a 
farmer all his life, and owned land in various places. 
He located in the town of Villenova (now Arkwright), 
Chautauqua county, N. Y., in 1823, and there resided 
many years. He married, in New England, Hannah 
Woods, born in Beiniington, Vt., daughter of Nathan 
Woods, a Revolutionary soldier, and descendant of John 
Woods, born in England about 1610, one of the first set- 
tlers of Sudbury, Mass. David and Hannah (Woods) 
Abbey were the parents of seven children : James 
Parker; Chauncey, mentioned below; Abial, Hannah, 
John, David, Jr., and a child who died young. 

Chauncey Abbey, second son of David and Hannah 
(Woods) Abbey, was born in the town of Virgil, Cort- 
land county, N. Y., April i, 1815, died in the village of 
Fredonia, Chautauqua county, N. Y., Sept. 11, 1894. He 
was eight years old when brought to Chautauqua county 
by his parents in 1823, and until reaching man's estate 
remained at the home farm in the now town of Ark- 
wright. He was educated in the district schools, and 
developed marked ability as a mathematician. In 1836 
he left home and began life on his own farm, having 
become the owner of a choice tract of 194 acres, in the 
town of Arkwright, near the village of the same name. 
He gave particular attention to the improvement and 
cultivation of his farm, and in course of time brought it 
to the very highest condition of productiveness. He spe- 
cialized in stock-raising and dealing, and in addition to 
fertile fields, his farm was also noted for its fine stock. 
He easily grew into leadership among the farmers of his 
district, and that, in a community remarkable for its fine 
farms and prosperous farmers. His cattle dealing began 
when he was a young farmer anxious to increase his 
income through other means than by actual cultivation of 
the soil. It is related of him that after making some 
small ventures he determined to go in heavier and went 
to Ellicott to bid up the large herd of cattle Mr. Pren- 
dergast annually placed upon the market. He looked so 
young that Mr. Prcndcrgast advised him not to buy, but 
be ."iatisfied with a farmer's gains, and not take a cattle 
drover's risks. But the young man persisted and bought 
the entire herd, clearing over a thousand dollars in the 
transaction. Many times afterward he bought the Prcn- 
dcrgast herd, but was never again burdened with the 
owner's pood advice. For many years each farmer pro- 
duced a herd of cattle for the market, and there was 
hardly a farm in the county but Mr. Abbey sometime 
visit<'d anti usually did some business. He imported 
rattle from the West, principally to replenish Chau- 
tauqua dairies, and fr)nnd marlcets for hi-; cattle at home 
and ;ibroad. 

So heavy were his transactions and so abundant was 
his r.rjpitrd that he became a i)urchaser of commercial 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



407 



paper and other securities, becoming practically the 
banker for entire townships, in which the highest form 
of security known was Chauncey Abbey's word. He 
became familiar with all forms of business, drew wills, 
settled estates, acted as guardian and safeguarded the 
investments of minors and others. He was literally con- 
sulted by hundreds in matters of deep importance to 
them, and the advice they sought was always freely 
given. Besides his own home farm at Arkwright, which 
he never sold, he owned and improved a farm in Ohio, 
and several valuable Chautauqua county tracts, for he was 
a firm believer iu the future agricultural greatness of 
the county and in the value of Chautauqua lands as an 
investment. 

While he was the best known financier in the county, 
it was not until 1856 that he formed regular banking 
connections. In tliat year, with Stephen M. Clements 
and others, he organized the Fredonia Bank under the 
State laws, and in 1865 reorganized and incorporated it 
under the newly enacted National banking laws as The 
First National Bank of Fredonia. He was a heavy 
investor in the stock of both banks, always a member 
of their boards of direction, and from 1882 until his 
death, in i8g4, was president of The First National. He 
was a member of the Presbyterian church, and in poli- 
tics a Republican. 

Mr. Abbey married (first) Elizabeth Chase, who died 
March 28, 1855, aged thirty-eight years, daughter of 
Stephen Chase, of Charlotte, Chautauqua county, N. Y. 
They were the parents of four children : Hannah, died 
young ; Ruble Lavinia, a resident of Fredonia ; Rosa E., 
married (first) Manly M. Sessions, (second) Herbert A. 
Peirce ; Etta Elizabeth, widow of Judge Warren Brew- 
ster Hooker, whose sketch precedes this. 

The rise of Chauncey Abbey from farmer boy to 
financier is well worth contemplation, and his character 
proves difficult to analyze. He was ambitious, but not to 
a degree unusual, and it is not easy to find the exact 
characteristic which won success. He was a keen ob- 
server of men. To the man struggling manfully with 
adversity his strong arm was outstretched, but drones 
and adventurers, wasters of fortunes and opportunities, 
and betrayers of trusts never successfully applied to him. 
He was a bold, energetic, self-reliant man, following 
more than most men the suggestions of his own judg- 
ment and conscience. He listened to others but decided 
for himself. He generously aided every public enter- 
prise to make men better and happier. He had the 
frankness and geniality that attached to him his busi- 
ness associates and neighbors. In a business career of 
more than sixty years his integrity was never questioned. 
He faithfully discharged every trust confided in him. He 
was a wise man from the lessons of life and the book of 
nature to him was ever open. 



HARRY BENJAMIN HOPSON— The founder of 
the Hopson line of this record was Sergeant John Hop- 
son, the name appearing in early records as both Hopson 
and Hobson, variations persisting to the present. Ser- 
geant John Hopson was born in England in 1610, and 
it is believed that he came to America in the "Globe" 
in 1635, probably accompanying his father, John Hop- 
son, who settled at Rowley, Mass. Sergeant John Hop- 



son located at Guilford in the Connecticut colony, and 
there he died July 3, 1701. He was three times married, 
his first wife, Sara, died Sept. 9, 1669; his second, whom 
he married Dec. 3 (or 9), 1672, Elizabeth, died in 1683, 
daughter of Edward Shipman, of Saybrook, Conn.; his 
third, Elizabeth Ailing, daughter of John Ailing, of 
New Haven, born Sept. 11, 1653. The children of his 
first marriage were: John, born March 16, 1666, and 
Francis, who died young: of his second: Elizabeth, 
born Jan. 27" 1674, married Comfort Starr; and Abi- 
gail, born Dec. 17, 1677, died young; of his third: Sam- 
uel, of whom further. 

(II) Lieutenant Samuel Hopson, son of Sergeant 
John and Elizabeth (Ailing) Hopson, was born in Guil- 
ford, Conn., Jan. 10, 1684, lived in that town all of his 
life, and died Dec. 21, 1771. He married (first) Jan. 
20, 1709, Mary Fowler, born about 1681, died Oct. 17, 
1717, daughter of Judge Abraham Fowler; (second) 
Ann Leete, daughter of Governor William Leete, of 
Guilford, Conn. 

(III) Samuel (2) Hopson, son of Lieutenant Samuel 
(i) Hopson, was born in Guilford, Conn., Oct. 21, 1710, 
and died in Wallingford, Conn., May 3, 1789. He grew 
to manhood on the homestead in the northern end of 
the town, and in 1760 moved to Wallingford, where he 
engaged in agricultural operations for the remainder of 
his life. He married, in Guilford, about 1733, Mercy 
Collins, born in Guilford, Jan. 19, 1707, died in Walling- 
ford, Conn. Children: Clement; Linus, of whom fur- 
ther; Samuel, born July 29, 1738; Ashel, born April 12, 
1743; Rue, born Aug. 12, 1745 ; Simeon, born Oct. 14, 
1747; Alvanus, born April 9, 1752; and Avis. 

(IV) Linus Hopson, son of Samuel (2) Hopson, was 
born about 1736, in Guilford. He was in the Colonial 
army during the Revolution, served at Boston, and rose 
to the rank of lieutenant. He was for a time a resi- 
dent of Wallingford, Conn., and later moved to Free- 
hold near Albany, N. Y. He married, about 1766, Mar- 
tha Shattuck, born in Middletown, Conn., April 15, 1746, 
died probably in Freehold, Albany county, N. Y., 
daughter of Timothy and Desire (Hall) Shattuck, 
granddaughter of Rev. Benjamin and Martha (Sher- 
man) Shattuck, and Nathaniel and Elizabeth (Curtis) 
Hall, of Wallingford, great-granddaughter of William 
and Susanna (Randall) Shattuck, of Woburn, Mass., 
and Joseph and Elizabeth (Winship) Sherman. (See 
Shattuck V). Children: Philo, of whom further; Lyman, 
born May 30, 1769; Sherman, born June 19, 1772; Linus, 
born Oct. 20, 1777; and Jason, born May 19, 1781. 

(V) Philo Hopson, son of Linus Hopson, was born 
in Wallingford, Conn,, Nov. 16, 1767. He lived for a 
time after his marriage in the place of his birth, then 
moved to Chautauqua county, N. Y. From Chautau- 
qua county he went to Virginia, and there all trace of 
him was lost. He married, in Branford, Conn., Dec. 
II, 1791, Anna Norton, who died in Chautauqua county 
in 1809. (See Norton XVIII.). Children: Stephen, 
Linus, Lyman, Sarah, born in 1801, Harry, and Philo, Jr. 

(VI) Lyman Hopson, son of Philo Hopson, was born 
in Wallingford, Conn., in 1799. He was a lad of ten 
years when the family moved to Chautauqua county, 
locating near Hartfield, and in this vicinity he became a 
land owner and farmer, his death occurring in 1853. 
He married, in 1823, Nancy Earnhardt, born in Som- 



4oS 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



erset county. Pa., in 1707. died in Hartfield. X. Y., in 
iS:^. daughter o\ Feter and Molly (.Boyer) Rarnhardt. 
Children: Martha, horn in August. 1S24: Amy Pris- 
cilla, born Xov. i. 1S25: Eliza Ann, born in iS:?8; Nel- 
son, of whom further: John and Peter (twins"), bom in 
iSj(6. 

(A'ln Nelson Hopson. son of Lyman Hopson, was 
born in Hartfield, Chautauqua count}-, N .Y., June 27, 
iS,--\ r.nd died Oct. 5. looo. one hundred years after his 
jrrandfather first came to Chautauqua county. He was 
a successful and substantial farmer, and both he and 
his wife were members and liberal supporters of the 
Methodist Episcopal church of Mayville. Politically 
he was a Prohibitionist, and did active work for the 
party. He married, March 20, 1852, Marilla Fuller, 
horn Dec. 12. 182S. died at Majnille, April 8, 1913. 
daughter of Joseph and Lydia (Lewis) Fuller. Chil- 
dren, all bom in Hartfield, X. Y.: Xancy Viola, born 
March 17. 1853: Newell Philo, born Feb. iS, 1S55; 
Harry Beniamin, of whom further; and Jane, born 
Sept.'2S, 1S68. 

(\'ini Harry Benjamin Hopson. son of Nelson Hop- 
son, was bom in Hartfield, Chautauqua county, X. Y., 
Sept. 14, 1857. He attended the district school 
until his fourteenth year, when he entered the Fre- 
donia Xormal School, where his sister Xancy Viola 
had graduated at an earlier date. The four children of 
Xelson and Marilla (Fuller) Hopson all attended the 
Fredonia Academy, and the daughters graduated from 
the Fredonia Xormal School. It has been characteris- 
tic of the Hopson men to marry at an early age, and 
Harrj- B. Hopson was no exception. In 1S70 he mar- 
ried -Adelaide J. Gleason, oldest daughter of Charles 
and Lucy .Ann (Slocum) Gleason. 

Nfr. Hopson engaged in the wholesale ice business 
at Mayville at about this time, and established one of 
the oldest and largest businesses of its kind on Chau- 
tiiinua Lake, building three different plants, all at the 
hend of the lake. This enterprise came to employ more 
men than almost any other concern, and the firm of 
Hopson & Carlson, later known as the H. B. Hopson 
Ice Company, has survived many other natural ice busi- 
ncs-es of this region. In 1892 Mr. Hopson and his 
brother purchased the old Sweet farm, a large grape 
farm two miles east of Westfield. In 1903 he became 
owner of the Prendcrgast homestead, a grape farm of 
120 acres, on the east side of the main road of West- 
field. He often delighted in telling his friends that 
wh'.n a small boy he had driven by this beautiful home 
with his father, and had resolved that at some time he 
would own this place. The beautiful old house is of 
splendid Jacol^crin architecture, and is situated on the 
south side of the road facing Lake Eric, approached 
through an avenue of magnificent old maples. It is 
known as Kowan Place, from the English name of the 
mountain ash trees found on the grounds in front of the 
ho-ise. Here Mr. Hopson made his home until his 
death in 1912. 

Mr. Hopson was a staunch Democrat, and although 
he did not care for politics, he filled many offices of 
trust in the village of .Mayville, then his home. He was 
a rommunirant of St. Peter's Episcopal Church of 
Westfield, and in the Masonic order was a member of 
lodge, chapter, commandcry, and consistory. He was 



highly esteemed not only in his own community, but 
throughout Chautauqua county and Western Xevv York, 
where he was well known. He possessed a magnetic 
personality, which not only endeared him to his family 
and his many loyal friends, but caused him to be highly 
regarded in a large circle of acquaintances. Aside from 
his business he was a man of many interests. He was 
passionately fond of music and the stage, and always 
felt himself fortunate to have lived in the days of Booth, 
Barrett. McCullough, Clara Morris, and their contem- 
poraries. From his mother's family, the Fullers, he 
inherited a great love for fine horses, and preferred sit- 
ting behind his little Kentucky bred pacer than driv- 
ing an automobile. He enjoyed the reputation of being 
the most genial and atifable man among his friends, in 
his clubs, and in fraternal organizations, but one of his 
strongest characteristics was his independence and his 
extreme aversion to all sham and pretense wherever 
and whenever it was met. 

Mrs. Hopson, who survives him, was educated in the 
grammar and high schools of Mayville and afterward 
took a course in elocution. She was a member of the 
Episcopal church, and later adopted the Christian Sci- 
ence faith, now (1920) being first reader in the Chris- 
tian Science church in Westfield. She was a lady of 
culture and refinement, a lover of nature and art, and a 
member of Patterson Chapter, Daughters of the Amer- 
ican Revolution. Children of Harry Benjamin and Ade- 
laide J. (Gleason) Hopson, all born in Mayville: i. 
Lucy Marilla, of whom further. 2. Sarah Rowena, born 
Aug. 22, 1S84, educated in the public schools of West- 
field, Darlington Seminary, at West Chester, Pa., and 
the Philadelphia School of Design; she married John 
Calvin Powers, a business man of New York City, and 
they reside in East Orange, N. J.: they are the parents 
of one child, Mary Adelaide. 3. Maude Viola, bom 
July 30, 1886, educated in Westfield schools, Vila Con- 
vent School, of Erie, and Painesville College for 
Women; lives at home. 4. Harold Sherman, born Oct. 
26, 1892, educated in Westfield schools and the Col- 
lege of Technology, of Troy, N. Y. 5. Harry Benja- 
min, Jr., born Dec. 28, 1897, educated in public schools 
and St. John's Academy at Manlius, N. Y. ; associated 
with Doubleday, Hill & Company, of Pittsburgh; mar- 
ried Margaret Belmont. 6. Charles Gleason, born May 
29, 1900; attended Westfield schools, now a student in 
the LT. S. Naval Academy at Annapolis, Md. 

(IX) Lucy Marilla Hopson was born March 2, 1882. 
She is a graduate of Mayville High School and Buffalo 
State Normal schools. She married Thomas W. Us- 
borne, who was born in Westfield, N. Y., April 21, 1881, 
son of William and Martha (Van Ness) Usborne. Mr. 
Usborne attended the Westfield schools, and after grad- 
uation from the high school entered the National Bank 
of Westfield in the capacity of clerk. He rose to the 
office of teller, and after twelve years resigned to accept 
the cashiership of the National Bank of North East. 
This responsible position he filled until 1912. He re- 
signed in this year because of the death of his father- 
in-law, and his appointment as executor and trustee of 
the estate of Mr. Hopson. lie has faithfully adminis- 
tered this estate to the present time, to the complete 
satisfaction of those most intimately concerned, and has 
labored diligently in their interest. Mr. Usborne has 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



409 



given much time and study to the breeding of Guernsey 
cattle, and is first vice-president of the Guernsey Cattle 
Association of Western New York. He is active in 
many circles in Westfield, and is president of the Cham- 
ber of Commerce, where his progressive beliefs and 
ideas have resulted in benefit to his city, and vice-presi- 
dent of the Western New York Guernsey Cattle Club. 
He is a member of the Episcopal church. Mr. Usborne 
showed a special aptitude for music when quite young, 
and during his early school life it was with difficulty 
that he was not permitted from neglecting his studies 
to practice on various band instruments. During his 
later school period he took up the study of music in 
a serious way on his own account, devoting much time 
to the study of music, musicians and harmony, and later 
settled down to playing his favorite instrument, the 
slide trombone, which instrument he has played ever 
since, professionally and otherwise. Much to his re- 
gret his other duties do not permit of his devoting as 
much time to music as he would like. Mrs. Usborne is 
a member and ex-secretary of Patterson Chapter, 
Daughters of the American Revolution, of Westfield, 
and is a charter member of the Ladies' Library Society 
of Westfield. She is interested in civic affairs and cur- 
rent events, inherits a talent for elocution from her 
mother, and is fond of genealogical research, having 
contributed valuable material to the family records. 

(The Shattuck Line). 

(I) William Shattuck was born in England, 1621, and 
died in Watertown, Mass., Aug. 14, 1672. He married, 

1642, Susanne , who died in Watertown, Dec. 11, 

1686. 

(ID William (2) Shattuck, son of William (i) and 
Susanne Shattuck, was born in Watertown, Mass., in 
1653, and died Oct. 19, 1732. He married, 1678, Susanna 
Randall, born in Watertown, Mass., died May 8, 1723, 
daughter of Stephen Randall. 

(in) Rev. Benjamin Shattuck, son of William (2) 
and Susanna (Randall) Shattuck, was born in Water- 
town, Mass., July 30, 1687, died in Littletown. Conn. 
He graduated at Harvard, June 17, 1709. He engaged 
to teach grammar school and taught until 1715. He 
studied Divinity and was ordained, and became first 
minister of Littletown, Conn., Dec. 25, 1717. He mar- 
ried, 1709. Martha Sherman, born Sept. i, i68q, in Wa- 
tertown, Mass., died in Littletown, Conn., daughter of 
Joseph and Elizabeth (Winship) Sherman. Joseph 
Shennan was a son of Captain John and Martha (Por- 
ter) Sherman, the latter named a daughter of Rodger 
and Grace (Colledge) Porter. Elizabeth (Winshiv. 
Sherman was a daughter of Edward Winship, of Cam- 
bridge. 

(I\') Timothy Shattuck, son of Rev. Benjamin and 
Martha (Sherman) Shattuck, was born in Watertown. 
Mass., 1715, died in 1775-76. He lived in Littletown and 
Middletown, Conn. He married, in Wallingford, Conn., 
Nov. 5, 1740, Desire Hall, daughter of Nathaniel and 
Elizabeth (Curtis) Hall. 

(V) Martha Shattuck, daughter of Timothy and De- 
sire (Hall) Shattuck, born in Middletown, Conn., April 
15, 1746, married Lieutenant Linus Hopson. (See 
Hopson IV.). 



(The Norton Line). 
The Norton family of Norwich, of whom the late 
Henry B., Timothy P. and William T. Norton were the 
founders, is one of the oldest families of Connecticut. 
Thomas Norton, the founder of the family in New Eng- 
land, was born in the County of Surrey, England, and 
was descendant in the fourteenth generation from 

(I) Le Sieur de Norville, who came to England with 
William the Conqueror, and was his constable. He 
married into the house of Valois. 

(II) Sr. de Norville married into the house of Barr. 

(III) Sr. de Norville married into the house of Dol- 
bermmonto. 

(IV) Sr. de Norville married Auelina, daughter of 
Neuil De Witt, of Raby. 

(V) Sr. de Norville married Jorica, daughter of 
Sieur Dumpre de Court. 

(VI) Sr. de Norville, alias Norton, married the 
daughter of Sir John Hadsooke. 

(VII) Sr. de Norville, alias Norton, married the 
daughter and co-heiress of Monseigneur Bassing- 
bourne. 

(VIII) Sir John Norton, alias Norville, married the 
daughter of the Lord Grey de Ruthyn. 

(IX) John Norton, of Sharpenhow, in Bedfordshire, 

(X) John Norton, of Sharpenhow, married a daugh- 
ter of Mr. Danie. She married for her second husband 
John Cowper. 

(XI) Thomas Norton, of Sharpenhow, married 
(first) Elizabeth Merry. 

(XII) Richard Norton married Margery, daughter 
of Wingar, of Sharpenhow. 

(XIII) William Norton married (first) Margaret, 
daughter of William Howes. Among his children was 
Thomas, of Guilford, Conn. 

(XIV) Thomas Norton married, in 1625, Grace 
Wells, and with his wife and children came from Ock- 
ley, Surrey, near Guilford, England, to Boston, Mass., 
1639. There he remained a short time, and while 
there his wife gave the land on which the old South 
Church was built. He joined Rev. Henry Whitfield's 
company of the New Haven Colony, locating at Guil- 
ford, where he spent the remainder of his life, and 
where he died. He and his wife had four children: 
Thomas, born about 1626, who settled in Saybrook, 
Conn. ; John, of whom further ; Grace ; Mary, who mar- 
ried Samuel Rockwell. 

(X\') John Norton, son of Thomas and Grace 
(Wells) Norton, born in England, came to the New 
World with his parents and located at Guilford, Conn., 
where he spent the remainder of his life, and where he 
died. He married (first) Hannah Stone, and (second) 
Elizabeth Hubbard. Children: John, born Nov. 18, 
1666, died Jan. 10, 1667: John, born May 29, 166S; 
Samuel, born Oct. 4, 1672, married Abigail Ward, 
Jan. 25, 1693; Thomas, of whom further; Hannah, born 
Feb. 4, 1678, married Ebenezcr Stone, Jan. 16, 1702; 
Jeruiah, married Simon Leete; Elijah; Benjamin; 
Martha. 

(XVI) Thomas Norton, son of John Norton, was 
born in Guilford, March 4, 1675, died in 1744. He 
married. May 28, 1701, Rachel Starr, born 1681, at Guil- 
ford, daughter of Comfort and Marah (Weld) Starr. 



4IO 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



Rachel (.Starri Norton, died Sept. 30, 1755. Children: 
Rachel, born May i;;, 1702: Thomas, of whom further; 
Daniel, bom Jan. 17, 1707: Reuben, born April 6, 171 1; 
Leah, bom .-Xpril .?, 1715: E\ in, born Xov. 8, 1718: 
Timothy, born Feb. 3, 17.21. 

iXX'IIt Thomas u) Norton, son of Thomas (i) and 
Rachel (.Starr^l Norton, was born Oct. 4, 1704, died 
Sept. 8, 176S. He married Bethiah , about 1724- 

(XVIII') Thomas i^'* Norton, son of Thomas (.;') 
and Bethiah Norton, married. May 29, 1761, Mercy 
Tyler, bom in 1737. died in Branford, Oct. 21, 1824. 
Children: Mattie, horn in Branford, Oct. 20, 1761; 
Timothy, born in Branford, Dec. iS, 1762. died next 
day: Thomas. Jr., married Sarah Potter, Nov. 16, 1789; 
.\nna. married Philo Hopson. Dec. 11, 179-1, at Bran- 
lord. (See Hopson V.). 

(The Gleason Line). 

The Gleason family herein traced was founded in 
.\merica by Thomas Gleason, who was born in North 
Hampton. England, in 1607. Thomas Gleason located at 
Cambridge, Mass., and there died in 1686. He married 
Susanna Page, born in England, who died in Boston, 
Mass. They were the parents of nine children. 

(II) William Gleason, the seventh child of Thomas 
Gleason. was born in Cambridge, Mass., in 1655, died 
there Jan. 14, 1690. With his brothers, Philip and Na- 
thaniel, he was a soldier in King Philip's War. He 
married, about 1678, Abigail Bartlett, born about 1651, 
who was a widow, and she was the mother of his seven 
children. 

(Ill I John Gleason, third son of William Gleason, 
was born in Cambridge, Mass., in 1683. He moved to 
Hartford county. Conn., settling on the Connecticut 
river, in the town of Enfield, where he died prior to 
.Aug. 23, 1717. He married, in Suffield, Hartford 
county. Conn., Feb. 15. 1704, Hannah Woolworth, born 
Feb. 10, 16S1, died in SufTield, in January, 1759. daughter 
f.f Kicliard and Hannah (Higgins) Woolworth, of New- 
b;iry. Mass. They were the parents of: John, of whom 
further: Hannah, born Feb. 23, 1708; Mary, born Oct. 
10, 1709: Elizabeth, born May 24, 1713. 

(IV'> John (2) Gleason. only son of John (i) Glea- 
son, was born in Enfield, Conn., Jan. 13, 1706, and there 
made his home. He married, about 1726, Sarah Rob- 
bins. The following children were all born in Enfield: 
John, born June 25, 1727; Deborah, born Jan. 27, 1731, 
F.phraim, lorn June 4, 1733; Hannah, born Jan. 24, 
1733: Asa, born .April 4, 17.3H; Ariel, of whom further; 
Hannah, born Dec. 24, 1747. 

<\') .Ariel Gleason, son of John (2) Gleason, was 
born in Enfield, Conn., Jan. 24, 1743, and there resided 
all his life. He married, about 1774, and was the 
father of Ariel, l>ioch ; Kiiius, of who:n further; and 
Elijah. 

(\'h Ruii!^ Glea-.on, son of Ariel Gleason, was born 
in Enficl'l, Conn., about 1777. He followed the occupa- 
tion of miller, made his home in several places in Con- 
n-cfirut. and di'd in early manhood. He married, about 
I/'/', Marian Granitcr, of .Suffield, Conn., born May 27, 
177''', daughter of f'hineas and Elizabeth CHall) 
Gransfer, her father a -oldi'-r of the Colonial army lor 
more than four yeari d'lrin;; the Revolution, rlyinx in 
the «crvicc. .She was a descendant of Launcrlot and 



Joanna (,.\dams) Granger through Samuel and Esther 
iHanchctt') Granger, and Jeremiah and Thankful 
( Ilale"! Granger. Rutus Gleason was the father of 
seven children. 

(\'II) Rufus (2) Gleason, son of Rufus (i) Gleason, 
was born .April 27, 1808, in Salisbury, Conn., and died 
in Mayville, Chautauqua county, N. Y., March 24, 
iSSq. He settled in Chautauqua county in 1837. He 
married, in 1S29, Melissa Sherman, horn June 10, 1809, 
daughter of Robert and Tirzah (Smith) Sherman. Her 
father was a cavalry officer in the \\'ar of 1S12, and died 
in Schoharie county, N. Y. Robert Sherman's widow 
was born in Boston, Mass., her father serving through- 
out the Rcvolutipn from Bunker Hill to the end of the 
war. She moved to Mayville and made her home with 
her daughter, Mrs. Rufus Gleason, at whose home she 
died May 14. 1S63. Children of Rufus (2) Gleason: 
.Albert, born in 1S31: Charles, of whom further; Wil- 
liam Sherman, born July 8, 1837: Adelaide Adelia, bom 
Jan. 25, 1841: Ellen, born Dec. 1$, 1844; Francis, born 
Sept. 20, 1848. 

(VIII) Charles Gleason, son of Rufus (2) Gleason, 
was born in Montgomery county, N. Y., July i, 1833. 
He resided in New York State for a time, later located 
at Mantorville, Minn., and subsequently moved to Flor- 
ida. He married at Mantorville, Minn., Oct. 11, 1858, 
Lucy Ann Slocum, who was born at Linesville, Pa., 
Nov. 18, 1842, died in Westfield, N. Y., July 11, 1912, 
daughter of George Washington Sherman and Rhoda 
Carv Van Courtlandt (Mantor) Slocum. (See Slo- 
cum' VII.). 

(The Slocum I>ine). 

The branch of the family of Slocum through which 
connection is made with the Gleason family was founded 
in Rhode Island by Anthony Slocum, who was born in 
Somersetshire, England, in 1590. 

(in The line continues through his son, Giles, who 
was born in Somersetshire, England, in 1618, and died 
in Portsmouth, R. I., in 1682. In 1655 he was a free- 
man in Portsmouth. He and his wife were both mem- 
liers of the Society of Friends. He married, in 1641, 
Joanna Bailey, who was born in England in 1615, died 
in Portsmouth, R. I., Aug. 3, 1679, daughter of John 
P.ailcy. Giles and Joanna Slocum were the parents of 
nine children. 

(Ill) Eliczcr Slocum, son of Giles Slocum, was born 
in Portsmouth, R. I., Oct. 25, 1664, died July 30, 1727. 
The following is a tradition that has come down through 
the family: There came to the Slocum homestead a 
maiden named Elcphel Fitzgerald, daughter of the Earl 
of Kildarc. An English army officer had fallen in love 
v.'ith her sister and the couple eloped to America, 
bringing with them Lady Elephel. Elephel became em- 
ployed in the household of Giles Slocum, father of 
F.liezer, and the son fell in love with the fair stranger. 
The young people were chided (she doubtless being a 
Romanist) and were forbidden to continue their court- 
shi]). There arc stories of this Portsmouth courtship, 
which have found their way down through more than 
two centuries, which hint at the incarceration of the 
m.iidcn in the smoke house. The youth scaled the roof 
by nii'ht, crawled down the chinuicy, and rescued the 
maiden. And so tliey were married and came to Dart- 
mouth and lived hai)pily ever after. Children: Meri- 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



411 



bah, born April 28, 16S9; Mary, born Aug. 22, 1691; 
Eliezer, born Jan. 20, 1693-94; John, born Jan. 20, 
1696-97; Benjamin, born Dec. 14, 1699; Joanna, born 
July 15, 1702: Ebenezer, of whom further. 

(IV) Ebenezer Slocura, seventh child of Eliezer Slo- 
cum, was born in 1704, and resided in Newport, R. I. 
He married, Feb. 4, 172S, Bathsheba Perry Harper 
Hull, born in Jamestown, R. I., daughter of Tristram 
and Elizabeth (Dyer) Hull, a descendant of Rev. Jo- 
seph Hull and William Dyer, whose wife, Mary Dyer, 
was hung on Boston Common for her religious belief, 
June I, 1660. Ebenezer Slocum was the father of nine 
children. 

(V) Samuel Slocum, fourth child of Ebenezer Slo- 
cum. was born at Dartmouth. Bristol county, Mass., 
June 4, 1736. He located at Monkton, Vt., and there 
died in 1S23. With his six brothers he was a soldier in 
the Colonial army in the Revolution, having volunteered 
from Tiverton, R. I. He married Ruth Hall, and they 
were the parents of seven children. (See Hall IV.). 

(VI) Samuel (2) Slocum, son of Samuel (i) Slocum, 
was born at Newport, R. I., Nov. 15, 1785. He went to 
Vermont with his parents and later in life journeyed 
west to Nebraska, where his death occurred, having 
also passed a period of time in Crawford, Pa. He 
served in the American army in the second war with 
Great Britain, and was in the action at Plattsburg. His 
death occurred Nov. 3, 1865. He married, in Rhode 
Island, in November, 181 1, Mary Gardiner Sherman, 
born at Narragansett, Washington county, R. I., in 
1791, daughter of Captain Henry (2) and Mary Eliza- 
beth (Gardiner) Sherman. (See Sherman V.). They 
were the parents of ten children, as follows: Henry 
Gardiner, born Sept. 3, 1812; Samuel Elliot, born June 
r, 1815: Elizabeth, born Oct. 2, 1816; George Wash- 
ington Sherman, of whom further; Fitzgerald, born 
Nov. IS, 1820; Ruth, born Feb. 27, 1822; Ann Robin- 
son, born April 29, 1825; Lucy Dailey, born 1827: 
Amanda Sherman, born Aug. 7, 1828; Manley Leanidas, 
born Oct. 23, 1832. 

(VII) Judge (jeorge Washington Slocum, son of 
Samuel (2) Slocum, was born in Monkton, Addison 
county, Vt., Aug. 7, 1818. In 1834 he went with his 
parents to Crawford county, Pa., and there married, 
Sept. 30, 1841, Rhoda Cary Van Courtlandt Mantor, 
who was born in Albany county, N. Y., Dec. 12, 1820. 
In 1S54 they went west to the southeastern part of Min- 
nesota, locating at Mantorville, the county seat of 
Dodge county. In 1855 Mr. Slocum was appointed on 
its first board of commissioners by Willis A. Gorman, 
territorial governor. He was elected justice of the 
peace in Mantorville in 1858, holding that office for 
more than twentj'-five years; was for several years 
clerk of the Probate Court, and was elected judge of the 
County Court for a four-year term. He was a man of 
importance and standing in the community. He died 
March 24. 1904, in \\'ashington. Pa., his wife's death 
having occurred in Mantorville, June 25, 1865. They 
were the parents of seven children, as follows: Lucy 
Ann. married Charles Gleason. (See Gleason VIII.); 
Frank Mantor, born in 1843; Emma Josephine; Mary 
Minerva; .A.ugusta Eveline, born Sept. 29, 1850: Sam- 
uel; Sara Lydia, born July 23, 1861. 



(The Hall Line). 

On the Sth day of the eighth month, 1638, the name 
of William Hall was one of a list of fifty-nine persons 
admitted inhabitants of an island on the coast of Rhode 
Island, now called Aquidneck. In 1639, William Hall 
was an inhabitant of Newport, R. I. On the 27th day 
of the fifth month, 1644, a parcel of land in Portsmouth, 
R. I., was granted to William Hall by the town. His 
name was onthe list of freemen, Portsmouth, 1655. Wil- 
liam Hall sold, on the 6th day of the seventh month, 
1654, to Richard Sisson, of Portsmouth, 1-300 of an 
island called Canonicut, and 1-300 of Dutch Island. Wil- 
liam Hall was commissioner to the General Court from 
Portsmouth, in 1654-56-60-63, and he was deputy from 
Portsmouth to the General Assembly in 1665-66-67-68- 
72-y2,. In 1673 he was appointed on a committee for the 
purpose of treating with the Indians about drunkenness, 
and to seriously council them, and to agree on some way 
to prevent extreme excess of Indian drunkenness. Five 
chiefs are named, among whom is the name of the famous 
Philip of Mount Hope, called King Philip, with whom 
the committee should treat. 

James Usher, genealogist, of No. 9 ^Murray street. 
New York City, says : 

We have the trans-Atlantic trace of William Hall, 
clerg-yman. He is believed to be the same William 
Hall who was a writer in London, and continued the 
"Fab you Chronical" begun by Sir Thomas Moore. .-Vnd 
there is added authority to believe a connection existed 
between William Hall and the Lord Chancellor's fam- 
ily. ^Villiam Hall, of London, went out of record there 
in 163S. the same year that William Hall began record 
in Rhode Island. Thomas Clement, a connection of the 
Mores, was an original founder of Portsmouth. R. I., 
and was a neighbor of William Hall, and the adminis- 
trator of his estate. 

William Hall made his will on the 20th day of the 
eleventh month, 1673. The will was probated on the 
19th day of the second month. 1676. He married Mary 
. Children,: Zurill, William, Benjamin, Eliza- 
beth, Rebecca, and Deliverance. 

(II) Benjamin Hall, son of William and Mary Hall, 
was born in Portsmouth, R. I. He was admitted free- 
man of Portsmouth, April 30, 1678; was appointed jus- 
tice. May 3, 1704, and 1709; was deputy to the Gen- 
eral Assembly, May 6, 1701, and May 3, 1704, Feb. 25, 
1706, and 1707, May, 1713, and 1714. He married, July 
27, 1676, Frances Parker, daughter of George Parker, 
of Portsmouth, R. I. Children: Mary, born April 3, 
1678; William, born Aug. 19, 1680; Benjamin, of whom 
further; George, born June 29, 1685; Nathaniel, born 
June 20, 1689. 

(III) Benjamin (2) Hall, son of Benjamin (i) and 
Frances (Parker) Hall, was born June 17, 1682, in 
Portsmouth, R. I. He married, in Portsmouth, R. I., 
April 18. 1716, Patience Corey, daughter of William 
Corey, of Portsmouth, R. I. (Thildren: Martha, bom 
March 27, 1717; Frances, born April 4, 1719; William, 
born March 27, 1721; Patience, born April 6, 1723; Re- 
becka, born Jan. 5, 1726; Benjamin, of whom further. 

(IV) Benjamin (3) Hall, son of Benjamin (2) and 
Patience (Corey) Hall, was born in Portsmouth, R. I.. 
May 21, 1729. He married, in Portsmouth, 1749, De- 
liverance Cornell. (See Cornell). Children: George, 
born Nov. 24, 1749; Parker, born June I", 1751; Pa- 
tience, born April 5, 1753; William, born Nov. 24, 



41- 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



1,-54: Ri:th. married Samuel Slociim. son of Ebenezer 
S'.ocum. April l", 1778. (See Slocum V.). 

(.The Cornell Line). 

Thomas Cornell, born in 1505, in Essex county, Eng- 
land, died in it'55. He married Rebecca Briggs, born 
in 1600, died Feb. S, 1673. 

(,in Thomas (2^ Cornell, married , and died 

in larj!. 

(Iin Thomas (.3'! Cornell, born in 1657. died in 1714. 
He married Susannah Lawton. 

(,n'^ George Cornell, horn in 1676, died in 1752, at 
Xewport. R. I. He married three wives. The second 
wife. Deliverance (Clark') Cornell, was daughter of 
Governor Walter Clark, of Rhode Island, and Han- 
nah (Scottl Cornell, daughter of Jeremy Scott. 

(Vl Richard Cornell, was born June 14, 1709. In 
174; he was made freeman of Portsmouth. In 1740 
he moved to East Greenwich and liought land two and 
one-half miles east of the village. At close of eighteenth 
ccntr.ry he bought two other parcels of land. He mar- 
ried, at Xewport. Mary Martin, of Portsmouth, R. I., 
Dec. 10. 1730. Mary Martin was daughter of Joseph 
and Mary Martin. Children: Philadelphia, born Sept. 
22. 1731 : Deliverance, born June iS, 1733 (see Hall 
IV."): Elizabeth, born Nov. 30, 1734; Joseph, born 
.April 16. 1737; Mary, born May 17, 1739; Sarah, born 
July 12. 1740; Abigail, born July 6, 1744: Ruth, born 
Sept. 9. 1748. 

(The Sherman Line). 

This line of Sherman traces to the Hon. Philip Sher- 
man, who was born in Dedham, England, Feb. 5, 1610, 
and died in Portsmouth, R. I., in 1687. In 1634 he came 
to N'ew England and settled first in Roxbury, Mass. At 
the time of the .Ann Hutchinson troubles in Boston, 
about l')37. he took the popular side, but as Governor 
Winthrop finally prevailed, he removed with others of 
the same opinion to Rhode Island. Here the company 
met R:'gcr Williams, who advised them to purchase the 
island of .'\quidneck from the Indians. This purchase 
was completed March 24, 1638. a rcgidar government was 
established July i, 1639, with Coddington as governor, 
and Philip Sherman as secretary. He frequently held 
ofSce in the colony afterward, and was consulted by those 
in authority as a man of intelligence, wealth and indu- 
imcc. The early record of the settlement, prepared Iiy 
him, still remains in Portsmrjuth, and shows him to have 
Ixen a very neat and careful penman, as well as a man of 
C'iucation. .After his removal to Rhode Island he left 
th<^ Congregational church and united with the Society 
of Friends. lie is said to have been a devout but de- 
t'Tm-ned man. He married Sarah ( )(l(\mK, dauglucr of 
.\Ir«. John Porter. 

<Mi Eljcr .Sherman, son of Hon. Pliilip Sherman, was 
iK.rn in 1634, and died in North Kingston, Washington 
coimty, R. I., in i'r/>. He and bis wife Mary were the 
par<^M of -levcn children. 

(III) Rhcr <2) Sherman, son of Ebcr (i) Slurman, 
was born in .Vorth Kingston, R. I. He married, about 
^7'^/'^ Martha Remington, l»orn in 1683, daiu^htcr of 
John and .Abigail f Davis) Remington. 

(IV) H^nry Sherman, son ol Ebcr (2) Sherman, was 
bom Jan. 14, 1724. He married, in 1747, Ann Higgin- 



botham. born 1730, daughter of Charles and Mary Hig- 
ginbotham, of Cranston, R. I. 

(V) Captain Henry (2) Sherman, son of Henry (i) 
Sherman, was born at South Kingston, R. I., March 31, 
1750. He was a minute-man at the battles of Lexington 
and Bunker Hill, and served throughout the Revolution. 
In 1777 he was commissioned ensign in Colonel Sher- 
burne's regiment, was later taken prisoner by the Brit- 
ish at Paramus. five miles north of Paterson, N. J., and 
in 1781 was returned to duty in an exchange of pris- 
oners. He became a lieutenant in Colonel Green's 
Rhode Island rc.giment, and was honorably discharged, 
June 15. 1783, with the rank of captain. He was granted 
a pension, April 13, 1813. He died at South Kingston, 
June 7, 1830. He married Mary Elizabeth Gardiner, of 
Kingston, R. I. Mary Gardiner, their daughter, born 
1791, married Samuel Slocum. (See Slocum VI.). 



FRANCIS D. STEELED— This branch of the Steele 
family, well known in Jamestown and in the county gen- 
erally, traces descent from Rudolph Stable, a native of 
Switzerland, of German antecedents. Rudolph Stable 
came to New York State at tlie age of twenty-one, and 
was a resident of Livingston Alanor on the Upper Hud- 
son, in 1711, when he responded to a call for volunteers 
to march against the French and Indians. From Liv- 
ingston Manor he moved to Schoharie county, and 
thence to the Upper Mohawk Valley, where he was 
granted large tracts of land. He owned considerable 
land at German Flats, in 1755, his property being known 
as the "Rudolpli Staley Patent" as it is to this day. 
Stnhles were foremost in the early history of that sec- 
tion of the Mohawk Valley, and in course of time the 
name became anglicised as Steele. The children of 
Rudolph Stable that can be traced are three sons: Die- 
tcrich, Adam, and Rudolph (2); and two daughters: 
Elizabeth, and Barbara. The sons all fought in the 
French and Indian War. 

Dieterich Stable, the eldest son, and his wife, Mar- 
garctta, were the parents of a son, George, of whom 
further. 

George Stable, son of Dieterich and Margaretta 
.Stable, was a soldier of the Revolution. He tnarried 
Dorothea Schumacher. They were the parents of four 
children: Elizabeth, born in 1777. married Jacob Totts; 
Adam, born March i, 1779; Rudolph, born Aug. 13, 
i7!-'6, anrl Maria Barbara, born May 11, 1788. 

.Adam Stable, son of George and Dorotliea (.Schu- 
macher) Stable, a soldier of the War of 1812, settled at 
Sacket Harbor, N. Y. He married Elizabeth Dygert, 
born April 3, 1783, daughter of Captain William Dyg- 
ert, who served with General Herkimer at the battle of 
'')riskany. They were the parents of seven children: 
(jeorge, Dolly, William, Nancy, lubn Arlam, Iliram, 
and .Abr.aham. In this generatii>n ihe name in this 
branch licramc Steele. 

John Adam Steele, .son of Adam and Elizabeth 
(D.vKcrl) Stable, was born at Sacket Harbor, N. Y., 
.Aug. 14, 1K14, died in Jamestown, N. Y., Dec. 17, 1879. 
He came to Heaver Dam, six miles from Corry, Pa., 
with his parents and bellied clear the farm upon which 
they sclllcd. lie had few school ojiportunities, and 
when a lad of biil foiirtrcn years be left home and 




:^ti(ini 3). Steele 




. I 







iFmncis D. Steele 




31anics UllilQon, Jiw 




£0ana JL. SUltlson 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



413 



walked to Jamestown, N. Y., where he obtained em- 
ployment at fifty cents per day. His first work was dig- 
ging a ditch, but he was used to hard work, and when 
his employer, Mr. Barrows, inspected his first day's 
work he was so gratified that he gave him a silver dol- 
lar for his day's work instead of the half dollar prom- 
ised. The lad did not remain in Jamestown, but re- 
turned to the farm at Beaver Dam, near Corry, and 
resumed work with his father and brothers at clear- 
ing. Later he became very much discontented, and one 
day while in the timber he intentionally broke his axe 
and again left home and walked the distance between 
Corry and Jamestown. This was in 1828, and from 
that time until his death he was a resident of James- 
town, N. Y. 

He found employment in the sash and blind factory 
owned by Levi C. Barrows, with whom he remained 
several years. Although he came to Jamestown with only 
a dollar of capital, he so thriftily managed his finances 
that when opportunity offered to enter business for 
himself he had the necessary capital. His first business 
venture was as a partner with William Levi and James 
Sprague in the foundry business. He continued a part- 
ner in the Jamestown Foundry Company for thirty 
years, then sold out his interest and purchased a tract 
of land in Jamestown, North Side, containing 70 acres. 
For ten j-ears he cultivated that tract, then for a short 
time again entered the foundry business. He came into 
possession of the same foundry he formerly had, and 
after disposing of all the machinery, he converted the 
building into grist mills, known as the Brooklyn Mills. 
He operated that mill for a short time in association 
with his son, but continued to reside on his farm, where 
he died in 1879 and was buried in Lakeview Cemetery. 
Mr. Steele was a member of the Presbyterian church, 
a Republican, a man of enterprise and progress, and a 
good citizen. 

He married Hannah M. Chapman, born April 25, 
181S, died July 5, 1878, who rests with her husband in 
Lakeview Cemetery. Mr. and Mrs. John Adam Steele 
were the parents of two children: Albert, born in 1845, 
died 1858: Francis D., to whose memory this review 
is dedicated. 

Francis D. Steele, youngest son of John Adam and 
Hannah M. (Chapman) Steele, was born in James- 
town, N. Y., June 4, 1846, died in the city of his birth, 
Nov. 3, 1907, and was buried in Lakeview Cemetery. 
He was educated in private schools and in old James- 
town Academy, and after completing his school years 
entered business life as his father's associate in his 
various business enterprises. When the Brooklyn Mills 
were started, Francis D. took charge of their opera- 
tion, and after the death of John Adam Steele continued 
them for several years. He was also for a time inter- 
ested with Dr. Martin in the ownership and opera- 
tion of the steamer "May Martin" on Chautauqua Lake. 
He was also largely interested in the development of 
real estate, laying out the 70-acre tract on the South 
West Side into building lots, upon which he built sev- 
eral houses. His home was on Fenton avenue, James- 
town, and there he died. Mr. Steele was a Republican 
in politics, a member of the Fireman's .^ssociation for 
seven years, and an attendant of the Methodist Epis- 



copal church. He was devoted to his home and family, 
and was Iiighly esteemed by his many friends. 

Francis D. Steele married, Sept. 21, i86g, Ida M. 
Wilson, daughter of James and Maria S. (Lydell) Wil- 
son. (See Wilson line following). Mrs. Steele survives 
her husband, a resident of Jamestown, residing on Church 
street. She is a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, and a lady highly respected by all who know 
her. Mr. and Mrs. Francis D. Steele were the par- 
ents of two children: i. Harry A., born July 7, 1876, 
now connected with the Art Metal Works, Syracuse, 
N. Y.: he is a member of the Masonic order and of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 2. Frances D., 
born Dec. 2. 1882, married William H. Miller, of Wil- 
Hamsport, Pa., now residing in New York City. 



LYDELL L. WILSON— A native son of Chautau- 
qua, Lydell L. Wilson is of the family of Wilson who 
came to Chautauqua from Pennsylvania. Mr. Wilson 
has spent his business life in lumber manufacturing and 
dealing and is one of the successful men of that busi- 
ness. 

The Wilson family herein reviewed is of Scotch an- 
cestry, and the progenitor of the family was influenced 
to leave his home in Scotland by his kinsman, James 
Wilson, a signer of the Declaration of Independence. 
This Mr. Wilson never reached the shores of America, 
but died on the voyage and was buried at sea. His 
widow landed with her children in Philadelphia, one of 
her sons. James, being then fourteen years of age. Mrs. 
Wilson was a woman of strong character and faced the 
burdens of widowhood in a strange land with a courage 
that never faltered. The boys of the family were ap- 
prenticed to useful trades, but the girls she kept with her 
until they married. In later years she married a sec- 
ond husband, a Mr. Reese, of Warren, Pa. 

James Wilson, their son, was born in Scotland, and 
was fourteen years old when he landed in Philadel- 
phia. He married, in 1809, Elizabeth Porter, a Quak- 
eress, of English parentage. 

