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UNIV. OF MASSACHUSETTS/AMHERST 
LIBRARY 



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History of Chelmsford 




HENRY SPAULDING PERHAM 



HISTORY 



OF 



CHELMSFORD 



MASSACHUSETTS 



BY 



THE REV. WILSON WATERS, M. A., B. D. 



Printed for the Town 

BY THE 

COURIER-CITIZEN COMPANY 

Lowell, Mabsachusbtts 

I9I7. 



^, ^, 



Copyright, 1917 
By WILSON WATERS 



INTRODUCTION. 

THE work of preparing a history of Chelmsford was under- 
taken by Mr. Henry S. Perham in 1904, at the request of 
the Town. Mr. Perham, a native of Chelmsford, whose ancestor 
was one of the early settlers, had written a sketch of Chelmsford 
for Kurd's History of Middlesex County, published in 1891; 
and at the Quarter- Millennial celebration in 1905, he delivered 
the historical address which was printed in the Report of the 
Proceedings. At the time of his death, in 1906, he had written 
so much of the contemplated history as appears in the first 
chapter of this volume under the title, "The Beginning." This, 
with whatever other material (consisting of a few notes, some 
correspondence, and occasional addresses in manuscript), was 
found among his papers, came into my hands, when, in 1907, 
I was asked by the Town to take up the work interrupted by 
the lamented death of Mr. Perham. 

I reluctantly accepted the task, realizing the labor involved 
and the time it would take from other pressing duties. I have 
endeavored to bring the work to completion in a manner as 
nearly consonant with that of my predecessor and as worthy of 
the subject as the imposed conditions and my own limitations 
would allow. I have traversed the whole field, verifying the 
quotations made by Mr. Perham, although this was hardly 
necessary in the case of such an accurate historian, and have 
searched diligently for the facts now presented to the reader. 
I am aware that further years of work might yield some things 
of interest yet unearthed, and perhaps give better finish to the 
result of my labors. 

The reader may discover a somewhat arbitrary grouping 
of chapters and subjects: perhaps a more homogeneous and 
logical arrangement might have been made, had the conditional 
limitations allowed. 

As the work progressed, it became evident that, to make a 
voltune of reasonable size, and to shape it in the documentary 
and topical, rather than the narrative style, it would be necessary 
to repress all inclination to the fine periods which make a book 



vi HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

more acceptable to the ordinary reader. The documents repro- 
duced are of more \^akie in a work of this nature than a mere 
reference to them, or than anything which an author may say 
concerning them, and are often more interesting and illuminating. 

This History is compiled, not so much to entertain, as to 
inform the reader concerning the past life of the Town, and to 
furnish him with a reference book of lasting value. 

Dr. Samuel A. Green, President of the Massachusetts 
Historical Society, a friend and helper of Mr. Perham in his 
historical work, said to me several years ago, "Do not spend too 
much time gathering material." A certain amount of material 
is essential to a good history, and. ha\-ing gathered sufficient, 
as I think, for this purpose. I now present the result to the patient 
reader. 

Extracts have been given from Bridge's diary, now in the 
possession of the Fiske family, of which Mr. Perham made a 
faithful copy. It is a valuable document, and should be printed. 

Wherever Mr. Perham's material has been used, it has been 
my purpose to give him due credit for the same. 

After Chapter I, extracts from the Town records have been 
given without reference to Book and page, the reader being able 
to find them in loco by the date. 

About forty manuscript volumes of Chelmsford records have 
been read through, and much has been gleaned from the 240 
folio volumes of manuscripts in the State Archives. The first 
book of Proprietors' records was burned about 1715. Parts of 
the first and second volumes of To\vti records are missing. The 
transcript made in 1742 gives only such records as the committee 
deemed important. Under a vote of the To\\'n, in 1892, Henr>' S. 
Pexham and George A. Parkhurst were made a committee to 
copy the first two books of records. The work was done by the 
former. Several of the early books have been preser\-ed by the 
Emery- process. 

The church records during the time of Mr. Clarke and Mr. 
Stoddard (1675-1740'> are missing. 

Documents and quotations from records are reproduced as 
nearly like the orig^al as can be done in t^-pe — not so easily 
read, but more pleasing to the historian and antiquarian. 

The old custom of vs-riting ye for the arose from the resemblance 
of y to the Anglo-Saxon letter thorn, which was really more like 



INTRODUCTION vii 

our small italic p, and which had the value of th. The letter 
thorn was used in English until, in the fifteenth century, it was 
transformed to y. The article, though written ye, should be 
pronounced the. 

Some persons will, perhaps, be disappointed that the history 
contains no complete family genealogies. 

Several genealogies of the early families were prepared, 
but, as it was found that to include all of these would require a 
separate volimie, they were necessarily omitted.* 

Human society, whether political or religious, makes progress 
by friction. Thoreau likened the two great political parties to 
the gizzard of a grain-eating fowl, between the two parts of which 
the people are ground. Benjamin P. Hunt, on a fly-leaf of his 
copy of Emerson's "First Church in Boston," copied these extracts 
from a letter of John Adams, written in 1817: 

"There is an overweening fondness for representing this 
country as a place of liberty, equality, fraternity, tmion, harmony 
and benevolence. But let not your sons or mine deceive them- 
selves. This coimtry, like all others, has been a theatre of parties 
and feuds for near two hundred years. 

"Look into all oiir memorials, histories they cannot be called, 
Winslow's, Winthrop, Morton the first, Morton the second, 
Hubbard, Mather, Prince, and even Hutchinson himself, and 
then judge how sweetly harmonious our ancestors have been. 

"There is one morsel which I beg leave to recommend to 
the deliberate perusal of your children and mine. It is my friend 
Emerson's 'History of the First Church.' See there elements 
that have been fomenting, foaming and frothing ever since." 
(Works, Vol. 10.) 

See also Slafter's "Memoir of the Rev. John Checkley," 
and many other voliimes. 

The truth of history is sacred. The chronicler and historian 
must record things as he finds them. In our day war is decried, 

*It hae been necessary to omit even mention of many things which have had part in the life 
of the Town's people, such as the North Chelmsford Cricket Club, the Hornbeam Hill 
Golf Club at the Centre, the tennis, whist, and dancing clubs, the Lodge of Odd Fellows 
formerly existing at the Centre, and the Civic League. 

The profii>erou8 life of the Town depends upon the worth of its citizens, the BoUd, 
faithful people, men and women, whose names, many of them, are not printed in town 
histories, because they happen not to be called to public duties. 

Among Chelmsford people who have gained success abroad may be mentioned John 
Galen Howard (son of Dr. Levi Howard), who studied at the Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology and I'Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris, and is now Professor of Architecture at 
the University of California, and the designer of its buildings. 



viii HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

and justly. We are sick of its horrible details. The history 
of our first two hundred years is full of battle, and if all its awfulness 
could be depicted, it would strongly dissuade from its continuance. 
Mr. Perham held deeply the modem feeling against war, and 
rightly. He felt that it was at least unwise to perpetuate the 
memory of war-like deeds and victories over our fellows obtained 
by great slaughter. We shall all welcome the coming of the day 
"when justice and reason and not rapine and murder shall hold 
sway over the destinies of the world." Yet none of us can fail 
to accord the meed of praise to the brave defenders of our liberties. 

I have no idea what Mr. Perham's plan was in regard to 
making a record of Chelmsford's part in the Indian Wars and 
the Revolution. He had very little material for such a record, 
and that, evidently, he had when the Hurd sketch was written 
a quarter of a century ago. And in what he had written for this 
History, he passes over the period of King Philip's War with slight 
mention. 

My purpose has been to give only so much of the history of 
our wars as may help the reader to understand the part per- 
formed in them by the men of this Town. 

In Chapter V, the records of Chelmsford men in the Revolu- 
tion are given. The records of the Continental Line towards 
the close of the war are in Washington, and I have not had access 
to them. Some of the later records, as found in the Massachusetts 
Archives, are, however, included in this chapter. 

Religious conflict has been less bloody, but at times bitter 
among good men and women, and the facts are here told. What 
men most value, they struggle hardest to maintain, and justify 
their contentions by claiming to uphold the right. They have 
been willing to inflict martyrdom and to be martyrs for what 
they believed to be true and right. Thus the truth has been 
emphasized, set free, and made a part of human history. 

Allen viTites of the thirty-nine first emigrants, a "company 
of holy pilgrims," who entered this wilderness and subdued the 
fallow ground; and it is well that we should know something 
of the character and worth of our ancestors and predecessors, 
the sturdy, upright lives of the men and women who have made 
Chelmsford what it is today. 

There is a proverb to the effect that a people which cares 
nothing for its past, has no present and deserves no future. It 
would seem as though everyone sliould be interested to know the 



INTRODUCTION ix 

history of his own town or of any town in which he may sojourn. 
He should wish to know what manner of people they were who 
first settled it, and whence they came, they who, "by their sturdy 
efforts subdued the earth and made it fruitful, felled and planted, 
delved and spun; who laid the foundations of our political, 
social and religious institutions; who they were that began under 
great privations and dangers what we now enjoy in abundance 
and without molestation." 

The knowledge of these things will help one better to love 
and to appreciate the topographical features of forests and hills, 
the brooks and meadows, the long-travelled roads that lead by 
the old homesteads, while one's imagination clothes them with 
incident and legend, and peoples them with the spirits of past 
years. One will more truly realize and enjoy the comforts and 
conveniences of the present day, as one compares them with the 
meagre advantages of the olden time. 

And still, while meditating upon the past, there is a tendency 
in human thought to find satisfaction in an age, if not golden, 
yet tinged with the enchantment of distance. There is a pleasure 
in returning to origins, in tracing the causes in the evolutionary 
process. And it is thus that our history becomes interesting 
as it takes us back, even to the ancient days in England, when 
names had a personal significance: When Abbotts were abbots, 
and Barrons, barons; when Kemps were knights; when the 
Chamberlains cared for the wardrobe of the lord; and Park, 
Parker, Parkhurst, the Warrens and the Fosters (Foresters) 
had charge of the hunting and pleasure grounds; and the Baileys 
were bailiffs. When the Fletchers fledged or feathered arrows, 
and the Bowers made the weapons to propel them; when 
Henchman was the faithful "right-hand man" of his chief, and 
Stoddard bore the Standard. When the lay Clarke (clerk) 
made the responses in Church, and the Haj^ward looked after 
the hedges and kept the cattle away. When Webb wove cloth, 
and Fiske (Fysche or Fisher) represented a craft which supplied 
many with an important portion of their food. When the Wright 
worked in wood and the softer materials, and the Smith in metals; 
of which latter name there is a remarkable dearth in our records. 
When Leach practised physic, and the Proctors kept order, or 
managed the affairs of others. When Kidder carried his kit; 
when Marshall and Farrer shod horses; when Perham and 



X HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

By(h)am lived at the hamlet, and the sturdy Spaulding [epaule- 
ding] gave shoulder blows; and everybody knew the meaning of 
his name. 

If History be Philosophy teaching by examples, mayhap 
this volume, falling into the hand of some newly naturalized 
citizen of Chelmsford, may persuade him to a reverence for the 
pious labors of the Fathers who made the Town and rendered 
it possible for him to enjoy the pleasures and privileges of the 
present time, and also move him towards an effort as energetic 
and effective for future betterment. 

The labor involved in the preparation of this History has 
been gladly bestowed con amore; and I trust its results will be 
accepted by my fellow-townsmen as a tribute to their worth 
and a token of my appreciation of the kindness I have universally 
received at their hands. The quarter of a century passed in 
their midst has left with me memories of many pleasant hours 
spent in social intercourse, or in united effort for the furtherance 
of the best interests of the Town. I can say with TuUy: "Haec 
scripsi non otii abundantia, sed amor is erga ie." (This have I 
written, not out of an abundance of leisure, but because of my 
affection towards you.) 

It remains to express my appreciation of the courtesy shown 
me, while working in the State Archives, by Mr. J. J. Tracy and 
Miss Alice R. Farnum, and others there and in the various offices 
at the State House, as well as in the Court Houses and rooms of the 
Historical Societies. 

Also I desire to thank those who have aided me in the final 
preparation of the History, by the reading of proof and in other 
ways; especially would I mention Alfred P. Sawyer, Esq., the 
Hon. Samuel P. Hadley and Mr. J. Adams Bartlett. 

Miss Bessie Alta Byam has been an efficient help in copying, 
and reading proof, and also in making the Index. 

Miss Ella A. Rose has aided by copying notes and documents. 

The printers have been obliging and considerate, and have 
done much to facilitate my work. 

By vote of the Town, the Trustees of the Adams Library 
were made the publishing committee. This committee put the 
whole matter into my hands, so that, except in this single particu- 
lar, all criticism of this volume must fall upon me. 



October, 1916. -^^ 



(""^H'TA.f^ 




CONTENTS. 



Chapter Page 

I. The Beginning 1 

II. Early Grants — The Indians 72 

King Philip's War 84 

III. Province Wars 127 

King William's War 127 

Queen Anne's War 138 

Dummer's or Lovewell's War 150 

Ser\'ice in the West Indies 156 

King George's War 157 

French and Indian War 162 

IV. The War of the Revolution 190 

»The Concord Fight 216 

The Battle of Bunker Hill 225 

V. Records of Chelmsford Men in the Revolution 301 
VI. Shays' Rebellion. Wars of 1812, 1848, 1898 .... 356 

VII. The Civil War, 1861-5 368 

Records of Chelmsford Men 378 

. VIII. The Life of Long Ago 392 

Roads, Stages, Social Life, the Doctor, &c. . . . 434 

IX. Territorial Limits 468 

Bridges, Canals, Steamboats, Railroads .... 494 

X Papers by Mr. H. S. Perham 511 

The Wamesit Purchase 511 

The Early Settlers in that Part of Chelmsford now Lowell 524 

The Folks at the Neck 540 

The Early Schools of Chelmsford 550 

XI. Slaves, Witches, Warning Out, Small Pox .... 570 

School for the Deaf, Libraries, Monument Association, <S:c. 582 

XII. Town Meeting, Taxes, Population, Valuation, Money, &c. . 600 

XIII. Topography 629 

Meteorological and Seismical Observations .... 639 

XIV. Geology and Botany 643 

XV. Manufacturing 656 

XVI. Religious Organizations 675 

XVII. Burying Grounds 716 

List of Interments in Forefathers' Burying Ground . 721 

Civil List 754 

Early Ministers, Physicians and Lawyers 769 

Annals 810 

Notes and Corrections 825 

List of Teachers in Chelmsford Schools, 1916 842 

Index of Names 846 

Index of Topics 888 



MAPS AND ILLUSTRATIONS. 

The maps have been much reduced in size in order to bring 
them within the Hmits of the letter-press. Where there is a 
graphic scale, the measurements will be foiuid correct. Otherwise, 
the reader is cautioned that a simple statement like "20 rods to 
the inch" will be misleading. 

A good reading glass will greatly assist in examining the maps. 

Naturally, there has been some difficulty in the selection 
of subjects for the illustrations, many having to be omitted which 
are historically interesting. The rule has been to include only 
those buildings which are of greatest architectural and historical 
interest within the present limits of the Town. 

Mr. E. R. Clark assisted in the preparation of the pictures, 
which were printed in Chelmsford by Mr. G. T. Parkhurst. 

Frontispiece. Portrait of Henry Spaulding Perham. 

1. Reduced copy of a map of 1677. 

2. Plan of Chelmsford, in 1653. In the State Archives. (See page 4.) 

3. Reduced copy of a Plan by Henry B. Wood. 

4. Reduced copy of a Map of Chelmsford in 1794. Official map ordered 
by the State, and now in the State Archives. 

5. Reduced copy of a Plan of the Farms at East Chelmsford in 1821. 
Original in the office of the Locks and Canals Company, Lowell. The 
large island, part of which is shown at the top of the plan, is Long island. 

6. Reduced copy of a Plan of Chelmsford in 1831. Official map ordered 
by the State, and now in the State Archives. 

7. Plans of Chelmsford Centre and the South and West villages in 1875. 
In 1884, George H. Wilson built the large block in Central Square, 
Chelmsford Centre, and kept a hotel there for a number of years. 

8. Plan of the North village in 1875. 

9. This Map is based on that of the United States Geological Survey of 
1886, edition of 1893. It shows almost all of the roads and some of the 
houses. Many of the Lowell streets are not shown. The figures show 
the old School Districts. (See page 560.) The exposed ledges, glacial 
marks and eskers are indicated as shown on a map made by G. H . 
Knowlton, formerly Superintendent of the Chelmsford schools. 

10. Plan of the Chelmsford Centre Water District. North street is now 
known as Centre street. (See page 598.) 

11. Plan of the North Chelmsford Fire District. (See page 597.) 

12. The effigy of Mr. Bridge is from his gravestone, and probably shows 
more accurately his wig, gown and bands than it does his features. 
Portraits of Hezekiah Packard, Wilkes Allen and John Parkhurst. 
(See Chapter XIX and page 706.) 



MA PS A ND ILL USTRA TIONS xiii 

13. Gravestones of Colonel Jonas Clarke and his wife. 
Gravestones of the Rev. Ebenezer Bridge and Madam Bridge. 
Forefathers' burying ground, Chelmsford Centre. 

14. Gravestone of the Rev. Thomas Clarke (see page 71). 

The Stoddard tomb, and the old schoolhouse, which originally had a 
porch in front of it. Forefathers' burying ground. 

15. The Sam Davis house, Chelmsford Centre. (See pages 299 and 396.) 

16. The Crosby house, Chelmsford Centre. (See page 394.) 

17. The Fiske house, Chelmsford Centre. (See page 395.) 

18. These three views were sketched from memory by Judge S. P. Hadley. 
(See page 500.) 

19. Map of Middlesex Village, by courtesy of the Lowell Historical Society. 
(See pages 442 and 478fT.) 

20. View showing part of Chelmsford Centre from the reservoir on Robin's 
hill. Lowell in the distance. 

21. Plan of Forefathers' burying ground (old part), Chelmsford Centre. 
(For references to figures, see pages 719 and 842.) 

22. Reproduction of part of page 7, Book A, Town Records. 

23. Reproduction of part of a page from the Town Records. 

These represent some of the more legible portions of the ancient records. 

24. A glimpse of Heart pond. Baptist Church, South Chelmsford. 

25. The Hayward garrison house, South Chelmsford, built in 1690. (See 
I pages 46, 92 and 400.) A partition on the right of the interior view 

has been left out of the picture in order to show the construction beyond. 

26. St. Mary's Church, Chelmsford, England. (See page 833.) View of 
the river Chelmer, Chelmsford, England, from a photograph taken by 
Walter Perham, in 1902. 

27. Unitarian Church, Chelmsford Centre. 

All Saints' Episcopal Church, Chelmsford Centre. 

28. Congregational Church, North Chelmsford, also the building burned 
in 1893. 

29. Eagle Mills, West Chelmsford. Methodist Church, West Chelmsford. 

30. St. John's Roman Catholic Church, North Chelmsford. 
Interior of St. Alban's Episcopal Mission, North Chelmsford. 

31. Reduced copy of a Letter signed by Colonel Parker and Captain Walker 
(see page 233), from a photograph owned by the late Charles Nichols. 

32. Baptist Church, Chelmsford Centre. 
Congregational Church, Chelmsford Centre. 

33. S. E. View of the Adams Library, Chelmsford Centre. Architect, 
John A. Fox. (See page 585.) 

34. Three historic Watches: 

The Swiss watch at the left has on the back case a beautiful piece 
of enamel in colors, and is said to have been carried by Colonel Stark 
of New Hampshire. It belongs to the Dadmun family. 

The small silver watch next shown is that carried by Joseph Spauld- 
ing, who fired the first shot at the battle of Bunker Hill. (See pages 
226, 331, and 332.) 

The third watch, of silver (with its steel chain), which, by the Hall 
mark, is known to have been made in 1750, was found by Jonathan 



xiv HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

Manning, when seven years old, in 1756, on the road from Chelmsford 
to Billerica. It may have been dropped by some English officer traveling 
to or from Boston. This watch is now owned by Arthur M. Warren, 
to whom it descended. 

35. Old view of Robin's hill, showing lone pine tree. (See page 629.) This 
sketch was made about 1876 by A. G. McAllister, formerly Principal 
of the High school. It shows the houses of Sewall and Solomon Park- 
hurst, then the only buildings on High street. Sewall Parkhurst teamed 
the lime from Robin's hill, which was used in building the first mill in 
Lowell. 

The Town Hall, Chelmsford Centre, looking up Centre street; Common 

on the left. 

Schoolhouses and Town Hall, North Chelmsford. 

36. The old Fletcher house, Chelmsford Centre. (See pages 393, 394.) 
The Spaulding-Hazen place, Chelmsford Centre. (See page 399.) 

37. The Stoddard house, Revolutionary Monument and Classical school, 
Chelmsford Centre. The Adams house. North Chelmsford. 

38. East Chelmsford in 1825, from a painting by Benjamin Mather. From 
left to right the principal buildings are the Machine Shop, the Merrimack 
Mills, St. Anne's Church, and Kirk Boott's house at the extreme right. 
(See pages 485, 489 and 711.) 

39. View of part of North Chelmsford from the water tower, 1907; showing 
part of Moore's Mills. 

40. Plan of Chelmsford Centre in 1856, from Walling's County Map. 
The great elm at the Putnam farm, Chelmsford Centre. (See page 698.) 

41. House built by the Rev. Hezekiah Packard, Chelmsford Centre. (See 
page 396.) 

South view of the buildings at the Town Farm, Chelmsford Centre. The 
house is square, the west front being similar to that here shown. In 
this house, and in the Lovering house nearby (page 397), are sliding 
shutters similar to those mentioned on page 394. 

42. View of the Silesia Mills at North Chelmsford. The low building at 
the right is the counting room of the Machine and Supply Company. 
(See page 668.) That on the left is the counting room of the Chelmsford 
Foundry Company. (See page 666.) 

The Berry house. South Chelmsford. (See page 398.) 

43. The High School building, Chelmsford Centre, erected in 1916 on the 
site of the Farwell-Adams house, Billerica street; Edwin R. Clark, 
architect; cost, $65,000. Building Committee: James P. Dunigan, 
Herbert E. Ellis, Frederick A. Snow. Advisory Committee: C. George 
Armstrong, Gabriel Audoin, Ulysses Lupien, William H. Shedd, 
Wilbur E. Lapham. 

44. Model of the meeting house burned in 1842. (See page 689.) 

Some century-old costumes pre.served at the Fiske house. The military 
uniform is that of John Minot Fiske, Colonel of the Chelmsford Militia. 

45. The Bowers, Ford and Parker houses, now in Lowell. The Warren 
homestead, Chelmsford Centre, built prior to 1697. 

View inside the chimney, showing the backs of ovens, at Karl M. 
Perham's house. 




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Seal of the Town of 
Chelmsford 



The first chapter of this History was written by Mr. Henry S. 
Perham, jor the remainder of the volume the Rev. Wilson Waters 
is to be held responsible. 

The expression, "the writer," frequently used, will be referred, 
accordingly, to the proper person. 

The attention of the reader is directed to "Notes and Corrections," 
at the end of the volume. 



CHAPTER I. 
THE BEGINNING. 

IN the settlement of New England the first towns which were 
planted along the coast had by 1640, when immigration ceased 
upon the accession of Cromwell in England, begun to extend 
inland, first to Watertown in 1630, to Concord in 1635, from 
CharlestowTi and Cambridge to Wobum in 1642 and from Lynn 
to Reading in 1644. Up to 1640, when the population of New 
England had reached 26,000, it was made up almost wholly by 
emigration from England, but from that time forward the growth 
of the colonies was almost entirely by the natural increase in 
population. 

After a town had been planted and the land taken up, the 
hardy and adventurous young men who lacked the means to buy 
land were ready to band themselves with others in like circum- 
stances and resolutely push on and make new homes in the 
wilderness. The General Court was ready to grant lands for such 
purpose to men of good character when their numbers promised 
to be sufficient for mutual protection and for the maintenance of 
religious worship. 

Soon after 1650 a few venturesome families took up their 
abode in Chelmsford, Groton and Billerica where, in a short time, 
they were joined by a sufficient number to become organized 
as towns. 

But the extension of the colony into new towns received a 
severe check in King Philip's War, and the ravages by the French 
and Indians which soon after followed, so that fifty years after its 
incorporation Chelmsford was still mentioned as a frontier town. 

The first recorded movement looking to the settlement of 
Chelmsford was made in 1652 by some citizens of Wobum and 
Concord who petitioned the Court for the privilege of examining 
a tract of land on the "other side of Concord River." 

Wobum and Concord were the towns then nearest this tract. 
There was at this time no English settlement north of this tract, 
and none as far north on the west. 



2 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

The examination of this land was followed by a petition for 
a grant of six miles square. The original manuscript of this 
petition, which is here given in full, was found several years ago 
among the papers left by Lemuel Shattuck, the historian of 
Concord, to the Mass. Historic Geneological Society. 

"To the honourd John Endicot Esqr. Gouvnr: with the reste: 
of the honord Magistrats and deputies at the Generall Courte 
now at Boston Assembled: humbly Sheweth: That whereas we 
your humble petitioners: who made bould the last Court 
Assembled to present a petition: to the Vew of this honoured 
Courte which was eccepted and Granted to Vs : for which we giue 
the Courte hmbl thankes and beinge jncoraged by this Courte 
to Vew the Land that Lyeth yet Vndisposed of and Vnimprooued : 
on the other side Concord Riuer acordingly we haue by a Comity 
taken care and paynes to doe, with seuerall others: that by the 
prouidenc of god : are now joyned petitioners : with us : who Vpon 
our Vewinge the lands as abousaid doe find a tracke of land: 
which bordereth Vpon the Riuer Merimake: nere to paatooket, 
which we doe find: a Very Comfortable place to acomidate A 
company of gods people Vpon: that may with gods blessinge 
and Asistance Liue Comfortably Vpon : and doe good in or places 
for church and Comon wealth, which many of Vs your petitioners 
are throw our nesisitys for wante of acomidationes some neuer 
haueing any and some others: but Very Litle a Comidation soe 
yt we canot subsiste excepte we doo take some care to Looke 
out in away or god for our Comfortable Subsistance, and now we 
yr humble petitioners doe intreate this honoured Courte for our 
Comfortable Suply : would please to grante to Vs soe much land : 
as may be Comfortable for a plantatione: 
which we conceiue may there be Layed out to the quantity of 
six myles Square of Vpland and medow: which parcell of land: 
we doe intreate may be gin at merimacke Riuer at a necke of 
land nere to Concord riuer: and soe run Vp by Concord: riuer. 
South and west into the Contrie, to make Vp that sircomferenc 
or quantity of land as is aboue expresed: and for as much as 
many of yr petitioners are in greate nesesity haueinge no setled 
place to abide in and we all in Generall beinge desirous to proseed 
as one man together to cary on that worke the lord shall call Vs 
to and this honered Courte shall in ther cristian wisdom Directe 
Vs in Tharefore we humbly entreate this honord Courte to 
Gratifie yr humble petitioners with a speedy and expresed anser 
so shall you euer bind Vs to Serue you wherein you shall comand 

Your humble Seruantes, 
Benjamin Butterfeilde Richard Griffin 

John Parker James Blood 

I sac Lemed : John Smedley 

James Parker Roger Draper 

George ffarley William ffietcher 



THE BEGINNING 3 

Thomas Chamberlin Thomas Adams 

Joseph Parker WilHam Hartwell 

John Stenies Robert Proctor 

Jacob Parker William Butricke 

Henery Foster Babtis Smedley 

William Chamberlin Richard Hildreth 

John Nutinge: Thomas Briggam 

Edmonde Chamberlin Daniell Bloggett 

John Baldinge John Hall 

William HaU 

The magists Desier theire bretheren the Deputs to Consider 
of this peticon @ retourne theire thoughts first about it 19 may (53) . 

Edward Rawson Sec 
[Endorsed] 

Concord peticon 
entred wth ye magistrts & wth 
pmisd ye majists conceave 
it may be admitted & reed 
wth out pajment 

1653 

It will be seen by the description here given of the tract 
petitioned for that it included the fishing grounds of the Pawtucket 
Indians where the City of Lowell now stands and where Rev. 
John Eliot of Roxbury, the Apostle to the Indians, was laboring 
to convert them to Christianity. He therefore, at the same time, 
in their behalf entered a petition for a grant of land for the Indians 
that they might not be disturbed in their ancient possessions. 

The Court granted both petitions. Their answer, which 
follows, is as it is given in the published Records of Massachusetts. 

"May 18, 1653. 
"In ans' to the peticon of seuerall of the inhabitants of 
Concord and Woobourne for the erecting of a new plantacon on 
Merremacke River, neere to Pawtuckett, the court doth graunt 
the peticoners of Concord and W^oobourne the track of land 
menconed in theire peticon, excepting some part of it joyning 
to Merremacke Riuer: Provided, that the sajd peticoners shall 
sufficjently breake vp full so much land for the Indjans in such 
place as they shall appointe wth in such plantacon as shall there 
be appointed them, as they haue of planting ground about a hill 
called Robbins Hill, and that the Indjans shall have vse of theere 
planting ground, aforesajd, free of all damages, vntill the peticoners 
shall have broken vp the land for the Indians as aforesajd. 



4 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

"21y: For the plantacon peticoned for by Mr. Eljott, the 
court judgeth it meete to be graunted them, with the exceptions 
and provissions aforementioned, and for the stating of both, that. 
Capt Willard and Capt Johnson be appointed to lay out the sajd 
plantacons or touneshipps, the Enghsh at the charge of the 
peticoners, the Indjans at the charge of the countrje, wthin one 
month after the end of this sessions, that neither of the plantacons 
be retarded. 

"Sly. That if the peticoners of Concord and Wooboiirne 
shall not, wthin two yeares, setle a competent noumber of familjes 
there, by building and planting vppon the sajd tract of land 
twenty familjes or vpwards, so as they may be in capacitje of 
injoying all the ordinances of God there, then the graunt to be 
vojd." 

[Records of the Mass. Bay Colony, Vol. IV, pt. I. p. 136.] 

Of this Committee, who were instructed by the Court to lay 
out these grants, Capt. Edward Johnson was one of the founders 
and leading men of Wobum, and the author of a valuable and 
quaint volume entitled "The Wonderworking Providence of 
Zion's Savior in New England," now extremely rare. (Reprinted 
in 1910.) 

Simon Willard was one of the leading men of Concord and the 
ancestor of two of the Presidents of Harvard College. The 
surveyor was Capt. John Sherman of Watertown, the ancestor 
of those distinguished brothers. General Wm. T. and United States 
Senator John Sherman of Ohio. So it would appear that the 
work of laying out the township was intrusted to able hands. 
The following plan of Chelmsford was engraved from a tracing 
from the original in the Massachusetts Archives (Ancient Plans, 
Vol. 112, p. 81). 

The description of the bounds of the town made by this 
committee is unfortunately lost. A description and "plott" is 
referred to by the committee of the General Court which laid out 
the enlargement in 1656. Allen* gives the following description 
of the original bounds of the town. "It was bounded on the 
north by a straight line, beginning at the glass manufactory and 
running to the house of Benj. Osgood, Esq., of Westford. On 
the southwest by Tadmuck Swamp, and on the southeast by a 
straight line, beginning at Pawtuckett Stake, so calld, by the side 
of Concord river at a point where Billerica, Chelmsford and 
Pawtuckett, or Wamesit meet, and running southwest 43 deg. 
to the aforesaid Tadmuck swamp. On the northeast by Paw- 
tuckett or Wamesit for which see No. 5 Index." 

•History of Chelmsford, page 10. 



THE BEGINNING 5 

The glass factory, erected in 1802, stood on what is now 
Baldwin street in Lowell nearly opposite West Pine street, and 
Benj. Osgood lived in Westford at what is now the residence of 
E. E. Haywood near Chamberlin's corner. A line drawn between 
those two points which Allen gives as the north line of the town 
would bring it on the south of Drum hill. It is imfortunate that 
he did not state the evidence upon which he concluded that the 
north line of the town was only about two miles north of the center 
of the town. On other points his description is evidently faulty. 

He gives Tadmuck swamp as the western line, which is near 
the present line between Chelmsford and Westford. The town 
did, however, originally extend five miles further west to the 
Groton line. He was doubtless deceived by the word Tadmuck 
written along the westemly line on the plan, supposing it to mean 
Tadmuck swamp. But the word Tadmuck was formerly applied 
to a wider extent of territory. We find in old land descriptions: 
Farther Tadmuck, Little Tadmuck, Great Tadmuck, and Hither 
Tadmuck, and Westford hill was Tadmuck hill. 

The space on the plan marked India Land was the Indian 
grant where the City of Lowell now stands, and Joe Sagamore's 
planting field is indicated by the small dotted space at the north- 
east. The larger dotted space, perhaps added later, was doubtless 
intended to indicate the extension which was made in 1656. 
It seems by this plan that the town did not, as first laid out, 
extend to the Merrimack river at any point. 

The loose manner of laying out land in those early days, the 
lines being indicated by marked trees and the bounds by stake 
and stones, led to endless controversies both between individuals 
and towns. Boundary controversies arose between Chelmsford, 
Billerica and Concord and in order to settle them the Selectmen 
of Chelmsford and Concord joined in a petition to the General 
Court, Feb. 7, 1693-4. 

The petition asked that a tract of land lying between 
Chelmsford and Concord and claimed by Billerica be given to 
the two former named towns. Billerica also petitioned the Court 
in 1698, setting forth their claims to the tract in question and gained 
in May, 1700. (Town Records, copy p. 49; first book p. 36.) 

Comet Nathll Hill, and Samll: Fletcher Junr: were appointed 

by the selectmen to Joyn with Billerica 1700 to Gen Court 

(as to lines bet. Billerica, Bloods, Chelmsford, Concord) 

This committee consisted of Major Jonathan Tyng, Major 
James Converse and Capt. Benjamin Garfield, and they reported, 



6 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

May 28, 1701. It is only necessary to give so much of their 
report as relates to the Chelmsford lines. "That is to say, 
that as well by their own view of the lines, Court Grants, 
and Deeds produced to them, as on hearing of what was off erred 
by the agents of the severall Towns, they find the land of 
Billerika bounded by the line of Chelmsford northward, 
beginning at Pautucket stake, so called by Concord River, where 
Chelmsford & Billerika & the Indians do meet, then Chelmsford 
line ninneth south fourty three degrees west to a pillar of stones; 
then it nmeth south, seventy nine degrees west, three hundred 
thirty & two poles; which reacheth unto Major Willard's farme 
to a great heap of stones lying in Chelmsford line" * * * 

Chelmsford chose a committee. Captain Bowers and Thomas 
Parker, Dec. 10, 1697, "to act on the towns behalfe in all things 
nesery as to the finding out the first grant of the town and to do 
what soauer is nedfull to secuer the town as it is bounded." They 
obtained the deposition of one of the committee who had acted 
on behalf of the petitioners for the original grant when it was laid 
out 45 years before. 

"Groton, noumber: 24: 1698 capten Jeams parker being of 
full age testyfy and say that the honered Jenarall courte grated 
a sarten track of land for a plantation nowe caled chelmsford and 
impowered majear symon wilard and capten edward Johnson as 
a committe, which committe came with full power to lay out sd 
plantation and did se sd plantation layd out to ther content 

capten John Shearmon being the artes, did lay out sd planta- 
tion begining at a riuer comonly caled conkard riuer bounded with 
a stake upon the land caled wamaset land and so runing on a lyne 
by marked tres to a heape of stones and to nashoba plantation 
runing upon nashoba line to a great pine-tre and so runing on 
a strayt line ouer a pond caled stonny brook pond to a pine-tre 
marked with C and G and so ouer sd brook to a heape of stones 
and so runing on the south syd of a great hill on the north syd of 
sd brook and ouer sd brook to a great pine-tre and so to sd stake 
by conkard riuer thus sd committe and sd arttes layd out sd 
plantation and rescued full sattesfacttion for ther sarues therein: 
and did ingage to make a tru return to the honared court of ther 
laying out sd plantation: and furder sd parker douthe testyfy 
and say that himself Thomis adams Wilyam flecher and Isack 
lamit ware the committe chosen by the petetinors of sd land 
to se sd plantation layd out: this taken upon outh befoer me 
this 24 of noumber: 1698 

"Thomis Hinchman, Justes. 

"This aboue is a true coppey of the origanall recorded by me, 
solloman Keyes, toune clerk the 5 day of desember 1698" 



THE BEGINNING 7 

This testimony of James Parker is the only description which 
we have of the original bounds of the town from anyone who had 
any part in laying it out, and this description cannot be regarded 
as particularly lucid. Taking it, however, in connection with 
the report of the committee of the General Court in May, 1701, 
as near as the lines can be determined at this late day, they began 
at Wamesit stake at the Concord river, where Chelmsford, Billerica 
and Wamesit met. From that point southerly about four miles 
on Billerica line and continuing a little westerly into what is 
Carlisle to the Blood Farm which lay between Concord and 
Chelmsford; and westerly to Nashoba, which was the grant to the 
Nashoba Indians and embraced practically what is now the town 
of Littleton, "and runing upon Nashoba line to a great pine-tre 
and so runing on a strayt line ouer a pond caled stormy brook 
pond to a pine-tre marked C and G." The letters, of course, 
stood for Chelmsford and Groton; and Stony Brook pond 
is now called Forge pond. It will be seen, therefore, that the 
line woiild be something like the present line between Littleton 
and Westford to Groton. Following the description from there 
"over sd brook to a heap of stones" which would be the northwest 
comer bound, "and so running on the south side of a great hill" 
probably Snake Meadow hill, "on the north side of said brook," 
"and over said brook to a great pine tree," which would be the 
northeast corner bound, located by Allen, as previously stated 
at the Glass Works, which stood on what is now Baldwin street, 
nearly opposite Pine street in Lowell. 

SETTLEMENT. 

A few families came in and settled upon this tract before the 
grant was made in 1653. They were here, doubtless, in 1652, as 
the first birth is recorded early in 1653, viz. : "Joseph Parker, the 
son of Joseph @, Marget his wife [ ] 30 daye of March: 1653." 
Allen states it as a tradition that Joseph Parker was the first person 
born in town, which seems to be verified by the records. There 
was one other birth apparently earlier, that of a girl, "Sarah 
Parker the dafter of Jacob Parker @ Sarah his wife [was bom] 
Janeware: 14: 1653," but the reform in the calendar, by Pope 
Gregory, had not then been adopted in New England. By the 
old style then in vogue the year began March 25th, therefore 
January, 1653, old style, would be January, 1654, new style. 



8 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

The usual form of writing such a date occurring between January 
1st and March 25th would be 1653-4. In the margin at the top 
of the first page of births stand the figures 1645, and of the first 
entry the date is missing. The record only informs us that 
"Isake Lamed the sun of Isake Lamed was born [ ]."* 
It does not necessarily follow, however, that this was an earlier 
birth than those given, the earliest entries of births not being 
recorded in the order of dates, but, probably, as they were reported 
by the families after a town clerk was chosen. One other birth 
was recorded the same year, "Sarah Lamed the dafter of Isake 
Lamed @ Mare his wife was borne octo: 28: 53:" 

The first marriage recorded was that of Danl. Blodget. 
"Daniell Bloged & Marie his wife ware Maried by Mr. Browne 
[Water]towne September 15: 1653:" The wife was Mary Butter- 
field who was bom in England and the daughter of Benjamin 
Butterfield. 

There used to be a tradition that the wife of Abraham Parker 
was the first woman to "Bake and Brew" in Chelmsford. The 
authority for this tradition is a letter written by Jonathan Perham, 
Town Clerk, August 8, 1821, to Hon. Abel Parker which says: 
"Bridget who now is the wd. Pierce, * * * states that her great 
grandmother is said to be the first woman that Brewed and Baked 
in Chelmsford, which I suppose to be the wife of Abraham Parker. 
Mrs. Pierce states that Moses Parker son of Abraham was grand- 
father to her" . Jonathan Perham was a prominent citizen of the 
town, was Town Clerk, Selectman, Moderator and Representative. 
He was descended from the first settlers of the town. He was bom 
and lived in the house now occupied by the writer [H. S. P.] on 
Westford road. 

Of the twenty-nine petitioners for the grant of the town, 
fifteen, over one-half, never took up their abode here, none of their 
names appearing subsequently in connection with the town. They 
were John Hosmer, Henry Foster, Richard Griffin, John Smedley, 
Roger Draper, Wm. Hartwell, Wm. Buttrick, Baptis Smedley, 
Thomas Briggam, John Hall, Wm. Hall and Wm. Chamberlin. 
Several of the others who came here did not remain to become 
permanent residents of the town. James Parker went to Groton 
soon after 1661, where he became the important man of that 
town. Joseph Parker, brother of James, went to Groton about 
the same time, and afterwards to Dunstable. Jacob Parker, 

♦"Chelmaford Vital Records" gives the date Sept. 16, 1655; Oct. 5 in the Court Record. [W.I 




kUTTEN /S. 



O >< 



Q S 




THE BEGINNING 9 

another of the five Parker brothers, was the first town clerk, but 
went to Maiden after 1667. John Nutting was granted a house 
lot and lands and was here in 1659, but went to Groton in 1661, 
where he was killed by Indians in their assault upon that town in 
1676. James Blood also went to Groton after a little time. The 
nine remaining petitioners all made homes here and remained 
during life. They were Benj. Butterfield, Isaac Learned, Thomas 
Chamberlain, Edmund Chamberlain, William Fletcher, Thomas 
Adams, Robert Proctor, Richard Hildreth and Daniel Blodgett. 
Others whose names are not among the petitioners were here from 
the fiirst: Abraham Parker, another of the brothers, already 
mentioned as, perhaps, the first settler. Robt. Fletcher and 
Simon Thompson were also here and, perhaps, others. 



GATHERING OF CHURCH. 



As soon as these few families had become established in their 
new home, the first public matter to engage their attention was to 
provide for the religious needs of the community. They must 
have a church and minister. 

Early in the fall of 1654 they sent a committee to Wenham, 
where a small church had been gathered ten years before, and 
invited their minister, Rev. John Fiske, and his church with him 
to come and unite their fortunes with Chelmsford. Mr. Fiske, 
and some of his people came over and viewed the place and were 
satisfied with the proposals made to them by the people of Chelms- 
ford. Early the following spring there came a hitch in the pro- 
ceedings and negotiations seemed likely to terminate but they 
soon came to a better understanding and it was decided between 
them that the important question should be submitted to a 
coimcil to consist of the Governor, John Endicott, Rev. Richard 
Mather of Dorchester, Rev. Thomas Cobbet of Lynn, Rev. John 
Sherman of Watertown, Rev. John Allin, the minister of the 
chiirch of Dedham (the friend of Mr. Fiske, they having been 
fellow passengers on the ship from England in 1637) and Capt. 
Edward Johnson of Wobum, who had assisted in laying out the 
first grant of the town. 

The weighty question before this able council apparently 
was whether Mr. Fiske and his people should remain in Wenham 



10 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

or remove to Chelmsford and unite with the people there to form 
a stronger church. The case was decided for Chelmsford, and upon 
the 13th of November, 1655, we find Mr. Fiske and his people 
at Chelmsford where that day was organized the church of Chelms- 
ford. This organization is still continued. It is now Unitarian 
and known as the First Congregational Society. 

These negotiations just mentioned and the organization of the 
church are of sufficient interest to warrant giving them in full as 
recorded by Mr. Fiske, himself. 

fiske's account. 



Vpon 4 of 7th, 1654 was dated a Lr. vnder the hands of Robt. 
Fletcher, Tho: Adams, Wm. Fletcher, Wm. Buttereck in the na 
of the rest, engaged in the N. plantation at Chelmsford, whrin 
the pastor with the rest of this chm-ch at Wenham were Invited 

This Lr. being eftsoones conveyed to vs by the hands of 
Isa: Lemet & Tho: Adams, was coicated to the church, & a 
Liberty by the Major pte graunted so far to attend the pvidence: 
as to pmit the pastor to Goe ouer & see the place 

accordingly a day was set of meeting at Chelmsford, & 
thrupon the messengers returned 

Vpon the sd. day set divrs of the Brethren accompanyed the 
pastor ouer vnto Chelms. where the comittee & divers others 
were prsnt a view was taken of the place. The Brethren prsent 
satisfyed themselves aboute there accommodations. & pposalls 
were then made to the pastor for his accommodation & yeerly 
mayntenance, as to be tendred vnto him by consent of the whole 
numb of Inhabitants & in their na by the Committee 

These pposals were pmised, with their furthr request to be 
taken into consideratio, & in so short seaso after the Returne 
an Answer & resolution to be sent by Br. Spalding, as at his coming 
ouer. 

After this Returne of the pastor & Brethren upon the 10th 
of 8 mo. 54 the resolution & engagmt of divrs of the Brethren 
was in the face of the whole church, at a church meeting concluded 
upo whras 5. absolutely engaged. 2 conditionally & in word 
only, refusing at prsent to subscribe their hands, yet after sent 
their Engagemts psonally by Bro: Spalding, so as the greater 
number of the Church now stood engagd, in case the pastor 
engaged also 

Vpon 6t. of 9mo. the pastor Sent his Engagmts. by Bro. 
Spalding & his Resolutio. as Respecting the engagt of so many 
Brethren as sd. 

Thus the matter Lay dormant as 'twere all winter till the 
1st mo. 55. 



THE BEGINNING 11 

at what time Bro: Read coming ouer enfoniied us in such 
wise here at Wenha. as thrvpon both the P. & the sd engaged 
Brethren demurred upo the pceedings & some tht had sold heere 
at Wenha, redeemed their accomodations agayne into their 
possession 

& a Lr. was sutably sent by Br. Read to acquainte the 
Chehnesf. Comittee how things stood, & advised to stead them- 
selves elswhere. 

Betwene this time & the 6t. of 4t. mo 55. things hung vncer- 
tayne & vncleered, notwithstanding some Lrs. passed & some 
agitatio at Wenha betwene Isa: Lernet agent fr Chelmsfd & 
Wenha Brethren. But as upo 6t of 4th aforesd was dated a Lr. 
& sent by the hands of Isa: Lernet Sim: Thompso & Tho: Adams, 
with full power to them to treate & finally to determine ths 
busines depending betwene both pties. 

Vpon there coming ouer to Wenham. The Matter was 
determined betwene them & the sd pastor touching the Building 
of the house Terms of Accommodation & of yeerly mayntenance., 
as under there hands affixed to the Lrs was sent before dated in 
first month tenth day. 

likewise it was concluded betwene them & the Brethren at 
Wenham to refer the matter to Counsell; & the pties agreed 
upon were. Mr Endicot Govrnor Mr Mather, Mr Allen of Dedham 
Mr Corbett. Mr Sherman Capt Johnson of Woobuerne who 
determined the case for Chelmsford. 

This case thus determined: on either side prpation was 
made for the Removal of the Church. 

Accordingly about the 13th of 9 mo. 55, there were met 
at Chelmsfd. the pasto with the engaged Brethren of Wenham 
church viz. Ezdras Read, Edw. Kemp. Austin Killam. Sa: Fostor. 
Geo: Byam & Rich. Goldsmith, seuen in all To whom such of 
the Brethren of Wooburne & Concord ch : who had before ppounded 
themselues to joyne with the ch: late at Wenham, Now in 
Removeing to Chelmsford. & prsented themselues, with there 
Lrs. of Dismission: upon satisfaction & Testimony Giuen were 
by an vnanimous vote Received into fellowship They being the 
greater numb, in way of mutual comply ance, a Relatio passd on 
either side, as each one voluntarily would: 

Membs sigd 

Viz. Isaack Lernett (he dyed 8. of 10.57. 1 
Simon Thompson (he dyed about 3 qrs of 

a y. after at Ooburne 2 

Wm. Vnderwood 3 

Abram Parker 4 

Benja: Butterfeild 5 

Tho: Chamberlin 6 
Next received 

Dan Blogged who brought lrs. of dismission 

from the Ch : at Cambridge 7 



12 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

So after this the seales of the supp administred & 
there were admitted by vote these Members of other 
churches, to coion with us in these seales. 

Mr Griffin 

Wm. fletcher & his wife 

Tho : Adams, & his wife 

Br. Vndrwoods wife 

(Edw. Spalding) 

Bro : Butterfeilds wife 

Bro : Chamberlins wife 

Edm : Chamberlins wife 

Abram Parkers wife 

Jos. Parkers wife 

Isa : Lernets wife 

Sim,: Thompsons wife 
since Rec'ed into fellowship was Jacob Parker 8 

It [em]. Tho: Adams. & Edw. Spalding, on 27 of 2d 56 ^ 

FIRST TOWN MEETING. 

The following is the record of the first Town Meeting: 

The: 22d: the: 9th: month: 1654 

At a Meeting then at William Fletchers Hous there was 
Chosen to officiate in Ordering the Public affairs of the Place 
by the Consent of the Major part of the Town for this present 
year ensuing are as followeth. 

Esdras Read: Edward Spaulding: William Fletcher: Isaac 
Lerned: Simon Thompson: William Underwood: Thomas Adams. 

We give to Mr Fisk Thirty acres of Meadow and Thirty 
Acres of Plowable Land for the acomidation of him for his most 
Conveniancy: And we do Agree and Order that he shall have 
a Hous built for him Thirty eight foot in Length & Twenty foot 
in breadth with three fire Rooms the Chimneys built with Brick 
or stone: And we promise to pay to Mr. Fisk Fifty Pounds for 
the first year: And we promise to pay his Maintinence as the 
Lord shall enable us for the future. 

The house where this meeting was held is said to have been 
the first frame house in town. It stood a few rods northeast of 
what is now known as the Crosby house. The land upon which 
it stood continued to be occupied by the descendents of William 
Fletcher until about the year 1900. Some part of the original 
holdings still remain in the possession of the family. The road, one 
of the oldest in town, originally ran from the meeting house by 
Westford road, Worthen street, and Crosby place, and continued 
to Golden Cove road near the house of Jas. F. Steams. The 
part beyond the Crosby place has been long discontinued. 



THE BEGINNING 13 

SECOND TOWN MEETING. 

The second Town Meeting fixed the date of the annual meeting 
and the officers to be chosen and also fixed a penalty for such as 
might be inclined to neglect their political duties. 

At a Publick meeting of the Town month fist Day 24th 1655. 
William Fletcher is Chosen Constable: Isaac Lerned is Chosen 
Sergeant of the band : Simon Tomson is Chosen Clerk of the Band : 

It is ordered that the first second Day of the first month 
Shall be observed by all the householders of the town from year 
to year for the Chusing of all annual officers belonging to the 
Town as the select-men or Committee: Deputy for the Court: 
Constable: The three men to end all small causes under Forty 
shillings Surveyors for the high-way overseers of the fences and 
swine and to meet at the meeting-hous by nine a Clock in the 
morning and for the first hours nonappearance twelve pence and 
for a Whole Days Absence two shillngs. 

INCORPORATION. 

The little settlement now felt themselves sufficiently well 
established to be incorporated and at the May session of the 
General Court of 1655 and in the week ending May 29th, the 
following act of incorporation was passed. 

Vppon informacon from Major Willard, by a letter from 
Esdras Read, Edward Spalden, Wm. Fletcher, etc., inhabitants 
of a new plantacon, that the notmiber of inhabitants, according 
to the time pfixt in the Courts graunt, were there settled at theire 
request, the Court doth graunt the name thereof to be called 
Chelmsford. 

The two adjoining towns, Groton and Billerica, were in- 
corporated at the same time. 

The town of Chelmsford was now organized with its church 
and town government, and it must now depend for its success 
and progress upon the industry, wisdom and fortitude of its 
inhabitants. The twenty or more families that now constituted 
the town were made up of the very best material with which to 
build a stable and well-ordered community. The heads of 
the families were for the greater part bom in England and left 
their homes there previous to 1640, because of religious per- 
secution, to take up their abode in the wilderness of America. 
As is always the case with people, who are willing to suffer hardship 
and privation for conscience's sake, they were men of strong char- 
acter and deep religious convictions. They were liberal in their 
support of their church as will be seen as this story progresses. 



14 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

It would seem that the entire energies of these few pioneers 
in the wilderness must have been required to obtain simply food 
and shelter for themselves and families, and it is difhcult to under- 
stand how they were able in so short a time to build their meeting- 
house, and such a commodious parsonage for their minister and 
incur other heavy expenses. 

NAMED FOR CHELMSFORD, ENGLAND. 

The town was named for Chelmsford, England, a substantial 
and interesting old town, twenty-nine miles from London, in the 
County of Essex, and containing a population of 13,000. It was 
named from the river Chelmer which flows through it. 

President John Adams, while visiting Chelmsford, England, 
in 1786 wrote in his diary: 

Chelmsford was probably named in compliment to Mr. 
Hooker, who was once minister of that town in Essex, but after- 
wards in Holland, and after that at "Newtown" (Cambridge) 
and after that at Hartford, in New England.* 

The Mr. Hooker referred to was Rev. Thomas Hooker, the 
founder of Connecticut and the author of "the first written con- 
stitution known to history that created a government, and it 
marked the beginning of American democracy, of which Thomas 
Hooker deserves more than any other man to be called the father."! 
While it would be pleasant to feel that the fathers of Chelmsford 
were prompted in giving it a name, by their admiration for this 
enlightened statesman and preacher, it is to be remembered that 
Hooker left Cambridge for Connecticut nearly twenty years 
before Chelmsford was settled, and there is no evidence that he 
ever had any connection with the town. 

It was undoubtedly named, in accordance with the custom 
of the time, for the town in England which had been the former 
home of some of the prominent settlers. An examination of a 
transcript of St. Mary's parish register, Chelmsford, England, 
in the possession of Mayor F. Chancellor, made by Walter Perham 
in 1902, shows that there were in the old mother town, between 
1538 and the time of the settlement of this town, families or 
individuals bearing the names Adams, Butterfield, Spaldyng, 
Chamberlyne, Fletcher, Parker, WaiTen and Purkis, perhaps our 
Parkhurst — names that have been prominent in the affairs of 
the Town, and its offshoots, from its earliest days to the present. 

♦Life and Works of John Adams, Vol. 3, p. 40-1. 
tJohn Fiske. 



THE BEGINNING 15 

Chelmsford is the only town of that name in the United 
States. There is, however, a Chelmsford in Ontario, Canada, 
and another in Northumberland County, New Bnmswick. 

The Wenham company was a great accession to the little 
settlement, particularly their minister, Rev. John Fiske. 

The infltience of the clergy was so great, in those times, that 
the welfare of the community depended very much upon the 
good sense, energy, and character of their spiritual advisors. 
This town was especially fortunate in that respect. The first four 
pastorates, those of Fiske, Clarke, Stoddard and Bridge, embraced 
a period of 137 years. No stronger evidence could be given of 
the good sense of these men and their strong hold upon the affections 
of their people than to say that during all this period, when 
religious controversies were so common, many churches being 
split in twain over what seem to us trivial doctrinal questions, no 
church council was ever called to settle any differences, in this 
town, between pastor and people. Differences, to be sure, they 
had, but they were all settled amicably between themselves, and 
each of the four first ministers remained and served the chiu"ch 
and commimity until death severed the connection. 

The Rev. John Fiske came to this country from England in 
1637 bringing a letter of introduction from Robt. Ryece to Gov. 
John Winthrop, which read as follows: 

To the woorshipfull his moste respected good ffrinde Mr 
John Wrinthrope esqr. at his house at Boston in New England give 
these. 

Sir, — This bearer, Mr. Fyske, being one every waye so pious 
& religeous, needes not my comendations of hym, but the malignitie 
of the tymes, removinge hym with sondry others of his profession 
into yoMT partes, hathe required this shorte wry tinge of mee, in 
his behalf e, that what employment you can procure hym I may 
be thankefuU vnto you for it. Hee is a graduate, & havinge 
preached mooche, seinge the danger of the tymes, he changed 
his profession of divinitie into phisicke. wherein he hath now 
laste warde employed hym selfe. He is a good schollar & an 
honeste man. I pray pardon my abrupte & sooddeyne writinge. 
I can stay no longer, but after the true remembrance of my best 
respecte vnto you. I take my leave this 19 of Apryll. 1637, and 
do remayne 

Yours euery wayes mooche bownde 

Robte. Ryece.* 

This letter was endorsed on the back by Gov. Winthrop: 
"Mr. Ryece per Mr. Fiske." 

♦Coll. Mass. Historical Society. First Series, Vol. VI. 



16 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

Mr. Fiske was not only beloved by the people among whom 
he labored but he was held in high esteem by his contemporaries 
as appears from a biographical account of him by Cotton Mather 
from which the following is taken. [Magnalia, Vol. 1, p. 430.] 

"Among the first preachers and writers, which rendered the 
primitive times of New England happy, there was one who might 
likewise be called a beloved physician; one of whom there might 
also be given the eulogy, which the ancients think was given 
to Luke, a brother whose praise was in the gospel throughout 
all churches. 

This was Mr. John Fisk. 

Mr. John Fisk was born in the parish of St. James * * * 
in the county of Siiffolk, about the year 1601, of pious and worthy 
parents, yea, of grand-parents, and great grand-parents, eminent 
for zeal in the true religion. There were six brothers in the 
infamous reign of Queen Mary, whereof three were Papists, and 
three were Protestants, I may say, Puritans; and of the latter 
(whereof none were owned by the former) two were sorely perse- 
cuted. For one of these brethren, the pursevant, having a kind- 
ness, gave him a private and previous notice of his coming with 
an order to seize him: whereupon the good man, first called his 
family to prayer, hastned away to hide himself in a ditch, with 
his godly wife, which had a sucking child at her breast. The 
pursevant being near at hand, a thorn in the hedge gave such 
a mark to the child's face, as never went out; whereat the child 
beginning to roar, the mother presently clapt it to the breast, 
whereby it was quieted at once, and there was no discovery then, 
or after, made of these confessors. Another of these brethren, 
from whom our Fisk was descended, was then (to avoid burning) 
hid many months in a wood-pile; and afterwards, for half a year 
in a cellar, where he diligently employed himself in profitable 
manufactures, by candle light, after such a manner as to remain 
likewise undiscovered; but his many hardships brought that 
excessive bleeding upon him, that shortened his days, and added 
unto the cry of the souls under the altar. 

Our John was the eldest of four children, all of whom after- 
wards came to New-England with him, and left a posterity, with 
whom God established his holy covenant. His parents having 
devoted him unto the service of the Lord Jesus Christ, they sent 
him first unto a grammar school, two miles from the place of 
their abode, whither his diligent soul was instead of wings, every 
day to carry him. 

His education at the school, having fitted him for the 
university, he went unto Cambridge, where he was admitted, 
into (as I think) Immanuel College, in which he resided, until 
he became a graduate. Some time after this, being both by art 
and by heart, well prepared for it, he applied himself unto the 
work to which he had been devoted; namely, the preaching of 



THE BEGINNING 17 

the gospel; but the silencers grew so hard upon him for his non- 
conformity, that upon the advice of his friends, he set himself 
to study physick, and upon a thorough examination, he obtained 
a licence for public practice. When he was about eight and 
twenty years of age, he married a vertuous young gentlewoman 
[Anne Gipps]; several hundreds of pounds of whose patrimony 
were denied her upon the displeasm-e of her father, at her coming 
to New-England. 

But upon the death of his father, who had committed unto 
him the care of his mother and two sisters, and his youngest 
brother, he thought it his duty to remove into New England, 
where he saw an opportunity of returning unto the quiet exercise 
of his ministry. He, and that excellent man Mr. John Allin, 
came aboard in disguise, to avoid the fury of their persecutors; 
but after they were past the Lands-End, they entertained the 
passengers with two sermons every day, besides other agreeable 
devotions, which filled the voyage with so much of religion, that 
one of the passengers being examined about his going to divert 
himself with a hook and line, on the Lords-day, he protested, 
that he did not know when the Lord's day was; he thought every 
day was a sabbath day; for, he said, they did nothing but pray 
and preach all the week long. 

Mr. Fisk arrived at New England in the year 1637. * * * 
His aged mother died quickly after he came aboard, and his only 
infant quickly after he came ashore. * * * He came well 
stocked with servants, and all sorts of tools for husbandry and 
carpentry, and with provisions to support his family in a wilderness 
for three years together; out of which, he charitably lent a 
considerable quantity to the country, which he then found in 
the distresses of a war with the Pequot-Indians. He now 
sojourned about three years at Salem where he was both a preacher 
to the church and a tutor unto divers young scholars (whereof 
the well-known Sir George Downing was one) as he was afterwards 
unto his own children, when the want of grammar-schools at hand 
made it necessary. From thence he removed unto a place 
adjoining thereunto, which is now called Wenham; where on 
Oct. 8, 1644, a church was gathered, of which he continued the 
pastor, in that place, for more than twice seven years ; contented 
with a very mean salary, and consuming his own fair estate for 
the welfare of the new plantation. 

About the year 1656, he removed with the major part of his 
church to another new town, called Chehnsford; and there he 
spent the remainder of his days. 

Twenty years did he shine in the golden candlestick of 
Chelmsford: a plain but an able painful, and useful preacher 
of the gospel; rarely if ever, by sickness hindered from the exercise 
of his ministry. * * * Thus our Mr. Fisk, now superseded 
his care and skill of dispensing medicines for the body, bv doing 
it for the soul. 



18 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

But although he did in his ministry, go through an exposition 
of almost all the scriptures in both Testaments, and unto his 
Lord's day sermons, added a monthly lecture on the week day, 
besides his discourses at the private meetings of the faithful, 
and his exact and faithful cares to keep up church discipline yet 
none of his labours were more considerable than his catechetical. 
* * * Our Fisk therefore did by most laborious catechising, 
endeavor to know the state of his flock, and make it good: and 
hence, although he did himself compose and publish a most useful 
catechism which he entitled. The Olive Plant Watered; yet he 
chose the assembly's catechism for his public expositions where- 
with he twice went over it, in discourses before his afternoon 
sermons on the sabbath." 

Mr. Fiske had six children. The first was bom in England 
and, as Mather mentioned, died soon after reaching this coimtry. 
The births of the others, as recorded by himself in his note book 
or church record, were as follows: 

The Children of John & Anna Fiske Born in N. E. 

1638 John. borne the 29th. of 6t 1 

bapt. the 2d. of 7. j Salem Mr Petrs [Peters] 
Escaped a grte danger at wenha, in passing with 
the streame vndr the mill wheele, when the mill 
was a goeing. An. 1647. 6t. of 3d, at what time he 
receid. (as twere) a new life, not a bone broke &c. 

1640 Sarah, borne 24. of 5t. 1 

bapt. 26t. of 5. J Salem. Mr pet 

1642. Moses, borne 12 of 2d. at Wenha 

bapt. 0- of 4t. at Salem* by mr Norice 

1644 Anna. borne 15t. of 11th 1 

1645 baptised 2. of 1st. (the 1st. child bapt at J Wenham 

1646. Eli-ezer. borne 8t. of 12th. \ 

bapt. 15. of 12. j Wenham. 
he Deceased 16. of 10. 49.) 

1671. the sd. Anne Fiske wife to the sd. Jno. ffiske haueing liued 
with him about 37. yeers. deceased 14. of 12th. mo. at 
Chelmsford. 

1672. Elizabeth Hinksman [widow of Edmund] marryed to the 
sd. Jno. ffiske 1. of 6. mo. at Chelmsford. * * * 

Mr. Fiske kept a record from the year 1637 to 1675, about 
eighteen months before his death. It relates almost wholly to 
church matters. Mr. Allen, in writing his history of Chelmsford, 
evidently did not have access to this valuable record, as he does not 
mention it or make use of the information it contained. It 
evidently strayed away from Chelmsford early, perhaps through 
Mr. Fiske's j'oungest son. Rev. Moses Fiske of Braintree, who 

*The date of this baptism is not clear. The record was made, probably, at a later time, and 
perhaps Mr. Fiske had forgotten the exact date. [Note by S. \. Green.] 



THE BEGINNING 19 

was executor of his father's will, and inherited the property after 
the death of his elder brother, John, without issue. Moses Fiske 
had a son, Samuel, li\'ing in Salem, and it was there that the 
late David Pulsifer of Boston unearthed this old record book. 
He made a copy for the late Rev. Dr. Dexter of the Congre- 
gationalist, which is in the Yale University Library. After the 
sale of Mr. Pulsifer's efTects this record book came into the posses- 
sion of Dr. Samuel A. Green of the Massachusetts Historical 
Society. Dr. Green has copied such part of this record as is 
deemed to be of historical interest, and published it in 1898, under 
the title, "Extracts from the note book of The Rev. John Fiske, 
1637-1675, with an Introduction by Samuel A. Green." 

The quotations, with one or two exceptions that I have used 
are from the published extracts. There are but few who would 
be able to read the original : as Dr. Green says in his Introduction, 
"The handwriting is very hard to read, and contains many abbre- 
\aations and nondescript characters which it is impossible to 
represent in type." 

The town made generous gifts of land to Mr. Fiske and his 
son, John, who reached his majority soon after coming to Chelms- 
ford, granting much more than that promised in 1654. 

The town also set apart a tract of land called the ministry 
land, for the benefit of the church and minister. This was the 
land now known as the Bussell place upon which Rev. Hezekiah 
Packard built, during his ministry, the fine old colonial house 
now standing. 

The following is the record of this grant as it appears in the 
second book of records, page 25 and page 34 of the copy made in 
1892. 

The 31 of May 1679 by the Townes Gifte and order was laid 
out to the Ministry and for that only vse for euer in Chelmsford 
to say thirtey Acers of vpland and swampe bee it more or les 
and is bownded East by the high way to the training Feild south 
vp on a great Rock North by the land of mr Conelias Walldow 
With a straite line to a stake with a heape of stones aboute it 
which is a westerly Corner of John bates his land and so of a 
Straite line to a pine neare stoney brooke path — North west 
bownded vpon the towne Common vpland to a black oake and 
From thence [ ] straite line to a Red oake Neare the land 

that was giuen by the towne to mr Fiske and his sonne John 
Fiske and From thence to a great Rock southerly all waies prouided 
ther bee a soiitient Carte way left beetwine the land of the Aboue 
sayd Fiske and the fore mentioned land; which way is to bee 



20 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

Foure polles in bredth in wittnes heare vnto wee the Commity 
Aponted to Actte hear in haue seett to our hands the day and 
yeare aboue sayd 

William vnderwood 
John Fiske 

Commity 

This aboue is a trew Record and 
Approued by the selectt men as 

wittnes my hand Samell Adams 

23 June 1679 Gierke 

The cart way mentioned in this description was what was 
known as "The Lane" until, by vote of the town it was named 
Bridge street in memory of Rev. Ebenezer Bridge, pastor of the 
church (1741-1792). 

In the description of Mr. Fiske 's land, opposite the ministry, 
the "Pound" is mentioned. This was a small enclosure sur- 
rounded by a high stone wall. The wall was removed and the 
land taken into the highway some ten years ago* when Bridge 
street was widened and improved. Mr. Fiske's land extended 
down to the cemetery. 

Formerly there were several families of colored people living 
on the lane. Peter Fields and his little one story cottage, where 
Mr. Daniel Haley's house stands, are still remembered by the 
older people. 

MEETING HOUSE. 

The town records contain no vote relative to the building of 
the first Meeting House, so that no description of the building 
has come down to us or any statement of the time when it was 
built. Mr Allenf says "The third public meeting was dated 
month 11, day 16. 1655 and, agreeable to a former vote, holden 
at the meeting house." 

"How and by whom the first meeting house was built" he 
says "are facts yet to be ascertained. There appears to be a 
tradition I that Samuel and Thomas Adams were at the principal 
expense of erecting this house. But the town records contain no 
infonnation relative to it. It stood at the south west comer of 

♦About 1895. It stood just west of the N. W. Corner of the Cemetery. 
tAllen's Hist., p. 12. 

jThis is intimated in a letter from the late President Adams of Quincy to Wm. Adams, 
Esq., requesting to know who built the first meeting house and mills. 



THE BEGINNING 21 

the present house. It was built in the year preceding the erection 
of Mr. Adams' saw-mill 1656 and in all probability was made of 
logs, hewed and locked together." 

I do not agree with Allen's conclusions upon either of the 
three points just mentioned. 

The vote of March 1, 1655, that future town meetings should 
be held at the meeting house plainly indicates an intention to 
have a meeting house, but there is reason to believe that their 
hopes were not realized that year. 

In the record of the third town meeting, to which Allen refers, 
the place of meeting is not mentioned. 

The best evidence obtainable would indicate that the meeting 
house was not built for several years, probably in 1659 or 60. The 
first mention of the meeting house in Mr. Fiske's record is, inci- 
dentally, in specifying the duties of church officers when Thos. 
Henchman and Henry Farwell were chosen deacons, at a church 
meeting "16 of 9 [16]60. * * * So Br. Hinksman was to keep 
the box, booke & acconts of constitution. Br Kemp to p vide the 
bread & the wine, & Bro. Farwl. to take the charge of the linen 
& pe\\i;er &c. 

this day Br. Abr. parkr was chosen in Br. Nuttings place, 
to take care of the clensing the meeting house that it be kept in 
a desent posture & of the hower [hour] glasse, Cushion &c. For 
a yeere. [In margin] He refusing attend Br. Bia [Geo. Byam] 
was chosen & acceptd" This would indicate that they now had 
a meeting house and proposed to have it decently cared for. 

The only light which the town records shed upon this question 
is in the action taken to provide for the payment for the building. 
From the large sums, over £264, from 1659 to 1663, raised for that 
purpose, not including the sum of £46-8 raised to pay Saml. 
Adams in 1659— the tradition that one or two individuals were 
at the main expense of erecting the building would seem to be 
exploded. And, as there was a saw mill in town in aid of which 
a large tract of land had been granted, the people would not be 
likely to construct their meeting house of logs. The building 
was sufficiently substantial and commodious to answer the needs 
of the town for fifty years. 

The town record showing the amounts that the town was 
assessing upon the inhabitants for various purposes during the 
years in which the meeting house was being paid for is sufficiently 
instructive to be given in full. 



22 



HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 



yeare 

:1 :6 [16]59 



It[emj 



A List of the disbursements Leuied by rate in this 
Toune of Chelmsford from the first of the first month 
^ and the names of the persons to home they 
ware Camited : 
A rate for the paiment for A drum to 

Henry Far well 

the Country rate for yt yeare was wth an 

addition of halfe 

A rate to pay mr Samuell Addams . 

to A County rate 



3-5-0 

14-6-001 

46-8-0 

2-7-4 



ye yeare 
:60: 



to Joseph Parker Constable" 66-4-4| 

A rate for the Toune house to meet in . 22-2-6 

A Country rate Colledg & Law books 14-1-0 

A rate for a toune stock of amunition . 13-6-0 

A County rate and for A presentment 2-8-6 



Roberd Proctor Constable 



m ye yeare 

:61 : A Countery rate wth an addition & to ye 

Colledg 

A Toune rate for glass and other dues 

from ye toune 15-1-8 



51-18-00 

17-17-8 



James Hilldereth Constable 



32-19-4 



8:62: 



A Countery rate wth an addition and 

Colledg 19-19-3 

A rate for the meeting house for ye Toune 100-8-00 



Thomas Chamberline Constable 



120-7-3 



8 63: 



A rate for the meeting house . . . 100-00-00 
to the Countery & Colledg . . . 19-9-05^ 
A Toune rate for ye meeting house Carting 



& other dues 

John Burge Constable* 



27-1-11 



146-11-4^ 



After the removal of Rev. Mr. Fiske and his brethren from 
Wenham to Chelmsford those members remaining in Wenham 
retained their connection with the church, now the church of 
Chelmsford, and still looked to Mr. Fiske for spiritual guidance. 
This appears from a letter written by Mr. Fiske to the Wenham 

*Second Book, Town Records, original, p. 190, Copy of 1S82, p. llS. 



THE BEGINNING 23 

brethren, as copied from the Fiske record by the late David 
Pulsifer of Boston. Only so much of the letter is here given as 
shows the relation of the Wenham members to this church and 
the objects of the letter. 

FROM FISKE RECORD. 

"The Copy of ye Churchs Answer to ye Lrs. from or brethren 
of Wenham Dated 31 of 1. 59. 

To our beloved Brethren of ye Church at Chelmsford resident in 

Wenham. 
Grace mercy & Peace be multiply ed by Jesus Christ. 

Brethren Beloved in our Lord 

We receiued of late Letters from you by our Bro: Byam 
whereby you expresse yor desire of our present approbation 
counsel! & prayers in Order to ye Erecting of a Church, amongst 
& of your selues, & to ye Calling an Officer to administer vnto 
you, ye things of Christ: manifesting yor hopes of Enjoying Mr 
NewTTian in that worke & function: & afterward (when you 
shalbe fully resolved of this) that accordingly we would condescend 
to yeeld you Letters of dismission to ye worke of God * * * 
****** And though we cannot but greately 
approue of yor prudence in not determining that matter, or 
desiring Letters of dismission from vs to that worke, before you 
haue recejved a full Answer from Mr Newman in ye case wch 
if we vnderstand be once giuen, according to your desire expressed, 
so as he shall both joyne wth you in gathering a Church, & 
vndertake office amongst you * * * you shall not need 
question a readiness & surenes on oiir parts to graunt you Letters 
of dismission, yea & our hearts & prayers shall goe along wth 
them for his gracious presence & blessing to be voutchsaffed in 
Jesus Christ. So desiring ye God of all Grace to make you 
perfect, stablish strengthen settle you in his owne holy Truthes 
& waies, we take our leave at present, & rest. 
Chelmsford Yor Loueing Br. 

24 of 2d in ye bonds of ye Gospel 

59 Jo:ffiske 

in ye name & with ye consent 
of ye Church 

Rev. Antipas Nev/man was ordained at Wenham, Dec. 8, 1663, 
a new meeting house having been built that year. 

Mr. Fiske prepared a Catechism for the instruction of the 
yoimg people of his flock, which was printed at the expense of 
the church in 1657. Copies of this little work are now exceedingly 
rare, probably not more than one or two remain in existence. One 
specimen was contained in the library of the late George Livermore 



24 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

of Cambridge, which was bought by the Lenox Library, of New 
York, for $106, at the auction sale of the Livermore collection. 
It was entitled "The Watering of the OHve Plant in Christs Garden 
or A Short Catechism for the first Entrance of our Chelmesford 
Children." 

The address "To the Church & Congregation at Chelmsford, 
Grace & Peace, through Jesus Christ," is as follows*: — 

"Beloved," What is here presented to Public view is yours: 
for looking to the poor-Penman, as Relating to you : to the external 
moving Cause, as arising firstly & freely from you, to the End 
& use as centering in you, to the reason of the Publishing thereof, 
as resting with you, and the care and costs, as to that end expended 
by you: It must not otherwise be determined but YOURS. 
Which being so, you have saved me the labour, of prefacing on 
behalf e, either of this so necessary & fruitfull an exercise of 
Catechising, or of this present draught: or of publishing it. The 
present encumbrances of our new-begining you know to have 
declined me till of late, from the former, and mine own inabilities 
much more from the latter, as being rather desirous to have made 
use of some others labours that way, or at least-wise to have 
acted mine own feeble apprehensions in a more private manner 
amongst our selves. But God hath moved your minds, first to 
see, and seeing to cause, as it must be as it is. I shall add only 
a word or two touching use; 1. The Scripture quotations in 
the margent, are so severed by those distinct marks as it is not 
hard to discern to which answer they pertayn. 2. They are 
orderly set down (for the generall) as they relate to the severall 
sentences or parts in the answers. 3. Where more than one, 
are mentioned to the same pm-pose, it is not without special 
cause, and may serve for help of memory, when we may have 
occasion to branch out such a subject, into its particulars. 4. 
Profitably you may reduce Promises to their proper heads in the 
Lords Prayer, and Dutyes or faylings to their proper places in 
the Decalogue. As for the annexing of these with the Doctrine 
of the Sacraments, by way of Appendix. It is because the same 
will more suit with such capacities as are allready entered, then 
such as are but in their enterance. I say no more but this. If 
now you & yours, (as is hoped) shall gain any Spiritual fruit by 
these poor weak Travells of mine. I have my desire: and no 
small encouragement, in the midst of many wilderness-discourage- 
ments. 

To His Blessing therefore I commit both you & yours, who 
is the God of all Blessing: and Rest 

Yours in the Lord 

John Fiske 
Chelmesford this 
25 of 1. mo: 1657." 

♦Early New England Catechisms by Wilberforce Eamea. 



THE BEGINNING 25 

Mr. Allen says (p. 124), "This little work is moderate in its 
doctrines, catholic in its spirit." The conclusion, however, would 
not be wan-anted from this that it taught any milder Calvanistic 
doctrines than the generality of New England churches at that 
time. 

The Puritan theocracy was still in force during Mr. Fiske's 
pastorate. Our Puritan ancestors who had escaped from religious 
persecution in England, proposed to avoid religious dissensions 
in their new home by founding a commonwealth to be composed 
of a united body of believers. The Cambridge Platform had 
been adopted in 1648, defining the creed and powers of the clergy. 
This was laid before the congregations and adopted by them. 
And the General Court had already in 1646 enacted a law 
for the banishment of heretics, prefaced by the declaration: 
"Although no Humane [human] power be Lord over the 
Faith and Consciences of men, yet because such as bring in 
damnable Heresies, tending to the subversion of the Christian 
Faith, and destruction of the Souls of men ought duely to be 
restrained from such notorious impieties" 
["Laws and Liberties of Massachusetts Colony," 1672, p. 58.] 

The Fiske Record gives some facts relative to the publication 
of the Catechism and the methods adopted by the chtrrch for 
catechising the children, viz. : 

"& togethr heerewithal in the 4 place of the refusall (as we 
vnderstood). to disburse their pportion to the Catech. printing, 
wch the Ch: stands engaged to see satisfyed. * * * [From 
a letter written to Esdras Read, under date of January 31, 1657-8, 
and copied into the Note-book.] 

23 of 10 58 Voted by the Church that the 33 shs 9 d wch 
the Church stood engaged to see pd. to Br. James Parker for the 
Catechises should be for prsnt lent to him out of the Church 
stock. & if light app hrafte [appear hereafter] to the Church 
where it lies behind, to be taken in to the deacos hand on the 
accont of the catechizes in lew of this loan if not light, then this 
pte of the Church stock to be here levyed in his hands as assignd 
to the discharge of this debt of the Church. * * * 

6 of 12 64 A Church meeting Catechising. Agreed by the 
Church, that the sa course of catechizg of all undere 16. yeers 
old. be attended at the house of the pasto. viz. for mayds the 
day afte the Lecture, & for youths the 2d. day of the weeke 
following the lecture. 

It [em] That for all yong men aboue 16. yeers old, vnmarryd. 
That it be moved, who will voluntarily app to giue in their Names 
to Answr in publick. & for such as shall decline: if Children of 
the Church, that the Church shall see that they attend to be 



26 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

catechisd by the pasto in his House upon the 2d. day of the week 
monthly afte the lecture at the usual time, of meeting (viz. aboute 
3 of the clock in aftrnoone & if they shall negl. to come on one 
day, to bring as much the next time, as may pportion the Time. 

This votd. . , , , , ^ • ■ 

That we begin the worke m publ. aboute the begmmg ot 

2d. month 

The Catechases to be dd out by Bro. Kemp at 6d. p peece. 
* * * 

30 of 4. 69 The Church mett * * * 

After this. It was pposed the way of Catechising fro house 

to house. 

& the yong or vnmarried psos to meet at so one house ot 4 or 
5, the maryed to be visitd in their owne houses" 

Of the six members of the church, who came with Mr. Fiske 
from Wenham, two of them, Richard Goldsmith and Austin 
Killam, soon returned to Wenham, where the former was killed 
by lightning in 1655 and the latter died in 1667. Esdras Read 
also withdrew from the church and went to Boston where he 
lived during the remainder of his life. 

There were others, however, who came with, or very soon 
after, Mr. Fiske, but who presumably were not members of the 
church as their names do not appear in the Fiske record. One 
of these was John Shepley, who sold in 1655 to William Fiske 
(brother of the minister) a dwelling house in Wenham and land, 
"butting with a bound tree by the mill & so running up to the 
meeting-house*." And in 1656 the names of "Sister Shipley's" 
children were recorded on the church book at Chelmsford. 

Dea. Cornelius Waldo, who, Allen says, came with the Fiske 
company, did not come for ten years. He was from Ipswich, 
where there is evidence of his living till 1665. 

In June, 1656, there were nine additional members received 
into the church. The record of the meeting is as follows: 

Vpon 11. of 4. 56. a publick gnal [general] fast 

In the close of the day was the Church Covt. renewed repeated 
& voted by the Brethren. 

It [em] there were received into or covt. pfessing their willing- 
ness to owne that or covt. as had ben exprssed 
11 William Fletcher ] dismissed 

1 Bro: Adams his wife [ fro the church Mary Adams 

2 Bro. Vndrwoods wife J of Concord Sara Vndrwood 

3 Anna Butterfield the wife of Bro: Butterfeild 

4 Mary Chamberiin the wife of Bro: Tho: Chamblm 

5 Mary Lernett the wife of Bro: Isaack Lernet 

♦Essex Reg. Deeds, So. Diet., Vol. 1, Leaf 27. 



THE BEGINNING 27 

6 Mary Thompso the wife of Bro : Symo Thoson 

7 Rose parker the wife of Bro : Abra Parker 

8 Margaret Parker, the wife of Joseph parker 

9 Mary Chamberlin, the wife of Edmond chamblin dismissed 

to us fro the Church of Oobiune. 
Edmond ChambHn the so [son] of the 1. sd. Mary Chamblin 

baptised 29 of 4 56. This d. [ay] the Lo [rd's] : supp [er] & 

here coicated [communicated] with vs. Rob. Proctor of 

Concord 
Rafe Hill & his wife 1 ^ , tttt , i 

Geo : Farly / ^^ oo^urn [Woburn] 

Wm. Baker of the Church of charlestowne 

The church was for some time exercised over the question 
as to the relation which the children of the church members 
should sustain to the church. At a meeting "1 of 11. 56 [Jan. 1. 
1657]" a set of propositions were adopted determining such 
relations, the third clause of which was: 

3 That the Children of Church members, vnder the age 
of 14 or 15. y. when there pnts [parents] tooke the Covt. are 
included in there pnts Covt. & to be reputed members, & conse- 
quently to be baptised, not haueing ben before Baptised. 

This question having been disposed of the "Brethren prsented 
their childr, names & Ages," and then follow the names and ages 
of 75 children belonging to 17 families. 

The action of the church in the case of Mr. Fiske's son, 
Moses, who had been prepared for college by his father at the 
age of sixteen years, shows the zealous care which the church 
exercised over its members. 

"12 of 7 58. This day Moses Fiske, being suddenly to depte 
to the Colledge was called forth before the Church: & owned thr 
his followeth Covt. in the face of the Church, psonally in covt. 
engaging himself to the Church. & the Church to him, as in the 
forme as followes" 

The covenant follows and also the copy of a long letter 
addressed to the Church of Cambridge commending the young 
man to their brotherly care and watchfulness. 

The control exercised by the church over its members often 
affected their temporal interests. Personal interests must give 
way to those of the church, when they conflicted. This is shown 
in the case of James Parker, James Fiske, and John Nutting, who 
desired to withdraw from the church and remove to Groton. 
Before they could obtain their dismission from the church they 
were required to appear and present satisfactory reasons for their 
withdrawal. The meeting to consider the matter was held 



28 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

"9 of 9 [16] 61 On this day, the 3 bre: Ja: parker, Ja: Fiske, 
Jon Nutting ppounded to the Chtirch. That they haueing some 
thoughts and incHnations to a Remoue, desired to ppound it to 
the Church, that (as they may see God to make way for them) 
they may haue the Churches loueing leaue so to doe, & their 
prayers for them, for a blessing of God upo there vndertakeings. 

Some discussion followed over the matter, brother Adams 
saying, "they saw a call of God leading them to this place & if 
they apprehended a call of God away, twas ney [necessary] they 
should giue an accont to the church of their call hence" 



DISMISSED TO GROTON. 

Being called upon by the pastor "to approue their grounds." 
Brother Parker "stepping up to speak, * * * sd. that he 
for his pte [part] owned that God had a hand in bringing him 
hither: & he hoped he should see the sa [same] oiiruling hand of 
his, in his Remoue & as to their grounds, tis not their desire to 
expresse them in ptic, [particular] vnlese it shall be pticularly 
desired & urged Onely in gnal [general] that it is bee. of sevral 
things prese upo their spits [pressing upon their spirits] as in 
refference to Church Administration, & so [some] uncomfortable 
differences, as they all know are wonted to arise abt the sa 
[sacrament]; & added, yt if he cordd enjoy all ordin: or Adminis- 
tration, as according to Rule, as he apprhended, he for his pte 
would not remoue 

Br. Fiske ppsed his assent. & added, yt as his ends of coming 
were wel knowne to God, & in so measure to the church, so it 
would be no smale thing that should moue him to a Remoue' ' 

]\lore discussion followed in which the rules of church govern- 
ment were argued, and action was deferred to a future meeting, 
at which brother Nutting called attention to his situation as 
follows : 

"Br. Nutting pposed one ground further in r of his one ptic. 
viz. the inconveniences of his prsent situation & that he could 
not help himself, for in remoueing to his remote accommodations, 
haueing sevral smale childr, he should much deprue himself or 
wife of the ordin: [ordinances] by that means, & sought rather the 
settling himself comfortably for the outward man nigh to the 
meeting house." 

At this time no church had been organized at Groton, but 
in 1665 the families of James Parker, Joseph Parker, James 
Fiske, and John Nutting were dismissed to the church at Groton. 

James Parker became the leading man of that town, where 
he lived to a good old age. Joseph, his brother, was a large 



THE BEGINNING 29 

landowner and "the ancestor of the most numerous branches 
of the Parker families in Groton and its vicinity." John Nutting 
was killed by the Indians when Groton was attacked and destroyed, 
March 13, 1676, and James Parker and family were obliged to 
seek an asylum among his old neighbors in Chelmsford, where 
he remained for several years. 

EXTENSION. 

Only the year following the incorporation of the town we 
find the people petitioning for an extension of their grant. They 
had fomid some parts of the land granted them stony and other 
parts barren, so that they had been constrained to set their 
habitations near the northeast comer of their town bounds as 
they alleged, "wheare wee haue no outlett for our Cattell to feed 
on" 

To understand the situation as they represented it, it is 
necessary to consider the town lines as they then existed, including, 
as they did, the present town of Westford and a large part of 
Carlisle, and as the north line did not extend as far north as the 
present village of North Chelmsford, it will be seen that what 
is now the center of the town, where the meeting house stood, 
was the northeast section of the town. 

That they found scanty pasturage over such a large tract 
while it was occupied by only twenty or thirty families was owing, 
of course, to the condition of the wilderness as they had found it 
and before they had cleared up land for cultivation. The land 
being covered by forest except on the meadows which skirted 
the streams or where Indian fires had destroyed the timber, it 
required a long range over which the cattle must roam to find 
sustenance. 

Their petition is as follows : 

'7th 3 mo., 1656. 
"The himibell petition of the inhabitants of Chemsford 
sheweth that wheareas this honoured Courtt hath fformerly 
giuen them a sertayn tractt of land which we thankefuly acsept 
of, and wee thought it to haue binn sofitient and Conuenient for 
a plantatyon, but by reason of the stonines of sum part and the 
barones of another part there of, we weare Constrained to set off 
our habitatyons on one corner of our bounds which was only 
Conuenient for that vse, and so wee have vnauoidably put our 
selues vp on straights because now our setuation is neare vpon 
oirr north east line, wheare wee haue no outlett for our Cattell 



30 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

to feed on, may it please, therefore, this honoured Courtt to take 
this our Condityon in to Consideratyon, and to graunt a small 
parsill of land from our north east line downe to merimack Rieur, 
and so bownd us by the sayd Riuer aboutt three mills, and so to 
run vp on a south west line so as that wee woold nott bee any 
hindrance to grauton plantatyon: May it please this honoured 
Courtt to graunt this our petytion how euer your petisionors 
will Continualy Remayne praying for a blesing vpon all yotu* 
waity affaires. 

"I sack lerned, 
"Thomas Addams, 
"Joffiske: "Simon Tompson, 

"Edward Spaulding, 
"Beniamin buterfild, 
"William fletcher 
"william vnderwood, 
"in the name & on the Behalfe of ye Towne. 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 112, p. 80.] 

The Apostle Eliot, with an ever watchful care for the interests 
of his Indian charges, had petitioned the court for an extension 
of their grant. The court granted both petitions but not in a 
manner calculated to promote harmony between the Indians 
and their white neighbors. They gave to the Indians a tract a 
mile in length lying between the Merrimack river and Chelmsford 
(Chelmsford did not then extend to the river at any point). It 
corresponded to what is now Middlesex village, from Black brook 
westward. The Indian name of this tract was Neahambeak as 
appears from a deed of land upon Black brook, from "Wanalanset 
the only Sonne surviving of old Passaconaway, deceased, who was 
the great and chief e Sachem upon Merimack River" to Thomas 
Henchman in 1685. And a much larger tract was given to 
Chelmsford and the Indians jointly. This tract took in what is 
now North Chelmsford and the northern section of Westford. 
Both these grants are indicated on the plan by dotted lines, the 
smaller one marked "Joe Sagamore" being the Indian grant. 
[See Vol. Ill, p. 406, printed Records Massachusetts Bay.] 

The following is the answer of the Court: 

"In Answer to this Peticon and Allso that part of mr. Eliot's 
Peticon respecting An Jnlargement of land, vpon Conference 
with the Comittee who layd out the bounds of Chelmsford and 
perusal of a descripcon of A plott of the sayd plantacons and 
Allso of the Track of land now by both parts Peticoned for: 
Wee Apprehend it requisite that the Indian grant be extended A 
mile from the North East Angle or corner bound of Chelmsford 
Abutting on Merrimack and Patucket Eastward, taking in John 



THE BEGINNING 31 

Sagamor's planting ground. And the end of the said mile to 
determine the Indain plantacon. And for the rest of the land on 
behalf of both towns — Peticoned for, that Chelmsford South and 
North line Abutting on Tadmuck, be extended from the North- 
weast Angle or Corner three Miles north: so as it pass not 
Merrimack riuer. And from thence to run A parralell line, with 
the East and west line of Chelmsford, vntill it meete with Meri- 
mack Riuer. And that the whole Track of land so taken in, be 
and remayne in Comunitie vnto the Towns of Chelmsford and 
the Indian Town called Patuckett for all vses. 

"21th 3 mo 1656. "Daniel Gookin, 

"Joseph Hills, 
"John Wiswall. 

"The Deputyes approve of the returne of the Comittee in 
answer to this petition desiringe the consent of or honord magists 
hereto, 

"William Torre y, Cleric. 

"Consented to by ye magists, Edward Rawson, Secrety.' ' 

[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 112, p. 80.] 

This joint ownership plan did not prove satisfactory, and we 
find the Court again appealed to in 1660, and it confirmed an 
agreement between the whites and Indians, by which Chelmsford 
got that large section that had been given to them and the Indians 
jointly, and the Indians were given a small strip of land bordering 
their grant, which had belonged to Chelmsford. 

As was usual in such transactions, the whites got a good 
deal and the Indians got a little. 

The line as then established between the Indians and Chelms- 
ford, would appear from the description to correspond very nearly 
to the line of the old Middlesex canal as far, perhaps, as where 
the canal crossed the River Meadow brook. 

The following is the decree of the Court. [Massachusetts 
Records, Vol. 4, p. 430.] 

1660 31 may exchang of land betwene ye Indians & 
chelmsford. 

To all people to whom this present writing shall come to be 
scene or read. 

Whereas the honnored Gennerall Court of the Massachusetts 
was pleased of their free beneficence & bounty to graunt vnto 
the Indians of Patucket a parcell of land adjoyning to the bounds 



32 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

of Chelmsford plantation, the scittuation whereof being by 
experience found to be prejudiciall vnto the mutuall peace of 
the sajd plantations, — now, this wittnesseth that the Indian 
inhabitants of the abouesajd plantation, wth the consent and 
approbation of the Reuerend Mr. John Elliott, Sen, haue coue- 
nanted and agreed to make an exchange of land wth the inhabitants 
of Chelmsford, in manner following, vizt: tat the partition & 
dividing Ijne betweene the sajd English & Indian plantation 
shall beginn at the Great Swampe, the sajd swampe being left 
wthin the bounds of Chemsford, excepting only about tenn foote 
in bredth, and from thence the Ijne to be continued by the marked 
trees, as the former comittee sett out the same, vntill it reacheth 
Merremacke Ruier; and all the land lying on the northeast side 
of the sajd Ijne, formerly belonging to Chelmsford, shall henceforth 
be the propper right & to the sole vse of the sajd Indian plantation; 
and all the land on the southwest side of the sajd Ijne, excepting 
only what is hereafter graunted vnto James Parker, whither of 
the Indians old or new graunt, & euery parte thereof, shall foreuer 
be & remajn the proper right & to the sole use of the inhabitants 
of Chelmsford. 

And Whereas there is a parcell of land lying & being at the 
west end of the Indians graunt, wch is not wthin the bounds 
(of either plantation) as aboue exprest, this wittnesseth that the 
sajd parcell of land, be it more or lesse, is, by the free consent 
of both the abouesajd plantations, given, graunted, & alienated 
vnto James Parker, of Chemsford, abouesajd, for and in con- 
sideration of his great pajnes and costs wch he hath necessarily 
expended in setling the bounds, as aboue is expressed, betweene 
the abouesajd plantations, to haue & to hold the sajd parcell 
of land, wth all the appurtenances thereof, vnto him, the sajd 
James Parker, his heirs and assignes for euer, to his and theire 
only propper vse & behoof e. And to the true performance of 
the aboue named exchange & graunt, mutually made by & 
betweene the sajd plantations, and also theire joinct graunt and 
guift vnto the sajd James Parker, on condicons & in manner 
aboue expressed, both the sajd plantations doe hereby respectively 
bind themselves, theire heires, execcutors, & administrators, 
each to other & joinctly, to the sajd James Parker, his heires & 
assignes, firmly by these presents; in wittnes whereof these 
whose names are subscribed as the dcputjes & la^vfull trustees 
of the abouesajd plantations, haue herevnto putt theire hands 
& scales. 

Aprill the third, 1660. 

Signed in presence of James Parker, & a seale, 

Willjam Simmes, William Felther, 

Samuell Greene, Tho: Hincksman, & a seale, 

James Converse, John Elliott, in wittness of my appro- 

bation. 

















M 1 J ~s 






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V 



m " ■■ ■' 



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THE BEGINNING 33 

The names of ye cheife inhabitants of Pmatucket, testifying 
theire consent and sattisfaction in this deed: — 

The marke of () Puntahhun. 

John Tohatowon. 

The mrke. c^" Kussinauscut, 

The marke of Pannobotiquis, 

The mrke Un of Nomphon, 

The mrke of (J Peter, 

The mrke of Q Nonnoit, 

The mrke of U^ Wampannooun. 

Wee doe testify these markes & names were sett doune 
lawfvdly at a pubHcke meeting, the 14th of the 3d. 1660 

John EHot, Sen. 
John EHot, Jun. 

This deed is acknowledged by Wm Fletcher, Tho Hincksman, 
together wth James Parker, as trustees for ye Indians, to be 
thire act & deed, this 5 2mo 1660 

as attest Tho: Danforth. 

In ansr to the petition of the inhabitants of Chelmsford & 
Patuckett, the Court Judgeth it meete to confirme theire agree- 
ment, & orders the same to be recorded. 

In order that their title to the land might be further strength- 
ened and to satisfy any claim that the Indians might presume to 
hold upon lands within the town a deed was obtained, April 26, 
1665, from the Indians, who deeded the land lying "within the 
bounds and limitts of the said Towne of Chelmsford, and is 
bounded Southerly by the lands of the Towne of Billerica and 
West Southerly partly by the lands of the towne of Concord and 
partly by the Indian plantation of Nashoba, and E' S'thly by 
the Countryes land. Northerly by the lands of Mr. Edward 
Ting, and on the North by Merrimacke River, and on the East 
and North East by the plantaccon of the Indians called 
Patuckett." 

In that year the town levied a rate of £31, 17s., 8d. for 
"A Toune rate and for the parches of the plantation of ye Indians." 

In 1665 the Hne was more definitely established between 
Chelmsford and Wamesit by committees from Chelmsford and 
Billerica and the Indians of Wamesit. It appears from the 
description of the line as established by them that it began at 
Concord river at what was subsequently known as Wamesit stake, 
from there crossing the river meadow and over the ridge on what 
is now the Lowell city farm to great swamp, through which later 
the Middlesex canal was constructed, and by the line of what is 
now Baldwin street to Merrimack river. 



34 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

The following is as this agreement appears in the town 
records. [Transcript of 1742, p. 142.] 

THE BOUNDS BETWEEN CHELMSFORD & WAMASETT. 

June the: 8th: 1665: Ensign Hinchman and Sergeant Fletcher 
being apointed by the Town of Chebnsford: and Sergeant Parker 
with Jonathan Danforth of Billerica: and the Indians who are the 
Inhabitants of Wamasett being apointed by the Indian Court 
at Wamassett to Run the Line— between Chelmsford and Wamas- 
sett did attend the same: And the Bounds between them are as 
foUoweth: viz: we began at the stake by the side of Concord river 
which is the most Northerly Comer of Billerica & on that side 
of the River: and from that stake we Run a Streight Line untill 
you Come over the River meadow to a black oak marked with W 
and C: from thence westward Cross the high Ridge to a pine in 
the Bottom Marked as before: from thence it Runs by marked 
trees at a Little distance westward of the high ridge uto a Little 
white oak: from thence it turns to the great swamp by a great 
white oak marked on the east of Butterfields high-way: and from 
thence to the swamp: and Tenn foot within the swamp there 
being a White oak marked where we Com to the Swamp with: 
C and W : and so the Line is to, Run Tenn foot within the thick 
swamp: untill you Come to Ensign Hinchmans meadow there it 
comes from the Swamp to Tenn White oaks standing together: 
one being marked: and from thence by marked trees Leaving the 
swamp and meadow to Chebnsford: and Continue the Line to 
Merimack: Also it is agreed that Chelmsford is to have Conveniant 
high wayes through this Land in any place as shall be found need- 
full: as also a Covneniant highway by their Line from Merimack 
River to Ensign Hinchmans Damm. This was agreed by us: 
there was present and Consented Thomas Hinchman 

Nob How William Fletcher 

John Line John Parker 

Misstick George Jonathan Danforth 

Frances. 

Samuel : alias Manatoques 
old Rogger. 

This above is a true Copy of the origanall Recorded 
the : 27th : of January : 1691 : By me Solomon Keyes 

Town Clerk 



THE BEGINNING 35 

FIRST SAW MILL. 

It has always been a marked characteristic of the New 
Englanders from the very first, that they manage to provide for 
themselves comfortable and substantial dwellings. 

There being no saw mill nearer than Concord or Wobum, 
and neither roads nor bridges between those places and Chelms- 
ford, the first who came must have been compelled to erect log 
houses for their shelter, although there is a tradition that William 
Fletcher had a frame house in 1654. There is a tradition also 
that Josiah Richardson's first shelter was partly formed by digging 
into the bank. 

The people were not long content to occupy such rude struc- 
tures, and very soon negotiated with the enterprising Samuel 
Adams to erect a saw mill, and also a mill for the grinding of com. 
Mr. Adams was a person of somewhat varied accomplish- 
ments. Rev. Wilkes Allen, in some notes made by him after 
his history of Chelmsford was published, states, upon the authority 
of some old deeds and other papers in the Adams family, that he 
was a millwright. "He was also somewhat skilled in medicine 
& exercised his skill to ye advantage & benefit of this infant 
settlement while they were destitute of a physician better 
informed." 

He was a Captain in the military, Clerk of the Writs, and 
for twenty years town clerk. The records in his handwriting are 
still mostly quite legible. 

The Town was quite liberal with Mr. Adams, giving him 
100 acres of land in consideration of his "erecting & maintaining 
a Com Mill for the Towns suply," and he was given 450 acres 
in consideration of his erecting a saw mill. 

These with other grants made his holdings "by estimation 
about six hundred acres." * * * 

The following is the vote of the Town in reference to the 
saw mill as it appears in the town records [Transcript, p. 32] : 

"1656, July Day ye third. At a Public meeting of the whole 
town, It IS Granted to Mr. Samuel Adams in Considoration of 
betting up a Saw-mill: and thereby supliing the Town with 
Boards at three Shillings the hundred, or the Sawing of one Board 
log tor the providmg and bringing of another to be Redy to work 
by the next March ensuing. In consideration Whereof it is 
hereby Granted to the Sd Mr. Adams to have the Sum of Four 
hundred and fifty acres of Land upon the South Side of the meadow 



36 . HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

belonging to the Sd Mr. Adams, called brook meadow; Farther 
that the Sd Mr. Adams Shall have Liberty to make use of the 
Pines upon the Common. And to hold the fore Sd Land to him 

and his heirs for ever." t^i j 4. 

And "Mr Adams is granted Libberty to sett Flood gates 
for the advantage of his Mill pond at the Mouth of Hart pond 
this was granted by the Town for the use of his Mill to him and 
his heirs forever"* 

This mill was upon Great, or River Meadow brook, about 
two miles, a Httle east of south, from the center of the town. A 
saw and gristmill was maintained there by five successive genera- 
tions of the Adams family. It then passed by purchase to Mr. 
Abbot Russell, who was followed by his son, the late Lincoln H. 
Russell, since whose death in 1899. the mill has not been used. 

PETITION TO TRADE W'lTH INDIANS. 

The following petition to the General Court, asking for the 
privilege of trading with the Indians, gives their representation 
of the difficulties which they encountered in providing for their 
famiUes in "this Remoat Comer of the wildemes." 

The 33 names signed to the petition probably included very 
nearly all of the adult males then living in town. 

Chelmsford 

Mav 17- 58 To the honered Coart Assembled at Boston 

the humble petistion the in habetants of the towne off 

Chebnsf ord Sheweth : that we have as god by his Providenc haveing 

despoased off us with our famelies into this Remoat Corner of the 

wildemes: whare not with Standing the miprovement of all La^s^uU 

Liberties and Advantages put into our hands wee have and doe hnd 

as the State of things now standethMuchdificalteto: naymiposebile 

[ 1 of procuering such ncsesarie suplye as boath cnurcn 

knd familie ocations doe call for to the great hasard boath ot 

uss and owrs as wee dout not but yr wisdoms are sensable off winch 

difecalltie is much increased to uss by beeing prohibeted from 

tradeing \%dth the indiens which we doe Conseive to bee our 

Lawfull Liberte: owr humble Requeste tharfore is that yr honers 

would bee pleased to take this Case into yr Consideration: and 

grant your petiscioners thare Lawfull Liberte which wee Conceive 

ought not to bee Menopolised in as much as it is no nue inuention 

and that the Lord would kepe boath you and yours m his teare 

and tmth wee your petiscioners shall for ever praye 

♦Town Records, Transcript, p. 34. 



THE BEGINNING 



37 



wee doe further in [ ] your honer 
Leter to bee our townes brand or Leter of 
Vss:C: 



to Rate for this inserted 
marke as Law injoyneth 



James Parker 
WiUiam Fletcher 
Henry Farwell 
Tho Chamberlin 
Edward Kempe 
James Blud 



Josiah Richardson 
John Fiske 
Berabin butterfild 
Roberd Procter 
Edman Chamberlin 
Joseph Parker 



Thomas Adams 

Edward Spalden 

Georg byam 

Beniamin buterfild 

Daniel Blodget 

John Spalden 

Roberd Flecher 

Samewell Foster 

Joseph Gilson: 

Games Hildereth: 

William Underwod 

John Shiple: 

Richard Hildereth 

John Nutting 

Abraham Parker 

John Right 

Jacob Parker 

Edward Spalden 

John Shiple 

Joseph Parkis 

Samewell Kempe 
[Massachusetts Archives, Trade &c., Vol. 119, p. 19.] 

What action was taken upon this petition does not appear, 
but the privilege asked for was probably not granted, because it 
would have interfered with a valuable source of revenue to the 
Colony, the statute holding that " * * * the Trade of 
Furrs with the Indians in this Jurisdiction, doth properly belong 
to this common-wealth and not unto particular persons."* 

EARLY ROADS AND LOCATION OF HOUSES. 



In fixing upon locations for their dwellings an important 
consideration, to the early settlers, was to be convenient to the 
meeting house. Mutual protection and social considerations 
woiild prompt them to cluster about this social center, and the 
General Court had decreed in 1635 that no dwelling should be 
placed more than half a mile away from the meeting house in 
any new plantation. But the physical condition of the country 
was such that these desires could not well be carried out, and 
they were forced to locate at places which offered the best promise 
of support for their families. 

♦General Laws, 1672, p. 75. 



38 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

When the committee first explored this tract with a view to 
settlement, the only land mentioned as under ctiltivation was the 
Indians' cornfield upon Robins hill. With that exception the 
territory which these men surveyed from this eminence was 
probably an almost unbroken forest, excepting upon the meadows 
which skirted the streams, or upon land too barren to support 
vegetation. This, at least, would be the condition unless the 
land had been devastated by Indian fires. 

As the meadows furnished a supply of food, easily obtained, 
to carry their animals through the winter, we find many of the 
first inhabitants located near the borders of such meadows. 

One of the first necessities in promoting the development 
of the town was for suitable highways to enable the people to pass 
from house to house and to "mill and meeting house." Highway 
surveyors were chosen at the second town meeting in 1655 and 
annually thereafter. Often the aboriginal paths were widened 
and graded by the early settlers into roads. 

If there were any roads laid out by the town before 1659, 
they are not recorded. There were, however, roads in use 
previous to that time. One of the first of these passed between the 
cemetery and common, following the line of Worthen street and 
Crosby place to the house of William Fletcher, some thirty rods 
beyond the Crosby house. Soon, if not at first, this continued 
toward what is now the house of Jas. L. Steams and from there 
by Golden Cove road and Stedman street towards the Merrimack 
river. 

The "town-way to the mill" led to Saml. Adams' saw and 
corn mill and corresponded to what is now the Boston road as 
far as the Hazen place. Originally it passed around (through what 
is now called Adams street) by the present house of C. E. Bartlett. 
It made a turn to the left near J. E. Warren's house, and, after 
crossing Farley's brook swung around to the east to avoid the hill. 

The "road to the Bay" was what is now Billerica road. 
This was the line of travel to Boston for Groton and Lancaster 
as well as Chelmsford, and those three towns were required to 
help build and support the bridge across the Concord river in 
Billerica. 

Upon these roads the houses in or near the village were 
located. The house of Mr. Fiske, the minister, was near the 
meeting house, of course. Wm. Fletcher's house has been men- 
tioned. His brother, Samuel, lived near him. John Bates' was 



THE BEGINNING 39 

near Mr. Fred E. Russells', and the house of Dea. Cornelius 
Waldo, who came here from Ipswich in 1665, Allen tells us was 
in his garden, probably where the house of Edward J. Robbins 
was recently erected. 

Abraham Parker, the first settler, had his homestead lot 
on the south side of the BiUerica road near the present town farm 
(he was bounded easterly by his river meadow, and north by the 
highway to the Bay), but later we find his house at the village, 
where he and his sons built a mill near the upper dam of the 
Mill pond. 

Jacob Parker, the town clerk in 1658 and several years fol- 
lowing, was near the first location of his brother, Abraham. 

Deacon Henry Farwell, the tailor, was nearer the village 
on the same road. 

John Nutting was on the south side of Beaver brook and east 
of the road to the mill and he had for near neighbors, James Blood 
and Joseph Parker. These last three and James Parker soon 
removed to Groton where their lot was made bitter by the repeated 
attacks upon that town by the Indians. 

Steven Pierce, a tailor, the progenator of the Pierce family 
in town, came from Wobum and married a daughter of Jacob 
Parker. His home was in the village. He was granted land in 
1671. "A small parsill to sett a house upon * * * south 
west side of Beaver brook bridge." 

Samuel Adams we should find at his mills on Great brook, and 
between him and the village was Moses Barron, near the place 
of the late Chas. Sweetser; and for a short time his near neighbor 
was Francis Gould and his wife Rose, who had come from Braintree. 

Farles brook and Round meadow are named in the description 
of Barron's land. 

John Blanchard probably lived at what is now the Joseph E. 
Warren place. Dea. Joseph Warren came into possession of 
this land about 1700, since which time it has remained in that 
family. Benjamin Butterfield lived on the same road, nearer 
the village. 

The Beaver brook meadows west of the village attracted a 
number of families into that section. This was known as the 
"West End." One of these families was George Byam's, one 
of the original families which came from Wenham with Mr. Fiske 
They settled where Geo. A. By am now lives (1905). The place 
has been continuously in the Byam family. 



40 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

A near neighbor to the Byams was Thomas Chamberlain. 
The spot is pointed out a few rods east of the Hunt place, where 
his house is supposed to have stood. The earliest record of any- 
high way in town started from his house. 

"January:?: 1659 
George Biam and Thomas Barrett are apointed a comitee 
to state the High-way that gos to Tadmuck before Thomas 
Chamberlains hous: The tree at his Hogs Coat is concluded one 
bound and so to Run his due bredth acording to order towards 
the Brook Cald Beaver brook."* 

Edmund Chamberlain, Richard Hildreth, Robert Proctor, 
the brothers, Jacob and Arthur Warren, and perhaps Dea. Edward 
Kemp and his son-in-law, Dea. Samuel Foster, both of whom were 
of the Wenham company, were in this neighborhood. 

Thomas Chamberlain's highway mentioned above presupposes 
one already in use for this neighborhood to go to the meeting house. 

This was formally laid out 

"3d 1 month 1662-3. 

Thomas Adams and Josiah Richardson being chosen a 
committee to Joyn with Groton committee to Lay out a High- 
way from Town to Town the work is performed by them and the 
way is Laid out from Beaver Brook Bridge over the North side 
of Robbins-hill and thence through Richard Hildreth's yard and 
so to the west end of Hart pond over the swamp and so to Thomas 
Chamberlins meadow and so on towards Groton, on the east side 
of Tadmuck great meadow" f 

This was the road over which the Groton people passed in 
going to Boston. 

All of this road which lies in Chelmsford is still in use, although 
upon some parts of it the travel is very limited. 

Another road started on the south side of Robins hill and, 
passing around on the west side of the hill and into the road above 
described, at what is now John Byam's place. 

The description given in the records of this is: 

:7th: 8: month :: 1673: Laid out by the selectmen the Day 
above for the use of the Town a high- way which is Bounded 
Between Henry Gidleys Lott and John Blanchards meadow and 
so all a Long between the meadow and Robbins hill Runing into 
the way that coms from George Biams to the meeting hous: 

This road accommodated Thomas Barrett, who had come 
from Braintree with his father, Thomas, and bought, ten years 
before, a house and land on the south side of Robins hill, where 

*P. 42, Town records, Transcript. 
tBook A, p. .36. 



THE BEGINNING 41 

C. W. Byam now lives. Henry Gidley may have lived at the 
Wm. Fay place, although there are marks of one or two old 
cellars on that road, over one of which his house may have stood. 

Quite a number of families settled in the northeast quarter 
of the town, near the Indian line, where they had near access 
to the fisheries on the Merrimack river. This section was called 
the "North End," and that term, later, included the section from 
Wamesit to the north schoolhouse (Dist. No. 2). 

Henry Bowtall, or Boutwell, who came from Cambridge 
with his wife and Jerathmell Bowers, her son by a former marriage, 
located upon what is now Stedman street, in Lowell. His house 
stood just north of where the stream crosses the road. In this 
neighborhood was Joseph Parkhurst,* the progenitor of the 
Parkhurst family in town, and on either side of him, John Wright 
and Thomas Sewall. 

North of these were JohnShepley, Jona. Butterfield, andEleazer 
Brown. Thomas Henchman was in what is now Middlesex village, his 
land being bounded east by the Indian line, and north by the river, 
and joining him at the south was his son-in-law, James Richardson. 

The picturesque John Webb, alias Evered, the former mer- 
chant of Boston, was the first man to cross over and plant himself 
on the opposite bank of the river. 

The first road which accommodated this section was called 
the "Highway to Merrimack." There is no record of its having 
been formally laid out. It terminated at "Poorman's bridge." 
Where that bridge stood there is neither record nor tradition to 
enlighten us, although it is mentioned from time to time in the 
records for 150 years. An examination of the old roads and 
paths in this section reveal its probable site. 

There is evidence of an old road leading from Stedman street 
towards the swamp just south of Mount Pleasant, and at Black 
brook, opposite to where this comes out at the edge of the swamp 
there are still to be seen some remains of a foundation to a bridge. 

The late Sewall Bowers, an old and lifelong resident of this 
section, stated that formerly a road crossed the swamp in the 
direction of Pine street. 

The road to Poorman's bridge was extended to Merrimack 
river in 1673, passing on the east side of Mount Pleasant, and 
from there the line corresponded to what is now Baldwin street. 
It is thus described in the records. 

♦The records in regard to his house lot are contradictory, but the weight of evidence locates 
him as above. 



42 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

[In margin] 20: 3: 1673 A highway 

Will vnderwood Will Flecher and Abraham parker being 
apointed to lay out a highway for the inhabitants on other sid 
meremake Do determin that it shall beegine att the Country way 
att pore mans bridge and so a longe bettwne the to swamps and 
ouer will vnderwods medow all along bowndid by markd treese 
on both sids and so runeth below mr hinchmans Dame and so to the 
Endian line to Answer the Contry Rode att meremake and on this 
side this is atrew rettorne of the Comity as Aboue Datted and 
heare entred by order of the selecttmen * * * 

Samell Adams 
clerk. 

Jerathmell Bowers, when he reached maturity, settled where 
his descendant, Joseph Bowers, now resides on Wood street. 
The place has been continuously in the family. The house, said 
to be over two hundred years old, is undoubtedly the oldest 
building now standing in Lowell. Another road which helped to 
develop this section was laid out from the newly incorporated town 
of Dunstable, viz.: [In margin] Country Way The 1 Day of 
January 1674 leften Thomas hinchman and liften Samuell Foster 
beeing Apointed by the Towne to Joyne with leftenant Whealer 
and Abraham parker the Cometty to lay out the Contry Way 
from — Donstable to Chelmsford thay Doe Joyntly Agree 
on both parties that the Way shall in Chelmsford bowns 
beegine at mr Tings Farme and so to bee sixe poUe wid and so to 
Continew as by marked treese Downe to Jerathmell bowers 
land and so to black brooke into the Contry way that Comes 
From merimack this is a trew Rettorne of the Comity as above 
Datted wittis Samell Adames 

clerk 

This was the old road from Tyngsboro through North Chelms- 
ford. It swung to the left above Drum hill over a piece of road 
now little used, coming out upon what is now Westford street 
near Joseph Bowers'. The travel to Boston, from Dunstable 
and towns above, passed over this road for many years, passing 
over what is now Stedman street and the Golden Cove road and 
crossing the Concord river at Billerica. 

The following year a new bridge was built across Stony brook, 
"to foot higher than the former was." 

There were two foot-paths laid out near Jerathmell Bowers 
in 1677, which are thus described. 



THE BEGINNING 43 

A highway — By apointment of the townesmen ther is tew 
foott waies laid out through the land of John Wright the one 
begining att the still next to Jerathmell bowers and * * * 
so to the Cartt brige and then below the orchard to the land of 
Jonathan butterfeild and then close by the fence of John wright 
vp to the drift way and the other begining Against John Sheplies 
and then straight to the drift way at Jonathan buterfilds barne 
by William vnderwoods and Jerathmell bowers and for partt of 
satisfaction hee hath taken apece of land about an acer and halfe 
bonendid North vp on the towne common east vp on the medow 
of John wright South vp on the lands of Jonathan Butterfeild and 
west upon the land of John wright: Recorded by order of the 
Selectt men 21 7 mo 1677 

This is a trew Coppey Samell Adams 

of the Rettom of the Comity clerk 

[Orig. Records, Book 1656. p. 129.] 

Whether it was Jerathmell Bowers' still which created the 
necessity for paths leading in his direction, we can only conjecture. 

In the transcript of the town records, which was made in 
1742, the word is written stile, but the original record gives it 
plainly "still." 

In 1686 and again in 1688 Jerathmell Bowers was licensed 
to sell "strong waters" by the General Court. 

Capt. Josiah Richardson located upon what is now the road 
leading from Westford to Lowell where, his descendent, the late 
Edward F. Richardson lived. The farm had been continuously 
in the family to the time of the death of the latter*. 

STONY BROOK PATH. 

One of the very early roads at first known as "Stony brook 
path" was what is now Westford road. Upon this road, about 
half a mile from the meeting house, settled John Perham, after 
his marriage in 1664, but at just what time is not known. The 
place has been continuously in the family to the present time. 
The present writer, who now occupies it, is of the seventh genera- 
tion from John. Edward Spalding settled about a mile and a 
half fvirther west, upon the farm of the late Henry. R. Hodson. 
This farm and those adjoining it on either side were occupied 
by Spaldings for several generations. To the west of Spalding, 
at what is now the William Martin place, at the foot of Francis 
hill, lived John Stevens and his descendants for five generations. 

^Family tradition. 



44 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD. 

William Underwood was also in this neighborhood. His daughter 
Priscilla, and Edward Spalding, Jr., having united their fortunes 
in marriage. 

The road from this neighborhood was early in use, but, if 
recorded, its description is, like those of so many of the old roads 
which were laid out by marked trees, such that it cannot be 
identified. It swung to the left near the present residence of 
Geo. F. Snow, crossing Stony brook at Westford comer, where a 
saw mill was established in 1669. 

STONY BROOK VALLEY. 

A number of families soon pushed out into the Stony Brook 
valley: John Snow, Joseph Butterfield and Joseph Parkhurst 
(probably Joseph, Jr.) and others. The following are the names of 
those who were chosen fence viewers for "Stony brook" from 
1682 to 1700: Samuel Burge, John Spalding, Joshua Fletcher, 
Benj. Spalding, Joseph Spalding, Samuel Cleveland, Samuel 
Underwood and Gershom Proctor. Arthur Crouch planted his 
house upon Tadmuck hill. He was probably the first resident 
upon this beautiful hill now crowned by the charming village of 
Westford. 

Two highways were laid out, one to accommodate the Stony 
brook families and another leading into it from Tadmuck hill 
furnished the first continuous highway from what is now Westford 
Center to the Chelmsford meeting house. They are thus described : 

A hie way Laid out from stony broock houses throw the 
Land of Joseph buterfild and so ouer frances hill by Josaph Keyses 
house bounded by marked trees and ouer flagi mado plaine bounded 
by marked trees and by the East and of henory forwells house in to 
the Cuntery road the hie way is 3 rod wide all so we laid out 
A hie way from Arthar Crouchis house and by the houses at 
Litell tadnick and by the house of Josaph parkhust and as the 
way is drawn bounded by marked trees untell it Coms to stony 
broock way Commity 

Soloman Keys 
Samuell Fletcher 

This record is not dated but it is recorded in the handwriting 
of Thomas Parker who was town clerk in 1696 and 97. 

The part of the road over Francis hill from No. 2 Schoolhouse, 
in Westford, to the top of the hill is no longer in use. 



THE BEGINNING 45 

Samuel Cleveland's land, granted in 1681, was upon the east 
side of Tadmuck hill, "by the highway to Great Tadnack" with 
liberty to dam and flow the swamp. It is said that there still 
remains evidence of an old dam at that place. 

Samuel Cleveland was a son of Moses Cleaveland of Woburn, 
an ancestor of Ex- President Grover Cleveland. 

GREAT BROOK SETTLERS. 

The meadows upon Great brook early attracted settlements 
in the southerly quarter of the town, in what is now Carlisle. 

The first that we find there were: John Barrett, George 
Robbins, Thomas Cory and Ambrose Swallow. A highway was 
laid out for their accommodation "to mill and meeting-house" in 
1671, described as follows: 

The selectt men vp on Request by George Robines for a 
highway to mill and metting house have Apointed a Cometty 
namly John Blanchard Moses Barron and John fiske to lay out 
the same And they make ther rettome thatt they have laid out 
the same from the house lott of the forsaid Robines to And through 
the land of John Brett and so passing Beefore his house in to 
Concord Rode way over great Brooke ; and so by Judgment of the 
Commetty And John Baretts Consent the town gives John barett 
three Acers of land Adioyning to his loott on the south side of his 
land By order of the selectt men* 
31 the 8 mo 1671 Sam Adames 

This neighborhood had increased by 1692 to at least ten 
families, three of which belonged to sons of John Barrett, mentioned 
above. The section from there to South Chelmsford came to 
be known as the "South End." 

DEVELOPMENT OF WEST END. 

In 1719 a highway, which furnished an outlet for other 
families that had settled in the West End, is thus described: 

Chelmsford November the 4th 1719: A High-way Laid out 
which began at the comer of Jacob Warrens by the Highway to 
the great pond Called Hart pond : and from sd Corner as the Path 
now is to Jonathan Minotts from thence as the path now is to 
Thomas Adams's and Pelatiah Adams through there Land; and 
from thence as the path now is by marked trees along to Little 
Tadmuck to the Land of Thomas Adams & Pelatiah Adams & 
through there Land and through the Land of Ephraim Hildreth 

•First Book of Records, p. 106. 



46 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

senr — by marked trees running & facing: and from thence to 
Ebenezer Wrights Land & through sd Wrights Land as the path 
now is: from thence by trees marked Runing & facing to the 
High-way that goes from the meeting hous to Ensign John Snows : 
The afore sd Highway is Three Rods wide* 

By the selectmens order 
Recorded this : 5th Day of November: 1719 1 Jonathan Richardson 
pr. Benj. Adams Town Clerk j Benjamin Adams 

Committee 

The original petition for this road was preserved in the house 
of B. O. Robbins until recently. The house is a very old one and 
it may have formerly been Jacob Warren's house. 

Of those mentioned in this description, Thomas Adams 
lived at the Hayvi^ard place. The house is still standing. It 
may have been built by Mr. Adams, who was a carpenter. He 
later removed to Dunstable, selling his place in Chelmsford in 
1726 to Benj. Heywood, cooper, of Billerica. It has since re- 
mained in the Heyward name. Timothy Adams lived at what is 
now the John Sheehan place. Ebenezer Wright lived at what is 
now Edwin Heyward's place near Chamberlin's comer in Westford. 
The road terminated on Francis hill at the road which led from 
the Stony brook houses to the center of Chelmsford. 

DEVELOPMENT OF THE TOWN. 

The material from which to draw any picture of the life of 
the people of those early times is almost wholly wanting. We 
have neither tradition nor literature written at that period. We 
can simply present such bare facts as are found in public records, 
and the imagination must supply the rest. 

The houses of that period were small and mostly of one story, 
with a living room and kitchen and a loft overhead for sleeping 
rooms, reached by a ladder, or a stairway in front of the big 
chimney. 

The question is often asked, When were the old houses now 
standing built? It is impossible to say. It was not the custom 
then any more than today to inscribe upon a house the date of 
its construction. 

Some of the oldest houses are thought to have been standing 
for two centuries. These are the old gambrel roof house by 
North square; the Emerson house on Dalton street near the road 
to North Chelmsford; the railroad house, so-called, near the 

♦Book A, p. 172. 



THE BEGINNING 47 

depot on Littleton road; the Joseph Warren house and the 
Hazen house on Boston road; the Bowers house in Lowell; and 
the Hayward house and house of B. O. Robbins near South 
Chelmsford. Of the first mentioned, we have only its architectural 
featiures by which to judge of its age. All of the others have had 
additions and improvements which have changed their original form. 

The meeting house was the social center. The minister 
was the important man, looked up to with great respect. His 
presence was called for at all important public, or family occasions. 

Attendance upon public worship was compulsory. All were 
taxed to support the church, and, when a minister was to be 
settled, he was voted upon in town meeting, the church having 
prcAdously made known its preference. 

SEATING THE MEETING HOUSE. 

The seats in the meeting house were assigned by a committee 
chosen by the town, persons being given preference according to 
their estate, office, or social standing. 

In 1678 the town chose "For a Comite to order the seating 
in metting house Capt thom hinchman, Capt Samell Adams, 
en [sign] Thom Adams william vnderwod, Josiah Richardson" 

It is not probable that the first meeting house contained 
pews, the people being seated on benches. It was repaired in 1702, 
"both wtout Side to keep out rain and snow, & also withinside 
such Inlargement as may be needful & in perticular A long table 
from one allee to another" At a later period persons were 
permitted to build pews at their own expense for themselves and 
families. In 1712, "It Was uoted that Colonall tyng Capt Bowrs 
Capt Barron and Jonathan Richardson shall haue the Liberty 
and Benefit of making Pues in that uacant Roome one the East 
side of the Pulpit in the New meeting hous to the East Window"* 
At a still later period the town received pay for such privilege. 
In 1772, "Voted to sell room, for pew, in meeting house by the 
mens stairs sold to Samuel Perham for ten dollars."! 

PRIVATE ENTRANCES. 

There are votes on record which indicate that such pew 
holders were sometimes permitted to have a door cut through the 
side of the building, giving them a private entrance to their pews. 

*Book B, p. 16. 
tBook I, p. 100. 



48 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

For what other purpose could have been the doors ordered 
by the following votes? In 1696, "it is voted yt two men shall 
be ordered to make two dors at ye back side of ye meeting hous" 
and the year following, "it is uoated that thare shall be A doar 
mad out at the noarth sid of ye meeting house and A pillor set 
under ye bame"* 

Before the introduction of bells it was the custom to summon 
the worshipers to meeting with a drum. Among the town charges 
in 1659, one was "for the paiment for A drum to Henry Farwell 
£3-5-0" 

It appears also that sometimes a flag was flung to the breeze 
for that purpose. 

"The 1 Day of June 1676 the selectt men made an Agreement 
with George biam to cleane the metting house putt out Cvdlers 
[colors] and Attend both saboth and lecttur Dales as formerly 
hee hath don and for the yeare insewing hee is to have 50 shillens 
in corne or Cattell to bee paid halfe att the last of Nouembor 
the other halfe att or before the last of June Foloing" 



BELL. 



But these primitive methods were soon superseded by better. 
From 1680 to the present time the sound of the church bell has 
called the people to worship. On the above date "Ther was a 
voatt past that ther shold bee a bell bought for the Towns vse 
and that ther shold be so much land sould out of the Comon as 
will purchas the bell and hange him in the metting house that 
is to say if the towns stock in hand will not doe it then to sell 
landf 

The Commity to sell the lands ar 

Mr John Fisk 

Ser [geant] Richardson 

Soloman Keies" 

The date 1682 was inscribed upon the bell. When the third 
meeting house was built the town voted, in 1793, "to sell the old 
Bell and buy a new one of 700 wt, raising £110 for this purpose." 

The old bell went to Tyngsboro, where it was used on a 
schoolhouse|. 

*lpp. 22.5, 229, First Book, 139, 143 Copy.] 
•fFirst Book, p. 157. 
JAllen, pp. 26, 77. 



THE BEGINNING 49 

Several votes remind us of the Dial, the Hour-glass, and the 
Stocks, those ancient instruments, the two former for marking 
time, the latter for the punishment of offenders. In 1698 payment 
was made 

"to John Kyder for tythin mens staues £0-4-6 
to John bates for mending the stoxs £0-1-6 

Samuell Foster for the desency of the meeting house £0-10-0" 

At another time Jona Barrett is paid for "sitting up the 
dial," and Abraham Byham "for bringing the stocks £0-1-0" 

LAND DISTRIBUTION. 

The method which governed the proprietors of the town in 
their land distribution is not described in the records. This 
may have been contained in the first book of proprietors' records, 
which Allen says were burned about 1715, with the house which 
contained them. 

The nile was doubtless the same as in other towns at the 
time. In Billerica the Dudley farm "was divided into twelve 
lots of one hundred and twenty-five acres each and this number 
became the unit of measuring shares through the town. Each 
share was called a ten-acre lot and consisted of one hundred and 
thirteen acres of upland and twelve acres of meadow and carried 
with it the right to 'all town priviledges, after additions and 
divisions of land and meadow.' "* From this it would seem that 
each proprietor's holdings were much larger than appears by 
the records. 

There were four divisions of the common lands. 

As the town controlled the disposal of land and new residents 
were admitted by vote, undesirable persons were prevented from 
gaining a foothold. The laws of the colony were very strict in 
regard to receiving and harboring strangers, it being enacted in 
1637 that "No Town or person shall receive any Stranger Resorting 
hither with intent to Reside in this Jurisdiction, nor shall allow 
any Lot or Habitation to any, or entertain any such above three 
Weeks, except such person shall have allowance under the hand of 
some one Magistrate! 

At first land was granted to approved characters on condition 
that they build and settle on same and pay town charges, but 
land soon came to have a greater value and in 1669 "it was ordered 

♦Hazen'e Billerica, p. 31. 
tLaws and LibertieB. 



50 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

by the town, that all those, who shall take up accommodations in 
town shall pay for a ten acre lot £2-10-0, and in the same pro- 
portion for any lot greater or smaller."* 

Land continued, however, to be granted free to encourage 
the introduction of useful trades. 

John Lowell was admitted an inhabitant in 1682, if he come 
and settle "and so follow his trade of Tanning" and given the 
privilege of taking bark from the commons. And James Dutton, 
in 1693, was granted three acres to set a house and shop on "in 
order to follow his trade." Thomas Parker, shoemaker, and 
Zachariah Richardson, blacksmith, were given similar grants. 

MILLS ESTABLISHED. 

Nothing more marks the enterprise of the people than the 
mills which were early established upon the various streams. 
The first saw and com mill, which the town so liberally endowed 
in 1656, was followed in 1669 by a second saw mill, upon Saw Mill 
Meadow brook which flows into Stony brook at what is now 
called Westford comer near West Chelmsford. 

"At a Publick meeting the: 3d: Day in September: 1669: 
Thomas Hinchman William Fletcher and Josiah Richardson 
Petitioning for a parcell of Land for there Conveniencies in 
Erecting of a Saw-mill and Carying along the work thereof." The 
grant was made by the town, the conditions being that the 
"Inhabitants thereof shall have there Boards at four shillings 
per Hundred and not exceeding that prise: for any kind of pay 
that the afore sd Inhabitants Can make : at price Currant between 
man and man in this Town: And that any of the Inhabitants of 
Chelmsford Giveing timely notice of there want of Boards to 
any of the owners of the Mill afore said that then they shall be 
suplied for there pay before others. And further it is Granted 
to the afore sd owners of the Mill that they shall have free Liberty 
to take of the Town Common What Timber they see meet for the 
Mill to work on: And to Rattifie the afore sd Grant the Town 
hath Chosen Samuel Foster and John Burge Senr to se to the 
Reccording thereof and that it is done according to former Order. 

Witnes our hands Samuel Foster Senr 
John Burge Senr"t 

The banks of an old canal are still plainly seen at this point. 

Att a General metting of the towne the 3 day of Febuary 

1673 * * * by a maior voatt was granted to Farther the 

♦Allen, p. 21. 
tBook A, p. 40. 



