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Full text of "History of the city of Altoona and Blair County : including sketches of the shops of the Pennsylvania Railroad Co."

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A GLIMPSE OF ALTOONA. 



HISTORY 



— OF THE- 




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BLAIR COUNTY. 



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PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD CO. 



Edited by Jas. H. Ewing and Harry Slep. 



altoona, pa. 
harry slep's' mirror printing house, , 



d880. 



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THE NEW YORK 

i PUBLIC LIBRARY 

1 93928 

ASTOR, LENOX AND 
TILDEN FOUNDATIONS. 



Entcrcil .■ic'cordintj to Act of Conifress, in the ycai' isso. ])y Hurry Slcii, in the ofHc*' 
of the Libruiiiui of (.'ongress, iit Wu^liington, 1). C. 



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Preface. 



A book without a })reface is considorcd iiicoiiipluti'. So is a shij) 
without a fiii-ure-head. In either case the affixture is more (»nia- 
mental than useful. A book without a preface is nevertheless a l»0(»k, 
and a ship without a figure-head is nevertheless a ship. Xotwith- 
standing this, in conformity to a custom which has existed from tiini- 
immemorial, and remembering that custom makes law, and that law 
must be obeyed, we submit the following preliminary remarks : 

Before commencing the preparation of a history of any jtarticidar 
locality, a city or county for instance, the custom has been to call 
upon leading .citizens, and particularly property owners, for rontribu- 
tions of money to aid the project, the })resumption being that tiie 
publication cannot fail to result in benefit to the community. Xo 
one designing to assume the position of publisher, unless he has nmri' 
wealth than he knows how. otherwise, to dispose of. or is a liti-rarv 
gentleman of "elegant leisure," fond of sccjul;- liis name in print, feels 
like solely depending upon the incoinc derived from tlie siile of tin- 
book as remuneration for the exi)enditure of time, money and lalior 
to which he would subject himself; for it must !)<■ i-euiembered that 
the sale of such a book, with but trifling exceptions, is eonlined to 
the immediate locality in which it is ])ublished. anfl. coiise(|ueMtly Imt 
a limited number is demanded. When c<>iitrii»utions have been ol>- 
tained, uidess very liberal, the ])rice of the bonk is geiierallv fixed at 
double the amount charLi'cd foi- |tnbliciitions of corresponding .»i/e, 
quality (tf pap<'r, binding, etc.. iiud thus jilaced lieyond the i-eacli of 
many of the jioorer classes. 

In order to avoid the necessity of calling upon citizens for contri- 
butions in money, and. ;U the same time to enable iis to place the 
book Avithin the reach of all. as well as to secure for ourselves a rea.'^- 



4 PHEFACE. 

onal)le remuneration for laI)or and outlay of caintal, we adopted the 
plan of calling- upon increhants and other business men for advertis- 
ing- patronag-e, believing- that to them, by publieity given, we could 
render an ecpiivalent for the amount expended. They lil)erally re- 
sponded, as will be seen by the uumber of announcements, and Ave 
take this occasion to return our thanks. 

As will be observed the advertisements do not interfere with tiie 
text of the Ijook. It is true that the arrangement of nnxtter is some- 
what different from the cour.se usually |)ursued by publishers, but the 
history is just as complete in itself as it would have been had not a 
single advertisement made its a])pearance. Indeed the business an- 
nouncements make the l)Ook more interesting, for, by this means, if 
no other, the reader is enabled to disceri) wlio the Avide-awake busi- 
ness men are, and such as arc^ possessed of sullicient pul)lic spirit, as 
citizens, to aid in enterprises w hich result in g-ood to the community. 

This book is not perfect — no nnin (!ver saw one that was — but wo 
console ourselves with the reflection that we did the best we could 
under the circumstances, sparing- neither labor, time nor expense in 
getting at the facts underlying- the subjects treated. 

As menilxa's of this community, and feeling a deep and altiding- 
interest in its prosperity and future advancement, we liope the facts 
and statements we have given will be well received l)v the public, 
and will .serve to abridge the labor of future historians. 

We are under many obligations to Mr. Ij. P. Farmer, the efficient 
and polite General Passenger Agent of the Pennsylvania Railroad 
company, for favors extended to us. 

PUBLISHERS. 



ALTOONA<>]lNDoBLAIR«COUNTY. 



Introduction. 



In a restricted sense, leaving out tlie ('ii.-|iiirit y of ye!u>, tlie life 
■of a city is like tlie life of n man. There is iiiijincy, piilertv, jidol- 
e.scence, manhood, old age, and death. AVere ihr live.- of citie.- cii- 
extensive with the lives of men, we might approiH'iiitclv miv that Al- 
toona has pas.^ed through the period of infancy, with it.- imliecijitv, 
helplessness and i)erils. It has not only renehed the iige of puliertv, 
but, from that point has i)assed through the entire period of adolo- 
cence. It has arrived at the age of thirty-one years, adolescence, in 
man, according to Dunglison, closing at tive-and twenty, and, there- 
fore, has fully entered upon a career of vigoi'oii.- nianliood. What :i 
triumph to commence with ! 

THE PATERNAL PARENT OF Al/r(t(»NA. 

Cities, like men, have fathers or founders. I're\ ion- to l.s4!i Al- 
tooiia existed, figuratively speaking, only in an emliryotic condi- 
tion. It was conceived liy the Pennsylvania I'ailroad. and, in th( 
Year iust mentioned, was broutidit fortli a liviiiii' child. 

As we have adopted the allegorical style of writing, w <■ will con- 
tinue it a little further l)v giving a laconic sketch of the liii-th and 
life of the Pennsylvania railroad, the father of Altoona. In tloing 
so we preface it with some general railroad and steam meinoranda. 
the appositeness of which, in this (•onnection, will lie readily per- 
ceiNi'd and appreciated: 

PRIMARY ATTE.MPTS ANT) SUCCESSES. 

Beaumont, an English miner, in the early perioil ol' the Seven- 
teenth century, invented the first railroad (wood tracks), iui w hicli 
coal wagons were drawn by horses. It was built at .\ewcastle-on- 
the-Tvne. The first rails wholly nnide of iron were ea.-t in Kngland. 
in 1T*7<J. In 1754 iron wheels were introduced. A steam engine 
Avas com])leted ])v XcAvconien and Cawley, in 1 7 10. A Cornish 



6 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

miner, In- the uniiie of Savarv, eonstnieted uue in 1*718. In UTO 
James Watt made an improved engine. In 1804, Kiehard Trevitliiek, 
of Corn\vall, constructed a locomotive to run upon liic Mertliyr- 
Tydvil railroad, in AVales. It drew, at the rate of live miles an hour, 
several wagons laden with ten tons of bar iron. In 1814, George 
Stephenson, of England, completed the iirst eflective locomotive, and 
that was not very effective. The " Rocket," which he constructed 
in 1821), succeeding other loconiotivt's he had l)uilt, took a premium 
of £500, offered tty the Liver])ool ct Manchester Railroad conii)any. 
Shortly after, Mr. Seguin, a French eiiu-ineer, introduced loc(»motives 
in France. In Septend)er, ISO'.), the first experimental railroad track 
in the United States was laid hy John Thomson, a civil engineer, of 
Delaware county, Pennsylvania, and constructed undcu- his direction 
by Somerville, a Scotch millwright, for Thos. Leiper, of Philadelphia, 
It was sixty yards in length, and graded to one and one-half inch to 
the ynrd. The gauge was four feet, and the sleepers were eigiit feet 
apart. The experiment Avith a loaded car was so successful that Lei- 
])er had the first jiractical I'ailroad l)uilt in the United States, con- 
structed I'oi- the transportation of stone from his qnarries on Crum 
creek to his landing on I\idley creek, Delaware county, Pennsylva- 
nia, a distance of al)out one mile. It continued in use for a))out nine- 
teen years. The iirst railroad in America over which a locomotive 
was run was that of the Delaware & Hudson Canal company, at 
Ilonesdale, Pennsylvania, to connect their mines with the canal. The 
locomotive was called "The Stowhridge Lion." It was tried on the 
road on the Sth d;iy of August, 18-2',) — found too hea\-v for success- 
fid use on the roadway, was housed up, and finally taken to pieces- 
and destroyed. The first stone on the Raltimore & Ohio railroad was 
laid on the 4th July, 1828, by Charles Carroll, of Carrollton, Mary- 
land. At first the cars were i)roi)elled by sails, afterwards by steam. 
The first locomotive regularly run on that roarl was made by Phineas 
Davis, at ^'ork, Pennsylvania, in iS.'il. The Iirst gauge of railroads 
(as in England) was four feet eight ;ind one-half inches, correspond- 
ing with the width of oi'dinary English wag(ms. 

Content with geitei'al railway memoranda we will now spenk of the 

PENNSYLVANIA RAILUOAl). 

On the l:;th (liiy of April, 1S4(;, an act was pnssed to inc(»rporate 
the Pennsylvjinia [.l:iilro;id eoni])any. The capital was fi.xed at $1,- 
500,000, witli the ])rivileg(' of increasing the same to $10,000,000. 
On Juni' 22, 184(t, books were opene(l for subsci'iptioiis to the stock 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND KLAIR COUNTY. 7 

ill viirinus placfs in the State. Mr. Jolm Ed^-ar Thomson eiitercil 
upon his duties as chief engineer of the road in the earlv part of 
1847. The grading of the first twenty niih-s of the road west of 
Ilarrishurg was let on July 1(>, 1847, and on the 22d of the same 
month fifteen miles east of Pittslnirg were put untU'r contract. On 
I)ecem))er 10, 1852, cars Avere run through from Philadelphia to Pitts- 
burg, connections between the eastern and western divisions being 
formed l)y the use of the Portage road over the mountains, the road 
of the Pennsylvania company not l)eing finished there until Febru- 
ary 15, 1854, when it was formally opened, and the first trains passed 
through Pennsylvania without use of the incline planes, of which 
the Portage consisted. 

PORTA(JE RAILROAP. 

The commencement of the construction of the Alleglieny I'ortagc 
railroad was authorized by an act of the Legislature of Penn.sylvania, 
passed the 21st day of March, 1831. Previous to that time surveys 
of the Allegheny mountains had been made 1)y several eminent eiigi- 
nec'rs, and thes(> surveys had thrown much light on the topography 
of the country through vrhich the railroad was to pass. Sylvester 
Welch was appointed principal engineer of the work by the Board of 
Canal Commissioners, and he organized his locating i)arty, and had 
the tents |)itched near Lilly's null, at the head of the mouiitain l)ranch 
of the Conemaugh, on the 12th day of April, 1831. The locatiiiir 
jiarty, at the Iieginninx, consisted of Sylvester Welch, principal cii'/i- 
iiei'r; Solomon W. Rolierts, principal assistant engineer; I'airick 
(xrifiin, surveyor; and twelve assistants, a.\e me!i and cook. The b'ne 
commenced at the head of the Little Concniau^li and contiinied down 
the valley of that stream to Johnstown, a distance of twenty-one 
miles, whcn-e it connected with the western division of the I'ennsylva- 
nia canal. The western end of the railroad was located on tiic 1 4th 
day of May, 1831. In the month of May, :\I;-. W. .Mihior Roberts 
joined the corps as principal assistant engineer, and traced the Hn-' 
from the turnpike crossing, near the summit of the miiuntain, to 
Lilly's mill, a distance of five miles. The grading a.iid masonry of 
the twenty-six miles were contracted for at Ebensljurg on the 25lh 
of May, and the v»-ork commenced l)y clearing a track one huu<ircd 
and twenty feet wide thvouyh the fore.-t, most of whicii consisted of 
heavy spruce or hemlock timber. The location of the line from the 
turnpike crossing, near the summit of Bhiir's (jaj), ea.stward t.. IImI- 
lidavs1)urti-. a di.-tance of ten and two-thirds miles, was immediately 



S HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND ULAia COL-NTV. 

proceeded with. Tliis i)ai't of the work was U't to contractors on tlie 
29th day of July, 1831, and tlius the. ii'radin,ii' and masonry of tlie 
whole railroad l)ein,ij' thirty-six and two-thirds niilt's in len.^-th, were 
j)iit under contract. The layinu' of the first track, and tiic necessary 
turnouts of edge rails, and of a donhle track of plate railway on in- 
cline i)Ianes, were contracti'd for on the 11th day of Ai)ril, iSoii. 
The work upon the road was proseeuled vigorously ; at one time a 
force e(puil lo two thousand nu'u being e)n])loyed u])on it. and on the 
26th November, 1833, the first track was so advanced as to permit 
the passage of the first car over its entire length. On tlie I8tii of 
March, 1834, the road was opened as a ipiiblic highway, the State fur- 
nishing the power on the incline plane oidy, and it eontini.cd in use 
until the 31st of Decemlx'r, wlim tlic na\ igation of the canals of 
Pennsylvania, which this road connected, was closed for the season. 
The railway was again opened on the 20tli March, lS3o, shortly after 
which the second track of edge raiis wa.-- completed. Oji the 11th of 
May the State began to furnish the whole motive i)ower, locomotive 
engines lieing used on the " long level,'" and this continued until about 
the le.iddio of Decemlier, when the eaiuils were closed l»y ice. 

'IMie Portage road consisted of eleven "levels"' or grade lines, and 
ten incline ])lanes. Thi' ascent from JohnstoAVU to the summit is 
1,1 71, to f<'*-'t ill ii distance of 2(i"o miles. The ([es(ciit from the sum- 
mit to llollidaysbtirg is l,398j;o feet i;i a distance of l(\V'o mile.-. 

There were five incline i)lanes on each side of the mountain, viwy- 
ing in inclination from 4° 9' to 5° 51', or from 7iii;, feet elevation to 
the 100 feet l)ase. They were ur.mbered ea>lwardly, the (Uie nearest 
J(^luislo^,vii Ix'ing Xo. 1, and that being nearest 1 Iol]iday^l)Lirg lieing 
No. 10. A part (if the railway, generally 30(1 fret long at the head 
a)id foot of each plane, was nuide exactly level. The i)Ianes are all 
straight in jilaii, aud also in ])i'otile, except that the angles of eleva- 
tion at the lower {'])(]> were ror.nded oil' by cur\'es. There are s(Une 
miiio]' variations ill the grades on the "levels" made to suit tin- 
ground. I'^roiu the lengths aud heights gi\('n in the following table 
the average grade of each plane may be olitaiued correctly. 

NO. OF PLANE. LENGTH IN FEET. UISE IN FEET. 

IMiuio No. 1 I,fi07.74 150.(Ht 

JMiiiK' No. •-> l.Tiio.i;; i:!'J.40 

J'linic Ni). :; 14S.-J.-) i;!0..i(i 

I'liUif No. 4 '.J. 111.-).'.) I 187.8(; 

Piano N (). ft •i,(;-2.-<.(;(l -iniXA 

JMiiiu' No. (i . '-'.Tl.i.s.-) 'iCC.iid 

I'liliu" No. 7 '2.(i.V).(ll 'i;(i..-)ll 

Tlioic \o. s .'S.lKi.'.i-J ;il»7.()i> 

IMiliH^ No. ;i 'J.7-ii'.SII 1S.!».)0 

I'Uoic No. I(t 'J,-J!ri.(;j ISO.-'i-J 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 9 

The cmbaiikiucnts wore made 25 feet wide on top, and the bed of 
the road in extavation.s was 25 feet with side ditches. Sixty-ei<i-ht cul- 
verts of masonry, the sum of the spans of which is 494 feet, passed 
under the road, besides eighty-five drains of dry masonry of from 
two t(j five feet span. There were four viaducts of hammer dressed 
.stone; the first and larger was over the Conemaugh, at "Horse-shoe 
Bend," about eight miles from Johnstown. This had a single 
semi-circular arch of 80 feet span, and the top of the masonry was 
70 feet al)ove the surface of the water. The whole cost of this work 
was $54,502.24, and by Iniilding it a lateral l^'nd of about two miles 
was avoided. There were two viaducts over the branches of the 
Conemaugh, each of 40 feet span, one over the Juniata at Holli- 
daysburg having two arches of 33 feet span, which vary 35 degrees 
from a right angle with the abutments. There was a tunnel through 
a spur of the mountain, at the head of plane Xo. 1, about four miles 
from Johnstown. This tunnel was 001 feet long and 20 feet wide 
by 19 feet high within the arch. It was arched for 150 feet at each 
end, and the entrance furnished with facades of cut stone. The 
whole cost of the tunnel was S3T, 498.85. The edge rails u.sed were 
parallel rails of rolled iron, weighing 40 pounds per lineal yard. 
They were supported by cast-iron chairs, which weighed on an average 
13 pounds each. The rail was secured in each chair by one iron 
wedge. The stone blocks which support the chairs contained 3^ cubic 
feet each, and were imljedded in broken stone, at a distance of 3 feet 
from centre to centre. On part of the road the chairs were laid upon 
a timber foundation, and on the incline plane and along the canal 
basins, at the terniiiuition of the road, flat rails upon timl)er M'cre used. 
At tlie head of each incline plane there were 2 stationary steam en- 
gines, of 35 hor.se-power each, which gave motion to the endless 
rope to wliich the cars were attached. Only one engine was used at 
a time, but two were provided to prevent delay from accidents. Four 
cars, each loaded with T,o60 pounds, could be drawn u]^. and four be 
let down at the same time, and from six to ten such trips made in an 
hour. The machineiw was simple and effective in its construction, 
and was superintended l)y Edward Miller, as pi-incipal assistant engi- 
neer. A safety car attended the other cars, both ascending and de- 
scending, and stopped them in case of accident to the rope. The 
credit of this contrivance was due to Mr. Welch, principal engineer. 
The grubbing and clearing of the road, a difficult piece of workman- 
ship, cost $30,524. The grading of the road, including grubbing, and 
cleaning, and all other work done under contracts for grading cost 



10 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUXTV. 

$472,102,595. This work includecl ao7,2:iU cubic yards of coiunioii 
excavation; 212,034 of slate or detached rock; 56(5,932 of hard pan 
or indurated clay ; 210,724 of solid rock; 14,857 solid rock in tunnel, 
at $1.47 per yard ; 967,060 cuhic yards of embankment carried over 
100 feet ; 37,327 perches of s]o]>e wall, of 25 cubic feet; 13,342 perclves 
vertical sl(»pe wall in drains, the viaducts, culverts and brid,ires in- 
cluded. Plane Xo. 6 contained 28,368 jjerches of masonry. For the 
first track there vrere delivered 50,911 stone blocks, which cost $27,- 
072.15; 508,901 feet lineal of 6x8, and 2,842 feet 12x12 inch timber, 
which cost $17,1 84.50. The amount done imder the contracts for 
"layin.u-" railway amounted to $135,776.2(;. 

All of the iron rails were imported from Great Britain, by A. cV 
G. Kalston, I'hiladelphia, and also part of the chairs, spikes and 
wedges for the iirst track. The total cost of IJritish iron at Phila- 
delphia, imported for the first track, was $118,888.36. The aggregate 
cost of all work done, and materials furnished under contract, for the 
first track complete, was $430,716,591-. For the second track, there 
Avere imported 16,i)76 bars of edge rails, each 18 feet long, wh.icli 
weiglied 1,S()3 tons and 1,400 pounds gross, and cost, at Philadelphia, 
$43.51 iier ton. The aggregate cost (*f all W(n'k done and materials 
furnished, under contract, for the seeoml track, was $363,937.05-g-. 
The aggregate cost of the ten stationary engines, houses, sheds, 
dwellings, water piin's, ropes, etc., was $151, 923. 30^. The tutal cost 
of the Portage railroad was $1,634,357.69. But this does not include 
office expenses, engiiu'ering, or the extra allowance to eonti'aetors Ijy 
the Legislature after the work was completed. Four locomotive en- 
gines were useil ini 1lic "long ]e\'e]." 

Fifty thous-and tons of freight and twenty thousand passi'Ugers 
passed over the road during the season of 1835. 

I50AT TARKN OVKR THE ALLEGIIKNY Mol NTAINS. 

In his History of Caml)ri:i Coujity, puljlished nearly half a eeii- 
lui'v ago, Mr. Sherman Day refers to the first boat taken over the 
Allegheny mountains, in Octobei', 18:]4, on the Portage railroad. 
Jle says: "Jesse Chrisjuan, from the Lae];av;aniia. a ti'ilmtary of the 
nortii branch of the Sus(piehaniia, loaded hi> boat, 'Hit or Mis.-,' with 
his Avife, ehildi'cn, beds and himily accommodations, with pigeinis and 
other live stock, and started for Illinois. At Ilollidaysljurg, w here 
lie e.xpeclcfl to sell his boat, il was suggested by .lohn Dougherty, of 
the Ilelianec Tran<]>oriat ion line, that the whole concern could be 
f^afelv hoisted ovi'r the mountain, and set alioat aiiain in the canal. 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 11 

Mr. Dou<i-licrty i)rci)ared a railroad car calciihitcd to licar the novel 
l)ur(lcii. Tlic boat was takon from its proper olciiu-nt, placed on 
wheels, and, nndev the siijierintendence of Major (\ Williams, the 
l)oat and caru'o at noon on the same day heji'an their i)rogTess over 
the rugged Alleg-heny. All this was done without disturlnng the 
family arrangements of cooking, sleeping, etc. They rested a night 
on the to|) of the mountain, like Xoah's ark on Ararat, and descended 
next morning into the valley of the Mississippi, and sailecl for St. 
Louis." 

OUADUAL ASCENT OF THE PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD. 

The road commences a gradual ascent at Harrishurg wheic it i> 
810 feet above tide, and rises regularly. At Lewistown it is -ISO 
feet al)ove tide; at Huntingdon, (510 feet; at Tyrone, S8(j feet ; at 
Altoona, 1,108 feet. Up to this })oint the heaviest gradient per mile 
has not exceeded -21 feet. A short distance west of Altoona this 
gradient is increased to 1)5 feet per mile on straight lines, and H'l feet 
per mile on curves. Thus, ascending, it reaches its culminating i»oint 
at the west end of the great tunnel, Avhere its altitude al)Ove tide is 
2,101 feet. The highest gradient west of the tunnel is 52/o feet per 
anile, and the average gradient on that end is 2f'i'o leet )>i'i' mile. At 
Johnstown the elevation above tide is 1,184 feet ; at Greensburg. 
1,090 feet, and at Pittsburg 748 feet, 1>eing 438 feet higher at its 
Avestern terminus than at Harrisburg, where it commences to over- 
come the barrier ])resented by the mountains. 

SUMMARY OF ITS PROGRESS. 

The rise and progress of tlie renn>yl\ ania railroad is wonderful. 
At first but a link in the chain of intercommnnicatioii Itctween i'hil- 
adelphia and Pittsliurg, it lias l)ecome the greatest highway oftraxcl 
and traffic on the face of the earth. The road and its connections 
permeate all sections of the country. To transact its extended an<l 
diversified business the company now owns and runs u|)on its own 
lines upwards of 1,000 locomotives. upAvards (jf 1,000 pa^^enger ears, 
and about 20,000 freight cars. It owns 2,000 miles of comi.li'ted 
road, and controls aljout 5,000 miles more. Its work-lioi)> cover an 
area of more thaii 500 acres. It employs 25, 0(H) men. many of whom 
■are mechanics and experts of the highest skill. It has upwards of 
200 foreign ticket offices and agents (inde])endent of those at its own 
.stations), established in thirteen different States. It has developed 
mines, created numufactories, established commerce, etc. 



12 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 



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AND DONT YOU FORGET IT/ 



STOVES. 



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Tin, Sheet-iron and Copper Ware, 



R()OFIX(i AND SPOUTING PROMPTLY ATTP:X1)I:1) TO. 



Best ^Materials — Lo^vest Prices. 




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No. 1108 Eleventh AA^enue, 



altooxa, pa. 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 1 :> 

On February 2, 1852, Mr. J. Edgar Thomson Avas elected Presi- 
dent of the Penn.sylvania Railroad company. He died on ^[ay 2", 
18T4. The vacancy was filled l)y the election of Thomas A. Scott, 
who had been acting in the capacity of Yice President, since ^[arch 
i, 18()0. It is true, however, that the position Mr. Scott held 
as Yice President was, for a time, merely nominal, for, on August 1, 

1861, he was appointed Assistant Secretary of War. On June 1, 

1862, he resigned this position, and resumed his duties as an officer 
of the road. But, again, in 1863, he was recalled to the War depart- 
ment, l)y Secretary Stanton, and on the 24th September of that 
year was created Colonel and Assistant Quartermaster. After ren- 
dering efficient service to thi' Government for a short time he again 
resumed his railroad duties. 

The prosperity of the Pennsylvania railroad, is mainly attril)uta- 

ble to its management under the direction of J. Edgar Thoms(ui 

and Thomas A. Scott, the latter being ju.stly recognized us the most 

efficient railroad officer in the United States, and, i)rol);il)ly, in the 

world. 

From the thirty-third annual report of the ])oard of directors to 
the stockholders, presented at the meeting held March 9, 1880, we 
learn that the gross earnings of the Pennsylvania railroad division, 
between Pittsburg and Philadelphia, were $21,743,628.31 ; expen.ses, 
$11,751,620.55; net earnings, $9,992,007.76; add interest for invest- 
ments, $2,513,198.21 ; deduct interest on bonded debt, etc., $5,022,- 
725.49— leaving the net income $7,482,480,48. The earnings of the 
United railroads of New Jersey division were $9,784,843.05, and the- 
expenses,$6,500,861.53. After deducting payments on account of in- 
terest, etc., there is a loss of $939,889.00 for the year, against a loss 
of $,136,775.16 for 1878. The Philadelphia and Erie division shows 
(earnings of $3,091,807.81, and expenses of $2,130,258.07. In order 
to provide for the cancellation of $4,970,000 of lirst mortgiige bonds, 
due December 31, 1880, the Board of Directors have caused to lie 
issued $5,000,000 of 5 ])er cent. 1)onds, due in forty years. 

Since the above was written Thomas A. Scott resigneil the i)resi- 
dency of the company, His resignation took eifect on the 1st Juni', 
(1880). George B. Kol)erts, First Yice President, was elected to filF 
the vacancy at a special meeting of the Board of Directors held ..n 
the 5th May. This gentleman began his career of service wiiii \\\<' 
Pennsylvania Railroad company in the spring of 1851 sis a r.xhnaii in 
the engineer corps, and was, during the following summer, promoted 
to the position of assistant engineer in charge of the division on the- 



14 inSTORY OF ALTOONA AM) BLAIU COiU.N'TY. 

suiiiiiiit Dftlic Alk\u-lici)_v iiioiiiitaiii, wliich dixisioii included llic^TCiit 
tunnel. Ill 1S(>9 hv was elected Fouiili Vice President, in 1872 
Second Vice i'fesideiit, and in 1874 First A'ice j'resident. When 
(^.)1. Scott was made rr<'sideiit, Mr. Roberts (as First Vice President) 
had chary-e of all cn.n'inccring- matters coiniected with the construc- 
tion or extension of any of the company's lines, and a ^-eneral super- 
vision over the accounts of the company throu,ii'h the coniplrnller. He 
also aided th«' President in all matters connected with other roads 
leased or controlled l)y the Pennsyhania Slailroad conipanv. On Feh- 
ruary •,}, ]S7n, he was re-elected Secretary and Tre;isui-(r of the \Vest 
Jersey railrcjad^ a position he had held for nine years, and in 187(1 
became President. Mr. Koberts is distinguished ior his conscientious 
devotion to interests intrusted to his care. With liiin railroad engi- 
neerinu' is one of the exact sciences. His tlnirougli training and 
g'reat ex|)erienee have rendered him perfe^'tly familiar with e\-ery- 
thin'4' connected with railwav business. 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNT V. 15 



Blair County. 



BOUNDS, POPULATION, ETC. 

IJlair county, on the novth, is bounded by Centre and Clearfield; 
on the east by Huntingdon ; on the south by Bedford ; on the west 
by Candjria. It is compo.sed of portions of Bedford and Hunting- 
don counties, which were cut off and assigned by an act of the Legis- 
lature of February 26, 184(;. The county was named in honor of 
Mr. John Blair, a prominent, intelligent, and highly esteemed citizeiu 

AVhen the census was taken in 1810 the population of the county 
num))ered 38,051. At this time of writing the census for ISSO has 
not been taken. The work will lie accomplished, howcNcr, before 
this ))Ook will Ik- completed, and the result will appear on a sul)se- 
que-nt page. 

AGRICULTURAL AND MINERAL RESOURCES. 

The land is not noted for its fertility so far as agricultural })r()diict> 
are concerned, excepting a tract of country called "Morrison's Cove," 
a portion of which lies in Blair, which is noted for the i)roduction of 
grain inferior to none in the market ; thi? land lying in close i)roxim- 
it}' to Hollidaysburg, and that comprising "Scotch'' and "Canoe" val- 
le3's. But the mountains produce iron ore in abundance. At the 
time this ore was converted into solid metal I)y means of small cliar- 
coal furnaces, it was taken to Pittsl)urg on wagons, at a cost of $30 
per ton for transportation, making it an expensive avticlc of merchan- 
dise. 

In this connection we feel justified in remarking that Aveve a little 
more energy and enterprise exhibited, the marki't for the excellent 
ores of Blair and adjoining counties would be greatly increased. So 
far as the Pittsburg works are concerned, "Western. Pennsylviinia iron 
enjoys a protective tariff in tlie shape of railroad rates, which would 
give it virtual control of the market. The prices for pig-metal in 
'Cleveland are: Lake Superior, Xo. 1, S12.50 ; do. No. 2, $12; ))rown 
'hermatite, $10. This is about the same quality of ore, l)ut contains 
mor(^ jihosphorus than the ores of Blair and neighboring counties- 
The frei^-ht to Pitt.^lnirg is about Sl.i)0 prr shin-t ton, or $2.25 i)er 
long ton. At this rate our oi'e can be delivered in Pittsburg at about 



H> HrSTORY OF ALTOOXA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 



If you want Batigains, here is the place to> 
^et tliem. We propose to otier Extra Induce- 
ments to our customers for the year 1880, and 
all subsequent years. We shall exert every 
means to spread still further the name of the- 
place where the most o;oods can be bou2;ht for the 
money ; where the clean cash tells the wonderful 
tale of its powerful intluence. — Remember, we- 
talk cash to all — the rich and poor alike. We 
neither ask nor o;ive credit, the interest of which 
is always added to your bill when "I TRUST" 
sells the o;oods. We claim and can prove that 
we 2;ive rnore s;oods for the money. This fact 
we have for the last three years fully demonstrated 
to this community. 



BALTZELL & RQUSS, 

ALTOOJ^A, PA. 



New York Office, 316 Broadway.. 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 17 

;$6.T5 per ton ; less than the l)est ore costs in Cleveland, which. 
Avhen taken to Pittsl)urji-, has the additional cost of freights. As a 
•consequence of this, onr home ores should be introduced in Pittsburg, 
where a good market could be secured. It would l)e well for Blair 
■county miners to think of this matter. 

At present there are eleven furnaces in the county, which, when 
in full l)last, are capal)le of producing ui»\vards of 1,000 tons of iron 
per week, and that, too, of superior qualitf . We append 

A LIST OF THE FURNACES. 

"Allegheny," in Allegheny; " Bennington," in Allegheny; "No. 
•One,"' in llollidaysburg ; "No. Two," in Hollidaysl)urg ; ".Etna," 
in Catharine township; "Springfield," in Woodberry township; 
"Martha," or " Gaj)," in Freedom township; "Rodman," in Taylor 
township; " Frankstown," in Frankstown townshij) ; "Juniata," in 
Juniata townshi]); " Elizal)eth," at Elizabeth Furnace. 

The last-mentioned furnace was but recently re-started, having 
.lain dormant for al)out six years. 

In addition to the aljove iron works there are four rolling niill.- 
.and t^^o nail factories. 

SINKING VALLEY. 

The valley called by this name received notoriety at an early ])e- 
ic'iod, on account of furnishing one of the jjrincipal articles of ain- 
.munition with which the Indians, after getting into possession of 
lire-arms, were in the habit of punishing their enemies, real or sup- 
po.^ed. We allude to lead, which was obtained from mines in that 
locality. But the inint-s had been worked more esi)ecially in the in- 
terest of the American government during a period of the revolu- 
tionary war — that is, for about one year and a half previous to the 
fall of 1179, when the government turned over the mines to pri\ate 
individuals, relieved of all apprehensions as to a sulTiciency of lead 
for the army from large receipts abroad, facilitated by an alliance 
with France. While operations were carried on at the mines liy the 
Government, a garrison was regularly maintained at the fort in the 
neighborhood, which was mounted with two pieces of artillery. The 
miners who received the works ft'om the Government soon al»andoiie(l 
them, and they have never ))een successfully ojwrated since. At 
different times they have been i^tarted, ami in 1.S52 a c()mi)any wa> 
formed in New York, -called the "Sinking Valley Lead Mining Com- 
panv," which promised great things, ])ut in a short time its bublde 



18 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

of prosperity burst, niid the hopes of its stockholders vanished into 
air. 

One hniKh'od years au'o (1*780) Sinking- or Bald Eag-lo valley con- 
tained abont forty families, who li\-ed in log- houses. The planta- 
tions were two or thi-ee miles from each other, so that when dlsa- 
g-reements with Indians occurred they were at their mercy, unable 
to concentrate in time to resist their attacks. 

Sinking- valley is some tftree miles east of Tyrone. For beauty \ 
of scenery, historic interest, and natural cnrio.sities, it deserves to 
take rank amon,g the most interestin.a; ])laces in the United States. 
It is formed l)y a rng-g-ed chain of mountains on tlie east, called Ca- 
noe ridge, and by IJald Eag'le monnt*)in on the west. It is e.\tensiv(^ 
and fertile, containing many highly-improved farms, mills, iron works, 
and an intelligent jiopnlation. 

NATURAL CURIOSITY. 

The g-reat natural cnriosity of this \'alley is Sinking- creek, from 
which it takes its name. This creek emerges from Arch Spring-, and 
then proceeds to lose itself, again and again, as it flows onward. 
Some of the pits through which the creek is visible, are several hun- 
dreds of feet in depth. Many of these openings are seen along- the- 
sinking- stream, wliicli at length ap]iears upon the surface for a short 
distance. It then enters a large cave, through which it flows in ii 
(duinnel about 20 feet wide, for a distance of nun-e than 300 yards, 
when the cave widens, the creek turns, and is plunged into a cavern 
where the waters arc whirled and churned with terrific f(n-ce. Sticks 
and large pieces of timber are immediately carried out of siglit, ])ut 
where they go has never been ascertained, no outlet f(U- the waters 
having been discovered. 

A stream flowing through Tyrone has characteristics somewhat 
similar to this Sinking creek — disappearing- and again reappearing as 
it flows onward. Doubtless these singularities are owing to sOme 
jx'culiar geological formation, as they are again re])eated in Fishing- 
creek, Centre county, some 40 miles northeast of Tyrone. 

A few miles from Arch Spring is a narrow pass, in Tussey'.s 
juountain, which, for the distance of «i mile, is cut like a western 
gulch or ravine through hug-(> rocks rising almost perpendicularly on 
both sides of it to a, consideralde height. 'J'he early settlers named 
tile pass "Water Street,'' and by this title it is often mentitmed in the 
records of cohmial times. 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AXD BLAIR COUNTY. Hi 

LOGAN, A\ INDIAN CHIEF. 

Tlie valley oxtendiii<>- from A Itoona to Tyrone derive;^ its iiaiiie 
from Loti-au, an Indian ehief of the Delaware "persuasion," \vhos6 
identity is sometimes i<i-noi-ant!y merg-ed in that of the Mingo wai-- 
rior who fig-ured so prominently during- an early period of our na- 
tional hist(n-y. His ea])in was located near a larg'c spring-, now with- 
in the limits of Tyrone. In an engagement with a hostile tribe on 
the Susquehanna, Logan, unfortunately, had an eye shot out by au 
arrow. This disfigurement was considered l)y the Indians as a dis- 
grace, and he was deposed froiii his chieftainship. He then came 
with his family to Juniata valley. His friendship for tlie whites was 
sincere, and he rendered them many important .services. After the 
revolution he was deprived of bis lands (where Tyrone now .stands) 
l)y some white men, who purchased them in due form, a proceeding 
the Indian, in his ignorance, had omitted. He moved to the Indian 
town of Chinklacamoose (where Clearfield now stands), and died 
there, one of the Iiest representatives of his race in the Juniata valley. 

THE SCOTCH SETTLE IN FRANKSTOWN AND CATHARINE TOWNSHIPS. 

A portion of Catharine and Frankstown townships constitute the 
Scotch and Canoe valleys, to the fertility of soil of which we have 
already referred. The elder inhaljitants of this part of the county — 
the Moores, Irwins, Crau-fords, Frazier.s, Bells, Stewarts and others 
— were of Scotch descent. 

now AND WHEN TOWNSHIPS WERE FORMED. 

Allegheny was, prior to the formation of Blair county, in 184(5, a 
townshi}) of Huntingdon county. As it then existed it joined Antis 
on the north. In 1852 Logan was formed out of Allegheny and An- 
tis; hence Allegheny is now bounded on the north by Logan, on the 
west I)y Cambria county, on the south ))y Blair and Juniata, and ou 
the east by Frankstown. 

Antis, like Allogheny, was a ])art of Huntingdon county. It is 
said the name is that of a somewhat noted Tory, who resided here 
during- the revolutionary war. In 1852 the southern portion of the 
township was taken from Logan. As Antis now stands it is l)Ounded 
on the north l)y Snyder, on the ea.st by Tyrone, on the south by Lo- 
gan, and on the west by Cambria county. 

Blair came out from Huntingdon county, and surrounds Hollidays- 
burg, the county seat. It was originally taken from Allegheny and 
Frankstown, and, as now organized, is bounded on the north by .\I- 



20 



HISTORY or ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 



FOE THE FINEST 






D 



V 





D 






()() TO — 



JOHN DAILY'S, 

1311 Eleveiitli Avenue, Altoona. 



DEALEll IN 



MTISTS' MSTERIULS, FRAMES, CHROMOS, 

AT CITY PRICES. GIVE HIM A CALL. 

4»-fi!aml:s madi: to oitnER.-'^ 



TEMPLE OF FASHION. 



G. E. ORMES 




D 



Corner 8tli Ax'eiiiie iind ITtli 8trcyt. 



DHV SHAMPOO, HAIR OILS, POMADES, DYES, ETC 
GRIFFIN'S MOUSTACHE SOLUTION. 



MODE Pv ATE PRICES— GOOD WORK—COURTEOUS 
TPvEATMEIS'T EXTENDED TO ALL. 



'7 




SINKING SPRING ARCH, NEAR TYRONE. 



^ 



m 



l^J-' 



/^fTn 



^^o.^'l}^,^^ 



^Of^/Vof^'VO 



i^^^r 



'ONs. 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 21 

feg-heny and Franki^towii, on the east by Frankstuwn and Taylor, on 
the soutli ))y P'rccdom, and on the west liy Alk'g'heny. 

Catharine was part of Morris in Hunting-don county, and became 
a township in 1840 l)y the organization of Blair county. It is 
bounded on tlie north and east by Huntingtlon county, on the soutli 
|jy Woodberry, and on the west by Frankstown and Tyrone. 

Frankstown was a township of Hunting-don county until the for- 
mation of Blair county in 184(5. Some chang-es have since l)een 
made in its l)Oundaries, but none of any importance. As it iu)W 
stands it is bounded on the north by Tyrone and Catharine, on the 
east by Wood)>erry and Huston, on the south by Taylor, and on the 
■west l)y Blair, Allegheny and Logan. 

Freedom originally belonged to Bedford county, and as part of 
Greenfield first in 1847. Juniata was formed out of Greenfit'ld, and, 
in 1851 Freedom was created out of Juniata. Freedom has (Green- 
field on the south, Juniata on the west, Blair on the north, and Tay- 
lor on the east. 

Greenfield, an old township of Bedford county, became jtart of 
Blair county in 1846. Since then both Freedom and Juniata have 
been taken from it. It is bounded on the south l)y Bedford county, 
on the west by Somerset county, on the north l)y Juniata and Free- 
dom, and on the east by Taylor. 

Huston was originally a townshiit of Bedford county. It is 
bounded on the south by Bedford county, on tiie east by Huntingdon 
county, on the north by Woodlx-rry, and on the west l)y Frankstown. 

Juniata, taken from Greenfield, was organized as .i township in 
1847. It has Caml)ria county on the west, Allegheny ou the north. 
Freedom on the east, and Greenfield on the south. 

Logan was formed in 1850 out of Allegheny and Antis, and lies 
around Altoona. It is bounded on the north by Antis, on the east 
by Tyrone and Frank.stown, on the south by Allegheny and on the 
M^est by Cambria county. 

North Woodberry originally belonged to Bedford eon nly. It has 
Bedford county on the south, Taylor on tlie west, Huston on tiie 
north, and Huntingdon county on the east. 

Snyder came from Huntingdon county, and is Ixtuiided on the 
north bv Centre county, on the east by Huntingdon county, on the 
south l)y Antis, and on'the west by Caml)ria county. It has within 
it the liorough of Tyrone. 
3 



22 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

Ta3'lor was formed in 1855 out of North Woodlierry and Huston, 
It has Bedford county on the south, Greenfield, Freedom and Bkxir 
on the west, Frankstown on the north, and Xorth Woodherry on the 
east. 

Tyrone was an old township of Hunting-don county, until incor- 
porated into Blair county in 1846. It has Logan and Antis on the 
west, Snyder on the north, Catharine on the east, and Frankstown 
on the south. 

Woodberry came from Huntingdon county, and has within it the 
town of Williamsburg. It is bounded on the south by Huston, west 
by Frankstown, north l)y Catharine and on the east by Huntingdon 
county. 

To recapitulate — fifteen townships in all — Allegheny, Antis, Blair 
Catharine, Frankstown, Snyder, Tyrone and Woodberry orig-inally 
from Huntingdon county ; Greenfield, Huston and North Woodlx'rry 
from Bedford county ; and Freedom, Juniata, Log-an and Taylor were 
formed since the org-anization of Blair county in 1846. 

EDUCATIONAL IILSTORY. 

We now g-ive an epitome of the educational history of the county,, 
derived from Mr. John H. Stephens, the present efficient Superinten- 
dent of public schools of the county. The educational interests of 
Altoona are sitecifically treated further on. 

In 1809 — no matter what may have been the character of the 
schools up to that time — the first law was enacted tending- toward a 
g-eneral system of public free schools, for the "education of the i)oor 
g-ratis." In 1834 the present law was passed, which has been modi- 
fied at various times. Two schools were established within the i)res- 
ent limits of the county as early as I TOO — our at Williamsburg, the 
other near "Red Ore Bank," on Clover ci-cck. Williamsburg- was 
formerly called Aketown, and Jacob Ake owikmI th(^ land upon which 
it was built. Believing; that the education of the youth in his vicin- 
ity was a matter of importance, Mr. Ake secured teachers and paid 
all the expenses out of his own purse. The system of instruction 
Mr. Ake established lasted fifteen years, when subscription schools 
began. Mr. James Martin taught until 1825. He was followed by 
Messrs. Cassel, li-\in, Opd^'ke and Spencer, and Miss Nancy Ander- 
dersou. The school on Clover creek was taught 1)y John Bridenthal, 
in a house which stood on what is now tlie Hyle farm. John Diltz 
tJiug-ht a school in a private house in the vicinity of Leather Cracker 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 23 

(now Henrietta) about 1795. William Loose, George Glass and - 



Ketring, were among the other teachers who taught in this vicinitv 
during this period. Another school was established near ^Etna Fur- 
nace, at an early day, which was in operation in IT 91. In 1800 the 
house was destroyed by fire, and another to take its place was located 
near Keller's church. James Martin is the only teacher of this .•school 
whose name has been handed down to po.sterity. About 1800 John 
Fisher taught a school in a private house near Sharpsburg, and in 
1802 a school house was built in the same vicinity known as the 
Hauser school. Most of the schools were German. The first English 
school taught in the "Cove" was in 1800, by Mr. Roach, in a hou.'se 
which stood near Roaring Spring. Thomas Kinney taught a school 
near Elizabeth Furnace in 1800. Another school was taught near 
Bell's Mills, in 1809. Alexander Kerr and Dudley Burnham were 
the leading teachers in this community. Sixty-seven years ago John 
Steele taught in a private house in Gaysport. Thomas Stearns, John 
Knox, Joshua Williamson, William Anderson, John Wertz, Robert 
McXamara, Joseph Cadwalder, S. F. Henry and Ephrain Gall)raith 
are among the teachers who taught in Frankstown. (At that time 
Frankstown included the present territory of Allegheny and Blair 
townships.) In 1812, James Langham taught a school near Black's 
Mills, Greenfield township. John Dodson also taught in this neigh- 
borhood. John Swoveland built a school house at his own expense, 
and donated it for school purposes. In 1815 a school house was built 
near Alleuhenv Furnace, called the Beales' school. John Gwin and 

Summerville were among the teachers here. Within the present 

limits of Allegheny township, the first school house with shingle roof 
was l)uilt (in I)uncansville) in 1815. 

Under the act of 1854, creating the office of County Sui)erinlen- 
dent, Hugh A. Caldwell was the first man to serve, with a salary of 
$400. L. H. Williams succeeded him in 1856, and Geo. W. English 
filled tlie office in 1857. John Dean, now President Judge of thi.s- 
Judicial district, was elected in 1857, wiih salary raised to $000. His 
successor was John Mitchell, who was appointed to fill the unexpired 
term of ilr. Dean. In 18fi0 Mr. ]\[itchell was electi-d for the ensuing 
term. J. Ginter Counsman was elected in 18()8, and was followed by 
Elexis Elder in 1S(;4. In 18(55 the salary was raised to SI, 000. Mr. 
Elder .served until 1869. In the same year John B. Holland wa.s 
elected, and in 1875 John H. Stephens was made Superintendent. 

More strenuous efforts have been made during the pi-e.-ent year 
(1880), than in any i»revious one, to free the schools from incompetent 



24 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 



GO TO 



i 




J- \_ v^ 



H'^- 



Cornel- lltli A\'eiiue and IGth Street, 

ALTOONA, PA., 

— FOR — 

Pure Drugs, 

roWEK'S AND WEIGHTMAN'S CHEMICALS, 

R. A. HANCE'S FLUID EXTRACTS, 
JNO. WYETH & IIRO.'S WINES AND ELIXIKS. 

ALL STANDARD PATENT MEDICINES. 
FAr,MER'S HANDKERCHIEF EXTRACTS and INVISIBLE POWDER, 

BEAN'S INDIAN (,)UEEN PERFUME, 
FANCY AND TOILET ARTICLES, 

SPONGES, BRUSHES, PERFUMERY, 
TOBACCO, CIGARS, SNUFFS, *c. 



Prescriptions carefully compoundod with acenracy and dispatch, at all 
hours of tli<^ tlay or nlgrlit. Business hours fvoni r, a. m. until 11 p. in. Open on 
Sxiuihu for the sale of iiecessarv niedicint's. 



ALTOONA T STORE, 

Moss MOSER & Co., Profrs. 

Comer ()tli Avenue and Ttli Sti'eet. 



IN ADDITION TO A LARGE AND VARIKD STOCK OF 

T'iiie Teas, Coffees and S}3ices, 

» WK KEKr A OENEUAL AND WELL ASSORTED STOCK OF 

Groceries, Mour, Feed and TsTotions. 

4S=- We claim to sell Groceries on smaller iirolits than any other linn in the 
*ity. Call and see for yourselves. Please rcniendjer the place and don't confound 
Jis \vi1 h others. 

ALTOONA W STORE, 

CoRNEa Sixth Avenue and Seventh Street. 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 25 

teachers and to keep out of the profession young' and inexperienced 
ones until they make more thoroug-h preparation before entering upon 
so important a ^\'ork. The standard has been raised so as to exclude a 
numl)er of teachers who ])elong to that class which serves no other 
purpose than to check the wheels of prog-ress. This, in connection 
with what directors are doing in exercising from year to year greater 
care in selecting teachers, seems, next to good teachers themselves, to 
be the most efficient means for the improvement of the schools. 

Three new houses were erected during the year in Logan and one 
in Antis. All are substantial buildings, well adapted to the purpose 
for which they were intended. The directors of Tyrone borough 
placed in their l)uilding apparatus to heat the I'ooms by steam, which, 
in connection with other improvements made, delayed the opening of 
the schools so as to make it necessary to diminish the t<'rni. 

The County Institute was held in Hollidaysburg commencing De- 
ceml)er 29 and closing January 2. It was the best attended institute 
ever held in the county, and in point of interest was pronounced fully 
equal to any heretofore held. The instructors and lecturers besides 
teachers of our own county, were Professors J. H. Shumaker of Cham- 
bersburg ; Carothers, of Shippensburg ; J. F. Davis, of Altoona ; P. 
H. Bridenbaugh, of Martinsburg, and Rev. Dr. B. B. Hamlin, of 
Altoona. 

The oldest academy in the county is located at Williamsl)urg. In 
1841 the house was built by a joint stock company. A charter was: 
granted in 1851. Rev. John White was the first teacher. 

The Juniata Collegiate Institute, (formerly the Franklin High 
School,) located at Martinsburg, was completed in 18(i0. It was l)uilt 
by joint stock subscriptions, at a cost of $8,000. In LSGT the T.utli- 
eran Synod ])0ught it for $3,000. It was afterwards sold to J. ii. 
Herl)st, who, after a short ownership, sold it to Prof. Lucian Cort for 
$5,000. While owned by Mr. Cort, there was an addition built to 
the main building, which cost $8,000. In 1815 Henry Bridenbaugh 
bought it for $10,700. It is now in successful operation under the 
principalship of Prof. S. R. Bridenbaugh. Professors Dickerson and 
Osborne were the first teachers. Their successors were Messrs. AVil- 
lard, Hughes, Hassler, Schwartz, Cort and S. R. Briden1)augh. 

The Hollidaysburg Female Seminary (an illustration of which we 
print elsewhere,) was chartered in 180(5. The building was comideted 
in 18()0. It cost about $75,000 and was erected l)y a joint stock com- 
pany. From the time of its opening in 1809 to Septeml)er 12, 1877, 



26 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

Rev. Joseph Waiig-h wa.s the principal. From the latter date up to 
the present time, Prof. W. P. Hussey is its efficient princii)al. 

Tipton Seminary, located at Bell's Mills, was built by General B- 
F. Bell, in 1860. Prof. Orr Lossing first took charge of the school; 
he was followed by Robert Fulton and J. A. Stewart. The building 
has not been used for school i)urposes for several years. 

A select school has Itcen in successful operation in Hollidaysburg 
for several years, under the principalship of Prof. J. A. Stewart. 

DESCRIPTION or NEW COURT HOUSE — DEDICATION EXERCISES, ETC. 

On April 29, 18*15, the old court house in Hollidaysburg was pre- 
sented by the grand inquest of the count}' in the following language: 
"The Grand Inquest, inquiring in and for the County of ]31air, in 
April session, 1875, do make the following presentment: That we 
find the present court house is inadequate and unfit for the accomo- 
dation of the courts and the officers of said county, and especially for 
the deliberations of the grand jury, as well as unsafe for tlie keeping 
of the records of said county ; we, therefore, recommend the erection 
of a new court house for the reception and safe-keeping of the records, 
as may be necessary for the proper use of said county." 

After this presentment, Messrs. David Aurandt, John Clark and 
Alex. Carothers, who at that time constituted the board of county 
commissioners', decided to erect a new building, and entered into a 
contract with Andrew Myers to superintend the removal of the old 
court house and jail on May 26, 18*15. The contract for making the 
excavations for the foundation walls was made with Michael Walls, 
who died while the work was in progress. On August 11, 1875, the 
commissioners, having previously adopted a plan, designed by David 
S. Gendell, of Philadelphia, and advertised for proposals, received 
twenty-three bids, varying from $103,700 to $168,000. The lowest 
bidder was John Schreiner, of Pittsl)urg, and to him was awarded 
the contract. Tie did the work well. 

Tile iMiilding is erected u[)()n a nearly level terrace — terrace sur- 
rounded by low stone walls, jtrovided with wi'ouglit iron railing — 
two main entrances by broad flights of stei)s — terrace hns l)road 
landings and foot walks laid with large flag stones. Tlie building is 
in the modern Gothic style of architecture, with the Italian treatment. 
The e.xterior walls are of stone — facing, cut stone. The color of the 
main l)ody of the work is a warm, rich, sunny l)uff — arch stones, 
string cour.ses, cornices and other ornamental portions of the work, are 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 27 

of a beautiful deep, poach bloom color, presenting a strong yet agreea- 
ble contrast. Inside the exterior stone walls are H inch ))rick walls, 
erected separately from the stone work, to which tliev are tied M'ith 
Avrought iron anchors. There is an air space of H Indies between 
the stone walls and the brick lining to secure freedom from dampness. 
The plan of the structure bears some reseml)lance to the letter "T." 
In width it is 70 feet on the front ; 83i feet on tlie rear, and 55^ feet 
across the narrow part — total depth 132^ feet. The front portion of the 
building is two stories in height, surmounted with a high, slated roof, 
Tlie rear part is thr<'e stories high, the upper story being contained 
within a Mansard roof, Avith ornamental gabled stone dormers. At 
each front angle of the building is a largo square tower, surmounted 
by an ornamontal slate covered roof, the total height fi-oin the ground 
to the to}* of the roof being 83 feet without tlic iron cresting. On tlie 
front, between the two towers, are three entrance doorways, facing. 
Allegheny street. These are approached from the terrace by a flight 
of steps 34 feet long, with a liroad landing at the toji, which forms the 
floor of an arcade. This arcade consi.'^ts of three arches carried ))y 
coupled columns. It is 27^ feet high from the pavement of tlie ter- 
race to the top of the weathering of the cornice. Al)ove the arcade 
are three traceried windows opening into the court-room. Over these 
is the front gable of the main roof. The height of this gable from the 
terrace to the top of the stone finial surmounting it is 77 feet. In 
this gable is a niche in which is placed a statue of Justice s feet 
high, executed in Amherst stone. In the rear building is another 
large entrance or doorway facing Union street. The main or clock 
tower is at the intersection of the front and rear buildings, a massive 
structure 19 feet square, in which is one of Meueely k ('(».'s best 
bells, sweet in tone, and Aveighing 2,550 pounds. Al)ove the bdlVy 
is the clock, the dials of Avhich are of thick heavy ground glass 1)*.) 
inches in diameter. Above the gal)les the tower is surmounted l)V a 
short spire or high roof, all of stone to the finial, nnd this spire is 
surmounted by ornamental iron Avork. On the rear of the entire 
building is a small turret iih fet't square and 80 feet high, intended to 
carry off the vitiated air from the rooms of the Ituildiug. 

The four entrance doorways iire provided with hiindsdiiicly pini- 
ellod Avalnut door.<. The three door.- faciii.i:- T'nion street (»peii into n 
vestibule 12x38 feet. At each end of this vestibide are stiiirwiiys t(» 
the second story. The tiling for the floors Wiis iin]torte(I jiiid furn- 
ished by Sharpless iV Watts, of Phi1iulel])hiii. 

0[»ening from the corridors are the Viii'iniis county offices. Com- 



28 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY- 



LOOK! 




. u . ri 



V H 








Cor. 8t]i Avenue and lltli Street, 



ALTOONA, PA. 



YOU CAN GET DRY GOODS, 
YOU CAN GET NOTIONS, 
YOU CAN GET GROCERIES, 
YOU CAN GET QUEENSWARE, 
YOU CAN GET CARl'ETS AND OIL CLOTHS, 
YOU CAN GET WOOD AND WILLOW-WARE, 
YOU CAN GET FLOUR AND FEED, 
YOU CAN GET COUNTRY PRODUCE, 
YOU CAN GET ANYTHING KEPT IN A FIRST- 
CLASS STORE AND ALWAYS AT THE VERY 
LOWEST PRICES. 

Please Call and be Convinced 



OF THE BARGAINS WE WILL GIVE YOU. 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 29 

missioners' room, 19 feet 5 inches by 24 feet, with a connecting private 
room 12 feet bv 13 feet 4 inches; Treasurer's office, 25 feet by 19 
feet 5 inches; Sheriff's office, 14 feet by 19 feet 5 inches; Protliono- 
tary's office (divided into two parts), is included in a si)ace of 20 feet 
by 50 feet; Recorder's office, 20 feet by 27 feet, etc. The last two 
offices mentioned are fire proof, so that the records be safe. All offices 
are neatly fitted up with necessary furniture and conveniences. In 
addition to the offices there is an arbitration room on tlic first fi(jor 
19 by 35 feet. The stairways are all iron except the hand niil. 

The court room is in the second story, approached tlirough three 
vestibules, two front and one rear. Access to the court room is had 
by four pairs of laro-(! folding doors. The Judg-es' bench is phiccd in 
a recess formed under the main tower. This recess has a })aniifllr(l 
Gothic arched ceiling twenty-five feet high and finely finished. The 
ceiling of the court room is pannelled, executed in ash and yellow 
pine. The lienches for the audience, the liar railing, the Judges' 
chairs and bench. Clerk's desk, the jury and witness boxes, the tal)les 
and other furniture of the court room, also the fittings of the various 
offices, arc all made of ash, designed to correspond with the architec- 
ture of the building. The acoustic properties of the courtroom arc 
excellent. 

In the rear building on the second floor are a conver.<ation nxnu 
15|- by 29 feet; a retiring room for the Judges; rooms for the grand 
and petit juries; and .separate rooms for male and female witnesses — 
all of good size and fifteen feet high in the clear. The third story is 
twelve feet high in the clear and contains several large rooms, to br 
used for storage, etc. Rooms containing water closets are conveni- 
ently located in several parts of the l)uilding. The drainage is excel- 
lent. The walls of all the halls and rooms are wainscotte(l. The 
carpenter work was well executed by ^Iv. George A. Cocliian, of 
Pittsburg. Mr. G. A. Giljson, of Philadelphia, did the glazing of tin- 
windows with stained glass of pleasing design, in catIi(Mli':il tints, iind 
set in lead work. 

The walls of all vestibules, balls, corridors and rooms, and all plas- 
tered ceilings throughout, are painted in colors. Altlioiiuh high 
colors are employed, the general e3"ect is that of a (piiet and perfect 
harmony. Messrs. Carlisle «fe Joy, of Philadelphia, did tliisnork, 
which is highly creditable to these artists. 

There is a cellar under the entire Iiuilding, with the exception of tlie 
front vestibules, thoroughly lighted and ventilated by larg<' wintlous. 

The buildin"- is heated bv steam. As the heated air i< d<'livered 



30 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

into (lie rooms through the warm air registers, the cold and vitiated 
air is di-aA\ n off through ventilating registers placed next the floor. 
These open into flues, which connect with ducts, passing under the 
cellar floor, all of which discharge into a ventilating shaft. Thus, 
while fresh air is admitted through the warm air registers, the viti- 
ated air is carried off through others. 

The gas fixtures are made from original designs by Messrs. Cor- 
nelius & Co., of I'hiladelphia, and are in character with the building 
— very rich and uiii(|U(' in design. 

On May 3, 1877, the following order of court was issued: 

" And now. May 3, 1877, in ojien court, on the second Monday of 
April term, it ai)pearing to the Court that the new court house, the 
erection of which was commenced at Ai)ril term, 1875, will be com- 
pleted and ready for occupancy on July 2, 1877, at Argument Court, 
and that, in view of the magnitude of the undertaking, the character 
of the building, its importance to the county in view of its increasing 
})opulation, and its largely increasing judicial business, the completion 
of so important a public work should ))e marked by proper notice; 
therefore, it is ordered that A. S. Tjandis, Samuel Calvin, Thaddeus 
Banks, }i. L. Jlewit, I). J. Xeff, II. K. Herr and A. A. Stephens, 
esqs., be a committee to prepare a suitable programme of ceremonies 
and make such arrangements for dedicating the building to public use, 
on the day aforesaid, as niav be deemed ])roper. 
"By the Court. 

"John Dean, President Judge.'''' 

Agreebly to this order the committee appointed prepared the fol- 
lowing order of exercises : 

Court called at 11 a. m. (adjourned session.) 

Adjournment of court on motion of Hon. S. S. Blair. 

Meeting of the Bars of the District, organized with Hon. Thad. Banks, 

President. 

Prayer by Rev. D. H. Barron. 

Music. 

Historical address by Hon. John Dean, President Judge. 

Music. 

Address by Hon. Samuel Calvin. 

Address by Hon. Jeremiah S. Black. 

Music. 

Addresses by Col. R. A. McMurtrie, and others. 

Court coiiNcned at 11 o'clock. Hon. S. S. Blair moved the adjourn- 
jneiit of coui't. Immediately after its adjournment, Mr. Landis, chair- 
man of the c<)mmittee of arrangements, stated that the following 
uflicers had been sel(>cted for the occasioii : 

President, Hon. Thad. Banks; Vice Presidents, Gen. John Wil- 
liamson, of Huntingdon, and John Fenlon, esq., of Cambria. 



HISTORY OF ALTOOXA AXD BLAIR COUNTY. 31 

After ihev had taken their places, Mr. Landls addre.'jsed the com- 
mittee of arrang-emeiits, cong-ratulatinii- them ui»on the happy occa- 
sion Avhich had a.ssemliled them tog-ether. 

Hon. Thad. Banks, the chairman, then made a fcAv remarks, return- 
ing- thanks for the position assig-ned him, and making- complimentary 
alhisions to Judges Black, Taylor and Dean. 

After prayer by Rev. D. H. Barron, pastor of the Presbytrrian 
church, and music hv the l)and, the chairman introduced Judy-e Dean, 
whose remarks we would like to publish in full. Unable to do so, on 
account of our space being- limited, we present a brief synopsis of its 
principal historical points, consoling our.selves with the reflection that 
thousands who were unable to hear it enjoyed the pleasure of reading 
it, as it was published in full after its deliveiy. 

In his introductory Judge Dean referred to the progress made 
toward the enforcement of the perfect law: "Do unto others as you 
would have others do unto you," — so marked within the compara- 
tively short period of the last fifty years, as to l)e a matter of exulta- 
tion to every true lawyer. 

In referring to the first two Judges of Blair county (Black and 
Taylor), Judge Dean said : --The moral sensibilities of the.=e two 
distinguished Judges were in no wise dull. Keenly alive to the 
wrongs of suitors, filled with a perfect hatred of all unfairness, over- 
reaching and all uncon.scionable conduct, possessing great learning- 
and ability, under their eyes the judgments of the Court were entered." 

"At the time of the erection of IJlair county," continued the speak- 
er, "Judge Black was the President Judge of the Sixteenth Judicial 
District, composed of tin- counties of Franklin, Bedford, Somerset ami 
Fulton, and in the act erecting the county it was provided that it 
should form part of this district. Thus Judge Black became our first 
Judge. The original act (see P. L. 1846, p. 04) provided that the 
first court should be held on the fourth Monday of July. l!-<4(i. From 
that time up to and including March term, 1849, Judge lilack pre- 
sided. By this act the terms of the courts were to commence on tlu- 
fourth Mondays of March, July, October and December, but a supple- 
ment (see P. L. 184(;, p. 398) directed that after the first court the 
summer session should commence the second Monday of June. Judge 
Black held twelve terms of the court, when the IjCgislature, by the 
act of April 5, 1849, making- a general reorganization of the judicial 
districts of the State, declared the counties of Huntingdon, Blair and 
Cambria should compose the Twenty-fourth Judicial District, thus 
detachinir this countv from the Sixteenth, Judge Black's district. 



32 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 




To show you the largest stock of Dry Gooils, Carpets, Notions and Fancy Gooils 
in BUiir county. We are constantly receiving new goods in all departments. Our 
Dry Goods Department is complete at all times in all standard makes of Muslins^, 
Ginghams, Calicoes, Tickings, antl we sell them all at the lowest possible price, 

DRESS GOODS DEPARTMENT. 

We make a specialty of this department and at all times you Avill be sure to lind" 
a complete assortment of fancy and plain dress fabrics. We would call special 
attention to our Black and Colored Cashmeres and would invite comparison with 
samples from New York or Fhiladelpliia. Our .Silks are always up to the standard ;, 
purchasers will find it to their advantage to examine our Silks. Samples sent when 
requested. 

TRIMMn^G DEPARTMENT. 

We would ask an inspection of this department. We are confident that we cau' 
show you the largest and rtnest stock of Black and Colored Silk Velvets, Buttons^ 
Braids, and all the latest Novelties in Trimming. We are always up to the times 
in this department. 

NOTIONS AND FANCY GOODS DEPART- 
MENT. 

You will be siire to find a large stock in this department. We make a specialty 
of these goods: buying in large quantities we can sell them more reasonably thaui 
any other house in the fancj^ goods business. A full stock of Laces, Ribbons, Ties,. 
Edgings, Hamburg Embroidery, Nainsook and Swiss Trimming. 

CARPET DEPARTMENT. 

We occupy all the second floor of our building tor this department and can show 
you the largest line of Carpets in Central Pennsylvania. We buy in large quanti- 
ties and sell them rapidly at a slight advance for cash. You are cordially invited' 
to call and examine our stock and learn our prices. We always keep up to the 
times at "No. i:517," and we shall spare no pains to make it to your advantage to 
deal with us as you will always find the latest goods in the market and at Eastern- 
prices. 

V/M. Murray. 




Eleventh Avenue, Altoona, Pa. 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 88 

[Here follows a hi.crhly coniplimentarv allusion to Juclgt' Black.] As 
we have seen, on April 5, 1849, the Twenty-fourth District was cre- 
ated. George Taylor, then a young, but al)le lawyer of the Hunting- 
don bar, was appointed by Governor Johnston President Judge. He 
held his first court in this countv on the second Mondav of Julv, 1841) 
the summer term having been again changed back from June to July. 
Under this appointment he continued to hold court until Octo1»er 
term, 1851. In the meantime the amendment to the Constitution 
had been adopted (called amendment of 1850) which provided for the 
election of the Judges of all the courts ; that their terms slionld lie 
ten years; that the terms of all Judges then in office sliould expire 
on the first Monday of December following the adoption of tiic amend- 
ment, and that the terms of those elected should commence at the 
same time. The first election after the adoption of the amendment 
was held in 1851, so that Judge Taylor's commission l)y appointment 
expired on the first Monday of December, 1851 ; but at the election 
previous, having been nominated by the Whigs, he was elected for 
the term of ten years. His opponent was the Democratic candidate, 
Thomas P. Campbell, of Huntingdon. Under this election he served 
his term of ten velars, and at the end of it was re-elected without op- 
position. At the end of this term he ran as an Independent candi- 
date but failed of an election. He died of paralysis in November, 
1871, in the fifty-ninth year of his age. [Following a eulogy ujton 
Judge Taylor, Judge Dean continues:] I was elected Judge in isTl. 
The first Associate Judges of the court were George R. McFarlane 
and Daniel McConnell, Democrats, api)ointed by Governor Simuk, 
June 8, 1846, to hold until the next session of the Senate of Pennsyl- 
vania. Judge McFarlane was re-appointed and confirmed hy tlie 
Senate on March 11, 1847. The other vacancy was filled \>\ tlie ap- 
pointment of Davis Brooke on January 28, 1848. James (Janlner 
was appointed by the Governor April 10, 1851, to till the vacancy 
occasioned 1)y the resignation of Judge Geo. R. McFarlane and was 
elected for the full term the following October, with Levi Slinglidf, of 
Martinsburg. Both resigned before the expiration of tlieii' terms. 
These are about the only examples of resignation l)y Judges witiiin 
my knowledge. James D. Rea, Democrat, was ai)poiiited to fill tlie 
vacancy occasioned ))y the resignation of Judge (Jardner on July -25, 
1854, and James L. Gwin to fill that occasioned by resignation of 
Judge Slingluft" in March, 1855. Judges Rea and Gwin lield office 
until October, 1855, when David Caldwell and Jolm Penii Jones 
were elected each for the full term of five years ; in 18(;0 Adam Moses 



34 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

and Samuel Dean Avere elected; in 18G5 Judye Moses was re-eleeted 
with B. F. Rose, of Altoona; in 1870 George W. Patton and Joseph 
Irwin \\'evc elected; and in 18T5 the present associates, Charles J. 
Mann and Samuel Smith. With the exceptions of Judges McFarlane, 
McConnell and Brooke, appointed by Grovernor Shunk, and Judge 
Rea, appointed l\v Governor Bigler, all these officers have been Whigs 
or Republicans. Whatever may have ])een their politics, it has l)een 
the united testimon}^ of the bar that, one and all, they performed 
faithfully and impartially their duty. Of those dead, honor and re- 
spect followed them during life ; of those living, no blot touches their 
integrity. They have the res}»ect and good wishes of a profession 
which learns, as no other one does, to apiircciate unblemished official 
life. 

" From the fourth Monday, July 21, 1840, until April 30, 1877, the 
last term of court, exactly two hundred lawyers have been sworn to 
the bar. Of these only seventy-two have been resident within the 
county. On the first day of the court, July 27, 1846, there were 
forty-eight admissions, commencing with Hon. Moses Canan, of 
Cambria county, and ending with Andrew G., afterward Governor 
Curtin, of Centre county; and during that term of the court there 
were fifty-one admissions. Out of these, however, there Avere only 
twelve resident of the county and they all in Hollidaysburg — Calvin,, 
Cline, J. M. Bell, Kemp, Coffey, Brotherline, Lowrie, T. Banks, Cress- 
well, Blair, McMurtrie and Hofius. At October term following, Robt. 
Wallace, father of the present United States Senator Wallace, was 
admitted and opened an office. Major Williams was admitted the 
Deceml)er following. Up to March 21, 1855, when I was admitted, 
nearly nine years after the organization of the county, only twenty- 
two resident practicing lawyers had been sworn to the bar, and of 
these eight had retired from i)ractice or reniovcil from the county, 
leaving fourteen. There are now in acti\-e ]iractic(> fiM'ty-oue. Among 
the names of those admitted from other eouuties who either were, or 
afterwards beenme prominent in the law or in jxilitics, I notice Eph- 
raim Banks, father of our chairnmn. Auditor General of the State; 
Judge Alexander King, Judge Kimmell, John G. ]Miles, Senator 
Scott, Judge Hale, Governor Curtin, Francis Jordan, Charles Shaler, 
R. Tj. Jolinson, John Cessna, Ross Forward, Judm' Pershing, Gen. 
John Williamson, Judge Hall, Judge John P. Blair, Harry AVhite, 
Samuel T. Brown, Charles J. Faulkner and Randolph Tucker, of 
Virginia, Thadeus Stephens, Judge AVliite, Jud^c Pettis, Hon. K. 
M. Speer, Judge Thatcher, John :\r. IJailey, Thomas :\r. ]Marsliall„ 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 35 

Joshua F. Cox, and a number of othovs. Among- them was John 
Blodg'ctt, of Bedford, noted for his acquirements in general literature, 
his poetical tastes, and wit. There was also admitted during- the first 
year of the court a lawyer noted in the whole profession along the 
Juniata Valley, Mr. Isaac Fisher, of Huntingdon. 

" Of the cases tried and suits entered in the thirty years since the 
organization of the county, when compared with the population, the 
aggregate seems enormous. In the Common Pleas, including- judg- 
ment bills, appeals and certioraris, there have been entered 30,205 
cases; in the Quarter Sessions, 2,619 ca.ses ; in the Oyer and Ter- 
miner, 99 cases, making altogether 41,923. In this are not included 
the large numlier of estates partitioned or appraised in the Orphans' 
Court, nor the trust accounts of assignees and other trustees, settled 
in the Common Pleas. There have passed through the Orphans' 
Court, for confirmation and allowance, 1,TT0 accounts of executors- 
and administrators, many of them involving protracted litigation be- 
fore auditors and on exceptions to auditors' reports. 

"Judge Black took forty-four verdicts, Judge Taylor eight hun- 
dred and seventy-eight ; and there have been taken since four ImndnMl 
and ninety-five. Of course this, as every lawyer knows, docs not 
show the extent of actual work done in the trial of causes ; for many 
of them, after hours, and sometimes days of trial, "go off," either I)y 
non suit or settlement of the parties. 

"By the act of Assembly erecting the county, all uiKlcicrniiiicd 
issues between parties resident on the territory out of wliidi it was 
formed, were to l)e transferred to the records of the new county. 

"The first suit in the Common Pleas is one to No. 43, August 
term, 1826, of Huntingdon county, transferre(l. It is an action of 
debt bv John Wilson and Kachael Buchanan, executors of Dr. Joim 
E. Buchanan, deceased, ag-ainst William Smith, executor of Joim 
Steel, deceased. When it was brought, in 1820, Judges Burnside, 
Adams and ^[cCune were on the bench in Huntingdon county. Sniit li 
is marked attorney for plaintiff and Alli.son and Steel for defeiniaiit. 
As appears from the record, more than seventy contiiiuaiices were- 
marked during- the twenty years it stood on the Huntingdon county 
docket, and live after its tran.sfer to Blair. 

"The first case l)rought originally in tliis county, is a libel for 
divorce ; sul)p(ena i.-sued June 23, 184(;, by Mary Armstrong against 
her husband, John Armstrong. T. J. Coffey is attorney for liliellant. 
John Cox, esq., was a])poin'ted commissioner to take testimony, and. 