They settled in Westmoreland county, Pa., and when 
their second son, James (2), was an infant, the family 
came on horseback to Chautauqua county, N. Y., each 
parent with a child and a camping outfit on the horse 
with them. They made camp their first night in Chau- 
tauqua county, on the banks of Cassadaga creek, under 
the shelter of clustering pines, and in the morning 
awoke to find a light snow had fallen during the night. 
James Wilson secured a grant of land in the town of 
Ellicott, on the banks of the Chadakoin river, on the 
north side of the State road, there cleared land and built 
a house. He enlisted in the War of 1S12, as a private 
in Captain John Silsbe's company. McMahan's regi- 
ment. New York Militia, and on Dec. 30, 1S13, was 
wounded at Black Rock. Several years later he was 
granted a yearly pension of $48, which he drew until 
his death. James Wilson was engaged in buying and 
rafting pine shingles to Pittsburgh, piloting his own 
rafts. He was a very religious man, an exhorter in the 
Methodist Episcopal church and a good singer. He 
was leader of the choir in the Methodist church at 
Jamestown, now the Independent Congregational 
Church. He was granted two quarter sections of land 



414 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



for his war services and continued his activities in 
farmincr and lumbering until his death in iS66. His 
wife. Elizabeth (.Porter"! Wilson, was a true pioneer, 
strong and most courageous. She endured the dan- 
gers and privations of pioneer life and contributed 
largely towards her husband's success in life. They 
were the parents of five sons and four daughters, all of 
whom lived to a good age and were among the re- 
spected citizens of their community. 

James Wilson. Jr.. son of James and Elizabeth (Por- 
ter"! Wilson, was born in Westmoreland county, Pa., in 
April. iSir. and died in Jamestown, N. Y., in Febru- 
arj-. iSo.^ He was educated in the public schools of his 
native county, and in early life engaged with his father 
in the lumber business, also becoming an expert pilot 
of lumber rafts. He joined with his father in the pur- 
chase of timber lands in Indiana, converting the timber 
into lumber in their own mill and freighting it to a 
profitable market. He married. Xovcmber. 1841, Maria S., 
daughter of Luther and Betsey (MacConick) Lydell, 
and granddaughter of Luther Lydell, Sr., who came from 
England to America at the close of the Revolutionary 
War. He married Asenath Bill, a niece of Ethan Allen, 
who lived nearly to the end of her century of life, dying 
in her one hundredth year. They were the parents of 
four sons and two daughters, Luther, Jr., being their 
youngest son. Luther Lydell. Jr., came to Chautauqua 
county in 1832, and settled on a farm in the town of 
Poland, where he engaged heavily in cattle raising. John 
MacConick. grandfather of Maria S. Wilson, came with 
his father. James MacConick, and brother, William Mac- 
Conick, who served in the Revolutionary War. John 
MacConick enlisted as a minute-man in Captain John 
Nutting's company, Jan. i, 1776, and was assigned to Col- 
onel Prescott's regiment, and Sept. 4, 1779, enlisted and 
served for nine months in Captain Hugh Maxwell's 
company. Colonel John Bailey's regiment. He served 
throughout the entire war and participated in the bat- 
tles of Harlem Heights, White Plains and Bunker Hill. 
He drew a Revolutionary pension until 1S38. He mar- 
ried -Abigail Hartson and lived in Exeter, Otsego county, 
N. Y., where he died. His son, William, was also in the 
battle of Bunker Hill. Children of James and Maria S. 
(Lydell) Wil.son : l. Laura M., born Xov. 2, 1842, mar- 
ried James Mc.-Xllister, 2. Lillian W., born Feb. 27, 1847, 
married (first) Myron John Lyons, fsccond) Charles 
Ralph Gibson. 3. Mary L., born June 8, 1850, married 
Charles McAllister. 4. Ida M., born Aug. 21, 1852, mar- 
ried Francis D. Steele (q. v.). $■ Jessie .M., born .May g, 
1857. 0. Burton J., born ?%Iay 9, 1857, married Laura 
Mcrz. 7. Lydell L., of whom further. 

Lydell L. Wilson was born in the town of Poland, 
Chautauqua county, N. Y., April S, 1859, son of James 
and Maria (Lydell) Wilson. He grew to manhood at 
the home f.irm. and obtained his education in the district 
irh'i'i]. He '-arly became ijitircstcMJ in hnnbering, and 
durinc his early manhood si>cnt two years in the Mich- 
igan lumber woods. He was with the Hortson Mill for 
two years, in Chaut."iuqu3 county, then leased a mill at 
Moon Station, N. Y., operating it until its destruction 
i/y fire in 1HH5. He then filled his orders through the 
Hortson .Mill, but in 18W rebuilt his mill, and in 1888 
erected a new mill at Moon Station. In i-'//> he moved 
to the town of Gerry, and upon lands leased from Levi 



Pratt erected 'The Wilson Mills," a modern saw mill 
plant with an annual capacity of 15,000,000 feet of man- 
ufactured lumber, most of which is shipped to James- 
town and Buffalo. Mr. Wilson is a man of strong busi- 
ness ability, is untiring in his industry, and through his 
own efforts has won success in the business world. He 
married, Nov. 10, 1S80, Anna Booth, daughter of James 
Booth, of Buffalo. Mr. and Mrs. Wilson are the par- 
ents of five children: Alice M., Mertie D., Willis L., 
Nellie S.. and Delbert, who died at camp during the late 
war. 



WILLIAM E. GOUCHER, D. D. S., of James- 
town, well known dental surgeon, was prominently iden- 
tified with his profession for a quarter of a century, be- 
ing in active practice here until his retirement in 1920. 
During those years he built up a large practice, and 
when he retired from active connection with the profes- 
sion he so long had graced, the news was received with 
genuine regret. He came fairly by his professional in- 
stincts, being a son of Dr. Curtis N. Goucher, a phy- 
sician of Girard, Ohio, and later of Erie, Pa., where he 
died in 1893. The elder Dr. Goucher was a leader in 
his profession, a man of affairs, and held in high 
esteem by all who knew him. He was a veteran of the 
Civil War, giving four years to his country's service, 
holding a medical commission. 

Dr. William E. Goucher, son of Dr. Curtis N. and 
Emily (Kincaid) Goucher, was born in Girard, Ohio, 
March 29, 1872. He was educated in Corunna High 
School, Orchard Lake Military Academy, and the Uni- 
versity of Michigan, entering the dental department of 
the last-named institution, whence he was graduated 
D. D. S., class of 1894. After graduating he became 
assistant to Dr. William Elgin, of Denver, Col., for six 
months, then associated himself with Dr. Assay, of San 
Jose, Cal., who was the secretary of the California State 
Board of Dental Examiners. Dr. Goucher had entire 
charge of Dr. Assay's practice while the latter served 
the commonwealth as examiner. 

In the spring of 1S96, Dr. Goucher came East, 
locating in Jamestown, N. Y., and in the fall of that 
year began practice in the Hall block at the corner of 
Main and Third streets. During the following years 
he built up a large practice, numbering among his 
patients prominent people of the county and surround- 
ing coimties of New York and Pennsylvania. Dr. 
Goucher retired from practice in the spring of 1920, 
feeling that he had justified himself in his profession, 
and he also wished to devote more time to his business 
interests, which are located in Oklahomo and Ken- 
tucky. Dr. Goucher's oil holdings, which he has been 
interested in for a number of years, have developed to 
large ijroportions during recent years, the companies 
with which he is associated having some of the most 
pronu'nent oil men in the mid-west field connected with 
them. 

I)r. Goucher's life in Jamestown is marked with 
noted success, for not only was he a leader in his pro- 
fession but he has accomplished things in a civic way 
for the city which have proven a great public benefit, 
lie was the first man who talked, labored and by all 
honorable means sought to convince the Jamestown 
school authorities of the value a detital clinic would be 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



415 



to the health of the school children of the city, and was 
one of the dentists who volunteered to give a certain 
portion of their time to the work of the clinic without 
remuneration. So, too, he stood, the friend of every 
progressive movement looking toward a better, health- 
ier Jamestown. Dr. Goucher was first to suggest a mu- 
nicipal milk plant, having first brought it to the atten- 
tion of Mayor Carlson six years before it was finally 
endorsed by the people of Jamestown at a taxpayers' 
election. 

Dr. Goucher was one of the founders of the James- 
town Dental Society, and in social and fraternal life 
connected with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
the Fraternal Order of Eagles, Loyal Order of Moose, 
the Knights of Pythias, the Moon Brook Country Club, 
and in former years was a member of the Jamestown 
Club. Dr. Goucher is a member of St. Luke's Protest- 
ant Episcopal Church, and helpful in the various activ- 
ities of the parish. He has always taken a deep interest 
in out-of-door sports, and with gun, rod and reel has 
hunted and fished in the woods and waters famed 
among sportsmen throughout the L'nited States and 
Canada. Automobiling is another of his favorite recre- 
ations, and he was for a number of years an official 
member of the national, state and local automobile asso- 
ciations, serving as the first director of the X^ational 
Automobile Association from Western New York, and 
the Jamestown Association as its first president. For a 
number of years he was a director of the New York 
State .Automobile Association. 

The chapter on Dental Surgery in this work from the 
pen of Dr. Goucher gives the reader a clear idea of his 
decided literary ability, his versatility and the wide 
range of his reading and research. 

Dr. Goucher married (first) in Buffalo, N. Y., Nov. 
23, 1898, MaBelle Wade, who died May 12, 1915, daugh- 
ter of .'Mfred and Ella Wade. He married (second) in 
Jamestown, N. Y., Feb. 14, 1917, G. Lemar Hurlbert, 
daughter of George F. and Arietta (Vandervoort) 
Hurlbert. The family home is at No. 306 East Fourth 
street. 

Dr. Goucher comes from a long line of ancestors, the 
line of descent tracing back to Colonial and pioneer 
stock, who have distinguished themselves as true ser- 
vants of this land. His mother was a great-grand- 
daughter of Ensign James Wilson, who wintered with 
General Washington at Valley Forge and served on his 
staflf. On his father's side he is a direct descendant of 
the Gouchers who built the first brass cannon for the 
Revolutionary War, their factory being at Canaioharie, 
N. Y. One of the cannon manufactured by them was 
captured by the British and is now at the British Mus- 
eum in London, and has the name of the makers cast on 
its side. 



JOHN W. DOUBLEDAY— There are some lives 
that, in their ceaseless, indefatigable energy, are the 
cause of wonder to their fellows, and might well serve 
as a model to those that would achieve success. The 
men who are thus endowed undertake enterprises that 
would make the average man pause, apparently without 
fear of consequences, seeming impervious to the sting 
of discouragement, meeting reverses, not with the usual 
surrender of most men, but with the simple expedient 



of trying again. The record of John W. Doubleday 
shows him to be a man of that character. He is a 
native of England, born there March 22, 1841, a son of 
Henry and Mary (Phillips) Doubleday, both of whom 
were natives of England and came to America in 1849, 
locating at Brooklyn, now New York City. 

John W. Doubleday was but eight years old when he 
crossed the Atlantic in a sailing vessel, landing in New 
York, going at once to his new home in Brooklyn, 
where he attended the public schools. He was ambi- 
tious as a lad and soon found employment, his compen- 
sation for his work being two dollars and fifty cents a 
week, from which he had to pay two dollars per week 
for board, and twelve cents for ferry fare. At the age 
of sixteen he became a clerk in a large dry goods store 
in New York City, where he continued until 1S63. 
However, he was not content, and that year he left for 
the oil regions of Western Pennsylvania and became a 
prospector. His operation in oil and gas proved re- 
markably successful. In partnership with others, they 
bought a gas plant for $49,000. The company was 
formed, and Mr. Doubleday was elected secretary and 
manager. Through his keen business ability and untir- 
ing efforts, the business grew to such proportions that 
they were able to dispose of the plant in a year and a 
half for $410,000. In 18S0 he withdrew from the oil and 
gas fields, turning his attention to the manufacturing 
industry. This year he came to Jamestown and at once 
became interested in textile manufacturing and other 
enterprises. In 1889 he, with Mr. J. S. Patterson, pur- 
chased the controlling interests of the Jamestown 
Woolen Spinning Company and continued thus until 
l8g6, when the company was incorporated under the 
name of The Empire Worsted Mills. The original 
stock of this company was one hundred thousand, which 
since its incorporation, through the shrewd business 
management of Mr. Doubleday, has greatly increased 
from one hundred thousand, with a large surplus, to 
one million stock, with a large surplus. The plant has 
been extensively improved by the erection of two four- 
storied buildings of brick and stone, with brick dye 
house, two weaving buildings, brick finishing plant and 
storage building. The floor space now in use comprises 
three hundred thousand feet, and boiler capacity in- 
creased from one hundred horse power to thirteen hun- 
dred. The corporation also owns the Acme Worsted 
Mills, employing nearly two hundred people. Nearly 
si.x hundred employees are on the pay roll of The 
Empire Worsted Mills. The products of these two 
mills have a distinct place in the textile market of the 
world and are sold through the company's offices in 
New York, Philadelphia, Boston and Chicago, with 
annual sales from two and a ha-lf million to three mil- 
lion dollars. Mr. Doubleday held the office of presi- 
dent of the company until he retired from active busi- 
ness in 1915, when he was elected president emeritus. 
The other members of the corporation are: L. M. But- 
man, president; W. D. Broadhead, vice-president, and 
G. W. Berquist, secretary and treasurer. 

Mr. Doubleday was also interested in the steel indus- 
try. In iS8g he, with six others, organized the Du- 
quesne Pennsylvania Steel Company at an investment 
of one million five hundred thousand dollars. Mr. 
Doubleday served as secretary of the company. This 



4i6 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



enterprise, under Mr. Doubleday's management, also 
proved a success, and in 1S92 it was sold to the Car- 
negie Steel Company, and this is now one of its largest 
plants. 

Mr. Doubleday married (first") Maria L. Taylor, who 
bore him three children: Mary, who is the widow of 
E. D. Boyd, who resides in San Pedro, Los Angeles, 
Cal.: William, who is a fruit grower and resides at 
El Ca.ion. San Diego, Cal.; and Grace, who is wife of 
Rev. Charles ^^^ Harris, and resides in Montana. Mr. 
Doubleday married (.second) Nellie C. Thayer. By 
this union there were three children: Ethelbert, de- 
ceased: Edna, the wife of Rev. H. \V. Georgi; Sybil, 
the wife of Frederick \V. Mix, of Jamestown. 

Mr. Doubleday is a member of Petrolia Lodge, An- 
cient Free and Accepted Masons, and the National 
\\'ool Manufacturers' L'nion. In political belief he is 
independent, voting for the man and measures which 
are for the best interests of the people. Mr. Double- 
day and his wife are members 01 the Baptist church. 
They are much devoted to their family, and spend their 
winters in Southern California, where they have a beau- 
tiful home at San Diego. 

The long and varied career of Mr. Doubleday has 
displayed balance and abilities as varied as the scenes 
in which they have been displayed, or the directions in 
which they have extended, but more especially has it 
been shown in those cardinal virtues of courage, hon- 
esty, and industry, without which there is no lasting 
achievement. He has been engaged during his life in 
many occupations, and among many different classes of 
people, but he has always proved himself a man among 
men and naturally has always been accorded a high 
place in their regard, and regardless of his large busi- 
ness interests he has always shown himself a devoted 
husband and father. 



EMERY W. FENTON, who was for many years 
prominent in ;hc mnnufacturing interests of James- 
tcwn, X. v., where his death occurred Aug. 9, igaj, at 
his home. No. 1392 East Second street, was a member of 
an old and distinguished New England family, which 
was founded here in the early Colonial period. 

(I) Robert Fcnton, the first ancestor of this branch 
of the Fcnton family of which wc have definite record, 
appears first at Woburn, Mass., in the year 1688. It is 
not known whence he came, but the probability seems 
to have been that he was of Welsh origin and was one 
o; the early Welsh settlers in Massachusetts. He did 
not remain in Woburn for more than a few years, but 
went to Windham. Conn., where between May ,30, I'Vj^, 
and .Xpril 19, 1694. he .was received as an inhabitant of 
thf town. He located in the northern part of Windham, 
which afterwards became Mansfield, and is believed to 
have f'.llowcd the trade of carpenter, as it was he who 
built the first bridge across the Natchaug river. He was 
one of the patentees of the town of Mansfield which 
was set off from Windham and made a town. Oct. 20, 
170.1. In 1707 he bfcame one of the proprietors of 
that town, but left it prior to 1730 and located at Will- 
iiiKton, where he died at the home of a son. He married 
Dorothy and they were the parents of the follow- 
ing children : I<otK.rt, l^^rn Oct. 0, if,H\ at Woburn, 



Mass.; Francis, born July 22, i6go, at \\'oburn, and was 
one of the earliest settlers at Willington ; Samuel, born at 
INlansfield; Bridget, born .\ug. 14, 1695; Jacob, bom 
April 5. 1698, and became one of the first settlers of 
Norwich, Vt. ; Dorothy, born Sept. 4, 1700, and became 
the wife of Samuel Slafter; .^nna, born July 7, 1703, 
and became the wife of John Rigbe ; Violetta, born 
.Aug. 20, 1706. and became the wife of John Harris; 
Ebenezer, mentioned below, and Abigail, a twin to 
Ebenezer, bom Aug. 29, 1710. 

(II) Ebenezer Fenton, son of Robert and Dorothy 
Fenton, was born Aug. 29. 1710, at Mansfield, and early 
in life removed to Willington with his parents. He was 
twice married and his first wife, whom he wedded 
Feb. II, 1740, was Alehitable Tuttle, a daughter of Jona- 
than Tuttle, and they were the parents of the follow- 
ing children: Jonathan, born May 17, 1741 ; Ebenezer, 
Jr., born April 15, 1743; Sarah, born Feb. 16, 1744; 
Nathan, born Feb. 9, 1746; Solomon, born June 23, 1749, 
who served for seven years in the War of the Revolu- 
tion and was first lieutenant in a company of the Second 
Regiment in 1779; Lydia, born May 26, 1753, and became 
the wife of Jacob Barrows; Elijah, born Aug. 8, 1754. 
Ebenezer Fenton married (second) Aug. 26, 1762, Lydia 
Conant, a daughter of Malachi Conant, and they were 
the parents of the following children : Nathaniel, born 
March 26, 1764; Jacob, mentioned below; Mehitable, 
born Jan. 18, 1767; Abigail, born Feb. 2, 1769; Robert, 
born May 24, 1771 : Justin, born Sept. i.i, 1772; Malachi, 
born April 9, 1776; and Robert, born Oct. II, 1780. 

(III) Jacob Fenton, son of Ebenezer and Lydia 
(Conant) Fenton. was born Nov. 5. 1765, in Connecticut, 
and served in the Revolutionary War as a private in 
Captain Thomas Dana's company, which he joined May 
23, 1 781. This company formed a part of General David 
Waterbury's State brigade and of the battalion which 
was ordered to be raised for the defense of the post 
at Horse Neck and places adjacent. It was commanded 
by General Waterbury, who was also the commander 
of all the guards raised for the defense of the sea 
crafts from Horse Neck to New Haven inclusive. The 
force was composed of draft from the militia and 
amounted to a brigade of two battalions. In July it 
joined General Washington, while he was in camp at 
Phillipsburg, and for some time after was under the 
command of General Heath, on the Westchester line. 
Jacob Fenton came to Jamestown. Chautauqua county, 
N. Y., in the year 181 1, and established here a pottery 
kiln between what is now First and Second streets, and 
manufactured all kinds of earthernware. He died in 
1822 at Jamestown. He married Lois Hurd, by whom 
he had nine children, one of whom was William, men- 
tioned below. 

(IV) William Fenton, son of Jacob and Lois (Hurd) 
Fenton, was horn in Connecticut, in 1796, and came to 
Jamestown with his parents when fifteen years of age. 
Here he engaged in business with his father until the 
latter's death, when he continued to conduct it on his 
own account until 1826. He then admitted as a partner, 
Samuel Whittimore, and they moved the establishment 
to Fluvanna, N. Y., and remained in active business 
there for Ihirtecn years, when the partnership was dis- 
solved. In 1839 Mr. I''entnn returned to Jamestown, 
where he continued lo make his home until the close of 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



417 



his life. He was prominent in local affairs and was 
elected justice of the peace, an office which he held for 
half a century. His death occurred in 1891, when nearly 
one hundred years of age. He was a Whig in politics 
during early life, but joined the Republican party 
upon its organization and was very active in its councils. 
He was also an active member of the Congregational 
church. He married in 1816, Hannah Tracy, a daughter 
of Elias Tracy, who served as a private in Captain 
Thomas Wheeler's company and Colonel Chapman's 
rtgiment in the Revolutionary War. William and 
Hannah (Tracy) Fenton were the parents of fourteen 
children, one of whom was Emery W., mentioned below. 

(V) Emery W. Fenton, youngest son of William 
and Hannah (Tracy) Fenton, was born March 23, 1S36, 
at Fluvanna, Chautauqua county, N. Y. When but 
three years of age he was brought by his parents to 
Jamestown and attended the local public schools of this 
place for his education. When eighteen years of age, 
Emery W. Fenton began his business career as an em- 
ployee in a local pail factory and continued in its em- 
ploy for a number of years. He then went to Corry, 
Pa., and spent eight years at that place, working in a 
woodenware factory. In 1S69 he returned to Cliautau- 
qua county and located at Falconer, where he formed 
a partnership with Samuel Sweet and engaged in the 
manufacture of butter tubs. Later Mr. Sweet sold 
out his interest and the business was conducted by E. 
W. Fenton for several years. Later the firm of Fenton, 
Robertson & Company was organized for the production 
of fine furniture, and in this line Mr. Fenton continued 
until his death. In addition to his industrial activities, 
Mr. Fenton was always actively interested in public 
affairs and was a leading Democrat. He took a keen 
interest in the educational development of Jamestown, 
and was a member of the Board of Education at Fal- 
coner, it being largely through his influence that the 
High School at that place was built. Mr. Fenton en- 
joyed a reputation second to none for honesty and 
square dealing, and it may be said of him that he made 
the golden rule his motto. 

Emery W. Fenton was united in marriage, Nov. 7, 
1861, with Louise Myers, a daughter of Peter and Lucy 
(Gould) Myers. Mrs. Fenton died Jan. 12, 1916, and 
was buried with her husband at Pine Hill Cemetery, 
Falconer. She was an attendant of the Congregational 
church, was a woman of many Christian virtues and 
much devoted to her home and children. Mr. and Mrs. 
Fenton were the parents of three children, as follows : 
Jennie, who died in early youth ; Lulu E. and J. Grace, 
both of whom reside at the old Fenton home. No. 
1392 East Second street, Jamestown. They resided 
with their parents and were greatly devoted to them 
and their home life. Both are members of Elliot Chap- 
ter, New York Society of the Daughters of the Amer- 
ican Revolution, of Falconer. 



MORGAN BOSTWICK KENT, of Jamestown, is 
a representative of an old English family founded in 
New England about a quarter of a century after the 
landing of the Pilgrims. He is a son of Alba Morgan 
Kent, a descendant of Thomas Kent, born in England, 
who came to Gloucester, Mass.. with his wife in 1643. 
The line from Thomas to Morgan B. Kent is through 
Chau-27 



the founder's son, Samuel Kent, and his wife, Frances 
(Woodal) Kent; their son, John Kent and his first wife, 
Abigail (Dudley) Kent; their son, Rev. Elisha Kent. 
and his wife, Abigail (Moss) Kent, a minister's daugh- 
ter and granddaughter; their son, Elisha (2) Kent, and 
his wife, Ann Kent; their son, Elisha (3) Kent, and his 
wife, Alice (Flynn) Kent; their son, Archibald Kent, 
and his wife, Emeline (Morgan) Kent; their son. Alba 
Morgan Kent, and his wife. Rose Elena ( Hall-Wetmore) 
Kent; their -only child, Morgan Bostwick Kent, of James- 
town, of the ninth American generation of the family 
founded by Thomas Kent. 

Alba Morgan Kent, son of Archibald and Emeline 
(Morgan) Kent, was born in Royalton, Vt., April 3, 
1841, died at his home in Jamestown. N. Y., Sept. 21, 
1914- He spent his early life in \'ermont, acquiring 
an education and fitting himself for the battle of life. 
When a young man he went West, locating at Madison, 
Wis., there being in State employ as steward of the Wis- 
consin State Hospital. While holding that position he 
enlisted, Sept. 2, 1862, in Company G, 29th Regiment, 
Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, and was mustered in as 
second lieutenant. Later he was commissioned first 
lieutenant, and during the greater part of the last two 
years of his service was in command of the company. 
From the time he enlisted until honorably discharged 
Lieutenant Kent was absent but once on furlough (sixty 
days), and participated in every battle in which his regi- 
ment was engaged. This included the Vicksburg cam- 
paign from Port Gibson until the fall of Vicksburg; 
Red River campaign ; seige of Mobile, and other opera- 
tions and battles. He held the rank of acting captain 
from April 2, 1863, and was mustered out of the service 
at Shreveport, La., June 22, 1865. 

Soon after his return from the army. Lieutenant Kent 
became associated with his brother, Archibald F. Kent, 
in oil refining, and later moved to Corry, Pa., and or- 
ganized the Corry Wooden Ware Company, later the 
Corry Chair Company, a corporation in which he retained 
a lifelong interest. He also organized and operated the 
Corry Gas Works, and after conducting it several years 
went to Warren, there establishing the Warren Gas 
Company, which he also operated several years. He 
then returned to Jamestown, N. Y., where he became 
interested in the Jamestown Worsted Mills, of which he 
was a director until his passing. He was also a director 
of the First National Bank of Jamestown; had other 
important business interests and large land holdings. 

One of the largest farms in the county is located in 
the town of Busti, south of Jamestown, and is popularly 
known as the Kent Farm. This estate, comprising 
about 1.500 acres, is largely Chapin Hall farm, but also 
includes the Bostwick farm and the Hastings farm, Mr. 
Bostwick being grandfather and Mr. Hastings an uncle 
of Mrs. Kent. For many years Alba AL Kent directed 
this estate and was deeply interested in its successful 
operation. The Kent Hotel at Lakewood, once the lead- 
ing hotel there, was built by Mr. Kent, who for several 
years directed its management. He never sought public 
applause, but made and always retained many warm, 
personal friends. His splendid war record was never 
paraded, and the public generally did not even know that 
he was a Civil War veteran. But he was recognized as 
an upright, public-spirited citizen, who did his full share 



4iS 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



in the upbuilding of liis city. He was a member of 
James M. Brown Post, Xo. jS?. Grand Army of the 
Repubhc, and on May ~. iSoo. was elected a member of 
New York Commanderj- Military Order Loyal Legion 
of the L'nited States, insignia Xo. 7980. He was a mem- 
ber of the Jamestown Club, and an attendant as well as 
a warm friend of the Unitarian church. During his last 
years Mr. Kent was an invalid, and for two years pre- 
ceding his death he took no part in business, that duty 
devolving upon his business associate and only son, 
Morgan Bostwick Kent. 

Mr. Ken; married, June IJ, 1873, Rose Elena (Hall) 
Wetmore, widow of Charles C. Wetmore, of Warren, 
Pa., who died in Jamestown, June Z'i. IQ12. By her first 
marriage, Mrs. Kent was the mother of Chapin H. and 
Susan Wetmore. who died in youth, and Charles D. 
Wetmore. now (1920") an architect of New York City, 
member of the firm of Warner S; Wetmore. Mrs. Kent 
was a daughter of Chapin and Susan (Bostwick) Hall, 
and a sister of Edward Hall. Chapin Hall was born in 
EUicott. Chautauqua county, X. Y., July 12, 1816, and 
his wife. Susan Bostwick, was born July 16, 1818, also 
a daughter of an early pioneer settler. 

Morgan Bostwick Kent, only child of Alba Morgan 
and Rose Elena (Hall-Wetmore) Kent, was born in 
Jamestown. X. Y., May 21, iS;8. After attendance at 
Jamestown public schools he entered St. Paul's School, 
Concord, X. H., whence he was graduated class of 1897. 
He was at once entered as an employe of the worsted 
m.ills in Jamestown, and eventually became foreman of 
a department. He was his father's associate in business 
during his latter years, and since becoming owner of the 
estate has continued it along similar lines. Mr. Kent is 
a devotee of out-of-doors sports, automobiling, hunting 
and fishing particularly appealing to him. He gratifies 
his tastes to the full extent and is a genuine lover of 
true sport. He is a member of Mount Moriah Lodge, 
Free and .-\ccepted Masons ; Wester Sun Chapter, Royal 
Arch Masons ; Jamestown Council, Royal and Select 
Masters; Jamestown Commandery, Knights Templar; 
Jamestown Lodge of Perfection ; Jamestown Council, 
Princes of Jerusalem ; Buffalo Consistory, Ancient Ac- 
cepted Scottish Rite. In politics he is a Republican, .-ind 
in religious faith a member of the Church of Christ 
(■Scientist). His clubs are the Jamestown and Rotary. 
He is also an Elk. 

Mr. Kent married f first) Sept. 30, 1902, Eleanor 
Pothw':Il, of Brookline. Children : Eleanor Rosal'c, 
Xi'iT'n Oct. 7, 1903; Juline, born March 13, 1905. Mr. 
Kent married Csccond) Iva E. Poor, and resides on 
Eait Fourth street, Jamestown. 

The old Kent home in Jamestown, long the home of 
Alba M. Kent, at the corner of Fourth street and Pren- 
dTgast avenue, has recently (1920) been sold to the two 
bodies of the Scottish Rite of Masonry in Jamestown, 
the \yAv,c of Perfection, and the Council Princes of 
jTU-al'm, The old home will In- devoted to the uses 
of thc^e bcKlie? and to social purposes. Mr, Kent is a 
man of pVasinf; personality, whole-souled and gcner- 
o'i = , -I po'.'l friend and a v,nr,<\ citizen 



GUSTAF FABIAN SELLSTROM— One of Jnmrs- 
lown'< well known citizens, who, although born in a 
forTigii lard, has contributed much to the life of this 



city, is Gustaf Fabian Sellstrom. He was born in Wim- 
merby. Sweden, June 9, 1851, the son of P. Adolph and 
Johanna Maria (Berg) Sellstrom. In 1856 the elder 
Mr. Sellstrom died, leaving his widow with the care of 
three children : Fabian at the age of four years ; Carl 
.\dolph, and John Frederick, the two latter now deceased. 

Gustaf I-'abian Sellstrom, better known as Fabian 
Sellstrom. attended the schools of his native country. 
.\t seventeen years of age he, together with his mother 
and two brothers, came to Jamestown, where he secured 
employment in the plant of Jones & Gififord, furniture 
inanufacturers. Leaving the furniture plant he went to 
Bradford, Pa., and remained there until 1877, being em- 
ployed during that time as foreman in a factory. Desir- 
ing to return to Jamestown, he secured a position as 
manager for Halliday &• Benedict, meat dealers. In 
1881 he formed a partnership with his brother, John 
Frederick Sellstrom, under the firm name of Sellstrom 
Bros., Meat Dealers, which continued until 1885, when 
through accidental death while hunting, John Frederick 
was taken away. Fabian Sellstrom bought out the inter- 
est of his brother's estate in June, 1885. and continued 
the business himself. Desiring a better location, he 
decided in May, 1886, to purcliase the business of Drake 
Sessions on Third street, and for over a quarter of a 
century remained at this location, building up a large 
and successful business, being the largest retail meat 
dealer in Chautauqua county. 

During these years he became interested in several of 
the manufacturing industries in the city, and became one 
of the strongest supporters of the Dahlstrom Metallic 
Door Company, this institution owing much to his loyal 
support during times of difficulties and financial stress. 
During the early period of organization he was com- 
missioned to handle several important business deals 
and problems of this concern. In 1912 Mr. Sellstrom 
sold out his meat business, retiring from active com- 
mercial life. He took active part, however, in the affairs 
of the Dahlstrom Metallic Door Company as vice-presi- 
dent and treasurer until 1918, when he retired entirely 
from active business. His interests in real estate and 
manufacturing concerns continue to keep him in touch 
with the business life of Jamestown. In politics, Mr. 
Sellstrom is a Republican, but in practice is an inde- 
pendent voter giving his support to the candidate he 
feels most nearly meets the requirements of the office. 
In fraternal life, he is a member of all the Masonic 
bodies up to and including the thirty-second degree, and 
also is a member of several social organizations. 

During all these years of business life the constant 
aid and encouragement of his devoted wife meant a 
great deal to his achievements and progressive develop- 
ment. On .^ug. 3. 1882, at Jamestown, he was united in 
marriage with Emily Eugenia Lundberg. Mrs. Sell- 
strom was born in Wester Gotland, Sweden, a daughter 
oi John Eliason and Maria Christina Lundberg. Mrs. 
Sellstrom came to this country as a young girl and has 
been active in the community and church life of the city 
of Jamestown, For a number of years she has been 
pr<-sidc-iit of tlie Ladies' Auxiliary of the Norden Club, 
and has eonlributed much to the literary and educational 
interest manifested there. Being greatly interested in 
equal suffrag<-, she was active in her energies for the 
cause. She is also a member of the First Lutheran 




_J 



-^ <><=^/-- 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



419 



Church. To Mr. and Mrs. Sellstrom were born four 
children : Elmer W., May H., Lilla E. P., and V. Emily. 
Lilla E. F. died in 1894 at the age of four years. Elmer 
W. received his early education in the public schools, 
later attending Cornell University and graduating with 
the degree of Civil Engineer in 1907. Leaving the uni- 
versity he became associated with the Dahlstrom 
Metallic Door Company, being active in the upbuilding 
of that institution. He has been actively identified with 
community work, serving in many capacities. He is a 
member of all the Masonic bodies and past emminent 
commander of Jamestown Commandery, Knights Temp- 
lar. He is at present the president of the Jamestown 
Rotary Club. May H. also attended the public schools, 
graduating in 1904, and later taking up special work in 
piano at the Sherwood Music School at Chicago. Upon 
graduating from there she became one of Mr. Sher- 
wood's able assistants. Later she was associated in the 
music department of Miss Bennett's School for Girls at 
Millbrook, N. Y. In 1917 she became the wife of Craw- 
ford N. Bargar, to whom one child has been born. Mr. 
Bargar has been long identified with the wholesale 
grocery business in Jamestown. V. Emily was educated 
in the Jamestown public schools, graduating with the 
class of 1 01 5, and the next year graduating from Dana 
Hall at Wellesley, Mass. She also attended Simmons 
College at Boston, and Smith College at Northampton, 
Mass., receiving the degree of Bachelor of Arts from 
the latter institution in 1920, and is now active in the 
educational and social life of the community. 



FRED H. GARFIELD— It is not always easy to 
discover and define the hidden forces that have moved 
a life of ceaseless activit)' and business success; little 
more can be done than note their manifestations in the 
career of the individual under consideration. In view 
or this fact, the life of Fred H. Garfield, late of James- 
town, N. Y.. affords a striking e.xample of well defined 
purpose with the ability to make that purpose subserve 
not only his own ends but those of the corporation with 
which he was associated and the good of his fellowmen 
as well. Mr. Garfield long held distinctive prestige in 
a calling which requires for its basis sound mentality, 
supplemented by rigid railroad traffic training, without 
which, one in that line of work cannot hope to rise 
above the mediocre. Rising in the confidence and esteem 
of the public, and in every relation of life, he never 
fell below the dignity nor in any way resorted to 
methods that invited criticism or censure. He was 
essentially a man among men, having ever moved as 
one v.'ho commanded respect by innate force, as well as 
by superior ability, and his life and labors eminently 
entitle him to representation among the representative 
men in Chautauqua county. 

The family from which Mr. Garfield is descended is 
a verj- old and prominent one in this country, and are 
descendants from Edward Garfield, who came from 
England to Massachusetts in 1636. For more than two 
centuries the Garfield family have been residents of the 
American colonies, and our loved and martyred presi- 
dent, James Abram Garfield, was a descendant from the 
same line. , 

For more than a century they were residents of 
Worcester county, Mass., and the first to come to Chau- 



tauqua county, N. Y., was Samuel Garfield, familiarly 
known as Deacon Garfield, who was born in Massachu- 
setts at the place above mentioned, and in 1803 removed 
with his father, Eliakim Garfield, to Windham county, 
Vt. The father was a Revolutionary soldier, and served 
with more than ordinary distinction under General 
George Washington. Samuel Garfield married in the 
"Green Mountain State," and in 1814 came to Chautau- 
qua county, .N. Y. ; he became a farmer in the town of 
Busti and also did carpentry work. He possessed con- 
siderable inventive genius, his first invention being 
grain measures nested from a half-bushel down; fol- 
lowing this he manufactured scythe-snaths, and grain- 
cradle handles, besides making a large number of rakes. 
Immense quantities of these "crooked sticks," as they 
were called in those days, were manufactured by him and 
sold to the farmers of the county, besides many ship- 
ments were sent down the Allegheny river to the 
southern markets. He was the father of a large family, 
among them being Benjamin, of further mention. 

Benjamin Garfield was born in the town of Busti, N. 
Y., and became one of the successful land owners. In 
1880 he moved to Salamanca and engaged in business. 
He remained there for a time and then removed to 
Bemus Point, Chautauqua county, N. Y., later removing 
to Jamestown, N. Y., where he soon retired from active 
business. Benjamin Garfield married Sarah Botsford, 
and to them were born two children: Fred H., of further 
mention ; and Charles B. 

Fred H. Garfield was born Nov. 10, 1853, on his 
father's farm, and here he passed his early life. He 
received his education in the district schools, and later 
in the public schools of Jamestown. It was while living 
with his parents at Bemus Point that Fred H. Garfield 
met the man who so largely influenced his future career 
in the person of W. P. Shattuck. of Cleveland. Mr. 
Shattuck was then general passenger agent of the 
Atlantic & Great Western (now a part of the Erie Rail- 
road system). His summers were spent at Bemus Point, 
where he formed a strong attachment for Mr. Garfield, 
then a young man, and they were much together. Mr. 
Garfield being a lover of the big out-doors and nature, 
and an intrepid hunter and fisherman, taught the art of 
hunting and fishing to Mr. Shattuck, and this brought 
them even closer together. Mr. Shattuck was struck with 
the intelligence of the young man and offered him a place 
as advertising agent for the .'\tlantic & Great Western 
Railroad, with ofifices in Buffalo. N. Y. Mr. Garfield, 
although but a young man of twenty-one years of age, 
accepted and made his home in Buffalo for several 
years. From 1880 to 1888 Mr. Garfield was traveling 
passenger agent for the same railroad, with which he 
spent practically his entire life. In the meantime the 
railroad had passed through several changes, finally 
becoming the familiar N. Y. P. & O., the "Nypano." 
In 1888 he was appointed division passenger agent at 
Jamestown, and held that office continually up to the 
time of his death. He witnessed the rapid growth of 
the passenger and freight business as the busy city of 
Jamestown grew up. 

It may be truly said of Fred H. Garfield that the 
Erie Railway Company secured his undivided ability 
during all the years that he was connected with the great 
transportation problem. Whatever he did was with the 



-po 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



thought and intention of benefiting the railroad and 
those connected with it. Xo man outdid him in loyalty 
to any company or corporation, and while he took part 
in matters of public concern, and always maintained a 
lively interest in the business and political life of James- 
town and Chautauqua county, this was never done at 
the sacrifice of any duty he owed to his company. 
During his long term of service with the Erie as 
division passenger agent he had immediate charge of 
more than two hundred miles of the business of the 
road, and in all his work he not only won and licld the 
confidence and respect of his superior officers in the 
company, but he won and held the equal confidence and 
respect of all the men in the passenger department over 
v.hich he had control. Mr. Garfield was more than a 
division passenger agent, he was the firm friend and 
close advisor of General Passenger Agent R. H. Wallace 
and other men at the head of the great railway system. 
They looked to him for advice in the management of 
the road, and they regarded his judgment upon railway 
interests as sound, and this might be said of many other 
otncials of connecting lines. He had wide influence in 
railway circles, and with such influence his loyalty to 
his home town was only second to that which he had 
for the company to which he devoted his life. Mr. 
Garfield passed away at his home, Aug. 31. 1908. His 
funeral was attended not only by many friends from 
Jamestown. Chautauqua county and vicinity, but by 
prominent railroad officials from various parts of the 
United States. Mr. Garfield was a member of the Benev- 
olent and Protective Order of Elks. Order of Maccabees, 
and Jamestown Club. In politics he was a Democrat. 

On June 6, 1882, Fred H. Garfield married (first) 
Marv- Smith, a daughter of George Smith, who lived in 
Wilson. Xiagara county. X. V. To them was born a 
son. Robert Marvin. Mrs. Garfield died in May. iSgo. 
On Sept. 24. 1801. he married (second) Tena Mcintosh, 
and to them was bom a daughter. .Alice M.. and a son 
Irederick M. 

A lover of out-of-doors life, he was an ardent sports- 
man, t.aking great pleasure in hunting and fishing, and 
friends frequently came long distances to spend a few 
days wi'h him on Chautauqua Lake, or in the sur- 
rounding forests in search of game, and such friends 
never counted the day lost, whether successful or not 
with rod or gun. 

Mr. Garfield was of a most gtni.-il nature; he loved 
hi'- fcllowmen and had confidence in tluni ; he would 
always give willingly of his time and service, especially 
for the interest and welfare of Jamestown. Many were 
th'- calls made upon him as the representative of the 
Erie road, cspecinlly in the m.-i'ter of local enterprises 
.ind local celebrations. He had many friends in business 
and social life fr^.m near and far away. It is certain 
that his death was mourned by all who knew him. 



ADELBERT PHILO SIMMONS— For forty years 

a m'T'-haM of fjii.ti. ix^istma-.t-r uiuli-r si.^: jiresidenis — 
r,r.-ip', \'.:ty . Hr.rri'on. ('l.-vekind. .MrKJnlcy. :nid 
F/r,^,-'-,'lt- to.vi rl-rk of Bu'-ti for a qMnrter of a nn- 
Itirv. and a soldi'-r of the Civil War, Ad'llxrt P. 
Simm'-rtu from every p^'int of vi'-w was entitlf-d to Ihc 
title of "\<teran," Wh'-n finally he was laid at rest 
in Lakeview Cemetery, Jamestown, the bearers were all 



veterans of the Forty-ninth Regiment, New York Vol- 
unteer Infantry, and the local Grand Army of the Re- 
public men attended the funeral of their comrade in a 
body, conducting at the grave the beautiful ritual burial 
sen-ice of the order, James M, Conroe, commander; N, 
R. Thompson, chaplain. 

Adclbert P. Sinunons was a native son of Chautauqua 
county, born in the town of Portland, who enlisted from 
Jamestown, Aug. 26, 1861, and was discharged, Sept. 17, 
1804. He was in business at Busti, Chautauqua county, 
from 1S66 until igo:', and resided in Jamestown from 
190S until his death in 1916, aged seventy-four I'ears, 
two months, four days. He resigned the office of post 
master in May, 1907, after continuous service covering a 
period of about forty years, and si.x administrations, one 
of eight years being of political complexion differing from 
his own, and he finally proving the falsity of that saying 
about office holders that "few died and none ever resign." 
He was a sou of Philander and Mary A. (Waid) Sim- 
mons, w^ho at the time of the birth of their son, Adelbert 
P., were living in Portland, but who moved to Jamestown 
in 1855. 

.•\delbert P. Simiuons was born in the town of Port- 
land. Chautauqua county, N. Y.. March 4, 1842, died at 
his home, No. 3 Forest Park, Jamestown, N. Y., May 
8. 1916. The first thirteen j'ears of his life were spent 
in Portland, where he attended the district school, but 
in 1855 his parents moved to Jamestown, where he com- 
pleted public school attendance and learned the chair 
maker's trade. He continued at his trade in Jamestown 
until Aug. 26, 1861, when he enlisted as a private in 
Company K, Forty-ninth Regiment, New York Volunteer 
Infantry, and on the following September 18 was mus- 
tered into the United States service at New York City 
He was in active service with his regiment, a part of the 
glorious Army of the Potomac, was all through the 
campaigns of that army until Dec. 18, 1863, and during 
the Peninsula campaign, his tent-mate. Milton Lewis, 
tlie first soldier to fall from Chautauqua county, was 
killed at Warwick Creek, near Yorktown, Va. He in- 
curred physical disabilities, and on Dec. 18, 1863, was 
transferred from the Forty-ninth to the Thirty-sixth 
Regiment, Second Battalion, Veteran Reserve Corps, 
and placed on detached service at Washington, D. C, 
as ward master in Harewood Hospital. He was honor- 
ably discharged and mustered out of the service, Sept. 
I", 1864, his three years' term of enlistment having 
expired. 

In li'fii) .Mr, Sinunons npmed a general store in the 
village of Rusti. Chautauqua county, and continued a 
successful merchant until October, 1906, when he sold 
his stock and goodwill to F. C. Whiting & Company of 
Rusti, and then retired. Under President Grant he re- 
ceived his first commission as postmaster of the village, 
and earh recurring four years brought him a renewal 
of tliat commission, no matter who the president or 
what his politics until May, 1907, when he resigned the 
office, ;ind in January following he moved to Jamestown, 
his boyhood home, and the scene of the closing activi- 
ties of his life. He was a Repidilican in politics, casting 
his first vole ff)r Abraham T.,incoln in 1S64. President 
Lincoln then a candidate for a second term. He served 
the town of Ilusti as town clerk for twenty-five years, 
was collector of taxes, registrar of vital statistics, secre- 



(2^T^^^^i f^Xyr 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



421 



tary of the Board of Health, and filled several village 
offices. 

Mr. Simmons always kept in close touch with his 
old comrades of the army, and was a member of the 
Veterans Union of Chautauqua County, serving as its 
secretary, and of James M. Brown Post, No. 285, Grand 
Army of the Republic, of Jamestown, of which he was 
a past commander. At Boston, Dec. 30, 1910, at the 
National Encampment of the order, Mr. Simmons was 
appointed aide-de-camp to the Grand Commander, J. E. 
Gilmore. He was a member of the First Methodist 
Church of Jamestown, and a man honored and respected 
by all who knew him. 

Mr. Simmons married, Jan. 6, 1869, Florence E. Glenn, 
daughter of William T. and Mary L. (Thompson) 
Glenn, of Phoenix, Pa., her father a Union soldier who 
gave his life for his country. Mrs. Simmons survives 
her husband, and continues her residence in Jamestown. 
She is a member of the Woman's Relief Corps, and of 
the Methodist Episcopal church. Her only son, Frank 
C. Simmons, was born in Milton, Armstrong county. 
Pa.. Nov. 16, i86g, and educated in the public schools. 
He was engaged in the mercantile business with his 
father until igo6, and is now connected with the James- 
town and Westfield Electric Railroad Company. He 
married May Wilcox. 

Such are the high lights in a life which was practically 
lived in the same community and when at its close 
the time came to pay the last tributes of respect, old 
friends, business associates, Grand Army comrades, 
church brethren, and neighbors testified by their presence 
to the high regard in which Mr. Simmons was held. 
Mr. Simmons was a man of quiet life and disposition, 
very fond of his home and family, and in his public 
life met every obligation of good citizenship. He fought 
well the battle of life and left behind him an honored 
name. 



JOHN FRANK SMITH— As inspector of plumb- 
ing for the Board of Health of Jamestown, John F. 
Smith enjoys the distinction of being an oflicial of a 
progressive city government, and as a veteran of the 
Civil War there is nothing more for the biographer to 
add to show that he has served his fellowman. Mr. 
Smith takes a leading part in the advancement of all that 
promises improvement of conditions in his home town, 
and is generally recognized as one of her foremost 
citizens. 

George W. Smith, father of John Frank Smith, was 
born in England, and grew to manhood in his native 
land, learning the trade of currier and tanner. As a 
young man he immigrated to the United States, settling 
in Lynn, Mass., where he worked at his trade until 
coming to Chautauqua county, N. Y., and taking up his 
abode in Panama. There he conducted a tannery for 
some years, and then removed to Jamestown, where he 
took up painting and paper hanging, but some years 
later abandoned it for the shoe business in which he 
was engaged on West Third street under the firm name 
of George W. Smith S: Son. He was a Republican, and 
attended the Protestant Episcopal church. Mr, Smith 
married, in L>Tin. Mass., Sarah Bindley, who was, like 
himself, a native of England, and their children were: 
George W., died in infancy; William H., George M., 



Sarah H., Charles A., Albert Al. ; John Frank, mentioned 
below ; Abner D., Minnie, Caroline F., Julia A., Frederick 
B. The parents of these children died in Jamestown. 