THE BEGINNING 51 

Iron worke that thye shall haue For 2d a Cord leave to cutt wood 
Acording to Former Agreement* This was doubtless Capt 
Jonas Prescotts mill at the outlet of Forge pond on the Stony 
brook. 

GROTON MILL. 

"At A Genii Town meeting August the : 24th 1709: it was 
voted that Capt Jonas Prescot of Groton shall have the Common 
Meadow Lying in Chelmsford as it was granted to Thomas 
Chamberlain of Groton for the sum of Twenty five pounds of 
money" t When this grant was recorded the following year, 
the only part of the description now intelligible is "Lying within 
the Town of Chelmsford near to Groton Mill on both sides of 
Stony brook" 

Capt. Prescott's object in obtaining the meadow was, doubt- 
less, for the purpose of obtaining bog ore to be manufactured 
into iron. "Prior to 1730, Jonas Prescott had greatly enlarged 
and improved the works on Stony Brook by erecting forges for 
manufacturing iron from the ore as well as other purposes. "J 

Capt. Jonas Prescott and his descendants continued the 
business at Forge Village till 1865, almost 200 years from the 
date of the first action by the town of Chelmsford in aid of the 
enterprise. 

FIRST FULLING MILL. 

The first Fulling mill, for the dressing of the homespun cloth, 
is indicated by a vote of the town Feb. 2, 1691. 
"on the day aboue lef tenant John barett and his sonn Jonathan 
barett propounding for libarty to erect a fuling mill on the mill 
brock it was by note granted and ther was chosen on the day 
aboue to setell this mater 

captine richarson 
and Joseph farwell se 
and Thomes parker 
commity"§ 

This mill was probably in the present town of Carlisle near 
the road leading to that town from Chelmsford. The two 
Barretts mentioned in the vote lived in that neighborhood at the 
time. 

There are several mill sites on the stream in that section, 
3ne of which is still in use. 

^First Book, p. 118. 
|-Book A, p. 172. 
tHodgman'a Weatford, p. 243. 
JFirat Book, p. 188. 



52 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

FIRST MILL AT CENTER OF TOWN. 

The first mill on Beaver brook at the center of the town, 
Allen tells us, was erected in "1678. — John Parker, son of Abra- 
ham, built a saw-mill on Beaver-brook, of which some remains 
are yet to be seen."^ I am unable to find any reference to this 
mill in the town records, but in an ancient deed from Abraham 
Parker, Senr., to his eldest son John, occurs this language: "Also 
whereas the said John Parker of his own estate hath ben at one 
third pt of ye charge in building of a saw milne now standing 
upon his father Abrahams land * * * both ye upper & lowr 
Dam with all the profits and comodityes of ye same According 
to his proportion of interest in ye said mill. * * * Dec 29. 
1679" and from another deed, from the same to son Moses, it is 
plain that the mill was on Beaver brook. 

FIRST GRISTMILL AT NORTH CHELMSFORD. 

Daniel Waldo, who, doubtless, had learned the mill business 
of Samuel Adams, whose daughter Susanna he had married, 
proposed to undertake a mill on his own account, and, in 1695, 
he made an agreement with the town "about Building a com 
mill on Stony brook below the Highway to Dunstable" 

The agreement stipulated that said Waldo was to maintain 
a good mill and miller. "The sd mill to be kept for the Towns 
use Except the fourth Day of each week which is for Dunstable: 
and to grind the Towns Com well and there Mault for half Toal 
Except a small quantity a Bushel or the Like," and the people 
were to be served in turn, and he is not to "Damnific" the highway 
or any man's meadow by flowing. In consideration for which 
"we grant to the sd Waldow the stream of sd Brook: and also 
Twenty five acres of Land on each side of sd Brook provided the 
sd Highway be not Damnified" 

The Dunstable highway here mentioned is the street passing 
through the village of North Chelmsford, now known as Middlesex 
road. The bridge originally crossed the stream lower down than 
the present one. Allen, writing in 1820, says of this mill privilege, 
"This advantageous situation has been constantly occupied by 
a mill under several successive owners. The present proprietor, 
Wm. Adams, Esq., rebuilt the saw mill, 1815, and in 1814, the 
gristmill on an improved plan. It contains three runs of stones, 



THE BEGINNING 53 

each of which is moved by a tub wheel. The wheels are placed 
at different elevations, that the uppermost may be used when 
the water in the Merrimack is at its greatest height, and either 
covers the other wheels or impedes their motion. As the water 
in the river falls to its common level, either or all of the wheels 
may be used at pleasure."* In a note made below, after his 
book was published, he wrote: "1822 These mills with twenty 
acres of land around were sold to Kirk Boott as agent for the 
Merrimack Manufacturing Company for 15 thousand dollars." 
But these mills continued in operation after Kirk Boott 's 
purchase, for the present writer has taken wheat there to be 
converted into flour, I should say, about 1858. 

JOHN Richardson's mill. 

To return again to the earlier period: Daniel Waldo sold, 
in 1700, to John Richardson, who then lived nearby, "one corn 
mill also one half of the third part of a Saw Mill Standing on the 
aforesaid Stony Brook near to said com mill"! 

Daniel Waldo removed to Dorchester, and later to Bridg- 
water. 

In 1707, "Jonathan Richardson and John Richardson had 
granted the Liberty of erecting Iron works upon Stony brook 
with Conveniency of flowing provided it Damnific none of the 
Inhabitants,"! and in May, 1709, "It was voted that John Richard- 
son shall have the Liberty of Drawing of the pond Called New- 
fied-pond to suply his mill with Water : And shall have the benifit 
of sd pond to the high-water mark" 

The attempt of Mr. Richardson to avail himself of the benefit 
of the waters of this pond caused a most remarkable catastrophe. 
As the workmen were digging a channel through the bank of the 
pond the pressure of the water suddenly burst the weakened 
bank and the water rushing out carried with it a negro who was 
in the ditch at the time and buried him in a mound of sand washed 
by the water to the meadow below. Thus this pond, covering 
100 acres, was all drawn off with the exception of about an acre 
in the lowest part. This story rests wholly upon tradition. 
Allen relates it (pp. 19, 20) and at the time he wrote, the pond 
still remained dry and its bed "covered with a thrifty growth of 
wood." The writer's father, the late David Perham, has told him 

♦Page 31. 

tRegister of Deeds, Cambridge, Book 26, p. 277. 

JBook A, p. 170. 



54 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

of going with his father, when a boy, to haul timber from the 
bed of the pond. Thus it remained for more than a hundred 
years, until Gen. Leech, in 1824, filled up the old breach in its 
banks and it was again filled with water. 

HIGHWAY TO JOHN RICHARDSON's MILL. 

In 1707, the year that John Richardson's iron works were 
established, at the mouth of Stony brook, a road was laid out to 
it, which is thus described: 

"February the: 21: 1707 

A high Way Laid out from Stony Brook to John Richardson 
mill bounded as foloweth begining at the high Way that Leads 
from John Snows to the meting hous this sd way bounded 2 : Roods 
wide by marked trees and so a Long to Dunstable Road near 
Stony Brook bridg."* I think this is the road which starts near 
the house of Patrick Savage, near Dist. No. 7 schoolhouse, passing 
the present house of A. M. Blaisdell and near that of the late 
E. F. Richardson. Mill street in North Chelmsford is probably 
a part of this old road. One object of this road at that time may 
have been to obtain a shorter route to their supply of bog ore, for 
Allen in a note written after his book was published speaks of 
"An ineshaustible bed of bog ore on the farm of Robert Richardson, 
late Mr. Andrew Spalding's." 

Robert Richardson, at that time, lived upon the place now 
occupied by the family of the late Henry R. Hodson, and a narrow 
road runs directly from their premises to the road above described. 

HERDING OF CATTLE AND FENCING IN COMMON. 

In the early days of the Town, before each farm was enclosed 
by fences, the cattle were allowed to range over the common 
lands, under certain restrictions. Each neighborhood had a 
prescribed range for its herd, which must have had a keeper 
to protect the cattle from wild beasts and to prevent them from 
encroaching upon planted fields. The term Field Driver may 
have originated from this custom. The Colony passed laws 
especially protecting the Indians' planting-fields, ordering that 
"the English shall keep their Cattle from destroying the Indians' 
Com." 

Large fields, in one case over two hundred acres, were fenced 
and used in common. 

♦Second book, copy p. 72. 



THE BEGINNING 55 

All these communal arrangements served to bring the people 
into closer relations one with another, and furnished a strong 
reason why only such should be admitted as inhabitants of the 
town as would work in harmony with such necessary regulations. 

The vote relating to herding reads, 

"7: 1 : [16] 71 its ordred Concerning herding of Cattell that From 
Cros Bridge to henry Bowtells shall bee one herd 

2 From Cros brige to Moses Barrons shall bee an other herd 

3 From Thommas Barrets to Robertt procters And John backe 
shall bee an other herd 

4 From George Biams to Arthur warrens shall be an other 
heard and that if Any person shall Neglect to put ther Catell 
to the herd they shall pay ther preportion of herding and twelve 
pence a beast over and Above"* 

The first range mentioned in this order was from the center 
of the town to Stedman street, where the line between Chelmsford 
and Lowell crosses that street. 

The second was from the Center to where the road to Concord 
branches from the Boston road. 

The third was from the present residence of Chas. W. Byam, 
on the south side of Robins hill, around the hill towards Geo. 
A. Byam's. 

It is impossible to define the limits of the fourth range because 
we are unable to locate the habitation of Arthur Warren in 1671, 
except that it was in the "West end" probably beyond Geo. A. 
Byam's towards Heart pond. 

A former vote passed in 1667 provided that "such as Live 
remoat shall have Liberty to choose their heards and have Cows 
and working cattell exempted, "f 

The management of the swine seemed to be the cause of a 
good deal of trouble owing to the destructive tendencies of those 
useful animals. 

Hog Reeves were annually chosen whose duties were, as 
described in one entry, "to oversee swine and keep them in order." 
Swine were allowed to run at large but the number that any one 
man was allowed to keep upon the public lands depended upon 
the amount of land which he possessed. In 1683 "it was voated 
that eury inhabitant beeing an house holder shall have librty to 
keep to swine vp on the Common and eury tenne Acer loot the 
propriettors ther of haue liberty to keep Four swine on the Common 
And so eury man Acording to his enlarged loott to keep swine to 

♦First book, p. 106. 
tFirst book, p. 173. 



56 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

ther priuilege Acording to A boue a tenn A cer lott And hee that 
keeps more swine then Acording to this order on the Common 
shall pay fiue shillens evry swine so fownd on the Common as a 
penalty for his trespas"* 

The regulations made to prevent damage by a too free use 
of piggy's snout must have been very annoying to that humble 
creature. 

In 1681, "ordered that all Swine Aboue three moth old shall 
bee soffitiently Ringed in the midell of the Nose Constantly and 
Youcked From the tenth day of Aprill ontill the Twentith day 
of octobor: soffitiently on penality of sixe pence a swine for 
wante of either youck or Ringe and twellue pence a Swine for 
wante of boath and this penality to bee paid to the officer 
Appointed or to Any other on the empownding of such swine 
with all other damages For empownding or leagall Conuiction 
of the owners of the swine, "f 

And these regulations were enforced. On accoimt of trespass 
done by Abraham Parker's eight swine, they were impounded 
"Fouer times in the same year" 

Owners of horses or cattle that do damage to meadows must 
pay such sum as may be appraised. 

In order that the breed of horses might not deteriorate, 
stallions must be approved by the selectmen. 

"28 the 12 mo 1670 mr John Fiske pastor presenting a sorell 
stone horse with a white face which for said horse the selectt men 
Do Aprove of to Answer the law wittnes in the Name of the 
selectt men 

Sam Adames 

cler"t 

Henry Bowtell's white stone horse was also approved the 
same year. 

With cattle, sheep and swine running at large, fences required 
much supervision. Sometimes as many as eight fence viewers 
were chosen. 

The selectmen ordered, 1677, that all fences should be made 
"sofitient Against great cattell." 

Such fences would not be a protection against sheep, and 
in 1681 it was ordered "that No Sheepe shall goe vp on the 
Common of this towne with out a Kepper" [Keeper]. 

*Fir8t book, p. 175. 
tFirat book, p. 158. 
iFirst book, p. 103. 



THE BEGINNING 57 

Wild beasts, particularly wolves, caused such destruction 
to the flocks and danger to the people that a bounty of ten 
shillings was paid for each woK killed. 

In 1692 the town paid for seventeen. 

The largest number taken by one person was by Moses 
Parker, "seven wolfs." 

In 1690 the town set apart a large tract of land in the north 
part of the town, extending from the Merrimack river westward 
to Groton, and in width from Deep brook to the Dunstable line 
(now Tyngsboro), "for to kepe a dri herd of chattells [cattle] and 
Shep"* 

SHEEP PASTURE — ROBINS HILL. 

In 1697 it was proposed to use Robins hill for a common 
sheep pasture. Three men, 

"Cap bowers Ephrem hildreth and samuell foster are Chosen a 
commity to draw up Artickels in order to the keping a flock of 
shep in a publick way upon Robins hill — and prasent them to 
the town the next town meeting" f 

NEWFIELD. 

A common field was laid out much earlier than those last 
mentioned, upon the Merrimack interval, north of Stony brook. 
It consisted of 214 acres, in lots of six acres each. It was owned 
by 22 proprietors, some of whom owned several lots. The largest 
owner was Benjamin Butterfield, who held seven lots, 42 acres. 

The field was enclosed by a fence, and, doubtless, used in 
common, by these owners, for pasturage. It was called Newfield, 
and that name came to be applied to all that part of the town 
now North Chelmsford. In 1667 a committee consisting of 
Lieut. Foster, Daniel Blodgett, and Jacob Parker were appointed 
by the Selectmen "to state to euerj'- propriator in the New field 
there proportions of fence." The committee reported: "Acres 
of Land: 214: Length of fence: 555. due to A Lott of : 6 : Acres : 
2 pole &: 10 foot of fence" | In 1659 a committee was appointed 
"to state the fence one the other parts of the said feild & they 
did find 2 pole and 6 foote to euery Acre Lying in the same order 
that the other doth * * *" 

♦First book, p. 184. 
tFirst book, p. 233. 
JFirstbook, p. 110. 



58 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

MILLSTONES. 

Some of the Town's action, calculated to restrain individual 
enterprise, would, at first view, appear to be prompted by a narrow 
spirit, thus: 

"Millestones [in margin] 26 March 1678 the selectt men orderd as 
Foloeth For the good of the towne thatt if Any person what so 
euer shall take to worke or worke vp Any stone for a mill bee it 
for Come or sider or Any other mill and make [s]all of the same 
stone or stones to Any other person then of this towne such person 
so selling shall pay to the vse of the towne the sum. of twenty 
shillens a stone in money For euery stone so sould out of the 
town and no stone or stones as Aboue is to bee transported out 
of this township vntill this order bee satiffied datted the 26 March 
1678 by order of the selecttmen: by Samell Adames" 

Gierke* 

And in 1689 it was "agred that no bordse or timber sho[u]ld 
be sovld ovte of this tovne comon land vpon penalltie of painge 
one shiling for evj hvndred of bord"t The common lands being 
held for the benefit of the community in general, nothing must 
be taken from them, for private profit, which would impair their 
value. Millstone hill is situated in the extreme northwest corner 
of the present town of Westford. 

As timber came to have a money value, upon the stump, it 
was voted, 1698, "that the owners of all saw mills in our towne 
execpt the first that improue the Towns Timber into bords shall 
pay two shilings a thousand in corn for the use of the Towne" 



LAW AFFECTING TAVERNERS. 

Our forefathers had their temperance problems no less than 
we of the present day. The Colony passed laws forbidding tippling 
at inns, and fines were prescribed for drunkenness, and, lest the 
attractions of the tavern might cause some to neglect their religious 
duties. It was ordered "That in all places where Week-day Lectures 
are kept, all Taverners, Victuallers and Ordinaries, that are 
within one mile of the Meeting-house to which they belong, shall 
from time to time clear their Houses of all persons able to go to 
Meeting, during the time of the exercise" t * * ♦ 

♦First book, p. 146. 
tFiret book, p. 185. 
JLawa and Liberties, p. 83. 



THE BEGINNING 69 

It is to be feared that this provision fell into disuse, for it 
appears, from the diary of Rev. Ebenezer Bridge, at a later period, 
that at one time he discontinued the weekly lecture, on accoimt 
of the bad conduct of those who went to the tavern upon lecture 
days. 

"lICKERS" to INDIANS. 

The people in the early days consumed much rum and strong 
beer, but they soon discovered that such drinks were bad for 
Indians and sale to them was prohibited. One case of the en- 
forcement of that law appears upon our town records (First 
Book, p. 150). 

"the 24 day of march 1678-9 Abraham Parker senior with his 
tew sonnes moses an Isack weare Acused for seling of strong 
lickers to seuerall endians Contrary to the law established thay 
doe each of them frely Acknolege ther Faulte ther in And doe 
heare by bind them selues severaly vnto the selectt men of Chelms- 
ford neuer hear after to sell Any more stronge lickers to Any 
Indians" 

The oldest tax list that has been preserved is that of 1671. 
It contains sixty-two names, the minister not being included. 
This shows that in the first sixteen years after the incorporation 
of the Town the number of families had increased three fold. The 
record seems of sufficient interest to be given in full 

30th 3 mo 1671 The Selectt men of Chehnsford madde this Rate 
as Foloeth for the payment of the Townes Ingagement to the 
m'nester 

Thomas Adames 

Thomas Chamberlin sen 

Thomas Chamberlin jun 

Beniamin Spaulding 

Joseph Spaulding 

Joshuah Flecher 

George Biam 

John perham 

En will Flecher 

John Battes 

John Coborn 

Robert Coborn 

Edward Coborn 

Thomas Coborn 

Edward Coborn sen 

John Wright 

James Richenson 



2 


14 





1 


13 








19 


— 





19 


8 





18 








13 


4 


1 


11 





1 


01 


8 


3 


1 








16 








14 








16 








15 


4 





12 


9 


1 


18 


9 


1 


05 





1 


05 






60 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

John Sheply Jun 
Beniamin Buterfeild 
Jonathan Buterfeild 
Daniell Bloggett 
Nathaniell Buterfeild 
Robertt Procttor 
John Barrett 
George Robines 
Edmond Chamberlin 
Thomas Corry 
John Bauke 
John wadell 
John Sheply sen 
John Blanchard 
will vnderwood 
Edward Spaulding 
Richard hildreth 
Sarah parker 
Samuell vamum 
Joseph Barrett 
Abraham parker 
Jacob warren 
Left Samuell Foster 
william woodhead 
Andrew Spaulding 
Jerathmell Bowers 
Thomas Copper 
mr Thom Hinchman 
Joseph perkis 
Joseph Farwell 
John Stevens 
John parker 
John Spaulding 
John Burge 
Ambros Swalow 
Francis Goold 
James hildreth 
mr Cornelios walldow 
Samuell Fletcher 
Henry Bowtell 
Moses Barron 
Mr John Fiske Jun 
Josiah Richenson 
Thomas Barrett 
Samuell Adames 
Solomon Keies 

To so much ped over by the last yers Ratt 
Totall is 






12 


8 


2 


05 


4 


1 


05 





1 


10 


2 





19 


4 


2 


09 


10 


1 


19 


8 





13 








13 








12 








14 


6 





17 


6 





14 


6 


1 


10 


4 


1 


07 


4 





16 





1 


16 


2 


1 


05 


8 


1 


16 





1 


10 


4 


2 


15 


4 





09 





2 


12 


2 





07 








13 


4 





07 


[] 





06 


4 


2 


16 


4 





17 


8 


1 


09 


8 





12 


4 





09 


4 





19 


4 


1 


14 


10 





10 


4 





13 





1 


09 





3 


03 


4 


1 


01 


8 


1 


01 


8 





17 


10 


1 


04 





1 


19 


4 


1 


00 


2 


1 


12 


5 


1 


01 


8 





15 





80 


01 


3 



THE BEGINNING 61 

At the time of Mr. Fiske's settlement as pastor he was 
promised, as we have seen, fifty pounds for the first year and 
"to pay his maintinence as the Lord shall enable us for the 
future." The above amount, eighty pounds, shows that the 
Lord had enabled them to make a very substantial increase in 
their minister's salary. 

In the tax list of the following year, 1672, there appears 
against nearly one-half the names an enumeration of the stock and 
real estate assessed. About an average estate is that of George 
Byam "2 heads 2 mares 4 Cowes 2 of 2 yer old 8 sheepe 1 swine 
8 Acres land bowsing." The land was probably only that which 
had been improved and "bowsing" included all the buildings. 

CARE OF POOR. 

But little appears upon the records to show what provision 
was made for the support of the poor. John Martin at the 
"South end" applied to the General Court for assistance, receiving 
the reply that the "Court declares yt ye releife of poore persons 
concemes the toune to wch they doe belong * * * " 

They preferred to relieve the wants of the needy by individual 
contributions rather than levy a tax for the purpose. In 1696-7 
"the inhabitance are not wiling to grant mony to releue the por to 
be raised by way of reat but promis to do it by a Contrybution--" 

Later the destitute were cared for in families at the expense 
of the town, but not until 1820 did the town purchase a farm 
and house for the support of the poor. 

CLUBS IN MEETING HOUSE. 

In 167 1 we find the first intimation of danger from the Indians, 
with whom the people had thus far been at peace. Evidently, 
the Indians were manifesting symptoms of uneasiness at the 
growing strength of their white neighbors, whom they attempted 
to destroy in the conflict which broke with such fury upon the 
colonies four years later in King Philip's war. 

The men were ordered to bring clubs with them to the meeting 
house. The record reads: 

25 the 5th mo 1671 It is ordred by the Selectt men For severall 
Considerations espetialy For the preseruation of peace That with 
in one moneth After the Date hear of euery malle person 



62 . HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

with in our towne Above the Age of Fiueten years shall prouid 
a good Clube of Fouer or Fiue Foot in lingth with a knobe in the 
end and to bringe the same to the meeting house ther to leaue 
the same vntill ocation fore use of it. 

sicmed the Name of the Rest By- 
Sam Adames 

Gierke* 

town's house on robins hill. 

Two years later, the Town built a house upon Robins hill, 
the purpose of which is not clear. It was neither sufficiently 
large nor substantial for a garrison house, being of one room, 
16 X 18, covered with but a single thickness of boards, and with 
but one window. The fact that Indian troubles were brewing, 
and that the committee appointed to select its location, Lieut. 
Samuel Foster and Ensign William Fletcher, were both officers 
in the "foot company," would indicate that it was intended to 
serve some military purpose. The place was admirably adapted 
for a lookout from which to discover and warn people of approach- 
ing danger. 

STOCKADE — signalling. 

Several years before, the friendly Wamesits had built a 
stockade upon Fort hill, now Rogers park, in Lowell, to protect 
themselves from their dreaded foes, the Mohawks. There was 
a tradition, related to me many years ago by an old man, that 
these Indians signalled across from Fort hill to high points in 
Chelmsford. 

robins hill house. 

The following is the wording of the contract for the house 
upon Robins hill: 

7 of octtobor 1673 Att a general metting Acording tv the towne 

order thes Foloing * * * 

Articls of agreement made the seventh Day of October on thousand 

sixe hundreth seventy and three bettwine the inhabitants of 

Chelmsford and Joseph barrett of the same place 

1 The said Joseph barrett Doth promis and Ingage to buld a 
house of eighten Foott longe and sixten foott wid and eight 
Foott stud and to Do all the worke belonging to the same 
From the stump to the finishing of the same and to Find 

♦First book, p. 108. 



THE BEGINNING 63 

bords For the hole house and lay the Flowers and Dobell 
bord the Roofe and bord the sids and ends and to make the 
Chemly and Dore and window and to Find stones and Clay 
and to Finish the said house att or beefore the last Day of 
March Next insewing the Date above 
2 The inhabitants of Chelmsford Do promise and hearby ingage 
to pay vnto the Forsaid barett in full satiffacttion for the 
house Aforsaid the Just simi of twelve pownds in towne pay 
that is such as the towne Can produce and to pay the same 
twelve powds att or beefore the tenth Day of octtobor in the 
yeare onthousand sixe hundreth seventy and Foure as wittnes 
in the behalfe of the towne the Date above 
Allso it was agreed vpon that the towne Sam Adames 

shold Find Naills for the whole house Clerke* 

Upon the same date "It was voated that all male persons 
From the Age of Twelve years to sixtey shall every one worke 
one Day in the yeare For the Clearing of Robins hill" the selectmen 
to "Apoint a man to lead on the worke either ther or else whear" 

JOSEPH BARRETT. 

Joseph Barrett had a double motive for doing faithful work 
when he built the house for the town, for, when completed, it 
was promptly occupied by Francis Gould, whose daughter, Martha, 
the builder had married the year before. 

GOOLE. 

Goold, or Gould, signed an agreement with the selectmen, 
stating that "I have taken to hier the house and land that I now 
live in of the selecttmen of the towne For which house and land 
I Do couenatt with thm to pay yearly the sum of one peck of 
endian Com For the towns use as wittnes my hand this last 
tuseday in Desembor 1673" Francis Goold 

his mark 

Gould and his wife, Rose, had a family of five small children, 
and others older, to occupy this one room cottage, which had but 
a single thickness of boarding to protect its inmates from the 
blasts of winter. Francis and Rose Gould have many descendants 
living today, one of whom is Hon. Samuel L. Powers. 

The fact that only a nominal rent was required, sufficient 
only to acknowledge the Town's ownership in the property, plainly 

♦First book, p. 116. 



64 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

implies that the occupant was to render to the Town some service 
as an equivalent for the use of the property, or else that the 
family were in circumstances requiring aid from the Town. 

The most reasonable supposition is that he was to maintain 
a lookout and warn the inhabitants in case of any discovered 
peril. 

GALUSHA. 

Gould remained in the house until his death, March 27, 1676. 
In October, following, his daughter, Hannah, married Daniel 
Galusha, a Dutchman, who paid the Town the peck of com due 
for rent and leased the house and seven acres of land for the term 
of seven years for which he was to pay as an acknowledgment of 
his grant from the Town "say one peck and halfe of Corne yerly" 
The one condition stated in the contract was "that he distorbe 
not his mother Gools peaceabl living in the house"* 

Galusha remained in the house three years when, his mother- 
in-law, Gould, having died, his request to leave the house was 
granted. Later he removed to Dunstable, where the family had a 
sad experience. At the assault upon that town, by the Indians, 
on the night of July 3, 1706, his house, upon Salmon river, was 
attacked and burned. Galusha escaped and one of the women 
of the household fled from the flames and saved herself from the 
savages by hiding in the underbrush, but his daughter, Rachel.f 
was killed. 

INTEREST IN PUBLIC AFFAIRS. 

Difficult as were the conditions of existence in this new 
settlement the people maintained a lively interest in public affairs. 

After the accession of King Charles II, when his displeasure 
was manifested toward the Colony and the Charter was felt to 
be in danger, Chelmsford was among the towns which sent petitions 
to the General Court, declaring their satisfaction in the present 
government, and expressing their earnest desire that the same 
might be continued. 

MIGRATION. 

About 1690, and for several years after, there was quite a 
migration of families to Connecticut to found the new town of 

♦First book, p. 131. 

tBorn at Chelmsford. Sept. 14, 1683. 



THE BEGINNING 65 

Canterbury. They were Capt. Joseph, Samuel, David and 
David Adams, Samuel and Josiah Cleveland, Jacob Warren, 
Joseph, William and Edward Spaulding, Eleazer Brown and 
probably others. Some of these became prominent in the affairs 
of that town. Jacob Warren, Joseph Spaulding and Saml. Adams 
were chosen on the first board of Selectmen, and Eleazer Brown 
was Deacon of the church. 

DEATH OF MR. FISKE. 

After twenty years of faithful service the aged pastor, Rev. 
John Fiske, became physically unable to carry the burdens of 
his labors alone, and the town took measures to procure him an 
assistant in the ministry. The following is the wording of the 
record : 

The 13 Day of the 10 mo 1675 att a Genorall metting of 
inhabitants of Chelmsford was voated as Foloeth 
lly in Consideration of mr Fisks Age and infermitis Acompaning 
the same ther is ned of sum hilpe to Joine with mr Fiske in 
the woorke of the minestry 
21y that besids the eighty pownds Formerly grauntid yerly to 
the minestry ther shall be Fourty pownds more Raised — 
yearly For the obtaining of mr Clarke to bee a help in the 
worke Aforsaid if hee may bee Attained 

Recorded by order 
of the selecttmen the 28 10 1675 

Sam Adams 
clerk* 

Mr. Fiske now rapidly declined in health, although he con- 
tinued his labors notwithstanding his weakness. 

On the second Lord's day of his confinement by illness, after he 
had been many Lord's days carried to church in a chair, and 
preached as in primative times sitting * * * on January 
14, 1676-7 he saw a rest from his labors." 

Mr. Fiske's will is dated June 18, 1674. It is a lengthy 

document written by himself in an excellent hand. His library 

was appraised at £60, and the entire estate at £703-3-10, including 

154 acres of land, 1 pair oxen, 4 cows, 1 mare, 12 sheep, carpet, 

quishions and 4 silver spoons. 

His gift, or legacy, of a silver communion cup to the church 

as been in use to the present time. The cup was made by John 

Dixwell, Jr., son of the regicide Judge of that name. He was 

I goldsmith at Boston. On the bottom of the cup is stamped 

'First book, p. 129. 



66 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

the maker's mark, a fleur-de-lis, and his initials, I. D., and sur- 
rounding it the letters, I. F. L. C. C. — John Fiske's Legacy, 
Chelmsford Church. 

He is buried in "Forefather's" cemetery, but the exact spot 
is not known, as there are no inscriptions of so early a date. 

A memorial cenotaph has been recently erected in the cemetery 
by the Fiske family of Chelmsford, to commemorate the life and 
virtues of the First Pastor of the Chelmsford Church, the Rev. 
John Fiske. 

SETTLEMENT OF REV. THOS. CLARKE. 

Rev. Thomas Clark, who had been Mr. Fiske's assistant, 
was now, upon the death of the latter, called to the pastorate. 
And, as a settlement in the ministry was, in those days, expected 
to continue during the pastor's life, the relation was entered into 
with great deliberation and a thorough understanding between 
pastor and people, as the following, from the records, will show: 

Articls of Agreement bettwine mr Thomas Clerke And the 
inhabitants of Chelmsford in order to mr Clarks settellment in 
the ministry for time to Com in Chelmsford are as Foloeth 

1 Firstly it is Agred beetwine both parties that the inhabitants 
of Chelmsford do pay yearly to the said Clarke the Just and 
full sirni of eightey pownds in maner as Foloeth Twenty 
pounds in Curent mony and sixtey pounds in provision viz 
fortey-pownds in Corn of all sortes as God giues and the other 
twenty pownd in porke Beefe and other flish beefe not exseding 
tow pence halfe peny p pownd more over its allso Agred that 
the towne shall soply mr Clerk with wood sofitient for his 
family use yearly which is by Agreement thirty cord yearly 

2 Secondly it is allso Agreed that the said towne shall pay sixty 
pownds in mony towards the parchas of Corsers land lying 
in Chelmsford and that thay build an house vp on the said 
land which house shall bee forty foott in length twenty in 
bredth fiveten in stud and a kiching Adioyning of sixten foot 
square tenne foott stud prouided that the said Clark shall 
pay on Quarter partt of what this bidding shall Cost 

3 Thirdly it is Agred that the said towne make an Adition to 
the salary Above stated if he stand in nede and the towne bee 
Abell ther to 

4 Fourthly that the selectt men shall stand ingaged yearly to 
the performance of the Aboue Agreements by making a Rate 
and proporsining the Inhabitants his partt of the Forsaid 
sum and leuey the same. 

5 Fifthly its Agred that his yearly salary shall bee paid with 
in the yeare 



THE BEGINNING 67 

Finaly it is Agred that if the said mr Clarke do growndlisly 
remov[e] and leave the worke of his ministry in Chelmsford 
then the said land and house as Above shall rettorne into the 
hands of the towne of Chelmsford thay paying to mr Clerke what 
hee hath expendid towards the parches and bidding and bettring 
the Acomendatione And For A confirmation of this Agrement 
As above this fifth day of the Twelfth mont[h] one thousand sixe 
hundreth seventy and seuen wee have sett to our hands 

Thomas Clarke: 
SameU Adams Clerk 
in the Name of the 
Inhabitants* 

This house which the town provided for Mr. Clarke was 
certainly of ample proportions, being 40 x 20, two stories in height, 
with an ell 16 feet square for a kitchen. 

There is good reason to believe that the house was the parson- 
age later occupied by his successors in the ministry, Rev. Samson 
Stoddard, and Rev. Ebenezer Bridge, and, if so, it is still standing. 
It stood upon the site of the present passenger depot, and was 
removed to its present location upon Littleton road, when the 
railroad was put through the village in 1872. It is now known 
as the railroad house. The house has been enlarged by the 
addition of a wing facing upon Littleton road. The old part 
facing east corresponds in width and height to the house built 
for Mr. Clarke, although now somewhat longer. When the 
house was remodelled about twenty years ago, the walls of one 
room were found lined up with plank. 

In the "Settlemt of the Garrison in the Wt Regiment of 
Middx. March, 1691/2" five families were assigned to Mr. Thomas 
Clarke's house, besides his own. The meaning of this is that these 
families were to resort to his house for safety, in case of an Indian 
attack. 

This fact explains the object of the plank lining found in 
the walls of this old house, and supports the belief that is it the 
identical house built by the town for Mr. Clarke two hundred 
and twenty-seven years ago. [This was written in 1904.] 

Mr. Clarke acknowledges over his own signature that "the 
purchas of Corsers land and bulding a house on the same is 
fully performed by the inhabitants" * * * 27th 11 mo 1679 

Rev. Thomas Clarke was born in Cambridge, March 2, 1652-3. 
His father was the Ruling Elder of the church, Jonas Clarke. He 
^aduated from Harvard University in 1670. 

First book, p. 144. 



68 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

He served, probably as chaplain, in the Narragansett cam- 
paign, in King Philip's war, as the following record of his services 
show: 

October 17. 1676 "Mr Thomas Clarke, minister, being 
seven weekes in the army at Narraganset, & officiating at the 
request 'of the comander in chiefe during that time, the Court 
judgeth it meete to grant him sixe pounds money to be payd by 
the tresurer."* 

There is very little material from which to form an estimation 
of Mr. Clarke's character. Mr. Allen, writing more than eighty 
years ago, could find "neither church records, manuscript sermons," 
nor "cotemporary notices" relating to him. 

It appears from the town records that he made few requests 
of the Town, and these in every case were granted, the most of 
them unanimously. 

He soon concluded that, rather than take three-quarters of 
his salary in grain, "porke beefe and other flesh" he woiild prefer 
to try a smaller salary to be paid in money, and, accordingly, 
in 1679, the selectmen made another agreement with him, that, 
for the next three years, he was to be paid yearly seventy pounds 
"in spesy" [specie]. 

By some means he became indebted to the town the same 
year for the sum of seven pounds and ten shillings, which he 
acknowledges upon the Town book (p. 150). 

At the end of two years from the date of the above arrange- 
ment, they returned again to the original agreement of 80 pounds 
in money and provisions, and, at the same time, "7 the 12 mo 
1681" Mr. Clarke's debt was "by a vnanimus voat of the towne 
* * * Freely Forgiuen him" * * * 

With such a great scarcity of ready money as existed at that 
time, it must have been very difficult for the town to pay their 
minister wholly in specie. 

It seems that the minister did not find 30 cords of wood 
enough to keep his house warm, and the Town voted "30 of octobor 
1683 * * * Mr Thomas Clerke shall have Forty Cord of 
wood alowed him by the towne yearly" 

The Town also granted him 10 acres of land near Beaver 
brook "22: 11: 1680" 

In 1688 Mr. Clarke asked of the Town an increase in his 
salary, which was granted unanimously, as appears by the following 
vote. 

*SibIey'8 Harvard Graduates, Vol. 2, p. 322. 



THE BEGINNING 69 

This seuenth day of Febuary 1687-8 mr Thomas Gierke 
requesting of the inhabitants that his yearly salary may be 
inlarged to which the Inhabitants doe Answer and Agree vnaimosly 
that mr Clark shall have paid him yearly on hundreth pownd that 
is twenty pownds in Current mony and eightey pownds in Corne 
of all sortes at the price as it goeth From man to man in the towne 
not respectting the Country and this to bee paid the one halfe 
of mony and Corne eury halfe year which is in full satiffacttion 
of the former Agrementt for mony Come Flesh and wood to 
which mr Thomas Clarke doth Asent to And Acsept of as wittnes 
my hand the day Above in the behalfe of both parties 

Samell Adams* 
clerk 



From these transactions, showing that every request made by 
Mr. Clarke was cheerfully granted, it is manifest that harmonious 
relations existed between the pastor and his people, and that he 
was held by them in affectionate regard. 



WITCHCRAFT. 



The witchcraft delusion occurred during Mr. Clarke's ministry 
and there was one suspected case at Chelmsford. The good 
sense displayed by Mr. Clarke in handling the matter shows 
him to have been free from that fanaticism which had seized upon 
the minds of the people at Salem with such disastrous consequences. 
The circumstances of the case are related in Mather's Magnalia if 

"There was at Chelmsford an afflicted person, that in her fits 
cried out against a woman, a neighbor, which Mr. Clark, the 
minister of the Gospel there, could not believe to be guilty of such 
a crime, and it hapned while that woman milked her cow, the cow 
struck her with one horn upon her forehead and fetched blood; 
and while she was thus bleeding a spectre in her likeness appeared 
to the party afflicted; who, pointing at the spectre, one struck 
at the plase, and the afflicted said, 'you have made her forehead 
bleed;' hereupon some went unto the woman and found her 
forehead bloody and acquainted Mr. Clarke of it; who fortunate 
went to the woman and asked, 'how her forehead became bloody?' 

♦First book, p. 183. 
tVol. 2, p. 478. 



70 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

and she answered, 'by a blow of a cow-horn,' as abovesaid; whereby 
he was satisfied, that it was design of Satan to render an innocent 
person suspected." 

The diary of Chief Justice Samuel Sewall, of Boston, mentions 
a visit to Chelmsford, in 1702, when he enjoys the hospitality 
of Mr. Clarke, but, unfortunately for us, he does not record his 
impressions of the man. He says: 

"Monday Octr 26. 1702 * * * Went to Chehnsford, by 
that time got there twas almost dark. Saw Capt Bowers and his 
Company; Gave a Volley and Huzza's. Supid at Mr. Clark's; 
I and Col. Pierce in his study."* 

We find one allusion to Mr. Clarke in the records of the 
Brattle Street church, Boston, which reveals his character in a 
very favorable light. It was at the time when that house of 
worship was new, and the church was having serious differences 
and troubles with their neighbors, (ministers and others) about 
their proceedings. The clerk "records in the Church Book an 
Acknowlegment of their great Obligations to * * * the Rev 
Mr. Clark of Chelmsford," and others, "for their good and kind 
Endeavours for their peaceable Settlement."! 

Mrs. Mary Clarke, the wife of the minister, died Dec. 2, 1700. 
He again married, Oct. 2, 1702, Miss Elizabeth Whiting, the 
daughter of Rev. Samuel Whiting of Billerica, J who survived 
him many years. 

Mr. Clarke's death occurred Dec. 4, 1704. The following 
brief account of it is found in Judge Sewall's diary, p. 118. 

Deer. 7th. Mr. Clark of Chelmsford dies of a fever; was taken very 
suddenly the Friday before, after he had been at a Funeral: 
buried the 11th. 

The Fairfield manuscript journal contains the following 
appreciative notice of him. "A great loss to all our towns, and 
especially to the frontier towns on that side of the country, who 
are greatly weakened with the loss of such a worthy man"§ 

Something may be judged of a man by his descendants. 
Those of Mr. Clarke have been people of intelligence and force of 
character. The most distinguished among them was his great 
grandson, the patriot Governor, John Hancock. 

•Sewall Papers, Vol. 2, p. 67. 

tSibley's Harvard Graduates, Vol. 2, p. 322. 

JAllen. 

tMaae. H. C, Vol. 9, p. 195. 



THE BEGINNING 71 

The epitaph upon Mr. Clarke's grave stone, in Forefathers' 
cemetery, is in Latin : 

MEMENTO FUGIT 

MORI HORA 

Huic pulveri Mandatae sunt 
Reliquiae Revdi Dom Those Clark 
Gregis Christi Chelmsf : 
Pastoris Eximij, qui fide & 
spe Beatae Resurrectionis amima 
in sinum Jesti Expiravit Die 

o 

VII Decembr, Anno Dom 
MDCCIV & .Etatis suae LIL* 

The following receipt shows the cost of the monimient : 

"Chelmsford 17th Nov. 1708 
"Recievd of Mr. William Fletcher the sum of fifty shillings in 
money to be bestowed for a montmient over the grave of the Rev. 
Mr. Thomas Clark late of Chelmsford deceased: it being the 
donations of sundry persons in Chelmsford for that use. I say 
received by me. 

"John Hancock." 

The signer of this receipt was Mr. Clarke's son-in-law, Rev. 
John Hancock, of North Cambridge, now Lexington, and the 
grandfather of the Governor. 



*Here to the dust are committed the remains of the Reverend Master Thomas Clark, the 
distinguished pastor of the flock of Christ in Chelmsford, who, in the faith and hope of a 
blessed resurrection, breathed forth his soul into the bosom of Jesus the 7th of December, 
in the year of the Lord 1704, and the 52nd of his age. [W.] 



CHAPTER II. 
EARLY GRANTS— THE INDIANS. 

EARLY GRANTS. 

THE Charter of Massachusetts Bay, given by ICing Charles I, 
in 1629, granted "all that part of America lying and being in 
breadth from forty degrees of northerly latitude from the Equin- 
oxial line to forty-eight degrees of the said northerly latitude 
inclusively, and in length of and within all the breadth aforesaid 
throughout the main lands from sea to sea." 

The maps of the previous century gave the extent of the 
Continent northward as much less than it is in reality, and some 
people in England as late as 1651 believed that the Pacific Coast 
was at the foot of the western slope of the Alleghanies. [Narr. 
and Crit. Hist, of America, Vol. II. p. 456.] The Charter 
continues: 

"AU that part of New England in America aforesaid, which 
lies and extends between a great river there, commonly called 
Monomack, alias Merriemack, and a certain other river there, 
called Charles river, being in the bottom of a certain bay there, 
commonly called Massachusetts. * * * And also all * * * 
those lands lying within the space of three English miles on the 
south part of the said part of the said Charles river * * * 
and also all * * * the lands lying * * * vvithin the 
space of three English miles to the southward of the southermost 
part of the said bay * * * and also all those lands * * * 
which lie * * * within the space of three English miles to 
the northward of the said river called Monomack, alias Merrymack, 
or to the northward of any and every part thereof, and all lands 
and hereditaments whatsoever, lying within the limits aforesaid, 
north and south in latitude and breadth, and in length and longi- 
tude of and within all the breadth aforesaid, throughout the 
mainland there, from the Atlantic and western sea and ocean 
on the east part to the south sea on the west part." 



EA RL Y GRA NTS— THE INDIA NS 73 

De Monts, Champlain and Capt. John Smith are all three 
claimants to the title of discoverer of the Merrimack. De Monts 
named it for himself, but the name did not obtain acceptance. 
Champlain called it "la riviere du Gua," after one of his associates. 
Captain John Smith, who explored this locality in 1614, named 
the Charles for his King, and allowed the Merrimack to retain 
its Indian name. Cowley says: "Like all the great rivers on 
the Atlantic coast, the Merrimack pursues a southerly course, 
but after following this course from Franklin (N. H.) to Tyngs- 
borough, a distance of eighty miles, the Merrimack, unlike any 
other stream on the Atlantic, makes a detour to the northeast, 
and even runs part of the way northwest. It is obviously 
unnatural, that, after approaching within twenty miles of the 
head waters of the Saugus, as the Merrimack does, on entering 
Massachusetts, it should suddenly change its course, and pursue 
a circuitous route of more than forty miles to the sea. If the 
history of bygone ages could be restored, we should probably 
find the Merrimack discharging its burden at Lynn, and not at 
Newburyport." 

Samuel Maverick, in his "Description of New England" 
(1660), says: "Above Twelve miles above Watter Town is an 
In-land Towne called Concord. It lieth on the River Meromack 
I conceive about 20 miles above the first falls but good passing 
on it there in small Boats from place to place. They subsist 
in Husbandry and breeding of Catle." 

This was, undoubtedly, written with no knowledge of the 
grants first to Cambridge and then to Chelmsford settlers and 
others, after Maverick had removed, but makes Concord to include 
the land thus granted, even to the Merrimack. 

Maverick describes Woburn: "Power or five miles above 
Mouldon [Maiden] West is a more considerable town called 
Woobume, they live by ffumishing the Sea Townes with Provisions 
as Come and Flesh, and also they ffurnish the Merchants with 
such goods to be exported." 

Of Wenham he says: "Six Miles from this Towne [Ipswich] 
lyeth a Town Called Wenham seated about a great Lake or Pond 
which abounds with all manner of fiEresh ffish, and such Comodities 
as other places have it affordeth." 

Woburn and Wenham and Concord helped to settle Chelms- 
ford. 



74 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

May 13, 1640, the General Court granted to Mrs. Margaret 
Winthrop, widow of the late Governor John Winthrop, three thou- 
sand acres of land, and the next year this was assigned about the 
lower end of Concord river, near Merrimack. This was east of the 
Concord and south of the Merrimack. Thirty acres of meadow 
were granted on the west side of the Concord, to compensate for 
poor land on the east side. In 1642 the report of those appointed 
to view it was that it was generally ordinary land, not of the 
best: "neither did wee see any medowe worth the mentioning 
there about, except a parcell on the west side of Concord Ryver 
which wee conceive may bee some 30 acres," which (as there were 
some Indians holding land within the large grant, and there being 
"no medow of any worth there") was also granted her. This 
was in Wamesit, and is mentioned in Tyng's deed of 1686, as 
excluded from the Wamesit purchase. In a later document, 
twenty-one acres of this is described as lying on the west side 
Concord river at the upper end of the meadow there, and is 
bounded about by the bounds of Chelmsford Township in that 
place, and below by a pine tree marked near the meadow side, and 
so runs cross the meadow to a stake that stands on the west 
side of a cove that runs toward Chelmsford field, not taking in 
the cove. [See also Mass. Bay Records, Vol. IV, pt. 2, p. 109.] 

In 1661 Mr. Deane Winthrop petitioned to have the land laid 
out for the use of the heirs, and Thomas Addams of Chelmsford 
was one of the committee appointed. The land (or part of it) 
included in the Chelmsford grant was originally given to Cam- 
bridge, June 2, 1641, and June 14, 1642. The language is: All 
the land lying upon Shawshin Ryver, and between that and 
Merrimack Ryver, not formerly granted by this Court, are 
granted to Cambridge, so as they erect a village there within five 
years, and so as it shall not extend to prejudice Charlestown 
village [Wobum], or the village of Cochitawit [Andover] &c. 
This grant was confirmed absolutely March 7, 1643-4, and 
included the present town of Billerica, portions of Bedford and 
Carlisle, and a part of Tewksbury or of Chelmsford, or of both, 
[Paige's History of Cambridge, page 3.] 

The record is as follows : 
"Shawshin is granted to Cambridg wth out any condition of 
makeing a village there; & the land between them & Concord is 
granted them, all save what is formly granted to the Millitary 
company or others, pvided the church & psent elders continue at 
Cambridge." 



EA RL Y GRA NTS— THE INDIA NS 75 

This liberal grant was made to induce Mr. Shepherd and his 
church to remain in Cambridge, and not emigrate to Connecticut 
as Thomas Hooker and his company had done. Shepherd was the 
son-in-law of Hooker, who urged him to follow him to Connecticut. 
(Hazen's Billerica.) 

In 1652, under a commission from the government of the 
Colony, the river (Merrimack) was explored by Captain Simon 
Willard and Captain Edward Johnson as far as Lake Winne- 
pesaukee. In the same year certain inhabitants of Concord and 
Wobum petitioned the General Court for the privilege of ex- 
amining the region at the confluence of the Concord and Merrimack 
wdth the intention of making a settlement, which was accomplished 
the next year. The Town of Chelmsford was settled in 1653, and 
incorporated May 29, 1655. 

THE INDIANS. 

At the time (1604) when the Sieur de Champlain discovered 
the Merrimack the region between the Concord and Merrimack 
rivers, afterwards called Concord Neck, and up to the Pawtucket 
falls, was the rendezvous of the Pawtucket or Pennacook Indians, 
the foremost of the five New England tribes, numbering, prior 
to the great plague in 1617, several thousand souls. 

The territory over which they roamed included all of what 
is now New Hampshire. Wamesit, at the confluence of the 
rivers, Merrimack and Concord, was their capital or headquarters, 
and these streams attracted the red men on account of the 
abundant supply of fish which they afforded. "Merrimack" means 
sturgeon, and this fish with salmon, shad, and alewives were easily 
taken in goodly nimibers. "It was no unusual spectacle to see 
thousands of the dusky sons and daughters of the forest encamped 
here in the season of Spring, catching with rude stratagem their 
winter's store of fish. Aside from this periodical convention of 
Indians this region contained one or two villages of more permanent 
inhabitants — one at Pawtucket falls and another at Massick or 
Wamesit falls." [Cowley.] 

Within the bounds of the Lowell cemetery, during the progress 
of improvements, there have been exhtraied, in past years, a large 
number of himian bones, which would indicate that this was a 
burying place of the Indians. Near the Concord river a large 
skeleton, presiunably that of an Indian chief, was found buried 
in what appeared to be charcoal. It was in a sitting posture. 



76 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

facing the east, and the skull seemed to have been broken by the 
blow of a tomahawk. Another skeleton seemed to indicate that 
the chief's squaw had been buried near him. A number of Indian 
fireplaces, constructed with stones, and of circular form have 
been discovered in this vicinity, at a depth of four or five feet below 
the surface of the ground, indicating great antiquity. 

The purpose of this History requires but a brief account of the 
Indian inhabitants of this region. Extended narratives may be 
found in the writings of Gookin, Hubbard, Drake and others, 
with descriptions of their wigwams, canoes, and implements 
of shell and bone and stone; their wampum (shell-bead money) 
and various personal ornaments. They were polytheists and 
polygamists, untruthful and fond of gambling; very hospitable and 
fond of extravagant dancing and reveling. Their government 
was a paternal despotism. These children of the forest were 
possessed of some noble traits and were grateful for kindness. 
They believed in the immortality of the soul and the resvirrection 
of all animal life. They had no priests, but the powwow, or 
medicine man, had almost unlimited influence among them. 

Various writers have given us their observations on the 
relations of the Whites and Indians. 

The Indians can hardly be said to have had proprietory 
right to the land. They were nomadic, occupying a certain 
territory as long as it afforded them a livelihood, their occupancy 
being determined largely by the superior strength of their particular 
tribe. The earlier cessions of land were made under a mis- 
conception on their part. They thought that the English, after 
a few years, would move on and leave the tract again to them. 
It was not easy to deal with them in buying land or in making 
treaties, as their government was on a loose system without 
a responsible head, so that it was uncertain that any compact 
made with them would be secure. 

The Indian trade was one incentive to colonization, and the 
stubborn contest for supremacy on the part of the English, who 
felt that the country rightly belonged to those who could make 
the best use of it, developed among the pioneer settlers a bravery 
and spirit of endurance, which was an element of strength in the 
colony. The fierce and savage nature of the natives prevented 
their being largely domesticated as slaves and saved the northern 
colonies from the moral danger arising from contact with a servile 
race. 



p 



EARLY GRANTS— THE INDIANS 77 

These treacherous foes persecuted scattered settlements 
in the interior country, and thus compacted the population and 
enabled the colonies to make a more united stand against the 
English government, when this became necessary. 

Passaconaway, "the child of the bear," a man of considerable 
ability, was the earliest Indian chief whose subjects dwelt upon 
the banks of the Merrimack, and whom history has made known 
to us. He was regarded as a magician for whom the trees would 
dance and the rocks move, who in the summer turned water into 
ice, and in winter made it burst into flame. He could bring 
dead serpents to life, and make himself a biuning fire. Major 
Gookin says he saw him alive about 1663, at Pawtucket, when 
he was about one hundred and twenty years old. He flourished 
at the time of the first permanent English settlements in Massa- 
chusetts, and showed himself the friend of the white man. In 
1644 he, with others, made a treaty with and submitted themselves 
to the English. In 1660 he resigned the sachemship to his son, 
Wannalancet, and at a great banquet, according to the early 
chronicles, made the following oration : 

"Hearken to the words of your father! I am an old oak, that 
has withstood the storms of more than a hundred winters. Leaves 
and branches have been stripped from me by the winds and frosts. 
My eyes are dim; my limbs totter; I must soon fall. When young 
no one could bury the hatchet in a sapling before me. My 
arrows covdd pierce the deer at a hundred rods. No wigwam had 
so many furs, no pole had so many scalp-locks as Passaconaway's. 
Then I delighted in war. The whoop of the Penacooks was heard 
on the Mohawk and no voice so loud as Passaconaway's. The 
scalps upon the pole in my wigwam told the story of Mohawk 
suffering. The English came; they seized the lands; they followed 
upon my footpath; I made war on them, but they fought with 
fire and thunder. My young men were swept down before me 
when no one was near them. I tried sorcery against them but 
they still increased, and prevailed over me and mine. I gave 
place to them, and retired to my beautiful Island, Naticook, I, 
that can take a rattlesnake in my palm as I would a worm without 
harm, — I, that have had communication with the Great Spirit, 
dreaming and awake, — I am powerless before the pale-faces. 
These meadows they shall turn with the plow; these forests shall 
fall by the axe. The palefaces shall live upon your hunting grounds, 
and make their villages upon your fishing places. The Great 
Spirit says this, and it must be so. We are few and powerless 
before them. We must bend before the storm; peace with the 
white man is the command of the Great Spirit, and the wish — 
the last wish — of Passaconaway." [Indian Wars of N. E., 
Caverly.] 



78 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

Wannalancet, the son of Passaconaway, succeeded his 
father in office and was friendly to the English. Numphow, the 
Indian magistrate, held a monthly court in a log cabin in the 
vicinity of the Boott canal in the City of Lowell. Samuel, his 
son, who had been well instructed in English and in Christianity, 
gave instruction to his fellow-Indians in a log chapel near the 
west end of Appleton street in Lowell. Cowley was certain this 
stood near or upon the site of what is known as the Eliot church 
on Summer street. Mr. H. S. Perham thought there was not 
sufficient evidence to substantiate the opinion of Cowley. The 
writer has talked with both these men on the subject. Mr. 
Cowley claimed to have the evidence of some who had seen the 
log chapel before it disappeared in 1823 or 1824. John Eliot, 
the Apostle to the Indians, who in 1647 had made his first visit to 
Pawtucket falls on the Merrimack was their staunch friend and 
in 1653, when the Chelmsford and Billerica grants were made, 
secured an ample reservation for the exclusive use of the Indians, 
where the City of Lowell now stands. There were two villages : 
Pawtucket, east of the falls, and Wamesit, east of Massick or 
Wamesit falls. The two were finally merged into one, known 
as Wamesit. The bounds of the reservation were enlarged in 
1656 and 1660, and a few years later a ditch was dug to mark its 
limits. Eliot and Gookin did good work among the Indians, 
who, for ten years or more, gave promise of growth in civilization. 
General Daniel Gookin, appointed superintendent of the Indians, 
gives this description of the praying town at Wamesit. 

"Wamesit is the fifth praying town; and this place is situate 
upon Merrimak river, being a neck of land, where Concord river 
falleth into Merrimak river. It is about twenty miles from Boston, 
north north west, and within five miles of Billerica, and as much 
from Chelmsford: so that it hath Concord river upon the -west 
north west; and Merrimak river upon the north north east. It 
hath about fifteen families; and consequently, as we compute, 
about seventy five souls. The quantity of land belonging to it is 
about twenty-five hundred acres. The land is fertile and yieldeth 
plenty of com. It is excellently accommodated with a fishing 
place; and there is taken variety of fish in their season, as salmon, 
shad, lamprey eels, sturgeon, bass, and divers others. There is 
a great confluence of Indians, that usually resort to this place in 
the fishing seasons. 

"Of these strange Indians divers are vitious and wicked men 
and women ; which Satan makes use of to obstruct the prosperity 
of religion here. The ruler of this people is called Numphow. 
He is one of the blood of their chief sachems. Their teacher is 



EARLY GRANTS— THE INDIANS 79 

called Samuel: son to the ruler, a young man of good parts, and 
can speak, read, and write English and Indian competently. He 
is one of those that was bred up at school, at the charge of the 
Corporation for the Indians. These Indians, if they were diligent 
and industrious, — to which they have been frequently excited, — 
might get much by their fish, especially fresh salmon, which are 
of esteem and good price at Boston in the season ; and the Indians 
being stored with horses of a low price, might furnish the market 
fully, being at so small a distance. And divers other sort of 
fish they might salt or pickle, as sturgeon and bass; which would 
be much to their profit. But notwithstanding divers arguments 
used to persuade them, and some orders made to encourage them; 
yet their idleness and improvidence doth hitherto prevail. 

"At this place, once a year, at the beginning of May, the 
English magistrate keeps his court, accompanied with Mr. Eliot, 
the minister: who at this time takes his opportunity to preach, 
not only to the inhabitants, but to as many of the strange Indians, 
that can be persuaded to hear him: of which sort, usually in times 
of peace, there are considerable numbers at that season. And 
this place being an ancient and capital seat of Indians, they come 
to fish; and this good man takes this opportunity to spread the 
net of the gospel, to fish for their souls. 

"Here it may not be impertinent to give you the relation 
following. May 5th, 1674, according to our usual custom, Mr. 
Eliot and myself took our journey to Wamesit, or Pawtuckett; and 
arriving there that evening, Mr. Eliot preached to as many of 
them as could be got together out of Mat. xxii. 1-14, the parable 
of the marriage of the king's son. We met at the wigwam of one 
called Wannalancet, about two miles from the town, near Paw- 
tuckett falls, and bordering upon Merrimak river. This person, 
Wannalancet, is the eldest son of old Passaconaway, the chief est 
sachem of Pawtuckett. He is a sober and grave person, and of 
years, between fifty and sixty. He hath been always loving and 
friendly to the English. Many endeavors have been used several 
years to gain this sachem to embrace the christian religion ; but he 
hath stood off from time to time, and not yielded up himself 
personally, though for four years past he hath been willing to 
hear the word of God preached, and to keep the Sabbath. — A 
great reason that hath kept him ofif, I conceive, hath been the 
indisposition and averseness of sundry of his chief men and 
relations to pray to God; which he foresaw would desert him, 
in case he turned christian. — But at this time, May 6th, 1674, it 
pleased God so to influence and overcome his heart, that it being 
proposed to hun to give his answer concerning praying to God, 
after some deliberation and serious pause, he stood up, and made 
a speech to this effect : 

" 'Sirs: You have been pleased for four years last past, in 
your abundant love, to apply yourselves particularly unto me and 
my people, to exhort, press and persuade us to pray to God. I 



80 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

am very thankful to you for your pains. I must acknowledge, 
said he, I have, all my days, used to pass in an old canoe (alluding 
to his frequent custom to pass in a canoe upon the river) and 
now you exhort me to change and leave my old canoe, and embark 
in a new canoe, to which I have hitherto been unwilling; but 
now I yield up myself to your advice, and enter into a new canoe, 
and do engage to pray to God hereafter.' 

"This his professed subjection was well pleasing to all that 
were present, of which there were some English persons of quality; 
as Mr. Richard Daniel, a gentleman that lived in Billerica, about 
six miles off, and Lieutenant Henchman, a neighbor at Chelmsford, 
besides brother Eliot and myself, with sundry others, English and 
Indians. Mr. Daniel before named desired brother Eliot to tell 
this sachem from him, that it may be, while he went in his old 
canoe, he passed in a quiet stream; but the end thereof was death 
and destruction to soul and body. But now he went into a new 
canoe, perhaps he would meet with storms and trials, but yet he 
should be encouraged to persevere, for the end of his voyage 
would be everlasting rest. Moreover he and his people were 
exhorted by brother Eliot and myself, to go on and sanctify 
the sabbath, to hear the word, and use the means that God hath 
appointed, and encourage their hearts in the Lord their God. 
Since that time, I hear this sachem doth persevere, and is a 
constant and diligent hearer of God's word, and sanctifieth the 
sabbath, though he doth travel to Wamesit meeting every sabbath, 
which is above two miles; and though sundry of his people have 
deserted him since he subjected to the gospel, yet he continues 
and persists. 

"In this town they observe the same civil and religious 
orders as in other towns, and have a constable and other officers. 

"This people of Wamesit suffered more in the late war with 
the Mawkawks than any other praying town of Indians; for 
divers of their people were slain; others wounded; and some 
carried into captivity; which providence hath much hindered the 
prosperous estate of this place." 

From this account it appears that their capital was on the 
east of Concord river, in what is now Belvidere. Allen states 
that Wamesit consisted of about 2500 acres, of which 1000 were 
estimated to be east of Concord river and 1500 on the west. 

The English came to this region at an opportune moment, 
because, a few years previously, the number of Indians had been 



No. 7 



PLAN OF CHELMSi 



fobp ' 




From 1895 to 1915 a hundred houses or more have been erected in the 
Centre Villasre shown in part on the left of this map. The other 
villages in the Town have grown in proportion. The Town Hall 
has been built on the vacant lot between the railroad and the house 
of Miss M. E. Richardson ; All Saints' Church stands where the 
words "Episc. Soc." are on the map ; the Congregational Church 
is on the land marked "G. P. Winn and Sisters;" the Central 
Block, below the house of Mrs. E. W. Fiske ; and the large fireproof 
building of the Chelmsford Spring Company, above the mill pond 
on the lot marked "D. Perham." The Adams Library occupies the 
southern part of the lot marked "Res. of J. A. Bartlett." 



..laMH14Mi.JJ -MJJ.Vj-.ai^j^j:jitlU.CuXaCu jU-U^..^iJJA ' ;ij'^^ 



COUNTY ATL.A 



EARLY GRANTS— THE INDIANS 81 

greatly reduced by a most sanguinary war begun about 1614 
between the Pawtuckets and the Tarrantines of Maine, whose 
devastation was followed by a terrible pestilence, which so 
afflicted the Indians that they "died in heaps." Thousands of 
corpses were left unburied, and the terrors of the plague were 
greatly increased by the comet of 1618, which appealed to the 
superstition of the savages. 

In the early settlement of New England, says Allen, the 
Pawtuckets consisted of about 3000; and, in 1674, 250. At 
Wamesit, when Mr. Eliot persuaded them to receive the Gospel, 
there were about 75 souls. Wannalancet resisted all Eliot's 
efforts, until 1674, when he received the Christian religion, and 
persevered in it, although some of his people abandoned him on 
that account. At the time of King Philip's war, the English 
and Indians in New England were about equal in number, probably 
55,000 each. 

In 1642, upon suspicion of conspiracy to exterminate the 
English, forty men were sent to arrest Passaconaway, but could 
not find him. Wannalancet was taken and tied with a rope, 
which he loosened and escaped. He was retaken, and his squaw 
captured. When the English saw they had been mistaken in 
their suspicions, they apologized to Passaconaway, and invited 
him to Boston. "Tell the English," he said, "when they restore 
my son and his squaw, I will talk with them." 

Thinking the Mohawks were about to attack them, Wanna- 
lancet and a number of Indians descended the Merrimack, in 
1669, and built a fort on what became known as Fort Hill, in 
Belvidere, Lowell. The English settlers became alarmed. The 
Indians of this region, numbering several hundred, and including 
the most dangerous, went against the Mohawks and were badly 
defeated. Wannalancet, however, was peaceably disposed, and 
friendly to the English, and escaped the fate of many of his race- 

For the first twenty years, the relations between the people 
of Chelmsford and the Indians were friendly. Trade between 
them was mutually advantageous. By it the Indian obtained 
food in winter (when, from their improvidence, it was lacking); 
better utensils; and, too often, rum. 

The Massachusetts Coiu-t held that trade with the Indians 
belonged to the Commonwealth and not to particular persons. 
From "The Retume of ye Committee betrusted to agree with 
such as presented to carry alonge ye Trade of Furrs," we learn 



82 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

that "The exclusive right of Trading with the Indians on the 
Merrimack River was sold to Simon Willard, Thomas Henchman, 
ensign Thomas Wheeler and WilHam Brenton for £25. on July 1, 
1657." The trade of Concord sold for £5; that of Springfield 
and Norwottock for £20; Cambridge £2; Nashaway & Grotton 
£8. 

THE INDIANS AND WICASSEE ISLAND. 

From 1637, when the crushing blow was given to the Pequots, 
until 1675, the people of New England were at peace with the 
Indians. But as the years went by, the courage of the Indians 
revived. Though contrary to the law, the savages procured 
rum and muskets, both of which were elements in this revival. 

1644, June 12. Passaconaway and Nanamocomuck signed 
a covenant submitting themselves and their subjects and pos- 
sessions to the Massachusetts Government. 

1645. The military officers of the several towns were ordered 
to keep a daily watch against the Indians; and the Reverend 
Elders were requested to give advice concerning the Christianizing 
of the Indians. 

1654. Persons licensed to sell intoxicating liquors to Indians 
were advised not to sell more than one pint to each individual. 

1656. The sale of horses, boats and skiffs to the Indians 
was prohibited. 

1659. John Eliot asked that Indians have no power to sell 
their land. But within a month (Nov. 8th) an order was issued 
permitting them to sell an island in Merrimack river (Wicassee) 
to John Evered to redeem Nanamocomuck, a son of Passaconaway, 
from imprisonment for a debt of £45. In 1663 there was made a 
grant of 3,000 acres on the same river at Naticot to Passaconaway 
and his associates. 

In 1663 John Evered and Thomas Hinchman were appointed 
to lay out 100 acres for Wannalancet about twelve miles from the 
house of Evered, on a great hill near a great pond. 

1665. The Indians, living on the "Island of Wicosucke," 
asked permission to exchange other lands for the island purchased 
by Mr. John Webb (Evered), Wannalancet to surrender 100 
acres of land formerly granted him by the Court. This was 
granted, and the Court gave John Evered, alias Webb, 500 acres 
adjoining his own, if he release his right and interest in Wicosuche. 

Wickasauke, Wicassee or Tyng's island, in the Merrimack 
river, opposite the northwestern part of Chelmsford, was owned 



EARLY GRA NTS— THE INDIA NS 83 

by the family of Passaconaway, and cultivated as a corn field. 
Wannalancet, the son and successor of that chief, occasionally 
made it a place of residence. As stated, Wannalancet 's elder 
brother was in prison in Boston, having become surety to one 
John Tinker, for another Indian to the amount of £45. In order 
to have Nanamocomuck released from jail, Wannalancet obtained 
permission from the General Court to sell the island in 1659 to 
John Webb, alias Evered. Wannalancet was granted 100 acres 
on a hill, ten or twelve miles westward. The former owners came 
again into possession of the island, for the release of which the 
Court gave Mr. Webb 500 acres, and Wannalancet forfeited his 
100 acres, above mentioned. After King Philip's war about sixty of 
the praying Indians from Wamesit were removed to this island or 
vicinity, under the care of Jonathan Tyng. They remained there 
about ten years, when they removed to St. Francis in Canada. 

In 1680 Capt. James Oliver, admitted freeman 1640, member 
of the Artillery Company, petitioned the Court to grant him 
"the Island whereon the Indian Wianenset lately dwelt lying 
neer Dunstable," etc. The Court for his relief on account of his 
incapacit}^ for getting a "livelyhud," granted to his Kinsman, 
Nathaniel Barnes, with whom he lived, "a small Island of upland 
containing about twenty acres (more or less) wch lyeth in Merimack 
River near to Mr. Jonathan Tings farme wch Island hath been 
commonly caled & knowne by ye name of Tinker's Island," etc. 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 45, p. 174.] 

October 18, 1681. The Court granted him two hundred 
acres "where it is to be found." 

December 5, 1683. Tyng's island, called Weikeset, was 
granted to Mr. Jonathan Tyng, in full, for all accounts having 
to do with his care of the Indians. [Massachusetts Bay Records, 
Vol. V, p. 430.] 

* * * "Whereas Mr. Jonathan Ting of Dunstable hath 
obtained of ye Honord Genii Court of the Massachusetts Bay a 
grant of a certaine Jland lying in Merimack River, near to the 
north east comer of Chelmsford land and partly right over and 
against a great commonfield in Chelmsford, lying upon said 
Merrimack River, which Hand is called & Known by ye name of 
Wekesoak Jland, which Jland hath been formerly planted by the 
Indians" of which "the indian right & title did & do belong & 
appertaine to Wanalansit, and indian sachem." The latter sells 
to Jonathan Ting for the full & just sum of six pounds sterling, 
New England coyne— 27th Oct. 1685. [Early Court Files, 
Number 2356.] 



84 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

KING PHILIP'S WAR. 

Although the English regarded the Indians as heathen, whose 
inheritance God would give to His people, yet the Rev. John Eliot 
and others knew that they had souls, and so were to be brought 
to a knowledge of the truth. The Indians as a rule resented 
the attempts of the English to Christianize them. "With 
jealous eye the Indian saw his htmting grounds vanish with 
each advance of the English, and the number of warriors 
diminish by the increase of 'praying Indians'." Massasoit, 
chief sachem of the Wampanoags, friendly to Plymouth, died in 
1660, leaving two sons, Wamsutta and Metacom, christened as 
Alexander and Philip. The former died in 1662 at Plymouth, 
where he had been summoned to defend himself against a charge 
of plotting mischief with the Narragansetts. Thinking his brother 
had been poisoned, Philip, his successor, became the scheming 
enemy of the English. After several rumors and denials, it 
became evident in 1674 that a general Indian uprising had been 
planned. Mount Hope, a peninsula, running into Narragansett 
bay, was the territory occupied by Philip. Sausamon, a Christian 
convert from the Massachusetts' tribe, with his family, had been 
taught by Eliot. His son, John, was a teacher and preacher 
to the Indians at Natick. Coming to Plymouth, Sausamon 
revealed to Governor Winthrop the plot of Philip, who declared 
his innocence. A few days later Sausamon was murdered near 
Middleborough by three Wampanoags, Philip's men, who were 
found guilty and put to death. On June 20, 1674, the Indians 
attacked Swanzey, killed many and committed fiendish outrages. 
Indian war parties now spread over the country, and panic seized 
the English in Massachusetts as far as the Connecticut valley. 
Worcester and Brookfield had about a dozen houses each, and from 
Springfield to Northfield a number of small villages were exposed 
to the Indian attacks. Captain Edward Hutchinson, son of the 
famous Ann, was sent by Governor Leverett to treat with the 
Nipmucks at Brookfield. He was murdered, with eight of his 
men, as his mother and most of the family had been before. Philip, 
himself, took part in the assault on Brookfield. The large house 
in which the inhabitants were besieged held them for three days, 
when Major Simon Willard, more than seventy years old, ancestor 
of two presidents of Harvard college, on his way from Lancaster 
to Groton with forty-seven horsemen, being informed of the 



EARLY GRANTS— THE INDIANS 85 

situation, turned toward Brookfield and routed the Indians. 
Worcester, Groton, Mendon and Marlborough were destroyed. 
Attacks were made upon Springfield, Hatfield, Medfield, Hadley, 
Northampton, Sudbury, Chelmsford, Andover, Wrentham, 
Scituate, Middleborough and Bridgewater. At Sudbury Capt. 
Wadsworth, with seventy men, was surrounded by five hundred 
Nipmucks. He and fifty of his men were killed, six being burned 
alive over slow fires. By August, 1676, the Indians had been 
practically exterminated. Philip was shot by one of his own men 
on August 12th, and his head was exposed in Plymouth. A dozen 
sachems were hanged or shot and hundreds of Indians sold into 
slavery in the West Indies, among them Philip's little son. Of 
ninety towns, twelve had been destroyed, and more than forty 
others had suffered. 

CHELMSFORD OFFICERS. 

In 1655 Isaac Lemed was chosen Sergeant of the band, and 
Simon Tomson Clerk of the band in Chelmsford. Lemed, or 
Lamed, was one of the first settlers of Chelmsford, and removed 
here from Woburn. He died November 29, 1657. 

Simon Thompson, or Tomson, was of Ipswich in 1636, and 
was active in securing the removal of the Wenham people to 
Chelmsford. He returned to Ipswich. Both of these men were 
among the first trustees or selectmen of Chelmsford. 

1659. 'Thomas Addams of Chelmsford, being presented 
by Joseph Parker, in the behalfe of that Towne for their Cheife 
Sergt & military Officer, This [County] Court being informed that 
the said Addams hath publiquely manifested himself to be Hessi- 
tant, as to the orders and practises of the churches in these places, 
do not judge meet to allow of ye said choyce, untill they shall 
be further sattisfied concerning the same — " 

The next year Mr. Adams was accepted by the Court, having 
solemnly engaged not to disseminate any of his principles or 
notions contrary to the practice of the churches. 
[Records of Middlesex Co. Court.] 

Thomas Adams was bom in England in 1612, married in 
Braintree in 1642, moved to Concord, and to Chelmsford in 1650-4. 
He was Ensign in 1678, and Lieutenant in 1682, in the company 
of which his brother, Samuel, was Captain. He was town clerk, 
selectman and representative. He died July 20, 1688, aged 76 
years. 



86 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

In 1660 Thomas Hinchman was clerk of the train band. He 
was made freeman in 1654, was a magistrate, and Major of the 
Middlesex Regiment; a representative in 1666, 1667, 1671 and 
1676; died July 18, 1703, aged 74 years. He had an accurate 
knowledge of Indian affairs, and his influence with them was of 
much value to the English. 

Edmond Hinchman, or Hincksman, of Chelmsford, died 
Oct. 27, 1668. His widow married the Rev. John Fiske. Major 
Thomas is supposed to have been the son of Edmond and the 
father of Capt. Thomas Hinchman. 

The Hinchman property adjoined the Warren homestead, 
and Deacon Joseph Warren married Ruth Wheeler, daughter of 
Sergeant Thomas Wheeler and niece of Major Hinchman's wife. 

1669, Oct. 12. "In answer to the motion in the petition 
of severall ye inhabitants of Concord, Chelmsford, Billirrikey, 
Lancaster, Groton, the court judgeth it meet, & doe order, that 
such persons living in the frontier townes within the county of 
Middlesex as are legally capacitated to lyst themselves troopers 
shall have liberty to doe the same, under Thomas Wheeler, Senior, 
of Concord, whom this Court appoints to be their leiftent; & for 
such others as are already listed in the other troope in that country 
that may find it more convenient to joyne in this new troope, 
they haue liberty so to doe, provided they doe it orderly & legally, 
& that a sufficjent nimiber be left in the old troope, according to 
lawe." 

[Records of Massachusetts, Vol. IV, pt. 2, p. 439.] 

"Sarjant Willjam Fletcher of Chelmsford, is appointed ensigne 

to the ffoot company there." Oct. 12, 1670. 

[Records of Massachusetts Bay, Vol. IV, pt. 2, p. 466.] 

William Fletcher, one of the first settlers, came from Concord, 
was a selectman, and died November 6, 1677. He had a son, 
William, born February 21, 1657. 

Edward Tyng, prominent in the Indian wars, was Lieutenant 
in the 5th Company, Mass. Reg't, in 1675, for the Narragansett 
Campaign. 

Edward and W^illiam Tyng came to America about 1639. 
/ In 1660 James Parker, of Chelmsford, sold Edward three thousand 
acres in what is now Tyngsboro. Dunstable was named for the 
English town, the home of his wife, Mary. 

His sons, Jonathan and Edward, born in 1642 and 1649, 
were prominent in this region, as were William, son of the former, 
and Edward, son of the latter. William came to Chelmsford and 



EARLY GRANTS— THE INDIANS 87 

represented the Town in the General Court. He was a Major, 
and married Lucy, daughter of the Rev. Thomas Clarke, Sept.^ 
19, 1700. He was severely wounded while commanding a batallion 
between Groton and Lancaster, and died in Concord, August 16 
1710. Lucy, his wife, died April 25, 1708. 

"The Nashoba Indians, who lived upon the southern borders 
of the Town, suffered great hardships during King Philip's War. 
They were removed by order of the Court to Concord, where they 
were cared for by John Hoar. Here they lived peaceably. When 
Captain Samuel Moseley came, he broke into their home, scattered 
their property, and they were hurried to 'their furnace of 
affliction' at Deer Island." In May, 1677, they were, with some 
of the Naticks, removed by order of the Court, to Pawtucket. 
Those who were removed were mostly women and children. It 
was ordered "that the men be improved in the service of the 
country." Arms were provided for such as were trusty, and they 
were placed under the command of Captain Hinchman. 

They were shiftless like all Indians and had no permanent 
homes, and required careful watching by their white neighbors 
whose pigs and chickens they often made away with. 

Rarely did the early settlers go into the field to work without 
taking their guns with them, and placing a sentinel to watch for 
the enemy. 

Gookin speaks of "some skulking Indians of the enemy" 
"the principal whereof was Nathaniel, he and his party did this 
and other mischief * * in burning several houses at Chelms- 
ford." Nathaniel was captured later in New Hampshire and 
hanged in Boston. 

At the opening of King Philip's war each county had its 
regiment of "trained soldiers." The Middlesex Regiment 
consisted of fifteen companies of foot and one of cavalry. Men 
were impressed from the local companies and placed under officers 
appointed for special service by the Council. The pay of soldiers 
was 6s. per week, and 5s. was paid for their "dyet." The old 
matchlock musket was used, but was discarded for the flint- 
lock or snaphance. No bayonets were used and pikemen were 
useless. The matchlock was too long and heavy to fire at arm's 
length, so that each soldier was obliged to carry a rest, or crotched 
staff, with an iron point at the bottom, and attached to his 
wrist by a string. He carried six feet of match or fuse with which 
to fire his gun. 



88 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

This weapon had the disadvantage of the burning fuse being 
scented by the enemy when to leeward, and in wet weather it 
was well nigh useless. It was perhaps less effective than the bow 
and arrow. 

According to the old colonial law, sixty-four soldiers were 
accounted a foot company, which could nominate their officers, 
and must have two drums. 

Every foot soldier was to be completely armed and furnished, 
the pikeman with a good pike well headed, corslet, head-piece, 
sword and snapsack; the musquetiers with a good fixed musquet^ 
not under bastard musquet bore, nor under three feet nine inches 
in length, nor above four feet, three inches long, with a priming 
wire, worm, scouter and mould, fitted to the bore of his musquet ; 
also with a good sword, rest, bandeliers (shoulder-straps with 
many little boxes containing powder and ball), one pound of 
powder, twenty bullets, and two fathom of match upon the penalty 
of ten shillings for every defect; and all other inhabitants of this 
Jurisdiction, except magistrates, and elders of Churches, the 
president, fellows and students of Harvard College, shall always 
be provided of arms, and furnished as aforesaid under the penalty 
aforesaid. 

Soldiers and others provided their own arms. Poor men 
were put to service to earn out the cost of their arms. Flintlocks 
came into use shortly after the outbreak of King Philip's war. 

November 3, 1675, every town was ordered to provide 6 gun 
flints to each of its soldiers." 

As early as 1671 Chelmsford people began to prepare for the 
coming outbreak. Men were ordered to bring clubs to the meet- 
ing house. 

In 1672 the town "covenanted with Abraham Parker 
* * * to cut all the brush in the training place * * * and 
by training place is understood all that land now cleared by the 
town for that use." This land was probably on the pine plain, 
formerly called the Carolina plain, on the west side of the road 
between Chelmsford Centre and Lowell. 

In 1673 a house was built on Robin's hill, probably for a 
lookout. 

7th 8mo., 1673. The towne voated Leftenant Samuell 
Foster and en-william Fletcher Shold a point the place whear the 
towne house Shold bee bultt. ... It was voated that all mall persons 
from the age of twelve years to sixtey, shall, every one, worke one 



EARLY GRANTS— THE INDIANS 89 

day in the yearc for the Clearing of Robins hill, on the penalty of 
twelve pence a boy, and tow Shillings a man, in case thay Neglectt 
beeing ther unto caled ... by order of the Selectmen. For sixe 
years in sewing, the datte heer of being left to the Selectmen to 
a point the day yeerly, and likwis thay are to apoint a man to 
lead on the worke either ther or else whear, att the selectmens 
apointment, dated as above by order of the Towne. [See Chapter 
on the Beginning.] 

At this period the Chelmsford Company in the Middlesex 
Regiment had for Lieutenant Thomas Hinchman, and for Ensign 
William Fletcher. The ensign carried the colors. The title of 
second lieutenant has been substituted for that of ensign, owing 
to the changed conditions of modern warfare. 

The following powder account of 1674 is found in the Town 
Records, and shows the names of Chelmsford's able-bodied men 
at that time. 

An ac't of Powder sould to the inhabitants of Chelmsford the 
1 Day of September, 1674. 

It[em] James Richerson 
Samuell Flecher 
Will woodhead 
Andrew spaulding 
Will Underwood 2 pds 

Thom barett 
Joseph barett 
Solomon Keies 
Robertt proctor 
Efrm hildreth 
Moses barron 
Joseph buterfild 
John Spaulding 
Nath buterfild 
John steuens 
Paull Flecher 
Will Flecher 
Jerath bowers 
George Robines 
John Wright 
Samll buterfild 
Abraham biam 
Ambros swalow 
Steuen perce 
John blanchard 
John battes 
Jonathan Adames 
Thomas hinchman 
Jacob Warren 





6 




6 




6 




6 








6 




6 




6 




6 




6 




6 








6 




6 




6 




6 








6 




6 




6 




6 









6 




6 








6 




6 


4 


6 


1 


6 



90 



HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 



Joshuah Flecher 

Sam Flecher Jun 

peletiah Adames 

Thomas Adames 

Joseph Farwell 

Thomas Cobom 

Edward Cobom Sen 

John Cobom 

Edward Cobom 

James hildreth 

John bauke 

Thom Cony 

Abraham parker, Sen 2 pounds 

John parker 

John barett 

Thom Chambrlin Sen 

Edward Spauldig 

lef ten Foster 

John perham 

John Fiske 

Josiah Richenson 

henry Gidly 

Eleazer browne 

Cornell waldow 

John burge 

Sam varnum 

Will Good 

beniamin spaulding 

Joseph spaiilding 

lefttenant Foster more 

Thom Chamberlin Jun 

Jacob parker 
this ac't above is to be Charged att 15d p pound 
And giune by Rate to the Connstable 6 9 

John Stevens, whose name appears in this list, (though it may 
have been another man, for he describes himself in his petition to 
the Court as a stranger, of Captain Mosely's company,) received a 
shot in his right arm so as to lose the use of it, and was granted 
40 shillings and other compensation. [Massachusetts Archives, 
Vol. 67, p. 269.] 

The Town provided several garrison houses. Lieut. Thomas 
Henchman's was at Middlesex in the north part of the town, on 
the Merrimack. One is supposed to have stood on South street 
near Warren avenue, just north of the Marshall place; another 
on the high ground between the mill pond and the South Chelms- 
ford road; still another opposite Andrew Spalding's, the Hodson 
place. Allen mentions "one south of the meeting-house." An 



1 


6 


1 


6 


1 


6 


4 


6 


1 


6 


1 


6 


1 


6 


1 


6 


1 


6 


1 


6 


1 


6 


1 


6 


3 





1 


6 


4 


6 


3 





1 


6 


6 





1 


6 


1 


6 


3 





1 


6 


1 


6 


3 





4 


6 


3 





1 


6 


1 


6 


1 


6 


4 


6 


1 


6 


1 


6 



EARLY GRANTS— THE INDIANS 91 

ancient well was recently discovered on Acton street, on Winthrop 
Parkhurst's lot. There was also one on Francis Hill, near the 
Keyes' place, which overlooked the settlements on Stony brook. 
The location of another was on Riverside street, in Dracut, a 
mile below Pawtucket falls. Tradition says that the mistress 
of this house drove away a prying Indian by throwing a dipper 
full of hot soft soap in his face, before blowing the horn to give 
the alarm. 

Allen says (page 148), "The English erected garrison houses 
in different parts of the town, to which they fled on the first notice 
of danger, and where they usually spent their nights. They were 
environed by a strong wall of stones or of hewn timber, built 
up to the eaves of the houses; through which was a gate, fastened 
by bars and bolts of iron. They were lined either with brick or 
thick plank. Some of them had port holes, for the discharge of 
musquetry. In these the early settlers spent many a sleepless, 
anxious night." There were loop-holes in the oldest part of the 
Spaulding house — the ell — for use in case of an Indian attack. 
This part of the house is thought to be as old as any building 
in Chelmsford. It stands on the Boston road, where the 
old Mill road branches off. Almost all of these buildings have 
disappeared. Some houses built in the time of the later Indian 
wars were also constructed as nearly bullet-proof as possible, 
the framed walls being filled in with brick. A wall of this nature 
was taken down within recent years at the Putnam farm, and also 
one at the old Farwell or Timothy Adams place on Billerica street. 

The parsonage, where Ebenezer Bridge lived, now known as 
the "Railroad house," had its walls lined with pine plank of three 
inches thickness. 

The Dupee house and the Homer Thayer house, towards 
the South village, were used as garrison houses. The walls of the 
latter were filled with brick. A house that formerly stood near 
that in which Andrew H. Park lived is also said to have been used 
as a garrison. 

The house, which Jonathan Tyng built about 1674, at Tyngs- 
boro (then Dunstable) is interesting. It was then the most 
northerly house in the Colony of Massachusetts Bay. Tyng's 
farm was cultivated by slaves, and in the great attics are said to 
have been the slave-pens where refractory slaves were chained. 
In the tower, on one of the adjoining buildings, was the bell which 
called the slaves in from their work in the fields. 



92 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

The Heywood, or Hayward, house at South Chelmsford is 
curiously constructed. The chimney, with three huge fireplaces 
opening into as many rooms, is about twelve feet square at the 
base, and rises in an open space in the middle of the house, which 
was built around it. The rooms on the second floor open on a 
sort of gallery in this space about the chimney, which here narrows 
to about half the above dimensions. It was bought in 1726 by 
Benj. Heywood, a cooper of Billerica, from Thomas Adams, who 
removed to Dunstable. One room in the house is said to have 
been a garrison, the plank lining of which was removed by Mr. 
Heywood, who died about 1860. 

In the present residence of Mr. J. Adams Bartlett, built in 
1692, by Joseph Parker, some of the walls were filled with brick. 

What is known as "The Ark" at the junction of Bartlett and 
Acton streets, built by Dr. Nehemiah Abbott, in 1700, had in its 
immense chimney (taken down some years since) a hiding place, 
concealed behind a sliding panel. It was a small room about 
six feet square, and five feet from the floor. It was entered by 
means of a ladder. When discovered, there were in it a low chair 
and a jug or pitcher. 

The William J. Stevens' place was used as a garrison. 

The Emerson house, opposite Colonel Simeon Spaulding's 
house at the comer of North and Dalton streets, was a garrison 
house. At one time, while thus occupied, an Indian attempted to 
set it afire with a bundle of flax, to destroy the inmates. He was 
fired upon by a man with a rifle from the meeting house. The 
ball struck the clapboards, just above the Indian's head, near 
the door of the house. The hole was still to be seen, at the time 
the house was burned in 1905. The old part of this house had been 
standing for more than two centuries and had been held by the 
Emerson family from an early date. 

CREDITED AT THE GARRISON AT CHELMSFORD. 

November 20, 1675. 





£ 


s 


d 




£ 


s 


d 


Moses Cleaveland 


02 


12 


08 


Samuel Parris 


02 


12 


08 






November 30, 1675. 








Zachariah Shedd 


03 


00 


00 


Joseph Simons 


03 


00 


00 


John Ellis 


04 


10 


00 


John Roby 


01 


04 


00 


Richard Nevers 


03 


00 


00 


John George 


04 


16 


00 


Joseph Samson 


04 


10 


00 


Hopewell Davis 


04 


16 


00 


Thomas Sawin 


03 


00 


00 


William Fisher 


04 


16 


00 


Thomas Train 


03 


00 


00 


Henry Harris 


04 


16 


00 



EARLY GRANTS— THE INDIANS 



93 



December 20, 1675. 



Francis Nichols 


02 


11 04 


Thomas Estman 


01 


04 


00 


Hezekiah Pilsbury 


01 


04 00 


Richard Beach 


03 


08 


06 


Joseph Est man 


01 


04 00 


William Foster 


00 


06 


00 


John Martin 


01 


04 00 


Henry Harris 


00 


06 


00 


Benjamin Allin 


01 


04 00 


Joseph Lamson 


00 


12 


00 


Amos Singlater 


01 


04 00 


Hopewell Davis 


00 


10 


00 


Nathaniel Ladd 


01 


04 00 
January 25 


, 1675-6. 








, ohn Bear 


00 


09 04 


John Eliot 


01 


17 


08 


^ohn Darling 


00 


09 04 


Joseph Simons 


01 


15 


02 


George Wyatt 


00 


09 04 


John Salendine 


02 


14 


00 


Samuel Parry 


01 


00 06 


Arthure Crouch 


02 


14 


00 


Robert Shelston 


02 


09 08 


William Ballard 


02 


08 


00 


Walter Davis 


00 


09 04 


Moses Cleaveland 


00 


06 


00 


Thomas Wenmore 


00 


09 04 


Richard Nevers 


02 


08 


00 


Benjamin Lernett 


04 


16 00 


John George 


02 


04 


06 


Moses Cleaveland 


02 


08 10 


Thomas Train 


02 


08 


00 






February 29, 1675-6. 








John Welch 


00 


07 08 
March 24, 


Ephraim Matson 
1675-6. 


01 


04 


00 


Thomas Henchman 


01 


10 00 


Joseph Parker Junr. 


00 


12 


00 


Joseph Parker Senr. 


00 


12 00 
June 24, 


1676. 








Daniel Woodward 


03 


08 06 


Robert Parker 


00 


10 


00 


Josiah Clarson 


03 


16 02 


Nathaniel Graves, Capt 


. 12 


10 


00 


Henry Harris 


03 


12 10 


Timothy Day 


04 


16 


00 


Samuel Cleveland 


03 


07 08 


George Stedman 


02 


12 


02 


John Clark 


03 


12 00 


John Polly 


02 


18 


00 


Henry Sparkes 


03 


12 00 


George Parson 


01 


16 


00 


John Mirecke 


03 


13 08 
July 24 


, 1676. 








John Solinden 


06 


12 00 


John Priest 


05 


02 


00 


William Fisher 


06 


12 00 


George Sowder 


04 


03 


00 


Arthure Crouch 


06 


12 00 


Samuel Damman 


03 


10 


00 


John George 


06 


12 00 


Saball Stearnes 


03 


05 


00 


Thomas Traine 


06 


12 00 


Samuel Heberd 


04 


00 


06 


Samuel French 


03 


08 06 


George Person 


04 


00 


06 


John Elliot 


03 


18 00 


Alexander Alhort 


02 


10 


06 






August 24, 1676. 








Nicholas Lunn 


03 


10 00 


Henry Harris 


03 


00 


10 


John Mirick 


06 


00 00 


Samuel Perry 


03 


18 


00 


John Barbene 


06 


13 08 


John Polly 


00 


18 


10 


Joseph Simons 


03 


18 00 


John Barbene 


05 


04 


06 






September 23, 1676. 








John Priest 


02 


08 00 


John Bateman 


07 


11 


00 


William Peirce 


07 


12 06 










[Bodge, King Philip' 


s War, p 


. 357.) 














At Wamesick 












January 25, 1675 








James Kidder 




00 12 


00 







94 



HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 



From a paper which was presented to the Court after Major 
Willard's death, in statement of his unpaid services and expenses 
for the government, it appears that from the 20th of September 
(1675) till the 18th of April (1676), the Major was employed about 
the country business, settling of garrisons in towns, and settling 
of Indians at Concord and Chelmsford and other business, etc. 

He was born in County Kent, England, baptized, April 7, 
1605. He came to Cambridge in 1634. At the opening of King 
Philip's war he was the chief military officer of Middlesex County. 
He was then seventy years old. 

The following names are on the list of those credited with 
service from Chelmsford under Major Willard, from August 7, 
1675 to January 25, 1675-6. 

October 5th 

Paul Fletcher 

Edward Foster 

John Barrett 

Gershom Procter 

Ephraim Hildred 

Samuel Cleaveland 

John Bateman 

Paul Fletcher 
[Bodge, p. 121.] 



02 


10 


00 


02 


10 


00 


02 


10 


00 


02 


10 


00 


02 


07 


00 


03 


06 


04 


03 


15 


00 


02 


01 


00 



CREDITED UNDER CAPT, WHEELER: 





FebV 29th 1675-6. 






David Batchelor. 


01 


12 


10 


Simon Davis (two credits) 01 


11 


10 


Simon Crosbe. 


01 


12 


10 




Nath. Hill. 01 


12 


10 


Daniel Maginnis. 


00 


06 


00 




Jonathan Hill. 01 


12 


10 


John Kitteridg. 


01 


12 


10 




Joseph Foster. 01 


12 


10 


James Pattison. 


01 


12 


10 




John Waldo. 01 


12 


10 


Jonathan Hide. 


01 


12 


10 




Francis Dudly, 01 


12 


10 


Samuel Davis. 


01 


02 


10 


1 


Samuel Fletcher Senr. 01 


04 


05 


John Brown. 


01 


12 


10 




Samuel Fletcher J unr. 01 


12 


10 


Joseph Hayward. 


01 


12 


10 




Eleazer Brown. 01 


19 


04 


John Hayward. 


01 


12 


10 




Cyprian Stevens. 00 


14 


03 


Stephen Hosmer. 


01 


12 


10 




Benjamin Graves. 00 


19 


04 


John Gould. 


01 


12 


10 




John Bates. 01 


12 


10 


Phinias Sprague. 


01 


19 


04 




Stephen Goble. 01 


12 


10 


Henry Green. 


01 


12 


10 


March 24th 






Joseph Winn. 


01 


12 


10 


Simon Willard. 01 


12 


10 


Sept. 23d 1676. 






Thomas Tarball. 01 


12 


10 


Abraham Jaque. 


00 


11 


00 


Joseph Blood. 01 


12 


10 


Joseph Fitch. 


01 


09 


00 


June 24th 1676. 






Samuel Dunton. 


01 


09 


00 


Henry VVoodis, Lieut. 04 


02 


02 


Jonathan Prescott. 


00 


14 


03 


Joses Buckman. 01 


12 


10 










[Bodge, p. 114.] 
















Some of these were from Chelmsford and Billerica. 









EARLY GRANTS— THE INDIANS 95 

OTHER CREDITS FOR MILITARY SERVICE. 

August 24, 1676 
Chelmsford — Towne Cr. By Sundry accpts viz. 05 05 06 
Joseph Hyde pd. as per 
assignment 01 00 06 



[Bodge, p. 373.] 



Jacob Miller per 

Jerathmell Bowers 02 15 00 

John Barrett 01 10 00 



Chelmsford 

November 24, 1676 

James Harwood 04 11 00 

January 24, 1676 
Cornelius Waldoe 00 19 00 

Joseph Hildrick 01 01 04 

[Bodge, p. 448.] 

Cornelius Waldo, who died here January 3, 1700-1, was 
probably bom in England about 1624, and came from Ipswich 
after 1668. He was a deacon, and had a son of the same name. 
John, a son of Deacon Waldo, married Rebecca, daughter of 
Samuel Adams, in 1673 (?) at Chelmsford. In 1678 Cornelius 
was one of the committee to instruct the selectmen of Chelms- 
ford, and was selectman in 1698. 

John was wounded at Brookfield in 1675 while in Captain 
Wheeler's company. 

Rebecca Waldo married Edward Emerson, the school master 
of Chelmsford, in 1698, and from them Ralph Waldo Emerson in- 
herited two-thirds of his name. 

Oliver Wendell Holmes is recorded as saying of Edward 
Emerson: "He was noted for the virtue of patience, and it is a 
family tradition that he never complained but once, when he said 
mildly to his daughter, that her dumplings were somewhat harder 
than needful, but not often." 
[Brown: "Beside Old Hearthstones," p. 349.] 

Joseph Hildreth, born April 16, 1658, was the son of Richard, 
one of the early settlers of Chelmsford, who came from Cambridge 
in 1656. Joseph married Abigail Wilson at Wobum, the 25th 
of the 12th month 1683, and died January 28, 1706. 

Richard died February 23, 1692-3, aged 88. His first wife, 
Sarah, died in 1644. His second wife, Elizabeth, died August 
3, 1693. 



96 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

1676. February 5. 

In an account of a return of the Committee of Militia in the 
Regiment of Middlesex for 20 men impressed, is this item: 

Chelmsford — Henery Sparkes 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 68, p. 130.] 

He married July 10, 1676 Martha Barrett of Chelmsford, who 
was imprisoned for more than a year in Boston on suspicion of 
witchcraft. 

"The towns assimied the payment of the wages of their own 
Soldiers, to their families left at home, the families thus receiving 
sure and immediate aid, and the towns being credited to that 
amount upon their colonial "rates" or taxes. It was doubtless 
a means of great help to the families, and of saving to the towns, 
as it secured at once the support of the families without public 
charge, and at the same time the prompt payment of taxes." 

The foregoing lists are from the account book of John Hull, 
Treasurer of the Colony, from which Bodge quotes extensively, 
and which is now in the keeping of the N. E. Hist. Geneological 
Society in Boston. 

Between August 9th and 16th Mosely had marched from 
Mendon to Brookfield, where he distributed his men as above. 
On the 17th he probably marched towards Chelmsford, as proposed, 
but on the 22d some of the Nipmuck Indians fell upon Lancaster 
and killed seven or nine inhabitants, and the next day the people 
sent for Capt. Mosely, and told him of their suspicions of the 
Hassanemesit Indians (friendly or Praying Indians) then living 
under supervision in a sort of fort at Marlborough. Capt. 
Mosely hastily marched to the fort and seized eleven (or, according 
to Major Gookin's account, fifteen) of the Indians, "pinioned" 
them and bound them neck to neck, and sent them down to Boston 
for trial. Of the fifteen, only eleven were accused; all were 
finally found innocent and acquitted, and Capt. Mosely's pro- 
ceeding severely criticised by the Court and his superior officers. 
Major Gookin believes that the people instigated suspicions "in 
order to secure the land of the Indians." After sending these 
prisoners down on August 30th, Capt. Mosely marched up the 
Merrimack as far as Pennacook (Concord, N. H.) to the home 
of the peaceful Wannalancit, where he was prepared to repeat 
the late transaction; but the Pennacooks had quietly withdrawn 
and eluded him. He burnt their village and stores of food, and 
marched back. Capt. Mosely's course was not approved and the 
Court immediately sent messengers to win back the friendship 
of Wannalancet. [Bodge, p. 67.] 



EARLY GRANTS— THE INDIANS 97 

Letter of Capt. Samuel Mosely to the Governor. He was 
Captain of the "Volunteers," mostly adventurers, released 
pirates, &c. 

ffrom Nashowah Allies Lankestor 16th August 1675. 
Honored Sir 

Yesterday I spayred Capt. Beeres 26 our men to march with 
him to Sprinkefeild & it was with Major Willard ordder and I 
have also Accordinge to my orders from Major General Denison 
Sentt to Dunstable fort to Inlearge there gard 18 men & to 
Groatton 12 men & to Chelmsford 12 men out of those yt ware 
under Capt Hinksmans & of those yt Caime with me: Also 
last nightt about Seaven A clocke we martched into Nashowah 
[Lancaster] wheare we are Att present butt shall as soon as the 
Constable haith prest us a dozen Horses proseed for groatton & 
so to Chensford: according to the order Major Willard gave 
me yesterday Att Quoah-bawge [Brookfield] ; The day before I 
came from Quoahbaugh — I martched I (n) company with Capt 
Beeres & Capt Laytrop to the Swamp where they left mee & tooke 
theire martch to SprinkfiUd and a soone as they ware gon I 
tooke my martch Into the woods about 8 mills beyond the Swape 
where Capt Huttcheinson and the rest ware yt ware wounded & 
killed & so returned to follow the enemy as above saide ; also we did 
find & prsell of wigwoms beyond the Swaimp about 20 which we 
burnt &c. our Majr having a Seartayne Intelligence of a con- 
siderable party of Indians yt have gathered toogather a littell 
above Chensford which I hope wee shalbe up with this night 
or toMorrough at furthest & if it pleese God I come up with them 
God assisting me I will cloosely ingadge with them & God spearing 
my life I shall as oppertunity gives leave Acquaint your honnor 
of my Actions; I have with me butt 60 men at present; so 
desiring your prosperity & yt it my please God to preserve your 
Honour in good health and humbly beseach your prayers to God 
for my Good Suckses in this my undertaking with my Humbell 
Searvis &c in all deuttyfullness I subscribe myself your Respective 
kinsman & Humble Searvantt 

Samuel Mosley 
my Cosson Leverett ppresents his 
Deuty to yor Honour & my Antt. 
[Quoted by Bodge, p. 66.] 

A merchant of Boston in "The Present State of New — 
England," London, 1675, relates an amusing incident, which, 
from the above letter, we may infer took place "a little above 
Chensford" when Capt. Mosely came up with the "considerable 
party of Indians." We wonder whether he acquainted the 
Governor "of his actions" and those of the Indians. 

"About the 15th of August, Captain Mosely with sixty men 
met a company, judged about three hundred Indians, in a plain 



98 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

place where few Trees were, and on both sides preparations were 
making for a Battle; all being ready on both sides to fight, Captain 
Mosely plucked off his Periwig, and put it into his Breeches, 
because it should not hinder him in fighting. As soon as the 
Indians saw that, they fell a Howling and Yelling most hideously, 
and said, ''Umh, Umh, me no staw merre [stay here?] fight Engis 
mon, Engis mon got two hed, Engis mon got two hed- if me cut off 
un hed, he got noder, a put on beder as dis; with such like words 
in broken English, and away they all fled and could not be over- 
taken, nor seen any more afterwards." 

"About a week after this Capt. Mosely took two Indians, 
the Father and his Son, and willing to examine them both apart, 
proceeded thus: Took the old Man and bound him to a Tree, 
after he was so bound, he sent away the Son by a File of Men 
out of sight; the old Man there confessed he was a Praying 
Indian, and that he was only hunting for Deer thereabouts, but 
said that his son was one of those Men that wounded Capt. 
Hutchison. So then after they had pumped him as much as 
they could, they fired a Gun with no Bullet in it over his Head, 
untied him, and sent him another way with a File out of sight: 
then telling him that they had shot his Father, and would shoot 
him also, if he would not confess what he was, and what he 
knew: He fairly told them, that he was a Praying Indian, but 
his Father made him go with him to the Nipmoog Indians, and 
that there they shot three or four times apiece; whereupon they 
then brought the old Man and tied him to his Son, and Examined 
them together, at length they confest. They were both among 
the Nipmoogs, and that the Son did wound Captain Hutchison; 
after their Examination, they were both shot to Death. 

In this same Week, King Philip's men had taken a Young 
Lad alive about fourteen Years old, and bound him to a tree two 
nights and two Days, intending to be merry with him the next 
day, and that they would Roast him alive to make sport with 
him; but God over night, touched the heart of one Indian so that 
he came and loosed him, and bid him run Grande (i. e. run Apace) 
and by that means he escaped." 

Aug. 30, 1675, the Governor and Council, yielding to the 
popular prejudice, against their own better judgment, decreed 
the disbandment of all Christian Indian Companies in service, 
to be confined in their five villages, one of which was Wamesit. 
* * * Oct. 18, a party of hostile Indians set fire to a haystack 



EARLY GRANTS— THE INDIANS 99 

of Lieut. James Richardson, at Chelmsford, and managed 
that the deed should appear to be done by the Wamesit Praying 
Indians, that so the English should remove them from their 
village, or so persecute them as to drive them to the enemy. 
This crime was afterwards confessed by Nathaniel, a hostile 
Indian, who was taken at Dover by the strategy of Major Waldron, 
and executed at Boston. Although Lieut. Richardson declared 
that the "Praying Indians" were his warm friends, and would 
never injiu-e him, their best friend in those parts, all availed 
nothing. The vulgar clamor prevailed, and the Court next day, 
passed an order for the troopers to bring down the Wamesits. 
* * * This order of the Council was carried out by a strong 
guard of troopers and infantry. The whole number of Wamesits, 
in their village, was one hundred and forty-five, of whom only 
thirty-three were able-bodied men. The original order was for 
all to be brought down; but after the village had been broken 
up, and all had been started on the way, it occurred to the Council 
that there were no sufficient accommodations for so large a body 
of people, especially Indians, and they prudently ordered all, 
save the able-bodied, back to their village. The thirty-three men 
were brought down to Charlestown, and lodged in the town -house, 
under guard, for a few days, and then all except a few, against 
whom some suspicions existed, were returned to their homes. 
[Bodge, p. 397.] Three of the Indians were condemned and sent 
away to be sold as slaves. 

Later in the year the Wamesits met with another disaster, 
in the burning of a barn of hay, by some hostile Indian or English- 
man, for the purpose of casting reproach upon them. Lieut. 
Thomas Henchman, and Lieut. James Richardson, whose bam 
was burnt, were friends of these Indians, and in charge of them, 
and believed them innocent; but some of the English at Chelms- 
ford secretly organized a party, which went to the wigwams and 
shot down five women, seriously wounding them and killing a 
boy outright. The assault was unqualified, brutal murder. The 
lad was a son of a Sagamore, and grandson of a worthy old Sachem, 
Tahatawarre. The mother, who was among the dangerously 
wounded, was the daughter of the English "Sagamore John." 
This horrible outrage greatly exercised the Council; and the 
murderers, two fellows named Largin and Robbins, who were 
shown to be the ones who had fired their guns, loaded with shot, 
into the crowd, were arrested. But, notwithstanding the efforts 



100 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

of the magistrates and ministers, with all the best men of the 
colony, no jury could be found to convict them; and, after an 
extended imprisonment, they were set free. By this act the rest 
of the Indians were so disheartened and frightened that they all 
forsook their villages and went away toward Pennacook to join 
Wannalancet. Sam Numphow and John Lyne, their rulers, 
sent back a \NTitten answer, by the messengers of the Council 
(sent to induce them to return, and promising protection), that 
they had confidence in the Council's good faith, but feared the 
people, and so were going away "to the French." * * * g^t, 
being in straightened circumstances and earnestly reassured by 
the Council, they were induced to return after a few weeks; and 
Lieut. Thomas Henchman was placed in charge as their guardian, 
and Major Willard, Mr. Eliot and Major Gookin went up and 
visited them. * * * Although the magistrates and their 
faithful friends, Eliot and Gookin, did all in their power to help 
them, these poor souls suffered terribly from cold and hunger 
diuing the winter. Bodge has this ftu-ther to say: Against 
Eliot, Gookin and Danforth, the blind fury raged, and the lives 
of these true men were attempted in a cowardly manner on 
several occasions. In February the Wamesits, fearing the 
hostile Indians on the one hand, and their English neighbors 
on the other, petitioned to be removed to some safer place in the 
Colony, The Court promised, but neglected to take care of them, 
and the great body of them fled to Pennacook, to Wannalancet, 
being forced to leave behind, for the time, some half a dozen of 
their aged and blind, whom they considered safe, being helpless 
and harmless. After they were gone, these poor creatures were 
found and brutally murdered (being burned to death, as appeared, 
within their wig\^'^ams) by two brutes of the English, against whom 
nothing direct could be proved, but who were quite well known 
by the public, as they rather enjoyed such notoriety than feared 
it among their fellows. 

In this retreat of the Wamesits, Sam Numphow, their ruler, 
and Mystic George, died from exposure and famine. 

The foregoing account is from the full narrative given by 
Bodge. The Court's record, relating to Robbins and Largin, 
is here added. The letters and other documents which follow 
will explain themselves. They are arranged as nearly as possible 
in chronological order. 



EA RL Y GRA NTS— THE INDIA NS 101 

"At an adjournment of the court of Assistants Nov. 19, 1675, 
George Robbins and Jno. Largin were Indicted and not found 
guilty. 

They were bound over to the next County Court at Cambridge 
in April to answer for their wounding of the Indians tmder the 
Court's protection." 

[Records of the Court.] 

In reference to this outrage, Increase Mather of Boston 
wrote in his diary: "It is to be feared yt yr is guilt vpon ye Land 
in resp. of ye Indians yea Guilt of blood in resp. of ye Indians 
so treacherously murdered at Chelmsford. I am aJffraid God 
will viset for yt gf [that grief]." 

LETTER OF NUMPHOW AND JOHN LINE. 

To Mr. Thomas Henchman of Chelmsford. [Whom the 
Council had asked to persuade them to return.] 

I, Numphow, and John a Line, we send a messenger to you 
again (Wepocositt) with this answer, we cannot come home 
again, we go towards the French, we go where Wannalancet is; 
the reason is, we went away from our home, we had help from 
the Council, but that did not do us good, but we had wrong by 
the English. 2dly. The reason is we went away from the 
English, for when there was any harm done in Chelmsford, they 
laid it to us, and said we did it, but we know ourselves we never 
did any harm to the English, but we go away peaceably and 
quietly. 3dly. As for the Island, we say there is no safety for 
us, because many English be not good, and may be they come to 
us and kill us, as in the other case. We are not sorry for what we 
leave behind, but we are sorry the English have driven us from 
our praying to God and from our teacher. We did begin to 
understand a little of praying to God. We thank hvmibly the 
Council. We remember our love to Mr. Henchman and James 
Richardson [The marks of Numphow and John Line are affixed 
to the letter, which bears no date.] 
[Transact. Am. Antiq. Soc, Vol. II, p. 483.] 

Wepocositt was a servant to William Fletcher of this town. 
About twenty-three days after this, being much in want of food, 
the greater part of the Wamesits returned. Lieutenant Henchman 
informed the Council, who sent, as already stated, Gookin, 
Willard and Eliot, to encourage and settle them, and persuade 
the English at Chelmsford to be more friendly with them. Mr. 
Clarke, the minister of Chelmsford, asked the Indians what they 
had done while absent. They said they had kept three Sabbaths 
in the woods, that is, reading the Bible and praying to God, and 
otherwise deporting themselves as Christians. 



102 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

ACTION OF THE GENERAL COURT. 

1675. Oct. 13 — Whereas the Wa5rmesitt Indians are vehemently 
suspected to be actors & Concenters to the burning of a haystacke 
at Chelmsford, this Court judgeth it meet that such Englishmen 
as cann inform or give euidence in the case be forth with sent for, 
and also those Indians now at Charls Towne, and the case to 
be heard by this Court, then & there to consider & conclude what 
wth the sajd Indians 
[Massachusetts Bay Records, Vol. V, p. 57.] 

It is ordered, that the major general! forthwith take order 
to secure the Indians at Wamesicke, & about Chelmsford. 

Vpon the Courts hearing the euidences produced against 
Wm Haukins, Indian, as to the firing the haystacke at Chelmsford, 
sentenct him to be sent away by the Treasurer. 

Two Indians, one an old man named Mannapaugh, & Mannen- 
esit, a young man, his sonn, pretending themselves to belong to 
Vncas, being found at Chelmsford, where the haystacke was 
fired, giving no reason of their coming & staying here, was judged 
to be spyes, and ordered to be sent away by the Treasurer. 
[Ibid, p. 58.] 

WARRANT TO SECURE WITNESSES AGAINST THE WAMESIT INDIANS 
FOR OUTRAGES COMMITTED AT CHELMSFORD. 

To Left. Tho. Hinchman & the Cunstable of Chelmsford 

You are hereby required in his Majty's name forthwith 
to sumon & require such & so many Englishmen as you or either 
of you know have heard or any of ye selectmen Wch you know 
cann Give any evidenc agt the Waymesit Indians wch have been 
actors or consentors to the burning of a Haystack in Chelmsford 
as also in refference to the Indians now at Charls toune and 
require such persons as Cann testify in such respect to make 
their appearances before the Genl Court sitting in Boston the 
25 inst at one of the clock in ye afternoon making your retume 
hereof nor to faile Dated in Boston 22 oct 1675 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 30, p. 183.) 

Joseph sponnaur Condemned 29 octobr. '75 

Sam I Indian condemed 29 octob 

John Indian sent down from left Tho. Hincksman Condemed 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 30, p. 183a.] 

THOS. HINCHMAN's LETTER CONCERNING THE INDIANS MENTIONED 

IN [183a]. 

Ye Honered Sir 

J Resefed Yover Honers wer in [wherein] you Recieved 
[required] me to sese the sqvaws wich be Lon[g] to Condemned 
indens and others who are rendered svspisiovs: Wo the Con- 



EARLY GRANTS— THE INDIANS 103 

demned parsons are I knov not and so cold not tell will w[h]o 
to send dovn: bort J having som of the sobrist indens advis and 
all so thayer de sir that thes Company shold be sent down wich 
ar in nomer: 14: yon[g] and old: som of w[h]os husbans ar in 
the arniy others of them as J understand are sold or Condemd 
to be sold: not troblen yover honor any f order bot J sobcrib my 

Self Yover Sarvent 
To Command 
Tho: Henchman 
Chensford 
30: 8 mo 75 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 30, p. 184.] 

Mr. Eliot protested against selling Indians as slaves. 



THE PETITION OF JOHN ELIOT TO THE GOVERNOR 
AND COUNCIL 

"Sheweth _ 13th of the 6th 1675 

That the terror of selling away such Jndians unto the Jlands 
fr perpetual slaves who shall yeild up ymselves to your mercy 
is like to be an effectual prolongation of the Warre. & such an 
exasperation of ym as may produce, we know not what evil conse- 
quences upon all the land." &c. 
[Massachusetts Archives. Vol. 30, p. 173.] 

The withdrawal of the Wamesit Indians into the wilderness 
occasioned great uneasiness, as it was feared they had joined 
the enemy. Some of the Chelmsford soldiers, who were in the 
more exposed garrisons at Groton, desired to be released because 
of this new peril at home. 

On September 8, 1675, the Council issued an order to 
Comet Thomas Brattle and Lieut. Thomas Henchman to march 
to Chelmsford with fifty men, collected, thirty from Norfolk 
(then a different county from the present one), and twenty from 
Middlesex County, and distribute them in the garrisons in the 
frontier towns of Groton, Lancaster and Dunstable. The men 
were to be left under the command of the chief officers in each 
town. 

For the succeeding months Major Willard was busily engaged 
in ordering the defences of the Middlesex frontier towns and 
settling the various bodies of friendly Indians. Garrisons were 
maintained at Lancaster, Chelmsford, Groton and Dunstable, 
and the entire available force of the country was kept in a "posture 
of war." [Bodge, p. 123.] 



104 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

The following is the order to which reference has been made : 

For Cornet Thomas Bratle & Leif tenant Thomas Henchman. 
You are herb}' impoured & appointed with a party of horsmen 
vnder comand, forthwith to march to Chelmsford to attend & 
put in execution the instructions following: 

1 first you are ordered with fifty soldiers that are appointed 
to meet you, at Leift Henchmans vizt thirty yt are to come from 
the county of Norfolke & twenty out of the county of Midlesex, 
that are ordered to aeet you at Groton these fifty men you are 
ordered to sett in garrisons in the frontier townes of Dunstable, 
Groton, and Lancaster &c in such proportion as in your discretion 
shal bee expedient placing them vnder the comand of the cheefe 
military officers of each towne: giueing those officers direction: 
to joyne & lyst other meet persons of their owne companyes with 
them, & order them euery day to surraund the townes yey are to 
seciu-e; & if they can to carry doggs with ym to search for & 
discouer any enimy that may aproch nere such towne & at night 
to repaire vnto such corps du gaurd, as are appointed to them 
for the security of the sd place, and there to keep watch by night; 
& furthermore you are to declare vnto the Inhabitants of each 
Towne (you are herby orderd to garrison) that the Gouemor 
& council do expect their bee meet prouisions of victual made 
for the garrison soldiers herby ordered, at ye charge of towne; 
whch is not to bee brought vnto the accot of the publicke; & 
if any town or people decline so to Doe so you are herby ordered 
not to leaue any soldiers with them. 

Secondly you are further ordered, to Vse your best endeuor 
to setle, compose & quiet matters respecting the indians our 
neighboars, particularly those that Hue at Wamesit, Nashubah, 
& Malborough; yt you endeuer to put in execution the printed 
order, relating to those indians & particularly yt you procure 
some english man or men to bee with ym or at least, to visit ym 
once a day to be as guardians for securing the english and indians, 
that neither the one or other may bee piudiced or injured, 
& the council are willing to allow such person or psons a meet 
compensation for their seruice in yt Imploy. And concerning 
the Indians at Marlborow who are ordered to reside at Hassan- 
amesit about twelue miles distant whether you are to order the 
cheefe officer of Malborow to conuey them, & if you can possibly 
procure, an english man or two to reside with them, at Hassan- 
amesit according as the printed order proude but in case that 
can not bee obtained yn those indians must be left at Hassan- 
amesit with exprse charge puncktualy to Obserue the printed 
order. 

Lastly you are to endeauor either one or both of you (if it 
may bee) to gaine the Indian Sachem called Wannalanset to 
com in againe and Hue at wamesit quietly [and] pecabley ; you may 
promise him in the Councills name yt if hee will retume & his 
people & Hue quietly at Wamesit hee shal susteyne No priudise 



EARLY GRANTS— THE INDIANS 105 

by the english: only you are to ppose to him yt he deliuer for a 
hostage to the english his sonne who shalbe wel vsed by vs, & 
in case hee come in & can bee gained then you are to impour 
him to informe the Pennakooke & Natacook indians & all other 
indians on the East side of Merrimack Riuer, that they may Hue 
quietly & peacable in yr places & shall not bee disturbed any more 
by the english prouided they do not assist or ioyne with any of 
or enimiy nor do any dammage or preiudice to ye english: 

And hauing put in execution these instructions you are to 
retume home and giue an accot thereof to the Council. 

And what euer is necessary for fulfiling these Instructions 
you are herby impowred by order of the Gounor & Councel to do 
it. 
past by 3'-e councel 8 September 1675 

ERS. 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 67, p. 252.] 

ORDER PERMITTING WAMESIT INDIANS TO GATHER THEIR HARVEST. 

At a meeting of the Council 21 of 7 bor 1675. 
It is ordered by the Councill that th Indians belonging to Wamesit, 
vnder Nobhow & John Alyne Rulers (they having approved 
themselves friends to the English) hau Liberty granted to gather 
their Come at Wemisett toune & to haue free Egress & regress 
to it from their fort neare Leiftenant Henchmans; prouided they 
do not goe any where whout th bounds of their plantation granted 
by the Genii Court & layd out to ym and this order to be & continue 
in force touching theise indians notwithstanding the old printed 
order Limitting ym not to travell above one mile from their 
wigwams. & All Englishmen are required to take notice of this 
order & not to molest theise indians in their lawfull employments 
duering the time of the Gathering & ining yr Come. 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 30, 176b.] 

CAPT. henchman's LETTER TO THE GOVERNOR. 

Chelmsford Sept 27, 75. 
Hond Sr 

In pursuance of my instructions; I and my Lieut, met at 
Major Willard's the last day of the week, with the Captaines of 
the severall townes directed to; as well for the drawing of the 
Souldiers, as to advise with them; for the first they promise they 
shall be sent to chelmsford at an hours warning and so will be 
ready here by that time I have provission for them; and that of 
absolute necessity for them will be powder shott biscake cheese 
and raisons, large and warme Wast-coats and drawers tobaco, 
some hatchets and a Chirurgion ; for the later the Major and rest 
of the officers will advise to no other motion than about this and 
other towns; but I understanding the intent of the Ho'd Council 



106 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

to be that I shotild march to Pennycooke although not named in 
my instructions ; I think it need full to acquaint your Honrs there 
with, and desire your express there unto. I have not farther 
at present but to subscribe 

Sr your Honrs humble Servant 

D. Henchman. 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 67, p. 269.] 

Daniel Henchman was a trusted officer of Boston, at the above 
date in command of the Chelmsford garrison. 

ORDER FOR LT. THOS. HINCHMAN TO SEND 2 INDIANS TO TREAT 
WITH WANNALANCET. 

Boston 30 September 1675 

It is ordered by the Councill 
That Leiftenant Thomas Henchman of Chelmsford do forthwith 
endevor to procure by hire one or two prudent & sutable jndians 
of Wamesit to trauill & seke to find out & speake with Wanna- 
lancent the Sachem & cary with them a writteng from the Councill, 
beeing a Safe conduct unto the said Sachem or any other principall 
men, not exceeding sLx persons, Belonging to Nantikook, penagooge 
or other people of thee northerly indians giving them free liberty 
to come into the house of the said Henchman ; where the Councill 
will appoint Capt Gookin & Mr Eliot (persons known to them) 
to treat with about termes of Amity & peace between them & the 
English, and in case Agreem'ts & Conclusions bee not made to 
mutuall satisfaction then the said Sachem & all others that 
accompany him, shall have free Liberty to returne Backe againe 
to their places without any preiudice or molestation By the English, 
and this offer the Councill are induced to make because the said 
Wannalancet sachem as they are informed hath declared himsefe 
that the English neuer did any wrong to him or his father 
Pasaconaway but alwais lived in Amity & that his said father 
Charged him so to doe and that hee ye said Wannalancet will not 
begin to do any wrong to the Englise. 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 30, p. 178.] 

LETTER TO WANNALANCET. 

These for Wannalancett Sachem 
or for any other principal Persons of th indians that Live vpon 
Merrimacke riuer either Belonging to Natakoog Penngooge or 
others touns. This our writing or safe conduct doth declare 
that the Governour & Council of Massacusets Doe giue you: & 
evey of you provided you exceed not 6 persons free liberty of 
coming unto & Returning in Safty from the House of Leiftenant 
Thomas Henchman at Naamkeake & there to treat with Capt 
Daniel Gookin & Mr John Eliot: Whome you Know & wee wil 



EARLY GRANTS— THE INDIANS 107 

fuly impoure to treat & conclude with you. upon such meet 
termes And Articles of friendship Amyty & subjection as was 
formerly made & concluded betwne the Englise and old Passa- 
conaway your father & his sonns & people: And for this end wee 
have sent these messengers. 

. to conuay these vnto you & 
to bring yor Answer: Whome we desire you to treat Kindly & 
speedily to dispatch them Backe to us with yor Answer. 
Datted in Boston the fiuth day of October 1675. 
Signed by order of the Councill 

Edward Rawson Secrty 
John Leveret Govnor 
Past by ye Council 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 30, p. 179.] 

LETTER FROM SAM NUMPHOW. 

To the honoured gouvnour J Sam Numphow being com- 
manded to Carrie a letter to Wanna[lan]cit and w^e cam to 
pannakook a little further then we se simi of the punnakook 
Indians and asked them were wanna[lan]cit they sait he was at 
pemechowasick we went to Wannipposokick that was our way 
to goe to a pleace were they sait he was but when we cam to 
wannipposokick there we saw sum more indians we asked them 
were is the sachem they sait he went away three weeks agone from 
pemechowasick he went toward the french and they tolled us 
two indians come from pascattoway today they tolled us they kiled 
two english men and taken one alive: ten indians in a company. 

And they tolled us there was sum more indians went out 
afore these last: from aospan and killed sum english and brought 
two children and one maid alive and they tolled us fifty more 
going out then we asked them which way doe they goe: they 
sait we can not tell. 

As we coming home we met with groton indians at panakook 
they tolled us they desired to com in our town 

Youres to command 

Sam Numphow 
12 8 mo 75 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 30, p. 182.] 

PETITION OF THOMAS HENCHMAN, OCT. 2, 1678. 

In 1675 the Gen Court ordered that Henchman should be 
paid by the Town of Chelmsford for maintaining several souldiers 
at his house on Merrimake River. His account is as follows: 
Account of Thomas Hinchmans Disburstments in Keeping of 
Garrison Souldiers which were sent to Garryson at Merrimake 
River by order of the Honord Councill. 



108 HISTOR Y OF CHELMSFORD 

For 6 soulders from the 7th of August 1675 wch 

continued at the Garrison till ye 27th of June 1676 [ £ S. D. 
46 weekes at 4 s. 8 d. per weeke j 64: 08: 00 

For 4 souldicrs from ye 27th of June 1676 and con- 
tinued untill the 1st of October 1676 13 weekes 5 ^ 12: 02: 08 
days at 4 s. 8 d. per weeke 

For 3 soulders of Majr Pykes who continued at ye 

sd Garrison one month and 3 from Ipswich six ^ 07 : 00 : 00 
weeks. 



Summa £83: 10. 8 

A committee was appointed to lay out some Indian land, "neere 
adjacent," which should satisfy the petitioner — 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 69, p. 211.] 

ACTION OF THE GENERAL COURT. 

Whereas Left Thomas Hinchman hath been at great charge 
in providing ff or the diet of certeine souldjers appointed to garrison 
his house vpon Merremacke riuer, where sundry Englishmen, 
his neighbours, are concerned, which is a very apt place to secure 
that frontier, and besides, the sajd Hinchman hauing, vpon all 
occasions, binn very serviceable, and hath expended much time 
and charge to put in execution sundry orders and directions sent 
to him from the Council, this Court doe order, that the souldiers 
of that garrison be maintejmed both for diet at the toune of 
Chelmsfords charge for the tjme to come, and vntill the Court 
or council take further order; and further more that tenn pounds 
be allowed him for his extraordinary expences and labour out 
of the Country treasury. 
1675. oct. 13. 

[Records of Massachusetts Bay, Vol. V, p. 54.] 
1675. oct, 13, Seven country rates were ordered to be levied. 

Chelmsford's tax was £14. 18. 00: Boston's, £300: 

Concord's, £33. 19. 10: Groton's, £11. 10. 00; Billerica's, 

£14. 07. 00. 
"All sorts of Come paid in said rates:" Wheat at 6 shillings; 

rye, 4/6; barly and pease, 4 shillings; Indian, 3/6; oats, 

2 shillings per bushel. If paid in money, 1/4 abated. 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 68, p. 29a.] 

Prayers were ordered to be said daily in Camp. 

ORDER FOR CAPT GOOKIN AND OTHERS TO PERSUADE THE INDIANS 
AT CONCORD & CHELMSFORD TO SETTLE AT DEER ISLAND. 

It is ordered that Maior willard Capt Gookin & Mr. Danforth 
with Mr. Eliot, by the first oppertunity are to repayre to Concord 
& Chelmsford & to examine those Jndians there & to vse their 



EARLY GRANTS— THE INDIANS 109 

best endeuor to setle them in sure a posture either at Deare Jland 
or in the pieces where they live so yt they who are friends to the 
English may be secured & the English in those parts also securied 
& as much as may satisfied with their setlement & the said Comittee 
or any two or three of them are impoured to effect this matter, 
& they are to vse their best indeur. that those indians may be 
imployd & kept to lauber & take Care they bee all disarmed 

9 december 75 Past by ye Council Edw. Rawson D. Secrety 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 30, p. 190.] 

PETITION OF FRIENDLY INDIANS NEAR CHELMSFORD ASKING FOR 

PROTECTION. 

To the much honoured Govomour and Counsel 
We pray you Consider how we may be secured from the 
Indians now the snow is of the ground and they Com When they will 
to do Mischif nere to us for there is one Indian runaway from 
the Chansforth and he tell them how we are well among the 
English, if your worshipfull please brouoid place for us where we 
may be both for for planding and wod and for food pray consider 
our condison with speed 

Mark of Nanphow 

T 
John liing his marke 

Simon Betogkom 
Sam Nanphow 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 30, p. 191.] 

PETITION OF CITIZENS OF CHELMSFORD. 

To the honored Comite of Majestrs yt are to mete at Namcock 
about the dispose of the Wamasak Indians 
We ye himible petitioners of the Town of Chelmsford, do humbly 
Intreat yt you would bee pleased to take [into consideration] 
our dangerous Conditions yt We are in, in refferance to our Hues 
& estate by reason of the retourne of the Wamasak Indians 
Emongst us: & also on[e] Indian whose name is Wibecusit & 
his wife yt is & have been harboured in a family Emongst us in 
the former Indians absence these are humbly to Intreat yr honors 
to take som such a course wth them as may seeme best to yr 
Juditious eyes so as they may not be a snare unto us: we leaue 
you & yr wayty concerns to the wise disposinge hand of god & 
rest 

Yrs in the name of 
Dated this 13th of The Toune 

the 10th Mo. [December] 1675 William Underwood 

John Burge 
Thos Chamberlin 

[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 30, p. 186.] 



110 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

NUMBER OF MEN TO BE RAISED FOR GARRISON SERVICE IN 1676. 

Magestrates consentt provided the proportion bee. 

Sudbury. 20. Haverhill. 10. Billerica. 15. 

f Braintry. 10. Chelmsford. 10. Andover. 10. 

\ having already 12 JndiansMedfild. 20. Concord. 20. 

Bradford. 10. Weymouth. 10. 

[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 68, p. 252.] 

1675/6. Jan. 11. "It was ordered by the Council that the 
Garrison Souldjers at Chelmsford, Billerica, Groaten, Lancaster, 
Marlborough, and Sudbury, under Major Willard, be discharged 
forthwith, and sent home"; and at the same time it was voted to 
pay them "two months' pay on their rettune." This may have 
been done at the request of the people in the above-named towns, 
because we know that in many cases these garrison soldiers 
become very obnoxious to the citizens * * * [Bodge.] 

It is ordered by the Councill that the County Treasurer pay 
& satisfy Jeraphmiel Bowers of Chelmsford thirty shilling in part 
of his wages, for gaurding the Wamesit Jndians being appointed 
thereunto by order of the Councill 

4 ffebr. 75/6 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 30, p. 191.] 

Cowley says: On the third of February, 1676, some of 
Philip's partizans attacked Chelmsford and burned several build- 
ings. Colburn's garrison on the east side of the Merrimack was 
now strengthened and nearly all the outer settlements were 
deserted. A second attack was made on the 20th of March, and 
Joseph Parker was wounded. These dates seem not to correspond 
with those here given from other sources. 

A letter from Groton, written by Capts. Parker, Wheeler 
and Woody s in Feb. 1675-6 says: "The Touns from whence our 
forces are raised especially Chelmsford and Billerikey, being 
weak and in want of more strength at home and danger accreuing 
to them by the sudden and suspicious removall of the Wamassuk 
Indians," they demand a release. 

LETTER FROM THE "COMMITTEE OF THE MILITIA" OF CHELMSFORD. 