36 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

HARRY SZINCK. 



— DEALEU IN — 



Groceries, FlourandFeed, 

Corner 6tli Avenue and 8th Street. 



THE VERY BEST GOODS AT LOWEST PRICES. 

t 

E. S. MILLER, M. D, 

OFFICE : Corner Sixteenth Street. and Eleventh 
Avenne, Altoona, Pa. 

OFFICE llorifS: 7 to9a. m. 
1 to 3 p. m. 

(i to 8 p. 111. 

COXSrLTATIONS IN ENGLISH OR GERMAN. 

thomas w. jackson, 

Attorney-at-La\v, 



AND — 



District Attorney, 

No. 1010 Twelfth Street, Altoona, Pa. 



D. r. BEEGLE, 

EAST SIDE JEWELER, 

12th Street, bet. 8th and 9th A\^ennes. 



COMPLETE STOCK— BEST GOODS— LOWEST PRICES. 
REPAIRING PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO. 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 37 

a divorce was decrot-d thereon by Judge Black, March 25, 1847. The 
entire costs were $7.75. Divorces have become more costly since. 

" In the first year of the court 661 cases were entered in the Com- 
mon Pleas, includin<j- original writs, certioraris and appeals. In 1S5(;, 
ten years later, J, 090; in 1866, ten years later, 1,100; in 1876, ten 
years later, 2,717. Many of the cases included in this last number are 
judgments on building association bonds; but still, the natural in- 
crease in legal business, the last ten, has been much greater than in 
any preceding ten years. 

[We cannot find room for the cases tried in the Supreme Court, to 
which Judge Dean makes reference.] 

"There have be<"n tried in the Oyc^j- and Terminer thirty cases of 
homicide. Of these eleven were found not guilty ; three, Alexander 
Hutchinson, James Shirley and David McKim, were found guilty of 
murder in the first degree. The fir.'^t, Hutchinson, was tried in 1850. 
After sentence his friends induced the Legislature to interfere by at- 
tempting legislation to relieve him from the death penalty. Nothing 
effective was done ; but the warrant for his execution was withheld 
until Governor Johnston, during whose administration he was con- 
victed, was out of office. Governor Bigler declined to issue it Ijecause, 
as he alleged, it was a duty of his predecessor which he was not bound 
to perform. Hutchinson remained in jail until 1853, when he escaped. 
Shirley was tried at March term, 1853, for the murder of his wife, and 
executed in August of that year. McKim was tried at April term, 
1857, for the murder of Xorcross, and executed in July following. 
The other convictions in the Oyer and Terminer were either of murder 
in the second degree or manslaughter. 

"There were two hearings on habeas corpus in the case of alleged 
fugitive slaves; one before Judge McFarlane, in 1849, tiud one l)efore 
Judge Moses, in March, 1862. In each case the detained persons 
were discharged. In 1855 a man named Parsons, from Virginia, who 
attempted to seize a colored man in Gay sport, on the claim that he was 
a fugitive slave, was indicted for abduction. John Randolph Tucker 
and Charles J. Faulkner came here to defend him ; a true bill was 
found, but a nolle pros, was entered by the district attorney, Mr. 
Hammond. 

"There are quite a large number of cases, both civil and criminal, 
a notice of which would be interesting to the lawyers, and many non- 
professional peoi)le, but I cannot undertake to refer to them in a short 
address. Those mentioned will suggest the general nature and amount 
of litigation carried on in the several courts since its organization. 
4 



38 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

" The first district attorney was Col. Cresswell, apjiointed by Gov- 
ernor Shunk. He was succeeded l)y Mr. H(jtius, appointed by Gov- 
ernor Johnston, who filled the office until 1851, when the office was 
elective. Mr. Keiuj) was elected by the Whigs ; but his health failing 
soon after, George A. Coffey performed the duties of»the office untif 
1 854, wdien Essington Hammond was elected. At the expiration of 
his term, Mr. Hewit filled the office two terms ; then John H. Keatly 
almost t-w'o terms. He resigned the last year of the second term, and 
I was appointed to the vacancy until next election ; Avas then electetP 
and served one term. Milton Alexander was then elected and served 
one term ; then James F. Milliken was elected. [Then the present 
district attorney, Thomas W. Jackson. — Ed.] 

" The office of prothonotary of Common Pleas, clerk of the Orphans'" 
Court, Quarter Sessions and Oyer and Terminer, filled by the same 
officer, has not had many incumbents. First, Jeremiah Cunningham 
was appointed in June, 184G, to serve until the next December. At 
the October election of that year Joseph Smith Avas elected and .served 
a term of throe years ; then George W. Johnston a term of three years; 
then Hugh McNeal one term ; then Joseph Baldrige two terms, or 
six years ; then A. S. Morrow four terms, or twelve years ; then James 
P. Stewart, present officer, was elected. 

" The office of register of wills and recorder of deeds was first filled 
by appointment of John M. Gibbony, to hold until December, 1846, 
or until his successor be qualified. At the election in October of that 
year, Eph. Galbraith was the Whig candidate and Samuel Smith the- 
Democratic. Galbraith died the day of the election, before the votes. 
were nearly all polled. Smith claimed the office on the grounds that 
he had a majority of the votes cast for a living man, although a major- 
it}^ of the people voted for Galljraith. Judge Black declined to decide 
in his favor, and Gibbony held the office until the next election, whem 
L. H. Williams was elected. He held the office nine years ; was suc- 
ceeded by H. A. Caldwell, who held it for .six years; and he by D. M.. 
Jones, who held the office for nine years, when A. Lingenfelter was. 
elected. 

" The first sheriff" was Jeremiah Betts, appointed by Governor 

Shunk. Then, follow him, in order, Samuel Royer, Thomas Ileese,, 

William Keed, George Port, James Funk, Samuel McCamant, Martin 

Bechtel,'John McKeage, Henry B. Huff", Alexander Bobb, James M. 

-Stiffler. 

" Tlu! territory in the original act, and over which the court had 
jurisdiction, embraced Greenfield and North Woodl)erry townships, of 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. ::^9 

Bedford county ; Alleo-hony, Aiitis, Blair, Huston, Tyrone and Wood- 
berry township;^, in Huntingdon county ; also, that part of Morris 
township, in Hunting-don county, west of a line run Ijy William Reed, 
surveyor, to I)e called Catharine township. Hollidayshurg and ^[ar- 
tinsburg had already been incorporated as lioroughs. The townships 
formed since the organization, are Juniata, out of Greenfield, in 1847 ; 
Logan, out of Allegheny and Antis, in 1850; Taylor, out of North 
Woodl)eiTy and Huston, in 1855; Freedom, out of Juniata, in 1857. 
Altoona was incorporated as a borough in 1854, and came under a city 
charter in 18T1. Tyrone became a 1)ovough in 1857; East Tyrone in 
1873; Newry in 1870. Eleven constal^les made returns the first day 
of the court, twenty-three now. 

"The original act required the Governor to appoint three non-resi- 
dents of the county commissioners to run the county lines and fix the 
county .seat. He appointed Henry McBride, of Westmoreland, Gen. 
Orr, of Armstrong, and Judge Christy of Juniata counties, who fixed 
upon Hollidaysburg as the county seat. 

"The first court was held in an old Methodist church, which stood 
wdiere the present Methodist church now stands. Mahony's stone 
house, along side, was rented at the rate of fifty dollars jier year and 
used as a jail. A contract was made in 184(5, with Daniel K. Kearney, 
then a prominent builder, for the erection of the court house and jail 
on the ground covered liy the present court hou.se. The contract price 
for both was $11,998.50, l)ut l)ecause of changes and extras, the amount 
paid was $14,576.18. Both were finished and occupied by June term, 
1847. As you are all aware, hoth, years ago, became entirely insufficient 
for the wants of the county. A new jail was erected at an I'X] tense of 
over $100,000 in 1868 and 1869, and the old court house lasted inil a few 
years longer. And although twenty-five or thirty years is not an old 
age for public l)uildings, 3'et a glance at the growth of the county in 
population and wealth in that period reveals, at once, the causes which 
demanded their destruction and the erection of new and Iietter. The 
men who designed these buildings did not foresee the rapid growtli of 
the new county in those particulars which ar(> ])rolific of litigation. 

"In 1846 only 2,187 votes were polled, indicating (at five to lln,' 
voter) a population of about 10,000. In 1856 there were ])olled 3,520 
votes, showing a pojiulation of 18,000. Jn ISOO iIktc were polled 
6,288 votes, pointing to a i)opulation of 32,000. In 1876 there were 
polled 8,720 votes, indicating a population of 44,000, four times greater 
than when the county was organized. In the meantime the a.'jsessed 
valuation of property far more than doubled; its cash value has dotd)t- 
less trebled. 



40 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

FRANKLIN HOUSE, 

Seventeenth Street, Altoona. 

AL. BURGOOK, Proprietor. 

a^Good acoomnioilations for guests. Ample .stalling for horses. The Bar is 
supplied with tlie best auil choicest brands of liquors in the market. 



JOHN M. PETERS, 



— DKALLU IN — 



PROVISIONS, BEEF. 

MUTTON, LAMB. 

PORK, POULTRY, HUM, SHUSME, ' 

TRIPE, PIU'S FEET, LIVER, LARD, MINCE MEAT, Etc. 



Eighth Avenue, bet. 8th and 9th Streets. 



<ioods delivered to anj- part of the citj- without additional cost. 

Orders promptly tilled and courteous treatment extended to a'.l. 



GEORGE A. STREIT, 

DEALER IN AND MANrFACTUKElt OF 

Imitation French Calf hnd Kip Skins, 

MOROCCOS, Linings, Roans. Etc. 

All kinds of Shoe Mauufaeturins Uoods, to.sether with all other articles pertaining 

to the ShoeFiU'dinff Business. >e®=Cash paid for Hides. Skins and Wool. 

Oiders l>y mail promptly attended to. 

1117 Fifth Avenue, neai- Twelfth Sti'eet. 



HlsTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 41 

"The cost of the present buiklinti-, with all its surroundings and 
conveniences, is very close to $139,000. It cannot exceed $140,000. 
Our records, whose preservation is worth millions of dollars to the 
people, are now .secured in fire-proof offices and vaults. For the ses- 
sions of the courts, for the deliberation of juries and for the detention 
of witnesses, we have rooms spacious, comfortable and convenient. 
Long after we are gone this building, in all its strength and beauty, 
will stand as a monument to the public spirit and enterprise of the 
people who authorized it, as well as an indisputable evidence of the 
architectural talents of him who designed it, and the mechanical skill 
of those who carried the design into execution. 

" We have met to-day, as lawyers and citizens, to dedicate it to its 
appropriate u.*es — the administration of justice between man and man. 
What we noic say or do, will soon pass from the memory ; but what we 
say or do within these walls hereafter, will not be forgotten ; the fruits 
of our words and conduct will appear in ineffaceable lines upon the 
records of our courts ; will l)e cut deep in the hearts and lives of those 
who shall here appear to have rights determined and Avrongs redressed. 
May we so perform our part that we shall reflect honor upon an hon- 
orable profession; and so perform it, too, that, when called to appear 
in a Higher Court, tliere to be inquired of, we shall be ready to answer, 
iilthough with awe, yet not with fear : 'What Thou gavest us to do, 
with the light we had, we did as best we could.'" 

[In most eloquent terms Judge Dean closed his address, the 
]>rincipal historical points of which Ave have given, omitting matter 
which, to many, would prove to be even more interesting. Want of 
space, the reason previously assigned, is our excuse for no^ publishing 
the discour.se in its entirety. AYe will take this occasion to say that, 
however ably his predecessors. Judges Black and Taylor, may luiv(? 
administered justice, Judge Dean has su!<tained, and still sustains, the 
reputation of the bench of Blair county for profound hiarning, sound 
judgment, legal talent and executive ability.] 

Hon. Samuel Calvin was next introduced. He said that he wa.s 
assigned a place on the programme V)ccause he was tin' eldest member 
of the bar, but he wanted the ladies Xo bear in mind the difference 
between the oldest member of the bar and olde.^t man practicing at th(i 
bar. His address was full of reminiscences, many of them of a highly 
humorous character — concerning Judges Taylor, Burnside and M'Cuno 
(associate), and the older members of the bar. 

The Hon. Jeremiah S. Black was next introduced, who stated that 
he came there upon the condition that he was not to make a .speech, 



;42 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

but seeing- his name on the programme as one of the speakers without 
. his previous knowledge or authority, it was absolutely necessary that 
he should appear, not to make a speech, but for the purpose of apolo- 
gizing for not making one! The reason he had assigned for not making 
a speech was that Blair county might make and ought to make orations 
fpr herself. [Here Judge Black pointed out and commented upon the 
fluency of Blair county lawyers.] They told him he should come for- 
ward and make a few remarks. Well, lie said he would do that — 
"he would take his position on the outer edge of created space, and 
crack away at all eternity." But, upon second thought, he couldn't 
do that. His intellectual running gears would give out before he could 
reach the outer edge of created si)ace, and he thought that all eternity 
would be too much for him. He regarded the address of Judge Dean 
as the most perfect that he could have conceived of, and so with the 
other gentlemen who had spoken. 

" You have erected a court house which is, beyond comparison, the 
most perfect structure of its kind in this country. It reminds me of 
the description that Horace gave of the woman that he admired more 
than any other — simplex munditiis — simple in the abundant wealth 
of its beauty." * * * "This building is dedicated to the 

administration of justice, which is the greatest of human concerns. 
The most important part of the machinery of justice is the county 
courts — the courts of Common Pleas — these courts whose function it is 
to take original cognizance of all cases affecting life, liberty and property, 
and to do justice l)etween man and man. All the other machinery of 
our Government is made for the purpose of l)ringing a competent judge 
upon that bench, and twelve honest men into that jury box in order 
that they may do justice. For that you make a Legislature; for that 
you have a Congress; for that you have a union of the States; an 
executive department; an army and nav3\ The ultimate object of it 
all is that justice shall be administered between the people of a neigh- 
borhood. As long as you can maintain perfect purity in the judiciary 
and have justice administered promptly and s})eedily at home it does 
not matter very much — that is, it is not a thing of vital importance 
how the other i»arts of your i)olitical machinery go on; and whenever 
there is any serious corruption or wrong l)y which the scales of justice 
do not hang with an even balance in these courts of original jurisdic- 
tion, 3'ou are in the worst possible condition in which you can be placed. 

" Now, gentlemen, have I made a sufficient ajtologv for not making 
a speech? If I have not, why, I -will have to apologize for that. If 
there was anybody here who would speak evil of the Blair county court 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 



43 



or its bar, or to falsify its history, or to say that the members of this 
bar were not the best men in the world, then I would have an issue 
which I couHd take up with them, and I think I could keep up mv side 
pretty well. But I have nobody to fight! I am, therefore, in a situa- 
tion somewhat like that of Jemima Wickersham, a female prophet, who 
made her appearance in western Xew York. She said she was able to 
walk upon the water miraculously, and called divers persons to witness 
the performance. They assembled in large numbers, and just before 
vshe made prejjaration to step out on the lake she asked the crowd 
there asseml)led if they believed she could do it. They told her that 
they thought she cuuld not. 'Then," she said, 'you have little faith 
— a generation of vipers, who seek a sign and shall find none.' Theri'- 
fore, she would not walk upon the water that day. She tried them 
again, however, another day, and she put the same question to them, 
-and, knowing wTiat sort of an answer had defeated them before, thev 
answered affirmatively, that they believed she could. 'Verv well, 
then,' said she, "tliere is no use to work miracles in your presence, you 
have faith enough!' Now, I think you all have faith enough in your 
Judge, and faith enough in your bar, and faith enough in yourselves 
to get on very well without any exhortation from me, and therefore I 
Ijid you an aftectionate farewell." 

At the conclusion of Judge Black's remarks, various persons were 
called on for speeches — Col. R. A. McMurtrie, Judges Orvis and 
Hall, and Messrs. Orbison, Williamson, Johnston, and others. The 
majority of those called out refused to respond. General William.>^on 
delivered an adolre.ss, sparkling with that wit for which he is so famous, 
while the remarks of R. L. Johnston, esq., of Camljria, were intensely 
humorous and highly enjoyed by the audience. The meeting then ad- 
journed, and the formal' dedicatory ceremonies were over. 



MEMBERS OF THE BAR. 



Alexander, MiUon 
Baldiige, H. M. 
Banks, Cecil R. 
Bunks, Thadtleus 
Bell, Martin 
Blair, Samuel 6. 
Brotlierline, J. Irvin 
Brumbaugh, D. S. 
Buckley, M. Edward 
Calvin," Matthew B. 
Calvin. Samuel 
Cresswell. Johi\. jr. 
tCnnningham, Jerre 
Dively. A. \. 
Dobvne, Geo. A. 
Doyle, John A. 
Flanigan. .James, jr. 
Greevy, Thos. H. 
Herr, U. H. 
Mewit, B. T>. 
Hieks. ,J. I). 
Jackson, Thos. W. 



Altoona. 
HolUdayshurg, 



Roaring Spring. 

Altoona. 

HoJlidaj-shurg, 



Altoona. 

Hollida3Sburg. 

Altoona. 



Hollidaysburg. 

Tyrone." 

Altoona. 



Jaekel, Fred. 
Johnson. Robert 
Kyle. J. 31. 
Landis, Augustus S. 
Leet, Jolm D. 
Leis(i«ring, J. S. 
Lysinger, Samuel B. 
jNIcMurtrie. R. A. 
iSIervine. X. P. 
Xetr, D. J. 
Riddle, J. F. 
Riley, A.J. 
Slia\v, Edmund 
Smith, I.Horace 
Snyder, H. H. 
Stevens, A. A. 
Tierney, F. P. 
Woodcock. S. M. 
Wookcock, W. Lee, 
Woodcock. W. Irvin, 
Heinsling, H. T. 



IloUidaysburg. 
Altoona. 

Hollidaysburg. 
Altoona. 

Martinsbnrg. 

Hollidaysburg. 

Altoona. 

Tyrone. 
Altoon;*. 

Hollidaysbuig. 

Tyrone. 
Altoona. 



Hollidaysburg, 
Altoona. 



44 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 



J. R. VAUGHN 



DEALER IN — 






H 



H 



Provisions, Flour, Feed, 

Queensware, Canned Fruits, Notions, Boots, Shoes, 

And all sucli articles as are usually kept in a First-class Dry Goods, Grocery ancb 

Provision Store. 

Best goods at Lowest Prices. 



Brick! Brick! 



-H^ 



KJ ± 








K 



Of Every Description : 



PRESSED, COMMON, 

PAVING, ANGLE, Etc. 

(For Uay Windows.) 

In any Quantity—at any Time— at Lowest Figures. 
J. R. VAUGHN, 

C(3riier 8th Avenue and 21st Street, Altoona.. 

(BRICK BUILDING.) 



HISTORY OF ALTOOXA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 45 

THE NEW JAIL. 

The new jail for the county was built during the years of 1868-9. 
Its total cost, with alterations, was about $100,000. It was erected 
by Jonathan Rhule, of this county, assisted by Ed. Havelan, architect, 
the latter now deceased. The commissioners appointed to supervise 
its construction were Robert Waring, John C. Biddle, R. B. Hamilton, 
Joshua Roller and David Henshey. The first keeper was Sheriff 
Harry Huff. On April 10, 1873, the Legislature enacted a si)ecial 
law authorizing the commissioners of the county to appoint a keeper, 
subject to the approval of the Court of Quarter Ses.sions. This ap- 
pointment is made annually. The first keeper under this law was 
Aiden Baird, who w^as succeeded the next year by John McClure, 
who.'^e ai)i)ointment was continued until his decease. The present 
keeper, J. B. Kephart, took charge April 1, 1880. 

The jail is built in the most approved style of prison architecture. 
The corridors and cells are well lighted and ventilated, at the same 
time perfectly secure. No improvement could be made or suggested. 
It reflects great credit upon those who were employed in its erection. 

ALMSHOUSE AND HOUSE OF EMPLOYMENT. 

This refuge of the poor of the county is situate in Allegheny 
township, about one and a half miles north of Hollidaysburg. It is 
a well-constructed brick Ijuilding, two stories and a half high, contain- 
ing fifty-two rooms. In addition to these are two dining rooms and 
two kitchens, besides a numl)er of halls or corridors. Its architec- 
ture is of modern style. It was planned by Mr. Hayden Smith, arcli- 
itect. Messrs. Peter Empfield and John B. Westley were the con- 
tractors. It was built in 1849-50. Its entire cost was $7,800.50. 

The grounds contain 267 acres 12 perches, being part of two tracts 
of land, one in the name of Joseph Patton, the other in the name of 
John Cochran. Both these tracts were purchased l)y Samuel Royer, 
and by him sold to the county for $10,000. The land or farm is un- 
der a high state of cultivation, owing to the efficient managciin'iit of 
the present steward, Mr. William Shinefelt. 

The house was first occupied in April, 1850. Its first steward 
was Mr. John Lytic, who served in that eajtacity until 1852; Mr. 
Edward McGraw from 1852 to 1863; Mr. O. E. Crissman from 1863 
to 1870 ; Mr. Joshua Aurandt from 1870 to Septeml)er 9, 1873, when 
the present steward, Mr. William Shinefelt, assumed the duties of the 
position. Its first physician was J. A. Landis, M. D. The pr<!.«ent 
one is W. C. Roller, M. D. 



46 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

The grounds immediately surrounding' the house, adorned with 
beautiful plants and flowers, convey the idea that the building is a 
comfortable abiding place for the poor. Under the direct supervision 
of the matron, Mrs. Shinefelt, the interior of the house is kept in the 
best possible condition. 



EXPENDITUUKS DURING 1879. 

For clotliing- $ skx) 93 

Delivering paupers 106 01 

Drugs 221 27 

Farm 1,225 83 

"Food i,<,0,5 66 

House 1)24 .51 

Improvements and repairs 2.>4 71 

MisceUiineou.s !iOO 42 

Outdoor relief 3,612 .52 

Outside burial 218 9.5 

Salaries 1,141 2.5 

Total expenses $11,412 09 



PRODUCTS CP FAIIM. 

In addition to amount paid for 

house expenses $6,099 45 

3931 pounds of beef 235 86 

3367 pou n ds of i>ork 185 18 

70 pounds of veal 4 20 

448 bushels of potatoes 224 00 

36059 pounds of flour 1,090 .52 

780 jiounds of butter 124 80 



Total outlay $7,964 01 

Deduct board of farm hands 384 00 



$7,580 01 
Average cost of inmates per week, $1.55. 

The products raised on the farm were: 1,275 bushels wheat, 299 
bushels oats, 1,573 bushels corn, 648 bushels potatoes, 4 bushels white 
beans, 228 bushels winter apples, 29 four-horse loads hay, 10 loads 
cornfodder, 3,367 pounds pork, 6,315 pounds beef, 780 pounds butter, 
20 bushels turnips, 46 barrels cider, 4,000 heads cabbage, 10 bushels 
beans in pod, 5 bushels peas in pod, 17 bushels onions, 20 bushels 
13arsnips, 10 bushels beets, 4 bushels hops, 50 bushels tomatoes, 1 bar- 
rel cucumbers for pickles. Amount realized on sale of products — 
$198.00. 

Articles manufactured in the house were: 119 straw ticks, 119 
bolsters, 110 sheets, 40 haps, 160 pillow cases, 6 sunbonnets, 8 night- 
caps, 61 women's dresses, 38 children's dresses, 98 men's shirts, 20 
women's flannel skirts, 6 children's skirts, 8 boys' shirts, 16 pairs 
boys' pants, 8 suits women's under clothing, 10 suits children's under 
clothing, 25 chemi.ses, 4 shrouds, 4 women's sacques, 53 aprons, 40 
towels, 25 pairs men's socks, 6 pairs women's stockings ; 200 pounds 
tallow candles, 10 barrels soft soap, 6 barrels sauer kraut, 280 gallons 
apple butter. 

The number of inmates in the house January 1, 1879, 88; ad- 
mitted during the year, 138; born during year, 7 ; total, 233. Dis- 
charged and eloped during the year, 153; died during the year, 12; 
total, 145. Number remaining Junuary 1, 1880, 88. Of the inmates 
remaining January 1, 1880, there are 41 adult males, 32 adult white 
females, 1 adult colored female, 9 male children, 5 female children (all 
white). Of these there are two blind adult males, 8 insane males 
(adults), 13 females. Natives, 02; foreigners, 26. 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 47 

THE county's FINANCES. 

To exhibit the present financial condition of the county, we sub- 
mit the following receipts and expenditures from January 6, 1879, to 
January 6, 1880: 

RECEIPTS 

From collectors $a5,366 06 

EXFEXDITURES. 

Paid to tittorneys $91(; 00 

Bridges (repairs, etc.) 1,53.5 4<> 

Uonds and interest 19,'24,i (>5 

Coinuiissioners' office 2.dii'.) 4-i 

Courts 7.071 0.J 

€ourt house (supplies, Insurance, etc.) 1. !•'•»;• 52 

Poor and lunatics - 11 .'M> !U 

Jails and penitentiaries 4,510 96 

Printing, books and stationery l,2f)7 10 

Miscellaneous 5,154 :',ii 

Treasury balance from last year 1.5«-2 04 

Balance on commission on $l-21,G!W.3-2 at 1}^ percent 1,S24 i;i 

Balance due county '. 5,298 87 

$65,360 00 

COUNTY INDEBTEDNESS J.YNI'ARY 5, 1880. 

Court house bonds $1-24.1(K) 00 

Prison bonds l'i.300 00 

Total $130,400 00 

NAMES OF OFFICERS AND YEAR OF ELECTION. 

PRESIDENT JUDGES. 

Jeremiah S. Black, from the fourth Monday of July, 1846 (when first court was 
held), up to and including March term, 1849. 

George Taylor, from April 5, 1849, (his tlrst court held on the second Monday of 
July, 1849), up to 1871. 

John Dean, from 1871 to the present time. 

ASSOCIATE JUDGES. 

George R. McFailane 1840 John Penn Jones K55 

Daniel McConnell 1847 , Adam Moses 18'>0 

Davis Brooke 1848 1 Samuel Dean 1800 

James Gardner 1851 j B. F. Rose 180.> 

Levi Slinglutr 1851 George W. Patton 18, (» 

JamesD. ilea 1854 Joseph Irwin 18^0 

J ames L. G win 18.55 Charles J. Mann 18^.2 

David Caldwell 1855 [ Samuel Smith 18<-i 

The names of the Di-strict Attorneys, since the furinatiuii of the 
county, will be found on page 38. 

SHERIFFS. 

Benj. E. Betts, appointed June 23.... 184<; Martin L. Bechtel \>^>l 

SamuelJ. Royer 1840 John McKeage l^j* 

Thomas Rees 1H49 Henry B. Hurt >l| 

George Port W55 Alexander I5r.bb l>'i 

James Funk 1&58 James M Miffler l'^' 

Samuel McCamant 1861 G.T.Bell 188"> 

FROTHONOTARIES AND CLERKS OF COURTS. 

J. Cunningham, appointed .Tune 10...184O Joseph Baldwge, r>";t'i" '«;}■/••; \^ 

Joseph Sufith. Dec?ember 1 1840 Anthony .v ^I"'':^"'-!^.':.^; ;''.':'•••• ^'*'^ 

George W. Johnston, Deccml)er 1 . . . .1849 James P. Mewart (present pi othono- 
HughMcXeal 185-2 i tuiy), December 1 187.5 



48 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 




H 



V 



OME^ 



-\ 



THE WAY TO DO IT IS TO PURCHASE GOOD 



FURNITURE 



SUCH AS CAN BE OBTAINED ONLY AT 



Arthur's Establishment, 



NO. 1008 ELEVENTH AVENUE. 



Parlor, Chamber and Kitchen Furniture, 



IN FINE STOCK, 



Including Chamber Sets, Bureaus, Lounges, Tables, Chairs, Bedsteads, Bed Springs 
and everything you can tnink of in the Furniture line. By adhering to the 
Cash Sj-stem we have no losses to make up. Thus we can sell at "20 
per cent, less than those who sell on time. >6®=-Wc manufac- 
ture as well as sell all kinds of Furniture. Orders left 
will receive prompt attention. 



JOSIAH ARTHUR, Prop'r. 

LEWIS TII'TON, Salesman. 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 



49 



REGISTERS AND RECORDERS. 



J. M. GibbODj-, appointed June 17 1846 

Peputy— H. A. Caldwell, appointed 

J u ne 1 7 1846 

J^ewls H. Williams, December 1 1847 

JIugli A. Caldwell, December 1 1856 

JJeputy — los. Baldiidge, appointed 

September 3 1857 



David M. Jones, December 1 It^ta 

Deputy— Jlngh A. Caldwell, Decem- 
ber 1 i8&-> 

Abraham Lin.urenfelter (present Reg- 
ister and Recorder) 1873 

Deputj— John C. Lingenfelter (pres- 
ent Deputy) 1875 



TREASURERS. 



K. H. MeCormick, appointed June 9.1846 

. Jo.seph Morrow 1846 

John Penn Jones 1849 

Joshua \Y. McCord 18.54 

.Samuel Hoover 18.57 

John Lingatelt 1858 



.John McKeage i860 

James H. Cramer if<i\-> 

John W. Hlack 186« 

.lohii :\I. Clark 186.S 

George M. Metz I87i 

Alexander Rutledge 1S77 



COMMISSIONERS. 



W'ni. C. MeCormick, appointed .June. 

William Bell 

Valentine Lingenfelter 

E< 1 \var< I .^I cG raw 

Will iam Bel 1 

jjohn K NeH" 

Jacob Hoover 

David Caldwell 

Jacob Burley 

Samuel Dean 

John Bennett 

John Lowe 

.John Campbell 

James Roller 

.James Hutchison 

David M. Confer 

[Jacob Barnhart tilled Confer's unex- 
pired term.] 

.John R McFarlane 

Enos M. Jones 

George L. Cowen , 

■George Koon 

.James M. Kinkead 

Daniel Shock 

j;joseph Irwin tilled Shock's ixncx- 



1846 
1846 



1847 
1847 
1847 
1819 
1849 
1849 
1850 
1S51 
18.5-2 
18.53 
18.54 
1855 
1856 



1857 
18.58 
18.59 
1860 
1861 
1862 



pired term, Shock having entered 

the arm v.] 

<ieorge W "Hewitt 18a3 

Robert Wai ing 1864 

John C. Biddle 1865 

R. R. Hamilton imi 

.Joshua Roller 1867 

David Henshey , I86s 

Jacob Walter.". 1869 

David S. Longenecker 1870 

Samuel Morrow 1871 

David Aurandt 1872 

John Clark 1873 

Alex. Caruthers 1875 

.John Halfpenny 1876 

Jonathan Slippy 1876 

.John Hilenian ." .1876 

John Hal fpen n y 1879 

Samuel B. Confer 1879 

James Mcintosh 1879 

Clerk from 1846 to 18.5(j, Lewis H. Wil- 
liams. From December 15, 18.5*;, to De- 
cember 23. 1862, Hugh A. Caldwell. Jo- 
seph Baldrige. present clerk, since 1862. 



CORONERS. 



James Funk 18.55 

William Fox 1858 



Jacob Weidensa 11 18(U 

John W. Humes (present coroner).. 1869 



SURVEYORS. 



Henry C. Xicodemus 1862 

John'M. Gibbony 1875 



Francis Cassidaj- 1878 



DIRECTORS OF THE POOIt. 



William Bell 1849 

Joseph Fay 1849 

J. A. Landis 1849 

Edward McGraw , 1851 

Jacob Igo 1851 

John G. McKee 1*51 

John Bennet 18.52 

George Cowen 18.52 

C. Stoner ia53 

David Fleck 18.54 

C. G u yer 18.55 

M. Wike 18.56 

Samuel Shryver 1857 

George Weaver 18.58 

John B. Riddle 18.59 

Peter Good 1860 

William Burley 18«il 

David Aurandt l^'yl 

Jacob Xicodemus 1863 



Samuel Jones ISM 

Samuel Moore 1865 

Stephen llaminotul l^tVi 

Samuel Smith \st;~ 

David Crawford I.s6s 

Jacob Stiller 18*;9 

Abraham Louden 1870 

Andrew Biddle, app. to till vacancy. 
John M. Bush, ajip to till, vacancy... 

James .M . Johnston 1871 

F. D. Yf>nng 1S72 

Albert Wilson ls7;i 

Joseph Riddle 1S74 

David Bell I.s75 

Ed ward Bell IS76 

John S. Biddle Is77 

David Bell Is7s 

J . C. Mattern 1879 



50 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

AUDITORS. 

Clias. K. KiiikoiHl 1847 (ieo. W. Hoed TSfil' 

Will. P. Dysart 1847 M. I). Thatcher 18ti5 

.Jauu's Wilson 1847 Abraliain Kobison..., 18ti() 

William I !»■»■( I 1848 .James McKiin 1866 

.James I,. Uwiii 1850 D. E. MeCahan 1867 

David Tate laiO S. A. Fulton 1868 

.Jacob Walter 185' (ieo. W. Hoover 186S 

(ieorge W. Smit li 18.51 Wm. H. Caiian 1869 

.James 'V. >IcCalian 1852 .1. I). Hicks I860 

Samuel Smith 1853 Wm. H. Calvert 1870 

Henry Linden teller 1854 .Jolm C. Uobeson 1871 

.John Ihu'-eitv 1855 .J. .J. Nottsker 1872 

.John W. Tiiijiei'v 1856 Martin P.ell. jr 1873 

Samuel Morrw 1857 Alexander Knox 1874 

A. C. .M cCartnev 1858 C liarles E. Butler 1875 

,Tosei)h 1{ . I rewitt 18.59 .; . Ross Mateer 1876 

A. M. I.lovd 1860 15. F. Custer l'^76 

K. M. iMessinier 186] .J. E. Hagey 1876 

E. L<)\vi\- .M'xite 18(i2 S. ( '. Baker 1879 

David Hens he V 18(.3 .J. H. Isett 1879' 

.John A. (J raw lord 18ii3 A. C. Clapper 1879 

Alex. Knox 1864 

n. It. POLICE. 

Tlie following- is a list of Railroad rolicemen, appointed by the (Governor, whose 
commissions are on tile in the Register and Recorder's oflice at Hollidaysburg: 

.John M. Clark 1865 | Edwin H. Carr 1873 

Benjainin Devine 1867 | Simon B. Barr 1873 

Alfred Thompson 1867 Xeal I'atton 1876 



.John M. Estep 1867 

.John Ehringer 1867 

Will iam ( )"Reilly 1873 

W il 1 iam \i. Smith 1873 



F ran kl i n Fox ] 876 

.James H. Cramer (trainmaster) 1877 

Patrick A. Burns 1878 

Alex. Mock 1878 



Isaac I-:. Rose 1873 I L. H. .Jones 1S7-! 

Henry .McDade 1873 ! Wm. W. Corkle 1878 

NEWSPAPERS AND OTHER PUBLICATIONS. 

For a portion of th(> followini;- we arc indebted to "Prof. Guss' 
History of the Juniata Valley," published in several papers of our 
county in IS"',) : 

The Aurora, was started at Hollidaysburg, August 9, 1833, by T. 
1'. Campbell, and was afterward conducted by Messrs. Sample Bros. 
It was sus])('nded after a year or two and was again revived in the 
Register in iSoC*. 

The Canal and Portage Register was first issued by John Scott 
and H. C. Gray, July 2, 1836. Mr. Gray sold his interest to John 
Pciiii Jones, October 2(5, 1836. Messrs. Scott and Jones continued 
until April 11, 1838, when Mr. Jones liecame sole proprietor, and 
he enlarged the pa])(U- to five columns, and changed the name to 
HollidaysI)urg Register and Huntingdon County Imiuirer. From 
May 1, 1839, to Fcdn-uary 24, 1840, 1). B. Williams was associated 
witli Mr. Jones, after which Mr. Jones continued again, and March 
4, PS-IC), changed the name to Hollidaysburg Register and Blair 
(^)iinty Hniuirer. Al)out 18.54 or 18.5.5 the name; was changed to 
Hollidaysl)urg Register and Ulair County Weekly News. Septemlier 
2.5, ISC.l, Afr. Jones took in H. A. Caldwell as a partner, and they 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 51 

sold the paper to John Dean, now Judge Dean, October 21, 18(53, 
from whom it passed, in 1865 or 1866, to Samuel Hoover & Son. 
March 16, 1868, it was purchased by David Over and his brother, 
Jacob Z. Over. January T, 1870, the name was changed to Holli- 
daysburg Register. November 27, 1872, Jacob Z. Over retired, and 
David Over continues its publication. On April 14, 1880, the paper 
was enlarged from twenty-four to thirty-six columns, and on thtit day 
appeared in a dress of new and Ijeautiful type. 

The Hollidaysburg Standard, five columns, was started witii 
materials of the old Huntingdon Gazette by P. L. Josliu, with George 
R. McFarlane editor, in the spring of 1838, and was owned by stock- 
holders. On January 1, 1841, O. A. Traugh and H. A. Boggs took 
charge, and on January 1, 1843, differences occurring between the 
editors and stockholders in regard to the Portage railroad, Messrs. 
Traugh and Boggs started a new paper, with new material, calliMl 
the Beacon Light, six columns, which was continued until June, 1845. 
In the meantime John Dougherty purchased a lot of new material 
and resumed the Democratic Standard about October 10, 1844. 
Alonzo S. Dougherty purchased the Standard, 0. A. Traugh i)ur- 
chased the interest of Mr. Boggs in the Beacon Light, and Messrs. 
Traugh and Dougherty merged the papers into a new series of the- 
Democratic Standard, May 1, 1845, and in May 1, 1846, Mr. Traugh 
became sole proprietor, and has continued until this date, now thirty- 
five years, and making thirty-eight years in all, counting l)Oth pajx-rs. 
The Standard now has eight columns to the page, and is all tliat a 
good printer can make it. Among the assistants on this paper, form- 
erly well known, was U. J. Jones. William H. Schwartz is the 
present assistant editor. 

The Blair County Whig was started about 1845 or 1846 by Jacob 
L. Slentz. After about three yeai-s, or about 1850, it was i)urcliii.--c(r 
bv Geoi'ffe T. Ravmond and William S. Wilson. Sul)se(iuently Mi'. 
Raymond alone conducted the paper. He is .said to have l)een mur- 
dered at WoodI)erry, X. J. After a suspension of a month or two it 
was purchased l)y John Brotherline, recently deceased. During part 
of the time (1861) Mr. Brotherline had John H. Keatley associated 
with him, and he also changed the name to the Radical ;iiid Blair 
County Whig, about 1866. May 18, 18(i8, it was purchased l)y :\F. 
p:dgar King and James H. L-win, and the name changed to Blair 
Countv Radi(;al. The office was removed to Altoona. On May 6,. 
1878, the interest of Jas. H. L-win was purchased by Samuel J. L'win, 
and bv him leased to M. Edgar King, since which tini*; James H. 



52 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

D. G. McCULLOUGH, 



V 



H 



jyj L 



H 




H 






nr\ 



GROCER, 

Kee^DS the Largest Stock of Groceries and Pro- 
visions in Altoona. 

w. R. ward; 



— DEALER IN — 



BITUMINOUS KND KNTHRICITE 

COALS. 



Kindling Wood, Lumber, 

Hay, Straw, Lime, Cement, Etc. 

Corner Dtli Avenue and ITtli Street. 



j8®-An orders for clean, pure Coal, (hai'd or soft) will bo promptly flllotl, as also for 

AVood, Hay, St)-a\v. etc-. Orders t-aii ho sent from the Telephone Exchange, 

ovei- K. \V. Olmes' Meat Market. Eleventh Avenue, bet. l.Uh and Iftli 

Streets, without cost, an<l will receive IMioMrr attention. 



HISTORY OF ALTOOXA AXD BLAIR COUNTY. 53 

Irwin re-associated himself witli Mr. King, the style of the publishini;: 
firm l)eing- King & Irwin. It is Republican, and now in it- thirty- 
fourth volume. . 

The Shield was a paper published about 1849 to 1850, in Holli- 
claysl)urg, in the intere>t of the Catholic church, by Harden Smith. 

The first newspajier enterprise undertaken in Altoona was l)y 
AVilliam H. and J. A. Snyder, who, in the spring of 1855, jjublished 
the Altoona Register from materials of the Standing Stone Banner. 
After five or six months it was discontinued, and the materials were 
purcha.sed l)y Ephriam B. McCrum and William M. Allison, wlio 
commenced the Altoona Triljune January 1, 1856. May 1, 1858, 
Mr. Allison disposed of his interest to H. C. Dern. July I'.i, 1875, 
the interest of McCrum passed into the hands of Hugh Piteairn, who, 
with Mr. Dern, has conducted the paper to this day. April 14, 1878, 
McCrum & Dern began the Daily Tril)une, which, after two years, 
on April 14, 1875, was discontinued. January 28, 1878, Dern <S: 
Piteairn resumed the daily edition, which, with the weekly, continues 
to be published. Adam J. Greer has been the principal editor for a 
number of years. The proprietors recently erected a neat and sul)- 
stantial three-story l)rick building, especially designed as a printing 
house, on Twelfth street, between Eleventh and Twelfth avenues. It 
fronts thirty-two feet on Twelfth street and has a depth of sixty feet. 

The American Era, started by a stock company in Tyrone al)out 
lS5fi, with W. S. H. Keys as editor, afterwards Benj. Jones. The 
material then went into the Tyrone Herald, by Rol)ert Stoddard, 
which suspended in about a year. It was revived again and called 
the Tyrone Star, Ity M. H. Jolly; afterwards it was conducted J)y 
Captain James Bell, and suspended. It was again revived and called 
the Western Hemisphere, I)y a stock company, with J. W. Scott and 
Cyrus Jeffries as editors. The paper suspended again, and then re- 
vived in August, 1867, by H. R. Holsinger, under the old name of 
Tyrone Herald, and August, 1867, sold to J. L. Holmes and C. S. W. 
Jones in April, 1868, and after April, 1869, Jones alone conducted it. 
W. H. H. Brainerd was a partner in 1871 and 1872, and Al. Tyhurst 
in 1875 and 1876. Mr. Jones continues to this date. On the morn- 
ing of July 8, 1880, the fine, new, three-story Herald building was 
destroyed by fire, together with a large portion of Mr. Jones' i)rinting 
material. With commendable energy and enterprise on the i)art of 
its puldisher, the paper made its appearance as if nothing had hap- 
pened. 



54 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

John H. Keatly commenced the publication of Tlie Leader in 1866, 
in Holliday.sburg, but after a little over a year it ceased, and the 
materials went to Dr. J. P. Thompson, Williamsburg, who started 
the Temperance Vindicator in the spring of 1868. About 1810 the 
paper was sold to Col. George F. McFarland, who removed the office 
to Harrisl)urg, but the press, etc., went to the Bedford Press office. 

The Altoona Vindicator was started May 1, 1868, by James 
¥. Campl)ell. In the summer of 1869 the office was nearly all 
destroyed by tire. New material was secured and the office sold, 
December 10, 1869, to D. W. Moore, who changed the name to the 
Altoona Sun, June 2, 1810, and it was conducted by Moore & Son, 
Moore & McKinney, and again by Mr. Moore alone. John W. Mc- 
Kinney entered the firm February 10, 1871. The Daily Sun was 
started May 2, 1810, and continued seven months. On May 10, 1814, 
the office was i)urchasod by N. C. Barclay, and his brother, Cyrus N. 
Barclay, who enlargt'd it, January 1, 1819. In Noveml)er, 1819, a 
joint stock comi)any was organized, compo.sed of a large number of 
the most active Democrats of Blair, Cambria, Huntingdon and Som- 
erset counties, fur the puri)0se of estal)lishing a daily Democratic i)a])er 
in Altoona in connection with the Weekly Sun. The organization, 
under the title of "The Sun Printing and Pul)lishing Company," was 
completed November 25, 1819, by the election of a board of directors, 
as follows: Andrew J. Riley, John P. Levan, (leorge W. (lood, N. 
(^ Barclay, S. M. Woodcock, M. Fitzharris, Albca-t F. Heess, F. I). 
Casanavc and R. W. (luthrie. The board of directors, at a subsequent 
meeting, elected A. J. Riley, president; N. C. Barclay, treasurer and 
business manager, and R. W. Guthrie, clerk. William P. Furey was 
elected as managing editor, John M. Furey, city editor, and Cyrus N. 
Barclay sui)erintend<'nt of the ))rinting department. The first num- 
ber of the Altoona Daily Sun was issued December 11, 1819. 

The Tyrone Blade was established by J. L. Holmes, June 1, 1810, 
who sold the office to Geo. Strouj), November 22, 1812, who changed 
the mime tn Tyrone Democrat, and continued its i)u))lication until 
July 8, 1880, when the office was destroyed by tire. 

The Altoona Bai)tist, first four jtages, afterwards eight pages, pub- 
lished in iIm' interest of the First Baptist church of Altoona; estab- 
lished Novend»er, 181."}; Rev. Wm. Codville, editor. It was published 
by Harry Slep, for altoiit one year, when it was di.seontinued. 

'i'lie Evening Mirror was started in Altoona, June 18, 1814, by 
Hairy Sle|> and (Jeo. J. Akers. It was a i>enny daily, four columns. 
Sei)tember 14 it was enlarged to liv(^ columns. W. J. Fleming en- 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 55 

torcd the tirni November 15, 1874. May 30, 18T5, it was enlarged to six 
coliiiiins, pric*' two cents, and forty cents per month. November 16,, 
1877, Harry Slep liecame sole proprietor, liut his health failing, he 
sold the paper, on Deceml)er 1, 1878, to W. K. Buckingham and W. 
S. Nicodemus, who, after a few months, changed it from an Inde})en- 
d(!nt to a Democratic paper, and named it the Democratic Call. 
Shortly after it resumed its indej)endence from party shackles and 
bore the iianic of Evening Call. It passed into the hands of Alex- 
ander it Hei'r, wlio conducted it a few months, and on January 1, 
1880, Edward B. Haines, who, for six years previously conducted 
the Williams))ort Banner, purchased the controlling interest and in- 
augnratecl active measures for the improvement of the paper. He 
c()nstructc(l a suitalile building adjoining tlie one ])reviously occu}»ied, 
stocked it with new ])rinting materials, introduced steam, etc., and at 
})resent }tublishes, in addition to the daily edition, a weekly edition of 
four i)ages, and also a Sunday edition styled the Sunday Call, four 
]>ages, eight columns to the page. 

The Cove Echo was published about 1S74 and 1875, in Martins- 
l)urg, by Henry and John Brumbaugh, and sul)sequently by B. F. 
Lehman; l)ut the Echo soon ceased for lack of sui»port. 

In 1S74 1). B. Ream commenced a temperance paper in Altoona 
called the Living Age, but the age of its living soon ended, and the 
materials were iiurchased by Geo. J. Akers, who established a Sunday 
})aper, called the (ilol)e, which, after a couple of months, he eon- 
verted into a daily, in the beginning of 1877, which ran for sometime, 
but for lack of oil on the gudgeons the Globe ceased to revolve daily, 
and the otlice was purchased and run by John Tomlinson as a (ireen- 
back pa])er; but this enterprise also failed. 

The Home Base, a base ball weekly, was published during the Imse 
ball season of 1876, V)y Frank McCullough, at Mirror Printing House. 

Der Deut.-^che Yolksfuehrer (the G<'rman People's Leader), was 
started in Altoona by Harry Slep, March 28, 1878. It has eight 
columns, four pages, and is the only (ierman j)ai)er in the Juniata 
valley. It is not political. Published at Harry Sleji's Printing House. 

The Musical Advocate; Altoona; monthly; established July, 1877 ; 
B. F>. Mahatfey, editor and jiublisher; lifty cents per year. 

The Gospel Trumpet, pul)lished in Altoona, monthly; established 
1878; gratuit(uis; T. B. Patton, editor. Printed at Harry Slep's 
Mirror Printing House. 

The Altoona Advance, weekly, by Mr. and Mrs. T. P. Bynder, 
was issued tirst on Mav 3, 187^». It is principally devoted to com- 



50 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 



B. BERKOWITZ, 

— CAN BE FOUND AT — 

No. 1318 Eleventh A\'enue, - Altooiiii, Pa. 

WHERE VOU CAN PUKCHASE YOUK 

Groceries and Provisions, 

TEAS, COFFEES, SPICES, 
Sugars, Syrups, Canned Fruits, Tobacco and Segars. 



F. P. TIBRNEY, 

ATTORNEY - AT - LAW, 

Ele\^entli A\'eiiue and Sixteenth ISti-eet, 



ALTOONA, PA. 



JACOB B. CO\¥EN, 



DEALER IN — 



Dry Goods, Groceries, 

PROVISIONS, ETC. 
Eighth Avenue and Nineteenth Street. 



BLMR COUNTY RKDIC 



A WEEKLY REPUBLICAN NEWSPAPER. 



TERMS: $1.50 peiyt-ur, invuiUibly in atlvancc; otlicrwise, $-.>.00 por year. All kinds 
ot .Job \\ oik at rcasonabh^ rati-s. Oflic-c in Sprankle'.s Building, 

Coi'nei' 11th Avenue and 17th Street, Altoona. 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 5t 

mercial purposes. It is delivered free at every house in the city, but 
ill the county where it also circulates, a small subscription price ik 
charged. Its political views are Greenback-Labor, Mr. T. P. Ryudcr 
having been the first man in the State to advocate a new party on 
the financial and laI)or issues. It believes in high tariff, high wages 
and cash payments. It is also a temperance paper. Mrs. Rynder 
contributes largely to its columns. It is printed at Harry Slep'.s 
Printing House. 

In August, 18T1I, Ed. J. Slep commenced the publication dl" the 
Youth's Mirror, a creditable monthly sheet, devoted exclusively to the 
rising generation, which is still successfully pul^lished. 

Our Work; Altoona; monthly; established Feliruary, 1880; 
])u))lished by the Young People's Christian Association of the Secuud 
Presbyterian church. Printed at the Mirror Printing House. 

The Tyrone Times, started as a semi-weekly ]iaper on June 1, 
1880, shortly after changed to a weekly. Messrs. Holmes & Wooden, 
proprietors. 

Tbe Book-Keeper and Penman ; Altoonu ; established August, 1880; 
J. F. Davis, editor and proprietor ; monthly ; one dollar jier year. KIov- 
enth avenue and Thirteenth street. 

The Marriage Advocate; Altoona; established 1880; J.F.Davis, 
editor and |)roprietor; monthly; fifty cents per year. Eleventh ave- 
nue and Thirteenth street. 

The first Altoona City Directory of any consequence was pub- 
lished in 1873, by Thomas H. Greevy, present City Recorder. The 
accuracy and extent of the information it contained made it extrenu^ly 
valual)le. This was followed by a directory for 18T5-() by the same 
author. The directory for 1878-1) was published liy Williant H. 
Renner, of Altoona, which constituted a complete compendium of 
such information as is sought in a publication of that kind. The 
directory for 1880-1, Webb Brothers & Co., of New York, publishers, 
is before the public. 

For the year 1875, George J. Akers compiled "The Mirror Hand- 
Book and Compendium of Facts," a pami)hlet of forty-seven {lagos. 
It contained a synopsis of the local occurrences of the year (1875), 
marriages and deaths; interments in Fairview Cemetery ; State, county 
and city elections; brief history of Altoona; list of city and (county 
officers; sketch of public schools, etc. ; making it a valuable book of 
reference. Harry Slep, publisher. 

In the early part of 1879, "The First Venture," a l)Ook consisting 
of one hundred and eighty-seven pieces of poetry and a story in pro.se, 



58 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

entitled ''After Many Days," was issued from the press of Harry 
Slep. It contained sixty pages. Harry I^. Woods was the author, 
and was also the author of a book of Irish tales, entitled "Pat. Mul- 
doon's Anecdotes." Five hundred copies were issued, which coni- 
manded a ready sale. 

LIST OF EXISTINO DAILY, WEEKLY AND MONTHLY PUBLICATIONS. 

H()lli(laysl)urg Register, weekly, Hollidaysburg. 

Democratic Standard, weekly, Hollidaysburg. 

Blair County Radical, weekly, Altoona. 

Altoona Tribune, daily and weekly, Altoona. 

Tyrone H<'rald, weekly, Tyrone. 

Altoona Sun, daily and weekly, Altoona 

Evening Call, daily, weekly and Sunday, Altoona. 

Musical Advocate, monthly, Altoona. 

Der Deutsche Volksfuehrer (German), weekly, Altoona. 

Gospel Trumpet, monthly, Altoona. 

Altoona Advance, weekly, Altoona. 

Youths' Mirror, monthly, Altoona. 

Our Work, monthly, Altoona. 

Tyrone Times, Aveekly, Tyrone. 

Book-Keei>er and Penman, monthly, Altoona. 

Marriage Advocate, monthly, Altoona. 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 59 



CITY OF ALTOONA. 



Altoona derived its name from the Latin word "Altus," or more 
directly from the French word "Alto," signifying "high." It is 
situate at the base of the Allegheny mountains, 1,168 feet above th<' 
level of the sea. Its location and surroundings are rich in scenic 
beauty and atmospheric purity, so much so that it has become a 
favorite place of resort for tourists during the summer months. The 
scenery is of the most varied description. Within a radius of a few 
miles there is a gradual transition from the graceful and pictures((uc 
to the rugged and sublime. A short distance west is the famous 
■"Horseshoe Bend." [See illustration.] The valley here separates 
into two chasms, but ))y a grand curve, the sides of which are fur 
some distance parallel with each other, the road crosses both ravines 
on a high embankment, cuts away the point of the mountain dividing 
them, and sweeps around and up the tremendous western wiill. 
Looking eastward from the curve, the view is peculiarly impressive, 
while at Allegrippus, where most of the mountains cluster, the vast 
hills in successive ranges roll away in billowy swells to the far horizon. 
During the summer, twice each day, an open "observation car" is 
attached to the Day Express train and makes the round trips between 
Altoona and Cresson Springs — the latter, in a more especial sense, 
perhaps, than the former, possessing a reputation as one of the most 
delightful summer resorts in the country. [See engraving of Cresson.] 

Opportunity is afforded for another pleasing diversion ))y the 
vicinity on the north of the Wopsononoc mountain, easily accessil)le 
to carriages, from whose summit is spread before the eye a panoramic 
view which, in the opinion of experienced travelers, is unsurpassed 
upon either continent in all those features which delight and inspire. 
It comprises the entire valley of the "Blue Juniata," a picture of 
highly cultivated farms, bounded l)y swelling ranges of hills, which 
gradually fade away in the azure of the distant horizon. 

The celebrated "Sinking Spring Valley," with its suljterranean 
.streams and immense caverns, lies to the eastward, whili' on the 
:South-east is the Bell's Gap Narrow Gauge railroad, excursions by 
which to the summits of the mountains are among the most satis- 
factory and popular diversions of life in Altoona. 



60 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 




H 



The Best Daily Newspaper published in Central Pennsylvania. 

HAS THE LARGEST CIRCULATION 

Of any pMper bctwi-en I'itlsbni-g and llarrisburg. 



As an adverli^iim niediinii it is lanf^xcpllffl. It .also contains the latest telegraph re 
and local news. SUBSCEIPTIOTsT PRICE, 40 Cents per Month. 



The Weekly Tribune, 

A Tliirty-two column paper, devoted entiridv 1o news— miseellaneous and local, 

and is considered the best family paiier in the State. SUJJSCRI I'TIONf 

IMMCK : ^l..iO per year in adv.ance. 



The Trihiine Jol ) Printing Roonis 

Have the facilities for executing all kinds of IJLAXK AND BOOK WORK, at the 
shortest possible notice, at the most reasonable terms. 

BERN & PITCAIRN, PROP'RS, 

Twelfth Street, bet. Eleventh and Twelfth Avenues, Altoona, 



LIVE AND LET LIVE? 

ENCOURHGE YOUR OWN MECHANICS! 
PROTECT HOME INDUSTRY! 



I. ^Y. TOOMEY, 

Merchant Tailor, 

Corner 11th Avenue and ITtli Street, 

Over Sprankle'.s Bee Hive Store, Altoona. 



Fabrics IVjr Clothing of the latest manufacture— Best Materials— Most approvecC 
Figures and Styles to select from— Best Workmanship— I'erfcct Fit. 

LOWEST PRICES. 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 61 

HOTEL ACCOMMODATIONS. 

The hotel accomniodations both of Altoona and Cresson, as sum- 
mer resorts, are not only sufficiently ample, but of a character to 
please the most fastidious. The Logan Hou.se has long enjoyed, and 
richly deserves the reputation it has acquired of being one of the most 
completely appointed hotels in the country, and since its erection by 
the Pennsylvania Railroad company (1855) has served as a model 
for similar institutions. The system of electric bells has recently 
been introduced. The building itself, surrounded by broad piazzas, 
its elegant furnishing, its tal)]e and entire management, leave nothing 
to be desired, while the elevated site and eharming suiToundings 
combine to render it one of the most delightful liealth and pleasure 
resorts in the country. The large and l)eautifully shaded lawn affords 
a fine field for croquet and other out-door sport, while within ten- 
pin'allevs, billiard tables, etc., provide ample facilities for recreation. 
In addition to the Logan House, Altoona can boast of other hotels 
which would prove credital)le to cities of much larger growth. 

The Mountain House, which is the only hotel at Cresson, is a 
very extensive frame building, and stands on the crest of a hill in 
the midst of a delightful grove. The grounds are expansive and are 
handsomely laid out, and scattered through them are a nunilier of 
cottages designed expressly for the accommodation of families. Thi' 
hill on which the house stands is always fanned by a delicious breeze. 
Several springs of medicinal waters flow from the mountain in the 
vicinity, and pleasant drives lead away through the almost unljrokeu 
forests. The Mountain House affords accommodations for five hun- 
dred guests. Both the Mountain House at Cre.sson and the Logan 
House in Altoona are under the general management of the Key- 
stone Hotel company, and under the special direction of that tndy 
efficient and polite caterer, Mr. W. D. Tyler. 

SITE OF THE CITY SELECTED. 

AVe have already adverted t(j the fact that, in 1840, Altoona was 
conceived by the Pennsylvania Railroad. The site of the city in that 
year was selected by the officers of that public highway as the most 
available place for the location of their princii)al workshops. At that 
time this portion of the country was a forest, broken only here and 
there by small tracts cleared for farming purposes. The hills and 
dales, now covered with the most striking evidences of materia? 
prosperity and progress, were at that time owned l)y William TiOudon, 
David Robison and Andrew Green, each of whom had a farm. 



62 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

WHERE THE SHOPS WERE LOCATED. 

It was (]('ci(l<'(l l)y the officers of the Pennsylvania Railroad that 
the shops should he located on the farm of Mr. Rol)ison, the centre 
one of the three, and arrangements were made with Mi*. Archibald 
Wrig-ht, of Philadelphia, to secure it. In connection with tlie pur- 
chase of the farm the following story is told: Mr. Wright sent Mr. 
Cadwalader to make the iturchase. At that time Mr. Robison lived 
in an old log house, near where the Logan House now stands. On 
his arrival he found Mr. R. engaged in butchering hogs, and at onco 
made known his errand, as it had been previously ascertained that he 
would sell for $(i,000. Fortunately for Mr. R., but unfortunately for 
Mr. C, the latter dro})ped a letter from his i)Ocket, which was picked 
up and read I)y Mrs. Robison. This letter authorized Mr. C. to pay 
$10,000 for the farm rather than fail in the ])urchase. Like any other 
good wife she immediately communicated this information to her 
hus))and, and the result was that Mr. C. had to yield to the demand 
of $10,000 instead of $0,000. 

Mr. Wright located the original })lot of Altoona upon the farm 
purchased from Mr. Robison, giving- to the Pennsylvania Railroad 
company some fifteen acres upon which to erect shops, offices and 
other buildings. At the time the plot was made a difficulty sprung 
u]) between Mr. W. and the farmers on cither side, which resulted in 
disarrangement of the streets as they passed from one farm to the 
other; hence the unsightly and annoying offsets east of Eleventh 
street and west of Sixteenth street. As soon as it was known that the 
Pennsylvania Railroad company intended locating their shops at this 
point, Messrs. (xreen and Loudon commenced to lay out and sell lots. 

NAMES OF LOCALITIES. 

The plot laid out on the Robison farm Avas known as Altoona, 
while that ])ortion lying east of Eleventh street was known as Greens- 
burg, and that west of Sixteenth street was called Loudonsville. 
Subse(|uently another addition was made at the eastern end of Greens- 
burg, on the western side of the railroad, beginning near or at Seventh 
street. This part, on which are the lower Pennsylvania Railroad 
shops, was laid out ])y George R. Mowry, then a civil engineer of 
the comi)any, aiul K. B. McPike, and called Logantown. These dis- 
tinctive names were retained until 1808, when a city charter Avas 
ol)taine(l, and these farms, together with land lying far beyond them, 
were )>rought within the city limits, when ward names were substi- 
tuted, and the old names droitpcd out of use. 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 63 

■\VHEN THE WORK WAS COMMENCED. 

In the summor of 1850 the raih'oad company commenced the erec- 
tion of shops. At that time the cars of the company passed over the 
mountain on the old Portage raih'oad, the mountain division, from 
this place to Conemaugh, not being completed. One passenger train 
a day, hauling a baggage car and two passenger coaches, carried all 
the people traveling east and west by way of the Juniata valley. At 
that time the road-bed was on Ninth avenue, and the passenger sta- 
tion was located near where the locomotive paint shop now stands. 

INSTANCE OF INCREASED VALUE OF REAL ESTATE. 

In the spring of 1856 the lot upon which the Brant House now 
stands was offered for $250, and refused. Ten years after it was 
sold for $7,500. This will convey an idea of the rapid advance in the 
price of property when it was ascertained that Altoona was to be 
made the head-quarters of the Pennsylvania Railroad company. 

BANKING HOUSES. 

The first banking house was opened al)out the year 1858, by 
Messrs. Bell, Johnston, Jack & Co., of Hollidaysburg, Wm. M. 
Lloyd being one of the firm. About the year 185Y or 1858, Messrs. 
Bell, Johnston and Jack retired, and the name of the firm was changed 
to that of Wm. M. Lloyd & Co. Mr. Lloyd continued to do a large 
banking business until overtaken by the panic of 1873, and he sub- 
.^equently ceased business. Between those periods the First National, 
Mechanics' Savings and the Altoona banks were established, and 
have braved all disasters, surmounted all obstacles, and are now doing 
a fair business, and regarded as solvent as any in th(i country. 

CHURCHES. 

In 1852 and 1853 the first churches were erected in Altoona. 
Previous to that time the only place of worship was the old Union 
school-house, which, for a long time, was used by a colored family as 
H place of residence and the African M. E. congregation as a place of 
worship. It was recently torn down, and a neat frame superstructure 
erected on the site, near the corner of Eleventh avenue and Sixtecntii 
street, for worship by the African M. E. congregation. [See Churches 
on subsequent pages.] 

WATER SUPPLY. 

The stream of water first introduced by the Pennsylvania Railroad 
company, and from which the puljlic was for a time supplied by the gas 



(;4 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 



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N. C. Barclay, Business Manager. 



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Eleventh Street, between Tenth and Eleventh 
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HISTORY OF ALTOOXA AND BLAIR COUNTY. (;5 

■and water company, was found insufficient, the increase of railroad 
«bops requiring, at least in the summer, all the water of the stream. 
The city council was urg-ed to supply the town from some other 
quarter, and finally selected Kittanning- and Burgoon runs, about four 
aiiiles west of the city. A twenty-inch pipe brings the water from a 
dam at Kittanning Point to a reservoir located on Prospect Hill, 
■which has a capacity of 3,275,000 gallons. This improvement cost 
i)ver $200,000. Besides the amount expended for water, $150,000 
were expended for putting in sewers and Macadamizing the principal 
.streets. Eighth and Eleventh avenues, the principal ones on eacii 
.side of the railroad, with the streets adjacent, have been properly 
j^ewered and Macadamized. [More on this subject hereafter.] 

CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION.. 

Among the notable events in the history of Altoona was the cele- 
bration of the centennial year. In a communication, written by our 
venerable and highly-esteemed townsman, H. Fettinger, sr., and i)u])- 
lished in the Evening Mirror, December 27, 1875, attention was 
called to the propriety and importance of a public demonstration un 
the occasion of the out-going of the last year of the first century of 
■our national independence. The suggestion was responded to, and 
in a few days, such was the activity displayed by our leading citizens, 
preparations were made for the grande.-^t demonstration that had ever 
been witnessed in our Mountain City. We append a truthful and 
graphic narrative of the })roceedings as they appeared in the EvENiNCi 
Mirror of January 1, 1876. The report was made l)y George J. 
Akers, one of the editors of that paper. We quote : 

"The largest and grandest demonstration ever witnessed in this 
city took place last night, the occasion ))eing the inauguration of the 
■centennial year. The outpouring of the people was immense, and 
not an accident occurred to mar the enjoyment of the people. At an 
■early hour the streets were thronged with an immense multitude, and 
presented a brilliant and lively spectacle. 

" The doors of the Opera House were thrown open at eight o'clock, 
and in less than twenty minutes it was impo.ssible to ol)tain standing 
room, and hundreds of persons were compelled to forego the pleasure 
of attending the exercises there. At ten minutes before nine o'clock 
the City Band marched to the Opera House, playing the old iamiliar 
air, 'Yankee Doodle,' shortly after which the curtain slowly rose. 
Arranged in appropriate order were thirteen little girls representing 
the thirteen original States of the Union, as follows: 



66 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

Massachusetts— Miss Mary Patton. | Delaware— Jliss Ketta .Smith. 

New Hampshire— Miss Jessie Murray. MaryUmd— Miss Emma Ofleuwahler. 

Rhode Ishxiid- Miss Tillie Smith. | Virgiuia— Miss Jennie Powel. 

Connecticut — Miss Ninnie Bowman. " ' ' 

New Jersey — Miss Magf<ie Cooney. 
New Yorlv— Miss Kate F. Fettinger. 
I'ennsylvania — Miss Ellen .Shuster. 



North Carolina— Miss Annie Kerr. 
South Carolina— Miss Jennie Smith. 
Georgia— Miss Clara Wahl. 



"The little girls were dressed in white, with blue sashes, l)earing' 
the naiMes of the States represented 1)y them. In the centre of the 
stage stood a beautiful evergreen ]»inc tree, representing the "Tree of 
Liberty," decorated with thirty-seven small flags, representing all the 
States now in the Union. The whole arrangement of the stage was 
under the direct supervision of H. Fettinger, sr. The overturi' on 
the grand piano, by Professor U. S. Lutz, was performed at about 
nine o'clock, but it was sometime afterwards that the Altoona City 
Band took their position on the stage, immediately in the rear of the 
'little girls,' and Avhen the curtain rose a second time the l)and played 
'Hail (^Jlumbia.' The rising of the curtain was the signal for a, 
tremendous burst of applause. After a slight pau.>^e the audience again 
'brought down the house' in appreciation of their delight at the beauty 
of the tableau. When the curtain was again raised, the Glee Club, com- 
posed of the following ladies and gentlemen, appeared and sung in 
elegant style, 'My Country 'Tis of Thee.' Soprano, Miss Lizzie Sny- 
der and Miss Tjibl)ie Hindman ; alto. Miss Carrie Bowman and Miss 
Maggie Hindman; tenor, AVni. Mills and T. W. Wiley; bass, E. M. 
Warren and E. J. Weston; ])ianist, Prof. U. S. Ijutz. 

"His Honor Mayor Gilland, then appeared and said: 'We have 
assembled here to-night to celebrate the inauguration of the centen- 
nial year of our indei)endence as a nation, to honor the memories of 
tho.se who laid (h)wn their lives for the blessings of freedom which 
we, as a people, now enjoy. They freely poured out their lilood to 
cement the Union, and we are here to-night to do them and their 
memories the honor which their deeds so justly merit. There are 
those here who will address you. With these few brief remarks I 
wish you one and all a Happy New Year.' 

"The (ilee (^lub then sang the 'Red, White and Blue,' in excel- 
lent .^tyle, after which P. Orr Alexander ])roposed three cheers for the 
'Bed, White and Blue.' They were given with a will. Rev. C. T. 
Steck tiieii read 'John Adams on the Peclaration,' a most appropriate 
scdectioii, and most (■xceljently rendered. Robert A. Clarke, in a 
clear and distinct voice, then read the Declaration of Lidep<Midence. 
The (ilee Club again sang the 'Red, White and Blue,' the audience 
joining in the ciiorus. A j)oem relating to the ringing of the memor- 
able Tjiberty Bell on the announcement of the passage of the DiH'lara- 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. i\1 

tioii of Iiidupeiidt'iice was read by Rev. C. T. Stuck. 'IMic band tlien 
rendered the 'Star Spangled Banner' and the 'Red, White and Blue,' 
after which Win. Lee Woodcock addressed the audience on nuitters 
relatinfr to the past and })re.sent of our glorious country. The 'Rock 
of Lil)ertv' was next sung l)y the Glee; Clul). At tlie conclusion of 
the singing the l)and struck u]* 'Yankee Doodle,' and the audience 
joined with hands and feet. Rev. Steck then read the stirring and 
ai»])ri)))riate jioein 'E IMuribus Unuin.' Rev. H. Baker then apjieared 
on the stage and made a brief, terse and eloquent s])eech. 1). B. Wil- 
liams was the next speaker ; he acquitted himself creditably. The 
'little iiirls" were again arranged along the front of the stage; the 
Glee Club took a })()siti<)n imnie(liately Ix-hind them; then followed 
the singing of the 'Star Spangled Banner.' P. S. Ake recited the 
following original apostrophe to the American eagk': 'The American 
eagle is the largest bir<l in the world — with his right foot perched on 
the Rocky Mountains, his left on the Alleghenies; with one wing 
sjtread over the Pacific, the other over the Atlantic; with one eye 
fixed on Mexico, the other on Cuba; his tail sj)read ov<-r Canada, and 
])icking for all South America; is destined to carry the Stars and 
Stripes to all till' nations of the earth, and freedom to all the inhab- 
itants thereof; he can spread his wings wider and .soar higher than 
any other bird that soars in the heavens. AVhen the eagle .scpieals the 
lion trend)les and snakes seek their hiding })laces.' This concluded 
the in-door exercises. The band struck up 'Hail Columbia,' amid the 
shouts and yells of the vast multitude. 

"After the exercises in the (J)>era Hou.'^e had concluded, thedeii.-e 
crowd therein assembled poured out into the streets and swelled the 
immense throngs ther<' congregated. Every door step, l)alcony, door 
and window along Eleventh avenue was occu]>ie(l by persons anxious 
to obtain a Ix'tter view of the proceedings on the streets. The interval 
from eleven until twelve o'clock was consunu'd in illuminating the 
houses, preparing for the parade and general Jollitication. 

"About twelve o'clock St. .John's Literary Society, numbering 
i'ightv men, attired in regalia, with torches and national c(»lors, marched 
down the east side of Eleventh avenu<' and halted in front of Marsh's 
tailoring establishment. The Empire Hook and Laddci- coiiipaiiy, 
fullv (Hpiijiped and carrying axes and torches, simidtaneoiisly marched 
down the western side of the avenue, halted o]»i)osite Stehle's hot«'l, 
and opened order to allow the (iood Will Enuine company to ])ass 
through. Li the meantime St. John's Society marched down to 
Eleventh street, across to the west sidi- of Eleventh avenue, and 



68 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIH COUNTY. 



ESTABLISHED 1874. 



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ill J!lair County. I'KICES LOW. 

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HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 69 

haltf'd. The Latta Guard, headed lyy their drum corps, next marched 
up Eleventh avenue to Eleventh street and halted at the Opera House. 
The Excelsior Hose company appeared at this juncture and took a 
position on the avenue, soon after which the Altoona Engine company 
(P. R. R.) marched up Twelfth street to Twelfth avenue, down Twelfth 
avenue to Eleventh street, along Eleventh street to Eleventh avenue, 
and halted; they were attired in full equipments, bearing axes and 
torches and headed I»y their drum corps. Aids Hamlin and Alexan- 
der having arrived on prancing steeds some time before, busied them- 
selves in forming the line, in which labors they were subsequently 
assisted by Messrs. Cornman, Fries, Hurd, Meyers and Crozier, assist- 
ant aids. During the formation of the line the immen.se throng of 
people maintained an uninterrupted cheering from one end of the avenne 
to the other. Fire-works were set off in profusion, fire-arms discharged, 
and the general enthusiasm was deafening. 