John Frank Smith, son of George W. and Sarah 
(Bindley) Smith, was born Feb. 25, 1846, in the town of 
Panama, Chautauqua county, N. Y., and for a short time 
attended school in his native place. When the family 
moved to Jamestown he was still a boy, but his oppor- 
tunities for acquiring an education were limited, and he 
was but Utile over sixteen when he enlisted in Company 
K, 49th Regiment, New York Volunteer Infantry, under 
Colonel D. W. Bidwell and Captain Alonzo J. Marsh. 
He participated in the battles of Fredericksburg, Chan- 
cellorsville, Gettysburg, the Wilderness and Spottsyl- 
vania Court House, being wounded in the last engage- 
ment by a shot which passed through both hips. This 
was on May 10, 1864, and he was obliged to remain in 
the hospital until Sept. 2, 1864, when he rejoined his 
company and regiment in time to take part in the battles 
of Fisher Hill, Opequon, Cedar Creek, and to help break 
the line before Petersburg, April 2, 1865. He was 
present at the Grand Review in Washington, and on 
June 24, 1865, was mustered out. 

Un returning to Jamestown the young soldier learned 
the trade of a machinist under the instruction of 
Josephus Clark and followed it until 1872, when he 
abandoned it for that of plumbing, conducting a success- 
ful business until 1887, when he was appointed inspector 
of plumbing to the Board of Health of Jamestown. He 
has ever since continuously filled that responsible o.Tice, 
being now in his twenty-fourth year. Nothing could 
more conclusively prove that he is thoroughly master of 
his business. In politics, Mr. Smith is a true Republican. 
He is a member of James M. Brown Post, Grand Army 
of the Republic, of Jamestown, and the Union Veteran 
Legion, also belonging to the Protective Home Circle of 
Jamestown. The Golden Rule is his motto and his 
religion. 

Mr. Smith married (first) in Jamestown, Sept. 8, 
1868, Adele M., daughter of Adam and Mercy Mambert, 
and they became the parents of one child, George M., 
who died in childhood. Mrs. Smith passed away in 
1894, and Mr. Smith married (second) Dec. 11, 1895. 
Rose V. Baugher, of Titusville, Pa. 

John Frank Smith has a varied and eventful record. 
As soldier, business man and public official, he has 
rendered faithful service and won an honorable name. 



ALBERT FERDINAND SOCH, M. D., one of the 

well known and capable physicians of Fredonia, Chau- 
tauqua county, N. Y., is a native of the town of Hanover, 
Chautauqua county, N. Y., having been born at this 
place, March 24, 1871, a son of Charles and Wilemina 
(Brewer) Soch. The elder Mr. Soch was a farmer all 
his life, and his death occurred at the age of seventy- 
four years. Mrs. Soch is still living, having just passed 
her eighty-sixth year. 

.Albert Ferdinand Soch received his preliminary edu- 
cation in the district schools of his native place, and 
after completing the elementary course went to work on 
his father's farm, where he remained for a time, later 
going to Boston, Mass. Upon arriving at Boston, he was 
given employment during the day, and utilized his even- 
ings by attending the Boston High School. Through 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



very frugal living, the young man had managed to save 
a considerable portion of his earnings, with a view to 
ertering college, and this he was enabled to do some 
time later, having accumulated enough money to pay 
for his tuition at the Phillips Exeter Academy, at 
Exeter. N. H. Mr. Soch. however, was compelled to 
continue working during his spare time in order to 
defray other college expenses, and though many a young 
man would have turned back if placed under such a 
handicap, this was not the case with him and he con- 
tinued in his course, graduating with the class of 1894. 
and winning the afifection and regard of his classmato:- 
as welt as his teachers. His next step toward his edu- 
c;:tion was taken wlicn he went to Buffalo and entered 
the medical depar.ment of the Buffalo University, from 
which he graduated three years later with the degree of 
M. D. After graduation. Dr. Soch spent several years 
in hospital work, and was an interne for a time in the 
Erie County Hospital. It was not until 1900 that Dr. 
Soch came to Fredonia and there began the practice of 
his profession, opening an office for this purpose. His 
complete knowledge and capabilities soon recommended 
him highly as an able practitioner, and his practice con- 
tinued to grow until he can now claim one of the largest 
hereabouts. In fact. Dr. Soch's services are so greatly 
in demand that it has compelled him to give up his 
ambition to become a surgeon, his duties being too con- 
rining to permit him to continue his surgical studies. 
In KOI Dr. Sc>ch was appointed on the medical staff 
of the Brooks Memorial Hospital, Dunkirk, and he still 
occupies this post. 

Dr. Soch is a member of the .•\. O. D. College Medical 
fraternity, the .Vmerican Medical Society, the New York 
Medical Association, the Western New York Medical 
Association, the Chautauqua County Medical Associa- 
tion, and the Dunkirk Fredonia Medical Society, and is 
medical examiner for the Mutual Life Insurance Com- 
pajiy, the .Io!i:i Hancock, Travelers', .State Mutual, 
Bankers' Life, Massachusetts Mutual, and Pnidenlial 
Life Insurance companies. He is also very prominent 
in the social and club life here, and is a member of 
F'-Tcst Lodge. No. 162, .'\ncient Free and ,\ccepted 
Ma,sons. of which organization he is the junior warden, 
and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, being past 
noble grand of the latter. In politics Dr. Soch is a 
Republican. 

.■\lbcrt Ferdinand Sfich was united in marriage with 
Mary Elizabeth Hall, a resident of Hamilton, Ontario, 
Canada, a daughter of James and Margaret (Brooks) 
Hall. Mrs. Soch was formerly a trained nurse and 
fihc mi-t Dr. Soch while <loing hospital work in Buffalo. 
They were married June 27, 1900, and six children were 
(('jrn '.]' this union, lour of whom arr livint;, as follows 
H-imilifn H.. who is now attending the high school at 
Fredonia; Albert F.. Jr., who also attends the high 
■■'■h'K.l here: Kol(crt A., a pupil in the elcmcnfan,- schuol ; 
and James W., who is in the kindergarten. The two 
childr<-;i who arc d'-rcasod arc : Dorothy, who was the 
oldest child and dif'd whin she was seven years of age; 
and Charles L.. who died in infancy. 



JOHN EDWARD KASE— John Kasc. father of 
J'hn fvlv.nrd Ka>c. a hxiy lime resident of Jann- - 
town, N. Y., wa-. lorn in Hesse, Germany, and ther' 



grew to manhood. To avoid German military service 
he came to the United States, finding employment and 
a home in Carbondale, Lackawanna county, Pa. He 
was a cabinetmaker by trade, and soon after locating 
in Carbondale established a small furniture business in 
connection with liis shop. He prospered in business 
as he became well known, and he continued a furni- 
ture dealer until his death, which occurred at the home 
of his daughter, Mrs. Burr, in Scranton, Pa. He 
married Martha Seibold, also born in Germany, she 
dying in Carbondale, Pa. Children : i. Theodore, 
deceased, who was a real estate broker in Boston, Mass. 
J. Julia, married Daniel Burr, a wholesale druggist of 
Scranton, Pa. 3. John Edward, of further mention. 

4. Edmund, a practicing physician of Philadelphia, Pa. 
John Edward Kase was born in Carbondale, Pa., 

July 17, 1858, died in Jamestown. N. Y., Jan. 15, 1913. 
He was educated in the public schools at Carbondale, 
and after completing his studies became associated with 
his fatlier in the manufacture and sale of furniture, the 
young man becoming an expert finisher of fine furniture, 
making that branch his occupation for life. He contin- 
ued with his father until 1879, and when he came to 
legal age at once began his own career. For two years 
after leaving home John E. Kase was employed as a 
furniture finisher in a factory at .Athens, Pa., going 
thence to Waverly, N. Y., where he was in the employ 
of the Hall and Lyons Company, furniture manufactur- 
ers of that town, where he continued until 1888. His 
business life in Jamestown began in that year with the 
Morgan. Maddo.x Company of this city. Later he was 
with the Maddox, Bailey Furniture Company, and still 
later with the J. W. Maddo.x Table Company, and with 
these companies he was employed as a furniture finisher 
until his death in 1913. He was a good workman, 
master of his branch of furniture making, his services 
always being in demand. He was a Democrat in politics, 
served as inspector of elections for many years, and was 
well known in Jamestown. 

Mr. Kase married, in Lackawanna county, Pa., Jan. 

5. i.SSi, Kninia E. Fuller, burn in Malamoras, P.i.. 
daughter of Siineon C. and Emiline (.Stout) Fuller. 
Mr. Fuller was one of the oldest and best known engi- 
neers on the Erie Railroad. He made his home in Port 
Jervis, N. Y., Carbondale, Pa., and later Susquehanna, 
Pa., where he died in 1883. His wife later moved to 
Jamestown. N. Y., where she died at the home of her 
daughter, Mrs. Kase, in 1893. Children of John E. and 
I'.nima F,. (Fuller) Kase: 1. Blanche. <lied in child- 
luiod. 2. Ralph Stout, born in Waverly, N. Y., Jan. 24, 
18K6, was educated in the grade and high schools of 
Jamestown, and later learned the printer's business, 
becoming an expert in this trade; he is now superintend- 
ent of the printing department of the Travelers' Life 
Insurance Cotnpany, of Hartford, Conn.; he married 
Margaret Maharon, of Jamestown, daughter of Judge 
John G. Maharon; Mr. and Mrs. Kase, Jr., arc the 
jiarents of two children: June Mary and Betty June 
,■>,. \'eraniee h'nllcr. hcprn i'eli. 15. !!-'9l, died .April 1. 
I'Kii. 4. .^iinenn Jnlin, born in Jamestown, June J(), 
1803; educated in the grade and high schools of James- 
t' wn, .Mechanics Institute of Rochester, N. Y., receiving 
from the Institute the degree of electrical engineer at 
graduation, June 14, 1917; after the United States 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



423 



entered the World War, he enlisted in the emergency 
electrical department of the Coast Artillery School at 
Fortress Monroe, Va., his work that of an expert: he 
was mustered out of the service, Dec. 26, igi8, and is 
now with the Dudlow Manufacturing Company, Fort 
Wayne, Ind. Mrs. John E. Kase is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church and Sunday school, the 
Women's Christian Temperance Union, also the Home 
and Foreign Missionary and Clothes societies, and the 
American Legion Auxiliary. 



ROXINA L. DAVIS, daughter of Ezra W, and 
Margaret W. (Cass) Davis, settled in Chautauqua 
county, N. Y., thirty years ago. She sprang from a 
hardy line of staunch New England stock, the Davis 
family coming from Vermont and the Cass family from 
New Hampshire, the former named having made a dis- 
tinctive record in the service of their country, ar.H 
have always occupied a prominent place in business. 

Miss Davis, since settling in Chautauqua county 
thirty years ago, has been actively engaged in business. 
She was first associated with Wilson & Van Tuyl's 
Hardware Store as bookkeeper, and when this company 
went out of business she joined a new enterprise with 
W. W. Wilson in the conduct of a tinsmith shop as a 
silent partner. She then branched out in the real estate 
line, a field in which she has made an eminent success, 
having built nearly the entire street known as \V'icks 
avenue. West Jamestown. She also engaged in exten- 
sive building enterprises in Yates county in the central 
part of the State, both enterprises testifying to good 
business acumen. Although her business career occupies 
a large portion of her time and attention. Miss Davis 
has not neglected her duty toward society, and has 
always been active in charitable and social organizations. 
She is a member of the Disciple church, and was one 
of the first members of the Young Women's Christian 
Association in Jamestown, being identified with that 
association for the past quarter of a century. She 
adopted and reared two children, namely, William C. 
and Margaret C. Davis, the latter named now the wife 
of William McKinley Loucks. Miss Davis has estabHshed 
a reputation for sound business judgment and square 
dealing with her associates that will stand for all time 
to come as a tribute to her memory. 



JOHN AUGUST JONES— A man of great self- 
reliance and self-dependence of character, with deter- 
mination to succeed in whatever he undertakes, John 
August Jones very early in life gave evidence of the 
sturdy independence which has helped him to gain the 
comfortable competence which he now enjoys. 

Born in the little town of Alsheda, Sweden, July 12, 
1875, the boy spent his childhood on a farm, attending 
the common schools until he was fifteen years old. when 
he decided to come to the United States. Having rela- 
tives in this country, he had heard of their continued pro- 
gress in business and he felt the desire to emulate their 
success; so in 1890 the lad started alone, landing in the 
United States and going direct to Jamestown, N. Y., 
where his friends were living. The career of John 
August Jones may be said to have started at that time, 
for he immediately applied for employment to the Gokey 



shoe factory, where he remained for four years. At the 
same time he began studying at night, attending the 
evening classes at the Young Men's Christian Association 
and making rapid progress in the various branches he 
had chosen. In 1894 the young man changed his form 
of work, becoming a salesman in the clothing store of 
A. J. Peterson & Son, continuing with them for four 
years, when he resigned. He now thoroughly under- 
stood two branches in commercial business, shoes and 
clothing, and in October, 1908, in company with William 
H. Scharf and Luther 1^. Lincoln, bought out the cloth- 
ing store of J. Whitley & Son, a long established con- 
cern with a fine reputation, the new firm becoming 
known as Jones, Scharf & Lincoln. In a short time Mr. 
Lincoln sold out his holdings to the other two partners, 
they carrying on the business. In 191 1 it became an in- 
corporated concern, under the name of Jones & Scharf, 
Inc., and at this time (1920) it still continues at No. 
210 Main street, each year showing increased prosperity. 
I\Ir. Jones is greatly interested in civic affairs, being 
active in the work of the Board of Commerce of James- 
town and one of its board of directors. He is also con- 
nected with the Swedish Brotherhood and the Norden 
Club; he and his family are regular attendants at the 
First Swedish Lutheran Church, which he serves as 
treasurer. 

In October, 1902, John August Jones married, in 
Jamestown, Hannah C. Eckman, daughter of N. P. 
Eckman, who resides in that city. Of this union four 
children have been born : Helen, Ralph, Robert, Marie. 
All but the \-oungest are now attending school, Mr. Jones 
being very desirous that his children shall have every 
advant.ige in life. 



CLYDE HENRY SCHUYLER, D. D. S.— In the 

short space of a year Jamestown has become thoroughly 
familiar with the fact that this is the name of a very 
skillful and progressive member of the dental profession. 
His fellow-citizens have learned to place great confi- 
dence in Dr. Schuyler and to think no less highly of him 
as a citizen than in his professional capacity. 

Clyde Henry Schuyler was born Feb. 4, 1802, at 
Frewsburg, N. Y., and is a son of Henry C. and Leplia 
(Moore) Schuyler, the former a farmer of that place, 
where he is still living. Mrs. Schuyler passed away in 
March, tgoo. The earliest education of Clyde Henry 
Schuyler was received in the public schools of the town 
of Carroll, whence he passed to the Frewsburg High 
School, graduating in igi2. For a year or two after, 
he taught in the district schools of Carroll township in 
order to earn the money wherewith to complete his 
course of study. He then entered the University of 
Pittsburgh for the purpose of studying dentistry, gradu- 
ating in 1916 with the degree of Doctor of Dental Sur- 
gery. 

On Sept. 19, 1017, Dr. Schuyler enlisted in the Dental 
Corps with the rank of first lieutenant, and was ordered 
to Camp Sevier. S. C, taking charge of Dental Infirmary 
No. I, for seven months. He had under his command 
twenty-nine commissioned officers, having charge in all 
of fifty-four commissioned and enlisted men. On Feb. 
II, 1910, he received an honorable discharge after which 
he returned to Jamestown and opened his own office. 
Already he has received gratifying proof of the wisdom 



4^4 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



o: his selection of a field of labor. If the tirst year of 
practice may be accepted as an augury of the future, Dr. 
Schuyler's career must unquestionably be one of success- 
ful achievement. Politically Dr. Schuyler is a Republi- 
can and a staunch one. but the demands of his profes- 
sion leave him little time for participation in public 
affairs. He belongs to the Psi Omega Dental fraternity. 



WELCOME FRANKLIN ROSS, a Civil War 
ve;eran of worihy military record, was one of the oldest 
residents oi the Conewango \'allcy, Chautauqua county, 
X. V. He was a hotel proprietor in that place from 
1S71 until his death, a record of forty-nine years of 
steady public service, in which he gained the respect of 
the majority of the residents of the district. He was 
popular and respected, honored because of his patriotic 
service, popular because of his whole-hearted manner, 
and respected because of his steady life. His calling 
was more than that of a keeper of an old-fashioned 
country hostelry where housing for horse and man 
could be had, and in his public service he was generally 
respected. .\nd wlicn bereavement came to him in the 
death of his adopted bon, Robert H.. who succumbed to 
the rigors of military campaigning a few weeks after 
the signing of the armistice, in 1918, he had evidence ui 
the respect in which he was held in the neighborhood 
by the extent to which the residents gathered around 
him at that time. 

Welcome Franklin R'-,>s was born in the town of New 
.\lbion. Cattaraugus county, N. Y., April 13, 1843, the 
son of Joseph F. and Lydia (Lewis) Ross, was educated 
in tlie public school of his native place. The Ros.; 
family is of Scottish antecedents, although for four gen- 
erations they have been resident in America. The .Amer- 
ican progenitor of the branch of the Ross family to 
which Welcome K. Ross belonged was William Joseph 
Ross, who came from Scotland. His son, Joseph F. 
Ross, father of Welcome F. Ross, was a farmer in 
Cattaraugus county, X. V. 

When the great call came to .Vmerican manhood, 
when the North and South sought to settle their differ- 
ences of opinion by armed conflict. Welcome F. Ross 
was still in his teens, notwithstanding which, h.- enlisted, 
ip i86j, as a private in Company R. 154th Regiment of 
New York \'oluntecrs, and he passed Ihroucrh all the 
t'lghtin? in which that regiment was engaged until the 
d.-it'- of his discharge. June 23. 1863. His honorable 
service during the time of national emergency brought 
him e'>r,t\ return in self satisfaction and in respect by 
others, and he had an honored place in the later 
patriotic organization, the Grand .\rmv of (he Krpiiblii-, 
in the ranks of which association of veterans he rose 
to the grade of captriin. His record in Masonry was a 
worthy one, for he afTiliated with th;il frntcrnal order 
'.'•r more than forty years. 

On Jan. i. r865, Mr. Ross was married to Julia A. 
f.ardn'-r. who was l>'>rn in l><4.=;. She came of two old 
f'attara'igu* county families, being the daughter of 
fJaniel and Laura fCrossfield) Cardnrr, both fjf whom 
KfTi- born in Cattaraugus county. Mrs. Julia A. fCard- 
n'T I U'^w livd to c-lebrate her golden wedding, her 
df-ath not ornirring until !'/!<'>. Th<- dr;ilh of Welcome 
F. F<o%» orrtirred N'fiv. 7, 1020. interment in the Coni-- 
wango Cemetery, .Mr. and Mrs. Ross were the parents 



of four children : Jessie E., Maud J., Elva G., and Helen 
B. Their family also included an adopted son, Robert 
H.. who went into the national military service, May 26, 
igiS, during the war with Germany. He was sent to 
C.imp Di.x, N. J., for training, and in all probability 
would have gone to France during the winter of 1918 
had the war lasted so long. But the signing of the 
Armistice, Nov. 11, 1918, rendered the sending of further 
troops overseas unnecessary, and quick demobilization 
of troops in home camps was commenced. Many of 
the camps near the seaboard were overcrowded, because 
of returning troops and of troops sent temporarily to 
the camps for demobilization. Camp Di.x, at which 
Robert 11. Ross was stationed, was one such, and al- 
though his dealh did not occur wdiile in the service, it 
is thought that it was caused through the rigors of camp 
life during the last month or so of his military service. 
He was honorably discharged, Nov. 28, 1918, reached 
home four days later, and died Dec. 16, 1918, his demise 
being the occasion of the manifestation of general and 
sincere sympathy for Mr. Ross in his sad bereavement. 
Still a life ending in national service in a cause so great 
as was that of .\merica in the late war was not lived in 
vnin. 



PAUL B. WIQUIST— Among the most successful 
111" the younger merchants and business men of James- 
town, N. v., should be mentioned Paul B. Wiquist, 
whose success in recent years in building up a large and 
remunerative milk business there has given him a repu- 
tation for enterprise and intelligence throughout the 
community. _Mr. Wiquist is one of the many figures 
of Swedish parentage whose activities are contributing 
tn the material welfare of Jamestown, and is a son of 
Otto and Alma (Nelson) Wiquisi, both of whom were 
born in Sweden. They came to the United States when 
young and settled at Jamestown, where the iomier en- 
gaged in business as a general clothing merchant and 
was highly successful. They were the parents of ten 
children, as follows : Paul B., with whom we are here 
especially concerned; David Earle, who was drafted into 
the United States army during the late World War, 
was sent to France, and saw much active service, being 
in (he firing line until he received a severe wound in his 
arm from which his death occurred July 21, 1919; Cecile, 
wlio served in France as a worker for the Red Cross 
Society for six months during the late war; I'lavia, 
Moyd, Hilda, Edward, Margaret, Dorothy, Marion. 

Paul n. Wiquist was born March 24, 1886, at James- 
town, and attended the public schools of that city. He 
graduated from the local high school, and in IQ04 began 
his active business career. He has been successful from 
the outset in his enterprise as a dealer in milk and now 
supplies a very large mimber of people in this region, 
where his integrity and liberality have gained him the 
esteem of all. His products are quite generally regarded 
as being the best of their kind that can be procured. 
Mr. Wiquist is a prominent figure in social circles at 
Jamestown, and has always taken a keen interest in the 
welfare of the community where he dwells. He is a 
mi-Mibcr of the local Grange, and attends the Swedish 
Mission Church, of which he is a most liberal and 
highly valued member. 

F'aul P.. VN'iquist was imitefl in marriage, June 28, 



0l!t^ 




■t/ ^/T 



^^ 



^--yiy ^ V, nv ^A^^ry-^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



425 



1905, at Jamestown, with Freida Winkler, a native of 
Buffalo, born Feb. 14, 1863, a daughter of August G. 
Winkler, a native of Germany, and for many years a 
cabinetmaker at Buffalo, and of Louise (Thomas) 
Winkler, his wife. Mr. and Mrs. Wiquist are the parents 
of two children, as follows : Howard Paul, born Dec. 
29. KJ06, and Gladys Louise, born Feb. 9, 1908. 



SVEN EDWARD NELSON, one of the associates 
in the automobile firm of Nelson & Nelson at No. 15 
Harrison street, Jamestown, is regarded as one of the 
rising young business men of this city. This firm makes 
a specialty' of acetylene welding, blacksmithing and gen- 
eral automobile construction work. He is a son of Nels 
.■\ and Helene (Nelson) Nelson, the former a farmer 
ir. Sv/eden, where he enjoyed considerable prosperity. 

Sven Edward Nelson was born in his native land, 
Dec. 4, 1880, and by the time he reached the age of 
twenty years he had definitely made up his mind, and 
accordingly, in the year 1901, set sail for this country 
and soon after landed at the port of New York. He 
spent several years in Wilcox. Pa., working at the trade 
of blacksmithing, and in 1908 came to Jamestown, N. 
v., where there was already a large settlement of his 
fellow countrymen, and here he began his business 
career as a blacksmith. He continued to follow this line 
for some time, but later took up the repairing of auto- 
mobiles and soon developed a large and lucrative busi- 
ness. He is now associated with Nels Berger Nelson 
under the firm name of Nelson & Nelson, and owns a 
large and well equipped automobile repair shop at No. 
15 Harrison street, where they transact a good sized 
business. In politics he is a Republican, and in religious 
belief a member of the Swedish Zion Church at James- 
town. 

Sven Edward Nelson was united in marriage, Oct. 14, 
1910, at Wilcox, Pa., with Elin E. Berge, bom in 
Sweden, May i, 1884, a daughter of Albin and Josephine 
Berge. Mr. and Mrs. Nelson are the parents of the 
following children: Elizabeth D., born Nov. 21, 191 1; 
Lawrence Edward, born Feb. 11, 1913; Helen Josephine, 
bom March 7, 1917; Robert Warren, born Nov. 5, 1919. 



PAUL STERRETT PERSONS, M. D., graduate 
of the University of Buffalo, medical department, began 
the general practice of medicine and surgery in his home 
town. Ripley. Chautauqua county, N. Y., in July, 1917, 
after having pursued a post-graduate course in the 
science and practice of surgery in the Massachusetts 
General Hospital, and an interneship for the same pur- 
pose in the Buffalo General Hospital. It is his intention 
eventually to confine himself wholly to surgical practice, 
to which branch of medical science he seems to be well 
adapted. He is an enthusiastic young professional man, 
of good family, and good college record, and he is in- 
defatigable, careful and skillful in practice, so that in 
all probability he will succeed, giving good service to 
the community in which he has established himself. 

Paul Sterrett Persons was born in Moorheadville, 
Pa., May 21, 1891, the son of Charles Dietly and ISlary 
M. (Sterrett) Persons, the former now deceased, a 
miller by trade, and the latter, who still lives in Ripley, 
of an old Lancaster, Pa., Colonial family. Charles 
Dietly Persons removed his family from Moorheadville, 



to Ripley township, Chautauqua county, N. Y., when 
his son, Paul Sterrett, was only five years of age, and 
that township has since been the home of the family. 
Paul S. obtained his elementary education in the Union 
District School, later attending the Ripley High School, 
and Westfield High School, from which he graduated 
in 1911. 

He had decided to enter the medical profession, and 
without delay became an undergraduate in the medical 
college of the University of Buffalo. In due course, 
in 1916, he was graduated therefrom with the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine. For the purpose of special surgi- 
cal research, he served an interneship in the Massa- 
chusetts General Hospital before his graduation, and 
for one year thereafter was an interne in the Buffalo 
General Hospital, there also specializing in surgical 
practice. And in the wide clinical opportunities of 
those two large hospitals, he must have obtained more 
than a general understanding of that branch of medical 
science in which he hopes at some future time to special- 
ize exclusively. Meanwhile, he is well regarded in Rip- 
ley and is developing a satisfactory practice. 

The Persons family is of Presbyterian affiliation, and 
in politics Dr. Persons is a Republican, though he takes 
no active part in political affairs. He is a Mason, belong- 
ing to Westfield Lodge, No. 219, and Westfield Chapter, 
No. 239; and his college fraternities are the Nu Sigma 
Nu and the Theta Nu Epsilon. Professionally, he is a 
member of the American Medical Society, the New 
York State Medical .Association, and the Chautauqua 
County Medical -Association. 

On Oct. II, 1917, Dr. Persons married Elizabeth T. 
Mosser, then resident at Sligo, Pa., but formerly of 
N. Y. Mrs. Persons is a trained nurse, and since their 
marriage she has given her professional ser\'ices to 
her husband. 



GEORGE ARTEMAS ROSS was born at Clymer, 
N. Y., Feb. 18, 1883. His parents were Dr. Artemas 
Ross, and Eva Evangeline (Bush) Ross. Dr. Ross, 
Vv'ho was a physician of good standing in Chautauqua 
county, was a graduate of the University of Pennsyl- 
vania, who after receiving his degree practiced one year 
at Corry, Pa., going from that village to Clymer, where 
he continued to practice for thirty years. He was a son 
of George and Barbara Ross, who were among the 
county's early settlers. On his mother's side, George 
A. Ross is descended from an historic and nationally 
prominent family, the Greeley family, one member of 
which was Horace Greeley, an earnest advocate of the 
abolition of slavery. United States Congressman from 
1848 to 1S..19, and presidential candidate on the Liberal 
Republican and Democratic ticket. Mr. Greeley was 
perhaps best known as founder of the New York "Tri- 
bune." The grandfather of George A. Ross was 
William O. Bush, and his grandmother, Margaret 
(Greeley) Bush, was a sister of Horace Greeley. In 
the immediate family of Mr. Ross are two sisters, Mrs. 
Freda Cornell, a Fredonia State Normal graduate, and 
Miss Margaret Ross, a graduate of .■\llegheny College, 
who is now instructor in English at Ticonderoga, N. Y. 

George A. Ross received his education at Clymer 
High School, Alfred Academy, Alfred University, and 
-Allegheny College. He spent five years in teaching; 
one year at Findley Lake, one year at Clymer, and 



4^ 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



three years as principal of Chautauqua High School. 
He was tor six years traveling salesman for the Stran- 
burt: Music House of Jamestown. Upon the expiration 
of the term of Mr. Frank M. Potter, then postmaster at 
Chautauqua. Mr. Ross, who is a Democrat, became a 
candidate for the position. He received the loyal sup- 
port of Chautauqua Institution officials, all of the 
count>"s prominent Democrats, and was on Dec. 17, 
I'jij. appointe,! by Prosident \\'o.-'drow Wilson to the 
position of postmaster which he now holds. Mr. Ross 
is a Free Mason, a member of Peacock Lodge No. 
t<36. of May\ille. 

George .A. Ross was united in marriage to Mary Pearl 
Ferguson, of Erie. Pa.. June 20. 11x14. 



HENRY S. HOLMES, one of the successful man- 
ufacturers of Jamestown. N. Y., is a native of James- 
town, bom Dec. jS. iSSS, a son of ^L C. and Margaret 
(Ronne> Holmes, the former named the founder of 
the business which is now operated by his son. The 
elder Mr. Holmes died in the year 19:5, survived by his 
wife, who makes her home at Jamestown. 

Henry S. Holmes attended the local public schools as 
a lad. and attended for a time the Jamestown High 
School. He did not graduate from that institution, how- 
ever, but matriculated at Ridgeley College, Ontario. 
Canada, where he took the usual academic course. 
Being ambitious, however, to begin business, he aban- 
doned his studies before completing them and entered 
the Jamestown Business College, where he took a com- 
mercial course. L'pon the completion of this, Mr. Holmes 
was employed in his father's establishment and there 
learned the business of manufacturing tents and awn- 
ings. This business had been established by his father 
in i8^>S, and the young man continued to work as an 
assistant until the death of his father In 1915. He then 
took over the business for himself, and during the in- 
tervening years it has developed to very large propor- 
tions under the capable management of Mr. Holmes. 
A', the time of its founding, Mr. Holmes, Sr., did al! 
the work of the establishment unaided, but at the 
present time Cioso) the plant is a very large one with 
eleven thousand square feet of floor space, gives einploy- 
ment to fifteen hands, and has a market for its goods 
throughout New York, Pennsylvania and Ohio, where 
Mr. Holmes. Jr. has established agencies. He is regarded 
at the present time as one of the most successful ;uin 
■iiibstantial business men of the community, and occupies 
a high place in the esteem of his fellow business men. 
In addition to his business activities, Mr. Holmes is 
prominent in the general life of the community, and is a 
memfyr of a numt)cr of organizations inclurling the 
P,»^rvolcnt and Protective Order of F.Iks, the National 
T'-nt and A'.vnir.e .Manufacturers' .'Xs'-oriation, and the 
.N'f-.v York Statf Tent and .Awning Manufacturers' .Xrso- 
riati' n. of which he is a director. In politics, Mr. 
Holm'-s is a Drmrxrrat, but docs not take an active part 
in the political activities of the community, his time and 
etiergi<-< being entirely r^cupicd in caring for his 'jwn 
Iar?e tii-Mne?<; interests. 

Henry S. Holmes was tmiled in in.irriatre. .April 20. 
i'/i4. at Chirago, III., with .Annie Ridill, daup^htir r,f 
Frank U. and Susie fWhitelsev) Ridell. old and highly 
respected residents of Oak Park, III. 



LYMAN P. HAPGOOD— As superintendent of 
light and water, Mr. Hapgood requires no introduction 
to his fellow-citizens of Jamestown. In the years dur- 
ing which he has held this verj' responsible otTice he 
has so devoted himself to the advancement of these 
two extremely important interests of his community, 
more especially the latter, as to merit and receive the 
gratitucle of the many who have reaped the benefit of his 
strenuous fidelity. 

Herbert L. Hapgood, father of Lyman P. Hapgood, 
is of Athol, Mass., where he was formerly engaged in 
the manufacture of match splints for old style matches. 
He married M. Josephine Proctor, and they are the 
parents of two sons: Lyman P., mentioned below; and 
Frederick H., graduate of Worcester Polytechnic Insti- 
tute, and now employed as civil engineer by the firm of 
Hazen & Fuller, New York City; he was master engi- 
neer in the Engineers' Corps, Water Division, at Camp 
Dix ; France, during the World War. 

Lyman P. Hapgood", son of Herbert L. and M. Jose- 
phine (Proctor) Hapgood. was born June 18, 1876, at 
.Athol. Mass. He received his education in the public 
schools of his native town. For three years he studied 
civil engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology at Boston, and in l8og entered upon the practice 
of his profession as clerk in the Water Company of 
Beyer & Beyer, of Athol, Mass. His choice of a pro- 
fession dated from boyhood, when in his summer vaca- 
tions he had worked with engineers who were employed 
in his home town. This had given him an interest in the 
work and eventually led him to make the profession his 
own. In 1000 Mr. Hapgood was made superintendent, 
and in TC)o6 the plant was sold to the town. He went to 
Springfield. Mo., for the same firm and served as super- 
intendent of their plant in that place until lOio. In that 
year he came to Jamestown, N. Y., as assistant super- 
intendent, and in 1911 was made superintendent. In 
political principle and practice. Mr. Hapgood is a Repub- 
lican. He is a member of the American Water Works 
.Association, and the New England Water Works Ass'^- 
ciation. In fraternal life he is affiliated with various 
Masonic bodies, member of the Blue Lodge, Chapter 
and Commandery of .Athol, Council of Jamestown, and 
the Shrine of Buffalo, also belonging to the Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology .Alumni .Association. He 
was reared in the Unitarian faith. 

Mr. Hapgood married, May 7, T907, at St. Louis, Mo.. 
F.mma C. Rarrcit, daughter of P. J. Barrett, of Adams, 
Mass. 

The promotion and improvement of the water supply 
system has been Mr. Hapgood's life work. His admin- 
istration of his office entitles him to be regarded as a 
public benefactor, and in Jamestown he is held in high 
esteem by his fellowmen. 



FRANK JOHN THIES, who has been prominent 
for- some years in business circles at Fredonia, Chau- 
tauqua county, N. Y., where he is the owner of the J. 
C. Thies 8i Son Greenhouses and the Cherry Park 
Gardens, is a native of this comity, his birth having 
ocrurrefl on a farm at Arkwright, .Sept. 9, 1870. Mr. 
Thies is a son of John C. and Miunie n)'it)'irh) Thiis, 
the former the foinider of the firm of florists of which 
his son is now the head. The elder Mr. Thies died in 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



427 



1919, but his wife survives him and continues to make 
her home in Frcdonia. 

Frank- John Thies was little more than an infant 
when his parents removed from Chautauqua county to 
the West, and located on a farm in Nebraska, where the 
lad attended the local district schools and was brought 
up in the healthy environment of the western plains. 
His parents remained in Nebraska for about seven years 
and then returned to New York State, making their 
home for a time at Laona. Chautauqua county, where 
yrung Mr. Thies completed his general education at the 
public schools. He then attended the Fredonia Normal 
School. About this time, in the year 1889, Cherry Park 
Gardens was established by his father on property which 
had been badly run down through neglect of its former 
owners and was indeed not entirely cleared of its 
original growth of timber. There was no improve- 
ments on the land at the time but the elder Mr. Thies, 
assisted by his son, soon brought the land under culti- 
vation and began there the fruit and flower culture 
which has since been carried to so high a point of devel- 
opment. A tract consisting of a little more than fifteen 
acres was originally devoted to this purpose, but the 
present Mr. Thies has found it more profitable to cut 
the acreage to precisely fifteen acres and concentrate 
his efforts in bringing them to a high state of cultivation. 
Great improvements have also been made on this place 
and a fine mansion has been built, together with offices 
and a number of large greenhouses. There are four of 
these latter, No. i measuring 150 x 25 feet. No. 2, 150 
X 28 feet. No. 3, 150 x 22 feet, and No. 4. 150 x 20 feet. 
In addition to the delicate plants cultivated under glass, 
there are also grown outdoors a great number of flower- 
ing and fruit-bearing shrubs, and a largo business is 
done in this line. First class shipping and packing 
rooms have been established and the 20,000 square feet 
which are contained under glass are equipped with 
modern furnaces and power rooms for the most ade- 
quate carrying on of the large industry. In addition 
to Cherry Park Gardens, Mr. Thies, who has succeeded 
his father as sole proprietor of the business since the 
latter's death, has a splendid fruit and vegetable farm 
of twenty acres in the township of Fredonia, which he 
also keeps in the highest state of cuhivation. He all 
together employs as many as seventeen hands during the 
busy season, and grows about every known fruit, vege- 
table and flower on his various properties, although he 
specializes in carnations geraniums and tomato plants, 
shipping these and his other products to every part of 
the State. Mr. Thies is well known in the general life of 
the community, and is a member of a number of im- 
portant organizations here, including the South Shore 
Grower & Shipper Association and the Florists' Club. 
He is a Republican in politics and attends the Methodist 
Episcopal church. 

Frank John Thies was united in marriage. June 21, 
1907, with Gertrude Neff, of Frewsburg, N. Y., a 
daughter of Ed. and Eliza (Bouquin) Neff, old and 
highly respected residents of the town of Pomfret. Mr. 
and Mrs. Thies are the parents of two children : Laura, 
aged ten, and John, aged two. 



HARVEY W. PARKER, one of the leading farm- 
ers of the Mayville section of Chautauqua county. N. 
Y., is representative of the worthiest agricultural effort 



in Chautauqua county ; he has risen to success from the 
humblest of beginnings only by the most resolute appli- 
cation to hard tasks. When he took the first portion of 
his present valuable farming property, it had no improve- 
ments and was covered with heavy second growth tim- 
ber, which, little by little, with scarcely any help, and 
only by dint of the hardest kind of work, often under 
most discouraging conditions, he and his wife gradually 
cleared. It was work such as the pioneers did, such as 
his own father did when he first came into the county 
in 1818. At that time the land upon which Harvey W. 
was eventually born was practically all virgin forest — 
wilderness — and it was that worthy pioneer spirit which 
enabled William Parker to keep doggedly on, at tasks 
which seemed almost impossible of accomplishment, 
until such time as he could realize that he owned a 
cleared acreage of good agricultural yield, .^nd an 
effort similar to his was that of his son, Harvey W., 
sixty years later, although perhaps the circumstances 
of the son were even more discouraging, for when 
Harvey W. Parker started to develop his first holding 
it was under an incubus of debt ; he had to incur heavy 
liabilities in making his first purchase, and his present 
rich farm and fine buildings, plus that wealth which is 
without price — a worthy family of seven children — rep- 
resent the sum total of the life effort of two worthy 
Chautauqua county people — Harvey W. Parker and his 
wife, Anna (Stebbins) Parker, who was his stay, his 
comfort, his encouragement, and also his co-worker, 
through all the hard times and trials of their early years 
upon the farm. 

Harvey W. Parker was born Oct. 17, 1855, on the 
farm which adjoins his present property, near Mayville, 
Chautauqua county, N. Y. His parents, William and 
Sarah (Davis) Parker, are both now deceased, but dur- 
ing their lives were much respected by the people of 
the neighborhood. 

Harvey W. Parker, in his early years, attended the 
district school to some extent, but very early in life he 
was doing sundry light tasks upon his father's farm, 
and as he grew in strength and stature, so his agri- 
cultural duties grew in responsibility and in the physi- 
cal effort necessary. He conscientiously and ably assisted 
his father in the development of the family property 
until he was twenty-three years old, by which time he 
had become a good farmer, conversant with most of 
the operations of a general farm, and possessed of a 
strength and spirit such as to give him confidence that 
he himself could accomplish the hard task of winning a 
piece of land from the wild state. For a while he rent- 
ed a farm nearby, but eventually purchased the first 
forty acres of his present holding, going deeply into debt 
to buy it. His early trials have already been referred 
to, and not many of the farmers of this generation 
would enter upon such tasks, .^.s opportunity came, 
he added to his acreage, until now he has a compact 
estate of 122 acres of good land, properly improved. 
His residence is an imposing one, commodious and sub- 
stantial, which was necessary, for he and his wife raised 
a large family. ."Xnd all the farm buildings are 
spacious and substantial. Every building on the place 
was built by Mr. Parker, as was also every fence, and 
the property is well fenced. .-Xbout fifty-five acres are 
in cultivation, and the remainder is rich pasture and 
woodland, and upon one piece of property more re- 



42S 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



ccntly acquired is some virgin timber. Altogether the 
farm is a well-lxilanced one, adapted well to the purpose 
to which Mr. Parker has put it, dair\- and general farm- 
ing. 

Mr. Parker is a member of the local Grange, and in 
political allegiance is a Republican. He has been school 
trustee, and he has been urged upon many occasions to 
stand for public offico. but he has consistently refused, 
feeling that he could not spare the time from the re- 
quirements of his own farm management. But he would 
have probably succeeded, had he stood for public office, 
for he is a man who is much esteemed in the neighbor- 
hood. 

On Dec. l6, 1S79. Harvey W. Parker married Anna 
Stebbins. who lived on a nearby farm, and was of an 
old Chautauqua county family. She was liis constant 
helpmate in all things until her death, which occurred 
in IQ03. and they were the parents of eight children, 
seven of whom they reared. Tlie deceased child, Francis 
Leon, died in infancy. The seven surviving children, 
in the order of their birth, are: i. Fred, who was edu- 
cated in the district schools of Chautauqua township, 
and now has a farm of his own near Brocton, N. Y. 

2. Grace, who attended the same schools as did her elder 
brother, and also took the course of the training school 
at Westtield, X. Y., eventually becoming a school teacher. 

3. Grant, also educated in the district schools of Cliau- 
tauQua township, and now a farmer. 4. Bert, similarly 
educated, and also a farmer. 5. Edna, who attended 
the district school and is now at home. 6. George, also 
at home. 7. Ruth, also at home. All the children at- 
tended high school at Mayville after attending the coun- 
trj- school. 

The value of Chautauqua county. N. Y., from an 
agricultural standpoint, has been developed by such note- 
worthy efforts as those of Harvey W. Parker and his 
father. William Parker. And Harvey W. Parker has 
given four stalwart sons to continue the development, 
and all are in agriculture. 



WESLEY G. BRONSON, who since 1912 has been 
the r.wiicr r,i the cxtc-nsive farm in Ripley township, 
Chautauqua county, X. Y., upon which his parents 
settled in 1835. They, Alvin and Maria (Hamm) Bron- 
son, may t)c considered to have been among the pioneer 
soulers. for their farm in i<S35 was practically in its 
wild state, unimproved. 

It was upon this same farm that Wesley G. P.roiisiin 
was lorn. Sept. 27. i860, and he has lived in the dis- 
trict practically all his life. For six years lie worked 
at farming occupations in Sherman township, and for 
four years was similarly employed in Mina township 
of Chautauqua county, but the remainder of his life 
has l)OC-n passed in Ripley township, and mostly in culti- 
vating the farm upon which he was born. He was edu- 
cated in the district school of Ripley township, and 
afterwards took resolutely to farming operations upon 
the parental farm. In 1912, the ownership passed to 
him. he having purchased the share of the other heirs, 
and he ha.s since undertaken considerable improvements 
upon the place. F.very improvement, of course, was 
put there either by his father or by himself, but during 
the last sev'-n years he has made rapid progress. The 
150 acre?, which is the extent of the property, is now 



a valuable holding, and during the years since he be- 
came sole owner of it he has rebuilt bam and house, 
has built a large silo, and has laid out a large grape 
vineyard. Upon the farm he maintains twenty cattle, 
and has some tine horses. He is progressive, energetic 
and skillful in his farming, and his average yearly out- 
going in wages for farm help is $300. 

In national politics Mr. Bronson has not taken much 
part; he is an Independent in national politics, and is 
independent in most of his relations to political ques- 
tions ; he is a man who thinks for himself, and some 
matters of national policies have been the subject of 
deep thought ))y him. In local administration, however, 
be has always been very much interested, and has con- 
sented to participate, to some extent, in the work of local 
administration ; he has held the oflice of school trustee, 
and in many other ways has cooperated in community 
affairs. Religiously he is a Methodist, member of the 
local Methodist Episcopal church and a substantial 
supporter thereof. During the recent war Mr. Bronson 
proved himself to be wholly patriotic, contributing sub- 
stantially to the national loans, and to the other funds 
raised by various agencies of the government for the 
purposes of the nation in the war. 

On Aug. 23, 1888, Mr. Bronson married Lida Thorp, 
of Jamestown. She is a woman of marked intelligence 
and refuied bearing, and it is of interest to note that in 
her schooldays some of her playmates were boys who 
later took prominent part in the affairs of Chautauqua 
county, and of Jamestown, and some of them are the 
historians on the editorial board of this historical work 
of Chautauqua county. To Wesley G. and Lida (Thorp) 
Bronson have been born seven children, as follows: I. 
Hazel, born July 16, 1880; was educated in the district 
school of Ripley township ; married R. L. Waite, to 
whom she has born one child, Nelson. 2. Walter E. ; 
born June 2, 1892; enlisted, Nov. 22, 1917, at Westfield, 
N. Y., serving in first enlistment period at date of dis- 
charge ; appointed corporal, Feb. 13, 1918, in the Amer- 
ican Expeditionary Forces ; worked at construction 
work at Camp Dix, N. J., Camp Kelley, Tex., Camp 
Sevcir, S. C, and in England, reaching England, Aug. 23, 
1018, serving until the close of the war; his discharge 
paper says : "Character excellent, service honest and 
faithful;" he returned to the United States, Dec. II, 
1918; married Alma Perdue. 3. Florence, born Feb. 8, 
1894; educated in the district school of Ripley township, 
and later a graduate of a business college; she is now 
in commercial life, having a satisfactory position in Erie, 
Pa. 4. Lillie, born Feb. 15, 1896; educated at the district 
school. ;uk1 now at home. 5. Harvey, born April 13, 
1897; erlncated similarly, and now at home assisting his 
father in the management of the farm. 6 Bcrnice, born 
.Aug. ]Ci. i8r;o; similarly educated, and now at home. 7. 
,Mvin, born July 9, KX)5 ; still at school. 

Mr. ;ind Mrs. Bronson have a worllty family, and 
have .'I large numlier of sincere friends in the neighbor- 
hood. They are very hospitable, and live the wholesome, 
happy and comfortable life that comes by upright 
.-ictions. honest toil, and conscientious dealings. 



JOSEPH BREADS, well-to-do farmer, and repre- 
sentative of the rcsiKinsible agriculturists of Chautau- 
qua county, N. Y., has lived in the county since 1862, 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



429 



and upon the farm he now owns, near Volusia, since 
1S68. He comes of a pioneer family of Chautauqua 
county, for when his father and his brothers came to 
that section of the county in 1862 it was mainly uncul- 
tivated land, and there is only one farmer now living 
in the neigborhood of Volusia who was there when the 
Breads brothers settled in the vicinity. 

Joseph Breads was born on the family homestead in 
Oneida county, N. Y., Aug. 19, 1845, the son of William 
and Sarah (Sims) Breads. His father had a farming 
property in Oneida county and there the family lived 
until Joseph was fifteen years old, and in the district 
schools of the neighborhood Joseph received his educa- 
tion. About 1862, his father. William Breads, and his 
brothers, Benjamin and Isaac, who were also farmers 
in Oneida county, decided to remove with their families 
to Chautauqua county. William Breads settled on a 
large farm of 300 acres near the one now owned by his 
son, Joseph, and Benjamin and Isaac settled near him. 
In the spring of 1868, Joseph Breads, son of William 
Breads, came to the farm he now lives on with his 
father, and in 1870 bought 80 acres. Joseph Breads is a 
skilled agriculturist, and has developed the land until 
it is now a valuable property, the fifty-two years of his 
cultivation of it having brought him substantial return, 
both in material possessions and in the respect of his 
neighbors. He has a twin brother who also has lived 
in Chautauqua county most of his life, and has con- 
ducted a general repair shop. And he has one sister, 
Charlotte, who married and went to Australia, but he 
has not heard from her for twenty years. 