To our Honord Governor & Counsail in Boston 

Mercy and peace May it please your Honors, 
we have judged our Duty, to acquaint to you, with our present con- 
dition, and danger of following or Brethren and Neibors in the Hor- 
rible distructiens, mines and loss of our owne lives and or relatiens. 
The Savages have been for a day or two discovered to have ranged 
aboite or Borders: and this morning about an hower and halfe 
after sunrising, Joseph Parker of this place, with his son, coming 



EA RL Y GRA NTS— THE INDIA NS 111 

for the Hon'd Major Willard, about fower mile from or meeting 
house, along by some houses perteyning to this town, now against 
one house standing nigh the way, way-layed, and had ye Indian 
Bullets thick (as they Report) about them, and were followed, by 
about 10 nilk guns, discharging at them and shouting: they 
rod fast to escape them: the young man was wounded in his 
shovilder by a Musket Bullet, as cut out on the other side of his 
Arme, and as we conceive, by pistol Bullets his cloathes tome in 
several places. Or men, ye inhabitants of ye saide place, never 
came away into towne over-night, but some as we heare gone 
up hastyly this morning, to see after their cattle; we are in such 
a postiire, as without God's extraordinarye help, we see not how 
we can stand against the enemy. Or garrisons are so weake, and 
or men so scattered about their personal occasions: that we are 
without rational hope, for want of men, and what is otherwise 
necessary. Argnts [arguments] we shall not need to use to yr 
Wisdoms to consider or necessity of help : If or frontiere Touns 
be cutt off, what will be the consequence, Itis not for us to say. 
We leave it humbly unto yr Hon'd to doe as God shall persuade 
your hearts. Commending all yr and our concerns unto the 
Lord Almighty, and subscribe 

Yr Hon'dr to command. 
Chebnsford— 15 of 12. 75 [15 Feb. 1676] 

Post Scr. May it please to understand, yt part of or men are 
abroad with Majr Willard; upon public service, whereby we are 
the more enfeebled. 

Sam. Adams 

Samuel Fletcher 

William Fletcher. 
[Coll. N. H. H. Soc, Vol. Ill, p. 97.] 

ANOTHER LETTER. 

For 
the Honord Governor of the Massachusetts- 
or Honord Major General : at Boston 
Mercy & peace 
May it please yor Honors tht we owne orselves greatly obliged 
for the Signal care yor Honors & the honord Counsile, had of us 
when we were put into or late pplexed feares, with respt to or 
Enemies, lately alarming of us, in sending for the prsent succor 
Capt Reynolds & his company; through wch means through Gods 
Blessing, the Enemies designs upon us further haue ben Retarded 
hitherto : So where as this morning. Capt Reynolds hath recej ved 
order to goe off from us towards Malbury: & we have for several 
days, had Expence of Jndian Scouts about or Towne, & the last 
night, (as this day we are Jnformed from Billereccy) was Scene 
on or side yt River betwene us, some fires, supposed by them, to be 
Jndians & this day about 11 of ye clock some house seemed on 



112 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

fire, belonging to or Towne, wherevpon, some Scouts sent out, 
& a company of Capt Reynolds & others Marching out after 
them, the horsemen came up to about the place where Joseph 
Parkr was formerly shot & found three dwelling houses burnt 
nigh downe to the ground, & where Jndians had been, Att other 
houses in that parte of the Towne, ye houses deserted by the 
Jnhabitants, & come into the body of or towne, the sd Horsemen 
also Report that they also discovered aboute three Mile from 
the sd Houses, in a dis mal wood some fires, as if there might be 
some smale body of Jndians wigwams, wch Jntimate that the 
Enemy are not far from us, so as upon the motion of Capt. Reynolds 
from us; tis most probable, we shall be soone assaulted, & we yet 
in to weake a posture for Resistance: And therefore "we humbly 
Beseech your Honors to doe us this further favor, as by yor 
"countermand to the sd Capt Reynolds, to order his & his company 
"to reside (at least wise for some days) still amongst us : and withall 
you would please to order to Billerecay or otherwise, the securing 
there Bridge in there towne, betwene them & us: & May it please 
yor Honors, to Consider, that several of or men are prest out, some 
by or Honord Major Willerd of Troops, some upon the otherside 
of Merimake, to the present assistance & security of ye Colbums, 
we adde no further but to commend yor Honors to the protection 
& direction of the Almighty & Rest 

yor Honors to serve in the Lord 
Chelmsford Sam Adams 

25 of 12. 75 Sam Foster 

Will Fletcher 

[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 68, p. 144a.] 

Lieut. Nathaniel Reynolds was in command of the garrison 
at Chelmsford in the fall and winter of 1675-6, and on February 
25th the inhabitants petitioned the Court that he be allowed to 
remain, with his soldiers, for their protection. After the war he 
was prominent in the early history of Bristol, R. I. 

He was born in England, the son of Robert and Mary; was of 
Boston, as early as 1632. He married Sarah Dwight of Dedham, 
Nov. 30, 1657. She died, July 8, 1663, and he married Priscilla 
Brackett, of Boston, before Feb. 21, 1666. He had three children 
by his first wife: Sarah, Mary, Nathaniel. By his second vnie: 
John, Peter, Philip, Joseph, Hannah, Mary, Benjamin, Ruth. 
He was of the Artillery Company in 1658, and admitted freeman 
in 1665. 



EARLY GRANTS— THE INDIANS 113 

ACT OF THE GENERAL COURT. 

21 February 1675-6 

Vppon consideration of many sculking Indians about our 
plantations doing much mischeife & damage, & that a probable 
way for their surprizall is by scouting in smale partjes, for 
encouragement thereof, this Court doeth order, that euery person 
or persons that shall surprize, slay, or bring in prisoner any such 
Indian on the south side of Piscataqua Riuer, he or they shallbe 
allowed three pounds per head, or the prisoners so taken, 
making it appeare to the Comittee of Militia of that toune to 
wch they are brought. 

According to Hubbard, the burning of a part of Chelmsford 
took place about March 18, 1676, and on April 15 "fourteen or 
fifteen houses" were burned. John Monoco, one-eyed John, a 
leader of the Indians, had boasted that as he had burnt Medfield 
and Lancaster, so he would burn Groton, Chelmsford and other 
towns. 

March 18, several houses on the north side of the river, 
belonging to the Cobums, were burned, probably in retaliation, 
by the Wamesits, and two sons of Samuel Varnum were shot 
and killed while crossing the river with their father and sister 
in a boat to tend their cattle on the other side. One of them fell 
back dead into his sister's arms. Varnimi shouted to the stupified 
soldiers who accompanied them, "Don't let dead men sit at the 
oars." The young men were buried by the river, on the Howard 
farm. The guard of soldiers with them were so taken by surprise 
that the Indians escaped. 

Drake mentions this attack upon Chelmsford, "where were 
many deserted houses burned in the beginning of April, 1676." 
See also, "Indian Wars of New England": Sylvester, Vol. II, 
p. 293. 

At the motion and request of Lieft Henchman of Chelmsford, 
about quitting his house at Merrimack, 

The Council declare yt they are willing for the present to 
continue the file of solders yt are there as formerly, and that 
Mr Henchman is impourered [sie] to take in any persons to abide 
with him to Keepe Garrison, and for their incouragement he shall 
abide neer to grant such persons liberty to improve any part 
of the Indians' land within the bounds of Wameset and Naamkeke 
untill the Council or General Court take further order. 
[Past 21 March 1675-6] 
Coll. N. H. H. Soc, Vol. Ill, p. 99.] 



114 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

In Boston many maintained that God had set the savages 
upon the people of New England for neglect to persecute "false 
worshippers." Quaker meetings were forbidden, some harmless 
Indians were murdered, and there was bitter feeling, even against 
the Christian Indians and their superintendents, Daniel Gookin, 
and Thomas Danforth. 

The following is a sample of the Placards threatening Messrs. 
Gookin and Danforth with death, as favorers of the Indians. 

Boston February 28, 1675. 
Reader thou art desired not to suppress this paper but to 
promote its designe which is to testify (those traytors to their 
King and Country) Guggins and Danford, that some generous 
spirits have Domed their destruction, as Christians wee warne 
them to prepare for death, for though they will deservedly dye; 
yet we wish ye healthe of their soules. 

By ye new Society 

A. B. C. D. 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 30, p. 193.] 

Council's act to Secure the corne at Chelmsford. 15. Febr. 
1675. 

The Councill orders that Lieftenant Hinchman take speedy & 
effectual care that all the corn at the Houses of Colborn & his 
sons on the East side of Merrymock Riuer or any other Houses 
there be secured by transporting the same over to his own house, 
or if any other way be more advisable that he forthwith giue 
notice to the Councill. And he is hereby Authorized to impresse 
what help is needful, past 

E. R. S. [Edward Rawson, Sec'y] 
15 Feb. 1675 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 68, p. 135b.] 

The following letter from a "chyrurgeon," or surgeon, who 
seems to have been sent to Chelmsford to be useful in case of need, 
gives some indication that there was fear of an attack at the time 
it was written. He may have been sent to attend the wounded 
man of whom he writes. 

Chelmsford N. E: March ye 20th 1675 
Honord Sr. 

J bless God I came safely hither but was much troubled with 
a Jadish horse who tyred by that tyme we gott to Cambridge, 
so that wee had much adoo to gett him to Wooborn. I am in 
very good Quarters Sc the Capt is very kinde to mee and extra- 



EA RL Y GRA NTS— THE INDIA NS 115 

ordinary civill, Sr. the young man that was shott in the Belly 
dyed about two of the Clock this morning he was mortally wounded 
for his bowells were pricked with yc shott I took out a worme about 
4 or 5 inches long & did dress his wounds, good Sr. I humbly 
intreat you to pray the Councill to grant us a stronger guard for 
wee expect the Jndians every houi- to fall upon us & if they come 
wee shall be all cutt off. Sr. J would desire you to send mee a 
paire of fforceps & a probe with an Jncission knife, Thus hoping 
you will grant me my request, for without those Jnstruements J 
can do nothing. J remain in hast hauing not time to inlarge att 
present. 

Sr. Yor obliged Servant 

David Middleton. 

[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 68, p. 168a.] 

David Middleton was credited in Capt. Scottow's Company, 
January, 1677-8. Oct. 24, 1676, he received £3. 5. 0. pay. 

At the siege of Brookfield in the early part of August, 1675, 
Edward Colburn of Chelmsford was killed at the ambuscade ; and 
John Waldo was wounded, as was also Captain Wheeler, who 
being unable to conduct the defense of the garrison, appointed to 
that office Simon Davis of Concord, James Richardson and John 
Fiske of Chelmsford. 

Those engaged in this affair from Chelmsford, and who 
received credit for military service under Capt. Thomas Wheeler 
were : 





Oct. 19th, 1675. 






John Bates. 


01 

November 30th 


14 


03 


John Waldoe. 
John Fisk. 


04 
01 


00 
14 


00 
09 



Jan'y 25, 1675-6. 
James Richardson. 02 02 00 

[Bodge, p. 113.] 

Edward Colburn also doubtless belonged to Wheeler's troop. 

John Fisk was the son of the minister. 

After the fight, the famous Cornelius Anderson, known as 
Consort to Captain Roderigo, the chief of the pirates, who had 
taken part, marched from Brookfield to Groton and Chelmsford. 



116 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

In the Return of the Middlesex Comittee. dated Cambridge 
28. 1 m. [March] 1676, is this proposal: 

1 : That ye townes of Sudbury, Concord and Chelmsford be 
strengthened with forty men a peice, which sd men are to be 
improued in scouting betwen toune and toune, who are to be 
Comanded by men of prudence, courage and interest in ye sd 
townes and ye partys in each toune are to be ordered to Keepe 
together in some place com odious in ye sd tounes, and not in 
garison houses: and these men to bee vpon ye toune charge of 
ye country. 

A thousand bushells of corn were to be raised upon the Indian 
land at Wamesit, and there was to be scouting between there 
and Andover, and on the west of Concord river, on the east and 
north of Chelmsford. 

Major Willard on complaint of the people of Chelmsford 
fortified Billerica bridge, and seized two great rafts which the 
Indians had in possession. 

In a letter dated April 1, 1676, from the Council to Major 
Savage, they express a fear that Chelmsford may meet the fate 
of Groton and Lancaster. 

The Council decided to brave the popular prejudice against 
employing friendly Indians in the war, and April 21, 1676, Capt. 
Samuel Hunting and Lieut. James Richardson drew up and 
furnished their company of forty Indians at Chariestown. They 
were ordered first to march to the Merrimack near Chelmsford, 
and build a fort and settle a garrison at the fishing place — the 
great (Pawtucket) falls, but the attack on Sudbury turned Capt. 
Hunting in that direction where he did good service, his company 
being doubled in number, and furnished with arms sent from 
England. The services rendered at Sudbury put the Christian 
Indians into better favor. The fort at Pawtucket falls was built 
in the stmimer and autumn of 1676. 

Credited under Capt. Hunting. 

Samuel Hunting, Capt. 21.00.00 
James Richeson, Lieut. 10.10.00 
Nathaniel Dunklin 05.05.00 

Sept 23, 1676 
Benjamin Collins 01.08.06 

JohnDevcricks 01.08.06 

In general, accounts were not kept with the Indians. [Bodge. 



William Browne 


01.05.08 


Andrew Robinson 


01.15.06 


Thomas Frost 


03.01.08 


Jacob Farar 


02.18.00 


Thomas Peach 


02.07.00 



EARLY GRANTS— THE INDIANS 117 

ORDERS & INSTRUCTIONS, FOR MR SAMUEL HUNTING & JAMES 

RICHARDSON, April 25, 1676. 

1 You are ordered (with all conuenient Dispatch) To take the 
conduct & comand of Such English and indians as are ordered 
to accompany you & with them to march vp to the fishing 
places vpon Merrimack riuer (neare Pawtuckt falls) & in 
the most conuienient place there to erect a fortification 
Sutable for yor company & build such shelters within it as 
may bee nescerary according to yor best Discretion- 

2 But while you are in hand wth this worke you are to send forth 
dayly one fowerth part of yor men vnder meet conductt both 
english & indians to scout on the north side of Merrimack 
riuer about or toune of Billerekey, Chelmsford, Andouer & 
woobtirne, according to yor best discretion & to order the 
returne of yor men to yor quarters at times appointed 

3 If you meet wth the enimy you are to use yor best skill & 
vtmost endeuer to sease kill & destroy ym 

4 For prouision for yor men wee conceue yr wilbe store of fish 
to be taken : for wh end you are to carry twine to make Scoop 
netts, or other netts wch yor indians are ready to do, & for 
supply of come Leift Tho Henchman hath promised to 
supply for the prsent at his house ther for wh you are to pass 
yor recept & take his order for the delivry of it 

5 what you shall need for earring on yor worke of fortification 
& building a shelter you have a warrent to the constables of 
these townes to supply it, either carts or boards or any other 
thing, and the comisoners are to furnish you wth tools nails 
Twine or any other thing nessecary for this affayre 

6 If you find any conuenient parcel of planting land Deserted 
by the english or indians vpon either side of merimake riuer 
or vpon any Hand you are to incoridg the english & indians 
vnder yor comand to plant it for ther owne Benifit, prouided 
the maine designe of scouting After the enimy & securing those 
parts bee not neglegted but vigorusly prosecuted from time 
to time with a part of yor company: — 

7 If any of the neighbour townes bee at any time assaletd or 
Alarmed you are wh all speid to endeaur to succor such place 
provid you leaue on fourth part of yor men at yor fort to 
secure a retreat 

8 you are wh all care to Gouenern the solders vnder yor comand 
according to the Rules of Gods word & the wholsome laws of 
the country & take care to punish all profaines & wickednes. 

9 wee have & doe ordered James Richardson late of Chelmsford 
to bee yor second and assistant. 



118 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

10 All soldiers vnder yor comand are required to submitt & giue 
obedience to all the Lawfull comands of yor selfe & ojfficers 
at yr perrll Lastly you are to giue intellegence to the councill 
from time to time of all occurences: 

So . desiring the Lords Presence 8c Blessing with & vpon your 
vndertaking for the publike good so wee commit you to God. 

wee are yo obi freinds 
Edwd Rawson Seceret by 

order of ye council 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 68, p. 211a.] 

This Order was sent 
To the Constables of Chelmsford, Bilerekey, Andover and 

Wooburne. 

You and every of you are hereby required in his Ma'ties 
name within your respective touns, to impress carts, boards, or 
other things necessary to build a fortification and shelter at 
Pautucket falls neare Merrimack river, under the Command of 
Samuel Hunting, for which this shall be yor Warrant, and futher 
more the townes afforesaid are to take notice, yt if at any time 
you be assaulted, you may send to the said Samuel Hunting for 
succor, whom we hau ordered to give you ayd as occasion shall 
require. Dated 19 April 1676. 
[Coll. N. H. H. Soc, Vol. HI, p. 99.] 

Capt. Samuel Hunting was born July 22, 1640, the son of 
John Hunting of Dedham. He settled at Chelmsford and later 
at Charlestown. He married Hannah Hackbume of Roxbury, 
Dec. 24, 1662, and had ten children. He was killed by the 
accidental discharge of his gun, Aug. 19, 1701. 

Lieut. James Richardson moved from Woburn to Chelmsford 
in 1659 & there (Captain Thomas Marshall, by special Act, being 
empowered to solemnize the marriage) married, November 28, 
1660, Bridget Henchman, daughter of Thomas, and by her had 
8 or more children. He was with Captain Wheeler in the defence 
of Brookfield and with Simon Davis, of Concord, and John Fiske, 
of Chelmsford, was appointed by the Captain, who was disabled by 
his wounds, to Manage the defence. He was afterwards active in the 
war; removed to Charlestown, May 1, 1676 & ser^^ed as Lieutenant 
with Captain Samuel Hunting in his mixed English and Indian Com- 
pany in the summer and fall of that year at Pawtucket falls, where 
they built a fortification and maintained a garrison, of which Lieut. 
Richardson was left in Charge as well as of the Christian Indians 
at Chelmsford. He was well acquainted with the ways of the 
Indians and had great influence with them. Bridget, widow 
of James Richardson, married William Chandler of Andover, 
October 8, 1679. 



EA RL Y GRA NTS— THE INDIA NS 1 19 

ORDER. 

It is ordered that twelve pound of pouder wth Shot answerable 
be delivered to the Committee of Militia of Chelmsford for so 
much lent by them out of their store to captain Sill at Groton. 

And it is further ordered that the Comissarye Mr Jno 
faireweatherer forthwith convey ouer to ye Constable to Charles- 
toun half a barrell of pouder & proportionable shott to be delivered 
to the persons appointed to carry the same to Capt Scyll at Groton 
together with twelve pounds of pouder with shott answerable 
to be conveyed & delivered to ye comittee of Militia of Chelmsford 
for somme lent by them to Capt Scyll for the Country service. 
22 Aprill 1676 

past. Edw. Rawson. Secy. 

[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 68, p. 221a.] 

TO THE CONSTABLES OF CHARLESTOUNE 

These require you in his Majestys name forthwith on sight 
hereof to Jmpresse two able men completeately armed with fouer 
Days provission and two very substantiall horses bridles & Sadies 
& well shod to convey&carry the amu'tion to Chelmsford &Groaten 
& deliver the same to Capt Scill as comissary faireweather shall 
direct making yr retume hereof, dated in Boston the 22d of Aprill 
1676. By ye Council 

Edw Rawson Secret 

Deacon Elliot. 

You are ordered to deliver two of the countrys horses ye best 
you have in yr hands to constable Monsall for ye ends above 
expressed. 22 Aprill 1676 

By ye councill 

Edw. Rawson Seer. 
[Ibid, p. 221b.] 

In May the Court ordered Nashoba and Natick Indians 
removed to Pawtucket under supervision of Hinchman, Fletcher 
and others. 

LETTER FROM CHELMSFORD 

To ye Honored Govrnor of ye 
Massachusets 

May it please yor Honor. 

This evening Jnformation comming to hand, of An Indian 
amongst others yt is come along with Wanalaunset, unto Mr 
Tings Garison: called Hankancor (& ordinarily by the English) 
al. Calacumbine: who was certajnely known to be amongst the 
Indians, yt shot at Lieftenant Hicksman at our toune end & fired 



120 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

afterward in the same day, at Tenne — which sd Indian was one 
(as is affirmed) of ye Guides of those murderers company : & soone 
he discharged his Gun upon some of the sd Company : considering 
several things, we have thought fit rather then to apprehend & 
bring the sd Jndian before yr Honors: to petition yor Honors, 
he may be sent for, & examined, & testimonies as may come agst 
him, be called for, & the sd Jndian to be secured, or at least 
disposed of from these parts. We being put into so great fears, by 
reason of ye mischeive is apprehended, he hath ben already 
amongst us achiefd (?) and if It please yor Honors, that Leift. 
Tho: Hinksman, Jerahmeel Bowers, or who may be nominated by 
either of ym, may be examined as to ye Case. Not further to trouble 
yor Honors : Desiring Gods presence with yor Honors we surcease 

Yor Honors most obliged 
Jno ffiske senr 
Chelmsford Samuel fiEoster Senr 

4. of 4. (June 4) John ffiske Junr. 

76 Edward Spauldyng 

[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 30, p. 222a.] 

ORDER. 

The Councill having received information by Major Waldem 
of the Coming in of Wanalanset, with the sachim of Penicook & 
several other Jndians now at Cocheechee, & that they have 
brought in severall english captives & freely delivered them, as 
a testimony of their goodwill to the English & their desire to 
maintain peace & friendship with us; as also that by order of the 
Comittee there, three Jndians of the number abovesayd in hold 
as having an hand in the Killing of two Englishmen & Captivating 
those that they have now brought in. It is ordered that the 
comittee for treating with the Jndians in those Eastern parts 
are licensed & Authorized if they see cause to imploy those 
Jndians so come in, in the publick service against the enemy 
having some English in same Company. & for that end supply 
them with competent Amunition & that they may also send out 
with them any one of the Jmprisoned Jndians retayning & 
effectually securing the other two, that they may all three take 
their tumes to goe out if incouragement be found So to doe. 
15 June 1676. 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 30, p. 204.] 

ORDER. 

It is ordered that the garrison souldiers of Chelmsford, 
Billericay & Concord be dismissed unless those Townes or any of 
them shall make it appear, when ordered to the Council that there 
is a necessity of continuing them or any part of them and the 
Comanders of those several towns and the garrison souldiers are 
hereby required to take notice of this order 

1st August 76 past E R S 

[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 69, p. 33.] 



EARLY GRANTS— THE INDIANS 121 

PETITION OF MOSES CLEVELAND. 

To the honored Govmor & councell 

May it please yr hons. yt my brother Saml Clevland hath 
been in ye service more then these twelve months & harvest & 
hay time coming in, & J being disenabled by ye lameness of my 
arm, request yt you would be pleased to release my brother yt 
we may get in our corn & hay for ye preservation of or selves 
& cattle, & therein we shall be obliged to further service when 
yor honrs call us thereunto. Yor. sevt. Moses Cleavland. 

Aug 1st. 76 

granted E R S 

Samuel Cleaveland is released & dismist the Country's 
service E R S 

[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 69, p. 31a.] 

LOSSES AT CHELMSFORD. 

To left hinchman Deputy from 
Chelmsford 

Sir: 

The Consideration of the losses that Chelmsford sustained 
by the Enemy and the laste law made the 3d of May last that the 
losers should have a meete Alottment in ther proportions in ther 
Rattes is argument to the Selectt men to psent what they with 
the Alowance of the honored Jenl. Courtt Judge meette to Alow 
to the Several persons as foloeth out of ther 10 Rates now Required. 

Jt to John Burge Sen —01—19—04 

It. to Thom Chambrlin Sen —02—18—04 

Jt to Robertt proctor —04—00—00 

Will Underwood —03—16—00 

Thom Chambrlin Jun —02—00—02 

Thom Adams —03—06—06 

Joseph Spaldin —01—15—08 

Andrew Spaldin —01—13—04 

John Stevens —01—16—08 

left Sam Foster —00—12—06 

Solomon Keies —01—17—06 

Will Wood Senr Slain —€1-05-06 

John Wattill slain —00—16—08 

Joseph butterfeld —00—09—00 

Nath butterfield —00—03—00 

Jt, to John Wright —01—18—00 

Edward spalding —01—09—09 

John Sheply Jun —01—02—08 

John Sheply Sen —00—02—06 

James Richardson — 01 — 13 — 04 

Joseph Perkins —01—14—00 



122 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

More loss in the Country Rats by persons 
and Estats removed from us 

It to 



Ed leborns 


10 Rattes —03—11—06 


Robertt leborns 


10 Ratts —01—10—00 


John leborns 


10 Ratts —01—10—00 


Thorn leborns 


10 Ratts —01—07—02 


Sam varnum 


10 ratts —03—04—04 


Thom Willkinson 


10 Rats —01—04—00 


left hinchman estat in partt \ —03 — 09 — 08 


and his person removed 


/ 




53: 07: 01 


5t 1676 by the selectt men of Chelmsford 




Sam Adams 




John Burge 




Thomas Adams 




William Underwood 




Thos Chamberline sen 



This Account of '53: 7: 1 

was allowed to be abated 

out of their to (sic) 

thier last 10 countrey Rates 

William park The deputyes approve of the 

Hugh Mason retume of theire Comittee 

John Wayt and to this account ye Honorble 

26 oct. 76. Magestrates consenting hereto 

William Torrey, Clerk. 

Consented to by ye Magistrates Ed. Rawson D. Secrety 
[Supreme Judicial Court. Early Court Files, No. 1521.] 



ABATEMENT. 



"In ansr. to the petition of the selectmen of Chelmsford, &c, 
it is ordered, that Chelmsford be allowed & abated the stune of 
fiuety three pounds seven shillings and one penny out of their 
last tenn county rates, toward theire losses." (by the Indian 
ennemy) Oct. 12, 1676. 
[Records of Massachusetts Bay, Vol. V, p. 125.] 

In an Account of People Distressed by the war in Mass. Colony, 

taken Jan 22 1676/7 we find: 

In Chettinford [Chelmsford] 11 familyes containing 44 

persons £6. 12S. OD. 
[Coll. N. H., Hist. Soc, Vol. Ill, p. 101.] 



EARLY GRA NTS— THE INDIA NS 123 

GENERAL DANIEL DENISON's LETTER. 

Sr. 

Yesterday I received a letter from Capt. Brocklebanck at 
Marlborough signifying his desire of being dismissed with his 
company the reasons he alleadges are 1. their necessities & 
wants having beene in the countryes service ever since the first of 
January at Narriganset & within one weeke after their return were 
sent out againe having neither time nor money (save a fortnights 
paye upon their march) to recruite themselves 2. he saith they 
doe little where they are: & he understands they are called off 
by the Council. I shall make bould to request the like favor in 
the behalfe of those (at least) some of those troopers & dragoons 
of Essex that went out last, intended for Hadley but by reason of 
the disaster at Groton diverted to Concord &c. to beate of & prose- 
cute the enemy in those parts and I directed orders to Major 
Willard, that with those he first tooke up wth him & then sent, 
together with the garrisons at Marlborough Lancaster & Chelms- 
ford (if need more) in all above 200 men he might not only defend 
the townes but might prosecute the enemy there, being within 2 
dayes march, but I heare of no such attempt nor indeed of any 
considerable improvement of them that hath beene, or is like to be. 
I am therefore sollicitous for many of them that out of a respect 
to myself went willingly, hoping of a speedy returne to their 
families and occasions some of them more than ordinary great 
and urgent I entreate therefore they may be prsently considered 
& eased to attend the seed time &c. and if there be necessity that 
others may be sent in their roomes, who may with far less detriment 
be spared. The stockade from Watertowne to Wamesit, might 
better be from Watertowne to Sudbury river 9 miles taking in 
more country, & that river being as good a stop as the stockade 
the greatest objection is Merrimack river though broad yet I 
understand is fordable in 20 places betweene Wamesit & Haveril, 
& cannot be safe without guards wch must be kept upon it, 
for hast I Jumble many things, wch be pleased to pardon. The 
Lord Looke in mercy upon his poore distressed people upon your 
selves in particular so prayes 

your humble Servant 
Ips March 27: 1676 Daniel Denison. 

[Bodge, p. 214.] 

Daniel Denison, of Ipswich, was the highest military officer 
of the Colony. 

A line of fortifications or bulwarks was projected, to extend 
from Charles river to Merrimack river. It was to be a fence of 
stockade or stones, about eight feet high, for protection against the 
Indians. The large ponds along the route were to form a part 
of the defence. 

An anonymous letter to the Governor recommended the use 
of dogs against "the savage foe." 



124 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

A list of soldiers under Capt. William Torner from the 7th 
of April, 1676, contains 

John ffiske Left, wounded 
Benjamin Barrett 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 68, p. 212.] 

In a list of men wounded at Eastward, sent from Salem, July 4, 
1677, are these names: 

Jacob Parker of Chelmsford; shot through ye Shoulder. 
Tho. Button of Bellricke; shot in ye knee & body. 

Slain : 
Andiver. Jno Parker 

James Parker 
Lin: one man wch was all they sent 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 69, p. 137.] 

The following indicates the spirit of the times: 
In 1676, On the "Sabbath" Jonathan Atherton, a poor soldier, 
"cut a peece of an old hatt to put in his shooes" which galled his 
feet from long use, and emptied two or three cartridges from which 
the powder was leaking and which had become dangerous to carry. 
He was sentenced by Capt. Henchman to lose a fortnight's pay, 
and petitioned the Hon. Governor and Council to have the fine 
remitted ; "yet if it be deemed a breach of the Sabbath, he desires to 
be humbled before the Lord, and beggs the pardon of His people" 
Jonathan Poole petitioned to have the fine remitted, giving 
Atherton a good character; but the Council declared that they 
saw no cause to grant the petitioner any relief. 

LETTER FROM JAMES PARKER TO THE HON'RED GOVNER 
AND COUNCIL AT BOSTOWN: HAST POST HAST: 

From Mr. Hinchman's farme ner Meremack: 
23: Imo: [March] 1676-7. 
To the Honred Govner and Counsell. This may informe youer 
honores that Sagamore Evanalanset [Wannalancet] come this 
morning to informe me, and then went to Mr. Tynge's to informe 
him that his son being one ye outher sid of Meremaek River a 
hunting, and his dauter with him up the River over against 
Souhegan upon the 22 day of this instant, about tene of the Clock 
in the morning, he discovered 15 Indens on this sid the River, 
which he soposed to be Mohokes by ther spech. He Called to 
them, they answered, but he culd not understand ther spech: and 
he having a canow [canoe] there in the River, he went to breck his 
canow that they might not have ani ues of it, in the mene time 
thay shot About thirty guns at him, and he being much frighted 
fled and come home forthwith to Nahamcok, wher ther wigowemes 
now stand. 

Not Eles at present, but Remain youer sarvant to Comand. 
Re'd 9 night 24 : Mrch 76-7 James Parker. 

[Shattuck Manuscripts, also printed in N. H. H. Soc. Coll., Vol. Ill, 
p. 100.] 



EARLY GRANTS— THE INDIANS 125 

ORDER OF THE COUNCIL, JUNE 15th, 1677. 

It is reffered to Major Gookin forthwith to Supply Leift. 
Richardson & his pty at Chelmsford with provision Ammunition & 
appl necessary & to order him to scout & range ye woods between 
Merrimack & Pascatawq River & endeavour to kill and sease ye 
Lurking enemy in those parts for wch the Major is ordered to 
encourage ym wth a reward of twenty shillings for every scalpe 
& forty shillings for every prisoner or ye prisoner. And also to 
make up in number 25 men, & to order ym after some time spent 
there, to mrch to Blackpoint garison & Their to bee at ye ordering 
of Liftenant Tipping until further order from the Council the 
time of Randevous at Blackpoint is to bee the 26 of this Instant 
June if possible. 

Past. Edwd Rawson, Secretary. 

[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 69, p. 129.] 

About ninety English and Natick Indians, under Captain 
Swett and Lieutenant James Richardson, were engaged in the 
fight at Blackpoint, July 29, 1677, where both lost their lives- 
"The Lieutenant was killed soon after the first onset." 

Chelmsford escaped the terrible fate of some of the other 
frontier towns, and this was, no doubt, due in part to the influence 
of Wannalancet and the friendly Wamesits, but the inhabitants 
of the town were in constant alarm, if not in fear or terror. 

The counsel of Passaconaway had its effect upon his son 
and successor and upon the actions of his people. Although 
Wannalancet suffered great provocation at the hands of the 
English, even in his retreat, his wigwams and provisions at 
Pennacook being destroyed by Captain Mosely's troops, he 
would not allow his men to retaliate. 

Allen (Hist. Chelmsford) says, "Wannalancet after a long 
absence called on the Rev. Mr. Fiske and congratulating him on 
the restoration of peace, solicitously inquired after the welfare 
of the people in Chelmsford, and whether they had suffered 
greatly during the war. Mr. Fiske replied that they had been 
highly favored, for which he desired to thank God. 'Me next,' 
said the sagacious sagamore, intimating that through his influence 
this town had been exempted from the calamities that had befallen 
many others." 

In March, 1677, he informed Captain Henchman in Chelms- 
ford that the Mohawks, allies of the French, were not far away, 
and Lieut. Richardson was sent to prevent them from attacking 
the English. 



126 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

Wannalancet, with a remnant of his followers, after the 
return of peace, came back to Wamesit, but it was through an 
intrigue of Major Waldron at Dover, where he managed to gather 
about four hundred of them, and take them prisoners, half of 
their number being sold as slaves in the West Indies. Wannalancet 
brought back seven white captives whom he had rescued. The 
Indians were placed under the care of Colonel Jonathan Tyng 
of Dunstable. Wannalancet was a man of simple, native goodness, 
which contrasts favorably with the treatment he received at the 
hands of the whites. 

In 1683 an order was issued awarding £10 to Wannalancet 
and other Indians to silence their complaints concerning a breach 
of the treaty made with them. 

A gratuity of land, besides their wages, was promised the 
soldiers in this war, December 10, 1675. Narraganset Township 
No. 6, now Templeton, Massachusetts, was confirmed by the 
General Court, February 12, 1733, to one hundred and twenty 
grantees, or their representatives, then residing in Chelmsford, 
Concord, Groton, Marlboro', Billerica, Lancaster, Lexington, 
and other towns in this vicinity. 

At the end of the war the plight of the savages was pitiful; 
without ammunition, without leadership, without country or 
hope of any sort, they found no mercy now at the hands of their 
older foes, the Mohegans and Pequots, nor yet the English, says 
Bodge. These hunted down their defenseless enemies, some of 
whom escaped to the eastward and put themselves under the 
protection of Wannalancet and his Pennacooks, who had remained 
neutral. 

The death of Philip was practically the close of the war, 
though hostilities continued for some time after. 

"King Philip's War, which was but the beginning of a long 
series of wars which devastated the frontiers, may be said, properly, 
to end with the treaty of Casco, April 12, 1678." [Windsor.] 
Hostilities continued, however, until the treaty of Portsmouth, 
September 8, 1685. 

On Fast Day, June 6, 1678, the various towns made con- 
tributions for the Canada captives, who had reached Albany. 
Chelmsford gave £2. 16. 10. 



CHAPTER III. 

PROVINCE WARS. 

KING WILLIAM'S WAR. 

A RATHER uncertain peace reigned after King Philip's War, 
and continual watchfulness on the part of the English was 
necessary. The accession of William and Mary to the English throne 
occurred in 1689. The King of France espoused the cause of James. 
After the declaration of war, between England and France, began the 
first inter-colonial war, known in America as King William's War. 
The French planned an invasion of Boston and New York. On 
Feb. 8, 1690, a war party came from Canada and burned and 
butchered in Schenectady. The Governor of Massachusetts 
urged the necessity of immediate action and a congress of the 
Colonies was called. Sir William Phips commanded an expedition 
against Acadia in 1690. He took Port Royal, and carried away 
almost everything portable from the Province. His expedition 
against Quebec, the same year, failed. 

The selectmen were ordered to furnish ammunition to their 
respective towns. 

In 1680 Samuel Foster petitioned the Court that he might 
"lay doune his leif tenant place," and the request was granted. 

The same year the Court placed the military forces of 
Chelmsford and neighboring towns under Major Peter Bulkley. 

1682. May 27. Ensign Thomas Addams is appointed to be 
lief't to the ffoot company in Chelmsford, vnder ye comand of 
Capt. Samuel Addams. 

In 1683 John Fiske was appointed ensign to the foot company. 

On November 7, 1685, Samuel Sewall of Boston wrote in his 
diary : "When came home, heard of body of Indians near Chelms- 
ford, 3 or 400. The fears and Rumors concerning them much 
increase. The Indians near Albany; Wonolanset brings the 
news to Chelmsford, and mistrusts of their mischevous designs." 

Boston May ye 10th 1689. 
Wee ye Representatives of the Severall Townes of ye Masitucets 
colony in newingland doe heere by declare in bee halfe of or selfes 
& ye several townes which wee A pere for, viz. for the ensuing yere. 



128 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

the Govemer & debety governer & A sistunt Chozen in May 
1686 A ccording too or Charter Rights & ye debeties yeu then 
sent by the freemen of the severall Townes to be ye government 
there Established of ye A bove sayd Colony & that Majr Waite 
Winthrop is Majr GineroU of our forces, in newingland & untel 
the freemen Renue there [choise] & that iff the present gouerment 
doe desier more A sistenc having enlarged the freemen there 
shall bee A Supply Emediatly maide according to Charter for ye 
Remaineing of the yere A pon ye the daye yt the gineral Cort 
shall A point hopping that all people will rest satisfied tell wee 
have confermation from ye Crown of Ingland which wee dayly 
hope for. 

Thees to testifi ye honered Councel for safety & the Repre- 
sentitives of the severall Townes of ye aboue sayd Collony ye 
Town of Chelmesford beeing Convened to gether on 13 of May 
1689 according to the honered Councell for safetye dezier ye 
aboue sayd act was severall times red & considered of & Legaly 
voted in the Afermitife , only 2. or 3. desented. 



Signed in the names & Samuell foster Senr 

Consent of the in habitants Cornelius Waldo Senr. 

of Chelmsford Nathanell Hill 

Solloman Keyes Senr. 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 107, p. 24a.] 



All laws made by the Governor & Company of the Mass. 
Colony that were in force on the 12th day of May 1686 were by 
the convention of Governor and Council and Representatives on 
June 22. 1689 declared to be the laws of the colony and to continue 
in force till further Settlement. 



The 20th of June 1689. 
Thees to sertifi: the Honored Councel in Boston that Sergent 
josiah Richardson was Legalli chosen Captaine. & Sergent James 
Hildreth Legally chosen Lef tenant, & Sergent John Stevens 
Legally chosen Ensigne by ye Towne of Chelmesford 

Test 
Samuell foster Senor 
Joseph Farwill 

The Representatives do allow and 
June 27th, 1689. Confirme the above nomination 

of officers to the Towne of Chelmsford 
Attest Ebenezer Prout, Clerk. 
June 27 1689 Consented to by the Govr and Councill 

Jas Addington, Sec'y- 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 107, p. 143.] 




PLAM OF THE 

CHELMSFORD WATER DISTRICT 

CHEUMSFORD MASS. 
PIPES. GATES « HVDRAnTS 



PROVINCE WARS 129 

Capt. Thomas Henchman of Chelmsford was apprised of the 
plot against Dover, and sent down a letter of warning to the 
Council at Boston, as follows: 

Hond Sir 

This day 2 Indians came from Pennacook, viz. Job Mara- 
masquand and Peter Muckamug, who report yt damage will 
undoubtedly be done within a few days at Piscataqua, and yt 
Major Waldrons, in particular, is threatened; and Intimates 
fears yt mischief quickly will be done at Dunstable. The Indians 
can give a more particular account to your honor. They say iff 
damage be done, the blame shall not be on them, having given 
a faithful account of what they hear; and are upon that report 
moved to leave yr habitation and corn at Pennacook. Sr, I was 
verry loth to trouble you and to expose myself to the Censure and 
derision of some of the confident people, that ware pleased to 
make sport of what I sent down by Capt. Tom. I am constrained 
from a sense of my duty and from love of my countrymen to 
give the acct. as above. So with my humble service to your 
Honor, and prayers for the safety of an Indangered people, 

I am, Sr, your humble servant Tho: Hinchman. 

June 22 (1689) 

[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 107, p. 139.] 

This letter was received by Mr. Danforth, and on the 27th 
laid before Gov. Bradstreet and the Council, and a messenger 
was sent to Dover the same day with the following letter to 
Major Waldron, which was received too late to prevent the 
tragedy. 

The messengers were detained at the ferry at Newbury, and 
arrived the day after the attack. 



Boston: 27.: June: 1689 
Honord Sir 

The Governor and Councill haveing this day received a 
Letter from Major Henchman of Chelmsford, that some Indians 
are come unto them, who report that there is a gathering of some 
Indians in or about Penecooke with designe of mischiefe to the 
English, amongst the said Indians is one Hawkins (Hogkins or 
Kankamagus) is said to be a principle designer, and that they 
have a particular designe against yourselfe and Mr. Peter Coffin 
which the Councill thought it necessary presently to dispatch 
Advice thereof to give you notice that you take care of yor own 
Safeguard, they intending endeavour to to betray you on a 
pretention of Trade. Please forthwith to Signify import hereof 



130 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

to Mr. Coffin and others as you shall think necessary, and Advise 
of what Information you may receive at any time of the Indians 
motions. 

By Order in Councill, 

Isa: Addington, Sec'y. 
For Major Richd Walden and Mr. Peter Coffin 
or either of them at Cocheca with all 
possible [haste] 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 107, p. 144.] 

After midnight the gates of the garrison house were opened 
by the squaws who had asked shelter in the garrison houses. 
The Indians waiting outside rushed in, struck down and bound 
the Major, eighty years old, into his arm-chair, and placed him 
thus on the table, where they mocked him, compelled his family 
to prepare supper for them, slashed the helpless man across the 
breast, saying, "I cross out my account." They then cut off his 
ears and nose and forced them into his mouth, and, when fainting 
from loss of blood, they held his sword under him, upon which 
falling, he expired. Some of the cruelties practiced by the Indians 
are too horrible to relate. Bodge gives a full acount of this 
event — page 316. 

In June, 1689, James Hildreth was confirmed Lieutenant 
of the Foot Company in Chelmsford, and John Stevens, Ensign. 
In 1691, Edward Spaulding was Ensign. 

A bounty not exceeding £10 per head was offered for Indians' 
heads or scalps, respect being had to the quality of the enemy 
taken or destroyed. 

In 1689, June 27, Major Thomas Hinchman was appointed 
Commander in Chief of the Upper Regiment in Middlesex. 

Wednesday, August 28th, the Upper Middlesex Regiment was 
ordered to rendezvous at Chelmsford. 
[Court Records, Vol. VI.] 

hinchman's letter. 

To the Honourable Councill seting in Boston July 12 1689. 

Chemlsford. 
Honourd. & Worshipfull: 

These bring you my humble services, Acquainting you that 
yors bearing date 11th Instant I have received; wherin I under- 
stand the great and eminent danger we are in, upon the account 
of the enemy, or Towne being threatened the next week to be 
assaulted; And not only from what yors expresses; but also, 
what was discovered at Groton, the night before last, the which 



PROVINCE WARS 131 

I understand you have been informed of: And AUso at Dunstable, 
on Thirsday night last towards morning, appeared within view 
of Mr Weldses Garrisson 4 Indians shewed themselves, as Spyes; 
and it is Judged (tho not \'isible) that all the garrissons in said 
Towne were veiwed by the enemy: and that by reason their 
cattle and other creatures were put into a strange ff right. 
Wherefore Honoured and worshipll., I Judge it highly needful 
and necessary that we have relief at this Towne, and that speedily 
of about 20 men or more, for the repulsing the enemy in guarding 
some out places which are considerable, on each side of Marimake, 
As Mr Haward, Varnham, Coburne &c: which otherwise must 
come into us, and leave what they have to the Enemy: or be 
Exposed to the merciles cruelty of bloody and barbarous men. 
Thus Honourd and worshipll., pleas to consider this request as 
highly needfull and necessary and be expeditios in granting the 
same. AllSo, I have ordered of these Troops which are made up 
of Towns which are in danger, 40 at a time to be out upon scouting 
(according to order given me) 'Till the latter end of the next week 
ensving : concerning whom I Jud[g]e it needful and necessary that 
they be released to go home to guard the several Towns they 
belong to. Thus Honoiu'ed and worshippfull pleas to consider 
of and grant the above petitioned things, which I hope and believe 
will be conducible to the saftey and security of vs, and these 
exposed Touns: and highly oblidge, yor most himible Servant 

Thomas Hinchman 
Chelmsford July 12th 1689 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 107, p. 198.] 

Ordered by the Representatives & consented to by the Gov. 
& Council, July 12, 1689, "that 20 men be fourth wth dispatched 
away to Major Henchman to be for the releife of Chelmsford 
farms" &c. 

July 31, Dunstable asked for protection for Samuel Adams' 
com mill, "without the use of which the Town cannot subsist." 
In August six hundred men were furnished for the frontier towns. 

The General Court ordered the selectmen to furnish ammuni- 
tion to their respective towns. 

In the first nimiber of "Publick Occurences" issued at 
"Boston, Thursday, Sept. 25th. 1690," the oldest newspaper in 
the United States (which was suppressed by the Governor and 
Council four days later, because it "contained Reflections of a 
very high nature.") is the following item: 

"While the barbarous Indians were lurking about Chelmsford, 
there were missing about the beginning of this month a couple 
of Children belonging to a man of that Town, one of them aged 
about eleven, the other aged about nine years, both of them 
supposed to be fallen into the hands of the Indians." 



132 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

hinchman's petition. 

To his Excellency Sr. William Phips, Knt. Capt Generall 
and Govnr. in Chiefe of their Majties Province of the Massachu- 
setts-bay, in Newengland, with the Honod. Council Sitting in 
Boston. 

The Humble petition of Thomas Hinchman of Chelmsford, 
on behalf of himself e, and the Captaines, and Soldiers of the 
Regiment under his Command &c, 

Sheweth, That Wheras yor Petitionr. with his Regiment 
were employed in the Service of the Crown of England, by Com- 
mission and orders from Sr. Edmund Andros. Knt, Late Capt. 
Genii, and Govr. of this their majties Territory & Dominion, 
for the defence of the said Territory against the Common Enemy 
in the yeares 1688 & 1689, there became due to yor Petitionrs 
Considerable Sums for wages and Billeting and other incident 
Charges in the said Servace, much of which remaines unpaid to 
this day, which the Continued Alarms from the Enemy ever since 
and the hesivy Taxes that have been and still are like to be Imposed 
upon us, render the more intollerable : 

And for as much as there hath never yet been any way stated 
by authority for the adjusting of those accompts — 

Yor Petitionrs do Humbly pray yor Excellency & the Honod 
Council wilbe pleased to appoint and Impower meet persons for 
the Auditing & Adjusting all accompts of wages & Disbursmts 
in the said Service for the time aforesaid, within the said Regiment, 
and that speedy and Effectual care may be taken for payment of 
such arreares as shall appeare to be justly due. 

And yor Petitionrs shall ever pray &c 

Tho: Hinchman 

[Probable date, 1692. No record of an answer has been found.] 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 70, p. 168.] 

"Chelmesford November 30. 1691 

A record of the last devision of the town stock of powder 
shot and flints acording to the acount that Decan foster gave to 
the selectmen is as foUoweth." 

Then are given 89 names; and also these 5 under "Powder 
lent to the garasons and shott as followeth" 
Left. Barett 
Mr Adams 

Mr Haward \ 2 pond pouder & 3 punds shot each, 

insingh Stevens 
Capt Richason 

The longer list includes "Mistres Shone" and "Mistres 
Adams." 

Thomas Chamarling, the second, received three pounds of 
powder, six pounds of shot and six flints. 



PROVINCE WARS 



133 



The amounts given out varied from one to five pounds of 
powder, from one to ten pounds of shot, and from four to ten flints. 

Account of the Number of men now in pay Under Thomas 
Hinchman & where posted. 

Vizt. 

At Lancaster Six men 6 

At Groton Six men 6 

At Dunstable Town Seven men 7 

At Mr Tyng's Garrison Six men 6 

At Nath. Howards Three men 3 

At Edwd. Colbums four men 4 

At Sergt Varnum's four men 4 

At Sam. Hunt's Two men 2 

At Chelmsford four men 4 

42 



Of wch number are out of pay, but most of them 
ready at a days Warning for service 

Impressed at sundry times by Warr't. from 
the Governor & Council viz. Sept. 10th. '91 21 men 

Nov. 20 36 men 

Febr. 6 21 men 

July 15. '92 42 men 

In all 120 



78 
120 



They were lately dismissed to ease charges, till futher Orders 
from His Excellency & ordered to be in readiness for service as 
above said. 
Novembr 17th Tho, Hinchman. 

1692 

[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 70, p. 184.] 



David Jeffries, writing from Boston, Sept : 16, 1692, to Lieut. 
Gov. John Usher, says: — 

* * * ye 14th Inst, at night a Post came to towne fro 
Major. Hinksman wch. gave an acott. of about 80 or 100 Indians, 
yt our scouts, had made discovery of in ye night siting per theire 
fires hammering of slugs for theire gunns — our scouts was soe 
neare them yt they could see ye Indians & heare them talke, 
yesterday morning we had news yt ye Indians had Killed two men 
at Groton. Jera: Bowers is gone out wth about 100 men after 
them * * * 

[Groton in the Indian Wars.] 



134 



HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 



There were nineteen garrisons at Chelmsford, as shown by the 
following list : 

SETTLEMENT OF THE GARRISON IN THE WEST REGIMENT OF 
MIDDLESEX. 

Chelmsford, March 16th. 169|. 



Jerathmiel Bowers & with him 
Jno. Wright 
Ebenezer Wright 
Joseph Wright 
Jno. Shipley 
Joseph Parker and 
their familys 

Samuel Butterfield and with him 
Nathaniel Butterfield 
Joseph Hide 
Benjamin Bagnet 
and their familys 



Andrew Spauldin and 

Ensign Spauldin 

Jno. Perrum 



Widdou Stevens 
Solomon Kye 
Solomon Kye Junr. 
Joseph Spauldins 
William Underwood 
and their familys 

Mrs. Adams and with her 
Moses Barnes 1 



1.5. men 



Daniel Waldoe 
James Procter 
Two Souldiers 



6; men. 



[Midst of Town] 

Mr. Tho; Clark and wth him 
Abraham Parker 
Moses Parker 
Stephen Peirce 6. men 

Jno. Burgess, and 
their familys 



Major Thomas Hincksman 
Thomas Parker 
Benjamin Parker 
Daniel Gallusha 



[Great Brook. 



Jonathan Baratt and 

Lieut Baratt 

Jno. Baratt 
Thomas Core 
Jno. Core 
Samuel Baratt 
Zach; Fair 
Jno. More 
Ambrose Swallow 
James Harwood 



7. men 



13. men 



Capt. Josiah Richardson and wth him 
Jno. Spauldin 

Josiah Richardson 11, 

Tho; Scotborn and 
their familys 

Nathaniel Hill and with him 
Sergeant Samuel Fletcher ] 
Josiah Cleaveland I 7. men 

and their familys 

[Midst of Town] 



[West End, Elija Richardson place.] 



Moses Baratt, and 
Samuel Gold 
Peter Talbert 
William Power 

Joseph Baratt 9. men 

Thomas Baratt 
Thomas Reed 
Samuel Chamberlain 
«S: yr. familys 



Samuel Foster Deacon 
and his three sons. 

Jno. Parker 

Jno. Kide. and 
their familys 



6. men 



Joseph Farewell and with him 
Samuel Flechers 
William Flechers 9. men 

Jno. Bates and 
their familys 



PROVINCE WARS 



135 



[Stoney Brook.] 

J no. Spauldin and wth him 
Benjamin Spauldin 
Joshua Fletcher 
Joseph Butterfield 
Thomas Chamberlain J unr 
Arthur Crouch 
Samuel Underwood 
Joseph Parkis 
Thomas Blogett 
Edward Spauldin 
Samuel Burge 

Mr. Nathaniel Haywood 

and his Man, with 

two Souldiers there 
Posted. 4 men 

[West End] 

Robert Proctor and with him 
Thomas Chamberlain 
Thomas Chamberlain Junr 
Abraham Byum 
Peter Procter 
Gershom Procter 
and their familys 



[Benj. Haywood's] 



Ephraim Hildrick and wth him 
Lieut Hildrick ] 



12. men 



Israel Procter 
Pellatiah Adams 
Timothy Adams 
Jonathan Adams 
Jacob Waren 
Jacob Waren Junr 



[Nashoba] 

Joseph Hildrick and 
Peter Dill 

James Bowen or Burn (?) 
Water Bower (Power f) 
with their familys 



Samuel Varnum and 
Jno. Whittaker 
J no. Walker 
Ezra Colburn 



9. men 



10. men 



Edward Colburn and with him Jno. Colburn: 3 men (158 Men.) 
[Original owned by N. H. Hist. Soc] 

In 1889 this was printed by the N. E. Hist. Gen. Society. 
The localities as indicated within the brackets are by IVIr. H. S. 
Perham, who noted on the printed copy that it had been com- 
pared with the original. [See Hinchman's letter, page 166.] 

According to an act of the General Court, IVLarch 12, 1694-5, 
inhabitants of the frontier towns were prohibited from deserting 
them without permission on pain of forfeiting their property. 
This included Chelmsford. 

The people had all they could do to obtain a livelihood at 
this time with short crops and attacks by the Indians along the 
frontier near Chelmsford. 

Raids by the Indians had been made on Billerica and Tewks- 
bury, and a number of people killed. Colonel Joseph Lynde with 
three hundred horse and foot scoured the neighborhood, August 24, 
1695, but failed to secure the enemy. He is said to have fortified 
Lynde's hill in Belvidere. He had a guard of forty men at each 
of the three fords between Chelmsford and Andover, and ranged 
the woods "on the northern side of the great swamp," and 
guarded this town. He camped on Prospect hill "that lies between 
Chelmsford and the river." [See his report, Courier-Citizen Hist, 
of Lowell, p. 122.] 



136 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

LIEUT. GOV. WILLIAM STOUGHTON's ORDER TO 
CAPT. JAMES CONVERSE, SEPT. 5, 1695. 

I order That at yoiir next passing over Merrimack with your 
Company towards Dunstable &c That you advise with Maj'r. 
Henchman and Mr Jona Ting concerning the posting yor men in 
the several Frontiers of Dunstable, Bilrica, Chelmsford, Groton, 
Lancaster and Marlboro for the better enforcemt of th Garrisons 
there and maintaining a good brisk Scout for the discovery of the 
Enemy to prevent their annoying of those Towns during the 

Harvest Season 

[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 51, p. 44.] 

1696. November 19, £10, was granted to Jonathan Tyng 
for journeys and posts to neighboring towns (including two 
journeys to Chelmsford) to settle garrisons. 

Wannalancet died in 1696 and was buried by Jonathan Tyng 
on the Tyng estate. A memorial tablet on a granite boulder to 
mark the spot has been placed by the Massachusetts Society of 
Colonial Dames. [See Old Residents' Contributions, Vols. VI and 
III.] 

PETITION OF JONATHAN TYNG FOR AN ALLOWANCE FOR 
SUPPORTING WANNALANCET. 

To the right Honorle. Wm. Stoughton Esq Lt. Govemr. and 
Comandr In Cheife, &c: together with ye Hond Council and ye 
Representatives assembled in Genii Court, now setting in Boston 
May ye 27, 1697 

The pettetion of Jonathan Ting of Dunstable Humbley 
Sheweth, 

That some time in ye yeare (1692) Wanalanset ye Indian 
Sagamore (belonging to patucket vpon Merremack) came in to 
dunstab with some other Jndians, and a flagg of truce, and sd 
Sagamore was desirous to stay with ye English, ye other Jndians 
promised to come again, but did not, this being before Wm phipps 
his arivall, your petetetior In formed ye then Governmt. brought 
sd Sagamore to ye Hond. Mr Danford, who ordered him to be kept 
At ye prison in Cambridge, where he remained for some time, 
ye sd Sagamore petetioned that he might be removed to your 
petetioner's hous, upon sd Wm's Arival & addressd his Excelencey 
concerning this Matter who ordered him back to Dunstable to 
your petetionrs hous and orded me to supply him with nessessary 
provisions & promised it should be payd out of ye public, your 
petetionr also pd his expenses coming to Boston and his retume, 
Kept him with food and good pt of his cloathing for almost four 
years, who then dyed. I was also at some small charge to bury 
him, he haveing shewed him selfe friendly to ye English, in the 
former warr and now, authorety would not suffer him now in his 
old age to be Jll treated. 



PROVINCE WARS 137 

My prayer to this Hononrle Court is yt you would please 
to ordr. me out of the publick tresury of ye province some meet 
compensation for my aforsd exspcnce, which I dispensed pr ordr 
of Authorety. 

So shall your pettetionr pray &c. 

£20. allowed Tyng. 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 30, p. 426.] 

[This Petition is written in the hand of the Rev. Thomas Clarke.] 

To ye honrable ye Lft Governr. Council & 

Representatives in Generall Cort assembled. 

The humble petition of the Inhabitts. of Chelmsford sheweth 
That whereas yor petitioners have been ever forward to the 
paymt of all ye publiq Assesmts for the support of his majestys 
Governmt, maintenance of ye warr &c as in duty wee were bound 
but by reason of the long continuance of the warr and the Enemys 
making greater assawlts & Depredations upon these frontier pts 
& our daily fears of being Invaded wch puts us upon still greater 
charges of building and repairing our fortifications, being also 
exposed to extream difficultys & Hazards in managing our hus- 
bandry, it having also pleased god to cut us very short in our harvest 
of late years (altho thro his great compassion wee hope wee have 
this year sufficient to maintain life) having also suffered great 
losses in Hay by fires, so that ye estate of the Town is much 
exhausted by these means & because these accumulated calamitys 
& a prospect of greater have driven away no less than ten familys 
not onely out of the Town but most of them out of province, 
(many more being upon the wing) which weakens and much 
discoiu-ages us, wee do therefore (being desirous yet to maintain 
our station in this one flourishing Town) & not without grateful 
acknowledgmts of ye care yt hath been taken for our defence, 
(wch through gods blessing wee have found ye benefit of) presume 
to spread before your honrs our distressing circumstances; & to 
supplicate humbly yt the wisdom & clemency of this honrable 
Generll Cort shall appear meet, to whose pleasiu-e wee humbly 
submit & upon whose fatherly compassions wee cast ourselves, 
praying God almightys presence & blessing may crown all your 
publiqe managmts. 
Chelmsford 
12th. Oct. 1697 

Thomas Clark Nataniell Hill ] 

Thomas Hinchman Et Ceteris Joseph Farwell Senr > Selectmen 
Samll ff oster Senr Steven Peirce J 

Edward Spaulding left 
Will, ffletcher 

We have Requested Capt Bowers or Representative humbly 
to prefer this petition for us 

Octr. 19th. 1697 Read Joseph heldreth Constable. 

[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 70, p. 358.] 



138 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

In 1698 various towns were reinforced for the defence of the 
frontier. Eight men were ordered to Chelmsford. The Council 
advised that there be forthwith a levy made of 150 soldiers in two 
companies, one to be posted on the frontiers about Chelmsford, 
Groton and Lancaster, the other about Andover, Haverhill and 
Amesbury. An assault was expected along the Merrimack. Jo 
English brought word that about seventy French and Indians 
were on the way from Canada, sixteen of them to attack Deerfield , 
and the rest to strike the river towns. 
[Acts and Resolves, Vol. VIII.] 

RESOLVE ALLOWING £6 TO JOSEPH ENGLISH. 

Resolved By ye House of Representatives that Joseph 
English an Indian escaping from Frentch Captivity and makeing 
his way home giveing intelligence of ye motions of the Enemy with 
intent to doe mischiefe upon ye Frontiers at this tjmie that there 
be six pounds drawn out of the Publique treasurie & put into ye 
hands of Majr. James Converse & Capt. Jerathmell Bowers to 
be by ym improved for to suply sd Indian & his wife & children 
with cloathing as a Recompence for his good Seruas 

June 14. 1698 

(Council Concurred) 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 30, p. 437a.] 

King William's war, called an unrighteous war, brought only 
disaster, sorrow and desolation to the English settlements. It 
came to an end in 1697 by the treaty of Ryswick, by which Acadia 
was restored to France. 

QUEEN ANNE'S WAR. 

This war began in 1702 when England declared war against 
France and Spain. The French had the sjonpathy of the New 
England Indians, who made constant vigilence necessary in the 
frontier settlements to guard against raids and massacres. "For 
the first time the Indians were well armed and guided by a superior 
intelligence." 

The war ended in 1713 by the treaty of Utrecht. Newfound- 
land and Acadia came into the possession of England, whose 
prestige was strengthened in North America. 

1702. November 19. A bill was passed providing snow- 
shoes for the men of the frontier towns at the charge of the 
Province. The Indians were more active and troublesome in 



PROVINCE WARS 139 

the winter, and companies were organized for service upon the 
snow. William Tyng commanded the first Massachusetts com- 
pany, and received for services from December 28 to January 25, 
1703-4, £71 .11.0, 25 shillings of which was paid to a "chyrugion." 
The company brought back five scalps and received as bounty 
£200. In the Granite State Magazine, Vol. I, is a list, with 
personal sketches, of forty -four men in this company, who, in 1735, 
with sixteen others named, were the grantees of Tyngstown, which 
included the greater part of the present Manchester, N. H. The 
adjustment of the province line in 1741 voided this charter, and 
Massachusetts gave the grantees the township now Wilton, 
Maine. The sketches of men who were born or lived in Chelms- 
ford are here given: 

1. John Shepley, son of John, was born in Chelmsford, 
Mass., in 1677. A few years later the family removed to Groton, 
Mass., where the father, mother and all the children except 
John were killed by the Indians, July 27, 1694. John, then 
seventeen years of age, was carried into captivity where he re- 
mained three and one-half years, when he returned to Groton. 
In memory of the massacre of his kindred, undoubtedly he was 
a willing recruit in Captain Tyng's company. Subsequently he 
was prominent in the town and church affairs of Groton. He was 
a representative nine years. He died September 14, 1736. Among 
his descendants is the late Ether Shepley, a former United States 
Senator and Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Maine. 

2. Joseph Parker, Groton, son of Capt. Joseph and Margaret 
Parker, was born in Chelmsford, March 30, 1653. The family 
removed to Dunstable in 1675, where Joseph, Sr., was a constable 
seven years. Joseph, Jr., had considerable experience in Indian 
warfare. He removed from Dunstable to Groton and there 
died about 1725, leaving a large estate. 

10. Joseph Perham, Groton, son of John and Lydia (Shepley) 
Perham, was born in Chelmsford, December 22, 1669. He lived 
in Dunstable and, by revision of town lines, in Nottingham West, 
now Hudson. At the time of his service in Captain Tyng's 
company he was a resident of Groton. 

11. Joseph Butterfield, Dunstable, son of Joseph and 
Lydia (BaUard) Butterfield, was bom in Chelmsford, June 6, 1680. 
He removed early in life to Dunstable, living in the section of the 
town now Tyngsborough, where he died in 1757. His daughter, 
Deborah, was the wife of Col. Samuel Moor of Litchfield. 



140 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

12. John Spalding, Chelmsford, son of Andrew and Hannah 
(Jefts) Spalding, was bom August 20, 1682. He lived through 
life in Chelmsford. He died March 7, 1760. 

13. John Spalding, Jr., Chelmsford, son of John and Hannah 
(Hale) Spalding, was born in Chelmsford, February 15, 1659. 
Late in life he removed to Plainfield, Conn. His son, Samuel, 
bom August 5, 1686, represented his father's interests in Tyngs- 
town. 

14. Henry Spalding, Chelmsford, son of Andrew and 
Hannah (Jefts) Spalding, was bom November 2, 1680. He was 
a brother of No. 12. He married a daughter of Thomas Lund, Sr. 

16. Ebenezer Spalding, Chelmsford, son of Lieut. Edward 
and Margaret (Barrett) Spalding, was born January 13, 1683. 
He lived in Chelmsford and later in Nottingham West, now 
Hudson. 

17. Samuel Davis, Groton, son of Samuel and Mary DavHs, 
was bom in Groton, January 8, 1669-70. He removed from 
Groton to Chelmsford in 1707. Many of his descendants have 
resided in New Hampshire. 

22. Nathaniel Butterfield, Chelmsford, son of Nathaniel 
and Deborah (Underwood) Butterfield, was born about 1676 
[1673]. He Hved in Chelmsford, where he died in 1749. 

23. Jonathan Butterfield, Chelmsford, was probably a 
son of Nathaniel and Deborah (Underwood) Butterfield, and a 
brother of No. 22. 

26. Jonathan Parker, Chelmsford, son of John and Mary 
Parker, was born in Chelmsford, January 2, 1683. His right 
appears to have been improved by Thomas Parker. I do not 
find that he had a son Thomas but he had a brother of that name. 

27. Peter Talbot [or Talbird], Chelmsford, was an emigrant 
from England. He lived several years in Dorchester, but at the 
time of his service in the snow-shoe company, under Capt. William 
Tyng, he was a resident of Chelmsford. At that time he must 
have been fully fifty years of age. His right in the township 
was given to his son, George Talbot, who lived several years in 
Stoughton. 

28. Stephen Keyes, Chelmsford. There is no record of 
his birth and it has been thought that he probably was a son of 
Elias Keyes of Sudbury. He received land in Chelmsford in the 
right of Solomon Keyes, and it is possible he was a son of Solomon 



PROVINCE WARS 141 

and Frances (Grant) Keyes. He was married March 7, 1706, 
by Jonathan Tyng, Esq., to Anna Robbins. He died in 
Chelmsford, February 6, 1714. 

29. Benoni Perham, Chelmsford, lived in Chelmsford. He 
was living in 1722 and died a short time after that date [1723]. 
His son, Samuel, represented his interest in the grant of Tyngs- 
town. 

32. Josiah Richardson, Chelmsford, son of Capt. Josiah 
and Remembrance (Underwood) Richardson, was born in Chelms- 
ford May 18, 1665. He was a town clerk and selectman of Chelms- 
ford, where he died October 17, 1711. His wife was a daughter 
of Deacon John Blanchard. 

36. Henry Farwell, son of Henry Farwell of Chelmsford. 
Mass., was bom about 1665. He was one of the early settlers 
of Dimstable. In the later years of Queen Anne's war his house 
was one of the seven garrisons in Dunstable. His son, Oliver 
was one of the victims of the Indian ambush at Naticook, 
September 5, 1724. His son, Josiah, was a lieutenant in Captain 
Lovewell's Company, and was killed by the Indians in the fight 
at Pigwacket, May 8, 1725. 

38. John Richardson, Chelmsford, son of Capt. Josiah 
and Remembrance (Underwood) Richardson, was a brother of 
No. 32. Josiah Richardson was bom in Chelmsford, February 14, 
1669-70, where he died September 13, 1746. 

40. Ephraim Hildreth, Chelmsford, removed from Chelms- 
ford to Dracut in 1712, and there died September 26, 1740. He 
was town clerk of Dracut, a major of the militia, and an active man 
in town and business affairs. He was one of the proprietors of 
Concord and an influential factor among the proprietors of 
Tyngstown. At one time he was the owner of the saw-mill. 

41. Samuel Chamberlain, Chelmsford, son of Thomas and 
Sarah (Proctor) Chamberlain, was born in Chelmsford, January 
11, 1679. He was a prominent citizen and styled Capt. 
Samuel Chamberlain in Chelmsford records. He died April 12, 
1767. There was a Samuel Chamberlain of about the same age, 
a son of Samuel and Elizabeth Chamberlain, who was styled in 
Chelmsford records Lieut. Samuel Chamberlain. The Tyngstown 
proprietors' records call the grantee Capt. Samuel Chamberlain, 
which makes it reasonably certain that the Samuel first named was 
the soldier and grantee. 



142 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

42. Stephen Pierce, Chelmsford, son of Stephen and Tabitha 
(Parker) Pierce and grandson of Thomas Pierce of Woburn, was 
bom in Chelmsford in 1678. He lived in Chelmsford and was 
the owner of many acres of land. He died September 9, 1749- 
This Stephen Pierce was the grandfather of Gov. Benjamin Pierce 
of Hillsborough, who was the father of President Franklin Pierce. 

43. Timothy Spalding, Chelmsford, son of John and Hanna 
(Hale) Spalding, was bom about 1676. He lived in the part of 
Chelmsford now Westford, where he died April 14, 1763. He 
was a brother of No. 13. 

44. Paul Fletcher, Chelmsford, was the son of Joshua. 
His father was twice married: First, in 1668, to Gussies Jewell; 
second, in 1682, to Sarah Willey. I cannot state which of the 
wives was the mother of Paul. The Fletcher genealogy states 
that Paul Fletcher was a snow-shoe man in 1724. The date is 
an error. 

45. Judge John Tyng, son of Major William and Lucy 
(Clarke) T3mg, born in Chelmsford, January 28, 1704-5, and 
graduated from Harvard University in 1725. He lived in 
Tyngsboro', where he died in 1797, aged ninety-two years. He was 
a colonel of the militia, a representative of Dunstable, Mass., 
which then included Tyngsboro', and speaker of the house. He 
was a delegate to the convention at Boston, in 1768, "for the 
preservation of the public peace and safety," and a delegate to 
the Provincial Congress, which assembled at Cambridge and 
Watertown in 1775, but he is best known as a judge of the coiurts 
of Middlesex county, which office he held many years. 

46. Col. Eleazer Tyng, Dunstable, son of Col. Jonathan and 
Sarah (Usher) Tyng, was born in the part of Dunstable now called 
Tyngsboro', April 30, 1690, and graduated at Harvard University 
in 1712. He was a magistrate and a colonel; an active and useful 
man. He was buried in the Tyng burial ground, about one mile 
below Tyngsboro' Village. Upon a broad, horizontal tablet is 
inscribed, "Underneath are entombed the remains of Eleazer 
Tyng, Esq., who died May 21, 1782, aged 92; Mrs. Sarah Tyng, 
who died May 23, 1753, aged 59; John Alford Tyng, Esq., who 
died Sept. 4, 1775, aged 44." John Alford Tyng, Esq., was a son 
of Colonel Eleazer. Fox's Dunstable is in error in calling him 
Judge Tyng. The judge, John Tyng, is No. 45. 

47. Thomas Colburn, son of Edward Colburn of Chelmsford, 
was born in 1674. He lived in Dunstable, where he died Novem- 



PROVINCE WARS 143 

ber 2, 1770. The committee of the General Court were instructed 
to admit six men who served under Capt. John Lovewell and were 
omitted in the grants of Pembroke, N. H., and Petersham, Mass. 
In the same connection there appears in the Massachusetts 
Archives the petition of Zaccheus Lovewell, Thomas Colburn, 
Peter Powers, Josiah Cummings, Henry Farwell, Jr., and Nicholas 
Crosby, alleging that they served against the Indian enemy 
under Captain Lovewell, either on his first or second march, and 
that all the other soldiers of Captain Lovewell's companies have 
been rewarded in grants of land. Thomas Colburn appears to 
have been the only one of the six petitioners who was made a 
grantee of Tyngstown. 

48. John Colburn, Dunstable, son of John and grandson 
of Edward Colburn, was bom in Dunstable. John, the father 
died December 1, 1700, and John, the son, was the representative 
of his grandfather, Edward Colburn of Chelmsford, who was killed 
in an ambuscade in King Philip's war. 

51. Jonas Clark, Esq., Chelmsford, son of Rev. Thomas 
Clark of Chelmsford, was bom December 20, 1684. He was a 
colonel and a magistrate. Several meetings of the proprietors 
of Tyngstown were held at his house in Chelmsford. He died 
April 8, 1770. His sister, Lucy or Lucia, was the wife of Major 
William Tyng, and his sister Elizabeth married Rev. John 
Hancock of Lexington, and was grandmother of Gov. John 
Hancock, one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence. 

53. Thomas Parker and William Reed. In a description 
of lands belonging to this right, the first name is written "Rev. 
Mr. Thomas Parker." He was a son of Josiah Parker of Groton, 
Wobum and Cambridge, and he was born in Cambridge, December 
7, 1700. He graduated from Harvard University in 1718. At 
nineteen years of age he was ordained and installed over the 
church in Dracut early in 1720, and there labored and preached 
until his death, March 18, 1765. He attended several of the 
meetings of the proprietors, and was moderator of one or more 
meetings. 

William Read, the joint owner of this right, without doubt, 
was William Read of Chelmsford, son of Thomas Read, and was 
bom about 1688. He married Hannah Bates and lived in 
Chelmsford. Among his children were Robert Read of Amherst 
and Col. William Read of Litchfield, in whose honor Reed's Ferry 
was named. This family generally wrote the name Read, while 
the ferry is written Reed's Ferry. 



144 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

57. Jonathan Hartwell, Chelmsford, son of John and 
Elizabeth (Wright) Hartwell, was bom in Concord, February 
15, 1691-2. He lived several years in Chelmsford and, by division 
of the town, in Westford. He died in Littleton, October 18, 1778. 
The father, John, and his brother, William, were soldiers in King 
Philip's war. The heirs of William were grantees of Templeton, 
Mass. Jonathan Hartwell probably was admitted a grantee on 
account of the service of his father. See the clause in the grant 
relative to soldiers "at the Fort Fight or Long March in the 
Narragansett War." 

Col. Jonathan Tyng had three sons who grew to manhood: 

First, John, born in 1673, graduated from Harvard University 
in 1691, and immediately went to England where he soon died. 

Second, William, born April 22, 1679, was in the service 
almost continuously from 1703 until his death. He married Lucy 
Clark, a daughter of Rev. Thomas Clark, and settled in Chelms- 
ford. He was a representative to the General Court from that 
town in 1707, and in the service was promoted, 1709, to major. 
In the summer of 1710, while in command of a battalion between 
Groton and Lancaster, he was mortally wounded by the Indians. 
He was carried to Concord for medical attendance, and there 
died a few days later [Aug. 16]. This date is confirmed by probate 
records, and in the will of the father. Col. Jonathan Tyng, written 
a few years later, he makes mention of his deceased sons, John and 
William. 

Third, Eleazer, born April 30, 1690, graduated from Harvard 
University in 1712 and was commissioned colonel in 1724. He 
was an influential and honored citizen of Dunstable. 

Governor Dudley wrote from Cambridge to Major Lane, 
November 5, 1702: "Sir, I desire you with two of your troops 
to repayr to the touns of Marlboro', Lancaster, Groten, Chelms- 
ford and Dunstable, and there deliver severally the letters given 
you, and encourage the officers in their duty, agreeable to the 
several directions . Let the officers in the several towns 

use all prudence not to make the first breach 

[Hazen's Billerica, p. 136.] 



PROVINCE WARS 145 

LETTER OF COLONEL TYNG. 

Capt. Lane. 

these are to order you forthwith to give out your warrant 
to your soldiers in Chelmsford to watch two in a night & the 
Day following at the wadeing place at Wamesit & to continue in 
3^ service till they have gone Round: The Soldiers are to keep 
at the said wading place till they are Relieved as the custom hath 
been by Capt. Bowers men 

Jonathan Tyng, Col. 
Dunst. 
3 Sept. 1703. 
[Original among papers of A. E. Brown, Bedford.] 

1703, November 26, £40 was allowed out of the Province 
treasury for each scalp of the Indian enemy above ten years of age. 
All Indians taken under that age were to be owned or sold by their 
captors. 

Supplies of bread were sent to Concord, Chelmsford, and 
neighboring places for the marching soldiers on the expedition 
to the north. 

In 1704 six hundred pairs of snow-shoes and "Mogginsons" 
were provided. Chelmsford and Captain William Tyng's company 
were the special objects of revenge on the part of the French and 
Indians. 

Dr. Green, in "Groton in the Indian Wars," quotes Pen- 
hallow's account of Butterfield's experience, among other instances 
of cruel treatment by the Indians: 

"A third was of Samuel Butterfield, who being sent to Groton 
as a soldier, was with others attackt, as they were gathering in 
the Harvest; his bravery was such, that he Kill'd one and wounded 
another, but being overpower'd by strength, was forc'd to submit; 
and it hapned that the slain Indian was a Sagamore, and of great 
dexterity in War, which caused matter of Lamentation, and 
enrag'd them to such a degree that they vow'd the utmost revenge ; 
Some were for whipping him to Death; others for burning him 
alive; but differing in their Sentiments, they submitted the Issue 
to the Squaw Widow, concluding she would determine something 
very dreadful, but when the matter was opened, and the Fact 
considered, her Spirits were so moderate as to make no other 
reply, than, "Fortune L'guare." Upon which some were uneasy; 
to whom she answered. If by Killing him, you can bring my 
Husband to life again, I beg you to study what Death you please; 
but if not let him be my Servant; which he accordingly was, 
during his Captivity, and had favour shown him." 



146 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

Dr. Green continues: The account of Butterfield's case was 
in substance originally printed in a pamphlet entitled "A Memorial 
of the Present Deplorable State of New England (1707) — now of 
great rarity, — which appeared twenty years before Judge Pen- 
hallow's History was published. This pamphlet has since been 
reprinted in the introduction to the sixth volume, fifth series, of 
the "Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society." The 
account is as follows: A man had Valiantly Killed an Indian or 
two before the Salvages took him. He was next morning to 
undergo an horrible Death, whereof the Manner and the Torture 
was to be assigned by the Widow Squa of the Dead Indian. 
The French Priests told him, they had indeavovired to direct 
the Tygres from ther bloody Intention, but could not prevail 
with them; he must prepare for the terrible Execution. His 
cries to God were hard, and heard; when the Sentence of the 
Squa, was demanded, quite contrary to Every ones Expectation, 
and the Revengeful Inclination so usual and well-Known among 
these Creatures, she only said. His Death won't fetch my Husband 
to Life; Do nothing to him! So nothing was done to him. 

Butterfield remained a captive for more than a year. It is 
not known how he obtained his release. 

butterfield's petition. 

To his Excellency Joseph Dudley Esq. Capt General and 
Governor in Chief To the Honoble the Council and House of 
Representatives now in General Assembly convened at Boston — 
within & for her Majesties Province of the Massachuts Bay 
April 10. 1706. 

The Humble Petition of Samuel Butterfield — Sheweth 

That yor. Petitioner is an Jnhabitant of the Town of Chelms- 
ford, and in the month of August 1704, when the Enemy came 
upon Nashoway & Groton &c, yor. Petitioner (with others) was 
sent out by the Capt Jerathmel Bowers to Groton to assist Col. 
Taylor, where yor Petitioner being ordered out with some others 
to Guard a man who was going to work in the field, the Enemy 
came upon them, Killed one man and took yor. Petitioner and 
one other Prisoner, Tho yor. Petitioner made all the resistance 
possible. Killed one and Knocked down two more after they 
had seized him, for which yor Petitioner was cruelly used by 
them afterwards & threatened to be burnt, several times, May 
it please this great and Generall Assembly yor Petitioner was very 
well accoutred in all respects when he was taken, And then was 
stript of all and was between fourteen and fifteen months a Captive 
exposed to great hardships, and has sustained great loss and 
Damage. 

Yor. Petitioner therefore humbly prays the favor of this great 
and General Assembly to talce the premises into yor serious 



PROVINCE WARS 147 

Consideration and Grant him such recompence for his Losses 
and sufferings as a forcsd, as to yor wisdom and goodness shall 
seem meet. 

And yor Petitioner (as in duty bound) shall ever pray &c 

Samuel Butterfield 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 71, p. 196.] 

Acts & Resolves. Vol. VIII. Chapter 48. 
Resolved that there be allow 'd and paid out of the publick 
treasury to John Shipley of Groton, and Samuel Butterfield, the 
sum of four pounds, each, for the scalp of one of the Indian enemy, 
being a man by them killed at Groton aforesaid in the summer 
past [1704] and that no other or further sum be allowed for Killing 
the said Indian. (Allowed as a special gratuity, he being not 
entitled to demand the statute bounty.) 

Chapter 107. (Taken Prisoner while in the Queen's Service.) 
Upon reading the petition of Samuel Butterfield setting forth 
his being taken Captive by the Indian enemy, cruelly used and 
strip 'd of all, having Killed one of them after they had seized him — 
Resolved that the sum of Five Pounds be Allowed, & Paid out of 
the Publick Treasury to Samuel Butterfield the Petitioner in 
Consideration of his Losse & service. 

In the Journal of the Rev. John Pike of Dover, N. H., is the 
following : 

1706, July 3. Captain Pearson's troops at supper were 
surprised by Indians marching to Dunstable. Jacob Galusha, 
a Dutchman, his house assaulted by Indians. The house was 
burned and some persons were killed, and some escaped. 

July 27. Lt. Butterfield and his wife, riding between 
Dunstable and some other town [returning home to Chelmsford], 
had their horse shot down by the enemy. The man escaped, 
the woman was taken, and Jo. English, a friendly Indian in 
company wnth them, was at the same time slain. 
[Coll. N. H. H. Soc, Vol. III.] 

In Vol. VIII of the Acts and Resolves it is stated that a band 
or bands of hostile savages, apparently those who perpetrated the 
outrages above described, infested for several days the region 
extending from Chelmsford to Exeter, N. H. 

Jo English was much distinguished for his attachment to the 
white settlers. 

Penhallow records: July 21, 1706, several strokes were 
afterwards made on Chelmsford, Sudbury and Groton. 

Chelmsford names on a list of men who went to Lancaster, 
Aug. 4, 1704, to "inforce Major Taylor," and had received nothing^ 

for provision. 



148 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

Henery Spaldinge, Benjamin Adams, Edward Spalding, 
John Swolow. [Lane papers.] 

"The Names of the men that went the roun[d]s with Major 
Lane." No date. 

Henry Spalding, John Swolow, John Barit, also six Billerica 
men and as many officers. [Lane papers.] 

Another list headed by the name of Capt Lane, no date. 
30 Billerica men with officers. 7 Groton and Dracut men. 

Chelmsford men: Edward Spalding, Henery Spalding, John 
Swalo, Samull Chamberlain, Benoy Perham, Samtdl Barron, 
Samull Sady, Jonathan Hill, Roland Flechard, John Barit, Joseph 
Hilldrath. [Lane papers.] 

Another list has these names: 

Benony Perhame, Benjamin Adams, Samuell Barron, Henery 
Spalding, John Swalow. [Lane papers.] 

In the Archives, Vol. 71, page 105, is the petition of William 
Tyng, stating that just before the mischief was done at Lancaster, 
by his Excellency's order he was going from Boston by Dunstable 
to Lancaster on his own horse which he turned into a pasture, 
and in the morning the Indians drove the horse into the woods 
and killed and ate him. Also that John Spalding, a young man 
and good soldier, was killed and his gun taken by the Indians. 
The gun was his father's, who was very poor. (Nov. 18, 1704.) 
On page 138 Jonathan Tyng asks to be paid for 42 pair of snow- 
shoes; also 43 pair at 5 shillings a pair; also hired 12 pair at 2 
shillings a pair. He was granted £42. 9. 0. 

To his Excy ye Gouemor and Hond Councill & Reprsentatiues 
now in Generall Court Assembled in Boston: Novr. 3d. 1704. 
The humble motion of Jonathan Tynge, of Dunstable Sheweth 
That whereas yor petitionr, by vertue of an order from his Excell- 
ency ye Goumr for the takeing Care that prsuant to ye Direction 
of ye Generall Assembly there Should be Erected and built four 
Blockhouses upon Merimack River In Complyance where wth, 
he hath procured ye Same to be done and perfected, the Same 
being all in ye County of Middx — vizt one in Billerica, Two in 
Chelmsford, and one in Dunstable for ye which according to his 
agreemt wth Sundry prsons for ye same he Stands obliged to pay 
them Six pounds apeice, ye whole amounting to Twenty four 
pounds, 

Humbly prayes That yor Excelency and ye Honbl 
Councill & Reprsentatiues, would please to grant An order 
that he may be paid out of ye Province Treasury the Said 
Sum, that he may Satisfy ye Workmen there wth as he Stands 
obliged. 

And as in Duty bound Shall 
pray Jonathan Tyng : 



PROVINCE WARS 149 

In the House of Representatives 
Novi-: 3: 1704 Read and Ordered That the Praier of this Petition 
be Granted, and the Sum of Twenty four Pounds be Allowed 
& Paid out of the publick Treasury to Jonathan Tyng Esqr. 
accordingly. 
Sent up for Concurrence. lams. Converse Speaker 

In Council. 
Read and Concurrd. 

Isa: Addington Sectry. 
[Indorsed] Jona. Tyng Esqr. Allowed 

£24. for foiu- blockhouses 
Erected on Merrimack River 
past Novr. 1704. 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 71, p. 83.] 



TYNG S LETTER. 



For Capt. William Tyng at Boston. 

Son Tyng I met yvn. this day at Chelmsford: I had at 
Chelmsford 30 pr : of Rackets : at my house 42 pr : at Groton 6 pr : 
beside them yt were brought there of Capt Willards providing, 
of those about 30 may be fit for a long march & 40 may be service- 
able for scouting with riging up, the rest are lost and not fit for 
any servis: 

I am yr loving ffather 

Jonath Tyng 
Jime ye 14. 1705. 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 71, p. 139.] 



1706. "A list of the Names of yr. Troopers which serued 
vnder my comand to the releefe of Dunstable Jiily the fourth 
seventeen hundred & six : Being seventy nine men two days with 
theire sustenance." 

28 names are given; including these of Chelmsford: 
Edward Spoldin, Samll. Chamberlin, Benone Periham, John 
Colbom, James Button. [Lane papers.] 



1706. "Those which served under me in my march to Groton 
& Dunstable & Drawcut from the 11th of August to the 13th by 
Command from his Exelency are as foUoweth & served 3 days and 
fotmd thir own sustenance." 

20 names are given : among them : 

Edward Spoldin, Benone Periham, Samll. Sady, Samll. Barren, 
Henery Spolden, SamU. Chamberlin. [Lane papers.] 



160 



HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 



1708. 

Chelmsford names on the Muster Roll of John Lane's Com- 
pany. 24 Billerica names are followed by these: 
John Swolow Centinel Aug. 30. Sept. 4. 6 days 

Samuel Sady 
Samuel Chamberlin 
Henery Spaldin " 

Benony Periam " 

Eephrim Hildreth " 

JohnBaritt " " " 

Thomas Tarbell " |' '* 

Simon Stone " 

Samull Parker " 

William Nutting " .... 

[Lane papers. A. B. Cutler, Bedford. Copied by Henry A. Hazen , 
for H. S. Perham.] 

Soldiers were "for their encouragement" paid seven shillings 
for the first cost of their snow shoes and mogginsons, and two 
shillings a year afterwards from the year ITIL 

DUMMER'S WAR. 

In August, 1723, Lieutenant-Governor Dummer, then 
acting Governor of the Province, ordered detachments of from 
three to six men from the several frontier towns to range the 
woods, as the Indians were still in a threatening attitude. Groton, 
Dunstable and Lancaster were then more on the frontier than 
Chelmsford, but this town was still necessarily watchful, and 
contributed men for the service. A number of men (some of 
them prominent) who are credited to other towns were bom in 
Chelmsford. 

In Dummer's, or Lovewell's, War, snow-shoe companies were 
raised in all the towns lying upon Merrimack river, says Allen, 
page 182. These companies were minute men, equipt with snow- 
shoes and fire arms, &c., holding themselves in readiness to go on 
scouting parties in pursuit of the Indians at the moment of alarm. 

The following constituted the snow-shoe company in Chelms- 
ford in 1724; under the command of Captain Robert Richardson 
and Lieutenant Joseph Parker: 

Paul Fletcher, Samuel Fletcher, Joseph Keyes, Henry Stevens, 
Robert Peirce, Josiah Spaulding, Zacharias Richardson, Nathan 
Proctor, Matthias Cowdrey, John Proctor, Jr., Benjamin Robbins, 
John Buttcrfield, James Burn, Benjamin Chamberlain, Benjamin 
Goold, Moses Graves, Timothy Spaulding, Phineas Spaulding, 
Joseph Underwood, Jacob Blodget, Ebenezer Parker, Joseph 
Warren, Jr., Jonathan Parker, Joseph Fletcher, Jonathan Spauld- 



PROVINCE WARS 151 

ing, James Kidder, Ezekiel Keyes, Edward Foster, Benjamin 
Parker, John Spaulding, John Corey, Jonathan Hildreth, Josiah 
Birge, Simon Rummery, Daniel Blodget, Henry Spaulding, 
Jonathan Cummings, Thomas Reed, Joseph Foster. 

JOSEPH Parker's commission. 

Wilham Dummer, Esq., Lieut. Governor and Commander in 
Chief in and over his Majesty's province of Massachusetts Bay in 
New-England. 

To Joseph Parker, Gent : — Greeting. 

By virtue of the power and authority in and by his Majesty's 
Commission to me granted, to be Lieutenant Governor &c., I do 
by these presents, reposing especial trust and confidence in your 
loyalty, courage and good conduct, constitute and appoint you 
the said Joseph Parker to be Lieutenant of a company of snow- 
shoe-men, and of those that are appointed to be in readiness to 
issue out against the Indian enemy and rebels upon any alarm 
or attack; whereof Robert Richardson is Captain, in the regiment 
of Militia in the county of Middlesex, whereof Eleazer Tyng, Esq., 
is Colonel. You are therefore diligently and faithfully to dis- 
charge the duties of a Lieutenant, &c. 

Given under my hand and seal at arms at Boston, 5th day 
February, in the Eleventh year of the reign of his Majesty, King 
George. A. D. 1724. 

Wm. Dummer. 
[Allen, p. 183.] 

CAPTAIN Richardson's certificate. 

May it Please your honores By Virtue of an order from Coll. 
Eleazer Tyng I have drawn out of my company Thirteen able 
bodyed men well fitted with snow shoes and moggasons according 
to the order of ye General Court and I desire the money may be 
paid to Robert Richardson Capt. over said snow shoemen to be 
repaid by him to his men. 

Your humble Servant 

Jonth Richardson, Capt. 
Chelmsford 
Feby. 22, 1724/5 
[Msssachusetts Archives, Vol. 72, p. 218.] 

The following rolls contain Chelmsford names : 

A Muster Roll of the Company in His Majesty's Service 
under the Command of Captain [1724?]: 

Jonathan Butterfield, Sergt., Dunstable; Joseph Richardson, 
Centinel; Joseph Bassow, Joseph Chamberlain, Wm. Chamberlain, 



152 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

Benj. Blochet, Timo. Spaulding, Wm. Spaulding, Zach. Spaulding 
(servant to John Davis), David Procter, John Hildrake, Joseph 
Reed, Nath. Emerson, Benj. Smith, Henry Farwell, Heny. Wright, 
Wm. Jeffs (sei-v't to John Spaulding), Zach. Cobum, John Cobum, 
Thos. Coburn, Jno. Peirce, John Wright, John Procter, Thos. 
Lane, Wm. Richardson, Thos. Chamberlain, Zach. Stevens, 
Wm. Gasson (servt to Benj. Robbins). 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 91, pp. 66, 67.] 

Another Roll, probably 1724: 

John Foott, Capt.; Joseph Varnimi, 13/4 per week; Benj. 
Kidder, Centinel, 10/ per week; Ephraim Corey; Ebenezer Frost, 
John Farmer, Wm. French, sons under age; Obediah Parker, 
Josiah Wright, Jonathan Wright, Eben Wright, James Kidder, 
Jona. Snow, John Barrot. 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 91, pp. 66, 67.] 

Read and committed. House of Rep. Jime 18. 1724 : 
Jabez Fairbank, Capt.; Jona. Butterfield, Sentinel; Jno. 

Barret, Ebenr. Virgin, Benj. Chamberlain, Jona. Heldreth. 

These are all Chelmsford names. 

[Ibid, Vol. 91.] 

A list of soldiers dismissed. In Col. Tyng's Company. 
Nov. 3. 1724: 

Wm. Spaulding, Edw. Winn, Benj Baldwin, Saml. Barron, 
Nich Danforth, Wm. Jeffs, Saml. Winn, Ephraim Spaulding. 

Those who remained in ye service : 

Lt. Joseph Blanchard, En. Jonathan Butterfield, John Snow, 
Henry Keyes, Eph. Chandler, Wm. Proctor, Eph. Corey, Eph. 
Barrot, Saml. Adams, Wm. Boyd, Joshua Reed, Jona. Wright, 
John Wilson, Henry Richardson, Jos. Butterfield, Jos. Whittemore, 
Josiah Richardson. 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 91, pp. 124, 126.] 

Sept. 13. 1724. Powder, bullets, and flints were delivered 
out by the Military officers of Chelmsford. 24 men received 
from half a jill to a pint of powder, from 6 to 18 bullets and 2 to 
4 flints 

PETITION OF CHELMSFORD CAPTAINS. 

To ye Honourable William Dummer Esq. Lieut Govemoiu* 
in Chief and over his Majesties province of the Massachusets 
bay in New England. The petition of us ye Subscribers Humbly 
sheweth that where as Merrymacke River is at present being 
exceeding low and thereby ye Town of Chelmsford is very 
Exceedingly endangred and we humbly pray your honour we 



PROVINCE WARS 



153 



may be allowed a Scout of men to Scout upon said River and 
other exposed part of the Town for about ye space of Two months 
from ye date hereof as in Duty bound Your humble Petitioners 
shall ever pray. 

Chelmsford June ye 23, 1725. Jonathan Richardson Captains for 

Jonas Clark Chelmsford. 

[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 72, p. 247.] 

Chelmsford men in the Company of Capt Joseph Blanchard 



of Dunstable. 1725: 








John Walker, centinel receivd 28/ per week 


Thomas Spaulden, " ' 


28/ ' 






Samuel Barron, " * 


28/ ' 






Jonathan Spaulden, " ' 


28/ ' 






Benj Kidder, " ' 


28/ ' 






Wm. Spaulden, " * 


28/ ' 






John Corey, " * 


28/ ' 






Zechariah Emery, " ' 


28/ ' 






James Bum, " ' 


28/ ' 






James Kidder " ' 


28/ ' 






Benj Smith, " ' 


28/ ' 






Gersham Proctor, " ' 


28/ ' 






The Captain 


50/ ' 






" Lieut. * 


40/ ' 






" Ensign ' 


32/6 ' 






" Sergt. 


32/6 ' 






" Pilot 


32/6 ' 






" Surgeon 


40/ ' 






" Clerk 


32/6 ' 






" Centinel ' 


28/ ' 







[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 91, p. 169.] 

Chelmsford men under Capt. Eleazer Tyng of Dunstable 
from June 10 to Nov. 10, 1725: 

Jona. Butterfield, Lieut. ; Eph. Cory, Corp. ; Henry Keyes, 
Corp.; Thos. Chamberlain, Jo. Chamberlain, John Bowers, 
Jona. Bowers, Aaron Hubbard, Alexander Kelsy, Josiah Cory, 
Robt. Miers, Jona. Spaulding, Benj. Blodget, Nathan Cross, 
Jabez Davis, John Usher, Benj. Chamberlain, Eph. Barrot, 
Saml. Adams, John Williams, Centinels; Robert Dickie, John 
Wright, John Kerkin, Samuel Lennox, John Kerkin, Tho. Bixby, 
Thomas Bixby, Moses Colbum, Ebr. Virgin. 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 91, p. 193.] 



1725. Under Capt Joseph Heath, 
ford] . (Same at Richmond Fort . ) 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 91, p. 254.] 



James Coller [of Chelms- 



154 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

On the 8th of May, 1725, occurred the famous Lovewell's 
fight. On April 15th Capt. John Lovewell of Dunstable with 
forty-seven well-armed men (Green: Groton during the Indian 
wars, says thirty-four were in the fight) set out to travel more 
than two hundred miles to attack the Pequawkets under Paugus, 
their Sachem, whose headquarters were on the Saco river in 
what is now Fryeburg, Maine, named for the English Chaplain, 
Jonathan Frye, of Andover, one of Lovewell's men who was slain. 
Of this party Lieut. Jonathan Robbins, and Solomon Keyes were 
bom in Chelmsford, as was John Chamberlain who killed Paugus . 
(Nason: Hist .-Dunstable says, "Paugus was probably killed by 
Ensign Wyman.") The parents of Chamberlain were Thomas and 
Elizabeth ; his father was a carpenter and miller. John was bom 
March 29, 1692. Solomon Keyes was bom May 11, 1701, son of 
Solomon, son of Solomon. Mr. H. S. Perham quotes Parkman 
(see "The Wamesit Pvirchase," Old Res. Contributions]: "Solomon 
Keyes of Billerica received two wounds, but fought on till a third 
shot struck him. He then crawled up to Wyman in the heat 
of the fight, and told him that he, Keyes, was a dead man, but 
that the Indians should not get his scalp if he could help it. 
Creeping along the sandy edge of the pond, he chanced to find a 
stranded canoe, pushed it afloat, rolled himself into it, and drifted 
away before the wind." Fortunately a favoring breeze wafted 
him across the lake, and notwithstanding his wounds, he succeeded 
in reaching the stockade. There he foimd several others of the 
survivers with whom he set out through the wilderness for Dun- 
stable, which they managed to reach six days later. The brave 
and hardy Keyes recovered from his wounds but was killed in 
battle thirty years later at Lake George while commanding a 
company from Western (now Warren), Mass. Why he was 
credited to Billerica does not appear. Hazen's History of 
Billerica gives no evidence of such a name there until it appeared 
upon their tax list in 1749. Hodgman, the Westford historian, 
claims him for that town. We will make the claim for Chelmsford, 
where we find his early home at Wamesit, and the name upon 
the tax list until after the date of Lovewell's fight. 

Joseph Farrar (son of George, son of Jacob, son of Jacob), 
bom Feb. 28, 1694, married in 1715, and settled in Chelmsford. 
He was in Lovewell's fight, where his cousin Jacob was killed. 
He died about 1731. [John P. Farrar, of Lynn,] 



PROVINCE WARS 155 

Lieut. Jonathan Robbins was a native of Chelmsford born in 
that part of the town which was afterwards annexed to Carlisle. 
After sunset the enemy drew off and left the field to the English , 
who assembling themselves and examining their situation, about 
midnight, Robbins and Usher were found unable to travel. 
Robbins desired his companions to charge his gun and leave it 
with him, which they did; he declaring that "as the Indians will 
come in the morning to scalp me, I will kill one more of them 
if I can." [Coll. Top. Hist, and Biog., Concord, N. H., 1822.] 

"Paugus their chief and several other Indians were known 
to Lovewell's men. They frequently conversed with each other 
during the engagement. In the course of the battle Paugus and 
John Chamberlain, a native of Chelmsford, discoursed familiarly 
with each other: Their guns had become foul from frequent 
firing: they washed their guns at the pond, and the latter assured 
Paugus that he should kill him: Paugus also menaced him, and 
bid defiance to his insinuations ; 'It is you or I,* he said. In loading, 
the bullet of Paugus lodged in about the center of his gun, which 
obliged him to draw his ram-rod. This gave Chamberlain the 
advantage. He fired first and Paugus fell." [Ibid.] 

Green in "Groton diu-ing the Indian Wars," says: "Paugus 
had nearly finished loading his gun, and was priming it from the 
powder-horn, when Chamberlain struck the breach of his own 
gun on the ground, causing it to prime itself, and in this way got 
the start of his Indian foe." 

The whole story of this famous battle is full of interest, and 
may be read in the Memoirs and Sermon of Rev. Thomas Symmes 
and in various histories. Several ballads on the event became 
very popular, and Captain Lovewell, who was killed, became a 
great hero. He was a brave and adventurous leader. This 
battle ended the war, and the Pequawkets removed to Canada. 

COMMISSION. 

PROVINCE OF THE 1 JONATHAN BELCHER, ESQ; 

MASSACHUSETTS-BAY. / Captain General and GOVERNOUR. 

in Chief in and over His Majesty's 
Province of the Massachusetts-Bay 
in New-England, &c. 

To John Butterfield Gentleman Greeting. 

By Virtue of the Power and Authority, in and by His Majesty's 
Royal Comission to Me granted, to be Captain General &c. over 
this His Majesty's Province of the Massachusetts-Bay aforesaid: 




156 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

I do (by these Presents) reposing especial Trust and Confidence 
in your Loyalt3% Courage and good Conduct, constitute and 
appoint you the said 

John Butterfield to be Capt. of a Troop of hors in the 

Rigment of hors in the Coimty of Middlesex 

whare of Joseph Vamum Esq. is Colonel 

this Troop was the forst Troop in Colonel 

Tyngs Rigment. 

You are therefore carefully and diligently to discharge the Duty 

of a Capt in Leading, Ordering and Exercising said Troop in 

Arms, both Inferiour Officers and Soldiers; and to keep them 

in good Order and Discipline; hereby commanding them to Obey 

you as their Capt. and yourvSelf to observe and follow such Orders 

and Instructions, as you shall from time to time receive from Me, 

or the Commander in Chief for the Time being, or other your 

Superiour Officers for His Majesty's Service, according to Military 

Rules and Discipline, pursuant to the Trust Reposed in you. 

Given under My Hand and Seal at Arms, 
at BOSTON ,the 15 Day of November 
In the Eleventh Year of the Reign of His 
Majesty KING. GEORGE the Second. 

Annoque Domini 1737. 
J. Belcher. 
By His Excellency's 
Command, 

J. Willard Secty. 
[Original in the Adams Library.] 



SERVICE IN THE WEST INDIES. 

The war between England and Spain was declared with due 
solemnity in Boston, April 21, 1740. New England raised about 
1,000 men to join the fleet of Admiral Vernon in the West Indies. 
Winsor says scarce a hundred of them ever returned. 

1740. August 27. A list of Persons as are Entered as 
Volunteers in His Majesties Service in the West Indies under the 
Command of Capt. John Prescott. 

Time of 
Persons Names Of what Town Age Calling Enlisting 

Oliver Spaulding Chelmsford 29 Husbandman July 15. 
Ephraim Fletcher " 30 Labourer Jiily 14. 

(Only Cheknsford names are here given.) 

Other rolls are headed "Expedition against the Spaniards in 
Cuba," or "Expedition against ye Spanish West Indies." 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 91, p. 333.] 



PROVINCE WARS 157 

1742. Names on a roll of Edward Tyng's Co. : 

Samuel Cleveland (carpenter), Eb. Howard, Joseph Glover, 

Moses Cleveland, Jona. Waldo, Robt. Moores, Eb. Moores, Saml. 

Warren, James Nutting, Richard Richardson, Peter Reed, Geo. 

Reed, Jos. Richardson. 

[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 92, p. 5.] 

Chelmsford Men in Phineas Stevens' Company: 

Josiah Parker, Wm. Haywood, Joseph Bloggett, Danl. Crosby, 

Thos. Clark, Benj. Corey, John Fletcher, Peter Fletcher, Josiah 

Foster, Josiah Hill, Isaac Parker, Joshua Reid, Chas. Stevens, 

Moses Walker. 

[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 92, p. 85.] 



KING GEORGE'S WAR. 

War was declared between England and France in 1744. 
Peace was again restored by the treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle, in 
1748, which was really a mere truce in the long contest for 
supremacy in America. 

In 1745 about four thousand Massachusetts, New Hampshire 
and Connecticut men went against Louisburg, the French port 
on the island of Cape Breton, and captured the fortifications 
which had been twenty-five years in building, and were the 
most formidable in America. Commodore Warren, the English 
naval commander in the West Indies, furnished ships for the 
convoy of the troops. The treaty restored Louisburg to the 
French. The attack planned the next year against the French 
at Crown Point came to nothing. The mutual restoration of all 
conquests by the treaty of 1748, which meant Louisburg given 
back to the French without the consent of the Americans, was one 
of the causes of dissatisfaction on the part of the Colonists which 
led eventually to a desire for separation from the mother country. 

1748, December 24. The Commissary General was directed 
to deliver to Capt. Saml. Chamberlayne a Gun out of the Province 
store for the use of Ebenezer Foster in place of one he furnished 
his son, a soldier in the public service, and which was taken from 
him by the Indian enemy, also 

1749, January 3, a gun and £10. for the use of Henry Stevens, 
Jr. in consideration of his loss of time and sufferings occasioned 
by his being taken prisoner by the enemy, while in the Province 
service. 

[Acts and Resolves, Vol. 14, p. 199.] 



158 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

Wm. Blodget and divers others, Inhabitants of Chelmsford, 
were granted the use of an island in the Merrimack containing 
3 /8 of an acre for the privilege and conveniency of fishing. 

[Ibid, Vol. 15, p. 625.] 



Isaac Parker in serv^ice at No. 4, April, 1746, was taken captive 
and a gun taken from him, which he valued at £16. £4 was 
allowed him. 

[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 73, p. 39.] 



Zacheus Blodgett in Capt. Hartwell's Company was killed 
by the Indians in 1748. His brother Oliver asked the Province 
Treasurer to pay the wages of Zacheus to Capt. John Colbum of 
Dracut. 

[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 73, p. 405.] 



1748. Phineas Stevens' Company: 

Phineas Stevens, Capt.; Elias Alexander, Lieut.; John Burk- 
Sergt.; Caleb Howe, Sergt.; James Johnson, Clerk; Josiah Parker» 
Corp.; William Haywood, Corp.; Bildad Andrews, Surgeon; 
Benjamin Allen, Centinel; Nathaniel Andrews, Isaac Aplin, 
David Burr, Joseph Bloggett, Titus Belling, Robert Barber, 
Daniel Crosby, William Cranney, Thomas Carpenter, Thomas 
Clark, Benjamin Corey, Robert Campbell, Eleazor Davis, John 
Dodd, John Fletcher, Peter Fletcher, Josiah Foster, David Fams- 
worth, Joshua Gerry, Daniel Gray, Squier Goff, Jonathan Gray, 
James Cowin, Samuel Holmes, Eleazer Hotton, Isaiah Hills, 
John Henry, James Holding, Stephen Johnson, Forbes Hibble, 
John Meeden, Daniel McKinney, Isaac Parker, Joseph Perry, 
Noah Paine, Benjamin Paine, Ephraime Powers, Eleasar Priest, 
Joseph Russell, Joseph Rutlin, Peter Russell, Joshua Reid, 
Ebenezer Scott, Charles Stevens, John Stevenson, John Stmimers, 
Josiah Suddock, Thomas Terry, Joshua Train, Joseph Wilson, 
Mathew Wyman, Moses Walker. 

[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 92, p. 85.] 



1748. Elisha Hawley's Company: 

Ebenezer Gould, Corporal, Chelmsford; Oliver Barret, 
Centinel, Dracut; Thomas Blodget, Chelmsford; Nathaniel Hunt, 
Dracut; Eliseus Barron, Dracut; John Corey, Billerica; Joseph 
Bates, Dracut. 

[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 92, p. 90^.] 



PROVINCE WARS 159 

Capt. John Catlin's Co. 1748. Due to the following men 
[Scouts] for their traveling Home : 



Jonathan Farwell 
Henry Snow 
John Parker 
Samuel Adams 


80 miles 
80 
60 
80 


10 shillings 
10 

7/6 
10 


David Bates 


80 


10 


Jonathan Parker 
Moses Parker 


60 
100 


7/6 
12 


Josiah Parker 


60 


7 



[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 93, p. 28.] 

Capt. Eleazer Melvin's Co.: 

Thomas Byam, Nath. Butterfield, Caleb Bean, Benj. Byam, 
Andrew Hutchins, Thomas Hutchins. All Chelmsford names. 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 93, p. 136.] 

1748. Josiah Willard's dismissed men: 
Peter Fletcher, Eb. Fletcher, Timothy Fletcher, Benj. Barrett. 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 92, p. 185.] 



ORDERS TO THE TREASURER. 

In the House of Rep'ives Jany 12, 1748 Ordered that the 
Treasurer be directed to pay Nathaniel Richardson or Order the 
Wages due upon muster Roll to his son Joseph Richardson dec'd 
who was Killed in the vService of the Province, the sd Nathaniel to 
be accountable to any admr. that shall be appted. upon the Estate 
of the Dec'd. 

Sent up for concurrence 
Attt. Roland Cotton Cler. Dom. Rep. 
In Council Jan 13, 1748. 
Read & Concurred Consented to 

J. Willard Secy. W. Shirley. 

[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 73, p. 325.] 

In the House of Rep'ives. April 7, 1749. 
In as much as Zacheus Blogget a soldier in the service of the 
Province was slain by the Indian Enemy the last summer, and He 
having left no other Estate than the Wages due from the Province : 
Therefore Ordered that the Treasurer be directed to Pay sd. 
Wages to Capt Saml Chamberlayne to be by him paid among the 
Brethren and Sisters of the Dec'd according to Law. 

Sent up for concurrence, 

T. Hutchinson Dep. Sec. 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 73, p. 403.] 



160 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

Lunenburg February the 8th. 1748 

These may Certify that Zacheus Blodgett was the last summer 

in His Majesties Service under my Command as he is born upon 

my last Muster role who was Killed by the Indian Enemy the fifth 

Day of July last. 

Attest Edward Hartwell. 

[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 73, p. 404.] 



PETITION OF EBENEZER FOSTER. JR. 

To his Excellency William Shirley Esq. 
Province of the 1 Governour and Commander in Chief — 

Massachusetts Bay j the Honble his Majesties Council and 
House of Representatives in General Court 
Assembled Nov. 1748. 
The Petition of Ebenezer Foster, Jr. of Chelmsford Himibly 
Sheweth 

That Reuben Walker a Sei^vant to your Petitioner was 
Impressed into his majesties Service and being under the Command 
of Capt. Josiah Willard was Captivated by the Enemy and Lost 
a gun of the value of Twelve pounds and the Property of your 
Petitioner who Prays that he may be allowed for the same. 

Samll Chamberlin 
in behalf of the Petitioner 

In the House of Rep'ives Dec. 23, 1748 

Read and in answer ordered that the Commissary Genl be 
directed to deliver to Capt. Saml Chamberlayne a gun out of the 
Province Store for the Use of the Petitioner. Sent up for Con- 
currence T. Hutchinson, Spkr, 

J. Willard Secy. 
In Council Dec. 24, 1748 Consented to 

Read & Concurred. W. Thirlbey. 

[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 73, p. 267.] 

John Henry of Lawful Age Testifieth that he was Taken 
Captive in July Last by the Indian Enemy at the same time when 
Reuben Walker was Taken and that he was well Knowing that 
the said Walker lost his gun he seeing it several times after in 
the Enemies hand and further saith not. 
Concord Nov. 25th. 1748 John Henery. 

Middlesex SS Nov. 25th. 1748. 

The above named John Henry personally appearing made 
oath to the truth of what is above written before me 

James Minot Just. Peace 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 73, p. 268.] 





EFFIGY OF EBENEZER BRIDGE 



HEZEKIAH PACKARD 





WILKES ALLEN 
A'o. 12 



JOHN PARKHURST 



PROVINCE WARS 161 

PETITION OF HENRY STEVENS, JR. 

To His Honour Spencer Phips Esg. 
Province of the Lieutenant Govemer, Captain General 

Massachusetts & Commander in Chief of the Province 

Bay &ca. aforesaid, the Honoble His Majesty's 

Council and House of Representatives in 

General Court Assembled at Boston 

on the Twenty second Day of November 

Anno Domini 174.9. 

The Petition of Henry Stevens junr. of Chelmsford in the County 

of Middlesex, Humbly Sheweth, 

That, he on the sixteenth Day of June A. D. 1748 Then a 
Soldier in the Service of the sd. Province under the Command of 
Capt Josiah Willard, was, at Fort Dummer, captivated by the 
Indians, stripped of what he had with him, and carried to Quebec, 
where he arrived the first Day of July next following, and im- 
prisoned until the 27th Day of August then next, and from thence 
taken and put on board a French Man of War, which was about 
to sail as a Flag of Truce to Cape Briton: That on his Passage 
from Quebec to Cape Briton (where he arrived about the middle 
of September following) he was taken very sick of a Fever, and 
continuing so at his arrival, was put into the Hospital, and there 
detained by his sickness until the 14th of October following, 
before he was able to take Passage for New England (being there 
sometime longer than his Fellow Captives) from thence he then 
sailed, and arrived at Home in Chelmsford aforesd. the 12th 
Day of November following. And that he while in Captivity 
aforesaid suffered great Hardships & Distresses & ca. 

Your Petitioner therefore humbly praj'-s your Honour and 
Honours would be pleased to grant him his full Wages out of the 
Treasury of this Province from the Time he was taken until he 
arrived at Home aforesaid, and a proper allowance for his Gun 
(of the Value of Fifteen Pounds Old Tenor Bills) which the Indians 
took from him when taken. 

And also that he may be reimbursed the simi of Ten Pounds 
Old Tenor Bills, which he was obliged to pay for his Passage 
from Cape Briton (he not being able otherways to procure the 
same) who as in duty bound Shallever pray. 

Henry Steavins, Junr. 

In the House of Rep'ives. Deer. 22 1749 

Ordered that the Treasurer be directed to pay to Capt. 

Chamberlayne Rep'ive. of Chelmsford for the use of the Petr. the 

sum of ten pounds in consideration of his loss of time, sufferings &c 

Ordered also that the Commissary Genl. be directed to deliver 

said Chamberlayne for the use aforesaid a Gun out of the Province 

^^°^^* Sent up for Concurrence 

Attt Roland Cotton Cler. Dom. Rep. 
In Council Jan 3 1749 Read and Concurred 
Sam Holbrook Dep Sec 

Consented to S. Phips 
M assachusetts Archives, Vol. 73, p. 565.] 



162 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

THE FRENCH AND INDIAN WAR. 

This was the fourth intercolonial war and the last and most 
severe of the struggles between the English and French colonies. 
It began in May, 1754 and ended in February, 1763. The Indians, 
as usual, took an important part in this war. After the capture 
of Louisburg (1745), the French had become aggressive. In 
1754 they seized the English fort at the forks of the Ohio, and 
Braddock's defeat took place the following year. Besides this 
expedition against Fort Du Quesne, others were to proceed 
against Niagara and Crown Point. Lord Loudon failed to take 
Louisburg in 1757, but General Amherst succeeded in 1758, and 
the power of France in America declined rapidly. The reader 
must look elsewhere for the fate of Ticonderoga, of Fort William 
Henry, and the events which took place on our northern boundaries. 
A tragic feature of this war was the expulsion by the British of the 
Acadians from Nova Scotia, justified on the groxmds of military 
necessity. More than a thousand, about one-seventh of the 
whole number carried away, were brought to Massachusetts, 
to be for years a burden on the public. [See Longfellow's 
"Evangeline," and Parkman's "Half Century of Conflict."] 

Encouraged by success the Colonists, with England, set out 
to accomplish the total reduction of Canada, which by the treaty 
of Paris was ceded to England in 1763. 

Chelmsford names on a bill for £848:8:0. 
The Province of Massachusetts Bay to John Winslow, Dr. 
To cash paid by himself and Major Frye out of his money to the 
Sundry Soldiers Inlisted in his Regiment. June, 1754. 

Of Capt. Melvin's Co. : 

Benj. Byam, Gordon Hutchins, Benj. Barrot, Joseph Butter- 
field, Simon Farrar, Caleb Bean, Thos. Byam, Andrew Hutchins, 
Solomon Kidder, Wm. Shed, Benj. Hutchins, Timothy Fletcher, 
Nat. Butterfield, Thos. Hutchins, Richard Burge. 

Of Capt. Hobb's Co. : 

Benj. Correy, Oliver Blodgett, John Blazdell, Jonas Parker, 
Leonard Parker. 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 93, p. 139a.] 

1754. In defense of the Eastern Frontiers: 

Eleazer Melvin, Capt., Concord; Centinels Thos. Byam, 
Nat. Butterfield, Caleb Bean (servant to Saml. Chamberlain), 
Benj. Byam, Andrew Hutchins, Thos. Hutchins, all of Chelmsford. 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 93, pp. 136-7.] 



PROVINCE WARS 163 

1754. Company for defence of Eastern Frontiers, Capt. 
John Fox. This roll contains the name of Charles Barron, 
Chelmsford. 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 93, p. 131.] 

1754. In Capt. Humphry Hobb's Co. were: 
Oliver Ban-on, Oliver Blodgett, Patrick Rogers, John Blazdell, 
all of Chelmsford. 

[Alassachusetts Archi\-es, Vol. 93, p. 133.] 

DEPOSITION. 

The Deposition of Jonathan Butterfield and Oliver Blodget, 

both of Lawfull age Testifie & say that being in Company 

with Jonathan Snow & Samuel Butterfield on the head Branches 
of Little Androscoggin River, on Monday the nineteenth of this 
Inst. May. We the Deponts parted with ye said Jona. & Samll, 
& agreed to meet each other at ye place of our departure on ye 
Wednesday following if our business would allow of it, if not to 
meet there without fail if alive & well on Saturday following, 
accordingly our business not allowing to go on Wednesday we 
went on Saturday, but on our return about three miles before 
we came to the place of meeting on a Small Brook we Trackt 
seven Indians (as we then supposed) and coming to the camp we 
found the said Jonathan (as we judged) Kill'd & Scalpt, lying 
out of ye Camp and covered with a Bark. The Deponant Jonathan 
saith as he was viewing the Dead Body (which was very much 
cut & stab'd) the Depont Oliver told me he heard some noise & 
disired I would draw of, that we might make our escape which we 
did and upon our Return to North Yarmouth when we had got 
about eight miles we Trackt about the same nmnber which were 
travelling down towards the English settlement. The Deponts 
say that they judge the person was killed some days before they 
came to the Camp and that they found the shoes of said Snow 
and the buUet bag of the said Samuel in the Camp. And a 
wooden spit stuck in the ground, with a mogasin hung on the end 
of it pointing towards the North West. And further say not. 

Jonathan Buterfield 
Oliver Blodget. 
Sworn May 27, 1755. 

[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 32, p. 613.] 

Sept 22 1755 Men in Expedition against Crown Point. 
Col. Eleazer Tyng's Reg't. : 

Troopers Stephen Adams, John Foster, Wm. Pirce, Peter 
Spaulding, Nathaniel Butorfield, John Foster, Joseph Barret, 
Samuel Stevens, Juner, Gideon Fletcher, Isaiah Spaulding, Samuel 
Fletcher, Joseph Done [Dunn], Jobe Spaulding. Josiah Richard- 
son, Muster-Master. 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 93, p. 194.] 



164 



HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 



Jonathan Butterfields Company. 1755: 

Stephen Adams, Ensign; Saml. Stevens, Peter Spaulding, 
Edw. Spaulding, Simeon Gould, Nat. Butterfield, Joseph Dunn, 
Gideon Fletcher, Job Spaulding, Joseph Barratt, Saml. Fletcher, 
Wm. Barratt, Oliver Spaulding. 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 94, p. 59.] 

A Return of Gov. Shirley's Companies. Nov. 28. 1755. 
Chelmsford Names: 

Major Jedediah Preble's Company on board the Sea Flower 
and Three Friends: 

Age Born. Last Residence, occupation. 

Jona. Howard. Private 35 Chensford Berwick Tanner 



Capt Humphry Hobb's 
Phoenix : 



Co on board Three Friends and 







Age 


Born. Last Residence 


. occupation. 


Eleazer Stevens 


Private 


24 


Chensford 


Chensford 


Labourer 


Patrick Rogers 




22 


Wexford 


" 


" 


John VVarrin 




21 


Chensford 


" 


" 


Benj. Kemp 




22 


" 


" 


Cooper 


John Blasdall 




22 


" 


" 


" 


Jacob Farmer 




41 


Bilricka 


" 


Labourer 


Benja. Byam 




21 


Chelsford 


Chilsford 


Cooper 


Thos. Byam 




40 


" 


" 


Cordwainer 


Ezekiel Davis 




18 


Newton 


Chemsford 


Labourer 


Jere Frost 




19 


Bilricka 


" 


" 


Benj Chamberlain 




18 


Chensford 


" 


<i 


Benj Fletcher 




17 


Bilricka 


" 


" 


Abraham Cummings 




21 


Notingham 


** 


Smith 


Capt Phineas Osgood's Co on board the Sloop Swan & Jolley: 






Age 


Born. 


La.st Residence, occupation. 


Nathl. Butterfield 


Private 


42 


Chelmsford 


Chelmsford 


Husbandman 


Ebenezer Kiterage 


" 


23 


" 


" 


" 


Zebadiah Corey 


" 


22 


" 


Billerica 


Cordwainer 


Wm Correy 


" 


22 


" 


Concord 


Cooper 



Lieut Col George Scott's Co: 

Age Born. 
Nehem. Varnum Private 19 Dracut 



Last Residence, occupation. 
Chelmsford Labourer 



Maj Joseph Frye's Co: 

Age Born. Last Residence, occupation- 

Abner Keys Private 17 Chelmsford Chelmsford Blacksmith 

Daniel Stevens " 18 " " Yeoman 

Capt Enoch Bayley's Co : 



Age 
John Parry Private 20 


Born. 
Boston 


Last Residence, occupation 
Chelmsford Housewright 


Capt Elijah Willard's Co: 






Age 
Nathl. Foster Corporal 25 
Saml. Foster Private 25 
Andrew Hutchins " 25 
Eliakim Hutchins " 22 


Born. 
Chilmsford 


Last Residence, occupation. 

Chelmsford Husbandman 
" Labourer 
" Husbandman 
" Labourer 



PROVINCE WARS 165 

Capt Ephraim Jones' Co: 

Age Born. Last Residence, occupation. 

Saml. Cowdry Private 20 Chelmsford Chelmsford Labourer 

Jona Shed " 45 " Pepperel Yeoman 

[Winslow's Journal. Mass. Hist. Soc] 

Captains Adams. Hobbs and Osgood were with Col. Winslow 
atGrandPr^. See Parkman's "Montcalm and Wolfe," Vol. 1, p. 270. 
Col. Edmund Goffe petitioned the Governor for compensation for 
himself and Henry Blaisdell whom he had appointed "to be 
surgeon to the said forces." 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 72, pp. 169-172.] 

In Capt. Saml. Preston's Company of Littleton. Served 
Aug 11, 1755 to Jan 1. 1756. Travel from Albany to Littleton. 
180 miles, 12 days. 

John Spaulding, Clerk; Privates Oliver Spaulding, John 
Mansfield, Henry Spaulding, all of Chelmsford. 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 94, p. 65.] 

Capt Jonathan Butterfield's Co. : 

Benj. Abbitt, Charles Barron, Simeon Corey, Robert Butter- 
field, Eb. Butterfield, Benj. Manning, James Button, John 
Warren, Isaac Proctor, Benj. Butterfield, Nat. Butterfield, Wm. 
Bowers. 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 94, p. 185.] 

Chelmsford men under command of John Reed & Beniah 
Young. Expedition to Crown Point from Mch. 30, 1755 to Jan. 
5. 1756. Travel from Albany. 20 to 30 weeks service. 

Jonathan Barron, Left.; Moses Parker, Sargt., later Ensign; 
Reuben Corey, Corp., later Sargt.; Joshua Atwood, Private, later 
Corp.; Privates Charles Barron, Isaac Warren, Elisha Procter, 
Asai Marten, Joshua Snow, John Parker, Jacob Parker, James 
Emery. 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 94, p. 105.] 



166 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 



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PROVINCE WARS 



167 



Capt Butterfield's Company. Mustered. Oct. 11, 1756: 
Robt. Butterfield, sick, Sergt.; Benj. Hoagg, sick, Corp.; 
Benj. Butterfield, Corp.; Nat. Butterfield, dead; Wm. Bowers, 
sick; Zebidon Buttman, sick; Simeon Corey, dead; James Dutton, 
Ambross Emery, Nathaniel Langley, dead; Benj. Manning, sick; 
Isaac Procter and Simeon Roby, sick at Albany. 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 94, p. 458.] 

Capt Bayley's Co. : 
Jacob Blasedell and Moses Blasedell. 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 94, p. 458.] 



LIST OF THE ACADIANS CARED FOR IN CHELMSFORD. 

Chehiisford Oct 24, 1757. 
In obedience & pursuant to an Order of the Great and General 
Court of the Province of the Massachusetts Bay, made & passed 
the 21st Day of January A. D. 1757 

The following is a true list of the several French Persons 
names in the Town of Chelmsford, the amount of their age sex 
& the circimistances of their Health & capacity for Labour. 

The Number of Frence are seventeen. 



Vizt. Names 
Jean Landrie a man 
Maudlin his wife 



Paul Landrie his son 

Charles Do Do 

Simon 

Asam 

Charles Trawhorn a man 

Tithome his wife 

Mary their daughter 

Maudlin " 

Joseph " son 

Grigwire " " 

Margaret " Daughter 

Joseph Landrie a son of the sd 

Jean Landrie 

Maudlin his wife 

Jean their son 

Murray Maudlin their daughter 5 months. 

David Spaulding 
Daniel Proctor 
Henry Spaulding 
Jonas Adams 
Andrew Fletcher 



Aged. 

62 yrs. 
60 weekly & unable to labour 
& laboviring under the misfortune 
of a broken arm & the charges 
there of now. 
22 able to Laboiir. 
20 Sickly & not able to Labour. 
18 able to Labour. 
16 " 

29 Sickly & not able to Labour. 
29 able to Labour 
61 
5^ 

4 sickly 
3 

: 7 months 
26 years Healthy & able to Labour. 

26 " " 

2 years sickly & weakly. 



Selectmen 

of 
Chelmsford. 



168 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

December 4, 1758, there were reported two more, Joseph and 
Paul, grandsons of Jean Landrie, twins, six weeks old, sickly. 

The ToA\Ti Records show many items of expense for the 
support of these people, such as rye and Indian meal, shuger, 
beef, mutton, salt pork, peas, syder, rhumb, biscake, fire-wood, and 
medical attendance. They were well taken care of, but of course 
suffered much from home-sickness, loss of friends and property, 
and other things incidental to their sad fate. In one instance 
one of the French is paid by the town for assistance rendered by 
him to his less fortunate companions in exile, as appears by the 
following: — "Joseph Landrie for time spent in moving Jane 
Landrie and wife with their goods from David Spaulding's to 
Ephraim Warrens and for going twice to Dunstable about a 
niirse for said Jane Landrie and wife when sick, five shillings and 
four pence," and David Spaulding is paid for his "cart and oxen 
to move the French from his own house to Ephraim Warren's." 

The Province accounts show items such as the following : 
Jime 14, 1758. Allowed to the Selectmen of Chelmsford for 

supporting French Neutrals, £25.2. 5j. 

Jan. 17, 1759. Allowed to the Selectmen of Chelmsford for 

supporting French Neutrals, £42.2. 6|. 

[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 136, p. 517.] 

An account was rendered by the Town from time to time to 
the secretary of the Province of the expense which had been 
incurred in their support. The following record shows that the 
Town was whoUy, or in part, reimbursed: 

"Chelmsford, April 27, 1761. 
At a meeting of the Major part of the Selectmen it was agreed 
upon and ordered that Oliver Fletcher, Esq., pay to Mr. Samuel 
Perham, Town Treasurer for the Town of Chelmsford for the 
year A. D. 1761, the Sum of twenty nine Pounds eight shillings 
and two pence lawful money, which the sd. Oliver received of 
Harrison Gray, Esq., Province Treasurer, a Grant made to the 
Town of Chelmsford for their last account exhibited for supporting 
Jean Landrie and Family in this Town, which grant was made on 
or about the first of April currant. £29-8-2." 

The fall of Fort William Henry in 1757 occasioned great 
alarm throughout the colony, and troops were hastily organized 
in the different towns to repel the threatened invasion. In 
August the Sheriffs were ordered by the Governor "to keep 
watch over French, and not allow them too great liberty at this 
critical juncture, as in consequence of the surrender of Fort 
William Henry and the attack of Fort Edward, the issue of which 
is uncertain." 

In 1760 Charles Trawhom and family were moved from 
Chelmsford to Concord by order of a committee of the General 
Court. While in this Town they lived in the house of "John 
Blazedel." 



PROVINCE WARS 169 

In regard to the treatment of those Acadeans who "sojourned" 
in Massachusetts, Gov. Hutchinson wrote that "many of them 
went through great hardships, but in general they were treated 
with himianity." We cannot but hope that those whose lot was 
cast among the farmers of Middlesex found some loving hearts 
to help lift the burdens which man's inhumanity had heaped upon 
them. 

Of their ultimate fate much has been written. Many of 
those who had been quartered in the Southern States found a 
permanent home in Louisiana. 

Fifty thousand "Cajeans," as they are vulgarly called, con- 
stitute today a separate community along the "Acadean coast" 
of the Mississippi in the western part of the State. Papers on 
file among the Massachusetts archives leave no doubt that those 
in this state, at least, found homes in Canada. 

Soon after the Treaty of Paris, by which Canada was ceded 
to Great Britain, a correspondence was opened between the 
Governors of Massachusetts and Quebec in regard to their settle- 
ment in Canada. One paper bears the endorsement, "List of 
the Acadeans ready to go to Canada, amounting to 890." 

Muster Roll of The Company in His Majesty's Service under 
Command of Jonathan Butterfield of Dunstable, Captain. 
Gridley's Reg't.'to Crown Point. Feb. 7. 1756 to Dec. 1756. 
Stephen Adams, Lieut. 1 Broke and Cashiered [a broken man 

J for stealing old Iron, vv^as an outlaw.] 
Robert Butterfield Dead. 

Benj Hoagg Corp. Tukesbury. Dead. 
Benj Butterfield " 
John Warren " 

Chas. Barron Drummer 
Nat Butterfield Private Dead 

Wm Bowers " 

Zebulon Buttman " 

Simeon Corey " Dead 

James Dutton " " 

Nat. Langley 

Benj Manning Billerica " " 

Isaac Procter " " 

[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 95, p. 84.] 

A roll of the 1st Military Co — under Capt James Minott. 
contains the names of Oliver Barron, Benj. Barrett, John (or 
Jonas) Bateman, Saml. Estabrooks. 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 95, pp. 322-324.] 



170 



HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 






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PROVINCE WARS 171 

Chelmsford names on a "Muster Roll for the Pay and Sub- 
sistence of a Troop of Horse that were ordered by Col Eleazer 
Tyng and marched for the Relief of Fort William Henry under the 
Command of Daniel Stickney [of Billerica] in August; 1757 — 
Marched to Marlboro. 56 miles. Days 



Daniel Procter Lieut. 


4^ 


£0. 16. 10. 


John Parker 


" 




0. 16. 10 


Simeon Spaulding 


Comet 




0. 13. 6 


Oliver Spalding 






0. 12. 


Josiah Spalding 






0. 12. 


Joseph Spalding 






0. 12. 


William Peirce 






0. 12. 


Solomon Corey 






0. 12. 


Benjamin Parker 






0. 12. 


Phillips Parker 






0. 12. 


Jonathan Butterfield 




0. 12. 


Jonas Spalding 






0. 12. 


Henry Spalding 






0. 12. 


Jacob Howard 






0. 12. 


[Massachusetts Archives, 


Vol. 97, p. 81.] 





1758. Muster Roll of Capt Daniel Fletcher's Co. Col. Ebenezer 
Nichol's Regt. Raised for the Reduction of Canada. (Chelms- 
ford names.) 
Christopher Barrat, (servant to Danl. Lock), Joseph Darling, 

Jonathan Hardwood, Ephraim Keyes, Abner Keyes, Jonas Robins, 

Job Spaulding. 

[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 96, p. 416.] 

Jonathan Buttei-fields Co. in the intended Expedition against 
Canada, 1758. 