"Precisely at twelve o'clock, midnight, the Vigilant bell gave the 
signal, and from every church steeple, from the school houses, shops 
and engine houses the glad tidings of great joy went forth and rever- 
berated through the atmosphere unto all the inhabitants of our Moun- 
tain City, reminding us that the grandest new year of the closing 
century was being l>orn. Simultaneous with the ringing of the bells, 
the locomotives in the yards of the Pennsylvania Railroad company 
.sounded their shrill whistles; the bon-fires on the hills were lighted; 
the cannons on Reservoir and Gospel hills thundered ; various colored 
lights appeared in various parts of the city ; windows were brilliantly 
illuminated, and the whole city was aglow with many colored lights. 
Such a scene was never before seen or heard in the city of Altoona. 
At precisely fifteen minutes pa.st twelve o'clock. Chief Marshal Stewart 
dashed up Twelfth street on his 'white charger,' and assumed command 
of the proces.sion. In a moment the command was given, and the 
procession of over a thousand men were in motion. The uniforms, 
regalias, axes and horns of those composing the parade, sparkled amid 
the glare of the torches. The music served to render the scene more 
impressive. The following was the order of the procession: (1) The 
Chief Marshal, plumed, and wearing a jeweled sash, on a spirited white 
charger, accompanied by his aids; (2) Latta Guards, in full uniform; 
(3) Altoona City Cornet Band; (4) Good Will Steam Fire Engine 
company; (5) Empire Hook and Ladder company; (6) Mountain 
City Cornet Band; (7) Vigilant Steam Fire Engine company; (8) 
Excelsior Hose company; (9) Altoona Steam Fire Engine company; 

6 



70 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

(10) St. Jolin'.s Literary and Benovolont Society; (11) Keystone 
Cornet Band ; (12) Cavalcade of citizen.s. 

Citizens vied with each other in decorating their respective resi- 
dences and places of business with bunting, flags, ensigns, arches, etc., 
in order to adorn the triumph of our arms, to peri)etuate a remem- 
brance of our national independence, as well as to exhibit an apprecia- 
tion of the superior blessings we enjoy in the "land of the free and the 
home of the brave." 

THE CENTENNIAL FOURTH. 

On the following Fourth of July every house and every street was 
decorated with flags, etc. The procession, composed of military, patri- 
otic personations, the fire department, benevolent and civic societies, 
the employes of our great work-shops, our tradesmen and artisans at 
work, each at his particular vocation, mounted on wagons drawn by 
richly caparisoned horses, and citizens in cnrriages and on foot, was 
one that was scarcely surpassed anywhere. Even the farmer with his 
hay wagon was represented. The ])roeession, after moving thrimgh 
the })rineii)al streets and avenues, halted at a staiul erected in a 
field belonging to the Pennsylvania Railroad conii)any, in the eastern 
part of the city,, where the immense concourse of jieople were suitably 
and patriotically addressed by Judge John P. Blair, of Indiana county. 
A violent storm at three o'clock p. m., i)ut an end to th(^ gorgeous 
spectacle. 

THE RAILROAD RIOTS. 

Th(^ next interesting event — mournfully interesting, we are justified 
in saying, and in striking contrast with the recital immediately pre- 
ceding — was the railroad strike, which originated with the disaft'ectcd 
employes (jf the Baltimore & Ohio Bailroad, and extended to the 
principal railroads of the country. Without exhausting time or occu- 
pying si)ace ill explaining the circumstances which led to the ince])tion 
of the strike, presuming that this subject is familiar to our readers, W(^ 
will remark that on July 17, 1877, seventy-five or eighty eiigin<'s had 
))een congregated iit Mnrtinsburg, W. Va., a station of the Baltimore 
& Ohio railroad, none of which were allowed to depart. Col. Faulk- 
ner, with seventy-live men of the light infantry guards, arrived at that 
point with loaded muskets and took charge of one of tlu; westward- 
l)ound freight trains which had lieen detained by tht! strikers there. 
He was confronted by the strikers, who had armed themselves with 
all kinds of weai)ons. On the day mentioned no trains left Baltimore. 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 71 

The Governor ordered out the Matthews' guards, of Wheeling, to 
assist in quelling the riot which had broken out at that point. The 
riot having quickly assumed gigantic proportions, on account of pre- 
concert of action on the part of the strikers, on the very next day 
(July 18), Governor Matthews called upon the President for United 
States troops, which were promptly furnished. On July 19 the strike 
became general, extending from Martinsburg to Chicago — riotous jiro- 
ceedings being enacted at Parkersburg, W. Ya.; Benwood, Columbus 
and Newark, Ohio ; Chicago, etc. The temporary success of the Balti- 
more & Ohio brakemen and firemen there — who were the parties who 
inaugurated the disturbances — encouraged tho.se who occupied relative 
positions in the employ of the Pennsylvania Railroad company, and 
out of these initiatory proceedings grew our own troubles. With this 
preamble, we turn our attention to 

WHAT TRANSPIRED IN ALTOONA. 

On July 19, 1877, our city was thrown into a furore of excitement 
by the announcement that the freight conductors and brakemen on the 
Pennsylvania railroad had struck at Pittsburg — that they not only 
refused to go out with their trains when the latter were ready, but 
that they would not let the trains go. out. When the strike was 
inaugurated in the morning, none but freight conductors and brake- 
men were concerned in it, but at night the freight engineers and fire- 
men joined them. The strikers were in good spirits, and confident 
that all their denuinds would be acceded to — that the golden opportu- 
nity had arrived to benefit their condition, and that they would take 
advantage of it. A few days previous the following order had been 
issued by Superintendent Pitcairn : 

Pennsylvania 1{ailbo.\d Offick of 1 

General Agent and Superintendent Pittsburg Division, S 

Pittsburg, July lb, 1.S77. ) 

notice to dispatchers. 
On and after Tliurstlay, July 19. 1.S77, two trains ai-e to he run on Union autl two 
trains on National line through between Pittsburg and Altoona, thirty-six cars to a 
train, a pusher from Conemaugh to Altoona. No passenger engines to be run oii 
freight. Balance of trains to divide at Deny, first in first out. Derry to be head, 
quarters eastward where engines will be turned. Between Derry and Pittsburg 
all double-headers, thirty-six cars to a train, or as many as they can haul, to be in- 
creased or decreased, in the judgment of dispatchers, according to lading in cars. 

Robert Pitcairn, Superintendent. 

A single freight train is a locomotive and eighteen cav>. The crew 
comprises an engineer, fireman, conductor and three brakemen. What 
is called a "doulile-header" is a train of thirty-six cars, with an engine 
at each end. Mr. Pitcairn's order did not provide for an increase in 
the crew in proportion to the increase in the .size of the train. The 



•72 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 







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HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 13 

men thought that a reduction on the first of June previous of ten per 
cent, and then an increase of one hundred per cent, in the labor 
required of them was more than they could bear. Previous to the 
issuance of the order the custom had been to employ four men besides 
the engineer and fireman in moving a single train of eighteen cars. 
If the above order had gone into effect an ordinary crew would have 
had to take charge of a train twice the u.sual size. This would have 
been equivalent to the discharge of every other man, and those retained 
would have had to perform double work. It was the increase in the 
amount of labor, the uncertainty as to who would be discharged and 
who retained, combined with the dissatisfaction created by the June 
reduction in i)ay that caused the strike. From the Evening Mirror 
of this city, of July 20, we extract the following : 

" The strike has not reached this city at this writing. Groups of 
persons, engineers, firemen, brakemen, shop men and others have been 
diseu.ssi^lg the affair on the streets since morning. Last night but 
three coal trains a^rrived from the west in this city, although seventeen 
freight trains generally arrive during the night. Messrs. Robert Pit- 
cairn and Frank Thomson were in the city last night, and in company 
with G. Clinton Gardner, left for Pittsburg at an early hour this 
morning. James McCrea was in the city, also, but left for Harrisburg 
on Philadelphia Express last night. Lieutenant-Governor John Latta 
passed through the city last night to Harrisburg to be on hand in case 
of disturbance, Governor Hartranft being in California. Several 
freight engineers, firemen and crews refused to take their trains out 
of the city last night and this morning. Representatives from the 
western division are in the city and are in consultation with train 
hands, who say they are not inciting a strike, though they declare 
they will not take a train on the road under the present difficulties. 
Thomas A. Scott passed through to Pittsburg this forenoon. 

MILITARY ON THEIR WAY TO PITTSBURG. 

"At an early period of the morning of July 21, three train loads of 
soldiers, en route to Pittsburg, passed through this city. As they 
entered the depot at this point they were received by a few of the 
railroad employes there collected with expressions of disapproval. 
They belonged to the First Division of Philadelphia, and were com- 
posed of the First, Second, Third and Sixth regiments, one thou.sand 
five hundred men, under the command of Gen. R. M. Brinton. The 
German Hussars and State Fencibles were with them. Dismounted 
cavalry and artillery were noticeable also. At this point four large 



"74 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

boxes of cartridges were put on board. As the trains left the depot 
here the coupling* pins of the engines were pulled five different times. 
One soldier was knocked down for an alleged insult. About two 
hundred railroaders were gathered at the depot, and the opinions ex- 
pressed were as varied as the characters of the men. A stone was 
thrown just as the last train went out, which struck the side of the 
last engine, and a link was thrown which struck a car. 

STRIKE INAUGURATED. 

"About 10:35 same morning (July 21), about fifty brakemen assem- 
bled in the yard of the railroad company, stopped two trains laden 
with stone, and refused to allow the other engines prepared to take 
the trains on to go out of the gate at the round house. They also 
sent all the shifting engines in but one for passenger use. They 
allowed all passenger trains to pass, but refused passage to freights. 

"At 2:50 p. m., as the Hollidaysburg train was hauling out of the 
depot, with some freight trains attached, the strikers cut the train and 
would not allow the engine to proceed until the freight cars were 
placed on a siding. At 5:20 p. m., a train of eight cars, containing 
about four hundred soldiers, under command of Col. H. Rodgers, 
passed through the city, taking supper here. Engineer Philips came 
out on engine No. 924, and at the request of the strikers stepped down, 
and Jacob Russell, foreman of the round house, took the engine. 
Engineer James Westfall refused to come down from engine No. 136. 
One striker attempted to uncouple the engines from the train and was 
pierced through the arm Ijv a l)ayonet in the hands of a soldier. A 
guard was thrown out around the engines, and when the trains started 
several of the guard were pulled off ]\v the strikers. One man was 
})ulled down and .severely beaten, but they all managed to get on. 
After this the train was fired upon and stoned by the strikers around 
the depot, but nevertheless succeeded in threading its way out of the 
city en route for Pittsburg. 

"The members of the striking l)ody disclaimed, Avith justice to 
themselves, that the stone throwing, etc., was done by what is known 
in the city as the 'gut gang,' and not Ijv railroaders." 

THE SHERIFF ISSUES A VERBAL PROCLAMATION. 

Ill the afternoon, previous to this occurrence, Sheriff J. M. Stifiler 
issued a proclamation, verlnilly, in the depot, requesting the assembled 
multitude to disperi^e and quietly return to their homes; not to tres- 
pass on any of the railroad company's property; preserve the peace; 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 75 

leave all trains pass, and not molest or stop engineers or engines from 
work, or to molest, in any manner, men in the employ of the Penn- 
sylvania Railroad company. 

On the same day Mayor Gilland issued the following 

PROCLAMATION : 

To THE CiTiZEN.s OF ALTOONA :—As the Chief Magistrate of this city, I believe It 
to be my duty, under the present circumstances, to caution the citizens and others 
against anj- unlawful assemblies that may form under the present difficulties. I 
trust that all will endeavor to prevent any disturbance that would be detrimental 
to the interests of our city, or to the property of any one while the present excite- 
ment lasts. It is required of all good citizens to be vigilant, and lend their personal 
influence in assisting the city authorities in carrying out that which seems to them 
best for the safety of lives and pi-operty. I also request all landlords to close their 
bars until the present excitement subsides. This request I expect to be complied 
with, and if not, those who disregard it will be held responsible under the law. Be- 
lieving that our citizens are law-abiding and that we have no occasion to chronicle 
riotous conduct on the part of any one, but that all maj- be peace and quietness, I 
remain, vei-y truly. D. A. Gilland, Mayor. 

[The ahove had the desired effect.] 

MEETING AT THE BRANT HOUSE. 

At 7 o'clock, p. m., a large number of citizens assembled at the 
Brant House. Col. David Jones introduced, as the fir.-^t speaker, 
James F. Milliken, who had been colonel of the Fifth reg-iment, X. G. 
P., and at that time was district attorney of Blair county. Mr. Mil- 
liken said : 

"Gentlemen and Fellow-Citizens : — It has always been to me a 
great pleasure to speak to and for the workingmen, and to defend the 
oppressed and down-trodden. A strike has been inaugurated by you 
against the Pennsylvania Railroad company. Let me ask for what 
purpose you strike ? Is it to injure the railroad company ? [Cries of 
'Xo!' 'Xo!'] Xo ! You strike because of your necessities; be- 
cause your wives and children cry to you for bread — for that which 
you are unable to give. Is this state of affairs attributable to your 
indisposition to work ? This needs no answer. It is attributable to 
the inadequency of the pay. Every man not controlled by the Penn- 
sylvania railroad is with you heart and soul. So long as you are or- 
derly, interfering in no man's private Ijusiness, you will have the sup- 
port of Blair county and Pennsylvania. I was once colonel of the 
Fifth regiment, and, in the past, have encountered a good deal of bad 
luck. I think I strike a good streak just now. And, just here, I 
wish to add one thing. Xot one man in the regiment can be com- 
pelled to turn out. If any one turns out voluntarily, you can mark 
him as one who wants to turn out against you. There is nothing in 
the militia law of this Commonwealth wliich can be construed as 



T6 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 



J. S. BOOTH. 



M. H. MACKEY. 



EXCELSIOR 

Planing Mill. 



BOOTH & MACKEY, 




\y -L 



H 




MAXXIFACTUliEKS OF AND DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OF 

Rough and Dressed Liimber, 

Flooring, Weatherboarding, Sash, Window Franaes, Doors, Shutters, 
Blinds, Mouldings, &.c. Scroll Sawing, Turning and Shaping 

in all its branches. 



— WE MAKE A SPECIALTY OF 



PORCHES, BHY WINDOWS, STORE FRONTS, 

AND STAIR BUILDING. 

All jobbing promptly attended to and neatly done. Having a first-class Planing 
Mill, and getting all our material from first hands, we are prepai-ed to con- 
tract for and put up houses as cheap and as quick as can be done by 
any other buililers. All work done under the supervision of 
competent foremen. Plans of buildings furnished and 
estimates made on short notice. 



Mill iind Office: 9th Avenue, between 11th and 
12th Streets, Altoona, Pa. 

MS'Vov the convenience of those who are emploj'ed tluring the day, the oflice 
will be open in the evening, from 7 : 30 to 9 o'clock, whei-e you will find Mr. Mackey 
in waiting. Or yon can call on Mr. Booth, at his residence, Gth Avenue, between 9tli 
and loih Streets. Being ju'actical cariienters themselves, all information relative to 
their business will be carefully as well as cheerfully given. 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. TY 

compulsory. In conclusion I would enforce the axiom: 'United we 
stand, divided Ave fall.' This is your time. If the shop men turn 
out now, the Pennsylvania railroad cannot refuse to accede to the de- 
mands of the workmen. You know your rights. Stick to them, and 
you will get what you want, and what you are entitled to — a fair 
day's wages for a fair day's work. I am with you heart and soul. 
If you Avant a friend you will find one in Jim Milliken ! Good night." 

Colonel Jones followed Mr. Milliken in a speech which substanti- 
ally covered the same ground, rendering its publication or even an 
abstract unneces.sary. 

He was followed in turn by Frank P. Tierney, Avhose appear- 
ance was greeted with cheers, and who was heard with respectful at- 
tention. He said : " My countrymen ! You have refused to remain 
longer in the employment of the Pennsylvania Railroad company at 
the wages you have been receiving. It is, undoubtedly, your right 
to demand from your employers such wages as would justify you in 
remaining in its employ. Should the company decline to accede to 
your demand, you are justified in continuing out of its .service as arti- 
sans or workmen. This is a right which, under the law, you can ex- 
ercise ; but in doing so, you must exercise that right with a jealous 
regard to the rights of others. You must cast your eyes upon the 
written and well-recognized law which governs us all in the enjoy- 
ment of our rights, and by it l)e governed. Therefore, gentlemen, 
you had better reflect well what you are doing before taking any rash 
step, for you must never foi'get that those who disregard the law 
must, in the end, come to grief. If you desire, therefore, to succeed 
in obtaining your object, it will only be accomplished by legal and 
proper means — by observing and respecting the rights of all under 
the law. I therefore appeal to you to use only such means to obtain 
the end you seek. I also appeal to our citizens who are not in the 
employ of the railroad company, to give to you a hel])ing hand by 
the use of legitimate means. And I further appeal to the railroad of- 
ficials, if there be any present, to aid, as soon as possible, in securing 
an increase of Avages for the Avorkmen. In the dark hours of the 
panic these gentlemen stood faithfully by you, and, as times improve 
they Avill see, as far as they can, that your patience Avill be rewarded. 
Their interests are identical Avith yours. Gentlemen, I thank you 
for this mark of your confidence and respect. I bid you good night.'" 

In response to urgent and repeated calls, Thomas H. Greevy, 
stepped on the improvised platform (store box) and addressed his- 
felloAV-citizens. The folloAving is a synopsis of his remarks: "In 



t8 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

an assembly like this it is impossi))le for me to say things to suit 
eveiybody. Thus, I am at a loss to know what to say. As a general 
thing I do not believe in strikes. A strike is a means which should 
only be used as a last resort. I am not sufficiently familiar with your 
demands to make a suitable speech. But I am familiar with the pre- 
carious condition of the workingmen all over the country, who labor 
for a mere pittance — scarcely sufficient to keep themselves and families 
from starving. I know that you, workingmen, have the sympathy of 
all the people including those high in authority in this city. I sym- 
pathize with you, })ut you must preserve the peace ; you must not vi- 
olate the law, for in case you do the State will luring all its machinery 
to bear upon you. There is one other point to which I will direct 
your attention. No strike has ever succeeded where violence was re- 
sorted to. Violence was invarial)ly met by violence, and ended in 
the discomfiture of the strikers. Let me warn you — the man who 
advises you to break the peace, to destroy pul)lic or private property, 
is not your friend." 

PATROLLING THE STREETS. 

During the evening and night the Latta Guard [)atrolled the 
streets for the protection of private property and the maintenance of 
law and order. The streets were thronged Avith an excited crowd. 
The latter portion of the night passed quietly, however, no freight 
trains running east or west to demand the attention of the strikers. 

SUNDAY THE CULMINATING POINT OF THE EXCITEMENT. 

Next day, Sunday, July 22, was characterized by the shriek of 
the fife, the rattle and roll of the drum, the marching of armed troops 
through our heretofore quiet city, the rai)id movements and cheering 
of men, the scream of the locomotive whistle, all strangely intermingled 
with the solemn tones of the church bells. 

About 9 o'clock in the morning ten car loads of troops, aggregat- 
ing a])Out five hundred, composed of parts of the First, Second, 
Third, Fifth, Sixth and Twelfth regiments, under the command of 
General Beaver, arrived in tliis city, and immediately pulled up to the 
u|)pcr end of the yard. Here breakfast was served to them, and their 
engine was backed into the upper round house. The strikers then 
closed the gates of the round house yard and refused to allow an en- 
gine to go out to take the trooi)s to Pitts))urg. A detachment of 
Company B, Twelfth regiment, of Williamsport, Robert M. Fores- 
man, captain, under the command of Col. Stead, was detailed to take 
an engine from the round house. They marched up to the round 



HISTORY OF ALTOOXA AND BLAIR COUNTY. T9 

house gate, Avhere they were faced and surrounded by about a hun- 
dred cool and determined strikers. They were compelled to halt 
within six feet of the gate, and al)out a half dozen of the railroad 
men stepi)ed into the ranks and laid hold of muskets in the hands-of 
the soldiers who quietly and not unwillingly yielded their arms. 
Fearing the utter demoralization of his command, Captain Foresmau 
faced the crowd and attempted to drive back the more venturesome 
at the point of his sword, when a huge stone was thrown which 
struck him back of the right ear, prostrating him. The gash was one 
inch aiid a half long and of considerable depth. Sergeant O.sborne Gif- 
ford received two cuts on the head from stones. For awhile the af- 
fair looked serious. The strikers, on learning that more troops had 
been detailed to procure an engine, and were marching towards the 
round hou.se, rushed into the yard and "spiked" engines Xos. 50B, 
123 and 206, by taking off driving rods, drawing- the sand, water and 
fire,- letting the steam escape and soaping the Jjoxes.- The troops 
started to march to the gates, but, concluding that it would be useless 
to attempt to get an engine, and that even if they did, no engineer 
could be found to take it out, marched back to their train. From 
the train the entire body of troops, with the exception of a guard at 
the train, marched to the Pennsylvania railroad depot and stacked 
arms. The soldiers and strikers then commingled in friendly inter- 
course. 

Though not allowed to go west, the soldiers were permitted to re- 
turn to their homes in the east if they chose. Company Gr, of Phil- 
adelphia, and s{|uads of other companies, took advantage of that and 
left for home in the evening. 

MEETING OF THE RAILROAD MEN. 

_ On the morning of the following day (Monday, July 23,) a meet- 
ingr of the railroad men was held, and it was unanimously agreed to 
protect both private and public property at all hazards. 

A committee of workingmen also waited on G. W. Strattan in the 
morning and requested him to close the u})per shops, which he did. 
The lower shops were also closed. 

CITIZENS' MEETING. 

In the morning also, by the advice of prominent citizens, placards, 
signed by Mayor Gilland, were posted in every conspicuous place in 
the city, calling a meeting of all the citizens at the Opera Hou.se to 
be held at 3 o'clock p. m. Before the appointed hour arrived the 
house was crowded. The Mayoi* opened the meeting by announcing 



80 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTT. 

WILLIAM W. YOI^, 



DEALER IN — 



Groceries:and:Provisions, 

FLOUR, FEED, ETC. 



¥00D, WILLOW, GLHSS, CHINHlMOUEENSWflRE. 



SEGARS AND TOBACCO. 



CoTLiitry Produce Bougiit and Sold. 

ITth Street, between lOtli and llth Avenues, 

ALTOONA, PA. 



J. A. CAN AN & CO., 

Margaret Aveime and 19th Street, Altoona,, 



HAVE THE LARGEST STOCK OF 



TERRA GOTTA 

DRAIN PIPE,. 

FIRE CLAY FLUES, CHIMNEY TOPS. LAWN VASES, PEDESTALS, Etc., 

Everoffered in Altounii, which they are now selling at greatly rednced prices. Hav- 
ing their own Lime Kilns located in the city, they are always prepared to 
furnish their customers with fresh lime. They have also on hand, 
Cleveland Lime. White .Sand, Dnncansville and Hill Sand, Cal- 
cined Plaster, Cements, Plastering Hair. Shingles, etc. 
AoE^TS Kou Grajtite Koofing. 



Also — Flour, Feed, Hay, Straw, Coal,, Wood,, Salt» 

TELEPHONE CONNECTIONS.. 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIB COUNTY. 81 

!his purpose in calling' it. He said a great burden had been laid on 
Lis shoulders, and that he wanted to do right l)y all, both the work- 
ingmen and the company, and if he failed it would not ))e his fault. 
He concluded: "I want you to act as men and good citizens, and 
not as roughs and rioters. I have sworn in a number of policemen 
■and I want you to stand Ijy them. I called this meeting through a 
pure motive and trust it will be so regarded." 

D. K. Ramey was made President, and Samuel S. Goodman and 
Hon. J. W. Curry, Vice Presidents. A. F. Kerr, G. S. Hamlin and 
N. C. Barclay were elected Secretaries. 

The President made a few remarks, the substance of which was 
that the difficulty would soon be settled ; that he had no hand in 
bringing it al)Out and hoped the workingmen would get justice. 

H. H. Herr stated that he understood that some railroad men had 
an idea that this meeting had been called to oppose the strikers, but 
it was not so. It was merely to organize so as to be able to meet 
•emergencies and protect property and prevent bloodshed. He thought 
that the troops were the persons to be feared and not the railroad 
men whose interests lay in this city, both in public and private prop- 
erty. 

Hon. J. W. Curry was called upon, Avho said that the laborer was 
worthy of his hire, and that every good citizen and laborer should 
protect his employer, and such employer, in turn, should protect the 
laborer. Every man is responsible to God for his own acts and not 
for the acts of others. We are called on as individuals to protect 
ourselves, not from any man in this house, or any workman what- 
ever, but from outsiders alone. I would trust any man in this house 
with my life and property. It is the tramps we have to fear; they 
are the ones who would do the firing, stealing and murdering. It is 
your right and my right to protect ourselves, and to each and every 
man it becomes a duty to protect the others. We depend upon the 
railroad company for what we get, and when we have difficulties to 
settle let us do so at the proper tribunal. I move, Mr. President, 
that five hundred policemen be appointed and sworn in. 

George J. Akers said that the same emergency did not exist in 
our city that did in Pittsburg. No Philadelphia soldiers were here 
to shoot down our wives and children as they did in Pittsburg. We 
are law-abiding citizens, and I am certain that with five hundred po- 
licemen to guard us we can go to our beds to-night in peace and there 
.sleep in safety. If the men conduct themselves properly they will 



82 HISTOEY OP ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

impel the company to accede to their justifiable and rightful demands. 
[Applause and cries "That's so !" etc.] 

Major Richard J. Crozier followed. He said it was not the rail- 
road men that destroyed the company's property at Pittsburg. He 
thought there was not a man in the house who would do the least 
harm to the; property of the company or that of citizens. 

William B. Blake desired to be informed whether the policemen 
would get any compensation or not. The Mayor replied that he 
could not answer the question, as the city was deepl}^ in debt now, 
and he had no authority nor the desire to lay any further l)urthen 
upon taxpayers. He could not say whether the company would pay 
them or not. He further stat<'d that nearly all those appointed five 
hundred had volunteered their services. 

Simon Hawk, an engineer on the Middle division, stated that he 
had presided at a railroad meeting this morning, in this city, and 
that almost one hundred men Avere present, each and every one of 
Avhom expressed themselves as going to, sworn in or not, protect all 
property at any hazard. He concluded: "We did not strike, but 
we of the Middle division are afraid of our lives and dare not go out 
on an engine, but since we are "out" w^o want our rights and are 
going to have them." [Applause.] 

Mayor Gilland said the police were to be put in all the wards of 
the city, those in the lower wards to be under the control of Andrew 
Kipple, and those in the upper wards under Thomas I. McKiernan. 
The meeting then adjourned. 

MEETINCi OF THE SHOP MEN. 

In the evening of the same day a meeting of the shop men was 
held in the Opera House. Some three hundred persons were present. 
Capt. J. W. Dougherty was elected President, and Caiit. E. M. War- 
ren, Secretary. The following named gentlemen were appointed a 
committee to draw up a series of resolutions : M. J. McCoy, P. O'Hare, 
AV. B. Blake, E. M. Warren and Robert Hudson. They went into 
session and soon returned with tlie following resolutions: 

Kesolveu— Tliat wv., llie Pennsylvania railroad employes of the sliops .silnated 
at Altoona, desire and claim the same wages we received prior to the 1st of June,, 
1S77. And be it further 

IvESOLVEU— That IK) (Iiscliari;e m- suspensions occur to any one who participated 
in the present difhculty. And be it further 

Resolved— That this action of the shop men is taken on account of recommen- 
dations of high Pennsylvania railroad ofhcials, and what we consider good and 
wise counsel. 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 83 

Resolved— That we heai-tUy sympathize with all persons Interested in the pres- 
ent difficulty, and deplore the loss of life and property in Pittsburg, and will do 
wliat we can to prevent a similar occurrence in our midst. 

[Signed] M. J. McCOY, Pres't, 

P. O'HARE, 
^ W. B. BLAKE, 

E. M. WARREN, 
ROBERT HUDSON. 

The above resolutions were adopted. 

A motion was made that the chairman appoint a committee of 
three to present the resolutions to General Superintendent G. Clin- 
ton Gardner, which was carried, and M. J. McCoy, W. B. Blake and 
J. B. Harkins were appointed such committee. On motion ad- 
journ<'d to meet in the 0})era House next morning at 10:30 o'clock. 

AD.T0URNED MEETING. 

In pursuance of announcement made, an adjourned meeting was 
promptly held at the Opera House at 10:30 o'clock on the 24th of 
July. The house was crowded with orderly and attentive shop men. 
Th(; meeting was called to order l)y Capt. E. M. Warren, Secretary, 
who announced the object of the meeting. In the absence of some 
of the officers previously elected, Wm. Fortenbaugh was called to 
the chair, Thomas Miller elected Vice President, and Martin Lewis, 
Assistant Secretary. Before taking his seat Mr. Fortenbaugh ad- 
dressed the audience, saying that he hoped that peace, good order 
and harmony would prevail. "There will be momentous (piestions," 
he said, " for your decision, and it is essential that a calm spirit exist." 

M. J. McCoy, chairman of the committee appointed the previous, 
evening to wait (Ui Mr. Gardner, presented the resolutions, and 
were received kindly. Mr. Gardner expres.sed himself as a consist- 
ent friend of the working man, which he had shown all through the 
panic in scouring the whole country to get work to be done here in 
the sh()i)s. He had done for them all that was in his power. He 
further said that he could not, at this short notice, give the men a 
dt'linitc answer ; he could not negotiate between the workmen and 
high officers, and all that he could do was to obey orders. Under 
such circumstances he could not assure the men anything. He 
would forward their resolutions, witli remarks of his own. He ex- 
pressed solicitation for the property of the company, and the commit: 
tee assured him that it would be jn-otected. The committee further 
expressed their entire confidence in Mr. Gardner, and their l)e]ief that 
he would do all in his power to bring about a satisfactory s(jlution. 

Capt. E. M. Warren advised the men to be careful. He knew of 
some dis.><atisfaction among the men, but hoped they Avould pursue a 



84 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

E. H. KEYES, 



DEALER IN — 



MANUFACTURER OF 



AND WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALER IN ALL KINDS OF MANUFACTURED 



Gents' FurnishingGoods, 

HATS, CAPS, TRUNKS, VALISES, ETC. 
Eleventh Avenue and Seventeenth Street, Altoona, Pa. 

•RUDOLPH LUEBBERT, 

MANUFj 

CIGARS, 

L DEA 

TOBACCO. 

NO. lllO ELEVENTH AVENUE, ALTOONA. 

PROP. R. C. WARD, 

TEACHEU OF 

Organ, Piano, Voice Culture, Harmony, 

COMPOSITION, AND DIRECTOR OF MUSICSL CONVENTIONS, 

Also, Agent for Sheet Music. Music Books, etc. Office with Prof. R. 15. Maluitfey, 

8th Avenue and 12th Street, Altoona. 

S. K. ORR, 

— DEALER IN — 

j^ NTHRHCITE AN D B iTUMINOUS C oMK 

WOOD, ETC, 

Lime, Sand, Posts, Siiinglos, Lath, and other kinds of Lumber. Those whocontem- 
pUitc liuilding, or improving jiroperty, will do well to give me a call. 

Corner 11th Avenue and 4th Street, Altoona. 




JAMES STEWART PARNELL.— (ske paoe 01.) 



i THE NEW YORlT 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 



A6TOR, LENOX AND 
TILDEN FOUNDATIONS. 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 85 

tvisc course. It would be neither brave nor manly to demand more 
than they demanded two months previously, nor more than was de- 
cuand<'d in the resolutions of the preceding meeting. Now that the 
company was in trouble was no reason to think that the more we de- 
mand the more we will get. There is a probability that we may get 
•what we demand, but it is a mere probability. If we demand too 
much the probability is that the com])any will either close the shops 
for months or secure the services of other men to run them, which 
could be done. 

On motion the report of the committee was received, and tin; 
<;ommittee discharged with the thanks of the workingmen. 

Mr. Fields, of the Seventh ward, moved that the resolutions 
iidopted the previous evening l)e rescinded and the resolutions of the 
Harris))urg railroaders be adopted. The motion was seconded, J>ut 
mu, also, was a motion to adjourn, which latter motion was put and 
iost. Mr. Fields then renewed his motion to rescind the resolutions, 
remarking that they had been passed liy a meeting of about one hun- 
dred boys and citizens who were not workmen in the shojts. "Sup- 
pose," he said, " we do get back our ten per cent. — it is only eight 
cents a day, and then the com]>any will take an hour off the day, and 
we will lose twice eight cents." The motion was seconded by John 
H. Speece. 

Capt. J. W. Dougherty, chairman of the former meeting, said: 
■"The resolutions of last night are now in the hands of the railway 
•officials. These resolutions represent our demands, and to rescind 
ihem is manifestly out of order. We cannot, consistently, at this 
|)eriod of time, frame and pass another series of resolutions. I deny 
that the meeting referred to by Mr. Fields had been compo.sed of 
lioys and citizens who were not workmen. On the other hand, I a.>^- 
iicrt that the meeting consisted of a hou.se full of the most responsiI)le 
and respectable workingmen of this city." 

Wilbur B. Blake suggested that if we send another set of reso- 
lutions, which cannot be otherwise than similar to those already 
adopted, the railroad authorities will conclude that we do not know 
what we do want, and, consequently, will take notice of neither. 
Then we will get nothing. Mr. Blake also denied the truth of the 
statement that the previous meeting had been composed of boys and 
-citizens who were not workmen. 

Several of the representative workingmen spoke against any 
change in the character or wording of the resolutions, and united in 

• 7 



86 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

c]onyin,i>- that th«; previous meeting was composed of any other than 
workingmen. 

Thc^se calmer counsels prevailed, and a motion to adjourn was 
overwhelmin<rly carried. 

[By way of parenthesis \v(! will say that about this time Presi- 
dent Hayes issued a proclamation admonishing all good citizens of 
the United States against aiding, countenancing, abetting or taking 
part in riotous ])roceedings.] 

ARRIVAL OF <J(»VERNOR HARTRANFT. 

Governor Hartranft, accompanied by Secretary Qmiy, arrived in 
this city on the morning of July 25. Ui)on the arrival of the train, 
an hour behind timt^ a crowd of sevc^ral hundred citizens had assem- 
bled in front of the Logan House, evidently with the expectation of 
hearing an elaborate speech. After jjartaking of l)reakfast the Gov- 
ernor ))roceeded to his car, from the i't>ar end of which he delivered 
the following : 

" GENTiiEMKN ANO Fellow-Citizens : You luive called upon me 
for an address. T shall make a short one. I, as chief executive of 
the State, am ))Iaced in a very unpleasant pcjsition. I shall endeavor 
to render exact justice to all so far as lies within my power. I shall 
execute the laws of the State according to the laws. I shall endeavor 
to protect iill citizens, as well ns ])u])lic and i)rivate property, and 
should I fail it will ])e Ix'cause I nm powerless. I bid you good day." 

Shortly after, the train, conveying the Governor and Secretary 
to Harrisburg, moved off, and the crowd dispersed. 

In this connection, whatever ])earing or sui)posed bearing it may 
have had ujxtn the city of Altoona, we append a ]»roclamation from 
Governor Hnrtranft : 

PiTTSBURcj. July 2.5, 1S77- ; 
TO THE I'KOVLE OF THE HTATE OF PENNSYLVANIA : 

WHEitEAs, Tlim-f (ixists a eoiHlition of turbulmice and disorder within the State, 
extendinfjf to many interests, and tlireatening aU comninnities, under tlae impulse 
of which there has thrown up a sjiirit of lawlessness requirinii that all law-oheyinj? 
citizens shall orfi;aiii/.e themselves into armed bodies for the j>urposes of self-pro- 
tection and preserving the pea(;e : 

Thendore, 1, John F. Hartranft, (iovernor of the State of Pennsylvania, do 
liereby recommend that all citizens shall organize themselves into associations 
with such iirms as they can procure, for the purpose of maintaining order and 
suppressing vioh!n(!e. And all good citizens are warned against appearing in 
company with any mob or liotous assembly, an<l thus giving (inconragement to 
violations of the law. 

[Signeil] J, F. HARTRANFT, (iovEKNOB. 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 8t 

A Rl MOU f'AI/'LLATEl) Fl RTIIKR TO EXCITE THE POPULACE. 

On July 2.') a nnnor was ciiiTcnt that a Imnd of miners from the. 
iiciyliborliood of Hoiitzdalc, and other mining- towns, thoroughly 
armed, were marehing- upon Altoona, in eon. -sequence of which Sheriff 
Stittici- immediately swore in a i)osse of nearly one hundred men, 
and placed them under command of ('apt. Guthrie. The miners, 
however, failed to make their aj)|)earance. 

"camp BEAVER." 

The main liody of soldiers were encamped near Haggertv's woods, 
ill I*, n. H. i>a,sseng(n* cars, their place of rendezvous being styled 
"Camp nciivcr," while a considerable number made their head(piar- 
ters in cars on Tenth avenue, opposite the round house. 

GRAND .rURY PRE.SENTMENT. 

The court lieing in session at Hollidaysburg on this day, the fol- 
lowing pi'esentment was ma<le : 

'• Wi', tlu' ^rand Jmy. iiKiniriii'j; in aiul for Blair county, would respectfully reij- 
reseiit (•oiicernin<; tlie disorder.s at Altoona within the last few days, that we have 
no personal knowledge of persons engaged therein. We are informed and believe 
t hat jici'sons of tln' iiniiiber of thi'ee oi' four lia\e. in a tumultuous, disorderly and 
riotous manner, with force, stoppeil the trains running on the Pennsylvania rail- 
road, and have by threats ami violence prevented engineers, tireinen and brake- 
men from ojierating ti'ains. But this iufornuttion is not fi-om personal observation 
of any one of us: nor is it from witnesses duly sworn, but only from rumor, or 
from slutemcnts made in the iiublic newspapers. We have not the names of those! 
<'ngagt'd ill suc'i disturbance, nor is it in our power this sitting (so far as we can 
.judge) to obtain iirecise aiul relisible testimony as to the names of guilty parties, 
and to the extent of their guilt, which wou!<l warrant a pi'esentment. While anx- 
ious lo aid in jireserving the peace and good name of our county b.v promptlj- tak- 
ing cognizance of violations of the law within its borders, we are of the ojiinion 
that unless our sessions be indcfinitclx- postponed by adjoui'ument from day to 
day to aUow for the hunting up and subpcenaiug witnesses and execution of suiu- 
jtuiry i>rocess for their attendance, it is impossible at this session of the court to 
make that proper presentment a.s to crimes and criminals, and dates, which wonUl 
be sufficient to warrant the arrest of the ottenders. At present there is (fuiet and 
order at Altootia. and as we believe the late violations of law will not be repeated, 
tlierefore. unless the court is of the opinif)n that our services in session slumld b«? 
prolonged after the conclusion of ordinary l)usiness, we respectfully request that 
we may be discharged. '" 

ROUTINd OF TRAMPS. 

About fifty tramps were driven out of Haggerty's v.'oods, in th« 
immediate neighborhood of Alto(»iia. on the nioriiing of July •2(1, in 
conseqiunice of having, it is alleged, broken open a car containing to- 
bacco, segars, etc.. which they approi)riat(^d to their own use, and 
also because it was believed that they were inciting to riot all whom 
they coidd, being ready themselves, upon iiny |)retext, to |)ounce ttfion, 
burn and ])lunder everything in their way. 



88 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 



H. J. CORNMAN, 



DEALER l\ 




H 



J L 



'O fl 



N 



D 





H 



flDY-MA 



H 



V 



GENTS^ FURNISHING GOODS 



TRUNKS, VALISES, ETC. 

Suits, Shirts and Hats 

Made to Order 



KO. HOT ETEYENTH AA^ENUE, 



OPPOSITE OPERA HOUSE, 



ALTOONA, PA. 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 89 

VETERAN soldiers' ORGANIZATION. 

Ill i»iirsiianc<' of a call from a committee of veteran sDhUrr.-^, a 
meetinir of veterans was held in the council chamber in the evening, 

F. B. Stewart, chairman, and J. D. Davis and J. G. Hirsh, secre- 
taries. Capt. E. M. Warren was elected captain, by acclamation ; 
Georjre H. Gwin, first lieutenant, and B. J. Brown, second lieuten- 
ant. The followintf preamble and resolution were passed : 

Whkbeas, Tills city is in a state of commotion, and, as we think, in danger of 
violence, and as it becomes the duty of good citizen.s to protect life ancl property, 
tlierefore, be it 

Kesolvkd— Tliat we, as soldiers of the late war. organize ourselves into one or 
two companies to act under proper officers to be elected by ballot, to obey snch or- 
ders as may be giv{;n by proper autliorities. 

C. .1. WOLF. 
K. J. CROZIEH, 
E. M. WARREN, 
.T. W. FRIES. 

FIRING UP ENGINES. 

On the morning of the 27Lh four engines were tired up to take 
freight trains out, but after some forty engineers and the same num- 
ber of firemen had been asked to go nut and refused, the fires were 
witlidrawn and the engines returned to t!ie upper round house. 

ADDITIONAL TROOPS EN ROUTE FOR PITTSBURG. 

This morning (2Tth), on Cincinnati west, 1,000 soldiers of the N. 

G. Pa., passed through Altoona to Pittsburg, with the view of open- 
ing the P. 1\. R. freight travel. Three sections of t\v train str)pped 
in this city for l)reakfa.st, or rather for coffee and sainhvidies, after 
wdiich they started for the west. Among tlic party was Governor 
Hartranft and staff, and other distinguished gentlemen. The troops 
were detained at the upper end of the yard liv a r<>port that a .><quad of 
strikers had taken engine Xo. 524 up the mountain with the avowed 
purpose of starting it down the mountain to collide with the train. 
But it was afterwards ascertained that most of the strikers had 
jumped off at the foot of the mountain, and the rest took the engine 
up as far as Gallitzin where it was surrendered to Supervisor Gilsou. 

About 12:30 two trains of United States troops arrived in the de- 
pot under the command of AFajor Hamilton, about six huinhi'd in 
number. 

The second soldier train left this city with S. Arthur Hand, of 
Philadelphia, (a soldier) as engineer of the first engine, and Cai)taitf 
Statler, of Bedford, as second engineer. Both firemen were also sol- 
diers. 



90 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

CT>EARIN(i THE I)EPf»T. 

Ten soldiers, under a lieutenant, marched through the depot, 
clearing everything before them, allowing nobody to remain. AH 
freight trains in the yard were moved east this morning. 

ARRIVAL Ol' ELEVEN CARS OF TROOPS. 

At 11:50, on July 28, a .section of five cars, followed at an iiiter\al 
of about ten minutes by another section of six cars, arrived in Al- 
toona. They contained detachments of the First, Second, Third and 
Sixth regiments N. G. Pa. They were on their way to join their 
conjmands — the Twentieth regiment, under command of Col. Bonna- 
fon. The men numbered six hundred. They were served wMth ra- 
tions, and after a rest of an hour took their departure. The Twen- 
tieth regiment was composed entirely of veterans of the late war, who 
had been recruited on State service for a few days previo\is to their 
arrival here in Philadelphia. The merchants of that city had sub- 
scribed $10,000 to equip them. 

STRIKE ENDED. 

On Monday, July 80, 1817, the strike ended in this city. Freight 
trains, both east and west, including Hollidaysbnrg branch, wcit run- 
ning the same as before. Workmen returned to their i)laces in the 
shops that morning. The curling smoke of industry again wafted 
skyward, and the l)uzz of the machinery was again heard in and aljout 
th(> shops of the Pennsylvania Pailroad company. 

THE STRIKE AT TYRONE. 

At a meeting hekl by the engineers, firemen and l)rakemen of the 
Tyrone branch roads, on the evening of July 23, a committee was 
appointed to confer with Superintendent Blair, and to lay their case 
before him in the form of resolutions i)assed by them which set forth 
c(U'tain demands made upon him. To these Mr. Blair could give no 
definite reply until he had held a consultation with General Superin- 
tendent G. Clinton Gardner, of Altoona, and that he (Blair) under 
the jtresent circumstances was in n'o condition to help them. The 
committee received but little satisfaction. 

On account of the strike in Harrisburg no empty cars from there 
could be run into Tyrone, nor from any other points ; consequently 
work was suspended as though a strike existed. The passenger trains 
continued to run as usual on the branches, however, but no freight. 
It had been resolved that no more troops would be allow^ed to pass 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUXTY. 91 

over the })ranch road, nor to remove those that were there, eoii- 
.sisting of two ccniipanies of the Twelfth regiment, X. G. Pa., who 
were kept for the protection of the town. Bnt on July 25 they 
we,re joined by two other companies of the Twelfth regiment from 
Bradford county, who came by way of Lock Haven, and, in obedience 
fo orders, they all embarked on a special train and were taken to Eliz- 
abeth Furnace, from which place they marched and joined their com- 
rades in "camp" at the loAver shops, arriving about 4 o'clock the fol- 
lowing morning. 

CONCLAVE OF KNIGHTS TEMPLAR. 

Beginning on the 29th and ending on the 30th of May, 18T8, the 
Annual Conclave of the Grand Commandery of Knights Tem]»lar of 
Pennsylvania, convened in this city. Thirty-five subordinate coni- 
manderies were in attendance. A grand parade that was to have oc- 
curred on the la.st day of the session, was prevented by a heavy fall 
of rain. 

The Grand Commandery of Knights Templar of Pennsylvania, 
met in Altoona, June 12, 1865, a detachment of which received Gen- 
eral Grant on his visit to this city. 

In this connection we remark that the Twenty-first Triennial Con- 
.clave of the Grand Encampment of the United States, met in the city 
■of Chicago, on August 16, 1880. The Mountain Commandery, 
No. 10, of Altoona, sixty Sir Knights and twenty ladies, James P. 
.Stewart, Eminent Commander, were in attendance. 

RELIEF FOR IRELAND RECEPTION OF MR. PARNELL. 

On the evening of February 12, 1880, in the Opera House, James 
'Stewart Parnell (see portrait) a member of the English Parliament, 
•delivered an address for the benefit of those who were suffering from 
the famine at that time existing in Ireland. He was accompanied 
by Mr. Murdoch, editor of the Inverness (Scotland) "Highlander." 
A committee of our citizens had been appointed to meet him at 
Huntingdon and escort him to Altoona. The committee consisted of 
the following gentlemen, although one-half of them, on account of 
other engagements, failed to serve: Charles E. Pugh, John Reilly, 
'Thomas W. Hurd, Thomas H. Greevy, S. M. Woodcock, Milton 
Alexander, T. N. Ely, H. C. Bern, William P. Furey, T. J. Maitland, 
W. D. Tyler, M. Fitzharris, Edmund Shaw, George W. Strattan, F. 
P. Tierney, D. A. Gilland, John Hurd, A. Y. Pively, Dennis Sulli- 
van, T. Blair Patton, Charles J. Mann, Simon Xeuwahl, H. J. Corn- 
man, James G. Flanigan, M. Edgar King, Thomas W. Jackson, 



92 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

CITY 

Planing Mills 

2()th Street, on Bi'ancli KMilroad, 

AI/rOONA, PA. 



WILLIflM STOKE & CO., Proprietors. 



Tile cxtciii.sivt; ('(jiiijiuit'iit of Die old Pnfjplcs' Phiiiiiiji Mill, imroliiised ]>y us, Ijciiif?. 
<Minplt;l(! in evin'j' I'C.spiHit, cntiblcs u.s to I'lirnish 

Sashes, Doors, 

Blinds, Shutters, 
Flooring, Siding, 

MOULDING, BRACKETS, FRHME LUMBER, 
Shingles, Pickets, Etc., 



AT THK 



LOWEST MARKET PRICE. 



Stair Building and Store Fronts a Specialty. 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 9;i 

Christ. Haiiser, Fred. W. Olmos, Henry Fettinji-er, sr., and James- 
K(!arney. [The last iiaiiiod ^r'ntlonian was the first to suggest th«- 
idea of obtaining the services of Mr. Parnell.] 

On th(! arrival of the train a large ninnl)er of citizens had congre- 
gated to take the first look at the " Irish agitator." The Altoona 
band was also there and rendered stirring music, after which the vis- 
itors were loudly cheered. 

On the night of the meeting Thomas W. Hurd, then mayor of the 
city, was selected as president, and a number of prominent citizens?- 
as vice-presidents and secretaries. 

William P. Furcy, having been selected for the purpose, intro- 
duced Mr. Parnell to the audience. In doing so he made a neat ancC 
appro|)riate extemporaneous speech. 

Mr. Parnell reviewed the infamous policy of the English govern- 
ment toward Ireland, as illustrated in the Frish land laws, picturing 
the absolute degradation which for ages had l)een the lot of the Irish 
tenantry und(!r the iniquitous landlord system. In clear and forcible- 
lang'uage he stated the causes which have reduced the peasantry to a 
condition of ]taiiperage and driven the native jiopulation from the fer- 
tile and pr(jductive lands to seek a miserable subsistence upon barren 
and unproductive wastes. His utterances throughout were those of 
a statesman and thinker, and the audience was pleased and gratified. 

When Mr. Parnell concluded his address, Mr. Furey introduced 
Mr. Murdoch, who, dad in the eostuiiie df the highlanders of Scotland, 
delivered a humorous but none the jess effective oration. 

A considerable amount of monev was then contributed, one per- 
son, Hon. John Reilly, donating $10(1, and other citizens manifested 
their interest l)y liberal contribiition.-'v Rev. Father Walsh, now de- 
ceased, contril)uted $500 out of his- private purse, and the St. John's- 
Literary Society appropriated $48i40.; (£10) all of which sums com- 
bined (expen.ses of renting Opera Hou.se, etc., deducted) aggregated 
$1,58-4.57. This amount was promptly forwarded to the sufferers by 
Rev. Father Walsh, receipts of which were duly acknowledged. Mr. 
Parnell and Mr. Murdoch decllncfd compensation for their labors and 
would have even paid their hiotel l)ills had the management of their 
reception allowed them to do so. 

CENTRAL PENNSYLVANIA CONFERENCE OF THE M. E. CHURCH. 

The twelfth annual .session of this body of Christian ministers' 
was held in the Opera House, commencing on the 10th of March, 
1880. Bishop Gill)ert Haven, whose death, occurred previous in tlui 



94 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

meeting of the Conference, was to have presided. His place was 
tilled by Bisliuj) Jesse T. Peek, who had been making- a sh<»rt tour of 
visitation among a few of the charges along the Susquehanna river. 

A }>rfvi()us annual conference had l)een held in Altoona in March, 
1814. IJishup Levi Scott, of Delaware, was the presiding (jfficer. 

Th(! Conference represents a membership of 35,000 full members 
and 5,000 probationers. The church property is estimated at $1,708,- 
1«5. Number of Sunday-schools, 4(i2 ; scholars, 42,638. There are 
203 ministers including fourteen superaunuates. 

Altoona Methodism — with uin<'ty-seven members and fifty-five 
probationers — was erected into a se|>arate station in 1854. John H. 
Kyland was the first preacher. He was succeeded by Alex. E. (Jib- 
«on in 1855, John A. Collins being jiresiding elder. In 185fi came 
Wilfred Downs. When the East JJaltimore Conference was formed 
in 1857, Samuel A. Wilson was sent to serve the station for 1857-8. 
In 1859-(H) Samuel Creighton ; 1861-2, W. L. Spottswood ; 1863, 
1864-5, W. K. Mills; 1866-7-8, J. S. McMurray— AV. M. Frysinger 
latter year. 

The remaining api)ointments were as follows : 1 869 — First church, 
A. W. Guyer; Second church, J. Donahue; 1870— S. W. Sears, D. 
S. Monroe; 1871— F. B. Riddle, D. S. Monroe; 1872— F. B. Riddle, 
R. E. Wilson, Daniel Hartman (third charge); 1874 — James Curns, 
R. P:. Wilson, I). Hartman; 1875-6— James Curns, S. C. Swallow, 
J. W. Owens, J. W. Leckie ; 1877— W. W. Evans, M. K. Foster, J. 
W. Leckie; l87S-i)— B. B. Hamlin, M. K. Foster, Thomas Sher- 
lock ; 1880-1 — B. B. Hamlin, Jesse B. Young, and Thomas Sherlock. 

RELIEF FOR THE MILTON SUFFERERS. 

A fire, commencing 11:30 on the morning of the 14th day of May, 
1880, in Milton, Pennsylvania, continued its ravages until six hun- 
dred and sixty-six buildings were destroyed. Indeed nearly the en- 
tire town fell a victim to the flames. In response to a call made by 
the Governor upon the mayors of the cities of the State, our own 
nuiyor, Howard, called a meeting at the Opera House on the evening 
of the 15th, of which he was constituted the presiding officer. During 
its progrji'ss a notice to the pastors of the various churches, request- 
ing them to l)ring the subject before their resi)ective congregations 
on the following day (Sunday) was prepared, in response to which 
.collections au that day were taken up in the various churches, with 
the following rt^sults : First Methodist, $201 ; Second Presbyterian, 
$54,38; Second Methodist, $23.47 ; First Lutheran, $50; St. James 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 95 

Gorman Lutheran, $12; Third Methodist, $n.91 ; Christ Reformed, 
111.71; Church of God, $0.25; United Brethren, $7.10; First Baptist, 
$44.75. Total, $428.03. 

At the meeting in the Opera House a committee of gentlemen 
from the different wards were appointed to solicit and receive contri- 
butions, who met at the mayor's office on Sunday morning, immedi- 
ately after which they commenced the good work, which they con- 
tinued during the week, collecting upwards of five hundred dollars in 
money and upwards of one thousand dollars' worth of provisions and 
such oth(T goods as the sufferers of Milton were supposed to stand in 
need of. These contributions, added to the collections taken up at the 
churches, ($428.03) constituted a respectable total — about $2,000. 

STATE MEDICAL SOCIETY. 

An annual meeting was held in the Opera House, commencing on 
May 19, 1880. [Its sixteenth annual ses.'^ion had been held in Al- 
toona, in June, 1805. About seventy delegates, representing every 
county in the State, were present on that occasion.] 

At the recent meeting. Dr. Andrew Nebinger, of Philadelphia, 
took the chair. Dr. Rowan Clarke, of Bell's Mills, delivered an ad- 
dress of welcome to the delegates. Appended is an abstract : 

" Our county occupies a central position in the State. It has rich 
and productive valleys to feed our people, and high mountains and 
hills filled with rich minerals that centuries will not exhaust. 

"We have the principal shops of the best constructed and man- 
aged railroad of the country. These shops make anything that is 
used on a railroad, from the smallest bolt to the finest Pullman coach, 
or the most powerful locomotive. Their fires never go out. As the 
Jews of old turned their eyes each morning and evening to the tem- 
ple to see that the daily sacrifice was offered, and were happy and 
contented when they saw smoke arise, so do our people rejoice each 
day when they see the cloud of smoke arise from the work shops, sat- 
isfied that our county is safe and prosperous. 

" The main line of the Pennsylvania railroad passes through this 
county. Branches are sent forth from Altoona to Hollidaysburg; 
there again dividing to different portions of the county, to collect the 
rich ores and other minerals which nature has so abundantly stored 
away in the hills and valleys. From Tyrone, in the northern end of 
the county, the Tyrone and Clearfield road, which also sends numer- 
ous branches to bring forth the products of the immense coal and 
lumber fields of Clearfield ; also the Tyrone and Lock Haven, to the 



96 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

- THE - 

American 
Sewing 
Machine 

[Awarded tlie First Preniiuin at nearly every public exliibitioii in wliicli tlicir 

macliines liave been exhibited, indudirif^ our late Centennial, wliere they 

received two awards, one lor tlie niaclnne, and one for the work done 

on the machine.] 

IS IN GREAT DEMAND, 



becau.se op its 



GREAT SIMPLICITY, 

Being particularly free from all combination.*, always ready to work, and easily 
understood by every one, even the most Inexpcrienceil. 



IT IS THE LIGHTEST RUNNING 

Shuttle Machine in the world, requirinjr little outlay of strength, and sews with 
great speed, and never skips stitches. 



IT HAS A SELF-THREADING SHUTTLE, 

And requires no adjusting of the tension every time a new bobbin is placed in it, 

Xo time wasted in vexatious delays in getting the shuttle reaily to work. 

IT IS ALWAYS READY. 



IT IS THE MOST DURABLE MACHINE 

That ever claimed public attention, owing to its simple arrangement and the care- 
ful se^lectionof the be.st material. 



For fnrthei' (larticutars call on or address 

R C. REESE, 

AGENT FOR BLAIR COUNTY. 
Office;— 5th Avenue and 12th Street, Altoona, Pa. 



HISrORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 9t 

top of the Susquehanna region, and soon the Tyrone and Lewisburg 
will be running through one of the finest- iron ore and limestone re- 
gions of the State. From Bell's Mills the Bell's Gap, a narrow guage 
road, climbs around the spurs of the Allegheny and shows deep ra- 
vines, over a route unsurpassed in Ijeauty and grandeur, giving pleas- 
ure to the lover of nature and collecting the products of Cambria and 
Clearfield. Whilst we do not dispute the claim that Boston is the 
hub of the universe, we do claim that Blair county is the hub of Cen- 
tral Pennsylvania. For here we have the heart of the great road 
that largely controls the traffic of the whole country ; and we draw 
the resources of the surrounding counties into our own. Our county 
is growing — a little mori- than a generation old — and this city is only 
a stripling. Many who are here present were in the full vigor of 
manhood when the site of this town was covered with forest, with 
here and there a swampy nreadow. Although its growth has been 
rapid, greater things are hoped for in the future." 

The annual address was deliv'ered by Dr. A. Nebinger, president 
of the Society. In his introductory he referred to their meeting (the 
thirty-first) as an occasion of friendly greeting; also, to note the 
•changes of the past for our future improvement, and to make honor- 
tible mention of those who have finished their work and gone to the 
grave like "one who wraps the draperies of his couch around him 
and lies down to pleasant dreams." He feelingly referred to those 
members of the Society who were yielding to the weight of years; 
idluded to the bright and cheering aspect of the country in a commer- 
•cial point of view; denounced jobbery and dishonesty in public af- 
fairs, and made feeling allusions to the distress existing in Ireland. 

The addresses delivered, and previously prepared i)apers on medi- 
-cine, surgery, etc., which were read during .the session, exhibited the 
progress medical .science had made, and reflected credit upon the med- 
ical profession. 

During their stay the physicians, in response to invitations ex- 
tended by Charles E. Pugh, General Superintendent Pennsylvania 
railroad; Superintendent B. G. Ford, of the Bellas Gap railroad, and 
W. D. Tyler, of the Keystone Hotel company, made excursions to 
Lloydsville and Cresson. They also visited the upi)er and lower 
shops of the Penn.sylvania railroad located here, accompanied by 
Theodore N. Elv, Superintendent Motive Power, and before leaving 
passed a vote of thanks to the gentlemen named, as well as to the 
Blair County Medical Society, ivho gave to them a banquet at the 
Logan House. ■ . . 



98 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

In Lancaster, on tlio second day of May, Ifi.Sl, the ni'Xt meeting- 
of the Society will occur. Dr. S. M. Ross, of Altoona, who, at the 
late session held in this city, delivered an address on "Conservative 
Surgery," was selected to deliver an address on " Surgery," at the- 
next annual convention. 

PROHIBITION CONVENTION. 

The State Convention of radical temperance, or total abstinence 
men, assembled in this city on May 20, 1880, and placed a ticket in 
nomination. On May 20, 1H78, simultaneously witli the Annual 
Conclave of Knights Temj)lar, of I'ennsylvania, a similar convoca- 
tion held its session here. 

DECORATION DAY. 

The 21)th day of May, 1880, (the 30th, the usual day for the cer- 
nionies, occurring on Sunday) was observed in this city as Memorial 
T>av. The old flag was reverently drooped over those who died so 
that it might still wave, the unsullied emblem of a nation united and 
free; and the fairest flowers of spring were scattered upon their graves. 
A much larger number of citizens and strangers joined in the ceremo- 
nies than on any ])r(>vious occasion, crowding our public thoroughfares 
at an early hour. 

The principal stre<>ts and avenues were ornamented with flags 
and other national devices. The procession formed on Eleventh av- 
enue, right resting on Twelfth street, and conunenced to move about 
9 o'clock a. m. It was led by a carriage containing Junior Vice De- 
partment Commander Burchfield, of the Grand Army of the Repub- 
lic ; Rev. Jesse B. Young, the orator of the day, and Rev. J. (Jreen 
Miles, of the First Baptist churcli. Chief Marshall Fitzharris and 
his aids — Messrs. Amheiser, ^'alentine and Stroh— came next, fol- 
lowed by the Junior Greys' band. The order of marching of the bal- 
ance of the organizations was: Junior and Senior order of Unit<>d 
American Mechanics, J. A. T'arker and Ij. S. Mc(Tlatliery, marshals; 
Citizens' band; IJethany and Ivising Sun Circles, Brotherhood of the^ 
Union, Wm. Fortenbaugh and p]dward W. Cavender, marshals ; So- 
cialVmnd ; (Jood Will Steam Fire comi)any, (lUst. Klemmert, mar- 
shal; Altoona City band; Vigilant Steam Fire company, William 
H. Johnson, marshal ; Excelsior Hose company, J. B. Stahl, marshal; 
Comjyany D, Fifth n'giment, N. G. Pa.,'command<'d by E. M. Amies; 
Mountain City l)and; carriage containing rej)resentatives of Potts. 
Tost; Lieutenant Stephen C. Potts Post, Xo. f>2, (i. A. R. 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 99 

When the line reached the entrance to the cemetery the Junior 
Greys' band and all the organizations following stood in o|»en order 
to permit the i)assa,ii;'e of the Post, which advanced to th<' lead, suc- 
ceeded by the Mountain City band and Oom]»any D. The march U> 
the monument was then resumed, dwrino- which the Mountain City 
band played a solemn dirge. A platform had Ijecn erected to the 
north of the soldiers' monument and the procession filed to the right 
and marched around the shaft, encircling it. The first thing in the or- 
der of exercises at that point was the rendering of " Uememlier Me," 
the well known nir from the opera of "Boht-mian (xirl,"' which was 
beautifully i)l!iy(Ml by the Mountain City band. Rev. J. (x. Miles of- 
fered a prayer ; then a dirge was rendered by the Altoona City band,, 
when the ceremony of decorating the graves of the dead soldiers was 
performed. Chief Marshal Fitzharris then introduced the orator of 
the occasian, Rev. Jes.se B. Young. At the conclusion of the oration 
a selection was given l)y the Junior Oreys' band, and the procession 
moved out of the cemetery to the ])liiee of assembling, where it waS' 
disbanded. 

OUR NATIONAL ANNIVERSARY. 

Since the Centennial year no es})ecial demonstration had been 
made in the ob.se-rvance of the anniversary of American independence.*" 
As early as \[ay, the present year, the subject of a firemen's parade- 
was freely discus.sed by our citizens. Meetings were held, and the 
various wards of the city canvassed for contrilmtions to defray the 
expenses of the firemen to whom, when the fact was established that 
a sufficient amount of money could be raised, invitations had been 
extended to visit our city. The sum realized was $1,191.80, whicfe 
after deducting or reserving $10 for printing and $50.30 for the pur- 
chase of fireworks, was divided among the Altoona companies for the 
entertainment of thiM'r expected guests in the following sums : Vigi- 
lant Steam Fire Fngine company, $328 ; Empire Hook and Ladder 
company, $313 ; Altoona Steam Fire Engine comjiany, $332.50; E.x- 
celsior Hose comj)any, $157.50. [The (iood Will company declined 
to participate in the celebration and consetpiently received no contri- 
bution.] 

The visiting firemen, were: (1) The Mount Vernon Hook and 
Ladder company of Harrisburg, guests of the Empire; (2) Hope 
Steam Fire Engine company, of Harrisl)urg, guests of the Altoona; 
(3) Logan Hose company, of Bellefonte, guests of the Vigilant; (4)- 

*The Foiiit h of .1 uly, 1S80, occurring on Sun<laj-, Monday, the 5tli was celebrated- 



voo 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 



C. W. SICKLES, 

BUTCHER, 



AND DEALER IN 



Presli, Salt and Smoked Meats, 



SAUSAGES, ETC. 



POULTRY ALWAYS ON HAND. 



1224 Mnth KStreet, ))etween Green and Chest- 
nut Avenues, Altoona, Pa. 



D 



V 



R A. BONINE, 



ivAPn 



H 



R, 



14th Sti'eet, between 11th and 12th Avenues, 

Altoona, Pa. 



Publisher of Stereoscopic Views: 

"..Among the Alleghenies," " Horse-shoe Bend," and other important 

points along the Penn'a and Bell's Gap Railroads; also, 250 

different views of Scenes in Florida. 



All KINDS OF PORTRAir PHOTOGRAPHY. 

LIFE SIZE OIL TYPES A SPECIALTY. 



I'i 



■m 



.;;^r 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 101 

Phceiiix Fire Eng-ine company, of Hollidaysburar, guosts of the Vigi- 
lant; (5) Huntinirdon Steam Fire ?]n<j'ine company, guests of the 
Vigilant; (6) Good Will Hose company, of Hollidaysburg, guests of 
the Altoona ; (7) Allegheny Hook and Ladder ccjmpany, of Holli- 
daysburg, guests of the Empire ; (S) Fame Hose company, of Lew- 
istown, guests of the Excelsior. 

Thus, with eight visiting companies and four of our own, twelve 
in all, fully eipiipped with the apparatus of each, steamers, trucks and 
hose carriages, material was furnished for jjroducing a spectach' rarely 
witnessed in cities of corresponding size. But the weather proved in- 
ausj)icious. No sooner had the firemen asseml)led and their orderly 
arrangement been effected than the rain descended, and, with slight 
intermissions, continued throughout the entire day. Nevertheless, the 
column moved and passed over the route jircv iou^ly [)lanne(l. There 
were, prol)ably, one thousand men in line. 

The city contained thousands of visitors from neighboring cities 
and towns, many of whom had arrived oh Saturday. The trains of 
Monday morning were filled to their utmost capacity. 

As usual on such occasions the streets and houses were profusely 
decorated with arches, flags, etc. 

On the following morning, in response to an invitation extended 
by the Hollidaysburg comi)anies, several hundred of our visfting fire- 
men, accompanied by several brass bands, as well as a large delega- 
tion of our citizens, visited the county capital and picniced in the 
neighborhood during the day. 

PENNSYLVANIA STATK EQUAL RIGHTS LEAGUE. 

The Sixteenth annual meeting of this organization was held in 
the Opera House, its session commencing on the Hth day of August, 
1880. Its first meeting was held in Harri.><burg in 1864. Rev. John 
Peck was the first president. William Nesbit, an old resident of Al- 
toona, succeeded him and has been the presiding officer ever since. The 
objects of the League (to quote from their printed constitution) "are 
to unite the entire colored people of our State in a common l>rother- 
hood ; for the promotion of morality, education, temperance, indu.s- 
try, and the encouragement of everything that pertains to a well-or- 
dered and dignified life, and to obtain, by appeals to the conscienc(;s 
of the American people, or by legal process, a recognition of the 
rights of the colored people of the United States." The attendance 
was large and the sessions harmonious. 
8 



102 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLATR COUNTY. 



PUBLIC AND PRIVATE SCHOOLS. 



THE FIRST SCHOOL HOUSE. 

From tho oourtooiis and ((ttioiont City Superintciidcnt of Public* 
Schools, Prof. I). S. Keith, W(^ learn that as early as 1815 the fii-st 
school house was erected within the boundaries of the territory now 
occupied by Altoona. The south-c^ast corner of Fourth avenue ancl 
Twenty-fourth street is the site where it stood. It was a loji; build- 
iufi', chinked and (laul)ed, not i)lastered, and furi\ished with slab 
benches. This house, surrounded ])y ])riinitiv<' forest, was used both 
for .school ])ur[>oses and for church services. Children, as far distant 
as two or three miles, attended school here, and often in winter, when 
the ^-round was covered with snow, there bein^- )iut few roads, a 
track was made to the school liouse by dra,i>'frin<>: a hv^ throUj2;h the 
snow. The buil(lini>- served for school purposes until 1.S38. During 
this period, spcllinu', readinu', writin,i>-, and "ciphering" were tht?- 
branches taught. Corporal [tunishment was in full foi'ce. The meth- 
ods of instruction differed widely from thos(> of the present. The i)u- 
pil's course of study began with the alphabet, and it was customary 
to introduce the whole number of letters to the abecedarian at tlus- 
first lesson. S]»elling was pursued for some time before the pu])il 
was advanced sutficicutly to take up the Bible, which was the text- 
book used in teaching reading. In pcninaiisliiii the teacher wrote 
the copies for each pupil wlut was ready for this branch, and manu- 
factured pens out of goosi' (piills. Arithmetic was the last study in 
the course;, and one who could solve "single rule of three" was con- 
sidered (piite an arithmetician. This school was at fii'st known as the 
Beales' school, but lat<'r as the Black Oak Ilidge school. Henry Ad- 
ams and John Gwin wei-e among the first teachers. 

PASSA(JE OF TF{E C'0>IMON SCHOOL LAW. 

The law, entitled "An act to ]»rovide for the education of the })00r 
gratis," was in force until 1S84, when the c(nnmon school law was 
passed. The passage of this law aroused the people somewhat in 
regard to education. It had bitter opponents, l)ut having been agi- 
tated and discussed, some of its opponents became its strong support- 
<'rs, and an effort was made to hnvv better school accommodations and 
better schools. 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. lOS 

UNION CHURCH AND SCHOOL HOUSE. 

In 183H the trustees of the Presbyterian, Lutheran, and Metho- 
dist churches purchased a lot of ground from Eli Hastings, on whichi 
to erect a union church. Shortly afterwards, the school directors, 
having determined to erect a school house, purcha.sed a lot adjoining 
for ten dollars, and agreed with the church committee that the church 
and school house should be erected as one Iniilding, the school ])art 
being on one lot and the church part on the other. The .school room 
and the church were separated by a swinging partition, which, when 
it was necessary to enlarge the church r(jom, was swung up to the 
ceiling and made secure 1)y means of hooks. After the house was 
coni))lete<l, which was late in 1838, a committee was appointed by the 
school directors to secure a teacher. Barton Hastings was elected 
first teacher, and the following is the agreement between him and the 
committee : 

".\rticl('s of ajj;reeuu'nt. made tliis .itli day of Jaimarv. IKi'.i. bt'twoen Barton 
Hastinyrs, schoolniastev, of the one part, and we, the undersigned, eoinniittee of 
school No. !), ill AHegheny townshi)i, Huntingdon eonuty. Pa., of the other part: 
Witncsscth that the said Barton llastiiisis does bar<^ain and agree with said com- 
mittee, to teacli in their primary seliool for a term not exceeiling tliree montlis, 
from tlie fii'St of the present month, dm-iiig wliieh time strict snbordination ae- 
conHiig to law and former custom shall Ijc observed. S])elling. reading, writing 
and arithm<!tie will be taught with tldelity. In consideration whereof, the said 
eonnnittee doth bind themselvos. tlieir heirs and executors, to pay. or cause to be 
])aid, unto the said Barton Hastings, the sum of twenty dollars per month for each 
and every month of said services. Witness our hands," etc. 

It will be seen from the above that this district Avas embraced in 
.Huntingdon county at the time referred to. 

The Union school house, the name by which it was known, re- 
cently reinodclrd, and now occupied by the congregation of the A. 
M. E. church, stands on the corner of Union ttvcuue and Si.xteenth 
street. It served for school purposes until 1854. 

BRANCHES TAUGHT. 

During this period, geography and grammar Avere taught, and a- 
degree of advancement somewhat higher than that during the former- 
period was attained. However, but little improvement was made in 
methods of instruction. Recitations were conducted in sjielling and 
reading, but it can hardly be said that any were conducted in arith- 
metic. As long as the pupils were able to obtain the answers to 
questions, no assistance, in the way of explanation nor recitation, 
was thought necessary. When a pupil could not "do a sum," he- 
went to the teacher, who, if conducting a recitation, allowed tiic class. 
to proceed, or permitted the pupil, who could not "do his sum," to. 



]()4 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY, 



WM. M. FINDLEY, M. D, 



802 Twelfth Street, Altoona. 

(EAST SIDE.) 



HOUSE: 1126 Eighth Avenue. 



J. D. HUGHES, 



DEALEH IN — 



j^NTHMCITE__lND BITUMINOUS QoRlS. 

WOOD, HAY, STRAW, ETC. 
Ninth Avenue and Nineteenth Sti'eet, Altoona. 



D. A. BRADLEY, 

MANUFACTaiiEK OF AND DEALER IN 

Monuments, Head Stones 

Lot Enclosures, iind all kinds ol Cciiietcry Work in Foreign and Dutnestie Marljlc- 

Designs ami l^iiees to suit all. All work done in an aitislie manner and s;iL- 

istaetion s;uarantee<l. Ortlers ri'S])ectlully .solicile<l. 

ELEVENTH AVENUE, NEAR ELEVENTH STREET, ALTOONA, PA. 

(.\djoiuiug .Josiah Arthur's I'urniture Store.; 



MISS ANNIE SHOEFNER, 

NKW MILLINERY AND 

Dress Making Store, 

Tweinii SM, tietwten ElgMli al Nimii Avenms, Allooia, Pa. 

Resiieetfullv solicits a share of patronage from the ladies of Altoona and vicinity. 

Tlie Dress Making is under the supervision ol' an experienced lady, and vvc 

<,Miarantee all our work. The stock of Millinery Goods is always tresli 

andof the Latest Styles. Xew styles constantly received. Hats 

and lionnets bleacheil, colored and reniodi'led. 



HISTORY OF ALTOOXA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 105 

hear the class while lie solved the (|uestion ; but, more generally, the 
assistance was given Vietween recitations, and often some pupils went 
up and stood near the teacher, or took a seat near him. before the reci- 
tation was finished, so that being foremost, they might have their 
(juestions solved first. It sometimes happened, when the teacher had 
his attention drawn from his pupils, and his mind concentrated upon 
some ((ucstion, not being very apt in figures, that pui)ils, waiting for 
their turns, had an opportunity to take a little recreation. 