The Breads family are earnest Methodists, Joseph 
Breads and his wife, Mary (Gossett) Breads, being 
members of the Volusia Methodist Episcopal Church, 
and good supporters thereof. Mr. Breads is a Repub- 
lican in national politics, but has never held what 
might strictly be called political office. He has always 
been interested in the affairs of his own district, and 
the neighboring community of Volusia, and has at 
different times taken active part in its affairs ; he was 
trustee of Public School No. 11, for some years; and 
in the functioning of the Lombard Grange he has been 
prominent; in fraternal and benevolent society move- 
ments he has been interested, being a member of the 
Westfield Blue Lodge of Masons and the Sherman, N. 
Y., Encatnpment of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. 

During the World War. he worthily did his part, both 
in contributing substantially to the various patriotic 
funds, and in the closer application to the matters of 
production upon his farm, which increased production 
of foodstuffs by American farmers had such an import- 
ant bearing upon the final victory which came. It is 
now a matter of history, and generally recognized, that 
the war was not won only in France. Those who labored 
in the home countries had almost as appreciable a part 
as had the armies in the field ; certainly the question of 
foodstuffs was at one time of such vital urgency that 
but for the increased eft'ort of the patriotic and hard- 
working American farmer the outlook for the cause of 
America and her allies would have been desperate. 
Therefore, to the individual American farmer, who 
had his share in the effort, is due a recording of that 
share. 



Joseph Breads was married, April ig, 1871, to Mary 
Gossett, of Sherman, N. Y., and they are now drawing 
near to the golden anniversary of their wedding. Both 
are highly esteemed in the neighborhood in which they 
have lived for so many years. They have one child. 
Flora. She received a good education, attending the dis- 
trict school for the elementary grades, and then going 
to Westfield to attend the high school at that place. 
She eventually graduated, and some years later married 
Henry Witt," a man of responsible position in industrial 
life, being foreman in the tinners' department at the 
American Locomotive Works at Dunkirk, N. Y. One 
child, a daughter, Juva May, has been born to them. 

Joseph Breads has lived an upright, industrious and 
productive life, in which steadiness of purpose and in- 
tegrity, both material and moral, have been marked 
characteristics, and he has a definite place in the histori- 
cal record of that section of Chautauqua county. 



JOHN A. KLING— Mayville, N. Y., and Chautau- 
qua county in general, seem to be regions where a 
number of men of Swedish birth have elected to make 
their homes. They have, upon coming to this country 
from Sweden, established themselves here, and many 
of them have successfully engaged in enterprises which 
have not only benefited themselves, but the community- 
at-large as well. John A. Kling, of this sketch, may be 
mentioned as one of the successful men of foreign 
birth to have settled here and a man whose integrity 
and square business dealings have won for him a dis- 
tinguished place in the esteem and regard of his fellow- 
men. 

John A. Kling was born in Sweden, July 31, 1868, 
and is a son of .A.ndrew Peter and Marie Kling. The 
elder Mr. Kling was a contractor and builder of high 
standing. John A. Kling received his education in the 
schools of his native land, and in 1885, at the age of 
seventeen, came to America. Upon arriving here, he 
worked as a cabinetmaker, obtaining a position in the 
establishment of Breed & Johnson, in Jamestown. He 
did considerable work in the large factories hereabouts, 
gaining a considerable amount of experience. He 
accepted a position in the employ of Cliarles Norquist. 
where he remained for two seasons. Here his work 
consisted of making roll top desks. He later accepted 
a position as foreman of the cabinet department of 
John Benson & Son. proprietors of the Chautauqua 
Desk Company, with wdiom he remained two years, and 
then went with the Cadwell Cabinet Company. In the 
latter establishment he was the superintendent, laying 
out the work and estimating the cost of production, two 
very important posts. He remained with these people for 
a period of seven years, during which time he learned 
a great deal and at the same time saved a considerable 
portion of his earnings, with a view to some day be- 
coming independent. About 1901 he became superin- 
tendent of the Randolph Furniture Company and re- 
mained with these people for about ten years. At the 
end of this time, having saved up enough money, he was 
enabled to realize his long cherished ambition, and 
began independently in business in a small way. organ- 
izing a stock company at Mayville, N. Y., under the style 
of the Chautauqua Cabinet Company, manufacturers 01 
bedroom furniture. The officers of the concern are as 



450 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



followj : John A. Kling. president and treasurer, Arvid 
J. Kling, vice-president, and Mrs. T. A. Kling secretary 
The concern was incorporated in April, ipii, with John 
A. Kling as president and treasurer, Edwin Hitchcock, 
vice-president, and Anton T. Anderson, secretary. These 
four gentlemen were also directors of the corporation. 
They obtained the building of the Chautauqua Spring 
Bed & Lounge Company, a three-story structure. 75 x 
00 feet, and installed all modern machinery. The concern 
new employs lifty to sixty hands, and they ship their 
product to all parts of the United States. During the 
recent World War the plant was turned into a war man- 
ufactory and made airplane parts, magazine containers, 
and hospital trays, with great success. In addition to 
tins enterprise, Mr. Kling is also actively interested in 
the Brocton Furniture Company, of Brocton, N. Y., 
taking the management in 191 5, and is also secretary. 

The Chautauqua Cabinet Company and the Brocton 
Furniture Company employ approximately 150 hands, 
with a combined output of over three-quarters of a 
million dollars. Mr. Kling has been a representative 
of the \"illage Board of Mayville for four years, and 
i; a prominent member of the Republican party in this 
region. 

John A. Kling was united in marriage, Oct. I, "1800, 
with Anna Augusta Anderson, a daughter of Andrew 
.Anderson, a resident of Jamestown. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Kling four children have been born, as follows : Arvid 
J. ; Edith Augusta, who is deceased ; Holger, deceased ; 
and Denold. 



THE ALLEN FAMILY— More than a century has 
elapsed since Elisha Allen, the first member of his 
family to leave his Xew England home, journeyed west- 
ward to Chautauqua county, N. Y. In all of the progress 
and development of the early time and down to the 
present. Aliens have figured in all important measures 
or movements, and been identified with the county 
through service in many fields. The paragraphs and 
pages following contain extracts from a history of the 
cent'.iry in Chautauqua county showing the lives and 
deeds of four generations of this branch of the Allen 
family. 

The Xew England progenitor. Captain Allen, of 
Princeton. Mass., while serving as sheriff there, was 
murdered by a prisoner he was guarding. His widow 
moved with her family to Wardsboro, Vt., and there 
Elisha .Mien, son of Captain .Mien, spent his youth and 
early manhood. 

Elisha .Allen was born in Princeton. Mass., in 17.%, 
and di'd in Jamestown. N. Y.. in 18.30. He married, 
in early manhood, Juliette Holbrook, born in !^tnr- 
bridge. Mass., in J-':/), her family later coming to Ch.'iu- 
tauqi:a county. Elisha .Mien first came to Chautauqua 
county in 1816, and in that year bought the properly 
on which stood the Jamestown Mouse and the Giflford 
House. He first came on a trading trip, and the same 
year returned to his Xew England home. In 1817 he 
cam" again with his wife and two sons. He was a man 
'.f forreful character and t'orid business ability, and 
v/isely he invested the capital brought by him from 
Vermont. For many years he k'-pt the .Mien House, 
and just south of Jamestown he owned a farm which 
later becam<! the property of his eldest son, Augustus 



Franklin .Allen. Elisha Allen, in addition to his hotel 
and his farm, was a merchant, and operated Durham 
boats on the lake and streams of Chautauqua. It was 
Elisha Allen who built and operated the famous "horse- 
boat" on Chautauqua Lake, described in this work, and 
he had large lumbering interests. He prospered, and 
when he passed away in 1830 he left a considerable 
fortune for that period and place. The children of 
Elisha and Juliette (Holbrook) Allen were: Augustus 
Franklin, of whom further; and Dascum, born in 1815; 
these two children were born in the East. Those born in 
Jamestown were: Adaline, born in 1817, died in 1851; 
Prudence Olivia, born in 1821, died in 1854; and Abner 
Holbrook, born in 1823, died in 1849. 

.Augustus Franklin Allen, son of Elisha and Juliette 
(Holbrook) Allen, was born in 1813 aiid died in James- 
town, N. Y., Jan. 20, 1875. He was seventeen years of 
age when the death of his father, Elisha Allen, left 
him, the eldest son, head of the family. He met his 
responsibilities in a wonderful manner, and within a 
year or two had with his brother Dascum formed a 
mercantile and lumbering firm, which operated in Chau- 
tauqua and Cattaraugus counties, N. Y., and Warren 
county. Pa., very successfully until 1846. In 1848, 
with Daniel Grandin, he formed the firm, Allen & 
Grandin, woolen manufacturers, which operated until 
1867, when it was succeeded by Allen, Preston & Com- 
pany. Augustus F. and Dascum Allen had also exten- 
sive real estate interests which continued mutual until 
1865, when the brothers separated. 

Colonel Allen was heartily in favor of bringing a 
railroad to Jamestown and as early as 1851 he partici- 
pated in the organization of the Erie & New York City 
Railroad, which originally extended from the Little 
Valley Creek to the Pennsylvania State line, and had 
a capital of $750,000. The town of Ellicott and various 
towns on the line of the road issued bonds, or in their 
corporate capacity took stock in the road, as did many 
private individuals. This company did considerable 
grading on the line of the road, but failed as an organ- 
ization, and was afterwards sold to the Atlantic & Great 
Western Railway. It was mainly owing to Augustus F. 
Allen's sagacity and good management that the greater 
part of all the investments made by the different towns on 
the line were saved to them in the transfer, and that the 
line of the Atlantic S: Great Western Railway was 
finally completed through Southern Chautauqua with 
very little cost to its citizens. Mr. Allen was for many 
years a director of the Atlantic & Great Western Rail- 
way, and of all the men who interested themselves in 
opening up this section of the country by proper rail- 
road facilities, none devoted so much time and energy 
to the project as Augustus F. Allen, who clearly recog- 
nized the necessity of betler traveling and freight 
accommodations to develop the interests of Southern 
Chantantpia. He gave much time to the public service, 
and for seventeen years represented the town of Ellicott 
on the Board of Supervisors. TS47-48, 1852, 1856, iSCiO 
to 1868, 1871 to 1874. 

During the war period, i8fji-65, be was chairman of 
the County War Cr>inmittee, and labored unceasingly 
for the welfare of the soldiers at the front and their 
families at home. In his early manhood, Augustus F. 
Allai had b'-en eonmn'ssioncd a colonel in the State 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



431 



militia, and during the Civil War was appointed 
colonel of the 112th Regiment, New York State Vol- 
unteers, for the purpose of recruiting, organizing and 
equipping the regiment. In 1867 he was elected a mem- 
ber of the State Constitutional Convention. 

In the winter of 1872-73, the building of the Buffalo 
& Jamestown Railway was first agitated, and Colonel 
Allen gave his best efforts to the inception and organi- 
zation of that enterprise, the first public meeting on the 
project being held at his office. His character and 
personal influence inspired confidence in the project, 
and ahhough not completed until after his death, the 
success of the road was largely due to his efforts. 

In the fall of 1874. Colonel Allen accepted an Inde- 
pendent nomination for Congress in opposition to the 
regular Republican candidate, Walter L. Sessions. Colo- 
nel .Allen was nominated in a district which under ordi 
nary circumstances gave from five to seven thousand 
Republican majority, but with characteristic zeal he 
waged his campaign, and after the most hotly-contested 
campaign that the district had ever known he was elect- 
ed by a large majority. But the arduous work of the 
campaign, and the incessant labor of long years of 
intense business activity, culminated in an attack of 
brain fever, to which Colonel Allen succumbed on Jan. 
20, 1875. 

Colonel Allen married, in 1836, Margaret Cook, 
daughter of Dr. Robert Cook, of New York City. Eight 
children were bom to them, two only surviving child- 
hood: Alfred D. Allen, of whom further, and Mrs. 
Charlotte Oliva Black, of whom further. Colonel 
Allen built the family home on the corner of East Fourth 
and Spring streets, which is yet standing practically 
unchanged, although it has passed out of the hands of 
the family. Through all the years they lived in this 
house Augustus F. Allen and his wife Margaret made 
their home a community center in the truest and best 
sense. Here were received alike distinguished visitors 
and the humblest neighbors with true and cordial hos- 
pitality that brought happiness and cheer to many lives. 

Colonel Allen became the owner of the farm just 
south of Jamestown, which by the extension of the city 
in now within its limits. Part of that farm Is now (1920") 
in the hands of the fourth Allen generation, another 
portion now being Allen Park, deeded to the city in 
IQ08 by his daughter-in-law, Virginia M. Allen, in 
memory of her father-in-law and husband. Colonel 
Allen was loved by his contemporaries as a friend, 
esteemed by them as a neighbor, and honored as a 
citizen. Energetic, progressive and public-spirited, he 
served well his day and generation, and left an honor- 
able record to his posterity. 

.Mfred D. Allen, son of Colonel .\ugustus Franklin 
and Margaret (Cook) Allen, was born in Jamestown, N. 
Y., in 1841, and died there in 1877, in his thirty-seventh 
year. After completing his education he, when quite 
young, became manager of his father's farm, lying 
south but near Jamestown. He was also for several 
years prior to his passing engaged in flour milling, his 
plant known as the Dexterville Mills. From 1875 to 
1877 Albert D. Miller was associated with him in the 
milling business. It was at the De.Kter Mills that the 
first "patent" flour was made in Jamestown. At the 
comer of East Third and Pine streets, Mr. Allen main- 



tained a flour and feed store, the site of that store his 
own birthplace. That property descended to his sons 
and later passed out of the family name. Mr. Allen 
was a good business man, and although cut off before 
even reaching middle age he had accumulated a hand- 
some competence from his business enterprises. 

Mr. Allen married in 1869, Virginia M. Mahon, of 
\'ew York, who survived her husband forty-two years, 
dying in Fort Worth, Tex., while traveling with her 
son, Augustus F. Allen and family in the South. She 
is buried in Lakeview Cemetery, Jamestown. They were 
the parents of two sons who survived childhood : 
Augustus F., named for his grandfather; and .Mfred 
D., named for his father. Both are of further mention 
in this review. 

Charlotte Olivia .Allen, daughter of Colonel Augustus 
Franklin and Margaret (Cook) Allen, was born in 
Jamestown. N. Y., in 1S48, and died in Alameda, Cal., 
Jan. 20, 1888. She was given all the advantages of 
education, and her charming personality won her many 
friends. In 1867 she married James Black, of New 
York City, and they were the parents of a daughter, 
Melita. Mrs. Black was widely traveled, her tours 
covering Europe and Northern .Africa, quite out of the 
beaten tourists routes. From her travel she gained a 
culture and a broad outlook on life, ohtainable in no 
other way. She resided several years in New York 
City, and was there identified with charitable causes and 
different organizations. .After the death of her mother 
in 1885, Mrs. Black's health failed and with her daueh- 
ter she sought the mild air of California, making her 
home in Alameda, where she died aged forty years. 
After her death the old .Allen homestead, corner of East 
Fourth and Spring streets, Jamestown, so long the 
abode of hospitality and good fellowship, was closed 
and later passed out of the family. 

Augustus F. Allen, eldest son of Alfred D. and Vir- 
ginia M. (Mahon) Allen, was born in Jamestown, Sept. 
7, 1873. He attended the Jamestown schools and 
Harvard University, took up the study of law and 
gained admission to the bar. He did not devote much 
time to the practice of his profession, but upon his 
return to Jamestown conducted extensive real estate 
operations. The large tract of farm land on the south 
side of Foote avenue and extending to the city line 
was platted in building lots, and encouragement in 
such practical form was given prospective home owners 
that one of the most attractive residential sections 
of the city was built up. The beauty of the local- 
ity was still further enhanced by the gift of a 
tract of land by Virginia M. Allen, the property being 
given over to the park commission and by that body 
greatly improved. It is now the principal park of 
Jamestown and known as Allen Park. 

As a young man Mr. .Allen entered public life, in 
Vv-hich a wide acquaintance and a personality of magnetic 
charm were his strongest assets. His first office was 
supervisor of his district, and his first campaign was for 
the Republican nomination, which was equivalent to an 
election. The manner in which he secured this and his 
subsequent election brought him into conspicuous notice 
as a future factor in local politics. .After a term as 
supervisor, 1905-06, in which his record was generally 
approved, he was nominated nn the Republican ticket for 



43- 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



the New York State Assembly from the First Chautau- 
qua District, ami was successful in the ensuing election, 
serving tour terms uw^-oS-oo-lo. Mr. Allen was a loyal 
and consistent supporter of Governor Charles E. Hughes 
in all of the constructive legislation sponsored by that 
executive, regardless of the dictates of policy or of 
party leaders. He was known in the legislature and 
among his constituency as a strong adherent of Govern- 
or Hughes and was close to the governor in much of 
the important political action of the times. He was 
honored by an invitation to join the governor's party in 
a visit to the St. Louis Exposition. 

Mr. .-Mien left tlie Assembly to assume the duties of 
postmaster of Jamestown, and his administration was 
one satisfactory from every point of view. Upon his 
retirement from office he became deputy election com- 
niissicner of the State with headquarters in New York 
City, serving until with the change of party power a 
Democratic successor was appointed. Since that time he 
has given his time to his Jamestown properties and to 
oil operations in the South, and in this line he has met 
with great success. 

Mr. .\llen is a veteran of the Spanish War. Im- 
mediately after the outbreak of war with Spain, in 1898, 
he began the recruiting of a cavalry company in James- 
towii. This was speedily done, but about the same 
time the 202nd Regiment was being formed in Buffalo, 
and in order to get more quickly into the service Mr. 
.\llen discontinued his recruiting work in Jamestown 
and enlisted as a private in this regiment. Many others 
who had originally preferred the cavalry organization 
followed his lead. Soon after the departure of the 202nd 
from Buffalo, he became sergeant major of the re.si- 
ment, and when it was assigned to w-inter duty in Cuba 
he was commissioned second lieutenant, a distinction 
won through faithful, soldierly service. He served with 
the 202nd until its return in the following year and 
subsequent demobilization, .■\lthough Mr. Allen was 
beyond the draft age in the World War, he sought 
opportunity for service, and when the armistice was 
signed he was making preparations to close up his 
affairs and to enlist as a private for overseas duty. 

Mr. .Mien married Mrs. Helen Crane, of Buffalo, N, 
Y. They are the parents of a daughter, Virginia M. 
.-Mien, named after Mr. .-Mien's mother. 

.Mfred D. .-Mien, youngest son of .\lfred D. and Vir- 
ginia M. CMahon) .Mien, was born in Jamestown, N. 
Y.. in 1877. He was educated in Jamestown public 
schrjols and compli-tcd his studies in the Berkeley 
School, New '^'ork City. In 1906, he went to Okla- 
homa and entered the hotel business and has operated 
in Oklahoma, Illinois, and Texas. He is a veteran of 
two wars. He served in the Spanish-.Amcrican War in 
the -i^ith United States Volunteer Infantry, and served 
nrarly two years in the Phillipinc Inlands. When the 
United States entered the World War. he enlisted and 
v.as commissioned a second lieutenant. He served with 
the .VS'h Division in France and went tbroufjh the hard 
fiKhtin;; that this division had withrjut any serious 
woimd^. 



WALTER RECORD— Thre.- generations f,f R 
or'!', have I'-ft their imprint upon the history of Ch; 
taufjiia county, N. Y., 10 v.hich the first of the nai 



Israel Record, came less than a century ago. Israel 
Record settled in the town of Sherman, in 1830, but 
later moved to the town of Hanover, where he ended 
his years, eighty-nine, fifty-seven of which had been 
spent in Chautauqua county, and nearly all of them in 
the town of Hanover. He was one of the strong Demo- 
crats of his day, and never surrendered an iota of his 
confidence in the party of Jefferson and Jackson. His 
memory was a wonderful storehouse of knowledge, and 
and it is said that within a few days after President 
Cleveland's inaugural address was published he repeated 
it verbatim and remembered it perfectly until he died. 
Dates and places, laws and State constitutions, amend- 
ments and the men who advocated them, were as 
familiar to his memorj' when past eighty years of age 
as to the eye of an ordinary man when looking at the 
printed page of an open book, and when he once 
asserted the correctness of a statement it was useless 
to refer to a book for corroborative proof — he was al- 
v.ays bound to be correct. The old pioneer left sons 
who worthily bore his name, and one of these sons, 
John G. Record, practiced law for thirty-six years at the 
Chautauqua count)- bar, and in turn left a son, Walter 
Record, who after the privilege of association in law 
practice with his honored father until the latter's death, 
then assumed the business, and for another quarter of 
a century has maintained the high reputation the Record 
name has always borne in the profession and in private 
life. 

The Records came to Chautauqua county from the 
\'alley of the Hudson, where Rev. John Record, an 
active minister of the Baptist church of Poughkeepsie, 
was later prominent in business, operating a grist mill 
for several years. His son, Israel Record, born in 
Poughkeepsie, N. Y., Oct. 12, 17Q8, died in the village of 
Silver Creek, Chautauqua county, N. Y., July 16, 1887. 
In 1830, with wife and two children, he came to the town 
of Sherman, Chautauqua county, and a few years later 
moved to the town of Hanover, where his entire after 
life was spent. He was a farmer and cattle dealer all 
his active years, and a man universally esteemed. He 
married Mary Gardner, born in Dutchess county, N. 
Y., died in Perrysburg, Cattaraugus county, in 1880, aged 
eighty-four years. They were the parents of eight chil- 
dren : Emily, married William Wood ; Ursula, married 
Norman Babcock, of Silver Creek; Laura, married 
William Parkman ; William K. ; John G., of fiirthc'- 
mention; Walter; Cornelius; and Daphne. 

John G. Record, son of Israel and Mary (Gardner) 
Record, was born at Smith's Mills, in the town of Han- 
over, Chautauqua county, N. Y., Oct. 2, 1836, died at his 
home in Forestville, N. Y., Aug. 12, i8fi5. He was edu- 
cated in public schools, Middlcbury and Wyoming acad- 
emies, his law studies beginning immediately after his 
graduation from Wyoming Academy. He studied law 
imder the perceptorship of Sherman & Scott of the 
Chautauqua bar, then practicing in Forestville. He was 
admitted to the Chautauqua bar in December, lB$C), and 
practiced his profession very successfully in Forestville 
until his death, thirty-six years later. In politics Mr. 
K'ecord was a zealous Democrat of Jcffersonian views, 
always stfiod upon the platform of the old time genuine 
princijiles of his parly, and advocated honesty and econ- 
omy in Stale as well as National affairs. In 187O, Mr. 




'^:^<^^^.^>^ ^t/- 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



433 



Record was elected supervisor of the town of Hanover, 
and several times accepted nominations from his party 
for other offices, in its plucky but hopeless fights against 
the overwhelming Republican majority in Chautauqua 
county. 

Mr. Record married (first) in 1862, Mary Farnham, 
of Forestville, who died in March, 1886, leaving four 
children; Nellie, married I. K. Dye; Walter, of further 
mention ; Charles F., and Ralph. Charles F. Record, 
although a Democrat in politics, is serving in the capaci- 
ty of postmaster of Forestville, having been appointed in 
April, 1916. Mr. Record married (second) Oct. 2, 1887, 
Nora M. Hayward, of Versailles. N. Y., and they were 
the parents of two daughters. Daphne and Mollie. 

Walter Record, son of John G. Record and his first 
wife, Mary (Farnham) Record, was born in Forest- 
ville, Chautauqua county, N. Y., June 4, 1868, and there 
yet resides. After finishing the full course of study 
furnished by the Forestville schools, he studied law 
under the able teaching of his father and in October, 
1892. was admitted to the New York bar. He was at 
once admitted to a partnership with his father, but that 
association was dissolved. Aug. 12, 1895, by the death 
of the honored senior partner. Since that date Walter 
Record has practiced alone and has won high standing 
at the Chautauqua bar. A Democrat in politics, Mr. 
Record has allowed his name to be used as the party 
candidate for Assembly and district attorney, not 
through expectation of success or political ambition for 
his party in so decided a minority, but party loyalty 
alone induced him to accept the nomination. In local 
affairs, where politics is forgotten, he has met with 
better success, and has served as president of the village. 

Mr. Record married (first) July 20, 1889, Nellie M. 
Judd, who died Aug. 26, 1894. He married (second) 
March 16, 1898, Minerva P. Strong. The family home 
is in Forestville. 



DARWIN RUSSELL CLARK, JR.— When Mr. 

Clark left his father's farm in the town of Carroll, he 
became an employ of the Lake View Cemetery Associ- 
ation in Jamestown, where he now holds the position 
of assistant superintendent. His choice of work was 
most natural, for his great-grandfather, his grandfather, 
and an uncle all were engaged in cemetery manage- 
ment and care. He is a son of Darwin Russell and 
Nellie A. (Bull) Clark, his father a farmer of the town 
of Carroll. 

Darwin Russell Clark, Jr., was born in Jamestown, N. 
Y., Sept. 27, 1882. He was educated in the district 
schools of the town of Carroll, and later completed a 
business course at Jamestown Business College. Until 
about nineteen years of age, Mr. Clark was his father's 
assistant at the farm in Carroll, and then came to James- 
town, securing employment with the Lake View Cemetery 
Association, and until the present year (1920) has con- 
tinued his connection with the association, now being 
assistant superintendent. For many years he has been 
a notary public in and for the county of Chautauqua. 
He is a Republican in politics, a member of the Wood- 
men of the World, and of the First Methodist Episco- 
pal Church of Jamestown. For many years Mr. Clark 
was a member of Company F. b^th Regiment, New 
York National Guard, and as cook served with Com- 



pany E., 74th Regiment New York National Guard, in 
the service of the United States Government, on the 
Mexican border under call of the president. His service 
on the border extended from July i, igi6, to Nov. 
5, 1916, when by reason of Paragraph 33, Special Order, 
264, Southern Department, 1916, he was finally mustered 
out at Fort Hamilton, N. V., with a full and honorable 
discharge. 

Mr. Clark married, in Jamestown, N. Y., Dec. 28, 1904, 
Minnie Mary Akins, daughter of Frank Seymour and 
Katherine Amanda (Heinemann) Akins. Mr. and Mrs. 
Clark are the parents of five children : Frank Brooks, 
born Sept. 7, 1905; Virginia Naomi, born July i. 1908; 
Lynn Russell, born Nov. 4, 1915; Nellie Katherine, 
born Sept. 5, 1917; Barbara Akins, born Nov. 10. 1919. 
The family home is at No. 52 Buffalo street, James- 
town. 



JOSEPH A. BERGWALL— The present satisfac- 
tory standing of the Bergwall Printing Company among 
the successful business enterprises of Jamestown, N. Y., 
is mainly the result of the continued efforts of its 
founder, the late Joseph A. Bergwall, who was a prom- 
inent publisher and citizen, and his two sons, Harold J. 
and Milton E. Joseph A. Bergwall followed the business 
as a printer in Jamestown for more than thirty years, 
and at the time of his death was considered a dean in 
his trade here. 

He was a native of Sweden, his birth occurring there, 
Aug. 17, 1870. He came to this country when a young 
man, and in 1882 established himself, in a small way, as 
an independent printer, setting up his plant in a base- 
ment at the corner of Main and East Third streets, 
Jamestown. Later, the business having increased to 
large proportions, he moved to more spacious quarters 
in the building of the American National Bank. Dur- 
ing the course of time the printing plant changed loca- 
tion several times, until 1912, when it finally became 
established at its present address, the corner of West 
Second and Washington streets. This final installation 
must have been the source of much gratification and 
pleasure to Mr. Bergwall when he realized how different 
the new plant was in comparison to the humble begin- 
ning he made thirty years previously In Jamestown. He 
then had but one hand press, and in the new plant there 
were six presses of which two are cylinders and four 
job presses, the latter being I^inotype machines, and a 
complete modern apparatus for binding and folding. In 
1920 a building adjoining the one erected in 1912 by Mr. 
Bergwall was acquired for additional space, and this 
was converted into the press department of the plant. 
This company now turns out all forms of magazine, 
book and catalogue work, as well as considerable job 
printing and book binding. 

The Bergwall Printing Company, Incorporated, re- 
ceived its charter of incorporation in 1910, and its orig- 
inal ofl^cials were : Joseph A. Bergwall, president and 
treasurer; E. E. Carpenter, vice-president; and Mrs. 
Sclma V. Bergwall, secretary. Following the death of 
Mr. Bergwall, in 1915, the personnel became as follows: 
Harold J. Bergwall, president ; Mrs. Selma V. Bergwall, 
vice-president ; and Milton E. Bergwall, secretary and 
treasurer. 

Aside from the business activities in his own organ- 



434 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



ization. Mr. Berg%vall was prominently connected with 
other interests and well abreast with the affairs of the 
city. 

He was a director and president of the Vart Land 
Newspaper, a Swedish journal issued daily to a large 
subscription throughout the section. When the city of 
Jamestown was represented in the Interstate Baseball 
League, Mr. Bergwall was one of the local club's strong- 
est si'.pporters and once its president. While not a 
member of its official board, he was a stockholder in 
the .-Kmcrican National Bank of Jamestown and did 
much to assist in the good will of this institution. The 
Jamestown Board of Commerce was also benefited by 
his attiliation. as he was one of its organizers. In club 
and fraternal life, Mr. Bergwall was one of the found- 
ers of the Norden Club, member of the Loyal Order of 
.Moose. Knights of Pythias, and various Swedish fra- 
ternal orders. Politically, while he did not seek nor hoM 
pfblic office, he was one of the strong supporters of the 
Republican party and was active in the management 
of the party's affairs locally. He and his family were 
members of the First Lutheran Church of Jamestown, 
ar.d it can be said that Mr. Bergwall was truly a Chris- 
tian. 

Mr. Berg^vall married, in Jamestown, Selma V. 
Swanson. a native of Sweden. To them were born two 
sons: Harold Joseph and Milton Earl, both of whom 
appear in the following lines. 

Mr. Bergwall was a man of good business foresight 
and well regarded in business circles. He was ahvays 
interested in the welfare of Jamestown and aided in 
movements of civic interest. In a social way he had 
hosts of warm friends, and when his death occurred, 
Sept. 2;. iQi;, it was a sad loss to the conimunitv-at 
large. 



HAROLD J. BERGWALL was bom in Jamestown, 
July 30. 1805. He was educated in the public and high 
schools of that city. In order to equip himself ade- 
quately for successful cooperation in the printing busi- 
ness, he went to Pittsburgh, Pa., and there took the 
printing and advertising course at the Carnegie Insti- 
tute of Technology, graduating in 191 7. The Bergwall 
Printing Company was then mainly under the super- 
vision of his mother, so Harold J. returned to James- 
town immediately after graduating, and entered at once 
into business. As a matter of fact, he was expert m 
many printing operations long before he went tn Pitts- 
burgh for the special course, for it had been his custom 
tor m-^ny years, while still in scli0"l iti Jamestown, In 
v/ork in his father's shop after school hours and during 
vacation. In I'liS he became president of the company, 
and because of his technical education and natural in- 
clination, devotes himself mainly to the management 
of the shops, leaving the commercial affairs of thi- com- 
pany to his younger brother, Harold J. Bergwall is a 
memliT of the Free and .'\cceptcd Masons. In rhurch 
artivitifs he belongs to the First Lutheran Church of 
Jamestown. He is fond of athletics, and his leisure is 
mainly <p'-nf in boating and yachting during the season 
r,n Chauiauqiia Lake, he being a member of the Chada- 
koin Club. 

He married. July 2^1, 1920, Florinc A. Hooker, of 
Jam'-'.town, 



MILTON E. BERGWALL was born in James- 
town, .\ug. JO, 1807. He was educated in the James- 
town public and high schools, and in 1915, after gradu- 
ating from the High School began to work steadily in the 
Bergwall Printing plant. Like his brother, he had 
worked previously in the shop alter school hours and dur- 
ing vacations, so that he soon became e.xpert. Such 
knowledge has been of value to him in the later responsi- 
bilities which became his share of the work. In 1919, he 
was elected secretary and treasurer of the corpora- 
tion, and attends to the coinmercial phase of its opera- 
tion. He is a member of the Free and Accepted Masons, 
and belongs to the Chadakoin and Norden clubs. He 
attends the First Lutheran Church. 



FREDERICK YALE TOY— Prominent among the 
young business men of Jamestown and well known in 
linancial circles of Chautauqua county since his coming 
here in October, 191 7, is Frederick Yale Toy. At the 
time of his coming to Chautauqua county, Mr. Toy 
was affiliated with Chandler & Company, bankers and 
financial experts of New York and Philadelphia. His 
first activities in the county were to aid in the organ- 
izing of the Second Liberty Loan campaign under plans 
of the local administration and those suggested by the 
Federal Reserve Bank of New York in behalf of the 
Lhiited States Government. 

Frederick Yale Toy is a native of Philadelphia, Pa., 
born April 28, 1894, son of Thomas Browne and Carrie 
Aiken (Yale) Toy. The elder Mr. Toy was for a num- 
ber of years the owner of a large wholesale clothing 
and men's apparel business in Richmond, Va. He re- 
tired froin his wholesale business in 1914 on account of 
ill health, and gave his attention in a semi-active way 
to his real estate and brokerage interests. During the 
latter part of 1917 and until March 1919, he served over 
seas as a secretary for the Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation in France, afterwards returning to Richmond, 
Va., where he is still residing. In the latter part of 
1019, he assisted in organizing the trust department of 
the First National Bank of Richmond, 

Frederick Yale Toy passed his boyhood at German- 
town, one of the suburbs of Philadelphia, where he at- 
tended the local schools and the Germantown Academy. 
He left the latter institution in 1907, accompanying his 
parents to Richmond, Va., and there studied at the Rich- 
mond Academy, graduating in 1910 with honors. It 
was at this institution that he won a scholarship which 
entitled him to a full course at Richmond College. In 
the fall of 1910 he entered Richmond College where he 
pursued a scientific course, and graduated with the class 
of 1914 with the degree of Bachelor of -Science. Mr. 
Toy then received an appointment to the United States 
Naval Academy at Annapolis, Md., from Ex-Governor 
A. J. Montague, of Virginia, and here he remained a 
midshipman but one year and resigned on account of 
physical disability resulting from a serious injury. 
Later, when his health permitted, Mr. Toy secured a 
Iiosition as assistant estimator wtth the Richmond 
Structural Steel Company of Richmond. Va., remain- 
ing with this concern for a time. In October, I9i.=i. he 
came to New York State and settled at Syracuse as 
representative for Julius Christenscn S[ Company, in- 
vestment bankers of that city. In June, 1017, he ac- 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



435 



cepted a position as State representative with Chandler 
& Company with headquarters at Syracuse, resigning 
this position in December, 1917. Subsequently he be- 
came associated with the Guaranty Trust Company of 
New York as their correspondent with offices in James- 
town, a position which he still continues very ably and 
which identities him with the financial interests of Chau- 
tauqua county. Mr. Toy has made a deep study on 
finance and investments, and is regarded as an author- 
ity on banking. 

While he has given his undivided business attention 
to matters of financial interest, at leisure he has in a 
social way become well known in fraternal and club 
life. He is a member of the Phi Kappa Sigma College 
fraternity, the Rotary Club of Jamestown, the Guaranty 
Club of New York, Mt. Moriah Lodge, No. 145, Free 
and Accepted Masons, of Jamestown, and the local 
lodge. No. 263, Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks. In religious belief, Mr. Toy is a Methodist, and 
politically, a Republican. 

Frederick Yale Toy was united in marriage, Sept. 
15. 1917, at Washington, D. C, with Lena Child 
Williams, a daughter of Robert Kenon and Lucy (Stith) 
Williams. Mr. Williams is the Southern manager 01 
a large European cotton company of Scotland. 



FRANCIS A. IRVINE, former city engineer of 
Jamestown, and now affiliated with the Jorgenson 
Plumbing and Electrical Company, is one of the well- 
known young business men of the city. 

Born in Tidioute, Pa., Sept 4, 18S4, Francis A. Irvine 
is the son of Oscar and Christine (Anderson) Irvine, 
the former having been for many years a prosperous 
builder of oil tanks in Tidioute, where he has been 
living for many years. After acquiring a good funda- 
mental education at the local grammar and high schools, 
young Irvine entered Allegheny College, taking the 
civil engineering course, graduating in 1908, his degree 
being Civil Engineer. Upon graduating, about a year 
was spent in concrete work at his home town, Tidioute, 
after which he was appointed to the position of drafts- 
man in the Pennsylvania State Highway Department, 
Feb. I, 1909, with headquarters at Warren. He held 
this position for a year and then accepted another posi- 
tion, later becoming assistant division engineer in the 
maintenance department of the Baltimore & Ohio Rail- 
road System. He remained in the employ of the rail- 
road for several years, until June l, 1915, when he 
went to Jamestown, entering the Jorgenson plumbing 
and heating establishment. A year later, June 20, 1916, 
Mr. Irvine received the appointment of temporary city 
engineer of Jamestown, and shortly after, Mayor Carl- 
son of that city appointed him city engineer, a com- 
mission he held until October, 1919. While holding the 
office he advocated many improvements, such as open- 
ing new streets, paving and repaving old ones, improve- 
ments on parkways, and many other such suggestions. 

In June. 1015. Francis A. Irvine was married to 
Madelyn. daughter of Nels and Mary (Lawson) Jorg- 
enson, at Jamestown. They have one child, Phillip 
Marshall. Mr. and Mrs. Irvine attend Holy Trinity 
English Lutheran Church. 

Mr. Irvine has held membership for the last few 
years in several of the Jamestown organizations, among 



them being the Ndrden Club, Kiwanis Club, the Order 
of Eagles, and the Greek letter fraternity of his college 
days. Phi Delta Theta. While at Allegheny College, 
Mr. Irvine took an active part in all athletic sports, 
gaining quite a reputation in track meets. He was also 
very greatly interested in music, being a member of the 
College Glee Club. 



GEORGE LIAS LOCKWOOD— Being the pos- 
sessor of a well established business which stands well 
in the front ranks of Jamestown's commercial life, 
George L. Lockwood is prominent here and is known 
throughout the city as a leading merchant. He was born 
in Forestville, N. Y., Sept. 4, 1883, his father being 
Melzar A. Lockwood. and his mother, Mary F. (Oliver) 
Loclcivood. 

When George L. Lockwood was very young the fami- 
ly moved from Forestville to Jamestown, and the lad 
was entered as a pupil at the grammar school of that 
city, later attending the high school. During the holidays, 
Saturdays, and after school hours, young Lockwood 
worked in a dry goods store, and alter leaving school 
became regularly employed by the Gokey Shoe Company, 
v/here he remained for the following two years. After 
that the young man went to Cleveland, Ohio, obtain- 
ing employment with wholesale shoe dealers, the Cady- 
Iverson Shoe Company, in iheir stock room. He only 
remained in Cleveland one year, returning to his home 
in Jamestown where his father, M. A. Lockwood, was 
engaged in the harness business, his shop being at No. 
106 East Second street. Two years after he had entered 
upon this new field of labor, Mr. Lockwood, the elder, 
took his son into partnership, extending the business 
to embrace all kinds of leather goods. This was con- 
tinued for some years, until 1907, when M. A. Lock- 
wood retired from active business life and his son con- 
ducted the enterprise alone. The harness portion of 
it was abandoned, confining the stock exclusively to 
leather goods, umbrellas, novelties and other goods of 
that description. The firm had been known as M. A. 
Lockwood & Son, but after the retirement of the senior 
partner it was changed to George L. Lockwood, leather 
goods and novelties, and has so continued; the business 
was established in 1890, when the father moved to 
Jamestown. In January, 1913, the business was removed 
to No. 7 West Third street, where it is located at the 
present time. Mr. Lockwood is a genial man, popular 
among other men, and interested in public affairs. He 
i.- a member of the Board of Commerce and of the 
Jamestown Auto Club. He is also a Free Mason ; with 
his family he attends the First Methodist Church. 

In Jamestown. Sept. 4, 1906, George L. Lockwood 
married Lillian Gornall, daughter of William and Fanny 
O. (Wilson") Gornall. residents of Jamestown. Mr. 
Gornall was one of the founders of the Empire Worsted 
Mills of Jamestown. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lockwood have four children : Thomas, 
Jean, George L.. Jr., and Betty. Mr. Lockwood has a 
very interesting family, their advancement in life being 
his greatest ambition. 



PAUL WALTER FREDERICKSON, prominent 
citizen and business man, is a native of America, and 
a descendant of that sturdy race, the Swedes, which rep- 



430 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



resent one oi the most progressive types of people in 
Chautauqua county. He is a man of education, sound 
citizenship and a representative in the business life of 
the coninuinity. and is one of the foremost young men 
in llie town of Stockton, Chautauqua county, N. V. 

Paul \V. Frederickson, son of Alfred and Matilda 
(Anderson* Frederickson, was born in Stockton, Dec. 
14. 1S03. He was educated here in the district schools 
and later the Brocton and Fredonia hi^h schools. 
He took a teacher's course at the Fredonia Normal 
School, from which he was graduated in the class of 
1015. and shortly afterwards became the principal of 
the Cassadaga High School. Cassadaga, N. Y. He re- 
mained here for one year, and in 1916 went to New York 
City, where he became the principal of the grammar de- 
partment of the Chelsea School, which was a branch 
0' the Young Men's Christian .\ssociation Educational 
Department, this school being located in the -Associa- 
tion's building on West 23rd street. In August, 1917, short- 
ly after the United States had entered the World War 
he enlisted and went to the Officers' Training Camp at 
Fort Niagara. X. Y., and there received an intensive 
military training. At Fort Niagara he was commission- 
ed as second lieutenant in the Field Artillery Service. 
In December, 191 7. he was assigned to Camp Travis. 
Tex., as an instructor, and remained in this assignment 
until January, 1918. when he was transferred to the 
.Aviation Section of the .Army. He had become very 
well equipped in the knowledge of his command, and 
was in charge of various squadrons at Kelly Field, Te.x., 
and \'an Couver Barracks, Washington. He was honor- 
ably discharged from service, Feb. 8, 1919. and shortl\' 
afterwards returned to his home at Stockton, where he 
joined his brothers, Delmar and Alvin L. Frederickson, 
in their manufacturing industry of basket making and 
other wood products, the firm being known as the Fred- 
erickson Brothers, of which he has since been secretary. 

Mr. Frederickson is identified with the various town 
interests, being a justice of the peace and a member of 
the Town Board. Fraternally he is a member of the 
varir.us Masonic bodies and the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows. In politics he is a staunch Republican, 
and in religion a memlier of the Stockton Baptist Church. 



FREDERICK YOUNG— Fnr many years Mr. 
■^ount; has been a resident of Celoron, Chautauqua 
county, N. Y., and in 1914 erected his present brick 
residence on Ninth street. During his years in the 
county he has steadily pursued his trade and is a well 
known contractor. He is a son of Mariin Van P.uren 
and F.lizaUth (Dunn) Young, his father born in Medina, 
N. Y. 

Tred'-rick Young was born in Hartlnnd, N. Y., Dec. 
20. I'-'fiy. He was educated in the public schools. His 
father was a mason by trade, and when Frederick 
arrivfd at a suitable age he devoted his attention to 
Warning a branch of the same trade, becoming an expert 
brirklav'T. Since cming to Chautauqua county he 
ha* worked at his trade as a journeyman and a con- 
tractor. He has invested in Oloron property, and in 
K/).3 erected the building for himself that stands next 
to hi? pres'-nt residenrc. When he built his first house 
hi- adopted the "pay as you go" plan, and when it was 
completed everything was fully paid for. Mr. Young 



has served as trustee for the village of Celoron for 
three years, he has also served as fireman in the city of 
Jamestown for about eight years. He is a Republican 
in politics, a member of the United Brethren church 
and of the Protected Home Circle. 

Mr. Young married, in Jamestown, N. Y., .April 21, 
1895, Ella Pryde, born April 5, 1874, daughter of Daniel 
and Ellen (Day) Pryde, of Mercer county. Pa., her 
parents born in Scotland. Mr. and Mrs. Young were 
the parents of three cliildren : i. Floyd Franklin, born 
Feb. 2, 1896; entered the United States army, July 22, 
1918, saw eight months' service overseas with the 
American Expeditionary Forces and was honorably 
discharged, May 14, 1919. 2. Maude Leona, born Sept. 
6, 1898. i. .Arthur Eliuer, born April 5. 1904. 



HENRY MARVIN LUND, a young and enter- 
prising business executive connected with the Linquest 
Electrical Company of New York, who has proved him- 
self to have a comprehensive knowledge of electrical 
work, and also an honest desire to give good and effi- 
cient service, is a native of Chautauqua county, N. Y., 
born in the city of Jamestown, Feb. 6, 1887. If his 
parents, James and Charlotte Lund, were still alive, 
they would have been gratified to realize that their son 
has advanced so substantially and so rapidly. 

Henry M. Lund was educated in local grammar and 
high schools, and when only fourteen years of age 
began to work, his first employinent betng with the Amer- 
ican .Aristotype Company, which was a branch of the 
Eastman Kodak Company. Two years later, he entered 
the service of the Bell Telephone Company, at James- 
town, and that may be said to have been his introduc- 
tion to things electrical; he started as errand boy, but 
gradually became proficient in construction work, the 
installing of telephones and such like phases of electri- 
cal work, and he remained with the Bell Telephone 
Company for four years, giving much time, in his spare 
hours, to the study of the science of electrical mani- 
pulation, and thus he became very proficient in wiring 
operations. After leaving the eiuploy of the Bell Tele- 
phone Company, he was with Hansen, the electrician, 
for a short while, leaving his service in order to take 
the position of electrician with the Chautauqua Electric 
Company, where he remained for three years. .After 
this he was for one year with the Jamestown Electric 
Company, in like capacity. In 191 1, he entered into part- 
nership with the Linquest Brothers and Fred J. Sutton, 
the outcome of which is the present Linquest Elec- 
trical Company of Jamestown. The operations of this 
firm in Jamestown and throughout the county have 
developed a business of considerable magnitude and of 
satisfactory return. Mr. Lund is secretary of the cor- 
j)i'ration and he has the supervision of all store and 
fixture work undertaken by the company. Mr. Lund is 
an energetic man who takes interest in all manly sports, 
and in certain activities of the life of Jamestown, He 
has been particularly prominent in various Masonic 
bodies and the Shrine. He was past master of the 
Council in loiTi, and is [last i)atroii of the Order of the 
Amaranth. 

r)n Aug. 7, n/)8, Mr. Lund was married in Jamestown, 
to Gertrude, daughter of Charles Wills, of Jamestown. 

Aggressive, active and thorough in his undertakings. 





^^^^ C ^, /UiMf^^r^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



437 



Mr. Lund is of the type that instills confidence in his 
co-workers; he has the ability of concentration, of being 
able to work both rapidly and skillfully, and to concen- 
trate his attention upon a task until it has reached sat- 
isfactory completion. And with steadiness of purpose, 
and consistent enterprise, he will in all probability in 
the future come even more prominently into the aiTairs 
of his native city. 



town. Mr. and Mrs. Sutton are the parents of one 
child, a daughter, Virginia, born June 27, 1913, and 
has recently commenced to go to school. 



FRED JOHN SUTTON, treasurer of the Linquest 
Electrical Company, one of the leading firms of elec- 
trical contractors in Chautauqua county, has manifested 
commendable traits in his business advancement. He 
started as a farm boy, then became a grocery clerk, 
after which he was a machinist, and then, with the 
firm resolution to fit himself for commercial aft'airs, 
he left his trade and entered a commercial college. 

Fred J. Sutton was born in Stockton, Chautauqua 
county, N. Y., Jan. 16, 1884, the son of William and 
Emma Sutton. The elder Suttons still live at the home- 
stead in Cassadaga, Chautauqua county, where both are 
much respected and have very many friends. As a boy, 
Fred J. Sutton attended the public school of Stockton, 
after which he assisted his father in the operation of the 
home farm. When he had reached eighteen years, 
Fred J. took employment in a local grocery store, as a 
clerk, and remained so employed for several years. 
Eventually, he entered the machine shop of the Ameri- 
can Locomotive Works, at Dunkirk, this county, and 
worked for three years as machinist. Then came the 
turning point in his business career ; he decided to leave 
his work and trade and go to Jamestown, and there 
become a student at the Jamestown Business College, 
with a view to gaining proficiency in the commercial 
phase of business. He found it required much strength 
of will and steadfastness of purpose to continue in his 
resolution under the conditions he had to carry through 
in order to remain at school until he had graduated, 
so he worked after school hours. After graduation, he 
immediately obtained a position as bookkeeper with the 
Jamestown Shale Paving Company, in the employ of 
which firm he remained for six months, thereafter tak- 
ing a like position with the Chautauqua Electric Com- 
pany, remaining for one year. After this, for three 
years, he was with the Hansen Electric Company. In 
l(,ll, he joined the Linquest Brothers and Henry M. 
Lund, the four forming business partnership to con- 
stitute a firm of electrical contractors, which firm, as 
it now is, is the well known and successful Linquest 
Electrical Company, of Jamestown. Of that corpora- 
tion, Mr. Sutton is treasurer, and has direction of the 
commercial phase of the business. .All the partners are 
young, alert, and enterprising, each skilled in his depart- 
ment, and all bent upon making the company the best in 
its line in the countj- and contiguous territories. Mr. 
Sutton is interested in the activities of Jamestown. 
Among the business men of the city he is well placed 
and recognized as a capable young executive. He is 
one of the charter members of the Jamestown Rotary 
Club, belongs to the United Commercial Travelers* 
Association, and in fraternal affiliations is identified 
with the Eagles and the Masonic bodies. 