Asa Merrill, Asa Kimball, Nehemiah Blogget, Isaac Warren, 
Oliver Wright, John Taylor, Junr, Jonathan Hildreth, John Mears, 
John Warren, Junr, Simeon Goold, Isaiah Corey, John Knowlton, 
Saml. Merrill, Danl. Foster, Benj. Chamberlain, Gideon Fletcher, 
James HayT^^ood, Saml. Danforth, John Williams, Robert 
Scott, vSimeon Wood, Danl. Clough, Caleb Coburn, John Didson, 
Ebenezr. Larrance, Moses Richardson, Ambrus Emery, Saml. 
Hawood, Ebenezr. Kitterage, Robt. Gifhn, Charles McLayn, 
Jonas Farmer, David Bennet, John Rollings, Elathan Sawtell, 
Wm. Needham, Jessee French, Wm. Bowers, Charles Barron, 
Peter Procter, Junr, Peter Procter, Ezekiel Kemp, Amziah 
Hildreth, Zebadiah Kyes, Edw. Spaulding, Pellitiah Whitemore, 
Abijah Goold, Rice Knowlton, Andrew Foster, Thos. Byam, 
Jacob Spaulding, Junr., Samuel Fletcher, Joel Manning, Saml. 
McClure, Joel Parkhurst, Aron Chamberlin, Zachariah Coburn, 
Danl. Clement, Jonathan Jewett, James Sawyer, Benj. Kemp, 
Josiah Hubbart, Medad Combs, John Coary, Jonathan Larrance, 
Danl. Nuting, Simeon Green, James Sunders, Jun., Nicholas 
Sprake, Thos. Kitterage, Henry Foster, Josiah Johnson, Junr., 




172 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

Robt. Morrel, Benj. Bowers, Timo. Farley, Wm. Parry, John 
Chamberlain, John Adams, Joseph Walker, Timo. Read, Jtmr., 
Robt. Blod, Junr., Benj. Swallow, Joseph Parkhurst, Jonas 
Spaulding, Oliver Hall, Jona. French, Thos. Peekock, Ebenezer 
Fisk, Jun., Andrew Richardson, Jun., John Richardson, Stephen 
Wood, Saml. Crosby. 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 96, p. 134-5.] 

In 1758 Stephen Pierce (aged 23), of Chelmsford, was in 
Capt. Bulkley's Company. 

COMMISSION. 

PROVINCE OF THE \ THOMAS POWNALL ESQ. 

MASSACHUSETTS-BAY. j Captain General and Governor 

in Chief, in and over His 
Majesty's Province of the 
Massachusetts-Bay in New-Eng- 
land, and Vice- Admiral of the 
same &c. 

To Jonathan Spaulding. Gentn. Greeting. 

By Virtue of the Power and Authority in and by His Majesty's 
Royal Commission to Me granted to be Captain General, &c. 
over this His Majestys Province of the Massachusetts Bay afore- 
said I do by these presents (reposing especial Trust and Confidence 
in your Loyalty, Courage and good Conduct) constitute and 
appoint You the said Jonathan Spaulding to be second Lieutenant 
of the South Military Foot Company in the Town of Chelmsford 
under the Command of John Alford Tyng Esqr. in the second 
Regiment of Militia in the County of Middlesex whereof Eleazer 
Tyng Esqr. is Colonel. 

You are therefore carefully and diligently to discharge the Duty 
of a Second Lieutenant in leading, ordering and exercising said 
Company in Arms both inferior Officers and Soldiers and to 
keep them in good Order and Discipline and they are hereby 
commanded to obey you as their Second Lieutenant and you are 
yourself to observe and follow such Orders and Instructions, as 
you shall from time to time receive from Me, or the Commander 
in Chief for the Time being or other your Superiotir Officers for 
his Majestys Servnce according to Military Rules and Discipline 
pursuant to the Trust reposed in you. 

Given under my Hand and Seal at Arms at BOSTON, 
the eighteenth Day of October. In the thirty second Year 
of the Reign of His Majesty King GEORGE the Second, 
Annoq; Domini, 1758. 

T. Pownall 

By His Excellency's 
Command, 

Thos. Clarke Depty Secry. 

(Original in the Adams Library.] 



PROVINCE WARS 173 



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174 



HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 



Jonathan Ha>^vood received £2. 19. for sufferings on account 
of exposure at "Green Bush" and expenses while in Captain Bent's 
Company in 1759. 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 73, p. 553.] 

In Jonathan Butterfield's Co.: Wm Hildreth, Phinehas 
Powers, Wm. Powers, Simeon Gould, Sergt. These served from 
April 6, to Dec. 6, 1759. 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 97, p. 364.] 



1760 

A Muster Roll of the Company in his Majesty's service 
under the command of Oliver Barron. Esq. Captain: 

OHver Barron, Capt.; Moses Bradley, 1st Lieut.; Constantino 
Pratt, 2nd Lieut. ; Wm. Brown, Lieut. ;Wm. Page, Isaac Warren, 
Eben Kitteridge, Enos Seward, Joseph Spaulding, John 
Spaulding, Peter Procter, Moses Clement, Joseph Heald, Wm. 
Blasdell, Jacob Brown, Natl. Bradley, Amos Bull, Wm. 
Butterfield, Benj. Barrett, John Cooley, Jon. Chiurch, Jos. Clark, 
Wm. Clement, John Gillson, James Gragg, AUin Greenough, Jona. 
Gillson, Reuben Gould, Nat. Hazeltine, Joseph Haywood, Ezra 
Johnson, Benj. Leath, Jared Munson, Micajah Morrill, Samuel 
Perham, Bernard Pratt, Timothy page (?), Jacob Read, Benj. 
Reed, Jonas Robbins, Solomon Rose, Levi Spaulding, Job Spauld- 
ing, Noadiah Seward, Moses Sanborn, Ezekiel Stone, Jessee 
Saunders, Philip Tilton, Silas Wright, James Webster. 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 97, p. 366.] 

Chelmsford Names on A Return of Men enlisted for His 
Majesty's service for the total Reduction of Canada. 1760. 





By whom enlisted Bom. 


Residence. Age. 


Charles Barron 


Wm. 


Barron 


Chelmsford 


Chelmsford 


28 


John Jewell 






Dunstable 


<( 


17 


Saml Cowdre 






Chelmsford 


" 


25 


Wm. Wright 










({ 


23 


Solomon Corey 










(( 


22 


Jonas Harwood 










(< 


18 


Ebenr. Galusha 










(( 


17 


Moses Barron 










<( 


22 


James Screen 










Lancaster 


22 


Levi Spaulding 










Chelmsford 


21 


Dinnes McLane 


Benj 


Byam 






<( 


17 


John Blassdell 










<< 


29 


Charles McLane 






i< 


<c 


17 


Joseph Dow 






Amesberry 


t< 


17 


John Porter servant to Jonah Parker Wenham 




17 


Thomas Dtirant 






Bill[erica] 


(( 


21 


[Massachusetts Archiv^es, \ 


^ol. 98, p 


.93.] 









PROVINCE WARS 175 

1760. A Muster Rool of the Company in His Majesty's 
sendee under the Command of Moses Parker. Esq, Capt. : 

Moses Parker, Capt.; Josiah Foster, 2nd Lieut.; John Warren, 
David Barker, Wm. Butterfield, Joseph Dunn, Thos. Byam. 
Saml. Brown, Reuben Bates, Oliver Corey, David Dutton, John 
Dunn, Jonas Farmer, Benj. Gould, Robt. Morrell, James Moor, 
Jonah Spaulden, Danl. Stevens, Zach Shed, Oliver Wright. 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 98, p. 160.] 

1760 

Chelmsford Men in Capt. Wm. Barron's Co. of Concord. 
In His Majesty's Service. Travel 90 miles. 

Benj. Byam, 1st Lieut.; Privates: Charles Baron, John 
Blasdell, Sam. Cowdre, Solo. Corey, Thos. Durant (died Aug. 26), 
James Haywood (died Aug. 6), Dennis McLane, John Porter 
(Jos. Parker, Master), Elijah Richardson, Levi Spaulding (died 
June 25), Wm. Wright. 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 98, pp. 254-5.] 

A Roll of Officers and men in Capt Moses Parker's Company 
and Col. Frye's Regiment, in Service in the Province of Nova 
Scotia after the 1st of January, 1760 and at the time of their 
discharge. 

Moses Parker, Capt.; 1st Lieuts. John Clap, Josiah Foster; 
Sergts. John Burrill, John Warren, David Barker, Wm. Butter- 
field; Corpls. Moses ColHns, Thomas Parry, Joseph Dunn, Samuel 
Brown; Privates Zachr. Alexander, Thomas Boutell, Jeremy 
Briant, Benj. Bachelor, John Boston, John Boutell, Thomas 
Byam, Benj. Baker, Colbiu-n Barrett, James Baker, Jr., William 
Baster, Simeon Brooks, Benj. Curtis, Oliver Corey, Job Cowins, 
William Corbett. Samuel Dammon, John Dunn, Timothy Damon, 
Charles Dwymell, Jonas Farmer, John Freelon, Samuel Farley, 
Peter Goss, Daniel Goss, Benj. Gould. Robt. Gilson, Amos Green, 
Edward Gross, John Gross, Thomas Hutchins, Ebenezer Randall, 
John Logan, Eliphalet Lewis, Isaac Lapham, Robert Morrill, 
James Moor, Alexander Orr, William Parris, Jr., Asa Pollard, 
Nehemiah Palmer, Edward Prouty, Moses Richardson, Samuel 
Sheldon, John Sentie, Daniel Stevens, Zachary Shad, Seth Silvester, 
Isaac Torrey, Jonathan Town, David Thompson, Jabez Upton, 
Isaac Walton, Eliphaz Wjonan, Peletiah Whittemore, Oliver 
Wright, Nirah Wran. The whole number, 68. 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 98, p. 450.] 

1760. 105 miles travel. 34 weeks, six days. 
Capt. Jonathan Butterfield, Thomas Byam, Benj. Cham- 
berlan. 

[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 93, p. 136.] 



176 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

1760. Aug. 26. "Orders for a number of men to go on bord 
the Prize Vessals Consisting of 165 men, officers Included, to go 
Voluntiers from the Proventials, also for 41 men to List out of the 
Massachusetts Regts. To Joyne Major Roggers as Rangers in 
Lieu of that Number of the New hampshires that was not fit for 
Rangers. Thompson Maxwell, of Capt. Whitings Company 
Listed a Ranger — & Sergt. [Jonas] Parker [of Chelmsford], Samll. 
Treadwell [of Littleton] Thaddeus Read [of Westford] & John 
Robinson [of Dunstable] wint on Board the Prizes." 
["Three Military Diaries." S. A. Green, p. 61.] 

NOTE BOOK OF OLIVER COREY — IN THE POSSESSION OF THE DADMUN 

FAMILY. 

Oliver Cory his book June the 12d. 1759. 

This day a sloop came in fort fradrek [Frederick] from boston 
and brot Rum and syder and clo[th]ing for us Shuger and all 
sorts of things for us and we had nuws that all Chelmsford pepel 
was well that day 

August the 15d. 1759 then there came in a slop and a skonoer 
and borot sum stores in to fort fradrek at sant John river. 

Aparl the 24d. 1759 then we wnt aboard of a brig whec was 
[ ] upon water then we ariued sant iohns is fort. Sant John 

reur at fort fradrek. 

And I listed the 23d of March and that is now leuen weks 
and three days 

May ye 14d 1759. then [we] spied three french and ingings 
and sent sixteen men besides officers after them and tha spied 
them and chased them but tha culd not git them and the 15d we 
sent thurty men beside and the 18 of May then whe went 13 men 
and I was won of them and they all askered [scared] but one and 
that was Dutton of birikey and we was a fishing at the wars [wiers] 
in the euing 

Wen the ingens shot on us six guns and whe run and we had 
no gon waith os 

June the 15d 1759 in the moring about ten men went 
down to fishing and then the frinch fired at our men and tha cilled 
one and wound one more 

and there was about twenty french and our men run to help them 
and our ofes [officers] called them back all but three or four and 
then run and shot at them and then hailed the wounded men away 
and they retreted and whe sent fiftey five men after them but they 
could not ove tack them. 

September the 6d 1759. then we sent up Sant John riuer 
a bout a hondred men and a skone[r] with two suels [swivel] gons 
in the skoner and they had fight with the french and we lost five 
men that was cilled there and seuen wound all in Ca[pt] parker 
Comp'ny. and one more was wound septemder the 12d 1759 the 
scout came in. 




GRAVESTONES OP COL. JONAS CLARK AND HIS WIFE. 




yu. /;. (JRAVESTUNES OF THE REV. EBENEZER BRIDGE AND MADAM SARAH BRIDGE. 



PROVINCE WARS 177 

September the 28d 1759. 

I have ben listed 27 weks 36 dols for 24 weks 

October the 17d 1759 

A snow a day then I and anouer man dog a grave for one 
of the wound men and berered him that day 

Otober the 18d 1759 then cam a flag a truth [truce] and three 
french for to sw're abegens [obedience] to oure King. 

Octoba the 26d 1759 then about one hundred men went up 
the river and brot down a bout one hundred and seuenty french 
and we 1[ ]e in the 8d of Novembr, 1759. 

March the 5d 1760 it was a very warn day and very wendy 
day and they gees flew breskly that day and dolk [duck] two 

August the lid 1759 then we sent eighty men up the Sant 
John r'ver in six battos 

August the 18d. 1759 then these men came in again and they 
brot in two skonos and riggins fit for sailing and more plonder 
wch is thort is woth about twoo thousand or more and they got 
one boot that they thet is woth fiftey pound and they colled it 
IVIoses for that was it name. 

Jtdy the 9d 1759 then whe sent forty eight men be sids ofes 
[officers] and in hoi was sixty men Capten parker and Lcaften 
foster went up the riuer siant John 

July the 12d 1759 then this scout came in all well and they 
bright in too french men into fort fradrick 

July 12d 1759 then we sent up the riuer seventy men a skout 

July the 16d 1759 then the [s]cout cam in all wll and got 
nothn but sum old plonder a bout one 100 pound worth 33 dols 

June 8d 1759 I writ this and I was on gard 
this fort lies four grat gons twenty four pounders and forteen 
twelve pounders 

Capten Gavis is ouer one Compny and Capten Crits is ouer 
a nother Compny and Capten parker is ouer a nother Compny 
thes are the captens ouer three Compens 

dcember the 25d 1759 we dined with the gonars [gunners] 
and we had a god dener and then we had licker and that night and 
the 26d I went on gard and it snow hard. 

January the 5d 1760 at Sant John at fort fredrick then there 
was six men ran a way from this pis with a skoner 

January th 29d 1760 then the Cumel bur — went to half ax 
with about two hundi-ed french and sixteen men for a gard. 

Oliver Corey made and mended shoes for the soldiers, and 
lent them money, and sold "sider," rum and "bere," and baked 
bread. He charged Jonathan Snow £0. 12. 10 for making a pair 
of shoes, and five shillings for mending "pomps." His name is 
found on several of the preceding rolls. 

The entries in the book are given in the same order as in the 
original. 



178 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

1761. Chelmsford names in Capt. Aaron Willard's Co.: 

Charles Barron, Ezra Corey (servant to John Button), 
Oliver Fletcher (son to Stephen Fletcher), Elijah Galusha, dead, 
(ser\^ant to Saml. Sureen), John Jewell, Charles McLean (son to 
Susan McLean). 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 98, pp. 228 and 389.] 

1762 — Capt William Baldwin, Col. Hoar's Regt. marched from 
Chelmsford to Boston, shipped to Halifax & then sailed to 
aid in the reduction of some French ports in the Gtdf of St. 
Lawrence 

Officers of the South Company in Chelmsford: 

Daniel Proctor, Capt., 1762; Jonathan Harw'^ood, Lieut., 
Jona. Robbins, Ensign. 

[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 99, p. 35.] 

Thomas Farrington's Co. 1762: 

Ephraim Corey, son of Oliver Corey, Littleton; William 
Barrett, Chelmsford; Ezra Corey, Westford; Levi Fletcher, 
Chelmsford. 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 99, p. 120.] 

Chelmsford Names in Capt Moses Parker's Company, 1762: 
Moses Parker, Capt.; Jonas Parker, Sergt.; Corpls, Leon 
Butterfield, John Senter, Rice Knowlton, Saml. Cowdry; Privates, 
Joseph Barrett, Jerh. Butterfield, Thos. Byam, Solomon Crosby, 
Ebenr. Foster (son of E. Foster), John Freeland, Benj. Gould, Jr. 
(son of A. Gould), Jona. Harwood, John Jewell (son of N. Jewell), 
Daniel Keyes (servant to Jos. Moores), Chas. McLain (servant 
to J. Dun), Willm. Perry, Saml. Stratton (servant to A. Spaulding), 
John Stephens. 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 99, pp. 153 and 158.] 

Chelmsford Names in Capt. Jonathan Carver's Company, 
1763: 

Daniel Keyes, Sergt., servt. to Jos. Moors; Jeremiah Butter- 
field, Privates; Luke Bowers (S. of Bowers), Charles 

Barron, Joseph Barrett, Joseph Buttei-field (s. of Wm. Butterfield), 
Uriah Fletcher (s. of Ste. Fletcher), Robert Fletcher (s. of Robt. 
Fletcher, Benj, Fletcher (s. of Jos. Fletcher), Benja. Gould. 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 99, p. 245.] 

Capt. Benjamin Edward's Co.: 

Luke Richardson (son of Henry Richardson), Ebenr. Foster 
(c. of Ebenr. Foster). 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 99, p. 256.] 






PROVINCE WARS 179 

Thursdayjuly 1,1756. 

The Petition of Oliver Adams of Chelmsford in the County of 
Middlesex Executor of the last Will and Testament of Benjamin 
Adams junr. late of Chelmsford aforesd, Housewright, deceased, 
humbly sheweth that the said Benjamin Adams, on the twenty 
seventh Day of September last being Saturday at evening was 
impressed into His Majestys service for the Crown Point 
Expedition then carrying on by Capt Ephraim Spaulding by order 
from Colo. Eleazer Tyng, to compleat a deficiency of Men in his 
Regiment: that on the next Day being Sabbath Day, the sd 
Benjamin received Orders from the said Colo. Eleazer Tyng to 
march the next Day morning for Worcester in the County of 
Worcester & there wait for further orders. And accordingly he 
did the next morning, being Monday, set out for Worcester 
aforesaid not having any Opportunity to settle any of his Affairs 
or even so much as to make any Charges for his Labour against 
those People whom he had then lately laboured for; to the great 
injury of the Heirs at Law of the sd. Benjamin; and that the sd 
Benjamin arrived at Worcester aforesd. the thirtieth Day of 
September last & there Tarryed nine Days and Billetted himself 
at his own Costs from the time that he marched from Chelmsford 
aforesd. eleven Days, at one shilling & six pence per Day — 
before he received, or there was any Provision made for his sub- 
sistance, by the Government; that the sd. Benjamin at Worcester 
aforesd. was put under the Command of Capt Henry Ingalls & 
with him from thence proceeded to Albany, & was employed 
from thence to Lake George as a Guard to the Waggoners Carrying 
Provisions for the Army untill the twenty fourth Day of November 
last, when through the great fatigues of his marches & the Duty 
he was ordered to perform & the very bad and unholesome 
Provisions he did receive & was obliged to eat (or else to starve) 
he was reduced to a low & bad state of health, and thereby rendered 
unable to do any further Duty; he on the twenty fourth Day 
of November aforesd Obtained dismission from the Service under 
the Hand of Colo. John Hazeltine to return Home to Chelmsford 
aforesd.; that in his joiimey & return his illness & weakness 
increased so upon him that he was unable to travel on foot the 
greater Part of the way & necessarily put the charged Eight 
shillings La\vful money for the hire of Horses from Town to 
Town and assistance therein, as also the expence of one shilling 
& six pence per Day for his subsistance for eleven Days in his 
return to Chelmsford aforesd. ; being sixteen shillings & six pence 
Lawful Money, that the said Benjamin on the fourth Day of 
December last got to Chelmsford aforesd. to the House of one 
Peter Procter, within about three miles of his own Lodging, and 
then was taken so very sick of a Fever that he could not hold out 
to be moved to his own Lodging, & continued so at the sd Peter 
Procter's until the eighteenth Day of December aforesd. when 
he died; That thesd. Oliver Adams Executor as aforesd. hath 



180 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

been Obliged to pay to the sd. Peter Proctor for the nursing of 
the sd. Benjamin & providing for the nurses & watchers & trouble 
about the same the sum of one Pound sixteen Shillings Lawful 
money, as per said Procter's receipt. 



Oliver Adams Executor 
July 3, 1756. 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 75, p. 683.] 

£2. 9. Allowed 

Deacon Spaulding was reported among the sick & wounded. 

The Petitition of William Bowers of Chelmsford in the 
County of Middlesex; Humbly Sheweth that he in the month of 
March Anno Domini 1756 inlisted in His Majesty's Service in 
the Crown Point Expedition then carrying on in a Company 
under the Command of Capt Jonathan Butterfield of Colo. 
Gridley's Regiment and proceeded to Lake George & there did 
perform Duty until on or about the Middle of October last & 
then was taken Sick of a Fever & thereby rendered wholly unable 
to perform any further Dut}^, and on or about the first of November 
last continuing unable to perform Duty was removed from thence 
Homeward to a place called the Half Moon, & was there obliged 
to tarry about six Weeks by reason of his Sickness, not being 
able to proceed any further homeward for that term of time, 
that on the 12th Day of December last he got to Capt Brewers 
at a place called Number one, on his Way Homeward & then not 
being able to travel any further by reason of his Great Weakness 
& Sickness & he having before that time sent home to Chelmsford 
for a man & Horse to assist him in the remaining Part of the Way 
Home, & that a man and Horse did come thither to him from 
Chelmsford aforesd. and assisted him Home to Chehnsford 
aforesd. where he arrived on or about the first Day of January 
last, that he was necessarily put to the expence of one Pound 
thirteen shillings and four pence Lawfull Money for the Expence 
of providing for the Man & Horse on the Road, while performing 
the sd. Journey being thirteen Days 
Chehnsford May 23 1757 William Bowers. 

Affidavit signed by Oliver Fletcher Just. Pac. 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 77, p. 13.] 

[£3.3.6. 
Asked] £0.15.2. for man's time. 1/2 per day. £0.15.0. 
hire of horse. 
Remained sick two months. 

£3. allowed. 



PROVINCE WARS 181 

Province of the Massachusetts Bay »&c 

To His Honour Spencer Phips Esq Sec 

The Petition of Zachcriah Emmery of Chelmsford in the County 
of Middlesex Htmibly Sheweth — 

That he in the month of June A. D. 1745 inlisted into His 
Majesty's Sen,dce in the Expedition against Cape Breton under 
the Command of Gershom Davis, Captain, & that he proceeded 
thither, & that in the month of October then next following; the 
General having given Orders for Each Company to choose an 
Agent to send to Boston, in New England, to make up the Muster- 
Roll of Each Company, he was then made choice of by the sd. 
Davis's Company for the same ser\nce and accordingly proceeded 
to Boston aforesd. & Effected the same Business: & that he was 
to have returned again to Cape Breton, but was prevented by 
the Providence of God, being taken sick and continuing so for 
along time; that when he left Cape Breton, he left his Gim with 
& under the care of his son Samuel Emmery who was in the 
same ser\dce under the command of Captain Peter Hunt. & that 
the said son afterward died at Cape Breton, aforesaid, & that 
thesd Petitioners own Gun and his sons Gun were sent in a Chest 
with other Guns to Zeuberbukler Commisary to Briggadr. 
D wights Regmt. to his Agent or Attorney Mr Jarvis of Boston 
mercht. tobe delivered to the owners, but it happened through 
mistake that the sd Chest of Guns was delivered by the sd. Mr 
Jarvis to Mr. Wheelwright Commisary General of said Province 
whereby the said Petitioner hath been Prevented receiving his 
own Gun & the Gun of his son aforesaid, as he ought to have 
done, they being his & his son's own property. 

Your Petitioner therefore humbly prays your Honour & 
Honours would be pleased to make an order that he may be 
allowed out of the publick Treasury of this Province in con- 
sideration of the loss of his own Gun, the sum of ten Pounds ten 
ShilUngs Old Tenor Bills and of his Sons Gun the Stmi of fifteen 
Pounds Old Tenor Bills being the true value of the sd Guns and 
your Petitioner as in duty bound shall ever pray, &ca. 

Zechariah Emery 

[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 74, p. 103.] 

Allowed £3.18.0 in full consideration for the loss of the two 
guns. 

Province of the Massachusetts Bay 

in New England. 

To His Honotu- Spencer Phips Captain General & Commander 
in Chief of the Province aforefaid. The Honourable His Majestys 
Council & House of Representatives in General Court Assembled 
at Boston on Wednesday the second Day of October Anno Domini 
1751. 

The Petition of Oliver Blodget of Chelmsford in the County 
of^Middlesex htmibly Showeth, that his Brother Zacheus Blodget 



182 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

was a soldier in His Majestys Service under the Command of 
Capt. Edward Hartwell of Lmienburgh in the year 1748 and that 
about the middle of July the same year he was Killed by the 
Indians at Lunenburgh aforesd & Striped of his Cloths & Gun 
which the Indians carried away with them. 

Your Petitioner therefore humbly moves your Honour & 
Honours would be pleased to give Order that he & his Brother 
Nehemiah Blodget (a minor) the only Heirs may be reimbursed 
the Simi of Two pounds thirteen shillings & foiu" pence Lawful 
Money the value of the sd. Gun out of the Treasury of the Province 
aforesaid 

Who as in duty bound shall every pray &c. 

Oliver Blodget. 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 74, p. 40.] 

The stun of £2. was allowed the petitioner. 

Province of the 1 To His Honour Spencer Phips Esq 

Massachusetts Bay j Lieutenant Governour and Commander 

in Chief of the Province aforesaid, the 
Honourable His Majesty's Council & 
House of Representatives in General 
Court Assembled, at Boston on Wed- 
nesday the twenty sixth Day of May, 
Anno Domini 1756. 
The Petition of Asa Martin of Chelmsford in the County of 
Middlesex, Husbandman, Humbly sheweth — That he on or about 
the fifth Day of April Anno Domini. 1755. inlisted into His 
Majesty's Service, in the then intended Expedition against 
Crown Point, in a company under the Command of Captain John 
Read of Woburn in the same County, & proceeded in the same 
Company to Lake George and that he on the fourth Day of 
October last being in a low state of Health & not able to do Duty, 
obtained a dismission from thesd. Sei"vice, under the Hand of 
Colo. Jonathan Bagley and the Hand of Amos Putnam, Surgeon, 
to return Home to Chelmsford. Where he arrived on or about 
the twenty first Day of October last, quite in a weak and low 
state of Health, after which in about six or seven Days he was 
taken Sick of a grie^^ous Fever & continued so for a month, & 
there by was rendered unable to do anything for his & his Family's 
Support for the space of twelve weeks, and put to the Charge of 
two Pounds eight Shillings Lawful Monej^ for Doctoring, as by 
the Account of Doctor Samuel King, charged against him herewith 
exhibited may appear, and also to the further charge of the Sum 
of three Pounds twelve Shillings Lawful Money for twelve weeks 
Nursing of him &ca. as per his account for the same herewith 
also exhibited may appear. 

Your Petitioner therefore most humbly prays &c 

Asa Martin 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 75, p. 595.] 
£3. was allowed the Petitioner. 



PROVINCE WARS 183 

May 26 1756 [Heading omitted] 

The Petition of Benja Warren of Chelmsford in the County 

of Middlesex, Saddler — Humbly sheweth that his servant Isaac 

Warren did in the month of April Anno Dom 1755 inlist into His 

Majesty's Service in the Expedition then carrying on against 

Crown Point, in a Company under the Command of Captain 

John Read of Wobum in the same County & proceeded in the 

same Company to Lake George, and was in the morning of the 

Eight Day of September last in the Engagement with the French 

and Indians in the Detachment under the Command of Colo. 

Williams, & then & there lost his Blanket, which he received as 

Part of his Bounty — that he on the thirteenth Day of October 

last being in a low state of Health & not able to do Duty, obtained 

a furlough to retiun home till further order under the Hand of 

Colo. Jonathan Bagley and two Surgeons, and accordingly arrived 

At Home in Chelmsford the twenty seventh Day of October 

aforesd. and on or about the Second Day of November last was 

taken sick of a bad Fevour and Confined to his Bed three weeks, 

& needed nursing five weeks where by your Petitioner was put to 

Considerable Cost & Charge for nursing & watchers, vizt. to the 

charge of the stun of one Pound ten Shillings Lawful Money 
* * * 

[He asks for this amount & a blanket] 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 75, p. 603.] 
£0. 18. 0. allowed. 

1 To His Excellency William Shirley Esq. 
Province of the i Governour of sd. Province and the Honble. 

Massachusetts Bay [ Council with the House of Representa- 

J tives. 

The Petition of David Keyes 
Humbly Sheweth that his Father Solomon Keyes, Commander of 
a Company, on the late Crown Point Expedition, in Colo. Ruggles 
Regiment, who was on the Eighth of Septemr. Killed, on a Scout 
wth Colo. Williams on said day, and was Entirely Stript of 
Everything 

And likewise your Petitioners brother Solomon Keyes Jr. 
had a Mare Imprest from Him, by Major Genl. Johnsons Order 
to Col Gilbert at Albany for the Use of the Waggoners. Your 
Petitioner nor His decest brother, not Having any account of 
Her nor Allowance for said Mare Himibly begs your Honours 
would take it under your Serious Consideration, and allow the 
Account annext — 

And your Petitioner as in duty bound Shall Ever Pray. 
April 9, 1756. David Keyes. 

[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 75, p. 467.] 
Warrant issued July 31, 1756. 
£3. for Gun and £10. for horse allowed. 



184 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

May 6, 1756. 

The Petition of Rachel Parker of Chelmsford in the County 
of Middlesex widow, humbly Sheweth. That her late Husband 
Jacob Parker, of Chelmsford aforesd. in the Month of April A. D. 
1755 inlisted into His Majesty's Service in the Expedition then 
carrying on against Crown Point, in a company under the Com- 
mand of Capt. John Read of Woburn in Said County & proceeded 
to Lake George, & on the Eighth Day of September last in the 
forenoon was in the Engagement with the French & Indians in 
the Detachment under the Command of Colo. Williams & then 
Killed in the same Engagement before he returned to the Army 
at their incampment at Lake George, and in the same Engagement 
lost the Gun he had with him, being his own Property of the Value 
of one Pound Six Shillings, & eight pence Lawful money and also 
the Blanket which he received as Part of his Boimty (besides all 
the Clothing he had then with him.) 

Rachel Parker 
June 14, 1757. Executrix 

[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 75, p. 544.] 
[£1.6.8 and a blanket asked. Nothing granted.] 

May 25 1757. 

The Petition of Ebenezer Goold of Chelmsford. &c. Humbly 
sheweth that his indented servant Zebulon Bootnam in the month 
of April, Anno Dom. 1756 inlisted in his Majesty's Service in the 
Crown Point Expedition under the command of Capt Jonathan 
Butterfield of Colo. Gridley's Regt & marched to Lake George 
& there performed Duty until a little time before the Campain 
finished the same year, when he was taken sick & when the Army 
returned homeward he was brought to Fort Edward, and after 
a considerable time made his way homeward as far as a place 
called Green Bush, and sent home to his Master for a man & horse 
who met him at Springfield. [Sick 8 weeks at home.] 

Ebenezer Goold 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 77, p. 40.] 

£4. 7. 4. asked & a grant for loss of Servant's time 
£4. 10. 0. allowed. 

March 13, 1757. 
The Petition of Benjamin Butterfield of Chelmsford in the County 
of Middlesex Humbly sheweth that he in the month of March 
Anno Dom. 1756 inlisted into His Majesty's Service in the Crown- 
Point Expedition then carrying on in the Company under the 
Command of Capt. Jonathan Butterfield, of Colo. Gridley's 
Regiment & proceeded to Lake George and performed Duty there 
until sometime in October last, when he was taken sick and ren- 
dered utterly unable to perform Duty, and as soon after as he was 



PROVINCE WARS 185 

able he proceeded from thence to a place call'd the half Moon, 
and on the twenty fifth of the same October, at the half Moon 
aforesd. he obtained a certificate under the hand of James Otis, 
Stirgeon, that by Reason of indisposition of Body he was unfit 
for Duty, & so suffered to return home, that he got homeward 
as far as to Capt Brewers at a place called Number one where he 
was taken sick of a Fever & not able to travel any further on foot 
for some time, that he sent Home to Chelmsford from thence 
for a man & Horse to meet him and assist him the remaining Part 
of the Way Home, & afterward when he was able to proceed 
from thence homeward to Spring Field, where a man & Horse 
met him from Chelmsford aforesd. at his Request; and did assist 
him thence home to Chelmsford aforesaid, he not being able to 
travel any further on foot, but must have remained there at the 
Charge of the Province, that he got Home to Chelmsford aforesd. 
on the eighteenth Day of November last, that he was necessarily 
put to the Expence of twenty four shillings in providing for the 
sd. Man & Horse on the Road while performing this Journey 
being eight Days, and also the Charge of nine shillings & four 
pence to pay the sd. man for his time therein expended, being 
eight Days at one shilling & two pence per Day; and also to the 
Charge of twelve shillings for the hire of the sd. Horse for the 
Journey aforesd. and that he was sick and Nursed for the space 
of a month after his return Home, and put to the Charge of twenty 
four shillings for nursing four weeks at six shillings per week & 
that he remained utterly unable to perform labour to support 
himself for the space of two months next after his return home as 
aforesaid. 

Your Petitioner therefore &c. 

Benjamin Butterfield. 

[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 76, p. 485.] 

The Committee reported two pounds eight shillings in full. 



Wednesday Oct. 1 1759. 
The Petition of Mary Keyes of Chelmsford, Administratrix 
on the Estate of her late Husband Zebadiah Keyes of Chelmsford 
deceased — Humbly Sheweth that the sd Zebadiah on or about 
the last of March A. D. 1758 inlisted into His Majesty's Service 
in the pay of this Province in an Expedition carrying on against 
Canada in a company under the command of Capt Jonathan 
Butterfield of Colo Joseph Williams Regiment and marched with 
thesd. Company to Fort Stanwix, at the Great Carrying Place 
& then faithfully performed his duty until about the beginning 
of August then next & there was taken sick & thereby, about the 
last of August he was sent in a "Battoe" to Schenectada & there 
put into the Hospital. He wrote home for a man & a horse which 
the petitioner sent & met him at Canterhook (Kinderhook) 180 



186 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

miles distant from Chelmsford. He arrived home about Oct. 
23, & there languished until the 4th Day of Nov. following & then 
died : That Benj Butterfield the man who went to assist him home 
was 15 days in performing the said Journey 

her 
Mary X Keyes Admx 
Mark 
Test Oliver Fletcher 
Chelmsford Sept 13 1759. 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 78, p. 578.] 

$5. for time and service. 

$7. for provisions. 

$3. used her own horse on journey. 

$2. for comfortable necessaries. 
$17 asked. £3. 6. 10. allowed. 

Affidavits of Mary Keyes & Benj Butterfield attached. 

The Petition of Abner Keyes of Chelmsford in the County of 

Middlesex : 
Humbly sheweth that in the year AD. 1758 he was a Soldier in 
the service & pay of this Province at the Westward in a Company 
Commanded by Capt. Daniel Fletcher of Colo. Nichols Regiment, 
that he was on the twenty eth day of July the same year. Captivated 
by the French & Indians near to half way Brook, when Capt. 
Jones and a number of Officers and soldiers were Killed and taken, 
that he was carry ed by the way of Ticonderoga, Crown Point, 
St. Johns and Montreal to Quebeck and there confined in Goal 
(sic) about two months, that he suffered many hardships there & 
whilest he was v.dth the Indians in travelling thither, that he was 
sent from there to England where he arrived the twenty eighth Day 
of October the same year, and tarried there until the twenty 
second Day of January following and then was with a number 
of Prisoners shipped on Board a Transport bound for New York, 
where he arrived the fourth Day of May last ; but the Kings Agent 
of the Transports one Capt. Price refused to put him & the other 
Prisoners on shore, and told them that if they would not go into 
His Majesty's Regular Service on shore that he would put them on 
board the men of war, upon which some of the Prisoners told the 
Agent that if they must do one or the other they choose to go 
on Shore, & he amongst the rest, & that he with a number were 
directly put on board a Schooner with a number of Regular Officers 
& sent to Albani ; and some that refused to go with the sd Officers 
were put on Men of War; and when he & the rest landed at 
Albani the sd Officers compelled him & the others with him to 
march into the Town & immediately clothed them with the 
King's Cloathing & marched them forthwith to Fort Edward & 
compelled them to serve in the same Service without signing any 
inlistment, & that he served in the fifty fifth Regiment under the 



PROVINCE WARS 187 

Command of Lieut Colo. Aives in Colo. Prideatix Company, until 
about the twenty ninth Day of December last, when he obtained 
a furlough to return Home for a while, not being discharged from 
the Service. 

Yovu" Petitioner therefore most humbly prays your Excellency & 
Honours to take his sufferings and hard usages into consideration, 
and Order that he may receive out of the Publick Treasury of 
this Province a sum equal to what others have received for the 
like sufferings & loss of time &c. * * * 

Abner Keyes. 

Chelmsford March 3, 1760 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 29, p. 30.] 
£8. Allowed March 29, 1760. 



The Petition of John Spaulding of Chelmsford in the Co. of 
Mddlesex humbly sheweth that his son Jonas Spaulding, a single 
person in the Spring of the year AD. 1758 was impressed & 
compelled into his Majesty's service in the pay of this Province, 
without receiving the Bounty of the said Province, and proceeded 
to the Great — Carrying Place, so called, and then performed his 
Duty faithfully in a Company under the Command of Capt 
Jonathan Butterfield, of Col Joseph Williams's Regiment, until 
about the middle of September then next, when he was taken 
sick and rendered unable for further service and there upon was 
conveyed from thence with others by order of the Commanding 
Officer to the Barracks at Schenectada, in Order to return home- 
ward, as soon as able to travel, from whence the sd Jonas sent word 
to your Petitioner to come and fetch him home, pursuant to which 
your Petitioner on the seventh Day of October following sent his 
son Peter Spaulding with a Horse to assist the sd. Jonas home, 
that the sd. Peter Spaulding proceeded to Schenectada about two 
hundred and eighteen miles and there found the sd. Jonas sick 
in thesd Barracks — and unable to travel (the sd Peter Spaulding 
arrived at the sd Barracks the twelfth Day of the same October) 
that on the next Day he set out homeward with the sd Jonas and 
travelled with him eight Days to Spencer-Town, so called beyond 
Sheffield and the sd Jonas then being unable to be removed any 
further homeward by reason of his sickness & weakness having 
increased upon him, the sd. Peter left the sd. Jonas at Spencer- 
Town aforesd. Where he died the twenty-seventh Day of the 
same October; and that your Petitioner necessarilay expended 
in performing that journey, in expences paid three Pounds, seven 
shillings & eleven pence lawful money, and paid for the Journey 
of the sd Horse eighteen shillings lawful money, besides the sd. 
Peters time being twenty days performing the same Journey; 
and that Truman Powell, the man with whom the sd. Jonas was 



188 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

left at Spencer Town aforesd. retained and kept all the sd Jonas's 
cloathing and blankett of the value of three Pounds lawful money, 
for nursing and burying the sd. Jonas, -^^^m Spaulding. 

Chelmsford, Oct. 10, 1763. 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 80, p. 387.] 

£5. 10. to be paid to Sampson Stoddard Esq. for the use of the 
Petitioner — 

The petition of Josiah Parkhurst of Chelmsford in the Co. 
of Middlesex humbly shews that his Apprentice John Porter in 
the year A. D 1700, inlisted into His Majesty's Service in the pay 
of this Province in an Expedition against Montreal under the 
Command of Capt. William Barron and proceeded to Crown Point 
& from thence to Montreal, & back again to Crown Point, & did 
his duty faithfully until about the tenth Day of November the 
same year, when he was taken sick of small pox, and put into the 
Hospital with a number of others, that when the Army was 
dismissed & returned home, Lieut Wesson was left to take care of 
them, and after some considerable Time all of the sd sick soldiers 
but four, who lived, having recovered so far as to be able to travel, 
Lieut Wesson & those able to travel came off from Crown Point 
homeward, and left the sd. Porter and three others, sick & unable 
to travel; with the regulars in a Hospital, that after some time 
the others left as aforesd recovered their Health so far as to set 
out Homeward and left the sd John Porter the only Provincial 
Soldier — that the sd John after he was somewhat recovered he 
broke out with greivous running sores and Ulcers which greatly 
affected him, and some of which run to this Day; and that he 
tarried at Crown-Point sick and utterly unable to travel until the 
fourteenth of May A. D. 1761. When he proceeded from thence 
to Albany about the last of the same May almost naked not 
having any stockings shoes or cloathing fit for his circumstances 
nor any but what the Charity of the People supplied him with, 
and destitute of any money to procure the Necessaries of life to 
support him home; and to prevent starving inlisted himself at 
Albani into one of the New York Batalions, and proceeded with 
them the last year to Osswago & Niagara in their service, and 
was obliged to make use of all his wages not having recovered his 
Health well, that he received for the same service, that he was 
dismissed from the service the first of November, 1761. and 
returned home to Chelmsford about the first of December last, 
and that the sd John was not made up on the Muster Roll of the 
sd Capt Barron for any longer Time than the rest of the Soldiers, 
who returned home at the Time when the Army was dismissed, 
although he was confined at Crown Point until May 1761 as 
aforesd. Where he suffered much, and that there was stopped 
out of his Wages on the Muster Roll six Dollars, for Hospital 
Charges, while he had the Small Pox, that the sd Josiah Parkhurst 
was at the Charge of Six Dollars besides Provisions in sending 



PROVINCE WARS 189 

a Horse and Man, one David Nevens, in May A. D. 17G1, to assist 
the sd John Porter home, who proceeded as far as Ticonderoga 
& who missed of the sd John, & could hear nothing about him 
only that he was dead, & so returned home without finding him — 

Chelmsford May 1762 Josiah Parkhurst. 

[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 80, p. 209.] 

$12 and pay for loss of time asked. 
£3. 12. 0— allowed 

The greater number of these petitions are written in the 
hand of Oliver Fletcher. They give as perhaps nothing else 
could, at this day, the sufferings and losses which these men were 
obliged to meet in the service of the Province. 

The lists of names on the rolls here printed show that Chelms- 
ford was called upon to make a large contribution of men to these 
wars, and many lives were sacrificed. 

Lieut. Jona. Barron was in the successful siege of Quebec. 
Upon his return he presented Parson Bridge with a silver cup 
taken there. Lieut. Barron afterwards lost his life in the cam- 
paign against Crown Point in 1755, as did three other Chelmsford 
soldiers, viz. : Jacob Parker, James Emery and Solomon Keyes. 

In the unsuccessful campaign of 1756, undertaken against 
the same point, of twelve Chelmsford men in the company of 
Capt. Jonathan Butterfield, of Dunstable (a native of Chelmsford), 
five lost their lives, viz.: Nathaniel Butterfield, Simeon Corey, 
James Dutton, Isaac Proctor, and Nathaniel Langley. John 
Barrett died at Lake George. 

Joseph Richardson, Elija Galusha and Zebediah Keyes lost 
their lives. SamuelEmery died at Cape Breton. Jonas Spaulding 
died after reaching home in 1758. 

The fall of Fort William Henry, at the head of Lake George, 
in 1757, occasioned great alarm, and troops were hastily sum- 
moned to repel a threatened invasion. 

Among the certificates relating to captives taken at Lake 
George is this: "Elijah Butterfield taken at Lake George, A. D. 
1757, being one included in the capitulation. 

Chelmsford, Sept. 29, 1758. Nathaniel Butterfield." 

Others who gave their lives in these wars were: William 
Martin, at Cape Breton, 1745; Zacheus Blodgett, 1748; Timothy 
Howard, at Halifax, 1749; James Emery, at Fort Edward, 1755; 
Samuel Foster, of a fever, at Schenectady, and Robert Butterfield 
at Crown Point, 1756; Leonard Emery, at Louisburg, 1759; 
Zechariah Keyes, a ranger at Quebec, 1759. These in 1760: 
A son of Jonathan Harwood, Levi Spaulding (son of Lt. Jonathan), 
Thomas Durant and James Haywood. Eben Lyon and Abraham 
Comings died here in 1756. "lately returned from Nova Scotia." 



CHAPTER IV. 
THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION. 

AMONG the causes of irritation which led to the feeHng against 
England were the Stamp Act of 1765 and the Quartering Act, 
which required the colonists to find lodging and provisions for 
British troops. 

In 1740 the General Court in Massachusetts had authorized 
a Land Bank "to issue notes based upon nothing but mortgages 
on land & personal bonds, with surety, given by those who sub- 
scribed to its support, and Parliament at the solicitation of Boston 
men who knew what certain disaster such a bank would bring 
upon the business of the colony, had * * * suppressed it. 
The scheme had been in great favor among the men of the country 
districts," and John Adams said this Act caused a greater ferment 
than the Stamp Act did. 
[Woodrow Wilson: Hist. Am. People.] 

Among the partners or subscribers were Joseph Barrett and 
Gershom Procter of Chelmsford. 

The riotous opposition excited by the passage of the Stamp 
Act by Parliament is thus alluded to in Parson Bridge's diary: 

August 30, 1765. — "Every day we hear ye news from Boston 
of ye mobish doings there in which first insurrection they hanged 
Secretary Oliver in effigy, and then burned him; burned the 
stamp-office, etc., rifled his dwelling. . . All this is owing 
to ye stamp act." 

The house of Lieut. Governor Hutchinson was sacked and 
\'aluable property and records destroyed. 

When, upon the accession of Pitt to the ministry in England, 
the Stamp Act was repealed, hope again revived in the Colonies, 
and there was much rejoicing. Colonel Stoddard's house was 
illuminated in honor of the event. Bridge writes, "May 22, 1766. 
Spent the evening at Col. Stoddard's, with abundance of other 
company. His house being illuminated, &c., on acct of the news 
of the repeal of the Stamp Act." It proved, however, that the 
hope was not well founded. 



THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION 191 

When, in consequence of the dissolution of the General Court 
by Governor Bernard, the convention of September 22, 1768, 
was called by the Committee of Safety of Boston to deliberate 
on measures to obtain redress of grievances, this town was one of 
the ninety-six there represented, Colonel Samson Stoddard being 
the delegate. 

Colonel Stoddard asked for instructions from the town as 
to how he should act in the General Court. 

Oct. 21, 1765 The Town "voted to give Instructions to 
Sampson Stoddard Esqr. Representative for sd Town [Chelmsford] 
how to act in the Great and General Court. Respecting the Act 
of Parliament called the Stamp act. 

Voted to chuse a committee to prepare Instructions for that 
purpose. Voted that Ephraim Spaulding, Aaron Chamberlin and 
Timothy Clark be the Committee for that purpose. The Com- 
mittee reported as follows: 

This being a time when by reason of Several Acts of Parlement 
not only this Province but all the English Collonies on this Conte- 
nent arc thrown into the utmost Confusion and perplexety: the 
Stamp act, as we apprehend, will not only Lay an unconstitutional, 
but an Unsupportable Tax upon us; and deprive us, as we humbly 
conceive, of our Rights and priviledges that we are Intitualed to, 
as being free born Subjects of Great Brittan, by Vertue of the 
Royal Charter ; and will also Strip us of one of our most valuable 
priviledges, for it admits of our being tryed by a Court of Admiraltj'' 
without the priviled[ge] of a Jury in such contreversies as arises 
from Internal concerns. 

Wherefore we think it our Duty and Interest, at this Critical 

Conjuncture of our publick affairs, and when in Danger of being 

deprived our Liberties and priviledges most valuable and precious 

unto us. To direct you Sr. our Representative to be so far from 

countenanceing or assisting in the Execution of the aforesd Stamp 

act, that you Use your Best Endeavors that such measures may 

be taken and Remonstrances made to the King And Parlement, 

as may obtain a Speedy Repeal of the aforesaid act, and that 

you use yoiu* Utmost Endeavours to remove the heavy burthen 

on Trade — and as the Province is greatly Impovershed by Reason 

of the late war, and the Great decay of Trade, we desire you to 

use your Best Endeavours that the publick monies be used with 

the utmost Frugality, and that no money be Drawn out of the 

Treasury, but what shall be applied to such Uses only as shall 

have a tendancy to promote the Interest of the Inhabitants in 

General. As to any other matters, tho of less Importance, that 

may come before the Honble house of Representatives we Doubt 

not, Sr., but you will conduct yourself in such a manner as shall 

tend to promote the best Interest of the province in General, 

and this Town in perticular. „ , r, , ,. > 

Ephm Spauldmg 

Aaron Chamberlin [ Committee 

Timothy Clark J 



192 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

WARRANT FOR SPECIAL TOWN MEETING. 

Middlesex S.S. To Andrew Battles one of the Constables of the 
Town of Chelmsford in the said County of Middlesex 

{] In his Majesties Name You are hereby Required forth- 
SEAL !■ with to warn all the freeholders and other Inhabitants 
J of the Said Town (in your ward) Qualified by Law to 
Vote in Town Affairs; to Assemble at th Meeting house in Sd. 
Chelmsford on Monday the first day of September next : at three 
of the Clock in the afternoon, tben and there (if they see cause) 
to give their Representative Instructions how to act in the General 
Court with respect to making good the Damages to [those] that 
ware Sufferers in the late affairs that happened by reason of the 
Stamp Act; and to act anything in that affair that they shall 
think proper. 

2dly To Give in to the Selectmen of sd Town a true Invoice of 
the Nxmiber of their Rateable Polls, and all their other Rateable 
Estate in order to make the Town and Province Taxes for the 
present Year; hereof fail not: and make Return of this warrant 
with your Doings thereon unto the Town Clerk some time before 
the time appointed for sd Meeting; Dated at Chelmsford afore- 
said the twenty fifth day of August in the sixth year of his 
Majesties Reign. Anno domini, 1766. 

By order of the Selectmen of Said Chelmsford. 

Ephraim Spaulding. Town Clerk. 

On the question whether the Town was willing that the 
Damages resulting from the tumults that happened by reason 
of the Stamp Act should be paid out of the public Treasury the 
vote was in the negative. 

An article in the warrant for a special Town Meeting in 
December, 1767, reads To see if the Town will come in with the 
Proposals of the town of Boston that some prudent and legal 
measures may be taken to encourage the produce and manu- 
facturies of this Province and to lessen the use of superfluities, 
&c. 

Voted: to encourage the manufacturies of this Province and to 

discourage the importation of foreign superfluities. 

1768 Sept 19 A warrant was issued for a town meeting to choose 

a person or persons to join with the Committee of Boston & other 

towns to meet in Faneuil Hall Sept 22. "to consult what measiu-es 

may be taken for The Real Service of our Gracious Sovereign and 

the welfare of his Subjects in this Province under the distressing 

Circimistances of the Present Day. 

Sampson Stoddard Esq was chosen a Committee man for that 

Purpos. 





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GRAVESTONE OF THE REV. THOMAS CLARKE 




No. 14 



THE STODDARD TOMB 



OLD SCHOOL HOUSE 



THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION 193 

The "Boston Massacre" occurred in 1770. 

The "Boston Tea Party" took place in December, 1773, 
when fifty or sixty men, disguised as Indians, Mohawks, boarded 
two vessels laden with tea, tore open the hatches, and threw 340 
chests overboard, as a protest against the levy of taxes by the 
British government without the consent of the people. The 
populace had previously refused to permit any cargo of tea to 
be landed, and a number of ships had been obliged to leave port 
with their cargoes untouched. The British Parliament passed a 
bill closing the port of Boston until the city should indemnify 
the owners of the £15,000 worth of tea destroyed, and transfemng 
the seat of government to Salem. The bill became a law on 
March 31, 1774, and its effect so exasperated the people that 
Gen. Gage, the British Commander, began to fortify Boston 
Neck, the only approach to the city by land. A regular siege 
was maintained by the Americans from July 3, 1775, when Wash- 
ington took command, to March 17, 1776, when the British 
evacuated the cit}'- and went to Halifax. 

Some of the Pitts family, members of which aftenvards 
resided in Chelmsford, participated in throwing overboard the 
tea. James Pitts and his sons John, Samuel and Lendall, were 
all associated with the Tea Party. 

Jan. 11, 1773 at a meeting of Freeholders and other Inhabi- 
tants. In consequence of some papers sent up by the Town of 
Boston enumerating sundry grievances, and Particularly the 
stipend annexed to the offices of the Judges of the Superior Court. 

Voted to Chuse a Committee of five Gentlemen to make 
Report to the adjournment viz. David Spaulding, Mr Jonathan 
Williams Austin, Capt. Oliver Barron, Mr Samuel Perham and 
Mr Benjamin Walker. 

On Jan. 21, the Committee Reported the following Draft 
which was uninamously agreed to: 

We are fully of oppinion, that the Inhabitants of this province 
are Justly entituled to all the Priviliges of Englishmen, & to all 
those Rieghts, inseperable from them as members of a free Com- 
munity. We are also Sensible that Some of those Rights are 
at present endangered. In such unhapp}'' Circmnstances, the 
only Question that can be made is this, what method is most 
suitable to obtain a Redress. Whatever Doubts may arise about 
the perticular mode, this we are clear in, that all Rash, Unmeaning 
passionate Proceeduers are by no means Justifiable in So Delicate 
a Crisis, when a Community thinks any of its Rights endangered, 
the}'' should always weigh Consequences, and be very Cautious 
least they Run into a Step, that may be attended with the most 



194 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

deplorable Effects. The Cause of Liberty, says a very fine 
Writer, is a Caiise of too much Dignity, to be sullied by Turbulance 
and Tumults. "When the Passions of a People are Inflamed, 
Reason is too often Silenced, and they soon forgit the Cause they 
originally imbarked in. Whereas the Patriot on true principles, 
always endeavours to Keep those Principles in View, conscious 
that he is a member of a Community he will endeavour to come 
up to all the obligations, Resulting therefrom, & to keep every 
part of it entire. Therefore while he cooly, but firmly pleads his 
own Right, he will never forget those of his Sovereign; but is always 
sensible. Loyalty to the prince & a Regard to the Liberties of the 
Subject are very Consistant things. These are Sentiments we 
are very full and Clear in, and by them we hope to Regulate our 
present Conduct. Greevencies we at present Labour under: 
But we can by no means think the Resolves of a Single Town Can be 
any Removeal. We hartily concur with our Brethren of Boston, 
that it is high Time, these Greevencies be Redressed; but then 
we think the general Court who Represent the province is the only 
Proper body to Preform this Task. The Cause of Liberty never 
more suffers, then when measures are pursued for its Defence, 
that can Never answer the end proposed. We are therefore of 
opinion that we can do nothing. Consistent with that Wisdom 
which will ever govern a free people. But Prepair the following 
Instructions to our Representative, which we heartily and 
unanimously concur in: 

To Mr. Simeon Spaulding, Representative of the Town of Chelms- 
ford in the General Court of this Province. 

"Sir, as the Present aspect of the Times is Dark and Difficult, 
we Do not Doubt but you will chearfully know the sentiments and 
receive the assistance of those you Represent. The matters that 
may now come under you Cognizance are of great Importance. 

The highest Wisdom, therefore, Prudence and r)e[s]CTesion 
is evidently necessary. We would earnestly caution you and 
your own good sense will easily see the propriety of it; by no 
means to consent to any Rash, Passionate Plan of Action, which 
will not only sully the Dignity, but finally prove the utter Destruc- 
tion of the cause we pretend to support. We hope those little 
animosities that involve persons, not things, and which have been 
too frequently used may be utterly banished, we hope every 
Determination will founded in the nature of a free State, and that 
therefore every Privilege annexed to each part may be Religiously 
Preserved. Of Consequence, you will be Careful not to trample 
on Majesty, while you are firmly but Decently Pleading the 
Liberties of the Subject. In fine, we wish you that wisdom which 
is from above, and we pray God that your conduct is this Important 
Crisis may be such as the coolest Reflection will ever after justifie." 

When the news of the Act closing the port of Boston and 
transferring the seat of government to vSalem was received, "At 



THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION 195 

a very full meeting of the freeholders and other Inhabitants of 
the town of Chelmsford May 30. 1774, in Consequence of Letters 
sent to the Committee of Correspondence of this Town by the 
Committee of Correspondence of the town of Boston, containing 
matters of as great Importance as ever came before a Town- 
meeting," a Committee of Correspondence was chosen, consisting 
of Jonathan Williams Austin, Captain Oliver Barron, Mr. Samuel 
Perham. David Spaulding, Mr. Benjamin Walker, Deacon Aaron 
Chamberlin, Captain Moses Parker, Mr. Samuel Stevens, Jr., 
and Mr. Simeon Spaulding, and the town expressed the following 
sentiments ; 

It is the opinion of this Town that the present Day is as 
Dark and Distressing a Day as this Country ever experienced, 
perhaps the Liberties of the Land, in no period, from the first 
Settlement of our Fathers, were ever as endangered as of present, 
and when we consider the aspect of the times, not only what has 
actually taken place, but what we are Immediately threatened 
•with, we must think that the Question is, whether we submit^ to 
the arbitrary, lawless, tyrannical will of a minister, or by using 
those Powers given us by the God of nature, and which it were 
sacrilege to surrender, prevent so awful a Catastrophe; and it is 
extremely afflicting to us to Consider that, if we are made Slaves, 
we are so made by a nation whom we ever gloried in as a parant 
State, whose Honor was Dear to us, and to secure whose reputation 
the best, the Richest Blood of this Country has been Spilt, and 
who ever is acquainted with the Annals of America must know 
that their never was a time when it was not our ambition to expend 
Life & Treasure for the Service of great Britain. And after all 
this waste of Blood & Treasure we found acts taking Place for the 
Purpose of Raising a Revenue, the Direct Tendency of which was 
to entail Slavery on us and our Posterity, we were willing to 
impute it to any other Cause, than a Direct Intention to enslave. 
And it has been to the Honour of the several towns of this 
Province, in their Instructions, and of the House of Representatives 
in their proceedings, that they have remonstrated & reasoned on 
the nature, Tendency and unhappy consequences of such acts. 
But these Remonstrances, these arguments have been totally 
Disregarded. And as if this was not sufficiently afflicting to vs, 
the Capital of the Province is actually ruined, by an act of 
Parliament, which we must say is as Cruel, and Severe an act as 
ever originated in the Breast of any minister in the worst of times, 
an Act, that not only ruins that Town, but must in the end prove 
the Destruction of us all. And when we consider the Temper of 
the Present minister, his Influence in the Present Parliament, 
and the Bill he has brought in to alter our civil Government, we 
justly fear as Compleat a System of Slavery is forming for this 
Province, as any People unhappily experienced. 

In this Dangerous and critical Situation, after cool and 
serious Thought, these are our Sentiments, that the notion of the 



196 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

Right of the Parliament of great Britain, their taxing this People 
for the purpose of raising a Revenue is utterly unconstitutional 
and which we never will concede to. Taxation without Repre- 
sentation we have no Conception of, and as we suppose it to be 
productive of absolute Slavery, so we must be Justified in never 
submitting to it. We have too many Instances in the History 
of mankind of the unhappy consequences that attend a Contrary 
Doctrine. When once a people have yielded the Right of granting 
their own monies, and permitted the King to exercise this power, 
when and in what manner he pleases, that moment they become 
Slaves. France was once free, but in Consequence of such 
Behaviour, their Estates and Lives are at the absolute Disposal 
of the monarch. The Cortes of Spain had once the same Rights 
with our parliament. But having allowed the King on a Particular 
occasion to raise monies without their interposition, they lost 
their Authority, and the People their freedom.. 

The present act respecting the blocking up the port of Boston, 
we esteem dangerous and Destructive. If the head of the province 
is Demolished, we look upon the Consequences in a political 
sense, as ruinous as in a natural. In both cases the members must 
suffer with it. And considering the Bills which are now in agita- 
tion, we are of oppinion, the Present act is Like the Bird of Noah, 
Sent over the Waters; if it find footing here, every other Evile 
will certainly follow. 

"We are not so lost to every generous principle of the human 
mind as not to sympathize with our Brethren of Boston, who have 
in a more peculiar sense been struggling in our Common Cause 
and are now suffering for our Cominon Liberties; and we think 
the act so very Severe and Cruel and consider at the same time the 
principle on which it was sent, so we are Determined to Support 
with all our power the town of Boston, in Defense of Rights 
Coinmon to us all. And while we are sensible our Cause is Right, 
we are Resolved never to submit to the Iron hand of Despotism 
and oppression. 

It is with Greef we find the House of Representatives removed 
from their ancient Seat in Boston. We shall not examine into the 
particular causes of this proceedure, we hope that as former Houses 
have Resolutely protested against this Indignity, the present House 
will not tamely acquiesce in it. We submit this to the wisdom 
of the House, and have no Doubt they will act worthy the guardians 
of a free people. One thing further, we think it our Duty to 
mention in the present Emergency. We are Informed that an 
address has been prepaired to the late Governer Hutchinson, by 
Gentlemen in Different Departments on his leaving the province. 
We are of opinion that an handle may be made of this proceeding 
by our Enemies, who are numerous and Crafty, as if his adminis- 
tration had been agreeable and happy to this people. We by 
no means Intend to Question the uprightness of those Gentlemen's 
Intention, but as a Town, and as a part of the Community, we 



THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION 197 

are obliged to say that so far from thinking that the late governor 
was a friend, we cannot but look upon him to have been very 
Inimical to the province, and we think the man, who would 
willingly "abridge english Liberties," would as willingly see the 
Town of Boston Ruined & the civil polety of the province altered. 

And we resent the base Treatment which that illustrious 
defender of american Liberty, Dr. Franklin, has received for 
Detecting such wicked Designs, but we have the pleasure to be 
assured he may be reviled, but cannot be disgraced. May he still 
live to be guardian of our Rights and the scourge to the Enemies 
of Liberty on both sides the Atlantic. 

And when he Dies, have a monument of marble erected to his 
memory. In fine, when we Consider what a melancholy Situation 
our Public affairs are in; acts of Parliament sent over to enslave, 
and because Resisted, threatned to be dragooned into obedience, 
when our Capital is ruined, and the many thousands of her poor, 
exposed to want and all the Horrors of poverty and misery and 
oxir other sea ports, out of a generous principle. Reducing them- 
selves to the same piteable Circumstances, our Hearts bleed within 
us. What can be thy policy, O Britain, by this Conduct. Not 
only our poor, but thousands, of thine own Subjects must suffer 
with them. Torn from the [ ] by so violent an Effort, 

Britain must bleed in every Vein. 

But in such a situation we dont think it sufffcient to weep 
only at the Distresses of our Country; we think our Union is our 
Life — the contrary is Death. We mean, therefore, to preserve 
this union Inviolate at all Hazards and we are Determined in a 
manly, firm, virtuous, and joint way, neither cajoled on the one 
hand nor Intimidated on the other, to Secure and Defend our 
liberties, those Liberties purchased for us by our ancestors, at the 
expense of so much Blood and Treasure, and before they are 
wrenched from us, to struggle hard, very hard for them, con- 
sidering ourselves as the guardians of unborn millions ; and O our 
God! in the midst of this Struggle we would look up for Thy 
Direction and assistance; may the Liberties of America still 
flourish under Thy smiles as they eminently did in the Days of 
our Fathers. 

May we look up to the in every step we take, and do thou 
give us an head to Contrive and an Heart to execute, and grant 
in the most adverse Situation of our public affairs, we may trust 
in thee, and may this be the prevailing Sentiments of us all — 
IN FREEDOM WE'RE BORN AN DIN FREEDOM WE' LLDIE. 

Voted, — That the foregoing Draught (after being Twice 
Read) be sent to the Committee of Correspondence of the Town 
of Boston. 

The Committee allowed an account of their proceedings to 
be printed in the Boston Gazette before it was sent to the Boston 
Committee. Today we might attribute this to the activity of 



198 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

some enterprising reporter. They took the blame upon them- 
selves, and indited the foUowinj^ a]3ology to Boston. In both 
documents we recognize the hand of Jonathan Williams Austin. 

To the Committee of Correspondence for the Town of Boston. 
Gentlemen : 

As the Representative of the Town of Chelms- 
ford has received the Votes & Instructions of, the said Town, 
which Votes & Instructions have been committed to the Printers 
of the Boston Ga^zette, and not in the first place delivered to you, 
we take the earliest Opportunity to apologize for such a mode of 
Conduct. Situated as We are in a Corner of the Earth, which 
the particular Transactions of the Province seldom reach, We 
were utterly ignorant that the Votes of each Town, were sent 
directly to the Committee of Correspondence. But imagining 
that the Design of these Meetings, was to know the Sentiments 
of the Province, We were of Opinion that the readiest Way to 
collect these Sentiments was their Appearance in print. To this, 
and this only was owing the Conduct of the Committee of this 
Town, and not to any Disrespect to the worth}^ Committee of the 
Town of Boston. On the contrary We entertain the sincerest 
Affection for You, as Brethren embarked in one comman Cause, 
and heartily wish the divine Approbation on all your Endeavors. 
Difference of Sentiment in immaterial Matters will unavoidbly 
take place. It is impossible it should be otherwise, while hmnan 
Nature is thus framed. But we hope this will never cause an 
alienation, while we fully agree in the most essential points. 
In fine.. Gentlemen, as we think you are actuated by the 
purest Motives, we heartily wish Success to 3'our Undertakings. 
And while your plan of Action is such, as will evince a true 
Magnanimity of Soul, a thorough Knoivledge of the Constitution, 
Loyalty to the Prince and Affection to the Rights oj the People, 
We hope almighty God will bless, & prosper You: And that all 
Mankind will willingly acknovv'ledge THE only right to be the 
Metropolis of a free State, who can so well understand the true 
Nature of their Rights, and who can so cooly, dispassionately , 
loyally and firmly watch over, protect and defend them. — 

We are, Gentlemen, 
with much Respect, 

Your very humble Servants 

David Spaulding 
Jona. W. Austin 
Oliver Barron 
To the Committee of Samuel Perham 

Correspondence of the Benjamin Walker 

Town of Boston. The Committee of the Town of Chehiisford. 

[No date] [1774] 
[Original in the Adams Lil^rary.] 



THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION 199 

The people of Chelmsford manifested their sympathy for the 
sufferers at Boston by collecting sheep and cattle and sending 
them to their relief. vSamuel Howard and Captain Samuel 
Stevens drove them to Boston, for which the Town paid them at 
a later date. 

"The expressions of the Town during all this trying period 
show that the hostilities which followed were not of their seeking. 
Their language is not the language of men eager to achieve glory 
by deeds of anns; nor was their intense desire for a peaceful 
solution of the difficulties, and caution against rash measures, 
the caution of timidity, as their subsequent acts abundantly 
testify." [H. S. P.] 

They had at first no desire to sever their connection with the 
mother country. 

During the first stages of the war hardly any American of 
prominence, possibly with the exception of Samuel Adams, enter- 
tained any idea of separation. Benjamin Franklin declared that 
whatever else the Americans might desire, they did not want 
independence, and Washington asserted that at the time he took 
command of the Army (July, 1775) he abhorred the idea of 
separation. [Hist. U. S., Garner and Lodge, p. 409.] 

Middlesex vS.S. To Josiah Parkhurst one of the Constables of 
the Town of Chelmsford in the County of Middlesex — Greeting — 

[ ] In his majesties name you are hereby Required forth- 

i SEAL \ with to warn all the freeholders and other Inhabitants 
[ J of the said Town (in your ward) Lawfully Qualified to 

vote, to assemble at the meeting House in Chelmsford aforesaid 
on monday the Twenty-seventh Day of June Instant at three 
of the Clock in the afternoon. Then and their to Consider of 
Certain papers Sent up from Boston to the Committee of Corre- 
spondence of this Town, Containing Proposals for a Plan Supposed 
to be the most Likely meathord to Prevent either absolute Slavery 
or the Troubels of a Civil V/ar; here of fail not and make Return 
of this warrant with your Doings thereon unto the Town Clerk 
Some Time before the Time appointed for Said meeting Dated 
at Chelmsford aforeSaid the Sixteenth Day of June in the four- 
teenth year of his majesties Reign. Anno Domini 1774. 

At a Publick Tov/n meeting of the freeholders and other 
Inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford being Duly warned and 
Regularly Assembled at the meeting House in vSaid Chelmsford 
on Monday the Twenty Seventh Day of June A. D. 1774 .;,,■, 

Voted David Spaulding moderator for Said meeting. 

The papers being Read and Considered of Sent up from 
Boston to the Committee of CoiTespondence of this Town — 



200 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

Voted That the papers Signed by the Inhabitants of this 
Town Shall be Kept in the Town Clerk's office of this town. 

Upon a motion made & seconded it was then put to vote to 
See if the Town would Reconsider the Last vote and it was 
accordingly Reconsidered by voting. 

Voted That the paper Signed by the Inhabitants of this 
Town Shall be Kept in the Town Clerks office of this Town untill 
Such Time as we are Informed that the Town of Boston and the 
other Towns of this Province Shall have signed Similar Papers, 
otherwise This Signing to be of none Effect. &c. &c. 

Chelmsford sent two delegates to the first Provincial meeting 
at Concord in August, 1774. They were Jonathan Williams 
Austin and Samuel Perham. A Committee of Inspection was 
chosen to prevent the purchase of any articles inported from Great 
Britain. It was voted to equip the Alarm list with the imple- 
ments of war, also to raise and equip fifty minute men. 

The Middlesex Convention met at Concord, August 30 and 31, 
1774, "to consult upon measures proper to be taken at the present 
very important crisis." Ebenezer Bridge, Jr., was clerk. Simeon 
Spaulding, Benjamin Walker, Zacheus Wright and Jonathan 
Williams Austin were jDresent. The latter was chairman of the 
committee appointed to take into consideration the Act of Parlia- 
ment for the better regulating of the government of the Province, 
and is supposed to have drafted the resolutions adopted by the 
Convention. 

The following is from the address of Henry S. Perham at the 
Bunker Hill Day outing of the Daughters of the American Revo- 
lution, in Chelmsford. June, 1896. 

At the time of the Revolution (census of 1770, Allen, p. 184) 
the town of Chelmsford contained a popluation of 1341. It 
included within its limits the greater part of the land now occupied 
by the city of Lowell, and also a large part of Carlisle. 

A century and a quarter had elapsed since the first settlement 
of the town, and the men upon the stage were cultivating well 
tilled farms, where their great grandfathers had first felled the 
forest. Comfortable and well-built houses, many of which are 
standing today, had taken the place of the small and ruder dwell- 
ings of the early settlers. During three quarters of a century of 
the time embraced in this period, beginning with King Philip's 
war, when this was a frontier town and the people were living in 
constant apprehension of attacks by the savages, and continuing 
through the long struggle between the French and English for 
supremacy on this continent, the young men of the colonies were 
receiving a training in arms. In all the campaigns of that period 
the men of Chelmsford participated. We find the names of several 
of the natives of this town in the roll of Lovewell's devoted band. 



THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION 201 

And wc find them engaged in that surprising achievement 
by the New England miHtia, the reduction of Louisburg. They 
took part in the conquest of Acadia, and with Wolfe at Quebec, 
they climbed the heights of Abraham. Again and again they 
marched to the support of our strongholds, which stood in the 
pathway of the enemy, between Montreal and Albany, or joined 
in movements against them when held by the enemy, losing heavily 
in the Crown Point expedition, under Gen. William Johnson. 

When important victories had been gained, there was general 
rejoicing among the people, attended with illiiminations, and 
sometimes a sky rocket or two was set off. When, on the other 
hand, oirr arms met with disaster, a day of fasting was appointed, 
and we find the sympathizing pastor offering prayer and con- 
solation in those stricken homes which mourned the loss of a 
husband, brother or son, who had fallen. 

These campaigns were attended with long and toilsome 
marches through forest pathways, sometimes in winter when 
snowshoes were a part of the equipment, and by them the men 
became inured to hardship, privation and danger. 

It was in such service that Ford, Walker, Barron and Parker 
gained the military experience that fitted them to lead in the 
Revolutionary struggle. These wars fostered the militarj'- spirit 
in the people of New England, which, together with the conditions of 
their daily life where nothing was gained except by labor and thrift, 
tended to develope a brave, hardy and self-reliant people, a people 
too confident in their own powers to submit readily to oppression. 

During the period of agitation, which preceded the Revolution, 
the attitude of the people of this town was firm and dignified, 
and apparently prompted by as deep a sense of their responsibility 
as though the action of the whole colony was to be guided by 
their course. In the instructions given to their representatives 
and the sentiments expressed in the resolutions passed in town 
meetings, nothing appears which, viewed in the light of today, 
their descendants could wish to see altered. They contain no 
suggestion of a desire to sever their connection with the mother 
country, for which they evidently felt strong attachment, and any 
rash or passionate action they strongly deprecated. But at the 
same time they firmly maintained those rights granted them as 
British subjects, by the Royal Charter, and opposed the obnoxious 
acts of the king and parliament. 

In conversation with a scholarly and thoughtful gentleman 
upon these questions, he said that he did not consider that the 
Colonies were seriously oppressed by England, and expressed the 
opinion that there would have been no war if the prople had not 
been worked up to it by the leaders. But the evidence goes to 
show, I think, that those problems were worked out slowly, 
deliberately and prayerfully in the minds of the plain people; 
people accustomed to do their own thinking, with a firmness and 
courage to enable them to face whatever might result. 



202 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

In this town the leaders were not at first in S3mipathy with 
the popular movement. [They were Englishmen, ready to fight 
for the preservation of the rights of Englishmen.] 

The two most prominent men and the ones whose opinions 
would have the greatest weight with the people, were the minister, 
Rev. Ebenezer Bridge, and Col. Samson Stoddard. Mr. Bridge 
was then in the prime of life. Of his 50 years' pastorate here, 20 
had been spent. He was a man of strong and vigorous intellect, 
whose opinions would have had weight, even aside from the great 
influence wielded by his pastoral office. 

It is not surprising that he should be inclined to look with 
disfavor upon the agitation then going on. 

The New England clergy were conservative as a class, and 
inclined to cling to existing institutions. Very many of thein 
continued loyal to the English government. Mr. Bridge associated 
with the most prominent people in the Colony, and, as we learn 
from his diary, held pleasant social relations with the leaders 
upon the loyalist side. He was a friend of Governor Hutchinson 
and Secretary Oliver, and exchanged visits with them, the former 
receiving him "very graciously." The royal Governor Francis 
Bernard, (who had so much difficulty with the Massachusetts 
assembly), also visited in town and Mr. Bridge dined with him 
at the house of his friend Col. Stoddard. [June 24, 1763. Dined 
at Col. Stoddard's with his Excellency, the Governor, and Hon. 
Mr. Bowdoin, and others, and their ladies.] 

Parson Bridge's views we find given in an election sermon 
delivered by him before the general assembly in Boston, May 27, 
1767 (two years after the passage of the Stamp Act). In 
the coirrse of that sermon he said: "We have cause to bless God, 
that in this day and this time, we are highly favored of God with 
a king, whose throne is established by righteousness, who hath 
made the laws of the nation the rule, and the happiness of his 
people the end of his government — who hath the hearts and the 
confidence of his people at home and abroad; and upon every 
occasion hath given them the greatest cause to rejoice in his 
paternal care of and goodness to them," * * * and a parlia- 
ment which tho' liable to mistakes, has yet been attentive to the 
good of the nation and kingdom and her colonies and dependencies." 
As to the British Colonies in North America * * * "How 
happy are they, in the enjoyment of the same liberties and privi- 
leges, as our brethren in our mother country; what a lasting 
foundation is hereby laid for continual union and harmon)% and 
a mutual dependence between the parent and her children ? May 
there never more be any attempts from any quarter, or Idv any 
means or instruments, to divide them, who are so nearly connected 
in affection and interest and I believe that all the people, in all 
the colonies, will heartily say amen." 

This laudation of George III and his Parliament, remember, 
vras addressed to the very assembly which was prorogued and 



THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION 203 

denounced by the royal Governor Bernard for adopting the 
circular letters of Samuel Adams, one of ^^'hich was to the king 
appealing for a redress of their grievances. But, notwithstanding 
those words, the parson's heart was right, the welfare of the 
people was dear to him, and he was soon led to change his views. 
Allen dates the change from the time of the re-publication of 
Hutchinson's letters in this country. But however it was brought 
about his change to the patriot cause was most complete. He 
became a firm supporter of the patriot cause. He contributed 
of his substance to its support and prayed with and exhorted the 
soldiers as they went forth to battle. Two of his sons were in 
the anny, one (Ebenezer, Jr.), as a colonel with Prescott at 
Bimlcer Hill. 

Colonel Stoddard, on the other hand, retained his tory 
principles. He was a son of the former minister, Rev. Samson 
Stoddard, and a graduate of Harvard College. His house, which 
stood on the site of the Central Baptist Church, was the social 
centre. It was often illuminated upon occasions of public rejoicing, 
and the people gathered there to celebrate, and there he enter- 
tained many distinguished guests. The town of Stoddard, in 
New Hampshire, was named in his honor. But his position upon 
the questions then uppermost cost him his influence forever. The 
people expressed their strong disapproval of his course in a 
manner more forcible than dignified. 

[His house was assailed with stones and his fence destroyed.] 
[Colonel Stoddard was the son of the Chelmsford minister of the 
same name, and was bom here May 1, 1709 ; graduated at Harvard 
in 1730; died here, and was buried April 28, 1777.] 

Meanwhile the people were following the lead of Adams and 
Hancock, and co-operating with the committees of correspondence. 

There was at this time engaged in the practice of his profession 
in this town, a gifted young lawyer, and ardent patriot, Jonathan 
Williams Austin. [He was twenty-three years of age when 
chairman of the Chelmsford Committee of Correspondence in 
May, 1774.] He was a gi-aduate of Harvard College, and studied 
in the office of John Adams. It was he, without doubt, who drew 
up the resolutions passed by the town meeting of May, 1774. 
He a.nd Samuel Perham were chosen by the town as delegates to 
the Middlesex Convention held at Concord, Aug. 30, 1774, and 
Mr. Austin was chosen by the Convention as chairman of the 
committee on resolutions. These resolves, which, without doubt, 
were framed by this Chelmsford delegate, took the most advanced 
grotmd occupied by the patriot party and were expressed in clear 
and forcible English. 

Charles H. Walcott, Esq., of Concord, says: "I feel that the 
Middlesex Resolves are infinitely superior to the much lauded 
SuiTolk Resolves which were framed later by Warren. This gave 
the latter greater prominence, as well as the fact that they eman- 



204 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

ated from Boston. The Middlesex Resolves have a dignity and 
force of expression, and especially (what was rare in Revolutionary 
manifestos) a simple, clear and direct style; sincere and bold, 
without being declamatory or bombastic. As a statement for 
all time of the grievances against the mother country, I do not 
hesitate to prefer them to the famous Declaration of Independence. 

Jonathan V/illiams Austin was, undoubtedly, their author. 
He was chairman of the Committee on Resolutions, which was a 
strong one, but none of them, perhaps, possessed the fine enthu- 
siasm of youth combined with a perfect knowledge of the issues 
of the day to such an extent as the young lawyer fresh from the 
office of John Adams. He was the son of Samuel Austin, a 
merchant of Boston, who died in 1792. His mother was a daughter 
of Jonathan Williams, deacon in the Brattle Street Church (died 
1788), and granddaughter of Jonathan Williams, wine-cooper, 
who died in 1737. 

Jonathan Williams Austin graduated at Harvard College in 
1769. He studied law with John Adams, afterwards President 
of the United States. He came to Chelmsford in 1773, and was 
Captain of the first company of militia. He engaged himself to 
the country's service April 20, 1775; was promoted to the rank of 
Major, and later to Colonel; 'died in the army to the southward.' " 

His published record is as follows: 

Austin, Jonathan W[illiams], Boston. Major, Col. Paul 
Dudley Sargent's (16th) Regt; engaged April 20, 1775; roll made 
up to July 31, 1775; service, 3 mos., 18 days; also, list of field 
officers of the Continental Army stationed at Cambridge in 1776. 

In the proceedings of the Mass. Hist. Soc'y, 1878, p. 350, is 
an extract from Gen. Greene's orderly book under date of May 10, 
1776, from which it appears that Major Austin, with three com- 
panies of Colonel Sargent's Regiment, was directed to take Castle 
Island to defend, and forward the work there. There was another 
order also on the 12th. 

Austin, Jonathan W. Volunteer, brig "Hazard," commanded 
by Capt. J. F. Williams; engaged Dec. 21, 1778; discharged 
April 21, 1779; service 4 mos. Roll dated Boston. 

His Middlesex Resolutions were adopted in the Convention 
by a vote of 146 to 4. They were heartily applauded by the 
Continental Congress at Philadelphia when read to that body. 

vSee Journals of the Convention at Concord, Aug. 30, 1774, 
and Drake's History of Middlesex Co., Vol. I., p. 107. 

The following is an extract from the preamble of the Middlesex 
Resolutions : 

"There is a mode of conduct, which, in our very critical 
circumstances, we would wish to adopt ; a conduct, on the one hand 



THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION 205 

never tamely submissive to tyranny and oppression, on the other 
never degenerating to rage, passion and confusion. This is a 
spirit which we revere, as we find it exhibited in former ages, 
and it will command applause to the latest posterity. The 
late acts of Parliament pervade the whole system of juris- 
prudence, by which means, we think, the fountains of justice are 
fatally corrupted. Our defence must, therefore, be immediate 
in proportion to the suddenness of the attack, and vigorous in 
proportion to the danger. 

We must now exert ourselves, or all those efforts which, for 
ten years past, have brightened the annals of this country' will 
be totally frustrated. Life and death, or, what is more, freedom 
and slavery, are in a peculiar sense now before us, and the choice 
and success, under God, depend greatly upon ourselves. 

We are therefore bound, as struggling not only for ourselves, 
but future generations, to express our sentiments in the following 
resolves: sentiments which, we think, are founded in truth and 
justice, and therefore sentiments we are determined to abide by." 

Mr. Bowdoin's Power of Attorney 
to Mr. Austin, April 20 1773. 
Know all Men by these Presents that J James Bowdoin of Boston 
in the County of Suffolk & Province of Massachusetts Bay Esqr. 
do hereby constitute and appoint Jonathan Williams Austin of 
Chelmsford in ye County of Middlesex in ye Province aforesaid 
Gentleman my Attorney in all Causes moved and to be moved 
for me or against me, in my name to appear, plead and pursue 
to final Judgment and Execution, with power of Substitution. 
Witness my hand and Seal this 20th day of April Anno Domini 
1773. 
Signed Sealed & did. 

In Presence of James Bowdoin. 

Sampson Stoddard f 1 

Elizabeth Johnson. { seal \ 

[Original in the Adams Library.] { J 

Besides the sheep and cattle already mentioned, Chelmsford 
sent forty bushels of rye to Boston for the relief of the sufferers 
by the Boston Port Bill. The rye was stored in the Granary. 
This letter was sent at the same time. 

Chelmsford, 26th September 1774. 
Gentlemen, 

We, the Committee of Correspondence of the Town of 
Chelmsford, take this opportunity of transmitting a quantity of 
grain, collected for the use of your poor. 

We are happy to have it in our power, by any means to show 
our affection for a Town, Who are so eminently suffering in the 
Common Cause. As we entertain the highest esteem of your 
Conduct, We are willing not only to sympathize but share with 
you in your troubles. 



206 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

And should you by the hand of power, be driven from your 
habitations, we welcome you to our own; and trust, that in 
these, at present, abodes of peace and liberty, you enjoy a superior 
satisfaction to those who are aiming "to raise their greatness on 
their country's ruin." 

We are. Gentlemen, with much esteem. 
Your humble servants, 
Jona. Williams Austin 1 Chainnan, by order 

j of the Coinmittee 
[Mass. Hist. Soc. Coll. Fourth Series, Vol. IV, p. 92.] 

The following was received in reply: 

Boston Octo 3d 1774 
Sir. 

To commiserate the Afflicted to Sympathise with the op- 
pressed Sufferer, to reach out the bountious hand for the Comfort, 
Relief & Support and the Distressed are sacrifices well pleasing 
and acceptable to God thro' Christ oiu* Saviour. 

Our Worthy Friends and Brethren of Chelmsford have in 
this way done honour to the Gospel of our divine Redeemer and 
by so doing have greatly honour'd themselves. We have an 
evidence hereof in the very kind Donation of Forty Bushels of 
Rye from the patriotic Inhabitants of that Town; it has been 
received and housed in the Granary, and shall be disposed of 
agreeable to the benevolent Intent of the generous Donors. 

It affords us great satisfaction to find that the Conduct of 
this much abused Town meets with their approbation ; we greatly 
value it; and trust that by the same gracious directing and 
supporting Hand, which hath brought us hitherto, we shall not 
be left to do anything which may incur a forfeiture of that 
Affection and Esteem. How can ye help us at such a time as 
this more effectually than by carrying our Cause daily to the God 
of all Grace and emploring his Mercy and Favour for us — They 
are inclusive of all Good. 

Your invitation to make your Houses our Homes is very 
engaging should we at length be forced out of those once peaceful 
Habitations we thinlc ourselves very happy that we are like to be 
so well provided for; but should we be obliged even to remove off 
fifteen times the distance of Chelmsford, yet the Consciousness 
of a cordial Attachment to the invaluable civil and religious 
Liberties of our Country, which we believe to be the Cause of 
Truth and Righteousness, would yield us content and Satisfaction 
far superior to that which those can experience who are ungrate- 
fully seeking to "build their Greatness on their Country s Ruin." 
With grateful Acknowledgments. I am 

Sir Your truly obliged Friend & Servt. 

David Jeffries pr order 
of the Committee of Donations 
Mr. Jonathan Williams Austin 
[Original in the possession of Charles H. Dalton.] 



THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION 207 

Alany of the people of Boston and Charlestown fled to 
Chelmsford and other towns, as will be seen later in this Chapter. 

On Sept. 29, 1774 the Town voted the following instructions 
for Mr. Simeon Spaulding, Representative in the General Court: 

As we have now chosen you to represent us in the Great and 
General Court to be holden at Salem on Wednesday the fifth day 
of October next ensuing, We do hereby instruct you that in all 
your doings as a member of the House of Representatives you 
adhere firmly to the Charter of this Province granted by their 
Majesties K. William & Q. Mary, and that you do no act which 
can possibly be construed into an acknowledgment of the validity 
of the Act of the British Parliament for altering [the] government 
of Massachusetts Bay; more especially that you acknowledge the 
Hon. Board of Concillors elected by the General Court at their 
Sessions in May last, as the only rightful and constitutional 
Cotmcil of this Province and as we have reason to believe that a 
conscientious discharge of your duty will produce your dissolution 
as an House of Representatives, we do hereby empower & instruct 
you to join with the members who may be sent from the other 
towns in the Province, & to meet with them at a time to be agreed 
on, in a general Provincial Congress to act upon such matters as 
m?i.y come before you in such a manner as shall appear to you 
most conducive to the true interest of this town and Province, 
and most lilcely to preserve the liberties of all America. 

Oct. 11, 1774, the Town chose Mr. Jonathan Williams Austin 
and Mr. Samuel Perham delegates "to a Provincial meeting to 
be holden at the town of Concord upon the Eleventh Day of 
October Instant." 

Jan. 3, 1775, Simeon Spaulding was chosen to represent the 
Town in the Provincial Congress at Cambridge on Feb. 1. 

Capt. Oliver Barron, Dr. Jonas Marshall and Mr. Benjamin 
Walker were chosen a Committee of Inspection respecting pur- 
chasing or selling any goods, wares or merchandise imported from 
Great Britain or Ireland. 

March 6, 1775, the town voted that the Alarm list should be 
equipt with fire arms and ammunition, and to raise fifty minute- 
men, including officers: that they be disciplined one half day in 
a week for eight weeks ensuing, and that they be paid eight pence 
per each half day they are disciplined over and more than the 
militia are disciplined. 

Voted to defend the constables and assessors of this town for 
the year 1774 for not obeying Harrison Gray's warrant for the 
Province Tax that year. 

Captain Oliver Barron was chosen muster-master. 

Colonel Simeon Spaulding was chosen to represent the town 
in the Provincial Congress. 

_ William Pierce of Chelmsford was a deputy sheriff at this 
period. 



208 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

The fighting at Lexington and Concord took place on April 
19, 1775. An account of the part which Chelmsford men played 
at Concord and Bunker Hill will be given further on. 

The Battle of Bunker Hill was fought on June 17, 1775. 

1775, May 15, the Committee of Safety ordered an inspection 
of town and district stocks of powder. Chelmsford was found to 
have one and one-half barrels. In all the towns of the Common- 
wealth together there were sixty-seven and three-fourths barrels. 
It was found that on June 17 Chelmsford had seven firelocks. 
There were 102 in the County and 1,065 in the Commonwealth. 
July 5, Chelmsford was apportioned fifty-five coats. 13,000 were 
apportioned to the whole Commonwealth. 

In 1777, the Town voted that all powder and balls taken out 
of the Town Stock at the time of the engagement with the King's 
troops at Concord or the Battle of Bunker Hill should be returned 
or paid for. 

1775, May 19, the selectmen voted £35: 0:0 for the use of 
this province. 

CHELMSFORD COMMITTEE TO THE MIDDLESEX COMMITTEE 

Whereas the Honorable the Provincial Congress Dated April 
12th 1775 Resolved and Recomended to the Committees of Corre- 
spondence of the Several Towns & Districts in this CoUoney, To 
render to the Committies of their Respective Countyes appointed 
by sd Congress, a True State of the Conduct of their Respective 
Towns & Districts with Respect to their Haveing Executed each 
Plan, Recomended by the Continential, & Provincial Congresses. 
These therefore may Inform the Honorable Committee of the 
County of Middlesex that the Town of Chelmsford have voted 
To Conform to the Resolves of the said Continential, & Provincial 
Congresses. The sd. Town have also Granted by vote the Sum 
of Fifty nine Pounds Seventeen Shillings & three pence which is 
assessed on the Inhabitants of sd. Town: we are also Informed 
by the Constables of sd. Town for the year 1773 that there 
Remaineth in their hands of the Province Tax, for the Same 
Year, the Simi of Fifty Two Pounds, nineteen Shillings & three 
pence. Each of the Said Sums are by a vote of sd. Town, to be 
paid in unto Capt. Oliver Barron Treasurer of sd. Town, the Said 
Treasurer being Directed to pay out the Sumes. which he Shall 
So Receive To Henry Gradner Esq. at Stoe, as he Shall Receive 
orders from the Selectmen for the use of this Province. Thirty 
five pounds of which is already ordered by the sd. Selectmen to 
be paid for the use aforesd. and the Residue thereof we hope & 
Trust will be Collected & paid in Due Time — 
Chelmsford May 20th 1775 Signed by order & in behalf of the 

Committee of Correspondence of 

Chelmsford 

Simeon Spaulding Chairman 
of the Comet 
[Original in the possession of Charles H. Dalton.] 



THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION. 209 

July 3, 1775, voted that 300 bushels of salt and 400 weight 
of sugar provided by the selectmen for the use of the Town should 
be paid for by the Town Treasurer. Thirty-five hogsheads of 
salt were carted from Salem for the Town's use. Sugar and salt 
were chiefly articles of import, and this was a precaution in case 
the war put an end to importation. 

An item in the town records reads: 
To Mr Crownshell [Crowinshield ?] of Salem 

for a quantity of Salt & Shugar for the Town's use. £38 : 1 : : 

Three years later it was voted to sell the Town's stock of 
salt and sugar and "convert the money to the yuse of paying the 
Continental soldiers * * *" The Salt was sold to the people 
of the Town for £3 per bushel. The sugar was sold at four 
shillings per pound. These articles were apportioned arnong the 

families of the Town according to the number in each family, and 
were sold on each Monday of July, 1778. For selling the salt 
and sugar the Committee received £168: 0: 0. 

The Town voted to Captain Oliver Barron for money delivered 
to Colonel Simeon Spaulding for this Town's part of the cost of 
the Delegates to the Continental Congress, £1: 17: 6: 0. 

Thomas Byam loaned the Town £103:11:6:3, which was 
repaid April 23, 1776. Joseph, Abel and Solomon Adams also 
loaned money to the Town, as did Jacob and Samuel Howard and 
Ephraim Parkhurst. 

March 4, 1776, Colonel Simeon Spaulding, Captain Oliver 
Barron, Deacon Aaron Chamberlain, Mr. David Parker, Lieuten- 
ant Samuel Stevens, Captain Joseph Warren, Lieutenant John 
Minott, Mr. Benjamin Parker, Mr. Thomas Marshall, Lieutenant 
Zebulun Spaulding, Doctor Jonas Marshall, Mr. Josiah Hodgman, 
Ensign Benjamin Fletcher, Mr. Samuel Howard, Mr. William 
Peirce and Mr. Joseph Emerson were chosen a Committee of 
Correspondence, Inspection and Safety. 

May 13, Oliver Barron, Simeon Spaulding, Samuel Perham 
and Zebulun Spaulding were consecutively chosen Representative, 
and each refused to serve. At an adjoining meeting. Col. Simeon 
Spaulding was chosen and accepted. It was voted that if it 
should be the pleasiure of the Honorable Continental Congress to 
declare an Independent State with Great Britain that this Town 
will stand by them to the expense of life and fortunes. Voted 
to provide spades or iron shovels and pickaxes and narrow axes, 
agreeable to a late act of the Great and General Coiu-t, and that 
fifes and dnmis be provided also, agreeable to said act. 

The town paid, June 13, to Mr. Joseph Emerson, for one drum 
for the use of the Town, £1 : 16: 0. 

In the warrant for this meeting there was an article: "At 
the desire of Samuel Perham and others to enquire into and con- 
sider of some things which has been done of late by the Selectmen 
respecting the recommendation and approbation of Col. Sampson 
Stoddard and Sampson Stoddard Junr. Esq. for to be true and 



210 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

faithful men to the interest of their Country that we are now- 
Contending for, as well as to sell liquors at their houses in said 
Chelmsford &c" Voted, Dissatisfied with the conduct of the 
selectmen in recommending and approbating Col. Sampson 
Stoddard and Sampson Stoddard, Junr., Esq. 

The following contains the names of two prominent Chelmsford 
men — Col. Spaulding and Capt. Ford. 

Delivered to Capt Zachariah Fitch of Groaton 1 Lt and 
1 Ens. and 25 privats, and one privat to Capt Nathan Seargent 
of Maiden all Inlisted mustered and paid by Simeon Spaulding 
and William Tompson Two of the Committee Appointed for that 
purpose 

Capt Fitchs Company marched August 28: 1776. 

In Obedience to an order of Council of the 21st. of august we 
Present the following acct. 

(Indorsed) Return men in Middlesex when the Rolls are 
Deficient. 

Towns Sam. Fay Woburn Jas Bancroft Reading Jno Ford 
Chebnsford Zac Fitch Groton Nath Sargent Maiden July, 1776, & 
aug 

Ace muster rolls by Simeon Spalding & Wm Thompson 

The inclos'd is evidence for Absent Rolls. 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 41, p. 103.] 

Groton Septr. 14th 1776. 
Sir, 

In pursuance of ordors this Day received from General 
Warren, you are hereby required & ordored, to Cause the militia 
as well of the Alarm as the Training Band of your Regt. to be 
mustered without the least delay and that you cause to be Drafted 
there from when so mustered, every fifth man, able bodied & 
Effective, under fifty years of age, in manner as is directed, & 
subject to such Exceptions as are ordered and made by the 
Resolves of the General Assembly of this State, of the 12th instant. 

And you are to make return of the men so Drafted from your 
Regt. to me, as soon as may be, that they may be formed into 
Companies and Regiments to be officered and accoutered agreeable 
to the sd. Resolves, and caused to march according to the directions 
and for the purposes therein Expressed, as soon as possible. You 
are in all things to conform yourself to the sd. Resolves, Coppies 
of which I herewith send you for the Government of your own 
Conduct & that of the officers and men in your Regiment. 

I am yr. hb. Sert. 

Oliver Prescott. 
P. S. The Service requires the 
utmost Dispatch 

Colo. Spaulding. 
[Original in the possession of Charles H. Dalton, Boston, January, 

1895.] 



THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION 



211 



A "letter written by Dr. Prescott, who at this time was a 
Brigadier General, is preserved among the Shattuck Manuscripts 
of the New England Historic, Genealogical Society. It gives 
some interesting facts concerning the Middlesex militia, and is 
as follows : — 

Sir, 

In persuance of your ordors Reed, the 14th. I have caused the 
militia of the County of middlesex to be mustered and have caused 
to be Drafted therefrom ever}'' fifth able bodied man under fifty 
years of age &c agreeable to the Resolves of the Genl. Assembly 
of this State of the 12th. instant, and formed the sd. men into 
Companies and appointed their Respective Officers in the following 
manner, viz. 

No. 1. Cambridge 33 men Capt. John Walton of Cambridge 
Charlestown 7 1st. Lt. 

Maiden 9 2d. Do. 

Medford 13 

62. 



No. 2. Watertown 15 

Newton 19 

Waltham 13 

Weston 18 



Capt. Edward Ftdler of Newton 
1st. Lt. Josiah Capen of Watertown 
2d. Do. Isaac Hager of Waltham 



65. 



No. 3. Woburn 20 

Reading 26 

Wilmington 13 

Stoneham 4 



Capt. Samuel Belnap of Woburn 
1st. Lt. 
2d. Do. 



63. 



No. 4. 



Concord 
Lexington 
Acton 
Lincoln 



23 
16 
15 
12 



Capt. Simon Himt of Acton 

1st. Lt. Samuel Heald of Concord 

2d. Do. Ebenr. White of Lexington 



66. 



No. 5. 



Sudbury 35 Capt. Amasa Cranson of Marlboro 

Marlboro 31 1st. Lt. Nathll. Sergeant of Stow 

Stow 16 2d. Do. Nathll. Smith of Sudbury 



82. 



212 



HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 



No. 6. Framingham 27 
Sherbum 15 

Hopkinston 20 
Holliston 15 
Natick 9 



Capt. Aaron Gardner of Sherbum 
1st Lt. Lawssen Buckminister of 
Framingham 

2d. Do. Isaac Clark of Hopkinton 



* 



86. 

No. 7. Groton 29 

Pepperrell 17 

Townshend 15 

Ashby 8 

69. 



Capt. Thomas Warren of Townshend 
1st Lt. James Lawrance of Pepperrell 
2d. Do. Joseph Rockwood of Groton 



No. 8. Chelmsford 21 men Capt. Zach. Wright of Westford 



Dunstable 
Dracutt 

Westford 



12 
18 

18 

69. 



1st Lt Nathll. 

2d. Do. Robt. 

ford 



Holden of Dunstable 
Spaulding of Chelms- 



No. 9. Billerica 

Tukesbury 
Bedford 
Littleton 
Shirley 



22 
12 
10 
12 
9 

65. 



Capt. Solomon Kidder of Billerica 
1st Lt. Daniel Kimball of Littleton 
2d. Do. Timo. Rogers of Tukesbury 



I have also formed the aforesd. Companies into one Regt. 
and appointed 

Eleazer Brooks Esqr. of Lincoln to be the Colo. 

Micah Stone Esqr. of Framingham Lt. Colo. 

Ebenr. Bancroft Esqr. of Dunstable Major 

Mr. Moses Adams of Framingham Chaplain 

Mr. Joseph Hunt of Acton Surgeon Mate 

Daniel Loring of Sudbury Adjut. m 

Samuel Hartwell of Lincoln Quartermaster f 

I have directed the sd. Colo. Brooks to ordor the several 
Captains aforesd. to march their Respective Companies, as soon 
as possible, in the best & most proper Road, to Horse Neck [West 
Greenwich, Connecticut], according to the Resolves of the Genl. 
Assembly of this State, & agreeable to the Directions and for the 



THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION 213 

purposes therein Expressed. Colo. Brooks informs me this day 
that he hath given marching ordors for Saturday next for the 
whole Regt. 

I am, Sir, with the greatest Respect, your most obedient and 
very hbl Sert. 

Oliver Prescott 
Groton Septr. 26th. 1776. 

N. B. Colo. Thatcher & Colo. Fox Engaged to fill up their 
Companies and Return the Names of the Lieuts. before the Time 
appointed to march. 

Generall [James] Warren 

[Indorsed] Brigr Prescots return of every fifth man Drafted 
from his Brigade Sepr. 1776." 
[Groton during the Revolution, p. 240, ff.] 

Chelmsford, October 14, 1776. 
This Town having been legally warned, met together in the 
meeting house, agreeable to the Recommendations of the present 
House of Representatives of this State of Massachusetts Bay in 
New England, and having chose Oliver Barron, Esq, Moderator, 
proceeded to the consideration of the subject matter of said 
recommendation and came into the following votes : 

First that we give our consent that the present House of 
Representatives, together with the Council of said State in one 
body with the House by equal voice should constitute, and agree on 
and erect such Constitution and form of Government for this 
State, as the said House of Representatives and Council aforesaid, 
on the fullest and most mature deliberation, shall judge will most 
conduce to the safety, peace and happiness of this State in all after 
successions and generations. 

Secondly, Voted that the Constitution of government of this 
State agreed upon by said House and said Council be made public 
for the inspection and perusal of the inhabitants of said State, 
before it be ratified by said House and Council. 

Thirdly Voted, that when we have had opportunity to have 
considered and to have expressed our sentiments by vote on said 
Constitution of government so agreed on, we will cause otir 
votes or resolution respecting the same to be certified into the 
office of the Secretary of this State. 

There follows in the Record Book the Declaration of Inde- 
pendence of July 4, 1776, copied by David Spaulding, Town 
Clerk (who received 4 shillings for doing it), as ordered by the 
Council July 17, after having been read by every Minister in the 
state to his congregation on the afternoon of the 1st Sunday after 
receipt of same. 

1777, March 3. At the Annual Town Meeting, the following 
men were chosen as a Committee of Correspondence, Inspection 
and Safety: Oliver Barron, Samuel Perham, Joseph Warren, 
David Parker, Zebulon Spaulding, John Minott, Josiah Hodgman, 
Jonathan Bigford and Benjamin Parker. 



214 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

March 19. Various matters relating to the War were acted 
on — the pajTnent of inhabitants of the town for services rendered, 
procuring about thirty new men for the service, £20. bounty- 
above that of the Continent and State to be given to each man 
enHsting for three years or during the war. 

May 21. The Town considered the Resolve of the General 
Court relating to the formation of a new Constitution, and "Voted 
that the General Court act in that affair as they think proper, etc." 

June 26 the Town chose Oliver Barron, Samuel Stevens, 
Aaron Chamberlin, Daniel Proctor, Joseph Emerson, Thomas 
Hutchins and William Peirce to see that the Acts of the General 
Court to prevent Monopoly and oppression be complied with. 
Voted to take the salt (80 bushels) provided by the General Court 
for the Town of Chelmsford. 

Sept. 25. Guns, locks, lead, and flints to be kept as a Town 
Store. 

Dec. 8. Voted that the State's money may not be called in 
in the manner the General Court prescribed, etc. Committees 
were appointed to petition the Court with reference to this and 
the manner of making the Province tax. Voted not to conform 
to the directions prescribed by the General Coiu-t in Taxing real 
and personal estate. Voted not to open the Town Store of 
salt [at present]. 

1778, Jan. 5. Action was taken to provide necessaries for 
the families of men in the Continental Sersdce. 

Jan. 28 the Town voted to leave the matter relating to the 
Confederation and Perpetual Union between the United States 
of America discretionary with the Representative to act as he may 
think will be most advantageous to this and the other States. 

The Committee of Correspondence this year consisted of 
Oliver Barron, Samuel Stevens, Aaron Chamberlain, Josiah 
Hodgman and Joel Barrett. (The same men were chosen in 1779.) 

The Town voted to give £20 bounty to all who engaged in 
the Continental service before the Town voted the bounty, to 
make them equal with those who engaged afterwards. This was 
over and above what the Government paid them. In 1781, in 
consequence of the depreciation of the currency, this bounty was 
commuted to "twenty head of homed cattle, middling cattle of 
their age, to each man." If the war lasted one year, they were 
to have their cattle at one year old, if it lasted two years, then at 
two years old, and so on. Captain Oliver Barron was to keep the 
public store of arms and ammunition. 

July 10. Voted unanimously their disapprobation of the new 
proposed form of government which was sent to the Town by the 
General Court for their inspection and consideration. 

1779, Jan. 18. Voted to receive the fire arms and steel, as 
a Town store, which the selectmen procured from the Board of 
War, paying them the first cost and expenses of transporting the 



THE M'AR OF THE REVOLUTION 215 

same into Town; that the fire arms and steel be sold at public 
vendue, the fonner at 22 dollars apiece and the latter at ten 
shillings per pound. 

March 1, Among other items in the record of Town meeting 
are these: Voted to choose one Committeeman to make sale of 
one Continental soldier who was hired by Capt. John Ford. 

Voted not to have a new Constitution or form of Government 
established the present year. 

1780. March 6. Committee of Correspondence: Oliver 
Barron, John Minott, Isaac Warren, Samuel Perham, Daniel 
Proctor. 

Two of the constables asked the Town to make them a 
consideration for a quantity of counterfeit money which they had 
collected of the inhabitants for taxes. 

In 1779 delegates were sent to the Convention in Concord, 
(July 14) to adopt measures "to recover credit of our money, &c., 
and the Town voted (November 11) to conform to the Resolves 
passed by the Convention. In August a committee was chosen 
"to inspect into the conduct of the Inhabitants of this Town 
relative to the resolves of the Convention held at Concord, regulat- 
ing prices, &c. 

1780. Cost of making a plan of the Town, including Surveyor 
chairmen, &c., three items totaling £147. 5. 0. 

May 29. The Town voted, 92 to 8, to accept the new 
Constitution, substituting the word "Protestant" for the word 
"Christian" in the qualification of the Governor. 
1780 Sept. 4. The Inhabitants, being legally warned and regularly 
assembled gave their votes for Governor of the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts. 

The Honorable John Hancock, Esq., of Boston — The nimiber 

of votes 102 

For Lieut. Governor, the Honorable Artemas Ward, of 

Shrewsbury — The number of votes 65 

For Councillor, the Honorable Abraham Fuller of Newtown — 

The number of votes 38 

For Second Councillor, Josiah Stone, Esq., of Framingham — 

The number of votes 38 

For Third Councillor, Nathaniel Gorham, Esq., of Charles- 
town — The ntmiber of votes 38 

For Fourth Councillor, Eleazer Brooks, Esq., of Lincoln — 

The number of votes 30 

For Fifth Councillor, Loammi Baldwin, Esq., of Woburn — 

The nimiber of votes 40 

In 1781 John Hancock received 60 votes for Governor, and 

Thomas Gushing 53 for Lieut. Governor. 
In 1782 \ John Hancock received 44 votes for Governor 
^ James Bowdoin " 7 " " 

J Artemas Ward " 6 " " 



216 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

THE CONCORD FIGHT. 

In the early days of Massachusetts people lived on the alert. 
Both men and boys were skilled in the use of firearms; and this 
of necessity. Much of their food roamed wild in the forest. The 
wolf, the bear and the Indian were wily enemies. The Indian 
wars were schools of military training. In 1645, the General 
Court ordered that all youths between the ages of ten and sixteen 
years should be instructed by competent soldiers in the exercise 
of arms, such as small guns, half-pikes, and bows and arrows, 
provided their parents were willing. And thirty men out of every 
hundred of the militia were to be ready for any service "at halfe 
an howers warning." The French and Indian war prepared 
many of the officers of the Revolution for their arduous work. 

At Cambridge, on October 26, 1774, the first Provincial 
Congress provided for the appointment of a Committee of Safety, 
with Dr. Joseph Warren at its head; who, when they judged 
occasion to require, should have power to alarm, muster, and cause 
to be assembled with the utmost expedition, such and so many 
of the militia as they might deem necessary. 

The Field Officers of the regiments were directed to endeavor 
"to enlist one quarter at ye least of the Number of the respective 
Companies" to be ready on the shortest notice to march to the 
place of rendezvous. These were called "Minute-men," and were 
organized under the resolve of the Provincial Congress above 
mentioned, which "accounts for the promptness with which they 
assembled in response to the alarm of the 19th of April, 1775." 
The actual nimiber of those who turned out was 19,860. This 
is the nimiber of names on the list compiled from the Archives, 
and published by the State. These men, a small part of whom 
really took part in the events at Lexington and Concord, formed 
good material for the first army organized. The authorities were 
embarrassed by their numbers, and immediately reorganized the 
military under regular enlistments. 

On April 23, the Provincial Congress then sitting at Water- 
town resolved that an army of 30,000 men must be immediately 
raised, and "That 13,000 Men be raised immediately by this 
Province." All minute-men were required by the Committee 
of Safety to enlist in the army, and orders were sent to the 
neighboring towns, requiring that one-half the militia be sent 
immediately to Roxbury and Cambridge, and that the remainder 
hold themselves in readiness to march at a minute's warning. 



THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION 217 

The following oath was to be administered to the officers and 
private soldiers of the army: "I, A. B., swear, I will truly & faith- 
fully serve in the Massachusetts army, to which I belong, for the 
defence and security of the estates, lives and liberties of the good 
people of this and the sister Colonies in America, in opposition to 
ministerial tyranny by which they are or may be oppressed, and 
to all other enemies & opposers whatsoever;" &c., &c. On May 
20, 1775, General Artemas Ward, of Shrewsbury, was sworn and 
received his commission as Commander-in-Chief. A large part 
of the officers and men had been continuously in service from their 
arrival in camp in response to the alarm sent out the 19th of 
April, and are so credited on the rolls in the State Archives. 

The Congress had provided that cannon, small arms, ammuni- 
tion and ordnance stores to cost £20,837, be purchased and 
deposited in such places as the Committee of Safety should 
direct. Concord was named as one place of storage. 

"The people of Massachusetts proceeded to organize a 
provincial government of their own with the intention of repudi- 
ating the sovereignty of Great Britain. The legislature, which 
had been dissolved by the governor, assembled at Salem upon its 
own authority and organized itself into a Provincial Congress 
under the presidency of John Hancock." 

The British General Gage had fortified Boston Neck to defend 
the only approach to the city. On April 15, he learned that 
Samuel Adams and John Hancock, the two chief arch-conspirators, 
were in Lexington, and eight hundred troops were sent to arrest 
these patriot leaders, and then proceed to Concord and seize the 
military supplies collected there by the "rebels." The signal 
lanterns having been displayed in the belfry of old Christ 
Chtu-ch, Paul Revere, on his famous ride, informed the citizens 
of the approach of the regulars. 

Early on April 19, Major Pitcairn, with several companies 
of infantry, met the doughty minute-men at Lexington, seven of 
whom were killed and ten wounded; and proceeded to Concord, 
(whence the stores had been removed to a place of safety). Here, 
at the bridge, took place the renowned engagement with the 
"embattled farmers," who harassed the British on their retreat 
all the way to Boston. It has been said that Concord supplied 
the scene of action on that memorable day, but that Chelmsford, 
Acton and other towns furnished the men who did the work. 
They came from all the neighboring towns. On the approach 



218 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

of the King's troops, about one hundred and fifty Concord, 
Acton and Lincoln men retired from Concord over the North 
Bridge about a mile to Punkatasset hill. Here the reinforcements 
met them, being directed to the rendezvous by men stationed along 
the roads for that purpose. They came by the roads or through 
the woods and across the fields. 

"To the hill there came from Bedford, 

And Littleton, and Carlisle, 
And Lincoln, Chelmsford, Westford, 

More men through each defile." — Raymond. 

The following quotations give the facts. 

"They thereupon proceeded over the North Bridge, and 
marched, not yet over one hundred and fifty in all, to Punkatasset 
hill, about a mile north of the meeting-house. Men were stationed 
on the several roads leading to Concord, to direct the reinforce- 
ments to the rendezvous, volunteers hastened forward. Minute- 
men and Militia * * * arrived from Bedford. Numbers 
came in from Chelmsford, Carlisle, Littleton, Westford, Billerica, 
Stow and elsewhere. Some came by the woods and some across 
the fields. Thus strengthened, this devoted band marched down 
from Punkatasset * * * " [The Story of Concord as told by 
Concord Writers. Edited by Swayne, p. 55.] 

"The British troops had been in Concord about two hours. 
During this time the minute-men from the neighboring towns 
had been constantly arriving on the high grounds, a short distance 
from the North Bridge, until they numbered about four hundred 
and fifty.* They were formed in line by Joseph Hosmer, who 
acted as adjutant. It is difficult, if not impossible, to ascertain 
certainly what companies were present thus early in the day. 
They came from Carlisle, from Chelmsford, from Westford, from 
Littleton and from Acton * * * 

"It was nearly ten o'clock in the morning when the provincials, 
about three hundred in numberf arrived near the river," on their 
way to dislodge the British guard at the North Bridge. 
[Frothingham, "Siege of Boston," p. 67.] 

Ellis, in his "History of the Battle of Bunker Hill," well 
describes these men : 

"The yeomen of town and village had not come together at 
the command of a commander-in-chief through adjutant, herald 

* Ripley's History, 
t DepoBitiona of 1775. 



THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION 219 

or advertisement. They came unbidden, at an alarm from the 
bell on their meeting-house, or from a post-rider, or from the 
telegrams transmitted by tongue and ear. And they came for 
what they were, and as they were, with their light summer clothing, 
with what was left from their last meals in their pantries packed 
with a few "notions" in sack or pillow-case; and with the ducking 
guns, fowling-pieces, or shaky muskets used in old times against 
the vermin and game in the woods and the Indian skulking in the 
thicket. And for the most part they were as free to go away as 
they had been to come. They were enlisted after a fashion, some 
prime conditions of which were their own convenience or pleasure." 
[Quoted in "Groton during the Revolution," p. 6.] 

But let us come back to Chelmsford and see what was doing 
here. 

It was towards eight o'clock on the morning of April 19th, a 
day unusuall}'- warm for the time of year, when the good people 
of Chelmsford, twenty-three miles northwest of Boston and about 
nine north of Concord, were roused by the alarm of the British 
advance. A mounted messenger from Billerica dashed into the 
village proclaiming the news that the redcoats were marching 
from Boston towards Concord. Alarm bells, drum beats, and 
signal guns warned the people, as prearranged messengers spread 
the news. 

"Now Concord's bell, resounding many a mile. 
Is heard by Lincoln, Lincoln's by Carlisle, 
Carlisle's by Chelmsford, and from Chelmsford's swell 
Peals the loud clangor of the alarum bell. 
Till it o'er Bedford, Acton, Westford spreads, 
Startling the morning dreamers from their beds." 

So run the lines by Pierpont. 

The reference to "morning dreamiers" must be regarded as 
poetic license, for practically all able-bodied people were up and 
at work when the word reached Chelmsford. 

The men composing the Chelmsford companies were scattered 
throughout the town, from Concord on the south to the Merrimack 
river and Dunstable on the north. 

It is stated by C. C. Chase (Vol. IV, Old Residents' Con- 
tributions) that when the messenger reached Chelmsford, the 
minute-men were already on their way to Concord. Those who 



220 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

lived nearest had, no doubt, started. The news had wings, and 
more heralds than one. John Ford, Sergeant in Captain Barron's 
Company, was one of the first in his locality to have the news. 
He immediately left his mill at Pawtucket falls and set out to 
notify the men in his part of the town, along the Merrimack. He 
hastily ate a bowl of bread and milk in his kitchen, and rode his 
horse to death; so tradition says. 

Lieutenant Colonel Simeon Spaulding, after hasty refresh- 
ment, mounted his restless horse, and as he had some difficulty 
in securing his gun, his wife stood on the large boulder which may 
still be seen in front of his house, and, giving him the weapon, 
waved her hand for a farewell. 

Benjamin Pierce, the father of President Franklin Pierce, 
was plowing in his field near the present Powell and B streets in 
Lowell, when he heard the alarm; he chained his steers to a tree 
and "the plow was in mid-furrow stayed." Taking his uncle's 
gun and equipment he hastened away on foot. Some of the 
others from that locality were Robert Pierce, Samuel Marshall, 
Benjamin Parker and his son Benjamin, and Henry Fletcher 
who was killed later in the war. Samuel Perham, Jr., was 
hoeing in the "lower field," still a part of the Perham estate, when 
he heard the alarm gun in the centre village nearby, and sticking 
his hoe in the ground, started to join his company, of which Moses 
Parker was in command. 

Samuel Parkhurst, a lad of sixteen, living on the west side of 
Robin's hill, called out, "Mother, I hear the shoots; I'm going"; 
and away he went. His descendents treasure a sword which he 
took from a British officer at Ticonderoga. 

Joseph Fletcher, fourteen years old, cried because he was too 
young to go with the others. 

One young man, who was not enrolled, begged and obtained 
leave to go in the place of his elderly employer, and ran all the 
way to Concord by the side of Sergeant Ford's horse, holding on 
to the stirrup strap. 

The place of rendezvous was near the memorial boulder 
in the little park where all the streets convene at the 
Centre village. From a rock a few feet north of this spot the 
minute guns were fired by Joseph Warren. Thither the men 
hastened from the farms and work-shops. This boulder was 
placed by the Molly Varnimi Chapter, Daughters of the American 
Revolution, on June 17, 1899. Mr. H. S. Perham, gave an 



THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION 221 

historical address. Other speakers were : General F. H. Appleton, 
President of the Sons of the American Revolution, and Mrs. 
Donald McLean, regent of the N. Y. City Chapter, D. A. R. A 
collation was served in the Town hall. The boulder bears this 
inscription: Here on the 19th of April, 1775, the minute guns 
svimmoned the men of Chelmsford to the Concord fight. Erected 
by the MoUy Vamum Chapter, D. A. R., A. D., 1899. 

The good parson. Bridge, was on the ground and requested 
the men to go into the meeting-house and have prayers before 
they went; but the impetuous Sergeant Ford, his patriotism 
getting the better of his piety, replied that they had more urgent 
business on hand, and hastened on with his men. Soon over one 
hundred men were on their way to the scene of conflict. 

Captain Oliver Barron's company nimibered sixty-one, and 
Lieutenant Colonel Moses Parker's, forty- three. 

These men did not march in regular order, but hiuried off in 
squads, on horseback, or on foot, as fast as they received the 
summons. As the foremost of them neared Concord about half- 
past nine o'clock, they perhaps being thus directed, followed the 
road leading over Punkatasset hill on the west side of the river, 
and took some refreshments at a farm house. This road has been 
reduced in grade in front of the Rev. Dr. Hutchins's residence, 
from which point a splendid view is obtained of the river and 
valley. Here the Chelmsford men met the Americans who had 
retired from the village on the approach of the 800 British troops, 
with others from Westford, Bedford, Lincoln and neighboring 
towns, and descended to Buttrick's hill just above the bridge, 
and there was a hurried debate. Finally Col. Barrett gave the 
order to march to the bridge and pass the same, but not to fire 
on the King's troops, unless they were fired upon. Then about 
ten o'clock took place the famous fight, which cannot be here 
described, and as the British retreated through the village towards 
Merriam's comer, other Chelmsford men came up, and with their 
comrades, crossing over the great meadows, met them at the comer, 
where a sharp engagement was fought. It was a race for life 
with the British, who were chased by the Americans all the way 
to Charlestown Neck. 

At Hardy's hill they harassed them, and Sergeant Ford 
showed conspicuous activity. He had learned to handle a rifle 
in the French and Indian wars, and on this day killed five of the 
British. Among the wounded were Captain Oliver Barron and 



222 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

Deacon Aaron Chamberlain of Chelmsford. [Frothingham, 
"Siege of Boston," p. 81.] 

Mr. Perham left the following note : 

"Wm. Fletcher went out on the 19th of April. By mistake 
his name is not on the Roll, which was not made out until 1776.'' 

He was, later, in Ford's Company. 

The family tradition repeats his words: "I was one of those 
who stepped over the body of the first British soldier killed at 
Concord Bridge." [Brown.] 

There is a William Fletcher, 3d, on the official list, who marched 
on the Alarm of April 19. There were several men of that name 
in Chelmsford. 

William Fletcher of Parker's company (Uncle Billy Fletcher, 
who lived in the old gambrel roof house recently demolished, 
which stood at North square) wrote out, late in life, an account of 
his experience. Evidently he was one of the Chelmsford men 
who arrived later on the scene than others, as the retreat of the 
British had already begun. He says : "We followed the enemy and 
came up with them somewhere in Lexington. Our company 
behaved as well as could be expected, all things considered. I 
was four times that day where the arrows of death flew thick. 
We followed the enemy more than half way over Charlestown 
Neck * * * the enemy was then in plain view, rising Bunker's 
Hill." He was 19 years of age when he enlisted. 

Frederick Hudson in Harper's Monthly for May, 1875, says: 
General [Colonel] Ebenezer Bridge, of Chelmsford, with a few 
men from Bedford, was also there [at Merriam's comer]. 

James Reed of Burlington made a deposition in 1825 regarding 
some of the British who were taken prisoners on their retreat 
from Concord on the afternoon of the 19th, in which he says: 
"Towards evening it was thought best to remove them from my 
house. I, with the assistance of some others, marched them to 
one Johnson's, in Wobrnii Precinct, and there kept a guard over 
them during the night. The next morning we marched them to 
Billerica; but the people were so alarmed, and not willing to have 
them left there, we then took them to Chelmsford, and there 
the people were much frightened; but the Committee of Safety 
consented to have them left, provided that we would leave a guard. 
Accordingly some of our men agreed to stay." [Drake, "Hist. 
Mddlsex. Co." p. 302.] 



THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION 223 

"Lieutenant Colonel Campbell's letters show that officers of 
his regiment were imprisoned or on parole at Chelmsford, at 
Dunstable and at Upton." [Shawshin in the Boston Transcript.] 

During the engagement and retreat at Concord the Americans 
lost forty-nine killed, thirty-nine wounded, and five missing. 

The British lost seventy-three killed, one hundred and 
seventy-four wounded, and twenty six missing — the most of whom 
were taken prisoners. Of these eighteen were officers, ten ser- 
geants, two drummers, and two hundred and forty were rank and 
file. 

The state of mind in Chelmsford is reflected in the diary of 
Parson Bridge. He records: 1775. April 10, Capt. Eben. Symmes 
came from Boston to secure a place of retreat &c in ye present 
troublesome season in Boston. [April 13, one load of the Captain's 
goods arrived. The next day some members of his family came. 
His two sisters, Betty and Sally, and boy.] 

April 18, Still hurry and confusion, in my own affairs, and 
on account of public news. 

April 19 — The Civil War was begun at Concord this morning! 
The Lord direct all things for his glory, the good of his Church and 
people, and ye preservation of ye British Colonies, and to ye 
Shame and Confusion of our Oppressors. 

April 20 — In a terrible state, by reason of ye news from our 
Army. The onset ye British forces made was begun at Lexington, 
& was carried on to Concord, where were some killed on both 
sides. They ingloriously retreated soon and were followed by our 
men down to Cambridge, before night. Heard of ye Welfare 
of my Sons in ye Army, & of my people there. 

Five captives carried through this town for Amherst. A 
constant marching of soldiers from ye towns above toward ye 
army as there was yesterday from this town and ye neighboring 
towns. We are now involved in a Warr which the Lord only 
knows what will be ye issue of, but I will hope in His Mercy and 
wait to see His salvation. 

April 21 — Much in ye same posture as yesterday. Forces 
still going to ye Army. I sent provisions to ye army so did many 
more. 

22. The same as yesterday in general. My Son Billy came home 
from ye Army in ye Evening. 

23. Lord's Day. I preached — O Tis a Very distressing day. 
Soldiers a passing all day & all night — but a small assembly. 

24. Things continue much in ye Same Posture. Billy went 
again P. M. to ye Army. 

25. No stir today — but little news from ye Army. Billy came 
home in evening. 

26. Billy went off again this morning after Capt Symmes' goods. 



224 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

27. Billy returned & ye goods came, P. M. 

28. Greatly distressed for our friends shut up in Boston from 
whom can get no news. 

29. My son John went off this morning for ye Army. 

30. Lord's Day. Read resolve of ye Provincial Congress for 
a General Fast 11th May. In ye morning Just as ye 2d. 
bell was ringing Capt. Symmes & wife arrived from Boston, 
ha\ang got out yesterday * * * 

May 1. Capt. Symmes & his wife &c with us. hurried in moving 
goods &c. 

2. Capt SjTTimes went off for Boston, if he might be 
be admitted there. 

3. Capt Symmes returned from Boston. 

4. A hurried life I have. O for peace and quiet. 
6. My son Ebenezer came from ye Army to Billerica 

yesterday & came over to see us. He being not well. 

Stays with us. Saml. Bridge came also to tarry over 

Sabbath. 
9. Capt Symmes went to Boston morning. * * * 

Ebenezer — went to Billerica. 
10. Fast Day thro' Province, on acct. of ye present difficulties. 

I preached all day fm Eccl. 9. 11. Capt Symmes came 

from Boston after meeting. 
12. A great deal of passing & repassing. So yt. I have no 

quiet. 
16. Capt Symmes went toward Boston * * * 
20 Capt Symmes came home. 
25 My Sister Blake & her family arrived at my house having 

escaped from Boston. 
27. Many pple passing frm Boston, &c. 

28 Lords Day. I preached at Billerica. 
Heard news at noon of a fight, begun yesterday, between 
ye regulars & our Soldiers at Chelsea, Noddle's Island 
&c, & yet going on. 

29 Rode to Cambridge — lodged at Esq. Hastings at the 
head quarters of ye Army. 

30 — * * * Visited our Soldiers, dined at Capt Stedman's 
pr invitation — much delighted with ye Army, their 
appearance & order &c. Saw ye spoils taken fm ye 
regulars at Chelsea &c arive at Cambridge. 

31 — went to Watertown * * * heard ye sermon preached 
before ye Congress. Addressed ye Congress abot ye 
times — offered our Service. To serve as Chaplains by 
turn in ye Army and Voted That our sermon Shod, be 
with other religs. Exercises in pub. on ye morrow at 
8 o'clock P. M. 



THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION 225 

June 1 It rained so could not go to Watertown. * * * 

Came home. My sons whom I saw in ye Army gave 
me pleasr. for Wm. I am thankful. 

On the day of the Concord fight some people living on the 
southerly borders of this Town removed their families to what 
they deemed a safe distance, carrying with them provisions for an 
extended absence, in case the British soldiers should overrun 
this part of the Province. A family of Proctors went over in the 
vicinity of Virginia meadow and built a place to live in for a time. 
The news of the repulse of the redcoats encouraged most of these 
people to return to their homes, and thanksgivings for their unex- 
pected deliverance were on every tongue; yet some hardly dared 
whisper opposition to the Mother Country. 

THE BATTLE OF BUNKER HILL. 

Chelmsford men took a prominent part in the battle of 
Bunker Hill on June 17, 1775. It was on the previous day that 
Captain John Ford volunteered to carry from Cambridge to 
Bunker Hill a message from General Artemas Ward. It was 
necessary in accomplishing this to pass within range of the British 
guns while crossing Charlestown Neck. Realizing his peril, 
General Ward ordered him to dismount and cross on foot, thus to 
escape observation. "But he ran the risk, and passed and repassed 
on horseback. While at Bunker Hill he warned Colonel Prescott 
that from the movements of the enemy it was evident that they 
were preparing to attack the Americans upon the hill, and urged the 
necessity of immediately casting up breastworks and redoubts."* 

"When the dawn of light revealed to the astonished Britishers 
the American works on Breed's Hill, Capt. Ford, who was now in 
command of the Chelmsford company, which consisted of sixty 
men, was stationed with the army at Cambridge, under Gen. Ward. 
When the preparations for the battle began, the gallant Captain, 
who had no taste for inactivity, obtained permission from the 
General to withdraw his company privately and march directly 
to the scene of action, to reinforce the troops. They marched 
across Charlestown Neck, which was being raked by cannon 
from the British ships, (a tradition given by Deacon Otis Adams 
is that some wavered and one or two turned back) and were pro- 
ceeding down Bunker Hill when they were met by Gen. Putnam, 
who ordered Capt. Ford, with his company, to draw the cannon, 
which had been deserted by Capt. Callender and left at the foot 
of the hill, into the line. The Captain at first remonstrated on the 

*OJd Ree. Contrib. Vol. IV. 



226 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

ground that his company were ignorant of the management of 
artillery, many having never seen a cannon before, but finally 
obeyed 'and moved with the cannon and the General himself to the 
rail fence,' which they reached just before the battle began." It 
was here that Joseph Spaulding of Ford's Company, being imable to 
restrain his impetuosity, began the battle by firing the first gun. It 
was from the hand of General Putnam that he received a blow on 
the head for it, and the General threatened to cut down with his 
sword the next offender who dared to risk the waste of another 
musket charge. It is related that Spaulding always declared that 
he killed Major Pitcaim, and Farmer's Geneological Register so 
states. It is thus recorded in the Chelmsford church record. He 
may have aimed at the Major, who, having been twice wounded, 
again placed himself at the head of his forces, and fell with four 
balls in his body. He did not die on the field. 

Captain Knowlton and the Connecticut troops were also 
stationed with Colonel Stark and the New Hampshire troops at 
this part of the defences. The right wing of the British army, 
under General Howe, was directed against the rail fence for the 
purpose of turning the flank of the Americans, and cutting off their 
retreat from the redoubt. As the enemy advanced to the attack, 
the artillery, manned by a portion of Captain Ford's company 
opened upon them with great effect, some of the shots being 
directed by General Putnam himself. The muskets were ordered 
to reserve their fire until the enemy were within forty yards, and 
again, until the whites of the enemies' eyes could be seen. 

It was at this time that Spaulding, and then some others fired, 
while the enemy paused to destroy the fence which obstructed their 
advance. 

When the word was given, the fowling-pieces mowed down 
their victims with fatal celerity, and the enemy was obliged to 
retreat, "leaving on the ground," as Colonel Stark related, "where 
but the day before the mowers had swtmg the scythe in peace, the 
dead, as thick as sheep in a fold." When upon the third assault 
of the enemy the fortunes of the day were reversed, and the 
Americans were obliged to retreat from the redoubt, the force 
at the rail fence, where some reinforcements had been received, 
maintained their ground with great firmness and intrepidity, and 
successfully resisted every attempt to turn their flank. This 
line indeed was nobly defended. The force here did great service, 
for it saved the main body, who were retreating in disorder from the 



THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION 227 

redoubt, from being cut off by the enemy. When it was perceived 
that the force under Colonel Prescott had left the hill, these brave 
men gave ground, but with more regularity than could have been 
expected of troops who had been no longer under discipline. Captain 
Ford behaved with great spirit in the engagement. Thirteen men 
of his company were wounded. Benj. Pierce (afterward Gen. 
Pierce, and the father of President Pierce) was a member of his 
company. He afterwards related that when Putnam ordered Ford 
to man the cannon, the latter "addressed his company in a very 
animated, patriotic and brave strain, which was characteristic 
of the man." The men then seized the drag-ropes and drew the 
cannon to the rail fence. One of these pieces burst after being 
fired eleven times. The firing continued until all the ammunition 
was spent. 