VETERAN SCHOOL DIRECTORS. 

James Hutchison, who was elected school director shortly after 
the passage of the common school law, of which he was an ardent 
sup])orter. served twelve or fifteen years, and took an active part in 
education. Altoona's first binird of school directors, after being incor- 
j>orati'd ns a borough, in 1854, was presided over by Thos. K. Burcli- 
iiH'il. 

ESTABLISHMENT OF COUNTY SUPERINTENDENCY. 

Ill 1854, the county sui)erintendency was established. This 
change did not tirteet some teachers very agreeably. Additional 
bi-iinclies were to Im' taught, and a more thorough examination was to 
br pa.-scd. 'riie first e.xamiiuition under this law, to be held in th<' 
Union school house, v\as advertised for several weeks, but, on exami- 
nation, day only one applicant, John Rutherford, was present. To 
be examined before the jmblic. l)y the superintendent, was an ordeal 
through which manv Inid no desire to pass ; and private examination 
being allowed, they preferred it to the public examination. 

EHKCTION OF SCHOOL BUILDINGS, ETC. 

The erection of a onc-story frame building, containing two rooms, 
in the Fourth ward, was commenced late in the year, and was com- 
pleted Fe])ruary, 1855, at which time two schools were opened. The 
house was fitted with improved furniture. The desks with seats were 
made each to accommodate two jiupils, but owing to the crowded con- 
dition of the schools, three or UKire pu])ils were put to one desk. 
This kind of furniture, which is now rapidly disappearing from the 
schoolrooms, "patent" furniture taking the place of it, was consid- 
ered a great improvement at that time. The sexes wer(> taught sep- 
aratelv. John Kutherford was elected teacher of tlu' boys' school, 
and Miss Cordelia White of the girls' school. Some time after the 
schools w^ere opened, a large number of pupils having been enrolled, an 
assistant was employed, who taught the primary i)ii|)ils, both boys 



10() HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

and g'irls, (>fcii})vinj;' ]»:irt of tlic ruoiii in wliirh Miss Wliito taught. 
A term of four niootlis was tau<j-ht, with an mroUnicnt of one hun- 
dred and Hft^'-cijrht pupils. The salary of tiic male teaciici- was thir- 
ty-five dolhirs per nioiitii. 'I'hc coiunion vschool l)rancli(\s wvvv tauf>ht. 
Durinu' the sumnier of hs,');"), a onc-stoi'v frame buihling-, with two 
rooms, was ereeted in tiic Third \s'ard, and was suppliccl witli furni- 
ture similar to that in the Fourth ward. Much the same kind of fur- 
niture was used in most of the rooms until 1870. TIk; railroad di- 
vided the town into two districts, I-^ast and West Altoona. Mr. 
Rutherford, who was "put on his muscle," taug-ht the hoys' school in 
West Altoona, and .served as a teacher for a nundx'i' of years. In 
IH^f), another huildiiifi', with one room, was erected in the F(»urth 
ward, to which weri^ assij^ned the more advanced i)ui)ils, both boys 
and g'irls. The elements of one or two of the higher l)raiiches were 
taug'ht. The numl)er of teachers was six, and the leufilh of the school 
term was increased to six months. As thc^'c were only ii\c rooms, 
one of them was occuiiied ))y two teachers. S(jnie .-schools were com- 
posed of both l)oys and girls, others of boys or girls only. This '■ un- 
systematic " arrangement, which, for the most of the time, was not 
restricted to any i)artieular grade, was c(jntiiinc(l until 1 ST;"), except 
from 1860 to 1869, when the sexes wen; taught together. In 1857, 
a building similar to th(> one last mentioned was erected in the Third 
ward. The borough was enlarged the same year, and made to include 
part of what was known as Greensbnrg. About 18.55, some of the 
citizens residing in (ireens))urg found it inc(jn\enient to send their 
<'hildren so far out in the townshijt to school, and therefore determined 
to build a school hou.se for themselves where it would lie convenient. 
The house was built on Howard avenue, between Tenth and Eleventh 
streets, and now serves as a dwelling. Robert McCorniick gave the 
ground, and with his subscription and that of other citizens, a suffi- 
cient amount was secured to erect the building. It was used for pri- 
vate school until it canu^ within the limits of the borough, when the 
school directors of the Itorough got control of it, and used it about 
one year for pu)>lic school ; 1)eing distant from the other school h(juses, 
it was afterwards left vacant, except when used for select school. 
[Professor John Milker taught a select school here about 1862, shortly 
after which the house was sold.] In 1857, th<M'e were ^^ryvn school 
rooms; nine teachers were employed, and five hundred and fifty i)U- 
pils wer(! enrolled. Th<' schools were divided into three grades — 
primary, intermediate, and grammar. J. (xinter Counsman, who 
was sometime afterwards elected superintendent of IMair county, was 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 107 

teacher of one of the two fi-rainmar schools. Only eig-ht teachers were 
«mi)loye<l the; next year. Xo more buildiiifi-s were erected until 18*54 
and no increase in the number of teachers was made. The school 
p<jpulation increased, and in some rooms from one hundred and fifty 
to two hundred ])ui)ils, under the care of two teachers, were enrolled. 

About iNfil, a district institute was organized by the teachers for 
their improvement in methods of instruction and school manaircment, 
and ill treneral culture. These institutes were kept up until 1875, 
when, the school directors refusinji' to rtmunerate the teachers for the 
time spent at these meetinjjs, they were discontinued. 

Xo other than frame buildinji-s were erected until 1870. The pop- 
ulation increasing so rapidly, the erection of buildin<i-s re(iuired con- 
siderable attention In 18f)4, a house with one room was built in the 
Third ward, at a cost of SI, 500. A fourth grade, called the high 
school, was made, and E. H. Brunner was elected teacher. A few of 
the higher branches were taught in addition to the common .<chool 
branches. The next year Professor John Miller was chosen teacher 
of the high school, for which a room was rented, all the .school rooms 
being occupied by the other grades. Professor Miller held this posi- 
tion until he was elected city superintendent. In 1806, a two-story 
building, with two rooms, was assigned to the high school, and wa.s 
occupied by it until a l)uilding was erected in the First ward. 

When the boundaries of Altoona were extended and it was incor- 
porated as a city, what was known as Loudonsville came within the 
limits. Here were two school houses, each with one r(jom. One of 
them was built about 1859, and served for school purposes until 1876, 
when it was destroyed by fire. The other was erected in 1866, when 
two grades were estal)Iished. Another house, with one room, in the 
Eighth ward, which was erected about 1867, came within the limits 
of the city also. The enrollment of pupils was greatly increased, 
and it was necessary to rent several rooms until more buildings could 
be erected. In a short time three houses were built — one with one 
room in the Fifth ward; and one with one, and one with two rooms 
in the Eighth ward. 

CITY SLPEHINTENDENT AND TEACHERS OF HIGH SCHOOL. 

The (office of city superintendent was in^tituted in 1869, to which 
Professor John Miller was called. He served until October, 1874, 
when the present incumbent, Prof I). S. Keith, was elected. 

John S. Alexander was assigned to the high school; however 
Profe.ssor Miller continued to teach a few branches for one year. 



108 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

PHILIP TEATS, 

AUCTIONEER 



ANT) UEALKH IN — 



SECOND-HAND GOODS OF JILL KINDS. 

New Furniture, Bedroom Suits, Jewelry, Notions, Dry Goods, Boots andi 
Shoes, Queensware, and Bedding of every description, both 

Old and New. 



All sorts of i(<)0(ls tiik(>ii aiul sold on oominission at rt-asoiiiiblc rates. .Sali-s in tind 

outside tlie city promptly attended to by himself. Speak.s both Engli.sh and 

(iernian. old Household Goods taken in exehanj^e for New. 

CALL AND SKE HIM. 

[A piece of jjoelry written as ail iiiii)r(>n)i)tn, ami l,)ft uneerenioniously, surrep- 
tition.sly and elandestinely on llir niass case of lMiilii> Teats' Auction Hon.se, 80(>' 
Twelfth Street, near i'>i<;iith Axcnue, without sifinatun;: 

Thosi' fond of fine sofas and very good sinits, 
Invaiialdy call on our fi-iend Philip Teats; 
Those wishing good tables at which to dine, 
Can then- find a stock especially tine ; 
And all kinds of furniture both new an<l old, 
Which at prices <iuile low is invariably sold. 

That Teats is a "brick," as all people know. 

Who Foreiiangh tried liard to add to his show 

As one of his s))eakeis to do the "polite," 

Knt Teats faile<I to .join him. beeanse "twas not right 

To jiull ui) his stakes. Mountain City to leave. 

For full well he knew how the iieopje would grieve; 

Ills musical \()ice would no longer be heard, 

.\nd we'ie glad that friend Teats is a man of his word. 

" His musical voie(! would no longer resound." 

For he's classed 'mongst the best that lives .above ground. 

.\t the favorite number— .S«Hi 

Twelfth Street, you'll timl him in very good fix ; 

His iiuctions at night are the best of tiie kind 

Of anywhere on the green (^artli you will timl. 

Those" sales (which are jnivate) ail through the long day^ 

Attending of which you can have your own way, 

Result to the good of" the iH^ople .itlarge — 

For attending his sales there's really no charge. 

So go to the place, and all take your seats. 

If you see nothing more, you will see our friend Teat.s. 



PHILIP TEATS, 

OFFICE: Twelfth Street, neiir Eightli Avenue^ 

ALTOONA, PA. 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 109* 

Nevin H. Fisher was next eloctod, and was followed by A. F. Hos- 
tettor, D. S. Keith, X. P. Ci'otise, and L. L. Book, the present 
teacher. 

GRADING OF SCHOOLS. 

In 18()i), the schools below the high school were divided into five 
g'rades, and a revisiid course of study was prepai'cd. The course for 
the high school included the conunon school branches, with algebra, 
geometry, natural philosophy, Latin, Greek and Geniian. However, 
but few pupils advanced much beyond the common school studies.. 
The course was not followed closely, every teacher changing it as lie- 
thought it best adapted to the wants of his pupils. 

MORE SUBSTANTIAL Bt ILDINOS ERECTED. 

When Altoona became a borough and a pe])arate school district,, 
little idea did the school directors have of tlie dimensions the place- 
would assume in ii few years. Frame buildings seemed to answer 
every puri)0se ; and it was thought, too, that there should be only 
one story, for when the first two-story school house was built, some- 
avowed that educational interest was getting up too high. But wheiv 
a city charter was ol)tain<'(l, and the ])o]Tulation continued to increase, 
the directors began to think it was necessary to erect more ])erman- 
ent and larger liuildings. In ISTO. a l)rick building, with eight rooms, 
was erected in tlie First ward. Six rooms were sujiplied with pat- 
ent furniture ; and all tin- l)uildings erected afterwards were fitted 
with such furniture, e.xcept a small addition ]tut to one of the build- 
ings in the Third ward in ISTl. There was still not sutticient school 
room for all the pupils, and, in ]S7"2, a brick house, with four rooms, 
was ]>uilt in the Eighth ward. In 1ST3, the frame i)uilding in tlu^ 
Fourth ward, which was erected in 185(i, was removed, and a brick 
house, with four rooms was l)uilt. The same year, two other brick 
houses, each with two rooms, were built — one in the Si.xth ward and 
one in the Seventh ward. In 1815, an addition, with two rooms, 
was built to the Sixth ward house, making the total numl)er of rooms 
thirty-eight; and thirty-eight teachers Avere el(;cted. In 1879, four 
additional rooms were added to the Sixth ward Imilding. Owing to 
the rapid increase in school population, it was difficult to keep pace- 
with the demand for new school buildings; and when the number of 
rooms became equal to the number of teachers employed, which had 
not been the case since 1854, a very desirable end w^as accomplished. 



110 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

REVISED COURSE OF INSTRUCTION. 

In 1875, a now gradation of the s^chools was made, a revised 
■course of instruction was prei)ared, the sexes were taught together in 
all the schools, and improvements were made in the plans for heating' 
•iind ventilati(»n. Eight grades below the high school were nuule — 
four constituting the ])rimary, two the intermediate, and two the 
grammer department. Tlie course for these three divisions included 
the common school branches, with drawing, simple equations in alge- 
l)ra and the elements of physiology. Two courses, an elementary 
and a scientific, were prepared for the high school. The elementary 
.course includes English grannuar, orthography, etym(»logv, reading, 
composition, rhetoric, Latin, arithnu'tic, algebra, geometry, physiol- 
ogy, natural philosophy, history and Constitution of the United 
i^tates, penmanship, drawing, botany or book-keeping. The scien- 
tific cour.^e includes English literature, composition, rhetoric, Latin, 
higher algebra, chemistry, general history, geology, trigonometry and 
.surveying, astronomy and mental philosophy, ({erman, French and 
Oreek are voluntary studies. An e(piivalent amount of language 
juay be substituted for sonu' of the mathematical studies. 

teachers' INSTITUTE. 

In 18*72, a law was passed in regard to annual institutes, "author- 
izing the city of Altoona to organize a teachers' institute independ- 
jcntly of the county of Blair." 

DEATH OF THE FIRST CITY SUPERINTENDENT. 

Professor John Miller, who was widely known thnjughout Blair 
county, died in Altoona, September 3, 1875. He was born in the 
city of Paris about 1800, and was taught to speak and read French 
by his mother. When lie was about three years of age his father 
moved to Strasburg. He was sent to school at Leipsic, where he re- 
juained until he graduated. Leaving Leipsic he came to this country 
a-lmut 1825. After being some time in New York and Philadelphia, 
he W4;'nt to the western i)art of this State, where he comnu'uced teach- 
ing school. Being a fine .scholar his services were soon sought. The 
most prominent places where he taught are Martinsburg, Williams- 
burg, Butler, Hollidaysburg, and Altoona. He filled the office of city 
.sui>erintendent until 1874, when he resigned, being so feeble that he 
was unable to discharge the duties of his office. 

Elexis Elder, W^ W. Osborne and J. B. Bowles are among the 
t^^achers who have taught longest in Altoona. Mr. Elder was ap- 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 



Ill 



pointod superintendent of Blair county in 18(54, and elected in 1860, 
.serving in all five years. 

(JROWTH OF THE PUBLIC SCHOOL SYSTEM. 

The annexed tabular stat(>nient will show the growth of the svs- 
tem since 1854 : 



YKAKS. 



18.5.5. 

J8.5f;. 

1857. 
18.58. 
18.59. 
1860. 
1861. 
186-2. 
186;!. 
1864. 
I860. 
1866. 
1867. 
1S68. 
J 869. 
1870. 
J871 . 
187-.>. 
187:i. 
1874. 
187.5. 
1876. 
1877. 
1878. 
1879. 
1880. 



u 

■a ■ 

a 

H 



o 



1 

2 
3 
3 

4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
5 
5 
.5 
4 
6 
5 
7 
7 
7 
10 
11 
11 
8 
(i 
6 
8 



'3 
S 



o 



'2 

2 
.5 
6 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
6 
7 
12 
15 
22 

25 
26 
26 
27 
30 
35 
37 
39 



• 







6 


5 




cS.= 


'^ 




tc 


^P 







s 


•*- 


1 




^ 


C 




E^ 


H 


>>z 


i-sCC i 


1 S 


e 





3« 

11 ' 




S 





?r^ 






ci tj 
























a 


^S 1 


d 


c 


>CH 


?; 


S^ 


<! 


< 


158 


4 


$35 00 


$25 00 


1 250 


4 


:io 00 


SO 00 


1 437 


6 


40 00 


30 00 , 


.5.50 


6 


40 00 


25 00 


1 603 


8 


37 .50 


27 50 


692 


9 


37 .50 


27 50 


! 770 


10 


37 50 


27 50 


i 769 


9 


37 50 


27 .50 , 


.S54 


9 


37 50 


27 .50 


762 


9 


39 72 


29 72 , 


82;^ 


8k, 


48 52 


35 39 


700 


9 


54 37 


38 64 i 


9-25 


H% 


55 0() 


39 33 


813 


lo 


62 50 


40 42 


1,.560 


10 


57 .50 


45 00 i 


1.640 


10 


60 00 


44 33 ' 


' 1,600 


10 


60 00 


45 00 


1,795 


9 


71 4;i 


44 46 1 


j 1,928 


9 


78 33 


44 80 


i 1,984 


9 


67 75 


4t 70 


2.085 


9 


61 82 


40 96 


2,082 


9 


57 0.5 


41 98 ■■ 


2,-254 


9 


,56 69 


40 95 ' 


2,382 


9 


.55 51 


;« 15 


2..505 


9 


.54 00 


36 87 1 


2.700 


9 


50 62 


35 36 



.0 



> « 

So 



OT2 



2 
4 

4 
4 

6 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
7 
7 

10 
13 
10 
10 
11 
11 
11 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 



%* 















Tl 

















> 


a 















'JJ 


* 1 








it ; 




2 


Z 










'*.< 


~'. 

















a 


y. 





a 

A 



o 



$1,4(X» 00 

() 2,400 00 

4 3,,S,57 ,36 

4 3,969 16 
2 3,454 31 
6 6.;i58 .30 

. ...! 2.744 04 

....: 2.776 87 

. . . . 2,800 00 

....( 3,112 00 

2 i 4,445 55 
....I 4,414 78 

3 6,340 .54 

3 9,107 85 
17,260 00 

5 IS.fWO 00 
10 28,000 00 

5 27,228 93 

9 1 37,994 .33 

9 1 43,873 00 

4 29,032 60 
2 25,377 63 
2 25,515 .53 

2 2:3, 1«) 95 

3 ; -25,616 .55 
3 1 -25,244 ;«) 



RAPID INCREASE OF SCHOOL POPULATION. 

Ever since Altoona was incor})orated as a borough it has been 
<lifficnlt to keep pace with the demand for school buildings sufficient 
to accommodate the number of children attending school. In addi- 
tion to the other buildings at that time existing, a.brick house — one 
of the most substantial and be.st arranged of the school buildings in 
the city — containing four rooms, was erected in the Fifth ward in 
I87T. It was supplied with first-class furniture. The .school direc- 
tors deserve great credit for the attention and care they gave in its 
erection. Several years ago a brick building of about the .same size 
was erected in the Fourth ward at a less cost, l)ut on account of the 
inferior material used, and the careless manner in which it was l)uilt, 



112 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR. COUNTY. 



Mountain City 



H 



H 



V 



H 



Howard Avenue, bet. Dth and 10th Streets,, 

ALTOONA, PA. 



ALLAN S. MYERS, 



Proprietor. 



Cut Flowers and Designs of all kinds, at all seasons of the year. 



GREENHOUSE and BEDDING PLANTS, 

BASKET and VASE PLANTS, 

VEGETABLE PLANTS IN SEASON. 



PRICES MODERATE. ORDERS BY MAIE PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO. 



mmd OF A 



I AM DETERMINED TO LEAD. BEST GOODS AT LOWEST PRICES. 




H 



H 



( L 



H 



vv 



H H 



Teas, Coffees, Sugars, Syrups, 

Canned Fruits, Dried Fruits, Mackerel in Kits and other packages. 
Fish, Bacon and Ham. Glass, Wood, ^A'^illow and Queensware, 

To^'t'tlK'r \\itli I'vcry iuticlo which is usually to l)e t'oiuid in a well-appointed, well- 

;u Til 11 ill '(I. lirst-class Gioeeiv and Provision Stoie. *S="Doirt mistake the 

name ami the place, as I don't wish others to trade on my capital. 

D. R. CHRISTIAN, 

No. 1018 

Chest Ji lit Avenue, Altoona, Pa. 

(BKICK BUII.UING.) 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 113 

it was recently condemned, and although the original cost, together 
•with rej)airs, amounted to, say $7,300, it was sold for the trifling 
sum of $355. 

[$5,700 was the amount originally contracted for the ereetion of 
this building. The contractor found the amount too small, when 
$1,000 additional was added, making $6,700. Afterwards a heater 
was placed in the building at a cost of about $400 ; then a new roof 
and other repairs amounting to about $200 — making $7,300.] 

In September, 1878, the term commenced with forty-two teachers, 
and during the month two thousand four hundred and twenty-two 
pupils were enrolled, with one hundred and twenty-three of them in 
charge of one of the i»riuiary teachers. This crowded condition of 
the schools made it neces.sary to establish another school. A church 
room, which was not at all suitaljle for a school room, was rented and 
occupied the renuiinder of the term. It became evident fr(jin the in- 
crease of the school population that i»rovision must be made tor more 
school rooms. Early in the summer an addition of four rooms to 
the Si.xth ward building was commenced and completed in September. 
The l)uil(ling, which is of brick, now contains eight rooms, supplied 
with good furniture. 

In September, 1870, the schools opened with forty-tiv(> teachers 
and an enrollment of two thousand si.\ hundred and nine pupils. 
Before the opening of the schools, it was thought that there would 
be sufficient school room to accommodate the increase in the number 
of pupils, but it became necessary again to resort to the renting of 
rooms. Two additi(jnal rooms were secured and two teachers elected, 
making the total number of teachers forty-seven. The erection of a 
building containing eight rooms, in the Second ward, is now in i)ro- 
irress, and will be (luite a relief to the crowded condition of the 
schools. The l>uilding, with furniture and heating a|)paratus, will 
cost about $18,000; two lots and a half, upoii which to erect the 
building, were purcha.sed at the cost of about $4,800. When the 
grounds are suitably improved, the total value of the public school 
pro])erty, in the Second ward, will l)e about $23,000, and will lie 
more valuable than that in any other ward. 

NUMBER OF SCHOOL BUILDINGS. 

To summarize the statistics of public school buildings scattered 
through preceding pages we state that in the First ward is one build- 
ing with eight rooms; Second ward, one building with eight rooms; 
'Third ward, one building with three rooms, and two buildings with 



114 



iiIkSTOry of altoona and blatr county. 



one room cacli — total, live rooms; Fourth ward,* two buildinji's with 
two rooms each — total, four rooms ; Fifth ward, one l)uildiiiti' with 
four I'ooms ; Sixth ward, one buildiny with (>i,iiht rooms; Seventh 
ward, one huildiiiii- with two rooms; Eig-hth ward, one huildins^ with 
four rooms, one with two rooms and two with one room eaeh — total, 
eight rooms. Grand total, forty-seven rooms. 

NAMKS OF TEACHERS, (JRADK, ENROLLMENT, ETC. 

The total numl>er of pupils eni'olled in the pul)lic seliools for 
1 810-80 was 2,()i)8. The names of teachers, grade, and the eni'oll- 
ment and average attendance of pupils (»f each school for that period 
are u-iven in the tables annexed: 



XiUiu's of Tcaclu'i-s. 



AVaid. 



(Jrade. 



Certificate. 



En- 
rolled 



Aver, 
age. 



L. L. I'.odk First. 

Liiidav Mnopor do. 

A. V. Kupcrt do. 

J. n. Bowles do. 

]\l!ir.\ I'.. Fosler do. 

Anuu M. .lolnistoii . . ! ....do. 
Nellie Dnrlioriow. ..... do. 

F^tnuiii K. Wdiiev do. 

Mrs. I,cllie Wilson , 
Mrs. Klla ( . Hei'Kle. 

Kalf .Mleiuan 

Anna <'. IJailcy 

Nannie Kiisstdl 

Kate K. Moscr 

Sadie K. Ini^rani ... 
:\Irs. Kinnia I'eaUe. 

i:ila Lewis 

Mrs. Tji/.zic Iteddint 



...do 

;d and od. 

...do 

..do 

...do 

...do 

...do 

...do 

...do 

...do 



I.,onisa O'Neill. do. ... 

Mi's. .Xniiii'i;. Moore Thini 

Mary .1 . stouH'er ... .do 

]Mrs.*Sallic .1. Steele..; do 

Sadie Iteajian i do. 

Aliee V. Slu-w ... .do 

W. W. Osliorne j Fourth... 

AiiK'lia (J. Sn.\-der . . . . .do 

Lillic M. Cowers ! . . . .do 

Li/.zie MeC niiipsey. . j .. . .do 

Jessie Custer ." ilo 

Lizzie A. (;ole : do 

INUigilie M. Uoss 1 do 

JLirni. L. ljreiineck(\! do 

jSIaddie Kendi^ do 

Cliarles i;e('sf\- Flftli 

Mattie Neville ; do 

G. Graliani Anderson] do 

Gretrude Rouslie do 

W. C. Reein Si.xtli 

K. Elder do 

Mary Wallaee \ do 

Jlaeliael .\. Cowcn...] (lo 

Marv K. Clarkson • do. 



Sallie II Meiilatliery 

Magfirie I'arUc '. . 

.Jennie Swartz 

llebeeea M. Patterson Seventh.. 
Emma F. Tiattord.. .l....do 



....lie. 
....do, 
....do. 



Tli^li School Normal Dii) 

Assistant lliiih School. . I'rotcssional 

Second (irainiiiar P(>rnianent. 

First (iraniinar do 

ist & 2tv\ InteriiH'dialc. l'rf)visional. 

Fonrth Primary do 

Third I'limary ; do 

Second I'liinary I'ermanenl. , 

First I'riinaiy .' Pi-o\isioiial 

F'iist (Grammar do 

.Vdvancc Second Inter do 

Second Intermediate... do 

First Intermediate \ Permanent. 

Fourth Primary Provisional 

Third Primary". <lo 

Second Primary do 

F'irst Primary.." do 

First Primary <lo 

First Primary do 

F'irst (i ram mar do , 

1st & -.ind Intermediate. ilo 

F'oTirth Piimary , ilo 

'2nd and ;!d Priiiiary do 

F^'irst Primary do 

Second (irau'imar Permanent. 

First (irammar do 

Second Intermediate... Professional 

Fii'.st Intermediate Provisional 

F\)ui'tli Pi'imary , do 

Third Primary." do 

Second Primary do 

First Priiiiarv ; do 

First Primary j do 

1st & '2nd Intermediate.! do 

Fourth Primary i Permanent.. 

Thiril Primary." Provisional. 

1st & '2nd I'riniary do 

Second tirammar Permanent.. 

First Grammar do 

Second Intermediate... Provisional . 

First Intermediate i do 

F^ourth Primary 1 do 

Third Primary." i do 

Secoiifl Primary ' do 

F^irst Primary.." [ do 

1st & ■2d Inter". & 4th Pri. do 

1st, 2d & 3d Piimary I do 



70 



50 
(i'2 
57 
(i5 
04 
44 
40 

ru 

.■)0 
HI 
(i5 
77 
71 
55 
.55 
47 
40 
5;j 
57 
t«! 
4(i 
44 
4S 
00 
50 
61 
71 
70 
52 
57 
5;i 

tn 

75 
4<) 
51 

4S 
48 
50 
67 
64 
85 
4() 
66 



67 



48 
47 

;» 

.55 
51 
57 
7:i 
37 
41 
51 
52 
54 
.56 
67 
.55 
48 
40 
43 
44 
48 
53 
.55 
42 
.'IS 
40 
51 
48 
53 
50 
67 
37 
.50 
4<i 
52 
.54 
.•{5 
45 
40 
42 
52 
(i2 
.53 
76 
37 
51 



*Princii)al building of this wanl condemned and sold. 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA ANT) BLAIR COUNTY. 



115 



Names of teachers for 1880-81, with their grade of sehool and 
certificate :* . 



Names of Tcacliers. 



Wards. 



Grade. 



Certifleate. 



A. 1'. Uupert First 

>;aTniie ilnssell do 

Jvillie M. Bower.s do 

Mary K. Foster do 

Anna M. Jolinston do 

Nellie Diirborrow do 

Dora Kearney do 

Mrs. Lettie Wilson df) 

J J. L. Book Second.. . 

r>iiida Hooper <lo 

W. W. Osborne do 

J. B. Jiowles do 

Charles (ieesey do 

.ressie Custer do 

Kiiinia K. Worley do 

r>ibl)ie H<Mr do 

Louisa O'Neill do 

Mrs. Annie K. Moore Third 

Anna C. Bailey do 

Mrs. Sailie J. Stetde ilo 

Sadie Hea|j;an do 

AUie V. Shew do 

Liz/.it! MeCuuipsey Fourth... 

Joliu B. Harmon.. <lo 

Ma<rgie M. Ross do 

Maiidie Ken dig .do 

S. (;. Uupert Fifth 

Mattie Neville do 

A. M. Crosthwaite do 

Ella Kenimerlinfi; do 

W. C. Reem Sixth 

Ele.xis Killer do 

Mary Wallace do 

Raehel A. Cowen do 

Lizzie A. Cole do 

Maggie Park do 

Emma Davis do 

Blanclie Miller do 

Rebecca JL I'atterson Seventh. 

Emma F. Trartord <Io 

3Irs. Ella C. Beegle Eighth... 

Mary J. Stoutt'er do 

Mary E. Clarkson do 

G. G. Anderson do 

Kate L. Moser do 

Sadie E . Ingram do 

Sadie Row do 

Harmenia Brenneeke do 

Lettie D. Johnston do 



Second Grammar 

First Grajnmar 

Seconfl Intermeiliate. . . 

First Intermediate 

Fourth Primary 

Tliird Primary." 

Second Primary 

First Primary. .* 

Principal High Scliool.. 
Assistant " " 

Second Graminar 

First Grammar 

First and Second Inter. 

Fourtli Primary 

Tliii-d Primai-y* 

Second I'rimary 

First Primary. .' 

First (iraniniai' 

First and Second Inter. 

Fourth Primary 

Second and Third Pri. . 

First Primary 

Fourth Primary 

Tliird Primai'y 

Second Primary 

First Pi'imary 

First and Si'cond Inter. 

Fourth I'rimarv „ 

Second and Third Pri.T 

First Primary 

Second Gram'mai' 

First Grammar 

Second Intermediate.. . 

First Intel-mediate 

Fouith Primary 

Third Primary.' 

Second Primary 

First Primary 

1st & '2d Int(;r. *4th Pri. 
1st. '2d anfl ;id' Primary.. 

First Grammar ".. 

•2d Inter. Advanceil 

Second Intermediate. . . 

First Intermediate 

Fourth Primary 

Third Primary 

Second Primary 

First Primary ." j 



Permanent. 

Professional. 
Provisional. 



Normal Diploma 

Professional. 

Permanent. 

Provisional. 



Professional. 
Provisional. 



Permanent. 

u 

Provisional. 
Permanent. 
Provisional. 



Xoi'mal Diploma 

Provisional.. 

hi 

Professional. 
Provisional. 



Normal Diploma 



*As the schools, for which teachers have been appointed!, do not commence un- 
til September, 1880, we are unable to give the numlier of pupils and average at- 
tendance. 

VALUE OF PUBLIC SCHOOL PROPERTY. 

The value of jtroperty used for school purjjoses amounts to $9(),- 
500, divided as follows : Grounds, $24,200 ; l)uildings, $04,800; fur- 
niture, $7,500. Twenty-five years ago there was but one school 
house, worth less than $300. [TTie value of the school property of 
the entire county is $200,850.] 



llfi HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

D. & C. MOORE, 



ALWAYS HAVE IN STOCK AN KLEOANT LINE OP 



GROCERIES 



WHICH THEY SKI,L AT THK 



LOWEST CASH PRICES. 



Canned Goods, 

Sugars, Coffees, 

Spices, Syrups, 

Aiul an uiuUess variety of Heavy and Fancy Groceries usually foiiiul in a well-reg- 
ulated store. Tliey also receive, in s<!ason, 

FEESH VEGETABLES 

From the East every tlay, which tliey sell at a very small margins. They also offer 

bargains to everybotl}' ill 

QUEENSWflRE and GLSSSW/IRE. 



All goods guaranteed to be of the best quality and warranted to give satisfaction 
in every case. Give them a call and become con vinced. 



D. & C. MOORE, 

Corner 11th Avenue unci 15th Street, Altoona. 



HISTORY OF ALTOOXA AXD BLAJR COUNTY. 117 

OFFICERS OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS, ETC. 

The board of school director.s consists of six members, as follows : 
John P. Levan, A. F. Heess, J. F. Pvainey, W. S. Douglass, H. C. 
Dorii, and C. N. Pimlott. Two directors are elected each year, the 
term of office being three years. At the election of February 17, 1880, 
J. P. Levan (whose term expired on June 1 following) was re-elected, 
and A. F. Heess was elected in place of W. E. Craine, whose term ex- 
pired also on June 1. The terms of J. F. Rainey and W. S. Douglass 
will expire June 1, 1881, and those of H. C. Dern and C. X. Pindott 
on June 1, 1882. 

Prof. D. S. Keith, city superintendent of schools, is elected by the 
directors and commissioned by the State superintendent. His term 
expires on June 1, 1881. 

The present visiting directors are: Fir.-t ward, H. C. Dern; Third 
ward, J. F. Rainey; Fourth ward, A. F. Heess; Fifth and Sixth 
wards, W. S. Douglass; Seventh ward, John P. Levan ; Eighth and 
Second wards, C. N. Pimlott. 

Officers of the board: President, John P. Levan; secretary, W. 
*S. Douglass ; treasurer, T. H. Wigton. 

ENGLISH AND GERMAN PRIVATE SCHOOLS. 

About 1855 a private school was established with twenty-five pu- 
pils, by Right Reverend J. Tuigg, and Mary Levi was appointed as 
teacher. The school grew rapidly in nunilK-rs and influence. 

The large and imposing structure, adjacent to St. John's church,- 
on Thirteenth avenue, between Thirteenth and Fourteenth streets, is 
now the residence and school building of the Sisters of Charity at- 
tached to the church. Its corner-stone was laid by Rt. Rev. Bishop 
Domenec, under the pastorship) of Rev. Father Tuigg, May 12, 1867. 
•On August 19, 1870, the building was ready to receive the Sisters. 
It was furnished with all the modern improvements. There are eight 
large and well-ventilated rooms for the children ; a comfortable and 
Jiandsome oratory, where the Sisters assemble to perform the religious 
•exercises of their order ; large and spacious parlors, and a grand re- 
'Ception room ; three or four music halls, together with a large dormi- 
tory divided into cells, where the members of the community sleep. 
'The Sisters, originally only four in number, came from Cincinnati, and 
under the Superior Mother Aloysia, took pos.session of the building in 
1870, and commenced at once the duties of imparting to the young 
people of the congregation, and to others who were willing to embrace 
the opportunity, a sound religious and secular education. The eoni- 
9 



118 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

t 

imuilty rapidl}^ grew and spread, and noAV from this house alone many- 
others have been established in the diocese — at Johnstown, East Lib- 
erty, South-Side (Pittsburg), Sharpsl)urg and Blairsvillc. The atten- 
dance at the Convent schools is large, averaging daily between six 
and seven hundred children. There is an academy or high school at- 
tached, from which the more advanced pupils graduate with honors. 
Mother Aloysia superintends the schools, and the whole is iiiidcr the 
supervision of the pastor of the cliurch. 

The German Catholic schocjls, conducted ))y the Sisters of St. 
Agnes, were started in 1877, and since that time have been very suc- 
cessful in providing the necessary religious and secular training to u])- 
wards of three hundred German Catholic children. 

In September, 1878, the Franciscan Brothers from Loretto, Cam- 
bria county, took charge of the boys' schools, one on the eastern side 
and one on the western side of the city. The superintendanc(? of the 
schools is committed to Brother Angelus, Avho is assisted by Brothers 
Vincent, Athanasius, and two others. Some tinu^ ago they gave a 
public entertainment at the Opera House, wliich was very successful 
and gave proof of the In-others' efficiency. 

Eight or ten years ago a parochial school was established by the 
German Lutheran church, in order that their children might receive 
instruction in their own language. Recently these children have 
come into the public schools, but, during the vacation of the public 
schools, they receive instructions in reading and writing German. By 
this method they receive the benefits of a system of graded schools, 
and advance as rapidly in learning their own language. 

A "Kindergarten" school, the central idea of which is to mingle 
work and play so adroitly that the child's mind unfolds through its 
play, so that mental and bodil}' develoiunent go hand in hand, was 
recently established by Miss Joanna Steichele, a young German lady, 
with prospects of ultimate success. 

In the year 1862 an effort was made l)y Dr. Wm. R. Findley, and 
severcil other i)rominent citizens, to establish an academy at which a 
higher grade of education might be obtainable than, at that time, the 
])ublic schools offered. A charter of incorporation was obtained, and 
although i\\o, ])lan of organization proposed was considered practicable, 
yet petty sectional jealousy Ijrought the enterprise to a speedy death. 
Pr. Findley had secured the refusal of a lot of ground adjoining the 
reservoir, on the east side, for $1,500, with $.300 sub.scribed, and it is 
to be regretted that the academy was not built at that time. 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 119 

CITY CHURCHES. 



BAPTIST — FIRST AND SECOND. 

The origin of the Fir.st church goes back to May, 1842, then or- 
ganized untler the name of "The Pleasant Yalley Baptist Church," 
with seventeen members, in the Union school house. Up to 1852 the 
church had no settled pastor, but was regularly supplied with preach- 
ing by Rev. Wm. B. Bingham, Rev. Mr. Fisher, Rev. J. B. Morris 
and Re\'. J. B. Williams, all of whom did pastoral work. With the 
laying out of Altoona, lots were secured principally through the kind- 
ness of Martin Bell, deceased. In 1853 the small brick liuilding, now 
occupied l)y the Catholics as a reading room, was l)uilt and used by 
the congregation until the present edifice, at the corner of Eleventh 
avenue and Fifteenth street, close to the old building, was erected. 
Rev. A. J. Hay was pastor of the church from 1852 to 1854. He 
was followed by Rev. W. B. Harris. In 1859 Rev. A. H. Sembower 
became pastor and remained with the church until 1865, when Rev. 
A. F. Shanafelt succeeded him. Rev. Wm. Shadrach, D. D., took the 
partorate in 1868 and remained until 1873. During Dr. Shadrach's 
pastorate the present church building was completed, he having faith- 
fully served the church for five years. Rev. Dr. Shadrack leaving. Rev. 
Wm. Codville became pastor, remaining until April, 1876. During 
the summer of tlic hitter year the church was without a pastor. In 
the fall of the same year Rev. A. K. Bell, D. D., assumed the pastoral 
charge, and has ever since been, more or less, identified with the church. 
During Dr. Bell's absence at Lewisburg, Rev. C. A. Hare filled the 
pastor's chair from July, 1878, to October, 1879, when he left to re- 
sume his studies at Crozer. Dr. Boll filled the pulpit from October, 
1879 to January, 1880, when the church again released him in the in- 
terests of the University at Lewisburg until June, 1880, his place be- 
ing filled l)y Rev. J. Green Miles. 

N. J. Mervine, W. B. Ketler, Benj. M. Bunker, H. B. Kendig, C. 
C. Lyon, Stephen Aiken and Samuel Colclesser constitute the pres- 
ent board of deacons ; W. S. Douglass, church clerk, and Dr. S. M. 
Sellers, treasurer. The board of trustees for 1880-1 consists of Dr. 
S. M. Sellers, J. H. Oves, H. B. Kendig, J. W. Cherry, X. J. Mer- 
vine, C. C. Lyon, G. S. El)y, W. S. Elder, and W. S. Douglass. 

As a corporate body the church is entirely free from debt, owning 



120 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 



Alive to the Wants of the People. 

We buy at the \'ery lowest ligures anrl iire tlnis enablod to f<ell at what some would 

term starvation prices. AVe mean what we say and say what we mean. Trj' 

us and pro\e ns. We carry at all times an ample stock of 

Dry Goods, Notions, 




) J- 



H 




) -L 



-\ 



H H 



PROVISIONS, BOOTS AND SHOES, 

• articles ot general mercliaadise too numerous to mention. 

"PRIDE OF ALTOONH," 



The most favorite brand of rtour, and can Ije olitainnd only of ns. 

WM. McDowell & son, 

Corner Ttli Avenue and 13t.li Street, Altoona. 



DR. LINDSEY JlGaiN IN THE FIELD. 

HIS NEW AND WONDERFUL REMEDY FOR THE BLOOD. 



lindsey's World-Renowned Panacea 

'Guaranteed to cure all diseases arising from impurities of the blood, of which the 

following IS a i)art : 

Scrofula, Cancer, Salt-Rheum, Fever-Sores, 

Secondary Syphilis, Tetter, Erysipelas, Itch, 

Catarrh, Liver Complaint, Scald Head, 

Pimples and Blotches on the Face, 

And at the same time is one of the greatest beautiliers, as it removes all eruptions 
and sallowness from the skin, and leaves it a clear and natural color. All per- 
sons in needof a blood purifier are requested to try the I'aiiacea, asit is guar- 
anteed to cure if taken according to directions. " The I'anacea is prejjared 
by Dr. J. jAI. Lindsey in person, at the Lal>oratory f)f the sole pi'oprie- 
tors. !>old by all druggists and dealers everywhere. 

LINDSEY & BECKMAN, 

SOLE PROPRIETORS, 

lltli Avenne, bet. 14tli and 15th Streets, Altoona, 

(Four Doors Kast of lUiptist Church.) 



IIISTURY OF ALTOOXA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 121 

a propfi'ty worth about $25,000. Membership, 202, with an average 
Sunday-school attendance of 225; volumes in library, 400. 

The Second Baptist church was' organized in 18T3, under the aus- 
pices of the First Baptist church. The congregation first worshipped 
in a ))uilding on Eighth avenue, between Twenty-first and Twenty- 
second streets. The first pastor was Rev. Jacob Robinson, who was 
succeeded ))v Revs. Richardson, Rhue and others. In 1876 a new 
building was erected on Seventeenth street, between Tenth and Elev- 
enth avenues, at a cost of about $1,000, Avhere the congregation now 
worship, although for some time they have had no pastor. 

CATHOLIC — ENGLISH AND GERMAN. 

The present flourishing congregation of St. John's started with a 
church organization in the year 1852. Rev. John Walsh, deceased, 
then in charge of St. Mary's church, Hollidaysl)urg, purchased on the 
above date two lots, upon which was erected a frame building, suffi- 
cient to accommodate the cono-rea-ation, at that time not verv larsre. 
Tliis frame church was dedicated the following year (1853). The ven- 
erable Father Bradley, pastor at Xewry, attended regularly to the 
spiritual wants of the people for the greater part of 1853, as yet there 
being no duly appointed resident pastor. In the following year. Rev. 
John Tuigg, the present Bishop of the Diocese of Pittsburg, was for- 
mally installed as pastor of St. John's congregation. The member- 
shii) up to this date, and for eight years afterwards, embraced both 
English and German speaking Catholics; the German ])ortion of the 
congregation had the ministrations, at regular intervals, of Fathers 
Clemens, Manus, Wendelin and others. In the year 1860 the German 
Catholics formed themselves into a separate congregation, having a 
resident priest. In the same year, under the very able, energetic and 
efficient pastorate of Rev. J. Tuigg, the present capacious and beauti- 
ful church building was commenced. The work was pushed through 
rapidly, and was dedicated on the 24th of June, 1815, the feast of St. 
John, after whom the church is named, by the Rt. Rev. M. Domenec, 
the late Catholic Bishop of the Diocese. There was a large gather- 
ing on the occasion, and the Catholic population must have felt justly 
proud of the success that crowned their efforts in securing for them- 
selves such an imposing church edifice. The early members of the 
church were chiefly composed of those engaged in the building of the 
Pennsylvania railroad, and belonged to that faith. A large number 
also came from the neighboring counties, especially from Cambria, 
where there is a large Catholic population, the fruits of the faithful 



122 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNT Y. 

labors of the Prince Priest, Dr. Gallitzin. The present pastor of St. 
John's church is Rev. Thomas Ryan, who for a number of years had 
been pastor of the Gallitzin churt'h. On July 18, 1880, Bishop Tuigg 
administered the sacrament of confirmation at St. John's, at the close 
of which he appointed Father Ryan to succeed the lamented Rev. John 
Walsh, who had been pastor since March, IS'ffi, and since the eleva- 
tion of Rev. John Tuigg, his predecessor, to the episcopate. Father 
Ryan is efficiently assisted in ministering to the congregation by the 
Rev. Morgan M. Sheedy and Rev. Jas. A. Nash. The present mem- 
bership of St. John's is between four and five thousand. 

St. Mary's (German) church was organized in 18G0. The first 
resident priest was Father Schuller, who was succeeded in order by 
Fathers Bierl, Kircher, Rosswog, and others. The present pastor, 
Rev. John Schell, took charge in 1871. In 1874 Father Schell got 
the church building to its present shape. It is, however, unfinished, 
but it is intended to complete it at an early date. This congregation 
also is in a very flourishing condition, and has a membership of nearly 
two thousand. 

CHRIST REFORMED. 

This church is located on the corner of Twelfth avenue and Fif- 
teenth street. It is a fine, imposing edifice, built of sandstone, in the 
Gothic style of architecture. A neat, commodious, frame parsonage 
stands adjoining it. The congregation worshipping in this church, 
and whose property it is, is connected with the Reformed Church in 
the United States, and was organized in January, 1863, as a Mission 
under the care of the Westmoreland Classis. In November of the 
same year it was received under the care of the Mercersburg Classis, 
with which it is still connected. It received missionary support until 
1872, since which time it has been self-sustaining, and by its benevo- 
lent contributions has already, in a great measure, returned to the 
Church at large what was given to it in its infancy. At the time of 
organization only about a dozen communicant members were con- 
nected with the mission. The actual organization was effected Jan- 
uary 29, 1863, l)y the adoption of a constitution and the election of 
the following officers: Elders, J. L. Reifsneider and C. B. Sink; dea- 
cons, J. H. Fritchey and Daniel Bohler. The first pastor was Rev. 
Cyrus Cort, who took charge of the mission January 1, 1863, and, 
after a very successful pastorate, resigned in March, 1867. The mis- 
sion was then vacant for about fifteen months, when Rev. A. C. Whit- 
mer was called as pastor. He was installed June 14, 1868, and closed 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 123 

his labors here April 1, 1819. During his long pastorate the member- 
ship was greatly increased, and the church became self-supporting. In 
October, 1879, a call was extended to the present pastor, Rev. J. M. 
Titzel. He was installed December 19, 1879, and regularly began his 
labors as pastor January 1, 1880. 

The corner-stone of the church edifice was laid July 31, 1864, and 
the Iniilding was finished, excepting the spire, in June, 1868, and con- 
secrated on the 14th of that month. In 1873 the spire was built and 
the structure finally completed through the efforts of J. P. Levan, then 
a deacon of the church, and one of its most liberal supporters. The 
cost of the building was about $15,000. It was erected under the su- 
pervision of a building committee consisting of J. L. Reifsneider, J. 
P. Levan, Daniel Bohler, and C. B. Sink. The architect was Fred. 
Thorn. The parsonage was built in the fall of 1868 and the spring of 
1869, at a cost of $3,000. Several hundred dollars have since been 
spent on it in repairs and improvements. The congregation at present 
numl)ers about three hundred comniTinicant members. The officers at 
this time are: Elders, J. F. Boult, J. L. Reifsneider and Peter L. 
Stouch; deacons, H. A. Folk, Y. H. Freet, George S. Thomas, A. C. 
Hammaker, E. Lingenfelter and C. E. Morse; trustees, J. F. Boult, 
J. L. Reifsneider and P. L. Stouch. A flourishing Sunday-school is 
connected with the congregation, numbering thirty officers and teach- 
ers, and over two hundred scholars. Geo. S. Thomas is the present 
superintendent of the school. 

CHURCH OF GOD. 

In the fall of 1862 Elder S. S. Richmond, assisted by a number of 
families in Altoona, among whom may be mentioned the Alloways, 
Fishers, Cavenders, Pools, Ottos and Weights, laid the foundation of 
the Church of God in Altoona. At first Elder Richmond conducted 
services in private houses. In January, 1863, Elder Jacob Boyer, 
who was in charge of the Martinsburg circuit, held a protracted meet- 
ing in the " Armory building," the result of which was the more defi- 
nite organization of the church. Charles Pool was elected elder, and 
Abraham AUoway deacon. A lot of ground, corner of Fifth avenue 
and Thirteenth street, was purchased from Mr. Jaggard, and a build- 
ing committee was appointed, consisting of PJlder S. S. Richmond, 
Charles Pool, Abraham AUoway, and Samuel Weight. Mr. AUoway 
shortly afterwards died, and John Mateer, of Martinsburg, wias se- 
lected to fill the vacancy In the fall of 1863 the building was under 
roof, and, although unfinished, services were held therein. Later in 



124 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

D. A. BARR, 



— DEALER IN — 



GROCERIES 

SND GENERAL MERCHANDISE. 

No. 1807 Eighth Avenue, ' - Altooiia, Pa. 



H. H. SNYDER, 

Attorney and Counselor at Law, 

Hollidaysburg, Pa. 



Collections in any part of the County promptly attended to. 



J. C. INNES, 

APOTHECARY 



AND DEALER IN — 



Fine PHflRMflCEUTicuL Prefarstions, 

Ninth Street, below Sixth A.venue, Altoona, Pa. 
AKE NOTICE.— Highest Cash Prices paid for Ginseng, Seneka Root, etc. 



J. W. ISENBERG, D. D. S. 



DKNTAL OFFICE: 

Corner 8th Avenue and 12tli Street, Altoona,, P^i. 



OFFICE HOURS: 9 A. M. TO G P. U 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 125 

the fall FAdcv Richnionfl entered the army as chaplain. In the .spring 
of 18G4 Elder John Hickernell and Mr.s. Martha Beecher conducted 
scrvice.s, and remained until the summer of 1865, when Elder Rich- 
mond returned and resumed the duties of the pastorate. The building 
was finished in the fall of that year. In 1866 Elder Richmond was 
succeeded by Elder P. D. Collins, who remained until the spring of 
1868, when Elder C. L. Arny assumed charge. In the .spring of 1869 
Elder J. M. Dugan, succeeded. He remained one year. Between 
April 1, 1870 and March 31, 18T1, the church was without a regular 
pastor. On April 1 of the latter year. Elder J. C. Owens took charge, 
who, in the fall, Avas followed by Elder F. L. Xicodemus, and in the 
spring of 1874 Elder J. M. Carvell occupied the pulpit. He remained 
two years. Elder John Hunter was the next pastor, under whose ad- 
ministration the building was enlarged (December, 1876,) to its pres- 
ent dimensions. The building committee consisted of Levi Fisher, 
John Bartley, Jeremiah Hoerner and A. Y. Price. The new or en- 
larged house, free of debt, was dedicated March 17, 1877. Elder John 
Hunter resigned the pastorate in the winter of 1878, and Elder G. L. 
Cowen took charge. On April 1, 1879, Elder J. W. Miller, the pres- 
ent pastor, commenced his labors here. The membership at first was 
twenty-fiv-e ; it has grown to upwards of two hundred. During the 
past year a parsonage has been erected at a cost of about $1,000. 

HEBREW SYNAGOGUE. 

With about twenty-three members, a Hebrew congregation, under 
the title of "Ahabath Achim," was organized in Altoona in May, 
1873. The first president was Joseph Berkowitz ; treasurer, A. Shee- 
line; secretary, S. Xeuwahl. The first rabbi was Rev. Mr. Goldman; 
then followed in order Revs. Grossman, Block and Leasker. Rev. S. 
Altman, the present rabbi, was engaged in June, 1879. The officers 
now serving are : President, Max Mayer ; treasurer, Joseph Berko- 
witz ; secretary, A. Sheeline. Present membership, twenty-five. The 
congregation has never had any regular stated place of worship for 
any protracted period of time. At present its meetings are held once a 
week, and on the holidays, in a hall on the corner of Eleventh avenue 
and Fourteenth street. The congregation has a cemetery, or burying 
ground, located on the Dry Gap road, in the immediate vicinity of 
the city. 

LUTHERAN FIRST ANT) SECOND. 

The First Lutheran church was organized about the year 1834, in 
a log school house, then located in a wood in the now called Sixth. 



126 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

ward. Subsequently, in about 1838, the congregation moved its place 
of worship to the Union school house, now greatly improved and oc- 
cupied by the Colored Methodist Episcopal church. In the spring of 
1846 Rev. Henry Baker received and accepted a call to this congrega- 
tion. During the same summer this congregation built a church edi- 
fice in Collinsville, now in the suburbs of the city, where they wor- 
shipped for eight years. After Altoona was laid out, it became neces- 
sary for the congregation again to change its base of operations. Two 
lots were selected on Eleventh avenue, where the present church and 
parsonage were built in 1853. The church edifice was dedicated in 
1854. The principal contributors to this enterprise were Michael 
Hileman, William Bell, J. B. Hileman, John Loudon, Peter Empfield, 
Harry Sellers, Henry Fleck, J. L. Reifsneider, Jacob Good, Benjamin 
Figart, William Robinson, Rudolph Lotz, George W. Patton, George 
Cowen. The contractors were Peter Empfield and David Brubaker. 
Cost of church and parsonage about $8,000. In 18*70 the church Avas 
enlarged and greatly improved at a cost of about $12,000. The pas- 
tors who served this church from time to time are as follows: Revs. 
Jacolj Martin, John H. Huffman, C. C. Guenther, Jacob Simons, Wil- 
liam Weaver, Henry Baker, S. Cartis, Jacob Steck, C. C. Ehrenfeld, 
S. Holman and Henry Baker. The latter pastor served the congre- 
gation for eleven and a half years — from 1846 to 1857. He returned 
in 1867 and has been pastor ever since. Membership, seven hundred. 
Sabbath-school numbers five hundred. It is due to say that out of 
this church the German church in part originated, and also the Second 
church. There are now about twelve hundred communing members 
of the Lutheran churches in Altoona. The church council at present 
is composed of three elders — Henry Yon, Daniel Stoner, J. B. Hile- 
man — and six deacons: C. C. Mason, L. B. Patton, S. S. Taylor, J. 
K. Roush, George F. Jones (now deceased), Thomas Bushman. Rev. 
Henry Baker has faithfully and efficiently served the First church for 
thirty-four years. The congregation is free of debt, is vigorous and 
active, always ready to unite in any enterprise which has the glory of 
God and the good of man in view. The Fairview cemetery originated 
with Mr. Baker, and the organization of an association took place in 
the lecture room of this church, Mr. Baker becoming the first presi- 
dent. 

F(jr some time i)revious to the organization of the Second church 
a num))cr of the members of the First church, as well as the pastor, 
felt that there was a necessitv for a second organization, the First 
church having attained a membership equal to its seating capacity. 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 12T 

Consequently, on July 11, 1871, the following persons met at the resi- 
dence of William Bell for the purpose of taking- some measures look- 
ing to the organization of the Second church: Rev. J. B. Crist, Wm. 
Bell and wife, D. K. Ramey, J. B. Westle}', Louis Walton and wife, 
Mrs. Sue Patton, and A. J. Riley. Rev. J. B. Crist was elected chair- 
man, and A. J. Riley secretary. After prayer by the venerable Father 
Crist, Mr. Ramey stated the object of the meeting, after which a com- 
mittee, consisting of D. K. Ramey, Wm. Bell and A. J. Riley, was 
appointed to procure a suitable place for public worship. This com- 
mittee secured the room known as Bell's hall, corner Seventh avenue 
and Twelfth street, and on the 13th of Augu.st, 1871, the congrega- 
tion was regularly organized. The officers elected at this meeting 
were: Elders, Wm. Bell and J. B. Westley; deacons, D. K. Ramey 
and L. F. Stahl ; treasurer, A. J. Riley. Rev. S. Domer, of Reading, 
preached in the morning, and Rev. Henr}' Baker in the evening, at 
which time the above-named officers were installed. In the afternoon 
of the same day the Sunday-school was organized. D. K. Ramey 
was elected superintendent, A. J. Riley secretary, Louis Walton lib- 
rarian, and L. F. Stahl assistant librarian. The school, including offi- 
cers and teachers, numbered twenty at its organization. At a congre- 
gational meeting, held December 31, 1874, the ground upon which the 
church edifice is erected was chosen, and the following building com- 
mittee was appointed: William Bell, George W. Heinsling, D. K. Ra- 
mey, D. C. Earhart and John B. Westley. On February 22, 1874, 
the church was occupied by the congregation for the first time, wor- 
shiping in the basement, or lecture-room, the audience chamber being 
yet unfinished. The entire co.st of the church property, including the 
parsonage, is over twenty thousand dollars. With the exception of a 
few hundred dollars, the entire amount has been raised and paid, and 
is a standing testimony of the self-sacrificing spirit of many of its mem- 
bers. Membership of church numbers two hundred and eighty. The 
present officers are: Elders, J. B. Westley, John Cole, D. K. Ramey 
and James Hileman ; deacons, F. W. Gearheart, Charles Geesey, J. B. 
Herring and Henry Otto. The Sabbath-school numbers three hun- 
dred and fifty. Its officers are: Charles Geesey, superintendent; D. K. 
Ramey, assistant superintendent ; John Alexander, secretary ; Wm. 
Stahl, treasurer; Samuel Dougherty, Harry Hooper and Joshua Ear- 
hart, librarians; Miss Linda Hooper, organist. The congregation had 
the following pastors since its organization : Rev. Geo. Scholl, from 
November, 1871, to July, 1874; Rev. Charles Steck, from Xovember, 
1874, to January, 1876; Rev. J. F. Shearer, the present pa.stor, from 



128 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 



1 



UUi 



V 



H 



H 



MANVyACTritER OF ALL KI;NDS OF 



FURNITURE, 



BEST STYLE, AT LOWEST PRICES. 



Eepairing and Eefinisliing Promptly Attencled 
to in tlie Best Mannei'. 



Pourtli Avenue and Tentli Street, 



ALTOONA, PA. 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 121) 

March 1, 1876. The con.sTeo-ation is looking hopefally to the time 
when the audience room shall he finished and opened for Avorship. 

St. James German Evangelical Lutheran church, Eighth avenm; 
and Fourteenth street. Dedicated 18fi2; rebuilt, 1873. Xuml)er of 
families, one hundred and forty ; Sunday-school scholars, one hundred 
and fifty ; teachers, eighteen ; library contains two hundred volumes. 

METHODIST — FIRST, SECOND, THIRD, MISSION AND AFRICAN. 

For the nanu's of those who have been pastors of the Methodist 
churches see page 94. The First Methodist church was erected in 

1853, at a cost of about $25,000. It was remodeled in 1871. Th<' 
membership, which, as previously stated, (page 94) numbered, in 

1854, ninety-seven, and fifty-five probationers, now numbers three hun- 
dred iiiid seventy-two in full connection and fort^'-eight probationers, 
over and above deaths and. removals ])y certificates. There are two 
hundred and twenty scholars in the Sunday-school attached to the 
church, and five hundred volumes in the library. The church build- 
ing is located at the corner of Twelfth avenue and Thirteenth street. 

The Second Methodist church, located on the corner of Eighth 
a\enue and Thirteenth street, was erected in 1867 at an estimated 
■cost of $24,000, and the parsonage at $3,000. The nunil)er of Sun- 
day-school scholars is six hundred and ninety-eight ; number of vol- 
unu'^ in the lil)rary, six hundred. Connected with this church is the 
Asbury C Impel, a Methodist Mission church, corner Twenty-fourth 
street and Seventh avenue; organized, 1871; numl)er of members, 
seventy-five; Sunday-school scholars, two hundred. Estimated vahn; 
of Iniilding, $2,000. 

Tlie Third Methodist church, corner of Chestnut avenue and 
Tenth street, was organized in 1872 and church Iniilding erected in 
1874; estimated value, $20,000 ; two hundred and ten .scholars con- 
nected with the Sunday-school. 

The Allen Chajiel African Methodist Episcopal church, Sixteenth 
jitreet, near Eleventh avenue, was organized in 1858, and dedicated 
bv ]]ishr)p Payne. Among the earliest pastors we may mention 
Revs. William H. Grimes and Alexander Johnson. Last year (1879) 
the church l)uilding was remodeled and improved, at an expense of 
about $1,000, and in November it was re-dedicatcd l^y Bishop Alex- 
ander Wayman. The present pastor is Rev. Xathaniel W. Evans. 
This church was at first under the jurisdiction of the Baltimore Con- 
fiu'ence of the M. E. church, l)ut for some time has been under the 
U'cneral (velesiastical control of the Pittsburg Conference. The Sun- 



130 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

day-school, numbering forty scholars, was under the superintendency 
of John Alexander for twenty-one years, a i)eriod, (up to May of the 
present year) co-extensive with its existence. In May he resigned, 
and was succeeded by Thaddcus Ormes, the iiresent incumbent. 

PRESBYTERIAN FIRST AND SECOND. 

Originally the church was foniieil fnnu that in HoUidaysburg. 
On the settlement of Rev. David McKinney, D. D., at the latter 
place in 1841, he instituted an afternoon service in the old Union 
school house in Altoona, afterwards occupied l)y the African Metho- 
dist church, once every four weeks. In 1850 measures were taken 
l)y the Presl)yterians of Altoona to provide themselves with a suit- 
able church edifice. Two lots were secured, and on these they erected, 
at a cost of about $3,000, a neat and commodious house of worship. 
On November 3, 1851, the congregation of Ilollidaysburg agreed 
that their pastor, Rev. Dr. McKinney, should preach in Altoona on 
alternate Sa))baths in the afternoon, which lie did for nearly a year, 
when he resigned his charges and moved to Philadelphia. At this 
time there were fifty Presbyterian families and seventy communi- 
cants, with their ecclesiastical connection in Hollidaysburg. In Oc- 
tober, 1852, a petition to the Presbytery of Huntingdon, asking for 
a separate organization was granted, and on November 8, following, 
the First Presbyterian church was duly organized. Jonathan Ham- 
ilton and John McCartney, elders in the parent church, w^ere contin- 
ued in the same relation in the new organization, and John Hutchi- 
son, G. D. Thomas and James L. Gwin were elected and ordained to 
the eldership. In 1853 William C. McCormick having been an elder 
both in the churches of Hollidaysburg and Johnstown, settled in Al- 
tooiui and was elected an elder in the new church. The church thus 
organized was served by supplies iintil November 14, 1854, when 
Rev. A. B. Clarke was called to the pastorate. Nine years after, in 
May, 1863, on account of ill-health he resigned, and died on July 4, 
following. On January 26, 1864, Rev. R. M. Wallace was called to 
the vacant pulpit. During the pastorate of Mr. Clarke, Messrs. Her- 
man J. Lombaert, Thomas P. Sargeant, John M. Campljell, James 
Hutchison, James H. Dysart and Dr. Wm. R. Findley were chosen 
ruling elders. The original church edifice was disposed of by sale in 
the year 1854, and the present edifice erected in 1855. In 1865 the 
communicants numbered about tAvo hundred and thirty. Mr. Wal- 
lace continued to serve the congregation until 1874, when he .severed 
his connection with the First church and assumed the care of a con- 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 131 

grogation at Stroudsbiirg, Monroe county, Pa. During hh pastorate 
the church so increased in numbers that a new organization was pro- 
jected and finally culminated in the Second Presbyterian church on 
the east side of the city. Col. Thomas A. Scott was among the 
worshippers of the First church during his residence here. Rev. M. 
N. Cornelius, the present pastor, was called to be the successor of 
Mr. Wallace, and began his pastoral labors Januar}^ 1, 1876. Its 
present membership is four hundred and thirty. In 1863 the school 
numbered ninety-eight, and in 1880 three hundred and twenty-tAvo. 
The following are the present officers of the .school : Thomas H. 
Wiggins, superintendent ; Professor D. S. Keith, assistant ; Mrs. N. 
C. Barclay, superintendent of infant school ; W. C. (italbraith, secre- 
tary and treasurer ; B. J. Lockard, librarian. 

On account (jf the rapid gr(jwtli of the membership another church 
building was found necessary. The matter was seriously discussed 
early in 1869, when a meeting was held at the house of Wm. M. Lloyd. 
James Hutchison, Joseph Dysart, Thos. McCauley, Wm. M. Lloyd, 
Dr. J. M. Gemmill, Dan'l Laughnum, Chas. J. Mann and S. C. Baker 
were present on the occasion. In addition to these were James H. 
Dysart, John M. Campbell and John H. Converse who gave the en- 
terprise the benefit of their counsel and efforts. A petition to Hunt- 
ingdon presbytery for a new organization was presented, and in an- 
swer thereto presbytery appointed a committee to organize the Second 
church, which the committee did on the evening of June 21, 1869. 
Forty-seven persons were enrolled as members, all of whom except one 
were from the First church. The first officers of the church were : 
Elders, James Hutchison, John M. Camplx'll and James H. Dysart; 
deacons, Charles J. Mann and Daniel Laughman ; trustees, Wm. M. 
Lloyd, S. C. Baker, Thomas McCauley, Joseph Dysart, John H. Con- 
verse and Dr. J. M. Gemmill. The congregation rented Bell's hall, 
corner Seventh avenue and Twelfth street, and on Sal)bath morning, 
Julv 11, 1869, the first public .service was held, conducted by Rev. C. 
L. Kitchell, after which meetings were kept up regularly. The Sab- 
l)ath-school was organized July 18, 1869; James H. Dysart, superin- 
tendent, and Max. Kinkead, treasurer, were its first officers. Thirty- 
nine names were on the school roll. A year afterwards the roll con- 
tained four hundred and seventy-two, officers included. In 1880 five 
hundred and .seven names were reported. At a congregational meet- 
ing held August 21, 1869, Rev. David Hall, of Mansfield, Ohio, was 
elected pa.stor, but he declined to accept. A^n-il 5, 18T0, a call was 
extended to W. J. Chichester, a licentiate of the Baltimore presbytery. 



132 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 



HARD COAL. 
PURE COAL. 
REAL COAL. 



SOFT COAL. 
CLEAN COAL. 
DESIRABLE COAL. 



OFFICE AND TRKSTLFS 



Corner Fourth Street and Eighth Avenue, Altoona, Pa. 



p. O. BOX 20. 



G. A. Mccormick, 

DEALER IN EVERY DESCRIPTION OF 



NTHRfl CI TE M D JjITUMlNOUS (^,OHLS. 

wholesalf:: and retail. 



All oi'ilers for cUmiii, i)nrc coal, (hard or soft) lillcil ])roiui)tly. Wc do not ask 
our customers to i^ay for slate and rul)l)isli, but pick every toii of our coal clean 
Jjcfore we sell it. Honest and just weif^lits i;uaranteed, a certiticatc of which is sent 
with each load. 

Orders can be given for coal, without cost, from the Teleplione Exchange, over 
1\W. Olmes' Meat Market, 11th Avenue, between l.:!th and 14ih Streets. 






OPERA HOUSE, ALTOONA, PA. 



HAVE IN STOCK A FILL LINE OF 



Glass, Earthen, China, Tin, Bohemian, Terra Cotta, Decorated and 

Plated Ware, 




H 



Satcliels, Tatte and Poctet Cutlery, Clronios, Chroiuo Franies, 

Together with all other articles usually found in a First-class 99 cent store. Fram- 
ing to order. 

j6®"I will sell any artktle in my Hue as cheap as any one in the State, consider- 
ing its intrinsic or real value. Goods called for which I may not happen to ha\e ou 
Jiand at the time, will be ordered immetliately anil furnished at the lowest prices. 



A. F. BLACKBURN. 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 133 

who at that time was pursuing his studies at the Western Theological 
Seminary. The call was accepted on condition that Mr. Chichester 
"be permitted to spend one year at Princeton Seminary before entering 
upon his duties as pastor. Rev. Stuart Mitchell was engaged to min- 
ister to the congregation until the pastor-elect had completed his stud- 
ies. On the second Tuesday of June, 1871, W. J. Chichester was or- 
dained a minister of the gospel and installed as the first pastor of the 
Second church. Mr. Chichester officiated as pastor of the church un- 
til June, 1878, when Rev. Samuel W. Puffield was unanimously 
called to fill the vacancy occasioned Ijy the resignation of the former 
pastor. On July 1 he entered upon the work, being installed Octo- 
her 7, 1878. He is the present efficient pastor. Early in 1870 the 
present site was selected and secured for the church Ijuildings, being- 
purchased from C. Jaggard, for $4,500. The erection of the chapel 
Taegan in 1870. It was finished and occupied in April, 1871, Rev. 
David Hall, of Mansfield, Ohio, preaching the dedication sermon. 
'The chapel cost |20,000, A congregational meeting was held in the 
>chapel on November 22, 1871, when Messrs. J. M. Gemmill, M. D.; 
Wm. M. Lloyd and Robert L. Gamble were elected elders, and John 
M. Bowman and Maxwell Kinkead, deacons. On February 11, 1874, 
Alex. T. Findley and Chas. J. Mann were elected elders, and John A. 
€astor, C. B. Bowles, Theodore H. Wigton and William A. Magee 
were elected deacons. March 28, 1877, James D. Irwin, William J. 
Allen, Joseph Dysart and Dr. S. M. Ross were elected elders, and J. 
N. Barr, Harry Slep, J. Chester Wilson, J. W. Martin and Thomas 
Cami)])ell were elected deacons. The erection of the church building- 
was commenced in August, 1875, and was finished and opened for 
public worship on Sabbath, December 17, 1876, when Rev. George 
P. Hayes, D. D., preached the opening sermon. The cost of the church 
liuilding, including heaters and gas fixtures, $31,246.99; cushious, 
carpets and pulpit furniture, $1,218.67 ; organ, 2,500.00; total cost of 
lot and all buildings, $62,965.66. 

ST. LUKE'S PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL. 

This church is located at the corner of Eighth avenue and Thir- 
teenth street, and was erected in 1858. The present rector is Rev. 
Allen Sheldon Woodle, B. D. ; rector's warden, Theodore N. Ely; 
junior warden, Jo.seph Wood ; treasurer, A. H. Maxwell ; secretary, 
James Mallett ; sexton, William Jarvis. 

10 



134 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

THE BRETHREN. 

This denomination is called "German Baptist," "Tunkers," and,, 
by the ignorant, "Dunkards," and is frequently classed with the 
"Mennonite," "Ornish," and other branches of faith. It was organ- 
ized in Pennsylvania in 1724, and was better known at that time, and' 
ever since, by the appellation of "Tunkers." We are in doubt as^ 
to whether the latter name was adopted by The Brethren, or any 
portion of them, or given to them by outside parties. Be this as it 
msij, the word "Tunker," derived from the German "J^unfcn," signi- 
fies to dip, and in this manner the converts to their faith are baptized.. 
The Brethren generally wear a peculiar dress, and do not shave the 
beiard. [That the men and women lived in separate habitations, and 
discarded marriage, is an allegation devoid of any foundation.] They 
are much less rigid than formerly in some particulars. Like the Bap- 
tists they believe in immersion, but unlike them practice feet-washing 
and differ on several other points of doctrine and practice. Like the- 
Church of God, they practice l)oth immersion and feet-washing, but 
differ in the manner of the former. In the Church of God baptism 
is accomplished l)y a single plunge backw^ard, whilst in The Breth- 
ren church three forward dips are required, the first "in the name 
of the Father," the second "in the name of the Son," and the third 
"in the name of the Holy Ghost." The position in the water of the 
candidate for Imptism in the Church of God is upon the feet; in The 
Brethren church upon the knees. Once in the spring and once in the 
fall feet-washing, partaking of a supper, saluting each other with a 
kiss, are rites practiced precedent to partaking of the communion, all 
of which are participated in on a single occasion in the order stated. 
With such marked peculiarities of practice and doctrine, notwithstand- 
ing the similarity of name, The Brethren are easily distinguishable 
from the United Brethren by those who are conversant with the doc- 
trines and mode of conducting services by each. The polity of the 
church, or the recognized principles upon which it is based, forbids its' 
members to go to law with each other, as well as discountenance ac- 
tions in law against those beyond the jurisdiction of their church. 
When called as witnesses in courts the rule is to affirm instead of tak- 
ing the usual oath. Bearing arms is prohibited. No member is al- 
lowed to become a beneficiary of the puljlic, or be provided for at the 
])u1)lic expense. They make provision for the extremely poor and 
otherwise unfortunate members of their religious society. 

The chief dignitary of the church is the Archbishop, there being 
only (Uic in the United States. He presides at the General Confer- 



HISTORY OF ALTGONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 135 

ence held annually, which is composed of delegates from every district 
in the country. Xext in dignity and importance is the elder or bishop 
(by The Brethren used as synonymous titles) who has the power of 
administering the communion, perform the rites of baptism and matri- 
mony and all other ceremonies of the church. Xext are ministers who, 
whilst they can baj^tize and perform the marriage ceremony, cannot 
administer the sacrament of the Lord's Supper. And, finally the 
novitiate, Avho, until advanced to a higher degree, by knowledge, age 
and experience, can neither perform the marriage ceremony nor bap- 
tize, and, of course, is unauthorized to conduct the communion. 

Formerly each State constituted a .separate ecclesiastical district. 
The membership of the churches has increased with the increase of 
population. Hence, now. States are subdivided. Pennsylvania has 
three districts, eastern, middle and western. An annual meeting of 
delegates from the respective districts is held in each State to deliber- 
ate for the .spiritual and temporal good of the church. It is here that 
differences are reconciled and difficulties removed. In cases of failure, 
however, appeals are taken or the matters are relegated to the General 
Conference, which constitutes an appellate ecclesiastical court of final 
resort. The Brethren ministers receive no stated or regular salarv. 
"When poor their traveling and other necessary expenses are cheer- 
fully paid by the laity ; when well off in this world's goods they ask 
no compensation. 