Mr. Sutton was married in Jamestown, June 23, 190Q, 
to Mildred, daughter of Charles J. Moflfette, of James- 



AUGUST FREDERICK NELSON— Jamestown 

has no citizen more enterprising than the one whose 
name heads this article. As a large real estate holder, 
as manager of the local G. R. Kinney Company's store, 
and as stockholder in this corporation, which is the 
largest shoe retailing organization in the world, he has 
become quite prominent in the mercantile life of the 
community. In a public capacity, Mr. Nelson stands 
among the front rank citizens for his public spirit in 
municipal affairs, having been a member of the local 
Board of Health for many years and its secretary. He 
has recently been appointed secretary of the Milk Ser- 
vice Commission of this city, this body being the first 
municipal Milk Service Commission appointed in the 
United States, functioning for the purpose of distribut- 
ing milk and milk products by direct municipal owner- 
ship and control. 

.August Frederick Nelson was born Jan. i, 1876, in 
Sweden, the only child of Gustaf .A. and Margaret 
(Johnson) Nelson. At the age of three and a half 
years he was brought to the United States by his parents 
who settled first in Antrim. Pa., removing thence to 
LaSalle, 111., and eventually making their permanent home 
in Buffalo, N. Y. August Frederick Nelson attended the 
grammar schools of that city. After leaving school he 
worked for various people, and during leisure hours he 
acquired an education by self-study. In 1904 he came to 
Jamestown and leased a store in the Fenton building, 
at the corner of Second and Main streets, in which he 
established himself in business. In 1907 he opened a 
retail shoe store, which included a repairing department 
equipped with modern machinery and giving employ- 
ment to several men. The venture proved successful 
and he became the head of a large and constantly grow- 
ing business. In October, 1919, he disposed of this 
business and interested himself in the G. R. Kinney 
Shoe Company, assuming management of this local store. 
While building up his trade in the shoe business he be- 
came interested in real estate, and is now the owner of 
many business blocks, tenements and dwellings, having 
purchased and developed various properties from an 
investment standpoint. He has built many fine blocks 
and remodelled others. Opposite the Jamestown High 
School he has built a brick block with stores, having all 
modern improvements; on Winsor and Second streets he 
has erected five stores, and on East Seventh street he 
built several houses, and improved others elsewhere. 

In the sphere of politics. Mr. Nelson is very active 
on the side of the Republicans, rendering valuable ser- 
vice as a speaker. For many years he has been a mem- 
ber of the Board of Health and for about nine years 
has served as its secretary. The careful study he has 
made of preventative medicine peculiarly fits him for 
service in the health department. He has been a mem- 
ber of the Board of Commerce. His only club is the 
Norden Club of Jamestown. He affiliates with the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, having passed the chairs 
and during 1918 held the rank of noble grand, and is 
a member of the Encampment. 

Mr. Nelson married, at Niagara Falls, .Kpri! 2^. 1800 



43^ 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



Mary, daughter of Joseph X. and Emma A. ^Waluiiiaii) 
Boehler. of Hamburg. Canada. Mr. and Mrs. Kolson 
are the parents of the following children : i. .Augustus C. 
bom March 17. 1S9S, educated in the public and high 
schools of Jamestown, and Albany Law School. 2. Nor- 
man F.. bom Oct. 24. 1002, educated in the public 
schools of Jamestown. 3. Elbert \'., born Sept. l6, 1913, 
now attending the graded schools of this city. 

Most emphatically Mr. Xelson is a self-made man; 
he has acquired by his own efforts a knowledge of sub- 
jects taught in high schools and colleges, and has read 
with appreciation the works of English and American 
scientists, as well as many other books of standard 
literature. In any community he would be a valuable 
man, and his fellow-citizens of Jamestown have evinced. 
on many occasions and in various ways, their thorough 
appreciation of his sterling character and fine abilities. 



CARL A. ANDERSON, business manager of the 
Jame;;own store of the J. G. McCrory Company, owners 
of n\e and ten cent stores throughout the United States, 
has been a resident of Jamestown for fourteen years, 
and during that time has created a good impression, 
being considered, by those who know him, as a good man 
of business, as an efficient store manager, and as a 
man of marked community interest 

He was bom in Sweden. May 17, 1S79, the son of 
Magnus O. and .\nna H. .\nderson, who came to this 
country from Sweden, settled in Utah, where Mr. .An- 
derson acquired a farm, which he operated until his 
death: his widow resides in L'tah at the present time 
0920>. 

Carl \. .\ndcrson was educated in the public schools 
of his native place, and when nineteen years of age 
c?me to this country. He immediately went West, to 
Omaha. N'eb.. and appears to have early grasped the 
desirability of taking a commercial course of study. He 
attended the Omaha Commercial College, and in due 
course became a graduate, which was creditable, bear- 
ing in mind that he had so recently arrived in the 
country, and that the language would have been a 
serious handicap to him in his study, ^\^^ile at school 
he also worked, finding cmplo>nnent in a packing house 
in Omaha. .Vfter graduating from the commercial col- 
lege, he was a checker in the packing house for a year, 
and then went into the employ of the McCrory Com- 
pany, as ris?.ist,->nt manager of their Omaha store. He 
held that position for nine months, and then received 
appointment as manager of their store at Anderson, 
Ind. .Xfter a service of eleven months at that place. 
he was called to Jamestown, X. ^'., to assume 
direction of the store interests in that city. The 
NfcCrory st'ire, which was opened in 1889, in the new 
WarnT Mock, Brooklyn Square, was managed for a 
f'-v.- months aftT C'lablishmcnt by Mr. J. G. McCrory 
him.'i'lf. and 'he center was considered an important 
one for the company, and demanderl the services of a 
provd manager. Hence, in I'/),;. Mr. .Anderson was 
callf-d to it and has since remain'-d. In August, loo^, 
it wru removed to its present location, N'os. 207-209 Main 
• treet. Jamf-t^town, and for a time the two stores were 
main'atn»-d in operation. Mr. .Anderson having the di- 
r'- lion of V.th, Evntually, however, the Jamestown 



business of the company was concentrated in the new 
store, and the original store was closed. 

It is almost needless to say that as a store manager 
Mr. .Anderson is a success; that might be inferred from 
the fact that he has been in the employ of, and in 
managerial capacity with such a corporation as the J, G. 
McCrory Company for so long. Men who rise to the 
position of manager in stores of such a corporation 
necessarily do so by ability only. And continuance in 
oflice indicates that no mistake was made in the choice 
of manager. Such corporations have so many men to 
choose from, and do business upon adaptability and 
merit only, that appointment is practically a certificate 
of amply demonstrated efficiency. 

Outside business hours, Mr. Anderson has given his 
time unselfishly to community afliairs. He is an ardent 
member of the First Baptist Church, Jamestown, and 
interests himself actively in Sunday school work, being at 
present assistant superintendent. Fraternally, he be- 
longs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and 
is a member of the Chautauqua Encampment. 

On Oct. I, 1908, Mr. Anderson was married to 
Carrie M. Howe, of Jamestown. Tliey have five chil- 
dren : Lowell, Maxine, Burdett, Irene, and Kermit. 



GILBERT THOMAS BOUCK— As a builder of 

small boats for lake use. Mr. Bouck is well known in 
Celoron, Chautauqua county, N. Y., where his yard is 
located. He is of Canadian birth, son of John F. and 
Elizabeth (Fader) Bouck, who at the time of the birth 
of their son were living at South Mountain, Province 
of Ont.Trio, Canada. 

Gilbert T. Bouck was born April 22, 1850, and ob- 
tained his education in the schools of his native place. 
He learned the ship carpenter's trade, at which he has 
worked all his active life, and in Celoron established a 
yard where he builds small boats and transacts a general 
business in that line. Mr. Bouck is a man well liked 
and esteemed, a member of the Masonic order, the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Protected Home 
Circle, and the First Baptist Church. In politics he is a 
Republican. 

Mr. Bouck married, Dec. 14, 1880, in St. Lawrence 
county, N. Y.. Arzetta Smith, born Dec. 12, 1863. dau.gh- 
ter of Harrison and Laura Smith. Mr. and Mrs. Bouck 
arc the parents of two children : Mabel, born Sept. 28, 
1882; and Alviii, born Feb. 28, 18S4. 



REUBEN R. WILLIAMS, for more than fifty 
years a resident in Conewango Valley, Chautauqua 
county, X. Y., and for long well known throughout the 
county as a prosperous farmer and stock raiser, and as 
an extensive dealer in cattle, was born in Leon, Cattar- 
aui'tis county, N. Y., March II, 1S67. the son of Norman 
I). Williams, formerly of Otto, N. Y., and Rebecca 
L. (Ross) Williams, who was a native of Leon. His 
father possessed a farm in Lenn, and there Reuben R. 
was borrr. 

After passing through flu- grades nf the district school 
nearest to his home, Reuben R. Williams entered the 
Ellington High School, and eventually graduated there- 
from, after which he entered seriously into farming 
pursuits. He resolved to become a skilled farmer, and 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



439 



throughout his life has followed the developments in 
scientific farming with keen interest and comprehen- 
sive understanding, and has been particularly interested 
in modern methods of stock raising and dairy farming. 
As a judge of cattle, and an extensive dealer in them, 
as well as an extensive raiser, he has gained an enviable 
reputation, as well as substantial success, and probably 
the subject in which he is most keenly interested, and 
upon which he can talk with the authority of an expert, 
is the raising and care of cattle. He is a member of the 
local Grange. Politically, he is a Republican, but 
throughout his life has manifested much more interest 
in agriculture and stock raising than in national political 
issues. And he has never sought political office. He has 
felt, with one exception, that the proper management of 
his farm was of greater consequence to him than even 
the most far-reaching political issue could ever be. The 
one exception was the World War, just ended so suc- 
cessfully, and even in that issue he felt that attention to 
production on his own farm was vital both to him and, 
in its degree, to the cause. He gave his son to the 
cause, as an American soldier, and he fought at home 
to win for the country and its allies his portion of that 
increased production of food stuffs the government 
stated that it relied upon the farmers of this country 
to furnish for the sustenance and continuance in the 
fight of its allies. And in the various financial cam- 
paigns to raise necessary national funds during the war, 
Mr. Williams took his due share, and when his son also 
returned safely from the inferno of the battlefields of 
France, it was with gratification and sincere thankful- 
ness that he looked back upon the contribution of his 
own family to the success gained by the forces of 
Right, against the breakers of international law and 
honor, who threatened to bring the entire world into its 
heartless dominion. 

Reuben R. Williams was married at Conewango, N. 
Y., March i6, 1893, to Amy Mason, born May 2, 1873, 
daughter of George J. and Josephine (Cowen) Mason, 
They are the parents of eight children : George M., born 
Jan. 22. 1S94; Helena J. born Aug. 18. 1S9S ; Jesse P., 
bom Aug. 9, 1897; Florence R., born Aug. 15, 1899; 
Cora M., born June 13, 1903; Laura M., born Feb. 7, 
1909; Vincent G., born Feb. 8, 1914; Margaret P., born 
April 21, 1919. 

Jesse P. Williams did not wait to be drafted; when 
war was declared, or rather when President Wilson 
declared this country to be in a state of war, he re- 
solved to enlist as soon as ever he could close his 
business and private affairs, and on July 26, 1917, he 
became a member of Company H, 49th Infantry, at Syra- 
cuse. Eventually, he was sent to Camp Merritt, N. J., 
and sailed for France, July 23, 1918, just after the 
commencement of the historic counter-drive which 
kept the Germans on the run, and eventually accom- 
plished their defeat. Young Williams was in France 
for six months, returning to America in February, loio, 
and being honorably discharged, Feb. 15, ipig. 



neers. Baker street, Jamestown, received that name as a 
tribute to his grandfather. Colonel Henry Baker, who 
was one of the first settlers and acquired extensive real 
estate holdings in the locality, and even to this day a 
copy of his deed is attached to transfers of real estate 
once belonging to the Baker family. Baker Park, the 
first park in the city of Jamestown, was a gift of 
Colonel Baker. 

Scott Baker was born in Jamestown, Aug. 18, 1876, 
the son of Charles S. and Katherine (Heffernan) Baker. 
He attended the Jamestown public schools, and after- 
wards passed through the High School, graduating there- 
from in 1895. To properly fit himself for a business 
career he pursued the full course of study at the James- 
town Business College. His first employment was in 
the local freight office of the Erie Railroad Company, 
where he was well-grounded in clerical work. Later, 
he entered the employ of the Atlas Furniture Company, 
of Jamestown, and still later was connected with the 
Bailey Table Company, in each case in executive capac- 
ity. He evidently was a reliable executive, for in the 
spring of 1904 he was offered the secretaryship of the 
Star Furniture Company of Jamestown. Since that 
year he has been connected with that important man- 
ufacturing company, latterly as treasurer, and has taken 
due part in its development. Mr. Baker's well ordered 
life, both in business and private affairs, has brought 
him a host of sincere friends in Jamestown, and his 
success is all the more gratifying to the historian to 
note because of the early association of the Baker fam- 
ily with the city of Jamestown. 

He is a member of St. Luke's Episcopal Church, a di- 
rector of the local Young Men's Christian Association, 
a member of the Norden Club, the Kiwanis Club, Satur- 
day Night Club, Moon Brook Country Club, and Mount 
Moriah Lodge, No. 145, Free and Accepted Masons. 
Although he does not very actively interest himself in 
political affairs, he took prominent part in furthering 
the cause of the Progressive party during the years of 
its existence. Primarily, he attends to the affairs of his 
business and to the maintenance of his home circle in 
comfort and wholesome Christian spirit. 

Mr. Baker married (first) in 1895, at Jamestown, 
Blanche Fisher, who died Jan. 17, 1914. On March 17, 
IQIS, he married (second) Bernice A. Lawson, of Sugar 
Grove, Pa. He has four children, all born to his first 
wife. They are : Ruth E., Margaret J., S. Sheldon, 
Scott F. 



SCOTT BAKER, well regarded citizen of James- 
town, N. Y., one of its representative men, and treas- 
urer of an important manufacturing industry of that 
place, comes into Jamestown history in another notable 
connection, for he is of the family of one of its pio- 



ALTON E. HAZELTINE, who was a city con- 
tractor in Jamestown, Chautauqua county, N. Y., and 
also is a prosperous farmer in the county, is a native of 
Chautauqua county, born in Jamestown, the son of one 
of the honored veterans of the Civil War. 

Alton E. Hazeltine was born May 4, 1867, a son of 
Daniel C. and Margaret Jane (Robbins) Hazeltine. His 
father was a blacksmith by trade, but during the Civil 
War had a notable record as a member of the famous 
Ninth New York Cavalry. Alton E. Hazeltine received 
a good education in Jamestown schools, passing from 
the graded school to the high school of the city. He 
satisfactorily graduated from that school, and then 
entered business. For many years he was a contractor 
in Jamestown, in partnership with another well known 



440 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



Jamesiown man of business, aiui acquired substantial 
means. But his inclination has led him into farming 
pursuits, and as a man of keen business intuition and 
alert intelligence, he has seen the advantage of and has 
adopted many modern methods of scientific farming, 
to his material advantage, while many a farmer of the 
old school has continued on in the old way while ponder- 
ing over the problem. And he has found much delight 
in farming, as well as profit, and has many friends 
among the leading agriculturists of the county. 

Politically. Mr. Hazeltine is a Republican; fraternally, 
he belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows 
and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. He 
is well known in Jamestown, and is also very popular, 
and had he wished for public office he probably might 
easily have secured election. He has never, however, 
shown any indication that he would favorably consider 
the question of standing for office ; in fact, he has more 
than once made it clear that political office has no attrac- 
tion for him. and would not in tlie slightest influence 
his decision upon any vital question. He. however, is 
an earnest Christian, and has been a member of the 
Congregational church for many years. 

On July II, 1894, Mr. Hazeltine married Jennie W. 
Wills, born Oct. 6, 1867, daughter of Christopher Wills. 
They have one child, Robert L. Hazeltine, born Dec. 3, 

During the progress of the recent World War, Mr. 
Hazeltine took keen part in many of the home activities 
connected therewith. He subscribed to the various 
funds promoted to further some phase of the nation's 
activities, and upon his farm he did his share in further- 
ing the ctTort of the .\merican farmers, as a class, to 
farm more closely, so as to bring an increased yield 
of loodstufts, which increase the nations of Europe 
stood so desperately in need of. So much has been 
written about the glorious achievements of the young 
Americans who went into the actual field of battle, that 
one is apt to overlook the less spectacular, but in reality 
very consequential part played in the final victory by the 
American farmer and others who worked in the national 
cause at home. In its comprehensive aspect, the part 
taken by the American farmer has been recorded; in 
the individual aspect, the part of the individual -Amer- 
ican farmer might well be recorded whenever oppor- 
tunity occurs. In all his business activities, Mr. Hazel- 
tine has ever held to the truest surety of success — 
honesty. He has endeavored always to do to others as 
he would expect to be done by, and thus he has gained 
general respect as well as material success. 



EMMETT PARD BARMORE. prosperous and 
rfip(!rt'-d farmer of Gcrrry. Ch;iMtaur|ua comity, N. Y., is 
rcjiresentativc of the enterprising younger g'-ncration of 
successful agriculturists of the county. He has a good 
prfi(K-rty, farms it f-ncrgetically, but intelligently, and is 
cvT r'-ady to intrwlucc modern methods which have 
l)*-<m demonstrated to be an improvement upon the 
method? of former days. AnrI he fakes an active in- 
terest also in public and community affairs, and partic- 
ularly in school and church work. He is a trustee of 
th<- I'.ral school I)'<ard. 

}]<■ is a native of Chautauqua county. N. Y.. the 
Earmorc family having had residence within its borders 



for at least four generations, including that of his 
children. And he is enthusiastic in all matters that have 
reference to the comity and its advancement; and 
certainly, in his productive farming, he is well carrying 
through the part of one resident to maintain the county 
in substantial prosperity. His birth date was March 3, 
iSSi, and place of birth, Gerry, where his parents, 
Frederick \'. and Rachel O. (Shepardson) Barmore, 
had lived all their married life and where his father had 
been born. He received the customary public school 
education of the time, and after leaving school took to 
farming occupations upon his father's farm. He has re- 
mained at farming ever since, and always in or near 
the place of his birth. Mr. Barmore is a Prohibitionist, 
althougli a Republican in politics, but is not a blind 
follower of any party. And upon certain questions of 
national politics he has, in the past, been outspoken in 
his opinions. During the recent World War, Mr. Bar- 
more followed the progress of national affairs with in- 
tense interest ; he was a substantial contributor to the 
various funds which were raised, in the form of loans 
or subscriptions, to meet the purposes of the nation in 
the prosecution of the war. Mr. Barmore has prob- 
ably a generation of productive effort in agriculture 
still before him. but up to now he has done commendably, 
and has proved himself to be a good patriot, a good 
citizen, and a good neighbor. 

Mr. Barmore married, at Gerry, June 5, 1906, Mildred 
Ostrander, who was born in Gerry, April 7, 1888, and 
also comes from a family long resident In the county, 
her parents, Orville and Lana (Fargo) Ostrander, 
having also been born in thecounty. To Mr.and Mrs. Bar- 
more have been born three children : Merritt, born May 
24, 1908; Harriet Oneita, born May 22, 1910; Elwood 
O.. born March 25, 1015. 



KLOID STANLEY RICE, a prominent and pros- 
perous farmer of Klliiigtoii. where he has been en- 
gaged in agricultural pursuits for a number of years, 
is a native of this place, his birth having occurred Jan. 
9, 1891. Mr. Rice is a son of Charles H. and Myrtle C. 
(Carpenter) Rice, respected residents of Ellington, where 
the former is also a farmer. 

Mr. Rice attended the Ellington public schools and 
was graduated from the high school here with the class 
of 1909. His childhood was spent on his father's farm 
where he became familiar with farm work, and he later 
purchased farm property of his own in the vicinity of 
the former place. Since that tme he has devoted his 
attention to dairying and apple growing and disposes 
of this, his produce, in the surrounding local markets. 
He has already Imilt up a large and substantial business, 
and is known as one of the substantial citizens of the 
place. Mr. Rice, in addition to his farm activities, has 
taken a considerable interest in the business operations 
of the community, and is associated with the Conewango 
Valley National Bank of Conewango Valley. Mr. Rice 
has also been prominent in public affairs and was 
elected in the year 1917 to the office of justice of the 
peace, which he continues to hold at the present time. 
Mr. Rice is a member of the local Grange of Kllington, 
and has been active in promoting the general agricul- 
tural interests of the region. In his religious belief, he is 




•j^ MO . & ^^^-^^ > 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



441 



a Congregationalist and attends the First Congrega- 
tional church in Ellington. 

Kloid Stanley Rice was united in marriage, Aug. 24, 
1918, with E. Frankie Johnson, a native of Sheridan, 
N. Y., where her birth occurred July 10, 1892, a daughter 
of William E. and Cora E. (Aldrich) Johnson, Mr. 
Johnson a native of Sheridan, Chautauqua county, N. V., 
and Mrs. Johnson a native of Hamburg, Erie county, N. 
Y. 

FRANK MATHEWS EVANS, D. D. S.— In view 
of the fact that he is now postmaster of Fredonia, and 
e.x-president and ex-trustee of the village, the public 
might almost be expected to become unmindful of Dr. 
Evans' professional standing were it not that the skill 
which has brought relief to so many does not allow them 
to forget it. Dr. Evans is influential in Masonic affairs, 
and a figure of prominence in the social circles of his 
home town. 

Frank Mathews Evans was born Oct. 29, 1S76, on his 
father's farm near Boston, N. Y., a son of John and 
Mary (Hatch) Evans. Mr. Evans is now deceased, and 
his widow resides at Springville, N. Y. Frank Mathews 
Evans attended local district schools, passing thence to 
Springville, N. Y., High School, from which he was 
graduated in 1900. It was Mr. Evans intention to study 
for admission to the bar, but in 1900 he obtained a 
position at the Pan-American Exposition in Buffalo, 
and while there was induced by the prediction of a 
clairvoyant to turn his attention to dentistry. Accord- 
ingly, he worked his way through the dental depart- 
ment of Buffalo University, being obliged to take four 
years for a three years' course, and in 1905 graduating 
with the degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery. After 
working one year in a dentist's office. Dr. Evans came 
to Fredonia in August, 1906, where he has built up an 
extensive and lucrative practice. 

As a staunch supporter of the principles of the Dem- 
cratic party. Dr. Evans has been for many years a 
prominent political worker, and before coming to Fre- 
donia was well known as a campaign orator, taking the 
stump as a supporter of William J. Bryan. .After serv- 
ing as president and trustee of the village, he was ap- 
pointed in .April. igi6, postmaster of Fredonia, and his 
administration has been, as his fellow-citizens can 
testify, fully satisfactory in every respect. He affiliates 
with the Masons of Fredonia, the Elks of Dunkirk, and 
is a member of the Citizens' Club of Fredonia. He 
is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church of his 
home town. 

Dr. Evans married, Dec. 6, 1905, ^^abel, daughter of 
Randolph and Sarah McWilliams, of Pittsburgh, and 
they are the parents of the following children : Stanley, 
Mendal, Charles, and Arthur. All these are in school with 
the exception of the youngest who attends the kinder- 
garten. Dr. and Mrs. Evans first met while the former 
was employed at the Pan-American E.xposition in Buff- 
alo. Frank Mathews Evans is, most emphatically, a 
man who counts in his community and always on the 
side of progress, reform and enlightened government. 



one of the representative, responsible and industrious 
residents of that section of the county, was born in 
Poland, Chautauqua county, N. Y., Oct. 25, 1875, the 
son of George Frank and Eunita (Page) Williams. 
His father, who by trade was a carpenter, was well 
known in the district and erected many buildings in 
that section of the county. He was an industrious, un- 
assuming, steadygoing man and had many sincere 
friends. 

Earl R. Frisbee, who has taken the name of Myron 
Frisbee, who adopted him when he was two years old, 
and with whom he remained until his marriage, 
went to the Ellington public school in his boyhood, 
and he had not advanced far into his teens when he was 
in full work, from morning until night, taking any 
honest labor that offered. Eventually he became estab- 
lished as a blacksmith and farrier at Conewango Valley. 
As such, during the long period he has been at the forge 
and anvil, he has come into close contact with most of 
the agriculturists of the neighborhood, and he is gener- 
ally held in high regard. And his business has steadily 
prospered. In political allegiance, he is a Republican, 
but he has shown, on more than one occasion, that he is 
a man of original thought, and that he will not follow 
any party platform blindly. And although he has taken 
some part in political activities, he has never accepted 
political office. He does not belong to any fraternal 
societies, secret orders, nor other organizations of that 
type, but throughout his life, since he reached adult age. 
he has been an earnest Congregationalist. conscientious 
in his observance of Christian duties and principles. 

Mr. Frisbee married, March 9, 1898, at Cherry Creek, 
Chautauqua county, N. Y.. Edna M. Hinds, born March 
7, 1875, daughter of Thomas P. and Mary M. CArnold) 
Hinds. They have two children : Eunice Bell, born 
May 13, 1903; Myron George, born July 21, 1908. 

During the terrible war just ended, Mr. and Mrs. 
Frisbee took proper and enthusiastic part in the various 
movements promoted to further the cause, and they 
contributed substantially to the several patriotic funds. 



EARL R. FRISBEE, who has been in independent 
business as a blacksmith in Conewango Valley, Chau- 
tauqua county, N. Y., for so many years, and who is 



PETER E. LARSON— There have been few ele- 
ments in the general life of Jamestown. Chautauqua 
ccunty, N. Y., so highly valued as that supplied by the 
large population of Swedish birth or extraction that 
have made that city their home, members of which have 
engaged in well nigh every form of activity in the 
region and become successful financiers, manufacturers, 
business men, merchants and farmers. Among these 
there is no name better known than that of Peter E. 
Larson, who conducts a successful business in the city. 

Mr. Larson is a native of Sweden, born March 23, 
1861, a son of Peter and .\nna (Krestena) Larson, the 
former an agriculturist in his own land. He was a 
young man when he came from Sweden to the United 
States, and it was on July 13, 1883, that he first came to 
Jamestown to make his permanent home. He had al- 
ready received a thorough training In agriculture as a 
lad on his father's farm, as well as an excellent educa- 
tion in the schools near his native town in Sweden. He 
is engaged in the sale of milk and cream, and is a 
much respected figure in the business life of the com- 
munity. In his religious belief, Mr. Larson is a Sweden- 



44^ 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



borgian and attends the church of that denomination 
at Jamestown. 

Peter E. Larson was united in marriage, December, 
-. lS5,-, with Sophia Grieph, a daugliter of John and Anna 
S. ( Erepon) Grieph, old and highly respected residents 
of Jamestown, and they are the parents of eight chil- 
dren, as follows: l. Walter, horn Sept- 22. 1S88, was 
educated and grew to manhood in Jamestown ; he was 
drafted into the United States Arniy, Sept. 30, 1017, 
and was sent to Syracuse. X. Y., for his preliminary 
training: from there he went to France and saw active 
scr\ice in the terrible closing campaigns of the World 
War, taking part in no fewer than five battles. 2. 
Plenney S.. born March 15. iSgi ; he was also drafted, 
entering the army, July 20, igiS, and three days later, 
upon his acceptance by the board, was sent directly to 
Europe, where his training took place : he remained six 
months abroad and was honorably discharged from the 
service, Feb. 4. IQIO. 3. Elmer E., born Nov. 24, 1S92; he 
received his education in the Jamestown schools, and 
upon completing his studies secured a position in the 
post oSce in Washington, D. C. ; his death occurred in 
Jamestown. March S, 1916. 4. .-Knna S., born Nov.24, 1894, 
died in early infancy. 5. Ruth E., born .\pril 2, 1896. 6. 
Harry R., born Sept. 30, iSoJ:'; he enlisted in the United 
States navy, Jan. 8, iQiS, and was assigned to the task 
of carrying our troops to France, crossing the Atlantic 
no less than eleven times. 7. Esther A., born Feb. 2, 
1900. S. May Dora, born May 9, 1901. 



JACOB H. JONES— Many years ago, David Jones 
came from Wales, Great Britain, and found a home in 
Prince Edward county, province of Ontario, Canada. 
There his son, Thomas Jones, was born, and spent his 
life, and there Jacob H. Jones, son of Thomas Jones, 
and grandson of David Jones, the pioneer settler, was 
bom. Thomas Jones married Rachel Verex and both 
died in Belleville. Ontario, Canada. They were mem- 
bers of the Methodist Episcopal church, and the father 
was a lifelong farmer. 

Jacob H. Jones was Ijorn near Pict<^iu, the capital oi' 
Prince Edward coimty. province of Ontario, Canada, 
.•\ug. 24. 1849. and there he pas.^cd the first fifteen years 
of his life. He had limited school opportunities and 
at a very early age became a farm worker. This con- 
dition roused dissatisfaction in his breast, and he re- 
solved to leave home, which at the age of fifteen he 
did. having as a companion a boy but little older than 
himself, Levi Carr. neither having any amount of money. 
The b'lvs maric their way across the border anfj 
rt-achcd the Uni'ed States safely, continuing across New 
^'ork State until Jacob H. made his way into Chau- 
tat:r)iia cunty, and found employment with .'\scl Burn- 
h;im, a farmer of the town of Arkwright. He received 
$20 monthly a.s wages, and he was in the employ of 
difTefnt farmers r.f (hat section. During the follow- 
injf winter he a'tendcd district school No. 8 in the town 
'f Charlott'-. In iW»7 he entered the employ of Nelson 
Cha»c. who<c son-in-law he later became. Aft'-r some 
yr,-;r^ he went Wet to the State of Iowa, bought a 
farm n'-ar the .Minnf^^.ta boundary, and became a grain 
frow-r and a maniifacltir'-r of rherse. a trade he had 
learned in Chautauf|!ia rounty. After three years in the 
West he sold hii farm and business and returned East, 



going to the oil holds at Bradford, Pa., there remaining 
one year. His next move was to return to Charlotte, 
Chautauqua county, N. Y., there purchasing a farm in 
the Chase neighborhood known as the Crampton Farm, 
containing 120 acres. Mr. Jones engaged in stock rais- 
ing and dairy farming very successfully until 1893, then 
leaving the farm he came to Jamestown and opened up 
Inisincss in the Broadhead building, on what is now 
Roosevelt square, as a wholesale dealer in butter, eggs, 
and other produce. He continued that business very 
successfully for eight years, then sold out and later 
opened a wholesale fruit business in the GifFord block, 
v/hich he conducted for two years. He then moved to 
a location at East Second and Winsor streets, taking in 
his son Earl C. as a partner, and operating as J. H. 
Jones & Son, and conducting a retail grocery for five 
years. Mr. Jones, Sr., then retired from the firm, and 
bought a tract of ten acres of fertile land which he 
has since cultivated as a market garden, supplying the 
local market. 

A man of whole-souled generous impulse, Mr. Jones 
is greatly liked and esteemed in his community, and is 
a citizen beyond reproach. He is a Democrat in politics, 
but neither seeks nor desires public ofhce. He is a 
member of Sylvanus Lodge, No. 303, Sinclairville, and 
his religious creed is the Golden Rule. Honorable and 
upright in all his dealings, he is a good exemplifica- 
tion of the value of that rule and of its practicability. 

Jacob H. Jones married, in Charlotte, Chautauqua 
count.v, N. Y., in 1875, Celinda Chase, born in that 
town, daughter of Nelson Chase, and a sister of Albert 
N. Chase, of Charlotte. Mr. and Mrs. Jones are the 
parents of five children: I. Jennie, married E. Jay 
Harris, superintendent of the Watson Manufacturing 
Company of Jamestown, and they have three children: 
Marion, Rachel, and Wilbur. 2. Earl C, now with the 
Watson Manufacturing Company, formerly his father's 
business partner; he married Mildred Flagg, and has 
two chilldren, Flora and Roger. 3. Clara R., who re- 
sides in Vancouver, British Columbia. 4. Jessie, died 
young. 5. Frances Victoria, married J. A. Carlson, a 
farmer of the town of Ellicott, Chautauqua county. N. 
Y., and has a daughter, Virginia Mary Carlson. The 
Jones home is at No. 40 Flagg avenue, Jamestown. 



HERBERT DEYO TERWILLIGER— Five years' 
residence in Fredonia has fully established Mr. Ter- 
williger in the position of one of her leading business 
men and most public-spirited citizens. As head of the 
wH'll known firm of Terwilligcr & Salzer, and as the 
present inciunbcnt of the responsible office of city trus- 
tee, he rcfpn'res no introduction in a work of this 
character. 

Herbert Dcyo Terwilligcr was born March 17, 
1883, on a farm in Broome county, N. Y., and is a son 
of John and Elizabeth (Adams) Terwilligcr. Mrs. 
Terwilligcr passed away in 1917, in Binghamton, N. 
\., and Mr. Terwilligcr is still living in that place. The 
education of their son was received in local district 
schools and at the Binghamton High School. Without 
waiting to graduate he entered, at an early age, into the 
MTi')Us work of life, finding employment in a candy 
factory, wlnri- In- nmained two years. He thoi became 
an orderly in the IJingliamton City Hospital, his desire 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



443 



being to study medicine and graduate as a member of 
the medical profession. Lack of funds frustrated his 
ambition, but he entered Bellevue Hospital, New York, 
graduating there, and also at the Mills Training School, 
in 1904, with the degree of R. N., having worked his 
way through these institutions. He passed in the same 
way through the Renard School of Embalming, gradu- 
ating in 1909. Going then to Binghamton, N. Y., Mr. 
Terwiiliger became an undertaker and furniture dealer, 
combining the two lines of business until the spring 
of 1914, when he moved to Fredonia, and formed a 
partnership with E. J. Salzer under the firm name of 
Terwiiliger & Salzer. They conduct a large furniture 
store, at the same time carr\'ing on a business as funeral 
directors. 

In civic affairs Mr. Terwiiliger has long taken a very 
active part, and in various forms of war work was an 
acknowledged leader. In politics he is a Republican, 
and is now serving his second term as trustee of the 
town of Fredonia. He affiliates with Eastern Light 
Lodge, No. 126, Free and Accepted Masons, of Greene, 
N. Y. ; with the Chapter of Greene ; and with the Con- 
sistory and Shrine, of Binghamton. He has attained 
to the thirty-second degree. He also affiliates with 
Chautauqua Lodge, No. 382, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, of Fredonia; Grape Vine Lodge, No. 81, Mac- 
cabees, in which he is recorder ; and belongs to Fre- 
donia Grange and Citizens' Club. He occupies a seat 
on the Board of Commerce. His religious membership 
is in the Episcopal church of Fredonia. in which he 
holds the office of vestryman and treasurer. 

Mr. Terwiiliger married. March 10, 1903, in "The 
Little Church around the Comer," New York City, 
Josephine Alice, daughter of Gustavus and Pauline 
(Bowers) Russ, whom he met while serving in Belle- 
vue Hospital. Mrs. Terwiiliger is a graduate of that in- 
stitution and also of the Renard School of Embalming, 
and is now her husband's very valuable assistant in his 
business. Most emphaticallv is Mr. Terwiiliger a self- 
made man and, equally emphatically, is he a man with a 
record to be proud of. 



of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the 
Grange. 

Guy VV. Milspaw was united in marriage on Christ- 
mas Day, 1901, at Falconer, N. Y., with Jennie A. 
Bedient, a nativfe of that town, born May 8, 1872, a 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Erwin Bedient, of Falconer. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Milspaw six children have been born, 
as follows: Ray H., born June 19, 1903; I'la B., born 
25, 1905; Irwin W., born Oct. 15, 1909; Harry M., 
born May 15,. igii; Hazel B., born Oct. 14, 1913; and 
Lynn G., born July 7, 1916. 



GUY W. MILSPAW, who has been recognized as 
one of the most substantial and influential citizens of 
Cherry Creek, Chautauqua county. N. Y., for a number 
of years, is a native of the town of Ellington in the 
same county, a son of William and Martha (Magee) 
Milspaw, old and highly respected residents of the 
latter place. The elder Mr. Milspaw was also born at 
Ellington, in the year 1847, and there for many years 
conducted extensive farming operations and was highly 
successful. He married Martha Magee, a native of 
Ohio, born in 1845, and one of their children was Guy 
\V. Milspaw, with whose career we are here concerned. 

Guy W. Milspaw was born Oct. 22. 1875, and passed 
his childhood in his native town of Ellington, where he 
attended the local public schools and was finally gradu- 
ated from the high school there. Since that time Air. 
Milspaw has been engaged successfully in the milling 
and feed business at Cherry Creek, where he also makes 
his home. In politics he is a Republican, but although 
his talents and abilities amply fit him to hold public 
office he has never been ambitious for political prefer- 
ment of any kind, choosing rather to exert his influence 
as a private citizen. He is a member of the local lodge 



SANDERS M. THAYER— No record of the suc- 
cessful men of Jamestown, Chautauqua county, N. Y., 
would be complete without mention of Sanders M. 
Thayer, who has for many years been engaged in the 
occupations of farming and contracting, and who has 
now reached a well assured place in the general esteem 
of the community. Mr. Thayer is a native of the town 
of Ellicott, N. Y., born Oct. 15, 1858, a son of Manley 
and Mary L. (Be wen) Thayer, the latter a native of 
Portland, N. Y. The elder Mr. Thayer was a farmer 
and builder, and founded the double business of agri- 
culture and contracting that has been carried on so 
successfully by his son. 

Sanders M. Thayer passed his childhood and early 
youth in his native region, and after completing his 
studies at the local schools, which he attended for a 
number of years, served a period of apprenticeship 
under the direction of his father. Eventually, upon the 
death of the elder man, he took over the prosperous 
business developed by the latter, and since that time 
has consistently carried on the same, in the conduct of 
which he has displayed unusual ability as an organizer 
and executive, and is now regarded as one of the most 
substantial citizens of Jamestown, which has always been 
the scene of his activities, .-^s a farmer he has shown 
a progressive conservatism which has been productive 
of the most gratifying results, combining in the culti- 
vation of his farm his own practical experience and that 
of his agricultural forbears with the more theoretical 
knowledge evolved by modern science. The same char- 
acteristics have marked him in his contracting enter- 
prises, his shrewd grasp of practical affairs being, per- 
haps, an inheritance from his old Scottish ancestry, 
it being from that sturdy stock that the Thayers are 
sprung. He has always exhibited a public-spirited inter- 
est in the general welfare of the community, especially in 
connection with its agricultural development, and is 
one of the most intelligent and active members of the 
local Grange. Another characteristic derived from his 
Scottish forbears is his strong religious convictions and 
beliefs, and he is one of the stanchest members of the 
Jlethodist church of Jamestown. 

Sanders M. Thayer was united in marriage, Oct. 15. 
1888, at Jamestown with Jessie Denslow, an native of 
that city, born Aug. 30, 1861, a daughter of Willard T. 
and Laura Jane (Smiley) Denslow, who were born 
respectively in Batavia and Ellicott, N. Y. Mr. and 
Mrs. Thayer are the parents of two children, as follows: 
Ralph E., born June 27, 1880, married Isabel Morgan, 
by whom he has had three children : Ros^;, Ralph, and 

Ruth: and Robert L., born Oct. 17. 1806, married 
.Mvida Swanson. by whom he has had two children: 

Robert, and William. 



444 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



ANDREW PAUL JONES— At the age of sixty- 
eight Andrew Paul Jones was called away without 
warning, his death the result of an accident on the Erie 
Railroad at Celoron. Chautauqua county. N. V. His 
widow. Anna Sophia (Morgan^ Jones, yet sur\ives him, 
her home also the home of her youngest son, Charles 
Russell Tones, a cabinetmaker and ofiicial of the village 
of Celoron. The excellencies of the boats built by 
Andrew Paul Jones brought him local fame, and he is 
yet spoken of ,is a builder of good boats and as a good 
citizen. In his own line of mechanical work the son, 
Charles R.. emulates the example of his father, and in 
his mcHlem home in Celoron are many articles testi- 
fying to his expertness as a worker in wood. 

.\ndre\v Paul Jones was bom in Sweden, March 31, 
liLp, died in the village of Celoron, Chautauqua count>, 
N. v.. Oct. 12. 1010. He became a skilled mechanic, and 
for several years after coming to the United States 
he was eng:3ged with his brother as a carriage builder, 
continuing in that business in Jamestown irom 1870 
until 1S92. He then opened a boat livery at Burtis Bay 
on the shore of Chautauqua Lake, which he conducted 
until his accidental death, eighteen years Tater. During 
the Civil War. Mr. Jones enlisted and served one year 
in the L'nited States navy. He allied himself with the 
Republican party, the Grand .Army of the Republic of 
Jamestown, and the Swedish Methodist Episcopal 
church.. 

Mr. Jones married, in Jamestown, in 1878, Anna 
Sophia Morgan, bom Aug. 31, 1847, in Sweden, daughter 
of Charles and Mary (Larsen) Morgan. Mrs. Jones 
continues her residence in Celoron. She is the mother 
of two sons: i. Clayton M.. born Oct. 2, 1879, a mem- 
ber of the Chautauqua county bar. practicing in James- 
town, his law office in the Fenton building; he married 
.Aimee Cedarquist, and has two children: Marietta and 
Clayton ^f., Jr. 2. Charles Russell, born Nov. 5, 1884, 
was educated in the public schools and graduated from 
the Jamestown High School and after finishing his 
studies learned the cabinetmaker's trade, which he still 
follows ; he has taken a deep interest in Celoron village 
affairs, and has served as tax collector, village trustee, 
assessor, and for the pa.st three years treasurer of the 
Celoron Ho«e Company ; he built the home in Celoron, 
now occupied by his widowed mother and himself. 



ELMER C. GIFFORD— The auto industry, that 
mo^t flourishing and .'•ggressive of morlern enterprises, 
has no more energetic representative in Cha\itauqua 
county than the citizen of Jamestown whoso name the 
bi'/graphcr has just written. Mr. GifTord in influentially 
associated with the financial interests r)f his community 
and is well known in fraternal and social circles. 

Elmer C. GifTord was t>orn Jan. 11, 1874. in Riisti, 
Chautaufjua county, N'. V., and is a son of Charles D. 
and Clem-ni'ine J. f Hitchcock) GifTord. The death of 
Mr, Giffr.rd '■<<-currfd in firi^ and in 1018 Mrs. GifTord 
pa-^fd away. The 'duTiiiin of Elmer C. GifTord was 
received in l^rral grammar and high schools and was 
stippl'nnenled by a course at the Jamestown Business 
C'/Mr-y. I'ntil the sprin/ of loi^ he worked on the 
GifTord hom'-st'-ad. This farm was purchased from the 
Holland I^nd 0->mpany and is devoted to general dairy 
work and the breeding of cattle. The estate originally 



consisted of 200 acres, but has been reduced by the sale 
of nine farms, leaving only about 40 acres for the use 
of the owners. 

In IQ16 Mr. GifTord engaged in the auto business as 
agent for the Interstate Company. In May of the same 
year he bought land and, in association with Albert G. 
Johnson, erected a building containing a showroom and 
service station. The venture proved successful and 
Mr. Gifford, in association with L. B. Parker, now con- 
trols the agency for the Buick, Chevrolet, and Haynes 
automobiles, and the Case tractor and Stewart trucks, for 
Jamestown and the surrounding territory, Mr. Gifford 
has been for sixteen years a director of the Farmers' 
anil Mechanics' Bank. 

In politics Mr. Gifford is a Republican, but has never 
been active in public afTairs. He is a member of the 
.Auto Dealers' Association of Jamestown, belongs to the 
Grange, and affiliates with the Knights of Pythias. His 
only club is the Rotary. 

Mr. Gifford married. Sept. 20, 1800. Pearl Terry, 
daughter of Jay Terry, and they are the parents of three 
children: Louise, Charles, and Corydon. Mr. Gifford 
has one sister. Mrs. Marion G. Martin, of Jamestown. 

El.mer C. Gifford has certainly proved a most valuable 
reenforcenient to the auto interests of Chautauqua 
county. Undoubtedly he will do much to make the in- 
dustrv flourish in Western New York. 



EMMETT W. ALEXANDER— Hugh Alexander, 
grandfather of Emmett W. Alexander, of Lakewood, N. 
Y., came to Chautauqua county from the State of Ver- 
mont and settled in the town of Harmony. There he 
followed the occupation of farmer and there his son, 
Daniel .Alexander, was born, who settled on a farm at 
RIockville, in Harmony, and there spent the remainder 
of his days. He married Charlotte Scofield, also born in 
the town of Harmony, and they were the parents of 
Emmett W. .Alexander, now of Lakewood, N. Y., a 
merchant and an esteemed citizen. 

Emmett W. Alexander was born at the home farm 
in Blockville, Harmony, N. Y'., June 10, 1850. He re- 
ceived his education in the public schools of his home 
town. He began his business career as a farmer, but 
later became a contractor. He settled in the village of 
Lakewood. where he is engaged in business as a retail 
coal dealer. He is a Republican in politics, a member of 
the Methodist Episcopal church, and for twenty-nine 
years, 1891-1020, has been a member of Lakewood 
Tvodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

Mr. A.lexander married, Sept. 20, 1871, at Blockville, 
N. Y., Mary Jones, born at French Creek, Chautauqua 
coimty, N. Y., March 14, 1854, died at the family home 
fjn Chautauqua avenue, Lakewood, May i?, 1020. Mrs. 
Alexandir was the daughter of James H. and Laura 
(■ Sullivan) Jones, her mother born in Clymer, Chau- 
tauqua county, N. Y., daughter of a Clymer farmer 
and minister. Two sons were born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Alexander: Roy C, born Oct. 2, 187S, married Effie J. 
I'elersoii, in Jamestown, and they arc the jiarents of 
two children: Emmett W. and Dorothy J. Alexander; 
Seward G., born July 0, 1880. married Mabel J. White, 
risides in Warren, Pa., and they are the parents of a 
sun, Donald M. Alexander. 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



445 



ALVIN E. PETERSON— Now that the Swedes of 
Jamestown are believed to number about 20,000, the 
question of priority of settlement becomes one of in- 
terest. The pioneer actual settlers were two young 
women, both born in Sweden, who first went to Sugar 
Grove, Pa., with other Swedes who settled there. The 
two young women, Johanna Charlotta Johnson and Lisa 
Lena Anderson, left Sugar Grove in the summer of 
1849, found employment in the nearby village of James- 
town, and became its first actual Swedish residents. 
One of these young women, Lisa Lena Anderson, born 
in Sweden, July 30, 1833, married, June 28, 1851, Otto 
Peterson, a farmer and tanner, born in Sweden, March 
3, 1831, came to the United States and settled in James- 
town in 1850, and there died Nov. 24, 1903. His widow, 
Mrs. Lisa Lena (.\nderson) Peterson, yet survives her 
husband, and is now (1920), at the age of eighty-seven, 
residing in Jamestown at No. 296 Harrison street. 
Among the twelve children of Otto and Lisa Lena 
(Anderson) Peterson was a son. Alvin E., eleventh 
child and second son. 

Alvin E. Peterson was born in Jamestown, N. Y., Feb. 
26, 1873. and is now (1920) a resident of the village of 
Celoron, and one of the prosperous business men of 
that popular lake resort. He was educated in the James- 
town public schools, finishing in high school, and from 
an early age has been a wage earner and business man. 
He has long been associated with the development of 
Celoron as a summer resort, and until its destruction 
by fire owned and managed the large amusement pavil- 
lion. He is now proprietor of a confectionery and ice 
cream parlor in the park and does a good business. He 
is a member of the First Swedish Lutheran Church, 
and in politics is an independent. He built his present 
residence in Celoron and has other real estate invest- 
ments in the village. 