There is a tradition that, when the first man in Ford's Com- 
pany fell, his comrades, then for the first time under fire, were 
feeized with panic; but thereupon one of Ford's officers began to 
sing "Old Hundred" in a firm voice, and this so reassured the men 
that they gave no further sign of panic. It is related that, just as 
the ammunition of the Americans was exhausted and orders were 
given to retreat, a British officer mounted the breastworks, and 
with a floiirish of his sword, exclaimed, "Now, my boys, we have 
you." Hearing this, Captain Colburn, of Dracut, picked up a 
stone, about the size of a hen's egg, and, throwing it with all his 
might, hit the officer in the forehead, knocking him down back- 
wards. The Captain and his men then hastily retreated with the 
rest of the American forces. 

From a letter of Benjamin Pierce of Ford's Company, later of 
Hillsborough, N. H.: "I went onto the Hill about 11 o'clock, A. M. 
When I arrived at the summit of Bunker's Hill I saw two pieces 
of cannon there standing, with two or three soldiers by them, who 
observed they belonged to Capt. Callender's Company, and that 
the Captain and his officers were cowards and had run away. 
Gen. Putnam there sat upon a horse * * *" and "requested 
our company, which was commanded by Capt Ford, of Chelms- 
ford, Mass., to take these pieces and draw them down. Our men 
utterly refused, and said they had no knowledge of the use of 
artillery, and they were ready to fight with their own arms. 
Capt. Ford then addressed his company in a very animated, 
patriotic and brave strain, which is characteristic of the man. 
The company then seized the drag-ropes and drew them to the 
rail fence about half the distance from the redoubt on Breed's 
HiU to Mystic River." 



228 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

To Major Henry Dearborn. 

[Boston Patriot and Daily Chronicle, June 13, 1818.] 

Sworn Statement of Alexander Davidson [from the Columbian 

Sentinel, July 22, 1818.] 

Alexander Davidson, of Edgecomb, [given as from Tewkes- 
bury] in the district of Maine, who was a private in Capt. Ford's 
company, confirms what Gen. Pierce of New Hampshire states 
as to Putnam's ordering down the Cannon; but recollects what 
Pierce seemed to forget that Putnam accompanied them in person 
and saw to the placing of them, and until they commenced firing 
the pieces. I well recollect an expression he used at the second fire of 
one of the pieces; it was loaded with canister, and seemed to make 
a lane through them. After firing eleven times, the piece near 
me split. What time Putnam left our company I cannot say, 
but he was with us at the rail fence, when the battle begun, 
animating the men and telling us not to fear. 

Capt. Callender afterwards fully established his character 
as a brave man and received the approval of Washington. 

Benjamin Pierce (born December 25, 1757), was 18 years 
old at the time of the Concord fight. He was in the service of 
his uncle, as his father was dead. After the fight he went to 
Cambridge by night and enlisted in Captain Ford's company of 
Colonel Bridge's regiment, and, after Bunker Hill, during the 
rest of the war was in Colonel Brook's regiment, and took part 
in many hard fought battles, especially those preceding the 
surrender of Burgoyne in 1777. At the close of the war he was 
Captain and had a noble record for bravery. He was afterwards 
promoted to the office of Brigadier General. In 1786 he went to 
Hillsborough, N. H., where he had fifty acres of wild land, which 
he cleared, Hving alone in a log hut. He became Governor of 
New Hampshire, and was the father of General Franklin Pierce, 
President of the United States. He died April 1, 1839, aged 81, 

In one of the battles, when the bearer of the colors was shot, 
young Pierce seized the colors and bore them to the front during 
the conflict. He remained in the army until the last troops were 
disbanded at West Point in February, 1784. 

He passed through various grades of a common soldier, 
corporal, sergeant, ensign and Heutenant, leaving the army_ in 
command of a company, and with the reputation of a brave soldier. 
He returned to Chelmsford after an absence of almost nine years. 
He lived where Orlando Blodgett's stable now stands, at the comer 
of Chelmsford and Midland streets. [Old Residents' Contributions, 
Vol. III.] 

COLONEL EBENEZER BRIDGE. 

"Ebenezer Bridge's regiment was commissioned May 27. 
Moses Parker was lieutenant-colonel ; John Brooks, major; Joseph 
Fox, adjutant; John Bridge, quartermaster. A return, dated 
June 23. gives but nine companies belonging to it. Though the 



THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION 229 

whole regiment was ordered to parade on the 16th of June, yet, 
it is stated that three of its companies did not go on under Colonel 
Prescott. Ford's company reached the field just before the action 
^began; and a portion of this regiment,— two companies, — under 
iMajor Brooks, were on the way to the hill when the Americans 
were retreating. Colonel Bridge, though wounded on the head 
and in the neck by a sword cut, and though he was one of the last 
to retreat, did not escape the scouting that took place in relation 
to the battle. It was charged against him that he kept too 
cautiously covered in the redoubt. He was tried, and acquitted 
on the ground of indisposition of body. 

Colonel Bridge was the son of the Rev. Ebenezer Bridge of 
this Town, and was bom here April 23, 1744. He graduated from 
Harvard at the age of twenty. He taught school for m.ore than 
a year at Worcester, and became a dealer in "East and West 
India goods" at Billerica. In 1775 he was chosen Colonel of the 
27th Regiment of Minute-men. Dvu-ing the war he was chosen 
Registrar of Deeds of Middlesex Coimty. From 1781 to 1800 
he was Senator in this state. From 1783 to 1808 he was the 
County Treasurer. In these positions of trust he served honor- 
ably. His death is recorded in the Chelmsford Church Records, 
February 22, 1814, at "Cassenobia," N. Y. Chelmsford claims 
him, although he was living in Billerica at the beginning of the 
Revolution. His record in the Revolution is given as follows; 

Bridge, Ebenezer, Billerica. Colonel, Middlesex Co. regt. 
of Minute-men; Marched April 19, 1775; service, 4 days; roll 
dated Cambridge; also, list of officers dated Cambridge, May 16, 
1775; reported field officer for the day, May 17, 1775; also, list 
of officers dated May 21, 1775; reported officer of main guard, 
May 22, 1775; also, list of officers dated Cambridge May 30, 
1775; reported field officer for May 30 and May 31, 1775; also 
order for cartridge boxes dated Cambridge, June 24, 1775; also 
Hst of officers commanding regiments, dated Headquarters, 
Cambridge, July 22, 1775; brigade under command of its senior 
officer forming part of reserve corps under Maj. Gen. Putnam for 
defense of ports north of Roxbury; also, pay roll for service from 
date of engagement, April 24, 1775 to Aug. 1, 1775, 3 mos. 15 days; 
also, certificate dated Cambridge, Nov. 30, 1775; signed by said 
Bridge as Colonel of the 27th regt., certifying to the loss of articles 
at the battle of Bunker HUl, June 17, 1775, also, list of officers 
who delivered firelocks Feb. 17, 1776. 
I 

LIEUTENANT COLONEL MOSES PARKER. 

Lieutenant Colonel Moses Parker was born May 13, 1731, 
the son of Joseph, bom March 25, 1693-4, the son of Moses, born 
about the year 1658, the son of Abraham, who died August 12, 
1685. He was a skillful and brave veteran of the French wars, and 
behaved with great gallantry at Bunker Hill. A ball fractured 
his thigh and he was left in the redoubt. The British carried him 



230 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

a prisoner to Boston, and lodged him in jail, where after the 
amputation of his leg, he died on the 4th of July, aged forty-three. 
He was a good officer, much beloved by his regiment, and his loss 
was severely felt. An obituary notice of him — in the New England 
Chronicle, July 21, 1775 — says: "In him fortitude, prudence, 
hiimanity, and compassion, all conspired to heighten the lustre of his 
military virtues;" and it states that "through the several com- 
missions to which his merit entitled him, he had always the pleasure 
to find that be possessed the esteem and respect of his soldiers, 
and the applause of his countrymen." The notice concludes in the 
following strain: "God grant each individual that now is, or may 
be, engaged in the American army, an equal magnitude of soul; 
so shall their names, unsullied, be transmitted in the latest catalogue 
of fame; and if any vestiges of liberty shall remain, their praises 
shall be rehearsed through the earth 'till the sickle of Time shall 
crop the creation . ' " 

Lieut. Col. Moses Parker was remarkable for his bravery 
and life-long love of military pursuits. From his lieutenancy in 
Capt. Jonathan Butterfield's company in the French and Indian 
war, he was in 1759 promoted to a captaincy and was at Fort 
Frederick the following year. In 1761 Colonels Thwing and 
Arbuthnot protested they would not make the campaign without 
this dauntless and skillful officer. Allen quotes a letter of Oliver 
Fletcher, Esq., to the effect that these colonels said "They would 
not go without him, that he was the only Captain they had insisted 
upon" among thirty captains the Governor was selecting from a 
multitude of applicants. So great was his popularity that his 
friends assured him that if he would accept a Captainship " fifty 
men might be immediately raised to serve under him." He was 
endeared to those under him, says Allen, by his assiduous attention 
to their wants and constant endeavors to render their situation 
as pleasant as circumstances w^ould permit. He had won dis- 
tinguished praise for valor at the siege of Fort Frontenac. 

Colonel Parker lived at what has been known as the Driscoll 
place on the Middlesex turnpike, about one hundred and fifty 
rods south of where it crosses River Meadow brook. 

In Trumbull's painting, "The Battle of Bunker Hill," Colonel 
Parker is represented as seated on the extreme left of the canvas, 
after being wounded. 

MOSES Parker's commission. 

The Congress of the Colony of the 
Massachusetts — Bay 

To Moses Parker Esq Lt. Colo. 

Greeting. 
We, reposing especial trust and Confidence in your Courage 
and good Conduct, Do, by these presents, constitute and appoint 
you the said Moses Parker Esq to be Lt. Colo, of the Foot Regi- 



THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION 231 

ment in the Regiment of Foot whereof Ebenezer Bridge Esq is 
Colo raised by the Congress aforeasid for the Defence of said 
Colony. You are therefore, earefully and diligently to discharge 
the duty of a Lciut Colo, in leading, ordering and exercising the 
said Regiment in Arms, both inferior Officers and Soldiers, and 
to keep them in good Order and Discipline; and they are hereby 
commanded to obey you as their Leiut. Colo, and you are yourself 
to observe and follow such Orders and Instructions as you shall, 
from Time to Time, receive from the General and Commander in 
Chief of the Forces raised in the Colony aforesaid, for the Defence 
of the same, or any other your superior Officers, according to 
military Rules and Discipline in War, in Pursuance of the Trust 
reposed in you. 

By Order of the Congress, 

Joseph Warren President P. T. 

Dated the 19th of May, A. D., 1775. 

Saml. Freeman Secretary P. T. 
[Original in the possession of Mrs. Mary A. Hatch.] 

"Captain Benjamin Walker led the second Chelmsford 
company of about fifty resolute men, sixteen of whom were from 
Chelmsford, into Charlestown before the battle commenced, to 
fire from the cover of buildings and fences, and thus to annoy 
the enemy's left flank. They did great execution and then 
abandoned their dangerous position to attack the right flank on 
Mystic river. Here the captain was wounded. 

It was probably when the Americans began their retreat from 
Bunker Hill that Captain Ford found Captain Walker lying wounded 
on the field and took him upon his shoulder and carried him about 
forty rods to save him from capture by the British. Captain 
Walker, however, pursuaded his friend to drop him and save 
himself. The unfortunate man was carried to Boston and lodged 
in the jail with Lieutenant-Colonel Parker. His leg was amputated 
and, after several weeks of suffering and neglect, he died of sickness 
near the close of the month of August, 1775. 

THE FIRST SHOT. 

Joseph Spaulding, who fired the first gun at Bunker Hill, 
was born April 18, 1756, the son of Robert and Hesediah (Johnson) 
Spaulding. Lt. Robert was the son of Lt. John, a member of 
Capt. Robert Richardson's snow-shoe company in Lovewell's 
war. His brother Joseph, bom 1728, died in the army in 1756. 
Lt. John was the son of Jospeh, son of John, son of Edward, one 
of the first settlers of Chelmsford. 



232 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

The inscription on his tombstone reads: 

"Sacred to the memory of 

MR. JOSEPH SPALDING 

who died July 31 1820 Aet. 64. 

in hope of eternal life which God 

who cannot lie hath promised to 

believers in Christ. 

"He was among the brave asserters and defenders of the 
liberties of his country at Bunker Hill, where he opened the 
battle by firing upon the enemy before orders were given: &, 
after enjoying for many years the blessings of civil & religious 
liberty in common with others 

"He 'sunk to rest 
With all his countrys honor's blest.' " 

He is reported to have said, "I fired ahead of time, and 
Putnam rushed up and struck at me for violating orders. I 
suppose I deserved it, but I was anxious to get another good 
shot at Gage's men ever since our affair at Concord. The blow 
from "Old Put" hit me on the head, made a hole in my hat, and 
left this scar." ["Beside Old Hearthstones."] 

AN ACCOUNT OF WHAT 

things was Lost in Capt. Ford's Company belonging to Col 
Bridges Ridgmt in Bunker Hill Fight, June 17 

Francis Davisson 1 Gun boyonet Cartridge Box 3. 0. 

1 Beaver hat 12/ a good Waistcoat 12 1. 4. 

Daniel Keyes 1 Gun 

William Chambers 1 Gun 

William Campbell 1 Gun 

Jonas Spaulding 1 Stout body Coat 

£11. 9. 

[Endorsed] Cambridge March 18. 1776 

These may certify the within named men ware in My 
Company in Col Bridges Ridgtm: and that they Lost the within 
mentioned in the action at Bunkers Hill June 17 A D 1775. 

John Ford Capt. 

In the House of Representatives Watertown June 24 1776 
Resolved that there be paid out of the Publick Treasiu-ey of this 
Colony to the persons within named the several sums hereafter 
named, viz. to Francis Davisson Three pounds eighteen shillings: 
to Daniel Keys one pound Eighteen Shillings; to William Cham- 
bers one pound eighteen shillings: to William Campbell one 
pound thirteen shillings and to Jonas Spaulding one pound in 
full of the within account by them Exhibited. Sent up for 
Concurrence Timo Danielson Sec. p. Tem. 
[Massachusetts Archives. Vol. 70, p. 114.] 



£4. 


4. 





£2. 


2. 





2. 


2. 





1. 


16. 





1. 


5. 






THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION 233 

At Bunker Hill the British loss, as officially reported, was 35 
officers and 191 soldiers killed, 122 officers and 706 soldiers 
wounded. These belonged to the artillery, to the marines, and to 
the various regiments of foot. The American loss is difficult to be 
ascertained, as so little organization had been effected at that 
time. Frothingham estimates it at 140 killed, 271 wounded and 
30 captured. 

A special messenger by way of Billerica brought the news of 
the battle to Chelmsford the same evening. It caused great excite- 
ment and anxiety because of the uncertainty as to the fate of the 
Chelmsford men who participated in it. The alarm guns were 
fired, and before morning several of the wounded returned. 

Letter of Colonel Moses Parker to his wife. 

Boston 22d. June 1775. 
My Dear 

After tendering you my most Affectionate regard — I would 
inform you that in the unhappy Engagement on the 17 instant, 
I was badly wounded in one of my thighs. The bone of which 
is broke, but am as well treated as I can desire and attended with 
great care and tenderness by Doc Whitworth, as are the rest of 
the prisoners. — Must desire you would procure some Linnen, 
Stockings, and other Clothing, with some money if possible, and 
direct that they be left for the care of Major MuncrieJ at the 
Lines on Boston Neck; must entreat you to do it as soon as you 
can — 

remain your loving husband 

Mosesparker J 



Mrs Sarahparker 

[In the possession of Mrs. Mary A. Hatch.] 

The following letter was sent to the families of the wounded 
men who signed it in Boston Prison. 

Boston Prison, July 3, 1775. 
Lieutenant Collonel Parker & Captain Walker acquaint 
their Friends that they are well & sufficiently supply'd with all 
Necessaries but fresh Provision, which they need daily, in their 
present Condition, and which Major Moncrief has kindly promised 
to convey upon Receipt 

Moses Parker 
Benjamin Walker. 

It is written in an excellent hand, but the signatures give 
evidence of physical weakness caused by suffering. These men 
were by no means "well." Colonel Parker died the day after the 
date of the letter, and Captain Walker on August 15. 



234 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

The faithful wives of these brave and suffering prisoners, 
in response to these requests, walked to Boston, carrying what 
they cotdd of food and dainties and other things for their comfort, 
but were denied the privilege of seeing them, and so were obliged 
to retrace their weary steps with heavy hearts. 

"The British authorities took their packages, but heartlessly 
refused them the privilege of seeing their husbands" "who were 
dying in prison for want of the very care which they had plead in 
vain for the privilege to bestow." 
[Testimony of a son of Captain Walker to Mrs. E. H. Warren.] 

The patriotism and enthusiasm of the time moved some 
home-spun bards to express their feelings in moralizing rhymes. 
The following verses, beginning in the style of the Irish "Come 
all ye"s, are from a specimen of this kind of poetry, whose author 
is unknown. The paper on which it is written bears the name of 
Samuel Richardson, and now belongs to Edward Richardson. 
There are twenty- two verses. 

Isth Come all who have skill and Lament 
and let your hearts and eys have vent 
While you to memory do call 
The Valiant Colonel Parkers fall 

2th He bravely did with courage go 

To Charlestown fight to meet his foe 

And in his place was Valient found 

And with great boldness kept his ground 

3sth But fighting for his Countries good 
Whar danger roled like a flood 
A Wound received in his thigh 
Of which in Boston he did die 

11th His officers and soldiers all 

Who mourn their Valiant Leaders fall 
May God inquire [inspire] with courage still 
And giv Submission to his will 

12th May Gods protection them Surround 
And all their bloody foes confound 
May they possess the gates of those 
That Do our city now inclose 

13th God Sanctify this Loss to all 
Who saw this noble Hero fall 
And while his courage they relate 
May they his virtue emitate 



THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION 235 

OPINION OF SECRETARY KNOX. 

The opinion of Henry Knox, Secretary of War, 1793, to 
whom was referred the following petition of Sarah Parker, widow 
of the late Col. Moses Parker, who was wounded and taken 
prisoner by the British troops in the action of Bunker Hill, on 
the 17th of June, 1775, and who afterwards died of his wounds in 
Boston in the month of July following. That she was left with 
a large family of young children, and has to encounter many 
difficulties in supporting and bringing them up. That she has 
not received the relief provided by the resolution of Congress 
for the widows and children of officers who died in the service 
since the month of August, 1775. That she does not apprehend 
it was the intention of Congress to make any distinction between 
the widows and children of officers who died in the service, on 
account of the time when they died. She therefore prays that the 
benefit of said resolution of Congress may be extended to her and 
her children. 

Secretary Knox's opinion was that: It may, by rigid prin- 
ciples, be questioned whether the regiments in action on that 
day prior to May 15, 1778 were in Continental service, and 
therefore, whether by any rule of Construction, the officer then 
Killed could be considered "as officers commissioned by Congress." 
But if this was a doubt on the 17th of June, it was not so on the 
27th of June, the day General Washington arrived in Cambridge, 
and assimied the command of the Army, and issued such orders 
as denominated and to all intents and purposes made it a Conti- 
nental army, and the officers were commissioned accordingly, "and 
should it be judged proper to extend the provision to any prior 
to the said 15th of May 1778, it would seem incimibent on the 
character of the Nation to provide for the widows of those gallant 
men who nobly sacrificed their lives, by which they eminently 
contributed to establish the cause and reputation of their Country" 
[Taken from "Pay & Bounty Revolutionary Army," Washington, 

D. C, 1838.] 

Note : It will be noticed that Secretary Knox gives June 27, 
1775, as the date Washington arrived in Cambridge, whereas 
Lossing gives July 3, 1775, as the date he took command of the 
army. 

EXTRACTS FROM BRIDGE'S DIARY. 

1775 

June 17. A terrible day this ! in relation to our Army — in Battle 
with our oppressors at Charlestown. The whole 
Town on fire ! The armies engaged on Bunker Hill — 
at night we saw ye fire at [from] Chelmsford — an 
Express came fm Billerica, & an Alarm was fired 
here in ye eveng. — before momg. arrived at Barron's, 



236 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

Francis Davidson & Benjamin Ha3rwood of this 
Town both wounded in ye fight & brot news of ye 
Slaughter of diverse of our pple this way, tho' of 
only Capt. Walker of this Town, &c. 

18. Lord's Day — We assembled & held ye Pub. wor: Tho' 
but a few in number And thro' divine goodness were 
in as quiet a State at home, as could be expected. 
The Armies at Charlestown being Still engaged and 
News flying with respect to the Slain & wounded 
&c. I preached all day fm. Hab. 3. 2. old serms. 
without y. application. Read A. M. II Chron. 35. 
half ye Chap. After meeting P. M. heard fm. y 
Army particularly of my Son ye Colo, in ye Battle. 
I & my wife extremely distressed on his accot. not 
expecting to hear of his being living — But by & by 
heard That he was living but badly wounded. & yt. 
he was on his way home — I sent off my horse & 
chaise to meet him — but y Messenger had not gone 
far before he met with some of our men returning 
who could give ye best information of him & others. 
So he returned — & Benja. Butterfield, & afterward 
Deacon Chamberlain visited me — and assured me 
5rt. yy. Saw my Son at Camb. — & Tho' he was terribly 
wounded & bruised, yet his wounds were deemed 
not mortal. That he was so well as to mount on 
horse back this A. M. to Visit 3^e Generals, and that 
his wounds had been dressed. O this tho' bad was 
greatly to our Comfort. Blessed be the Lord. My 
Son Jno. well — he was not in battle. My Son Wm. 
well, he went off last night in ye alarm. All there. 
The Lord preserve em fm. sin and all evil. They, 
ye one, or ye other, or both, gave an accot. of ye 
Death of Capt. Walker of this Town. Killed at 
once. Of Col. Parker (My Son's Lieut. Colo.) his 
being wounded and left in ye hands of our Enemies, 
but not certain of his being Killed, & of Doctr., now 
General Warren's being Killed, & of many others 
I know not. This is a day big with distress & 
trouble. The Lord suffers it to be so, yt. our 
Enemies are yy. who were our brethren — Of ye 
same Nation, & Subjects of ye Same King. And all 
for y sake of y. Vengeance of a Wicked & Corrupt 
Ministry a deluded — a Devilish Venal parliamt. — 
O, ye Judgmts. of the Lord are a great deep — The 
Lord is known by ye Judgments wch. he executeth. 
Amen. 

19th. I visited Capt. Walker's widow & mother, on occasion 
of his Death — My Son Wm. returned fm. Camb. 
and brot. me Word yt. his brothr. ye Colo, was 



THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION 237 

better & yt. Jno. went a plundering at Chariestown 
yesterday — & was not very well last night & this 
Momg. Continual news Varying greatly fm y 
army. &c. Our Militia returned. O tis a day of 
sore distress — 
20 I visited Wido. Parker & her daughter ye wife of Col. 
Moses Parker, wounded, Missing, & supposed to 
be Slain in ye late battle. & discours'd & prayd 
wth em. 
26. O, This is an unsettled day & time. I am glad when I 

can seize a moment for any duty. 
27 Visited Mrs Walker, wife of Capt. Walker, To rejoice 
with her, on her receiving ye news of her husband's 
being alive — Tho' wounded & in Captivity in Boston. 
Also Doctr. Abbot to rejoice with em on accot. of 
y news yy. have also received of Colo. Moses Parker 
their brothr. his being alive, tho' Wounded & in 
Captivity in Boston. 
July 1. Capt. Sjrmmes & his family went off for Littleton to 

take up their abode there. 
1776 

Jtme 25. Mr Dunkinson, a young Gentleman fm. Scotland 
Captivated by our forces a year ago & who has 
resided at Concord, dined with me in his way with 
7 or 8 highland officers lately captivated, to Dunstable 
where yy. are to remain prisoners. 
A Lieut. Christie also Visited me after dinr. A number 
of highland soldiers are brot. in among us as 
prisoners, and a nimibr. sent off this momg. to 
Dunstable 
30. Lord's Day — After ye Blessing read a Resolve of y 
Genl. Coiu-t relating to y raising men To go to 
Canada. And at y desire of Colo. Spaulding 
Notified y pple on y Alarm & training lists to appear 
tomorrow wth arms &c at one of y Clock & gave a 
Short Word of Exhortation to em upon y affair. 
July 2. Much worried about y times. 

3. The town again in confusion. Companies mett to 

draw out men for Canada. 
5. More hurry abot. raising soldiers. 

15. Capt. Andw Symmes of Boston, Colo. Conant & Mr. 
Samll Fletcher came from Billerica to see us P. M. 

22. Two of y British officers, prisoners at Dunstable Visited 

me. P. M. 

23. Capt Ford & his Company marched off, in ordr. to 

Join our Northern Army. At his desire I went 
into ye meeting house, previous to their Marching. 
Simg part 18th psalm, fm. 32 ver. to end 38 — 
prayed with em & gave em a word of exhortation 



238 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

* * * Part of Two other Companies, Soldiers on 
their march, on ye same rout fm. lower Towns, came 
into Town toward night & lodged in Town. 

25 Much Compy & much confusion by reason of Soldiers 

passing &c. 

26 Early in ye morning I prayed in the meeting house with 

Capts Toy & Bancroft of Wobiim & Reading & 
their respective companies upon their march to 
Join our Northern Army. 
30. Rev. Mr. Hitchcock of Beverly, going as a chaplain 
to ye Northern Army gave me a Visit A. M. 

Aug 1 Fast Day thro ye Massachusetts Bay. 

Sept. 1. After service P. M. Read y declaration of independence 
of ye United States of America in y pub. congre- 
gation, agreeable to y order of y. council of this 
State. And when I had done, added Zion heard 
and was glad and y Daughters oj Juda rejoiced 
because of yy. ludgments, Lord. 
19. (David Spaulding receivs news of death of son David 
in army at Ticonderoga of Small Pox on Aug 27 or 28 
24 (Visited Willard Byam & Jonas Dutton both sick home 

from ye army.) 
30. (prayed in Meeting house with Compy. of Soldiers 
going to N. Y. under Capt Wright of Westford) 

1777 

Oct. 23 This momg. Assurtained of ye news of Genl. Burgoine's 
stirrendering himself & Army to Gen Gates &c &c 
Blessed be ye Lord. [On the day that the news of 
Burgoyne's surrender reached Boston, Joseph 
Warren, who in turn, with a few other citizens, went 
on horseback once in two weeks to that city for the 
mail, brought a paper containing the news to "Parson 
Bridge." On reaching home, Mr. Warren called his 
son Joseph, then a lad of nine or ten years, to make 
haste and carry the paper to the Parson. This he 
did, and on being shown into his room, passed the 
paper to Mr. Bridge, who, UDon reading the joyful 
news, jumped and capered about in a manner sur- 
prising to the boy. The happy Parson rewarded 
the boy with a pistareen.] [Related by E. H. Warren.] 
26 My son y Colo, came * * * fm. Cambridge. 

1777 Oct (Some time back the price of a cask wine for Communion 
was £8 lawful money. Now a cask of y same bulk 
costs £50.) 

Nov 5 (Wm. Foster lately reed news of his son Noah's death 
killed in battle. & of Ebenezer Foster [of Westford] 
who died of sickness in ye Army.) 
11 Jacob Howard's son Willard \ sick lately returned from 
& Saml. Howard's son Ben. j Army. 



THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION 239 

12 Flying news of Washington's taking Howe, &c. 

20 (Thanksgiving Day) 
Dec 7 Informed y. Congregation of y Continental Thanks- 
giving to be on next Thursday se'nnight. He 
preached from H Chron. 20. 20 latter part. 

11 visited Leiut Isaac Warren lately returned from ye 
Army. 

23 Received a valuable present of a new gown both inside 
& outside, from a ntmiber of the good women 
of the parish, also a sum of money and several 
quantities of wool & flax. 

29. [A Committee of ye Town brought him £86.8.0 lawful 
money; others gave grain.] 

1778 Jan 3 Mr Guild tutor of Havd Coll & Mrs Sally Bradstreet 

dined with us. 
5. (Capt. Hastings from y Eastward visited him) 
Capt. Minot's wife fell in ye fire in a fit 
Lieut. Benj. Fletcher, Lieut. Harwood, Liut Blodget, 
Col Eleazer Tyng, Liut. Jno. Spaulding, Col. 
Symmes, Col. Conant. &; Capt Fox, called. Dr. 
Hastings ret'd from ye Army. 
Nov 16 Town voted £400 addition to his salary (lawful money) . 
Dec 27 So cold that only 6 or 8 persons came to meeting. 

1779 Dec. 6. £1000 added to salary 

Road laid out by ye Town between ye ministry & ye 
land of Mr Fisk i. e. ye road south of ye ministry. 

1780 Jan 7 Yet stormy, windy, cold & blocked up I think more 

than I ever saw it. 
9 Lord's day but a handful of pple attended ye pub. wor. 
& those came on snow shoes except about yi Doz. in 
ye neighborhood. 
14 much drifted. No traveling. Shut up. No news 
this fortnight. &c 
May 15 I attended town meeting for ye Consideration of ye 
form of Government drawn up by ye Convention for 
ye State. 

1781 July 7 Doctor Hastings & wife & child moved to young 

widow Stoddard's to live there. 

[Dr. Hastings' mother — Elizabeth, daughter of Rev. Jno. 

Cotton of Newton, was a life long friend of Mr. Bridge.] 

Aug 17 Reed visit from Mr Waters a young preacher 

Oct 6 We have a great deal good news from ye forces at ye 

Southward both by sea & land. 

1782 April 1 I went to Town Meeting p m & voted for Govern'r. 

4. Lords day I began reading in public — after the winter 

16. Col Bromfield of Harvard dined with us. 

25. Fast day thro all ye States. 

28. Rev. Mr Ripley visited me. 



240 



HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 



May 21 Col Baldwin, high Sheriff, Visited & breakfasted with us, 
going to Groton Court. This eveng died Col. 
Eleazer Tyng, aged 93. 

24 His funeral. "I made ye prayer" & was a p bearer. 

25 Had a talk with ye wife of oliver adams a Shaking 

Quaker. She is a poor deluded visionary. En- 
thusiastic, high-tempered, self-willed creature, and 
is tended to no good purpose. 
[For an account of things lost by Chelmsford men at Bunker Hill and 
recompense therefor, refer to pages 232 and 844.] 

[The soldiers of the Seventy-First Regiment of Foot, Highlanders, under 
the command of Lieutenant Colonel Archibald Campbell, were taken prisoners 
at the capture of the transport-ship George in Boston harbor, in June, 1776. 
See pages 223 and 237.] 

The following receipt was found among the Town papers. 
"Bunker Hill Monument Association. Received of Capt. 
Caleb Abbot $369, being the amount subscribed in the town of 
Chelmsford towards the erection of a monument on Bunker Hill. 

Nathl. P. Russell, Treasurer. 
Boston, April 8, 1825." 

Roll of Chelmsford Minute Men who participated in the 
Centennial Celebration of the Battle of Bunker Hill, June 17, 1875. 



H. S. Perham, Capt. 

J. A. Bartlett, Lieut. 

J. C. Hobbs, Ensign 

Rev. E. Fitz Gerald, Sergt. 

Geo. Spalding, Sergt. 

Robt. Fletcher, Sergt. 

Chas. Christy, Sergt. 

A. G. Green, Corp. 

N. P. Dadmun, Corp. 

E. B. Kittredge, Corp. 

Milo J. Proctor, Corp. 

Herbert H. Emerson 

A. C. Thissell 

C. Proctor 

Henry B. Hunt 

A. W. Allen 

G. W. Butterfield 

E. R. Marshall 

E. H. Warren 

E. Crosby 

Otis Adams, Jr. 

Geo. P. Mansfield 

Luther C. Upham 

Geo. E. Hall 

Levi Lamphere 

L L. Putnam 

Jas. H. Hazen 

A Lowell paper of the day gave the following, apparently 
from the pen of H. S. Perham, as to the plans of the above company. 



Saml. Hagerman 
Thos. Borden 
Asa H. Webber 

E. G. Nicless 
O. N. Thissell 
C. E. Parkhurst 
Isaac Button 
C. A. Parker 

C. H. Hall 
W. Whitfield 
Geo. F. Reed 
J. H. McFarlin 
J. H. Willis 
John H. Lane 
R. Wilson Dix 
Henry Martin 
Frank Kelley 
CD. Ticknor 
Timothy Adams 
W. E. Stone 
A. H. Park 
H. F. Ebert 
John Larey 

F. Sweetser 

Pearson, Drummer 

Willie Adams, Fifer 



THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION 241 

The company will wear the continental costume. They will 
carry old flint lock muskets, and powder horns. The sword that 
was carried by Capt. Ford — who commanded the Chelmsford 
men at the battle of Bunker Hill — will be carried by the 
captain. Several of the guns and powder horns were also used 
at the battle. The Chelmsford Monument Association will aid 
in furnishing the banner for the occasion. Sergeant Geo. Spalding 
— grandson of Joseph Spalding— will carry the banner. A sword 
that was captured from the British at Ticonderoga, and brought 
home from there by a Chelmsford soldier, Samuel Parkhurst, 
father of the late Rev. John Parkhurst, will also be carried. 

The officers of the Boston & Lowell railroad, have tendered 
to the company the use of a hall in their passenger depot in Boston, 
where the company will partake of a collation after the procession 
is dismissed. The Cambridge Cadets will escort the company to 
their place in the procession. 

Frank Leslie's of July 3, 1875 contains a double page illus- 
tration of the Lexington and Chelmsford Minute Men passing 
up Columbus Avenue, Boston, on the day of the celebration. Co. F, 
Unattached Cavalry, of Chelmsford, was assigned a place in the 
procession. 

The significance of the battle of Bunker Hill is not, however, 
to be gauged by the losses on either side, heavy as they were in 
proportion to the numbers engaged, nor by its purely military 
results, but by the moral effect which it produced; and when it 
is considered from this standpoint its far-reaching consequences 
can hardly be over-estimated. "It roused at once the fierce 
instinct of combat in America * * * ^ ^^^ dispelled * * * 
the almost superstitious belief in the impossibility of encountering 
regular troops with hastily levied volunteers. * * * Nq one 
questioned the conspicuous gallantry with which the provincial 
troops had supported a long fire from the ships and awaited the 
charge of the enemy, and British soldiers had been twice driven 
back in disorder before their fire." The pride which Americans 
naturally felt in such an achievement, and the self-confidence 
which it inspired, were increased when they learnt that the small 
force on Bunker Hill had not been properly reinforced, and that 
their ammunition was running short before they were dislodged 
from their position. [Encyclopaedia Britannica.] 

The British soldiers fired without taking aim, and charged that 
the Americans were murderous because they took aim and fired 
from the shoulder. 

COLONEL SIMEON SPAULDING. 

Colonel Simeon Spaulding was born August 4, 1713, the son 
of Joseph (born September 22, 1673) and Elizabeth Colbum 
Spaulding who were married April 10, 1700. Joseph was the son 
of John and Hannah Hall (or Hale) Spaulding who were married 
May 18, 1658. John, bom about 1633, was the son of Edward, 
died February 26, 1669-70. He was of Braintree, where his wife, 



242 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

Margaret, died in 1640. He had sons, John; Edward, Repre- 
sentative in 1691; Benjamin; Joseph; Andrew, deacon in the 
Church at Chelmsford, born 1653, died 1713; and two daughters, 
Grace and Dinah. 

Colonel Spaulding married Sarah Fletcher; 2d, Mrs. Abigail 
(Johnson) Willson, daughter of Edward Johnson. He was the 
Town's agent for delivering contributions in the Revolution. 
On the farm he was succeeded by his son Deacon Noah, whose 
daughter Julia Ann married Dr. John C. Dalton. She was a 
woman of great force of character. 

Colonel Spaulding was Town Treasurer and Selectman; 
Colonial Representative from 1771 to 1775; in the Provincial Con- 
gress, 1775 to 1778; Chairman of the Committee of Safety, 1776; 
Commissioner to adjust War Act., 1778; Delegate to form the new 
Constitution, 1779. He died, April 7, 1785. 

By his first wife he had five children, and nine by his second. 

His record in the Revolution is given as follows : 

Spaulding, Simeon. 1st Lieutenant Colonel, Col. David 
Green's (2d Middlesex Co.) regt., which marched on the alarm of 
April 19, 1775; service, 6 days; reported returned home; also 
official record of a ballot by the House of Representatives, dated 
Feb. 7, 1776; said Spaulding chosen Colonel, 7th Middlesex Co. 
regt. of Mass. Militia; appointment concurred in by Council 
Feb. 8, 1776; reported commissioned Feb. 8, 1776; also, list of 
officers chosen in 4th Co. (North Co. in Chehnsford), as returned 
by said Spaulding, field officer and moderator, dated Chelmsford, 
July 5, 1776 ; also. Colonel; list of members of committees appointed 
to raise men for New York and Canada, showing number of 
commissions delivered them; said Spaulding reported as belonging 
to committee for Middlesex Co.; also, resignation dated Chelms- 
ford, March 9, 1778, signed by said Spaulding, resigning his 
commission as Colonel of 7th Middlesex Co., regt. of Mass. Militia 
on account of advanced age; resignation accepted in Council 
March 11, 1778. See also later record in Chapter V. 

An account of Colonel Bridge has already been given. 

A MUSTER ROLL OF THE FIELD & STAFF OFFICERS BELONGING TO COLO. BRIDGE'S 
REGIMT. OF MINUTE MEN. 

Officers' Names Towna they ^^^ Jimeof Time ia Amount of 
21 belong to "^^ ^ Marching Service Wages 

Ebenr Bridge Billerica Colonel April 19th 4 Days £1. 14. 4 

Moses Parker Chelmsford Lt. Colo. April 19th 4 Days 1. 7. 5 

John Brooks Reading Major 19th 4 Days 1. 2. 10 

Joseph Fox Billerica Adjutt. 19th 4 Days 10. 4 

Walter Hastings Chelmsford Surgeon 19th 4 Days 1. 1. 5 

Errors Excepted. £4. 14. 11 

Cambridge Dec. 20th. 1775. Ebenr Bridge Col. 

Min. Men. 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 26, p. 35.] 

On the original a pen has been drawn across the name of 
Walter Hastings and all on that line, which explains the footing. 



THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION 



243 





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244 



HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 



CAPTAIN OLIVER BARRON. 

Captain Oliver Barron was bom January 7, 1733, son of 
Lt. Jonathan, bom June 28, 1698, and Rebecca Prescott Barron. 
Jonathan was the son of Moses, Jr., who was bom October 28, 
1669, and Mary Bunker (Richardson) Barron. Moses, Sr., bom 
1643, married Mary Learned, and was the son of Ellis or Eliseus 
of Watertown, freeman in 1641, married Grace . 

Captain Barron married Abigail Proctor July 30, 1755. He 
died November 11, 1809. She died September 10, 1820, aged 87. 

Parson Bridge records that Captain Barron's house burned 
November 18, 1770, and that he raised the frame of a new one 
on the old site, January of the following year. 



CAPT. OLIVER BARRON S ALARM ROLL. 

A List of the Travil and Service of Capt. Oliver Barron of 
Chelmsford in the County of Middlesex and the men under him 
belonging to the Regiment of Militia whereof David Green Esq 
is Colonol. 

We in Consequence of the alarm made one ye 19th of April 
1775 marched from home for the defence of This Colloney against 
the Ministerial Troops. 









at one 


§.9 

I' n 9> 




Total 


Men's Names 


Rank 


Iro 


penny 
per mile 


■S a lu 
«, is "i 


Wages 


carried out 






III 


£. s. d. 


i' 


£ S. D. Q. 


£ S. D. Q 


Oliver Barron 


Capt. 


60 


0:4:2 


16 


3: 8: 7:0 


3:12: 9:0 


Samuel Stevens 


Lieut. 


50 


0:4:2 


10 


1: 8: 6:3 


1:12: 8:3 


John Ford 


Sergt. 


— 




6 


0:10: 3:2 


0:10: 3:2 




Benjamin Warren 


Sergt. 


50 


0:4:2 


9 


0:15: 5:0 


0:19: 7:0 


Silas Spaulding 




50 


0:4:2 


16 


1: 7: 5:0 


1:11: 7:0 


Jonas Peirce 


Cor. 


— 




6 


0: 9: 5:1 


0: 9: 5:1 




John Spaulding 


Drummer 


50 


0:4:2 


10 


0:15: 8:1 


0:19:10:1 


Jacob Howard 


Private 


50 


0:4:2 


10 


0:14: 3:0 


0:18: 5:0 


Benjamin Spaulding 


" 


50 


0:4:2 


11 


0:15: 8:0 


0:19:10:0 


David Burge 




50 




11 


0:15: 8:0 


0:19:10:0 


Ephraim Parkhurst 




50 


do 


11 


0:15: 8:0 


0:19:10:0 


Oliver Richardson 




50 




7 


0:10: 0:0 


0:14: 2:0 


Daniel Dammon 




50 


do 


18 


1: 5: 8:0 


1: 9:10:0 


Daniel Sillaway 




50 




9 


0:12:10:0 


0:17: 0:0 


Willard Howard 




50 




2 


0: 2:10:0 


0: 7: 0:0 


William Bowers 




50 




13 


0:18: 7:0 


1: 2: 9:0 


Josiah Richardson 




50 




3 


0: 4: 3:0 


0: 8: 5:0 


John Dunn 




50 


do 


3 


0: 4: 3.0 


0: 8: 5:0 


John Twiss 




50 




3 


0: 4: 3:0 


0: 8: 5:0 


Henry Spaulding, 














Junr. 




50 




7 


0:10: 0.0 


0:14: 2:0 


Joseph Marshall 




50 




5 


0: 7: 1:0 


0:11: 3:0 


Stephen Peirce, 














Junr. 




50 




5 


0: 7: 1:0 


0:11: 3:0 


Samuel Fletcher 




50 


do 


4 


0: 5: 8:0 


0: 9:10:0 



THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION 
CAPT. OLIVER Barron's alarm roll — continued. 



245 



[61 names] 



Men's Name3 


Rank 


^i o 

= S2; 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 


at one 

penny 

per mile 

£. 3. d. 


« 00 1. 

03 03 "^ 

-J 


Wages 
£. S. D. Q. 


Total 
carried out 

£. S. D. Q 


Joshua Davis 
Oliver Fletcher 
Jonathan Peirce 
Nathaniel Farrar 
Joseph Tylor 
Thomas Marshall, 

Junr. 
William Mears 
John Roby 
Benjamin Parkhurst 
Moses Barron 
John Mears 
Jeremiah Abbott 
Reuben Parker 
David Danforth 
Benjamin Parker 
Amos Mastes 
Isaac Keent, Junr. 
David Marshall 
Benjamin Melvin 
Samuel Marshall 
Daniel Keyes 
John Ke^'es 
William Dunn 
Benjamin Barrit 
James Dunn, Junr. 
Francis Davidson 
Moses Esterbrooks 
William Cambel 
David Chambers 
John Chambers 
Jonathan Sprage 
Isaiah Foster, Junr. 
Samuel Britton 
William Chambers 
Benjamin Parker, 

Junr. 
Benjamin Peirce 
Josiah Fletcher, Junr. 
Joseph Spaulding 


Private 

II 
II 

II 

II 

II 

II 
II 

II 

II 

II 
II 
II 

II 


do 


8 
8 

11 
9 

10 

9 
4 

17 
3 

15 
5 
5 

13 
4 
3 
7 
6 
5 
5 
9 
6 
6 
4 
6 
8 
7 
8 
6 
8 
7 
6 
6 
6 
3 

8 
7 
9 
6 


0:11: 5:0 
0:11: 5:0 
0:15: 8:0 
0:12:10:0 
0:14: 3:0 

0:12:10:0 
0: 5: 8:0 
1: 4: 3:0 
0: 4: 3:0 
1: 1: 5:0 
0: 7: 1:0 
0: 7: 1:0 
0:18: 7:0 
0: 5: 8:0 
0: 4: 3:0 
0:10: 0:0 
0: 8: 7:0 
0: 7: 2:0 
0: 7: 2:0 
0:12:10:0 
0: 8: 7:0 
0: 8: 7:0 
0: 5: 8:0 
0: 8: 7:0 
0:11: 5:0 
0:10: 0:0 
0:11: 5:0 
0: 8: 7:0 
0:11: 5:0 
0:10: 0:0 
0: 8: 7:0 
0: 8: 7:0 
0: 8: 7:0 
0: 4: 3:2 

0:11: 5:0 
0:10: 0:0 
0:12:10:0 
0: 8: 7:0 


0:15: 7:0 
0:15: 7:0 
0:19:10:0 
0:17: 0:0 
0:18: 5:0 

0:12:10:0 
0: 9:10:0 
1: 8: 5:0 
0: 8: 5:0 
1: 5: 7:0 
0:11: 3:0 
0:11: 3:0 
1: 2: 9.0 
0: 9:10:0 
0: 8: 5:0 
0:14: 2:0 
0:12: 9:0 
0:11: 4:0 
0:11: 4:0 
0:12:10:0 
0: 8: 7:0 
0: 8: 7:0 
0: 9:10:0 
0: 8: 7:0 
0:11: 5:0 
0:10: 0:0 
0:11: 5:0 
0: 8: 7:0 
0:11: 5:0 
0:10: 0:0 
0: 8: 7:0 
0: 8: 7:0 
0: 8: 7:0 
0: 4: 3:2 

0:11: 5:0 
0:10: 0:0 
0:12:10:0 
0: 8: 7:0 


0:4:2 
do 

do 


0:4:2 
0:4:2 
0:4:2 
0:4:2 





0:4:2 






































Sum Total 



£45: 5: 4:1 



Oliver Barron > Capt. 



246 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

Chelmsford January 1th. 1776. 

I OHver Barron atest the above 

To be a True Musterroal according 

To the best of My Knowledge 

Colony of the Massachusetts Bay, Jan 24th. 1776. 

Capt Oliver Barron above named made solemn oath 

to the truth of the above rool by him subscribed to the 

best of his knowledge. 

Before me Saml Hotton J of Peace thro the Colony. 

April 3. 1776 the Council ordered a warrant drawn on the 
Treas. for the above amt. 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 11, p. 210.] 

To fill a blank space on this page this pedigree is inserted. 

Dr. Walter Hastings was born Sept. 25, 1752, and died Nov. 
29, 1782. He graduated at Harvard in 1771. He settled in 
Chelmsford as a physician, and married, Nov. 23, 1777, Lucretia, 
daughter of the Rev. Ebenezer Bridge. He was at Bunker Hill 
in the capacity of surgeon in Col. Bridge's regiment. His record 
will be found in Chapter V. His father was Jonathan, bom in 
January, 1708; died at Cambridge, Feb. 16, 1783, a graduate and 
steward of Harvard. His home was the headquarters of General 
Artemas Ward in 1775. From this house General Warren went 
to the battle of Bunker Hill. 

The father of Jonathan Hastings was Jonathan, bom July 15, 
1672; died, 1742. He was the son of Walter, born 1631; died, 
1705. 

Walter's father was John, who came to this country in 
1638; freeman, 1643; died at Cambridge, Dec. 2, 1657. 

ANCESTRY OF LT. COL. MOSES PARKER. 



Abraham Parker, from Wiltshire, England, came to Wobum; 
freeman, 1645, came to Chelmsford 1653, married Rose Whitlock 
in 1644. He died here in 1685. 

His son Moses, born about 1658, married Abigail, daughter of 
Richard Hildreth, 1684; died 1732. 

His son Joseph, born March 25, 1693-4, married Rebeckah 
and died April 29, 1738. 

His son Lieutenant Colonel Moses, bom May 13, 1731, 
married Sarah . She died March 10, 1817, aged 80. 

The following names are those of their children whose births 
are recorded in Chelmsford: Abel and Aaron, twins; Joseph, 
Nehemiah Abbott, Moses, Rebecca and Sarah. 



THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION 



247 



A MUSTER ROLL OF COL. MOSES PARKER COMPANY, YEAR 1775. 



Men's Names 



Benjn. Walker 

Isaac Parker 
John Freland 
Wm. Parker 
Azariah Procter 
Willard Parker 
Simeon Barritt 
Wm. Abbot 
Saml Perham Jr. 
Wm. Parker Jr. 
Isaac Foster 
David Spaulding 
Aaron Chamberling 
Henry Fletcher 
Wm. Fletcher 3d 
Jeptha Spaulding 
Mica Spaulding 
Robert Adams 
Supply Reed 
Levi Peirce 
Isaac Marshall 
John Bates 
Nathaniel Foster 
Benjn. Farly 
Endfch Cleaveland 
Benjn. Butterfield 
Reuben Foster 
Joseph Spaulding, Jr 
Solomon Keys 
John Parker 
John Adams 
Ebenezer Goold 
Josiah Blood 
Zacheous Fletcher 
Robert Peirce 
Saml Marshal 
Joseph Ausgood 
Charles Fletcher 
Thomas Adams 
Benjn. Ausgood 
Joshaway Durant 
David Walker 



Town from 

whence they 

came 



Chelmsford 



Rank 



Lieut. 



Sargt. 



Private 



Time 
ingaged 



Travil 

54 miles 

in the 

hole 



April the 
19th 



Amoimt 
atone 
penny 
a mile 



0:4:6:0 






5 
17 
11 
11 
11 

9 
16 
13 

9 
16 
11 
10 
21 
11 
12 
10 
12 

8 
10 
12 

7 

7 



10 

7 



The hole 
amount 



0:14: 3:1 



6:0 
6:2 
3:2 
3:2 
3:2 
3:0 
4:0 

11:0 
3:0 
4:0 
9:0 
9:1 
3:0 
9.0 
6:0 
9:0 
6:0 

10:0 
9:0 
1:2 

11:0 

11:0 
6:0 
4:0 

11:0 
4:0 
4.0 
8:0 

11:0 
9:0 
9:0 
9:0 
9:0 
9:0 
9:0 
9:0 
9:0 
9:0 
9:0 
9:0 
9:0 
dq 



35: 1: 9:1 

[43 names] 

In council April 1776. Read and allowed & ordered that 
a warrant be drawn on the Treasurer £35.1.9^ in full of the 
within roll. Perez Morton D. Secy. [Deputy Secretary] 

This company was commanded by Lieut. Benjamin Walker, 
who became captain. 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 13, p. 153.] 



248 



HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 



CAPTAIN BENJAMIN WALKER. 

He was born October 6, 1741, the son of Benjamin, son of 
Benjamin, son of Joseph, first of Woburn, then of Billerica where 
he settled in 1667. The genealogy of this family is given in Hazen's 
Billerica. 

The reader will please consult the Index to find the ancestry of 
Captain Benjamin Walker. He married Abial Abbott of Andover. 

The following births are recorded in Chelmsford : 

Abbott, son of Benjamin and Abial Walker, July 24, 1770. 
Ephraim, " " '" " " " July 22, 1772. 

Rhoda, daughter of " " " " Aprill2, 1774. 

This marriage is recorded : Abiel Walker and Samuel Fitch 
of Acton, April 23, 1778. 



CHELMSFORD NAMES ON 

A RETURN OF CAPT. BENJAMIN WALKER's COMPANY IN 

THE 27th REGT. OF FOOT. [aN IMPERFECT ROLL TO AuG. 1-1775] 





Rank 


Time of 


Travel 


Time of 


Amt. 


— 




Enlistment 


miles 


service 












months days 






Charles Fletcher 


Sergt. 


April 19 


25 


3. ] 


L5 


8. 4. 


11 


Josiah Blood 


Corp. 


do 


25 


3. ] 




7.11. 


2 


Thomas Marshall 


Corp. 


do 


25 


3. ] 




7.11. 


2 


John Adams 


Private 


do 


25 


3. ] 




6.17. 


8 


Zacheous Fletcher 




do 


25 


3. ] 




6.17. 


8 


Robert Peirce 




do 


25 


3. ] 




6.17. 


8 


Joseph Osgood 




do 


25 


3. ] 




6.17. 


8 


Ebenezer Gould 




do 


25 


3. ] 




6.17. 


8 


Joshua Durant 




do 


25 


3. ] 




6.17. 


8 



David Putnam 
David Osgood 
Samuel Marshall 
Benj. Osgood 
Phinehas Kidder 
David Walker 
Thomas Adams 



These names are supplied from the October 

Return. 
These men were undoubtedly at Bunker 
Hill with the others, as there were prac- 
tically no enlistments between the dates of 
these rolls. 



[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 16, p. 57.] 

[A few of these men had guns & cartridge boxes, Shoes, 
stockings, &c, furnished by the Province. Guns charged at 
£1 . 16 . to £2. 14. 0. Cartridge boxes 4 Shillings. 

Shoes 0.6.8 

Shirt 0.9.0 

Stockings 0.3.4 
Privates were given £2. advance wages. Officers, 8. S. or 4. S. 
more.] 



THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION 



249 



[October Return, 1775] 

A RETURN OF CAPT BENJAMIN WALKER's COMPANY 27th REG FOOT 
COMMANDED BY COL. EB. BRIDGE. 

Benjamin Walker Capt. Dead from Chelmsford 
John Flint 1 Lieut Tewksbury 
Ebenr Fitch 2 Lieut Bedford 



Men'a Names 


The Towna they 
belong to 


Men's Names 


The Towns they 
belong to 


Sargts Lake Swett 


Tewksbury 


Josiah Kidder 


Tewksbury 


Asa Fassett 


Beadford 


Nehemiah Hunt 


Tewksbury 


Charles Fletcher 


Chelmsford 


Amos Foster 


Tewksbury 


Eliakim Walker 


Tewksbury 


John Bailey 


Tewksbury 


Corprils Josiah Blood 


Chelmsford 


Joseph Frost 


Tewksbury 


Thomas Marshal Chelmsford 


John Welch 


Andover 


Peter Hunt 


Tewksbury 


James Bailey 


Andover 


David Bailey 


Tewksbury 


Jonathan Dutton 


Tewksbury 


Phinehas Annis, Drum 


Tewksbury 


Malachi Allen 


Bedford 


Isaac Manning, Fife 


Tewksbury 


Jabez Carter 


Bedford 


John Adams 


Chelmsford 


Asa Duran 


Bedford 


Zacheus Fletcher 


Chelmsford 


Samuel Fletcher 


Billerica 


Robert Peirce 


Chelmsford 


Obediah Johnson 


Bedford 


Joseph Osgood 


Chelmsford 


Ebenezer Johnson 


Bedford 


Ebenezer Gould 


Chelmsford 


Abraham Meriam 


Bedford 


John Hall 


Tewksbury 


Abner Mead 


Lexington 


David Morrill 


Tewksbury 


Simeon Parker 


Bedford 


Hezekiah Thorndike 


Tewksbury 


Joseph Ross 


Bedford 


Justus Blanchard 


Billerica 


Epheriam Smith 


Bedford 


Jonathan Beard 


Tewksbury 


Benjn. Winship 


Bedford 


John Haywood 


Tewksbury 


Abe! Winship 


Lexington 


Paul Hunt 


Tewksbury 


David Osgood 


Chelmsford 


Eliphalet Manning 


Tewksbury 


Samuel Marshall 


Chelmsford 


John Dandelen 


Tewksbury 


Benj Osgood 


Chelmsford 


Jonathan Gould 


Tewksbury 


Phinehas Kidder 


Chelmsford 


Jonathan Frost 


Tewksbury 


David Walker 


Chelmsford 


Joseph Phelps 


Tewksbury 


Benj Dilleway 


Andover 


Jonathan Gray 


Tewksbury 


William Calwell 


Billerica 


Amos Goodell 


Bedford 


Thomas Adams 


Chelmsford 


Asa Leavestone 


Tewksbury 


Reuben Beacon Dead 


Bedford 


Samuil Bayley 


Tewksury 


Jacob Crosby Dead 


Billerica 


Joshua Durant 


Chelmsford 


Jacob Frost 




David Putnam 


Chelmsford 


Prisoner Boston 


Tewksbury 


Amos Russell 


Lexington 


Corprel Philip Fowler 




Timothy Dutton 


Tewksbury 


Missing 


Tewksbury 



[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 56, p. 178. 



250 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

CAPTAIN JOHN FORD, HIS COMMISSIONS AND MUSTER ROLLS. 

Captain John Ford was bom August 3, 1740, the son of 
Robert Ford and Esther Davis Ford of Haverhill. John was the 
fifth of seven children. Robert died at Cape Breton, July 5, 
1745. Captain Ford married Sarah Barker of Methuen. They 
had eleven children. He is described as a tall, wiry and active 
man, with a florid complexion. All his actions were indicative 
of great resolution and endurance. He was a man of few words, 
simplicity of manner and sterling integrity. He was early put 
to work. When fourteen years old he drove an ox team drawing 
logs, and was so small that in order to reach the off ox, he was 
obliged to run his goad under the nigh one. He was at the second 
taking of Louisburg, in 1758. In 1767, he purchased his property 
at the head of Pawtucket falls. John Corliss, the carpenter 
who built his house, married his eldest daughter, Sarah. He 
owned a sawmill at the foot of the falls. 

In 1820, by an act of the General Court, he, with numerous 
others, was set of from the Chelmsford church to the church in 
Dracut ( Pawtucket ville) . Chase, in "Old Residents' Collections" 
says: "Captain Ford once told Colonel Thomas Adams that one 
day when he went to his sawmill wearing his 'Revolutionary' 
coat, having three brass buttons two inches in diameter, he was 
met by an Indian, who sprang at him, shouting 'Me got you!' 
and immediately attempted to stab him with a knife, but the 
knife striking one of his buttons, his life was saved. Captain 
Ford having in his hand a bar with which he moved the logs in 
his mill, struck the Indian a powerful blow and sent him dead 
out of the tail race of the mill." 

FROM A PAPER BY MISS JOSEPHINE H. EARL. 

Capt. Ford's coinpany belonged to the regiment of Col. 
Ebenezer Bridge. This regiment on the morning of the battle 
of Bunker Hill had not yet left their quarters in Cambridge. 

It shows the impatient disposition of the man that, becoming 
restive at the delay, he gained permission to lead forth his com- 
pany alone, and proceeded to the Hill. 

It is related by one of his historians that, while at Bunker 
Hill, the day before the battle, Capt. Ford warned General Prescott 
that it was evident that the British were preparing to attack the 
Americans upon the hill, and urged the necessity of immediately 
throwing up breastworks. Prescott, who had not feared such 
an attack, yielded to the persuasion of Capt. Ford and before 
morning, the fortifications were completed, without which the 
Americans could not have held their ground or achieved the 
immortal glory of that day. Mr. Chase in his article pertinently 
asks, "Is it asking too much to claim a share of that glory for 
the brave and sagacious Capt. Ford?" 



THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION 251 

At the end of the nine months' service of Capt. Ford's first 
company, another company of Chehnsford men, with Ford in 
command, was raised to reinforce the army in Cambridge. This 
company served from January to April, 1776, but with little 
fighting, and in April the soldiers returned to their farms. In 
connection with Capt. Ford's second company, I quote from a 
manuscript of Lawyer Corliss. "William Fletcher of Chelmsford 
was a member of Capt. Ford's 2d company at Cambridge. His 
son William told me that his father, then alive, told him that 
Washington planned an attack upon Boston in the night, to 
cross with boats and Capt. Ford was put in charge of a boat, 
but for some reason the expedition was given up." 

In the siunmer of 1776 a third company with Ford as Captain 
was raised and stationed at Ticonderoga. While there Capt. 
Ford kept a regimental order book in which are recorded regi- 
mental orders, trials by court martial, promotion of officers, 
punishments of soldiers, and other matters. This book is in the 
possession of his descendants. 

[On their starting out to join the Northern Army, Captain 
Ford, his impetuosity having been somewhat abated, since April 
19, 1775, requested Parson Bridge to pray with them in the meeting 
house, which he did. They sang part of the 18th Psalm and he 
gave them a word of exhortation.] 

FROM THE ORDER BOOK. 

HeadQuarters Aug. 31, 1776. 
General Orders : — 

The Officers and Soldiers may be satisfied that the Genii, 
has left no means in his Power untry'd to procure medicines and 
every comfort for the Sick of this Army which the Station and 
Circumstances of this place will admit. 

The Genii, is credibly informed that a principal Surgeon is 
dispatched from N. Y. above a fortnight ago with a supply of 
medicines and apprehends that the Badness of the weather and 
Roads has alone prevented his arrival. 

It is the Soldiers duty to maintain the post he is ordered 
to defend. The same climate affects our enemies that affects us 
and the favor of the Almighty to whom we have appealed will if 
we trust in him, preserve us from Slavery and Death. 

Capt. Ford and his company returned to Chelmsford toward 
the close of 1776 and for some months they attended to their 
farms and mills, but on Sept. 30, 1777, still another company 
raised in Chelmsford and commanded by Capt. Ford marched 
to reinforce the Northern army. They were a little too late, 
however, to assist in the splendid victory at Saratoga. On 
returning they brought forty or fifty British prisoners from 
Stillwater. 



252 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

During the forty-five remaining years of his life he carried 
on his lumber business, bought large tracts of land in Chelmsford 
und did considerable farming. 

Among his papers is a ruling of the Court of Common Pleas, 
Middlesex Co., given at the December term, 1806, in a case of 
some disagreement between two Chelmsford men. "The parties 
appear and agree to refer this action and all demands between 
them to the determination of Capt. John Ford, Messrs. Joel 
Spalding and Phineas Whiting." 

John Ford married Sarah Barker of Methuen. They were 
blessed with eleven children, seven of whom lived to manhood 
and womanhood. Sarah, the eldest, born in Chelmsford in 1767, 
married John Corliss of Chelmsford, afterward of Haverhill, 
N. H. 

The other children, Deborah and Prudence, lived, unmarried, 
and died on the old homestead. Elisha, who was a civil engineer, 
spent many years in the service of the Locks and Canals Co., 
and helped to build Pawtucket bridge, the wooden structure 
that preceded the present bridge. He was captain of the militia 
of the town of Chelmsford, and represented the town of Lowell 
in the General Court in 1828. 

John Ford died November 6, 1822, aged 84, and was buried 
in the Pawtucketville Cemetery. 

THE CONGRESS OF THE COLONY OF THE MASSACHUSETTS-BAY. 

To John Foord Gentleman — Greeting. 

WE, reposing especial Trust and Confidence in your Courage 
and good Conduct, Do, by these Presents, constitute and appoint 
you the said John Foord to be Captain of the Foot Company in 
the Regiment of Foot whereof Ebenezer Bridge Esq. is Colonel 
raised by the Congress aforesaid, for the Defence of said Colony. 
You are, therefore, carefully and diligently to discharge the 
Duty of a Captain in leading, ordering, and exercising the said 
Company in Arms, both inferior Officers and Soldiers, and to keep 
them in good Order and Discipline; and they are hereby com- 
manded to obey you as their Captain, and you are yourself to 
observe and follow such Orders and Instructions as you shall, 
from Time to Time, receive from the General and Commander 
in Chief of the Forces raised in the Colony aforesaid, for the 
Defence of the same, or any other your superior Officers, according 
to Military Rules and Discipline in War, in Pursuance of the 
Trust reposed in you. 

By Order of the Congress 

Jos. Warren President P. T. 

Dated, the 19th of May, A. D. 1775. 
Sam Freeman Secretary P. T. 



THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION 253 

Middlesex SS June 1 1775 

Then John Ford within named personally appeared and repeated 
the Oath by Congress required to be taken by the officers of the 
Massachusetts Army. 

Before us Jona. Hastings 1 Justices 
Jona. Dix j of Peace 



COMMISSION. 

Sigilium Coloniae 

SEAL i 

Massachusettensis 
Colony of the 1 The Major Part of the Council of the 

Massachusetts-Bay J Massachusetts-Bay, in New-England. 
B. Greenleaf To John Ford Gentleman Greeting. 

W. Spooner YOU being appointed Captain of a Company 

Caleb Gushing raised by this Colony as a temporary reinforce- 
J. Gushing ment to the American Army untill the first 

Jedh. Foster day of April next. 

Eldad Taylor By virtue of the Power vested in us, WE do 

B. Lincoln by these Presents, (reposing special Trust and 

John Whitcomb Confidence in your Loyalty, Courage, and good 

Moses Gill Conduct,) Commission you accordingly. — You 

S. Hoi ten are therefore carefully and diligently to dis- 

Michael Farley charge the Duty of a Captain in leading, order- 

I. Palmer ing, and exercising said Company in Arms both 

John Taylor Inferior Officers and Soldiers; and to keep them 

B. White in good Order and Discipline: And they are 

Jabez Fisher hereby commanded to obey you as their Captain 

and you are yourself, to observe and follow such 

Orders and Instructions as you shall from Time 

to Time receive from your Superior Officers. 

Given under our Hands and the Seal of the said Colony, 

at Watertown the Seventh Day of February in the Sixteenth 

Year of the Reign of his Majesty King George the Third, Anno 

Domini, 1776. 

By the Command of the 
Major Part of the Council 

Perez Norton D[eputy] Secy. 



254 



HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 



COMMISSION. 

Colony of the Massachusetts-Bay. The Major Part of the Council 
of the Massachusetts-Bay, in New-England. 

To John Ford — Gentleman Greeting. 
You being appointed Captain of the fourth 
Company in the Seventh Regiment of Militia 
in the County of Middlesex whereof Simeon 
Spaulding Esqr. is Colonel — 

By Virtue of the Power vested in us, WE 
do by these Presents, (reposing special Trust 
and Confidence in your Loyalty, Courage, and 
good Conduct,) Commission you accordingly. — 
Jr. You are therefore carefully and diligently to 
discharge the Duty of a Captain in leading, 
ordering, and exercising said Company in 
Arms both Inferior Officers and Soldiers; and 
to keep them in good Order and Discipline: 
And they are hereby commanded to obey you 
as their Captain and you are yourself, to 
observe and follow such Orders and Instruc- 
tions as you shall from Time to Time receive 
from the Major part of the Council or 
from your Superior Officers. 

GIVEN under our Hands and the seal of 
the said Colony, at Watertown the third Day 
of September, in the Year of our Lord, 1776 — 

By the Command of the 
Major Part of the Council 

John Avery, Depy. Secy. 

Given under our hands and seal of said Colony at Watertown 
Sept. 3. 1776. 



SEAL 

1 J 

Jer. Powell 
Caleb Gushing 
J. Winthrop 
Rich'd Derby 
J. Gushing 
I. Holten 
Ebenr. Thayer. 
B. Lincoln 
B. Chadboiim 
Jos. Gushing 
D. Sewall 
B. White 
D. Hopkins 
John Taylor 
F. M. Dunn 



[Condensed.] 

A RETURN OF THE CO. OF THE 7tH REGT OF MILITIA IN THE 

COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX. 

Officers' Names Rank Date of Commission Place of Abode 

John Ford, Capt June 11th 1775 Chelmsford 

Benj Warren 1st Lieut Sept 3d 1776 do 

Vacant, 2nd " Vacant do 

Training Band Present 76 Alarm List present 34 

Clerks 1 Under 50 years of age 16 

Serjeants 4 Between 50 and 60 years 9 

Drummers and fifers . . 2 " 60 " 65 " 9 

Rank and File Total . . 76 Total alarm List 34 



THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION 



255 



Absent in the Training Band in Capacity of Non-Commissioned 
officers and Privates 

In the Continental Army 17 

" " State Service \\ 

28 
The whole number of males above 16 years of age not included 

either in the Training Band or alarm list 13 

Whites between 16 and 60 years of age 129 

Upwards of 60 years of age 9 

l38 

[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 55, p. 48.] 

In a Muster Roll of Capt John Ford's Company in ye twenty- 
seventh Rigimt of Foot in Continental Army, these officers are 
given: 1775 

John Ford Capt John Bats Corp 1 

Isaac Parker Litit William Chambers Do ! p 

Jonas Parker Ensign William Cambell Do [ ^ 

Moses Barker Sergt \ Benjn. Berritt Do J 

Parker Emerson Do I q ^ William Ranstard 1 Drummer 
Daniel Keyes Do [ ^ Barzilar Lew J and Fifer 

Jonas Pierce Do J 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 55, p. 49.] 

The whole number of Equipments in the Training Band and Alarm 
List Present 
83 Good Fire Arms 75 Jack-Knife 

31 Steel Ram-rods 83 wadding 

58 worms 327 Flints 

74 Priming — wire and Brushes 66 lb Powder 

74 Belt and Scabboard Bayonets 3043 Bulletts 
63 Cartridge-Boxes of 15 Rounds 83 Blanket 
5339 Buck-Shott 72 Canteen 

[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 55, p. 48.] 



RETURN OF CAPT JOHN 


FORDS 


COMPANY IN COL BRIDGE'S RIDGM. 


John 


Ford Capt 




JUNE 15, 1775. 


Isaac Parker Lieut. 








Jonas Parker 


Ensign 






Men's Names 


Age 


Day 
Inlisted 


Town they 
belong to 


Com- Q. „ 
plection ^^^^ 


their occupation 


Sergts 














Moses Barker 


36 


25 April 


Dracutt 


Light 6 


Farmer 


Parker Emerson 


30 


" 




Chelmsford 


fresh 5.10 


housewright 


Daniel Keyes 


37 


" 




Chelmsford 


do 5.10 


farmer 


Jonas Pierce 


25 


" 




<( 


do 6 


housewright 


Corps 














John Bates 


28 


26 






Dark 6 


farmer 


William Chambers 25 


25 






Light 6 


Do 


William Cambell 


37 


" 






Dark 6 


Do 


Benja. Berret 


42 


" 






Light 6 


Do 


John Keyes 


26 


" 






Fresh 6 


Do 


Alexander Davidson 


27 


25 




Tewkesby 


Dark 5.9 


Cord winder 


John Chambers 


27 


26 




Chelmsford 


Light 6 


farmer 


Samuel Briton 


18 


25 




<i 


Dark 5.6 


Do 



256 



HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 



Men's Names 


Age 


Day 

Inlisted 


Town they 
belong to 


Com- Q. ^ 
plection ^>=« 


their occupation 


Moses Barker Jr 


16 


25 April 


Dracutt 


Light 


5.6 


Do 


Benjamin Pierce 


19 


26 




Chelmsford 


Do 


5.8 


Do 


David Chambers 


26 


27 






Do 


6 


Do 


Ebenezer Shed 


25 


25 






Dark 


6 . 


house Wright 


Samuel Wilson 


21 


25 






Light 


6 


farmer 


Jonathan Sprigue 


19 


25 






Do 


5.8 


housewright 


Nathll. Foster 


20 


26 






Dark 


6 


farmer 


James Dun 


23 


27 






Light 


6 


Do 


Isaiah Foster 


22 


25 






Light 


6 


Do 


Benja Parker 


22 


27 


Do 


Do 


Dark 


6 


Do 


Enoch Cleavland 


19 


27 




Do 


Light 


5.8 


Do 


Benja Butterfield 


18 


27 




Do 


Light 


5.6 


Do 


Samuel Haywood 


17 


26 




Do 


Dark 


5.6 


Do 


Moses EsterBrooks 


30 


27 




Do 


Light 


6. 


Do 


Robert Aynger 


42 


28 




Billiraca 


Do 


5.5 


Do 


Elijah Heaselton 


25 


29 




Tewksbury 


Dark 


5.6 


Do 


John Glode 


25 


28 




Chelmsford 


Dark 


5.10 


Do 


Jesse Dow 


21 


29 




Methen 


Dark 


5.10 


Blacksmith 


Joseph Spaulding 


20 


25 


Do 


Chelmsford 


Do 


5.10 farmer 


Francis Davidson 


23 


26 




Do 


Do 


5.9 


Do 


Oliver Cory 


18 


28 




Do 


Do 


5.6 


Do 


Samuel Marshel 


23 


29 




Do 


Do 


6 


Do 


Joseph Chambers 


21 


26 




Do 


Do 


6 


Do 


Nathaniel Hunt 


20 


29 




Tewkesbury 


Do 


5.9 


Do 


Reuben Foster 


23 


27 




Chelmsford 


Light 


6.1 


Do 


Joseph Spaulding Jr 


19 


27 




Do 


Do 


6. 


Do 


Noah Foster 


18 


27 




Do 


Light 


5.6 


Do 


Jonas Spaulding 


19 


29 




Do 


Do 


6. 


Do 


Solomon Keyes 


23 


29 




Do 


Do 


5.10 


Do 


Isaac Berret 


22 


25 


Do 


Do 


Do 


6 


Do 


Benja. Farley 


17 


25 


Do 


Do 


Do 


5.10 


Do 


Timothy Adams 


18 


29 


Do 


Do 


Do 


5.6 


Do 


Josiah Fletcher 


18 


28 


Do 


Do 


Do 


5.6 


Do 


John Parker 


20 


26 




Do 


Dark 


5.10 


Do 


James Chambers 


16 


2 May 


Do 


Light 


5.6 


Do 


Silas Parker 


17 


29 April 


Do 


Light 


5.6 


Do 


Benj Haywood 


21 


28 April 


Do 


Do 


5.5 


Do 


Robert Richardson 


33 


4 May 


Do 


Do 


6. 


Do 


Berzillia Lew 


30 


6 May 


Do 


Negro 6 . 


Cooper [Fifer] 


William Rowell 


25 


6 


Do 


Sandown 


Light 


6. 


farmer 


William Ranstard 


14 


6 


Do 


Boston 


Dark 


5. 


Do [Drummer] 


Thomas Bewkell 


25 


27 April 


Chelmford 


Light 


5.10 


Do 


William Brown 


23 


25 April 


Darcutt 


Light 


6. 


Do 


James Alexander 


26 


28 


Do 


Chelmford 


Dark 


5.10 


Do 


Solomon Farmer 


21 


28 


Do 


Do 


Do 


5.6 


Do 


William Brown 


the 














James Alexander 


29 of May. 1775 








Solomon Farmer | 


Enlistee 


in to 


the Train 








Thomas Bewkell 25 of June 1775 






Desarted from Camp 


in Cambridge 










[Massachusetts Archives, 


Vol. 


55, p. 54.] 








Another Roll 


[Vol. 56, p. 


179], dated 


Sept. 


25, 


1775, has the 



same names. 

Mr. Henry S. Perham once expressed to the writer the 
opinion that the name Chambers on the foregoing roll might be 
erroneously given for Chamberlain. 

This was the first enlisted company of Chelmsford men, and 
was stationed at Cambridge, serving from April 25, 1775 to 
February, 1776. 




MIDDLESEX VILLAGE. AQUEDUCT, LOOKING WEST. 




MIDDLESEX VILLAGE. AQUEDUCT, LOOKING EAST. 




No. l8 



BALDWIN MANSION. STORE HOUSE. 

BRIDGE OVER CANAL, MIDDLESEX VILLAGE. 



THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION 257 

Captain Barron's company, which turned out on the 19th of 
April, remained at Cambridge a short time, the service of the men 
varying from two to eighteen days. About twenty of these men 
enlisted into Capt. Ford's company, a few days later. 

On the 25th of April, nineteen of Capt. Ford's company were 
enlisted, eight on the 26th, and by the 29th, twenty-five more. 

The militia was called out, as a temporary reinforcement to 
the army, to serve to April 1, 1776, until a new army could be 
recruited to take the place of those whose term of enlistment had 
expired. 

Second Enlisted Company of Chelmsford men, at Cambridge, 
which served from January, 1776, to April 1776. 

John Ford, Capt.; Lemuel Perham, Lieut.; Micah Hildreth, 
Benjamin Byam, John Adams, Uriah Keyes, Moses Barker, 
Oliver Richardson, Samuel Twiss, Daniel Silaway, Solomon Keyes, 
Isaac Liveston, John Taylor, James Heaston, Eliphalet Manning, 
Israel Hunt, Jonathan Hunt, John Roby, Willard Hall, Nicholas 
Morrill, Stephen Pierce, John Marsh, Nathaniel Richardson, John 
Needham, Isaiah Foster, Sherebiah Fletcher, Jeremiah Morrill, 
Moses Esterbrooks, Samuel Wilson, Ebenezer Goidd, Jr., Elijah 
Hildreth, Joshua Jones, Solomon Abbott, Barzilla Lew, Joseph 
Barrett, James Annas, Simon Hyde, Ezekiel Andrews, Joshua 
Durant, Hezekiah Thorndike, Willard Pierce, John Haywood, 
John Mears, Daniel Abbot, Jonathan Stevens, John Spaulding, 
Samuel Fletcher, Jonathan Shed, James Read, Joseph Ingals, 
Caleb Coburn, Daniel Clough, Daniel Proctor, Jeptha Spaulding, 
William Fletcher, Jeremiah Hill, Joseph Willson, Leonard Willson, 
John Hunt, Joseph Spaulding, John Baker, Thomas Hoadley, 
Benjamin Lane. 
[Ford Papers.] 

The following names are on the enlistment papers dated 
January, 1776, among the papers left by Capt. Ford, and probably 
served in the company, although they did not receipt for their 
pay with those named above: 

John Carlton, Jr., Stephen Barrett, Elijah Cory, Josiah 
Abbot, Paul Hill, Timothy Gray, John Wright, Benjamin Sanders, 
Charles Harris, John Wining, Benjamin Sprake, Benjamin Dutton, 
John Sprake, William Stearns, Joel Crosby, Nicholas Sprake, 
Aaron Monroe, Abraham Jaquith, John Merrick, Moses Hardee, 
Aaron Palmer, John Perham, 3d, Lemuel Perham, Jr., Josiah 
Danforth, Gershom Proctor, Francis Lane, David Lane, William 
Clough, Uriah Griffin, James Hazeltine, John Hunt, Daniel 
Glode, James Bailey. 
[Ford Papers.] 

'Tt may be that some of the last names are of men transferred 
to other companies, although their names are on enlistment papers 
with the names of those on the pay roll of April 19, 1776." [See 
Lowell Journal and Courier, Sept. 23, 1859.] 



258 



HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 



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THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION 



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260 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

Captain Ford's muster roll of August, 1775, is placed after 
that of the second enlisted company in order to bring it on 
opposite pages. 

Company of Capt. John Ford of Chelmsford, at Ticonderoga, 
being mostly men from Chelmsford, from July to the end of 
December, 1776. 

John Ford, Capt. ; Micah Hildreth, Lieut. ; John Richardson, 
Lieut.; John Chaney, also Lieut, for part of the time; John Lane, 
Ensign; Ebenezer Bowman, Sarg't.; Daniel Parker, John Osgood, 
John Smith, Robert Richardson, Robert Morrell or Morall, John 
Adams, Ezra Corey, Joel Estabrooks, Joseph or Josiah Estabrooks, 
William Mears, Samuel Brown, Eleazer Colburn, Abram Littlehale, 
Jesse Haywood, Benjamin Hajrwood, Daniel Silaway, William 
Smiley, John Taylor, Joshua Jones, Samuel Piper, Willard Hall, 
Benjamin Barron, Philip Butterfield, John Marsh, Moses Chandler, 
John Perham, Isaac Carkin, Reuben Silaway, Abijah Wood, 
Solomon Wood, Alexander Brown, Timothy Farrar, David 
Adams, Thomas Clark, Richard Hughes, Daniel Damon, Ebenezer 
Wakefield, Samuel Ellingwood, John Fox, William Blazedell, 
Hezekiah Thomdike, Caleb Rea, Benjamin Sprake, Jacob 
Williams, Aaron Farmer, Eben'r Green, Levi Parker, Jonas 
Whitney, James Cumings, James Davis, Seth Didson, Ephraim 
Howe, Lazarus Hubbard, Nathaniel Boroughs, Abijah Fox, 
Joseph Butterfield, Jesse Butterfield, William Bowers, Benjamin 
Williams, Robert Adams, Jeduthan Warren, Solomon Keyes, 
William Chambers, Charles Fips or Phipps, Samuel Whitney, 
Jonathan Woodward, Sampson Harris or Hardy, Mitchell Davis, 
John Mears, Moses Barker, Obadiah Johnson, Jonathan Evans, 
Barzilla Lew, John Mills, Asa Colbvim, Joseph Carkin, Solomon 
Adams, John Bowers, Ziba Lane, Abraham Mears, Zaccheus 
Fletcher, Joshua Durant, John Manning, John Burge, John Ditson, 
John Storrs. 
[Ford Papers.] 



THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION 
ROUTE TO TICONDEROGA. 



261 



In the Diary of Micah Hildreth of Dracut (Lieutenant in 
Capt. Ford's company), are given the routes taken by the troops 
on their march from Chelmsford on July 25, 1776, and on 
their return. 



Dracutt, July 25. 1776. 
to Chelmsford 
to Westf ord 

Groton 

Pepperel 

Townsend 
Ashby 

Ashbumham 

New Ipswich 

Ringe 

Jeffry 

New Marlboro 

Swanzey 

Keen 

Slurry 

Westmoreland 

Walpole 

Charlestown, N. Y. 

Springfield 

Weathersfield 

Cavendish 

Saltish 

Ludlow 

Susbury 

Clarendon 

Rutland 

Castleton 

Skeenborough 

Mount Independence 

Ticonderoga 



Then marched for Cannada 
From Ticonderoga, Nov. 26. 1776. 
To Fort George 
Fort Edward 

" Miller 

Saratoga 
Still Water 

Half Moon 

New City 

Albany Flats 

Albany 

Then across the River to Green Bush 

Scoduck 

New Lebanon 

Green Groves, called Philipstown 

Pittsfield 

Partridgefield 

Washington 

Williamsburg 

Hatfield 

Then across the river to Hadley 

Amherst 

Shutesbury 

New Salem 

Petersham 

Templeton 

Westminster 

Fitchburg 

Lunenburg 

Shirley 

Groton 

Westford 

Chelmsford 

Dracut 



[Courtesy of Dr. M. G. Parker.] 



"A Muster Roll of Capt. John Ford's Company of Volunteers 
in Col. Jonathan Reed's Regiment of Militia, who engaged Sept 
27th and marched Sept. 30, A. D. 1777, to reinforst the northern 
army, by the desire of the General Court of the Massachusetts 
Bay." as we belonged to sd. State. Chelmsford Sept. A. D. 1777. 



262 



HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 



John Ford, Capt. 

Tempel Kindall Lieut. 

Jonathan Bancroft, Sergt. 

Willard Parker Sergt. 2. 8. 

Azariah Proctor, Corp. 2. 4. 

Silas Pierce, Corp. 2. 4. 

Caleb Colburn, Corp. 2. 4. 

Simeon Cummings, Corp. 2. 4. 

Privates 

Oliver Barron, Esq. 2. 0. 

Jonathan Shed, 2. 0. 

William Chambers 2. 0. 

Jonathan Woodard 2. 0. 

Willard Hayward 2. 0. 

David Putnam 2. .0 

Joseph Adams 2. 0. 

Samuel Adams 2. 0. 

Jeduthan Warren 2. 0. 

Sam'l Perham 2. 0. 

Tosiah Fletcher 2. 0. 

Henry Fletcher 2. 0. 

Joe! Spauldin 2. 0. 

David Danforth 2. 0. 

David Marshall 2 0. 

Aaron Chamberlain 2. 0. 

Azariah Spauldin 2. 0. 

Timothy Adams 2. 0. 

Jonathan Robins 2. 0. 

Ephraim Robins 2. 0. 

Supply Reed 2. 0. 

William Spauldin 2. 0. 

Stephen Pierce 2. 0. 

Benjamin Butterfield 2. 0. 

Levi Fletcher 2. 0. 

Banja Hayward 2. 0. 

Oliver Richardson 2. 

John Hadlock 2. 0. 

Joseph Butterfield 2. 0. 

Joseph Ingals 2. 0. 

Aaron Small 2. 0. 

William Fletcher 2. 0. 

Elijah Fletcher 2. 0. 

Benjamin Didson 2. 0. 

Sam'l Lunn 2. 0. 

Solomon Pollard 2. 0. 

John Marsh 2. 0. 

Jesse Butterfield 2. 0. 

Elizer Farwell 2. 0. 

William Parker 2. 0. 
Jacob Baldwin or Bauldwin 2. 0. 

Joseph Tyler 2. 0. 

John French 2. 0. 

Oliver Adams 2. 0. 

Samuel French 2. 0. 



Establishment Distance from Disch'd Nov. 8 

per m onth home 40 miles Time of service Whole Amt. 

Days allowed 
£12. 0. to return home 
8. 2. 20 miles per day 
2. 8.0 



43 days 
do 
do 

2 days do 
do 
do 
do 
do 

do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
Disch'd Oct. 20, 23 days 
do 
do 
do 



£17, 4. 

11-12. 

3. 8. 9 



8.9 
3.0 
3.0 
3.0 
3.0 



2. 17. 4 
2. 17. 4 
2. 17. 4 
2. 17. 4 
2. 17. 4 
2. 17. 4 
2. 17. 4 
2. 17. 4 
2. 17. 4 
2. 17. 4 
2. 17. 4 
2. 17. 4 
2. 17. 4 
2. 17. 4 
2. 17. 4 
2. 17. 4 
2. 17. 4 
2. 17. 4 
2. 17. 4 
2. 17. 4 
2. 17. 4 
2. 17. 4 
2. 17. 4 
2. 17. 4 
2. 17. 4 
17.4 
17.4 
17. 4 
17. 4 
17. 4 
17. 4 
2. 17. 4 
2. 17. 4 
2. 17. 4 
2. 17. 4 
2. 17. 4 
2. 17. 4 
2. 17. 4 
2. 17. 4 
2. 17. 4 
2. 17. 4 
1. 10. 8 
1. 10. 8 
1. 10. 8 
1. 10. 8 



[Capt. Ford allowed for extra services] 
Chelmsford, March 28. 1778. 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 55, p. 57.] 



£171. 
46. 



19. 3 
9. 4 



£218. 08. 7 



3. 


15.5 


5. 


16.2 


2. 


8.9 


7. 


7.6 


7. 


4. 4 


3. 


12.2 


134. 


11.8 



THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION 263 

An abstract of Capt. John Ford's Company in Col Reed's 
Regiment A D 1776 for travel from fort George and for 
mileage from Albany home at one penny Pr mile and one Days 
Pay for every twenty miles from Albany home. 

1 Capt. for travel 265 miles and 200 mile mileage 

2 Lieuts. Do 

1 Ensign Do 
4 Seargt. Do 
4 Corol. Do 

2 Dnrni & fife Do 
76 Privates Do 

total 165. 16. 

Chelmsford January 9th. 1777 

John Ford. Capt. 
John Ford 
[Ford Papers.] 

Captain Ford's Company was at the taking of Burgoyne, and 
brought back with them between forty and fifty of the prisoners 
from Stillwater to Cambridge. 

An Abstract for pay Due to Capt. John Ford and his Company 
for pack horses to carry their baggage to Stillwater and for horses 
Expences and for the men to bring back their horses and for 
Extroydenary Expence in their Return as they Brougt back the 
prisoners. 

9 horses for 53 men at 6d pr mile Each 160 miles Each £36 = = 

for 2 men to bring back the pack horses 15 Days at 3s. 

prmanpr day 4 = 10 = 

and for their Expences for the men to Bring back the 

horses 4 = 10 = 

and for the Expence for the above horses at l£-16s-0 

pr horse 16 = 4 = 

for milage to Bennington 53 men 160 miles 2 pence pr 

mile Each 35= 6 = 8 

for Extrordinary Expence from Stillwater to Cam- 
bridge in bringing back the prisoners 250 miles 
Each and one peny pr mile 51 = = 10 

the above was transacted A: D: 1777 total 147: 11: 6 

Chelmsford March 28 1778 John Ford Capt 

[Ford Papers.] 

Sept. 10, 1778, Capt Ford was ordered to detach 3 privates 
from his Company to reinforce Gen. Sullivan and to defend the 
seacoasts, to march to Providence, armed & equipped as the law 
directs. 
[Ford Papers.] 



264 



HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 



ANCESTRY OF CAPTAIN JOHN MINOT 

(^)Thomas Minot of Essex, England, had a son (2)George, born 
Aug. 4, 1594, who came to Dorchester in 1630; was an Elder in 
the Church and prominent in the town. He married Martha 
and died Dec. 24, 1671. 

(^) James, their son, was born Dec. 31, 1628, and died March 
30, 1676. He married 1st Hannah (daughter of Col. Israel 
Stoughton and sister of Lieut. Gov. William Stoughton), Dec. 9, 
1653; 2d Hepsibah Corlet, May 21, 1673. 

(*) James, bom April2, 1659, married Rebecca Jones of Concord, 
Feb. 9, 1688. 

(^) Lieut. Jonathan, born 1689; died July 23, 1770. Married 
Elizabeth Stratton of Concord, Jan. 26, 1714. They had Samuel, 
Elizabeth, Rebecca, Jonathan, Anna. 

(«)John, bom at Chelmsford, Dec. 16, 1730; died Sept. 16, 
1809. Married Rachel Spaulding, June 27, 1753. She died 
Dec. 31, 1812, aged 80. No children are recorded in Chelmsford. 
Jonathan, brother of (^)John, was of Westford, and a Captain 
in the Revolution. 



Chelmsford names on "A Pay Role of Travill and Wages 
Due to Capt. John Minots Company in Col. Dike's Regt. for the 
Travill from their Places of Abode to the Heights of Dorchester 
the Place of Rendezvous and back to their Respective homes and 
one days Wages for Every Twenty Miles home." 



Men's Names 


Towns 




o 

a > (U 


01 0) 

II 


> m S 

^^! 

° 3 
— ■a C 

o " « 
H « 


John Minot 


Chelmsford 


64 


0. 5.4 


2 


0. 16 


John Dutton 


(( 


64 


0. 5. 4 


2 


0. 8.0 


Willard By am 
Joseph Dunn 
Samuel Chamberlin 


<< 


64 
64 
64 


0.5.4 
0.5.4 
0. 5. 4 


2 
2 

2 


0. 8.0 
0. 8.0 
0. 8.0 


Moses Davis 


<( 


64 


0.5.4 


2 


0. 8.0 


Jonas Dutton 


II 


64 


0. 5.4 


2 


0. 8. 


[Warrant allowed, Nov. 30, 1776. 


1 








[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 55, 


p. 34.] 









THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION 



265 



A MUSTER ROLE OF CAPT. JOHN MINOTTS COMPANY IN COLO. DIKES REGT. 





Boston December the 21st 1776. 






Name 


Rank 


Put in pay 


Town 


Age] 


affective Casualities 


John Minott 


Capt 


Deer. 1 


Chelmsford 


years 
47 


/ 13 Day taken 


Benja. Lawrance 


Lievt. 


Do. do 


Groton 


30 


/ 14 Do 


Isaac Parker 


Lt. 


Deer. 13 


Chelmsford 


29 


', 15th Taken 
/ 18th Taken 


Aaron Parker 


Ensn. 


Deer. 1 


Wesford 


38 


/ 19th Taken 


Nathan Coburn 


Sergt. 


Deer. 1 


Dunstable 


38 


/ 20th Taken 
/ 2l8t Taken 
/ 23 Taken 


S Johnathan Robins 


Sergt. 


Deer. 13 


Chelmsford 


24 


S Asa Porter 


Sergt. 


Deer. 13 


Groton 


21 


/ 24th Taken 


S Amos Russell 


Sergt. 


Deer. 18 


Wesford 


28 


/ 


John Byam 


Drumr, 


, Deer. 13 


Chelmsford 


16 


/ 


Winslow Lakin 


Fifer 


Deer. 1 


Pepperell 


19 


/ 


Cor. 












Isaac Foster 


Corpl. 


Deer. 13 


Chelmsford 


30 


/ 


Cor. 












Jabez Frothingham 


Corpl. 


Deer. 1 


Lexington 


21 


/ 


Cor. 












Benja. Barrot 
Cor. 

Edmund Blood 


Corpl. 


Deer. 13 


Chelmsford 


46 


/ 


Corpl. 


Deer. 13 


Groton 


25 


/ 


Robt. Richardson 


Private 


Deer. 13 


Chelmsford 


41 


/ 


Henry Blasdell 


Do 


Deer. 13 


Do 


16 


/ 


Jonathan Pierce 


Do 


Deer. 1 


Do 


24 


/ 


Saml. Chamberlain 


Do 


Deer. 1 


Do 


18 


/ 


Benja. Chamberlin 


Do 


Deer. 13 


Do 


16 


/ 


Saml. Parkhust 


Do 


Deer. 1 


Do 


17 


/ 


David Putnam 


Do 


Deer. 13 


Do 


19 


/ 


John Spaulding 


Do 


Deer. 13 


Do 


15 


/ 


Joptha Spaulding 


Do 


Deer. 13 


Do 


22 


/ 


Samuel Twiss 


Do 


Deer. 13 


Do 


22 


/ 


Jonathan Capron 


Do 


Deer. 13 


Groton 


21 


/ 


Simeon Williams 


Do 


Deer. 13 


Do 


19 


/ 


Salmon Whitney 


Do 


Deer. 1 


Do 


18 


/ 


Benja. Farwell 


Do 


Deer. 1 


Do 


21 


/ 


Cotton Procter 


Do 


Deer. 1 


Do 


50 


/ 


Benja. Esterbrook 


Do 


Deer. 24 


Wesford 


31 


/ 


Solomon Gilson 


Do 


Deer. 1 


Groton 


19 


/ 


Ephraim Farwell 


Do 


Deer. 1 


Do 


17 


/ 


Shattuck Blood 


Do 


Deer. 1 


Do 


19 


/ 


Jonathan Teel 


Do 


Deer. 13 


Do 


23 


/ 


Roland Lawrance 


Do 


Deer. 1 


Do 


15 


/ 


Joseph Jewet 


Do 


Deer. 13 


Pepperrill 


18 


/ 


Benja. Green 


Do 


Deer. 1 


Do 


17 


/ 


Edmund Parker 


Do 


Deer. 1 


Do 


16 


/ 


Josiah Wright 


Do 


Deer. 1 


Do 


19 


/ 


Ivory Wiles 


Do 


Deer. 1 


Shirley 


23 


/ 


John Davis 


Do 


Deer. 13 


Do 


18 


/ 


Cornelus Davis 


Do 


Deer. 1 


Do 


16 


/ 


Abel Russell 


Do 


Deer. 18 


Wesford 


22 


/ 


Smith Foster 


Do 


Deer. 13 


Do 


20 


/ 


Da\'id Parker 


Do 


Deer. 18 


Do 


19 


/ 


Nehemiah Fletcher 


Do 


Deer. 18 


Do 


18 


/ 


Daniel Dudley 


Do 


Deer. 13 


Do 


19 


/ 


Jesse Minott 


Do 


Deer. 13 


Do 


17 


/ 


Thos. Robbins 


Do 


Deer. 13 


Do 


19 


/ 


Solomon Fletcher 


Do 


Deer. 13 


Do 


17 


/ 


Jacob Robbins 


Do 


Deer. 13 


Do 


16 


/ 


Raymond Fletcher 


Do 


Deer. 13 


Do 


16 


/ 



266 



HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

CAPTAIN JOHN MINOT'S ROLL — CONTINUED. 



Name 


Rank 


Put in pay 


Town 


Age Effective Caaualitiea 








years 




Joshua Fletcher 


Private 


Deer. 13 


Wesford 


17 


/ 


Aaron Parker, Jr. 


Do 


Deer. 13 


Do 


16 


/ 


Isaac Chandler 


Do 


Deer. 5th 


Do 


17 


/ 


Simeon Kemp 


Do 


Deer. 13 


Do 


24 


/ 


Isaac Parker 


Do 


Deer. 13 


Do 


17 


/ 


Jeremiah Hildreth 


Do 


Deer. 13 


Do 


16 


/ 


Elnathan Reed 


Do 


Deer. 18 


Do 


18 


/ 


Jesse Dudley 


Do 


Deer. 13 


Do 


16 


/ 


William Frothingham 


Do 


Deer. 15 


Cambridge 


23 


/ 


Solomon Phips 


Do 


Deer. 15 


Stoneham 


21 


/ 


James Masterman 


Do 


Deer. 15 


Billerica 


17 


/ 


Samuel Stuart 


Do 


Deer. 1 


Scarborough 


26 


/ 


Benj. Winchester 


Do 


Deer. 20 


Roxbury 


17 


/ 


James Reed 


Do 


Deer. 5th 


Dracut 


24 


/ 


Jeptha Coburn 


Do 


Deer. 5 


Do 


17 


/ 


Amos Bradley 


Do 


Deer. 19 


Do 


17 


/ 


David Richardson 


Do 


Deer. 19 


Do 


22 


/ 


Asa Emerson 


Do 


Deer. 5 


Dunstable 


30 


/ 


Peter Bullard 


Do 


Deer. 13 


Do 


16 


/ 


Saml. Spaulding 


Do 


Deer. 19 


Chelmsford 


40 


/ 


Joel Crosby 


Do 


Deer. 14 


Billerica 


16 


/ 


John Farmer 


Do 


Deer. 1 


Lexington 


20 


/ 


Thomas Smith 


Do 


Deer. 1 


Do 


19 


/ 


William Blasdell 


Do 


Deer. 14 


Billerica 


19 


/ 


Thomas Wright 


Do 


Deer. 20 


Wesford 


41 


/ 


Blaney Teel 


Do 


Deer. 21 


Charlestown 


25 


/ 


Josiah Williams 


Do 


Deer. 23 


Do 


22 


/ 


Jube Savage 

66 

Silas Parlin 


Do 


Deer. 23 


Lincoln 


40 


/ 




January 1th 


Concord 


17 








1777 








Roberson Lakin 




Jany. 5 


Pepperil 






Nehemiah Cutter 




Jany. 9 


Cambridge 






Andrew Cutter 




Jany. 9 


do 






William Winship 




Jany. 9 


do 






Bennet Foster 




Jany. 9 


do 







[Original among Fiske papers.] 

Colonel Greene's order book, kept by Captain John Minot, at 
Middletown, R. I., in August, 1778, is in the Adams Library, 
Chelmsford. 



THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION 



267 



A MUSTER ROLL OF CAPT JOHN MINOTS COMPY. COL DIKE S REGT. 

(The items in the "Casualties" cohimn are from another roll of January, 1777, 
in the possession of the Fiske family of Chelmsford.] 



Month days 


Names 


Ranks 


Town 


Casualties 


Dec [1776] 1st 


John Minott 


Capt. 


Chelmsford 


present 


do 


Benjn. Lawrence 


Is Lieut. 


Groton 


/ 


13 


Isaac Parker 


2 do 


Chelmsford 


/ 


1 


Aaron Parker 


Ensign 


Wesford 


On duty 


do 


Nathan Coburn 


Sergt 


Dunstable 


/ 


13 


Jonathan Robbins 


do 


Chelmsford 


on duty 


do 


Asa Porter 


do 


Groton 


/ 


18 


Amos Russell 


do 


Wesford 


/ 


13 


John Byam 


Drumr. 


Chelmsford 


/ 


1 


Winslow Lakin 


Fifer 


Pepperill 


/ 


13 


Isaac Foster 


Corpl. 


Chelmsford 


/ 


1 


Jabez Frothingham 


do 


Lexington 


/ age 21 


13 


Benjn. Barrott 


do 


Chelmsford 


/ 


do 


Edmund Blood 


do 


Groton 


on duty 


do 


Robt Richardson 


Private 


Chelmsford 


discharged 22 Jany. 
1777. 


do 


Henry Blazdell 


do 


do 


/ 


1 


Jonn. Pearce 


do 


do 


/ 


do 


Saml. Chamberlain 


do 


do 


/ 


13 


Benja. Chamberlain 


do 


do 


/ 


1 


Saml. Parkhurst 


do 


do 


/ 


13 


David Putnam 


do 


do 


at Barrack 


do 


Joshua Durant 


do 


do 


on duty 


do 


Jephtha Spaulding 


do 


do 


/ 


do 


Saml. Twiss 


do 


do 


on duty 


do 


Jonan. Capron 


do 


Groton 


do 


do 


Simeon Williams 


do 


do 


do 


1 


Salmon Whitney 


do 


do 


do 


do 


Benj Farwell 


do 


do 


/ 


do 


Cotton Proctor 


do 


do 


sick present 


do 


Solomon Gilson 


do 


do 


on duty 


do 


Ephraim Farwell 


do 


do 


/. 


do 


Shattuck Blood 


do 


do 


Sick present 
(discharged 13 Feby) 


13 


Jonn. Teel 


do 


do 


/ 


1 


Roland Lawrence 


do 


do 


/ 


13 


Joseph Jewett 


do 


Pepperil 


sick present 


1 


Benjn. Green 


do 


do 


/ 


do 


Edmd. Parker 


do 


do 


on duty 


do 


Josiah Wright 


do 


do 


do 


do 


Ivory Wildes 


do 


Shirley 


do 


3 


John Davis 


do 


do 


/ 


1 


Cornelius Davis 


do 


do 


on duty 


18 


Abel Russell 


do 


Wesford 


/ 


13 


Smith Foster 


do 


do 


on duty 


18 


David Parker 


do 


do 


/ 


do 


Nehh. Fletcher 


do 


do 


/ 


13 


Danl. Dudley 


do 


do 


/ 


do 


Jesse Minott 


do 


do 


/ 


do 


Thomas Robbins 


do 


do 


/ 
/ 


do 


Raymond Fletcher 


do 


do 


Dischd. Jany. 15. 1777. 


do 


Joshua Fletcher 


do 


do 


Discd. Jany. 15, 1777. 


do 


Aaron Parker Junr. 


do 


do 


/ 


5 


Isaac Chandler 


do 


do 


/ 


13 


Simeon Kemp 


do 


do 


/ 


do 


Isaac Parker 


do 


do 


on duty 



268 



HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 



CAPT JOHN MINOT S ROLL — CONTINUED. 



Month days 


Names 


Ranks 


To'vn 


Casualties 




Dec [1776] 13 


Jerh. Hildreth 


Private 


Wesford 


/ 




18 


Elnathan Reed 


do 


do 


on duty 




13 


Jesse Dudley 


do 


do 


/ 




15 


Wm. Frothingham 


do 


Cambridge 


sick present 




15 


Solomon Phips 


do 


Stoneham 


/ 




do 


James Masterman 


do 


Billerica 


on duty 




1 


Saml. Stuart 


do 


Scarborough do 




20 


Benj Winchester 


do 


Roxbury 


/ 




5 


James Reed 


do 


Dracut 


/ 




do 


Joptha Coburn 


do 


do 


/ 




19 


Amos Bradley 


do 


do 


/ 




do 


David Richardson 


do 


do 


on duty 




5 


Asa Emmerson 


do 


Dunstable 


/ 




13 


Peter Bullard 


do 


do 


/ 




19 


Saml Spaulding 


do 


Chelmsford 


/ 




14 


Joel Crosby 


do 


Billerica 


/ 




1 


John Farmer 


do 


Lexington 


/ 




do 


Thos. Smith 


do 


do 


on duty 




14 


Willm Blasdell 


do 


Chelmsford 


/ 




20 


Thos Wright 


do 


Wesford 


on duty 




21 


Blaney Teel 


do 


Charlestown/ 




23 


Josiah Williams 


do 


do 


on duty 




do 


Jube Savage 


do 


Lincoln 


/ 




13 


Solomon Fletcher 


do 


Wesford 


Dischd. Jany. 15th. 

1777 
on duty 




do 


Jacob Robbins 


do 


do 




24 


Benjn. F.asterbrooks 


do 


do 


/ 




1777 Jany 9 


Nehh. Cutter 


do 


Cambridge 


/ 




5 


Robinson Larkin 


do 


Pepperill 


on duty 




9 


Andw Cutter 


do 


Cambridge 


/ 
/ 




do 


Willm. Winship 


do 


do 


on duty 




do 


Bennett Foster 


do 


do 


sick present 




[On Roll of 












Jan. 1, 1777 


Silas Parlin 


do 


— 


on duty] 




[Massachuse 


tts Archives, Vol. 


26, p. 428i] 







1777. Chelmsford names on a Pay Role of Capt. John 
Minot's Company in Coll. Josiah Whitneys Regiment of IVIilitia 
from the State of JVIassachusetts Bay for two months service at 
the State of Rhode Island Warwich Neck. 

State bounty Time iu Servi e 

per. mo. travil included Amt of Bounty 



John IVIinot 


Capt. 


£ 


mo. days 


£. S. d 


Isaac Foster 


Sergt 


1. 0.0 


2 9 


2. 6. 


William Melendy 


Private 


1.0.0 


do 


2. 6.0 


Azariah Spaulding 




1.0.0 


do 


2.6.0 


Jonathan Peirce 




1.0.0 


do 


2. 6. 


William Parker Jr. 




1.0.0 


do 


2.6. 


Isaac Marshall 




1.0.0 


do 


2.6.0 


Saml. Marshall 




1.0.0 


do 


2.6.0 


Saml. Parkhurst 




1. 0. 


do 


2.6.0 


Peter Reed 




1.0.0 


do 


2. 6.0 



[Robbins Papers: Duplicate in Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 2, 
p. 216.] 



THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION 



269 






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270 



HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 



A Return of Capt. Ebenezr Bancrofts Company in the 27 
Ridgt. Commanded By Colo Bridge in order To make out the 
Abstract for the Pay for the Third month from the First Day of 
August. [1775] 

Ebenezr Bancroft Capt £6 

Nathal. Holden 1st Leiut 4 

Samll. Brown 2d Lt 3- - 

Serjeants 



James Person 2-8-0 

Hezekiah Kendall Dest Octor \ 2-4-10 
the 28 j 

Richard Welsh 2-8- - 

John Didson 2-8- 

Samll Dow made Sergant 1 2-4-6 

October 2 8 J 

Jonathan Shenvin 2-4-0 

Phinehas Underwood 2-4- 

Jerahmel Colburn 2-4- 

Jonathan Underwood = 1 2-0-3 

=made Corpl October 28 J 

Silas Persons Fifer 2-4-0 

William Mcmilleon 2-4-0 

Able Blood 
Caleb Bancroft 
Levi Butterfield 
John Brown 
Caleb Cimiings 
James Cobby 
John Davidson 
James Danley 
Jonathan Emerson 
Joel Esterbrooks 



John French 
Will French 
Joseph Farror 
Timothy Farror 
Samll. Fletcher 
Thomas Farwell 



Josiah Goodhue 
Silas Gould 
Jesse Gould 
John Glenne Jur. 
Will Glenne 
Noah Mac Gould 
James Gouge 
Nathll. Ingals 

Enock Jewit 
Thomas Kilmot 
Ezra Littlehail 
Samll. Lund 
Francis Mitchel 
Thomas McLaughlen 
Daniel Nutting 
James Persons Jur 
Titus Potami 
Henry Sheapord 
Joshua Taylor 
Abraham Taylor 
Benja Whittemore 
Sanill. Peak. 



Total £113 = 13-7 
December the 4th 1775 Ebenez Bancroft Capt 
[Reverse] Capt. Bancroft 
October pd. 



1 Captain 

1 Lieut 

1 Ensign 

4 Serjeants 

4 Corporals 

2Drum:&Fif: . 

38 Privates 

1 Do died Oct 28. 



- 6— 

- 4— 

- 3— 

- 9-12- 

- 8-16- 

- 4- 8- 
-76 

1..17..7 



Cambridge December 29. 1775. Reed, of Eben. £113..13..7 

Bridge One hundd. & thirteen pounds thirteen 
shillings & seven pence in full of this Abstract 
£113. 13. 7— 

Ebener. Bancroft, Capt. 
[Original among the Fiske Papers.] 



THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION 



271 



A Muster Roll of Capt John Nutting whose men marched 
from Pepperill April 19, 1775 



Names 



No. of miles from 
and to each Man's No of Days 
home service 



Isaac Chamberlain 50 

[Chelmsford] 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 13, p. 22.] 



6 



£. 0. 8. 6. 3 



An abstract of Capt Charles Furbushs Company in the 27 
Redgt of foot Comanded by Col. Bridge for the Month of October 
[1775] 



Capt. Charles Furbush 


6-0-0 


Jeremiah Blanchard 


2-0-0 


Leiut Jeremiah Morrill 


4-0-0 


Jsaac Foster 


2-0-0 


Jnsine James Silver 


3-0-0 


Abraham Silver 


2--0-0 


Sart Joseph Frost 


2-8-0 


Hugh Riley 


2-0-0 


St Daniel Silver 


2-8-0 


William Kemp 


2-0-0 


St William Smith 


2-8-0 


Charles Furbush 


2-0-0 


St Jeremiah Morrill 


2-8-0 


London Siterson 


2-0-0 


Corp William Morrisin 


2^-0 


John Loyd 


2-0-0 


CI thomas Smith 


2-4-0 


Jsaac Meloon 


2-0-0 


C! Jacob Annis 


2-4-0 


William Gordin 


2-0-0 


CI William Bailey 


2^1-0 


John Morison 


2-0-0 


dr Simeon Furbush 


2-4-0 


John handcock 


2-0-0 


Fir abraham Stickney 


2-4-0 


daniel Longon 


2-0-0 


Ezra Annis 


2-0-0 


Joseph Pettingal 


2-O-0 


John boldwin 


2-0-0 


Joshua bell for & for 7 das ogust 


2-9-4 


Cuff blanchard 


2-0-0 


Abiel Upton 


2-0-0 


theoder emerson 


2-0-0 


Marcus Shead 


2-0-0 


thomas hoadly 


2-0-0 


EHiah hildreth 


2-0-0 


Jsrael hunt 


2-0-0 


John Craford 


2-0-0 


Samuel Farmer 


2-0-0 


beniamin Clark 


2-0-0 


david Clough 


2-0-0 


daniel Petingal 


2-0-0 


david Meril 


2-0-0 


david Silver 


2-0-0 


Cato. hubard 


2-0-0 


Josiah McComb died 11th Oct 


0-14-8 


Ceaser Porter 


2-0-0 


Charles Furbush Capt. 




[Reverse] Capt. Fubursh 








October pd 


— 






1 Capt 


.... £6 







1 Lieut 


4 


~ — 




1 Ensign 


.... 3 




3 Sergts 48/ 


.... 7 


: 4 - 




4 Corporals 44/ 


8 


:16 - 




2 Drummers & Fifers . . . 


.... 4 


: 8 - 




34 privates 40/ 


.... 68 






1 private 7 Days 


—9 


- 4 




1 Do— 11 Days 


.... 14 


- 8 






£102 


.12— 





Cambridge Deer. 29, 1775 — Reed, of Ebenr Bridge one hundd. & two pounds 

twelve shillings in full of this Abstract. 

£102—12 Charles Furbush Capt. 

[Fiske Papers.] 

Captain Furbush was of Andover. 



272 



HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 



Chelmsford names on a Return of Capt. Zacheus Wright's 
Co. in Col. Bancrofts Regt. 

Camp on White Plains, Oct. 31, 1776. 



Lieut. 


Robt. Spaulding 


in Camp. 


Chelmsford. 


Sargt. 


Simeon Barret 


do 




do 


Corp. 


William Bowers 


do 




do 




Jethro Spaulding 


do 




do 




Phinehas Underwood 


do 




do 




Arthemas Spalding 


do 




do 




Zebulon Spaulding 


do 




do 




Samuel Wilson 


do 




do 




Jonathan Shed 


do 




do 




Joseph Parker 


do 




do 




Wm Dun 


do 




do 




Thomas Davis 


do 




do 




Oliver Fletcher 


do 




do 




Samuel Bolifield 


do 




do 




Stephen Pierce 


do 




do 




Jonathan Parker 


do 




do 




Asa Hogman 


do 




do 




Daniel Twist 


do 




do 




Isaac Marshal 


do 




do 




Ebenezer Gould 


do 




do 




John Crosby- 


do 




do 




Joseph Spalding 


do.. 




do 




Samuel Spalding 


at Weathersfield 


do 


[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 24, 


p. 139.] 






Captain Wright was of Westford. 







Chelmsford names on A pay Role of Capt Joseph Bradley Varnum's company 
Col Mclntoshs Rigt Gen Lord's Brigade of Militia from ye State of Massachusetts 
Bay on an expedition to Rhode Island in July August & Sept. 1777 State Pay. 





11 

W p. 


Date of 
Engagement 

Date of 
discharge 


Distance from 
home when 
discharged 
100 miles 


-J 



o 

|. Time of 
whole 
Bervice 


day 


1 

1 


Oliver Bowers Corp 
Josiah Fletcher 
Levi Fletcher 
John Dunn 
Wm. Spaulding 
Jesse Haywood 


£5. 0. 
5. 0. 
5.0.0 
5.0.0 
5.0.0 
5.0.0 


July 29 Sept 11 
July 29 Sept 11 
July 29 Sept 11 
Aug 19 Sept 11 
July 30 Sept 11 
July 19 Sept 11 




5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 


1 
1 

1 

1 

1 


18 
18 

18 
28 
17 
18 


£8. 0.0 
8. 0.0 
8. 0.0 
4. 13. 4 

7. 16. 8 

8. 0.0 



[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 23, p. 185. 
Captain Vamum was of Dracut. 




MAP or 
Old Middle:5ex Village. 

Drawn in on, 
By Mom. Saml.P Haoley. 

SCALt. or FE-E-T 



vVo. ig 



THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION 



273 



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274 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

Chelmsford names on A descriptive list of the Second Division of six month* 
men marched from Springfield under the Care of Capt Phinehas Parker July 2' 1780. 

Names Age Stature Complexion Town County Arrived at Springfield 



Timo Farrow 


20 


5. 


9 


Light 


Chelmsford 


Middlesex 


July 2nd 


William Adams 


18 


5. 


7 


do 


do 


do 


do 


Benj Howard 


20 


5. 


8 


do 


do 


do 


do 


Oliver Perham 


17 


5. 


9 


do 


do 


do 


do 


James Marshall 


20 


5. 


9 


do 


do 


do 


do 


Jacob Marshall 


20 


5. 


9 


do 


do 


do 


do 


Lemuel Barrett 


17 


5. 


3 


do 


do 


do 


do 


Samuel Lancey 


20 


5. 


9 


do 


do 


do 


do 


Phinehas Kidder 


23 


5. 


9 


Dark 


do 


do 


July 7 


David Walker 


23 


6. 


3 


do 


do 


do 


July 2 


Silas Parker 


20 


6. 




do 


do 


do 


do 


Oliver Core 


23 


5. 


11 


do 


do 


do 


do 


John McKlenne 


28 


5. 


5 


do 


do 


do 


do 


Ephraim Pierce 


18 


5. 


10 


do 


do 


do 


do 


Supply Reed 


25 


5. 


6 


Light 


do 


do 


July 9th 1780 



[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 35, pp. 183, 188b, 192.] 

William Adams was out in the army at West Point, and saw 
the execution of Major Andre. 

In some instances the same men served at different times in 
two or more companies. 

A brother would relieve a soldier in camp at Cambridge and 
the latter would return home for a short period to help in farm 
work. 

"The minute men, determined as they were and actuated by 
intense patriotism, came and went according to their own estimate 
of the relative importance of their agricultural and military 
duties." [F.V.Greene.] 

The following affidavit, made by William Adams, of Chelms- 
ford, is found among the Revolutionary papers of the Massa- 
chusetts Archives (LV., File H, No. 1) in the volume marked 
on the back "Worcester Rolls Parcels 2nd. & Mixed Rolls Vol 2." 
* * * Pomp Phillis, one of the privates, was a negro; then all 
colors, red, white or black, were warmly welcomed by the patriots. 

"William Adams of Chelmsford in the County of Middlesex 
and Commonwealth of Massachusetts, in the seventy-ninth 
year of my age, do testify and say that I rendered service in the 
Revolutionary War, that I now receive a Pension for services 
thus rendered; That in the first part of the Summer of 1778 I 
enlisted and went to West Point, the Company that I belonged 
to was Capt. Asa Lawrence Company of Groton, the regiment 
was commanded by Col. Poor of Andover or Methuen, some 
part of our service was rendered at White Plains and Peekskill, 



THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION 275 

this was an eight monthes service, we received our Discharges 
in the month of February, 1779. the Company was commanded 
principally by the first Leutenant John Flint of Tukesbury, 
this Company was made up of men from Groton Chelmsford 
Bilerica Tukesbury, and other Towns in this vicinity, and I 
further testify that I have carefully examined the Role of Capt. 
Asa Lawrence Company hereto attached and the principle part 
of the names born on this Roll are familiar to me, and many of 
the mens names, born on this Rolle are persons which I am certain 
were with me in the eight monthes service as above described, 
and I have no doubt but what it is an original Roll of the Company 
which I rendered service in as above described, 

Wm. Adams [ wafer ] 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 

Middlesex ss. . Chelmsford April 23 = 1841 = then Personally 
appeared the above named William Adams, well known to me to 
be a person of sound mind, and veracity, made Oath that the 
above affidavit by him subscribed is true, 

Before Me 

Benjn. Adams Justice of the Peace" 
[Groton in the Revolution, pages 24-5.] 

Cato Abbott was a slave belonging to Dr. Nehemiah Abbott. 
He died in 1818, aged about 80. See his record in next chapter. 

"Barzillai Lew, the son of Primus, was a negro and belonged 
to a well-known colored family of that day, somewhat noted for 
their musical attainments." [Three Military Diaries, Green.] 
Some of his descendants still live in Dracut and Lowell. In 
1760 he v/as in Farrington's Company of Groton, (given as born 
there), for the total reduction of Canada. 

1777, August 15, the company of Colonel Stephen Russell 
of Dracut rendezvoused at Chelmsford. 

In 1780 a fine of £150 was imposed on drafted men able to 
pay it, who should fail to pass muster or hire an able-bodied man 
in his stead. The fine to be paid within twenty-four hours or be 
collected by levy or warrant of distress. The following resolve 
passed by the General Court, December 2, 1780, explains itself, 
and to some extent the succeeding documents relating to "Classes." 
"A bounty of $50 for each man enlisted and passing muster was 
promised to every town or plantation which should fill up its 
quota on or before Jan. 1. 1781." 

CLASSES OF SOLDIERS. 

December 2, 1780, the General Court Resolved, That the 
several towns and plantations within this Commonwealth be, and 
hereby are authorized to agree (if they think fit) upon classing 



276 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

the inhabitants thereof at a legal town-meeting called for that 
purpose, in order to procure their proportion of soldiers to serve 
in the Continental army, for three years or during the war: And 
in all towns and plantations where the mode of classing shall 
be adopted, the selectmen of such towns, and the assessors of 
such plantations, or such committee as the town or plantation 
shall appoint for that purpose, shall divide all the inhabitants 
thereof, with others who were assessed in the hard-money-tax, 
into as many classes as according to the annexed schedule, there 
are men required of such town or plantation, in proportion to their 
several taxes, intermixing poor with the rich, so as to make the 
several classes as nearly equal in property and in ntimber of polls 
as may be with convenience; and each of said classes shall, on or 
before the twentieth day of January next, procure a good able- 
bodied effective soldier to serve in the Continental army three 
years or during the war, unless such town or plantation shall in 
some other way procure the whole number of soldiers to be by 
them raised: And that in case any one or more of said classes 
shall neglect or refuse to procure the soldiers assigned them, 
within the limited time aforesaid, such town or plantation is hereby 
empowered and directed to procure such soldier for each class so 
neglecting of such town or plantation, and the assessors shall 
assess said classes, or the several neglecting individuals thereof, 
in the same proportion they were severally assessed in the hard- 
money-tax, the full value of the stim which shall be expended in 
procuring said soldier, with an additional sum not exceeding double 
the sum advanced to procure the said soldier, as the said town 
shall determine; and the several collectors of such towns or 
plantations are hereby authorized and required to collect said 
assessments in the same manner as they are directed by law to 
collect town taxes, and pay in the same according to the direction 
contained in the warrant which they may receive from the select- 
men or assessors of such towns or plantations for the purpose of 
collecting said assessments; and the said selectmen or assessors 
are hereby authorized to grant such warrants, agreeable to the 
form by law prescribed for collecting town taxes, mutatis mutandis. 

Chelmsford November 26, 1781 



The following is a List of the Names of the parsons which 
are Classed together to precure one Good Able Bodyed Man to 
go into the Contanental Armey for three years or Dureing the 
present wor which is by ordor of the Authority of the Common- 
welth of the Massachusetts and the Sum sett against Each parsons 
Name is their Equal part of the first payment which is £45 this 

Tax Being made agreable to the Hard Money Tax 

Benjn. Spaulding £3 : 10 : 1:3 

Benjn. Chamberlin 3 : 12 : 0:0 

James Haywood 3:16: 6:0 

Jonathon Adams 3: 12: 11 : 2 

amll. Adams ashbornham 3: 2: 3:3 



THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION 277 

Abnor Herick £0: 13: 0:3 

Oliver Peirce 2: 0: 4:2 

Zebadiah Roggers Billirace 1: 8: 0:0 

John Glode 0: 13: 0:0 

Ebenezer Sheed 1: 0: 0:3 

Agt. Wm. Bridge 0: 19: 3:0 

Thomas Adams 0: 19: 0:1 

Jonathon Richardson 0: 17: 0:3 

William Philips 1: 4: 0:0 

Samuell Chamberlin 0:13: 0:0 

Jesse Haywood 0: 13: 0:0 

Sargt. Parker Emerson 0: 17: 0:3 

Sargt. Pattrick Fleming 0: 13: 0:0 

David Walker 0:13: 0:0 

JohnBetteys 0:15: 4:0 

Timothy Manning 2: 0: 3:0 

WiUiam Parker 1: 6: 2:1 

Widw. Sarah Parker 3: 17: 6:3 

Josiah Blood 0: 13: 0:0 

Elnathon Sherwin 1: 6: 0:0 

Mary Adams 1: 2: 1:0 

Henry Blazdell 0: 13: 0:3 

William Betteys 0: 13: 0:0 

John Keys 0:13: 0:0 

Saml. Lovkin 0: 13: 0: 

David Danforth on the Estate of John Bolen Esqr. 1 : 5: 2:0 

Henry Richardson 1: 1: 0:0 

Samll. Butterfield 1: 2: 0:1 

[CO. Robbins Papers.] 

Another list of the same names has somewhat smaller amounts 
set against them, and the amounts which some are "to receive 
back." 

This list is among the Ford Papers. 

Oliver Richarsdon, one man. 

Stephen Peirce, one man. 

Samson Stoddard & Vryling Stoddard, one man. 

Benj Melven one man 

Benj Spaulding & Josiah Richardson, one man. 

Stephen Spaulding & Abijah Spaulding, one man 

John Dimn & Benj Goiild, one man 

Jonathan Manning & Timothy Manning, one man. 

Daniel Stevens & Silas Cobum and Timothy Path, one man. 

Philiap Parker one man 

Thomas Marshall & Samuel Marshall one man 

Joseph Moor one man 

Samuel Fletcher and Jonas Pierce, one man 

Timothy Clark and Samuel Howard, one man 



278 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

CLACES NAMES & SUMES. 

Benjamin Spaulding £2:15: 5:0 

Benjamin Chamberlin 2: 17: 6:2 

James Haywood 3: 0: 5:0 

Jonathon Adams 2: 17: 8:0 

Samuell Adams Ashbomham 2: 9: 4:0 

Abnor Herick 0: 10: 11: 

Olever Peirce 1 : 14: 2:0 

Zabadiah Roggers Billireca 1: 2: 6:0 

John Glode 0: 10: 2:0 

Ebenezer Sheed : 0: 16: 4:0 

Agt. Wm. Bridge 0: 15: 6:2 

Thomas Adams 0:15: 3:0 

Jonathon Richardson 0:13: 6:0 

WilHam philips 0: 18: 5:0 

Samuel Chamberlin 0: 10: 2:0 

Jesse Haywood 0:10: 2:0 

Sargt. parker Emerson 0:13: 6:0 

Sargt. pattrick Fleming 0: 10: 2:0 

David Walker 0:10: 2:0 

John Bettyes 0:11: 6:2 

Timothy Manning 1 : 12: 10: 2 

Wm. parker 1: 1: 6:2 

widw. Sarah parker 3: 2: 4:2 

Josiah Blood 0: 10: 2:0 

Elnathan Sherwin 1: 0: 4:0 

Mary Adams 0: 17: 8:0 

Henry Blazdell 0: 10: 4:0 

Wm. Betteys 0:10: 2:0 

John Keys 0:10: 2:0 

Samll. Lufkin 0: 10: 2:0 

Henry Richardson Westford 0: 16: 10: 

Samuel Butterfield 0:17: 4:0 

David Danforth on the Estate of 1 

John Bolen Esqr of Boston Decest J 1: 0: 0:0 



38: 0: 5:0 



Chehnsford March 23, 1784. 
At a meeting of a Class whareof Mr. Benjamin Spaulding & Mr. 
Wm. parker are a Committee 

1st ly. it was Voted that Mr. Benjn. Spaulding be a moderator 
to govern Sd. meeting & John Betteys Clerk to record the votes 
passed at Sd. meeting 

2d. ly Voted that Mr. David Walker pay his Class Rate for the 
year he was in the Contanental Sar\ds 

3d. ly Voted not to pay Mr. Jonathon Stratton the four pounds 
which He forfated by not being in the Contanental Sarvis at the 
Time he agreed to which Money the Class Gave to Mr. David 



THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION 279 

Walker whome Mr. Stratton agreed to Sattisfy for what time He 
Remained in Sarvis after the first of January 1783 that The Class 
be at no Cost in Consequence of his not marching upon His 
Receaveing his money 

4th. ly Voted that Mr. Benjamin Spaulding and Mr. William 
parker Be Defended (as a Committee.) By the Class from all 
Charges that Shall arise in Consequence of not paying the four 
pounds to mr. Jonathan Stratton, which Sum was paid to mr. 
Walker to Sattisfy Him for the time he remained in Sarvis after 
the Class had ingaged Mr. Stratton. 

5th. ly Voted to Chuse a Committee to Visit Mr. Jonathan 
Stratton and informe him of the proceedings of the Class, and 
Demand the Obligations which the Classes Committee have given 
him which obligations are Sattisfyed according to agreement 
6th. ly Voted that this Committee Concest of three parsons. 
7th. ly Voted that Mr. Benjamin Chamberlin be one of this 
Committee. 

8th ly Voted that Mr. William Bridge be one of this Committee. 
9th. ly Voted that John Betteys be one of this Committee. 
lOthly Voted that this meeting be adjurned to the first Monday 
in April next at 6 oClock in the afternoon 

Benja. Spaulding — Moderator 
John Betteys Cler. of Sd. Meeting. 
At a meeting of the within Class upon an adjumment as within 
to April 5: — it was 

1st. ly Voted that the within Committee Viz Mrsseres Benjn. 
Chamberlin Wm. Bridge and John Betteys be a Cummittie to 
act as they may think proper and go into what meathods they may 
think proper in order to make a final Settlemen with Mr. Jonathan 
Stratton 

2dly Voted that the Class Defend the above Commettie from 
all Cost and Charges that Shall arise in Consequence of any 
LawfuU preceeding in Makeing a »Settlement with Jonathan 
Stratton 

John Betteys Clar. 

BOND. 

Know all men by these presents that We, phinehas Cham- 
berlin, Blacksmith, Jacob Reed, yeoman, James Wheeler, yeoman, 
Benjn. procter, yeoman, Elijah procter. Gentleman, Andrew 
Betteys, yeoman, Timothy Hildreth, yeoman, peter procter, 
yeoman, John Reed, yeoman, Hugh Cargill, Cordwiner, John 
Harwood, yeoman, John Mansfield, yeoman, James Hall, Black- 
smith, and William Foster, yeoman, all of Chelmsford in the 
County of middlesex and commonwealth of the Massachusetts in 
New England, are holden and stand firmly Bound and obliged 
to Isaac Barrot, Laborer, of said Chelmsford in the full and Just 
Slim of four hundred Spannish milled Dollars to be paid to him 



280 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

the sd Isaac Barrot his Executors, administrators or assignes, 
to the which payment well and truly to be made we bind our 
selves and each of our executers, administrators and assignes 
firmly by These presents, sealed with our seals, Dated this twenty- 
eighth Day of May, one thousand seven hundred eighty one and 
in the fifth year of the Independence of the United States of 
amaraca — 

The condition of the present obligation is such that we the 
above bounden phinehas Chamberlin, Jacob Reed, James Wheeler, 
Benjn. procter, Elijah procter, andrew Betteys, Timothy Hildreth, 
peter procter, John Reed, Hugh Cargill, John Harwood, John 
Mansfield, James Hall, William Foster, have agreed with the 
above named Isaac Barrot for fifteen head of young Chattels 
for his going into the sarvice of the United States of amaraca 
for the tarme of three years (unless suner Regulerly Discharged) 
for the Clace that the above named men Compose, Sd Chattels 
to be Delivered to the sd Isaac Barrot in the manner following 
that is to say if the sd Isaac Barrot Shall Be Regularly Discharged 
at the End of two years from the Above Date he Shall Receve sd 
Chattels at two years old and if not Discharged till sd tarme is 
out he Shall Receive sd Chatties at Three years old all Being 
Calved in the Spring Season of the year one thousand seven 
hundred and Eighty-one and to be of a full midling Size part 
Stears and part heffers to be Delivered on the twentyeth Day of 
may whether at two or three years old Each one his preportinable 
part to the sd Isaac Barrot his heirs Executers adminestrators or 
assigns then the above writen oblegation to be Voide and of none 
effect or Else to be and Remain in full force Strength and Virtue. 

Phinehas Chamberlen (seal) 
Signed Sealed and Delivered Jacob Reed (seal) 

in presents of us James Wheeler (seal) 

John Betteys peter procter (seal) Benjn. procter (seal) 

John Spolding Hugh Cargill (seal) Elijah procter (seal) 

Oliver Barrott John Harwood (seal) his 

William Foster (seal) Andrew X Betteys (seal) 

mark 
[C. O. Robbins papers.] Timothy Hildreth (seal) 

The soldiers who fought in the Revolution had to foot it 
home if they survived the British bullets and the diseases which 
killed many of them. They were a miserable lot. They had to 
beg food and sleep where they could. They dragged themselves 
home. Dr. Marshall, who lived in the present residence of Mr. 
C. W. Byam, came home one day in December, 1776, and said 
he did not like the smell in the house, and asked if any soldiers 
had been there. The answer was that one had stopped there. 
The doctor's fears were realized. His wife and two children 
died of the small-pox; the soldier also died of the same disease. 
Mrs. Marshall was a lovely woman, and the doctor was broken- 
hearted. 



THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION 281 



ITEMS FROM THE TOWN ACCOUNTS. 

1774. 

For one barrel of powder for the Toun's use £ 4: 0:0:0 

1775. 

To. Capt. Oliver Barron for the expense of the Com- 
mittee of Correspondence £ : 4 :8 :0 

Joseph Warren for time about getting powder for 

the Toun 0: 2:0:0 

Joseph Warren for 56 pounds of lead and 200 flints 1 : :0 :0 

Joseph Warren for ninning bullets : 3 :8 :0 

John Minott for one day running bullets : 1 :9 :0 

1777. 

January 25, to Captain Samuel Stevens for 2 half 

barrels of gunpov/der for the Toun's use £35 : 7 :0 :0 

1778. 