The amplitude of this prelude to what we are about to say of the 
church in Altoona, grows out of a desire to correct wrong impressions 
in regard to a people who are truly "peculiar and zealous in good 
works," and at the same time to acquaint the public with the distinc- 
tive characteristics of their church polity, doctrines and practices. 

About 1869 or 18T0, eight or ten members of the church, residing 
in Altoona, composed the congregation of The Brethren here. Ser- 
vices were held in a chapel, now torn down, on Eighth avenue, be- 
tween Twenty-first and Twenty-second streets. September 4, 18T4, 
the congregation having increased in numbers, it purchased from H. 
D. Witmer a lot and building, on the corner of Sixth avenue and Fifth 
street, for fifteen hundred dollars. This building was first constructed 
as a chapel and used by a mission school of the Second Methodi.sts, 
afterwards converted into a dwelling and when bought by The Breth- 
ren remodeled into a church, in which they now worship every alter- 
nate Sunday, services being generally conducted by Elders James A. 
Sell, Graybill Myers, Brice Sell and David E. Sell, in rotation. The 
membership now is .sixty-five. A Sunday-school, of which George "W". 



136 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 



D. W. COLYER, 



V 



H N 



\^ 



iriT D 



D 




H 



R. 



GRAINER, KALSOMINER AND PAPER HANGER. 



Twelfth Street, between 8tli and ytli A\^e Lines, 



ALTOONA, PA. 



BEST WORK M LOWEST PRICES. 



W. B. REESE, 



MANUFACTUKEU OF AND DEALER IX 



TIN, SHEET-IRON, 

BRASS AND COPPER- WARE, 
No. 712 Ninth Street, - Altoona, Pa. 

[Between Seventh and Eighth Avenues.] 



PARTICULAR ATTENTION GIVEN TO ROOFING AND SPOUTING. 



A COMI'LETE .STOCK OF 



STOVES AND HOUSE-FURNISHING GOODS 

Constantly on hand and for sale at Lowest Prices. 



Repairing of all kinds proinptly attended to. Uot'ore piiroluisiiiy goods in my line, 
or entering into conti'aet for rofiting or .spouting, give nie u call. 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 137 

Kephart, a deacon, is superintendent, numbering about one hundred 
scholars, is attached to the church. The Bible is the only book used 
by the teachers and scholars, with the exception of a book of sacred 
songs — "Precious Jewels," by Prof. R. B. Mahaffey of our city. 

UNITED BRETHREN. 

The church of the United Brethren in Christ was established in 
Altoona with the early growth of the town. The circumstances that 
led to the organization were principally brought about by a large num- 
ber of its members coming from other sections of the country where 
they stood identified with this branch of the church, and having a 
natural desire for the church of their choice they were prompted to 
form themselves into a congregation. They were served for several 
years by ministers from adjacent charges. The annual conference, re- 
cognizing the growth of the new town and the consequent demand 
for a more concentrated effort, made it a station, assigning Rev. D. 
Speck as pastor. The first thing demanding the attention of the pas- 
tor was a church building, and in this enterprise he was ably seconded 
by Samuel McGlathery, Jacob Bottenberg, Thomas Stackhouse, Wil- 
liam Fox, M. T. Dill, George Earhart, Cornelius McLaughlin, and 
many others that space will not permit to name. 

A splendid location was secured, on the corner of Eighth avenue 
and Twelfth street. In due time, by earnest effort and noble sacrifice 
on the part of this little congregation, a commodious church building 
was erected, and set apart to the service of God. From this time 
the church has had a permanent growth, and its future prosperity is 
ominous. 

In the following order the congregation has been served by the 
various pastors up to the present date: Rev. D. Speck, from January, 
1857, to January, 1859. [Mr. Speck was afterwards presiding el- 
der of the district in which this congregation is embraced.] Rev. W. 
B. Dick, from January, 1859, to January, 1860. [Mr. Dick died a few 
years ago, much lamented, and rests in the Tyrone cemetery.] Rev. 
D. Sheerer, from January, 1860, to January, 1861. Rev. E. B. Kep- 
hart, from January, 1861, to January, 1863. [Mr. Kephart is serv- 
ing as president of Western College, Iowa ; he also served two terms 
in the Iowa senate.] Rev. T. H. Hallo well, from January, 1863 to 
January, 1865. Rev. M. P. Doyle, from 1865 to 1869, during whose 
pastorate the church was enlarged. Rev. W. Wragg, from 1869 to 
1872. Rev. J. Walker, from 1872 to 1876. [Mr. Walker also served 
as presiding elder of this district. He died at Conemaugh, Cambria 

1 



138 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

county, in the early part of 1880.] Rev. M. Spangler, from 1876 
to the time of his appointment as presiding elder of this district, 
September, 1880. Rev. J. Medsger was appointed pastor to fill, Mr. 
Spangler's place at the same time. 

Owing to the rapid growth of the congregation, more room and 
better accommodations were required; in consequence the building 
Avas enlarged and re-modeled in 187*7, at a cost approximating $5,000. 
This work was consummated under the supervision of Rev. M. Spang- 
ler and the board of trustees, consisting of J. Peight, H. Schum, A. 
Eberly, J. Carl and J. Bush. The church and parsonage are valued 
at $15,000. The membership numbers four hundred ; Sabbath-school 
three hundred scholars. The officers are : Officiar}- — Pastor, Rev. J. 
Medsger ; leaders, S. Hawk, P. M. Smith and J. M. Barwis ; stewards, 
S. Beecher, D. Bolinger, J. W. Parson, Geo. Blackburn, J. Claybaugh, 
Geo. Cruse and J. C. Shirk. Snperiiiitendent of Sal)bath-school. P. 
M. Smith; leader of choir, R. C. Ward; trustees, J.. Peight, H. Schum, 
A. Eberly, J. Carl, J. Bush, J. Barwis and George Blackburn. 

The whole amount collected for various benevolent purposes dur- 
ing the last four years has averaged $2,750 for each year. 



[The reader will observe an inequality or disproportion of histori- 
cal data in the preceding sketches of the churches, relatively consid- 
ered, and may feel inclined to charge us with partiality. In explana- 
tion we say, that invitations were extended to all the ministers in the 
city, and county, to furnish us with such facts and figures as would 
enable us to give a full and correct history of their respective churches. 
Some complied Avith our request, and others paid no attention to it. 
As we had no access to church records, we publish Avhat facts we could 
gather from other sources, and Ave believe them correct as far as they 
go, though not as full as Ave desired to have them.] 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 139 



CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATIONS. 



YOUNG men's CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION OF ALTOONA. 

The earliest org-anization of this association was effected in 1863 
•or 1864, with quite a large membership. After various interferences 
the association located in a room over the Mechanics' Savings bank, 
corner Twelfth street and Eighth avenue, where regular and special 
religious and business meetings were held from 1870 to 1874, when 
the association moved to rooms over John Kurd's book store. Twelfth 
street, near Eleventh avenue, where it was domiciled for about three 
years. During this time, after the holding of the State convention of 
the Young Men's Christian Associations of Pennsylvania, the mov-e- 
ment which resulted in the Railroad Men's Christian Association was 
inaugurated, and quite a number of the efficient members of the asso- 
ciation deemed it their duty to enter that organization, after which, 
for about three years, in order not to incur expenses unprovided for, 
the association's business meetings were held at the house of L. F. 
Stahl. In January, 1880, it was deemed expedient again to venture 
on the procuring of a room, which resulted in the occupancy of the 
present very suitable room on Eleventh avenue, near Thirteenth street. 
The association has always numbered among its warmest friends many 
of our leading business men, who now are supporting it by voluntary 
monthly contributions, and the members have full time to spend in 
the immediate work of teaching God's word to the liest of their abil- 
ity, without troubling themselves about the finances. The work is 
largely done by committees appointed by the president for special defi- 
nite work — a devotional committee to arrange for all religious ser- 
vices ; a sick visiting committee to visit not only association members 
who may be sick, but all others who may desire to have a band of 
young men visit them, to counsel them, pray with them or sing for 
them ; a finance committee to attend to all pecuniary affairs ; a church 
committee, a membership committee and other needed committees. 
The membership is now about eighty. There is a nucleus for a lib- 
rary, and a devoted band of workers. The present officers are as fol- 
low : President, Dr. W. M. Findley ; vice presidents, J. B. Herring and 
Samuel G. Hall; treasurer, T. H. Wiggins; recording secretary, A. 
Swope ; corresponding secretary, Will H. Slep. 



140 HISTORY OP ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUN"TV. 

J. B. Smith's 



1 





H OF 






H 



ArA n\ 



bb 



1321 Eleventh Avenue, Altooiia, Pa. 



If you want a Fashionable Pair of Boots, go to J. B. Smith's, 
1321 Eleventh Avenue^ Altoona, Pa. 



If you want a Neat-Fitting Boot, go to J. B. Smith's, 
1321 Eleventh Avenue, Altoona, Pa, 



J. B. Smith's Place of Business : 

1321 Eleventh Avenue, Altoona, Pa. 



H. B. MILLER, 

DENTIST. 



1410 Eleventli Avenue, Altoona. 



Teeth Inserted Cheaper than anywhere else in 

the county, for Cash. 

4S"ALL WOUK ■VVAnKANTED. 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 141 

RAILROAD men's CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION. 

This association was the outgroAvth of the railroad men's Sunday 
afternoon prayer meetings, which were commenced in October, 1815. 
The great religious interest which manifested itself throughout the 
country during the fall and winter of that year resulted in the spirit- 
ual ingathering of many of those employed in the service of the Penn- 
sylvania Railroad company in Altoona. With a view of exerting a 
greater influence over their companions, as well as to provide for their 
social, moral and spiritual improvement, those engaged in carrying on 
the meetings referred to deemed it expedient that an organization 
should be effected into which the men might be brought. Accordingly, 
on February 24, 1876, a permanent organization was formed by the 
selection of the following officers : President, George F. Jones ; vice 
presidents, Flcmen Trout and S. Hawk; recording secretary, John L. 
Williams; corresponding secretary, T. B. Patton ; treasurer, W. A. 
Adams. A reading room was opened at the corner of Eleventh ave- 
nue and Thirteenth street, and on the 16th day of the following month 
it was dedicated with appropriate services. The room is supplied with 
quite a selection of daily and weekly, religious and secular, papers, 
magazines, books, etc., which are largely made use of by its many 
visitors. The association has its regular committees to look after the 
various departments of its work, who report monthly and receive all 
needed instructions from the association. The prayer meeting organ- 
ized in October, 1875, is still being regularly held every Sunday after- 
noon at four o'clock, as well as devotional or cottage meetings through 
the week. The present officers are : President, Wm. Burbank ; vice 
presidents, H. J. Aukerman, W. W. Gardner and W. P. Moore ; re- 
cording secretary, Taylor Grant ; corresponding secretary, T. B. Pat- 
ton; treasurer, C. S. Xicodemus. 



142 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 



CITIES OF THE DEAD. 



FAIRVIEW CEMETERY. 

This solemn cit}- of the dead covers an area of eighteen or twenty 
acres of ekvated ground, on the northern suburbs of Altoona. The 
land was purchased from John Koug-h and James Trees. On March 
-3, 1857, an association was formed, which on October 28, same year, 
procured a charter. Rev. Henry Baker was made the first president; 
Rev. A. B. Clarke and George R. Everson, vice presidents; Theodore 
A. Stecker, secretary; J. B. Hileman, treasurer; G. W. Patton, M. 
Clabaugh, C. C. Mason, A. A. Smith, M. T. Dill, A. C. Vauclain, 
Austin McGraw and John Hamilton, trustees. Changes in its man- 
agement, of course, have occurred from time to time. At the meeting 
of the stockholders on April t, 1880, (elections occur annually, on the 
first Monday of April,) A. F. Heess was elected president; Harry C. 
Dern and A. H. Maxwell, vice presidents; A. Clabaugh, secretary; 
A. Kipple, treasurer; A. C. Devlan, John P. Levan, J. Wagner, J. 
Loudon, S. F. Ramey, G. W. Kessler, George W. Hawksworth, sr., 
and J. W. Smith, trustees. 

Since the cemetery was laid out improvements have been con- 
stantly made. The money derived from the sale of lots instead of 
being applied as dividends to stockholders, or projectors, has been ex- 
pended in rendering the grounds attractive. About five years ago 
water pipes were laid for conveying water to the premises at no little 
■expense and labor to the association, for the benefit of lot-holders. 
Up to this time about eight hundred family lots (the entire tract con- 
tains 1,373 lots) have been disposed of at prices ranging from ten to 
twenty-five dollars. Upwards of 2,500 burial permits have been issued. 
The grounds and improvements have been fully paid for, and, conse- 
quently, no incumbrances exist on the property. 

A receiving vault has been constructed on the grounds to supply 
the urgent necessities of those who may not be prepared for perma- 
nent interment, but no corpse will be allowed to remain in the vault 
over two months, unless absolutely necessitated by unavoidable cir- 
cumstances, and hermetically closed cases must be used. 

Andrew M'Farran, an elderly gentleman, became the first inhabit- 
ant of this city of the dead. He was hurried on March 17, 1857, 
.since which time over twcntv-five hundred have followed him to that 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 143 

"bourne from whence no traveler returns." At first the graves were 
dug by Mr. Russel, afterwards by James Shellenberger, but, since 
August, 1870, Robert Cox has been acting as superintendent. He re- 
sides on the grounds and is well known for his efficiency and politeness. 

Our city having no parks or pleasure grounds, Fairview cemetery 
has become a popular place of resort, during spring and summer, not 
only for those who throng thither to view the graves of their friends, 
and to meditate upon the brevity and uncertainty of life, but for those 
who seek temporary relief from the harassing cares and vexations of 
business. Until the trees and shrubbery already planted, and such as 
will be planted, mature fully, the eye of the visitor will more particu- 
larly dwell upon the works of art exhibited there. The soldiers' monu- 
ment, erected upon the apex of the mound, is the chief object of at- 
traction, more on account of the patriotic memories which cluster 
around it and its prominent location, than any intrinsic merit exhibited 
in the emblazonment of its shaft. Exhibitions of sculpture, at least 
equally meritorious, are visible on every hand, no incon.siderable por- 
tion of which was executed by our townsman, D. A. Bradley. To 
James Simpson, of Huntingdon, belongs the credit of furnishing the 
majorit}" of neat iron railings which surround the various lots. 

N. W. Cunningham, formerly of Altoona, now of Chicago, recently 
presented his vault or mausoleum to the Altoona Fairview Cemetery 
association, the erection of which cost a considerable sum of money. 

OAK RIDGE CEMETERY. 

In 18t8 a number of citizens of Altoona, believing that a necessity 
existed for the establishment of another cemetery, determined to form 
themselves into an association for that purpose. There were several 
reasons which led to this, one of the principal ones of which was that 
a general desire existed to have, for convenience, a cemetery on the 
east side of the city. The best location and the most suitable ground 
was found to be on the farm of G. T. Bell, of whom nine acres were 
bought and enclosed Avith a substantial picket fence. The ground 
is beautifully situated, with a south-eastern exposure, overlooking 
Pleasant Valley, and presenting romantic views of mountain scenery. 
The soil is of a fertile sandy loam, perfectly dry, sloping gently to the 
south-east, making the drainage perfect, and being well adapted to the 
rapid growth of trees, shrubbery and flowers. 

The association Avas incorporated on December 16, 1818, under the 
name and title of "Oak Ridge Cemetery Association," and is con- 
ducted by a board of managers, Avho are not allowed any compensa- 
tion for their services. Bv the terms of the charter we notice that all 



144 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

F. W. OLMES. CARL OLMES. 

Olmes & Bro. 




■^ WA 



H 

-I- 







^rr\ 



H 



llth Avenue, bet. 13tli and 14tli Streets, 

13th Street, between Tth and 8tli Avenues,, 

ALTOONA, PA. 



Beef, Mutton, Veal and Pork, 

SMOKED AND FRESH SAUSAGE, BOLOGNA AND PUDDING. 

We now claim not only to have the Finest Meat Markets, but sell the best meats 
at pilces to suit everybody. When It is considered that we buy all of the be&t 
Western stock, it is as cheap as it can bo sold. 



JAMES W. riNDLEY'S 

INSURANCE AGENCY, 

llth Avenue, bet 12th and 13th Streets, 

SECOND FLOOR ALTOONA BANK BUILDING, ALTOONA, PA. 



Only sound and reliable companies represented. All losses promptly adjusted and 

paid at this ofllce. Agent for Steamship Lines and dealer in Foreign 

Exchange and Drafts. 



J. WESLEY ALLEN, 

Homeopathic Physician and Surgeon, 

1330i Eleventh Avenue, Altoona, Pa. 



C 8 to 9 a. m. 
Office Hours: •] itoSp. m. CONSULTATIONS IN ENGLISH AND GERMAN, 

( 7 to 8 p. ni. 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 145 

moneys derived from the sale of lots must be used in paying for the 
ground, and in improving and beautifying it. After this has been 
done the moneys received shall be invested in good securities, and the 
interest accruing shall constitute a perpetual fund for keeping the cem- 
etery in good order. The sale of lots up to the present time has been 
so encouraging that the managers think they will be able to make con- 
sideraV)le imi)rovements during this year. The success of the associ- 
ation is, therefore, an assured fact. The fertility of the soil and the 
beauty of location must in a few years make this cemetery one of the 
most popular burial grounds in this portion of the State. The officers 
are: Josei)h Dysart, jn-esident; Theo. H. Wigton, treasurer; H. B. 
Kendig, secretary. Joseph Dy.sart, George S. Eaby, John W. Cherry, 
Jonathan Foreman, John Boynes, G. T. Bell and Richard J. Crozier 
are the managers. The election for officers is held annually. 

ST. JOHN'S CEMETERY. 

The first i)urchase for a Catholic cemetery was made in 185T, be- 
ing a lot of ground lying in the Second ward. Before the second 
body was laid to rest in the new cemetery it was discovered that the 
location was not desirable, and also that the grounds were too limited 
to meet the wants of a large Catholic community. It was concluded, 
therefore, to make a second purchase. In 1858 the present cemetery, 
situated on the east side of the city, near the reservoir, was secured 
at a cost of a))Out four thousand dollars. 

ST. JOSEPH'S CEMETERY. 

In 1879 the German Catholic congregation bought ground lying 
dose by St. John's cemetery, for about tAvo thousand dollars, where 
they intend to lay their dead to rest. The location of both St. John's 
and St. Joseph's cemeteries is excellent ; they look to the east, and 
with a continuance of the care and attention bestowed on improving 
and beautifying them, in a short time they will become picturesque 
and solemn "cities of the dead." 

EASTERN LIGHT CEMETERY. 

About the year 1865, John Ferguson, George Hooper and John 
Alexander purchased a lot of ground, fronting on Tenth .street, east 
side, now adjoining Oak Ridge cemetery, for ninety-four dollars and 
sixty cents, to be used as a burial place for the colored people of this 
city, regardless of religious sect. Added to the cost of the ground, 
the imi)rovements swelled the amount to about three hundred dollars. 
The first stockholders consisted of the projectors already named and 
Geo. M. Jackson, Henry Johnson, Geoi-ge Payne and Allan Hurley, 



146 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 



CITY FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



To Hon. B. F. Rose, the thoroughly competent and energetic 
chief engineer of the city fire department, we are indebted for the fol- 
lowing sketches of the fire companies of Altoona : 

December 15, 1859, was an eventful day in the history of Al- 
toona, on account of the introduction of gas and water. Previous 
to that date there was no organized fire company. If there had been, 
apparatus would have been useless. During the summer of 1858, 
those old fire veterans, A. H. Maxwell and A. C. Yauclain, conceived 
the idea of organizing a fire company ; but what, the question may be 
asked, would a company be without an engine ? To secure one a sub- 
scription was taken up and sufficient money secured to purchase the 
hand engine of the Good Will Fire company of Philadelphia. The 
organization here adopted the same name, "Good Will," and housed 
their engine on October 22, 1859. At the grand parade of December 
15, 1859, the Good Will made their first appearance, equipped in dark 
pants, white shirts, black belts and glazed caps. 

In September, 1866, the Empire Hook and Ladder company was 
instituted, and equipped with a good, substantial truck, ladders, etc., 
purchased from the Empire company of Lancaster. 

In 1867 the borough council created the offices of chief and assist- 
ant engineers. Alex. A. Smyth was chosen chief, and A. H. Max- 
well and B. F. Rose assistant engineers. Mr. Smyth served as chief 
about one year, when he resigned, and A. H. Maxwell was elected. 

The two companies forming the department, at that time, were 
deemed sufficient for the protection of property, but the numerous in- 
cendiary fires soon convinced the authorities that additional apparatus 
was needed. 

The Pennsylvania Railroad company, early in 1867, ordered from 
the Amoskeag Manufacturing company of Manchester, N. H., one of 
their fine second-class steamers. On the 4th of June of the same year, 
the engine arrived and was immediately placed in service, under the 
charge of W. A. Adams and Adam Moss, members of the "Altoona 
Steam Fire Engine company." 

On the 12th of February, 1868, the legislature passed an act im- 
powering the burgess and council of the borough of Altoona to levy 
and collect a special tax of twelve mills on the dollar, for three years, 
for the purpose of purchasing steam fire engines, etc. 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 14T 

Council having decided to purchase two Amoskeag steamers, one 
for the Good Will company, on the east side, and the other for the 
west side of town, it was deemed necessary to organize another fire 
company. Accordingly a number of prominent young men formed 
themselves into a company, March 26, 1868, under the name of the 
"Vigilant Steam Fire Engine company." 

The two steamers were contracted for by A. H. Maxwell, chief en- 
gineer and chairman of Fire committee of council. On the fourth of 
July, 1868, the engines were placed in charge of the Good Will and 
Vigilant companies. 

In 1869 a number of young men organized the Excelsior Hose 
company. 

At this time, October, 1880, Altoona has five efficient fire compa- 
nies, forming as complete a five department as can be found anywhere 
in the State. [Although the Altoona Steam Fire Engine company 
does not belong to the fire department of the city, it cheerfully co- 
operates with it at all times in extinguishing fires.] 

ENGINE, HOSE AND TRUCK HOUSES. 

In 1859 the Pennsylvania Railroad company erected a building 
on their land, corner Xinth avenue and Twelfth street, for the occu- 
pancy of the Good Will until that company could secure other quar- 
ters. Since the removal of the Good Will the railroad company has 
occupied the house Avitli one of their two hose carriages, their steamer 
and the other carriage being kept in a building at the lower shops. 

The Vigilant building, on the corner of Thirteenth avenue and 
Twelfth street, was built in 1870-1, and cost $17,423. 

The Empire building, on Tenth avenue, between Fourteenth and 
Fifteenth streets, was built in 1871-2, and cost $10,500. 

The Excelsior IIo.>^e company put up a building, on Tenth street, 
between Chestnut and Lexington avenues, in 1880, which cost about 
$1,000. 

A building for the Good Will Engine company. Fifth avenue and 
Thirteenth street, is now under contract, to cost $7,500. 

BOARD OF FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

The board of fire department consists of the following gentlemen : 
B. F. Rose, Vigilant, chief engineer ; Gust. Klemmert, Good Will, 
assistant engineer, eastern district ; John B. Stahl, Excelsior, assist- 
ant engineer, western district. Directors : A. C. Vauclain, sr., Good 
Will; George B. Bennett, Vigilant; W. R. Gamble, Empire; Elmer 
Hackett, Excelsior. 



148 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

TERKEL O. NELSON, 

PRACTICAL 

Watchmaker -d Jeaveler, 

— AND DEALER IN — 

WATCHES, CLOCKS, JEWELRY, SILVER-PLATED WARE, ETC. 

1126 ELEVENTH AVENUE, ALTOONA, PA. 

DR. J. F. FULTOiT, 

OFFICE: Over Randolph\s Drug Store, 

ALTOONA, PA. 



C 8 to 10 a. m. 

Office HorRS : ^ 12 to 'i p. m. 

f 6 to 8 p. 111. 



A. LUEBBERT, 



MANUFACTiaiER OP AND DEALER IN 



CIGARS, TOBSCCOS, PIPES, SNUFFS. 

lOOS SEVENTEENTH STREET, ALTOONA, PA. 

WM. B. MILLER, D. D. S. 

DENTAL OFFICE: 

1330^ ELEVENTH AVENUE, - ALTOONA, PA. 

(UP STAIRS.) 



( 8 to 12 a. Ill 
Office Hours : < 1 to .'):.'!0 p. m. 
( (i::H) to !) p. 111. 




SYLVAN SCENE ON THE ALLEGHENIES, NEAR ALTOONA. 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 



149 



CHIEF ENGINEERS. 

The following is a list of the chief engineers since the organiza- 
tion of the department : 

Alexander A. Smyth 1867 E. Mountney 1873 

A. H. Maxwen 1868 T. B. Patton 1875 

B. F. Rose 1869 J. 11. Garden .......1877 

T. B. Patton 1871 B. F. Rose 1879 

OFFICERS AND MEMBERS OF THE GOOD WILL COMPANY. 



A. C. Vauclain, sr., prest. 
■3. T. Dougherty, vice pres. 
John Malady, secretary. 
James E. Gardner, asst. sec. 
John R. Garden, treas. 
"Wm. F. Enney, engineer. 

ACTIVE MEM BEES. 

■George Bowman, 
■J. Sapp, 
D. LalTerty, 
J. McCuUough, 

F. Endress, 
-.1. Carney, 
N. Crum, 
W. Alleman, 
A. Gamble, 

G. Filer, 

I). Shultzhei-ger, 
J. Kelly, 
R. Lowther, 
W. L. Faisick, 
J. Kimmell, 
J. P. Faisick, 
AV. Young, 
N. Kearns, 
Wm. F. Enney, 
•J. Leng, 

■J. T. Pendergast, 
J. Ford, 
I. Price, 



C. C. Smith, 
C. E. Renner, 
J. E. Gardner, 
G. T. Plummer, 
W. McBride, 
M. Weakland, 
M. Fagan, 
T. Riley. 
F. J. O'Kain, 
L. Wichum, 
Theo. Reis, 
.1. Carney, 

C. W. Sm'ith, 
W. Isett, 

R. ]McGraw, 

D. Donahue, 
F. Hammers, 

B. Higgins, 
S. Renner, 

C. Cornelius, 
I). Robertson, 
W. Hudson, 
T. Tiernej- 

H. Smith, 

F. Clabaugh, 

G. Treece, 
T. Patterson. 

HONORARY MEMBERS. 

A. H. Maxwell, 
A. C. Vauclain, sr.. 



W. A. Adams, 

W. Riches. 

J. A. Hindman, 

G . S. Debray, 

H. Bowers, 

.\. C. Vauclain, jr., 

D. Quay, 

A. A. Snij-th, 

D. McCloskey, 

J. T. Dougherty^ 

J. Bulger, 

D. Love. 

J. Galceran, 

P. Logue. 

C. S. Cordes, 
A. R. Moss, 
A. H. OXeil, 

F. Custer. 
J. Klink. 

T. Heacock, - 

D. Stackhouse, 

G. Klemmert, 
J. Malads". 
VV. Rice. 

J. Bradley. 
H. Stackhouse, 
T. McKee. 
J. R. Garden. 
P. Drumgold. 



OFFICERS AND MEMBERS OF THE EMPIRE COMPANY. 



W. W. Smith, president. 
Jas. McMurray, vice pres. 
Charles Gern, secretary. 
■C. Gardner, assistant sec. 
J. A. Weidensall, ti'eas. 

ACTIVE MEMBERS. 

M. Alexander, 

S. W. Arble. 

J. W. Anderson, 

J. H. Burley, 

E. Burley, 

A. Behm, 

R. Black, 

M. A. Condrin, 

W. D. Couch, 

T. D. Crawford, 

P. Clare, 

H. Dougherty, 

A. Engle, 

J. Fralev, 

P. Flynn, 

J. Fultz, 

W. R. Gamble, 

C. E. Gardner, 
M. Gardner, 
H. Gardner, 

D. A. Gilland, 

11 



J. J. Gehrdes, 
Charles Gern, 
George Houclr, 
C. Houck, 
E. B. Haines, 
V. Hudson, 
Levi Knott, 
W. Knepper, 
H. McCormick. 
J. McMuiTay, 
T. B. Patton, 
C. Petschelt, 
George Reeves, 
J. KajTnond, 
J. Ramp, 
S. S. Stains, 
J. N. Stevens, 
W. W. Smith, 
W. Vaughn, 
J. A. Weidensall, 
M. Yeager. 

LIFE AND CONTRIBUTING 
MEMBERS. 

B. Berkowitz, 

C. L. Pettinger, 
S. M. Griffith, 

I R. McMahan, 



L. B. Pancake, 
W. J. Allen, 
H. C. Dern, 
S. I. Fries, 
A. F. Heess, 
J. Lutz, 

E. B. McCrum, 
L. Plack, 

C. Wahl. 

D. K. Ramej-. 
W. Alexander, 
S. C. Baker, 

D. F. Beegle, 

F. Blumhardt, 
H. Fettinger, sr., 
S. Smith, 

E. M. Jones, 

G. Kessler, 
W. M. Lloyd, 

.1. L. Reifsnyder, 
E. F. Lytle, 
John Loudon, 
R. A. O. Kerr, 
S. M. Woodcock, 
M. R. .Jones, 
C. Yeager, 
S. Christ. 
W. KeUer. 



150 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 



OFFICERS AND MEMBERS OF THE VIGILANT COMPANY. 



Frank Molloy, president. 
W. M. Rose, secretary. 
B. W. Story, assistant sec. 
John Schenk, treasurer. 
E. Lippett, engineer. 
\ G. H. Maxwell, lireman. 

ACTIVE AND HONORARY MEM- 
BERS. 

B. F. Rose, 

C. M. Hackett, 
C. S. Taylor, 
Samuel Black, 
H. C. Dern, 

G. T. Bell, 

E. Mountney, 
W. L. Hallack, 
G. M. Metz, 
Tlieo.. Burchfiekl, 
W. M. Rose, 

F. Dumphy, 
H. Barr, 

W. H. .Johnson, 

J. B. Gray, 

.J. L. Rickabaugli, 

T. B. Story, 

J. Johnston, 

J. Adams, 

W. H. Bennett, 

A. H. Grahanif 
J, Paisley 

C. A. Szink, 
H. Beam, 
H. Ritter, 
W. Simpson, 

G. B. Bennett, 

D. McEldowney, 
W. C. Alexander, 

B. W. Story, 
J. E. Winn, 
W. Pimlott, 

E. Folk. 

C Esterline, 
G. H. Maxwell, 
I. Ward, 

F. Copley, 
J. S. Smith, 

E. Lippett, 

J. W. Arnsberger, 

T. Winn, 

J. P. Montgomery, 

C. Kephart, 

B. W. Coyle, 

F. Story, 
C Herr, 

C. Adams, 
W. Davis, 

M. Zimmerman, 
J. Espenlanb, 
A. Davis, 



M. Vetter, 
S. W. Beegle, 

D. Condrin, 
W. Gundecker, 
W. H. Eynon, 
H. Butler, 

E. Casslday, 
.J. W. Leslie, 
G. P. Levan, 
C. Cassiday, 
•Jacob Stier, 
C. Flinn, 

B. Stehle, 
H. Parsons, 

C. Rauch, 

R. L. McCartney, 
W. Ake, 
H. K. Story, 
G. W. Kelly, 
.1. A. Smith, 

B. Bennett, 
J. Hopkinson, 
P. Smith, 

H. Brogan, 
.J. Stehle, 
J. Dixen, 

C. Ensbrenner, 
J. U. Schenk, 
L. B. Levan, 
G. F. Fresh, 

A. M. Stewart, 
M. McCartney, 

D. Kilday, 

H. Kimmerling, 
L. Smith, 
J. Goldman, 
T. W. Jackson. 

LIFE MEMBERS. 

E. L. Taylor, 
Fred Rahiey, 

W. A. McCormick, 
G. Brunner, 
John F. Bowman, 
John Stehle, 
William 31 array, 
Godfrey Wolf, 
G. W. Sparks, 
W. H. Durborrow, 
Adam Behm, 
C. C. Shannon, 
John M. Bowman, 
E. 11. Williams, 
R. A. O. Kerr, 
Jacob Snyder, 
C. Behm, 
Wm. Myers, 
Dr. J. T. Christy, 
W. Rodamore, 
•James S. Mann, 



F. W. Olmes, 
Christ Wahl,. 
L. P. Work, 
W. S. Bittner, 
M. Clabaugh, 
•James Kearney,. 

G. W. Kessler, 
S. C. Baker, 
D. Iv. Ramey, 

C. C. Mason, 
Hon. B. L. Hewitt, 
Hon. D. J. Morrell, 
A. S. ]Morrow, 

Hon. Samuel Calvin, 

D. Koch, 
Henry Elway, 
George Rosenberger, 

Rt. Rev. Bishop .J. Tuigg,, 
John A. Sprankle, 
John P. I^evan, 
•James H. Dysart, 

D. Laughmau, 
•John Ij. Ickes, 
G. L. Myers, 
I>. J. Neff, 
George Dixon, 
P. Vetter, 

H. Fettingei', sr., 

C. Guyer, 

Hon. .'John A. Lemoni,. 

Wm. Kemp. 

I). T. Caldwell, 

I. Farabaugh, 

John O'Neil, 

Wm. H. Renner, 

Daniel Price, 

•Jacob Ri7ik, 

Wm. Conroy, 

W . A. Adams, 

•J. M. Stonebraker,. 

Dr. Walter Bell, 

F. X. Endress, 
Samuel Smith, 
Stejihen Bewley, 

E. Powell, 

•J. V. Mazurie, 

D. P. Ray, 
Louis Plack, 
•John H. Friedley,. 
•John Trout, 

•J. Garland, 

G. W. Stewart, 
S. A. Christ, 
John A. Smith, 
J. E. Gintner, 
A. F. Heess, 
•Joseph Watson, 
•John Loudon, 
Frank Molloy, 
N. F. Mervine, 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 



151 



OFFICERS AND MEMBERS OF THE EXCELSIOR COMPANY. 



EmmettP. Davis, president 
J. W. Elway, 1st vice pres. 
G. M. Atkinson, 2a " 
William O. Roush, treas. 
II. 1). Alexander, sec'y. 
T. W. Allenian, asst. sec'y. 

MEMBERS. 

R. E. Stoutfer, 
H. E. Ferguson, 
Joseph Watts, 
H. M. Ferguson, 
James McCormick, 
H. D. Alexander, 
H. M. Parker, 
William Heller, 
J. R. Runyeon, 



Emmett P. Davis, 
Will J. Ferguson, 
William Roush. 
J. W. Elway, 
William Copley, 
Derbiij Trout, 
Robert Goodwin, 
George Wigand, 
Clay Cherry, 
George Palmer, 
James Stitzel, 
Elmer Hackett, 
John Espenlaub, jr., 

F. J. Stehle, 
J. B. Stahl, 

T. W. Alleman, 

G. M. Atkinson, 
George Leslie, 



Charles Klink, 
John L. Yeatts, 
L. li. Weisgarver, 
N. J. Ehrin^er, 
Thomas Claljaugh, 
Charles Loreman, 
James Miller. 
William Weisenberg, 
Charles Garrettson, 
George Inlew, 
George Fultz, 
Harry Smith, 
William Clark, 
Geoi'ge F. Krick, 
John Irvine, 
P. McDonongh, 
Herman J. L. Piper. 



OFFICERS AND MEMBERS OF THE ALTOONA COMPANY. 



Andrew Kipple, foreman. 
G. F. McNoldy, 1st asst. 
M. Valentine, 2d asst. 
M. D. Carrol us, 3d asst. 
J. D. Stoutfer, secretary. 
W. A. Adums, engineer. 
Harry Geesey, fireman. 

MEMRER8. 

A. Kipple, 

G. R. Waggoner, 

G. W. Sands, 

W. Shnltzberger, 

J. Irwin, 

S. Bumgardner, 

L. K. Young, 

G. FUer, 

C. Patterson, 

W. Ferguson, 

W. Irwin, 

Harry Geesv, 

M. B. Stouch, 

W. W. Green, 

C. C. Wilson, 

D. Miller, 
M. Fichtner, 

F. Richter, 

J. A. Walters, 
H. Swanger, 
C. W. Kerlin, 
C. Salsburg, 

G. Davis. 

M. D. Carrolus, 
G. C. Detrow, 
G. L. Adams, 
J. Ullery, 

E. Clegg, 



J. H. White, 

G. W. Blackburn, 

E. A. Grindle, 

A. E. Rickabaugh, 

R. W. Taylor, 

S. Groves, 

G. Carrolus, 

W. Green, 

C. Mellor, 

M. Valentine, 

I. Wyant, 

C. S. Nicodeiiius, 

H. Rettburg, 

G. Slater, 

J. D. Stouffer, 

Christ Gern, 

T. Blackburn, 

J. McNoldy, jr., 

C. W. Smith, 
W. H. Shaw, 
H. Kriner, 
A. Cretin, 
31. Wilkins, 
S. Gaily, 

0. L. Forrister, 
M. H. Foose, 
G. B. Smith, 

D. S. Mai-key, 
W. B. Hershey, 
G. Tompkins, 

1. Kelly, 
L. Statler, 
J. Roberts, 

E. K. Hamilton, 
C. A. Weidman, 
G. Moore, 

R. Woods, 
P. McGarvey, 



E. E. Johnson. 

L. W. Vaughn,' 

J. Smithhamnier, 

J. Foster, 

E. L. Price, 

H. Stover, 

W. Brinkman, 

C. L. Hiltner, 
AV. Grindle, 

P. F. Barkdoll, 
E. N. Moore, 
J. Filer, 
J. Eagle, 

D. F. Mauk, 
J. L. Smelser, 
J. AVertsberger, 
C. Rath, 

C. Labe, 

J. Lantz, 

W. Moore, 

A. Pietsch, 

J. C. Palmer, 

C. W. Armstrong, 

J. R. Eraser, 

R. Wilson, 

C. H. Bragonier, 
A. C. Lytle, 

G. Rupert, 

E. S. Hall, 
T. P. Clegg. 
J. Foust, 

D. M. Keckler, 
R. A. Isenberg, 
L. G. Flemming, 
G. Curtis. 

G. F. McNoldy, 

W. A. Adams, 

N. F. Cunningham. 



152 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 



PALMER & MORSE, 



MANUPACTURERS OF EVKRY DESCRIPTION OP 



Coaches, 
Carriages, 

Sulkies 




iGHT i Hemy Spring Wagons 



SLEIGHS, ETC. 
REPAIRING IN ALL ITS BRANCHES DONE 

WITH Dispatch. 



Eighth Street, het. Sixth and Seventh A\'enues, 



ALTOONA, PA. 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 153 



GAS AND WATER DEPARTMENTS. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

"The Gas and "Water Company of Altoona," was incorporated 
April 9, 1859, upon which the city was dependent for both water and 
gas. [See pages 63 and 65.] Its first officers were : President, 
William H. Wilson ; treasurer, Wm. M. Lloyd ; secretary, B. F. 
Rose ; managers, John Shoemaker, Enos M. Jones, Charles J. Mann, 
Albert B. Clark and George B. Cramer; superintendent, Thomas S. 
Francis. The najne of the company, on May 9, 1871, was changed 
to "Altoona Gas Company," and on September 10, 18'72, the water 
pipes were sold to the city authorities. The reservoirs at Pottsgrove, 
with the company's interest in water power of Pottsgrove mill and in 
the twelve-inch main from there to Twelfth street reservoir, were 
sold to the Penns3-lvania Railroad company. 

Without repeating what is said on page 65 in regard to increasing 
the water supply at the time referred to, and the means by which it 
was effected, we are confidant in saying that no one supposed that in 
so short a period it would prove inadequate to the requirements of 
the population, which has nearly doubled within the last ten years. 

At an early period of the present year (1880) the subject of in- 
creasing the supply of water, which had been agitating the commun- 
ity for several years, began to be regarded as one of prime import- 
ance, requiring prompt attention. Such was the scarcity of water 
during the previous summer (1879) that nearly all the Pennsylvania 
Railroad company's engines were directed to stop and take water at 
other points ; thus entailing, at the samfi time and by the same cause, 
serious loss and forced idleness to workmen in the shops, loss to the 
railroad company in having to stop work and in being compelled to 
take water supplies at inconvenient points, and loss and great incon- 
venience to every consumer in the city. 

About three hundred houses had been ei'ected during that season, 
rendering an additional quantity essential, to say nothing of the pre- 
dicament the city would have been in had an extensive conflagration 
occurred. At a meeting of the city council, held on the evening of 
June 14, 1880, the following was offered by A. F. Kerr, which was 
adopted by the council : 

Whereas, The city is poorly supplied with water pipes, and the reservoirs are 
too small to retain an adequate supply during dry seasons ; 



154 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

And Whereas, The reservoir of the city cuunot be relied on to meet the clefl- 
ciency in this direction : Now, therefore, may it be ordained, etc.. 

That in order to extend tlie water pipes through the city, and increase tlie sup- 
ply of water, this council negotiate a loan of $60,000, in accordance with the author- 
ity given them by Act of Assembly of 1874, and supplements thereto, and the 
Mayor is hereby instructed to give the proper notice, as provided by law, and to 
direct an election to be held on the 20th day of July, 1880, to the end that the quali- 
fled voters of this city maj have the opportunity to approve or disapprove of said 
loan. 

In accordance with the above, on the 23d of June, Mayor How- 
ard issued a proclamation appointing an election to be held on the 
23d day of the following month, but in consequence of the inability 
of a committee which had been appointed by council to make esti- 
mates of the cost of constructiitg- a dam at Kittanning Point,* the 
election was postponed until August 2, when a majority of seven 
hundred and thirty-nine citizens voted in favor of the loan. 

At a special meeting of the city council, held on the evening of 
August 11, the following resolution was offered by Mr. Kerr and 
passed by that body by a vote of seven to five: 

Resolved, That the Committee on Water be and they' are hereby instructed to 
purchase water pii^es, hydrants and material needed for laying of the same in such 
quantities and at such times as they may deem proper, such purchase not to exceed 
in the aggregate $15,000. The laying of the pipe shall commence as quickly as a 
supply can be obtained, and the digging of the trenches for said pipe shall be let to 
the lowest bidder ; and the committee may, if they find it needful, let the laj'ing of 
the water pipe to the lowest responsible bitlder, the successful bidder to furnish 
bonds to be approved by the committee and city solicitor. 

Shortly after the contract of laying the pipe was awarded to Da- 
vid Wylie, plumber and gas fitter, who, on the, 7th of September com- 
merced the work. 

THE GAS WORKS. 

On April 9, 1859, the "Gas and Water Company of Altoona" 
was. incorporated. [For names of first officers see page 153.] 

On December 15, 1859, gas was first introduced into the pipes. 

On May 9, 1.871, having previously disposed of their water prop- 
'erty to the Pennsylvania Railroad and Altoona, the name was changed 
to "Altoona Gas Company," and retains that name to the present 
time. 

■ *In compliance with a request by the city council a coriis of Pennsylvania 
Railroad company engineers made a complete map of the proposed reservoir or 
dam on the city property at Kittanning Point, and gave the following estimate of 
the cost of its construction : For grubbing and cleaning, $792; moving i),64() yards 
of earth, $2,838 ; moving 2,850 yards of muck, $997.. 50 ; moving .'5,840 yards of puddle 
earth, $4,380; moving 1,003 yards of riprap, $451.35; moving 1,.500 yards of overflow, 
$450; masonry and paving outlet, $4,000; contingencies, $1,000; total, $14,908.85. 

They also made; a map of a proposed reservoir on Loudon's Hill, and also of two 
places to the riglit (comiug into Altoona) of the Wopsonnonock road, but have at 
this time of writing made no report. 



HISTORY OF ALTOOXA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 155 

The capacity of the gas works, when first startold, was 30,000 
feet per day; present capacity, 150,000 feet per day. The first price 
of gas was three dollars per 1,000 feet, and ten per cent, added when 
not paid in ten days after presentation of bills ; present price two 
•dollars per 1,000 feet. 
■ Improvements have recently been made. An addition of fifteen 
feet has been made to the purifying room. The present purifiers, six 
by eight feet, will be replaced by a new set ten by fourteen feet, and 
with three times the power of the old ones. 

The eastern side of the city, especially beyond Sixth avenue, has 
often been poorly lighted when the shops were running. This was 
not caused by inferior gas, but by the light pressure. That part of 
the city was supplied by a four inch main from which the shops also 
temped. In order to remedy it there was laid a six inch main across 
Twelfth street, and sinCe that time no complaint has been made. 

The average consumption of gas per day, in summer time, is fifty 
thousand feet, five tons of coal being required to make it. The coal 
produces from four and one-half to five cubic feet of gas for every 
pound used. During the summer and winter the supply varies 
greatly. One month the amount of gas used was over 3,300,000 feet, 
but this fluctuates and depends largely on the work in the company's 
«hops. 

There is now in use a plan by which all the gas tar, or the greater 
part of it, is burnt, and used in place of coke under the gas retorts. It 
makes an intensely hot fire and thrown into the furnace in a small 
stream answers very satisfactorily. J3y this means nearly all the 
■coke remains for sale and finds a ready market among city consumers. 

At the election of officers. May 2, 1880, the following were chosen : 
President, J. B. Collin; secretary, W. S. Humes; treasurer, W. D. 
•Couch ; superintendent and engineer, T. W. Cole ; assistant engineer, 
D. T. Kantner ; managers, W. H. Wilson, Enoch Lewis, H. C. Dern, 
Olement Jaggard and George W. Patton. 

The works are located on Eleventh avenue near Xinth street. 



156 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 



H 



RESTING Museum 



OF CURIOSITIES, 

EMBRACING ARTICLES StJItEEi FOE 

GIFTS OR PRESENTS, 

ALWAYS TO BE FOUND AT 

CURTIS' 

GREAT VARIETY AND MAMMOTH 

Dollar Store, 

REMODELED, ENLARGED md IMPROVED, 

PRESENTING AN UNEQUALED APPEARANCE AND CONTAINING THE 

'Finest Goods for the Least Money.. 



EVERYBODY WELCOME. No one urged to buy. Courteous salesladies always- 
in attendance. CASH AND ONE PRICE. 



Small Dealers', Pedlars' and Merchants' Supplies at Wholesale Prices.. 



|Vlaiilifactlirer3' /Igept? for ShoW Ca3e? apd Baby Carriage?. 



Curtis' Grest Yrriety Store,. 



(IN THE MOST CENTRAL BLOCK,) 

ALTOONA, PA. 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 15T 



PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD COMPANY'S SHOPS. 



INTRODUCTORY REMARKS. 

One hundred and twenty-two acres of ground are occupied for 
business purposes by the Pennsylvania Railroad company in this 
city. On this are erected the passenger station and the Logan 
House ; freight warehouse ; offices of the general superintendent ; 
the superintendent of motive power ; the superintendent of transpor- 
tation, with their appurtenances, and the following additional build- 
ings: Three engine or round houses; iron and brass foundries; ma- 
chine shops; paint shops; blacksmith shops; coaling platform ; freight 
car works ; passenger car shop ; planing mill ; tin and cabinet shops ; 
upholstery shop ; store houses ; fire engine room ; lumber dryer ; car 
shed, etc., having an aggregate frontage of fully two miles. All the 
buildings, excepting the paint shop, car shed and the temporary wheel 
foundry, are composed of brick or stone, substantially constructed on 
the most approved plans, and the tools and machinery used in them 
are the best that can be procured. As a consequence the work is of 
the highest standard, and at the minimum cost. 

It is difficult to analyze the impressions left by a visit to the shops 
of the Pennsylvania Railroad. The progress that is silently yet 
surely underway is difficult to grasp, for the work that the company 
is doing, a work of national importance, comes upon you with the 
sharp force of a revelation. There is, indeed, a revolution in pro- 
gress here. You feel it ; you recognize the tremendous influence 
that is emanating and must emanate from the metropolitan city of 
the Alleghenies, spreading like ripples upon the surface of a pond, 
until our whole country feels the force of railroad science carried to 
its conclusion. It is a fact universally conceded that the Pennsyl- 
vania railroad company is the leader of the van of progress. Every 
month, every year it institutes the most exact scientific researches, 
tests, experiments and observations governed by the sole idea of ob- 
taining railroad perfection ; and the benefit of each year's crystaUized 
experience forms the basis of the oi>erations, constantly progressive, 
of the following twelve months. A corps of scientists, regularly in 
the employ of the company, devotes its entire time, intelligence, acu- 
men and energy in determining what is best in everything, and the 
result is not only to furnish the road with what is wanted but to 



158 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 



gradually raise and purify the products of manufacturers of railroad 
supplies. A single instance will illustrate the subject. By other 
railroad companies, generally speaking, a car spring is ordered with 
due reference to its dimensions only, the name of a good maker be- 
ing considered a sufficient guarantee of its quality. The spring ar- 
rives, is put in position, and after serving its time it is condemned, 
taken out and dis^posed of, and that is the end of it. At the shops of 
the Pennsylvania Railroad no spring is received from the manufac- 
turer that does not rigidly conform to a prepared specification, a speci- 
fication that calls not only for absolutely correct dimensions, but in- 
sists upon a soft, slow movement, regularity of action, certain qual- 
ity of steel, and a hundred requirements which cause the spring to be 
as near perfection as possible. Such springs, also, are not only tested 
before Ijeing placed to determine their probable performance, but are 
tested again after condemnation, to better ascertain the cause of failure, 
or, in other words, to learn just how new springs must be made to 
obviate what proved weakness in the old. Everything is therefore 
based on a system of betterments ; on the theory of always improv- 
ing by correcting each discovered fault ; a system of thorough eman- 
cipation from ])lunder, with the always sought result of perfection. 




..^d^AC- ^£-Z 



■^-^noi^-ia^ w^ 



MOTIVE POWER DEPARTMENT OR "UPPER SHOPS." 



We have premised this much to give to the reader a faint idea of 
the spirit which pervades the "upper" machine shop to which we are 
about to introduce him. And it must be always borne in mind that 
it is entirely on the initiative of the Pennsj'lvania Railroad that the 
experiments to which we shall call attention have been instituted and 
carried to their ])resent conclusion ; experiments that, while every 
railroad would readily acknowledge to be of inestimable value, would 
yet leave to the manufacturers to carry out. And they, for want of 
better facilities, never could carry them out. Bearing this in mind, 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 159 

we will enter the machine shops and learn about the birth, life and 
death of a railroad locomotive. As we pass over Twelfth street 
bridge that arches the main line, some idea of the extent of the shops 
is gathered, though the actual fact that the area of the yard is 24.33 
acres is hardly patent. The area of the first floor of the shops is 
6.409 acres, and of the second floor is .933. There are also in this 
yard three round houses covering an area of nearly three and one- 
fourth acres ! Where everything is usually so sombre, overlaid as a 
machine shop must naturally be with coaldust, it is indeed a happy 
thought to notice here and there in the grounds, during the spring, 
summer and fall months, flower beds filled with the gorgeous bloom 
of scarlet geraniums and other brightly-dressed plants. It indicates, 
also, a softer side to the life of these grimy men ; it argues well for 
the liberality of the employers. And it must be mainly this that has 
induced such a vital spirit of cleanliness all through the yard. Pass- 
ing by one of these beds, we enter the 

BLACKSMITH SHOP, 

where the preliminary process of engine making begins — the heavy 
forging of the locomotive frames and the making of a great many 
forgings by means of dies. Just here we will mention that, in noting 
the various shops in which a locomotive is made, onh' such points as 
are remarkable and such processes as are novel will be dwelt upon. 
This shop has a floor area of 23,280 feet, and contains twenty-five 
double brick forges and seven steam hammers, the two largest of 
which are of 5,000 pounds. Heavier pieces than those formed by 
the dies referred to are fashioned under the hammer on cast iron 
blocks and shaped to the desired form. The work turned out of 
these dies, which is always at one heat, include ends of valve rods, 
links, etc. After the frame is begun and begins to take recognizable 
shape, the frame passes out, passing by a large shearing machine cap- 
able of cutting the heaviest sections of steel rails as if they were pa- 
per, and into 

THE MACHINE SHOP, 

a building 426 feet long, where it is laid first on a planer and then on 
a slotting machine. This machine takes the right and left of a frame 
at the same time. Another noticeable machine in this shop is a ver- 
tical milling machine, in which' the table revolves and moves at right 
angles. Almost any shape can be finished on this machine at one op- 
eration. A horizontal milling machine near by saves many hours in 



160 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

Q A. DIMOND & CO.. 



DEALER IN ALL KINDS OP 




) 





7, IVll 

AND A GOOD QUALITY OF 




MoTintain Building Stone. 

Brick, Sand, Lime § Hair. 

FLOUR, FEED, ETC. 

Our rule is to sell the best goods at the lowest prices, and extend courteous treat- 
ment to all. 



9th Avenue, between ITth and 18th Streets, 

ALTOONA, PA. 



M. G. LINGENPELTER, 



— DEALER IN 



Groceries, Flour, Feed, 

VEGEMBLES IN SEASON, 

Canned Fruits, Provisions of all kinds, Notions, Etc. 
Corner 14th Street and 12th Avenue, ALTOONA, PA. 



RUDISILL BROTHERS, 

WATCHMAKERSijEY/ELERS 

1310 Eleventh Avenne, Altoona, Pa. 



Sole agents for the Kockpoiid Railroad Watch ; also, sole agents for the celebrated 
Lemare's Rock Crystal Spectacles. Particular attention given to repairing 

fine watches and jewelry. 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 161 

surfacing accurately all kinds of work, such as steam chest joints, the 
machine traveling all around the object. Catching your eye in a cor- 
ner of this room is a small enclosure slatted off. It is the tool and 
standard sample shop. And here, again, you notice how thoroughly 
every part of this great system has been thought out. All gauges, 
templates, etc., are furnished on standard measurements. No work- 
man is allowed to set a pair of callipers for himself ; they are made 
rigid. The motive of this is at once obvious. It insures against er- 
ror; error that the most skilled labor could not but commit, for no 
man can repeat absolutely accurately any delicate mechanical opera- 
tion ; it allows the employment of men less highh' skilled than used 
to be the case in fine work, and it insures also absolute interchangea- 
bility of parts in engines of the same class. All parts, tools, etc., are 
numbered in a printed catalogue, and everything is requisitioned 
from such catalogue. The tools themselves are in the care of men 
who furnish a certain number of the commoner tools to each me- 
chanic, and when he brings a broken one it is repaired here, saving 
in this way both the time and confusion that usually is noted at the 
forge. For other than common tools, obtained from the storeroom, 
each workman is furnished with a brass check upon which is his num- 
ber. He takes out a tool, and his number is hung in its stead. The 
planing machines in this shop are arranged in pairs, so that two of 
them can be operated by one man. It is the system also to place as 
large a number of similar pieces at one operation as possible, and this 
principle rules through all the shops. It is also noticeable here that 
in turning up cast iron, chilled cast iron tools are used instead of 
steel, which would dull more easily. 

THE VISE SHOP. 

Passing into the vise shop, an interesting machine is finishing the 
coupling rods on a grindstone with an emery wheel, a machine that 
saves a great deal in "trueing up" of old guides formerly done on a 
planer. By this means only the smallest amount of metal is removed 
and time saved. The emery wheel has entirely replaced the file for 
such work. But there is plenty of other work that the wheels cannot 
"smooth up," and which gives employment to about fifty men. As 
you cross the yard to where the cylinders are being bored you notice 
a pile of steel tires being heated so as to be placed upon the driving 
wheels, it having been found that the contraction of the metal is suf- 
ficient to keep them always in place. The cylinders are bored two at 
a time. While all this has been going on, over in the boiler shop the 



162 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

boiler of our locomotive is in process of construction from entirely 
steel plates, iron having been long ago discarded. 

THE BOILER SHOP 

is divided into the erecting, the flanging and the tank departments, 
this last named including the manufacture of tender and engine tanks, 
ash pans, water troughs for track tanks, etc. All of these are also 
made of steel, sheet-iron having been abandoned. In the flanging de- 
partment are three flanging forges on Nixon's patent, by which any 
desired form can be given to the fire. This obviates all danger of 
straining and cracking, which was inseparable from the old method. 
In the erecting room of the boiler shop are placed the punches, bend- 
ing rolls and shears required, as well as a large steel riveting ma- 
chine, which rivets each bolt in two blows. To handle the work there 
ai'e here two ten-ton jib cranes and the Stowe flexible shaft. Simul- 
taneously with the preparation of the boiler for our locomotive, 
over in 

THE FOUNDRY 

all sorts of castings for its construction are in progress. This foun- 
dry you find is 250 feet long and 100 feet wide, with thirty-four feet 
and ten inches to the roof ties. The roof is surmounted by a venti- 
lator 213 feet long and twenty-eight feet nine inches span. About 
thirty-five tons of iron a day are consumed in the castings, which are 
made mainly on the snap flask and match card systems. The mould, 
for cylinders, as well as many small things, is made of sharp sand 
mixed with flour and molasses, covered with black lead and baked in 
huge ovens. The moulding machines are marvels of ingenuity, parts 
of the pattern moving before the whole of it, thus preserving the 
sharp edges. A second wing of the main foundry contains the brass 
foundry, which has eighteen melting furnaces ranged round a chim- 
ney stack seventy feet high. Phosphor-bronze is used for all journal 
bearings made here. Zincs cast in chilled moulds are manufactured 
for use in electric batteries, and the whole foundry has an admirable 
ventilation. From the foundry you go to 

THE FIRST ERECTING SHOP, 

where the frames and the boiler of our locomotive are fitted together 
and made one. The various parts are bolted and riveted here, and 
then the locomotive, now approaching form, is run out upon a trans- 
fer table by means of a windlass, and carried along to the door of 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 163 

THE SECOND ERECTING SHOP. 

This shop is one of the most complete and best arranged in the col- 
lection. It is 350x5t feet, and there are three lines of rails running 
the full length of it. There is ample room for seven engines on each 
track, and, in cases of emergency, nine. For facility in handling the 
work there are two overhead traveling cranes, each of twenty-five 
tons capacity. They run upon rails placed along each side of the 
building, at a sufficient height above the ground, and fifty-nine feet 
apart. Each crane consists of two plate-iron girders, weighing to- 
gether eighteen tons, and carrying at their ends the frame and wheels 
with which they run upon the rails. Upon rails laid upon these 
girders traveling crabs run to and fro. The cranes are driven by a 
cotton rope, traveling at the rate of 5,0*14 feet per minute, and the 
power is applied by the friction of this running rope upon grooved 
wheels, on the shaft of which are worms working into worm wheels, 
and thence to reducing gear. The crane travels longitudinally at the 
rate of forty-eight feet a minute, carrying the heaviest locomotive as 
if it were a ginger snap at the end of a string ; the crabs travel thirty 
feet a minute. There are two hoisting speeds — the quick, eight feet 
one inch a minute, the slow, eighteen inches in the same time. Be- 
low the door of this shop, on each side of the centre track, are deep 
paved pits extending the whole length of the building, in which are 
stored the machinery or other parts of engines, the boilers of which 
are sent for repair. Wheels five feet six inches in diameter can be 
stored in these pits. Within the pits a system of pipes is laid in con- 
nection with a Worthington pressure and force pump and with two 
steam boilers. This arrangement is employed for testing the boilers 
by hydraulic pressure before they leave the shop, the test rising to 
one hundred and fifty pounds per square inch, and also for testing by 
steam at one hundred and twenty-five pounds per square inch. This 
does away with all the old annoying system of smoky fires and un- 
satisfactory tests, and is a big step forward. Our engine is thus 
ready, as far as metal work is concerned. She is almost complete, 
and has answered in construction every test. 

THE PAINT SHOP. 

It is now sent to the paint shop, 345x32 feet, and here it must re- 
main twelve days according to schedule. Painting iron is always a 
.slow process; it requires so much careful preparing with white lead. 
The paints used in decoration have all been tested as to their wear- 
ing qualities, and these, chemical analyses have demonstrated how 



164 



HISTORY OP ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 




H 




H 




H 






Boss Store Still Ahead. 



Best Goods at Popular Prices. 

On our first and second floors will be found a large antl complete stock of such 

goods as are kept in a First-class Dry Goods, Notion and Fancj* Goods Store, 

at prices as low, and oftentimes lower than any other store in Blair 

county. A trial purchase will convince you of our bargains. 



DRY GOODS, 

DRESS GOODS, 

SILKS, SATINS, VELVETS, 

Beaver Cloths, ^Vaterproofs, Cashmeres, CaHcoes, 
Flannels, Muslins, &e. 



FULL LLSTE OF KID GLOVES- ALL SHADES. 



Blankets and Haps. 



AJf ESPECIALLY LARGE STOCK OF 



D 



H 



AND 



.m:^, 



CflRI 

WINDOW SHADES AND FIXTURES, 

Always on hand and sold at the very lowest prices. Also, Agent for the " GUEAT 
PEAKL,"and " BOSS " SHIRTS, and BUTTERICK'S PATTERNS. 

J. M. Bowman, 

(SUCCESSOR TO BOWMAN & MORROW,) 

llth. Avenue and 12tli Street, Altoona, Pa. 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLATR COUNTY. 165 

they shall 1)0 mixed. When finished thp tender i.s coated just as 
.smoothly as any Japanese lacquer, and shines like a looking-glass. 
The lettering and striping have all been done in accord with speci- 
fication, and the locomotive is taken to the round house, where the 
few remaining connections are made, and it stands completely liorn. 
Though it possesses no brass bands and ornamental metal work, the 
tender and wheels are painted a mixture of Brunswick green and 
black, but so dark that the green can only be seen in certain lights 
— still it is a very handsome locomotive. The connections necessary 
tire made in the round house, by a trial engineer, who then takes it 
out for a preliminary spin up the mountain. This satisfactory, it 
goes into service, and its real life begins. 

LIFE AND SERVICES OF LOCOMOTIVES. 

On a grand average the life of a locomotive may Ije set down as 
fourteen or fifteen years, with var3nng results as to mileage. The 
earliest collated statistics as to the life of engines were made with 
some Baldwin locomotives built during the war, when both good ma- 
terial and good men were practically unattainable. These give vary- 
ing results of from two to six years, and up to 175,000 miles. Such 
a record is nothing, nowadays. On the Pennsylvania Railroad there 
are a couple of engines in active service that have reached the unpre- 
cedented record of over 250,000 miles, without receiving other tlian 
round house repairs. These are the standard engines used on the 
road. Supposing that the engine we have seen built to have been 
one of these, it will make its annual 30,000 miles in the grand total 
■of 6,680,122 miles run by all engines. (This Avas in 1878.) Per- 
liaps it will run more — one engine, in 1878, on a passenger train, 
made 75,570 miles — perhaps less, as circumstances decide. At all 
•events, the railroad will get out of the engine all it is worth. For 
m\ engine, in England, the best practice does not exceed 18,000 miles; 
but experience shoAvs the American engine is good for much more. 

CLASS "k'' engines. 

A new class of engines (K) has been adopted by the company, 
ten of which have recently lieen ordered to be built at these shops. 
One is now upon the road and has, after a number of test trials, proven 
satisfactory in every respect. It weighs 90,200 pounds, (about 45 
tons) with driving wheels, 68 inches in diameter and 19x24 inch 
cylinders. The others are to be of corresponding weight and power. 
This class of locomotives is capable of hauling seven or more cars upon 
12 



iC.f; HISTORY OP ALTOONA ANT) IJLAIR COUNTY. 

tho vtirious ^^radcs of 25 fV'ct pci' mile, wliilc uitli oidiiiiirv fiigincs five 
carH is a siiflicicnt load. Class K loc-oiiiotivfs arc; built with a view to 
<;oinV)iii(! rapid transit with i)(!rfect safety. 

RFX'OKI) OF MOVEMENTS ANT) C0NT)rTION OK KNOINES. 

Our en;/!!!!', diicc in service, is liy no niciiiis lost si/rht of. Its. 
iiio\cincnts are as t i)oroii;ilil\' notcil n- iir(' tlni-c ofiui ocean steamer. 
In Mr. Kly's office, in this city, there is an immense board covered 
with littl(! ])ins, upon which liiiii;r sninll ronnd colored discs, from tlie 
under piirl of which tins bci'ii cut a .-iiiiill jtoiiioii. These; pegs and 
disr-s ;ii-c nniiibci'id fVnni I to 1,250. Kficli number crirrcsponds 
with 111) i)i;.'inc. On oni' |i:ii-t of t lie bojirij tlir ]»■'/< art' nnmlicrcd 
cons(!CUtivel\ . Luokin;.'- ;it tlii- |i;iri Coi- iiny piiri icnhir ciiLiinc that 
may Vie desii'c(|, on the; disc will be CoiumI " I'li^h,"' '-N. V," lu- " P," 
etc, 'I'liis refers you to the divi>iou where the engine is. Looking 
to that division on the board, and fiuding tin- number of the engine, 
iinother little di-c, l)\- inciin- of its erthir, will tell you just what c(»n- 
dition tlieciiLiine i- in. II' the disc is pni'e white the engine is in 
lierfeei iii-ihT. If tliedi-e i- Ix.rdei'ed bv ii i-e(| line t he engine nccds 
oiil\- -iieh -li^lit i-e|)iiirs as may be made without withdm w in^^- it rinni 
the service. If t he ilisc is covered one-half with led, repairs are le. 

(|ilired of ;i vcj-y slight nature, but for which thr: engine iiin-t proceetl 

to the shop. If the entire di.sc is pale gray, nqiairs of a iiKjrc import- 
iiiit character iire needed, though still deemed slight. A di-c entirely 
bine denote- ;i niiiejiine tjint iKicds vcrv substantial ri'jiairs. One-half 
black and linll \s hiti' indicates the macliine is Ijcing built over. A 
disc all black denotes an engine unfit, save to be cut up or -old. 
This recor(| is changed every week, and is so complete as to enable 
aii\ one to see at a glance just the condition of the ntotive power. 
Kepair- ai'i' in'\er nndertaketi if thi'\ will co.-t over $3,000. For that 
a ni'W standard boijei' c;iii he built, and, unless an ennine i- of the 
stainlar<l pattern, -he i- ne\er built o\ci', for the eoniiiaiiv doe- not 
wish to perpetuate odd engines, and to pay inoir than .fijjOUO would 
not be so I'conomical as to pay interest on the \alu(! of a new ma- 
chim-. Here, aL-ain, true economy .steps in to r-han;_'e the practice of 
blind conseiw ill isni. 

An (uigini' on the roa<l i- always very carefully u-ed. .Aftei' our 
locomotive i- placed in the hand- of an en-jineir it is cared for with 
the watcldnlni'ss of a jjanint's alfcction. .\ n accurate record of its 
performance,- is made aiifl conijiared with that of otlier encines. As 
ireight is ]»ai<l for per ton \>iy mile, .-o the co-t ai' an engine is 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 16T 

reckoned. The amount of coal consumed per ear per engine mile 
l)eing' calculated, it is easy to see, by dividing this by the tonnage, 
just how much coal it takes to move a ton of freight one engine mile. 
And the engine that does this most successfully is the cheapest and 
best. 

Finally, after having traveled many thousands of miles, having 
speedily and safely liaulcd millions of human beings, our locomotive is 
sent to the shop condemned. It is ignominiously bundled off into 
a corner to stand with a lot of others until cut up or sold. Its im- 
mediate neighbors may be like itself, worn out; perluips " died in 
the harness." The little disc that records in the superintendent's of- 
fice its physical condition has turned to black. There is no hope. 
To-morrow a committee of inspection will condemn it to be cut to 
pieces. Into the furnace the })arts will go, to emerge, like the mill 
where old men were ground out into new, rejuvenated, ready to take 
a place in sonu' new monster with steel heart and transmigrated soul. 
And so the story will be told again ; the theory of the survival of the 
fittest always having prominence; until in years to come perfection 
will be reached, or the hurrying mortal shall travel in some other 
fiishion, looking down with strong contempt on what are the marvels 
of to-day. 

[In the Boston (Mass.) Herald, of August 2, 18T9, was published 
an able and elaborate article descriptive of the motive power shops of 
the Pennsylvania Railroad, and although we had made ourselves fa- 
miliar with their extent and operations we have interwoven a portion 
of the Herald's description with our own.] 

CAR DEPARTMENT, OR "LOWER" SHOPS. 

A correct knowledge of the sciences of mechanics and natural i)hil- 
osophy, as well as a practical and experimental application of the 
principles of these sciences are essential to one who would wish to 
act as foreman of a nmchine shop. AVere he deficient in such knowl- 
edge we cannot see how he could give intelligent directions to the 
men in his employ, for the principles of these sciences underlie 
all mechanical operations. True, with hwX little instruction, a man 
may learn how to control the operations of a machine, and thus make 
like machines without the knowledge we speak of, ui)on the same 
principle that a parrot may learn how to talk. He is no machinist, 
in the full acceptation of the term, unless lie lie in full possession of 
the knowledge referred to. To this knowledge must be added a con- 
siderable admixture of inventive genius, for we never yet saw a good 



1G8 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 



E. M. KENNEDY & CO., 



— DEALEILS IN 



H 



H 



H 



\y -L 



H H 



H 



) 



PROVISIONS, ETC. 

rOUETH STREET and CHESTNUT AVENUE, (Logantown,) ALTOONA. 



Altoona Laundry, 

Misses SUTTON, EEGTHEES & McMULLEN, Prop'rs. 
Cor. 11th A\'eiiue and lOtli Sti'eet, Altoona, Pa. 

ALL KINDS OF LAUNDRY WORK, 

For Gc'iitU'incii and Ladie.s, promptly attended to in tlie best nunmei' and at tlie 

LcONVKST PRICES. 



JOHN KINSEL, 

Carpet Manufacturer, 



l^o. 804 Chestnut Avenue, 



Between Eighth and Ninth Streets, 



ALTOONA, PA. 



R. B. MAHAFFET. 



I'UBLI.SHER OF 



Sheet Music and Music Books, 

And Dealer in Musical Merchandise Generally. 

Yon cannot attord to be witliout the " Ml'SICAL ADVOCATE," only 10 eents a 
number. Fnll of local mi\.sieal notes, and each number contains a piece of music 
Avorth frf)in ;!0 to 4(> cents. Get a copy at the first of each month. 

VIOV4 EIGHTH AVENITE, ALTOONA. PA. 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 169 

mechanic in any branch of industry whose In'ain was not i)ermeated 
witli or transversed liy a vein of ingenuity, originality, eccentricity, 
genius, or whatever else you may call it. 

THE MACHINE SHOP. 

In the lower shoj) are sixty machines of different kinds, all in use 
in the manufacture of the new machinery from time to time required 
by the other "lower" shops, as they are generally called, and in keep- 
ing the machinery already there in good working condition. In ad- 
dition to this all the iron work used in the construction of passenger 
and freight cars (not locoiuotives — they are built and repaired at the 
machine shop of the motive power department) is dressed, properly 
prepared or finished here; the wheels are bored, axles turned, screws 
cut, holes drilled, etc., etc. Seventy men' are employed, about as 
many as can work to advantage. The room is only 135x70 feet. 
Small as it is, considering the amount of space occupied by the ma- 
chines and to allow workmen proper elbow room, there have been as 
high as eighty-three at work at the same time. 

Any one knows, or ought to know, that a description of each of 
the sixty machines would fill a large volume. Even the simple men- 
tion of the names, coupled with laconic notices, would occupy too 
much space for the present article. We will mention, however, fi\-e 
boring mills or machines for boring holes in the centre of car wheels, 
or rather enlarging the holes that are already in, through which the 
ends of axles pass, capable of "doing" 250 wheels per day — fifty 
each. The "nut tapper " cuts the spiral threads inside of nuts at the 
rate of 2,600 pounds per day Of course these nuts vary in size to 
correspond with the size of the screws cut (.)n bolts, whatever size 
that may be. There are standard sizes of both nuts and screw bolts. 
We use the term "screw bolt" to distinguish it from all other bolts. 
There are six nut-tappers and eleven bolt cutters. As nuts and screw 
bolts are counterparts of each other, and as the nuts are tapped in 
larger proportion than the screws are cut in bolts, more machines are 
required for executing the latter work than the former. Hence the 
proportion of the machines is six to eleven — that is, six nut-tappers 
keep eleven bolt cutters in operation to the best advantage. There 
are twelve drilling machines which move with the regularity of clock 
work. We might as well have said that a clock works with the reg- 
ularity of a drilling machine, for what is a clock but a machine? But 
let this go. 

The original of all or nearly all the machines here employed were 



no 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 




PASSENGER CAR. 



ipar I c^r z:j.yML.,jiHq t:L jaH::::iH::;iAieK: 




^Lj4t^£^-jt^^J*Ci^ >P<= 



PARLOR CAR. 




^^i/£^f^ef.^l7^^ ^C 



SLEEPING CAR. 




U. S. POSTAL CAR. 




BAGGAGE CAR. 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 171 

obtained from Messrs. William Sellers & Co., and Messrs. William 
B. Bement & Son, of Philadelphia, in whom, whoever may have 
been the inventors or patentees, was vested the right to manufacture 
and sell ; and, in the Pennsylvania Railroad company, as we under- 
stand it, is now vested the same "right, title and interest." 