Mr. Peterson married, Sept. 23, 1908, Rev. Julius 
Lincoln, pastor of the First Lutheran Church of James- 
town, officiating, Jennie Maria Warner, born in Sweden, 
daughter of Ludvig and Maria (Ryd) Warner. 



EARL JESTIE FOSTER, an enterprising young 
farmer who is succeeding well in the cultivation of his 
acreage in Ripley township. Chautauqua county. N. Y., 
has shown himself to be a worthy son of a worthy 
father, the latter, William Foster, having had responsi- 
ble and consequential connection with agriculture in 
Chautauqua county for many decades. 

Earl Jestie Foster was born in the town of Westfield, 
Chautauqua county, N. Y., Sept. 6, 1877. the son of 
William and Julia (Bunville) Foster. He was edu- 
cated in district schools of Westfield and Brocton, 
Chautauqua county, and for a time in district schools 
of Erie county, N. Y. After completing his schooling, 
he resolutely applied himself to farming and has since 
continued to pass his entire time in agricultural pursuits 
with the exception of six years, three years working 
in the Liternational Street Car Company, and three 
years in the Buffalo & Lake Erie Street Car Company, 
in Buffalo. N. Y. In 1915, he purchased a farm in Rip- 
ley township and he has since appreciably improved it. 
It is 63 acres in extent, quite enough in these days of 
highly paid and scarce help, and he has erected a new 
granary, silo, and milk house. He has about nine acres 



of his land in vineyard, and has an additional acreage 
of other fruits, but his main farming is dairy, which 
means hard work, but consistently substantial returns. 

Mr. Foster is a Republican in his political allegiance, 
and fraternally belongs to the Ripley branch of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He is much inter- 
ested in the functioning of the Ripley Grange, of which 
he is a member, and he is interested in all matters per- 
taining to farming. Upon his farm he is adopting many 
modern methods, and is an observant student of agri- 
cultural developments. Religiously, he is a Methodist, 
which denomination he substantially supports. 

Mr. Foster married, Feb. 20, 1901, Mary Homewood, 
of a well known Ripley family. ■ They have two chil- 
dren : Leigh, who now attends school ; and Clara. 

Mr. Foster is an aggressive, optimistic, and skillful 
farmer, and probably has another generation of conse- 
quential connection with Chautauqua county agriculture 
still before him, and he will probably advance in mater- 
ial possessions as rapidly as he has during the last four 
or five years, for he is of the type that, having put his 
shoulder to the wheel, will hold to the task as long as 
the task exists. And Mr. Foster's task will probably 
last until old age, for he indicates in his work that 
farming pursuits are to him his hobby and pleasure, as 
well as his means of subsistence. He is reputed to be 
a good neighbor, and since he has been on his present 
farm he and his wife have made many friends, and have 
taken part in community movements. During the war 
he manifested a worthy patriotism, subscribing to the 
various loans and other funds raised for the needs of 
the government during that period. 



CHARLES EDWARD BROWN is among the suc- 
cessful representatives of the agricultural interests of 
Chautauqua county. The appearance of his name wins 
instantaneous and appreciative recognition as that of an 
enterprising citizen of Ripley. He has long been active 
in the political life of his community, filling with credit 
numerous local offices, and is now holding that of deputy 
sheriff. 

Charles Edward Brown was born .'\pril 27, 1863, on 
a farm in South Otselic, N. Y., and is a son of Win- 
sor and Lucy (Seldon) Brown. Charles Edwara 
Brown attended the district schools of the neighbor- 
hood, and assisted in the labors of the farm, later find- 
ing employment in the cheese factory of which his 
father was the owner and which he conducted in con- 
junction with the management of his farm. In 1874 the 
family moved to Ripley, Chautauqua county, and there 
Charles Edward worked on the farm and attended 
school. At the age of twenty he engaged in the retail 
meat business, meeting with such success that he con- 
ducted his own establishment for thirteen years. \t the 
end of that time he sold out and with the capital which he 
had accumulated he purchased a farm, which he still 
cultivates. In addition to his work as an agriculturist, 
Mr. Brown has the ice business in Ripley village, 
where he has a very attractive home. During the busy 
season he employs as many as twenty hands. In politics 
Mr. Brown is a Republican, and has at different times 
been summoned by his fellow-citizens to fill many of the 
offices at their disposal. He has held that of deputy 
sherifif for thirteen years, his present term expiring in 



446 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



IWI. For twenty-tive years he served on the School 
Board, being president of the board from 1917 until the 
present time (.19-^) : and for thirty years has been con- 
stable, combining the office with that of probation officer. 
He alfiliates with the Masonic fraternity, and attends the 
Methodist Episcopal church. 

Mr. Br.-iwn married. Nov. 12. 1SS4, Lizzie E., daughter 
of Joel and .Mmira l Staples') Colvin, and they are the 
parents of the following children : i. Carl K. W., edu- 
cated in the common schools and high school of Ripley 
and at Syracuse I'niversity. taking the degree of Bache- 
lor of -\rts ; he is unmarried. 2. Bessie Marie, educated 
in the same manner as her brother, including the libra- 
rian's degree; married Clarence O. Johnson and became 
the mother of one child, Marjorie; Mrs Johnson died 
Dec. II. 1018. and Marjorie now lives with her maternal 
grandparents. 3. Almira, educated as above, but did 
not take a degree: married Louis .K. Pease, of North 
East. Pa., superintendent of the Buffalo and Erie Trac- 
tion Company, and they have three children, Charles 
Louis. Ruth, and Edith. 4. Florence Lucy, educated 
m Ripley grammar and high schools and at the New 
Haven, (Conn..) Normal School of Gymnastics, now 
physical training teacher in the Buflfalo, N. Y., schools. 
5. Elizabeth Winifred, now attending Ripley High 
School. 

In all worthy ambitions Mr. Brown has been success- 
ful, and his children, with the advantages he has given 
them and the example he has set them, cannot fail to 
be good citizens and blessings to their respective com- 
n'uni'ie^. 



DANIEL JAMES HARRINGTON, who for the 
last tive or si.x years has been one of the most sub- 
stantial farmers in Chautauqua township, Chautauqua 
county, N. Y., farming an e.xtensive acreage, cannot 
strictly be considered a native of the county, yet it is 
almost due to him, for he lived in it for thirty-two of 
the first thirty-three years of his life, and his father 
owned a farm in Chautauqua countj' for more than 
fifty years. The name Harrington can be found among 
the early records of Chautauqua township, Chautauqua 
county. 

Daniel James Harrington had an interesting birth- 
place: he was born in an emigrant wagon, near Oregon 
Grove, now known as New Oregon, Iowa, July 2.S, 1855, 
the son of James and Sarah (Raynor) Harrington. ?Iis 
father had the sturdy spirit of the early pioneers, aiid 
had left his Chautauqua county, N. Y., farm under 
rental, and had gone into the unknown, but supposedly 
rich western part of the United .States, seeking foe a 
JiCtt'T farm holding, and with venturesome spirit harl 
taken his wife with him. Within a year of the birtli of 
Daniel James, the Harrington family retnrncrl to Chau- 
tauqua county, and the fath'-r did not again go west- 
ward. He trv,k up the cultivation rif his own farm in 
Chautauqua township, and farmed it until his death. 

Daniel J. Harrington received the whole of his .school- 
ing in Chautauqua county district schools, and after- 
ward", a-'^is'ed his father in the operation f>f the parental 
farm. In iWi. however. Daniel James IlarringtriU 
wa^ agnin in Iowa, and there acquired a farm of 77 
acrei, which he farmed very successfully, and aiiprcci- 
ably improved. He lived in Iowa until i';!.-;. when h'' 



was forced to return to Chautauqua county, N. Y., to 
care for his interests there. He therefore sold his Iowa 
farm, and took the management of the property be- 
queathed to him by his father, a farm of 170 acres in 
Chautauqua township, Chautauqua county, N. Y., later 
buying also the Crossgrove homestead farm, which 
adjoins the other, and is 125 acres in extent, so that he 
now cultivates and owns almost 300 acres of agricultural 
land, a big undertaking in these days of expensive and 
scarce help. The land is in good condition, and the 
improvements are mainly modern and quite adequate to 
the requirements of the acreage; they were built either 
by his father or by himself. Mr. Harrington has a 
line herd of milch cows, all of which, with one excep- 
tion, were raised by him, and are from registered stock. 

Mr. Harrington has ample means to follow his incli- 
nation in respect to the farms he owns, and he evidently 
intends to have fine cattle, which probably in the end 
will give ample return for the outlay. He is indefatig- 
able in his work, has taken practically no recreation, 
excepting in automobiling, for many years, and he prob- 
ably will continue to get increasing yields from his two 
farms, for he is an efficient farmer. Regarding his one 
diversion from agricultural work, his possession of a 
fine automobile may be attributed to his desire to meet 
the wish of his younger daughter, Delia, to whom he 
is devoted, and who has remained at home with her 
parents. 

In political allegiance he is a Republican, but has 
not taken prominent part in national politics. His own 
agricultural ties are so many and consequential, that 
he does not feel that he can aflFord the time necessary to 
participate actively in local affairs. He is, however, of 
markedly generous spirit, and where it has been possible 
to help local interests or movements by financial con- 
tributions he has been ever ready to co-operate in that 
way. And during the war just ended he contributed 
very substantially to the various funds raised by the 
government, and governmental agencies. 

He has always manifested worthy characteristics of 
steadiness and self-reliance, and he early entered upon 
the serious responsibilities of life; he was only twenty- 
one years old when he married Helen Smith, Dec. 24, 
1S76. They have two children : i. Edna, born in Chau- 
tauqua county, N. Y., married James Oliver, an ener- 
getic and successful young farmer in Iowa. 2. Delia, 
born in Iowa ; she entered the teaching profession, but 
since the family returned to New York State she has 
remained at Imme. 

Daniel James Harrington is continuing the long asso- 
ciation of the Harrington family with Chautauqua 
county and is making that association more conse- 
quential. He is a man of fine characteristics, and the 
regard for him by tlie people of the district will increase 
as the years pass, and the people of tlie township become 
more acquainted with his commendable qualities; and 
his farminr of la) acres is one of the appreciable 
a'.^ricnltnral enterprises of the county. 



JACOB WILLIAM BELSON— For nearly half a 
century Mr. P.elson li:is bei-ti numbered among the pros- 
perous farmers of K'iplcy, whillier he came with a fund 
of cxperieine i^-itlirrrd in cither places. As a citizen 
hr Ii;is always been ipiiitly active and unnbtriisively in- 




?l^, Q^^^^^^'^^ < ^^ O. 




BIOGRAPHICAL 



447 



fluential for all that he deemed best calculated to serve 
the true interests of his commimity. 

Jacob William Belson was born Nov. 14, 1850, in 
Great Yarmouth, England, and is a son of John and 
Elizabeth (Pastel) Belson, who emigrated to the United 
States and settled in Norfolk county, N. Y. At this time 
Jacob William Belson was two years of age, and he 
attended the schools of Norfolk county until reaching 
his thirteenth year. As a youth he engaged in farming, 
sometimes in Michigan and sometimes in New York 
State. In 1870 he came to Ripley, where he purchased 
the farm on which he now lives. The estate comprises 
115 acres and was wild land when Mr. Belson became 
possessed of it, all the improvements which it now boasts 
being his own work. He has fifty acres of grape vine- 
yard which he set out himself and an orchard which he 
planted. He not only cleared the land, but built the 
house and constructed the barns and outbuildings. 
For some years he has had a residence in the village 
of Ripley, but pa\-s almost daily visits to his farm, 
giving the closest attention to all his affairs. In political 
principle Mr. Belson is a Republican, always voting with 
that party. In community affairs he has ever taken a 
helpful interest and at various times has served as school 
collector. His family are members of the Protestant 
Episcopal church. 

Mr. Belson married. Feb. 6, 1876, Ellen Hardgener, 
of Ripley, and the following children have been born to 
them: Ann Elizabeth, wife of Harry Walker, a real 
estate man of Providence, R. I. ; John ; and Charles, 
married Rose Belson (no relation). 

During his long residence in Ripley, Mr. Belson has 
not only achieved material prosperity, but has won the 
cordial friendship of his neighbors and commanded 
the respect of the entire community. 



PETER CADY, a native of Saratoga county, N. Y., 
where his birth occurred Dec. i, 1829, was a son of 
Calvin and Polly Cady. He came to Jamestown, Chau- 
tauqua county, N. Y., when a young man, and was here 
engaged principally as a farmer and gardener. He was 
one of the ardent members of the local grange. Patrons 
of Husbandry, a staunch Democrat and an ardent 
admirer of Horace Greeley. Mr. Cady was a man of 
affairs and had many friends. He was one of the repre- 
sentative citizens of his city and did everything possi- 
ble to advance the welfare of his community. He was 
a member of the lodge. Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, and the Ancient Order of United Workmen, 

Mr. Cady married Helen Sherwin and they were the 
parents of two children, as follows : Willis C, of whom 
further; and Nellie C, born April 9, 1861, died April 
21, 1863. Mr. and Mrs. Cady adopted a daughter. 
Mary L-, born Oct. 17, 1857, who became the wife of 
Albert C. Brunson, to whom she has borne four chil- 
dren : Grace, Lulu, Florence, and Ruth. 

Undoubtedly one of the most venerable and deeply 
beloved figures in the life of Jamestown is that of ATrs. 
Cady, who after a long and active career is now (1920) 
living in the home with her son, Willis C. Cady, at 
Jamestown. Mrs. Cady was born Feb. 25. 1838, in 
Jamestown, and as a girl had the usual educational 
advantages for the time, attending the local public 
school and the Old Jamestown Academv. She is a 



member of the old Sherwin family of this region, a 
daughter of Milton and Flora (Griffith) Sherwin, 
highly esteemed residents of Jamestown, where the 
former named was engaged in business as a carpenter 
and pattern maker for many years. Mrs. Cady is a 
Methodist in religious belief, and she and the members 
of her family attend the Methodist church at Falconer, 
in which she still takes an active part, as well as in 
other organizations. She graduated from the Chautau- 
qua Literary and Scientific Circle at Chautauqua in the 
class of 1915. 

Willis C. Cady, only son of Peter and Helen (Sher- 
win) Cady, was born in Jamestown, N. Y., Oct. 28, 1859. 
He was educated in the district and high schools of 
Jamestown. In early life he was engaged in the occu- 
pation of farming, and later followed the wood working 
trade. In 1895, after the death of his father, he ac- 
quired a small farm in the town of Ellicott, and since 
then has followed the occupation of gardening thereon. 
He is a member of the American Mechanics .Associa- 
tion, and in politics is a Democrat, but acts independent- 
ly in casting his vote. 

Mr. Cady married, in Frewsburg, N. Y., Sept. 21, 1882, 
Nellie Fox, by whom he has one daughter. Bertha 
Nellie, born May 11, 1883, now the wife of Lee W. 
Swart, of Washington, D. C, and they are the parents 
of one child, Leslie Swart. 



NELSON AUGUSTUS JOHNSON, D. O.— 

Among the many prominent men of Swedish origin 
who have made Chautauqua county their home, no name 
stands higher than that of Dr. Nelson Augustus John- 
son, who has been active in medical circles here for a 
number of years and who has built up a large practice 
in his profession and a reputation of the highest order 
during that time. Dr. Johnson was born in Sweden, 
March 3, 1866, a son of John Nelson and Clara (Nel- 
son) Johnson, the former a farmer in Sweden, where 
his death occurred. The elder Mr. Johnson and his 
wife were the parents of the following children: Anna 
M., who resides in Sweden ; Carl J., who came to this 
country and settled at Rutland, Vt., Elizabeth, who 
resides with her mother at Rutland, Vt. ; Alfred, who 
is employed as a foreman in the carpentry department 
of the New England Butt Company, a concern known 
all over the world, with headquarters at Providence, R. 
I. ; Nelson Augustus, with whose career we are here 
especially concerned. 

Dr. Johnson obtained his elementary education in the 
grammar schools in his native country, and when old 
enough engaged in farming there and also secured a 
position in a grist mill, where he remained for three 
years. After his father's death, when twenty years of 
age, he came to the LTnited States, his mother coming 
later, and for a time worked in the iron mines in Essex 
and Clinton counties, N. Y. He was advanced to the 
position of foreman of a slope and held this post for 
five years. He then served an apprenticeship in a 
machine and tool-making establishment and followed 
this occupation for about fifteen years. The young man 
was, however, exceedingly ambitious and was deter- 
mined upon a professional career, with which end in 
view he entered in 1004 the .American School of Osteo- 
pathy, at Kirkville, N. Y. He was graduated with the 



448 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



class of 1906 with the degree of D. O., and in the same 
year passed the examination of the State Board of Ex- 
aminers. He then came to Fredonia and opened an 
office here in the month of July, 1906, began the prac- 
tice of his profession and has remained actively engaged 
ever since. In u>X) he opened another office at Dunkirk, 
N. Y., extended his practice largely, and now enjoys a 
splendid reputation both for skill and for the high 
standards of professional ethics which he has main- 
tained throughout the region. Dr. Johnson is a promi- 
nent figure in the general life of Fredonia, and is a 
mcml>er of many fraternal organizations in this place. 
He is affiliated witli the .\ncient Free and .\ccepted 
Masons, Royal Arch Masons, Knights Templar, Ancient 
Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, Sovereign 
Princess of the Royal Secret, and has taken his thirty- 
second degree in Free Masonry. He is also a member 
of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and the 
Atlas Club of the American School of Osteopathy. In 
religious belief Dr. Johnson is a Methodist and attends 
the church of that denomination at Fredonia. He is 
active in church work and has held a number of offices 
in connection with the congregation, including those of 
steward and superintendent of the Sunday school, and 
financial secretary of the official hoard. He is a Re- 
publican in politics, and a strong advocate of prohibition. 
Dr. Ji>hnson was united in marriage at Plattsburg, 
Clinton county, X. Y., April 29, 1807, with .Mice V. 
Hilton, of Dunkirk, a daughter of William and Mary 
(Frizzein Hilton, old and highly respected residents 
of that place. They are the parents of one daughter, 
Florence Dorothv. 



EMMET HAMILTON ROSS— Prominent among 
the yo'ire professional nun nf the city of Jamestown is 
Emmet Hamilton Ross. .\s an attorney of law, Mr. 
Ross stands well abreast in the Chautauqua county 
bar, and is a member of the well known law firm of 
Rice & Ross, with offices at Suite 200 — Squier's Court, 
in Jamestown. 

Emmet Hamilton Ross was liorn in Rochester, N. 
Y.. Oct. 14, 18S7, son of William and Louise J. (Nye) 
Ross. His parents for a number of years resided in 
Rochester, where they were well known and highly 
respected ; later they moved to Jamestown. Eirimet 
Hamilton Ross attended the public schools of Roches- 
ter until the family came to Jamestown, in looi, and 
here he rompleted his grammar school education. He 
entered the Jamestown High School and graduated 
with honors in \<fyj as president of the senior class. 
I'c-ides iKfinK well identified as a student at high school, 
Mr. Ross was prominent in athletics. After leaving 
hit'h 'ch<-)ol he matriculated in the law department of the 
.Mbany Law School. .Albany, N. Y., and two >ears later, 
iti X't^f), was graduated with the degree of Bachelor of 
Law. A year later, in 1910. he was admitted to the New 
Y'Tk Stale bar and began the practice of law in the city 
of Jam<stown, where he has since been identified. 

Mr. Koss' first venture in the legal world was in 
partnership with the well knr.wn late James L. Weel<s. 
This partnership continued for seven years, up to the 
lime of thf- death of Mr. Weeks. In T91K, Mr, Ross 
j'.in'-d Joset)h F. Rirc and this l.iw firm has been known 
as Rice &• Ross, and has acquired a large and well estab- 
lished practice in Jamestown and throughout the county. 



Their former address was in the Chadakoin building, 
but on Dec. i, 1920, they acquired ownership of Squier's 
Court adjacent to the previous address. Squier's Court 
contains many suitable offices and some commercial 
space, and in a section of it is located the well equipped 
law office of Rice & Ross. 

Mr. Ross is prominent in a number of other things 
outside of his profession, being vice-president of the 
Sportsmen's Supply Company, Inc., of Jamestown, N. 
Y., formerly a member of Company E, 74th Infantry, 
which served on the Mexican Border in 1916, member 
of the Delta Chi, College fraternity, and the Fraternal 
Order of Eagles at Jamestown. In the matter of poli- 
tics, Mr. Ross does not take an active part, but is a 
firm believer in the principles of the Republican party. 

He married, in Jamestown, April 10, 1912, Anna 
Frances Britton, daughter of Edward R, and Ella 
(West) Britton. 



CHARLES WILLIAM MERRICK— A native son 
of Jamestown, Mr. Herrick has attained position in the 
business world of his city as financier and manufacturer, 
being first vice-president of the Bank of Jamestown, 
and president of the C. W. Herrick Manufacturing Com- 
pany of Falconer. He is a son of .Anson L. and Eliza- 
beth A. (Devoe) Herrick, his father a farmer, 

Charles W. Herrick was born in Jamestown, N. Y., 
Nov. 19, 1867, and there has spent his years, fifty- 
three. He was educated in the public schools, and after 
graduation from high school completed his school term 
with a course at a Bryant & Stratton Business College. 
At the age of nineteen, he became an employee of the 
Chautauqua County National Bank, and for ten years, 
1S86-1896, was connected with that institution. In 
ig03, when the Bank of Jamestown was organized, Mr. 
Herrick was one of the incorporators, being elected 
vice-president, also chairman of the executive com- 
mittee, offices he has held until the present, 1920, He 
holds intimate connection with the manufacturing inter- 
ests of the city as president of the C. W. Herrick 
Manufacturing Company, a corporation engaged in 
manufacturing furniture, with their plant at Falconer. 
Whether considered as banker or manufacturer, Mr. 
Herrick measures up to all requirements and has always 
met every demand made upon his business sagacity. 
Mr. Herrick is affiliated with both rites of the Masonic 
order, being a member of Mt. Moriah Lodge, chapter, 
council, and Jamestown Commandery; he holds the 
thirty-second degree of the Ancient Accepted Scottish 
Rite; and is a noble of Isniailia Temple, Nobles of the 
Mystic Shrine. His clubs are the Rotary, Jamestown, 
Sportsman's, and Moon Brook Golf. He is a member 
of the F'irst Presbyterian Church of Jamestown, and 
president of the board of trustees. 

Mr. Herrick married, in Jamestown, N. Y., June 7, 
1894, Oertnidr V,. Proiulfit, daughter of William H. and 
Ellen E. (Hall) Proudfit, her father one of J.amcstown's 
vi-tcran business nun, her mother of the eminent Hall 
family of Jamestown and Chautauqua county. 

This brief review reveals Mr. Herrick as a man of 
energy and ability, interested in the social and religions 
activities of his city as well as in its material side. All 
good causes appeal to him ;ind he is always ready to 
"lend a hand." To his interest and careful supervision 
the chapter on "Banks" in this work is due. 




Qy^''(AA.ct^'u^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



449 



WILTON H. DeLANEY, well known dry goods 
merchant of Jamestown, and considered an expert in 
this business, had many years of experience in merchan- 
dising before becoming the president of the well known 
concern, DeLaney & Throop, Inc., at Nos. 14-16 North 
Main street, Jamestown. Wilton H. DeLaney is a 
native of Stockton, Chautauqua county, N. Y., born 
March 20, 1858, son of Jonathan and Maryette (Howard) 
DeLaney. The elder Mr. DeLaney was a well known 
resident of Stockton, where he kept a general store, and 
was a justice of the peace before his removal to Cherry 
Creek in this county. 

Wilton H. DeLaney attended the village schools of 
Stockton and later Cherry Creek, this being followed 
by a course at Randolph Institute, Randolph, N. Y. 
When he was but eighteen years of age he had a firm 
desire to start out and earn his own livelihood, and 
connected himself in a line of business which afterwards 
proved him to be one of the leaders of the mercantile 
life of Jamestown. His first attempt was at Panama, 
N. Y., where he clerked in a general store for one year, 
after which he was in the employ of DeForest Weld 
in the latter's stores, first at Bradford, Pa., and then at 
Jamestown, N. Y., where he remained until about 1884, 
when Mr. Weld went out of business. Following this 
he became connected with the well known merchant, 
A. D. Sharpe, in whose employ he remained for a period. 
The subsequent fourteen years were spent respectively 
with the old merchants, Scofield & Adams, later changed 
to Scofield & Dinsmore, whose interests were disposed 
to Jones & Audette, after the death of Mr. Dinsmore. 

It was in the year 1904 that Mr. DeLaney, after work- 
ing diligently in the pursuit of merchandising, particu- 
larly of dry goods, felt himself experienced enough to 
embark in this endeavor himself; he formed a partner- 
ship with the late Henry W. Throop, and with a small 
capital started a dry goods store at No. 16 North Main 
street. The small beginning prospered, and five years 
later they added two more floor spaces above the street 
floor, one being directly over the original address. No. 
r6 North Main street, and the other over an adjoining 
store at No. 14. A few years later, in 1917, they further 
expanded and took the adjoining floor space on the street 
at No. 14, thereby giving them spacious quarters in which 
to conduct their growing business. The building has 
been remodeled and improved, and now it has a double 
store with basements ; first and second floors, at Nos. 
14 and 16 North Main street, making it the second 
largest dry goods store in Chautauqua county. The title 
in 1917 become DeLaney & Throop, Inc., Mr. Throop 
being the president until his death, Aug. 2, 1920, and Mr. 
DeLaney secretary and treasurer. After Mr. Throop's 
death, Mr. DeLaney succeeded to the presidency, and 
R. M. Stewart, a long time employee, became secretary 
and treasurer. 

As a business corporation, DeLaney & Throop have 
a most excellent reputation as conservative merchants 
of high standing. Their customers number among the 
well known families of Chautauqua county, and the 
mark of quality can truly be placed upon the goods 
handled by this concern. This firm now conducts a 
large, general dry goods business and is a shopping 
center for Jamestown and the surrounding country. 

Mr. DeLaney married, in Jamestown, June 16, 1887, 



Harriet, daughter of G. C. and Loretta (Butler) Smith. 
Mr. Smith was a well known resident of this city, a 
veteran of the Civil War, being commissioned a captain 
near the close of hostilities. Mr. and Mrs. DeLaney 
have one daughter, Florence L., now the wife of Henry 
L. Beakes, a chemist of Louisville, Ky. 

Aside from his own business, Mr. DeLaney has been 
active in the general afi'airs of the city. He is one of 
the Exempt Firemen of Jamestown, member of the 
Chamber of Commerce, the Fraternal Order of Eagles, 
and the various Masonic bodies. Politically he is a 
Republican, and has always taken an interest in the 
political situation as a voter, but has not sought office. 



A. FRED HELGRAN, who for almost twenty years 
has been a responsible enterprising merchant and con- 
tractor of Jamestown, as one of the principals of Carl- 
son & Helgran, and latterly as the head of A. Fred 
Helgran & Son, painters and decorators, and wholesale 
and retail dealers in wall paper and like commodities, 
has had well merited success. He is a native of James- 
town, has lived in it for almost fifty years, and has many 
times manifested his sincere interest in the development 
of the city. 

He was born on March 10, 1871, the son of John and 
Hilda Helgran. The Helgran family is of Swedish 
origin, and has had honorable part, with other industrious 
residents of Swedish origin, in the development of James- 
town. His father, John Helgran, industriously worked 
in the city almost until his death, and gained many true 
friends. His mother, Hilda Helgran, is still living in 
Jamestown, esteemed asid respected as a good Christian 
woman of charitable spirit. 

A. Fred Helgran attended the public schools of James- 
town. When he finally put aside his academic studies, 
and definitely entered business life, he was fifteen years 
old. He engaged with the Jamestown Lounge Company, 
learning the upholstering business. With that company 
he remained for fourteen years, until 1900, when he ven- 
tured into independent business. He, in partnership with 
another Jamestown man, C. F. Carlson, established the 
firm of Carlson & Helgran, undertaking to trade as 
wholesale and retail merchants in paint, oils, wall paper, 
and allied commodities of interior decorating, and also 
to work as painting and decorating contractors. The 
partnership was maintained in successful operation until 
May I, 1916, when Mr. Carlson died. Mr. Helgran soon 
thereafter purchased the interest of the relatives of his 
deceased partner in the business, and soon afterwards 
he took his son, A. Gordon, into business partnership, 
and caused the firm name to be changed to that of A. 
Fred Helgran & Son. As such it has sihce been con- 
tinued. 

Mr. Helgran is a business man of commendable appli- 
cation to and concentration upon his business, and the 
keynote of his success has been his consistent, persistent 
effort, and close attention to grade of workmanship. 
Politically, he is a member of the Republican party, and 
has taken some part in local political activities. For 
four years he was alderman of the fourth ward, and now 
is supervisor of the fourth and fifth wards. He is a 
director of the Norden Club, of Jamestown, and also 
of the Eagle Temple. Religiously, he belongs to the 



45>3 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



Lutheran churcli, and attends the First Lutheran Church 
of Jamestown. 

His wile. Mar>- Louise Helgran, whom he married 
in Jamestown, has borne to him three children, all of 
whom have given satisfaction to their parents by their 
lives. The children, in their order of birth, are: i. 
Hazel, who is married, and lives in Jamestown. 2. Ches- 
ter, who is an able executive, and is secretary and treas- 
urer 01 the Chautauqua Cabinet Company, of Mayville. 
3. .\. Gordon, who is a member of the firm of A. Fred 
Helgran & Son, and also a veteran of the Great War ; 
he was in France for nineteen months, a member of the 
First (Regular) Division, which probably was the most 
famous of all the American divisions. 



in direct line for a commission when the armistice was 
signed. In his religious belief Dr. Lodico is a Roman 
Catholic and attends the Italian Church of St. Anthony 
at Fredonia. while in politics he is an Independent. He 
is also a member of St. Anthony Club. Dr. Lodico 
is unmarried. 



LOUIS JOSEPH LODICO, D. D. S., who in spite 
of his youth and the comparatively short time that he 
has been established here is already regarded as one of 
the leading members of the dental profession at Fre- 
donia, Chautauqua county, X. Y., is a native of Buffalo, 
bom Dec. 29, 1896. Dr. Lodico is a son of Frank and 
Mari' (Siragusa) Lodico, who resided at Buffalo for a 
number of years, but afterwards removed to Fredonia, 
where they now make their home. 

Louis J. Lodico was but three years of age when he 
was brought by his parents to Fredonia, and since that 
time has continued to reside there, taking an active part 
in its general life since he has reached maturity. As 
a lad he attended the public schools of Fredonia, and 
completed his studies at the high school of the Fredonia 
State Normal School. In the meanwhile, however, the 
youth had determined upon a professional career, and 
with this end in view, after his graduation from the 
Normal School in 1915. matriculated at the Dental De- 
partment of the University of Buffalo, where he pursued 
his professional studies until 1918, when he was grad- 
uated with the degree of D. D. S. In the same year 
he also passed the examinations of the New York 
State Examiners, and at once returned to Fredonia 
and opened a handsome office at No. 7 East Main street 
and engaged in active practice. It was not long before 
the community began to realize the ability and skill of 
the young dental surgeon who had come amongst them, 
and his fatrons rapidly and steadily grew in numbers, 
so that at the present time his clientele is a large one 
and still is increasing uninterruptedly. 

Dr. Lodico is prominent among his professional col- 
leagues, by whom he is respected and honored for his 
technical knowledge of his subject and his native skill, 
as well as for the close observance which he consistently 
gives to the etiquette of the profession and his high 
code of ethics. His career seems assured for the future, 
and such success as he has already won or inay win in 
time to come is entirely deserved and the result of his 
own indefatigable efforts and earnest devotion to the 
work he has ukcn up. There is no advance in dental 
science with which he d(jes not keep abreast, and his 
constant ctid'.-avor is to keep himself familiar with its 
most mofk-rn theory and practice. During the interval 
between his graduation from the University and the 
close of the late war. Dr. I^xJico offered his services to 
hii country in that gigantic struggle. These were 
acccpited, and after his recommendation for the army he 
wa» undergoing a course in the training school and was 



LEONARD J. FIELD has for years been one of 
the leading furniture merchants of Jamestown, N. Y., 
executive of the Field and Wright Company, successors 
to the .'Mdrich Furniture Company, and once prominent 
in the city administration. He was born in Gerry, N. Y., 
Dec. 19, 1867, son of Myron and Lucy B. (Thompson) 
Field, both of whom are now deceased. His father, 
Myron Field, who had an agricultural estate at Cherry 
Creek, and followed farming industriously, was a man 
of steady purpose, strong character, and fixed convic- 
tions. He was one of the pioneer Prohibitionists of his 
section of the State, and courageously expressed his 
opinions long before the subject was received with the 
present favor accorded to it ; in fact, at a time when 
only a man of courageous spirit, and the most unbending 
Christian principle, would raise his voice in a public 
place in its favor. His mother, Lucy B. (Thompson) 
Field, was a woman of superior education, and prior to 
her marriage was a school teacher. 

Leonard J. Field attended local schools, and acquired 
a good education. After attending the Cherry Creek 
High School, he took a course at the Fredonia Normal 
School. He had reached the age of twenty-one years 
before he closed his years of schooling and entered upon 
a business career. His first employment was in the capac- 
ity of bookkeeper for the furniture firm of H. M. Gage, 
on Third street, Jamestown, and as such he remained for 
six years, when he was apixaintcd manager of the Aldrich 
Furniture Company, Main street, that company also 
being owned by Mr. Gage. He was manager of that 
branch for eight years until the death of Mr. Gage, soon 
after which occurrence he took even greater respon- 
sibility. He took part in the organization of a com- 
pany, which, when incorporated, took over the business 
interests of a large part of Mr. Gage's estate, and there- 
after conducted it under the corporate name of the 
Field and Wright Company. The incorporators were : 
Leonard J. Field; Mary M. Field, his sister; Judson S. 
Wright, and John J. Beustrom, both substantial James- 
town business men. The present officials of the corpora- 
tion are: H. T. Wilson, president; L. W. Brainard, vice- 
president; Leonard J. Field, treasurer and general man- 
ager; and M. M. Field, secretary. The business is a 
substantial one, handling furniture and rugs of all grades, 
crockery and allied commodities, and having extensive 
salesrooms. By those who know, it would hardly be 
considered an extravagant statement to state that the 
success of the Field and Wright Company has been 
due in great measure to the business ability and enter- 
prise of Mr. Field. 

Mr. Field is a man much interested in the prosperity 
of the city, and cooperates in all ways within his power 
and means to aid in its development, but in later years 
has not taken an active part in public affairs because of 
impaired health. Mr. Field is interested in the cause of 
Prohibition, and manifests in this and in many other 
ways much of the estimable character of his father. 




JOSl^Pll C. WIiLLARI) 



4 

> 

O 

PC 

o 




BIOGRAPHICAL 



451 



'\nd although in general political campaigns he has not 
;aken conspicuous part, he has been outspoken in his 
ifforts to further the cause of Prohibition, which met 
tvith such signal national success in the year 1919. 
During the years 190S and 1909, Mr. Field was a mem- 
ber of the Jamestown Board of Aldermen, representing 
the first ward. 

His rise to important place in business life, and to 
a post of honor in the affairs of the community, is com- 
mendable and noteworthy, seeing that it came wholly 
a result of a resolute purpose, consistently main- 
tained. Mr. Field is a member of the First Methodist 
Episcopal Church of Jamestown, and substantial in his 
support thereof. He is also a member of the James- 
town Board of Commerce. 

On Oct. 17, 1895, at Utica, N. Y., Leonard J. Field 
[was married to Florence L. Hebron, daughter of Har- 
jvey Hebron, of that place. They have three chil- 
'dren: i. Helene Mara, who married D. Niel Fleek, of 
-Jamestown. 2. Jeanette Francis, who has finished her 
.academic schooling, and having marked musical ability 
lis now studying the piano and pipe organ at AUentown, 
I Pa. 3. Lois Minnie, who is still a student at Jamestown 

' schools. 

ERNEST CAWCROFT was born at Lawrence, 
Mass., April 29, 1881. He is a son of Aquilla Cawcroft, 
who now resides at Cassadaga, Fla., and Elizabeth 
(Carden) Cawcroft, deceased. 

Mr. Cawcroft attended the Jamestown public schools 
and the New York University. He toured North Amer- 
ica, Central America and Europe for various magazines. 
He was admitted to the New York Bar in 1907, and 
formed a co-partnership with William L. Ransom, now 
of the firm of Whitman, Ottinger & Ransom, of 
New York. He has practiced law at Jamestown, N. Y., 
since he was admitted to the bar. 

Mr. Cawcroft has acted as special counsel for the city 
of Jamestown in connection with various charter and 
ordinance provisions. He was nominated for State 
treasurer of the Progressive party of New York in 
1912; in 1916 was elected Republican presidential elector 
on the Hughes ticket; and in 191 5 was appointed deputy 
treasurer of New York State. Mayor Samuel A. Carl- 
son named him as corporation counsel of the city of 
Jamestown in 191 8, and he has been the legal advisor 
of the city of Jamestown since that time. During the 
fall of 1918 he was special counsel to the United 
States Shipping Board in connection with the legal or- 
ganization of the various shipping towns created on 
the coast by that board. In addition to his professional 
activities, Mr. Cawcroft has been connected with many 
business and civic enterprises. He initiated the building 
of the Eagle Temple, which is the civic center of James- 
town, and is now the chairman of the board of directors 
of that institution. He is a member of the board of 
trustees and on the executive board of the Chautau- 
qua Institution. Mr. Cawcroft is a member of : The 
Jamestown Bar .\ssociation ; the New York State Bar 
Association; the .\merican Bar .Association; the Young 
Men's Christian Association; Jamestown Club; Amer- 
ican Academy of Political Science ; a thirty-second 
degree Mason; a director of the Jamestown Board of 
Commerce; and is interested in many other fraternal, 
social and civic welfare bodies. 



JOSEPH CHARLES WELLARD, respected and 
prosperous farmer of Ripley township, where he has 
lived for seventy-two years, is one of the worthy and 
representative agriculturists of Chautauqua county. 
Although blind for the last thirty years, he has con- 
tinued cheerfully pursuing a useful life of industry and 
productiveness, has undertaken many public duties, 
and has lived honored and respected among his neigh- 
bors. 

He comes of one of the pioneer families of Chautau- 
qua county, and- was born on a farm in the town of 
Mina, this county, Sept. 5, 1848, the son of Joseph and 
Polina (Geer) Wellard. Seven weeks after his birth, 
his parents removed to the farm upon which he has 
ever since lived, that is, for more than seventy-two 
years. His mother died when he was quite young, and 
a worthy uncle came to superintend the operation of 
the farm, and to care for and rear the children, includ- 
ing Joseph C. The children were all educated in the 
Ripley township district schools, after passing through 
which, Joseph C. took resolutely to farming, manfully 
helping his uncle. Joseph C. Wellard was thirty-seven 
years old when, in 1885, his uncle died, and during the 
twenty or more years in which he had steadily farmed 
since the close of his school days he had accumulated 
some material wealth, sufficient to enable him, after the 
death of his uncle, to acquire the farm upon wliich he 
had been reared and had worked for so long. Since 
tliat time the property has remained his, and he has 
materially helped in its cultivation for the greater part 
of the time, notwithstanding that four years after he 
purchased the farm he liad the crowning misfortune 
to lose his sight altogether. He is fortunate in having 
a worthy son who with filial faithfulness stayed near 
his father, and of late years has taken the entire burden 
of the farm management from his father's shoulders. 
Mr. Wellard's eyes were weak even in his early days, 
but to have completely lost sight when still in the prime 
of vigorous manhood must have been a very great 
misfortune, one very hard to bear. He bore the calam- 
ity cheerfully and determined that it should not end his 
usefuhiess nor undermine his general health. That 
was thirty years ago, and he is still in good health and 
still maintains the farm in successful cultivation, thanks, 
it must be admitted, to the loyalty and labor of his sor., 
who is a skillful and energetic farmer. 

Mr. Wellard has been a Republican in politics for 
the greater part of his life, and at times has shown 
much interest in national politics. During the World 
War he felt the loss of his sight more keenly than per- 
haps at any other time, for he longed to be able to 
read all the news that the papers printed of the 
momentous happenings of those days. He has always 
been interested particularly in local affairs, and has held 
some local ofliccs including those of school trustee and 
collector, which offices he has held several times. Of 
course all matters pertaining to farming are of interest 
to him. that having been his life long occupation, and 
bearing in mind his physical handicap he is particularly 
well informed on most subjects. For many years he 
has been a member of the local grange, and in his 
younger days took active part in its functioning. He 
is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and a 
consistent supporter of the local church. Throughout 



452 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



his lite he has manifested worthy characteristics such as 
would emanate from the wholesome thoughts of a con- 
scientious Christian, and as a neighbor he has been ever 
ready, where possible, to lend a helping hand and ever 
ready to receive his neighbors with open-hearted hos- 
pitality. He is a good conversationalist, and his con- 
pany is appreciated. 

Mr. Wellard was also blessed by another loyal loved 
one. as well as his son, during his many years of sight- 
lessness : his dear wile was more than a companion to 
him. so that, as is so often the case, he has had blessings 
to compensate for rnisfortunes. To go back to the year 
of his marriage is a stretch of forty-six years, for it 
was on Sept. lo. lS~j, that he married Mary Hubbard, 
of Sherman. Chautauqua county. Her death occurred 
March 20. 1003. Five children were bom to them, but 
cnly tliree still live. The five children, in the order of 
birth, were: l. Mary Jane, who was educated in the 
district school of Ripley township, married (first) Willis 
Urch : they had two children, Mildred, and Nelson; 
Mr. Urch died .Tan. 5. 1919. and she married (second) 
Thomas Urch. 2. Flora, who died when only three 
montli*; old. 3. Henry D.. who was educated in the dis- 
trict school of the township, and afterwards stood man- 
fully at his father's side, ready to assist him in all 
things; he lives on the farm, and of late years the 
entire management has devolved upon him ; he mar- 
ried Rua Whitford, and they have two children, Blos- 
som and Jesse. 4. Nellie Polina, who duly passed 
through the local school, married Clyde Wilson ; died 
in KXJi. leaving one child. Nellie, who married Edward 
.\!brecht. 5. Nancy, educated in the local district 
schcM"'! ; became the wife of Ernest Scott, to whom she 
has borne four children : X'irgil, Kenneth, Helen and 
Cecil. 

The life of Joseph Charles Wellard has been one of 
upright, manly endeavor and commendable fortitude in 
misfortune. He accepted with good cheer the will of 
destiny, and by his many spheres of usefulness since has 
aemonstrated that the will to accomplish is the greater 
part r.i the task to be accomplished. He has lived 
through practically three generations of Chautauqua 
county life, and for more than fifty years has been a 
producer. He is therefore w'orthy of note in the present 
historical record of worthy sons of Chautauqua county. 
.\nd in any case, he would be so deserving by reason of 
the association of his family with the early pioneer 
• fTr.ns within the countv. 



DR. ELMER AUGUSTUS JONES, M. D.— One 

of thi" phy-jriaiis ni di tiiutirm in tin- city of J;imcstnwn, 
Cham;iiir|ua county. N. ^'., who hrjlds ;i place of high 
e-'te'.-m, is Elmer Augustus Jones, .M. ])., whose reputa- 
tion a<, a physician and as a man is valued in great degree 
fy.th in the circles of the mclical profession and in the 
r».-alm of citizenship. He was horn in Chandlers Valley, 
in the .State of t'eimsylvania, Feb. 11, 1872, a son of ,\u- 
pu'tni William and Carrie I^Miise (Lawson) Jones. His 
lather was thf owner of a saw mill and lumber husi- 
neis in Chandlers V'all'-y for many years, but later in 
life er(;a((ed in th<- vrrri-ry business in North Warren, 
Pa, V here he and his wife still reside. Mr. and Mrs. 
Aiiifu-ttis W. Jones are the jiarents of thnir children: 
Dr. Elmer A. Jones, of whom further; Alice Carrie, 



the wife of H. D. Wade, an oil operator, who lives at 
Warren, Pa. ; and Dr. Claud William Jones, a dentist 
of Corry, Pa. 

The elementary portion of Dr. Elmer A. Jones' educa- 
tion was acquired at the local public schools of Chandlers 
X'allcy. and he next attended the Sugar Grove Seminary, 
where he took the usual preparatory course and gradu- 
ated in 1S03. Having decided upon the career of a medi- 
cal doctor as his life's work, he entered the University of 
Buffalo, at Buffalo, N. Y., where he pursued the study 
of medicine, resulting in his graduation with honors 
therefrom in 1896 with the degree of Doctor of Medi- 
cine. That same year he passed the New York State 
board examinations which entitled him to the privilege 
of the general practice of his profession. He came 
almost immediately to the city of Jamestown, and here 
he began in active practice as a physician on his own 
account. His residence in Jamestown has covered a 
period of almost a quarter of a century, and here his time 
has been devoted to unrestricted and faithful service in 
behalf of those whom he was able to serve both as a phy- 
sician and citizen. 

Dr. Elmer .A. Jones is a member of the Jamestown and 
Chautauqua Medical societies, the American Medical .As- 
sociation, and various others. Fraternally, he is affiliated 
with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Mt. Tabor 
Lodge, No. 780, of Jamestown, and the Knights of 
Pythias, Lodge No. 248, of Jamestown. He was a mem- 
ber of the Medical Corps of the 113th Separate Com- 
pany, National Guard New York, during the Spanish- 
American War. During the recent World War, Dr. 
Jones gave much of his time to the various war activi- 
ties. He was on the reserve list for medical service and 
rendered what aid he could to his country. In his politi- 
cal faith. Dr. Jones is a Republican. He and his family 
attend the First Congregational Church, of Jamestown. 

Four years after his removal to Jamestown, N. Y., Dr. 
Jones was united in marriage, Dec. 30, 1900, to Helen B. 
Selandcr, of that city. Dr. and Mrs. Jones are the par- 
ents of two children, as follows : Everett William, bom 
March 14, 1907; and Margaret Helen, born .'\pril 25, 
1909. 



CLARE A. PICKARD, one of the prominent attor- 
neys of Jamestown, Chautauqua county, N. Y., and also 
a conspicuous figure in the business life of this com- 
munity, is a member of a family which has for four 
generations taken an active part in the affairs of this 
region. He is a grandson of the late Major Henry Pick- 
ard, who was one of the pioneers of the town of Ellery, 
where be settled on Pickard Hill as early as 1816. Major 
Pickard's father, John Pickard, was also one of the 
early settlers in this part of the country. 

Alonzo C. Pickard, father of Clare A. Pickard, was 
born Feb. 17, 1838, at Ellery, N. Y., and was the .son of 
Major Henry and Maria (Vanderwarker) Pickard. 
Alonzo C. Pickard attended the local schools until he 
reached the age of eighteen years, after which he studied 
at the Meadville Academy, and later matriculated at 
Allegheny College. At the outbreak of the Civil War, 
however, he left college to enroll in the Allegheny Col- 
lege Volunteers, afterwards Company L, of the loth 
Pennsylvania Reserves. He later became a member of 
the Ii2tb Regiment of the New York Volunteer Infan- 




<£■ 



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BIOGRAPHICAL 



453 



try, where he was commissioned first lieutenant, and sub- 
sequently brevated major for gallantry in the field. He 
was seriously wounded in the Battle of the Wilderness, 
and after his recovery was assigned to court martial duty 
in Washington and later was made judge advocate in 
Alexandria, Va. After his discharge from the army, in 
1865, he returned to Western New York, where he taught 
school for several years. He was school commissioner 
for two terms, and for several years supervisor of his 
town. He commenced the study of law with the late 
Judge Cook, and continued, subsequently, with John G. 
Wicks. After his admission to the bar he engaged con- 
tinually in the practice of his profession until the time 
of his death, in 1910. He married, June 16, 1865, Rozilla 
Flagg, a daughter of Captain Madison Flagg, of Stock- 
ton. They became the parents of three children ; Clare 
A., of whom further ; Ray F. ; and Fern, who became 
the wife of E. W. Stevens. 