To Mr. Samuel Perham for nine fire-arms 33 :15 :0 :0 

250 pounds of lead 10: 1 :3 :0 

8 gunlocks and 184 flints 7:14:9:0 

Going to Concord and purchasing the above articles :15 :0 :0 

Captain Samuel Stevens and Lieutenant Benjamin Fletcher were 

paid for journeys to Concord transporting clothing for the soldiers, 
£1:10:0 a trip. 

1779. 

The selectmen paid bounty and billeting money "to 

the soldiers gone into the Army" £ 450 : 5 :0 

Also Bounty to Eleven men "raised to join General 

Washington" ($1,100) £ 330: 0:0 

Also Bounty to three men to go to Rhode Island 90 : :0 

1780. 

November 6, $36,720, was voted by the Toun, to be 

paid instead of the beef required by the State for 

the Army. 

Paid billeting money to the three months men £ 900 : :0 

Paid billeting money to the Continental men 480 : :0 

Price of the horses provided "for the yuce of the 

Army" 3340: 0:0 

For one blanket provided for the soldiers 90 : :0 

For "another blanquet" 45: 0:0 

1780. 

November 6. To Mr. Samuel Howard for time 
spent and expenses in driving sheep to Boston 
to relieve the inhabitants of that Town 30 : :0 

To Capt. Samuel Stevens for time spent and expenses 
in driving sheep and cattle to Boston to relieve 
the inhabitants of that town when in distress ... 30 : :0 



282 



HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 



Besides the ordinary expenses of the Town there '^ £ 2541: 7:7:0 
was raised by taxation in Chelmsford in 1780 
for hiring men to go into the service of the \ 2061:12:5:0 
United States on one assessment. A war- 
rant being given to each Constable 

On another 



For beef which the General Court required to be . 
procured for the Army j 



24017: 7:0:0 

15982:13:0:0 

6017:13:3:0 

4998: 6:9:0 



The ordinary taxes were: three assessments for the State tax 
1780. 



"To answer the State Treasurer's Warrant" 

Each assessment was divided between the 

north and south "ends" of the Town. . 



To defray the charges arising in the Toun 
in 1780 

For the support of the Gospel ministry for 
6 months 

For the support of the Gospel ministry for 
6 months 



£ 5460 

4448 

11897 

9473 

152 

122 

£ 6657 

5342 

18270 

11729 

£ 1202 

797 

3240 

1759 



:11:10:0 
: 8: 2:0 
: 0: 4:0 
: 9: 8:0 
: 3: 2:0 
: 4:10:0 
:14: 7:0 



5: 
13: 

7: 
0: 
0: 
5: 
14: 



5:0 
4:0 
4:0 
0:0 
0:0 
3:0 
9:0 



In 1777 a levy of 5,000 blankets for the army was ordered, 
of which this Town's proportion was 19. The next year the 
General Court ordered a levy of shirts, shoes and stockings for 
the army, of which Chelmsford's proportion was 47 shirts and the 
same nmnber of pairs of shoes and stockings. In 1780 another 
demand was made. Some items from the Town records are here 
given. 

1781. For clothing for the soldiers £ 

For five blankets for the yuce of the army . 
For one horse for the yuce of the army .... 



" Wages and blankets for the soldiers .... 
To Major John Minot for his hiring men to go 

into the service in 1779 

To John Byam, Jr., for going to Rhode Island 

as a soldier in 1780 

For part of 100 bushels of Indian com due 
Jacob Marshall for 6 months service in the 

army in 1780 

In lieu of 20 bushels of Indian corn and 

interest 11 months to Josiali Fletcher 

For 4 shirts for the yuce of the soldiers 



505 


0:0 


200 


0:0 


911 


0:0 


982 


2:0 


768 


7:6 


8,359 


10:0 


2,379 


14: 


10 


4:2 



6: 0:0 

5: 2:0 
1: 6:8 



THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION 283 

To William Bridge for conveying three horses 
to Concord, time and expenses, and buying 

one horse at Springfield in 1780 £ 0: 8:6 

To the same for conveying Clothing for the 

Solgers to Concord in 1779 0: 18: 6 

Grain and money for 9 months men in 1780 5,542: 2: 
The six months continental men and the 
three months militia to be paid their bounty 
in com at sixty dollars per bushel with 
interest till paid. The sums were respec- 
tively \ 8,000: 0:0 



40,000: 0:0 

To Capt. Samuel Stevens, one journey to 

Concord and horse and expenses to carry the 

clothing for the army 0: 6:0 

To Benj. Spaulding for 1 day spent in 

notifying the Classes in this Town to procure 

the Continental men 0: 6:0 

To Mr. John Minot to pay the 3 months men 

to go to North River and the five months men 

to go to Rhode Island 30: 0:0 

To Lt. Daniel Proctor for one journey to 

Wobum and horse and expenses to pay 

money to the agent for beef 0: 6:0 

Shirts and stockings for soldiers 4: 4:0 

Shoes 2: 0: 

For 6 pairs of stockings which Mrs. Sarah 

Richardson provided for the soldiers 1:16:0 

For 9 pairs shoes provided by Oliver Peirce 

Jr. and one pair for the poor 4: 6:0 

For 13 shirts provided for the soldiers by 

Abel Adams 3: 18: 

1782 Paid out of the Town's money granted in 
1780 for beef and paying out to the soldiers 
and for horses for the yuce of the army, for 

clothing and other articles 61,832: 7: 

To Capt. Joseph Warren for beef for the army 45 : 0:0 

For grain and money provided and paid to 

the 9 months men in 1780, in old Continental 

money 5,542: 2: 

These are a few out of hundreds of items found on the records. 
The Town did wonderfully well in supplying men, money and 
provisions, paying bounties and providing for the families of her 
soldiers. Frequently the taxes of soldiers were abated, and 
constables were sometimes released from the obligation of paying 
into the Town Treasury taxes which were "not gittable." 

1780 — December 27. Committee appointed to raise fifteen 
Continental men as required by the State. 



284 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

The Town appropriated for beef for the Army, clothing and 
blankets, £27000:0:0. 

1781. The six months Continental men and the three 
months Militia to be paid their bounty in corn at $60. per bushel, 
with interest till paid. The sums were respectively £8000. and 
£40,000. $1, new emission, equalled £12. old Continental money. 

The men who engaged for three years or during the war were 
each to receive twenty head of horned cattle. 

1787. To Col. Simeon Spaulding for 55 days attendance 
at the Constitutional Convention at Cambridge and Boston 
and expenses, £990:0:0. 

In 1780-81 Chelmsford was called upon for 31 shirts, pairs 
of shoes and stockings, and 15 blankets for the Army. 

FROM THE SIXTH CENSUS OF THE UNITED STATES. 



Names of Pensioners for Revolutionary 

or Military Services. 

Chelmsfoid. 

Josiah Fletcher 
Samuel Davis 


Age. 

81 
75 


Names of Heads of Families 
with whom Pensioners resided. 
.Tune 1. 1840. 

Josiah Fletcher 
Samuel Davis 


Samuel Brown 


75 


Samuel Brown 


Samuel Parkhurst 


81 


Samuel Parkhurst 


Levi Proctor 


73 


Levi Proctor 


John Crosby 
Hezikiah Thorndike 


80 
86 


John Crosby 
Hezekiah Thorndike 


William Adams 


78 


William Adams 


Martha Merrill 


68 


Charles A. Frost 


Amy Wibber 
Polly Pierce 
Rachel Dunn 


89 
83 
80 


Hugh Pettingill 



In the report of 1835 is the following: 

Amount of Allowance Pension began died 

Cato Abbott, private $96 Apr. 14, 1818. Nov. 16, 1819. 

[Church Record says, died 1818,] 

THE colonel's ORDER. 

Chelmsford 10th May 1777. 
Sir- 
Conformable to order wch I have recfeived from General 
Warren, I call upon & require of you, that you strictly Examine, 
forth with, ye Company of Militia under 3^our Command, and 
see how they are furnished with arms & ainmunition and see 
whether any of yr men are deficient in any articles required by 
the Militia Act, & yt you take ye most Effectual measures without 
delay, to have them supplied, yt they may be ready to march 
on the Shortest notice — And that you make return to me as 
soon as possible of ye State you find em in — And this because 



THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION 285 

of Intelligence received, that our Enemies are determined to 
enslave us, if it Shall be in their power, & New England is fixed 
upon, as the particular Object of their revenge & present Campaign. 

Im yr. humble servt. 
[Adams Library.] Col. 

John Betteys, credited to Dracut, Private, Capt. Joseph 
Bradley Varnum's Co. Col. Mcintosh's Regt., Gen. Lovell's 
Brigade: enhstcd July 29. 1778, discharged vSept. 11, 1778 service 
1 mo. 18 days, at Rhode Island. He was born in Chelmsford, 
July 7, 1757, the son of Andrew and Mary Battles of Chelmsford. 
Col. Varnum's order book is among his papers in the possession 
of C. O. Robbins. His letter addressed to his father, Andrew, is 
here given. 

Honored Father and Mother: This comes with my Duty to you 
with my lov to Brother and all other inquireing friends we marchd. 
into Rhod island on Sundy last about alio Clock and we Remain 
on the island yet and I trust we shall as long as we please for 
contanental State Regts. melisha and Volentears are very numerous 
on the island and I hope we Shall Be abel to Giv you a better 
acount of them Be fore it Be long: but we have not had a Site 
at them yet I am well at present and have bean Ever sence I 
came from home tho I have nothing to lay on but the ground and 
the open heaven to Cover us but I am in hops we Shall fare Better 
be fore longe. Sir I want sum money for I am in the Camps — tell 
Lieut. Procter to Send me 80 [old] Dollers if he can and I will 
Sattisfy him when I com home. I Don't want no more Cloaths 
only a pare Shues and Capt foard is Coming you may Send By 
him or Soom trusty hand ; So no more from your Dutifull son, 
Compton Rhod island Jo. Betteys. 

Portsmouth Aug. 11. 1778. 

REPLY. 

Chebnsford August 18th. 1778 
Louing Son I would in Form you that we are all well at present 
threw the goodness of god hoping these Lines will find you as 
they Leve us I Reed the Letters from you that you Sent By Capt 
Wright I would Be glad that you Would Rite to us the news as 
Sone as you Can for we want to hear them to know how you fare 
Doct. marShall Sent ten Dollars By mr. John Dun we have not 
got the Shoues But we will send them as Sone as we have any 
oppertunety mr James Haywoods folks are well So no more at 
present But we Remaine your Loving parrence 

Andrew Bettey 

To John Bettey 
in Capt Vamum 
Company att Rodiseland 
in 

Colo Mcingtuch 

The above and following letters are among the Robbins papers. 



286 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

IN THE HAND OF JOHN BETTEYS 

"Camp on Rhodisland August 29-1778. 
Died in Battel John Heywood of Tuksbury. 

He was a Respectable youth, a good Solgear and Died Like a 
Hero Fiteing in Defence of his Ravished Cuntray; oh! may Each 
one of his fellow Solgears think upon him and as far as his Exampals 
was good may Thay patron after him and if thay are Called to 
meet the Enemy may thay Consider thir Caus is good, and under 
god may thay fight manfully knowing and considering Who is 
abel to Succor and presarve them." 

Besides the John Heywood in the list of Chapter V, there 
were six others of the same name, one of whom is given as of 
"Capt Benjamin Walker's Co., Col. Bridge's Regt.: order for 
advanced pay, signed by said Heywood and others, dated Cam- 
bridge, June 6, 1775." None of these is given as of Tewkesbury. 
The two here mentioned were probably the same. 

EXTRACTS FROM TWO LETTERS WRITTEN BY CHELMSFORD BOYS 
TO ONE OF THEIR COMRADS AT HOME. 

Camps longisland Red hook August ye 24th. 1776. 
Sir it is with the gratest pleasur I take this oppertunity to Rite 
to you to let you No that I am Well hoping these few lins Will 
find you in as good helth as they leave me at this time. I Would 
in form you that I Sent you a letter Dated July 21 Weather you 
have got it or no I have nothing more Strang to Rit to you more 
than I put in that Letter only there is more Ships Come in it 
is judged that there is about 200 — and 50 — or — 300 sail of the 
Kings troops lies Close by in plane sight of us and Can Come so 
near as to fire into our tents I am stashaned on a Little island 
about three miles to the South of New York a place Called Red 
hook and We Expect to have a battle Enny Day Whereas if 
We Should We Expect to be Kild or taken if We Dont beat them 
for there is no Room to Retreat for the Water is all Round us 
When the tid is up * * * I Remain your true friend and 
humble sarvant 

Nathaniel Foster. 
Mr To 

John Batteys 

att 
Chelmsford 
this With 
Cair and speed 

Absent friend I Now set Down with Plasure to write To 
Jnform you of my Wellfair, hoping these unworthy Lins will find 
you in good helth as they Leve me att this time. I Received your 
Letters Dated October 6 and Nov. 21, and was Exceeding glad 
to find you was well our Compy are all in good helth it is Exceeding 
helthy Jn the Camp thak god: and J hope will Remain So. J 



THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION 287 

have No nuse to write to you att present only we Entend to Kill 
all the Enemy Before we come home if we Can for we have 
Amenison plenty we Draw Pees that will after Boild twenty four 
hours Do Excicution thirty Rods if they hit rite & J am sure we 
shall make the ships to hot for them when we give them a few 
Broad sides. * * * Remember My Love to all the prity 
girls. * * * 

Your humble servient till Death. 

Jesse Heywood 
North Kingston Nov. 29. 1777. 
To Mr. 

John Betty 

in 
Chelmsford 

with Care 

ENLISTMENT AGREEMENTS. 

We the subscribers do hereb}^ severally inlist ourselves into 
the service of the United Colonies of America to serve until the 
first day of April next if the service shall require it, and each of 
us do agree to firrnish and carry with us into the service a good 
effective Fire Arm, and Blanket (also a good Bayonet and Catridge 
Pouch if possible), and we severally consent to be formed by such 
Persons as the General Court shall appoint, into a Company of 
Ninety men, including one Captain, Two Lieutenants, one ensign, 
four vSergeants, four Corporis, one Drummer & one fifer to be 
elected by the Companies and when formed we engage to March 
to headquarters of the American Army with the utmost Expedition 
and to be under the Command of such Field officers as the General 
Court shall appoint, and we further agree during the time aforesaid 
to be subject to such generals as are or shall be appointed and to 
be under such Regulations in every respect as are provided for 
the Army aforesaid. 

Dated this 29th day of January A D 1776. 

John Adams 
his 
Joseph X Barrett 

mark 
Samuel Willson 
Jesse Spaulding 
Daniel Proctor 
Joseph Adams Jr 

his 
Benj. X Chambling 

mark 
Jonas Marshall 
Roger Toothaker 
Samson Cobum 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 55, p. 53. Also Miss H. M. 
Spalding.] 



288 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

We the Subscribers do hereby severally inlist Ourselves into 
the Service of the United Colonies of America, to serve until the 
first Day of April next, if the Service Shall require it; and each 
of us do engage to furnish and carry with us into the Service, a 
good effective Fire Arm, and Blanket, (also a good Bayonet and 
Cartridge Pouch, if possible.) And we severally consent to be 
formed by such Person as the General Court shall appoint, into 
a Company of Ninety Men, including one Captain, two Lieu- 
tenants, one Ensign, four Sergeants, four Corporals, one Drummer, 
and one Fifer, to be elected by the Companies; and when formed, 
we engage to march to Head-Quarters of the American Army, 
with the utmost Expedition, and to be under the Command of 
such Field Officer or Officers as the General Court shall appoint. — 
And we further agree, during the Time aforesaid, to be subject 
to such Generals as are or shall be appointed; and to be under 
such Regiilations, in every Respect, as are provided for the Army 
aforesaid. Dated this Day of January the 29 A. D. 1776. 

Samuel Perham Junr, Jonathan Stevens, Joseph Spaulding, 
Samuel Twiss, Uriah Keyes, John Mears, William Fletcher, 
Stephen Peirce the (?), Sherebijah Fletcher, Jonas Spaulding, 
OHver Rjchardson, Ebenezer Goold, Isaiah foster, Jephthae 
Spaulding, Charles fletcher, John Spaulding, William Peirce. 
[Original in the possession of Miss H. M. Spalding.] 

The following are among the Ford papers : 
Names on an Enlistment paper dated 1776. 
Uriah Griffin, John Heywood, Jonathan Shed, James Heazel- 
tine, John Hunt, Jsrael Hunt, Jonathan Hunt, Eliphalet Manning, 
Hezekiah Thorndike, Daniel Glood, James Annas, James Bailey, 
Jeremiah Morrill, Benj farley, T Bakewell. 

These names are attached to Receipts for pay or pay orders. 

Saml Heald, B Barron, Saml Ellinwood, Edw Butman, 
Bengam Didson, Benj Butterfield, John Green, Parker Emerson, 
John Taylor, Jr., Jesse Heywood, Wm Blazdell, Jr., C. Pollard, 
John McCluer, Thomas Mclaney, Oliver Farwell, John Partherch, 
Daniel How, Wm Peirce, Benj Lane, Samuel Moor, John Stark, 
Jonathan Stark, James Vose, James Nober or Noble, Moses 
Barker, Jr., Eleazer Farwell, Benj He3Avood, Thomas Hoadley. 

The following documents are among the Ford papers : 

These men received Cartridge Boxes: 
Lt. Perham, John Mears, Joseph Ingles, Gershom Proctor, Samuel 
Twist, John Winning, Aaron Farmer, Saml Fletcher, Caleb 
Colburn, Daniel Gload, Nat Richardson, Joseph Wilson, Josiah 
Danforth, Jonathan Hunt, John Merre, Moses Hardee, Jonathn 
Shed, Nicholas Sprake, Willard Hall, Simon Hide, Ezekiel Andress, 
Joseph Berret, Jesse Spaulding, Stephn Pierce, Jonas Spaulding, 
Wm. Abbot, John Sprake, Daniel SiUaway, Benj Bream (or 



THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION 289 

Byam?), James Reed, Oliver Richardson, Daniel Abbott, John 
Wright, Joshua Jones, Benj Chamberling, James Annes, Barzillar 
Lew, Solomon Abbot, Learnard Willson, John Cathorn, David 
Lane. 

Cambridge, Jan. 1, 1776. 
Twenty-one men, names under-mentioned, returned each man 
a cartridge box into the ordnance stores. 

Moses Barker Benj Parker 

John Keyes Benj Farley 

Berzellai Lew Enoch Cleauland 

John Bates Benj. Butterfild 

Reuben Porter Oliver Corey 

Samuel Briton Samul Marshall 

William Ramstead Joseph Chambers 

Alexander Davidson Nathanil Hunt 

John Chambers Isaac Barret 

Parker Emerson James Chambers 

Samuel Hayward 

All these names are on Capt. Ford's Rolls except Isaac Barret. 

RECEIPT. 

Camp at Cambridge 
June 27, 1775. 
Received of Eben Bridge Fifteen Pounds in Province Notes for 
my Company 
£15 John Ford. 

ORDER. 

Cambridge, May 17, 1775. 
Parole, Ethan; Countersign, Allen; officer of the Day, Col. 
William Henshaw; Field officer for the Picket gard, Lt. Col. 
Bond's. Field officer for the main gard tomorrow. Col. Scammons; 
Field officer for Treatage tomorrow, Lt. Col. Whitney; agitant 
of the Day, Gager. 
Otherwise as usual. 

CERTIFICATE. 

Hospital, Cambridge, May 13, 1775 
Sir — Having examined William Parker Junr. of your regiment, 
who was kicked by a horse some time ago, he is, in my opinion, 
absolutely unfit for ser^ace at present, and should he continue in 
the army it would greatly endanger his life, without the least 
prospect of his doing any good. 

Isaac Foster, Jun. Surgeon. 



290 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

colonel's orders. 

To Col. Eben'r Bridge 

To Capt. Ford — Sir: I expect to-morrow morning by sunrise 
you will not fail of parading every one of your men on the common 
parade and leave none in the barracks, except those that are really 
unfit for duty. 

John Robinson, Col. 
Cambridge, March 9th, 1776 

Capt John Ford Sir your Allarm Post or Place of Pradue on an 
Allarm is at the Meeting House in Chelmsford & you will Direct 
your Company accordingly the meathord or mod of making an 
alarm 

I submit to you Yours to serve. 

April the 29 1777. Simeon Spaulding, Con'l. 

SALE OF JOHN BATES' EFFECTS. 

Cambridge Dec. 7 1775 
This day sold by order of Capt Ford the things and wearing 
apparill of John Bates who died at Cambridge Dec. 5, 1775 
Whereof Lt. Isaac Parker was Vendue master 

old tenor 
£. s. d 

William Campbell a pare of stokens 0. 15. 

Samuel Hayward a shirt fine 4. 8. 

a piece of cloth velvet 4. 17. 

Elijah Heasiltine a tow sheet 1. 16. 

" " a pare of old Britches 1. 17. 

Enoch Cleveland Dr to a hat 2. 0. 

William Campbell Dr to a pare of shoes 1. 15. 

" " " " " old shoes 0. 6. 

John Keyes Dr to a pare of stokens 0. 5. 

Benj Pierce Dr to an old coat 1. 1. 

Capt Ford Dr to the Coat Found by the Government . . 7. 17. 

Benj Pierce to an old wescot 0. 15. 

[Ford Papers.] 

27. 8. 

PRINTED RESOLVE. 

IN PROVINCIAL CONGRESS, AT WATERTOWN, APRIL 23, 1775: 

Resolved, That the following Establishment of Forces now 
immediately to be raised for the Recovery and Preservation of our 
undoubted rights and liberties be as follows, Viz. 



THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION 291 

To each Col. of a Regiment of 598 men £15. 0. 

To 1 Lieut. Col. of such a regiment 12. 0. 

To 1 Major " " " " 10. 0. 

For a Capt. of 59 men, including officers 6. 0. 

For 1 Lieutenant of such a company 4. 0. 

For 1 Ensign ditto 3. 0. 

For 1 Adjutant for such Regiment 5. 10. 

For 1 Quartermaster ditto 3. 0. 

For 1 Chaplain ditto 6. 0. 

For 1 Chirurgeon ditto 7. 10. 

For 1 Surgeon's Mate ditto 4. 0. 

For Each Sergent 2. 8. 

For Each Corporal 2. 4. 

For " Fifer 2. 4. 

For " Private Centinel 2. 0. 

Resolved, That besides the above, a coat for a uniform be given 
to each of the non-commission officers and privates, so soon as 
the state of the Province will admit of it. 

Also, Resolved, That the selectmen of the several towns and 
districts within this Colony be desired to furnish the soldiers who 
shall enlist from their respective towns and districts with good and 
sufficient blankets, and render their accounts to the committee 
of supplies who are hereby directed to draw on the colony treasurer 
for payment of the same 

Joseph Warren, Pres. P. T, 



RECEIPTS. 



Chehnsford, March 17, 1777. 

Capt. Ford: Sir — Pleas to Deliver the Barer of this order 
all the wages dew me and Reers of all kind and this shall be your 
final discharge 

Per me 

Jesse Heywood. 



Chelmsford January ye 12 1779 

This Day Rec'd of Capt John Ford the simi of Eight Pounds, 
sixteen Shillings in full of what was my Due upon the sd. Capt 
Ford's musterroal for servis on the Alarram in the year 1777 at 
the time of the surrender of Burgones army, 
J say 

Reed by me 

Oliver Barron. 



292 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

Some extracts from Captain Ford's order-book at Ticonderoga 
have been printed in Brown's "Beside Old Hearthstones," which 
give regimental orders, parole and counter-sign, the finding of 
courts-marshal, punishments inflicted on disorderly soldiers, and 
so forth. Some received 39 lashes on the bare back. One was 
sentenced to be tied naked to the post for five minutes at the 
head of the regiment. One, besides receiving 39 lashes, was to 
wear a withe on his neck for 14 days "for a mark of Ignominion," 
and if seen without it, he was to receive 100 lashes with the cat 
o'nine tails. Green, in "Three Diaries," gives an instance in 
1745 of a soldier who, for disrespect to an officer, was condemned 
to "ride the pickets for an hour." 

As an illustration of one of the minor difficulties which beset 
the historian, it may be interesting to the reader to know that in 
the list of Soldiers in the War of the Revolution prepared by the 
State, there are fourteen Joseph Emersons, and none of them is 
credited to Chelmsford. Joseph Emerson of Chelmsford served 
in the latter part of the War, possibly earlier. The record given 
below puts him in Moore's Company, a Bedford company made 
up of men from the neighboring towns, as the most likely. One 
or more of the earlier records might belong to him. 
Emerson, Joseph. Sergeant, Capt. John Moore's Co., Col. 

Jonathan Reed's (1st) Regt. of guards; joined April 2, 1778; 

service to July 3, 1778, 3 mos., 2 days, guarding troops of 

convention at Cambridge; enlistment, 3 months from April 2, 

1778. 

From the records in the Adjutant General's office it is learned 
that he was 1st Lieutenant in 1781, and Captain December 27, 
1786. He resigned in 1789. The original docimient is preserved 
with many others at the State House. 

For one finding the record of an ancestor in the preceding 
list, it might be well to refer to the official volume, where possibly 
another record of earlier or later date might be given, but not 
credited to Chelmsford. 

In John Bridge's record he is given as of Walker's Company. 
His name is not on the rolls of that company, and he probably 
signed for some one else. He might have been "doing a turn" 
for another man. This was a common practice. Brother would 
relieve brother, father or son, and servant relieve master, when 
needed at home for a season, to attend to business or get in the 
crops. 

Chelmsford, Jan. 26, 1776. 

Received of Philip Parkis three pounds, twelve shillings, 
lawful money, in full for doing a turn for him in the continental 
army, this present year. 

Sylas Parker. 
Attested. — Francis Southack. 
[Ford Papers.] 



THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION 293 

The following are among the Parker papers at the old home- 
stead on Pine street, Lowell: 

"Simon Parker and John Dutten march to Cambridge July 
ye 3, 177b 

Paid thirteen Mileage to North riuer £71 : 10: 

Paid Seuen Men Millige to Rodeisland £11:17:6 

Paid Two Millige to Winter Hill 1 : 3:0 

Sum Total £84: 10:6 
The sum of the Clo[thling is 282: 4: 



£366: 14:6 



An agreement of Thorn Snydam to serve in the Continental 
service for the Town. Mustered in August 28, 1781, for the 
Class whereof Mr. Benj. Parker and others are members. Oliver 
Barron, Muster-master. 

Chelmsford August 28 1781 

I the Subscriber haveing inlisted myself into the Continental 
Serv^es for the Term of three years. Do promise and Ingage to be 
under such Regulations as shall be provided from time to Time 
by the Commanding officer of the army of the Unitid States and 
to obey all my superior officers in sd army from Time to time as 
I shall have orders from them while in the Army of the United 
States of America. 

Thorn Snydam. 

A SUBSCRIPTION PAPER. 

We the Inhabitance of the town of Chelmsford taking into 
consideration the dificulties hardships which our Bretheren endure 
and undergo that are in the Service of the United States of America 
and in the Defence of the Rights and Priviliges of the People of 
said Stats, we being sensible that sundry articles being wanted 
by our Bretheren which are in servis Espeseally Shirts. & Shoes & 
Stockings therefore we the subscribers the inhabitants of the 
lown of Chelmsford aforesaid being willing to contribute something 
to their Relif by way of subscription. We the subscribers do 
Promise and Ingage each one for ourselves to Provide the Artical 
which we shall subscrib and specify at the End of our names and 
also that we will procure the said articles as soon as Posabally 
can be with any convennantcy. 

men's nams shirts stockings shoes 

John Ford one Peare of Shous 

W m Peirce one Peare of shous 

Simeon Moors one Peare of shurts 

Ebenezer Frost stockings one pair 

Oliver peirce iun one pare of shous 



294 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

men's nams shirts stockings shoes — Continued 
Oliver peirce one par stockines 
John Purmort 

P. Underwood one 

Jonas Peirce one shirts 

Simeon Blodget one pair of shoes 

Jon'an Bickford one peair of stockings 

Josiah Foster one pr shoes 

Samuell Marshal one pair of stockings 

Sert. Robert Bates stockings one pair 

Benjamin Parker Shirt one 

Philip Parker stockings one pair 

Thomas Marshal shirt one 

Among the Parker papers are Shirley's Commission (dated 
July 29, 1754) to Benjamin Parker, Gentleman, to be 2d Lieutenant 
of the first foot Company in Chelmsford, of which Ebenezer 
Parker was Captain; also Harrison Gray's warrant to Benjamin 
Parker, Constable and Collector of Chelmsford, dated 28. October, 
1765. 

TRADITION. 

There is a tradition that on the 19th of April, 1775, the men 
in the northern part of the Town assembled in a field opposite the 
old Parker place on Pine Street (Lowell), and from that place 
went on to join their comrades at the centre of the Town. 

August, 1778, six men were draughted from the Militia, to 
go to Rhode Island, viz.: — Oliver Bowers, John Dunn, Josiah 
Fletcher, Levi Fletcher, Jesse Haywood, Wm. Spalding. 

Dr. John Betty went as a volunteer, and was chosen Clerk 
of the company commanded by Joseph B. Varnum. The above 
were draughted for six weeks, were in an engagement on Rhode 
Island — in which from Capt. J. B. Varnimi's company, one was 
killed, two wounded, one missing. 

1779 — 16 men were engaged to go to Rhode Island for three 
months,viz.: — James Marshall, Simon Parker, Ashbel Spalding, 
Josiah Parkhurst, Benja. Butterfield, John Byam, Joseph Hay- 
wood, Luke Bowers, Joseph Chambers, Wm. Chambers, John 
Keys, Simeon Spalding, Abel Chamberlin, Peter Farror. 

1780 — The militia officers were empowered by the town to 
hire fifteen men for the continental service, and the selectmen in- 
structed to raise money and produce, to pay them for nine months' 
service; and, Phineas Kidder, Peter Farror, Jacob Marshall, 
Robert Spalding, Noah Foster, Henry Fletcher, Samuel Wilson, 
Jr., Pelatiah Adams, Thomas Hutchens, Jesse Stevens, John 
Keyes, Leonard Parker, Benja. Spalding, Joseph Warren, Jr., 
Robert Richardson, were engaged. 
[Allen, page 181.] 



THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION 295 

Allen (page 66) says: 1777. "Thirty men were raised for the 
three years' ser\dce or during the war. The town agreed to give 
them £20 bounty per man, over and above what the contment and 
state offered. This bounty was in 1781, permuted for twenty 
heads of horn cattle, of a middling size, per man. If the war 
lasted but one year, they were to have their cattle at one year old; 
if it continued two years, at two years old and so on in the same 
proportion. The scarcity of specie and the uncertam value of paper 
currency suggested various expedients for supplying the place of 
money, in carrying on the war. The bounty and wages m some 
instances were paid in com, in others, in cattle. Another expedient 
was to supply the famiUes of soldiers with the necessaries of life. 
To prevent exorbitant demands and charges for the articles thus 
furnished to the families of soldiers, a Committee was chosen to 
join with committees from the westerly part of the country, m 
order to regulate and fix the price of labor and of necessaries. 

Thus without money or with very little, the town paid the 
soldiers it furnished for the war; and by such methods an arduous 
and expensive struggle for liberty was long maintained and 
finally brought to a successful close. ^ ^-.^ , • 

A new levy was called for, partly to join Gen. Washington s 
army at North river, or Hudson, partly to go to Rhode Island. 
The requisition of eleven men for the continental service to the 
westward was for nine months, and that of three men for Rhode 
Island three months. The town gave at this time $100 bounty 

to each soldier. . r r- j 

1779. This year the town received a quantity of fire arms and 
steel from Government, which were sold at auction to the in- 
habitants of the town on condition that the fire arms should not 
be struck off at less than twenty-two dollars a piece, nor the steel 
at less than ten shillings per pound. The over plus after paying 
the first cost and expense of transportation was paid into the town 

treasury. , ^ . 

1780. Another requisition of fifteen men for Tyconderoga 
was made, to be enlisted for six months. These were engaged 
for a hundred bushels of corn per man as a bounty. The militia 
officers were empowered to hire and the selectmen to raise money 
and produce by which to pay them. A demand was made this 
year by the govermnent, upon the respective towns m the Province 
for clothing to supply the army. The depreciation of paper money 
may be learned from the following items. A horse bought of 
Ephraim Spalding, Esq. for the army cost £911. A blanket £100. 
Col. Simeon Spalding's account for attendance and necessary 
expences fifty-five days at Cambridge in a convention for forming 
the Constitution was £990. And the Rev. Mr. Bridge's salary 
from September to March, eight months, was set at £3,600. 

In a resolve of the legislature of this province, passed June 
22, 1780, each town was required to furnish a certain_ quota of 
beef, for the Continental army. The town voted to raise 36,720 
dollars instead of the beef required. Voted also to raise 40,000 



296 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

dollars to pay the six months' continental soldiers, and three 
months militia men, together with their bounty; for which the 
selectmen and militia officers had given their notes payable in 
corn, at 50 dollars per bushel. It was also agreed that every 
dollar of the new emission should be equal to £12 in said taxes. 
The expenditures of the town this year for horses and supplies 
for the army, amounted to £61,832. 

1784. The rapid depreciation of paper money, the little 
probability of its rising again, together with the inexplicable 
difficulties in which it involved the people, induced the Town to 
lay it aside and make their grants in specie. The expenditure 
for horses provided for the army this year was £3340. 

In obedience to a late Law or act of the great and General 
Court, or assembly of the State of Massachusetts Bay in New- 
England, relative to the affixing of the prices of the necessaries 
of life, which are produced in America, we the Selectmen and the 
Committee of Correspondence, Inspection and safety of the town 
of Chelmsford met, considered and proceeded as follows: 

Rye, Good and merchantable 4s. 8d per £ S. D. Q. 

Bushel 4 8 

Wheat, Do. 7s per Bushel 7 

Com, Good merchantable Indian Corn, 3s. 

8d pr. bush 3 8 

Wool, Do. 2s. pr. lb 2 

Pork, Do. 4d: Iq. pr. lb 4 1 

Salt Pork, in usual proportion the price of 

salt, good middlings at 8d. 2q. pr. lb 8 2 

Beef, well fatted and grass fed, 3d per lb. . . . 3 

Stall fed beef of the best quality, 4d per lb. . . 4 

Hides, Raw Hides at 3d per lb 3 

Calf-skins, Green at 6d. per lb 6 

Cheese, New-milk 6d. other cheese according 

to its goodness 6 

Butter, Good at 9d. per lb 9 

Pease, Good at 7s. 4d. per bush 7 4 

Beans, Good at 6s. per bush 6 

Potatoes, In the fall Is. 2d 1 2 

In the Spring Is. 6d 1 6 

Stockings, Made of good yam and well knit, 

(men's) 6 

Shoes, men's. Made of neat's leather, common 

sort, 7 8 

Women's Do 5 4 

Oats, Good and merchantable 2s. per bushel . 2 

Flax, Well drest and of a good quality Is. per lb. 1 
Tallow, Good tried tallow 7d. 2q per. lb. . . . 7 2 

Tow Cloth, 3-4 yd. wide Is. 9d 1 9 

Veal, Good veal 3d. per lb 3 

Mutton and Lamb, 3d. 2q. per lb 3 2 



THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION 297 

£ S. D. Q. 

Horse-keeping on English hay, Is. per night . . 1 

Ox-keeping, a large yoke on English hay Is. 

6d. do 1 6 

Ox-work, For a large, good pair 2s. per day 

from the 1st of April till the last of Sept. . . 2 

the other six months Is. Cd. pr. day 1 6 

Men's Labor, In the 3 summer months for a 

faithful day's work 3s 3 

From Nov. to April — Is. 6d. per day,. . . 16 

The other 4 months 2s 2 

Hay, English the best quality 3s 3 

Shingles, per thousand 12s. 6d 12 6 

Boards, at the Mill or landing £1 13s per thous. 1 13 

Clapboards, Per. thousand £3 6s. 8d 3 6 8 

Coal, Pine 3d. 2q. per Bush, at the Smith's 

Shop 3 2 

Do. Maple and Birch at Do. 4d. per bush 4 

Axes, Warranted by the smith 9 

Do. New-laying and warranting 5s. 4d 5 4 

Shoemaking, For one pair, the shoe-maker 

finding thread and wax and making them 

at his shop 3 2 

Do. at the Farmer's house 

Salt, Good imported salt, lis. 8d 11 8 

Tanning, Tanning hides 2d per lb. currying in 

proportion 2 

Tobacco, Well made into rolls and of the best 

quality 8d 8 

Spinning, Woolen warp, taking it home, 5d. 

per skein 5 

Double Skein of Cotton warp, 5d. do 5 

Spinning by the week from home 2s. 8d 2 8 

Housework by the week 2s. lOd 2 10 

Carpenters, Labor per day from 1st of Apr. 6 

mo. & found 3 4 

the other 6 months 2s. 6d 2 6 

Wood, by the cord, oak wood corded up in 

the middle of the town, 8s 8 

Horse-shoeing and steeling all round and well 

6s 6 

Horse-shoeing, plain without steeling 4s. lOd. 4 10 

Malt, Rye Malt, 4s. 8d. per bushel 4 8 

FHp, Made of W. India Rum, lOd. per mug . . 10 

Do. of N. E. Rum, 8d. per do 8 

Rum, W. I. for a gill in the Innkeeper's house . 4 

N. E. do. do 3 

Toddy, W. I. lOd. per Mug 10 

Do. N.E.8d. permug 8 

Cheknsford, May 1779. 



298 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

CHELMSFORD GIVES ASYLUM TO PEOPLE FLEEING FROM BOSTON 
AND CHARLESTOWN. 

Charlestown siiffered full as much as Boston during the siege. 
Hundreds of people from both towns were given passes, and 
removed to the country towns, which the Congress ordered to 
provide for these people according to their population. At first 
it was arranged that Chelmsford should have forty-nine of the 
inhabitants of Boston, who were removed from the besieged city. 
The nimiber of Boston people allotted to the different towns of 
the Commonwealth was 4,903. 

In the year 1776 the selectmen of Chelmsford, as required by 
the authorities at Boston, sent to the Secretary's office a list of 
the people of Boston and Charlestown who were resident in 
Chelmsford on the 20th of March in that year. 

There were one hundred and six of them. 

The Town Records do not give the names of these people. 
The writer has searched every likely place in Boston to find this 
list, but without success. 

A few names are given in the Town accounts, and Bridge's 
Diary gives some : 

Captain Symmes and family; Mrs. Blake, sister of Mr. 
Bridge; James Fitzgerald and wife, he a privateer and an Irish 
Roman Catholic. Bridge, in his diary, says that Fitzgerald's 
prosperity destroyed him. 

"Captain" Andrew Symmes is given as 2d Major in Col. 
Henry Bromfield's Boston Regiment of Massachusetts Militia; 
also as Major in command of a detachment from Lieut. Col. 
Jabez Hatch's Boston Regiment, and also as Lieutenant Colonel 
in the same regiment. 

The widow Mary Baker, a stranger, late of Boston, died at 
the house of Mr. Samuel Pitts, November 24, 1787. 

Items in the Town Records, Book I, page 350, show that 
William Perrin, James Perrin and family, and others came from 
Charlestown to Chelmsford. The State of Massachusetts paid 
for bringing their goods and supporting the Perrin family. In 
,1777 Joshua Snow received of the Town £l, for bringing a family 
of Boston people from Charlestown; paid by Captain Joseph 
Warren, whom the Town reimbursed. Henry Spaulding removed 
some of these people's goods from Charlestown ferry. William 
Parker, Jr., was paid for sundry articles delivered for their support. 

Widow E,lizabeth Bryant and Widow Sarah Hicks and family 
were from Charlestown. The General Court, in the session of 
1780-81, granted Billerica's petition to be allowed to remove 
Mrs. Hicks and her family, consisting of four persons, to Chelms- 
ford, and directed the selectmen here to provide for them agreeably 
to the acts of the Commonwealth. 

There are numerous items in the Town accounts of sums 
paid for the support of these women — doctoring, food and wearing 
apparel, and "digging grave for wido Hicks, 0: 3: 0: — " in 



THE WAR OF THE REVOLUTION 299 

1784. They lived for a time in the Widow Elizabeth Park- 
hurst's house. 

Nathaniel Coverly left Boston in 1775, and set up a printing 
press in the south part of Chelmsford. 

Some of the Pitts family came to Chelmsford from Boston 
at the time of the siege, and some of them went to Dunstable, 
from which town the Hon. John Pitts was several times sent as 
representative to the General Court. He married Mary, daughter 
of John Tyng, in 1779. 

John Pitts, son of Berwick, was born in England, came to 
Boston in 1695, and married Elizabeth Lindall. Their daughter 
Sarah married William Stoddard, in 1721. Their son James, 
bom in 1712, married Elizabeth, daughter of James Bowdoin, 
afterwards Governor, and was a councillor, a patriot, and an 
antagonist of Governor Hutchinson, who, in his diary, July 1, 
1774, says King George HI asked him, "Who is Mr. Pitts?" when 
Hutchinson told the King he was one of the select few to whom 
Hutchinson's letters had been shown before publication. Of the 
sons of James, John married Mary Tyng; Lendall married Eliza- 
beth Fitch; and Samuel, bom 1745, married Joanna Davis. 
Samuel was a merchant of Boston, and, with his father, owned 
and sent merchantmen to the Bermudas. He was a Son of 
Liberty and one of the Boston Tea Party, as was his brother 
Lendall, who commanded the division of the Tea Party which 
boarded the brig, "Beaver." This fact had to be concealed, 
as his father and uncle Bowdoin were of the King's Council. 
The tradition is that the boys were sent away from Boston to 
get them into "a cooler atmosphere," or at least were induced to 
come to Chelmsford, where, according to the statement of Mrs. 
Luther Faiilkner of Billerica (who was Martha Prescott Merriam 
of Chelmsford, and lived in what had been Colonel Stoddard's 
house), Samuel Prince, a nephew of Samuel Pitts, built what is 
known as "the Sam Davis house" in Worthen street, which, it 
has been generally supposed, was built by Davis, who was probably 
connected with the Pitts family, and followed the sea. It may 
have been that the young men were persuaded to come to Chelms- 
ford that they might be under the restraining influence of Colonel 
Stoddard and Parson Bridge. Samuel Pitts lived in the house 
which had been the home of Colonel Stoddard, which he found 
too small for his accommodation, and he bought the house built 
by the Rev. Hezekiah Packard, and lived there until his (Pitt's) 
death, in 1805. His sister Elizabeth married Robert Brinley of 
Tyngsborough. Nathaniel Brinley married Sarah Elizabeth 
Bridge. Daniel Goodwin, Jr., in his Memorial of the Pitts, says 
that after the Revolution Samuel Pitts came to Chelmsford and 
lived in luxury, devoted to domestic comfort and a noble hospi- 
tality. Copley painted his portrait. After the death of his wife, 
Joanna, he married her sister, Mrs. Mary Davis Carver. Bridge, 
in his diary, records a visit from Mr. Samuel Pitts, who had come 
with his family to live in the late Colonel Stoddard's house. 



300 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

Captain James Pitts, son of Samuel, bom in Boston in 1777, 
was educated for the Navy. He owned and sailed merchant 
vessels to the Bermudas. He married Rachel Hildreth of Chelms- 
ford, in 1808, and lived here in the house which was the home of 
the late Joseph Read. He died December 19, 1843. 

Elizabeth W., daughter of Lendall Pitts, married Gerard 
Cazeaiix, the French Consul to the United States. 

Thomas, son of Samuel, married Elizabeth Mountfort, both 
of Chelmsford, Nov. 9, 1802. They were the parents of Mrs. 
Mary A. P. Wheelock of Framingham, and of Mary Ann Warren, 
wife of Ezra Warren. 

Mary, daughter of Samuel of Chelmsford, married, in 1811, 
William Stoddard Bridge, of Chelmsford, (son of William, and 
grandson of the Rev. Ebenezer Bridge). 

Sarah Chardon, daughter of Sa.muel, married Noah Davis. 

Sarah Bridge married Jonathan Mountfort, Jr., in 1742. 

Col. Ebenezer Bridge married Mary Mountfort, in 1787. 

Thomas Pitts, says Mrs. Wheelock, held three commissions 
as Lieutenant and Captain in the War of 1812. "At the Battle 
of Lundy's Lane he commanded men enough to cover a mile of 
ground." When peace was declared, he removed from Chelmsford 
to Boston, and was in the State Bank for some years; was eight 
years an inspector of Customs. He died at Cambridge, in 1836, 
aged 57 years. 

For mention of the Pitts familv, see Drake's "Tea Leaves," 
Goodwin's "Memorial," and "History for Ready Ref.," Vol. V, 
p. 3211. 

THE END OF THE WAR. 

The Revolutionary War came to an end when Comwallis 
surrendered at Yorktown, Va. He hoisted the white flag, October 
17, 1781, four years after Burgoyne's surrender, and formally 
capitulated two days later, when his 8,000 men marched out to 
the tune "The World's Turned Upside Down." To Washington 
belongs the glory. 



CHAPTER V. 

RECORDS OF CHELMSFORD MEN 
IN THE REVOLUTION. 

THE following lists have been compiled with great care, at 
the cost of much time and labor, and are, it is hoped, as 
nearly complete and correct as it is possible to make them. 

LIST OF CHELMSFORD SOLDIERS COMPILED FROM "MASSACHUSETTS SOLDIERS 
AND SAILORS OF THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR." 

Abbot, Cato, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. William H. Ballard's Co., Col. 
Brook's Regt.; Continental Army pay accounts for service from March 
26, 1777, to Dec. 31, 1779; enlistment, 3 years; reported transferred to 
Capt. Day's Co., Oct. 31 (?); also, muster roll of Capt. Luke Day's Co., 
for March and April, 1779, dated Cherry Valley. 

Abbot, Daniel. Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Robinson's Regt.; receipt for 
wages from Feb. 5 to April 1, 1776, dated Chelmsford. 

Abbot, Solomon. Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Robinson's Regt.; receipt for 
wages from Feb. 5, 1776 to April 1, 1776, dated Chelmsford. 

Abbot, William, Chelmsford. Private, Col. Moses Parker's Co., commanded 
by Lieut. Benjamin Walker, which marched on the alarm of April 19, 
1775; service, 16 days. 

Abbott, Jeremiah, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Oliver Barron's Co., Col. 
David Green's Regt., which marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; 
service, 5 days. 

Abbott, Josiah. Ensign, Col. Benjamin Tupper's (10th) Regt.; muster rolls 
of field and staff officers for services and subsistence from Oct. 1, 1781, 
to Jan. 1, 1783. 

Adams, Abel. 2d Lieut., Capt. Benjamin Fletcher's (1st) Co., 7th Middle- 
sex Co. Regt.; list of Massachusetts militia; commissioned July 6, 1780; 
also, Lieut., Capt. Asa Drury's Co., Col. Turner's Regt.; enlisted Aug. 1, 
1781; discharged Dec. 1, 1781; service, 4 mos., 4 days, on an alarm at 
Rhode Island. 

Adams, David. Capt. John Ford's Co.; receipt for wages, etc., dated Ticon- 
deroga, Aug. 28, 1776; also, receipt dated Ticonderoga, Oct. 2, 1776. 

Adams, John, Chelmsford. Private, Col. Moses Parker's Co., commanded 
by Lieut. Benjamin Walker, which marched on the alarm of April 19, 
1775; service, 9 days; also, Capt. Benjamin Walker's Co., Col. Ebenezer 
Bridge's (27th) Regt.; receipt for advance pay dated Cambridge, June 24, 
1775; also, muster roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; enlisted April 28, 1775; service, 
3 mos., 11 days; also, company return (probably Oct., 1775); also, certi- 
ficate of non-receipt of bounty coat or its equivalent in money, dated 
Jan. 1, 1776; also, Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Robinson's Regt.; receipt 
for wages from Feb. 5, 1776, to April 1, 1776, dated Chelmsford; also, 
receipt for wages due Oct. 2, 1776, dated Ticonderoga; also. Corporal, 
Capt. Moses Barns's Co., Lieut. Col. Solomon Pierce's Regt.; enlisted 
May 17, 1779; discharged July 1, 1779; service, 1 mo., 14 days, on an 
alarm at Rhode Island; enlistment, 2 months. 

Adams, Joseph, Chelmsford. Capt. John Ford's (Volunteer) Co., Col. 
Jonathan Reed's Regt.; enlisted Sept. 27, 1777; discharged Nov. 8, 1777; 
service, 1 mo., 13 days; marched to reinforce Northern Army. 



302 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

Adams, Oliver, Chelmsford. List of men in Col. Baldwin's Ree:t., May 1, 
1775; also, Private, Capt. John Ford's (Volunteer) Co., Col. Jonathan 
Reed's Regt.; enlisted Sept. 27, 1777; discharged Oct. 20, 1777; service, 
23 days; marched to reinforce Northern Army. 

Adams, Pelatiah, Bradford (also given Chelmsford). Private, Capt. William 
Hudson Ballard's Co., Col. John Brooks's (late Alden's) 7th Regt.; 
Continental Army pay accounts for service from March 25, 1777, to 
Nov. 11, 1778; reported killed Nov. 11, 1778. 

Adams, Robert, Chelmsford. Private, Col. Moses Parker's Co., commanded 
by Lieut. Benjamin Walker, which marched on the alarm of April 19, 
1775; service, 12 days. 

Adams, Salathiel, Chelmsford. List of men in Col. Loammi Baldwin's 
Regt., May 1, 1775. 

Adams, Samuel, Chelmsford. List of men in Col. Baldwin's Regt., May 1, 
1775; also Private, Capt. John Ford's (Volunteer) Co., Col. Jonathan 
Reed's Regt.; enlisted Sept. 27, 1777; discharged Nov. 8, 1777; service, 
1 mo., 13 days; marched to reinforce Northern Army. 

Adams, Samuel. Private, Capt. John Ford's (Volunteer) Co., Col. Jonathan 
Reed's Regt.; enlisted Sept. 27, 1777; discharged Nov. 8, 1777; service, 
1 mo., 13 days; marched to reinforce Northern Army. 

Adams, Solomon, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. James Varnum's Co., Col. 
Michael Jackson's Regt.; Continental Army pay accounts for service 
from May 15, 1777, to Dec. 31, 1779; also, Continental Army pay ac- 
counts for service from Jan. 1, 1780, to May 15, 1780. 

Adams, Thomas, Chelmsford. Private, Col. Moses Parker's Co., commanded 
by Lieut. Benjamin Walker, which marched on the alarm of April 19, 
1775; service, 9 days; also, Capt. Benjamin Walker's Co., Col. Ebenezer 
Bridge's (27th) Regt.; receipt for advance pay dated Cambridge, June 
24, 1775; also, company return (probably Oct., 1775); also, order for 
bounty coat or its equivalent in money, dated Cambridge, Dec. 25, 1775. 

Adams, Timothy, Chelmsford. List of men in Col. Baldwin's Regt., May 1, 
1775. 

Adams, Timothy. Private, Capt. John Ford's (Volunteer) Co., Col. Jonathan 
Reed's Regt.; enlisted Sept. 27, 1777; discharged Nov. 8, 1777; service, 
1 mo., 13 days; marched to reinforce Northern Army. 

Adams, Timothy, Chelmsford. Descriptive list of enlisted men; Capt. 
John Ford's Co., Col. Ebenezer Bridge's Regt.; age, 18 yrs. ; stature, 
5 ft., 6 in.; complexion, light; occupation, farmer; enlisted April 29, 
1775; also. Private, Capt. Ford's Co., Col. Bridge's (27th) Regt.; muster 
roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; enlisted April 29, 1775; service, 3 mos., 10 days; 
also, company return dated Sept. 25, 1775; also, Capt. John Ford's 
(Volunteer) Co., Col. Jonathan Reed's Regt.; enlisted Sept. 27, 1777; 
discharged Nov. 8, 1777; service, 1 mo., 13 days; marched to reinforce 
Northern Army; also, descriptive list of men enlisted from Middlesex 
Co. for the term of 9 months from the time of their arrival at Fishkill, 
June 19, 1778; Capt. Minot's Co., Col. Spaulding's Regt.; age, 20 yrs.; 
stature, 5 ft., 9 in.; also, list of 9 months men returned as received July 
20, 1778, by Col. Rufus Putnam._ 

Adams, William, Chelmsford. Descriptive list of men raised to reinforce 
Continental Army for the term of 6 months, agreeable to resolve of June 
5, 1780; age, 18 yrs.; stature, 5 ft., 7 in.; complexion, light; arrived at 
Springfield, July 2, 1780; marched to camp July 2, 1780, under command 
of Capt. Phineas Parker; also, pay roll for 6 months men raised by the 
town of Chelmsford for service in the Continental Army during 1780; 
marched June 30, 1780; discharged Dec. 6, 1780; service, 5 mos., 17 
days; company raised for service at North River, N. Y. 

Admos, William, Chelmsford. List of men raised for the 6 months' service 
and returned by Brig. Gen. Paterson as having passed muster, in a 
return dated Camp Totoway, Oct. 25, 1780. 

Alexander, James, Chelmsford. Descriptive list of enlisted men; Capt. John 
Ford's Co., Col. Ebenezer Bridge's (27th) Regt.; age, 26 yrs.; stature, 
5 ft., 10 in.; complexion, dark; occupation, farmer; residence, Chelms- 



RECORDS OF CHELMSFORD MEN IN THE REVOLUTION 303 

ford; enlisted April 28, 1775; enlisted in the train May 29, 1775; also, 
private, Capt. Ford's Co., Col. Bridge's Regt.; muster roll dated Aug. 1, 
1775; enlisted April 28, 1775; service, 1 ino., 3 days; also, Capt. John 
Popkin's Co., Col. Richard Gridley's (Artillery) Regt.; receipt for 
advance pay dated Winter Hill, July 14, 1775; also, Matross, muster 
roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; enlisted May 29, 1775; service, 2 mos., 8 days; 
also, company return dated Sept. 27, 1775. 

Andrews, Ezekiel. Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Robinson's Regt.; receipt 
for wages from Feb. 5 to April 1, 1776, dated Chelmsford. 

Annas, James. Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Robinson's Regt.; receipt for 
wages from Feb. 5 to April 1, 1775, dated Chelmsford. 

Ausgood, Benjamin, Chelmsford. Private, Col. Moses Parker's Co., com- 
manded by Lieut. Benjamin Walker, which marched on the alarm of 
April 19, i775; service, 9 days. 

Ausgood, Joseph, Chelmsford. Private, Col. Moses Parker's Co., com- 
manded by Lieut. Benjamin Walker, which marched on the alarm of 
April 19, 1775; service, 9 days. 

Austin, Jonathan W[illiams], Boston. Major, Col. Paul Dudley Sargent's 
(16th) Regt.; engaged April 20, 1775; roll made up to July 31, 1775; 
service, 3 mos., 18 days; also, list of field officers of the Continental 
Army stationed at Cambridge in 1776. 

[In the proceedings of the Mass. Hist. Soc'y, 1878, p. 350, is an 
extract from Gen. Greene's orderly book under date of May 10, 1776, 
from which it appears that Major Austin, with three Companies of Colonel 
Sargent's Regiment, was directed to take Castle Island to defend, and 
forward the work there. Another order, also, on the 12th.] 

Austin, Jonathan W. Volunteer, brig "Hazard," commanded by Capt. J. F. 
Williams; engaged Dec. 21, 1778; discharged April 21, 1779; service, 
4 mos. Roil dated Boston. 

Bacon, John. Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Robinson's Regt.; receipt for 
wages for service from Feb. 5 to April 1, 1776, dated Chelmsford. 

Baker, John. Private; list of men returned as serving on picket guard under 
Maj. Loammi Baldwin, May 11, 1775; also, Capt. Jonas Hubbard's 
Co.; list of men returned as serving on picket guard under Maj. Baldwin, 
May 23, 1775. 

Bancroft, Jonathan, Chelmsford. Sergeant, Capt. John Ford's (Volunteer) 
Co., Col. Jonathan Reed's Regt.; enlisted Sept. 27, 1777; discharged 
Nov. 8, 1777; service, 1 mo., 13 days; marched Sept. 30, 1777, to reinforce 
Northern Army. 

Barker, Enoch, Chelmsford. List of enlisted men dated Lincoln, July 21, 
1779; Capt. Ford's Co.; residence, Chelmsford; reported returned by 
Maj. Brown. 

Barker, Joseph, Chelmsford. Descriptive list of men enlisted from Middlesex 
Co., in 1779, to serve in the Continental Army; Capt. Ford's Co.; age, 
16 yrs. ; stature, 5 ft., 3 in.; complexion, light; residence, Chelmsford; 
delivered to Ensign T. Clark; also, list of men dated Lincoln, July 21, 
1779, returned by Maj. Brown. 

Barret, Isaac, Chelmsford. Descriptive list of enlisted men; Capt. John 
Ford's Co., Col. Ebenezer Bridge's (27th) Regt.; age, 22 yrs.; stature, 
6 ft.; complexion, light; occupation, farmer; residence, Chelmsford; 
enlisted April 25, 1775. 

Barret, Lemuel, Chelmsford. List of men raised for the 6 months' service 
and returned by Brig. Gen. Paterson as having passed muster, in a 
return dated Camp Totoway, Oct. 25, 1780. 

Barret, Simeon, Chelmsford. Sergeant, Capt. Zaccheus Wright's Co., Col. 
Brook's Regt.; return of men in service at White Plains, Oct. 31, 1776. 

Barrett, Benjamin, Chelmsford. Corporal, Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. 
Ebenezer Bridge's (27th) Regt.; enlisted April 25, 1775; roll made up 
to Aug. 1, 1775; service, 3 mos., 14 days. 

Barrett, Isaac, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Ebenezer 
Bridge's (27th) Regt.; enlisted April 25, 1775; roll made up to Aug. 1, 
1775; service, 3 mos., 14 days; also, descriptive list of men enlisted from 



304 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

Middlesex Co.; age, 29 yrs. ; stature, 5 ft., 9 in.; comolexion, dark; hair, 
dark; eyes, dark; occupation, farmer; residence, Chelmsford; enlisted 
May 23, 1781; enlistment, 3 yrs._ 

Barrett, Lemuel, Chelmsford. Descriptive list of men raised to reinforce 
Continental Army for the term of 6 months, agreeable to resolve of June 
5, 1780; a'^e, 17 yrs. ; stature, 5 ft., 3 in.; complexion, light; residence, 
Chelmsford; arrived at Springfield, July 2, 1780; marched to camp July 
2, 1780, under command of Capt. Phineas Parker; also, pay roll for 6 
months men raised by the town of Chelmsford for service in the Con- 
tinental Army during 1780; marched June 30, 1780; discharged Jan. 2, 
1781; service, 6 mos., 14 days; company raised to serve at North River. 

Barrit, Peniamin, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Oliver Barron's Co., Col. 
David Green's Regt., which marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; 
service, 6 days. 

Barritt, Simeon, Chelmsford. Private, Col. Moses Parker's Co., com- 
manded by Lieut. Benjamin Walker, which marched on the alarm of 
April 19. 1775; service, 9 days. 

Barron, Benjamin. Capt. John Ford's Co.; receipt for wages, etc., dated 
Ticonderoga, Aug. 28 and Oct. 2, 1776. 

Barron, Moses, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Oliver Barron's Co., Col. David 
Green's Regt., which marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 
15 days; also, list of men in Col. Baldwin's Regt., dated May 1, 1775. 

Barron, OHver, Chelmsford. Captain of a company in Col. David Green's 
Regt., which marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 16 days; 
also. Captain, serving as Ensign, Capt. John Ford's (Volunteer) Co., 
Col. Jonathan Reed's Regt.; enlisted Sept. 27, 1777; discharged Nov. 8, 
1777; service, 1 mo., 13 days, with Northern Army. 

Barron, Oliver, Chelmsford. Muster Master for Middlesex Co.; official 
record of a ballot by the House of Representatives, dated Feb. 19, 1781; 
appointment concurred in by the Council, Feb. 19, 1781. 

Barrot, Isaac, Chelmsford. List of men in Col. Baldwin's Regt., dated May 1, 
1775. 

Barrott, Benjamin, Chelmsford. Corporal, Capt. John Minot's Co., Col. 
Dike's Regt.; return of men in service from Dec. 13, 1776, to March 1, 
1777. 

Bates, John, Chelmsford. Private, Col. Moses Parker's Co., commanded by 
Lieut. Benjamin Walker, which marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; 
service, 7 days; also, descriptive list of enlisted men; Capt. John Ford's 
Co., Col. Ebenezer Bridge's (27th) Regt.; age, 28 yrs.; stature, 6 ft.; 
complexion, dark; occupation, farmer; residence, Chelmsford; enlisted 
April 26, 1775; also, Capt. Ford's Co., Col. Bridge's Regt.; order for 
advance pay dated Cambridge, Jime 6, 1775; also. Corporal; muster 
roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; enlisted April 26, 1775; service, 3 mos., 13 days; 
also, company return dated Sept. 25, 1775. 

Bats, John. Corporal, Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Ebenezer Bridge's (27th) 
Regt.; enlisted May 25, 1775 (service not given). 

Bauldin, Jacob, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. John Ford's (Volunteer) Co., 
Col. Jonathan Reed's Regt.; enlisted Sept. 27, 1777; discharged Nov. 8, 
1777; service, 1 mo., 13 days; marched to reinforce Northern Army. 

Berret, Benjamin, Chelmsford. Corporal; descriptive list of enlisted men; 
Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Bridge's Regt.; age, 42 yrs.; stature, 6 ft.; 
complexion, light; occupation, farmer; residence, Chelmsford; enlisted 
April 25, 1775; also, Capt. Ford's Co., Col. Bridge's (27th) Regt.; 
company return dated Sept. 25, 1775. 

Berret, Isaac, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Ford's Co., Col. Bridge's (27th) 
Regt.; company return dated Sept. 25, 1775. 

Berrett, Benjamin, Chelmsford. Corporal, Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. 
Ebenezer Bridge's Regt.; muster roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; enlisted April 
25, 1775; service, 3 mos., 14 days. 

Berrett, Isaac, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Ebenezer 
Bridge's Regt.; muster roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; enlisted April 25, 1775; 
service, 3 mos., 14 days. 



RECORDS OF CHELMSFORD MEN IN THE REVOLUTION 305 

Bettes, William, Chelmsford. List of men in Col. Baldwin's Regt., dated 
May 1, 1775. 

Betteys, John, Dracut. Private, Capt. Joseph Bradley Varnum's Co., Col. 
Mcintosh's Regt., Gen. Lovell's Brigade; enlisted July 29, 1778; dis- 
charged Sept. 11, 1778; service, 1 nio., 18 days, at Rhode Island. 

Bewkel, Thomas, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Ebenezer 
Bridge's (27th) Regt.; company return dated Sept. 25, 1775; reported 
deserted June 25, 1775. 

Bewkell, Thomas, Chelmsford. Descriptive list of enlisted men; Capt. 
John Ford's Co., Col. Bridge's Regt.; age, 25 yrs. ; stature, 5 ft., 10 in.; 
complexion, light; occupation, farmer; residence, Chelmsford; enlisted, 
April 27, 1775; reported deserted from Camp at Cambridge, June 25, 1775. 

Blasdell, Henry, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. John Minot's Co., Col. Dike's 
Regt.; return of men in service from Dec. 13, 1776, to March 1, 1777. 

Blasdell, William, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. John Minott's Co., Col. 
Dike's Regt.; return of men in service from Dec. 14, 1776, to March 1, 
1777. 

Blazdel, Henry, Chelmsford. Private, Lieut. Colonel's Co., Col. Bailey's 
Regt.; Continental Army pay accounts for service from Jan. 1, 1780, 
to March 20, 1780. 

Blazdel, William, Chelmsford. Private, Lieut. Colonel's Co., Col. Bailey's 
Regt.; Continental Army pay accounts for service from Jan. 1, 1780, 
to March 20, 1780. 

Blazdell, Aaron, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Samuel Tay's Co., Lieut. Col. 
Webb's Regt.; enlisted Aug. 18, 1781; discharged Nov. 29, 1781; service, 
3 mos., 22 days; enlistment, 3 months; regiment raised in Suffolk and 
Middlesex Counties to reinforce Continental Army. 

Blazdiel, William. Receipt for wages due Oct. 2, 1776, dated Ticonderoga, 
given to Capt. John Ford; marched from Chelmsford, July 25, 1776; 
discharged at Albany, Jan. 1, 1777. 

Blazdiel, William, Jr. Receipt for mileage and wages dated Ticonderoga, 
Aug. 28, 1776, given to Capt. John Ford. 

Blazedell, Henry, Chelmsford. Private, 1st Co., Col. Bailey's Regt.; Con- 
tinental Army pay accounts for service from March 20, 1777, to Dec. 31, 
1779; also, Capt. Hugh Maxwell's Co., Col. Bailey's Regt.; return dated 
Camp near Valley Forge, Jan. 24, 1778. 

Blazedell, William, Chelmsford. Private, 1st Co., Col. John Bailey's Regt., 
Continental Army pay accounts for service from March 20, 1777, to 
Dec. 11, 1779; also, Capt. Hugh Maxwell's Co.; return dated Camp near 
Valley Forge, Jan. 24, 1778. 

Blood, Josiah, Chelmsford. Private, Col. Moses Parker's Co., commanded 
by Lieut. Benjamin Walker, which marched on the alarm of April 19, 
l775; service, 9 days; also. Corporal, Capt. Benjamin Walker's Co., 
Col. Ebenezer Bridge's Regt. ; receipt for advance pay dated Cambridge, 
June 24, 1775; also, muster roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; enlisted May 28, 1775; 
service, 3 mos., 11 days; also, Company return (probably Oct., 1775); 
also, order for bounty coat or its equivalent in money dated Cambridge, 
Nov. 30, 1775; also, list of men who received money from the public 
treasury for losses at the battles of Lexington and Bunker Hill, allowed 
in Council, June 13, 1776; also, 1st Co., Col. John Bailey's Regt.; Con- 
tinental Army pay accounts for service from Jan. 1, 1777, to Feb. 1, 1779; 
reported as serving 7 mos. as Corporal, 18 mos. as Sergeant; discharged 
Feb. 1, 1779; enlistment, 3 years; also, Capt. Hugh Maxwell's (1st) Co., 
Col. Bailey's Regt.; return of men in Camp near Valley Forge, Jan. 24, 
1778; reported promoted to Sergeant, Aug. 1, 1777; also, receipt for 
bounty paid him by William Bridge for the town of Chelmsford to serve 
in the Continental Army for the term of 3 years, dated Boston, July 5, 
1782; also, Private, Capt. Benjamin Pike's Co., Lieut. Col. Calvin 
Smith's Regt.; return for wages, etc., for June — Dec, 1782; time allowed 
from July 5, 1782. 

Bolifield, Samuel, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Zaccheus Wright's Co., 
Col. Brook's Regt.; return dated White Plains, Oct. 31, 1776. 



306 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

Bowers, [Luke.] Private, Capt. Amos Foster's Co., Col. Cyprian How's 
(7th Middlesex Co.) Regt.; enlisted July 28, 1780; discharged Oct. 30, 
1780; service 3 mos., 8 days, at Rhode Island; enlistment, 3 months. 

Bowers, Oliver, Dracut. Corporal, Capt. Joseph B. Varnum's Co., Col. 
Mcintosh's Regt., Gen. Lovell's Brigade; engaged July 29, 1778; dis- 
charged Sept. 11, 1778; service, 1 mo., 18 days, on an expedition to Rhode 
Island. 

Bowers, William, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Oliver Barron's Co., Col. 
David Green's Regt., which marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; 
service, 13 days; also. Corporal, Capt. Zaccheus Wright's Co., Col. 
Brook's Regt.; return dated Camp at White Plains, Oct. 31, 1776. 

Bowman, Ebenezer. Capt. John Ford's Co.; receipt for wages and mileage 
dated Ticonderoga, Aug. 28, 1776; also, receipt for wages due to Oct. 2, 
1776, dated Ticonderoga; marched from Chelmsford, July 25, 1776; 
discharged at Albany, Jan. 1, 1777. 

Brenon, Samuel. Receipt for wages due Oct. 2, 1776, given to Capt. John 
Ford, dated Ticonderoga; marched from Chelmsford, July 25, 1776; 
discharged at Albany, Jan. 1, 1777. 

Bridge, Ebenezer, Billerica. Colonel, Middlesex Co. Regt. of Minute-Men; 
marched April 19, 1775; service, 4 days; roll dated Cambridge; also, 
list of officers dated Cambridge, May 16, 1775; reported field officer for 
the day, May 17, 1775; also, list of officers dated May 21, 1775; reported 
officer of main guard, May 22, 1775; also, list of officers dated Cambridge, 
May 30, 1775; reported field officer for May 30 and May 31, 1775; also 
order for cartridge boxes dated Cambridge, June 24, 1775; also list of 
officers commanding regiments, dated Headquarters, Cambridge, July 22, 
1775; brigade under command of its senior officer forming part of reserve 
corps under Maj. Gen. Putnam for defense of posts north of Roxbury; 
also, pay roll for service from date of engagement, April 24, 1775 to 
Aug. 1, 1775, 3 mos., 15 days; also, certificate dated Cambridge, Nov. 30, 
1775, signed by said Bridge as Colonel of the 27th Regt., certifying to the 
loss of articles at the battle of Bunker Hill, June 17, 1775; also, list of 
officers who delivered firelocks, Feb. 17, 1776. 

Bridge, John, Chelmsford. Capt. acting as Quartermaster, Col. Ebenezer 
Bridge's (Middlesex Co.) Regt.; engaged April 24, 1776; service to Aug. 
1, 1775, 3 mos., 15 days. 

Bridge, John. Capt. Benjamin Walker's Co., Col. Ebenezer Bridge's (27th) 
Regt. ; order for bounty coat or its equivalent in money dated Cambridge, 
Dec. 25, 1775. 

Bridge, William. Adjutant, Col. Doolittle's Regt. of Minute-Men; service 
from April 19, 1775 to April 26, 1775, 7 days; also. Adjutant, 7th Middle- 
sex Co. Regt.; official record of a ballot by the House of Representatives, 
dated June 20, 1778; appointment concurred in by Council, June 20, 1778. 

Briton, Samuel, Chelmsford. Descriptive list of enlisted men; Capt. John 
Ford's Co., Col. Ebenezer Bridge's (27th) Regt.; age, 18 yrs. ; stature, 5 ft., 
6 in.; complexion, dark; occupation, farmer; residence, Chelmsford; 
enlisted April 25, 1775; also, order for advance pay dated Cambridge, 
June 6, 1775; also, Private; company return dated Sept. 25, 1775. 

Britton, Samuel, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Oliver Barron's Co., Col. 
David Green's Regt., which marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; 
service, 6 days; also, Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Ebenezer Bridge's 
(27th) Regt.; muster roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; enlisted April 25, 1775; 
service, 3 mos., 14 days. 

Brown, Alexander. Receipt for wages and mileage signed by said Brown 
and others of Capt. John Ford's Co., dated Ticonderoga, Aug. 28, 1776; 
also Capt. Ford's Co.; receipt for wages due Oct. 2, 1776, dated Ticon- 
deroga; endorsed marched from Chelmsford, July 25, 1776; discharged at 
Albany, Jan. 1, 1777. 

Brown, Samuel. Receipts for wages and mileage given to Capt. John Ford 
dated Ticonderoga, Aug. 28 and Oct. 2, 1776. 



RECORDS OF CHELMSFORD MEN IN THE REVOLUTION 307 

Brown William, Dracut (also given Chelmsford). Descriptive list of enlisted 
men; Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Ebenezer Bridge's (27th) Regt.; age 
23 yrs.; stature. 6 ft.; complexion, light; occupation, farmer; residence, 
Dracut; rank, Private; enlisted April 25, 1775; service, 1 mo., 6 days; 
reported enlisted in the train May 29, 1775; also, Capt. John Popidn's 
Co., Col. Richard Gridley's (Artillery) Regt.; receipt for advance pay 
dated Winter Hill, July 14, 1775; also, Matross; muster roll dated Aug, 1, 
1775; enlisted May 29, 1775; service, 2 mos., 8 days; also, order for 
bountv coat or its equivalent in money dated Artillery Barracks, Winter 
Hill, Jan. 13, 1776. 

Burge, David, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Oliver Barron's Co., Col. David 
Green's Regt., which marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 
11 days. 

Burroughs, Nathaniel. Receipt for mileage, etc., given to Capt. John Ford 
dated Ticonderoga, Aug. 28, 1776; also receipt for wages to Oct. 1, 1776, 
given to Capt. John Ford dated Ticonderoga; endorsed "marched from 
Chelmsford, July 25, 1776; discharged at Albany, Jan. 1, 1777." 

Burt (?), Moses (?). Receipt dated Ticonderoga, given to Capt. John Ford^ 
for wages to Oct. 1, 1776; roll endorsed "marched from Chclmsfordi 
July 25, 1776; discharged at Albany, Jan. 1, 1777." 

Butterfield, Benjamin, Chelmsford. Private, Col. Moses Parker's Co.» 
commanded by Lieut. Benjamin Walker, which marched on the alarm 
of April 19, 1775; service, 7 days; also, descriptive list of enlisted men; 
Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Ebenezer Bridge's (27th) Regt.; age, 18 
yrs.; stature, 5 ft., 6 in.; complexion, light; occupation, farmer; resi- 
dence, Chelmsford; enlisted April 26, 1775; also, same Co. and Regt.; 
order for advance pay dated Cambridge, Tune 6, 1775; also, muster roll 
dated Aug. 1, 1775: enlisted April 26, 1775; service, 3 mos., 13 days; 
also, company return dated Sept. 25, 1775; also, Capt. John Ford's Co. 
of volunteers. Col. Jonathan Reed's Regt.; enlisted Sept. 27, 1777; 
discharged Nov. 8, 1777; service, 1 mo., 13 days; marched to reinforce 
Northern Armv. 

Butterfield, Benjamin. Private, Capt. Amos Foster's Co., Col. Cyprian 
How's Regt.; enlisted July 28, 1780; discharged Oct. 30, 1780; service, 
3 mos., 8 days, at Rhode Island; enlistment, 3 mos.; company detached 
from 7th Middlesex Co. Militia to reinforce Continental Army. 

Butterfield, Jesse, Chelmsford. Receipt for mileage, etc., dated Ticonderoga, 
Aug. 28, 1776, given to Capt. John Ford ; also, receipt for wages to Oct. 1, 
1776, dated Ticonderoga, Oct. 2, 1776, given to Capt. John Ford; receipt 
endorsed "marched from Chelmsford, July 25, 1776; discharged at Albany, 
Jan. 1, 1777"; also. Private, Capt. John Ford's Co. of Volunteers, Col. 
Jonathan Reed's Regt.; enlisted Sept. 27, 1777; service, 1 mo., 13 days; 
company marched Sept. 30, 1777, to reinforce Northern Army. 

Butterfield, Joseph, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. John Ford's Co. of Volun- 
teers, Col. Jonathan Reed's Regt.; enlisted Sept. 27, 1777; discharged 
Nov. 8, 1777; service, 1 mo., 13 days; company marched Sept. 30, 1777, 
to reinforce Northern Army. 

Butterfield, PhiUp. Receipt dated Ticonderoga, Aug. 28, 1776, for mileage, 
etc., given to Capt. John Ford; also, receipt for wages due Oct. 1, 1776, 
given to Capt. John Ford dated Ticonderoga; receipt endorsed "marched 
from Chelmsford, July 25, 1776; discharged at Albany, Jan. 1, 1777.'[ 

Byam, Benjamin. Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Roberson's Regt.; receipt 
dated Chelmsford, April 19, 1776, for wages for service from Feb. 5, 1776, 
to April 1, 1776; also. Private, Capt. Reuben Butterfield's Co.; enlisted 
Dec. 16, 1776; discharged March 16, 1777; service, 3 mos., 15 days. ^ 

Byam, John, Chelmsford. Drummer, Capt. John Minot's Co., Col. Dike's 
Regt.; service from Dec. 13, 1776, to March 1, 1777; also, Capt. John 
Moore's Co., Col. Jonathan Reed's (1st) Regt. of guards; joined April 2 
(also given April 1), 1778; service to July 3, 1778, 3 mos., 2 days, guarding 
troops of convention at Cambridge; enlistment, 3 months from April 2, 
1778. 



308 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

Byam, Willard, Chelmsford. Account of subsistence money due said Byam 
from Aug. 24, 1776, to Sept. 28, 1776, dated Roxbury, Oct. 15, 1776; 
also. Private, Capt. John Minot's Co., Col. Dike's Regt.; pay abstract 
for wages and travel allowance to and from Dorchester Heights; warrant 
for pay allowed in Council, Nov. 30, 1776. 

Byham, John. Private, Capt. Amos Foster's Co., Col. Cyprian How's Regt.; 
enlisted July 28, 1780; discharged Oct. 30, 1780; service, 3 mos., 8 days 
at Rhode Island; enlistment, 3 mos.; company detached from 7th 
Middlesex Co. Regt. 

Cambel, William, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Oliver Barron's Co., Col. 
David Green's Regt., which marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; 
service, 6 days. 

Cambell, William, Chelmsford. Descriptive list of enlisted men; Capt. 
John Ford's Co., Col. Bridge's Regt.; age, 37 yrs.; stature, 6 ft.; com- 
plexion, dark; occupation, farmer; residence, Chelmsford; enlisted April 
25 (also given May 25), 1775; also, Corporal, Capt. John Ford's Co., 
Col. Ebenezer Bridge's (27th) Regt.; company return dated Sept. 25, 
1775. 

Campbell, William, Chelmsford. Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Ebenezer 
Bridge's (27th) Regt.; order for advance pay dated Cambridge, June 6, 
1775; also. Corporal, same Co. and Regt.; muster roll dated Aug. 1, 
1775; enlisted April 25, 1775; service, 3 mos., 14 days; also, order dated 
Chelmsford, Aug. 8, 1776, for money due for losses incurred at battles 
of Lexington and Bunker Hill. 

Carit (?) [Barit (?)], Joseph. Receipt dated Chelmsford for wages for service 
in Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Roberson's Regt., from Feb. 5, 1776 to 
April 1, 1776. 

Carkin, Joseph. Receipt given to Capt. John Ford for mileage, etc., dated 
Ticonderoga, Aug. 28, 1776; also, receipt given to Capt. John Ford for 
wages due Oct. 1, 1776, dated Ticonderoga; receipt endorsed "marched 
from Chelmsford, July 25, 1776, discharged at Albany, Jan. 1, 1777." 

Chamberlain, Abel, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Moses Barn's Co., Lieut. 
Col. Samuel Peirce's Regt.; enlisted May 17, 1779; service to July 1, 
1779, 1 mo., 14 days, at Rhode Island; enlistment, 2 months from May 1, 
1779. 

Chamberlain, Benjamin, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. John Minot's Co., 
Col. Dike's Regt.; service from Dec. 13, 1776, to March 1, 1777; also, 
list of men mustered in Suffolk Co. by Nathaniel Barber, Muster Master, 
dated Boston, Jan. 8, 1777; Capt. Thomas's Co., Col. Thomas Marshall's 
Regt.; also Capt. Philip Thomas's Co., Col. Thomas Marshall's (10th) 
Regt.; rations allowed from date of enlistment, Jan 1, 1777, to Feb. 6, 
1777; credited with 37 days' allowance, also subsistence allowed for 11 
days' travel on march from Boston to Bennington. 

Chamberlain, Benjamin, Chelmsford. Fifer, Capt. Smart's Co., Col. Calvin 
Smith's (late Vv'igglesworth's) Regt.; Continental Army pay accounts 
for 1777-1779 (service not given) ; credited to town of Falmouth ; reported 
transferred to Capt. Pillsbury's Co.; also, Capt. Nicholas Blasdel's 
Co., Col. Edward Wigglesworth's Regt.; muster return dated Camp 
Valley Forge, Feb. 5, 1778; residence, Chelmsford; enlisted for town 
of Chelmsford; mustered by Col. Barrett, County Muster Master; 
Fifer, Capt. Blasdel's Co., Col. Wigglesworth's Regt.; muster roll for 
May, 1778, dated Camp Valley Forge; also, same Co. and Regt.; muster 
roll for June, 1778, dated "Camp Greenage"; also. Drummer, same Co. 
and Regt.; muster roll for Oct., 1778, sworn to in camp at Providence; 
also, same Co. and Regt.; muster roll for March and April, 1779; sworn to 
at Providence; enlisted March 1, 1777; enlistment, 3 years; reported 
transferred to Light Infantry Co.; also, Fifer, Capt. Daniel Pillsbury's 
(Light Infantry) Co., Col. Wigglesworth's Regt.; muster roll for March and 
April, 1779; reported furloughed for 10 days from April 20, 1779. 

Chamberlain, Benjamin, Jr., Chelmsford. List of men enlisted for Continental 
Army from Middlesex Co. (year not given); residence, Chelmsford; 
enlisted for town of Chelmsford. 



RECORDS OF CHELMSFORD MEN IN THE REVOLUTION 309 

Chamberlain, Beniamin, 3d. Chelmsford. List of men enlisted into Con- 
tinental Army from Middlesex Co. (year not given); residence, Chelms- 
ford; enlisted for town of Chelmsford. ^ 

Chamberlain, Samuel, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. John Minot s Co., Col. 
Dike's Regt.; service from Dec. 1, 1776, to March 1, 1777. 

Chamberlin, Aaron, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. John Ford s Co. of Volun- 
teers, Col. Jonathan Reed's Regt.; enlisted Sept. 27 1777; discharged 
Nov. 8, 1777; service, 1 mo., 13 days; company marched Sept. 30, 1777 
to reinforce Northern Army. . ,. , ,• , r a/t-jji 

Chamberlin Abel, Chelmsford. Descriptive list of men enlisted from Middle 
sex Co agreeable to resohe of Dec. 2, 1780; age, 18 yrs.; stature, 5 ft., 
2 in.; complexion, light; hair, light; eyes, light; occupation farmer 
(also given cordwainer); residence, Chelmsford; enlisted April 11, 1781- 

enlistment, 3 years. , r- t • ^ <" i 

Chamberlin, Benjamin, Chelmsford. Capt. Pillsbury s Co., Lieut. Col 
Calvin Smith's (13th) Regt.; list of deserters; age, 16 yrs.; stature 
5 ft 6 in.; complexion, light; hair, dark; occupation, yoeman; birth 
place, Chelmsford; residence, Chelmsford; deserted April —,1779. 
Chamberlin, Benjamin, Chelmsford. Sergeant, Col. Thomas Marshall s 
Regt.; Continental Army pay accounts for service from March 1, 1777, 
to Dec 31,1779; residence, Chelmsford; credited to town of Chelmsford; 
also 2d Sergeant, Capt. Philip Thomas's (5th) Co., Col. Thomas 
Marshall's (10th) Regt.; appointed by Colonel Sept. 20 1777; also, 
same Co. and Regt.; muster roll for Jan., 1779, dated West Point; 
enlisted Jan. 1, 1777; enlistment, 3 yrs.; also. Colonel's Co., Col. 
Marshall's Regt.; muster roll for April, 1779, dated West Point; reported 
sick at Hartford; also, (late) Capt. Thomas's Co., Col. Marshall's Regt.; 
account of clothing delivered for the year 1778; reported deserted Aug. 
1 1779- also, Capt. Thomas's Co., Col. Marshall's Regt.; account of 
clothing delivered for the year 1777, certified to at "Steenrapie," Sept. 

Chamberlin, Isaac, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. John Nuttings Co. of 
Minute-Men, Col. William Prescott's Regt., which marched on the 
alarm of April 19, 1775, from Pepperell; service, 6 days; also, Capt. 
Nutting's Co., Col. Prescott's (10th) Regt.; muster roll dated Aug. 1, 
1775- enlisted April 25, 1775; service, 3 mos., 8days; also, companyreturn 
dated Cambridge, Oct. 2, 1775, also, ordjn- for bounty coat or its equivalent 
in money dated Cambridge, Jan. 1, 1776. ^ 

Chamberlin, Samuel, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. John Minot s Co., Col. 
Dike's Regt.; pay abstract for wages and travel allowance on march 
to and from Dorchester Heights; warrant allowed in Council, Nov. 30, 

Chamberiing, Aaron, Chelmsford. Private, Col. Moses Parker's Co., com- 
manded by Lieut. Benjamin Walker, which marched on the alarm ot 
April 19, 1775; service, 10 davs; reported enlisted April 19, 1775. 

Chambers, David, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Oliver Barron s Co., Col. 
David Green's Regt., which marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; 
service 8 days; also, descriptive list of enlisted men; Capt. John bord s 
Co., Col. Ebenezer Bridge's Regt.; age, 26 yrs.; stature, 6 ft.; com- 
plexion light; occupation, farmer; residence, Chelmsford; enlisted April 
27 1775; also, Private, Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Bridges (2/th) 
Regt • order for advance pay dated Cambridge, June 6, 1775; also, same 
Co and Regt.; muster roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; enlisted April 2/, 1775; 
service, 3 mos., 12 days; also, company return dated Sept. 25, 17/5; 
also list of men who delivered firelocks; date of delivery, Jan. 1, 177b; 
also' descriptive list of men detached to service in the Continental Army 
for 9 months, agreeable to resolve of June 9, 1779, returned as received 
of Justin Ely, Commissioner at Springfield, July 19, 1779, by Capt. 
James Cooper; Capt. Ford's Co., Maj. Brown's Regt.; age 28 yrs.; 
stature 5 ft., 10^ in.; complexion, light; residence, Chelmsford; also, 
list dated Lincoln, July 21, 1779, of enlisted men as returned by Maj. 
Brown. 



310 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

Chambers, James, Chelmsford. Descriptive list of enlisted men; Capt. 
John Ford's Co., Col. Ebenezer Bridge's (27th) Regt.; age, 16 yrs.; 
stature, 5 ft., 6 in.; complexion, light; occupation, farmer; residence, 
Chelmsford; enlisted May 2, 1775; also, Private, same Co. and Regt.; 
muster roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; enlisted May 2, 1775; service, 3 mos., 
7 days; also, company return dated Sept. 25, 1775. 

Chambers, James, Tewksbury (also given Chelmsford). List of men mustered 
in Suffolk Co. by Nathaniel Barber, Muster Master, dated Boston, 
April 13, 1777; Capt. Lane's Co., Col. Nixon's Regt.; residence, Chelms- 
ford; enlisted for town of Chelmsford; enlistment, 3 years or during war; 
also. Major's (8th) Co., Col. Thomas Nixon's (6th) Regt.; Continental 
Army pay accounts for service from April 6, 1777, to Nov. 30, 1779; 
residence, Tewksbury; credited to town of Tewksbury; reported dis- 
charged; also, Capt. Jabez Lane's Co., Col. Nixon's (5th) Regt.; return 
of men in camp on or before Aug. 15, 1777, dated Camp near Peekskill, 
Feb. 16, 1779; also, Maj. Joseph Thompson's Co., 6th Regt.; pay roll 
for June — Oct., 1779; reported sick at Continental Village, Sept. and 
Oct., 1779; also. Major's Co.; account of clothing delivered for ITS'), 
dated Peekskill, Dec. 5, 1779; also, Maj. Peter Harwood's Co., Col. 
Nixon's Regt.; pay rolls for Nov. and Dec, 1779; reported transferred 
to Col. Sheldon's Regt., Nov. 30, 1779; also, Capt. Nathaniel Craft's 
Co., Col. Sheldon's Regt. of light dragoons; Continental Army pay 
accounts for service from Dec. 1, 1779, to Dec. 31, 1779. 

Chambers, John, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Oliver Barron's Co., Col. 
David Green's Regt., which marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; 
service, 7 days; also, descriptive list of enlisted men; Capt. John Ford's 
Co., Col. Ebenezer Bridge's (27th) Regt.; age, 27 yrs.; stature, 6 ft.; 
complexion, light; occupation, farmer; residence, Chelmsford; enlisted, 
April 26, 1775; also, same Co. and Regt.; order for advance pay dated 
Cambridge, June 6, 1775; also, muster roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; enlisted 
April 25, 1775; service, 3 mos., 13 days; also, company return dated 
Sept. 25, 1775. 

Chambers, Joseph, Chelmsford. Descriptive list of enlisted men; Capt. 
John Ford's Co., Col. Ebenezer Bridge's (27th) Regt.; age, 21 yrs.; 
stature, 6 ft.; complexion, light; occupation, farmer; residence, Chelms- 
ford; enlisted April 26, 1775; also. Private, same Co. and Regt.; muster 
roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; enlisted April 26, 1775; service, 3 mos., 13 days; 
also, company return dated Sept. 25, 1775; also, Capt. Stephen Russell's 
Co., Col. Samuel BuUard's Regt.; enlisted, Aug. 15, 1777; discharged 
Nov. 30, 1777; service, 3 mos., 28 days, with Gen. Warner's Brigade in 
Northern department; roll dated Dracut; also, descriptive list of men 
enlisted from Middlesex Co. for the term of 9 months from the time of 
their arrival at Fishkill, June 19, 1778; Capt. Minot's (also given Capt. 
Ford's) Co., Col. Spaulding's Regt.; age, 23 yrs.; stature, 5 ft., 10 in.; 
residence, Chelmsford; also, list of men returned as received of Jonathan 
Warner, Commissioner, by Col. R. Putnam, July 20, 1778. 

Chambers, William, Chelmsford (also given Newbury). Private, Capt. 
Oliver Barron's Co., Col. David Green's Regt., which marched on the 
alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 3 days; also, descriptive list of enlisted 
men; Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Ebenezer Bridge's (27th) Regt.; age, 
25 yrs.; stature, 6 ft.; complexion, light; occupation, farmer; residence, 
Chelmsford; rank. Corporal; enlisted, April 25, 1775; also, same Co. and 
Regt.; order for advance pay dated Cambridge, June 6, 1775; also, same 
Co. and Regt.; account of articles lost in battle at Bunker Hill, June 17, 
1775; also, muster roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; enlisted April 25, 1775; service, 
3 mos., 14 days; also, company return dated Sept. 25, 1775; also, receipt 
dated Ticonderoga, Aug. 28, 1776, given to Capt. John Ford; also, receipt 
dated Ticonderoga, for wages to Oct. 1, 1776, given to Capt. John Ford; 
endorsed "marched from Chelmsford, July 25, 1776, discharged Jan. 1, 
1777"; also Capt. John Ford's Co. of volunteers. Col. Jonathan Reed's 
Regt.; enlisted Sept. 27, 1777; discharged Nov. 8, 1777; service, 1 mo., 
13 days; company marched Sept. 30, 1777, to reinforce Northern Army; 



RECORDS OF CHELMSFORD MEN IN THE REVOLUTION 311 

also, descriptive list of men enlisted from Essex Co. for the term of 
9 months from the time of their arrival at Fishkill, June 20 (also given 
June 19), 1778; age, 28 yrs. ; stature, 5 ft., 10 in.; complexion, light; hair, 
light ; e}es, light ; residence, Chelmsford ; enlisted for town of Newbury 
(also given Nevvburj'port); also, list of men returned as received of 
Jonathan Warner, Commissioner, by Col. R. Putnam, July 20, 1778. 

Chandler, Moses. Receipt dated Ticonderoga, Aug. 28, 1776, for mileage, 
etc., given to Capt. John Ford; also, receipt dated Ticonderoga, Oct. 2, 
1776, for wages due Oct. 1, 1776, given to Capt. John Ford; roll endorsed 
"marched from Chelmsford, July 25, 1776, discharged at Albanv, Jan. 1, 
1777." 

Chaney, John. Lieutenant; receipt dated Ticonderoga, Aug. 28, 1776, for 
mileage, etc., given to Capt. John Ford; also, receipt dated Ticonderoga, 
Oct. 2, 1776, for wages due Oct. 1, 1776, given to Capt. John Ford; 
endorsed "marched from Chelmsford, July 25, 1776, discharged at 
Albany, Jan. 1, 1777"; also, 2d Lieut. Capt., Asahel Wheeler's Co., 
Col. Jonathan Reed's Regt.; list of officers (year not given); also, Lieut., 
Col. Jonathan Reed's Regt.; rations allowed from July 11, 1776 to Nov. 
30, 1776; credited with 143 days allowance; also, 1st Lieut., Capt. 
Nathaniel Lakin's Co., Col. John Robinson's Regt.; muster return 
dated North Kingston, Dec. 18, 1777; commissioned June 27, 1777; 
company engaged for 6 months from July 1, 1777. 

Chizen, William. Private, Capt. Hawe's corps of Artillery artificers. Col- 
Jeduthan Baldwin's Regt. ; Continental Army pay accounts for service 
from Jan. 1, 1780, to Dec. 31, 1780, stationed at Springfield. 

Chizm, William, Chelmsford. Private, Maj. Eayer's Co., Col. Flower's 
Regt. of Artillery artificers, Continental Army pay accounts for service 
from Sept. 30, 1778 to Dec. 31, 1779. 

Clark, Thomas. Capt. John Ford's Co.; receipt for mileage dated Ticon- 
deroga, Aug. 28, 1776; also, same Co.; receipt for wages due to Oct. 1, 
1776, dated Ticonderoga, Oct. 2, 1776; endorsed "marched from Chelms- 
ford, July 25, 1776, discharged at Albany, Jan. 1, 1777." 

Cleaveland, Enoch, Chelmsford (also given Westford). Private, Col. Moses 
Parker's Co., commanded by Lieut. Benjamin Walker, which marched 
on the alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 8 days; also, descriptive list of 
enlisted men endorsed "Jan. 11, 1781"; age, 25 yrs.; stature, 5 ft., 4 in.; 
complexion, light (also given dark); hair, dark; occupation, farmer; 
birthplace, Westford; residence, Chelmsford (also given Westford); 
enlisted March 16 (also given April — ), 1779, by Capt. Coburn; joined 
Light Infantry Co., Lieut. Col. John Brooks's (7th) Regt.; enlistment, 
during war; also. Private, Capt. William White's (Light Infantry) Co., 
Lieut. Col. John Brooks's (7th) Regt.; muster roll for Jan., 1781, dated 
West Point; also. Light Infantry Co., Lieut. Col. Brooks's Regt.; list of 
men court-martialed; tried March 30, 1781, by regimental court-martial, 
Capt. Felt, President, on charge of stealing a blanket; sentence, 100, 
lashes, 10 remitted; also, Capt. Asa Coburn's (Light Infantry) Co. 
Lieut. Col. John Brooks's (7th) Regt.; muster rolls for Feb. — Dec, 1781, 
dated York Hutts; also Light Infantry Co., Lieut. Col. Brooks's Regt.; 
list of men discharged subsequent to Jan. 1, 1781; discharged June 10, 
1783, by Gen. Washington, term of enlistment having expired. 

Cleavland, Enoch, Chelmsford (also given Randolph). Descriptive list of 
enlisted men; Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Ebenezer Bridge's (27th) 
Regt.; age, 19 yrs.; stature, 5 ft., 8 in.; complexion, light; occupation, 
farmer; residence, Chelmsford; enlisted April 27, 1775; also. Private, 
same Co. and Regt.; muster roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; service, 3 mos., 12 
days; also, company return dated Sept. 25, 1775; also, muster return 
dated Albany, Jan. 12, 1778; residence, Chelmsford; enlisted for town 
of Chelmsford; joined Capt. William Hudson Ballard's Co., Col. Ichabod 
Alden's Regt.; mustered by Col. Barrett, County Muster Master; reported 
on furlough; also, Private, Capt. Asa Coburn's Co., Lieut. Col. John 
Brooks's (7th) Regt.; Continental Army pay accounts for service from 



312 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

Jan. 1, 1780, to Dec. 31, 1780; also, Capt. Asa Coburn's (Light Infantry) 
Co., Lieut. Col. Brooks's Regt.; muster rolls for Jan. and Feb., 1782, 
dated York Hutts. 

Cleveland, Enoch, Chelmsford (also given Randolph). Private, Capt. 
William Hudson Ballard's Co., Col. Asa Whitcomb's Regt.; muster 
roll dated Camp at Ticonderoga, Nov. 27, 1776: enlisted Jan. 1, 1776; 
reported re-engaged Nov. 13, 1776; also, Capt. William Hudson Ballard's 
Co., Col. John Brooks's (7th) Regt.; Continental Army pay accounts 
for service from Jan. 1, 1777, to Dec. 31, 1779; reported transferred to 
Capt. Coburn's Co.; also, Capt. Asa Coburn's (Light Infantry) Co., 
(late) Col. Ichabod Alden's (6th) Regt.; muster roll for March and 
April, 1779, dated Fort Harkimer; enlisted Nov. 13, 1776; enlistment, 
during war. 

Clough, fSaniel. Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Robinson's Regt.; receipt 
dated Chelmsford, April 19, 1776, for wages for service from Feb. 5, 
1776, to April 1, 1776. 

Coburn [Colburn], Asa. Receipt for mileage dated Ticonderoga, Aug. 28, 
1776, signed by said Coburn and others of Capt. John Ford's Co.; also 
receipt dated Ticonderoga, Oct. 2, 1776, for wages due to Oct. 1, 1776, 
signed by said Coburn and others of Capt. John Ford's Co.; roll endorsed 
"marched from Chelmsford, July 25, 1776; discharged at Albany, Jan. 1, 
1777." 

Colborn, Caleb. Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Robinson's Regt.; receipt 
dated Chelmsford, April 19, 1776, for wages for service from Feb. 5, 1776, 
to April 1, 1776. 

Colburn, Caleb. Corporal, Capt. John Ford's Co. of volunteers. Col. 
Jonathan Reed's Regt.; enlisted Sept. 27, 1777; discharged Nov. 8, 
1777; service, 43 days; company marched Sept. 30, 1777, to reinforce 
Northern army; roll dated Chelmsford. 

Core, Oliver, Chelmsford. Descriptive list of men raised to reinforce Con- 
tinental Army for the term of 6 months, agreeable to resolve of June 5, 

1780, returned as received of Justin Ely, Commissioner, by Brig. Gen. 
John Glover, at Springfield, July 7, 1780; age, 23 yrs.; stature, 5 ft., 
11 in.; complexion, dark; residence, Chelmsford; marched to camp 
July 7, 1780, under command of Capt. Dix. 

Corey, Ezra, Chelmsford. Capt. John Ford's Co.; receipt for wages due 
Oct. 1, 1776, dated Ticonderoga, and endorsed "marched from Chelms- 
ford, July 25, 1776, discharged at Albany, Jan. 1, 1777." 

Corey, Oliver, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Ebenezer 
Bridge's Regt.; muster roll dated Aug. 1, 1776; enlisted April 28, 1775; 
service, 3 mos., 11 days; also, Private, Capt. White's Co., Col. Brook's 
Regt.; Continental Army pay accounts for service from Jan. 1, 1780, 
to March 17, 1780; also, list of men raised for the 6 months' service and 
returned by Brig. Gen. Paterson as having passed muster in a return 
dated Camp Totoway, Oct. 25, 1780. 

Corey, Stephen. Return of recruits sent by Massachusetts as a portion of 
her quota of the Continental Army subsequent to Jan. 1, 1781, who 
were reported unfit for duty; 3d Mass. Regt.; age, 16 yrs.; stature, 5 ft.; 
reported under size; engaged for the town of Chelmsford; engagement, 
3 yrs.; also, list of men mustered in Middlesex Co.; mustered April 11, 

1781, for the town of Chelmsford. 

Corry, Ezra, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. William Hudson Ballard's Co., 
Col. John Brooks's Regt.; Continental Army pay accounts for service 
from March 23, 1777, to May 9, 1777; enlistment, 3 yrs.; also, Capt. 
Ballard's Co., (late) Col. Ichabod Alden's (6th) Regt.; return of men 
in camp on or before Aug. 15, 1777; reported died May 9, 1777. 

Cory, Ezra. Receipt for mileage dated Ticonderoga, Aug. 28, 1776, given 
to Capt. John Ford; also, Capt. William Hudson Ballard's Co., Col. 
Ichabod Alden's Regt.; muster return dated Albany, Jan. 12, 1778; 
residence, Chelmsford; enlisted for town of Chelmsford; mustered by 
Col. Barrett, Muster Master for Middlesex Co.; reported died May 9, 
1777. 



RECORDS OF CHELMSFORD MEN IN THE REVOLUTION 313 

Cory, 01i\-er, Chelmsford. Descriptive list of enlisted men; Capt. John 
Ford's Co., Col. Ebenezer Bridge's (27th) Regt.; age, IS yrs. ; stature, 
5 ft., 6 in.; complexion, dark; occupation, farmer; residence, Chelmsford; 
enlisted April 28, 1775; also, Private, same Co. and Regt.; company 
return dated Sept. 25, 1775; also. Private, Capt. William Hudson 
Ballard's Co., Col. Brooks's Regt.; Continental Army pay accounts for 
service from March 27, 1777, to Dec. 31, 1779; also, Capt. Ballard's 
Co., Col. Ichabod Alden's Regt.; muster return dated Albany, Jan. 12, 
1778; residence, Chelmsford; enlisted for town of Chelmsford; mustered 
by Col. Barrett, Muster Master for Middlesex Co., and by a Continental 
Muster Master; reported taken prisoner July 20, 1777; also, Capt. 
Ballard's Co., (late) Col. Alden's (6th) Regt.; muster roll for March and 
April, 1779, dated Cherry Valley; enlisted March 17, 1777; enlistment, 
3 yrs.; also, 1st Co., Lieut. Col. John Brooks's (7th) Regt.; return made 
up to Dec. 31, 1779, signed by Lieut. James Lunt; also, pay roll for 6 
months men raised by the town of Chelmsford for service in the Conti- 
nental Army at North river during 1780; marched June 30, 1780; dis- 
charged Jan. 7, 1781; service, 6 mos., 19 days. 

Coudre, Nathaniel. Private, Capt. Ford's Co.; return of cartridges received 
from Nov. 4 to Jan. 6 (year not given). 

Crosby, John, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Zaccheus Wright's Co., Col. 
Brooks's Regt.; company return dated Camp at White Plains, Oct. 31, 
1776; also, descriptive list of men engaged for Continental service; 
Capt. Minot's Co., Col. Spaulding's Regt.; age, 18 yrs.; stature, 5 ft., 
11 in.; engaged for town of Chelmsford; term, 9 months from time of 
arrival at Fishkill, June 19, 1778; also, list of men raised in Middlesex 
Co., returned as received of Jonathan Warner, Commissioner, by Col. 
R. Putnam, July 20, 1778. 

Cumings, James. Receipt for mileage dated Ticonderoga, Aug. 28, 1776, 
given to Capt. John Ford; also, receipt for wages due Oct. 1, 1776, dated 
Ticonderoga, given to Capt. John Ford; receipt endorsed "marched from 
Chelmsford July 25, 1776, discharged at Albany, Jan. 1, 1777." 

Cutler, Jacob. Private, Capt. Ford's Co.; list of men with an account of the 
ammunition allowed them from Nov. 4 to Jan. 6 (year not given). 

Dammon, Daniel, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Oliver Barron's Co., Col. 
David Green's Regt., which marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; 
service, 18 days. 

Damon, Daniel. Receipt for mileage given to Capt. John Ford, dated 
Ticonderoga, Aug. 28, 1776; also, receipt for wages due Oct. 1, 1776, 
given to Capt. John Ford, dated Ticonderoga, Oct. 2, 1776; receipt 
endorsed "marched from Chelmsford, July 25, 1776, discharged at Albany, 
Jan. 1, 1777." 

Damon (?), David, Chelmsford (probably). List of men probably belonging 
to Chelmsford, dated May 1, 1775. 

Danforth, David, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Oliver Barron's Co., Col. 
David Greene's Regt., which marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; 
service, 4 days; also, Capt. John Ford's Co. of Volunteers, Col. Jonathan 
Reed's Regt.; enlisted Sept. 27, 1777; discharged Nov. 8, 1777; service, 
43 days; company marched Sept. 30, 1777, to reinforce Northern Army. 

Danforth, Jonathan, Chelmsford. List of men raised in Middlesex Co. to 
serve in the Continental Army (year not given); residence, Chelmsford; 
reported "in the works at Springfield." 

Daverson, [Davidson], Francis, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Oliver Barron's 
Co., Col. David Green's Regt., which marched on the alarm of April 
19, 1775; service, 7 days. 

Davidson, Francis, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. 
Bridge's Regt.; age, 23 yrs.; stature, 5 ft., 9 in.; complexion, dark; 
occupation, farmer; residence, Chelmsford; enlisted April 26, 1775; 
also, Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Ebenezer Bridge's (27th) Regt.; order 
for advance pay dated Cambridge, June 6, 1775; also, company return 
dated Sept. 25, 1775. 



314 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

Davis, James. Company receipt for mileage dated Ticonderoga, Aug. 28, 
1776, given to Capt. John Ford; also, receipt dated Ticonderoga, Aug. 2, 
1776, given to Capt. John Ford, for wages to Oct. 1, 1776, endorsed 
"marched from Chelmsford, July 25, 1776, discharged at Albany Jan. 1,, 
1777." 

Davis, Joshua, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Oliver Barron's Co., Col. David 
Green's Regt., which marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 
8 days. 

Davis, Moses, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. John Minot's Co., Col. Dike's 
Regt.; pay abstract for wages and travel allowance to and from Dor- 
chester Heights; warrant allowed in Council, Nov. 30, 1776. 

Davis, Samuel. Private, Capt. Jonathan Minott's Co.; Col. Baldwin's 
Regt.; pay abstract for traveling allowance from home and return dated 
Cambridge, Jan. 12, 1776; 106 miles traveling allowed. 

Davis, Thomas, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Zaccheus Wright's Co., Col. 
Brooks's Regt.; return of men in camp at White Plains dated Oct. 31, 
1776. 

Davis, Thomas. Private, Capt. Ford's Co.; return of cartridges received 
from Nov. 4, to Jan. 6 (year not given). 

Davison, Francis, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. 
Ebenezer Bridge's Regt.; muster roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; enlisted April 
26, 1775; service, 3 mos., 13 days. 

Didson, Benjamin, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. John Ford's Co. of Volunteers, 
Col. Jonathan Reed's Regt.; enlisted Sept. 27, 1777; discharged Nov. 8, 
1777; service, 1 mo., 13 days; company marched Sept. 30, 1777, to 
reinforce Northern Army. 

Ditson, John. Capt. John Ford's Co.; company receipt for mileage dated 
Ticonderoga, Aug. 28, 1776; also, same Co.; company receipt for wages 
to Oct. 1, 1776, dated Ticonderoga; roll endorsed "marched from Chelms- 
ford, July 25, 1776, discharged at Albany, Jan. 1, 1777." 

Dun, James, Chelmsford. Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Bridge's Regt.; 
descriptive list of men; age, 23 yrs. ; stature, 6 ft.; complexion, light; 
occupation, farmer; residence, Chelmsford; enlisted April 27, 1775. 

Dun, William, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Zaccheus Wright's Co., Col. 
Brooks's Regt.; company return dated Camp at White Plains, Oct. 31, 
1776. 

Dunn, James, Chelmsford. Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Ebenezer Bridge's 
(27th) Regt.; company order for advance pay dated Camp at Cam- 
bridge, June 6, 1775; also, Private, same Co. and Regt.; muster roll 
dated Aug. 1, 1775; enlisted April 27, 1775; service, 3 mos., 12 days; 
also, company return dated Sept. 25, 1775. 

Dunn, James, Jr., Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Oliver Barron's Co., Col. 
David Green's Regt., which marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; 
service, 8 days. 

Dunn, John, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Oliver Barron's Co., Col. David 
Green's Regt., which marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 

3 days. 

Dunn, John. Private, Capt. Joseph Bradley Varnum's Co., Col. Mcintosh's 
Regt., Gen. Lovel's Brigade; engaged Aug. 19, 1778; discharged Sept. 
11, 1778; service, 28 days, travel included, on an expedition to Rhode 
Island. Roll dated, Dracut. 

Dunn, Joseph, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. John Minot's Co., Col. Dike's 
Regt.; pay abstract for wages and travel allowance to and from Dor- 
chester Heights; warrant allowed in Council, Nov. 30, 1776. 

Dunn, William, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Oliver Barron's Co., Col. David 
Green's Regt., which marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 

4 days; also. Corporal, Capt. James Varnum's Co., Col. Michael Jackson's 
Regt.; Continental Army pay accounts for service from May 15, 1777, 
to May 15, 1780; residence, Chelmsford; credited to town of Chelmsford; 
enlistment, 3 yrs. 



RECORDS OF CHELMSFORD MEN IN THE REVOLUTION 315 

Durant, Joshua, Chelmsford. Private, Col. Moses Parker's Co., commanded 
by Lieut. Benjamin Walker, which marched on the alarm of April 19, 
1775; service, 9 days; also, Capt. Benjamin Walker's Co., Col. Ebenezer 
Bridge's (27th) Regt. ; company receipt for advance pay dated Cambridge, 
June 24, 1777; also, Private, same Co. and Regt.; muster roll dated Aug. 
1, 1775; enlisted April 2.S, 1775; service, 8 mos., 11 days; also, company 
return (probably Oct., 1775); also, order for bounty coat or its equivalent 
in money dated Cambridge, Dec. 25, 1775; also, Capt. John Ford's Co., 
Col. Robinson's Regt.; company receipt for wages from Feb. 5, 1776, 
to April 1, 1776, dated Chelmsford, April 19, 1776; also, Capt. John 
Ford's Co.; company receipt for money due Oct. 1, 1776, dated Ticon- 
deroga; receipt endorsed "marched from Chelmsford, July 25, 1776, 
discharged at Albany, Jan. 1, 1777"; also, Capt. John Minot's Co., Col. 
Dike's Regt.; service from Dec. 13, 1776, to March 1, 1777; credited to 
town of Chelmsford. 

Dutton, John, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. John Minot's Co., Col. Dike's 
Regt.; pay abstract for wages and travel allowance to and from Dor- 
chester Heights; warrant allowed in Council, Nov. 30, 1776. 

Dutton, Jonas, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. John Minot's Co., Col. Dike's 
Regt.; pay abstract for wages and travel allowance to and from Dor- 
chester Heights; warrant allowed in Council, Nov. 30, 1776; also, account 
of milk and sauce money due said Dutton and Willard Byam from Aug. 
24, to Sept. 28 (year not given), dated Roxbury, Oct. 15, 1776. 

Easterbrooks, Moses, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. 
Ebenezer Bridge's (27th) Regt.; muster roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; enlisted 
April 27, 1775; service, 3 mos., 12 days; also, Capt. Varnum's Co., 
Col. Michael Jackson's Regt.; Continental Army pay accounts for 
service from May 5, 1777, to Dec. 31, 1779; residence, Chelmsford; 
credited to town of Chelmsford; term, 3 yrs.; reported "deserted, but 
returned to his duty and served the whole of his time, as appears by a 
certificate from Capt. Smith, and N. Dix, Captain Commandant, dated 
April 22, 1781"; also, same Co. and Regt.; Continental Army pay 
accounts for service from Oct. 17, 1780, to Dec. 31, 1780; reported 
joined from desertion. 

Eaton, Jonathan. Private, Capt. Ford's Co.; return for cartridges received 
from Nov. 4 to Jan. 6 (year not given). 

Eavens, Sherebiah. Private, Capt. Ford's Co.; list of men on an account 
of ammunition allowed from Nov. 4 (year not given, probably 1777), 
to Jan. 6 (year not given, probably 1777); also, Private, Capt. John 
Dix's Co., Col. Mcintosh's Regt., Gen. Lovel's Brigade; enlisted July 
30, 1778; discharged Sept. 12, 1778; service, 1 mo., 17 days, travel 
included, at Rhode Island. 

Ellinwood, Samuel. Receipt for mileage given to Capt. John Ford, dated 
Ticonderoga, Aug. 28, 1776; also, company receipt given to Capt. John 
Ford for money due to Oct. 1, 1776, dated Ticonderoga, Oct. 2, 1776. 

Emerson, Parker (alias Peter), Chelmsford. Sergeant, Capt. John Ford's 
Co., Col. Ebenezer Bridge's (27th) Regt.; age, 30 yrs.; stature, 5 ft., 10 
in.; complexion, fresh; occupation, housewright; residence, Chelmsford; 
enlisted April 25, 1775; also, same Co. and Regt.; company order for 
advance pay dated Cambridge, June 6, 1775; also, Sergeant, same Co. 
and Regt.; muster roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; enlisted April 25, 1775; 
service, 3 mos., 14 days; also, company return dated Sept. 25, 1775; 
also, memorandum of firelocks received from sundry officers and men; 
date of delivery Jan. 1, 1776; also. Sergeant, Capt. William Hudson 
Ballard's Co., Col. John Brooks's Regt.; Continental Army pay accounts 
for service from March 10, 1777, to Dec. 31, 1779; also, Capt. Ballard's 
Co., Col. Ichabod Alden's (6th) Regt.; muster return dated Albany, 
Jan. 12, 1778; residence, Chelmsford; engaged for town of Chelmsford; 
mustered by Col. J. Barrett, Muster Master for Middlesex Co., and by 
a Continental Muster Master; also, same Co. and Regt.; muster roll 
for March and April, 1779, dated Cherry Valley; enlisted March 10, 
1777; enlistment, 3 yrs.; reported on command after deserters; also 



316 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

1st Co., Lieut. Col. John Brooks's (7th) Regt.; return made up to Dec. 
31, 1779; also, Capt. White's Co., Col. Brooks's Regt.; Continental 
Army pay accounts for service from Jan. 1, 1780, to March 10, 1780. 

Estabrooics, Joel, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Ebenezer Bancroft's Co., 
Col. Ebenezer Bridge's Regt.; company return dated Sept. 25, 1775; 
also, company receipt given to Capt. John Ford for mileage dated 
Ticonderoga, Aug. 28, 1776; also, company receipt given to Capt. John 
Ford for wages due to Oct. 1, 1776, dated Ticonderoga, Oct. 2, 1776; 
receipt endorsed "marched from Chelmsford, July 25, 1776, discharged 
at Albany, Jan. 1, 1777." 

Esterbrooks, Josiah (?). Company receipt given to Capt. John Ford for 
wages due to Oct. 1, 1776, dated Ticonderoga; receipt endorsed "marched 
from Chelmsford, July 25, 1776, discharged at Albany, Jan. 1, 1777." 

Esterbrooks, Josiah (?). Company receipt given to Capt. John Ford for 
mileage dated Ticonderoga, Aug. 28, 1776. 

Esterbrooks, Moses, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Oliver Barron's Co., Col. 
David Green's Regt., which marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; 
service, 8 days; also, descriptive list dated June 15, 1775; Capt. John 
Ford's Co., Col. Bridge's Regt.; age, 30 yrs. ; stature, 6 ft.; complexion, 
light; occupation, farmer; residence, Chelmsford; enlisted April 27, 
1775; also Private, Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Ebenezer Bridge's (27th) 
Regt.; company return dated Sept. 25, 1775. 

Estherbrooks, Moses. Capt. Ford's Co., Col. Bridge's Regt.; company 
order for advance pay dated Camp at Cambridge, June 6, 1775; also, 
Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Roberson's (Robinson's) Regt.; company 
receipt for wages from Feb. 5, 1776, to April 1, 1776, dated Chelmsford. 

Evens, Jonathan. Company receipt for mileage given to Capt. John Ford 
dated Ticonderoga, Aug. 28, 1776; also, company receipt given to Capt. 
John Ford for wages due to Oct. 1, 1776, dated Ticonderoga, Oct. 2, 1776, 
and endorsed "marched from Chelmsford, July 25, 1776, discharged at 
Albany Jan. 1, 1777." 

Farley, Benjamin, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Ebenezer 
Bridge's (27th) Regt.; company return dated June 15, 1775; age, 17 
yrs.; stature, 5 ft., 10 in.; complexion, light; occupation, farmer; resi- 
dence, Chelmsford; enlisted April 25, 1775; also, muster roll dated 
Aug. 1, 1775; enlisted April 25, 1775; service, 3 mos., 14 days; also, 
company return dated Sept. 25, 1775. 

Farley, William, Chelmsford. Receipt dated July 14, 1781, for bounty paid 
said Farley by the town of Ashby to serve in the Continental Army 
for the term of 6 months; also, descriptive list of men raised in Middlesex 
Co., agreeable to resolve of Dec. 2, 1780, as returned by Joseph Hosmer, 
Superintendent for said county; age, 20 yrs.; stature, 5 ft., 11 in.; 
complexion, dark; hair, dark; eyes, dark; occupation, farmer (also given 
laborer); residence, Chelmsford; engaged for town of Ashby; engaged 
July 14, 1781; joined Capt. Francis's Co., Lieut. Col. John Brooks's 
(7th) Regt.; term, 6 mos. (also given 3 yrs.); also. Sergeant, Capt. 
Nathaniel C. Allen's (8th) Co., 4th Mass. Regt.; muster rolls for May — 
Aug., 1783; reported promoted from Corporal, June 10, 1783; balance 
of term of enlistment unexpired, 6 mos.; also, 8th (also given 3d) Co.; 
order dated Dec. 26, 1783, for wages for the month of May and 9 days 
in June as Corporal, 21 days in June and the months of July — Dec. 
(year not given), as Sergeant, appearing as a register of orders accepted 
on account of wages. 

Farly, Benjamin, Chelmsford. Private, Col. Moses Parker's Co., which 
marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775, under command of Lieut. 
Benjamin Walker; service, 6 days. 

Farmer, Aaron. Company receipt given to Capt. John Ford for mileage, 
dated Ticonderoga, Aug. 28, 1776; also, company receipt given to Capt. 
John Ford for wages due to Oct. 1, 1776, dated Ticonderoga, and 
endorsed "marched from Chelmsford, July 25, 1776, discharged at Albany, 
Jan. 1, 1777"; also. Private, Capt. Nathaniel Lakin's Co., Col. John 
Robinson's Regt.; enlisted July 7, 1777; service, 2 mos., 25 days, at 



RECORDS OF CHELMSFORD MEN IN THE REVOLUTION 317 

Rhode Island; enlistment to expire Jan. 1, 1778; roll sworn to at Groton; 
also, Capt. Solomon Pollard's Co., Col. Samuel Denny's Reajt.; enlisted 
Oct. 23, 1779; discharged Dec. 4, 1779; service, 1 mo., 12 days, travel 
included; company detached to march to Claverack and join Con- 
tinental Army for 3 months; roll dated Billerica; also, Capt. Watts's 
Co., Sth Mass. Regt.; list of United States pensioners made up to Dec. 
31, 1787, as returned by John Lucas, Commissary of Pensions; age, 30 
years; pensioned Sept. 1, 1782. 

Farmer, Oliver, Chelmsford. List of men raised to serv^e in the Continental 
Army (year not given); residence, Chelmsford; engaged for town of 
Chelmsford; also, list of men mustered by Nathaniel Barber, Muster 
Master for Suffolk Co., dated Boston, Feb. 16, 1777; Capt. Lane's Co., 
Col. Nixon's Regt.; also. Private, Major's Co., Col. Thomas Nixon's 
(6th) Regt.; list of deserters dated Camp Ten Eyck, Aug. 27, 1780; 
deserted Dec. 20, 1777. 

Farmer, Solomon, Chelmsford. Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Ebenezer 
Bridge's (27th) Regt.; descriptive list dated June 15, 1775; age, 27 yrs.; 
stature, 5 ft., 6 in.; complexion, dark; occupation, farmer; residence, 
Chelmsford; enlisted April 28, 1775; reported enlisted in the train May 29, 
1775; also. Private, Capt. Ford's Co., Col. Bridge's Regt.; muster roll 
dated Aug. 1, 1775; enlisted April 28, 1775; service, 1 mo., 3 days; also, 
same Co. and Regt.; company return dated Sept. 25, 1775; also, Capt. 
John Popkin's Co., Col. Richard Gridley's (Artillery) Regt.; company 
receipt for advance pay dated Winter Hill, July 14, 1775; also, Matross, 
same Co. and Regt.; muster roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; enlisted May 29, 
1775; service, 2 mos., 8 days; also, company return dated Camp at Winter 
Hill, Sept. 27, 1775; also, order for bounty coat or its equivalent in money 
dated Winter Hill, Jan. 2, 1776. _ 

Farrar, Nathaniel, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Oliver Barron's Co., Col. 
David Green's Regt., which marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; 
service, 9 days. 

Farrar. Timothy, Chelmsford. Capt. Ebenezer Bancroft's Co., Col. Ebenezer 
Bridge's (27th) Regt.; company receipt for advance pay dated Camp 
before Boston, July 24, 1775; also, same Co. and Regt.; order for bounty 
coat or its equivalent in money dated Nov. 4, 1775. 

Farrar, Timothy. Company receipt given to Capt. John Ford, for mileage, 
dated Ticonderoga, Aug. 28, 1776; also, company receipt given to Capt. Joeh 
Ford, for wages due Oct. 1, 1776, dated Ticonderoga and endorsed "marched 
from Chelmsford, July 25, 1776, discharged at Albany, Jan. 1, 1777." 

Farrer, Peter. Private, Capt. Amos Foster's Co., Col. Cyprian How's Regt.; 
enlisted July 8, 1780; discharged Oct. 10, 1780; service, 3 mos., 3 days, 
at Rhode Island; company detached from 7th Middlesex Co. Regt. to 
reinforce Continental Army for 3 months. 

Farror, Timothy, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Ebenezer Bancroft's Co., 
Col. Ebenezer Bridge's Regt.; muster roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; enlisted May 
4, 1775; service, 3 mos., 5 days; also, company return dated Sept. 25, 1775. 

Farror, Timothy, Chelmsford. List of men for the 6 months' service and 
returned by Brig. Gen. Paterson as having passed muster in a return 
dated Camp Totoway, Oct. 25, 1780. 

Farrow, Nathaniel, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Varnum's Co., Col. Michael 
Jackson's Regt.; Continental Army pay accounts for service from April 
28, 1777, to Dec. 31, 1779; residence, Chelmsford; engaged for Chelms- 
ford; term, 3 yrs. 

Farwell, Eleazer. Private, Capt. John Ford's Co. of volunteers. Col. Jonathan 
Reed's Regt.; enlisted Sept. 27, 1777; discharged Nov. 8, 1777; service, 
43 days; company marched Sept. 30, 1777, to reinforce Northern Army; 
roll dated Chelmsford. 

Fips, Charles. Company receipt given to Capt. John Ford for mileage, 
dated Ticonderoga, Aug. 28, 1776; also, company receipt given to Capt. 
John Ford for wages to Oct. 1, 1776, dated Ticonderoga, and endorsed 
"marched from Chelmsford, July 25, 1776, discharged at Albany, Jan. 1, 
1777." 



318 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

Fleming, Patrick, Chelmsford. Capt. Micajah Gleason's Co., Col. Nixon's 
Regt.; company receipt for advance pay dated Cambridge, June 10, 
1775; also, Sergeant, Capt. Moses Hart's Co., Col. Paul Dudley Sergeant's 
Regt.; muster roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; enlisted April 24, 1775; service, 
98 days; also, same Co. and Regt.; order for bounty coat or its equivalent 
in money dated Dec. 13, 1775. 

Fletcher, Charles, Chelmsford. Private, Col. Moses Parker's Co. which 
marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 9 days; also Sergeant, 
Capt. Benjamin Walker's Co., Col. Ebenezer Bridge's (27th) Regt.; 
company receipt for advance pay dated Cambridge, June 24, 1775; 
also, same Co. and Regt.; muster roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; enlisted May 
28, 1775; service, 3 mos., 11 days; also, company return (probably Oct., 
1775); also, order for bounty coat or its equivalent in money dated 
Cambridge, Nov. 30, 1775. 

Fletcher, Elijah. Private, Capt. John Ford's Co. of volunteers. Col. Jonathan 
Reed's Regt.; enlisted Sept. 27, 1777; discharged Nov. 8, 1777; service, 
1 mo., 13 days; company marched Sept. 30, 1777, to reinforce Northern 
army. Roll dated Chelmsford. 

Fletcher, Henry, Chelmsford. Private, Col. Moses Parker's Co., which 
marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 21 days; roll endorsed 
"Lieut. Benjamin Walker's roll" ; also, Capt. John Ford's Co. of volunteers 
Col. Jonathan Reed's Regt.; enlisted Sept. 27, 1777; discharged Nov. 8, 
1777; service, 1 mo., 13 days; company marched Sept. 30, 1777, to reinforce 
Northern Army; also, descriptive list of men raised in Middlesex Co. to 
serve in the Continental Army for the term of 9 months, agreeable to 
resolve of June 9, 1779, returned as received of Justin Ely, Commissioner, 
by Capt. James Cooper, at Springfield, July 19, 1779; Capt. Ford's Co., 
Col. Brown's Regt.; age, 25 yrs. ; stature, 5 ft., 8 in.; complexion, light; 
engaged for town of Chelmsford; also, list of men raised for Continental 
service, as returned by Brig. Gen. Eleazer Brooks to Maj. Hosmer, 
dated Lincoln, July 21, 1779; also, list of men raised for Continental 
service, as returned by Joseph Hosmer, Superintendent for Middlesex 
Co., Nov. 24, 1779; also, Capt. Varnum's Co., Col. Michael Jackson's 
(8th) Regt.; entered service July 15, 1779; discharged April 15, 1780; 
term, 9 months. 

Fletcher, Josiah (also given Jr.), Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Oliver Barron's 
Co., Col. David Green's Regt., which marched on the alarm of April 19, 
1775; service, 9 days; also, Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Bridge's Regt.; 
descriptive list dated June 15, 1775; age, 18 yrs.; stature, 5 ft., 6 in.; 
complexion, light; occupation, farmer; residence, Chelmsford; enlisted, 
April 28, 1775; also. Private, Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Ebenezer 
Bridge's (27th) Regt.; muster roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; enlisted April 28, 
1775; service, 3 mos., 11 days; also, company return dated Sept. 25, 1775; 
also, Capt. John Ford's Co. of Volunteers, Col. Jonathan Reed's Regt.; 
enlisted Sept. 27, 1777; discharged Nov. 8, 1777; service, 1 mo., 13 days; 
company marched Sept. 30, 1777, to reinforce Northern Army; also, 
descriptive list of men raised in Middlesex Co. for the term of 9 mos. 
from the time of their arrival at Fishkill; Capt. Ford's Co., Col. Spaulding's 
Regt.; age, 20 yrs.; stature, 5 ft., 8 in.; residence, Chelmsford; engaged 
for town of Chelmsford; also, list of men returned as received of Jonathan 
Warner, Commissioner, by Col. R. Putnam, July 20, 1778; arrived at 
Fishkill, June 20, 1778. 

Fletcher, Levi, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. John Ford's Co. of Volunteers, 
Col. Jonathan Reed's Regt.; enlisted Sept. 27, 1777; discharged Nov. 8, 
1777; service, 1 mo., 13 days; company marched Sept. 30, 1777, to re- 
inforce Northern Army; also, Capt. Thomas Hovey's Co., Col. Nathan 
Tyler's Regt.; enlisted July 6, 1779; discharged Dec. 16 (also given 
Dec. 18), 1779; service, 5 mos., 16 days, travel included, at Rhode Island; 
also, same Co. and Regt.; pay roll for Dec, 1779; allowing 1 mo., 5 days 
service at Rhode Island. 



RECORDS OF CHELMSFORD MEN IN THE REVOLUTION 319 

Fletcher, Oliver, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Oliver Barron's Co., Col. 
David Green's Regt., which marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; 
service, 8 days; also, Capt. Zaccheus Wright's Co., Col. Brooks's Regt.; 
company return dated Camp at White Plains, Oct. 31, 1776. 

Fletcher, Sampson. Private, Capt. Jonathan Minott's Co., Col. Baldwin's 
Regt.; pay abstract for travel allowance to and from home, dated Cam- 
bridge, Jan. 12, 1776; also, Capt. Edmund Longlcy's Co., Col. Cogswell's 
Regt.; enlisted Sept. 22, 1778; discharged Dec. 31, 1778; service, 3 mos., 
12 days, travel included; company detached to fortify posts at and about 
Boston. 

Fletcher, Samuel, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Oliver Barron's Co., Col. 
David Green's Regt., which marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; 
service, 4 days; also, Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Roberson's (Robinson's) 
Regt.; company receipt for wages from Feb. 5, 1776, to April 1, 1776, 
dated Chelmsford. 

Fletcher, Sherebiah, Chelmsford. Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Roberson's 
(Robinson's) Regt.; company receipt for wages from Feb. 5, 1776, to 
April 1, 1776, dated Chelmsford; also, Private, Capt. James Varnum's 
Co., Col. Michael Jackson's Regt.; Continental Army pay accounts for 
service from Aiay 15, 1777, to May 15, 1780; residence, Chelmsford; 
engaged for town of Chelmsford; term, 3 years. 

Fletcher, William. Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Roberson's (Robinson's) 
Regt.; company receipt for wages from Feb. 5, 1776, to April 1, 1776, 
dated Chelmsford; also. Private, Capt. John Ford's Co. of Volunteers, 
Col. Jonathan Reed's Regt.; enlisted Sept. 27, 1777; discharged Nov. 8, 
1777; service, 1 mo., 13 days; company marched Sept. 30, 1777, to re- 
inforce Northerm Army; roll dated Chelmsford. 

Fletcher, William, 3d, Chelmsford. Private, Col. Moses Parker's Co., which 
marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 11 days; roll endorsed 
"Lieut. Benjamin Walker's roll." 

Fletcher, Zaccheus, Chelmsford. Private, Col. Moses Parker's Co., which 
marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 9 days; roll endorsed 
"Lieut. Benjamin Walker's roll"; also, Lieut. John Flint's Co.; order 
on Maj. Barber dated Cambridge, June 24, 1775, signed by Col. E. 
Bridge, for cartridge boxes; also, Capt. Benjamin W^alker's Co., Col. 
Ebenezer Bridge's (27th) Regt.; company receipt for advance pay dated 
Cambridge, June 24, 1775; also Private, same Co. and Regt.; muster roll 
dated Aug. 1, 1775; enlisted April 28, 1775; service, 3 mos., 11 days; 
also, company return (probably Oct., 1775); also, company receipt given 
to Capt. John Ford for mileage, dated Ticonderoga, Aug. 28, 1776; also, 
company receipt given to Capt. John Ford for wages due to Oct. 1, 1776, 
dated Ticonderoga, and endorsed "marched from Chelmsford, July 25, 
1776, discharged at Albany, Jan. 1, 1777." 

Ford, John, Chelmsford. Sergeant, Capt. Oliver Barron's Co., Col. David 
Green's Regt., which marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 
6 days. 