Taking- oft' and putting on wheels on axles, by hydrostatic pres- 
sure, is an interesting- operation. From thirty to eighty tons pres- 
sure is brought to bear in removing- wheels from their axles, and 
from twenty to forty tons in putting them on. Removing the burnt, 
warped and twisted wheels from burnt, warped and twisted axles 
which were in the fire at Pittsburg" a few years ago, Avas a big job. 
We were shown \\heels and axles which were absolutely fused or 
melted together at the place they were conjoined — but the powerful 
pressure applied released the one from the other. 

Freight car wheels and axles are made of iron, but the axles for 
passenger cars are constructed of steel, brought from the steel works 
at Meadville, Penn'a; the Forge and Iron works of Pittsburg, and 
from various other sources of supply. 

Mr. James Sharp has acted as foreman for over nine years, or 
since the lower shops were built. Indeed it was under his supervis- 
ion that the necessary machinery for all the lower shops was ordered 
and |)ut in position. Long before this he was employed by the com- 
pany in the motive power department. 

PASSENGER CAR SHOP. 

AI)Out one hundred hands are at present employed — the highest 
number at any one time having been one hundred and thirty-seven. 
This was during the Centennial year, at which time one hundred pas- 
senger cars were built to meet the exigencies of the extensive travel 
on the road. The force is employed on eight or ten cars at one and 
the same time. 

Mr. Pullman has a shop or shops of his own, yet occasionally an 
order is sent here for the manufacture of new ones, as Avell as re- 
pairing those which have seen service. Mr. Pullman has an uphols- 
tery in Chicago, and one in Jersey City ; yet it frequently happens 
that the upholstering is done by the Pennsylvania Railroad company, 
it having all the facilities for doing- work of this kind in the most ele- 
gant manner. Indeed, taking- the "Passaic," built in 1877, or any 
Pullman ear built since by the Pennsylvania Railroad company, as 
an illustration, whatever may be the facilities of Mr. Pullman, it is 
impossible for him either to construct or furnish cars more luxuriously 



n2 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 



D. WYLIE, 



PRACTICAL 



\-j 



H 



j^ 



f 



-( 



H 



AND DEALEll IN 



CIRCULATING BOILERS, BATH TUBS 



. CAST-IRON Sinks, Urinals, 



Marble .Slabs ami Wash Basins. Hydrants, Terra Cotta Pipe, Brass Work for Water 

and Steam, Gas Machines, etc. 



Hot Water and Steam Circiilation 

FOR GREENHOUSES AND CONSERVATORIES, 

Iron Pumps for deep and shallow wells, fitted up and set. Old Gas- 
Fixtures Cleaned and Rebronzed. Hydrant and Water Pipe put in 

at the Lowest Rates. 



SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. 



]:^[o. 1108 Fourteenth Street, 



Altoona, Pa. 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 



n3 



than those constructed for him In' the Pennsylvania Tlailroad com- 
pany. The cost of a Pulhnan car, l)e it a sleeping, drawing--room, 
hotel, or parlor car, is from $14,000 to $16,000; for a first-class pas- 
senger car, $5,000 ; and for an ordinary second-class car, $2,500. 




INTERIOR OF PARLOR CAR. 

The frame-work of a Pullman is generally made from yellow pine ; 
panels from poplar ; posts and trucks from ash. Six-wheel trucks are 
u.sed, with Westinghouse air brakes to check their movements. 

FREIGHT SHOP. 

In this department about three hundred and twenty men are at 
present employed, all skillful workmen. Xew freight cars, of what- 
ever kind, are not only manufactured here, but all the necessary re- 
]iairs to those which have seen service are also made. All new cars 
and repaired cars are painted and lettered before being removed from 
the freight shop. 



114 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

The yellow pine used for car floors is brought from Georgia, sup- 
posed to be the best in the country ; white pine, for roofing, from 
Michigan ; oak from all points of the compass. We will here take 
occasion to remark that >\hen a requisition for cars is received by 
John P. Levan, general forenuui, he issues orders to the foremen of 
all the departments for the necessary materials for their construction. 
The planing mill furnishes the lumlier already planed and otherwise 
prepared; the blacksmith shop all the iron in the forms required, etc. 
But all this material is used and put together in the freight shop, or 
round house, as some people call it. The man who planned the 
freight shop had an eye to business. 

BLACKSMrni SHOP. 

In this department one hundred and sixty-five men are emi)loyed. 
Every tool and machine for the al)ridgment of lalior that has been 
devised l)v the cunning, eraft or ingenuity of man is Ijrought into 
requisition. A description of these tools and machines does not fall 
Avithin the purview of this sketch further than to say that there are 
four dead-stroke power hammers, each of which give a hundred pounds' 
])\o\v ; a machine for heading l)olts from one and one-half to two 
inches; two punching machines with power to punch a two-inch hole 
through two-inch iron ; two bolt machines which work from three- 
eighths to seven-eighths inch, each of which has the capacity to make 
1,800 bolts per day ; a drill-press able to drill six holes at one opera- 
tion; four steam hammers — one 500 pounds pressure, another 1,600, 
another 2,000 and another 2,500 pounds pressure ; a machine for weld- 
ing links, or compress butt welder, capable of welding thirty per hour; 
machines for forming bullnoses, making links, etc. Almost 400 tons 
of iron per month is at present used. It comes principally from the 
Altoona Iron works, this city, the Ijest iron to be obtained ; from the 
Logan Iron and Steel company; from Carnegee tt Bros., and Wilson 
& Walker of Pittsburg, and Benjamin Johnson, of Hollidaysburg. 
There are fifty-nine forges in the blacksmith shop, the blast for the 
fires being supplied by a noiseless blower. There is a one-spring fur- 
nace for setting springs. There is a split-key machine for manufac- 
turing keys for bolts when not convenient to use nuts. About 640 
pounds of these keA's — each one weighs about an ounce — are manu- 
factured per day. There are three bolt furnaces and three heating 
furnaces. The textile strength of the iron used is sixty to sixty-five 
tons to the inch. Probably the most difficult operation is the manu- 
facture of bullnoses. A great deal of ingenuity and care are brought 
to bear in their production. 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 115 

THE PLANING MILL. 

This mill, which is the most complete and largest in the United 
States, is full of interesting objects— interesting to those at least who 
are proud of progress and improvement. The machines there em- 
ployed for sawing and dressing luml>er are admirable in their con- 
struction, and do their Avork in an admirable manner. There are 
thirty-nine of them — .'(ix boring, eight planing, three tenon, six mortis- 
ing, one Balster machine, two band saws, one moulding machine and 
one universal wond woi-ker; besides five rip saws, four cross-cut saws, 
a saw gummer, saw filer, etc. The engine Avhich drives this machin- 
ery, and the machinery also of the other .shops, is a double cylinder, 
250 horse power, manufactured by the Corliss company of Providence, 
R. I. It cost $7,500, and Si, 400 additional for putting it in position, 
procuring the Ix'lting, etc. The i)rincipal Ixdting is 32 inches wide. It 
is formed of a double thickness of leather with canvas betAveen. The 
flvAvheel is 20 f<'ct, and >i/,e of cylinder, 18x48 inches. By a SA'stem 
of signal gongs the foi rmcii of the various .'^hops can increase or retard 
the motion of the engine, or, rather, can communicate Avith the engi- 
neer, without leaving their shops, so that he can give them the exact 
motion they rerpiire, be it fast or sIoav. It is operated by electricity, 
and proves to be of great convenience. Six boilers — three Avith eight 
feet and three Avith eight feet long and four feet wide fire-boxe.< — the 
largest in this portion of the State, supply the steam. They were 
built at the upi)er boiler shops I)y Joseph Xixon, foreman of that 
department. Five tons of coal per day, together Avitli all the shav- 
ings, saAvdust, etc., of the planing mill, Avhich is conveyed to the 
boiler house through pipes, supply the heat for the generation of the 
.steam which drives the engine. 

The pi})es alluded to, through which the shavings, saAvdust, etc., 
are conducted to the boiler room, Avith their fans and other append- 
ages, constitute a curious and ingenious apparatus. A description 
such as Ave Avould like to make Avould occupy too much of our space. 
Suffice it to say that immediately after the formation of shavings, 
chips and saAvdust, they are sucked into the mouth of the pipes which 
are pendant over the machines, and, on the ''wings of the Avind," are 
hurried through to the boiler house. These pipes are al)out two feet 
in diameter, and constructed of tin or sheet-iron, AA'e forget Avhich. 
There are six of these conductors, each embracing a certain number 
of pii)es and fans in operation. Messrs. Latimore & Davis, of Phila- 
delphia, are the inventor?;. It is scarcely necessary to add that pre- 
vious to their introduction a visit to the planing mill, especially if 



176 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 



MRS. ADAM GABLE, 



WHOLESALE AND HETAIL DEALER IN 



CONFECTIONERIES, FOREI&N ani BOMESTIC FRUITS. 

ICE CREAM AND OYSTERS IN SEASON. 
706 and 708 Twelfth Street, - Altoonii, Pa. 

(Between Seventh and Eighth Avenues.) 



Keystone Grocery, 

Green Avenue and Xinth Street, Altoona, Pa. 

Groceries and Provisions, 

FLOUR, CANNED FRUITS, Etc. Confectioneries, Scgais, Tobaccos, Notions. 

Oysters and Fish in season. 

ELWAY & MAUK. 

~"b. f. rose. 

ALDERMKN, 

11th Avenue, near 12th Street, Altoona, Pa. 

(Opposite Altoona Hardware Co., limited.) 



Legal DocLiments written and acknowledged. Collections promptly attended to. 



J. C. CONRAD, 

DEALER IN 

NTIMCITE^I'D BrTU MlNOUS ' CoIE 

(Free from slate and other foreign substances.) Full weight guaranteed. 

Also, dealer In KINDLING WOOD and STRAW. Delivery to all parts of the city 

without extra charge. 

Elevenlli Avenue, lietweeu Seveuleentli and Eigliteentli Streets, Altoona, Pa. 

(Near the Culvert.) 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. ITT 

a ladv or gentleman had their In-st clothes on, was like passing- 
through a flouring mill, anil emerging therefrom covered Avith dust. 
Besides, the millions of small particles floating through the atmos- 
])here of the room made it unpleasant for the workmen, and injurious 
to health. All this, now, is obviated. The place is as free from dust 
as any of the other shops, for, if perchance some shavings or sawdust 
fall upon the floor they are quickly sucked into the mouths of the 
pipes underlying it, for the mouths of the.^e pipes are in close proxim- 
ity to the machines. There are pipes below as well as above the 
floor. Formerly from six to eight hands were employed in carrying 
awav the dirt, so to call it. Hence .six dollars to eisrht dollars are 
saved per day. 

The tenon machines were invented by Isaac l)rii)ps, who, at one 
time, was Superintendent of the Motive Power Dc}»artment. 

The principal [)laning machine was built by Messrs. K. Ball & 
Co., of Worcester, Mass. It is sixty-three feet in length, with cog 
gearing. It is called the "Daniel Planing Machine,'' a man by that 
name, Ave presume, being the inventor of it. 

The jtlaning machine next in size and imi)ortance is run by belt 
gearing, and has been in use for about two years. It is thirty-four 
feet in length and was built l»y lliehards, London k Kelley, of the 
Atlantic Iron works. It performs 1,T00 revolutions a minute. 

There is one large four-sided planing machine, humorously called 
by the men in the shops "the Modoc," whatever name the inventor 
may have given to it. 

As previously stated there are three Allen mortising machines in 
use. They mortise timber without "laying off,'' by use of templates. 

The building is .35T feet by TO feet. This includes the new exten- 
sion comi)leted during the month of August, 1880. 

At present about eighty men are employed. 

THE TIN SHOP. 

The principal work done here is the construction of the roofs of 
passenger and Pullman palace cars, as well as old freight cars when 
needing repairs of this kind. Xew freight cars are now constructed 
in such a manner that they don't require tin roofing, the boards con- 
stituting the roofs being fitted together upon a new waterproof and 
air-])roof principle. Why this principle should not be adopted in the 
construction of the roofs of passenger and other cars, we will not now 
take time to inquire. Besides the roofing of cars, all the tin, sheet- 
iron, (plain or galvanized) brass and coi)per work which enter into 



lis HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

the construction or constitute the convenience of cars, is here made to 
assume appropriate form. The stoves, too, used in the cars, are sup- 
plied w^ith pipe and all other necessary fixtures. A portion of the 
round house (freight shop) is devoted to the reception of stoves which 
need repairs; and arrayed on shelves are duplicates to take the place 
of those parts of stoves Avoru out, burnt out, or broken. These 
stoves and parts of stoves are cast at the foundry of the company at 
their upper works. 

The machines used in the tin shop are such, only, as are generally 
found in private establishments of the kind, with a few exceptions, 
one of which is an apparatus, apparently simple in its construction, 
but in reality evincing much profundity of thought in its invention. 
It is designed, by one operation, to throw strips of tin into such forms 
as to cover the gas pipes which traverse the roofs of passenger cars ; 
and it does the work neatly and effectively. Another machine is a 
spinning lathe not generally found in tinncries conducted by private 
parties, by means of which a flat piece of tin, copper, zinc or brass 
is made to assume a great variety of foi'ins, both hollow and cylindri- 
cal. It is turned by steam. In size the tin shop is 70x50 feet, af- 
fording enough room f(n' fourteen men to "turn around in." When 
tliirty-two men were employed it was tight squeezing. 

CABINET SHOP, OR (iLUE ROOM. 

Were all the caljiuet makers in the country to meet in convention 
for the specific purpose of devising the most suitable building and the 
most suitable tools, machinery, etc., for starting the cabinet making 
business on a large scale, or, rather, for the manufacture of such arti- 
cles as appertain to any specific branch of that business, we do not 
see how they could do better than the man or men Avho planned the 
cabinet shop or glue room (as many call it) of the Pennsylvania Rail- 
road company. With no further introductory remarks we will say 
that all the veneering, gluing, cutting, carving, mortising, polishing, 
boring, turning, scolloping, moulding, planing, sawing and twisting 
all kinds of wood into all kinds of shapes, required for all kinds of 
work, found inside of ordinar\' ])assenger and Pullman palace cars, 
are here performed by the aid of the best tools and machinery the in- 
ventive genius of the country has been able to produce. And these 
tools and machines are guided by ninot}^ workmen who thoroughly 
understand such business, a less number by fift}^ than were employed 
during a greatiu* i)ortion of the Centennial year. To accomplish the 
same amount of work, thirty years ago, would have taken about six 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 179 

thousand five hundred men. This may appear extravagant, but we 
believe it as firmly as Tve believe that we are writing this sketch. 
And then, too, the work is done in an admirable manner. In addi- 
tion to ear furniture, paneling, etc., all the elegant desks and furniture 
which adorn and render prince-like and comfortable the offices of the 
railroad officers, all along the line, are manufactured here. The 
heavy work, such as sawing out lumber, etc., of course is done in the 
planing mill. 

Among the principal machines used, not only for the abridgment 
of labor, but for their efficiency in executing their work perfectly, we 
noticed a scroll saw of surprising utility; a "Variety Moulding'^ 
machine, which, with its appliances, executes all kinds of moulding, 
the tool or bit performing about 2,000 revolutions per minute ; a ma- 
chine for planing, grooving, etc. ; a .slat machine which planes both 
sides and rounds the edges at a single operation ; tliirt3'-three turn- 
ing lathes ; two mounting machines ; a tenon machine ; hand and rip 
saws ; veneering presses, etc. There is a turning machine, the de- 
sign of which is to turn flag staifs, thirty-six inches long, in use by 
flagmen along the road, as well as a vast amount of other work. 
Preparing flag staffs, formerly, was a difficult thing to do. Let any- 
one try to make one by hand or even turn one on an ordinary lathe. 
Then he will appreciate a machine by the use of which 1,000 can be 
manufactured in one day. Of such a machine we speak. Before its 
invention lumber by the car load was required to meet the demands 
for flagstaffs. Now they are made fi"om the off-falls or refuse pieces 
of wood, fit for no other purpose. A great saving of material is 
observable, as well as a great reduction of labor. There is another 
machine which performs a great variety of operations — rounding and 
polishing strips of wood, cut crossAvise, of various diameters, suitable, 
for instance, as plugs for holes where screws are driven below the 
surface. 

All kinds of wood are used in this department. Among the most 
valuable are bird-eye maple, French walnut, mahogany, cherry and 
rosewood. 

The shop is one hundred and seventy-five feet in depth and sev- 
ent}^ feet wide. 

THE PAINT SHOP. 

One hundred and forty-eight workmen are at present employed. 
The capacity of the shop is twenty-four cars — that is, the tracks 
within the enclosure can accommodate that number at one and the 



180 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY, 



S. O. ADLBR, 



DEALER IN 



GROCERIES,PROVISIONS,FLOUR,FEED 

Qvieensware, Glassware, Wood and AVillow-ware, Tobacco and Segars. All kinds of 

Fruits and ^'egetal)les in seas(ni. 

1316 Twelfth Avenue, Altoona, Pa. 



DR. J. H. WEAVER, 



1004 Seventeenth Street, 



(Near the Bridge.) 



Altoona, Pa. 



Druggist and Pharmaceutist. 

A full line Drugs and C'lunnicals, Patent Medicines. Oils, Paints, Putty. Dye Stutt's, 

Toilet and Fancy Articles, Perfunieiy, best brands of Tobacco and Segars. 

Pure Wines iind Liquors for Medicinal Purposes. Prescriptions Care- 

fullj- Coin])ounded Day or Night at all liours. 



PIPER & CO., 

BooksellerslStationers, 

1316 Tenth Avenue, Altoona, Pa. 



Notions, Novelties, etc., of all kinds. Imported and Domestic Segars, Toljacco, etc. 
Subscriptions received for Newspapers, Magazines and other periodicals. 




r\~ 




T 


n~ 


V 


\J 


L_J 




^ 


_^ _ 






R FOUR-PflGE, 16 COLUMN, MONTHLY PSPER, 

I'rinted on Fine Tinted Book Paper and devoted to Choice Poetry, Stories, History 

— Natural and otherwisi — in fact everything that ■will interest boys and girls. 

( >nly ;>0 cents a year. Samijle copies free. Agents wanted to canvass 

for subscribers. Liberal Terms. Address, 

ED. J. SLEP, ALTOONA, PA. 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUXTY. 



181 



;saino tinu", and they are so arranged that men can work to the best 
advantage. The department of painting embraces a head-lining 
room in which fifteen men are t-niphiyed; varnish rooms, sixteen men; 
freight car room, sixteen men ; passenger car room, one hnndred men. 
The ])rincipal shop measnres 304x70 feet, with eighteen feet pitch of 
ceiling. A portion of it is two stories high, the npper story contain- 
ing the varnish and iipliolstery departments. Tlie force cinplovcd in 




INTERIOR OF SLEEPING CAR. 

painting the passenger cars is divided into gangs of eight men, four 
employed on inside and four on outside work. A larger nnnd)er can- 
not work to as much advantage. Connected with this department is 
a storeroom, separate building, al)out 30x50 feet in size, with cellar 
or basement, which contains large cpiantities of materials, from which 
all the paints, colors, tints and shades are made, together with var- 
nishes, paint brushes, glass, putty, etc. As high as $20,000 worth of 
12 



182 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

such goods have been stored here at one time. Some very expensive 
materials are used, such, for in.stance, as inside car varnish, and out- 
side rubbing, which costs $.3.83 per gallon, and finishing varnish 
which costs $5.10 per gallon. Here the paints are mixed, several 
hands being engaged on this work alone. 

Search the country through and you will be unable to find any 
set of hands anywhere who can outrival the present force in their 
Knowledge of the blending and application of colors. The work do^e 
impresses one with this idea. By " head-linings" the decorations on 
ceilings of the cars are meant. They are composed of ordinar}^ un- 
bleached sheeting, which, by means of simple appliances, is stretched 
to its utmost tension on frames placed in an ui)right position when 
the painters commence the work of drawing their decorative lines. 
As in architecture there are various distinct orders, so there are dis- 
tinct orders of decoration. But we decline to write an essay on the 
subject. 

It is a nice thing,' requiring not oidy a steady hand, Init a keen, 
observant, artistic eye to execute all the fine lines and shades required 
by the connoisseur who "bosses'' the job. Wore he not a connois- 
seur he would evidently be unfit for the position. And here, in the 
head-line department, more so, jirobably, than in any other, the skill 
of the painter is exhibited. But, after all, this work partakes more of 
mechanical than true artistic skill, from the fact that forms or pat- 
terns of representation are previously prepared. With pieces of pa- 
per, properly punctured, the lines of the work are temporarily and 
quickly drawn or struck on the canvas, then followed up with the 
painter's pencil. But to be appreciated this Avork must Ije seen. 

UPHOLSTERING DEPARTMENT. 

And now a few words about supi)lying the interior of passenger 
cars with the necessary furniture to make them comfortable for those 
who travel. Comfortable, did we say? We mean luxurious. Every- 
thing else done, even the painting, the seats with their hair cushions 
covered with plush are placed in position, the carpets laid, etc., etc. 
The plush used in the covering of seats is manufactured in France. 
The raw material consists of the long, silky hair or wool of the An- 
gora goat of Asia Minor. The fabric is beautiful. Plush costs about 
$2.8t^ per yard, and is generally in strips forty yards in length, of 
various widths. The hair, which forms the interior of the cushions 
for seats, or filling in, is principally derived from the manes and tails 
of horses, mules, etc., which is mixed with a small per centage of 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 



183 



iH-istles. This hair is spun up, heated, picked, assorted and curled be- 
fore it is ready for use. Other materials, such as sponge, cotton, etc., 
have been tried, but have been found lacking that quality of hair, 
which is highly prized, viz : elasticity. Eight pounds are required 
to make a double seat — a Pullman mattress requires twenty-five 
pounds. Its cost is about twenty-five cents per pound. 




INTERIOR OF PASSENGER CAR. 

The various operations involved in upholstery work we will not 
attempt to delineate. There are three separate rooms devoted to the 
upholstery department, to say nothing of the rooms filled with chairs,, 
seats, etc., waiting to be cushioned and equipped. The room in 
which is stored various kinds of materials has held §25,000 worth at 
one time; the stock now amounts to about $10,000. During a po;-- 
tion of the Centennial year when work was brisk, twenty-six mea 
were employed. At present only fourteen men are at work. 



184 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

ESTABLISHED 1860. 



Kuoom 




H 




A.F. HEESS,, Proprietor, 

713 Thirteenth Street, Altoona, Pa. 



MANUFACTURES 



FRESH BREAD I CRACKERS, 



AND ALL KINDS OF 



FANCY END COMMON CAKES. 



Large Cakes Baked to Order on Short Notice at Reasonable Terms. 



ed. mountney, 

wOUSEmdSIGN PHINTER, gruiner, 

KALSOMINER, PAPER HANGER, Etc-. 
Eleventh Avenue and Eleventh Street, (Opera House Building,) Altoona, Pa. 

I cluillenge any Knight of tlie Paint Urusli in Altoonu f>r Jihiir County, to pro- 
(Incf licttfv .speciiiien* oi GRAINING, or equally as good, Jlany whf) boast of their 
l)rolicii'ncy in thi~ art. don't nnderstand its ruiiini(n"its. Work of ivll kintl cxecutcnl 
pronii)tlv,"\vitli true artistic elegance and at lowest prices. 



F. THEBMLT RIYllILLES, M. D. 

1124 ELEVEI^TH AYENUE, 



(OVEll NELSON'S .JE^VELRY STOllE,) 



ALTOONA, PA. 



t ;i to 11 a. m. 
Office Hours : { •-' to 4},.; p. m. 
( 7 to II p. ni. 



Consultations in FrencH and German, 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 185 

In condusion, the window blinds for all the teleg-raph stations 
along the line are manufactured in this deparment. The harness for 
horses of the company are here kept in constant repair, and new sets 
of harness are also made when ref^uircd. 

beatty's shop. 

This I)uilding-, culled Planing Mill No. 1, was originally erected 
for the Maintenance of Way department, but since appropriated to the 
use of the Car department. Among the most ingenious devices is a 
machine for turning handles for picks, axes, etc. 



RESIDENT OFFICERS, PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD CO. 



OFFICE GENERAL SUPERINTENDENT. 

Charles E. Pugh, general superintendent. 

Thomas J. ^Maitland, chief clerk. 

Robert E. Pettit, principal assistant engineer. 

J. Chester Wilson, electrician. 

John R. Bingaman, chief clerk maintenance of way 

OFFICE SUPERINTENDENT MOTIVE POWER. 

Theodore X. Ely, superintendent motive power. 

Joseph Wood, assistant engineer. 

J. B. Collin, mechanical engineer. 

B. F. Custer, chief clerk. 

G. W. Strattan, master mechanic. 

F. D. Cassanave, assistant master mechanic. 

Dr. Charles B. Dudley, chemist. 

John W. Cloud, engineer of tests. 

OFFICE SUPERINTENDENT TRANSPORTATION. 

John Reilly, superintendent transportation. 
Frank T. Bishop, chief clerk. 
George W. Jones, chief car accountant. 
W. F. Taylor, chief operator. 



18G HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

FOREMEN AND ASSISTANT FOREMEN OF MOTIVE POWER SHOPS. 

Peter Moore, foreman lathe shop. 

Jacob Cain, foreman telegraph shop. 

W. B. Ford, foreman erecting shop. 

A. C. Davis, assistant foreman erecting- shoj). 

A. C. Yanclain, assistant foreman erecting shop. 

Ludwig Kiefer, foreman vise shop. 

Joseph Davis, assistant foreman vise shop. 

W. H. Jackson, foreman round house No. 1. 

George Ro!seul)erger, foreman carpenter shop. 

Thomas I. McKiernan, assistant foreman carpenter shop. 

George F. McXoldy, foreman cab shop. 

George W. Arthur, foreman round house No. 3. 

John H. Carr, assistant foremau round house No. 3. 

George Hawkesworth, foreman smith shop. 

William Cook, assistant foreman smith shop. 

Joseph Nixon, foreman boiler shop. 

C. W. Mason, foreman paint shop. 

C N. Pimlott, foreman tin shojx 

W. T. Miller, fcjreman wheel shop. 

Samuel Abrahims, foreman pattern shop. 

A. H. Maxwell, forenuin iron foundry. 

W. C. Jacobs, assistant foreman iron foundry. 

H. H. Stone, assistant foreman iron foundry. 

Thomas Baxter, foreman brass foundry. 

Jacob N. Barr, foreman wheel foundry. 

Edward Si)ielman, assistant foreman Avheel foundry. 

Edward McLean, assistant foreman wheel foundrv. 

A. C. McCartney, foreman coal wharf. 

Jacob Gearhart, foreman laborers. 

FOREMEN AND ASSISTANT FOREMEN OF CAR SHOPS. 

John P. Levan, general foreman. 

Andrew Kipple, foreman freight car shop. 

George W. Ehrhart, assistant foreman freight car sho}). 

Levi Geesey, foreman passenger car shop. 

Isaac Beck, assistant foreman passenger car shop. 

John L. Burley, foremau cal^iuet shoj). 

Samuel M. Houston, assistant foreman cabinet shop. 

Fred S. Ball, foreman car ijaint shop. 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 187 

"William Dwyer, assistant foreman car paint shop. 

Richard Rowan, foreman house painters. 

Joseph Maize, assistant foreman house painters. 

James Sharp, foreman machine shop. 

John A. Hindman, assistant foreman machine shop. 

Harry A. Folk, foreman smith shop. 

Alex. Eberle, assistant foreman smith shop. 

Walter K. Beatty, foreman planing mill Xo. 1. 

Samuel Hook, assistant foreman planing mill Xo. 1. 

George L. Freet, foreman planing mill Xo. 2. 

William A Decker, assistant foreman planing mill Xo. 2. 

Chambers E. Springer, foreman lumber yard. 

Charles L. Fettinger, assistant foreman lumber yard. 

Charles C. Mason, foreman trimming shop. 

Philip L. Stroh, assistant foreman trimming shop. 

Adam B. Hamilton, foreman tin shop. 

David Koch, assistant foreman tin shop. 

Daniel Houseman, foreman outside laborers. 

Edwin A. Myers, assistant foreman outside laborers. 

Thomas Myers, foreman gas fitters. 

James Torrens, assistant foreman gas fitters. 

John W. Colyer, foreman brick layers. 



■George X. Anderson, despatcher, Altoona yard. 

Charles P. McCully, supervisor, Altoona yard. 

John McCormick, assistant train master, Pittsburg division. 

James H. Cramer, assistant train master, middle division. 



188 



HISTORY OF ALT(X)XA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 



HOWARD TIPTON'S 

LIVERY, SALE 






rry 




H 



GOOD, SfiFE STOCI 



STYLISH VEHICLES. 



PRICES LOW AND SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. 



1017 ELEVENTH AVENUE, ALTOONA, PA. 



CAMPBELL & COLE, 



DEALEUS IN — 



Dry Goods, 



\j 



PROVISIONS OF ALL KINDS IN SEASON. 



AN ESPECIALLY LAlUiE STOCK OP 



Carpets and Oil Cloths, 

BOOTS, SHOES, ETC. 
Corner 8th Avenue and 13th Street, Altoona, Pa. 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 



189 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



By referring to pages 61-2-3 the reader will be enabled to infer 
what kind of a town or hamlet Altoona was previous to its erection 
into a borough, which occurred on February 6, 1854. We append a 
list of the burgesses : 



George W. Patton 18.54-5 

Tlioma.'? JlcCiiuley li^-'>*5 

James Lowtlier 1857 

Enos INI. .T(inc^ 

W. C. McConiiic'k 



.Jolin Allison * 

AVilliam Leonard * 

John Baert 1*^*> 

]8.-)8-9 i H. Fettinger, sr 1867 

. . 18(50 



In February, 1868, Altoona received a city charter. Through 
the courtesy of John McXevin, who has been the efficient clerk of the 
city council since 1876, we have obtained a list of the officers who 
have controlled our nuinicipal aff"airs up to the present time, which 
we submit : 



NAMES OF MATOKS AND YEAR OF ELECTION. 



(".eorgc Potts 1868 

Davia Kinch 187-2 

1). A. Gillanil 1874 



Thomas W. Hnrd. 
W.T. Howard 



.1878 
.l!S80 



NAMES OF CITY TREASUItEUS AND TERM OF OPFICE. 

James Lowther 1868 | W. C. Galbraith 1876 

Thomas El way 1870 i John C. Sullivan 1878 

Jacob Snyder! 1872 W. S. Bittner 1880 

John H. Carr 1874 ) 



CITY RECORDER. 



Thomas H. Greevy,. 



.1878-33 



MEMBERS OF COUNCIL. 



1868. 



1st waril, D. K. Kamev. H. C. Dern 
2nd ward, W. B. liartlev. John Delalmnt. 
.3i-d ward, T. 1. McKlornau. *W. :Murray. 
4th ward, J. N. Glanding, A. li. ]Maxwell. 
.5th ward, David Hobisou, James Smith, 
(■)th ward, Phillip Fadle, John Rocket. 

1860. 

1st ward. II. C. Dern, .Tacol) Snyder. 
2nd ward, J. W. Devlin, Andrew Kipple. 
.•h-d ward, *\V. Murray. R. A. O. Kerr. 
4th ward, A. II. Maxwell. John H. Carr. 
5tl) ward, .Tames Smith, .Tnf). W. Kobison. 
6th ward, John Rocket, John O'Toole. 

1870. 

1st ward. Geo. W. Stewart, Pat. Green. 
2nd ward, Andrew Kipple, Henry El way. 
:ird ward. *R. A. O. Kerr, E. M. Jones. 
4th ward, John II. Carr. Clement Jaggard. 
.5th ward, J. W. Kobison, II. N. Anderson. 
6th ward, John 0"Toole, Joseph Long. 



j 1871. 

'ist warii, Koliert Green, D. K. Ramey. 
2n<l ward, Henry Elway. .John Lloyd, 
.h-d ward, *E. M". .Jones. R. A. O. Kerr. 
4th ward, H. N. Anderson, Sam'l Si)rankle. 
i5th ward, C. Jaggard, W. S. Douglass. 
0th ward, Joseph Long, J. C. McCloskey. 

1872. 

1st ward. I). K. Ramey, J. W. Curry. 
2nd ward, .John Llovd, .James Clabaugh. 
;;rd ward, *R. A. O. Kerr, J. Capstiek. 
41 li ward, W. S. Douglass. T. I. McKiernan. 
.5th ward. Sam'l 'sprankle, H. N. Anderson. 
0th ward, J. McCloskey, J. T. McDonald. 



I 1873. 

1st ward, J. W. Curry, Jno. Clingerman. 
2nd ward. James Clabaugh. R. J. Crozier. 
ord ward. J. Capstiek, *.Jno. Swartz. 
4th ward, T. I. McKiernan. Sam'l Lloyd. 
loth ward, H. N. Anderson. John Lloyd. 
Otli ward, J. T. McDonald. Jno. Rockett. 
;7th ward, David Walker, J. C. McCartney. 
8th ward, J. F. Beegle, G. A. Smith. 



*\Ve are unable to olitain precise dates for Allison and Leonard. 
tJohn Baer served l)ut three months. His unexpired term was fllled,by H. 
Dern, at that time president of the council. 



C. 



190 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 



MEMBERS OP COUNCIL — CONTNIUED. 



1874. 

1st ward, Jno. Cllnjieruian, Fred Olines. 
2nd ward, R. .1. Cro'zler, D. S. Markey. 
3rd ward, .fno. Swartz, A. G. Sink. 
4tli ward. *.Sani'l Lloyd. Albert Heess. 
5th ward, John Lloyd, William Stoke. 
6th ward, .John Roekett, Jno. F. Storm. 
7th ward, David Walker, J. C. McCartney. 
8th ward. J. F. Beegle, F, S. BalL 

1875. 
1st ward, F. W. Olmes, George Metz. 
2nd ward, *D. S. Markev, G. J. Akers. 
3rd ward, A. G. Sink, James Harkins. 
4th ward, A. F. Heess, Sam'l Lloyd. 
5th ward, VVm. Stoke, C. Hanser". 
(ith ward, Jno. Storm, F. I). Casanave. 
7th ward, J. C. McCartney, J. Gearhart. 
8th ward, F. S. Ball, David Koch. 

1876. 
1st M^ard George Metz, A. Ake. 
2nd ward. G. J. Akers, Blain McCormick. 
3rd ward. James Harkins, *A. G. Sink. 
4th ward. Sam'l Lloyd, W. W. Smith. 
5th ward, C. Hanser" Geo. W. Detwiler. 
6th ward, F. D. Casanave, Jno. O'Toole. 
7th M-ard, J. Cearhart, N. T. Cnnningham 
8th ward, David Koch, Wm. Decker. 

1877. 
1st ward, A. Ake, S. T.aylor. 
2nd ward, B. IMeCormick, James Lntz. 
3rd ward, *A. G. Sink, J. L. Reifsnyder. 



4th wartl, H. W. Snyder, J. G. Flanigan. 

Members marked thus * were presidents of council 



5th ward, Geo. W. Detwiler. Paul Sharp. 
6th ward, Jno. O'Toole, F. D. (Jasanave. 
7th ward, N. T. Cunningham, W. McGill. 
8th ward, W. M. Decker, G. W. Cessna. 

1878. 

1st ward, Sampson Taylor, J. F. Bowman. 
'2nd ward, .James Lntz, Jno. M. Klein. 
.3rd ward, .1. L. Reifsnyder, Frank MoUoj'. 
4th ward, .1. G. Flanigan, H. B. Kendig. 
5th ward, Paul Sharp. C. C. Mateer. 
6th ward, *F. D. Casanave, I). G. Owens. 
7th ward, N. T. Cunningham, H. S. Morgan. 
8th ward, Geo. W. Cessna, J. B. Burket. 

1879. 

1st ward, Jno. Bowman, Sampson Taylor. 
2nd ward, Jno. M. Klein, W. B. Bartley. 
3rd ward, *Frank Molloy. A. F. Kerr. 
4th ward, II. B. Kendig, A. H. Maxwell. 
5th ward, C. C. Mateer^ Jno. Flanigan. 
6th ward, D. G. <^>wens, F. D. Casanave. 
7tli ward, H. S. Morgan, Harry Geesej'. 
8th ward, Jolin B, Burket, F. S. Ball. 

1880. 

1st ward, S. Tavlor, A. L. McCartney. 
'2nd ward, W. B. Bartley, Zac. Endress. 
3rd ward, A. F. Kerr, *Frank Molloy 
4th ward, A. H. Maxwell, H. W. Snyder. 
5th ward, Jno. Flanigan. M, Keough. 
6th ward, F. D. Casanave, TlK)mas Miller. 
7th ward, Harry Geesey, Rinehart Line. 
8th ward, F. S. Ball, Jas. D.Brannan. 



8ECRET.\RIES OF COUNCIL. 



J. W. McKinney 1868-70 

T. B, Patton. . . .' 1871 

Timothy Brophy 1872 



T. B. Patton 1873-5 

John McNevin 1876-80 



NAMES OF SOLICITORS, 



D. J. Netr 1868-70 

JS eff & R ile V 1 871 

S. M. Woodcock 1872 

D. J. Nett" 1S73 



H. H. Herr 187.5-6 

A. V. Divelv 1877 

Alexander & Herr 1878 

J. G. Flanigan 1879-80 



NAMES OF CIVIL ENGINEERS. 



E. F. Lvtle 187'2-3 

William McDonald 1874 



J. B. Hanpt 1875 

William McDonald 1879-80 



SUPERINTENDENT OF WATER DEPARTMENT. 

John A. Baer 1875-80 



NAMES OF POLICEMEN. 



Arthur Storm 1868-9 ( 

J. A. Whitmer 1868-70 i 

H. P. Foreman 1870-1 ' 

G. W. Hazzard 1871 

J. A Westbrook, chief 187'2-3 

William Robeson 187'2-3 

J. K. Kly 1873-3 

John H." Cf>okc 1873 

Benjamin Burley 1873-5 ^ 

Theodore Doll ..". 1873 i 

T. S. Riley, chief 1874 

W. T. Howard 1874-5 : 

J. M. Lantz 1874 I 

George D. Itandolph 1874-6 

W. W. Smith, chief 1875-6 



Jacob Holtzman 1875 

John Coho 1876-8 

George D. Randolph, chief 1877 

Charles W. Whittle 1877 

James P. McDonald, chief. 1878 

George D. Ramlolph 1878 

Abram Mvers 1878-80 

H . E. Fett'inger 1878-9 

Jacob Iloltznmn, chief 1879 

James Allen 1879-80 

James Powell, eliief 1880 

John Kimmell 1880 

C. A. Dotzler 1880 

Anton Schittlekopf. 1880 

Chas. W. Whittle, special police, 1880 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 



191 



NAMES OF STREET COMMISSIONERS. 



Bernard Kolley 
C. N. Atkinson.. 
John Rocket t. .. 



...1875 
.187&-9 
...1880 



ticor<re D. Ramlolph 1868 

Hu<ih AlcCartnej' 1869 

WilHain Fox 1870-2 

Sampj^on Taj-lor 1873-4 

ALDERMEN. 

First, Third and Seventh -rtards— B. F. Rose. 
Second, Fonrthand Eiglitli wards— W. B. Blake. 
Fifth and Sixth wards— John O'Toole. 

CONSTABLES. 

Jackson Gibbs — second term — West side. 
Joseph W. Douglierty — third term — East side. 

CITY FINANCES. 

For the fiscal year, ending December 31, 18T9, the receipts of the 
city treasurer had been $21,419.99, and his expenditures $20,165.23, 
leaving a balance in his hands of $1,254.76. The outstanding indebt- 
edness of the city up to the time specified was: City fund, 87,128.01 ; 
Avater fund, $207,310.05; improvement fund, $155,010.00 — total, 
$369,448.06. 

We append a tabular statement by wards of the number of taxa- 
bles in the city, the valuation of property and the assessments : 



Taxables. Valuation, 

First ward 634 $325.0(j0 

Second ward 821 2.39..501 

Third ^\ ard 505 393.900 

Fourth ward 619 398.165 

Fifth waril 746 187,625 



Taxables. Valuation 



Sixth ward 838 

Seventh ward 2.51 

Eif'hth ward 487 



Total 4,901 



$210,757 
121,575 
103,075 

$1,979,658 



THE ASSESSMENTS. 





City Tax. 


Water Tax. 

$3,250 60 
2,395 01 
3,939 00 
3,981 65 
1,876 25 
2,107 57 
1.215 75 
1,030 75 


Improvem't 

$1,300 24 
958 00 
1,575 60 
1,.5!»2 66 
750 50 
843 03 
486 .30 
412 30 


Total. 


First ward 


$1.9.50 36 
1,437 01 
2.363 40 
2,388 99 
1,125 75 
1,264 .54 
729 45 
618 45 


$6..501 20 
4,790 02 
7,878 00 
7 963 30 


Second wai'd 

Third ward 

Fourth W ard 


Fifth ward 

Sixth ward 

Seventh ward 


3.7.52 .50 
4.215 14 
2 4;J1 50 


Eighth ward 


2 061 50 






Total 


11.877 95 


19.796 58 


7,918 63 


39,593 16 



li)2 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND liLAIK COUNTY. 



FRIES BROS. 



DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OF 



HARDA^^ARE, 

Paints, Oils, Glass, Putty, 

Table and Pocket Cutlery, Silver-plated Ware, and everything kept in a 

First-class Hardware Store. 



Heaters, 

Ranges, 
Stoves 

ALL OF THE LATEST IMPROVED PATTERNS. 



Tin, Copper and Sheet-iron ^A'■are, Pumps, and a general 

variety of Wooden Ware. 



SPORTSMEN'S GOODS: 

Guns, Revolvers, Powder, 

Shot, Fishing Tackle, Etc. 



ROOFING, SPOUTING AND REPAIRING PROMPTLY DONE. 



1313 Eleventh Avenue, - Altoona, Pa. 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 193 



GENERAL DIRECTORY OF ALTOONA. 



ALTOONA AVENUES AND STREETS. 

Boll's avenue, from eastern limits of city to Fourth street. 

Crawford avenue, from eastern limits of city to Eleventh street. 

First avenue, from eastern limits of city to Nineteenth street. 

Second avenue, from east to west boundarv or limits. 

Third avenue, from east to west boundary or limits. 

Fourth avenue, from east to west boundary or limits. 

Fifth avenue, from east to west boundary or limits. 

Sixth avenue, from east to west boundary or limits. 

Seventh avenue, from western limits to township road, between 
First and Second streets. 

Eighth avenue, from intersection of township road, between Third 
and Fourth streets, to Union avenue. 

Ninth avenue, from western limits of city to Fourth avenue. 

Tenth avenue, from Eighth to Sixteenth streets, and from Eigh- 
teenth street to western limits of city. 

Eleventh avenue, from Seventh street to western limits. 

Twelfth avenue, from Eleventh to Sixteenth streets, and from 
Eighteenth street to city limits. 

Thirteenth avenue, from Eleventh to Sixteenth streets, and from 
Eighteenth street to western limits. 

Fourteenth avenue, from Eleventh to Fourteenth .streets, and 
from Eighteenth to Twenty-fifth streets. 

Fifteenth avenue, from P]leventh to Thirteenth streets. 

Sixteenth avenue, from Tenth to Sixteenth streets, and from Dry- 
Gap road to Twenty-third .•street. 

Seventeenth avenue, from Tenth street to Coleman'.s road. 

Eighteenth avenue, from Tenth street to Coleman's road. 

Fairview avenue, from cemetery to eastern limits. 

Calvert avenue, from cemetery to eastern limits. 

Caldwell avenue, from cemetery to west Second street. 

Green avenue, from Seventh to Eleventh streets. 

Chestnut avenue, from Seventh to Eleventh streets. 

Lexington avenue, from Eighth to Eleventh streets. 

Howard avenue, from Eighth to Eleventh streets. 

Union avenue, from Eleventh avenue to Twenty-seventh St., west. 



194 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

Hamilton avenue, from cemetery to eastern limits. 

Broad street, from Union avenue to western limits. 

Margaret street, from Sixteenth street to Union avenue. 

Beale street, from Union avenue to western limits. 

West Chestnut street, from Twenty-third street to western limits. 

Maple street, from Twenty-third street to western limits. 

Oak street, from Twenty-fourth street to western limits. 

Walnut street, from Twenty-fourth street to western limits. 

Middle street, from Twenty-fifth street to western limits. 

Lombard street, from Seventh street to city limits east. 

East Chestnut street, from Fourth street to city limits. 

Hickory street, from Fourth street to eastern city limits. 

East Walnut street, from Fourth street to eastern city limits. 

Greevy street, from Lombard street to northern city limits. 

East First street, from Lombard street to northern city limits. 

East Second street, from southern limits to Seventh street. 

West Second street, from Lombai'd to northern city limits. 

East Third street, from southern limits to Eighth avenue. 

West Third street, from Lombard street to northern limits. 

Fourth street, from southern to northern limits. 

Fifth street, from southern limits to Ninth avenue. 

Sixth street, from southern limits to Ninth avenue. 

East Seventh street, from southern limits to Ninth avenue. 

West Seventh street, from Eleventh avenue to Lombard street. 

East Eighth street, from southern limits to Ninth avenue. 

West Eighth street, from Green avenue to Lexington avenue. 

Ninth street, from southern to northern limits. 

East Tenth street, from southern limits to Eighth avenue. 

West Tenth street, from Green avenue to Wopsonnonock road. 

East Eleventh street, from Third to Ninth avenues. 

West Eleventh street, from Tenth avenue to northern limits. 

Twelfth street, from southern to northern limits. 

East Thirteenth street, from southern limits to Ninth avenue. 

West Thirteenth street, from Tenth avenue to northern limits. 

East Fourteenth street, from southern limits to Ninth avenne. 

West Fourteenth street, from Tenth avenue to northern limits. 

East Fifteenth street, from southern limits to Ninth avenue. 

West Fifteenth street, from Tenth avenue to northern limits, 

East Sixteenth street, from southern limits to railroad. 

West Sixteenth street, from Tenth avenue to city limits. 

Seventeenth street, from southern limits to Dry Gap road. 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 195 

West Seventeenth street, from Tenth avenue to Dry Gap road. 
Bridge street, from Eleventh avenue to P. R. R. 
East Eighteenth street, from southern limits to Xinth avenue. 
West Eighteenth street, from Tenth to Union avenues. 
East Nineteenth street, from southern limits to Union avenue. 
West Nineteenth street, from Tenth avenue to city limits. 
East Twentieth street, from southern limits to Union avenue. 
West Twentieth street, from Tenth avenue to city limits north. 
East Twenty-first street, from southern limits to Broad street. 
West Twenty-first street, from Tenth avenue to city limits north. 
East Twenty-second street, from southern limits to Broad street. 
West Twenty-second sti-eet, from Tenth avenue to limits north. 
East Twenty-third street, from southern limits to Eighth avenue. 
West Twenty-third street, from Tenth avenue to Broad street. 
Twenty-fourth street, from southern to northern limits. 
Twenty-fifth street, from southern to northern limits. 
East Twenty-sixth street, from southern limits to Seventh avenue. 
West Twenty-sixth street, from Ninth avenue to northern limits. 
Tw^enty-seventh street, from southern limits to Seventh avenue. 

ASSOCIATIONS. 

Altoona Association, No. 2, of the Iii(lepen<lent Oraer of Pliilozatheuus 

Altoona Mechanics' library and Heading Room Association. 

Bethany Circle B. U. of Pa., (H. F.) No. 20. 

Cresson Conncil, No. 108, Jr. O. U. A. M. 

Freiglit Sliop Aid Association. 

Moses Monteflore I.odge, No. 308, I. O. B. B. 

Mountain City Conncil, No. 198, O. U. A. M. 

Mystic Castle, No. 27, A O. K. of M. C. 

Railroad Men's Christian Association. 

Rising Sun Circle, No. .^lO, B. U. (H. F.) of Pa. 

St. .Jolin's Literary and Benevolent Association. 

Sodality of the Blessed Virgin. 

Young Men's Christian Association. 

BUILDING AND LO.\N ASSOCIATIONS. 

Altoona. 1 Keystone. 
Allegheny. Logan. 

Enterprise. Mechanics'. 

Franklin. Washington. 

IMPROVED OTiDER OF RED MEN. 

Tammany Tribe, No. 85. 
Winnebago, Tribe, No. 3.5. 

INDEPENDENT ORDER OF ODD FELLOWS. 

Altoona Encampment, No, 1'29. 

Altoona Lodge, No. 473. 

Amelia Degree Lodge, Daughters of Rebekah. 

Eudora Degree Lodge, Daughters of Rebekah, No. 87. 

Eleanor Degree Lodge. Daughters of Rebekah, No. 21. 

Mountain City Lodge, No. 837. 

Vernandah Lodge, No. 532. 



190 



HISTORY OF ALTOOXA AND HLAIll COUNTY. 



v^y 



H 



-7 




H 



AA 



H 



AFTER SHAVING. 



IT BEATS BAY RUM. Ladies use it to rcinovc Skin Irruptions. Prevents liair 
from falling out. PRICE, 75 CENTS PER BOTTLE. 



C. F. RANDOLPH, Prop'r., 



HOG ELKVENTH STREET, 



ALTOONA, PA. 



MICHAEL MTZHARRIS, 



DEALER IN 



Groceries, Flour, Feed and Provisions, 

Canned Fruits, "Wood and "Willow "Ware. 

Corner Twelfth Avenue and Sixteenth Sti-eet, 

ALTOONA, PA. 



D. J. XEFF. 



N. V. MERVIXE. 



NEFF & MERVINE, 

Attorneys and Counsellors at Law, 

OFFICE: ISth Street, bet. 10th and tlth Avenues, 
ALTOONA, PA. 

JOHN O'TOOLE, 

ALDERMAN, 

OFFICE: Corner Eleventh Avenue and Seven- 
teenth Street, Altoona, Pa. 



Conveyancing attended to and Collections promptly made. 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 



197 



KSIGHTS OF PYTHIAS. 

Logan Lodge, No. 79. 
White Cross Lodge, Xo. 334. 

MASONIC. 

Logan Lodge, No. 490, F. & A. M. 
Mountain Lodge, No. 281, F. & A. M. 
Mountain Chapter, No. 189, K. A. M. 
Mountain Counoil, No. 9, R. & S. M. 
Mountain Comniandery, No. 10, K. T. 

AMU.SEMENTS. 

Altoona City Opera House : Eleventh street and Eleventli avenue: seats 1,200; 
stage 'iJ7x35; ten sets of seenerj'; proprietor. Joseph Watson: manager and l>ill 
poster, J. Cloyd Kreider. 

SILVER GREY SOCIAL CLL'B. 

Organized August '20, 1879; composed of ehlerly gentlemen, of excellent social 
standing, whose ages proljablj' average 60 years. President. Kol^t-rt Alexander: 
vice president, Allen McGhitliery ; treasurer, John Miller: secretary, II. Fettin- 
ger, Sr. : number of members, 50. 

TELEGRAPH OFFICES. 

American T'nion Telegi'aph Company, Logan House. 
Western Union Telegraph Company, Logan House. 

I'OST OFFICE, 

Twelfth street, between Tenth and Eleventh avenues; oftice hours, 7 a. ji. to 
8.30 p. M. ; Sundays, from 9.30 to 10.30 a. m. ; legal holidays fron 7 to 10 a. m., and 7 to 
8.30p.m.; T. Blair Patton, postmaster; James E. Winn, assistant; registry clerk, 
W. P. Patton ; delivery clerk, A. S. Johnson. 



MUSICAL ORGANIZATIONS. 

The art or science of harmonious sounds, or the production of 
simultaneous sounds in accord or harmony, is evidently well under- 
stood by the various instrumental and vocal musical associations of 
Altoona. Of this we justly feel proud. Taking into consideration 
all the circumstances, nothing but uiuiualified praise is due, both in- 
dividually and collectively, to the gentlemen who furnish our local 
musical entertainments. We give a list of the members of the bands, 
alphabetically arranged, with their instumentatiun : 

ALTOONA CITY BAND. 

Organized in 18.5.1;: Jule A. NeflT, leader; A. C. Brown, drum major. 

Armstrong. Irvin, baritone. 
Canty, Patrick, 1st E flat cornet. 
Carr,'Wm. K., 1st D flat cornet. 
Clabangh, Andrew, solo alto. 
Cunningham, Newton F., bass drum. 
Durnbaugh. Il.irry, E flat bass. 
Fettinger, Charles L., cymbals. 
Grimme, Ignatius, piccolo. 
Hammer, Florian, 1st E flat clarionet. 
Hargraves, George, 2(1 tenor trombone. 
Hargraves, James, euphonou. 
Jones, Wm. I)., 1st B flat tenor. 

14 



Letford, John, 1st tenor trombone. 
Labe, Harry, glockenspiel. 
Matthews, ilames, 2 B flat tenor. 
Stewart, G. M., 1st alto. 
Sidel, John, 2d alto. 
Snyder, Ed.. E flat bass. 
Stout. Charles, snare drum. 
Thomasburgcr. F., 1st B flat clarionet. 
Willis, Ed.. 2d B flat cornet. 
Westbrook, W. D., 3d B flat cornet. 
Weidlieh, Stephen, 2(1 B flat clarionet. 
Wolf, Wm. H., snare ilrum. 



198 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 



MOUNTAIN CITY BAND. 



Organized in 187.5; Nelson Graham, leader; M. M. Rush, drum major. 



Burkett, Geo. W., 1st alto. 
Black, Edward, cymbals. 
Barkheimer, M. M., bass tlrum. 
Burkett, Jolin B., '2d E tlat cornet. 
Coyle, B. J., snare drum. 
Davis, Abraham, snare drum. 
Ehrhartj George W., tuba. 
Elliott, Howard, B flat cornet. 
Forry, Robert, solo alto. 



Kipp, George, E flat tuba. 
Mintell, Roman, baritone. 
Myers, Ellsworth, piccolo. 

Miller, , 2d tenor. 

Shoemaker, Henry F., 2d B flat cornet. 

Ward, Joshua T., trombone. 

Wahl, Joseph F., 1st tenor. 

Ward, William, 2d alto. 

Walters, Charles L., solo B flat cornet. 



Organized Sept. 1, 1877 ; G. W, 
Bolger, S. P., Ijaritone. 
Davis, G. W., E flat cornet. 
Fottst, Samuel, bass, 
(iraft, David L.. snare drum. 
Jlurtman. Harry, 1st alto. 
.Jackson, B. D.,"E flat cornet. 
Kerline, Cloyd W., 1st tenor. 
Kuhns, L. M", bass. 



JUNIOR GREYS BAND. 

. Dunlap, leader ; George Blacklmrn, ilr«m major. 

Meredith, William, solo alto. 

Patterson, Charles C, bass drum. 

Renner, Charles W., 1st B flat cornet. 

Stoufler. J. D., 3d B flat cornet. 
I Stover, Jacob, 2il 15 flat cornet. 

Stover, J. H.. 2d tenor. 

Salsburg, C. C, cyndjals. 
I White, Juiison, 2d alto. 

citizens' cornet band. 



Organized in 1878; A. Filer, leader. 



Baird, James M.. E flat liass. 
Beasoni, Thos., 1st B flat tenor. 
Cantner, .John, 2d B flat tenor. 
Dibert, William, 2d E flat alto. 
Hikes, G. W.. solo E flat alto. 
Hottman, D. F., E flat bass. 
Lindsey, H. M.. snare drum. 
Miller, C. W., E flat cornet. 



Nolan, Thomas. E flat clarionet. 
Stoufler. H. W., E flat cornet. 
Shade, Howard, 1st E flat alto. 
Speece, .John, cymbals. 
Snell, H. F., E. flat cornet. 
Waite, D. A., baritone, 
Waggoner, George, bass drum. 



GERMAN SOCIAL CORNET BAND. 



Organized September, 1878 ; president, Andrew Auer ; vice president, John H. 
Schmidt; secretary, George Bender; treasurer, John Foster; leader, John Foster. 

FROHSINN SINGING SOCIETY. 

Organized in 18()2: 1.35 members: president, E. Zemsch; secretai'y, Oscar Han- 
son ; treasurer, Jacob Rink ; teacher, J. F. Maeder. New hall erected in 1877. 

CONCORDIA SINGING SOCIETY. 

Organized in 1870 : 126 members ; president, Balzer Wolf; vice president, Henry 
Vetter; secretary, Geo. Hauser ; treasurer, Geo. Koelle, jr.; director, Fred. Ehredt. 

THE MILITARY. 

Considering its age our city enjoys a fair share of military re- 
nown. During the war of the rebellion it furnished its quota of men 
with cheerfulness and alarcity, none of whom brought disgrace upon 
the flag of our country. 

The first company formed in Altoona (1854) was called the 
"Logan Rangers." H. J. Lombeart was captain ; John L. Piper, first 
lieutenant ; Harry Sellers, second lieutenant, and William Renner, 
third lieutenant. The company numbered about sixty men, many of 
the survivors still living in Altoona and Blair county. The late Col. 
John L. Piper, who entered as first lieutenant, afterwards became 
captain, who was succeeded by Jacob Zink. When this company dis- 
banded another was formed, many of the members of the old com- 
pany entering into its organization. Jacol) Zink was captain ; R. J. 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 199 

Crozier, first lieutenant, and Fred. Schillinger, second lieutenant. It 
was mustered into the United States service as Company E, 3rd Pa. 
Yols., April 20, 1861, and served three months. 

The Altoona Guards was organized in September, 1854. P. S. 
Reed was captain ; Henry Wayne, first lieutenant, and Ezra Ale, 
second lieutenant. In the spring of 1855 Captain Reed went west, 
when Lieutenant Wayne was made captain. Both these men had 
seen active service — Reed in the Mexican war, and Wayne in the 
Florida war. On the 20th of April, 1861, the company was mus- 
tered into service, under Captain Wayne, as Company B, 3rd Pa. 
Yols., and was mustered out at expiration of service, July 29, 1861. 
In the following month the company was re-organized and, on the 
26th day of that month, was mustered in as Co. F, 7 6th regiment Pa. 
Yols., for three years, with Henry Wayne as captain, who was killed 
in action at Pocotaligo, South Carolina, on October 22, 1862. On 
the 28th day of November, 1864, the remnant of the company was 
mustered out of service. The majority of the men had been killed or 
discharged on account of wounds and other disabilities. 

A company of one hundred men was organized, partly through the 
instrumentality of Mortimer B. Morrow, and was mustered as Com- 
pany I, 205th regiment Pa. Yols., on September 2, 1864. Ira R. 
Shipley was captain; John A. McCahan, first lieutenant, and Henry 
Ehva}^, second lieutenant. On the 30th of October the captain was 
discharged. John A. McCahan superseded him, and Henry Hawk, 
who previously had l)een sergeant, became first lieutenant, and Henry 
Elway remained second lieutenant. The company had enlisted for 
one, year, but was mustered out on June 2, 1865, the war having 
closed. 

The "Keystuiie Zouaves" was organized in 1871, with John R. 
Garden as captain ; Harry A. Miller, first lieutenant, and Charles L. 
Fettinger, second lieutenant. It numbered about sixty men. Some- 
time in 1873 this company was re-organized and its name changed 
to ."Latta Guard," when Theodore Burchfield became its captain; 
Maiden Yalentine, first lieutenant, and F. R. Barr, second lieutenant. 

In 1874 the Fifth regiment N. G. Pa. was formed. The Latta 
Guard, of Altoona ; Juniata Riflemen, of Hollidaysburg, together 
with companies of Bedford and Cambria counties, composed it. 
James F. Milliken was elected colonel. He was discharged from the 
service November 2, 1876. He was succeeded by P. B. Wilson, of 
Bellefonte, at which time Theodore Burchfield was made lieutenant 
colonel. Colonel Wilson died in February, 1878. In March, same 



200 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 



year, Theodore Burehfield was elected colouel, and at the present 
time is the commandino- officer of the reo-iment. 

In July, 1878, the National Guard of the State was re-organized, 
and the Fifth regiment consisted then, as it does now, of Company 
A, of Ebensburg'; Company B, of Bellefonte ; Company C, of HoUi- 
daysburg; Company D, of Altoona; Company E, of Philipsburg ; 
Compan}' G, of Lewistown; Company H, of Johnstown, and Com- 
pany I, of Bedford. 

The commissioned field and staff officers of the regiment consist of 
Colonel Theodore Burehfield, of Altoona ; Lieutenant Colonel D. H. 
Hastings, of Bellefonte; Major P. J. Woleslagle, of Philiitsburg; 
Adjutant W. Sargent, jr., of Altoona; Quartermaster J. A. Rohrer, 
of Hollidaysburg; Commissary H. D. Tate, of Bedford; Surgeon 
George F. Harris, of Bellefonte; Assistant Surgeons I. C. Blaisdell, 
of Wilmore, and A. S. Stayer, of Roaring Spring; Pa3aiiaster C. S. 
Marks, of Lewistown; and Chaplain D. W. Hunter, of Lewistown. 

Near Braddock's station, on the 8th of September, 1880, the Fifth, 
together with. six other regiments were inspected by General Gibson, 
IJ. S. A., and James W. Latta, Adjutant General of Pennsylvania, Avho 
complimented the Fifth as being the first in point of merit. This 
opinion was also giv^en by General J. F. Hartranft, who was present 
on the occasion. 

Company D, (Fifth regiment) was organized in August, 1879. 
The commissioned officers are Captain John L. Pijter ; First Lieu- 
ienant Edwin M. Amies, and Second Lieutenant John R. Garden. 



MEMBERS. 



BiiU, Win. H., (coi-poral.) 
Jjcnsoi), WiUiuiu 
Bcnclcr, A. J. 
IJcrkovvitz, WiUiam 
ISouine. K. K. 
IJiuiiibiirger. W. H. 
Butlei-, Joseph, (corporal.) 
C'ii«ev, Thomas, (corporal.) 
Christy. F. U. 
Davis. F. M.. (corporal.) 
JJagcnhart, .V. 
Uagenhart, F. 
Douglass, .1 . P. 
J>cvtin James 
lEnright, William 
Evey, J. T. 
Feeney, John 

Fowle, George D., (sergeant.) 
Guthrie. K. 15., (sergeant.) 
Haldeman, B. F. 
Ilerr, Charles 
Hudson V. D., (sergeant.) 
Houck, II. J. 
Hni. John 
Kinney, Bryan 
Lippet", Ed. 
Loudcni, Wm. D. 
Maekey, John A., (corporal.) 
3Iaher" Wni. E. 



McConncll, James A. 

McGougli, Thomas F. 

.Miller. Luther 

Miller, Freilcrick 

Montgomery. J. I'. 

McDowell, Robert 

Nagle, L. \V.. (sergeant.) 

0'l)onneIl. V. 15. 

Follitt, E. F. 

Reynolds, H. L. 

Roberts. Harry C, (sergeant.) 

Scott, R. W., (corporal.) 

Slep, Ed. J. 

Smith, J. Lincoln 

SpuuUling, (;ef)rge T. 

Turner, \V. E. 

Turner, W. A. 

\ etter. Max 

Walker, »I. H. 

Walker, S. C. 

Weaver. William 

Weiss, Charles T., (corporal.) 

Westfall. William C, (corporal.) 

W hei-rv, George M. 

Whittre, C. W. 

Woods, llarrv L. 

Woodring. .(ohn C. 

Zinimernian, W. 



HISTORY- OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 



201 



HOLLIDAYSBURG. 



BY II. H. SNYDER. 



Adam and William HoUiday were brothers.* They emigrated to 
this country from the north of Ireland in the year IToO, and settled 
in Ijancaster county in this State. From there they moved to Frank- 
lin county and settled on the banks of the Conococheague. They 




served in the wars again.st the French and Indians, of 1755-6 and of 
1762-3. Adam was a lieutenant under Col. Armstrong, and accom- 
panied him on his expedition over the mountains to destroy the In- 



dian town of Kittanning. 



Their route was over the ground on which 



*In his history of Juniata Valley, Mr. Jones states that Adam and WiUiam 
lloUiday were cousins. This error should be corrected. The grand-daughter of 
Adam, now residing in Lewlstown, a lady of line intelligence, and good memory, 
seventy-six years of age. states that they were brothers, and she is at a loss to know 
liow such an error could have originated. 



202 HISTOEY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

HoUiclaysbiirg now stands. In 1708, these brothers resolved to seek 
a new location, and, placing all their earthly possessions on pack- 
horses, faced westward, hoping- to reach the banks of the Allegheny 
and possess themselves of some of the fertile lands which l)order on 
that river, and they, like others we read of in history, saw and ad- 
mired those rich valleys whilst engaged in their military campaigns. 
But upon their arrival at the place whero HoUidaysburg now .'Stands, 
then a wild and unbroken wilderness, they determined to halt and 
jiroceed no farther. They apprehended trouble with the Indians who 
still held undisputed possession of the lands of that region. 

Adam Holliday took out a warrant for one thousand acres of land 
and erected his "homestead," a rough building of logs, on the l)row 
of the hill from which he could have a good view of the Juniata 
river as it meandered its course through the forests of beach and ma- 
ple, sugar and hickory, and had, at the same time, a commanding 
view of the country beyond. The site of this pioneer hut was the 
south-west corner of Allegheny and Montgomery streets. William 
crossed the river, and although somewhat discouraged by the swampy 
nature of the soil, finally found a location to suit him, in the ravine 
south of Gaysport, and what was for many years known as the Jack- 
son farms. He purchased one thousand acres from Mr. Peters. Gay- 
sport is built on a portion of this purchase. 

ERECTION OF THE FIRST SUBSTANTIAL HOUSE. 

The first substantial house was erected about the close of the 
Revolutionary war, by Mr. Adam Holliday, on the bank of the river 
near where the bridge between HoUidaysburg and Gaysport now 
stands. Many of the older citizens of the town have seen and re- 
member the old log house. Here he lived to a good old age, and 
died in 1801. Soon after the war broke out, and the Indians were 
hunting white scalps for shipment to Canada, to he paid for with 
British gold, Lieut. Holliday took command of all the able-bodied set- 
tlers, and selecting a favorable site erected a fort, which he named 
"Roberdeau," in honor of a French officer whom he admired. This 
fort was located on the flat between the Williamsburg branch railroad 
and the river, and not far from the "Two locks." It proved, indeed, 
a place of refuge for the settlers, for here they would gather with 
their women and children and remain sometimes for weeks. In the 
year 1781, early in the month of August, William Holliday, having 
heard from the scouts that the country was clear of Indians, left Fort 
Roberdeau, accompanied by his two sons, Adam and Patrick, and his 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 203 

little daughter, Janet, aged about fourteen, and went over to the farm 
in the ravine to take off a crop of hay, when suddenly and unex- 
pectedly they were attacked by a party of Indians, who lay in am- 
bush, and his two sons and daughter were killed. Mr. Holliday nar- 
rowly escaped with his life. The bodies were found where they had 
fallen. All were scalped. They were buried on the farm, near where 
they fell, and a rude stone marks their graves. This tragedy, hor- 
rible in its details, i.s part of the history of the early settlement of 
this part of the country, and is cited as an instance of the cruelty of 
savages and the hardships of the pioneers. It was many months be- 
fore William recovered from this fearful shock. The screams of his 
little daughter, as she was being heartlessly and brutally butchered 
by the savage fiends, rang in his ears for many months afterward, 
and at times he was almost bereft of reason. But he did recover from 
it, and lived for many years afterward, and, dying at a good old age, 
was laid to rest by the side of his children. The place is still known 
as the "Holliday ])urying ground." 

Adam Holliday left surviving him a son and a daughter — John 
and Janet. John was accounted, in his day, the wealthiest man in 
this country. He removed to the Conemaugh and purchased all that 
tract of land on which Johnstown now stands, but having no faith in 
the future greatness of Johnstown,* sold out to Peter Livergood for 
eight dollars an acre, and returned to Hollidavsburff. He immedi- 
ately erected a hotel, and in the east end of the building opened a 
general store. The hotel property was subsequently purchased by 
Mr. Peter Hewit, father of Mr. James M. Hewit, who occupied it as a 
hotel, store and post office until the year 1839, when it was torn 
down and on the same ground was erected the large brick build- 
ing now known as the "American House." 

In the primitive hotel building was born Alexander L. Holliday, 
son of John Holliday. James M. Hewit was also born in the old 
hotel building. Both these gentlemen are still citizens of Hollidays- 
burg. Janet Holliday married William Reynolds, of Bedford county. 
Her sons — William, James and Holliday — were proprietors of the 
American House during the years 1853-5. Mrs. Thomas W. Jack- 
son, of Altoona, is a daughter of James Reynolds. 

The Blairsville and Huntingdon turnpike, which i)asses through 
Hollidaysburg, was completed in 1818. The conipletion of this im- 

* Mr. HoUiday's cliristian name being '• .John." the town was called JoHxs-town. 
Had not his surname enteretl into the composition of •• Hollidaysburg," .lohnstown 
would doubtless have been calleil Hollidaysburg. 



204 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

])ortant highway was regarded as a long stride in progress. Previous 
to this time the road through tliis country was little more than a 
})ridle path, and at an early day was known as a trail, called the "Kit- 
tanning trail." It crossed the river diagonally, starting at Alle- 
gheny street, crossing where the viaduct now stands, and coming 
out at the steam grist mill of Wood, Moi'rel it Co. At that time 
Hollidaysburg consisted of the "Holliday and Adams' Taverns" and a 
few scattering houses. It now began to assume an air of more im- 
portance. The teamsters hauling merchandise between Philadelphia, 
or Baltimore, and Pittsburg made this a halting place, and almost 
every night the space in front of the " tavern," now the diamond, 
would 1)(( crowded with heavily ladencd wagons. The "Adams 
House," or tavern, as it was called, was the oldest hotel in Hollidays- 
burg, and was built about the year ITDO. Mr. John Bowers, sr., stated 
in the year 1831, that when a young man, about forty years before 
that time, he stopped over night at this house. It occupied the 
ground on Allegheny street, where the buildings of A. F. Osterloh 
and Mrs. S. C. Sn^'dor now stand. This house was for many years 
a favorite resort. The elections for Frankstown and Allegheny town- 
shi])s were held in it, the politics of the day were discussed here, 
and in its ampk; grounds the men for miles around, even from Franks- 
town, would gather and play what was then the favoritp game of 
"gable ball." 

FIRST SURVEY MADE. 

From the best information obtainabh;, and a careful comparison of 
dates, it is safe to say that the town of Hollidaysburg was surveyed 
and plotted as early as 1*780, not later than this, and perhaps a few 
years earlier. Mr. James M. Hewit has in his possession a copy of 
the original town plot, and it is very unfortunate that it does not 
contain a date ; not even the date when the copy was made. This 
old paper has been in his possession for upwards of forty years. We 
know the town was plotted prior to 1781, because Miss Janet Holli- 
day, who was massacred by the Indians in August of that year, was 
the owner of a lot on Walnut street, between Wayne and Union. 
This copy was evidently made in a very earh^ period of the century, 
for the lot on the north-west corner of Allegheny and Wayne 
.streets, now the property of Mrs. Virginia Over, and was owned by 
her uncle. Christian Garber, as early as 1 808, and on the plot it is in 
the name of Peter Titus. The boundaries of the town were Front 
street on the west ; Union street on the east; Walnut street on the 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 205 

north, and Mullx-rry street on the south. There were no lots on the 
west side of Front street; on the south side of ^lulberry street, 
nor on the cast side of Union street. The land between Mul- 
berry street, or the southern limits, and the river was covered 
by the most beautiful sugar, hickory and walnut trees — it was a fa- 
mous sug-ar camp. This beautiful woods long remained a place of re- 
sort. It was known as the grove adjoining the basin. Here the pa- 
triotic citizens assembled to celebrate 

s 

THE FOURTH OF .JULY. 

One of these good old-fashioned celebrations, which occurred on 
July 4th, 183fi, will be briefly referred to, for the purpose of showing 
the spirit of Hollidaysburg at that day : John Dougherty, proprietor 
of the United States hotel, was the caterer of the occasion, or, as was 
the custom at that time, he was selected by the committee of arrange- 
ments to get up the dinner. He and his good wife were recognized 
as the host and hostess. Everybody assembled at the "United 
States," where the procession was formed, and, headed l)y a band of 
music, proceeded to the grove. C. Garber, csf(., was chosen presi- 
dent, and John Dougherty, vice-president. After the reading of the 
Declaration of Independence, by Mr. John Davidson, the Hon. 
Samuel Calvin, who had ))ut two months previously made his debut 
as a young lawyer, was introduced to the large assemblage, which "ob- 
served much respectful order and attention," and delivered an oration 
w^hich w^as w^ell received and highly spoken of. In this oration Mr. 
Calvin took strong ground against the growing agitation of the 
slavery question, and denominated the Abolitioni-sts as "self-styled 
philanthropists,^'' and predicted that a continuation of these discus- 
sions would eventually lead to war between the North and South. 
After the good things had disai)peared, and everybody Avas feeling 
happy, the toasts were read. In those days toasts upon all festive 
occasions were indispensable. It will no doubt be interesting to 
many of the citizens of Hollidaysburg to give a few of them 
that an idea may be had of the feelings and sentiments of the lead- 
ing citizens of Holliday.sburg forty-four years ago. There were thir- 
teen "regular toasts," and perhaps fifty or sixty by the citizens. Of 
the regular toasts, we select: "The day we celebrate — worthy the 
commemoration of freeman." [Yankee Doodle ; three cheers.] "The 
memory of General George Washington." [Drank silent and stand- 
ing.] By the vice-president of the day: " Beaver Dam Branch, of 
the Juniata river at Hollidaysburg; yesterday, a rill, too small to 
float an Indian canoe ; to-day, a lake covered with canal boats ; 



206 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

twenty years hence, navigated with steam-boats ; go ahead, keep 
moving." By George R. McFarlane : "The memory of James Mad- 
ison: The last of the band of sages, who reared the edifice of the 
Constitution ; having lived to see the work of his hands cemented by 
time, strengthened by the storms which have beat against it, and 
bidding fair to immortalitv, he is sunk to rest, full of vears and full 
of honors. 