Clare A. Pickard was born Sept. 9, 1866, at Busti, 
Chautauqua county, N. Y. As a lad he attended the 
Frewsburg Union School, from which he was graduated 
in 1882. He displayed unusual aptitude as a student and, 
like his father, began his career in life as a school 
teacher, being employed in several different schools in 
Chautauqua county. In 1885 he gave up his work in 
order to enter the employ of the Remington Typewriter 
Company at Pittsburgh. In this work he displayed much 
business ability and made himself of such value to his 
employers that he was appointed manager of the Rem- 
ington Company's offices at Cleveland, Ohio, and later at 
Wheeling, W. Va. He remained with this concern for 
about four years and then located at San Francisco, Cal., 
having been sent to that point by the New York Life 
Insurance Company as metropolitan manager. Here 
also Mr. Pickard made a marked success and continued 
to fill this responsible post for about seven years. In 
1895 he returned to the East, having severed his connec- 
tion with the New York Life, and settled at Jamestown. 

Before going to the West, Mr. Pickard had taken up 
the study of law and, upon returning to Jamestown, he 
resumed his study of this subject, which he pursued to 
such good purpose that he was admitted to the practice 
of law in June, 1898. He then opened offices in the El- 
licott building and engaged in the general practice of his 
profession, meeting with a high degree of success from 
the outset. Later he changed his location to the Well- 
man building, where his headquarters are at the present 
time. He conducts a large legal practice, making a spe- 
cialty of corporation and business law. He has engaged 
in the trial of many cases, some of which have been 
among the most important held within the county. In Feb- 
ruary, 1920, he took into partnership Hugh V. N. Bodine, 
formerly of Friendship, N. Y., who is now associated 
with him under the firm name of Pickard & Bodine. Mr. 
Pickard is a member of the Jamestown Bar Association, 
the New York State Bar Association, and the Lawyers' 
Club of Buffalo. 

In addition to his law practice, Mr. Pickard has actively 
engaged in many business enterprises in Jamestown and 
Chautauqua county. He has been a member of the board 
of directors of a number of important business con- 
cerns. During the participation of the United States in 
the great World War, Mr. Pickard served his country 



efficiently and well in the responsible office of United 
States Food .Administrator for Chautauqua county. 

Mr. Pickard is prominent in fraternal circles, especially 
in the Masonic order, in which he has taken the thirty- 
second degree in Freemasonry, and is a member of : 
Mount Moriah Lodge, Free and .Accepted Masons ; West- 
ern Sun Chapter, Royal Arch Masons ; Jamestown Coun- 
cil, Royal and Select Masters ; Jamestown Commandery, 
Knights Templar; Ismailia Temple, Ancient .Arabic 
Order Nobles- of the Mystic Shrine; and Buffalo Con- 
sistory, Sovereign Princes of the Royal Secret. 

Clare A. Pickard married, Feb. 25, 1896, Rachael Giles, 
a daughter of Benjamin and Rachael (Longshore) Giles. 
To Mr. and Mrs. Pickard were born three children, as 
follows : Clarence Giles, who is now a student at Ham- 
ilton College, with the class of 1921 ; Rachael Long- 
shore, a high school student with the class of 1922; and 
Rozilla Putnam, aged ten years. 



HENRY LEWORTHY— Were Mr. Leworthy to 
be classed according to his business, "antiquarian" would 
be his classification, for his storerooms at No. 32 West 
Main street, Fredonia, are filled with old furniture, pic- 
tures, curios, engravings, silver, pewter, china, glass and 
brass, a veritable "Curiosity Shop." But the character 
of the man varies greatly from the classification, for in 
heart, spirit and deed he is progressive, alert and help- 
ful. He radiates kindliness and helpfulness, and "Ye 
Olde Booke Shoppe" is a favorite resting place for both 
town and country folk. Nearly half a century ago he 
first made Fredonia his abiding place, and there are few, 
or rather none, in the village or town who do not know 
him. He is a native son of Chautauqua, born in the town 
of Villenova, of English-Irish parents, his father, Wil- 
liam Beer Leworthy, of North Devon, England, and his 
mother, Mary Jamison, of Waterford, Ireland. They 
were married in the village of Johnson Creek, Niagara 
county, N. Y., in 1855, lived in Chautauqua county, 
1855-60, Niagara county, 1860-67, then in the State of 
Michigan until the husband's death, in 1878. Mrs. Mary 
(Jamison) Leworthy died in Michigan, in 1904. 

The Leworthys are an old Devonshire family ; the 
little village of Charles, about nine miles distant from the 
city of Barnstable, has been the family home for about 
four centuries. In the village church, visited by Mr. 
Leworthy while on tour abroad, the register dates back 
to 1531. In that record the sixth marriage entry is that 
of John Leworthie and Englishe Bright, the date June 
28, 1547. On the largest of the five bells in the old 
church tower he found the inscription : "Given to the 
parish by George Leworthy, Gentlemen, in 1733, during 
the pastorate of John Rosier." John Leworthy, great- 
grandfather of Henry Leworthy, was an English soldier 
and fought under Wellington at Waterloo. 

Henry Leworthy was born in the town of Villenova, 
Chautauqua county, N. Y., Aug. 2, 1856. He was taken 
by his parents to Southern Michigan in 1867, but in l86g 
returned to Villenova and entered the employ of his 
uncle, Edwin Leworthy, a merchant in the village of 
Hamlet. In that country store he developed a taste for 
mercantile life and there remained until 1875, when he 
became a student at the Fredonia State Normal, con- 
tinuing until 1878. In that year and for twelve years 



454 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



thereafter, he was a clerk in the Jesse K. Starr store in 
Fredonia, leaving in iSiX) to become a partner with Bert 
Belden. they trading as Belden &: Leworthy, dealers in 
groceries and crocker>'. The partnership existed until 
lOoS: Mr. Leworthy then served as town assessor for a 
time. .\t tlie failure of Dorset Brothers he bought their 
drug and grocen- business, soon closing out the drugs 
and later selling the groccrv stock to the firm of Annas 
& Dorset. 

In the spring of igiS Mr. Leworthy opened "Ye Olde 
Booke Shoppe" at Xo. 3,- ^^'cst Main street, and there 
continues, a dealer in books and antiques. He has a won- 
derful collection of old china, that having long been a 
specialty with him, and he possesses some pieces of great 
historical interest and value. His collection of antique 
furniture is remarkable and includes pieces rare and 
valuable. He is considered an authority, especially upon 
old china, and has given little addresses upon the subject 
to gatherings of persons interested in the ceramic art. 

Mr. Leworthy is interested in the preservation of local 
history and has aided in the gathering of material for 
this present work. Anything historic in books, pictures, 
china or furniture, possesses a peculiar interest for him, 
and their collection and arranging is his favorite recrea- 
tion. He has been an official member of the First Metho- 
dist church of Fredonia for over forty years, and is an 
active, interested member of the County Committee of the 
Young Men's Christian Association. All good works 
appeal to him and his time is freely given to helpful 
church or association work. During the World War 
period, 1917-18, he gave himself unreservedly to war 
work of various kinds and was one of the enthusiastic 
"drive" workers. 

Mr. Leworthy married, Sept. 2, 1885, Arabelle Wheeler, 
daughter of Dan and Mary A. (Kirkland) Wheeler. The 
Wheelers and Kirklands were early settlers of the town 
of Hanover. Mr. and Mrs. Leworthy are the parents of 
two sons: i. Ralph Hall, born Nov. s, iSoo; a veteran 
of the World War, serving with the 306th Machine Gun 
Battalion. Si.x weeks after leaving Fredonia he was in 
Northern France, where his outfit engaged in many 
historic battles, and fought up to the signing of the 
armistice. 2. Henry K., born Aug. 15, 1806; also a vet- 
eran of the World War, a member of the First Division, 
Third Battalion, Naval Militia, of the State of New 
York. Three days after President Wilson's declaration 
of a state of war existing between the United States 
and Germany he was in active service, serving fiom 
Easter Sunday, 1917. until July i, 1919. During this time 
he crossed the .■\tlantic ocean twenty-eight times. 

The Ix;worlhy brothers arc the authorized agents for 
the Ford .\utomobile Company for the city and town of 
Dunkirk. 



LEVI LUCE — Among the prominent merchants of 
Kllington, Chautar'iua county. N. Y., is Levi Luce, a 
native of this plar<-, whi-re his birth occurred Aug. 14, 
1874, and a son of Joseph and I-ucy (Simons) Lu( r, the 
former a prominent farmer nf these parts for many 
years. I>-vi F^urc obtained his education at (he public 
vhry/l- of Ellington and the Ellington High .School. 
Ulf<n completing his studies at the latter institution, Mr. 
Ellington began his business career by opening a general 
store, and met with notable success from the outs't 



Since that time Mr. Luce has developed a large and suc- 
cessful business and his establishment is regarded as one 
of the finest of its kind in the community to-day. Mr. 
Luce has not confined himself to the carrying on of his 
private business but has become affiliated with a number 
of important financial institutions in this region. He has 
always taken a keen interest in public affairs and at the 
present time holds the office of justice of the peace at 
Ellington, where he has established an enviable record 
on account of his just and impartial treatment of all 
who come before him in that capacity. Mr. Luce is a 
Free Methodist in his religious belief and attends the 
church of that denomination at Ellington. 

Levi Luce married, Feb. 7, 1900, at Ellington, Minnie 
Pritchard, a native of this place, where her birth oc- 
curred March 23, 1876, and a daughter of Amos and 
Anna (Wilcox) Pritchard. 



CHARLES HENRY WIBORG, well known law- 
yer and prominent in various activities of civic, fra- 
ternal and club life of Jamestown, is a native of this city, 
having been born here Oct. 30, 1873, son of Jacob N. 
and Christine (Ahlstrom) Wiborg. The elder Mr. 
Wiborg was a native of Sweden and was among the first 
settlers of this nationality to come to Chautauqua county. 
He was engaged for many years in the manufacture of 
pianos, being connected with the Ahlstrom Piano Com- 
pany of Jamestown. To Mr. and Mrs. Jacob N. and 
Christine (Ahlstrom) Wiborg were born five children: 
Charles Henry, the subject of this sketch ; Jennie M., 
deceased; Florence W., who became the wife of T. H. 
W. Meredith, of Jamestown; Lillian, who became the 
wife of H. H. Roberts, also of this city; and Leonard, 
deceased. 

Charles Henry Wiborg has spent his entire life in 
Jamestown, having been educated in the public schools 
and Jamestown High School, graduating from the lat- 
ter in 1893. As a youth he determined upon law as a 
profession and accordingly entered the law offices of 
Green & Woodbury, prominent attorneys of Jamestown, 
where he read law for two years. He then matriculated 
at the law school of Cornell University, from which he 
was graduated in 1897 with the degree of LL. D. He 
began general practice in his profession on July 29 of 
the same year in Jamestown, and for a time was in part- 
nership with C. D. Babcock. fn 1904 this association 
was discontinued and since that time Mr. Wiborg has 
practiced alone, with ofiices in the Fenton building. 

Mr. Wiborg is a man of much versatility and has been 
identified with many important movements of Jamestown 
and the county, and is widely known. During the great 
World War, liis patriotic endeavors were appreciated in 
the various campaigns of the Liberty I^oans, the Red 
Cross, Young Men's Christian Association, and the 
United War Work Drives. In every movement of this 
kind he gave much of his time, and was a most active 
and energetic worker. Mr. Wiborg may be considered an 
e.xiK-rt in creating a sentiment of good fellowship and 
cheer in the many things he has been asked to give his 
leadership to. He has been in much demand as a cheer 
and song leader at many public banquets and other funr- 
(iriiis held by the civic, church, fraternal and club organi- 
zations in this city and all over the county. 






^'' 




'^h-< 




£^r6. JLctJi Hucc 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



455 



Mr. Wiborg is eminently a strong community fignrer 
and public-spirited. In all his activities he never loses 
sight of the interest and promotion of good fellowship 
among his fellow-citizens. 

The review, herewith, gives a number of the affiliations 
in which he has been prominent. Politically he is a 
staunch Republican. At the present time he is an acting 
judge of the City Court; transfer tax appraiser for 
Chautauqua county since June, 1916; member of the 
New York State Motor Federation ; Legislative Com- 
mittee, and has done much for the advancement of good 
roads and road regulations ; member of the Jamestown 
Bar Association, of which he has been secretary and 
treasurer since 1906. His fraternal and club organiza- 
tions are : The Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, 
being a member of its Blue Lodge, chapter, commandery 
and shrine ; he is one of the organizers and was one of 
the first directors of the Rotary Club ; member of the 
Norden Club; the Jamestown Automobile Club, of which 
he was secretary in 1915; the Chadakoin Boat Club, of 
which he has been commodore for nine years ; trustee for 
twelve years of the Jamestown High School Alumni As- 
sociation ; and member of the First Methodist Episcopal 
Church of Jamestown. 



BRAINARD T. HARKNESS— A residence of forty 
years in Jamestown has made the name we have just 
written so familiar to a majority of her citizens as to 
render wholly unnecessary any introductory clause or par- 
agraph. Not only is the name of Mr. Harkness familiar, 
but any mention of it is always greeted with respect, 
inasmuch as it is the name of a veteran of the Civil War 
and an upright, public-spirited citizen. 

The following is the "Mayflower" lineage of the Hark- 
ness family : 

(I) Edward Doty, came in the "Mayflower" in 1620. 
He married, Jan. 6, 1634, Faith Clark, born 1619, prob- 
ably a second wife, daughter of Tristram Clark. 

(H) John Doty, son of Edward and Faith (Clark) 
Doty, was born at Plymouth, Mass., 1639. He married, 
about 1667, Elizabeth Cook, born in 1648, daughter of 
Jacob Cook, born in Holland, who was a son of Francis 
Cook, who came in the "Mayflower," 1620. 

(HI) John (2) Doty, son of John (l) and Elizabeth 
(Cook) Doty, was born at Plymouth, Mass., .A.ug, 24, 
1668. He married, February, 1692, Mehitable Nelson, 
born April 5, 1670, daughter of John and Sarah (Wood) 
Nelson. John Nelson, born 1647, was son of W. Nelson, 
who came early to New England, and married Martha 
Ford. 

(IV) John (3) Doty, son of John (2) and Mehitable 
(Nelson) Doty, was born at Plymouth, Mass., Feb. 5, 
1700. He married, July 8, 1724, Lidiah Dunham, born 
1704, daughter of Elisha and Johanna Dunham. The 
Dunhams were early at Plymouth. 

(V) Ebenezer Doty, son of John (3) and Lidiah 
(Dunham) Doty, was born 1727. He married, June 12, 
1750, Mary Whiting. 

(VI) Amaziah Doty, son of Ebenezer and Mary 
(Whiting) Doty, was born at Plymouth, Mass., May 17, 
1756, died at Cazenovia, N. Y., Jan. 24, 1833. He mar- 
ried, 1779, Bertha Hamlin, of Banistable, Mass. They 
moved to Lee, Mass.; fifteen years later they moved to 



Bennington, Vt. ; a short time thereafter they moved to 
Granville, N. Y., then to Chenango county, N, Y., and 
about 1813 to Cazenovia, N. Y. 

(VII) Mary Doty, daughter of Amaziah and Bertha 
(Hamlin) Doty, was born at Lee, Mass., June 20. 1786. 
She married, at Granville, N. Y., November, 1805, Jacob 
Harkness. 

(VIII) Henderson Harkness, son of Jacob and Mary 
(Doty) Harkness, was born in Granville, N. Y., 1816. 
He was twelve years old when his parents moved to 
Salem, Washington county, N. Y., where they were 
pioneer settlers. Henderson Harkness was a farmer all 
his life, owning and operating for many years a farm in 
Salem township. Later he moved to North Greenwich, 
N. Y., where he also engaged in farming, settling, when 
he retired from active life, in the village of Greenwich, 
where he passed the remainder of his days. Mr. Hark- 
ness married Sarah Ann Bishop, of Lyons, N. Y., and 
both he and his wife passed away in their home in 
Greenwich. They were members of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church. Mrs. Harkness was born in Dutchess 
county, N. Y., daughter of William and Sarah Ann 
(Dunning) Bishop. Mr. and Mrs. Harkness were the 
parents of five children : Julia, Brainard T., Edward, 
Sarah, and William. 

(IX) Brainard T. Harkness, son of Henderson and 
Sarah Ann (Bishop) Harkness, was born July 3, 1845, 
in Salem, Washington countv', N. Y.. and was reared to 
farm life, acquiring his education in Salem school. While 
still a boy he exchanged the quiet environment of the 
country for that of the camp and the battle field, enlist- 
ing, Dec. 26, 1861, for a term of three years, in Company 
D, 4th Regiment, New York Heavy Artillery, under Cap- 
tain Jones and Colonel Doubleday. On Dec. 28, 1863, 
he reenlisted, as a veteran, as corporal in the same com- 
pany and regiment, and participated in the battles of the 
Wilderness and Spottsylvania, receiving. May ig. 1864, 
at Spottsylvania. a wound in the left knee which sent 
him to the field hospital and later to the Lincoln Hospital 
in Washington. Later he was sent to the hospital at 
Davids Island, Long Island Sound, and finally to the hos- 
pital in Albany, N. Y., whence he was transferred to the 
Veteran Reserve Corps, April 15, 1865, received his dis- 
charge at Indianapolis. Ind., Oct. 3, 18^5. 

On returning home, Mr. Harkness learned the black- 
smith's trade in Greenwich, and followed it in that town, 
later going to Cambridge, N. Y., where he enga.ged in 
general blacksmithing on his own account for a period of 
ten years. In 1879, Mr. Harkness came to Jamestown 
and established himself as a blacksmith on Second street, 
but at the end of a year obtained a position as black- 
smith and iron worker in the Jamestown Worsted Mills, 
which were then under the supcrintendency of the late 
Samuel Briggs. Mr. Harkness has now, for forty years, 
been continuously employed by this corporation, which is 
one of the oldest in Jamestown. In politics, Mr. Hark- 
ness is a staunch Republican. He belongs to James M. 
Brown Post, Grand Army of the Republic, of James- 
town, in which he has filled many offices, including that 
of post commander. 

Mr. Harkness married. Feb. 10, 1875. in Jamestown, 
Effie B. Tefft, a native of that place, daughter of Benja- 
min Franklin and Harriet (Hanchett) Tefft, grand- 



456 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



daughter of Benjamin Cottrell and Margaret (Xelson) 
Tent, and great-granddaughter of Asa Tefft. a Revohi- 
tionar>- soldier. Her grandfather ser^'ed as a soldier in 
the War of 1S12. and her father served in the Civil War, 
was quartermaster sergeant in Company E, 21st New 
York Ca\-alry, discharged Sept. 9, 1S60, at Camp Collins, 
Col. Mrs. Harkness is a niece of Lathrop L. Hanchett, 
justice of the peace, and the late Theodore D. Hanchett, 
of Jamestown. Mr. and Mrs. Harkness are the parents 
of a son and a daughter: Louis Tefft Harkness. super- 
intendent of the -Automatic Registering Machine Com- 
pany of Jamestown, who married Myrtle Guild; and 
Harriet M. Hark-ness. Mrs. Harkness is a woman of 
culture, devoted to household ties. She is a past presi- 
dent of tlie Woman's Relief Corps. The beautiful fam- 
ily home, which was built by Mr. Harkness some years 
ago. is situated on Winsor street, Jamestown. 

If to make a good record as soldier, citizen, and busi- 
ness man is to succeed, Brainard T. Harkness must cer- 
tainly be counted a successful man, especially as, over and 
above the causes for congratulation already mentioned, he 
has won the high respect and warm regard of his neigh- 
bors and fellow-citizens. 



HARVEY FRANKLIN JONES, the well known 
business man of Falconer, Chautauqua county, N. Y., 
is a native of Pine Grove, Warren county. Pa., bom 
April 14, 1859, a son of Jehu P. and Harriett CHerrick') 
Jones, old and highly respected residents of that place. 
The elder Mr. Jones was a farmer by occupation, and 
died about twenty-five years ago. He was a native of 
Pine Grove townsliip, as was also his wife, and he was 
for many years well known as a leading Republican 
there. Harvey Franklin Jones is a great-grandson of 
Isaiah Jones, who took part in the Revolutionary War 
and served under General Washington. He was a man 
of unusual ability, and could speak the Indian language, 
so that he became a well known figure in the dealings 
of the early .\mericans with their savage neighbors. 

The early life of Harvey Franklin Jones was passed 
in his native region, and it was there that he gained his 
education, attending the local district schools for this 
purp'^se. While still quite a youth, however, he aban- 
doned his studies and secured a position on a neighboring 
farm, working for a time both for his father and for 
fAhcr agriculturalists in the region. Upon attaining his 
majority, Mr. Jones secured a position with E. H. 
French, of Russell, Pa., who was engaged in the feed 
business there, and remained with him for two years. 
Desiring to be engaged in business on his own account, 
Mr. Jones then took charge of the mill at Kinzua, War- 
ren county. Pa., which he operated for about five years. 
While he resided in Kinzua, Mr. Jones held the office of 
constable for the township and discharged the duties of 
this office lor three years. He then removed tr) McKcan 
county, Pa., where he worker! for the firm of ["rench & 
VirUcH, who conducted a large lumber business in that 
rogion. For two years he was superintendent of that 
ronccm. and in if</> came to Falconer, N. Y., and en- 
gaged in th': meat bu.sincss, founding the City Meat 
Market on Main street. F-'or two years he continued in 
thi< mtcriirisc, with a high degree of success, by him- 
Jcll, and then admitted as a (lartner E. L. Elderkin, an 



association which continued for three years longer. At 
the end of tluit period, Mr. Jones sold out his interest in 
the business and formed the Falconer Milling Company, 
Inc., of which he was elected the president and manager, 
an office which he continued to hold until igoo. In that 
year, Mr. Jones was elected to the office of town clerk 
of Ellicott, and served the community in that capacity 
for a period of eleven years. He is a staunch Republican 
in politics, and in addition to his post as town clerk has 
also served as assessor to the town of Ellicott, and was 
twice elected a trustee of the village. In 1913 Mr. Jones 
sold his interest in the milling business and entered the 
grocery business, opening an establishment at No. 67 
West Main street. Still later he repurchased his old mill- 
ing concern at Falconer, to which he was again elected 
president and general manager, an office that he con- 
tinues to hold at the present time. Mr. Jones attends St. 
Luke's Episcopal Church at Jamestown, and has been 
active in supporting the work of the parish, liberally sup- 
porting its philanthropic and benevolent undertakings. 

Mr. Jones was united in marriage, Dec. 5, 1888, at Rus- 
sell, Warren county. Pa., with Estelle French, who was 
born at Pine Grove, a daughter of Edwin H. and El- 
lenore (Jones) French, the former a native of Massachu- 
setts, who came to Pennsylvania as a small boy, and the 
latter of Warren county. Pa. Mr. French was engaged 
in a mercantile business at Russell, Pa., and also dealt in 
lumber. To Mr. and Mrs. Jones two children have been 
born, as follows : Helen Marie, who became the wife of 
Robert P. Hussey, of Falconer, to whom she has borne 
one child, Gwendolyn ; Florence Aline, who became the 
wife of William F. May, of Falconer, to whom she has 
borne one child, Mary Genevieve. 



GEORGE RAPPOLE— The narrowest part of 
Chautauqua Lake is at Bemus Point, a ferry there cross- 
ing the lake to Stow, in the town of Harmony. Eleven 
acres of this Bemus Point tract was formerly owned by 
Albertus W. Rappole, who started the ferry and was one 
of the early builders of the Bemus Point settlement, now 
a prosperous summer resort, and an incorporated village, 
with a permanent population reported by the State cen- 
sus of 191 5 to be 270. The eleven acres he owned be- 
came valuable, and upon part of his holdings Mr. Rap- 
pole erected in 1893 the Columbian Hotel, a house of en- 
tertainment, containing forty-five rooms, built at a cost 
of $17,000. The hotel was well patronized in the sum- 
mer months, the balance of the little farm of eleven acres 
producing the fruits and vegctal^Ies whioh supplied its 
table. 

At the Bemus Point farm George Rappole, now pro- 
prietor of the hotel, and an electrician, was born Oct. 
13, 1881, son of Albertus W. and Velona (Stone) Rap- 
pole. He attended public schools, completing grammar 
grades, then became interested in electricity and adopted 
its application to home uses as a business. He completed 
a course of study with the International Correspondence 
School of Scranton, and spent four years in the business 
in th'- city of Buffalo, and became an expert electrician. 
In i<)')l his father was killed. The management of the 
hotel ilicn fell upon George Rapjiolc, and to that duty 
he h.'is dcviilc'l his summers, following his business of 
electrician during the balance of the year. The Colum- 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



457 



bian Hotel is a popular house and well patronized during 
the vacation period, Bemus Point being one of the most 
popular of the many lake resorts. In 1920 100 rooms 
were added thereto, 80 having baths connected with 
them. Mr. Rappole formed a stock company, took over 
the Pickard Hotel, now adjoining, also the McKinzey 
farm consisting of 109 acres, which was turned into golf 
links, also the Ferry property, and he is now the presi- 
dent and manager of the same, Clarence D. Held serving 
in the capacities of secretary and treasurer. Mr. Rap- 
pole organized and installed the first telephone service 
in the village, serving seventy-four subscribers, a busi- 
ness which he later sold to the Bell Telephone Company. 
He is also interested in the ownership of the Eagle Garage 
in Jamestown, and is a very successful business man. He 
is a Republican in politics ; member of the Sons of the 
American Revolution, Board of Commerce, the Sports- 
man's Club, the Knights of Pythias, Fraternal Order of 
Eagles, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and of 
the Free and Accepted Masons. 

Mr. Rappole married, in 1903, Elizabeth R. McLaugh- 
lin, daughter of Patrick and Fanny (Smith) McLaugh- 
lin, and they are the parents of two children : Albertus 
W. and George, Jr. 



CHARLES JEFFORDS CARPENTER, late of 
Jamestown, Chautauqua county, N. Y., where his death 
occurred at his home, March 30, 1912, was for many 
years one of the prominent manufacturers and business 
men of the community and a public-spirited citizen. He 
was a native of Jamestown, born Nov. 20, 1857, a son of 
William and Sybbel (Jeffords) Carpenter, old and highly 
respected residents of this city. 

He was a lad of only six years of age when his father 
died, and he was brought up by his mother who gave 
the greatest devotion and affection to her children, pro- 
viding them with the best education that her limited 
means could afford. After attending the local schools 
of Jamestown for a number of years, Charles J. Car- 
penter began at an early age to be regularly employed in 
order to assist in supporting the family, working in the 
axe factory in which his father had met his death and 
his elder brother Elial was already employed. The two 
brothers worked at this establishment for a time, and in 
1881, having laid by a little capital, left their employer and 
formed a partnership with Charles Tew and John Kofod 
and began the manufacture of axes and other tools. This 
company did business under the style of the Jamestown 
Axe and Edge Tool Manufacturing Company, and was 
highly successful in the enterprise, a very large business 
being worked up with a market extending throughout 
the region. The business was continued uninterruptedly 
up to the time of Mr. Elial Carpenter's death and for a 
short time afterwards, but it was then sold by the 
brother, Charles Jeffords Carpenter, who had accepted a 
position with the American Express Company. This he 
continued to hold until he again took up mechanical work, 
at which he was actively engaged up to the time of his 
death. 

Mr. Carpenter was exceedingly active in the general 
life of the community of which he was a member, and 
took a prominent part in many of its affairs. During his 
youth he was not active in religious matters, but later 



in life he was converted and joined the Methodist Episco- 
pal church of Jamestown, and became the superintendent 
of the Sunday school there. He also became a strong 
advocate of temperance and did much to promote the 
cause in this region. Mr. Carpenter was a member of a 
number of fraternal organizations, and was prominent in 
Masonic circles, being affiliated with Mt. Moriah Lodge, 
Ancient Free and Accepted Masons ; Western Sun Chap- 
ter, Royal Arch Masons ; Jamestown Commandery, 
Knights Templar; Ismailia Temple, .Ancient Arabic 
Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, of Buffalo. He was 
also a member of the Jeffords Hose Company of James- 
town, and the Exempt Firemen's Association, and did 
much to advance the interests of the fire department. 

Charles Jeffords Carpenter was united in marriage, 
Sept. 5, 1882, at Jamestown, to Jennie Young, born at 
Jamestown, Jan. 29, 1862, a daughter of James and Eliz- 
abeth (Moody) Young, and a member of a well known 
family here. They were the parents of two children, as 
follows: I. Charles Raymond, who resides at James- 
town ; married Olive Phillips, by whom he has had two 
daughters, Allene E.stella and Donna Marion. 2. Allene, 
who became the wife of T. N. Nelson, the well known 
merchant tailor of Jamestown, to whom she has borne 
three children : Jane Elizabeth, Helen .A.llene, and Mary 
Louise. 



WILLIAM HENRY HARRISON— The Harrison 
family is one of the oldest in Jamestown, where they are 
well known and highly respected citizens. The first mem- 
ber of the family to be known here was Dr. James J. 
Harrison, a dentist, who was a native of Massachusetts, 
but who came to Jamestown prior to 1830. He was one 
of the early settlers of this section. 

William H. Harrison, son of Dr. James J. Harrison, 
was born in Jamestown in 1830 in a dwelling house which 
stood on the site now occupied by one of the Jamestown 
banks, at the corner of Main and Second streets. Wil- 
liam H. Harrison married Mary Moynahan and among 
their children is William Henry, of whom further. 

William Heniy Harrison was born in Jamestown, April 
30, 1871. His education was gained in the local schools 
of this city, but when fourteen years of age he left school 
and sought employment in the dry goods store of 
Hevenor Brothers in a minor position. Young Harrison 
remained with them until he was twenty years old ; in 
the meantime he was promoted to the position of sales- 
man. On May 16, 1891, Mr. Harrison entered the em- 
ploy of A. D. Sharpe, the dry goods dealer, as a sales- 
man in the dress goods department, later being trans- 
ferred to the silk dress goods department in a similar 
capacity. He is now well identified with this company 
and is in charge of the purchasing department. Mr. Har- 
rison has always been to the fore in the matter of ren- 
dering service to his city. For more than twenty-one 
years he was a member of the Fenton Guards, having 
the rank of second lieutenant. When the Spanish-Amer- 
ican War broke out he enlisted, but as it was of so short 
a duration, he did not have an opportunity to leave the 
United States. Mr. Harrison is a member of the Knights 
of Columbus, being a past grand knight of that order; 
he is also district deputy for the Catholic Mutual Benev- 
olent Association, and a member of the C. M. B. A. 



45S 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



Council. Mr. Harrison and his family are all mem- 
bers of the Roman Catholic Church of St. Peter and St. 
Paul. 

On July i6. iSg5. Mr. Harrison married in James- 
town, X. Y., Mary Kennedy. Of this union six children 
were bom : Catherine. Cecelia, Richard, Francis, Jose- 
phine. William H.. Jr. 



MARVIN H. KENT— .\ dealer in tires and auto- 
mobile accessories in Jamestown, N. Y., Mr. Kent has a 
good business and one with which he has long been 
familiar. He has prospered through close attention to 
business and through ability as a mechanic, he being an 
expert vulcanizer and repair man. He is a son of George 
Kent, of Cattaraugus county, N. Y.. a farmer and teams- 
ter, and his wife, Louise (Cook) Kent, of Cattaraugus 
county. 

Marvin H. Kent was born m Perrysburg, Cattaraugus 
coiinty. X. Y., Oct. 29, 1S72. He was educated in the 
public schools of that section, worked on the farm in 
early life, then became interested in automobile work 
and for several years has been successfully engaged in 
that business. At his place of business in Jamestown he 
ministers to the needs of automobilists generally. He is 
a Republican in politics. Mr. Kent has prospered in 
business, and has acquired considerable real estate in the 
section in which he resides. 

Mr. Kent married, Jan. 13, i8q6, in Leon, Cattaraugus 
county, X'. Y., Elvina Hamilton, born in Leon, June i, 
1888, daughter of Leroy and Susan (Samuel) Hamilton. 
Mr. and Mrs. Kent are the parents of four children: i. 
Herman, born June 30, 1S97; he enlisted in the service of 
his country, and served in Company E, io8th New York 
Infantry, from February, 1916, to Sept. 29, 1918, when 
he was killed in action. 2. Xellie, born March 12, 1S99. 
3. Leroy. born July 12. igoi. 4. Eva, born March 8, 
1911. 



ERNEST JOHN BAILEY, one of the leading 
rcMdents of Brocton, Chautauqua county, N. Y., a suc- 
cessful building contractor who has to his credit many 
large contracts, has advanced far in material wealth, and 
at the same time has held the sincere respect of the peo- 
ple of the county who have known him under all con- 
ditions. He has manifested commendable characteristics, 
is a man of distinct business ability, and has exhibited 
a praiseworthy public spirit, and a practical desire to 
help on the well being of the community in general, and 
the fxKjr and needy in particular. In business enterprise, 
he has been very successful, and has many consequential 
associations; he has for two decades had a contracting 
business which has found employment for a consider- 
able number of mtn, has taken part in the establishment 
and direction of other important mainifarturiny; ron- 
rerns, and is vice-president of the Brocton Furniture 
Comiiany. 

Ernest J. Bailey v.as born in Charlotte Center, Char- 
lotte township, Chautauqua county, X. Y., Oct. 27, 1868, 
the son of John J. and Barliara fBeha) Bailey, or Bal- 
lay, as the family is known in I-'rancc, wherein is the 
original family seat. Ernest John Bailey is French in 
Ujth paternal and maternal anteced'.nts, the paternal line 
oriitinalinK in ChamiBigiie, and his maternal ancestors 



being from .-Msace-Lorraine provinces of France. The 
patronymic, as originally spelled, was Ballay, and the 
American progenitor of the branch of the Ballay family 
to which Ernest John Bailey belongs was of that name, 
and it is not clear why the name became changed in 
spelling. It probably was wrongly written in real estate 
deeds, to substantiate the title to which the heirs took the 
Americanized version of the French patronymic. How- 
ever that may be, the family in America has for some 
generations been known by the name of Bailey. 

Ernest John Bailey was born on a farm, and in due 
time attended the district school nearest to his father's 
farm, after passing through which he seems to have 
commenced working at farming occupations quite early 
in his teens. By such work he accumulated sufficient 
means to carry him through business college, where he 
gained the fundamentals of executive work which were 
later of inestimable value to him in the management of 
his own important enterprises. He perhaps had mapped 
out his career well in advance, and knew the various 
steps by which sound success would come. He appren- 
ticed himself to carpentry, serving an apprenticeship of 
five years, and later for six years was a journeyman car- 
penter, by which time he was thoroughly conversant with 
most phases of building construction. By steadiness of 
life, and by industrious continuance in work during the 
years, he had by that time acquired some financial means, 
sufficient at all events to induce him to enter inde- 
pendently into business as a builder and contractor. He 
had come to Brocton in 1893, and had worked as a car- 
penter upon many contracts in that place, so that he was 
comparatively well known in the village when he started 
in contracting business for himself in 1900. During the 
almost two decades to the present, he has had very sub- 
stantial success as a contractor, and has to his credit the 
erection of many important buildings. Many of the fine 
residences in that section of Chautauqua county have 
been built by him, and among the buildings of public 
institutions and business corporations constructed by Mr. 
Bailey may be listed the following, all of which do credit 
to his thoroughness as a builder : The Brocton State 
Bank building; the .\hira Memorial Library building, 
Brocton ; the Crandall building, Brocton ; the Bailey 
building, which is a very fine structure, and used mainly 
by Mr. Bailey for his own business offices; the Norquist 
Afctal Door Company plant, at Jamestown, a huge build- 
ing ; additions to the American Loco Works, and to the 
Atlas Crucible Steel Company plant at Dunkirk ; con- 
struction work for the Buffalo & Lake Erie Traction 
Company, including the car barns at Fredonia, and all the 
stations with the exception of two between Buffalo and 
Erie, Pa.; the Court House at Mayville, Chautauqua 
county ; the Church of Christ at Chautauqua ; the 
Chautaucpia High School; the Falconer High School; 
the Jamestown Grammar School ; the Sherman Library ; 
the Armour Grape Juice Company headquarters at West- 
field, Chautauqua county ; the gymnasium and other addi- 
tions to the Normal School at Fredonia; some of the 
builflings of the Redwing Grape Juice Company, Fre- 
donia; warehouses of the same coinpany at Fredonia; 
the Memorial Hospital at Lillydale; the St. Hedwick 
Roman Catholic Church at Dunkirk; and the plant of 
the Brocton I'urniture Company, and in addition, Mr. 




/j<//A // 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



459 



Bailey has undertaken many important building con- 
tracts outside Chautauqua county. He has during the 
period given employment to an average of about 140 
workmen. It may therefore be inferred that, with mod- 
erate success, he must have acquired an appreciable de- 
gree of material wealth during the many years he has 
spent in consequential business as a contractor. As a 
matter of fact, he has been universally successful, for he 
knew his business thoroughly before committing himself 
to independent work. And latterly, as a capitalist, he has 
been brought into connection with many other outside 
enterprises. He owns stock in many manufacturing cor- 
porations in Chautauqua county ; Mr. Bailey is one of 
the largest stockholders of the Brocton Furniture Com- 
pany, of which he is vice-president. 

Politically, Mr. Bailey is an independent Democrat, but 
has been too busy with business affairs that needed almost 
his undivided time to have much time to spare for partici- 
pation in political movements, and he has never allowed 
himelf to consider the thought of taking public office. 
He has nevertheless always been closely interested in 
local affairs, and has been ready to lend his support to 
any worthy local project. In fraternal affiliations, he 
has been faithful and is identified particularly with the 
Masonic order. He has risen to the thirty-second degree 
in the order, and is a member of the following : Blue 
Lodge of Brocton; the Chapter, Council, and Command- 
ery, of Dunkirk ; the Buffalo Shrine ; and the Consistory 
of Jamestown, also of Buffalo. 

On Sept. 12, 1900, Ernest John Bailey married Ruth 
Hall Pettit, grand-niece of Ahira Hall, whose genealogy 
will be found elsewhere in this historical work. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Bailey have been born three children : Kath- 
leen Elizabeth, now in high school ; Angeline Sarah, 
twin sister of the first-named, and also a high school 
student ; Florence Edith, who also attends the local 
school. 

The business success of Ernest John Bailey has been 
notable, especially so bearing in mind that it has come 
to him entirely by his own efforts, and he has a definite 
place among the worthy Chautauqua county people of his 
generation. 



HARRY RICHARD LEWIS, one of the promi- 
nent attorneys of Jamestown, Chautauqua county, N. Y., 
and a much respected citizen of the community, is a 
native of Cincinnati, Ohio, born June 23. 1854. He is a 
son of Richard and Jane (Hatch) Lewis, old and highly 
respected residents of Jamestown. 

Harry Richard Lewis attended the grammar schools of 
Cincinnati, and later the Woodward High School of that 
city, where he was prepared for college and from which 
he graduated in 1872. He then attended the University 
of Michigan at Ann Arbor in that State, where he took 
a three years' classical course. He was then transferred 
to the law school of the same university and graduated 
with the class of 1876, receiving the degree of LL. B. 
He spent a probationary period of one year in the law 
offices of Cook & Lockwood, prominent attorneys of 
Jamestown, and in 1877 was admitted to the Chautauqua 
county bar, and engaged in practice here on his own 
account. Since that time Mr. Lewis has developed a large 
general practice and has been successful in his profes- 
sion. Mr. Lewis is a member of the Jamestown Bar 



Association, and is also affiliated with a number of Ma- 
sonic bodies, including Mt. Moriah Lodge, Ancient Free 
and Accepted Masons ; Western Sun Chapter, Royal 
Arch Masons; Jamestown Commandery, No. 61, Knights 
Templar. 

Mr. Lewis married (first) Frances Adams, a daugh- 
ter of Charles P. and Cornelia (Crane) Adams. To this 
union seven children were born, as follows: i. Frances, 
who was educated at the grammar and high schools of 
Jamestowit, and became the wife of Claude K. Ahlstrom, 
of Jamestown. 2. Richard, who was educated in the 
public schools of Jamestown, and is now at the head of 
a large mercantile business at Norwich, Conn. 3. Cor- 
nelia, who was also educated in the public schools of 
Jamestown, and became the wife of Fred H. Balcom, of 
Jamestown. 4. Charles Adams, who was educated in the 
public schools of Jamestown, and later at the Worcester 
Polytechnic Institute, from which he graduated with the 
degree of Chemical Engineer; at the present time he 
holds a very responsible position in a large industrial 
plant at Buffalo, N. Y. 5. Harry Richard, Jr., who stud- 
ied in the Jamestown public schools, and later at the 
Worcester Polytechnic Institute, where he received the 
degree of Chemical Engineer ; he is now prominently 
associated with a large manufacturing concern at Shelby, 
Ohio. 6. Bryce, who received the degree of Mechanical 
Engineer from the University of Michigan ; he now 
holds an important position in a Detroit manufacturing 
plant. 7. Jane, who was educated in the public schools of 
Jamestown, and at the Leland Powers School at Boston, 
from which she was graduated with the class of 1917; 
she is now very successful in her career as an actress, 
being now in a large stock company at Schenectady, 
N. Y. All Mr. Lewis's children have been successful 
and have entirely justified their father's large expenditure 
of time and money in securing them the best possible 
education in their chosen subject. The first Mrs, Lewis 
died in the year 1910. On May 19, 1919, Mr. Lewis mar- 
ried (second) Harriet Woodford, of Jamestown, N. Y. 



JOHN FRANCIS RHINEHART, for nineteen 
terms a teacher in Chautauqua county schools, and lat- 
terly a substantial and successful farmer in the Ripley 
section of the county, is a man well known and respected 
in the neighborhood, and prominent in many phases of 
its public affairs, having been school trustee and collector, 
justice of the peace, and assessor. He is an active 
granger and a charter member of the local branch of the 
Odd Fellows order. His life of si.xty-five years has been 
lived wholly within the county, and since early manhood 
he has been connected, for at least part of his time each 
year, with worth-while agricultural production. 

He was born in Ripley, Chautauqua county, X. Y., 
Aug. 23, 1854, the son of James and Jane (Sinden) 
Rhineliart. His mother was of English birth, but for 
years had been resident in Ripley. His father was an 
old Ripley resident, respected and prosperous, having a 
good blacksmithing business, and owning a good farm 
in Ripley. Their children, John F. and Effie, attended 
the Ripley schools. John F. Ripley was an apt pupil, 
and- of studious inclination, and eventually he entered the 
teaching profession, which he followed for nineteen 
terms in Ashville and Chautauqua countj' schools. How- 



4CiO 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



ever, he was characteristically a man oi energy and ac- 
tion, as well as of vigorous intellect, and each summer 
he devoted his time to occupations upon his father's farm. 
Finally, his father purchased from Thomas Sinden a rich 
farm of 200 acres at Ripley, and ultimately it passed into 
the possession of John F. Ripley, since which time he has 
lived there and devoted himself wholly to its management. 
It is a rich farm, having fine modern buildings, and Mr. 
Rhinchart has proved that he is a skillful farmer. He has 
a large herd of cattle, and as a dairy and general farm 
the property has brought him substantial return. 

His education, his general ability, his likable disposi- 
tion, and his estimable, general character, have brought 
him preferment to many positions of honor and responsi- 
bility in the local administration, and in political matters 
he has been a factor of some consequence in his district. 
He has for ver>' many years given staunch allegiance to 
the Republican party in national politics, and he might 
have held many more offices in the local administration 
than he has undertaken had he so wished, for he has 
always been well regarded in the district. He has been 
assessor of Ripley, and has also been justice of the peace, 
to which judical office he brought an impartial mind and 
a firm resolve to administer justice rightly, so far as he 
was able, and that he was able has been manifested upon 
many occasions, his findings being such as would have 
brought credit to a higher court. He has always been 
thorough and conscientious in all that he has under- 
taken, and in general has been able rapidly to assimilate 
knowledge, and there is every reason to suppose that soon 
after he was appointed to judicial office he rapidly became 
well versed in the fundamentals of law. He is a man 
of clear mind and logical thought, and has a good know- 
ledge of men, so that as a justice he was well placed in 
the public senice. He has also been interested actively 
in educational affairs, as might have been expected of a 
man of his academic inclinations and earlier associations; 
he has been a school trustee for many years, and has also 
undertaken the duties of collector of taxes. Fraternally, 
he is associated with the Odd Fellows organization, and 
is one of the charter members of the local body. And he 
has been a member of Ripley Grange for many years, 
actively interesting himself in its functioning and con- 
tinuance in usefulness. 

Mr. Rhinchart married (first) Rose B. Stone, of a 
well known Ripley family. They were married on April 
18, 1876, at Ripley, and to them were born three chil- 
dren : I. Myma, who married Baxter, wlio for 

many years has been connected with railroad administra- 
tions. 2. Murray, who was well educated, primarily in 
Ripley schools; he eventually entered profession.!] life, 
as a civil engineer, and is now connected with the Nickel 
Plate Railroad Company. 3. Ross, whose history is 
very similar to that of his elder brother, he also being a 
civil engineer, and also connected with the same railroad. 
Mr. Rhinchart married C second) Mertie Williams. She 
was born in Wisconsin, and they were married in Octo- 
ber. I<X)2. 

Th'- home of thi; Rhiticharts in Ripley is a fine one, 
and has ever been ojK.-n to their friends. In earlier years 
Mr. Rhinchart twjk much part in social and community 
movements in the town, and has very many friends. His 
record of more than sixty years is an enviable one, his 
life having been given to useful, public service, and to 
consc'jucntial jirfyluclion in his native county. 



NEWTON LINCOLN— Filling more than one 
minor public office with credit, Mr. Lincoln is, perhaps, 
more thoroughly identified with that of county librarian 
than with any other. In each one, however, his name is 
synonymous with talent and fidelity, and his fellow-citi- 
zens of Mayville congratulate themselves on having se- 
cured his services. Newton Lincoln was born Nov. 21, 
i86;i, on his father's farm at Summerdale, N. Y., a son 
of Harrison and Adeline (Dickerson) Lincoln. 

Newton Lincoln received his education in district 
schools and at the Mayville High School, being then for 
a time employed in a hotel. For four years thereafter he 
was engaged in farming, going then to Michigan and 
spending five years on his grandparents' farm. Return- 
ing to his home in Mayville, he was quietly employed 
for thirteen years in hotels there and in Jamestown, N. Y., 
and in 1904 obtained a position in the surrogate's office. 
He is now deputy clerk to the Surrogate's Court of the 
county. In loio he was appointed librarian and still re- 
tains the office, being devoted to its duties, which he finds 
thoroughly congenial. He has charge of between five 
and six thousand volumes. Cataloguing and similar 
duties he attends to personally. So highly is his work 
appreciated that he is frequently complimented on its ex- 
cellence. From 1887 to 1900, Mr. Lincoln was a Demo- 
crat, but has since been allied with the Republicans. His 
favorite recreation, in the few leisure hours which atten- 
tion to duty permits, is gardening, the cultivation of flow- 
ers and vegetables alike affording him enjoyment. 

Mr. Lincoln married, Oct. 30, 1892, in Mayville, Annie, 
daughter of John and Elizabeth Lundquist, and they are 
the parents of the following children: i. Edna, graduate 
of the Mayville grammar and high schools, and the Nor- 
mal School, Fredonia, N. Y., class of 1913. 2. Margaret, 
graduate of the Mayville grammar and high schools, 
and Fredonia Normal, class of 1913; married Floyd A. 
Baker, of Erie, Pa. 3. Ruth, also a graduate of the 
Mayville grammar and high schools, and of Jamestown 
Business College ; now a legal stenographer in Buffalo. 
4. Robert B., in school. 5. Molly, also in school. 

The people of Mayville have reason to wish that Mr. 
Lincoln may long continue to retain the office of librarian, 
in which he has for so many years given them an exam- 
ple of exceptional efficiency. 



A. MORELLE CHENEY— The Cheneys are of 
an ancient English family and in Chautauqua county date 
from early settlement days. The family in New Eng- 
land trace to either John or William Cheney, both of 
whom came from England in 1635, and lived in Roxbury, 
Mass. The Cheneys of Chautauqua county are descend- 
ants of William Cheney. The first of the Cheneys in 
Chautauqua county was Ebenezer, a soldier of the 
French and Indian, and Revolutionary wars. He came 
first in June, 1808, stopping overnight at the Cross Roads 
(Westfield) while journeying elsewhere. He was so 
taken with lands on Lake Chautau(|ua that he made a 
selection and in the early summer of 1810 located perma- 
nently, taking land at what is now the village of Kian- 
tone, and there died, Aug. 12, 1828, aged sixty-seven 
years. 