Ford, John, Chelmsford. Captain, Col. Ebenezer Bridge's Regt.; regimental 
return dated May 26, 1775; 59 men reported as in said Ford's Co.; also, 
Capt., Col. Bridge's Regt.; list of officers to be commissioned; ordered 
in Provincial Congress, May 27, 1775, that said officers be commissioned; 
also, Captain, 7th Middlesex Co. regt.; return of said Ford's Co.; com- 
missioned June 11, 1775; also. Captain, Col. Bridge's (27th) Regt.; 
engaged April 19, 1775; roll made up to Aug. 1, 1775; also, same regt.; 
muster roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; engaged April 25, 1775; service, 3 mos., 
14 days; also, company return dated Sept. 25, 1775; also. Captain; list of 
officers chosen Jan. 29, 1776, in a company raised in Billerica, Dracut, 
Chelmsford, Dunstable, Tewksbury and Bedford, to reinforce the army; 
list endorsed "to the first of April next"; ordered in Provincial Congress, 
Feb. 7, 1776, that said officers be commissioned; reported commissioned 
Feb. 7, 1776; also. Captain, 1st Co., Col. John Robinson's Regt.; list of 
officers to be commissioned; commissions reported as dated Feb. 5, 1776; 
list endorsed "to April 1, 1776"; also, Captain, same Regt.; regimental 



320 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

return dated Camp Cambridge, Feb. 24, 1776; also, account of articles 
lost at Bunker Hill, June 17, 1775, by men belonging: to his company, 
as certified by said Ford at Cambridge, March 18, 1776; also. Captain, 
4th Co., 7th Middlesex Co. Regt. of Mass. militia; list of officers; com- 
missioned May 31, 1776; also. Captain; account of provisions delivered 
Col. Reed's Regt. while at Charlestown, N. H., in 1776, as returned 
by Joseph Gilbert, Commissary, dated Charlestown, Aug. 6, 1776; 
also, company receipt given to said Ford, for mileage and travel allowance, 
dated Ticonderoga, Aug. 28, 1776; also Captain, 4th Co. (North Co. in 
Chelmsford); list of officers chosen in said company, as returned by 
Simeon Spaulding, field officer, dated Chelmsford, July 5, 1776; ordered 
in Council, Sept. 3, 1776, that said officers be commissioned; also. Captain, 
Col. Jonathan Reed's Regt., Brig. Gen. Bricket's brigade; ammunition 
return dated Ticonderoga, Sept. 3, 1776; also, company receipt given 
to said Ford, for wages due Oct. 2, 1776, dated Ticonderoga; also, return 
of flints needed in Col. Reed's Regt., dated Ticonderoga, Oct. 4, 1776; 
also, Col. Reed's Regt.; regimental return dated Ticonderoga, Nov. 2, 
1776; also, same Regt.; return for rations dated Nov. 30, 1776; rations 
allowed said Ford from July 11, 1776, to Nov. 30, 1776; credited with 
143 days allowance; also, same Regt.; pay abstract for travel allowance 
from Albany, home, in 1776, dated Chelmsford and endorsed "company 
marched from Chelmsford, July 25, 1776, containing 94 men, including 
officers, when mustered by Simeon Spaulding"; also, Captain of a 
Volunteer Co., Col. Reed's Regt.; engaged Spet. 27, 1777; discharged 
Nov. 8, 1777; service, 43 days; company marched Sept. 30, 1777, to 
reinforce Northern Army; roll dated Chelmsford. 

Foster, Isaac, Chelmsford. Private, Col. Moses Parker's Co., which marched 
on the alarm of April 19, 1775; service 16 days; also, Corporal, Capt. 
John Minot's Co., Col. Dike's Regt.; service from Dec. 13, 1776, to 
March 1, 1777; also. Sergeant, Capt. John Minot's Co., Col. Josiah 
Whitney's Regt.; arrived at destination May 10, 1777; discharged July 9, 
1777; service, 2 mos., 9 days, travel included, at Rhode Island; roll 
dated Warwick Neck. 

Foster, Isaiah (also given Jr.), Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Oliver Barron's 
Co., Col. David Green's Regt., which marched on the alarm of April 19, 
1775; service, 6 days; also, Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Ebenezer Bridge's 
(27th) Regt.; company order for advance pay dated Camp at Cambridge, 
June 6, 1775; also, descriptive list dated June 15, 1775; Capt. John Ford's 
Co., Col. Bridge's Regt.; age, 22 yrs. ; stature, 6 ft.; complexion, light; 
occupation, farmer; residence, Chelmsford; enlisted April 25, 1775; also. 
Private, same Co. and Regt.; muster roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; enlisted 
April 25, 1775; service, 3 mos., 14 days; also, company return dated 
Sept. 25, 1775; also, Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Roberson's (Robinson's) 
Regt.; company receipt for wages from Feb. 5, 1776, to April 1, 1776, 
dated Chelmsford; also, Capt. Solomon Kidder's Co., Col. Brooks's 
Regt.; company return endorsed "1776"; said Foster reported at White 
Plains. 

Foster, Joseph, Chelmsford (also given Kittery). Private, Major's Co., 
Col. Ebenezer Sprout's Regt.; Continental Army pay accounts for 
service from Jan. 1, 1777, to July 6, 1777; enlistment, during war; reported 
a prisoner from July 6, 1777; also reported deserted. 

Foster, Nathaniel, Chelmsford. Private, Col. Moses Parker's Co., which 
marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 7 days; also, Capt. 
John Ford's Co., Col. Bridge's Regt.; company order for advance pay 
dated Cambridge, June 6, 1775; also, descriptive list dated June 15, 1775; 
Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Ebenezer Bridge's (27) Regt.; age, 20 yrs.; 
stature, 6 ft.; complexion, dark; occupation, farmer; residence, Chelms- 
ford; enlisted April 26, 1775; also, Private, same Co. and Regt.; muster 
roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; enlisted April 26, 1775; service, 3 mos., 13 days; 
also, company return dated Chelmsford, Sept. 25, 1775. 



RECORDS OF CHELMSFORD MEN IN THE REVOLUTION 321 

Foster, Noah, Chelmsford. Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Bridge's Regt.; 
company order for advance pay dated Cambridge, June 6, 1775; also, 
descriptive list dated June 15, 1775; Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Ebenezer 
Bridge's (27th) Regt.; age, 18 yrs.; stature, 5 ft., 6 in.; complexion, 
light; occupation, farmer; residence, Chelmsford; enlisted April 27, 1775; 
also. Private, same Co. and Regt.; muster roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; en- 
listed April 27, 1775; service, 3 mos., 12 days; also, company return dated 
Sept. 25, 1775; also, Capt. William Hudson Ballard's Co., Col. John 
Brooks's (late Col. Ichabod Alden's) 7th Regt.; Continental Army pay 
accounts for service from March 10, 1777, to Oct. 7, 1777; reported killed 
in battle Oct. 7, 1777; also, Capt. Ballard's Co., 6th Mass. Regt., lately 
commanded by Col. Ichabod Alden; return of men in camp on or 
before Aug. 15, 1777; also, Capt. Ballard's Co., Col. Ichabod Alden's 
battalion; return dated Albany, Jan. 12, 1778; residence, Chelmsford; 
enlisted for town of Chelmsford; term, 3 years; mustered by Col. Barrett, 
Muster Master for Middlesex Co., and by a Continental Muster Master. 

Foster, Reuben, Chelmsford. Private, Col. Moses Parker's Co., which marched 
on the alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 8 days; roll endorsed "Lieut. 
Benjamin Walker's roll"; also, Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Ebenezer 
Bridge's (27th) Regt.; descriptive list dated June 15, 1775; age, 23 yrs.; 
stature, 6 ft., 1 in.; complexion, light; occupation, farmer; residence, 
Chelmsford; enlisted April 27, 1775; also. Private, same Co. and Regt.; 
muster roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; enlisted April 27, 1775; service, 3 mos., 
12 days; also, company return dated Sept. 25, 1775. 

Freland, John, Chelmsford. Sergeant, Col. Moses Parker's Co., which 
marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 17 days; roll endorsed 
"Lieut. Benjamin Walker's roll." 

French, John. Private, Capt. John Ford's Co. of Volunteers, Col. Jonathan 
Reed's Regt.; enlisted Sept. 27, 1777; discharged Oct. 20, 1777; service, 
23 days; company marched to reinforce Northern Army, Sept. 30, 1777. 
Roll dated Chelmsford. 

French, Samuel. Private, Capt. John Ford's Co. of Volunteers, Col. Jonathan 
Reed's Regt.; enlisted Sept. 27, 1777; discharged Oct. 20, 1777; service, 
23 days; company marched Sept. 30, 1777, to reinforce Northern Army 
Roll dated Chelmsford. 

Garey, Joseph. Return of cartridges for Capt. Ford's Co. received from 
Nov. 4th to Jan. 6th (year not given). 

Gibson, William, Chelmsford. Descriptive list of men raised in Middlesex 
Co. to serve in the Continental Army for the term of 9 months from the 
time of their arrival at Fishkill; age, 20 yrs.; stature, 5 ft., 6 in.; residence, 
Chelmsford; arrived at Fishkill, June 26, 1778. 

Glode, John, Chelmsford. Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Ebenezer Bridge's 
(27th) Regt.; order for advance pay, signed by said Glode and others, 
dated Cambridge, June 6, 1775; also, descriptive list dated June 15, 1775; 
Capt. Ford's Co., Col. Bridge's Regt.; age, 25 yrs.; stature, 5 ft., 10 in.; 
complexion, dark; occupation, farmer; residence, Chelmsford; enlisted 
April 28, 1775; also, Private, same Co. and Regt.; muster roll dated 
Aug. 1, 1775; enlisted April 28, 1775; service, 3 mos., 11 days; also, 
company return dated Sept. 25, 1775; also, list of men raised to serve in 
the Continental Army (year not given); residence, Chelmsford; en- 
gaged for town of Chelmsford; term, 3 years; also. Private, Capt. James 
Varnum's Co., Col. Michael Jackson's Regt.; Continental Army pay 
accounts for service from May 15, 1777, to May 15, 1780. 

Goold, Ebenezer, Chelmsford. Private, Col. Moses Parker's Co., which 
marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 9 days; roll endorsed 
"Lieut. Benjamin Walker's roll"; also, Capt. Walker's Co., Col. Bridge's 
Regt.; receipt for advance pay, signed by said Goold and others, dated 
Cambridge, June 24, 1775. 

Goold, Ebenezer, Jr. Receipt dated Chelmsford, April 19, 1776, signed by 
said Goold and others, for wages for service from Feb. 5, 1776, to April 1, 
1776, in Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Roberson's (Robinson's) Reg^. 



322 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

Gould, Ebenezer, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Benjamin Walker's Co., Col. 
Ebenezer Bridge's (27th) Regt.; muster roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; enlisted 
April 28, 1775; service, 3 mos., 11 days; also, company return (probably 
Oct., 1775); also, Capt. Zaccheus VVright's Co., Col. Brook's Regt.; 
company return dated Camp at White Plains, Oct. 31, 1776; reported 
as fit for duty and in camp. 

Green, Thomas, Chelmsford. List of men raised in Middlesex Co., as returned 
by Brig. Gen. Eleazer Brooks to Maj. Hosmer, dated Lincoln, July 21, 
1779; Capt. Minot's Co., 7th Middlesex Co. Regt.; also, list of men 
raised agreeable to resolve of June 9, 1779, returned by Joseph Hosmer, 
Superintendent; also, descriptive list of men raised in Middlesex Co. 
to serve in the Continental Army for the term of 9 months, returned as 
received of Justin Ely, Commissioner, by Capt. James Cooper, at Spring- 
field, July 19, 1779; Capt. Minot's Co., Col. Brown's Regt.; age, 27 
yrs. ; stature, 5 ft., 7 (also given 5 ft., 6) in.; complexion, light; residence, 
Chelmsford; engaged for town of Chelmsford; also. Col. Michael Jack- 
son's (8th) Regt.; engaged July 15, 1779; discharged April 15, 1780; 
term, 9 mos. 

Hall, James, Chelmsford. List of men raised in Middlesex Co. to reinforce 
the Continental Army, as returned by Brig. Gen. Eleazer Brooks to 
Maj. Hosmer, dated Lincoln; also, list of men raised agreeable to resolve 
of June 9, 1779, as returned by Joseph Hosmer, Superintendent; also, 
descriptive list of men raised in Middlesex Co. to serve in the Continental 
Army for the term of 9 mos., returned as received of Justin Ely, Com- 
missioner, by Capt. James Cooper, at Springfield, July 19, 1779; Capt. 
Minot's Co., Col. Brown's (7th Middlesex Co.) Regt.; age, 25 (also 
given 35) yrs.; stature, 5 ft., 7 in.; complexion, light; residence, Chelms- 
ford; engaged for town of Chelmsford; also, Col. Michael Jackson's (8th) 
Regt.;enteredservice July 15, 1779; discharged April 15, 1780; term' 9 mos. 

Hall, Willard. Company receipt dated Chelmsford, April 19, 1776, for wages 
for service in Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Roberson's (Robinson's) Regt.; 
from Feb. 5, 1776, to April 1, 1776; also, company receipt for mileage, 
given to Capt. John Ford, dated Ticonderoga, Aug. 28, 1776; also, 
company receipt for wages to Oct. 1, 1776, given to Capt. John Ford, 
dated Ticonderoga, and endorsed "25 July 76 march's from Chelmsford 
& discharged at Albany on 1 Jary 77." 

Hardey, Sampson. Company receipt for mileage, given to Capt. John Ford, 
dated Ticonderoga, Aug. 28, 1776. 

Hardwick, William, Westford (also given Dunstable and Chelmsford). List 
of men raised to serve in the Continental Army from Capt. Peletiah 
Fletcher's Co., 6th Middlesex Co. Regt., as returned by Col. Jonathan 
Reed to Brig. Gen. Prescott, dated Littleton, Sept. 17, 1777; residence, 
Westford (also given Dunstable); engaged for town of Westford (also 
given Dunstable); joined Capt. Ballard's Co., Col. Alden's Regt.; term, 
3 yrs., to expire in 1780; reported a transient; also, Private, Capt. 
William Hudson Ballard's Co., Col. Brooks's Regt.; Continental Army 
pay accounts for service from March 15, 1777, to Feb. 2, 1778; reported 
"Taken prisnor & Deserted"; also, Capt. Ballard's Co., 6th Mass. Regt. 
lately commanded by Col. Ichabod Alden; return of men who were in 
camp on or before Aug. 15, 1777; reported taken prisoner July 21 (also 
given July 20), 1777, escaped from captivity Jan. 10, 1778, and joined 
(date illegible) ; also Capt. Ballard's Co., Col. Ichabod Alden's Regt. ; return 
dated Albany, Jan. 12, 1778; mustered by Col. Varrick, Muster Master 
for Middlesex Co., and by a Continental Muster Master; also. Private, 
1st Co., Lieut. Col. John Brooks's (7th) Regt.; return made up to Dec. 31, 
1779; also, descriptive list dated Feb. 20, 1782; Capt. Jonathan Felt's 
Co., Lieut. Col. Brooks's Regt.; age, 35 yrs.; stature, 5 ft., 8 in.; com- 
plexion, light; hair, light; enlisted March 9, 1779 (also given March 9, 
1777); enlistment, during war; also, list of men who deserted subsequent 
to Jan. 1, 1777, dated West Point, Aug. 18, 1782; Capt. Felt's Co., Lieut. 
Col. Brooks's Regt.; residence, Chelmsford; deserted July 20, 1777, 
from Ticonderoga. 



RECORDS OF CHELMSFORD MEN IN THE REVOLUTION 323 

Hastings, Walter, Chelmsford. Surgeon, Col. Ebenezer Bridge's Regt. of 
Minute-Men; marched April 19, 1775; service, 4 days (name crossed 
out on roll); also, same Regt.; list of surgeons and surgeons' mates, 
examined and approved by a committee of Congress at VVatertown, 
July 5, 1775; also, same Regt.; engaged April 24, 1775; service to Aug. 1, 
1775, 3 mos., 15 days; also, return made by Lieut. Col. John Brooks to 
the Council, of officers to be commissioned in Col. Michael Jackson's 
Regt. (year not given); also, Surgeon, Col. Michael Jackson's (8th) 
Regt.; Continental Army pay accounts for service from Jan. 1, 1780, to 
Dec. 31, 1780. 

Hays, Thomas. Return of cartridges for Capt. Ford's Co. received from 
Nov. 4, to Jan. 6 (year not given). 

Hayward, Samuel. Capt. Ford's Co., Col. Bridge's Regt.; order for advance 
pay, signed by said Hayward and others, dated Cambridge, June 6, 
1775; also, account showing sums of money to be paid from the public 
treasury to sundry persons for losses sustained at battles of Lexington 
and Bunker Hill; amounts allowed in Council, June 13, 1776. 

Haywood, Benjamin, Chelmsford. Descriptive list dated June 15, 1775; 
Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Bridge's Regt.; age, 21 yrs.; stature, 5 ft., 
5 in.; complexion, light; occupation, farmer; residence, Chelmsford; 
enlisted April 28, 1775; also. Private, Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. 
Ebenezer Bridge's (27th) Reg^.; muster roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; enlisted 
April 28, 1775; service, 3 mos., 11 days; also, company return dated 
Sept. 25, 1775; also, company receipt, given to Capt. John Ford, for 
money due to Oct. 2, 1776, dated Ticonderoga. 

Haywood [Heyward], Joseph. Private, Capt. Amos Foster's Co., Col. 
Cyprian How's Regt.; enlisted July 28, 1780; discharged, Oct. 30, 1780; 
service, 3 mos., 8 days, including 5 days (100 miles) travel home; 
company detached from 7th Middlesex Co. Regt. to reinforce Continental 
Army for 3 months, and ordered part to Fishkill and part to Rhode 
Island. 

Haywood, Jesse. Private, Capt. Joseph Bradley Varnum'sCo., Col. Mclntush's 
(Mcintosh's) Regt., Gen. Lovel's Brigade; enlisted July 29, 1778; dis- 
charged Sept. 11, 1778; service, 1 mo., 18 days, on expedition to Rhode 
Island, including 5 days (100 miles) travel home. Roll dated Dracut. 

Haywood, Samuel, Chelmsford. Descriptive list dated June 15, 1775; Capt. 
John Ford's Co., Col. Bridge's Regt.; age, 17 yrs.; stature, 5 ft., 6 in.; 
complexion, dark; occupation, farmer; residence, Chelmsford; enlisted 
April 26, 1775; also, Private, Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Ebenezer 
Bridge's (27th) Regt.; muster roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; enlisted April 26, 
1775; service, 3 mos., 13 days; also, company return dated Sept. 25, 1775. 

(He)adlock, John. Private, Capt. John Ford's (Volunteer) Co., Col. Jonathan 
Reed's Regt.; engaged Sept. 28, 1777; discharged Nov. 8, 1777; service, 
40 days; company probably raised in Dracut, Chelmsford, and Dun- 
stable, and marched to reinforce Northern Army, Sept. 30, 1777. 

Heasten, James. Receipt dated Chelmsford, April 19, 1776. signed by 
said Heasten and others belonging to Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. 
Robinson's Regt., for wages for service from Feb. 5, 1776, to April 1, 1776. 

Heaward, Benjamin. Private, Capt. John Ford's (Volunteer) Co., CoL 
Jonathan Reed's Regt.; engaged Sept. 28, 1777; discharged Nov. 8, 
1777; service, 40 days; company probably raised in Dracut, Chelmsford, 
and Dunstable, and marched to reinforce Northern Army, Sept. 30, 1777. 

Heawood, Willard. Private, Capt. John Ford's (Volunteer) Co., Col. Jona- 
than Reed's Regt.; engaged Sept. 28, 1777; discharged Nov. 8, 1777; 
service, 40 days; company probably raised in Dracut, Chelmsford, and 
Dunstable, and marched to reinforce Northern Army, Sept. 30. 1777. 

Hey wood, Benjamin, Chelmsford (probably). List of men probably belonging 
to Chelmsford, dated May 1, 1775; also, company receipt for mileage, 
given to Capt. John Ford, dated Ticonderoga, Aug. 28, 1776; also, 
company receipt for wages to Oct. 1, 1776, given to Capt. John Ford, 
dated Ticonderoga; company marched from Chelmsford, July 25, 1776, 
and was discharged at Albany, Jan. 1, 1777. 



324 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

Heywood, Jesse, Chelmsford (probably). List of men probably belonging 
to Chelmsford, dated May 1, 1775; also, company receipt for mileage, 
given to Capt. John Ford, dated Ticonderoga, Aug. 28, 1776; also, 
company receipt for wages to Oct. 1, 1776, given to Capt. John Ford, 
dated Ticonderoga; company marched from Chelmsford, July 25, 1776, 
and was discharged at Albany, Jan. 1, 1777. 

Heywood, John. Company receipt, dated Chelmsford, April 19, 1776, for 
wages from Feb. 5, 1776, to April 1, 1776, for service in Capt. John 
Ford's Co., Col. Roberson's (Robinson's) Regt. 

Heywood, Samuel, Chelmsford (probably). List of men probably belonging 
to Chelmsford, dated May 1, 1775. 

Hibbord, Lazarus. Company receipt for mileage, given to Capt. John Ford, 
dated Ticonderoga, Aug. 28, 1776; also, company receipt, given to Capt. 
John Ford, for wages to Oct. 1, 1776, dated Ticonderoga; company 
marched from Chelmsford, July 25, 1776, and was discharged at Albany, 
Jan. 1, 1777. 

Hildreth, Elijah. Drummer, Capt. Jonathan Minott's Co., Col. Baldwin's 
Regt.; pay abstract for mileage to and from headquarters, dated 
Cambridge, Jan. 12, 1776. 

Hildreth, Elijah. Receipt dated Chelmsford, April 19, 1776, signed by said 
Hildreth and others belonging to Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Roberson's 
(Robinson's) Regt., for wages for service from Feb. 5, 1776, to April 1, 1776. 

Hildreth, Zachariah, Boston. List of men mustered by Nathaniel Barber, 
Muster Master for Suffolk Co., dated Boston, June 8, 1777; Capt. 
Langdon's Co., Col. Henry Jackson's Regt. 

Hodgman, Asa. Private, Capt. Joshua Parker's Co., Col. Robinson's Regt.; 
enlisted Aug. 2, 1777; service to Jan. 1, 1778, at Rhode Island. 

Hogmon [or Hodgman], Asa, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Zaccheus Wright's 
Co., Col. Brooks's Regt.; company return dated Camp at White Plains, 
Oct. 31, 1776. 

How, Ehpraim. Company receipt for mileage, given to Capt. John Ford, 
dated Ticonderoga, Aug. 28, 1776; also company receipt for wages to 
Oct. 1, 1776, given to Capt. John Ford, dated Ticonderoga; company 
marched from Chelmsford, July 25, 1776, and was discharged at Albany, 
Jan. 1, 1777. 

Howard, Benjamin, Chelmsford. List of 6 months men raised agreeable to 
resolve of June 5, 1780, returned as received of Maj. Joseph Hosmer, 
Superintendent for Middlesex Co., by Justin Ely, Commissioner; also, 
descriptive list of men raised to reinforce the Continental Army for the 
term of 6 months, agreeable to resolve of June 5. 1780, returned as received 
of Justin Ely, Commissioner, by Maj. Peter Harwood, of 6th Mass. 
Regt., at Springfield, July 2, 1780; age, 20 yrs.; stature, 5 ft., 8 in.; 
complexion, light; engaged for town of Chelmsford; marched to camp 
July 2, 1780, under command of Capt. Phineas Parker; also, list of men 
raised for the 6 months' service and returned by Brig. Gen. Paterson as 
having passed muster in a return dated Camp Totoway, Oct. 25, 1780; 
also, pay roll for 6 months men raised by the town of Chelmsford for 
service in the Continental Army at North river during 1780; marched 
from home June 30, 1780; discharged Jan. 2, 1781; service, 6 mos., 14 
days, including 10 days (200 miles) travel home. 

Howard, Jacob, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Oliver Barron's Co. of Militia, 
Col. David Green's Regt., which marched on the alarm of April 19, 
1775; service, 10 days. 

Howard, Samuel (also given Samuel Smith Howard), Chelmsford. Descrip- 
tive list dated West Point, Jan. 25, 1781; Col. John Greaton's (3d) Regt.; 
age, 22 yrs.; stature, 5 ft., 7^ in.; complexion, dark; hair, dark; eyes, dark; 
residence, Chelmsford; enlisted Nov. 18, 1776, by Lieut. Dorathy; 
enlistment, during war. [See Samuel Hayward.] 

Howard, Willard, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Oliver Barron's Co. of Militia, 
Col. David Green's Regt., which marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; 
service, 2 days; Capt. John Ford's Co., marched Sept. 30, 1777 to 
reinforce the Northern Army. 



RECORDS OF CHELMSFORD MEN IN THE REVOLUTION 325 

Hucherson, Nathaniel, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Simon Hunt's Co., Col. 

Brooks's Regt.; company return (year not given); reported wounded. 
Hughes Richard. Company receipt for mileage, given to Capt. John hord, 

dated Ticonderoga, Aug. 28, 1776; also, company receipt given to Capt. 

Tohn Ford for wages to Oct. 1, 1776, dated Ticonderoga; company 

marched from Chelmsford, July 25, 1776, and was discharged at Albany, 

Hunt John. ^Receipt dated Chelmsford, April 19, 1776, signed by said Hunt 
and others belonging to Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Roberson s (Robin- 
son's) Regt., for wages for service from Feb. 5, 1776, to April 1, 177b. ^ 

Hunt Jonathan. Receipt dated Chelmsford, April 19, 1776, signed by said 
Hunt and others belonging to Capt. John Ford's Co., Col Roberson s 
(Robinson's) Regt., for wages for service from Feb. 5, 1/76, to April, 

1776. r . r J 

Hutchinson, Nathaniel, Chelmsford. List of men returned as serving on 
picket guard under Maj. Baldwin, dated May 23, 1775; reported detailed 
under Capt. Reuben Dickinson; also, Capt. Abishai Browns Co., Col. 
Tohn Nixon's (5th) Regt.; receipt for advance pay, signed by said 
Hutchinson and others, dated Cambridge, June 26, 1775; also. Private, 
same Co. and Regt.; muster roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; enlisted April 28, 
1775- service, 3 mos., 11 days; also, company return dated Sept. 30, 
1775; said Hutchinson's place reported as having been taken by Joseph 

Hyde Simon. Company receipt dated Chelmsford, April 19, 1776, for 
wages for service from Feb. 5, 1776, to April 1, 1776, in Capt. John 
Ford's Co., Col. Roberson's (Robinson's) Regt. 

Jacob, Sa'l. Return of cartridges for Capt. Ford's Co. received from Nov. 4 
to Jan. 6 (year not given). . t u r j 

Johnson, Obadiah. Company receipt for mileage, given to Capt. John bord, 
dated Ticonderoga, Aug. 28, 1776; also, copy of a company receipt, 
given to Capt. John Ford, for money due Oct. 2, 1776, dated Ticonderoga. 

Jons, Jonathan. Return of cartridges for Capt. Ford's Co. received from 
Nov. 4 to Jan. 6 (year not given). t , r- j r 

Jonson, Obadiah. Company receipt, given to Capt. John Ford, for wages 
to Oct. 1, 1776, dated Ticonderoga; company marched from Chelmsford, 
July 25, 1776, and was discharged at Albany, Jan. 1, 1777. , ... . 

Keent, Isaac, Jr., Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Oliver Barron s Co. of militia, 
Col. David Green's Regt., which marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; 
service, 6 days. t • ^ /- i 

Kent, Isaac, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Moses Barns s Co., Lieut. Col. 
Perce's (Pierce's) Regt.; enlisted May 24, 1779; service to July 1, 1779, 
1 mo., 7 days, at Rhode Island; enlistment, 2 months, to expire July 1, 
1779 

Keyes, Daniel, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Oliver Barron's Co. of Militia, 
Col David Green's Regt., which marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; 
service, 6 days; also, Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Ebenezer Bridge's (27th) 
Regt. ; order for advance pay, signed by said Keyes and others, dated 
Cambridge, June 6, 1775; also. Sergeant, same Co. and Regt.; muster 
roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; enlisted April 25, 1775; service, 3 mos., 14 days; 
also, account of articles lost at the battle of Bunker Hill, June 17, 1775, 
certified at Cambridge, March 18, 1776. r iv/r-i- • 

Keyes, John, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Oliver Barrens Co. of Militia, 
Col. David Green's Regt., which marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; 
service 6 days; also, list of men mustered by Nathaniel Barber, Muster 
Master for Suffolk Co., dated Boston, March 30, 1777; Capt. Lane's Co., 
Col. Nixon's Regt.; also. Sergeant, Capt. Amos Foster's Co., Col. Cyprian 
How's Regt.; entered service July 28, 1780, 3 days preceding march; 
discharged Oct. 30, 1780; service, 3 mos., 8 days, probably at Rhode 
Island, including 5 days (100 miles) travel home; company detached 
from 7th Middlesex Co. Regt. and ordered part to Rhode Island and 
part to Fishkill; regiment raised to reinforce Continental Army for 3 
months. 



326 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

Keyes, Solomon, Chelmsford. Capt. Ford's Co., Col. Bridge's Regt.; order 
for advance pay, signed by said Keyes and others, dated CamlDridge, 
June 6, 1775; also, descriptive list dated June 15, 1775; Capt. John 
Ford's Co., Col. Bridge's Regt.; age, 23 yrs. ; stature, 5 ft., 10 in.; com- 
plexion, light; occupation, farmer; residence, Chelmsford; enlisted April 
29, 1775; also, company receipt dated Chelmsford, April 19, 1776, for 
wages for service from Feb. 5, 1776, to April 1, 1776, in Capt. Ford's 
Co., Col. Roberson's (Robinson's) Regt.; also, company receipt for 
mileage, given to Capt. John Ford, dated Ticonderoga, Aug. 28, 1776; 
also, company receipt, given to Capt. John Ford, for wages to Oct. 1, 1776, 
dated Ticonderoga; company marched from Chelmsford, July 25, 1776, 
and was discharged at Albany, Jan. 1, 1777. 

Keyes, Uriah. Company receipt dated Chelmsford, April 19, 1776, for 
wages for service from Feb. 5, 1776, to April 1, 1776, in Capt. John 
Ford's Co., Col. Roberson's (Robinson's) Regt. 

Keys, John, Chelmsford. Descriptive list dated June 15, 1775; Capt. John 
Ford's Co., Col. Bridge's Regt.; age, 26 yrs.; stature, 6 ft.; complexion, 
fresh; occupation, farmer; residence, Chelmsford; enlisted April 25, 1775; 
also, Private, Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Ebenezer Bridge's (27th) 
Regt.; muster roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; enlisted April 25, 1775; service, 
3 mos., 14 days; also, list of men raised to serve in the Continental Army; 
residence, Chelmsford; engaged for town of Chelmsford; term, 3 years; 
also. Sergeant, 8th Co., Col. Thomas Nixon's Regt.; Continental Army 
pay accounts for service from Jan. 1, 1777, to Dec. 31, 1779; also, Capt. 
Jabez Lane's Co., Col. Thomas Nixon's (5th) Regt.; return of men who 
were in camp on or before Aug. 15, 1777, and who had not been absent 
subsequently except on furlough, etc., certified in Camp at Peekskill, 
Feb. 16, 1779; also, Maj. Joseph Thompson's Co., Col. Nixon's (6th) 
Regt.; pay rolls for June — Oct., 1779; also, Maj. Peter Harwood's Co., 
Col. Nixon's Regt.; pay rolls for Nov. and Dec, 1779; reported discharged 
Jan. 1, 1780; also. Major's Co.; account of clothing delivered for the 
year 1780; receipt for said clothing dated Peekskill, Dec. 5, 1779. 

Keys, Solomon, Chelmsford. Private, Col. Moses Parker's Co., which 
marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 10 days; roll endorsed 
"L't. Benj. Walkers Roll"; also, Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Ebenezer 
Bridge's (27th) Regt.; muster roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; enlisted April 29, 
1775; service, 3 mos., 10 days. 

Kidder, Phineas, Chelmsford. Order on Maj. Barber, dated Cambridge, 
June 24, 1775, signed by Col. E. Bridge, for cartridge boxes for said 
Kidder and others belonging to Lieut. John Flint's Co.; also. Private, 
Capt. Benjamin Walker's Co., Col. Ebenezer Bridge's (27th) Regt.; 
company return (probably Oct., 1775); also, order for bounty coat or its 
equivalent in money dated Cambridge, Nov. 30, 1775; also. Private, 
Capt. Stephen Russell's Co., Col. Samuel Bullard's Regt., Gen. Warner's 
Brigade; enlisted Aug. 15, 1777; discharged Nov. 30, 1777; service, 3 mos., 
28 days, in Northern department, including 12 days (240 miles) travel 
home; roll dated Dracut; also, list of 6 months men raised agreeable to 
resolve of June 5, 1780, returned as received of Maj. Joseph Hosmer, 
Superintendent for Middlesex Co., by Justin Ely, Commissioner; also, 
descriptive list of men raised to reinforce the Continental Army for the 
term of 6 months, agreeable to resolve of June 5, 1780, returned as re- 
ceived of Justin Ely, Commissioner, by Brig. Gen. John Glover, at 
Springfield, July 7, 1780; age, 23 yrs.; stature, 5 ft., 9 in.; complexion, 
dark; engaged for town of Chelmsford; marched to camp July 7, 1780, 
under command of Capt. Dix; also, list of men raised for the 6 months' 
service and returned by Brig. Gen. Paterson as having passed muster in 
a return dated Camp Totoway, Oct. 25, 1780; also, pay roll for 6 months 
men raised by the town of Chelmsford for service in the Continental 
Army at North River during 1780; marched from home June 30, 1780; 
discharged Jan. 7, 1781; service, 6 mos., 19 days, including 10 days 
(200 miles) travel home. 



RECORDS OF CHELMSFORD MEN IN THE REVOLUTION 327 

Kves. Daniel, Chelmsford. Sergeant, Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Bridge's 

(27th) Regt.; descriptive list dated June 15, 1775; age, 37 yrs.; stature, 

5 ft 10 in. ; complexion, fresh; occupation, farmer; residence, Chelmsford; 

enlisted April 25, 1775; also, company return dated Sept. 25, 1775^ 

Kyes, John, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. John Fords Co., Col. Ebenezer 

Bridge's (27th) Regt.; company return dated Sept. 25, 1775. 
Kyes, Solomon, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. John Ford s Co., Col. Ebenezer 

Bridge's (27th) Regt.; company return dated Sept. 25, 1775. 
Lancey, Samuel, Chelmsford. List of 6 months men raised agreeable to 
resolve of June 5, 1780, returned as received of Ma]. Joseph Hosmer, 
Superintendent for Middlesex Co., by Justin Ely, Commissioner, dated 
Springfield; also, descriptive list of men raised to reinforce the Con- 
tinental Army for the term of 6 months agreeable to resolve of June 5, 
1780 returned as received of Justin Ely, Commissioner, by Maj. Peter 
Harwood, of 6th Mass. regt., at Springfield, July 2, 1780; age, 20 yrs ; 
stature 5 ft., 9 in.; complexion, light; engaged for town ot Chelmstord; 
marched to camp July 2, 1780, under command of Capt. Phineas Parker; 
also, list of men raised for the 6 months' service and returned by Brig. 
Gen. Paterson as having passed muster in a return dated Camp Totoway, 
Oct 25 1780; also, pay roll for 6 months men raised by the town of 
Chelmsford for service in the Continental Army at North River during 
1780; marched from home June 30, 1780; discharged Dec. 19, 1780; 
service, 6 mos., including 10 days (200 miles) travel home. 
Lancy, Samuel, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. John Moore s Co., Col. Jonathan 
Reed's Regt. of guards; muster rolls dated Cambridge, May 9, and 
June 1 1778; enlisted April 1, 1778; service guarding troops of con- 
vention; enlistment, 3 months from April 2, 1778; also, same Co. and 
Regt ; joined April 2, 1778; service to July 3, 1778, 3 mos^ 2 days, at 
Cambridge; also. Corporal, Capt. Thomas Hovey's Co., Col. Nathan 
Tyler's Regt.; enlisted July 6, 1779; discharged Dec. 25 (also given 
Dec 18), 1779; service, 5 mos., 25 (also given 5 mos., 17) days, at Rhode 
Island; also, same Co. and Regt.; pay roll for Dec, 1779, allowing 1 mo., 
5 davs service at Rhode Island, including travel (100 miles) home. 
Lane John. Ensign; company receipt for mileage, given to Capt. John 
Ford dated Ticonderoga, Aug. 28, 1776; also, company receipt for wages 
to Oct 1, 1776, given to Capt. Ford, dated Ticonderoga; company 
marched from Chelmsford, July 25, 1776, and was discharged at Albany, 
Jan. 1, 1777; also. Ensign, Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Jonathan Reed a 
Regt.; rations allowed said Lane from July 11, 1776, to Nov. 30, 177b; 
credited with 143 days' allowance. t^ , . r- <- i 

Larkins, Peter, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Joshua Parkers Co., Col. 
William Prescott's Regt.; muster roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; enlisted April 
26, 1775; service, 97 days. _ ic i^^rc /- ^- 

Lew, Barzillai, Chelmsford. Descriptive list dated June 15, 1775; Capt. 
John Ford's Co., Col. Bridge's Regt.; age, 30 yrs.; stature 6 ft.; occu- 
pation, cooper; residence, Chelmsford; enlisted May 6, 1775; reported a 
negro; also, Fifer (also given Drummer), Capt. Ford's Co., Col. Ebenezer 
Bridge's (27th) Regt.; muster roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; enhsted May 6, 
1775- service, 3 mos., 3 days; also, company return dated Sept. 25, 1775; 
also, company receipt dated Chelmsford, April 19, 1776 for wages for 
service from Feb. 5, 1776, to April 1, 1776, in Capt. John Ford s Co., 
Col. Roberson's (Robinson's) Regt.; also, company receipt for mileage, 
given to Capt. John Ford, dated Ticonderoga, Aug. 28, 1776; also, 
company receipt for wages to Oct. 1, 1776, given to Capt John Ford 
dated Ticonderoga; company marched from Chelmsford, July zd, i//b, 
and was discharged at Albany, Jan. 1, 1777. 
Lloyd, Thomas, Boston (also given Chelmsford). Return of men raised 
to serve in the Continental Army from Capt. Ebenezer Gores (1st) 
Co., Col. William Mcintosh's (1st Suffolk Co.) Regt.; engaged for town 
of Roxbury (also given Walpole); joined Capt. Sumner s Co., Col. 
Greaton's Regt.; term, 3 years, to expire April —,1780; reported as 
from Ireland; also, list of men mustered by Nathaniel Barber, Muster 



328 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

Master for Suffolk Co., dated Boston, March 16, 1777; Capt. Sumner's 
Co., Col. Greaton's Regt.; also, descriptive list of men mustered, as 
returned by Nathaniel Barber, Muster Master for Suffolk Co., dated 
Boston, June 25, 1780; Col. Nixon's Regt.; age, 25 yrs.; stature, 5 ft., 
5 in.; complexion, dark; occupation, gentlemen soldier; residence, Chelms- 
ford; mustered by Capt. Chambers; also, descriptive list dated West 
Point, Jan. 20, 1781; Capt. Chambers's Co., Lieut. Col. Smith's (6th) 
Regt.; rank. Private; age, 24 yrs.; stature, 5 ft., 5 in.; complexion, dark; 
hair, dark; eyes, dark; occupation, tailor; residence, Boston; enlisted 
in 1780, by Capt. Chambers; enlistment, during war; also. Private, Capt. 
Matthew Chambers's Co., Lieut. Col. Calvin Smith's (6th) Regt.; return 
for wages; wages allowed said Lloyd for Jan., 1781 — July, 1782; reported 
sick in hospital Oct., 1781 — Jan., 1782, transferred to 2d Co. in Aug., 
1782; also, Capt. Daniel Pilsbury's Co., Lieut. Col. Smith's Regt.; return 
for wages; wages allowed said Lloyd for Aug. — Dec, 1782; reported 
transferred from Capt. Chambers's Co., Aug. 1, 1782. 

Lunn, Samuel. Private, Capt. Reuben Butterfield's Co.; enlisted Dec. 16, 
1776; discharged March 16, 1777; service, 90 days; travel home 15 days 
(300 miles) also allowed; also, Capt. John Ford's Co. of Volunteers, Col. 
Jonathan Reed's Regt.; enlisted Sept. 28 (also given Sept, 27), 1777; 
discharged Nov. 8, 1777; service, 40 (also given 43) days; company 
probably raised in Dracut, Chelmsford and Dunstable, and marched 
Sept. 30, 1777, to reinforce Northern Army. 

Macintir, Benjamin. Capt. Ford's Co., return of cartridges received from 
Nov. 4 to Jan. 6 (year not given). 

Macintir, Daniel. Capt. Ford's Co.; return of cartridges received from 
Nov. 4 to Jan. 6 (year not given). 

Maneng, John. Company receipt, given to Capt. John Ford, for wages to 
Oct. 1, 1776, dated Ticonderoga; company marched from Chelmsford, 
July 25, 1776, and was discharged at Albany, Jan. 1, 1777. 

Maning, John. Company receipt for mileage, given to Capt. John Ford, 
dated Ticonderoga, Aug. 28, 1776. 

March [Marsh], John. Private, Capt. John Ford's Co. of Volunteers, Col. 
Jonathan Reed's Regt.; enlisted Sept. 28 (also given Sept. 27), 1777; 
discharged Nov. 8, 1777; service, 40 days; company raised in Dracut, 
Chelmsford and Dunstable, and marched Sept. 30, 1777, to reinforce 
Northern Army. 

March [Marsh], John. Receipt dated Chelmsford, April 19, 1776, signed by 
said March and others, for wages for service from Feb. 5, 1776, to April 1, 
1776, in Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Roberson's (Robinson's) Regt.; 
also, company receipt, given to Capt. John Ford, for mileage, dated 
Ticonderoga, Aug. 28, 1776; also, company receipt, given to Capt. John 
Ford, for wages to Oct. 1, 1776, dated Ticonderoga; company marched 
from Chelmsford, July 25, 1776, and was discharged at Albany, Jan. 1, 
1777. 

Marchel [Marshall], David. Private, Capt. John Ford's Co. of Volunteers, 
Col. Jonathan Reed's Regt.; enlisted Sept. 28, 1777; discharged Nov. 8, 
1777; service, 40 days; company probably raised in Dracut, Chelmsford 
and Dunstable, and marched Sept. 30, 1777, to reinforce Northern Army. 

Marshal, Isaac, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Zaccheus Wright's Co., Col. 
Brooks's Regt.; company return dated Camp at White Plains, Oct. 31, 
1776; reported sent with the wounded; also, Capt. Stephen Russell's 
Co., Col. Samuel Bullard's Regt.; enlisted Aug. 15, 1777; discharged 
Nov. 30, 1777; service, 3 mos., 28 days, with Gen. Warner's Brigade in 
Northern department, including 12 days (240 miles) travel home; roll 
dated Dracut. 

Marshal, Samuel, Chelmsford. Private, Col. Moses Parker's Co., which 
marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 9 days; roll endorsed 
"L't. Benj Walkers Roll." 

Marshal, Thomas, Chelmsford. Corporal, Capt. Benjamin Walker's Co., 
Col. Ebenezer Bridge's (27th) Regt.; company return (probably Oct., 
1775). 



RECORDS OF CHELMSFORD MEN IN THE REVOLUTION 329 

Marshall, David, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Oliver Barron's Co. of Militia, 
Col. David Green's Regt., which marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; 
service, 5 days. 

Marshall, Isaac, Chelmsford. Private, Col. Moses Parker's Co., which 
marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 12 days; roll endorsed 
"L't Benj Walkers Roll"; also, Capt. John Minot's Co., Col. Josiah 
Whitney's Regt.; arrived at destination May 10, 1777; discharged July 9, 
1777; service, 2 mos., 9 days, at Rhode Island, including travel (8 days) 
to and from place of destination; roll dated Warwick Neck. 

Marshall, Jacob, Chelmsford. List of 6 months men raised agreeable to 
resolve of June 5, 1780, returned as received of Maj. Joseph Hosmer, 
Superintendent for Middlesex Co., by Justin Ely, Commissioner; also, 
descriptive list of men raised to reinforce the Continental Army for the 
term of 6 months, agreeable to resolve of June 5, 1780, returned as received 
of Justin Ely, Commissioner, by Maj. Peter Harwood, of 6th Mass. 
Regt., at Springfield, July 2, 1780; age, 20 yrs. ; stature, 5 ft., 9 in.; 
complexion, light; engaged for town of Chelmsford; marched to camp 
July 2, 1780, under command of Capt. Phineas Parker; also, list of men 
raised for the 6 months' service and returned by Brig. Gen. Paterson as 
having passed muster in a return dated Camp Totoway, Oct. 25, 1780; 
also, pay roll for 6 months men raised by the town of Chelmsford for 
service in the Continental Army at North river during 1780; marched 
from home June 30, 1780; discharged Jan. 2, 1781; service, 6 mos., 14 
days, including 10 days (200 miles) travel home. 

Marshall, James, Chelmsford. List of 6 months men raised agreeable to 
resolve of June 5, 1780, returned as received of Maj. Joseph Hosmer, 
Superintendent for Middlesex Co., by Justin Ely, Commissioner; also, 
descriptive list of men raised to reinforce the Continental Army for 
the term of 6 months, agreeable to resolve of June 5, 1780, returned as 
received of Justin Ely, Commissioner, by Maj. Peter Harwood, of 6th 
Mass. Regt., at Springfield, July 2, 1780; age, 20 yrs.; stature, 5 ft., 
9 in.; complexion, light; engaged for town of Chelmsford; marched to 
camp July 2, 1780, under command of Capt. Phineas Parker; also, list 
of men raised for the 6 months' service and returned by Brig. Gen. 
Paterson as having passed muster in a return dated Camp Totoway, 
Oct. 25, 1780; also, pay roll for 6 months men raised by the town of 
Chelmsford for service in the Continental Army at North river during 
1780; marched from home June 30, 1780; discharged Jan. 2, 1781; 
service, 6 mos., 14 days, including 10 days (200 miles) travel home. 

Marshall, Joseph, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Oliver Barron's Co. of 
Militia, Col. David Green's Regt., which marched on the alarm of April 19, 
1775; service, 5 days. 

Marshall, Samuel, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Oliver Barron's Co. of 
Militia, Col. David Green's Regt., which marched on the alarm of April 
19, 1775; service, 9 days. 

Marshall, Samuel, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. 
Ebenezer Bridge's (27th) Regt.; muster roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; enlisted 
April 29, 1775; service, 3 mos., 10 days. 

Marshall, Samuel, Chelmsford. Capt. Benjamin Walker's Co., Col. Ebenezer 
Bridge's (27th) Regt. ; receipt for advance pay, signed by said Marshall 
and others, dated Cambridge, June 24, 1775; also. Private, same Co. 
and Regt.; company return (probably Oct., 1775). 

Marshall, Samuel, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. John Minot's Co., Col. 
Josiah Whitney's Regt.; arrived at destination May 10, 1777; dis- 
charged July 9, 1777; service, 2 mos., 9 days, at Rhode Island, including 
(8 days) to and from place of destination. Roll dated Warwick Neck. 

Marshall, Thomas, Chelmsford. Corporal, Capt. Benjamin Walker's Co., 
Col. Ebenezer Bridge's Regt.; receipt for advance pay, signed by said 
Marshall and others, dated Cambridge, June 24, 1775; also, muster roll 
dated Aug. 1, 1775; enhsted April 28, 1775; service, 3 mos., 11 days. 



330 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

Marshall, Thomas, Jr., Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Oliver Barron's Co. 
of Militia, Col. David Green's Regt., which marched on the alarm of 
April 19, 1775; service, 9 days. 

Marshel, Abel. Descriptive list of men raised in Middlesex Co., agreeable 
to resolve of Dec. 2, 1780, as returned by Joseph Hosmer, Superintendent 
for said county; age, 16 yrs.; stature, 5 ft., 6 in.; complexion, light; 
hair, light; eyes, blue; occupation, farmer; engaged for town of Chelms- 
ford; engaged July 31, 1781; term, 6 months. 

Marshel, Samuel, Chelmsford. Descriptive list dated June 15, 1775; Capt. 
John Ford's Co., Col. Bridge's Regt.; age, 23 yrs.; stature, 6 ft.; com- 
plexion, dark; occupation, farmer; residence, Chelmsford; enlisted April 
29, 1775; also, Private, Capt. Ford's Co., Col. Ebenezer Bridge's (27th) 
Regt.; company return dated Sept. 25, 1775. 

Marting, William, Walpole (also given Chelmsford). Private, Capt. Luke 
Drury's Co., Col. Jonathan Ward's Regt.; muster roll dated Aug. 1, 
1775; enlisted May 1, 1775; service, 3 mos., 7 days; also, company 
return (probably Oct., 1775); reported on command at Canada; also, 
certificate dated Grafton, May 25, 1776, signed by Capt. Luke Drury, 
certifying that said Marting had been a soldier in his company and had 
enlisted in Sept., 1775, into Capt. Jonas Hubbard's Co. for the expedition 
to Quebec, and that he had not received a bounty coat for that 8 months' 
service prior to said enlistment. 

Mastes, Amos, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Oliver Barron's Co. of Militia, 
Col. David Green's Regt., which marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; 
service, 7 days. 

Maxell, Elijah. Order on Capt. Ford, payable to Lieut. Eaton, dated 
Cambridge, Jan. 26, 1778, signed by said Maxell, for 20s 6d out of his 
wages; also, company receipt for wages, etc., given to Capt. Cadwallader 
Ford, dated Wilmington, May 22, 1778. 

McClaning, John, Chelmsford. List of men raised for the 6 months' service 
and returned by Brig. Gen. Paterson as having passed muster in a return 
dated Camp Totoway, Oct. 25, 1780; also, list of men mustered in 
Middlesex Co.; engaged for town of Chelmsford; mustered March 4, 
1781. 

McClannen, John. Pay roll for 6 months men raised by the town of Chelms- 
ford for service in the Continental Army at North river during 1780; 
marched from home June 30, 1780; discharged Dec. 10, 1780; service, 
5 mos., 21 days, including 10 days (200 miles) travel home. 

McCom, Josiah. Capt. Furbush's Co., Col. Bridge's Regt.; receipt for 
advance pay, signed by said McCom and others, dated Cambridge, 
June 30, 1775. 

McKawes, Hugh, Chelmsford. List of men mustered to serve in the Con- 
tinental Army, as returned by Nathaniel Barber, Muster Master for 
Suffolk Co., dated Boston, April 26, 1780; Col. Nixon's Regt.; age, 25 
yrs.; stature, 5 ft., 8 in.; comple.\ion, brown; occupation, gentleman 
soldier; residence, Chelmsford; mustered by Capt. Chambers; enlist- 
ment, during war. 

McKlenne, John. List of 6 months men raised agreeable to resolve of June 5, 
1780, returned as received of Maj. Joseph Hosmer, Superintendent for 
Middlesex Co., by Justin Ely, Commissioner, dated Springfield; also, 
descriptive list of men raised to reinforce the Continental Army for the 
term of 6 months, agreeable to resolve of June 5, 1780, returned as received 
of Justin Ely, Commissioner, by Brig. Gen. John Glover, at Springfield, 
July 7, 1780; age, 28 yrs.; stature, 5 ft., 5 in.; complexion, dark; engaged 
for town of Chelmsford; marched to camp July 7, 1780, under command 
of Capt. Dix. 

Mears, John, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Oliver Barron's Co. of Militia, 
Col. David Green's Regt., which marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; 
service, 5 days; also, receipt dated Chelmsford, April 19, 1776, signed 
by said Mears and others belonging to Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. 
Roberson's (Robinson's) Regt., for wages for service from Feb. 5, 1776, 
to April 1, 1776; also, company receipt for mileage, given to Capt. John 



RECORDS OF CHELMSFORD MEN IN THE REVOLUTION 331 

Ford, dated Ticonderoga, Aug. 28, 1776; also, company receipt, given 
to Capt. John Ford, for wages to Oct. 1, 177G, dated Ticonderoga; 
company marched from Chelmsford, July 25, 1776, and was discharged 
at Albany, Jan. 1, 1777. 
Mears, William, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Oliver Barron's Co. of Militia, 
Col. David Green's Regt., which marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; 
service, 4 days; also, company receipt for mileage, given to Capt. John 
Ford, dated Ticonderoga, Aug. 28, 1776; also, company receipt, given 
to Capt. John Ford, for wages due to Oct. 1, 1776, dated Ticonderoga; 
company marched from Chelmsford, July 25, 1776, and was discharged 
at Albany, Jan. 1, 1777; also. Private, Lieut. Colonel's Co., Col. John 
Bailey's Regt.; Continental Army pay accounts for service from Jan. 1, 
1780, to Dec. 31, 1780; residence, Chelmsford; engaged for town of 
Chelmsford; also, descriptive list dated Hutts, West Point, Jan. 25, 1781; 
Capt. Hay ward's Co., 2d Mass. Regt.; rank, Private; age, 25 yrs.; 
stature, 5 ft., 4 in. ; complexion, dark; hair, black; residence, Chelmsford; 
enlisted April — , 1777, by Lieut. Ball, at Chelmsford; enlistment, during 
war. 

Meears, William, Chelmsford. Private, 1st Co., Col. Bailey's Regt.; Con- 
tinental Army pay accounts for service from April 23, l777, to Dec. 31, 
1779; also, Capt. Hugh Maxwell's (1st) Co., Col. John Bailey's Regt.; 
company return dated Camp near Valley Forge, Jan. 24, 1778; residence, 
Chelmsford. 

Melendy, William, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. John Minot's Co., Col. 
Josiah Whitney's Regt.; arrived at destination May 10, 1777; discharged 
July 9, 1777; service, 2 mos., 9 days, at Rhode Island, including travel 
(8 days) to and from place of destination; roll dated Warwick Neck; 
also, Capt. Joshua Walker's Co., Col. Samuel Deanney's (Denny's) 
Regt.; enlisted Oct. 27, 1779; discharged Nov. 23, 1779; service, 1 mo,, 
9 days, including travel (215 miles) home; company detached to join 
Continental Army and ordered to march to Claverack to serve for 3 
months; roll dated Woburn. 

Melvin, Benjamin, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Oliver Barron's Co. of 
Militia, Col. David Green's Regt., which marched on the alarm of April 
19, 1775; service, 5 days. 

Menule, Charles. Pay roll for 6 months men raised by the town of Chelmsford 
for service in the Continental Army at North river during 1780; reported 
deserted before he arrived at camp. 

Meriam, Abraham. Company receipt for mileage, given to Capt. John Ford, 
dated Ticonderoga, Aug. 28, 1776; also, company receipt for wages to 
Oct. 1, 1776, given to Capt. John Ford, dated Ticonderoga; company 
marched from Chelmsford, July 25, 1776, and was discharged at Albany, 
Jan. 1, 1777. 

Minot, John, Chelmsford. Captain, 1st Co. (South Co. in Chelmsford), Col. 
Simeon Spaulding's (7th Middlesex Co.) Regt. of Mass. Militia; list 
of officers chosen in said regiment; ordered in Council, May 31, 1776, 
that said officers be commissioned; reported commissioned May 31, 
1776; also, return of officers who marched to camp to join Col. Dike's 
Regt., dated Dorchester, Sept. 27, 1776; said Minot, Captain, with the 
other officers of his company, marched Aug. 21, 1776; ordered in Council, 
Sept. 27, 1776, that said officers be commissioned; also. Captain, Col. 
Dike's Regt.; pay abstract for mileage to and from Dorchester Heights 
and travel allowance home ; mileage (64 miles) and 2 days' travel allowed 
said Minot; warrant allowed in Council, Nov. 30, 1776; also. Captain, 
Col. Josiah Whitney's Regt.; arrived at destination May 10, 1777; 
discharged July 9, 1777; service, 2 mos., 9 days, at Rhode Island, including 
8 days (144 miles) travel to and from place of destination; roll dated 
Warwick Neck; also. Major; lists of men appearing under the heading 
"Hartwell Brook the first Everidge"; said Minot appears among men 
who "filled up the Continental Army 1777"; also, ofticial record of a 
ballot by the House of Representatives, dated June 20, 1778; said Minot 
chosen 2d Major, Col. William Thompson's (7th Middlesex Co.) Regt. 



332 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

of Mass. Militia; appointment concurred in by Council June 20, 1778; 
also, ofificial record of a ballot by the House of Representatives, dated 
April 21, 1780; said Minot chosen 2d Major, Col. Jonathan Brown's 
(7th Middlesex Co.) Regt. of Mass. Militia; appointment concurred in 
by Council, April 21, 1780; reported commissioned April 21, 1780. 

Minott, John. Lieutenant, Capt. Ebenezer Withington's Co., which mustered 
April 19, 1775; service, 12 days; also, Captain, Col. Nicholas Dike's 
Regt.; list of officers of two regiments raised for defence of Boston (year 
not given, probably 1776); also. Captain; return of company officers 
of Col. Dike's Regt., showing number of men present and also those not 
joined, dated Dorchester, Sept. 21, 1776, and endorsed "Officers to be 
Commissioned"; company probably joined from Col. Brooks's or Col. 
Sawtell's Regt., Brig. Prescott's Brigade; also. Captain; list of officers 
in Col. Nicholas Dike's Regt.; ordered in Council, Feb. 1, 1777, that said 
officers be commissioned; commissions to be dated Dec. 1, 1776; also 
Captain; list of officers belonging to Col. Dike's Regt., who agreed to 
tarry at Dorchester Heights until March 1, 1777; also. Captain; Col. 
Dike's Regt.; muster roll for Dec, 1776 — Feb., 1777; credited to town 
of Chelmsford; engaged Dec. 1, 1776; regiment raised to serve until 
March 1, 1777. 

Morall, Robert. Company receipt for mileage, given to Capt. John Ford, 
dated Ticonderoga, Aug. 28, 1776. 

Morel, Robert. Company receipt, given to Capt. John Ford, for wages to 
Oct. 1, 1776, dated Ticonderoga; company marched from Chelmsford, 
July 25, 1776, and was discharged at Albany, Jan. 1, 1777. 

Morrill, Jeremiah. Capt. Charles Furbush's Co., Col. Ebenezer Bridge's 
Regt. ; receipt for advance pay, signed by said Morrill and others, dated 
Cambridge, June 30, 1775; also, order for bounty coat or its equivalent 
in money dated Cambridge Camp, Nov. 21, 1775; also, receipt dated 
Chelmsford, April 19, 1776, signed by said Morrill and others belonging 
to Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Roberson's (Robinson's) Regt., for wages 
for services from Feb. 5, 1776, to April 1, 1776. 

Needham, John. Company receipt dated Chelmsford, April 19, 1776, for 
wages for service from Feb. 5, 1776, to April 1, 1776, in Capt. John Ford's 
Co., Col. Roberson's (Robinson's) Regt. 

Newton, Hananiah, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Joseph Fox's Co., Col. 
Henry Jackson's (16th) Regt.; Continental Army pay accounts for 
service from July 10, 1777, to July 10, 1780; residence, Chelmsford; 
credited to town of Chelmsford; also. Col. David Henley's Regt.; return 
of recruits for knapsacks, dated Boston, Feb. 16, 1778; reported under 
marching orders; also, Capt. Joseph Fox's Co., Col. Henley's Regt.; 
pay roll for Nov., 1778; also, Capt. Fox's (7th) Co., Col. Jackson's 
Regt.; muster roll for April, 1779, dated Pawtuxet; enlisted July 10, 
1777; enlistment, 3 yrs. ; also, same Co. and Regt.; return dated Camp 
Providence, July 8, 1779; also, same Co. and Regt.; pay roll for July, 
1779; also, Capt. Joseph Fox's (3d) Co., Col. Jackson's Regt.; muster 
roll for Oct., 1779, dated Camp Providence; reported on command at 
Newport; also, same Co. and Regt.; regimental return made up to Dec. 
31, 1779, dated Camp at Providence; also, return certified at Camp near 
Morristown, April 30, 1780, of officers and men belonging to Col. Lee's, 
Col. Henley's, and Col. Jackson's Regts., and men belonging to Massa- 
chusetts in Col. Henry Sherburne's Regt., who were incorporated into 
a regiment under the command of Col. Henry Jackson, agreeable to the 
arrangement of April 9, 1779; Capt. Fox's Co.; rank. Drummer; resi- 
dence, Chelmsford; engaged for town of Chelmsford; engaged July 10, 
1777; term, 3 yrs.; reported reduced to Private, July 6, 1778; also, Capt. 
Joseph Fox's (3d) Co., Col. Henry Jackson's Regt.; pay rolls for April — 
July, 1780; reported discharged July 10, 1780. 

Nickles, Jere. Capt. Ford's Co.; return of cartridges received from Nov. 4, 
to Jan. 6 (year not given). 



RECORDS OF CHELMSFORD MEN IN THE REVOLUTION 333 

Osgood, Benjamin, Chelmsford. Capt. Benjamin Walker's Co., Col. Ebenezer 
Bridge's (27th) Regt.; order for advance pay, signed by said Osgood 
and others, dated Cambridge, June 6, 1775; also, Private, same Co. and 
Regt.; company return (probably Oct., 1775); also, order for bounty 
coat or its equivalent in money dated Jan. 1, 1776; also. Private, Capt. 
William Hudson Ballard's Co., Col. Brooks's Regt.; Continental Army 
pay accounts for service from March 1, 1777, to March 1, 1778; reported 
deceased; also, Capt. Ballard's Co., 6th Mass. Regt., formerly commanded 
by Col. Ichabod Alden; return of men who were in camp on or before 
Aug. 15, 1777; also, Capt. Ballard's Co., Col. Alden's Regt.; return 
dated Albany, Jan. 12, 1778; mustered by Col. Barret, Muster Master 
for Middlesex Co., and by a Continental Muster Master; reported on 
furlough; also, 1st Co., Lieut. Col. John Brooks's (7th) Regt.; return 
made up to Dec. 31, 1779; enlisted March 2, 1777; enlistment, 3 yrs.; 
reported died March 1, 1778. 

Osgood, David, Chelmsford. Capt. Benjamin Walker's Co., Col. Ebenezer 
Bridge's (27th) Regt.; receipt for advance pay, signed by said Osgood 
and others, dated Cambridge, June 24, 1775; also, order on Maj. Barber, 
dated Cambridge, June 24, 1775, signed by Col. E. Bridge, for cartridge 
boxes for said Osgood and others belonging to Lieut. John Flint's Co.; 
also, Private, Capt. Walker's Co., Col. Bridge's Regt.; company return 
(probably Oct., 1775); also, order for bounty coat or its equivalent in 
money dated Cambridge, Nov. 30, 1775; also, list of men raised to serve 
in the Continental Army; residence, Chelmsford; engaged for the town 
of Chelmsford; also, Private, 7th Co., Col. Thomas Nixon's (6th) Regt.; 
Continental Army pay accounts for service from April 9, 1777, to Dec. 31, 
1779; also, Capt. Elijah Danforth's Co., Col. Nixon's Regt.; return of 
men who were in camp on or before Aug. 15, 1777, and who had not been 
absent subsequently except on furlough, certified at Camp near Peekskill, 
Feb. 16, 1779; also, Lieut. Col. Calvin Smith's Co., Col. Nixon's (5th) 
Regt.; muster roll for May, 1779, dated Highlands; also, same Co. and 
Regt.; pay rolls for Aug. — Oct., 1779; also, Lieut. Col. Daniel Whiting's 
Co., Col. Nixon's Regt.; pay rolls for Nov. and Dec, 1779, dated Soldier's 
Fortune; also, Lieut. Colonel's Co., 6th Mass. Regt.; return for clothing 
for the year 1780; receipt for said clothing, dated Peekskill, Dec. 5, 1779; 
also. Lieut. Colonel's (7th) Co., Col. Nixon's Regt.; Continental Army 
pay accounts for service from Jan. 1, 1780, to April 9, 1780; also, Lieut. 
Colonel Daniel Whiting's Co., Col. Nixon's Regt.; pay roll for Jan. — 
June, 1780; reported discharged April 9, 1780; also, order on Capt. 
Howard, Paymaster, 6th Mass. Regt., payable to Phineas Osgood, dated 
Billerica, Jan. 24, 1785, signed by said David Osgood, for wages and 
clothing allowance for 1777-1779. 

Osgood, John. Company receipt for mileage, given to Capt. John Ford, 
dated Ticonderoga, Aug. 28, 1776; also, company receipt given to Capt. 
John Ford, for wages to Oct. 1, 1776, dated Ticonderoga; company 
marched from Chelmsford, July 25, 1776. and was discharged at Albany, 
Jan. 1, 1777. 

Osgood, Joseph, Chelmsford. Capt. Benjamin Walker's Co., Col. Ebenezer 
Bridge's Regt. ; order for advance pay, signed by said Osgood and others 
dated Cambridge, June 6, 1775; also. Private, same Co. and Regt.; 
muster roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; enlisted April 28, 1775; service, 3 mos., 
11 days; also, company return (probably Oct., 1775). 

Osgood, Phineas, Billerica (also given Chelmsford and Charlestown). List 
of men raised to serve in the Continental Army; residence, Billerica; 
engaged for town of Billerica; also. Private, 7th Co., Col. Thomas Nixon's 
(6th) Regt.; Continental Army pay accounts for service from April 7, 
1777, to Dec. 31, 1779; reported as serving 18 mos. as Corporal, 14 mos., 
24 days as Private; also. Corporal, Capt. Elijah Danforth's Co., Col. 
Nixon's Regt.; return of men who were in camp on or before Aug. 15, 
1777, and who had not been absent subsequently except on furlough, etc., 
certified at Camp near Peekskill, Feb. 16, 1779; also, Lieut. Col. Calvin 
Smith's Co., Col. Nixon's (5th) Regt.; muster roll for May, 1779, dated 



334 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

Highlands; also, same Co. and Regt. ; pay rolls for Aug. and Sept., 1779; 
reported reduced to Private, Sept. 24, 1779; also. Private, same Co. and 
Regt.; pay roll for Oct., 1779; also, Lieut. Col. Daniel Whiting's Co., 
Col. Nixon's Regt.; pay rolls for Nov. and Dec, 1779, dated Soldier's 
Fortune; also, Lieut. Colonel's Co., 6th Mass. Regt.; return for clothing 
for the year 1780; receipt for said clothing, dated Peekskill, Dec. 5, 1779; 
also, description list of men belonging to Col. Thomas Nixon's Regt., 
who enlisted for the war prior to Sept. 30, 1779, certified at Highlands; 
age, 20 yrs. ; stature, 5 ft., 8 in.; complexion, light; engaged for town of 
Billerica; also, Capt. A. Holden's Co., Col. Nixon's Regt.; Continental 
Army pay accounts for service from Jan. 1, 1780, to Dec. 31, 1780; 
residence, Chelmsford; also, Lieut. Col. Daniel Whiting's Co., Col. 
Nixon's Regt.; pay roll for Jan. — June, 1780; said Osgood allowed 2 mos., 
29 days' service; also. Light Infantry Co., 6th Mass. Regt.; return of 
men in need of clothing, dated Peekskill, July 31, 1780; also, Capt. Abel 
Holden's (Light Infantry) Co., Col. Nixon's Regt.; pay rolls for Jan. — 
Dec, 1780; said Osgood made up from March 29, 1780; also descriptive 
list dated West Point, Jan. 29, 1781; Capt. Holden's Co., Col. Nixon's 
(6th) Regt., commanded by Lieut. Col. Calvin Smith; age, 20 yrs; stature, 
5 ft., 8 in.; complexion, light; hair, light; occupation, farmer; residence, 
Charlestown; enlisted April 7, 1777, by Capt. Danforth; enlistment, 
during war; also, Capt. Peter Clayes's (Light Infantry) Co., commanded 
by Capt. John K. Smith prior to May 1, 1781, Lieut. Col. Calvin Smith's 
(6th) Regt.; returns for wages for the years 1781 and 1782; wages allowed 
said Osgood for 24 mos.; reported deserted in Feb., 1782, joined in March, 
1782, and full amount of wages allowed. 

Parker, Benjamin, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Oliver Barron's Co. of Militia, 
Col. David Green's Regt., which marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; 
service, 3 days. 

Parker, Benjamin (also given Benjamin, Jr.), Chelmsford. Private, Capt. 
Oliver Barron's Co. of Militia, Col. David Green's Regt., which marched 
on the alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 8 days; also, descriptive list 
dated June 15, 1775; Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Bridge's Regt.; age, 
22 yrs.; stature, 6 ft.; complexion, dark; occupation, farmer; residence, 
Chelmsford; enlisted April 27, 1775; also. Private, Capt. John Ford's 
Co., Col. Ebenezer Bridge's (27th) Regt.; muster roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; 
enlisted April 27, 1775; service, 3 mos., 12 days; also, company return 
dated Sept. 25, 1775. 

Parker, Chester, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Asa Drury's Co., Col. Turner's 
Regt.; entered service Aug. 24, 1781; discharged Nov. 30, 1781; service, 
3 mos., 11 days, at Rhode Island, including travel (80 miles) home; 
roll endorsed "five Months' Service at Rhode Island." 

Parker, Daniel. Company receipt for mileage, given to Capt. John Ford, 
dated Ticonderoga, Aug. 28, 1776; also, company receipt, given to Capt. 
John Ford, for wages to Oct. 1, 1776, dated Ticonderoga; company 
marched from Chelmsford, July 25, 1776, and was discharged at Albany, 
Jan. 1, 1777. 

Parker, David, Chelmsford (probably). List of men probably belonging to 
Chelmsford, dated May 1, 1775. 

Parker, Isaac, Chelmsford. Lieutenant, Col. Moses Parker's Co., which 
marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 5 days; roll endorsed 
"L't Benj. Walkers Roll"; also, Lieutenant, Capt. John Ford's Co.; 
list of officers belonging to Col. Ebenezer Bridge's Regt. to be com- 
missioned; ordered in Provincial Congress, at Watertown, May 27, 1775, 
that said officers be commissioned; receipt for above commissions dated 
Watertown, May 27, 1775; also. Lieutenant, Capt. John Ford's Co., 
Col. Ebenezer Bridge's (27th) Regt.; muster roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; 
enlisted April 25, 1775; service, 3 mos., 14 days; also, 1st Lieutenant, 
same Co. and Regt.; company return dated Sept. 25, 1775; also, 2d 
Lieutenant, Capt. John Minott's Co., Col. Nicholas Dike's Regt.; list 
of officers; ordered in Council, Feb. 1, 1777, that said officers be com- 
missioned; commissions to be dated Dec. 1, 1776; also, 2d Lieutenant, 



RECORDS OF CHELMSFORD MEN IN THE REVOLUTION 335 

Capt. Minott's Co., Col. Dike's Regt.; muster roll for Dec, 1776 — 
Feb., 1777; engaged Dec. 13, 1776; regiment raised to serve until March 1, 
1777, and stationed at Dorchester Heights; also, Lieutenant, Col. Michael 
Jackson's Regt.; Continental Army pay accounts for service from Jan. 1, 
1777, to Oct. 3, 1778; reported resigned Oct. 3, 1778; also, list of men 
belonging to Col. Michael Jackson's (Mass. Line) Regt., approved 
April 9, 1779; Capt. James Varnum's Co.; rank. Lieutenant; also, same 
Co. and Regt.; return of officers for clothing, dated Boston, April 27, 
1778; also, certificate dated Medford, Feb. 15, 1779, signed by Lieut. 
Col. J. Brooks, certifying that said Parker served as Lieutenant in Col. 
Michael Jackson's Regt. from Jan. 1, 1777, to Oct. 3, 1778, when he was 
honorably discharged, and that when in service he was not absent except 
on furlough or on command; also, Lieutenant; Council warrant dated 
Feb. 15, 1779, for £36 drawn in favor of said Parker for gratuity allowed 
by resolve of May 1, 1778. 

Parker, John, Chelmsford. Private, Col. Moses Parker's Co., which marched 
on the alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 7 days; roll endorsed "L't. Benj. 
Walkers Roll"; also, descriptive list dated June 15, 1775; Capt. John 
Ford's Co., Col. Bridge's Regt.; age, 20 yrs.; stature, 5 ft., 10 in.; com- 
plexion, dark; occupation, farmer; residence, Chelmsford; enlisted 
April 26, 1775; also. Private, Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Ebenezer 
Bridge's (27th) Regt.; enlisted April 26, 1775; service, 3 mos., 13 days; 
also company return dated Sept. 25, 1775. 

Parker, John, Westford (also given Chelmsford). List of men raised to serve 
in the Continental Army, as returned by Capt. Zaccheus Wright and 
Capt. Pelatiah Fletcher; residence, Westford (also given Chelmsford); 
engaged for town of Westford (also given Chelmsford); joined 
Capt. Ballard's Co., Col. Alden's Regt.; term to expire in 1780; 
also. Private, Capt. William Hudson Ballard's Co., Col. John Brooks's 
Regt.; Continental Army pay accounts for service from April 18, 1777, to 
Oct. 7, 1777; also, Capt. Ballard's Co., Col. Ichabod Alden's Regt.; 
return dated Albany, Jan. 12, 1778; mustered by Col. Barrett, Muster 
Master for Middlesex Co., and by a Continental Muster Master; also, 
1st Co., Lieut. Col. John Brooks's (7th) Regt.; return made up to Dec. 31, 
1779; reported killed in action Oct. 7, 1777. 

Parker, Jonas, Acton (also given Chelmsford). Ensign, Capt. John Ford's 
Co.; list of officers belonging to Col. Ebenezer Bridge's Regt. to be 
commissioned; ordered in Provincial Congress, at Watertown, May 27, 
1775, that said officers be commissioned; receipt for above commissions 
dated Watertown, May 27, 1775; also. Lieutenant, Capt. John Ford's 
Co., Col. Ebenezer Bridge's (27th) Regt.; muster roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; 
enlisted April 25, 1775; service, 3 mos., 14 days; also, 2d Lieutenant, 
same Co. and Regt.; company return dated Sept. 25, 1775; also, 2d 
Lieutenant, Capt. William Hudson Ballard's (4th) Co., Col. Asa Whit- 
comb's Regt.; muster roll dated Camp at Ticonderoga, Nov. 27, 1776; 
appointed Jan. 1, 1776; reported re-engaged for the war, Nov. 13, 1776, 
as 1st Lieutenant in Capt. Ballard's Co., Col. Alden's Regt., but to 
remain in Col. Whitcomb's Regt., until Dec. 31, 1776; also Captain and 
Lieutenant, Col. Brooks's Regt.; Continental Army pay accounts for 
service from Jan. 1, 1777, to Dec. 31 1779; reported as serving 30 mos. 
as Lieutenant, 6 mos. as Captain; also 1st Lieutenant, Capt. William 
Hudson Ballard's (1st) Co., Col. Ichabod Alden's Regt.; return of field, 
staff, and commissioned officers (year not given); residence, Chelmsford; 
also, return of Capt. Ballard's Co., Col. Ichabod Alden's Regt., dated 
Albany, Jan. 12, 1778, signed by said Parker and James Lunt, Lieutenants; 
also, Captain Lieutenant, in command of (late) Colonel's Co., (late) 
Col. Alden's Regt.; muster roll for Dec, 1778, dated Cherry Valley; 
also. Captain, in a regiment formerly commanded by Col. Alden; return 
of field, staff, and commissioned officers, dated Boston, Jan. 5, 1779; 
also. Captain Lieutenant, 9th Co., Col. Alden's (6th) Regt.; muster roll 
of field, staff, and commissioned officers for March and April, 1779, 
dated Cherry Valley; appointed Oct. 1, 1778; also, Captain Lieutenant, 



336 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

in command of (late) Col. Alden's Co., 6th Mass. Regt. formerly com- 
manded by Col. Ichabod Alden; muster roll for March and April, 1779, 
dated Fort "Harkemer"; reported furloughed by Gen. Clinton; also, 
Captain, 7th Mass., Regt.; list of settlements of rank of Continental 
officers, dated West Point, made by a board held for the purpose and 
confirmed by Congress, Sept. 6, 1779; commissioned June 25, 1779; 
also, return of field, staff, and commissioned officers of Lieut. Col. John 
Brooks's (late Col. Alden's) 7th Regt., made up to Dec. 31, 1779; said 
Parker commissioned as Lieutenant, Jan. 1, 1777; promoted to Captain 
Lieutenant and commissioned Oct. 1, 1778; promoted to Captain and com- 
missioned June 5, 1779; service as Lieutenant, 21 mos., as Captain Lieu- 
tenant, 8 mos., 4 days, and as Captain, 6 mos., 26 days; also, Captain, Col. 
Brooks's Regt.; Continental Army pay accounts for service from Jan. 1, 

1780, to Dec. 31, 1780; also. Captain, 4th Co., Lieut. Col. John Brooks's 
(7th) Regt.; return of officers, dated Sept. 9, 1780; commissioned Nov. 
11, 1777; also, same Regt.; return of officers for clothing, dated Camp 
Totoway, Oct. 16, 1780; also, returns of effectives between Oct. 26 and 
Nov. 23, 1780, dated Camp Totoway; reported absent in Massachusetts 
without leave from Oct. 19, 1780; also, Captain, 3d Co., Lieut. Col. 
Brooks's Regt.; muster roll of field, staff and commissioned officers for 
Oct. — Dec, 1780, dated Huts West Point; appointed June 5, 1779; 
also, returns of effectives between Jan. 5, and Jan. 19, 1781, dated German 
Hutts and West Point; reported under arrest; also, muster roll for Jan., 

1781, dated West Point; reported dismissed the service Jan. 24, 1781. 
Parker, Jonathan, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Zaccheus Wright's Co., 

Col. Brooks's Regt.; company return dated Camp at White Plains, 
Oct. 31, 1776; said Parker reported as in camp at White Plains fit for 
duty and as having lost articles in battle. 

Parker, Joseph, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Zaccheus Wright's Co., Col. 
Brooks's Regt.; company return dated Camp at White Plains, Oct. 31, 
1776; said Parker reported as in camp at White Plains. 

Parker, Leonard, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Samuel Tay's Co., Lieut. 
Col. Webb's Regt.; enlisted Aug. 18, 1781; discharged Nov. 29, 1781; 
service, 3 mos., 22 days, including 11 days (212 miles) travel home; 
regiment raised in Suffolk and Middlesex Counties to reinforce Con- 
tinental Army for 3 months; roll dated Woburn. 

Parker, Levi. Company receipt, given to Capt. John Ford, for mileage, 
dated Ticonderoga, Aug. 28, 1776; also, company receipt, given to Capt. 
John Ford, for wages to Oct. 1, 1776, dated Ticonderoga; company 
marched from Chelmsford, July 25, 1776, and was discharged at Albany, 
Jan. 1, 1777. 

Parker, Moses, Chelmsford. Lieutenant Colonel, Col. Ebenezer Bridge's 
Regt. of Minute-Men; marched April 19, 1775; service, 4 days; also. 
Lieutenant Colonel, Col. Ebenezer Bridge's Regt.; engaged April 24, 
1775; service, 2 mos., 22 days; also. Lieutenant Colonel; order of the day, 
dated May 8, 1775; said Parker appointed field officer of the main guard; 
also, order of the day, dated Cambridge, May 11, 1775; said Parker 
appointed field officer of fatigue; also, Lieutenant Colonel; list of officers 
belonging to Col. Ebenezer Bridge's Regt. to be commissioned; ; ordered 
in Provincial Congress, at Watertown, May 27, 1775, that said officers 
be commissioned; receipt for above commissions, dated Watertown, 
May 27, 1775; also. Lieutenant Colonel; order of the day, dated Cam- 
bridge, June 2, 1775; said Parker appointed field officer of fatigue for 
June 3, 1775; also, order of the day, dated June 4, 1775; said Parker 
appointed officer of the main guard; also, order of the day, dated Cam- 
bridge, June 4, 1775; said Parker appointed field officer of the main 
guard for June 5, 1775; the foregoing orders taken from Lieut. Col. 
Loammi Baldwin's Orderly Book. 

Parker, Oliver, Chelmsford. List of men mustered by Nathaniel Barber, 
Muster Master for Suffolk Co., dated Boston, Sept. 14, 1777; Capt. 
Varnum's Co., Col. Michael Jackson's Regt.; also. Private, Capt. 
Varnum's Co., Col. Michael Jackson's Regt.; Continental Army pay 



RECORDS OF CHELMSFORD MEN IN THE REVOLUTION 337 

accounts for service from May 15, 1777, to June 1, 1778; residence, 
Chelmsford; credited to town of Chelmsford; term, 3 years; reported 
discharged. 

Parker, Reuben, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Oliver Barron's Co. of Militia, 
Col. David Green's Regt., which marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; 
service, 13 days. 

Parker, Silas, Chelmsford. Descriptive list dated June 15, 1775; Capt. 
John Ford's Co., Col. Bridge's Regt.; age, 17 yrs.; stature, 5 ft., 6 in.; 
complexion, light; occupation, farmer; residence, Chelmsford; enlisted 
April 29, 1775; also. Private, Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Ebenezer 
Bridge's (27th) Regt.; muster roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; enlisted April 29, 
1775: service, 3 mos., 10 days; also, company return dated Sept. 25, 1775. 

Parker, Silas, Chelmsford. List of 6 months men raised agreeable to resolve 
of June 5, 1780, returned as received of Maj. Joseph Hosmer, Super- 
intendent for Middlesex Co., by Justin Ely, Commissioner, dated Spring- 
field; also, descriptive list of men raised to reinforce the Continental 
Army for the term of 6 months, agreeable to resolve of June 5, 1780, 
returned as received of Justin Ely, Commissioner, by Brig. Gen. John 
Glover, at Springfield, July 7, 1780; age, 20 yrs.; stature, 6 ft.; complexion, 
dark; engaged for town of Chelmsford; marched to camp July 7, 1780, 
under command of Capt. Dix; also, list of men raised for the 6 months' 
service and returned by Brig. Gen. Paterson as having passed muster in 
a return dated Camp Totoway, Oct. 25, 1780; also, pay roll for 6 months 
men raised by the town of Chelmsford for service in the Continental 
Army at North river during 1780; marched June 30, 1780; discharged 
Jan. 7, 1781; service, 6 mos., 19 days, including travel (200 miles) home. 

Parker, Simon. Private, Capt. Simon Hunt's Co., Col. Jacob Gerrish's 
Regt. of Guards; enlisted July 4, 1778; discharged Dec. 15, 1778; service, 
5 mos., 12 days; roll dated Winter Hill. 

Parker, Willard, Chelmsford. Sergeant, Col. Moses Parker's Co., which 
marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 11 days; roll endorsed 
"L't Benj Walkers Roll"; also, Capt. John Ford's Co. of Volunteers, 
Col. Jonathan Reed's Regt.; engaged Sept. 28 (also given Sept. 27), 
1777; discharged Nov. 8 1777; service, 40 (also given 43) days; company 
probably raised in Dracut, Chelmsford, and Dunstable, and marched to 
reinforce Northern Army, Sept. 30, 1777. 

Parker, William, Chelmsford. Sergeant, Col. Moses Parker's Co., which 
marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 11 days. Roll endorsed 
"L't Benj Walkers Roll." 

Parker, William. Private, Capt. John Ford's Co. of Volunteers, Col. Jonathan 
Reed's Regt.; engaged Sept. 28 (also given Sept. 27), 1777; discharged 
Nov. 8, 1777; service, 40 (also given 43) days; company probably raised 
in Dracut, Chelmsford, and Dunstable, and marched Sept. 30, 1777, to 
reinforce Northern Army. 

Parker, William, Jr., Chelmsford. Private, Col. Moses Parker's Co., which 
marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 9 days; roll endorsed "L't 
Benj Walkers Roll"; also, Capt. John Minot's Co., Col. Josiah Whitney's 
Regt.; arrived at destination May 10, 1777; discharged July 9, 1777; 
service, 2 mos., 9 days, at Rhode Island, including travel (8 days) to and 
from place of destination; roll dated Warwick Neck. 

Parkhurst, Benjam.in, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Oliver Barron's Co. of 
Militia, Col. David Green's Regt., which marched on the alarm of April 
19, 1775; service, 3 days. 

Parkhurst, Ephraim, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Oliver Barron's Co. of 
Militia, Col. David Green's Regt., which marched on the alarm of April 
19, 1775; service, 11 days. 

Parkhurst, Samuel, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. John Minott's Co., Col. 
Dike's Regt.; muster roll for Dec, 1776 — Feb., 1777; enlisted Dec. 1, 
1776;regiment raised to serve until March 1, 1777;also, Capt. John Minot's 
Co., Col. Josiah Whitney's Regt.; arrived at destination May 10, 1777; 
discharged July 9, 1777; service, 2 mos., 9 days, at Rhode Island, including 
travel (8 days) to and from place of destination; roll dated Warwick Neck. 



338 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

Parkhust, Josiah. Private, Capt. Joshua Lealand's Co. of Guards; enlisted 
Sept. 29, 1779; discharged Nov. 10, 1779; service, 1 mo., 13 days; 
company detached from militia by order of Gen. Hancock to man forts 
at and about Boston until Nov. 10, 1779, and stationed at Boston under 
Maj. Nathaniel Heath. 

Peirce, Benjamin, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Oliver Barron's Co. of Militia, 
Col. David Green's Regt., which marched in response to the alarm of 
April 19, 1775; service, 7 days; also. Sergeant, Col. Michael Jackson's 
(8th) Regt.; Continental Army pay accounts for service from May 15, 
1777, to Jan. 25, 1778; credited to town of Chelmsford; reported pro- 
moted to Ensign; also, list of officers and men belonging to Col. Michael 
Jackson's Mass. Line Regt., returned probably in 1779; Sergeant, Capt. 
James Varnum's Co.; also. Ensign, same Regt.; Continental Army pay 
accounts for service from Jan. 25, 1778, to Dec. 31, 1779; also, same 
Regt.; return of officers, dated West Point, Nov. 8, 1779; also. Ensign, 
same Regt.; list of officers promoted in the Continental Army; com- 
missioned Nov. 26, 1779; also. Ensign, same Regt.; Continental Army 
pay accounts for service from Jan. 1, 1780, to Dec. 31, 1780; also, Ensign; 
return dated PhiUipsburgh, July 18, 1781, made by Ezra Badlam, Lieut. 
Colonel Commandant, 8th Mass. Regt. of officers of said regiment doing 
duty upon warrants; date of warrant, Nov. 26, 1779; also, communica- 
tion addressed to His Excellency Gov. Hancock, dated West Point, 
July 3, 1782, signed by J. Vose, Colonel, requesting that a warrant might 
be issued to said Peirce as there was a deficiency of officers in his regiment; 
advised in Council, July 31, 1782, that a warrant be granted in accordance 
with Col. Vose's recommendation; certificate dated Camp Nelson's 
Point, July 14, 1782, signed by J. Greaton, Colonel, 3d Mass. Regt., 
accompanying above communication, certifies that said Peirce, Ensign, 
was entitled to a Lieutenancy in the 1st Regt., Vice Lieut. Joseph Foot, 
resigned. 

Peirce, Jonas, Chelmsford. Corporal, Capt. Oliver Barron's Co. of Militia, 
Col. David Green's Regt., which marched in response to the alarm of 
April 19, 1775; service, 6 days; also, list of men probably belonging to 
Chelmsford, dated May 1, 1775; also. Sergeant, Capt. John Ford's Co., 
Col. Ebenezer Bridge's (27th) Regt.; muster roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; 
engaged April 25, 1775; service, 3 mos., 14 days. 

Peirce, Jonathan, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Oliver Barron's Co. of Militia, 
Col. David Green's Regt., which marched in response to the alarm of 
April 19, 1775; service, 11 days; also, Capt. John Minot's Co., Col. 
Josiah Whitney's Regt.; arrived at destination May 10, 1777; discharged 
July 9, 1777; service, 2 mos., 9 days at Rhode Island, including travel 
(8 days) to and from place of destination; roll dated Warwick Neck. 

Peirce, Levi, Chelmsford. Private, Col. Moses Parker's Co., which marched 
on the alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 10 days. Roll endorsed "L't 
Benj Walkers Roll." 

Peirce, Robert, Chelmsford. Private, Col. Moses Parker's Co., which marched 
on the alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 9 days; roll endorsed "L't Benj 
Walkers Roll"; also, Capt. Benjamin Walker's Co., Col. Ebenezer 
Bridge's (27th) Regt.; order for advance pay signed by said Peirce and 
others, dated Cambridge, June 6, 1775; also. Private, same Co. and 
Regt.; company return (probably Oct., 1775); also, descriptive list of 
men raised in Middlesex Co. for the term of 9 months from the time of 
their arrival at Fishkill; Capt. Ford's Co., Col. Spaulding's Regt.; age, 
23 5'rs. ; stature, 5 ft., 11 in.; residence, Chelmsford; engaged for town 
of Chelmsford; arrived at Fishkill, June 19, 1778. 

Peirce, Silas. Corporal, Capt. John Ford's Co. of Volunteers, Col. Jonathan 
Reed's Regt.; engaged Sept. 28 (also given Sept. 27), 1777; discharged 
Nov. 8, 1777; service, 40 (also given 43) days; company probably raised 
in Dracut, Chelmsford, and Dunstable, and marched Sept. 30, 1777, 
to reinforce Northern Army. 



RECORDS OF CHELMSFORD MEN IN THE REVOLUTION 339 

Peirce, Stephen, Chelmsford. Private. Capt. Zaccheus Wright's Co., Col. 
Brooks's Regt.; company return dated Camp at White Plains, Oct. 31, 
1776; said Peirce reported as in Camp at VVhite Plains, fit for duty. 

Peirce, Stephen. Company receipt dated Chelmsford, April 19, 1776, for 
wages for service from Feb. 5, 1776, to April 1, 1776, in Capt. John Ford's 
Co., Col. Roberson's (Robinson's) Regt. 

Peirce, Stephen. Private, Capt. John Ford's Co. of Volunteers, Col. Jonathan 
Reed's Regt.; enlisted Sept. 28 (also given Sept. 27), 1777; discharged 
Nov. 8, 1777; service, 40 (also given 43) days; company probably raised 
in Dracut, Chelmsford, and Dunstable, and marched Sept. 30, 1777, to 
reinforce Northern Army. 

Peirce, Stephen. Jr., Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Oliver Barron's Co. of 
Militia, Col. David Green's Regt., which marched in response to the 
alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 5 days. 

Peirce, Willard, Chelmsford. Company receipt dated Chelmsford, April 19, 
1776, for wages for service from Feb. 5, 1776, to April 1, 1776, in Capt. 
John Ford's Co., Col. Roberson's (Robinson's) Regt.; also. Private, 
Capt. Reuben Butterfield's Co.; enlisted Dec. 16, 1776; discharged March 
16, 1777- service. 90 days; 15 days (300 miles) travel home also allowed; 
also. Private, Capt. James Varnum's Co., Col. Michael Jackson's Regt.; 
Continental Army pay accounts for service from April 28, 1777, to Dec. 
31, 1780; residence, Chelmsford; credited to town of Chelmsford; also, 
descriptive list dated Jan. 7, 1781; Capt. Lieut. E. Smith's (also given 
Capt. Wade's) Co., Col. Michael Jackson's (8th) Regt.; rank, Corporal; 
age, 33yrs.; stature, 5 ft., 6 in.; complexion, dark; hair, brown; occupa- 
tion, farmer; birthplace, Chelmsford; residence, Chelmsford; engaged 
Feb. 5, 1780, by Sergt. Barron, at West Point; term, during war; also, 
list dated Boston, Jan. 28, 1803, returned by John Avery, Secretary, and 
J. Jackson, Treasurer, of men who had enlisted into the Continental 
Army, and actually served 3 years, and were, accordingly, entitled to 
gratuities under resolves of March 4, 1801, and June 19, 1801; regiment 
of invalids. 

Pence, Ephraim, Chelmsford. List of men raised for the 6 months' service 
and returned by Brig. Gen. Paterson as having passed muster in a return 
dated Camp Totoway, Oct. 25, 1780. 

Perham, John. Company receipt for mileage, given to Capt. John Ford, 
dated Ticonderoga, Aug. 28, 1776. 

Perham, Oliver, Chelmsford. Private, Lieut. John Flint's Co., Col. Thomas 
Poor's Regt.; enlisted June 10, 1778, 3 days preceding march; discharged 
Feb. 11, 1779; service, 8 mos., 14 days, at and about White Plains, 
including 12 days (240 miles) travel home; regiment raised to fortify 
passes of North river, N. Y. ; also, Capt. Asa Lawrence's Co., Col. 
Thomas Poor's Regt.; pay rolls for June — Aug., 1778, dated Fort Clinton; 
also, (late) Capt. Asa Lawrence's Co., commanded by Lieut. John Flint, 
Col. Poor's Regt.; pay roll for Sept., 1778, dated West Point; also, 
Lieut. John Flint's Co., Col. Poor's Regt.; pay roll for Nov., 1778, 
dated West Point; also, list of 6 months men raised agreeable to resolve 
of June 5, 1780, returned as received of Maj. Joseph Hosmer, Superin- 
tendent for Middlesex Co., by Justin Ely, Commissioner, dated Spring- 
field; also, descriptive list of men raised to reinforce the Continental 
Army for the term of 6 months, agreeable to resolve of June 5, 1780, 
returned as received of Justin Ely, Commissioner, by Maj. Peter Harwood, 
of 6th Mass. Regt.. at Springfield, July 2, 1780; age, 17 yrs.; stature, 
5 ft., 9 in.; complexion, light; engaged for town of Chelmsford; marched 
to camp July 2, 1780, under command of Capt. Phineas Parker; also, 
list of men raised for the 6 months' service and returned by Brig. Gen. 
Paterson as having passed muster in a return dated Camp Totoway, 
Oct. 25, 1780; also, pay roll for 6 months men raised by the town of 
Chelmsford for service in the Continental Army at North river during 
1780; marched from home June 30, 1780; discharged Dec. 19, 1780; 
service, 6 mos., including 10 days (200 miles) travel home. 



340 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

Perham, Samuel. Private, Capt. John Ford's Co. of Volunteers, Col. Jonathan 
Reed's Regt.; enlisted Sept. 28 (also given Sept. 27), 1777; discharged 
Nov. 8, 1777; service, 40 (also given 43) days; company probably 
raised in Dracut, Chelmsford, and Dunstable, and marched Sept. 30, 
1777, to reinforce Northern Army. 

Perham, Samuel, Jr., Chelmsford. Private, Col. Moses Parker's Co., which 
marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 13 days. Roll endorsed 
"L't Benj Walkers Roll." 

Perhomn, John. Company receipt, given to Capt. John Ford, for wages 
^ to Oct. 1, 1776, dated Ticonderoga; company marched from Chelmsford, 
July 25, 1776, and was discharged at Albany, Jan. 1, 1777. 

Pierce, Benjamin, Chelmsford. Company return dated June 15, 1775; 
Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Bridge's Regt.; age, 19 yrs. ; stature, 5 ft., 
8 in.; complexion, light; occupation, farmer; residence, Chelmsford; 
enlisted April 26, 1775; also. Private, Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Eben- 
ezer Bridge's (27th) Regt.; enlisted April 25 (also given April 26), 1775; 
service, 3 mos., 14 days (also given 3 mos., 13 days); also, company 
return dated Sept. 25, 1775; also, Lieutenant, Col. Joseph Vose's (1st) 
Regt.; list of officers of 1st Mass. Brigade (year not given), probably 
1782 or 1783), showing dates of appointments; commissioned July 7, 
1782; also. Lieutenant, Col. Joseph Vose's (1st) Regt.; returns of 
effectives between Sept. 6, and Sept. 20, 1782, dated Camp Verplanck's 
Point and Camp West Point; reported on command at West Point from 
Aug. 1, 1782; also. Lieutenant and Paymaster, same Regt.; returns of 
effectives, dated Camp Philadelphia, July 11, and July 18, 1783; reported 
on command at West Point; also. Lieutenant; returns of effectives 
between July 25, 1783, and Aug. 22, 1783, dated Camp Philadelphia; 
reported on command at West Point. 

Pierce, Ephraim, Chelmsford. List of 6 months men raised agreeable to 
resolve of June 5, 1780, returned as received of Maj. Joseph Hosmer, 
Superintendent for Middlesex Co., by Justin Ely, Commissioner, dated 
Springfield; also, descriptive list of men raised to reinforce the Contin- 
ental Army for the term of 6 months, agreeable to resolve of June 5, 
1780, returned as received of Justin Ely, Commissioner, by Brig. Gen. 
John Glover, at Springfield, July 7, 1780; age, 18 yrs.; stature, 5 ft., 
10 in.; complexion, dark; engaged for town of Chelmsford; marched to 
camp July 7, 1780, under command of Capt. Dix; also, list of men raised 
for the 6 months' service and returned by Brig. Gen. Paterson as having 
passed muster in a return dated Camp Totoway, Oct. 25, 1780. 

Pierce, Jonas, Chelmsford. Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Ebenezer Bridge's 
(27th) Regt.; company return dated June 15, 1775; age, 25 yrs.; stature, 
6 ft.; complexion, fresh; occupation, housewright; residence, Chelms- 
ford; enlisted April 25, 1775; also, Sergeant, same Co. and Regt.; muster 
roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; service, 3 mos., 14 days; also, company return 
dated Sept. 25, 1775. 

Pierce, Robert, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Benjamin Walker's Co., Col. 
Ebenezer Bridge's Regt.; muster roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; enlisted April 
28, 1775; service, 3 mos., 14 days. 

Piper, Samuel. Company receipt for mileage, given to Capt. John Ford, 
dated Ticonderoga, Aug. 28, 1776; also, company receipt, given to Capt. 
John Ford, for wages to Oct. 1, 1776, dated Ticonderoga; company 
marched from Chelmsford, July 25, 1776, and was discharged at Albany, 
Jan. 1, 1777. 

Procter, Azariah, Chelmsford. Sergeant, Col. Moses Parker's Co., which 
marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 11 days; roll endorsed 
"L't Benj Walkers Roll"; also. Corporal, Capt. John Ford's Co. of 
Volunteers, Col. Jonathan Reed's Regt.; engaged Sept. 28 (also given 
Sept. 27), 1777; discharged Nov. 8, 1777; service, 40 (also given 43) 
days; company probably raised in Dracut, Chelmsford, and Dunstable, 
and marched to reinforce Northern Army, Sept. 30, 1777. 



RECORDS OF CHELMSFORD MEN IN THE REVOLUTION 341 

Procter, Daniel. Enlistment agreement dated Jan. 29, 1776 signed by said 
Procter and others, engaging themselves to serve until April 1, 17 /t); 
also receipt dated Chehnsford, April 19 1776 signed by .f ^^ Prmer 
and others, for wages for service from Feb 5, 1776, to April 1, 1776, in 
Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Roberson's (Robinson s) Regt.; also, 1st 
Lieutenant, Capt. Benjamin Fletcher's (1st) Co., /th M.dd esex Co. 
Regt. of Mass. Militia; list of officers commissioned July 16, 1/»U. 

Procter Eliiah 2d Lieut., Capt. John Minot's (1st) Co. (South Co. in 
Chelmsfid), Col. Simeon Spaulding's (7th Middlesex Co.) Regt. of Mass. 
Militia- list of officers chosen in said regiment; ordered in Council, May 
31 1776 that said officers be commissioned; reported commissioned 
Mkv 31. 1776; also. Lieutenant, Capt. John Moore's Co.. Col. Jonathan 
Reed's Regt of Guards; muster rolls dated Cambridge May 9, and 
Tune 1 1778; appointed March 23, 1778; service guarding troops of 
convention; term, 3 months from April 2 1778; also, same Co. and 
Regt.; engaged April 1, 1778; discharged July 1, 1778; service, 3 mos. 
at Cambridge. 

Procter, Levi, Chelmsford. Descriptive list of men raised in Middlesex Co. 
for the term of 9 months from the time of their arrival at Fishkill, agree- 
able to resolve of April 20, 1778; Capt. Minot's Co Co. Spaulding 3 
Regt age, 21 yrs.; stature, 5 ft., 9 in.; residence, Chelrnsford ; engaged 
for toWn of Chelmsford; arrived at Fishkill, June 19,. 1778; also, list of 
men returned as received of Jonathan Warner, Commissioner, by Col. K. 
Putnam. July 20, 1778. 

Pntman David Private. Capt. John Ford's Co. of Volunteers, Col. Jonathan 
Xd's Regt.; e^HsLd Sept. 28, 1777; discharged Nov. 8, 1777; service. 
40 days; company probably raised in Dracut, Chelmsford, and Dun- 
stable and marched Sept. 30, 1777, to reinforce Northern Army. 

Putnam, David, Chelmsford. Capt. Benjamin Walker's Co Col Ebenezer 
Bridee's (27th) Regt.; order for advance pay, signed by said Putnam 
and others, dated Cambridge, June 6, 1775; also, order on Maj. Barber, 
da?ed Cambridge, June 24, 1775, signed by Col. E. Bridge, for cartridge 
boxes for said Putnam and others belonging to Lieut. John Mint s Co., 
also, Private, Capt. Walker's Co., Col. Bridge's Regt. ; company return 
rorobablv Oct 1775); also, Capt. John Minott's Co., Col. Dike's Regt.; 
Ser roll for-'Dec., 1776-Feb., 1777; enlisted Dec. 13, 1776; regiment 
raised to serve until March 1, 1777. 

Ouinlen William, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Asa Drury's Co., Col Turner s 

^ Regt ; entered service Aug. 24, 1781; discharged Nov 27 1781; service 
3 mos 8 days, at Rhode Island, including travel (80 miles) home; roll 
endorsed "five Months Service at Rhode Island^';, also, receipt dated 
Dunstable, March 26, 1782, for bounty paid said Quinlen by Class No. 1 
of the town of Dunstable, of which Ebenezer Bancroft was Chairman, 
to serve in the Continental Army for the term of 3 years. 

Rea, Caleb. Company receipt for mileage, given to Capt. John Ford dated 
Ticonderoga, Augf 28, 1776; also, company receipt, given to Capt. John 
Ford for wages to Oct. 1, 1776, dated Ticonderoga; conipany marched 
from Chelmsford, July 25, 1776, and was discharged at Albany, Jan. 1, 
1777. 

Read Abel, Chelmsford. Descriptive list of men raised in Middlesex Co. 
to reinforce the Continental Army, agreeable to resolve of June 9, 1779, 
as returned by Brig. Gen. Eleazer Brooks to Maj. Hosmer, dated Lincoln, 
fuly 21, mgTcapl Minott's Co., 7th Middlesex Co. Regt ; age, 22 yrs.; 
stature 6 ft 1 in (also given 6 ft.) ; complexion, light; residence. Chelms- 
ford- engaged for town of Chelmsford; reported delivered to Ensign 

Clark. . J i_ -J 

Read, James. Receipt dated Chelmsford April 19 1^76, signed by said 
Read and others belonging to Capt. John Fo'-d s Co., Col. R^ber^^Y 
(Robinson's) Regt. for wages for serA-ice from Feb. 5, 1776, to April 1, 
1776. 



342 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

Read, Supply, Chelmsford. List of men raised for the 6 months' service and 
returned by Brig. Gen. Paterson as having passed muster in a return 
dated Camp Totoway, Oct. 25, 1780; also, pay roll for 6 months men 
raised by the town of Chelmsford for service in the Continental Army 
at North river during 1780; marched from home June 30, 1780; discharged 
Jan. 9, 1781 ; service, 6 mos., 20 days, including 10 days (200 miles) travel 
home. 

Reed, Abel. List of men raised in Middlesex Co., for Continental service, 
agreeable to resolve of June 9, 1779, as returned by Joseph Hosmer, 
Superintendent for said county. Nov. 24, 1779; engaged for town of 
Chelmsford; also, Maj. Keith's Co., Col. Michael Jackson's (8th) Regt. ; 
entered service July 28, 1779; discharged April 28, 1780; term, 9 months. 

Reed, Peter, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. John Minot's Co., Col. Josiah 
Whitney's Regt.; arrived at destination May 10, 1777; discharged July 9, 
1777; service, 2 mos., 9 days, at Rhode Island, including travel (8 days) 
to and from place of destination. Roll dated Warwick Neck. 

Reed, Supply, Chelmsford. Private, Col. Moses Parker's Co., which marched 
on the alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 8 days; roll endorsed "L't Benj 
Walkers Roll"; also, Capt. John Ford's Co. of Volunteers, Col. Jonathan 
Reed's Regt.; enlisted Sept. 28 (also given Sept. 27), 1777; discharged 
Nov. 8, 1777; service, 40 (also given 43) days; company probably raised 
in Dracut, Chelmsford, and Dunstable, and marched Sept. 30, 1777, to 
reinforce Northern Army; also, list of 6 months men raised agreeable to 
resolve of June 5, 1780, returned as received of Maj. Joseph Hosmer, 
Superintendent for Middlesex Co., by Justin Ely, Commissioner, dated 
Springfield; also, descriptive list of men raised to reinforce the Con- 
tinental Army for the term of 6 months, agreeable to resolve of June 5, 
1780, returned as received of Justin Ely, Commissioner, by Brig. Gen. 
John Glover, at Springfield, July 11, 1780; age, 25 yrs.; stature, 5 ft., 
6 in.; complexion, light; engaged for town of Chelmsford; arrived at 
Springfield, July 9, 1780; marched to camp July 11, 1780, under command 
of Ensign Bancraft. 

Rice, Benjamin, Chelmsford. List of men raised to serve in the Continental 
Army (year not given); residence, Chelmsford; engaged for town of 
Chelmsford. 

Richardson, James, Chelmsford. Fifer, Colonel's Co., Col. Thomas Marshall's 
(10th) Regt.; Continental Army pay accounts for service from Jan. 10, 
1777, to Dec. 31, 1779; residence, Chelmsford; credited to town of 
Chelmsford; also, Capt. Philip Thomas's (5th) Co., Col. Thomas Mar- 
shall's Regt.; subsistence allowed from date of entering service, Jan. 15, 
1777, to Feb. 6, 1777; credited with 22 days' allowance; subsistence also 
allowed for 11 days (220 miles) travel on march from Boston to Benn- 
ington; also, same Co. and Regt.; subsistence allowed from Feb. 6, 
1777, to June 2, 1777; credited with 135 days' allowance; also, same Co. 
and Regt.; muster roll for Jan., 1779, dated West Point; enlisted Jan. 10, 
1777; enlistment, 3 yrs.; also. Colonel's Co., Col. Marshall's Regt.; 
muster roll for April, 1779, dated West Point; also. Private, same Co. and 
Regt.; Continental Army pay accounts for service from Jan. 1, 1780, to 
Jan. 12, 1780. 

Richardson, Josiah, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Oliver Barron's Co. of 
Militia, Col. David Green's Regt., which marched in response to the 
alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 3 days. 

Richardson, Nathaniel, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Varnum's Co., Col. 
Michael Jackson's Regt.; Continental Army pay accounts for service 
from Jan. 1, 1780, to Feb. 3, 1780; residence, Chelmsford; term, 3 years; 
reported deceased. 

Richardson, Nathaniel. Receipt dated Chelmsford, April 19, 1776, signed 
by said Richardson and others, for wages for service from Feb. 5, 1776, 
to April 1, 1776, in Capt. John Ford's Co., Col Roberson's (Robinson's) 
Regt. 



RECORDS OF CHELMSFORD MEN IN THE REVOLUTION 343 

Richardson, Oliver, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Oliver Barron's Co. of 
Militia, Col. David Green's Rcgt., which marched in response to the 
alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 7 days; also, receipt dated Chelmsford, 
April 19, 1776, signed by said Richardson and others, for wages for 
service from Feb. 5, 1776, to April 1, 1776, in Capt. John Ford's Co., 
Col. Roberson's (Robinson's) Regt.; also. Private, Capt. John Ford's 
Co. of Volunteers, Col. Jonathan Reed's Regt.; enlisted Sept. 28 (also 
given Sept. 27), 1777; discharged Nov. 8, 1777; service, 40 (also given 
43) days; company probably raised in Dracut, Chelmsford, and Dun- 
stable, and marched Sept. 30, 1777, to reinforce Northern Army. 

Richardson, Robert, Chelmsford (also given Lancaster). Capt. John Ford's 
Co., Col. Ebenezer Bridge's (27th) Regt.; order for advance pay for 1 
month, signed by said Richardson and others, dated Cambridge, June 6, 
1775; also, same Co. and Regt.; company return dated June 15, 1775; 
age, 23 yrs. ; stature, 6 ft. ; complexion, light ; occupation, farmer; residence, 
Chelmsford; enlisted May 4, 1775; also. Private, same Co. and Regt.; 
muster roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; enlisted May 4, 1775; service, 3 mos., 
5 days; also, company return dated Sept. 25, 1775; also, company receipt 
for mileage, given to Capt. John Ford, dated Ticonderoga, Aug. 28, 1776; 
also, company receipt, given to Capt. John Ford, for wages to Oct. 1, 
1776, dated Ticonderoga; company marched from Chelmsford, July 25, 

1776, and was discharged at Albany, Jan. 1, 1777; also, Capt. John 
Minott's Co., Col. Dike's Regt.; muster roll for Dec, 1776 — Feb., 1777; 
enlisted Dec. 13, 1776; discharged Jan. 22, 1777; regiment raised to serve 
until March 1, 1777; also, Private, Colonel's Co., Col. Thomas Marshall's 
(10th) Regt.; Continental Army pay accounts for service from Jan. 12, 

1777, to Dec. 31, 1780; residence, Chelmsford; credited to town of Chelms- 
ford; also, Capt. Phillip Thomas's (5th) Co., Col. Marshall's Regt.; 
subsistence allowed from date of entering service, Jan. 15, 1777, to Feb. 6, 
1777; credited with 23 days' allowance; subsistence also allowed for 11 
days (220 miles) travel on march from Boston to Bennington; also, same 
Co. and Regt.; subsistence allowed from Feb. 6, 1777, to June 2, 1777; 
credited with 135 days' allowance; also, same Co. and Regt.; muster 
roll for Jan., 1779, dated West Point; enlisted Jan. 12, 1777; enlistment, 
3 yrs.; reported sick at Hartford; also, Colonel's Co., Col. Marshall's 
Regt.; muster roll for April, 1779, dated West Point; also, descriptive 
list endorsed "W' point January 11th 1781"; Capt. William Parks' Co., 
Col. Benjamin Tupper's (10th) Regt.; age, 44 yrs.; stature, 5 ft., 8 in.; 
complexion, light; hair, light; residence, Lancaster (also given Chelms- 
ford); engaged Oct. 7, 1779, by Capt. Parks; term, during war; also. 
Private, Col. Tupper's Regt.; service from Jan. 1, 1781, 24 mos. 

Robb, John. Company receipt, dated Chelmsford, April 19. 1776, for wages 

for service from Feb. 5, 1776, to April 1, 1776, in Capt. John Ford's Co., 

Col. Roberson's (Robinson's) Regt. 
Robbins, Jonathan. Sergeant, Capt. John Minott's Co., Col. Dike's Regt.; 

muster roll for Dec, 1776 — Feb., 1777; credited to town of Chelmsford; 

enlisted Dec. 13, 1776; regiment raised to serve until March 1, 1777. 
Robens [Robins], Ephraim. Private, Capt. John Ford's Co. of Volunteers, 

Col. Jonathan Reed's Regt.; enlisted Sept. 28 (also given Sept. 27), 1777; 

discharged Nov. 8, 1777; service, 40 (also given 43) days; company 

probably raised in Dracut, Chelmsford, and Dunstable, and marched 

Sept. 30, 1777, to reinforce Northern Army. 
Robens [Robins], Jonathan. Private, Capt. John Ford's Co. of Volunteers, 

Col. Jonathan Reed's Regt.; enlisted Sept. 28 (also given Sept. 27), 

1777; discharged Nov. 8, 1777; service, 40 (also given 43) days; company 

probably raised in Dracut, Chelmsford, and Dunstable, and marched 

Sept. 30, 1777, to reinforce Northern Army. 
Roby, John, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Oliver Barron's Co. of Militia, 

Col. David Green's Regt., which marched in response to the alarm of 

April 19, 1775; service, 17 days. 



344 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

Rowell, William, Sandown (also given Chelmsford). Private, Capt. John 
Ford's Co., Col. Ebenezer Bridge's (27th) Regt.; muster roll dated 
Aug. 1, 1775; enlisted May 6, 1775; service, 3 mos., 3 days. 

Shad, Jonathan. Company receipt dated Chelmsford, April 19, 1776, for 
wages for service from Feb. 5, 1776, to April 1, 1776, in Capt. Ford's 
Co., Col. Roberson's (Robinson's) Regt. 

Shed, Ebenezer, Chelmsford. Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Ebenezer Bridge's 
(27th) Regt.; company return dated June 15, 1775; age, 25 yrs.; stature, 
6 ft.; complexion, dark; occupation, house wright; residence, Chelmsford; 
enlisted April 25, 1775; also. Private, same Co. and Regt.; muster roll 
dated Aug. 1, 1775; enlisted April 25, 1775; service, 3 mos., 14 days; also, 
company return dated Sept. 25, 1775. 

Shed, Jonathan, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Zaccheus Wright's Co., Col. 
Brook's Regt.; company return dated Camp at White Plains, Oct. 31, 
1776; said Shed reported as in Camp at White Plains and fit for duty. 

Shed, Jonathan. Private, Capt. John Ford's Co. of Volunteers, Col. Jonathan 
Reed's Regt.; enlisted Sept. 28 (also given Sept. 27), 1777; discharged 
Nov. 8, 1777; service, 40 (also given 43) days; company probably raised 
in Dracut, Chelmsford, and Dunstable, and marched Sept. 30, 1777, to 
reinforce Northern Army; also, order on Capt. John Ford, of Col. Jonathan 
Reed's Regt., payable to Daniel Proctor, dated Chelmsford, Nov. 16, 

1778, signed by said Shed, for wages for 40 days' service in 1777. 
Sherwin. Elnathan, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Thomas Hovey's Co., Col. 

Nathan Tyler's Regt.; enhsted July 15, 1779; discharged Dec. 18, 1779; 
service, 5 mos., 9 days, at Rhode Island; also, same Co. and Regt.; pay 
roll for Dec, 1779, allowing 1 mo., 5 days' service at Rhode Island, in- 
cluding travel (100 miles) home. 

Silaway, Reuben. Company receipt for mileage, given to Capt. John Ford, 
dated Ticonderoga, Aug. 28, 1776; also, company receipt, given to Capt. 
John Ford, for wages to Oct. 1, 1776, dated Ticonderoga; company 
marched from Chelmsford, July 25, 1776, and was discharged at Albany, 
Jan. 1, 1777. 

Sillaway, Daniel, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Oliver Barron's Co. of Militia, 
Col. David Green's Regt., which marched in response to the alarm of 
April 19, 1775; service, 9 days. 

Siloway, Daniel. Company receipt dated Chelmsford, April 19, 1776, for 
wages for service from Feb. 5, 1776, to April 1, 1776, in Capt. John Ford's 
Co., Col. Roberson's (Robinson's) Regt.; also, company receipt for 
mileage, given to Capt. John Ford, dated Ticonderoga, Aug. 28, 1776; 
also, company receipt, given to Capt. John Ford, for wages to Oct. 1, 
1776, dated Ticonderoga; company marched from Chelmsford, July 25, 
1776, and was discharged at Albany, Jan. 1, 1777. 

Simmonds, John, Boston (also given Chelmsford). Fifer, Major's Co., Col. 
Henry Jackson's Regt.; Continental Army pay accounts for service 
from July 14, 1777, to June 1, 1779; residence, Chelmsford; reported 
deserted June 1, 1779, returned to service May 1, 1780; also, Capt. 
Nathaniel Jarvis's Co., Col. Jackson's Regt.; pay roll for Feb., 1778; 
also, same Co. and Regt.; pay rolls for June, July, and Aug.. 1778, sworn 
to at Providence; also, same Co. and Regt.; pay roll for Sept., 1778, 
certified at Pawtuxet; also, Lieut. Thomas Hunt's Co., Col. Jackson's 
Regt.; pay rolls for Dec, 1778, and Feb., 1779, sworn to at Pawtuxet; 
also, Capt. Hunt's (4th) Co., Col. Jackson's Regt.; pay roll for March, 

1779, sworn to at Pawtuxet; also, Capt. Lemuel Trescott's (3rd) Co., 
Col. Jackson's Regt.; muster roll for April, 1779, dated Pawtuxet; enlisted 
June 27, 1777; enlistment, 3 years; reported furloughed Feb. 22, 1779, 
by Col. Jackson, for 25 days; also, descriptive list dated Hutts, three 
miles from West Point, Jan. 28, 1781; Capt. Hastings's Co., 9th Mass. 
Regt., commanded by Col. Jackson; rank, Fifer; age, 13 yrs.; stature, 
4 ft., 8 in.; complexion, dark; hair, dark; residence, Boston; enlisted 
Jan. 17, 1781, by Col. Jackson; enlistment, during war; reported much 
marked with small-pox. 



RECORDS OF CHELMSFORD MEN IN THE REVOLUTION 345 

Smiley, William. Company receipt for mileage, given to Capt. John Ford, 
dated Ticonderoga, Aug. 28, 1776; also, company receipt, given to Capt. 
John Ford, for wages to Oct. 1, 1770, dated Ticonderoga; company 
marched from Chelmsford, July 25, 1776, and was discharged at Albany, 
Jan. 1, 1777. 

Smith, John. Company receipt for mileage, given to Capt. John Ford, dated 
Ticonderoga, Aug. 28, 1776; also, company receipt, given to Capt. 
John Ford, for wages to Oct. 1, 1776, dated Ticonderoga; company 
marched from Chelmsford, July 25, 1776, and was discharged at Albany, 
Jan. 1, 1777. 

Spalding, Artemas, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Zaccheus Wright's Co., 
Col. Brooks's Regt.; company return dated Camp at White Plains, 
Oct. 31, 1776; said Spalding reported as in Camp at White Plains and 
fit for duty. 

Spalding, Joseph, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Zaccheus Wright's Co., 
Col. Brooks's Regt.; company return dated Camp at White Plains, 
Oct. 31, 1776; said Spalding reported as in camp and fit for duty; also 
reported as having lost articles in battle. 

Spalding, Samuel, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Zaccheus Wright's Co., Col. 
Brooks's Regt.; company return dated Camp at White Plains, Oct. 31, 
1776; reported sick at Weathersfield. 

Spaulding, [Ashbel.] Private, Capt. Amos Foster's Co., Col. Cyprian How's 
Regt.; entered service July 28, 1780, 3 days preceding March; discharged 
Oct. 30, 1780; service, 3 mos., 8 days, probably at Rhode Island, including 
5 days (100 miles) travel home; company detached from 7th Middlesex 
Regt., and ordered part to Rhode Island and part to Fishkill; regiment 
raised to reinforce Continental Army for 3 months. 

Spaulding, Azriah, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. John Minot's Co., Col. 
Josiah Whitney's Regt.; arrived at destination May 10, 1777; discharged 
July 9, 1777; service, 2 mos., 9 days, at Rhode Island, including travel 
(8 days) to and from place of destination; roll dated Warwick Neck. 

Spaulding, Benjamin, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Oliver Barron's Co. of 
Militia, Col. David Green's Regt., which marched in response to the 
alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 11 days. 

Spaulding, Benjamin, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Samuel Tay's Co., Lieut. 
Col. Webb's Regt.; enlisted Aug. 18, 1781; discharged Nov. 29, 1781; 
service, 3 mos., 22 days, including 11 days (212 miles) travel home; 
regiment raised in Suffolk and Middlesex Counties to reinforce Continental 
Army for 3 months. 

Spaulding, David, Chelmsford. Private, Col. Moses Parker's Co., which 
marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 11 days; roll endorsed 
"L't Benj Walkers Roll." 

Spaulding, Henry, Jr., Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Oliver Barron's Co. of 
Militia, Col. David Green's Regt., which marched in response to the 
alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 7 days. 

Spaulding, Jephthah, Chelmsford. Receipt dated Chelmsford, April 19, 
1776, signed by said Spaulding and others, for wages for service from 
Feb. 5, 1776, to April 1, 1776, in Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. John Rober- 
son's (Robinson's) Regt.; also. Private, Capt. Zaccheus Wright's Co., 
Col. Brooks's Regt.; company return dated Camp at White Plains, Oct. 
31, 1776; said Spaulding reported as in Camp at White Plains; also 
reported as having been sent with the wounded; also, Capt. John 
Minott's Co., Col. Dike's Regt.; muster roll for Dec, 1776 — Feb., 1777; 
enlisted Dec. 13, 1776; regiment raised to serve until March 1, 1777. 

Spaulding, Jesse, Chelmsford (probably). List of men probably belonging 
to Chelmsford, dated May 1, 1775; also, enlistment agreement dated 
Jan. 29, 1776, signed by said Spaulding and others, engaging themselves 
to serve until April 1, 1776; also, Corporal, Capt. Reuben Butterfield's 
Co.; enlisted Dec. 16, 1776; discharged March 16, 1777; service, 90 
days; travel home, 15 days (300 miles), also allowed; also, order on 
Capt. Butterfield, signed by said Spaulding, for remainder of wages due for 
service in Capt. Butterfield's Co., Col. Thatcher's Regt. (year not given). 



346 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

Spaulding, John, Chelmsford. Drummer, Capt. Oliver Barron's Co. of 
Militia, Col. David Green's Regt., which marched in response to the 
alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 10 days. 

Spaulding, John, Chelmsford (probably). List of men probably belonging 
to Chelmsford, dated May 1, 1775. 

Spaulding, John (also given John, 3d), Chelmsford. List of men mustered 
by Nathaniel Barber, Muster Master for Suffolk Co., dated Boston, 
June 8, 1777; Capt. Brown's Co., Col. Henry Jackson's Regt.; reported 
received State bounty; also, Drummer, Major's Co., Col. Jackson's 
Regt.; Continental Army pay accounts for service from Jan. 1, 1780, 
to April 3, 1780; also, return certified at Camp near Morristown, April 
30, 1780, of ofificers and men belonging to Col. Lee's, Col. Henley's, and 
Col. Jackson's Regts., and men belonging to Massachusetts in Col. 
Henry Sherburne's Regt., who were incorporated into a regiment under 
the command of Col. Henry Jackson, agreeable to the arrangement of 
April 9, 1779; Major's Co.; rank, Drummer; residence, Chelmsford; 
engaged for town of Chelmsford; engaged April 3, 1777; term, 3 yrs.; 
reported discharged April 3, 1780, term of enlistment having expired. 

Spaulding, John, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Samuel Tay's Co., Lieut. Col. 
Webb's Regt.; enlisted Aug. 18, 1781; discharged Nov. 29, 1781; service, 
3 mos., 22 days, including 11 days (212 miles) travel home; regiment 
raised in Suffolk and Middlesex Counties to reinforce Continental Army 
for 3 months. 

Spaulding, John. Receipt dated Chelmsford, April 19, 1776, signed by said 
Spaulding and others, for wages for service from Feb. 5, 1776, to April 1, 
1776, in Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Roberson's (Robinson's) Regt. 

Spaulding, Jonas (also given Jonas, Jr.), Chelmsford. Capt. John Ford's 
Co., Col. Ebenezer Bridge's (27th) Regt.; company return dated June 
15, 1775; age, 19 yrs.; stature, 6 ft.; complexion, light; occupation, 
farmer; residence, Chelmsford; enlisted, April 29 (also given April 27), 
1775; also, Private, same Co. and Regt.; muster roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; 
enlisted April 29, 1775; service, 3 mos., 10 days; also, company return 
dated Sept. 25, 1775; also, account of articles lost at the battle of Bunker 
Hill, June 17, 1775, by said Spaulding and others; also, memorandum 
of firelocks received of sundry ofificers and soldiers; date of delivery, Jan. 1, 
1776. 

Spaulding, Joseph, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Oliver Barron's Co. of 
Militia, Col. David Green's Regt. which marched in response to the 
alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 6 days; also, Capt. John Ford's Co., 
Col. Ebenezer Bridge's (27th) Regt.; order for advance pay, signed by 
said Spaulding and others, dated Camp at Cambridge, June 6, 1775; 
also, same Co. and Regt.; company return dated June 15, 1775; age, 
20 yrs.; stature, 5 ft., 10 in.; complexion, dark; occupation, farmer; 
residence, Chelmsford; enlisted April 25, 1775; also, Private, same Co. 
and Regt.; muster roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; enlisted April 25, 1775; 
service, 3 mos., 14 days; also, company return dated Sept. 25, 1775. 

Spaulding, Joseph. Receipt dated Chelmsford, April 19, 1776, signed by 
said Spaulding and others, for wages for service from Feb. 5, 1776, to 
April 1, 1776, in Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Roberson's (Robinson's) 
Regt. 

Spaulding, Joseph, Jr., Chelmsford. Private, Col. Moses Parker's Co., which 
marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 8 days; roll endorsed 
"L't Benj Walkers Roll"; also, Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Ebenezer 
Bridge's (27th) Regt.; company return dated June 15, 1775; age, 19 
yrs.; stature, 6 ft.; complexion, light; occupation, farmer; residence, 
Chelmsford; enlisted April 27, 1775; also, Private, same Co. and Regt.; 
muster roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; enlisted April 27, 1775; service, 3 mos., 
12 days; also, company return dated Sept. 25, 1775. 

Spaulding, Micah, Chelmsford. Private, Col. Moses Parker's Co., which 
marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 10 days. Roll endorsed 
"L't Benj Walkers Roll." 



RECORDS OF CHELMSFORD MEN IN THE REVOLUTION 347 

Spaulding, Robert, Chelmsford. 2d Lieutenant, Capt. John Ford's (4th) 
Co., 7th Middlesex Co. Regt. of Mass. Militia; list of officers; com- 
missioned May 31, 1776; also, 2d Lieutenant, Capt. Ford's (4th) Co. 
(North Co. in Chelmsford); list of officers chosen in said company, as 
returned by Simeon Spaulding, field officer, dated Chelmsford, July 5, 
1776; ordered in Council, Sept. 3, 1776, that said officers be commissioned; 
also, 2d Lieutenant, Capt. Zacchcus Wright's (8th) Co., Col. Eleazer 
Brooks's Regt.; list of officers of a regiment drafted from Middlesex Co. 
Militia and ordered to march to Horse Neck by Brig. Oliver Prescott, 
Sept. 26, 1776; also, Lieutenant, Capt. Wright's Co., Col. Brooks's 
Regt.; company return dated Camp at White Plains, Oct. 31, 1776; 
said Spaulding reported as in Camp at White Plains and fit for duty. 

Spaulding, Samuel. Private, Capt. John Minott's Co., Col. Dike's Regt.; 
muster roll for Dec, 1776 — Feb., 1777; credited to town of Chelmsford; 
enlisted Dec. 19, 1776; regiment raised to serve until March 1, 1777. 

Spaulding, Silas, Chelmsford. Sergeant, Capt. Oliver Barron's Co. of Militia, 
Col. David Green's Regt., which marched in response to the alarm of 
April 19, 1775; service, 16 days; also, list of men probably belonging to 
Chelmsford, dated May 1, 1775. 

Spaulding, Simeon. 1st Lieutenant Colonel, Col. David Green's (2d Middle- 
sex Co.) Regt., which marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 
6 days; reported returned home; also official record of a ballot by the 
House of Representatives, dated Feb. 7, 1776; said Spaulding chosen 
Colonel, 7th Middlesex Co. Regt. of Mass. Militia; appointment con- 
curred in by Council, Feb. 8, 1776; reported commissioned Feb. 8, 1776; 
also, list of officers chosen in 4th Co. (North Co. in Chelmsford), as 
returned by said Spaulding, field officer and moderator, dated Chelmsford, 
July 5, 1776; also, Colonel; list of members of committees appointed 
to raise men for New York and Canada, showing number of commissions 
delivered them; said Spaulding reported as belonging to committee for 
Middlesex Co.; also, resignation dated Chelmsford, March 9, 1778, 
signed by said Spaulding, resigning his commission as Colonel of 7th 
Middlesex Co. Regt. of Mass. Militia on account of advanced age; 
resignation accepted in Council, March 11, 1778. 

Spaulding, [Simeoni. Private, Capt. Amos Foster's Co., Col. Cyprian How's 
Regt.; entered service July 28, 1780, 3 days preceding march; discharged 
Oct. 30, 1780; service, 3 mos., 8 days, probably at Rhode Island, in- 
cluding 5 days (100 miles) travel home; company detached from 7th 
Middlesex Co. Regt. and ordered part to Rhode Island and part to 
Fishkill; regiment raised to reinforce Continental Army for 3 months. 

Spaulding, William. Private, Capt. Joseph Bradley Varnum's Co., Col. 
Mclntush's (Mcintosh's) Regt.; Gen. Level's Brigade; enlisted July 30, 
1778; discharged Sept. 11, 1778; service, 1 mo., 17 days, on expedition 
to Rhode Island, including 5 days (100 miles) travel home. Roll dated 
Dracut. 

Spaulding, Zebulon, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Zaccheus Wright's Co., 
Col. Brooks's Regt.; company return dated Camp at White Plains, 
Oct. 31, 1776; said Spaulding reported as in Camp at White Plains and 
fit for duty. 

Spauling, Jephthah, Chelmsford. Private, Col. Moses Parker's Co., which 
marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 12 days; roll endorsed 
"L't Benj Walkers Roll." 

Spoulding, Azriah. Private, Capt. John Ford's Co. of Volunteers, Col. 
Jonathan Reed's Regt.; enlisted Sept. 28 (also given Sept. 27), 1777; 
discharged Nov. 8, 1777; service, 40 (also given 43) days; company 
probably raised in Dracut, Chelmsford, and Dunstable, and marched 
Sept. 30, 1777, to reinforce Northern Army. 

Spoulding, Joel. Private, Capt. John Ford's Co. of Volunteers, Col. Jonathan 
Reed's Regt.; enlisted Sept. 28 (also given Sept. 27), 1777; discharged 
Nov. 8, 1777; service, 40 (also given 43) days; company probably raised 
in Dracut, Chelmsford, and Dunstable, and marched Sept 30, 1777, to 
reinforce Northern Army. 



348 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

Spoulding, William. Private, Capt. John Ford's Co. of Volunteers, Col. 
Jonathan Reed's Regt.; enlisted Sept. 28 (also given Sept. 27), 1777; 
discharged Nov. 8, 1777; service, 40 (also given 43) days; company 
probably raised in Dracut, Chelmsford, and Dunstable, and marched 
Sept. 30, 1777, to reinforce Northern Army. 

Sprage, Jonathan, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Oliver Barron's Co. of Militia, 
Col. David Green's Regt., which marched in response to the alarm of 
April 19, 1775; service, 6 days. 

Sprake, Benjamin. Company receipt for mileage, given to Capt. John Ford, 
dated Ticonderoga, Aug. 28, 1776; also, company receipt, given to Capt, 
John Ford, for wages to Oct. 1, 1776, dated Ticonderoga; company 
marched from Chelmsford, July 25, 1776, and was discharged at Albany, 
Jan. 1, 1777. 

Sprake (?), Nicholas. Company receipt dated Chelmsford, April 19, 1776, 
for wages for service from Feb. 5, 1776, to April 1, 1776, in Capt. John 
Ford's Co., Col. John Roberson's (Robinson's) Regt. 

Sprauge, Jonathan, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. 
Ebenezer Bridge's (27th) Regt.; muster roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; enlisted 
April 25, 1775; service, 3 mos., 14 days. 

Sprigu, Jonathan, Chelmsford. Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Bridge's Regt.; 
company return dated June 15, 1775; age, 19 yrs. ; stature, 5 ft., 8 in.; 
complexion, light; occupation, housewright; residence, Chelmsford; en- 
listed April 25, 1775. 