'How sleeps the sage who sinks to rest, 
With all his countiy's wishes blest.' " 

By Joseph Baldridge: " The " yearly return of the Fourth of July: 
May it always find mankind on an equality." By James Morehouse : 
"Allegheny Portage Railway: How magnificent an improvement 
compared with the serpentine pathway by which our forefathers 
wended their way over the rugged Allegheny." By C. McCormick: 
" May the people of Hollidaysburg never feel want, nor ever want 
• feeling." By James Cooper : " The fair sex of Hollidaysburg : Long 
may they continue what they are, a virtuous and intelligent class." 
By H. Divine: "Pennsylvania improvements over the Allegheny 
mountain, without incline planes, is only wanting to make them su- 
perior to any in the world, and show that nature has formed no bar- 
rier to American enterprise." By Jacob Snyder: "The declaration, 
of July, "70, and the Pennsylvania resolutions, passed by the legisla- 
ture at the extra session of 1836; the former declaring to the world 
that we are free and independent States; the latter sustaining, with 
the firmness of our fathers, the true principles on which the Union 
of States shall be maintained." By W. G. Campbell: "Mr. Calvin, 
the orator of the day : May he live a hundred years, and every day 
like this." By L. H. Williams: "Henry Clay: Ma}^ the evening of 
his life be as calm as the morning was glorious." By C. Lowe : 
"The ladies of Hollidaysburg and vicinity cannot be excelled for vir- 
tue, beauty and intelligence." By Wm. M. Lloyd: "Texas, like our 
forefathers, her sons are struggling for independence: may they be 
as successful, and convince tyrants that they cannot enchain the spirit 
of liberty." By the company: "Our Host and Hostess deserve the 
thanks of this company for the excellent fare and superior style of 
our dinner." 

"billy" DONALDSON'S TAVERN. 

A stone l)uildiiig stood in the diamond on the ground now occu- 
pied by the opera house. It was built early in the century, probably 
in 1808 or 1810. It was occupied in 1814 as a general store by 
John Swope, who came from Huntingdon. This property was pur- 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 207 

chased by William Donaldson, who put an addition to it, and used it 
for a hotel. " Billy" Donaldson's tavei-n became very popular. The 
landlord was a famous character, and many amusing anecdotes re- 
garding him are still narrated. It was also a favorite boarding house, 
and many young unmarried gentlemen, who suljsequently became 
prominent leading citizens of the town, some of whom are still liv- 
ing, boarded here, amongst whom may be mentioned, Hon. Samuel 
Calvin, A. L. Holliday, Jacob Snyder, Caleb Chambers, Henry 
Lloyd, (brother of Wm. M. Lloyd, of Altoona,) John Culbertson, 
and John Penn Jones. 

FRANKSTOWN IN THE LEAD. 

But up to the period of 1830-1 Frankstown was the metropolis of 
this region of country, and the locality of Hollidaysburg was only 
distinguished ))y a few houses .scattered along the road. The post 
office was at Frankstown ; the churches were at Frankstown, or near 
there ; the stores, with the heavy stocks of goods, were at Franks- 
to'^m, and if the ladies of fashion, the belles of that day, wished fine 
dress goods, and of stylish patterns, they must go to Frankstown to 
purchase them. 

ADVANTAGEOUS SITUATION. 

Hollidaysburg" had its growth and became a town of importance 
from its situation being at the termini of the Pennsylvania canal and 
Allegheny Portage railroad. In 1831, when the act authorizing the 
construction of these public works became a law, Hollidaysburg was 
but a small hamlet ; Frankstown, as before intimated, and Xewry 
were towns of far greater importance. It was generally conceded 
that wherever the "basin" or canal terminus would be located, a 
town would spring into existence which would be of considerable 
consequence, precisely as the location of the shops and principal 
offices of the Pennsylvania Railroad company created a large and 
prosperous town. The engineers in charge considered Frankstown 
as the natural point, and the "basin" was not only "staked off" 
there, but its construction actually commenced, and on the strength 
of it Mr. Henry Denlinger commenced the erection of a large three- 
story brick hotel. Town lots went up rapidly, and for awhile the 
old town enjoyed quite a "boom." An eff"ort was made to locate the 
''basin" on the farm of Jacob Wertz, now owned by Mr. George W. 
Rhodes, and an offer of ten thousand dollars, a fj-ood sum at that 
time, was made for the land ; but the old man refused to sell. Per- 
haps if Jacob had not proved so contrary and obstinate, HoUidays- 



208 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

burg would never have had any other (wistence than a resting place 
for teamsters. The farm of Patrick McCloskey, where the reservoir 
was subse{(uently located, was also selected as the place for the canal 
"basin." The Wertz farm was the place designated by nature for its 
location, for near that point is the junction of two branches of the 
Juniata river, and with a proper dam, it is fair to presume that the 
large expenditure of money for the construction of the reservoir 
would never have become a necessity. 

ENTERPRISE OF .lOIIN 15LA1R. 

But John Blair, the same for whom the county was named, (and he 
was thus honored by his friends in Ilollidaysburg for this very ac- 
tion,) was the leading politician in all this region. He represented 
the west end of Huntingdon county in the; legislature, and Avas also 
possessed of a widely extended influence. It was he who agitated 
the building of the turnpike, and who first talked of the expediency 
of, and insisted upon, crossing the Allegheny mountains with a rail- 
road by means of incline planes. The ])roposition was at first re- 
garded as chimerical and visionary; l)ut he had taken the levels him- 
self, Avith a rudely constructed instrument made of birch bark, and he 
demonstrated from actual observation the feasibility and practicability 
of the scheme. He was enterprising and progressive, and at the 
same time awake to his own interests. He was the owner of hun- 
dreds of acres of coal lands on the Alleghenies, and he Intended that 
these mineral lands should be developed. He was in the Legislature 
when the question of the "basin" was being discussed. He wanted 
it at Hollidaysburg. Huntingdon hooted at the idea of a canal 
"basin " being located in the mountains, and the Hon. John William- 
son, of Huntingdon, in illustration of his point, declared that the 
eyes of the boatmen would be blinded with the dust which would 
rise from the bottom of the "basin" located there. Subsequent 
events went far to prove that Mr. Williamson had a pretty clear com- 
prehension of the thinness of the water in this direction. But 
John Blair had set his heart on Hollida3"sburg. He wanted a turn- 
pike and he got it; he wanted a railroad and he got it; and now he 
wanted the "basin" located at Hollidaysburg and it was done. If, 
at a later day, Hollida^'^sburg had possesed such an able and generous 
champion and friend as the Hon. John Blair, the city of Altoona, in 
Blair county, would never have been heard of. 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 209 

ARRIVAL OF THE FIRST CANAL BOAT. 

The firyt canal l)oat ai-rived in Hollidayslnirg in the fall of 1833, 
and was named the "John Blair." . The event was celebrated by a 
g-rand Ijall. Xo bnilding- in the town was^ large enongh to accommo- 
date the guests, and the music and dancing was adjourned to the 
large brick building in Frankstown, known as the "Denlinger hotel." 
The work on the railroad was so far completed on the 26th of No- 
vember, 1833, as to permit the passage of the first car over its entire 
length. On the 18th of March, 1884, the road was opened as a pub- 
lic highway. The Canal and Portage Railroad Exchange, a new and 
spacious brick hotel, corner of Mull)erry and Montgomery streets, 
was opened to the public April 1, 1834, and was kept by J. C. Wil- 
liams and R. M. Shaw. The United States hotel was built by John 
Dougherty, on the corner of Juniata and Wayne streets, about the 
year 1840. 

EDUCATION LOOKED AFTER. 

About 1834 the citizens of the town took great interest in educa- 
tion. The common school law had been enacted the year previous, 
and they were anxious to see it in operation. A large meeting — 
called then "a great meeting" — of the friends of education was held 
in the public school house on the 9th day of September. Joseph 
Adams was president ; John Lytle and Samuel Smith, vice-presidents, 
and John Brotherline and Isaac Tingling, secretaries. On motion of 
Jacob Snyder, esq., a committee of five persons was appointed for 
the purpose of drafting a preamble and resolutions expressive of the 
views of the meeting, and also to select six citizens to be nominated 
by the meeting as candidates for school directors. The chair ap- 
pointed Jacolj Snyder, David Y. Hileman, John Davis, William Mc- 
Farland and Joseph Purse as that committee. The committee re- 
tired and prepared a lengthy preamble and resolutions, in which was 
set forth, in strong and effective language, the great a'dvantage to be 
derived from a good system for the public schools, and predicted the 
future greatness of the Commonwealth and the country if the law 
would be properly and liberally enforced. The candidates then nom- 
inated for the board of school directors at that meeting were all 
elected, and it might be well to note here that this was the first board 
of school directors in HoUidaysburg and in this part of the county. 
The l)oard comprised Robert McXamara, Suttle F. Henry, John 
Barr, Henry Stiffler, E. Galbraith and James Smith, sr., of Scotch 
Vallev. 



210 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

BOROUGH OFFICERS. 

The town of Hollida3'^sburg' was organized into a borough, by or- 
der of the Court of Quarter Sessions of Huntingdon county, in the 
month of August, 1836, under the act of Assembly approved April 
1, 1835, and became subject also to the provisions of the act of As- 
sembly of April 3, 1851, by order of the Court of Quarter Sessions 
of Blair county, July 24, 185-4. The first election for borough offi- 
cers was held on the 13th day of September, 1836, and the following 
gentlemen were elected : Burgess, Dr. James Coffe}' ; town council, 
Joseph Reed, John Walker, William McFarland, D. Mitchell and S. 
F. Henry ; constable, Simon Brotherline. 

THEIR FIRST MEETING. 

The burgess and town council held their first meeting on Tues- 
day, September 20th, and made the following appointment of borough 
officers: town clerk, Alexander McCormick; (now a citizen of Al- 
toona;) treasurer, James McCahan ; assessor, Peter Hewit, esq.; 
assistant assessor, John Mitchell ; street commissioners. Col. 
Samuel Smith and John Dougherty ; street regulators, James Craw- 
ford, esq., C. Garber, esq., and Col. John Bingham ; firemen, John 
Irwin, Samuel Frampton, esq., James Clossin and Abrahani^Brown; 
collector, James Clossin. 

The office of " street regulator " has been for years abolished. It 
was the duty of these officers to superintendent the grading of the 
streets. This was an important, matter. Hollidaysburg had in it 
many ugly "washes" and gullies; these had to be filled and hills cut 
down and a proper grade established. Allegheny street had in it a 
good sized gully or wash-out, which continued itself down through 
what is now the lot of Moses Brown ; in some places* it was eight or 
ten feet deep, and proportionately wide at the top. 

HOW MONEY WAS PROVIDED. 

The borough had little or no money in the treasury, and the ques- 
tion of raising funds became an important one. All that was wanted, 
or asked for, was fifteen hundred dollars, and with this modest sum 
the borough council, assisted by their honest board of regulators, pro- 
posed to accomplish the work. It was proposed that a loan be taken 
of the citizens, but the subject of issuing the bonds of the borough 
was not broached or, perhaps, thought of. The liljeral minded citi- 
zen was invited to deposit a sum in thi' treasury, and as an evidence 
of this obligation a certificate was given him, which was to be used 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 211 

1)V him, or the holder, in the payment of taxes. The ordinance wa.s 
adopted in June, 1837, and the certificate was in the following lan- 
guage : 

" HOLLIDAYSBURG BOROUGH LOAN. 

" This is to certify that there is rlue to bearer from the Burgess, Town Council 
antl citizens of tlie Borough of Hollidaysburg One Dollar, hearing an interest, re- 
deemable in the payment of taxes, by virtue of an ordinance passed by the Town 
Council, -Tune 19, 18.37. James Coffey. Burgess." 

These borough notes were printed on brown or yellow paper, and 
were called "shinplasters," and passed current with the merchants 
and dealers in the town and vicinity. It is said that some of the hon- 
est old farmers became indignant and disgusted when it was at- 
tempted to circulate this sort of money amongst them, but their dark 
visaged countenances brightened, and finally radiated with a broad 
grin, when it became evident that they would bring a pound of coffee, 
or a quart of whisky as cpiickly as the gold or silver. These " shin- 
plasters " must have been popular, for since the earliest recollections 
of the writer the streets of Hollidaysburg have been finely graded 
and well paved. 

RAILWAY FROM PHILADELPHIA TO PITTSBURG. 

As early as 1836 the feasibility of the construction of a contin- 
uous line of railway from Philadelphia to Pittsburg, and over the Al- 
leghenies without incline planes, was earnestly and enthusiastically 
discussed. Accordingly a large " Railroad Convention" was called 
to assemble at Hollidaysburg, on Tuesday the 24th day of January, 
183T. The convention was in session two days. It was composed 
of delegates from Westmoreland, Indiana, Cambria, Huntingdon, 
Miftlin and Juniata counties. The delegates from Huntingdon county 
were Gilbert L. Llovd, Dr. J. H. Dorsev, John M. Owens, James 
Henderson, David McMurtrie, David Blair, G. W. Russ, William 
McFarland, Thomas B. Moore, Dr. H. Y. Bramwell, J. S. Weisling, 
Samuel Calvin, Maxwell Kinkead, Edward Bell, D. Buoy, W. R. 
Hampson, Peter Hewit, John Cresswell, Sr., A. P. Wilson, James 
A. McCahan, Samuel Royer, Henry Divine, J. Bingham, Dr. James 
Coffey, S. F. Henry, Anthony G. Stewart, Robert Lowry, A. Mc- 
Cormick, S. Frampton and Thomas J. Kennedy. 

A committee was appointed to prepare a memorial to the Legisla- 
ture and an address to the people of Pennsylvania. A. P. AYilson, 
Samuel Calvin and John Bingham were of this committee for Hun- 
tingdon county. Strong resolutions, favoring and predicting the 
great importance and utility of the project, were adopted. It was 
resolved that the convention was firmlv and decidedlv convinced 



2f2 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA ANI) BLAIR COUNTY. 




HOLLIDAYSBURG SEMINARY. 

A BOARDING SCHOOL FOR YOUNG LADIES. 

HOLLIDAYSBURG, PA. 

W. P. HUSSEY, A. M., Principal. 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 2lo 

of tlie perfect practicability of constructing a continuous railroad, 
without incline planes, from Harrisburg, through the valley of the 
Juniata, and along the Blacklick, on the western side of the moun- 
tain, and passing through Westmoreland county to the waters of the 
Sewiekly, Youghegheny and Monongahela, to Pittsburg; that tlie 
route passes through the richest mineral regions of the Common- 
wealth; that Pennsylvania was anxious to secure the large trade of 
the west by the construction of one continuous railroad on the short- 
est'and best route, and passing directly through tlie middle of the 
Commonwealth; that this route was demanded l)y the increasing 
trade which passes between the eastern and western waters. A com- 
mittee on finance was appointed, consisting. of James A. McCahan, 
Peter Hewit and Dr. James Coffey. Before adjourning, a resolution 
was unanimously adopted returning the thanks of the convention to 
"the trustees of the Methodist p]piscopal church, in Hollidaysburg, 
for the polite manner in which they have gi\'en to the convention the 
use of their commodious building." 

NOTABLE STORMS AND FLOODS. 

On the morning of the 10th of June, 18oS, the town was visited 
by a terrible storm and flood. The rain began to fall about midnight, 
and continued, in unceasing torrents, until about six o'clock in the 
nnn'uing. The waters descended furiously in every direction from the 
high grounds, in immense columns, until all that portion of Gaysport 
Ivin"- between the railroad and the river was covered with a wild and 
almost irresistable flood. The Juniata had risen about fourteen feet 
above its ordinary level. The water in the dwellings near the river 
had risen as high as from four to five feet. This terrible flood did 
much damage to the canal between Hollidaysburg and Huntingdon, 
amounting to about half a million of dollars. Joseph Kemp, still 
a resident of Hollidaysburg, and Henry Lloyd, who died a few 
months ago in Pittsburg, were at the time connected with the Pilot 
Line Transportation company, and being in Gaysport during this event- 
ful night, endeavored to make their escape- on a porch. The frail 
craft broke in pieces, and their fate Avas for a few moments in- 
tensely critical. Their escape from drowning was miraculous. A 
woman, named Mrs. Barrick, and two young children, whilst 
attempting to escape, were drowned. The store house of Chamljcrs 
& King was wrenched from its foundation and borne down the 
stream ; the building was crushed against the viaduct and the entire 
stock of goods lost. Their loss was estimated at Sr),000. John 
14 



214 HISTORY OV ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

Bouslough, a niercliaiit, lost much of his stock ; also, John Culbert- 
son lost merchandise and ftiniitiivc ; John Keim, a grocer, lost almost 
his entire stock ; Peter Boy Ics lost a large new stable; John Barr 
had his furniture damaged and a tine library destroyed; the paint shop 
of Mr. Egbert was carried away; Mr. A. Ennis lost furniture, books 
and shingles; the Baltimore and Pitt.sburg line lost a new stable; 
Hewit & McComb lest several small houses; Mr. Samuel Sharrerlost 
con.siderablo material used in boat building; and Mr. Charles Hughes' 
l»rick yard and a large stock of brick were destroyed. 

The town was again visited with a terrible and destructiv(; freshet 
October 7, 1847. The rain began falling on the previous day, 
and by three o'clock on Thursday afternoon the water was over the 
banks of the river and some three or four feet deep in the buildings 
nearest the stream in Gaysport. The store house of James R. Pat- 
ton, the Imrbcr shop of Snyder Carr, the oHice and store building of 
Justice Smith, Herron's blacksmith shoj), the tailor shop of William 
Charlton, and a warehouse belonging to S. J. Royer & Co., were 
carried off". Serious damage was done to the canal, and the farmers 
along the river lost heavily. 

FORMATION OF BLAIR COUNTY. 

Perhaps no event in the history of the peo])l(; of Hollidaysburg 
was the subject of so much interest, and fraught with so much im- 
portance as the erection of the new county of Blair, to be composed 
of parts of Huntingdon and Bedford counties. These counties op- 
posed tlie measure in season and out of season, and did everything to 
thwart the wishes and purposes of the ambitious and spirited people 
of Holliday.sburg. But, notwithstanding, the leading citizens of the 
town and vicinity labored most earnestly and zealously for the ac- 
complishment of this great and laudable object. The division of the 
county liad been agitated as early as 1839, a meeting for the consider- 
ation of this ])roject having been held in the Methodist church on the 
21st of .January uf tiiat year. Christian Garber, a progressive and 
inHnentia! citizen of thai day, was })resident of the meeting. Wil- 
liam Williams, Peter Cassiday, Dr. James Coffey, Peter Hewit, John 
Walkcu', Samu(^l Calvin, esq., and Edward McGraw, were appointed 
a committee to (hitermine the proper Ijounderies for the new county 
prt)])ose(l, and draft pc.'titions, and have the same printed, and after 
])rocuring signers forward the same to the Legislatui'(>. But their ef- 
forts were not erownetl with success until February 2o, 184(), when 
the bill erecting tiie new county was apjjroxcd by (Jovermjr Shunk. 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 215 

The citizens of "old mother" Hiiiitiii,u<loii were considerably exer- 
cised, and tli(! peoj)lc of the new county were exultant. Ilollidays- 
I)urg, of ccnirse, l)ecame the county-seat, and the first sessions of 
court were held in the Methodist cluirch. The commissioners 
leased of John Mahony a one-story stone teuemant house, which, 
after havinir the windows covered with iron bars, was used for a jail. 
When a ])risonri- wanted to make his escape he would have himself 
committed to tiie '• tlungeon," from which he could easily "bore" 
through the Wiill. 

Aill.lTARY AFFAIRS. 

The Washington Greys, the first military company ever organized 
in Hollidaysburg, was the pride and Itoast of the town. It was or- 
ganized October 5, 1839. Maj. Wm. W. Williams was captain; Dr. 
J. A. Landis, first lieutenant, and Hon. George R. McFarlane, second 
lieutenant. The best citizens of the town were in the ranks and carried 
muskets. They were provided with uniforms, and the ^icople 
lioasted that their's was one of the best drilled companies of the State. 
HoUidavsburg was pleased and delighted with a military encamp- 
ment for the fu'st time, duriii,ii- the week commencing (jii Monday, the 
18th day of OctolxT, 1841. The eompanies in attendance, in addi- 
tion to the Washington Greys, were the Bedford Artillery, Captain 
Reamer; the Independent Greys of Bedford, Captain Arnold; Cam- 
bria Guards, Captain William A. Smith ; Williamsburg Light In- 
fantry, Captain McKieruan. and the Union Cavalry, Ca])tain Bell. 
They were encamped on the beautiful flat north of the town, known 
then, and for many years since, as the " Race Course." The field is 
now owned l)y Col. William Jack. Maj. William W. Williams, of 
The Washington (irevs was in command, and Maj. Talliaferro, of Bed- 
ford, second in command. On Thursday the ladies gave a grand and 
sumptuous dinner to the richly uniformed troops. The table was 
spread in what was known as Market squni'e, and extended from near 
Wayne street to I'nion, a distance of one hundred and sixty-five feet. 
It was loaded with all the delicacies the country aftorded. After the 
soldiers and the laruc concourse of citizens and strangers had i)ar- 
takeu to tlieii- heart-' content of tlii> boiintcoii- rei)a.st, "three times 
three heart \ cliccr- were uiveii to the hidies of nollidaysl)urg, f(il- 
lowed by as many salutes, and appropriate music l»y the l)auds in at- 
tendance." The generous and noble conduct of the ladies on this 
occasion was s])ok(;n of in terms of the hiuhest ])raise and commenda- 
tion. The troo)»s were reviewed and iiispectetl liy Major Waslia- 
liaugh and General Compher, of liedford. 



216 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

A grand military encampment was held in the town, commencing 
October 11, 1843. The affair seemed to absorb pnblic attention for 
the time being. Even the great and mighty qnestions inxolved in the 
political campaign then pending were forgotten, and the town, espe- 
cially the ft>male portion of it, was in a whirl[)Ool of excitement. 
Preparations were made on a grand scale for the entertainment of 
.guests, and the following hotels were in readiness, and entertained to 
the entire satisfaction the large number of strangers that thronged 
the town for a Axcek : The People's House, by William Donaldson ; 
American House, Ijy J. M. Hewit ; Washington Hotel, by Captain 
Joseph Hammer; Exchange, In' D. H. Moore; Juniata Hotel, by 
Col. J. R. Johnston; United States Hotel, by John Dougherty; 
Temperance Hotel, by Mrs. Stackpole, in Gaysi)ort ; Gaysport "Inn," 
by John Law; Perry Hotel, by William Barr, and the "Boarding 
House," by Gideon Marlett. The cam}) was located on the Ijeautiful 
slope of the Jackson (now Smith) farm facing Hollidaysburg, and 
was named Camp Warren. Seventeen companies, and as many 
bands, were in attendance, well uniformed, fully equipped and profi- 
cient in drill and discipline. These were divided into two regiments, 
numbered the First and Second. Captain K. C. Hale was elected 
colonel of the First regiment, and Captain William W. Williams, of 
the Greys, was made colonel of the Second, and A. L. Holliday 
Avas elected (puirter-master of the In'igade. Col. Williams was a gal- 
lant looking officer — military from crown to foot. The following- 
companies were in camp : Union Cavalry, Captain Bell; Lewistown 
Artillery, Captain Porter; Washington Guards, Captain Michael 
Cresswell ; Washington Infantry, Captain W. W. Porter ; Miftiin- 
town Guards, Captain S. Davis ; Lewistown Guards, Captain R. 
Sims; Juniata Artiller}', Captain D. M. Jamison; Centre Guards, 
Captain A. Gregg; Penn's Valley Cadets, Captain Lot W. Irvin ; 
Bellefonte Infantry," Captain J. Morrison; AVashington Greys, 
(Johnstown,) Ca})tain J. Potts; Washington Greys, (Hollidaysburg,) 
First Lieutenant J. A. Landis; Bedford Artillery, Captain J. Reamer; 
Independent Greys, Ca})tain S. M. Taylor ; Montgomery Greys, 
Captain T. B. Wallace; Conematigh Greys, Captain John Linton; 
Somerset Guards, Captain John R. Edie. 

On Sunday morning one regiment attended di\ine service at the 
Methodist Episcopal church, and the other attended at tlu' Presby- 
terian church. In tlie afternoon llie entire brigade marched to the 
Prosbyt(>rian clnu'cli, which was a large and spacious ))uilding, and 
listened to an excellent and ap))roiiriate discourse, by the llev. Dr. 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 21 T 

David McKinnev, from the text found in Provei'bs xii : 2: "A good 
man obtaineth favor of the Lord; but a man of wicked devices will 
he condemn." 

The Governor of the State, David 11. Porter, Avas present, and re- 
viewed the troo))s. This was reg-arded as a first-class military dis- 
play in every respect, and Hollidaysburg- was equal to the occasion. 

The commencement of hostilities with Mexico in 184G put a qui- 
etus on military organizations in Hollidaysburg as well as in other 
localities in the State. Their presence was required at the front 
Although the Washington Greys did not go to Mexico as an organi- 
zation, many of the company volunteered and were found in the 
ranks of the Second Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers, where they 
acquitted themselves in a manner chnracteristic of that military spirit 
of which they gave evidence in their holiday parades. It was not for 
some years after the close of the Mexican war that the martial spirit 
began again to be awakened. At one time the town boasted three 
fully equipped, well drilled companies* ; these were the "Emmet 
Guards," the "Hollidaysburg Fencibles" and "Juniata Rifles." Pre- 
vious to these organizations, however, there existed for a brief period 
a plucky little company called the "Hollidaysburg Guards," which 
enjoyed, and was more commonly known by the sobriquet of the 
"Twelve Apostles." This company had a good band and a very 
becoming uniform. It was officered by George Bingham, captain ; 
William Stone, lirst lieutenant, and W. F. McFarland, second lieu- 
tenant ; but it was with difficulty that its members could be induced 
to turn out on "muster day." The company had regular "muster 
days" and never failed to turn out on the 8th of January to celebrate 
General Jackson's victory at New Orleans. But muster they would, 
"at the risk of bullets," and frequently the entire column would con- 
sist of from twelve to fifteen muskets. Hence the name of "Twelve 
Apostles." They would march on the sidewalks. The writer was 
a child during the palmy days of this company, and he remembers, 
that after hearing the music, and rushing to the front door, the com- 
pany would suddenly appear filing around the corner. Hence it is 
that the Mother Goose melody comes to mind simultaneously with 
the remembrance of this company : 

"Rubljer dubbergoes the Uruiii, 
Soe tbem 'roiand the corner come.'' 

The boys hardly ever followed this company. But, notwithstand- 
ing the slim attendance on parades, when called upon to do active 
duty in the service of the State, the ranks were filled up and the mem- 



218 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLATR COUNTY. 

bers turned out to a man. During- the building- of the tunnel in 1850- 
51, the Irish raised a little war among themselves, which ^vas of such 
mag-nitude that the Pennsylvania railroad company could not settle 
their dispute or cause a cessation of hostilities. The military had to 
be called upon, and the "Hollidaysburg Guards" responded promptly 
and forty rounds of ball cartridges were issued to each man. The 
knapsacks were supplied with necessary blankets and clothing, and 
live days' cooked rations filled the haversacks. They were in the 
field three days, and did not leave until the last infuriated connaught- 
man or orangeman had surrendered his shot gun and laid down his 
"shellaleh," and had returned to his allegiance and to the blasting of 
rocks in the tunnel. The company was under fire several times, and 
the battle of Bennington caused considerable sensation. The Guards 
captured thirtv-three prisoners. Soon after this little experience, the 
noble and gallant little company ceased to have an existence. 

The "Hollidaysburg Fencibles" were organized about the year 
1856, with Col. D. H. Hoffius as captain. Colonel Hoffius was a dis- 
tinguished and highly respected lawyer, then enjoying a large and 
lucrative practice at the bar, and was besides one of Hollidaysburg's 
leading citizens. He had passed through the Mexican war, serving 
as a lieutenant, and was proud of bis military record. The "Fenci- 
:bles" were a good company and the citizens were proud of it. It 
was composed of some of the best young men in the community. On 
one occasion the ladies of Hollidaysburg presented the company with 
a beautiful and very valuable silk flag. 

The "Juniata Rifles" were organized on the 22nd of October, 
1858, Avith our worthy townsman, A. M. Lloyd, as captain. This 
was also a first-class company and merited the praise and approba- 
tion of their fellow-citizens. Thev had their encamnments and their 
festive days — their competitive drills, frolics and fun until the early 
spring of 18G1. The American firmament was overhung by a black 
cloud ; the "cannon's opening roar" was heard in the south ; the na- 
tion suddenly sprang to arms and the days of "Sunday soldiering" 
were ended. The "Juniata Rifles" had resolved as early as the 22nd 
of February to accept the call of the Governor and be ready for ac- 
tive service at a moment's notice. The companies did respond 
promptly. The Governor's telegram was received on the evening 
of the 13th of April, and they were in Harrisburg, mustered into the 
"United States' service and on their way to the front on the 20th. 

The "Fencibles" were officered by F. P. Minier, captain ; (their 
brave and mucli lamented cai)taiu, David H. Hoflius, having died in 



HISTORY OF ALTOOXA AXD BLAIR COUNTY. 219 

July, 1859) John E. McFarlaue, first lieutenant, and Thomas McFar- 
lane, second lieutenant. They were given the post of honor in the 
Third Pennsylvania Regiment, having been assigned as company 
"A". Immediately after the organization of the regiment, its captain, 
F. P. Minier, was elected colonel. 

The "Juniata Rifles" were officered by A. M. Lloyd, as captain ; 
Christ. X. Snyder, first lieutenant, and Stephen C. Potts, second lieu- 
tenant, and assigned as company "H'' of the Second regiment. Xearly 
all the members composing these companies served in different or- 
ganizations to the end of the war. Lieutenant Potts was killed in 
the first battle of Fredericksburg, December 13th and 14th, 1863, 
whilst acting adjutant of his regiment, the Sixty-second Pennsylvania. 

After the close of the war, the enthusiasm for "the pride, pomp 
and circumstance of glorious war," had subsided; the boys "didn't 
want any more of it in theirs," and the streets were not again enli- 
vened with the tread of men in martial array until the year 1874, when 
the "Juniata Riflemen," company "F", Fifth Regiment, National 
Guards of Pennsylvania, were organized. Jas. F. Milliken, captain ; 
J. Rodgers, first lieutenant, and Martin Bell, jr., second lieutenant. It 
was mustered out of service in January, 1876. 

The military organization which is now the pride and boast of 
Hollidaysburg — company "C," Fifth Regiment X. G. of Pa. — date« 
its existence with the autumn of 1878. The company, like the entire 
corps of the National Guards, is equipped in a first-class manner and 
could take the field in complete readiness for campaign duty in twelve 
hours' notice. T. Dallas Wilkins, a young gentleman perfectly famil- 
iar with military tactics and having the capacity, in a high degree, 
of drilling and disciplining men, is captain ; James P. Stewart is 
first lieutenant, and J. D. Hemphil, second lieutenant. The company 
is composed of the flower of the young gentlemen of Hollidaysburg, 
and, as many of them are possessed of more than ordinary intelligence, 
it need scarcely be a surprise to any one, when informed, that at the 
last encampment at Braddocks, they were highly complimented for 
their proficiency in drill and for the excellent discipline observed by 
the men. Hollida3'sburg could always boast of a good military or- 
ganization. Its first company, the old Washington Greys, received 
the plaudits and compliments of all for excellent marching and drill 
at the great encampment of 1843, and now company "C," its last 
compan}' up to this date, received the plaudits and compliments of 
all for the same accomplishments at the' great encampment at Brad- 
docks in 1880. 



220 inSTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

VISIT OF KOSSUTH. 

That distinguislKMl Hung-arian, Louis Kossutli, and suito, visited 
Hollida3'Slnirg on Saturday, January 17, 1852, and remained in 
the town over Sunda}^ He was welcomed at the Mountain House, 
at the Portage Intersection, wliicli stood near what is now called "Y" 
switches, by four or five hnn(h-ed citizens. He left the cars under the 
escort of Hon. George R. McFarlane, and he had scarcely reached 
the platform until the people began to press closely around him and 
welcome him in tiie most cordial manner. He was escorted to the 
dining hall by Mr. William Shomo, who was chairman of the commit- 
tee of arrangements. Some two hundred persons dined with him. 
After dinner, the doors were thrown open and all thronged in. Gov- 
ernor Kossuth was introduced ])y Col. I). H. Hoifius in one of his 
characteristic and eloquent speeches. He tendered him, on behalf of 
his fellow-citizens, a hearty welcome and assurances of their warmest 
regard for him personally, and their deep sympathy for his betrayed 
and down-trodden country and their unalterable devotion to the cause 
of liberty. Governor Kossuth replied in an eloquent speech of over 
half an hour. Cheers Avere ])roi)ose(l, l)y Judge McFarlane, for Kos- 
suth, the rightful Governor of Hungary, and l)y Dr. H. T. Coffey, for 
"giving powder and ball to Russia." Thaddeus Banks, escj., on lie- 
half of the committee to receive contributions of "material aid," 
presented to the governor a purse containing over two hundred dol- 
lars in gold. Judge McFarlane ottered to make for him fifty toils of 
cannon balls, and would deliver them whenever called upon. Whilst 
in town the Governor \\as the guest of Hon. George R. McFarlane. 
On Sunday, Kossuth and party attended divine service in thi 
Lutheran church, and heard a discourse by Rev. Lloyd Knight. * 

I 

DISCOVERY OF IRON ORE. I 

In May, 1852, discoveries of iron ore were made on lands north 
of town. These ores were first discovered by Mr. Thorn, a citizen of 
the town, who owned some fields ju.st beyond the borough limits. 
He commenceil ])ros])ecting, and in a comparatively short time found 
the ore, and threw out a))out a ton. It proved to be fossil ore. This 
led to more prospecting by others interested in the neighborhood, and 
in a sh(U't time it was ascertained that the entire country between 
Hollidaysburg and Brush mountain was underlaid with a good 
(piality of fossil oi'e. The surrounding hills lieing filled with a good 
quality of linu' stone, these (Tiscoveries soon led to the building of 
two furnaces, and soon after the building of a largo rolling mill and- 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA ANF BLAIR COUNTY. 221 

nail factory. For a time con.siderable excitement prevailed, and the 
town seemed to take a new start. These mines have been worked at 
different points constantly ever since their first development — mil- 
lions of tons of ore, of good quality, have been taken oat and large 
(pianties shipped to Johnstown and other furnaces. The mines are 
still being worked with profit, and many years will be required to ex- 
haust them. At the present time the mines and furnaces are owned 
and operated by the Cambria Iron company. 

CONSTRUCTION OF THE RESERVOIR. 

I 

A meeting of the citizens, for the construction of a reservoir, was 
held in the town hall, March 6, ]8o9. At this meeting resolutions 
were adopted and committees appointed, and the most determined 
steps were taken to push forward the measxire. Robert Williams, 
Dr. James CofFey, G. R. McFarlane, John B. Royer, J. C. Betts, 
Peter Hewit and Joseph Kemp were appointed on the most import- 
ant coQimittee. The Legislature was stirred up, the necessary 
money appropriated, and the next year the work was commenced and 
vigorously prosecuted. The contractors were John Mitchell and 
S. H. Lloyd. The firm of McFarlane & Garber furnished the iron. 
The work was completed by Henry L. Patterson, who subsequently 
took the contract. 

FIRE APPARATUS AND FIRE COMPANIES. 

The first fire engine purchased l)y the borough was during the fall 
of ISSfi, soon after its organization, and cost two hundred and twenty- 
five dollars. It was a very odd looking and singularly constructed 
machine, and proved of little service at a fire. In December, 183Y, 
an attempt was made to organize a fire department and take steps to 
supply a want which was evidently felt — means to subdue a fire in 
case the borough, which was now a rapidly growing town, should 
be threatened with such a disaster. 

[An eft'ort Avas at the same time made to form a joint stock com- 
pany for the purpose of supphing the borough- Mith water. Joseph 
Crawford, esq., lion. Joseph Adams, Rudolph Williams, David 
Mitchell and Robert Williams were appointed a committee to procure 
from the Legislature an act of incor})oration for said company. In 
the fall of 1867, a little more than thirtv years after this meeting-, 
the fond dream of these public spirited citizens was realized, but not 
one of the above committee were present to witness it.] 

There was no regular fire organization until January 26, 1838. 
The citizens then met at the United States hotel and a company was- 



222 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

formed, and a deterniiiiation ovinct'd to procure a ,yood en,yiiie. But 
the effort was abortive, and the company organized proved to be 
nothing more than a " bucket brigade." In the Avinter of 1841 the 
"Diamond Engine company" Avas organized, and this was really the 
first fire company in the borough. It was then determined to pro- 
cure two good fire engines. A vote on the subject was had, and the 
tax-payers were largely favorable to the proposition. In September, 

1841, the "Juniata " arrived, and was placed in the hands of the 
firemen. But the Allegheny engine was not received until April 9, 

1842. In 1869 the borough authorities purchased of Mr. Button, 
the manufacturer of the Button engine, of Troy, New York, the fine 
steamer " Phoenix," at a cost of $2,500. It is in charge of a good 
company, composed of some of the best citizens of the town. It has 
done good service. In addition to the Phcenix organization, Holli- 
daysburg boasts of the Allegheny Hook and Ladder company, with a 
good truck, constructed on the modern plan ; the Good Will Hose 
company, with a first-class carriage, and also a hose carriage man- 
aged by the Phoenix company. The fire organization is not only 
complete in all its details, Itut is a credit to the liorough and those 
having the management of public affairs. 

MARKET HOUSK. 

In July, 1841, the borough authorities built a fine market house, 
on the Blair street front of what was then known as Market scpiare. 
The building is still standing, and is used for the Hook and Ladder 
Truck and the Good Will Hose carriage. Each butcher had his own 
stall, where he dealt out the choicest steaks ; and the farmers for 
many years patronized this market, bringing the products of their 
farms in front of the l)uilding and backing their wagons against the 
curb. The market was open on Wednesday and Saturday mornings 
of each week. The hours were from about 3 until 8 or 9 A. M. Dur- 
ing these pleasant market times the "early bird caught the worm." 
Here, at the early blush of dawn, could be purchased the best of 
everything — vegetables and fruits in their season. 

IIOLLIDAYSBURG IN 1842. 

Hollidaysburg, in .lanuary, 1842, is described by J. Penn Jones, 
esq., (at th;it time editor and proprietor of the "Register and En- 
quirer," and which is still ably conducted ))y David Over, esq., to 
whom we are indebted for favors,) as follows: " Hollidaysburg is a 
great place! It is great in a great many respects — one of the great- 



HISTORY OF ALTOOXA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 223 

est perhaits in the interior of the jireiit State of rennsylvanial It is 
great as a business place ; it is a great place for fun, and great for 
sobriety and order ; great for pretty girls, and gO(jd ones, too ; (the 
assertion of the ' Willianisport Emporium ' to the contrary notwith- 
standing;) great for its liberality and enterprise; great for its rapid 
increase in population, wealth and improvement ; great for its muddy 
streets in wet weather; great for its dusty ones in dr}" ; it's a great 
place for Washingtonians and Teatotallers; great for industrious 
men and thinking mechanics, and a great place for sleighing when the 
ground is frozen ! It's a good place to sell saddles of venison, and 
flour for burkwheat cakes, potatoes, chickens, ice cream, (in summer,) 
and patent medicines all the year round! But the greatest thing of 
all, is, it's a great i)lace for taking newspapers — greater in this re- 
spect, than any other town of the same population in the world. 
'But enough said ' about our town's greatness for the present. Not 
many years ago it was little better than a wilderness. In 1830 it did 
not contain more than fifteen or twenty houses, and a population of 
150 or 200. Where Gaysport stands there was no sign of a town I 
Swamps and thickets, in which rabbits 1)urrowed and black birds 
built their nests, were then where now are houses, gardens, streets, 
alleys and work-shops. 

"In 1842 the American House was kept as a temperance hotel by 
Ira Hoadh', and the Ijar-room was turned into a reading room. 

"The i)opulation of Hollidaysburg at the present time, as correctly 
taken by our ))orough assessor, A))raham Yantries, esq., is 2,368; 
Gaysport, 448; total, 2,816. Gaysport is an incorporated district, 
cut off from Hollidaysburg proper, by a branch of the Juniata." 

GAS INTRODUCED 

In 1856 Hollidaysburg was lighted for the first time with gas. 
The Hollidaysburg Gas and "Water company was incorporated by an 
act of Assemldy, approved March 16, 1854, but was not fully organ- 
ized for the purpose of manufacturing gas until April, 1856. No at- 
tempt was at that time made to introduce water. The capital of the 
company was $40,000. Sometime during the si)ring a contract was 
made with L. R. Titus, of Trenton, X. J., for the furnishing and 
laying of the pipes, and construction of the works at a cost of $30,- 
000. The first officers of the company were Thomas C. McDowell, 
president; J. R. Crawford, secretary; and Thomas Bingham and 
William McFarland, directors. They held their positions until June, 
when an election was had and R. M. Lemon was elected president; 



224 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

R. B. Johnston, treasurer, and Thomas C. McDowell, secretary. 
The manag-ers were Jesse R. Crawford, Thomas Biiig-ham and Dr. 
Joseph A. I^andis. The work was prosecuted with viuor, and the 
town was brought from darkness to light by ineiins of a good article 
of gas in the month of October, 1850. 

WATER WORKS AND RESERVOIR. 

.The Ilollidtiysburg water works were Ijuilt by the l)orough au- 
thorities. The act of Assembly authorizing their construction was 
approved March IG, 1860. James (lardncr, William Jack, Jiimes 
Condron, John L. Hemphill and Thaddeus Banks were the water 
commissioners. An article of agrcicment was made and entered into 
with John A. Woodward and T. B. Farrington, of Williamsport, Pa., 
to sup])ly the water ])ipes. These pipes are of wood, wrapped with 
iron by a machine invented for this express jiurpose, and coated with 
a composition of coal tar and asphaltum. The water is brought 
from a beautiful spring of free-stone water on the Brush mountain 
farm of the Hon. Thaddeus Banks. Its location is in a l)eautiful 
mountain dell, into which the rays of the sun seldom pcMietrate, and 
the ])ure, clenr, cold water comes forth from the mountain side, leap- 
ing and rushiniv over larare moss-covered boulders, and from the noise 
thus made it has received the apprc^priate name of "Roaring Run." 
The distance, along the line of pipes, from the borough limits to 
where the stream is tapped, is two and three-fourth miles. Hollidays- 
burg was tiMily hap])y when the ])iu'e Brusli mountain water leaped 
from the hydrants for tlie lirst time, early in Xovember, 186T. The 
cost of these works was about $.50,000. It must be remembered 
that in ISGG-t the cost of iron pipes was from one-third to one-lialf 
more than the cost of wooden pipes. 

It was ascertained tliat the smnll well first used for the reception of 
the water was insufficient, and a reservoir was constructed of a ca- 
pacity of two and a half million ^gallons, at a cost of about $15,000. 
The elevation of the reservoir above Brusii I'un is one hundred and 
seventy-live feet, and above points in town from si.xty to one hundred 
and twenty feet. Tlif water works are jnanaged and controlled by 
the burgess and town council. 

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH .\Nn ITS PASTORS. 

The l*resl)\ierian ciiurcdi, of Hollidaysburg was organized about 
the year 1778. The ITollidays were Presbyterians. The fir.st preach- 
inii' that we liaAc anv aci-oiiiit of was at the houst; of ]\Ir. William 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 225 

Holliday, I)y the Rev. Dr. Kiu^-, of Mercerslnirg, Franklin connty, 
in 1772. The Rev. Mr. MeDuoal, Rev. John Johnson, - Rev. 
Matthew Stevenson, and other ministers, preached here at different 
times. Bnt it was not until after the arrival of the Rev. David 
Baird, or Rard, as he was called, came here that a church was fully 
organized. A frail wooden structure, called a "tent," was erected 
at the Blue Spring- — now owned by Archiliald McFadden — which 
Avas used as a place of worship. Thomas Blair, (the father of John 
Blair, for whom the county was named,) Thomas McCune and Jame.s 
Smith, sr., were the first ruling elders of this church. 

In 1790 the "tent" was replaced by a house of W(n"ship, and was 
erected on the ground where the cemetery now is. It was liuilt of 
round logs, and was used until 1818, when it caught fire from the 
burning woods and was destroyed. A new and more elegant struc- 
ture, built of hewn logs, immediately took its place, which was occu- 
pied until the new brick church was erected in 183G-7 on the corner 
of Walnut and Clarke streets, the same ground now occupied by the 
large and commodious building erected in 18fi9-70. 

Mr. Bard, whilst serving this congregation, also served the na- 
tion as a memlter of Congress. He was a member of the 4th and 
5th Congress, and of the 8th to the 13th, inclusive. In the 13th 
Congress, which commenced Decemlier, 1813, and had three sessions, 
Mr. Bard was a member of the committee on claims. 

Mr. Bard preached not alone to this congregation, but divided his 
time between this place, Williamsljurg and Sinking Valley. He re- 
sided here most of his time; l)ut at the time of his death, which oc- 
curred suddenly in Alexandria, Pa., in March, 1815, his residence 
Avas in Sinking Valley, Avhere he Avas buried. 

After the death of Rev. Bard, the church was without a regular 
minister until 1816, when Rev. James Galbraith, Avho had been 
preaching in Indiana county, became its settled pastor. He labored 
here, giving one-third of his time to the church in Williamsburg, un- 
til 1835. The .same year, Mr. John' Dunlap, a licentiate, came Avith 
a commission from the Board of Missions. His health being feeble 
he AA-as never ordained. He Avent to Cincinnati in 1837 and assumed 
editorial charge, in connection with Rev. William D. Smith, of the 
"Presl)yterian of the West," i)ublished in that city. 

In 1838 the congregation called the Rev. William J. (iilison, of 
Philadelphia, who continued as their pastor until 1841. He removed 
to Darlington ; thence to Philadelphia; thence to Jacksonville, and 
thence to Duncan.-ville. this countv, wlirre lie .now ministers. The 



226 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

Kev. Dr. David McKinney was called to this charge in 1841, and 
continued ill the pastorate until 1852. He was one of the leading 
si)irits in the great temperance movement of 1844. He resigned the 
pastoral charge to take control of the "Presbyterian Banner," which 
he originated, and which is still published in Pittsburg. 

Between the years 1820 and 1841 Alexander Knox, Thomas B. 
Moore, John B. Kiddle, John G. McKee and John Lyttle were or- 
dained ruling elders of the church. During Dr. McKinney's pastor- 
ate Jonathan Hamilton, John McCartney, Joseph Smith, Charles 
Wilson, William C. McCormick and Samuel Moore were ordained 
ruling elders. 

Th(> Rev. David X. Junkin, pastor of the F Street Presbyterian 
church, of Washington, D. C, having been called to the pastorate, 
commenced his ministry on the oOth of October, 1853. During his 
[•astorate James D. Kea, Joseph Dysart, Wm. R. Findley, M. D., 
Thomas Smith and Robert R. Hamilton were ordained ruling elders. 
Tn the spring of 18(i0, tlie health of Dr. Junkin becoming impaired, he 
was granted a leave of absence for six months. On the 11th of De- 
cember, of th(^ same year, the pastoral relations between Dr. Junkin 
and the church were, at his own request, dissolved. The Rev. David 
Sterret sui>])lied the pulpit until the first Sabbath in September, 18fil. 

On the 4th day of August, 18(U, the Rev. David Henry Barron 
received a call to become the pastor of this church, and, it having 
been accepted, he preached his first sermon as the pastor elect on the 
second Sabbath of September, 1861. On Tuesday, November 12, 
1801, he was installed pastor of the church, in which relation he still 
continues. 

In 1845 a number of families .■separated from this church and or- 
ganized as the church of East Freedom. It has since been changed 
to Duncansville. In 1852 the church of Altoona was organiz(Ml out 
of the members of this church. From that has sjirung the Second 
church, of Altoona, and now both are large and flourishing. The 
})resent membership of the Hollidaj^sburg church is 440. 

During the i»astorato of Rev. Mr. Barron, four members of the 
session have died, viz: John B. Riddle, Charles Wilson, James D. 
Rea and Joseph Smith ; two have removed from the bounds of the 
church, viz: Joseph Dysart and Robert Riddle, who now reside in 
Altoona. Hon. Samuel S. l>lair, Hon. A. S. Landis, Crawford Ir- 
win, M. D., and Mobcirt Riddle hav(! been ordained ruling elders. 
Three of tiiese, Messrs. Blair, Landis and Irwin, with Messrs. 
Robert R. llamilton, coiiipi>se the i)reseiit session. 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 227 

In tlif! summei' of 18C8 the congreg-ation resolved to build :i new 
church as the old structure, which had done good service, was be- 
coming unsafe and had been time upon time condemned. Th(! writer 
distinctlv renieml)ers that during some condemnatory remarks by the 
Rev. Dr. Junkin, his furious pounding made the feathers or cotton fly 
from the old pulpit cushion. Fortunately, that same pulpit was the 
most durable part of the church, and could have easily witlistood tbe 
Doctor's most vigorous pounding for ages. It was not, however, 
until the December following that the abandonment of the old church 
building was fully determined upon. The congregation then (De- 
cember 13) commenced worshipping in the court house, which they 
continued to occupy until the nth itf June, 1870, when the chapel was 
ready for occupancy. 

On the 9th of September, 1809, tbe corner-stone of the new 
buildinu' was laid. The stone occupies a place in the south-west 
corner of the wall. "First Presbyterian Church," is cut upon (jne 
side, and "Sept. 9, 18()9," upon the other. The laying of the .stone 
was observed with appro]iriate ceremonies. The l)ox deposited in 
the stone contained a sermon l)y Dr. W. J. Gibson and his photo- 
graph ; sermon l)y Dr. David Mclvinney and his photograph ; .sermon 
by Dr. D. X. Junkin and his photograph; sermon by Rev. D. H. 
Barron and his photograph ; history of the church, by Hon. A. S. 
Landis; one copy of the Bible; Hymnal and Confession of Faith; 
photograph of the old church building; list of officers and members 
of the church; fractional currency; one copy each of the "Xew 
York World," "Xew York Tribune," "Presbyterian," "Xew York 
Observer," " Hollidaysburg Standard," and "Hollidaysburg Reg- 
ister ;" and sixty dollars in Continental currency. The first ])ublic 
service was held in the new church during the sessions of the Synod 
of Harrisburg, which liegan on the 19th of October, 1871, but regu- 
lar Sabbath worshi]> did not l)egin in the main room vmtil December 
31, 1871. 

ST. MICHAEL'S ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH. 

Among the early citizens of this town were a number of Roman 
Catholics from different parts of Germany. The}- attended St. 
Mary's church here. Messrs. Jos(^ph and John Baroner, sr., the 
Melntels, the Fiichs, Gri'iieders, Lieb, W. Ranch, J. Zanker, J. Heil- 
meier, and others, finally numbering eighty families, estal)lished a 
German congregation, and ))iiilt a n(^w church of their own. 

The corner-stone of their elm reh (St. Michael's) was laid on Xo- 
veniber 27, 1802, an<l in less than a year tlie church was dedicated 



228 HISTORY OV ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

by Rt. Rov. Michael Donu'iiec, Bishop of Pittsburg-, who also ap- 
pointed the first pastor in the person of Rev. Geory-e Kirehner. The 
■church is built in an elevated part of the town upon a fine plot of 
ground. It measures 75x43 feet. Its tower or steeple is 120 feet, 
and contains a chime of bells. In addition, the German Catholics 
possess a school-house and a temporary residence for their pastor. 

The pastor, Rev. G. Kirehner, labored hard among" his flock ; he 
had many sore trials, hard work and at times insufficient rest. Yet 
he bore it pleasantly in his zeal to promote the welfare of his }»eo})le. 
He filled the position of pastor for nearly five years, after which he was 
transferred to Pittsburg-. The second pastor was Rev. John B. 
Schmidt. Nothing particular was done during- his pastorate, save the 
•endeavor to promote the spiritual welfare of the congregation. 
Rev. J. Rosswog was his successor. He remained about nine 
months. His pastorate was attended by nothing noteworthy. The 
next pastor appointed was Rev. George Allman. He was born in 
Germany, but completed his studies and was ordained in this country. 
He was beloved here by all classes. The next pastor, was Rev. 
Julius Kuenzer. He also was Ijorn in Germany. His literary abilities 
were of a high grade ; a great scholar in Latin, nnexcelled in profane 
and ecclesiastical history, and well posted in all theological matters. 
No changes were made during his pastorate of nearly four and a half 
years. From here he w\as transferred to Pine Creek, Allegheny 
•county, I'a., where he is still in charge. The present pastor, Rev. 
Francis J. Kaib, came on December 1, 1878. He is a native of our 
<^ountry, born at Pittsburg, on February 24, 1850. Great improve- 
ments have been made up to date under his careful management. 

The old school-building has been superseded by a new and elegant 
•one. Mrs. Barbara Zanker, wife of Joseph Zanker, an old citizen of 
this town, but now deceased, gave to the pastor, toward erecting the 
new school, $4,000. Work was commenced at the new building about 
April, 1879, and was finished for school purposes the following Octo- 
ber. The building is large and commodious, measuring fiO feet in 
depth, 2{) feet in width and about 28 feet in heighth. Besides this im- 
provement, there now stands in the place of the old school building a 
neat brick dwelling for the good teachers, the Sisters. It is 21 feet 
front and 83 ft^et (U^ep and two stories high, and complete in its ar- 
rangements. The Sisters have brought the school to a high grade, 
teaching in both languages — German and English — reading, spelling, 
writing, grammar, arithnu't ic, geography, Bible history and catechism, 
to an average of ninetv to one hundred children. 



HISTORY OF ALTOOXA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 229 

Thus the congTeg-ation has pi-ospored under the present pastor. 
He is a young" and active man, and is considered an able speaker iu 
both the German and EngHsh hing-uages. Since his advent he has 
gained the friendship and respect of all classes without exception, and 
all good wishes attend his ministry among the citizens. Thus, 
through his earnest endeavors and hard labor, Rev. Francis J. Kaib 
has raised St. Michael's congregation to such a state that it may l»e 
justly considered one of the best in the Catholic diocese of Pitt.-l)urg-. 
1862 and 1880 — what a change during this^inii! 

LUTHERAN CHURCH. 

It is with difficulty that a complete history of the Lutheran cluirch 
•can at this day be written. Its early records were loosely kept 
and the original members are either now members of the church in 
heaven or have removed to other States. In Frankstown, about the 
year 1824, the First Lutheran church of Hollidaysburg was organ- 
ized with Rev. G. A. Reichart as pastor, who served until 1830. 
Rev. Smick filled the pulpit for several years. The old church build- 
lag is still standing. It was built and finished inside like all other 
church edifices in those days — galleries around the three sides, a pul- 
pit high in the air, reached by winding stairs, and high back pews. 
Rev. Jacob Martin became the pastor in 1832, and with his advent 
the church began to increase in numbers and prosperity. His pas- 
torate continued, with the exception of several 3'ears, until 1819. In 
1840, the church was without a pastor. In 1846 Rev. Peter Anstadt 
ministered to the congregation. In 1837, the congregation — many 
having now settled in Hollidaysburg — contemplated a removal. Mr. 
Christian Garber, accordingly donated to the church a piece of ground 
on the hill where the cemetery now is, and in the spring of 1838, 
ground was broken for a new church edifice. Henry L. Patterson, 
Jacob Brumbaugh and John R. Martin composed the building com- 
mittee. The ceremony of laying the corner stone was performed on 
Saturday, May 14, 1838. The exercises were held in the then new 
Presbyterian church. Rev. Benjamin Kurtz, of Baltimore, Md., and 
Rev. Gibson, of Bedford, assisted in the devotional services. In a 
few years, additional ground was purchased, and used as a cemeterv. 
This building did good service, and was, in its day, a comfortable 
church. The l)asement of the church was used for a short time by 
the public school. During Rev. Martin's pastorate, there were re- 
ceived into the church 466 members and he baptized 320 children. 
In 1849, Rev. Lloyd Knight was called to l)e the pastor, and he 
15 



230 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

served the congregation until 1862. During his pastorate, the new 
church, on the corner of Allegheny and Union streets, was built and 
the old church taken down. The corner stone of the new church wa.s 
laid in June, 1853, amidst imposing ceremonies. Many articles of 
interest were deposited, and it is to be regretted that a description of 
them cannot be given. Rev. Daniel Schindler became the pastor in 
1862 and served for three years. He was an eloquent preacher and 
a good man, but there was no notable prosperity during his pastor- 
ate. He succeeded in procuring for the church an elegant pipe organ 
which cost six hundred dollars. Rev. Charles L. Ehrenfeld became 
the pastor during the summer of 1865, and served the congregation 
acceptal)ly for five years. He was succeeded by the pre.5ent pastor, 
Rev. D. L. Ryder, who preached his first sermon as the regular min- 
ister, in the month of January, 1872. During his ministry the 
church edifice and parsonage have been remodeled and greatly im- 
proved. The church is now very neat and comfortable. The walls 
are handsomely frescoed ; beautiful stained glass adorn the windows 
and the floor is covered with a handsome carpet. The present mem- 
bership is three hundred and fifty, and the Sabbath-school number.^ 
some two hundred sc^holars. 

BAPTIST CHURCH. 

The Baptist church of Hollidaysburg sprung from the church at 
Williamsburg, which was admitted into the Juniata Baptist Associ- 
ation in 1829. Ten members of that church had their residence in 
Hollidaysburg, and when it was determined that the canal basin 
should be located there, and it became evident that the village of Hol- 
lidaysburg was destined to become a large and prosperous town, 
these ten members deemed it expedient and proper for them to organ- 
ize a church of their own. Accordingly, in August, 1833, they ob- 
tained letters of dismission from the Williamsburg church. On No- 
vember 17, following, a council of the association, which had been 
previously called, met in the public school building on Walnut street, 
(the old school building which was torn down some years since), and 
then and there the i^aptist church of Hollidaysburg was organized. 
Rev. David Williams, pastor of the Williamsburg church, was called 
and became the first |)astor. Sutlifif F. Henry and Joshua William- 
son were elected deacons of the new organization. But it was not 
until 1836 that the congregation felt themselves able to build a church 
edifice. Although this small nucleus soon grew, in numbers and in- 
fluence, their limited means would allow of the erection of but a 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 231 

small brick building, which was built on the corner of Walnut autl 
ITnion streets, the site of the present church. Rev. Williams contin- 
ued to serve the church for several years. Rev. Thomas E. Thomas 
was the pastor for six months during- the year 1837. Rev. John P. 
Rockafellar, an able and earnest divine, very zealous in the cause of 
Christ, was called to the pastorate in 1837. He continued to labor 
am oner the people, witnessing, in many instances, rich returns for 
bis labors, up to the time of his death, which occurred in 1849, ex- 
cept an interval of three years. He died young, and his early depart- 
ure w&s much regretted. Rev. Rockafellar had many warm and 
true friends. During his ministry, the little brick church was dis- 
covered to be too small for the accommodation of the rapidly increas- 
ing congregation, and in 184('» the neat edifice now used by the church 
was built. In 1874 it was remodeled, and the auditorium has been 
made very comfortable and attractive. Daring the interval of three 
years, before alluded to, the pulpit was filled by Rev. Dr. A K. Bell, 
and Rev. Henry We.scott. In 1848 thecongregation extended a call 
to Rev. D. J. Yerkes, who continued in the pastorate until 1857. 
Rev. Yerkes was a brilliant preacher, a good pastor and very suc- 
cessful. He was succeeded by Rev. A. H. Taylor, who continued in 
charge until 1862. Rev. C. S. Stineman was the pastor for one year. 
In 1864 Rev. Dr. William Shadrack became the pastor, and contin- 
ued, greatly admired and respected by all his congregation, until 
1868, when Rev. E. C. Clapp was called and served for two years. 
He was regularly installed pastor in August, 1867, and served his 
people faithfully until October, 1869. In the spring of 1870 Rev. H. 
F. King, the present pastor, received a call, which was accepted, and 
took charge of the congregation during the month of April of that 
vear. Rev. King is very acceptalile to the people as a pastor. His 
heart is in his work, and there is no que.stion of his future success. 
He is a young, earnest and arduous worker in the cause of his Master. 
The Sabbath-school attached to the church is large and in a flour- 
ishing condition. M. H. Baldridge, is its superintendent. A. M. 
Lloyd takes an active interest and has charge of the Bible class — 
called the "Judson Bible Class.'' 

HOLLIDAYSBURG SEMINARY FOR YOUNG LADIES. 

On page 25 reference is made to this institution of learning, which 
originated from a desire for higher education for young ladies. The 
building is stone, four stories from the foundation, frontage one hun- 
dred and fifty feet, and depth one hundred and sixty feet. It con- 



232 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

tains, in addition to a larft'e and commodious sc-hool hall, a laboratory, 
recitation, readiuy, nui.sic and art rooms, besides apartments for the 
principal and hiii family, and dormitories for boarding- pupils. The 
building contains all the modern conveniences. The location of the 
.Seminary, on an elevated campus, the grounds embracing four or five 
acres, is a beautiful one, commanding a tine view in everv direction. 
In point of healthfuluess the location is unexcelled. While, in no 
sense, sectarian, the school is, in the best sense, moral and Christian. 
The work is thorough, broad and liljeral, in recognition of the fact 
that the sphere of woman's activity' and usefulness is constantly wi- 
dening-. [Sec engraving- on page 212.] 

THE GREAT FIRE IN HOLLIDAYSBURG. 

About four o'clock, p. m., on the 14th day of April, 1880, a fire 
•originated, evidently the work of an incendiary, in an unoccupied 
barn, formerly used as a livery stable by Charles Hewit, located on 
Wayne street, between Allegheny and Mulberry streets. The Phoe- 
nix Steam Fire Engine company, Allegheny Hook and Ladder company 
and the Good Will hose company promptly responded to an alarm 
ffiven bv the whistle of furnace- number one. The wind, however, 
spread the flames over adjoining frame structures, and in a short time 
two blocks were on fire, rendering the efforts of the fire department 
to subdue the flames entirely unavailing. A telegram for aid was 
transmitted to Chief Engineer Rose, of Altoona. Promptly the 
Yigilant company with their apparatus, embarked on a special train, 
consisting of an engine and truck, and the run was made (seven 
miles) in eleven minutes. The Yigilant was followed by the Em- 
pire Hook and Ladder company, who drove to Hollidaysburg, over a 
rough road, in forty minutes. By this time the fire was under con- 
trol. Its progress was stopped by the firemen confining their atten- 
tion to preventing its further spread. 

After the fire there remained but one stable, occupied by James 
Condron, on the two squares ravaged by the flames. The buildings 
destroyed were the double cottage house owned by the Rollins broth- 
ers ; green house, photogragh gallery and dwelling of Frank Proctor ; 
the large l)rick house on the corner of Allegheny and Penn streets, 
owned by Dr. C. Irwin and occupied l)y Dr. D. S. Hays ; also two 
frame houses adjoining, owned by Dr. Irwin, and a brick house owned 
bv Wm. Thomas, of Altoona, and a small house owned and occupied 
by the widow Ijewis; also stables of A. L. Ilolliday, J. Berckheimer, 
8amuel McFadden, Hon. Thad. Banks, Samuel Milliken, William 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 233 

William?^, A. F. Osterloh, William Gardner, James Patton, Mrs. 
Reynolds, Col. J. A. Lemon, G. I. Davis, J. M. Kinports, C. G. 
Lowrj, McFavlane heirs, the stables on the Dr. Irwin lots and the 
William Thomas lot, and two others. A large number of out houses, 
sheds, grape arbors, etc., wore either 1)roken, burned or d;iinajred. 

While the fire was in progress the roof of the residence of Judge 
Dean, and also on that of Hon. R. A. McMurtrie, caught fire from 
flying sparks, but vA'ere extinguished before serious damasre resulted. 
Several other buildings caught fire from sparks and blazinii: shingles 
carried by the wind, among which were the residences of Dr. W. C. 
Roller, Mrs. Charlotte Irvine, Hon. S. S. Blair, and the stable of 
David Over, which sustained but little or no damage. 

The losses amounted to al)out twenty thousand dollars, upon 
which there was about ten thousand dollars of insurance. 

BLAIR COUNTY MEDICAL SOCIETY. 

From Rowan Clarke, M. D., of Belhvood, w.e obtained a short 
and concise history of the Blair County Medical Society. A prelim- 
inary meeting was held in Hollidaysburg, July 25, 1848, in pursu- 
ance to a notice which appeared in the Hollidaysburg papers, signed 
by James Coffey, M. D.; J. A. Landis, M. D.; A. Rodrigue, M. D.; 
Robert W. Christy, M. D., and Harry T. Coff"ey, M. D. In addition 
to the gentlemen just named, Wm. R. Findley, M. D., at that time 
of Frankstown, and John Getty, M. D., of Martinsburg, were present, 
Dr. John Getty presiding, and Dr. H. T. Coffey, acting as secretary. 
Drs. J. A. Landis, Wm. R. Findley and H. T. Coffey were appointed 
a committee to draft a constitution and by-laws. On the 16th Xo- 
vember, 1848, an adjourned meeting was held at the Exchange hotel, 
Hollidaysburg, which was composed of the gentlemen just named. 
A constitution and by-laws were adopted .and signed by those pres- 
ent. The following officers were elected : President, James Coffey, 
M. D., Hollidaysburg ; vice presidents, John Getty, M. D., Martins- 
burg, and John D. Ross, M. D., of Williamsburg; corresponding 
secretary, Harry T. Coffey, M. D., Hollidaysburg; treasurer, Rob- 
ert W. Christy, M. D., Hollidaysburg. The next meeting (the first 
regular meeting) was held on December 2(), 1848, in tlic office of Dr. 
R. W. Chri.sty in Hollidaysburg. 

The constitution described the oljject of the society to be the ad- 
vancement of medical knowledge, and to sustain and elevate the med- 
ical profession, to protect the interests of its nKnnbers, to extend the 
bounds of medical science, and to promote all measures calculated to 



234 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

relieve sufferiiifi;-, to imi)rove the health and to protect the liven of the 
community. Article 3, section l,says: "No one shall be admitted 
as a member unless he is a graduate in medicine of some respectable 
school ; or, has a license to practice from some board recognized by 
the State Medical Society ; or, has been a practitioner of medicine 
for at least fifteen years, and who is in good moral standing in the 
place where he resides." The balance of the constitution and by-laws 
is for the government and discipline of its members, and has been but 
slightly amended since its adoption. The society is also governed by 
the code of ethics of the "American Medical Association," an admira- 
able code in every respect. 

Twenty-seven names are on the roll at the present time, only one 
of the original memlxTS, Pr. John D. Ross, of Martinsburg, being 
among the number. 

The officers for the present year are as follows: President, G. E. 
Brehman ; vice presidents, C. H. Clossin, and R. W. Christy; sec- 
retary, Rowan Clarke; treasurer, John D. Ross. 

CONCLUSION. 

The first postmaster of Hollida3'sburg was William Holliday. 
He was postmaster in 1779, and it is probable was commissioned by 
the Supreme Executive Council of the State. He and several others 
addressed a petition to the Council, to which he signed his name as 
postmaster, on the 29th of May, 1779. John Holliday was postmaster 
during the administrations of Madison and Monroe, and probably 
John Quincy Adams. Peter Hewit served during the first part of 
Jackson's administration. He was followed by Samuel Moore. 
Wm. McFarland was appointed by Van Buren ; Dr. James Coffey, 
by President Harrison; John Gorley, under James K. Polk; the 
Rev. J. P. Rockafellar, under President Taylor. Rev. Rockafellar's 
health becoming poor he was unable to discharge the duties and was 
succeeded )iy Joseph Baldrige. Col Wm. G. -Murray was commis- 
sioned l)y Franklin Pierce in 18.53, and was continued during the ad- 
ministration of James Buchanan. James Bingham was appointed 
by Abraham Lincoln in ISGl, and continued in the office until 1869 
or 1870, when John Lingafcit was commissioned by U. S. Grant, and 
continued to discharge the duties in a very acceptable manner up to 
the time of liis death, in Ihe s[)ring of 1879. His son, James M. Lin- 
gafelt, succeeded to the office, and is the present incumbent. 

Three of Holiidaysburg's citizens served in the supreme council 
of the nation. David Bard served as a member of Coniirross from 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 235 

March 4, HOT, to March 4, 1801, durino- the Fourth and P'ifth Con- 
gresses, and again from March 4, 1803, to March 4, 1815 ; or, from 
the Eighth to the Thirteenth Congresses inchisive. He died suddenly 
on his return from Washington, at Alexandria, on March 12, 1815. 
He was, as stated in another place, a Presb^'terian minister, and up 
to within a short time of his death, a citizen of the borough and 
owned the lot now occupied ))y John Wighaman, on Allegheny 
street. At the time of his death he resided in Sinking Yalley. The 
Hon. Samuel Calvin represented this district in the Thirteenth Con- 
gress, and the Hon. Samuel S. Blair was its representativ^e in the 
Thirty-sixth and Thirty-seventh Congresses. 

The Hon. Hiram Price, who is a member of the present congress 
from the Second Iowa district, was at one time an active and lead- 
ing citizen of the borough. General Henry H. Bingham, present 
member of the First district of this State spent his boyhood days in 
Hollidaysburg, and his father, Mr. James Bingham, is still an hon- 
ored citizen. Hon. Ed. Belch, now a prominent lawyer in Missouri, 
and who served prominently for some years in the state senate, was 
a citizen ; he studied law in the office of Col. D. H. Hoffius, and hung 
out his first shingle in Hollidaysburg. Hon. Geo. W. Martin, now 
a prominent citizen of Kansas, and for many years the State printer, 
looks upon Hollidaysburg as his old stamping ground, and recalls 
Avith pleasure the many pleasant days he spent at his first home. 
Robert Lowry, now a prominent citizen of Davenport, Iowa, was 
once a leading citizen, and at one time proprietor of the "American 
House." Many others could be named who have gone out and be- 
come prominent members of society elsewhere, but the brief space 
allowed for this narration, prevents it. 

Among the leading citizens may be mentioned the Hon. Geo. R. 
McFarlane. He was fast rising in prominence, when his sudden and 
untimely death, in September, 1852, cut short a career which bid fair 
to be one of high rank in the nation. He was not only a leading cit- 
izen of the community, but was a leading and influential spirit in the 
Democratic party, and through it, was, at the time of his death, on 
the line of promotion to the gubernatorial chair. Hon. S. S. Blair, 
a leading citizen, is a distinguished lawyer, standing in the front rank 
of the Pennsylvania bar, and perhaps the most successful in this sec- 
tion of the State. By many of his friends it is thought only a ques- 
tion of time when he shall take his place on the Supreme Bench. 
Hon. Samuel Calvin has been an active citizen for forty-four years, 
and has done much to advance the interests and promote the welfare 



236 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

of the borough. He held a disting-uished place ia the old Whig and 
the Republican parties, and his name was brought forward in several 
of the State conventions for Governor, and would, perhaps, have suc- 
ceeded in securing a nomination, had he not peremptorily declined 
being a candidate. Rabin Wallace, the father of Hon. William A. 
Wallace, was for many years a citizen and a member of the Blair 
county bar. Hon. Thad. Banks has been for forty years a leading 
lawyer and distinguished citizen, and has always taken an interest in 
all matters and movements calculated to promote the welfare of the 
borough. Hon. John Dean, for many years an active and enterpris- 
ing citizen, has, through his own untiring exertions, attained promi_ 
nence as a lawyer, and since his elevation to the bench has given 
perfect satisfaction to the people of the Twenty-fourth district, and 
Hollidaysburg is proud of his legal attainments and his clear and im- 
partial rulings and legal opinions. Hon. A. S. Landis, a lawyer rap- 
idly rising in prominence, was a distinguished member of the late 
constitutional convention. Hon. B. L. Hewitt, also a prominent 
member of the bar, has represented the people of the county in the 
Legislature for a number of years, and he bids fair to distinguish him- 
self in other and more prominent fields of usefulness. Hon. John A. 
Lemon, who represented this district, for a number of years, in the 
State Senate, is now the candidate on the Republican ticket for Audi- 
tor General of the State. He has always been a prominent and use- 
ful citizen, and the people are proud of his advancement. Hon. John 
Cresswell, jr., has been a resident and a leading citizen for many 
years, and at one period of his life, a leader of the Democracy in this 
Senatorial district. He represented the district with honor and dig- 
nity in the State Senate, over which body he presided as Speaker. 
He was the first Blair county man to occupy the Speaker's chair. 
Mr. Cresswell is also a lawyer of learning and ability. 