A. Morelle Cheney, a son of Joshua and Mary (Gif- 
ford) Cheney, grandson of Calvin, a?i(l great-grandson 
of Jonathan Cheney, was born in the township of Ellery, 




^ 7?4^>>*^jC C^^^>ty^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



461 



Chautauqua county, N. Y., Aug. 7, 1857, and the farm 
upon which he was born, at now Bemus Point, he owns 
and upon it makes his home. He has developed the farm 
to a high state of productiveness, causing it to yield 
bountifully. He was educated in the public schools, 
Jamestown Union School, and Collegiate Institute, class 
of 1879. He has developed strong ability as a man of 
affairs, and has important business interests in Jamestown, 
He was one of the incorporators of the bank of James- 
town and since its organization has been a director and 
member of the executive committee of the board. 

A Republican in politics, Mr. Cheney was continuously 
in county office from 1905, when he was elected super- 
visor of his own county, until the expiration of his term 
in 1917. He has served on many important committees of 
the board of supervisors. During the building of the 
court house at Mayville, he was chairman of the com- 
mittee on public buildings and to him is largely due the 
credit of a county court house, completed with the 
amount appropriated therefor. In 1904 Mr. Cheney was 
elected to the State Assembly and served on the follow- 
ing committees : Revision, Taxation and Retrenchment, 
and Affairs of Villages. In 1913 he was again elected to 
the Assembly, polling 3,612 votes against his opponent's 
3,537. He was again elected in 191 5, receiving 4,753 
votes against 1,728 for his opponent. He was appointed 
in that session a member of the following committees : 
Electricity, Gas and Water Supply, Taxation and Re- 
trenchment, and Revision. He is a member of Union 
Grange, Patrons of Husbandry, and of Bemus Point 
Lodge, No. 585, Independent Order of Odd Fellows 

Mr. Cheney married, in Falconer, N. Y., Jan. 28, 1892, 
E. Maude Tracy, daughter of Oscar and Jemima (Lent) 
Tracy. Mr. and Mrs. Cheney are the parents of three 
children : M. Allene, born Feb. 2, 1893 ; Lucile M., born 
May 22, 1896; and A. Morelle, Jr., born July 4, 1902. 



FRANK W. BULLOCK— Among the class of citi- 
zens who have helped to add to the development and im- 
portance of Jamestown and Chautauqua county, none 
have become more prominent by the force of their own 
individual efforts than Frank W. Bullock. He was born 
in Busti, Chautauqua county, N. Y., Feb. 2, 1874, a son 
of DeForest and Nettie (Blackmar) Bullock. Mr. Bul- 
lock, Sr., was a farmer and occupied the old homestead 
of ninety acres at Busti, which was formerly owned by 
Grandmother Marietta Shattuck, who came here in an 
ox-cart and located on this farm, in April, 1819, more 
than a century ago. Mr. Bullock's grandfather, Alvin, 
was a well known farmer and cattle buyer, and also dealt 
in agricultural implements, mowing machines, reapers, 
etc. This farm is now in the possession of Mr. Bul- 
lock, the subject of this review, who has improved and 
is making a fruit farm of it. 

The early education of Frank W. Bullock was secured 
in the schools at Busti and the Sugar Grove Seminary at 
Sugar Grove, Pa. Later he took up a course in elec- 
tiical engineering with the International Correspondence 
School, of Scranton, Pa. At the age of seventeen he 
accepted a position with the electric light plant at Lake- 
wood, and during this time he received practical experi- 
ence in power plant operations and the repairs of genera- 
tors and other electrical apparatus. He worked in all 



branches of the trade and in this he received the practical 
knowledge which served him so well in the years that 
followed. He was with this company three years when, 
Oct. II, 1894, he accepted a position with the Jamestown 
Electric Lighting and Power Company. For four 
months he did the inside wiring for the company and then 
was promoted to operating engineer in the p<jwer house, 
continuing thus until 1000, when he was made superin- 
tendent, a position which he still holds, as well as being 
the superirrtendent for the Western New York Electric 
Company. He is a stockholder and director of both the 
Jamestown Lighting and Power Company and the West- 
cm New York Electric Company. 

Mr. Bullock takes great interest in his work, as he has 
been much engaged in machinery and the science of elec- 
tricity since his childhood. He is a member of the Ma- 
sonic order, having attained the Knight Templar degree, 
of which he is past commander, having filled the office of 
commander in 1912. He is also a member of the Buffalo 
Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He attends the 
Methodist church, of which he is a member of the offi- 
cial board. He belongs to the Board of Commerce of 
Jamestown, and the National Electric Light Association 
of New York City. 

At Jamestown, April 7, 1900, Mr. Bullock was united 
in marriage with Cassie, daughter of Alvero and Alice 
(Foster) Mathews, of Jamestown. Mr. and Mrs. Bul- 
lock are the parents of a son, Frederick, who is attend- 
ing the public schools of Jamestown. 

Mr. Bullock's thorough business qualifications, his 
knowledge of electricity and motive power, as well as his 
energy and strict integrity in business relations, have won 
for him the warm personal regard he merits. 



THE JAMESTOWN LIGHTING AND POWER 
COMPAN"Y — In 1886, the old Jamestown Electric 
Light and Power Company was incorporated, and in 1902 
the present company was incorporated, under the name of 
the Jamestown Lighting and Power Company and the 
former company was merged into the new one. The 
purpose of the company was to supply electric light and 
power to citizens, manufacturing plants, and other insti- 
tutions in Jamestown, Ellicott and Celoron. The old 
plant was situated at Nos. 9 to 11 Race street, on the 
west side of Brooklyn Square of Jamestown, N. Y. 

In 1909, Messrs. A. N. and S. B. Broadhead, bought 
out the Jamestown Lighting and Power Company, and a 
new sub-station was built during the years 1910 and 191 1 
at No. 101 Washington street, and power was also ob- 
tained from the Jamestown Street Railway Company The 
current is generated at the Jamestown Street Railway 
Power Company's power plant, located at the boat land- 
ing in Jamestown. This current from the power house 
is delivered to the sub-station at No. loi Washington 
street and is transformed to the proper voltage for direct 
and alternating current. The general offices of the com- 
pany are situated at No. 316 North Main street. The 
company is incorporated under the New York State laws 
with the following officers : President, A. N. Broadhead ; 
vice-president, S. B. Broadhead ; treasurer and secretar>', 
Eric Sundholm; superintendent, F. W. Bullock. In 1916, 
this company purchased the Falconer Electric Light plant. 



46j 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



and current is now furnished to Falconer and town of 
Poland. 

In igii. tlie Western New York Electric Company, 
which is relatively close to the Jamestown Lighting and 
Power Company, was organized and incorix>rated with 
the following officers : President, A. \. Broadhead ; 
vice-president. S. B. Broadhead : secretary, \V. R. Rey- 
nolds : treasurer. Eric Sundholm: superintendent, F. \\'. 
Bi'llock. Power and light is now furnished by this com- 
pany at Jamestown to both sides of Chautauqua Lake 
which includes the towns of Lakewood, Bcmus Point, 
Busti, Harmony, Chautauqua, Ellery and Ellicott. 



CLARENCE DAVID JACKWAY, although now 
living at Huron, Ohio, is a native of Chautauqua county, 
X, Y.. and is part owner of a substantial fishery enter- 
prise centering at Barcelona, Chautauqua county, which 
business for the last decade or so has found steady em- 
ployment for about thirty men. 

He was born in Barcelona. X. Y., Sept. 7, 1S75, the son 
of John and Adeline c Fisher) Jackway. Thc'jackway 
family is of British origin, both parents of Clarence D. 
having been born in England, where his father followed 
the precarious and perilous occupation of fishing. To 
better his condition John Jacknvay came to America, and 
settled at Barcelona, and upon Lake Erie followed his 
original occupation, fisherman. He was the father of a 
large family, Clarence D. being one of eleven children 
born to his parents, and they were all young when his 
father died. The elder boys had to work for a living, 
and to provide sustenance for the mother and the younger 
children as soon as that great calamity came to the 
family. 

Clarence X>. Jackway was adopted by an uncle soon 
after his father's death, the uncle becoming responsible 
for the boy"s wellbeing until he attained his majority. But 
as Clarence D. grew into manhood, he was drawn into 
the alluring and adventurous occupation followed by his 
father, and although, until IQOS, he did not con.fine him- 
self to fishing, most of his years of labor since he 
reached man's estate have been passed in undertakings 
rx;rilous and otherwise, profitable and otherwise, upon 
Lake Eric. In 1908, he formed business partnership with 
a man of his native place, and he and his partner, Her- 
man Lart, then established the Barcelona Fish Company, 
which iocm became a flourishing business. It developed 
steadily until at the present time the partners own and 
keep in constant use during the season eight fishin„' 
schooners and other boats, finding employment for thirty 
mf.-n. .\Ir. Jackway undertakes the commercial phase of 
the company's affairs, and his partner, Herman Lart, 
supervises the operation of the boats. Roth are sub- 
stantial men of industry, who have succeeded by the 
adoption of gwd and logical business methods, but 
mainly by applying themselves industriously to that 
business. 

Mr. Jackway married, April 14, i8fj8, .'\rras Wilson, of 
Fredonia. X. Y. They have three children : Flovd Wil- 
liam, Ethel Irene. Ruth Margaret. The children are all 
Ixring ediirated in Huron, Ohio, which is now the home of 
the family. 

Clarr-nce D. Jackway is a member of a Huron. f;hii,, 
I'xige of the IndciH.-ndent Order of Odd I'rllows ; and 



politically he is a Republican, but of independent mind. 
He has fixed convictions upon certain national subjects, 
and does not hesitate to follow those convictions even 
though they might temporarily draw him from his gen- 
eral allegiance to the Republican party. In general char- 
acteristics, Mr. Jackway is a man of outspoken frank- 
ness, but of pleasing disposition. His success in life is 
noteworthy, especially when one considers the handicaps 
of his early days. 



ROBERT LIVINGSTON NEWTON— One of the 

leading representatives of Irving, N. Y., is Robert Liv- 
ingston Xewton, who has been a resident of this com- 
munity for nearly fifty years and to-day is the owner 
of extensive farm lands which cover 250 acres. 

Henry Newton, father of Robert Livingston Newton, 
was a farmer and mill owner during his lifetime. He 
married Harriett Lothridge, and they became the parents 
of six children: Sarah, wife of George H. Potter; 
Henry; Frances, wife of Albert Avery, of Battle Creek. 
Mich.; Melinda; Robert L., the subject of this review; 
and Lora, all now deceased, except Robert L. 

Robert Livingston Newton was born June 26, 1844, at 
Irving, N. Y. After attending the district schools and 
graduating from the academy at Fredonia, N. Y., he 
learned the trade of miller with his father who ran the 
Irving Mill. This mill was burned in i8.s8 and was re- 
built and destroyed again by fire in 1861. After a year 
his father bought the Laona Mill, and a little later Rob- 
ert L. bought it from his father, selling it in 1869 and 
buying a farm of 100 acres at Laona, where he built a 
large brick house. This he sold in 1874, and then moved 
to Irving. N. Y., where he bought a large grist and saw 
mill which later was destroyed by flood. Mr. Newton has 
resided in Irving, N. Y., since 1874, and to-day is the 
owner of a farm consisting of 250 acres on which are 
grown all kinds of vegetables together with fruits and 
grapes. By means of this occupation Mr. Newton has 
become very prosperous, and is a well known figure in the 
community. Politically Mr. Newton is a Republican, 
giving to public affairs the interest and attention de- 
manded of eveo' good citizen. He is a member of St. 
Andrew's Episcopal Church. The best proof of his cap- 
able management is furnished by the history of his busi- 
ness career, but his countenance and personality seem to 
make this record appear quite a matter of course. 

Mr. Newton married, Dec. 19, 1866, Harriett Moore, 
daughter of William and Flora (Rood) Moore, and they 
are the parents of three children : Melinda, wife of 
George P. Newton, of Cleveland, Ohio; Carrie, widow 
of W. F. Nash; Katherinc, wife of A. C. Barbeau, of 
Silver Creek, and mother of two children, Katherine and 
A. C, Jr. 

Throughout his career Mr. Newton has been animated 
by the spirit of progress, and he has furnished a true pic- 
ture nf the man who creates and adds to the wealth of 
nations while advancing his own interests. 



FRANK GUSTAVE NORDSTRUM— The domi- 
nanl rharartcrislirs in tin- life ,,f Frank Gustave Nord- 
struiTi havi- been ambition and determination to progress; 
progression, advancement, onward and upward being 




-^ '-^ 



feA#*' 







iaobm Jl. JlPetoton 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



463 



words that unconsciously filled his thoughts from early 
boyhood until years after he had attained his majority. 

Born in Sweden, Sept. 17, 1861, Mr. Nordstrum was 
thirteen years old when he came to America, coming to 
join his father who was a worker in Antrim, Pa. The 
elder Nordstrum had come to this country some time 
before, sending for his family, a wife and ten children, 
after he became located in his new environment. The 
boy found ready employment in the coal mines in An- 
trim during the working hours, and at night he studied 
constantly to make up for the forced neglect of an early 
education. This strenuous form of living was continued 
until the lad reached the age of twenty-one, when he left 
the mines and hired out to a farmer for the sum of ten 
dollars a month and board, with the privilege of attend- 
ing the local school. This only continued for six months, 
when he went into the blacksmithing business, continuing 
in that for several years, when he had an opportunity to 
work for a railroad as foreman of a construction gang. 
At the end of six months, Mr. Nordstrum went West, 
settling in De Moines, Iowa, where for five years he was 
salesman and later assistant manager of the store of F. L. 
Harbeck, a furniture dealer of that city, continuing his 
studies as before. 

After leaving the employ of Mr. Harbeck, Mr. Nord- 
strum returned East, going to Mansfield, Pa., where he 
entered the State Normal School, remaining for one 
term ; then he went to Buffalo, N. Y., and remained for 
a year as salesman for D. E. Morgan & Son, dealers in 
furniture and carpets. Ke then found an opening in the 
Iroquois Hotel to act as timekeeper, having the oppor- 
tunity of devoting his spare time to the study of the 
jewelry trade, which he determined to settle upon as his 
future method of earning a living. For a year he re- 
mained at the Iroquois Hotel, then in 1891 went to Wal- 
tham, Mass., where the Howard and Waltham watch 
companies conduct their large factories for the manufac- 
turing of watches. Here he paid Zalg Brothers fifty 
dollars to allow him to learn more of the details of the 
jewelry business, working there for a time and else- 
where, wherever an opportunity in that line occurred. In 
1896 lie was in Oswego, N. Y., and rode from that city 
on a bicycle to Jamestown, where he intended going into 
business for himself. Taking a little store at No. 12 
East Second street, Mr. Nordstrum entered upon the 
career of which he had dreamed for years ; he under- 
stood every smallest detail of the work and he gave his 
customers such satisfaction that in three years the busi- 
ness grew to such a flourishing condition that it was 
necessary to enlarge his facilities, so he moved to Main 
street into larger quarters. This store soon proved too 
small for his constantly growing trade, so he bought out 
the jewelry business of Fred Fuller at No. 213 Main 
street, enlarged the store to accommodate his large stock 
and furnishings, and entered upon the most successful 
era of his long and patient preparation. Mr. Nordstrum 
has the largest jewelry store in Jamestown, and one of 
the finest in the western part of New York State. His 
advancement is well deserved, for the best years of his 
life were spent in overcoming the paucity of advantages 
in his youth and in fitting himself by constant application 
for his later occupation. 

True to the inborn love of everything connected with 
the country of his birth, Mr. Nordstrum finds his pleas- 



ure in associating with others of his nationality, being a 
member of the Norden Club, and of the Swedish Brother- 
hood. He is also connected with the Order of Eagles, 
and with the local lodge. No. 248, Knights of Pythias. 
He and his family are members of the Presbyterian 
church. 

In 1893 Frank Gustave Nordstrum married May Fran- 
ces Bacon, a resident of Wellsboro, who died in April, 
1916. Of this marriage two children were born: i. 
Frances Albertine, who married Raymond Bates Bush, 
of Kennedy, N. Y., a chemist, at present connected with 
the Nestle Food Company of New York City ; Mr. Bush 
is a graduate of Cornell University. 2. Chester, now a 
student in the medical school of the University of Buf- 
falo. Mr. Nordstrum enjoys the respect and confidence 
of his fellow-townsmen, and he is devoted to the inter- 
ests of Jamestown and its inhabitants. 



SAMUEL P. KIDDER— Upon the farm which he 
now owns in the town of Kiantone, Chautauqua county, 
N. Y., Samuel P. Kidder was born, April 18, 1868. Upon 
the same farm, which was then included in the town of 
Carroll, his father, Samuel (2) Kidder, was born Oct. 
12, 1825, and in 1816 his grandfather, Ezbai Kidder, first 
settled on the same farm, one hundred five years having 
since elapsed, and during those years the farm has not 
been out of the possession of the family. The farm was 
originally 300 acres in extent, bought from the Holland 
Land Company. The Kidders were originally from Dud- 
ley, Mass., and there Samuel (i) Kidder was born. 
Later he moved to the State of Vermont, where he en- 
gaged in farming until his death in January, 1805. He 
married Zilpah Bacon, and they were the parents of four 
sons and three daughters. One of these sons, Ezbai Kid- 
der, was the founder of the branch of the family of 
which Samuel P. Kidder is representative. 

Ezbai Kidder was born in Dudley, Mass., in 1787, and 
died at his farm in Kiantone, Chautauqua county, N. Y., 
in 1879, s nonagenarian. In early childhood he was taken 
by his parents to their new home in Wardsboro, Vt., and 
there he spent the years until 1813, coming to Chautau- 
qua county in that year. He did not remain, however, 
but returned to Vermont, coming again to Chautauqua 
county in 1816, and settling on the farm in Carroll, now 
Kiantone, upon which his grandson, Samuel P. Kidder, 
resides. He was a carpenter by trade, and in addition 
to clearing, cultivating and improving his own acres he 
did a great deal of carpenter work in Kiantone and Car- 
roll, erecting many of the frame houses and barns in his 
section. At the first town meeting held in Carroll, March 
6, 1826, he was elected commissioner of highways. In 
1838 he was supervisor of Carroll, and when Kiantone 
was set off he was elected supervisor of that town at the 
first election held Feb. 21, 1854. He was a member of 
the Congregational church at Jamestown, and in politics 
a Whig, later a Republican. Ezbai Kidder married, in 
1824, Louisa Sherman, who died Nov. 14, 1867, daugh- 
ter of Noah and Laura (Hubbard) Sherman, her father 
born in Wardsboro, Vt., her mother in Brimfield. Mass. 
The children of Noah and Laura Sherman all came in 
after years to the "Holland Purchase." Ezbai and Louisa 
(Sherman) Kidder were the parents of a son Samuel, of 
further mention, and three daughters. 



464 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



Samuel (.2) Kidder was bom at the Kidder homestead, 
then in the towni of Qirroll, Oct. i:;, 1825, and died there, 
Oct iS. iSoS. He was his I'atlier's helper from youth, 
and in the winter months attended the district school. 
Later he was a pupil at Jamestown Academy, and devoted 
himself to additional reading and self-improvement, be- 
coming a well-informed man. He was the owner of a 
farm left to him by his father, which is well adapted to 
general and dairy farmuig. He was also the owner of 
considerable land in Jamestown. He was originally a 
Whig in politics, but later became a Democrat. He 
served the town of Kiantone three terms as assessor and 
three terms as supervisor, 1S86-87 and 1S90. His father, 
Ezbai Kidder, was the first supervisor of tlie town, and 
his son. George C. Kidder, held the same office, 1910-17, 
eight terms. Samuel Kidder was a member of the James- 
town Congregational Church. He married, Oct. 17, 1S54, 
Elnora Partridge, daughter of Joel Partridge, of James- 
town. Samuel and Elnora (Partridge) Kidder were the 
parents of ten children: i. Ida, married \V. C. Parker. 

2. Willard, a farmer of Kiantone, married Anna Miller. 

3. J. Edward, died aged eighteen years. 4. Henry E., 
married Grace Sherrod, and removed to Knoxville, Tenn. 
5. George C, a farmer of Kiantone, married Lillian Van 
Duzee. 6. Dora. 7. Samuel P., of further mention. 8. 
Mary L. 0. Fanny E. 10. Jay H. 

Samuel P. Kidder, son of Samuel and Elnora (Par- 
tridge") Kidder, was born at the homestead in Kiantone, 
Chautauqua county, N. Y., April 18, 1868, and yet resides 
upon the old farm. He was educated in the public 
schools, finishing at Jamestown High School, and when 
school days were over he became his father's farm as- 
sistant. He later took the burden of management upon 
his shoulders and now owns the old farm. He conducts 
general farming in connection with dairy farming, and 
is one of the prosperous and substantial men of his town. 
He is a member of the Patrons of Husbandry, and of the 
Congregational church. In politics he is a Democrat. 

Mr. Kidder married, in Bradford, Pa., Oct. 25, 1894, 
Flora VVyman, born in the town of Carroll, Chautauqua 
count}-, X. Y., Oct. 25, 1873, daughter of Frank and Kate 
(Van Arsdale) Wyman. Mr. and Mrs. Kidder are the 
parents of six children: i. Ruth M., born March 22, 
1896. 2. Ralph \V., born Dec. 26, 1897. 3. M. Elnora, 
born Jan. 9, 1900. 4. Samuel F., born Aug. 5, 1909. 5. 
Elliot H., born April 29, 191,3 d- Eunice L., born Sept. 
18. 1016. 

JAMES E. HANSON— The old proverb tells us 
that "a rolling stone gathers no moss;" in many cases 
this is true, but there arc exceptions to every rule, and 
one of these is James E. Hanson. Before settling himself 
in business, Mr. Hanson was interested in many difTcrcnl 
occupations, almost always in the line of electrical appli- 
ances, in various parts of the country, in each case gain- 
ing fresh experiences which in the aggregate made up 
a complete knowledge of the business which he finally 
made his life work, that of general electrical work. 

While the Hanson family was really of English birth, 
the [larents of James E. Hanson came to this continent 
in 1878, and lived for a time in Canada, eventually going 
to Rhvle Island. At the present time James Hanson, 
father of James E. Hanson, is living in Vonngstown, 
Ohio. The r>on, James E. Hanson, was Uirn in luigland, 



March 15, 1875, and was three years old when he arrived 
in Canada. While very young he attended the schools in 
the town where the family lived, but later, when they 
went to Rhode Island, the boy obtained employment in a 
cotton mill and worked there for some time. In 1888, 
James HaTison, the father, went to live in Jamestown, 
N. Y., and the son again attended school for a short 
period, this time at the Central Branch School of James- 
town. This was followed by employment in the Broad- 
head Worsted Mills, he remaining there for a few 
months, and then working at various odd employments 
until finally he became much interested in electricity. In 
1893, when seventeen years old, young Hanson went to 
Saratoga Springs, N. Y., and entered the employ of the 
Union Electric Railway, going later to Troy with the 
Gilbert Car Works. Following this he obtained a posi- 
tion with the New York Central Railroad in the lighting 
and power department, gaining considerable practical ex- 
perience thereby. Later Mr. Hanson went to Washing- 
ton, D. C, and while there was in the employ of the 
Glen Echo Electric Railway Company for a short time. 
When he returned to Jamestown, N. Y., in 1805, he was 
employed by J. C. Stearns & Company, contractors of 
Buffalo, who had the contract for building St. Luke's 
Protestant Episcopal Church. When this was finished 
the young man went to Falconer, N. Y., with the Amer- 
ican Manufacturing Company in their shipping depart- 
ment. This not being in his line of work, he only re- 
mained there a short time, when he returned to electri- 
cal work, this time with Sooliday & Miner, they having 
the contract to wire the city hall. After the conclusion 
of this job, he worked for his father who was superin- 
tendent of the municipal lighting plant, the son continu- 
ing in the commercial department for two years. Again 
the desire for a change sent the young man to Chicago to 
enter the service of Richards & Meecham, electrical con- 
tractors, where he gained still further experience in his 
chosen pursuit. 

It was in the latter part of 1897 that he returned to 
Jamestown and formed a partnership with M. W. 
Vaughan, as Hanson & Vaughan, on East Second street, 
in a short time taking Mr, Vaughan's brother into the 
business, the name being changed to Hanson & Vaughan 
Brothers. Near the end of the first year, Mr. Hanson 
withdrew from the firm to do electrical work for the 
Gokey Electric Light Plant on several buildings then in 
course of construction, among them being the Burnham 
Brothers' building, the Sherman House (since destroyed 
by fire), the Jamestown Brewery, and the residence of 
.Samuel Briggs. After the completion of these contracts, 
Mr. Hanson went into partnership with David Maloney, 
the firm being Maloney & Han.son, this continuing for 
three and a half years, then Mr. Maloney severed his con- 
nection with the firm to enter the Home Telephone Com- 
pany and Mr. Hanson continued the business alone for 
two years. Then E. P. Barley joined with him, the part- 
nership being known as the Hanson Electric Company, 
electrical contractors and suppliers for the wholesale and 
retail trade. This continued for a year. Then Mr. Han- 
son carried on the business for several years, until 1913. 
when Edwin W. Shier became his partner, continuing for 
three years, since which time Mr. Hanson has conducted 
the affairs of the Hanson Electric Company at No. 30 
Main street. .Mr. Hanson began at the very bottom of 




JO.M^ P.c. 





^M^cA^ 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



465 



his line of work, learning every detail in every form of 
labor, and may now be considered a past master of elec- 
trical construction. Mr. Hanson is much interested in 
public affairs in Jamestown, being an active worker in 
the Chamber of Commerce; he is a member of the local 
lodge of Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and 
of the beneficial order of Knights of Pythias. .At one 
time he was a member of the Fire Department of James- 
town. 

In Randolph, N. Y., Sept. i, 1903, Mr. Hanson married 
Anna B. Murray. They have three children : James E., 
now at school : Paul M., at school ; William J. Mr. 
Hanson is regarded among his associates as a "hustler" 
in business, and as a man who thoroughly understands 
the work he has in hand. 



ALTON DELISLE JOBES, D. C— At the time 
Dr. Johes took his degree at the Universal Chiropractic 
College, that institution was located in Davenport. Iowa, 
but it now has become an incorporated body of the State 
of Pennsylvania, and is located at No. 1940 Fifth avenue, 
Pittsburgh. This school of drugless therapy attracted his 
interest, and since 1915 he has been its successful advo- 
cate in Fredonia, his present seat of practice. Mrs. Jobes 
is also a practitioner of the drugless methods in associa- 
tion with her husband. 

Alton D. Jobes, son of William and Caroline (Ayling) 
Jobes, was born near the village of North East, Erie 
county, Pa., Aug. 14, 1859. His father was a farmer of 
that section at the time of the birth of his son, but soon 
after moved to Lottsville, Pa., where he lived until the 
time of his death, which occurred in the summer of 1865. 

Alton D. Jobes attended the public schools in Lotts- 
ville, also the South Lancaster Academy, in South Lan- 
caster, Mass. During his youth and manhood, he was 
variously employed, farming, lumbering, etc., and later 
on was engaged as a jeweler, doing watch, clock, and 
jewelr)' repairing in Conneautville, Pa., but finally en- 
tered the Universal Chiropractic College of Davenport, 
Iowa, whence he was graduated Doctor of Chiropractic. 
He located in Fredonia in 1915, and is there well estab- 
lished in practice. He is a member of the Seventh Day 
Adventist church, and in politics is a Prohibitionist. 

Dr. Jobes married, Dec. 30, 1885, Hattie V. Johnson, 
of Fredonia. They are the parents of two children: i. 
Lottie Evelyn (Jobes) Kaelin, of Takoma Park, Wash- 
ington, D. C. ; was educated in the schools of Michigan, 
and Mount Vernon Academy, Mount Vernon, Ohio, also 
a graduate of the Jamestown Business College. Mrs. 
Kaelin and her husband hold lucrative positions in the 
Review & Herald Publishing Company, at Takoma Park, 
Washington, D. C. 2. Vernon LeRoy Jobes, who was 
educated in the public schools of Pennsylvania, and Cedar 
Lake Academy, Cedar Lake, Mich. ; married Mary 
Knapp, of Corydon, Pa., and has two children : Theo- 
dore, and Ariel ; he is an expert machinist in garage 
work, and is located in East Randolph, N. Y. 



JOHN W. WITHERS, who comes of a worthy 
British family, and has for so many years lived in 
Chautauqua county, N. Y., in the Kiantone township of 
which he has a well-improved farm, is a citizen of high 
moral character and commendable traits in general, and 
Chau— 30 



is highly regarded in that section of the county. He 
was born Jan. 29, 1869, in England, the son of James and 
Sarah (Watson) Withers, the former at one time a 
miller, but later a farmer, having in his later life fol- 
lowed his natural inclination for agricultural pursuits. 

John W. Withers was educated in Appleby, England, 
and with his parents came to this country in 18S2. They 
at first settled in Busti, but eventually John W. Withers 
acquired a farm in Kiantone township, and there he has 
lived for thirty years, during which time he has mani- 
fested a comprehensive understanding of farming and a 
marked interest in community affairs. He is a man of 
upright character, and has definite and fixed convictions 
upon many subjects, regarding which there has been 
much elasticity of opinion among less conscientious men. 
He has endeavored to live in strict accordance with his 
reading of the Bible, and his general understanding of 
right and wrong, good and bad. He is an ardent church- 
man, a member of the local Presbyterian church ; in poli- 
tics he is a resolute, outspoken Prohibitionist. Fra- 
ternally he belongs to the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen. 

During the war, he was intensely interested in the 
progress of national affairs, in fact, as a man of British 
birth, he was interested in the struggle long before this 
country entered into it, and he showed by his actions that 
he was whole-heartedly patriotic. He subscribed as much 
as he was able to the war funds, both to the loans and to 
other funds which were for the purposes of the nation in 
some phase of its war aims. As a loyal farmer, he 
sought, to the limit of his ingenuity and energy, to co- 
operate with the Department of Agriculture in a national 
endeavor to bring into profitable bearing every acre of 
agricultural land that was possible, and thus, by increas- 
ing production and preventing waste, be able to send to 
the impoverished allies of the nation foodstuffs that they 
stood sorely in need of. The result of that national effort 
by patriotic American farmers is of course well known 
in the aggregate, and it has its proper place of honor in 
the national historical records of the war period, and it is 
generally well known to what an appreciable extent the 
sending of foodstuffs by this country to Europe affected 
the prospects of the combatants. But a proper recording 
of the individual effort of every American farmer has 
not been possible in the comprehensive national records, 
and must be left to compilation of local history such as 
this. Mr. Withers, as an earnest man of English birth, 
probably felt the awfulness of the calamity which had 
befallen his homeland long before this nation was drawn 
into the struggle, and probably felt his own helplessness 
even more keenly, so that when the opportunity did come 
to aid in the good cause it must have been a relief to him, 
and it is but proper that record should be made of his 
share in the combined effort of nations, not only armies, 
to hold back and finally defeat the domineering aims of a 
cruel and unrighteous autocracy which sought to hold 
sway over all the nations of the earth. 

John W. Withers married, July 12, 1894, Jennie B. 
Osborn, the marriage ceremony taking place in Busti, 
Chautauqua county, N. Y. Mrs. Jennie B. (Osborn) 
Withers was born in Warren county. N. Y., and was a 
daughter of George F. and Roxana (Stultz) Osborn, her 
father being of English birth, and her mother of Dutch. 
Her father was a veteran of the American Civil War, 



466 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



and belonged to a regimental unit which was sent in 1864 
to the Federal capital at Washington, D. C, to garrison 
it at a critical period, and tliere he was honorably dis- 
charged at the termination 01 hostilities. Mr. and Mrs. 
\\'ithers are the parents of one child, a daughter, Annie, 
born Dec. u. uxv. 



PARK L. STARR is a prominent and well known 
fanner of the town of Gerry, where he was born and has 
spent most of his active life. He comes from the pioneer 
stock of Western New York, known for its activity and 
rugged energ>-. His father and mother were both born 
in the town, and both were descendants of the earliest 
settlers, when Gerry was known as Little Vermont, a 
designation that honored the State from w^hich many of 
the early settlers came. Mr. Starr has taken an active 
interest in the affairs of his town and county ever since 
attaining his majority, and has successfully filled the 
offices of assessor and of town and county supervisor, 
being repeatedly elected to these positions by the votes 
of his fellow-townsmen and women. His public service, 
like his private service, has been performed for the good 
of the community, in a painstaking way that has won for 
him the confidence and respect of the people of his com- 
munity. 

Park L. Starr was born in the town of Gerry, May 7, 
18' 6, the son of Henry and Mary T. (Fargo) Starr. He 
spent his boyhood life upon the farm of his father, at- 
tending the common schools of his neighborhood and 
securing the foundations of an education which he has 
built upon by practical observation, experience and a line 
of reading that has kept him in touch with the affairs of 
the day at home and abroad. His father, Henry Starr, 
served the town of Gerry in the same capacity as the son 
is now serving, in the office of supervisor, for many 
years, and until the infirmities of age demanded rest and 
retirement from public activities. 

While engaged in business off the farm, the early train- 
ing of Park L. Starr enabled him to take hold of the 
farm and manage and develop it at the death of his 
father, adding more modern equipment than the old time 
farmers were accustomed to. During the recent war. 
Park L. Starr did his full share with the farmers of the 
State and Nation to tnect the requirements placed upon 
agriculture by the government at Washington, and in the 
interests of the people of the entire World. He also re- 
sponded to every call for funds to prosecute the activities 
of war, and he served as one of the great army of work- 
ers behind the men in the trenches wherever opportunity 
called and health and strength permitted. As a practical 
farmer, Mr. Starr long ago became identified with the 
work of the Patrons of Husbanrlry and is a member of 
Gerry Grange. 

Mr. Starr was united in marriage at East Aurora, Erie 
rounly. \, Y., June 10, 1890, to Lillie Rose Monchow, 
who was l»rn at Marilla, Erie county, N. Y., March i, 
iHfif), the daughter of Herman Augustus and Melissa 
I'h'cbe fStedman) Monchow. To Mr. and Mrs. Starr 
hai fxren t>'jrn one son, Troy Scranton Starr, Sept. 10, 
i'/<4. ;>t Marilla. Eric county, N. Y.; he is now a student 
at Falfomr High School. 

I'ark I,. .Starr r'prc'-nts the type of farmer and busi- 
ness man who is safe and sane in the transaction of his 



own business and that of the public ; the kind of citizen 
that is at the foundation of honest Democratic govern- 
ment, dependable in public service or the privacy of his 
home. His public services have been recognized by his 
continued election to public office. He is a Republican by 
inheritance and by inclination, and at every State or Na- 
tional election he has given the best service that he could 
to the cause of the Republican party and its candidates. 



FRANCIS E. HARRIS— Although his older broth- 
ers, Oscar and Gilbert Harris, came earlier to Chautau- 
qua county, N. Y., Francis E. Harris did not arrive 
until 1852. He was a son of Jonathan and Lucy (Mil- 
ler) Harris, and a grandson of John Harris, who served 
as a private in the Revolutionary army when only a lad 
of fourteen years. Jonathan and Lucy (Miller) Har- 
ris were natives of Vermont, living in Halifax and Ben- 
nington, that State, many years before coming to Chau- 
tauqua county, N. Y. J'onathan Harris was a carpen- 
ter and farmer in Vermont and later in New York. 
They were the parents of seven children: I. Oscar, a 
farmer in later years in Chautauqua county, N. Y., 
where he died. 2. Gilbert, a soldier of the Union 
army, killed at the battle of the Wilderness. 3. Francis 
E., of whom further. 4. Malinda, who is now (1921) 
one hundred years old; lives at Ripley, N. Y., the 
widow of Addison Burton. 5. Mandana, deceased, was 
the wife of Lucius Correll, of Portland, N. Y. 6. 
Maria, died in young life in Portland, N. Y. 7. Vic- 
toria, deceased, was the wife of Joel Stratton, of Spar- 
tensburg, Pa. Jonathan Harris married (second) Jane 
Bruce, of Bennington, Vt., and they became the par- 
ents of four children: Jennet, Reuben, Mary and Ed- 
win. These four children were born in Vermont, and in 
later life resided in various parts of this country and 
Canada, where their death occurred. 

Francis E. Harris was born in Marlboro, Vt., Nov. 
29, 1830, died Aug. 12, 1890, at Iiis home in Ellicott, 
Chautauqua county, N. Y. He obtained few educa- 
tional advantages in his youth, a fact he deplored all his 
later life, as at the age of eleven he was hired out to 
the farmers of his neighborhood by his father and they 
seemed to have no interest in the motherless lad save to 
get all the work possible out of him. Later he learned 
the carpenter's trade, and so rapidly did he advance 
that at the age of seventeen he was a contractor of 
building and an employer of men of his trade many 
years his senior. In 1852, he came to Chautauqua, still 
single, but four years later married Lydia H. Crandall, 
and settled down to the life of a farmer. He had broth- 
ers and sisters living in Chautauqua county when he 
came, and it was that fact which inlhienced his coming. 
l''rom 1S52 until 1856, he was employed as a carpenter 
and builder, but the life of an agriculturist claimed him 
:iflrr bis marriage, his farm being located in the town 
of F.llicott. He was a man of splendid qualities, sound in 
judgment, and sought by his neighbors for counsel and 
advice. Honorable and upright, he was respected and 
esteemed in life and deeply mourned in death. 

h'rauris K. Harris married, in T856, Lydia Helen 
fr:in'lall. born at Kinderbook-on-the-Hudson, Colum- 
bia (oiipiiy. .v. v., but when four years of age was 
Ijrougbt to Chautauqua comity, N. Y., by her parents, 




^:z^^C^^.J^, 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



467 



Stephen and Christiana (Benjamin) Crandall. From 
Albany the Crandalls, father, mother and nine chil- 
dren, came West to Buffalo by boat on the Erie canal, 
consuming about two weeks in the journey. Lydia H. 
(Crandall) Harris was a true helpmeet, devoted to her 
home and family, and from early life a member of the 
Baptist church of Brocton, N. Y. She died Oct. 8, 1918, 
in the village of Falconer, N. Y. Francis E. Harris 
was a Universalist in his religious faith, and in poli- 
tics a Republican. Mr. and Mrs. Francis E. Harris 
were the parents of six children: Cora, Ida, Rollin 
Arthur, Gilbert D., (see forward) ; Jennie May, 
died in early childhood ; and Flory Belle. Flory 
Belle prepared at Jamestown High School, en- 
tered Cornell University, then after graduation spent 
a year in post-graduate study, specializing in Romance 
languages; she has taught in New York and New Jer- 
sey cities, also two years in California, and is now a 
teacher of Spanish and French in New York City; she 
is a member of the Daughters of the American Revolu- 
tion, and of the Unitarian church. 

Cora Harris, a graduate of Fredonia State Normal 
School, taught several years, and is the author of a 
volume of child stories entitled "Half a Hundred 
Stories." She is a Daughter of the American Revolu- 
tion, and a member of the Unitarian church. 

Ida Harris married Andrew J. Petersen, in 1892, and 
died Aug. 15, 1919, leaving two children, Francis and 
Ruth. 

Rollin Arthur Harris, Ph. D., was born in Randolph, 
N. Y., April 18, 1863. He received his early educa- 
tion in the public schools and high school of James- 
town, N. y. In 1881, he entered Cornell University, 
receiving the degree of Ph. B. in 1885. He remained at 
Cornell, taking up graduate work in mathematics and 
physics. In 1886-87, he was a fellow in mathematics, 
and in 1888 he received the degree of Ph. D. From 
1889 to 1890, he was a fellow in mathematics at Clark 
University, Worcester, Mass., where he pursued special 
studies in mathematics and lectured on mathematical 
subjects. 

Mr. Harris entered the Tidal Division of the United 
States Coast and Geodetic Survey as computer in 1890, 
through the United States Civil Service. After becom- 
ing familiar with the work, he began the preparation 
of a publication into which would be gathered the tidal 
information scattered in various journals and memoirs 
and in which the methods of tidal reduction and predic- 
tion would be cotirdinated. Dr. Harris threw himself 
into the work with enthusiasm. Because of his splen- 
did training in mathematics and his ability, he was spe- 
cially fitted for the work, and the result, as embodied 
in the "Manual of Tides," which appeared in six parts 
in various reports of the superintendent of the Coast 
and Geodetic Survey, between the years 1884 and 1907. 
has placed our country well at the front in that branch 
of scientific enquiry. Taken as a whole the "Manual of 
Tides" is a monumental work of some 1,200 quarto 
pages of text and plate containing a large amount of 
original contributions in a field cultivated by the most 
brilliant mathematicians. 

The "Manual of Tides" has received the recognition 
it merited from scientists the world over, the eminent 
French mathematician, Henri Poincare, in his "Meca- 
nique Celeste," subjects the various tidal theories to 



searching analysis and sums up by saying that "it ap- 
pears probable that the final theory will have to borrow 
from that of Harris a notable part of its essentia! 
features." Dr. Harris published a number of articles in 
"Science" and other scientific journals on mathematical 
and tidal subjects. Mention should also be made of 
"Arctic Tides," a monograph published by the Coast 
and Geodetic Survey in 191 1, which is a classic of its 
kind. 

Personally, Dr. Harris was a man of modest bearing, 
somewhat reticent, but possessed of a pleasing sense of 
humor. He was an indefatigable worker with a high 
conception of the obligations of the scientist. He was 
a member of scientific societies, both local and national. 
His loss will be felt by his friends and colleagues of 
the Coast and Geodetic Survey, and by the many scien- 
tific men, engineers and explorers in many parts of the 
world, who brought their problems to him and received 
the benefit of his wide knowledge in a peculiarly 
abstruse branch of science. He died Jan, 20, 1918, of 
heart disease, death coming suddenly. He married 
Emily Doty, of Ellicott, Chautauqua county, N. Y. 

Gilbert Dennison Harris was born at Jamestown, Oct. 
2, 1864. He there graduated from high school, in 1882, 
going thence to Cornell University, whence he was 
graduated Ph. B., class of 18S6. He was connected as 
assistant with the Arkansas Geological Survey, 1887-88; 
United States Geological Survey, 1889-92; Texas Geo- 
logical Survey, 1892-93; and during 1894 was engaged 
in geological research in England and Northern 
France. He was assistant professor of paleontology and 
stratigraphic geology at Cornell University in 1894- 
1909; professor of the same since 1909: director of the 
Louisiana State Geological Survey, 1S99-1909; editor 
and proprietor of bulletins of "American Paleontology," 
Vols. I to 6; editor and proprietor of "Palaeonto- 
graphica Americana," Vol. i ; special geologist to the 
Louisiana Sulphur Company, 1917; geologist to various 
salt and oil companies. 1909; paleontologist to Pear- 
son's Oil Company, of Trinidad, 1919; and is yet a 
professor at Cornell. He has specially investigated for 
economic purposes the oil, sulphur and salt fields, and 
scientifically investigated the geology and paleontology 
of the tertiary formations of the Southern States and 
Central America. He is a member of de la Societie 
Geologique de France since 1895; life fellow of the 
Geological Society of America since 1899; member of 
Phi Beta Kappa and Sigma Xi. In politics he is a 
Republican, and in his religious views liberal. 

Mr. Harris married, Dec. 30, 1890, Clara Stoneman, 
and they are the parents of: Rebecca, graduate of Cor- 
nell, 1913, A. B., Phi Beta Kappa and other university 
honors. 



JEREMIAH J. SULLIVAN, M. D.— More than 
thirty years of active practice have so firmly intrenched 
Dr. Sullivan in the confidence and affection of his fel- 
low-citizens of Dunkirk and of many far beyond the 
limits of his home town that the appearance of his 
name will be instantly greeted with admiring and cor- 
dial recognition. Distinguished in his profession. Dr. 
Sullivan is also highly esteemed as a citizen, ranking 
among the foremost in his community. 

Jeremiah J. Sullivan was born Dec. i, 1862, in Byron, 
Genesee county, N. Y., a son of Michael and Julia 



46S 



CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY 



(.Cashman") Sullivan, the former a small farmer who 
worked for the railway. Jeremiah J, Sullivan attended 
the public schools of his birthplace, passing thence to 
the high school of Akron. X. Y.. and then entering the 
medical department of the University of Buffalo. In 
1SS7. he received the degree of Doctor of Medicine, hav- 
ing sersed during his last year as interne in the Erie 
County ^X. Y."> Hospital. Immediately after gradua- 
tion. Dr. Sullivan began practice in Dunkirk, where he 
has ever since been continuously engaged in the general 
work of his profession and in surgery. He is medical 
examiner for the Xew York Life and Metropolitan Life 
Insurance companies. Among the professional organi- 
zations in which he is enrolled are the American Medi- 
cal Association, the X^ew York State Medical Associa- 
tion, the Dunkirk-Fredonia Medical Association, and 
the Chautauqua County Medical Society. At the time of 
its foundation and for a number of years after, he was 
a member of the staff of Brooks Hospital. He has been 
for thirty years house physician to St. Mary's and Holy 
Cross colleges, both of Dunkirk. In public affairs. Dr. 
Sullivan has never actively mingled, though always tak- 
ing a helpful interest in all that he deems vital to the 
welfare and progress of his home town. He belongs to 
the Knights of Columbus, and is a member of St. 
Mary's Roman Catholic Church. 

Dr. Sullivan married. Sept. 6. l8g2, Margaret Sheehe, 
daughter of Timothy and Ann (Conway) Sheehe, of 
Dunkirk, and they became the parents of one child, 
Roma J., who died in infancy. 

The professional record of Dr. Sullivan is incorpo- 
rated with honor in the annals of medicine, and his 
name is written on the grateful hearts of the many to 
whom he has carried health and healing. 



ADAM PERCY CHESSMAN, banker and promi- 
nent man of affairs of Fredonia, N. Y., was born in 
Pittsburgh. Pa., Sept. 4, 1867, a son of Harry and 
Mary E. ('Herspcrger) Chessman. Harry Chessman 
was born in Brighton. England, in 1842, and when eight 
years old accompanied his parents to the L^nited States, 
they locating in Pittsburgh, Pa. He was connected with 
the United States Pension Department practically all 
the active years of his life. He was a Democrat in poli- 
tics, an Episcopalian in religious belief, and a member 
of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, in which 
organization he held local offices. His death occurred 
in the year tHr/o. 

.Adam Percy Chessman attended the public schools of 
his native city, and at the age of sixteen, having com- 
pleted his studies, he accepted a position with the Penn- 
sylvania Railroad, in the general car accountants divi- 
sion, and remained so employed until 1891. He was 
promoted to the position of assistant to the chief of this 
division, but was compelled to retire on account of ill 
health. In 1802, Mr, Chessman, in order to recuperate, 
r'-movcd to Chautau'|ua county, X. Y., and shortly 
aftrrward accepted a position with the Chautatuiua 
Lake Mills, where he was employed until i8ov His 
next position was with the State Bank, Mayville, N. Y., 
and he served in the capacity of clerk until 1^)7, in 
whi'-h year he organized the firm of Scoficld, Cippcrly 
& Chessman, private bankers in Sinrlairville, .X. Y. In 
if^/j, he organized the Sinrlairville C.'inning Company, 



and in 1002 consolidated with the Fredonia Preserving 
Company and moved to FVedonia, N. Y. In igo6, he 
organized the Xational Bank of Fredonia, filling the 
offices of director and cashier from that time to 1920, 
when he was elected president, which office he still 
holds. Mr. Chessman is, without doubt, one of the fore- 
most figures in the banking circles of Fredonia, and his 
opinion is very often solicited on banking questions of 
the most delicate nature. He is a man of keen business 
foresight in all financial matters, and his personality is 
a stimulant in all banking matters with which he is 
identified. Mr. Chessman also takes a prominent part 
in the political life of the region, being a staunch Demo- 
crat in politics. He has served as president of the 
Chamber of Commerce, treasurer of the village. He is 
prominent in Masonic circles, having attained the 
Knights Templar degree, and is a member of the Citi- 
zens' Club of Fredonia. In religious belief he is a 
Methodist, but with his wife attends the Episcopal 
church. 

,\dam Percy Chessman married, at Mayville, N. Y., 
Sept. II, 189s, M. Gertrude Bond, a native of Mayville, 
a daughter of Orlando Bond, a highly respected citizen 
of Mayville. 



MOSES SMITH STEVENS— There is no charac- 
teristic element of our national development of which 
we have more just reason to be proud than the fact 
that in this country advancement can be secured through 
capability, merit, and labor, unhampered by cast or 
class, and that the majority of our strongest and best 
citizens are self-made men. Suc