Sprigue, Jonathan, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. 
Ebenezer Bridge's (27th) Regt.; company return dated Sept. 25, 1775. 

Stacy, William, Pepperell (also given Chelmsford). Descriptive list dated 
Feb. 20, 1782; Light Infantry Co., Lieut. Col. John Brooks's (7th) 
Regt.; age, 19 (also given 20) yrs.; stature, 5 ft., 10 in.; complexion, 
light (also given dark); hair, light (also given dark); occupation, black- 
smith; birthplace, Chelmsford; residence, Pepperell (also given Chelms- 
ford); engaged for town of Chelmsford; engaged April 22, 1782; term, 
3 yrs.; also. Light Infantry Co., Lieut. Col. Brooks's (7th) Regt.; list 
of men who died or were discharged subsequent to Jan. 1, 1781; said 
Stacy discharged June 15, 1783, by Gen. Washington; reported an officer's 
servant. 

Starns, Jonathan. Company receipt, given to Capt. John Ford, for wages to 
Oct. 1, 1776, dated Ticonderoga; company marched from Chelmsford, 
July 25, 1776, and was discharged at Albany, Jan. 1, 1777. 

Stevens, Jesse, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Samuel Tay's Co., Lieut. Col. 
Webb's Regt.; enlisted Aug. 18, 1781; discharged Nov. 29, 1781; service, 
3 mos., 22 days, including 11 days (212 miles) travel home; regiment 
raised in Suffolk and Middlesex Counties to reinforce Continental Army 
for 3 months; roll dated Woburn. 

Stevens, Jonathan. Company receipt dated Chelmsford, April 19, 1776, 
for wages for service from Feb. 5, 1776, to April 1, 1776, in Capt. John 
Ford's Co., Col. Roberson's (Robinson's) Regt. 

Stevens, Samuel, Chelmsford. Lieutenant, Capt. Oliver Barron's Co. of 
Militia, Col. David Green's Regt., which marched in response to the 
alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 10 days. 

Taloy, John. Company receipt dated Chelmsford, April 19, 1776, for wages 
for service from Feb. 5, 1776, to April 1, 1776, in Capt. John Ford's Co., 
Col. Roberson's (Robinson's) Regt. 

Taylor, John. Company receipt for mileage, given to Capt. John Ford, 
dated Ticonderoga, Aug. 28, 1776; also, company receipt, given to Capt. 
John Ford, for wages to Oct. 1, 1776, dated Ticonderoga; company 
marched from Chelmsford, July 25, 1776, and was discharged at Albany, 
Jan. 1, 1777. 

Thorndike, Hezckiah. Company receipt dated Chelmsford, April 29, 1776, 
for wages for service from Feb. 5, 1776, to April 1, 1776, in Capt. John 
Ford's Co., Col. Roberson's (Robinson's Regt.; also, company receipt 
for mileage, given to Capt. John Ford, dated Ticonderoga, Aug. 28, 



RECORDS OF CHELMSFORD MEN IN THE REVOLUTION 349 

1776; also, company receipt, given to Capt. John Ford, for wages 
to Oct. 1, 1776, dated Ticondcroga; company marched from Chelmsford, 
July 25, 1776, and was discharged at Albany, Jan. 1, 1777. 

Tuttle, Nathaniel, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Samuel Tay's Co., Lieut. 
Col. Webb's Regt.; enlisted Aug. 18, 1781; discharged Nov. 29, 1781; 
service, 3 mos., 22 days, including 11 days (212 miles) travel home; 
regiment raised in Suffolk and Middlesex Counties to reinforce Contin- 
ental Army for 3 months. 

Twiss, John, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Oliver Barron's Co. of Militia, 
Col. David Green's Regt., which marched in response to the alarm of 
April 19, 1775; service, 3 days. 

Twiss, Samuel. Receipt dated Chelmsford, April 19, 1776, signed by said 
Twiss and others, for wages for service from Feb. 5, 1776, to April 1, 
1776, in Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Roberson's (Robinson's) Regt.; 
also. Private, Capt. John Minott's Co., Col. Dike's Regt.; pay abstract 
for equipments for Dec, 1776, Jan. and Feb., 1777. [See Samuel Swiss.] 

Twist, Daniel, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Zaccheus Wright's Co., Col. 
Brooks's Regt.; company return dated Camp at White Plains, Oct. 31, 
1776; reported as in camp and fit for duty. 

Tyler, Joseph. Private, Capt. John Ford's Co. of Volunteers, Col. Jonathan 
Reed's Regt.; enlisted Sept. 28 (also given Sept. 27), 1777; discharged 
Oct. 20, 1777; service, 20 (also given 23) days; company probably raised 
in Dracut, Chelmsford, and Dunstable, and marched Sept. 30, 1777, 
to reinforce Northern Army. 

Tylor, Joseph, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Oliver Barron's Co. of Militia, 
Col. David Green's Regt., which marched in response to the alarm of 
April 19, 1775; service, 10 days. 

Underwood, Phineas, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Zaccheus Wright's Co., 
Col. Brooks's Regt.; company return dated Camp at White Plains, Oct. 
31, 1776; said Underwood reported as in camp and fit for duty. 

Wakefield, Ebenezer. Company receipt for mileage, given to Capt. John 
Ford, dated Ticonderoga, Aug. 28, 1776; also, company receipt, given 
to Capt. Ford, for wages to Oct. 1, 1776, dated Ticonderoga; company 
marched from Chelmsford, July 25, 1776, and was discharged at Albany, 
Jan. 1, 1777. 

Walker, Benjamin, Chelmsford. Lieutenant, Col. Moses Parker's Co., 
which marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 5 days; roll 
endorsed "L't Benj Walkers Roll"; also. Captain; list of officers belonging 
to Col. Ebenezer Bridge's Regt. to be commissioned; ordered in Provincial 
Congress, at Watertown, May 27, 1775, that said officers be commissioned; 
receipt for above commissions, dated Watertown, May 27, 1775; also. 
Captain, Col. Bridge's (27th) Regt.; muster roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; 
engaged April 19, 1775; service, 3 mos., 15 days; also, company return 
(probably Oct., 1775); reported deceased. 

Walker, Benjamin, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Samuel Tay's Co., Lieut. 
Col._ Webb's Regt.; enlisted Aug. 18, 1781; discharged Nov. 29, 1781; 
service. 3 mos.. 22 days, including 11 days (212 miles) travel home; 
regiment raised in Suffolk and Middlesex Counties to reinforce Continental 
Army for 3 months. 

Walker, David, Chelmsford. Private, Col. Moses Parker's Co., which 
marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 9 days; roll endorsed 
"L't Benj Walkers Roll"; also, Capt. Benjamin Walker's Co.; order 
for advance pay, signed by said Walker and others, dated Camp at 
Cambridge, June 6, 1775; also, order on Maj. Barber, dated Cambridge, 
June 24, 1775, signed by Col. E. Bridge, for cartridge boxes for said 
Walker and others belonging to Lieut. John Flint's Co.; also. Private, 
Capt. Walker's Co., Col. Ebenezer Bridge's (27th) Regt.; company 
return (probably Oct., 1775). 

Walker, David, Chelmsford. List of 6 months men raised agreeable to 
resolve of June 5, 1780, returned as received of Maj. Joseph Hosmer, 
Superintendent for Middlesex Co., by Justin Ely, Commissioner, dated 
Springfield; also, descriptive list of men raised to reinforce the Continental 



350 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

Army for the term of 6 months, agreeable to resolve of June 5, 1780, 
returned as received of Justin Ely, Commissioner, by Brig. Gen. John 
Glover, at Springfield, July 7, 1780; age, 23 yrs.; stature, 6 ft., 3 in.; 
complexion, dark; engaged for town of Chelmsford; marched to camp 
July 7, 1780, under command of Capt. Dix. ; also, list of men raised for 
the 6 months' service and returned by Brig. Gen. Paterson as having 
passed muster in a return dated Camp Totoway, Oct. 25, 1780; also, 
pay roll for 6 months men raised by the town of Chelmsford for service 
in the Continental Army at North river during 1780; marched from 
home June 30, 1780; discharged Jan. 7, 1781; service, 6 mos., 19 days, 
including 10 days (200 miles) travel home; also, descriptive list of men 
raised in Middlesex Co., agreeable to resolve of Dec. 2, 1780, as returned 
by Joseph Hosmer, Superintendent for said county; age, 25 yrs.; stature, 
6 ft., 2 in.; complexion, light; hair, brown; eyes, blue; occupation, 
farmer (also given laborer) ; engaged for town of Chelmsford ; engaged 
Dec. 28 (also given Nov. 28), 1781; term, 1 year. 

Warren, Benjamin, Chelmsford. Sergeant, Capt. Oliver Barron's Co. of 
Militia, Col. David Green's Regt., which marched in response to the 
alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 9 days; also, 2d Lieutenant, Capt. 
Samuel Stephens, Jr.'s (4th) Co. (North Co. in Chelmsford), Col. Simeon 
Spaulding's (7th Middlesex Co.) Regt. of Mass. Militia; list of officers 
chosen by the several companies in said regiment; ordered in Council, 
May 31, 1776, that said officers be commissioned; also, 2d Lieutenant, 
Capt. Stephens's (4th) Co., 7th Middlesex Co. Regt. of Mass. Militia; 
list of officers commissioned May 31, 1776; names of officers of said 
company crossed out on list, probably because another set of officers was 
chosen later; also, 1st Lieutenant, Capt. John Ford's (4th) Co. (North 
Co. in Chelmsford), 7th Middlesex Co. Regt. of Mass. Militia; list of 
officers chosen in said company, as returned by Simeon Spaulding, 
field officer, dated Chelmsford, July 5, 1776; ordered in Council, Sept. 3, 
1776, that said officers be commissioned; commissions reported dated 
Sept. 3, 1776. 

Warren, Jeduthan. Private, Capt. John Ford's Co. of Volunteers, Col. 
Jonathan Reed's Regt.; enlisted Sept. 28 (also given Sept. 27), 1777; 
discharged Nov. 8, 1777; service, 40 (also given 43) days; company 
probably raised in Dracut, Chelmsford, and Dunstable, and marched 
Sept. 30, 1777, to reinforce Northern Army. 

Warren, Joseph, Chelmsford (also given Townsend). Return of men raised 
to serve in the Continental Army from Capt. Warren's Co., Col. Jonathan 
Reed's (6th Middlesex Co.) Regt.; residence, Chelmsford; enlisted for 
town of Townsend (also given Chelmsford); joined Capt. Maxwell's 
Co., Col. Bailey's Regt.; enlistment, 3 yrs.; also. Private, 1st Co., Col. 
John Bailey's Regt.; Continental Army pay accounts for service from 
June 1, 1777, to Dec. 31, 1779; also, Capt. Hugh Maxwell's (1st) Co., 
Col. Bailey's Regt.; company return dated Camp near Valley Forge, 
Jan. 24, 1778; residence, Townsend; also, same Co. and Regt.; muster 
roll for July, 1779, dated West Point; enlisted Jan. 1, 1777; reported 
on command at Philadelphia; also, Lieut. Colonel's Co., Col. Bailey's 
Regt.; Continental Army pay accounts for service from Jan. 1, 1780, to 
June 1, 1780. 

Weatherby, John, Chelmsford. List of men raised from 3d Middlesex Co. 
Regt. to reinforce the Continental Army for the term of 9 months, agree- 
able to resolve of April 20, 1778, as returned by E. Brooks, Superintendent; 
also, descriptive list of men raised by the town of Danvers to serve in 
the Continental Army, agreeable to resolve of April 20, 1778; age, 27 
yrs.; stature, 5 ft., 7 in.; complexion, light; hair, dark; eyes, dark; 
residence, Chelmsford. 

Wheelock, Jonathan. Receipt dated Boston, May 24, 1782, for bounty paid 
said Wheelock by Samuel Lancey, Chairman of Class No. 2 of the town 
of Chelmsford, to serve in the Continental Army for the term of 3 years. 



RECORDS OF CHELMSFORD MEN IN THE REVOLUTION 351 

Whiting, Samuel. Company receipt for mileage, given to Capt. John Ford, 
dated Ticonderoga, Aug. 28, 1776; also, company receipt, given to Capt. 
John Ford, for wages to Oct. 1, 1776, dated Ticonderoga; company 
marched from Chelmsford, July 25, 1776, and was discharged at Albany, 
Jan. 1, 1777. 

Whiting, William. Private; list of men belonging to Capt. Asa Lawrance's 
Co., Col. Poor's Regt.; depositions affixed made by William Adams and 
Joseph Dows, sworn to at Chelmsford, April 23, 1841, and in Middlesex 
Co., May 6, 1841, respectively, state that in the summer of 1778 they 
enlisted for the term of 8 months and went to West Point; that they 
served in Capt. Asa Lawrance's Co., Col. Poor's Regt., near King's 
Ferry and Peekskill; that said company was made up of men from 
Groton, Westford, Chelmsford, Tewksbury, Billerica, Bedford, Tyngs- 
borough, and Dracut, and was commanded for the most part by 1st 
Lieut. John Flint. 

Wier, Jeremiah, Limerick (also given Chelmsford). Private, Capt. Henry 
Farwell's Co., Col. William Prescott's Regt.; muster roll dated Aug. 1, 
1775; enlisted April 25, 1775; service, 98 days; also, return of men 
raised to serve in the Continental Army (year not given); residence, 
Chelmsford; engaged for town of Chelmsford. 

Williams, Benjamin. Company receipt for mileage, given to Capt. John 
Ford, dated Ticonderoga, Aug. 28, 1776; also, company receipt, given 
to Capt. John Ford, for wages to Oct. 1, 1776, dated Ticonderoga; 
company marched from Chelmsford, July 25, 1776, and was discharged 
at Albany, Jan. 1, 1777. 

Williams, Jacob. Company receipt for mileage, given to Capt. John Ford, 
dated Ticonderoga, Aug. 28, 1776; also, company receipt, given to 
Capt. John Ford, for wages to Oct. 1, 1776, dated Ticonderoga; company 
marched from Chelmsford, July 25, 1776, and was discharged at Albany, 
Jan. 1, 1777. 

Willis, Zachariah, Chelmsford (also given Westford, Westfield, and Lanes- 
borough). Private, Capt. Smart's Co., Col. Calvin Smith's (late Wiggles- 
worth's) 13th Regt.; Continental Army pay accounts for service from 
Jan. 6, 1777, to Dec. 31, 1780; residence, Chelmsford (also given West- 
ford); credited to town of Chelmsford; also, Capt. Nicholas Blasdel's 
Co., Col. Edward Wigglesworth's Regt. ; return dated Camp Valley Forge, 
Feb. 5, 1778; mustered by Col. Barrett, County Muster Master; also, 
same Co. and Regt.; muster roll for May, 1778, dated Camp Valley 
Forge; also, same Co. and Regt.; muster roll for June, 1778, dated 
"Camp Greeage"; reported at Peekskill tending the sick; also, same 
Co. and Regt.; pay roll for Oct., 1778, sworn to at Camp Providence; 
also, Capt. Blasdel's Co., (late) Col. Wigglesworth's Regt.; muster roll 
for March and April, 1779, dated Providence; enlisted Jan. 6, 1777; 
enlistment, 3 yrs.; reported furloughed April 23, 1779, by Maj. Porter, 
for 18 days; also, descriptive list dated West Point, Jan. 25, 1781; Col. 
John Greaton's (3d) Regt.; age, 39 yrs.; stature, 5 ft., 4| in.; complexion, 
dark; hair, dark; eyes, dark; residence, Westfield; enlisted Nov. 15, 
1779, by Capt. Smith; enlistment, during war; also (late) Capt. Smart's 
Co., 3d Mass. Regt.; account of clothing delivered subsequent to Jan. 1, 
1781, endorsed "July 1781"; reported on command at West Point; 
also, list dated Jan. 18, 1802, returned by John Avery, Secertary, and 
P. Coffin, Treasurer, of men who had enlisted into the Continental Army 
and actually served 3 years, and were, accordingly, entitled to gratuities 
under resolves of March 4, 1801, and June, 1801; 3d Mass. Regt.; 
residence, Lanesborough. 

Willson, Ephraim, Chelmsford. Sergeant, Capt. Turner's Co., Col. Henry 
Jackson's Regt.; Continental Army pay accounts for service from June 1, 
1777, to Dec. 31, 1780; also, Capt. Joseph Fox's Co., Col. Henley's 
Regt.; pay roll for Nov., 1778; also, Capt. Thomas Turner's (9th) Co., 
Col. Jackson's Regt.; muster roll for April, 1779, dated Pawtuxet; 
appointed June 1, 1778; term, 3 yrs.; also, same Co. and Regt.; return 
dated Camp at Providence, July 10, 1779; engaged for town of Chelms- 



352 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

ford; also, Capt. Turner's (5th) Co., Col. Jackson's Regt.; pay roll for 
Oct., 1779; also, same Co. and Regt.; regimental return made up to 
Dec. 31, 1779, dated Camp at Providence; engaged June 1, 1777; also, 
return certified at Camp near Morristown, April 30, 1780, of officers and 
men belonging to Col. Lee's, Col. Henley's, and Col. Jackson's Regts., 
and men belonging to Massachusetts in Col. Henry Sherburne's Regt., 
who were incorporated into a regiment under the command of Col. 
Henry Jackson, agreeable to the arrangement of April 9, 1779; Capt. 
Turner's Co.; rank. Sergeant; residence, Chelmsford; engaged July 2, 
1778; term, during war; also, Capt. Thomas Turner's Co., Col. Jackson's 
(16th) Regt.; pay roll for June and July, 1780; reported sick and absent. 

Willson, Joseph. Company receipt dated Chelmsford, April 19, 1776, for 
wages for service from Feb. 5, 1776, to April 1, 1776, in Capt. John Ford's 
Co., Col. Roberson's (Robinson's) Regt. 

Willson, Leonard. Company receipt dated Chelmsford, April 19, 1776, for 
wages for service from Feb. 5, 1776, to April 1, 1776, in Capt. John 
Ford's Co., Col. Roberson's (Robinson's) Regt. 

Willson, Samuel. Enlistment agreement dated Jan. 29, 1776, signed by said 
Willson and others, engaging themselves to serve until April 1, 1776; 
also, company receipt dated Chelmsford, April 19, 1776, for wages for 
service from Feb. 5, 1776, to April 1, 1776, in Capt. John Ford's Co., 
Col. Roberson's (Robinson's) Regt. 

Wilson, Ephraim, Chelmsford. List of men mustered by Nathaniel Barber, 
Muster Master for Suffolk Co., dated Boston, July 5, 1778; Capt. Fox's 
Co., Col. Henley's Regt.; reported received State bounty; also, descrip- 
tive list dated Hutts, three miles from West Point, Jan. 28, 1781 ; Capt. 
Turner's Co., 9th Mass. Regt. commanded by Col. Henry Jackson; 
rank. Sergeant; age, 21 yrs.; stature, 5 ft., 6 in.; complexion, light; 
hair, light; occupation, blacksmith; residence, Chelmsford; engaged, 
Jan. 1, 1780, by Col. Jackson; term, during war. 

Wilson, Samuel, Chelmsford. Capt. John Ford's Co., Col. Bridge's Regt.; 
company return dated June 15, 1775; age, 21 yrs.; stature, 6 ft.; com- 
plexion, light; occupation, farmer; residence, Chelmsford; enhsted April 
25, 1775; also. Private, Capt. Ford's Co., Col. Ebenezer Bridge's (27th) 
Regt.; muster roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; enlisted April 25, 1775; service, 
3 mos., 14 days; also, company return dated Sept. 25, 1775; also, Capt. 
Zaccheus Wright's Co., Col. Brooks's Regt.; company return dated Camp 
at White Plains, Oct. 31, 1776; said Wilson reported as in Camp at White 
Plains and fit for duty. 

Wood, Solomon. Company receipt for mileage, given to Capt. John Ford, 
dated Ticonderoga, Aug. 28, 1776; also, company receipt, given to Capt. 
John Ford for wages to Oct. 1, 1776, dated Ticonderoga; company marched 
from Chelmsford, July 25, 1776, and was discharged at Albany, Jan.'^l, 
1777. _ _ _ -U"; 

Worren, Jeduthan. Company receipt for mileage, given to Capt. John Ford, 
dated Ticonderoga, Aug. 28, 1776; also, company receipt, given to Capt. 
John Ford, for wages to Oct. 1, 1776, dated Ticonderoga; company 
marched from Chelmsford, July 25, 1776, and was discharged at Albany, 
Jan. 1, 1777. 

Wyer, Jeremiah, Chelmsford. Private, Capt. Henry Farwell's (1st) Co., 
Col. William Prescott's (10th) Regt.; company return (probably Oct., 
1775); reported enlisted April 19, 1775. 



RECORDS OF CHELMSFORD MEN IN THE REVOLUTION 353 



LIST OF MEN ON ROLLS OF CHELMSFORD COMPANIES, BUT NOT CREDITED TO 

ANY TOWN. 



Adams, Benjamin 
Adams, Capt. Jesse 
Annis, Ezra 
Annis, Jacob 
Bailey, James 
Bailey, William 
Bancroft, Caleb 
Bancroft, Ebenezer 
Barrett, Joseph 
Barrett, Stephen 
Barrit, John 
Barron, Lieut. Jonathan 
Bell, Joshua 
Blanchard, CufT 
Blanchard, Jeremiah 
Blodgett, Lieut. William 
Blood, Able 
Blood, Edmund 
Boldwin, John 
Bowers, Lieut. Jonathan 
Bowers, John 
Brown, John 
Burge, John 
Butterfield, Nathaniel 
Capron, Jonathan 
Carleton, John 
Carleton, John, Jr. 
Chamberlin, Capt. Samuel 
Clark, Benjamin 
Clark, Col. Jonas 
Clough, David 
Coburn, Nathan 
Coburn, Samson 
Colburn, Eleazer 
Colburn, Jerahmel 
Colby, James 
Corey, Elijah 
Corey, Samuel 
Craford, John 
Cummings, Sim(eo)n 
Didson, John 
Didson, Seth 
Durant, John 
Emerson, Joseph 
Estabrooks, Joseph 
Fips, Charles 
Foster, Jonath 
Fox, Abijah 
Fox, John 
Frost, Sart. Joseph 
Frothingham, Jabez 
Gordin, Wm. 



Green, Ebenezer 

Griffin, Uriah 

Hardee, Moses 

Harris, Chas. 

Harris, Sampson 

Harwood, Lieut. Jonathan 

Hill, Jeremiah 

Hunt, Israel 

Kilmot, Thomas 

Lane, Zibon 

Liveston, Isaac 

Longon, Daniel 

Loyd, John 

MacGould, Noah 

Maskel, Samuel 

Mearel (?), David 

Mears, Abraham 

Merrick, John 

Mills, John 

Monroe, Aaron 

Morrill, Nicholas 

Morrison, Corp. Wm. 

Palmer, Aaron 

Peak, Samuel 

Perham, Lemuel, Jr. 

Person, James 

Petingal, Daniel 

Pettingal, Joseph 

Pollard, Solomon 

Porter, Asa 

Proctor, Gershom 

Richardson, John 

Richardson, Capt. Zechariah 

Robbins, Ensign Jonas 

Russell, Amos., Sergt. 

Small, Aaron 

Smith, Thomas 

Smith, Wm. 

Spalding, Thomas (or Spaulding) 

Spaulding, Artemas 

Spaulding, Ashbel 

Sprake, John 

Stearns, Wm. 

Sterns, Wm. 

Storrs, John 

Underwood, Jonathan 

Webber, John 

Welsh, Daniel 

Whitney, Samuel 

Winning, John 

Woodward, Jonathan 



354 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 



Names of men found on the Town records who received 
bounty for going into the service, and whose names are not on 
the other lists: 

Chambers, Matthew; Blodgett, Henry; Blodget, Simeon; 
Fitzgerald, James; Hildreth, Zachariah; Hutchins, Thomas; 
Snydam, Thorn; Woods, Samuel. 

RECAPITULATION. 

Number of records of Chelmsford men given . . 504 
Nimiber of names on Chelmsford rolls not credited to any 

town 120 

Number of men who received bounty from the Town of 

Chelmsford, whose names are not on the above lists . 8 

Total "632 

Nimiber twice mentioned 88 

Number of Chelmsford men who served in the Revolu- 
tionary War 544 

CHELMSFORD MEN WHO ANSWERED THE ALARM OF APRIL 19, 1775. 

Abbot, William; Abbott, Jeremiah; Adams, John; Adams, 
Robert; Adams, Thomas; Ausgood, Benjamin; Ausgood, Joseph; 
Barrit, Benjamin; Barritt, Simeon; Barron, Moses; Barron, 
Oliver; Bates, John; Blood, Josiah; Bowers, William; Bridge, 
Ebenezer; Bridge, William; Britton, Samuel; Burge, David; 
Butterfield, Benjamin; Cambel, William; Chamberlin, Isaac; 
Chamberling, Aaron; Chambers, David; Chambers, John; Cham- 
bers, William; Cleaveland, Enoch; Dammon, Daniel; Danforth, 
David; Daverson, Francis; Davis, Joshua; Dunn, James, Jr.; 
Dimn, John; Dunn, William; Durant, Joshua; Esterbrooks, 
Moses; Farly, Benjamin; Farrar, Nathaniel; Fletcher, Charles; 
Fletcher, Henry; Fletcher, Josiah; Fletcher, Oliver; Fletcher, 
Samuel; Fletcher, William; Fletcher, William, 3d; Fletcher, 
Zaccheus; Ford, John; Foster, Isaac; Foster, Isaiah; Foster, 
Nathaniel; Foster, Reuben; Freland, John; Goold, Ebenezer; 
Hastings, Walter; Howard, Jacob; Howard, Willard; Keent, 
Isaac, Jr. ; Keyes, Daniel; Keyes,John; Keys, Solomon; Marshal, 
Samuel; Marshall, David; Marshall, Isaac; Marshall, Joseph; 
Marshall, Samuel; Marshall, Thomas, Jr. ; Mastes, Amos; Mears, 
John; Mears, William; Melvin, Benjamin; Minot, John; 
Osgood, Joseph; Parker, Benjamin; Parker, Benjamin, Jr.; 
Parker, Isaac; Parker, John; Parker, Moses; Parker, Reuben; 
Parker, WiUard; Parker, William; Parker, William, Jr.; Park- 
hurst, Benjamin; Parkhurst, Ephraim; Parkhurst, Samuel 
(Family tradition); Peirce, Benjamin; Peirce, Jonas; Peirce, 
Jonathan; Peirce, Levi; Peirce, Robert; Peirce, Stephen, Jr.; 
Perham, Samuel, Jr.; Procter, Azariah; Reed, Supply; Richard- 
son, Josiah; Richardson, Oliver; Roby, John; Sillaway, Daniel; 
Spaulding, Benjamin; Spaulding, David; Spaulding, Henry, Jr.; 
Spaulding, John; Spaulding, Joseph; Spaulding, Joseph, Jr.; 
Spaulding, Micah; Spaulding, Silas; Spaulding, Simeon; Spauld- 



I 



RECORDS OF CHELMSFORD MEN IN THE REVOLUTION 355 

ing, Jephthah; Sprage, Jonathan; Stevens, Samuel; Twiss, John; 
Tyior, Joseph; Walker, Benjamin; Walker, David; Warren, 
Benjamin; Wyer, Jeremiah. 

The Chelmsford men at Bunker Hill were those found on the 
roll of field and staff officers of Bridge's regiment, those on the 
roll of Ford's first enlisted company, and those on the roll of 
Walker's company. 

Chelmsford men who were wounded in the Battle of Bunker 
Hill, as given by Allen: ^ . • 

Col. Ebenezer Bridge, Lieut. Col. Moses Parker, Captam 
Benjamin Walker, John Keyes, Moses Barker, James Dunn, 
Elijah Hazelton, Samuel Marshall, John Parker, Benjamm Hay- 
ward, Solomon Keyes, Robert Richardson, Joseph Spauldmg, Noah 
Foster, Francis Davidson. The last name is from Bridge's Diary. 

These Chelmsford men were at Valley Forge during the 
army's terrible experience in the winter of 1777-78. The first 
four are from a List of Officers at Valley Forge, prepared by Brig. 
Gen. Philip Reade: .,. t i x 

Isaac Parker, 1st Lieutenant, 8th Infantry (M. Jackson); 
Walter Hastings, Surgeon, 8th Infantry (M. Jackson); Zachariah 
Hildreth, Ensign, 16th Infantry (H. Jackson) ; Benjamin Pierce, 
Ensign, 8th Infantry (M. Jackson); Joseph Warren, William 
Mears, Josiah Blood, Benjamin Chamberlain, Zachariah Wilhs, 
William Blazedell, Henry Blazedell. 

Names of soldiers from Chelmsford who died or were killed 
in the Revolutionary War: 

Lt. Col. Moses Parker, wounded at Bunker Hill, died a 
prisoner in Boston, July 4, 1775. Buried at Boston. 

Capt. Benjamin Walker, wounded at Bunker Hill, died a 
prisoner in Boston, in ye latter end of August, 1775. (Aug. 15, 
Bunker Hill Mem. Tablets, p. 123.) Buried at Boston. "He died, 
not of his wound, but of sickness." Allen says that both Parker 
and Walker had a leg amputated. 

Lt. Robert Spalding, died at Milford, Ct., in 1776, "returning 
from ye Army at New York." "The Spalding Memorial" says: 
"While on his way to join the American Army." 

John Bates, died in the Army at Cambridge; buried at 
Cambridge, December 4, 1775. 

David Spalding, Jr., died at Ticonderoga, of the smallpox, 

August 28, 1776. . , . i, 

Peletiah Adams, killed at Cherry Valley, 1778, m the fall 

(Nov. 11). 

Ezra Corey reported died May 9, 1777. 

Noah Foster, killed at Bemis's Heights, Stillwater, October 7, 

1777. 

Henry Fletcher, killed at White Plains, February 3, 1780. 

Ebenezer Foster, died "in the Army," before Nov. 5, 1777. 

Samuel Wilson never returned from the army, nor were the 
time and manner of his death ever known. [Allen.] 



CHAPTER VI. 
SHAYS' REBELLION— WARS OF 1812. 1848, 1898. 

SHAYS' REBELLION. 

THE War of the Revolution brought great economic distress to 
the country, and this, with a certain spirit of lawlessness, was 
the cause of Shays' Rebellion, so called from the leader, Daniel 
Shays, who had been a Captain in the Continental Army. The 
seat of the rebellion was western Massachusetts, where the people 
were under a burden of private debts and heavy taxes. The 
coiu"ts were over-crowded with lawsuits. Debtors were pressed. 
"Attachments were put upon the poor man's cattle and teams, 
and his little homestead was sacrificed under the sheriff's hammer." 
Conventions met and drew up statements of grievances. Demand 
was made that the Court of Common Pleas be abolished, that 
large amounts of paper money be issued, taxes reduced, and 
"that the General Court should no longer sit amid the baleful 
influences of a merchant-and-lawyer-infested Boston." 

The following, in the possession of the writer, will serve as 
a sample of the documents relating to this period. 

To the Honbl. The Court of Common Pleas to be Holden 
Att Worcester the 5 day of Septr. Jnstant. The Petition of the 
Inhabitants of The Town of Athol Humbly Sheweth that By 
Reason of the Great Scarcity of a Circulating Medium The Good 
People of this County are Unable to Satisfy the Executions that 
May Come Out against them Without their Property Being Sold 
Much Under the Real Value. We Your Petitioners Therefore 
Pray Your Hours That all Sivil Causeis Might be Suspended 
Except Whare the Parties are agreed to have a trial or Where itt 
appears to the Court That the Creditor is in Jmmediate Danger 
of Loosing His Property. 

And your Petitioners as in Duty Bound Shall Ever Pray. 

Athol Septr. ye 4th, 1786. Simon Goddard Moderater. 

In the summer of 1786 the Courts at Northampton, Worcester, 
Great Barrington, and Concord were prevented from sitting. 
The Supreme Court at Springfield was broken up. At Worcester 
the bravery of Gen. Artemas Ward, then Chief Justice, in facing 
the bayonets of the instugents, is well known. (See "Old Times 
in Shrewsbury," Elizabeth Ward.) At Concord the insurrec- 
tionary leader was Job Shattuck of Groton, who had been a 
captain in the Revolution. (For an account of him, see Green's 
"(jroton in the Revolution.") Governor Bowdoin raised a force 
of militia under General Lincoln, and put down the rebellion. 



SHA YS' REBELLION— WARS OF 1812, 1848, 1898 357 

At Petersham, 150 of the insurgents were captured, and the 
rest were dispersed and fled into New Hampshire. 

The rout of Shays' men at Petersham was complete, February 
4 1787 The vanquished rebels were treated with marked 
clemency. Governor Bowdoin's energy lost him his re-election. 
A free pardon was finally offered by Governor Hancock to all 
who had taken part in the insurrection, provided they should take 
the oath of allegiance. Fourteen of the leaders had been tried and 
sentenced to death, but were not executed, for the authorities 
saw that the great mass of the people were m sympathy with them. 
(See Minot, "Insurrections in Massachusetts.") 

McMaster (Hist, of People of U. S.) quotes this specimen of 
poetry and wit on the retreat of Shays. 

"Says sober Will, well. Shays has fled. 
And peace returns to bless our days. 
Indeed! cried Ned, I always said. 

He'd prove at last & fall-hack chaise; 
And those turned over and undone 
Call him a worthless Shays to run:' 
When in 1787 the State pardoned political offenders, one 
hundred and seven from Groton, sixty-two from Shirley, sixty- 
seven from Townsend, thirty-nine from Pepperell, three from 
Ashbv ten from Westford, one from Chelmsford, and one from 
FramiAgham took the oath of allegiance. There were no others 

in Middlesex County. 4. r 4-1,^ 

A meeting was held in Chehnsford, and an account of the 
proceedings was sent with a letter to the selectmen of Cambridge 
to influence them to join with others in securmg the pardon of 
Shattuck. This is the reply. ,^ ,^0^ 

Cambridge July 13. 1787 

^^"^ Your letter of the 6. inst. directed to the Selectmen of this 
Town containing the proceedings of a number of Gentlemen met 
at Chelmsford, & also the form of _ a petition m behalf of Capt 
Shattuck We have received, & having considered them with that 
Attention they deserve when coming from such respectable 
Characters, We take the first Opportunity to return an Answer. 

In Order to justify an Oppinion that does not seem to coincide 
with yours, it may be necessary to make some Observations, which 
We hope will be received with that Candor that We are led to 
expect from persons of your known moderation _ 

Mr Shattuck was unknown to us till since the conclusion ot 
the late War, We are therefore unable to bear testimony to his 
former life, either with respect to his Character as an Officer, or 
his charitable disposition as a private person. Since that tune 
We have chiefly known him by the publick Inquines that have 
been made by the Supreme Judicial Court at different tmies; 
but in every case it appears he has been connected with the 



358 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

Tumults & opposition to Government. These Circumstances 
surely cannot Operate as an inducement for us to think very 
favorably of him. 

After the minds of many people had been misled with respect 
to the Government, a circular letter was framed in the upper part 
of this County in the Course of last Summer & sent to the different 
Towns, & to this among others, requesting their Assistance at a 
County Convention. Alarmed at such a proceeding the Inhabi- 
tants at a Town meeting desired the Selectmen to protest against 
such an unconstitutional Assembly. You will undoubtedly 
recollect that their letter was published containing at large the 
reasons of their dissent. How far those reasons were satisfactory, 
will appear by the readiness with which they were adopted by 
many Towns throughout the Commonwealth. 

It makes us unhappy to find that the ill consequences which 
were then easily foreseen, soon came to pass. 

If then our sentiments were against joining with an Assembly, 
which We consider as unconstitutional when apparently justified 
by the form of an Election it can hardly be expected We should 
concur in a similar measure where even that form has not been 
observed. We were then & still are of Opinion, that the Consti- 
tution & the laws provide for every case. It has invested the 
Governor & Council with a power to pardon those Criminals 
that may be convicted in any case where they suppose the publick 
Good will be promoted, & We conceive that power could not be 
more properly lodged in any other hands. It must be presumed, 
they are the best acquainted with all the Circumstances both for 
& against the Convict; infinitely more so, than persons at a 
distance & without the means of information; & We think there 
has been no reason to distrust the Judgment or the Uprightness 
of those who are invested with that power. And further. We 
presume that if you had seen the resolve of the General Court 
passed on the 29 of June last, you would not have desired us to 
have interfered in matters of Government in the present Instance. 
In that Resolve, after specifying the particular exceptions from 
the Act of Indemnity, they declare that any further Act of Grace 
will not be consistant with the dignity of Government, & with 
the safety & protection which ought to be afforded to the peaceable 
& loyal Citizens, it becomes therefore peculiarly improper for 
individual Citizens to give their Advice in contradiction to the 
declared sense of two great branches of the Government, the 
Legislative & Judicial. These Reasons without others that 
might be added, We presume are sufficient to convince you of 
the impropriety of our joining in the proposal contained in your 
Letter. We have only to add that it is our sincere Wish that the 
happy time may come & that the period may be not far distant, 
when that Confidence in those who by the Constitution are 
invested with the Government, may be restored; without which 



SHAYS' REBELLION— WARS OF 1812, 1848, i8q8 359 

We never can expect that the Confidence between Individuals 
which is so necessary to promote their Happiness, will be revived; 
that such an Event may soon take place is the earnest desire of 
Gent. Your Humble Servant. AARON HILL. 

Chairman of the Selectmen of said Town. 
[Original in the possession of C. O. Robbins.] 

The following petition is among the Robbins papers. It 
indicates the fact that the sympathies of a considerable number 
of people in this, as in other communities, were with the insurgents. 

Comonwelth of Massachusetts 

To His Excelency the Govener, and the Honorable the 
Councel now Setting in Boston; The petition of the Subscribers 
inhabitence of the town of Chehnsford m the County of Middlesix, 
Humbly Sheweth, that whareas Job Shattuck of Said County is 
now under the Sentance of Death For treasanable conduct against 
this Commonwelth Which conduct we Vew with abhorrance & 
Disaprobation. But we believe that he was in a grate measure 
insensable of the fatal tendancy of his conduct, and that through 
ignorance of the Laws and Constatution of the Commonwelth 
and by hearing the Complants of the people; together with the 
Insinuations of rash an inconsiderate men, he was led to Conduct 
in such a manner as he Did; Which circomstances we thmk m Som 
measure extenuates his Crimenallety. Considering the above 
circomstances together with the character which according To 
information from undoubted athonty the Said S^ttock has 
Hear tofore Sustaned Especially as being a good officer m the 
Servis of this Commonwelth in the late war with Britain, and 
also in being Very charetable to the poor. Therefore, your 
petitioners humbly conceive that it would be Consistante with 
the Good and Safety of the Commonwelth that his life might be 
spaired and that it would have a tendancy To restore peace and 
hamiony to the people of this Commonwelth, and prevent the 
dissafection of many people in the Neighbouring States: There- 
fore your petitioners humbly and most earnestly pray that his 
Excelency and your Honours would take the matter J^to your 
wise Consideration and if it Can be Consistant with the Good and 
Safety of the Commonwelth, that the above named crimenal may 
be pardoned; and your petitioners as in Duty bound will ever pray 

John Mansfield Jonathan Snow 

Levi Snow David Dun Sen. 

Samuel Spaulding Joel Barrett 

Ebenezer Shed Wilham Parker 

Elijah Procter Joseph Parker ^ 

Eliakim Read Jonathan Manning 



360 



HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 



Phinehas Chamberlin 
Nathan Ames, Junr. 
James Heywood 
Joseph Heywood 
Joseph Foster 
John Adams 
Robert Adams 
Josiah Parkhurst 
Saml. Chamberlin 
Moses Hale 
John Byam 
John Byam Jun 
William Laws 
Abel Chamberlin 
Samuel Sims 
Asa Hodgman 
Zebtilon Spalding 
Henry Spaulding 
Samuel Adams 
John Spaulding 
Benja. Adams 
David Walker 
Isaac Warren 
Asa Procter 
Thomas Adams 
Jeremiah Wyer 
thomas Weber 
Isaac Chamberlin 
Andrew Spaulding 
Jacob Howard 
Isaac Clark 
John Hildreth 
Benja. Parker 
Joseph Parker 
Jedutham Parker 
Zebulan Parker 
Philip Parker 
Samuel Hadlock 
Moses Estherbrooks 
Josiah Coben 
George Furbush 
Reuben Davis 
Josyah Simonds 



Jeremiah Abbott 

Isaiah Foster 

Jeremiah Warren 

Isaiah Blood 

Jonathan Richardson 

Thomas Marshall 

Jacob Marshall 

Ebenezer Frost 

David Marshall 

Samuel Marshall 

Abel Mansfield 

Timothy Manning 

Stephen Peirce 

Seth Levingston 

Joseph Peirce 

Stephen Peirce, third 

Robert Peirce, ir. 

Stephen Peirce 

Zacheus Fletcher 

Silas Peirce 

Isaac Marshall 

Andrew Fletcher 

Joseph Moors 

Thos Hoadley 

Levi Dakin 

Michel Carter 

Andrew Fletcher 

Willard Howard 

Jacob Howard Juner 

William Bowers 

Peter Procter 

Samuel Parkhurst 

John Adams Jur. 

Timothy Adams 

Henry Spaulding Jun 

John Reed 

David Morrison 

John Batteys 

Isaac Patten 

Wilard Mansfield 

William Mansfield 

Benjamin pelsey 

Jonathan Adams 
Abishai Crosman Eldr of the 
Babtist (sic) Chh. in Chelmsford. 



Chelmsford, July 16, 1787 
We the Subscribers approve of Fourgoing petition the Greater 
part of the Signers being Freeholders and legal Voters in town. 



SHA YS' REBELLION— WARS OF 1812, 1848, 189S 



361 



A PAY ROLL OF CAPT JOSEPH EMERSON COMPANY IN 

LT. COL. EBENEZER BANCROFT'S REGT. CALLED 

UPON TO RENDEZVOUS AT LANCASTER ON THE 

29 OF JANUARY, 1787, IN ORDER TO SUPPORT 

CONSTITUTIONAL GOVERNMENT. 







Estab. 


Time 


Total 






per month 


in service 


wages 


Joseph Emerson 


Capt. 


£8: 0:0 


5 d 


1:16:8 


Josiah Fletcher 


Ens. 


4:10:0 


5 d 


1: 1:8 


William Fletcher 


Clerk 


2:14:0 


5 d 


0:12:4 


Andrew Spaulding 


Sargt. 


2: 8:0 


5 d 


0:11:4 


Oliver Baron 


Private 


2: 0:0 


4 d 


0: 8:0 


Aaron Chamberlain 


do 


do 


do 


0: 8:0 


Samuel Howard 




do 


do 


do 


Timothy Harrington 




do 


do 


do 


Francis Bowers 




do 


do 


do 


John Freland 




do 


do 


do 


Oliver Baron Jr 




do 


do 


do 


Philip Spaulding 




do 


do 


do 


Henry Spaulding 




do 


do 


do 


Simeon Spaulding 




do 


do 


do 


Ephraim Spaulding 




do 


do 


do 


Mattethias Spaulding 




do 


do 


do 


Benjamin Walker 




do 


do 


do 


Joseph Fletcher 




do 


do 


do 


Samuel Loufkin 




do 


do 


do 


Sampson Stevens 




do 


do 


do 


Nehemiah Ab Parker 




do 


do 


do 


Simion Blodget Jr 




do 


do 


do 


Samuel Lancey 




do 


do 


do 


Parley I. Dunklee 




do 


do 


do 






Sum Total 


£12:2:0 


Chelmsford, April 16, 1787. Joseph Emerson, Capt. 




[Massachusetts Archives 


Vol. 191, 


p. 208.] 






Time of service includes one 


day for travel home 


Total 


Vv'ages includes rations. 


Privates entered service 


; January 


27. 



A list of names of twenty-seven Chehnsford men who 
went under General Lincoln in 1787. Each man received, by 
vote of the Town, $1, or 6 shillings, bounty. 

Jacob Spaulding, Zebulon Spaulding, Jeremiah Warren, 
John Butterfield, Aaron Spaulding, Dennis MacLaine, Jesse 
Stevens, Samuel Stevens, Thomas Chamberlain, Oliver Adams, 
John Farmer, Stephen Willson, Levi Spalding, James Parker, 
William Mears, Nathaniel Chamberlain, Joseph Emerson, Jr., 
Timothy Haward, Benjamin Butterfield, Jr., Abel Marshall, 
Willard Marshall, John Macknannel, Henry Spaulding, Benjamin 
Adams, Silas Parker, Reuben Goold, Leonard Parker. 



362 



HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 



These names are found scattered over numerous pages of the 
Town records. 

Allen gives "A list of those who were detached from the 
militia and formed a part of the Army of General Lincoln, in the 
memorable expedition through the counties of Worcester and 
Berkshire, to suppress the insiurection in 1786, commonly known 
by the name of the Shays insurrection. The company, formed 
from this and the neighboring towns, was commanded by Capt. 
(now Col.) James Vamum, of Dracut. 



1 Lt. Daniel Procter 

2 Lt. Abel Adams 
Benj. Butterfield, Jr. 
Oliver Perham 
Silas Parker 
Oliver Cory 
Jeremiah Warren 
Zebiilon Spalding, Jr. 
Oliver Adams 

Benj a. Adams 
Ruben Goold, Jr. 
John McClenny 
Aaron Spalding 



John Butterfield 
Joseph Emerson, Jr. 
Timothy Howard 
Jesse Stevens 
Henry Spalding, Jr. 
Thomas Chamberlin 
Samuel Stevens 
James Parkhiu-st 
John Farmer 
Willard Marshall 
Abel Marshall 
Amost Prescott 
Levi Spaulding." 



The following items were obtained at the office of the Adjutant 
General, giving Chelmsford officers at this period. 



1781 Col. 

July 1 Benjamin Fletcher Captain 7th Reg Jonathan Bancroft 
Daniel Proctor 1st Lieut do do 

Samuel Stephens Capt. do do 

Joseph Emerson 1st Lieut do do 

Jonas Pierce Capt do do 

1786 

Dec 27 Joseph Emerson Capt do 

Jonas Pierce Lieut do 

Josiah Fletcher 3d Ensign do 

1787 
Sept 20 Azariah Proctor 
Ebenezer Shed 



Lieut Co 4 do 
Ensign do do 



Joseph Bryant 
do 
do 

J. B. Varnimi 
do 



Committees were chosen from various towns and met at 
Concord to devise measures for suppressing the Insurgents. 

1788, March 1. The Town paid Aaron Chamberlain, Samuel 
Howard, Samuel Stevens and Oliver Barron nine shillings each 
expenses as committeemen at Concord in September, 1786 "on 
public matters relating to the Insurgents rising against the Govern- 
ment to stop the Courts sitting." 



SHA YS' REBELLION— WARS OF 1812, 1848, 1898 363 

FROM THE DIARY OF PARSON BRIDGE. 

1787, Jan. 17. Confusion by reason of Soldiers collecting here, 
going out against ye Insurgents. 

29. Dr. Harrington * * * marched yesterday 
with ye soldiers to Lancaster, & so to Worcester, with a view 
to suppress ye Rebels under a Vile fellow named Shays in 
Hampshire County. 

On the memorable thirtieth of January, Lincoln's men per- 
formed a march of thirty miles, without refreshment through deep 
snows, in a stormy and severely cold night; a march that would 
have done honor to the veteran soldiers of Hannibal or Napoleon. 
[Allen.] 

As in the Revolution, Chelmsford was the rendezvous for 
troops marching westward, so it was at this time. ^) W"7 \!57 

Nason, in his Histor>^ of Dunstable, ^ives the route taken ^^j,; 
by the Dunstable men. "On the 17th of January, 1787, we ^ , 
marched to Chelmsford ; on the 18th, to Lincoln; 19th, to Weston; ^^'^ 
20th, to Sudbury; 21st, to Marlborough; 22d, to Worcester; '^o^ 
25th, to Western; 26th, to Pahner; 27th, to Springfield, West 
25 miles; 29th, to Hatfield, 25 miles; Feb. 4th, to Petersham, 33 
miles; 7th, to Amherst, 25 miles; 8th, to Northampton, 8 miles; 
9th, to Chesterfield, 14 miles; 10th, to Partridgefield, 18 miles; 
11th, to Pittsfield, 8 miles; 13th, to Tyringham, 20 miles; 14th, 
to Sandisfield, 16 miles; 22d, to Grantville; 23d, to Springfield; 
24th, to Spencer; 25th, to Harvard; 26th, to Dunstable, the end 
of the march." 

ARREST OF CAPTAIN FORD. 

As in the height of the witchcraft excitement a century 
earlier, so, in 1787, in what might be called another popular 
delusion, there were many spite accusations, and the authorities, 
in their eagerness to put down the insurrection, were, perhaps, 
too ready to issue warrants for the arrest of men who might be 
accused or suspected. For some reason, on March 12, 1787, a 
warrant went forth to the Sheriff of Middlesex County, or either 
of his deputies, for the apprehension of Captain John Ford, which 
reads in part as follows: "The Governor and Council, upon 
information received, deeming the safety of the Commonwealth 
inconsistent with the personal liberty of John Ford of Chelmsford 
in the County of Middlesex, and that the enlargement of the said 
John Ford is dangerous to the said Commonwealth, its peace and 
safety. You are therefore hereby authorized and required 
forthwith to apprehend the said John Ford and him to commit 
to any Gaol or other safe place," &c. 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 189, Part I, p. 220.] 



364 



HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 



Captain Ford was confined with the following named men: 

List of Insurgents in Boston Jail, 1787. 
Col. Luke Drury,- 
Rev. Caleb Curtis, 
Mr. Daniel Beard,, 
Mr. Aaron Broad,-, 
Capt. Jonah Goulding, 
Lieut. Henry Gale, 
Capt. Artemas Dryden, 
Capt. Job Shattuck 
Capt. Oliver Parker, 

Mr. Benjamin Page 
George Marsden 
Capt. John Ford 
Capt. Moses Harvey 
Justice Wright 



Worcester Co. 


Grafton. 


(( i< 


Charles town. 


{< It 


Worcester. 


(( (1 


Holden. 


(( (( 


Ward. 


(< (( 


Princeton. 


K 1( 


Holden. 


Middlesex Co. 


Groton. 


(( t( 


" left Jail 


<( << 


6 April 


<( K 


Pepperell. 


(< (< 


Chelmsford. 


Hampshire " 


Montague. 



[Ford Papers. 



Province of New Brunswick, formerly 
Northampton. 



CAPTAIN FORD S PETITION. 



To his Exelency James Bowdoin, Esq., Governor of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the Honorable the Council 
of the sd Commonwealth: 

The Petition of Captain John Ford, a prisoner in the Common 
Gaol in Boston, H\imbly sheweth That yotir Petitioner was taken 
Prisoner by a State Warrant the twenty-seventh Day of March 
Last and committed to Prison in close confinement on Suspicion 
of his being a Dangerous Person to the Commonwealth. 

That your Petitioner has ever endeavored to behave and 
conduct himself as a good subject of the Government and is 
Innocent of being aiding or assisting in the Late Rebellion in this 
State. 

That your Petitioner has a Large Family at Home: which 
must suffer by his Detention in Prison, and a large weight of 
Business, which must suffer at this Particular Season of the year, 
by his Absence. 

That your Petitioner is Disposed to Honor the Government 
in every Respect and conceives it consistent thereto that your 
Petitioner may be Liberated from his Confinement on Ball for 
appearance at Court to answer any charge that may be alledged 
against him. Your Petitioner therefore himibly requests your 
Excellency with advice of Council to grant that your Petitioner 
may be Admitted to Bail and Liberated from his present Confine- 
ment that his Family and Business maybe provided for, and your 
Petitioner as in Duty Bound will pray. 

John Ford. 
Boston Gaol, April 3rd, 1787. 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 189, p. 226.] 



SHA YS' REBELLION— WARS OF 1812, 1848, 1898 365 

On April 11th, the Council advised the release of John Ford, 
he to give bonds in the penalty of £200 to appear at the Supreme 
Judicial Court next to be holden in the County of Middlesex. 

One will read the following with a smile, and might think that 
Robert Treat Paine was trying to fasten the whole responsibility 
for the insurrection upon Captain Ford. 

CAPTAIN ford's INDICTMENT. 

Middlesex S.S. At the Supreme Judicial Court begun and holden 
at Concord within and for the County of Middlesex on the ninth 
day of May in the year of our Lord seventeen hundred and eighty 
seven, by adjournment to that time, by writs from the first Tuesday 
of the same May pursuant to Law. 

The Jurors for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts upon 
their oaths present that John Ford of Chelmsford in the County 
of Middlesex, Gentleman, being a disorderly, riotous and seditious 
person and minding and contriving as much as in him lay, unlaw- 
fully by force and arms to stir up, promote incite and maintain 
Riots, mobs, tumults and insurrection in this Commonwealth, 
and to disturb, impede and prevent the Government of the same, 
and the due administration of Justice from setting as by law 
appointed for that purpose, and to promote disquiets, uneasiness. 
Jealousies, animosities and seditions in the minds of the citizens 
of the Commonwealth on the tenth day of November last past 
and on divers days and times as well before as since that time at 
Groton within the County of Middlesex aforesaid unlawfully 
and seditiously v/ith force and arms did advise, persuade, incite, 
encourage and procure divers persons, citizens of this Common- 
wealth by force and arms to oppose this Commonwealth and the 
Government thereof, and riotously to join themselves to a great 
number of riotous and seditious persons with force and arms then 
and there opposing this Commonwealth and the Government 
thereof as aforesaid, and the due administration in the same, 
and in pursuance of his wicked and seditious purposes aforesaid 
unlawfully and seditiously did procure guns, swords, gunpowder, 
provisions, blankets, and other warlike instruments offensive and 
defensive, and other warlike supplies and did deliver and cause 
them to be conveyed and delivered to the riotous and seditious 
persons aforesaid in evil example to others to offend in like manner 
against the peace of the Commonwealth and Dignity of the same. 
R. T. Paine, Atty per Repub. 
A true bill. 

Abijah Peirce, Foreman. 

Middlesex May term by Adjournment at Concord, 1787, the said 
John Ford is set to the Bar and has this Instrument read to him — 
he says that thereof he is not Guilty and thereof for tryal puts &c 

Jer. Tucker, Cler. 
[Suffolk Court Files, Vol. 1042, No. 149890.1 



366 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

In the Record of the Supreme Judicial Court held at Cam- 
bridge, folio 288, under date October 30, 1787: "John Ford 
appears upon his recognizance and has the leave of Court to 
depart." 

Nothing was found against him. 

Thus this fiasco came to an end, but Captain Ford, with 
nearly three hundred in this County, took the oath of allegiance. 

Middlesex. S.S. August 31st. 1787. 

This may certify that John Ford of Chelmsford in the County 
of Middlesex, Gentleman, and James Mallon of Methuen in the 
County of Essex, Gentleman, personally appeared and Took and 
Subscribed the oath of alegiance Required by an act of the General 
Court of the 17th of June Last. 

before me 

Parker Vamum Justice of Peace 
[Massachusetts Archives, Vol. 190, p. 205.] 

In voliime 190, page 252 of the Archives, is an interesting 
letter from Artemas Ward of Shrewsbury to the Governor, in which 
he states his belief that the Insurrection was partly due to the 
influence of British sympathizers who wished to see the Govern- 
ment meet with disaster. 

These two records may be of interest. 

Aug. 18, 1794. It was ordered that the Town Treasurer 
should pay six shillings [$1.] to each of the following (the list 
returned by Capt. Josiah Fletcher) "who were minute-men who 
were called for * * *" 

Sergeant John Ford, William Cory, John Peirce, Benjamin 
Brown, John Glynn, James Foster, Zechariah Spaulding, Ebenezer 
Spaulding, Elijah Richardson, John Willard, Abel Stevens, John 
Putnam, Jeremiah Abbott, Simeon Richardson, James Twiss, 
Simeon Wilson, Philip Melvin, Joseph Hutchenson. 

Regimental order. Dracutt Dec. 22d, 1798. 

The Commandant of the Regiment calls on all the Com- 
missioned Officers of the Regiment to meet at the house of Oliver 
Barron, Esq., in Chelmsford on Wednesday the 26th instant at 
2 o'clock P. M. there to consult on certain papers presented. A 
strict attendance is wished. By order of Lt. Col. Hildreth 

WiUiam Bridge, Adjt. 
[Endorsed.] Public Service 

Ensign Josiah Richardson, 

Chelmsford 
[Fiske Papers.] 



SHAYS' REBELLION— WARS OF 1812, 1848, 1898 367 

WARS OF 1812, 1848 AND 1898. 

No official record has been found of Chelmsford men who 
served in the War of 1812 or in the Mexican War in 1848. The 
same is true of the War with Spain in 1898, in which John Larkin, 
John Finnegan and Bert Warren Chandler served. Gardner 
Fletcher was an orderly sergeant in 1812, stationed in Boston 
Harbor. 

Mention has been made of Captain Thomas Pitts in the War 
of 1812. Nathaniel Manning was in the United States service 
in 1814. William M. Wheeler was a drummer in this war, serving 
about seventy days at Fort Warren. 

A. E. Brown, in "Old Hearthstones," (page 282) quotes Mrs. 
Mary Shedd, daughter of Sherebiah Spaulding, as saying that her 
father was in the second War with England (1812.) 

In 1814 the Town voted to provide cartridges and canteens 
to the number of 150 for the militia; also knapsacks and 18 sheet- 
iron kettles; the canteens to be made of white pine heads, and 
ash or white oak hook. All who should go into the service were 
to be paid $15 a month. Horses and wagons were to be engaged 
to carry the soldiers' baggage. 

Jeduthan Parker was Captain of the militia in 1812, but his 
company did not go into service. 

Oliver Scripture of Chelmsford was commissioned Sep. 13, 
1813 as Surgeon's Mate, 3d Regt., 2d Brig., 3d Div. Removed 
and discharged July 23, 1819. 

William Meredith, according to the record at West Chelms- 
ford, served and died in the Mexican War. 



CHAPTER VII. 
THE CIVIL WAR, 1861-5.* 

IT is unnecessary to give here a history of the War of the 1 
Rebellion. The great struggle was actually begun by the bom- 
bardment of Fort Sumpter, April 12th- 13th, and its evacuation on 
the 14th, 1861. April 15th, President Lincoln called for 75,000 
three months volunteers. The last struggle of the war took 
place in Texas, May 13, 1865, where the colored troops fired the 
last volley. On April 9th, Lee surrendered to Grant at Appo- 
mattox Court House. On the 26th, Johnston surrendered to 
Sherman in North Carolina and on May 26th, Kirby Smith gave 
up the struggle in Texas, and the war was over. 

The total cost of the war was more than eight billion dollars, j 
More than two and a half million Northern men were called into " 
the service. More than half of these saw actual service, of whom 
nearly 60,000 were killed in the field and about 35,000 were 
mortally wounded. Disease killed 184,000. The actual loss to 
the country, including both sides, was certainly a million men. 

The young fellows from comfortable homes and bountiful 
tables were not fond of salt horse or pork and hard-tack. Henry 
S. Perham, writing home from Camp Suffolk, Virginia, in October, 
1862, says: "I should like to call around to David Perham's house 
and get a good, warm supper tonight, say flap- jacks and molasses 
with a cup of milk, or good warm biscuit and a cup of tea. I can't 
say that I admire soldiers' fare very much. It would not be so 
bad if I could go to Mother's cupboard once in a while. But 
we have only seven months more. I suppose there are some 
good things on the way for me from home. Henry Putnam is 
expressman for the regiment and goes to Norfolk every day to 
look after the boxes." 

At home every agency available was brought into use to 
furnish such relief as was possible to the soldiers at the front. 

A fair and a concert of noteworthy excellence were given for 
the benefit of the Sanitary Commission. The singers and orchestra 
were Chelmsford people. The director was known as "Father" 
Thurston, a man of some ability in his line, who came from out of 
town. The concert was repeated in various places in the neighbor- 
hood. The Soldiers' Aid Society collected considerable money, and 
made or furnished hundreds of articles for the soldiers: blankets, 
quilts, socks, shirts, bandages, towels, mittens, comfort bags, 
and so forth, with articles of food such as the soldiers would not 
have in camp: pickles, current jelly, wine, dried apples, com- 

*See the Town's action at this period in Chapter: "Annals." 






4 















l':^ -^ "^ 






•A 






I- 




?5 

















H4tiaw'^ 






t^. 






■^^ 



^^^« 
^ 



i..^'^- 



S^i 



\ 



t^^ 



';Ai*-> 



4 






'^ 



THE CIVIL WAR, 1 861-5 369 

starch. Mittens were knit with the forefinger free, to pull the 
trigger. Picking lint, to send for the surgeons to use, was the 
children's occupation. 

In 1862 the officers were: treasurer, Mrs. H. W. Morse; 
secretary. Miss M. E. Perham. The weekly meetings were held 
at the homes of the following ladies: Mrs. Dr. Bartlett, Mrs. 
Charles Proctor, Mrs. G. D. Furber, the Misses Winn, Mrs. 
E. F. Webster, Mrs. H. W. Morse, Mrs. E. A. Upham, Mrs. 
Jabez Stevens, Mrs. Clement Upham, Mrs. Dr. Howard, Mrs. 
EHza Fiske, Mrs. Joel Adams, Mrs. Solomon Parkhurst, Mrs. 
Joseph Reed, Mrs. David Perham, Mrs. Owen Emerson, Mrs. 
N. P. Dadmun, Mrs. Francis Parker, Mrs. Loammi Chamberlain, 
Mrs. Joseph Fletcher, Mrs. Charles E. Reed and Mrs. WilHam 
Fletcher. They met at Central Hall to quilt and during the 
summer of 1864 met there regularly. Mr. S. S. Parkhurst received 
the thanks of the Society for the use of the hall. 

In 1863 the officers were: president, Mrs. Joseph Reed; 
vice-president, Mrs. David Perham ; secretary. Miss M. E. Perham; 
treasurer. Miss M. E. Richardson. 

The next year the officers were: president, Mrs. David 
Perham; vice-president, Mrs. Loammi Chamberlain; secretary, 
Miss M.' E. Perham; treasurer. Miss NelHe Richardson; directors, 
Mrs. J. C. Bartlett, Mrs. N. P. Dadmun and Mrs. Charles Proctor. 

THE CHELMSFORD VETERANS' ASSOCIATION. 

This organization was formed April 21, 1891. President, 
Henry S. Perham; vice-president, John C. Hobbs; secretary, 
George A. Parkhurst; treasurer, James P. Emerson; executive 
committee, Daniel P. Byam, J. R. Fletcher and Royal S. Ripley. 
The following is from the Record Book. 

Members of Chelmsford Veterans' Association, 1915: 

Charles L. Adams, South Chelmsford 

Joseph E. Adams, Chelmsford 

George Alexander, Chelmsford 

J. A. Bartlett, Chelmsford 

Daniel P. Byam, South Chelmsford 

J. P. Emerson, Chelmsford 

Francis Hutchinson, Chelmsford 

WilHam H. Hills, Chehnsford 

W. W. KUboume, Chelmsford 

C. T. Melvin, Chelmsford 

George H. Smith, North Chehnsford 

George G. Stetson, North Chelmsford 

A. G. Charles, Chelmsford 

J. J. Middleton, Chelmsford 

A. J. Boise, Chelmsford 

H. H. Emerson, South Chelmsford 

Burt Emerson, Chelmsford 

Thomas Smith, Chehnsford 



370 



HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 



Members of Chelmsford Veterans' Association — Continued. 
J. H. Stewart, Chelmsford 
E. A. Bartlett, East Chelmsford 
Luther C. Titcomb, South Chelmsford 



DECEASED 


COMRADES. 








Name 


Age 


Date of Death 


Alfred Day 


68 


June 


21, 1894 


Charles S. Reed 


63 


April 


16 


1898 


Melvin E. Dam 


54 


May 


30 


1898 


Albian J. Lamphere 


58 


Nov. 


15 


1898 


John H. Nichols 


70 


Dec. 


9 


1898 


James W. Patchen 


74 


May 


11 


1899 


Nathan B. Lapham 


60 


July 


24 


1899 


Charles E. A. Bartlett 


63 


April 


4 


1900 


Robert Fletcher 


73 


Sept. 


21 


1902 


Homer E. Thayer 


64 


Oct. 


13 


1902 


Samuel J. Garland 


68 


Feb. 


5 


1903 


A. Howard Richardson 


69 


March 


16 


1903 


Henry R. Hodson 


56 


Oct. 


17 


1903 


George A. Parkhurst 


70 


Feb. 


3 


1904 


Arthur B. Chapin 


72 


April 


15 


1904 


Riley Davis 


62 


July 


17 


1904 


Wm. A. Kneeland 


65 


Sept. 


23 


1904 


Henry Herbert Emerson 


63 


Oct. 


22 


1904 


Morrill C. Gove 


81 


April 


21 


1905 


Loren Loker 


94 


April 


28 


1905 


George F. Locke 


64 


April 


28 


1905 


Henry S. Perham 


62 


Feb. 


25 


1906 


Benjamin M. Fletcher 


79 


Nov. 


10 


1906 


Henry Adams Cobum 


65 


Dec. 


7 


1906 


John F. Buckley 


63 


Dec. 


15 


1907 


Charles D. Clark 


75 


Dec. 


19 


1907 


Jonathan Wright 


— 


March 


17 


1909 


William R. Fowle 


— 


Oct. 


22 


1909 


Jessee H. Parker 


— 


Nov. 


2 


1909 


Lorenzo Sweetser 


— 


March 


2 


1910 


William A. Ingham 


— 


March 


16 


1910 


S. L. Dutton, M. D. 


— 


May 


27 


1910 


James Thomas 


70 


Jan. 


28 


1911 


H. L. Knowlton 


69 


March 


21 


1912 


John C. Hobbs 


75 


March 


30 


1912 


Owen Burnes 


— 


July 


4 


1912 


J. R. Fletcher 


— 


Nov. 


28 


1912 


Charles M. Connell 










A. G. Parkhurst 


— 


Feb. 


7 


1913 


C. H. Greenleaf 


75 


March 


15 


1913 


R. S. Ripley 


72 


March 


28 


1913 


Joseph Marshall 


74 


Nov. 


30 


1913 


Wallace W. Joslyn 


74 


Oct. 


2 


1913 


A. P. Goddard 


— 






1915 



THE CIVIL WAR, 1861-5 



371 



LIST OF CIVIL WAR VETERANS BURIED IN FOREFATHERS CEMETERY, 
CHELMSFORD CENTRE. 



Da\'id Carleton 
William Carlton 
Jos. B. Emerson 
Benj. M. Hildreth 
Henry B. Lovering 
Calvin Allen 
Fitz Henry Spalding 
Charity L. Dunn 
Charles Rolf 
C. E. A. Bartlett 
Charles F. Fletcher 
George B. Lamphere 
Levi Lamphere 
Elijah N. Day 

George E. Reed 
Paul Kitridge 
Nelson C. Cook 
John Esty 
Samuel C. Hunt 
Alfred Day 
Warren A. Blackmer 
Adams Emerson 
John H. Nichols 
James W. Patchen 
Howard Richardson 
George A. Parkhurst 
A. J. Loker 
Loren Loker 
C. S. Manchester 
W. A. Kneeland 
Edward A. Parkhurst 
Charles S. Reed 
Herbert H. Emerson 
Henry S. Perham 
David A. Copeland 
Charles D. Clark 
Jonathan Wright 
Samuel L. Dutton 
William R. Fowle 
Josiah R. Fletcher 
Albion J. Lamphere 
John C. Hobbs 



Co. F, 23d Mass. Regt. 
Co. B, 39th " 
Co. B, 6th 
Co. G, 33d " 



Co. G, 33d " 

Co. K, 6th 

Capt..Co. K,6th 
Co. K, 6th 
Co. D, 30th " 
Co. E, 26th " 
Co. K, 6th 

also Co. D, 4th Cavalry 
Co. C, 30th Mass. Regt. 
Co. H, 10th Vt. 
Co. H, 10th " 



Co. C, 6th Mass. " 
Co. A, 26th " 
30th " 
Co. B, 2d N. H. 
Co. I, 105th Ohio " 
Co. B, 6th Mass. 
Co. K and B, 6th Mass. Regt. 
Co. C, 34th Mass. Regt. 
Co. E, 57th " 
Co. B, 47th " 
Co. D, 9th Vt. 

Co. K, 6th Mass. 

Co. K, 6th '• 

Co. K and B, 6th Mass. Regt. 

Co. A, 1st Mass. Regt. 

Co. D, 2d Wisconsin Regt. 

Co. K, 6th Mass. Regt. 

Asst. Surg. , 1st Mass. Heavy Art'l'y 

11th Mass. Battery 
Co. K, 6th Mass. Regt. 
Co. E, 26th " 
Co. A, 6th " Inf. 



James Thomas 



PINE RIDGE CEMETERY. 

1st Heavy Artillery 



372 



HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 



LIST OF VETERANS BURIED IN RIVERSIDE CEMETERY, NORTH 

CHELMSFORD 



William H. Davidson 30th Mass 


Infy 


E. H. Ripley Navy 




J. V. Pierce 33d " 


<( 


Steams L. Ripley 26th " 


<< 


E. F. Joslyn 42d 


<( 


J. Griffin 58th " 


" 


L. W. Campbell 33d 


(< 


J. W. Hood 1st 


Cav. 


R. S. Burnham 6th 


Infy 


George H. Barton 30th " 


<i 


James H. Barton 26th " 


(( 


John H. Butterfield 




John F. Sweet 6th 


i< 


Jefferson Wright 35th " 


<< 


J. F. Smart 6th 


<( 


George Lawrence 




C. R. Sprague 




Charles M. Connell Vt. Cav. 




R. S. Ripley 30th Mass. 


Infy 


Miller 33d 


•» 


Also three graves of unknown comrades. 





LIST OF CIVIL WAR VETERANS BURIED IN HEART POND CEMETERY, 
SOUTH CHELMSFORD. 



Henry S. Spaulding 
Robert Fletcher 
Albert E. Pike 
Ephraim A. Byam 
Stillman Byam 
Nathan B. Lapham 
George F. Locke 
Benjamin M. Fletcher 
Homer E. Thayer 
Lorenzo Sweetser 
Lieut. Harry Meserve 
Samuel J. Garland 
Robert N. Kendall 
Rufus E. Byam 
Thomas J. Hutchins 
Haskell Leach 



Co. E, 26th Regt. Mass. Vols. 

Co. E, 26th 

Co. E, 26th 

Co. E, 26th 

Co. K, 6th 

Co. K, 6th 

Co. F, 13th " N. H. 

Co. G, 13th 

12th " Vermont 

35th " Mass. 
Co. A, 33d 

10th " Conn. 
Co. A, 15th " Mass. 
Co. C, 6th " Ohio 
Co. E, 33d " Mass. 

15th Mass. Light Battery 



THE CIVIL WAR, 1861-3 



373 



LIST OF VETERANS BURIED IN THE WEST CHELMSFORD CEMETERY. 



John F. Buckley- 
John Fox 
William Fox 
David Le Duke 
Alfred G. Parkhurst 
George Curtis 

Joseph Marshall 

George Thurlow 
Higgins 
Henry Hodson 
Arthur Holt 
George Pelsue 
J. C. Bos well or Bus well 
Clark Clapper 
Henry Cobum 



33d Regt. Mass. Vol. Militia 



Co. C, 6th Mass. Regt. 

1st Co. Sharp Shooters 

Co. A, 6th Mass. Regt. 

Co. G, 19th " 

Co. E, 2d " Heavy Artillery 

Co. B, 5th " Infantry 



Co. G, 14th 



Heavy Artillery 



At the time of Lincoln's second election to the Presidency 
a liberty pole was raised in the Centre Village at the southeast 
comer of the common, November 7, 1864. The whole cost of the 
flag and staff was $288.12. The bill calls for one 12 yard Am. 
Ensign-$95. 

The money was raised by subscription, the collectors being 
Mr. N. P. Dadman and Dr. N. B. Edwards. Mr. David Perham 
was treasurer. The executive committee were: David Perham, 
H. W. B. Wightman, N. P. Dadman, E. S. Parkhurst, Sanford 
Hazen, A. G. Green and L. Chamberlain, the builder of the 
Revolutionary monument. 



1913, August 30, Company K, M. V. M., celebrated the 
50th Anniversary of their return home from the war (June 3, 1863), 
at the Town Hall in Chelmsford Centre. 

The following record was printed on the notice of the meeting 
sent to the Associates: 

RECORD OF COMPANY K, M. V. M., 1862-1863 



Capt. Charles E. A. Bartlett 
1st Lieut. William F. Wood 
2nd Lieut. Shapleigh Morgan 
Sergt. Charles A. Barker 

" George A. W. Vinal . 

" Jona S. Davis . 

" Charles H. Sweeney . 



Died April 4, 1900 

Died 

Died 1904 

Died 1904 

Died 1906 

P. O. Address, Deny, N. H. 

P. O. Address, Maiden, Mass. 

407 Lyme St. 



374 



HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 



P. O. 131 



Corporal Josiah R. Fletcher 
" Rollin Perkins 
" Edwin Bowman . 

William T. Wilson 
" Edward E. Lapham 
" Albert O. Davidson 

William E. Clark 
" Milo J. Proctor 

" Henry S. Perham 
Musician Arthvir Jones 
Wagoner Roswell S. Bumham 
Stillman Byam 
Daniel P. Byam . 
George A. Byam . 
George F. Butterfield 
Richard Bums 
James L. Boston . 
Kirk H. Bancroft 
Patrick Buckmaster 
John Buckley 
George W. Bridges 
Michael Burrows 
John T. Billings 
Dennis Crehen 
John Crehen 
Thomas Carney . 
John H. Colburn . 
Charity L. Dunn . 
Joseph V. Danforth 
Alonzo A. Davis . 
Elijah N. Day 
Herbert H. Emerson 



Died Nov. 29, 1911 

Died Nov. 26, 1905 

P. O. Address, Philadelphia, Pa. 

P. O. Address, Carlisle, Mass. 

P. O. Address, Watertown, Mass. 

Died 1871 

P. O. Address, Roxbury, Mass. 

58 Sherman St. 

. Died February 26, 1906 

Died 1908 

Died July 9, 1878 

P. O. Address, South Chelmsford 

Died June 24, 1912 

Eliot Ave., West Newton, Mass. 

Died Sept. 21, 1894 

. P. O., Strong, Me. 



Died July 27, 



1910 
Died 
Died 



. Died Sept., 1907 
O. 35 West Ninth St., Lowell, Mass. 

Died 

Died 

Died Apr. 8, 1910 

Died 

Died Oct. 23, 1904 



Amos B. French . . P. O., 36 Marlborough St., Lowell, Mass. 

Charles F. Fletcher Died 

John P. Fisher P. O., Medford, Mass. 

George W. Gragg Died 1903 

Byron H. Griswold Died 1911 

Joseph Hallowell Died July 12, 1897 

Henry H. Ingalls Died Oct. 26, 1864 

Franklin Jaquith P. O., Billerica, Mass. 

Nelson E. Jewett P. O., New Bedford, Mass. 

Nathan B. Lapham Died July 14, 1899 



Thomas Lines 
Daniel Murphy 
Dennis Murphy 
John McEneany 
Michael McNulty 
John McCarthy 



P. O., Lowell, Mass., 163 



Howard St. 
Died 
Died 



THE CIVIL WAR, 1861-5 375 

Henry E. Putnam Died May 27 1904 

John Parkhurst ^- ^^.^°^^°u'^'o^nS 

George A. Parkhurst Died Feb. 3 1904 

Amos A. Parkhurst P- O., Escanaba, Mich. 

John Pierce P. O., So. Pans, Me 

James B. Peck Died 

Peter Pendergast Died Apr 28, 1903 

Oliver Pasho r^' a ^ o jon^ 

Hiram F. Russell T.?'^'^^^P^?' lono 

Charles F. Reed Died Apr. 16, 1898 

Charles L. Richardson Died 

John Reall ^ ^_ , . ^^ 

Benjamin Sharp . . P. O., Lowell, Mass., 15 Hazeltme St. 

Henry Sharp ^ . . r.^ 

William H. Smith . P. O., Rockland, Me., 21 Trinity St. 

Henry W. Stevens ^. . ,, ... -.nn^ 

Jesse A. Sargent Died Mar. 14, 1904 

Edward Sullivan 

Peter H. Staples ^. , . o.^ -.nno 

Elbridge Steams Died Apr. 29, 1903 

Hudson F. Smiley P- 0., Chicago, 111. 

George A. Seaver 

John T. Smith 

James Welch ^. , ,, , ,-t -mnn 

Jonathan Wright Died March 17, 1909 

John Webb 

It has been the custom for the Town to appropriate annually 
$100 or more for the celebration of Memorial Day, May 30th, 
which is done by a procession, with music, consisting of veterans, 
Town officials, clergymen, school children and others; G. A. R. 
ritual in Forefathers' Cemetery; saluting the Revolutionary 
monument; exercises with address in the Town Hall; and a dinner. 

TROOP F CAVALRY, M. V. M. 

In the year 1864, when raids on the Canadian border were 
being made by those in sympathy with the Southern Confederacy, 
Christopher Roby of Chebnsford, who at one time was a member 
of the Governor's Horse Guards of New Hampshire, made appli- 
cation to Adjutant-General Schouler of Massachusetts _ for 
permission to raise a troop of cavalry that would be in readiness 
for any call that might be made to suppress the depredations 
referred to. 

The permission was granted, provided a troop of 100 men 
could be recruited. This the energetic Roby speedily accomplished 
and at Chelmsford Centre, Sept. 5, 1864, the troop was organized. 
The election for officers resulted in the choice of Christopher 
Roby, Captain; Edgar S. Parkhurst, 1st Lieut, and Warren C. 



376 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

Hamblet 2nd Lieut., all residents of Chelmsford, the rank and 
file being made up by men from Chelmsford, Carlisle, Billerica, 
Dracut and Westford. 

Its organization complete, the troop became a portion of the 
Mass. Vol. Militia. The troop held its first encampment at 
Westford in 1865. While in camp the troop was presented with 
a stand of colors by Col. Charles H. Dalton, a grandson of Capt. 
Noah Spalding, of Chelmsford, who in olden times commanded a 
company of troopers in Chelmsford. The troop adopted the 
name of "The Spalding Light Cavalry." The town of Chelms- 
ford previous to this organization supported two mounted 
bodies, — one antedating the war of the Revolution, and the 
other during the War of 1812. Soon after the troop was organized, 
it was designated as "Company F Unattached Cavalry." 

While the troop, in the performance of its annual tour of 
duty, had been attached, as a rule, to the First Brigade until May 
19, 1906, at which time it was assigned to the First Squadron 
of Cavalry, nevertheless, during a brief portion of its existence 
it was attached to the Second Brigade, and in a few instances 
also performed service with the Third Brigade. For the 
purpose of further instruction and drills, the troop was 
divided into squads, and squads have at various times been 
established at Ayer, Billerica, Carlisle, Chelmsford Centre, 
Dracut, Groton, Lowell, North Chelmsford, Pepperell, West 
Chelmsford and Westford. 

On July 24, 1866, H. Herbert Emerson of Chelmsford was 
appointed adjutant with the rank of 1st Lieutenant, which office 
he held until 1874, when Elijah D. Bearce of Chelmsford succeeded 
him and held that office until it was abolished in 1878. 

On July 24, 1866, Levi Howard of Chelmsford was appointed 
Asst. Surgeon v^/^ith the rank of 1st Lieutenant. Capt. Roby 
continued in command until 1877, a period of thirteen years, 
when he was succeeded by Capt. Sherman H. Fletcher of Westford. 
The troop was disbanded July 1, 1907. 

The following list of officers of the troop, with the residences 
on the date of their election or appointment, will clearly indicate 
that Chelmsford has furnished her full quota. 



CAPTAINS. 

Name Residence Term of Service 

Christopher Roby Chelmsford 1864—1877 

Sherman H. Fletcher Westford 1877—1888 

Horace W. Wilson Carlisle 1888—1893 

EHsha H. Shaw Chehnsford 1893—1898 

Amos R. Leighton Westford 1899—1900 

John J. Monahan Chelmsford 1900—1905 

Edward H. Keyes Chelmsford 1905—1907 



THE CIVIL WAR, 1861-5 
ADJUTANT (with rank of 1st Lieut.) 



377 



NAME 

H. Herbert Emerson 
Elijah D. Bearse 



RESIDENCE 

Chelmsford 
Chebnsford 



TERM OF SERVICE 

1866—1874 
1874—1878 



ASSISTANT SURGEON (with rank of 1st Lieut.) 



Levi Howard 
Joseph B. Heald 
Walter H. Leighton 
Joseph B. Heald 
Amasa Howard 
Arthur G. Scoboria 



Chelmsford 

Westford 

Lowell 

Westford 

Chelmsford 

Chelmsford 



1866—1878 
1878—1883 
1883—1886 
1886—1888 
1889—1900 
1900—1907 



Edgar S. Parkhurst 
Warren C. Hamblett 
Allan Cameron 
Arthur M. Clement 
Nathan B. Lapham 
Arthur M. Clement 
William L. Kittredge 
Horace W. Wilson 
Elisha H. Shaw 
Amos R. Leighton 
John J. Monahan 
Edward H. Keyes 
Edward Fisher 



FIRST LIEUTENANTS 

Chelmsford 

Chelmsford 

Westford 

Dracut 

Chelmsford 

Boston 

Westford 

Carlisle 

Chelmsford 

Westford 

Chelmsford 

Chelmsford 

Westford 



1864—1866 
1866—1867 
1867—1872 
1872—1873 
1874—1878 
1878—1883 
1883—1885 
1885—1888 
1889—1893 
1893—1898 
1899—1900 
1900—1905 
1905—1907 



Warren C. Hamblett 
Allan Cameron 
James A. Davis 
Benjamin F. Day 
Sherman H. Fletcher 
Arthur M. Clement 
William L. Kittredge 
Horace W. Wilson 
Everett C. Williams 
Elisha H. Shaw 
Amos R. Leighton 
William J. Quigley 
Edward H. Keyes 
EHsha H. Shaw 
Edward Fisher 
Edward S. Ricker 



SECOND LIEUTENANTS 

Chelmsford 

Westford 

Dunstable 

Chelmsford 

Westford 

Boston 

Westford 

Carlisle 

Groton 

Chelmsford 

Westford 

Chelmsford 

Chelmsford 

Chelmsford 

Westford 

Carlisle 



1864—1866 

1866—1867 

1867—1871 

1871—1874 

1874—1877 

1877—1878 

1878—1883 

1883—1885 

1885—1888 

1888 

1888—1893 

1893—1899 

1899—1900 

1900—1903 

1903—1905 

1905—1907 



378 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

SOLDIERS AND SAILORS IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

Two hundred and eighteen men served to the credit of 
Chebnsford in the Army during the Civil War, and twenty-three 
in the Navy, not including three who were rejected after being 
mustered in, and ten who were credited elsewhere. Of this 
number, twenty-five were killed, or died, in the service. 

The following list was prepared with painstaking care by Mr. 
Henry S. Perham, Chairman of a committee appointed by the 
Town for that purpose. Residents of Chelmsford who served 
to the credit of other towns or cities are included, and the name 
of such town or city is given. This list bears the date 1899. 

RECORD OF THE SERVICE OF CHELMSFORD SOLDIERS AND SAILORS WHO SERVED 
IN THE CIVIL WAR, 1861-1865. 

ARMY. 

Abbott, George A. Mustered in, Aug. 11, 1862, for 3 years. Co. A, 33d 
Regt. Inf., which became Co. I, 3d Cavalry. Deserted, Nov. or Dec, 
1862. Enlisted and mustered in Aug. 10, 1864, for 1 year. Co. C, 4th 
Heavy Art'y- Reported under President Lincoln's Proclamation of 
March 11, 1865, as deserted from 33d Regt., and returned to 3d Cav. 
Mustered out with Company at Alexandria, Va., June 9, 1865. Age, 
20. Single, born Montpelier, Vt. Credited at 2d enlistment to Lawrence. 

Abbott, Solomon. Enl., June 10, 1862. Mustered in, Aug. 7, 1862, for 
3 years. Co. H, 33d Inf. Mustered out, June 22, 1865. Prisoner from 
March 26, 1864 to May 5, 1865. Age, 23. Single, son of Dominicus and 
Sally Abbott. Residence given on roll, Lowell. 

Ackroyd, George H. Enl. and mustered, Aug. 12, 1862, for 3 years. Co, E, 
33d Inf. Mustered out, June 11, 1865. Age, 18. 

Andrews, John. Enl. and mustered, Sept. 1, 1864, for 3 years. Co. L, 4th 
Cav. When Regt. was mustered out, reported as absent sick. Age, 23. 
Married. Residence, Boston. 

Austin, Charles O. Enl. and mustered, Nov. 30, 1864, for 1 year. Co. C, 
1st Batt'n Heavy Art'y- Mustered out, Oct. 20, 1865. Age, 18. Resi- 
dence, Methuen. 

Baker, George E. Mustered in, Dec. 13, 1864, for 1 year. 6th Mass. Battery. 
Mustered out, Aug. 7, 1865. Age, 21. Residence, Lowell. 

Baker, John M. Enl. and mustered in, Aug. 8, 1864, for 3 years. Co. I, 
2d Regt. Inf. Admitted to 1st Div., 2d A. C. Hospital, Sept. 1, 1864. 
Returnedtoduty, Sept. 22, 1864. No further record. Age, 26. Married. 
Residence, New York City. 

Balcomb, Horace A. Enl. and mustered, April 22, 1864, for 3 years. Co. A, 
26th Regt. Inf. Mustered out, Aug. 26, 1865. Age, 24. Married. 

Barker, Charles Alfred. Mustered in, Aug. 31, 1862. Sergt. Co. K, 6th 
Regt. Inf., for 9 months. Promoted to 1st Sergt., March 14, 1863. 
Mustered out, June 3, 1863. Age, 21. Single. Born, Prospect, Maine, 
son of Dr. Thos. C. and Rebecca (Abbot) Barker. 

Barr, John. Enl. and mustered, Nov. 30, 1864, for 1 year. Co. G, 61st 
Regt. Inf. Mustered out, July 16, 1865. Age, 18. Residence, Boston. 

Barritt, Patrick. Enl. and mustered, Oct. 9, 1861, for 3 years. Co. F, 30th 
Regt. Inf. Died, Oct. 7, 1862, at Carrollton, La. Age, 42. Married. 

Barron, Edward H. Enl. and mustered, Nov. 28, 1864, for 1 year. Co. B, 
1st Heavy Art'y. Mustered out, Aug. 16, 1865. Previous service, 
3 years in U. S. Navy, on U. S. Ship Minnesota, from April 10, 1861 to 
April 13, 1864. 2d enlistment, credit Chelmsford. Res., East Boston. 
Age, 21. Born, Halifax. 



THE CIVIL WAR, 1861-5 379 

Bartlett, Charles Edwin Adams. Commissioned, Aug. 30, 1862. Mustered 
in, Aug. 31, 1862, for 9 months. Captain, Co. K, 6th Regt. Inf. 
Mustered out, June 3, 1863. Age, 26. Married. Born, Chelmsford, 
son of Dr. J. C. and Maria (Adams) Bartlett. 

Bartlett, Erastus A. Enl., Aug. 3, 1862. Mustered in, Aug. 9, 1862, for 3 
years. Co. A, 33d Regt. Inf. Wounded, July 3, 1863, at Gettysburg, 
Pa. Mustered out, May 16, 1865. Age, 20. Born, Lowell, son of 
Nathaniel and Mary (Churchill) Bartlett. 

Bartlett, Joel Adams. Mustered in, July 17, 1864, for 100 days. Co. B, 
6th Regt. Inf. Mustered out, Oct. 27, 1864. Age, 21. Born, Chelms- 
ford, son of Dr. J. C. and Maria (Adams) Bartlett. 

Barton, James H. Enl. and mustered in, Sept. 17, 1861. Co. G, 26th Regt. 
Inf., for 3 years. Re-enlisted, Jan. 3, 1864. Died at sea, July 17, 1864. 
Age, 45. Married, left 7 children. 

Birch, James. Enl., Aug. 11, 1862. Mustered in, Aug. 20, 1862, for 3 years. 
Co. K. 38th Regt. Inf. Discharged for disability, Sept. 24, 1863. Age, 
44. Married. Residence, Portland. 

Bladden, Thomas G. Enl. and mustered in, Aug. 13, 1864, for 3 years. Co. 
E, 39th Regt. Inf. Transferred to Co. F, 32d Regt. Inf. Discharged, 
July 15, 1865, by order War Dept. Age, 38. Married. Residence, 
South Reading. Name on muster out roll, Blenden. 

Boies, Andrew J. Enl. and mustered in, Aug. 11, 1862, for 3 years. Co. E, 
33d Regt. Inf. Mustered out, June 11, 1865. Age, 25. Married. 
Born, Calais, Maine, son of James and Mary Ann Boies. Name on muster 
roll, "Boice." 

Bokett, James. Enl. and mustered in, Nov. 28, 1864, for 3 years. Deserted, 
April 13, 1865, at Port Hudson. Age, 29. Married. Res., Lowell. 

Bond, Phineas S. Enl. and mustered in, July 2, 1861, for 3 years. Co. C, 
16th Regt. Inf. Appointed Corpl., Nov. 1, 1862. Sergt., July 12, 1863. 
Mustered out, July 27, 1864. Age, 25. Single. 

Boston, James Laforest. Enl. Aug. 30, 1862. Mustered in, Aug. 31, 1862, 
for 9 months. Co. K, 6th Regt. Inf. Mustered out, June 3, 1863. Age 24. 
Single. Born, Avon, Maine, son of Joseph, Jr., and Betsy (Sprague) Boston. 

Bowley, Leander G. Enl. and mustered in May 25, 1861, for 3 years. Co. B, 
2d Regt. Inf. Re-enlisted, Dec. 30, 1863. Appointed, 1 Sergt. Com- 
missioned 2d Lieut., July 3, 1865. Mustered out, July 14, 1865. Age, 
18, son of William and Mary Bowley. Born, Temple, Me. 

Brooks, Charles A. Enl. and mustered in, Sept. 4, 1861, for 3 years. Co. E, 
26th Regt. Inf. Re-enlisted, Feb. 1, 1864. Mustered out, Aug. 26, 
1865. Age, 21. Residence, Acton. Re-enlistment credit, Chelmsford. 

Brown, Edmund H. Enl. and mustered in, July 12, 1861, for 3 years. Co. G, 
16th Regt. Inf. Discharged, disability, Dec. 5, 1862. Age, 24. Single. 

Brown, Frederick C. Enl. and mustered in, Nov. 28, 1864, for 1 year. Co. G, 
61st Regt. Inf. Mustered out, July 16, 1865. Age, 18. Residence, Boston. 

Brown, George P. Enl. and mustered in, Nov. 29, 1864, for 1 year. Co. M, 
4th Cavalry. Mustered out, Nov. 14, 1865. Age, 18. Residence, Lowell. 

Brown, John T. Enl., Aug. 23, 1864. Veteran Reserve Corps. Prior 
service in 20th Mass. Regt. Born, New York City. 

Buckley, John F. Enl., July 26, 1862. Mustered in, Aug. 5, 1862, for 3 
years. Co. E, 33d Regt. Inf. Promoted Corpl., March 1, 1863. Sergt., 
July, 1864. .Mustered out, June 11, 1865. Age, 19. 

Buckmaster, Patrick. Enl., Aug. 30, 1862. Mustered in, Aug. 31, 1862, 
for 9 months. Co. K, 6th Regt. Inf. Mustered out, June 3, 1863. 
Age, 21. Born, Ireland, son of Patrick and Ellen (Lane) Buckmaster. 

Buzzell, George W. Enl. and mustered in, Dec. 29, 1863. 40th Regt. Inf. 
Discharged for disability, June 21, 1865. Age, 18. Residence, Gil- 
manton, N. H. 

Byam, Daniel P. Enl. and mustered, Aug. 31, 1862, for 9 months. Co. K, 
6th Regt. Inf. Mustered out, June 3, 1863. Enl., March 31, 1864, 
for 3 years, U. S. Army, Signal Corps. Discharged, Nov. 10, 1865. 
Age, 20. Born, Chelmsford, son of Marcus D. and Mary (Proctor) Byam. 



380 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

Byam, Ephraim Albert. Enl., Sept. 11, 1861, for 3 years. Co. E, 26th 
Regt. Inf. Died, Oct. 6, 1861, at Chelmsford. Age, 18. Born, Chelms- 
ford, son of Stillman and Mary Ann (Carpenter) Byam. 

Byam, George A. Enl., Aug. 30, 1862. Mustered in, Aug. 31, for 9 months. 
Co. K, 6th Regt. Inf. Mustered out, June 3, 1863. Age, 18. Born, 
Hudson, N. H., son of Amos Adams and Mary A. (Bowers) Byam. 

Byam, Stillman. Enl., Aug. 30, 1862. Mustered in, Aug. 31, 1862, for 9 
months. Co. K, 6th Regt. Inf. Mustered out, June 3, 1863. Age, 44. 
Married. Son of Solomon and Abi (Adams) Byam. 

Cade, John. Enl. and mustered in, Aug. 5, 1864, for 3 years. Co. I, 33d 
Regt. Inf. Recruit, never joined regiment. Age, 22. Residence, New 
Bedford. 

Callahan, Bartlett O. Enlisted, Aug. 17, 1864. Veteran Reserve Corps. 
Prior Service, 27th Indiana Regt. Dis., Oct. 30, 1862. 

Callahan, James. Enl. and mustered in, Aug. 19, 1864, for 3 years. Co. M, 
3d Heavy Art'y. Mustered out, Sept. 18, 1865. Age, 30. 

Carl, Anthony. Mustered into United States Service for 3 years. Jan. 16, 

1863. Nothing further obtainable. 

Casey, James. Enl. and mustered in, Aug. 12, 1864, for 3 years. Co. H, 
27th Regt. Inf. Taken prisoner at Battle of South West Creek, March 8, 
1865. Regt. mustered out, June 26, 1865. Absent when Regt. mustered 
out. 

Clancey, Daniel. Enl., Aug. 16, 1864. Veteran Reserve Corps, 2d Battalion. 

Clogston, William Hyslop Sumner. Enl., Dec. 2, 1863. Mustered in, Jan. 2, 

1864, for 3 years. Co. F, 2d Heavy Art'y- Mustered out, Sept. 3, 1865. 
Age, 30. Born, Dorchester, Mass., son of John G. and Mary (Howe) 
Clogston. 

Coburn, George B. Enl. and mustered in, Sept. 19, 1861, for 3 years. Co. E, 

26th Regt. Inf. Deserted, Nov. 18, 1861. Subsequent service as 

George D. Coburn, credit, Lowell, Co. G, 6th Regt. Inf., for 9 months 

from Aug. 31, 1862, to June 3, 1863. Also, Co. G, 6th Regt. Inf., for 

100 days. Age, 18. 
Cochrane, Thomas. Enl. and mustered in, Oct. 31, 1861, for 3 years. Co. E, 

30th Regt. Inf. Died, Aug. 26, 1863, at New Orleans, La. Age, 21. 

Married. 
Coffey, Henry. Enl. and mustered in, Dec. 6, 1864, for 1 year. Co. G, 61st 

Regt. Inf. Mustered out, July 16, 1865. Age, 19. Residence, Boston. 
Collier, John A. Enl. and mustered in, Aug. 13, 1862, for 3 years. Co. K, 

20th Regt. Inf. Discharged for disabiHty, Dec. 29, 1863. Age, 37. 

Married. 
Collins, John C. Enl. and mustered in, July 29, 1863, for 3 years. Co. B, 

13th Regt. Inf. Deserted, Nov. 26, 1863. —Substitute. Age, 25. 

Residence, Concord. 
Connelly, James. Enl., Aug. 19, 1861. Mustered in, Aug. 28, 1861, for 3 

years. Co. G, 19th Regt. Inf. Wounded, June 30, 1862. Discharged, 

March 25, 1863. Disability. Enl., Dec. 30, 1863. Credit of Lowell, 

for 3 years. Co. B, 1st Regt. Cav. Transferred, Apr. 29, 1865, to 

Veteran Reserve Corps. Discharged, Nov. 27, 1865, from C. G, 14 

V. R. C. Age, 24. 
Conway, Michael. Enl., May 5, 1864, for 3 years. 26th Regt. Inf. 

Rejected, May 10, 1864, as unqualified. 
Corthell, William E. Enl., Aug. 16, 1864. 6th Independent Co. Veteran 

Reserve Corps. Mustered out, Aug. 31, 1866. Prior service, Cr. 

Boston. Co. p, 3d Cav. Mass. Aug. 31, 1862, to Aug. 25, 1863. Dis- 
charged for disability. Born, Boston. 
Cotter, John J. Enl. and mustered in, Nov. 28, 1864, for 1 year. Co. B, 

1st Heavy Art'y- Mustered out, Aug. 16, 1865. Age, 21. Married. 

Residence, East Boston. 
Cumber, George. Enl. and mustered in, Aug. 5, 1862, for 3 years. Co. G, 

33d Regt. Inf. Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps., July 1, 1863. 

Re-enlisted, Cr. Dracut, Aug. 23, 1864. No further record. Age, 44. 

Married. Residence, Boston. 



THE CIVIL WAR, 1861-5 381 

Curtis, George. Enl., Sept. 2, 1861. Mustered in, Sept. 3, 1861, for 3 years. 
1st Co. Sharp Shooters. Re-enlisted as Sergt., Credit, Bedford, Feb. 16, 

1864. Died, May 28, 1864, of wounds received in action, May 18, 1864, 
at Spottsylvania. Age, 22. 

Cushing, Edward F. Enl. and mustered in, Sept. 3, 1861. Co. H, 26th 
Regt., for 3 years. Re-enlisted, Jan. 3, 1864. Mustered out, Aug. 26, 

1865. Age, 19. Believed to belong to Chelmsford. Roll gives Residence 
and Cr., Lowell. 

Cutler, Benjamin P. Enl. and mustered in, Sept. 5, 1864, for 3 years. Co. F, 
4th Regt. Cav., Corpl., July 26, 1865. Mustered out, July 26, 1865. 
Age, 30. Married. Residence, Boston. 

Dalley, Edward. Enl. and mustered in, Aug. 5, 1862, for 3 years. Co. G> 
3'3d Regt. Inf. Mustered out, June 11, 1865. Age, 29. Residence, 
Lowell. 

Daly, Simon. Enl., Aug. 14, 1862. Mustered in, Nov. 1, 1862, for 3 years. 
Co. G, 3d Regt. Cav. Volunteered for Forlorn Hope, intended for 
assault of Port Hudson. Discharged, May 20, 1865. Age, 21. Son of 
James Daly, born, Ireland. 

Davidson, Henry W. Enl. and mustered in, Oct. 7, 1861, for 3 years. 
Musician, Co. D, 30th Regt. Inf. Died, June 3, 1862, at New Orleans, 
La. Age, 21. 

Davis, Alonzo A. Enl., Aug. 30, 1862. Mustered in, Aug. 31, 1862, for 9 
months. Co. K, 6th Regt. Inf. Mustered out, June 3, 1863. 

Davis, Andrew. Enl. and mustered in, March 8, 1865, at Hilton Head, S. C« 
103d U. S. Regt. Colored Troops. No further record. Age, 25. Resi- 
dence, Georgetown, South Carolina. 

Day, Benjamin F. Enl., Aug. 30, 1862. Mustered in, Aug. 31, 1862, for 9 
months. Co. K, 6th Regt. Inf. Mustered out, June 3, 1863. Age, . 
Married. Born, Avon, Maine, son of Benjamin and Polly (Jacobs) Day. 

Day, Elijah N. Enl., Aug. 30, 1862. Mustered in, Aug. 31, 1862, for 9 
months. Co. K, 6th Regt. Inf. Mustered out, June 3, 1863. Enl., 
March 26, 1864. Mustered in, March 31, 1864, for 3 years. Co. D, 
4th Regt. Cav. Died, June 29, 1864, at Jacksonville, Fla. Age, 23. 
Single. Born, Strong, Maine, son of John and Martha (Norton) Day. 

Decatur, Webster C. Enl. and mustered in, Aug. 14, 1862, for 3 years. Co. 

E, 33d Regt. Inf. Died, March 14, 1863. Age, 18. 

Deery, Patrick. Enl. and mustered in, June 13, 1861, for 3 years. Co. B, 
11th Regt. Inf. Killed in action, July 2, 1863, Gettysburg. Age, 21. 

Dunn, Charity Lunn. Enl., Aug. 30, 1862. Mustered in, Aug. 31, 1862, 
for 9 months. Co. K, 6th Regt. Inf. Mustered out, June 3, 1863. 
Enl., Dec. 12, 1863. Mustered in, Jan. 2, 1864, for 3 years. Co. E, 2nd 
Heavy Art'y- Died, Oct. 5, 1864 (fever), at Newbern, N. C. Age, 21. 
Single. Born, Chelmsford, son of Senter and Jane (Stone) Dunn. 

Dunn, Timothy. Enl., July 25. 1862. Mustered in, Aug. 5, 1862, for 3 years. 
Co. G, 33d Regt. Inf. Promoted to Corpl., March 5, 1864. Mustered 
out, June 11, 1865. Age, 28. Single. Residence, Dracut. 

Dutton, Samuel Lane. Commissioned and mustered in, Aug. 11, 1862. 
Asst. Surgeon, 1st Heavy Art'y-. for 3 years. Promoted to Surgeon, 
with rank of Major, 40th Regt. Inf., March 7, 1864. Surgeon in Chief 
3d Brig., 1st Div., 18 A. C. Resigned and discharged. May 11, 1865. 
Age, 26 and 28. Married. Born, Acton, son of Solomon Lane and 
Olive Charlotte (Hutchinson) Dutton. 

Dyar, Albert Atherton. Enl., Aug. 25, 1862. Mustered in, Aug. 31, 1862, 
for 9 months. Co. E, 6th Regt. Inf. Mustered out, June 3, 1863. 
Enl. and mustered in, Dec. 29, 1863, for 3 years. 15th Light Batt'y- 
Mustered out, Aug. 4, 1865. Born, Sept. 26, 1826, Lowell, son of Albert 

F. and Mary (Atherton) Dyar. 

Emerson, Adams. Commissioned, Aug. 29, 1862, for 3 years. 2d Lieut., 
Co. C, 30th Regt. Inf. 1st Lieut., May 7, 1863. Dismissed, Feb. 23, 
1865. Son of Dudley Bailey and Lucy (Adams) Emerson. 



382 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

Emerson, Burt. Enl. and mustered in, Oct. 14, 1861, for 3 years, Co. C, 30th 

Regt. Inf. Transferred for Promotion to 1st Regt. La Native Guards, 

Lieut. 76, U. S. Colored Inf. Discharged as 1st Lieut., Sept. 13, 1864. 

Age, 23. Married Rhoda Wheeler. Born Chelmsford, son of Bryant and 

Hannah (Bradford) Emerson. 
Emerson, Henry Harrison. Enl. and mustered in, Oct. 14, 1861, for 3 years, 

Co. C, 30th Regt. Inf. Discharged, Sept. 16, 1862, for disability. Age, 

20. Single. Born, Chelmsford, son of Bryant and Hannah (Bradford) 

Emerson. 
Emerson, Henry Herbert. Enl., Aug. 30, 1862, mustered in, Aug. 31, 1862, 

for 9 months, Co. K, 6th Regt. Inf. Mustered out, June 3, 1863. Age, 

20. Single. Born Chelmsford, son of Owen and Louisa (Butterfield) 

Emerson. Name given on muster roll, Herbert H. 
Emerson, James Pitts. Enl., Aug. 25, 1862, mustered in, Aug. 31, 1862, for 

9 months, Co. H, 6th Regt. Inf. Mustered out, June 3, 1863. Age, 19. 

Single. Born, Chelmsford, son of Bryant and Hannah (Bradford) 

Emerson. 
Emerson, Joseph Bradford. Mustered in, July 7, 1864, for 100 days, Co. B, 

6th Regt. Inf. Mustered out, Oct. 27, 1864. Age, 31. Married Sarah 

Byam. Born, Chelmsford, son of Bryant and Hannah (Bradford) 

Emerson. 
Emerson, Rufus Webster. Enl., July 25, 1862. Mustered in, Aug. 5, 1862, 

for 3 years, Co. G, 33d Regt. Inf., Corpl., April 8, 1863. Mustered out. 

May 22, 1865. Born, Chelmsford. Married Martha Parkhurst. Son 

of Bryant and Hannah (Bradford) Emerson. 
Everett, Jerry. Enl. and mustered in, Sept. 30, 1864, at Vicksburg, Miss., 

3d U. S. Colored Cav. Age, 32. Residence, Houston Co., Georgia. 
Farrell, Michael J. Enl. and mustered in, May 4, 1864, for 3 years, Co. A, 

26th Regt. Inf. Mustered out, Aug. 26, 1865. Age, 18. Single. 

Residence, Lowell. 
Parson, Frank E. Enl. and mustered in, Sept. 6, 1861, for 3 years. Musician, 

Co. B, 30th Regt. Inf. Discharged, May 27, 1862, disability. Enl., 

Sept. 1, 1864, credit Lowell, Veteran Reserve Corps. Age, 18. Born, 

Lowell, son of Samuel and Elsie (Lane) Parson. 
Parson, Frederick E. Enl. and mustered in, Nov. 1, 1861, for 3 years. 

Musician, Co. B, 30th Regt. Inf. Discharged, May 27, 1862, disability. 

Age, 17. Born, Lowell, son of Samuel and Elsie (Lane) Parson. 
Farwell, Coleman S. Enl., Dec. 21, 1863, mustered in, Jan. 2, 1864, for 3 

years. Co. E, 2d Heavy Art'y- Transferred to Co. C, June, 1864. 

Died, Nov. 5, 1864, at Newbern, N. C. Age, 23. Single, son of John 

and Dorcas (Hall) Farwell. 
Fay, John. Enl. and mustered in, Aug. 6, 1864, for 3 years. 2d Cav. No 

further record. Age, 21. Single. Residence, New York City. 
Fish, Frank P. Enl. and mustered in, Dec. 13, 1864, for 1 year. 7th Mass, 

Batt'y. Mustered out, Nov. 10, 1865. Age, 18. Single. Residence, 

Tyngsboro. 
Fletcher, Charles P. Enl., Aug. 30, 1862, mustered in, Aug. 31, 1862, for 

9 months. Co. K, 6th Regt. Inf. Mustered out, June 3, 1863. Enl., 

March 9, 1865. Orderly Sergt., Co. H, 12th Regt. Maine Inf. Mustered 

out with Regt. Age, 18. Born, Chelmsford, son of William and Diantha 

(Dustin) Fletcher. 
Fletcher, Josiah Richardson. Enl., Aug. 30, 1862, mustered in, Aug. 31, 1862, 

for 9 months. Corpl., Co. K, 6th Regt. Inf. Mustered out, June 3, 1863. 

Age, 40. Single. Born, Chelmsford, son of Capt. Josiah and Hannah 

(Fletcher) Fletcher. 
Fletcher, Robert. Enl. and mustered in, Sept. 10, 1861, for 3 years. Co. E, 

26th Regt. Inf. Re-enlisted, Jan. 1, 1864. Mustered out, Aug. 26, 1865. 

Age, 33. Married Mary Jane (Spaulding). Born Scotland, son of 

William and Elizabeth (Scott) Fletcher. 



THE CIVIL WAR, 1 86 1-5 383 

French, Amos B. Enl., Aug. 30, 1862, mustered in, Aug. 31, 1862, for 9 

months. Co. K, 6th Regt. Inf. Mustered out, June 3, 1863. Age, 18. 

Single. Born, East Chelmsford, son of Thomas T. and Sarah J. (Pierce) 

French. 
Gay, Edward. Enlisted, prior to Aug. 8, 1862. Co. H, 13th Regt, U. S. Inf. 

(Selectmen's statement, nothing further obtained.) 
Gibney, Owen. Enl., Aug. 15, 1862, mustered in, Nov. 1, 1862, for 3 years. 

Co. G, 3d Regt. Cav. Deserted, Dec. 3, 1862, at New York City. Age, 

21. Married. Residence, Lowell. 
Gilmore, William P. Enl. and mustered in, Nov. 2, 1861, for 3 years. Co. 

L, 3d Regt. Cav. Transferred to Co. K, 3d Veteran Reserve Corps. 

Discharged, Nov. 1, 1864. Age, 18. 
Gray, George A. Enl. and mustered in, Dec. 15, 1863, for 3 years. 7th 

Batt'y. Prior service, Aug. 31, 1862 to June 3, 1863, for 9 months. Co. C, 

6th Regt. Inf. Age, 25. Married. 
Gray, James. Enl. and mustered in, Aug. 9, 1862, for 3 years. Co. I, 3d 

Regt. Cav. Died, July 17, 1863, at New Orleans, La. 
Griffin, Addison. Enl., Aug. 4, 1862, mustered in, Aug. 4, 1862, for 3 years. 

Co. I, 23d Regt. Inf. Killed, Dec. 16, 1862, Battle Whitehall, N. C. 

Age, 26. Married. Residence, Gloucester. 
Griffin, George. Enl. at Vicksburg, Miss., Oct. 12, 1864. Mustered in, 

Oct. 13, 1864. 3d Regt., U. S. Colored Cav. Age, 18. Residence, 

Woodville, Miss. 
Griffin, James. Enl. and mustered in, Dec. 2, 1864, for 3 years, Co. K, 

58th Regt. Inf. Discharged, June 22, 1865, by order War Dept. Age, 18. 

Residence, Wrentham. 
Hannaford, William Nelson. Drafted and mustered in, July 11, 1863, for 

3 years. Co. G, 32d Regt. Inf. Mustered out, June 29, 1865. Age, 20. 

Single. Born, Billerica, son of Ira N. and Emily (Durant) Hannaford. 

Name given on roll, William H. Hannaford. 
Hathaway, Solon A. Enl. and mustered in, Dec. 2, 1861, for 3 years. 1st 

Co. Unattached, and Co. L, 3d Regt. Cav. Discharged, June 14, 1862, 

for disability. Age, 18. 
Hemminway, Jim. Enl. and mustered, March 8, 1865, at Hilton Head, S. C. 

Served in 103d Regt., U. S. Colored Troops. Age, 30. Residence, 

Florence, South Carolina. 
Herbert, Jacob. Enl. and mustered in, Aug. 6, 1864, for 3 years. Co. L, 

5th Regt. Cav. (Colored). Mustered out, Oct. 31, 1865, as absent sick. 

Age, 23. Married. Residence, Taunton. 
Hildreth, Benjamin M. Enl., July 25, 1862, mustered in, Aug. 5, 1862, for 

3 years. Co. G, 33d Regt. Inf. Corpl., Aug. 6, 1864. Mustered out, 

June 11, 1865. Age, 36. Married Mary Clogston. Born, Chelmsford, 

son of Moses and Eliza (Murdock) Hildreth. 
Hildreth, George V. Enl. and mustered in, Sept. 26, 1861, for 3 years. Corpl., 

Co. E, 26th Regt. Inf. Discharged, Sept. 11, 1862, as Private, for 

disability. Age, 23. Married Maria J. . Son of Moses and Eliza 

(Murdock) Hildreth. Born, Chelmsford. 
Holt, Abner Dumont. Enl., Aug. 30, 1862, mustered in, Aug. 31, 1862, for 

9 months. Sergt., Co. K, 6th Regt. Inf. Mustered out, June 3, 1863. 

Age, 23. Single. 
Holt, Henry H. Enl. and mustered in. May 25, 1861, for 3 years. Co. A, 

2d Regt. Inf. Discharged, May 28, 1864. Expiration of service. 

Subsequent service, 6th Regt. Inf., for 100 days. Age, 20. Single. 
Hoyt, Charles N. Enl. and mustered in. May 25, 1861, for 3 years. Co. A, 

2d Regt. Inf. Discharged, April 23, 1863, for disability. Age, 20. 

Single. Residence, Lowell. 
Hoyt, Reuben G. Enl. and mustered in, Dec. 21, 1863, for 3 years. 7th 

Mass. Batt'y- Mustered out, Nov. 10, 1865. Age, 27. Married. 

Residence, Lowell. 
Humphrey, John. Enl., Aug. 25, 1862, mustered in, Aug. 31, 1862, for 9 

months. Co. D, 6th Regt. Inf. Mustered out, June 3, 1863. Age, 32. 

Married. 



384 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

Hunter, Joel Aclon. Enl. and mustered in, July 2, 1861, for 3 years. Co. C, 

16th Regt. Inf. Wounded at Fair Oaks, June 21, 1862. Discharged, 

Oct. 3, 1862, disability. Enl., Dec. 30, 1863. Mustered in, Jan. 2, 1864, 

for 3 years. 11th Light Batt'y. Mustered out as Corpl., June 16, 1865. 

Age, 20. Single. Born, Tyngsboro, son of Joel, Jr., and Judith (Carkin) 

Hunter. 
Hunter, Winfield S. Enl., Aug. 1, 1862. Mustered in, Aug. 11, 1862, for 

3 years. Co. E, 33d Regt. Inf. Mustered out, June 11, 1865. Age, 18. 

Residence, Tyngsboro. Son of Joel and Judith (Carkin) Hunter. 
Ingalls, Henry Harrison. Enl., Aug. 30, 1862. Mustered in, Aug. 31, 1862, 

for 9 months. Co. K, 6th Regt. Inf. Mustered out, June 3, 1863. 

Mustered in, July 17, 1864, for 100 days. Co. B, 6th Regt. Inf. Died, 

Oct. 26, 1864, at Chelmsford. Age, 21, and 23. Single. Born, Lowell. 

Son of Joseph and Eliza (Curtis) Ingalls. 
Jackson, James. Enl. and mustered in, Oct. 11, 1861, for 3 years. Co. A, 

26th Regt. Inf. Discharged, Oct. 16, 1862, for disability. Age, 18. 
Jenkins, John. Enl. and mustered in, Nov. 28, 1864, for 1 year. Co. G, 5th 

Regt. Cav. (Colored). Mustered out, Oct. 31, 1865, as absent sick. 

Age, 38. Single. Residence, Robertson, Maine. 
Jewett, Nelson E. Enl. and mustered in, Aug. 31, 1862, for 9 months. Co. 

K, 6th Regt. Inf. Mustered out, June 3, 1863. Age, 23. Single. 
Johnson, William A. Enl. and mustered in. May 4, 1864, for 3 years. Co. A, 

26th Regt. Inf., musician. Discharged, May 23, 1865, disability. Age, 

18. Single. Residence, Vermont. 
Jones, Frank N. P. Drafted and mustered in, July 17, 1863, for 3 years. 

Co. F, 32d Regt. Inf. Died, Sept. 16, 1864, prisoner of war, Anderson- 

ville, Ga. Age, 21. Married. Roll says residence, Chelmsford, credit, 

Fitchburg. Selectmen's book says "Substitute." Was drafted at 

Greenfield. Letter W. D. 
Juggins, William. Enl. and mustered in, Dec. 8, 1864, for 1 year. 6th Mass. 

Batt'y. Mustered out, Aug. 7, 1865. Age, 18. Residence, Cambridge. 
Kearns, James. Enl. and mustered in, Dec. 7, 1864, for 1 year. 6th Mass. 

Batt'y. Mustered out, June 5, 1865. Age, 18. Residence, Boston. 
Kelly, Daniel. Enl., Aug. 13, 1862. Mustered in, Nov. 1, 1862, for 3 years. 

Co. G, 3d Cav. Deserted, Nov. 6, 1862, at New York City. Age, 21. 

Single. Residence, Lynn. 
Kirwan, Michael. Enl. and mustered in, April 28, 1864, for 3 years. Co. A, 

2d Regt. Inf. Never joined Regiment. Age, 22. Married. Residence, 

Newburg, N. Y. 
Lamphere, Albion J. Enl. and mustered in, Oct. 14, 1861, for 3 years. Co. E, 

26th Regt. Inf. Re-enlisted, Feb. 1, 1864. Credit, Acton. Mustered 

out,_ Aug. 26, 1865. Age, 21. Single. Born, Lebanon, N. H., son of 

Levi and Mary (Sawyer) Lamphere. 
Lamphere, George B. Enl., Jan. 1, 1862. Co. C, 30th Regt. Inf. Re- 
enlisted, Jan. 1, 1864. Credit, Lowell. Died, at Winchester, Va., Oct. 

21, 1864, of wounds in Battle of Cedar Creek. Age, 25. Married. 

Born, Lebanon, N. H., son of Levi and Mary (Sawyer) Lamphere. 
Lamphere, Levi, Jr. Enl. and mustered in, Sept. 2, 1861, for 3 years. Co. 

E, 26th Regt. Inf. Re-enlisted, Jan. 1, 1864. Mustered out, Aug. 26, 

1865. Age, 19. Single. Born, Lebanon, N. H., son of Levi and Mary 

(Sawyer) Lamphere. 
Lapham, Edward Everett. Enl., Aug. 30, 1862. Mustered in, Aug. 31, 1862, 

for 9 months. Co. K, 6th Regt. Inf. Mustered out, June 3, 1863. 

Enl. and mustered in, July 17, 1864, for 100 days. Co. B, 6th Regt. Inf. 

Appointed Corpl. Mustered out, Oct. 27, 1864. Age, 21 and 23. 

Single. Born, Littleton, son of William and Elizabeth (Creasy) Lapham. 
Lapham, Nathan Brown. Enl., Aug. 30, 1862. Mustered in, Aug. 31, 1862, 

for 9 months. Co. K, 6th Regt. Inf. Mustered out, June 3, 1863. Age, 

23. Single. Born, Groton, son ot William and Elizabeth (Creasy) 

Lapham. 



THE CIVIL WAR, 1861-5 385 

Lawrey, James. Enl. and mustered in, Aug. 6, 1864, for 3 years. First 

Heavy Art'y- Unassigned. Deserted, Sept. 4, 1864. Age, 25. Single. 

Residence, Hingham. 
Lewis, James. Mustered in, Jan. 16, 1863, to U. S. Service, for 3 years. 

(Certificate of Asst. Adjt. Genl., Jan. 20, 1863.) Nothing further obtain- 
able. Credited, Chelmsford. 
Lynch, Michael. Enl. and mustered in, Nov. 30, 1864, for 1 year. Co. G, 

61st Regt. Inf. Mustered out, July 16, 1865. Prior service as Michael 

Barrett, Co. K, 59th Regt. Inf. Deserted, Aug. 20, 1864. Age, 21. 

Residence, Boston. 
Lyons, Stephen. Enl. and mustered in, April 23, 1864, for 3 years. 5th 

Alass. Batt'y. Deserted. Never joined Battery. Age, 23. Single. 

Residence, Lowell. 
Marr, William. Enl. and mustered in, Dec. 17, 1864, for 1 year. 7th Mass. 

Batt'y- Mustered out, Nov. 10, 1865. Age, 21. Single. Residence, 

Lowell. 
Martin, Michael. Enl. and mustered in, Aug. 20, 1864, for 3 years. 1st 

Heavy Art'y- No further record. Age, 30. Single. Residence, 

Boston. 
Marvis, Frank. Enl. and mustered in, July 28, 1863, for 3 years. Co. K, 

13th Regt. Inf. Substitute. Deserted, Aug. 22, 1863. Sentenced to 

Prison during war. Dishonorably disch. Age, 21. Residence, (i*). 
Masterson, Michael. Enl., Sept. 18, 1862. Mustered in, Oct. 27, 1862, for 

3 years. Co. H, 3d Regt. Cav. Discharged, Feb. 20, 1863. Disability. 

Age, 21. Single. Residence, Lowell. 
McAlier, Joseph. Enl., Jan. 4, 1864. Mustered in, Jan. 19, 1864, for 3 

years. Co. G, 59th Regt. Inf. Mustered out, July 12, 1865. Age, 27. 

Single. 
McCabe, John T. Enl. and mustered in, Oct. 7, 1861, for 3 years. Co. D, 

.30th Regt. Inf. Died, Nov. 14, 1862, at New Orleans, La. Age, 36. 

Married. Residence, given on roll, Lowell. Should be Chelmsford. 
McDermott, Thomas. Enl and mustered in, Jan. 2, 1864, for 3 years. Co. 

B, 17th Regt. Inf. Mustered out, July 11, 1865. Age, 30. Married. 

Residence, Chelmsford. Credit, Charlestown. 
McEneany, John. Enl., Aug. 30, 1862. Mustered in, Aug. 31, 1862, for 9 

months. Co. K, 6th Regt. Inf. Mustered out, June 3, 1863. Age, 21. 

Single. Born, Ireland. 
McEneany, Patrick. Mustered in, July 23, 1861, for 3 years. Co. E, 17th 

Regt. Inf. Discharged, Dec. 2, 1861. Disability. Age, 28. Married. 

Residence given on roll, Georgetown. Selectmen's statement of men 

in service, Aug. 26, 1862, has name. 
McEneany, Peter. Enl., Aug. 16, 1862. Mustered in, Aug. 16, 1862, for 3 

years. Co. I, 20th Regt. Inf. Killed in action, Dec. 11, 1862, at 

Fredericksburg. Age, 19. Single. Born, Ireland. 
McEnnis, Edward. Enl. and mustered in, Sept. 10, 1861, for 3 years. Co. D, 

26th Regt. Inf. App. Corpl., Dec. 22, 1862. Sergt., Jan. 24, 1864. 

Discharged, April 22, 1865. Age, 22. Single. Born, Ireland, son of 

Philip and Roseanna (Farley) McEnnis. Died, W. Chelmsford, Apr. 

29, 1893. 
McEnnis, James. Enl. and mustered in, Sept. 17, 1861, for 3 years. Corpl., 

Co. B, 30th Regt. Inf. Re-enlisted, Jan. 1, 1864. Wounded, Oct. 19, 

1864. Battle Cedar Creek. Discharged, July 27, 1865. Disability. 

Age, 19. Single. Born, Ireland, son of Philip and Roseanna (Farley) 

McEnnis. Died, West Chelmsford, June 5, 1882. 
McGregor, James. Enl., July 23, 1864. Veteran Reserve Corps. Prior 

service in 30th Regt. Age, 46. Born, Scotland. 
McGuire, John. Enl. and mustered in, Nov. 28, 1864, for 3 years. 1st 

Heavy Art'y. Discharged, Dec. 28, 1864. Rejected Recruit. Age, 28. 

Residence, Boston. 
McGuire, Thomas. Enl. and mustered in, Dec. 10, 1864. 7th Mass. Batt'y. 

Mustered out, Oct. 13, 1865. Age, 18. Residence, Freetown, N. B. 



386 HISTORY OF CHELMSFORD 

Mcintosh, George. Enl. and mustered in, Nov. 29, 1864, for 1 year. 6th 
Mass. Batt'y. Mustered out, Aug. 7, 1865, as Artificer. Prior service 
in Co. E, 7th Regt. Inf. Mustered in, June 15, 1861. Discharged, 
April 17, 1863, for disability. Age, 32. Residence, Dorchester. 

McKeever, John. Enl., April 28, 1864. Mustered in, April 28, 1864, for 3 
years. 2d Regt. Inf. Recruit. Never joined Regiment. Age, 34. Resi- 
dence, Baltimore. 

Mealey, Richard. Enl. and mustered in, Dec. 19, 1863, for 3 years. 7th 
Mass. Batt'y. Mustered out, Nov. 10, 1865. Age, 36. Married. 

Moran, John. Enl., Aug. 22, 1862. Mustered in, Sept. 4, 1862, for 3 years- 
Drummer, Co. C, 3d Cav. Discharged, Feb. 19, 1863, for disability- 
Age, 17. Son of Michael and Jane Moran. Roll gives residence, 
Roxbury. 

Morgan, Charles C. Mustered in, July 25, 1864, for 100 days. Co. B, 5th 
Regt. Inf. Mustered out, Nov. 16, 1864. Age, 21. 

Morrissey, James. Enl. and mustered in, Nov. 30, 1864, for 3 years. Co. C, 
1st Heavy Art'y- Mustered out, June 18, 1865. Age, 28. Single. 
Residence, Boston. 

Murphy, Daniel. Enl. and mustered in, Oct 31, 1861, for 3 years. Co. B, 
30th Regt. Inf. Re-enlisted, Jan. 1, 1864. Corpl., Aug. 5, 1864. 
Mustered out, July 5, 1866. Age, 27. Married. 

Murphy, James. Substitute. Mustered, July 24, 1863, Co. A, 13th Inf., 
for 3 years. Transferred to Navy, April 16, 1864. 

Murphy, William. Enl., April 28, 1864, for 3 years. Co. G, 2d Regt. Inf. 
Mustered out, July 14, 1865. Age, 21. Single. Residence, Phila- 
delphia 

Murray, Timothy. Enl. and mustered in. May 6, 1864, for 3 years. Co. D, 
26th Regt. Inf. Mustered out, Aug. 26, 1865. Age, 18. Residence, 
Lowell. 

Neiman, Henry. Enl. and mustered in, Aug. 9. 1864, for 3 years. Co. C, 
2d Cav. Mustered out, Aug. 1, 1865, as absent sick. Age, 40. Single. 
Residence, Hanover. 

Nevens, George H. Enl., Jan. 4, 1864, 15th Batt'yi for 3 years. Rejected, 
Jan. 7, 1864, Rejected recruit. 

Noonan, Michael. Enl., Sept. 14, 1861. Co. E, 26th Regt. Died, Sept. 
19, 1863, at New Orleans. Age, 30. 

Osgood, George A. Enl. and mustered in, Aug. 9, 1862, for 3 years. Co. A, 
33d Regt. Inf. Corpl., Aug. 12, 1863. Mustered out, June 11, 1865. 
Age, 19. 

Parkhurst, Alfred Gilman. Enl. and mustered in, Aug. 31, 1862, for 9 months. 
Co. C, 6th Regt. Inf. Mustered out, June 3, 1863. Age, 24. Single. 
Born, Dunstable, son of Americus and Sally (Roby) Parkhurst. 

Parkhurst, Amos A. Enl., Aug. 30, 1862. Mustered in, Aug. 31, 1862, for 
9 months. Co. K, 6th Regt. Inf. Mustered out, June 3, 1863. Age, 
19 Single. Born, Chelmsford, son of Amos and Mary J. (Durgin) 
Parkhurst. 

Parkhurst, Charles W. Enl. and mustered in, Sept. 5, 1861, for 3 years. 
Corpl., Co. E, 26th Regt. Inf. Sergt., Sept. 14, 1863. Re-enlisted, 
Jan. 1, 1864. Mustered out, Aug. 26, 1865. Age, 22. Single. Born, 
Chelmsford, son of Rev. John and Celia (Burrows) Parkhurst. 

Parkhurst, George Adams. Enl., Aug. 30, 1862. Mustered in, Aug. 31, 

1862, for 9 months. Co. K, 6th Regt. Inf. Mustered out, June 3, 

1863. Mustered in, July 17, 1864, for 100 days. Corpl., Co. B, 6th 
Regt. Inf. Mustered out, Oct. 27, 1864. Age, 29. Single. Born, 
Chelmsford, son of Solomon and Lucina (Adams) Parkhurst. 

Parkhurst, John 3d. Enl., Aug. 30, 1862. Mustered in, Aug. 31, 1862, for 
9 months. Co. K, 6th Regt. Inf. Mustered out, June 3, 1863. Age, 
35. Married. Born, Chelmsford, son of Rev. John and Celia (Burrows) 
Parkhurst. 



THE CIVIL WAR, 1861-5 387 

Patch, William T. Musician, Co. D, 6th Regt., for 3 months. Was not 
mustered in. Wounded at Baltimore, April 19, 1861. Age, 27. Born, 
Tyngsboro, son of Asa and Mary (Tyng) Patch. 

Pearson, Oscar. Enl. and mustered in, Feb. 10, 1864, for 3 years. Musician, 
Co. F, 2d Regt. Inf. Mustered out, July 14, 1865. Age, 18. 

Perham, Henrv Spalding. Enl., Aug. 30, 1862. Mustered in, Aug. 31, 1862, 
for 9 months. Corpl., Co. K, 6th Regt. Inf. Discharged, at Suffolk, 
Va., March 17, 1863. Disability. Loss of sight, right eye. Mustered 
in, July 17, 1864, for 100 days. Corpl., Co. B, 6th Regt. Inf. Mustered 
out, Oct. 27, 1864. Age, 18. Born, Chelmsford, son of David and 
Eleutheria (Waite) Perham. 

Pierce, John. Enl., Aug. 30. Mustered in, Aug. 31, 1862, for 9 months. 
Co. K, 6th Regt. Inf. Mustered out, June 3, 1863. Age, 18. Born, 
Chelmsford, son of Stephen and Mary Pierce. 

Pierce, Jonas V. Enl., June 25, 1862. Mustered in, Aug. 5, 1862, for 3 
years. Co. G, 33d Regt. Inf. Died, June 21, 1863, at Washmgton, 
D. C. Age, 22. Single. 

Pike, Albert E. Enl. and mustered in, Sept. 5, 1861, for 3 years. Co. E, 
26th Regt. Inf. Discharged, Nov. 22, 1862, to join Regular Army, Co. 
C, 2d Regt. U. S. Art'y. Died, Aug. 17, 1863, at Chelmsford. Age, 
18. Son of Joseph F. and Eliza Pike. 

Pike, William H. Served in Navy five years, from 1858 to 1863. Re-enhsted 
in Regular Army, Co. C, 6th Regt., U. S. Cavalry. Selectmen's statement, 
Aug., 1864, at Adjt. Gen. Office. (See Navy). Enl., Jan. 3, 1857, in 
3d U. S. Artillery, for 5 years. Discharged, Jan. 3, 1862, and Enl. in 
6th U. S. Cav., Jan. 18, 1862, for 3 years. Discharged, as 1st Sergt., 
Jan. 18, 1865. (Statement of Pike, Mch. 21, 1899.) 

Popples, Daniel. Enl. and mustered in, Aug. 6, 1864, for 3 years. Co. L, 
4th Regt. Cav. Corpl., Sept. 28, 1864. Sergt., June 12, 1865. Mustered 
out, June 12, 1865. Age, 30. Single. Residence, New York City. 

Post, Cornelius H. Enl. and mustered in, Aug. 5, 1864, for 1 year. Co. N, 
2d Heavy Art'y. Transferred, Dec. 16, 1864, to 17th Mass. Regt. Inf. 
Died in hospital, at Beaufort, N. C. Age, 42. Single. Residence, 
Patterson, N. J. 

Proctor, Josiah Kendall. Enl., Dec. 3, 1863. Mustered in, Dec. 22, 1863, 
for 3 years. Co. K, 2d Regt. Heavy Art'y. Mustered out, Sept. 3, 
1865. Age, 18. Born, Chelmsford, son of Calvin and Honora (Peckins) 
Proctor. 

Proctor, Milo J. Enl., Aug. 30, 1862. Mustered in, Aug. 31, 1862, for 9 
months. Co. K, 6th Regt. Inf. Discharged, Nov. 16, 1862, for dis- 
ability. Age, 21. Singl