Hollidaysburg may be an old town and not a big town for itis- 
age, but it can truthfully boast of a larg-e number of good and prom- 
inent citizens at home and abroad. There are few prettier towns or 
more healthful localities. Its streets are well shaded and there are 
few streets that can excel Allegheny for beauty. The town is lacking 
in but one thing, and that is a large, first-class hotel. It could be- 
made, on account of the pureness of its atmosphere, and beauty of its 
surrounding scenery, a very desirable summer resort. It is to be 
hoped that the day is not far distant, when this much needed want, 
will be supplied. 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 237 



TYRONE BOROUGH. 



To J. D. Hicks, esq., of Tyrone, a prominent member of the bar 
of Blair county, we are indebted for the historical reminiscences con- 
tained in the following: 

"Tyrone* City," so called in its earliest day by its original pro- 
prietors, is one of the comparatively new towns in the central part of 
the State, and is, in nearly every respect, what may be called a "rail- 
road town," owing, as it does, its prosperity to the Pennsylvania 
railroad and its branches. 

FIRST BUILDINGS ERECTED. 

It was originally laid out by Messrs. Lyon, Shorb & Co., an old 
and much respected iron firm, that, until a few years since, carried on 
extensive iron-works in different parts of the State. John T. 
Mathias, at the present day a venerable and highly respected citizen 
of the town, in 1850, assisted in planning the streets and laying out 
the lots. He was then the superintendent of what was known as 
Tyrone Forges. Hon. Jacob Burley built the first house and moved 
into it in November, 1850, and Rev. John D. Stewart and Mr. Bur- 
ley started business together in the building first then completed, ad- 
joining, or in close proximity to the same ground now occupied by the 
City hotel. In 1852 the Central hotel Avas erected by Joshua Burley, 
and in 1853 Messrs. Edwin L. Study, Pius Sneeringer and Samuel 
Berlin, on their way to the far west from Adams county, were in- 
duced to interrupt their journe\' and look at the new town. They 
were so favorabl}' impressed that they purchased lots and ever after- 
wards identified themselves with the growth and prosperity of Ty- 
rone. Mr. Study died about a year ago, after being widely and favor- 
ably known over the entire State as an active and honorable business 
man. He was president of the Blair County Banking company at 
the time of his decease. Mr. Berlin commenced in the drug business, 
in which he is still engaged. Mr. Sneeringer started in general mer- 
chandising and retired but a year or two since. In 1852 the first 
school-house and the Methodist E. church were added to the many 
new buildings previously erected, and in the following year the Pres- 
byterian and United Brethren churches were built. 

♦Commencing its career as a town In 1849, Tyrone was created a. borough in 
18.57; Kast Tyrone lu 187-3. The name was derived fiorn the Tyrone Iron works» 
about one mile east of Tyrone. 



238 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 



RAILROAD FACILITIES. 

The railroad facilities of Tyrone are second to no town of like 
population in the State, and the early completion of the Tyrone and 
Lewisburg railroad (soon to be effected) makes Tyrone in reality 
a railroad centre and a point which will be sought after by persons 
whose inclinations and means would lead them into the manufactur- 
ing business. 

Through the courtesy of Capt. C. S. W. Jones, editor of the 
^'Herald," we are able to present a diagram of Tyrone: 






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HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 239 

TYRONE AND CLEARFILD RAILROAD. 

In 1853 the Bellefonte Plank road was completed, and in 1856 
the Tyrone and CleaVtleld railroad Avas commenced, by David J. 
Pruner, but owing' to some difficulties the road was in an incomplete 
condition until 1860, when the Pennsylvania railroad took charge of 
it and soon laid the rails over what is said to be the steepest gradient 
in the State, and Clearfield county poured its coal and lumber into 
the already flourishing borough. 

NEW DIVISION OF PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD. 

In 1862 the Bald Eagle Valley railroad superseded the old plank 
road, and a new division of the Pennsvlvania railroad was organized 
with Mr. Samuel G. Black as superintendent, and D. D. Wood, a 
well-known and tried railroad man, as train-master. From this time 
the town grew rapidly. 

SUPERINTENDENTS AND CLERKS. 

Superintendent Black was succeeded by James Lewis, a brother 
.of Enoch Lewis, purchasing agent, P. R. R., and, in turn, was suc- 
ceeded by Georo-e C. Wilkins. Mr. Wilkins became much interested 
in the growth of Tyrone and did much towards its improvement. 
In 1877 Mr. Wilkins was succeeded by S. S. Blair, the present effi- 
cient and gentlemanly officer. The first chief clerk of the road was 
M. H. Taylor, son of the late Judge Taylor. In 1867 Mr. Taylor 
was succeeded by Josiah D. Hicks, residing- in Tyrone. He removed 
to Altoona in 1868, and was succeeded by Thomas J. Maitland, who 
was afterwards yjromoted to the general superintendent's office in Al- 
toona. R. H. Powell succeeded Mr. Maitland, and upon the acces- 
sion of Mr. Blair to the superintendency Mr. Powell was succeeded 
by John H. Riley. 

SHOPS OF PENNSYLVANIA RAII^IOAD. 

The Pennsylvania railroad, as early as 1868, established shops for 
repairs in this place, which, for a number of years were under the 
management of Andrew Yauclain, sr., now of Altoona. He was 
succeeded by William H. Jackson, at present also a resident of the 
"Mountain City." Mr. Jackson was succeeded l)y William H. 
Carothers, who is, to-day, the same genial fellow he used to be when 
chief director of the Good Will Fire company of Altoona, in its 
early history. These shops, from small beginnings, have grown to 
be extensive, in which are now eniployr'd a large number of men. 



240 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

BOILER AND MACHINE SHOPS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 

There are large boiler and machine shops in successful operation, 
under the management of W. H. Pawling; tw6 large planing mills, 
owned by Samuel McCamant & Co. and Bojer, Guyer & Co. ; a 
large steam tannery, ou-ned and conducted by D. P. Ray ; extensive 
lime-stone works and quarries of A. S. Morris; saw-mill and shingle- 
mill ; large steam flouring mill in town and others close by ; new 
process steel works in the vicinity, as well as the extensive Tyrone 
forges, conducted by S. C. Stewart, proprietor, who has long been 
identified with the prosperity of Tyrone, doing all that could be done 
to further its interests, and especially in urging the completion of the 
Tyrone and LeAvisburg railroad, which must largely add to the fu- 
ture prosperity of the place. The manufacture of illuminating gas, 
by the Tyrone Gas & Water company, may be considered as one of 
the growing industries of the place. 

PAPER MILL. 

A large paper mill has just been erected in the northern end of 
the town by Morrison, Bare & Cass, in which about eighty hands 
receive employment. With a front of 120 feet on Main street,' 
the building extends back 190 feet. The rear wing, on a parallel 
with the front, is 10 feet, making the walls on three sides 380 feet. 
Out-buildings in the immediate vicinity have also been erected to sub- 
serve the purposes of the company. The interior of the main build- 
ing is filled with improved and finely adjusted machinery. 

BANKING HOUSES. 

About \SC>C) William M. Lloyd opened the first bank in the place, 
and was shortly after succeeded by the Tyrone bank, with Caleb 
Guyer as its cashier. For a long time previously, Mr. Guyer had 
acted as railroad agent, and in that capacity acquired an extensive ac- 
quaintance. Both banks did a large business. The latter is still in 
existence, and Mr. Guyer its efficient head. In the year 18*7(5 the 
Blair County Banking company was organized, and it, also, has be- 
come one of the fixed institutions of Tyrone. Edwin L. Study be- 
came its first iiresid<mt, and Gen. Robert A. McCoy, of the famed 
Pennsylvania Reserves, and private secretarj- of Governor Curtin, 
was made cashier. 

CHURCHES AND SCHOOLS. 

All the leading denominations have commodious churches, so that 
persons who are inclined churchward cannot go amiss in Tyrone. 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 2^1 

The public school building is ainong the best in the county. The 
schools are graded, and in a flourishing condition. There are also 
private schools, and within a short distance of town, is located the 
Mountain Seminary, a college for young ladies. Churches and 
schools may not directly add money to the coffers of the people, but 
they are safeguards thrown around society, and guardians of science, 
intelligence, morality, and those national virtues for which our fore- 
fathers "pledged their lives, their fortunes and their sacred honor." 

JUSTICES OF THE PEACE. 

J. M. Calderwood and Samuel Jones were the first justices of the 
peace. Both are living and do honor to the constituency that elected 
them. Mr. Calderwood is the Adams Express agent, and Mr. Jones 
is still acting as magistrate. 

[For history of Tyrone newspapers see pages 53 and 54.] 

MILITARY MEMORANDA. 

In 1835, eleven years before the erection of Blair county, David 
Robinson, (killed by a runaway accident at Frankstown, on Friday, 
August G) ; J. G. Fleck, of Sinking Valley ; Allen McGlathery, E. 
B. Tipton, Robert Riddle, of Altooua ; 0. P. Haggerty, of Logan 
township, and Thomas Smith, of Scotch Valley, were seven of the 
sixty persons who formed a military organization, called "The 
Union Cavalry Company." The company was organized in Pleas- 
ant Valley, and Martin Bell, of Elizabeth Furnace, uncle of Mr, 
Martin Bell, the Hollidaysburg attorney, was made captain. James 
Hutchison, now of Altoona, was made first lieutenant, and Joseph 
Irvin, of Hollidaysburg, was second lieutenant. Mr. Fleck has 
made some researches in order to ascertain how many of the original 
members of the Union cavalrv are living to-dav, and the result has 
been as follows : B. F. Bell, now residing somewhere in the west, 
about 6T years old; James Hutchison, of this city, about 70 years; 
Oliver P. Haggerty, of Logan township, 68 years old ; J. G. Fleck, 
of Sinking Valley, 60 years old ; John Hamilton, of Altoona, prob- 
ably 65 years old; Smith Hamilton, living in the west, 63 years old; 
Allen McGlathery, of Altoona, 70 years old ; David Henshey, of 
Antis township, about 70 years old ; Samuel Noble, who was born 
in the old log house that formerly marked the site of Altoona, but 
who now resides in Iowa, aged 60 ; Thomas Smith, of Scotch Valley, 
now about 65 years of age ; E. B. Tipton, then a resident of Logan 
township, but now of Altoona, 69 years ot age; Robert Riddle, 
now of this city, about 60 years old; Elias B. McClellan, at that 



242 HISTORY OP ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

time olerk at Allegheny Furnace, now living somewhere in the west, 
at the age of more than (50 ; Stephen Johnson, then living- at BelTs 
Mills, bat now a resident of Indiana county, about 60 ; Thomas 
Trout, of Logan township, about 66 years of age ; O. P. Trout, 
then of Logan township, but now in Bedford county, about 60 ; Jo- 
seph Irvin, then of Scotch Valley, but now of HoUidaysburg, about 
64 ; Elias Moore, of Scotch Valley, about 65 : James Hopkins, then 
of Logan township, now of Lee county, Illinois, about 65 ; A. K. 
Bell, then of Bell's Mills, but now pastor of the Baptist church of 
Altoona, about 65 years. 

The Sheridan Troop was organized July 15, 1871, with C. S. W. 
Jones, captain, and J. C. Akers, first lieutenant. Mr. Jones was re- 
elected captain in 1876. George Grenninger was elected first lieu- 
tenant, July 1, 18T4, and re-elected to same position July 1, 1819. 
T. M. Fleck was elected second lieutenant December 1, 18*75. The 
company numbers fifty-eight men, who, fully equipped with uniforms^ 
carbines, revolvers, saddles, bridles, etc., present a fine military ap- 
pearance. Connected with the troop is a fine cornet band. 

EXTENSIVE CONFLAGRATION. 

Up to th<' Sth day of July, 1880, Tyrone met with no serious re- 
verses. About three o'clock on the morning of that day a fire broke 
<mt in the livery stable attached to the City hotel. The stable was 
burned to the ground. Its contents, including nine horses, a number 
of buggies, carriages, wagons, etc., were also destroyed. The third 
story of the City hotel, as well as a two-story frame building occu- 
pied by the Blair County Banking compan}^ clothing firm of Mem- 
inger & Stewart, and by Dr. J. M. Gemmil as an office, disappeared 
with the flames; also, a frame two-story house with a one-story addi- 
tion ownied by James T. Owens, and occupied by W. B. Stewart as a 
shoe store and dwelling and by Mrs. S. G. Black as a notion and 
stationery store. The next victim of the fire was a two-story frame 
building owned by John A. Crawford & Bro., of Sinking Valley, 
and occupied by John W. Thomas as a dwelling and by Smith & 
Gray, grocers. From this point the flames leaped across an alley and 
attacked a large brick building owned by the heirs of Wesley Nowlin, 
deceased, and occupied by Templeton, Crawford & Co., as a dry 
goods store, the roof and upper story of which were partially de- 
stroyed. A large frame warehouse in the rear of the store and a 
frame dwelling house in the same locality, also belonging to the 
Nowlin estate!, met a similar fate. A frame dwelling house, owned 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 243 

by W. Fisk Conrad, was next consumed. A dwelling house adjoin- 
ing-, owned by Mrs. Rebecca Walker, was totally destroyed. The 
"Herald" building, adjoining the City hotel, on Main street, the first 
floor of which was occupied by D. B. Wilson as a book and sta- 
tionery store, the .second floor by the "Herald" printing office, and 
third floor by the Grand Army of the Republic, was partially de- 
stroyed — the first storv remainino-. Xext to the "Herald" liuildin"- 
a two-story brick house, owned by Patrick Flynn, the first floor of 
which was occupied by the Tyrone bank and the second floor as 
offices by D. T. Caldwell and John A. Mathias, as well as a two- 
.story frame hall adjoining the bank building, also owned by Mr. 
Flynn, yielded to the flames. The latter building was occupied on the 
first floor by the post office ; P. Snecringer & Sons, tobacco dealers, 
and George H. Garner, dealer in drugs; second floor, "Democrat" 
printing office. Next destroyed was a frame building owned and" oc- 
cupied by P. Sneeringer as a dwelling, and by Messrs. Van Yalzah 
& Wilson as a dry goods and grocery store ; also John Scullin's three- 
story brick building, occupied by him as a dwelling and merchant 
tailoring establishment ; two-story frame building, used by I. P. 
Walton as a dwelling and jewelry store. An inconsiderable portion 
of personal property (goods, furniture, etc.,) was saved, and, in the 
absence of insurance the loss fell heavily upon many. The insur- 
ance, altogether amounted to about $100,000. The value of property 
destroyed was in the neighborhood of $150,000. 

In response to a telegram transmitted by J. D. Hicks, of Tyrone, 
to Chief Engineer Rose, of Altoona, about an hour after the fire 
broke out, the latter gentleman with the Vigilant Steam Fire com- 
pany hastened to the scene of the conflagration. When the call for 
help was received. Chief Engineer Rose and the firemen were in 
bed. Notwithstanding, in fifty minutes thereafter they arrived in 
Tyrone, fully equipped, and commenced the work of fighting the 
fire. Huntingdon had been called upon, and it was not long before 
it responded with a company of firemen and a steam fire engine. 
The Empire Hook and Ladder company, of Altoona, next made its 
appearance. These companies, with the Neptune, of T\'rone, all 
composed of fearless and active firemen, by concert of action, soon 
put an end to the devouring element. 

REBUILDING COMMENCED. 

Removing the debris from the burnt district commenced immedi- 
ately after the fire, and it was not long before active preparations 



244 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

were made for the erection of more substantial and imposing build- 
ings on the site of those destroyed. 

NEW RAILROAD DEPOT. 

The new railroad depot, built on the site of the old one destroyed 
by fire, has just been completed. The ground plan is 47^x68 feet, 
the basement is of the best and most durable stone, and the building 
consists of two stories above the basement. The north elevation 
shows one door in the centre ; the east and west elevations, each 
two doors, and the south elevation, three doors, irrespective of the 
basement openings and the doors above the first story. On the first 
floor is the ticket office, dispatcher's office, express office, and several 
other dei)artments. The apartments on the second floor are fitted 
and arranged for the office of the superintendent of the Tyrone di- 
vision, and his assistants. The main front elevation, with its octag- 
onal faces and angles, presents a fine appearance ; but the entire 
building, finished in the best style of railroad architecture, is an im- 
posing and magnificent structure. 

NEW IRON BRIDGE. 

Besides these industries and improvements we may mention a 
new iron bridge which now spans the Bald P^agle creqk. It is sev- 
enty-five feet in length — a very neat and firm structure. It is of 
sufficient width for wagons to pass each other, with extensions on 
each side for foot passengers. Soon another bridge, spanning the Ju- 
niata river, will be constructed. 

TYRONE'S FUTURE PROSPECTS. 

The iron-ore fields of Warriors-mark and Nittany valleys, and the 
Spruce Creek and Half-moon valley mines on the east ; the inex- 
haustible coal* fields and lumber districts of Clearfield and Centre 
counties on the north and west, and the zincf and lead mines of 
Sinking Valley on the south — these resources, coupled with the beau- 



*The product ranges from 40,000 to 60,000 tons per week. This coal is said to be 
superior to that iiiinod in any other bituniinons district. It yiclct'--, by analysis, 
seventy-four per cent, carbon, is comparatively free from impurities, makes but 
little ash, and conseciuently adds to its combustive power a medium percentage of 
volatile or inflammable gas. Large bodies of carbonate iron-ore, wliieh mixes ad- 
vantageously with the hemitite and fossil ores of the Juniata vallej-, exists in part 
of the eoal Hehls. 

tone of the lime-stone belts of the lower Devonian, cropping along the val- 
ley, yiekls a considerable amount of lead and zinc, which, if properly developed 
through scieutilic skill, would start a remunerative business in the manufac- 
ture of oxides. Silex, or silica, in the form of glass-sand, is also abundant. 




SINKING SPRING CAVE, NEAR TYRONE. 



'^> LEMsx AND 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUXTY. 245 

tifal Juniata|, which sends forth a never-faih'ug supply of pure wa- 
ter, to.irether with its ag-ricultural resources, must in the near future 
make Tyrone one of the most important and populous railroad 
towns of Pennsylvania. The health-imparting- influences of the at- 
mosphere, and the beauty of natural scenery, combined with the ad- 
vantages already recited, point with unerring certainty to this result. 



DIRECTORY OF TYRONE. 



BOROUGH OFFICERS. 

Chief Bnrsess, C. S. W. Jones. j Treusurer. C. J. KeKel. 

Assistant do, John F. Knng. ' SolicUor. J. I). Hicks. 

TOWN COUNCIL, 

1st Ward— Samuel Berlin, E. J. Pruner. I 3d W^unl— A. G. Morris, M. J. McCann. 
2nd AYard— J. M. Smith, M. G. Crawford, j 4tli Ward— M. Stewart. Jno. Farrell, sr. 

SCHOOL DIRECTORS. 

J. M. Caldevwood. i D. P. Ray, .sr. 

A. B. Hoove». ' J. S. Plummer. 

S. S. Blair. J. H. Holtzingcr. 

Constable, H. I. Ilarpliam. 

Borough Surveyor, H. V. Boecking. 

CHURCHES. 

Evangelical Lutheran (German) church, organized in 1809. 

First Evangelical Lutheran (English) church, organized in 1872. J. H. Walterick, 
pastor. 

Methodist Episcopal church, erected in 18.5.5. Rev. J. F. Kiddle, present pastor. 

Presbyterian church, organized in 1857. Rev. S. M. JMoore, D. I)., pastor. 

St. Matthew's Roman Catholic church, organized originally in Sinking Valley over 
thirty-tive years ago ; church built in Tyx-one in 18.54. Rev. Father J. C. Farran. 
pastor. 

Y'oung Men's Christian Association, organized in 1870. President, Ur. J. C. Ham- 
ilton. 

FIRE COMPANY. 

The Neptune Hose Company. Organized in 1876. Incorporateil as Neptune Steam 
Fire Engine Company in October, 1880. 



JThe historic Juniata flows through the valley, and at this point, has 
cut a narrow channel through the shale rocks of Brush mountain. Flowing nearly 
in the opposite direction, and reversely through the old primal betl of the Juniata, 
is the Bald Eagle creek, which joins the river at Tyrone, in its ceaseless '-march to 
the sea." Sinking Run, (see engraving of Sinking Spring,) a beautiful mountain 
stream, enters a subterranean cavern at the upper end of town, comes to tlaylight 
on the margin of the Juniata, and forms its confluence with the river a short dis- 
tance above the mouth of the Bald Eagle. Sinking run is tapped some distance 
above the " Sink," by the main water pipe, and supplies the town with pure and un- 
adulterated water. Two other very line mountain streams flow together below the 
''Big Fill" on the Tyrone and Cleurfleld railroad, and the pure, sparkling water 
comes rushing, gushing, foaming and bounding over the rocks, until it enters the 
Bald Eagle above Ea.st Tyrone. Numerous smaller runs and rivulets drain the 
basins that enter the great vallej-. 
IG 



246 HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 

SECRET SOCIETIES. 

Tyrone Loilge, 152, I. O. of O. F., re-organized in 1872. Meets every Wetlnesday 

evening in Heller's Hall, 
Tyrone Lodge, No. 494, A. Y. M., organized in 1870. Meets the third Monday of 

each month. 

MISCELLANEOUS ASSOCIATIONS. 

Bald Eagle Building and Loan Association, incorporated in 1872. Sam'l McCamant, 

presitlent; .J. M. Calderwood, secretary. 
Emerald Benetlcial Association, branch 231, organized in 1872. William Vogt, 

president. 
Tyrone Gas and Water Company, ineorporatefl in 1868. C. (iuyer, president; A. A. 

Stevens, secretary. 

SHERIDAN BAND. 

The Slieridan Band re-organized in 1879. Meets every Tuesday evening. 

BANKS. 

Tyrone Bank, organized in 1.S71. Caleb Guyer, cashier. 

Blair County Banldng Company, organizeil in 1874. Robt. A. McCoy, cashier. 



BELL'S MILLS, OR BELLWOOD. 



We are indebted to Miss Clarke, a daug'hter of Rowau Clarke,. 
M. D., for the following article: Bell's Mills or Bellwood is a vil- 
lage, on the line of the Pennsylvania railroad, seven miles north of 
Altoona. It is named for Mr. Edward Bell, who was one of the first 
permanent residents in the village. Quite a large number of Mr. 
Bell's descendants are now living in or near Bell's Mills. The village 
is noted for its beautiful mountain scenery and pure healthy atmos- 
phere. The Allegheny mountains almost completely surround this 
valley. The only stream of water in it is the Juniata river, and it is- 
so small at this point, that it can scarcely claim the name of river. 
There are quite a number of mills in the immediate vicinity of Bell- 
wood. It is also one of the principal coaling stations along the Penn- 
.sylvania railroad. This place has become quite famous of late as 
the point to which all parties come on their way over the Bell's Gap 
railroad. This railroad was built eight years ago. Its chief object 
was to bring coal from the mines on the mountain to the Pennsylva- 
nia railroad ears; but it is much visited by strangers on account of 
the grand and romantic scenery surrounding it. The road is at 
present eight miles in length, but the company are building an ex- 
tension, which, when completed, will make a road twenty miles ia 
length. The highest point is twelve hundred feet above Bell's Mills. 
The road winds along the side of the mountain, and crosses gorges 
over seventy-five feet deep. On all sides are mountains, and far be- 
low is the valley. On top of the mountain is a beautiful little re- 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 247 

sort, called Rhododendron Park. This is a favorite place for picnics 
and excursions. The population of Bell's Mills has increased quite 
rapidly since the building- of this railroad, and the business capacities 
of the place are much better than before. There are two stores and 
four churches in the village. In the cemetery are some graves bear- 
ing the date of the first years of the century. Bell's Mills has a 
population of about five hundred people. Mature has done much to 
make the village beautiful. A few touches from the hand of art 
would make it as pretty as any place of its size along the Pennsyl- 
vania railroad. 



ROARING Spring. 



This thrifty little village is located in the southern part of the 
county, about seventeen miles south of Altoona, on the Morrison 
Cove railroad at the junction of the Bloomfield railroad. It has a 
population of about 600 inhabitants. The town derives its name 
from the spring located on the land of G. H. Spang, of Bedford, Pa. 
The spring sends forth large volumes of soft lime-stone water, and 
the beautiful surroundings are used as a favorite picnic ground by 
adjacent towns. The spring derived the name of "roaring" from 
the sonorous sound produced by the flow of the water over a rocky 
precipice at the fountain head, which could be heard for a mile or 
more. The artificial improvements, made some years ago, had the 
effect of destroying this gurgling sound. It still maintains its 
former name of Roaring Spring. 

Daniel Bare and his son, D. M. Bare, of the grist and paper 
mills, purchased the major portion of the land on- which the town is 
located from Job Mann, of Bedford, in 1863. These enterprising 
gentlemen at once saw that it was a very desirable location for a 
paper manufactory and the powerful volume of water emanating 
from the spring could b« utilized to drive the machinery. They, in 
conjunction with John Eby and John Morrison, began the erection 
of a paper mill which they operated successfully, but it was destroyed 
by fire. It was again rebuilt and operated again foi' seven years 
when it was destroyed by an explosion. Phuenix-like, it arose from 
its ashes, and now it is one of the most complete paper manufac- 
tories in the State, employing in its various departments over one 
hundred persons. The enterprising firm have large .stores in Xew 
York and Pittsburg. The mill is operated day and night, and the 



248 HISTORY or ALTOONA and BLAIR COUNTY. 

mammoth Corliss enjiine is toiling- its ceaseless rounds from Monday 
morning until Saturday night without stopping. 

Besides the paper mill, Roaring Spring has a large grist mill, a 
commodious school edifice, four churches, telegraph office, etc. The 
spring itself, with its beautiful grove and charming surroundings, is a 
favorite resort for lovers of pleasure. 



Martinsburg. 



It is beautifully situated in Morrison Cove, about twelve miles from 
Hollidaysburg, on a branch of the Pennsylvania railroad, starting 
from Altoona. "Great Cove," in which it was situated, was settled 
in 1749, but the name was changed to "Morrison's Cove," in honor 
of a Mr, Morris, as early as 1770. It is an incorporated borough, 
with burgess and council. A number of rich ore mines are in the 
vicinity. This is the seat of the Juniata Collegiate Institute. [See 
page 25.] 

This town Avas settled by Conrad Martin, a well-to-do farmer 
from Washington county, Md. Among the early settlers were ex- 
Sheriff Alexander Bobb, Abraham Stoner and Daniel Camerer. 
There are six churches within the borough limits — Lutheran, Metho- 
dist, Presbyterian, Church of God, German Reformed, and German 
Baptist. It contains a literary society and a cornet band. 

About tvvo and a half miles south of Martinsburg is a village 
called Fredericksburg, with about two hundred inhabitants, situated 
on Clover Creek, composed of "The Brethren." 



WILLIAMSBURG. 



This village is located in the southeastern part of the county, 
pleasantly situated on the Juniata river. It was laid out in 1794 by 
a German named Jacob Ake, who purchased the land of Col. 
Canan. It was called Akestown, but previous to his death he 
changed its name to Williamsburg, as an honor to his oldest son, 
William, who was about to leave him and settle in Tuckahoe Yalley. 
The old plan of selling lots on lease, by payment of one Spanish 
milled dollar yearly, forever, was adopted by him, and to this day, 
most all the lots vield that tax. 



HISTORY OF ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 249 

A spring of very fine water flows through the centre of the town, 
which supplies several mechanical works. The furnace property is 
at present idle, but five dry goods, one grocery, one hardware and 
two drug stores indicate business. Homer Hewit has erected on the 
outskirts of the town an immense house for the propagation of poul-" 
try ©f rare and valuable breeds, as well as swine. 



Gaysport. 



In his history of Hollidaysburg, commencing with page 201, Mr. 
Snyder makes allusions to Gaysport. We add that it was organized 
as a borough on June 9, 1841. It contains about eight hundred in- 
habitants, and is free from debt. It is separated from Hollidaysburg 
by the Juniata river. 



Bennington Furnace. 



This is a small village, composed, principally, of the employes of 
the furnace located there. The Bennington shaft supplies Hollidays- 
burg with coal for coke. In the neighborhood are the mines of Den- 
niston, Porter & Co., which supply Gap furnace with coal ; also the 
mines ofKittanning Coal company, of Philadelphia, shippers to mar- 
ket. The place is improving, the Cambria Iron company having re- 
cently erected ten double houses, in addition to what they previously 
built. A good boarding house or hotel is needed. There are two 
churches ; population about 700. 



KITTANNING POINT. 



This place was so named from the great Indian path or trail, be- 
tween Kittanning and the valley of the Delaware, which crosses the 
mountain through this gorge. Coal is extensively mined in the 
neighborhood, two branch railroads, each two miles in length, run- 
ning up the ravines to the mines. Population about 250. The post 
office has been removed to Glen White. 



250 



HISTORY or ALTOONA AND BLAIR COUNTY. 



ARCH Spring. 



This is a village with a population of 300 or 400, containing three 
churches, a post office and a seminary for young ladies. It lies in 
the vicinity of Tyrone. It derives its name from a natural arch 
which spans the Sinking Spring. [See engraving on page 18.] 



Tipton. 



This village contains three churches, among them a new Metho- 
dist church erected in place of the one recently destroyed by fire. 
Its location is ten miles east of Altoona and four miles west of Ty- 
rone, a station on the Pennsylvania railroad. Its population is about 
three hundred. 



NEWRY AND DUNCANSVILLE. 



Newry (a borough) and Duncansville are towns containing be- 
tween 300 or 400 inhabitants each. The other towns of the county 
are small settlements from fifty to one hundred inhabitants, all of 
which contain post offices. Their names appear in the list of post 
offices of the county, as follows: 



POST OFFICES IN BLAIR COUNTY. 



Altoona, 
Arch Spring, 
Bellwood, 

Bennington Furnace, 
Blue Knob, 
Canoe Creek, 
Clover Creek, 
Curry ville, 
Duncansville, 
East Freetlom, 
Kldorado, 



Fcstoria. 

Frankstown, 

Henrietta, 

Ilollidav-^'Jurs-, 

Glen White, (Kit'g Ft.,) 

McKee's Gap, 

Martinsburg, 

Mines, 

Newrv, 

Olivia", 

Ore Hill, 



Poplar Run, 
Roaring Spring, 
Royer, 

Sabbath Rest, 
Sarah, 

Sinking Vallej', 
Tipton. 
Tyrone, 
Williamsburg, 
Yellow Spring. 



APPENDIX. 



251 



APPENDIX. 



POPULATION. 

The population of Blair countj- in 1870 was 38,051. 
■of each township was as follows : - 



In that year the population 



Allegheny township 1,913 

Altoona city 10,G10 

Antis township 1.893 

Blair township 1,571 

Catharine township 907 

Frankstown township 1,553 

Freedom township 1,020 

Gaysport horough 799 

Greenttekl township 1,233 

HoUichiysbnrg borough 2,952 

Huston "township 1,335 



•Tuniata township 621 

Logan township 2,422 

Martinsl>nrg borough 536 

Xorth \Vof)([bnry township 9.53 

Snyiler township 1,412 

Taylor township 1,3()0 

Tyrone township 1,006 

Tyrone borough 1.848 

Woodbury township 2,107 



Total 38,051 

In 1875 the population of Altoona was 15,329, distributed as follows : 



Fanii- Pupu- 

lies. lation. 

First ward 418 2,322 

Second ward 549 2. 7f'9 

Third ward 373 2,088 

Fourth ward; 417 2.093 

Fifth ward 393 1,998 



Fanii- Popu- 

lies. lation. 

Sixth ward 478 2.267 

Seven th ward 114 557 

Eighth ward 262 1,265 

Totals 3,004 15,320 



The population of the county in 1880 is 52,733. In one sense this is ottieial, but 
after-the revised report is issued from Washington slight inaccuracies may appear. 
We give the townships : 



Juniata township 723 

Logan towhship 4,582 

Martinsburg borougli 567 

North Woodbury townsliip 1,695 

Snyder township 1,391 

Taylor township 2,011 

Tyrone township 1,002 

Tyrone antt East Tyrone borough . 2.957 

Woodbury township 1,900 



Allegheny township 2.148 

Altoona city 19,740 

Antis township 2,282 

Blair township 1.426 

Catliarine township 579 

Frankstown tow nship 1,783 

Freedom township 1,214 

Gaysport bf) rough 764 

(Treenflekl township 1,286 

Hollidaysburg liorough 3,1.50 

Huston township 1,,533 I Total .52,733 

It will be observed that the population for tlie last ten years has increased 14,682. 

Of this increase Altoona is credited with 9,130 ; Tyrone and Hollidaysburg, 198. 

The following is the enumeration of the various wards of Altoona for 1880: 

First ward 2,735 

Second ward 3,34;3 

Third ward 2.517 



Fourth ward 2.587 

Ejfth ward 2,708 



Sixth ward 3,058 

Seventh ward .• 825 

Eighth ward 1,967 



Total 19,740 



BUILDING. 

Probably five hundred buildings of various kinds will have beefl erected for the 
year ending on the 31st of December, 1880, in the city of Altoona. This is strong, 
practical evidence of the enterprise antl progressive spirit of the citizens. Fortu- 
nately there has been but little difficulty in procuring materials. Good building 
stone can be obtained in the vicinity, and lumber can be transported from any 
point of the compass at very low rates. The best kind of clay for building bricK 
can be procured within a stones-throw of the corporate limits. At the j-ards of Mr. 
J. U. Vaughn, pressed, common, paving and angle brick can be procured in any 
quantity, at any time. The Altoona Fire Clay works, otHcially conducted by Dr. 
S. C. Baker, president ; M. Kinkead, secretarj- and treasurer and W. L. Winkle, su- 
perintendent, produce the be.st ai-ticle of tire clay brick. 



252 APPENDIX. 

We roprodiico an article wliicli appeareil in tlie Altoona Daily Sun of Jnly 26, 
1880: "Evidence of the prosperity of the building and loan associations of Altoona 
are plainly visible. Buildings erected through their instrvimentality are located, at 
short distances, all over the city. Outside of this agency, and besides the buildings 
constructed by individuals at individual cost and for individual benefit, a few citi- 
zens of means have aided less prosperous citizens in erecting dwellings, agreeing 
to receive what otherwise would be paid for rent as so much purchase money on 
the property, charging little or ho interest on the amount investetl, thus enabling 
the beneficiaries to secure homes of their own. One of these gentlemen is 3Ir. W. J. 
Heinsling, who has been engaged in this good work for several years. He has assis- 
ted quite a number in this way, thus setting an example to others, which, if follow- 
ed, will result in permanent lienefit to the community." 

THE CITY PLANING MILL 

Is located in the south-western portion of the city. It was erected in the spring 
of 1873 by a joint-stock company, who gave to it the title of "Peoples' Planing mill." 
The officers wei-e: John Geesey, president ; J. W. Martin, superintendent and treas- 
urer. These, together with James Clabaugh, Frederick Hesser and Louis Plack, 
constituted the board of directors. The land, buildings, machinery, etc., cost about 
$;50,000. After the expiration of a year or so, failing to realize its expectations, and 
consequently unprepared to meet its financial obligations, the company asked for 
an extension of two years, which was granted by the creditors. Then failing in its 
payments, an assignee was appointed to dispose of its property. The property was 
purchased by William Stoke, who, in company with other gentlemen of capital, 
are now engaged in its conduct, with ijrofit, we trust, to themselves, certainly with 
credit to the community. The pi ice paid by Mi-. Stoke was $11,700. 

The City Planing mill, with its office, a dwelling house, warehouses, sheds, sta- 
bles, etc., covers two acres of ground. The main building, (the mill) and office are 
composed of brick, the former 60x1.50 feet, and the latter a creditable structure, with 
ample room for the performance of clerical labor. Among other "conveniences," 
so to term them, is a railroad siding capable of holding eight or ten ears. Additions 
have recently been made to the machinery, including the latest appliances for the 
abridgment of labor. Having thus far satisfactorily met the expectations of the 
public, IMessrs. Stoke & Co. have the best wishes of the community. 

EXCELSIOR PLANING MILL 

Is located on Nintli avenue, between Eleventh and Twelfth streets. It was 
erected in 1869. John S. Booth and Martin H. Mackey have conducted the establish- 
ment since 1876. The frontage occupietl by the Planing mill and its appurtenan- 
ces consisting of various buildings — office, sheds for the storage of lumber, ^c. — meas- 
ures l.OO feet. Since Booth & Mackey assumed control of the mill, of which they are 
owners, much additional machinery has been added, and otheriiiiprovemcuts made 
from time to time. Both these gentlemen being practical and experienced 
draughtsmen, carpenters and builders, are evidently the right men in the 
right place. Hence no difficulty is encountered by those Avho wish buildings 
erected, for plans, estimates and specifications are quickly made out, and the work 
executed in a manner entirely satisfactory. During the entire period in wliich they 
have been engaged in business no complaints have been iiiaile l:)y any of those who 
have availed themselves of their services, for they have conducted affairs, from 
the commencement up to the present time, upon the sti'ictest principles of integ- 
rity. Their business has increased in arithmetical, or we might say, in geometrical 
progression ever since. Notwitlislandiiig this, their facilities for the fulfilment of 
orders is fully equal to tlie di^maiids made upon them. 

MOUNTAIN CITY STAR MILL. 

The Mountain City Star Mill, of C. Hauscr & Son, located at the corner of Eighth 
avenue and Sixteenth street, Altoona, is a large and substantial structure litted 
with all tlie most approved machinery foi' the rapid and economic pro<liietion of 
the feest grades of flour. The engine i'f)oni is well adapted to its use and contains 
a forty horse power engine of motlerii construction and is provided, as are also the 



APPENDIX. 253 

■boilers, with the best safeguards against accident. Mr. -James Hauser is the engin- 
eer, and the splendifl condition of the maehineiy, under his care, proves that he is 
the right man for the place. 

A twenty-four inch helt connects tlie engine with the main shalting of the miil 
whicli contains four run of stone adapted to various work. Tlie burrs, at great ex- 
pense, are provided with Holfner's patent coil back lash spring which secures a 
steady and regular motion without jar. 

All wheat is put tlirough one of C. D. Hanna's steamers and di-yers before going 
to the burrs and the firm make the celebrated new process flour which finds so 
much favor with the best judgfts. A patent middlings purifier and a Eureka smut 
machine— the best in use— arc among the machinery of the mill, which also con- 
tains one of Richmond's smut machines with combined breaker and cleaner. 

From the third floor of the mill a fine view is obtained of the city and shops, 
while the floor itself is crowded with machinery, all in active motion : there being 
four bolting reels on this floor, each 21 J^ feet long, which bolt the flour and separate 
the bran, etc. Here are stored eight thousand bushels of choice wheat selected 
"witli great care and especial reference to its flouring qualities. The grain is re- 
ceived at the second floor where it is carefully inspected and weighed and dropped 
into the receiving bin, and from thence is elevated to the fourth story and con- 
veyed to the smut and brush machines that we have spoken of. These machines 
separate all impurities and thoroughly cleanse the giain from dust and leave it in 
a golden shower, pure and clean, on its way to the burrs which gi-ind it. It is first, 
however, passed through the steamer, and is steamed and dried before it is ground. 
The burrs are four feet in diameter, and grind fifteen bushels per hour each. 

The ground wheat is elevatefl again and goes through the bolts, purifiers, etc., on 
the third floor. It descends to the second floor where it is weighed and packed into 
sacks or barrels to suit the requirements of patrons. The miller is Harry G. Gard- 
ner, a prince of good fellows and a practical man, who always makes A Xo. 1 floiir. 
His assistant, William Hauser, is also a practical miller of rare judgment and great 
experience. 

C. Hauser, sr.,one of Altoona"s oldest, most reliable, energetic and safe business 
men, is the senior partner and general manager of the firm while the office business 
is transacted by his son, C. Hauser, jr., who, to all the good qualities of his father, 
adds a genial pleasant manner that always attracts and retains friends. 

The flour of these mills finds rea<ly sale because of its excellent quality whichis 
even and can always be depended upon to give satisfaction. The firm also deal 
largely in all kinds of mill products, bran, feefl, shorts, grain, seeds, etc., and can 
always be depended upon to sell at the lowest market prices. Their mill consti- 
tutes one of the institutions of which Altoona is deservedly proud and their popu- 
larity and^usiness are daily increasing. 

NEW AMERICAN SEWING MACHINE. 

Agencies are established in every city of the United States, all the countries 
of Europe, Mexico, Canada and South America. The "American"' has taken the 
first premium at nearly every jiublic exhibition at which it appeared, including the 
Centennial, where it received two first-class awards, One for the ingenuity and sim 
plicity of its construction, the other for the work done on it. The company claim, 
with propriety, that it is the best family ami light manufacturing machine in exis- 
tence. D. R. Betts, a polite and courteous gentleman, is the general agent of Cen- 
tral Pennsylvania. His residence is in Harrisburg. E. C. Reese is tiie popular 
agent in Altoona. 

TERRA COTTA WORKS. 

In February, present year, John A. Canan erected a building on Margaret ave- 
nue, near the Branch railroad, for the display and sale of Terra Cotta merchandise. 
<:)u the -iOth March he commenced business, and has been doing well ever since. 
He keeps a complete stock of chimney tops, lawn vases, etc., together with fire- 
brick flues, and other articles in consonance with, if not legitimately belonging to 
the business. He deals also in lime, sand, hair, cement, brick, etc. He has the good 
wishes of the community. 



254 



APPENDIX. 



SENATORS AND REPRESENTATIVES. 

Below we give a ilst of Senators and Representatives of tlie districts to wliicli 
Blair county Avas joined, wlien not entitled to separate representation : 

ASSEMBLYMEN. 

Blair— Henry Bridenthall and David Blair. 

do. — Henry Bridenthall. 

do. — Joseph Higgins. 

do. — Charles Kinkead. 
Blair and Huntingdon— Setli R. McCune and W. B. Smith. 



1847 

1848 

1849 

1&50 

1851 

1852 

18.53 

1854 

1855 

185G 

1&57 

1858 

1859 

1860 

1861 

1862 

1863 

1864 

1865 

1866 

1867 

1868 

1869 

1870 

1871 

1872 

1873 

1874 

1875 

1876 

1877 

1878 

1879 



do. do. do. do. 

do. do. —James L. Gw in and S. S. Wharton. 

do. do. do. and James Magnire. 

do. do. — George Leas and G. W. Smith. 

do. do. — John M. Gibbony and J. H. Wintrose. 

do. do. do. do, 

do. do. —Robert W. Christy. 

do. do. — Jacob Bnrley. 

do. do. do. 

do. do. — James Holler. 

do. do. — Thaddeus Banks. 

do. do. — R. A. McMurtrie (died in 1880). 

do. do. do. 

do. do. —James G. Adium. 

do. do. do. 

do. do. —Samuel McCamant. 

do. do. do. 

do. do. —Jos. Robinson. 

do. do. do. 

do. do, — B. L. Hewitt. 

do. do. do. 

do. do. — Seth R. McCune. 

do. do. do. 

do. do. —J. C. Everhart and I. H. Rawlins. 

do. do. do do. 

do. do. —Daniel Shock and David M. Jones. 

do. do. do. M. Edgar King. 

do. do. — B. L. Hewitand D. A. Gilland. 



SENATORS. ^ 

1847 Huntingdon and Bedford— John INIorrison. 

1848-50 Huntingdon, Bedford and Blair— Alexander King. 

1851-53 Huntingdon, Blair and Cambria— Robert A. McMurtrie. 

1854-59 do. do. do. — John Creswell, jr. 

1860-62 Blair, Cambria and Clearfleld— Louis W. Hall. 

1863-64 do. do. do. — Wm. A. Wallace. 

1865-67 Blair, Huntingdon, Centre, Mifflin, Juniata and Perry— Louis W.Hall and 

Kirk Haines. 
1868-70 [District tlie same]— Chas. J. T. Mclntyre and S. T. Shugert— Shugert un- 
seated by contest and John K. Robinson, seated. 
1871-73 do. do. —P. Bruce Petrikcn and D. M. Crawford. 

1874-80 Blair aiul Cambria— John A. Lemon. 

COAL TRAFFIC OF THE CITY. 

However it nuiy have been before the erection of those immense receptacles for 
coal, usually called "trestles," in the eastern part of the city, subsequently and ever 
since our citizens liiive been supplied with both anthracite and bituminous coalg, 
in large or small (luantities, as they desired, at any and all periods of the year. 
These depositories for coal were erected in 1878, and on July 11, that j'ear, they 
received the first car-load of coal. There are three "trestles," each 600 feet in length 



APPENDIX. 255 

and each of sufficient width to admit a train of eiglat cars, including an engine. As 
many as twentj-two cars, averaging twelve tons eacli, have been unloaded in a sin- 
gle daj-. We mention this as an instance of the amount of coal received in a sin- 
gle daj', not as an illustration of the celerity with which cars are unloaded, for the 
contents of one car can be discharged in three minutes' time. Thecapacitj- of each 
"trestle" is about 1,000 tons— hence 3,000 tons at a time can receive storage. We mas- 
state, in this connection, that in addition to the quantity here deposited, 2.000 addi- 
tional tons are consigned to dealers in other parts of the city. Purchasing coal in 
such large quantities, and by watching the market closely enabled to buy at the 
lowest rates, G. A. McCormick is prepared to sell coal in large or small quantities, 
either to dealers or consumers at low figures, resulting in benefit to the community. 
And in proi)ortion as the city increases In population, the business of this gentle- 
man increases. As an instance, for the season of 1879-80, about 2,t00 more tons were 
sold than during the previous season. 

THE ALTOONA IRON COMPANY 

Was formed in 1872, for the purpose of manufacturing merchant ii-on, and was 
chartered July 10, 1873. The construction of the rolling mill was commenced July 
24, 1872, and was put in operation April 16,1873, with a capacity of 3,000 tons manu- 
facturing iron annuallj-. Since 1874 extensive improvements have been made, and 
has now a capacitj- ot 10,000 tons manutacturing iron per annum. The officers are : 
S. C. Baker, president; W. M. Wheatley, secretary and treasurer; S. C. Baker, 
James Gardner, Robert Smiley, John P. Dean, D. K. Ramey and John FuUerton, 
directors. 

ALTOONA CAR WORKS. 

In 1868 shops were erected on the site now occupied bj- the Altoona Car Works, 
by the "Altoona M anufacturing Company." A fire, which occurred on May 23, 1879, 
destroyed the buildings. Recentlj- new and better structures were reared, filled 
with improved machinerj- and such other appliances as enable the new manage- 
ment to execute better work, more promptly, and at lower prices. The i^rincipal 
industry, as the title of the establishment indicates, is the manufacture of railroad 
cars; coal pit wagons, castings of every description, and general machine work oc- 
cupy a large share of the attention of the company. The works are located at 
the extreme limits of tlie south-western portion of the city. 

The following gentlemen compose the board of officers : S. C. Baker, president: 
S. H. Smith, treasurer and secretary; M. A. Green, superintendent: C. Campt)ell, 
John KeiJy, S. C. Baker, S. H. Smith and M. A. Green, stockholders. 

MOUNTAIN CITY FLORAL ESTABLISHMENT. 

Allen S. Mj-ers recently established a florticultural gardmi, so to call it, on 
Howard avenue, between Ninth and Tenth streets, Altoona. and exhibits a stock of 
rare plants and flowers, together with such as are in more general demand, at all 
seasons of the j-ear. He is meeting with success. 

CITY PASSENGER RAILWAY. 

At a special meeting ot the city council, held on the evening of Maj- 12, an ordi- 
nance authorizing the construction of a street railway was passed by a large major- 
Itj' of that bodj-, since which tiiue books have been opened bj- the leaders of the en- 
terprise, and a considerable amount of stock subscribed. The captal required was 
$50,000; shares $i50 each par value. The probability is that the road will soon be 
built and equipped. 

CONTEMPLATED ALTOONA AND CHERRYTREE RAILROAD. 

The project of constrvieting a narrow gauge railroad between Altoona and Cher- 
rytree, has not, at this time ot writing, assumed a practical shape, further than that 
several routes have been surveyed by engineers in the employ ot the parties inter- 
ested, who are men of means, influence and energy, residing here and at other 
points along the proposed route, among whom we may mention James Perry, of 
Chest Springs : Joseph Behe, of Carrollton ; George Meyers, of Gallitzen township, 
and Dr. S. C. Baker and D. and C. Moore, of Altoona. 



256 APPENDIX. 



LIGHT COMPANY. 

Under date of September 10, 1880. there Wivs grunted by the commonwealth ot 
Pennsylvania a charter lor "The Altuona Light Cumiiany,' tlie corporation to be 
perpetual. T)ie purpose of the company is to supply the public Mith light by means 
other than gas— wliich means, as we imderstand, by electricity. It is the intention 
of;the managers to push the matter actively, and they are assured their meth- 
ods will be botli acceptable to the people and successful. The officers of the com- 
pany are John I^. Levan, president; T. H. Wigton, treasurer; John R. Bingaman, 
secretary ; K. P. Mervine, solicitor. 

MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS OP INTEREST. 

The council of Altoona has not, as yet, determined where the new reservoir or 
reservoirs shall be located. Tlie water question is treated on iniges 63, 6.i, 15.3 and 1.'54. 

The telephone, which was recently introduced by J. Chester Wilson has proven 
a success, most ot the leading business men of Altoona having adopted it. 

The Merchants' Exchange, recently organized, Ave trust will stay Avith us. 

James Philip Lowe, at the time of his death, which occurred on May -JS, 1880, 
was the oldest passenger engineer on the Pennsylvania railroad. 

.1. B. EwiNG, practicing law in Ilarrisburg taught a select school or academy in 
W. Altoona school house, commencing April 1, 1857. 

We acknowledge our indebtedness to the press of Altoona, HoUidaysburg, and 
Tyrone, as well as the Pliiladelphia "Times" and "Chronicle-Herald," Ilarrisburg 
"Patriot" and "Telegraph," and indeed to the press of the entire State for notices 
and other courtesies extended to us. 

H. H. Snydek. esq., commander of William G. Murray Post, No. 39, G. ,\.R., of 
Hollidaysbiirg, who was a member of the same company as Lieutenant Stephen C. 
Potts, prepared an able biography of that chivalrous gentleman and soldier for 
publication in the "Grand Army Review," of Philadelpha, the official organ in the 
department of IV^nnsylvania. It, as well as the historical delineation of HoUidays- 
Tjurg in this book, evinces a peculiar aptitude for literary labor. 

During the tlrst six months of official control (from April until October, 1880), 
Mayor Howard has collected in tines, building permits, etc., $l,3r2.97. 

The foremen and clerks in the "lower shops," on July '22, (18S0) presented a cor- 
ner stone for the, new residence of Jno. P. Levan, general lorenian, Altoona, which 
was accompanied by a neat address. 3Ir. Levan responded in a few well chosen re- 
marks, expressive of his appreciation of the gift. 

One of the unerring signs of the rapid progress of a town is the establishment 
of hoiises exclusively devoted to one branch of a specialty of trade, such, lor in- 
stance, as that of George A. Streit, who deals exclusively in leather and .shoe tind- 
ings. 

Wsi. FouTENitAUGH, was f)ne of the seven voters who supported Peter Cooper as 
National Greenback-labor candidate for President of the United States. We will 
here remark that Charles C. Stanbarger, who was nominated for Mayor of Al- 
toona on the National Greenbnck-labor ticket, in the spring 1880, but declined, was 
<"lectedslH!rit1f)r Milllin county, in 18(50, for a term of three years, after which he was 
sent to the legislature by a large majority. 

Isaiah Bunkek, HoUidaysburg, was the lirst blacksmith whose name appeared 
on the check-roll in the machine department of the "upper shops." 

John Douohertv, now between eighty and ninety years of age, residing at Mt. 
Union, Pa., was the first engineer on the old Portage railroad, 

Bernard Kerr, father of R. A. O. ;nid K. P. Kerr, who died in the west about 
nine years ago, kept the first store that was located on Tenth avenue, between 
Thirteenth and Pouitt'enth streets, Altoona He did a thriving business in 1855-.56. 

OuTSiBK the ronliue of official duties as city treasurer. Dr. Bittner assumes the 
dual character f)f dentist and portrait painter. IIowev(U' widely-extended his repu- 
tation as a dentist may be, it will Ix^ eclipsed, if he don't stop practicing, by his 
newly assunnnl profession. The portraits of (ieneral Hancock, General Garfield an<l 
Rev. Dr. Hamlin are really master pieces of art. 



Table of Contents. 



PAGE 

PRKFACE 3 

INTRODUCTION 5 

Th<3 Pateinivl Parent of Altoona 5 

Priiimry Atteiiiiit-* and Successes o 

Pennsylvania Kailroad 

Portaiie Kailroad 7 

Boat Taken over Allef<heny :\Ioun tains 10 

Gradual Ascent of Pennsj-lvania Railroad 11 

Summary of Its Proj^ress 11 

BLAIR COUNTY. 

Bounds, Population, etc lr> 

AgriculturiU and Mineral Resources 15 

List of Furnaces 17 

Sinking Valley 17 

Natural Curiosity 18 

Louan, an Indian Cliief. . 19 

Seotcli Settle in Frankstown and Catliarine Towusliips 19 

How and Wlien Townsliips -were Formed 19 

Eilucational History 22 

Description of New' Court House 26 

Discourse of Juda:e Dean, giving History of tlie Courts and Bar.. . . 31 

List of Members of the Bar 43 

The New Jail 4') 

Almshouse and House of Employment 4.5 

The County's Finances 47 

Names of County Otlicers an<l Years of Election 47 

Newspapers and'Other Publications no 

€ITY OF .VLTOONA. 

Introductory Remarks .59 

Hotel Accommodations 61 

Site of the City Selected 61 

W liere the shcips were Located 62 

Names of Ix)ca!ities 62 

When the Work was Commenced 63 

Instance of Increased Value of Real Estate 63 

Banking Houses 63 

Churches 63 

Water Supply 63 

Centennial Celebration 65 

Centennial "Fourtli." 7i) 

llAILROAl) l!lOTS 70 

Wliat Transpired in Altoona 71 

Order of Itobert Pltcairn 71 

Military on Their Way to Pittsburg 73 

Strike inaugurated 74 

Sheritt's Proclamation 74 

Proclamation ot Mayor Gilland 75 

Meeting at the Brant House 75 

Speech of James F. ^Hlliken 75 

Speech of Franlc P. Tierney 77 

Speech of Thomas H. yreevy 77 

Patrolling tlie Streets 78 

Sunday, the Culminating Period of tlie Excitement 78 

Meeting of the Railroatl Men 79 

Citizens' Meetinij 79 

Meeting of the Shopmen 82 

Ad.ionrned Meeting 83 

Arrival of (ioveinor Hartranft 86 

His speech to Citizens 86 

His Proclamation 86 

Rumor Calci dated Furtlierto Excite the Populace 87 

'■Camp Beaver." 87 

Grand Jury Presentment.' 87 

Routing of Tramps 87 

\eieran Soldiers' Organization 89 

Firing I']) Engines 89 

Addiiional Troojjs en route for Pittsburg 89 

Clearing the Depot 90 



258 TABLE OF CONTElSrTS. 

I'AGK 

Arrival of Eloven Car Loivds of Troops 90 

Strike Ended 90 

The Strike at Tyrone iW 

Conclave of Knights Templar 91 

Relief for Ireland— Speech of Mr. Parnell 91 

Meetinf< of the Central Pennsylvania C<mference, M. E. Church.. 93 

Relief of thi; Milton Snlterers 94 

Meeting of State Medical Society 95 

Prohibition Convention 98 

Decoration Day Ceremonies 9S 

Our National Anniversarv, (I8S0) and how it was celebrated 99 

Meeting of Pa. State Equal Rights' League 101 

Public and Private Schools 102 

The First School House 102 

Passage of tlie Common School Law 102 

Union Church and School House 103 

Branches Taught 103 

V eteran School Directors 105 

Establishment of Countv Superintendency lO.i 

Erection ot School Buildings 105 

City Superintendent and Teachers of High School 107 

Grading of Schools UK) 

More siibstantial Buildings Erected 109 

Revis(!d Course of Instruction 110 

Teachers' Institute 110 

Death of First Citv Superintendent 110 

(Growth of the Public School System Ill 

Rapid Increase of School Population Ill 

Number of School Buildings 113 

Vames of Teachers, Gr;ide, Enrollment of Scholars, etc 114 

Names of Teachers for 1880-1 115 

Value of Public Scliool property 115 

Otliccrs of Public Schools, etc 117 

IjUglisli and German Private Schools 117 

City Churches. 

Baptist— First and Second 119 

Catholic— English and German 121 

Christ Reformed 122 

Church of (iod 12:3 

Hebrew Synagogue 125 

IjUtheran— First and Secon<l 125 

Methodist— First. Second, Third, IMission and African 129 

Presbj'terian- First and Second 130 

St. I uke's Protestant Episcopal 133 

The Brethren , 134 

United Brethren 137 

Christian As.sociations. 

Young !\Ieii's Christain Association • 139 

Railroad Men's Christian Association 141 

Cemeteries. 

Fairview Cemetery 142 

Oak Ridge Cemetery 143 

St. John's Cemetery 145 

St. Joseph's Cemetery 145 

Eastern Light Cemetery 145 

City Fire Department 146 

Engine, Hose and Truck Houses 147 

Board of F:re Department 147 

Chief Engineers 149 

Officers and Members of Good Will Company 149 

Officers and :\l(!nd)ers of Emjiire Company 149 

Officers an<l Members of Vigilant Company 150 

Officers and M<'mbe)-s of Excelsior (;onipany 151 

(Officers and Members of Altoona Company 151 

(ias and Water Department 153 

Peijnsylv.\nia Kailroai) Company's Shops. 

Introductory Remarks 157 

Motive Power Department, or Upper Shops 1.58 

Blacksmith Shoj) 159 

Machine Shop 159 

The Vise Shop 1<>1 

The Boiler shop 102 

The Foundry T>2 

The First Erecting Shop 102 

The Second EniCting Shop 103 

The Paint Slioi) '. h>3 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 259 

PAGE 

Life and Services of Locomotives 165 

Class " K " Engines 1^^ 

Kecoicl of Movements and Condition of Engines l^j*> 

Car Departme>'t or Lower Shops'. 167 

Machine Shop 169 

Passenger Car Shop l''! 

Freiglit Shop 173 

Blacksmith Shop l~i 

Planing Mill l"-5 

Tin Shop 1^7 

Cabinet Shop, or Glue Koom 1~8 

Paint Shops 179 

L' pholsteiing Shop 182 

Beatty's Shop 185 

Resident Officers Pennsylvania Railroad Company. 

In General Superintendent's Oftlce 185 

In Office Superintendent Motive Power 185 

In Office Superintendent Transportation 185 

Foreman and Assistants of Motive Power Shops 186 

Foreman and Assistants of Car or •• Lower Shops." 1S6 

Dispatcher, Supervisor, and As.sistant Trainmaster 187 

Altoona City Government. 

List of Burgesses 18» 

Mayors and Years of Election 189 

City Treasurers arnl Tenn of Office 189 

City Recorder 189 

Members of Council 189 

Secretaries of Council 190 

Solicitors 190 

Civil Engineers 190 

Superin tendent VV ater Department 190 

Policemen 190 

Street Commissioners 191 

Aldermen 191 

Constables 191 

CiTT Finances of Altoona. 

Receipts and Expenditui-es for 1S79 191 

Number of Taxables, andA'alnation of Property 191 

Assessments 191 

General Directory of Altoona. 

Avenues and Streets 193 

Miscellaneous Associations 195 

Building and Loan Associations 195 

Orders of Red Men 195 

Orders of Odd Fellows. 195 

Knights of Pythias 197 

Masonic 197 

< Jpera House 197 

Silver Grey Social Club 197 

Telegraph Offices 197 

Post Office hours 197 

Musical Organizations. 

Altoona Cit v Baud 197 

Mountain City Band 198 

■ .Junior Grevs' Band 198 

Citizens' Cornet fiand 198 

German Social Comet Band 198 

Frohsinn Singing Society 198 

Concordia Singing Society 198 

The >1 ilitary 198 

Members of Company D 200 

HOLLIDAYSBUBG. 

Erection of the First Substantial House Xtl 

First Survey made 204 

Fourth of .J uly 205 

Billy Donaldson's Tavern 206 

Frankstown in the Lead 207 

Advantageous Situation 207 

Enterprise of .John Blair 208 

AiTival of the First Canal Boat 209 

Education Looked -Ifter 209 

Borough Officers 210 

Their First Meeting 210 

How Money was Provided 210 

Railway from Philadelphia to Pittsburg 211 

Notable Stonns and Floods 2i:i 



260 TABLE OF CONTENTS. 

rA»E 

Foniiatioii of BUiir Couiitv 214 

Militury Amiirs " 215 

Visit of Kossuth J 220 

Discovery of Iron (Jre 220 

Construr^tion of tlie Reservoir 221 

Fire Ai-)]iiirat ns and Fire Companies 221 

M arket House 222 

IIolll(lays1iur>,' in 1842 222 

Gas 1 ntrodneetl 223 

Water Worlds and Reservoir 224 

Presbyterian Cluirch and Its I'astoi's 224 

St. Michael's Roman Catholic Church 227 

Lutheran Church 229 

Baiitist Church 230 

Ilollidayshurg Seminary tor Young Ladies 231 

The (ireat Fire in JloUidaysbnrg .-. 232 

Blair Connty AFedical Society 233 

Prominent Citizens 234 

TYRONE BOROrciil 237 

First Building Erected 237 

Railroad Facil it ies 238 

Tyrone and Clearfield Railroad 239 

New Division of Pennsylvania Railroad 2.39 

Superintendents and Clerks 239 

Shojjs of Pennsylvania Railroad 239 

Boiler and Macliine Shops and Improvements 240 

Paper ^Mill 240 

Banking Houses 240 

Churches and Schools 240 

Justices of the Peace 241 

Military Memoi'anda 241 

FjXtensive Conflagration 242 

Reljuilding Commenced 243 

New Railroad Depot 244 

New Iron Bridge 244 

Tyrone's Future Prospects 244 

General Directory 24.5 

Bell's Mills 246 

RoAUiNG Spring 247 

MAiiTiNSnuiia and Williamsburg 248 

Oaysi'out, Bennington Furnace and Kittanning I'oint 249 

Arch Spring, Tipton, Newry and Duncansville 250 

Post Offices in Blair County 250 

APPENDIX 251 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 



FRONTISPIECE— Glimpse of Altoona. 

Arch Sju-ing between pages 20 and 21 

Cresson '• " 68 " 69 

Portrait of Mr. Parnell " " 84 " 85 

Horseshoe Curve " " 100 "101 

Svlvan Scen(t on the Alleghenies " " 148 " 149 

sinking Spring Cave " " 244 " 245 

Loc(unotive and Tender page 1.58 

Parlor, SUicping and Passenger Cars 170 

Postal and I'.aggagc^ Cars 170 

Interior of I'ai-lor Cai' 173 

Interior fil' Sleeping Car 181 

IntfU'ior of Passcngci- Car 183 

Court House in Ilollidaysburg 201 

Ilollidayshurg Seminary 212 

Dlagrain of Tyrone 238 



Index to advertisements. 



PAGE 

Mc'Nf'vin & Yt'iiger, stoves, 1108 lllh iivenne 12 

Baltzc'll & IJonss, dry goods, 11th tiveiuie iif-iir 13lh street Kj 

John Daily, pliotograpiis, 1311 11th avenue 20 

G. E. Onnes, hairdresser, 8th avenue and 17th street 20 

Irwin's Drug Store, Uth avenue and 16th street 24 

Moss Moser & Co., groceries, 6th avenue and 7th street 24 

W. J. ileinsling, dry gof)ds and groceries, 8th avenue ami 11th street 28 

Wni. Murray, dry goods, KiJT llih avenue 32 

E. S. Miller, physician, 16th street and 11th avenue 36 

Harry Szink, groceries, 6th avenue and 8th street 36 

Thomas W. Jackson, hiwyer, 1010 12ili street 36 

D. F. l?eegle, jeweler, l-2th street, Ix^tween 8th and flth avenues 36 

Franklin House, Al. linigoon, proprietor. 17th street 40 

Jolin M. I'eters, meats, sth avenue near 9tli street 40 

George A. Streit, leather, 1117 5th aventie 40 

J. II. Vaughn, drj^ goods ami groceries, 8tli avenue and -list street 44 

Josiah Artliur. (Lewis C. Tipton, successor), furniture, 1008 Uth avenue 48 

D. G. MeCul lough, grocei. Uth avenue, between Uth and lith streets 52 

W. K. Ward. coal. 9th avenue and 17tli street 52 

li. Berkowitz, grocer, 1318 Uth avenue 5<) 

F. P. Tierney, lawyer, Uth avenue and 16th street 56 

Jacob B, Cowen, grocer, 8th avenue and 19th street -56 

Blair County Hadlcal, Uth avenue and 16th street 56 

Tribune, daily and weekly, 12th street near 12tli avenue 60 

I. W. Toomey, merchant tailor. Uth avenue and 17tli street 60 

Sun, daily and weeklj-, Uth street near Uth avenue 64 

M. J. Smith, blacksmith, Uth street and 10th avenue 64 

Call, daily, weekly and Sunday, Uth avenue near 13th street 68 

S. M. GriJtith, painter, Uth avenue near Uth street 68 

Volksfuelirer, German paper, 1122 Utli avenue 72 

Henry Hench, paints, 13th avenue and 16th street 72 

Booth & Mackey, Excelsior Planing mill, 9th avenue near 12th street 76 

W. W. Yon, grocer, 17th street near Uth avenue 80 

J. A. Canan & Co., terra cotta, Margaret avenue and 19th street 80 

E. H. Keyes, gents' turnishing goods, Uth avenue neai' 17th street 84 

II. Luebbert, tobacco, 1110 Utii avenue 84 

Prof. R. C. Ward, inusic teacher, Sth avenue ai.d 12tli street S4 

S. K. Orr, coal, Uth avenue and 4th street 84 

H. J. Cornman, clotliing, 1107 Uth avenue 88 

William Stoke & Co., City Phining mill, 20thstreet. (branch railroad) 92 

E. C. Keese, American Sewing iinichine, .5tli avenue and 12tli streei 96 

C. W. Sickles, meats, 1224 9th street 100 

R. A. Bonine, photographer, 14th street near Uth a^■enne IW) 

VVm. M. Findley, i)hysician. 802 12th street 104 

J. V. Hughes, coal, 9th avenue and 19th street 104 

D. A. BraiUey, marble works, Uth avenu(^ near Uth street 104 

Miss Annie SholTner, milliner, 12th street, between 8th and 9th avenues 104 

Philip Teats, auction house, 12th street, between Sth and 9th avenues 108 

Allen E. >[yers, floral establishment, Howard avenue bet. 9th and 10th .streets.. . 112 

D. R. Cliristian, grocers, lOls Cliestnut avenue 112 

I). & C. Moore, grf)cers, Uth avenue and loth street U6 

Wm. McOowcll iV: Son, di'v gofxls and groceries. 7tli avenue and l.'itli strccl 120 



262 INDEX TO ADVERTISEMENTS. 

PA«B 

Llndsey & IJeekmiin, TiunlicliK's, 11th avcmic. l)('t\v('('ii Utli luid 15tli streets 1'20 

D. A. IJarr, grocer, 1807 8th aven ne 124 

H. H. Snyder, lawj'er, ilollidayshiua: 124 

J. C. Imies, druggist, 9th street below Cth avenue 124 

J. W. Isenberg, dentist, 8th avenue anil l-2th sli'cet 124 

rJonathan Foreman, furniture, 4th aveuile and Jdlli street 128 

G. A. McCormick, coal, 4th sti'eet and 8th avenue 132 

A. F. IJiackhurn, 99 cent store, opera house 132 

D. W. Qolycr, painter, 12th street near 9th avenue 136 

W. B. Reese, stoves and tinware, 712 9th sti-eet 130 

J. B. Smith, boots and shoes, 1321 11th avenue 140 

H. B. Miller, dentist, 1410 llth avenue 140 

Olmes & Bro., meats, 11th avenue between 13th and 14th streets 144 

James W. Findley, insurance, 11th avenue, between 12th and 13tli streets 144 

J. Wesley Allen, pliysician. 13301..^ nth avenue 144 

Terkel C. Nelson, jeweler, 112(3 11th avenue 148 

J. F. Fulton, physician, over Randoljih's drug store 148 

A. Luebbert, tobacco, IOCS 17th street 148 

William B. Miller, dentist, 13301^ 11th avenue 148 

Palmer & Morse, carriage builders, 8th street, between (Jth and 7th avenues 1.V2 

Curtis' Dollar Store, 11th avenue and 13th street ISff 

C. A. Dimond & Co., coal, 9th avenue, between 17th and 18th streets KiO 

M. U. Lingent'elter, grocer, 14th street and 12thavenue 160 

Rudisill Brothers, jewelers. 1310 11th avenue IfiO 

J. M. Bowman, dry goods, 11th avenue and r2th streets 1H4 

E. M. Kennedy & Co., Logantown 16S 

Altoona Laundry, llth avenue and Kith street 168 

John Kinsel. carpets, 804 Chestnut avenue 168 

R. B. Mahaftey, music goods, l-iOli^ 8t h avenue 168 

D Wylie, plumber, 1108 14th street 172 

Mrs. Adam Gable, confectioner, 706 and 708 12th street 176 

Elway & Mauk, grocers, Gi-een avenue and 9th street 176 

B. F. Rose, alderman, llth avenue near 12th street 176 

J. C. Conrad, coal, llth avenue between 17th and 18th streets 176 

S. O. Adler, grocer, 1316 12th avenue 180 

Dr. J. H. Weaver, druggist, 17th street near 10th avenue 180 

Piper & Co., stationers, 1316 10th a ven ue 180 

Ed. J. Slep, Youth's Mirror, 1122 lllh avenue 180 

A . F. Heess, bakery, 713 13th street 1S4 

Ed. Monntney, house and sign painter, in opera house building 184 

Thebault Rivailles, physician, 1124 llth avenue , 184 

Howard Tipton, livery stables, l(il7 llth avenue, near llth street 188 

Campljell & Cole, dry goods, 8th avenue and 13th street 18» 

Fries Brothers, hardware, 1313 llth avenue 192 

C. F. Randolph, eosmetine, 1106 llth street 196 

M. Fitzharris, grocer, 12th avenue and 16th street 196 

Netr & Mervine, lawyers, 13th street, between 10th and llth avenues 196 

John O'Toole, alderman, llth avenue and 17th street li»6 

Ilollidayslrurg Seminary 212' 

S. INI. Griffith, hous<! and sign painter, llth avenue near llth street 263 

J. G. Vallade, confectioner, 10th avenue, betweeh 13th and 14tli streets 263 

W. R. Vaughn, plumber and gas titter, 7th avenue and l.'ith street 263 



ERRATA. 

Although Dr. Thebault Rivailh^s can si>eak sevei-al languages : in his profes- 
sional card, iiage 1S4. we should have printed "consultations in French ami Kng- 
lish" instead of "French and (Jerman." 

For "shows" in fourth line from top of page !I7 read "ta-osses." 

For "William" read "Wilbur" I',. Blake, page 82. 

For "-alarcity," i>age 19S. llth line from bottom, read "alacrity." 




HAVE YOUR CLOTHES MilDE TO ORDER BY 

ALFRED E. GOETZ, 

MERCHANT TAILOR, 

15101 Eleventh Avenue, Altoona, Pa. 



A- 



J_ J_ X v_y 



V 



V H 




But our clt-Kii'i* ii'i'l liifi'ily urtistir work ou permiment exhibition all ovtT the city, 

on the t^xterior and lu the interior of several hand red houses, speaks plainly, 

positively and unequivocally of our superiority over all rivals in the 

PAINTING, GRAINING*^ KALSOMINING 

IJusmess, whatever their pretentions may he 

S. M. GRIFFITH, 

Corner 11th Avenue and 11th Street, ALTOONA, PA. 



^/v. r. vaughn, 

Plumber and Gas Fitter, 

At his new establishment, constructed especially for conducting his business 
to the best advantage, is prepared to execute all kind's of work in his line, prompt- 
ly, in the best manner and at tiie lowest prices. He keeps in full stock. Gas Fix- 
tures, inclnding chandeliers, etc., and is prepared, at a moment's notice, to execute 
all orders entrusteil to his care. 

SEVENTH. AVENUE AND FIFTEENTH STREET, ALTOONA, PA. 

J. G. VALLADE, 



■WHOLKSALE A>l) HETAIL DEALER IX 



COPICTIOERIES, TOYS, MUSICAL INSTEMENTS, 

SATCHELS, CHILDREN'S CARRIAGES, PERFUMERY, VASES, 
Dolls. Foreign and Domestic Fruits, Notions, Segars, Tobacco, etc. 

1 324 Tenth Avenue, _ _ _ Altoona, Pa. 



HARRY SLEP, 



Dt 



iiin*iind*F]1ncy+Job^Printer 



Newspaper and Book Publisher, 



ALTOONA, PA. 



vT-/ 



i)£Pl7 T931 



i^B^H